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Sample records for dysmetria experimental evidence

  1. Mechanisms of human cerebellar dysmetria: experimental evidence and current conceptual bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manto, Mario

    2009-04-13

    The human cerebellum contains more neurons than any other region in the brain and is a major actor in motor control. Cerebellar circuitry is unique by its stereotyped architecture and its modular organization. Understanding the motor codes underlying the organization of limb movement and the rules of signal processing applied by the cerebellar circuits remains a major challenge for the forthcoming decades. One of the cardinal deficits observed in cerebellar patients is dysmetria, designating the inability to perform accurate movements. Patients overshoot (hypermetria) or undershoot (hypometria) the aimed target during voluntary goal-directed tasks. The mechanisms of cerebellar dysmetria are reviewed, with an emphasis on the roles of cerebellar pathways in controlling fundamental aspects of movement control such as anticipation, timing of motor commands, sensorimotor synchronization, maintenance of sensorimotor associations and tuning of the magnitudes of muscle activities. An overview of recent advances in our understanding of the contribution of cerebellar circuitry in the elaboration and shaping of motor commands is provided, with a discussion on the relevant anatomy, the results of the neurophysiological studies, and the computational models which have been proposed to approach cerebellar function.

  2. Movement and electromyographic disorders associated with cerebellar dysmetria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flament, D; Hore, J

    1986-06-01

    velocity and amplitude. Thus it is unlikely that dysmetria results from inappropriate selection or triggering of an otherwise normal motor program. We conclude that normal function of the cerebellum is necessary for the generation of agonist and antagonist muscle activity that is both of the appropriate magnitude and timing to control the dynamic phase of arm movements.

  3. Communicating Uncertain Experimental Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Alexander L.; Fischhoff, Baruch

    2014-01-01

    Four experiments examined when laypeople attribute unexpected experimental outcomes to error, in foresight and in hindsight, along with their judgments of whether the data should be published. Participants read vignettes describing hypothetical experiments, along with the result of the initial observation, considered as either a possibility…

  4. Experimental Evidence for the Pentaquark

    CERN Document Server

    Carman, D S

    2004-01-01

    The present experimental evidence for the existence of light pentaquarks is reviewed, including both positive and null results. I also discuss the CLAS experiments at Jefferson Laboratory that are forthcoming in the near future to address questions regarding existence, mass, width, and other quantum numbers of these five-quark baryon states.

  5. Metalinguistic deficits in patients with cerebellar dysfunction: empirical support for the dysmetria of thought theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guell, Xavier; Hoche, Franziska; Schmahmann, Jeremy D

    2015-02-01

    The cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome (CCAS) includes disruption of linguistic processing such as verbal fluency, verbal working memory, grammar, and speech perception. We set out to examine linguistic capabilities in patients with cerebellar lesions to determine which domains are spared and which impaired and to evaluate the underlying cognitive structure of these deficits. Forty-four patients with cerebellar disease were compared to 40 healthy controls on the Oral Sentence Production Test (OSPT) which assesses production of sentences with correct syntactic structure and semantic quality. Twenty-five of these cerebellar patients and 25 controls received the Test of Language Competence-Expanded (TLC-E) that assesses metalinguistic ability. The OSPT failed to reveal differences between patients and controls. In contrast, all cerebellar patients were impaired on each of the four TLC-E subtests. Differences between isolated cerebellar and complex cerebrocerebellar patients were nonsignificant. These results confirm and extend prior observations of the TLC-E in patients with cerebellar lesions and suggest three separate but related language impairments following cerebellar dysfunction: (1) disruption in automatic adjustment of intact grammatical and semantic abilities to a linguistic context in sentence production, (2) disruption in automatic adjustment to a linguistic context in sentence interpretation, and (3) disruption of cognitive processes essential for linguistic skills, such as analysis and sequential logical reasoning. These findings are consistent with the unifying framework of the universal cerebellar transform and the dysmetria of thought theory and provide new insights into the nature of the cognitive impairments in patients with the CCAS.

  6. Preliminary pilot fMRI study of neuropostural optimization with a noninvasive asymmetric radioelectric brain stimulation protocol in functional dysmetria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mura M

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Marco Mura1, Alessandro Castagna2, Vania Fontani2, Salvatore Rinaldi21Institute of Radiology, University of Cagliari, 2Rinaldi Fontani Institute – Department of Neuro Psycho Physical Optimization, Florence, ItalyPurpose: This study assessed changes in functional dysmetria (FD and in brain activation observable by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI during a leg flexion-extension motor task following brain stimulation with a single radioelectric asymmetric conveyer (REAC pulse, according to the precisely defined neuropostural optimization (NPO protocol.Population and methods: Ten healthy volunteers were assessed using fMRI conducted during a simple motor task before and immediately after delivery of a single REAC-NPO pulse. The motor task consisted of a flexion-extension movement of the legs with the knees bent. FD signs and brain activation patterns were compared before and after REAC-NPO.Results: A single 250-millisecond REAC-NPO treatment alleviated FD, as evidenced by patellar asymmetry during a sit-up motion, and modulated activity patterns in the brain, particularly in the cerebellum, during the performance of the motor task.Conclusion: Activity in brain areas involved in motor control and coordination, including the cerebellum, is altered by administration of a REAC-NPO treatment and this effect is accompanied by an alleviation of FD.Keywords: motor behavior, motor control, cerebellum, dysmetria, functional dysmetria, fluctuating asymmetry

  7. Income Aspirations and Cooperation : Experimental Evidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalton, P.S.

    2010-01-01

    This article is the first attempt to study the empirical link between income aspirations and cooperation in a one shot public good game. By combining experimental with survey data, we find evidence that the more frustrated people are with their income, the lower is their propensity to cooperate with

  8. Experimental evidence for Abraham pressure of light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; She, Weilong; Peng, Nan; Leonhardt, Ulf

    2015-05-01

    The question of how much momentum light carries in media has been debated for over a century. Two rivalling theories, one from 1908 by Hermann Minkowski and the other from 1909 by Max Abraham, predict the exact opposite when light enters an optical material: a pulling force in Minkowski's case and a pushing force in Abraham's. Most experimental tests have agreed with Minkowski's theory, but here we report the first quantitative experimental evidence for Abraham's pushing pressure of light. Our results matter in optofluidics and optomechanics, and wherever light exerts mechanical pressure.

  9. Experimental evidence of electromagnetic pollution of ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronenko, Vira; Korepanov, Valery; Dudkin, Denis

    multiple low orbiting satellites have confirmed a significant increase in their intensity over the populated areas of Europe and Asia. Recently, there are many experimental evidences of the existence of power line harmonic radiation (PLHR) in the ionosphere. Their spectra consist of succession of 50 (60) Hz harmonics which is accompanied by a set of lines separated by 50 (60) or 100 (120) Hz - the central frequency of which is shifted to high frequency. These lines cover rather wide band - according to the available experimental data, their central frequencies are observed from ~1.5 - 3 kHz up to 15 kHz, and recently the main mains frequencies are also observed. The examples of power line harmonic radiation, which were detected by “Sich-1M”, “Chibis-M” and “Demeter” satellites, have been presented and discussed. The available experimental data, as well as theoretical estimations, allow us with a high degree of certainty to say that the permanent satellite monitoring of the ionospheric and magnetospheric anthropogenic EM perturbations is necessary for: a) objective assessment and prediction of the space weather conditions; b) evaluation of the daily or seasonal changes in the level of energy consumption; c) construction of a map for estimation of near space EM pollution. This study is partially supported by SSAU contract N 4-03/13.

  10. Experimental evidence for aerobic bio-denitrification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Nitrate pollution of groundwater is paid more and more attention for its hazardous to environments and human health. A strain of DN11 was isolated from soil and used in the laboratory columns filled with various media for nitrate removal. The experimental results showed that DN11could reduce nitrate at different rates in different media under the aerobic condition. The mechanism for nitrate removal with DN11 is explained meanwhile.

  11. Experimental evidence for circular inference in schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardri, Renaud; Duverne, Sandrine; Litvinova, Alexandra S.; Denève, Sophie

    2017-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SCZ) is a complex mental disorder that may result in some combination of hallucinations, delusions and disorganized thinking. Here SCZ patients and healthy controls (CTLs) report their level of confidence on a forced-choice task that manipulated the strength of sensory evidence and prior information. Neither group's responses can be explained by simple Bayesian inference. Rather, individual responses are best captured by a model with different degrees of circular inference. Circular inference refers to a corruption of sensory data by prior information and vice versa, leading us to `see what we expect' (through descending loops), to `expect what we see' (through ascending loops) or both. Ascending loops are stronger for SCZ than CTLs and correlate with the severity of positive symptoms. Descending loops correlate with the severity of negative symptoms. Both loops correlate with disorganized symptoms. The findings suggest that circular inference might mediate the clinical manifestations of SCZ.

  12. Experimental Evidence of a Bonded Dineutron Existence

    CERN Document Server

    Kadenko, I M

    2015-01-01

    Experimental observation of 159Tb(n,2n) reaction product was performed with application of the activation technique. Tb specimen of natural composition was irradiated with (d,d) neutrons of 5.39 and 7 MeV energy at the AMANDE neutron generating facility with 15 month break. Several instrumental spectra of Tb specimen were measured with HPGe spectrometer in 1.5 years after last irradiation. An unexpected 944.2 keV {\\gamma}-ray peak was observed. Other {\\gamma}-ray lines of 158Gd as the daughter nucleus due to 158Tb EC and \\b{eta}+- decay were identified as well. A bonded dineutron emission with the binding energy (Bdn) within limitations 1.3 MeV < Bdn < 2.8 MeV is evidenced by the energy of incident neutrons and by 158Tb presence in output channel.

  13. Electron fishbones: Theory and experimental evidence

    CERN Document Server

    Zonca, F; Cardinali, A; Chen, L; Dong, J -Q; Long, Y -X; Milovanov, A V; Romanelli, F; Smeulders, P; Wang, L; Wang, Z -T; Castaldo, C; Cesario, R; Giovannozzi, E; Marinucci, M; Ridolfini, V Pericoli

    2007-01-01

    We discuss the processes underlying the excitation of fishbone-like internal kink instabilities driven by supra-thermal electrons generated experimentally by different means: Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH) and by Lower Hybrid (LH) power injection. The peculiarity and interest of exciting these electron fishbones by ECRH only or by LH only is also analyzed. Not only the mode stability is explained, but also the transition between steady state nonlinear oscillations to bursting (almost regular) pulsations, as observed in FTU, is interpreted in terms of the LH power input. These results are directly relevant to the investigation of trapped alpha particle interactions with low-frequency MHD modes in burning plasmas: in fact, alpha particles in reactor relevant conditions are characterized by small dimensionless orbits, similarly to electrons; the trapped particle bounce averaged dynamics, meanwhile, depends on energy and not mass.

  14. Experimental evidence for Wigner's tunneling time

    CERN Document Server

    Camus, Nicolas; Fechner, Lutz; Klaiber, Michael; Laux, Martin; Mi, Yonghao; Hatsagortsyan, Karen Z; Pfeifer, Thomas; Keitel, Christoph H; Moshammer, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Tunneling of a particle through a potential barrier remains one of the most remarkable quantum phenomena. Owing to advances in laser technology, electric fields comparable to those electrons experience in atoms are readily generated and open opportunities to dynamically investigate the process of electron tunneling through the potential barrier formed by the superposition of both laser and atomic fields. Attosecond-time and angstrom-space resolution of the strong laser-field technique allow to address fundamental questions related to tunneling, which are still open and debated: Which time is spent under the barrier and what momentum is picked up by the particle in the meantime? In this combined experimental and theoretical study we demonstrate that for strong-field ionization the leading quantum mechanical Wigner treatment for the time resolved description of tunneling is valid. We achieve a high sensitivity on the tunneling barrier and unambiguously isolate its effects by performing a differential study of t...

  15. Experimental evidence for foraminiferal calcification under anoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. P. Nardelli

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Benthic foraminiferal tests are widely used for paleoceanographic reconstructions. There is ample evidence that foraminifera can live in anoxic sediments. For some species, this is explained by a switch to facultative anaerobic metabolism (i.e. denitrification. Here we show for the first time that adult specimens of three benthic foraminiferal species are not only able to survive but are also able to calcify in anoxic conditions, at various depths in the sediment, with and without nitrates. This demonstrates ongoing metabolic processes, even in micro-environments where denitrification is not possible. Earlier observations suggest that the disappearance of foraminiferal communities after prolonged anoxia is not due to instantaneous or strongly increased adult mortality. Here we show that it cannot be explained by an inhibition of growth through chamber addition either. Our observations of ongoing calcification under anoxic conditions means that geochemical proxy data obtained from benthic foraminifera in settings experiencing intermittent anoxia have to be reconsidered. The analysis of whole single specimens or of their successive chambers may provide essential information about short-term environmental variability and/or the causes of anoxia.

  16. Time discounting and pain anticipation. Experimental evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brañas Garza, Pablo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with pain anticipation experienced before medical procedures. our experimental results show that individuals with lower time discount factors are more prone to suffer pain in advance. We provide a framework to rationalize the connection between pain anticipation and impatience. in this set up, more impatient subjects, who only value very near events, mainly take into account the present negative effects of medical procedures (the costs, whereas more patient individuals have a net positive valuation of medical events, given that they are able to value both the cost incurred now and all the benefits to be accrued in the future.

    Este artículo trata de la anticipación del dolor experimentada antes de los procedimientos médicos. nuestros resultados experimentales muestran que los individuos con factor de descuento temporal más bajo son más proclives a sufrir dolor por adelantado. el artículo proporciona un marco en el que racionalizar la relación existente entre impaciencia y anticipación del dolor. en este marco, los sujetos más impacientes, que evalúan sólo los eventos muy próximos en el tiempo, focalizan su atención principalmente en los efectos negativos de los procedimientos médicos (sólo los costes, mientras que los individuos más pacientes tienen una valoración neta positiva de los actos médicos puesto que valoran tanto el coste en el que se incurre en el presente como los beneficios que se obtendrán en el futuro.

  17. Reconciling Experimental and Quasi-Experimental Evidence on the Impact of Full-Day Kindergarten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Chloe

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses the question of how to interpret evidence on the impact of full-day kindergarten resulting from different study designs, and provides guidance on how this evidence taken in tandem may inform the design and implementation of full-day kindergarten policies. Incorporating both experimental and quasi-experimental estimates on…

  18. The origins of medical evidence : communication and experimentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Widder, Joachim

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The experimental method to acquire knowledge about efficacy and efficiency of medical procedures is well established in evidence-based medicine. A method to attain evidence about the significance of diseases and interventions from the patients' perspectives taking into account their righ

  19. Single-Subject Experimental Design for Evidence-Based Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byiers, Breanne J.; Reichle, Joe; Symons, Frank J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Single-subject experimental designs (SSEDs) represent an important tool in the development and implementation of evidence-based practice in communication sciences and disorders. The purpose of this article is to review the strategies and tactics of SSEDs and their application in speech-language pathology research. Method: The authors…

  20. First experimental evidence of corals feeding on seagrass matter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lai, S.; Gillis, L.G.; Mueller, C.; Bouma, T.J.; Guest, J.R.; Last, K.S.; Ziegler, A.D.; Todd, P.A.

    2013-01-01

    We present the first experimental evidence of a coral (Oulastrea crispata) ingesting and assimilating seagrass material. Tropical seagrass meadows export a substantial portion of their productivity and can provide an important source of nutrients to neighbouring systems such as coral reefs; however,

  1. Experimental evidence of water formation on interstellar dust grains

    CERN Document Server

    Dulieu, F; Fillion, J-H; Matar, E; Momeni, A; Pirronello, V; Lemaire, J L

    2009-01-01

    The synthesis of water is one necessary step in the origin and development of life. It is believed that pristine water is formed and grows on the surface of icy dust grains in dark interstellar clouds. Until now, there has been no experimental evidence whether this scenario is feasible or not. We present here the first experimental evidence of water synthesis under interstellar conditions. After D and O deposition on a water ice substrate (HO) held at 10 K, we observe production of HDO and DO. The water substrate itself has an active role in water formation, which appears to be more complicated than previously thought. Amorphous water ice layers are the matrices where complex organic prebiotic species may be synthesized. This experiment opens up the field of a little explored complex chemistry that could occur on interstellar dust grains, believed to be the site of key processes leading to the molecular diversity and complexity observed in our universe.

  2. Direct Experimental Evidence of Nonequilibrium Energy Sharing in Dissipative Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casini, G.; Maurenzig, P. R.; Olmi, A.; Bini, M.; Calamai, S.; Meucci, F.; Pasquali, G.; Poggi, G.; Stefanini, A. A.; Gobbi, A.; Hildenbrand, K. D.

    1997-02-01

    Primary and secondary masses of heavy reaction products have been deduced from kinematics and energy-time-of-flight measurements, respectively, for the direct and reverse collisions of 100Mo with 120Sn at 14.1A MeV. Direct experimental evidence of the correlation of energy sharing with net mass transfer and model-independent results on the evolution of the average excitation from equal-energy to equal-temperature partition are presented.

  3. Experimental evidence of delocalized states in random dimer superlattices

    OpenAIRE

    Bellani, V.; Díez, E.; Hey, R.; Toni, L.; Tarricone, L.; Parravicini, G.B.; Domínguez-Adame Acosta, Francisco; Gómez-Alcalá, R.

    1999-01-01

    We study the electronic properties of GaAs-AlGaAs superlattices with intentional correlated disorder by means of photoluminescence and vertical dc resistance. The results are compared to those obtained in ordered and uncorrelated disordered superlattices. We report the first experimental evidence that spatial correlations inhibit localization of states in disordered low-dimensional systems, as our previous theoretical calculations suggested, in contrast to the earlier belief that all eigensta...

  4. Experimental evidence of conformal invariance in soap film turbulent flows

    CERN Document Server

    Thalabard, S; Artana, G; Mininni, P D; Pouquet, A

    2010-01-01

    We present experimental evidence of statistical conformal invariance in isocontours of fluid thickness in experiments of two-dimensional turbulence using soap films. A Schlieren technique is used to visualize regions of the flow with constant film thickness, and association of isocontours with Schramm-L\\"owner evolution (SLE) is used to identify conformal invariance. In experiments where an inverse energy cascade develops, statistical evidence is consistent with such an association. The diffusivity of the associated one-dimensional Brownian process is close to 8/3, a value previously identified in isocontours of vorticity in high-resolution numerical simulations of two-dimensional turbulence (D. Bernard et al., Nature Phys. 2, 124, 2006). In experiments where the inverse energy cascade is not sufficiently developed, no statistical evidence of conformal invariance is found.

  5. Experimental evidence of hyperbolic heat conduction in processed meat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitra, K.; Kumar, S.; Vedavarz, A.; Moallemi, M.K. [Polytechnic Univ., Brooklyn, NY (United States)

    1995-08-01

    The objective of this paper is to present experimental evidence of the wave nature of heat propagation in processed meat and to demonstrate that the hyperbolic heat conduction model is an accurate representation, on a macroscopic level, of the heat conduction process in such biological material. The value of the characteristic thermal time of a specific material, processed bologna meat, is determined experimentally. As a part of the work different thermophysical properties are also measured. The measured temperature distributions in the samples are compared with the Fourier results and significant deviation between the two is observed, especially during the initial stages of the transient conduction process. The measured values are found to match the theoretical non-Fourier hyperbolic predictions very well. The superposition of waves occurring inside the meat sample due to the hyperbolic nature of heat conduction is also proved experimentally. 14 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Record dynamics: Direct experimental evidence from jammed colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robe, Dominic M.; Boettcher, Stefan; Sibani, Paolo; Yunker, Peter

    2016-11-01

    In a broad class of complex materials a quench leads to a multi-scaled relaxation process known as aging. To explain its commonality and the astounding insensitivity to most microscopic details, record dynamics (RD) posits that a small set of increasingly rare and irreversible events, so-called quakes, controls the dynamics. While key predictions of RD are known to concur with a number of experimental and simulational results, its basic assumption on the nature of quake statistics has proven extremely difficult to verify experimentally. The careful distinction of rare (“record”) cage-breaking events from in-cage rattle accomplished in previous experiments on jammed colloids, enables us to extract the first direct experimental evidence for the fundamental hypothesis of RD that the rate of quakes decelerates with the inverse of the system age. The resulting description shows the predicted growth of the particle mean square displacement and of a mesoscopic lengthscale with the logarithm of time.

  7. Fear creates an Allee effect: experimental evidence from seasonal populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Kyle H; Betini, Gustavo S; Norris, D Ryan

    2017-06-28

    Allee effects driven by predation can play a strong role in the decline of small populations but are conventionally thought to occur when generalist predators target specific prey (i.e. type II functional response). However, aside from direct consumption, fear of predators could also increase vigilance and reduce time spent foraging as population size decreases, as has been observed in wild mammals living in social groups. To investigate the role of fear on fitness in relation to population density in a species with limited sociality, we exposed varying densities of Drosophila melanogaster to mantid predators either during an experimental breeding season or non-breeding season. The presence of mantids in either season decreased the reproductive performance of individuals but only at low breeding densities, providing evidence for an Allee effect. We then used our experimental results to parametrize a mathematical model to examine the population consequences of fear at low densities. Fear tended to destabilize population dynamics and increase the risk of extinction up to sevenfold. Our study provides unique experimental evidence that the indirect effects of the presence of predators can cause an Allee effect and has important consequences for our understanding of the dynamics of small populations. © 2017 The Author(s).

  8. Direct Experimental Evidence of Nonequilibrium Energy Sharing in Dissipative Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casini, G.; Maurenzig, P.; Olmi, A.; Bini, M.; Calamai, S.; Meucci, F.; Pasquali, G.; Poggi, G.; Stefanini, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare and Universita di Firenze, I--50125 Florence (Italy); Gobbi, A.; Hildenbrand, K. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, D--64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    1997-02-01

    Primary and secondary masses of heavy reaction products have been deduced from kinematics and energy{endash}time-of-flight measurements, respectively, for the direct and reverse collisions of {sup 100}Mo with {sup 120}Sn at 14.1AMeV. Direct experimental evidence of the correlation of energy sharing with net mass transfer and model-independent results on the evolution of the average excitation from equal-energy to equal-temperature partition are presented. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  9. DOES FRAMING AFFECT RISK ATTITUDE? EXPERIMENTAL EVIDENCE FROM CREDIT MARKET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry Vladimirovich Burakov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article we study the effect of framing on the attitude of lenders toward risk over a credit cycle and also review potential causes of negative framing when making decisions. Using an experimental setting, we present evidence of frame of losses’ significant impact on willingness to accept credit risk: In comparison with frame of gains, willingness to accept credit risk increases from 29% in frame of gains up to 77% in frame of losses. Among the main reasons leading to a shift in frames, changes in bargaining power and conflict of interests are proposed. Admitting the existence of negative framing in credit market helps explaining duration of credit crunches and excessive risk taking during the upward phases of credit cycle.

  10. Experimental evidence for a two-dimensional quantized Hall insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilke, M.; Shahar, D.; Song, S. H.; Tsui, D. C.; Xie, Y. H.; Monroe, Don

    1998-10-01

    The general theoretical definition of an insulator is a material in which the conductivity vanishes at the absolute zero of temperature. In classical insulators, such as materials with a band gap, vanishing conductivities lead to diverging resistivities. But other insulators can show more complex behaviour, particularly in the presence of a high magnetic field, where different components of the resistivity tensor can display different behaviours: the magnetoresistance diverges as the temperature approaches absolute zero, but the transverse (Hall) resistance remains finite. Such a system is known as a Hall insulator. Here we report experimental evidence for a quantized Hall insulator in a two-dimensional electron system-confined in a semiconductor quantum well. The Hall resistance is quantized in the quantum unit of resistance h/e2, where h is Planck's constant and e the electronic charge. At low fields, the sample reverts to being a normal Hall insulator.

  11. Experimental evidence of pollination in marine flowers by invertebrate fauna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tussenbroek, Brigitta I; Villamil, Nora; Márquez-Guzmán, Judith; Wong, Ricardo; Monroy-Velázquez, L Verónica; Solis-Weiss, Vivianne

    2016-09-29

    Pollen transport by water-flow (hydrophily) is a typical, and almost exclusive, adaptation of plants to life in the marine environment. It is thought that, unlike terrestrial environments, animals are not involved in pollination in the sea. The male flowers of the tropical marine angiosperm Thalassia testudinum open-up and release pollen in mucilage at night when invertebrate fauna is active. Here we present experimental evidence that, in the absence of water-flow, these invertebrates visit the flowers, carry and transfer mucilage mass with embedded pollen from the male flowers to the stigmas of the female flowers. Pollen tubes are formed on the stigmas, indicating that pollination is successful. Thus, T. testudinum has mixed abiotic-biotic pollination. We propose a zoobenthophilous pollination syndrome (pollen transfer in the benthic zone by invertebrate animals) which shares many characteristics with hydrophily, but flowers are expected to open-up during the night.

  12. Experimental evidence of planar channeling in a periodically bent crystal

    CERN Document Server

    Bagli, E; Bellucci, V; Berra, E; Camattari, R; De Salvador, D; Germogli, G; Guidi, V; Lanzoni, L; Lietti, D; Mazzolari, A; Prest, M; Tikhomirov, V V; Vallazza, E

    2014-01-01

    The usage of a Crystalline Undulator (CU) has been identified as a promising solution for generating powerful and monochromatic $\\gamma$-rays. A CU was fabricated at SSL through the grooving method, i.e., by the manufacturing of a series of periodical grooves on the major surfaces of a crystal. The CU was extensively characterized both morphologically via optical interferometry at SSL and structurally via X-ray diffraction at ESRF. Then, it was finally tested for channeling with a 400 GeV/c proton beam at CERN. The experimental results were compared to Monte Carlo simulations. Evidence of planar channeling in the CU was firmly observed. Finally, the emission spectrum of the positron beam interacting with the CU was simulated for possible usage in currently existing facilities.

  13. Experimental evidence for action imitation in killer whales (Orcinus orca).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramson, José Z; Hernández-Lloreda, Victoria; Call, Josep; Colmenares, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Comparative experimental studies of imitative learning have focused mainly on primates and birds. However, cetaceans are promising candidates to display imitative learning as they have evolved in socioecological settings that have selected for large brains, complex sociality, and coordinated predatory tactics. Here we tested imitative learning in killer whales, Orcinus orca. We used a 'do-as-other-does' paradigm in which 3 subjects witnessed a conspecific demonstrator's performance that included 15 familiar and 4 novel behaviours. The three subjects (1) learned the copy command signal 'Do that' very quickly, that is, 20 trials on average; (2) copied 100 % of the demonstrator's familiar and novel actions; (3) achieved full matches in the first attempt for 8-13 familiar behaviours (out of 15) and for the 2 novel behaviours (out of 2) in one subject; and (4) took no longer than 8 trials to accurately copy any familiar behaviour, and no longer than 16 trials to copy any novel behaviour. This study provides experimental evidence for body imitation, including production imitation, in killer whales that is comparable to that observed in dolphins tested under similar conditions. These findings suggest that imitative learning may underpin some of the group-specific traditions reported in killer whales in the field.

  14. Experimental evidence of hepatitis A virus infection in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Young-Jo; Park, Woo-Jung; Park, Byung-Joo; Kwak, Sang-Woo; Kim, Yong-Hyeon; Lee, Joong-Bok; Park, Seung-Yong; Song, Chang-Seon; Lee, Sang-Won; Seo, Kun-Ho; Kang, Young-Sun; Park, Choi-Kyu; Song, Jae-Young; Choi, In-Soo

    2016-04-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) is the leading cause of acute viral hepatitis worldwide, with HAV infection being restricted to humans and nonhuman primates. In this study, HAV infection status was serologically determined in domestic pigs and experimental infections of HAV were attempted to verify HAV infectivity in pigs. Antibodies specific to HAV or HAV-like agents were detected in 3.5% of serum samples collected from pigs in swine farms. When the pigs were infected intravenously with 2 × 10(5) 50% tissue culture infectious dose (TCID50 ) of HAV, shedding of the virus in feces, viremia, and seroconversion were detected. In pigs orally infected with the same quantity of HAV, viral shedding was detected only in feces. HAV genomic RNA was detected in the liver and bile of intravenously infected pigs, but only in the bile of orally infected pigs. In further experiments, pigs were intravenously infected with 6 × 10(5) TCID50 of HAV. Shedding of HAV in feces, along with viremia and seroconversion, were confirmed in infected pigs but not in sentinel pigs. HAV genomic RNA was detected in the liver, bile, spleen, lymph node, and kidney of the infected pigs. HAV antigenomic RNA was detected in the spleen of one HAV-infected pig, suggesting HAV replication in splenic cells. Infiltration of inflammatory cells was observed in the livers of infected pigs but not in controls. This is the first experimental evidence to demonstrate that human HAV strains can infect pigs.

  15. Female rose bitterling prefer MHC-dissimilar males: experimental evidence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Reichard

    Full Text Available The role of genetic benefits in female mate choice remains a controversial aspect of sexual selection theory. In contrast to "good allele" models of sexual selection, "compatible allele" models of mate choice predict that females prefer mates with alleles complementary to their own rather than conferring additive effects. While correlative results suggest complementary genetic effects to be plausible, direct experimental evidence is scarce. A previous study on the Chinese rose bitterling (Rhodeus ocellatus demonstrated a positive correlation between female mate choice, offspring growth and survival, and the functional dissimilarity between the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC alleles of males and females. Here we directly tested whether females used cues associated with MHC genes to select genetically compatible males in an experimental framework. By sequentially pairing females with MHC similar and dissimilar males, based on a priori known MHC profiles, we showed that females discriminated between similar and dissimilar males and deposited significantly more eggs with MHC dissimilar males. Notably, the degree of dissimilarity was an important factor for female decision to mate, possibly indicating a potential threshold value of dissimilarity for decision making, or of an indirect effect of the MHC.

  16. Decompression to altitude: assumptions, experimental evidence, and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Philip P; Butler, Bruce D

    2009-02-01

    Although differences exist, hypobaric and hyperbaric exposures share common physiological, biochemical, and clinical features, and their comparison may provide further insight into the mechanisms of decompression stress. Although altitude decompression illness (DCI) has been experienced by high-altitude Air Force pilots and is common in ground-based experiments simulating decompression profiles of extravehicular activities (EVAs) or astronauts' space walks, no case has been reported during actual EVAs in the non-weight-bearing microgravity environment of orbital space missions. We are uncertain whether gravity influences decompression outcomes via nitrogen tissue washout or via alterations related to skeletal muscle activity. However, robust experimental evidence demonstrated the role of skeletal muscle exercise, activities, and/or movement in bubble formation and DCI occurrence. Dualism of effects of exercise, positive or negative, on bubble formation and DCI is a striking feature in hypobaric exposure. Therefore, the discussion and the structure of this review are centered on those highlighted unresolved topics about the relationship between muscle activity, decompression, and microgravity. This article also provides, in the context of altitude decompression, an overview of the role of denitrogenation, metabolic gases, gas micronuclei, stabilization of bubbles, biochemical pathways activated by bubbles, nitric oxide, oxygen, anthropometric or physiological variables, Doppler-detectable bubbles, and potential arterialization of bubbles. These findings and uncertainties will produce further physiological challenges to solve in order to line up for the programmed human return to the Moon, the preparation for human exploration of Mars, and the EVAs implementation in a non-zero gravity environment.

  17. Experimental evidence of superionic conduction in H2O ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimura, Emiko; Komabayashi, Tetsuya; Ohta, Kenji; Hirose, Kei; Ohishi, Yasuo; Dubrovinsky, Leonid S.

    2012-11-01

    Ionic conductivity and molar volume measurements were performed on H2O ice at high pressure (P) and temperature (T) in a resistive-heated diamond anvil cell. The conductivity data obtained at P = 20-62 GPa, T = 304-930 K are well fitted with a single Arrhenius equation. Isothermal volume measurements at T = 873 K, P = 30-101 GPa indicate that H2O ice undergoes phase transitions at P = 50 GPa and 53 GPa due to hydrogen-bond symmetrization. Combining these results, we suggest that the conduction mechanism does not change with pressure-induced hydrogen-bond symmetrization. Along the Arrhenius behavior of conductivity data, the experimental evidence for superionic conduction (>10-1 S/cm) was found at T = 739 K, P = 56 GPa and T = 749 K, P = 62 GPa, which is significantly low temperature compared with earlier theoretical estimates resorted to the observation of a drastic rise of the melting curve. We infer that the sudden increase of the melting temperature is not related to the onset of superionic conduction, but is attributed to the phase change regarding to the symmetrization.

  18. First experimental evidence of corals feeding on seagrass matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, S.; Gillis, L. G.; Mueller, C.; Bouma, T. J.; Guest, J. R.; Last, K. S.; Ziegler, A. D.; Todd, P. A.

    2013-12-01

    We present the first experimental evidence of a coral ( Oulastrea crispata) ingesting and assimilating seagrass material. Tropical seagrass meadows export a substantial portion of their productivity and can provide an important source of nutrients to neighbouring systems such as coral reefs; however, little is known about the mechanisms of this link. To investigate whether seagrass nutrient uptake via coral heterotrophy is possible, we conducted a feeding experiment with seagrass particulate and dissolved organic matter. Using gut extractions and stable isotope analyses, we determined that O. crispata ingested 15N-enriched seagrass particles and assimilated the nitrogen into its tissue at a rate of 0.75 μg N cm-2 h-1. Corals took up nitrogen from dissolved matter at a comparable rate of 0.98 μg N cm-2 h-1. While other ecological connections between seagrass meadows and reef ecosystems are well known, our results suggest a previously unstudied direct nutritional link between seagrasses and corals.

  19. Experimental evidence for sexual selection against inbred males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega-Trejo, Regina; Head, Megan L; Keogh, J Scott; Jennions, Michael D

    2017-03-01

    The detrimental effects of matings between relatives are well known. However, few studies determine the extent to which inbreeding depression in males is due to natural or sexual selection. Importantly, measuring fitness or key fitness components, rather than phenotypic traits allows more accurate estimation of inbreeding depression. We investigate how differences in inbreeding and juvenile diet (i.e. early stressful environment) influence a key component of male fitness, namely their reproductive success. We experimentally created inbred and outbred male mosquitofish (Gambusia holbrooki) by mating full-sibs (f = 0·25). We show that this led to a 23% reduction in genome-wide heterozygosity based on SNPs. Males were raised on different diets early in life to create high-stress and low-stress rearing environments. We then allowed adult males to compete freely for females to test if inbreeding, early diet and their interaction affect a male's share of paternity. Early diet had no effect on paternity, but outbred males sired almost twice as many offspring as inbred males (n = 628 offspring from 122 potential sires). Using artificial insemination methods we determined that this was unlikely to be due to early embryo mortality of eggs fertilised by inbred males: there was no evidence that male inbreeding status affects the realised fecundity of females (n = 288). Given there was no difference in male mortality in our competitive mating experiment, the lower reproductive success of inbred males can most parsimoniously be attributed to inbreeding negatively affecting sexually selected traits that affect male mating success and/or sperm competitiveness. We discuss which sexually selected traits might be involved. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2016 British Ecological Society.

  20. Self-Organization of Blood Pressure Regulation: Experimental Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortrat, Jacques-Olivier; Levrard, Thibaud; Courcinous, Sandrine; Victor, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Blood pressure regulation is a prime example of homeostatic regulation. However, some characteristics of the cardiovascular system better match a non-linear self-organized system than a homeostatic one. To determine whether blood pressure regulation is self-organized, we repeated the seminal demonstration of self-organized control of movement, but applied it to the cardiovascular system. We looked for two distinctive features peculiar to self-organization: non-equilibrium phase transitions and hysteresis in their occurrence when the system is challenged. We challenged the cardiovascular system by means of slow, 20-min Tilt-Up and Tilt-Down tilt table tests in random order. We continuously determined the phase between oscillations at the breathing frequency of Total Peripheral Resistances and Heart Rate Variability by means of cross-spectral analysis. We looked for a significant phase drift during these procedures, which signed a non-equilibrium phase transition. We determined at which head-up tilt angle it occurred. We checked that this angle was significantly different between Tilt-Up and Tilt-Down to demonstrate hysteresis. We observed a significant non-equilibrium phase transition in nine healthy volunteers out of 11 with significant hysteresis (48.1 ± 7.5° and 21.8 ± 3.9° during Tilt-Up and Tilt-Down, respectively, p < 0.05). Our study shows experimental evidence of self-organized short-term blood pressure regulation. It provides new insights into blood pressure regulation and its related disorders. PMID:27065880

  1. Auger Recombination in Indium Gallium Nitride: Experimental Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krames, Michael

    2010-03-01

    Progress in InGaN-based light-emitting diode (LED) technology has resulted in white-light emitters with efficiencies far exceeding those of conventional light sources such as tungsten-filament-based incandescence and mercury-vapor based fluorescence. Indeed, by now efficacies exceeding 150 lumens per Watt for InGaN-based phosphor-converted white LEDs are claimed, which represent a 90% energy savings compared to the conventional incandescent (i.e., ``light bulb'') solution. However, these high performance levels are obtained under conditions of very low forward current-density for the InGaN LED and do not represent true operating conditions (nor cost-effective utilization) for the device. In order to reduce the cost (and thus increase market penetration of) solid-state lighting, more lumens per unit of semiconductor area are required which in practice necessitates higher drive current densities. Unfortunately, at these higher driver current densities, the internal quantum efficiency of InGaN-based LEDs is observed to decrease significantly. In the fall of 2007, researchers at the Advanced Laboratories of Philips Lumileds were the first to propose Auger recombination as the root-cause mechanism in InGaN which was behind this ``efficiency droop'' [1]. They further proposed to circumvent the problem by employing InGaN-based active region designs that maintain low carrier density, and demonstrated an LED device design that reaches a maximum quantum efficiency above 200 A/cm2, compared to ˜1-10 A/cm^2 for typical multiple-quantum-well heterostructures [2]. In this talk we will review the experimental evidence for Auger recombination in InGaN, beginning with the early work from 2007 and then considering additional work from more recent efforts to better understand the details behind this loss mechanism. [4pt] [1] Y. C. Shen, G. O. M"uller, S. Watanabe, N. F. Gardner, A. Munkholm, and M. R. Krames, ``Auger recombination in InGaN measured by photoluminescence'', Appl. Phys

  2. Plant-induced weathering of a basaltic rock: experimental evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinsinger, Philippe; Fernandes Barros, Omar Neto; Benedetti, Marc F.; Noack, Yves; Callot, Gabriel

    2001-01-01

    The active role of higher plants in the weathering of silicate minerals and rocks is still a question for debate. The present work aimed at providing experimental evidence of the important role of a range of crop plants in such processes. In order to quantitatively assess the possible effect of these diverse plant species on the weathering of a basaltic rock, two laboratory experiments were carried out at room temperature. These compared the amounts of elements released from basalt when leached with a dilute salt solution in the presence or absence of crop plants grown for up to 36 days. For Si, Ca, Mg, and Na, plants resulted in an increase in the release rate by a factor ranging from 1 to 5 in most cases. Ca and Na seemed to be preferentially released relative to other elements, suggesting that plagioclase dissolved faster than the other constituents of the studied basalt. Negligible amounts of Fe were released in the absence of plants as a consequence of the neutral pH and atmospheric pO 2 that were maintained in the leaching solution. However, the amounts of Fe released from basalt in the presence of plants were up to 100- to 500-fold larger than in the absence of plants, for banana and maize. The kinetics of dissolution of basalt in the absence of plants showed a constantly decreasing release rate over the whole duration of the experiment (36 days). No steady state value was reached both in the absence and presence of banana plants. However, in the latter case, the rates remained at a high initial level over a longer period of time (up to 15 days) before starting to decrease. For Fe, the maximum rate of release was reached beyond 4 days and this rate remained high up to 22 days of growth of banana. The possible mechanisms responsible for this enhanced release of elements from basalt in the presence of plants are discussed. Although these mechanisms need to be elucidated, the present results clearly show that higher plants can considerably affect the kinetics

  3. Experimental evidence for a phylogenetic Janzen-Connell effect in a subtropical forest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Xubing; Liang, Minxia; Etienne, Rampal S.; Wang, Yongfan; Staehelin, Christian; Yu, Shixiao

    2012-01-01

    Observational evidence increasingly suggests that the JanzenConnell effect extends beyond the species boundary. However, this has not been confirmed experimentally. Herein, we present both observational and experimental evidence for a phylogenetic JanzenConnell effect. In a subtropical forest in Gua

  4. Experimental evidence for density dependence of reproduction in great tits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Both, Christiaan

    1998-01-01

    1.  Density dependence of avian reproduction has often been analysed using correlations between annual mean reproductive output and population density. Experiments are necessary to prove that density is the cause of the observed patterns, but so far, three out of four experimental studies do not

  5. Experimental evidence for density dependence of reproduction in great tits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Both, C.

    1998-01-01

    1. Density dependence of avian reproduction has often been analysed using correlations between annual mean reproductive output and population density. Experiments are necessary to prove that density is the cause of the observed patterns, but so far, three out of four experimental studies do not

  6. Experimental evidence for density dependence of reproduction in great tits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Both, Christiaan

    1998-01-01

    1.  Density dependence of avian reproduction has often been analysed using correlations between annual mean reproductive output and population density. Experiments are necessary to prove that density is the cause of the observed patterns, but so far, three out of four experimental studies do not sup

  7. Experimental evidence for density dependence of reproduction in great tits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Both, Christiaan

    1998-01-01

    1.  Density dependence of avian reproduction has often been analysed using correlations between annual mean reproductive output and population density. Experiments are necessary to prove that density is the cause of the observed patterns, but so far, three out of four experimental studies do not sup

  8. Do incentives exert undue influence on survey participation? Experimental evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Eleanor; Couper, Mick P

    2008-09-01

    MONETARY INCENTIVES ARE INCREASINGLY used to help motivate survey participation. Research Ethics Committees have begun to ask whether, and under what conditions, the use of monetary incentives to induce participation might be coercive. The article reports research from an online vignette-based study bearing on this question, concluding that at present the evidence suggests that larger incentives do not induce research participants to accept higher risks than they would be unwilling to accept with smaller ones.

  9. Do Biases in Probability Judgment Matter in Markets? Experimental Evidence

    OpenAIRE

    1987-01-01

    Microeconomic theory typically concerns exchange between individuals or firms in a market setting. To make predictions precise, individuals are usually assumed to use the laws of probability in structuring and revising beliefs about uncertainties. Recent evidence, mostly gathered by psychologists, suggests probability theories might be inadequate descriptive models of individual choice. (See the books edited by Daniel Kahneman et al., 1982a, and by Hal Arkes and ...

  10. Experimental evidence of interhemispheric transport from airborne carbon monoxide measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, R. E.; Gauntner, D. J.

    1979-01-01

    During the period 28-30 October 1977, a Pan American 747-SP aircraft flew around the world with an automated instrument package that included measurements of atmospheric CO made every 4 sec. The flight path extended from San Francisco, over the North Pole to London, south to Capetown, over the South Pole to Auckland, and back to San Francisco. The data collected show large changes with longitude, which are interpreted as direct evidence of interhemispheric mixing. Possible sources for CO are discussed.

  11. The effect of peer observation on consumption choices: experimental evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Grohmann, Antonia; Sakha, Sahra

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the impact of peer observation on the consumption decisions of rural households in Thailand using a lab-in-the-field experiment. We find that those groups that observe each other show lower within group standard deviation in their decisions. Thus, we find evidence for conformity. Further, we find that individual's consumption choice is influenced by the group choice controlling for large number of individual, household, and village characteristics. We find that unfamil...

  12. Experimental Evidence of Directivity-Enhancing Mechanisms in Nonlinear Lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Ganesh, R

    2016-01-01

    In this letter, we experimentally investigate the directional characteristics of propagating, finite-amplitude wave packets in lattice materials, with an emphasis on the functionality enhancement due to the nonlinearly-generated higher harmonics. To this end, we subject a thin, periodically perforated sheet to out-of-plane harmonic excitations, and we design a systematic measurement and data processing routine that leverages the full-wavefield reconstruction capabilities of a laser vibrometer to precisely delineate the effects of nonlinearity. We demonstrate experimentally that the interplay of dispersion, nonlinearity, and modal complexity which is involved in the generation and propagation of higher harmonics gives rise to secondary wave packets with characteristics that conform to the dispersion relation of the corresponding linear structure. Furthermore, these nonlinearly generated wave features display modal and directional characteristics that are complementary to those exhibited by the fundamental harm...

  13. Experimental evidence for formation mechanism of regular circular fringes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.; Zhu, R.; Wang, G.; Wang, P.; Li, H.; Zhang, W.; Ren, G.

    2016-10-01

    Laser active suppressing jamming is one of the most effective technologies to cope with optoelectric imaging systems. In the process of carrying out laser disturbing experiment, regular circular fringes often appeared on the detector, besides laser spot converging by optical system. First of all, the formation of circular fringes has been experimentally investigated by using a simple converging lens to replace the complex optical system. Moreover, circular fringes have been simulated based on the interference theory of coherent light. The coherence between the experimental phenomena and the simulated results showed that the formation mechanism of regular circular fringes was the interference effect between reflected light by back surface of lens and directly refractive light on the detector. At last, the visibility of circular fringes has been calculated from 0.05 to 0.22 according to the current plating standard of lens surface and manufacture technique of optoelectric detector.

  14. What Behaviors are Disapproved? Experimental Evidence from Five Dictator Games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Vorsatz

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The literature on social norms has often stressed that social disapproval is crucial to foster compliance with norms and promote fair and cooperative behavior. With this in mind, we explore the disapproval of allocation decisions using experimental data from five dictator games with a feedback stage. Our data suggests that subjects are heterogeneous in their disapproval patterns, distinguishing two main groups: (1 Subjects who only disapprove choices that harm them, and (2 subjects who disapprove socially inefficient choices.

  15. Experimental evidence of Alfven wave propagation in a Gallium alloy

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    10p.; International audience; Experiments with a liquid metal alloy, galinstan, are reported and show clear evidence of Alfvén wave propagation as well as resonance of Alfvén modes. Galinstan is liquid at room temperature, and although its electrical conductivity is not as large as that of liquid sodium or NaK, it has still been possible to study Alfvén waves, thanks to the use of intense magnetic fi elds, up to 13 teslas. The maximal values of Lundquist number, around 60, are similar to that...

  16. INSTITUTIONS AND BEHAVIOR: EXPERIMENTAL EVIDENCE ON THE EFFECTS OF DEMOCRACY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bó, Pedro Dal; Foster, Andrew; Putterman, Louis

    2013-01-01

    A novel experiment is used to show that the effect of a policy on the level of cooperation is greater when it is chosen democratically by the subjects than when it is exogenously imposed. In contrast to the previous literature, our experimental design allows us to control for selection effects (e.g. those who choose the policy may be affected differently by it). Our finding implies that democratic institutions may affect behavior directly in addition to having effects through the choice of policies. Our findings have implications for the generalizability of the results of randomized policy interventions. PMID:25076785

  17. Multiple Openings and Competitiveness of Forward Markets: Experimental Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, José Luis; Kujal, Praveen; Rassenti, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    We test the competition enhancing effect of selling forward in experimental Cournot duopoly and quadropoly with multiple forward markets. We find that two forward periods yields competitive outcomes and that the results are very close to the predicted theoretical results for quantity setting duopolies and quadropolies. Our experiments lend strong support to the hypothesis that forward markets are competition enhancing. We then test a new market that allows for endogenously determined indefinitely many forward periods that only close when sellers coordinate on selling a zero amount in a forward market. We find that the outcomes under an endogenous close rule are also very competitive. These results hold for both duopolies and quadropolies.

  18. Experimental evidence on the immunopathogenesis of primary biliary cirrhosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selmi, Carlo; Meda, Francesca; Kasangian, Anaid; Invernizzi, Pietro; Tian, Zhigang; Lian, Zhexiong; Podda, Mauro; Gershwin, M Eric

    2010-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is a chronic cholestatic liver disease for which an autoimmune pathogenesis is supported by clinical and experimental data, including the presence of autoantibodies and autoreactive T cells. The etiology remains to be determined, yet data suggest that both a susceptible genetic background and unknown environmental factors determine disease onset. Multiple infectious and chemical candidates have been proposed to trigger the disease in a genetically susceptible host, mostly by molecular mimicry. Most recently, several murine models have been reported, including genetically determined models as well as models induced by immunization with xenobiotics and bacteria. PMID:20029462

  19. Experimental evidence of a chaotic region in a neural pacemaker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Hua-Guang, E-mail: guhuaguang@tongji.edu.cn [School of Aerospace Engineering and Applied Mechanics, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Department of Electronic Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR (China); Jia, Bing [School of Aerospace Engineering and Applied Mechanics, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Chen, Guan-Rong [Department of Electronic Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR (China)

    2013-03-15

    In this Letter, we report the finding of period-adding scenarios with chaos in firing patterns, observed in biological experiments on a neural pacemaker, with fixed extra-cellular potassium concentration at different levels and taken extra-cellular calcium concentration as the bifurcation parameter. The experimental bifurcations in the two-dimensional parameter space demonstrate the existence of a chaotic region interwoven with the periodic region thereby forming a period-adding sequence with chaos. The behavior of the pacemaker in this region is qualitatively similar to that of the Hindmarsh–Rose neuron model in a well-known comb-shaped chaotic region in two-dimensional parameter spaces.

  20. Experimental and clinical evidence of antioxidant therapy in acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mukaddes Esrefoglu

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been shown to play an important role in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis (AP).Antioxidants,alone or in combination with conventional therapy,should improve oxidative-stress-induced organ damage and therefore accelerate the rate of recovery.In recent years,substantial amounts of data about the efficiency of antioxidants against oxidative damage have been obtained from experiments with rodents.Some of these antioxidants have been found beneficial in the treatment of AP in humans; however,at present there is insufficient clinical data to support the benefits of antioxidants,alone or in combination with conventional therapy,in the management of AP in humans.Conflicting results obtained from experimental animals and humans may represent distinct pathophysiological mechanisms mediating tissue injury in different species.Further detailed studies should be done to clarify the exact mechanisms of tissue injury in human AP.Herein I tried to review the existing experimental and clinical studies on AP in order to determine the efficiency of antioxidants.The use of antioxidant enriched nutrition is a potential direction of clinical research in AP given the lack of clues about the efficiency and safety of antioxidant usage in patients with AP.

  1. Experimental Evidence of the Gardner Phase in a Granular Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seguin, A.; Dauchot, O.

    2016-11-01

    Analyzing the dynamics of a vibrated bidimensional packing of bidisperse granular disks below jamming, we provide evidence of a Gardner phase deep into the glass phase. To do so, we perform several compression cycles within a given realization of the same glass and show that the particles select different average vibrational positions at each cycle, while the neighborhood structure remains unchanged. The separation between the cages obtained for different compression cycles plateaus with an increasing packing fraction, while the mean square displacement steadily decreases. This phenomenology is strikingly similar to that reported in recent numerical observations when entering the Gardner phase, for a mean-field model of glass as well as for hard spheres in finite dimension. We also characterize the distribution of the cage order parameters. Here we note several differences from the numerical results, which could be attributed to activated processes and cage heterogeneities.

  2. Experimental evidence for two different dynamical regimes in liquid rubidium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demmel, Franz; Morkel, Christoph

    2017-08-01

    We present evidence for changes in the dynamics of liquid rubidium with rising temperature. The thermal expansion of this liquid alkali metal shows a changing derivative with temperature in a temperature range of about 400-500 K. With neutron scattering the amplitude at the structure factor maximum demonstrates a changing slope with increasing temperature. A derived averaged structural relaxation time can be understood that an additional relaxation process sets in upon cooling. The deduced generalized viscosity and high frequency shear modulus indicate a change in dynamics in the same temperature range. All these findings point to a change in dynamics of the equilibrium liquid metal state with a dynamical crossover from a viscous to a fluid-like liquid metal well above the melting point.

  3. Predicting the Unpredictable: 75 Years of Experimental Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radin, Dean I.

    2011-11-01

    From time immemorial, people have reported foreknowledge of future events. To determine whether such experiences are best understood via conventional explanations, or whether a retrocausal phenomenon might be involved in some instances, researchers have conducted hundreds of controlled laboratory experiments over the past 75 years. These studies fall into four general classes, and each class has generated repeatable evidence consistent with retrocausation. The statistical results for a class of forced-choice studies is associated with odds against chance of about 1024; for a class of free-response studies, odds about 1020; for psychophysiological-based studies, odds about 1017; and for implicit decision studies, odds about 1010. Effect sizes observed in the latter three classes are nearly identical, indicating replication of similar underlying effects. These effects are also in close agreement with the average effect size across 25,000 conventional social psychology experiments conducted over the last century, suggesting that retrocausal phenomena may not be especially unique, at least not in terms of the magnitude of effect. Bayesian analyses of the most recent classes of experiments confirm that the evidence is strongly in favor of a genuine effect, with Bayes Factors ranging from 13,669 to 1 for implicit decision experiments, to 2.9×1013 to 1 for psychophysiological designs. For the two most recent classes of studies examining retrocausal effects via unconscious physiological or behavioral measures, 85 of 101 studies (84%) reported by 25 different laboratories from the United States, Italy, Spain, Holland, Austria, Sweden, England, Scotland, Iran, Japan, and Australia, have produced results in the direction predicted by a retrocausal effect (odds against chance = 1.3×1012, via a sign test). Assessment of the methodologies used in these studies has not identified plausible conventional alternatives for the observed outcomes, suggesting the existence of a

  4. Experimental evidence for reduced rodent diversity causing increased hantavirus prevalence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Suzán

    Full Text Available Emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases have become a major global environmental problem with important public health, economic, and political consequences. The etiologic agents of most emerging infectious diseases are zoonotic, and anthropogenic environmental changes that affect wildlife communities are increasingly implicated in disease emergence and spread. Although increased disease incidence has been correlated with biodiversity loss for several zoonoses, experimental tests in these systems are lacking. We manipulated small-mammal biodiversity by removing non-reservoir species in replicated field plots in Panama, where zoonotic hantaviruses are endemic. Both infection prevalence of hantaviruses in wild reservoir (rodent populations and reservoir population density increased where small-mammal species diversity was reduced. Regardless of other variables that affect the prevalence of directly transmitted infections in natural communities, high biodiversity is important in reducing transmission of zoonotic pathogens among wildlife hosts. Our results have wide applications in both conservation biology and infectious disease management.

  5. What Goes Around, Comes Around: Experimental Evidence on Exposed Lies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Mörtenhuber

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We experimentally investigate the optimal way to handle the uncovering of a noble lie, that is, a lie that supposedly is in the best interest of a given community. For this purpose, we analyze a public good game with feedback to group members on the average contributions of the other group members. The computer program inflates the feedback and shows higher than real average contributions to the high contributors. As shown by earlier studies, the partial feedback inflation increases the total payoff of the public good as it avoids the feeling of being a sucker for above average contributors. The lie is then uncovered and we continue with different feedback modes on contributions, some inflated, some true. We find that players respond similarly to both feedback modes. However, with true feedback, initial contributions in the second stage are significantly higher than with inflated feedback.

  6. Multiple Openings and Competitiveness of Forward Markets: Experimental Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, José Luis; Kujal, Praveen; Rassenti, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    We test the competition enhancing effect of selling forward in experimental Cournot duopoly and quadropoly with multiple forward markets. We find that two forward periods yields competitive outcomes and that the results are very close to the predicted theoretical results for quantity setting duopolies and quadropolies. Our experiments lend strong support to the hypothesis that forward markets are competition enhancing. We then test a new market that allows for endogenously determined indefinitely many forward periods that only close when sellers coordinate on selling a zero amount in a forward market. We find that the outcomes under an endogenous close rule are also very competitive. These results hold for both duopolies and quadropolies. PMID:27442516

  7. Experimental evidence of energetic neutrals production in an ion diode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pushkarev, A.I., E-mail: aipush@mail.ru; Isakova, Y.I.; Khaylov, I.P.

    2015-01-15

    The paper presents several experimental proofs of the formation of energetic charge-exchange neutrals in a self-magnetically insulated ion diode with a graphite cathode. The energetic neutrals are thought to be produced as a result of charge exchange process between accelerated ions and stationary neutral molecules. The experiments have been carried out using both a diode with externally applied magnetic insulation (single-pulse mode: 100 ns, 250–300 kV) and a diode with self-magnetic insulation (double-pulse mode: 300–500 ns, 100–150 kV (negative pulse); 120 ns, 250–300 kV (positive pulse)). The motivation for looking at the neutral component of the ion beam came when we compared two independent methods to measure the energy density of the beam. A quantitative comparison of infrared measurements with signals from Faraday cups and diode voltage was made to assess the presence of neutral atoms in the ion beam. As another proof of charge-exchange effects in ion diode we present the results of statistical analysis of diode performance. It was found that the shot-to shot variation of the energy density in a set of 50–100 shots does not exceed 11%, whilst the same variation for ion current density was 20–30%; suggesting the presence of neutrals in the beam. Moreover, the pressure in the zone of ion beam energy dissipation exceeds the results stated in cited references. The difference between our experimental data and results stated by other authors we attribute to the presence of a low-energy charge-exchange neutral component in the ion beam.

  8. Implicit negotiation beliefs and performance: experimental and longitudinal evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kray, Laura J; Haselhuhn, Michael P

    2007-07-01

    The authors argue that implicit negotiation beliefs, which speak to the expected malleability of negotiating ability, affect performance in dyadic negotiations. They expected negotiators who believe negotiating attributes are malleable (incremental theorists) to outperform negotiators who believe negotiating attributes are fixed (entity theorists). In Study 1, they gathered evidence of convergent and discriminant validity for the implicit negotiation belief construct. In Study 2, they examined the impact of implicit beliefs on the achievement goals that negotiators pursue. In Study 3, they explored the causal role of implicit beliefs on negotiation performance by manipulating negotiators' implicit beliefs within dyads. They also identified perceived ability as a moderator of the link between implicit negotiation beliefs and performance. In Study 4, they measured negotiators' beliefs in a classroom setting and examined how these beliefs affected negotiation performance and overall performance in the course 15 weeks later. Across all performance measures, incremental theorists outperformed entity theorists. Consistent with the authors' hypotheses, incremental theorists captured more of the bargaining surplus and were more integrative than their entity theorist counterparts, suggesting implicit theories are important determinants of how negotiators perform. Implications and future directions are discussed. Copyright 2007 APA, all rights reserved.

  9. Fostering Early Math Comprehension: Experimental Evidence from Paraguay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Naslund-Hadley

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Research indicates that preschool children need to learn pre-math skills to build a foundation for primary- and secondary-level mathematics. This paper presents the results from the early stages of a pilot mathematics program implemented in Cordillera, Paraguay. In a context of significant gaps in teacher preparation and pedagogy, the program uses interactive audio segments that cover the entire preschool math curriculum. Since Paraguayan classrooms tend to be bilingual, the audio and written materials use a combination of Spanish and Guaraní. Based on an experimental evaluation since the program’s implementation, we document positive and significant improvements of 0.16 standard deviations in standardized test scores. The program helped narrow learning gaps between low- and high-performing students, and between students with trained teachers and those whose teachers lack formal training in early childhood education. Moreover, the program improved learning equally among both Guaraní- and Spanish-speaking students. But not all learning gaps narrowed as a result of the program. Although girls improved significantly, boys improved much more, ultimately increasing the gender gap. To close this gender gap, the program has been modified to encourage girls’ increased participation in the classroom and general interest in math

  10. Negative experimental evidence for magneto-orbital dichroism

    CERN Document Server

    Mathevet, Renaud; Pruvost, Laurence; Rikken, Geert L J A

    2012-01-01

    A light beam can carry both spin angular momentum (SAM) and orbital angular momentum (OAM). SAM is commonly evidenced by circular dichroism (CD) experiments i. e. differential absorption of left and right-handed circularly polarized light. Recent experiments, supported by theoretical work, indicate that the corresponding effect with OAM instead of SAM is not observed in chiral matter. Isotropic materials can show CD when subjected to a magnetic field (MCD). We report a set of experiments, under well defined conditions, searching for magnetic orbital dichroism (MOD), differential absorption of light as a function of the sign of its OAM. We experimentally demonstrate that this effect, if any, is smaller than a few 10^{-4} of MCD for the Nd:YAG ^4I_{9/2} ^4F_{5/2} transition. This transition is essentially of electric dipole nature. We give an intuitive argument suggesting that the lowest order of light matter interaction leading to MOD is the electric quadrupole term.

  11. Experimental evidence for the influence of cognitions on compulsive buying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQueen, Paul; Moulding, Richard; Kyrios, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Compulsive buying is a disabling condition, where individuals are unable to resist or control their buying behavior, leading to substantial social and financial problems. Cognitive models implicate the role of beliefs as one factor in buying behavior, for example, "this item is unique and will help me improve my life". This study experimentally examined the contribution of such beliefs to the disorder, in individuals who compulsively buy (N = 18) and in non-clinical controls (N = 17). Participants were presented with photographs of idiosyncratically appealing and unappealing items, in the context of imagined scenarios that either minimized or maximized aspects relevant to hypothesized "compulsive buying beliefs" (i.e., beliefs that acquisition can compensate for negative feelings, beliefs regarding uniqueness and lost opportunities, and emotional reasons for buying). It was found that individuals who compulsively buy demonstrated stronger urges to purchase than control participants, regardless of context, but the overall strength of these urges was responsive to manipulations of beliefs about consumer items said to be associated with compulsive buying. The main limitation of the study was a small sample size, potentially reducing power. Nonetheless, these findings provide insights into the processes underlying compulsive phenomena, in particular supporting the role of cognitions in compulsive buying. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. [Is it possible a bioethics based on the experimental evidence?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor, Luis Miguel

    2013-01-01

    For years there are different types of criticism about principialist bioethics. One alternative that has been proposed is to introduce empirical evidence within the bioethical discourse to make it less formal, less theoretical and closer to reality. In this paper we analyze first in synthetic form diverse alternative proposals to make an empirical bioethics. Some of them are strongly naturalistic while others aim to provide empirical data only for correct or improve bioethical work. Most of them are not shown in favor of maintaining a complete separation between facts and values, between what is and what ought to be. With different nuances these proposals of moderate naturalism make ethical judgments depend normative social opinion resulting into a certain social naturalism. Against these proposals we think to make a bioethics in that relates the empirical facts with ethical duties, we must rediscover empirical reality of human action. Only from it and, in particular, from the activity of discernment that makes practical reason, when judged on the object of his action, it is possible to integrate the mere descriptive facts with ethical judgments of character prescriptive. In conclusion we think that it is not possible to perform bioethics a mode of empirical science, as this would be contrary to natural reason, leading to a sort of scientific reductionism. At the same time we believe that empirical data are important in the development of bioethics and to enhance and improve the innate ability of human reason to discern good. From this discernment could develop a bioethics from the perspective of ethical agents themselves, avoiding the extremes of an excessive normative rationalism, accepting empirical data and not falling into a simple pragmatism.

  13. Gender differences in cooperation: experimental evidence on high school students.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Alberto Molina

    Full Text Available The emergence of cooperation among unrelated human subjects is a long-standing conundrum that has been amply studied both theoretically and experimentally. Within the question, a less explored issue relates to the gender dependence of cooperation, which can be traced back to Darwin, who stated that "women are less selfish but men are more competitive". Indeed, gender has been shown to be relevant in several game theoretical paradigms of social cooperativeness, including prisoner's dilemma, snowdrift and ultimatum/dictator games, but there is no consensus as to which gender is more cooperative. We here contribute to this literature by analyzing the role of gender in a repeated Prisoners' Dilemma played by Spanish high-school students in both a square lattice and a heterogeneous network. While the experiment was conducted to shed light on the influence of networks on the emergence of cooperation, we benefit from the availability of a large dataset of more 1200 participants. We applied different standard econometric techniques to this dataset, including Ordinary Least Squares and Linear Probability models including random effects. All our analyses indicate that being male is negatively associated with the level of cooperation, this association being statistically significant at standard levels. We also obtain a gender difference in the level of cooperation when we control for the unobserved heterogeneity of individuals, which indicates that the gender gap in cooperation favoring female students is present after netting out this effect from other socio-demographics factors not controlled for in the experiment, and from gender differences in risk, social and competitive preferences.

  14. Ethnic and Gender Discrimination in Recruitment: Experimental Evidence From Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karmela Liebkind

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We ask (1 how the position of an ethnic (majority or minority group in the local ethnic hierarchy affects the amount of recruitment discrimination faced by applicants from that group, and (2 whether gender discrimination is dependent on occupational gender stereotypes in the same way among ethnic majority and minority applicants. We use the situation testing method for the first time in Finland: In an experimental study (Study 1, 103 dentistry students made recruitment decisions based on the CVs of three bogus applicants from different ethnic groups (Finnish, Austrian and Polish and in a field experiment (Study 2, four test applicants (male and female Finns and Russians with equivalent CVs applied for 1,258 vacant jobs, addressing gender discrimination in relation to occupational gender stereotypes as well as ethnic discrimination. Together these studies cover both skilled (Study 1 and semi-skilled jobs (Study 2 and applicants from ethnic minority groups originating from within as well as outside the EU. Results show that majority group members are more likely to be hired compared to minority members (both Studies and that minority members from a higher status group are more likely to be hired than those from a lower status group (Study 1. Results also show that male applicants from the majority group were discriminated compared to women in occupations characterised as feminine, while Russian men faced recruitment discrimination compared to Russian women independently of the job’s gender stereotype (Study 2. Implications of recruitment discrimination based on ethnicity and gender are discussed.

  15. Gender differences in cooperation: experimental evidence on high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, J Alberto; Giménez-Nadal, J Ignacio; Cuesta, José A; Gracia-Lazaro, Carlos; Moreno, Yamir; Sanchez, Angel

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of cooperation among unrelated human subjects is a long-standing conundrum that has been amply studied both theoretically and experimentally. Within the question, a less explored issue relates to the gender dependence of cooperation, which can be traced back to Darwin, who stated that "women are less selfish but men are more competitive". Indeed, gender has been shown to be relevant in several game theoretical paradigms of social cooperativeness, including prisoner's dilemma, snowdrift and ultimatum/dictator games, but there is no consensus as to which gender is more cooperative. We here contribute to this literature by analyzing the role of gender in a repeated Prisoners' Dilemma played by Spanish high-school students in both a square lattice and a heterogeneous network. While the experiment was conducted to shed light on the influence of networks on the emergence of cooperation, we benefit from the availability of a large dataset of more 1200 participants. We applied different standard econometric techniques to this dataset, including Ordinary Least Squares and Linear Probability models including random effects. All our analyses indicate that being male is negatively associated with the level of cooperation, this association being statistically significant at standard levels. We also obtain a gender difference in the level of cooperation when we control for the unobserved heterogeneity of individuals, which indicates that the gender gap in cooperation favoring female students is present after netting out this effect from other socio-demographics factors not controlled for in the experiment, and from gender differences in risk, social and competitive preferences.

  16. Polyphenol nanoformulations for cancer therapy: experimental evidence and clinical perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davatgaran-Taghipour Y

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Yasamin Davatgaran-Taghipour,1,2 Salar Masoomzadeh,3 Mohammad Hosein Farzaei,4,5 Roodabeh Bahramsoltani,6 Zahra Karimi-Soureh,7 Roja Rahimi,6,8 Mohammad Abdollahi9,10 1Department of Medical Nanotechnology, School of Advanced Technologies in Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 2PhytoPharmacology Interest Group (PPIG, Universal Scientific Education and Research Network (USERN, Tehran, Iran; 3Zanjan Pharmaceutical Nanotechnology Research Center, School of Pharmacy, Zanjan University of Medical Sciences, Zanjan, Iran; 4Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran; 5Medical Biology Research Center, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran; 6Department of Traditional Pharmacy, School of Traditional Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 7School of Pharmacy, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 8Evidence-Based Medicine Group, Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 9Toxicology and Diseases Group, Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 10Department of Toxicology and Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran Abstract: Cancer is defined as the abnormal cell growth that can cause life-threatening malignancies with high financial costs for patients as well as the health care system. Natural polyphenols have long been used for the prevention and treatment of several disorders due to their antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, cytotoxic, antineoplastic, and immunomodulatory effects discussed in the literature; thus, these phytochemicals are potentially able to act as chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agents in different types of cancer. One of the problems regarding the use of polyphenolic compounds is their low

  17. Charity donations and the Euro introduction: some quasi-experimental evidence on money illusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooreman, P.; Faber, R.; Hofmans, H.

    2004-01-01

    We compare the revenues of a house-to-house collection for a charity before and after the introduction of the euro in a ceteris paribus setting. We find strong evidence of money illusion, supplementing earlier econometric, experimental, and survey evidence on its existence.

  18. Educational evidence based interventions for adults with autism spectrum disorders: experimental evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saverio Fontani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The educational interventions for adults with autism spectrum disorders are a relatively unexplored topic, in the face of numerous studies on the educational intervention models for the child population. In this paper the results of major studies and meta-analysis on the topic are presented and their implications for educational intervention are discussed.Interventi educativi evidence based per adulti con disturbi dello spettro autistico: evidenze sperimentaliGli interventi educativi per adulti con Disturbi dello Spettro Autistico rappresentano un’area relativamente poco esplorata, a fronte di numerosi studi dedicati ai modelli di intervento educativo rivolti alla popolazione infantile. In questo articolo sono presentati i risultati dei principali studi e delle meta-analisi sul tema e vengono discusse le loro implicazioni per l’intervento educativo.

  19. Developmental origins of health and disease: experimental and human evidence of fetal programming for metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gusmão Correia, M L; Volpato, A M; Águila, M B; Mandarim-de-Lacerda, C A

    2012-07-01

    The concept of developmental origins of health and disease has been defined as the process through which the environment encountered before birth, or in infancy, shapes the long-term control of tissue physiology and homeostasis. The evidence for programming derives from a large number of experimental and epidemiological observations. Several nutritional interventions during diverse phases of pregnancy and lactation in rodents are associated with fetal and neonatal programming for metabolic syndrome. In this paper, recent experimental models and human epidemiological studies providing evidence for the fetal programming associated with the development of metabolic syndrome and related diseases are revisited.

