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Sample records for dysentery

  1. (Epidemic of bacillary dysentery)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auger, P.; Pouliot, B.; De Grace, M.; Milot, C.; Lafortune, M.; Bergeron, Z.

    1981-10-01

    An outbreak of bacillary dysentery in 1978 affecting 928 persons, most of whom were living in the village of St-Jacques, PQ, is described. An epidemiologic study suggested the water supply as the source of the infection, and it was established that the water carried by the municipal aqueduct was contaminated by feces containing the causal agent, Shigella sonnei. This epidemic, the largest mentioned in he Canadian medical literature, demonstrates how contagious this infection is.

  2. [Dysentery and amoebiasis in Poland in 2010].

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    Stypułkowska-Misiurewicz, Hanna; Baumann-Popczyk, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Dysentery as infective and contagious disease is registered by all EU and EFTA countries only as shigellosis according to etiological classification of the infectious diseases. The cases are also registered by ECDC. According to ECDC Report for 2006-2008 the incidence rate in Poland Sanitary Stations, send to the National Register of Infectious Diseases, evaluated, calculated and published by Department of Epidemiology National Institute of Public Health (NIZP-PZH) in Annual Bulletin "Infections and Intoxications in Poland in 2010", Warsaw NIZP-PZH and GIS (Chief Sanitary Inspectorate ) 2010. Laboratory data were collected as reports from all Regional Sanitary Laboratories send to NIZP-PZH Department of Bacteriology, data from epidemiological investigation of outbreaks including data from identification of Shigella strains obtained from the Reference Laboratory for Gram-negative Bacilli of NIZP-PZH Bacteriology Department. In 2010 thirty cases of shigellosis were registered (incidence was 0.08/100 000 inhabitants) the same number of cases and incidence was observed in 2009, nearly the same in 2008 - 33 cases (incidence 0.09). The numbers were lower than the median in 2004-2008 (64 cases, incidence 0.17/100 000). According to laboratory reports in all 16 Regional Sanitary Stations only 14 persons were Shigella positive, in spite that more than 600 000 were examined: 10 persons were infected by S. sonnei, 4 by S. flexneri. Only one strain of S. sonnei was isolated from a patient with diarrhea. It was in the Regional Sanitary Station laboratory of the małopolskie voievodeshaft. No one strain of S. boydii or S. dysenteriae was isolated. Most of the dysentery cases were examined by other laboratories than laboratories of sanitary epidemiological service. The obligation of private payment for bacteriological examination of suspected cases is one of reason that patient is treated with antibacterial drugs without determination of etiological agent of the infection. It

  3. [Study on influence of floods on bacillary dysentery incidence in Liaoning province, 2004 -2010].

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    Xu, X; Liu, Z D; Han, D B; Xu, Y Q; Jiang, B F

    2016-05-01

    To understand the influence of floods on bacillary dysentery in Liaoning province. The monthly surveillance data of bacillary dysentery, floods, meteorological and demographic data in Liaoning from 2004 to 2010 were collected. Panel Poisson regression analysis was conducted to evaluate the influence of floods on the incidence of bacillary dysentery in Liaoning. The mean monthly morbidity of bacillary dysentery was 2.17 per 100 000 during the study period, the bacillary dysentery cases mainly occurred in during July-September. Spearman correlation analysis showed that no lagged effect was detected in the influence of floods on the incidence of bacillary dysentery. After adjusting the influence of meteorological factors, panel data analysis showed that the influence of floods on the incidence of bacillary dysentery existed and the incidence rate ratio was 1.439 4(95%CI: 1.408 1-1.471 4). Floods could significantly increase the risk of bacillary dysentery for population in Liaoning.

  4. Patterns of Bacillary Dysentery in China, 2005–2010

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    Han Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the incidence of bacillary dysentery in China has been declining progressively, a considerable disease burden still exists. Few studies have analyzed bacillary dysentery across China and knowledge gaps still exist in the aspects of geographic distribution and ecological drivers, seasonality and its association with meteorological factors, urban-rural disparity, prevalence and distribution of Shigella species. Here, we performed nationwide analyses to fill the above gaps. Geographically, we found that incidence increased along an east-west gradient which was inversely related to the economic conditions of China. Two large endemically high-risk regions in western China and their ecological drivers were identified for the first time. We characterized seasonality of bacillary dysentery incidence and assessed its association with meteorological factors, and saw that it exhibits north-south differences in peak duration, relative amplitude and key meteorological factors. Urban and rural incidences among China’s cities were compared, and disparity associated with urbanization level was invariant in most cities. Balanced decrease of urban and rural incidence was observed for all provinces except Hunan. S. flexneri and S. sonnei were identified as major causative species. Increasing prevalence of S. sonnei and geographic distribution of Shigella species were associated with economic status. Findings and inferences from this study draw broader pictures of bacillary dysentery in mainland China and could provide useful information for better interventions and public health planning.

  5. Financial benefit from the eradication of swine dysentery.

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    Wood, E N; Lysons, R J

    1988-03-19

    Swine dysentery was eradicated from a 270 sow herd by using medication in conjunction with cleaning and disinfection, without reducing the herd size. The feed conversion efficiency, cost per kg liveweight gain and veterinary costs in the herd were compared with similar Meat and Livestock Commission recorded herds before swine dysentery entered the farm, while it was present and after its eradication. During the four years when the disease was endemic in the herd the feed conversion efficiency deteriorated by 0.58, equivalent to 7.31 pounds per pig, the cost per kg liveweight gain was 15 per cent higher and the costs of veterinary care and medicines were 1.38 pounds per pig greater. Although there were pigs with clinical swine dysentery in the herd during the four year period, the poor production figures were attributed mainly to subclinical disease. The cost of eradicating the disease was more than 20,000 pounds but this sum was recouped within 12 months by the improved production and reduced drug usage. The chances of success of such a programme have been estimated to be between 54 and 90 per cent.

  6. Distributed lag effects and vulnerable groups of floods on bacillary dysentery in Huaihua, China

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    Liu, Zhi-Dong; Li, Jing; Zhang, Ying; Ding, Guo-Yong; Xu, Xin; Gao, Lu; Liu, Xue-Na; Liu, Qi-Yong; Jiang, Bao-Fa

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the potential links between floods and bacillary dysentery in China is important to develop appropriate intervention programs after floods. This study aimed to explore the distributed lag effects of floods on bacillary dysentery and to identify the vulnerable groups in Huaihua, China. Weekly number of bacillary dysentery cases from 2005–2011 were obtained during flood season. Flood data and meteorological data over the same period were obtained from the China Meteorological Data Sharing Service System. To examine the distributed lag effects, a generalized linear mixed model combined with a distributed lag non-linear model were developed to assess the relationship between floods and bacillary dysentery. A total of 3,709 cases of bacillary dysentery were notified over the study period. The effects of floods on bacillary dysentery continued for approximately 3 weeks with a cumulative risk ratio equal to 1.52 (95% CI: 1.08–2.12). The risks of bacillary dysentery were higher in females, farmers and people aged 15–64 years old. This study suggests floods have increased the risk of bacillary dysentery with 3 weeks’ effects, especially for the vulnerable groups identified. Public health programs should be taken to prevent and control a potential risk of bacillary dysentery after floods. PMID:27427387

  7. Spatial-temporal detection of risk factors for bacillary dysentery in Beijing, Tianjin and Hebei, China

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    Chengdong Xu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacillary dysentery is the third leading notifiable disease and remains a major public health concern in China. The Beijing–Tianjin–Hebei urban region is the biggest urban agglomeration in northern China, and it is one of the areas in the country that is most heavily infected with bacillary dysentery. The objective of the study was to analyze the spatial-temporal pattern and to determine any contributory risk factors on the bacillary dysentery. Methods Bacillary dysentery case data from 1 January 2012 to 31 December 2012 in Beijing–Tianjin– Hebei were employed. GeoDetector method was used to determine the impact of potential risk factors, and to identify regions and seasons at high risk of the disease. Results There were 36,472 cases of bacillary dysentery in 2012 in the study region. The incidence of bacillary dysentery varies widely amongst different age groups; the higher incidence of bacillary dysentery mainly occurs in the population under the age of five. Bacillary dysentery presents apparent seasonal variance, with the highest incidence occurring from June to September. In terms of the potential meteorological risk factors, mean temperature, relative humidity, precipitation, mean wind speed and sunshine hours explain the time variant of bacillary dysentery at 83%, 31%, 25%, 17% and 13%, respectively. The interactive effect between temperature and humidity has an explanatory power of 87%, indicating that a hot and humid environment is more likely to lead to the occurrence of bacillary dysentery. Socio-economic factors affect the spatial distribution of bacillary dysentery. The top four factors are age group, per capita GDP, population density and rural population proportion, and their determinant powers are 61%, 27%, 25% and 21%, respectively. The interactive effect between age group and the other factors accounts for more than 60% of bacillary dysentery transmission. Conclusions Bacillary dysentery poses a

  8. Quantifying the Impact of Floods on Bacillary Dysentery in Dalian City, China, From 2004 to 2010.

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    Xu, Xin; Ding, Guoyong; Zhang, Ying; Liu, Zhidong; Liu, Qiyong; Jiang, Baofa

    2017-04-01

    Studies quantifying relationships between floods and diarrheal diseases have mainly been conducted in low-latitude regions. It's therefore increasingly important to examine these relationships in midlatitude regions, where they may have significant public health implications. This study aimed to examine the association between floods and bacillary dysentery in the city of Dalian, China. A generalized additive mixed model was applied to examine the association between floods and bacillary dysentery. The relative risk (RR) of flood impact on bacillary dysentery was estimated. A total of 18,976 cases of bacillary dysentery were reported in Dalian during the study period. Two weeks' lagged effect was detected from the impact of floods on bacillary dysentery. The RR of flood impact on bacillary dysentery was 1.17 (95% CI: 1.03-1.33). Floods have significantly increased the risk of bacillary dysentery in Dalian. More studies should focus on the association between floods and infectious diseases in different regions. Our findings have significant implications for managing the negative health impact of floods in the midlatitude region of China. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2017;11:190-195).

  9. Efficacy of Synbiotics for Treatment of Bacillary Dysentery in Children: A Double-Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Study

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    Manijeh Kahbazi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacillary dysentery is a major cause of children’s admission to hospitals. To assess the probiotic and prebiotic (synbiotics effects in children with dysentery in a randomized clinical trial, 200 children with dysentery were studied in 2 groups: the synbiotic group received 1 tablet/day of synbiotic for 3–5 days and the placebo group received placebo tablets (identical tablet form like probiotics. The standard treatment was administered for all patients. Duration of hospitalization, dysentery, fever, and the weight loss were assessed in each group. It was concluded that there was no significant difference in both groups in the baseline characteristics. The mean duration of dysentery reduced (P0.05. The use of synbiotics as an adjuvant therapy to the standard treatment of dysentery significantly reduces the duration of dysentery, fever, and rate of weight losses. The trial is registered with IRCT201109267647N1.

  10. Quantitative analysis of burden of bacillary dysentery associated with floods in Hunan, China.

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    Liu, Xuena; Liu, Zhidong; Zhang, Ying; Jiang, Baofa

    2016-03-15

    Jishou and Huaihua, two cities in the west of Hunan Province, had suffered from severe floods because of long-lasting and heavy rainfall during the end of June and July 2012. However, the Disability Adjusted of Life Years (DALYs) of bacillary dysentery caused by the floods have not been examined before. The study aimed to quantify the impact of the floods on the burden of bacillary dysentery in Hunan, China. A unidirectional case-crossover study was firstly conducted to determine the relationship between daily cases of bacillary dysentery and the floods in Jishou and Huaihua of Hunan Province in 2012. Odds ratios (ORs) estimated by conditional logistic regression were used to quantify the risk of the floods on the disease. The years lived with disability (YLDs) of bacillary dysentery attributable to floods were then estimated based on the WHO framework to calculate potential impact fraction in the Burden of Disease study. Multivariable analysis showed that floods were significantly associated with an increased risk of the number of cases of bacillary dysentery (OR=3.270, 95% CI: 1.299-8.228 in Jishou; OR=2.212, 95% CI: 1.052-4.650 in Huaihua). The strongest effect was shown with a 1-day lag in Jishou and a 4-day lag in Huaihua. Attributable YLD per 1000 of bacillary dysentery due to the floods was 0.0296 in Jishou and 0.0157 in Huaihua. Our study confirms that floods have significantly increased the risks of bacillary dysentery in the study areas. In addition, a sudden and severe flooding with a shorter duration may cause more burdens of bacillary dysentery than a persistent and moderate flooding. Public health preparation and intervention programs should be taken to reduce and prevent a potential risk of bacillary dysentery epidemics after floods. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Intrafamilial person-to-person spread of bacillary dysentery due to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BD) within families during a propagated outbreak of bacillary dysentery. Design: A retrospective cohort study. Setting: Eighteen neighbouring villages in rural Gizan, southwestern Saudi Arabia. Subjects: Two hundred and thirty three cases of ...

  12. Impacts of floods on dysentery in Xinxiang city, China, during 2004–2010: a time-series Poisson analysis

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    Ni, Wei; Ding, Guoyong; Li, Yifei; Li, Hongkai; Jiang, Baofa

    2014-01-01

    Background Xinxiang, a city in Henan Province, suffered from frequent floods due to persistent and heavy precipitation from 2004 to 2010. In the same period, dysentery was a common public health problem in Xinxiang, with the proportion of reported cases being the third highest among all the notified infectious diseases. Objectives We focused on dysentery disease consequences of different degrees of floods and examined the association between floods and the morbidity of dysentery on the basis of longitudinal data during the study period. Design A time-series Poisson regression model was conducted to examine the relationship between 10 times different degrees of floods and the monthly morbidity of dysentery from 2004 to 2010 in Xinxiang. Relative risks (RRs) of moderate and severe floods on the morbidity of dysentery were calculated in this paper. In addition, we estimated the attributable contributions of moderate and severe floods to the morbidity of dysentery. Results A total of 7591 cases of dysentery were notified in Xinxiang during the study period. The effect of floods on dysentery was shown with a 0-month lag. Regression analysis showed that the risk of moderate and severe floods on the morbidity of dysentery was 1.55 (95% CI: 1.42–1.670) and 1.74 (95% CI: 1.56–1.94), respectively. The attributable risk proportions (ARPs) of moderate and severe floods to the morbidity of dysentery were 35.53 and 42.48%, respectively. Conclusions This study confirms that floods have significantly increased the risk of dysentery in the study area. In addition, severe floods have a higher proportional contribution to the morbidity of dysentery than moderate floods. Public health action should be taken to avoid and control a potential risk of dysentery epidemics after floods. PMID:25098726

  13. Impacts of floods on dysentery in Xinxiang city, China, during 2004-2010: a time-series Poisson analysis.

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    Ni, Wei; Ding, Guoyong; Li, Yifei; Li, Hongkai; Jiang, Baofa

    2014-01-01

    Xinxiang, a city in Henan Province, suffered from frequent floods due to persistent and heavy precipitation from 2004 to 2010. In the same period, dysentery was a common public health problem in Xinxiang, with the proportion of reported cases being the third highest among all the notified infectious diseases. We focused on dysentery disease consequences of different degrees of floods and examined the association between floods and the morbidity of dysentery on the basis of longitudinal data during the study period. A time-series Poisson regression model was conducted to examine the relationship between 10 times different degrees of floods and the monthly morbidity of dysentery from 2004 to 2010 in Xinxiang. Relative risks (RRs) of moderate and severe floods on the morbidity of dysentery were calculated in this paper. In addition, we estimated the attributable contributions of moderate and severe floods to the morbidity of dysentery. A total of 7591 cases of dysentery were notified in Xinxiang during the study period. The effect of floods on dysentery was shown with a 0-month lag. Regression analysis showed that the risk of moderate and severe floods on the morbidity of dysentery was 1.55 (95% CI: 1.42-1.670) and 1.74 (95% CI: 1.56-1.94), respectively. The attributable risk proportions (ARPs) of moderate and severe floods to the morbidity of dysentery were 35.53 and 42.48%, respectively. This study confirms that floods have significantly increased the risk of dysentery in the study area. In addition, severe floods have a higher proportional contribution to the morbidity of dysentery than moderate floods. Public health action should be taken to avoid and control a potential risk of dysentery epidemics after floods.

  14. Corrigendum - Influence of Tiamulin Therapy on Weight Gain in Brachyspira Dysentery in Piglets

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    Alexandru O. Doma; Andreia B. Chirila; Eugenia Dumitrescu; Florin Muselin; ROMEO TEODOR CRISTINA

    2014-01-01

    In the article Influence of Tiamulin Therapy on Weight Gain in Brachyspira Dysentery in Piglets first published in Vol 47, No 1 in Scientific Papers: Animal Science and Biotechnologies, by a clerical error instead Novartis was presented Dopharma as producer of Tiamutin 10% oily injectable solution (1ml of solution containing 100 mg of tiamulin fumarate). This article corrects: Influence of Tiamulin Therapy on Weight Gain in Brachyspira Dysentery in Piglets Vol. 47, Issue 1, p....

  15. High mean water vapour pressure promotes the transmission of bacillary dysentery.

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    Guo-Zheng Li

    Full Text Available Bacillary dysentery is an infectious disease caused by Shigella dysenteriae, which has a seasonal distribution. External environmental factors, including climate, play a significant role in its transmission. This paper identifies climate-related risk factors and their role in bacillary dysentery transmission. Harbin, in northeast China, with a temperate climate, and Quzhou, in southern China, with a subtropical climate, are chosen as the study locations. The least absolute shrinkage and selectionator operator is applied to select relevant climate factors involved in the transmission of bacillary dysentery. Based on the selected relevant climate factors and incidence rates, an AutoRegressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA model is established successfully as a time series prediction model. The numerical results demonstrate that the mean water vapour pressure over the previous month results in a high relative risk for bacillary dysentery transmission in both cities, and the ARIMA model can successfully perform such a prediction. These results provide better explanations for the relationship between climate factors and bacillary dysentery transmission than those put forth in other studies that use only correlation coefficients or fitting models. The findings in this paper demonstrate that the mean water vapour pressure over the previous month is an important predictor for the transmission of bacillary dysentery.

  16. Spatiotemporal Risk of Bacillary Dysentery and Sensitivity to Meteorological Factors in Hunan Province, China

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    Chengdong Xu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Bacillary dysentery remains a public health concern in the world. Hunan Province is one of the provinces having the highest risk of bacillary dysentery in China, however, the spatial-temporal distribution, variation of bacillary dysentery and sensitivity to meteorological factors in there are unclear. In this paper, a Bayesian space-time hierarchical model (BSTHM was used to detect space-time variation, and effects of meteorological factors between 2010 and 2015. The risk of bacillary dysentery showed apparent spatial-temporal heterogeneity. The highest risk occurred in the summer season. Economically undeveloped mountainous areas in the west and south of the province had the highest incidence rates. Twenty three (18.9% and 20 (16.4% counties were identified as hot and cold spots, respectively. Among the hotspots, 11 counties (47.8% exhibited a rapidly decreasing trend, suggesting they may become low-risk areas in the future. Of the cold spot counties, six (30% showed a slowly decreasing trend, and may have a higher risk in the future. Among meteorological factors, air temperature, relative humidity, and wind speed all played a significant role in the spatial-temporal distribution of bacillary dysentery risk. These findings can contribute to the implementation of an early warning system for controlling and preventing bacillary dysentery.

  17. Analysis of Risk and Burden of Dysentery Associated with Floods from 2004 to 2010 in Nanning, China.

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    Liu, Zhidong; Ding, Guoyong; Zhang, Ying; Xu, Xin; Liu, Qiyong; Jiang, Baofa

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to examine the association between floods and the morbidity of dysentery and to quantify the burden of dysentery due to floods in Nanning, China. A generalized additive mixed model was conducted to assess the relationship between monthly morbidity of dysentery and floods from 2004 to 2010. The years lived with disability (YLDs) of dysentery attributable to floods were then estimated based on the WHO framework of the burden of disease study for calculating the potential impact fraction. The relative risk (RR) of floods on the morbidity of dysentery was 1.44 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.18-1.75). The models suggest that a potential 1-day rise in flood duration may lead to 8% (RR = 1.08, 95% CI = 1.04-1.12) increase in the morbidity of dysentery. The average attributable YLD per 1,000 of dysentery caused by floods were 0.013 in males, 0.005 in females, and 0.009 in persons. Our study confirms that floods have significantly increased the risk and the burden of dysentery in the study area. Public health action should be taken to prevent and control the potential risk of dysentery after floods. Vulnerable groups such as males and children should be paid more attention. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  18. Epidemiologic Investigation of Dysentery in North of Iran: Use of Geographic Information System (GIS)

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    Nadi, Aliasghar; Abedi, Ghassem; Isazadeh, Khatoon; Rostami, Farideh; Siamian, Hasan; Hosseini, Mahbobeh; Asadi-Aliabadi, Mehran

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Dysentery is an intestinal inflammation which is created by the microorganisms attacking intestine mucus. Knowing the prevalence of this disease in different societies paves the way for programming and providing treatment and preventive measures. The main purpose of this study is to investigate the epidemiologic pattern and geographical distribution of dysentery based on GIS. Method: This was a cross-sectional and analytical study. The dysentery cases were gathered from the section of contagious diseases in health chancellery of Mazandaran University of medical sciences through a checklist during the years 2008 to 2013. In order to analyze the data, we made use of chi-square test. Then, the GIS software was used to recognize the geographical distribution of the disease. Findings: There was reported about 653 cases affected by dysentery and the disease proportion was equal for both men and women. Most of the persons with dysentery was city dwellers. The highest rate of incidents was reported to be in Fereidunkenar in 2011, and the disease was mostly found among farmers, students, and college students. Conclusion: Since dysentery is a disease transmitted from water and food, and in this study, it was found out that the disease sources included using polluted water, vegetables, and lack of appropriate personal hygiene. Therefore, it is essential to take into consideration the health issues. Moreover, the suitable conditions of the geographical area which has the highest rate of incident have paved the way for dysentery occurrence. In addition, using geographic information system (GIS) as a visual instrument can help the stakeholders and officials to elaborate on the death trend and recognize the areas for optimal use of the available resources. PMID:28144197

  19. Socio-economic factors of bacillary dysentery based on spatial correlation analysis in Guangxi Province, China.

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    Chengjing Nie

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In the past decade, bacillary dysentery was still a big public health problem in China, especially in Guangxi Province, where thousands of severe diarrhea cases occur every year. METHODS: Reported bacillary dysentery cases in Guangxi Province were obtained from local Centers for Diseases Prevention and Control. The 14 socio-economic indexes were selected as potential explanatory variables for the study. The spatial correlation analysis was used to explore the associations between the selected factors and bacillary dysentery incidence at county level, which was based on the software of ArcGIS10.2 and GeoDA 0.9.5i. RESULTS: The proportion of primary industry, the proportion of younger than 5-year-old children in total population, the number of hospitals per thousand persons and the rates of bacillary dysentery incidence show statistically significant positive correlation. But the proportion of secondary industry, per capital GDP, per capital government revenue, rural population proportion, popularization rate of tap water in rural area, access rate to the sanitation toilets in rural, number of beds in hospitals per thousand persons, medical and technical personnel per thousand persons and the rate of bacillary dysentery incidence show statistically significant negative correlation. The socio-economic factors can be divided into four aspects, including economic development, health development, medical development and human own condition. The four aspects were not isolated from each other, but interacted with each other.

  20. Comparative activity of some veterinary pharmaceutical products in swine dysentery

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    Cristina, T. Romeo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the diseases that cause great damage in the pig breeding farms, Brachyspyra swine dysentery has a special importance because involve great losses both by growth failure and high mortality andsignificant costs to the prevention and control. The study was conducted in a swine farm in Timis County, where the disease was originally identified in autumn of year 2009. Cumulative adverse conditions have affected the rate of morbidity and mortality. Themost common clinical developments in the unit were usually acute and subacute. Research included: a comparative study of the effectiveness of tiamulin fumarate, hydrogenated and dimetridazole powder in sick acute and subacute forms in piglets, at the weaning period; the comparative study of efficiency in therapy of soluble tiamulin (the tiamulin fumarate-hydrogenated and of the injection of piglets effective and the study of growth indicators: average daily gain.Experiment IGroup I consisted in 15 piglets with an average weight per lot of 7.60 kg/head (batch weight: 114kg received p.o. dimetridazole insoluble powder (Romvac Bucharest, mixed in feed, for 5 days dose of 25 mg/kg.bw. During the observation, two mortalities were recorded, representing 13.33% of the treated lot. Other animals from the group were clinically cured, the signs of the disease gradually disappeared, and the temperature returned to normal enteric symptoms. The observation period after the 21 days of experiment, the batchweight was 114.2 kg, corresponding to growth registered 95.5 g/head/day.Group II, of 15 pigs with enteritis clinical signs, have had an average weight per lot of 7.48 kg/head, and he has undergone treatment with tiamulin product (Novartis Animal Health soluble granules, in drinking water. Treatments were performed for 5 consecutive days at a dose of 60 mg/liter of drinking water. In this group, diarrhea symptoms decreased and general status of the animals gradually improved, no mortality was recorded five days

  1. The effect of fermentable carbohydrates on experimental swine dysentery and whip worm infections in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Lisbeth E.; Knudsen, Knud Erik Bach; Jensen, Tim Kåre

    2007-01-01

    ingredients were composed. Both diets were based on triticale and barley and supplemented with either rape seed cake (Diet 1) or dried chicory root and sweet lupins (Diet 2). The study had a three-factorial design, with eight groups of pigs receiving Diet I or Diet 2, +/- B. hyodysenteriae, and +/- T suis......An experiment was conducted to study the effect of diets with contrasting fermentability in the large intestine on experimental infections with Brachyspira hyodysenteriae, the causative agent of swine dysentery, and the whip worm, Trichuris suis, in pigs. Two diets with organically grown....... Pigs fed Diet 2 and challenged with B. hyodysenteriae did not develop swine dysentery and B. hyodysenteriae was not demonstrated in any of the pigs during the study. In contrast, 94% of the B. hyodysenteriae challenged pigs fed Diet I showed clinical symptoms of swine dysentery and all the pigs were...

  2. Diagnosis of swine dysentery: spirochaetes which may be confused with Treponema hyodysenteriae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, M J; Alexander, T J; Lysons, R J

    Spirochaetes, designated PWS, microscopically resembling Treponema hyodysenteriae, were isolated from the colon contents of pigs with post-weaning scours from three herds, which on clinical and epidemiological grounds were thought to be free from swine dysentery. One of the isolates was fed to pigs experimentally but no evidence of disease was noted. Their cultural characteristics differed from those of T hyodysenteriae but they were similar to those of a non-pathogenic spirachaete (4/71) which had been isolated previously from the laboratory's dysentery-free herd. Smears prepared from cultures of the PWS spirochaete, 4/71 and two virulent and one avirulent strain of T hyodysenteriae were all positive to a fluorescent antibody test which was in use as an aid to the diagnosis of swine dysentery in the United Kingdom.

  3. Effects of the floods on dysentery in north central region of Henan Province, China from 2004 to 2009.

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    Ni, Wei; Ding, Guoyong; Li, Yifei; Li, Hongkai; Liu, Qiyong; Jiang, Baofa

    2014-11-01

    Zhengzhou, Kaifeng and Xinxiang, the cities in the north central region of Henan Province, suffered from many times floods from 2004 to 2009. We focused on dysentery disease consequences of floods and examined the association between floods and the morbidity of dysentery, based on a longitudinal data. A generalized additive mixed model was conducted to examine the relationship between the monthly morbidity of dysentery and floods from 2004 to 2009 in the study areas. The relative risks (RRs) of the floods risk on the morbidity of dysentery were estimated in each city and the whole region. The RRs on dysentery were 11.47 (95% CI: 8.67-15.33), 1.35 (95% CI: 1.23-3.90) and 2.75 (95% CI: 1.36-4.85) in Kaifeng, Xinxiang and Zhengzhou, respectively. The RR on dysentery in the whole region was 1.66 (95% CI: 1.52-1.82). Our study confirms that flooding has significantly increased the risk of dysentery in the study areas. Additionally, we observed that a sudden and severe flooding can contribute more risk to the morbidity of dysentery than a persistent and moderate flooding. Our findings have significant implications for developing strategies to prevent and reduce health impact of floods. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Corrigendum - Influence of Tiamulin Therapy on Weight Gain in Brachyspira Dysentery in Piglets

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    Alexandru O. Doma

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In the article Influence of Tiamulin Therapy on Weight Gain in Brachyspira Dysentery in Piglets first published in Vol 47, No 1 in Scientific Papers: Animal Science and Biotechnologies, by a clerical error instead Novartis was presented Dopharma as producer of Tiamutin 10% oily injectable solution (1ml of solution containing 100 mg of tiamulin fumarate. This article corrects: Influence of Tiamulin Therapy on Weight Gain in Brachyspira Dysentery in Piglets Vol. 47, Issue 1, p. 372-376. Article first published online: 30 May 2014

  5. The Etiology and Pathogenesis of Hepatitis and Liver Cirrhosis under the Influence of Dysentery Toxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.A. Alimova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic intoxication of white rats by intravenous administration of dysentery toxin causes in animals within 2–4 months the development of liver cirrhosis. A particularly intensive development of cirrhosis is observed in simultaneous application of dysentery toxin and very low doses of heliotrope containing hepatotoxic alkaloids. Heliotrope was added to the food for animals and was given once in 7 days. The research results are considered as an evidence of the etiologic role of chronic toxic-infectious intestinal diseases in the development of liver cirrhosis.

  6. The influence of diet on the development of swine dysentery upon experimental infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindecrona, R.H.; Jensen, Tim Kåre; Jensen, B.B.

    2003-01-01

    , to confirm if low non-starch polysaccharide (NSP)-containing diets reduce swine dysentery the effect of different dietary levels of NSP and resistant starch (RS) was evaluated. These diets were based on cooked rice and animal protein, cooked rice and potato starch, cooked rice and wheat bran, or cooked rice...

  7. Differential clinical features and stool findings in shigellosis and amoebic dysentery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speelman, P.; McGlaughlin, R.; Kabir, I.; Butler, T.

    1987-01-01

    To obtain information that could assist the clinician to differentiate between shigellosis and amoebic dysentery, we compared clinical features and stool findings in 58 adult male patients in Bangladesh. Mean values indicated that patients with invasive amoebiasis were older and had a longer

  8. Investigating the effects of climate variations on bacillary dysentery incidence in northeast China using ridge regression and hierarchical cluster analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Junqiao

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effects of climate variations on bacillary dysentery incidence have gained more recent concern. However, the multi-collinearity among meteorological factors affects the accuracy of correlation with bacillary dysentery incidence. Methods As a remedy, a modified method to combine ridge regression and hierarchical cluster analysis was proposed for investigating the effects of climate variations on bacillary dysentery incidence in northeast China. Results All weather indicators, temperatures, precipitation, evaporation and relative humidity have shown positive correlation with the monthly incidence of bacillary dysentery, while air pressure had a negative correlation with the incidence. Ridge regression and hierarchical cluster analysis showed that during 1987–1996, relative humidity, temperatures and air pressure affected the transmission of the bacillary dysentery. During this period, all meteorological factors were divided into three categories. Relative humidity and precipitation belonged to one class, temperature indexes and evaporation belonged to another class, and air pressure was the third class. Conclusion Meteorological factors have affected the transmission of bacillary dysentery in northeast China. Bacillary dysentery prevention and control would benefit from by giving more consideration to local climate variations.

  9. Impacts of ambient temperature on the burden of bacillary dysentery in urban and rural Hefei, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, J; Xie, M Y; Zhao, K F; Wu, J J; Xu, Z W; Song, J; Zhao, D S; Li, K S; Wang, X; Yang, H H; Wen, L Y; Su, H; Tong, S L

    2017-06-01

    Bacillary dysentery continues to be a major health issue in developing countries and ambient temperature is a possible environmental determinant. However, evidence about the risk of bacillary dysentery attributable to ambient temperature under climate change scenarios is scarce. We examined the attributable fraction (AF) of temperature-related bacillary dysentery in urban and rural Hefei, China during 2006-2012 and projected its shifting pattern under climate change scenarios using a distributed lag non-linear model. The risk of bacillary dysentery increased with the temperature rise above a threshold (18·4 °C), and the temperature effects appeared to be acute. The proportion of bacillary dysentery attributable to hot temperatures was 18·74% (95 empirical confidence interval (eCI): 8·36-27·44%). Apparent difference of AF was observed between urban and rural areas, with AF varying from 26·87% (95% eCI 16·21-36·68%) in urban area to -1·90% (95 eCI -25·03 to 16·05%) in rural area. Under the climate change scenarios alone (1-4 °C rise), the AF from extreme hot temperatures (>31·2 °C) would rise greatly accompanied by the relatively stable AF from moderate hot temperatures (18·4-31·2 °C). If climate change proceeds, urban area may be more likely to suffer from rapidly increasing burden of disease from extreme hot temperatures in the absence of effective mitigation and adaptation strategies.

  10. Plants used for treatment of dysentery and diarrhoea by the Bhoxa community of district Dehradun, Uttarakhand, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gairola, Sumeet; Sharma, Jyotsana; Gaur, R D; Siddiqi, T O; Painuli, R M

    2013-12-12

    Dysentery and diarrhoea are major causes of morbidity and mortality in rural communities of developing world. The Bhoxa community is an important primitive indigenous community of Uttarakhand, India. In this paper we have tried to scientifically enumerate ethnomedicinal plants and herbal preparations used by Bhoxa community to treat dysentery and diarrhoea, and discuss their antidiarrhoeal properties in the light of previous ethnomedicinal, pharmacological, microbiological and phytochemical studies. To record plants and herbal preparations used by Bhoxa community of district Dehradun, Uttarakhand, India in treatment of dysentery and diarrhoea, and to discuss antidiarrhoeal and antimicrobial properties of the recorded plants. Ethnomedicinal survey was conducted in different villages of Bhoxa community located in district Dehradun, Uttarakhand, India. Thirty Bhoxa traditional healers were interviewed to collect information on plants used by them for treating dysentery and diarrhoea. For each of the recorded plant species the use value (UV) and fidelity level (FL) was calculated. Detailed literature survey was conducted to summarize ethnomedicinal, pharmacological, microbiological and phytochemical information on the medicinal plants listed in the present study. Fifty medicinal plants (45 genera and 30 families) were used by Bhoxa community to treat dysentery and diarrhoea, among which 27 species were used for dysentery, 41 for diarrhoea and 18 for both dysentery and diarrhoea. Three plants viz., Dioscorea bulbifera L., Euphorbia thymifolia L. and Prunus persica (L.) Stokes, recorded in the present survey have been reported for the first time in treatment of dysentery and diarrhoea by any indigenous communities in India. FL and UV values revealed that most preferred species for the treatment of dysentery and diarrhoea by Bhoxa community are Euphorbia hirta L. followed by Holarrhena pubescens Wall., Helicteres isora L. and Cassia fistula L. Earlier pharmacological

  11. The Effects of Floods on the Incidence of Bacillary Dysentery in Baise (Guangxi Province, China) from 2004 to 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuena; Liu, Zhidong; Zhang, Ying; Jiang, Baofa

    2017-02-12

    Research shows potential effects of floods on intestinal infections. Baise, a city in Guangxi Province (China) had experienced several floods between 2004 and 2012 due to heavy and constant precipitation. This study aimed to examine the relationship between floods and the incidence of bacillary dysentery in Baise. A mixed generalized additive model and Spearman correlation were applied to analyze the relationship between monthly incidence of bacillary dysentery and 14 flood events with two severity levels. Data collected from 2004 to 2010 were utilized to estimate the parameters, whereas data from 2011 to 2012 were used to validate the model. There were in total 9255 cases of bacillary dysentery included in our analyses. According to the mixed generalized additive model, the relative risks (RR) of moderate and severe floods on the incidence of bacillary dysentery were 1.40 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.16-1.69) and 1.78 (95% CI: 1.61-1.97), respectively. The regression analysis also indicated that the flood duration was negatively associated with the incidence of bacillary dysentery (with RR: 0.57, 95% CI: 0.40-0.86). Therfore, this research suggests that floods exert a significant part in enhancing the risk of bacillary dysentery in Baise. Moreover, severe floods have a higher proportional contribution to the incidence of bacillary dysentery than moderate floods. In addition, short-term floods may contribute more to the incidence of bacillary dysentery than a long-term flood. The findings from this research will provide more evidence to reduce health risks related to floods.

  12. The Effects of Floods on the Incidence of Bacillary Dysentery in Baise (Guangxi Province, China from 2004 to 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuena Liu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Research shows potential effects of floods on intestinal infections. Baise, a city in Guangxi Province (China had experienced several floods between 2004 and 2012 due to heavy and constant precipitation. This study aimed to examine the relationship between floods and the incidence of bacillary dysentery in Baise. A mixed generalized additive model and Spearman correlation were applied to analyze the relationship between monthly incidence of bacillary dysentery and 14 flood events with two severity levels. Data collected from 2004 to 2010 were utilized to estimate the parameters, whereas data from 2011 to 2012 were used to validate the model. There were in total 9255 cases of bacillary dysentery included in our analyses. According to the mixed generalized additive model, the relative risks (RR of moderate and severe floods on the incidence of bacillary dysentery were 1.40 (95% confidence interval (CI: 1.16–1.69 and 1.78 (95% CI: 1.61–1.97, respectively. The regression analysis also indicated that the flood duration was negatively associated with the incidence of bacillary dysentery (with RR: 0.57, 95% CI: 0.40–0.86. Therfore, this research suggests that floods exert a significant part in enhancing the risk of bacillary dysentery in Baise. Moreover, severe floods have a higher proportional contribution to the incidence of bacillary dysentery than moderate floods. In addition, short-term floods may contribute more to the incidence of bacillary dysentery than a long-term flood. The findings from this research will provide more evidence to reduce health risks related to floods.

  13. A cytotoxic haemolysin from Treponema hyodysenteriae--a probable virulence determinant in swine dysentery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysons, R J; Kent, K A; Bland, A P; Sellwood, R; Robinson, W F; Frost, A J

    1991-02-01

    The haemolysin from a virulent strain of Treponema hyodysenteriae was extracted and injected into ligated loops of the ileum and colon of germ-free pigs. It caused severe epithelial damage, especially to the differentiated cells at the tips of the villi in the ileum and the cells in the intercrypt zones of the colon; goblet cells were less affected. The changes in the colon were similar to those seen in natural cases of swine dysentery. The ligated loop offers a means of investigating pathogenic mechanisms and the mode of action of the toxin. This study demonstrated that the haemolysin was a potent cytotoxin for pig enterocytes, and a probable virulence determinant in swine dysentery.

  14. Swine dysentery: protection of pigs by oral and parenteral immunisation with attenuated Treponema hyodysenteriae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, M J; Alexander, T J; Lysons, R J; Prescott, J F

    1976-11-01

    An attenuated strain of Treponema hyodysenteriae was used to immunise 18 pigs in three experiments. Live attenuated spirochaetes were dosed orally and injected intra-peritoneally, and killed spirochaetes were injected intramuscularly with adjuvant. The vaccinated pigs, which developed high serum agglutination titres against T hyodysenteriae, and 18 unvaccinated litter-mates were repeatedly challenged with virulent T hyodysenteriae. Nine vaccinated pigs and 16 control pigs developed typical swine dysentery.

  15. Therapeutic effects of various concentrations of lincomycin in drinking water on experimentally transmitted swine dysentery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdy, A H

    1978-07-01

    Three experimental studies were conducted in 232 growing pigs (8 to 12 weeks old) to evaluate the therapeutic effects of various concentrations of lincomycin in drinking water, against swine dysentery experimentally transmitted, by oral inoculation or by contact-commingling exposure. Four or 5 concentrations of lincomycin were used in each experiment (132, 66, 33, 16.5 or 0.0 mg/L of drinking water). Medication was initiated 7 to days after exposure and was continued for 6 to 10 days. Both methods of exposure were capable of transmitting the disease successfully. A more marked dose response was noticed in pigs inoculated orally than in pigs that were exposed by contact. All concentrations of lincomycin were effective for the treatment of swine dysentery by oral or by contact exposure. At the smaller concentration of 16.5 mg/L of drinking water, lincomycin was less effective for treating the disease than it was at greater concentrations. The suggested optimal concentration was 33 mg of lincomycin/L of drinking water for the treatment of swine dysentery.

  16. The changing epidemiology of bacillary dysentery and characteristics of antimicrobial resistance of Shigella isolated in China from 2004-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Zhaorui; Zhang, Jing; Ran, Lu; Sun, Junling; Liu, Fengfeng; Luo, Li; Zeng, Lingjia; Wang, Liping; Li, Zhongjie; Yu, Hongjie; Liao, Qiaohong

    2016-11-18

    Bacillary dysentery caused by bacteria of the genus Shigella is a significant public health problem in developing countries such as China. The objective of this study was to analyze the epidemiological pattern of bacillary dysentery, the diversity of the causative agent, and the antimicrobial resistance patterns of Shigella spp. for the purpose of determining the most effective allocation of resources and prioritization of interventions. Surveillance data were acquired from the National Infectious Disease Information Reporting System (2004-2014) and from the sentinel hospital-based surveillance system (2005-2014). We analyzed the spatial and temporal distribution of bacillary dysentery, age and sex distribution, species diversity, and antimicrobial resistance patterns of Shigella spp. The surveillance registry included over 3 million probable cases of bacillary dysentery during the period 2004-2014. The annual incidence rate of bacillary dysentery decreased from 38.03 cases per 100,000 person-years in 2004 to 11.24 cases per 100,000 person-years in 2014. The case-fatality rate decreased from 0.028% in 2004 to 0.003% in 2014. Children aged Shigella flexneri was the most prevalent species that caused bacillary dysentery in China (63.86%), followed by Shigella sonnei (34.89%). Shigella isolates were highly resistant to nalidixic acid (89.13%), ampicillin (88.90%), tetracycline (88.43%), and sulfamethoxazole (82.92%). During the study period, isolates resistant to ciprofloxacin and cefotaxime increased from 8.53 and 7.87% in 2005 to 44.65 and 29.94% in 2014, respectively. The incidence rate of bacillary dysentery has undergone an obvious decrease from 2004 to 2014. Priority interventions should be delivered to populations in northwest China and to individuals aged Shigella is a serious public health problem and it is important to consider the susceptibility profile of isolates before determining treatment.

  17. Cefotaximase and AmpC-producing Shigella flexneri in case of dysentery from southern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Oommen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Diarrhoea and dysentery caused by Shigella spp. are major public health concerns. Emerging multidrug resistance (MDR in this pathogen further complicates this disease. Extended spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs have been described in this pathogen, which significantly compromises the treatment options for shigellosis. The usual ESBLs seen are sulfhydryl variable (SHV-type; cefotaximases (CTX-M are very uncommonly detected. Here, we report a CTX-M type and AmpC-producing Shigella flexneri from a three-year-old boy residing in Central Kerala, South India.

  18. Blood concentrations of the cytokines IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-10, TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma during experimentally induced swine dysentery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensen-Waern Marianne

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge of the cytokine response at infection with Brachyspira hyodysenteriae can help understanding disease mechanisme involved during swine dysentery. Since this knowledge is still limited the aim of the present study was to induce dysentery experimentally in pigs and to monitor the development of important immunoregulatory cytokines in blood collected at various stages of the disease. Methods Ten conventional pigs (~23 kg were orally inoculated with Brachyspira hyodysenteriae B204T. Eight animals developed muco-haemorrhagic diarrhoea with impaired general body condition. Blood was sampled before inoculation and repeatedly during acute dysentery and recovery periods and cytokine levels of IL-1β, IL-6, Il-10, TNF-α and IFN-γ were measured by ELISA. Results IL-1β was increased at the beginning of the dysentery period and coincided with the appearance of Serum amyloid A and clinical signs of disease. TNF-α increased in all animals after inoculation, with a peak during dysentery, and IL-6 was found in 3 animals during dysentery and in the 2 animals that did not develop clinical signs of disease. IL-10 was found in all sick animals during the recovery period. IFN-γ was not detected on any occasion. Conclusion B. hyodysenteriae inoculation induced production of systemic levels of IL-1β during the dysentery period and increased levels of IL-10 coincided with recovery from dysentery.

  19. The changing epidemiology of bacillary dysentery and characteristics of antimicrobial resistance of Shigella isolated in China from 2004–2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaorui Chang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacillary dysentery caused by bacteria of the genus Shigella is a significant public health problem in developing countries such as China. The objective of this study was to analyze the epidemiological pattern of bacillary dysentery, the diversity of the causative agent, and the antimicrobial resistance patterns of Shigella spp. for the purpose of determining the most effective allocation of resources and prioritization of interventions. Methods Surveillance data were acquired from the National Infectious Disease Information Reporting System (2004–2014 and from the sentinel hospital-based surveillance system (2005–2014. We analyzed the spatial and temporal distribution of bacillary dysentery, age and sex distribution, species diversity, and antimicrobial resistance patterns of Shigella spp. Results The surveillance registry included over 3 million probable cases of bacillary dysentery during the period 2004–2014. The annual incidence rate of bacillary dysentery decreased from 38.03 cases per 100,000 person-years in 2004 to 11.24 cases per 100,000 person-years in 2014. The case-fatality rate decreased from 0.028% in 2004 to 0.003% in 2014. Children aged <1 year and 1–4 years were most affected, with higher incidence rates (228.59 cases per 100,000 person-years and 92.58 cases per 100,000 person-years respectively. The annual epidemic season occurred between June and September. A higher incidence rate of bacillary dysentery was found in the Northwest region, Beijing and Tianjin during the study period. Shigella flexneri was the most prevalent species that caused bacillary dysentery in China (63.86%, followed by Shigella sonnei (34.89%. Shigella isolates were highly resistant to nalidixic acid (89.13%, ampicillin (88.90%, tetracycline (88.43%, and sulfamethoxazole (82.92%. During the study period, isolates resistant to ciprofloxacin and cefotaxime increased from 8.53 and 7.87% in 2005 to 44.65 and 29.94% in 2014

  20. Association of Serpulina hyodysenteriae with the colonic mucosa in experimental swine dysentery studied by fluorescent in situ hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tim Kåre; Boye, Mette; Møller, Kristian

    1998-01-01

    The localization of Serpulina hyodysenteriae in experimental swine dysentery was studied by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) using an oligonucleotide probe targeting the 23S rRNA of S. hyodysenteriae. Nine 8-week-old pigs were challenged. Seven of the pigs were intragastrically dosed with 1......x10(9) cfu S. hyodysenteriae for 3 consecutive days, whereas two pigs were infected by contact. Six non-challenged pigs served as negative controls. The challenged pigs developed clinical swine dysentery from 8 to 14 days postinfection with typical gross lesions. By FISH S. hyodysenteriae cells...

  1. The extant World War 1 dysentery bacillus NCTC1: a genomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Kate S; Mather, Alison E; McGregor, Hannah; Coupland, Paul; Langridge, Gemma C; Day, Martin; Deheer-Graham, Ana; Parkhill, Julian; Russell, Julie E; Thomson, Nicholas R

    2014-11-08

    Shigellosis (previously bacillary dysentery) was the primary diarrhoeal disease of World War 1, but outbreaks still occur in military operations, and shigellosis causes hundreds of thousands of deaths per year in developing nations. We aimed to generate a high-quality reference genome of the historical Shigella flexneri isolate NCTC1 and to examine the isolate for resistance to antimicrobials. In this genomic analysis, we sequenced the oldest extant Shigella flexneri serotype 2a isolate using single-molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing technology. Isolated from a soldier with dysentery from the British forces fighting on the Western Front in World War 1, this bacterium, NCTC1, was the first isolate accessioned into the National Collection of Type Cultures. We created a reference sequence for NCTC1, investigated the isolate for antimicrobial resistance, and undertook comparative genetics with S flexneri reference strains isolated during the 100 years since World War 1. We discovered that NCTC1 belonged to a 2a lineage of S flexneri, with which it shares common characteristics and a large core genome. NCTC1 was resistant to penicillin and erythromycin, and contained a complement of chromosomal antimicrobial resistance genes similar to that of more recent isolates. Genomic islands gained in the S flexneri 2a lineage over time were predominately associated with additional antimicrobial resistances, virulence, and serotype conversion. This S flexneri 2a lineage is a well adapted pathogen that has continued to respond to selective pressures. We have created a valuable historical benchmark for shigellae in the form of a high-quality reference sequence for a publicly available isolate. The Wellcome Trust. Copyright © 2014 Baker et al. Open Access article distributed under the terms of CC BY. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Application of Poisson kriging to the mapping of cholera and dysentery incidence in an endemic area of Bangladesh

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    Haq M Zahirul

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Disease maps can serve to display incidence rates geographically, to inform on public health provision about the success or failure of interventions, and to make hypothesis or to provide evidences concerning disease etiology. Poisson kriging was recently introduced to filter the noise attached to rates recorded over sparsely populated administrative units. Its benefit over simple population-weighted averages and empirical Bayesian smoothers was demonstrated by simulation studies using county-level cancer mortality rates. This paper presents the first application of Poisson kriging to the spatial interpolation of local disease rates, resulting in continuous maps of disease rate estimates and the associated prediction variance. The methodology is illustrated using cholera and dysentery data collected in a cholera endemic area (Matlab of Bangladesh. Results The spatial analysis was confined to patrilineally-related clusters of households, known as baris, located within 9 kilometers from the Matlab hospital to avoid underestimating the risk of disease incidence, since patients far away from the medical facilities are less likely to travel. Semivariogram models reveal a range of autocorrelation of 1.1 km for dysentery and 0.37 km for cholera. This result translates into a cholera risk map that is patchier than the dysentery map that shows a large zone of high incidence in the south-central part of the study area, which is quasi-urban. On both maps, lower risk values are found in the Northern part of the study area, which is also the most distant from the Matlab hospital. The weaker spatial continuity of cholera versus dysentery incidence rates resulted in larger kriging variance across the study area. Conclusion The approach presented in this paper enables researchers to incorporate the pattern of spatial dependence of incidence rates into the mapping of risk values and the quantification of the associated uncertainty. Differences

  3. Randomized intervention study of solar disinfection of drinking water in the prevention of dysentery in Kenyan children aged under 5 years

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Du Preez, M

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The authors report the results of a randomized controlled intervention study (September 2007 to March 2009) investigating the effect of solar disinfection (SODIS) of drinking water on the incidence of dysentery, nondysentery diarrhea...

  4. [Epidemic of bacillary dysentery in the Rwanda refugee camps of the Goma region (Zaire, North Kivu) in August 1994].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milleliri, J M; Soares, J L; Signoret, J; Bechen, R; Lamarque, D; Boutin, J P; Coué, J C; Niel, L; Merouze, F; Rey, J L

    1995-09-01

    The authors describe the extension of an outbreak of bacillary dysentery among the Rwandese populations seeking refuge in the region of Goma, Zaire in august 1994. Analysis of the epidemiological surveillance data and of the bacteriological laboratory results of the Bioforce, show that this epidemic was probably facilitated by the preceding cholera outbreak. In such circumstances, rapid sterilization of the virus reservoir, by short course treatments, might be beneficial in limiting the extension of the epidemic.

  5. The other Campylobacters: Not innocent bystanders in endemic diarrhea and dysentery in children in low-income settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    François, Ruthly; Yori, Pablo Peñataro; Rouhani, Saba; Siguas Salas, Mery; Paredes Olortegui, Maribel; Rengifo Trigoso, Dixner; Pisanic, Nora; Burga, Rosa; Meza, Rina; Meza Sanchez, Graciela; Gregory, Michael J; Houpt, Eric R; Platts-Mills, James A; Kosek, Margaret N

    2018-02-01

    Campylobacter is one of the main causes of gastroenteritis worldwide. Most of the current knowledge about the epidemiology of this food-borne infection concerns two species, C. coli and C. jejuni. Recent studies conducted in developing countries and using novel diagnostic techniques have generated evidence of the increasing burden and importance of other Campylobacter species, i.e. non-C. coli/jejuni. We performed a nested case-control study to compare the prevalence of C. coli/jejuni and other Campylobacter in children with clinical dysentery and severe diarrhea as well as without diarrhea to better understand the clinical importance of infections with Campylobacter species other than C. coli/jejuni. Our nested case-control study of 439 stool samples included dysenteric stools, stools collected during severe diarrhea episodes, and asymptomatic stools which were systematically selected to be representative of clinical phenotypes from 9,160 stools collected during a birth cohort study of 201 children followed until two years of age. Other Campylobacter accounted for 76.4% of the 216 Campylobacter detections by qPCR and were more prevalent than C. coli/jejuni across all clinical groups. Other Campylobacter were also more prevalent than C. coli/jejuni across all age groups, with older children bearing a higher burden of other Campylobacter. Biomarkers of intestinal inflammation and injury (methylene blue, fecal occult test, myeloperoxidase or MPO) showed a strong association with dysentery, but mixed results with infection. MPO levels were generally higher among children infected with C. coli/jejuni, but Shigella-infected children suffering from dysentery recorded the highest levels (26,224 ng/mL); the lowest levels (10,625 ng/mL) were among asymptomatic children infected with other Campylobacter. Adjusting for age, sex, and Shigella infection, dysentery was significantly associated with C. coli/jejuni but not with other Campylobacter, whereas severe diarrhea was

  6. The other Campylobacters: Not innocent bystanders in endemic diarrhea and dysentery in children in low-income settings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruthly François

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter is one of the main causes of gastroenteritis worldwide. Most of the current knowledge about the epidemiology of this food-borne infection concerns two species, C. coli and C. jejuni. Recent studies conducted in developing countries and using novel diagnostic techniques have generated evidence of the increasing burden and importance of other Campylobacter species, i.e. non-C. coli/jejuni. We performed a nested case-control study to compare the prevalence of C. coli/jejuni and other Campylobacter in children with clinical dysentery and severe diarrhea as well as without diarrhea to better understand the clinical importance of infections with Campylobacter species other than C. coli/jejuni.Our nested case-control study of 439 stool samples included dysenteric stools, stools collected during severe diarrhea episodes, and asymptomatic stools which were systematically selected to be representative of clinical phenotypes from 9,160 stools collected during a birth cohort study of 201 children followed until two years of age. Other Campylobacter accounted for 76.4% of the 216 Campylobacter detections by qPCR and were more prevalent than C. coli/jejuni across all clinical groups. Other Campylobacter were also more prevalent than C. coli/jejuni across all age groups, with older children bearing a higher burden of other Campylobacter. Biomarkers of intestinal inflammation and injury (methylene blue, fecal occult test, myeloperoxidase or MPO showed a strong association with dysentery, but mixed results with infection. MPO levels were generally higher among children infected with C. coli/jejuni, but Shigella-infected children suffering from dysentery recorded the highest levels (26,224 ng/mL; the lowest levels (10,625 ng/mL were among asymptomatic children infected with other Campylobacter. Adjusting for age, sex, and Shigella infection, dysentery was significantly associated with C. coli/jejuni but not with other Campylobacter, whereas severe

  7. The Rising Dominance of Shigella sonnei: An Intercontinental Shift in the Etiology of Bacillary Dysentery.

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    Corinne N Thompson

    Full Text Available Shigellosis is the major global cause of dysentery. Shigella sonnei, which has historically been more commonly isolated in developed countries, is undergoing an unprecedented expansion across industrializing regions in Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East. The precise reasons underpinning the epidemiological distribution of the various Shigella species and this global surge in S. sonnei are unclear but may be due to three major environmental pressures. First, natural passive immunization with the bacterium Plesiomonas shigelloides is hypothesized to protect populations with poor water supplies against S. sonnei. Improving the quality of drinking water supplies would, therefore, result in a reduction in P. shigelloides exposure and a subsequent reduction in environmental immunization against S. sonnei. Secondly, the ubiquitous amoeba species Acanthamoeba castellanii has been shown to phagocytize S. sonnei efficiently and symbiotically, thus allowing the bacteria access to a protected niche in which to withstand chlorination and other harsh environmental conditions in temperate countries. Finally, S. sonnei has emerged from Europe and begun to spread globally only relatively recently. A strong selective pressure from localized antimicrobial use additionally appears to have had a dramatic impact on the evolution of the S. sonnei population. We hypothesize that S. sonnei, which exhibits an exceptional ability to acquire antimicrobial resistance genes from commensal and pathogenic bacteria, has a competitive advantage over S. flexneri, particularly in areas with poorly regulated antimicrobial use. Continuing improvement in the quality of global drinking water supplies alongside the rapid development of antimicrobial resistance predicts the burden and international distribution of S. sonnei will only continue to grow. An effective vaccine against S. sonnei is overdue and may become one of our only weapons against this increasingly dominant and

  8. Spatiotemporal pattern of bacillary dysentery in China from 1990 to 2009: what is the driver behind?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiwei Xu

    Full Text Available Little is known about the spatiotemporal pattern of bacillary dysentery (BD in China. This study assessed the geographic distribution and seasonality of BD in China over the past two decades.Data on monthly BD cases in 31 provinces of China from January 1990 to December 2009 obtained from Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, and data on demographic and geographic factors, as well as climatic factors, were compiled. The spatial distributions of BD in the four periods across different provinces were mapped, and heat maps were created to present the seasonality of BD by geography. A cosinor function combined with Poisson regression was used to quantify the seasonal parameters of BD, and a regression analysis was conducted to identify the potential drivers of morbidity and seasonality of BD.Although most regions of China have experienced considerable declines in BD morbidity over the past two decades, Beijing and Ningxia still had high BD morbidity in 2009. BD morbidity decreased more slowly in North-west China than other regions. BD in China mainly peaked from July to September, with heterogeneity in peak time between regions. Relative humidity was associated with BD morbidity and peak time, and latitude was the major predictor of BD amplitude.The transmission of BD was heterogeneous in China. Improved sanitation and hygiene in North-west China, and better access to clean water and food in the big floating population in some metropolises could be the focus of future preventive interventions against BD. BD control efforts should put more emphasis on those dry areas in summer.

  9. An Investigation into the Etiological Agents of Swine Dysentery in Australian Pig Herds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom La

    Full Text Available Swine dysentery (SD is a mucohemorrhagic colitis, classically seen in grower/finisher pigs and caused by infection with the anaerobic intestinal spirochete Brachyspira hyodysenteriae. More recently, however, the newly described species Brachyspira hampsonii and Brachyspira suanatina have been identified as causing SD in North America and/or Europe. Furthermore, there have been occasions where strains of B. hyodysenteriae have been recovered from healthy pigs, including in multiplier herds with high health status. This study investigated whether cases of SD in Australia may be caused by the newly described species; how isolates of B. hyodysenteriae recovered from healthy herds compared to isolates from herds with disease; and how contemporary isolates compare to those recovered in previous decades, including in their plasmid gene content and antimicrobial resistance profiles. In total 1103 fecal and colon samples from pigs in 97 Australian herds were collected and tested. Of the agents of SD only B. hyodysenteriae was found, being present in 34 (35.1% of the herds, including in 14 of 24 (58% herds that had been considered to be free of SD. Multilocus sequence typing applied to 96 isolates from 30 herds and to 53 Australian isolates dating from the 1980s through the early 2000s showed that they were diverse, distinct from those reported in other countries, and that the 2014/16 isolates generally were different from those from earlier decades. These findings provided evidence for ongoing evolution of B. hyodysenteriae strains in Australia. In seven of the 20 herds where multiple isolates were available, two to four different sequence types (STs were identified. Isolates with the same STs also were found in some herds with epidemiological links. Analysis of a block of six plasmid virulence-associated genes showed a lack of consistency between their presence or absence and their origin from herds currently with or without disease; however

  10. A survey of medicinal plants used in the treatment of dysentery in amathole district municipality, south africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afolayan, A.J.; Wintola, O.A.

    2014-01-01

    In view of the prevalence of dysentery in developing countries such as South Africa and the erosion of indigenous knowledge of phytomedicine due to lack of interest by the young generation, a survey of five local municipalities of Amathole district, Eastern Cape Province was carried out in 2012. A questionnaire-guided interview of the indigenous people by random sampling was done with the help of an interpreter during a survey of the district. Fifty-five (55) respondents participated in the study. The respondents comprised of 25% traditional medical practitioners, 15% herb-sellers and 15% rural elders. Fifty-one (51) plants species of 32 families were documented. Fabaceae had the highest representation of seven (14%) plant species used for the treatment of dysentery; some other families were Asphodelaceae, Apiaceae, Geraniaceae, Anacardiaceae, Bignoniaceae, Ebenaceae, Euphorbiaceae, Hyacinthaceae, Asclepiadiaceae, Acanthaceae, Asteraceae, Balanophaceae, Celstraceae, Convolvulaceae, Cornaceae, Iridaceae, and Hydronaceae. The medicinal plants with the highest frequency of prescription were Hydnora africana and Alepidea amatymbica. The plants were used singly or in combination in recipes. Leaves (28%) had the highest use-value of plant parts, followed by the roots (24%), bark (22%) and the whole plant (9%). Methods of preparation of recipes were decoction, infusion and tincture. The use of recipe as an enema was also documented. The study of the pharmacology and mode of action of the plants will contribute immensely to their therapeutic value. (author)

  11. Solar disinfection of drinking water in the prevention of dysentery in South African children under 5 years: the role of participant motivation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Du Preez, M

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This 1-year randomized controlled trial investigated the effect of SODIS of drinking water and motivation on the incidence of dysentery and nondysentery diarrhea among children of age 6 months to 5 years living in periurban communities in South...

  12. Temperature and atmospheric pressure may be considered as predictors for the occurrence of bacillary dysentery in Guangzhou, Southern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiegang Li

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The control of bacillary dysentery (BD remains a big challenge for China. Methods Negative binomial multivariable regression was used to study relationships between meteorological variables and the occurrence of BD during the period of 2006-2012. Results Each 1°C rise of temperature corresponded to an increase of 3.60% (95%CI, 3.03% to 4.18% in the monthly number of BD cases, whereas a 1 hPa rise in atmospheric pressure corresponded to a decrease in the number of BD cases by 2.85% (95%CI = 3.34% to 2.37% decrease. Conclusions Temperature and atmospheric pressure may be considered as predictors for the occurrence of BD in Guangzhou.

  13. Applied mixed generalized additive model to assess the effect of temperature on the incidence of bacillary dysentery and its forecast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiping Ma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Association between bacillary dysentery (BD disease and temperature has been reported in some studies applying Poisson regression model, however the effect estimation might be biased due to the data autocorrelation. Furthermore the temperature effect distributed in the time of different lags has not been studied either. The purpose of this work was to obtaining the association between the BD counts and the climatic factors such as temperature in the form of the weighted averages, concerning the autocorrelation pattern of the model residuals, and to make short term predictions using the model. The data was collected in the city of Shanghai from 2004 to 2008. METHODS: We used mixed generalized additive model (MGAM to analyze data on bacillary dysentery, temperature and other covariates with autoregressive random effect. Short term predictions were made using MGAM with the moving average of the BD counts. MAIN RESULTS: Our results showed that temperature was significant linearly associated with the logarithm of BD count for temperature in the range from 12°C to 22°C. Optimal weights in the temperature effect have been obtained, in which the one of 1-day-lag was close to 0, and the one of 2-days-lag was the maximum (p-value of the difference was less than 0.05. The predictive model was showing good fitness on the internal data with R(2 value 0.875, and the good short term prediction effect on the external data with correlation coefficient to be 0.859. CONCLUSION: According to the model estimation, corresponding Risk Ratio to affect BD was close to 1.1 when temperature effect goes up for 1°C in the range from 12°C to 22°C. And the 1-day incubation period could be inferred from the model estimation. Good prediction has been made using the predictive MGAM.

  14. Treatment rates for injectable tiamulin and lincomycin as an estimate of morbidity in a swine herd with endemic swine dysentery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walczak, Krysia; Friendship, Robert; Brockoff, Egan; Greer, Amy; Poljak, Zvonimir

    2017-05-01

    Treatment can be used as an indirect measure of morbidity, and treatment records can be used to describe disease patterns in a population. The aim of this study was to describe the rates of treatments with tiamulin and lincomycin by the intramuscular route in cohorts of pigs affected by swine dysentery. Data from treatment records from 19 cohorts of a 1500-head grower-finisher barn were analyzed using Poisson regression to determine factors associated with rates of treatment. Serial interval and reproductive numbers were extracted. Treatment rates displayed marked seasonality. The mean serial interval was estimated at 17 d with variability among batches. In the early period of most cohorts, the effective reproductive number did not exceed 1, and the highest estimate was 2.15 (95% CI: 1.46, 3.20). The average days-to-first treatment was 4.8 which suggests that pigs could have been infected at time of entry. The information about possible sources of infection and likely seasonality should be considered when developing disease and infection control measures in affected barns.

  15. Impact of meteorological factors on the incidence of bacillary dysentery in Beijing, China: A time series analysis (1970-2012.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Yan

    Full Text Available Influence of meteorological variables on the transmission of bacillary dysentery (BD is under investigated topic and effective forecasting models as public health tool are lacking. This paper aimed to quantify the relationship between meteorological variables and BD cases in Beijing and to establish an effective forecasting model.A time series analysis was conducted in the Beijing area based upon monthly data on weather variables (i.e. temperature, rainfall, relative humidity, vapor pressure, and wind speed and on the number of BD cases during the period 1970-2012. Autoregressive integrated moving average models with explanatory variables (ARIMAX were built based on the data from 1970 to 2004. Prediction of monthly BD cases from 2005 to 2012 was made using the established models. The prediction accuracy was evaluated by the mean square error (MSE.Firstly, temperature with 2-month and 7-month lags and rainfall with 12-month lag were found positively correlated with the number of BD cases in Beijing. Secondly, ARIMAX model with covariates of temperature with 7-month lag (β = 0.021, 95% confidence interval(CI: 0.004-0.038 and rainfall with 12-month lag (β = 0.023, 95% CI: 0.009-0.037 displayed the highest prediction accuracy.The ARIMAX model developed in this study showed an accurate goodness of fit and precise prediction accuracy in the short term, which would be beneficial for government departments to take early public health measures to prevent and control possible BD popularity.

  16. Comparison of Brachyspira hyodysenteriae Isolates Recovered from Pigs in Apparently Healthy Multiplier Herds with Isolates from Herds with Swine Dysentery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom La

    Full Text Available Swine dysentery (SD is a mucohaemorrhagic colitis of grower/finisher pigs classically resulting from infection by the anaerobic intestinal spirochaete Brachyspira hyodysenteriae. This study aimed to determine whether B. hyodysenteriae isolates from pigs in three healthy German multiplier herds supplying gilts to other farms differed from isolates from nine German production herds with SD. Isolates were subjected to whole genomic sequencing, and in silico multilocus sequence typing showed that those from the three multiplier herds were of previously undescribed sequence types (ST132, ST133 and ST134, with all isolates from the same herd having the same ST. All isolates were examined for the presence of 332 genes encoding predicted virulence or virulence lifestyle associated factors, and these were well conserved. Isolates from one multiplier herd were atypical in being weakly haemolytic: they had 10 amino acid substitutions in the haemolysin III protein and five in the haemolysin activation protein compared to reference strain WA1, and had a disruption in the promoter site of the hlyA gene. These changes likely contribute to the weakly haemolytic phenotype and putative lack of virulence. These same isolates also had nine base pair insertions in the iron metabolism genes bitB and bitC and lacked five of six plasmid genes that previously have been associated with colonisation. Other overall differences between isolates from the different herds were in genes from three of five outer membrane proteins, which were not found in all the isolates, and in members of a block of six plasmid genes. Isolates from three herds with SD had all six plasmid genes, while isolates lacking some of these genes were found in the three healthy herds-but also in isolates from six herds with SD. Other differences in genes of unknown function or in gene expression may contribute to variation in virulence; alternatively, superior husbandry and better general health may have

  17. INVESTIGATION OF DYSENTERY (1)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    On 12 December 2008, several cases of bloody diarrhoea visited Jimma University. Specialized ... factory. Therefore, screening of food handlers need to be conducted in a regular manner. ... Despite the risk, epidemiological studies regarding ...

  18. Identification of a New Antimicrobial Resistance Gene Provides Fresh Insights Into Pleuromutilin Resistance in Brachyspira hyodysenteriae, Aetiological Agent of Swine Dysentery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roderick M. Card

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Brachyspira hyodysenteriae is the aetiological agent of swine dysentery, a globally distributed disease that causes profound economic loss, impedes the free trade and movement of animals, and has significant impact on pig health. Infection is generally treated with antibiotics of which pleuromutilins, such as tiamulin, are widely used for this purpose, but reports of resistance worldwide threaten continued effective control. In Brachyspira hyodysenteriae pleuromutilin resistance has been associated with mutations in chromosomal genes encoding ribosome-associated functions, however the dynamics of resistance acquisition are poorly understood, compromising stewardship efforts to preserve pleuromutilin effectiveness. In this study we undertook whole genome sequencing (WGS and phenotypic susceptibility testing of 34 UK field isolates and 3 control strains to investigate pleuromutilin resistance in Brachyspira hyodysenteriae. Genome-wide association studies identified a new pleuromutilin resistance gene, tva(A (tiamulin valnemulin antibiotic resistance, encoding a predicted ABC-F transporter. In vitro culture of isolates in the presence of inhibitory or sub-inhibitory concentrations of tiamulin showed that tva(A confers reduced pleuromutilin susceptibility that does not lead to clinical resistance but facilitates the development of higher-level resistance via mutations in genes encoding ribosome-associated functions. Genome sequencing of antibiotic-exposed isolates identified both new and previously described mutations in chromosomal genes associated with reduced pleuromutilin susceptibility, including the 23S rRNA gene and rplC, which encodes the L3 ribosomal protein. Interesting three antibiotic-exposed isolates harboured mutations in fusA, encoding Elongation Factor G, a gene not previously associated with pleuromutilin resistance. A longitudinal molecular epidemiological examination of two episodes of swine dysentery at the same farm indicated

  19. Seasonal and geographical distribution of bacillary dysentery (shigellosis) and associated climate risk factors in Kon Tam Province in Vietnam from 1999 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hu Suk; Ha Hoang, T T; Pham-Duc, Phuc; Lee, Mihye; Grace, Delia; Phung, Dac Cam; Thuc, Vu Minh; Nguyen-Viet, Hung

    2017-06-21

    Bacillary dysentery (BD) is an acute bacterial infection of the intestine caused by Shigella spp., with clinical symptoms ranging from fever to bloody diarrhoea to abdominal cramps to tenesmus. In Vietnam, enteric bacterial pathogens are an important cause of diarrhoea and most cases in children under 5 years of age are due to Shigella strains. The serogroups S. flexneri and S. sonnei are considered to be the most common. The main objective of this study was to, for the first time, assess the seasonal patterns and geographic distribution of BD in Vietnam, and to determine the climate risk factors associated with the incidence of BD in Kon Tum Province, where the highest rate of bacillary dysentery was observed from 1999 to 2013. The seasonal patterns and geographic distribution of BD was assessed in Vietnam using a seasonal-trend decomposition procedure based on loess. In addition, negative binomial regression models were used to determine the climate risk factors associated with the incidence of BD in Kon Tum Province, from 1999 to 2013. Overall, incidence rates of BD have slightly decreased over time (except for an extremely high incidence in 2012 in the north of Vietnam). The central regions (north/south central coast and central highlands) had relatively high incidence rates, whereas the northwest/east and Red River Delta regions had low incidence rates. Overall, seasonal plots showed a high peak in the mid-rainy reason and a second smaller peak in the early or late rainy season. The incidence rates significantly increased between May and October ("wet season") across the country. In Kon Tum Province, temperature, humidity, and precipitation were found to be positively associated with the incidence of BD. Our findings provide insights into the seasonal patterns and geographic distribution of BD in Vietnam and its associated climate risk factors in Kon Tum Province. This study may help clinicians and the general public to better understand the timings of

  20. Epidemiological characterization of resistance and PCR typing of Shigella flexneri and Shigella sonnei strains isolated from bacillary dysentery cases in Southeast Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.P.A. Penatti

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Shigella spp are Gram-negative, anaerobic facultative, non-motile, and non-sporulated bacilli of the Enterobacteriaceae family responsible for "Shigellosis" or bacillary dysentery, an important cause of worldwide morbidity and mortality. However, despite this, there are very few epidemiological studies about this bacterium in Brazil. We studied the antibiotic resistance profiles and the clonal structure of 60 Shigella strains (30 S. flexneri and 30 S. sonnei isolated from shigellosis cases in different cities within the metropolitan area of Campinas, State of São Paulo, Brazil. We used the following well-characterized molecular techniques: enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus, repetitive extragenic palindromic, and double-repetitive element-polymerase chain reaction to characterize the bacteria. Also, the antibiotic resistance of the strains was determined by the diffusion disk method. Many strains of S. flexneri and S. sonnei were found to be multi-resistant. S. flexneri strains were resistant to ampicillin in 83.3% of cases, chloramphenicol in 70.0%, streptomycin in 86.7%, sulfamethoxazole in 80.0%, and tetracycline in 80.0%, while a smaller number of strains were resistant to cephalothin (3.3% and sulfazotrim (10.0%. S. sonnei strains were mainly resistant to sulfamethoxazole (100.0% and tetracycline (96.7% and, to a lesser extent, to ampicillin (6.7% and streptomycin (26.7%. Polymerase chain reaction-based typing supported the existence of specific clones responsible for the shigellosis cases in the different cities and there was evidence of transmission between cities. This clonal structure would probably be the result of selection for virulence and resistance phenotypes. These data indicate that the human sanitary conditions of the cities investigated should be improved.

  1. On the etiology of an outbreak of winter dysentery in dairy cows in Brazil Sobre a etiologia de um surto de disenteria de inverno em vacas leiteiras no Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo E. Brandão

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Winter dysentery (WD is a seasonal infectious disease described worldwide that causes a marked decrease in milk production in dairy cows. In the Northern hemisphere, where the disease is classically recognized, bovine coronavirus (BCoV has been assigned as a major etiologic agent of the disease. Nonetheless, in the Southern hemisphere, an in-deep etiological survey on WD cases had not been carried out. This study aimed to survey for BCoV by nested-RT-PCR, rotavirus by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE and ELISA, bacteria by classical bacteriological methods and PCR for virulence factors and parasites by sugar flotation test on fecal samples of 21 cows from a farm during an outbreak of WD in São Paulo state, Southeastern Brazil. BCoV was detected in all 21 samples, while rotavirus was detected in two symptomatic cows. Escherichia coli, Yersinia intermedia, Providencia rustigianii Proteus penneri, Klebsiella terrigena and Enterobacter aglomerans were detected in samples from both asymptomatic and healthy cows in different associations. The study of E. coli virulence factors revealed that the strains isolated were all apathogenic. Cysts of Eimeria sp. and eggs of Strongyloidea were detected at low numbers in four of the symptomatic cows, with one co-infestation. These results suggest BCoV as the main etiologic agent of the cases of WD in Brazil, a conclusion that, with the clinical and epidemiological patterns of the disease studied herein, match those already described elsewhere. These findings give basis to the development of preventive measures and contribute to the understanding of the etiology of WD.Em vacas leiteiras, a disenteria de inverno (DI é uma doença infecciosa sazonal mundialmente relatada que ocasiona uma marcada queda na produção de leite; no hemisfério Norte, onde a doença é classicamente reconhecida, o coronavirus bovino (BCoV tem um importante papel como agente etiológico. Entretanto, no hemisfério Sul

  2. Achados clínico patológicos durante um surto de disenteria de inverno em bovinos no Rio Grande do Sul Clinic pathological features during a winter dysentery outbreak in cattle in Rio Grande do Sul

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saulo Petinatti Pavarini

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Descreve-se um surto de disenteria de inverno que afetou 10 vacas leiteiras de uma propriedade localizada em Viamão, Rio Grande do Sul. O quadro clínico caracterizou-se por uma diarréia inicialmente líquida esverdeada com estrias de sangue e muco, evoluindo, em alguns animais, para uma diarréia de coloração marrom escura à sanguinolenta, que persistiu, em média, cinco dias. Drástica diminuição na produção de leite e no consumo de alimentos, além de graus variados de depressão também foram observados. Apenas um dos 10 animais afetados morreu. Durante a necropsia, observaram-se mucosas pálidas, conteúdo sanguinolento com presença de grande quantidade de coágulos, principalmente no cólon espiral e petéquias na mucosa do cólon. Os principais achados histológicos foram encontradas no cólon espiral, onde havia criptas dilatadas, sem epitélio de revestimento ou revestidas por epitélio pavimentoso e/ou cuboidal, por vezes com núcleos grandes e nucléolos proeminentes. Algumas criptas eram preenchidas por debris necróticos e polimorfonucleares. Na imuno-histoquímica com anticorpo monoclonal para coronavírus bovino (8F2 em cortes do cólon espiral, havia marcações positivas no citoplasma de enterócitos das criptas, nos debris necróticos destas e em macrófagos na lâmina própria.The report describes a winter dysentery outbreak that affected 10 dairy cows from a ranch located in the county of Viamão, Rio Grande do Sul. The most significant clinical sign was profuse and watery diarrhea, which ranged from a greenish to a brownish coloration and from occasional blood streaks with mucus to a bloody diarrhea. Most cases persisted for 5 days and also included depression, drastic decrease in milk production and in food consumption. Only one of the affected animals died. The necropsy revealed pale mucosa and sanguineous content with high quantity of blood clots, particularly within the spiral colon, and petechiae on the

  3. Influence of tiamulin therapy on weight gain in Brachyspira dysentery in piglets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru Octavian Doma

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of research was to evaluate the therapeutic and economic efficiency (daily individual weight gain / observation period of two available tiamulin fumarate antibiotic conditionings (one oral and one injectable in a farm environment, were Brachyspira evolution was suspicioned and confirmed. The experiment was conducted in a pig growing and fattening unit from Timis County, constituted as an intensive system. The sick piglets manifested acute clinical signs, mainly: drowsiness, enophtalmia, kyphosis and the sanguinolent diarrhoea in all cases. Clinical and morphopathologic suspicion was confirmed by the laboratory and bacterioscopic examination, which ascertained the presence of Brachyspira hyodysenteriae. Consequently, were chosen 48 ill piglets from the age group of 35 to 45 days and three experimental therapeutic (T and one Control (C groups were constituted as follows: group T1 - oral way treatment for five consecutive days with Tiamutin 45% soluble granules (Ceva, at doses of 6 and 8 mg.kg.bw., (for group T2 and respectively Tiamutin 10% injectable (Dopharma (T3, 8mg.kg.bw-1 I.M., four consecutive days. Study duration was 21 days, revealing the economic superiority of the oral conditionings vs. injectable of tiamulin fumarate and also the therapeutic efficiency of this form as primal choice in the enteric disease outbreaks.

  4. Epidemic shigella dysentery in children in northern KwaZulu-Natal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sex, clinical features, complications and outcome. Results. Between February and December 1995, 158 cases of bloody diarrhoea were admitted, compared with. 6 the previous year. Shigella dysenteriae type I, resistant to ampicillin, tetraCYCline, chloramphenicol, trimethoprim and sulphamethoxazole, but susceptible to ...

  5. Shigella-specific IgA in saliva of children with bacillary dysentery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schultsz, C.; Qadri, F.; Hossain, S. A.; Ahmed, F.; Ciznar, I.

    1992-01-01

    To study the secretory immune response after Shigella infection, the anti-lipopolysaccharide and anti-Shiga-toxin response in saliva, obtained from children with confirmed shigellosis and healthy children, were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and by Western blot. Children with

  6. Increased amount of Bifidobacterium thermacidophilum and Megasphaera elsdenii in the colonic microbiota of pigs fed a swine dysentery preventive diet containing chicory roots and sweet lupine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølbak, Lars; Thomsen, L.E.; Jensen, Tim Kåre

    2007-01-01

    Aims: To investigate which specific bacterial species that were stimulated or inhibited in the proximal colon of pigs when a fructan-rich diet was compared with a diet that contained resistant carbohydrates. The study focussed especially on Bifidobacterial species by using a noncultureable approa...

  7. Disease: H00299 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available H00299 Shigellosis; Bacillary dysentery Shigellosis (bacillary dysentery) is a food...t and bloody diarrhea, and tenesmus. Transmission usually occurs via contaminated food and water or through

  8. Protection of rats by extracts of some common Nigerian trees against ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GRACE

    2006-05-02

    May 2, 2006 ... Leaves. Tranquilizer, diaphoretic, vertigo, otitis, headaches, migraine, childhood fever, dysentery, haemorrhoid. Vitellaria paradoxa. Root. Gastritis, liver cancer, female sterility, ascites. Bark. Dysentery, haemorrhoids, schistosomiasis, coughs,. Jaundices, nausea, diarrhoea, constipation, headaches, fever.

  9. Phytochemical screening and antimicrobial activities of leaf extracts ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The plant S. macrophylla is commonly used traditionally for the treatment of diarrhoea, wound, headache, malaria, dysentery and fevers. The overall results confirm the significance of the use of the plant in traditional medicinal treatment of diarrhea, wound, headache, malaria, dysentery and fevers, in line with reported ...

  10. Mangosteen

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is used for diarrhea, urinary tract infections (UTIs), gonorrhea, thrush, tuberculosis, menstrual disorders, cancer, osteoarthritis, and an ... as follows:Dysentery. Diarrhea. Urinary tract infections (UTIs). Gonorrhea. Thrush. Tuberculosis. Eczema. Menstrual disorders. Other conditions. More ...

  11. Drug: D00409 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available moniasis [DS:H00812] Intestinal amebiasis (amebic dysentery) [DS:H00360] Anaerobic bacterial infections [DS:H01410] Bacterial endocar...ditis [DS:H00334] ... Nitroimidazole derivative Trichomonas infection ... Enzyme: CYP2A6

  12. Phytochemical constituents and effects of aqueous root-bark extract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-11-02

    Nov 2, 2009 ... tional medicinal uses in the treatment of snake bites, jaundice, chest pains, dysentery, .... ties of this plant for the treatment of psychiatry disease as claimed by traditional ... Royal Botanical Garden Kew. pp. 415-440. Evans WC ...

  13. East African Medical Journal - Vol 76, No 5 (1999)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Intrafamilial person-to-person spread of bacillary dysentery due to shigelza dysenteriae in Southwestern Saudi Arabia · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. HE El Bushra, AA Bin Saeed ...

  14. Cytotoxicity, phytochemical analysis and antioxidant activity of crude ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Elephantorrhiza elephantina (Ee) and Pentanisia prunelloides (Pp) are two medicinal plants which are widely used to remedy various ailments including diarrhoea, dysentery, inflammation, fever, rheumatism, heartburn, tuberculosis, haemorrhoids, skin diseases, perforated peptic ulcers and sore joints in ...

  15. Estimating Selected Disease and Non-Battle Injury Echelon I and Echelon II Outpatient Visits of U.S. Soldiers and Marines in an Operational Setting from Corresponding Echelon III (Hospitalization) Admissions in the Same Theater of Operation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kilian, Dennis B

    2000-01-01

    .... This has been demonstrated throughout history from Napoleon's typhus outbreak in the retreat from Moscow, to Merrill's Maraders' dysentery outbreak in Burma, and to the US Forces-Somalia dengue and malaria outbreak...

  16. Antimicrobial Activity of Garcinia kola

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    treatment of dysentery, bronchitis and throat infections. (Braide ... for parasitic skin disease while the latex (gum) is used internally ..... sulphate sodium-induced colitis in rats. ... (Herckel) On Gastric acidity and Experimental Ulceration in. Rats.

  17. Antimicrobial Susceptibility Patterns of Brachyspira Species Isolated from Swine Herds in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Mirajkar, Nandita S.; Davies, Peter R.; Gebhart, Connie J.

    2016-01-01

    Outbreaks of swine dysentery, caused by Brachyspira hyodysenteriae and the recently discovered “Brachyspira hampsonii,” have reoccurred in North American swine herds since the late 2000s. Additionally, multiple Brachyspira species have been increasingly isolated by North American diagnostic laboratories. In Europe, the reliance on antimicrobial therapy for control of swine dysentery has been followed by reports of antimicrobial resistance over time. The objectives of our study were to determi...

  18. Antibiotic susceptibility of Brachyspira hyodysenteriae isolates from Czech swine farms: a 10-year follow-up study

    OpenAIRE

    Josef Prášek; Daniel Šperling; Dana Lobová; Jiří Smola; Alois Čížek

    2014-01-01

    Brachyspira hyodysenteriae is the causative agent of swine dysentery. Loss of clinical efficacy of some antimicrobial agents authorized for treating swine dysentery was observed on certain Czech pig farms. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antimicrobial sensitivity of six antibiotics using a set of 202 randomly selected B. hyodysenteriae isolates obtained from farms in the Czech Republic between years 1997 and 2006. Minimum inhibitory concentration of antibiotics tylosin, linco...

  19. LATAR BELAKANG KARAKTERISTIK RESPONDED DALAM PENCEGAHAN PENYAKIT SHIGELLA/DISENTRI YANG DILAKUKAN OLEH MASYARAKAT DI JAKARTA UTARA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kartika Handayani

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The Research was conducted in North Jakarta and Selected 2 district in Jakarta North that is Tanjung Priok and Koja district as a research region. About 300 respondents which include 140 men and 151 woman from Tanjung Priok district. In Koja district was taken 200 respondents that consist of 101 men and 99 woman. Data processing done with double entry, by using program ISSA (Integrated Survey Analysis and Analysis Data used SPSS (Statistic Package for Social Science. The Research shown 88,7%-89,2% prevent spicy food can overcome dysentery disease of, 55.2% improving clean water can be temporary prevention of dysentery disease, and 56,4%-56,6% personal hygiene able to handle dysentery disease forever. By repairing bathroom (usually used for bath, wash, dump faeces 57.1%-58.4% and fixing garbage 56,2%-57,2% can prevent dysentery disease temporary, while 97,2%-97,4% of drinking traditional medicine (jamu also happen the same thing with dysentery disease. Based on respondents, 96,5%-96,6% using its own medicine/ingredient will prevent dysentery disease. According respondents habit on wash hand about 84.4% respondents wash their hand firstly in the morning and 74.2% washing band before sleep but 64.4% respondents who never wash their band before get dressed. From this research inferential respondents belief to prevent eat spicy food, improving readily clean water, bathroom, garbage place, efficacious of traditional drink, ingredients, washing band habit can be major factors that can prevent community from dysentery disease. The research is part of social Behavior Culture in Overcome Shigella Disease in Jakarta. Keywords: Respondent, Preventing, Shigella Disease

  20. Identification and management of Shigella infection in children with diarrhoea: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tickell, Kirkby D; Brander, Rebecca L; Atlas, Hannah E; Pernica, Jeffrey M; Walson, Judd L; Pavlinac, Patricia B

    2017-12-01

    Shigella infections are a leading cause of diarrhoeal death among children in low-income and middle-income countries. WHO guidelines reserve antibiotics for treating children with dysentery. Reliance on dysentery for identification and management of Shigella infection might miss an opportunity to reduce Shigella-associated morbidity and mortality. We aimed to systematically review and evaluate Shigella-associated and dysentery-associated mortality, the diagnostic value of dysentery for the identification of Shigella infection, and the efficacy of antibiotics for children with Shigella or dysentery, or both. We did three systematic reviews (for mortality, diagnostic value, and antibiotic treatment of Shigella and dysentery), and meta-analyses where appropriate, of studies in resource-limited settings. We searched MEDLINE, Embase, and LILACS database for studies published before Jan 1, 2017, in English, French, and Spanish. We included studies of human beings with diarrhoea and accepted all study-specific definitions of dysentery. For the mortality and diagnostic value searches, we excluded studies that did not include an effect estimate or data necessary to calculate this estimate. The search for treatment included only randomised controlled trials that were done after Jan 1, 1980, and assessed antibiotics in children (aged Shigella. We extracted or calculated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% CIs for relative mortality and did random-effects meta-analysis to arrive at pooled ORs. We calculated 95% CIs assuming a binomial distribution and did random-effects meta-regression of log-transformed sensitivity and specificity estimates for diagnostic value. We assessed the heterogeneity of papers included in these meta-analyses using the I 2 statistic and evaluated publication bias using funnel plots. This review is registered with PROSPERO (CRD42017063896). 3649 papers were identified and 60 studies were included for analyses: 13 for mortality, 27 for diagnostic value, and 20 for

  1. in vitro antimicrobial activity of crude extracts from plants

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Clement Adewunmi

    are prepared and administered the same way. Bryophyllum pinnatum is used in ethnomedicine generally for the treatment of ear-ache, cough, diarrhoea, dysentery, abscesses, ulcers, insect bites, heart-troubles, epilepsy, arthritis, dysmenorrhea and whitlow (Gill, 1992). In southern Nigeria, it is used to facilitate the dropping ...

  2. Antimicrobial activity of extracts of leaves of Pseudocedrela kotschyi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hope&shola

    2010-11-08

    Nov 8, 2010 ... and leaves are used to treat rheumatism and dysentery. In Northern Nigeria, the plant serves as an occasional ingredient for use in arrow poison (Oliver-Bever, 1986). In. West Africa, it has been established that the root of P. kotschyi is widely used as chewing sticks for dental cleaning (Akande and Hayashi, ...

  3. Phytochemical and Antibacterial Properties of Leaf Extract of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    acer

    treat coughs and are used in treatment of ulcers, leprosy, skin eruptions and venereal diseases, while the stem bark decoction or infusion is used to cure bronchitis, pneumonia, cough, rheumatic arthritis and dysentery (Gill, 1992). The twigs are chewed to clean teeth and to treat toothache. The roots and leaves have been ...

  4. Scalable Emergency Response System for Oceangoing Assets Report on Defining Proposed Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-17

    electropherogram of RNA extracted from ocean water spiked with Salmonella sp ...meningoencephalitis Waterborne Balantidium coli Balantidosis (dysentery) Waterborne Cryptosporidium Cryptosporidiosis Waterborne Entamoeba histolytica Amoebic...extracted from ocean water spiked with Salmonella sp . The significance of bioanalyzer results lays in bands labeled as 23S rRNA in Figure 2 and 3. The

  5. Possible antimicrobial activity of Morinda lucida stem bark, leaf and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MR FAKOYA AKINDELE

    2014-01-15

    Jan 15, 2014 ... are used in the treatment of different types of diseases. Roots, barks or leaves of Newbolbea leavis are used in the treatment of dysentery, syphilis, ear ache, ringworm and scrotal elephantiasis (Azoro, 2002.) Morinda lucida known as Oruwo in the South-Western part of Nigeria is a medium sized tree with a ...

  6. Reiters syndrome – a case report and review of literature | Alebiosu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The occurrence of Reiter's Syndrome is rare and not commonly reported in Nigeria. This paper reports a case of a 35yr old male Nigerian with Reiter's Syndrome, occurring 1-2 weeks after a bout of a dysenteric illness. The patient presented with fever, conjunctivitis, dysentery, urethritis and arthralgia. The joint pains ...

  7. Download this PDF file

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJTCAM

    Amaranthus tricolor whole plants are used by folk medicinal practitioners of Bangladesh for treatment of pain, anaemia, dysentery, skin diseases, diabetes, and as a blood purifier. Thus far, no scientific studies have evaluated the antihyperglycaemic and antinociceptive effects of the plant. The present study was carried out ...

  8. Phytochemical screening and antimicrobial activity of roots, stem ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The roots, stem-bark and leaves of Grewia mollis which is used as herbal remedies for the cure of diarrhea and dysentery by natives in northern part of Nigeria were studied. The ethanol and water extracts of roots, stem-bark and leaves of the plant were subjected to phytochemical screening and antimicrobial activity against ...

  9. BKR 27(2) pp. 89-97 (Sunmonu et al)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Femi J. Olorunniji

    2015-06-30

    Jun 30, 2015 ... are used as analgesic and in the treatment of sexual diseases, malaria, dysentery, stroke, heart failure, gonorrhea, arthritis, diabetes, snake bites ..... Traditional Medical Development for medical and dental primary. Health care .... of coronary artery disease in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus,” American.

  10. SURVEY OF WILD PLANT SEEDS AND THEIR VALUE IN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    disease, asthma, dysentery and piles. Seeds from tree species accounted for 23 ... SURVEY OF WILD PLANT SEEDS AND THEIR VALUE IN TRADITONAL HERBAL MEDICINE IN OSUN STATE, NIGERIA. INTRODUCTION. Seeds are fertilized ..... dynamics and regeneration of a logged over secondary regrowth forest.Ph.D.

  11. Anti-venom potentials of Friedelin isolated from hexane extract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... taenicidal, cough remedy, dysentery, cancer, diabetes mellitus, tuberculosis and snake bite remedy. In this report, an attempt has been made to evaluate the bioactive molecules in the plant that are anti-venom agents. Consequently, the stem bark was exhaustively extracted with hexane and subsequently with methanol.

  12. The Nepalese Army in Internal Peace and Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-14

    with observers from the Roman Catholic Church and United Nations (UN) in Mexico City, Mexico . Due to low interest in the subject, little literature...the country suffer from forest fires during the summer or epidemics of cholera or dysentery, all of which demand emergency attention. The NA has been

  13. Al Qaida and Yemen- Is Our Current Policy Good Enough?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-23

    thus contributing to waterborne diseases such as cholera and bacterial dysentery. In fact, waterborne diseases help to contribute to 70% of Yemen‟s...the capture of the United States born cleric Anwar al-Awlaki. As eluded to earlier, al-Awlaki, born in New Mexico , “is the evil genius behind AQAP‟s

  14. Separation and Identification of Four New Compounds with Antibacterial Activity from Portulaca oleracea L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Lei

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Portulaca oleracea L. (P. oleracea has been used to treat bacillary dysentery for thousands of years in China. Pharmacology studies on P. oleracea have also showed its significant antibacterial effects on the enteropathogenic bacteria, which might reveal the treatment of P. oleracea in cases of bacillary dysentery to some extent. To date, however, the therapeutic basis of P. oleracea treating on bacillary dysentery remains unknown. We determined the antibacterial effective fraction of P. oleracea in a previous study. The current study, which is based on our previous study, was first designed to isolate, identify and screen antibacterial active constituents from P. oleracea. As a result, four new compounds (1–4, portulacerebroside B (1, portulacerebroside C (2, portulacerebroside D (3 and portulaceramide A (4 along with five known compounds (5–9 were isolated, and structures were established by their physico-chemical constants and spectroscopic analysis. The antibacterial activities against common enteropathogenic bacteria were evaluated for all compounds and the new compounds 1–4 showed significant antibacterial effect on enteropathogenic bacteria in vitro, which might contribute to revealing the treatment of P. oleracea in cases of bacillary dysentery.

  15. Separation and Identification of Four New Compounds with Antibacterial Activity from Portulaca oleracea L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Xia; Li, Jianmin; Liu, Bin; Zhang, Ning; Liu, Haiyang

    2015-09-10

    The Portulaca oleracea L. (P. oleracea) has been used to treat bacillary dysentery for thousands of years in China. Pharmacology studies on P. oleracea have also showed its significant antibacterial effects on the enteropathogenic bacteria, which might reveal the treatment of P. oleracea in cases of bacillary dysentery to some extent. To date, however, the therapeutic basis of P. oleracea treating on bacillary dysentery remains unknown. We determined the antibacterial effective fraction of P. oleracea in a previous study. The current study, which is based on our previous study, was first designed to isolate, identify and screen antibacterial active constituents from P. oleracea. As a result, four new compounds (1-4), portulacerebroside B (1), portulacerebroside C (2), portulacerebroside D (3) and portulaceramide A (4) along with five known compounds (5-9) were isolated, and structures were established by their physico-chemical constants and spectroscopic analysis. The antibacterial activities against common enteropathogenic bacteria were evaluated for all compounds and the new compounds 1-4 showed significant antibacterial effect on enteropathogenic bacteria in vitro, which might contribute to revealing the treatment of P. oleracea in cases of bacillary dysentery.

  16. Unit Ministry Team Religious Support to Casualties on the Airland Battlefield

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-10-28

    Dysentery, Mod 248 Gastrits, Acute 249 Peptic Ulcer, Severe 250 Peptic Ulcer, Mod 251 Regional Ileitis 252 Regional Ileitis, Mod 253 Helminthiasis ...Severe 254 Helminthiasis , Mod 255 Migraine, acute 256 Varicosities, Severe 257 Varicosities, Mod 258 Essential Hypertension 2,)9 Ischemic Heart

  17. Constituents of the arial parts of Eupatorium odoratum L. ( Syn. Chromolaena odorata) (L.) R.M. King And H Robinson), family compositae-grown in Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trang, N.T.D.; Phuong, L.V.N.; Dung, N.X.; Leclercq, P.A.; Wanner, M.J.; Koomen, C.J.; Fokkens, R.

    1994-01-01

    Eupatorium odoratum (L.), Family Compositae grows very fast in various places of the world, especially in tropical countries. This plant belonges to one of the worst plants. Some applications of this plant used for treatment of diseases such as disrrhoea, dysentery and scabies have been found in

  18. High compliance randomized controlled field trial of solar disinfection of drinking water and its impact on childhood diarrhea in rural Cambodia

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    McGuigan, KG

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available of a 1 year randomized controlled trial investigating the effect of SODIS of drinking water on the incidence of dysentery and nondysentery diarrhea among children of age 6 months to 5 years living in rural communities in Cambodia. They compared 426...

  19. Microbicidal effect of the lactoferrin peptides Lactoferricin17-30, Lactoferrampin265-284, and Lactoferrin chimera on the parasite Entamoeba histolytica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    López-Soto, F.; León-Sicairos, N.; Nazmi, K.; Bolscher, J.G.; de la Garza, M.

    2010-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is a parasitic protozoan that produces amoebiasis, an intestinal disease characterized by ulcerative colitis and dysentery. In some cases, trophozoites can travel to the liver leading to hepatic abscesses and death. Recently, lactoferrin and lactoferricin B have been shown to

  20. Preliminary Phytochemical, Antimicrobial and Acute Toxicity Studies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2010-10-11

    Oct 11, 2010 ... Full Length Research Paper ... The oil had a saponification value of 363 and an acid value of 4.21. The lethal ... fruits are used for dysentery and the leaves extract for .... The acid value of 4.21 is lower than that of olive oil (6.6).

  1. Faecal egg counts and expulsion dynamics of the whipworm, Trichuris trichiura following self-infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, E P; Tejedor, A M; Thamsborg, S M

    2015-01-01

    More than 400 million humans are estimated to be infected with the intestinal helminth parasite, Trichuris trichiura. The infection is chronic in nature and high-intensity infection can lead to colitis, anaemia, Trichuris Dysentery Syndrome and reduced cognitive performance. Single doses of 400 m...... as the fecundity of female worms, which was around 18,000 eggs/female per day....

  2. Download this PDF file

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    takes place. Some hypothesis to ... for a few days to 2-3 weeks and mimics dysentery or ... One of the cases was diagnosed as food poisoning, a second as a case of hypovolemic shock and the third also as .... kills parasitic intestinal protozoa.

  3. Anti-Trichomonal Activities Of Extracts And Furocoumarins Of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hence, use of this plant as a spice similar to the carbazole-producing M. koenigii would confer on the user additional protection against trichomonads and may confirm the ethnomedicinal uses of the plants in the treatment of protozoal diseases such as amoebiasis, dysentery and trichomoniasis as well as represent a ...

  4. Hexane extract of Dacryodes edulis fruits possesses anti-diabetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The fruit extract of Dacryodes edulis (D. edulis), the African pear or plum, a tree indigenous to the humid tropics has been used for managing wounds, skin diseases, sickle cell anaemia, dysentery and fever in some African nations. In South Eastern Nigeria, 'herbal doctors' include its marshed fruit in decoctions ...

  5. Ficus benghalensis L. also spelt as Ficus bengalensis (English ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... furniture, crates, door panels and cart-shafts. The props are used for tent poles and umbrella handles. The leaves are used as fodder for cattle and elephants. The milky latex is applied externally for treating pains in rheumatism and in lumbago. The infusion of the bark is used against dysentery, diarrhoea and diabetes.

  6. Pterocarpus marsupium Roxb. ofLeguminosae is a lofty tree ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The native natural strands of this tree are fast disappearing due to over exploitation. This has led to inclusion of this plant in the list of endangered species. Extracts of tender vegetative regions of this plant are used as remedy for diarrhoea, dysentery, fever and toothache. The aqueous infusion of the wood is believed to ...

  7. Susceptibility and HLA-B27 in post-dysenteric arthropathies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bohemen, C. G.; Lionarons, R. J.; van Bodegom, P.; Dinant, H. J.; Landheer, J. E.; Nabbe, A. J.; Grumet, F. C.; Zanen, H. C.

    1985-01-01

    A recent outbreak of bacillary dysentery in The Netherlands revealed that, despite the close association of HLA-B27 with post-dysenteric or reactive arthritis (ReA), not even in one family did all HLA-B27 positive patients infected by an arthritogenic bacterium, develop ReA. This dissociation shows

  8. Chemical composition profiling and antifungal activity of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Essential oil from Mesembryanthemum edule leaves have been used by the Eastern Cape traditional healers for the treatment of respiratory tract infections, tuberculosis, dysentery, diabetic mellitus, laryngitis and vaginal infections. The investigation of bioactive compounds in the essential oil of this plant could ...

  9. AJTCAM PROOF

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJTCAM

    Quite a number of the plants have been reported to contain bio-active phytochemicals with important .... Acidity, diabetes, jaundice, peptic ulcer, dysentery, fever in children, ... Constipation, eczema, heat stroke, rheumatoid arthritis, nervous ...... Methodology for collecting and sharing indigenous knowledge: a case study.

  10. Khan et al., Afr J Tradit Complement Altern Med. (2015) 12(2):60-64 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cadewumi

    alkalinity, chronic catarrh, renal disorders, dyspepsia, bloody dysentery and coronary (Madhavashetty et al., 2008), vomiting (Khan et al., 2013), leucoderma, antiviral, lymphatic glyndular system disease, antidiabetic, rectal prolapsus, aphrodisiac, anti-cholesterol, impetigo and carbubuncles (Nardkarnis, 2008; Pullaiah and ...

  11. How Effective was Field Marshal William Slim as an Operational Artist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-17

    Division having conducted an unidentified flanking maneuver to threaten his Division rear area. Slim, bedridden with dysentery, was also surprised at...Ashes: The Indian Army in the Burma Campaign. Westport: Praeger Publishers, 2003. Matheny, Michael R . The Roots of Modern American Operational Art

  12. 2000-IJBCS-Article-Yelezouomin Stéphane

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hp

    Étude de la prévalence des maladies liées à l'eau et influences des facteurs ... plus répandue, suivie de la fièvre typhoïde et la dysenterie. Les eaux ..... épidémiologiques sont les seuls instruments .... d'origines hydrique et comme outil d'aide.

  13. The combined effects of starvation and pH on the virulence of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACER

    2013-04-17

    Apr 17, 2013 ... route is the primary mode of transmission. It is respon- sible for a worldwide health problem; however, it is a serious concern in developing countries. It is estimated that Shigella spp. account for 1.1 million deaths and 165 million cases of dysentery annually worldwide. Shigellosis has a high morbidity and ...

  14. Antibacterial and Anti-Biofilm Activity of Flavonoids and Triterpenes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative Medicines ... Background: Ficus species are used in African traditional medicine in the treatment of a wide variety of ailments and diseases such as convulsive disorder, wound healing, gonorrhea, tuberculosis, diabetes, diarrhoeal infections, dysentery, malaria ...

  15. Gossypol content on leaves and seeds from some wild Malvaceae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The toxic effects of gossypol earlier observed against several parasitic protozoa and viruses makes these findings very important, since the Malvaceae specimens studied here have been used in traditional medicine against scalp infection, dysentery, gonorrhea and as antiseptic. On the other hand, it is also noteworthy that ...

  16. Mimusops elengi L. (Bulletwood tree; Hindi: Bakul or Maulsari) of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tree is often cultivated in parks and as an avenue tree. The fascicled flowers are small, white and sweet-scented. The ovoid berries are edible. The bark is astringent, tonic and used in fevers. Leaves are an antidote to snake-bite. The pulp of the fruit is used in curing chronic dysentery. Powder of dried flowers is a brain tonic.

  17. [Notes about other epidemics in Colonial Chile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laval, Enrique

    2015-10-01

    In chronicles or in the historiography of the Colony in Chile there are few references about epidemics different to smallpox; like typhus, typhoid fever, dysentery, etc. Almost all, fast spreading in the country and some with high lethality, which led to overflowing the capacity of hospitals in the Chilean colonial period.

  18. HLA-B27M1M2 and high immune responsiveness to Shigella flexneri in post-dysenteric arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bohemen, C. G.; Nabbe, A. J.; Landheer, J. E.; Grumet, F. C.; Mazurkiewicz, E. S.; Dinant, H. J.; Lionarons, R. J.; van Bodegom, P. C.; Zanen, H. C.

    1986-01-01

    The heterogeneous HLA-B27 antigen is closely associated with post-infectious or reactive arthritis (ReA) and is comprised of two serologically defined variants: B27M1+M2+ and B27M1+M2-. An outbreak of dysentery (n = 120) caused by a Shigella flexneri 2a strain, which possessed cell envelope antigens

  19. Molecular characterization of Shigella spp. from patients in Gabon 2011-2013

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaumburg, Frieder; Alabi, Abraham S.; Kaba, Harry; Lell, Bertrand; Becker, Karsten; Grobusch, Martin P.; Kremsner, Peter G.; Mellmann, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Shigella spp. dysentery is widespread in developing countries; the incidence is particularly high in children between 1-2 years of age. In sub-Saharan Africa, there is a paucity of epidemiological data on Shigella spp., with possible negative consequences for recognition and correct treatment choice

  20. Shigellosis Caused by CTX-M Type ESBL Producing Shigella flexneri in Two Siblings of Rural Nepal: First Case Report from the Country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayan Prasad Parajuli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Shigellosis is an acute infectious disease characterized as severe bloody diarrhea (dysentery and is accountable for a significant burden of morbidity and mortality especially in children under the age of 5 years. Antimicrobial therapy is required in the cases of severe dysentery associated with Shigella. However, emergence of multidrug resistant (MDR strains of Shigella spp. over the last two decades has restricted the use of common therapeutic antimicrobials. In MDR strains, the third-generation cephalosporins have been used for the treatment, but, unfortunately, emerging reports of enzyme mediated β-lactam resistance among Shigella isolates from various parts of the world have greatly compromised the therapy of pediatric dysentery. In Nepal, drug resistant strains of Shigella spp. have been reported, but MDR and extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL producing strains were previously unknown. Here, we report two Shigella flexneri isolates harboring ESBL genotype-CTX-M associated with acute dysentery in two siblings which were presented and treated in a tertiary care teaching hospital of Kathmandu, Nepal.

  1. Water, Water Everywhere, but What's in the Pipes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoober, Scott

    1997-01-01

    Waterborne diseases like cholera, typhoid, and dysentery are not problematic in the United States. Most industrial and agricultural chemicals are neutralized by existing treatment technology, but cryptosporidium contamination can occur in dysfunctional treatment/filtration systems. Bottled water is no better than tap water. Awareness is better…

  2. Life style of people and surveillance of management related to cockroaches in Southern Punjab, Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    NAEEM, Afifa; JALEEL, Waqar; SAEED, Qamar; ZAKA, Syed Muhammad; SAEED, Shafqat; NAQQASH, Muhammad Nadir; BAKHTAWAR, Marryam; AYUB, Waleed Bin

    2014-01-01

    Cockroaches are the major household pests which prefer humid areas for habitation i.e. bathrooms, kitchens, sewerage systems etc., where warmth, moisture and food are satisfactory. Cockroaches are responsible for transmitting microorganisms like pathogenic bacteria, virus and fungi. Some examples of common bacterial diseases of human beings transmitted by cockroaches are Pasteurellapestisand bubonic plague; Shigellaalkalescensand dysentery; Staphylococcus aureusand boils and abscesses; Shigel...

  3. 199 bacteriological quality of water used for ice making in some

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    2010-06-01

    Jun 1, 2010 ... from water related diseases like typhoid and para typhoid fevers, cholera bacillary dysentery and gastroenteritis. Water borne or related pathogens including bacteria are spread in water either through human ingestion of contaminated water or because water provides the habitat for intermediate host.

  4. Phytochemical And In Vitro Antimicrobial Assay Of The Leaf Extract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study has justified the traditional use of this plant for the treatment of stomach discomfort, diarrhea, dysentery and as a remedy for wound healing whose causative agents are some of the organisms used in this study. Keywords: Antimicrobial, Leaf Extracts,In Vitro, Phytochemical, Newbouldia laevis. African Journal of ...

  5. Intervention sensu Wilson: The only valid approach to microbiological safety of food

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mossel, D.A.A.; Kayser, A.

    1984-01-01

    Between December 25th 1983 and January 7th 1984 59 cases of dysentery bacteriologically proven to be caused by Shigella flexneri 2 occurred in the Netherlands. For a further 34 cases of gastroenteritis, strong epidemiological evidence was present to allow the diagnosis of shigellosis. In

  6. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An outbreak of dysentery in a rural district of Zimbabwe: the role of personal hygiene at public gatherings. Abstract · Vol 46, No 9 (2000) - Articles Thyroid status and the levels of thyroid auto-antibodies in the sera of hyperthyroid and goitrous subjects. Abstract · Vol 47, No 11 (2001) - Articles Mercury poisoning: prevalanece ...

  7. Phytochemical and antimicrobial study on the leaf extracts of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The activities observed could be attributed to the presence of terpenoids, saponins, flavonoids, alkaloids and tannins. The results justify the ethnomedicinal use of this plant in the treatment of sores, boils, wounds, dysentery, diarrhea and sexually transmitted infections. Keywords: Erythrophleum africanum, phytochemistry, ...

  8. Chemsearch Journal Volume 4 Number 1, June, 2013

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Magashi

    2016-11-07

    Nov 7, 2016 ... malaria, dysentery and fevers, in line with reported claims. Keywords: INTRODUCTION. Medicinal plants contain organic compounds which could produce definite physiological action on the human body. These bioactive substances could include tannins, alkaloids, terpenoids, steroids and flavonoids etc.

  9. Effects of the ethanolic stem bark extract of pterocarpus erinaceus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This finding might lend credence to the use of the stem bark of the plant in the treatment of diarrhea and dysentery traditionally. From the results of this work and information from literature, flavonoids and tannins identified during phytochemical screening of the extract may be the biologically active components responsible ...

  10. Specific detection of the genus Serpulina, S-hyodysenteriae and S-pilosicoli in porcine intestines by fluorescent rRNA in situ hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boye, Mette; Jensen, Tim Kåre; Møller, Kristian

    1998-01-01

    , for the detection of Serpulina isolates at genus level as well as for specific detection of S. hyodysenteriae and S. pilosicoli in formalin-fixed colon tissue sections from pigs suffering from swine dysentery and porcine colonic spirochaetosis, respectively. Tissue sections were also used from pigs without any...

  11. Sub-Chronic Administration of Aqueous Leaf Extract of Ficus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The stem bark of Ficus sycomorus is used traditionally for cure of fungal infection, jaundice and dysentery in some parts of northern Nigeria. The leaves of Ficus sycomorus were collected, dried and extracted to screen for some phytochemicals and study its effect on liver and kidney functions in experimental rats.

  12. Antibacterial assessment of whole stem bark of Vitex doniana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    diffusion method and the minimum inhibitory concentration. The stem bark extracts were able to inhibit the growth pattern of the tested microorganisms. In all cases Shigella dysentariae showed the highest sensitivity. The results suggest that V. doniana may be valuable in the management of dysentery and gastroenteritis ...

  13. Hypoglycaemic activity of ethanolic leaf extract and fractions of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Holarrhena floribunda is a common plant that has traditionally been used in Africa to treat many diseases such as fever, dysentery, sterility and diabetes. This study was set out to evaluate the hypoglycaemic properties of ethanolic leaf extract of Holarrhena floribunda and various fractions of this extract in normal fasted and ...

  14. Assesment of the water quality and prevalence of water borne ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The water related diseases that were consistently reported and diagnosed for the period are cholera (3.37%), diarrhea (44.94%), dysentery (16.85%), and typhoid fever (34.83%). The quality of the water and the prevalence of water related diseases in the hospitals were casually related to the contamination of the river in the ...

  15. Antimicrobial potential of extracts and fractions of the African walnut ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... and absence of cardiac glycosides. The thin layer chromatographic analysis of the ethyl acetate fraction of the leaf crude extract confirmed the presence of alkaloids and tannis. These could be responsible for observed activity in the leaf of the plant; thus justifying its traditional uses especially in the treatment of dysentery.

  16. Phytochemical and Antimicrobial Screening of Aqueous and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: The aqueous and ethanolic extracts of Annona senegalensis possess phytochemicals with activities against Shigella flexineri a human intestinal pathogen which causes dysentery and Pseudomonas aeruginosa an opportunistic human pathogen which causes all kinds of infections including urinary tract, ...

  17. Haematological studies on the ethanolic stem bark extract of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pterocarpus erinaceus (fabaceae) is used in the Nigerian folk medicine as well as in other African savanna countries to treat diarrhea, dysentery, urethral discharges, fever, and as an ingredient in abortifacient prescriptions. It is also used in arresting bleeding and as a dressing on ring worm of the scalp. The acute toxicity ...

  18. Antibacterial activities and toxicological potentials of crude ethanolic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Leaves of Euphorbia hirta used in traditional medicine for the treatments of boils, wounds and control of diarrhoea and dysentery were extracted by maceration in ethanol. The agar diffusion method was used to determine the antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, ...

  19. Untitled

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    asthma, cough and bronchitis, cold, flu, influenza, diabetes, diarrhoea, dysentery, digestive disorders, ear infections and eye complaints. 25 species belonging to 25 genera were used for common ailments. it was found that plant based remedies were used in effective prescriptions, which are simple, inexpensive, and ...

  20. Microbial quality of drinking water in Dar es Salaam and use of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Despite this, prevalence of waterborne diseases like cholera, dysentery and typhoid are still high. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of Waterguard® in disinfecting drinking water, and determine the level of fecal coliform contamination of water from four sources viz. taps, streams, shallow wells and ...

  1. Pheromones of the housefly : A chemical and behavioural study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noorman, N

    2001-01-01

    Houseflies (Musca domestica L.) often make themselves a nuisance in human and livestock habitations. Moreover, these flies may transmit over a hundred different pathogens. They can transmit intestinal worms or their eggs, and are potential vectors of pathogens of, for example, dysentery,

  2. Metabolic response of porcine colon explants to in vitro infection by Brachyspira hyodysenteriae : a leap into disease pathophysiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welle, Thijs; Hoekstra, Anna T.; Daemen, Ineke A.J.J.M.; Berkers, Celia R.; de Oliveira Costa, Matheus

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Swine dysentery caused by Brachyspira hyodysenteriae is a production limiting disease in pig farming. Currently antimicrobial therapy is the only treatment and control method available. Objective: The aim of this study was to characterize the metabolic response of porcine colon

  3. Preliminary Phytochemical and Antimicrobial Studies of phyllantus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The whole plant of phyllantus amarus Linn (Euphorbiaceae) has wide traditional uses for jaundice, gonorrhoea, frequent menstruation, chronic dysentery and diabetes. Aqueous and methanol extracts were tested against 8 human pathogenic bacterial strains using agar well diffusion and tube macro-dilution techniques.

  4. Treatment of common ailments by plant-based remedies among the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present communication deals with the common diseases treated by plant based remedies such as abdominal pain and worms, asthma, cough and bronchitis, cold, flu, influenza, diabetes, diarrheoa, dysentery, digestive disorders, ear infections and eye complaints. 25 species belonging to 25 genera were used for ...

  5. Molecular epidemiology of bovine coronavirus on the basis of comparative analyses of the S gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Lihong; Hägglund, Sara; Hakhverdyan, Mikhayil

    2006-01-01

    Bovine coronavirus (BCoV), a group 2 member of the genus Coronavirus in the family Coronaviridae, is an important pathogen in cattle worldwide. It causes diarrhea in adult animals (winter dysentery), as well as enteric and respiratory diseases in calves. The annual occurrence of BCoV epidemics...

  6. The humanitarian and scientific interests of Thomas Hodgkin (1798 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... and his involvement in the movement for the abolition of capital punishment and in mental hospital and prison reform. His wide range of scientific interests included medical education, geography, ethnology and social anthropology. He is buried in Jaffa, Israel, where he died of dysentery while on a trip with Montefiore.

  7. Phytochemical and anti-inflammatory studies of ethanol extract of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Terminalia macroptera Guill. & Perr. (Combretaceae) is a flowering plant used traditionally for the treatment of various disease conditions including hepatitis, dysentery, piles, edema, fever, gastritis, as aphrodisiac, applied to sprains and as a cleanser for washing sores. The aim of the work was to evaluate the ...

  8. Study on isolation of chemical constituents from Sophora ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Sophora flavescens Ait. is a traditional Chinese medicine with a long history in China. It is mainly used in the treatment of heat dysentery and similar ailments in the clinical. The objective of this paper was to isolate, purify and identify alkaloids from Sophora flavescens Ait. and to explore their inhibitory effects on ...

  9. Ethiopian Journal of Health Sciences - Vol 19, No 3 (2009)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    nvestigation of Dysentery Outbreak and its causes, Jimma City, Southwest Ethiopia · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Fessehaye Alemseged, Alemshet Yami, Wondwossen Birke, Zewdinesh S/Mariam, Kenate Worku ...

  10. Evaluation of the Antimicrobial Activity of Some Medicinal Plants ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the anti-enterobacterial potential of nine ethnobotanically selected plants traditionally used in different parts of India for the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders such as cholera, diarrhea or dysentery. Methods: The methanol extracts of these plants were screened for antibacterial activity against 11 ...

  11. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Birke, Wondwossen. Vol 19, No 3 (2009) - Articles nvestigation of Dysentery Outbreak and its causes, Jimma City, Southwest Ethiopia Abstract PDF · Vol 18, No 2 (2008) - Articles ENVIRONMENTAL DETERMINANTS OF DIARRHEA AMONG UNDER-FIVE CHILDREN IN NEKEMTE TOWN, WESTERN ETHIOPIA

  12. Burn Treatment: Annual Research Progress Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-06-30

    with syphilis, and fermentative gram-negative bacilli representing the enteric fevers , typhoid and paratyphoid, dysentery, arid the whole realm of...activity, poor feeding and petechial or ecchymotic lesions of the eschar. A few of these animals bled from the eschar, most commonly at the burned-unburned

  13. Histological effects of chronic administration of Phyllanthus amarus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of administration of Phyllanthus amarus commonly used for the treatment of jaundice, diarrhea, dysentery, urogenital disease and wound on the superior colliculus of adult wistar rats was carefully studied. Rats of both sexes (n = 24), with average weight of 200 g were randomly assigned into two treatments (A and B) ...

  14. Uitbraak van amoebiasis in een Nederlands gezin; tropen onverwacht dichtbij

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edeling, W. M.; Verweij, J. J.; Ponsioen, C. Y.; Visser, L. G.

    2004-01-01

    An amoebic liver abscess, amoebic dysentery and asymptomatic cyst passage were diagnosed in a father, a mother and one of their three children, respectively. One of the other children had been in the tropics, but only after the father's symptoms had begun. All three family members were infected with

  15. Folk medicinal plants of Nushki, district Chagai, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durrani, M.I.; Taj, A.M.; Hussain, F.

    2003-01-01

    Ethno botanical survey conducted in Nushki, District Chagai revealed that the local people use 50 species of plants in traditional heath care system. The most important health problems cured by the traditional use of plants include stomach related disorders, malarial, typhoid and common fevers, liver and kidney disorders, cough and related ailments, aphrodisiac, gonorrhea, diuretic, diabetes, eye diseases, skin allegories, rashes, diarrhea and dysentery etc. Elders, especially women, appeared to be more knowledgeable. Most plants had multiple uses. (author)

  16. Acetone Extract from Rhodomyrtus tomentosa: A Potent Natural Antioxidant

    OpenAIRE

    Lavanya, Goodla; Voravuthikunchai, Supayang Piyawan; Towatana, Nongporn Hutadilok

    2012-01-01

    Rhodomyrtus tomentosa (Myrtaceae) has been employed in traditional Thai medicine to treat colic diarrhoea, dysentery, abscesses, haemorrhage, and gynaecopathy. In addition, it has been used to formulate skin-whitening, anti-aging and skin beautifying agents. Ethnomedical activities of this plant may be due its antioxidant property. Hence, the aim of this study was to evaluate both in vitro and in vivo antioxidant activities of R. tomentosa leaf extract. In vitro antioxidant activity of the ex...