  20. Teacher Incentives in Developing Countries: Recent Experimental Evidence from Kenya. Working Paper 2008-09

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glewwe, Paul; Ilias, Nauman; Kremer, Michael

    2008-01-01

    This paper reviews recent evidence on the impact of a teacher incentives program in Kenya. The results are based on a randomized trial, which removes many sources of bias that can arise in analyses of non-experimental data. One hundred schools in a rural area were randomly divided into 50 that participated in a teacher incentives program and 50…

  1. Experimental evidence of the decrease of kinetic energy of hadrons in passing through atomic nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strugalski, Z.

    1985-01-01

    Hadrons with kinetic energies higher than the pion production threshold lose their kinetic energies monotonically in traversing atomic nuclei, due to the strong interactions in nuclear matter. This phenomenon is a crude analogy to the energy loss of charged particles in their passage through materials. Experimental evidence is presented.

  2. Scientific reasoning in kindergarten: Cognitive factors in experimentation and evidence evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaf, J. van der; Segers, P.C.J.; Verhoeven, L.T.W.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of cognitive factors in two core components of scientific reasoning: experimentation and evidence evaluation. Measures of visuospatial and verbal working memory, inhibition, cognitive flexibility, vocabulary, grammatical ability, and spatial v

  3. Scientific reasoning in kindergarten: Cognitive factors in experimentation and evidence evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaf, J. van der; Segers, P.C.J.; Verhoeven, L.T.W.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of cognitive factors in two core components of scientific reasoning: experimentation and evidence evaluation. Measures of visuospatial and verbal working memory, inhibition, cognitive flexibility, vocabulary, grammatical ability, and spatial v

  4. Is Gy’s formula for the Fundamental Sampling Error accurate? Experimental evidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geelhoed, B.

    2011-01-01

    Pierre Gy’s theory for the sampling of particulate materials is widely applied and taught. A crucial part of Gy’s theory deals with the estimation, prediction and minimization of the variance of the Fundamental Sampling Error using a formula that is known as “Gy’s formula”. Experimental evidence, ho

  5. Teacher Incentives in Developing Countries: Experimental Evidence from Kenya. Research Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Center on Performance Incentives, 2008

    2008-01-01

    In "Teacher Incentives in Developing Countries: Experimental Evidence from Kenya"--a paper presented at the National Center on Performance Incentives research to policy conference in February--Paul Glewwe (University of Minnesota), Nauman Illias (The Brattle Group), and Michael Kremer (Harvard University) review findings from recent…

  6. Relevance of the glutathione system in temporal lobe epilepsy: evidence in human and experimental models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas-Rodríguez, Noemí; Coballase-Urrutia, Elvia; Pérez-Cruz, Claudia; Montesinos-Correa, Hortencia; Rivera-Espinosa, Liliana; Sampieri, Aristides; Carmona-Aparicio, Liliana

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress, which is a state of imbalance in the production of reactive oxygen species and nitrogen, is induced by a wide variety of factors. This biochemical state is associated with diseases that are systemic as well as diseases that affect the central nervous system. Epilepsy is a chronic neurological disorder, and temporal lobe epilepsy represents an estimated 40% of all epilepsy cases. Currently, evidence from human and experimental models supports the involvement of oxidative stress during seizures and in the epileptogenesis process. Hence, the aim of this review was to provide information that facilitates the processing of this evidence and investigate the therapeutic impact of the biochemical status for this specific pathology.

  7. Experimental evidence of wave chaos from a double slit experiment with water surface waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yunfei; Shen, Yifeng; Yang, Jiong; Liu, Xiaohan; Zi, Jian; Li, Baowen

    2008-10-01

    In this paper, we report experimental evidence of wave chaos using the double slit water surface wave experiment. We demonstrate that classical dynamics of a domain manifests itself in the interference patterns after the diffraction behind the double slit. For a domain whose classical dynamics is integrable clear interference fringes can be observed behind the double slits; for a domain whose classical dynamics is chaotic, however, interference fringes can totally disappear. Our experimental results clearly demonstrate that the centuries-old double slit experiment can render an excellent tool to observe the manifestations of wave chaos.

  8. Experimental Evidence of the Origin of Nanophase Separation in Low Hole-Doped Colossal Magnetoresistant Manganites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Gil, Raquel; Ruiz-González, M Luisa; González-Merchante, Daniel; Alonso, José M; Hernando, Antonio; Trasobares, Susana; Vallet-Regí, María; Rojo, Juan M; González-Calbet, José M

    2016-01-13

    While being key to understanding their intriguing physical properties, the origin of nanophase separation in manganites and other strongly correlated materials is still unclear. Here, experimental evidence is offered for the origin of the controverted phase separation mechanism in the representative La1-xCaxMnO3 system. For low hole densities, direct evidence of Mn(4+) holes localization around Ca(2+) ions is experimentally provided by means of aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy combined with electron energy loss spectroscopy. These localized holes give rise to the segregated nanoclusters, within which double exchange hopping between Mn(3+) and Mn(4+) remains restricted, accounting for the insulating character of perovskites with low hole density. This localization is explained in terms of a simple model in which Mn(4+) holes are bound to substitutional divalent Ca(2+) ions.

  9. Direct experimental evidence of non-equilibrium energy sharing in dissipative collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Casini, G; Olmi, A; Bini, M; Calamai, S; Meucci, F; Pasquali, G; Poggi, G; Stefanini, A A; Gobbi, A; Hildenbrand, K D

    1996-01-01

    Primary and secondary masses of heavy reaction products have been deduced from kinematics and E-ToF measurements, respectively, for the direct and reverse collisions of 100Mo with 120Sn at 14.1 A MeV. Direct experimental evidence of the correlation of energy-sharing with net mass transfer and model-independent results on the evolution of the average excitation from equal-energy to equal-temperature partition are presented.

  10. Experimental evidences of singlet to triplet transition in a spin cluster compound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, Tanmoy [Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER) Kolkata, Mohanpur Campus, PO: BCKV Campus Main Office, Nadia, Mohanpur 741246, West Bengal (India); Experimental Physics III, Fakultät Physik, TU Dortmund, 44221 Dortmund (Germany); Singh, Harkirat [Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER) Kolkata, Mohanpur Campus, PO: BCKV Campus Main Office, Nadia, Mohanpur 741246, West Bengal (India); Department of Condensed Matter Physics and Material Sciences, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai 400 005 (India); Mitra, Chiranjib, E-mail: chiranjib@iiserkol.ac.in [Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER) Kolkata, Mohanpur Campus, PO: BCKV Campus Main Office, Nadia, Mohanpur 741246, West Bengal (India)

    2015-12-15

    Experimental realization of magnetic field induced singlet to triplet transition is reported for NH{sub 4}CuPO{sub 4}·H{sub 2}O, a two spin cluster material with isotropic Heisenberg interaction. Experimental magnetization and specific heat data have been collected as a function of temperature and magnetic field. Experimental data have been analyzed in terms of Heisenberg dimer model. Two quantum complementary observables representing local and non-local properties of the spins are constructed using the experimental data and a clear evidence of singlet to triplet transition is observed through partial quantum information sharing when the magnetic field is swept through a particular value. Signature of this transition has also been captured when specific heat is measured as a function of magnetic field. Furthermore, using the experimental specific heat data, magnetic energy values are calculated and their variations are captured as a function of magnetic field and temperature. - Highlights: • Magnetic field induced energy level crossing is reported for NH{sub 4}CuPO{sub 4}·H{sub 2}O. • Magnetic data are analyzed within the framework of spin 1/2 dimer model. • Singlet-triplet transition is captured employing quantum complementarity principle. • Field dependent specific heat data also provides the signature of the transition.

  11. Theory and experimental evidence of phonon domains and their roles in pre-martensitic phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yongmei M.; Wang, Yu U.; Ren, Yang

    2015-12-01

    Pre-martensitic phenomena, also called martensite precursor effects, have been known for decades while yet remain outstanding issues. This paper addresses pre-martensitic phenomena from new theoretical and experimental perspectives. A statistical mechanics-based Grüneisen-type phonon theory is developed. On the basis of deformation-dependent incompletely softened low-energy phonons, the theory predicts a lattice instability and pre-martensitic transition into elastic-phonon domains via 'phonon spinodal decomposition.' The phase transition lifts phonon degeneracy in cubic crystal and has a nature of phonon pseudo-Jahn-Teller lattice instability. The theory and notion of phonon domains consistently explain the ubiquitous pre-martensitic anomalies as natural consequences of incomplete phonon softening. The phonon domains are characterised by broken dynamic symmetry of lattice vibrations and deform through internal phonon relaxation in response to stress (a particular case of Le Chatelier's principle), leading to previously unexplored new domain phenomenon. Experimental evidence of phonon domains is obtained by in situ three-dimensional phonon diffuse scattering and Bragg reflection using high-energy synchrotron X-ray single-crystal diffraction, which observes exotic domain phenomenon fundamentally different from usual ferroelastic domain switching phenomenon. In light of the theory and experimental evidence of phonon domains and their roles in pre-martensitic phenomena, currently existing alternative opinions on martensitic precursor phenomena are revisited.

  12. Analysis of experimental evidence that shows adverse effects of salt and its relation to hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Bravo A.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The study by Taylor et al published in June 2010 in the American Journal of Hypertension questions the effectiveness of reducing salt intake in the diet in the prevention and treatment of high blood pressure and other cardiovascular conditions. The publication of this article has lead to great controversy and medical associations and learned societies responded promptly. The response criticized the results of the meta-analysis and pointed out its methodological shortcomings. In this review we critically appraise the experimental evidence that shows the importance of diet salt intake and its role as a determinant of blood pressure. We briefly describe the paradigm that explains the role of salt intake in contributing in the regulation of blood pressure (Guyton hypothesis and model and we mention the experimental evidence that supports this. We briefly comment on the classical studies that indicate that salt intake (NaCl contributes directly to the development of high blood pressure and target tissues. Finally, we briefly mention the experimental data that is related with the controversy on the role of salt (NaCl or sodium as prohypertensive agents.

  13. Theoretical and Experimental Evidence of Hydrogen Migration rather than Isomerization in the Acetylene Dication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liekhus-Schmaltz, Chelsea; Li, Zheng; Petrovic, Vladimir; Martinez, Todd; Bucksbaum, Phil; AMO75113 Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    Theoretical calculations and experimental results in the acetylene dication have long agreed that isomerization after x-ray excitation occurs in the first singlet state, where the carbon-carbon bond lives long enough for isomerization to complete. These same calculations predict that a large barrier to isomerization exists that would cause isomerization to occur in about a picosecond, while there is some evidence for ultrafast isomerization in under 100 fs. However, new ab initio calculations of the acetylene dication reveal that ultrafast isomerization after x-ray excitation is unlikely. In this talk, we present evidence that signatures of hydrogen migration observed in recent time resolved LCLS data are mostly due to hydrogen migration in an excited state which dissociates too quickly for isomerization to complete. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. PHY-0649578.

  14. Additional experimental evidence for a solar influence on nuclear decay rates

    CERN Document Server

    Jenkins, Jere H; Blue, Thomas E; Fischbach, Ephraim; Javorsek, Daniel; Kauffman, Andrew C; Mundy, Daniel W; Sturrock, Peter A; Talnagi, Joseph W

    2012-01-01

    Additional experimental evidence is presented in support of the recent hypothesis that a possible solar influence could explain fluctuations observed in the measured decay rates of some isotopes. These data were obtained during routine weekly calibrations of an instrument used for radiological safety at The Ohio State University Research Reactor using Cl-36. The detector system used was based on a Geiger-Mueller gas detector, which is a robust detector system with very low susceptibility to environmental changes. A clear annual variation is evident in the data, with a maximum relative count rate observed in January/February, and a minimum relative count rate observed in July/August, for seven successive years from July 2005 to June 2011. This annual variation is not likely to have arisen from changes in the detector surroundings, as we show here.

  15. Relevance of the Glutathione System in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: Evidence in Human and Experimental Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noemí Cárdenas-Rodríguez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress, which is a state of imbalance in the production of reactive oxygen species and nitrogen, is induced by a wide variety of factors. This biochemical state is associated with diseases that are systemic as well as diseases that affect the central nervous system. Epilepsy is a chronic neurological disorder, and temporal lobe epilepsy represents an estimated 40% of all epilepsy cases. Currently, evidence from human and experimental models supports the involvement of oxidative stress during seizures and in the epileptogenesis process. Hence, the aim of this review was to provide information that facilitates the processing of this evidence and investigate the therapeutic impact of the biochemical status for this specific pathology.

  16. Relevance of the Glutathione System in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: Evidence in Human and Experimental Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas-Rodríguez, Noemí; Coballase-Urrutia, Elvia; Pérez-Cruz, Claudia; Montesinos-Correa, Hortencia; Rivera-Espinosa, Liliana; Sampieri, Aristides; Carmona-Aparicio, Liliana

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress, which is a state of imbalance in the production of reactive oxygen species and nitrogen, is induced by a wide variety of factors. This biochemical state is associated with diseases that are systemic as well as diseases that affect the central nervous system. Epilepsy is a chronic neurological disorder, and temporal lobe epilepsy represents an estimated 40% of all epilepsy cases. Currently, evidence from human and experimental models supports the involvement of oxidative stress during seizures and in the epileptogenesis process. Hence, the aim of this review was to provide information that facilitates the processing of this evidence and investigate the therapeutic impact of the biochemical status for this specific pathology. PMID:25538816

  17. Permanent dissipative structures in water: the matrix of life? Experimental evidences and their quantum origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elia, V; Germano, R; Napoli, E

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a short review of the evidence - both experimental and theoretical - of the formation of dissipative structures in liquid water induced by three kinds of physical perturbations having a low energy content: extremely diluted solution (EDS), iteratively filtered water (IFW), and iteratively nafionated water (INW). Particular attention is devoted to the very recent discovery that such structures are tremendously persistent even in the solid phase: large ponderal quantities of supramolecular aggregates of water (with each nucleus hundreds of nanometers in size) have been observed - at ambient pressure and temperature - using easily-reproducible experimental methods. The nature of these dissipative structures is analyzed and explained in terms of the thermodynamics of far-from-equilibrium systems and irreversible processes, showing their spontaneous quantum origin. Are these kinds of structures the matrix itself of life?.

  18. Poverty, inequality, and increased consumption of high calorie food: Experimental evidence for a causal link.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratanova, Boyka; Loughnan, Steve; Klein, Olivier; Claassen, Almudena; Wood, Robert

    2016-05-01

    Rising obesity represents a serious, global problem. It is now well established that obesity is associated with poverty and wealth inequality, suggesting that these factors may promote caloric intake. Whereas previous work has examined these links from an epidemiological perspective, the current paper examined them experimentally. In Study 1 we found that people experimentally induced to view themselves as poor (v. wealthy) exhibited increased calorie intake. In Study 2, participants who believed that they were poorer or wealthier than their interaction partners exhibited higher levels of anxiety compared to those in an equal partners condition; this anxiety in turn led to increased calorie consumption for people who had a strong need to belong. The findings provide causal evidence for the poverty-intake and inequality-intake links. Further, we identify social anxiety and a strong need to belong as important social psychological factors linking inequality to increased calorie intake.

  19. Experimental evidence of high-frequency complete elastic bandgap in pillar-based phononic slabs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pourabolghasem, Reza; Mohammadi, Saeed; Eftekhar, Ali A.; Adibi, Ali [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Khelif, Abdelkrim [Institut FEMTO-ST, Université de Franche-Comté, CNRS, 32 Avenue de l' Observatoire, 25044 Besançon Cedex (France)

    2014-12-08

    We present strong experimental evidence for the existence of a complete phononic bandgap, for Lamb waves, in the high frequency regime (i.e., 800 MHz) for a pillar-based phononic crystal (PnC) membrane with a triangular lattice of gold pillars on top. The membrane is composed of an aluminum nitride film stacked on thin molybdenum and silicon layers. Experimental characterization shows a large attenuation of at least 20 dB in the three major crystallographic directions of the PnC lattice in the frequency range of 760 MHz–820 MHz, which is in agreement with our finite element simulations of the PnC bandgap. The results of experiments are analyzed and the physics behind the attenuation in different spectral windows is explained methodically by assessing the type of Bloch modes and the in-plane symmetry of the displacement profile.

  20. Experimental evidence of tetrahedral interstitial and bond-centered Er in Ge

    CERN Document Server

    Decoster, S; Wahl, U; Correia, J G; Vantomme, A

    2008-01-01

    We report on an emission channeling study of the lattice site location of implanted Er in Ge together with its thermal stability. We found direct experimental evidence of Er atoms located on the tetrahedral (T) interstitial site and on the bond-centered (BC) site, with a maximum total occupancy after annealing at 400 °C. Whereas Er is expected to occupy the T site in a diamond crystal structure, the observation of BC Er in Ge is more surprising and believed to be related to the Er-vacancy defect in the split-vacancy complex configuration.

  1. Experimental evidence of the existence of a nonstationary coherent crystal state in bismuth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misochko, O. V.

    2014-02-01

    The excitation of a bismuth (Bi) crystal by intense ultrashort laser pulses at liquid-helium temperature leads to consistent motion of atoms and variations in the electron density. At various time instants over an interval reaching several dosen picoseconds, atoms in the Bi lattice exhibit sequential pairing in the real and reciprocal spaces. This behavior may correspond to the formation of a coherent crystal—a special state of matter that combines the properties of a solid and quantum fluid. Experimental data showing evidence of the possible existence of this unusual state are presented and analyzed.

  2. Direct experimental evidence for atomic tunneling of europium in crystalline Eu8Ga16Ge30.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Raphaël P; Keppens, Veerle; Bonville, Pierre; Nolas, George S; Grandjean, Fernande; Long, Gary J; Christen, Hans M; Chakoumakos, Bryan C; Sales, Brian C; Mandrus, David

    2006-07-07

    Mössbauer-effect and microwave absorption experimental evidence unambiguously demonstrates the presence of slow, approximately 450 MHz, tunneling of magnetic europium between four equivalent sites in Eu8Ga16Ge30, a stoichiometric clathrate. Remarkably, six of the eight europium atoms, or 11% of the constituents in this solid, tunnel between these four sites separated by 0.55 A. The off centering of the atoms or ions in crystalline clathrates appears to be a promising route for producing Rabi oscillators in solid-state materials.

  3. Experimental evidences of topological surface states of β-Ag2Te

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaev, Azat; Ren, Peng; Xia, Bin; Lin, Qing Hua; Yu, Ting; Qiu, Caiyu; Zhang, Shuang-Yuan; Han, Ming-Yong; Li, Zhi Peng; Zhu, Wei Guang; Wu, Qingyu; Feng, Yuan Ping; Shen, Lei; Shen, Shun-Qing; Wang, Lan

    2013-03-01

    We present evidence of topological surface states in β-Ag2Te through first-principles calculations, periodic quantum interference effect and ambipolar electric field effect in single crystalline nanoribbon. Our first-principles calculations show that β-Ag2Te is a topological insulator with a gapless Dirac cone with strong anisotropy. To experimentally probe the topological surface state, we synthesized high quality β-Ag2Te nanoribbons and performed electron transport measurements. The coexistence of pronounced Aharonov-Bohm oscillations and weak Altshuler-Aronov-Spivak oscillations clearly demonstrates coherent electron transport around the perimeter of β-Ag2Te nanoribbon and therefore the existence of topological surface states, which is further supported by the ambipolar electric field effect for devices fabricated by β-Ag2Te nanoribbons. The experimental evidences of topological surface states and the theoretically predicted anisotropic Dirac cone of β-Ag2Te suggest that the material may be a promising candidate of topological insulator for fundamental study and future spintronic devices.

  4. Experimental Evidence for a Liquid-Liquid Crossover in Deeply Cooled Confined Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cupane, Antonio; Fomina, Margarita; Piazza, Irina; Peters, Judith; Schirò, Giorgio

    2014-11-01

    In this work we investigate, by means of elastic neutron scattering, the pressure dependence of mean square displacements (MSD) of hydrogen atoms of deeply cooled water confined in the pores of a three-dimensional disordered SiO2 xerogel; experiments have been performed at 250 and 210 K from atmospheric pressure to 1200 bar. The "pressure anomaly" of supercooled water (i.e., a mean square displacement increase with increasing pressure) is observed in our sample at both temperatures; however, contrary to previous simulation results and to the experimental trend observed in bulk water, the pressure effect is smaller at lower (210 K) than at higher (250 K) temperature. Elastic neutron scattering results are complemented by differential scanning calorimetry data that put in evidence, besides the glass transition at about 170 K, a first-order-like endothermic transition occurring at about 230 K that, in view of the neutron scattering results, can be attributed to a liquid-liquid crossover. Our results give experimental evidence for the presence, in deeply cooled confined water, of a crossover occurring at about 230 K (at ambient pressure) from a liquid phase predominant at 210 K to another liquid phase predominant at 250 K; therefore, they are fully consistent with the liquid-liquid transition hypothesis.

  5. Bacteria are not too small for spatial sensing of chemical gradients: An experimental evidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thar, Roland; Kühl, Michael

    2003-01-01

    By analyzing the chemotactic behavior of a recently described marine bacterial species, we provide experimental evidence that bacteria are not too small for sensing chemical gradients spatially. The bipolar flagellated vibrioid bacteria (typical size 2 × 6 µm) exhibit a unique motility pattern as...... is rotating faster than the other bundle. A mathematical model based on these assumptions reproduces the observed swimming behavior of the bacteria.......By analyzing the chemotactic behavior of a recently described marine bacterial species, we provide experimental evidence that bacteria are not too small for sensing chemical gradients spatially. The bipolar flagellated vibrioid bacteria (typical size 2 × 6 µm) exhibit a unique motility pattern...... as they translate along as well as rotate around their short axis, i.e., the pathways of the cell poles describe a double helix. The natural habitat of the bacteria is characterized by steep oxygen gradients where they accumulate in a band at their preferred oxygen concentration of ˜2 µM. Single cells leaving...

  6. Experimental evidences of topological surface states of β-Ag2Te

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azat Sulaev

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We present evidence of topological surface states in β-Ag2Te through first-principles calculations, periodic quantum interference effect and ambipolar electric field effect in single crystalline nanoribbon. Our first-principles calculations show that β-Ag2Te is a topological insulator with a gapless Dirac cone with strong anisotropy. To experimentally probe the topological surface state, we synthesized high quality β-Ag2Te nanoribbons and performed electron transport measurements. The coexistence of pronounced Aharonov-Bohm oscillations and weak Altshuler-Aronov-Spivak oscillations clearly demonstrates coherent electron transport around the perimeter of β-Ag2Te nanoribbon and therefore the existence of topological surface states, which is further supported by the ambipolar electric field effect for devices fabricated by β-Ag2Te nanoribbons. The experimental evidences of topological surface states and the theoretically predicted anisotropic Dirac cone of β-Ag2Te suggest that the material may be a promising candidate of topological insulator for fundamental study and future spintronic devices.

  7. Resilience of experimentally seeded dietary traditions in wild vervets: Evidence from group fissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Waal, Erica; van Schaik, Carel P; Whiten, Andrew

    2017-10-01

    Controlled laboratory experiments have delivered extensive and compelling evidence for the diffusion and maintenance of socially learned behavior in primates and other animals. Such evidence is rarer in the wild, but we show that a behavior seeded in a majority of individuals within vervet monkey (Chlorocebus pygerythus) groups may be sustained across several years. Here, we report results of two natural fission events in such groups that offer novel evidence of the resilience of socially transmitted group norms of behavior. Before fission, high ranked females exhibited an almost exclusive adherence to a group preference among two food options, originally introduced through a distasteful additive in one option, but no longer present in repeated later tests. Because of rank-dependent competition, low-ranked females ate more of the formerly distasteful food and so discovered it was now as palatable as the alternative. Despite this experience, low ranked females who formed the splinter groups then expressed a 100% bias for the preferred option of their original parent group, revealing these preferences to be resilient. We interpret this effect as conformity to either the preferences of high rankers or of a majority in the parent group, or both. However, given fissioned individuals' familiarity with their habitat and experimental options, we question the adequacy of the informational function usually ascribed to conformity and discuss alternatives under a concept of "social conformity". © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Experimental evidence of super-resolution better than λ/105 with positive refraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miñano, Juan C.; Sánchez-Dehesa, José; González, Juan C.; Benítez, P.; Grabovičkić, D.; Carbonell, Jorge; Ahmadpanahi, H.

    2014-03-01

    Super-resolution (SR) systems surpassing the Abbe diffraction limit have been theoretically and experimentally demonstrated using a number of different approaches and technologies: using materials with a negative refractive index, utilizing optical super-oscillation, using a resonant metalens, etc. However, recently it has been proved theoretically that in the Maxwell fish-eye lens (MFE), a device made of positive refractive index materials, the same phenomenon takes place. Moreover, using a simpler device equivalent to the MFE called the spherical geodesic waveguide (SGW), an SR of up to λ/3000 was simulated in COMSOL. Until now, only one piece of experimental evidence of SR with positive refraction has been reported (up to λ/5) for an MFE prototype working at microwave frequencies. Here, experimental results are presented for an SGW prototype showing an SR of up to λ/105. The SGW prototype consists of two concentric metallic spheres with an air space in between and two coaxial ports acting as an emitter and a receiver. The prototype has been analyzed in the range 1 GHz to 1.3 GHz.

  9. Live Fast, Die Young: Experimental Evidence of Population Extinction Risk due to Climate Change.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvire Bestion

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Evidence has accumulated in recent decades on the drastic impact of climate change on biodiversity. Warming temperatures have induced changes in species physiology, phenology, and have decreased body size. Such modifications can impact population dynamics and could lead to changes in life cycle and demography. More specifically, conceptual frameworks predict that global warming will severely threaten tropical ectotherms while temperate ectotherms should resist or even benefit from higher temperatures. However, experimental studies measuring the impacts of future warming trends on temperate ectotherms' life cycle and population persistence are lacking. Here we investigate the impacts of future climates on a model vertebrate ectotherm species using a large-scale warming experiment. We manipulated climatic conditions in 18 seminatural populations over two years to obtain a present climate treatment and a warm climate treatment matching IPCC predictions for future climate. Warmer temperatures caused a faster body growth, an earlier reproductive onset, and an increased voltinism, leading to a highly accelerated life cycle but also to a decrease in adult survival. A matrix population model predicts that warm climate populations in our experiment should go extinct in around 20 y. Comparing our experimental climatic conditions to conditions encountered by populations across Europe, we suggest that warming climates should threaten a significant number of populations at the southern range of the distribution. Our findings stress the importance of experimental approaches on the entire life cycle to more accurately predict population and species persistence in future climates.

  10. Live Fast, Die Young: Experimental Evidence of Population Extinction Risk due to Climate Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bestion, Elvire; Teyssier, Aimeric; Richard, Murielle; Clobert, Jean; Cote, Julien

    2015-10-01

    Evidence has accumulated in recent decades on the drastic impact of climate change on biodiversity. Warming temperatures have induced changes in species physiology, phenology, and have decreased body size. Such modifications can impact population dynamics and could lead to changes in life cycle and demography. More specifically, conceptual frameworks predict that global warming will severely threaten tropical ectotherms while temperate ectotherms should resist or even benefit from higher temperatures. However, experimental studies measuring the impacts of future warming trends on temperate ectotherms' life cycle and population persistence are lacking. Here we investigate the impacts of future climates on a model vertebrate ectotherm species using a large-scale warming experiment. We manipulated climatic conditions in 18 seminatural populations over two years to obtain a present climate treatment and a warm climate treatment matching IPCC predictions for future climate. Warmer temperatures caused a faster body growth, an earlier reproductive onset, and an increased voltinism, leading to a highly accelerated life cycle but also to a decrease in adult survival. A matrix population model predicts that warm climate populations in our experiment should go extinct in around 20 y. Comparing our experimental climatic conditions to conditions encountered by populations across Europe, we suggest that warming climates should threaten a significant number of populations at the southern range of the distribution. Our findings stress the importance of experimental approaches on the entire life cycle to more accurately predict population and species persistence in future climates.

  11. Evolution and maintenance of sexual size dimorphism: Aligning phylogenetic and experimental evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matjaz eKuntner

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Integrating the insights derived from both phylogenetic and experimental approaches offers a more complete understanding of evolutionary patterns and processes, yet it is rarely a feature of investigations of the evolutionary significance of trait variation. We combine these approaches to reinterpret the patterns and processes in the evolution of female biased sexual size dimorphism in Nephilidae, a spider lineage characterized by the most extreme sexual size dimorphism among terrestrial animals. We use a molecular phylogeny to reconstruct the size evolution for each sex and reveal a case of sexually dimorphic gigantism: both sexes steadily outgrow their ancestral sizes, but the female and male slopes differ, and hence sexual size dimorphism steadily increases. A review of the experimental evidence reveals a predominant net selection for large size in both sexes, consistent with the phylogenetic pattern for females but not for males. Thus, while sexual size dimorphism in spiders most likely originates and is maintained by fecundity selection on females, it is unclear what selection pressures prevent males from becoming as large as females. This integrated approach highlights the dangers of inferring evolutionary significance from experimental studies that isolate the effects of single selection pressures.

  12. Insight of scent: experimental evidence of olfactory capabilities in the wandering albatross (Diomedea exulans).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardon, J; Nesterova, A P; Traugott, J; Saunders, S M; Bonadonna, F

    2010-02-15

    Wandering albatrosses routinely forage over thousands of kilometres of open ocean, but the sensory mechanisms used in the food search itself have not been completely elucidated. Recent telemetry studies show that some spatial behaviours of the species are consistent with the 'multimodal foraging strategy' hypothesis which proposes that birds use a combination of olfactory and visual cues while foraging at sea. The 'multimodal foraging strategy' hypothesis, however, still suffers from a lack of experimental evidence, particularly regarding the olfactory capabilities of wandering albatrosses. As an initial step to test the hypothesis, we carried out behavioural experiments exploring the sensory capabilities of adult wandering albatrosses at a breeding colony. Three two-choice tests were designed to investigate the birds' response to olfactory and visual stimuli, individually or in combination. Perception of the different stimuli was assessed by comparing the amount of exploration directed towards an 'experimental' display or a 'control' display. Our results indicate that birds were able to perceive the three types of stimulus presented: olfactory, visual and combined. Moreover, olfactory and visual cues were found to have additional effects on the exploratory behaviours of males. This simple experimental demonstration of reasonable olfactory capabilities in the wandering albatross supports the 'multimodal foraging strategy' and is consistent with recent hypotheses of the evolutionary history of procellariiforms.

  13. Antioxidants and skeletal muscle performance: ’Common knowledge’ vs. experimental evidence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés eHernández

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Antioxidants are assumed to provide numerous benefits, including better health, a reduced rate of aging, and improved exercise performance. Specifically, antioxidants are commonly ‘prescribed’ by the media, supplement industry, and ‘fitness experts’ for individuals prior to training and performance, with assumed benefits of improved fatigue resistance and recovery. This has provoked expansion of the supplement industry which responded by creation of a plethora of products aimed at facilitating the needs of the active individual. However, what does the experimental evidence say about the efficacy of antioxidants on skeletal muscle function? Are antioxidants actually as beneficial as the general populous believes? Or, could they in fact lead to deleterious effects on skeletal muscle function and performance? This mini review addresses these questions with an unbiased look at what we know about antioxidant effects on skeletal muscle, and what we still need to know before conclusions can be made.

  14. Individualism, authoritarianism, and attitudes toward assisted death: cross-cultural, cross-regional, and experimental evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemmelmeier, Markus; Wieczorkowska, Grazyna; Erb, Hans-Peter; Burnstein, Eugene

    2002-01-01

    We hypothesized that in individualistic cultures, individualism predicts positive attitudes toward assisted death, whereas authoritarianism is negatively associated with favorable views of this issue. Study 1 confirmed this hypothesis in a Polish sample (n=100). Study 2, using a German sample (n=102), found the predicted relationships for forms of assisted death that involved the individual self-determination of a terminally ill patient. In Study 3 (n=72), we found experimental evidence that priming individualistic aspects of the self-concept results in more favorable views of physician-assisted suicide. Using a representative sample (n=1158), Study 4 found that across the United States, regional levels of individualism are reflected in corresponding patterns of support for assisted suicide. The discussion focuses on assisted suicide as a cultural phenomenon and explores the implications of growing levels of individualism for public opinion and policy on assisted suicide.

  15. Definitive experimental evidence for two-band superconductivity in MgB2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, S; Yokoya, T; Takano, Y; Kito, H; Matsushita, A; Yin, F; Itoh, J; Harima, H; Shin, S

    2003-09-19

    The superconducting-gap of MgB2 has been studied by high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The results show that superconducting gaps with values of 5.5 and 2.2 meV open on the sigma band and the pi band, respectively, but both the gaps close at the bulk transition temperature, providing a definitive experimental evidence for the two-band superconductivity with strong interband pairing interaction in MgB2. The experiments validate the role of k-dependent electron-phonon coupling as the origin of multiple-gap superconductivity as well as the high transition temperature of MgB2.

  16. Experimental evidence for alleviating nociceptive hypersensitivity by single application of capsaicin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiao-Li; Zhang, Fang-Xiong; Dong, Fei; Bao, Lan; Zhang, Xu

    2015-04-22

    The single application of high-concentration of capsaicin has been used as an analgesic therapy of persistent pain. However, its effectiveness and underlying mechanisms remain to be further evaluated with experimental approaches. The present study provided evidence showing that the single application of capsaicin dose-dependently alleviated nociceptive hypersensitivity, and reduced the action potential firing in small-diameter neurons of the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) in rats and mice. Pre-treatment with capsaicin reduced formalin-induced acute nocifensive behavior after a brief hyperalgesia in rats and mice. The inhibitory effects of capsaicin were calcium-dependent, and mediated by the capsaicin receptor (transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1). We further found that capsaicin exerted inhibitory effects on the persistent nociceptive hypersensitivity induced by peripheral inflammation and nerve injury. Thus, these results support the long-lasting and inhibitory effects of topical capsaicin on persistent pain, and the clinic use of capsaicin as a pain therapy.

  17. Pediatric asthma case management: a review of evidence and an experimental study design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Amanda; Musolf, Jeanne; Meurer, John R; Cohn, Jennifer H; Kelly, Kevin J

    2004-08-01

    Asthma is a complex disease that involves physiological, environmental, and psychosocial factors. This paper reviews childhood asthma case management by social service professionals, lay health workers, and nurses, and it presents a new randomized controlled study using nurse case management in a local community coalition. Evidence suggests the common factor for success involves case managers spending time contacting and patiently and persistently working with the family, thus building a trusting relationship. Although case management time is an expense for a health care payer, provider, and the child and family, the positive outcomes achieved can demonstrate the benefit of these interventions to all parties involved. The described experimental study assesses the cost and effectiveness of home-based nurse case management by a community coalition for children visiting an emergency department for asthma care.

  18. The Yang-Yang anomaly in liquid-liquid criticality: Experimental evidence from adiabatic scanning calorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losada-Pérez, Patricia; Tripathi, Chandra Shekhar Pati; Leys, Jan; Cerdeiriña, Claudio A.; Glorieux, Christ; Thoen, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Using adiabatic scanning calorimetry, we have found the first experimental evidence of the Yang-Yang anomaly in liquid-liquid criticality from high-resolution two-phase isobaric heat capacity measurements for the binary mixture 3-pentanol + nitromethane. The results suggest a rather strong effect. The critical amplitude of the partial molar heat capacity is higher for the component with larger molecular volume, in accordance with the predictions of complete scaling as obtained from the customary observed asymmetric behavior of the coexistence-curve diameter. This consolidates complete scaling as the true formulation of fluid-fluid criticality. The quantitative analysis indicates that molecular size is not the only microscopic factor at play in asymmetric liquid-liquid criticality.

  19. Management of renal artery stenosis: What does the experimental evidence tell us?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammed; Al-Suraih; Joseph; Peter; Grande

    2014-01-01

    Optimal management of patients with renal artery stenosis(RAS) is a subject of considerable controversy. There is incontrovertible evidence that renal artery stenosis has profound effects on the heart and cardiovascular system in addition to the kidney. Recent evidence indicates that restoration of blood flow alone does not improve renal or cardiovascular outcomes in patients with renal artery stenosis. A number of human and experimental studies have documented the clinical, hemodynamic, and histopathologic features in renal artery stenosis. New approaches to the treatment of renovascular hypertension due to RAS depend on better understanding of basic mechanisms underlying the development of chronic renal disease in these patients. Several groups have employed the two kidney one clip model of renovascular hypertension to define basic signaling mechanisms responsible for the development of chronic renal disease. Recent studies have underscored the importance of inflammation in the development and progression of renal damage in renal artery stenosis. In particular, interactions between the renin-angiotensin system, oxidative stress, and inflammation appear to play a critical role in this process. In this overview, results of recent studies to define basic pathways responsible for renal disease progression will be highlighted. These studies may provide the rationale for novel therapeutic approaches to treat patients with renovascular hypertension.

  20. Experimental evidence of Alfv\\'en wave propagation in a Gallium alloy

    CERN Document Server

    Alboussiere, Thierry; Debray, François; La Rizza, Patrick; Masson, Jean-Paul; Plunian, Franck; Ribeiro, Adolfo; Schmitt, Denys

    2011-01-01

    Experiments with a liquid metal alloy, galinstan, are reported and show clear evidence of Alfv\\'en wave propagation as well as resonance of Alfv\\'en modes. Galinstan is liquid at room temperature, and although its electrical conductivity is not as large as that of liquid sodium or NaK, it has still been possible to study Alfv\\'en waves, thanks to the use of intense magnetic fi elds, up to 13 teslas. The maximal values of Lundquist number, around 60, are similar to that of the reference experimental study by Jameson [1]. The generation mechanism for Alfv\\'en waves and their refl ection is studied carefully. Numerical simulations have been performed and have been able to reproduce the experimental results despite the fact that the simulated magnetic Prandtl number was much larger than that of galinstan. An originality of the present study is that a poloidal disturbance (magnetic and velocity fields) is generated, allowing us to track its propagation from outside the conducting domain, hence without interfering.

  1. Experimental evidence of Alfvén wave propagation in a Gallium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alboussière, Thierry; Cardin, Philippe; Debray, François; La Rizza, Patrick; Masson, Jean-Paul; Plunian, Franck; Ribeiro, Adolfo; Schmitt, Denys

    2011-09-01

    Experiments with a liquid metal alloy, Galinstan, are reported and show clear evidence of Alfvén wave propagation as well as resonance of Alfvén modes. Galinstan is liquid at room temperature and, although its electrical conductivity is not as large as that of liquid sodium or NaK, it has still been possible to study Alfvén waves, thanks to the use of intense magnetic fields up to 13 T. The maximal values of Lundquist number, around 60, are similar to that of the reference experimental study by Jameson [J. Fluid Mech. 19, 513 (1964)]. The generation mechanism for Alfvén waves and their reflection is studied carefully. Numerical simulations have been performed and have been able to reproduce the experimental results, despite the fact that the simulated magnetic Prandtl number was much larger than that of Galinstan. An originality of the present study is that a poloidal disturbance (magnetic and velocity fields) is generated, allowing us to track its propagation from outside the conducting domain, hence without interfering.

  2. Evidence of low dimensional chaos in renal blood flow control in genetic and experimental hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, K.-P.; Marsh, D. J.; Holstein-Rathlou, N.-H.

    1995-01-01

    We applied a surrogate data technique to test for nonlinear structure in spontaneous fluctuations of hydrostatic pressure in renal tubules of hypertensive rats. Tubular pressure oscillates at 0.03-0.05 Hz in animals with normal blood pressure, but the fluctuations become irregular with chronic hypertension. Using time series from rats with hypertension we produced surrogate data sets to test whether they represent linearly correlated noise or ‘static’ nonlinear transforms of a linear stochastic process. The correlation dimension and the forecasting error were used as discriminating statistics to compare surrogate with experimental data. The results show that the original experimental time series can be distinguished from both linearly and static nonlinearly correlated noise, indicating that the nonlinear behavior is due to the intrinsic dynamics of the system. Together with other evidence this strongly suggests that a low dimensional chaotic attractor governs renal hemodynamics in hypertension. This appears to be the first demonstration of a transition to chaotic dynamics in an integrated physiological control system occurring in association with a pathological condition.

  3. State-dependent alpha peak frequency shifts: Experimental evidence, potential mechanisms and functional implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mierau, Andreas; Klimesch, Wolfgang; Lefebvre, Jérémie

    2017-09-30

    Neural populations produce complex oscillatory patterns thought to implement brain function. The dominant rhythm in the healthy adult human brain is formed by alpha oscillations with a typical power peak most commonly found between 8 and 12Hz. This alpha peak frequency has been repeatedly discussed as a highly heritable and stable neurophysiological "trait" marker reflecting anatomical properties of the brain, and individuals' general cognitive capacity. However, growing evidence suggests that the alpha peak frequency is highly volatile at shorter time scales, dependent on the individuals' "state". Based on the converging experimental and theoretical results from numerous recent studies, here we propose that alpha frequency variability forms the basis of an adaptive mechanism mirroring the activation level of neural populations which has important functional implications. We here integrate experimental and computational perspectives to shed new light on the potential role played by shifts in alpha peak frequency and discuss resulting implications. We further propose a potential mechanism by which alpha oscillations are regulated in a noisy network of spiking neurons in presence of delayed feedback. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Role of Chronic Inflammation in Myopia Progression: Clinical Evidence and Experimental Validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Ju Lin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Prevention and treatment of myopia is an important public problem worldwide. We found a higher incidence of myopia among patients with inflammatory diseases such as type 1 diabetes mellitus (7.9%, uveitis (3.7%, or systemic lupus erythematosus (3.5% compared to those without inflammatory diseases (p < 0.001 using data from children (<18 years old in the National Health Insurance Research database. We then examined the inhibition of myopia by atropine in Syrian hamsters with monocular form deprivation (MFD, an experimental myopia model. We found atropine downregulated inflammation in MFD eyes. The expression levels of c-Fos, nuclear factor κB (NFκB, interleukin (IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α were upregulated in myopic eyes and downregulated upon treatment with atropine. The relationship between the inflammatory response and myopia was investigated by treating MFD hamsters with the immunosuppressive agent cyclosporine A (CSA or the inflammatory stimulators lipopolysaccharide (LPS or peptidoglycan (PGN. Myopia progression was slowed by CSA application but was enhanced by LPS and PGN administration. The levels of c-Fos, NF-κB, IL-6, and TNF-α were upregulated in LPS- and PGN-treated eyes and downregulated by CSA treatment. These findings provide clinical and experimental evidence that inflammation plays a crucial role in the development of myopia.

  5. Experimental evidence and molecular modeling of the interaction between hRSV-NS1 and quercetin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Deriane Elias; Caruso, Ícaro Putinhon; de Araujo, Gabriela Campos; de Lourenço, Isabella Otenio; de Melo, Fernando Alves; Cornélio, Marinônio Lopes; Fossey, Marcelo Andrés; de Souza, Fátima Pereira

    2016-04-01

    Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus is one of the major causes of acute respiratory infections in children, causing bronchiolitis and pneumonia. Non-Structural Protein 1 (NS1) is involved in immune system evasion, a process that contributes to the success of hRSV replication. This protein can act by inhibiting or neutralizing several steps of interferon pathway, as well as by silencing the hRSV ribonucleoproteic complex. There is evidence that quercetin can reduce the infection and/or replication of several viruses, including RSV. The aims of this study include the expression and purification of the NS1 protein besides experimental and computational assays of the NS1-quercetin interaction. CD analysis showed that NS1 secondary structure composition is 30% alpha-helix, 21% beta-sheet, 23% turn and 26% random coils. The melting temperature obtained through DSC analysis was around 56°C. FRET analysis showed a distance of approximately 19Å between the NS1 and quercetin. Fluorescence titration results showed that the dissociation constant of the NS1-quercetin interaction was around 10(-6)M. In thermodynamic analysis, the enthalpy and entropy balanced forces indicated that the NS1-quercetin interaction presented both hydrophobic and electrostatic contributions. The computational results from the molecular modeling for NS1 structure and molecular docking regarding its interaction with quercetin corroborate the experimental data.

  6. Experimental evidence validating the computational inference of functional associations from gene fusion events: a critical survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Promponas, Vasilis J; Ouzounis, Christos A; Iliopoulos, Ioannis

    2014-05-01

    More than a decade ago, a number of methods were proposed for the inference of protein interactions, using whole-genome information from gene clusters, gene fusions and phylogenetic profiles. This structural and evolutionary view of entire genomes has provided a valuable approach for the functional characterization of proteins, especially those without sequence similarity to proteins of known function. Furthermore, this view has raised the real possibility to detect functional associations of genes and their corresponding proteins for any entire genome sequence. Yet, despite these exciting developments, there have been relatively few cases of real use of these methods outside the computational biology field, as reflected from citation analysis. These methods have the potential to be used in high-throughput experimental settings in functional genomics and proteomics to validate results with very high accuracy and good coverage. In this critical survey, we provide a comprehensive overview of 30 most prominent examples of single pairwise protein interaction cases in small-scale studies, where protein interactions have either been detected by gene fusion or yielded additional, corroborating evidence from biochemical observations. Our conclusion is that with the derivation of a validated gold-standard corpus and better data integration with big experiments, gene fusion detection can truly become a valuable tool for large-scale experimental biology.

  7. Photorespiratory bypasses lead to increased growth in Arabidopsis thaliana: Are predictions consistent with experimental evidence?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg eBasler

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Arguably the biggest challenge of modern plant systems biology lies in predicting the performance of plant species, and crops in particular, upon different intracellular and external perturbations. Recently, an increased growth of Arabidopsis thaliana plants was achieved by introducing two different photorespiratory bypasses via metabolic engineering. Here we investigate the extent to which these findings match the predictions from constraint-based modeling. To determine the effect of the employed metabolic network model on the predictions, we perform a comparative analysis involving three state-of-the-art metabolic reconstructions of Arabidopsis thaliana. In addition, we investigate three scenarios with respect to experimental findings on the ratios of the carboxylation and oxygenation reactions of RuBisCO. We demonstrate that the condition-dependent growth phenotypes of one of the engineered bypasses can be qualitatively reproduced by each reconstruction, particularly upon considering the additional constraints with respect to the ratio of fluxes for the RuBisCO reactions. Moreover, our results lend support for the hypothesis of a reduced photorespiration in the engineered plants, and indicate that specific changes in CO2 exchange as well as in the proxies for cofactor turnover are associated with the predicted growth increase in the engineered plants. We discuss our findings with respect to the structure of the used models, the modeling approaches taken, and the available experimental evidence. Our study sets the ground for investigating other strategies for increase of plant biomass by insertion of synthetic reactions.

  8. Timing vocal behaviour: experimental evidence for song overlap avoidance in Eurasian wrens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao-Jing; Ma, Xiang-Ru; Slabbekoorn, Hans

    2014-03-01

    Timing during vocal interactions can play a significant role in terms of audibility as signal overlap may lead to masking of acoustic details for both of the interacting animals as well as for third-party eavesdroppers. Here we investigated timing aspects experimentally in Eurasian wrens (Troglodytes troglodytes) using non-interactive playback. We applied a randomized overlay method incorporating the temporal pattern of singing by the focal bird to establish a null model and to test observed patterns of overlap against this null model. We used different stimulus song rates but temporal response patterns always resulted in significantly lower levels of overlap than expected by chance. The male wrens avoided overlapping by timing their song starts predominately right after the end of stimulus songs, but they did not avoid being overlapped by the stimulus songs. The territorial males typically raised their song rates during and after playback with a tendency to shorten between-song intervals while keeping song durations unchanged. Higher song rates of the playback stimuli increased the extent to which responders were being overlapped by the stimulus songs. Our data provide experimental evidence for a timing ability in Eurasian wrens by which they reduce mutual interference during vocal interactions.

  9. A novel transmembrane topology of presenilin based on reconciling experimental and computational evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henricson, Anna; Käll, Lukas; Sonnhammer, Erik L L

    2005-06-01

    The transmembrane topology of presenilins is still the subject of debate despite many experimental topology studies using antibodies or gene fusions. The results from these studies are partly contradictory and consequently several topology models have been proposed. Studies of presenilin-interacting proteins have produced further contradiction, primarily regarding the location of the C-terminus. It is thus impossible to produce a topology model that agrees with all published data on presenilin. We have analyzed the presenilin topology through computational sequence analysis of the presenilin family and the homologous presenilin-like protein family. Members of these families are intramembrane-cleaving aspartyl proteases. Although the overall sequence homology between the two families is low, they share the conserved putative active site residues and the conserved 'PAL' motif. Therefore, the topology model for the presenilin-like proteins can give some clues about the presenilin topology. Here we propose a novel nine-transmembrane topology with the C-terminus in the extracytosolic space. This model has strong support from published data on gamma-secretase function and presenilin topology. Contrary to most presenilin topology models, we show that hydrophobic region X is probably a transmembrane segment. Consequently, the C-terminus would be located in the extracytosolic space. However, the last C-terminal amino acids are relatively hydrophobic and in conjunction with existing experimental data we cannot exclude the possibility that the extreme C-terminus could be buried within the gamma-secretase complex. This might explain the difficulties in obtaining consistent experimental evidence regarding the location of the C-terminal region of presenilin.

  10. Biparental incubation-scheduling: no experimental evidence for major energetic constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulla, Martin; Cresswell, Will; Rutten, Anne L; Valcu, Mihai; Kempenaers, Bart

    2015-01-01

    Incubation is energetically demanding, but it is debated whether these demands constrain incubation-scheduling (i.e., the length, constancy, and timing of incubation bouts) in cases where both parents incubate. Using 2 methods, we experimentally reduced the energetic demands of incubation in the semipalmated sandpiper, a biparental shorebird breeding in the harsh conditions of the high Arctic. First, we decreased the demands of incubation for 1 parent only by exchanging 1 of the 4 eggs for an artificial egg that heated up when the focal bird incubated. Second, we reanalyzed the data from the only published experimental study that has explicitly tested energetic constraints on incubation-scheduling in a biparentally incubating species (Cresswell et al. 2003). In this experiment, the energetic demands of incubation were decreased for both parents by insulating the nest cup. We expected that the treated birds, in both experiments, would change the length of their incubation bouts, if biparental incubation-scheduling is energetically constrained. However, we found no evidence that heating or insulation of the nest affected the length of incubation bouts: the combined effect of both experiments was an increase in bout length of 3.6min (95% CI: -33 to 40), which is equivalent to a 0.5% increase in the length of the average incubation bout. These results demonstrate that the observed biparental incubation-scheduling in semipalmated sandpipers is not primarily driven by energetic constraints and therefore by the state of the incubating bird, implying that we still do not understand the factors driving biparental incubation-scheduling.

  11. Experimental evidence of spatial memory and home range affinity in White-tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    The role of spatial memory in the movement of animals through landscapes remains elusive. To examine spatial memory and home range affinity of White-tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in northeastern Minnesota during 1995–2007, I translocated 17 adult does with known home ranges to unfamiliar sites and radio-tracked them after their release. Twelve does wearing transmitting radio-collars returned to their home ranges. Death and collar expiration precluded determination of whether the remaining five does would have returned to home ranges. Three of five does wearing global positioning system collars traveled throughout hundreds of square kilometres, circling, backtracking, and returning to release sites, while two others exhibited directional movement for tens of kilometres. Four does that survived to parturition stopped traveling and moved at hourly rates similar to those of control does during the first three weeks of the typical fawn-rearing period, but continued traveling later. Their aberrant extensive travel before and after interruption by parturition suggests that they recognized they were in unfamiliar areas, demonstrating both their capacity and propensity to search for and occupy the familiar space of their individual home ranges. Their successful return to home ranges provided experimental evidence of spatial memory and further elucidated its pervasive role in White-tailed Deer spatial ecology.

  12. Experimental evidence of the thermal effect of lubricating oil sprayed in sliding-vane air compressors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Valenti

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A way to increase the efficiency of positive-displacement air compressor is spraying the lube oil to exploit it not only as lubricating and sealing agent but also as thermal ballast. This work seeks the experimental evidence in sliding-vane compressors by measuring the air standard volume flow rate and the electrical power input of three diverse configurations. The first configuration, taken as the reference, employs a conventional injection system comprising calibrated straight orifices. The other two, referred to as advanced, adopt smaller orifices and pressure-swirl full-cone nozzles designed for the purpose; the third configuration utilizes a pump to boost the oil pressure. The laser imagining technique shows that the nozzles generate sprays that break-up within a short distance into spherical droplets, ligaments, ramifications and undefined structures. Tests on the packaged compressors reveal that the advanced configurations provide almost the same air flow rate while utilizing half of the oil because the sprays generate a good sealing. Moreover, the sprayed oil is acting as a thermal ballast because the electrical input is reduced by 3.5% and 3.0%, respectively, if the pump is present or not , while the specific energy requirement, accounting for the slightly reduced air flow, by 2.4% and 2.9%, respectively.

  13. Infectivity of DWV associated to flower pollen: experimental evidence of a horizontal transmission route.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Mazzei

    Full Text Available Deformed wing virus (DWV is a honeybee pathogen whose presence is generally associated with infestation of the colony by the mite Varroa destructor, leading to the onset of infections responsible for the collapse of the bee colony. DWV contaminates bee products such as royal jelly, bee-bread and honey stored within the infected hive. Outside the hive, DWV has been found in pollen loads collected directly from infected as well as uninfected forager bees. It has been shown that the introduction of virus-contaminated pollen into a DWV-free hive results in the production of virus-contaminated food, whose role in the development of infected bees from virus-free eggs has been experimentally demonstrated. The aim of this study was twofold: (i to ascertain the presence of DWV on pollen collected directly from flowers visited by honeybees and then quantify the viral load and (ii determine whether the virus associated with pollen is infective. The results of our investigation provide evidence that DWV is present on pollen sampled directly from visited flowers and that, following injection in individuals belonging to the pollinator species Apis mellifera, it is able to establish an active infection, as indicated by the presence of replicating virus in the head of the injected bees. We also provide the first indication that the pollinator species Osmia cornuta is susceptible to DWV infection.

  14. Experimental evidence for paternal effects on offspring growth rate in Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilertsen, Eirik Mack; Bårdsen, Bård-Jørgen; Liljedal, Ståle; Rudolfsen, Geir; Folstad, Ivar

    2009-01-07

    Sexual selection theory predicts that females should choose males that signal viability and quality. However, few studies have found fitness benefits among females mating with highly ornamented males. Here, we use Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus), a teleost fish with no parental care, to investigate whether females could gain fitness benefits by mating with highly ornamented and large-sized males. Carotenoid-based coloration signalled by males during spawning is believed to be an indicator of good genes for this species. Paternal effects on offspring size (body length and dry body mass) were examined experimentally by crossing eggs and sperm in vitro from 12 females and 24 males in a split-brood design and raising larvae to 30 days past hatching. We clearly demonstrated that there was a relationship between offspring size and paternal coloration. However, a negative interaction between paternal length and coloration was evident for offspring length, indicating that positive effects of paternal coloration were only present for smaller males. Thus, the red spawning coloration of the male Arctic charr seems to be an indicator of good genes, but the effect of paternal coloration on offspring length, an indicator of 'offspring quality', is size dependent.

  15. Proprioceptive dysfunction in focal dystonia: from experimental evidence to rehabilitation strategies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura eAvanzino

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Dystonia has historically been considered a disorder of the basal ganglia, mainly affecting planning and execution of voluntary movements. This notion comes from the observation that most lesions responsible for secondary dystonia involve the basal ganglia. However, what emerges from recent research is that dystonia is linked to the dysfunction of a complex neural network that comprises basal ganglia-thalamic-frontal cortex, but also the inferior parietal cortex and the cerebellum. While dystonia is clearly a motor problem, it turned out that sensory aspects are also fundamental, especially those related to proprioception.We outline experimental evidence for proprioceptive dysfunction in focal dystonia from intrinsic sensory abnormalities to impaired sensorimotor integration, that is the process by which sensory information is used to plan and execute volitional movements. Particularly, we will focus on proprioceptive aspects of dystonia, including: i processing of vibratory input, ii temporal discrimination of two passive movements, iii multimodal integration of visual-tactile and proprioceptive inputs and, iv motor control in the absence of visual feedback. We suggest that these investigations contribute not only to a better understanding of dystonia pathophysiology, but also to develop rehabilitation strategies aimed at facilitating the processing of proprioceptive input.

  16. Smectite clays in Mars soil - Evidence for their presence and role in Viking biology experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banin, A.; Rishpon, J.

    1979-01-01

    Evidence for the presence of smectite clays in Martian soils is reviewed and results of experiments with certain active clays simulating the Viking biology experiments are reported. Analyses of Martian soil composition by means of X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and dust storm spectroscopy and Martian geological history strongly suggest the presence of a mixture of weathered ferro-silicate minerals, mainly nontronite and montmorillonite, accompanied by soluble sulphate salts, as major constituents. Samples of montmorillonite and nontronite incubated with (C-14)-formate or the radioactive nutrient medium solution used in the Viking Labeled Release experiment, were found to produce patterns of release of radioactive gas very similar to those observed in the Viking experiments, indicating the iron-catalyzed decomposition of formate as the reaction responsible for the Viking results. The experimental results of Hubbard (1979) simulating the results of the Viking Pyrolytic Release experiment using iron montmorillonites are pointed out, and it is concluded that many of the results of the Viking biology experiments can be explained in terms of the surface activity of smectite clays in catalysis and adsorption.

  17. Experimental evidence that microbial activity lowers the albedo of glacier surfaces: the cryoconite casserole experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musilova, M.; Tranter, M.; Takeuchi, N.; Anesio, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    Darkened glacier and ice sheet surfaces have lower albedos, absorb more solar radiation and consequently melt more rapidly. The increase in glacier surface darkening is an important positive feedback to warming global temperatures, leading to ever growing world-wide ice mass loss. Most studies focus primarily on glacial albedo darkening caused by the physical properties of snow and ice surfaces, and the deposition of dark impurities on glaciers. To date, however, the important effects of biological activity have not been included in most albedo reduction models. This study provides the first experimental evidence that microbial activity can significantly decrease the albedo of glacier surfaces. An original laboratory experiment, the cryoconite casserole, was designed to test the microbial darkening of glacier surface debris (cryoconite) under simulated Greenlandic summer conditions. It was found that minor fertilisation of the cryoconite (at nutrient concentrations typical of glacial ice melt) stimulated extensive microbial activity. Microbes intensified their organic carbon fixation and even mined phosphorous out of the glacier surface sediment. Furthermore, the microbial organic carbon production, accumulation and transformation caused the glacial debris to darken further by 17.3% reflectivity (albedo analogue). These experiments are consistent with the hypothesis that enhanced fertilisation by anthropogenic inputs results in substantial amounts of organic carbon fixation, debris darkening and ultimately to a considerable decrease in the ice albedo of glacier surfaces on global scales. The sizeable amounts of microbially produced glacier surface organic matter and nutrients can thus be a vital source of bioavailable nutrients for subglacial and downstream environments.

  18. Spontaneous Time Symmetry Breaking in System with Mixed Strategy Nash Equilibrium: Evidences in Experimental Economics Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhijian; Xu, Bin; Zhejiang Collaboration

    2011-03-01

    In social science, laboratory experiment with human subjects' interaction is a standard test-bed for studying social processes in micro level. Usually, as in physics, the processes near equilibrium are suggested as stochastic processes with time-reversal symmetry (TRS). To the best of our knowledge, near equilibrium, the breaking time symmetry, as well as the existence of robust time anti-symmetry processes, has not been reported clearly in experimental economics till now. By employing Markov transition method to analysis the data from human subject 2x2 Games with wide parameters and mixed Nash equilibrium, we study the time symmetry of the social interaction process near Nash equilibrium. We find that, the time symmetry is broken, and there exists a robust time anti-symmetry processes. We also report the weight of the time anti-symmetry processes in the total processes of each the games. Evidences in laboratory marketing experiments, at the same time, are provided as one-dimension cases. In these cases, time anti-symmetry cycles can also be captured. The proposition of time anti-symmetry processes is small, but the cycles are distinguishable.

  19. The fishermen were right: experimental evidence for tributary refuge hypothesis during floods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, Itsuro; Kanazawa, Yukiyo; Tanaka, Yuuki

    2013-05-01

    Fishermen often anecdotally report an unexpected increase of fish caught in small tributary streams during floods, presumably due to refuge-seeking behavior from the main stem. From a population perspective, this implies the significance of refuge habitats and connectivity for population viability against natural disturbances. Despite the plausibility, however, surprisingly few studies have examined the tributary refuge hypothesis, mainly due to the difficulty in field survey during floods. Here, we made use of a large-scale controlled flood to assess whether fishes move into tributaries during flooding in the main stem. A planned water release from the Satsunai River Dam located on Hokkaido Island in Japan rapidly increased the main stem discharge by more than 20-fold. Before, during, and after flooding censuses in four tributaries provided evidence of the refuge-seeking behavior of fishes from the main stem. For example, more than 10 Dolly Varden char, a salmonid fish, were caught in a tributary during the flood, even though almost no individuals were captured before or after the flood. The fish responded immediately to the flooding, suggesting the need for studies during disturbances. In addition, the likelihood of refuge movements varied among tributaries, suggesting the importance of local environmental differences between tributary and the main stem habitats. This is the first study to experimentally confirm the tributary refuge hypothesis, and underscores the roles of habitat diversity and connectivity during disturbances, even though some habitats are not used during normal conditions.

  20. Evident?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plant, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Quality assurance and evidence in career guidance in Europe are often seen as self-evident approaches, but particular interests lie behind......Quality assurance and evidence in career guidance in Europe are often seen as self-evident approaches, but particular interests lie behind...

  1. Ultra-deep Subduction of Continental Crust: Evidence from Natural Rocks and Experimental Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrzhinetskaya, L.; Green, H. W.

    2005-12-01

    Much of what we know about the deep subduction of continental crust is gained from study of the mineralogy of ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic (UHPM) rocks incorporated within continent-continent collision belts. UHPM rocks of metasedimentary origin were only recently recognized due to discovery of coesite, diamond, titanite inferred to have contained six-fold coordinated Si before exsolution of coesite, and TiO2 with alpha-PbO2 structure. Modern seismic tomography provides remarkable images that suggest lithospheric plates are subducted to the core-mantle boundary and may remain there stagnated during long geological times; the presence of continental material within such plates cannot be excluded. The mineral phase transformations possible within deeply subducted continental crust have been the subject of intensive laboratory experimentation during the last decade. Though many new UHP minerals were synthesized at P~ 6 to >20 GPa (e.g., wadeite, topaz-OH, phase Egg, K- and Na-hollandite) in the KNASH, KASH and ASH chemical systems, none except topaz-OH has yet been identified in UHPM rocks. The microstructural evidence of former majoritic garnet decompression is proven only for garnet peridotite, whereas no evidence of such structures has been reported yet from diamondiferous felsic rocks. It is not clear if this is because the UHPM minerals of felsic rocks are easily lost during retrograde metamorphism, or if this is because garnets crystallized in the felsic systems do not contain a large majoritic component at high pressures. There is no clear indication of what portion of subducted continental crust is returned back to Earth's surface, and what fraction may have become more dense than mantle rocks and sunk down to the mantle transition zone and even deeper. Is there any connection between mantle plumes and deeply subducted continental rocks? The UHPM discipline would also benefit from new experiments designed to reproduce decompression structures of UHP minerals

  2. Evidence of experimental vertical transmission of emerging novel ECSA genotype of Chikungunya Virus in Aedes aegypti.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankita Agarwal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chikungunya virus (CHIKV has emerged as one of the most important arboviruses of public health significance in the past decade. The virus is mainly maintained through human-mosquito-human cycle. Other routes of transmission and the mechanism of maintenance of the virus in nature are not clearly known. Vertical transmission may be a mechanism of sustaining the virus during inter-epidemic periods. Laboratory experiments were conducted to determine whether Aedes aegypti, a principal vector, is capable of vertically transmitting CHIKV or not. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Female Ae. aegypti were orally infected with a novel ECSA genotype of CHIKV in the 2nd gonotrophic cycle. On day 10 post infection, a non-infectious blood meal was provided to obtain another cycle of eggs. Larvae and adults developed from the eggs obtained following both infectious and non-infectious blood meal were tested for the presence of CHIKV specific RNA through real time RT-PCR. The results revealed that the larvae and adults developed from eggs derived from the infectious blood meal (2nd gonotrophic cycle were negative for CHIKV RNA. However, the larvae and adults developed after subsequent non-infectious blood meal (3rd gonotrophic cycle were positive with minimum filial infection rates of 28.2 (1∶35.5 and 20.2 (1∶49.5 respectively. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This study is the first to confirm experimental vertical transmission of emerging novel ECSA genotype of CHIKV in Ae. aegypti from India, indicating the possibilities of occurrence of this phenomenon in nature. This evidence may have important consequence for survival of CHIKV during adverse climatic conditions and inter-epidemic periods.

  3. Designing a light fabric metamaterial being highly macroscopically tough under directional extension: first experimental evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    dell'Isola, Francesco; Lekszycki, Tomasz; Pawlikowski, Marek; Grygoruk, Roman; Greco, Leopoldo

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we study a metamaterial constructed with an isotropic material organized following a geometric structure which we call pantographic lattice. This relatively complex fabric was studied using a continuous model (which we call pantographic sheet) by Rivlin and Pipkin and includes two families of flexible fibers connected by internal pivots which are, in the reference configuration, orthogonal. A rectangular specimen having one side three times longer than the other is cut at 45° with respect to the fibers in reference configuration, and it is subjected to large-deformation plane-extension bias tests imposing a relative displacement of shorter sides. The continuum model used, the presented numerical models and the extraordinary advancements of the technology of 3D printing allowed for the design of some first experiments, whose preliminary results are shown and seem to be rather promising. Experimental evidence shows three distinct deformation regimes. In the first regime, the equilibrium total deformation energy depends quadratically on the relative displacement of terminal specimen sides: Applied resultant force depends linearly on relative displacement. In the second regime, the applied force varies nonlinearly on relative displacement, but the behavior remains elastic. In the third regime, damage phenomena start to occur until total failure, but the exerted resultant force continues to be increasing and reaches a value up to several times larger than the maximum shown in the linear regime before failure actually occurs. Moreover, the total energy needed to reach structural failure is larger than the maximum stored elastic energy. Finally, the volume occupied by the material in the fabric is a small fraction of the total volume, so that the ratio weight/resistance to extension is very advantageous. The results seem to require a refinement of the used theoretical and numerical methods to transform the presented concept into a promising technological

  4. Experimental evidence for thermal generation of interstitials in a metallic crystal near the melting temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safonova, E. V.; Mitrofanov, Yu P.; Konchakov, R. A.; Vinogradov, A. Yu; Kobelev, N. P.; Khonik, V. A.

    2016-06-01

    The only intrinsic point defects of simple crystalline metals known from solid state physics are vacancies and interstitials. It is widely believed that while vacancies play a major role in crystal properties and their concentration reaches relatively big values near the melting temperature T m, interstitials essentially do not occur in thermodynamic equilibrium and their influence on properties is minor. Here, taking aluminum single crystals as an example, we present compelling experimental evidence for rapid thermoactivated growth of interstitial concentration upon approaching T m. Using high precision measurements of the shear modulus we found a diaelastic effect of up to -1.5% near T m. It is argued that this effect is mostly due to the generation of dumbbell (split) interstitials. The interstitial concentration c i rapidly increases upon approaching T m and becomes only 2-3 times smaller than that of vacancies just below T m. The reason for this c i -increase is conditioned by a decrease of the Gibbs free energy with temperature, which in turn originates from the high formation entropy of dumbbell interstitials and a decrease of their formation enthalpy at high c i . Special molecular dynamic simulation confirmed all basic aspects of the proposed interpretation. The results obtained (i) demonstrate the significance of interstitial concentration near T m that could lead to the revaluation of vacancy concentration at high temperatures, (ii) suggest that dumbbell interstitials play a major role in the melting mechanism of monatomic metallic crystals and (iii) support a new avenue for in-depth understanding of glassy metals.

  5. Individual benefits of nestling begging: experimental evidence for an immediate effect, but no evidence for a delayed effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessells, C Kate M; Riebel, Katharina; Draganoiu, Tudor Ion

    2011-06-23

    The evolutionary stability of honest signalling by offspring is thought to require that begging displays be costly, so the costs and benefits of begging--and whether they are experienced individually or by the whole brood--are crucial to understanding the evolution of begging behaviour. Begging is known to have immediate individual benefits (parents distribute more food to intensely begging individuals) and delayed brood benefits (parents increase provisioning rate to the brood), but the possibility of delayed individual benefits (previous begging affects the current distribution of food) has rarely, if ever, been researched. We did this using playback of great tit Parus major chick begging and a control sound from either side of the nest. Male parents fed chicks close to the speaker more when great tit chick begging, but not other stimuli, was played back. In contrast, there was no effect of playback at the previous visit on the chicks that male parents fed. We have thus demonstrated an immediate individual benefit to begging, but found no evidence of a delayed individual benefit in this species.