  17. A System Approach to Navy Medical Education and Training. Appendix 14. Field Medical Technician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-08-31

    TREATMENT FOR BACILLARY DYSENTERY 50 IPALPATE (FFELI BLADDER FOR DISTENSION (FULLNESSI T TURN PAGE LEFT PAGE Oc FIELr uEDICINE TASK FOlKLET | TASK NO. I...IOBSEPVE/PEPOrT PATIENT’S muSCLE TONE. F.G. RIGId, FLACCID, ISPASTIC, SPAS-S t 4 JOBSERV- PATIENT’S PHYSICAL MCVEMENT, E.G. MUSCULAR C01PDINATIO’t

  18. The Republic of Turkey: Intercultural Education and the Colorado Air National Guard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-05-01

    shame (Politeness). F Verily anger destroys faith just as aloes spoil honey . Verily anger comes from the devil, and the devil was created from fire, and...23,601 DIPHTHERIA 792 INFECTIOUS HEPATITIS 7,711 MENINGOCOCCAL WHOOPING COUGH 6,105 INFECTIONS 716 TYPHOID & PARATYPHOID DYSENTERY (ALL FORMS) 715...of our most important allies. They may indeed be onto a cure for that linguistic and cultural myopia. AIRMAN1, itarch 1980 (inside back cover) 218

  19. Failure of Syndrome-Based Diarrhea Management Guidelines to Detect Shigella Infections in Kenyan Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlinac, P B; Denno, D M; John-Stewart, G C; Onchiri, F M; Naulikha, J M; Odundo, E A; Hulseberg, C E; Singa, B O; Manhart, L E; Walson, J L

    2016-12-01

    Shigella is a leading cause of childhood diarrhea mortality in sub-Saharan Africa. Current World Health Organization guidelines recommend antibiotics for children in non cholera-endemic areas only in the presence of dysentery, a proxy for suspected Shigella infection. To assess the sensitivity and specificity of the syndromic diagnosis of Shigella-associated diarrhea, we enrolled children aged 6 months to 5 years presenting to 1 of 3 Western Kenya hospitals between November 2011 and July 2014 with acute diarrhea. Stool samples were tested using standard methods for bacterial culture and multiplex polymerase chain reaction for pathogenic Escherichia coli. Stepwise multivariable logit models identified factors to increase the sensitivity of syndromic diagnosis. Among 1360 enrolled children, median age was 21 months (interquartile range, 11-37), 3.4% were infected with human immunodeficiency virus, and 16.5% were stunted (height-for-age z-score less than -2). Shigella was identified in 63 children (4.6%), with the most common species being Shigella sonnei (53.8%) and Shigella flexneri (40.4%). Dysentery correctly classified 7 of 63 Shigella cases (sensitivity, 11.1%). Seventy-eight of 1297 children without Shigella had dysentery (specificity, 94.0%). The combination of fecal mucous, age over 23 months, and absence of excessive vomiting identified more children with Shigella-infection (sensitivity, 39.7%) but also indicated antibiotics in more children without microbiologically confirmed Shigella (specificity, 82.7%). Reliance on dysentery as a proxy for Shigella results in the majority of Shigella-infected children not being identified for antibiotics. Field-ready rapid diagnostics or updated evidence-based algorithms are urgently needed to identify children with diarrhea most likely to benefit from antibiotic therapy. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society. All rights reserved. For Permissions

  20. The Armed Forces Epidemiological Board: Its First Fifty Years, 1940-1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-02-01

    measles; (9 mumps; (g) diphtheria and tetanus toxoids; (I) enteric infections such as bacillary dysentery, Shigella, Sahnonella typhosa, Vibrio cholerae ...pestis that followed the kissing of the dead. Once he remarked that a patient in New Mexico did not die of plague but of "too many antibiotics." Another...interests shifted to hog cholera and the f’eld of virology. This interest continued for the next thirty-eight y’ears. A key obs,’.%ation (with Dr. Paul

  1. World Epidemiology Review, Number 76.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-11-10

    cholera vibrio found in pilgrims to El Tor who died with symptoms of dysentery]. It was a germ that originated in ballot boxes and multiplied under...DISEASES BRAZIL 47 CHILE 49 MEXICO 50 NEW ZEALAND 50 REPUBLIC OF CHINA 52 TUNISIA 52 VENEZUELA 53 a - [III - INT - 134] CONTENTS...inhabitants. JORDAN VACCINATION CAMPAIGN AGAINST CHOLERA BEGUN Amman Domestic Service in Arabic 1600 GMT 11 Oct 76 JN [Excerpt] An official source at

  2. Metabonomics-based analysis of Brachyspira pilosicoli's response to tiamulin reveals metabolic activity despite significant growth inhibition

    OpenAIRE

    Le Roy, Caroline Ivanne; Passey, Jade Louise; Woodward, Martin John; La Ragione, Roberto Marcello; Claus, Sandrine Paule

    2017-01-01

    Pathogenic anaerobes Brachyspira spp. are responsible for an increasing number of Intestinal Spirochaetosis (IS) cases in livestock against which few approved treatments are available. Tiamulin is used to treat swine dysentery caused by Brachyspira spp. and recently has been used to handle avian intestinal spirochaetosis (AIS). The therapeutic dose used in chickens requires further evaluation since cases of bacterial resistance to tiamulin have been reported. In this study, we evaluated the i...

  3. JPRS Report, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-05-14

    such diseases as malaria, dropsy, dysentery, hepatitis, aphtha, gingivitis , and anemia all rose. According to some reports, among the units... gingivitis in the troops were generally between 50 percent and 60 percent. In particular, the incidence of malaria increased markedly. In troops sta...product, but it is also related to the country’s reputation. For example, because the 70500/1 IMF colored velve- teen fabric produced by Shaoxing

  4. Higiene Dan Sanitasi Pengelolaan Makanan Di Pesantren Modern Unggulan Terpadu Darul Mursyid Dan Pesantren KH. Ahmad dahlan di kabupaten tapanuli selatan tahun 2011

    OpenAIRE

    Aryanti, Lili

    2012-01-01

    Management of food hygiene sanitation in islamic boarding school aims to get the food hygiene and safely consumed, so as to avoid the health problems or disease such as diarrhea, cholera, dysentery basiler, typhoid fever and etc. The purpose of this research is to know about hygiene and sanitation management of food and physical test at Darul Mursyid Islamic Boarding School and Ahmad Dahlan Islamic Boarding School. The used method in this research is descriptive, by seeing the descripti...

  5. Chemical Profiling of Acalypha Indica Obtained from Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Extraction and Soxhlet Extraction Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Surangkana Chaichoowong; Jan Bernd Bol; Pornprapa Bol; Thomas Gamse; Malinee Sriariyanun

    2017-01-01

    Acalypha indica is a weed that grows in South-East Asia. It contains several valuable compounds that can be used for curing various diseases such as rheumatism, skin infection and blood dysentery. Here, the extraction of A. indica using Soxhlet extraction with two different solvents and supercritical CO2 extraction (SCE) with two different temperatures (40 and 60°C) was performed. In Soxhlet extraction, ethanol solvent provided the highest extraction yield of 34.36%. For SCE, the increased te...

  6. An unusual presentation of an amoebic liver abscess: the story of an unwanted souvenir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaminathan, Vikram; O'Rourke, Joanne; Gupta, Rashmi; Kiire, C F

    2013-02-05

    This case was rather unusual with regard to the disease presentation. The patient had non-specific symptoms of weight loss and general malaise, without any history of preceding diarrhoea or dysentery. It is important to be aware of the epidemiology of the disease, and to relate it to patients presenting with symptoms suggestive of amoebiasis. We discuss the recommended investigations and management options for these patients based on the current guidelines/evidence.

  7. Minimum inhibitory concentration of Brazilian Brachyspira hyodysenteriae strains

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel, Amanda G.S.; Sato, José P.H.; Gabardo, Michelle P.; Resende, Talita P.; Barcellos, David E.S.N. de; Pereira, Carlos E.R.; Vannucci, Fábio A.; Guedes, Roberto M.C.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The objectives of this study were to characterize Brachyspira hyodysenteriae isolates and to evaluate the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of strains obtained from pigs in Brazil based on the minimal inhibitory concentration test (MIC). The MIC was performed for 22 B. hyodysenteriae isolates obtained from 2011 to 2013 using the following antimicrobial drugs: tylosin, tiamulin, valnemulin, doxycycline, lincomycin and tylvalosin. Outbreaks of swine dysentery were diagnosed based ...

  8. Antimicrobial susceptibility of porcine brachyspira hyodysenteriae isolates from Switzerland

    OpenAIRE

    Kirchgässner, Constanze

    2016-01-01

    The anaerobic spirochaete Brachyspira (B.) hyodysenteriae is the causative agent of swine dysentery (SD), a severe mucohaemorrhagic diarrheal disease in pigs worldwide. Currently, no data for antimicrobial susceptibility of B. hyodysenteriae from Switzerland are available and though antimicrobial treatment is the main therapy, no standardised methods for antimicrobial susceptibility testing are established. Therefore, a broth microdilution test was performed for 30 Swiss porcine field isolate...

  9. The Art of the Possible: T. E. Lawrence and Coalition Liaison

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-06-01

    Letters of T. E. Lawrence and his Brothers ed. M. R . Lawrence (Oxford: Blackwell; New York: MacMillan, 1954), 284; quoted in Jeremy Wilson, Lawrence of...and dysentery and was bedridden in his tent for ten days. Up to this point in the fighting things had been moving quickly and Lawrence had been, by...determines that information is subject to special dissemination limitation specified by paragraph 4-505, DoD 5200.1- R . STATEMENT X: Distribution

  10. Evaluation of antibacterial activity of "Mangabarana" Austroplenckia populnea Reissek (Celastraceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roqueline R. S. de Miranda

    Full Text Available Austroplenckia populnea (Mangabarana is popularly used by people from Minas Gerais, Brazil for dysenteries diseases treatment. Antitumor and antiulcer activities were also attributed to this plant. Extracts obtained using solvents of different polarities and pentacyclic triterpenes (PCTTs isolated from these extracts through phytochemical methods were submitted to antibacterial assays. The results showed the existence of this activity and open perspectives for news studies with other organic compounds isolated from this plant.

  11. Pathological features of glutaminase toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskerville, A.; Hambleton, P.; Benbough, J. E.

    1980-01-01

    In an investigation of the toxicity of the anti-tumour enzyme glutaminase Rhesus monkeys, marmosets, rabbits and mice were given various doses of chemically modified glutaminase parenterally. The enzyme induced diarrhoea and dysentery and at all but the lowest doses caused illness which was fatal within 10 days. Pathological lesions produced were hepatic lipidosis and glycogen accumulation, and, in the primates, acute necrotizing colitis. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:6775661

  12. Evaluation of an intragastric challenge model for Shigella dysenteriae 1 in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) for the pre-clinical assessment of Shigella vaccine formulations

    OpenAIRE

    Islam, Dilara; Ruamsap, Nattaya; Khantapura, Patchariya; Aksomboon, Ajchara; Srijan, Apichai; Wongstitwilairoong, Boonchai; Bodhidatta, Ladaporn; Gettayacamin, Montip; Venkatesan, Malabi M; Mason, Carl J

    2013-01-01

    Shigellosis is a worldwide disease, characterized by abdominal pain, fever, vomiting, and the passage of blood- and mucus-streaked stools. Rhesus monkeys and other primates are the only animals that are naturally susceptible to shigellosis. A suitable animal model is required for the pre-clinical evaluation of vaccines candidates. In this study, the minimal dose of Shigella dysenteriae1 1617 strain required to produce dysentery in four of five (80% attack rate) monkeys using an escalating dos...

  13. Ultrastructural Histopathology of Vervet Monkey Colonic Epithelium After In Vitro Exposure to Cell-free Supernatants of Shigella Cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, R. R.; Collins, N. E.; Cowley, H. M.

    2011-01-01

    The full dysentery syndrome of human shigellosis is often preceded by a transient diarrhoea that may be induced by bacterial extracellular products before invasion of the colonic mucosa and development of subsequent pathology. To examine this hypothesis, we studied the effects of cell-free cultures of Shigella sp. on the ultrastructure of monkey colonic epithelium in vitro. Clinical isolates of shigella strains were grown in a niche-simulating medium. Sheets of colon wall collected from verve...

  14. Sesquiterpene lactones from neurolaena oaxacana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passreiter; Sandoval-Ramirez; Wright

    1999-08-01

    Twelve sesquiterpene lactones, two new (1 and 2) and 10 known neurolenin-type germacranolides and furanoheliangolides (3-12) were isolated from Neurolaena oaxacana, and their structures were elucidated by NMR and GC-MS analysis. The chemotaxonomic importance of these findings is discussed. As N. lobata is used against dysenteries, neurolenin B (4) and a mixture of the neurolenins C (5) and D (6) were tested against Entamoeba histolytica and Giardia intestinalis.

  15. Epidemiology: the future is sickness and death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Middleton, H.

    1982-01-01

    A nuclear world war of the type outlined in this issue would kill nearly 750 million people outright, leaving some 340 million seriously injured, mostly in the Northern Hemisphere. Of the 200 million initial survivors, many of them would perish from the latent effects of radiation as well as infectious diseases like cholera, typhus, tuberculosis and dysentery. Caring for the vast number of injured would greatly hamper post-war recovery efforts.

  16. Interventions communautaires durables visant à améliorer l ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    L'urbanisation rapide est l'un des grands défis du XXIe siècle. Environ 12 000 personnes vivent dans la paroisse de Banda, dans la partie est de Kampala. Ce secteur marécageux est propice à l'éclosion d'épidémies de choléra. Le grand nombre de cas de malaria, de dysenterie, de diarrhée et de malnutrition fait en sorte ...

  17. Pleuromutilins: use in food-producing animals in the European Union, development of resistance and impact on human and animal health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Duijkeren, Engeline; Greko, Christina; Pringle, Märit; Baptiste, Keith Edward; Catry, Boudewijn; Jukes, Helen; Moreno, Miguel A; Pomba, M Constança Matias Ferreira; Pyörälä, Satu; Rantala, Merja; Ružauskas, Modestas; Sanders, Pascal; Teale, Christopher; Threlfall, E John; Torren-Edo, Jordi; Törneke, Karolina

    2014-08-01

    Pleuromutilins (tiamulin and valnemulin) are antimicrobial agents that are used mainly in veterinary medicine, especially for swine and to a lesser extent for poultry and rabbits. In pigs, tiamulin and valnemulin are used to treat swine dysentery, spirochaete-associated diarrhoea, porcine proliferative enteropathy, enzootic pneumonia and other infections where Mycoplasma is involved. There are concerns about the reported increases in the MICs of tiamulin and valnemulin for porcine Brachyspira hyodysenteriae isolates from different European countries, as only a limited number of antimicrobials are available for the treatment of swine dysentery where resistance to these antimicrobials is already common and widespread. The loss of pleuromutilins as effective tools to treat swine dysentery because of further increases in resistance or as a consequence of restrictions would present a considerable threat to pig health, welfare and productivity. In humans, only one product containing pleuromutilins (retapamulin) is authorized currently for topical use; however, products for oral and intravenous administration to humans with serious multidrug-resistant skin infections and respiratory infections, including those caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), are being developed. The objective of this review is to summarize the current knowledge on the usage of pleuromutilins, resistance development and the potential impact of this resistance on animal and human health. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Brachyspira hyodysenteriae isolated from 21 Polish farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zmudzki, J; Szczotka, A; Nowak, A; Strzelecka, H; Grzesiak, A; Pejsak, Z

    2012-01-01

    Swine dysentery (SD) is a common disease among pigs worldwide, which contributes to major production losses. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of B. hyodysenteriae, the etiological agent of SD, is mainly performed by the agar dilution method. This method has certain limitations due to difficulties in interpretation of results. The aim of this study was the analysis of antimicrobial susceptibility of Brachyspira hyodysenteriae (B. hyodysenteriae) Polish field isolates by broth microdilution procedure. The study was performed on 21 isolates of B. hyodysenteriae, collected between January 2006 to December 2010 from cases of swine dysentery. VetMIC Brachyspira panels with antimicrobial agents (tiamulin, valnemulin, doxycycline, lincomycin, tylosin and ampicillin) were used for susceptibility testing of B. hyodysenteriae. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined by the broth dilution procedure. The lowest antimicrobial activity was demonstrated for tylosin and lincomycin, with inhibition of bacterial growth using concentrations > 128 microg/ml and 32 microg/ml, respectively. In the case of doxycycline, the MIC values were < or = 2.0 microg/ml. No decreased susceptibility to tiamulin was found among the Polish isolates and MIC values for this antibiotic did not exceed 1.0 microg/ml. The results of the present study confirmed that Polish B. hyodysenteriae isolates were susceptible to the main antibiotics (tiamulin and valnemulin) used in treatment of swine dysentery. Further studies are necessary to evaluate a possible slow decrease in susceptibility to tiamulin and valnemulin of B. hyodysenteriae strains in Poland.

  19. Antibiotic susceptibility of Brachyspira hyodysenteriae isolates from Czech swine farms: a 10-year follow-up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Prášek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Brachyspira hyodysenteriae is the causative agent of swine dysentery. Loss of clinical efficacy of some antimicrobial agents authorized for treating swine dysentery was observed on certain Czech pig farms. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antimicrobial sensitivity of six antibiotics using a set of 202 randomly selected B. hyodysenteriae isolates obtained from farms in the Czech Republic between years 1997 and 2006. Minimum inhibitory concentration of antibiotics tylosin, lincomycin, tylvalosin, chlortetracyclin, tiamulin and valnemulin were tested, using an agar dilution method. All antibiotics tested showed an increase in minimal inhibitory concentrations. Continual decrease in susceptibility of B. hyodysenteriae isolates to tiamulin and valnemulin was observed. Multiresistant B. hyodysenteriae were isolated more frequently in the past years. Only a careful use of antibiotics can ensure their efficacy, especially in case of pleuromutilins, in the strategic therapy of swine dysentery. This rare study demonstrates the minimal inhibitory concentration changes of selected antidysenterics among Czech isolates of Brachyspira hyodysenteriae during a ten-year period.

  20. Global phylogeography and evolutionary history of Shigella dysenteriae type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njamkepo, Elisabeth; Fawal, Nizar; Tran-Dien, Alicia; Hawkey, Jane; Strockbine, Nancy; Jenkins, Claire; Talukder, Kaisar A; Bercion, Raymond; Kuleshov, Konstantin; Kolínská, Renáta; Russell, Julie E; Kaftyreva, Lidia; Accou-Demartin, Marie; Karas, Andreas; Vandenberg, Olivier; Mather, Alison E; Mason, Carl J; Page, Andrew J; Ramamurthy, Thandavarayan; Bizet, Chantal; Gamian, Andrzej; Carle, Isabelle; Sow, Amy Gassama; Bouchier, Christiane; Wester, Astrid Louise; Lejay-Collin, Monique; Fonkoua, Marie-Christine; Le Hello, Simon; Blaser, Martin J; Jernberg, Cecilia; Ruckly, Corinne; Mérens, Audrey; Page, Anne-Laure; Aslett, Martin; Roggentin, Peter; Fruth, Angelika; Denamur, Erick; Venkatesan, Malabi; Bercovier, Hervé; Bodhidatta, Ladaporn; Chiou, Chien-Shun; Clermont, Dominique; Colonna, Bianca; Egorova, Svetlana; Pazhani, Gururaja P; Ezernitchi, Analia V; Guigon, Ghislaine; Harris, Simon R; Izumiya, Hidemasa; Korzeniowska-Kowal, Agnieszka; Lutyńska, Anna; Gouali, Malika; Grimont, Francine; Langendorf, Céline; Marejková, Monika; Peterson, Lorea A M; Perez-Perez, Guillermo; Ngandjio, Antoinette; Podkolzin, Alexander; Souche, Erika; Makarova, Mariia; Shipulin, German A; Ye, Changyun; Žemličková, Helena; Herpay, Mária; Grimont, Patrick A D; Parkhill, Julian; Sansonetti, Philippe; Holt, Kathryn E; Brisse, Sylvain; Thomson, Nicholas R; Weill, François-Xavier

    2016-03-21

    Together with plague, smallpox and typhus, epidemics of dysentery have been a major scourge of human populations for centuries(1). A previous genomic study concluded that Shigella dysenteriae type 1 (Sd1), the epidemic dysentery bacillus, emerged and spread worldwide after the First World War, with no clear pattern of transmission(2). This is not consistent with the massive cyclic dysentery epidemics reported in Europe during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries(1,3,4) and the first isolation of Sd1 in Japan in 1897(5). Here, we report a whole-genome analysis of 331 Sd1 isolates from around the world, collected between 1915 and 2011, providing us with unprecedented insight into the historical spread of this pathogen. We show here that Sd1 has existed since at least the eighteenth century and that it swept the globe at the end of the nineteenth century, diversifying into distinct lineages associated with the First World War, Second World War and various conflicts or natural disasters across Africa, Asia and Central America. We also provide a unique historical perspective on the evolution of antibiotic resistance over a 100-year period, beginning decades before the antibiotic era, and identify a prevalent multiple antibiotic-resistant lineage in South Asia that was transmitted in several waves to Africa, where it caused severe outbreaks of disease.

  1. THE RELATION BETWEEN RESUDUE CHLOR QUANTITY AND WATER RELATED DISEASES IN AYDIN

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    Emine Didem EVCI

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The correlation between the residue chlor quantity in water sampled in different points of Aydin province in 2004 and the incidence of infections via water (diarrhea, thyphoid fever, amoebic and bacillary dysentery is studied. Materials and Methods: A retrospective definitive study is performed during June-July 2005. Results: 924 physical and chemical analysis are performed in 2004. In winter season, the mean residue chlor was 0,57±0,10 mg/lt; there were 310 diarrhea cases and a bacillary dysentery case. In summer season, the mean residue chlor was 0,46±0,13 mg/lt; there were 529 diarrhea cases and an amoebic dysentery. Both seasons determined that there was a negative correlation between diarrhea and the residue chlor quantity and there was a poor connection between them and it was statistically unsignificant (for winter r= -0,242, p=0,224; for summer r= -0,148, p=0,480 Conclusion: However there is no determined, expressive connection between diarrhea cases and residue chlor quantity it was seen that as the residue chlor quantity evaluated, the diarrhea cases were reduced. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2006; 5(1.000: 1-7

  2. Impacts of Tropical Cyclones and Accompanying Precipitation on Infectious Diarrhea in Cyclone Landing Areas of Zhejiang Province, China

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    Zhengyi Deng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Zhejiang Province, located in southeastern China, is frequently hit by tropical cyclones. This study quantified the associations between infectious diarrhea and the seven tropical cyclones that landed in Zhejiang from 2005–2011 to assess the impacts of the accompanying precipitation on the studied diseases. Method: A unidirectional case-crossover study design was used to evaluate the impacts of tropical storms and typhoons on infectious diarrhea. Principal component analysis (PCA was applied to eliminate multicollinearity. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to estimate the odds ratios (ORs and the 95% confidence intervals (CIs. Results: For all typhoons studied, the greatest impacts on bacillary dysentery and other infectious diarrhea were identified on lag 6 days (OR = 2.30, 95% CI: 1.81–2.93 and lag 5 days (OR = 3.56, 95% CI: 2.98–4.25, respectively. For all tropical storms, impacts on these diseases were highest on lag 2 days (OR = 2.47, 95% CI: 1.41–4.33 and lag 6 days (OR = 2.46, 95% CI: 1.69–3.56, respectively. The tropical cyclone precipitation was a risk factor for both bacillary dysentery and other infectious diarrhea when daily precipitation reached 25 mm and 50 mm with the largest OR = 3.25 (95% CI: 1.45–7.27 and OR = 3.05 (95% CI: 2.20–4.23, respectively. Conclusions: Both typhoons and tropical storms could contribute to an increase in risk of bacillary dysentery and other infectious diarrhea in Zhejiang. Tropical cyclone precipitation may also be a risk factor for these diseases when it reaches or is above 25 mm and 50 mm, respectively. Public health preventive and intervention measures should consider the adverse health impacts from tropical cyclones.

  3. BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY AND PHYTOCHEMICAL SCREENING OF THE OLEORESIN OF Shorea robusta Gaertn. f.

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    Kondragunta Sri Rama Murthy

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Shorea robusta Gaertn.f. oleoresin (gum extracts were used against the skin allergies, diarrhea, dysentery, astringency and is wide spread in different parts of Eastern Ghats of Southern Peninsular India. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the antimicrobial and phytochemical activity of resin extract against pathogenic microorganisms. Successive petroleum ether, methanol, benzene and aqueous extracts of Shorea robusta resin were tested for their phytochemical constituents, antibacterial and antifungal activity. The aqueous and methanolic extracts were found to be most effective against most of the tested organisms. The results confirmed the potency of this plant in the indigenous systems of medicine.

  4. Decreased susceptibility to tiamulin and valnemulin among Czech isolates of Brachyspira hyodysenteriae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobová, Dana; Smola, Jiri; Cizek, Alois

    2004-04-01

    The agar dilution method was used to investigate the sensitivity to pleuromutilins of 100 isolates of Brachyspira hyodysenteriae isolated from 63 pig farms between 1997 and 2001. In the period under investigation, MICs to both tiamulin and valnemulin increased, with differences between the periods 1997-98 and 1999-2001 being statistically significant (P tiamulin and P tiamulin increased from 0.062 and 0.25 microg ml, respectively, to 1.0 and 4.0 microg ml. Valnemulin MIC50 and MIC90 were tiamulin and valnemulin demonstrated in this study reflect the intensity of pleuromutilin use in the treatment of swine dysentery in the Czech Republic.

  5. KERATODERMA BLENORRHAGICUM IN A PATIENT WITH REITER SYNDROME

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    Valentina Dimitrova

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Reiter syndrome is a systemic disorder, originally defined as a triad of arthritis, urethritis and conjunctivitis. This symptoms complex usually follows an episode of either urethritis or dysentery. Skin and mucosal involvement is observed in about 10% of the cases. We present a case of Reiter’s syndrome in a 55-year-old man who developed the typical skin lesions - kerathoderma blenorrhagicum. The disease started with a severe asymmetric oligoarthritis a month after the patient had urethritis. Two weeks after the onset of the arthritis red patches on the palms and plants appeared, which transformed quickly in harder and elevated plaques.

  6. Secondary metabolites and biological activity of Pentas species: A minireview

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    Heba-tollah M. Sweelam

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The genus Pentas belongs to the Rubiaceae family, which contains approximately 40 species. Several Pentas species were reported to be used as a folk treatment by African indigenous people in treating some diseases such as malaria, tapeworms, dysentery, gonorrhea, syphilis and snake poisoning. This article covers the period from 1962 to 2017 and presents an overview of the biological activity of different Pentas species and describes their phytochemical traits. As a conclusion, the main secondary metabolites from Pentas species are quinones, highly oxygenated chromene-based structures, and iridoids. Pentas species are widely used in folk medicine but they have to be more investigated for their medicinal properties.

  7. La Mettrie's soul: vertigo, fever, massacre, and The Natural History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacking, Ian

    2009-01-01

    La Mettrie's materialist and monistic philosophy is that of a military doctor, knowing what dysentery did to his own mind, watching his regiment destroyed at Fontenoy, running French field hospitals in Flanders. He learned brain science in the injuries of his fellows. He knew pain and that man's main positive drive was sex. He despised the prudish hypocrisies of feeble materialists like Diderot and Voltaire. His brutal military life and his hedonism made him the most coherent monist against Cartesian dualism. His study of vertigo is sound clinical medicine, which well accords with one trend in today's medical practice.

  8. Rupture, Invasion and Inflammatory Destruction of the Intestinal Barrier by Shigella: The Yin and Yang of Innate Immunity

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    Philippe J Sansonetti

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Shigella is a Gram-negative bacterial species of the family Enterobacteriaceae that causes bacillary dysentery in humans. This acute colitis reflects the capacity of the microorganism to disrupt, invade and cause the inflammatory destruction of the intestinal epithelium. The pathogenesis of the Shigella infection can be seen as a disruption of the homeostatic balance that protects the gut against inflammation in the presence of its commensal flora. This provides the unified view that enteroinvasive pathogens allow for the identification of key signalling molecules and pathways involved in the regulation of intestinal inflammation, and more generally, in the regulation of the innate and adaptive immune response.

  9. Giardiasis: a return of waterborne disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spofford, W.O. Jr.

    Complacency about safe water supply has turned to concern over possible chemical contamination and waterborne disease, giardiasis, caused by a protozoan. A case study of an outbreak of giardiasis in Pennsylvania raises questions about water treatment strategies, which must necessarily vary because of differences in public water systems. While giardiasis is an unpleasant and uncomfortable disease, it is not as serious as typhoid, dysentery, and other diseases. The costs of analyzing water systems to detect and eliminate the risk of contamination may exceed the costs of the disease itself. Americans have grown used to safe drinking water, however, and may conclude that the benefits are worth the cost. 2 figures, 1 table.

  10. Arsanilic acid blindness in pigs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menges, R.W.; Kintner, L.D.; Selby, L.A.; Stewart, R.W.; Marlenfeld, C.J.

    1970-06-01

    Blindness in pigs that were given an overdosage of arsanilic acid is reported. A 0.0375% level of arsanilic acid was fed to 640 pigs for 90 days beginning when the animals were 3 months old. Approximately one month after the start of feeding, partial or complete blindness was observed in 50 of the pigs. Clinical signs, pathologic findings and the chemical analysis of hair are discussed. The level of arsanilic acid used was that recommended for the control of swine dysentery, to be fed for only five or six days. The overdosage resulted from a misunderstanding between the farmer and the feed mill.

  11. Ameboma: A Colon Carcinoma-Like Lesion in a Colonoscopy Finding

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    Chung-Cheng Lin

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Ameboma is a rare complication of amebic colitis presenting as a mass of granulation tissue with peripheral fibrosis and a core of inflammation related to amebic chronic infection. The initial presentations are usually obstruction and low gastrointestinal bleeding. The most common sites are the ascending colon and the cecum. It may mimic colon carcinoma, Crohn's disease, carcinoma of the colon, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, tuberculosis, fungal infection, AIDS-associated lymphoma and Kaposi's sarcoma in colonoscopy findings. The therapeutic strategy should be combined with antibiotics for invasive dysentery and eradication of luminal cysts.

  12. Antisecretory activity from the flowers of Chiranthodendron pentadactylon and its flavonoids on intestinal fluid accumulation induced by Vibrio cholerae toxin in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velázquez, Claudia; Calzada, Fernando; Esquivel, Baldomero; Barbosa, Elizabeth; Calzada, Samuel

    2009-12-10

    The flowers of Chiranthodendron pentadactylon Larreat. (Sterculiaceae) has been traditionally used as folk medicine in Mexico for the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders such as diarrhea and dysentery. This study aimed to assess the antisecretory activity which supports the therapeutic use of Chiranthodendron pentadactylon and its flavonoids to treat diarrhea. The methanol extract of Chiranthodendron pentadactylon, subsequent fractions, and flavonoids were evaluated on cholera toxin-induced intestinal secretion in rat jejunal loops model. Three antisecretory flavonoids were isolated by bioassay-guided purification, namely, isoquercitrin 3, (+)-catechin 4 and (-)-epicatechin 5. Among them, epicatechin exhibited the most potent antisecretory activity with ID(50) of 8.3 microM/kg. Its potency was close that of to loperamide (ID(50) 6.1 microM/kg), drug used as control. Isoquercitrin (ID(50) 19.2 microM/kg) and catechin (ID(50) 51.7 microM/kg) showed moderate and weak activity, respectively. The results of the present study lend some support to the anecdotal report for the traditional use of the flowers of Chiranthodendron pentadactylon in the control of dysentery.

  13. Cessation of clinical disease and spirochete shedding after tiamulin treatment in pigs experimentally infected with "Brachyspira hampsonii".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilberts, B L; Arruda, P H; Warneke, H L; Erlandson, K R; Hammer, J M; Burrough, E R

    2014-10-01

    With the emergence of "Brachyspira hampsonii" associated with swine dysentery in North America, identification of effective treatments and interventions is a pressing need. Denagard® (tiamulin hydrogen fumarate) Liquid Concentrate 12.5% is approved in the United States for treatment of dysentery caused by Brachyspira hyodysenteriae at 0.006% in the water. In this study, the effectiveness of tiamulin in resolving clinical disease, eliminating viable spirochete shedding, and reducing neutrophilic colitis following infection with either "B. hampsonii" or B. hyodysenteriae was evaluated. Seventy-eight 7-week-old crossbred pigs were divided into three groups [sham-inoculated (n = 18), "B. hampsonii"-inoculated (n = 30), and B. hyodysenteriae-inoculated (n = 30)]. Each inoculum group was divided into three subgroups which received either 0.006% tiamulin, 0.018% tiamulin, or no medication. Both levels of tiamulin resolved clinical disease within 24 h of treatment initiation, eliminated spirochete shedding within 72 h of treatment initiation, and resolved and/or prevented histologic lesions in pigs infected with either Brachyspira spp. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A Brief History of Shigella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampel, Keith A; Formal, Samuel B; Maurelli, Anthony T

    2018-01-01

    The history of Shigella , the causative agent of bacillary dysentery, is a long and fascinating one. This brief historical account starts with descriptions of the disease and its impact on human health from ancient time to the present. Our story of the bacterium starts just before the identification of the dysentery bacillus by Kiyoshi Shiga in 1898 and follows the scientific discoveries and principal scientists who contributed to the elucidation of Shigella pathogenesis in the first 100 years. Over the past century, Shigella has proved to be an outstanding model of an invasive bacterial pathogen and has served as a paradigm for the study of other bacterial pathogens. In addition to invasion of epithelial cells, some of those shared virulence traits include toxin production, multiple-antibiotic resistance, virulence genes encoded on plasmids and bacteriophages, global regulation of virulence genes, pathogenicity islands, intracellular motility, remodeling of host cytoskeleton, inflammation/polymorphonuclear leukocyte signaling, apoptosis induction/inhibition, and "black holes" and antivirulence genes. While there is still much to learn from studying Shigella pathogenesis, what we have learned so far has also contributed greatly to our broader understanding of bacterial pathogenesis.

  15. The Galleria mellonella larvae as an in vivo model for evaluation of Shigella virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnoy, Shoshana; Gancz, Hanan; Zhu, Yuewei; Honnold, Cary L; Zurawski, Daniel V; Venkatesan, Malabi M

    2017-07-04

    Shigella spp. causing bacterial diarrhea and dysentery are human enteroinvasive bacterial pathogens that are orally transmitted through contaminated food and water and cause bacillary dysentery. Although natural Shigella infections are restricted to humans and primates, several smaller animal models are used to analyze individual steps in pathogenesis. No animal model fully duplicates the human response and sustaining the models requires expensive animals, costly maintenance of animal facilities, veterinary services and approved animal protocols. This study proposes the development of the caterpillar larvae of Galleria mellonella as a simple, inexpensive, informative, and rapid in-vivo model for evaluating virulence and the interaction of Shigella with cells of the insect innate immunity. Virulent Shigella injected through the forelegs causes larvae death. The mortality rates were dependent on the Shigella strain, the infectious dose, and the presence of the virulence plasmid. Wild-type S. flexneri 2a, persisted and replicated within the larvae, resulting in haemocyte cell death, whereas plasmid-cured mutants were rapidly cleared. Histology of the infected larvae in conjunction with fluorescence, immunofluorescence, and transmission electron microscopy indicate that S. flexneri reside within a vacuole of the insect haemocytes that ultrastructurally resembles vacuoles described in studies with mouse and human macrophage cell lines. Some of these bacteria-laden vacuoles had double-membranes characteristic of autophagosomes. These results suggest that G. mellonella larvae can be used as an easy-to-use animal model to understand Shigella pathogenesis that requires none of the time and labor-consuming procedures typical of other systems.

  16. Evaluation of an intragastric challenge model for Shigella dysenteriae 1 in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) for the pre-clinical assessment of Shigella vaccine formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Dilara; Ruamsap, Nattaya; Khantapura, Patchariya; Aksomboon, Ajchara; Srijan, Apichai; Wongstitwilairoong, Boonchai; Bodhidatta, Ladaporn; Gettayacamin, Montip; Venkatesan, Malabi M; Mason, Carl J

    2014-06-01

    Shigellosis is a worldwide disease, characterized by abdominal pain, fever, vomiting, and the passage of blood- and mucus-streaked stools. Rhesus monkeys and other primates are the only animals that are naturally susceptible to shigellosis. A suitable animal model is required for the pre-clinical evaluation of vaccines candidates. In this study, the minimal dose of Shigella dysenteriae1 1617 strain required to produce dysentery in four of five (80% attack rate) monkeys using an escalating dose range for three groups [2 × 10(8) , 2 × 10(9) and 2 × 10(10) colony forming unit (CFU)] was determined. In addition, the monkeys were re-infected. The identified optimal challenge dose was 2 × 10(9) CFU; this dose elicited 60% protection in monkeys when they were re-challenged with a one log higher dose (2 × 10(10) CFU). The challenge dose, 2 × 10(10) CFU, produced severe dysentery in all monkeys, with one monkey dying within 24 h, elicited 100% protection when re-challenged with the same dose. All monkeys exhibited immune responses. This study concludes that the rhesus monkey model closely mimics the disease and immune response seen in humans and is a suitable animal model for the pre-clinical evaluation of Shigella vaccine candidates. Prior infection with the 1617 strain can protect monkeys against subsequent re-challenges with homologous strains. © 2013 The Authors. APMIS published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Abortive Intestinal Infection With an Escherichia coli-Shigella flexneri Hybrid Strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formal, Samuel B.; LaBrec, E. H.; Kent, T. H.; Falkow, S.

    1965-01-01

    Formal, Samuel B., (Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Washington, D.C.), E. H. LaBrec, T. H. Kent, and S. Falkow. Abortive intestinal infection with an Escherichia coli-Shigella flexneri hybrid strain. J. Bacteriol. 89:1374–1382. 1965.—The mechanism of the apparent loss of virulence of an Escherichia coli-Shigella flexneri hybrid strain was studied. The parent Shigella strain caused a fatal enteric infection when fed to starved guinea pigs, and signs of dysentery followed its oral administration to monkeys. The hybrid strain failed to produce any apparent symptoms when fed to either of these species. The parent strain was shown to invade the intestinal mucosa of starved guinea pigs. This caused a severe inflammatory reaction in the lamina propria, which progressed to ulceration of the intestinal epithelium and resulted in death of the animal. The hybrid strain also invaded the intestinal mucosa and produced an inflammatory reaction. In this case, the inflammatory reaction subsided, the intestine returned to normal within 4 days after challenge, and the animal survived. Both fluorescent-antibody techniques and in vivo growth studies have shown that the hybrid strain can not maintain itself in the intestinal mucosa. Preliminary studies have indicated that a similar situation also exists in the monkey. It is concluded that the virulence of dysentery bacilli rests not only in the capacity to reach the lamina propria, but also in the ability to multiply in this region. Images PMID:14293011

  18. Vaccinomics Approach for Designing Potential Peptide Vaccine by Targeting Shigella spp. Serine Protease Autotransporter Subfamily Protein SigA

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    Arafat Rahman Oany

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Shigellosis, a bacillary dysentery, is closely associated with diarrhoea in human and causes infection of 165 million people worldwide per year. Casein-degrading serine protease autotransporter of enterobacteriaceae (SPATE subfamily protein SigA, an outer membrane protein, exerts both cytopathic and enterotoxic effects especially cytopathic to human epithelial cell type-2 (HEp-2 and is shown to be highly immunogenic. In the present study, we have tried to impose the vaccinomics approach for designing a common peptide vaccine candidate against the immunogenic SigA of Shigella spp. At first, 44 SigA proteins from different variants of S. flexneri, S. dysenteriae, S. boydii, and S. sonnei were assessed to find the most antigenic protein. We retrieved 12 peptides based on the highest score for human leukocyte antigen (HLA supertypes analysed by NetCTL. Initially, these peptides were assessed for the affinity with MHC class I and class II alleles, and four potential core epitopes VTARAGLGY, FHTVTVNTL, HTTWTLTGY, and IELAGTLTL were selected. From these, FHTVTVNTL and IELAGTLTL peptides were shown to have 100% conservancy. Finally, IELAGTLTL was shown to have the highest population coverage (83.86% among the whole world population. In vivo study of the proposed epitope might contribute to the development of functional and unique widespread vaccine, which might be an operative alleyway to thwart dysentery from the world.

  19. A Multigene Approach for Comparing Genealogy of Betacoronavirus from Cattle and Horses

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    Iracema N. Barros

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastroenteritis is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality among young and newborn animals and is often caused by multiple intestinal infections, with rotavirus and bovine coronavirus (BCoV being the main viral causes in cattle. Given that BCoV is better studied than equine coronaviruses and given the possibility of interspecies transmission of these viruses, this research was designed to compare the partial sequences of the spike glycoprotein (S, hemagglutinin-esterase protein (HE, and nucleoprotein (N genes from coronaviruses from adult cattle with winter dysentery, calves with neonatal diarrhea, and horses. To achieve this, eleven fecal samples from dairy cows with winter dysentery, three from calves, and two from horses, all from Brazil, were analysed. It could be concluded that the enteric BCoV genealogy from newborn and adult cattle is directly associated with geographic distribution patterns, when S and HE genes are taken into account. A less-resolved genealogy exists for the HE and N genes in cattle, with a trend for an age-related segregation pattern. The coronavirus strains from horses revealed Betacoronavirus sequences indistinguishable from those found in cattle, a fact previously unknown.

  20. Detection of EnteroinvasiveEscherichia coli by PCR technique in Children with Diarrhea

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    v Aein

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: EnteroinvasiveEscherichia coliis one of the important agents of invasion to intestinal epithelial cells, damage and cell death which due to dysentery. The aim of this study wastoDetection of EnteroinvasiveEscherichia coli by PCR technique from Children’s Diarrheain yasuj. Methods:This cross-sectional study was performed on 200 stool samples taken from children with diarrhea in Yasuj. After initial identification of E.coli strains by culture and biochemical tests, EIEC gene such as ipaH detected by PCR technicque and antibiotic susceptibility of isolates was evaluated by using disc diffusion (CLSI method. Results: Out of all examined samples, 16(8% EIEC were separated. Antibiotic susceptibility test showed that the most susceptible antibiotic is ciprofloxacin for EIEC and also most resistant antibiotic is ceftizoxime. Conclusion: Results showed that EIEC strains have a moderate prevalence than other studies in our study area. Therefore, for importance of this strain to producing dysentery, hospital-wide surveillance using molecular techniques hase been proposed in other regions of country.

  1. Impacts of different grades of tropical cyclones on infectious diarrhea in Guangdong, 2005-2011.

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    Ruihua Kang

    Full Text Available Guangdong province is one of the most vulnerable provinces to tropical cyclones in China. Most prior studies concentrated on the relationship between tropical cyclones and injuries and mortality. This study aimed to explore the impacts of different grades of tropical cyclones on infectious diarrhea incidence in Guangdong province, from 2005 to 2011.Mann-Whitney U test was firstly used to examine if infectious diarrhea were sensitive to tropical cyclone. Then unidirectional 1:1 case-crossover design was performed to quantitatively evaluate the relationship between daily number of infectious diarrhea and tropical cyclone from 2005 to 2011 in Guangdong, China. Principal component analysis (PCA was applied to eliminate multicollinearity. Multivariate logistic regression model was used to estimate the hazard ratios (HRs and the 95% confidence intervals (CI.There were no significant relationships between tropical cyclone and bacillary dysentery, amebic dysentery, typhoid, and paratyphoid cases. Infectious diarrhea other than cholera, dysentery, typhoid and paratyphoid significantly increased after tropical cyclones. The strongest effect were shown on lag 1 day (HRs = 1.95, 95%CI = 1.22, 3.12 and no lagged effect was detected for tropical depression, tropical storm, severe tropical storm and typhoon, with the largest HRs (95%CI of 2.16 (95%CI = 1.69, 2.76, 2.43 (95%CI = 1.65, 3.58 and 2.21 (95%CI = 1.65, 2.69, respectively. Among children below 5 years old, the impacts of all grades of tropical cyclones were strongest at lag 0 day. And HRs were 2.67 (95%CI = 1.10, 6.48, 2.49 (95%CI = 1.80, 3.44, 4.89 (95%CI = 2.37, 7.37 and 3.18 (95%CI = 2.10, 4.81, respectively.All grades of tropical cyclones could increase risk of other infectious diarrhea. Severe tropical storm has the strongest influence on other infectious diarrhea. The impacts of tropical cyclones on children under 5 years old were higher than total population.

  2. The Role of Enteropathogenic E.coli in the Development and Progression of Chronic Non-Ulcerative Colitis

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    L.I. Sydorchuk

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The analysis of the literature has shown that in patients with chronic non-ulcerative colitis, there were isolated E.coli that cause dysentery-like, cholera-like diseases and escherichioses. Thus, the aim of our study was to establish the level of persistence of enteropathogenic Escherichia in the colon of patients with chronic non-ulcerative colitis and their importance in the ecological system «macroorganism — microbiota». Material and methods. During 2000–2015, there has been conducted a bacteriological examination of the colon content in patients with chronic non-ulcerative colitis aged 27–41 years (average age 37.74 ± 3.62 years. The resulting cultures were examined in the indicative agglutination tests with OKA polyvalent serum. Positive cultures were tested with polyvalent serum of narrow spectrum ОКВ, ОКС, ОКD and ОКЕ. Results. In patients, in colon cavity of which E.coli O18ac:K77; O26:K60; O55:K59; O128ab:K67 were detected, the disease occurs by nosology of colienteritis. In those patients, in whom O25:K11; O144:K; O124:K72 serotypes have been identified, disease occurred as bacterial dysentery, and O25:K11 and O128:K67 — in chole­ra-like form. Discussion. In 94.50 % of patients, common E.coli were detected, but in 55 (35.03 % of them enteropathogenic Escherichia persist, in 41 (26.11 % — E.coli Hly+, in 37 (23.57 % — E.coli Lac–, in 18 (11.46 % — enterotoxigenic E.coli, in 14 (8.42 % — enteroinvasive, and in 11 (7.01 % — enterohemorragic Escherichia. Conclusions. It was determined that the main serotypes of opportunistic Escherichia, which colonize and persist in the colon cavity of patients with chronic non-ulcerative colitis, were O114:K90; O25:K11; O124:K72; O128:K67; O18ac:K77, the persistence of which affects clinical manifestation from colitis to dysentery-like or cholera-like disease.

  3. Use of Ionizing Radiations to Prepare Radiovaccines and Radio-Antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumanyan, MA; Hruschev, V.G.

    1967-01-01

    The possibility of employing ionizing radiations at certain doses to kill micro-organisms was used to produce vaccines against intestinal infections, and also to obtain from these bacteria antigens capable of being used as chemical vaccines. Typhoid fever and dysentery radiovaccines and radio-antigens were prepared, and the effect of various gamma ray doses on their toxicity and their antigenic and immunogenic properties was tested. The doses used did not change properties of these products as compared with those of vaccines and antigens produced by normal means. The paper also discusses the possibility of using radiation to sterilize fabricated vaccines and antigens, including radiovaccines and radio-antigens, anitoxins, antitoxic serums and nutrient media for the culture of micro-organisms. Data on the irradiation apparatus used for these investigations are reported. (author) [ru

  4. A review of the current state of antimicrobial susceptibility test methods for Brachyspira.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulathunga, D G R S; Rubin, J E

    2017-06-01

    The re-emergence of swine dysentery (Brachyspira-associated muco-haemorrhagic colitis) since the late 2000s has illuminated diagnostic challenges associated with this genus. The methods used to detect, identify, and characterize Brachyspira from clinical samples have not been standardized, and laboratories frequently rely heavily on in-house techniques. Particularly concerning is the lack of standardized methods for determining and interpreting the antimicrobial susceptibility of Brachyspira spp. The integration of laboratory data into a treatment plan is a critical component of prudent antimicrobial usage. Therefore, the lack of standardized methods is an important limitation to the evidence-based use of antimicrobials. This review will focus on describing the methodological limitations and inconsistencies between current susceptibility testing schemes employed for Brachyspira, provide an overview of what we do know about the susceptibility of these organisms, and suggest future directions to improve and standardize diagnostic strategies.

  5. Possible mechanisms of action of Caesalpinia pyramidalis against ethanol-induced gastric damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, Polyana B F; Ribeiro, Ana Roseli S; Estevam, Charles S; Bani, Cristiane C; Thomazzi, Sara M

    2015-06-20

    Caesalpinia pyramidalis Tul. (Fabaceae), known as "catingueira", is an endemic tree of the Northeast region of Brazil. This plant, mainly inner bark and flowers, has been used in traditional medicine to treat gastritis, heartburn, indigestion, stomachache, dysenteries, and diarrheas. The ethanol extract of C. pyramidalis inner bark was used in rats via oral route, at the doses of 30, 100, and 300 mg/kg, in the ethanol-induced ulcer model and some of the mechanisms underlying to the gastroprotective effect of this plant investigated. The ethanol extract of C. pyramidalis inner bark (100 mg/kg) produced reduction (P process with imbalance between pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory mediators, supporting the popular usage of this plant. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Antiproliferative Activity and Induction of Apoptosis in PC-3 Cells by the Chalcone Cardamonin from Campomanesia adamantium (Myrtaceae in a Bioactivity-Guided Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aislan Cristina Rheder Fagundes Pascoal

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The Myrtaceae family is a common source of medicines used in the treatment of numerous diseases in South America. In Brazil, fruits of the Campomanesia species are widely used to make liqueurs, juices and sweets, whereas leaves are traditionally employed as a medicine for dysentery, stomach problems, diarrhea, cystitis and urethritis. Ethanol extracts of Campomanesia adamantium (Myrtaceae leaves and fruits were evaluated against prostate cancer cells (PC-3. The compound (2E-1-(2,4-dihydroxy-6-methoxyphenyl-3-phenylprop-2-en-1-one, cardamonin was isolated from ethanol extracts of C. adamantium leaves in a bioactivity-guided study and quantified by UPLC-MS/MS. In vitro studies showed that the isolated chalcone cardamonin inhibited prostate cancer cell proliferation and decreased the expression of NFkB1. Moreover, analysis by flow cytometry showed that this compound induced DNA fragmentation, suggesting an effect on apoptosis induction in the PC-3 cell line.

  7. Acorus calamus (The Healing Plant): a review on its medicinal potential, micropropagation and conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vikas; Singh, Isha; Chaudhary, Priyanka

    2014-01-01

    Acorus calamus L., a tall, perennial, grass-like monocot plant from the Acoraceae family, is a well-known plant in Indian traditional medicines for centuries. It is a highly valued herb as it acts as a rejuvenator for brain and nervous system. It is a main medhya drug, which has the property of improving the memory power and intellect. Rhizomes of the plant are widely used in the treatment of number of ailments such as epilepsy, mental ailments, chronic diarrhoea, dysentery, fever, abdominal tumours, kidney and liver troubles, and rheumatism. A. calamus leaves, rhizomes and its essential oil possess many biological activities such as antispasmodic, carminative and are compiled in a simple approach in this review. This review presents a pragmatic description that deals with chemical constituents, toxicology, ethnobotany and pharmacological properties of A. calamus for easy and better understanding of the outstanding medicinal potential of this very special plant and sirens for its conservation.

  8. Tyrosine kinases, drugs, and Shigella flexneri dissemination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragoi, Ana-Maria; Agaisse, Hervé

    2014-01-01

    Shigella flexneri is an enteropathogenic bacterium responsible for approximately 100 million cases of severe dysentery each year. S. flexneri colonization of the human colonic epithelium is supported by direct spread from cell to cell, which relies on actin-based motility. We have recently uncovered that, in intestinal epithelial cells, S. flexneri actin-based motility is regulated by the Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk). Consequently, treatment with Ibrutinib, a specific Btk inhibitor currently used in the treatment of B-cell malignancies, effectively impaired S. flexneri spread from cell to cell. Thus, therapeutic intervention capitalizing on drugs interfering with host factors supporting the infection process may represent an effective alternative to treatments with antimicrobial compounds.

  9. Review of the genus Ipomoea: traditional uses, chemistry and biological activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilena Meira

    Full Text Available Approximately 600-700 species of Ipomoea, Convolvulaceae, are found throughout tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Several of those species have been used as ornamental plants, food, medicines or in religious ritual. The present work reviews the traditional uses, chemistry and biological activities of Ipomoea species and illustrates the potential of the genus as a source of therapeutic agents. These species are used in different parts of the world for the treatment of several diseases, such as, diabetes, hypertension, dysentery, constipation, fatigue, arthritis, rheumatism, hydrocephaly, meningitis, kidney ailments and inflammations. Some of these species showed antimicrobial, analgesic, spasmolitic, spasmogenic, hypoglycemic, hypotensive, anticoagulant, anti-inflammatory, psychotomimetic and anticancer activities. Alkaloids, phenolics compounds and glycolipids are the most common biologically active constituents from these plant extracts.

  10. [Epidemiological health surveillance among the troops during combat operations in armed conflicts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mel'nichenko, P I

    1997-08-01

    With local wars and armed conflicts the sanitary-epidemiological situation for the troops and local population shows a tendency to worsen. The main objects of the military medical service at the period of deployment are the preventive measures against troops infection from local sources by virus hepatitis A, bacterial dysentery, typhoid, cholera etc. As a rule, combat actions result in communal service destruction, low quality of potable water, soil contamination and worsening sanitary norms and standards. Also, there is a danger of reactivation of the natural centres of infection due to large-scale defence earthworks in the region of operations. The experience of the military medical service in Afghanistan and Chechnya proves, that a multimedia approach to preventive antiepidemic measures is necessary together with the emphasis on the most important actions against infections that represent the biggest danger for the land troops.

  11. Watch on human experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budiansky, S

    The National Institutes of Health's Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee (RAC) has reaffirmed its role as reviewer of recombinant DNA research with human subjects and of any proposals to release recombinant organisms into the environment. Review is binding on recipients of federal research funds, and government agencies and industry have agreed to comply voluntarily with RAC guidelines. Activist Jeremy Rifkin protested against RAC's recent closing of a session to the public in order to discuss the planned release of frost-resistant bacteria into the environment by a private firm, and a proposal by the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences to reduce the required containment level for research involving the cloning of a gene that codes for a dysentery-causing toxin.

  12. Shigella infection of intestinal epithelium and circumvention of the host innate defense system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashida, Hiroshi; Ogawa, Michinaga; Mimuro, Hitomi; Sasakawa, Chihiro

    2009-01-01

    Shigella, Gram-negative bacteria closely related to Escherichia coli, are highly adapted human pathogens that cause bacillary dysentery. Although Shigella have neither adherence factors nor flagella required for attaching or accessing the intestinal epithelium, Shigella are capable of colonizing the intestinal epithelium by exploiting epithelial-cell functions and circumventing the host innate immune response. During Shigella infection, they deliver many numbers of effectors through the type III secretion system into the surrounding space and directly into the host-cell cytoplasm. The effectors play pivotal roles from the onset of bacterial infection through to the establishment of the colonization of the intestinal epithelium, such as bacterial invasion, intracellular survival, subversion of the host immune defense response, and maintenance of the infectious foothold. These examples suggest that Shigella have evolved highly sophisticated infectious and intracellular strategies to establish replicative niches in the intestinal epithelium.

  13. Expeditions to Death and Disaster: Chappe d'Auteroche and Charles Green at the 1769 Transit of Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.

    2012-09-01

    Scientific expeditions usually bring back information or specimens that forward human knowledge. We also prefer them to bring back the humans in good shape, but that does not always occur. I discuss the expeditions to Siberia in 1761 and to Baja California in 1769 by the French abbé Jean Chappe d'Auteroche and to Tahiti in 1769 by the English astronomer Charles Green, accompanying Captain James Cook, to observe the transits of Venus. Neither Chappe d'Auteroche nor Green survived their expeditions. Chappe managed to hang on after the transit to see an eclipse of the Moon about two weeks later, and it is said that since ``the intent of his voyage was fulfilled, and the fruit of his observations secured,'' he ``died content,'' since ``he saw nothing more to wish for.'' Green died of dysentery caught in Batavia (now in Indonesia) on the continuation of his expedition with Capt. Cook on the ship Endeavour after the transit.

  14. Survey of diseases and parasites of honeybees (Apis mellifera L.) in Sudan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Niweiri, M. A.; El-Sarrag, M. S. A.; Satti, A. A.

    2009-01-01

    A survey of the honeybee diseases and parasites including questionnaires were carried out in eight bee areas in Sudan during the season 2002/03. About 117 local colonies and 324 packages of imported colonies of Apis mellifera were inspected, in addition to 25 colonies of Apis florea. All areas were found to be free of most bacterial brood diseases and fungal diseases, except the bacterial brood disease (Serratia marcescens) which was merely detected in 2.6% of Khartoum colonies. However, non infective dysentery was the only adult disease found during this study infecting 18.2% of Kordofan colonies. On the other hand, the parasitic mite (Varroa jacobsoni) was reported as first record in Sudan, detected only in Khartoum State infecting about 75% of colonies in apiaries and 27% of wild colonies. Sudanese honeybees were found to be characterized by hygienic behaviour of colonies which resist most pests and diseases, and no chemicals were used for control.(Author)

  15. Study on the natural pigments present in the Hulls of Garcinia Mangostana Linn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    San Dar Aung; Aye Aye Tun; San San Aye; Maung Maung Htay

    2005-09-01

    Garcinia mangostana Linn,(Family; Guttiferae) is known to be a rich source of bioactive molecules including flavonoids, benzophenones and lactones. A variety of xanthones have been isolated from mangosteen plants and fruits include the hull, rind heartwood and flesh. The fruit hull is used as an astringent and also used against cholera, dysentery and diarrhoea in traditional medicinal system. Petroleum ether extraction of the dried and powered fruit hulls followed by column chromatographic separation afforded two compounds, namely, gartanin (1) (0.48% in yield, mp 146-152 ) and mangostin (2) (0.97% in yield, mp (179-180). The structures of these two compounds have been identified by UV, FT-IR, NMR and EIMS. These identifications were confirmed by comparison of melting point values with reported data in the literature

  16. Melastoma malabathricum (L. Smith Ethnomedicinal Uses, Chemical Constituents, and Pharmacological Properties: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mohd. Joffry

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Melastoma malabathricum L. (Melastomataceae is one of the 22 species found in the Southeast Asian region, including Malaysia. Considered as native to tropical and temperate Asia and the Pacific Islands, this commonly found small shrub has gained herbal status in the Malay folklore belief as well as the Indian, Chinese, and Indonesian folk medicines. Ethnopharmacologically, the leaves, shoots, barks, seeds, and roots of M. malabathricum have been used to treat diarrhoea, dysentery, hemorrhoids, cuts and wounds, toothache, and stomachache. Scientific findings also revealed the wide pharmacological actions of various parts of M. malabthricum, such as antinociceptive, anti-inflammatory, wound healing, antidiarrheal, cytotoxic, and antioxidant activities. Various types of phytochemical constituents have also been isolated and identifed from different parts of M. malabathricum. Thus, the aim of the present review is to present comprehensive information on ethnomedicinal uses, phytochemical constituents, and pharmacological activities of M. malabathricum.

  17. Microbiological and Pharmacological Evaluation of the Micropropagated Rubus liebmannii Medicinal Plant

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    Adelina Jiménez-Arellanes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rubus liebmannii is an endemic species from Mexico used in traditional medicine primarily to treat dysentery and cough. The in vitro activity against Giardia lamblia and Entamoeba histolytica that produces the ethanolic extract of the aerial parts of the plant led us to expand the pharmacological and phytochemical research of this species. Gastrointestinal disorders including amebiasis remain one of the health problems that need to be addressed and it is of interest to find alternatives that improve their treatment. Also, it is important to emphasize that R. liebmannii grows wild in the country and is not found in abundance; therefore, alternatives that avoid overexploitation of the natural resource are mandatory. Ongoing with the evaluation of the potentialities that R. liebmannii possesses for treating infectious gastrointestinal diseases, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the biological effects and the chemical composition of the micropropagated plant.

  18. Safety and efficacy of Labisia pumila containing products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Syafiq Saleh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Labisia pumila is a traditional medicinal plant which has wide therapeutic application including induction of labor and treatment of dysentery, dysmenorrhea and gonorrhea. We aimed for systematic review of the efficacy andsafety of L. pumila extract or its other commercial products availabe in Malaysian market. The marketed 500 mg capsule is composed of 40 mg L. pumila, 10 mg C. caudatum extract and 450 mg excipient. The commercial products did not follow the registration guidelines of Malaysian National Pharmaceutical Control Bureau (NPCB and advertisement guidelines of Malaysian Advertisement Board. Randomized, placebo controlled clinical trials reported the safe consumpotion of L. pumila water extract on postmanoposal women. Information on the efficacy and safety of commercial products are not sufficiently available. Many unregistered products (mostly capsule form are flooded in Malaysian market without having scientific information. Consumption of those products may seriously impair the health of the people.

  19. Chromosome Aberration on High Level Background Natural Radiation Areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanti-Lusiyanti; Zubaidah-Alatas

    2001-01-01

    When the body is irradiated, all cells can suffer cytogenetic damage that can be seen as structural damage of chromosome in the lymphocytes. People no matter where they live in world are exposed to background radiation from natural sources both internal and external such as cosmic radiation, terrestrial radiation, cosmogenic radiation radon and thoron. Level of area natural ionizing radiation is varies depending on the altitude, the soil or rock conditions, particular food chains and the building materials and construction features. Level of normal areas of background exposure is annual effective dose 2.4 mSv and the high level areas of background exposure 20 mSv. This paper discuses the frequency of aberration chromosome especially dysenteries in several countries having high level radiation background. It seems that frequency of chromosome aberrations increase, generally with the increase of age of the people and the accumulated dose received. (author)

  20. Antibacterial activity of selected Myanmar medicinal plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nwe Yee Win; Nyunt Wynn; Mar Mar Nyein; Win Myint; Saw Hla Myint; Myint Khine

    2001-01-01

    Thirteen plants which are traditionally used for the treatment of dysentery and diarrhoea in Myanmar were selected and tested for antibacterial activity by using agar disc diffusion technique. Polar and nonpolar solvents were employed for extraction of plants. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the extracts with the most significant predominant activity were evaluated by plate dilution method. The plants Eugenia jambolana, Quisqualis indica, Leucaena glauca and Euphorbia splendens var. 1 were found to show significant antibacterial activity. It was also observed that extracts using nonpolar solvents did not show any antibacterial activity and extracts using polar solvents showed antibacterial activity on tested bacteria, indicating that the active chemical compound responsible for the antibacterial action must be a polar soluble compound. (author)

  1. Crystal structure and functional characterization of SF216 from Shigella flexneri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ha-Neul; Seok, Seung-Hyeon; Lee, Yoo-Sup; Won, Hyung-Sik; Seo, Min-Duk

    2017-11-01

    Shigella flexneri is a Gram-negative anaerobic bacterium that causes highly infectious bacterial dysentery in humans. Here, we solved the crystal structure of SF216, a hypothetical protein from the S. flexneri 5a strain M90T, at 1.7 Å resolution. The crystal structure of SF216 represents a homotrimer stabilized by intersubunit interactions and ion-mediated electrostatic interactions. Each subunit consists of three β-strands and five α-helices with the β-β-β-α-α-α-α-α topology. Based on the structural information, we also demonstrate that SF216 shows weak ribonuclease activity by a fluorescence quenching assay. Furthermore, we identify potential druggable pockets (putative hot spots) on the surface of the SF216 structure by computational mapping. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  2. PI5P Triggers ICAM-1 Degradation in Shigella Infected Cells, Thus Dampening Immune Cell Recruitment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Boal

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Shigella flexneri, the pathogen responsible for bacillary dysentery, has evolved multiple strategies to control the inflammatory response. Here, we show that Shigella subverts the subcellular trafficking of the intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1, a key molecule in immune cell recruitment, in a mechanism dependent on the injected bacterial enzyme IpgD and its product, the lipid mediator PI5P. Overexpression of IpgD, but not a phosphatase dead mutant, induced the internalization and the degradation of ICAM-1 in intestinal epithelial cells. Remarkably, addition of permeant PI5P reproduced IpgD effects and led to the inhibition of neutrophil recruitment. Finally, these results were confirmed in an in vivo model of Shigella infection where IpgD-dependent ICAM-1 internalization reduced neutrophil adhesion. In conclusion, we describe here an immune evasion mechanism used by the pathogen Shigella to divert the host cell trafficking machinery in order to reduce immune cell recruitment.

  3. Isolation and antifungal screening of endophytic fungi from Erigeron canadensis

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    Xuelian Bai

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Sixteen fungal strains isolated from the Erigeron canadensis, one of traditional Chinese medicines used to treat the pathogenic infection and dysentery, were evaluated for their antifungal activities against one human pathogen Candida albicans, and two phytopathogens, Colletotrichum fructicola and Rhizoctonia cerealis. The bioassay results indicated that the ethyl acetate extract of the fermentation broth of these fungal endophytes had stronger antimicrobial activities. Among these endophytic strains, the ethyl acetate extracts of strains NPR003 and NPR005 showed the strongest inhibitory effects and has potential application in the discovery of new antifungal agents. This was the first report on the isolation of endophytic fungi from E. canadensis and evaluation of their antifungal activities.

  4. The Inside Story of Shigella Invasion of Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carayol, Nathalie; Tran Van Nhieu, Guy

    2013-01-01

    As opposed to other invasive pathogens that reside into host cells in a parasitic mode, Shigella, the causative agent of bacillary dysentery, invades the colonic mucosa but does not penetrate further to survive into deeper tissues. Instead, Shigella invades, replicates, and disseminates within the colonic mucosa. Bacterial invasion and spreading in intestinal epithelium lead to the elicitation of inflammatory responses responsible for the tissue destruction and shedding in the environment for further infection of other hosts. In this article, we highlight specific features of the Shigella arsenal of virulence determinants injected by a type III secretion apparatus (T3SA) that point to the targeting of intestinal epithelial cells as a discrete route of invasion during the initial event of the infectious process. PMID:24086068

  5. [Massive trichuriasis in an adult diagnosed by colonoscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapunar, J; Gil, L C; Gil, J G

    1999-01-01

    A case of massive trichuriasis in a 37-year-old female from a rural locality of the Metropolitan Region of Chile, with antecedents of alcoholism, chronic hepatic damage and portal cavernomatosis, is presented. Since 12 year ago she has had geophagia. In the last six months she has frequently presented liquid diarrhea, colic abdominal pains, tenesmus and sensation of abdominal distention. Clinical and laboratory tests confirmed her hepatic affection associated with a celiac disease with anemia and hypereosinophilia. Within a week diarrhea became worse and dysentery appeared. A colonoscopy revealed an impressive and massive trichuriasis. The patient was successfully treated with two cures of 200 mg tablets of mebendazole twice daily for three days with a week interval. After the first cure she evacuated a big amount of Tricuris trichiura, fecal evacuations became normal, geophagia disappeared and recovered 4 kg of body weight.

  6. Ethnobotanical value of dry, fallen ovaries of Bombax ceiba L. (Bombacaceae: Malvales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Gopakumar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In the tropics, the traditional ecological knowledge regarding utilization of diverse Non Timber Forest Products (NTFPs available with different human communities remains under-explored. Though not on an organized scale, the collection and sale of various NTFPs, help the members of tropical rural communities to sustain themselves. Bombax ceiba, a tropical moist deciduous tree has various ethnobotanical values. Semul gum is edible and possesses medicinal value. Immature fruits of this tree have value as an expectorant, stimulant and diuretic. Extracts of young roots are used for treating dysentery. Now the dry, fallen ovaries of this tree species have a new commercial value, and are being widely collected and traded by some local herbalists in Thrissur District of Kerala.

  7. Antibody production by the pig colon during infection with Treponema hyodysenteriae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, A S; Lysons, R J; Stokes, C R; Bourne, F J

    1989-09-01

    When 47 pigs were dosed orally with cultures of Treponema hyodysenteriae, 44 (94 per cent) developed swine dysentery. Of those which recovered and were rechallenged, nine of 21 (43 per cent) showed clinical signs, as did one of 10 (10 per cent) challenged on a third occasion. Clinical disease was associated with development of specific IgG, IgA and IgM antibodies in serum and the local production of IgA in gut mucosal tissues. The appearance of antibody was not directly related to protection but rather indicated either prolonged exposure (in the case of serum IgG) or recent exposure to T hyodysenteriae (for secretory IgA). Infection also resulted in the appearance of IgG and IgA memory cells in gut-associated lymphoid tissue. However, these studies indicated that humoral immunity alone is not responsible for the onset of a protective response to T hyodysenteriae in the colon.

  8. Review-An overview of Pistacia integerrima a medicinal plant species: Ethnobotany, biological activities and phytochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibi, Yamin; Zia, Muhammad; Qayyum, Abdul

    2015-05-01

    Pistacia integerrima with a common name crab's claw is an ethnobotanically important tree native to Asia. Traditionally plant parts particularly its galls have been utilized for treatment of cough, asthma, dysentery, liver disorders and for snake bite. Plant mainly contains alkaloids, flavonoids, tannins, saponins and sterols in different parts including leaf, stem, bark, galls and fruit. A number of terpenoids, sterols and phenolic compounds have been isolated from Pistacia integerrima extracts. Plant has many biological activities including anti-microbial, antioxidant, analgesic, cytotoxicity and phytotoxicity due to its chemical constituents. This review covers its traditional ethnomedicinal uses along with progresses in biological and phytochemical evaluation of this medicinally important plant species and aims to serve as foundation for further exploration and utilization.

  9. Molecular Mechanisms of Host Cytoskeletal Rearrangements by Shigella Invasins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Hyuck Lee

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Pathogen-induced reorganization of the host cell cytoskeleton is a common strategy utilized in host cell invasion by many facultative intracellular bacteria, such as Shigella, Listeria, enteroinvasive E. coli and Salmonella. Shigella is an enteroinvasive intracellular pathogen that preferentially infects human epithelial cells and causes bacillary dysentery. Invasion of Shigella into intestinal epithelial cells requires extensive remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton with the aid of pathogenic effector proteins injected into the host cell by the activity of the type III secretion system. These so-called Shigella invasins, including IpaA, IpaC, IpgB1, IpgB2 and IpgD, modulate the actin-regulatory system in a concerted manner to guarantee efficient entry of the bacteria into host cells.

  10. Isolation of Shewanella algae from rectal swabs of patients with bloody diarrhoea

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    R Nath

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Shewanella algae is an emerging bacteria rarely implicated as a human pathogen. It was infrequently recovered from clinical specimens probably because of inadequate processing of non-fermenting oxidase-positive gram-negative bacilli. We report here isolation of S. algae in pure culture and mixed with E. coli from two cases of acute gastroenteritis with bloody mucous containing diarrhea occurring at the same time. As this organism is not a normal flora of the gut, the possible source of infection may be fish contaminated with the organism. Whether this bacterium can be considered an enteric pathogen needs to be evaluated. The cases were clinically diagnosed as acute bacillary dysentery. The bacterium was identified by 16S r-RNA gene sequence analysis.

  11. Primary Pulmonary Amebiasis Complicated with Multicystic Empyema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Zakaria

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Amebiasis is a parasitic infection caused by the protozoan Entamoeba histolytica. While most infections are asymptomatic, the disease could manifest clinically as amebic dysentery and/or extraintestinal invasion in the form of amebic liver abscess or other more rare manifestations such as pulmonary, cardiac, or brain involvement. Herein we are reporting a case of a 24-year-old male with history of Down syndrome who presented with severe right side pneumonia complicated with multicystic empyema resistant to regular medical therapy. Further investigation revealed a positive pleural fluid for E. histolytica cysts and trophozoites. The patient was diagnosed with primary pleuropulmonary amebiasis and he responded promptly to surgical drainage and metronidazole therapy. In patients from endemic areas all physicians should keep a high index of suspicion of amebiasis as a cause of pulmonary disease.

  12. Main causes of mortality in Holstein calves on rural properties in the Bragantina region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Moraes de Olivera

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted on two dairy farms that breed Holstein cattle in the municipality of Bragança Paulista, São Paulo. The study included 11 female calves that were one to three months old. The animals were autopsied. Tissue samples of affected organs were collected for histopathological and microbiological examination and blood was collected for serological tests. The aim of this study was to identify the main causes of death in calves of dairy cattle from the Bragantina region. Among the causes, the frequency of dysentery and respiratory diseases was similar. The samples evalulated identified a higher frequency of macroscopic and microscopic lung lesions when compared to intestinal lesions. The etiological agents associated with the diseases found were Salmonella sp., Escherichia coli, Clostridium perfringens, Pasteurella spp., syncytial virus and coronavirus, which affect the respiratory and gastrointestinal systems and can lead to septicemia and death.

  13. Caso fatal de balantidíase intestinal

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    Maria da Conceição Pinheiro

    1991-09-01

    Full Text Available Caso fatal de balantidíase em mulher desnutrida de 63 anos, criadora de porcos, da zona rural de Uberaba. A doença evoluiu em oito dias com disenteria, náusea e vômitos, culminando em óbito por enterorragia. A necropsia constatou-se colite ulcerada causada por B. coli, facilmente identificado ao exame histológico do intestino grosso.A fatal case of a 63-year old pig-raising country woman with an eight-day course of nausea, vomiting. dysentery with intestinal bleeding the latter being the direct cause of death. The autopsy showed ulcerative colitis due to B. coli, which was easily observed on histological examination of the large bowel.

  14. Prevalence of Balantidium coli Infection in Bred Rhesus Monkeys (Macaca mulatta in Guangxi, southern China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai Long Li

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Balantidium coli infects humans, primates and pigs, causing serious diarrhea and dysentery. Little information on the prevalence of B. coli in primates is available in China. This investigation was conducted to determine the prevalence of B. coli infection in bred rhesus monkeys in Guangxi Zhuang Nationality Autonomous Region (GZNAR, southern China.A total of 120 fecal samples were collected from rhesus monkeys bred in cages in GZNAR and B. coli cysts and/or trophozoites were examined microscopically after sedimentation with water in May 2013.(64.2% samples were tested positive. The prevalence was 65% (39/60 and 63.3% (38/60 in female and male monkeys, respectively. 80% (48/60 cages in this nonhuman primate center were positive for B. coli.The present survey revealed high circulation of B. coli in bred rhesus monkeys in GZNAR, which poses potential threats to animal and human health.

  15. Prevalence of Yersinia enterocolitica Bioserotype 3/O:3 among Children with Diarrhea, China, 2010–2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Ran; Liang, Junrong; Zhang, Jing; Chen, Yuhuang; Tong, Jing; Guo, Bangcheng; Hu, Wanfu; Wang, Mingliu; Zhao, Jiayong; Liu, Chang; Hao, Huijing

    2017-01-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica is thought to not significantly contribute to diarrheal disease in China, but evidence substantiating this claim is limited. We determined the prevalence of Y. enterocolitica infection and strain types present among children enterocolitica infection and should be used as an indication for microbiological diagnostic testing, rather than for the diagnosis of bacillary dysentery. In contrast with Y. enterocolitica isolates from adults, which were primarily biotype 1A, isolates from children were primarily bioserotype 3/O:3. Most pathogenic isolates from children shared pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns with isolates from pigs and dogs, suggesting a possible link between isolates from animals and infections in children. Our findings underscore the need for improved diagnostics for this underestimated pathogen. PMID:28820132

  16. Parasitic diseases as the cause of death of prisoners of war during the Korean War (1950-1953).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Sun

    2014-06-01

    To determine the cause of death of prisoners of war during the Korean War (1950-1953), death certificates or medical records were analyzed. Out of 7,614 deaths, 5,013 (65.8%) were due to infectious diseases. Although dysentery and tuberculosis were the most common infectious diseases, parasitic diseases had caused 14 deaths: paragonimiasis in 5, malaria in 3, amoebiasis in 2, intestinal parasitosis in 2, ascariasis in 1, and schistosomiasis in 1. These results showed that paragonimiasis, malaria, and amoebiasis were the most fatal parasitic diseases during the early 1950s in the Korean Peninsula. Since schistosomiasis is not endemic to Korea, it is likely that the infected private soldier moved from China or Japan to Korea.

  17. Patients with gastrointestinal complains due to enteric parasites, with reference to Entamoeba histolytica/dispar as dected by ELISA E. histolytica adhesion in stool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Kadi, Mohammad A; Dorrah, Ahmad O; Shoukry, Nahla M

    2006-04-01

    A total of 210 patients with gastrointestinal troubles, of both sex and a mean age of 32 +/- 6.1 years, selected from the outpatient's clinics of Al-Azhar University Hospitals. 115 (54.76%) had dysentery, 95 (45.23%) did not have dysentery, 15 (14%) suffered flatulence, 20 (9.52%) had epi-gastric pain, 19 (9.05%) had vague abdominal pain, 5 vomiting (5.2%) and 10 (4.9%) had fever. Two symptoms were in 29 (13.81%) patients and three symptoms in 12 (5.71%). Of the 210 patients, 20 (9.9%) had helminthes infection, 121 (57.6%) had intestinal protozoa and 69 (32.9%) had no parasitic infection. Of these parasite-free patients, 16 had Shigella sp. and nine had Campylobacter sp. Of the patients with intestinal protozoa, 34 (16.2%) had E. histolytica/dispar by stool examination of stained smears. By using ELISA for detection of E. histolytica adhesion in stool samples of 115 with diarrhea only 18 had true E. histolytica infection and of 3 without diarrhea only one had E. histolytica infection. Mean-while, ELISA did not cross-reacted E. coli, Giardia lamblia, Cryptosporidium parvum, Endolimax nana or Blastocystis hominis. So, ELISA for detection of E. histolytica adhesion in stool samples was more specific than microscopy and safe direction to the E. histolytica treatment. Apart from intestinal protozoan and bacteria, helminthes were seen in stool analysis. These were Schistosoma mansoni (0.95%), Capillaria sp. (0.95%), Enterobius vermicularis (1.90%) macroscopically, Hymenolepis nana (4.3%) and Ascaris lumbricoides (1.43%).

  18. Antimicrobial Susceptibility Patterns of Brachyspira Species Isolated from Swine Herds in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirajkar, Nandita S; Davies, Peter R; Gebhart, Connie J

    2016-08-01

    Outbreaks of swine dysentery, caused by Brachyspira hyodysenteriae and the recently discovered "Brachyspira hampsonii," have reoccurred in North American swine herds since the late 2000s. Additionally, multiple Brachyspira species have been increasingly isolated by North American diagnostic laboratories. In Europe, the reliance on antimicrobial therapy for control of swine dysentery has been followed by reports of antimicrobial resistance over time. The objectives of our study were to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility trends of four Brachyspira species originating from U.S. swine herds and to investigate their associations with the bacterial species, genotypes, and epidemiological origins of the isolates. We evaluated the susceptibility of B. hyodysenteriae, B. hampsonii, Brachyspira pilosicoli, and Brachyspira murdochii to tiamulin, valnemulin, doxycycline, lincomycin, and tylosin by broth microdilution and that to carbadox by agar dilution. In general, Brachyspira species showed high susceptibility to tiamulin, valnemulin, and carbadox, heterogeneous susceptibility to doxycycline, and low susceptibility to lincomycin and tylosin. A trend of decreasing antimicrobial susceptibility by species was observed (B. hampsonii > B. hyodysenteriae > B. murdochii > B. pilosicoli). In general, Brachyspira isolates from the United States were more susceptible to these antimicrobials than were isolates from other countries. Decreased antimicrobial susceptibility was associated with the genotype, stage of production, and production system from which the isolate originated, which highlights the roles of biosecurity and husbandry in disease prevention and control. Finally, this study also highlights the urgent need for Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute-approved clinical breakpoints for Brachyspira species, to facilitate informed therapeutic and control strategies. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. A multi-center randomized trial to assess the efficacy of gatifloxacin versus ciprofloxacin for the treatment of shigellosis in Vietnamese children.

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    Ha Vinh

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial genus Shigella is the leading cause of dysentery. There have been significant increases in the proportion of Shigella isolated that demonstrate resistance to nalidixic acid. While nalidixic acid is no longer considered as a therapeutic agent for shigellosis, the fluoroquinolone ciprofloxacin is the current recommendation of the World Health Organization. Resistance to nalidixic acid is a marker of reduced susceptibility to older generation fluoroquinolones, such as ciprofloxacin. We aimed to assess the efficacy of gatifloxacin versus ciprofloxacin in the treatment of uncomplicated shigellosis in children.We conducted a randomized, open-label, controlled trial with two parallel arms at two hospitals in southern Vietnam. The study was designed as a superiority trial and children with dysentery meeting the inclusion criteria were invited to participate. Participants received either gatifloxacin (10 mg/kg/day in a single daily dose for 3 days or ciprofloxacin (30 mg/kg/day in two divided doses for 3 days. The primary outcome measure was treatment failure; secondary outcome measures were time to the cessation of individual symptoms. Four hundred and ninety four patients were randomized to receive either gatifloxacin (n=249 or ciprofloxacin (n=245, of which 107 had a positive Shigella stool culture. We could not demonstrate superiority of gatifloxacin and observed similar clinical failure rate in both groups (gatifloxacin; 12.0% and ciprofloxacin; 11.0%, p=0.72. The median (inter-quartile range time from illness onset to cessation of all symptoms was 95 (66-126 hours for gatifloxacin recipients and 93 (68-120 hours for the ciprofloxacin recipients (Hazard Ratio [95%CI]=0.98 [0.82-1.17], p=0.83.We conclude that in Vietnam, where nalidixic acid resistant Shigellae are highly prevalent, ciprofloxacin and gatifloxacin are similarly effective for the treatment of acute shigellosis.

  20. Susceptibility to pleuromutilins in Brachyspira (Serpulina) hyodysenteriae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, M; Gunnarsson, A; Franklin, A

    2001-06-01

    The pleuromutilins are the only antimicrobial agents with sufficient minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values left to treat swine dysentery in Sweden. Other antimicrobials are either not approved for use against swine dysentery or only partly active against Brachyspira hyodysenteriae. To date, in Sweden two pleuromutilins, tiamulin and valnemulin, are authorized for use in pigs. This study includes a comparison between MICs of tiamulin and valnemulin for Swedish field isolates of B. hyodysenteriae, as determined by broth dilution. For different isolates the MIC of tiamulin was between 0 and 8 times higher than that of valnemulin. No resistance to pleuromutilins was recorded (tiamulin MIC range 0.031-2 microg/ml, valnemulin MIC range tiamulin resistance was also studied. Two B. hyodysenteriae and two B. pilosicoli strains became resistant to tiamulin following reiterated passages on agar containing tiamulin in increasing concentrations. The resistance emerged slowly and three of the strains that went through more than 60 passages increased their tiamulin MICs from 0.031-0.25 to more than 128 microg/ml. The tiamulin MIC for one B. hyodysenteriae strain that went through 29 passages increased from 0.0125 to 4 microg/ml. One B. pilosicoli strain developed cross-resistance to valnemulin; the MIC increased from 0.25 to more than 64 microg/ml. The valnemulin MIC for one B. hyodysenteriae strain increased from 0.031 microg/ml to 32 microg/ml. Valnemulin MIC was not determined for the B. hyodysenteriae strain that only went through 29 passages. The valnemulin MIC of the other B. pilosicoli strain increased from 0.031 to 4 microg/ml.

  1. Antimicrobial Susceptibility Patterns of Brachyspira Species Isolated from Swine Herds in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirajkar, Nandita S.; Davies, Peter R.

    2016-01-01

    Outbreaks of swine dysentery, caused by Brachyspira hyodysenteriae and the recently discovered “Brachyspira hampsonii,” have reoccurred in North American swine herds since the late 2000s. Additionally, multiple Brachyspira species have been increasingly isolated by North American diagnostic laboratories. In Europe, the reliance on antimicrobial therapy for control of swine dysentery has been followed by reports of antimicrobial resistance over time. The objectives of our study were to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility trends of four Brachyspira species originating from U.S. swine herds and to investigate their associations with the bacterial species, genotypes, and epidemiological origins of the isolates. We evaluated the susceptibility of B. hyodysenteriae, B. hampsonii, Brachyspira pilosicoli, and Brachyspira murdochii to tiamulin, valnemulin, doxycycline, lincomycin, and tylosin by broth microdilution and that to carbadox by agar dilution. In general, Brachyspira species showed high susceptibility to tiamulin, valnemulin, and carbadox, heterogeneous susceptibility to doxycycline, and low susceptibility to lincomycin and tylosin. A trend of decreasing antimicrobial susceptibility by species was observed (B. hampsonii > B. hyodysenteriae > B. murdochii > B. pilosicoli). In general, Brachyspira isolates from the United States were more susceptible to these antimicrobials than were isolates from other countries. Decreased antimicrobial susceptibility was associated with the genotype, stage of production, and production system from which the isolate originated, which highlights the roles of biosecurity and husbandry in disease prevention and control. Finally, this study also highlights the urgent need for Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute-approved clinical breakpoints for Brachyspira species, to facilitate informed therapeutic and control strategies. PMID:27252458

  2. The Comparison of Effect of Human Milk and Powdered Milk on the Shigella dysenteriae Invasion in Cell Culture

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    Mahdeye Azadi Aghdam

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Shigella species are the common etiologic agents of bacterial dysentery. Many epidemiological studies have shown that breastfeeding may protect infants against intestinal infections. Among the components of milk, glycosylated proteins inhibit the adhesion of enteric pathogens in the laboratory. Immunoglobulins mainly secretory immunoglobulin A, glycosylated compounds, and oligosaccharides of breast milk are associated with protection against different intestinal pathogens. Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the effect of different proteins of breast milk and powdered milk on the invasion of Shigella colonies. Materials and Methods: To accomplish this goal, breast milk samples were provided from two donors in the first 6 months of breastfeeding and powdered milk with different brands were obtained from the market. Then the proteins were extracted by precipitation using ammonium sulfate and dialysis using dialysis bag and protein bands were separated through SDS-PAGE electrophoresis. Finally, the obtained milk proteins through Hela cells culture were tested and evaluated for the adhesion and invasion of the Shigella. Results: Our results revealed that the adhesion and invasion of Shigella stains were more inhibited by low concentrations of breast milk proteins in comparison with powdered milk. This concentration was about 2.75 mg/mL for the proteins of breast milk and 0.5 mg/mL for the proteins of powdered milk and this inhibition in different dilutions of breast milk was 71.21% and those of powdered milk was 27.19% in average. There was a significant difference between breast milk and powdered milk (P < 0.5 considering their inhibitory behavior. Conclusion: The results revealed that the components of breast milk inhibit the adhesion and consequently invasion of Shigella and inhibit bacterial dysentery.

  3. Antibiotics for the treatment of Cholera, Shigella and Cryptosporidium in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Jai K; Ali, Anum; Salam, Rehana A; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2013-01-01

    Diarrhea is a major contributor to the burden of morbidity and mortality in children; it accounts for a median of 11% of all deaths among children aged less than 5 years, amounting to approximately 0.8 million deaths per year. Currently there is a dearth of literature exploring the effectiveness of antibiotics for diarrhea due to Cholera, Shigella and cryptosporidiosis in children. We reviewed the literature reporting the effect of antibiotics for the treatment of diarrhea due to Cholera, Shigella and Cryptosporidium in children under five years. We used a standardized abstraction and grading format and performed meta-analyses to determine the effect of the treatment with various antibiotics on mortality and rates of clinical and bacteriological/parasitological failure. The CHERG Standard Rules were applied to determine the final effect of treatment with antibiotics on diarrhea morbidity and mortality. For Cholera; the evidence was weak to recommend any effect on mortality. For Shigella; there was no data on mortality; either all-cause or cause specific, hence we used clinical failure rates as a proxy for Shigella deaths and propose that treatment of Shigella dysentery with antibiotics can result in a 82% reduction in diarrhea mortality due to Shigella. For cryptosporidiosis; there was data on all-cause mortality but the evidence was weak hence we used clinical failure rates as a proxy for mortality to estimate that antimicrobial treatment of diarrhea due to cryptosporidiosis can result in a 54% reduction in mortality. There is evidence to recommend antibiotic use for reduction of morbidity and mortality due to Cholera, Shigella and Cryptosporidium. We recommend that more clinical trials should be conducted to evaluate the efficacy and safety of first- and second- line drugs currently in use for treatment for diarrhea and dysentery in both developing and developed countries.

  4. PENGARUH KONSENTRASI PERASAN MENGKUDU (Morinda citrofilia Linn TERHADAP PERTUMBUHAN Shygella disenteriae

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    Diah Ariana

    2017-09-01

    Abstract Mengkudu (Morinda citrofilia Linn Indonesia is known as a medicinal plant that can treat a variety of diseases. This study  to determine the effect of noni juice concentration on the growth of Shigella dysenteriae, the bacteria that causes the disease shigellosis (bacillary dysentery. The design of this study used an experimental design to test laboratory, noni juice obtained by weighing 100g were still ripe noni fruit (puti yellowish color and texture is still hard and washed, blender 100gr noni plus 100ml of sterile distilled water, filtered with sterile gauze and then Stril put in a test tube, back in autoclav sterilized for 15 minutes at a temperature of 1210C that noni juice is really sterile. Inhibition test with freshly made juice dilution method at concentrations of 100%, 50%, 25%, 12.5%, 6.25%, 3.13%, 1.57% and 0.78%, followed planted in the media Muller Hinton Shigella to know whether it is growing or not growing, Statistical data analysis using Chisquer test on α = 0.05. The test results showed λ2 Chisquer count> λ2 table, then Ho is rejected. The results showed 12.5% of concentration - 100% can inhibit the growth of Shigella dysenteriae while the concentration of 0.78% - 6.25% solid not inhibit the growth of Shigella dysenteriae, so it can be concluded that the noni (Morinda citrofilia Linn can inhibit the growth of Shigella dysenteriae and noni efficiently used for dysentery patients because of the concentration of 12.5% was able to inhibit the growth of Shygella dysenteriae. Keywords: Mengkudu (Morinda citrofilia Linn , Shigella dysenteriae

  5. Activity of medicinal plants from Ghana against the parasitic gut protist Blastocystis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremer Christensen, Charlotte; Soelberg, Jens; Stensvold, Christen R; Jäger, Anna K

    2015-11-04

    The plants tested in this study were examples of plants historically used to treat or alleviate several types of stomach disorders manifested by e.g. stomachache, diarrhoea or dysentery. These plants have been consumed typically as a decoction, sometimes mixed with other flavourings. The aim of this study was to evaluate the anti-Blastocystis activity of 24 plant parts from 21 medicinal plants from Ghana. The medicinal plants were collected in the Greater Accra region of Ghana. Every plant part was tested in three different extracts; an ethanolic, a warm, and a cold water extract, at a final concentration of 1 mg/mL for the initial screening, and in a range from 0.0156 to 1mg/mL for determination of inhibitory concentrations. The obligate anaerobic parasitic gut protist Blastocystis (subtype 4) was used as a 48 h old subcultivated isolate in the final concentration of 10(6) cells/mL. Plant extracts inoculated with Blastocystis were incubated at 37 °C for 24 h and 48 h. Both MIC minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC90) assays and minimal lethal concentration (MLC) assays were performed after 24 h and 48 h. The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) was derived after 24 h and 48 h. Antimicrobial activity was tested against two Gram-positive and two Gram-negative bacteria for all 24 plant parts at a final concentration of 1mg/mL. Screening of the 24 different plant parts showed significant anti-Blastocystis activity of six of the ethanolic extracts: Mallotus oppositifolius, IC50, 24 h 27.8 µg/mL; Vemonia colorata, IC50, 24 h 117.9 µg/mL; Zanthoxylum zanthoxyloides, cortex IC50, 24 h 255.6 µg/mL; Clausena anisata, IC50, 24 h 314.0 µg/mL; Z. zanthoxyloides, radix IC50, 24 h 335.7 µg/mL and Eythrina senegalensis, IC50, 24 h 527.6 µg/mL. The reference anti-protozoal agent metronidazole (MTZ) had an IC50, 24 h of 7.6 µg/mL. Only C. anisata showed antimicrobial activity at a concentration of 800 µg/mL. Six ethanolic plant extracts showed significant anti

  6. Are there any changes in burden and management of communicable diseases in areas affected by Cyclone Nargis?

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    Siriwan Pichit

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study aims to assess the situation of communicable diseases under national surveillance in the Cyclone Nargis-affected areas in Myanmar (Burma before and after the incident. Methods Monthly data during 2007, 2008 and 2009 from the routine reporting system for disease surveillance of the Myanmar Ministry of Health (MMOH were reviewed and compared with weekly reporting from the Early Warning and Rapid Response (EWAR system. Data from some UN agencies, NGOs and Tri-Partite Core Group (TCG periodic reviews were also extracted for comparisons with indicators from Sphere and the Inter-Agency Standing Committee. Results Compared to 2007 and 2009, large and atypical increases in diarrheal disease and especially dysentery cases occurred in 2008 following Cyclone Nargis. A seasonal increase in ARI reached levels higher than usual in the months of 2008 post-Nargis. The number of malaria cases post-Nargis also increased, but it was less clear if this reflected normal seasonal patterns or was specifically associated with the disaster event. There was no significant change in the occurrence of other communicable diseases in Nargis-affected areas. Except for a small decrease in mortality for diarrheal diseases and ARI in 2008 in Nargis-affected areas, population-based mortality rates for all other communicable diseases showed no significant change in 2008 in these areas, compared to 2007 and 2009. Tuberculosis control programs reached their targets of 70% case detection and 85% treatment success rates in 2007 and 2008. Vaccination coverage rates for DPT 3rd dose and measles remained at high though measles coverage still did not reach the Sphere target of 95% even by 2009. Sanitary latrine coverage in the Nargis-affected area dropped sharply to 50% in the months of 2008 following the incident but then rose to 72% in 2009. Conclusion While the incidence of diarrhea, dysentery and ARI increased post-Nargis in areas affected by the

  7. A Multi-Center Randomized Trial to Assess the Efficacy of Gatifloxacin versus Ciprofloxacin for the Treatment of Shigellosis in Vietnamese Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinh, Ha; Anh, Vo Thi Cuc; Anh, Nguyen Duc; Campbell, James I.; Hoang, Nguyen Van Minh; Nga, Tran Vu Thieu; Nhu, Nguyen Thi Khanh; Minh, Pham Van; Thuy, Cao Thu; Duy, Pham Thanh; Phuong, Le Thi; Loan, Ha Thi; Chinh, Mai Thu; Thao, Nguyen Thi Thu; Tham, Nguyen Thi Hong; Mong, Bui Li; Bay, Phan Van Be; Day, Jeremy N.; Dolecek, Christiane; Lan, Nguyen Phu Huong; Diep, To Song; Farrar, Jeremy J.; Chau, Nguyen Van Vinh; Wolbers, Marcel; Baker, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Background The bacterial genus Shigella is the leading cause of dysentery. There have been significant increases in the proportion of Shigella isolated that demonstrate resistance to nalidixic acid. While nalidixic acid is no longer considered as a therapeutic agent for shigellosis, the fluoroquinolone ciprofloxacin is the current recommendation of the World Health Organization. Resistance to nalidixic acid is a marker of reduced susceptibility to older generation fluoroquinolones, such as ciprofloxacin. We aimed to assess the efficacy of gatifloxacin versus ciprofloxacin in the treatment of uncomplicated shigellosis in children. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted a randomized, open-label, controlled trial with two parallel arms at two hospitals in southern Vietnam. The study was designed as a superiority trial and children with dysentery meeting the inclusion criteria were invited to participate. Participants received either gatifloxacin (10 mg/kg/day) in a single daily dose for 3 days or ciprofloxacin (30 mg/kg/day) in two divided doses for 3 days. The primary outcome measure was treatment failure; secondary outcome measures were time to the cessation of individual symptoms. Four hundred and ninety four patients were randomized to receive either gatifloxacin (n  =  249) or ciprofloxacin (n  =  245), of which 107 had a positive Shigella stool culture. We could not demonstrate superiority of gatifloxacin and observed similar clinical failure rate in both groups (gatifloxacin; 12.0% and ciprofloxacin; 11.0%, p  =  0.72). The median (inter-quartile range) time from illness onset to cessation of all symptoms was 95 (66–126) hours for gatifloxacin recipients and 93 (68–120) hours for the ciprofloxacin recipients (Hazard Ratio [95%CI]  =  0.98 [0.82–1.17], p  =  0.83). Conclusions We conclude that in Vietnam, where nalidixic acid resistant Shigellae are highly prevalent, ciprofloxacin and gatifloxacin are similarly effective for the

  8. The genus Sida L. - A traditional medicine: Its ethnopharmacological, phytochemical and pharmacological data for commercial exploitation in herbal drugs industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinda, Biswanath; Das, Niranjan; Dinda, Subhajit; Dinda, Manikarna; SilSarma, Indrajit

    2015-12-24

    Sida L. (Malvaceae) has been used for centuries in traditional medicines in different countries for the prevention and treatment of different diseases such as diarrhea, dysentery, gastrointestinal and urinary infections, malarial and other fevers, childbirth and miscarriage problems, skin ailments, cardiac and neural problems, asthma, bronchitis and other respiratory problems, weight loss aid, rheumatic and other inflammations, tuberculosis, etc. To assess the scientific evidence for therapeutic potential of Sida L. and to identify the gaps of future research needs. The available information on the ethnomedicinal uses, phytochemistry, pharmacology and toxicology of Sida species was collected via a library and electronic searches in SciFinder, PubMed, ScienceDirect, Google Scholar for the period, 1933-2015. A variety of ethnomedicinal uses of Sida species have been found in India, China, Afrian and American countries. Phytochemical investigation of this genus has resulted in identification of about 142 chemical constituents, among which alkaloids, flavonoids and ecdysteroids are the predominant groups. The crude extracts and isolates have exhibited a wide spectrum of in vitro and in vivo pharmacological effects involving antimicrobial, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, abortifacient, neuroprotective, cardiovascular and cardioprotective, antimalarial, antitubercular, antidiabetic and antiobesity, antioxidant and nephroprotective activities among others. Ethnopharmacological preparations containing Sida species as an ingredient in India, African and American countries possess good efficacy in health disorders. From the toxicity perspective, only three Sida species have been assessed and found safe for oral use in rats. Pharmacological results supported some of the uses of Sida species in the traditional medicine. Alkaloids, flavonoids, other phenolics and ecdysteroids were perhaps responsible for the activities of extracts of the plants of this genus. No clinical study

  9. Prebiotic and probiotic fortified milk in prevention of morbidities among children: community-based, randomized, double-blind, controlled trial.

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    Sunil Sazawal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent reviews suggest common infectious diseases continue to be a major cause of death among preschool children in developing countries. Identification of feasible strategies to combat this disease burden is an important public health need. We evaluated the efficacy of adding prebiotic oligosaccharide and probiotic Bifidobacterium lactis HN019 to milk, in preventing diarrhea, respiratory infections and severe illnesses, in children aged 1-4 years as part of a four group study design, running two studies simultaneously. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In a community based double-masked, randomized controlled trial, children 1-3 years of age, willing to participate, were randomly allocated to receive either control milk (Co; n = 312 or the same milk fortified with 2.4 g/day of prebiotic oligosaccharide and 1.9x10(7 colony forming unit (c.f.u/day of probiotic Bifidobacterium lactis HN019 (PP; n = 312. Children were followed up for 1 year providing data for 1-4 years. Biweekly household surveillance was conducted to gather information on compliance and morbidity. Both study groups were comparable at baseline; compliance to intervention was similar. Overall, there was no effect of prebiotic and probiotic on diarrhea (6% reduction, 95% Confidence Interval [CI]: -1 to 12%; p = 0.08. Incidence of dysentery episodes was reduced by 21% (95% CI: 0 to 38%; p = 0.05. Incidence of pneumonia was reduced by 24% (95% CI: 0 to 42%; p = 0.05 and severe acute lower respiratory infection (ALRI by 35% (95% CI: 0 to 58%; p = 0.05. Compared to children in Co group, children in PP group had 16% (95% CI: 5 to 26%, p = 0.004 and 5% (95% CI: 0 to 10%; p = 0.05 reduction in days with severe illness and high fever respectively. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Milk can be a good medium for delivery of prebiotic and probiotic and resulted in significant reduction of dysentery, respiratory morbidity and febrile illness. Overall, impact of diarrhea was not significant. These

  10. Real-time analysis of gut flora in Entamoeba histolytica infected patients of Northern India

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    Verma Anil Kumar

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amebic dysentery is caused by the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica and the ingestion of quadrinucleate cyst of E. histolytica from fecally contaminated food or water initiates infection. Excystation occurs in the lumen of small intestine, where motile and potentially invasive trophozoites germinate from cysts. The ability of trophozoites to interact and digest gut bacteria is apparently important for multiplication of the parasite and its pathogenicity; however the contribution of resident bacterial flora is not well understood. We quantified the population of Bacteroides, Bifidobacterium, Ruminococcus, Lactobacillus, Clostridium leptum subgroup, Clostridium coccoides subgroup, Eubacterium, Campylobacter, Methanobrevibacter smithii and Sulphur reducing bacteria using genus specific primers in healthy (N = 22 vs amebic patients (E. histolytica positive, N = 17 stool samples by Real-time PCR. Results Absolute quantification of Bacteroides (p = .001, Closrtridium coccoides subgroup (p = 0.002, Clostridium leptum subgroup (p = 0.0001, Lactobacillus (p = 0.037, Campylobacter (p = 0.0014 and Eubacterium (p = 0.038 show significant drop in their population however, significant increase in Bifdobacterium (p = 0.009 was observed where as the population of Ruminococcus (p = 0.33 remained unaltered in healthy vs amebic patients (E. histolytica positive. We also report high prevalence of nimE gene in stool samples of both healthy volunteers and amebic patients. No significant decrease in nimE gene copy number was observed before and after the treatment with antiamebic drug. Conclusions Our results show significant alteration in predominant gut bacteria in E. histolytica infected individuals. The frequent episodes of intestinal amoebic dysentery thus result in depletion of few predominant genera in gut that may lead to poor digestion and absorption of food in intestine. It further disturbs

  11. Trapa bispinosa Roxb.: A Review on Nutritional and Pharmacological Aspects

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    Prafulla Adkar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Trapa bispinosa Roxb. which belongs to the family Trapaceae is a small herb well known for its medicinal properties and is widely used worldwide. Trapa bispinosa or Trapa natans is an important plant of Indian Ayurvedic system of medicine which is used in the problems of stomach, genitourinary system, liver, kidney, and spleen. It is bitter, astringent, stomachic, diuretic, febrifuge, and antiseptic. The whole plant is used in gonorrhea, menorrhagia, and other genital affections. It is useful in diarrhea, dysentery, ophthalmopathy, ulcers, and wounds. These are used in the validated conditions in pitta, burning sensation, dipsia, dyspepsia, hemorrhage, hemoptysis, diarrhea, dysentery, strangely, intermittent fever, leprosy, fatigue, inflammation, urethrorrhea, fractures, erysipelas, lumbago, pharyngitis, bronchitis and general debility, and suppressing stomach and heart burning. Maybe it is due to photochemical content of Trapa bispinosa having high quantity of minerals, ions, namely, Ca, K, Na, Zn, and vitamins; saponins, phenols, alkaloids, H-donation, flavonoids are reported in the plants. Nutritional and biochemical analyses of fruits of Trapa bispinosa in 100 g showed 22.30 and 71.55% carbohydrate, protein contents were 4.40% and 10.80%, a percentage of moisture, fiber, ash, and fat contents were 70.35 and 7.30, 2.05 and 6.35, 2.30 and 8.50, and 0.65 and 1.85, mineral contents of the seeds were 32 mg and 102.85 mg calcium, 1.4 and 3.8 mg Iron, and 121 and 325 mg phosphorus in 100 g, and seeds of Trapa bispinosa produced 115.52 and 354.85 Kcal of energy, in fresh and dry fruits, respectively. Chemical analysis of the fruit and fresh nuts having considerable water content citric acid and fresh fruit which substantiates its importance as dietary food also reported low crude lipid, and major mineral present with confirming good amount of minerals as an iron and manganese potassium were contained in the fruit. Crude fiber, total

  12. Trapa bispinosa Roxb.: A Review on Nutritional and Pharmacological Aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkar, Prafulla; Dongare, Amita; Ambavade, Shirishkumar; Bhaskar, V H

    2014-01-01

    Trapa bispinosa Roxb. which belongs to the family Trapaceae is a small herb well known for its medicinal properties and is widely used worldwide. Trapa bispinosa or Trapa natans is an important plant of Indian Ayurvedic system of medicine which is used in the problems of stomach, genitourinary system, liver, kidney, and spleen. It is bitter, astringent, stomachic, diuretic, febrifuge, and antiseptic. The whole plant is used in gonorrhea, menorrhagia, and other genital affections. It is useful in diarrhea, dysentery, ophthalmopathy, ulcers, and wounds. These are used in the validated conditions in pitta, burning sensation, dipsia, dyspepsia, hemorrhage, hemoptysis, diarrhea, dysentery, strangely, intermittent fever, leprosy, fatigue, inflammation, urethrorrhea, fractures, erysipelas, lumbago, pharyngitis, bronchitis and general debility, and suppressing stomach and heart burning. Maybe it is due to photochemical content of Trapa bispinosa having high quantity of minerals, ions, namely, Ca, K, Na, Zn, and vitamins; saponins, phenols, alkaloids, H-donation, flavonoids are reported in the plants. Nutritional and biochemical analyses of fruits of Trapa bispinosa in 100 g showed 22.30 and 71.55% carbohydrate, protein contents were 4.40% and 10.80%, a percentage of moisture, fiber, ash, and fat contents were 70.35 and 7.30, 2.05 and 6.35, 2.30 and 8.50, and 0.65 and 1.85, mineral contents of the seeds were 32 mg and 102.85 mg calcium, 1.4 and 3.8 mg Iron, and 121 and 325 mg phosphorus in 100 g, and seeds of Trapa bispinosa produced 115.52 and 354.85 Kcal of energy, in fresh and dry fruits, respectively. Chemical analysis of the fruit and fresh nuts having considerable water content citric acid and fresh fruit which substantiates its importance as dietary food also reported low crude lipid, and major mineral present with confirming good amount of minerals as an iron and manganese potassium were contained in the fruit. Crude fiber, total protein content of the

  13. Rationale for using Peltophorum africanum (Fabaceae extracts in veterinary medicine

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    S.E. Bizimenyera

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Peltophorum africanum (Fabaceae is a deciduous tree widespread in southern Africa. The plant has many ethnomedical and ethnoveterinary uses. Root and bark decoctions are used to treat diarrhoea, dysentery, sore throat, wounds, back and joint pains, HIV-AIDS, venereal diseases and infertility. Pastoralists and rural farmers use the root and bark extracts to treat diarrhoea, dysentery, infertility, and to promote well-being and resistance to diseases in cattle. To evaluate these ethnobotanical leads, dried leaves, stem bark and root bark were extracted with ethanol, acetone, dichloromethane and hexane. Polyphenols in the extract were determined by the Folin-Ciocalteu method with gallic acid as standard. Qualitative antioxidant activity was screened by spraying thin layer chromatograms (TLC of the extracts with 0.2 % 1, 1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH, and quantified with Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC assay. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and total antibacterial activity (TAA were determined by serial microplate dilution for Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterococcus faecalis, with gentamicin as standard and tetrazolium violet as growth indicator. Acetone and ethanol extracted the largest quantity of material. Polyphenols concentration was 49.2% in acetone extract of the root and 3.8 % in dichloromethane extract of the leaf. Antioxidant activity of at least 5 antioxidant compounds as measured by TEAC ranged from 1.34 (ethanol extract of the root to 0.01 (hexane extract of the leaf. The total antibacterial activity (volume to which active compounds present in 1 g plant material can be diluted and still inhibit bacterial growth was 1263 mℓ/g for ethanol extract of the root against S. aureus, and 800 mℓ/g for acetone extract of the root against P. aeruginosa. There was substantial activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, with MIC values of 0.08 mg/mℓ for S

  14. Upgrading a Piped Water Supply from Intermittent to Continuous Delivery and Association with Waterborne Illness: A Matched Cohort Study in Urban India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercumen, Ayse; Arnold, Benjamin F.; Kumpel, Emily; Burt, Zachary; Ray, Isha; Nelson, Kara; Colford, John M.

    2015-01-01

    had no significant overall association with diarrheal disease or ponderal growth in children water contamination from continuing household storage and exposure to diarrheagenic pathogens through nonwaterborne routes. Continuous supply was associated with lower prevalence of dysentery in children in low-income households and lower typhoid fever incidence, suggesting that intermittently operated piped water systems are a significant transmission mechanism for Salmonella typhi and dysentery-causing pathogens in this urban population, despite centralized water treatment. Continuous supply was associated with reduced transmission, especially in the poorer higher-risk segments of the population. PMID:26505897

  15. Upgrading a piped water supply from intermittent to continuous delivery and association with waterborne illness: a matched cohort study in urban India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercumen, Ayse; Arnold, Benjamin F; Kumpel, Emily; Burt, Zachary; Ray, Isha; Nelson, Kara; Colford, John M

    2015-10-01

    disease or ponderal growth in children water contamination from continuing household storage and exposure to diarrheagenic pathogens through nonwaterborne routes. Continuous supply was associated with lower prevalence of dysentery in children in low-income households and lower typhoid fever incidence, suggesting that intermittently operated piped water systems are a significant transmission mechanism for Salmonella typhi and dysentery-causing pathogens in this urban population, despite centralized water treatment. Continuous supply was associated with reduced transmission, especially in the poorer higher-risk segments of the population.

  16. Fate of Entamoeba histolytica during establishment of amoebic liver abscess analyzed by quantitative radioimaging and histology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigothier, Marie-Christine; Khun, Hout; Tavares, Paulo; Cardona, Ana; Huerre, Michel; Guillén, Nancy

    2002-06-01

    The protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica is the causative agent of amoebiasis, a human disease characterized by dysentery and liver abscess. The physiopathology of hepatic lesions can be satisfactorily reproduced in the hamster animal model by the administration of trophozoites through the portal vein route. Hamsters were infected with radioactively labeled amoebas for analysis of liver abscess establishment and progression. The radioimaging of material from parasite origin and quantification of the number inflammation foci, with or without amoebas, described here provides the first detailed assessment of trophozoite survival and death during liver infection by E. histolytica. The massive death of trophozoites observed in the first hours postinfection correlates with the presence of a majority of inflammatory foci without parasites. A critical point for success of infection is reached after 12 h when the lowest number of trophozoites is observed. The process then enters a commitment phase during which parasites multiply and the size of the infection foci increases fast. The liver shows extensive areas of dead hepatocytes that are surrounded by a peripheral layer of parasites facing inflammatory cells leading to acute inflammation. Our results show that the host response promotes massive parasite death but also suggest also that this is a major contributor to the establishment of inflammation during development of liver abscess.

  17. A case of fulminating amebic colitis associated with toxic megacolon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Kyung Sik; Lee, Joong Suk; Suh, Soo Jhi [Kyung Hee University Hospital. Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1985-12-15

    Amebic colitis was common disease in Korea as well as in the world especially frequent in tropical area such as Africa, India and South America. Clinicopathological forms of this condition were ulcerative rectocolitis (95%), typhloappendicitis (3%), ameboma (1.5%), and fulminating colitis with toxic megacolon (0.5%). The fulminating amebic colitis with toxic megacolon was very rare and dangerous condition which was reported by Wruble on 1966. Toxic megacolon was seen in the cases of ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, typhoid fever, cholera, and acute bacillary dysentery. Radiological findings of fulminating amebic colitis with toxic megacolon were megacolon, multiple polypoid filling defects, thumbprinting, and cobble stone appearance, which were resemble with ulcerative colitis. The cause of toxic megacolon was not well known, but it has been speculated that this results from transmural disease with destruction of muscle and the myenteric plexus with resultant loss of muscle tone. Authors experienced a case of fulminating amebic colitis with toxic megacolon which was resemble with ulcerative colitis by radiologically at Kyung Hee University Hospital and reported it with review of the literatures.

  18. Environmental impacts of polluted effluents on human health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, M.S.

    2005-01-01

    One of the major environmental problems confronting Pakistan is water pollution. Human health is being affected by water pollution. The major sources of pollution for surface and groundwater resources are municipal sewage and industrial wastewater. The indiscriminate discharges of untreated sewage and industrial effluents into the water bodies have affected not only the water quality but also human health. Groundwater is also being contaminated by the discharge of untreated sewage into land. Water pollution is responsible for water borne diseases such as hepatitis, dysentery, typhoid, cholera, paratyphoid fever etc. This paper presents a general overview of the wastewater pollution in Pakistan, an evaluation and a specific reference to Lahore city and the effects on human health. Finally, sustainable treatment methods have been proposed to mitigate the water pollution problem. The analysis of water bodies at wastewater discharge points shows depletion of Dissolved Oxygen (DO) and high levels of E. Coli. There is an evidence of groundwater pollution in many areas due to the discharge of wastewater on open land. To protect the water sources from contamination, appropriate treatment methods/treatment technologies have also been discussed in this paper. In the end conclusion and recommendations are given. (author)

  19. Environmental impacts of polluted effluents on human health

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, M S [NESPAK, Lahore (Pakistan). Geo-Environmental Engineering Div.

    2005-07-15

    One of the major environmental problems confronting Pakistan is water pollution. Human health is being affected by water pollution. The major sources of pollution for surface and groundwater resources are municipal sewage and industrial wastewater. The indiscriminate discharges of untreated sewage and industrial effluents into the water bodies have affected not only the water quality but also human health. Groundwater is also being contaminated by the discharge of untreated sewage into land. Water pollution is responsible for water borne diseases such as hepatitis, dysentery, typhoid, cholera, paratyphoid fever etc. This paper presents a general overview of the wastewater pollution in Pakistan, an evaluation and a specific reference to Lahore city and the effects on human health. Finally, sustainable treatment methods have been proposed to mitigate the water pollution problem. The analysis of water bodies at wastewater discharge points shows depletion of Dissolved Oxygen (DO) and high levels of E. Coli. There is an evidence of groundwater pollution in many areas due to the discharge of wastewater on open land. To protect the water sources from contamination, appropriate treatment methods/treatment technologies have also been discussed in this paper. In the end conclusion and recommendations are given. (author)

  20. A case of fulminating amebic colitis associated with toxic megacolon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Kyung Sik; Lee, Joong Suk; Suh, Soo Jhi

    1985-01-01

    Amebic colitis was common disease in Korea as well as in the world especially frequent in tropical area such as Africa, India and South America. Clinicopathological forms of this condition were ulcerative rectocolitis (95%), typhloappendicitis (3%), ameboma (1.5%), and fulminating colitis with toxic megacolon (0.5%). The fulminating amebic colitis with toxic megacolon was very rare and dangerous condition which was reported by Wruble on 1966. Toxic megacolon was seen in the cases of ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, typhoid fever, cholera, and acute bacillary dysentery. Radiological findings of fulminating amebic colitis with toxic megacolon were megacolon, multiple polypoid filling defects, thumbprinting, and cobble stone appearance, which were resemble with ulcerative colitis. The cause of toxic megacolon was not well known, but it has been speculated that this results from transmural disease with destruction of muscle and the myenteric plexus with resultant loss of muscle tone. Authors experienced a case of fulminating amebic colitis with toxic megacolon which was resemble with ulcerative colitis by radiologically at Kyung Hee University Hospital and reported it with review of the literatures.

  1. BACTERIA CARRIED BY CHRYSOMYA MEGACEPHALA (FABRICIUS, 1794 (DIPTERA: CALLIPHORIDAE IN SINOP, MATO GROSSO, BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. S. Carneiro

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Chrysomya megacephala (Diptera: Calliphoridae, popularly known as blowfly, has a great capacity for dispersion and, due to factors such as food abundance and favorable climate, it colonizes Brazil completely in a short time. These insects are important to the sectors of epidemiology, public health and forensics, especially due to carrying microorganisms such as bacteria, viruses, protozoa and helminthes, which are responsible for the spread of diseases such as dysentery, cholera, botulism, typhoid fever, brucellosis, polio, smallpox and tuberculosis. The objective of this study was to verify the diversity of bacteria carried by this species in the Federal University of Mato Grosso – Campus of Sinop during the month of January of 2012. The flies were collected using two traps baited with 100 g of fresh sardines on each and maintained in the field for 24 hours. Twenty specimens of C. megacephala were placed in Petri dishes, to walk for two minutes upon Nutrient Agar (NA. After establishment of the colonies, isolation of the bacteria on the NA medium and their multiplication in test tubes containing the same culture medium was performed, and later sent to identification by gas chromatography. The bacteria encountered were Aquaspirillum polymorphum; Burkholderia ambifaria; Burkholderia anthina; Burkholderia cepacia; Burkholderia cenocepacia; Burkholderia pyrrocinia; Burkholderia stabilis; Paenibacillus macerans; Virgibacillus pantothenticus, Bacillus subtilis e Photorhabdus luminescens luminescens, with the last two species considered of importance in the plant protection sector.

  2. Detection and differentiation of Entamoeba histolytica and Entamoeba dispar isolates in clinical samples by PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmy, Moshira M F; Rashed, Laila A; Abdel-Fattah, Hisham S

    2007-04-01

    A total of 140 out of 180 outpatients attended MISR University for Science and Technology Hospital complained of abdominal pain, diarrhoea and/or dysentery. Stool examination showed 47 (33.6%) had Entamoeba sp., 36 (25.7%) had cysts and 11 (7.9%) had trophozoites. Of 40 asymptomatic ones, 4 (10%) had cysts. A total of 51 positive stool samples for Entamoeba sp. (40 cysts & 11 trophozoites) were tested by Ne-sted Polymerase Chain Reaction (N-PCR) and Restriction Enzyme Digestion (RED) to clarify true E. histolytica from E. dispar. The results showed that 9/51 (17.6%) had E. dispar, while 31 (60.8%) had E. histolytica and 11 (21.6%) had dual infection with both E. histolytica and E. dispar. All E. histolytica PCR proved cases were from the symptomatic group, 11 had trophozoites and 34 had cysts. Thus, the result showed the potential use of molecular tools in detection of E. histolytica and E. dispar, and is a promising tool for epidemiology, particularly to differentiate pathogenic and non pathogenic Entamoeba sp.

  3. Preliminary pharmacological screening of Bixa orellana L. leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilpi, Jamil Ahmad; Taufiq-Ur-Rahman, Md; Uddin, Shaikh Jamal; Alam, Md Shahanur; Sadhu, Samir Kumar; Seidel, Véronique

    2006-11-24

    Preliminary pharmacological studies were performed on the methanol extract of Bixa orellana L. (Bixaceae) leaves to investigate neuropharmacological, anticonvulsant, analgesic, antidiarrhoeal activity and effect on gastrointestinal motility. All studies were conducted in mice using doses of 125, 250 and 500 mg/kg of body weight. In the pentobarbitone-induced hypnosis test, the extract statistically reduced the time for the onset of sleep at 500 mg/kg dose and (dose-dependently) increased the total sleeping time at 250 and 500 mg/kg dose. A statistically significant decrease in locomotor activity was observed at all doses in the open-field and hole-cross tests. In the strychnine-induced anticonvulsant test, the extract increased the average survival time of the test animals (statistically significant at 250 and 500 mg/kg). The extract significantly and dose-dependently reduced the writhing reflex in the acetic acid-induced writhing test. Antidiarrhoeal activity was supported by a statistically significant decrease in the total number of stools (including wet stools) in castor oil-induced diarrhoea model. A statistically significant delay in the passage of charcoal meal was observed at 500 mg/kg in the gastrointestinal motility test. The extract was further evaluated in vitro for antioxidant and antibacterial activity. It revealed radical scavenging properties in the DPPH assay (IC(50)=22.36 microg/ml) and antibacterial activity against selected causative agents of diarrhoea and dysentery, including Shigella dysenteriae.

  4. Studies on Antimicrobial and Immunomodulatory Effects of Hot Aqueous Extract of Acacia nilotica L. Leaves against Common Veterinary Pathogens

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    Arvind Kumar Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acacia nilotica is a plant species that is almost ubiquitously found in different parts of the world. Various preparations of it have been advocated in folk medicine for the treatment of tuberculosis, leprosy, smallpox, dysentery, cough, ophthalmia, toothache, skin cancer as astringent, antispasmodic, and aphrodisiac since immemorial times. The present study investigates the antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, and immunomodulatory potential of hot aqueous extract (HAE of Acacia nilotica leaves. On dry matter basis, the filtered HAE had a good extraction ratio (33.46% and was found to have carbohydrates, glycosides, phytosterols, phenolic compounds, saponins, and flavonoids as major constituents. HAE produced dose dependent zone of inhibition against Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, E. coli, Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus uberis and fungal pathogens Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus fumigates; however, no antiviral activity was recorded against IBR virus. HAE of A. nilotica revealed both proliferative and inhibitory effects on the rat splenocytes and IL-10 release depending on the dose. Detailed studies involving wide spectrum of bacterial, fungal, and viral species are required to prove or know the exact status of each constituents of the plant extract.

  5. Pharmacological and biological activities of Mirabilis jalapa L.

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    Rozina Rozina

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available AbstractPlants have been used for health care and medical purposes for several thousands of years. The number of higher plant species on earth is about 250000. It is estimated that 35000 to 70000 species have, at one time or another, been used in some cultures for medicinal purposes. One of these is Mirabilis jalapa L. which is traditionally used as Purgative and emetic, for treatment of many gastrointestinal disorders, including dysentery, diarrhea, muscle pain and abdominal colic. Besides this it also exhibits certain useful activities like Antiviral activity, Antimicrobial activity, Antimalarial activity, Anthelmintic activity, Antioxidant activity, Aytotoxic activity Anti-tubercular drugs induced hepatotoxicity, Antinociceptive activity, Antifungal activity, Anti-corrosion activity, Antispasmodic activity, Anti-inflammatory activity and many others. Pharmacologically active compounds include active alcoholic extract, ether compound-3,3’-Methylenebis (4- hydroxycoumarin N-D-alpha-Phenylyglycinelaminaribiitol-3-(4-(dimethylamino cinnamoyl 4hydroxycoumarin. The purpose of my review is to find out the areas of scope and to give the detail of the work done on Mirabilis Jalapa L. for future research work.

  6. A status survey of common water-borne diseases in desert city Bikaner (NW Rajasthan, India).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, M M; Chhabra, Chetna

    2004-03-01

    Water is scarce and, in general, a low quality resource in desert areas and the Indian desert is no exception. With this in view, the present study was taken up to survey the status of common water-borne diseases epidemiological trends in the desert city Bikaner (NW Rajasthan). In the city, 15.5 per cent population and 44.5 per cent families were found to suffer from one or more common water-borne diseases including amoebiasis, diarrhoea, dysentery, jaundice and typhoid. No case of fluorosis was recorded. The highest incidence was that of diarrhoea (5.4 per cent population). The worst affected and safe zones in the city were identified and the trends of different diseases in different zones of the city are discussed. The highest incidence of diseases was noted during summer (58.8 per cent) followed by winter (34.1 per cent) and monsoon (7.0 per cent). Relationship of diseases with population attributes like age, education, economy and family size are also discussed. Attributes for contamination of drinking water have been tried to identify and safety measures suggested.

  7. Guava: phytochemical composition of a potential source of antioxidants for cosmetic and/or dermatological applications

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    Bruna Galdorfini Chiari-Andréo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Guava (Psidium guajava L. is a native fruit of the American tropics with commercial applications for its taste, flavor and aroma. Numerous pharmacological uses have been described for it, such as the antiseptic effect of its leaves, the use of the fresh fruit and tea from its leaves for the treatment of diarrhea, dysentery, diabetes mellitus, and others. However, considering its rich composition, the guava also is a potential source of antioxidants to be used in the development of new formulations for cosmetic and/or dermatological applications, the main focus of this research. Herein, we describe the study of the phytochemical composition and the antioxidant activity of a guava extract prepared with non-toxic solvents aiming its use at biological applications. High performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry were employed to identify the major components, while thermoanalytical measurements and hot stage microscopy were used to assess the chemical stability of guava fruit extract. The antioxidant activity was also evaluated assessing the SOD-like activity and ABTS free radical scavenger. The results show that the extract is a rich source of phenolic compounds, such as quercetin, kaempferol, schottenol, among many others. All of the components found in guava extract exhibit biological effects according to the literature data, mainly antioxidant properties.

  8. Acetone Extract from Rhodomyrtus tomentosa: A Potent Natural Antioxidant

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    Goodla Lavanya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhodomyrtus tomentosa (Myrtaceae has been employed in traditional Thai medicine to treat colic diarrhoea, dysentery, abscesses, haemorrhage, and gynaecopathy. In addition, it has been used to formulate skin-whitening, anti-aging and skin beautifying agents. Ethnomedical activities of this plant may be due its antioxidant property. Hence, the aim of this study was to evaluate both in vitro and in vivo antioxidant activities of R. tomentosa leaf extract. In vitro antioxidant activity of the extract was assessed by lipid peroxidation inhibition capacity, ferric reducing antioxidant power, and metal chelating activity. R. tomentosa extract demonstrated its free radical scavenging effects in concentration dependent manner. In vivo antioxidant activity of the extract was conducted in Swiss Albino mice. Levels of thio-barbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS, glutathione (GSH, and the activities of antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, and glutathione peroxidase (GPx in blood, liver, and kidney were analyzed using microtitre plate photometer. Administration of CCl4 caused significant increase in TBARS and decrease in GSH, SOD, CAT and GPx levels. In contrast, R. tomentosa extract (0.8 g/kg effectively prevented these alterations and maintained the antioxidant status. The results suggest that R. tomentosa extract can serve as a potent antioxidant.