  6. Are bilingualism effects on the L1 byproducts of implicit knowledge? Evidence from two experimental tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Augusto de Souza

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Estudos experimentais em Linguística apoiam-se em dados oriundos de desempenho de participantes em tarefas linguísticas. Portanto, a compreensão dos construtos abordados por tais tarefas é fundamental para a interpretação dos resultados gerados pelo trabalho experimental. Neste estudo, explora-se questões trazidas por um estudo previamente publicado baseado em uma tarefa de julgamento de gramaticalidade temporizada que não replicou evidências anteriormente relatadas acerca de efeitos de interações translinguísticas no processamento bilíngue de construções de estrutura argumental que não fazem parte do repertório construcional da L1 dos bilíngues. Apesar da tarefa de julgamento de gramaticalidade temporizada ter sido defendida como uma medida válida de conhecimento linguístico implícito, resenha-se estudos psicométricos recentes que põem este pressuposto em dúvida, ao mostrar que tal tarefa ou não captura conhecimento implícito, ou não o captura tão completamente quanto o fazem tarefas psicolinguísticas de processamento online. Neste estudo, conduz-se dois experimentos com a mesma amostra de sujeitos. Um dos experimentos empregou uma tarefa de processamento online, e o outro empregou uma tarefa de julgamento de gramaticalidade temporizada. Nessas tarefas, sentenças em português do Brasil que emulavam o comportamento linguístico da construção resultativa do inglês constituíram os itens alvo. Relata-se resultados que mostram a discrepância de observações geradas pelos dois tipos de tarefa, com somente a tarefa de processamento online revelando os aparentes efeitos da L2 sobre o desempenho linguístico da L1. Interpreta-se os resultados como sugestivos de que o local das interações translinguísticas de bilíngues é majoritariamente nos processos implícitos.

  7. Metal loading effect on rare earth element binding to humic acid: Experimental and modelling evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsac, Rémi; Davranche, Mélanie; Gruau, Gérard; Dia, Aline

    2010-03-01

    The effect of metal loading on the binding of rare earth elements (REE) to humic acid (HA) was studied by combining ultrafiltration and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry techniques. REE-HA complexation experiments were performed at pH 3 for REE/C molar ratios ranging from ca 4 × 10 -4 to 2.7 × 10 -2. Results show that the relative amount of REE bound to HA strongly increases with decreasing REE/C. A middle-REE (MREE) downward concavity is shown by patterns at high metal loading, whereas patterns at low metal loading display a regular increase from La to Lu. Humic Ion Model VI modelling are close to the experimental data variations, provided that (i) the ΔLK 2 parameter (i.e. the Model VI parameter taken into account the presence of strong but low density binding sites) is allowed to increase regularly from La to Lu (from 1.1 to 2.1) and (ii) the published log KMA values (i.e. the REE-HA binding constants specific to Model VI) are slightly modified, in particular with respect to heavy REE. Modelling approach provided evidence that logKdREE patterns with varying REE/C likely arises because REE binding to HA occurs through two types of binding sites in different density: (i) a few strong sites that preferentially complex the heavy REE and thus control the logKdREE atterns at low REE/C; (ii) a larger amount of weaker binding sites that preferentially complex the middle-REE and thus control the logKdREE pattern at high REE/C. Hence, metal loading exerts a major effect on HA-mediated REE binding, which could explain the diversity of published conditional constants for REE binding with HA. A literature survey suggests that the few strong sites activated at low REE/C could be multidentate carboxylic sites, or perhaps N-, or P-functional groups. Finally, an examination of the literature field data proposed that the described loading effect could account for much of the variation in REE patterns observed in natural organic-rich waters (DOC > 5 mg L -1 and 4

  8. Pursuing Quality Evidence: Applying Single-Subject Quality Indicators to Non-Experimental Qualitative Educational Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stodden, Robert A.; Yamamoto, Kathryn K.; Folk, Eric; Kong, Eran; Otsuji, Derek N.

    2013-01-01

    The need for quality evidence in support of strategies used while working with persons with autism and intellectual disability (ID) has been long been recognized by researchers and practitioners. The authors reviewed and applied a number of evidence-based indicators, developed through the "What Works Clearinghouse" (WWC), to the conduct…

  9. Experimental evidence that changes in mood cause changes in body dissatisfaction among undergraduate women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haedt-Matt, Alissa A; Zalta, Alyson K; Forbush, Kelsie T; Keel, Pamela K

    2012-03-01

    Previous research has found concurrent and prospective associations between negative mood and body dissatisfaction; however, only experimental research can establish causal relationships. This study utilized an experimental design to examine the influence of negative mood on body dissatisfaction. Undergraduate women were randomly assigned to an experimental or control condition. Participants in the experimental condition (n=21) completed a negative mood induction procedure. Participants in the control condition (n=24) completed a neutral mood procedure. All participants completed visual analog scales regarding their mood and satisfaction with weight and shape before and after each manipulation. Body dissatisfaction increased following the procedure for experimental but not control participants, suggesting that negative mood caused increased body dissatisfaction. In cultures that idealize thinness, body dissatisfaction may arise from funneling general feelings of dysphoria into more concrete and culturally meaningful negative feelings about the body.

  10. Experimental evidence of total absorption by a thin absorbing layer deposited on a patterned metallic surface

    CERN Document Server

    Díaz-Rubio, Ana; Carbonell, Jorge; Sánchez-Dehesa, José

    2014-01-01

    This work presents the experimental demonstration of total absorption by a metal-dielectric metasurface. Following the theoretical proposal [A. D\\'iaz-Rubio et al. Phys. Rev. B 89, 245123 (2014)], we fabricated a metasurface consisting of a low absorbing dielectric layer (made of FR4) deposited on top of a metallic surface patterned with a square distribution of coaxial cavities. For P-polarized waves, it is observed a low frequency peak with perfect absorption. The behavior of this peak has been experimentally characterized for different dielectric layer thicknesses, coaxial cavity lengths and incidence angles. The experimental results are in excellent agreement with numerical simulation and support the previous theoretical findings.

  11. Experimental Evidence Linking Elevated CO2, Rhizosphere C/N Stoichiometry and Microbial Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo, Y.; Dijkstra, F. A.; Pendall, E.; LeCain, D. R.; Morgan, J.

    2012-12-01

    expected to be more efficient in their C use. Decreasing the C/N ratio of roots decreased SOM respiration and increased the efficiency of SOM-consuming microbes. Direct N additions had a similar but stronger effect. Increased C efficiency with greater nutrient availability is consistent with theoretical expectations of C utilization under nutrient limitation. Notably, the response of C use to N treatments occurred only under eCO2 conditions. This functional contrast was supported by differential responses of microbial PLFA profiles to N treatments under CO2 treatments. Together, these results suggest that the eCO2 environment was more conducive to N limitation, via changes in microbial community structure and function. Our results provide direct experimental evidence of plant-mediated alteration of decomposer C efficiency due to changes in atmospheric CO2 and N availability from both plant and soil sources. An increase in SOM-consuming microbes efficiency in an eCO2 world is likely to have important ecosystem-level implications as it could enhance the amount of C that remains in soil relative to the amount released to the atmosphere. The interactive effects of CO2 and N treatments suggest that microbial efficiency will be more sensitive to changes in nutrient status under the future eCO2 atmosphere.

  12. Experimental evidence on RH-dependent crossover from an electronic to protonic conduction with an oscillatory behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solanki, Vanaraj; Krupanidhi, S. B.; Nanda, K. K.

    2017-06-01

    An oxide semiconductor changes its resistance with exposure of water molecules and is accepted to be governed by electronic and protonic conduction in low and high humid atmosphere, respectively, without any experimental evidences. Here, we report on the experimental evidence of a relative humidity (RH) dependent crossover, from an electronic to protonic conduction and its oscillatory behaviour in mesoporous SnO2. Interestingly, oscillatory conduction observed in the intermediate humidity range (70%-90% RH) lies in between two monotonic variations that substantiate the competitive adsorption and desorption processes of oxygen species and water molecules. In addition, we have shown that the conduction process can be tuned predominantly electronic or protonic by pre- and post-UV treatment. The conductance increases by 2-3 orders as the conduction changes from pure electronic to protonic, suggesting an insulator-to-metal like transition.

  13. Evidence for a cage effect in the UV photolysis of HBr in ArHBr. Theoretical and experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segall, J.; Wen, Y.; Singer, R.; Wittig, C.; García-Vela, A.; Gerber, R. B.

    1993-05-01

    Evidence for a cage effect in the 193 nm photodissociation of HBr in the ArHBr cluster is found. This effect manifests itself as a tail extending toward lower energies in the hydrogen photofragment kinetic energy distribution (KED). This is a consequence of energy transfer in collisions between the light and the heavy atoms. There is good agreement between the experimental and theoretical KEDs.

  14. Experimental and Theoretical Evidence for U(C6H6) and Th(C6H6) Complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Infante, Ivan Antonio; Raab, Juraj; Lyon, Jonathan T.; Liang, Binyong; Andrews, Lester; Gagliardi, Laura

    2007-01-01

    The vibrational spectra of UBz and ThBz have been measured in solid argon. Complementary quantum chemical calculations have allowed the assignments of the vibrational spectra. According to the calculations, AcBz are stable molecules, as well as other species like BzAcBz and BzAc2Bz. Experimentally, there is no evidence for the sandwich compounds BzAcBz and BzAc2Bz due to the limitations in the reagent concentrations.

  15. Scientific reasoning in early and middle childhood: the development of domain-general evidence evaluation, experimentation, and hypothesis generation skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piekny, Jeanette; Maehler, Claudia

    2013-06-01

    According to Klahr's (2000, 2005; Klahr & Dunbar, 1988) Scientific Discovery as Dual Search model, inquiry processes require three cognitive components: hypothesis generation, experimentation, and evidence evaluation. The aim of the present study was to investigate (a) when the ability to evaluate perfect covariation, imperfect covariation, and non-covariation evidence emerges, (b) when experimentation emerges, (c) when hypothesis generation skills emerge, and (d), whether these abilities develop synchronously during childhood. We administered three scientific reasoning tasks referring to the three components to 223 children of five age groups (from age 4.0 to 13.5 years). Our results show that the three cognitive components of domain-general scientific reasoning emerge asynchronously. The development of domain-general scientific reasoning begins with the ability to handle unambiguous data, progresses to the interpretation of ambiguous data, and leads to a flexible adaptation of hypotheses according to the sufficiency of evidence. When children understand the relation between the level of ambiguity of evidence and the level of confidence in hypotheses, the ability to differentiate conclusive from inconclusive experiments accompanies this development. Implications of these results for designing science education concepts for young children are briefly discussed. © 2012 The British Psychological Society.

  16. FORMULAE FOR AVERAGE VELOCITY OF GROUNDWATER FLOW AND EXPERIMENTAL EVIDENCE OF NON-DARCY'S FLOW THROUGH A SINGLE FRACTURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian Jia-zhong; Wang Jia-quan; Li Ru-zhong; Liu Yong

    2003-01-01

    The formulae for average velocity of groundwater flow in a single fracture were derived based on the characteristics of fracture properties and hydraulic methods. The results show that the average velocity is proportional to the square root of the hydraulic gradient. In order to verify the results, a laboratory model was established, and the experimental data were analyzed. Experimental results indicate that the relation between the average velocity and hydraulic gradient is nonlinear, and can be fitted with power functions. And for both the unconfined and confined flows, the value of the exponent of power functions are close to 0.5. Thus the experimental results agree well with those from the theoretical analysis. By comparing the calculated and measured values of the average velocity under the same conditions, the formulae presented herein are more effective than the traditional formula based on Darcy's Law. These results provide the evidences of non-Darcy's flow in single fracture.

  17. The Modulation of Pain by Circadian and Sleep-Dependent Processes: A Review of the Experimental Evidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagenauer, Megan; Crodelle, Jennifer; Piltz, Sofia Helena

    2017-01-01

    conditions, pain sensitivity varies across the 24 h day, with highest sensitivity occurring during the evening in humans. Pain sensitivity is also modulated by sleep behavior, with pain sensitivity increasing in response to the build-up of homeostatic sleep pressure following sleep deprivation or sleep...... disruption. To explore the interaction between these two biological processes using modeling, we first compare the magnitude of their effects across a variety of experimental pain studies in humans. To do this comparison, we normalize the results from experimental pain studies relative to the range...... of physiologically meaningful stimulation levels. Following this normalization, we find that the estimated impact of the daily rhythm and of sleep deprivation on experimental pain measurements is surprisingly consistent across different pain modalities. We also review evidence documenting the impact of circadian...

  18. On the power of confession evidence: an experimental test of the fundamental difference hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassin, S M; Neumann, K

    1997-10-01

    In Arizona v. Fulminante (1991), a U.S. Supreme Court majority stated that confessions are similar to, not fundamentally different from, other types of evidence. To evaluate this claim, three mock juror studies compared the impact of confessions to other common forms of evidence. In Experiment 1, participants read summaries of four criminal trials (murder, rape, assault, theft), each of which contained a confession, an eyewitness identification, character testimony, or none of the above. Significantly, the confessions produced the highest conviction rates. In Experiments 2 and 3, participants read a murder or assault trial containing all three types of evidence and made a series of midtrial judgments. Results indicated that the confession was seen as the most incriminating, followed by the eyewitness and character testimony. Although the comparisons we made are limited in certain respects, our findings suggest that confessions are uniquely potent.

  19. Qualitative Experimental Evidences for the thermal Wave Mechanisms of temperature Oscillations in Living Tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JingLiu; XingguoSun; 等

    1996-01-01

    To make it possible for the thermal wave theory on temperature oscillation (TO)effects in living tissues to be founded on the substantial experimental basis,a series of typical decisive experiments in vivo as well as in artificially simulating costructions were carred out.COnclusions obtained including some other scholars animal experimental results all greatly support the thermal wave viewpoint qualitatively,A few experimental facts used not to be easily understood from the classical viewpoint are also well reinterpreted.The revealing on the thermal wave mechanisms of TO in living tissues is a brand new discovery and deep insight into this important thermophysiological phenomenon,It may possibly promote new investigations on the corresponding topics in the field of bioheat transfer science.

  20. The price elasticity of demand for heroin: matched longitudinal and experimental evidence#

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmstead, Todd A.; Alessi, Sheila M.; Kline, Brendan; Pacula, Rosalie Liccardo; Petry, Nancy M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports estimates of the price elasticity of demand for heroin based on a newly constructed dataset. The dataset has two matched components concerning the same sample of regular heroin users: longitudinal information about real-world heroin demand (actual price and actual quantity at daily intervals for each heroin user in the sample) and experimental information about laboratory heroin demand (elicited by presenting the same heroin users with scenarios in a laboratory setting). Two empirical strategies are used to estimate the price elasticity of demand for heroin. The first strategy exploits the idiosyncratic variation in the price experienced by a heroin user over time that occurs in markets for illegal drugs. The second strategy exploits the experimentally-induced variation in price experienced by a heroin user across experimental scenarios. Both empirical strategies result in the estimate that the conditional price elasticity of demand for heroin is approximately −0.80. PMID:25702687

  1. The price elasticity of demand for heroin: Matched longitudinal and experimental evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmstead, Todd A; Alessi, Sheila M; Kline, Brendan; Pacula, Rosalie Liccardo; Petry, Nancy M

    2015-05-01

    This paper reports estimates of the price elasticity of demand for heroin based on a newly constructed dataset. The dataset has two matched components concerning the same sample of regular heroin users: longitudinal information about real-world heroin demand (actual price and actual quantity at daily intervals for each heroin user in the sample) and experimental information about laboratory heroin demand (elicited by presenting the same heroin users with scenarios in a laboratory setting). Two empirical strategies are used to estimate the price elasticity of demand for heroin. The first strategy exploits the idiosyncratic variation in the price experienced by a heroin user over time that occurs in markets for illegal drugs. The second strategy exploits the experimentally induced variation in price experienced by a heroin user across experimental scenarios. Both empirical strategies result in the estimate that the conditional price elasticity of demand for heroin is approximately -0.80.

  2. Experimental Evidence of Two-Proton Emissions from lSNe Excited State

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA Fei; LIN Cheng-Jian; ZHANG Huan-Qiao; YANG Feng; JIA Hui-Ming; XU Xin-Xing; WU Zhen-Dong; LIU Zu-Hua; ZHANG Gao-Long; ZHANG Chun-Lei

    2009-01-01

    Experiment 18 Ne+197 Au was performed in Heavy Ion Research Facility Radioactive Ion Beam Line at Lanzhou (RIBLL).The nuclear energy levels of 18 Ne were built by complete kinematical reconstruction of the decay products and diproton decay were observed from 18 Ne excited states.At 6.15 MeV,the experimental relative momentum and angular correlations of the emitted protons are given. The obvious enhancement at |qrel| =23 MeV/c and θc.m.= 40° shows the experimental criterion of 2 He duster decay from 18 Neq.

  3. Income Mobility Breeds Tolerance for Income Inequality: Cross-National and Experimental Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariff, Azim F; Wiwad, Dylan; Aknin, Lara B

    2016-05-01

    American politicians often justify income inequality by referencing the opportunities people have to move between economic stations. Though past research has shown associations between income mobility and resistance to wealth redistribution policies, no experimental work has tested whether perceptions of mobility influence tolerance for inequality. In this article, we present a cross-national comparison showing that income mobility is associated with tolerance for inequality and experimental work demonstrating that perceptions of higher mobility directly affect attitudes toward inequality. We find support for both the prospect of upward mobility and the view that peoples' economic station is the product of their own efforts, as mediating mechanisms.

  4. Experimental evidence of skyrmion-like configurations in bilayer nanodisks with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stebliy, Maxim E., E-mail: stebliyme@gmail.com; Kolesnikov, Alexander G.; Davydenko, Alexander V.; Ognev, Alexey V.; Samardak, Alexander S.; Chebotkevich, Ludmila A. [Laboratory of Thin Film Technologies, School of Natural Sciences, Far Eastern Federal University, Vladivostok 690950 (Russian Federation)

    2015-05-07

    Formation and existence of magnetic skyrmion-like configurations in bilayer nanodisks (Ta(3 nm)/[Co(0.37 nm)/Ni(0.58 nm)]{sub 10}){sub 2} with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy are shown experimentally at room temperature. Magnetization reversal through the skyrmion state is studied using magnetic hysteresis measurements. An evolution of skyrmion configurations in the nanodisk structure is analyzed. Experimental methods and micromagnetic simulations help to understand the magnetization reversal processes occurring through the stable skyrmion-like configurations. Formation of the intermediate C-states during magnetization reversal is demonstrated. The skyrmion number for all possible spin configurations is calculated.

  5. DNA minor groove binding of small molecules: Experimental and computational evidence

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prateek Pandya; Md Maidul Islam; G Suresh Kumar; B Jayaram; Surat Kumar

    2010-03-01

    Eight indole derivatives were studied for their DNA binding ability using fluorescence quenching and molecular docking methods. These indole compounds have structural moieties similar as in few indole alkaloids. Experimental and theoretical studies have suggested that indole derivatives bind in the minor groove of DNA. Thermodynamic profiles of DNA complexes of indole derivatives were obtained from computational methods. The complexes were largely stabilized by H-bonding and van der Waal’s forces with positive entropy values. Indole derivatives were found to possess some Purine (Pu) - Pyrimidine (Py) specificity with DNA sequences. The results obtained from experimental and computational methods showed good agreement with each other, supported by their correlation constant values.

  6. Psychoneuroimmunology: an interpretation of experimental and case study evidence towards a paradigm for predictable results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalt, H W

    2000-07-01

    This paper surveys a number of key experiments and case studies relating to psychoneuroimmunology. It finds that most techniques to influence or even direct the immune system via the mind fall into a series of theoretical categories called passive, active and targeted effects. By examining the results of experiments and studies in the light of these categories a number of important conclusions are drawn. These conclusions explain differences in experimental results, describe those variables that appear to be central to obtaining results, and describe in detail where experimentation should be concentrated to further knowledge of psychoneuroimmunology.

  7. Probability Judgements in Multi-Stage Problems : Experimental Evidence of Systematic Biases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gneezy, U.

    1996-01-01

    We report empirical evidence that in problems of random walk with positive drift, bounded rationality leads individuals to under-estimate the probability of success in the long run.In particular, individuals who were given the stage by stage probability distribution failed to aggregate this

  8. Probability Judgements in Multi-Stage Problems : Experimental Evidence of Systematic Biases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gneezy, U.

    1996-01-01

    We report empirical evidence that in problems of random walk with positive drift, bounded rationality leads individuals to under-estimate the probability of success in the long run.In particular, individuals who were given the stage by stage probability distribution failed to aggregate this informat

  9. Experimental evidence for electron localization on Au upon photo-activation of Au/anatase catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carneiro, Joana T.; Savenije, Tom J.; Mul, Guido

    2009-01-01

    Time resolved microwave conductivity (TRMC) measurements show that the presence of Au on anatase Hombikat UV100 significantly reduces the lifetime of mobile electrons formed by photo-excitation of this photocatalyst at 300 nm, providing evidence for the widely acclaimed electron localization effect

  10. Experimental evidence for a dual pathway model analysis of coping with the climate crisis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zomeren, Martijn; Spears, Russell; Leach, Colinn Wayne

    2010-01-01

    Two experiments examined the psychological power of fear and group efficacy beliefs to increase environmental action intentions against the climate crisis Extending a dual pathway model of coping with collective disadvantage results showed evidence for emotion-focused approach coping Environmental a

  11. Persistence of Learning Gains from Computer Assisted Learning: Experimental Evidence from China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, D.; Zhang, L.; Wang, J.; Huang, W.; Shi, Y.; Boswell, M.; Rozelle, S.

    2015-01-01

    Computer assisted learning (CAL) programs have been shown to be effective in improving educational outcomes. However, the existing studies on CAL have almost all been conducted over a short period of time. There is very little evidence on how the impact evolves over time. In response, we conducted a clustered randomized experiment involving 2741…

  12. The effects of public service motivation on collaborative behavior : Evidence from three experimental games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esteve, M.; van Witteloostuijn, A.; Boyne, G.

    2015-01-01

    Although research on the antecedents of collaboration is vast, no study has examined the effects of public service motivation (PSM). The current study relates PSM to decisions on whether or not to collaborate, while controlling for the Big Six personality traits. Empirical evidence is gathered by me

  13. Experimental evidence of non-linear behaviour in YBCO superconducting thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palenque, E.R.; Appleyard, N.J.; Jackson, T.J.; Palmer, S.B. [Dept. of Phys., Warwick Univ., Coventry (United Kingdom)

    1995-05-01

    Preliminary measurements of the non-linear dynamics of a thin (two dimensional) YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} superconducting film in a small AC magnetic field are presented, a peak in third harmonic generation which may provide evidence of the Kosterlitz-Thouless transition is found just below the superconducting transition temperature. (author)

  14. The curse of knowledge increases self-selection into competition: Experimental evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Danz, David

    2014-01-01

    The psychology literature provides ample evidence that people have difficulties taking the perspective of less-informed others. This paper presents a controlled experiment showing that this "curse of knowledge" can cause comparative overconfidence and overentry into competition. In a broader context, the results provide an explanation for the overconfidence of nascent entrepreneurs and the substantial rate of failure among new businesses. (author's abstract)

  15. HYPERACTIVE TISSUE RENIN-ANGIOTENSIN SYSTEMS IN CARDIOVASCULAR DYSFUNCTION - EXPERIMENTAL-EVIDENCE AND CLINICAL HYPOTHESES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PINTO, YM; BUIKEMA, H; VANGILST, WH

    1995-01-01

    In this review, hypotheses are discussed with regard to the role of local, tissue renin-angiotensin systems in the progression of cardiovascular dysfunction. After local renin-anglotensin systems had been described as functionally distinct systems, recent experimental studies have suggested an assoc

  16. Mimicking Aphasic Semantic Errors in Normal Speech Production: Evidence from a Novel Experimental Paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, Catherine; Lambon Ralph, Matthew A.

    2008-01-01

    Semantic errors are commonly found in semantic dementia (SD) and some forms of stroke aphasia and provide insights into semantic processing and speech production. Low error rates are found in standard picture naming tasks in normal controls. In order to increase error rates and thus provide an experimental model of aphasic performance, this study…

  17. Experimental Evidence of the Knowledge Gap: Message Arousal, Motivation, and Time Delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabe, Maria Elizabeth; Yegiyan, Narine; Kamhawi, Rasha

    2008-01-01

    This study experimentally tested the knowledge gap from an information processing perspective. Specifically, knowledge acquisition was investigated under conditions of medium and low news message arousal, with time delay. Results show the persistence of a knowledge gap, particularly for low arousing messages. In fact, at low levels of message…

  18. Supplying Disadvantaged Schools with Effective Teachers: Experimental Evidence on Secondary Math Teachers from Teach For America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Hanley S.; Clark, Melissa A.; McConnell, Sheena

    2017-01-01

    Teach For America (TFA) is an important but controversial source of teachers for hard-to-staff subjects in high-poverty U.S. schools. We present findings from the first large-scale experimental study of secondary math teachers from TFA. We find that TFA teachers are more effective than other math teachers in the same schools, increasing student…

  19. Experimental evidence of a symbiosis between red-cockaded woodpeckers and fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelle A. Jusino; Daniel L. Lindner; Mark T. Banik; Kevin R. Rose; Jeffrey R. Walters

    2016-01-01

    Primary cavity excavators, such as woodpeckers, are ecosystem engineers in many systems. Associations between cavity excavators and fungi have long been hypothesized to facilitate cavity excavation, but these relationships have not been experimentally verified. Fungi may help excavators by softening wood, while excavators may facilitate fungal dispersal. Here we...

  20. Benefit of multiple trait selection to increase reproductive traits; experimental evidence from Golden hamsters.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Satoh, M.; Nishida, A.; Arendonk, van J.A.M.; Lende, van der T.

    1997-01-01

    Fifteen generations of selection were conducted to study responses for litter size at birth (LSB), weight at weaning of standardized litter (LWW), and individual body weight at 8 wk of age (BW8) using golden hamsters as an experimental model for pigs. The experiment involved three lines: selection

  1. Supplying Disadvantaged Schools with Effective Teachers: Experimental Evidence on Secondary Math Teachers from Teach For America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Hanley S.; Clark, Melissa A.; McConnell, Sheena

    2017-01-01

    Teach For America (TFA) is an important but controversial source of teachers for hard-to-staff subjects in high-poverty U.S. schools. We present findings from the first large-scale experimental study of secondary math teachers from TFA. We find that TFA teachers are more effective than other math teachers in the same schools, increasing student…

  2. Testing the theory of emissions trading : Experimental evidence on alternative mechanisms for global carbon trading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, Ger; Nentjes, Andries; Smith, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Simulation models and theory prove that emission trading converges to market equilibrium. This paper sets out to test these results using experimental economics. Three experiments are conducted for the six largest carbon emitting industrialized regions. Two experiments use auctions, the first a

  3. Verb Form Indicates Discourse Segment Type in Biological Research Papers: Experimental Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Waard, Anita; Maat, Henk Pander

    2012-01-01

    Corpus studies suggest that verb tense is a differentiating feature between, on the one hand, text pertaining to experimental results (involving methods and results) and on the other hand, text pertaining to more abstract concepts (i.e. regarding background knowledge in a field, hypotheses, problems or claims). In this paper, we describe a user…

  4. Testing the theory of emissions trading : Experimental evidence on alternative mechanisms for global carbon trading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, Ger; Nentjes, Andries; Smith, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Simulation models and theory prove that emission trading converges to market equilibrium. This paper sets out to test these results using experimental economics. Three experiments are conducted for the six largest carbon emitting industrialized regions. Two experiments use auctions, the first a sing

  5. Localization of light on a cone: theoretical evidence and experimental demonstration for an optical fiber

    CERN Document Server

    Sumetsky, M

    2010-01-01

    High Q-factor localized conical modes are discovered theoretically and demonstrated experimentally in an optical fiber. The theory of these modes provides a means for exceptionally accurate local characterization of the optical fiber nonuniformity and a new paradigm in the field of high Q-factor resonators.

  6. Oxytocin and Major Depressive Disorder: Experimental and Clinical Evidence for Links to Aetiology and Possible Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inga D. Neumann

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Affective disorders represent the most common psychiatric diseases, with substantial co-morbidity existing between major depressive disorders (MDD and anxiety disorders. The lack of truly novel acting compounds has led to non-monoaminergic based research and hypotheses in recent years. The large number of brain neuropeptides, characterized by discrete synthesis sites and multiple receptors, represent likely research candidates for novel therapeutic targets. The present review summarises the available preclinical and human evidence regarding the neuropeptide, oxytocin, and its implications in the aetiology and treatment of MDD. While the evidence is not conclusive at present additional studies are warranted to determine whether OXT may be of therapeutic benefit in subsets of MDD patients such as those with comorbid anxiety symptoms and low levels of social attachment.

  7. Experimental evidence of adiabatic splitting of charged particle beams using stable islands of transverse phase space

    CERN Document Server

    Gilardoni, S S; Martini, M; Métral, E; Steerenberg, R; Müller, A-S

    2006-01-01

    Recently, a novel technique to perform multi-turn extraction from a circular particle accelerator was proposed. It is based on beam splitting and trapping, induced by a slow crossing of a nonlinear resonance, inside stable islands of transverse phase space. Experiments at the CERN Proton Synchrotron started in 2002 and evidence of beam splitting was obtained by summer 2004. In this paper the measurement results achieved with both a low- and a high-intensity, single-bunch proton beam are presented.

  8. The Role of Framing, Inequity and History in a Corruption Game: Some Experimental Evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Ananish Chaudhuri; Tirnud Paichayontvijit; Erwann Sbai

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the role of framing, inequity in initial endowments and history in shaping behavior in a corrupt transaction by extending the one-shot bribery game introduced by Cameron et al. (2009) to a repeated game setting. We find that the use of loaded language significantly reduces the incidence of bribery and increases the level of punishment. Punishment of bribery leads to reduced bribery in future. The evidence suggests that this game captures essential features of a corrupt transact...

  9. Memories affect mood: evidence from covert experimental assignment to positive, neutral, and negative memory recall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillihan, Seth J; Kessler, Jennifer; Farah, Martha J

    2007-06-01

    Memory recall has been proposed as a common and effective mood regulation strategy. Although several studies have presented results suggesting that recalling valenced memories affects subsequent mood, their designs allow for alternative interpretations of the observed effects. Two such alternatives include the reverse effect (mood effects on memory due to non-experimental assignment to memory recall condition) and demand characteristics of the experiment. We used covert experimental assignment to memory condition, asking subjects (N=314; 56% female) to recall memories that were primarily positive, neutral, or negative. Results showed the expected effect on mood (pmood worst in the negative memory condition, better in the neutral condition, and best in the positive condition. These results suggest that valenced memory recall does indeed exert an effect on mood, and may do so even without the individual's awareness.

  10. Experimental evidence for extreme surface sensitivity in Auger-Photoelectron Coincidence Spectroscopy (APECS) from solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liscio, A.; Gotter, R.; Ruocco, A.; Iacobucci, S.; Danese, A.G.; Bartynski, R.A.; Stefani, G

    2004-07-01

    Core hole creation and subsequent Auger decay processes are studied with unprecedented discrimination by Auger-Photoelectron Coincidence Spectroscopy (APECS). Early works in this field have already pointed out the intrinsic surface sensitivity of these experiments. However, it was not until recently that a model calculation was developed to quantitatively evaluate it. Here we present the first attempt to experimentally establish an effective target thickness for such experiments. The angular distribution of 3p{sub 3/2} photoelectron with kinetic energy of 160 eV is measured in coincidence with the M{sub 3}VV Auger electron with kinetic energy of 55 eV on a Cu (1 1 1) surface. Coincidence and non-coincidence photoelectron angular distributions display differences that, to large extent, are explained by confining the source of the coincident signal within the first two layers of Cu target, thus establishing an experimental upper limit for the effective target thickness of the APECS experiment.

  11. The significance of secondary organic aerosol formation and growth in buildings: experimental and computational evidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarwar, G.; Corsi, R.; Allen, D.

    2003-01-01

    -pinene, and subsequent gas-to-particle partitioning of the products. A new indoor air quality model was used to predict dynamic particle mass concentrations based on detailed homogeneous chemical mechanisms and partitioning of semi-volatile products to particles. Chamber particle mass concentrations were estimated from......Experiments were conducted in an 11 m3 environmental chamber to investigate secondaryparticles resulting from homogeneous reactions between ozone and alpha-pinene. Experimental results indicate that rapid fine particle growth occurs due to homogeneous reactions between ozone and alpha...... measured particle size distributions and were in reasonable agreement with results predicted from the model. Both experimental and model results indicate that secondary particle mass concentrations incfrease substantially with lower air exchange rates. This is an interesting results, given a continuing...

  12. Experimental evidence and early translational steps using bone marrow derived stem cells after human stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasahara, Yukiko; Ihara, Masafumi; Taguchi, Akihiko

    2013-01-01

    Neurogenesis is principally restricted to the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricle wall and the subgranular zone of the hippocampal dentate gyrus in physiological situations. However, neuronal stem cells are known to be mobilized into the post- and peristroke area and we have demonstrated that appropriate support of these stem cells, achieved by therapeutic angiogenesis, enhances neuroregeneration followed by neuronal functional recovery in an experimental stroke model. We also found that neural stem cells are mobilized in patients after stroke, as well as in animal models. Based on these observations, we have started cell-based therapy using autologous bone marrow-derived stem/progenitor cells in patients after stroke. This review summarizes the findings of recent experimental and clinical studies that have focused on neurogenesis in the injured brain after cerebral infarction. We also refer to the challenges for future cell-based therapy, including regeneration of the aged brain. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Experimental evidence of a helical, supercritical instability in pipe flow of shear thinning fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picaut, L.; Ronsin, O.; Caroli, C.; Baumberger, T.

    2017-08-01

    We study experimentally the flow stability of entangled polymer solutions extruded through glass capillaries. We show that the pipe flow becomes linearly unstable beyond a critical value (Wic≃5 ) of the Weissenberg number, via a supercritical bifurcation which results in a helical distortion of the extrudate. We find that the amplitude of the undulation vanishes as the aspect ratio L /R of the capillary tends to zero, and saturates for large L /R , indicating that the instability affects the whole pipe flow, rather than the contraction or exit regions. These results, when compared to previous theoretical and experimental works, lead us to argue that the nature of the instability is controlled by the level of shear thinning of the fluids. In addition, we provide strong hints that the nonlinear development of the instabiilty is mitigated, in our system, by the gradual emergence of gross wall slip.

  14. Experimental and theoretical evidence for bilayer-by-bilayer surface melting of crystalline ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, M. Alejandra; Kling, Tanja; Ishiyama, Tatsuya; van Zadel, Marc-Jan; Mezger, Markus; Jochum, Mara N.; Cyran, Jenée D.; Smit, Wilbert J.; Bakker, Huib J.; Shultz, Mary Jane; Morita, Akihiro; Donadio, Davide; Nagata, Yuki; Bonn, Mischa; Backus, Ellen H. G.

    2017-01-01

    On the surface of water ice, a quasi-liquid layer (QLL) has been extensively reported at temperatures below its bulk melting point at 273 K. Approaching the bulk melting temperature from below, the thickness of the QLL is known to increase. To elucidate the precise temperature variation of the QLL, and its nature, we investigate the surface melting of hexagonal ice by combining noncontact, surface-specific vibrational sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy and spectra calculated from molecular dynamics simulations. Using SFG, we probe the outermost water layers of distinct single crystalline ice faces at different temperatures. For the basal face, a stepwise, sudden weakening of the hydrogen-bonded structure of the outermost water layers occurs at 257 K. The spectral calculations from the molecular dynamics simulations reproduce the experimental findings; this allows us to interpret our experimental findings in terms of a stepwise change from one to two molten bilayers at the transition temperature. PMID:27956637

  15. Exposure affects the risk of an owl being mobbed - experimental evidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendrichsen, Ditte Katrine; Christiansen, Peter; Nielsen, Elsemarie K.

    2006-01-01

    Mobbing is a widespread anti-predator strategy in birds, and predators are generally expected to avoid mobbing. For example, observational studies suggest that the cryptic roosting behaviour of nocturnal predators, such as many owls, may be a strategy to limit mobbing. In this paper, we present...... the results of the first experimental study investigating to what degree roost exposure influences the risk of being mobbed, and the intensity of a mobbing incidence once initiated. To determine these factors, we used an experimental setup with taxidermic mounts of tawny owls Strix aluco in Grib Skov forest......, Denmark. The risk of an owl being mobbed during a 50 min morning survey period increased with the exposure of its roosting position, from 24% when hidden to 85% when openly exposed. The corresponding increase in the afternoon was from 6% to 36%. This suggests that an owl may minimize the mobbing rate...

  16. The price elasticity of demand for heroin: matched longitudinal and experimental evidence#

    OpenAIRE

    Olmstead, Todd A; Alessi, Sheila M.; Kline, Brendan; Pacula, Rosalie Liccardo; Petry, Nancy M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports estimates of the price elasticity of demand for heroin based on a newly constructed dataset. The dataset has two matched components concerning the same sample of regular heroin users: longitudinal information about real-world heroin demand (actual price and actual quantity at daily intervals for each heroin user in the sample) and experimental information about laboratory heroin demand (elicited by presenting the same heroin users with scenarios in a laboratory setting). Tw...

  17. Experimental evidence of Xe incorporation in Schottky defects in UO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bès, René, E-mail: rene.bes@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DEC, F-13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Synchrotron SOLEIL, Ligne de Lumière MARS, L' Ormes des Merisiers, Saint Aubin, BP48, F-91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Martin, Philippe, E-mail: philippe-m.martin@cea.fr; Vathonne, Emerson; Delorme, Rémy; Sabathier, Catherine; Freyss, Michel; Bertolus, Marjorie [CEA, DEN, DEC, F-13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Glatzel, Pieter [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2015-03-16

    We report here the direct experimental observation of the preferential xenon incorporation site in uranium dioxide and analyse how its incorporation evolves with the annealing temperature. We show that High Energy Resolution Fluorescence Detection X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure in combination with first-principles calculations enable a precise determination of the Xe incorporation site. Our finding provides important insight for the understanding and modeling of noble gases behavior in nuclear oxide fuel.

  18. Experimental evidence of optical analogue of electromagnetically induced transparency in graphene

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Lei; Liu, Min; Huang, Wei; Li, Yu Jia; Gao, Cong

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the first experimental observation of coherent population oscillation, an optical analogue of electromagnetically induced transparency, in graphene based on phase sensitive pump-probe system. Degenerate four-wave-mixing between pump and probe modifies the dispersion and absorption of the population oscillation process in graphene, and leads to enhance and depression of modulation instability with asymmetry in frequency. The analytically predicted asymmetrical burning hole fully consists with the experiments.

  19. An Innovative Assay for the Analysis of In Vitro Endothelial Remodeling: Experimental and Computational Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scianna, Marco; Bassino, Eleonora; Munaron, Luca

    2017-02-01

    The molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying vascular remodeling are currently investigated by experimental strategies which aim to mimic the complex environmental conditions found in vivo. Some of them focus on the tubulogenic activity of dispersed endothelial cell populations, while others evaluate vascular sprouting. Here we propose a new method to assess matrigel invasion starting from confluent or subconfluent monolayers of human microvascular ECs (HMVEC) seeded on different substrates. The experimental setting is also validated by an improved hybrid multiscale mathematical approach, which integrates a mesoscopic grid-based cellular Potts model, that describes HMVEC phenomenology, with a continuous one, accounting for the kinetics of diffusing growth factors. Both experimental and theoretical approaches show that the endothelial potential to invade, migrate, and organize in tubule structures is a function of selected environmental parameters. The present methodology is intended to be simple to use, standardized for rapid screening and suitable for mechanistic studies. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 243-248, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Bird colonies cause seagrass enrichment in a subtropical estuary: Observational and experimental evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, George V. N.; Fourqurean, James W.; Kenworthy, W. Judson; Zieman, Joseph C.

    1991-06-01

    Colonies/roosts of piscivorous birds in Florida Bay, a subtropical estuary, concentrate nutrients by feeding away from their colonies/roosts and returning with food for young and to defaecate. Seagrass beds surrounding the colony islands were markedly different from those around similar islands that did not contain colonies. Seagrass standing crop was enhanced up to 200 m from bird colony islands compared with islands without colonies. The species of seagrass were also different at colonies, where Halodule wrightii and Ruppia maritima predominated in zones close to the colony islands. Around islands without colonies, only Thalassia testudinum was present. Experimental bird perches placed to stimulate concentrated bird presence produced changes in adjacent seagrass meadows that were similar to differences between islands with colonies and those without. Over 5 years, seagrass standing crop increased around the experimental perches, and species dominance shifted from T. testudinum to H. wrightii. No similar changes occurred at control locations. These experimental results indicate that the bird concentrations are responsible for the observed differences in seagrass communities surrounding islands that contain colonies. These enriched areas are significant to the seagrass ecosystem because many seagrasses in Florida Bay appear to be nutrient-limited. Demersal fish and invertebrate density and species richness have been shown to be a function of the seagrass standing crop and species composition, so the changes in seagrasses stimulated by localized bird concentrations have the capacity to alter the entire community structure.

  1. Examination of experimental evidence of chaos in the bound states of 208Pb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, L.; Molina, R. A.; Gómez, J. M. G.; Heusler, A.

    2017-01-01

    We study the spectral fluctuations of the 208Pb nucleus using the complete experimental spectrum of 151 states up to excitation energies of 6.20 MeV recently identified at the Maier-Leibnitz Laboratorium at Garching, Germany. For natural parity states the results are very close to the predictions of random matrix theory (RMT) for the nearest-neighbor spacing distribution. A quantitative estimate of the agreement is given by the Brody parameter ω , which takes the value ω =0 for regular systems and ω ≃1 for chaotic systems. We obtain ω =0.85 which is, to our knowledge, the closest value to chaos ever observed in experimental bound states of nuclei. By contrast, the results for unnatural parity states are far from RMT behavior. We interpret these results as a consequence of the strength of the residual interaction in 208Pb, which, according to experimental data, is much stronger for natural than for unnatural parity states. In addition, our results show that chaotic and nonchaotic nuclear states coexist in the same energy region of the spectrum.

  2. Experimental evidence for strong stabilizing forces at high functional diversity of aquatic microbial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrara, Francesco; Giometto, Andrea; Seymour, Mathew; Rinaldo, Andrea; Altermatt, Florian

    2015-05-01

    Unveiling the mechanisms that promote coexistence in biological communities is a fundamental problem in ecology. Stable coexistence of many species is commonly observed in natural communities. Most of these natural communities, however, are composed of species from multiple trophic and functional groups, while theory and experiments on coexistence have been focusing on functionally similar species. Here, we investigated how functional diversity affects the stability of species coexistence and productivity in multispecies communities by characterizing experimentally all pairwise species interactions in a pool of 11 species of eukaryotes (10 protists and one rotifer) belonging to three different functional groups. Species within the same functional group showed stronger competitive interactions compared to among-functional group interactions. This often led to competitive exclusion between species that had higher functional relatedness, but only at low levels of species richness. Communities with higher functional diversity resulted in increased species coexistence and community biomass production. Our experimental findings and the results of a stochastic model tailored to the experimental interaction matrix suggest the emergence of strong stabilizing forces when species from different functional groups interact in a homogeneous environment. By combining theoretical analysis with experiments we could also disentangle the relationship between species richness and functional diversity, showing that functional diversity per se is a crucial driver of productivity and stability in multispecies community.

  3. Strain rate sensitivity of the tensile strength of two silicon carbides: experimental evidence and micromechanical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinszner, Jean-Luc; Erzar, Benjamin; Forquin, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Ceramic materials are commonly used to design multi-layer armour systems thanks to their favourable physical and mechanical properties. However, during an impact event, fragmentation of the ceramic plate inevitably occurs due to its inherent brittleness under tensile loading. Consequently, an accurate model of the fragmentation process is necessary in order to achieve an optimum design for a desired armour configuration. In this work, shockless spalling tests have been performed on two silicon carbide grades at strain rates ranging from 103 to 104 s-1 using a high-pulsed power generator. These spalling tests characterize the tensile strength strain rate sensitivity of each ceramic grade. The microstructural properties of the ceramics appear to play an important role on the strain rate sensitivity and on the dynamic tensile strength. Moreover, this experimental configuration allows for recovering damaged, but unbroken specimens, giving unique insight on the fragmentation process initiated in the ceramics. All the collected data have been compared with corresponding results of numerical simulations performed using the Denoual-Forquin-Hild anisotropic damage model. Good agreement is observed between numerical simulations and experimental data in terms of free surface velocity, size and location of the damaged zones along with crack density in these damaged zones. This article is part of the themed issue 'Experimental testing and modelling of brittle materials at high strain rates'.

  4. Natural and experimental evidence of viscerotropic infection caused by Leishmania tropica from North Sinai, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doha, Said A; Shehata, Magdi G; Fahmy, Adel R; Samy, Abdallah M

    2014-08-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is a neglected clinical form that is quite prevalent in Eastern North parts of the country in Sinai Peninsula. Leishmania tropica was identified by previous reports as the causative agent responsible for viscerotropic infections in-patients and experimental animals. Here, we reported the viscerotropic infections from naturally infected rodent Gerbillus pyramidum floweri collected from North-Sinai. Footpad and tail lesions, spleenomegaly, and malformed dark-colored spleen were the characteristic CL symptoms. The spleen of the rodent found positive to amastigote impression smear. ITS-1 DNA was sequenced and revealed 100% identity of the strain in the current study to the other L. tropica sequences identified from the patients with the suspected CL and inhabited the same study area. The current findings confirmed the susceptibility of gerbil to L. tropica, and raise the concerns for the role of rodents as accidental host suffering the infections. The susceptibility of wild and experimental rodents to the same L. tropica strain was also investigated; BALB/c and G. pyramidum were more susceptible to L. tropica (24.33 ± 4.37 and 25 ± 4.58 days post-infection, respectively). Similar viscerotropic pathologies were reported in experimental infection of only golden hamster (≈ 120 days post-infection), and G. p. floweri (≈ 160 days post-infection).

  5. Experimental evidence for growth factor treatment and function in certain neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, J E

    1993-11-01

    This issue focuses on the potential utilization or involvement of growth factors in Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, and epilepsy. Certainly, the role of growth factors in other neurological disorders associated with stroke, trauma, and neurodegeneration needs to be considered. While there is no direct evidence to indicate that a neurological disorder is associated with the compromised function of a specific growth factor, the use of these molecules as therapeutic agents is justifiable. Undoubtedly, the outcome of current clinical trials will certainly influence future decisions on the use of growth factor therapies.

  6. Experimental evidence of adiabatic splitting of charged particle beams using stable islands of transverse phase space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Gilardoni

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Recently, a novel technique to perform multiturn extraction from a circular particle accelerator was proposed. It is based on beam splitting and trapping, induced by a slow crossing of a nonlinear resonance, inside stable islands of transverse phase space. Experiments at the CERN Proton Synchrotron started in 2002 and evidence of beam splitting was obtained by summer 2004. In this paper, the measurement results achieved with both a low- and a high-intensity, single-bunch proton beam are presented.

  7. The Role of Framing, Inequity and History in a Corruption Game: Some Experimental Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananish Chaudhuri

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the role of framing, inequity in initial endowments and history in shaping behavior in a corrupt transaction by extending the one-shot bribery game introduced by Cameron et al. (2009 to a repeated game setting. We find that the use of loaded language significantly reduces the incidence of bribery and increases the level of punishment. Punishment of bribery leads to reduced bribery in future. The evidence suggests that this game captures essential features of a corrupt transaction, over and above any sentiments of inequity aversion or negative reciprocity However, showing subjects the history of past play has little effect on the level of corruption.

  8. Experimental evidence for a vector-like behaviour of Pomeron exchange

    CERN Document Server

    Barberis, D; Close, Francis Edwin; Danielsen, K M; Donskov, S V; Earl, B C; Evans, D; French, Bernard R; Hino, T; Inaba, S; Jacholkowski, A; Jacobsen, T; Khaustov, G V; Kinson, J B; Kirk, A; Kondashov, A A; Lednev, A A; Lenti, V; Minashvili, I A; Peigneux, J P; Romanovsky, V I; Rusakovitch, N A; Semenov, A A; Shagin, P M; Shimizu, H; Singovsky, A V; Sobol, A E; Stassinaki, M; Stroot, Jean-Pierre; Takamatsu, K; Tsuru, T; Villalobos Baillie, O; Votruba, M F; Yasu, Y

    1999-01-01

    Evidence is presented that the Pomeron act as a non-conserved vector current. A study has been made of the azimuthal angle phi, which is defined as the angle between the pT vectors of the two outgoing protons, in the reaction pp -> pp(X0) for those resonances (X0) which are compatible with being produced by double Pomeron exchange. These distributions have been compared with a model which describes the Pomeron as a non-conserved vector current and a qualitative agreement is found. In addition, when one of the particles exchanged is known to have spin 0, namely pi-Pomeron exchange, the phi distribution is flat.

  9. Escape of DNA from a weakly biased thin nanopore: Experimental evidence for a universal diffusive behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogerheide, David P.; Albertorio, Fernando; Golovchenko, Jene A.

    2014-01-01

    We report experimental escape time distributions of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) molecules initially threaded halfway through a thin solid-state nanopore. We find a universal behavior of the escape time distributions consistent with a one-dimensional first passage formulation notwithstanding the geometry of the experiment and the potential role of complex molecule-liquid-pore interactions. Diffusion constants that depend on the molecule length and pore size are determined. Also discussed are the practical implications of long time diffusive molecule trapping in the nanopore. PMID:24483704

  10. Quantum criticality in an Ising chain: experimental evidence for emergent E8 symmetry

    OpenAIRE

    Coldea, R.; Tennant, D. A.; Wheeler, E M; Wawrzynska, E.; Prabhakaran, D.; Telling, M; Habicht, K.; Smeibidl, P; Kiefer, K.

    2011-01-01

    Quantum phase transitions take place between distinct phases of matter at zero temperature. Near the transition point, exotic quantum symmetries can emerge that govern the excitation spectrum of the system. A symmetry described by the E8 Lie group with a spectrum of 8 particles was long predicted to appear near the critical point of an Ising chain. We realize this system experimentally by tuning the quasi-one-dimensional Ising ferromagnet CoNb2O6 through its critical point using strong transv...

  11. Experimental evidence for the role of ions in particle nucleation under atmospheric conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensmark, Henrik; Pedersen, Jens Olaf Pepke; Marsh, N.D.

    2007-01-01

    Experimental studies of aerosol nucleation in air, containing trace amounts of ozone, sulphur dioxide and water vapour at concentrations relevant for the Earth's atmosphere, are reported. The production of new aerosol particles is found to be proportional to the negative ion density and yields...... nucleation rates of the order of 0.1 1 cm(-3) s(-1). This suggests that the ions are active in generating an atmospheric reservoir of small thermodynamically stable clusters, which are important for nucleation processes in the atmosphere and ultimately for cloud formation....

  12. Experimental evidence for the formation mechanism of metallic catalyst-free carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y H Tang; X C Li; J L Li; L W Lin; H F Xu; B Y Huang

    2010-01-01

    Our work reported that the so-called pure carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can be synthesized without metallic catalyst by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The as-prepared CNTs have average diameter of 50 nm and length over several microns. Analysis of intermediate objects in the products indicates that their formation mechanism follows the wire-to-tube model. Besides, according to thermodynamic analysis of the driving force combing with experimental results, we find that the thermal gradient can effectively favor the formation of CNTs in our metallic catalyst-free CVD.

  13. Experimental evidence of the effect of nutrient enrichment on the zooplankton in a Brazilian coastal lagoon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. KOZLOWSKY-SUZUKI

    Full Text Available Non-treated sewage disposal is one of the main impacts to which Imboassica Lagoon has been subjected. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a potential increase in the artificial enrichment on the environmental conditions and zooplankton of this system. To this end, an experimental study was conducted in mesocosms where nutrients were added daily. Bacterial numbers, chlorophyll-a, and picoplanktonic cyanobacteria densities showed an increase with the availability of nutrients. Bacterio- and phytoplankton seemed to be regulated by the rotifers Brachionus rotundiformis and Hexarthra brandorffi.

  14. Experimental and statistical reevaluation provides no evidence for Drosophila courtship song rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, David L; Clemens, Jan; Coen, Philip; Calhoun, Adam J; Hogenesch, John B; Arthur, Ben J; Murthy, Mala

    2017-09-12

    From 1980 to 1992, a series of influential papers reported on the discovery, genetics, and evolution of a periodic cycling of the interval between Drosophila male courtship song pulses. The molecular mechanisms underlying this periodicity were never described. To reinitiate investigation of this phenomenon, we previously performed automated segmentation of songs but failed to detect the proposed rhythm [Arthur BJ, et al. (2013) BMC Biol 11:11; Stern DL (2014) BMC Biol 12:38]. Kyriacou et al. [Kyriacou CP, et al. (2017) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 114:1970-1975] report that we failed to detect song rhythms because (i) our flies did not sing enough and (ii) our segmenter did not identify many of the song pulses. Kyriacou et al. manually annotated a subset of our recordings and reported that two strains displayed rhythms with genotype-specific periodicity, in agreement with their original reports. We cannot replicate this finding and show that the manually annotated data, the original automatically segmented data, and a new dataset provide no evidence for either the existence of song rhythms or song periodicity differences between genotypes. Furthermore, we have reexamined our methods and analysis and find that our automated segmentation method was not biased to prevent detection of putative song periodicity. We conclude that there is no evidence for the existence of Drosophila courtship song rhythms.

  15. Experimental Evidence for Anomalous Retroactive Influences on Human Cognition and Affect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bem, Daryl J.

    2011-11-01

    Six experiments are described that take well-established psychological effects on human cognition and affect and "time-reverse" them so that the individual's responses are obtained before the putatively causal stimulus events occur. Two of the experiments tested for the retroactive facilitation of recall: It is well known that rehearsing or practicing a set of verbal materials enhances an individual's ability to recall them on a subsequent test. In our experiments, participants were first shown 48 common words one at a time and were then asked to recall as many of those words as they could. They were then given practice exercises on a randomly selected subset of those words. The results show that participants recalled more of the words they later practiced than the control words they did not practice. Two experiments on retroactive priming provide evidence for retroactive influence on an individual's response times when judging the pleasantness or unpleasantness of visual stimuli. Finally, two experiments provide evidence for the retroactive habituation to emotionally arousing visual stimuli. Each of the six experiments yielded statistically significant results, with a combined z = 3.66, p = .0001, and an effect size (d) of 0.25. The six experiments are a subset of nine retroactive influence experiments reported in Bem [1] that yielded a combined z = 6.66, p = 1.34×10-11, and an effect size of 0.22.

  16. Renin-angiotensin system as a potential therapeutic target in stroke and retinopathy: experimental and clinical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouda, Abdelrahman Y; Artham, Sandeep; El-Remessy, Azza B; Fagan, Susan C

    2016-02-01

    As our knowledge expands, it is now clear that the renin-angiotensin (Ang) system (RAS) mediates functions other than regulating blood pressure (BP). The RAS plays a central role in the pathophysiology of different neurovascular unit disorders including stroke and retinopathy. Moreover, the beneficial actions of RAS modulation in brain and retina have been documented in experimental research, but not yet exploited clinically. The RAS is a complex system with distinct yet interconnected components. Understanding the different RAS components and their functions under brain and retinal pathological conditions is crucial to reap their benefits. The aim of the present review is to provide an experimental and clinical update on the role of RAS in the pathophysiology and treatment of stroke and retinopathy. Combining the evidence from both these disorders allows a unique opportunity to move both fields forward.

  17. Reaction time effects in lab- versus Web-based research: Experimental evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbig, Benjamin E

    2016-12-01

    Although Web-based research is now commonplace, it continues to spur skepticism from reviewers and editors, especially whenever reaction times are of primary interest. Such persistent preconceptions are based on arguments referring to increased variation, the limits of certain software and technologies, and a noteworthy lack of comparisons (between Web and lab) in fully randomized experiments. To provide a critical test, participants were randomly assigned to complete a lexical decision task either (a) in the lab using standard experimental software (E-Prime), (b) in the lab using a browser-based version (written in HTML and JavaScript), or (c) via the Web using the same browser-based version. The classical word frequency effect was typical in size and corresponded to a very large effect in all three conditions. There was no indication that the Web- or browser-based data collection was in any way inferior. In fact, if anything, a larger effect was obtained in the browser-based conditions than in the condition relying on standard experimental software. No differences between Web and lab (within the browser-based conditions) could be observed, thus disconfirming any substantial influence of increased technical or situational variation. In summary, the present experiment contradicts the still common preconception that reaction time effects of only a few hundred milliseconds cannot be detected in Web experiments.

  18. Selective Cooperation in the Supermarket : Field Experimental Evidence for Indirect Reciprocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Florian; Eggert, Frank

    2015-12-01

    Numerous laboratory experiments suggest that mechanisms of indirect reciprocity might account for human cooperation. However, conclusive field data supporting the predictions of indirect reciprocity in everyday life situations is still scarce. Here, we attempt to compensate for this lack by examining the determinants of cooperative behavior in a German supermarket. Our methods were as follows: Confederates of the experimenter lined up at the checkout, apparently to buy a single item. As an act of cooperation, the waiting person in front (the potential helper) could allow the confederate to go ahead. By this means, the potential helper could take a cost (additional waiting time) by providing the confederate with a benefit (saved waiting time). We recorded the potential helpers' behavior and the number of items they purchased as a quantitative measure proportional to the confederate's benefit. Moreover, in a field experimental design, we varied the confederates' image by manipulating the item they purchased (beer vs. water). As predicted, the more waiting time they could save, the more likely the confederates were to receive cooperation. This relationship was moderated by the confederates' image. Cost-to-benefit ratios were required to be more favorable for beer-purchasing individuals to receive cooperation. Our results demonstrate that everyday human cooperation can be studied unobtrusively in the field and that cooperation among strangers is selective in a way that is consistent with current models of indirect reciprocity.

  19. Experimental evidence that livestock grazing intensity affects the activity of a generalist predator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar, Nacho; Lambin, Xavier; Evans, Darren; Pakeman, Robin; Redpath, Steve

    2013-05-01

    Grazing by domestic ungulates has substantial impacts on ecosystem structure and composition. In grasslands of the northern hemisphere, livestock grazing limits populations of small mammals, which are a main food source for a variety of vertebrate predators. However, no experimental studies have described the impact of livestock grazing on vertebrate predators. We experimentally manipulated sheep and cattle grazing intensity in the Scottish uplands to test its impact on a relatively abundant small mammal, the field vole (Microtus agrestis), and its archetypal generalist predator, the red fox (Vulpes vulpes). We demonstrate that ungulate grazing had a strong consistent negative impact on both vole densities and indices of fox activity. Ungulate grazing did not substantially affect the relationship between fox activity and vole densities. However, the data suggested that, as grazing intensity increased i) fox activity indices tended to be higher when vole densities were low, and ii) the relationship between fox activity and vole density was weaker. All these patterns are surprising given the relative small scale of our experiment compared to large red fox territories in upland habitats of Britain, and suggest that domestic grazing intensity causes a strong response in the activity of generalist predators important for their conservation in grassland ecosystems.

  20. Experimental evidence of independence of nuclear de-channeling length on the particle charge sign

    CERN Document Server

    Bagli, E; Mazzolari, A; Bandiera, L; Germogli, G; Sytov, A I; De Salvador, D; Berra, A; Prest, M; Vallazza, E

    2016-01-01

    Under coherent interactions, particles undergo correlated collisions with the crystal lattice and their motion result in confinement in the fields of atomic planes, i.e. particle channeling. Other than coherently interacting with the lattice, particles also suffer incoherent interactions with individual nuclei and may leave their bounded motion, i.e., they de-channel. This latter is the main limiting factor for applications of coherent interactions in crystal-assisted particle steering. We experimentally investigated the nature of dechanneling of 120 GeV/c $e^{-}$ and $e^{+}$ in a bent silicon crystal at H4-SPS external line at CERN. We found out that while channeling efficiency differs significantly for $e^{-}$ ($4\\pm2$ $\\%$) and $e^{+}$ ($53\\pm2$ $\\%$), their nuclear dechanneling length is comparable, $(0.7\\pm0.1)$ mm for $e^{-}$ and $(0.85\\pm0.15)$ mm for $e^{+}$. The experimental proof of the equality of the nuclear dechanneling length for positrons and electrons is interpreted in terms of similar dynamic...

  1. Possible Experimental Evidence of a Moderate Proton Halo in 29S

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘祖华; 阮明; 赵耀林; 张焕乔; 杨峰; 马中玉; 林承键; 陈宝秋; 吴岳伟; 詹文龙; 郭忠言; 肖国青; 徐瑚珊; 孙志宇; 李加兴; 陈志强

    2004-01-01

    The total reaction cross sections (TRCSs) of 29 S+28 Si have been measured at intermediate energies. An obvious enhancement in TRCS of 29S is observed as compared with its neighbouring nuclei. The TRCSs of 29S+28Si are calculated with the modified Glauber theory in the optical limit and few-body approaches. The different factor d as a possible measure of halo appearance is deduced from the experimental and theoretical data. It is well accepted that 27p is a proton halo nucleus. Although not as anomalous as 27p, the different factor d of 29S is obviously larger than that of its neighbouring isotones of N = 13. This result indicates that a moderate proton halo may exist in 29S nucleus. We calculate the total reaction cross sections for 29S with the modified Glauber theory as a function of incident energy and compare the results with those for 27 Si which is a core nucleus of 29S.The measured TRCSs of 27 Si+28 Si can be described to be satisfactory by the modified Glauber theory of the optical limit approach. Although a diffused nuclear density distribution is used, the theories still inadequately predict the experimental TRCSs of 29 S+28Si, which further indicates the possibility of proton halo in 29S.

  2. Glazed clay pottery and lead exposure in Mexico: Current experimental evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Ruiz, Araceli; Tristán-López, Luis Antonio; Medrano-Gómez, Karen Itzel; Torres-Domínguez, Juan Alejandro; Ríos, Camilo; Montes, Sergio

    2017-11-01

    Lead exposure remains a significant environmental problem; lead is neurotoxic, especially in developing humans. In Mexico, lead in human blood is still a concern. Historically, much of the lead exposure is attributed to the use of handcrafted clay pottery for cooking, storing and serving food. However, experimental cause-and-effect demonstration is lacking. The present study explores this issue with a prospective experimental approach. We used handcrafted clay containers to prepare and store lemonade, which was supplied as drinking water to pregnant rats throughout the gestational period. We found that clay pots, jars, and mugs leached on average 200 µg/l lead, and exposure to the lemonade resulted in 2.5 µg/dl of lead in the pregnant rats' blood. Neonates also showed increased lead content in the hippocampus and cerebellum. Caspase-3 activity was found to be statistically increased in the hippocampus in prenatally exposed neonates, suggesting increased apoptosis in that brain region. Glazed ceramics are still an important source of lead exposure in Mexico, and our results confirm that pregnancy is a vulnerable period for brain development.

  3. Ecological novelty by hybridization: experimental evidence for increased thermal tolerance by transgressive segregation in Tigriopus californicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Ricardo J; Barreto, Felipe S; Burton, Ronald S

    2014-01-01

    Early generations of hybrids can express both genetic incompatibilities and phenotypic novelty. Insights into whether these conflicting interactions between intrinsic and extrinsic selection persist after a few generations of recombination require experimental studies. To address this question, we use interpopulation crosses and recombinant inbred lines (RILs) of the copepod Tigriopus californicus, and focus on two traits that are relevant for the diversification of this species: survivorship during development and tolerance to thermal stress. Experimental crosses between two population pairs show that most RILs between two heat-tolerant populations show enhanced tolerance to temperatures that are lethal to the respective parentals, whereas RILs between a heat-tolerant and a heat-sensitive population are intermediate. Although interpopulation crosses are affected by intrinsic selection at early generational hybrids, most of the sampled F9 RILs have recovered fitness to the level of their parentals. Together, these results suggest that a few generations of recombination allows for an independent segregation of the genes underlying thermal tolerance and cytonuclear incompatibilities, permitting certain recombinant lineages to survive in niches previously unused by parental taxa (i.e., warmer thermal environments) without incurring intrinsic selection.

  4. The behaviour of mosquitoes in relation to humans under holed bednets: the evidence from experimental huts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth R Irish

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The physical integrity of bednets is a concern of national malaria control programs, as it is a key factor in determining the rate of replacement of bednets. It is largely assumed that increased numbers of holes will result in a loss of protection of sleepers from potentially infective bites. Experimental hut studies are valuable in understanding mosquito behaviour indoors, particularly as it relates to blood feeding and mortality. This review summarises findings from experimental hut studies, focusing on two issues: (i the effect of different numbers or sizes of holes in bednets and (ii feeding behaviour and mortality with holed nets as compared with unholed nets. As might be expected, increasing numbers and area of holes resulted in increased blood feeding by mosquitoes on sleepers. However, the presence of holes did not generally have a large effect on the mortality of mosquitoes. Successfully entering a holed mosquito net does not necessarily mean that mosquitoes spend less time in contact with the net, which could explain the lack in differences in mortality. Further behavioural studies are necessary to understand mosquito behaviour around nets and the importance of holed nets on malaria transmission.

  5. Test the Principle of Maximum Entropy in Constant Sum 2x2 Game:Evidence in Experimental Economics

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Bin; Wang, Zhijian; Zhang, Jianbo

    2011-01-01

    Entropy serves as a central observable which indicates uncertainty in many chemical, thermodynamical, biological and ecological systems, and the principle of the maximum entropy (MaxEnt) is widely supported in natural science. Recently, entropy is employed to describe the social system in which human subjects are interacted with each other, but the principle of the maximum entropy has never been reported from this field empirically. By using laboratory experimental data, we test the uncertainty of strategy type in various competing environments with two person constant sum $2 \\times 2$ game. Empirical evidence shows that, in this competing game environment, the outcome of human's decision-making obeys the principle of maximum entropy.

  6. Experimental Evidence for Polybaric Intracrustal Differentiation of Primitive Arc Basalt beneath St. Vincent, Lesser Antilles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blundy, Jon; Melekhova, Lena; Robertson, Richard

    2014-05-01

    We present experimental phase equilibria for a primitive, high-Mg basalt from St. Vincent, Lesser Antilles. Experimental details were presented in Melekhova et al (Nature Geosci, 2013); the objective here is to compare experimental phase compositions to those of erupted lavas and cumulates from St. Vincent. Starting material with 4.5 wt% H2O is multiply-saturated with a lherzolite assemblage at 1.3 GPa and 1180 ° C, consistent with mantle wedge derivation. Experimental glasses from our study, in addition to those of Pichavant et al (GCA, 2002) and Pichavant & Macdonald (CMP 2007) on a similar high-Mg basalt, encompass a compositional range from high-magnesian basalt to dacite, with a systematic dependence on H2O content, temperature and pressure. We are able to match the glasses from individual experiments to different lava types, so as to constrain the differentiation depths at which these magmas could be generated from a high-Mg parent, as follows: Composition wt% H2OP (GPa) T (° C) High-Mg basalt 3.9-4.8 1.45-1.751180-1200 Low-Mg basalt 2.3-4.5 1.0-1.3 1065-1150 High alumina basalt 3.0-4.5 0.4 1050-1080 Basaltic andesite 0.6-4.5 0.7-1.0 1050-1130 Andesite 0.6 1.0 1060-1080 The fact that St. Vincent andesites (and some basaltic andesites) appear to derive from a low-H2O (0.6 wt%) parent suggest that they are products of partial melting of older, high-Mg gabbroic rocks, as 0.6 wt% H2O is approximately the amount that can be stored in amphibole-bearing gabbros. The higher H2O contents of parents for the other lava compositions is consistent with derivation by crystallization of basalts with H2O contents that accord with those of olivine-hosted melt inclusions from St. Vincent (Bouvier et al, J Petrol, 2008). The generation of evolved melts both by basalt crystallization and gabbro melting is consistent with the hot zone concept of Annen et al (J Petrol, 2006) wherein repeated intrusion of mantle-derived basalt simultaneously crystallize by cooling and melt

  7. Experimental evidence and isotopomer analysis of mixotrophic glucose metabolism in the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yuting; Quinn, Andrew H; Sriram, Ganesh

    2013-11-14

    Heterotrophic fermentation using simple sugars such as glucose is an established and cost-effective method for synthesizing bioproducts from bacteria, yeast and algae. Organisms incapable of metabolizing glucose have limited applications as cell factories, often despite many other advantageous characteristics. Therefore, there is a clear need to investigate glucose metabolism in potential cell factories. One such organism, with a unique metabolic network and a propensity to synthesize highly reduced compounds as a large fraction of its biomass, is the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum (Pt). Although Pt has been engineered to metabolize glucose, conflicting lines of evidence leave it unresolved whether Pt can natively consume glucose. Isotope labeling experiments in which Pt was mixotrophically grown under light on 100% U-(13)C glucose and naturally abundant (~99% (12)C) dissolved inorganic carbon resulted in proteinogenic amino acids with an average 13C-enrichment of 88%, thus providing convincing evidence of glucose uptake and metabolism. The dissolved inorganic carbon was largely incorporated through anaplerotic rather than photosynthetic fixation. Furthermore, an isotope labeling experiment utilizing 1-(13)C glucose and subsequent metabolic pathway analysis indicated that (i) the alternative Entner-Doudoroff and Phosphoketolase glycolytic pathways are active during glucose metabolism, and (ii) during mixotrophic growth, serine and glycine are largely synthesized from glyoxylate through photorespiratory reactions rather than from 3-phosphoglycerate. We validated the latter result for mixotrophic growth on glycerol by performing a 2-(13)C glycerol isotope labeling experiment. Additionally, gene expression assays showed that known, native glucose transporters in Pt are largely insensitive to glucose or light, whereas the gene encoding cytosolic fructose bisphosphate aldolase 3, an important glycolytic enzyme, is overexpressed in light but insensitive to

  8. The emotional and attitudinal consequences of religious hypocrisy: experimental evidence using a cognitive dissonance paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousaf, Omar; Gobet, Fernand

    2013-01-01

    We explored the emotional and attitudinal consequences of personal attitude-behavior discrepancies using a religious version of the hypocrisy paradigm. We induced cognitive dissonance in participants (n = 206) by making them feel hypocritical for advocating certain religious behaviors that they had not recently engaged in to their own satisfaction. In Experiment 1, this resulted in higher levels of self-reported guilt and shame compared to the control condition. Experiment 2 further showed that a religious self-affirmation task eliminated the guilt and shame. In Experiment 3, participants boosted their religious attitudes as a result of dissonance, and both religious and non-religious self-affirmation tasks eliminated this effect. The findings provide evidence that dissonance induced through religious hypocrisy can result in guilt and shame as well as an attitude bolstering effect, as opposed to the attitude reconciliation effect that is prevalent in previous dissonance research.