  9. Preliminary Phytochemical Screening and Biological Activities of Bulbine abyssinica Used in the Folk Medicine in the Eastern Cape Province, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibiti, Cromwell Mwiti; Afolayan, Anthony Jide

    2015-01-01

    Bulbine abyssinica A. Rich. is used in traditional medicine to treat rheumatism, dysentery, bilharzia, cracked lips, back pain, infertility, diabetes mellitus, and gastrointestinal, vaginal, and bladder infections. Therefore, preliminary phytochemical screening, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antibacterial properties of the whole plant (acetone and aqueous extracts) were determined using standard procedures. The in vitro antioxidant model assays revealed that the plant possesses free radical scavenging potential varying with free radical species. The species showed significant protein denaturation inhibitory activity with good protection against erythrocyte membrane lysis indicating anti-inflammatory potential. The results also showed that the species was active against the growth of all the selected eight diabetic status opportunistic bacteria except one. Moreover, the species is characterized by appreciable amounts of total phenols, flavonoids, flavanols, proanthocyanidins, and alkaloids. Traces amounts of saponins and tannins were also observed. Amongst the identified phytochemicals present, empirical searches identified them being antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antimicrobial agents. The identification of these phytochemical constituents with their known pharmacological properties indicates that this plant is a good source of the free radical scavenging, anti-inflammatory, and antimicrobial agents. These findings also account for the multipharmacological use of B. abyssinica in fork medicine.

  10. Ethnopharmacology and Therapeutic Value of Bridelia micrantha (Hochst. Baill. in Tropical Africa: A Comprehensive Review

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    Alfred Maroyi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Bridelia micrantha is traditionally used in tropical Africa to treat a wide range of human and animal diseases. The aim of this study was to summarise the research that has been done on the ethnomedicinal uses, phytochemistry and pharmacological properties of B. micrantha so as to understand its importance and potential value in primary healthcare systems. The literature search for information on ethnomedicinal uses and pharmacological activities of B. micrantha was undertaken using databases such as Web of Science, Scopus, Google Scholar, Science Direct, BioMed Central (BMC, PubMed and Springerlink. Other relevant literature sources included books, book chapters, websites, theses, conference papers and other scientific publications. This study showed that B. micrantha is used as herbal medicine in just over half (57.3% of the countries in tropical Africa where it is indigenous. A total of 54 ethnomedicinal uses of B. micrantha have been recorded with a high degree of consensus on burns, wounds, conjunctivitis, painful eyes, constipation, gastric ulcers, cough, headache, rheumatism, painful joints, dysentery, ethnoveterinary medicine, malaria, sexually transmitted infections, stomach ache, tape worms and diarrhoea. Different plant parts, aqueous and organic extracts exhibited anthelmintic, antimicrobial, anticonvulsant and sedative, antidiabetic, antidiarrhoeal, antinociceptive, antioxidant, antiplasmodial, antischistosomal, hepatoprotective, insecticidal and β-lactamase inhibitory activities.

  11. Modification of radiation induced intestinal lesions by Aegle marmelos fruit extract, an Indian medicinal plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agrawal, Annapurna; Jahan, Swafiya; Goyal, R.K.

    2012-01-01

    Recently, some plant extracts have been screened out against radiation and found to be quite promising. Aegle marmelos (Bael), belonging to family Rutaceae, fruits are very good source of proteins which form 5.12% of the edible portion. It is claimed to be useful in treating pain, fever, inflammation, respiratory disorders, cardiac disorders, dysentery and diarrhea. The ripe fruit is used for the treatment of digestive and stomachic complications. Aegle marmelos is a useful medicine for herbalist and it holds a reputed position in Ayurvedic system of medicine. Protection of intestinal constituents by Aegle marmelos extract (AME) was studied after exposure to 6 Gy gamma radiations in mice. For this purpose, Swiss albino mice were divided in various groups. Group I was administered with double distilled water (DDW), volume equal to AME (100 mg/kg body wt./animal), by oral gavage to serve as normal. Group II was administered orally AME extract once daily at a dose of 100 mg/kg b.wt./animal for 5 consecutive days. Group III was exposed to 6 Gy gamma radiations to serve as irradiated control. Group IV was treated with AME, orally for 5 consecutive days (as in Group-II), and were exposed to gamma radiation half an hour after the last administration of AME on day 5. Animals from all these group autopsied on 12 hrs, days 1, 3, 7, 15 and 30 post-treatment intervals

  12. Immune evasion mechanisms of Entamoeba histolytica: progression to disease

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    Sharmin eBegum

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Entamoeba histolytica (Eh is a protozoan parasite that infects 10% of the world’s population and results in 100,000 deaths/year from amebic dysentery and/or liver abscess. In most cases, this extracellular parasite colonizes the colon by high affinity binding to MUC2 mucin without disease symptoms, whereas in some cases, Eh triggers an aggressive inflammatory response upon invasion of the colonic mucosa. The specific host-parasite factors critical for disease pathogenesis are still not well characterized. From the parasite, the signature events that lead to disease progression are cysteine protease cleavage of the C-terminus of MUC2 that dissolves the mucus layer followed by Eh binding and cytotoxicity of the mucosal epithelium. The host mounts an ineffective excessive host pro-inflammatory response following contact with host cells that causes tissue damage and participates in disease pathogenesis as Eh escapes host immune clearance by mechanisms that are not completely understood. Ameba can modulate or destroy effector immune cells by inducing neutrophil apoptosis and suppressing respiratory burst or nitric oxide (NO production from macrophages. Eh adherence to the host cells also induce multiple cytotoxic effects that can promote cell death through phagocytosis, apoptosis or by trogocytosis (ingestion of living cells that might play critical roles in immune evasion. This review focuses on the immune evasion mechanisms that Eh uses to survive and induce disease manifestation in the host.

  13. Keragaman Rubus di Gunung Kembang Kabupaten Wonosobo Jawa Tengah dan Potensi Pemanfaatannya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratna Susandarini

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Rubus is a member of Rosaceae family where its natural habitat is in open areas of lowland and upland forests. Rubus has been reported found in Mount Kembang which is situated in Wonosobo, Central Java, but the number of species was unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate the Rubus diversity in M. Kembang and its uses by local people. Sample collecting was carried out using explorative methods on the slopes of M. Kembang. Uses information was obtained by interviewing the local people. The data were analyzed descriptively to provide species description along with their uses and potential in biological research. The result showed that there were four species of Rubus in M. Kembang, R. rosifolius J.E.Smith, R. chrysophyllus Reinw. Ex Miq., R. fraxinifolius Poir., and R. moluccanus L. with altitudinal distribution ranging from 945 m to 1,387 m above sea level. Among these four species R. rosifolius is the well-known one, that people sell the fruits in its fruiting season in the local market. Based on the literature some Rubus species in other areas in Java have potential as fresh fruits, source for making fruit jam, traditional herbal drink to cure diarrhoea and dysentery, or as ornamental plants. A few studies showed that the fruit extract of R. rosifolius has potential for natural dye in cosmetic products.

  14. Chronic toxicity, genotoxic assay, and phytochemical analysis of four traditional medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda Sortibrán, América; Téllez, María Guadalupe Ordaz; Ocotero, Verónica Muñoz; Carballo-Ontiveros, Marco Antonio; García, Angélica Méndez; Valdés, Rocio Jimena Jiménez; Gutiérrez, Elizabeth Romero; Rodríguez-Arnaiz, Rosario

    2011-09-01

    Four medicinal plants--Tecoma stans, Ligusticum porteri, Monarda austromontana, and Poliomintha longiflora, which are distributed in tropical and subtropical countries of the American continent--are widely used in folk medicine to treat diseases such as diarrhea and dysentery. In addition, T. stans and P. longiflora are extensively used as hypoglycemic agents, and M. austromontana and P. longiflora are used as condiments. The plants were collected, identified, dried, and pulverized. Solvent extraction was prepared by maceration of the plant samples, and the phytochemical composition of the extracts was determined by using standard analysis procedures. Phytochemical analysis showed the presence of triterpenoids/steroids, flavonoids, and phenols/tannins and, in L. porteri, traces of alkaloids. After the elimination of solvents in vacuo, the extracts were administrated to Drosophila larvae to test their toxicity and genotoxicity. Third instar larvae were chronically fed with the phytoextracts. The extract from L. porteri was toxic, whereas those from T. stans, P. longiflora, and M. austromontana were not. Genotoxic activities of the 4 plants were investigated by using the wing-spot assay of D. melanogaster. Mitomycin C was used as a positive control. No statistically significant increase was observed between treated sample series and a concurrent negative (water) or solvent control sample series.

  15. Gastrointestinal effects of Nigella sativa and its main constituent, thymoquinone: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzaneh Shakeri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal (GI diseases affect a large number of people all over the world. Uncontrolled acid secretion and occurrence of gastric ulcers are common disorders of GI tract which pose serious problems to human health. Many synthetic drugs have been used to treat GI disorders but a definite cure has not been discovered so far and the available medications cause several side effects. Nigella sativa (N. sativa (Ranunculacea has several therapeutic effects which are attributed to its constituents like nigellicine, nigellidine, thymoquinone, dithymoquinone, thymol and carvacrol. Several beneficial pharmacological properties of this plant such as anti-oxidant, anti-bacterial, anti-histaminic, anti-hypertensive, hypoglycemic, anti-fungal, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer and immunomodulatory effects were reported and different therapeutic properties such as reliving bronchial asthma, jaundice, hydrophobia, paralysis, conjunctivitis, piles, skin diseases, anorexia, headache, dysentery, infections, obesity, back pain, hypertension and gastrointestinal problems, have been described for the seeds of N. sativa and its oil. The present review provides a detailed summery of scientific researches regarding gastrointestinal effect of N. sativa and its main constituent, thymoquinone.

  16. The Ethanol Extract of Osmanthus fragrans Flowers Reduces Oxidative Stress and Allergic Airway Inflammation in an Animal Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Ya Hung

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Osmanthus fragrans flower, a popular herb in Eastern countries, contains several antioxidant compounds. Ben Cao Gang Mu, traditional Chinese medical literature, describes the usefulness of these flowers for phlegm and stasis reduction, arrest of dysentery with blood in the bowel, and stomachache and diarrhea treatment. However, modern evidence regarding the therapeutic efficacy of these flowers is limited. This study was aimed at assessing the antioxidative effects of the ethanol extract of O. fragrans flowers (OFE in vivo and evaluating its antioxidant maintenance and therapeutic effect on an allergic airway inflammation in mice. After OFE’s oral administration to mice, the values obtained in the oxygen radical absorbance capacity assay as well as the glutathione concentration in the lungs and spleens of mice increased while thiobarbituric acid reactive substances decreased significantly, indicating OFE’s significant in vivo antioxidant activity. OFE was also therapeutically efficacious in a mouse model of ovalbumin-induced allergic airway inflammation. Orally administered OFE suppressed ovalbumin-specific IgE production and inflammatory cell infiltration in the lung. Moreover, the antioxidative state of the mice improved. Thus, our findings confirm the ability of the O. fragrans flowers to reduce phlegm and suggest that OFE may be useful as an antiallergic agent.

  17. Water. Unresolved emergency of the Southern hemisphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lotti, C.

    2001-01-01

    Among the serious dramas in the Southern hemisphere, the most serious relates to health, and the most serious health problem is dysentery among the rural population, caused by the lack of unpolluted water. Bad management frustrates much of the aid sent to this part of the world, including projects to help the water crisis. In view of the success, it would appear that a concrete solution could be found within a decade, at a cost that can easily be sustained by the rich world, so long as funds are managed honestly. Much more ambitious and, at least for the moment, beyond all concrete possibility, is the project to provide a barrel of water per head to each person in the southern hemisphere. Providing unpolluted water and facilitating farming development through minor irrigation and family cattle-raising schemes is an idea that appears entirely Utopian. The conclusion provides a critical analysis of the major hydraulic works essential for true development, but effective only if the human environment is ready to receive them, whereas minor works are useful in any case - at village level - to resolve the thirst of the southern hemisphere [it

  18. Enterobacteriaceae infection – diagnosis, antibiotic resistance and prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Jarząb

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal infections caused by rod-shaped bacteria of the [i]Enterobacteriaceae[/i] genus are one of the major health hazards in countries where sanitation standards are low. [i]Strains[/i] of [i]Shigella,[/i] [i]Salmonella, Escherichia[/i] and [i]Yersinia [/i]are responsible for diarrhea, severe bacillary dysentery, typhoid, other intestinal diseases, as well as genitourinary tract and blood infections. According to the WHO there are 4.5 billion cases every year, of which 1.9 million end in death. This makes intestinal infections third in terms of human disease mortality. In this work we discuss methods of pathogen identification, the mechanism of host-pathogen interaction, and the nature of the ¬host’s immunological response. Due to rising drug resistance we discuss the importance of better pathogen detection, vaccine design and the use of vaccines as a preventive measure against intestinal infections. Special attention is paid to OMP38, a protein isolated from [i]S. flexneri[/i] 3a outer membrane. Since it is known that this protein has good immunogenic properties, it can be used as an antigen or carrier for conjugate vaccines.

  19. Harnessing the medicinal properties of Andrographis paniculata for diseases and beyond: a review of its phytochemistry and pharmacology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agbonlahor Okhuarobo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Andrographis paniculata Wall (family Acanthaceae is one of the most popular medicinal plants used traditionally for the treatment of array of diseases such as cancer, diabetes, high blood pressure, ulcer, leprosy, bronchitis, skin diseases, flatulence, colic, influenza, dysentery, dyspepsia and malaria for centuries in Asia, America and Africa continents. It possesses several photochemical constituents with unique and interesting biological properties. This review describes the past and present state of research on Andrographis paniculata with respect to the medicinal usage, phytochemistry, pharmacological activities, toxicity profile and therapeutic usage, in order to bridge the gap requiring future research opportunities. This review is based on literature study on scientific journals and books from library and electronic sources. Diterpenes, flavonoids, xanthones, noriridoides and other miscellaneous compounds have been isolated from the plant. Extract and pure compounds of the plant have been reported for their antimicrobial, cytotoxicity, anti-protozoan, anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, immunostimulant, anti-diabetic, anti-infective, anti-angiogenic, hepato-renal protective, sex hormone/sexual function modulation, liver enzymes modulation insecticidal and toxicity activities. The results of numerous toxicity evaluations of extracts and metabolites isolated from this plant did not show any significant acute toxicity in experimental animals. Detailed and more comprehensive toxicity profile on mammalian tissues and organs is needed in future studies.

  20. Harnessing the medicinal properties of Andrographis paniculata for diseases and beyond: a review of its phytochemistry and pharmacology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okhuarobo, Agbonlahor; Falodun, Joyce Ehizogie; Erharuyi, Osayemwenre; Imieje, Vincent; Falodun, Abiodun; Langer, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Andrographis paniculata Wall (family Acanthaceae) is one of the most popular medicinal plants used traditionally for the treatment of array of diseases such as cancer, diabetes, high blood pressure, ulcer, leprosy, bronchitis, skin diseases, flatulence, colic, influenza, dysentery, dyspepsia and malaria for centuries in Asia, America and Africa continents. It possesses several photochemical constituents with unique and interesting biological properties. This review describes the past and present state of research on Andrographis paniculata with respect to the medicinal usage, phytochemistry, pharmacological activities, toxicity profile and therapeutic usage, in order to bridge the gap requiring future research opportunities. This review is based on literature study on scientific journals and books from library and electronic sources. Diterpenes, flavonoids, xanthones, noriridoides and other miscellaneous compounds have been isolated from the plant. Extract and pure compounds of the plant have been reported for their anti-microbial, cytotoxicity, anti-protozoan, anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, immunostimulant, anti-diabetic, anti-infective, anti-angiogenic, hepato-renal protective, sex hormone/sexual function modulation, liver enzymes modulation insecticidal and toxicity activities. The results of numerous toxicity evaluations of extracts and metabolites isolated from this plant did not show any significant acute toxicity in experimental animals. Detailed and more comprehensive toxicity profile on mammalian tissues and organs is needed in future studies.

  1. Short-term impacts of floods on enteric infectious disease in Qingdao, China, 2005-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, F; Liu, Z; Gao, L; Zhang, C; Jiang, B

    2016-11-01

    The current study aimed to examine the relationship between floods and the three enteric infectious diseases, namely bacillary dysentery (BD), hand-foot-mouth disease (HFMD) and other infectious diarrhoea (OID) in Qingdao, China. Relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of floods on BD, HFMD and OID were calculated using a quasi-Poisson generalized linear model, adjusting for daily average temperature, daily average relative humidity, and seasonal and long-term temporal trends. Two separate models within two different periods were designed. Model 1 for the summer period showed that floods were positively associated with BD for 4- to 12-day lags, with the greatest effects for 7-day (RR 1·41, 95% CI 1·22-1·62) and 11-day (RR 1·42, 95% CI 1·22-1·64) lags. Similar findings were found in model 2 for the whole study period for 5- to 12-day lags. However, HFMD and OID were not significantly associated with floods in both models. Results from this study will provide insight into the health risks associated with floods and may help inform public health precautionary measures for such disasters.

  2. CT evaluation of infectious colitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horiki, Noriyuki; Maruyama, Masataka; Fujita, Yoshiyuki; Suzuki, Yuko; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Imoto, Ichiro; Adachi, Yukihiko

    2002-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is useful for evaluating the diagnosis of gastrointestinal disease, such as infectious colitis, in patients with severe pain and bloody diarrhea. During the 7 years between November 1993 and October 2000, 34 patients with infectious colitis (18 male, 16 female; mean age 42±19 yrs), received emergency CT and colonoscopy because of severe abdominal pain and dysentery. The following organisms were isolated: pathogenic Escherichia coli (12), 6 of which were O157: H7 (O-157), Salmonella species (11), Campylobacter species (5), Vibrio parahaemolyticus (3), Yersinia enterocolotica (2) and Shigella species (1). Thickening of the intestinal wall greater than 10 mm was seen in the ascending colon in the 6 cases with E. coli O157, in 5/11 cases with Salmonella, 4/5 with Campylobacter and 1/6 with non-O157 pathogenic E. Coli. marked intestinal wall thickening, greater than 20 mm, was seen in the ascending colon of the 4 of the patients with an O-157 infection. In all patients with O-157 colitis, slight ascites was noted in the pelvic space. In additions, ascites was also seen in 3/13 patients with Salmonella and 1/5 patients with Campylobacter colitis. The CT findings, in the patients with infectious colitis, are non-specific but knowledge and recognition of the findings will help in patient evaluation and proper treatment. (author)

  3. Infectious Diseases and Tropical Cyclones in Southeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jietao; Han, Weixiao; Jiang, Baofa; Ma, Wei; Zhang, Ying

    2017-05-07

    Southeast China is frequently hit by tropical cyclones (TCs) with significant economic and health burdens each year. However, there is a lack of understanding of what infectious diseases could be affected by tropical cyclones. This study aimed to examine the impacts of tropical cyclones on notifiable infectious diseases in southeast China. Disease data between 2005 and 2011 from four coastal provinces in southeast China, including Guangdong, Hainan, Zhejiang, and Fujian province, were collected. Numbers of cases of 14 infectious diseases were compared between risk periods and reference periods for each tropical cyclone. Risk ratios (RR s ) were calculated to estimate the risks. TCs were more likely to increase the risk of bacillary dysentery, paratyphoid fever, dengue fever and acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis ( ps infectious diseases. TCs are more likely to increase the risk of intestinal and contact transmitted infectious diseases than to decrease the risk, and more likely to decrease the risk of respiratory infectious diseases than to increase the risk. Findings of this study would assist in developing public health strategies and interventions for the reduction of the adverse health impacts from tropical cyclones.

  4. Tamarindus indica: Extent of explored potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhadoriya, Santosh Singh; Ganeshpurkar, Aditya; Narwaria, Jitendra; Rai, Gopal; Jain, Alok Pal

    2011-01-01

    Tamarindus is a monotypic genus and belongs to the subfamily Caesalpinioideae of the family Leguminosae (Fabaceae), Tamarindus indica L., commonly known as Tamarind tree is one of the most important multipurpose tropical fruit tree species in the Indian subcontinent. Tamarind fruit was at first thought to be produced by an Indian palm, as the name Tamarind comes from a Persian word "Tamar-I-hind," meaning date of India. Its name "Amlika" in Sanskrit indicates its ancient presence in the country. T.indica is used as traditional medicine in India, Africa, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nigeria,and most of the tropical countries. It is used traditionally in abdominal pain, diarrhea and dysentery, helminthes infections, wound healing, malaria and fever, constipation, inflammation, cell cytotoxicity, gonorrhea, and eye diseases. It has numerous chemical values and is rich in phytochemicals, and hence the plant is reported to possess antidiabetic activity, antimicrobial activity, antivenomic activity, antioxidant activity, antimalarial activity, hepatoprotective activity, antiasthmatic activity, laxative activity, and anti-hyperlipidemic activity. Every part of the plant from root to leaf tips is useful for human needs. Thus the aim of the present review is to describe its morphology, and explore the phytochemical constituents, commercial utilization of the parts of the plant, and medicinal and pharmacologic activities so that T. indica's potential as multipurpose tree species can be understood.

  5. Review of the trends and causes of food borne outbreaks in Malaysia from 1988 to 1997.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meftahuddin, T

    2002-03-01

    This paper examines the trend and possible contributing factors for the occurrence of the food borne diseases outbreaks in Malaysia. These diseases mainly are cholera, typhoid fever, hepatitis A, dysentery and food poisoning. The outbreaks still occur sporadically in certain high risk areas throughout the country. The incidence rate of all the other three major food borne diseases steadily declined from the year 1988 to 1997 except for food poisoning and cholera. Statistic of food poisoning from the year 1996 to 1997 showed that 66.5% of the outbreak occurred in schools whereas only 0.4% originated from the contaminated food sold at various public food outlets. The school age group is always more affected than the general population. Amongst the contributing factors identified are related to unhygienic food handling practices followed by inadequate safe water supply and poor environmental sanitation. A multisectoral approach between Ministry of Health and other government agencies or private agents needs to be undertaken in the management of the food borne diseases in order to curb the incidences of food borne diseases in Malaysia.

  6. Metabonomics-based analysis of Brachyspira pilosicoli's response to tiamulin reveals metabolic activity despite significant growth inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roy, Caroline Ivanne; Passey, Jade Louise; Woodward, Martin John; La Ragione, Roberto Marcello; Claus, Sandrine Paule

    2017-06-01

    Pathogenic anaerobes Brachyspira spp. are responsible for an increasing number of Intestinal Spirochaetosis (IS) cases in livestock against which few approved treatments are available. Tiamulin is used to treat swine dysentery caused by Brachyspira spp. and recently has been used to handle avian intestinal spirochaetosis (AIS). The therapeutic dose used in chickens requires further evaluation since cases of bacterial resistance to tiamulin have been reported. In this study, we evaluated the impact of tiamulin at varying concentrations on the metabolism of B. pilosicoli using a 1 H-NMR-based metabonomics approach allowing the capture of the overall bacterial metabolic response to antibiotic treatment. Based on growth curve studies, tiamulin impacted bacterial growth even at very low concentration (0.008 μg/mL) although its metabolic activity was barely affected 72 h post exposure to antibiotic treatment. Only the highest dose of tiamulin tested (0.250 μg/mL) caused a major metabolic shift. Results showed that below this concentration, bacteria could maintain a normal metabolic trajectory despite significant growth inhibition by the antibiotic, which may contribute to disease reemergence post antibiotic treatment. Indeed, we confirmed that B. pilosicoli remained viable even after exposition to the highest antibiotic dose. This paper stresses the need to ensure new evaluation of bacterial viability post bacteriostatic exposure such as tiamulin to guarantee treatment efficacy and decrease antibiotic resistance development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. New fatty acid and acyl glycoside from the aerial parts of Phyllanthus fraternus Webster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Abuzer; Jameel, Mohammad; Ali, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Phyllanthus fraternus Webster (Euphorbiaceae) is used to treat dyspepsia, indigestion, jaundice, dysentery, diabetes, influenza, kidney stones, urinary tract diseases, vaginitis, and skin eruptions in traditional systems of medicine. The methanol extract of aerial parts of P. fraternus was obtained by soxhlation method. Isolation of compounds was done by silica gel column chromatography. Analytical thin layer chromatography was used to check the homogeneity of eluted fractions. The structures of isolated compounds were established on the basis of spectral studies and chemical reactions. Phytochemical investigation of a methanolic extract of the aerial parts yielded a new fatty acid characterized as cis-n-octacos-17-enoic acid (5) and a new acyl tetraglycoside formulated as n-dodecanoyl-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(2'→1'')-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(2''→1''')-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(2'''→1'''')-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (7) along with known compounds 1-pentacosanol (1), β-sitosteryl oleate (2), β-sitosteryl linoleate (3), stigmasterol (4) and palmityl glucuronoside (6).

  8. Sewage sterilization through gamma radiation; Esterilização de esgoto através da radiação gama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, D.V.; Teixeira, W.M.S. [Faculdade Casa Branca, SP (Brazil). Pós-Graduação de Proteção Radiológica em Aplicações Médicas, Industriais e Nucleares; Lima, C.M.A. [MAXIM Cursos, Rio de Janeiro-RJ (Brazil); Silva, F.C.A. da, E-mail: franciscodasilva13uk@gmail.com [Instituto de Radioproteção e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Riode Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Lack of sewage treatment and adequate sanitation conditions can contribute to the proliferation of numerous parasitic and infectious diseases in addition to water degradation. Approximately fifty types of infections can be transmitted from a sick to a healthy person through different pathways involving human excreta. Untreated sewage can contaminate water, food, hands, soil, etc. Epidemics of certain diseases such as typhoid, cholera, dysenteries, etc., and countless cases of worms are responsible for high mortality rates in third world countries. In the work the different techniques of sewage treatment by disinfestation and sterilization were analyzed, highlighting the use and the advantages of the gamma radiation as well as the aspects of the radiological protection involved. The technique of sewage sterilization using gamma radiation is a method of controlling bacteria and microorganisms. It is estimated that more than 200 large irradiators are in operation worldwide, of which 5 are in Brazil, for general sterilization use. These facilities use a large amount of radioactive material, in the order of millions of Becquerel, for sterilization with high doses of radiation, which can generate lethal doses in a few minutes. These industrial facilities use Cobalt-60, being classified by the International Atomic Energy Agency - IAEA as Category 1 of high risk, and must possess a high level of radiological protection to carry out the sterilization, standing out the defense in depth. Specific legislation on radiological protection should be drafted for safe work and avoid future radiation accidents.

  9. Immune Evasion Mechanisms of Entamoeba histolytica: Progression to Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begum, Sharmin; Quach, Jeanie; Chadee, Kris

    2015-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica (Eh) is a protozoan parasite that infects 10% of the world's population and results in 100,000 deaths/year from amebic dysentery and/or liver abscess. In most cases, this extracellular parasite colonizes the colon by high affinity binding to MUC2 mucin without disease symptoms, whereas in some cases, Eh triggers an aggressive inflammatory response upon invasion of the colonic mucosa. The specific host-parasite factors critical for disease pathogenesis are still not well characterized. From the parasite, the signature events that lead to disease progression are cysteine protease cleavage of the C-terminus of MUC2 that dissolves the mucus layer followed by Eh binding and cytotoxicity of the mucosal epithelium. The host mounts an ineffective excessive host pro-inflammatory response following contact with host cells that causes tissue damage and participates in disease pathogenesis as Eh escapes host immune clearance by mechanisms that are not completely understood. Ameba can modulate or destroy effector immune cells by inducing neutrophil apoptosis and suppressing respiratory burst or nitric oxide (NO) production from macrophages. Eh adherence to the host cells also induce multiple cytotoxic effects that can promote cell death through phagocytosis, apoptosis or by trogocytosis (ingestion of living cells) that might play critical roles in immune evasion. This review focuses on the immune evasion mechanisms that Eh uses to survive and induce disease manifestation in the host.

  10. Assessment of cytotoxicity of Portulaca oleracea Linn. against human colon adenocarcinoma and vero cell line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mali, Prashant Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Portulaca oleracea Linn. (Portulacaceae) is commonly known as purslane in English. In traditional system it is used to cure diarrhea, dysentery, leprosy, ulcers, asthma, and piles, reduce small tumors and inflammations. Aim: To assess cytotoxic potential of chloroform extract of P. oleracea whole plant against human colon adenocarcinoma (HCT-15) and normal (Vero) cell line. Materials and Methods: Characterization of chloroform extract of P. oleracea by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was performed. Cytotoxicity (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide) assay was used for assessment of cytotoxic potential of chloroform extract of P. oleracea. The concentrations of 1000–0.05 μg/ml were used in the experiment. Doxorubicin was considered as standard reference drug. Results: FTIR spectrum showed the peak at 1019.52 and 1396.21 center. The 50% cell growth inhibition (IC50) of chloroform extract of P. oleracea and doxorubicin was 1132.02 μg/ml and 460.13 μg/ml against human colon adenocarcinoma and 767.60 μg/ml and 2392.71 μg/ml against Vero cell line, respectively. Conclusion: Chloroform extract of P. oleracea whole plant was less efficient or does not have cytotoxic activity against human colon adenocarcinoma cell line. It was not safe to normal Vero cell line. But, there is a need to isolate, identify, and confirm the phytoconstituents present in extract by sophisticated analytical techniques. PMID:27833374

  11. Sewage sterilization through gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, D.V.; Teixeira, W.M.S.; Silva, F.C.A. da

    2017-01-01

    Lack of sewage treatment and adequate sanitation conditions can contribute to the proliferation of numerous parasitic and infectious diseases in addition to water degradation. Approximately fifty types of infections can be transmitted from a sick to a healthy person through different pathways involving human excreta. Untreated sewage can contaminate water, food, hands, soil, etc. Epidemics of certain diseases such as typhoid, cholera, dysenteries, etc., and countless cases of worms are responsible for high mortality rates in third world countries. In the work the different techniques of sewage treatment by disinfestation and sterilization were analyzed, highlighting the use and the advantages of the gamma radiation as well as the aspects of the radiological protection involved. The technique of sewage sterilization using gamma radiation is a method of controlling bacteria and microorganisms. It is estimated that more than 200 large irradiators are in operation worldwide, of which 5 are in Brazil, for general sterilization use. These facilities use a large amount of radioactive material, in the order of millions of Becquerel, for sterilization with high doses of radiation, which can generate lethal doses in a few minutes. These industrial facilities use Cobalt-60, being classified by the International Atomic Energy Agency - IAEA as Category 1 of high risk, and must possess a high level of radiological protection to carry out the sterilization, standing out the defense in depth. Specific legislation on radiological protection should be drafted for safe work and avoid future radiation accidents

  12. Tiamulin-nitrovin interaction in pigs: a case report and experimental reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noa, M; Bulnes, C; Valcárcel, L; Abeledo, M A; Figueredo, J M; Toraño, M E

    2000-10-01

    Tiamulin is a diterpenic veterinary drug widely used in swine for the control of infectious diseases, including swine dysentery and enzootic pneumonia. Tiamulin is well tolerated and only a few drug interactions have been reported with some ionophore antibiotics. A case of tiamulin adverse drug interaction with nitrovin, a nitrofuranic growth promoter, in fattening pigs from a commercial farm is described. To confirm the diagnosis, experimental reproduction was conducted using 20 healthy female pigs. The animals were randomly divided into 4 groups: 1 of them receiving feed medicated with 100 mg tiamulin hydrogen fumarate/kg, another received 20 mg nitrovin/kg to establish the harmlessness of the drugs alone. The other 2 groups received feeds containing both drugs at the previous concentrations, one of which came from the farm. In the last 2 groups clinical signs appeared 72-96 h after initially feeding pigs the tiamulin hydrogen fumarate + nitrovin-containing feed. The animals had uneasiness, anxiety, skin erythema, and rash on snout, vulva and abdomen, and increased body temperatures. No mortality occurred, and there were no characteristic findings during pathological examination. The signs disappeared after 96 h of consuming the medicated feed, leaving a slight skin thickening of the affected regions. All signs disappeared spontaneously 4-5 d after ceasing medication.

  13. Further characterization of porcine Brachyspira hyodysenteriae isolates with decreased susceptibility to tiamulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, M; Aspán, A; Landén, A; Franklin, A

    2004-04-01

    Brachyspira hyodysenteriae is the causative agent of swine dysentery, a severe diarrhoeal disease in pigs. Few drugs are available to treat the disease, owing to both antimicrobial resistance and withdrawal of drugs authorized for use in pigs. Tiamulin is the drug of choice in many countries, but isolates with decreased susceptibility have recently been reported. The mechanism of tiamulin resistance in B. hyodysenteriae is not known and this facet is essential to understand the dissemination of the trait. To study the resistance epidemiology of B. hyodysenteriae, further characterization of a set of isolates from Germany (n = 16) and the UK (n = 6) with decreased susceptibility to tiamulin was performed. The relatedness between the isolates was studied by comparing PFGE patterns, and the in vitro susceptibility to five other antimicrobials (aivlosin, doxycycline, salinomycin, chloramphenicol and avilamycin) was also determined. For comparison of the antimicrobial-susceptibility pattern, Swedish (n = 20) and British (n = 4) tiamulin-susceptible isolates were tested. The German isolates represented several different PFGE patterns, indicating that tiamulin usage has been sufficient to select clones with decreased tiamulin susceptibility at different farms in Germany. The PFGE pattern for the six British isolates with decreased tiamulin susceptibility was identical to that of the German isolates, and they had a similar antimicrobial-susceptibility pattern, except for resistance to aivlosin, which was only found in a few German isolates. No other co-resistance with tiamulin was found.

  14. Determination of betulinic acid, oleanolic acid and ursolic acid from Achyranthes aspera L. using RP-UFLC-DAD analysis and evaluation of various parameters for their optimum yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Sandeep R; Upadhya, Vinayak; Hegde, Harsha V; Joshi, Rajesh K; Kholkute, Sanjiva D

    2016-03-01

    Achyranthes aspera L. is a well known herb commonly used in traditional system of Indian medicine to treat various disorders, such as cough, dysentery, gonorrhea, piles, kidney stone, pneumonia, renal dropsy, skin eruptions, snake bite, etc. Here, we used RP-UFLC-DAD method for determining triterpenoids betulinic acid (BA), oleanolic acid (OA) and ursolic acid (UA) from A. aspera. Optimum yield of these compounds were studied and evaluated using parameters viz., method of extraction, time of extraction, age of plant and plant parts (leaves, stem and roots). Linear relationships in RP-UFLC-DAD analysis were obtained in the range 0.05-100 µg/mL with 0.035, 0.042 and 0.033 µg/mL LOD for BA, OA and UA, respectively. Of the variables tested, extraction method and parts used significantly affected content yield. Continuous shaking extraction (CSE) at ambient temperature gave better extraction efficiency than exposure to ultra sonic extraction (USE) or microwave assisted extraction (MAE) methods. The highest content of BA, OA and UA were determined individually in leaf, stem and root extracts with CSE. Collective yield of these triterpenoids were higher in leaf part exposed to 15 min USE method. To best of our knowledge, the study newly reports UA from A. aspera and the same was confirmed using ATR-FT-IR studies. This study explains the distribution pattern of these major triterpenoids and optimum extraction parameters in detail.

  15. Potensi Antibakteri Ekstrak Bunga Soka (Ixora coccinea L terhadap Staphylococcus aureus dan Escherichia coli

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    Munira Munira

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Soka plants (Ixora coccineal L. often used to treat diarrhea, dysentery and wounds. This study was conducted to determine the effect of soka flower ethanol extract in inhibiting the growth of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. This study is experimentally using completely randomized design (CRD with 4 treatments and 6 repetitions which is distilled water as a control, the ethanol extract of soka flowers concentration are 100%, 75%, and 50%. Microbiological test using the diffusion method of Kirby-Baueur. Phytochemical test results soka ethanol extracts of flowers contain alkaloids, flavonoids, tannins, saponins, and triterpenoid. ANOVA test results ethanol extracts of soka flowers greatly affect the growth of S. aureus and E. coli (P=0.000. Duncan test results an average diameter of inhibition zone for the ethanol extract of soka flowers against S. aureus at a concentration of 100% (14.50 mm was significantly different from the concentration of 75% (10.33 mm and concentration of 50% (10.67 mm, while the average diameter of inhibition zone for the ethanol extract of soka flowers against E. coli at 100% (11.00 mm was not significantly different from the 75% (7.83 mm and 50% (7.50 mm. The ability of ethanol extract of soka flower in inhibition zone against S. aureus greater than E. coli. Keywords:               Ixora coccinea L., inhibition zone, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli.

  16. Human intestinal parasites from a Mamluk Period cesspool in the Christian quarter of Jerusalem: Potential indicators of long distance travel in the 15th century AD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Hui-Yuan; Prag, Kay; Clamer, Christa; Humbert, Jean-Baptiste; Mitchell, Piers D

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this research is to determine which parasites were present in a mediaeval latrine from the old city of Jerusalem. This latrine contains fragments of pottery from the Middle East and also from Italy, suggesting links of some kind with Europe. Excavation identified two separate entry chutes emptying in a shared cesspool. Radiocarbon dating and pottery analysis is compatible with a date of use in the late fifteenth century and early sixteenth century. Twelve coprolites (preserved stool) and mixed cesspool sediment were analysed with light microscopy and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Six species of intestinal parasites were identified. These were the helminths Ascaris lumbricoides (roundworm), Trichuris trichiura (whipworm), Taenia sp. (beef/pork/asiatic tapeworm) Diphyllobothrium sp. (fish tapeworm), and two protozoa that can cause dysentery (Entamoeba histolytica and Giardia duodenalis). While roundworm and whipworm were found in every sample, the other parasite species were present in only one or two samples each, suggesting that only a minority of those using the latrine were infected with those species. The role of Jerusalem as a site for long distance trade, migration or pilgrimage is considered when interpreting the Italian pottery and the parasites present, especially E. histolytica and Diphyllobothrium sp. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Previous medical history of diseases in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and their parents

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    Ayyoub Malek

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The etiology of Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD is complex and most likely includes genetic and environmental factors. This study was conducted to evaluatethe role of previous medical history of diseases in ADHD children and their parents during theearlier years of the ADHD children's lives. Methods: In this case-control study, 164 ADHD children attending to Child and AdolescentPsychiatric Clinics of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Iran, compared with 166 normal children selected in a random-cluster method from primary and guidance schools. ADHDrating scale (Parents version and clinical interview based on schedule for Schedule forAffective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children-Present and Lifetime Version(K-SADS were used to diagnose ADHD cases and to select the control group. Two groupswere compared for the existence of previous medical history of diseases in children andparents. Fisher's exact test and logistic regression model were used for data analysis. Results: The frequency of maternal history of medical disorders (28.7% vs. 12.0%; P = 0.001was significantly higher in children with ADHD compared with the control group. The frequency of jaundice, dysentery, epilepsy, asthma, allergy, and head trauma in the medicalhistory of children were not significantly differed between the two groups. Conclusion: According to this preliminary study, it may be concluded that the maternal historyof medical disorders is one of contributing risk factors for ADHD.

  18. The exposed proteomes of Brachyspira hyodysenteriae and B. pilosicoli.

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    Vanessa Casas

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available B. hyodysenteriae and B. pilosicoli are well-known intestinal pathogens in pigs. B. hyodysenteriae is the causative agent of swine dysentery, a disease with an important impact on pig production while B. pilosicoli is responsible of a milder diarrheal disease in these animals, porcine intestinal spirochetosis. Recent sequencing projects have provided information for the genome of these species facilitating the search of vaccine candidates using reverse vaccinology approaches. However, practically no experimental evidence exists of the actual gene products being expressed and of those proteins exposed on the cell surface or released to the cell media. Using a cell-shaving strategy and a shotgun proteomic approach we carried out a large-scale characterization of the exposed proteins on the bacterial surface in these species as well as of peptides and proteins in the extracellular medium. The study included 3 strains of B. hyodysenteriae and 2 strains of B. pilosicoli and involved 148 LC-MS/MS runs on a high resolution Orbitrap instrument. Overall, we provided evidence for more than 29000 different peptides pointing to 1625 and 1338 different proteins in B. hyodysenteriae and B. pilosicoli, respectively. Many of the most abundant proteins detected corresponded to described virulence factors and vaccine candidates. The level of expression of these proteins, however, was different among species and strains, stressing the value of determining actual gene product levels as a complement of genomic-based approaches for vaccine design.

  19. Antimicrobial Effects of Psidium Guajava Extract as One Mechanism of its Antidiarrhoeal Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutterodt, G.D.; Ismail, A.; Basheer, R.H.; Baharudin, H. Mohd.

    1999-01-01

    A morphine-like spasmolytic action (not naloxone reversible; involving the inhibition of acetylcholine release) and also effects on the transmural transport of electrolytes (Na+ and K+) and water have been reported as possible modes of the antidiarrhoeal action of polar fractions of Psidium guajava leaf extractives. The objective for this study was to verify if the reported modes of the antidiarrhoeal action should be broadened to include direct antimicrobial actions on some of the more common bacteria known to cause toxin-induced acute diarrhoea. Serial dilutions of a water-soluble, freeze-dried methanolic extract were tested on 10 such organisms, grown separately on nutrient agar plates, to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for each of these bacteria. These included the causative agents for (i) enteric fever (Salmonella typhi, Salmonella paratyphi A, Salmonella paratyphi B and Salmonella paratyphi C), (ii) food poisoning (Salmonella typhimurium and Staphylococcus aureus), (iii) dysentery (Shigella dysenteriae, Shigella flexneri and Shigella sonnei), and (iv) cholera (Vibrio cholerae). The growth of all these organisms was inhibited at the MIC of 10mg/ml of the extract, which is equivalent to 2.5μg/ml of active extractable flavonoids. The most sensitive organisms (MIC = 1mg/ml) were Staphylococcus aureus, Vibrio cholerae and Shigella flexneri. PMID:22589684

  20. Homoisoflavonoids and Chalcones Isolated from Haematoxylum campechianum L., with Spasmolytic Activity

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    Armando Escobar-Ramos

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Haematoxylum campechianum is a medicinal plant employed as an astringent to purify the blood and to treat stomach problems such as diarrhea and dysentery. A bio-guided chemical fractionation of the methanolic extract obtained from this plant allowed for the isolation of five compounds: two chalcones known as sappanchalcone (1; 3-deoxysappanchalcone (2; three homoisoflavonoids known as hematoxylol A (3; 4-O-methylhematoxylol (4; and, hematoxin (5. The spasmolytic activity was determined in an in vitro model (electrically induced contractions of guinea pig ileum, and allowed to demonstrate that the methanolic extract (EC50 = 62.11 ± 3.23 fractions HcF7 (EC50 = 61.75 ± 3.55 and HcF9 (EC50 = 125.5 ± 10.65 and compounds 1 (EC50 = 16.06 ± 2.15 and 2 (EC50 = 25.37 ± 3.47 of Haematoxylum campechianum present significant relaxing activity as compared to papaverine (EC50 = 20.08 ± 2.0 as a positive control.

  1. The Medicinal Usage and Restriction of Ginseng in Britain and America, 1660-1900*

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    Heasim SUL

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This article demonstrates the medicinal usage of ginseng in the West from 1660 to 1914. Asian[Korea] ginseng was first introduced into England in the early 17th century, and North American ginseng was found in the early 18th century. Starting from the late 17th century doctors prescribed ginseng to cure many different kinds of ailments and disease such as: fatigue general lethargy, fever, torpidity, trembling in the joints, nervous disorder, laughing and crying hysteria, scurvy, spermatic vessel infection, jaundice, leprosy, dry gripes and constipation, strangury, yellow fever, dysentery, infertility and addictions of alcohol, opium and tobacco, etc. In the mid-18th century Materia Medica began to specify medicinal properties of ginseng and the patent medicines containing ginseng were widely circulated. However, starting in the late 18th century the medicinal properties of ginseng began to be disparaged and major pharmacopoeias removed ginseng from their contents. The reform of the pharmacopoeia, influenced by Linnaeus in botany and Lavoisier in chemistry, introduced nomenclature that emphasized identifying ingredients and active constituents. Western medicine at this period, however, failed to identify and to extract the active constituents of ginseng. Apart from the technical underdevelopment of the period, the medical discourses reveal that the so-called chemical experiment of ginseng were conducted with unqualified materials and without proper differentiation of various species of ginseng.

  2. [Not Available].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutten, A M

    1994-10-01

    In 1686 the Zeeland Chamber of the West Indian Company undertook a serious effort to establish a colony on the Wild Coast at the Pomeroon. The Wild Coast, a territory described as stretching from the Amazon to the Orinoco river, was of growing significance for the trade in pharmaceutical and technical products of the Guyana country: dyes, letterwood, balsam of copaiba, tobacco, sugar, vanilla beans and carape oil. The expedition consisted of the ship 'De Vrijheyt' which was dispatched from Flushing with the new commander Jacob de Jongh, his family, some soldiers and the surgeon David van Cassel aboard. The latter could rely on a surgeon chest with 103 medicines. The new Pomeroon colony however quickly collapsed. Mortality due to dysentery and malaria was high and the lack of leadership led to faulty discipline. The list of medicines used to combat diseases is reviewed in this article. Antimony takes an important place in the assortment and theriac was used for its anti-inflammatory activity.

  3. DRINKING WATER, SANITATION AND HEALTH IN KOLKATA METROPOLITAN CITY: CONTRIBUTION TOWARDS URBAN SUSTAINABILITY

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    R. B. Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In an urban area, the water is supplied through centralised municipal tap water system. For the present enquiry, the municipal supply of water for drinking and sanitation purposes has been assessed in terms of its availability and accessibility to the people, possible sources of water contamination and related health issues in Kolkata. The relevant data have been accessed from various secondary sources where the published data from West Bengal Pollution Control Board (WBPCB and Kolkata Municipal Corporation (KMC are noteworthy. The data thus obtained have been assessed qualitatively to depict the ground reality on sanitation and health related issues. The analyses of the data reveal that in Kolkata, the availability of good quality drinking water is not sufficient as the supply is low and inadequate. On the other hand, the underground water which is considered as the alternative source to the people is found to be contaminated with heavy metals like arsenic and lead. The non-availability of sufficientwater for drinking and sanitation purposes and consumption of contaminated water mayresult into poor health condition with various water borne diseases. The data on diseases from dispensaries (aided by KMC in Kolkata has revealed that people with water borne diseases are significant in number where they are found to be affected with diseases like Acute Diarrhoeal Infection and Dysenteries. Some suitable measures have been proposed whereby applying those, the availability and accessibility of water for drinking and proper sanitation could be enhanced and the occurrences of diseases might be avoided.

  4. Treatment with aquatic plants by a Bagdi tribal healer of Rajbari District, Bangladesh

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    Mohsina Mukti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Tribal healers mainly use land plants in their medicinal formulations; use of aquatic plants has been scarcely reported. Aims: The aim of the present study was to conduct an ethnomedicinal survey working with a Bagdi tribal healer of Rajbari District, Bangladesh. Settings and Design: The survey was carried out working with a Bagdi healer, who lived alone in the wetlands of Rajbari District and used primarily aquatic plants for treatment. Materials and Methods: Interview of the healer was carried out with the help of a semi-structured questionnaire and the guided field-walk method. Results: The Bagdi healer was observed to use seven different aquatic plant species coming from five plant families for treatment of ailments such as hemorrhoids, tonsillitis, heart disorders, burning sensations and pain in hands or legs, blurred vision, debility, sexual weakness in males, chronic dysentery, infertility in women, constipation, chronic leucorrhea, blackness and foul odor of menstrual blood, hair loss, graying of hair and to keep the head cool. One plant was used to treat what the healer mentioned as "evil eye", this refers to their belief in black-magic. Conclusions: This is the first reported instance of a Bagdi healer who primarily uses aquatic plants for treatment. Ethnomedicinal uses of a number of the plants used by the Bagdi healer have been reported for other places in India and Pakistan. Taken together, the various uses of the different plant species opens up scientific possibilities of new drug discoveries from the plants.

  5. KAJIAN ETNOFARMASI ETNIK BUNGKU DI KECAMATAN BUNGKU TENGAH KABUPATEN MOROWALI PROVINSI SULAWESI TENGAH

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    Hermin Hermin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to find out and to inventory the types and parts of plants as well as to dig up information about ways of their utilization as remedy used by Bungku people “To Bungku”. It was conducted from August to December 2015 in Bungku Subdistrict, Central Bungku, Morowali Regency, Central Sulawesi. This research is a descriptive study using qualitative methods and snowball sampling technique on 12 informants through data collection by questionnaire. Results of this etnopharmacy study revealed that there were 62 species of medicinal plants divided into 34 familia. The most widely used plants came from familia Euphorbiaceae, Fabaceae and Zingiberaceae, each was as many as 8%. Parts of plant including roots, stems, leaves, flowers, fruits, seeds and bulbs were used in accordance with their function. Leaves were the ones used with the highest percentage (50%. Bungku people used medicinal plants to treat diseases such as kidney stone, diabetes, hemorrhoids, diarrhea, abscess, candidiasis, gout, cancer, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, dyspepsia, cough, abdominal pain, malaria, hematuria, skin inflammation, headache, fever, bronchitis, dysentery, asthma, stroke, gallstones, urinary tract infections, broken bones, nail-punctured, wound ulcers, burns, hepatitis, appendicitis. Ways of the utilization were very diverse such as boiling then drinking the decoction; crushing then rubbing on the necessary skin; attaching to the body; squeezing then drinking the juice; and heating on the fire. Processing by boiling has the largest percentage, as much as 54%

  6. Minimum inhibitory concentration of Brazilian Brachyspira hyodysenteriae strains

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    Amanda G.S. Daniel

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The objectives of this study were to characterize Brachyspira hyodysenteriae isolates and to evaluate the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of strains obtained from pigs in Brazil based on the minimal inhibitory concentration test (MIC. The MIC was performed for 22 B. hyodysenteriae isolates obtained from 2011 to 2013 using the following antimicrobial drugs: tylosin, tiamulin, valnemulin, doxycycline, lincomycin and tylvalosin. Outbreaks of swine dysentery were diagnosed based on clinical presentation, bacterial isolation, gross and microscopic lesions, duplex PCR for B. hyodysenteriae and B. pilosicoli and nox gene sequencing. All obtained MIC values were consistently higher or equal to the microbiological cut-off described in the literature. The MIC 90 values for the tested drugs were 8μg/ml for doxycycline, >4μg/ml for valnemulin, 8μg/ml for tiamulin, 32μg/ml for tylvalosin, >64μg/ml for lincomycin and >128μg/ml for tylosin. These results largely corroborate those reported in the literature. Tiamulin, doxycycline and tylvalosin showed the lowest MIC results. All of the samples subjected to phylogenetic analysis based on the nox gene sequence exhibited similar results, showing 100% identity to B. hyodysenteriae. This is the first study describing the MIC pattern of B. hyodysenteriae isolated in Brazil.

  7. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Brachyspira hyodysenteriae in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchgässner, C; Schmitt, S; Borgström, A; Wittenbrink, M M

    2016-06-01

    Brachyspira (B.) hyodysenteriae is the causative agent of swine dysentery (SD), a severe mucohaemorrhagic diarrheal disease in pigs worldwide. So far, the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of B. hyodysenteriae in Switzerland have not been investigated. Therefore, a panel of 30 porcine B. hyodysenteriae isolates were tested against 6 antimicrobial agents by using the VetMIC Brachy panel, a broth microdilution test. Tiamulin and valnemulin showed high antimicrobial activity inhibiting all isolates at low concentrations. The susceptibility testing of doxycycline revealed values from ≤0.25 μg/ ml (47%) to 2 μg/ml (10%). The MIC values of lincomycin ranged between ≤0.5 μg/ml (30%) and 32 μg/ml (43%). For tylosin, 57% of the isolates could not be inhibited at the highest concentration of ≥128 μg/ml. The MIC values for tylvalosin were between ≤0.25 μg/ml (10%) and 8 μg/ml (20%). These findings reveal Switzerland's favourable situation compared to other European countries. Above all, tiamulin and valnemulin are still effective antimicrobial agents and can be further used for the treatment of SD.

  8. [Preparation of a "chronological table of main diseases in Japanese history" for pharmacy students of the 6-year program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Jun; Iida, Kotaro

    2005-01-01

    A chronological table of the main diseases that have appeared throughout Japanese history was prepared for pharmacy students, especially for students of clinical pharmacy in the new 6-year system. In ancient times (even in the 8th century), smallpox and measles prevailed in Japan. Japanese people prayed to gods and Buddha to cure the sick. New infectious diseases, like ruebella, pest, typhoid fever, dysentery, cholera, leprosy, etc., prevailed with the increasing exchange of culture from foreign countries. After the vaccines and the toxides were prepared, these infectious diseases were gradually stamped out in Japan early in the Meiji Era. While, public nuisances like the Minamata disease (CH3HgCl), Itaiitai disease (Cd), and atmospheric pollution with sulfurous acid gas, drug-induced suffering (Thalidomide, Sumon, AIDS, etc.) and toxin contaminations in foods have recently increased and produced new diseases. However, these diseases can be prevented if the workers in factories and government officers keep in mind the medical ethics and the ethics for pharmacists to protect the health of people from diseases. Today, cancer, diseases of cerebral vessels, heart diseases, and pneumonia are the four most important causes of death related to aging.

  9. Antibacterial and glucosyltransferase enzyme inhibitory activity of helmyntostachyszelanica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuspradini, H.; Putri, AS; Mitsunaga, T.

    2018-04-01

    Helminthostachyszeylanica is a terrestrial, herbaceous, fern-like plant of southeastern Asia and Australia, commonly known as tunjuk-langit. This kind of plant have a medicinal properties such as treatment of malaria, dysentery and can be eaten with betel in the treatment of whooping cough. To evaluate the scientific basis for the use of the plant, the antimicrobial activities of extracts of the stem and leaves were evaluated. The bacteria used in this study is Streptococcus sobrinus, a species of gram-positive, that may be associated with human dental caries. The dried powdered plant parts were extracted using methanol and 50% aqueous extract and screened for their antibacterial effects of Streptococcus sobrinus using the 96 well-plate microdilution broth method. The inhibitory activities of its related enzyme were also determined. The plant extracts showed variable antibacterial and Glucosyltransferase enzyme inhibitory activity while some extracts could not cause any inhibition. It was shown that 50% ethanolics of Helminthostachyzeylanica stem have a potency as anti dental caries agents.

  10. Colonic perforation with peritonitis in amoebiasis: a tropical disease with high mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Bhupendra Kumar; Garg, Pankaj Kumar; Kumar, Anjay; Mishra, Kiran; Mohanty, Debajyoti; Agrawal, Vivek

    2013-01-01

    Invasive colonic amoebiasis presents primarily with dysentery; colonic perforation occurs rarely. Cases of amoebic colonic perforations have been reported sporadically over the past 20 years. A retrospective study was done in the surgical unit of a tertiary care hospital in North India. The case records of those patients were reviewed who underwent exploratory laparotomy from January 2011 to September 2012 and were diagnosed with amoebic colonic perforation on histopathological examination. Details concerning the clinical presentation, investigations, intraoperative findings, operative procedures, and postoperative outcomes were retrieved. Amongst, a total of 186 emergency exploratory laparotomies carried out during the study, 15 patients of amoebic colonic perforation were identified. The median age of the patients was 42 years (IQR 32.0-58.0) and the male to female ratio was 13:2. Previous history of colitis was present in only 1 patient. The preoperative diagnosis was perforation peritonitis in 12 patients; and intussusception, intestinal obstruction and ruptured liver abscess in 1 patient each. Ten patients had single perforation while 5 had multiple colonic perforations. All the patients except one had perforations in the right colon. Bowel resection was performed depending upon the site and extent of the colon involved-right hemicolectomy (8), limited ileocolic resection (6) and sigmoidectomy (1). Bowel continuity could be restored only in 2 of the 15 patients and a stoma was constructed in the remaining 13 patients. The overall mortality rate was found to be 40% (6/15). Amoebic colonic perforation is associated with unusually high mortality.

  11. Preliminary phytochemical and elemental analysis of aqueous and fractionated pod extracts of Acacia nilotica (Thorn mimosa

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    Mohammed Shaibu Auwal

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Acacia nilotica (Thorn mimosa is used locally for various medicinal purposes by traditionalists and herbalists in northeastern Nigeria. Plants products have been used since ancient times in the management of various conditions. The bark of A. nilotica has been reported to be used traditionally to manage diabetes, dysentery, leprosy, ulcers, cancers, tumor of the eye, ear and testicles, induration of liver and spleen and also in treatment of various condylomas. The objective of this study is to determine the phytochemical and elemental constituents of the extracts of A. nilotica pods. Flame emission and atomic absorption spectrometry were also used to determine the presence or absence of micro- and macro-elements in the extracts. Phytochemical analysis of the aqueous, ethyl acetate and N-butanol fractionated portions of the pod extracts of A. nilotica revealed the presence of tannins, saponins, flavonoids, carbohydrate, whereas carbohydrates and tannins were the only constituent in the residue portion. Anthraquinones, alkaloids, terpene and steroids were not present in the extracts. The elemental screening revealed the presence of iron, potassium, manganese, zinc, calcium, phosphorous, magnesium, sodium, cadmium and copper. Lead, arsenic and molybdenum were not detected in the pod.

  12. [The medical literature of the Egyptian campaign].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutin, Jean-François

    2012-01-01

    Bonaparte's Egyptian Campaign (1798 - 1801), like all other episodes from the Napoleonic era, gave rise to an extensive literature on the subject, but most of all a significant medical literature. This fact is due to many reasons:--an important health service for this expeditionary corps of more than 36.000 men, with two main figures at its hea, Desgenettes and Larrey--but also with valuable subordinates like Assalini, Savaresi, Balme, Pugnet or Barbès.--A Commission for Science and Art, of which a few doctors and surgeons were members, but most of all pharmacists like Boudet or Rouyer--The presence in the field of Ludwig Frank, the nephew of the famous Johann Peter Frank.--The creation in Cairo of an Egyptian Institute and the publication of the masterly Description of Egypt and the establishment of printing houses.--The emergence of the myth of the Orient and its mysteries.--An extensive array of indigenous pathologies, which is characteristic of those countries. For instance: plague, dysentery, yellow fever, Egyptian ophthalmia, as well as more common diseases like tetanus, scurvy or venereal diseases. The main medical works that cover this period and its pathologies are skimmed.

  13. Ethanol and Isopropanol in Concentrations Present in Hand Sanitizers Sharply Reduce Excystation of Giardia and Entamoeba and Eliminate Oral Infectivity of Giardia Cysts in Gerbils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Aparajita; Bandini, Giulia; Motari, Edwin

    2015-01-01

    Enteric protozoan parasites, which are spread by the fecal-oral route, are important causes of diarrhea (Giardia duodenalis) and amebic dysentery (Entamoeba histolytica). Cyst walls of Giardia and Entamoeba have a single layer composed of fibrils of β-1,3-linked GalNAc and β-1,4-linked GlcNAc (chitin), respectively. The goal here was to determine whether hand sanitizers that contain ethanol or isopropanol as the active microbicide might reduce transmission of these parasites. We found that treatment with these alcohols with or without drying in a rotary evaporator (to model rapid evaporation of sanitizers on hands) kills 85 to 100% of cysts of G. duodenalis and 90 to 100% of cysts of Entamoeba invadens (a nonpathogenic model for E. histolytica), as shown by nuclear labeling with propidium iodide and failure to excyst in vitro. Alcohols with or without drying collapsed the cyst walls of Giardia but did not collapse the cyst walls of Entamoeba. To validate the in vitro results, we showed that treatment with alcohols eliminated oral infection of gerbils by 1,000 G. duodenalis cysts, while a commercial hand sanitizer (Purell) killed E. invadens cysts that were directly applied to the hands. These results suggest that expanded use of alcohol-based hand sanitizers might reduce the transmission of Giardia and Entamoeba. PMID:26282413

  14. Phytochemical screening, total phenolic, total flavonoids contents and antioxidant activity of cinchona ledgeriana leaves ethanol extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundowo, Andini; Artanti, Nina; Hanafi, M.; Minarti, Primahana, Gian

    2017-11-01

    C ledgeriana is a medicinal plant that contains alkaloids, especially on the barks for commercial production of quinine as antimalarial. The main alkaloids in this plant are cinchonine, cinchonidine, quinine and quinidine. Besides for antiamalarial this plant is also commonly used to treat whooping cough, influenza and dysentery. Compare to other medicinal plants, nowadays only very few studies were conducted in Cinchona species. Our current study aims to determine the content of phytochemical, total phenol and total flavonoids from C. ledgeriana leaves 70% ethanol extract. The extraction was performed by maceration method using 70% ethanol solvent and then fractionated into hexane, ethylacetate and butanol. Phytochemical screening was performed to determine the content of alkaloids, flavonoids, terpenoids, tannins and saponins. Total phenol and flavonoid contents of the extract were determined by Folin-Ciocalteu and alumunium chloride colorimetric methods using gallic acid and quercetin as standards. The antioxidant activity was determined by using 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity. The results of phytochemical screening showed that the 70% ethanol extract of C. ledgeriana leaves contained alkaloids, flavonoids, terpenoids, tannins and saponins. The total phenol and total flavonoids analysis showed that ethyl acetate fraction had the highest total phenol (40.23%) and total flavonoids (65.34%).