  9. Rapid communication: experimental evidence that juvenile pelagic jacks (Carangidae) respond behaviorally to DMSP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debose, Jennifer L; Nevitt, Gabrielle A; Dittman, Andrew H

    2010-03-01

    Dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) is produced by marine algae and released during foraging activity by zooplankton and fish. Pelagic fishes depend on patchily distributed foraging opportunities, and DMSP may be an important signaling molecule for these events. We have previously shown that the abundance of carangid jacks is positively associated with elevated DMSP levels over coral reefs in the Gulf of Mexico, suggesting that these fishes may use spatial and temporal variation in DMSP to locate foraging opportunities. Here, we extend this work by demonstrating that juveniles of two species of pelagic jack, crevalle jack, Caranx hippos, and bluefin trevally, C. melampygus, detect and respond to DMSP in a flow-through tank in the laboratory. Juveniles of these species showed elevated swimming activity in response to ecologically relevant concentrations of DMSP (10(-9) M). These results provide further evidence that this chemical may serve as a chemosensory cue for carangid species.

  10. The Impact of Smoking Bans on Smoking and Consumer Behavior: Quasi-Experimental Evidence from Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boes, Stefan; Marti, Joachim; Maclean, Johanna Catherine

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we exploit the progressive implementation of smoking bans in public venues at the state level in Switzerland to evaluate both the direct effects on smoking and the potential unintended consequences of these legislations on consumer behaviors as measured by visiting restaurants/bars and discos ('going out'). Our results indicate that public venue smoking bans in Switzerland reduce smoking rates, but the findings do not emerge until 1 year following the ban. This pattern of results is consistent with delays in ban enforcement on the part of business owners, difficulties in changing addictive behaviors such as smoking, and/or learning on the part of smokers. We find evidence that smoking bans influence going-out behavior and there is substantial heterogeneity across venue and consumer characteristics. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. The interplay of speech perception and phonology: experimental evidence from Turkish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielke, Jeff

    2003-01-01

    This study supports claims of a relationship between speech perception and phonology with evidence from a crosslinguistic perception experiment involving /h/ deletion in Turkish. Turkish /h/ is often deleted in fast speech, but only in a specific set of segmental contexts which defy traditional explanation. It is shown that /h/ deletes in environments where lower perceptibility is predicted. The results of the perception experiment verify these predictions and further show that language background has a significant impact on speech perception. Finally, this perceptual account of Turkish /h/ deletion points to an empirical means of testing the conflicting hypotheses that perception is active in the synchronic grammar or that its influence is limited to diachrony.

  12. Experimental evidence of vocal recognition in young and adult black-legged kittiwakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulard, Hervé; Aubin, T.; White, J.F.; Hatch, Shyla A.; Danchin, E.

    2008-01-01

    Individual recognition is required in most social interactions, and its presence has been confirmed in many species. In birds, vocal cues appear to be a major component of recognition. Curiously, vocal recognition seems absent or limited in some highly social species such as the black-legged kittiwake, Rissa tridactyla. Using playback experiments, we found that kittiwake chicks recognized their parents vocally, this capacity being detectable as early as 20 days after hatching, the youngest age tested. Mates also recognized each other's long calls. Some birds reacted to their partner's voice when only a part of the long call was played back. Nevertheless, only about a third of the tested birds reacted to their mate's or parents' call and we were unable to detect recognition among neighbours. We discuss the low reactivity of kittiwakes in relation to their cliff-nesting habit and compare our results with evidence of vocal recognition in other larids. ?? 2008 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour.

  13. Fayalite Oxidation Processes: Experimental Evidence for the Stability of Pure Ferric Fayalite?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, A. M.; Righter, K.; Keller, L. P.; Medard, E.; Devouard, B.; Rahman, Z.

    2011-01-01

    Olivine is one of the most important minerals in Earth and planetary sciences. Fayalite Fe2(2+)SiO4, the ferrous end-member of olivine, is present in some terrestrial rocks and primitive meteorites (CV3 chondrites). A ferric fayalite (or ferri-fayalite), Fe(2+) Fe2(3+)(SiO4)2 laihunite, has been reported in Earth samples (magnetite ore, metamorphic and volcanic rocks...) and in Martian meteorites (nakhlites). Laihunite was also synthesized at 1 atmosphere between 400 and 700 C. We show evidence for the stability of a pure ferrifayalite end-member and for potential minerals with XFe(3+) between 2/3 and 1.

  14. B-Cell Depletion Therapy in Systemic Sclerosis: Experimental Rationale and Update on Clinical Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Daoussis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic sclerosis (SSc is a systemic rheumatic disease with poor prognosis since therapeutic options are limited. Recent evidence from animal models suggests that B-cells may be actively involved in the fibrotic process. B-cells from tight skin mice, an animal model of scleroderma, display a “hyperresponsive” phenotype; treatment with rituximab (RTX significantly attenuates skin fibrosis in this animal model. In humans, B-cell infiltration is a prominent finding in most lung biopsies obtained from patients with SSc-associated interstitial lung disease. Several open label studies have assessed the clinical efficacy of RTX in SSc. In most patients skin fibrosis improved; lung function either improved or remained stable. Definite conclusions regarding the clinical efficacy of RTX in SSc cannot be drawn but further exploration with a multicenter, randomized study is warranted.

  15. Evidence of experimental postcyclic transmission of Bothriocephalus acheilognathi in bonytail chub (Gila elegans)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, S.P.; Choudhury, A.; Cole, R.A.

    2007-01-01

    We examined the role that predation of infected conspecific fish and postcyclic transmission might play in the life cycle of the Asian fish tapeworm, Bothriocephalus acheilognathi (Cestoda: Pseudophyllidea) Yamaguti, 1934. Young-of-the-year (YOY) bonytail chub (Gila elegans) were exposed to copepods infected with B. acheilognathi and subsequently fed to subadult bonytail chub. Within 1 wk after consumption of the YOY chub, subadults were necropsied and found infected with gravid and nongravid tapeworms. This study provides evidence that postcyclic transfer of B. acheilognathi can occur. Postcyclic transmission may be an important life history trait of B. acheilognathi that merits consideration when studying the impact and distribution of this invasive and potentially pathogenic tapeworm. ?? American Society of Parasitologists 2007.

  16. Sharks shape the geometry of a selfish seal herd: experimental evidence from seal decoys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vos, Alta; O'Riain, M Justin

    2010-02-23

    Many animals respond to predation risk by forming groups. Evolutionary explanations for group formation in previously ungrouped, but loosely associated prey have typically evoked the selfish herd hypothesis. However, despite over 600 studies across a diverse array of taxa, the critical assumptions of this hypothesis have remained collectively untested, owing to several confounding problems in real predator-prey systems. To solve this, we manipulated the domains of danger of Cape fur seal (Arctocephalus pusillus pusillus) decoys to provide evidence that a selfish reduction in a seals' domain of danger results in a proportional reduction in its predation risk from ambush shark attacks. This behaviour confers a survival advantage to individual seals within a group and explains the evolution of selfish herds in a prey species. These findings empirically elevate Hamilton's selfish herd hypothesis to more than a 'theoretical curiosity'.

  17. Resveratrol, from experimental data to nutritional evidence: the emergence of a new food ingredient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raederstorff, Daniel; Kunz, Iris; Schwager, Joseph

    2013-07-01

    The polyphenol resveratrol is found notably in grapes and in a variety of medicinal plants. Recently, resveratrol has been suggested to have cardioprotective effects and to improve metabolic health by mimicking the effects of calorie restriction. Numerous animal and in vitro studies suggest that resveratrol could improve cardiovascular and metabolic health in humans. In view of this compelling preclinical evidence, several human studies investigating the effects of resveratrol on vascular and metabolic health have been initiated. Collectively, the animal, human epidemiological, and first human intervention studies support a role of resveratrol in vascular and metabolic health. This has led to the introduction of the first supplement and food products containing resveratrol and its emergence as a promising new health ingredient. Thus, supplementation with resveratrol may be included in nutritional and lifestyle programs aiming to reduce the risk of vascular and obesity-related problems. © 2013 New York Academy of Sciences.

  18. The role of butyrate, a histone deacetylase inhibitor in diabetes mellitus: experimental evidence for therapeutic intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sabbir; Jena, Gopabandhu

    2015-01-01

    The contribution of epigenetic mechanisms in diabetes mellitus (DM), β-cell reprogramming and its complications is an emerging concept. Recent evidence suggests that there is a link between DM and histone deacetylases (HDACs), because HDAC inhibitors promote β-cell differentiation, proliferation, function and improve insulin resistance. Moreover, gut microbes and diet-derived products can alter the host epigenome. Furthermore, butyrate and butyrate-producing microbes are decreased in DM. Butyrate is a short-chain fatty acid produced from the fermentation of dietary fibers by microbiota and has been proven as an HDAC inhibitor. The present review provides a pragmatic interpretation of chromatin-dependent and independent complex signaling/mechanisms of butyrate for the treatment of Type 1 and Type 2 DM, with an emphasis on the promising strategies for its drugability and therapeutic implication.

  19. Possible Experimental Evidence for Violation of Standard Electrodynamics, de Broglie Pilot Wave and Spacetime Deformation

    CERN Document Server

    Mignani, R; Cardone, F

    2011-01-01

    We report and discuss the results of double-slit-like experiments in the infrared range, which evidence an anomalous behaviour of photon systems under particular (energy and space) constraints. These outcomes apparently disagree both with standard quantum mechanics (Copenhagen interpretation) and with classical and quantum electrodynamics. Possible interpretations can be given in terms of either the existence of de Broglie-Bohm pilot waves associated to photons, and/or the breakdown of local Lorentz invariance (LLI). We put forward an intriguing hypothesis about the possible connection between these seemingly unrelated points of view by assuming that the pilot wave of a photon is, in the framework of LLI breakdown, a local deformation of the flat minkowskian spacetime.

  20. Passive Facebook usage undermines affective well-being: Experimental and longitudinal evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verduyn, Philippe; Lee, David Seungjae; Park, Jiyoung; Shablack, Holly; Orvell, Ariana; Bayer, Joseph; Ybarra, Oscar; Jonides, John; Kross, Ethan

    2015-04-01

    Prior research indicates that Facebook usage predicts declines in subjective well-being over time. How does this come about? We examined this issue in 2 studies using experimental and field methods. In Study 1, cueing people in the laboratory to use Facebook passively (rather than actively) led to declines in affective well-being over time. Study 2 replicated these findings in the field using experience-sampling techniques. It also demonstrated how passive Facebook usage leads to declines in affective well-being: by increasing envy. Critically, the relationship between passive Facebook usage and changes in affective well-being remained significant when controlling for active Facebook use, non-Facebook online social network usage, and direct social interactions, highlighting the specificity of this result. These findings demonstrate that passive Facebook usage undermines affective well-being.

  1. Microscopic experimental evidence of sublattice decoupling and negative magnetization in a spinel ferrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amit; Yusuf, S. M.

    2017-06-01

    We have observed the phenomenon of negative magnetization in spinel ferrites, CoCr2-xFexO4. The x = 0.15 compound lies in the interesting region of the composition (Fe) driven magnetic phase diagram as it shows two magnetic ordering temperatures along with a negative magnetization behavior. We have given a microscopic experimental proof of magnetic sublattice decoupling and temperature-induced negative magnetization using the neutron diffraction technique. The present study supports the Belov's hypothesis of a "weak" magnetic sublattice for an explanation of negative magnetization, where the "weak" octahedral sublattice deviates from the Brillouin function type behavior of sublattice magnetization as envisioned by Néel in his theory of ferrimagnetism. A physics concept for a possible application of such a negative magnetization phenomenon in spin transfer torque based magnetic random access memory has been outlined.

  2. Surface patterns on single-crystal films under uniaxial stress: Experimental evidence for the Grinfeld instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berréhar, J.; Caroli, C.; Lapersonne-Meyer, C.; Schott, M.

    1992-11-01

    We study the stress relaxation in single-crystal films of polymerized polydiacetylene, in epitaxy with their monomer substrate. Polymerization induces a uniaxial stress. Two types of surface patterns are observed and studied by atomic force microscopy: films thicker than 175 nm exhibit quasiperiodic cracks perpendicular to the polymer chains; thinner ones exhibit regular wrinkles with the same orientation. The wrinkle surface deformation is stress relaxing and plastic. We show that all experimental results, in particular, the order of magnitude of the pattern spacings, are compatible with the following interpretation: as polymerization proceeds, the uniaxial stress generates a Grinfeld instability (Dok. Akad. Nauk SSSR 290, 1358 (1986) [Sov. Phys. Dokl. 31, 831 (1986)]) fed by surface diffusion. The crack pattern is a secondary instability, initiated at the sites of stress concentration provided by the wrinkles.

  3. Experimental evidence of localized plasmon resonance in composite materials containing single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuba, M. V.; Paddubskaya, A. G.; Plyushch, A. O.; Kuzhir, P. P.; Slepyan, G. Ya.; Maksimenko, S. A.; Ksenevich, V. K.; Buka, P.; Seliuta, D.; Kasalynas, I.; Macutkevic, J.; Valusis, G.; Thomsen, C.; Lakhtakia, A.

    2012-04-01

    Experimental proof of localized plasmon resonance was found in thin films containing either single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) or SWNT bundles of different length. All samples were prepared by a simple technique that permitted the selection of different SWNT lengths in different samples without significant differences in electronic properties. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy showed that an optical-density peak, the same as a terahertz conductivity peak, shifts to higher frequencies as the SWNT lengths are reduced—in agreement with a similar tendency predicted for the localized plasmon resonance in finite-length SWNTs [Slepyan , Phys. Rev. BPRBMDO1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.81.205423 81, 205423 (2010)].

  4. Experimental evidence for collisional shock formation via two obliquely merging supersonic plasma jets

    CERN Document Server

    Merritt, Elizabeth C; Hsu, Scott C; Adams, Colin S; Gilmore, Mark A

    2013-01-01

    We report spatially resolved experimental measurements of the oblique merging of two supersonic laboratory plasma jets. The jets are formed and launched by pulsed-power-driven railguns using injected argon, and have electron density $\\sim 10^{14}$ cm$^{-3}$, electron temperature $\\approx 1.4$ eV, ionization fraction near unity, and velocity $\\approx 40$ km/s just prior to merging. The jet merging produces a few-cm-thick stagnation layer, as observed in both fast-framing camera images and multi-chord interferometer data, consistent with collisional shock formation [E. C. Merritt et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 085003 (2013)]. The observed stagnation layer emission morphology is consistent with hydrodynamic oblique shock theory at early times, and then undergoes an evolution at later times that is coincident with the theoretically predicted transition to detached shock formation.

  5. Cycle frequency in standard Rock-Paper-Scissors games: Evidence from experimental economics

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Bin

    2013-01-01

    In the iconic game, standard Rock-Paper-Scissors (RPS) game, cyclic trajectory is predicted by evolutionary game theory but not by classical game theory. We conduct lab experiments of the standard RPS game to index the cycle. Our experiments are of traditional setting with discrete time and random matched. In the 12 samples of 300 rounds 'stochastic' social evolution trajectories, (1) We find the cycles not only exist but also persist; (2) We firstly test out the frequencies of cycles in this experiments; The observed frequency is about 0.028 +/- 0.007 period per experimental round. The application of the observed frequency on a dynamics model is illustrated. Using frequency of cycles to index the distance from equilibrium, we consider both of the time symmetry and the sampling size effect, both of which have the root in non-equilibrium statistical physics.

  6. Experimental evidence of temperature path independence in the polycrystalline alloy Ni{sub 3}Al

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, G.; Antolovich, S.D. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States). School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering

    1995-10-01

    The results from a series of elevated temperature prestrain experiments on a hypostoichiometric polycrystalline Ni{sub 3}Al are presented. Experiments were conducted to examine the deformation characteristic of thermal reversibility or temperature path history independence (TPHI). Temperature path history independence was experimentally observed from prestraining experiments (also known as Cottrell-Stokes experiments) in which the specimen was deformed at different temperatures; the results were compared to those obtained from tests conducted at constant temperature. The purpose of such experiments was to macroscopically evaluate the effects of intrinsic dislocation mobility and dislocation substructure on deformation. These experiments provide a framework in which to evaluate fundamental characteristics of thermally activated deformation processes. The results for polycrystalline Ni{sub 3}Al alloys indicate that the mechanisms responsible for thermal strengthening is independent of prior deformation history. This observation implies that the mechanism of anomalous strengthening in such alloys is fully reversible and independent of the development of a dislocation substructure.

  7. Experimental evidence of the role of viscosity in the molecular kinetic theory of dynamic wetting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvivier, D; Seveno, D; Rioboo, R; Blake, T D; De Coninck, J

    2011-11-01

    We report an experimental study of the dynamics of spontaneous spreading of aqueous glycerol drops on glass. For a range of glycerol concentrations, we follow the evolution of the radius and contact angle over several decades of time and investigate the influence of solution viscosity. The application of the molecular kinetic theory to the resulting data allows us to extract the coefficient of contact-line friction ζ, the molecular jump frequency κ(0), and the jump length λ for each solution. Our results show that the modified theory, which explicitly accounts for the effect of viscosity, can successfully be applied to droplet spreading. The viscosity affects the jump frequency but not the jump length. In combining these data, we confirm that the contact-line friction of the solution/air interface against the glass is proportional to the viscosity and exponentially dependent on the work of adhesion.

  8. Strain Compensation in Single ZnSe/CdSe Quantum Wells: Analytical Model and Experimental Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieger, Torsten; Riedl, Thomas; Neumann, Elmar; Grützmacher, Detlev; Lindner, Jörg K N; Pawlis, Alexander

    2017-03-08

    The lattice mismatch between CdSe and ZnSe is known to limit the thickness of ZnSe/CdSe quantum wells on GaAs (001) substrates to about 2-3 monolayers. We demonstrate that this thickness can be enhanced significantly by using In0.12Ga0.88As pseudo substrates, which generate alternating tensile and compressive strains in the ZnSe/CdSe/ZnSe layers resulting in an efficient strain compensation. This method enables to design CdSe/ZnSe quantum wells with CdSe thicknesses ranging from 1 to 6 monolayers, covering the whole visible spectrum. The strain compensation effect is investigated by high resolution transmission electron microscopy and supported by molecular statics simulations. The model approach with the supporting experimental measurements is sufficiently general to be also applied to other highly mismatched material combinations for the design of advanced strained heterostructures.

  9. Amplification of seismic ground motion in the Tunis basin: Numerical BEM simulations vs experimental evidences

    CERN Document Server

    Kham, Marc; Bouden-Romdhane, Nejla

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims at the analysis of seismic wave amplification in a deep alluvial basin in the city of Tunis in Tunisia. This sedimentary basin is 3000m wide and 350m deep. Since the seismic hazard is significant in this area, the depth of the basin and the strong impedance ratio raise the need for an accurate estimation of seismic motion amplification. Various experimental investigations were performed in previous studies to characterize site effects. The Boundary Element Method is considered herein to assess the parameter sensitivity of the amplification process and analyse the prevailing phenomena. The various frequencies of maximum amplification are correctly estimated by the BEM simulations. The maximum amplification level observed in the field is also well retrieved by the numerical simulations but, due to the sensitivity of the location of maximum amplification in space, the overall maximum amplification has to be considered. The influence of the wave-field incidence and material damping is also discuss...

  10. Molecular and experimental evidence refuse the life cycle of Proctoeces lintoni (Fellodistomidae) in Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, Marcelo E; Valdivia, Isabel M; Cárdenas, Leyla; George-Nascimento, Mario; Gonzalez, Karen; Guiñez, Ricardo E; Cuello, Diego

    2010-02-01

    The mussel Perumitylus purpuratus has been described as the first intermediate host for the digenea Proctoeces lintoni (Fellodistomidae) in the Chilean coast. The study of more than 3000 specimens of P. purpuratus, taken off northern Chile revealed the absence of sporocysts. Experimental infection of mussels with eggs obtained from the known host for P. lintoni was unsuccessful. We analyze the V4 region of the SSU rRNA of living sporocysts and cercariae obtained from P. purpuratus from central Chile in order to confirm the proposed life cycle for this digenea. Our results demonstrated that sporocysts and cercariae obtained from P. purpuratus do not belong to P. lintoni but to an undescribed digenea from the Chilean coast.

  11. Theoretical Analysis and Experimental Evidence of NonFourier Heat Conduction Behavior

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋方明; 刘登瀛; 蔡睿贤

    2001-01-01

    This paper consists of two parts. (1) For a hollow sphere with sudden temperature changes on its inner and outer surfaces, the hyperbolic heat conduction equation is employed to describe this extreme thermal case and an analytical expression of its temperature distribution is obtained. According to the expression, the non-Fourier heat conduction behavior that will appear in the hollow sphere is studied and some qualitative conditions that will result in distinct non-Fourier behavior in the medium is ultimately attained. (2) A novel experiment to observe non-Fourier heat conduction behavior in porous material (mainly ordinary duplicating paper) heated by a microsecond laser pulse is presented. The conditions for observing distinct non-Fourier heat conduction behavior in the experimental sample agree well with the theoretical results qualitatively.

  12. Experimental evidence for water formation via ozone hydrogenation on dust grains at 10 K

    CERN Document Server

    Mokrane, H; Accolla, M; Congiu, E; Dulieu, F; Chehrouri, M; Lemaire, J L

    2009-01-01

    The formation of water molecules from the reaction between ozone (O3) and D-atoms is studied experimentally for the first time. Ozone is deposited on non-porous amorphous solid water ice (H2O), and D-atoms are then sent onto the sample held at 10 K. HDO molecules are detected during the desorption of the whole substrate where isotope mixing takes place, indicating that water synthesis has occurred. The efficiency of water formation via hydrogenation of ozone is of the same order of magnitude of that found for reactions involving O atoms or O2 molecules and exhibits no apparent activation barrier. These experiments validate the assumption made by models using ozone as one of the precursors of water formation via solid-state chemistry on interstellar dust grains.

  13. Self-transcendence facilitates meaning-making and flow: Evidence from a pilot experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osin, Evgeny N.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We review the psychological theory of flow and focus on the notion of the autotelic personality, arguing that self-transcendence (understood within the existential tradition of Frankl and Längle as the individual’s ability to establish inner relationships with values can be viewed as a personality disposition conducive to flow experience. The study aimed to investigate the effects of situational task meaning and dispositional self-transcendence on productivity and flow experience. We present a pilot quasi-experimental study conducted in a student sample (N = 82 Students were asked to work in small-group settings on a creative task, which consisted in finding solutions to a social problem. Each group was randomly assigned to an instruction presenting the problem as happening either in a distant country (low-meaning or in their home country (high-meaning condition. The outcome variables were measures of flow, perceived meaning of the task, and satisfaction with time spent working. The solutions generated by the students were rated by three experts. The experimental manipulation had a main effect on the quality of the resulting solutions, but not on the subjective experience of the participants. A number of significant interaction effects were found, indicating that the associations of self-transcendence with experiential outcomes tended to be linear under the low-meaning condition, but curvilinear under the high-meaning condition. The findings suggest that self-transcendence is particularly beneficial to flow in situations with unclear meaning, but very high levels of self-transcendence may hinder flow in highly meaningful situations. Overall, the findings suggest that self-transcendence can be considered as a disposition of the autotelic personality.

  14. Experimental evidence for chick discrimination without recognition in a brood parasite host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grim, Tomás

    2007-02-01

    Recognition is considered a critical basis for discriminatory behaviours in animals. Theoretically, recognition and discrimination of parasitic chicks are not predicted to evolve in hosts of brood parasitic birds that evict nest-mates. Yet, an earlier study showed that host reed warblers (Acrocephalus scirpaceus) of an evicting parasite, the common cuckoo (Cuculus canorus), can avoid the costs of prolonged care for unrelated young by deserting the cuckoo chick before it fledges. Desertion was not based on specific recognition of the parasite because hosts accept any chick cross-fostered into their nests. Thus, the mechanism of this adaptive host response remains enigmatic. Here, I show experimentally that the cue triggering this 'discrimination without recognition' behaviour is the duration of parental care. Neither the intensity of brood care nor the presence of a single-chick in the nest could explain desertions. Hosts responded similarly to foreign chicks, whether heterospecific or experimental conspecifics. The proposed mechanism of discrimination strikingly differs from those found in other parasite-host systems because hosts do not need an internal recognition template of the parasite's appearance to effectively discriminate. Thus, host defences against parasitic chicks may be based upon mechanisms qualitatively different from those operating against parasitic eggs. I also demonstrate that this discriminatory mechanism is non-costly in terms of recognition errors. Comparative data strongly suggest that parasites cannot counter-evolve any adaptation to mitigate effects of this host defence. These findings have crucial implications for the process and end-result of host-parasite arms races and our understanding of the cognitive basis of discriminatory mechanisms in general.

  15. Extreme iron enrichment and liquid immiscibility in mafic intrusions: Experimental evidence revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veksler, Ilya V.

    2009-07-01

    This paper examines phase equilibria and mass balance constraints on Fe enrichment in tholeiitic liquids in plutonic environments. The peak of Fe enrichment is thought to roughly coincide with magma saturation in Fe-Ti oxides; and olivine starts to react with the liquid at about the same time. This crucial stage of crystallization is examined in detail using a compilation of chemical analyses of 64 experimental charges that comprise liquids (quenched glasses) equilibrated with the liquidus assemblage of olivine, plagioclase, high-Ca pyroxene, and low-Ca pyroxene. Some samples also contain Fe-Ti oxides. It is shown that the 4-phase liquidus assemblage does not constrain a narrow range of liquid compositions. The concentrations of SiO 2 in the selection of experimental glasses vary broadly from 42 to 66 wt.%. Silica content shows strong negative correlations with FeO and CaO/Al 2O 3, and strong positive correlation with alkalis. Extreme Fe enrichment above 22 wt.% FeO is observed only in alkali-free or alkali-poor liquids. Broad compositional variations for the multiply-saturated liquids are attributed to strong non-ideality and complex concentration-activity relationships in ferrobasaltic melts. Liquid immiscibility characteristic of Fe-rich silicate liquids is the ultimate consequence of non-ideality. Petrogenetic implications of phase equilibria and mass balance constraints are discussed for a classical example of the Skaergaard intrusion in East Greenland, where the trend of extreme Fe enrichment has been in contention. It is proposed that seemingly conflicting results of experiments on Skaergaard natural cumulate rocks and model melt compositions can be reconciled if it is assumed that silicate liquid immiscibility in Skaergaard started not at the very end of crystallization but earlier, soon after the start of ilmenite and magnetite crystallization.

  16. The mechanics of sill inception, propagation and growth: Experimental evidence for rapid reduction in magmatic overpressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanagh, J. L.; Boutelier, D.; Cruden, A. R.

    2015-07-01

    A model of magma propagation in the crust is presented using a series of analogue experiments, where dyed water is injected at a constant flux into layers of solidified gelatine. The gelatine layers are transparent and, when intruded, deform in an almost ideal-elastic manner under the experimental conditions (low gelatine concentration: 2.5 or 3 wt%, and low temperature: 5-10 °C). The upper gelatine layer was 1.0 to 1.5 times stiffer than the lower layer, with either a 'weak' or 'strong' interface strength between the gelatine layers. The gelatine is seeded with 20- 50 μm-diameter PMMA-RhB neutrally buoyant particles that are fluoresced by a pulsed, vertical laser sheet centred on the injection point. Digital image correlation (DIC) is used to calculate incremental strain and finite strain in the deforming host material as it is intruded. This is mapped in 2D for the developing experimental volcanic plumbing system that comprises a feeder dyke and sill. Since the gelatine deforms elastically, strain measurements correlate with stress. Our results indicate that, for constant magma flux, the moment of sill inception is characterised by a significant magmatic pressure decrease of up to ∼ 60%. This is evidenced by the rapid contraction of the feeder dyke at the moment the sill forms. Sill propagation is then controlled by the fracture properties of the weak interface, with fluid from the feeder dyke extracted to help grow the sill. Pressure drops during sill inception and growth are likely to be important in volcanic systems, where destabilisation of the magmatic plumbing system could trigger an eruption.

  17. In-Situ and Experimental Evidence for Acidic Weathering of Rocks and Soils on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurowitz, J. A.; McLennan, S. M.; Tosca, N. J.; Arvidson, R. E.; Michalski, J. R.; Ming, D.; Schroeder, C.; Squyres, S. W.

    2006-01-01

    Experimental data for alteration of synthetic Martian basalts at pH=0-1 indicate that chemical fractionations at low pH are vastly different from those observed during terrestrial weathering. Rock analyses from Gusev crater are well described by the relationships apparent from low pH experimental alteration data. A model for rock surface alteration is developed which indicates that a leached alteration zone is present on rock surfaces at Gusev. This zone is not chemically fractionated to a large degree from the underlying rock interior, indicating that the rock surface alteration process has occurred at low fluid-to-rock ratio. The geochemistry of natural rock surfaces analyzed by APXS is consistent with a mixture between adhering soil/dust and the leached alteration zone. The chemistry of rock surfaces analyzed after brushing with the RAT is largely representative of the leached alteration zone. The chemistry of rock surfaces analyzed after grinding with the RAT is largely representative of the interior of the rock, relatively unaffected by the alteration process occurring at the rock surface. Elemental measurements from the Spirit, Opportunity, Pathfinder and Viking 1 landing sites indicate that soil chemistry from widely separated locations is consistent with the low-pH, low fluid to rock ratio alteration relationships developed for Gusev rocks. Soils are affected principally by mobility of FeO and MgO, consistent with alteration of olivine-bearing basalt and subsequent precipitation of FeO and MgO bearing secondary minerals as the primary control on soil geochemistry.

  18. Experimental evidence of population differences in reproductive investment conditional on environmental stochasticity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauthey, Zoé [INRA, UMR 1224, Ecologie Comportementale et Biologie des Populations de Poissons, Aquapôle, quartier Ibarron, 64310 Saint-Pée sur Nivelle (France); Univ Pau & Pays Adour, UMR 1224, Ecologie Comportementale et Biologie des Populations de Poissons, UFR Sciences et Techniques de la Côte Basque, Allée du parc Montaury, 64600 Anglet (France); Panserat, Stéphane [INRA, UR 107, Nutrition Metabolism Aquaculture, Aquapôle, 64310 Saint Pée sur Nivelle (France); Elosegi, Arturo [Faculty of Science and Technology, University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, 48080 Bilbao (Spain); Herman, Alexandre [INRA, UR 107, Nutrition Metabolism Aquaculture, Aquapôle, 64310 Saint Pée sur Nivelle (France); Tentelier, Cédric [INRA, UMR 1224, Ecologie Comportementale et Biologie des Populations de Poissons, Aquapôle, quartier Ibarron, 64310 Saint-Pée sur Nivelle (France); Univ Pau & Pays Adour, UMR 1224, Ecologie Comportementale et Biologie des Populations de Poissons, UFR Sciences et Techniques de la Côte Basque, Allée du parc Montaury, 64600 Anglet (France); and others

    2016-01-15

    Environmental stochasticity is expected to shape life histories of species, wherein organisms subjected to strong environmental variation should display adaptive response by being able to tune their reproductive investment. For riverine ecosystems, climate models forecast an increase in the frequency and intensity of extreme events such as floods and droughts. The speed and the mechanisms by which organisms may adapt their reproductive investment are therefore of primary importance to understand how species will cope with such radical environmental changes. In the present study, we sampled spawners from two different populations of wild brown trout, originating from two environments with contrasting levels of flow stochasticity. We placed them in sympatry within an experimental channel during reproductive season. In one modality, water flow was maintained constant, whereas in another modality, water flow was highly variable. Reproductive investment of all individuals was monitored using weight and energetic plasma metabolite variation throughout the reproductive season. Only the populations originating from the most variable environment showed a plastic response to experimental manipulation of water flow, the females being able to reduce their weight variation (from 19.2% to 13.1%) and metabolites variations (from 84.2% to 18.6% for triglycerides for instance) under variable flow conditions. These results imply that mechanisms to cope with environmental stochasticity can differ between populations of the same species, where some populations can be plastic whereas other cannot. - Highlights: • We place two populations of brown trout under contrasting water flow for reproduction. • Energetic metabolite variation is used as a cue of reproductive investment. • In constant flow, both populations show the same reproductive investment. • In variable flow, only one of the populations modifies its reproductive investment. • Divergent evolution of reproductive

  19. Antioxidants and embryo phenotype: is there experimental evidence for strong integration of the antioxidant system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Possenti, Cristina Daniela; Karadas, Filiz; Colombo, Graziano; Caprioli, Manuela; Rubolini, Diego; Milzani, Aldo; Donne, Isabella Dalle; Saino, Nicola; Parolini, Marco

    2017-02-15

    Organisms have evolved complex defense systems against oxidative stress. Bird eggs contain maternally derived antioxidants that protect embryos from oxidative damage. The antioxidant system components are thought to be integrated, but few studies have analyzed the covariation between antioxidant concentrations, embryo 'oxidative status' and morphology. In addition, no study has tested the effects of experimental change in yolk antioxidant concentration on other antioxidants, on their reciprocal relationships and on their relationships with embryo oxidative status or growth, which are expected if antioxidants defenses are integrated. In yellow-legged gull (Larus michahellis) embryos, we analyzed the covariation between several antioxidants, markers of 'oxidative status' [total antioxidant capacity (TAC), concentration of pro-oxidants (TOS), lipid peroxidation (LPO) and protein carbonylation (PC)] in the yolk, liver and brain, and morphology. Yolk and liver antioxidant concentrations were positively correlated reciprocally and with embryo size, and positively predicted TAC but not oxidative status. TOS and LPO were positively correlated in the liver, while TAC and LPO were negatively correlated in the brain. Weak relationships existed between antioxidants and TOS, PC and LPO. The effects of antioxidants on oxidative status and morphology were non-synergistic. An experimental physiological increase in yolk vitamin E had very weak effects on the relationships between other antioxidants or oxidative status and vitamin E concentration, the concentration of other antioxidants or oxidative status; the covariation between other antioxidants and oxidative status, and relationships between morphology or oxidative status and other antioxidants, challenging the common wisdom of strong functional relationships among antioxidants, at least for embryos in the wild. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  20. Evidence evaluation: measure Z corresponds to human utility judgments better than measure L and optimal-experimental-design models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusconi, Patrice; Marelli, Marco; D'Addario, Marco; Russo, Selena; Cherubini, Paolo

    2014-05-01

    Evidence evaluation is a crucial process in many human activities, spanning from medical diagnosis to impression formation. The present experiments investigated which, if any, normative model best conforms to people's intuition about the value of the obtained evidence. Psychologists, epistemologists, and philosophers of science have proposed several models to account for people's intuition about the utility of the obtained evidence with respect either to a focal hypothesis or to a constellation of hypotheses. We pitted against each other the so-called optimal-experimental-design models (i.e., Bayesian diagnosticity, log₁₀ diagnosticity, information gain, Kullback-Leibler distance, probability gain, and impact) and measures L and Z to compare their ability to describe humans' intuition about the value of the obtained evidence. Participants received words-and-numbers scenarios concerning 2 hypotheses and binary features. They were asked to evaluate the utility of "yes" and "no" answers to questions about some features possessed in different proportions (i.e., the likelihoods) by 2 types of extraterrestrial creatures (corresponding to 2 mutually exclusive and exhaustive hypotheses). Participants evaluated either how an answer was helpful or how an answer decreased/increased their beliefs with respect either to a single hypothesis or to both hypotheses. We fitted mixed-effects models and used the Akaike information criterion and the Bayesian information criterion values to compare the competing models of the value of the obtained evidence. Overall, the experiments showed that measure Z was the best fitting model of participants' judgments of the value of obtained answers. We discussed the implications for the human hypothesis-evaluation process.

  1. Effect of land use change on ecosystem function of dung beetles: experimental evidence from Wallacea Region in Sulawesi, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SHAHABUDDIN

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Shahabuddin (2011 Effect of land use change on ecosystem function of dung beetles: experimental evidence from Wallacea Region in Sulawesi, Indonesia. Biodiversitas 12: 177-181. The deforestation of tropical forests and their subsequent conversion to human-dominated land-use systems is one of the most significant causes of biodiversity loss. However clear understanding of the links between ecological functions and biodiversity is needed to evaluate and predict the true environmental consequences of human activities. This study provided experimental evidence comparing ecosystem function of dung beetles across a land use gradient ranging from natural tropical forest and agroforestry systems to open cultivated areas in Central Sulawesi. Therefore, standardized dung pats were exposed at each land-use type to assess dung removal and parasite suppression activity by dung beetles. The results showed that ecosystem function of dung beetles especially dung burial activity were remarkably disrupted by land use changes from natural forest to open agricultural area. Dung beetles presence enhanced about 53% of the total dung removed and reduced about 83% and 63% of fly population and species number respectively, indicating a pronounce contribution of dung beetles in our ecosystem.

  2. Electromagnetic and neutron emissions from brittle rocks failure: Experimental evidence and geological implications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Carpinteri; G Lacidogna; O Borla; A Manuello; G Niccolini

    2012-02-01

    It has been observed energy emission in the form of electromagnetic radiation, clearly indicating charge redistribution, and neutron bursts, necessarily involving nuclear reactions, during the failure process of quasi-brittle materials such as rocks, when subjected to compression tests. The material used is Luserna stone, which presents a very brittle behaviour during compression failure. The observed phenomenon of high-energy particle emission, i.e., electrons and neutrons, can be explained in the framework of the superradiance applied to the solid state, where individual atoms lose their identity and become part of different plasmas, electronic and nuclear. Since the analysed material contains iron, it can be conjectured that piezonuclear reactions involving fission of iron into aluminum, or into magnesium and silicon, should have occurred during compression damage and failure. These complex phenomenologies are confirmed by Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) tests conducted on Luserna stone specimens, and found additional evidences at the Earth’s Crust scale, where electromagnetic and neutron emissions are observed just in correspondence with major earthquakes. In this context, the effects of piezonuclear reactions can be also considered from a geophysical and geological point of view.

  3. Experimental evidence for ecological selection on genome variation in the wild.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gompert, Zachariah; Comeault, Aaron A; Farkas, Timothy E; Feder, Jeffrey L; Parchman, Thomas L; Buerkle, C Alex; Nosil, Patrik

    2014-03-01

    Understanding natural selection's effect on genetic variation is a major goal in biology, but the genome-scale consequences of contemporary selection are not well known. In a release and recapture field experiment we transplanted stick insects to native and novel host plants and directly measured allele frequency changes within a generation at 186,576 genetic loci. We observed substantial, genome-wide allele frequency changes during the experiment, most of which could be attributed to random mortality (genetic drift). However, we also documented that selection affected multiple genetic loci distributed across the genome, particularly in transplants to the novel host. Host-associated selection affecting the genome acted on both a known colour-pattern trait as well as other (unmeasured) phenotypes. We also found evidence that selection associated with elevation affected genome variation, although our experiment was not designed to test this. Our results illustrate how genomic data can identify previously underappreciated ecological sources and phenotypic targets of selection. © 2013 The Authors. Ecology Letters published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and CNRS.

  4. Experimental Evidence and In Silico Identification of Tryptophan Decarboxylase in Citrus Genus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi De Masi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Plant tryptophan decarboxylase (TDC converts tryptophan into tryptamine, precursor of indolealkylamine alkaloids. The recent finding of tryptamine metabolites in Citrus plants leads to hypothesize the existence of TDC activity in this genus. Here, we report for the first time that, in Citrus x limon seedlings, deuterium labeled tryptophan is decarboxylated into tryptamine, from which successively deuterated N,N,N-trimethyltryptamine is formed. These results give an evidence of the occurrence of the TDC activity and the successive methylation pathway of the tryptamine produced from the tryptophan decarboxylation. In addition, with the aim to identify the genetic basis for the presence of TDC, we carried out a sequence similarity search for TDC in the Citrus genomes using as a probe the TDC sequence reported for the plant Catharanthus roseus. We analyzed the genomes of both Citrus clementina and Citrus sinensis, available in public database, and identified putative protein sequences of aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase. Similarly, 42 aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase sequences from 23 plant species were extracted from public databases. Potential sequence signatures for functional TDC were then identified. With this research, we propose for the first time a putative protein sequence for TDC in the genus Citrus.

  5. The Function of Gas Vesicles in Halophilic Archaea and Bacteria: Theories and Experimental Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aharon Oren

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A few extremely halophilic Archaea (Halobacterium salinarum, Haloquadratum walsbyi, Haloferax mediterranei, Halorubrum vacuolatum, Halogeometricum borinquense, Haloplanus spp. possess gas vesicles that bestow buoyancy on the cells. Gas vesicles are also produced by the anaerobic endospore-forming halophilic Bacteria Sporohalobacter lortetii and Orenia sivashensis. We have extensive information on the properties of gas vesicles in Hbt. salinarum and Hfx. mediterranei and the regulation of their formation. Different functions were suggested for gas vesicle synthesis: buoying cells towards oxygen-rich surface layers in hypersaline water bodies to prevent oxygen limitation, reaching higher light intensities for the light-driven proton pump bacteriorhodopsin, positioning the cells optimally for light absorption, light shielding, reducing the cytoplasmic volume leading to a higher surface-area-to-volume ratio (for the Archaea and dispersal of endospores (for the anaerobic spore-forming Bacteria. Except for Hqr. walsbyi which abounds in saltern crystallizer brines, gas-vacuolate halophiles are not among the dominant life forms in hypersaline environments. There only has been little research on gas vesicles in natural communities of halophilic microorganisms, and the few existing studies failed to provide clear evidence for their possible function. This paper summarizes the current status of the different theories why gas vesicles may provide a selective advantage to some halophilic microorganisms.

  6. Experimental evidence of polymorphysm of sexual development in Capitella sp. B (Polychaeta: Capitellidae from Barcelona, Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuria Méndez

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The development and growth of Capitella sp. B obtained from Barcelona were studied under culture conditions. Trochophore and metatrochophore larvae hatched non-simultaneously (two release periods from single brood tubes. This is the first laboratory evidence of polymorphysm of sexual development in the Capitella capitata species-complex. During the first release period, only free swimming trochophores hatched. The females, still bearing larvae inside the brood tube, were transferred to another dish. After three days, ciliated metatrochophores hatched from 8.7% of the transferred broods. In a culture experiment, larvae maintained in sediment enriched with artificial food grew to immature and mature adults. In this condition, the larvae that hatched during the first release reached the immature adult stage, while the larvae derived from the second release became mature adults. Oogenesis was observed three times in one female from the second release, though no spawning and fertilization occurred under incubation with sib mature males. Two different sizes of coelomic oocytes were observed. Polymorphysm of sexual development is discussed as an advantageous reproductive strategy enhancing survival in organic enriched sediments.

  7. Experimental evidence of landscape reorganization under changing external forcing: implications to climate-driven knickpoints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Arvind; Tejedor, Alejandro; Grimaud, Jean-Louis; Foufoula-Georgiou, Efi

    2017-04-01

    Understanding and quantifying geomorphic and topologic re-organization of landscape in response to changing climatic or tectonic forcing is of scientific and practical interest. Although several studies have addressed the large-scale response (e.g., change in mean relief), studies on the smaller-scale drainage pattern re-organization and quantification of landscape vulnerability to the timing, magnitude, and frequency of changing forcing are lacking. To that goal, a series of controlled laboratory experiments were conducted to study the effect of changing precipitation patterns on landscape evolution at the short and long-time scales. High resolution digital elevation (DEM) both in space and time were measured for a range of rainfall patterns and uplift rates. Results from our study show a distinct signature of the precipitation increase on the probabilistic and geometrical structure of landscape features, evident in widening and deepening of channels and valleys, change in drainage patterns within sub-basins and change in the space-time structure of erosional and depositional events. A spatially explicit analysis of the locus of these erosional and depositional events show an acceleration of erosion in the hillslopes when the rainfall intensity is increased, while the incision in fluvial channels is slowed down exhibiting a sediment-flux dependent behavior. Finally, we document the changes in the longitudinal river profiles with increasing precipitation intensity, revealing the formation of knickpoints at certain confluences where large discontinuities in the ratio Qs/Qw are observed.

  8. Experimental evidence of pharmacological management of anchorage in Orthodontics: A systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-González, Felipe José; Cañigral, Aránzazu; Balbontín-Ayala, Felipe; Gonzalo-Orden, José Manuel; de Carlos, Felix; Cobo, Teresa; Fernández-Vázquez, Jose Pedro; Sánchez-Lasheras, Fernando; Vega, José Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Orthodontic anchorage is one of the most challenging aspects of Orthodontics. Preventing undesired movement of teeth could result in safer and less complicated orthodontic treatment. Recently, several reviews have been published about the effects of different molecules on bone physiology and the clinical side effects in Orthodontics. However, the effects of local application of these substances on the rate of orthodontic tooth movement have not been assessed. Objectives: The aim of this research was to analyze the scientific evidence published in the literature about the effects of different molecules on orthodontic anchorage. Methods: The literature was systematically reviewed using PubMed/Medline, Scopus and Cochrane databases from 2000 up to July 31st, 2014. Articles were independently selected by two different researchers based on previously established inclusion and exclusion criteria, with a concordance Kappa index of 0.86. The methodological quality of the reviewed papers was performed. Results: Search strategy identified 270 articles. Twenty-five of them were selected after application of inclusion/exclusion criteria, and only 11 qualified for final analysis. Molecules involved in orthodontic anchorage were divided into three main groups: osteoprotegerin (OPG), bisphosphonates (BPs) and other molecules (OMs). Conclusions: Different drugs are able to alter the bone remodeling cycle, influencing osteoclast function and, therefore, tooth movement. Thus, they could be used in order to provide maximal anchorage while preventing undesired movements. OPG was found the most effective molecule in blocking the action of osteoclasts, thereby reducing undesired movements. PMID:26560822

  9. Experimental evidence for the functional relevance of anion-π interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Ryan E.; Hennig, Andreas; Weimann, Dominik P.; Emery, Daniel; Ravikumar, Velayutham; Montenegro, Javier; Takeuchi, Toshihide; Gabutti, Sandro; Mayor, Marcel; Mareda, Jiri; Schalley, Christoph A.; Matile, Stefan

    2010-07-01

    Attractive in theory and confirmed to exist, anion-π interactions have never really been seen at work. To catch them in action, we prepared a collection of monomeric, cyclic and rod-shaped naphthalenediimide transporters. Their ability to exert anion-π interactions was demonstrated by electrospray tandem mass spectrometry in combination with theoretical calculations. To relate this structural evidence to transport activity in bilayer membranes, affinity and selectivity sequences were recorded. π-acidification and active-site decrowding increased binding, transport and chloride > bromide > iodide selectivity, and supramolecular organization inverted acetate > nitrate to nitrate > acetate selectivity. We conclude that anion-π interactions on monomeric surfaces are ideal for chloride recognition, whereas their supramolecular enhancement by π,π-interactions appears perfect to target nitrate. Chloride transporters are relevant to treat channelopathies, and nitrate sensors to monitor cellular signaling and cardiovascular diseases. A big impact on organocatalysis can be expected from the stabilization of anionic transition states on chiral π-acidic surfaces.

  10. No experimental evidence for visual prior entry of angry faces, even when feeling afraid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, Timothy P; Youssef, Hanan; Denson, Thomas F

    2017-02-01

    Threatening stimuli prevent attentional disengagement. Less clear is whether threat captures attention in addition to holding it. One way to measure attentional capture is to examine visual prior entry. Visual prior entry occurs when one stimulus is consciously recognized as appearing prior to other stimuli. Using a temporal order judgments paradigm, we examined whether threatening, angry faces would experience visual prior entry. Such a finding would provide evidence for attentional capture by threat. We further examined whether such attentional capture by threat was contingent on feeling afraid. Using Bayesian analyses, we found moderate support for the null hypothesis in 2 experiments (Ns = 44, 63). Angry faces did not capture attention, and there was no effect of feeling afraid because of watching a horror movie (Experiment 1) or anticipatory fear about giving a speech in front of an expert panel (Experiment 2). These studies were supplemented with a meta-analysis that suggests the visual prior entry effect is very small, if indeed it exists. Thus, the visual prior entry effect for threatening faces is likely a much smaller effect than the extant literature suggests. (PsycINFO Database Record

  11. Can people really "laugh at themselves?"--experimental and correlational evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beermann, Ursula; Ruch, Willibald

    2011-06-01

    Laughing at oneself is considered a core component of the sense of humor in the theories of several authors. In McGhee's (1996) eight-step-training program of the sense of humor, laughing at oneself constitutes one of the most difficult levels. However, until now, only little empirical evidence on laughing at oneself exists. Using a multimethod approach, in the current study, 70 psychology students and a total of 126 peers filled in the Sense of Humor Scale (SHS, McGhee, 1996), containing as a subscale "Laughing at oneself". In addition, the participants answered the Trait and State forms of the State-Trait-Cheerfulness-Inventory (STCI, Ruch, Köhler, & van Thriel, 1996; Ruch, Köhler, & van Thriel, 1997). They then were confronted with six distorted images of themselves. Facial responses of the participants were videotaped and analyzed using the Facial Action Coding System (FACS, Ekman, Friesen, & Hager, 2002). Four indicators of exhilaration were examined: (a) experienced funniness, (b) AU12 smiles, (c) Duchenne displays, and (d) laughter. Furthermore, fake and masking smiles were studied. Results demonstrated that self- and peer reports of "laughing at oneself" converged moderately. All four indicators of exhilaration were shown, but funniness and laughter seemed to be the most strongly related indicators. Trait cheerfulness and (low) seriousness, and a cheerful mood state formed further characteristics of persons who laugh at themselves.

  12. User preferences and willingness to pay for safe drinking water: Experimental evidence from rural Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Zachary; Njee, Robert M; Mbatia, Yolanda; Msimbe, Veritas; Brown, Joe; Clasen, Thomas F; Malebo, Hamisi M; Ray, Isha

    2017-01-01

    Almost half of all deaths from drinking microbiologically unsafe water occur in Sub-Saharan Africa. Household water treatment and safe storage (HWTS) systems, when consistently used, can provide safer drinking water and improve health. Social marketing to increase adoption and use of HWTS depends both on the prices of and preferences for these systems. This study included 556 households from rural Tanzania across two low-income districts with low-quality water sources. Over 9 months in 2012 and 2013, we experimentally evaluated consumer preferences for six "low-cost" HWTS options, including boiling, through an ordinal ranking protocol. We estimated consumers' willingness to pay (WTP) for these options, using a modified auction. We allowed respondents to pay for the durable HWTS systems with cash, chickens or mobile money; a significant minority chose chickens as payment. Overall, our participants favored boiling, the ceramic pot filter and, where water was turbid, PuR™ (a combined flocculant-disinfectant). The revealed WTP for all products was far below retail prices, indicating that significant scale-up may need significant subsidies. Our work will inform programs and policies aimed at scaling up HWTS to improve the health of resource-constrained communities that must rely on poor-quality, and sometimes turbid, drinking water sources.

  13. Quantum criticality in an Ising chain: experimental evidence for emergent E8 symmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coldea, R; Tennant, D A; Wheeler, E M; Wawrzynska, E; Prabhakaran, D; Telling, M; Habicht, K; Smeibidl, P; Kiefer, K

    2010-01-08

    Quantum phase transitions take place between distinct phases of matter at zero temperature. Near the transition point, exotic quantum symmetries can emerge that govern the excitation spectrum of the system. A symmetry described by the E8 Lie group with a spectrum of eight particles was long predicted to appear near the critical point of an Ising chain. We realize this system experimentally by using strong transverse magnetic fields to tune the quasi-one-dimensional Ising ferromagnet CoNb2O6 (cobalt niobate) through its critical point. Spin excitations are observed to change character from pairs of kinks in the ordered phase to spin-flips in the paramagnetic phase. Just below the critical field, the spin dynamics shows a fine structure with two sharp modes at low energies, in a ratio that approaches the golden mean predicted for the first two meson particles of the E8 spectrum. Our results demonstrate the power of symmetry to describe complex quantum behaviors.

  14. Experimental Evidence Shows the Importance of Behavioural Plasticity and Body Size under Competition in Waterfowl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Prins, Herbert H. T.; Versluijs, Martijn; Wessels, Rick; Cao, Lei; de Boer, Willem Frederik

    2016-01-01

    When differently sized species feed on the same resources, interference competition may occur, which may negatively affect their food intake rate. It is expected that competition between species also alters behaviour and feeding patch selection. To assess these changes in behaviour and patch selection, we applied an experimental approach using captive birds of three differently sized Anatidae species: wigeon (Anas penelope) (~600 g), swan goose (Anser cygnoides) (~2700 g) and bean goose (Anser fabalis) (~3200 g). We quantified the functional response for each species and then recorded their behaviour and patch selection with and without potential competitors, using different species combinations. Our results showed that all three species acquired the highest nitrogen intake at relatively tall swards (6, 9 cm) when foraging in single species flocks in the functional response experiment. Goose species were offered foraging patches differing in sward height with and without competitors, and we tested for the effect of competition on foraging behaviour. The mean percentage of time spent feeding and being vigilant did not change under competition for all species. However, all species utilized strategies that increased their peck rate on patches across different sward heights, resulting in the same instantaneous and nitrogen intake rate. Our results suggest that variation in peck rate over different swards height permits Anatidae herbivores to compensate for the loss of intake under competition, illustrating the importance of behavioural plasticity in heterogeneous environments when competing with other species for resources. PMID:27727315

  15. Experimental Evidence of Classical Conditioning and Microscopic Engrams in an Electroconductive Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbowski, Lukasz M.; Persinger, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic experimental substrates are indispensable tools which can allow researchers to model biological processes non-invasively in three-dimensional space. In this study, we investigated the capacities of an electroconductive material whose properties converge upon those of the brain. An electrically conductive material composed of carbohydrates, proteins, fats, ions, water, and trace amounts of other organic compounds and minerals was classically conditioned as inferred by electrophysiological measurements. Spectral densities evoked during the display of a conditioned stimulus (CS) probe were strongly congruent with those displayed during the conditioned-unconditioned stimulus pairing (CS-UCS). The neutral stimulus consisted of the pulsed light from a LED. The unconditioned stimulus was an alternating current. Interstimulus intervals >130 ms did not result in conditioned responses. Microscopic analysis of the chemically-fixed substratum revealed 10–200 μm wide ‘vessel structures’ within samples exposed to a stimulus. Greater complexity (increased fractal dimensions) was clearly discernable by light microscopy for stained sections of fixed samples that had been conditioned compared to various controls. The denser pixels indicated greater concentration of stain and increased canalization. Implications for learning and memory formation are discussed. PMID:27764215

  16. Impact of Bisphenol A on the Cardiovascular System — Epidemiological and Experimental Evidence and Molecular Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqian Gao

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Bisphenol A (BPA is a ubiquitous plasticizing agent used in the manufacturing of polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins. There is well-documented and broad human exposure to BPA. The potential risk that BPA poses to the human health has attracted much attention from regulatory agencies and the general public, and has been extensively studied. An emerging and rapidly growing area in the study of BPA’s toxicity is its impact on the cardiovascular (CV system. Recent epidemiological studies have shown that higher urinary BPA concentration in humans is associated with various types of CV diseases, including angina, hypertension, heart attack and coronary and peripheral arterial disease. Experimental studies have demonstrated that acute BPA exposure promotes the development of arrhythmias in female rodent hearts. Chronic exposure to BPA has been shown to result in cardiac remodeling, atherosclerosis, and altered blood pressure in rodents. The underlying mechanisms may involve alteration of cardiac Ca2+ handling, ion channel inhibition/activation, oxidative stress, and genome/transcriptome modifications. In this review, we discuss these recent findings that point to the potential CV toxicity of BPA, and highlight the knowledge gaps in this growing research area.

  17. The racialized construction of exceptionality: Experimental evidence of race/ethnicity effects on teachers' interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish, Rachel Elizabeth

    2017-02-01

    Scholars, policy-makers, and practitioners have long argued that students of color are over-represented in special education and under-represented in gifted education, arguing that educators make racially/ethnically biased decisions to refer and qualify students with disabilities and giftedness. Recent research has called this into question, focusing on the role of confounders of race/ethnicity. However, the role of educator decisions in the disproportionality is still unclear. In this study, I examine the role of student race/ethnicity in teachers' categorization of student needs as "exceptional" and in need of special or gifted education services. I use an original survey experiment in which teachers read case studies of fictional male students in which the race/ethnicity, English Language Learner status, and exceptionality characteristics were experimentally manipulated. The teachers are then asked whether they would refer the student for exceptionality testing. My findings suggest a complex intersection of race/ethnicity and exceptionality, in which white boys are more likely to be suspected of having exceptionalities when they exhibit academic challenges, while boys of color are more likely to be suspected when they exhibit behavioral challenges. This suggests that the racialized construction of exceptionalities reflects differential academic expectations and interpretations of behavior by race/ethnicity, with implications for the subjectivity of exceptionality identification and for the exacerbation of racial/ethnic inequalities in education. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Experimental evidence for both progressive and simultaneous shear during quasistatic compression of a bulk metallic glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Wendelin J.; Liu, Yun; Gu, Xiaojun; Van Ness, Katherine D.; Robare, Steven L.; Liu, Xin; Antonaglia, James; LeBlanc, Michael; Uhl, Jonathan T.; Hufnagel, Todd C.; Dahmen, Karin A.

    2016-02-01

    Two distinct types of slip events occur during serrated plastic flow of bulk metallic glasses. These events are distinguished not only by their size but also by distinct stress drop rate profiles. Small stress drop serrations have fluctuating stress drop rates (with maximum stress drop rates ranging from 0.3-1 GPa/s), indicating progressive or intermittent propagation of a shear band. The large stress drop serrations are characterized by sharply peaked stress drop rate profiles (with maximum stress drop rates of 1-100 GPa/s). The propagation of a large slip is preceded by a slowly rising stress drop rate that is presumably due to the percolation of slipping weak spots prior to the initiation of shear over the entire shear plane. The onset of the rapid shear event is accompanied by a burst of acoustic emission. These large slips correspond to simultaneous shear with uniform sliding as confirmed by direct high-speed imaging and image correlation. Both small and large slip events occur throughout plastic deformation. The significant differences between these two types require that they be carefully distinguished in both modeling and experimental efforts.

  19. Chemical, experimental, and morphological evidence for diagenetically altered melanin in exceptionally preserved fossils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colleary, Caitlin; Dolocan, Andrei; Gardner, James; Singh, Suresh; Wuttke, Michael; Rabenstein, Renate; Habersetzer, Jörg; Schaal, Stephan; Feseha, Mulugeta; Clemens, Matthew; Jacobs, Bonnie F; Currano, Ellen D; Jacobs, Louis L; Sylvestersen, Rene Lyng; Gabbott, Sarah E; Vinther, Jakob

    2015-10-13

    In living organisms, color patterns, behavior, and ecology are closely linked. Thus, detection of fossil pigments may permit inferences about important aspects of ancient animal ecology and evolution. Melanin-bearing melanosomes were suggested to preserve as organic residues in exceptionally preserved fossils, retaining distinct morphology that is associated with aspects of original color patterns. Nevertheless, these oblong and spherical structures have also been identified as fossilized bacteria. To date, chemical studies have not directly considered the effects of diagenesis on melanin preservation, and how this may influence its identification. Here we use time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry to identify and chemically characterize melanin in a diverse sample of previously unstudied extant and fossil taxa, including fossils with notably different diagenetic histories and geologic ages. We document signatures consistent with melanin preservation in fossils ranging from feathers, to mammals, to amphibians. Using principal component analyses, we characterize putative mixtures of eumelanin and phaeomelanin in both fossil and extant samples. Surprisingly, both extant and fossil amphibians generally exhibit melanosomes with a mixed eumelanin/phaeomelanin composition rather than pure eumelanin, as assumed previously. We argue that experimental maturation of modern melanin samples replicates diagenetic chemical alteration of melanin observed in fossils. This refutes the hypothesis that such fossil microbodies could be bacteria, and demonstrates that melanin is widely responsible for the organic soft tissue outlines in vertebrates found at exceptional fossil localities, thus allowing for the reconstruction of certain aspects of original pigment patterns.

  20. Experimental evidence of variable-order behavior of ladders and nested ladders

    CERN Document Server

    Sierociuk, Dominik; Petras, Ivo

    2011-01-01

    The experimental study of two kinds of electrical circuits, a domino ladder and a nested ladder, is presented. While the domino ladder is known and already appeared in the theory of fractional-order systems, the nested ladder circuit is presented in this article for the first time. For fitting the measured data, a new approach is suggested, which is based on using the Mittag-Leffler function and which means that the data are fitted by a solution of an initial-value problem for a two-term fractional differential equation. The experiment showed that in the frequency domain the domino ladder behaves as a system of order 0.5 and the nested ladder as a system of order 0.25, which is in perfect agreement with the theory developed for their design. In the time domain, however, the order of the domino ladder is changing from roughly 0.5 to almost 1, and the order of the nested ladder is changing in a similar manner, from roughly 0.25 to almost 1; in both cases, the order 1 is never reached, and both systems remain th...

  1. Processed meat and colorectal cancer: a review of epidemiologic and experimental evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santarelli, Raphaëlle L; Pierre, Fabrice; Corpet, Denis E

    2008-01-01

    Processed meat intake may be involved in the etiology of colorectal cancer, a major cause of death in affluent countries. The epidemiologic studies published to date conclude that the excess risk in the highest category of processed meat-eaters is comprised between 20% and 50% compared with non-eaters. In addition, the excess risk per gram of intake is clearly higher than that of fresh red meat. Several hypotheses, which are mainly based on studies carried out on red meat, may explain why processed meat intake is linked to cancer risk. Those that have been tested experimentally are (i) that high-fat diets could promote carcinogenesis via insulin resistance or fecal bile acids; (ii) that cooking meat at a high temperature forms carcinogenic heterocyclic amines and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; (iii) that carcinogenic N-nitroso compounds are formed in meat and endogenously; (iv) that heme iron in red meat can promote carcinogenesis because it increases cell proliferation in the mucosa, through lipoperoxidation and/or cytotoxicity of fecal water. Nitrosation might increase the toxicity of heme in cured products. Solving this puzzle is a challenge that would permit to reduce cancer load by changing the processes rather than by banning processed meat.

  2. Evidence for an early wet Moon from experimental crystallization of the lunar magma ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yanhao; Tronche, Elodie J.; Steenstra, Edgar S.; van Westrenen, Wim

    2017-01-01

    The Moon is thought to have been covered initially by a deep magma ocean, its gradual solidification leading to the formation of the plagioclase-rich highland crust. We performed a high-pressure, high-temperature experimental study of lunar mineralogical and geochemical evolution during magma ocean solidification that yields constraints on the presence of water in the earliest lunar interior. In the experiments, a deep layer containing both olivine and pyroxene is formed in the first ~50% of crystallization, β-quartz forms towards the end of crystallization, and the last per cent of magma remaining is extremely iron rich. In dry experiments, plagioclase appears after 68 vol.% solidification and yields a floatation crust with a thickness of ~68 km, far above the observed average of 34-43 km based on lunar gravity. The volume of plagioclase formed during crystallization is significantly less in water-bearing experiments. Using the relationship between magma water content and the resulting crustal thickness in the experiments, and considering uncertainties in initial lunar magma ocean depth, we estimate that the Moon may have contained at least 270 to 1,650 ppm water at the time of magma ocean crystallization, suggesting the Earth-Moon system was water-rich from the start.

  3. Experimental evidence for beneficial effects of projected climate change on hibernating amphibians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Üveges, Bálint; Mahr, Katharina; Szederkényi, Márk; Bókony, Veronika; Hoi, Herbert; Hettyey, Attila

    2016-01-01

    Amphibians are the most threatened vertebrates today, experiencing worldwide declines. In recent years considerable effort was invested in exposing the causes of these declines. Climate change has been identified as such a cause; however, the expectable effects of predicted milder, shorter winters on hibernation success of temperate-zone Amphibians have remained controversial, mainly due to a lack of controlled experimental studies. Here we present a laboratory experiment, testing the effects of simulated climate change on hibernating juvenile common toads (Bufo bufo). We simulated hibernation conditions by exposing toadlets to current (1.5 °C) or elevated (4.5 °C) hibernation temperatures in combination with current (91 days) or shortened (61 days) hibernation length. We found that a shorter winter and milder hibernation temperature increased survival of toads during hibernation. Furthermore, the increase in temperature and shortening of the cold period had a synergistic positive effect on body mass change during hibernation. Consequently, while climate change may pose severe challenges for amphibians of the temperate zone during their activity period, the negative effects may be dampened by shorter and milder winters experienced during hibernation. PMID:27229882

  4. Experimental evidence for beneficial effects of projected climate change on hibernating amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Üveges, Bálint; Mahr, Katharina; Szederkényi, Márk; Bókony, Veronika; Hoi, Herbert; Hettyey, Attila

    2016-05-27

    Amphibians are the most threatened vertebrates today, experiencing worldwide declines. In recent years considerable effort was invested in exposing the causes of these declines. Climate change has been identified as such a cause; however, the expectable effects of predicted milder, shorter winters on hibernation success of temperate-zone Amphibians have remained controversial, mainly due to a lack of controlled experimental studies. Here we present a laboratory experiment, testing the effects of simulated climate change on hibernating juvenile common toads (Bufo bufo). We simulated hibernation conditions by exposing toadlets to current (1.5 °C) or elevated (4.5 °C) hibernation temperatures in combination with current (91 days) or shortened (61 days) hibernation length. We found that a shorter winter and milder hibernation temperature increased survival of toads during hibernation. Furthermore, the increase in temperature and shortening of the cold period had a synergistic positive effect on body mass change during hibernation. Consequently, while climate change may pose severe challenges for amphibians of the temperate zone during their activity period, the negative effects may be dampened by shorter and milder winters experienced during hibernation.

  5. Experimental evidence of counterion affinity in alginates: the case of nongelling ion Mg2+.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donati, Ivan; Asaro, Fioretta; Paoletti, Sergio

    2009-10-01

    The present contribution aims at testing experimentally the theoretical model previously devised (Donati, I.; Cesaro, A.; Paoletti, S.; Biomacromolecules 2006, 7, 281-287) for the description of the interaction between alginate and nongelling Mg(2+) ions. The model, based on an extension of the counterion condensation theory, introduces a contribution of free energy of affinity, DeltaG(aff,0), which depends on the monomer composition of the polyuronate. In the present work, three different alginates separately mimicking the mannuronan (polyM), the guluronan (polyG), and the polyalternating (polyMG) components of alginate, together with a natural alginate isolated from Laminaria hyperborea ( L. hyperborea ), were examined. They were treated with Mg(2+) ions, and relative variations in scattered light intensity, isothermal calorimetry (DeltaH(mix)), specific viscosity, and (23)Na NMR longitudinal relaxation rates were monitored with respect to samples at the same ionic strength but containing only Na(+) ions. The fraction of condensed magnesium counterions was found to be strongly dependent on alginate composition, increasing along the series mannuronan < polyalternating approximately L. hyperborea < guluronan, thus in good agreement with the theoretical predictions.

  6. Female attractiveness affects paternal investment: experimental evidence for male differential allocation in blue tits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahr Katharina

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The differential allocation hypothesis (DAH predicts that individuals should adjust their parental investment to their current mate’s quality. Although in principle the DAH holds for both sexes, male adjustment of parental investment has only been tested in a few experimental studies, revealing contradictory results. We conducted a field experiment to test whether male blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus allocate their parental effort in relation to female ornamentation (ultraviolet colouration of the crown, as predicted by the DAH. Results We reduced the UV reflectance in a sample of females and compared parental care by their mates with that of males paired to sham-manipulated control females. As predicted by the DAH our results demonstrate that males paired with UV-reduced females invested less in feeding effort but did not defend the chicks less than males paired with control females. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is one of the first studies providing support for male differential allocation in response to female ornamentation.

  7. Experimental evidence of dust-induced shaping of surface dissolved organic matter in the oligotrophic ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido-Villena, Elvira; Djaoudi, Kahina; Barani, Aude; Charrière, Bruno; Delmont, Anne; Hélias-Nunige, Sandra; Marc, Tedetti; Wambeke France, Van

    2016-04-01

    Recent research has shown that dust deposition may impact the functioning of the microbial loop. On one hand, it enhances bacterial mineralization of dissolved organic matter (DOM), and so may limit the carbon export. On the other hand, the interaction between heterotrophic bacteria and DOM in the surface ocean can increase the residence time of DOM, promoting its export and sequestration in the deep ocean. The main goal of this study was to experimentally assess whether the bacterial response to dust deposition is prone to have an effect on the residence time of the DOM pool by modifying its bioavailability. The bacterial degradation of DOM was followed on dust-amended and control treatments during long-term incubations. Dissolved organic carbon concentration decreased by 9 μmol L-1 over the course of the experiment in both control and dust-enriched conditions, with no significant differences between treatments. However, significant differences in DOM optical properties appeared at the latest stage of the incubations suggesting an accumulation of DOM of high molecular weight in the dust-amended treatment. At the end of the incubations, the remaining water was filtered and re-used as a new culture medium for a bacterial natural assemblage. Bacterial abundance and production was lower in the treatment previously submitted to dust enrichment, suggesting a decrease in DOM lability after a dust deposition event. These preliminary results point to a new link between dust and ocean carbon cycle through the modification of the residence time of the DOM pool.

  8. Experimental evidence of beam-foil plasma creation during ion-solid interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Prashant; Nandi, Tapan

    2016-08-01

    Charge state evolution of the energetic projectile ions during the passage through thin carbon foils has been revisited using the X-ray spectroscopy technique. Contributions from the bulk and the solid surface in the charge changing processes have been segregated by measuring the charge state distribution of the projectile ions in the bulk of the target during the ion-solid interaction. Interestingly, the charge state distribution measured in the bulk exhibits Lorentzian profile in contrast to the well-known Gaussian structure observed using the electromagnetic methods and the theoretical predictions. The occurrence of such behavior is a direct consequence of the imbalance between charge changing processes, which has been seen in various cases of the laboratory plasma. It suggests that the ion-solid collisions constitute high-density, localized plasma in the bulk of the solid target, called the beam-foil plasma. This condensed beam-foil plasma is similar to the high-density solar and stellar plasma which may have practical implementations in various fields, in particular, plasma physics and nuclear astrophysics. The present work suggests further modification in the theoretical charge state distribution calculations by incorporating the plasma coupling effects during the ion-solid interactions. Moreover, the multi-electron capture from the target exit surface has been confirmed through comparison between experimentally measured and theoretically predicted values of the mean charge state of the projectile ions.

  9. Behavioral response to contamination risk information in a spatially explicit groundwater environment: Experimental evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingyuan; Michael, Holly A.; Duke, Joshua M.; Messer, Kent D.; Suter, Jordan F.

    2014-08-01

    This paper assesses the effectiveness of aquifer monitoring information in achieving more sustainable use of a groundwater resource in the absence of management policy. Groundwater user behavior in the face of an irreversible contamination threat is studied by applying methods of experimental economics to scenarios that combine a physics-based, spatially explicit, numerical groundwater model with different representations of information about an aquifer and its risk of contamination. The results suggest that the threat of catastrophic contamination affects pumping decisions: pumping is significantly reduced in experiments where contamination is possible compared to those where pumping cost is the only factor discouraging groundwater use. The level of information about the state of the aquifer also affects extraction behavior. Pumping rates differ when information that synthesizes data on aquifer conditions (a "risk gauge") is provided, despite invariant underlying economic incentives, and this result does not depend on whether the risk information is location-specific or from a whole aquifer perspective. Interestingly, users increase pumping when the risk gauge signals good aquifer status compared to a no-gauge treatment. When the gauge suggests impending contamination, however, pumping declines significantly, resulting in a lower probability of contamination. The study suggests that providing relatively simple aquifer condition guidance derived from monitoring data can lead to more sustainable use of groundwater resources.

  10. Social learning solves the problem of narrow-peaked search landscapes: experimental evidence in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acerbi, Alberto; Tennie, Claudio; Mesoudi, Alex

    2016-09-01

    The extensive use of social learning is considered a major reason for the ecological success of humans. Theoretical considerations, models and experiments have explored the evolutionary basis of social learning, showing the conditions under which learning from others is more adaptive than individual learning. Here we present an extension of a previous experimental set-up, in which individuals go on simulated 'hunts' and their success depends on the features of a 'virtual arrowhead' they design. Individuals can modify their arrowhead either by individual trial and error or by copying others. We study how, in a multimodal adaptive landscape, the smoothness of the peaks influences learning. We compare narrow peaks, in which solutions close to optima do not provide useful feedback to individuals, to wide peaks, where smooth landscapes allow an effective hill-climbing individual learning strategy. We show that individual learning is more difficult in narrow-peaked landscapes, but that social learners perform almost equally well in both narrow- and wide-peaked search spaces. There was a weak trend for more copying in the narrow than wide condition, although as in previous experiments social information was generally underutilized. Our results highlight the importance of tasks' design space when studying the adaptiveness of high-fidelity social learning.

  11. A Spotlight on Liquefaction: Evidence from Clinical Settings and Experimental Models in Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pere-Joan Cardona

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Liquefaction is one of the most intriguing aspects of human tuberculosis. It is a major cause of the transition from the infection to active disease (tuberculosis, TB as well as the transmission of M. tuberculosis to other persons. This paper reviews the natural history of liquefaction in humans from a pathological and radiological point of view and discusses how the experimental models available can be used to address the topic of liquefaction and cavity formation. Different concepts that have been related to liquefaction, from the influence of immune response to mechanical factors, are reviewed. Synchronic necrosis or apoptosis of infected macrophages in a close area, together with an ineffective fibrosis, appears to be clue in this process, in which macrophages, the immune response, and bacillary load interact usually in a particular scenario: the upper lobes of the lung. The summary would be that even if being a stochastic effect, liquefaction would result if the organization of the intragranulomatous necrosis (by means of fibrosis would be disturbed.

  12. Chemical, experimental, and morphological evidence for diagenetically altered melanin in exceptionally preserved fossils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colleary, Caitlin; Dolocan, Andrei; Gardner, James; Singh, Suresh; Wuttke, Michael; Rabenstein, Renate; Habersetzer, Jörg; Schaal, Stephan; Feseha, Mulugeta; Clemens, Matthew; Jacobs, Bonnie F.; Currano, Ellen D.; Jacobs, Louis L.; Lyng Sylvestersen, Rene; Gabbott, Sarah E.; Vinther, Jakob

    2015-10-01

    In living organisms, color patterns, behavior, and ecology are closely linked. Thus, detection of fossil pigments may permit inferences about important aspects of ancient animal ecology and evolution. Melanin-bearing melanosomes were suggested to preserve as organic residues in exceptionally preserved fossils, retaining distinct morphology that is associated with aspects of original color patterns. Nevertheless, these oblong and spherical structures have also been identified as fossilized bacteria. To date, chemical studies have not directly considered the effects of diagenesis on melanin preservation, and how this may influence its identification. Here we use time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry to identify and chemically characterize melanin in a diverse sample of previously unstudied extant and fossil taxa, including fossils with notably different diagenetic histories and geologic ages. We document signatures consistent with melanin preservation in fossils ranging from feathers, to mammals, to amphibians. Using principal component analyses, we characterize putative mixtures of eumelanin and phaeomelanin in both fossil and extant samples. Surprisingly, both extant and fossil amphibians generally exhibit melanosomes with a mixed eumelanin/phaeomelanin composition rather than pure eumelanin, as assumed previously. We argue that experimental maturation of modern melanin samples replicates diagenetic chemical alteration of melanin observed in fossils. This refutes the hypothesis that such fossil microbodies could be bacteria, and demonstrates that melanin is widely responsible for the organic soft tissue outlines in vertebrates found at exceptional fossil localities, thus allowing for the reconstruction of certain aspects of original pigment patterns.

  13. Spatiotemporal mapping of matrix remodelling and evidence of in situ elastogenesis in experimental abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, Partha Pratim; Ramamurthi, Anand

    2017-01-01

    Spatiotemporal changes in the extracellular matrix (ECM) were studied within abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) generated in rats via elastase infusion. At 7, 14 and 21 days post-induction, AAA tissues were divided into proximal, mid- and distal regions, based on their location relative to the renal arteries and the region of maximal aortic diameter. Wall thicknesses differed significantly between the AAA spatial regions, initially increasing due to positive matrix remodelling and then decreasing due to wall thinning and compaction of matrix as the disease progressed. Histological images analysed using custom segmentation tools indicated significant differences in ECM composition and structure vs healthy tissue, and in the extent and nature of matrix remodelling between the AAA spatial regions. Histology and immunofluorescence (IF) labelling provided evidence of neointimal AAA remodelling, characterized by presence of elastin-containing fibres. This remodelling was effected by smooth muscle α-actin-positive neointimal cells, which transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed to differ morphologically from medial SMCs. TEM of the neointima further showed the presence of elongated deposits of amorphous elastin and the presence of nascent, but not mature, elastic fibres. These structures appeared to be deficient in at least one microfibrillar component, fibrillin-1, which is critical to mature elastic fibre assembly. The substantial production of elastin and elastic fibre-like structures that we observed in the AAA neointima, which was not observed elsewhere within AAA tissues, provides a unique opportunity to capitalize on this autoregenerative phenomenon and direct it from the standpoint of matrix organization towards restoring healthy aortic matrix structure, mechanics and function. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Natural and experimental evidence of past seismic faulting from Clay-Clast Aggregates occurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutareaud, S.

    2009-04-01

    S. Boutareaud (1), A.M. Boullier (2,3), M. Andreani (4), D.G. Calugaru (5), P. Beck (6), S.R. Song (7,3), T. Shimamoto (8) Spherical aggregates named Clay-Clast Aggregates (CCAs) have been reported from recent investigations on both retrieved clay-bearing fault gouges from shallow depth seismogenic faults and rotary-shear experiments conducted on clay-bearing gouge at seismic slip-rates. We have conducted additional high velocity rotary-shear experiments and low velocity double-shear experiments. From these two types of friction experiments, we demonstrate that a critical temperature depending on dynamic P-T conditions is needed for the formation of CCAs. This temperature corresponds to the transition of water from liquid to vapor or to critical, that induces gouge pore fluid expansion and therefore a thermal pressurization of the fault. We compared natural CCAs obtained by the Taiwan Chelungpu fault Drilling Program (TCDP) from a gouge layer recognized as the last slip surface of the Mw 7.6 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake, and CCAs obtained from our high velocity experiments. EDX-SEM element mapping, SEM and TEM observations show strong similar characteristics of the two types of CCAs with a concentric well-organized fabric of the cortex, and reveals that their development may result from the combination of electrostatic and capillary forces in a critical reactive medium during the dynamic slip-weakening. The formation of CCAs appears to be related to the shearing of a clay-rich granular material that expands and become fluidized. Accordingly, the occurrence of CCAs in natural clay-rich fault gouges constitutes new unequivocal textural evidence for shallow depth thermal pressurization and consequently for past seismic faulting.

  15. Experimental evidence in support of the biological effects and physical basis of homeopathic potencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirmal Sukul

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Homeopathic potencies 12 cH and above cross the Avogadro number and, for this, do not contain any original drug molecules. Two major problems involved in the scientific study of potencies are (1 understanding the physical basis of potencies and (2 demonstrating the biological effects of potencies. The present study aims to address these questions. Methods and Results: In course of our experimental studies spanned over more than 30 years we have demonstrated significant effects of homeopathic potencies on man, animals and plants. We have also showed that potencies could be differentiated through their electronic spectra, and this difference in spectra can be attributed to the electron transfer interaction. In a molecular complex, electron of one molecule absorbs a quantum of visible radiation and is excited, not to a higher energy level of this molecule, but to one of the vacant high energy levels of the neighboring molecules. This process is known as electron or charge transfer interaction. This has been demonstrated in Iodine Ó© in two different solvents of CCl4 and aqueous ethanol (Sukul N C, Environ Ecol 17,866-872, 1999. We have further demonstrated that the effect of a homeopathic potency can be transmitted from one part of a plant to another, and also from one plant to another through water. I am presenting here a few selected cases of our experimental studies. Potentized Nux vomica significantly reduced ethanol consumption in rats by 73.7%and ethanol-induced sleep time in albino mice by 44.4%. Causticum 30 C and Rhus tox 30 C produced anti-inflamatory and anti-nocicptive effect on adjuvant arthritis in albino rats. Potentized homeopathic drugs reduced microfilaraemia by 28 to 100% and filariasis in two villages of West Bengal endemic for Bancroftian filaiasis. Potentized Cina and Thuja ameliorated trichinellosis in mice reducing larval population in muscles by 84% and 68%, respectively. Potencies of Agaricus and Nux

  16. Experimental evidence for healing during stick-slip at the bases of ice streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoet, Lucas K.; Iverson, Neal R.

    2016-04-01

    The Whillians Ice Stream has twice daily stick-slip events of ca. 50 cm with a maximum inter-event time of ca. 60,000 s. In order for stick-slip phenomena to occur under rate and state friction, two conditions need to be met: 1) A rate-weakening material at the interface, so that a nucleated slip perturbance can be propagated and 2) a material capable of healing (i.e., becoming stronger) when stationary, so that stress can be recharged during hold periods between ruptures. Although rate weakening has been experimentally demonstrated for some basal tills, experimental data relevant to glacier slip that bear on healing have been absent. Without an understanding of the healing mechanisms active at the beds of ice streams, models of the mechanics of ice stream stick-slip or ice stream shut-down will be inadequately informed. We investigated healing mechanisms with slide-hold-slide experiments, a technique common in rock mechanics, using two different ring shear apparatuses. In one set of experiments till alone was sheared, while in another set ice at its melting temperature was slid over till. These two kinds of experiments allowed for the isolation of mechanisms active at ice-till interface from those within the till. In all experiments sliding velocity was ca. 345 m/yr, and effective stress was ca. 150 kPa. Once steady-state sliding friction, μss, was attained, sliding was stopped and the materials were held in stationary contact for a given duration. When sliding was reinitiated, slip resistance initially rose above the previous μss value to a peak friction, μpeak, before returning to μss. The difference between μss and μpeak, Δμ, was then calculated. For each subsequent hold, the duration of stationary contact was increased logarithmically (100, 1,000, 10,000 and 100,000 s) until the maximum hold duration was attained. From the relationship between hold time and Δμ, a healing rate was calculated. Results from both sets of experiment indicate that

  17. Experimental Evidence of Biological Interactions among Different Isolates of Trypanosoma cruzi from the Chaco Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragone, Paula G.; Pérez Brandán, Cecilia; Monje Rumi, Mercedes; Tomasini, Nicolás; Lauthier, Juan J.; Cimino, Rubén O.; Uncos, Alejandro; Ramos, Federico; Alberti D´Amato, Anahí M.; Basombrío, Miguel A.; Diosque, Patricio

    2015-01-01

    Many infectious diseases arise from co-infections or re-infections with more than one genotype of the same pathogen. These mixed infections could alter host fitness, the severity of symptoms, success in pathogen transmission and the epidemiology of the disease. Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease, exhibits a high biological variability often correlated with its genetic diversity. Here, we developed an experimental approach in order to evaluate biological interaction between three T. cruzi isolates belonging to different Discrete Typing Units (DTUs TcIII, TcV and TcVI). These isolates were obtained from a restricted geographical area in the Chaco Region. Different mixed infections involving combinations of two isolates (TcIII + TcV, TcIII + TcVI and TcV + TcVI) were studied in a mouse model. The parameters evaluated were number of parasites circulating in peripheral blood, histopathology and genetic characterization of each DTU in different tissues by DNA hybridization probes. We found a predominance of TcVI isolate in blood and tissues respect to TcIII and TcV; and a decrease of the inflammatory response in heart when the damage of mice infected with TcVI and TcIII + TcVI mixture were compared. In addition, simultaneous presence of two isolates in the same tissue was not detected. Our results show that biological interactions between isolates with different biological behaviors lead to changes in their biological properties. The occurrence of interactions among different genotypes of T. cruzi observed in our mouse model suggests that these phenomena could also occur in natural cycles in the Chaco Region. PMID:25789617

  18. Ultrafine Spherical Quartz Formation during Seismic Fault Slip: Natural and Experimental Evidence and Its Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, L. W.; Song, Y. F.; Yang, C. M.; Song, S. R.; Wang, C. C.; Dong, J. J.; Suppe, J.; Shimamoto, T.

    2015-12-01

    In recent works on the determination of pseudotachylyte within the principal slip zone (PSZ) of the Chelungpu fault (Taiwan), we demonstrated that frictional melting occurred at shallow depths during the 1999 Mw 7.6 Chi-Chi earthquake. Thus, the characteristics of melts are of paramount importance to investigate processes controlling dynamic fault mechanics during seismic slips. We conducted rock friction experiments on siltstone recovered from the Taiwan Chelungpu fault Drilling Project (TCDP) at a slip rate of 1.3 m/s and a normal stress of 1 MPa. Here we not only target to characterize experimental pseudotachylyte and evaluate the associated frictional behavior, but compare it with natural frictional melts of TCDP. Our results show (1) initial shear stress drop was related to the generation of low viscosity melt patches, (2) the evolution of shear stress in the postmelting regime was congruent with frictional melt rheology, and (3) the slip strengthening was presumably resulted from dehydration of the frictional melt. In particular, the state-of-art of in situ synchrotron analyses (X-ray diffraction and Transmission X-ray Microscope) determine the presence of ultrafine spherical quartz (USQ) (~10 nm to 50 nm) in the glassy matrices presumably produced at high temperature. Our observations confirm that the USQ formed in rock friction experiments do occur in natural faults. We surmise the USQ is the result of frictional melting on siltstone and represents the latest slip zones of the Chelungpu fault, and further infer that the viscous melts may terminate seismic slips at shallow crustal conditions.

  19. Siliceous sponge spicule dissolution: In field experimental evidences from temperate and tropical waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolino, Marco; Cattaneo-Vietti, Riccardo; Pansini, Maurizio; Santini, Chiara; Bavestrello, Giorgio

    2017-01-01

    Sponge siliceous spicules are considered a sink in the silica balance of the oceans as their dissolution rate seems to be negligible, but no field data are available about this process. The aim of this study was a first evaluation of the quantitative dissolution rates of some demosponge and hexactinellid spicules (collected in different localities at different latitudes), left at sea for six months in two localities characterised by different water average temperatures: Mediterranean Sea and Celebes Sea. The effects of silica dissolution on the experimented spicules, studied by SEM analysis, produced an enlargement of the axial canal sometimes resulting in empty spicules. While in demosponges the axial canal wall of eroded spicules was perfectly smooth or slightly rough, the hexactinellid Rossella racovitzae showed a cavernous, well recognisable pattern of dissolution. The dissolution rates were determined evaluating the decrease in outer diameter and in the expansion of the axial channel of about 300 spicules for each considered species and locality. The spicules from the Mediterranean Geodia cydonium did not show any detectable dissolution in both localities, while those from Tethya citrina showed a loose of silica of about 23% in the Mediterranean and 47% in the Celebes Sea. Paratetilla bacca from the Red Sea decreased the silica content of about 30% in both the localities. Tetilla leptoderma from Mar del Plata lost about 8% and 42% of silica respectively in Mediterranean and Celebes Sea. Finally, the hexactinellid spicules from the Antarctic Rossella racovitzae showed highest dissolution rates in both experimental sites (37% and 66% in the Mediterranean and Celebes Sea, respectively). The different levels of dissolution can be related to the different taxonomic position in terms of specular structures as well as to the temperatures at which the spicules have been deposited and exposed. In fact, spicules from the same species showed a dissolution rate generally

  20. Experimental evidence of biological interactions among different isolates of Trypanosoma cruzi from the Chaco Region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula G Ragone

    Full Text Available Many infectious diseases arise from co-infections or re-infections with more than one genotype of the same pathogen. These mixed infections could alter host fitness, the severity of symptoms, success in pathogen transmission and the epidemiology of the disease. Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease, exhibits a high biological variability often correlated with its genetic diversity. Here, we developed an experimental approach in order to evaluate biological interaction between three T. cruzi isolates belonging to different Discrete Typing Units (DTUs TcIII, TcV and TcVI. These isolates were obtained from a restricted geographical area in the Chaco Region. Different mixed infections involving combinations of two isolates (TcIII + TcV, TcIII + TcVI and TcV + TcVI were studied in a mouse model. The parameters evaluated were number of parasites circulating in peripheral blood, histopathology and genetic characterization of each DTU in different tissues by DNA hybridization probes. We found a predominance of TcVI isolate in blood and tissues respect to TcIII and TcV; and a decrease of the inflammatory response in heart when the damage of mice infected with TcVI and TcIII + TcVI mixture were compared. In addition, simultaneous presence of two isolates in the same tissue was not detected. Our results show that biological interactions between isolates with different biological behaviors lead to changes in their biological properties. The occurrence of interactions among different genotypes of T. cruzi observed in our mouse model suggests that these phenomena could also occur in natural cycles in the Chaco Region.

  1. Experimental evidence that dispersal drives ant community assembly in human-altered ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Joshua R; Tschinkel, Walter R

    2016-01-01

    A key shortcoming in our understanding of exotic species' success is that it is not known how post-introduction dispersal contributes to the success of exotic species and the reassembly of invaded communities. Exotic and native species face poorly understood competition-colonization trade-offs in heterogeneous landscapes of natural and anthropogenic habitats. We conducted three experiments that tested how ant queen behavior during dispersal affects community composition. Using experimental plots, we tested whether (1) different types of habitat disturbance and (2) different sizes of habitat disturbance affected the abundance of newly mated queens landing in the plots. The three most abundant species captured were the exotic fire ant Solenopsis invicta, and the native species Brachymyrmex depilis, and S. pergandei, respectively. When queens were considered collectively, more queens landed in plowed, sand-added, and roadside plots than in control or mow plots, in other words, in the more heavily disturbed plots. We also tested (3) the effect of habitat manipulations on the survival of newly mated fire ant queens (Solenopsis invicta). Soil disturbance (tilling), lack of shade, and removal (poisoning) of the ant community resulted in the greatest fire ant colony survivorship. Collectively, experiments revealed that both exotic and native newly mated ant queens select open, human-altered ecosystems for founding new colonies. The selection of such habitats by fire ant queens leads to their successful colony founding and ultimately to their dominance in those habitats. Selection of disturbed habitats is therefore advantageous for exotic species but is an ecological trap for native species because they do not often succeed in founding colonies in these habitats.

  2. Experimental infection of mice with hamster parvovirus: evidence for interspecies transmission of mouse parvovirus 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Rachel D; Marcus, Emily C; Wagner, April M; Besselsen, David G

    2010-04-01

    Hamster parvovirus (HaPV) was isolated 2 decades ago from hamsters with clinical signs similar to those induced in hamsters experimentally infected with other rodent parvoviruses. Genetically, HaPV is most closely related to mouse parvovirus (MPV), which induces subclinical infection in mice. A novel MPV strain, MPV3, was detected recently in naturally infected mice, and genomic sequence analysis indicates that MPV3 is almost identical to HaPV. The goal of the present studies was to examine the infectivity of HaPV in mice. Neonatal and weanling mice of several mouse strains were inoculated with HaPV. Tissues, excretions, and sera were harvested at 1, 2, 4, and 8 wk after inoculation and evaluated by quantitative PCR and serologic assays specific for HaPV. Quantitative PCR detected viral DNA quantities that greatly exceeded the quantity of virus in inocula in multiple tissues of infected mice. Seroconversion to both nonstructural and structural viral proteins was detected in most immunocompetent mice 2 or more weeks after inoculation with HaPV. In neonatal SCID mice, viral transcripts were detected in lymphoid tissues by RT-PCR and viral DNA was detected in feces by quantitative PCR at 8 wk after inoculation. No clinical signs, gross, or histologic lesions were observed. These findings are similar to those observed in mice infected with MPV. These data support the hypothesis that HaPV and MPV3 are likely variants of the same viral species, for which the mouse is the natural rodent host with rare interspecies transmission to the hamster.

  3. Muscle study in experimental scoliosis in rabbits with costotransversectomy: evidence of ischemic process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werneck, Lineu C; Cousseau, Vlademir A; Graells, Xavier S; Werneck, Mauricio C; Scola, Rosana H

    2008-05-01

    Scoliosis involves the central nervous system diseases, ligaments, articulations and skeletal muscles, but there is no consensus on its pathogeny and progression of muscle abnormalities. In this study, we investigate the morphologic changes in the muscle of rabbit submitted to experimental scoliosis, with special emphasis on abnormalities related to blood supply. We studied 26 rabbits subjected to costotransversectomy by pulling out six transverse processes at thoracic level and six rabbits were used as controls. All the animals operated upon developed scoliosis showing an average angle of 29.1 degrees on the 60th day, with its apices located at T4 and T12 when they were subjected to paraspinal muscle biopsy on both sides. The muscle biopsies were subjected to histological stains and histochemical reactions, as well as to a morphometric study. On the concave side, the changes were not statistically significant regarding the control group. On the convex side conjunctive tissue proliferation, infiltration by adipose tissue, central nucleus excess, inflammatory reaction, segmental fibrosis, type 1 fiber hypertrophy, type 2 fiber hypertrophy and atrophic angular dark fibers in the unspecific esterase were statistically significant. The segmental fibrosis reached a circumscribed muscle segment, compatible with an ischemic phenomenon. The histological diagnoses on the concave side of the animals had unspecific alterations (atrophy and hypertrophy) in 13, myopathy in 3, denervation in 3 and normal in 7. The convex side diagnoses were myopathy in 14, denervation in 8, mixed in 3 and normal in 1. The procedure determined morphologic changes on the convex side indicating possible denervation or myopathy of ischemic origin.

  4. Experimental evidence for millisecond activation timescales using the Fast IN Chamber (FINCH) measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundke, U.; Jaenicke, R.; Klein, H.; Nillius, B.; Reimann, B.; Wetter, T.; Bingemer, H.

    2009-04-01

    Ice formation in clouds is a subject of great practical and fundamental importance since the occurrence of ice particle initializes dramatic changes in the microphysical structure of the cloud, which finally ends in the formation of precipitation. The initially step of ice formation is largely unknown. Homogenous nucleation of ice occurs only below -40 °C. If an ice nucleus (IN) is present, heterogeneous nucleation may occur at higher temperature. Here deposition freezing, condensation and immersion freezing as well as contact freezing are known. Also growth rates of ice particles are known as function of crystal surface properties, temperature and super saturation. Timescales for homogenous freezing activation in the order of 0.01 seconds and nucleation rates have been measured by Anderson et al. (1980) and Hagen et al., (1981) using their expansion cloud chamber. This contribution of deposition mode freezing measurements by the ice nucleus counter FINCH presents evidence that the activation timescale of this freezing mode is in the order of 1E-3 seconds. FINCH is an Ice Nucleus counter which activates IN in a supersaturated environment at freezing temperatures. The activation conditions are actively controlled by mixing three gas flows (aerosol, particle-free cold-dry and warm-humid flows).See Bundke et al. 2008 for details. In a special operation mode of FINCH we are able to produce a controlled peak super saturation in the order of 1 ms duration. For several test aerosols the results observed in this particular mode are comparable to normal mode operations, where the maximum super saturation remains for more than a second, thus leading to the conclusion that the time for activation is in the order of 1ms or less. References: R.J. Anderson et al, "A Study of Homogeneous Condensation Freezing Nucleation of Small Water Droplets in an Expansion Cloud Chamber, Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, Vol. 37, 2508-2520, 1980 U.Bundke et al., "The fast Ice Nucleus

  5. Experimental evidences on the scaling behavior of a sandy porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallico, C.; Straface, S.; Chidichimo, F.; Ferrante, A. P.; De Bartolo, S.

    2012-04-01

    Various authors treated the scaling of the hydrodispersive parameters in porous media. Nevertheless several studies and reports finding in literature on this matter, specifically on the dispersivity increases with scale of measurement, are based on a statistical or experimental approach (Neuman, 1990; Wheatcraft & Tylor, 1988; Clauser, 1992; Schulze-Makuch, 2005). Following this last approach, we analysed the scale behaviour of a sandy porous media, the grain size of which was characterized carefully in laboratory. For this aim we carried out several tracer tests on three cylindrical samples of the considered sandy soil. The diameter of these samples was the same, equal to 0.0635 m, and the lengths respectively equal to 0.15 m, 0.30 m and 0.60 m. At the bottom and the top of the cylindrical sample two membrane were located to allow the water flow. The water arrived in the sample from the bottom by a plastic tube and came out from the top to exclude the presence of air in the soil sample. The flow was produced by a peristaltic pump, able to develop different rates and therefore different flow velocities. For all tests the utilized tracer was NaCl, that was melted in 50 ml of solution with concentration of 5 g/l. The letting in of the solution was performed immediately up pump, by a connection of plastic tubes and a tap. The tests was carried out at first letting in the tracer in short times and after repeating it with continuous letting in. In this way the tests was carried out, repeating them five times with different rates and, therefore, velocities. For each of test the breakthrough curves were obtained and successively the longitudinal dispersivity (αL) and the coefficient of longitudinal dispersion (DL) were calculated. These values, considering also the lengths of the samples, allowed to verify the scaling behaviour of the examined sandy porous media. In fact a specific law to describe the increase of αL with scale was determined. Analogously another law was

  6. Thiol groups controls on arsenite binding by organic matter: new experimental and modeling evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catrouillet, Charlotte; Davranche, Mélanie; Dia, Aline; Bouhnik-Le Coz, Martine; Pédrot, Mathieu; Marsac, Rémi; Gruau, Gérard

    2015-12-15

    Although it has been suggested that several mechanisms can describe the direct binding of As(III) to organic matter (OM), more recently, the thiol functional group of humic acid (HA) was shown to be an important potential binding site for As(III). Isotherm experiments on As(III) sorption to HAs, that have either been grafted with thiol or not, were thus conducted to investigate the preferential As(III) binding sites. There was a low level of binding of As(III) to HA, which was strongly dependent on the abundance of the thiols. Experimental datasets were used to develop a new model (the modified PHREEQC-Model VI), which defines HA as a group of discrete carboxylic, phenolic and thiol sites. Protonation/deprotonation constants were determined for each group of sites (pKA=4.28±0.03; ΔpKA=2.13±0.10; pKB=7.11±0.26; ΔpKB=3.52±0.49; pKS=5.82±0.052; ΔpKS=6.12±0.12 for the carboxylic, phenolic and thiols sites, respectively) from HAs that were either grafted with thiol or not. The pKS value corresponds to that of single thiol-containing organic ligands. Two binding models were tested: the Mono model, which considered that As(III) is bound to the HA thiol site as monodentate complexes, and the Tri model, which considered that As(III) is bound as tridentate complexes. A simulation of the available literature datasets was used to validate the Mono model, with logKMS=2.91±0.04, i.e. the monodentate hypothesis. This study highlighted the importance of thiol groups in OM reactivity and, notably, determined the As(III) concentration bound to OM (considering that Fe is lacking or at least negligible) and was used to develop a model that is able to determine the As(III) concentrations bound to OM.

  7. Intrapopulation variability shaping isotope discrimination and turnover: experimental evidence in arctic foxes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Lecomte

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tissue-specific stable isotope signatures can provide insights into the trophic ecology of consumers and their roles in food webs. Two parameters are central for making valid inferences based on stable isotopes, isotopic discrimination (difference in isotopic ratio between consumer and its diet and turnover time (renewal process of molecules in a given tissue usually measured when half of the tissue composition has changed. We investigated simultaneously the effects of age, sex, and diet types on the variation of discrimination and half-life in nitrogen and carbon stable isotopes (δ¹⁵N and δ¹³C, respectively in five tissues (blood cells, plasma, muscle, liver, nail, and hair of a top predator, the arctic fox Vulpes lagopus. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We fed 40 farmed foxes (equal numbers of adults and yearlings of both sexes with diet capturing the range of resources used by their wild counterparts. We found that, for a single species, six tissues, and three diet types, the range of discrimination values can be almost as large as what is known at the scale of the whole mammalian or avian class. Discrimination varied depending on sex, age, tissue, and diet types, ranging from 0.3‰ to 5.3‰ (mean  = 2.6‰ for δ¹⁵N and from 0.2‰ to 2.9‰ (mean  = 0.9‰ for δ¹³C. We also found an impact of population structure on δ¹⁵N half-life in blood cells. Varying across individuals, δ¹⁵N half-life in plasma (6 to 10 days was also shorter than for δ¹³C (14 to 22 days, though δ¹⁵N and δ¹³C half-lives are usually considered as equal. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Overall, our multi-factorial experiment revealed that at least six levels of isotopic variations could co-occur in the same population. Our experimental analysis provides a framework for quantifying multiple sources of variation in isotopic discrimination and half-life that needs to be taken into account when designing and analysing ecological

  8. The effects of prosocial video games on prosocial behaviors: international evidence from correlational, longitudinal, and experimental studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, Douglas A; Anderson, Craig A; Yukawa, Shintaro; Ihori, Nobuko; Saleem, Muniba; Ming, Lim Kam; Shibuya, Akiko; Liau, Albert K; Khoo, Angeline; Bushman, Brad J; Rowell Huesmann, L; Sakamoto, Akira

    2009-06-01

    Although dozens of studies have documented a relationship between violent video games and aggressive behaviors, very little attention has been paid to potential effects of prosocial games. Theoretically, games in which game characters help and support each other in nonviolent ways should increase both short-term and long-term prosocial behaviors. We report three studies conducted in three countries with three age groups to test this hypothesis. In the correlational study, Singaporean middle-school students who played more prosocial games behaved more prosocially. In the two longitudinal samples of Japanese children and adolescents, prosocial game play predicted later increases in prosocial behavior. In the experimental study, U.S. undergraduates randomly assigned to play prosocial games behaved more prosocially toward another student. These similar results across different methodologies, ages, and cultures provide robust evidence of a prosocial game content effect, and they provide support for the General Learning Model.

  9. Modulation of antioxidant enzymatic activities by certain antiepileptic drugs (valproic acid, oxcarbazepine, and topiramate): evidence in humans and experimental models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas-Rodríguez, Noemí; Coballase-Urrutia, Elvia; Rivera-Espinosa, Liliana; Romero-Toledo, Arantxa; Sampieri, Aristides; Ortega-Cuellar, Daniel; Montesinos-Correa, Hortencia; Floriano-Sánchez, Esaú; Carmona-Aparicio, Liliana

    2013-01-01

    It is estimated that at least 100 million people worldwide will suffer from epilepsy at some point in their lives. This neurological disorder induces brain death due to the excessive liberation of glutamate, which activates the postsynaptic N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors, which in turn cause the reuptake of intracellular calcium (excitotoxicity). This excitotoxicity elicits a series of events leading to nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activation and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Several studies in experimental models and in humans have demonstrated that certain antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) exhibit antioxidant effects by modulating the activity of various enzymes associated with this type of stress. Considering the above-mentioned data, we aimed to compile evidence elucidating how AEDs such as valproic acid (VPA), oxcarbazepine (OXC), and topiramate (TPM) modulate oxidative stress.

  10. Modulation of Antioxidant Enzymatic Activities by Certain Antiepileptic Drugs (Valproic Acid, Oxcarbazepine, and Topiramate): Evidence in Humans and Experimental Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas-Rodríguez, Noemí; Coballase-Urrutia, Elvia; Rivera-Espinosa, Liliana; Romero-Toledo, Arantxa; Sampieri, Aristides III; Ortega-Cuellar, Daniel; Montesinos-Correa, Hortencia; Floriano-Sánchez, Esaú; Carmona-Aparicio, Liliana

    2013-01-01

    It is estimated that at least 100 million people worldwide will suffer from epilepsy at some point in their lives. This neurological disorder induces brain death due to the excessive liberation of glutamate, which activates the postsynaptic N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors, which in turn cause the reuptake of intracellular calcium (excitotoxicity). This excitotoxicity elicits a series of events leading to nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activation and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Several studies in experimental models and in humans have demonstrated that certain antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) exhibit antioxidant effects by modulating the activity of various enzymes associated with this type of stress. Considering the above-mentioned data, we aimed to compile evidence elucidating how AEDs such as valproic acid (VPA), oxcarbazepine (OXC), and topiramate (TPM) modulate oxidative stress. PMID:24454986

  11. The Effects of Prosocial Video Games on Prosocial Behaviors: International Evidence from Correlational, Longitudinal, and Experimental Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, Douglas A.; Anderson, Craig A.; Yukawa, Shintaro; Ihori, Nobuko; Saleem, Muniba; Ming, Lim Kam; Shibuya, Akiko; Liau, Albert K.; Khoo, Angeline; Bushman, Brad J.; Huesmann, L. Rowell; Sakamoto, Akira

    2009-01-01

    Although dozens of studies have documented a relation between violent video games and aggressive behaviors, very little attention has been paid to potential effects of prosocial games. Theoretically, games in which game characters help and support each other in nonviolent ways should increase both short-term and long-term prosocial behaviors. We report three studies conducted in three countries with three age groups to test this hypothesis. In the correlational study, Singaporean middle-school students who played more prosocial games behaved more prosocially. In the two longitudinal samples of Japanese children and adolescents, prosocial game play predicted later increases in prosocial behavior. In the experimental study, U.S. undergraduates randomly assigned to play prosocial games behaved more prosocially toward another student. These similar results across different methodologies, ages, and cultures provide robust evidence a prosocial game content effect, and provide support for the General Learning Model. PMID:19321812

  12. Modulation of Antioxidant Enzymatic Activities by Certain Antiepileptic Drugs (Valproic Acid, Oxcarbazepine, and Topiramate: Evidence in Humans and Experimental Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noemí Cárdenas-Rodríguez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It is estimated that at least 100 million people worldwide will suffer from epilepsy at some point in their lives. This neurological disorder induces brain death due to the excessive liberation of glutamate, which activates the postsynaptic N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA receptors, which in turn cause the reuptake of intracellular calcium (excitotoxicity. This excitotoxicity elicits a series of events leading to nitric oxide synthase (NOS activation and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Several studies in experimental models and in humans have demonstrated that certain antiepileptic drugs (AEDs exhibit antioxidant effects by modulating the activity of various enzymes associated with this type of stress. Considering the above-mentioned data, we aimed to compile evidence elucidating how AEDs such as valproic acid (VPA, oxcarbazepine (OXC, and topiramate (TPM modulate oxidative stress.

  13. What role can information play in improved equity in Pakistan's irrigation system? Evidence from an experimental game in Punjab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Reid. Bell

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Indus Basin Irrigation System suffers significant inequity in access to surface water across its millions of users. Information, i.e., monitoring and reporting of water availability, may be of value in improving conditions across the basin, and we investigated this via an experimental game of water distribution in Punjab, Pakistan. We found evidence that flow information allowed players to take more effective action to target overuse, and that overall activities that might bring social disapproval were reduced with information. However, we did not find any overall improvement in equity across the system, suggesting that information on its own might not be sufficient to lead to better water distribution among irrigators.

  14. Experimental evidence for the intention-behavior relationship in the physical activity domain: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Ryan E; Dickau, Leanne

    2012-11-01

    Most contemporary theories of physical activity include an intention construct as the proximal determinant of behavior. Support of this premise has been found through correlational research. The purpose of this paper was to appraise the experimental evidence for the intention-behavior relationship through meta-analysis. Studies were eligible if they included: (1) random assignment of participants to intervention/no intervention groups; (2) an intervention that produced a significant difference in intention between groups; and (3) a measure of behavior was taken after the intention measure. Literature searches were concluded in December 2010 among five key search engines. This search yielded a total of 1,033 potentially relevant records; of these, 11 passed the eligibility criteria. Random effects meta-analysis procedures with correction for sampling bias were employed in the analysis. The sample-weighted average effect size derived from these studies was d+ = .45 (95% CI .30 to .60) for intention, yet d+ = .15 (95% CI .06 to .23) for behavior. These results demonstrate a weak relationship between intention and behavior that may be below meaningful/practical value. We suggest that prior evidence was probably biased by the limits of correlation coefficients in passive designs. It is recommended that contemporary research apply models featuring intention-behavior mediators or action control variables in order to account for this intention-behavior gap.

  15. Cash transfers, maternal depression and emotional well-being: Quasi-experimental evidence from India's Janani Suraksha Yojana programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell-Jackson, Timothy; Pereira, Shreya K; Dutt, Varun; Tougher, Sarah; Haldar, Kaveri; Kumar, Paresh

    2016-08-01

    Maternal depression is an important public health concern. We investigated whether a national-scale initiative that provides cash transfers to women giving birth in government health facilities, the Janani Suraksha Yojana (JSY), reduced maternal depression in India's largest state, Uttar Pradesh. Using primary data on 1695 women collected in early 2015, our quasi-experimental design exploited the fact that some women did not receive the JSY cash due to administrative problems in its disbursement - reasons that are unlikely to be correlated with determinants of maternal depression. We found that receipt of the cash was associated with an 8.5% reduction in the continuous measure of maternal depression and a 36% reduction in moderate depression. There was no evidence of an association with measures of emotional well-being, namely happiness and worry. The results suggest that the JSY had a clinically meaningful effect in reducing the burden of maternal depression, possibly by lessening the financial strain of delivery care. They contribute to the evidence that financial incentive schemes may have public health benefits beyond improving uptake of targeted health services.

  16. Probabilistic evidential assessment of gunshot residue particle evidence (Part II): Bayesian parameter estimation for experimental count data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedermann, A; Bozza, S; Taroni, F

    2011-03-20

    Part I of this series of articles focused on the construction of graphical probabilistic inference procedures, at various levels of detail, for assessing the evidential value of gunshot residue (GSR) particle evidence. The proposed models--in the form of Bayesian networks--address the issues of background presence of GSR particles, analytical performance (i.e., the efficiency of evidence searching and analysis procedures) and contamination. The use and practical implementation of Bayesian networks for case pre-assessment is also discussed. This paper, Part II, concentrates on Bayesian parameter estimation. This topic complements Part I in that it offers means for producing estimates usable for the numerical specification of the proposed probabilistic graphical models. Bayesian estimation procedures are given a primary focus of attention because they allow the scientist to combine (his/her) prior knowledge about the problem of interest with newly acquired experimental data. The present paper also considers further topics such as the sensitivity of the likelihood ratio due to uncertainty in parameters and the study of likelihood ratio values obtained for members of particular populations (e.g., individuals with or without exposure to GSR).

  17. A review of in vitro experimental evidence for the effect of spatial and temporal modulation of radiation dose on response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suchowerska, Natalka (Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, New South Wales (Australia)), E-mail: Natalka@email.cs.nsw.gov.au; McKenzie, David R. (School of Physics, Univ. of Sydney, New South Wales (Australia)); Ebert, Martin A. (Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Western Australia (Australia)); Jackson, Michael (Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Randwick, New South Wales (Australia))

    2010-11-15

    Background. Intensity modulated radiation therapy introduces strong spatial and temporal modulation of the dose delivery that may have therapeutic benefits, as yet unrealized. Material and methods. Experimental evidence for spatial and temporal modulation affecting the cell survival following in vitro irradiation has been derived using clonogenic assays. Results and discussion. The experimental results show that the survival status of a cell is strongly influenced by the spatial dose modulation. The classical bystander effect of decreased survival has now been supplemented by observations of increased survival, which may result from the same or different signaling mechanisms. Temporal dose modulation experiments show that dose protraction significantly increases cell survival. An appropriate choice of temporal dose modulation pattern enables cell death to be maximized or minimized for a constant dose and delivery time. Conclusion. Bystander effects challenge the assumption that outcome is solely dependent on local dose. Intra-fractional temporal modulation via protracted treatments and time varying dose delivery both affect the cell survival. The presence of bystander and temporal effects emphasize the need for a mathematical framework which incorporates their influence on cell survival

  18. Experimental evidence for the ancestry of allotetraploid Trifolium repens and creation of synthetic forms with value for plant breeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Warren M

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background White clover (Trifolium repens is a ubiquitous weed of the temperate world that through use of improved cultivars has also become the most important legume of grazed pastures world-wide. It has long been suspected to be allotetraploid, but the diploid ancestral species have remained elusive. Putative diploid ancestors were indicated by DNA sequence phylogeny to be T. pallescens and T. occidentale. Here, we use further DNA evidence as well as a combination of molecular cytogenetics (FISH and GISH and experimental hybridization to test the hypothesis that white clover originated as a hybrid between T. pallescens and T. occidentale. Results T. pallescens plants were identified with chloroplast trnL intron DNA sequences identical to those of white clover. Similarly, T. occidentale plants with nuclear ITS sequences identical to white clover were also identified. Reciprocal GISH experiments, alternately using labeled genomic DNA probes from each of the putative ancestral species on the same white clover cells, showed that half of the chromosomes hybridized with each probe. F1 hybrids were generated by embryo rescue and these showed strong interspecific chromosome pairing and produced a significant frequency of unreduced gametes, indicating the likely mode of polyploidization. The F1 hybrids are inter-fertile with white clover and function as synthetic white clovers, a valuable new resource for the re-incorporation of ancestral genomes into modern white clover for future plant breeding. Conclusions Evidence from DNA sequence analyses, molecular cytogenetics, interspecific hybridization and breeding experiments supports the hypothesis that a diploid alpine species (T. pallescens hybridized with a diploid coastal species (T. occidentale to generate tetraploid T. repens. The coming together of these two narrowly adapted species (one alpine and the other maritime, along with allotetraploidy, has led to a transgressive hybrid with a

  19. Experimental evidence of the tonic vibration reflex during whole-body vibration of the loaded and unloaded leg.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa N Zaidell

    Full Text Available Increased muscle activation during whole-body vibration (WBV is mainly ascribed to a complex spinal and supraspinal neurophysiological mechanism termed the tonic vibration reflex (TVR. However, TVR has not been experimentally demonstrated during low-frequency WBV, therefore this investigation aimed to determine the expression of TVR during WBV. Whilst seated, eight healthy males were exposed to either vertical WBV applied to the leg via the plantar-surface of the foot, or Achilles tendon vibration (ATV at 25 Hz and 50 Hz for 70s. Ankle plantar-flexion force, tri-axial accelerations at the shank and vibration source, and surface EMG activity of m. soleus (SOL and m. tibialis anterior (TA were recorded from the unloaded and passively loaded leg to simulate body mass supported during standing. Plantar flexion force was similarly augmented by WBV and ATV and increased over time in a load- and frequency dependent fashion. SOL and TA EMG amplitudes increased over time in all conditions independently of vibration mode. 50 Hz WBV and ATV resulted in greater muscle activation than 25 Hz in SOL when the shank was loaded and in TA when the shank was unloaded despite the greater transmission of vertical acceleration from source to shank with 25 Hz and WBV, especially during loading. Low-amplitude WBV of the unloaded and passively loaded leg produced slow tonic muscle contraction and plantar-flexion force increase of similar magnitudes to those induced by Achilles tendon vibration at the same frequencies. This study provides the first experimental evidence supporting the TVR as a plausible mechanism underlying the neuromuscular response to whole-body vibration.

  20. Experimental evidence that an asteroid impact led to the extinction of many species 65 million years ago

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez, L.W.

    1982-09-01

    The development of the theory that the mass extinction of the dinosaurs at the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary was caused by an asteroid impact is reviewed. The personnel involved, the objections to the theory, and the evidence refuting those objections are presented chronologically. (ACR)

  1. The Effect of Feedback by SMS-text messages and email on Household Electricity Consumption: Experimental Evidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anders

    2010-01-01

    This paper analyzes the effect of supplying online feedback by SMS-text messages and email about electricity consumption on the level of total household electricity consumption. An experiment was conducted in which 1,452 households were randomly allocated to three experimental groups and two...

  2. The harmony of programs package: Quasi-experimental evidence on deworming and canteen interventions in rural Senegal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Azomahou, T.T.; Diallo, F.L.; Raymond, W.

    2014-01-01

    This paper uses a unique and large-scale quasi-experimental data to study the effect of deworming and school meals programs as a package on educational outcomes (pupils' test scores: aggregate, French or math; enrollment, promotion or dropout rates) in rural Senegal. We extend the endogenous selecti

  3. Experimental Evidence of the Superiority of the Prevalence Model of Conceptual Change over the Classical Models and Repetition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potvin, Patrice; Sauriol, Érik; Riopel, Martin

    2015-01-01

    This quasi-experimental study investigated the effects on 558 grades five and six students of three different teaching conditions: the "classical" model of conceptual change (for which cognitive conflict is considered as a precondition to the transformation of knowledge), the "prevalence" model of conceptual change (in which…

  4. The Effect of Feedback by SMS-text messages and email on Household Electricity Consumption: Experimental Evidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anders

    2010-01-01

    This paper analyzes the effect of supplying online feedback by SMS-text messages and email about electricity consumption on the level of total household electricity consumption. An experiment was conducted in which 1,452 households were randomly allocated to three experimental groups and two...

  5. Non-Strategic Punishment when Monitoring is Costly: Experimental Evidence on Differences between Second and Third Party Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Goeschl, Timo; Jarke, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    This paper studies monitoring and punishment behavior by second and third parties in a cooperation experiment with endogenous information structures: Players are uninformed whether the target player cooperated or defected at the cooperation stage, but can decide to resolve the information imperfection at non-negative cost at the punishment stage. We examine how monitoring and punishment respond to changes in monitoring costs, and exploit the evidence to gain new insights about commonalities a...

  6. Test the principle of maximum entropy in constant sum 2×2 game: Evidence in experimental economics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Bin, E-mail: xubin211@zju.edu.cn [Experimental Social Science Laboratory, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310058 (China); Public Administration College, Zhejiang Gongshang University, Hangzhou, 310018 (China); Zhang, Hongen, E-mail: hongen777@163.com [Department of Physics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310027 (China); Wang, Zhijian, E-mail: wangzj@zju.edu.cn [Experimental Social Science Laboratory, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310058 (China); Zhang, Jianbo, E-mail: jbzhang08@zju.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310027 (China)

    2012-03-19

    By using laboratory experimental data, we test the uncertainty of strategy type in various competing environments with two-person constant sum 2×2 game in the social system. It firstly shows that, in these competing game environments, the outcome of human's decision-making obeys the principle of the maximum entropy. -- Highlights: ► Test the uncertainty in two-person constant sum games with experimental data. ► On game level, the constant sum game fits the principle of maximum entropy. ► On group level, all empirical entropy values are close to theoretical maxima. ► The results can be different for the games that are not constant sum game.

  7. Evidence for the Use of Isoflurane as a Replacement for Chloral Hydrate Anesthesia in Experimental Stroke: An Ethical Issue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pétrault Maud

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Since an ethical issue has been raised regarding the use of the well-known anesthetic agent chloral hydrate, owing to its mutagenic and carcinogenic effects in animals, attention of neuroscientists has turned to finding out an alternative agent able to meet not only potency, safety, and analgesic efficacy, but also reduced neuroprotective effect for stroke research. The aim of this study was to compare the potential of chloral hydrate and isoflurane for both modulating the action of the experimental neuroprotectant MK801 and exerting analgesia. After middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats, no difference was observed in 24 h survival rate, success of ischemia, or infarct volume reduction between both anesthetics. However, isoflurane exerted a more pronounced analgesic effect than chloral hydrate as evidenced by formalin test 3 hours after anesthesia onset, thus encouraging the use of isoflurane in experimental stroke models.

  8. Helicobacter pylori infection causes gastric cancer? A review of the epidemiological, meta-analytic, and experimental evidence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guy D Eslick

    2006-01-01

    Since the discovery of Campylobacter-like organisms (Helicobacter pylori) more than two decades ago the possibility of a relationship with gastric cancer has been postulated, tested and supposedly proven. There have been numerous human studies of various designs from many countries around the world. Several meta-analyses have been published and more recently a small number of experimental animal studies were reported looking at the association between Helicobacter pylori infection and gastric cancer. Over the years, the human epidemiological studies have produced conflicting results; the metaanalyses have as one would expect produced similar pooled estimates; while the early experimental animal studies require replication. The exact mechanisms by which H pylori might cause gastric cancer are still under investigation and remain to be elucidated.

  9. Modafinil: a useful medication for cocaine addiction? Review of the evidence from neuropharmacological, experimental and clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Raga, Jose; Knecht, Carlos; Cepeda, Sonsoles

    2008-06-01

    Cocaine addiction is a chronic relapsing disorder associated with severe medical and psychosocial complications. However, there are no approved medications for cocaine dependent individuals. Modafinil, a medication that differs chemically and pharmacologically from other central nervous system stimulants, has been suggested to be potentially useful for this complex disorder. The present paper aims to critically review the published evidence from laboratory and clinical studies on modafinil for cocaine addiction, including discussion of its pharmacological characteristics and how it may relate with cocaine neurobiology. Whilst its exact mechanism of action remains to be elucidated, different neurotransmitter systems have been implicated, including modulation on dopamine, glutamate/GABA, noradrenaline and the hypocretin/orexin system, but it is possible that modafinil acts by a synergistic combination of mechanisms. With a favourable pharmacokinetic profile, it appears to have a low abuse potential. Laboratory and clinical studies provide consistent, albeit preliminary, evidence of the potential usefulness of modafinil for cocaine dependent patients. Not only there is no evidence of pharmacokinetic interactions between modafinil and cocaine, but in addition cocaine induced euphoria and cardiovascular effects appear to be attenuated by modafinil. Furthermore, modafinil has been shown to decrease cocaine self-administration. In addition, modafinil treated patient are more likely to achieve protracted abstinence than placebo treated patients. However, further research is needed to confirm these findings.

  10. District Magnitude and Representation of the Majority?s Preferences: Quasi-Experimental Evidence from Popular and Parliamentary Votes

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Members of parliament have more effective incentives to cater for the majority?s preferences when they are elected in districts with few seats in parliament rather than in districts with many seats. We empirically investigate this hypothesis by matching voting behavior on legislative proposals of Swiss members of parliament with real referenda outcomes on the same issues for the years 1996 to 2008. This quasi-experimental data allows us to identify the impact of electoral systems through dist...

  11. Electoral Systems and the Influence of the Median Voter: Quasi-Experimental Evidence from popular and parliamentary votes

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    When moving from a plurality rule to a proportional system, members of national parliament have more incentives to diverge from the median voter's preferences. We match voting behavior concerning legislative proposals of Swiss members of parliament with real referenda outcomes on the same issues for the years 1996 to 2009. This quasi-experimental data allows us to identify whether differences in electoral systems induce members of parliament to diverge from the choices of the median voter. Em...

  12. Silica-rich lavas in the oceanic crust: experimental evidence for fractional crystallization under low water activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdmann, Martin; Koepke, Jürgen

    2016-10-01

    We experimentally investigated phase relations and phase compositions as well as the influence of water activity ( aH2O) and redox conditions on the equilibrium crystallization path within an oceanic dacitic potassium-depleted system at shallow pressure (200 MPa). Moreover, we measured the partitioning of trace elements between melt and plagioclase via secondary ion mass spectrometry for a highly evolved experiment (SiO2 = 74.6 wt%). As starting material, we used a dacitic glass dredged at the Pacific-Antarctic Rise. Phase assemblages in natural high-silica systems reported from different locations of fast-spreading oceanic crust could be experimentally reproduced only in a relatively small range of temperature and melt-water content ( T ~950 °C; melt H2O generally regarded as key for producing silica-rich rocks in an oceanic environment. However, our conclusion is also supported by mineral and melt chemistry of natural evolved rocks; these rocks are only congruent to the composition of those experimental phases that are produced under low aH2O. Low FeO contents under water-saturated conditions and the characteristic enrichment of Al2O3 in high aH2O experiments, in particular, contradict natural observations, while experiments with low aH2O match the natural trend. Moreover, the observation that highly evolved experimental melts remain H2O-poor while they are relatively enriched in chlorine implies a decoupling between these two volatiles during crustal contamination.

  13. Experimental evidence of E × B plasma rotation in a 2.45 GHz hydrogen discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortázar, O. D., E-mail: daniel.cortazar@uclm.es [Institute for Energy Research-INEI, University of Castilla-La Mancha, C.J. Cela s/n, 13170 Ciudad Real (Spain); Megía-Macías, A. [CERN, BE-ABP-HSL Department, CH1211 Geneva (Switzerland); E.S.S. Bilbao, Polígono Ugaldeguren III, A-7B, 48170 Zamudio (Spain); Tarvainen, O.; Koivisto, H. [Department of Physics, Accelerator Laboratory, University of Jyväskylä, PO Box 35 (YFL), 40500 Jyväskylä (Finland)

    2015-12-15

    An experimental observation of a rotating plasma structure in a 2.45 GHz microwave-driven hydrogen discharge is reported. The rotation is presumably produced by E × B drift. The formation of the rotating plasma structure is sensitive to the strength of the off-resonance static magnetic field. The rotation frequency is on the order of 10 kHz and is affected by the neutral gas pressure and applied microwave power.

  14. Favorable results from the use of herbal and plant products in inflammatory bowel disease: evidence from experimental animal studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triantafillidis, John K; Triantafyllidi, Aikaterini; Vagianos, Constantinos; Papalois, Apostolos

    2016-01-01

    The use of herbal therapy for inflammatory bowel disease is increasing worldwide. The aim of this study was to review the available literature on the efficacy of herbal therapy in experimental colitis. All relevant studies published in Medline and Embase up to June 2015 have been reviewed. The results of bowel histology and serum parameters have been recorded. A satisfactory number of published experimental studies, and a quite large one of both herbal and plant products tested in different studies have been reported. The results showed that in the majority of the studies, herbal therapy reduced the inflammatory activity of experimental colitis and diminished the levels of many inflammatory indices, including serum cytokines and indices of oxidative stress. The most promising plant and herbal products were tormentil extracts, wormwoodherb, Aloe vera, germinated barley foodstuff, curcumin, Boswellia serrata, Panax notoginseng, Ixeris dentata, green tea, Cordia dichotoma, Plantago lanceolata, Iridoidglycosides, and mastic gum. Herbal therapies exert their therapeutic benefit via various mechanisms, including immune regulation, anti-oxidant activity, inhibition of leukotriene B4 and nuclear factor-κB, and antiplatelet activity. Large, double-blind clinical studies assessing these natural substances should be urgently conducted.

  15. Protective effect of curcumin on experimentally induced inflammation, hepatotoxicity and cardiotoxicity in rats: evidence of its antioxidant property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Suresh R; Thakare, Vishnu N; Patil, Snehal R

    2011-07-01

    The present study investigates the protective effects of curcumin on experimentally induced inflammation, hepatotoxicity, and cardiotoxicity using various animal models with biochemical parameters like serum marker enzymes and antioxidants in target tissues. In addition, liver and cardiac histoarchitecture changes were also studied. Curcumin treatment inhibited carrageenin and albumin induced edema, cotton pellet granuloma formation. The increased relative weight of liver and heart in CCl(4) induced liver injury and isoproterenol induced cardiac necrosis were also reduced by curcumin treatment. Elevated serum marker enzymes, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) increased lipid peroxidation, decreased gluthione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) in edematous, granulomatus, liver and heart tissues during inflammation, liver injury and cardiac necrosis, respectively. Curcumin treatment reversed all these above mentioned biochemical changes significantly in all animal models studied. Even histoarchitecture alterations observed in liver injury and cardiac necrosis observed were partially reversed (improved) by curcumin treatments. In in vitro experiments too curcumin inhibited iron catalyzed lipid peroxidation in liver homogenates, scavenged nitric oxide spontaneously generated from nitroprusside and inhibited heat induced hemolysis of rat erythrocytes. The present in vitro and in vivo experimental findings suggest the protective effect of curcumin on experimentally induced inflammation, hepatotoxicity, and cardiotoxicity in rats.

  16. Favorable results from the use of herbal and plant products in inflammatory bowel disease: evidence from experimental animal studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triantafillidis, John K.; Triantafyllidi, Aikaterini; Vagianos, Constantinos; Papalois, Apostolos

    2016-01-01

    The use of herbal therapy for inflammatory bowel disease is increasing worldwide. The aim of this study was to review the available literature on the efficacy of herbal therapy in experimental colitis. All relevant studies published in Medline and Embase up to June 2015 have been reviewed. The results of bowel histology and serum parameters have been recorded. A satisfactory number of published experimental studies, and a quite large one of both herbal and plant products tested in different studies have been reported. The results showed that in the majority of the studies, herbal therapy reduced the inflammatory activity of experimental colitis and diminished the levels of many inflammatory indices, including serum cytokines and indices of oxidative stress. The most promising plant and herbal products were tormentil extracts, wormwoodherb, Aloe vera, germinated barley foodstuff, curcumin, Boswellia serrata, Panax notoginseng, Ixeris dentata, green tea, Cordia dichotoma, Plantago lanceolata, Iridoidglycosides, and mastic gum. Herbal therapies exert their therapeutic benefit via various mechanisms, including immune regulation, anti-oxidant activity, inhibition of leukotriene B4 and nuclear factor-κB, and antiplatelet activity. Large, double-blind clinical studies assessing these natural substances should be urgently conducted. PMID:27366027

  17. Experimental evidence for the sensitivity of the air-shower radio signal to the longitudinal shower development

    CERN Document Server

    Apel, W D; Bähren, L; Bekk, K; Bertaina, M; Biermann, P L; Blümer, J; Bozdog, H; Brancus, I M; Buchholz, P; Cantoni, E; Chiavassa, A; Daumiller, K; de Souza, V; Di Pierro, F; Doll, P; Engel, R; Falcke, H; Finger, M; Fuchs, B; Fuhrmann, D; Gemmeke, H; Grupen, C; Haungs, A; Heck, D; Hörandel, J R; Horneffer, A; Huber, D; Huege, T; Isar, P G; Kampert, K -H; Kang, D; Krömer, O; Kuijpers, J; Link, K; Luczak, P; Ludwig, M; Mathes, H J; Melissas, M; Morello, C; Oehlschläger, J; Palmieri, N; Pierog, T; Rautenberg, J; Rebel, H; Roth, M; Rühle, C; Saftoiu, A; Schieler, H; Schmidt, A; Schröder, F G; Sima, O; Toma, G; Trinchero, G C; Weindl, A; Wochele, J; Wommer, M; Zabierowski, J; Zensus, J A

    2012-01-01

    We observe a correlation between the slope of radio lateral distributions, and the mean muon pseudorapidity of 59 individual cosmic-ray-air-shower events. The radio lateral distributions are measured with LOPES, a digital radio interferometer co-located with the multi-detector-air-shower array KASCADE-Grande, which includes a muon-tracking detector. The result proves experimentally that radio measurements are sensitive to the longitudinal development of cosmic-ray air-showers. This is one of the main prerequisites for using radio arrays for ultra-high-energy particle physics and astrophysics.

  18. Experimental Evidence Supported by Simulations of a Very High H2 Diffusion in Metal Organic Framework Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salles, F.; Jobic, H.; Maurin, G.; Koza, M. M.; Llewellyn, P. L.; Devic, T.; Serre, C.; Ferey, G.

    2008-06-01

    Quasielastic neutron scattering measurements are combined with molecular dynamics simulations to extract the self-diffusion coefficient of hydrogen in the metal organic frameworks MIL-47(V) and MIL-53(Cr). We find that the diffusivity of hydrogen at low loading is about 2 orders of magnitude higher than in zeolites. Such a high mobility has never been experimentally observed before in any nanoporous materials, although it was predicted in carbon nanotubes. Either 1D or 3D diffusion mechanisms are elucidated depending on the chemical features of the MIL framework.

  19. Accumulation and transport of microbial-size particles in a pressure protected model burn unit: CFD simulations and experimental evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mimoun Maurice

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Controlling airborne contamination is of major importance in burn units because of the high susceptibility of burned patients to infections and the unique environmental conditions that can accentuate the infection risk. In particular the required elevated temperatures in the patient room can create thermal convection flows which can transport airborne contaminates throughout the unit. In order to estimate this risk and optimize the design of an intensive care room intended to host severely burned patients, we have relied on a computational fluid dynamic methodology (CFD. Methods The study was carried out in 4 steps: i patient room design, ii CFD simulations of patient room design to model air flows throughout the patient room, adjacent anterooms and the corridor, iii construction of a prototype room and subsequent experimental studies to characterize its performance iv qualitative comparison of the tendencies between CFD prediction and experimental results. The Electricité De France (EDF open-source software Code_Saturne® (http://www.code-saturne.org was used and CFD simulations were conducted with an hexahedral mesh containing about 300 000 computational cells. The computational domain included the treatment room and two anterooms including equipment, staff and patient. Experiments with inert aerosol particles followed by time-resolved particle counting were conducted in the prototype room for comparison with the CFD observations. Results We found that thermal convection can create contaminated zones near the ceiling of the room, which can subsequently lead to contaminate transfer in adjacent rooms. Experimental confirmation of these phenomena agreed well with CFD predictions and showed that particles greater than one micron (i.e. bacterial or fungal spore sizes can be influenced by these thermally induced flows. When the temperature difference between rooms was 7°C, a significant contamination transfer was observed to

  20. Experimental evidence of giant pure optical activity in a metasurface based on a complementary twisted cross configuration

    CERN Document Server

    Díaz-Rubio, Ana; Carbonell, Jorge; Sánchez-Dehesa, José; Hibbins, Alastair

    2014-01-01

    This work presents an experimental study of giant and pure optical activity in a periodic structure consisting of twisted crosses and complementary crosses patterned on the sides of a copper coated dielectric board. Additionally, a multilayer system is proposed and numerically studied to broaden the transmission bandwidth. Our results show that a dual band behavior can be obtained due to coupling effects between the layers whilst maintaining the dispersionless giant optical activity and negligible circular dichroism. We theoretically study the effect of the separation between layers and its influence on the transmission spectra.

  1. Single case design studies in music therapy: resurrecting experimental evidence in small group and individual music therapy clinical settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geist, Kamile; Hitchcock, John H

    2014-01-01

    The profession would benefit from greater and routine generation of causal evidence pertaining to the impact of music therapy interventions on client outcomes. One way to meet this goal is to revisit the use of Single Case Designs (SCDs) in clinical practice and research endeavors in music therapy. Given the appropriate setting and goals, this design can be accomplished with small sample sizes and it is often appropriate for studying music therapy interventions. In this article, we promote and discuss implementation of SCD studies in music therapy settings, review the meaning of internal study validity and by extension the notion of causality, and describe two of the most commonly used SCDs to demonstrate how they can help generate causal evidence to inform the field. In closing, we describe the need for replication and future meta-analysis of SCD studies completed in music therapy settings. SCD studies are both feasible and appropriate for use in music therapy clinical practice settings, particularly for testing effectiveness of interventions for individuals or small groups. © the American Music Therapy Association 2014. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Experimental evidence of an incomplete thermalization of the energy in an x-ray microcalorimeter with a TaAu absorber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perinati, E; Barbera, M; Varisco, S; Silver, E; Beeman, J; Pigot, C

    2008-05-01

    We have conducted an experimental test at our XACT facility using an x-ray microcalorimeter with TaAu absorber and neutron transmutation doped germanium thermal sensor. The test was aimed at measuring the percentage of energy effectively thermalized after absorption of x-ray photons in superconducting tantalum. Moreover, in general, possible formation of long living quasiparticles implies that by using a superconducting absorber, a fraction of the deposited energy could not be thermalized on the useful time scale of the thermal sensor. To investigate this scenario, we exploited an absorber made of gold, where no energy trapping is expected, with a small piece of superconducting tantalum attached on top. We obtained evidence that the thermalization of photons absorbed in tantalum is delayed by energy trapping from quasiparticles. We compare the experimental results with numerical simulations and derive a value for the intrinsic lifetime of quasiparticles.

  3. Genesis of granulite in Himalayan lower crust: Evidence from experimental study at high temperature and high pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Here we present an insight into the genesis of Himalayan granulitic lower crust based on the experimental studies on the dehydration melting of natural biotiteplagioclase gneiss performed at the temperatures of 770-980℃ and the pressures of 1.0-1.4 GPa. The experiments produce peraluminous granitic melt and residual phase assemblage (Pl+Qz+Gat+Bio+Opx±Cpx+Ilm/Rut±Kfs). The residual mineral assemblage is similar to those of granulites observed at the eastern and western Himalayan syntaxises, and the chemical compositions of characteristic minerals-garnet and pyroxene in the residual phase and the granulite are identical. Additionally, the modeled wave velocities of the residual phase assemblage are comparable well with those of the top part of lower crust beneath Himalayas.Hence, we suggest that (1) the top part of lower crust beneath Himalayas is probably made up of garnet-bearing intermediate granulite; (2) the formations of granulite and leucogranites in Himalayas are interrelated as the results of crustal anatexis; and (3) dehydration melting of biotite-plagioclase gneiss is an important process to form granulitic lower crust, to reconstitute and adjust the crustal texture. Moreover, experimental results can provide constraints on determining the P-T conditions of Himalayan crustal anatexis.

  4. Non-standard coupled extensional and bending bias tests for planar pantographic lattices. Part II: comparison with experimental evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turco, Emilio; Barcz, Katarzyna; Rizzi, Nicola Luigi

    2016-10-01

    In dell'Isola et al. (Zeitschrift für Angewandte Math und Physik 66(6):3473-3498, 2015, Proc R Soc Lond A Math Phys Eng Sci 472(2185):1-23, 2016) pantographic sheets are proposed as a basic constituent for a novel metamaterial. In Part I, see Turco et al. (Zeitschrift für Angewandte Math und Physik, doi: 10.1007/s00033-016-0713-4, 2016), two different numerical models are applied in order to design an experimental setup aimed to prove the effectiveness of introduced concept. The aim of this paper is to prove that the Hencky-type model introduced for planar pantographic sheets allows for the correct prediction, in a large range of imposed displacements, of the experimental measurements concerning specimens undergoing coupled bending and extensional deformations. The four-parameter numerical model introduced is shown to have a large range of applicability: Indeed without changing the values of the material parameters previously attributed in simple extensional tests to a specific specimen by a best-fit procedure, it is possible to forecast its behavior in all the considered type of imposed deformations. The measurements performed include the determination of reactive forces exerted by used hard devices, and the numerical modeling is able to predict very carefully quantitatively and qualitatively also this complex aspect of phenomenology, where previously attempted models seem to have failed.

  5. Experimental evidence for the occurrence of E8 in nature and the radii of the Gosset circles

    CERN Document Server

    Kostant, Bertram

    2010-01-01

    A recent experimental discovery involving the spin structure of electrons in a cold one-dimensional magnet points to a validation of a Zamolodchikov model involving the exceptional Lie group $E_8$. The model predicts 8 particles and predicts the ratio of their masses. I.e., the vertices of the 8-dimensional Gosset polytope identifies with the 240 roots of $E_8$. Under the 2-D (Peter McMullen) projection of the polytope, the image of the vertices are arranged in 8 concentric circles, here referred to as the Gosset circles. The Gosset circles are understood to correspond to the 8 masses in the model, and it is understood that the ratio of their radii is the same as the ratio of the corres-ponding conjectural masses. A ratio of the two smallest circles (read 2 smallest masses) is the golden number. The conjectures have been now validated experimentally, at least for the first five masses. The McMullen projection generalizes to any complex simple Lie algebra whose rank is greater than 1. The Gosset circles also g...