  15. Effect of Woodfordia fruticosa on dexamethasone induced insulin resistance in mice

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    Santosh S. Bhujbal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is a group of syndrome characterized by hyperglycemia, altered metabolism of lipids, carbohydrates and proteins, resulting in an increased risk of complications from vascular disease. The flowers of Woodfordia fruticosa (L. Kurz, Lythraceae, have been used traditionally in the treatment of diabetes, dysentery, diarrhea, other bowel complaints, internal haemorrhages, in leucorrhoea and menorrhagia. Externally powdered flower is sprinkled over foul ulcers and wounds for diminishing their discharge and promoting granulations. In Konkan leaves are used in bilious sickness. W. fruticosa is also reported to have DNA topoisomerase inhibitor, antibacterial, antifertility, antipeptic ulcer, free radical scavenging, and hepatoprotective activity. W. fruticosa is a medicinal plant used to treat a wide range of disorder including diabetes. The present work investigates the effects of the WF in dexamethsone induced insulin resistance in mice. The results of animal study revealed that the extract at dose 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg was found to be significant (p<0.01 after 22 days of treatment. Further isolation studies afforded an anthraquinone glycoside, chrysophanol-8-O-β-D-glucopyranoside. Moreover further experiments will be required to identify their exact mechanism of action.

  16. A review of methods used for studying the molecular epidemiology of Brachyspira hyodysenteriae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeeh, Friederike; Nathues, Heiko; Frey, Joachim; Muellner, Petra; Fellström, Claes

    2017-08-01

    Brachyspira (B.) spp. are intestinal spirochaetes isolated from pigs, other mammals, birds and humans. In pigs, seven Brachyspira spp. have been described, i.e. B. hyodysenteriae, B. pilosicoli, B. intermedia, B. murdochii, B. innocens, B. suanatina and B. hampsonii. Brachyspira hyodysenteriae is especially relevant in pigs as it causes swine dysentery and hence considerable economic losses to the pig industry. Furthermore, reduced susceptibility of B. hyodysenteriae to antimicrobials is of increasing concern. The epidemiology of B. hyodysenteriae infections is only partially understood, but different methods for detection, identification and typing have supported recent improvements in knowledge and understanding. In the last years, molecular methods have been increasingly used. Molecular epidemiology links molecular biology with epidemiology, offering unique opportunities to advance the study of diseases. This review is based on papers published in the field of epidemiology and molecular epidemiology of B. hyodysenteriae in pigs. Electronic databases were screened for potentially relevant papers using title and abstract and finally, Barcellos et al. papers were systemically selected and assessed. The review summarises briefly the current knowledge on B. hyodysenteriae epidemiology and elaborates on molecular typing techniques available. Results of the studies are compared and gaps in the knowledge are addressed. Finally, potential areas for future research are proposed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Identification of capsule, biofilm, lateral flagellum, and type IV pili in Vibrio mimicus strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tercero-Alburo, J J; González-Márquez, H; Bonilla-González, E; Quiñones-Ramírez, E I; Vázquez-Salinas, C

    2014-11-01

    Vibrio mimicus is a bacterium that causes gastroenteritis; it is closely related to Vibrio cholerae, and can cause acute diarrhea like cholera- or dysentery-type diarrhea. It is distributed worldwide. Factors associated with virulence (such as hemolysins, enterotoxins, proteases, phospholipases, aerobactin, and hemagglutinin) have been identified; however, its pathogenicity mechanism is still unknown. In pathogenic Vibrio species such as V. cholerae, Vibrio. parahaemolyticus and Vibrio vulnificus, capsule, biofilms, lateral flagellum, and type IV pili are structures described as essential for pathogenicity. These structures had not been described in V. mimicus until this work. We used 20 V. mimicus strains isolated from water (6), oyster (9), and fish (5) samples and we were able to identify the capsule, biofilm, lateral flagellum, and type IV pili through phenotypic tests, electron microscopy, PCR, and sequencing. In all tested strains, we observed and identified the presence of capsular exopolysaccharide, biofilm formation in an in vitro model, as well as swarming, multiple flagellation, and pili. In addition, we identified homologous genes to those described in other bacteria of the genus in which these structures have been found. Identification of these structures in V. mimicus is a contribution to the biology of this organism and can help to reveal its pathogenic behavior. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Microbial contaminants in Pakistan: a review

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    Maida Kanwal

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Worldwide contamination of surface waters with microbial pathogens is of substantial health concern. These contaminants are usually transmitted by improper sanitation measures, unsafe waste disposal, excretions from patients, and physical contacts, i.e., sexual and nonsexual. Majority of these microbial pathogens have been categorized into three classes, i.e., bacteria, viruses and protozoa. Pakistan, being a developing country, is facing a noteworthy threat due to microbial contamination. In Pakistan, bacterial contaminants are reported extensively followed by viral and protozoa contaminants. The health issues associated with bacterial population includes dysentery, abdominal pain, headache, diarrhea etc.; and usually includes faecal and total coliforms, E. coli, Salmonella, Shigella and Campylobacter. The cases related to viral contamination are lesser but chronic and evidenced the presence of HCV, HAV, HEV viruses causing hepatitis, and other hepatic disorders. Lastly, the health impacts associated with protozoans are least reported; and a number of diseases such as giardia, cryptosporidium and toxoplasma have been linked with this class of contaminants. The current review compiles information of these biological contaminants along with their health issues in Pakistan. Moreover, potential sources and fate of microbial contaminants are also discussed.

  19. Protective effect of Lannea coromandelica Houtt. Merrill. against three common pathogens

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    Rupinder Kaur

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ayurvedic text reports suggested Lannea coromandelica is used in various microbial origin disorders like dysentery, sore eyes and leprosy, genital wounds. Objective: The present study was designed to investigate the antimicrobial effect of L. coromandelica Houtt. Merrill. (Anacardiaceae on microbes which cause female reproductive tract infection. Materials and Methods: Ethanolic and aqueous bark extract (Ext. of L. coromandelica were screened against strains of Streptococcus pyogens, Staphylococcus aureus, and Candida albicans. Antimicrobial assay had been done with agar well diffusion method. Results: Ethanolic extracts [100% (16 mg, 75% (12 mg and 50% (8 mg] of L. coromandelica exhibited zone of inhibition (ZI 19.21 mm, 18.45 mm, 16.41 mm and 18.12 mm, 17.35 mm, 16.35 mm against S. aureus and S. pyogens, respectively. However, only 100% and 75% ethanolic extract showed (ZI-19.18 mm, 16.29 mm activity against C. albicans. Nevertheless, aqueous extract (100% showed higher antifungal activity (ZI-16.97 mm. Ciprofloxacin and amphotericin B were used as a standard drugs in the present study. Conclusion: The results demonstrated that L. coromandelica Houtt. Merrill. have antibacterial activity against S. pyogens, S. aureus and antifungal property against C. albicans. Our findings corroborate the ethnobotanical use of L. coromandelica in traditional medicine system (Ayurveda of India.

  20. Analisis Antioksidan Ekstrak Etil Asetat Dari Kulit Buah Rambutan (Nephelium Lappaceum dengan Menggunakan Metode dpph (1,1 difenil-2-pikrilhidrakzil

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    Nurfadillah Nurfadillah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Rapiah rambutan fruit leather (Nephelium lappaceum is one of the traditional medicine to cure various diseases such as fever and dysentery. Scientific research previously stated rambutan fruit peel skin Rapiah rambutan (Nephelium lappaceum potentially have antioxidant content. Through this research can know the effect of solvent ethyl acetate to extract optimal rambutan fruit skin in antioxidants withdrawal. The method used for extraction is macerated using methanol and partitioned with liquid-liquid extraction using ethyl acetate solvent with a ratio (1:3, (1:4 and (1:5 which produces a thick rind extract rambutan. The extract was tested color and separated by thin layer chromatography (TLC using the eluent butanol: glacial acetic acid: water (BAA (4: 1: 5. Antioxidants are determined by testing against DPPH free radicals by measuring the absorbance of DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-pikrilhidraksil at a wavelength of 517 nm. So that the results of this study showed the highest % reduction obtained at a ratio (1:3.

  1. [Sensibility of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites to ivermectin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Salazar, Francisco; Mata-Cárdenas, Benito D; Vargas-Villareal, Javier

    2009-01-01

    Amebiasis caused by Entamoeba histolytica is a problem of public world health. The most frequent clinical presentation are the dysentery and the amebic liver abscess. Fifty millions of cases and more than 100.000 deaths for this disease are reported annually worldwide. The life cycle of E. histolytica has two phases: trophozoite and cyst. Trophozoites are the causal agent of disease. The effective treatment for the amebiasis includes drugs with serious collateral effects. Ivermectin is a macrolid with activity against endoparasites and ectoparasites causing strongiloidosis, filariasis, oncocercosis, scabiasis and pediculosis. The use of ivermectin has been extended almost worldwide; it is recognized as a safe drug. The main objective of this study was to determine in vitro sensibility of trophozoites of E. histolytica was to the treatment with ivermectin. To determine the sensibility of the parasites to the drug, E. histolytica was cultivated in PEHPS medium. During its logarithmic growth phase the trophozoites were exposed to different concentrations of ivermectin. As controls other antiparasitic drugs were used. For each drug, serial dilutions were prepared, and mixed in culture tubes with parasites (2 x 104 cells/ml). They were incubated for 72 h and then the percentage of growth inhibition was calculated by Probit analysis. Ivermectin showed activity against trophozoites of E. histolytica. The 50% of growth inhibition of ivermectin was 6.40 mg/ml. This dose was higher than for other anti parasitic drugs. Its activity in vivo in animal models remains to be demonstrated.

  2. [Fight against epidemics: Austrian prisoners in Troyes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetzel, Géraldine

    2014-01-01

    The victories near Ulm and Elchingen, where the Napoleonic army took 60000 prisoners between 15th and 20th of October 1805, lead to the arrival at Troyes (county "Aube") of nearly 2000 Austrian soldiers to be held inside former monasteries among whose, mainly the Jacobinians casern where more than half of them stayed. At the beginning of 1806, the government sent the epidemics medical practitioner Dr Desgenettes on an inspection tour to control the state of health of the populations of places where foreign prisoners were held, which lead him through several counties of the North-eastern part of France, where he surveyed several diseases ranging from all kinds offevers up to dysentery, scabies or gangrenes. With the means of acid fumigations invented by the chemist Guyton Morveau from Dijon, the authorities took care of combating and preventing the epidemics in the caserns. As soon as October 1805, the epidemics medical practitioner Dr Pigeotte from Troyes wrote to the county governor his observations recommending a better diet, airing of the rooms and also calls to take some exercise. All these precepts showed an astonishing modernity.

  3. Bacterial Whack-a-Mole: Reconsidering the Public Health Relevance of Using Carbadox in Food Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lance B. Price

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbadox is an antibiotic used to control dysentery and promote growth in swine in the United States; however, the drug also causes tumors and birth defects in laboratory animals. Despite this and because the drug has no analogs in human medicine, it is not considered “medically important” and can be used in livestock without veterinarian oversight. In their recent study, T. A. Johnson et al. (mBio 8:e00709-17, 2017, https://doi.org/10.1128/mBio.00709-17 demonstrated that carbadox has profound effects on the swine gut microbiome, including the induction of transducing phage carrying tetracycline, aminoglycoside, and beta-lactam resistance genes. In swine production, carbadox can be used in conjunction with other antibiotics (e.g., oxytetracycline that could fuel the emergence of strains carrying phage-encoded resistance determinants. Johnson et al.’s findings underscore the potential unforeseen consequences of using antibiotics in livestock production and call into question our current methods for classifying whether or not a veterinary drug has relevance to human health.

  4. Traditional uses, phytochemistry and pharmacology of the medicinal species of the genus Cordia (Boraginaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oza, Manisha J; Kulkarni, Yogesh A

    2017-07-01

    Cordia (family Boraginaceae) is a genus of deciduous flowering trees or shrubs comprising more than 300 species distributed widely in the tropical regions. The aim of this review was to provide exhaustive scientific information on traditional uses, phytochemistry and pharmacological activities of the 36 important species with medicinal value from the genus Cordia, to divulge prospects for further research on its therapeutic potential. Leaves, fruit, bark and seed of a majority of the species were found to possess abundant ethnomedicinal value, but leaves were found to be used most frequently to treat many ailments such as respiratory disorders, stomach pain, wound, inflammation, myalgia, cough, dysentery and diarrhoea. The phytochemical investigation of 36 species resulted in isolation of 293 chemical constituents from various chemical classes. The crude extracts, fractions, essential oils and pure compounds isolated from various Cordia species were reported to have a varied range of pharmacological activities. Many of the traditional uses of the genus Cordia were supported by the results obtained from pharmacological studies performed using various extracts or pure compounds. More attention should be given to the biological evaluation using pure phytochemicals and to identify the mechanism of actions and exploring this genus for new drug discovery. © 2017 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  5. Identification of C-geranylated flavonoids from Paulownia catalpifolia Gong Tong fruits by HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS/MS and their anti-aging effects on 2BS cells induced by H2O2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wen-Zhao; Wang, Ying-Ai; Gao, Tian-Yang; Wang, Xiao-Jing; Zhao, Yun-Xue

    2017-05-01

    The fruits of Paulownia catalpifolia Gong Tong are used as a Chinese folk herbal medicine for the treatment of enteritis, tonsillitis, bronchitis, and dysentery, etc. Our previous study has identified new C-geranylated flavanones with obvious anti-proliferative effects in lung cancer A549 cells. In the present study, a new C-geranylated flavone, paucatalinone C (1) and five known C-geranylated flavanones (2-6) were isolated. In addition, a total of 34 C-geranylated flavonoids were detected by HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS/MS coupling techniques from the CH 2 Cl 2 extract of P. catalpifolia. Futhermore, anti-aging effects of isolated compounds were evaluated in vitro with premature senescent 2BS cells induced by H 2 O 2 . Phytochemical results indicated that P. catalpifolia was a natural resource of abundant C-geranylated flavonoids. Diplacone (3) and paucatalinone A (5) were the potent anti-aging agents in the premature senescent 2BS cells induced by H 2 O 2 and the C-geranyl substituent may be an important factor because of its lipophilic character. Copyright © 2017 China Pharmaceutical University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluation of the Interaction between the Poincianella pyramidalis (Tul. LP Queiroz Extract and Antimicrobials Using Biological and Analytical Models.

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    Thiago P Chaves

    Full Text Available Poincianella pyramidalis (Tul. LP Queiroz (Fabaceae is an endemic tree of northeastern Brazil, occurring mainly in the Caatinga. Its medicinal use is widespread and is an important therapeutic option against diarrhea, dysentery, and respiratory and urinary infections, among other diseases. In this study we determined the chemical marker and evaluated the interaction between P. pyramidalis extract and a commercial antimicrobial through the use of biological and analytical models. To obtain the extract, an ethanol-water mixture (50:50 v/v was used as solvent. It was nebulized in a spray dryer using colloidal silicon dioxide as a drying adjuvant. The extract (ENPp was subjected to HPLC analysis to verify the presence of certain secondary metabolites. The Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC of the extract against Gram-negative bacteria was determined by broth microdilution and the MIC of synthetic antimicrobial drugs in the presence and absence of the extract. The antioxidant activity of ENPp was evaluated by the DPPH method. The compatibility between the antimicrobial and the extract was evaluated by thermal analysis (TG/DTA. The acute toxicity of the extract was evaluated in vivo in rodents. The results indicate significant additive action of the extract on synthetic antibiotics, considerable antioxidant activity and absence of toxicity. This extract shows high potential for the development of formulations for antimicrobial therapy when used with a vegetable-active ingredient.

  7. Ginger and Its Constituents: Role in Prevention and Treatment of Gastrointestinal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Sahdeo; Tyagi, Amit K.

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) cancer, a cancer of different organs of the digestive system, is one of the most common cancers around the world. The incidence and death rate of some of these cancers are very high. Although a large variety of chemotherapeutic agents have been introduced since the last few decades to combat GI cancer, most of them are very expensive and have side effects. Therefore, the compounds derived from natural sources, which are considered to be safe and cost effective, are needed. Ginger (Zingiber officinale) is one of the most widely used natural products consumed as a spice and medicine for treating nausea, dysentery, heartburn, flatulence, diarrhea, loss of appetite, infections, cough, and bronchitis. Experimental studies showed that ginger and its active components including 6-gingerol and 6-shogaol exert anticancer activities against GI cancer. The anticancer activity of ginger is attributed to its ability to modulate several signaling molecules like NF-κB, STAT3, MAPK, PI3K, ERK1/2, Akt, TNF-α, COX-2, cyclin D1, cdk, MMP-9, survivin, cIAP-1, XIAP, Bcl-2, caspases, and other cell growth regulatory proteins. In this review, the evidences for the chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic potential of ginger extract and its active components using in vitro, animal models, and patients have been described. PMID:25838819

  8. Molecular characterization of Shigella spp. from patients in Gabon 2011-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaumburg, Frieder; Alabi, Abraham S; Kaba, Harry; Lell, Bertrand; Becker, Karsten; Grobusch, Martin P; Kremsner, Peter G; Mellmann, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    Shigella spp. dysentery is widespread in developing countries; the incidence is particularly high in children between 1-2 years of age. In sub-Saharan Africa, there is a paucity of epidemiological data on Shigella spp., with possible negative consequences for recognition and correct treatment choice for this life-threatening bacterial infection. We therefore characterized Shigella spp. isolates from Gabon. The antimicrobial resistance, virulence factors, genotypes and mobile genetic elements of Shigella isolates (29 S. flexneri; 5 S. boydii; 3 S. sonnei) from a retrospective strain collection were analyzed. High resistance rates were found for gentamicin and tetracycline (100%, 37/37), cotrimoxazole (92%, 34/37) and ampicillin (84%, 31/37). All isolate harbored ial and ipaH; no isolate produced Shiga toxins (stx1/2); enterotoxins (set1A/B) were only found in S. flexneri (n=19). Multilocus sequence types (MLST) clustered with global clones. A high prevalence of atypical class 1 integrons harboring blaOXA30 and aadA1 were detected in S. flexneri, while all S. sonnei carried class 2 integrons. There is a strong link of Gabonese Shigella spp. isolates with pandemic lineages as they cluster with major global clones and frequently carry atypical class 1 integrons which are frequently reported in Shigella spp. from Asia. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. How Shigella Utilizes Ca(2+) Jagged Edge Signals during Invasion of Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, Mariette; Tran Van Nhieu, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Shigella, the causative agent of bacillary dysentery invades intestinal epithelial cells using a type III secretion system (T3SS). Through the injection of type III effectors, Shigella manipulates the actin cytoskeleton to induce its internalization in epithelial cells. At early invasion stages, Shigella induces atypical Ca(2+) responses confined at entry sites allowing local cytoskeletal remodeling for bacteria engulfment. Global Ca(2+) increase in the cell triggers the opening of connexin hemichannels at the plasma membrane that releases ATP in the extracellular milieu, favoring Shigella invasion and spreading through purinergic receptor signaling. During intracellular replication, Shigella regulates inflammatory and death pathways to disseminate within the epithelium. At later stages of infection, Shigella downregulates hemichannel opening and the release of extracellular ATP to dampen inflammatory signals. To avoid premature cell death, Shigella activates cell survival by upregulating the PI3K/Akt pathway and downregulating the levels of p53. Furthermore, Shigella interferes with pro-apoptotic caspases, and orients infected cells toward a slow necrotic cell death linked to mitochondrial Ca(2+) overload. In this review, we will focus on the role of Ca(2+) responses and their regulation by Shigella during the different stages of bacterial infection.

  10. Oxidative and antibacterial activity of Mn3O4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chowdhury, Al-Nakib; Azam, Md. Shafiul; Aktaruzzaman, Md.; Rahim, Abdur

    2009-01-01

    Mn 3 O 4 nanoparticles with diameter ca. 10 nm were synthesized by the forced hydrolysis of Mn(II) acetate at 80 deg. C. The X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infra red (FT-IR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) techniques were employed to study structural features and chemical composition of the nanoparticles. The unique oxidative activity of the Mn 3 O 4 nanoparticles was demonstrated in the polymerization and dye degradation reactions. On adding Mn 3 O 4 suspension to an acidic solution of aniline, yielded immediately green sediment of polyaniline (PANI). The organic dyes, viz., methylene blue (MB) and procion red (PR) were found to be completely decolorized from their aqueous solution on treating the dyes with Mn 3 O 4 suspension in acidic media. The Mn 3 O 4 nanoparticles also showed a clear antibacterial activity against the Vibrio cholerae, Shigella sp., Salmonella sp., and Escherichi coli bacteria that cause cholera, dysentery, typhoid, and diarrhea diseases, respectively.

  11. Role of the SRRz/Rz1 lambdoid lysis cassette in the pathoadaptive evolution of Shigella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuzzi, Adriano; Grossi, Milena; Di Martino, Maria Letizia; Pasqua, Martina; Micheli, Gioacchino; Colonna, Bianca; Prosseda, Gianni

    2017-06-01

    Shigella, the etiological agent of bacillary dysentery (shigellosis), is a highly adapted human pathogen. It evolved from an innocuous ancestor resembling the Escherichia coli strain by gain and loss of genes and functions. While the gain process concerns the acquisition of the genetic determinants of virulence, the loss is related to the adaptation of the genome to the new pathogenic status and occurs by pathoadaptive mutation of antivirulence genes. In this study, we highlight that the SRRz/Rz 1 lambdoid lysis cassette, even though stably adopted in E. coli K12 by virtue of its beneficial effect on cell physiology, has undergone a significant decay in Shigella. Moreover, we show the antivirulence nature of the SRRz/Rz 1 lysis cassette in Shigella. In fact, by restoring the SRRz/Rz 1 expression in this pathogen, we observe an increased release of peptidoglycan fragments, causing an unbalance in the fine control exerted by Shigella on host innate immunity and a mitigation of its virulence. This strongly affects the virulence of Shigella and allows to consider the loss of SRRz/Rz 1 lysis cassette as another pathoadaptive event in the life of Shigella. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Relationship among Shigella spp. and enteroinvasive Escherichia coli (EIEC) and their differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ud-Din, Abu; Wahid, Syeda

    2014-01-01

    Shigellosis produces inflammatory reactions and ulceration on the intestinal epithelium followed by bloody or mucoid diarrhea. It is caused by enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC) as well as any species of the genus Shigella, namely, S. dysenteriae, S. flexneri, S. boydii, and S. sonnei. This current species designation of Shigella does not specify genetic similarity. Shigella spp. could be easily differentiated from E. coli, but difficulties observed for the EIEC-Shigella differentiation as both show similar biochemical traits and can cause dysentery using the same mode of invasion. Sequencing of multiple housekeeping genes indicates that Shigella has derived on several different occasions via acquisition of the transferable forms of ancestral virulence plasmids within commensal E. coli and form a Shigella-EIEC pathovar. EIEC showed lower expression of virulence genes compared to Shigella, hence EIEC produce less severe disease than Shigella spp. Conventional microbiological techniques often lead to confusing results concerning the discrimination between EIEC and Shigella spp. The lactose permease gene (lacY) is present in all E. coli strains but absent in Shigella spp., whereas β-glucuronidase gene (uidA) is present in both E. coli and Shigella spp. Thus uidA gene and lacY gene based duplex real-time PCR assay could be used for easy identification and differentiation of Shigella spp. from E. coli and in particular EIEC.

  13. Oxidative and antibacterial activity of Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chowdhury, Al-Nakib, E-mail: nakib@chem.buet.ac.bd [Department of Chemistry, Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology, Dhaka-1000 (Bangladesh); Azam, Md. Shafiul, E-mail: azam@ualberta.ca [Department of Chemistry, Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology, Dhaka-1000 (Bangladesh); Aktaruzzaman, Md.; Rahim, Abdur [Department of Chemistry, Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology, Dhaka-1000 (Bangladesh)

    2009-12-30

    Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles with diameter ca. 10 nm were synthesized by the forced hydrolysis of Mn(II) acetate at 80 deg. C. The X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infra red (FT-IR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) techniques were employed to study structural features and chemical composition of the nanoparticles. The unique oxidative activity of the Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles was demonstrated in the polymerization and dye degradation reactions. On adding Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} suspension to an acidic solution of aniline, yielded immediately green sediment of polyaniline (PANI). The organic dyes, viz., methylene blue (MB) and procion red (PR) were found to be completely decolorized from their aqueous solution on treating the dyes with Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} suspension in acidic media. The Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles also showed a clear antibacterial activity against the Vibrio cholerae, Shigella sp., Salmonella sp., and Escherichi coli bacteria that cause cholera, dysentery, typhoid, and diarrhea diseases, respectively.

  14. Cytosolic Access of Intracellular Bacterial Pathogens: The Shigella Paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellouk, Nora; Enninga, Jost

    2016-01-01

    Shigella is a Gram-negative bacterial pathogen, which causes bacillary dysentery in humans. A crucial step of Shigella infection is its invasion of epithelial cells. Using a type III secretion system, Shigella injects several bacterial effectors ultimately leading to bacterial internalization within a vacuole. Then, Shigella escapes rapidly from the vacuole, it replicates within the cytosol and spreads from cell-to-cell. The molecular mechanism of vacuolar rupture used by Shigella has been studied in some detail during the recent years and new paradigms are emerging about the underlying molecular events. For decades, bacterial effector proteins were portrayed as main actors inducing vacuolar rupture. This includes the effector/translocators IpaB and IpaC. More recently, this has been challenged and an implication of the host cell in the process of vacuolar rupture has been put forward. This includes the bacterial subversion of host trafficking regulators, such as the Rab GTPase Rab11. The involvement of the host in determining bacterial vacuolar integrity has also been found for other bacterial pathogens, particularly for Salmonella. Here, we will discuss our current view of host factor and pathogen effector implications during Shigella vacuolar rupture and the steps leading to it.

  15. Shigella entry unveils a calcium/calpain-dependent mechanism for inhibiting sumoylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lhocine, Nouara; Andrieux, Alexandra; Nigro, Giulia; Mounier, Joëlle

    2017-01-01

    Disruption of the sumoylation/desumoylation equilibrium is associated with several disease states such as cancer and infections, however the mechanisms regulating the global SUMO balance remain poorly defined. Here, we show that infection by Shigella flexneri, the causative agent of human bacillary dysentery, switches off host sumoylation during epithelial cell infection in vitro and in vivo and that this effect is mainly mediated by a calcium/calpain-induced cleavage of the SUMO E1 enzyme SAE2, thus leading to sumoylation inhibition. Furthermore, we describe a mechanism by which Shigella promotes its own invasion by altering the sumoylation state of RhoGDIα, a master negative regulator of RhoGTPase activity and actin polymerization. Together, our data suggest that SUMO modification is essential to restrain pathogenic bacterial entry by limiting cytoskeletal rearrangement induced by bacterial effectors. Moreover, these findings identify calcium-activated calpains as powerful modulators of cellular sumoylation levels with potentially broad implications in several physiological and pathological situations. PMID:29231810

  16. Shigella Diversity and Changing Landscape: Insights for the Twenty-First Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark; Sansonetti, Philippe J.; Marteyn, Benoit S.

    2016-01-01

    Shigella is a pathovar of Escherichia coli comprising four groups, Shigella flexneri, Shigella sonnei, Shigella dysenteriae, and Shigella boydii, each of them, with the exception of S.sonnei, comprising several serotypes. Shigella accounts for the majority of dysentery causing infections occurring world-wide each year. Recent advancements in the Shigella field have led to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying host epithelial cell invasion and immune cell function manipulation, mainly using S. flexneri as a model. Host-cell invasion is the final step of the infection process, as Shigella's virulence strategy relies also on its ability to survive hostile conditions during its journey through the gastro-intestinal tract, to compete with the host microbiota and to cross the intestinal mucus layer. Hence, the diversity of the virulence strategies among the different Shigella species has not yet been deeply investigated, which might be an important step to understand the epidemiological spreading of Shigella species worldwide and a key aspect for the validation of novel vaccine candidates. The recent development of high-throughput screening and sequencing methods will facilitate these complex comparison studies. In this review we discuss several of the major avenues that the Shigella research field has taken over the past few years and hopefully gain some insights into the questions that remain surrounding this important human pathogen. PMID:27148494

  17. Characterization of Shigella Strains by Plasmid Profile Analysis and Antibiotic Susceptibility Patterns in a Pediatric Hospital in Ahvaz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Sakhaei

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: High incidences of dysentery and diarrhea were reported in a pediatric hospital in Ahvaz, Iran during March to April, 2013. Objectives: A cross-sectional study was therefore undertaken to identify the causative agents. Patients and Methods: A total of 230 diarrhea samples were collected from the patients and analyzed by routine bacteriological methods. Bacterial identification, serological assay, antimicrobial susceptibility testing, extended spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs screening and plasmid profile analysis were performed according to the standard guidelines. Results: A total of 70 Shigella strains including %70 (n = 49 S. sonnei and 30% (n = 21 S. flexneri were isolated from diarrhea samples. Most of the Shigella isolates showed high degrees of resistance to ampicillin, ulafamethoxazole- trimethoprime and cefexim. Concurrent resistance to sulafametoxazole- trimethoprime and ampicillin was the most common resistance pattern. Overall, 11.4% of Shigella isolates showed the ESBL producer criteria. The plasmid profile patterns of all the strains were determined by a modified alkaline lysis method. By plasmid profile analysis 23 genotypes were identified among all the isolates, 14 and 9 genotypes among the S. sonnei and S. Flexneri respectively. S. sonnei and S. flexneri isolates demonstrated unique plasmid profiles. Conclusions: These data demonstrated that S. sonnei strains are the main cause of shigellosis as the prevalent Shigella serotype in Iran. We also found that the antibiotic resistance rates are increasing among Shigella strains. Plasmid profile analysis is more reliable than antibiotic susceptibility patterns in epidemiologic studies.

  18. Distinct Mutations Led to Inactivation of Type 1 Fimbriae Expression in Shigella spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Verónica; Puhar, Andrea; Sansonetti, Philippe; Parsot, Claude; Toro, Cecilia S.

    2015-01-01

    Shigella spp. are responsible for bacillary dysentery in humans. The acquisition or the modification of the virulence plasmid encoding factors promoting entry of bacteria into and dissemination within epithelial cells was a critical step in the evolution of these bacteria from their Escherichia coli ancestor(s). Incorporation of genomic islands (GI) and gene inactivation also shaped interactions between these pathogens and their human host. Sequence analysis of the GI inserted next to the leuX tRNA gene in S. boydii, S. dysenteriae, S. flexneri, S. sonnei and enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC) suggests that this region initially carried the fec, yjhATS and fim gene clusters. The fim cluster encoding type I fimbriae is systematically inactivated in both reference strains and clinical isolates and distinct mutations are responsible for this inactivation in at least three phylogenetic groups. To investigate consequences of the presence of fimbriae on the outcome of the interaction of Shigella with host cells, we used a S. flexneri strain harboring a plasmid encoding the E. coli fim operon. Production of fimbriae by this recombinant strain increased the ability of bacteria to adhere to and enter into epithelial cells and had no effect on their ability to disseminate from cell to cell. The observations that production of type I fimbriae increases invasion of epithelial cells and that independent mutations abolish fimbriae production in Shigella suggest that these mutations correspond to pathoadaptive events. PMID:25811616

  19. CT evaluation of infectious colitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horiki, Noriyuki; Maruyama, Masataka; Fujita, Yoshiyuki; Suzuki, Yuko [Saint Luke' s International Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Imoto, Ichiro [National Mie Chuo Hospital, Hisai (Japan); Adachi, Yukihiko [Mie Univ., Tsu (Japan). School of Medicine

    2002-08-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is useful for evaluating the diagnosis of gastrointestinal disease, such as infectious colitis, in patients with severe pain and bloody diarrhea. During the 7 years between November 1993 and October 2000, 34 patients with infectious colitis (18 male, 16 female; mean age 42{+-}19 yrs), received emergency CT and colonoscopy because of severe abdominal pain and dysentery. The following organisms were isolated: pathogenic Escherichia coli (12), 6 of which were O157: H7 (O-157), Salmonella species (11), Campylobacter species (5), Vibrio parahaemolyticus (3), Yersinia enterocolotica (2) and Shigella species (1). Thickening of the intestinal wall greater than 10 mm was seen in the ascending colon in the 6 cases with E. coli O157, in 5/11 cases with Salmonella, 4/5 with Campylobacter and 1/6 with non-O157 pathogenic E. Coli. marked intestinal wall thickening, greater than 20 mm, was seen in the ascending colon of the 4 of the patients with an O-157 infection. In all patients with O-157 colitis, slight ascites was noted in the pelvic space. In additions, ascites was also seen in 3/13 patients with Salmonella and 1/5 patients with Campylobacter colitis. The CT findings, in the patients with infectious colitis, are non-specific but knowledge and recognition of the findings will help in patient evaluation and proper treatment. (author)

  20. Use of zebrafish to study Shigella infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggan, Gina M.

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Shigella is a leading cause of dysentery worldwide, responsible for up to 165 million cases of shigellosis each year. Shigella is also recognised as an exceptional model pathogen to study key issues in cell biology and innate immunity. Several infection models have been useful to explore Shigella biology; however, we still lack information regarding the events taking place during the Shigella infection process in vivo. Here, we discuss a selection of mechanistic insights recently gained from studying Shigella infection of zebrafish (Danio rerio), with a focus on cytoskeleton rearrangements and cellular immunity. We also discuss how infection of zebrafish can be used to investigate new concepts underlying infection control, including emergency granulopoiesis and the use of predatory bacteria to combat antimicrobial resistance. Collectively, these insights illustrate how Shigella infection of zebrafish can provide fundamental advances in our understanding of bacterial pathogenesis and vertebrate host defence. This information should also provide vital clues for the discovery of new therapeutic strategies against infectious disease in humans. PMID:29590642

  1. How Shigella Utilizes Ca2+ Jagged Edge Signals during Invasion of Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, Mariette; Tran Van Nhieu, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Shigella, the causative agent of bacillary dysentery invades intestinal epithelial cells using a type III secretion system (T3SS). Through the injection of type III effectors, Shigella manipulates the actin cytoskeleton to induce its internalization in epithelial cells. At early invasion stages, Shigella induces atypical Ca2+ responses confined at entry sites allowing local cytoskeletal remodeling for bacteria engulfment. Global Ca2+ increase in the cell triggers the opening of connexin hemichannels at the plasma membrane that releases ATP in the extracellular milieu, favoring Shigella invasion and spreading through purinergic receptor signaling. During intracellular replication, Shigella regulates inflammatory and death pathways to disseminate within the epithelium. At later stages of infection, Shigella downregulates hemichannel opening and the release of extracellular ATP to dampen inflammatory signals. To avoid premature cell death, Shigella activates cell survival by upregulating the PI3K/Akt pathway and downregulating the levels of p53. Furthermore, Shigella interferes with pro-apoptotic caspases, and orients infected cells toward a slow necrotic cell death linked to mitochondrial Ca2+ overload. In this review, we will focus on the role of Ca2+ responses and their regulation by Shigella during the different stages of bacterial infection. PMID:26904514

  2. Shigella IpaH Family Effectors as a Versatile Model for Studying Pathogenic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashida, Hiroshi; Sasakawa, Chihiro

    2015-01-01

    Shigella spp. are highly adapted human pathogens that cause bacillary dysentery (shigellosis). Via the type III secretion system (T3SS), Shigella deliver a subset of virulence proteins (effectors) that are responsible for pathogenesis, with functions including pyroptosis, invasion of the epithelial cells, intracellular survival, and evasion of host immune responses. Intriguingly, T3SS effector activity and strategies are not unique to Shigella, but are shared by many other bacterial pathogens, including Salmonella, Yersinia, and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC). Therefore, studying Shigella T3SS effectors will not only improve our understanding of bacterial infection systems, but also provide a molecular basis for developing live bacterial vaccines and antibacterial drugs. One of Shigella T3SS effectors, IpaH family proteins, which have E3 ubiquitin ligase activity and are widely conserved among other bacterial pathogens, are very relevant because they promote bacterial survival by triggering cell death and modulating the host immune responses. Here, we describe selected examples of Shigella pathogenesis, with particular emphasis on the roles of IpaH family effectors, which shed new light on bacterial survival strategies and provide clues about how to overcome bacterial infections.

  3. Penyediaan Air Bersih Masyarakat Sekitar Masjid Al-Iklas Desa Cukanggenteng Ciwidey dengan Menggunakan Penyaringan Air Sederhana

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    Hans Kristianto

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Cukanggenteng Village, Ciwidey, Bandung has problem with availability of clean water. The villagers use water from Cisondari River near the village and shallow well which has high turbidity. Usage of high turbidity water could cause various health problems, such as cholera, dysentery, typhus, and so on. There is some effort done by the villager to reduce the water turbidity, by utilizing sedimentation process. However the sedimentation process does not work effectively. In this community service project, a sand filter and pipe filter was utilized to solve the clean water scarcity problem. The sand filter was operated up flow, and its overflow was fed into the pipe filter. The pipe filter consisted of three 4” pipes with sand, coconut shell carbon, and sponge. This system was designed with easily obtained filter media, and simple construction, so that it could be taken care, operated, duplicated by the villagers. Analysis of the water showed that the filtration could remove 91.06% of water turbidity from 94.55 NTU to 8.445 NTU, with pH 6.55. The water after this simple filtration process could be categorized as clean water, based on the standards in PERMENKES RI No. 416/MENKES/PER/IX/1990. The results obtained showed that the filtration process has successfully implemented to reduce the water turbidity.

  4. A novel anti-virulence gene revealed by proteomic analysis in Shigella flexneri 2a

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    Ying Tianyi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shigella flexneri is a gram-negative, facultative pathogen that causes the majority of communicable bacterial dysenteries in developing countries. The virulence factors of S. flexneri have been shown to be produced at 37 degrees C but not at 30 degrees C. To discover potential, novel virulence-related proteins of S. flexneri, we performed differential in-gel electrophoresis (DIGE analysis to measure changes in the expression profile that are induced by a temperature increase. Results The ArgT protein was dramatically down-regulated at 37 degrees C. In contrast, the ArgT from the non-pathogenic E. coli did not show this differential expression as in S. flexneri, which suggested that argT might be a potential anti-virulence gene. Competitive invasion assays in HeLa cells and in BALB/c mice with argT mutants were performed, and the results indicated that the over-expression of ArgTY225D would attenuate the virulence of S. flexneri. A comparative proteomic analysis was subsequently performed to investigate the effects of ArgT in S. flexneri at the molecular level. We show that HtrA is differentially expressed among different derivative strains. Conclusion Gene argT is a novel anti-virulence gene that may interfere with the virulence of S. flexneri via the transport of specific amino acids or by affecting the expression of the virulence factor, HtrA.

  5. Isolation and in silico evaluation of antidiabetic molecules of Cynodon dactylon (L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annapurna, Hasthi V; Apoorva, Babu; Ravichandran, Natesan; Arun, Kallur Purushothaman; Brindha, Pemaiah; Swaminathan, Sethuraman; Vijayalakshmi, Mahadevan; Nagarajan, Arumugam

    2013-02-01

    Cynodon dactylon is a potential source of metabolites such as flavanoids, alkaloids, glycosides and β-sitosterol and has been traditionally employed to treat urinary tract and other microbial infections and dysentery. The present work attempts to evaluate the activity of C. dactylon extracts for glycemic control. Aqueous extracts of C. dactylon analyzed by HPLC-ESI MS have identified the presence of apigenin, luteolin, 6-C-pentosyl-8-C-hexosyl apigenin and 6-C-hexosyl-8-C-pentosyl luteolin. Evaluation of hypoglycemic activity through an extensive in silico docking approach with PPARγ (Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor), GLUT-4 (glucose transporter-4) and SGLT2 (sodium glucose co-transporter-2) revealed that luteolin, apigenin, 6-C-pentosyl-8-C-hexosyl apigenin, 6-C-hexosyl-8-C-pentosyl luteolin interact with SGLT2. Interactions of these molecules with Gln 295 and Asp 294 residues of SGLT2 have been shown to compare well with that of the phase III drug, dapagliflozin. These residues have been proven to be responsible for sugar sensing and transport. This work establishes C. dactylon extract as a potential SGLT2 inhibitor for diabetic neuropathy thus enabling a possibility of this plant extract as a new alternative to existing diabetic approaches. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Infectious Diseases and Tropical Cyclones in Southeast China

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    Jietao Zheng

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Southeast China is frequently hit by tropical cyclones (TCs with significant economic and health burdens each year. However, there is a lack of understanding of what infectious diseases could be affected by tropical cyclones. This study aimed to examine the impacts of tropical cyclones on notifiable infectious diseases in southeast China. Disease data between 2005 and 2011 from four coastal provinces in southeast China, including Guangdong, Hainan, Zhejiang, and Fujian province, were collected. Numbers of cases of 14 infectious diseases were compared between risk periods and reference periods for each tropical cyclone. Risk ratios (RRs were calculated to estimate the risks. TCs were more likely to increase the risk of bacillary dysentery, paratyphoid fever, dengue fever and acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis (ps < 0.05 than to decrease the risk, more likely to decrease the risk of measles, mumps, varicella and vivax malaria (ps < 0.05 than to increase the risk. In conclusion, TCs have mixed effects on the risk of infectious diseases. TCs are more likely to increase the risk of intestinal and contact transmitted infectious diseases than to decrease the risk, and more likely to decrease the risk of respiratory infectious diseases than to increase the risk. Findings of this study would assist in developing public health strategies and interventions for the reduction of the adverse health impacts from tropical cyclones.

  7. ETHNO-VETERINARY MEDICINAL USAGE OF FLORA OF GREATER CHOLISTAN DESERT (PAKISTAN

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    FRAZ M. KHAN

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available A study on the ethno-veterinary usage of wild medicinal plants of Greater Cholistan desert of Pakistan was conducted from January, 2007 to December, 2008. Information regarding 35 plant species was collected. According to the results, Blepharis sindica was used as galactagogue. Butea monosperma, Calotropis procera and Phyllanthus nirurii were used as emollient, demulcent and antiphlogistic. Amaranthus trilocular, Capparis decidua, Clerodendron phlomoides, Phyllanthus nirurii and Ricinus communis were used as carminative and stomachic. Capparis decidua and Calotropis procera were used as appetizer. Prosopis glandulosa had anodyne properties, Achyranthes aspera had antilithic, while Pedalium murex, Tribulus terrestris and Barleria prionites had diuretic value. Achyranthes aspera, Argemone mexicana, Balanites aegyptiaca, Butea monosperma, Cassia senna, Citrullus colocynthis and Vitex negundo were used as vermifuge. Alhagi camelorum and Balanites aegyptiaca had aperient properties. Barleria prionites and Mollugo nudicaulis had their role in the ripening of an abscess. Ricinus communis and Salvadora oleoides aided in the removal of placenta and lochia. Anamitra cocculus and Argemone mexicana were used as febrifuge. Aerva javanica, Ailanthus excelsa, Amaranthus trilocular, Capparis decidua were used in diarrhoea and dysentery. Argemone mexicana and Ailanthus excelsa were used in ague.

  8. Gene expression profiling in Entamoeba histolytica identifies key components in iron uptake and metabolism.

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    Nora Adriana Hernández-Cuevas

    Full Text Available Entamoeba histolytica is an ameboid parasite that causes colonic dysentery and liver abscesses in humans. The parasite encounters dramatic changes in iron concentration during its invasion of the host, with relatively low levels in the intestinal lumen and then relatively high levels in the blood and liver. The liver notably contains sources of iron; therefore, the parasite's ability to use these sources might be relevant to its survival in the liver and thus the pathogenesis of liver abscesses. The objective of the present study was to identify factors involved in iron uptake, use and storage in E. histolytica. We compared the respective transcriptomes of E. histolytica trophozoites grown in normal medium (containing around 169 µM iron, low-iron medium (around 123 µM iron, iron-deficient medium (around 91 µM iron, and iron-deficient medium replenished with hemoglobin. The differentially expressed genes included those coding for the ATP-binding cassette transporters and major facilitator transporters (which share homology with bacterial siderophores and heme transporters and genes involved in heme biosynthesis and degradation. Iron deficiency was associated with increased transcription of genes encoding a subset of cell signaling molecules, some of which have previously been linked to adaptation to the intestinal environment and virulence. The present study is the first to have assessed the transcriptome of E. histolytica grown under various iron concentrations. Our results provide insights into the pathways involved in iron uptake and metabolism in this parasite.

  9. Gene expression profiling in Entamoeba histolytica identifies key components in iron uptake and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Cuevas, Nora Adriana; Weber, Christian; Hon, Chung-Chau; Guillen, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is an ameboid parasite that causes colonic dysentery and liver abscesses in humans. The parasite encounters dramatic changes in iron concentration during its invasion of the host, with relatively low levels in the intestinal lumen and then relatively high levels in the blood and liver. The liver notably contains sources of iron; therefore, the parasite's ability to use these sources might be relevant to its survival in the liver and thus the pathogenesis of liver abscesses. The objective of the present study was to identify factors involved in iron uptake, use and storage in E. histolytica. We compared the respective transcriptomes of E. histolytica trophozoites grown in normal medium (containing around 169 µM iron), low-iron medium (around 123 µM iron), iron-deficient medium (around 91 µM iron), and iron-deficient medium replenished with hemoglobin. The differentially expressed genes included those coding for the ATP-binding cassette transporters and major facilitator transporters (which share homology with bacterial siderophores and heme transporters) and genes involved in heme biosynthesis and degradation. Iron deficiency was associated with increased transcription of genes encoding a subset of cell signaling molecules, some of which have previously been linked to adaptation to the intestinal environment and virulence. The present study is the first to have assessed the transcriptome of E. histolytica grown under various iron concentrations. Our results provide insights into the pathways involved in iron uptake and metabolism in this parasite.

  10. Analysis of the axial filaments of Treponema hyodysenteriae by SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, K A; Sellwood, R; Lemcke, R M; Burrows, M R; Lysons, R J

    1989-06-01

    Purified axial filaments from eight serotypes of Treponema hyodysenteriae and two non-pathogenic intestinal spirochaetes were characterized by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting. Axial filaments of all ten strains had similar SDS-PAGE profiles; five major axial filament polypeptides were identified, with molecular masses of 43.8, 38, 34.8, 32.8 and 29.4 kDa. Hyperimmune gnotobiotic pig serum raised against purified axial filaments of strain P18A (serotype 4) cross-reacted with all other serotypes and with the non-pathogens, and convalescent serum taken from a pig with persistent swine dysentery also showed a strong response to the axial filament polypeptides. Hyperimmune gnotobiotic pig serum raised against axial filaments failed to agglutinate viable organisms and did not inhibit growth in vitro. Hence, the axial filaments of T. hyodysenteriae have been identified as major immunodominant antigens, although the role that antibodies to these antigens play in protection has yet to be established.

  11. Antiamoebic Activity of Petiveria alliacea Leaves and Their Main Component, Isoarborinol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavala Ocampo, Lizeth M; Aguirre-HernÁndez, Eva; Pérez-HernÁndez, Nury; Rivera, Gildardo; Marchat, Laurence A; Ramírez-Moreno, Esther

    2017-08-28

    Petiveria alliacea L. (Phytolacaceae) is a medicinal plant with a broad range of traditional therapeutic properties, including the treatment of dysentery and intestinal infections caused by protozoan parasites. However, its effects against Entamoeba histolytica have not been reported yet. We investigated the antiamoebic activity present in the leaves of P. alliacea Antiamoebic activity was evaluated in methanolic and aqueous extracts, as well as in the hexanic, methanolic, and EtOAc fractions. The P. alliacea methanolic extract showed a better antiamoebic activity than the aqueous extract with an IC 50 = 0.51 mg/ml. Likewise, the hexanic fraction was the most effective fraction, showing a dose-dependent activity against E. histolytica , with an IC 50 = 0.68 mg/ml. Hexanic subfraction 12-19 showed the highest antiamoebic activity at 0.8 mg/ml, producing 74.3% growth inhibition without any toxicity in mammal cells. A major component in subfraction 12-19 was identified as isoarborinol, which produced 51.4% E. histolytica growth inhibition at 0.05 mg/ml without affecting mammal cells. The P. alliacea leaf extract has antiamoebic activity that can be attributed to a major metabolite known as isoarborinol.

  12. Diarrhea in the International Traveler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchini; Rodgers

    1999-06-01

    International travelers to developing countries have a 40% risk of developing a diarrheal illness, usually acute and occasionally chronic. Preventive measures, including diet and lifestyle modifications, are highly recommended but may not be sufficient. Prophylaxis with bismuth subsalicylate or an antimicrobial should be considered in travelers with immunodeficiencies, co-morbid conditions, achlorhydria, or those who cannot afford a loss of time. Oral rehydration is the primary goal of therapy. Bismuth-subsalicylate is a first-line agent for treatment of milder cases with less than three watery bowel movements per day and prominent nausea. Use of an antibiotic is indicated for more severe cases or in the presence of fever, dysentery, or severe dehydration. A short course of a quinolone is highly effective, safe and well tolerated. Antimicrobial resistance among enteropathogens is growing and appropriate therapeutic modifications should be considered according to specific geographic areas. Metronidazole may be empirically added in those cases that do not respond to quinolones. Specific guidelines for particular pathogens are highlighted.

  13. Solar disinfection of water for low income communities; Desinfeccao solar de agua para comunidades de baixa renda

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felix, Lorna Falcao

    2010-03-15

    The use of solar energy for water disinfection, and is accessible to disadvantaged communities because of its low cost, has the advantage of using disposable materials such as bottles of polyethylene terephthalate (PET). We present a study that used two methods of disinfection: the methodology proposed by the project Solar Water Disinfection (SODIS), which consisted of water disinfection by solar radiation and temperature and the methodology which the temperature of the water for disinfection. In both, we seek to eliminate microorganisms that cause serious diseases such as dysentery, typhoid, cholera, etc. Water samples were collected in the community of Bass, where the population has low income and the incidence of waterborne diseases is high. The experiments were divided into two stages. In step 1 we studied the feasibility of disinfection and in step 2 the feasibility of the pilot plant to obtain adequate levels of disinfection temperatures desired. The results showed the efficiency of the disinfection process, reaching an average of 80 to 100% death of microorganisms, but regrowth was observed in some samples. Finally on the good results of stage 1, is designed and built and tested in an experimental pilot plant, which has shown to be feasible to promote water disinfection through the use of solar energy. The water after treatment is in accordance with the limits established by Brazilian legislation for clean water, maintaining a positive performance for the disinfection and acceptable levels of bacterial regrowth. (author)

  14. Status Of Physico-Chemical Parameter Of Ground Water Of Gorakhpur City U.P. India

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    Priyanka Chaudhary

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The ground water is most prime water which has multipurpose use ranging from drinking to industrial and agricultural uses. The continuously increase in the level of pollution of water is a serious problem. The city of Gorakhpur is not untouched with this serious issue .The pollution level of the major water sources in and around the city is increase rapidly. The main objective of the present study is to study the variation of ground water quality in Gorakhpur district by collecting 20 samples of water from hand pump from 20 locations well distributed with in Gorakhpur district were analyzed for different parameters such as pH electric conductivity chloride total free chlorine hardness fluoride nitrate iron Turbidity potassium. Groundwater is polluted from seepage pits refuse dumps septic tanks barnyards manures transport accident and different pollutant. Important sources of ground water pollution are sewage is dumped in shallow soak pits. It gives rise to cholera hepatitis dysenteries etc. especially in areas with high water table.

  15. Ethno-medicinal uses and screening of plants for antibacterial activity from Similipal Biosphere Reserve, Odisha, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Sujogya Kumar

    2014-01-01

    The present study examined the variety and the extent of medicinal plants used in the health care system of tribal inhabitants of Similipal Biosphere Reserve. In addition to this, such plants were also screened for antibacterial properties against common pathogenic bacteria. Semi-structured interview was carried out with 42 informants (mean age 42, 86% male, 14% female) at 24 locations in and around SBR, regarding the use of plants for the treatment of various human ailments. Antibacterial screening is adopted with the documented ethnomedicinal plants using methanol and aqueous extracts against eight bacterial strains. A total of 187 plant species belonging to 74 families were documented for frequent medicinal uses against common ailments such as stomach problems, fever, skin diseases, diarrhea and dysentery. Although all parts of plant are used, leaves and bark are most common. Tribals used the plant parts both in form of decoction (taken orally as in internal problems) and paste (external use). Out of 187 plant species, 120 plants recorded antibacterial activity against test bacterial strain. This study revealed that self care using medicinal plants is a common practice by the tribes of SBR. About 64% of the used plants have scientifically proved medicinal values with respect to the antibacterial properties. © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A case of fulminating amebic colitis associated with toxic megacolon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Kyung Sik; Lee, Joong Suk; Suh, Soo Jhi [Kyung Hee University Hospital. Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1985-12-15

    Amebic colitis was common disease in Korea as well as in the world especially frequent in tropical area such as Africa, India and South America. Clinicopathological forms of this condition were ulcerative rectocolitis (95%), typhloappendicitis (3%), ameboma (1.5%), and fulminating colitis with toxic megacolon (0.5%). The fulminating amebic colitis with toxic megacolon was very rare and dangerous condition which was reported by Wruble on 1966. Toxic megacolon was seen in the cases of ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, typhoid fever, cholera, and acute bacillary dysentery. Radiological findings of fulminating amebic colitis with toxic megacolon were megacolon, multiple polypoid filling defects, thumbprinting, and cobble stone appearance, which were resemble with ulcerative colitis. The cause of toxic megacolon was not well known, but it has been speculated that this results from transmural disease with destruction of muscle and the myenteric plexus with resultant loss of muscle tone. Authors experienced a case of fulminating amebic colitis with toxic megacolon which was resemble with ulcerative colitis by radiologically at Kyung Hee University Hospital and reported it with review of the literatures.

  17. Prevalence Of Traditional Medications Through Native Floral Elements Among Tribal Communities Of Kachchh Arid Ecosystem, Gujarat, India

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    Ekta B Joshi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This communication deals with the documentation of 38 medicinal plant species used for indigenous medications by local villagers such as pastoralists (Maldharis and farmers of Tapkeshwari Hill Range (THR, Bhuj Taluka, Kachchh District, Gujarat, India. Traditional knowledge on medicinally important plant species has been recorded from tribal communities through semi-questionnaire survey using an open-ended questionnaire datasheets. The response from the people interviewed clearly indicated that most of the villagers were fully or partially dependent on the forest produce for their primary healthcare requirements as well as for curing chronic or acute disorders and ailments. Plant parts such as bark, flowers, fruits, gum, latex, leaves, roots, seeds, and spadix, were found to be used for the cure of bronchitis, cold, cough, diabetes, diarrhea, dropsy, dysentery, earache, fever, fistula, gastric troubles, hypothermia, indigestion, piles, skin diseases, snake-bites, toothache, and ulcer. The most predominantly used 10 plant species in the area are Asparagus racemosus, Balanites aegyptiaca, Capparis cartilaginea, Cassia auriculata, Commiphora wightii, Enicostema axillare, Fagonia schweienfurthii, Maytenus emerginata, Tinospora cordifolia, and Tribulus terrestris. An enumeration of these 38 medicinal plant species is presented; each species is cited with correct scientific names, vernacular names, ailments treated for, mode of preparation and dosages. International Journal of Environment, Volume-2, Issue-1, Sep-Nov 2013, Pages 184-201 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/ije.v2i1.9221

  18. Roles of ROS mediated oxidative stress and DNA damage in 3-methyl-2-quinoxalin benzenevinylketo-1, 4-dioxide-induced immunotoxicity of Sprague-Dawley rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hui; Wang, Di; Zhang, Shun; Xu, Mengjing; Yang, Wei; Yan, Peipei; Liu, Yang; Luo, Xiao; Wu, Hailei; Yao, Ping; Yan, Hong; Liu, Liegang

    2015-11-01

    3-methyl-2-quinoxalin benzenevinylketo-1, 4-dioxide (Quinocetone, QCT) has been broadly used to treat dysentery and promote animal growth in food producing animals. However, its potential toxicity could not been neglected as parts of safety assessment according to the acceptable guidelines for QCT administration. In this study, the immunotoxicity of QCT was investigated in male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats following a 28-day oral exposure at doses of 0, 50, 800, and 2400 mg/kg/day. The food consumption, body weight gain and relative spleen weight were significantly decreased by QCT in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment of rats with QCT also notably suppressed the T-cell proliferation and natural killer (NK) cell activity, accompanied by intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, antioxidant system inhibition and DNA damage enhancement. Thus, the primary finding of this study is that QCT exposure (2400 mg/kg/day) could cause immunotoxicity in SD rats due to ROS mediated oxidative stress and DNA damage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Mary Grant Seacole: the first nurse practitioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messmer, P R; Parchment, Y

    1998-01-01

    Mary Grant Seacole was born in 1805, in Kingston, Jamaica, to a Jamaican doctress (medicine woman) and a Scottish naval officer. Later Seacole became a doctress, nursing British soldiers during epidemics of cholera, dysentery, and yellow fever in Jamaica, Cuba, and Panama. After refusals by both the British government and Florence Nightingale to be allowed to practice in Scutari, she financed her own way to the scene of the Crimean War and then established the British Hotel to serve both the comfort and medical needs of the wounded soldiers. At night, Seacole worked side by side with Nightingale at Scutari as a volunteer nurse. Seacole's fame grew proportionately after she was seen helping wounded soldiers on the battlefields even while the battles were still raging. Seacole died on May 14, 1881, in London. One hundred years later, many members of the London black community, a few members of the Nurses Association of Jamaica and the Friends of Mary Seacole marched to her grave, honoring her as one of the greatest women of all times. Mary Grant Seacole rose above the barriers of racial prejudice and demonstrated the determinism, compassion, and caring that have became the hallmark of nurse practitioners.

  20. Examining Reactive Arthropathy in Military Skeletal Assemblages: A Pilot Study Using the Mass Grave Assemblage from the Battle of Towton (1461

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    Meghan Elizabeth Banton

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Military personnel are often subjected to physical exertion, sleep deprivation, deficient diets, overcrowding, and stress. All of these influences are capable of compromising the immune system’s ability to ward off disease-causing bacteria, thus explaining why the historical narrative of war is frequently accompanied by reports of death and suffering due to epidemics of infectious diseases. Historically some of the most common infections included: diarrhoea, dysentery, typhoid fever, gonorrhoea, and streptococcal tonsillitis. The bacteria which cause these diseases are also capable of triggering arthritis. When an arthritic condition is triggered by an infectious microbe it can broadly be referred to as “reactive arthropathy,” of which the spondyloarthritides (SpAs are of great interest. Since the bacteria associated with these arthritic conditions are responsible for the epidemics which have plagued combatants for centuries, it is reasonable to assume that reactive arthropathy was present in past military populations. This assertion can be tested through a prevalence study of military related skeletal assemblages. To test the methodology and gain preliminary results for this research project, a pilot study was carried out using remains from the 1461 Battle of Towton. The methodology was deemed to be sound and the statistical results, while not significant, were promising.

  1. Doctors for tribal areas: Issues and solutions

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    Dileep Mavalankar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Health parameters of tribal population had always been a concern for India's march towards Millennium development Goals (MDG's. Tribal population contributes 8.6% of total population, in spite of efforts and commitment of Government of India towards MGD, India lagged far behind from achieving and optimal health of tribal population will be a concern for achieving Sustainable development Goals SDG's also. Some of the common health problems of the tribal population face are deficiency of essential components in diet like energy malnutrition, protein calorie malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies. Goiter, Gastrointestinal disorders, particularly dysentery and parasitic infections are very common. High prevalence of genetic disorders like sickle cell anemia and others are endemic in few tribes of India. Tribal Health is further compounded issues by social issues like excessive consumption of alcohol, poor access to contraceptive, substance abuse and gender based violence. Besides other reasons, like poor budget allocation, difficult to reach, poor access to health care facility, severe shortage of qualified health workers and workforce led to poor governance of health sector in tribal areas. Present view point reflects on the issues of inadequacy of doctors in tribal area and suggests possible solutions.

  2. Identification and Molecular Characterisation of a Novel Mu-Like Bacteriophage, SfMu, of Shigella flexneri.

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    Richa Jakhetia

    Full Text Available S. flexneri is the leading cause of bacillary dysentery in the developing countries. Several temperate phages originating from this host have been characterised. However, all S. flexneri phages known to date are lambdoid phages, which have the ability to confer the O-antigen modification of their host. In this study, we report the isolation and characterisation of a novel Mu-like phage from a serotype 4a strain of S. flexneri. The genome of phage SfMu is composed of 37,146 bp and is predicted to contain 55 open reading frames (orfs. Comparative genome analysis of phage SfMu with Mu and other Mu-like phages revealed that SfMu is closely related to phage Mu, sharing >90% identity with majority of its proteins. Moreover, investigation of phage SfMu receptor on the surface of the host cell revealed that the O-antigen of the host serves as the receptor for the adsorption of phage SfMu. This study also demonstrates pervasiveness of SfMu phage in S. flexneri, by identifying complete SfMu prophage strains of serotype X and Y, and remnants of SfMu in strains belonging to 4 other serotypes, thereby indicating that transposable phages in S. flexneri are not uncommon. The findings of this study contribute an advance in our current knowledge of S. flexneri phages and will also play a key role in understanding the evolution of S. flexneri.