  6. The effect of varying the number of response alternatives in rating scales: experimental evidence from intra-individual effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maydeu-Olivares, Alberto; Kramp, Uwe; García-Forero, Carlos; Gallardo-Pujol, David; Coffman, Donna

    2009-05-01

    Despite a hundred years of questionnaire testing, no consensus has been reached on the optimal number of response alternatives in rating scales. Differences in prior research may have been due to the use of various psychometric models (classical test theory, item factor analysis, and item response theory) and different performance criteria (reliability, convergent/discriminant validity, and internal structure of the questionnaire). Furthermore, previous empirical studies on this issue have tackled the experimental design from a between-subjects perspective, thus ignoring intra-individual effects. In contrast with this approach, we propose a within-subjects experimental design and a comprehensive statistical methodology using structural equation models for studying all of these aspects simultaneously, therefore increasing statistical power. To illustrate the method, two personality questionnaires were examined using a repeated measures design. Results indicated that as the number of response alternatives increased, (1) internal consistency increased, (2) there was no effect on convergent validity, and (3) goodness of fit worsened. Finally, the article assesses the practical consequences of this research for the design of future personality questionnaires.

  7. Honest sexual signaling in turtles: experimental evidence of a trade-off between immune response and coloration in red-eared sliders Trachemys scripta elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibáñez, Alejandro; Polo-Cavia, Nuria; López, Pilar; Martín, José

    2014-10-01

    Sexual signals can be evolutionarily stable if they are honest and condition dependent or costly to the signaler. One possible cost is the existence of a trade-off between maintaining the immune system and the elaboration of ornaments. This hypothesis has been experimentally tested in some groups of animals but not in others such as turtles. We experimentally challenged the immune system of female red-eared sliders Trachemys scripta elegans, with a bacterial antigen (lipopolysaccharide (LPS)) without pathogenic effects to explore whether the immune activation affected visual colorful ornaments of the head. The LPS injection altered the reflectance patterns of color ornaments. In comparison to the control animals, the yellow chin stripes of injected animals exhibited (1) reduced brightness, (2) lower long wavelength (>470 nm) reflectance, and (3) lower values for carotenoid chroma. The postorbital patches of injected individuals also showed reduced very long wavelength (>570 nm) reflectance but did not change in carotenoid chroma. Thus, experimental turtles showed darker and less "yellowish" chin stripes and less "reddish" postorbital patches at the end of the experiment, whereas control turtles did not change their coloration. This is the first experimental evidence supporting the existence of a trade-off between the immune system and the expression of visual ornaments in turtles. We suggest that this trade-off may allow turtles to honestly signal individual quality via characteristics of coloration, which may have an important role in intersexual selection processes.

  8. Experimental evidence of bulk chemistry constraint on SiO2 solubility in clinopyroxene at high-pressure conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Toshisuke; Osanai, Yasuhito

    2015-06-01

    We have experimentally confirmed that the solubility of SiO2 in clinopyroxene at ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic conditions is buffered by coesite and kyanite. The present findings were derived from high-pressure experiments on metapelite glass, powdered andesite and eclogite glass under anhydrous conditions. The metapelite glass and powdered andesite were recrystallised in boron nitride capsules at 8 GPa and 1100-1500 °C. The eclogite glass was heated in an AuPd capsule, both ends of which were welded, at 3 GPa and 1000 °C. Clinopyroxene nucleated from metapelite glass, the bulk composition of which is saturated in both SiO2 and Al2SiO5 components plotting within the Jd (Na,K)(Al,Cr)(Si,Ti)2O6-Qtz (Si,Ti)O2-Grt M3(Al,Cr)2(Si,Ti)3O12-Als (Al,Cr)2(Si,Ti)O5 tetrahedron (M = Fe, Mn, Mg, Ni, Zn, Ca), coexists with garnet, coesite and kyanite. The average excess silica content of the clinopyroxene ranges from 23.4 to 35.4 mol%. In contrast, an andesite experiment saturated in SiO2 but undersaturated in Al2SiO5 within the Jd-Qtz-Aug M(Si,Ti)O3-Grt tetrahedron produced clinopyroxene, garnet and coesite but no kyanite. The average excess silica in the clinopyroxene was 9.7-15.5 mol%, which is comparable to previous experimental data. Experiment on the eclogite glass with similar composition to andesite yielded clinopyroxene, garnet and coesite. An average excess silica content in clinopyroxene counts 6.4 mol%, which is much lower than that obtained from the andesite. The SiO2 content of clinopyroxene coexisting with garnet, coesite and kyanite is much higher than that of clinopyroxene coexisting with garnet and coesite without kyanite. Although the temperature dependence is unclear, the SiO2 solubility increases with pressure and Fe/(Fe+Mg). Clinopyroxene forms the solid solution series Jd-Es □0.5M0.5Al(Si,Ti)2O6 and Aug-Es, rather than Jd-Ts MAl2(Si,Ti)O6 and Es-Ts joins. Our experimental data suggest the probable existence of octahedral Si which may accompany the M2

  9. Mental Practice Combined with Motor Rehabilitation to Treat Upper Limb Hemiparesis of Post-Stroke Patients: Clinical and Experimental Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Sergio; Lattari, Eduardo; Paes, Flávia; Rocha, Nuno B.F.; Nardi, Antonio E.; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Mura, Gioia; Yuan, Ti-Fei; Carta, Mauro G.; Campos, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is one of the major causes of disability in the world. Due to the extended lifetime of the world's population, the number of people affected by stroke has increased substantially over the last years. Stroke may lead to sensorimotor deficits, usually causing hemiplegia or hemiparesia. In order to reduce motor deficits and accelerate functional recovery, MP combined with motor rehabilitation was introduced to the rehabilitation process of post-stroke patients. Evidence has shown that MP combining with motor rehabilitation based on activities of daily living was more effective than conventional motor rehabilitation used per se. This combination proved very useful and effective, with significant results in improvement of motor deficits in post-stroke patients. However, further studies must be conducted to determine specific parameters, such as type of imagery, frequency or duration. PMID:27346996

  10. Mental Practice Combined with Motor Rehabilitation to Treat Upper Limb Hemiparesis of Post-Stroke Patients: Clinical and Experimental Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Sergio; Lattari, Eduardo; Paes, Flávia; Rocha, Nuno B F; Nardi, Antonio E; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Mura, Gioia; Yuan, Ti-Fei; Carta, Mauro G; Campos, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is one of the major causes of disability in the world. Due to the extended lifetime of the world's population, the number of people affected by stroke has increased substantially over the last years. Stroke may lead to sensorimotor deficits, usually causing hemiplegia or hemiparesia. In order to reduce motor deficits and accelerate functional recovery, MP combined with motor rehabilitation was introduced to the rehabilitation process of post-stroke patients. Evidence has shown that MP combining with motor rehabilitation based on activities of daily living was more effective than conventional motor rehabilitation used per se. This combination proved very useful and effective, with significant results in improvement of motor deficits in post-stroke patients. However, further studies must be conducted to determine specific parameters, such as type of imagery, frequency or duration.

  11. Effects of Exercise on Physical and Mental Health, and Cognitive and Brain Functions in Schizophrenia: Clinical and Experimental Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimes, Ridson Rosa; de Souza Moura, Antonio Marcos; Lamego, Murilo Khede; de Sá Filho, Alberto Souza; Manochio, João; Paes, Flávia; Carta, Mauro Giovanni; Mura, Gioia; Wegner, Mirko; Budde, Henning; Ferreira Rocha, Nuno Barbosa; Rocha, Joana; Tavares, João Manuel R S; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Nardi, Antonio Egidio; Yuan, Ti-Fei; Machado, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Exercise promotes several health benefits, such as cardiovascular, musculoskeletal and cardiorespiratory improvements. It is believed that the practice of exercise in individuals with psychiatric disorders, e.g. schizophrenia, can cause significant changes. Schizophrenic patients have problematic lifestyle habits compared with general population; this may cause a high mortality rate, mainly caused by cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Thus, the aim of this study is to investigate changes in physical and mental health, cognitive and brain functioning due to the practice of exercise in patients with schizophrenia. Although still little is known about the benefits of exercise on mental health, cognitive and brain functioning of schizophrenic patients, exercise training has been shown to be a beneficial intervention in the control and reduction of disease severity. Type of training, form of execution, duration and intensity need to be better studied as the effects on physical and mental health, cognition and brain activity depend exclusively of interconnected factors, such as the combination of exercise and medication. However, one should understand that exercise is not only an effective nondrug alternative, but also acts as a supporting linking up interventions to promote improvements in process performance optimization. In general, the positive effects on mental health, cognition and brain activity as a result of an exercise program are quite evident. Few studies have been published correlating effects of exercise in patients with schizophrenia, but there is increasing evidence that positive and negative symptoms can be improved. Therefore, it is important that further studies be undertaken to expand the knowledge of physical exercise on mental health in people with schizophrenia, as well as its dose-response and the most effective type of exercise.

  12. Experimental evidence of a xylose-catabolic pathway on the pAO1 megaplasmid of Arthrobacter nicotinovorans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Mihasan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The pAO1 megaplasmid of A. nicotinovorans consists of 165 ORF's related mainly to nicotine degradation, uptake and utilization of carbohydrates, amino acids and sarcosine. A putative sugar catabolic pathway consisting of 11 ORF's organized as a single operon were previously described. The current work brings experimental data supporting the existence of a D-Xylose catabolic pathway on the pAO1 megaplasmid. When grown on D-xylose containing media, the cells harboring the pAO1 megaplasmid grow to higher cell densities and also express the OxRe protein coded by the megaplasmid. A putative pathway similar to Weimberg pentose pathway is postulated, in which D-xylose is transported in the cell by the ABC-type transport system and then transformed using the putative sugar-dehidrogenase OxRe to D-xylonate, which is further degrated to 2-ketoglutarate and integrated into the general metabolism of the cell

  13. Use of magnetic resonance imaging to predict outcome after stroke: a review of experimental and clinical evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, Tracy D; Wegener, Susanne

    2010-01-01

    Despite promising results in preclinical stroke research, translation of experimental data into clinical therapy has been difficult. One reason is the heterogeneity of the disease with outcomes ranging from complete recovery to continued decline. A successful treatment in one situation may be ineffective, or even harmful, in another. To overcome this, treatment must be tailored according to the individual based on identification of the risk of damage and estimation of potential recovery. Neuroimaging, particularly magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), could be the tool for a rapid comprehensive assessment in acute stroke with the potential to guide treatment decisions for a better clinical outcome. This review describes current MRI techniques used to characterize stroke in a preclinical research setting, as well as in the clinic. Furthermore, we will discuss current developments and the future potential of neuroimaging for stroke outcome prediction. PMID:20087362

  14. Experimental evidence of excited electron number density and temperature effects on electron-phonon coupling in gold films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giri, Ashutosh; Gaskins, John T.; Foley, Brian M.; Cheaito, Ramez; Hopkins, Patrick E., E-mail: phopkins@virginia.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States)

    2015-01-28

    The electronic transport properties of metals with weak electron-phonon coupling can be influenced by non-thermal electrons. Relaxation processes involving non-thermal electrons competing with the thermalized electron system have led to inconsistencies in the understanding of how electrons scatter and relax with the less energetic lattice. Recent theoretical and computational works have shown that the rate of energy relaxation with the metallic lattice will change depending on the thermalization state of the electrons. Even though 20 years of experimental works have focused on understanding and isolating these electronic relaxation mechanisms with short pulsed irradiation, discrepancies between these existing works have not clearly answered the fundamental question of the competing effects between non-thermal and thermal electrons losing energy to the lattice. In this work, we demonstrate the ability to measure the electron relaxation for varying degrees of both electron-electron and electron-phonon thermalization. This series of measurements of electronic relaxation over a predicted effective electron temperature range up to ∼3500 K and minimum lattice temperatures of 77 K validate recent computational and theoretical works that theorize how a nonequilibrium distribution of electrons transfers energy to the lattice. Utilizing this wide temperature range during pump-probe measurements of electron-phonon relaxation, we explain discrepancies in the past two decades of literature of electronic relaxation rates. We experimentally demonstrate that the electron-phonon coupling factor in gold increases with increasing lattice temperature and laser fluences. Specifically, we show that at low laser fluences corresponding to small electron perturbations, energy relaxation between electrons and phonons is mainly governed by non-thermal electrons, while at higher laser fluences, non-thermal electron scattering with the lattice is less influential on the energy relaxation

  15. Experimental and Computational Evidence for the Reduction Mechanisms of Aromatic N-oxides by Aqueous Fe(II)-Tiron Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yiling; Dong, Hao; Zhang, Huichun

    2016-01-05

    A combined experimental-theoretical approach was taken to elucidate the reduction mechanisms of five representative aromatic N-oxides (ANOs) by Fe(II)-tiron complex and to identify the rate-limiting step. Based on the possible types of complexes formed with the reductant, three groups of ANOs were studied: type I refers to those forming 5-membered ring complexes through the N and O atoms on the side chain; type II refers to those forming 6-membered ring complexes through the N-oxide O atom and the O atom on the side chain; and type III refers to complexation through the N-oxide O atom only. Density functional theory calculations suggested that the elementary reactions, including protonation, N-O bond cleavage, and the second electron transfer processes, are barrierless, indicating that the first electron transfer is rate-limiting. Consistent with the theoretical results, the experimental solvent isotope effect, KIEH, for the reduction of quinoline N-oxide (a type III ANO) was obtained to be 1.072 ± 0.025, suggesting protonation was not involved in the rate-limiting step. The measured nitrogen kinetic isotope effect, KIEN, for the reduction of pyridine N-oxide (a type III ANO) (1.022 ± 0.006) is in good agreement with the calculated KIEN for its first electron transfer (1.011-1.028), confirming that the first electron transfer is rate-limiting. Electrochemical cell experiments demonstrated that the electron transfer process can be facilitated significantly by type I complexation with FeL2(6-) (1:2 Fe(II)-tiron complex), to some extent by type II complexation with free Fe(II), but not by weak type III complexation.

  16. Experimental Evidence for a Revision in the Annotation of Putative Pyridoxamine 5'-Phosphate Oxidases P(N/MP from Fungi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Domitrovic

    Full Text Available Pyridoxinamine 5'-phosphate oxidases (P(N/MP oxidases that bind flavin mononucleotide (FMN and oxidize pyridoxine 5'-phosphate or pyridoxamine 5'-phosphate to form pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP are an important class of enzymes that play a central role in cell metabolism. Failure to generate an adequate supply of PLP is very detrimental to most organisms and is often clinically manifested as a neurological disorder in mammals. In this study, we analyzed the function of YLR456W and YPR172W, two homologous genes of unknown function from S. cerevisiae that have been annotated as putative P(N/MP oxidases based on sequence homology. Different experimental approaches indicated that neither protein catalyzes PLP formation nor binds FMN. On the other hand, our analysis confirmed the enzymatic activity of Pdx3, the S. cerevisiae protein previously implicated in PLP biosynthesis by genetic and structural characterization. After a careful sequence analysis comparing the putative and confirmed P(N/MP oxidases, we found that the protein domain (PF01243 that led to the YLR456W and YPR172W annotation is a poor indicator of P(N/MP oxidase activity. We suggest that a combination of two Pfam domains (PF01243 and PF10590 present in Pdx3 and other confirmed P(N/MP oxidases would be a stronger predictor of this molecular function. This work exemplifies the importance of experimental validation to rectify genome annotation and proposes a revision in the annotation of at least 400 sequences from a wide variety of fungal species that are homologous to YLR456W and are currently misrepresented as putative P(N/MP oxidases.

  17. Expression of TLR4 protein is reduced in chronic renal failure: evidence from an experimental model of nephron reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacsó, Ina Maria; Borza, Gabriel Mircea; Ciuce, Cătălin C; Bîrsan, Andrei; Apostu, Raluca Cristina; Dindelegan, George Călin; Bondor, Cosmina Ioana; Potra, Alina Ramona; Netea, Mihai G; Cătoi, Cornel

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling is involved in various acute and chronic renal lesions and contributes to inflammation and fibrosis in several organs; the latter are important determinants to the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). We aimed to assess TLR4 expression in progressive CKD and relate it to severity of kidney damage, using an experimental nephron reduction model. Male Wistar rats were subjected to subtotal nephrectomy using the ligation technique, after 12 weeks of observation, serum creatinine and proteinuria were determined, animals were sacrificed, glomerulosclerosis and interstitial scarring were quantified histologically, and TLR4 expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Sham-operated rats served as controls. Case animals had significantly higher creatinine, proteinuria, glomerulosclerosis and tubulointerstitial involvement. TLR4 expression was prominent in proximal tubes, less staining was observed on infiltrating inflammatory cells. Percentage of TLR4-positive tubes was reduced in the subtotal nephrectomy animals, when compared to controls (0.67±0.09 versus 0.79±0.07, p=0.003). Percentage of TLR4-positive tubes correlated inversely to markers of kidney damage: to proteinuria (r=-0.55, p=0.02), serum creatinine (r=-0.53, p=0.01); percentage of glomeruli with glomerulosclerosis (r=-0.54, p=0.01) and tubulointerstitial score (r=-0.36, p=0.01). As TLR4 staining appears in tubular casts only in nephrectomy animals, shedding from damaged tubular cells is a very likely explanation for the reduced TLR4 expression in the kidneys of subjects with experimental nephron reduction.

  18. Blood-pressure-independent wall thickening of intramyocardial arterioles in experimental uraemia: evidence for a permissive action of PTH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amann, K; Törnig, J; Flechtenmacher, C; Nabokov, A; Mall, G; Ritz, E

    1995-11-01

    Abnormalities in cardiovascular structures, e.g. LV hypertrophy and thickening of vessels (arteries, arterioles, veins) are hallmarks of renal failure. They are in part independent of elevated blood pressure. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) has been shown to affect cardiac function and has also been identified as a permissive factor in the genesis of cardiac fibrosis. The present study in rats with experimental renal failure was designed to examine whether PTH was permissive for wall thickening of intramyocardial arterioles as well. Male SD rats were sham operated or subtotally nephrectomized and maintained for 2 weeks. Subgroups of subtotally nephrectomized (SNX) rats were parathyroidectomized (PTX). Saline or rat 1, 34 PTH was administered by osmotic minipump. Eucalcaemia was maintained in PTX animals by a high-calcium diet (3%). Serum calcium was not statistically different between the groups. After perfusion fixation, intramyocardial arterioles were assessed using stereological techniques (wall thickness; wall/lumen ratio; minimal lumen diameter; length density). In random samples of the left ventricle, wall thickness of arterioles was 2.2 +/- 0.25 microns in sham-op controls and 2.76 +/- 0.41 in SNX (n = at least 8 animals per group). SNX-PTX animals+solvent did not differ significantly from sham-op controls (2.08 +/- 0.42 microns), while SNX-PTX animals+PTH had values not significantly different from SNX (2.59 +/- 0.54 microns). Differences in wall thickness were not paralleled by differences in systolic blood pressure (sham-op 110 +/- 13.3 mmHg; SNX 138 +/- 8.4 mmHg, SNX-PTX+solvent 142 +/- 5.2 mmHg; SNX-PTX+PTH 148 +/- 5.7 mmHg). PTH treated animals showed signs of marked vascular smooth-muscle cell and endothelial-cell activation. The data suggest that wall thickening of intramyocardial arterioles in short-term experimental uraemia is dependent upon the presence of PTH (permissive effect).

  19. Influences of Electromagnetic Energy on Bio-Energy Transport through Protein Molecules in Living Systems and Its Experimental Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofeng Pang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The influences of electromagnetic fields (EMFs on bio-energy transport and its mechanism of changes are investigated through analytic and numerical simulation and experimentation. Bio-energy transport along protein molecules is performed by soliton movement caused by the dipole–dipole electric interactions between neighboring amino acid residues. As such, EMFs can affect the structure of protein molecules and change the properties of the bio-energy transported in living systems. This mechanism of biological effect from EMFs involves the amino acid residues in protein molecules. To study and reveal this mechanism, we simulated numerically the features of the movement of solitons along protein molecules with both a single chain and with three channels by using the Runge–Kutta method and Pang’s soliton model under the action of EMFs with the strengths of 25,500, 51,000, 76,500, and 102,000 V/m in the single-chain protein, as well as 17,000, 25,500, and 34,000 V/m in the three-chain protein, respectively. Results indicate that electric fields (EFs depress the binding energy of the soliton, decrease its amplitude, and change its wave form. Also, the soliton disperses at 102,000 V/m in a single-chain protein and at 25,500 and 34,000 V/m in three-chain proteins. These findings signify that the influence of EMFs on the bio-energy transport cannot be neglected; however, these variations depend on both the strength and the direction of the EF in the EMF. This direction influences the biological effects of EMF, which decrease with increases in the angle between the direction of the EF and that of the dipole moment of amino acid residues; however, randomness at the macroscopic level remains. Lastly, we experimentally confirm the existence of a soliton and the validity of our conclusion by using the infrared spectra of absorption of the collagens, which is activated by another type of EF. Thus, we can affirm that both the described mechanism and the

  20. Experimental Evidence for Fast Lithium Diffusion and Isotope Fractionation in Water-bearing Rhyolitic Melts at Magmatic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cichy, S. B.; Till, C. B.; Roggensack, K.; Hervig, R. L.; Clarke, A. B.

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this work is to extend the existing database of experimentally-determined lithium diffusion coefficients to more natural cases of water-bearing melts at the pressure-temperature range of the upper crust. In particular, we are investigating Li intra-melt and melt-vapor diffusion and Li isotope fractionation, which have the potential to record short-lived magmatic processes (seconds to hours) in the shallow crust, especially during decompression-induced magma degassing. Hydrated intra-melt Li diffusion-couple experiments on Los Posos rhyolite glass [1] were performed in a piston cylinder at 300 MPa and 1050 °C. The polished interfaces between the diffusion couples were marked by addition of Pt powder for post-run detection. Secondary ion mass spectrometry analyses indicate that lithium diffuses extremely fast in the presence of water. Re-equilibration of a hydrated ~2.5 mm long diffusion-couple experiment was observed during the heating period from room temperature to the final temperature of 1050 °C at a rate of ~32 °C/min. Fractionation of ~40‰ δ7Li was also detected in this zero-time experiment. The 0.5h and 3h runs show progressively higher degrees of re-equilibration, while the isotope fractionation becomes imperceptible. Li contamination was observed in some experiments when flakes filed off Pt tubing were used to mark the diffusion couple boundary, while the use of high purity Pt powder produced better results and allowed easier detection of the diffusion-couple boundary. The preliminary lithium isotope fractionation results (δ7Li vs. distance) support findings from [2] that 6Li diffuses substantially faster than 7Li. Further experimental sets are in progress, including lower run temperatures (e.g. 900 °C), faster heating procedure (~100 °C/min), shorter run durations and the extension to mafic systems. [1] Stanton (1990) Ph.D. thesis, Arizona State Univ., [2] Richter et al. (2003) GCA 67, 3905-3923.

  1. Influences of Electromagnetic Energy on Bio-Energy Transport through Protein Molecules in Living Systems and Its Experimental Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Xiaofeng; Chen, Shude; Wang, Xianghui; Zhong, Lisheng

    2016-07-25

    The influences of electromagnetic fields (EMFs) on bio-energy transport and its mechanism of changes are investigated through analytic and numerical simulation and experimentation. Bio-energy transport along protein molecules is performed by soliton movement caused by the dipole-dipole electric interactions between neighboring amino acid residues. As such, EMFs can affect the structure of protein molecules and change the properties of the bio-energy transported in living systems. This mechanism of biological effect from EMFs involves the amino acid residues in protein molecules. To study and reveal this mechanism, we simulated numerically the features of the movement of solitons along protein molecules with both a single chain and with three channels by using the Runge-Kutta method and Pang's soliton model under the action of EMFs with the strengths of 25,500, 51,000, 76,500, and 102,000 V/m in the single-chain protein, as well as 17,000, 25,500, and 34,000 V/m in the three-chain protein, respectively. Results indicate that electric fields (EFs) depress the binding energy of the soliton, decrease its amplitude, and change its wave form. Also, the soliton disperses at 102,000 V/m in a single-chain protein and at 25,500 and 34,000 V/m in three-chain proteins. These findings signify that the influence of EMFs on the bio-energy transport cannot be neglected; however, these variations depend on both the strength and the direction of the EF in the EMF. This direction influences the biological effects of EMF, which decrease with increases in the angle between the direction of the EF and that of the dipole moment of amino acid residues; however, randomness at the macroscopic level remains. Lastly, we experimentally confirm the existence of a soliton and the validity of our conclusion by using the infrared spectra of absorption of the collagens, which is activated by another type of EF. Thus, we can affirm that both the described mechanism and the corresponding theory are

  2. Sclereids are strong enough to support the delicate corollas: experimental and computational data evidence from Camellia sinensis (L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Xue, Yuanyuan; Yang, Shuo; Wang, Yangang; Zhao, Hong

    2017-01-01

    Sclereids are a fundamental cell type that widely exist in higher plants and are generally thought to have a mechanical function. However, the occurrence of sclereids in the ephemeral corolla has rarely been documented and their biological significance is poorly understood. In this study, flower buds from Camellia sinensis at various ontogenetic stages were sampled, cleared, sectioned, stained, and examined using light microscopy to ascertain the morphology and distribution of sclereids and their variation. In addition, Camellia japonica plants with distinctive floral structures were investigated and compared to explore whether sclereid occurrence is associated with floral form. In particular, a computational simulation using finite element analysis was undertaken to investigate how corollas, with and without sclereids, responded to wind and rain. The results showed that sclereids have some mechanical properties that are based on their shape and distribution, which make the soft corolla strong enough to protect the inner ovary. Thus, corolla sclereids may explain how the seemingly delicate corolla performs its protective function in response to environmental stresses. These findings provide further evidence for the hypothesis that flower traits exhibit adaptive responses to abiotic factors in addition to their traditionally recognized pollinator-mediated selection. PMID:28252101

  3. Communities of different plant diversity respond similarly to drought stress: experimental evidence from field non-weeded and greenhouse conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanta, Vojtěch; Doležal, Jiří; Zemková, Lenka; Lepš, Jan

    2012-06-01

    Accelerating rate of species loss has prompted researchers to study the role of species diversity in processes that control ecosystem functioning. Although negative impact of species loss has been documented, the evidence concerning its impact on ecosystem stability is still limited. Here, we studied the effects of declining species and functional diversity on plant community responses to drought in the field (open to weed colonization) and greenhouse conditions. Both species and functional diversity positively affected the average yields of field communities. However, this pattern was similar in both drought-stressed and control plots. No effect of diversity on community resistance, biomass recovery after drought and resilience was found because drought reduced biomass production similarly at each level of diversity by approximately 30 %. The use of dissimilarity (characterized by Euclidean distance) revealed higher variation under changing environments (drought-stressed vs. control) in more diverse communities compared to less species-rich assemblages. In the greenhouse experiment, the effect of species diversity affected community resistance, indicating that more diverse communities suffered more from drought than species-poor ones. We conclude that our study did not support the insurance hypothesis (stability properties of a community should increase with species richness) because species diversity had an equivocal effect on ecosystem resistance and resilience in an environment held under non-weeded practice, regardless of the positive relationship between sown species diversity and community biomass production. More species-rich communities were less resistant against drought-stressed conditions than species-poor ones grown in greenhouse conditions.

  4. Uric Acid Amplifies Aβ Amyloid Effects Involved in the Cognitive Dysfunction/Dementia: Evidences From an Experimental Model In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desideri, Giovambattista; Gentile, Roberta; Antonosante, Andrea; Benedetti, Elisabetta; Grassi, Davide; Cristiano, Loredana; Manocchio, Antonello; Selli, Sara; Ippoliti, Rodolfo; Ferri, Claudio; Borghi, Claudio; Giordano, Antonio; Cimini, Annamaria

    2017-05-01

    There is still a considerable debate concerning whether uric acid is neuroprotective or neurotoxic agent. To clarify this topic, we tested the effects of uric acid on neuronal cells biology by using differentiated SHSY5Y neuroblastoma cells incubated with amyloid β to reproduce an in vitro model of Alzheimer's disease. The incubation of cells with uric acid at the dose of 40 µM or higher significantly reduced cell viability and potentiated the proapoptotic effect of amyloid β. Finally, uric acid enhanced the generation of 4-hydroxynonenal and the expression of PPARβ/δ promoted by amyloid β, indicating a prooxidant effects. In conclusion, uric acid could exert a detrimental influence on neuronal biology being this influence further potentiated by the concomitant exposure to neurotoxic stimuli. This effect is evident for uric acid concentrations close to those achievable in cerebrospinal fluid in presence of mild hyperuricemia thus suggesting a potential role of uric acid in pathophysiology of cognitive dysfunction. These effects are influenced by the concentrations of uric acid and by the presence of favoring conditions that commonly occur in neurodegenerative disorders and well as in the aging brain, including increased oxidative stress and exposure to amyloid β. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 1069-1078, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Experimental evidence of threat-sensitive collective avoidance responses in a large wild-caught herring school.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Rieucau

    Full Text Available Aggregation is commonly thought to improve animals' security. Within aquatic ecosystems, group-living prey can learn about immediate threats using cues perceived directly from predators, or from collective behaviours, for example, by reacting to the escape behaviours of companions. Combining cues from different modalities may improve the accuracy of prey antipredatory decisions. In this study, we explored the sensory modalities that mediate collective antipredatory responses of herring (Clupea harengus when in a large school (approximately 60,000 individuals. By conducting a simulated predator encounter experiment in a semi-controlled environment (a sea cage, we tested the hypothesis that the collective responses of herring are threat-sensitive. We investigated whether cues from potential threats obtained visually or from the perception of water displacement, used independently or in an additive way, affected the strength of the collective avoidance reactions. We modified the sensory nature of the simulated threat by exposing the herring to 4 predator models differing in shape and transparency. The collective vertical avoidance response was observed and quantified using active acoustics. The combination of sensory cues elicited the strongest avoidance reactions, suggesting that collective antipredator responses in herring are mediated by the sensory modalities involved during threat detection in an additive fashion. Thus, this study provides evidence for magnitude-graded threat responses in a large school of wild-caught herring which is consistent with the "threat-sensitive hypothesis".

  6. Experimental evidence of threat-sensitive collective avoidance responses in a large wild-caught herring school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieucau, Guillaume; Boswell, Kevin M; De Robertis, Alex; Macaulay, Gavin J; Handegard, Nils Olav

    2014-01-01

    Aggregation is commonly thought to improve animals' security. Within aquatic ecosystems, group-living prey can learn about immediate threats using cues perceived directly from predators, or from collective behaviours, for example, by reacting to the escape behaviours of companions. Combining cues from different modalities may improve the accuracy of prey antipredatory decisions. In this study, we explored the sensory modalities that mediate collective antipredatory responses of herring (Clupea harengus) when in a large school (approximately 60,000 individuals). By conducting a simulated predator encounter experiment in a semi-controlled environment (a sea cage), we tested the hypothesis that the collective responses of herring are threat-sensitive. We investigated whether cues from potential threats obtained visually or from the perception of water displacement, used independently or in an additive way, affected the strength of the collective avoidance reactions. We modified the sensory nature of the simulated threat by exposing the herring to 4 predator models differing in shape and transparency. The collective vertical avoidance response was observed and quantified using active acoustics. The combination of sensory cues elicited the strongest avoidance reactions, suggesting that collective antipredator responses in herring are mediated by the sensory modalities involved during threat detection in an additive fashion. Thus, this study provides evidence for magnitude-graded threat responses in a large school of wild-caught herring which is consistent with the "threat-sensitive hypothesis".

  7. Experimental evidence that kin discrimination in the Seychelles warbler is based on association and not on genetic relatedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komdeur, Jan; Richardson, David S; Burke, Terry

    2004-05-07

    In cooperative breeding systems driven by kin selection, effective kin-recognition cues are important. Recognition could be achieved by the direct assessment of the genetic relatedness of individuals or by learning through association. In the Seychelles warbler, Acrocephalus sechellensis, female subordinates maximize indirect fitness by preferentially helping genetically related nestlings. Help seems to be based on the continued presence of the primary female who previously fed the subordinate in the nest but it has, so far, been impossible to discount the direct assessment of genetic relatedness. We used a cross-fostering experiment to separate the two possible cues. Adult birds did not discriminate between their own and cross-fostered eggs or nestlings. Cross-fostering resulted in nestlings that were unrelated to the primary female that raised them, but control nestlings were closely related to their primary females. The proportions of cross-fostered and control female offspring that stayed and became helpers on their 'natal' territory were similar. However, for both groups the chance of becoming a subordinate helper was associated with the continued presence of the primary female and not with any other factor tested. Our study provides strong evidence that helping decisions are based on associative-learning cues.

  8. Regulation of dorso‐ventral polarity by the nerve cord during annelid regeneration: A review of experimental evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boilly‐Marer, Yolande; Bely, Alexandra E.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract An important goal for understanding regeneration is determining how polarity is conferred to the regenerate. Here we review findings in two groups of polychaete annelids that implicate the ventral nerve cord in assigning dorso‐ventral polarity, and specifically ventral identity, to the regenerate. In nereids, surgical manipulations indicate that parapodia develop where dorsal and ventral body wall territories contact. Without a nerve cord at the wound site, the regenerate differentiates no evident polarity (with no parapodia) and only dorsal identity, while with two nerve cords the regenerate develops a twinned dorso‐ventral axis (with four parapodia per segment instead of the normal two). In sabellids, a striking natural dorso‐ventral inversion in parapodial morphology occurs along the body axis and this inversion is morphologically correlated with the position of the nerve cord. Parapodial inversion also occurs in segments in which the nerve cord has been removed, even without any segment amputation. Together, these data strongly support a role for the nerve cord in annelid dorso‐ventral pattern regulation, with the nerve cord conferring ventral identity. PMID:28616245

  9. Experimental identification of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae strains L20 and JL03 heptosyltransferases, evidence for a new heptosyltransferase signature sequence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Merino

    Full Text Available We experimentally identified the activities of six predicted heptosyltransferases in Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae genome serotype 5b strain L20 and serotype 3 strain JL03. The initial identification was based on a bioinformatic analysis of the amino acid similarity between these putative heptosyltrasferases with others of known function from enteric bacteria and Aeromonas. The putative functions of all the Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae heptosyltrasferases were determined by using surrogate LPS acceptor molecules from well-defined A. hydrophyla AH-3 and A. salmonicida A450 mutants. Our results show that heptosyltransferases APL_0981 and APJL_1001 are responsible for the transfer of the terminal outer core D-glycero-D-manno-heptose (D,D-Hep residue although they are not currently included in the CAZY glycosyltransferase 9 family. The WahF heptosyltransferase group signature sequence [S(T/S(GAXXH] differs from the heptosyltransferases consensus signature sequence [D(TS(GAXXH], because of the substitution of D(261 for S(261, being unique.

  10. Experimental Identification of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae Strains L20 and JL03 Heptosyltransferases, Evidence for a New Heptosyltransferase Signature Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino, Susana; Knirel, Yuriy A.; Regué, Miguel; Tomás, Juan M.

    2013-01-01

    We experimentally identified the activities of six predicted heptosyltransferases in Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae genome serotype 5b strain L20 and serotype 3 strain JL03. The initial identification was based on a bioinformatic analysis of the amino acid similarity between these putative heptosyltrasferases with others of known function from enteric bacteria and Aeromonas. The putative functions of all the Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae heptosyltrasferases were determined by using surrogate LPS acceptor molecules from well-defined A. hydrophyla AH-3 and A. salmonicida A450 mutants. Our results show that heptosyltransferases APL_0981 and APJL_1001 are responsible for the transfer of the terminal outer core D-glycero-D-manno-heptose (D,D-Hep) residue although they are not currently included in the CAZY glycosyltransferase 9 family. The WahF heptosyltransferase group signature sequence [S(T/S)(GA)XXH] differs from the heptosyltransferases consensus signature sequence [D(TS)(GA)XXH], because of the substitution of D261 for S261, being unique. PMID:23383222

  11. Temporal separation between CO2 assimilation and growth? Experimental and theoretical evidence from the desiccation-tolerant moss Syntrichia ruralis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royles, Jessica; Ogée, Jérôme; Wingate, Lisa; Hodgson, Dominic A; Convey, Peter; Griffiths, Howard

    2013-03-01

    The extent of an external water layer around moss tissue influences CO(2) assimilation. Experiments on the desiccation-tolerant moss Syntrichia ruralis assessed the real-time dependence of the carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions of CO(2) and H(2)O in terms of moss water status and integrated isotope signals in cellulose. As external (capillary) water, and then mesophyll water, evaporated from moss tissue, assimilation rate, relative water content and the stable isotope composition of tissue water (δ(18)O(TW)), and the CO(2) and H(2)O fluxes, were analysed. After drying, carbon (δ(13)C(C)) and oxygen (δ(18)O(C)) cellulose compositions were determined. During desiccation, assimilation and (13)CO(2) discrimination increased to a maximum and then declined; δ(18)O(TW) increased progressively by 8‰, indicative of evaporative isotopic enrichment. Experimental and meteorological data were combined to predict tissue hydration dynamics over one growing season. Nonsteady-state model predictions of δ(18)O(TW) were consistent with instantaneous measurements. δ(13)C(C) values suggest that net assimilation occurs at 25% of maximum relative water content, while δ(18)O(C) data suggests that cellulose is synthesized during much higher relative water content conditions. This implies that carbon assimilation and cellulose synthesis (growth) may be temporally separated, with carbon reserves possibly contributing to desiccation tolerance and resumption of metabolism upon rehydration.

  12. Experimental evidence of genome-wide impact of ecological selection during early stages of speciation-with-gene-flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Scott P; Ragland, Gregory J; Assour, Lauren; Powell, Thomas H Q; Hood, Glen R; Emrich, Scott; Nosil, Patrik; Feder, Jeffrey L

    2015-08-01

    Theory predicts that speciation-with-gene-flow is more likely when the consequences of selection for population divergence transitions from mainly direct effects of selection acting on individual genes to a collective property of all selected genes in the genome. Thus, understanding the direct impacts of ecologically based selection, as well as the indirect effects due to correlations among loci, is critical to understanding speciation. Here, we measure the genome-wide impacts of host-associated selection between hawthorn and apple host races of Rhagoletis pomonella (Diptera: Tephritidae), a model for contemporary speciation-with-gene-flow. Allele frequency shifts of 32 455 SNPs induced in a selection experiment based on host phenology were genome wide and highly concordant with genetic divergence between co-occurring apple and hawthorn flies in nature. This striking genome-wide similarity between experimental and natural populations of R. pomonella underscores the importance of ecological selection at early stages of divergence and calls for further integration of studies of eco-evolutionary dynamics and genome divergence. © 2015 The Authors Ecology Letters published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and CNRS.

  13. Ultrastructural and biochemical aspects of liver mitochondria during recovery from ethanol-induced alterations. Experimental evidence of mitochondrial division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, O. R.; Roatta de Conti, L. L.; Bolaños, L. P.; Stoppani, A. O.

    1978-01-01

    To study the morphologic and biochemical changes occuring in liver mitochondria during recovery from ethanol-induced injury, rats fed a 6-month high-alcohol regimen plus a nutritionally adequate diet which did not induce fatty liver were compared with isocalorically fed controls. After this period the alcohol-fed animals displayed striking ultrastructural changes of liver mitochondria and a decreased respiratory activity with succinate or malate-glutamate as substrate. On the contrary, the respiratory rate with I-glycerophosphate was 50% increased. Regression changes were studied after alcohol was withdrawn from the diet. Enlarged mitochondria rapidly disappeared (in 24 hours), although a few megamitochondria were still present after 8 days of abstinence. A similar recovery was observed for the functional alterations. At the end of the experimental period, only a slight decrease of the maximal respiratory rate using malate-glutamate as a substrate was noted. The ultrastructural findings and the morphometric data suggest that the way in which mitochondrial normalization takes place is based on partition of these organelles. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 13 PMID:623205

  14. Chronic malaria infections increase family inequalities and reduce parental fitness: experimental evidence from a wild bird population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, S C L; Palinauskas, V; Sheldon, B C

    2010-03-01

    Avian malaria parasites (Plasmodium) occur commonly in wild birds and are an increasingly popular model system for understanding host-parasite co-evolution. However, whether these parasites have fitness consequences for hosts in endemic areas is much debated, particularly since wild-caught individuals almost always harbour chronic infections of very low parasite density. We used the anti-malarial drug Malarone to test experimentally for fitness effects of chronic malaria infection in a wild population of breeding blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus). Medication caused a pronounced reduction in Plasmodium infection intensity, usually resulting in complete clearance of these parasites from the blood, as revealed by quantitative PCR. Positive effects of medication on malaria-infected birds were found at multiple stages during breeding, with medicated females showing higher hatching success, provisioning rates and fledging success compared to controls. Most strikingly, we found that treatment of maternal malaria infections strongly altered within-family differences, with reduced inequality in hatching probability and fledging mass within broods reared by medicated females. These within-brood effects appear to explain higher fledging success among medicated females and are consistent with a model of parental optimism in which smaller (marginal) offspring can be successfully raised to independence if additional resources become available during the breeding attempt. Overall, these results demonstrate that chronic avian malaria infections, far from being benign, can have significant effects on host fitness and may thus constitute an important selection pressure in wild bird populations.

  15. Evidence for host genetic regulation of altered lipid metabolism in experimental toxoplasmosis supported with gene data mining results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milovanović, Ivan; Busarčević, Miloš; Trbovich, Alexander; Ivović, Vladimir; Uzelac, Aleksandra; Djurković-Djaković, Olgica

    2017-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is one of the most successful parasites on Earth, infecting a wide array of mammals including one third of the global human population. The obligate intracellular protozoon is not capable of synthesizing cholesterol (Chl), and thus depends on uptake of host Chl for its own development. To explore the genetic regulation of previously observed lipid metabolism alterations during acute murine T. gondii infection, we here assessed total Chl and its fractions in serum and selected tissues at the pathophysiological and molecular level, and integrated the observed gene expression of selected molecules relevant for Chl metabolism, including its biosynthetic and export KEGG pathways, with the results of published transcriptomes obtained in similar murine models of T. gondii infection. The serum lipid status as well as the transcript levels of relevant genes in the brain and the liver were assessed in experimental models of acute and chronic toxoplasmosis in wild-type mice. The results showed that acute infection was associated with a decrease in Chl content in both the liver and periphery (brain, peripheral lymphocytes), and a decrease in Chl reverse transport. In contrast, in chronic infection, a return to normal levels of Chl metabolism has been noted. These changes corresponded to the brain and liver gene expression results as well as to data obtained via mining. We propose that the observed changes in Chl metabolism are part of the host defense response. Further insight into the lipid metabolism in T. gondii infection may provide novel targets for therapeutic agents.

  16. Experimental evidence and modeling studies support a synchronizing role for electrical coupling in the cat thalamic reticular neurons in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentealba, Pablo; Crochet, Sylvain; Timofeev, Igor; Bazhenov, Maxim; Sejnowski, Terrence J.; Steriade, Mircea

    2010-01-01

    Thalamic reticular (RE) neurons are crucially implicated in brain rhythms. Here, we report that RE neurons of adult cats, recorded and stained intracellularly in vivo, displayed spontaneously occurring spikelets, which are characteristic of central neurons that are coupled electrotonically via gap junctions. Spikelets occurred spontaneously during spindles, an oscillation in which RE neurons play a leading role, as well as during interspindle lulls. They were significantly different from excitatory postsynaptic potentials and also distinct from fast prepotentials that are presumably dendritic spikes generated synaptically. Spikelets were strongly reduced by halothane, a blocker of gap junctions. Multi-site extracellular recordings performed before, during and after administration of halothane demonstrated a role for electrical coupling in the synchronization of spindling activity within the RE nucleus. Finally, computational models of RE neurons predicted that gap junctions between these neurons could mediate the spread of low-frequency activity at great distances. These experimental and modeling data suggest that electrotonic coupling within the RE nucleus plays an important role in the generation and synchronization of low-frequency (spindling) activities in the thalamus. PMID:15245484

  17. Experimental Evidence of Near-Wall Reverse Flow Events in a Zero Pressure Gradient Turbulent Boundary Layer

    CERN Document Server

    Willert, Christian E

    2015-01-01

    This study reports on experimentally observed near-wall reverse flow events in a fully developed flat plate boundary layer at zero pressure gradient with Reynolds numbers between $Re_\\tau = 1000$ and $Re_\\tau = 2700$. The reverse flow events are captured using high magnification particle image velocimetry sequences with record lengths varying from 50,000 to 126,000 samples. Time resolved particle image sequences allow singular reverse flow events to be followed over several time steps whereas long records of nearly statistically independent samples provide a variety of single snapshots at a higher spatial resolution. The probability of occurrence lies in the range of 0.01% to 0.1% which matches predictions made with direct numerical simulations (DNS). The self-similar size of the reverse flow bubble is about 30-50 wall units in length and 5 wall units in height which also agrees well to DNS data provided by Lenaers et al. (ETC13, Journal of Physics: Conference Series 318 (2011) 022013).

  18. Water vapor effect on the HNO3 yield in the HO2 + NO reaction: experimental and theoretical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butkovskaya, Nadezhda; Rayez, Marie-Thérèse; Rayez, Jean-Claude; Kukui, Alexandre; Le Bras, Georges

    2009-10-22

    The influence of water vapor on the production of nitric acid in the gas-phase HO(2) + NO reaction was determined at 298 K and 200 Torr using a high-pressure turbulent flow reactor coupled with a chemical ionization mass spectrometer. The yield of HNO(3) was found to increase linearly with the increase of water concentration reaching an enhancement factor of about 8 at [H(2)O] = 4 x 10(17) molecules cm(-3) ( approximately 50% relative humidity). A rate constant value k(1bw) = 6 x 10(-13) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) was derived for the reaction involving the HO(2)xH(2)O complex: HO(2)xH(2)O + NO --> HNO(3) (1bw), assuming that the water enhancement is due to this reaction. k(1bw) is approximately 40 times higher than the rate constant of the reaction HO(2) + NO --> HNO(3) (1b), at the same temperature and pressure. The experimental findings are corroborated by density functional theory (DFT) calculations performed on the H(2)O/HO(2)/NO system. The significance of this result for atmospheric chemistry and chemical amplifier instruments is briefly discussed. An appendix containing a detailed consideration of the possible contribution from the surface reactions in our previous studies of the title reaction and in the present one is included.

  19. Experimental evidence for spring and autumn windows for the detection of geobotanical anomalies through the remote sensing of overlying vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labovitz, M. L.; Masuoka, E. J.; Bell, R.; Nelson, R. F.; Larsen, C. A.; Hooker, L. K.; Troensegaard, K. W.

    1985-01-01

    It is pointed out that in many regions of the world, vegetation is the predominant factor influencing variation in reflected energy in the 0.4-2.5 micron region of the spectrum. Studies have, therefore, been conducted regarding the utility of remote sensing for detecting changes in vegetation which could be related to the presence of mineralization. The present paper provides primarily a report on the results of the second year of a multiyear study of geobotanical-remote-sensing relationships as developed over areas of sulfide mineralization. The field study has a strong experimental design basis. It is proceeded by first delineating the boundaries of a large geographic region which satisfied a set of previously enumerated field-site criteria. Within this region, carefully selected pairs of mineralized and nonmineralized test sites were examined over the growing season. The experiment is to provide information about the spectral and temporal resolutions required for remote-sensing-geobotanical exploration. The obtained results are evaluated.

  20. Experimental evidence for the effect of small wind turbine proximity and operation on bird and bat activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeroen Minderman

    Full Text Available The development of renewable energy technologies such as wind turbines forms a vital part of strategies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions worldwide. Although large wind farms generate the majority of wind energy, the small wind turbine (SWT, units generating <50 kW sector is growing rapidly. In spite of evidence of effects of large wind farms on birds and bats, effects of SWTs on wildlife have not been studied and are likely to be different due to their potential siting in a wider range of habitats. We present the first study to quantify the effects of SWTs on birds and bats. Using a field experiment, we show that bird activity is similar in two distance bands surrounding a sample of SWTs (between 6-18 m hub height and is not affected by SWT operation at the fine scale studied. At shorter distances from operating turbines (0-5 m, bat activity (measured as the probability of a bat "pass" per hour decreases from 84% (71-91% to 28% (11-54% as wind speed increases from 0 to 14 m/s. This effect is weaker at greater distances (20-25 m from operating turbines (activity decreases from 80% (65-89% to 59% (32-81%, and absent when they are braked. We conclude that bats avoid operating SWTs but that this effect diminishes within 20 m. Such displacement effects may have important consequences especially in landscapes where suitable habitat is limiting. Planning guidance for SWTs is currently lacking. Based on our results we recommend that they are sited at least 20 m away from potentially valuable bat habitat.

  1. Fluorescent proteins function as a prey attractant: experimental evidence from the hydromedusa Olindias formosus and other marine organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven H. D. Haddock

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Although proteins in the green fluorescent protein family (GFPs have been discovered in a wide array of taxa, their ecological functions in these organisms remain unclear. Many hypothesized roles are related to modifying bioluminescence spectra or modulating the light regime for algal symbionts, but these do not explain the presence of GFPs in animals that are non-luminous and non-symbiotic. Other hypothesized functions are unrelated to the visual signals themselves, including stress responses and antioxidant roles, but these cannot explain the localization of fluorescence in particular structures on the animals. Here we tested the hypothesis that fluorescence might serve to attract prey. In laboratory experiments, the predator was the hydromedusa Olindias formosus (previously known as O. formosa, which has fluorescent and pigmented patches on the tips of its tentacles. The prey, juvenile rockfishes in the genus Sebastes, were significantly more attracted (P<1×10−5 to the medusa's tentacles under lighting conditions where fluorescence was excited and tentacle tips were visible above the background. The fish did not respond significantly when treatments did not include fluorescent structures or took place under yellow or white lights, which did not generate fluorescence visible above the ambient light. Furthermore, underwater observations of the behavior of fishes when presented with a brightly illuminated point showed a strong attraction to this visual stimulus. In situ observations also provided evidence for fluorescent lures as supernormal stimuli in several other marine animals, including the siphonophore Rhizophysa eysenhardti. Our results support the idea that fluorescent structures can serve as prey attractants, thus providing a potential function for GFPs and other fluorescent proteins in a diverse range of organisms.

  2. Infiltration-soil moisture redistribution under natural conditions: experimental evidence as a guideline for realizing simulation models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Morbidelli

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The evolution in time, t, of the experimental soil moisture vertical profile under natural conditions is investigated in order to address the corresponding simulation modelling. The measurements were conducted in a plot with a bare silty loam soil. The soil water content, θ, was continuously monitored at different depths, z, using a Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR system. For each profile four buriable three-rod waveguides were inserted horizontally at different depths (5, 15, 25 and 35 cm. In addition, we used sensors of air temperature and relative humidity, wind speed, solar radiation, evaporation and rain as supports for the application of selected simulation models, as well as for the detection of elements leading to their improvement. The results indicate that, under natural conditions, very different trends of the θ(z,t function can be observed in the given fine-textured soil, where the formation of a sealing layer over the parent soil requires an adjustment of the simulation modelling commonly used for hydrological applications. In particular, because of the considerable variations in the shape of the moisture content vertical profile as a function of time, a generalization of the existing models should incorporate a representation of the variability in time of the saturated hydraulic conductivity of the uppermost soil. This conclusion is supported by the fact that the observed shape of θ(z can be appropriately reproduced by adopting this approach, however the observed rainfall rate and the occurrence of freeze-thaw cycles with high soil moisture contents have to be explicitly incorporated.

  3. Infiltration-soil moisture redistribution under natural conditions: experimental evidence as a guideline for realizing simulation models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Morbidelli

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The evolution in time, t, of the experimental soil moisture vertical profile under natural conditions is investigated in order to address the corresponding simulation modelling. The measurements were conducted in a plot with a bare silty loam soil. The soil water content, θ, was continuously monitored at different depths, z, using a Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR system. Four buriable three-rod waveguides were inserted horizontally at different depths (5, 15, 25 and 35 cm. In addition, we used sensors of air temperature and relative humidity, wind speed, solar radiation, evaporation and rain as supports for the application of selected simulation models, as well as for the detection of elements leading to their improvement. The results indicate that, under natural conditions, very different trends of the θ(z, t function can be observed in the given fine-textured soil, where the formation of a sealing layer over the parent soil requires an adjustment of the simulation modelling commonly used for hydrological applications. In particular, because of the considerable variations in the shape of the moisture content vertical profile as a function of time, a generalization of the existing models should incorporate a first approximation of the variability in time of the saturated hydraulic conductivity, K1s, of the uppermost soil. This conclusion is supported by the fact that the observed shape of θ(z, t can be appropriately reproduced by adopting the proposed approach with K1s kept constant during each rainfall event but considered variable from event to event, however the observed rainfall rate and the occurrence of freeze-thaw cycles with high soil moisture contents have to be explicitly incorporated in a functional form for K1s(t.

  4. Field and experimental evidence of a new caiman trypanosome species closely phylogenetically related to fish trypanosomes and transmitted by leeches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno R. Fermino

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma terena and Trypanosoma ralphi are known species of the South American crocodilians Caiman crocodilus, Caiman yacare and Melanosuchus niger and are phylogenetically related to the tsetse-transmitted Trypanosoma grayi of the African Crocodylus niloticus. These trypanosomes form the Crocodilian clade of the terrestrial clade of the genus Trypanosoma. A PCR-survey for trypanosomes in caiman blood samples and in leeches taken from caimans revealed unknown trypanosome diversity and frequent mixed infections. Phylogenies based on SSU (small subunit of rRNA and gGAPDH (glycosomal Glyceraldehyde Phosphate Dehydrogenase gene sequences revealed a new trypanosome species clustering with T. terena and T. ralphi in the crocodilian clade and an additional new species nesting in the distant Aquatic clade of trypanosomes, which is herein named Trypanosoma clandestinus n. sp. This new species was found in Caiman yacare, Caiman crocodilus and M. niger from the Pantanal and Amazonian biomes in Brazil. Large numbers of dividing epimastigotes and unique thin and long trypomastigotes were found in the guts of leeches (Haementeria sp. removed from the mouths of caimans. The trypanosomes recovered from the leeches had sequences identical to those of T. clandestinus of caiman blood samples. Experimental infestation of young caimans (Caiman yacare with infected leeches resulted in long-lasting T. clandestinus infections that permitted us to delineate its life cycle. In contrast to T. terena, T. ralphi and T. grayi, which are detectable by hemoculturing, microscopy and standard PCR of caiman blood, T. clandestinus passes undetected by these methods due to very low parasitemia and could be detected solely by the more sensitive nested PCR method. T. clandestinus n. sp. is the first crocodilian trypanosome known to be transmitted by leeches and positioned in the aquatic clade closest to fish trypanosomes. Our data show that caimans can host trypanosomes

  5. Experimental evidence of nitrogen control on pCO(2) in phosphorus-enriched humic and clear coastal lagoon waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peixoto, Roberta B; Marotta, Humberto; Enrich-Prast, Alex

    2013-01-01

    Natural and human-induced controls on carbon dioxide (CO(2)) in tropical waters may be very dynamic (over time and among or within ecosystems) considering the potential role of warmer temperatures intensifying metabolic responses and playing a direct role on the balance between photosynthesis and respiration. The high magnitude of biological processes at low latitudes following eutrophication by nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) inputs into coastal lagoons waters may be a relevant component of the carbon cycle, showing controls on partial pressure of CO(2) (pCO(2)) that are still poorly understood. Here we assessed the strength of N control on pCO(2) in P-enriched humic and clear coastal lagoons waters, using four experimental treatments in microcosms: control (no additional nutrients) and three levels of N additions coupled to P enrichments. In humic coastal lagoons waters, a persistent CO(2) supersaturation was reported in controls and all nutrient-enriched treatments, ranging from 24- to 4-fold the atmospheric equilibrium value. However, both humic and clear coastal lagoons waters only showed significant decreases in pCO(2) in relation to the controlled microcosms in the two treatments with higher N addition levels. Additionally, clear coastal lagoons water microcosms showed a shift from CO(2) sources to CO(2) sinks, in relation to the atmosphere. Only in the two more N-enriched treatments did pCO(2) substantially decrease, from 650 µatm in controls and less N-enriched treatments to 10 µatm in more N-enriched microcosms. Humic substrates and N inputs can modulate pCO(2) even in P-enriched coastal lagoons waters, thereby being important drivers on CO(2) outgassing from inland waters.

  6. Role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors alpha and gamma in gastric ulcer: An overview of experimental evidences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lekha; Saha

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors(PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors belonging to the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily. Three subtypes, PPARα, PPARβ/δ, and PPARγ, have been identifiedso far. PPARα is expressed in the liver, kidney, small intestine, heart, and muscle, where it activates the fatty acid catabolism and control lipoprotein assembly in response to long-chain unsaturated fatty acids, eicosanoids, and hypolipidemic drugs(e.g., fenofibrate). PPARβ/δ is more broadly expressed and is implicated in fatty acid oxidation, keratinocyte differentiation, wound healing, and macrophage response to very low density lipoprotein metabolism. This isoform has been implicated in transcriptional-repression functions and has been shown to repress the activity of PPARα or PPARγ target genes. PPARγ1 and γ2 are generated from a single-gene peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors gamma by differential promoter usage and alternative splicing. PPARγ1 is expressed in colon, immune system(e.g., monocytes and macrophages), and other tissues where it participates in the modulation of inflammation, cell proliferation, and differentiation. PPARs regulate gene expression through distinct mechanisms: Liganddependent transactivation, ligand-independent repression, and ligand-dependent transrepression. Studies in animals have demonstrated the gastric antisecretory activity of PPARα agonists like ciprofibrate, bezafibrate and clofibrate. Study by Pathak et al also demonstrated the effect of PPARα agonist, bezafibrate, on gastric secretion and gastric cytoprotection in various gastric ulcer models in rats. The majority of the experimental studies is on pioglitazone and rosiglitazone, which are PPARγ activators. In all the studies, both the PPARγ activators showed protection against the gastric ulcer and also accelerate the ulcer healing in gastric ulcer model in rats. Therefore, PPARα and PPARγ may be a target for gastric ulcer therapy

  7. Field and experimental evidence of a new caiman trypanosome species closely phylogenetically related to fish trypanosomes and transmitted by leeches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fermino, Bruno R.; Paiva, Fernando; Soares, Priscilla; Tavares, Luiz Eduardo R.; Viola, Laerte B.; Ferreira, Robson C.; Botero-Arias, Robinson; de-Paula, Cátia D.; Campaner, Marta; Takata, Carmen S.A.; Teixeira, Marta M.G.; Camargo, Erney P.

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosoma terena and Trypanosoma ralphi are known species of the South American crocodilians Caiman crocodilus, Caiman yacare and Melanosuchus niger and are phylogenetically related to the tsetse-transmitted Trypanosoma grayi of the African Crocodylus niloticus. These trypanosomes form the Crocodilian clade of the terrestrial clade of the genus Trypanosoma. A PCR-survey for trypanosomes in caiman blood samples and in leeches taken from caimans revealed unknown trypanosome diversity and frequent mixed infections. Phylogenies based on SSU (small subunit) of rRNA and gGAPDH (glycosomal Glyceraldehyde Phosphate Dehydrogenase) gene sequences revealed a new trypanosome species clustering with T. terena and T. ralphi in the crocodilian clade and an additional new species nesting in the distant Aquatic clade of trypanosomes, which is herein named Trypanosoma clandestinus n. sp. This new species was found in Caiman yacare, Caiman crocodilus and M. niger from the Pantanal and Amazonian biomes in Brazil. Large numbers of dividing epimastigotes and unique thin and long trypomastigotes were found in the guts of leeches (Haementeria sp.) removed from the mouths of caimans. The trypanosomes recovered from the leeches had sequences identical to those of T. clandestinus of caiman blood samples. Experimental infestation of young caimans (Caiman yacare) with infected leeches resulted in long-lasting T. clandestinus infections that permitted us to delineate its life cycle. In contrast to T. terena, T. ralphi and T. grayi, which are detectable by hemoculturing, microscopy and standard PCR of caiman blood, T. clandestinus passes undetected by these methods due to very low parasitemia and could be detected solely by the more sensitive nested PCR method. T. clandestinus n. sp. is the first crocodilian trypanosome known to be transmitted by leeches and positioned in the aquatic clade closest to fish trypanosomes. Our data show that caimans can host trypanosomes of the aquatic or

  8. Experimental evidence for the interplay of exogenous and endogenous factors on the movement ecology of a migrating songbird.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily B Cohen

    Full Text Available Movement patterns during songbird migration remain poorly understood despite their expected fitness consequences in terms of survival, energetic condition and timing of migration that will carry over to subsequent phases of the annual cycle. We took an experimental approach to test hypotheses regarding the influence of habitat, energetic condition, time of season and sex on the hour-by-hour, local movement decisions of a songbird during spring stopover. To simulate arrival of nocturnal migrants at unfamiliar stopover sites, we translocated and continuously tracked migratory red-eyed vireos (Vireo olivaceus throughout spring stopover with and without energetic reserves that were released in two replicates of three forested habitat types. Migrants moved the most upon release, during which time they selected habitat characterized by greater food abundance and higher foraging attack rates. Presumably under pressure to replenish fuel stores necessary to continue migration in a timely fashion, migrants released in poorer energetic condition moved faster and further than migrants in better condition and the same pattern was true for migrants released late in spring relative to those released earlier. However, a migrant's energetic condition had less influence on their behavior when they were in poor quality habitat. Movement did not differ between sexes. Our study illustrates the importance of quickly finding suitable habitat at each stopover site, especially for energetically constrained migrants later in the season. If an initial period prior to foraging were necessary at each stop along a migrant's journey, non-foraging periods would cumulatively result in a significant energetic and time cost to migration. However, we suggest behavior during stopover is not solely a function of underlying resource distributions but is a complex response to a combination of endogenous and exogenous factors.

  9. Experimental evidence for the interplay of exogenous and endogenous factors on the movement ecology of a migrating songbird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Emily B; Moore, Frank R; Fischer, Richard A

    2012-01-01

    Movement patterns during songbird migration remain poorly understood despite their expected fitness consequences in terms of survival, energetic condition and timing of migration that will carry over to subsequent phases of the annual cycle. We took an experimental approach to test hypotheses regarding the influence of habitat, energetic condition, time of season and sex on the hour-by-hour, local movement decisions of a songbird during spring stopover. To simulate arrival of nocturnal migrants at unfamiliar stopover sites, we translocated and continuously tracked migratory red-eyed vireos (Vireo olivaceus) throughout spring stopover with and without energetic reserves that were released in two replicates of three forested habitat types. Migrants moved the most upon release, during which time they selected habitat characterized by greater food abundance and higher foraging attack rates. Presumably under pressure to replenish fuel stores necessary to continue migration in a timely fashion, migrants released in poorer energetic condition moved faster and further than migrants in better condition and the same pattern was true for migrants released late in spring relative to those released earlier. However, a migrant's energetic condition had less influence on their behavior when they were in poor quality habitat. Movement did not differ between sexes. Our study illustrates the importance of quickly finding suitable habitat at each stopover site, especially for energetically constrained migrants later in the season. If an initial period prior to foraging were necessary at each stop along a migrant's journey, non-foraging periods would cumulatively result in a significant energetic and time cost to migration. However, we suggest behavior during stopover is not solely a function of underlying resource distributions but is a complex response to a combination of endogenous and exogenous factors.

  10. Experimental evidence of nitrogen control on pCO2 in phosphorus-enriched humic and clear coastal lagoon waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Bittencourt Peixoto

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Natural and human-induced controls on carbon dioxide (CO2 in tropical waters may be very dynamic (over time and among or within ecosystems considering the potential role of warmer temperatures intensifying metabolic responses and playing a direct role on the balance between photosynthesis and respiration. The high magnitude of biological processes at low latitudes following eutrophication by nitrogen (N and phosphorus (P inputs into inland waters may be a relevant component of the C cycle, showing controls on partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2 that are still poorly understood. Here we assessed the strength of N control on pCO2 in P-enriched humic and clear coastal lagoons waters, using four experimental treatments in microcosms: control (no additional nutrients and three levels of N additions coupled to P enrichments. In humic coastal lagoon waters, a persistent CO2 supersaturation was reported in controls and all nutrient-enriched treatments, ranging from 24-fold to fourfold the atmospheric equilibrium value. However, both humic and clear coastal lagoon waters only showed significant decreases in pCO2 in relation to the controlled microcosms in the two treatments with higher N addition levels. Additionally, clear coastal lagoon water microcosms showed a shift from CO2 sources to CO2 sinks, in relation to the atmosphere. Only in the two more N-enriched treatments did pCO2 substantially decrease, from 650 µatm in controls and less N-enriched treatments to 10 µatm in more N-enriched microcosms. Humic substrates and N inputs can modulate pCO2 even in P-enriched coastal lagoon waters, thereby being important drivers on CO2 outgassing from inland waters.

  11. Effect of brand and advertising medium on demand for e-cigarettes: Evidence from an experimental auction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew C. Rousu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Print and television advertisements for e-cigarettes are currently legal in the United States. Given that e-cigarettes are a lower-risk alternative to cigarettes, these ads could have a positive public health impact if they motivate smokers to switch to e-cigarettes. However, the public health impact of e-cigarette ads could be negative if ads increase demand for both e-cigarettes and cigarettes. We use experimental auctions –in which participants bid in real auctions and winners pay for the items they purchase – to study the effect of print and TV e-cigarettes ads on demand for the brand from the ad, for another e-cigarettes brand, and for cigarettes. We ran experiments with 288 Pennsylvania smokers in November 2014–March 2015 and we found that in cases where an ad affects demand for e-cigarettes, the ad moves demand for cigarettes in the same direction. For example, the Blu print ad increases demand for Blu e-cigarettes and cigarettes among non-white participants. The Vuse TV ad reduces demand for both types of e-cigarettes and for cigarettes. We also find that non-white participants are willing to pay more for e-cigarettes in the absence of advertising, and that smokers who worry most about their health are willing to pay more for e-cigarettes. The results of this study point to the need for greater scrutiny of advertising for e-cigarette products such that they do not also induce demand for tobacco cigarettes.

  12. Effect of brand and advertising medium on demand for e-cigarettes: Evidence from an experimental auction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousu, Matthew C; O'Connor, Richard; Corrigan, Jay

    2017-09-01

    Print and television advertisements for e-cigarettes are currently legal in the United States. Given that e-cigarettes are a lower-risk alternative to cigarettes, these ads could have a positive public health impact if they motivate smokers to switch to e-cigarettes. However, the public health impact of e-cigarette ads could be negative if ads increase demand for both e-cigarettes and cigarettes. We use experimental auctions -in which participants bid in real auctions and winners pay for the items they purchase - to study the effect of print and TV e-cigarettes ads on demand for the brand from the ad, for another e-cigarettes brand, and for cigarettes. We ran experiments with 288 Pennsylvania smokers in November 2014-March 2015 and we found that in cases where an ad affects demand for e-cigarettes, the ad moves demand for cigarettes in the same direction. For example, the Blu print ad increases demand for Blu e-cigarettes and cigarettes among non-white participants. The Vuse TV ad reduces demand for both types of e-cigarettes and for cigarettes. We also find that non-white participants are willing to pay more for e-cigarettes in the absence of advertising, and that smokers who worry most about their health are willing to pay more for e-cigarettes. The results of this study point to the need for greater scrutiny of advertising for e-cigarette products such that they do not also induce demand for tobacco cigarettes.

  13. Protective Role of Cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 in Experimental Lung Injury: Evidence of a Lipoxin A(4)-Mediated Effect.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Polymorphoneutrophils (PMNs) are activated by inflammatory mediators following splanchnic ischemia\\/reperfusion (I\\/R), potentially injuring organs such as the lung. As a result, some patients develop respiratory failure following abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Pulmonary cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 protects against acid aspiration and bacterial instillation via lipoxins, a family of potent anti-inflammatory lipid mediators. We explored the role of COX-2 and lipoxin A(4) in experimental I\\/R-mediated lung injury. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to one of the following five groups: (1) controls; (2) aortic cross-clamping for 45 min and reperfusion for 4 h (I\\/R group); (3) I\\/R and SC236, a selective COX-2 inhibitor; (4) I\\/R and aspirin; and (5) I\\/R and iloprost, a prostacyclin (PGI(2)) analogue. Lung injury was assessed by wet\\/dry ratio, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) neutrophil counts. BAL levels of thromboxane, PGE(2), 6-keto-PGF(1)alpha (a hydrolysis product of prostacyclin), lipoxin A(4), and 15-epi-lipoxin A(4) were analyzed by enzyme immunoassay (EIA). Immunostaining for COX-2 was performed. RESULTS: I\\/R significantly increased tissue MPO, the wet\\/dry lung ratio, and neutrophil counts. These measures were significantly further aggravated by SC236 and improved by iloprost. I\\/R increased COX-2 immunostaining and both PGE(2) and 6-keto-PGF(1alpha) levels in BAL. SC236 markedly reduced these prostanoids and lipoxin A(4) compared with I\\/R alone. Iloprost markedly increased lipoxin A(4) levels. The deleterious effect of SC236 and the beneficial effect of iloprost was associated with a reduction and an increase, respectively, in lipoxin A(4) levels. CONCLUSIONS: Lipoxin A(4) warrants further evaluation as a mediator of COX-2 regulated lung protection.

  14. Experimental evidence of edge intrinsic momentum source driven by kinetic ion loss and edge radial electric fields in tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boedo, J. A.; deGrassie, J. S.; Grierson, B.; Stoltzfus-Dueck, T.; Battaglia, D. J.; Rudakov, D. L.; Belli, E. A.; Groebner, R. J.; Hollmann, E.; Lasnier, C.; Solomon, W. M.; Unterberg, E. A.; Watkins, J.

    2016-09-01

    Bulk ion toroidal velocity profiles, V| | D + , peaking at 40-60 km/s are observed with Mach probes in a narrow edge region of DIII-D discharges without external momentum input. This intrinsic rotation can be well reproduced by a first principle, collisionless kinetic loss model of thermal ion loss that predicts the existence of a loss-cone distribution in velocity space resulting in a co-Ip directed velocity. We consider two kinetic models, one of which includes turbulence-enhanced momentum transport, as well as the Pfirsch-Schluter (P-S) fluid mechanism. We measure a fine structure of the boundary radial electric field, Er, insofar ignored, featuring large (10-20 kV/m) positive peaks in the scrape off layer (SOL) at, or slightly inside, the last closed flux surface of these low power L- and H-mode discharges in DIII-D. The Er structure significantly affects the ion-loss model, extended to account for a non-uniform electric field. We also find that V| | D + is reduced when the magnetic topology is changed from lower single null to upper single null. The kinetic ion loss model containing turbulence-enhanced momentum transport can explain the reduction, as we find that the potential fluctuations decay with radius, while we need to invoke a topology-enhanced collisionality on the simpler kinetic model. The P-S mechanism fails to reproduce the damping. We show a clear correlation between the near core V| | C 6 + velocity and the peak edge V| | D + in discharges with no external torque, further supporting the hypothesis that ion loss is the source for intrinsic torque in the present tokamaks. However, we also show that when external torque is injected in the core, it can complete with, and eventually overwhelm, the edge source, thus determining the near SOL flows. Finally, we show some additional evidence that the ion/electron distribution in the SOL is non-Maxwellian.

  15. Charge Transport in 4 nm Molecular Wires with Interrupted Conjugation: Combined Experimental and Computational Evidence for Thermally Assisted Polaron Tunneling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taherinia, Davood; Smith, Christopher E; Ghosh, Soumen; Odoh, Samuel O; Balhorn, Luke; Gagliardi, Laura; Cramer, Christopher J; Frisbie, C Daniel

    2016-04-26

    We report the synthesis, transport measurements, and electronic structure of conjugation-broken oligophenyleneimine (CB-OPI 6) molecular wires with lengths of ∼4 nm. The wires were grown from Au surfaces using stepwise aryl imine condensation reactions between 1,4-diaminobenzene and terephthalaldehyde (1,4-benzenedicarbaldehyde). Saturated spacers (conjugation breakers) were introduced into the molecular backbone by replacing the aromatic diamine with trans-1,4-diaminocyclohexane at specific steps during the growth processes. FT-IR and ellipsometry were used to follow the imination reactions on Au surfaces. Surface coverages (∼4 molecules/nm(2)) and electronic structures of the wires were determined by cyclic voltammetry and UV-vis spectroscopy, respectively. The current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of the wires were acquired using conducting probe atomic force microscopy (CP-AFM) in which an Au-coated AFM probe was brought into contact with the wires to form metal-molecule-metal junctions with contact areas of ∼50 nm(2). The low bias resistance increased with the number of saturated spacers, but was not sensitive to the position of the spacer within the wire. Temperature dependent measurements of resistance were consistent with a localized charge (polaron) hopping mechanism in all of the wires. Activation energies were in the range of 0.18-0.26 eV (4.2-6.0 kcal/mol) with the highest belonging to the fully conjugated OPI 6 wire and the lowest to the CB3,5-OPI 6 wire (the wire with two saturated spacers). For the two other wires with a single conjugation breaker, CB3-OPI 6 and CB5-OPI 6, activation energies of 0.20 eV (4.6 kcal/mol) and 0.21 eV (4.8 kcal/mol) were found, respectively. Computational studies using density functional theory confirmed the polaronic nature of charge carriers but predicted that the semiclassical activation energy of hopping should be higher for CB-OPI molecular wires than for the OPI 6 wire. To reconcile the experimental and

  16. Foraging behaviour in tadpoles of the bronze frog Rana temporalis: Experimental evidence for the ideal free distribution

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dheeraj K Veeranagoudar; Bhagyashri A Shanbhag; Srinivas K Saidapur

    2004-06-01

    The ability of bronze frog Rana temporalis tadpoles (pure or mixed parental lines) to assess the profitability of food habitats and distribute themselves accordingly was tested experimentally using a rectangular choice tank with a non-continuous input design. Food (boiled spinach) was placed at two opposite ends of the choice tank in a desired ratio (1 : 1, 1 : 2 or 1 : 4) to create habitat A and B. The tadpoles in Gosner stage 28–33, pre-starved for 24 h, were introduced in an open ended mesh cylinder placed in the center of the choice tank, held for 4 min (for acclimation) and then released to allow free movement and habitat selection. The number of tadpoles foraging at each habitat was recorded at 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 min time intervals. The actual suitability, (the food available in a habitat after colonization of tadpoles) of each habitat was obtained from the equation = - () where is basic suitability (amount of food provided at each habitat before release of tadpoles), is the rate of depletion of food (lowering effect) with introduction of each tadpole, and is the density of tadpoles in habitat . The expected number of tadpoles at each habitat was derived from the actual suitability. With no food in the choice tank, movement of the tadpoles in the test arena was random indicating no bias towards any end of the choice tank or the procedure. In tests with a 1 : 1 food ratio, the observed ratio of tadpoles (11.71 : 12.28) was comparable with the expected 12 : 12 ratio. The observed number of tadpoles in the habitats with a 1 : 2 food ratio was 8.71 : 15.29 and 7.87 : 16.13 for pure and mixed parental lines respectively. In both cases, the observed ratios were close to the expected values (7 : 17). Likewise, in experiments with a 1 : 4 food ratio, the observed number of tadpoles in the two habitats (10.78 : 37.22) did not differ significantly from the expected ratio of 7 : 41. In all tests, the number of R. temporalis tadpoles matched ideally with

  17. Cytoreductive surgery plus hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy improves survival of gastric cancer with peritoneal carcinomatosis: evidence from an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Li; Mei, Lie-Jun; Yang, Xiao-Jun; Huang, Chao-Qun; Zhou, Yun-Feng; Yonemura, Yutaka; Li, Yan

    2011-05-07

    Cytoreductive surgery (CRS) plus hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) has been considered as a promising treatment modality for gastric cancer with peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC). However, there have also been many debates regarding the efficacy and safety of this new approach. Results from experimental animal model study could help provide reliable information. This study was to investigate the safety and efficacy of CRS + HIPEC to treat gastric cancer with PC in a rabbit model. VX2 tumor cells were injected into the gastric submucosa of 42 male New Zealand rabbits using a laparotomic implantation technique, to construct rabbit model of gastric cancer with PC. The rabbits were randomized into control group (n = 14), CRS alone group (n = 14) and CRS + HIPEC group (n = 14). The control group was observed for natural course of disease progression. Treatments were started on day 9 after tumor cells inoculation, including maximal removal of tumor nodules in CRS alone group, and maximal CRS plus heperthermic intraperitoneal chemoperfusion with docetaxel (10 mg/rabbit) and carboplatin (40 mg/rabbit) at 42.0 ± 0.5°C for 30 min in CRS + HIPEC group. The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS). The secondary endpoints were body weight, biochemistry, major organ functions and serious adverse events (SAE). Rabbit model of gastric cancer with PC was successfully established in all animals. The clinicopathological features of the model were similar to human gastric PC. The median OS was 24.0 d (95% confidence interval 21.8 - 26.2 d ) in the control group, 25.0 d (95% CI 21.3 - 28.7 d ) in CRS group, and 40.0 d (95% CI 34.6 - 45.4 d ) in CRS + HIPEC group (P = 0.00, log rank test). Compared with CRS only or control group, CRS + HIPEC could extend the OS by at least 15 d (60%). At the baseline, on the day of surgery and on day 8 after surgery, the peripheral blood cells counts, liver and kidney functions, and biochemistry parameters were all comparable. SAE

  18. Cytoreductive surgery plus hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy improves survival of gastric cancer with peritoneal carcinomatosis: evidence from an experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonemura Yutaka

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cytoreductive surgery (CRS plus hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC has been considered as a promising treatment modality for gastric cancer with peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC. However, there have also been many debates regarding the efficacy and safety of this new approach. Results from experimental animal model study could help provide reliable information. This study was to investigate the safety and efficacy of CRS + HIPEC to treat gastric cancer with PC in a rabbit model. Methods VX2 tumor cells were injected into the gastric submucosa of 42 male New Zealand rabbits using a laparotomic implantation technique, to construct rabbit model of gastric cancer with PC. The rabbits were randomized into control group (n = 14, CRS alone group (n = 14 and CRS + HIPEC group (n = 14. The control group was observed for natural course of disease progression. Treatments were started on day 9 after tumor cells inoculation, including maximal removal of tumor nodules in CRS alone group, and maximal CRS plus heperthermic intraperitoneal chemoperfusion with docetaxel (10 mg/rabbit and carboplatin (40 mg/rabbit at 42.0 ± 0.5°C for 30 min in CRS + HIPEC group. The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS. The secondary endpoints were body weight, biochemistry, major organ functions and serious adverse events (SAE. Results Rabbit model of gastric cancer with PC was successfully established in all animals. The clinicopathological features of the model were similar to human gastric PC. The median OS was 24.0 d (95% confidence interval 21.8 - 26.2 d in the control group, 25.0 d (95% CI 21.3 - 28.7 d in CRS group, and 40.0 d (95% CI 34.6 - 45.4 d in CRS + HIPEC group (P = 0.00, log rank test. Compared with CRS only or control group, CRS + HIPEC could extend the OS by at least 15 d (60%. At the baseline, on the day of surgery and on day 8 after surgery, the peripheral blood cells counts, liver and kidney functions, and biochemistry

  19. Experimental evidence for segregation of interstitial impurities to defects in a near α titanium alloy during dynamic strain aging using energy filtered transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, Kartik, E-mail: kartik@dmrl.drdo.in [Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory, Kanchanbagh, Hyderabad 500058 (India); School of Engineering Science and Technology, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad (India); Amrithapandian, S.; Panigrahi, B.K. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi for Centre of Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Kumar, Vikas [Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory, Kanchanbagh, Hyderabad 500058 (India); Bhanu Sankara Rao, K. [Mahatma Gandhi Institute of Technology, Gandipet, Hyderabad 500075 (India); Sundararaman, M. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India)

    2015-06-25

    Dynamic strain aging was observed in the temperature range between 300 °C and 500 °C in a near α titanium alloy 834 without Silicon (10.38%Al–0.16%Sn–1.86%Zr–0.37%Nb–0.25%Mo–0.27%C–0.30%O–0.006%N, all in at%) tested in the temperature range from room temperature to 500 °C. Electron microscopic investigation of tensile tested samples in an energy filtered transmission electron microscopy provided direct experimental evidence for segregation of interstitial elements like carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) to lath boundaries and dislocation pile ups. On the basis of these results and the comparison of lattice strain generated by different interstitials in α-Ti, it was concluded that segregation of carbon and nitrogen and not oxygen to defects is responsible for DSA in this alloy.

  20. Nutrition, weight gain and eating behavior in pregnancy: a review of experimental evidence for long-term effects on the risk of obesity in offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Sarbattama; Carpenter, Arielle H; Hochstadt, Jessica; Huddleston, Juli Y; Kustanovich, Vladimir; Reynolds, Ashley A; Roberts, Susan

    2012-08-20

    Obesity has reached near epidemic proportions in the developed world. As reproductive age women are a part of this trend, the effect of maternal obesity on the developing fetus must be investigated. In this review, we evaluated the experimental evidence relating maternal nutritional status and eating behavior before and during pregnancy on the risk of obesity in the offspring. The studies were compiled and selected based on their methodologies, study design and relevance. The analyzed studies were compiled to quantify, if possible, the relationship between maternal and offspring weight. Descriptive and observational studies were also included if they were seminal in the field. Based on the current data, maternal obesity is a critical factor exacerbating multigenerational obesity. Mechanistic studies, mainly in animals, have identified potential areas for intervention which might limit transmission of adverse risk factors for obesity from mothers to infants during pregnancy.

  1. Experimental evidence for negative turgor pressure in small leaf cells of Robinia pseudoacacia L versus large cells of Metasequoia glyptostroboides Hu et W.C.Cheng. 1. Evidence from pressure-volume curve analysis of dead tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dongmei; Pan, Shaoan; Ding, Yiting; Tyree, Melvin T

    2017-03-01

    This paper provides a mini-review of evidence for negative turgor pressure in leaf cells starting with experimental evidence in the late 1950s and ending with biomechanical models published in 2014. In the present study, biomechanical models were used to predict how negative turgor pressure might be manifested in dead tissue, and experiments were conducted to test the predictions. The main findings were as follows: (i) Tissues killed by heating to 60 or 80 °C or by freezing in liquid nitrogen all became equally leaky to cell sap solutes and all seemed to pass freely through the cell walls. (ii) Once cell sap solutes could freely pass the cell walls, the shape of pressure-volume curves was dramatically altered between living and dead cells. (iii) Pressure-volume curves of dead tissue seem to measure negative turgor defined as negative when inside minus outside pressure is negative. (iv) Robinia pseudoacacia leaves with small palisade cells had more negative turgor than Metasequoia glyptostroboides with large cells. (v) The absolute difference in negative turgor between R. pseudoacacia and M. glyptostroboides approached as much as 1.0 MPa in some cases. The differences in the manifestation of negative turgor in living versus dead tissue are discussed. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Effects of aerogel-like disorder on the critical behavior of O(m-vector models. Recent simulations and experimental evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.Vásquez

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We review recent results on the effect of a specific type of quenched disorder on well known O(m-vector models in three dimensions: the XY model (3DXY, m=2 and the Ising model (3DIS, m=1. Evidence of changes of criticality in both systems, when confined in aerogel pores, is briefly referenced. The 3DXY model represents the universality class to which the λ-transition of bulk superfluid 4He belongs. Experiments report interesting changes of critical exponents for this transition, when superfluid 4He is confined in aerogels. Numerical evidence has also been presented that the 3DXY model, confined in aerogel-like structures, exhibits critical exponents different from those of bulk, in agreement with experiments. Both results seem to contradict Harris criterion: being the specific heat exponent negative for the pure system (α3DXY≈-0.0114He and N2 confined in aerogels, also showed changes in critical-point exponents. Being the LV critical-point in the O(1 universality class, criticality may be affected by both short-range correlated (SRC and LRC subsets of disorder. Simulations of the 3DIS in DLCA aerogels can corroborate experimental results. Both experiments and simulations suggest a shift in critical exponents to values closer to the SRC instead of those of the LRC fixed point.

  3. Experimental Evidence for the Formation of Fourfold Rovibrational Energy Clusters in the ν 1/ν 3 Vibrational States of H 280Se

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaud, J. M.; Camypeyret, C.; Burger, H.; Jensen, P.; Kozin, I. N.

    1995-07-01

    The present paper reports experimental evidence for the "cluster effect" (i.e., the formation of nearly degenerate, four-member groups of rotation-vibration energy levels at high rotational excitation) in the ν 1/ν 3 vibrational states of the H 280Se molecule. The formation of such clusters in the vibrational ground state of H 280Se has been experimentally verified (see I. N. Kozin, S. Klee, P. Jensen, O. L. Polyansky, and I. M. Pavlichenkov, J. Mol. Spectrosc.158, 409-422, 1993 and references therein). K. K. Lehmann ( J. Chem. Phys.95, 2361-2370, 1991) and I. N. Kozin and P. Jensen ( J. Mol. Spectrosc.161, 186-207, 1993) independently predicted the existence of a new type of fourfold clusters (referred to by Kozin and Jensen as Type II clusters) in the ν 1/ν 3 vibrational states of H 280Se. These clusters form by coalescence of two energy doublets, one belonging to the ν 1 vibrational state and one belonging to the ν 3 state. However, from the experimental data available at the time (J.-M. Flaud, C. Camy-Peyret, H. Bürger, and H. Willner, J. Mol. Spectrosc.161, 157-169, 1993) the term values of the levels predicted to form clusters could be obtained for J ≤ 13 only. At this J value, the term values are still far from cluster formation. For the present work, we have recorded a new FTIR spectrum of H 280Se at high pressure × (path length) with the purpose of providing new information about the cluster formation. In this spectrum, we can follow the doublets at highest energy in the ν 1 and ν 3 states, respectively, to J = 18 where the energy difference between them is 0.94 cm -1. On the basis of this fact and on the basis of the trend shown by the experimentally derived term values, we conclude that the present work provides experimental verification of the formation of Type II clusters in the ν 1/ν 3 vibrational states of H 280Se.

  4. In vivo evidence for CD4+ and CD8+ suppressor T cells in vaccination-induced suppression of murine experimental autoimmune thyroiditis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flynn, J.C.; Kong, Y.C. (Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan (USA))

    1991-09-01

    In several experimental autoimmune diseases, including experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (EAT), vaccination with attenuated autoantigen-specific T cells has provided protection against subsequent induction of disease. However, the mechanism(s) of vaccination-induced suppression remains to be clarified. Since the authors have previously shown that suppression generated by pretreatment with mouse thyroglobulin (MTg) or thyroid-stimulating hormone in EAT is mediated by CD4+, not CD8+, suppressor T cells, they examined the role of T cell subsets in vaccination-induced suppression of EAT. Mice were vaccinated with irradiated, MTg-primed, and MTg-activated spleen cells and then challenged. Pretreatment with these cells suppressed EAT induced by immunization with MTg and adjuvant, but not by adoptive transfer of thyroiditogenic cells, suggesting a mechanism of afferent suppression. The activation of suppressor mechanisms did not require CD8+ cells, since mice depleted of CD8+ cells before vaccination showed reduced EAT comparable to control vaccinated mice. Furthermore, depletion of either the CD4+ or the CD8+ subset after vaccination did not significantly abrogate suppression. However, suppression was eliminated by the depletion of both CD4+ and CD8+ cells in vaccinated mice. These results provide evidence for the cooperative effects of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in vaccination-induced suppression of EAT.

  5. Downregulation of CX3CR1 ameliorates experimental colitis: evidence for CX3CL1-CX3CR1-mediated immune cell recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Felix; Holthoff, Christina; Anthoni, Christoph; Rijcken, Emile; Alexander, J Steven; Gavins, Felicity N E; Spiegel, H U; Senninger, Norbert; Vowinkel, Thorsten

    2017-03-01

    Inflammatory conditions like inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are characterized by increased immune cell infiltration. The chemokine ligand CX3CL1 and its receptor CX3CR1 have been shown to be involved in leukocyte adhesion, transendothelial recruitment, and chemotaxis. Therefore, the objective of this study was to describe CX3CL1-CX3CR1-mediated signaling in the induction of immune cell recruitment during experimental murine colitis. Acute colitis was induced by dextran sodium sulfate (DSS), and sepsis was induced by injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Serum concentrations of CX3CR1 and CX3CL1 were measured by ELISA. Wild-type and CX3CR1(-/-) mice were challenged with DSS, and on day 6, intravital microscopy was performed to monitor colonic leukocyte and platelet recruitment. Intestinal inflammation was assessed by disease activity, histopathology, and neutrophil infiltration. CX3CR1 was upregulated in DSS colitis and LPS-induced sepsis. CX3CR1(-/-) mice were protected from disease severity and intestinal injury in DSS colitis, and CX3CR1 deficiency resulted in reduced rolling of leukocytes and platelets. In the present study, we provide evidence for a crucial role of CX3CL1-CX3CR1 in experimental colitis, in particular for intestinal leukocyte recruitment during murine colitis. Our findings suggest that CX3CR1 blockade represents a potential therapeutic strategy for treatment of IBD.

  6. DEFORMATION OF SOFT COLLOIDAL CRYSTALLINE STRUCTURE-THEORETICAL CONSIDERATIONS AND EXPERIMENTAL EVIDENCES BY SYNCHROTRON SMALL-ANGLE X-RAY SCATTERING ON TENSILE STRETCHED POLYMERIC LATEX FILM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-qi Zhang; Yong-feng Men

    2009-01-01

    Films obtained via drying a polymeric latex dispersion are normally colloidal crystalline where latex particles are packed into a face centered cubic (fcc) structure.Different from conventional atomic crystallites or hard sphere colloidal crystallites,the crystalline structure of these films is normally deformable due to the low glass transition temperature of the latex particles.Upon tensile deformation,depending on the drawing direction with respect to the normal of specific crystallographic plane,one observes different crystalline structural changes.Three typical situations where crystallographic c-axis,body diagonal or face diagonal of the fcc structure of the colloidal crystallites being parallel to the stretching direction were investigated.Tilting angle and d-spacing of several crystallographic planes as a function of draw ratio at each situation were derived.Experimental evidences for such relationships were also given by considering in-situ synchrotron small angle X-ray scattering data of a typical latex film during stretching.It turns out that the experimental results are fully in accordance with the mathematical calculations.

  7. Numerical and experimental evidence of the inter-blade cavitation vortex development at deep part load operation of a Francis turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, K.; Müller, A.; Favrel, A.; Landry, C.; Avellan, F.

    2016-11-01

    Francis turbines are subject to various types of the cavitation flow depending on the operating conditions. In order to compensate for the stochastic nature of renewable energy sources, it is more and more required to extend the operating range of the generating units, from deep part load to full load conditions. In the deep part load condition, the formation of cavitation vortices in the turbine blade to blade channels called inter-blade cavitation vortex is often observed. The understanding of the dynamic characteristics of these inter-blade vortices and their formation mechanisms is of key importance in an effort of developing reliable flow simulation tools. This paper reports the numerical and experimental investigations carried out in order to establish the vortex characteristics, especially the inception and the development of the vortex structure. The unsteady RANS simulation for the multiphase flow is performed with the SST- SAS turbulence model by using the commercial flow solver ANSYS CFX. The simulation results in terms of the vortex structure and the cavitation volume are evaluated by comparing them to the flow visualizations of the blade channel acquired through a specially instrumented guide vane as well as from the downstream of the runner across the draft tube cone. The inter-blade cavitation vortex is successfully captured by the simulation and both numerical and experimental results evidence that the inter-blade vortices are attached to the runner hub.

  8. Chlorine-rich amphibole in deep layered gabbros as evidence for brine/rock interaction in the lower oceanic crust: a microstructural and experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currin, Adriana; Koepke, Juergen; Almeev, Renat; Ildefonse, Benoit; Wolff, Paul Eric

    2017-04-01

    The occurrence of amphiboles in the lower oceanic crust indicates the presence of water during rock formation or alteration, either in the parental melt or in reacting hydrothermal fluids. Amphibole-rich high temperature metamorphic veins and magmatic dykes are found in MOR-associated layered olivine gabbros from Wadi Wariyah of the deep palaeocrust of the Sumail ophiolite, Sultanate of Oman. These veins contain different types of amphiboles: pargasite, hornblende, actinolite and Cl-rich pargasite. In some cases, amphibole grains are zoned and contain a range of compositions, from pargasite formed at magmatic conditions to Cl-rich pargasite formed at subsolidus conditions. Pargasite and ferropargasite are found containing up to 5 wt% Cl (1.4 a.p.f.u.). This variety of amphibole compositions occurring in layered gabbros evidences a complex history of brine/rock interaction and hydrothermal cooling at the base of the oceanic crust. However, the precise origin of these amphibole- and Cl-rich veins associated to hydrothermal activity is still poorly understood. We investigated the formation of Cl-rich amphibole by means of a microstructural study using EBSD (electron backscattered diffraction) and, in addition, an experimental simulation of hydrothermal processes affecting amphibole formation in gabbro at subsolidus conditions. The microstructural EBSD study on natural gabbro from Oman confirms that the hydrothermally-formed amphiboles (hornblende, actinolite, Cl-pargasite) are epitactic in relation to high-temperature pargasite areas adjacent to them. This implies a coherent process, where magmatic pargasite formed initially was subsequently transformed by a Cl-rich hydrothermal brine and fluid at decreasing temperatures, ranging from the magmatic regime down to greenschist facies. Experiments were performed with a starting material of millimetre-sized pargasite pieces (with Cl content pressure of 200 MPa, and oxygen fugacity of QFM+1. Our experimental results show

  9. Inequality and riots: experimental evidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Abbink; D. Masclet; D. Mirza

    2009-01-01

    We study the relationship between inequality and inter-groups conflicts (riots), focussing on social inequality. Disadvantaged societal groups experience discrimination and thus have limited access to some social and labour resources like education or employment. The aim of our paper is twofold. Fir

  10. Improving implementation of evidence-based practice in mental health service delivery: protocol for a cluster randomised quasi-experimental investigation of staff-focused values interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Virginia; Oades, Lindsay G; Deane, Frank P; Crowe, Trevor P; Ciarrochi, Joseph; Andresen, Retta

    2013-07-02

    There is growing acceptance that optimal service provision for individuals with severe and recurrent mental illness requires a complementary focus on medical recovery (i.e., symptom management and general functioning) and personal recovery (i.e., having a 'life worth living'). Despite significant research attention and policy-level support, the translation of this vision of healthcare into changed workplace practice continues to elude. Over the past decade, evidence-based training interventions that seek to enhance the knowledge, attitudes, and skills of staff working in the mental health field have been implemented as a primary redress strategy. However, a large body of multi-disciplinary research indicates disappointing rates of training transfer. There is an absence of empirical research that investigates the importance of worker-motivation in the uptake of desired workplace change initiatives. 'Autonomy' is acknowledged as important to human effectiveness and as a correlate of workplace variables like productivity, and wellbeing. To our knowledge, there have been no studies that investigate purposeful and structured use of values-based interventions to facilitate increased autonomy as a means of promoting enhanced implementation of workplace change. This study involves 200 mental health workers across 22 worksites within five community-managed organisations in three Australian states. It involves cluster-randomisation of participants within organisation, by work site, to the experimental (values) condition, or the control (implementation). Both conditions receive two days of training focusing on an evidence-based framework of mental health service delivery. The experimental group receives a third day of values-focused intervention and 12 months of values-focused coaching. Well-validated self-report measures are used to explore variables related to values concordance, autonomy, and self-reported implementation success. Audits of work files and staff work samples

  11. The dominant role of structure for solute transport in soil: experimental evidence and modelling of structure and transport in a field experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.-J. Vogel

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A classical transport experiment was performed in a field plot of 2.5 m2 using the dye tracer brilliant blue. The measured tracer distribution demonstrates the dominant role of the heterogeneous soil structure for solute transport. As with many other published experiments, this evidences the need of considering the macroscopic structure of soil to predict flow and transport. We combine three different approaches to represent the relevant structure of the specific situation of our experiment: i direct measurement, ii statistical description of heterogeneities and iii a conceptual model of structure formation. The structure of soil layers was directly obtained from serial sections in the field. The sub-scale heterogeneity within the soil horizons was modelled through correlated random fields with estimated correlation lengths and anisotropy. Earthworm burrows played a dominant role at the transition between the upper soil horizon and the subsoil. A model based on percolation theory is introduced that mimics the geometry of earthworm burrow systems. The hydraulic material properties of the different structural units were obtained by direct measurements where available and by a best estimate otherwise. From the hydraulic structure, the 3-dimensional velocity field of water was calculated by solving Richards' Equation and solute transport was simulated. The simulated tracer distribution compares reasonably well with the experimental data. We conclude that a rough representation of the structure and a rough representation of the hydraulic properties might be sufficient to predict flow and transport, but both elements are definitely required.

  12. Testing predictions of the Janzen-Connell hypothesis: a meta-analysis of experimental evidence for distance- and density-dependent seed and seedling survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comita, Liza S; Queenborough, Simon A; Murphy, Stephen J; Eck, Jenalle L; Xu, Kaiyang; Krishnadas, Meghna; Beckman, Noelle; Zhu, Yan; Gómez-Aparicio, Lorena

    2014-07-01

    The Janzen-Connell hypothesis proposes that specialist natural enemies, such as herbivores and pathogens, maintain diversity in plant communities by reducing survival rates of conspecific seeds and seedlings located close to reproductive adults or in areas of high conspecific density. Variation in the strength of distance- and density-dependent effects is hypothesized to explain variation in plant species richness along climatic gradients, with effects predicted to be stronger in the tropics than the temperate zone and in wetter habitats compared to drier habitats.We conducted a comprehensive literature search to identify peer-reviewed experimental studies published in the 40+ years since the hypothesis was first proposed. Using data from these studies, we conducted a meta-analysis to assess the current weight of evidence for the distance and density predictions of the Janzen-Connell hypothesis.Overall, we found significant support for both the distance- and density-dependent predictions. For all studies combined, survival rates were significantly reduced near conspecifics compared to far from conspecifics, and in areas with high densities of conspecifics compared to areas with low conspecific densities. There was no indication that these results were due to publication bias.The strength of distance and density effects varied widely among studies. Contrary to expectations, this variation was unrelated to latitude, and there was no significant effect of study region. However, we did find a trend for stronger distance and density dependence in wetter sites compared to sites with lower annual precipitation. In addition, effects were significantly stronger at the seedling stage compared to the seed stage.Synthesis. Our study provides support for the idea that distance- and density-dependent mortality occurs in plant communities world-wide. Available evidence suggests that natural enemies are frequently the cause of such patterns, consistent with the Janzen

  13. Beyond the blank slate: routes to learning new coordination patterns depend on the intrinsic dynamics of the learner —experimental evidence and theoretical model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane eKostrubiec

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Using an approach that combines experimental studies of bimanual movements to visual stimuli and theoretical modeling, the present paper develops a dynamical account of sensorimotor learning, that is, how new skills are acquired and old ones modified. A significant aspect of our approach is the focus on the individual learner as the basic unit of analysis, in particular the quantification of predispositions and capabilities that the individual learner brings to the learning environment. Such predispositions constitute the learner’s behavioral repertoire, captured here theoretically as a dynamical landscape (‘intrinsic dynamics’. The learning process is demonstrated to not only lead to a relatively permanent improvement of performance in the required task —the usual outcome— but also to alter the individual’s entire repertoire. Changes in the dynamical landscape due to learning are shown to result from two basic mechanisms or routes: bifurcation and shift. Which mechanism is selected depends both on the initial individual repertoire before new learning begins and the task to be learned. Both bifurcation and shift mechanisms are accommodated by a dynamical model, a relatively straightforward development of the well-established HKB model of movement coordination. Model simulations show that although environmental or task demands may be met equally well using either mechanism, the bifurcation route results in greater stabilization of the to-be-learned behavior. Thus stability not (or not only error is demonstrated to be the basis of selection, both of a new pattern of behavior and the path (smooth shift versus abrupt qualitative change that learning takes. In line with these results, recent neurophysiological evidence indicates that stability is a relevant feature around which brain activity is organized while an individual performs a coordination task. Finally, we explore the consequences of the dynamical approach to learning for

  14. Beyond the blank slate: routes to learning new coordination patterns depend on the intrinsic dynamics of the learner-experimental evidence and theoretical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostrubiec, Viviane; Zanone, Pier-Giorgio; Fuchs, Armin; Kelso, J A Scott

    2012-01-01

    Using an approach that combines experimental studies of bimanual movements to visual stimuli and theoretical modeling, the present paper develops a dynamical account of sensorimotor learning, that is, how new skills are acquired and old ones modified. A significant aspect of our approach is the focus on the individual learner as the basic unit of analysis, in particular the quantification of predispositions and capabilities that the individual learner brings to the learning environment. Such predispositions constitute the learner's behavioral repertoire, captured here theoretically as a dynamical landscape ("intrinsic dynamics"). The learning process is demonstrated to not only lead to a relatively permanent improvement of performance in the required task-the usual outcome-but also to alter the individual's entire repertoire. Changes in the dynamical landscape due to learning are shown to result from two basic mechanisms or "routes": bifurcation and shift. Which mechanism is selected depends the initial individual repertoire before new learning begins. Both bifurcation and shift mechanisms are accommodated by a dynamical model, a relatively straightforward development of the well-established HKB model of movement coordination. Model simulations show that although environmental or task demands may be met equally well using either mechanism, the bifurcation route results in greater stabilization of the to-be-learned behavior. Thus, stability not (or not only) error is demonstrated to be the basis of selection, both of a new pattern of behavior and the path (smooth shift versus abrupt qualitative change) that learning takes. In line with these results, recent neurophysiological evidence indicates that stability is a relevant feature around which brain activity is organized while an individual performs a coordination task. Finally, we explore the consequences of the dynamical approach to learning for theories of biological change.

  15. Improper hydrogen bonded cyclohexane C-Hax···Yax contacts: theoretical predictions and experimental evidence from 1H NMR spectroscopy of suitable axial cyclohexane models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolocouris, Antonios; Zervos, Nikolaos; De Proft, Frank; Koch, Andreas

    2011-06-03

    C-H(ax)···Y(ax) contacts are a textbook prototype of steric hindrance in organic chemistry. The nature of these contacts is investigated in this work. MP2/6-31+G(d,p) calculations predicted the presence of improper hydrogen bonded C-H(ax)···Y(ax) contacts of different strength in substituted cyclohexane rings. To support the theoretical predictions with experimental evidence, several synthetic 2-substituted adamantane analogues (1-24) with suitable improper H-bonded C-H(ax)···Y(ax) contacts of different strength were used as models of a substituted cyclohexane ring. The (1)H NMR signal separation, Δδ(γ-CH(2)), within the cyclohexane ring γ-CH(2)s is raised when the MP2/6-31+G(d,p) calculated parameters, reflecting the strength of the H-bonded C-H(ax)···Y(ax) contact, are increased. In molecules with enhanced improper H-bonded contacts C-H(ax)···Y(ax), like those having sterically crowded contacts (Y(ax) = t-Bu) or contacts including considerable electrostatic attractions (Y(ax) = O-C or O═C) the calculated DFT steric energies of the γ-axial hydrogens are considerably reduced reflecting their electron cloud compression. The results suggest that the proton H(ax) electron cloud compression, caused by the C-H(ax)···Y(ax) contacts, and the resulting increase in Δδ(γ-CH(2)) value can be effected not just from van der Waals spheres compression, but more generally from electrostatic attraction forces and van der Waals repulsion, both of which are improper H-bonding components.

  16. Review: geological and experimental evidence for secular variation in seawater Mg/Ca (calcite-aragonite seas and its effects on marine biological calcification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. B. Ries

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Synchronized transitions in the polymorph mineralogy of the major reef-building and sediment-producing calcareous marine organisms and abiotic CaCO3 precipitates (ooids, marine cements throughout Phanerozoic time are believed to have been caused by tectonically induced variations in the Mg/Ca ratio of seawater (molar Mg/Ca>2="aragonite seas", <2="calcite seas". Here, I assess the geological evidence in support of secular variation in seawater Mg/Ca and its effects on marine calcifiers, and review a series of recent experiments that investigate the effects of seawater Mg/Ca (1.0–5.2 on extant representatives of calcifying taxa that have experienced variations in this ionic ratio of seawater throughout the geologic past.

    Secular variation in seawater Mg/Ca is supported by synchronized secular variations in (1 the ionic composition of fluid inclusions in primary marine halite, (2 the mineralogies of late stage marine evaporites, abiogenic carbonates, and reef- and sediment-forming marine calcifiers, (3 the Mg/Ca ratios of fossil echinoderms, molluscs, rugose corals, and abiogenic carbonates, (4 global rates of tectonism that drive the exchange of Mg2+ and Ca2+ along zones of ocean crust production, and (5 additional proxies of seawater Mg/Ca including Sr/Mg ratios of abiogenic carbonates, Sr/Ca ratios of biogenic carbonates, and Br concentrations in marine halite.

    Laboratory experiments have revealed that aragonite-secreting bryopsidalean algae and scleractinian corals and calcite-secreting coccolithophores exhibit higher rates of calcification and growth in experimental seawaters formulated with seawater Mg/Ca ratios that favor their skeletal mineral. These results support the assertion that seawater Mg/Ca played an important role in determining which hypercalcifying marine organisms were the major reef-builders and sediment-producers throughout Earth history. The observation that primary

  17. EXPERIMENTAL EVIDENCE FOR THE FORMATION OF HIGHLY SUPERHYDROGENATED POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS THROUGH H ATOM ADDITION AND THEIR CATALYTIC ROLE IN H2 FORMATION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrower, John; Jørgensen, Bjarke; Friis, Emil Enderup;

    2012-01-01

    Mass spectrometry measurements show the formation of highly superhydrogenated derivatives of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecule coronene through H atom addition reactions. The observed product mass distribution provides evidence also for abstraction reactions resulting in H2 formation...

  18. Experimental evidence and theoretical modeling of two-photon absorption dynamics in the reduction of intensity noise of solid-state Er:Yb lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Amili, Abdelkrim; Kervella, Gaël; Alouini, Mehdi

    2013-04-01

    A theoretical and experimental investigation of the intensity noise reduction induced by two-photon absorption in a Er,Yb:Glass laser is reported. The time response of the two-photon absorption mechanism is shown to play an important role on the behavior of the intensity noise spectrum of the laser. A model including an additional rate equation for the two-photon-absorption losses is developed and allows the experimental observations to be predicted.

  19. Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Predictors of Success in Adult Education Programs: Evidence from Experimental Data with Low-Income Welfare Recipients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leininger, Lindsey Jeanne; Kalil, Ariel

    2008-01-01

    Using data on approximately 2,000 low-income welfare recipients in a three-site random-assignment intervention conducted in the early 1990s (the NEWWS), we examine the role of cognitive and non-cognitive factors in moderating experimental impacts of an adult education training program for women who lacked a high school degree or GED at the time of…

  20. Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Predictors of Success in Adult Education Programs: Evidence from Experimental Data with Low-Income Welfare Recipients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leininger, Lindsey Jeanne; Kalil, Ariel

    2008-01-01

    Using data on approximately 2,000 low-income welfare recipients in a three-site random-assignment intervention conducted in the early 1990s (the NEWWS), we examine the role of cognitive and non-cognitive factors in moderating experimental impacts of an adult education training program for women who lacked a high school degree or GED at the time of…

  1. Experimental evidence of deep electron and hole trapping levels in high fluence proton irradiated p-n Si junctions using optical charging spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Pintilie, I; Botila, T; Petre, D

    2000-01-01

    Optical charging spectroscopy (OCS) is first time reported as applied to p-n junctions. The existence of one deep trapping level for electrons and two deep trapping levels for holes was put into evidence, using this method, in proton irradiated p/sup +/-n-n/sup +/ silicon structures. An analytical formula for the OCS discharging current for this type of structures was deduced. (19 refs).

  2. Evidência da ação antiparasitária da azitromicina na infecção experimental de camundongos pelo Plasmodium berghei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gakiya Erika

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A azitromicina debelou a infecção experimental de camundongos pelo Plasmodium berghei quando administrada, pela via oral e durante 28 dias, na dose de 100mg/kg, iniciada no mesmo dia em que os animais foram infectados. Mediante uso de 10mg/kg houve insucesso. Os resultados obtidos suscitam investigações complementares sobre a referida atividade antiparasitária desse medicamento.

  3. Beyond the blank slate: routes to learning new coordination patterns depend on the intrinsic dynamics of the learner —experimental evidence and theoretical model

    OpenAIRE

    Viviane eKostrubiec; pier-Giorgio eZanone; Armin eFuchs; J. A. Scott eKelso

    2012-01-01

    Using an approach that combines experimental studies of bimanual movements to visual stimuli and theoretical modeling, the present paper develops a dynamical account of sensorimotor learning, that is, how new skills are acquired and old ones modified. A significant aspect of our approach is the focus on the individual learner as the basic unit of analysis, in particular the quantification of predispositions and capabilities that the individual learner brings to the learning environment. Such ...

  4. Beyond the blank slate: routes to learning new coordination patterns depend on the intrinsic dynamics of the learner—experimental evidence and theoretical model

    OpenAIRE

    Kostrubiec, Viviane; Zanone, Pier-Giorgio; Fuchs, Armin; Kelso, J.A. Scott

    2012-01-01

    Using an approach that combines experimental studies of bimanual movements to visual stimuli and theoretical modeling, the present paper develops a dynamical account of sensorimotor learning, that is, how new skills are acquired and old ones modified. A significant aspect of our approach is the focus on the individual learner as the basic unit of analysis, in particular the quantification of predispositions and capabilities that the individual learner brings to the learning environment. Such ...

  5. Felsic Melt Generation at the MOR Magma Chamber Roof: Trace Element Evidence of Experimental Hydrous Partial Melts for Anatectic Processes at the East-Pacific Rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdmann, M.; Fischer, L. A.; France, L.; Deloule, E.; Koepke, J.

    2013-12-01

    Felsic lithologies in oceanic crust environment are volumetrically small but occur frequently. Based on experimental and geochemical studies, different models for their generation are suggested, as fractional crystallization, partial melting of mafic lithologies, and liquid immiscibility. Geochemical studies on felsic lithologies from fast-spreading ridge systems imply that partial melting of previously hydrothermally altered mafic lithologies at the gabbro/dike transitions may play an important role (e.g., Wanless et al., 2010). For a detailed study of this process, we simulated experimentally anatexis at the gabbro/dike transition. In order to evaluate the potential of MORB contamination by anatectic melts, trace elements of the experimental melts were analyzed in-situ by applying secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). As starting material we used rock powder (125-200 μm) of different hydrothermally altered dikes and basaltic hornfelses (so-called granoblastic dikes) from the base of the sheeted dike complex of the IODP site 1256 (East-Pacific Rise, EPR). Such lithologies are assumed to undergo partial melting due to an upward moving of the axial melt lens after replenishment, while granoblastic lithologies are regarded as restitic material of anatectic processes (France et al., 2010). Partial melting experiments under water-saturated conditions were performed in internally heated pressure vessels (IHPV) under conditions similar to those prevailing at the base of the sheeted dike complex (i.e. 100 MPa, 910 to 1030°C, fO2=ΔQFM+1). Our results show that melting of altered basalt with melt fractions less than 20 % (corresponding to temperatures ≤ 970°C) exhibit residual phases perfectly matching those observed in basalts with granoblastic texture (i.e. clinopyroxene, orthopyroxene, plagioclase, magnetite). Anatectic melts of these low degree melting experiments show trace element pattern which are very similar to those of natural dacites from the EPR

  6. Can colorectal cancer mass-screening organization be evidence-based? Lessons from failures: The experimental and pilot phases of the Lazio program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valle Sabrina

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Screening programmes should be organized to translate theoretical efficacy into effectiveness. An evidence-based organizational model of colorectal cancer screening (CRCS should assure feasibility and high compliance. Methods A multidisciplinary Working Group (WG, reviewed literature and guidelines to define evidence-based recommendations. The WG identified the need for further local studies: physicians' CRCS attitudes, the effect of test type and provider on compliance, and individual reasons for non-compliance. A survey of digestive endoscopy services was conducted. A feasibility study on a target population of 300.000 has begun. Results Based on the results of population trials and on literature review the screening strategy adopted was Faecal Occult Blood Test (FOBT every two years for 50–74 year olds and, for positives, colonoscopy. The immunochemical test was chosen because it has 20% higher compliance than the Guaiac. GPs were chosen as the preferred provider also for higher compliance. Since we observed that distance is the major determinant of non-compliance, we choose GPs because they are the closest providers, both geographically and emotionally, to the public. The feasibility study showed several barriers: GP participation was low, there were administrative problems to involve GPs; opportunistic testing by the GPs; difficulties in access to Gastroenterology centres; difficulties in gathering colonoscopy results; little time given to screening activity by the gastroenterology centre. Conclusion The feasibility study highlighted several limits of the model. Most of the barriers that emerged were consequences of organisational choices not supported by evidence. The principal limit was a lack of accountability by the participating centres.

  7. Direct experimental evidence for a negative heat capacity in the liquid-to-gas like phase transition in hydrogen cluster ions backbending of the caloric curve

    CERN Document Server

    Gobet, F; Carré, M; Farizon, B; Farizon, M; Gaillard, M J; Maerk, T D; Scheier, P

    2002-01-01

    By (i) selecting specific decay reactions in high energy collisions (60 keV/amu) of hydrogen cluster ions with a helium target (utilizing event-by-event data of a recently developed multi-coincidence experiment) and by (ii) deriving corresponding temperatures for these microcanonical cluster ensembles (analyzing the respective fragment distributions) we are able to construct caloric curves for ii sub 3 sup + (ii sub 2) sub m cluster ions (6 <= m <= 14). All individual curves and the mean of these curves show a backbending in the plateau region thus constituting direct evidence for a negative microcanonical heat capacity in the liquid-to-gas like transition of these finite systems.

  8. The emotional toll of hell: cross-national and experimental evidence for the negative well-being effects of hell beliefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariff, Azim F; Aknin, Lara B

    2014-01-01

    Though beliefs in Heaven and Hell are related, they are associated with different personality characteristics and social phenomena. Here we present three studies measuring Heaven and Hell beliefs' associations with and impact on subjective well-being. We find that a belief in Heaven is consistently associated with greater happiness and life satisfaction while a belief in Hell is associated with lower happiness and life satisfaction at the national (Study 1) and individual (Study 2) level. An experimental priming study (Study 3) suggests that these differences are mainly driven by the negative emotional impact of Hell beliefs. Possible cultural evolutionary explanations for the persistence of such a distressing religious concept are discussed.

  9. Experimental evidence for the global acidification of surface ocean at the Cretaceous-Palaeogene boundary: the biogenic calcite-poor spherule layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premović, Pavle I.

    2009-07-01

    The massive amount of impact-generated atmospheric CO2 at the Cretaceous-Palaeogene boundary (KPB) would have accumulated globally in the surface ocean, leading to acidification and CaCO3 undersaturation. These chemical changes would have caused a crisis of biocalcification of calcareous plankton and enhanced dissolution of their shells; these factors together may have played a crucial role in forming the biogenic calcite-poor KPB spherule layers observed at numerous oceanic sites and marine (now on land) sites in Europe and Africa. Experimental data and observations indicate that the deposition spherule layer probably lasted only a few decades at most.

  10. Evidence for excited-state intramolecular proton transfer in 4-chlorosalicylic acid from combined experimental and computational studies: Quantum chemical treatment of the intramolecular hydrogen bonding interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, Bijan Kumar [Department of Chemistry, University of Calcutta, 92 Acharya Prafulla Chandra Road, Calcutta 700009 (India); Guchhait, Nikhil, E-mail: nikhil.guchhait@rediffmail.com [Department of Chemistry, University of Calcutta, 92 Acharya Prafulla Chandra Road, Calcutta 700009 (India)

    2012-07-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Experimental and computational studies on the photophysics of 4-chlorosalicylic acid. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spectroscopically established ESIPT reaction substantiated by theoretical calculation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quantum chemical treatment of IMHB unveils strength, nature and directional nature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Superiority of quantum chemical treatment of H-bond over geometric criteria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Role of H-bond as a modulator of aromaticity. -- Abstract: The photophysical study of a pharmaceutically important chlorine substituted derivative of salicylic acid viz., 4-chlorosalicylic acid (4ClSA) has been carried out by steady-state absorption, emission and time-resolved emission spectroscopy. A large Stokes shifted emission band with negligible solvent polarity dependence marks the spectroscopic signature of excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) reaction in 4ClSA. Theoretical calculation by ab initio and Density Functional Theory methods yields results consistent with experimental findings. Theoretical potential energy surfaces predict the occurrence of proton transfer in S{sub 1}-state. Geometrical and energetic criteria, Atoms-In-Molecule topological parameters, Natural Bond Orbital population analysis have been exploited to evaluate the intramolecular hydrogen bond (IMHB) interaction and to explore its directional nature. The inter-correlation between aromaticity and resonance assisted H-bond is also discussed in this context. Our results unveil that the quantum chemical treatment is a more accurate tool to assess hydrogen bonding interaction in comparison to geometrical criteria.

  11. Net Loss of CaCO3 from a subtropical calcifying community due to seawater acidification: Mesocosm-scale experimental evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, A.J.; Kuffner, I.B.; MacKenzie, F.T.; Jokiel, P.L.; Rodgers, K.S.; Tan, A.

    2009-01-01

    Acidification of seawater owing to oceanic uptake of atmospheric CO 2 originating from human activities such as burning of fossil fuels and land-use changes has raised serious concerns regarding its adverse effects on corals and calcifying communities. Here we demonstrate a net loss of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) material as a result of decreased calcification and increased carbonate dissolution from replicated subtropical coral reef communities (N=3) incubated in continuous-flow mesocosms subject to future seawater conditions. The calcifying community was dominated by the coral Montipora capitata. Daily average community calcification or Net Ecosystem Calcification (NECC=CaCO3 production - dissolution) was positive at 3.3 mmol CaCO3 m-2 h-1 under ambient seawater pCO2 conditions as opposed to negative at -0.04 mmol CaCO3 m-2 h-1 under seawater conditions of double the ambient pCO2. These experimental results provide support for the conclusion that some net calcifying communities could become subject to net dissolution in response to anthropogenic ocean acidification within this century. Nevertheless, individual corals remained healthy, actively calcified (albeit slower than at present rates), and deposited significant amounts of CaCO3 under the prevailing experimental seawater conditions of elevated pCO2.

  12. Net Loss of CaCO3 from a subtropical calcifying community due to seawater acidification: mesocosm-scale experimental evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. S. Rodgers

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Acidification of seawater owing to oceanic uptake of atmospheric CO2 originating from human activities such as burning of fossil fuels and land-use changes has raised serious concerns regarding its adverse effects on corals and calcifying communities. Here we demonstrate a net loss of calcium carbonate (CaCO3 material as a result of decreased calcification and increased carbonate dissolution from replicated subtropical coral reef communities (n=3 incubated in continuous-flow mesocosms subject to future seawater conditions. The calcifying community was dominated by the coral Montipora capitata. Daily average community calcification or Net Ecosystem Calcification (NEC=CaCO3 production – dissolution was positive at 3.3 mmol CaCO3 m−2 h−1 under ambient seawater pCO2 conditions as opposed to negative at −0.04 mmol CaCO3 m−2 h−1 under seawater conditions of double the ambient pCO2. These experimental results provide support for the conclusion that some net calcifying communities could become subject to net dissolution in response to anthropogenic ocean acidification within this century. Nevertheless, individual corals remained healthy, actively calcified (albeit slower than at present rates, and deposited significant amounts of CaCO3 under the prevailing experimental seawater conditions of elevated pCO2.

  13. Experimental evidence for evolved tolerance to avian malaria in a wild population of low elevation Hawai`i `Amakihi (Hemignathus virens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Carter T.; Saili, Katerine S.; Utzurrum, Ruth B.; Jarvi, Susan I.

    2013-01-01

    Introduced vector-borne diseases, particularly avian malaria (Plasmodium relictum) and avian pox virus (Avipoxvirus spp.), continue to play significant roles in the decline and extinction of native forest birds in the Hawaiian Islands. Hawaiian honeycreepers are particularly susceptible to avian malaria and have survived into this century largely because of persistence of high elevation refugia on Kaua‘i, Maui, and Hawai‘i Islands, where transmission is limited by cool temperatures. The long term stability of these refugia is increasingly threatened by warming trends associated with global climate change. Since cost effective and practical methods of vector control in many of these remote, rugged areas are lacking, adaptation through processes of natural selection may be the best long-term hope for recovery of many of these species. We document emergence of tolerance rather than resistance to avian malaria in a recent, rapidly expanding low elevation population of Hawai‘i ‘Amakihi (Hemignathus virens) on the island of Hawai‘i. Experimentally infected low elevation birds had lower mortality, lower reticulocyte counts during recovery from acute infection, lower weight loss, and no declines in food consumption relative to experimentally infected high elevation Hawai‘i ‘Amakihi in spite of similar intensities of infection. Emergence of this population provides an exceptional opportunity for determining physiological mechanisms and genetic markers associated with malaria tolerance that can be used to evaluate whether other, more threatened species have the capacity to adapt to this disease.

  14. EXPERIMENTAL EVIDENCE FOR THE FORMATION OF HIGHLY SUPERHYDROGENATED POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS THROUGH H ATOM ADDITION AND THEIR CATALYTIC ROLE IN H{sub 2} FORMATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thrower, J. D.; Jorgensen, B.; Friis, E. E.; Baouche, S.; Luntz, A. C.; Andersen, M.; Hammer, B.; Hornekaer, L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO), Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Mennella, V., E-mail: thrower@phys.au.dk [Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica, Osservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte, Via Moiariello 16, 80131 Napoli (Italy)

    2012-06-10

    Mass spectrometry measurements show the formation of highly superhydrogenated derivatives of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecule coronene through H atom addition reactions. The observed product mass distribution provides evidence also for abstraction reactions resulting in H{sub 2} formation, in agreement with recent IR measurements. Complementary density functional theory calculations confirm the stability of the observed superhydrogenated species toward spontaneous H and H{sub 2} loss indicating that abstraction reactions may be the dominant route to H{sub 2} formation involving neutral polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The results indicate that highly superhydrogenated PAHs could well be formed and could act as efficient catalysts for H{sub 2} formation in the interstellar medium in low UV flux regions.

  15. Experimental Evidence that Fungi are Dominant Microbes in Carbon Content and Growth Response to Added Soluble Organic Carbon in Moss-rich Tundra Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, O Roger; Lee, Jee Min; McGuire, Krista

    2016-05-01

    Global warming significantly affects Arctic tundra, including permafrost thaw and soluble C release that may differentially affect tundra microbial growth. Using laboratory experiments, we report some of the first evidence for the effects of soluble glucose-C enrichment on tundra soil prokaryotes (bacteria and archaea) and fungi, with comparisons to microbial eukaryotes. Fungal increase in C-biomass was equivalent to 10% (w/w) of the added glucose-C, and for prokaryote biomass 2% (w/w), the latter comparable to prior published results. The C-gain after 14 d was 1.3 mg/g soil for fungi, and ~200 μg/g for prokaryotes.

  16. Experimental evidence supporting the insensitivity of cloud droplet formation to the mass accommodation coefficient for condensation of water vapor to liquid water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langridge, Justin M.; Richardson, Mathews S.; Lack, Daniel A.; Murphy, Daniel M.

    2016-06-01

    The mass accommodation coefficient for uptake of water vapor to liquid water, αM, has been constrained using photoacoustic measurements of aqueous absorbing aerosol. Measurements performed over a range of relative humidities and pressures were compared to detailed model calculations treating coupled heat and mass transfer occurring during photoacoustic laser heating cycles. The strengths and weaknesses of this technique are very different to those for droplet growth/evaporation experiments that have typically been applied to these measurements, making this a useful complement to existing studies. Our measurements provide robust evidence that αM is greater than 0.1 for all humidities tested and greater than 0.3 for data obtained at relative humidities greater than 88% where the aerosol surface was most like pure water. These values of αM are above the threshold at which kinetic limitations are expected to impact the activation and growth of aerosol particles in warm cloud formation.

  17. Egg whites from eggs of chickens infected experimentally with avian hepatitis E virus contain infectious virus, but evidence of complete vertical transmission is lacking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, H; Zhou, E M; Sun, Z F; Meng, X-J

    2007-05-01

    Avian hepatitis E virus (HEV) is genetically and antigenically related to human HEV. Vertical transmission of HEV has been reported in humans, but not in other animals. In this study, we showed that avian HEV could be detected in chicken egg-white samples. Subsequently, avian HEV in egg white was found to be infectious, as evidenced by the appearance of viraemia, faecal virus shedding and seroconversion in chickens inoculated with avian HEV-positive egg white, but not in chickens inoculated with HEV-negative egg white. To further assess the possibility of vertical transmission of avian HEV, batches of embryonated eggs from infected hens were hatched, and hatched chicks were monitored for evidence of avian HEV infection. However, no virus was detected in samples collected from the hatched chicks throughout this study, suggesting that avian HEV could not complete the vertical transmission cycle. The possible implications of our findings are also discussed.

  18. First experimental evidence of hydrodynamic tunneling of ultra–relativistic protons in extended solid copper target at the CERN HiRadMat facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, R.; Grenier, D.; Wollmann, D. [CERN-AB, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Blanco Sancho, J. [CERN-AB, 1211 Geneva 23, Switzerland and Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Lausanne (Switzerland); Burkart, F. [CERN-AB, 1211 Geneva 23, Switzerland and Goethe University, Frankfurt (Germany); Tahir, N. A. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Planckstraße 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Shutov, A. [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, Chernogolovka (Russian Federation); Piriz, A. R. [E.T.S.I. Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2014-08-15

    A novel experiment has been performed at the CERN HiRadMat test facility to study the impact of the 440 GeV proton beam generated by the Super Proton Synchrotron on extended solid copper cylindrical targets. Substantial hydrodynamic tunneling of the protons in the target material has been observed that leads to significant lengthening of the projectile range, which confirms our previous theoretical predictions [N. A. Tahir et al., Phys. Rev. Spec. Top.-Accel. Beams 15, 051003 (2012)]. Simulation results show very good agreement with the experimental measurements. These results have very important implications on the machine protection design for powerful machines like the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the future High Luminosity LHC, and the proposed huge 80 km circumference Future Circular Collider, which is currently being discussed at CERN. Another very interesting outcome of this work is that one may also study the field of High Energy Density Physics at this test facility.

  19. Experimental study on electrical conductivity of dunite at high temperature and pressure—— The evidence of electrical conductivity of cold mantle in the Gaize-Lugu area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The electrical conductivities of the dunite from the Qinghai-Xizang (Tibetan) Plateau were measured with the impedance spectra method at 1.0 -4.0 GPa and 643-1093 K. The experimental results indicated that activation enthalpies of the dunite are smaller than 0.9 eV, the conduction mechanism in dunite may be attributed to the mixed electrical conduction involving grain interiors and boundaries. On the basis of the results of this experiment, we can deduce that there exists cold mantle in the area of Gaize- Lugu in the Qinghai-Xizang (Tibetan) Plateau by reverse methods from the magnetotelluric sounding data (conductivity-depths profile) available for western Tibet. The result provides the present cold mantle viewpoint with strong proof on the basis of high temperature and pressure experiments.

  20. The emotional toll of hell: cross-national and experimental evidence for the negative well-being effects of hell beliefs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azim F Shariff

    Full Text Available Though beliefs in Heaven and Hell are related, they are associated with different personality characteristics and social phenomena. Here we present three studies measuring Heaven and Hell beliefs' associations with and impact on subjective well-being. We find that a belief in Heaven is consistently associated with greater happiness and life satisfaction while a belief in Hell is associated with lower happiness and life satisfaction at the national (Study 1 and individual (Study 2 level. An experimental priming study (Study 3 suggests that these differences are mainly driven by the negative emotional impact of Hell beliefs. Possible cultural evolutionary explanations for the persistence of such a distressing religious concept are discussed.

  1. Experimental evidence for diel variations of the carbon isotope composition in leaf, stem and phloem sap organic matter in Ricinus communis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessler, Arthur; Tcherkez, Guillaume; Peuke, Andreas D; Ghashghaie, Jaleh; Farquhar, Graham D

    2008-07-01

    Carbon isotope fractionation in metabolic processes following carboxylation of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) is not as well described as the discrimination during photosynthetic CO(2) fixation. However, post-carboxylation fractionation can influence the diel variation of delta(13)C of leaf-exported organic matter and can cause inter-organ differences in delta(13)C. To obtain a more mechanistic understanding of post-carboxylation modification of the isotopic signal as governed by physiological and environmental controls, we combined the modelling approach of Tcherkez et al., which describes the isotopic fractionation in primary metabolism with the experimental determination of delta(13)C in leaf and phloem sap and root carbon pools during a full diel course. There was a strong diel variation of leaf water-soluble organic matter and phloem sap sugars with relatively (13)C depleted carbon produced and exported during the day and enriched carbon during the night. The isotopic modelling approach reproduces the experimentally determined day-night differences in delta(13)C of leaf-exported carbon in Ricinus communis. These findings support the idea that patterns of transitory starch accumulation and remobilization govern the diel rhythm of delta(13)C in organic matter exported by leaves. Integrated over the whole 24 h day, leaf-exported carbon was enriched in (13)C as compared with the primary assimilates. This may contribute to the well-known--yet poorly explained--relative (13)C depletion of autotrophic organs compared with other plant parts. We thus emphasize the need to consider post-carboxylation fractionations for studies that use delta(13)C for assessing environmental effects like water availability on ratio of mole fractions of CO(2) inside and outside the leaf (e.g. tree ring studies), or for partitioning of CO(2) fluxes at the ecosystem level.

  2. Testosterone replacement effectively inhibits the development of experimental autoimmune orchitis in rats: evidence for a direct role of testosterone on regulatory T cell expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fijak, Monika; Schneider, Eva; Klug, Jörg; Bhushan, Sudhanshu; Hackstein, Holger; Schuler, Gerhard; Wygrecka, Malgorzata; Gromoll, Jörg; Meinhardt, Andreas

    2011-05-01

    Despite the immune-privileged status of the male genital tract, infection and inflammation of the male genital tract are important etiological factors in male infertility. A common observation in clinical and experimental orchitis as well as in systemic infection and inflammation are decreased levels of testosterone. Emerging data point to an immunosuppressive role of testosterone. In our study, we substituted testosterone levels in experimental autoimmune orchitis (EAO) in rat by s.c. testosterone implants. EAO development was reduced to 17% when animals were treated with low-dose testosterone implants (3 cm long, EAO+T3) and to 33% when rats were supplied with high-dose testosterone implants (24 cm, EAO+T24) compared with 80% of animals developing disease in the EAO control group. In the testis, testosterone replacement in EAO animals prevented the accumulation of macrophages and significantly reduced the number of CD4(+) T cells with a strong concomitant increase in the number of regulatory T cells (CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+)) compared with EAO control. In vitro testosterone treatment of naive T cells led to an expansion of the regulatory T cell subset with suppressive activity and ameliorated MCP-1-stimulated chemotaxis of T lymphocytes in a Transwell assay. Moreover, expression of proinflammatory mediators such as MCP-1, TNF-α, and IL-6 in the testis and secretion of Th1 cytokines such as IFN-γ and IL-2 by mononuclear cells isolated from testicular draining lymph nodes were decreased in the EAO+T3 and EAO+T24 groups. Thus, our study shows an immunomodulatory and protective effect of testosterone substitution in the pathogenesis of EAO and suggests androgens as a new factor in the differentiation of regulatory T cells.

  3. Experimental and Human Evidence for Lipocalin-2 (Neutrophil Gelatinase-Associated Lipocalin [NGAL]) in the Development of Cardiac Hypertrophy and heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Francine Z; Prestes, Priscilla R; Byars, Sean G; Ritchie, Scott C; Würtz, Peter; Patel, Sheila K; Booth, Scott A; Rana, Indrajeetsinh; Minoda, Yosuke; Berzins, Stuart P; Curl, Claire L; Bell, James R; Wai, Bryan; Srivastava, Piyush M; Kangas, Antti J; Soininen, Pasi; Ruohonen, Saku; Kähönen, Mika; Lehtimäki, Terho; Raitoharju, Emma; Havulinna, Aki; Perola, Markus; Raitakari, Olli; Salomaa, Veikko; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Kettunen, Johannes; McGlynn, Maree; Kelly, Jason; Wlodek, Mary E; Lewandowski, Paul A; Delbridge, Lea M; Burrell, Louise M; Inouye, Michael; Harrap, Stephen B; Charchar, Fadi J

    2017-06-14

    Cardiac hypertrophy increases the risk of developing heart failure and cardiovascular death. The neutrophil inflammatory protein, lipocalin-2 (LCN2/NGAL), is elevated in certain forms of cardiac hypertrophy and acute heart failure. However, a specific role for LCN2 in predisposition and etiology of hypertrophy and the relevant genetic determinants are unclear. Here, we defined the role of LCN2 in concentric cardiac hypertrophy in terms of pathophysiology, inflammatory expression networks, and genomic determinants. We used 3 experimental models: a polygenic model of cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure, a model of intrauterine growth restriction and Lcn2-knockout mouse; cultured cardiomyocytes; and 2 human cohorts: 114 type 2 diabetes mellitus patients and 2064 healthy subjects of the YFS (Young Finns Study). In hypertrophic heart rats, cardiac and circulating Lcn2 was significantly overexpressed before, during, and after development of cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. Lcn2 expression was increased in hypertrophic hearts in a model of intrauterine growth restriction, whereas Lcn2-knockout mice had smaller hearts. In cultured cardiomyocytes, Lcn2 activated molecular hypertrophic pathways and increased cell size, but reduced proliferation and cell numbers. Increased LCN2 was associated with cardiac hypertrophy and diastolic dysfunction in diabetes mellitus. In the YFS, LCN2 expression was associated with body mass index and cardiac mass and with levels of inflammatory markers. The single-nucleotide polymorphism, rs13297295, located near LCN2 defined a significant cis-eQTL for LCN2 expression. Direct effects of LCN2 on cardiomyocyte size and number and the consistent associations in experimental and human analyses reveal a central role for LCN2 in the ontogeny of cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  4. Review: geological and experimental evidence for secular variation in seawater Mg/Ca (calcite-aragonite seas) and its effects on marine biological calcification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ries, J. B.

    2010-09-01

    Synchronized transitions in the polymorph mineralogy of the major reef-building and sediment-producing calcareous marine organisms and abiotic CaCO3 precipitates (ooids, marine cements) throughout Phanerozoic time are believed to have been caused by tectonically induced variations in the Mg/Ca ratio of seawater (molar Mg/Ca>2="aragonite seas", experimental seawaters formulated with seawater Mg/Ca ratios that favor their skeletal mineral. These results support the assertion that seawater Mg/Ca played an important role in determining which hypercalcifying marine organisms were the major reef-builders and sediment-producers throughout Earth history. The observation that primary production increased along with calcification within the bryopsidalean and coccolithophorid algae in mineralogically favorable seawater is consistent with the hypothesis that calcification promotes photosynthesis within some species of these algae through the liberation of CO2. The experiments also revealed that aragonite-secreting bryopsidalean algae and scleractinian corals, and bacterial biofilms that secrete a mixture of aragonite and high Mg calcite, began secreting an increased proportion of their calcium carbonate as the calcite polymorph in the lower-Mg/Ca experimental seawaters. Furthermore, the Mg/Ca ratio of calcite secreted by the coccolithophores, coralline red algae, reef-dwelling animals (crustacea, urchins, calcareous tube worms), bacterial biofilms, scleractinian corals, and bryopsidalean algae declined with reductions in seawater Mg/Ca. Notably, Mg fractionation in autotrophic organisms was more strongly influenced by changes in seawater Mg/Ca than in heterotrophic organisms, a probable consequence of autotrophic organisms inducing a less controlled mode of calcification simply through the removal of CO2 via photosynthesis. These results indicate that biomineralogical control can be partially overridden by ambient seawater Mg/Ca and suggest that modern aragonite

  5. Some consideration about how to provide experimental evidence in pharmaceutical patent applications%关于药物领域专利申请如何提供实验数据的思考

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈红霞; 王克伟; 姚云; 何朝辉

    2012-01-01

    发明的技术效果以及说明书中是否有相应的实验数据对于化学领域的发明是否充分公开以及是否具备创造性具有重要的意义.本文通过案例分析了在药物领域尤其是涉及剂型改进以及联合用药发明中如何根据发明要解决的技术问题以及现有技术提供实验数据,对申请人撰写申请文件具有现实的指导意义.%The technical effects and the related experimental evidence in the description of patents are of great importance for judging whether the said invention has been disclosed sufficiently and whether it involves an inventive step in chemical field. In this paper, several cases of inventions in pharmaceutical field, especially inventions in respect of dosage improvement and drug combination, are analyzed in order to explain how to provide experimental evidence on the basis of describing the target technical problem the invention intended to solve and the prior art. This article has practical significance for applicants to write their applications.

  6. Cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) experimentally infected with B19V and hepatitis A virus: no evidence of the co-infection as a cause of acute liver failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, Luciane Almeida Amado; Marchevsky, Renato Sergio; Gaspar, Ana Maria Coimbra; Garcia, Rita de Cassia Nasser Cubel; de Almeida, Adilson José; Pelajo-Machado, Marcelo; de Castro, Tatiana Xavier; do Nascimento, Jussara Pereira; Brown, Kevin E; Pinto, Marcelo Alves

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to analyse the course and the outcome of the liver disease in the co-infected animals in order to evaluate a possible synergic effect of human parvovirus B19 (B19V) and hepatitis A virus (HAV) co-infection. Nine adult cynomolgus monkeys were inoculated with serum obtained from a fatal case of B19V infection and/or a faecal suspension of acute HAV. The presence of specific antibodies to HAV and B19V, liver enzyme levels, viraemia, haematological changes, and necroinflammatory liver lesions were used for monitoring the infections. Seroconversion was confirmed in all infected groups. A similar pattern of B19V infection to human disease was observed, which was characterised by high and persistent viraemia in association with reticulocytopenia and mild to moderate anaemia during the period of investigation (59 days). Additionally, the intranuclear inclusion bodies were observed in pro-erythroblast cell from an infected cynomolgus and B19V Ag in hepatocytes. The erythroid hypoplasia and decrease in lymphocyte counts were more evident in the co-infected group. The present results demonstrated, for the first time, the susceptibility of cynomolgus to B19V infection, but it did not show a worsening of liver histopathology in the co-infected group. PMID:27074255

  7. Intracerebroventricular Administration of Streptozotocin as an Experimental Approach to Depression: Evidence for the Involvement of Proinflammatory Cytokines and Indoleamine-2,3-Dioxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Leandro Cattelan; Jesse, Cristiano R; de Gomes, Marcelo Gomes; Viana, Cristini Escobar; Mattos, Etiara; Silva, Neici Cáceres; Boeira, Silvana Peterini

    2017-02-02

    There is a lack of information about the molecular events underlying the depressive-like effect of an intracerebroventricular injection of streptozotocin (ICV-STZ) in mice. Elevated activity of the tryptophan-degrading enzyme indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) has been proposed to mediate depression in inflammatory disorders. In this study, we report that ICV-STZ activates IDO in the hippocampus of mice and culminates in depressive-like behaviors, measured by an increased duration in immobility time in the forced swimming test and decreased total time of grooming in the splash test. Indirect blockade of IDO activation with the cytokine inhibitor minocycline prevents the development of depressive-like behaviors and attenuates STZ-induced upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines in the hippocampus. Minocycline abrogates the increase in tryptophan and kynurenine levels as well as prevents serotonin dysfunction in the hippocampus of STZ-injected mice. These results suggest that hippocampal IDO activation in STZ-associated depressive-like behavior is mediated by proinflammatory cytokine-dependent mechanisms. Our study not only extends the evidence that IDO has a critical role in mediating inflammation-induced depression but also supports the notion that neuroinflammation and the kynurenine pathway are important targets of novel therapeutic drugs for depression. In addition, our study provides new insights into the neurobiological mechanisms underlying ICV-STZ and indicates that this model could be employed in the preclinical research of depression.