  3. Effects of extreme precipitation to the distribution of infectious diseases in Taiwan, 1994-2008.

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    Mu-Jean Chen

    Full Text Available The incidence of extreme precipitation has increased with the exacerbation of worldwide climate disruption. We hypothesize an association between precipitation and the distribution patterns that would affect the endemic burden of 8 infectious diseases in Taiwan, including water- and vector-borne infectious diseases. A database integrating daily precipitation and temperature, along with the infectious disease case registry for all 352 townships in the main island of Taiwan was analysed for the period from 1994 to 2008. Four precipitation levels, 350 mm, were categorized to represent quantitative differences, and their associations with each specific disease was investigated using the Generalized Additive Mixed Model and afterwards mapped on to the Geographical Information System. Daily precipitation levels were significantly correlated with all 8 mandatory-notified infectious diseases in Taiwan. For water-borne infections, extreme torrential precipitation (>350 mm/day was found to result in the highest relative risk for bacillary dysentery and enterovirus infections when compared to ordinary rain (<130 mm/day. Yet, for vector-borne diseases, the relative risk of dengue fever and Japanese encephalitis increased with greater precipitation only up to 350 mm. Differential lag effects following precipitation were statistically associated with increased risk for contracting individual infectious diseases. This study's findings can help health resource sector management better allocate medical resources and be better prepared to deal with infectious disease outbreaks following future extreme precipitation events.

  4. Shigella IpaH family effectors as a versatile model for studying pathogenic bacteria

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    Hiroshi eAshida

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Shigella spp. are highly adapted human pathogens that cause bacillary dysentery (shigellosis. Via the type III secretion system (T3SS, Shigella deliver a subset of virulence proteins (effectors that are responsible for pathogenesis, with functions including pyroptosis, invasion of the epithelial cells, intracellular survival, and evasion of host immune responses. Intriguingly, T3SS effector activity and strategies are not unique to Shigella, but are shared by many other bacterial pathogens, including Salmonella, Yersinia, and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC. Therefore, studying Shigella T3SS effectors will not only improve our understanding of bacterial infection systems, but also provide a molecular basis for developing live bacterial vaccines and antibacterial drugs. One of Shigella T3SS effectors, IpaH family proteins, which have E3 ubiquitin ligase activity and are widely conserved among other bacterial pathogens, are very relevant because they promote bacterial survival by triggering cell death and modulating the host immune responses. Here, we describe selected examples of Shigella pathogenesis, with particular emphasis on the roles of IpaH family effectors, which shed new light on bacterial survival strategies and provide clues about how to overcome bacterial infections.

  5. Shigella dysenteriae infection activates proinflammatory response through β-catenin/NF-κB signaling pathway.

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    Ashidha Gopal

    Full Text Available Shigella dysenteriae (S.dysenteriae the causative agent of bacillary dysentery invades the human colonic epithelium resulting in severe intestinal inflammatory response and epithelial destruction. However, the mechanism by which S.dysenteriae infection regulates proinflammatory cytokines during intestinal inflammation is still obscure. In this study, we evaluated whether the interaction of β-catenin and NF-κB regulates proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-8 by modulating GSK-3β activity during S.dysenteriae infection in rat ileal loop model. Here we demonstrated that S.dysenteriae infection stimulate β-catenin degradation which in turn decreased the association between NF-κB and β-catenin. Also, we showed that S.dysenteriae infection increased GSK-3β kinase activity which in turn phosphorylates β-catenin for its degradation by ubiquitination and upregulates IL-8 through NF-κB activation thereby leading to inflammation. Thus these findings revealed the role of β-catenin/ NF-κB and GSK-3β in modulating the inflammatory response during bacterial infection and also showed that β-catenin acts as a critical regulator of inflammation.

  6. The normal chain length distribution of the O antigen is required for the interaction of Shigella flexneri 2a with polarized Caco-2 cells

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    Anilei Hoare

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Shigella flexneri causes bacillary dysentery in humans. Essential to the establishment of the disease is the invasion of the colonic epithelial cells. Here we investigated the role of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS O antigen in the ability of S. flexneri to adhere to and invade polarized Caco-2 cells. The S. flexneri 2a O antigen has two preferred chain lengths: a short O antigen (S-OAg regulated by the WzzB protein and a very long O antigen (VL-OAg regulated by Wzz pHS2. Mutants with defined deletions of the genes required for O-antigen assembly and polymerization were constructed and assayed for their abilities to adhere to and enter cultured epithelial cells. The results show that both VL- and S-OAg are required for invasion through the basolateral cell membrane. In contrast, the absence of O antigen does not impair adhesion. Purified LPS does not act as a competitor for the invasion of Caco-2 cells by the wild-type strain, suggesting that LPS is not directly involved in the internalization process by epithelial cells.

  7. Cytosolic access of intracellular bacterial pathogens: the Shigella paradigm

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    Nora eMellouk

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Shigella is a Gram-negative bacterial pathogen, which causes bacillary dysentery in humans. A crucial step of Shigella infection is its invasion of epithelial cells. Using a type III secretion system, Shigella injects several bacterial effectors ultimately leading to bacterial internalization within a vacuole. Then, Shigella escapes rapidly from the vacuole, it replicates within the cytosol and spreads from cell-to-cell. The molecular mechanism of vacuolar rupture used by Shigella has been studied in some detail during the recent years and new paradigms are emerging about the underlying molecular events. For decades, bacterial effector proteins were portrayed as main actors inducing vacuolar rupture. This includes the effector/translocators IpaB and IpaC. More recently, this has been challenged and an implication of the host cell in the process of vacuolar rupture has been put forward. This includes the bacterial subversion of host trafficking regulators, such as the Rab GTPase Rab11. The involvement of the host in determining bacterial vacuolar integrity has also been found for other bacterial pathogens, particularly for Salmonella. Here, we will discuss our current view of host factor and pathogen effector implications during Shigella vacuolar rupture and the steps leading to it.

  8. Antimicrobial Resistance of Shigella spp. isolated in the State of Pará, Brazil

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    Flávia Corrêa Bastos

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Shigella spp. are Gram-negative, nonsporulating, rod-shaped bacteria that belong to the family Enterobacteriaceae and are responsible for shigellosis or bacillary dysentery, an important cause of worldwide morbidity and mortality. METHODS: We studied the antibiotic resistance profiles of 122 Shigella spp. strains (81 S. flexneri, 41 S. sonnei, 1 S. boydii isolated from patients (female and male from 0 to 80 years of age presenting diarrhea in different districts of the State of Pará, in the North of Brazil. The antibiotic resistance of the strains, isolated from human fecal samples, was determined by the diffusion disk method and by using the VITEK-2 system. RESULTS: The highest resistance rate found was the resistance rate to tetracycline (93.8%, followed by the resistance rate to chloramphenicol (63.9% and to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (63.1%. Resistance to at least three drugs was more common among S. flexneri than S. sonnei (39.5% vs. 10%. Six (4.9% strains were susceptible to all the antibiotics tested. All strains were susceptible to cefotaxime, ceftazidime, ciprofloxacin, nalidixic acid and nitrofurantoin. CONCLUSIONS: High rates of multidrug resistance in Shigella spp. are a serious public health concern in Brazil. It is extremely important to continuously monitor the antimicrobial resistances of Shigella spp. for effective therapy and control measures against shigellosis.

  9. Expression of bacterial virulence factors and cytokines during in vitro macrophage infection by enteroinvasive Escherichia coli and Shigella flexneri: a comparative study

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    Silvia Y Bando

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Enteroinvasive Escherichia coli (EIEC and Shigellaspp cause bacillary dysentery in humans by invading and multiplying within epithelial cells of the colonic mucosa. Although EIEC and Shigellashare many genetic and biochemical similarities, the illness caused by Shigellais more severe. Thus, genomic and structure-function molecular studies on the biological interactions of these invasive enterobacteria with eukaryotic cells have focused on Shigella rather than EIEC. Here we comparatively studied the interactions of EIEC and of Shigella flexneriwith cultured J774 macrophage-like cells. We evaluated several phenotypes: (i bacterial escape from macrophages after phagocytosis, (ii macrophage death induced by EIEC and S. flexneri, (iii macrophage cytokine expression in response to infection and (iv expression of plasmidial (pINV virulence genes. The results showed thatS. flexneri caused macrophage killing earlier and more intensely than EIEC. Both pathogens induced significant macrophage production of TNF, IL-1 and IL-10 after 7 h of infection. Transcription levels of the gene invasion plasmid antigen-C were lower in EIEC than in S. flexneri throughout the course of the infection; this could explain the diminished virulence of EIEC compared to S. flexneri.

  10. Virulence Factors Associated with Pediatric Shigellosis in Brazilian Amazon

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    Carolinie Batista Nobre da Cruz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Shigellosis is a global human health problem and the incidence is highest among children. In the present work, main Shigella virulence genes was examined by PCR and compared to symptoms of pediatric shigellosis. Thirty Shigella isolates were identified from an etiologic study at which 1,339 children ranging 0–10 years old were enrolled. S. flexneri was the most frequent species reaching 60.0% of isolates, 22.2% were S. sonnei, and 6.6% were both S. dysenteriae and S. boydii. All Shigella infected children had diarrhea, but not all were accompanied by others symptoms of bacillary dysentery. Among major virulence genes, the PCR typing revealed ipaBCD was present in all isolates, followed by IpaH7.8, set-1A, set-1B, sen/ospD3, virF, and invE. The pathogenic potential of the ShET-1B subunit was observed in relation to dehydration (P<0.001 and ShET-2 related to the intestinal injury (P=0.033 evidenced by the presence of bloody diarrhea. Our results show associations among symptoms of shigellosis and virulence genes of clinical isolates of Shigella spp.

  11. Distinct mutations led to inactivation of type 1 fimbriae expression in Shigella spp.

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    Verónica Bravo

    Full Text Available Shigella spp. are responsible for bacillary dysentery in humans. The acquisition or the modification of the virulence plasmid encoding factors promoting entry of bacteria into and dissemination within epithelial cells was a critical step in the evolution of these bacteria from their Escherichia coli ancestor(s. Incorporation of genomic islands (GI and gene inactivation also shaped interactions between these pathogens and their human host. Sequence analysis of the GI inserted next to the leuX tRNA gene in S. boydii, S. dysenteriae, S. flexneri, S. sonnei and enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC suggests that this region initially carried the fec, yjhATS and fim gene clusters. The fim cluster encoding type I fimbriae is systematically inactivated in both reference strains and clinical isolates and distinct mutations are responsible for this inactivation in at least three phylogenetic groups. To investigate consequences of the presence of fimbriae on the outcome of the interaction of Shigella with host cells, we used a S. flexneri strain harboring a plasmid encoding the E. coli fim operon. Production of fimbriae by this recombinant strain increased the ability of bacteria to adhere to and enter into epithelial cells and had no effect on their ability to disseminate from cell to cell. The observations that production of type I fimbriae increases invasion of epithelial cells and that independent mutations abolish fimbriae production in Shigella suggest that these mutations correspond to pathoadaptive events.

  12. A Novel Small RNA Regulates Tolerance and Virulence in Shigella flexneri by Responding to Acidic Environmental Changes

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    Ligui eWang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Shigella flexneri is an important cause of bacillary dysentery in developing countries. Small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs play essential roles in diverse cellular processes. We found a novel sRNA Ssr1 based on RT-PCR, northern blot, and 5´RACE in S. flexneri. Ssr1 responds to acidic environmental changes, as shown by a strong linear correlation between the pH value and Ssr1 expression (R = 0.785, P < 0.05 using the qRT-PCR method. Deletion of Ssr1 results in growth retardation at pH values ranging from 5.0 to 7.0 (P < 0.05, and the survival rate was reduced by 22% in acidic conditions (pH 3.0. Additionally, virulence was significantly increased in an Ssr1 mutant strain, as revealed in a murine lung invasion model and survival model assays. By using the sTarPicker method and proteomic analysis, we considered that DnaK, which is a major factor that confers acidic stress tolerance, may be a direct target of Ssr1. We also found that Ssr1 may enhance virulence by directly targeting OmpA; this leads to altered expression of genes in the type three secretion system. This work provides new insight into the mechanism of adaptation to environmental stress and into the pathogenesis of Shigella.

  13. The use of comparative genomic hybridization to characterize genome dynamics and diversity among the serotypes of Shigella

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    Sun Meisheng

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Compelling evidence indicates that Shigella species, the etiologic agents of bacillary dysentery, as well as enteroinvasive Escherichia coli, are derived from multiple origins of Escherichia coli and form a single pathovar. To further understand the genome diversity and virulence evolution of Shigella, comparative genomic hybridization microarray analysis was employed to compare the gene content of E. coli K-12 with those of 43 Shigella strains from all lineages. Results For the 43 strains subjected to CGH microarray analyses, the common backbone of the Shigella genome was estimated to contain more than 1,900 open reading frames (ORFs, with a mean number of 726 undetectable ORFs. The mosaic distribution of absent regions indicated that insertions and/or deletions have led to the highly diversified genomes of pathogenic strains. Conclusion These results support the hypothesis that by gain and loss of functions, Shigella species became successful human pathogens through convergent evolution from diverse genomic backgrounds. Moreover, we also found many specific differences between different lineages, providing a window into understanding bacterial speciation and taxonomic relationships.

  14. A novel plasmid-encoded serotype conversion mechanism through addition of phosphoethanolamine to the O-antigen of Shigella flexneri.

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    Qiangzheng Sun

    Full Text Available Shigella flexneri is the major pathogen causing bacillary dysentery in developing countries. S. flexneri is divided into at least 16 serotypes based on the combination of antigenic determinants present in the O-antigen. All the serotypes (except for serotype 6 share a basic O-unit containing one N-acetyl-d-glucosamine and three l-rhamnose residues, whereas differences between the serotypes are conferred by phage-encoded glucosylation and/or O-acetylation. Serotype Xv is a newly emerged and the most prevalent serotype in China, which can agglutinate with both MASF IV-1 and 7,8 monoclonal antibodies. The factor responsible for the presence of MASF IV-1 (E1037 epitope has not yet been identified. In this study, we analyzed the LPS structure of serotype Xv strains and found that the MASF IV-1 positive phenotype depends on an O-antigen modification with a phosphoethanolamine (PEtN group attached at position 3 of one of the rhamnose residues. A plasmid carried gene, lpt-O (LPS phosphoethanolamine transferase for O-antigen, mediates the addition of PEtN for serotype Xv and other MASF IV-1 positive strains. These findings reveal a novel serotype conversion mechanism in S. flexneri and show the necessity of further extension of the serotype classification scheme recognizing the MASF IV-1 positive strains as distinctive subtypes.

  15. Outer membrane proteins analysis of Shigella sonnei and evaluation of their antigenicity in Shigella infected individuals.

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    Hemavathy Harikrishnan

    Full Text Available Bacillary dysentery caused by infection with Shigella spp. remains as serious and common health problem throughout the world. It is a highly multi drug resistant organism and rarely identified from the patient at the early stage of infection. S. sonnei is the most frequently isolated species causing shigellosis in industrialized countries. The antigenicity of outer membrane protein of this pathogen expressed during human infection has not been identified to date. We have studied the antigenic outer membrane proteins expressed by S. sonnei, with the aim of identifying presence of specific IgA and IgG in human serum against the candidate protein biomarkers. Three antigenic OMPs sized 33.3, 43.8 and 100.3 kDa were uniquely recognized by IgA and IgG from patients with S. sonnei infection, and did not cross-react with sera from patients with other types of infection. The antigenic proteome data generated in this study are a first for OMPs of S. sonnei, and they provide important insights of human immune responses. Furthermore, numerous prime candidate proteins were identified which will aid the development of new diagnostic tools for the detection of S. sonnei.

  16. How Shigella utilizes Ca2+ jagged edge signals during invasion of epithelial cells

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    Mariette eBonnet

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Shigella, the causative agent of bacillary dysentery invades intestinal epithelial cells using a type III secretion system (T3SS. Through the injection of type III effectors, Shigella manipulates the actin cytoskeleton to induce its internalization in epithelial cells. At early invasion stages, Shigella induces atypical Ca2+ responses confined at entry sites allowing local cytoskeletal remodeling for bacteria engulfment. Global Ca2+ increase in the cell triggers the opening of connexin hemichannels at the plasma membrane that releases ATP in the extracellular milieu, favoring Shigella invasion and spreading through purinergic receptor signaling. During intracellular replication, Shigella regulates inflammatory and death pathways to disseminate within the epithelium. At later stages of infection, Shigella downregulates hemichannel opening and the release of extracellular ATP to dampen inflammatory signals. To avoid premature cell death, Shigella activates cell survival by upregulating the PI3K/Akt pathway and downregulating the levels of p53. Furthermore, Shigella interferes with pro-apoptotic caspases, and orients infected cells towards a slow necrotic cell death linked to mitochondrial Ca2+ overload. In this review, we will focus on the role of Ca2+ responses and their regulation by Shigella during the different stages of bacterial infection.

  17. Use of zebrafish to study Shigella infection

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    Gina M. Duggan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Shigella is a leading cause of dysentery worldwide, responsible for up to 165 million cases of shigellosis each year. Shigella is also recognised as an exceptional model pathogen to study key issues in cell biology and innate immunity. Several infection models have been useful to explore Shigella biology; however, we still lack information regarding the events taking place during the Shigella infection process in vivo. Here, we discuss a selection of mechanistic insights recently gained from studying Shigella infection of zebrafish (Danio rerio, with a focus on cytoskeleton rearrangements and cellular immunity. We also discuss how infection of zebrafish can be used to investigate new concepts underlying infection control, including emergency granulopoiesis and the use of predatory bacteria to combat antimicrobial resistance. Collectively, these insights illustrate how Shigella infection of zebrafish can provide fundamental advances in our understanding of bacterial pathogenesis and vertebrate host defence. This information should also provide vital clues for the discovery of new therapeutic strategies against infectious disease in humans.

  18. Systems Pharmacological Approach of Pulsatillae Radix on Treating Crohn’s Disease

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    Su Yeon Suh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In East Asian traditional medicine, Pulsatillae Radix (PR is widely used to treat amoebic dysentery and renowned for its anti-inflammatory effects. This study aimed to confirm evidence regarding the potential therapeutic effect of PR on Crohn’s disease using a system network level based in silico approach. Study results showed that the compounds in PR are highly connected to Crohn’s disease related pathways, biological processes, and organs, and these findings were confirmed by compound-target network, target-pathway network, and gene ontology analysis. Most compounds in PR have been reported to possess anti-inflammatory, anticancer, and antioxidant effects, and we found that these compounds interact with multiple targets in a synergetic way. Furthermore, the mRNA expressions of genes targeted by PR are elevated significantly in immunity-related organ tissues, small intestine, and colon. Our results suggest that the anti-inflammatory and repair and immune system enhancing effects of PR might have therapeutic impact on Crohn’s disease.

  19. Characterization of the fecal microbiota of pigs before and after inoculation with "Brachyspira hampsonii".

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    Matheus O Costa

    Full Text Available "Brachyspira hampsonii" causes disease indistinguishable from swine dysentery, and the structure of the intestinal microbiome likely plays a role in determining susceptibility of individual pigs to infection and development of clinical disease. The objectives of the current study were to determine if the pre-inoculation fecal microbiota differed between inoculated pigs that did (INOC MH or did not (INOC non-MH develop mucohaemorrhagic diarrhea following challenge with "B. hampsonii", and to quantify changes in the structure of the microbiome following development of clinical disease. Fecal microbiota profiles were generated based on amplification and sequencing of the cpn60 universal target sequence from 89 samples from 18 pigs collected at -8, -5, -3 and 0 days post-inoculation, and at termination. No significant differences in richness, diversity or taxonomic composition distinguished the pre-inoculation microbiomes of INOC MH and INOC non-MH pigs. However, the development of bloody diarrhea in inoculated pigs was associated with perturbation of the microbiota relative to INOC non-MH or sham-inoculated control pigs. Specifically, the fecal microbiota of INOC MH pigs was less dense (fewer total 16S rRNA copies per gram of feces, and had a lower Bacteroidetes:Firmicutes ratio. Further investigation of the potential long-term effects of Brachyspira disease on intestinal health and performance is warranted.

  20. Activations of Both Extrinsic and Intrinsic Pathways in HCT 116 Human Colorectal Cancer Cells Contribute to Apoptosis through p53-Mediated ATM/Fas Signaling by Emilia sonchifolia Extract, a Folklore Medicinal Plant

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    Yu-Hsuan Lan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Emilia sonchifolia (L. DC (Compositae, an herbaceous plant found in Taiwan and India, is used as folk medicine. The clinical applications include inflammation, rheumatism, cough, cuts fever, dysentery, analgesic, and antibacteria. The activities of Emilia sonchifolia extract (ESE on colorectal cancer cell death have not been fully investigated. The purpose of this study explored the induction of apoptosis and its molecular mechanisms in ESE-treated HCT 116 human colorectal cancer cells in vitro. The methanolic ESE was characterized, and γ-humulene was formed as the major constituent (63.86%. ESE induced cell growth inhibition in a concentration- and time-dependent response by MTT assay. Apoptotic cells (DNA fragmentation, an apoptotic catachrestic were found after ESE treatment by TUNEL assay and DNA gel electrophoresis. Alternatively, ESE stimulated the activities of caspase-3, -8, and -9 and their specific caspase inhibitors protected against ESE-induced cytotoxicity. ESE promoted the mitochondria-dependent and death-receptor-associated protein levels. Also, ESE increased ROS production and upregulated the levels of ATM, p53, and Fas in HCT 116 cells. Strikingly, p53 siRNA reversed ESE-reduced viability involved in p53-mediated ATM/Fas signaling in HCT 116 cells. In summary, our result is the first report suggesting that ESE may be potentially efficacious in the treatment of colorectal cancer.

  1. Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Iridoids and Verbascoside Isolated from Castilleja tenuiflora

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    Verónica Rodríguez-López

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Castilleja tenuiflora (Orobanchaceae has been used in Mexican traditional medicine as a treatment for cough, dysentery, anxiety, nausea and vomiting as well as hepatic and gastrointestinal diseases. The ethanolic extract of the aerial parts of Castilleja tenuiflora was separated by silica gel column chromatography. The fractions were evaluated using the induced edema acetate 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol (TPA anti-inflammatory activity model. The most active fraction was subjected to medium-pressure liquid chromatography (MPLC with UV detection at 206 and 240 nm. The following iridoids were isolated: geniposidic acid, aucubin, bartioside, 8-epi-loganin, mussaenoside, and the phenylpropanoid verbascoside. The most active iridoid was geniposidic acid, which was more active than the control (indomethacin, and the least active iridoid was mussaenoside. 8-epi-Loganin, and mussaenoside have not been previously reported to be anti-inflammatory compounds. The results of these investigations confirm the potential of Mexican plants for the production of bioactive compounds and validate the ethnomedical use of Castilleja tenuiflora-like anti-inflammatory plants.

  2. Commentary: Ignorance as Bias: Radiolab, Yellow Rain, and “The Fact of the Matter”

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    Paul Hillmer

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In 2012 the National Public Radio show “Radiolab” released a podcast (later broadcast on air essentially asserting that Hmong victims of a suspected chemical agent known as “yellow rain” were ignorant of their surroundings and the facts, and were merely victims of exposure, dysentery, tainted water, and other natural causes. Relying heavily on the work of Dr. Matthew Meselson, Dr. Thomas Seeley, and former CIA officer Merle Pribbenow, Radiolab asserted that Hmong victims mistook bee droppings, defecated en masse from flying Asian honey bees, as “yellow rain.” They brought their foregone conclusions to an interview with Eng Yang, a self-described yellow rain survivor, and his niece, memoirist Kao Kalia Yang, who served as translator. The interview went horribly wrong when their dogged belief in the “bee dung hypothesis” was met with stiff and ultimately impassioned opposition. Radiolab’s confirmation bias led them to dismiss contradictory scientific evidence and mislead their audience. While the authors remain agnostic about the potential use of yellow rain in Southeast Asia, they believe the evidence shows that further study is needed before a final conclusion can be reached.

  3. Human parasites in the Roman World: health consequences of conquering an empire.

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    Mitchell, Piers D

    2017-01-01

    The archaeological evidence for parasites in the Roman era is presented in order to demonstrate the species present at that time, and highlight the health consequences for people living under Roman rule. Despite their large multi-seat public latrines with washing facilities, sewer systems, sanitation legislation, fountains and piped drinking water from aqueducts, we see the widespread presence of whipworm (Trichuris trichiura), roundworm (Ascaris lumbricoides) and Entamoeba histolytica that causes dysentery. This would suggest that the public sanitation measures were insufficient to protect the population from parasites spread by fecal contamination. Ectoparasites such as fleas, head lice, body lice, pubic lice and bed bugs were also present, and delousing combs have been found. The evidence fails to demonstrate that the Roman culture of regular bathing in the public baths reduced the prevalence of these parasites. Fish tapeworm was noted to be widely present, and was more common than in Bronze and Iron Age Europe. It is possible that the Roman enthusiasm for fermented, uncooked fish sauce (garum) may have facilitated the spread of this helminth. Roman medical practitioners such as Galen were aware of intestinal worms, explaining their existence and planning treatment using the humoural theory of the period.

  4. Release and Cytokine Production of BmpB from BmpB-Loaded pH-Sensitive and Mucoadhesive Thiolated Eudragit Microspheres.

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    Singh, Bijay; Jiang, Tao; Kim, You-Kyoung; Kang, Sang-Kee; Choi, Yun-Jaie; Cho, Chong-Su

    2015-01-01

    Swine dysentery is a contagious mucohaemorrhagic colitis of pigs that is caused by anaerobic intestinal spirochaete Brachyspira hyodysenteriae. Recently, an outer membrane lipoprotein of B. hyodysenteriae (BmpB) has been identified, and the mice or pigs immunized with a recombinant BmpB generated antibodies recognizing the native BmpB of B. hyodysenteriae. In this study, we cloned, expressed and purified BmpB protein from E. coli and used it as a vaccine candidate for oral delivery. The BmpB was encapsulated into the pH-sensitive and thiolated Eudragit microspheres (TEMS). The sizes of the microspheres ranged from 5-20 μ. About 22-34% of BmpB were released from the BmpB-loaded TEMS within 24 h at stomach pH 2.0 whereas the release of BmpB from the BmpB-loaded TEMS was 35% in the first one hour and reached 81% within 24 h at intestinal pH 7.2. These data revealed that the BmpB could be protected in the harsh gastric condition. Mucoadhesive experiment in vitro showed that TEMS have high binding affinity with the mucin glycoproteins of porcine intestine. Finally, in vitro production of cytokines from immune cells treated with the BmpB-loaded TEMS suggested that the TEMS would be a promising approach for oral delivery of BmpB as vaccine candidate.

  5. Phytochemical investigation and antimicrobial activity of leaves extract of Vernonia auriculifera Hiern.

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    Bekele Albejo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Context: The genus Vernonia is one of the largest groups in the family Compositae constituting more than 500 species distributed widely in tropical and sub-tropical regions of Africa, Asia, and America. Traditionally the genus is used for the treatment of schistosomiasis, amoebic dysentery, gastrointestinal problems, malaria, venereal diseases, wounds, hepatitis, and diabetes. Vernonia auriculifera Hiern is used for healing wounds as ointment around the injured areas. Aims: To investigate the phytochemical constituents and evaluate antimicrobial activity of leaves extract of Vernonia auriculifera Hiern. Methods: Phytochemical screening tests were conducted to identify the class of compounds present in the leaves extracts of V. auriculifera. Silica gel column chromatographic technique was applied to separate the constituents of the extracts. Various spectroscopic techniques (IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, DEPT-135, COSY, gHSQC, and gHMBC were applied to determine the structures of isolated compounds. Results: Phytochemical screening of the methanol leaf extract revealed the presence of tannins, flavonoids, terpenoids, saponins and absence of anthraquinones, steroids, and alkaloids. Silica gel column chromatography of the methanol leaves extract yielded one compound. The hexane, chloroform, methanol and water extracts were tested against Staphylococcus aureus. The methanol and water extracts showed promising growth suppression at minimum inhibitory concentration of 200 mg/mL. Conclusions: The polar extracts of the leaves of Vernonia auriculifera Hiern possess antimicrobial activity.

  6. Solena amplexicaulis induces cell cycle arrest, apoptosis and inhibits angiogenesis in hepatocarcinoma cells and HUVECs.

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    Ren, Jie; Xu, Yuan Yuan; Jiang, He Fei; Yang, Meng; Huang, Qian Hui; Yang, Jie; Hu, Kun; Wei, Kun

    2014-01-01

    Solena amplexicaulis (Lam.) Gandhi (SA) has been used as a traditional medicine for the treatment of dysentery, multiple abscess, gastralgia, urethritis, and eczema in the minority area of China. This study was aimed to examine the cell proliferation inhibitory activity of the SA extract (SACE) and its mechanism of action in human hepatoma cell line (HepG2) and evaluate its anti-angiogenesis activity in human umbilical vein endothelial cell line (HUVEC). SACE could inhibit the growth of HepG2 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. FCM analysis showed that SACE could induce G2/M phase arrest, cell apoptosis, the mitochondrial membrane potential loss (ΔΨm) and increase the production of intracellular ROS of HepG2 cells. After treatment with SACE, topical morphological changes of apoptotic body formation, obvious increase of apoptosis-related protein expressions, such as Bax, cytochrome c, caspase-3, PARP-1, and decrease of Bcl-2, procaspase-9 protein expressions were observed at the same time. Moreover, SACE caused the significant inhibition of endothelial cell migration and tube formation in HUVEC cells. The results suggested that SACE could act as an angiogenesis inhibitor and induce cell apoptosis via a caspase-dependent mitochondrial pathway. Therefore, SACE could be a potent candidate for the prevention and treatment of liver cancer.

  7. An Annotated Checklist of the Human and Animal Entamoeba (Amoebida: Endamoebidae Species- A Review Article.

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    Hossein Hooshyar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The number of valid of pathogen and non-pathogen species of Entamoeba has continuously increased in human and animals. This review is performed to provide an update list and some summarized information on Entamoeba species, which were identified up to the 2014.We evaluated the Entamoeba genus with a broad systematic review of the literature, books and electronic databases until February 2014. The synonyms, hosts, pathogenicity and geographical distribution of valid species were considered and recorded. Repeated and unrelated cases were excluded.Totally 51 defined species of Entamoeba were found and arranged by the number of nuclei in mature cyst according to Levin's grouping. Seven of these species within the 4 nucleate mature cysts group and 1 species with one nucleate mature cyst are pathogen. E. histolytica, E. invadence, E. rananrum and E. anatis causes lethal infection in human, reptiles, amphibians and brides respectively, four species causes non-lethal mild dysentery. The other species were non-pathogen and are important to differential diagnosis of amoebiasis.There are some unknown true species of Entamoeba that available information on the morphology, hosts, pathogenicity and distribution of them are still very limited and more considerable investigation will be needed in order to clarify the status of them.

  8. Genesis of a novel Shigella flexneri serotype by sequential infection of serotype-converting bacteriophages SfX and SfI

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    Sun Qiangzheng

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shigella flexneri is the major pathogen causing bacillary dysentery. Fifteen serotypes have been recognized up to now. The genesis of new S. flexneri serotypes is commonly mediated by serotype-converting bacteriophages. Untypeable or novel serotypes from natural infections had been reported worldwide but have not been generated in laboratory. Results A new S. flexneri serotype-serotype 1 d was generated when a S. flexneri serotype Y strain (native LPS was sequentially infected with 2 serotype-converting bacteriophages, SfX first and then SfI. The new serotype 1 d strain agglutinated with both serotype X-specific anti-7;8 grouping serum and serotype 1a-specific anti- I typing serum, and differed from subserotypes 1a, 1b and 1c. Twenty four S. flexneri clinical isolates of serotype X were all converted to serotype 1 d by infection with phage SfI. PCR and sequencing revealed that SfI and SfX were integrated in tandem into the proA-yaiC region of the host chromosome. Conclusions These findings suggest a new S. flexneri serotype could be created in nature. Such a conversion may be constrained by susceptibility of a strain to infection by a given serotype-converting bacteriophage. This finding has significant implications in the emergence of new S. flexneri serotypes in nature.

  9. Ethnomedicinal plants used by the Nag clan of the Rai Ghatual tribe of Moulvibazar district, Bangladesh.

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    Das, Protiva Rani; Islam, Md Tabibul; Jahan, Rownak; Rahmatullah, Mohammed

    2013-04-01

    Medicinal practices of the tribes of Bangladesh remain largely un-documented. The aim of the present study was to conduct an ethnomedicinal survey and documentation among the Nag clan of the Rai Ghatual tribe of Bangladesh. The survey was carried out among the Nag clan of the Rai Ghatual tribal community of Moulvibazar district. The clan, according to them, is the only Nag clan of the Rai Ghatual tribe in Bangladesh. The clan has three tribal healers, still continuing their traditional medicinal practices. Interviews of the healers were carried out with the help of a semi-structured questionnaire and the guided field-walk method. The Nag clan healers were observed to use 28 different plant species distributed into 22 families for treatment of ailments such as fever, loss of appetite, male infertility, dysentery, lower abdominal pain during menstruation, jaundice, stomachache, burning sensations during urination, bodily pain and weak health. This is the first reported study of the traditional medicinal practices of Nag clan healers. Several of the plants can be validated in their uses on the basis of existing scientific literature. The medicinal plants used by the Nag healers warrant further scientific studies, for the plants are readily available and can form alternative medicinal sources instead of costlier biomedical drugs.

  10. Ethnomedicinal plants used by the Nag clan of the Rai Ghatual tribe of Moulvibazar district, Bangladesh

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    Protiva Rani Das

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Medicinal practices of the tribes of Bangladesh remain largely un-documented. Aims: The aim of the present study was to conduct an ethnomedicinal survey and documentation among the Nag clan of the Rai Ghatual tribe of Bangladesh. Settings and Design: The survey was carried out among the Nag clan of the Rai Ghatual tribal community of Moulvibazar district. The clan, according to them, is the only Nag clan of the Rai Ghatual tribe in Bangladesh. The clan has three tribal healers, still continuing their traditional medicinal practices. Materials and Methods: Interviews of the healers were carried out with the help of a semi-structured questionnaire and the guided field-walk method. Results: The Nag clan healers were observed to use 28 different plant species distributed into 22 families for treatment of ailments such as fever, loss of appetite, male infertility, dysentery, lower abdominal pain during menstruation, jaundice, stomachache, burning sensations during urination, bodily pain and weak health. Conclusions: This is the first reported study of the traditional medicinal practices of Nag clan healers. Several of the plants can be validated in their uses on the basis of existing scientific literature. The medicinal plants used by the Nag healers warrant further scientific studies, for the plants are readily available and can form alternative medicinal sources instead of costlier biomedical drugs.

  11. Phylogenetic diversity, antimicrobial susceptibility and virulence gene profiles of Brachyspira hyodysenteriae isolates from pigs in Germany.

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    Jessica Joerling

    Full Text Available Swine dysentery (SD is an economically important diarrheal disease in pigs caused by different strongly hemolytic Brachyspira (B. species, such as B. hyodysenteriae, B. suanatina and B. hampsonii. Possible associations of epidemiologic data, such as multilocus sequence types (STs to virulence gene profiles and antimicrobial susceptibility are rather scarce, particularly for B. hyodysenteriae isolates from Germany. In this study, B. hyodysenteriae (n = 116 isolated from diarrheic pigs between 1990 and 2016 in Germany were investigated for their STs, susceptibility to the major drugs used for treatment of SD (tiamulin and valnemulin and genes that were previously linked with virulence and encode for hemolysins (tlyA, tlyB, tlyC, hlyA, BHWA1_RS02885, BHWA1_RS09085, BHWA1_RS04705, and BHWA1_RS02195, outer membrane proteins (OMPs (bhlp16, bhlp17.6, bhlp29.7, bhmp39f, and bhmp39h as well as iron acquisition factors (ftnA and bitC. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST revealed that 79.4% of the isolates belonged to only three STs, namely ST52 (41.4%, ST8 (12.1%, and ST112 (25.9% which have been observed in other European countries before. Another 24 isolates belonged to twelve new STs (ST113-118, ST120-123, ST131, and ST193. The temporal distribution of STs revealed the presence of new STs as well as the regular presence of ST52 over three decades (1990s-2000s. The proportion of strains that showed resistance to both tiamulin und valnemulin (39.1% varied considerably among the most frequent STs ranging from 0% (0/14 isolates resistant in ST8 isolates to 46.7% (14/30, 52.1% (25/48, and 85.7% (6/7 in isolates belonging to ST112, ST52, and ST114, respectively. All hemolysin genes as well as the iron-related gene ftnA and the OMP gene bhlp29.7 were regularly present in the isolates, while the OMP genes bhlp17.6 and bhmp39h could not be detected. Sequence analysis of hemolysin genes of selected isolates revealed co-evolution of tlyB, BHWA1_RS02885, BHWA1_RS

  12. One Gene and Two Proteins: a Leaderless mRNA Supports the Translation of a Shorter Form of the Shigella VirF Regulator.

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    Di Martino, Maria Letizia; Romilly, Cédric; Wagner, E Gerhart H; Colonna, Bianca; Prosseda, Gianni

    2016-11-08

    VirF, an AraC-like activator, is required to trigger a regulatory cascade that initiates the invasive program of Shigella spp., the etiological agents of bacillary dysentery in humans. VirF expression is activated upon entry into the host and depends on many environmental signals. Here, we show that the virF mRNA is translated into two proteins, the major form, VirF 30 (30 kDa), and the shorter VirF 21 (21 kDa), lacking the N-terminal segment. By site-specific mutagenesis and toeprint analysis, we identified the translation start sites of VirF 30 and VirF 21 and showed that the two different forms of VirF arise from differential translation. Interestingly, in vitro and in vivo translation experiments showed that VirF 21 is also translated from a leaderless mRNA (llmRNA) whose 5' end is at position +309/+310, only 1 or 2 nucleotides upstream of the ATG84 start codon of VirF 21 The llmRNA is transcribed from a gene-internal promoter, which we identified here. Functional analysis revealed that while VirF 30 is responsible for activation of the virulence system, VirF 21 negatively autoregulates virF expression itself. Since VirF 21 modulates the intracellular VirF levels, this suggests that transcription of the llmRNA might occur when the onset of the virulence program is not required. We speculate that environmental cues, like stress conditions, may promote changes in virF mRNA transcription and preferential translation of llmRNA. Shigella spp. are a major cause of dysentery in humans. In bacteria of this genus, the activation of the invasive program involves a multitude of signals that act on all layers of the gene regulatory hierarchy. By controlling the essential genes for host cell invasion, VirF is the key regulator of the switch from the noninvasive to the invasive phenotype. Here, we show that the Shigella virF gene encodes two proteins of different sizes, VirF 30 and VirF 21 , that are functionally distinct. The major form, VirF 30 , activates the genes

  13. Phylogenetic diversity, antimicrobial susceptibility and virulence gene profiles of Brachyspira hyodysenteriae isolates from pigs in Germany

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    Joerling, Jessica; Barth, Stefanie A.; Schlez, Karen; Willems, Hermann

    2018-01-01

    Swine dysentery (SD) is an economically important diarrheal disease in pigs caused by different strongly hemolytic Brachyspira (B.) species, such as B. hyodysenteriae, B. suanatina and B. hampsonii. Possible associations of epidemiologic data, such as multilocus sequence types (STs) to virulence gene profiles and antimicrobial susceptibility are rather scarce, particularly for B. hyodysenteriae isolates from Germany. In this study, B. hyodysenteriae (n = 116) isolated from diarrheic pigs between 1990 and 2016 in Germany were investigated for their STs, susceptibility to the major drugs used for treatment of SD (tiamulin and valnemulin) and genes that were previously linked with virulence and encode for hemolysins (tlyA, tlyB, tlyC, hlyA, BHWA1_RS02885, BHWA1_RS09085, BHWA1_RS04705, and BHWA1_RS02195), outer membrane proteins (OMPs) (bhlp16, bhlp17.6, bhlp29.7, bhmp39f, and bhmp39h) as well as iron acquisition factors (ftnA and bitC). Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) revealed that 79.4% of the isolates belonged to only three STs, namely ST52 (41.4%), ST8 (12.1%), and ST112 (25.9%) which have been observed in other European countries before. Another 24 isolates belonged to twelve new STs (ST113-118, ST120-123, ST131, and ST193). The temporal distribution of STs revealed the presence of new STs as well as the regular presence of ST52 over three decades (1990s–2000s). The proportion of strains that showed resistance to both tiamulin und valnemulin (39.1%) varied considerably among the most frequent STs ranging from 0% (0/14 isolates resistant) in ST8 isolates to 46.7% (14/30), 52.1% (25/48), and 85.7% (6/7) in isolates belonging to ST112, ST52, and ST114, respectively. All hemolysin genes as well as the iron-related gene ftnA and the OMP gene bhlp29.7 were regularly present in the isolates, while the OMP genes bhlp17.6 and bhmp39h could not be detected. Sequence analysis of hemolysin genes of selected isolates revealed co-evolution of tlyB, BHWA1_RS02885, BHWA1_RS

  14. Upgrading a piped water supply from intermittent to continuous delivery and association with waterborne illness: a matched cohort study in urban India.

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    Ayse Ercumen

    2015-10-01

    ratio [CIR] = 0.58, 95% CI: 0.41-0.78, p = 0.001 than intermittent supply areas. There was no significant association with hepatitis, cholera, or mortality of children <2 y old; however, our results were indicative of lower mortality of children <2 y old (CIR = 0.51, 95% CI: 0.22-1.07, p = 0.10 in continuous supply areas. The major limitations of our study were the potential for unmeasured confounding given the observational design and measurement bias from differential reporting of health symptoms given the nonblinded treatment. However, there was no significant difference in the prevalence of the negative control outcomes between study groups that would suggest undetected confounding or measurement bias.Continuous water supply had no significant overall association with diarrheal disease or ponderal growth in children <5 y old in Hubli-Dharwad; this might be due to point-of-use water contamination from continuing household storage and exposure to diarrheagenic pathogens through nonwaterborne routes. Continuous supply was associated with lower prevalence of dysentery in children in low-income households and lower typhoid fever incidence, suggesting that intermittently operated piped water systems are a significant transmission mechanism for Salmonella typhi and dysentery-causing pathogens in this urban population, despite centralized water treatment. Continuous supply was associated with reduced transmission, especially in the poorer higher-risk segments of the population.

  15. Study on the changes of serum HA and CG levels in several diseases besides liver disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Zhiping; Ma Yunbao; Zhang Xiaoyi; Lv Weihua

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the changes of serum hyaluronic acid (HA) and cholyglycine (CG) in several diseases besides liver disorders. Methods: Serum HA and CG levels were measured with RIA in 78 patients with chronic liver diseases (with 70 controls), (84 patients with primary hepatic carcinoma ), 70 pediatric patients with various infections diseases (with 40 controls), 50 pediatric patients with recurrent respiratory infection (RRI, with 30 controls) and 428 pregnant women ( with 60 controls). In addition, RBC C 3 b receptor ratio (RBCC 3 bRR) and RBC immune-complex ratio (RBCICR) (both with yeast rosette method) as well as serum IgG,IgM,IgA,C 3 levels (with immunoturbidity test) were examined in the 50 RRI pediatric patients, ALT levels were examined in the 70 pediatric patients with infectious diseases and SF examined in the 78 patients with chronic liver diseases. Results: The serum CG, HA and SF levels in the three groups of patients with chronic liver diseases ( CPH, CAH, Cirrhosis) were significantly higher than those in the controls (all P 0.05). In patients with hepatic carcinoma, the CG and HA levels were positively correlated with the mortality at 4 months (P 0.05). For ALT, levels only increased in patients with hepatitis and typhoid fever with none in bacillary dysentery and mumps. In pediatric patients with RRI, RBCC 3 bRR (%), CG, C 3 , IgG levels were significantly higher than those in controls (P 0.05). Conclusion: Various infectious diseases in pediatric patients could induce mild liver damage, which was closely related to the depressed immune status. High CG and HA levels in liver cancer patients suggested high mortality at 4 months. Women in late pregnancy might harbour disturbances in CG metabolism and mild liver injury though without overt symptoms. (authors)

  16. The Amoebicidal Effect of Ergosterol Peroxide Isolated from Pleurotus ostreatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meza-Menchaca, Thuluz; Suárez-Medellín, Jorge; Del Ángel-Piña, Christian; Trigos, Ángel

    2015-12-01

    Dysentery is an inflammation of the intestine caused by the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica and is a recurrent health problem affecting millions of people worldwide. Because of the magnitude of this disease, finding novel strategies for treatment that does not affect human cells is necessary. Ergosterol peroxide is a sterol particularly known as a major cytotoxic agent with a wide spectrum of biological activities produced by edible and medicinal mushrooms. The aim of this report is to evaluate the amoebicidal activity of ergosterol peroxide (5α, 8α-epidioxy-22E-ergosta-6,22-dien-3β-ol isolated from 5α, 8α-epidioxy-22E-ergosta-6,22-dien-3β-ol) (Jacq.) P. Kumm. f. sp. Florida. Our results show that ergosterol peroxide produced a strong cytotoxic effect against amoebic growth. The inhibitory concentration IC50 of ergosterol peroxide was evaluated. The interaction between E. histolytica and ergosterol peroxide in vitro resulted in strong amoebicidal activity (IC50  = 4.23 nM) that may be due to the oxidatory effect on the parasitic membrane. We also tested selective toxicity of ergosterol peroxide using a cell line CCL-241, a human epithelial cell line isolated from normal human fetal intestinal tissue. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the cytotoxicity of ergosterol peroxide against E. histolytica, which uncovers a new biological property of the lipidic compound isolated from Pleurotus ostreatus (Jacq.) P. Kumm. f. sp. Florida. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. PREVALENCE, RISK FACTORS AND SYMPTOMS ASSOCIATED TO INTESTINAL PARASITE INFECTIONS AMONG PATIENTS WITH GASTROINTESTINAL DISORDERS IN NAHAVAND, WESTERN IRAN

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    Hamed KIANI

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied the prevalence of intestinal parasites (IPs, their risk factors and associated symptoms among patients with gastrointestinal disorders. A total of 1,301 participants aged 22 days-90 years were enrolled in this study. We used a structured questionnaire to obtain socio-demographic and stool examination to investigate intestinal parasite infections. Data analysis was performed using SPSS16. The overall prevalence of intestinal parasites (IPs was 32.2% (419/1,301. Three hundred and fifty nine cases/1,301 (27.6% were infected with a single parasite and 60/1,301 cases (4.6% presented polyparasitism. The most common IP was Blastocystis sp. 350/1,301 (26.9%, followed by Entamoeba coli 38/1,301 (2.92%, Giardia lamblia 30/1,301 (2.3% and Cryptosporidium spp. 17/1,301 (1.3%. Regarding the socio-demographic variables, educational status (p = 0.001, contact with domestic animals and soil (p = 0.02, age above 15 years (p = 0.001 and seasons (p = 0.001 were significantly associated to intestinal parasitic infections. Concerning clinical characteristics, the presence of IPs was significantly associated to diarrhea (OR = 1.57; CI 95% = 1.24-1.98; p < 0.001 and dysentery (OR = 1.94; CI 95% = 1.03-3.66; p < 0.04. Our findings suggest that IPs are one of the main causal agents of gastrointestinal disorders. Improving the knowledge on local risk factors such as poverty, low level of education, poor sanitation, contact with soil and contact with domestic animal is warranted.

  18. [Quality of the water and public health in the Central American isthmus].

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    Donato, C

    1976-06-01

    As of December 1970 the population of the Central American Isthmus was 16,436,723; 6,225,447 (37.9%) urban and 10,210,946 (62.1%) rural. Of the urban population, 63.3%, or 3,964,611 had water in the home, while 2,283,836 (36.7% had no adequate water supply. The problem is even worse in the rural population where only 732,150 inhabitants (7.17%) had water in the home; the rest, 9,500,000 were using water from contaminated rivers, streams, wells, etc. These low percentages do not meet the standards proposed at Punta del Este, Uruguay in 1961 of providing drinking water to 70% of the urban population and to 50% of those of rural areas. Nor do the very low figures for sanitary disposal of wastes meet these standards (31.4% in urban areas and 19.5% in rural areas). As a logical consequence, water-bourne morbility in the Central American Isthmus is very high. The rates per 100,000 inhabitants are 0.4 to 18.8 for typhoid fever; 0.7 to 13.0 for paratyphoid fever; 0.5 to 786.2 for bacillary dysentery; and 17.9 to 555.6 for amebiasis. Although it would be hard to evaluate the benefits of sanitary water and waste disposal systems, the damage caused by water-bourne illnesses is well known, especially their effect on the individual human being since they sap his energy, lower his life expectancy and productivity, and thus indirectly affect the national economy. It is a well known fact that the cost of optimum water supply and waste disposal systems will more than amply be paid for by the savings in medication and lost time through illness.

  19. Eco-health in the rural environment.

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    Carr-harris, J

    1993-04-01

    The rural population in India is exposed to working and living conditions: drinking supply, sanitation, fuel wood shortages, maternal mortality, alcoholism among males, pesticide use, environmental degradation, migrant workers, sickness and injury compensation in natural resource based industry, and mechanization in the workplace. Good health is dependent on a supportive home environment which physically provides protection, has access to safe potable drinking water and sanitary facilities, and reinforces health habits and behavior. One of the greatest health hazards is the lack of safe drinking water. The result is increases in water-related diseases such as dysentery, cholera, diarrhea, and hepatitis among men, women, children, and fetuses. Today only 30% of the total population has access to sufficient, safe drinking water. Personal hygiene is also affected by inadequate supplies. Another hazard is waste disposal, which if improperly managed, results in hookworm and ascarias infestations. Barefoot people are particularly affected. In 1982, 8790 villages were found to be without latrines, or with only bucket latrines. The firewood fuel shortages impact directly on women through food habit changes and excessive labor in acquiring adequate supplies. Women are also affected by high rates of anemia which are a by-product of environmental and social conditions. There are a number of psychosocial conditions that impact on the health of women. In Himachal Pradesh women complain that their husbands drink too much alcohol, which increases acts of domestic violence. Male migration for work places women in stressful work conditions managing the land and child care, and exposing women to sexually transmitted diseases. The workplace also had hazards. Agricultural workers have little bargaining power and few organizations representing their interests. A brief description is given of conditions among plantation workers in Assam and Darjeeling. There are hazards due to unskilled

  20. Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Shigella flexneri Dissemination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agaisse, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    The intracellular pathogen Shigella flexneri is the causative agent of bacillary dysentery in humans. The disease is characterized by bacterial invasion of intestinal cells, dissemination within the colonic epithelium through direct spread from cell to cell, and massive inflammation of the intestinal mucosa. Here, we review the mechanisms supporting S. flexneri dissemination. The dissemination process primarily relies on actin assembly at the bacterial pole, which propels the pathogen throughout the cytosol of primary infected cells. Polar actin assembly is supported by polar expression of the bacterial autotransporter family member IcsA, which recruits the N-WASP/ARP2/3 actin assembly machinery. As motile bacteria encounter cell-cell contacts, they form plasma membrane protrusions that project into adjacent cells. In addition to the ARP2/3-dependent actin assembly machinery, protrusion formation relies on formins and myosins. The resolution of protrusions into vacuoles occurs through the collapse of the protrusion neck, leading to the formation of an intermediate membrane-bound compartment termed vacuole-like protrusions (VLPs). VLP formation requires tyrosine kinase and phosphoinositide signaling in protrusions, which relies on the integrity of the bacterial type 3 secretion system (T3SS). The T3SS is also required for escaping double membrane vacuoles through the activity of the T3SS translocases IpaB and IpaC, and the effector proteins VirA and IcsB. Numerous factors supporting envelope biogenesis contribute to IcsA exposure and maintenance at the bacterial pole, including LPS synthesis, membrane proteases, and periplasmic chaperones. Although less characterized, the assembly and function of the T3SS in the context of bacterial dissemination also relies on factors supporting envelope biogenesis. Finally, the dissemination process requires the adaptation of the pathogen to various cellular compartments through transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms.

  1. Housefly population density correlates with shigellosis among children in Mirzapur, Bangladesh: a time series analysis.

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    Tamer H Farag

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Shigella infections are a public health problem in developing and transitional countries because of high transmissibility, severity of clinical disease, widespread antibiotic resistance and lack of a licensed vaccine. Whereas Shigellae are known to be transmitted primarily by direct fecal-oral contact and less commonly by contaminated food and water, the role of the housefly Musca domestica as a mechanical vector of transmission is less appreciated. We sought to assess the contribution of houseflies to Shigella-associated moderate-to-severe diarrhea (MSD among children less than five years old in Mirzapur, Bangladesh, a site where shigellosis is hyperendemic, and to model the potential impact of a housefly control intervention. METHODS: Stool samples from 843 children presenting to Kumudini Hospital during 2009-2010 with new episodes of MSD (diarrhea accompanied by dehydration, dysentery or hospitalization were analyzed. Housefly density was measured twice weekly in six randomly selected sentinel households. Poisson time series regression was performed and autoregression-adjusted attributable fractions (AFs were calculated using the Bruzzi method, with standard errors via jackknife procedure. FINDINGS: Dramatic springtime peaks in housefly density in 2009 and 2010 were followed one to two months later by peaks of Shigella-associated MSD among toddlers and pre-school children. Poisson time series regression showed that housefly density was associated with Shigella cases at three lags (six weeks (Incidence Rate Ratio = 1.39 [95% CI: 1.23 to 1.58] for each log increase in fly count, an association that was not confounded by ambient air temperature. Autocorrelation-adjusted AF calculations showed that a housefly control intervention could have prevented approximately 37% of the Shigella cases over the study period. INTERPRETATION: Houseflies may play an important role in the seasonal transmission of Shigella in some developing

  2. Water microbiology. Bacterial pathogens and water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, João P S

    2010-10-01

    Water is essential to life, but many people do not have access to clean and safe drinking water and many die of waterborne bacterial infections. In this review a general characterization of the most important bacterial diseases transmitted through water-cholera, typhoid fever and bacillary dysentery-is presented, focusing on the biology and ecology of the causal agents and on the diseases' characteristics and their life cycles in the environment. The importance of pathogenic Escherichia coli strains and emerging pathogens in drinking water-transmitted diseases is also briefly discussed. Microbiological water analysis is mainly based on the concept of fecal indicator bacteria. The main bacteria present in human and animal feces (focusing on their behavior in their hosts and in the environment) and the most important fecal indicator bacteria are presented and discussed (focusing on the advantages and limitations of their use as markers). Important sources of bacterial fecal pollution of environmental waters are also briefly indicated. In the last topic it is discussed which indicators of fecal pollution should be used in current drinking water microbiological analysis. It was concluded that safe drinking water for all is one of the major challenges of the 21st century and that microbiological control of drinking water should be the norm everywhere. Routine basic microbiological analysis of drinking water should be carried out by assaying the presence of Escherichia coli by culture methods. Whenever financial resources are available, fecal coliform determinations should be complemented with the quantification of enterococci. More studies are needed in order to check if ammonia is reliable for a preliminary screening for emergency fecal pollution outbreaks. Financial resources should be devoted to a better understanding of the ecology and behavior of human and animal fecal bacteria in environmental waters.

  3. Oral treatment with methanolic extract of the root bark of Condalia buxifolia Reissek alleviates acute pain and inflammation in mice: Potential interactions with PGE2, TRPV1/ASIC and PKA signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, Róli Rodrigues; Dos Santos Coelho, Igor; do Espírito Santo, Caroline Cunha; Morel, Ademir Farias; Zanchet, Eliane Maria; Santos, Adair Roberto Soares

    2016-06-05

    The Condalia buxifolia root bark infusion is used in traditional medicine in Brazil as antipyretic, anti-inflammatory and anti-dysentery. Previous data from our group showed that methanolic extract of Condalia buxifolia (MECb) produced a marked antinociceptive effect in animal models of acute pain. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanisms of MECb-induced antinociception as measured by nocifensive behavior in pain induced by endogenous (prostaglandin E2) or exogenous (TRPs and ASIC agonist, and protein kinase A and C activators) chemical stimuli, and the potential role of PKA signaling and capsaicin-sensitive central C-fiber afferents. The effect of MECb administered orally (0.1-300mg/kg, i.g.) to mice on nociception induced by capsaicin (TRPV1 agonist), cinnamaldehyde (TRPA1 agonist), menthol (TRPM8 agonist), acidified saline (ASIC agonist), PMA (protein kinase C activator), PGE2 and forskolin (protein kinase A activator) was assessed. Moreover, this study also investigated the role of C-fibers desensitizing mice with a high dose of intrathecal capsaicin. Furthermore, this study performed the western blot to PKA phosphorylated on nocifensive behavior induced by forskolin. MECb was able to reduce the nociception and paw edema induced by capsaicin, acidified saline, PMA, PGE2 and forskolin, but not by cinnamaldehyde or menthol. Western blot analyses showed that MECb reduced the levels of PKA phosphorylation induced by forskolin in hind paws. Finally, ablating central afferent C-fibers abolished MECb antinociception. In accordance with its use in traditional medicine, these findings provide new evidence indicating that Condalia buxifolia reduces the acute painful behavior of animals caused by chemical stimuli. The precise mechanism of MECb antinociceptive activity is not completely understood but the results suggest involvement of PGE2, TRPV1/ASIC and PKA signaling pathways, and require integrity of the capsaicin-sensitive central C-fiber afferents

  4. The genus Desmodium (Fabaceae)-traditional uses in Chinese medicine, phytochemistry and pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xueqin; Zheng, Chengjian; Hu, Changling; Rahman, Khalid; Qin, Luping

    2011-11-18

    Plants of the genus Desmodium (Fabaceae), such as Desmodium styracifolium (Osbeck) Merr. and Desmodium gyrans (L. f.) DC., have a long history of medical use in Traditional Chinese Medicine to treat various ailments including rheumatism, pyrexia, dysentery, wounds, cough, malaria, hepatitis, hemoptysis, etc. In the theory of Traditional Chinese Medicine, most species have the effect of relieving internal heat or fever, neutralizing toxins, inhibiting pain, invigorating blood circulation, suppressing cough and alleviating dyspnea. A bibliographic investigation was accomplished by analyzing secondary sources including Chinese Herbal Classics, and worldwide accepted scientific databases (Pubmed, Scopus and Web of Science, SciFinder) were scrutinized for the available information on the ethnopharmacological uses in Chinese medicine, phytochemistry, pharmacology and toxicology of Desmodium species. The genus Desmodium is a large member of the Papilionaceae (Fabaceae) family. It contains about 350 plant species used for both feeding stuffs and herbal medicines, of which only about 30 species have been phytochemically or pharmacologically investigated. Desmodium plant extracts, as well as the active principles, have been experimentally studied for their anti-inflammatory, cytotoxic, antidiabetic, antinephrolithic, antibacterial, and nootropic activities in vitro or in vivo. And so far, a total of 212 compounds have been isolated from 15 Desmodium species and characterized mainly as flavonoids and alkaloids, followed by terpenoids, steroids, phenols, phenylpropanoids, glycosides and a number of volatile oils. The remaining unrevealed species are recorded chiefly in Asia and Africa being used in empirical treatment for various diseases. Desmodium species have long been used in TCM to treat various ailments. Available scientific references revealed that the traditional medical uses of some important Desmodium species in TCM have been evaluated by modern pharmacological

  5. Elemental analysis of some ethnomedicinaly important hydrophytes and marsh plants of India used in traditional medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Somnath Bhowmik; Badal Kumar Datta

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To study the elemental content of some ethnomedicinaly important hydrophytes and marsh plant of Tripura, India. Methods: With the help of standardize d questionnaires, 10 informants were interviewed on the medicinal use of hydrophytes and marsh plants of Tripura, India during 2009-2010.The elemental content of those plants were determined using Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer. Results: A total of 8 plant species belonging to 8 different genera and 8 family were reported with their ethnomedicinaly uses. Among the different plant part used leaves and young tender shoots are most frequently used for the treatment of different disease. The hydrophytes and marsh plants are mostly used for the treatment of dysentery and other hepatic disorder. Different elemental constituents at trace levels of plants play an effective role in the medicines prepared. Elemental composition of eight ethno-medicinally important hydrophytes and marsh plants of Tripura, India have been determined using Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (AAS). A total of 11 elements K+, Mg+2, Ca+2, Na+ , Fe+2, Mn+2, Cu+3, Mn+2, Cu+3, Cr+3, Zn+2, Pb+4 and Cd+2 have been measured. Their concentrations were found to vary in different samples. Toxic elements Cd and Pb were also found but at very low concentration. Medicinal properties of these plant samples and their elemental distribution have been correlated. These results can be used to set new standards for prescribing the dosage of the herbal drugs prepared from these plant materials in herbal remedies and in pharmaceutical companies. Conclusions: The data obtained in the present work will be useful in synthesis of new herbal drugs with various combinations of plants, which can be used in the treatment of different diseases at global level.