  8. Experimental and Theoretical Evidence for Surface-Induced Carbon and Nitrogen Fractionation during Diamond Crystallization at High Temperatures and High Pressures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadim N. Reutsky

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Isotopic and trace element variations within single diamond crystals are widely known from both natural stones and synthetic crystals. A number of processes can produce variations in carbon isotope composition and nitrogen abundance in the course of diamond crystallization. Here, we present evidence of carbon and nitrogen fractionation related to the growing surfaces of a diamond. We document that difference in the carbon isotope composition between cubic and octahedral growth sectors is solvent-dependent and varies from 0.7‰ in a carbonate system to 0.4‰ in a metal-carbon system. Ab initio calculations suggest up to 4‰ instantaneous 13C depletion of cubic faces in comparison to octahedral faces when grown simultaneously. Cubic growth sectors always have lower nitrogen abundance in comparison to octahedral sectors within synthetic diamond crystals in both carbonate and metal-carbon systems. The stability of any particular growth faces of a diamond crystal depends upon the degree of carbon association in the solution. Octahedron is the dominant form in a high-associated solution while the cube is the dominant form in a low-associated solution. Fine-scale data from natural crystals potentially can provide information on the form of carbon, which was present in the growth media.

  9. Experimental Evidence of ω-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Modulation of Inflammatory Cytokines and Bioactive Lipid Mediators: Their Potential Role in Inflammatory, Neurodegenerative, and Neoplastic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Calviello

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A large body of evidence has emerged over the past years to show the critical role played by inflammation in the pathogenesis of several diseases including some cardiovascular, neoplastic, and neurodegenerative diseases, previously not considered inflammation-related. The anti-inflammatory action of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs, as well as their potential healthy effects against the development and progression of the same diseases, has been widely studied by our and others’ laboratories. As a result, a rethinking is taking place on the possible mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of ω-3 PUFAs against these disorders, and, in particular, on the influence that they may exert on the molecular pathways involved in inflammatory process, including the production of inflammatory cytokines and lipid mediators active in the resolving phase of inflammation. In the present review we will summarize and discuss the current knowledge regarding the modulating effects of ω-3 PUFAs on the production of inflammatory cytokines and proresolving or protective lipid mediators in the context of inflammatory, metabolic, neurodegenerative, and neoplastic diseases.

  10. Facial expressions and speech acts: experimental evidences on the role of the upper face as an illocutionary force indicating device in language comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domaneschi, Filippo; Passarelli, Marcello; Chiorri, Carlo

    2017-08-01

    Language scientists have broadly addressed the problem of explaining how language users recognize the kind of speech act performed by a speaker uttering a sentence in a particular context. They have done so by investigating the role played by the illocutionary force indicating devices (IFIDs), i.e., all linguistic elements that indicate the illocutionary force of an utterance. The present work takes a first step in the direction of an experimental investigation of non-verbal IFIDs because it investigates the role played by facial expressions and, in particular, of upper-face action units (AUs) in the comprehension of three basic types of illocutionary force: assertions, questions, and orders. The results from a pilot experiment on production and two comprehension experiments showed that (1) certain upper-face AUs seem to constitute non-verbal signals that contribute to the understanding of the illocutionary force of questions and orders; (2) assertions are not expected to be marked by any upper-face AU; (3) some upper-face AUs can be associated, with different degrees of compatibility, with both questions and orders.

  11. Sarcocystis neurona infections in raccoons (Procyon lotor): evidence for natural infection with sarcocysts, transmission of infection to opossums (Didelphis virginiana), and experimental induction of neurologic disease in raccoons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, J P; Saville, W J; Stanek, J F; Lindsay, D S; Rosenthal, B M; Oglesbee, M J; Rosypal, A C; Njoku, C J; Stich, R W; Kwok, O C; Shen, S K; Hamir, A N; Reed, S M

    2001-10-24

    Equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM) is a serious neurologic disease of horses in the Americas and Sarcocystis neurona is the most common etiologic agent. The distribution of S. neurona infections follows the geographical distributions of its definitive hosts, opossums (Didelphis virginiana, Didelphis albiventris). Recently, cats and skunks were reported as experimental and armadillos as natural intermediate hosts of S. neurona. In the present report, raccoons (Procyon lotor) were identified as a natural intermediate host of S. neurona. Two laboratory-raised opossums were found to shed S. neurona-like sporocysts after ingesting tongues of naturally-infected raccoons. Interferon-gamma gene knockout (KO) mice fed raccoon-opossum-derived sporocysts developed neurologic signs. S. neurona was identified immunohistochemically in tissues of KO mice fed sporocysts and the parasite was isolated in cell cultures inoculated with infected KO mouse tissues. The DNA obtained from the tongue of a naturally-infected raccoon, brains of KO mice that had neurological signs, and from the organisms recovered in cell cultures inoculated with brains of neurologic KO mice, corresponded to that of S. neurona. Two raccoons fed mature S. neurona sarcocysts did not shed sporocysts in their feces, indicating raccoons are not likely to be its definitive host. Two raccoons fed sporocysts from opossum feces developed clinical illness and S. neurona-associated encephalomyelitis was found in raccoons killed 14 and 22 days after feeding sporocysts; schizonts and merozoites were seen in encephalitic lesions.

  12. Novel Role of Parathyroid Hormone-Related Protein in the Pathophysiology of the Diabetic Kidney: Evidence from Experimental and Human Diabetic Nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montserrat Romero

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP and its receptor type 1 (PTH1R are extensively expressed in the kidney, where they are able to modulate renal function. Renal PTHrP is known to be overexpressed in acute renal injury. Recently, we hypothesized that PTHrP involvement in the mechanisms of renal injury might not be limited to conditions with predominant damage of the renal tubulointerstitium and might be extended to glomerular diseases, such as diabetic nephropathy (DN. In experimental DN, the overexpression of both PTHrP and the PTH1R contributes to the development of renal hypertrophy as well as proteinuria. More recent data have shown, for the first time, that PTHrP is upregulated in the kidney from patients with DN. Collectively, animal and human studies have shown that PTHrP acts as an important mediator of diabetic renal cell hypertrophy by a mechanism which involves the modulation of cell cycle regulatory proteins and TGF-β1. Furthermore, angiotensin II (Ang II, a critical factor in the progression of renal injury, appears to be responsible for PTHrP upregulation in these conditions. These findings provide novel insights into the well-known protective effects of Ang II antagonists in renal diseases, paving the way for new therapeutic approaches.

  13. Novel role of parathyroid hormone-related protein in the pathophysiology of the diabetic kidney: evidence from experimental and human diabetic nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Montserrat; Ortega, Arantxa; Olea, Nuria; Arenas, María Isabel; Izquierdo, Adriana; Bover, Jordi; Esbrit, Pedro; Bosch, Ricardo J

    2013-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) and its receptor type 1 (PTH1R) are extensively expressed in the kidney, where they are able to modulate renal function. Renal PTHrP is known to be overexpressed in acute renal injury. Recently, we hypothesized that PTHrP involvement in the mechanisms of renal injury might not be limited to conditions with predominant damage of the renal tubulointerstitium and might be extended to glomerular diseases, such as diabetic nephropathy (DN). In experimental DN, the overexpression of both PTHrP and the PTH1R contributes to the development of renal hypertrophy as well as proteinuria. More recent data have shown, for the first time, that PTHrP is upregulated in the kidney from patients with DN. Collectively, animal and human studies have shown that PTHrP acts as an important mediator of diabetic renal cell hypertrophy by a mechanism which involves the modulation of cell cycle regulatory proteins and TGF- β 1. Furthermore, angiotensin II (Ang II), a critical factor in the progression of renal injury, appears to be responsible for PTHrP upregulation in these conditions. These findings provide novel insights into the well-known protective effects of Ang II antagonists in renal diseases, paving the way for new therapeutic approaches.

  14. Experimental evidence for heat plume-induced cavitation and xylem deformation as a mechanism of rapid post-fire tree mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Adam G; Nel, Jacques A; Bond, William J; Midgley, Jeremy J

    2016-08-01

    Recent work suggests that hydraulic mechanisms, rather than cambium necrosis, may account for rapid post-fire tree mortality. We experimentally tested for xylem cavitation, as a result of exposure to high-vapour-deficit (D) heat plumes, and permanent xylem deformation, as a result of thermal softening of lignin, in two tree species differing in fire tolerance. We measured percentage loss of conductance (PLC) in distal branches that had been exposed to high-D heat plumes or immersed in hot water baths (high temperature, but not D). Results were compared with predictions from a parameterized hydraulic model. Physical damage to the xylem was examined microscopically. Both species suffered c. 80% PLC when exposed to a 100°C plume. However, at 70°C, the fire-sensitive Kiggelaria africana suffered lower PLC (49%) than the fire-resistant Eucalytpus cladocalyx (80%). Model simulations suggested that differences in PLC between species were a result of greater hydraulic segmentation in E. cladocalyx. Kiggelaria africana suffered considerable PLC (59%), as a result of heat-induced xylem deformation, in the water bath treatments, but E. cladocalyx did not. We suggest that a suite of 'pyrohydraulic' traits, including hydraulic segmentation and heat sensitivity of the xylem, may help to explain why some tree species experience rapid post-fire mortality after low-intensity fires and others do not.

  15. Phasons modulate the atomic Debye-Waller factors in incommensurate structures: Experimental evidence in ThBr[sub 4] at 55 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madariaga, G. (Dept. de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencias, Univ. del Pais Vasco, Bilbao (Spain)); Perez-Mato, J.M. (Dept. de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencias, Univ. del Pais Vasco, Bilbao (Spain)); Aramburu, I. (Dept. de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencias, Univ. del Pais Vasco, Bilbao (Spain))

    1993-04-01

    The incommensurate displacive structure of [beta]-ThBr[sub 4] at 55 K has been determined from a neutron diffraction data set including main reflections and first-order satellites. The superspace group is Psub(s anti 1 s1)sup(I4[sub 1]/amd). Final agreement factors are 0.0193, 0.0186 and 0.045 for all, main and satellite reflections, respectively. It is shown that the effect of phasons on the atomic Debye-Waller factors can be quantified by two additional structural parameters: The modulus [beta][sub 11,2][sup Br] and the phase [chi][sub 11,2][sup Br] of a second harmonic that spatially modulates the temperature factors of Br atoms. Results are in good agreement, within the resolution of the experimental data, with the theoretically expected value for [chi][sub 11,2][sup Br]. Crystal data for the average structure: M[sub r]=551.65, tetragonal, I4[sub 1]/amd, a=8.919(1), c=7.902(1) A, V=628.6(2) A[sup 3], Z=4, D[sub x]=5.82 Mg m[sup -3], [lambda]=0.84 A, wavevector q=0.32c*. (orig.).

  16. The identification and characteristics of Echinoparyphium rubrum (Cort. 1914) new comb. (Trematoda, Echinostomatidae) based on experimental evidence of the life cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanev, I.; Sorensen, R.; Sterner, M.; Cole, R.; Fried, B.

    1998-01-01

    The life cycle of Echinoparyphium rubrum (Cort, 1914) comb. n. has been completed experimentally. All of the developmental stages egg, miracidium, sporocyst, mother and daughter rediae, cercaria, metacercaria, and adult were examined and described. The miracidia infected freshwater snails of the genus Physa , P. gyrina and P. occidentalis. Attempts to infect snails of the genera Lymnaea, L. auricularis, L. peregra, L. truncatula and Bulinus, B. truncatus failed. Cercariae infected various pulmonate and prosobranch freshwater snails, mussels, frogs, water turtles and planarians. The adults developed in the small intestine of birds and mammals. The identity and major characteristics of Echinoparyphium rubrum are discussed. Synonyms of E. rubrum are Cercaria rubra Cort, 1914; Cercaria biflexa Faust, 1917; Cercaria chisolenata Faust, 1918; Echinostoma callawayensis Barker et Noll, 1915; Echinostoma revolutum of Johnson (1920); Echinoparyphium elegans of Cannon (1938), of Bain and Trelfall (1977), of Mahoney and Trelfall (1977); and Echinoparyphium recurvatum of Jilek (1977), Harley (1972), Sankurathri and Holmes (1976). Comparisons are made between E. rubrum and its 43-collar-spined allies: E. flexum from North America, E. cinctum from Europe, E. dunni from Asia and E. elegans from Africa.

  17. Experimental evidence shows no fractionation of strontium isotopes ((87)Sr/(86)Sr) among soil, plants, and herbivores: implications for tracking wildlife and forensic science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flockhart, D T Tyler; Kyser, T Kurt; Chipley, Don; Miller, Nathan G; Norris, D Ryan

    2015-01-01

    Strontium isotopes ((87)Sr/(86)Sr) can be useful biological markers for a wide range of forensic science applications, including wildlife tracking. However, one of the main advantages of using (87)Sr/(86)Sr values, that there is no fractionation from geological bedrock sources through the food web, also happens to be a critical assumption that has never been tested experimentally. We test this assumption by measuring (87)Sr/(86)Sr values across three trophic levels in a controlled greenhouse experiment. Adult monarch butterflies were raised on obligate larval host milkweed plants that were, in turn, grown on seven different soil types collected across Canada. We found no significant differences between (87)Sr/(86)Sr values in leachable Sr from soil minerals, organic soil, milkweed leaves, and monarch butterfly wings. Our results suggest that strontium isoscapes developed from (87)Sr/(86)Sr values in bedrock or soil may serve as a reliable biological marker in forensic science for a range of taxa and across large geographic areas.

  18. Experimental evidence for de novo synthesis of PBDD/PBDF and PXDD/PXDF as well as dioxins in the thermal processes of ash samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamoto, K.; Ishikawa, N. [National Inst. for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba (Japan)

    2005-07-01

    Fly ash in gasification-melting plants and conventional incineration plants can form dioxins through a process known as de novo synthesis. This paper investigated the de novo synthesis of dioxins formed as a result of fly ash catalysis activities. Thermal experiments using fly ash were performed using a flow-through reactor to investigate the formation of brominated and chlorinated-brominated dibenzodioxins (PBDD/F) and dibenzofurans (PXDD/F). Ash samples were collected at conventional stoker incineration and gasification-melting plants. Samples included ash from a bag filter (Ash A); ash from a fluidized gasification and melting furnace plant (Ash C); boiler ash (Ash B); and ash containing tetrabromobisphenol (Ash D). Samples were subjected to a thermal treatment at 300 degrees C. Results showed that dioxin levels were very high for Ash A, which suggested that temperature had a significant influence on de novo synthesis. Dioxin concentrations for Ash C had a relatively low carbon content. Considerable concentrations of PXDD/PXDF were determined for Ash A. High PBDD, PBDF, PXDD and PXDF were observed for Ash D and Ash B. The total amount of dioxins in Ash A were relatively slow to change before and after the thermal treatment of the sample. The homologue distribution patterns of PCDD and PCDF in Ash A showed significant alterations after treatment. It was concluded that de novo dioxin synthesis occurred during the experimental procedure. Results suggested that carbon content plays an important role in the production of dioxins. 3 refs., 2 tabs., 4 figs.

  19. Embodied Cognition:the Evidences that Come from Experimental Psychology%具身认知:来自实验心理学的证据

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周天下

    2014-01-01

    Embodied cognition, the production of traditional cognitive science, provides a new direction for the cognition study. In order to further study the theory, the paper tries to expound the central meaning of embodied cognition from the point of view of experimental psychology and integrates the brain mechanism of embodied cognition on the basis of domestic and oversea studies, and then proposes some tentative ideas for the further study of the embodied cognition according to the development tendency of cognitive neuroscience. It is expected to perfect the embodied cognition theory to bring the secret of human cognition to light.%具身认知是在传统认知科学的基础上发展而来的,它是认知科学的发展产物,为认知科学的研究提供了新的方向。本文试图从实验心理学的角度来阐明具身认知理论的中心含义,并对具身认知脑机制方面的国内外研究进展进行梳理和整合,结合认知神经科学的发展趋势,对具身认知的未来研究提出展望和构想,期待能逐步完善具身认知的理论观点。

  20. Experimental evidence for quantum cutting co-operative energy transfer process in Pr(3+)/Yb(3+) ions co-doped fluorotellurite glass: dispute over energy transfer mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaji, Sathravada; Ghosh, Debarati; Biswas, Kaushik; Gupta, Gaurav; Annapurna, Kalyandurg

    2016-12-07

    Pr(3+)/Yb(3+) doped materials have been widely reported as quantum-cutting materials in recent times. However, the question of the energy transfer mechanism in the Pr(3+)/Yb(3+) pair in light of the quantum-cutting phenomenon still remains unanswered. In view of that, we explored a series of Pr(3+)/Yb(3+) co-doped low phonon fluorotellurite glass systems to estimate the probability of different energy transfer mechanisms. Indeed, a novel and simple way to predict the probability of the proper energy transfer mechanism in the Pr(3+)/Yb(3+) pair is possible by considering the donor Pr(3+) ion emission intensities and the relative ratio dependence in the presence of acceptor Yb(3+) ions. Moreover, the observed results are very much in accordance with other estimated results that support the quantum-cutting phenomena in Pr(3+)/Yb(3+) pairs, such as sub-linear power dependence of Yb(3+) NIR emission upon visible ∼450 nm laser excitation, integrated area of the donor Pr(3+) ion's visible excitation spectrum recorded by monitoring the acceptor Yb(3+) ion's NIR emission, and the experimentally obtained absolute quantum yield values using an integrating sphere setup. Our results give a simple way of estimating the probability of an energy transfer mechanism and the factors to be considered, particularly for the Pr(3+)/Yb(3+) pair.

  1. Theoretical and experimental study of the quasistatic capacitance of metal-insulator-hydrogenated amorphous silicon structures: Strong evidence for the defect-pool model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleider, J. P.; Dayoub, F.

    1998-10-01

    The density of localized states in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) is studied by means of the quasistatic capacitance technique applied to metal-insulator a-Si:H structures. Calculations in the framework of the defect-pool model show that the changes in the quasistatic capacitance versus gate bias curves (qs-CV curves) after bias annealing reveal the changes in the density of dangling-bond states predicted by the model, and are sensitive to the defect-pool parameters. The comparison of theoretical qs-CV curves with experimental curves obtained in a wide range of bias-anneal voltages Vba on several kinds of structures (top gate oxide, top gate nitride, and the most commonly used bottom gate nitride structures) strongly support the defect-pool model, and values for the model parameters are deduced. It is shown that for all structures the dominant phenomenon for bias annealing at positive Vba (i.e., under electron accumulation) is the creation of defects in the lower part of the gap in the a-Si:H. Bias annealing under hole accumulation reveals the creation of defects in the upper part of the gap of a-Si:H, but the precise dependence of the qs-CV curves upon Vba depends on the nature of the insulator-a-Si:H interface. In particular, it is affected by a higher density of interface trap levels in the top gate nitride structures, and by hole injection and trapping from the a-Si:H into the nitride layer in the bottom gate nitride structures.

  2. Experimental and clinical evidence of the role of cytokines and growth factors in the pathogenesis of acquired cobalamin-deficient leukoneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalabrino, Giuseppe; Veber, Daniela; Mutti, Elena

    2008-11-01

    Our experimental and clinical studies have highlighted the non-coenzyme functions of cobalamin (Cbl; vitamin B12). The neuropathy of the rat central nervous system (CNS) due to Cbl deficiency is associated with increases in CNS tissue and/or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of some neurotoxic molecules, and decreases in local and/or CSF levels of some neurotrophic molecules. The increased molecules are nerve growth factor (NGF), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, and the soluble (s)CD40:sCD40 Ligand dyad; the decreased molecules are epidermal growth factor (EGF) and interleukin-6. The morphological lesions of the CNS white matter in Cbl-deficient (Cbl-Df) rats can be prevented to the same extent by treatments replacing Cbl or the deficient neurotrophic molecules, or treatment with agents that antagonize the excess neurotoxic molecules. Patients with neurological and/or hematological manifestations of severe Cbl deficiency also have high TNF-alpha levels and low EGF levels in CSF and serum. Cbl replacement treatment corrects cytokine and growth factor abnormalities in Cbl-Df patients and Cbl-Df rats, and so Cbl-Df CNS neuropathy is also due to an imbalance in local cytokine/growth factor networks. TNF-alpha and NGF levels are also increased in Cbl-Df rat liver, which is morphologically unaffected by Cbl deficiency. The increases in TNF-alpha and NGF levels increase nuclear factor-kappaB activity levels in both the CNS and liver, and this indirect regulation supports the idea that Cbl may modulate the expression of some cytokine/growth factor genes in rat CNS and other tissues. Finally, we have tried to harmonize our pathogenetic theory of cytokine and growth factor dysregulation with the biochemical interpretation.

  3. Experimental evidences of charge transition levels in ZrO2 and at the Si: ZrO2 interface by deep level transient spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Arvind; Mondal, Sandip; Koteswara Rao, K. S. R.

    2017-03-01

    The native defects in zirconium oxide (ZrO2) and defects at the ZrO2/Si interface lead to threshold voltage shifts, Fermi level pinning, and various other reliability concerns. It is necessary to recognize the origin of these defects and to quantify them. A large number of theoretical reports deal with oxygen vacancy related defect states in the ZrO2 films; however, the large band gap limits the experimental assessments. In this study, we have deployed Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy to study the deep level defects present in high-κ ZrO2 gate dielectrics and at the Si:ZrO2 interface. The band alignment of the Al/ZrO2/Si stack was derived from Ultraviolet Photo electron Spectroscopy measurement to find the exact locations of trap levels. Five deep levels were observed in the band gap of ZrO2; these are related to different charge states of oxygen vacancies. The activation energies of these trap states are in the range of 1.16-1.84 eV from the ZrO2 conduction band. The capture cross-section of these states was also measured and found to be quite low (10-21 cm2). The small value of capture cross-sections is attributed to tunneling events occurring between the energy levels of the bulk and interface. This study would aid in the understanding of numerous fascinating facts witnessed in ZrO2, such as resistive switching, threshold voltage instabilities, and leakage current problems associated with oxygen vacancy related traps.

  4. Evidence of a M1-muscarinic GPCR homolog in unicellular eukaryotes: featuring Acanthamoeba spp bioinformatics 3D-modelling and experimentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, Abdul Mannan; Ahmad, H R

    2017-06-01

    Acetylcholine affects the target cellular function via muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptors that are seen to exist in humans. Both the cholinergic receptors are G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) that perform cardinal functions in humans. Anti-muscarinic drugs, particularly the ones that target M1 subtype (mAChR1), have consistently shown to kill unicellular pathogenic eukaryotes like Acanthamoeba spp. As the M1 receptor subtype has not been reported to be expressed in the above protist, the presence of an ancient form of the M1 muscarinic receptor was inferred. Bioinformatic tools and experimental assays were performed to establish the presence of a ligand-binding site. A search for sequence homology of amino acids of human M1 receptor failed to uncover an equivalent ligand-binding site on Acanthamoeba, but structural bioinformatics showed a hypothetical protein L8HIA6 to be a receptor homolog of the human mAChR1. Immunostaining with an anti-mAChR1 antibody showed cellular staining. Growth assays showed proliferation and lethal effects of exposure to mAChR1 agonist and antagonist respectively. With the recent authentication of human mAChR1 structure and its addition to the database, it was possible to discover its structural analog in Acanthamoeba; which could explain the effects of anticholinergics observed in the past on Acanthamoeba spp. The discovery of a receptor homolog of human mAChR1 on Acanthamoeba with future studies planned to show its expression and binding to cholinergic agonist and antagonist would help clarify its role in the biology of this protist pathogen.

  5. Field and experimental evidence of Vibrio parahaemolyticus as the causative agent of acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease of cultured shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) in Northwestern Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Rodriguez, Sonia A; Gomez-Gil, Bruno; Lozano-Olvera, Rodolfo; Betancourt-Lozano, Miguel; Morales-Covarrubias, Maria Soledad

    2015-03-01

    Moribund shrimp affected by acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND) from farms in northwestern Mexico were sampled for bacteriological and histological analysis. Bacterial isolates were molecularly identified as Vibrio parahaemolyticus by the presence of the tlh gene. The tdh-negative, trh-negative, and tlh-positive V. parahaemolyticus strains were further characterized by repetitive extragenic palindromic element-PCR (rep-PCR), and primers AP1, AP2, AP3, and AP and an ems2 IQ2000 detection kit (GeneReach, Taiwan) were used in the diagnostic tests for AHPND. The V. parahaemolyticus strains were used in immersion challenges with shrimp, and farmed and challenged shrimp presented the same clinical and pathological symptoms: lethargy, empty gut, pale and aqueous hepatopancreas, and expanded chromatophores. Using histological analysis and bacterial density count, three stages of AHNPD (initial, acute, and terminal) were identified in the affected shrimp. The pathognomonic lesions indicating severe desquamation of tubular epithelial cells of the hepatopancreas were observed in both challenged and pond-infected shrimp. The results showed that different V. parahaemolyticus strains have different virulences; some of the less virulent strains do not induce 100% mortality, and mortality rates also rise more slowly than they do for the more virulent strains. The virulence of V. parahaemolyticus strains was dose dependent, where the threshold infective density was 10(4) CFU ml(-1); below that density, no mortality was observed. The AP3 primer set had the best sensitivity and specificity. Field and experimental results showed that the V. parahaemolyticus strain that causes AHPND acts as a primary pathogen for shrimp in Mexico compared with the V. parahaemolyticus strains reported to date.

  6. Experimental Evidence for Branch-to-Bird Transfer as a Mechanism for Avian Dispersal of the Hemlock Woolly Adelgid (Hemiptera: Adelgidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Nicholas J; Cheah, Carole A S-J; Tingley, Morgan W

    2016-10-01

    Birds have long been hypothesized as primary dispersal agents of the hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae Annand). Although A. tsugae eggs and mobile first instars (crawlers) have been collected from wild birds, key mechanistic elements necessary for avian dispersal have never been examined. To evaluate the mechanisms of bird-mediated A. tsugae dispersal, we conducted both stationary (i.e., where crawlers must actively disperse) and disturbance (i.e., where crawlers may transfer from substrates due to mechanical abrasion) dispersal trials. For stationary trials, we tested the role of perching duration, ovisac density, and seasonal timing on the rate of crawler transfer to immobile preserved bird mounts at a single site in Connecticut. For disturbance trials, we explored if transfer rates were different when branches were actively brushed against birds. Both stationary and disturbance trials resulted in successful transfers of A. tsugae to bird mounts, with disturbance trials having significantly higher rates of transfers. Crawler counts from stationary trials increased significantly with local ovisac density. Additionally, we found a nonlinear relationship between crawler transfer and experimental week, with crawler transfer highest at the beginning of sampling in May, coinciding with avian spring migration in Connecticut and the emergence of progrediens crawlers, and spiking again near 14 June, when sistens generation crawlers began to emerge. While many aspects of potential avian dispersal of A. tsugae remain unknown, these results suggest that crawler transfer to birds may occur most often when peak crawler emergence coincides with the northward migration of many small passerine bird species. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Functional and neurophysiological evidence of the efficacy of trophic pharmacotherapy using an adrenocorticotrophic hormone4-9 analog in experimental allergic encephalomyelitis, an animal model of multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duckers, H J; van Dokkum, R P; Verhaagen, J; Lopes da Silva, F H; Gispen, W H

    1996-03-01

    Chronic experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (CEAE) is a well-established animal model for the human syndrome, multiple sclerosis. CEAE has striking histological, electrophysiological and clinical analogies with multiple sclerosis and is a valuable animal model for the preclinical pharmacotherapeutical development of new putative therapeutic agents. In this paper, we describe a neurotrophic repair approach in Lewis rats suffering from CEAE. The neurotrophic peptide used is a degradation resistant adrenocorticotrophic hormone4-9 analog. The development of CEAE was examined using a combination of clinical, functional and electrophysiological parameters including somatosensory and motor evoked potentials. The latencies and amplitudes of the various evoked potentials can provide quantitative, objective data regarding the involvement of different nerve tracts in CEAE and the effectiveness of the neurotrophic peptide. Repeated subcutaneous injections of the neurotrophic peptide suppressed the development of CEAE-related clinical symptoms, markedly improved motor performance and reduced the reaction time upon thermal stimulation as compared to saline-treated CEAE animals during a 17 week follow-up study. Prolonged onset latencies of corticomotor evoked potentials and peak latencies of somatosensory evoked potentials due to the demyelination were normalized upon peptide treatment. In addition, peptide treatment substantially prevented total blocking of the corticomotor pathway in CEAE-animals and reduced the attenuation of sensory evoked potentials-related peak amplitudes as compared to saline-treated animals. The functional and electrophysiological improvements observed in CEAE-animals treated with the adrenocorticotrophic hormone4-9 analog, suggest that a neurotrophic repair approach could be of great value to promote the restoration of function in a disabling demyelinating disorder.

  8. Naris deformation in Darwin’s finches: Experimental and historical evidence for a post-1960s arrival of the parasite Philornis downsi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Kleindorfer

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The rate of evolution depends on the strength of selection, which may be particularly strong for introduced parasites and their naive hosts. Because natural selection acts on phenotypes and because parasites can alter host phenotype, one fruitful starting point to measure the impact of novel pathogens is to quantify parasite-induced changes to host phenotype. Our study system is Darwin’s finches on Floreana Island, Galápagos Archipelago, and the virulent fly larvae of Philornis downsi that were first discovered in Darwin’s finch nests in 1997. We use an experimental approach and measure host phenotype in parasitized and parasite-free chicks in Darwin’s small ground finch (Geospiza fuliginosa. Beak size did not differ between the two treatment groups, but naris size was 106% larger in parasitized chicks (∼3.3 mm versus parasite-free chicks (∼1.6 mm. To test if P. downsi was present prior to the 1960s, we compared naris size in historical (1899–1962 and contemporary birds (2004–2014 on Floreana Island in small ground finches (G. fuliginosa and medium tree finches (Camarhynchus pauper. Contemporary Darwin’s finches had significantly larger naris size (including extreme deformation, whereas historical naris size was both smaller and less variable. These findings provide the first longitudinal analysis for the extent of P. downsi-induced change to host naris size and show that Darwin’s finches, prior to the 1960s, were not malformed. Thus natural selection on altered host phenotype as a consequence of P. downsi parasitism appears to be contemporary and novel.

  9. Interactions between cadmium and lead with acidic soils: Experimental evidence of similar adsorption patterns for a wide range of metal concentrations and the implications of metal migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokrovsky, O.S. [GET-CNRS-UPS-IRD-UMR 5563, 14, Avenue Edouard Belin, 31400 Toulouse (France); Probst, A., E-mail: anne.probst@ensat.fr [Universite de Toulouse, INPT, UPS, EcoLab (Laboratoire Ecologie fonctionnelle et Environnement), ENSAT, Avenue de l' Agrobiopole, 31326 Castanet-Tolosan (France); CNRS, EcoLab, 31326 Castanet-Tolosan (France); Leviel, E. [GET-CNRS-UPS-IRD-UMR 5563, 14, Avenue Edouard Belin, 31400 Toulouse (France); Liao, B. [International College, Central South University of Forestry and Technology, Changsha 410004 (China)

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adsorption experiments of Cd and Pb in acid soils (China, France). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Large pH conditions and large range of metal concentrations were considered. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Similar dependencies between metals concentration in solution and metal adsorbed on the surface were predicted using Langmuir and Freundlich equations and surface complexation model (SCM). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer No competition between Cd and Pb detected at pH 5. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Metal adsorption capacity is two orders of magnitude higher than limit value for soil protection. - Abstract: The importance of high- and low-affinity surface sites for cadmium and lead adsorption in typical European and Asian soils was investigated. Adsorption experiments on surface and deep horizons of acidic brown (Vosges, France) and red loess soils (Hunan, China) were performed at 25 Degree-Sign C as a function of the pH (3.5-8) and a large range of metal concentrations in solution (10{sup -9}-10{sup -4} mol l{sup -1}). We studied the adsorption kinetics using a Cd{sup 2+}-selective electrode and desorption experiments as a function of the solid/solution ratio and pH. At a constant solution pH, all samples exhibited similar maximal adsorption capacities (4.0 {+-} 0.5 {mu}mol/g Cd and 20 {+-} 2 {mu}mol/g Pb). A constant slope of adsorbed-dissolved concentration dependence was valid over 5 orders of magnitude of metal concentrations. Universal Langmuir and Freundlich equations and the SCM formalism described the adsorption isotherms and the pH-dependent adsorption edge over very broad ranges of metal concentrations, indicating no high- or low-affinity sites for metal binding at the soil surface under these experimental conditions. At pH 5, Cd and Pb did not compete, in accordance with the SCM. The metal adsorption ability exceeded the value for soil protection by two orders of magnitude, but only critical load guarantees soil

  10. Exacerbation of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in prion protein (PrPc-null mice: evidence for a critical role of the central nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gourdain Pauline

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cellular prion protein (PrPc is a host-encoded glycoprotein whose transconformation into PrP scrapie (PrPSc initiates prion diseases. The role of PrPc in health is still obscure, but many candidate functions have been attributed to the protein, both in the immune and the nervous systems. Recent data show that experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE is worsened in mice lacking PrPc. Disease exacerbation has been attributed to T cells that would differentiate into more aggressive effectors when deprived of PrPc. However, alternative interpretations such as reduced resistance of neurons to autoimmune insult and exacerbated gliosis leading to neuronal deficits were not considered. Method To better discriminate the contribution of immune cells versus neural cells, reciprocal bone marrow chimeras with differential expression of PrPc in the lymphoid or in the central nervous system (CNS were generated. Mice were subsequently challenged with MOG35-55 peptide and clinical disease as well as histopathology were compared in both groups. Furthermore, to test directly the T cell hypothesis, we compared the encephalitogenicity of adoptively transferred PrPc-deficient versus PrPc-sufficient, anti-MOG T cells. Results First, EAE exacerbation in PrPc-deficient mice was confirmed. Irradiation exacerbated EAE in all the chimeras and controls, but disease was more severe in mice with a PrPc-deleted CNS and a normal immune system than in the reciprocal construction. Moreover, there was no indication that anti-MOG responses were different in PrPc-sufficient and PrPc-deficient mice. Paradoxically, PrPc-deficient anti-MOG 2D2 T cells were less pathogenic than PrPc-expressing 2D2 T cells. Conclusions In view of the present data, it can be concluded that the origin of EAE exacerbation in PrPc-ablated mice resides in the absence of the prion protein in the CNS. Furthermore, the absence of PrPc on both neural and immune cells does not

  11. SUPRAVENTRICULAR RHYTHM DISTURBANCES TREATMENT WITH ANTIARHYTHMIC DRUG III CLASS NIBENTAN IN PATIENTS WITH ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE (EXPERIMENTAL, CLINICAL AND MORPHOLOGICAL EVIDENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Latfullin

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate antiarhythmic efficiency of Nibentan (Verofarm, Russia, antiarrythmic drug III class, in supraventricular rhythm disturbances (SRD relief in patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD. To assess morphological changes of myocardium in IHD with SRD. To specify inotropic characteristics of nibentan in experiment. Material and methods. 55 patients with IHD with different SRD were studied. 41 patients had heart failure (HF of III functional class.14 other patients suffered acute myocardial infarction (AMI. SRD relief was achieved with 1% solution of nibentan in dose of 0.125 mg/kg patient's weight. After sinus rhythm recovery all patients received sotalol 80 mg twice a day to prevent SRD relapses. In vitro on myocardium of 10 healthy rats and 10 sliced myocardium strips of IHD patients (obtained during surgical intervention changes in myocardium contraction intensity were assessed with PowerLab plant (ADInstruments, Australia as a reaction on nibentan in doses of 4, 6 and 8 mkM. These doses correspond to doses of 0.125, 0.2 and 0.250 mg/kg, which are recommended for clinical practice. Histological study of autopsy materials of atrium myocardium of IHD patients with and without SRD was carried out. Phase-contrast and luminescent microscopy was also used. Results. Nibentan treatment lead to sinus rhythm recovery in 92.67% of HF patients. In 3 patients with persistent auricular fibrillation the drug was inefficient. Nibentan therapy did not result in blood pressure reduction. Heart rate decreased in 26.5%. Nibentan recovered sinus rhythm in 85.7% of AMI patients. Sinus rhythm didn't recover in 2 patients with persistent auricular fibrillation. Experimental studies revealed that myocardium contraction intensity in healthy rats increased at nibentan 4 and 6 mkM, and decreased at nibentan 8 mkM. Myocardium contraction intensity in IHD patients was decreasing while nibentan dose was growing. Histological study of auricular myocardium in IHD

  12. Ultrabasic-basic change over primary inclusions in lower-mantle diamonds: Mineralogical and experimental evidence for crucial role of stishovite paradox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvin, Yuriy; Spivak, Anna

    2017-04-01

    Melting relations of the lower-mantle magmatic system MgO - FeO - CaO - SiO2 are characterized by peritectic reaction of bridgmanite (Mg,Fe)SiO3 and melt with formation of Fe-rich phases of periclase-wustite solid solutions (MgO•FeO)ss and stishovite SiO2. The reaction proceeds also in melts-solutions of lower-mantle diamond-parental system MgO - FeO - CaO - SiO2 - (Mg-Fe-Ca-Na-carbonate) - C. Xenoliths of lower mantle rocks were never found among the deep mantle derived materials. Estimation of lower-mantle mineralogy as ferropericlase+ bridgmanite+ Ca-perovskite association is inferred from high-pressure subsolidus experiments with ultrabasic pyrolite composition (Akaogi, 2007). The paradoxical in situ paragenesis of stishovite and ferropericlase as primary inclusions in lower-mantle diamonds (Kaminsky, 2012) takes its explanation from the bridgmanite peritectic reaction (effect of "stishovite paradox") (Litvin et al., 2014). Based on the data for inclusions, physico-chemical study on syngenesis of diamonds and primary inclusions has experimentally revealed the ferropericlase-bridgmanite-Ca-perovskite-stishovite-magnesiowustite-(Mg-Fe-Ca-Na-carbonate)-carbon compositions of the lower-mantle diamond-forming system .(Litvin et al., 2016). The generalized diagram of diamong-forming media characterizes the variable compositions of growths melts for diamonds and paragenetic phases and their genetic relationships with lower mantle matter, and it is the reason for genetic classifying primary inclusions. Fractional ultrabasic-basic evolution and continuous paragenetic transition from ultrabasic bridgmanite-ferropericlase to basic stishovite-magnesiowustite assemblages in the of lower-mantle diamond-parental melts-solutions are providing by the physico-chemical mechanism of stishovite paradox. References Akaogi M. (2007). Phase transformations of minerals in the transition zone and upper part of the lower mantle. In Advances in High-Pressure Mineralogy (Ohtani E., ed

  13. Vibriosis induced by experimental cohabitation in Crassostrea gigas: evidence of early infection and down-expression of immune-related genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Decker, Sophie; Saulnier, Denis

    2011-02-01

    The understanding of reciprocal interactions between Crassostrea gigas and Vibrio sp., whether these be virulent or avirulent, is vital for the development of methods to improve the health status of cultured oysters. We describe an original non-invasive experimental infection technique using cohabitation, designed to explore these interactions. Using real-time PCR techniques we examined the dynamics of virulent and avirulent Vibrio sp. in oyster hemolymph and tank seawater, and made a parallel study of the expression of four genes involved in oyster immune defense: Cg-BPI, Cg-EcSOD, Cg-IκB, Cg-TIMP. No mortality occurred in control animals, but oysters put in cohabitation for 2-48 h with animals previously infected by two Vibrio pathogens suffered mortalities from 2 to 16 days post-cohabitation. Our results show that virulent Vibrio infect healthy individuals after only 2 h of cohabitation, with values ranging from 4.5 x 10² to 2 x 10⁴ cells ml⁻¹ hemolymph. Simultaneously, an approximate ten-fold increase of the total Vibrio population was observed in control animals, with a 6.6-78.5-fold up-expression of targeted genes. In contrast, oysters exposed to harmful bacteria had mean expression levels strongly down-regulated by a factor of 9.2-29 (depending on the gene) compared with control animals. Although oysters were still found to be infected by virulent Vibrio after 6-48 h of cohabitation, no significant differences were noted when comparing levels of each transcript in control and infected oysters at the same sampling times during this period: the important differences were noted before 6 h cohabitation. Taken together, our data support (1) the hypothesis that virulent Vibrio disturbs the immune response of this invertebrate host both rapidly and significantly, although this occurs specifically during an early and transient period during the first 6 h of cohabitation challenge, and that (2) expression of targeted genes is not correlated with vibriosis

  14. Experimental and computational evidence for hydrogen bonding interaction between 2′-deoxyadenosine conjugate adduct and amino-terminated organic film on Si(001)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szwajca, A., E-mail: Anna.Szwajca@amu.edu.pl [Faculty of Chemistry, A" . Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 89 b, 61-614 Poznań (Poland); Krzywiecki, M. [Institute of Physics-CSE, Silesian University of Technology, Konarskiego 22B, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Pluskota-Karwatka, D. [Faculty of Chemistry, A" . Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 89 b, 61-614 Poznań (Poland)

    2015-08-03

    A simple method for immobilization of malonaldehyde-acetaldehyde conjugate adduct with DNA base onto an amino-terminated surface of silicon from water solution is proposed. The Si(001) surface which contains OH groups was modified with 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APTMS) to serve as a linker between the silica surface and the organic adduct. The 2′-deoxyadenosine adduct was adsorbed on the APTMS/Si surface from acetonitrile/water solution. This nucleoside derivative is stable under laboratory conditions and emits a natural fluorescence, allowing for its adsorption on the APTMS/Si surface to be easily verified by fluorescence microscopy, non-contact atomic force microscopy and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The degree of surface coverage by the adduct was evaluated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Analysis of the XPS spectra revealed bands at 400.2 eV and 533.1 eV which are characteristic of a hydrogen bonded –NH{sub 2} and –OH group. This observation implies that the free electron donating –NH{sub 2} groups from the APTMS layer makes hydrogen bonds with the fluorescent adduct and immobilize it on the surface. The wetting angle of the APTMS/Si surface before and after adsorption of the nucleoside derivative does not differ significantly, which points to the involvement of an – OH group from 2′-deoxyadenosine to be involved in hydrogen bonding. These experimental results were further supported using quantum chemical calculations to demonstrate that the 2′deoxyadenosine adduct makes hydrogen bonds with the APTMS molecule. Furthermore, this hydrogen bond involves the –NH{sub 2} group from APTMS and –OH group at carbon atoms C3 and C6 from the deoxyribose ring of 2′deoxyadenosine. - Highlights: • DNA base adduct was immobilized onto amino-terminated silicon surface. • Hydrogen bonds were observed between aminosilane molecules and deoxyribose ring. • Fluorescent film was characterized by

  15. Collective Intelligence Heuristic: An Experimental Evidence

    CERN Document Server

    Stefanelli, Federica; Bagnoli, Franco; Guazzini, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The main intreest of this study was to investigate the phenomenon of collective intelligence in an anonymous virtual environment developed for this purpose. In particular, we were interested in studiyng how dividing a fixed community in different group size, which, in different phases of the experiment, works to solve tasks of different complexity, influences the social problem solving process. The experiments, which have involved 216 university students, showed that the cooperative behaviour is stronger in small groups facing complex tasks: the cooperation probability negatively correlated with both the group size and easiness of task. Individuals seem to activate a collective intelligence heuristics when the problem is too complex. Some psychosocial variables were considered in order to check how they affect the cooperative behaviour of participants, but they do not seem to have a significant impact on individual cooperation probability, supporting the idea that a partial de-individualization operates in vi...

  16. Experimental evidence for hadroproduction of exotic mesons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. S. Adams; T. Adams; Z. Bar-Yam; J. M. Bishop; V. A. Bodyagin; B. B. Brabson; D. S. Brown; N. M. Cason; S. U. Chung; R. R. Crittenden; J. P. Cummings; K. Danyo; S. Denisov; V. Dorofeev; J. P. Dowd; A. R. Dzierba; P. Eugenio; J. Gunter; R. W. Hackenburg; M. Hayek; E. I. Ivanov; I. Kachaev; W. Kern; E. King; O. L. Kodolova; V. L. Korotkikh; M. A. Kostin; J. Kuhn; R. Lindenbusch; V. Lipaev; J. M. LoSecco; J. J. Manak; J. Napolitano; M. Nozar; C. Olchanski; A. I. Ostrovidov; T. K. Pedlar; A. Popov; D. R. Rust; D. Ryabchikov; A. H. Sanjari; L. I. Sarycheva; E. Scott; K. K. Seth; N. Shenhav; W. D. Shephard; N. B. Sinev; J. A. Smith; P. T. Smith; D. L. Stienike; T. Sulanke; S. A. Taegar; S. Teige; D. R. Thompson; I. N. Vardanyan; D. P. Weygand; D. White; H. J. Willutzki; J. Wise; M. Witkowski; A. A. Yershov; D. Zhao

    2001-01-01

    New measurements of peripheral meson production are presented. The data confirm the existence of exotic mesons at 1.4 and 1.6 GeV/c2. The latter state dominates the eta'pi- decay spectrum. The data on eta pi+pi-pi- decay show large strength in several exotic (Jpc = 1- +) waves as well.

  17. Experimental evidence of bounds of quantum correlations

    CERN Document Server

    Bovino, F A; Castelletto, S; Degiovanni, I P; Rastello, M L; Berchera, I R

    2003-01-01

    We implemented the experiment proposed by Cabello [arXiv:quant-ph/0309172] to test the bounds of quantum correlation. As expected from the theory we found that, for certain choices of local observables, Cirel'son's bound of the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt inequality ($2\\sqrt{2}$) is not reached by any quantum states.

  18. Reaction between H2, CO, and H2S over Fe,Ni metal in the solar nebula: Experimental evidence for the formation of sulfur-bearing organic molecules and sulfides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorca, Jordi; Casanova, Ignasi

    2000-07-01

    Detailed laboratory studies have been carried out in order to simulate the interaction between nanometer-sized kamacite metal particles and different gas mixtures consisting of H2:H2S (250:0.1), H2:CO (250:1) and H2:CO:H2S (250:1:0.1) under nebular-type conditions (5x10-4 atm and 473 K). Reaction of H2+H2S with kamacite particles for 1000 h leads to the formation of pyrrhotite. Incorporation of CO into the gaseous reactant mixture results in the formation of both sulfide and carbide phases. At the same time, amorphous carbon is deposited onto the metal particles and organic molecules are evolved, namely hydrocarbons and thiols in the C1-C5 and C1-C2 range, respectively. Carbon deposition and production of organics are enhanced with respect to experiments performed with H2+CO, where a carbide phase is formed. There is no evidence for the existence of sulfur poisoning effects on the metal-catalysed hydrogenation of CO through Fischer-Tropsch-type reactions in nebular environments. In fact, it is experimentally demonstrated that sulfur-containing organic species could be synthesized by such reactions from nebular gas.

  19. Experimental evidence of photoinduced valence change of Fe3+ in BaTiO3 and mechanism for growth of new grating in depleted pump condition: An EPR investigation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M D Sastry; M Moghbel; Putcha Venkateswarlu; A Darwish

    2001-05-01

    With a view to understanding the role of photo-induced valence changes of impurities in BaTiO3 in the phenomena of photorefraction, EPR experiments were conducted under in situ HeNe laser illumination. These experiments gave evidence for photoinduced valence change of Fe in BaTiO3 at room temperature. The EPR signal due to trivalent iron was found to reduce in intensity with laser illumination The kinetics of the valence change has been investigated. Under large fringe width condition, the time constant of the decay is identified as the dielectric relaxation time d. The changes in line shape on laser illumination to Dysonian form, appeared most predominantly in mechanically poled crystal compared to electrically poled single domain crystals. This demonstrated the possible role of domain walls and the defects there, as source or sinks of charge carriers on photo excitation. It is observed, that there is transient growth of Fe3+, when the laser illumination was put on, before its decay. This was attributed to charge transfer between electrons in oxygen vacancies and Fe4+. This predicted the growth of transient grating under depleted pump condition in a two beam coupling experiment. This was experimentally proved by following the diffracted signal of the reading beam under the depleted pump condition.

  20. Experimental evidences for reducing Mg activation energy in high Al-content AlGaN alloy by MgGa δ doping in (AlN)m/(GaN)n superlattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao; Wang, Wei; Wang, Jingli; Wu, Hao; Liu, Chang

    2017-01-01

    P-type doping in high Al-content AlGaN alloys is a main challenge for realizing AlGaN-based deep ultraviolet optoelectronics devices. According to the first-principles calculations, Mg activation energy may be reduced so that a high hole concentration can be obtained by introducing nanoscale (AlN)5/(GaN)1 superlattice (SL) in Al0.83Ga0.17N disorder alloy. In this work, experimental evidences were achieved by analyzing Mg doped high Al-content AlGaN alloys and Mg doped AlGaN SLs as well as MgGa δ doped AlGaN SLs. Mg acceptor activation energy was significantly reduced from 0.378 to 0.331 eV by using MgGa δ doping in SLs instead of traditional doping in alloys. This new process was confirmed to be able to realize high p-type doping in high Al-content AlGaN. PMID:28290480

  1. 利益侵占、风险补偿与控制权私利:实验的证据%Large Shareholder Expropriation, Risk Premium and Private Benefits of Control: Evidence from an Experimental Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐细雄

    2012-01-01

    external capital market efficiency, which provide supportive evidence for the theoretical model. The contributions of the research are as follows. Firstly, this paper revises the small-minded point of "the pri-vate benefit of control equals to expropriation of controlling shareholders", which provides new thought and empiri- cal evidence to understand the meaning of the private benefit of control and its determinants, and also contributes tohelp obtain the reciprocal equilibriumbetween minority investors and controlling shareholder in practical corporate governance. And then, this paper introduces experimental study, which originates in behavioral economics, intohelp obtain the reciprocal equilibriumbetween minority investors and controlling shareholder in practical corporate governance. And then, this paper introduces experimental study, which originates in behavioral economics, into the field of corporate governance and so expands and enriches the research methods for the scholars interesting in corporate governance. Finally, compared with the existing literatures, this paper is entirely embedded into the background in transitional economics and so provides much more valuable implication to the corporate governance practice in emerging markets.

  2. Experimental charge density and neutron structural study of cis-HMn(CO){sub 4}PPh{sub 3}: Comprehensive analysis of chemical bonding and evidence for a C-H{hor_ellipsis}H-Mn hydrogen bond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramov, Y.A.; Brammer, L. [Univ. of Missouri, St. Louis, MO (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Klooster, W.T.; Bullock, R.M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Chemistry Dept.

    1998-11-30

    The structure and bonding in cis-HMn(CO){sub 4}PPh{sub 3} have been studied by low-temperature neutron and high-resolution X-ray diffraction, the latter study using a charge-coupled device (CCD) area detector. A charge density analysis, including the deformation density, a full topological analysis of {minus}{del}{sup 2}{rho}, has been conducted. The electrostatic component of the H{sup {delta}+}{hor_ellipsis}H{sup {delta}{minus}} interaction energy is calculated to be 5.7 kcal/mol from the experimental data. This electrostatic evidence coupled with the geometry C-H{hor_ellipsis}H 129.0(2){degree} and H{hor_ellipsis}H-Mn 126.5(1){degree} and the identification of an H{hor_ellipsis}H bond path in the charge density distribution strongly supports the characterization of this interaction as an intramolecular C-H{hor_ellipsis}H-Mn hydrogen bond. Both the deformation density and the topological study clearly illustrate the {sigma}-donor nature of both the H-Mn and Ph{sub 3}P-Mn interactions and the {sigma}-donor/{pi}-acceptor nature of the manganese-carbonyl bonds. The topological study further confirms the decrease in C-O bond order upon coordination to the metal and demonstrates for the first time by this method that the metal-ligand bonds, although showing characteristics of a closed-shell interaction, do have a significant dative covalent component to the bond. The latter is reinforced by a study of the derived Mn d-orbital populations, in which populations of the d{sub z{sup 2}} and d{sub x{sup 2}{minus}y{sup 2}} orbitals are significantly higher than would be predicted by a simple crystal field theory model of metal-ligand bonding.

  3. Monopoly experimentation

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    This paper considers a firm facing an uncertain demand curve. The firm can experimentally adjust its output in order to gain information that willincrease expected future profits. We examine two basic questions. Under whatconditions is it worthwhile for the firm to experiment? How does the firmadjust its output away from the myopic optimism to exploit its ability to experiment? Two necessary conditions are established for experimentation tooccur, involving requirements that experimentation be...

  4. Equal Opportunity Laws, Affirmative Action and Asymmetric Tournaments:Some Experimental Evidence%机会公平、倾斜政策与不对称锦标赛:一项实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫威; 陈长怀

    2012-01-01

    employees with low abilities? If the affirmative action program has been put into practice, will the objective of equality be achieved at the cost of efficiency loss? In this paper, based on the seminal work by Schotter and Weigelt ( 1992) , we experimentally study the impact of equal opportunity law and affirmative action on agents' effort. Our study differs from the previous research in two ways. First, we recruit Chinese students as subjects in seven experiments. This design can provide new evidence and promote research interests among domestic scholars. Second, in contrast with findings in Schotter and Weigelt's study ( 1992) our experimental results suggest the implementation of affirmative action programs do not increase subjects' effort and their total output. This finding is quite different from that of most studies on affirmative action or weakens most literature based on Schotter and Weigelt's study.In the first part, following the basic tournament models established by Lazear & Rosen (1981) and Schotter & Weigelt (1992) the equilibrium efforts are derived respectively for the unfair tournament model, uneven tournament model and affirmative action model. A brief discussion on those models and some research inferences are presented to provide the baseline for empirical analysis. The second part gives a detailed explanation of the experimental design and experimental procedures adopted in this study. We recruited 130 subjects from students attending economics or management courses at Chongqing University. Seven experiments were designed and carried out to study the behavior modes of subjects in different tournament settings. There are two main parameters in these " experiments, kanda , representing the degree of unfairness and asymmetry respectively in a certain tournament. To be more specific, each experiment differs from the other one by a change in only one parameter. Experiment 1 is a fair and symmetrical benchmark experiment. In order to investigate the impact

  5. The impact of leadership hubs on the uptake of evidence-informed nursing practices and workplace policies for HIV care: a quasi-experimental study in Jamaica, Kenya, Uganda and South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Nancy; Kaseje, Dan; Kahwa, Eulalia; Klopper, Hester C; Mill, Judy; Webber, June; Roelofs, Susan; Harrowing, Jean

    2016-08-03

    The enormous impact of HIV on communities and health services in Sub-Saharan Africa and the Caribbean has especially affected nurses, who comprise the largest proportion of the health workforce in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Strengthening action-based leadership for and by nurses is a means to improve the uptake of evidence-informed practices for HIV care. A prospective quasi-experimental study in Jamaica, Kenya, Uganda and South Africa examined the impact of establishing multi-stakeholder leadership hubs on evidence-informed HIV care practices. Hub members were engaged through a participatory action research (PAR) approach. Three intervention districts were purposefully selected in each country, and three control districts were chosen in Jamaica, Kenya and Uganda. WHO level 3, 4 and 5 health care institutions and their employed nurses were randomly sampled. Self-administered, validated instruments measured clinical practices (reports of self and peers), quality assurance, work place policies and stigma at baseline and follow-up. Standardised average scores ranging from 0 to 1 were computed for clinical practices, quality assurance and work place policies. Stigma scores were summarised as 0 (no reports) versus 1 (one or more reports). Pre-post differences in outcomes between intervention and control groups were compared using the Mantel Haenszel chi-square for dichotomised stigma scores, and independent t tests for other measures. For South Africa, which had no control group, pre-post differences were compared using a Pearson chi-square and independent t test. Multivariate analysis was completed for Jamaica and Kenya. Hub members in all countries self-assessed changes in their capacity at follow-up; these were examined using a paired t test. Response rates among health care institutions were 90.2 and 80.4 % at baseline and follow-up, respectively. Results were mixed. There were small but statistically significant pre-post, intervention versus control

  6. Functional and neurophysiological evidence of the efficacy of trophic repair pharmacotherapy using an adrenocorticotrophic hormone4-9 analog in experimental allergic encephalomyelitis, an animal model of multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gispen, W.H.; Duckers, H.J.; Dokkum, R.P. van; Verhaagen, J.; Lopes da Silva, F.H.

    1996-01-01

    Chronic experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (CEAE) is a well-established animal model for the human syndrome, multiple sclerosis. CEAE has striking histological, electrophysiological and clinical analogies with multiple sclerosis and is a valuable animal model for the preclinical pharmacotherape

  7. Convenience experimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krohs, Ulrich

    2012-03-01

    Systems biology aims at explaining life processes by means of detailed models of molecular networks, mainly on the whole-cell scale. The whole cell perspective distinguishes the new field of systems biology from earlier approaches within molecular cell biology. The shift was made possible by the high throughput methods that were developed for gathering 'omic' (genomic, proteomic, etc.) data. These new techniques are made commercially available as semi-automatic analytic equipment, ready-made analytic kits and probe arrays. There is a whole industry of supplies for what may be called convenience experimentation. My paper inquires some epistemic consequences of strong reliance on convenience experimentation in systems biology. In times when experimentation was automated to a lesser degree, modeling and in part even experimentation could be understood fairly well as either being driven by hypotheses, and thus proceed by the testing of hypothesis, or as being performed in an exploratory mode, intended to sharpen concepts or initially vague phenomena. In systems biology, the situation is dramatically different. Data collection became so easy (though not cheap) that experimentation is, to a high degree, driven by convenience equipment, and model building is driven by the vast amount of data that is produced by convenience experimentation. This results in a shift in the mode of science. The paper shows that convenience driven science is not primarily hypothesis-testing, nor is it in an exploratory mode. It rather proceeds in a gathering mode. This shift demands another shift in the mode of evaluation, which now becomes an exploratory endeavor, in response to the superabundance of gathered data.

  8. Experimental philosophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knobe, Joshua; Buckwalter, Wesley; Nichols, Shaun; Robbins, Philip; Sarkissian, Hagop; Sommers, Tamler

    2012-01-01

    Experimental philosophy is a new interdisciplinary field that uses methods normally associated with psychology to investigate questions normally associated with philosophy. The present review focuses on research in experimental philosophy on four central questions. First, why is it that people's moral judgments appear to influence their intuitions about seemingly nonmoral questions? Second, do people think that moral questions have objective answers, or do they see morality as fundamentally relative? Third, do people believe in free will, and do they see free will as compatible with determinism? Fourth, how do people determine whether an entity is conscious?

  9. Experimental Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Engelfried, J

    1999-01-01

    In this course we will give examples for experimental techniques used in particle physics experiments. After a short introduction, we will discuss applications in silicon microstrip detectors, wire chambers, and single photon detection in Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) counters. A short discussion of the relevant physics processes, mainly different forms of energy loss in matter, is enclosed.

  10. Animal experimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolar, Roman

    2006-01-01

    Millions of animals are used every year in often times extremely painful and distressing scientific procedures. Legislation of animal experimentation in modern societies is based on the supposition that this is ethically acceptable when certain more or less defined formal (e.g. logistical, technical) demands and ethical principles are met. The main parameters in this context correspond to the "3Rs" concept as defined by Russel and Burch in 1959, i.e. that all efforts to replace, reduce and refine experiments must be undertaken. The licensing of animal experiments normally requires an ethical evaluation process, often times undertaken by ethics committees. The serious problems in putting this idea into practice include inter alia unclear conditions and standards for ethical decisions, insufficient management of experiments undertaken for specific (e.g. regulatory) purposes, and conflicts of interest of ethics committees' members. There is an ongoing societal debate about ethical issues of animal use in science. Existing EU legislation on animal experimentation for cosmetics testing is an example of both the public will for setting clear limits to animal experiments and the need to further critically examine other fields and aspects of animal experimentation.

  11. Interpreting Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munsart, Craig A.

    1993-01-01

    Presents an activity that allows students to experience the type of discovery process that paleontologists necessarily followed during the early dinosaur explorations. Students are read parts of a story taken from the "American Journal of Science" and interpret the evidence leading to the discovery of Triceratops and Stegosaurus. (PR)

  12. Functional and neurophysiological evidence of the efficacy of trophic repair pharmacotherapy using an adrenocorticotrophic hormone4-9 analog in experimental allergic encephalomyelitis, an animal model of multiple sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Gispen, W. H.; Duckers, H.J.; van Dokkum, R.P.; Verhaagen, J; Lopes da Silva, F.H.

    1996-01-01

    Chronic experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (CEAE) is a well-established animal model for the human syndrome, multiple sclerosis. CEAE has striking histological, electrophysiological and clinical analogies with multiple sclerosis and is a valuable animal model for the preclinical pharmacotherapeutical development of new putative therapeutic agents. In this paper, we describe a neurotrophic repair approach in Lewis rats suffering from CEAE. The neurotrophic peptide used is a degradation re...

  13. A refined atomic scale model of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae K+-translocation protein Trk1p combined with experimental evidence confirms the role of selectivity filter glycines and other key residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zayats, Vasilina; Stockner, Thomas; Pandey, Saurabh Kumar; Wörz, Katharina; Ettrich, Rüdiger; Ludwig, Jost

    2015-05-01

    Potassium ion (K+) uptake in yeast is mediated mainly by the Trk1/2 proteins that enable cells to survive on external K+ concentration as low as a few μM. Fungal Trks are related to prokaryotic TRK and Ktr and plant HKT K+ transport systems. Overall sequence similarity is very low, thus requiring experimental verification of homology models. Here a refined structural model of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Trk1 is presented that was obtained by combining homology modeling, molecular dynamics simulation and experimental verification through functional analysis of mutants. Structural models and experimental results showed that glycines within the selectivity filter, conserved among the K-channel/transporter family, are not only important for protein function, but are also required for correct folding/membrane targeting. A conserved aspartic acid in the PA helix (D79) and a lysine in the M2D helix (K1147) were proposed earlier to interact. Our results suggested individual roles of these residues in folding, structural integrity and function. While mutations of D79 completely abolished protein folding, mutations at position 1147 were tolerated to some extent. Intriguingly, a secondary interaction of D79 with R76 could enhance folding/stability of Trk1 and enable a fraction of Trk1[K1147A] to fold. The part of the ion permeation path containing the selectivity filter is shaped similar to that of ion channels. However below the selectivity filter it is obstructed or regulated by a proline containing loop. The presented model could provide the structural basis for addressing the long standing question if Trk1 is a passive or active ion-translocation system.

  14. Conformational flexibility around the Gal-β-(1 → 3)-Glc linkage: Experimental evidence for the existence of the anti-ψ conformation in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Paloma; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Espinosa, Juan F

    2016-10-04

    NOE-based analysis of the disaccharide β-Gal-(1 → 3)-β-Glc-OMe (1), especially a diagnostic Gal1-Glc4 NOE detected in a HSQC-NOESY spectrum, reveals the existence of the anti-ψ conformer in aqueous solution in addition to the major syn conformer. This result provides experimental proof of conformational flexibility around the aglyconic bond of β-(1 → 3) disaccharides, in contrast to previous studies that suggested that the flexibility around this linkage was restricted to the syn conformational region.

  15. Genetic evidence for an essential role of neuronally expressed IL-6 signal transducer gp130 in the induction and maintenance of experimentally induced mechanical hypersensitivity in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarta, Serena; Vogl, Christian; Constantin, Cristina E; Üçeyler, Nurcan; Sommer, Claudia; Kress, Michaela

    2011-09-27

    Tenderness and mechanical allodynia are key symptoms of malignant tumor, inflammation and neuropathy. The proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) is causally involved in all three pathologies. IL-6 not only regulates innate immunity and inflammation but also causes nociceptor sensitization and hyperalgesia. In general and in most cell types including immune cells and sensory neurons, IL-6 binds soluble μ receptor subunits which heteromerizes with membrane bound IL-6 signal transducer gp130. In the present study, we used a conditional knock-out strategy to investigate the importance of signal transducer gp130 expressed in C nociceptors for the generation and maintenance of mechanical hypersensitivity. Nociceptors were sensitized to mechanical stimuli by experimental tumor and this nociceptor sensitization was preserved at later stages of the pathology in control mice. However, in mice with a conditional deletion of gp130 in Nav1.8 expressing nociceptors mechanical hypersensitivity by experimental tumor, nerve injury or inflammation recovery was not preserved in the maintenance phase and nociceptors exhibited normal mechanical thresholds comparable to untreated mice. Together, the results argue for IL-6 signal transducer gp130 as an essential prerequisite in nociceptors for long-term mechanical hypersensitivity associated with cancer, inflammation and nerve injury.

  16. Genetic evidence for an essential role of neuronally expressed IL-6 signal transducer gp130 in the induction and maintenance of experimentally induced mechanical hypersensitivity in vivo and in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin Cristina E

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Tenderness and mechanical allodynia are key symptoms of malignant tumor, inflammation and neuropathy. The proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6 is causally involved in all three pathologies. IL-6 not only regulates innate immunity and inflammation but also causes nociceptor sensitization and hyperalgesia. In general and in most cell types including immune cells and sensory neurons, IL-6 binds soluble μ receptor subunits which heteromerizes with membrane bound IL-6 signal transducer gp130. In the present study, we used a conditional knock-out strategy to investigate the importance of signal transducer gp130 expressed in C nociceptors for the generation and maintenance of mechanical hypersensitivity. Nociceptors were sensitized to mechanical stimuli by experimental tumor and this nociceptor sensitization was preserved at later stages of the pathology in control mice. However, in mice with a conditional deletion of gp130 in Nav1.8 expressing nociceptors mechanical hypersensitivity by experimental tumor, nerve injury or inflammation recovery was not preserved in the maintenance phase and nociceptors exhibited normal mechanical thresholds comparable to untreated mice. Together, the results argue for IL-6 signal transducer gp130 as an essential prerequisite in nociceptors for long-term mechanical hypersensitivity associated with cancer, inflammation and nerve injury.

  17. Realism And Empirical Evidence

    CERN Document Server

    Schmelzer, I

    1997-01-01

    We define realism using a slightly modified version of the EPR criterion of reality. This version is strong enough to show that relativity is incomplete. We show that this definition of realism is nonetheless compatible with the general principles of causality and canonical quantum theory as well as with experimental evidence in the (special and general) relativistic domain. We show that the realistic theories we present here, compared with the standard relativistic theories, have higher empirical content in the strong sense defined by Popper's methodology.

  18. 非傅立叶热现象的理论分析和实验证实%Theoretical Analysis and Experimental Evidence of Non-Fourier Heat Conduction Behavior

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋方明; 刘登瀛; 蔡睿贤

    2001-01-01

    This paper consists of two parts. (1) For a hollow sphere with sudden temperature changes on its inner and outer surfaces, the hyperbolic heat conduction equation is employed to describe this extreme thermal case and an analytical expression of its temperature distribution is obtained. According to the expression, the nonFourier heat conduction behavior that will appear in the hollow sphere is studied and some qualitative conditions that will result in distinct non-Fourier behavior in the medium is ultimately attained. (2) A novel experiment to observe non-Fourier heat conduction behavior in porous material (mainly ordinary duplicating paper) heated by a microsecond laser pulse is presented. The conditions for observing distinct non-Fourier heat conduction behavior in the experimental sample agree well with the theoretical results qualitatively.``

  19. Experimental music for experimental physics

    CERN Multimedia

    Rosaria Marraffino

    2014-01-01

    Using the sonification technique, physicist and composer Domenico Vicinanza paid homage to CERN at its 60th anniversary ceremony. After months of hard work, he turned the CERN Convention and LHC data into music.   Click here to download the full score of the "LHChamber music". Every birthday deserves gifts and CERN’s 60th anniversary was no exception. Two gifts were very special, thanks to the hard work of Domenico Vicinanza, a physicist and composer. He created two experimental pieces by applying the sonification technique to the CERN Convention and to data recorded by the four LHC detectors during Run 1. “This technique allows us to ‘hear’ data using an algorithm that translates numbers or letters into notes. It keeps the same information enclosed in a graph or a document, but has a more aesthetic exposition,” explains Domenico Vicinanza. “The result is meant to be a metaphor for scientific cooperation, in which d...

  20. Evidence of type-II band alignment in III-nitride semiconductors: experimental and theoretical investigation for In 0.17 Al 0.83 N/GaN heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiaming; Xu, Fujun; Zhang, Xia; An, Wei; Li, Xin-Zheng; Song, Jie; Ge, Weikun; Tian, Guangshan; Lu, Jing; Wang, Xinqiang; Tang, Ning; Yang, Zhijian; Li, Wei; Wang, Weiying; Jin, Peng; Chen, Yonghai; Shen, Bo

    2014-10-06

    Type-II band alignment structure is coveted in the design of photovoltaic devices and detectors, since it is beneficial for the transport of photogenerated carriers. Regrettably, for group-III-nitride wide bandgap semiconductors, all existing devices are limited to type-I heterostructures, owing to the unavailable of type-II ones. This seriously restricts the designing flexibility for optoelectronic devices and consequently the relevant performance of this material system. Here we show a brandnew type-II band alignment of the lattice-matched In 0.17 Al 0.83 N/GaN heterostructure from the perspective of both experimental observations and first-principle theoretical calculations. The band discontinuity is dominated by the conduction band offset ΔEC, with a small contribution from the valence band offset ΔEV which equals 0.1 eV (with E(AlInN(VBM) being above E(GaN)(VBM)). Our work may open up new prospects to realize high-performance III-Nitrides optoelectronic devices based on type-II energy band engineering.