  6. Evaluation of cytotoxic, analgesic, antidiarrheal and phytochemical properties of Hygrophila spinosa (T. Anders) whole plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellah, S M Faysal; Islam, Md Nur; Karim, Md Rezaul; Rahaman, Md Masudur; Nasrin, Mst Samima; Rahman, Md Atiar; Reza, A S M Ali

    2017-03-01

    Synthetic drugs are going to be replaced by plant-derived traditional drugs due to their cost effectiveness, relatively less harmfulness, and efficacy against multidrug resistance organisms. Hygrophila spinosa (Acanthaceae) has been used in a wide range of ailments including flatulence, diarrhea, dysentery, gonorrhea, and menorrhagia. Therefore, we investigated the cytotoxic, antinociceptive, and antidiarrheal effects of H. spinosa ethanol extract (EExHs). Preliminary phytochemical screening was accomplished by established methods modified in experimental protocol. EExHs was undertaken for cytotoxic assay by Brine shrimp lethality bioassay, antinociceptive action by acetic acid induced writhing test, and antidiarrheal activity by castor oil induced antidiarrheal test. Data were analyzed by GraphPad Prism 6.0 software using Dunnett's test for multiple comparisons. Reducing sugar, steroid, glycoside, tannin, alkaloid, saponins, and flavonoids were found to be present in EExHs. Lethal concentration (LC50) of EExHs for brine shrimps was 50.59 µg/mL which was relatively lower than that of the standard drug vincristine sulfate. In acetic acid induced writhing test, oral administration of EExHs at three different doses (125, 250, and 500 mg/kg) decreased writhing in dose-dependent manner while the highest dose (500 mg/kg) achieved the maximum percentages of pain inhibition (58.8%). Diclofenac sodium (25 mg/kg) was used as a reference antinociceptive drug. The antidiarrheal action of EExHs was not found to be very promising for further use; however, the pure compounds from EExHs could be analyzed to justify the effects. This research demonstrates that the secondary metabolites guided cytotoxic and analgesic effects could be extensively studied in multiple models to confirm the effects.

  7. Phenylbutyrate counteracts Shigella mediated downregulation of cathelicidin in rabbit lung and intestinal epithelia: a potential therapeutic strategy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Protim Sarker

    secondary respiratory infections that frequently are the lethal causes in dysentery.

  8. Phenylbutyrate counteracts Shigella mediated downregulation of cathelicidin in rabbit lung and intestinal epithelia: a potential therapeutic strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarker, Protim; Ahmed, Sultan; Tiash, Snigdha; Rekha, Rokeya Sultana; Stromberg, Roger; Andersson, Jan; Bergman, Peter; Gudmundsson, Gudmundur H; Agerberth, Birgitta; Raqib, Rubhana

    2011-01-01

    dysentery.

  9. Effect of dietary olaquindox on the growth of large yellow croaker ( Pseudosciaena crocea R.) and the distribution of its residues in fish tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huitao; Wang, Weifang; Mai, Kangsen; Ai, Qinghui; Zhang, Chunxiao; Zhang, Lu

    2014-10-01

    Olaquindox (OLA), one of quinoxaline-N, N-dioxides, has been put under ban. However it was used as a medicinal feed additive early; it promotes the growth of livestock and prevents them from dysentery and bacterial enteritis. In this study, we evaluated the effect of dietary OLA on the growth of large yellow croaker ( Pseudosciaena crocea R.) and the histological distribution of OLA and its metabolite 3-methyl-quinoxaline-2-carboxylic acid (MQCA) in fish tissues. Four diets containing 0 (control), 42.5, 89.5 and 277.2 mg kg-1 OLA, respectively, were formulated and tested, 3 cages (1.0 m × 1.0 m × 1.5 m) each diet and 100 juveniles (9.75 ± 0.35 g) each cage. The fish were fed to satiation twice a day at 05:00 am and 17:00 pm for 8 weeks. The survival rate of fish fed the diet containing 42.5 and 89.5 mg kg-1 OLA was significantly higher than that of fish fed the diet containing 0 and 277.2 mg kg-1 OLA ( P diet containing 42.5 and 89.5 mg·kg-1 OLA was significantly higher than that of fish fed the diet without OLA (control) ( Pdiet with 277.2 mg kg-1 OLA. Fish fed the diet with 277.2 mg kg-1 OLA had the highest content of OLA and MQCA in liver (3.44 and 0.39 mg kg-1, respectively), skin (0.46 and 0.09 mg kg-1, respectively) and muscle (0.24 and 0.06 mg kg-1, respectively). In average, fish fed the diet containing OLA had the highest content of OLA and MQCA in liver which was followed by skin and muscle ( P diet containing OLA, thus imposing a potential safety risk to human health.

  10. Anti-inflammatory, anti-cholinergic and cytotoxic effects of Sida rhombifolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mah, Siau Hui; Teh, Soek Sin; Ee, Gwendoline Cheng Lian

    2017-12-01

    Sida (Malvaceae) has been used as a traditional remedy for the treatment of diarrhoea, malarial, gastrointestinal dysentery, fevers, asthma and inflammation. This study evaluates the anti-inflammatory, cytotoxic and anti-cholinergic activities of Sida rhombifolia Linn. whole plant for the first time. S. rhombifolia whole plant was extracted by n-hexane, ethyl acetate and methanol using Soxhlet apparatus. The plant extracts were evaluated for their antioxidant (DPPH, FIC and FRAP), anti-inflammatory (NO and protein denaturation inhibitions), cytotoxic (MTT) and anti-cholinesterase (AChE) properties in a range of concentrations to obtain IC 50 values. GC-MS analysis was carried out on the n-hexane extract. The ethyl acetate extract exhibited the most significant antioxidant activities by scavenging DPPH radicals and ferrous ions with EC 50 of 380.5 and 263.4 μg/mL, respectively. In contrast, the n-hexane extract showed the strongest anti-inflammatory activity with IC 50 of 52.16 and 146.03 μg/mL for NO and protein denaturation inhibition assays, respectively. The same extract also revealed the strongest effects in anti-cholinesterase and cytotoxic tests at the concentration of 100 μg/mL, AChE enzyme inhibition was 58.55% and human cancer cells, SNU-1 and Hep G2 inhibition was 68.52% and 47.82%, respectively. The phytochemicals present in the n-hexane extract are palmitic acid, linoleic acid and γ-sitosterol. The present study revealed that the n-hexane extract possessed relatively high pharmacological activities in anti-inflammation, cytotoxicity and anti-cholinesterase assays. Thus, further work on the detail mechanism of the bioactive phytochemicals which contribute to the biological properties are strongly recommended.

  11. The Intriguing Evolutionary Journey of Enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC) toward Pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqua, Martina; Michelacci, Valeria; Di Martino, Maria Letizia; Tozzoli, Rosangela; Grossi, Milena; Colonna, Bianca; Morabito, Stefano; Prosseda, Gianni

    2017-01-01

    Among the intestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli , enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC) are a group of intracellular pathogens able to enter epithelial cells of colon, multiplicate within them, and move between adjacent cells with a mechanism similar to Shigella , the ethiological agent of bacillary dysentery. Despite EIEC belong to the same pathotype of Shigella , they neither have the full set of traits that define Shigella nor have undergone the extensive gene decay observed in Shigella . Molecular analysis confirms that EIEC are widely distributed among E. coli phylogenetic groups and correspond to bioserotypes found in many E. coli serogroups. Like Shigella , also in EIEC the critical event toward a pathogenic life-style consisted in the acquisition by horizontal gene transfer of a large F-type plasmid (pINV) containing the genes required for invasion, intracellular survival, and spreading through the intestinal mucosa. In Shigella , the ample gain in virulence determinants has been counteracted by a substantial loss of functions that, although important for the survival in the environment, are redundant or deleterious for the life inside the host. The pathoadaptation process that has led Shigella to modify its metabolic profile and increase its pathogenic potential is still in infancy in EIEC, although maintenance of some features typical of E. coli might favor their emerging relevance as intestinal pathogens worldwide, as documented by recent outbreaks in industrialized countries. In this review, we will discuss the evolution of EIEC toward Shigella -like invasive forms going through the epidemiology, including the emergence of new virulent strains, their genome organization, and the complex interactions they establish with the host.

  12. In vivo evaluation of the genetic toxicity of Rubus niveus Thunb. (Rosaceae) extract and initial screening of its potential chemoprevention against doxorubicin-induced DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolentino, Flora; Araújo, Priscila Alves de; Marques, Eduardo de Souza; Petreanu, Marcel; Andrade, Sérgio Faloni de; Niero, Rivaldo; Perazzo, Fábio F; Rosa, Paulo César Pires; Maistro, Edson Luis

    2015-04-22

    Rubus niveus Thunb. plant belongs to Rosaceae family and have been used traditionally to treat wounds, burns, inflammation, dysentery, diarrhea and for curing excessive bleeding during menstrual cycle. The present study was undertaken to investigate the in vivo genotoxicity of Rubus niveus aerial parts extract and its possible chemoprotection on doxorubicin (DXR)-induced DNA damage. In parallel, the main phytochemicals constituents in the extract were determined. The animals were exposed to the extract for 24 and 48 h, and the doses selected were 500, 1000 and 2000 mg/kg b.w. administered by gavage alone or prior to DXR (30 mg/kg b.w.) administered by intraperitoneal injection. The endpoints analyzed were DNA damage in bone marrow and peripheral blood cells assessed by the alkaline alkaline (pH>13) comet assay and bone marrow micronucleus test. The results of chemical analysis of the extract showed the presence of tormentic acid, stigmasterol, quercitinglucoronide (miquelianin) and niga-ichigoside F1 as main compounds. Both cytogenetic endpoints analyzed showed that there were no statistically significant differences (p>0.05) between the negative control and the treated groups with the two higher doses of Rubus niveus extract alone, demonstrating absence of genotoxic and mutagenic effects. Aneugenic/clastogenic effect was observed only at 2000 mg/kg dose. On the other hand, in the both assays and all tested doses were observed a significant reduction of DNA damage and chromosomal aberrations in all groups co-treated with DXR and extract compared to those which received only DXR. These results indicate that Rubus niveus aerial parts extract did not revealed any genotoxic effect, but presented some aneugenic/clastogenic effect at higher dose; and suggest that it could be a potential adjuvant against development of second malignant neoplasms caused by the cancer chemotherapic DXR. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. In silico analysis to identify vaccine candidates common to multiple serotypes of Shigella and evaluation of their immunogenicity

    KAUST Repository

    Pahil, Sapna

    2017-08-02

    Shigellosis or bacillary dysentery is an important cause of diarrhea, with the majority of the cases occurring in developing countries. Considering the high disease burden, increasing antibiotic resistance, serotype-specific immunity and the post-infectious sequelae associated with shigellosis, there is a pressing need of an effective vaccine against multiple serotypes of the pathogen. In the present study, we used bio-informatics approach to identify antigens shared among multiple serotypes of Shigella spp. This approach led to the identification of many immunogenic peptides. The five most promising peptides based on MHC binding efficiency were a putative lipoprotein (EL PGI I), a putative heat shock protein (EL PGI II), Spa32 (EL PGI III), IcsB (EL PGI IV) and a hypothetical protein (EL PGI V). These peptides were synthesized and the immunogenicity was evaluated in BALB/c mice by ELISA and cytokine assays. The putative heat shock protein (HSP) and the hypothetical protein elicited good humoral response, whereas putative lipoprotein, Spa32 and IcsB elicited good T-cell response as revealed by increased IFN-γ and TNF-α cytokine levels. The patient sera from confirmed cases of shigellosis were also evaluated for the presence of peptide specific antibodies with significant IgG and IgA antibodies against the HSP and the hypothetical protein, bestowing them as potential future vaccine candidates. The antigens reported in this study are novel and have not been tested as vaccine candidates against Shigella. This study offers time and cost-effective way of identifying unprecedented immunogenic antigens to be used as potential vaccine candidates. Moreover, this approach should easily be extendable to find new potential vaccine candidates for other pathogenic bacteria.

  14. Shigella flexneri infection in Caenorhabditis elegans: cytopathological examination and identification of host responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya T George

    Full Text Available The Gram-negative bacterium Shigella flexneri is the causative agent of shigellosis, a diarrhoeal disease also known as bacillary dysentery. S. flexneri infects the colonic and rectal epithelia of its primate host and induces a cascade of inflammatory responses that culminates in the destruction of the host intestinal lining. Molecular characterization of host-pathogen interactions in this infection has been challenging due to the host specificity of S. flexneri strains, as it strictly infects humans and non-human primates. Recent studies have shown that S. flexneri infects the soil dwelling nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, however, the interactions between S. flexneri and C. elegans at the cellular level and the cause of nematode death are unknown. Here we attempt to gain insight into the complex host-pathogen interactions between S. flexneri and C. elegans. Using transmission electron microscopy, we show that live S. flexneri cells accumulate in the nematode intestinal lumen, produce outer membrane vesicles and invade nematode intestinal cells. Using two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis we identified host proteins that are differentially expressed in response to S. flexneri infection. Four of the identified genes, aco-1, cct-2, daf-19 and hsp-60, were knocked down using RNAi and ACO-1, CCT-2 and DAF-19, which were identified as up-regulated in response to S. flexneri infection, were found to be involved in the infection process. aco-1 RNAi worms were more resistant to S. flexneri infection, suggesting S. flexneri-mediated disruption of host iron homeostasis. cct-2 and daf-19 RNAi worms were more susceptible to infection, suggesting that these genes are induced as a protective mechanism by C. elegans. These observations further our understanding of the processes involved in S. flexneri infection of C. elegans, which is immensely beneficial to the routine use of this new in vivo model to study S. flexneri pathogenesis.

  15. Public health and clinical importance of amoebiasis in Malaysia: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tengku, S A; Norhayati, M

    2011-08-01

    Entamoeba histolytica, the causative agent of human amoebiasis remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in developing countries and is responsible for up to 100,000 deaths worldwide each year. Entamoeba dispar, morphologically indistinguishable from E. histolytica is more common in humans in many parts of the world. Similarly Entamoeba moshkovskii, which was long considered to be a free-living amoeba is also morphologically identical to E. histolytica and E. dispar, and is highly prevalent in some E. histolytica endemic countries. Humans are the host of infection and there would not appear to be other meaningful animal reservoirs of E. histolytica. Entamoeba. histolytica can be present in sewage and contaminated water. The infection is mainly transmitted via ingestion of water or food contaminated by faeces containing E. histolytica cysts. Clinical features of amoebiasis range from asymptomatic colonization to amoebic dysentery and invasive extraintestinal amoebiasis, which is manifested most commonly in the form of abscesses in liver and lungs. The epidemiology of amoebiasis has dramatically changed since the separation of E. histolytica and E. dispar species and the worldwide prevalence of these species has not been estimated until recently. Morever, E. moshkovskii, another morphologically indistinguishable human parasitic Entamoeba was not mentioned or considered as a contributor to the prevalence figures in endemic areas. Amoebiasis is still a major health problem especially in aboriginal settlements and amongst people living in remote area in Malaysia. However, until now there is only one data currently available to indicate the true prevalence and incidence of E. histolytica and E. dispar. Further studies are needed to determine the burden of E. histolytica, E. dispar and E. moshkovskii infections in Malaysia. In the present review, we briefly summarize all methods use in diagnosing Entamoeba species, ranging from microscopic identification to

  16. Phytochemical Quantification and the In Vitro Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitory Activity of Phellodendron chinense and Its Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yu Jin; Lim, Hye-Sun; Kim, Yoonju; Lee, Jun; Kim, Bu-Yeo; Jeong, Soo-Jin

    2017-06-02

    The dried bark of Phellodendron chinense has been used as a traditional herbal medicine to remove damp heat, relieve consumptive fever, and cure dysentery and diarrhea. In the present study, we performed quantitative analyses of the two components of P. chinense , phellodendrine and berberine, using high-performance liquid chromatography. A 70% ethanol extract of P. chinense was prepared and the two components were separated on a C-18 analytical column using a gradient solvent system of acetonitrile and 0.1% ( v / v ) aqueous trifluoroacetic acid. The ultraviolet wavelength used for detection was 200 nm for phellodendrine and 226 nm for berberine. The analytical method established here showed high linearity (correlation coefficient, ≥0.9991). The amount of phellodendrine and berberine used was 22.255 ± 0.123 mg/g and 269.651 ± 1.257 mg/g, respectively. Moreover, we performed an in vitro acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity assay and an amyloid-β aggregation test to examine the biological properties of phellodendrine and berberine as therapeutic drugs for Alzheimer's disease. Phellodendrine and berberine inhibited AChE activity in a dose-dependent manner (IC 50 = 36.51 and 0.44 μM, respectively). In contrast, neither phellodendrine nor berberine had an effect on amyloid-β aggregation. The P. chinense extract and phellodendrine, but not berberine, exhibited antioxidant activity by increasing radical scavenging activity. Moreover, P. chinense demonstrated a neuroprotective effect in hydrogen peroxide-treated HT22 hippocampal cells. Overall, our findings suggest that P. chinense has potential as an anti-Alzheimer's agent via the suppression of the enzymatic activity of acetylcholinesterase and the stimulation of antioxidant activity.

  17. Albumin synthesis in protein energy malnutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duggan, C.; Hardy, S.; Kleinman, R.E.; Harvard Medical School, Children's Hospital, Boston, MA; Lembcke, J.; Young, V.R.

    1996-01-01

    Assessment of protein nutritional status during re-feeding children with protein energy malnutrition (PEM) can be difficult. We hypothesized that the fractional synthesis rate (FSR) of albumin, as measured by stable isotope technology, would serve as an objective measure of changes in protein status, and that increased amounts of dietary protein (15% of calories vs 10%) would lead to higher FSR. Eight (5 M, 3 F) Peruvian children (mean age 15.5 months) with PEM (mean wt/ht Z score = -2.47) were studied twice during the first week of admission by the flooding dose technique. An intravenous dose of 13 C-leucine (57 mg/kg, 99 atom%) was given and serial blood samples were drawn in intervals up to 90 minutes in order to measure isotopic enrichment of serum albumin. Mean FSR for the day one infusion was 6.11% (range 3.07 - 15.37%) (n = 8). Mean FSR for the follow-up infusion was 7.67% (range 3.63 - 12.37%) (n = 5), and FSR was no different between the two dietary groups. FSR on day one was inversely related to age (r = -0.62), and one patient with Shigella dysentery had the highest FSR (15.9%). We conclude that FSR of albumin can be measured successfully in children with PEM using the flooding dose technique, and that assessment of albumin FSR holds promise to help determine protein requirements and status during recovery from PEM. (author). 14 refs, 6 figs, 3 tabs

  18. THE HISTOPATHOLOGICAL EFFECT OF LEAF, STEM AND ROOT BARK EXTRACTS OF MORINDA LUCIDA ON SOME VISCERAL ORGANS AND MUSCLES OF WISTAR MICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The leaf, stem and root bark of Morinda lucida (Ezeogwu, are bitter and astringent used in Nigeria in the treatment of fever, malaria, yellow fever, jaundice and dysentery. They are also used as dyestuff. The aim of the study was to investigate and compare histological effects of the leaves, stem and root bark extracts of Morinda lucida on some visceral organs and muscles of albino Wistar mice. Acute intraperitoneal toxicity tests were performed for each of the extracts to determine their LD50s using modified Lorke\\'s method. Sub-chronic toxicity study was then carried out by intraperitoneal administration of different doses of the extracts on daily basis to the different groups of male mice for 21 days. The weights of the mice were taken before, during and after administration of the substance at weekly intervals. The animals were subsequently sacrificed and the liver, kidney, stomach, colon and muscle excised for histology processing and analysis. The acute intraperitoneal toxicity result (LD50 revealed Morinda lucida leaf, stem and root bark extracts to be lethal at 1,732.1; 1,058.3 and 970.8mg/kg body weight respectively. Microscopic examinations of the kidney, liver, stomach, colon and cardiac muscles showed that the effects of sub-chronic administration of Morinda lucida on the liver varied with the type of extracts and was dose dependent. The root extract had higher toxic effect. It had no adverse effect on the kidney, muscles, stomach and colon. This result may form the basis for further trials. It shows that Morinda lucida extracts are nontoxic at the dosage and oral route used by local traditional healers for its administration. However, caution is necessary in case of over dose.

  19. What is safe and clean water in rural Bolivian communities? A preliminary investigation of heavy metal contamination in rural community water systems in the Bolivian Altiplano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borella, M.; Guido, Z.; Borella, P.; Ketron, T.

    2009-12-01

    A proliferation of potable water systems utilizing groundwater is currently underway in the Lake Titicaca region of the Bolivian Altiplano. With the aid of national and international organizations, rural communities are developing groundwater sources because the region’s surface water is highly contaminated with waterborne pathogens—the primary factor contributing to high child mortality rates in developing nations. According to UNICEF, 86 percent of Bolivian families have access to “improved” water systems, which predominantly take the form of deep groundwater wells or contained natural springs. While the water systems have worked well to reduce pathogens in drinking water systems that cause illnesses such as dysentery, the water is rarely tested for heavy metal contamination, such as arsenic and lead. While bacteria analysis is essential, it is not the only component of healthy drinking water. Testing for heavy metals is especially important in the Bolivian Altiplano because abundant volcanic deposits and massive sulfide deposits suggest that in some areas it is likely that the water contains elevated concentrations of heavy metals. In this study, Terra Resource Development International, A California-based 502(c)3 nonprofit organization, partnered with Stanford University, the Technical University of Bolivia, and the Bolivian Geologic and Mining Survey to collect water samples in 36 rural community situated in four watersheds feeding into Lake Titicaca. Water was collected from shallow, hand dug wells, deep groundwater wells, springs, and small rivers in the Tiwanku, Laja, Batallas, Achacachi watersheds and were analyzed for inorganic contaminants. Samples were analyzed at Stanford’s Environmental Measurements Facility using the Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) Spectrometer for major ions and heavy metals. Results will help determine which, if any, community water systems are at risk of heavy metal contamination, where more comprehensive sampling is

  20. Comparative Genomic and Phylogenetic Analysis of a Shiga Toxin Producing Shigella sonnei (STSS Strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domonkos Sváb

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Shigella strains are important agents of bacillary dysentery, and in recent years Shigella sonnei has emerged as the leading cause of shigellosis in industrialized and rapidly developing countries. More recently, several S. sonnei and Shigella flexneri strains producing Shiga toxin (Stx have been reported from sporadic cases and from an outbreak in America. In the present study we aimed to shed light on the evolution of a recently identified Shiga toxin producing S. sonnei (STSS isolated in Europe. Here we report the first completely assembled whole genome sequence of a multidrug resistant (MDR Stx-producing S. sonnei (STSS clinical strain and reveal its phylogenetic relations. STSS 75/02 proved to be resistant to ampicillin, streptomycin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, thrimetoprim, and sulfomethoxazol. The genome of STSS 75/02 contains a 4,891,717 nt chromosome and seven plasmids including the 214 kb invasion plasmid (pInv harboring type III secretion system genes and associated effectors. The chromosome harbors 23 prophage regions including the Stx1 converting prophage. The genome carries all virulence determinants necessary for an enteroinvasive lifestyle, as well as the Stx1 encoding gene cluster within an earlier described inducible converting prophage. In silico SNP genotyping of the assembled genome as well as 438 complete or draft S. sonnei genomes downloaded from NCBI GenBank revealed that S. sonnei 75/02 belongs to the more recently diverged global MDR lineage (IIIc. Targeted screening of 1131 next-generation sequencing projects taken from NCBI Short Read Archive of confirms that only a few S. sonnei isolates are Stx positive. Our results suggest that the acquisition of Stx phages could have occurred in different environments as independent events and that multiple horizontal transfers are responsible for the appearance of Stx phages in S. sonnei strains.

  1. Lythrum salicaria L.-Underestimated medicinal plant from European traditional medicine. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piwowarski, Jakub P; Granica, Sebastian; Kiss, Anna K

    2015-07-21

    Purple loosestrife-Lythrum salicaria L. is a herbaceous perennial plant belonging to the Lythraceae family. It has been used for centuries in European traditional medicine. Despite Lythri herba being a pharmacopoeial plant material (Ph. Eur.), L. salicaria popularity as a medicinal plant has recently declined. The aim of the paper is to recall a traditional and historical use of L. salicaria and juxtapose it with comprehensive view on the current knowledge about its chemical composition and documented biological activities in order to bring back the interest into this valuable plant and indicate reasonable directions of future research and possible applications. Systematic survey of historical and ethnopharmacological literature was carried out using sources of European and American libraries. Pharmacological and phytochemical literature research was performed using Scopus, PubMed, Web of Science and Reaxys databases. The review of historical sources from ancient times till 20th century revealed an outstanding position of L. salicaria in traditional medicine. The main applications indicated were gastrointestinal tract ailments (mainly dysentery and diarrhea) as well as different skin and mucosa affections. The current phytochemical studies have shown that polyphenols (C-glucosidic ellagitannins and C-glucosidic flavonoids) as well as heteropolysaccharides are dominating constituents, which probably determine the observed pharmacological effects. The extracts and some isolated compounds were shown to possess antidiarrheal, antimicrobial, anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-diabetic activities. The intrinsic literature overview conclusively demonstrates that L. salicaria L. used to be considered as an exceptionally effective remedy in European traditional medicine. Despite its unquestionable important position from unknown reasons its popularity has been weakened during the past few decades. Unfortunately the contemporary pharmacological research is still

  2. Plasmid-Mediated Quinolone Resistance in Shigella flexneri Isolated From Macaques

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    Anthony J. Mannion

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Non-human primates (NHPs for biomedical research are commonly infected with Shigella spp. that can cause acute dysentery or chronic episodic diarrhea. These animals are often prophylactically and clinically treated with quinolone antibiotics to eradicate these possible infections. However, chromosomally- and plasmid-mediated antibiotic resistance has become an emerging concern for species in the family Enterobacteriaceae. In this study, five individual isolates of multi-drug resistant Shigella flexneri were isolated from the feces of three macaques. Antibiotic susceptibility testing confirmed resistance or decreased susceptibility to ampicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, cephalosporins, gentamicin, tetracycline, ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin, levofloxacin, and nalidixic acid. S. flexneri isolates were susceptible to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and this drug was used to eradicate infection in two of the macaques. Plasmid DNA from all isolates was positive for the plasmid-encoded quinolone resistance gene qnrS, but not qnrA and qnrB. Conjugation and transformation of plasmid DNA from several S. flexneri isolates into antibiotic-susceptible Escherichia coli strains conferred the recipients with resistance or decreased susceptibility to quinolones and beta-lactams. Genome sequencing of two representative S. flexneri isolates identified the qnrS gene on a plasmid-like contig. These contigs showed >99% homology to plasmid sequences previously characterized from quinolone-resistant Shigella flexneri 2a and Salmonella enterica strains. Other antibiotic resistance genes and virulence factor genes were also identified in chromosome and plasmid sequences in these genomes. The findings from this study indicate macaques harbor pathogenic S. flexneri strains with chromosomally- and plasmid-encoded antibiotic resistance genes. To our knowledge, this is the first report of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance in S. flexneri isolated from NHPs and warrants

  3. Green synthesis of NiO nanoparticles using Aegle marmelos leaf extract for the evaluation of in-vitro cytotoxicity, antibacterial and photocatalytic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel Ezhilarasi, A; Judith Vijaya, J; Kaviyarasu, K; John Kennedy, L; Ramalingam, R Jothi; Al-Lohedan, Hamad A

    2018-03-01

    In the present study, we report the green synthesis of NiO nanoparticles using Aegle marmelos as a fuel and this method is ecofriendly and cost effective. The plant Aegle marmelos is used in the field of pharmaceuticals to cure diseases like chronic diarrhea, peptic ulcers and dysentery in India for nearly 5 centuries. The as-prepared nanoparticles were confirmed as pure face centered cubic phase and single crystalline in nature by XRD. The formation of agglomerated spherical nanoparticles was shown by HR-SEM and HR-TEM images. The particle size calculated from HR-SEM was in the range 8-10 nm and it matches with the average crystallite size calculated from the XRD pattern. NiO shows intense emission peaks at 363 and 412 nm in its PL spectra. The band gap of 3.5 eV is observed from DRS studies and the formation of pure NiO is confirmed by FT-IR spectra. The as-prepared NiO nanoparticles show super paramagnetic behavior, when magnetization studies are carried out. It is then evaluated for cytotoxic activity towards A549 cell culture, antibacterial activity and photocatalytic degradation (PCD) of 4‑chlorophenol (4‑CP), which is known as the endocrine disrupting chemical (EDC). From the results, it is found that the cell viability of A549 cells was effectively reduced and it showed better antibacterial activity towards gram positive bacterial strains. It is also proved to be an efficient and stable photocatalyst towards the degradation of 4‑CP. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of aqueous extracts of Achyranthes aspera Linn. on experimental animal model for inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhosale, Uma A; Yegnanarayan, Radha; Pophale, Prachi; Somani, Rahul

    2012-04-01

    Achyranthes aspera is known as Chirchita (Hindi), Apamarga (Sanskrit), Aghedi (Gujarati), Apang (Bengali), Nayurivi (Tamil), Kalalat (Malyalam) and Agadha (Marathi) in our country. It possesses valuable medicinal properties and used in treatment of cough, bronchitis and rheumatism, malarial fever, dysentery, asthma, hypertension and diabetes in Indian folklore. Present study was designed to evaluate anti-inflammatory activity of an aqueous extracts of Achyranthes aspera (AEAA). AEAA leaves and whole plant (i.e. Aqueous extracts of Achyranthes aspera leaves (AEAAL)/Aqueous extracts of A. aspera whole plant (AEAAW) were studied in albino mice using carrageenan induced left hind paw edema. Both extracts were subjected to preliminary phytochemical analysis and acute toxicity of the extracts was also studied using Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development OECD guidelines 423. Acute toxicity study confirmed toxic dose of AEAA to be more than 2,000 mg/kg. Flavonoids, alkaloids, saponins and triterpenoids were the major constituents found in extracts. AEAA reduced the edema induced by carrageenan by 35.71-54.76% on intraperitoneally administration of 400 mg/kg and 800 mg/kg as compared to the untreated control group. Diclofenac sodium at 10 mg/kg inhibited the edema volume by 42.85%. The results indicated that the AEAA 800 mg/kg body weight shows more significant (P < 0.01, P < 0.001) anti-inflammatory activity when compared with the standard and untreated control respectively. Both AEAA exhibit promising anti-inflammatory activity attributed to flavonoids, alkaloids, saponins and triterpenoids phytoconstituents.

  5. Decontamination of dried Phyllanthus niruri (Dokong anak) and Labisa pumila (Kacip Fatimah) using gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ros Anita Ahmad Ramli; Norimah Yusof; Foziah Ali; Zainab Harun

    2010-01-01

    Herbs, spices and dry food ingredients are gamma irradiated to control pest and microorganisms such as bacteria, yeasts and moulds. Irradiation is an effective decontamination method for herbs. Two herbal teas of Phyllanthus niruri (Dokong anak) and Labisa pumila (Kacip Fatimah) bought from a local supplier were selected for the present study. Phyllanthus niruri from Family Euphorbiaceae is native to the tropics. This medicinal herb is found throughout South East Asia and tropical Australia. In Malaysia, it is used to treat diarrhoea, kidney ailment, gonorrhoea, syphilis, urological disorders and taken as tonic after miscarriage and childbirth. Early clinical observations showed that the plant has a great potential as a diuretic, hypotensive and hypoglycaemic drug for humans with no side effects. Labisia pumila is a well known herb for women, which is to induce and ease childbirth and as a post-mortem medication to contract the womb, delay conception, regain body strength, firm up breasts and abdominal muscles. It is also used to treat dysentery, rheumatism and gonorrhoea. The herbal samples were screened for their microbiological quality, including detecting the presence of pathogenic bacteria such as Escherichia coli, Salmonella sp. and other coliforms. The results indicated that the total plate count (TPC) for Phyllanthus niruri and Labisa pumila were 1.44 x 10 9 and 1.39 x 10 6 colonies per g sample, respectively. No pathogenic microbes were detected in both samples. When irradiated with gamma rays using the Gamma cell, the microbial counts decreased with increasing radiation doses. No microbial colonies were detected after irradiation at greater than 10 kGy in both herbal samples. Gamma irradiation of 10 kGy were suggested as the minimum doses for the decontamination of dried preparations of Phyllanthus niruri and Labisa pumila, respectively, to reduce the microbial counts to an acceptable level of 102 colonies per g sample. (author)

  6. Potential nutritional and antioxidant activity of various solvent extracts from leaves and stem bark of Anisophyllea laurina R. Br ex Sabine used in folk medicine

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    Gbago Onivogui

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Anisophyllea laurina is a plant that has been used in folk medicine to treat malaria, dysentery, diabetes, toothache and various skin diseases. Leaves extract had protein content of 9.68% and a high calcium content of 25084.317 mg/100 g while stem bark extract was found to contain greater amounts of calcium (8560.96 mg/100 g, potassium (7649.47 mg/100 g, magnesium (1462.49 mg/100 g and iron (973.33 mg/100 g. Palmitic acid, linolenic acid, linoleic acid and oleic acid were the most abundant fatty acids in leaves and stem bark extracts. Furthermore, total phenolic (2382.39 mg GAE /100 g and total flavonoid (385.79 mg QE/100 g contents were abundant in stem bark while leaves extract was rich in total tannin content (3466.63 mg CE/100 g. However, both leaves and stem bark contained great amounts of vitamins and amino acids were a good source of antioxidant activities. For the individual polyphenol, stenophyllanin A (45.87 mg/g, casuarinin (24.55 mg/g and digalloyl-HHDP-glucopyranose isomer (15.63 mg/g were found to be the major compounds from the leaves whereas procyanidin tetramer (14.89 mg/g, (--Epicatechin (12.18 mg/g and procyanidin trimer (11.25 mg/g were the most predominant compounds from the stem bark. Additionally, the results revealed a significant and strong correlation between phenolic compounds and antioxidant activities.

  7. Consequences of captivity: health effects of far East imprisonment in World War II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, D; Welch, E; Beeching, N J; Gill, G V

    2009-02-01

    Though medical consequences of war attract attention, the health consequences of the prisoner-of-war (POW) experience are poorly researched and appreciated. The imprisonment of Allied military personnel by the Japanese during the World War II provides an especially dramatic POW scenario in terms of deprivation, malnutrition and exposure to tropical diseases. Though predominantly British, these POWs also included troops from Australia, Holland and North America. Imprisonment took place in various locations in Southeast Asia and the Far East for a 3.5-year period between 1942 and 1945. Nutritional deficiency syndromes, dysentery, malaria, tropical ulcers and cholera were major health problems; and supplies of drugs and medical equipment were scarce. There have been limited mortality studies on ex-Far East prisoners (FEPOWs) since repatriation, but these suggest an early (up to 10 years post-release) excess mortality due to tuberculosis, suicides and cirrhosis (probably related to hepatitis B exposure during imprisonment). In terms of morbidity, the commonest has been a psychiatric syndrome which would now be recognized as post-traumatic stress disorder--present in at least one-third of FEPOWs and frequently presenting decades later. Peptic ulceration, osteoarthritis and hearing impairment also appear to occur more frequently. In addition, certain tropical diseases have persisted in these survivors--notably infections with the nematode worm Strongyloides stercoralis. Studies 30 years or more after release have shown overall infection rates of 15%. Chronic strongyloidiasis of this type frequently causes a linear urticarial 'larva currens' rash, but can potentially lead to fatal hyperinfection if immunity is suppressed. Finally, about 5% of FEPOW survivors have chronic nutritional neuropathic syndromes--usually optic atrophy or sensory peripheral neuropathy (often painful). The World War II FEPOW experience was a unique, though often tragic, accidental experiment into

  8. An epidemiological research and risk factor analysis of functional gastroduodenal disorders in a Chinese naval force

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    Bin YAN

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the epidemiology and relative risk factors of functional gastroduodenal disorders (FGD in servicemen of a Chinese naval force. Methods The officers and soldiers in a Chinese naval force were surveyed by multistage stratified random cluster sampling method according to FGID Rome Ⅲ classification and diagnostic criteria. FGD was diagnosed and classified by the international harmonization evaluation method (SA for Rome Ⅲ-DQ. Results 8600 officers and soldiers were included. According to the 7574 valid questionnaires, the incidence of FGD was 16.74%(1268/7574. Among them, the incidence of functional dyspepsia (FD was 9.88%(748/7574, belching 4.48%(339/7574, functional nausea and vomiting 6.62%(501/7574, and adult rumination syndrome 2.38%(180/7574. FGD in naval force was prevalent mainly in 26-35 years old population. A higher incidence was found in persons with higher body mass index (BMI, P<0.05. The incidence in those who had been in military service over 4 years was obviously higher (P<0.05. The incidence was higher in officers than in soldiers (P<0.05. The incidence was higher in administrative staff, military professional personnel, scientific and technical workers, medical practitioners and teachers than that of students and logistic staff (P<0.05. Spicy food, avoidance of certain food, work stress, working in high temperature and extremely hot weather, drinking, noninfectious diarrhea, and history of dysentery might be the most important risk factors, and they showed higher strength of association with the incidence of FGD (P<0.01. Conclusion FGD has a relatively high morbidity rate in naval force population, and it is closely related to dietary habits, working conditions and past history, and attention should be given to this ailment.

  9. In vivo screening platform for shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC using Caenorhabditis elegans as a model.

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    Su-Bin Hwang

    Full Text Available Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC strains are the main cause of bacillary dysentery, although STEC strains generally induce milder disease symptoms compared to Shigella species. This study aimed to determine the virulence of STEC using the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as a model host. Worm killing, fertility and bacterial colonisation assays were performed to examine the potential difference in the virulence of STEC strains compared to that of the control E. coli OP50 strains on which worms were fed. A statistically significant difference in the survival rates of C. elegans was observed in that the STEC strains caused death in 8-10 days and the E. coli OP50 strains caused death in 15 days. STEC strains severely reduced the fertility of the worms. The intestinal load of bacteria in the adult stage nematodes harbouring the E. coli OP50 strains was found to be 3.5 log CFU mL-1. In contrast, the STEC strains E15, E18 and E22 harboured 4.1, 4.2 and 4.7 log CFU ml-1 per nematode, respectively. The heat-killed STEC strains significantly increased the longevity of the worms compared to the non-heated STEC strains. In addition, PCR-based genomic profiling of shiga toxin genes, viz., stx1 and stx2, identified in selected STEC strains revealed that these toxins may be associated with the virulence of the STEC strains. This study demonstrated that C. elegans is an effective model to examine and compare the pathogenicity and virulence variation of STEC strains to that of E. coli OP50 strains.

  10. A review of traditional uses, phytochemistry and pharmacology of Portulaca oleracea L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iranshahy, Milad; Javadi, Behjat; Iranshahi, Mehrdad; Jahanbakhsh, Seyedeh Pardis; Mahyari, Saman; Hassani, Faezeh Vahdati; Karimi, Gholamreza

    2017-06-09

    Portulaca oleracea L. is a widespread medicinal plant that is used not only as an edible plant, but also as a traditional medicine for alleviating a wide spectrum of diseases. It is a well-known plant in the European Traditional Medicine. PA is mentioned by Dioscorides (40-90 CE), with the name of "andrachne". In this study, we provide detailed information on botany, traditional uses, phytochemistry, pharmacological uses, pharmacokinetics and safety of P. oleracea. An extensive search on electronic databases including PubMed, Web of Science, Google Scholar, ScienceDirect, Scopus, conference papers, local herbal encyclopedias, articles, books (in English, French, Arabic, Persian, etc.) and also a number of unpublished handwritten manuscripts was done to find articles have been published between 1956 and 2015 on pharmacology and phytochemistry of P. oleracea. P. oleracea has been addressed in De Materia Medica as an astringent, and a remedy for headaches, inflammation of the eyes and other organs, burning of the stomach, erysipela, disorders of the bladder, numbness of the teeth, excessive sexual desire, burning fevers, worms, dysentery, hemorrhoids, eruptions of blood, and bites. Phytochemical investigations revealed that this plant a wide range of secondary metabolites including alkaloids, terpenoids, flavonoids and organic acids. The most important pharmacological activities are renoprotective activities and effects on metabolism. P. oleracea could successfully decrease blood glucose and lipid profile of patients with metabolic syndrome. The safety of P. oleracea has been reported in many clinical trials. Modern pharmacological studies have now proven many traditional uses of P. oleracea, including anti-hyperglycemic and anti-hyperlipidemic, renoprotective and hepatoprotective effects. In addition, in many clinical trials P. oleracea showed no adverse effects and constipation was reported as the most frequent adverse effect. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd

  11. Leishmanicidal activity of the crude extract, fractions and major piperidine alkaloids from the flowers of Senna spectabilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Albuquerque Melo, Gabriela Muniz; Silva, Marcela Campelo Rodrigues; Guimarães, Thaís Pereira; Pinheiro, Kátia Mantovani; da Matta, Carolina Barbosa Brito; de Queiroz, Aline Cavalcanti; Pivatto, Marcos; Bolzani, Vanderlan da Silva; Alexandre-Moreira, Magna Suzana; Viegas, Claudio

    2014-02-15

    Senna spectabilis (sin. Cassia excelsa, C. spectabilis) is an endemic tree of South America and Africa, very common in Brazil, where it is known as "canafistula-de-besouro" and "cassia-do-nordeste". In folk medicine, this plant is indicated for the treatment of constipation, insomnia, anxiety, epilepsy, malaria, dysentery and headache. Phytopharmacological studies have also confirmed anticonvulsive, sedative, anti-malarial, antimicrobial and cytotoxic properties of many parts of S. spectabilis. In this communication, we present a comparative study of the leishmanicidal activity of the crude ethanolic extract, its fractions and also the two major alkaloidal metabolites (-)-cassine/(-)-spectaline, trying to establish a relationship between the presence of piperidine alkaloidal constituents and leishmanicidal activity. The growth inhibitory effect of promastigote forms of Leishmania major was determined for the crude extract, fractions of the flowers of S. spectabilis and a mixture of (-)-cassine/(-)-spectaline in comparison to pentamidine used as standard drug. The cytotoxic effects were assessed on macrophage strain J774 by lactate dehydrogenase assay. Fractions dichloromethane (FL-DCM) and n-butanol (FL-Bu) and a mixture of (-)-cassine/(-)-spectaline (∼7:3) exhibited significant activity against the parasite Leishmania major (IC50 values of 0.6±0.1 μg/ml, 1.6±0.9 μg/ml and 24.9±1.4 μg/ml, respectively), without toxic effects on murine macrophages. Due to the promising results elicited, further studies in vivo need to be performed to confirm the therapeutic potential of Senna spectabilis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. [Toxicity of the combination of salinomycin and tiamulin in swine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, M; Büsing, S; Bollwahn, W

    1997-09-01

    The toxicity of the combination of salinomycin (sal.) and tiamulin (tia.) was investigated in dependence upon dosage and feeding method. In addition the efficacy of a safe dose for prophylactic treatment of dysentery was controlled. Following feed medications were tested for toxic effects in pigs: a) 3 mg sal. + 5 mg tia./kg BW, b) 3 mg sal. + 3 mg tia./kg BW, c) 3 mg sal. + 1 mg tia./kg BW, d) 3 mg sal./kg BW, e) 10 mg tia./kg BW, f) 30 mg tia./kg BW. The daily dose was given for 2 weeks by restricted feeding (twice a day) either as bolus or mixed in the whole ration or by feeding ad libitum. Animals were controlled for clinical symptoms and activities of creatine phosphokinase (CK) and aspartate aminotransferase (ASAT) were evaluated daily. Main clinical signs of poisoning were loss of appetite and locomotor disturbances and could be noticed for dosages of 8, 6 and 4 mg sal. + tia./kg BW. Activities of CK and ASAT were increased dose-related, the feeding method also had an influence on the degree of intoxication. Some animals showed locomotor disturbances without any corresponding changes of CK and ASAT levels. Single pigs remaining without any symptoms even at high dosage pointed to differences in individual susceptibility. Toxicity was not found to be age dependent. Feed medication with 60 ppm sal. + 20 ppm tia. (feeding ad libitum) did not result in any signs of toxicity, however, the transmission of Serpulina hyodysenteriae from infected pigs to healthy, treated control animals could not be inhibited efficiently. Therefore the simultaneous application of salinomycin and tiamulin should be avoided generally, because the risk of intoxication is high and subtherapeutical dosage has an insufficient effectiveness against Serpulina hyodysenteriae.

  13. Comprehensive Analysis of Tiamulin Metabolites in Various Species of Farm Animals Using Ultra-High-Performance Liquid Chromatography Coupled to Quadrupole/Time-of-Flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Feifei; Yang, Shupeng; Zhang, Huiyan; Zhou, Jinhui; Li, Yi; Zhang, Jinzhen; Jin, Yue; Wang, Zhanhui; Li, Yanshen; Shen, Jianzhong; Zhang, Suxia; Cao, Xingyuan

    2017-01-11

    Tiamulin is an antimicrobial widely used in veterinary practice to treat dysentery and pneumonia in pigs and poultry. However, knowledge about the metabolism of tiamulin is very limited in farm animals. To better understand the biotransformation of tiamulin, in the present study, in vitro and in vivo metabolites of tiamulin in rats, chickens, swine, goats, and cows were identified and elucidated using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole/time-of-flight. As a result, a total of 26 metabolites of tiamulin, identified in vitro and in vivo, and majority of metabolites were revealed for the first time. In all farm animals, tiamulin undergoes phase I metabolic routes of hydroxylation in the mutilin part (the ring system), S-oxidation and N-deethylation on side chain, and no phase II metabolite was detected. Among these, 2β- and 8α-hydroxylation and N-deethylation were the main metabolic pathways of tiamulin in farm animals. In addition, we have put forward that 8a-hydroxy-tiamulin and 8a-hydroxy-N-deethyl-tiamulin could be hydroxylated into 8a-hydroxy-mutilin, the marker residue of tiamulin in swine. Furthermore, a significant interspecies difference was observed on the metabolism of tiamulin among various farm animals. The possible marker residues for tiamulin in swine were 8α-hydroxy-tiamulin, N-deethyl-tiamulin, and 8α-hydroxy-N-deethyl-tiamulin, which were consistent with the hypothesis proposed by the European Agency for the Evaluation of Medicinal Products. However, results in present study indicated that three metabolites (2β-hydroxy-tiamulin, N-deethyl-tiamulin, and 2β-hydroxy-N-deethyl-tiamulin) of tiamulin in chickens had larger yields, which implied that 2β-hydroxy-mutilin or N-deethyl-tiamulin was more likely to be regarded as the potential marker residue of tiamulin in chickens.

  14. Collateral Effects of Antibiotics: Carbadox and Metronidazole Induce VSH-1 and Facilitate Gene Transfer among Brachyspira hyodysenteriae Strains▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Thaddeus B.; Humphrey, Samuel B.; Sharma, Vijay K.; Zuerner, Richard L.

    2008-01-01

    Brachyspira hyodysenteriae is an anaerobic spirochete and the etiologic agent of swine dysentery. The genome of this spirochete contains a mitomycin C-inducible, prophage-like gene transfer agent designated VSH-1. VSH-1 particles package random 7.5-kb fragments of the B. hyodysenteriae genome and transfer genes between B. hyodysenteriae cells. The chemicals and conditions inducing VSH-1 production are largely unknown. Antibiotics used in swine management and stressors inducing traditional prophages might induce VSH-1 and thereby stimulate lateral gene transfer between B. hyodysenteriae cells. In these studies, VSH-1 induction was initially detected by a quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase PCR assay evaluating increased transcription of hvp38 (VSH-1 head protein gene). VSH-1 induction was confirmed by detecting VSH-1-associated 7.5-kb DNA and VSH-1 particles in B. hyodysenteriae cultures. Nine antibiotics (chlortetracycline, lincomycin, tylosin, tiamulin, virginiamycin, ampicillin, ceftriaxone, vancomycin, and florfenicol) at concentrations affecting B. hyodysenteriae growth did not induce VSH-1 production. By contrast, VSH-1 was detected in B. hyodysenteriae cultures treated with mitomycin C (10 μg/ml), carbadox (0.5 μg/ml), metronidazole (0.5 μg/ml), and H2O2 (300 μM). Carbadox- and metronidazole-induced VSH-1 particles transmitted tylosin and chloramphenicol resistance determinants between B. hyodysenteriae strains. The results of these studies suggest that certain antibiotics may induce the production of prophage or prophage-like elements by intestinal bacteria and thereby impact intestinal microbial ecology. PMID:18359835

  15. Hepatic amebiasis

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    Salles José Maria

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Amebiasis can be considered the most aggressive disease of the human intestine, responsible in its invasive form for clinical syndromes, ranging from the classic dysentery of acute colitis to extra-intestinal disease, with emphasis on hepatic amebiasis, unsuitably named amebic liver abscess. Found worldwide, with a high incidence in India, tropical regions of Africa, Mexico and other areas of Central America, it has been frequently reported in Amazonia. The trophozoite reaches the liver through the portal system, provoking enzymatic focal necrosis of hepatocytes and multiple micro-abscesses that coalesce to develop a single lesion whose central cavity contains a homogeneous thick liquid, with typically reddish brown and yellow color similar to "anchovy paste". Right upper quadrant pain, fever and hepatomegaly are the predominant symptoms of hepatic amebiasis. Jaundice is reported in cases with multiple lesions or a very large abscess, and it affects the prognosis adversely. Besides chest radiography, ultrasonography and computerized tomography have brought remarkable contributions to the diagnosis of hepatic abscesses. The conclusive diagnosis is made however by the finding of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites in the pus and by the detection of serum antibodies to the amoeba. During the evolution of hepatic amebiasis, in spite of the availability of highly effective drugs, some important complications may occur with regularity and are a result of local perforation with extension into the pleural and pericardium cavities, causing pulmonary abscesses and purulent pericarditis, respectively The ruptures into the abdominal cavity may lead to subphrenic abscesses and peritonitis. The treatment of hepatic amebiasis is made by medical therapy, with metronidazole as the initial drug, followed by a luminal amebicide. In patients with large abscesses, showing signs of imminent rupture, and especially those who do not respond to medical treatment, a

  16. Hepatic amebiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Maria Salles

    Full Text Available Amebiasis can be considered the most aggressive disease of the human intestine, responsible in its invasive form for clinical syndromes, ranging from the classic dysentery of acute colitis to extra-intestinal disease, with emphasis on hepatic amebiasis, unsuitably named amebic liver abscess. Found worldwide, with a high incidence in India, tropical regions of Africa, Mexico and other areas of Central America, it has been frequently reported in Amazonia. The trophozoite reaches the liver through the portal system, provoking enzymatic focal necrosis of hepatocytes and multiple micro-abscesses that coalesce to develop a single lesion whose central cavity contains a homogeneous thick liquid, with typically reddish brown and yellow color similar to "anchovy paste". Right upper quadrant pain, fever and hepatomegaly are the predominant symptoms of hepatic amebiasis. Jaundice is reported in cases with multiple lesions or a very large abscess, and it affects the prognosis adversely. Besides chest radiography, ultrasonography and computerized tomography have brought remarkable contributions to the diagnosis of hepatic abscesses. The conclusive diagnosis is made however by the finding of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites in the pus and by the detection of serum antibodies to the amoeba. During the evolution of hepatic amebiasis, in spite of the availability of highly effective drugs, some important complications may occur with regularity and are a result of local perforation with extension into the pleural and pericardium cavities, causing pulmonary abscesses and purulent pericarditis, respectively The ruptures into the abdominal cavity may lead to subphrenic abscesses and peritonitis. The treatment of hepatic amebiasis is made by medical therapy, with metronidazole as the initial drug, followed by a luminal amebicide. In patients with large abscesses, showing signs of imminent rupture, and especially those who do not respond to medical treatment, a

  17. Effect of wild-type Shigella species and attenuated Shigella vaccine candidates on small intestinal barrier function, antigen trafficking, and cytokine release.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Fiorentino

    Full Text Available Bacterial dysentery due to Shigella species is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The pathogenesis of Shigella is based on the bacteria's ability to invade and replicate within the colonic epithelium, resulting in severe intestinal inflammatory response and epithelial destruction. Although the mechanisms of pathogenesis of Shigella in the colon have been extensively studied, little is known on the effect of wild-type Shigella on the small intestine and the role of the host response in the development of the disease. Moreover, to the best of our knowledge no studies have described the effects of apically administered Shigella flexneri 2a and S. dysenteriae 1 vaccine strains on human small intestinal enterocytes. The aim of this study was to assess the coordinated functional and immunological human epithelial responses evoked by strains of Shigella and candidate vaccines on small intestinal enterocytes. To model the interactions of Shigella with the intestinal mucosa, we apically exposed monolayers of human intestinal Caco2 cells to increasing bacterial inocula. We monitored changes in paracellular permeability, examined the organization of tight-junctions and the pro-inflammatory response of epithelial cells. Shigella infection of Caco2 monolayers caused severe mucosal damage, apparent as a drastic increase in paracellular permeability and disruption of tight junctions at the cell-cell boundary. Secretion of pro-inflammatory IL-8 was independent of epithelial barrier dysfunction. Shigella vaccine strains elicited a pro-inflammatory response without affecting the intestinal barrier integrity. Our data show that wild-type Shigella infection causes a severe alteration of the barrier function of a small intestinal cell monolayer (a proxy for mucosa and might contribute (along with enterotoxins to the induction of watery diarrhea. Diarrhea may be a mechanism by which the host attempts to eliminate harmful bacteria and transport them

  18. The inhibitory effect of Mesembryanthemum edule (L.) bolus essential oil on some pathogenic fungal isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Mesembryanthemum edule is a medicinal plant which has been indicated by Xhosa traditional healers in the treatment HIV associated diseases such as tuberculosis, dysentery, diabetic mellitus, laryngitis, mouth infections, ringworm eczema and vaginal infections. The investigation of the essential oil of this plant could help to verify the rationale behind the use of the plant as a cure for these illnesses. Methods The essential oil from M. edule was analysed by GC/MS. Concentration ranging from 0.005 - 5 mg/ml of the hydro-distilled essential oil was tested against some fungal strains, using micro-dilution method. The plant minimum inhibitory activity on the fungal strains was determined. Result GC/MS analysis of the essential oil resulted in the identification of 28 compounds representing 99.99% of the total essential oil. A total amount of 10.6 and 36.61% constituents were obtained as monoterpenes and oxygenated monoterpenes. The amount of sesquiterpene hydrocarbons (3.58%) was low compared to the oxygenated sesquiterpenes with pick area of 9.28%. Total oil content of diterpenes and oxygenated diterpenes detected from the essential oil were 1.43% and 19.24%. The fatty acids and their methyl esters content present in the essential oil extract were found to be 19.25%. Antifungal activity of the essential oil extract tested against the pathogenic fungal, inhibited C. albican, C. krusei, C. rugosa, C. glabrata and C. neoformans with MICs range of 0.02-0.31 mg/ml. the activity of the essential oil was found competing with nystatin and amphotericin B used as control. Conclusion Having accounted the profile chemical constituent found in M. edule oil and its important antifungal properties, we consider that its essential oil might be useful in pharmaceutical and food industry as natural antibiotic and food preservative. PMID:24885234

  19. Advanced Chemical Reduction of Reduced Graphene Oxide and Its Photocatalytic Activity in Degrading Reactive Black 5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christelle Pau Ping Wong

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Textile industries consume large volumes of water for dye processing, leading to undesirable toxic dyes in water bodies. Dyestuffs are harmful to human health and aquatic life, and such illnesses as cholera, dysentery, hepatitis A, and hinder the photosynthetic activity of aquatic plants. To overcome this environmental problem, the advanced oxidation process is a promising technique to mineralize a wide range of dyes in water systems. In this work, reduced graphene oxide (rGO was prepared via an advanced chemical reduction route, and its photocatalytic activity was tested by photodegrading Reactive Black 5 (RB5 dye in aqueous solution. rGO was synthesized by dispersing the graphite oxide into the water to form a graphene oxide (GO solution followed by the addition of hydrazine. Graphite oxide was prepared using a modified Hummers’ method by using potassium permanganate and concentrated sulphuric acid. The resulted rGO nanoparticles were characterized using ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry (UV-Vis, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD, Raman, and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM to further investigate their chemical properties. A characteristic peak of rGO-48 h (275 cm−1 was observed in the UV spectrum. Further, the appearance of a broad peak (002, centred at 2θ = 24.1°, in XRD showing that graphene oxide was reduced to rGO. Based on our results, it was found that the resulted rGO-48 h nanoparticles achieved 49% photodecolorization of RB5 under UV irradiation at pH 3 in 60 min. This was attributed to the high and efficient electron transport behaviors of rGO between aromatic regions of rGO and RB5 molecules.

  20. A review on the elemental contents of Pakistani medicinal plants: Implications for folk medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Muhammad Abdul; Adnan, Muhammad; Begum, Shaheen; Azizullah, Azizullah; Nazir, Ruqia; Iram, Shazia

    2016-07-21

    Substantially, plants produce chemicals such as primary and secondary metabolites, which have significant applications in modern therapy. Indigenous people mostly rely on traditional medicines derived from medicinal plants. These plants have the capacity to absorb a variety of toxic elements. The ingestion of such plants for medicinal purpose can have imperative side effects. Hence, with regard to the toxicological consideration of medicinal plants, an effort has been made to review the elemental contents of ethno medicinally important plants of Pakistan and to highlight the existing gaps in knowledge of the safety and efficacy of traditional herbal medications. Literature related to the elemental contents of ethno medicinal plants was acquired by utilizing electronic databases. We reviewed only macro-elemental and trace elemental contents of 69 medicinal plant taxa, which are traditionally used in Pakistan for the treatment of sundry ailments, including anemia, jaundice, cancer, piles, diarrhea, dysentery, headache, diabetes, asthma, blood purification, sedative and ulcer. A majority of plants showed elemental contents above the permissible levels as recommended by the World health organization (WHO). As an example, the concentrations of Cadmium (Cd) and Lead (Pb) were reportedly found higher than the WHO permissible levels in 43 and 42 medicinal plants, respectively. More specifically, the concentrations of Pb (54ppm: Silybum marianum) and Cd (5.25ppm: Artemisia herba-alba) were found highest in the Asteraceae family. The reported medicinal plants contain a higher amount of trace and toxic elements. Intake of these plants as traditional medicines may trigger the accumulation of trace and toxic elements in human bodies, which can cause different types of diseases. Thus, a clear understanding about the nature of toxic substances and factors affecting their concentrations in traditional medicines are essential prerequisites for efficacious herbal therapeutics with

  1. Ethnomedical and ethnobotanical investigations on the response capacities of Guinean traditional health practioners in the management of outbreaks of infectious diseases: The case of the Ebola virus epidemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldé, A M; Traoré, M S; Baldé, M A; Barry, M S; Diallo, A; Camara, M; Traoré, S; Kouyaté, M; Traoré, S; Ouo-Ouo, S; Myanthé, A L; Keita, N; Haba, N L; Goumou, K; Bah, F; Camara, A; Diallo, M S T; Sylla, M; Baldé, E S; Diané, S; Pieters, L; Oularé, K

    2016-04-22

    The recent outbreak of Ebola virus infections has mostly remained confined to the West African countries Guinea-Conakry, Sierra-Leone and Liberia. Due to intense national and international mobilizations, a significant reduction in Ebola virus transmission has been recorded. While international efforts focus on new vaccines, medicines and diagnostics, no coherent national or international approach exists to integrate the potential of the traditional health practitioners (THPs) in the management of infectious diseases epidemics. Nevertheless, the first contact of most of the Ebola infected patients is with the THPs since the symptoms are similar to those of common traditionally treated diseases or symptoms such as malaria, hemorrhagic syndrome, typhoid or other gastrointestinal diseases, fever and vomiting. In an ethnomedical survey conducted in the 4 main Guinean regions contacts were established with a total of 113 THPs. The socio-demographic characteristics, the professional status and the traditional perception of Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) were recorded. The traditional treatment of the main symptoms was based on 47 vegetal recipes which were focused on the treatment of diarrhea (22 recipes), fever (22 recipes), vomiting (2 recipes), external antiseptic (2 recipes), hemorrhagic syndrome (2 recipes), convulsion and dysentery (one recipe each). An ethnobotanical survey led to the collection of 54 plant species from which 44 identified belonging to 26 families. The most represented families were Euphorbiaceae, Caesalpiniaceae and Rubiaceae. Literature data on the twelve most cited plant species tends to corroborate their traditional use and to highlight their pharmacological potential. It is worth to document all available knowledge on the traditional management of EVD-like symptoms in order to evaluate systematically the anti-Ebola potential of Guinean plant species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Vertebrates used for medicinal purposes by members of the Nyishi and Galo tribes in Arunachal Pradesh (North-East India).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravorty, Jharna; Meyer-Rochow, V Benno; Ghosh, Sampat

    2011-03-31

    Arunachal Pradesh, the easternmost part of India, is endowed with diverse natural resources and inhabited by a variety of ethnic groups that have developed skills to exploit the biotic resources of the region for food and medicines. Information on animals and animal parts as components of folk remedies used by local healers and village headmen of the Nyishi and Galo tribes in their respective West Siang and Subansiri districts were obtained through interviews and structured questionnaires. Of a total of 36 vertebrate species used in treatments of ailments and diseases, mammals comprised 50%; they were followed by birds (22%), fishes (17%), reptiles (8%) and amphibians (3%). Approximately 20 common complaints of humans as well as foot and mouth disease of cattle were targets of zootherapies. Most commonly treated were fevers, body aches and pains, tuberculosis, malaria, wounds and burns, typhoid, smallpox, dysentery and diarrhoea, jaundice, and early pregnancy pains. Very few domestic animal species (e.g., goat and cattle) were used zootherapeutically. More frequently it was wild animals, including endangered or protective species like hornbill, pangolin, clouded leopard, tiger, bear, and wolf, whose various parts were either used in folk remedies or as food. Some of the animal-based traditional medicines or animal parts were sold at local markets, where they had to compete with modern, western pharmaceuticals. To record, document, analyze and test the animal-derived local medicines before they become replaced by western products is one challenge; to protect the already dwindling populations of certain wild animal species used as a resource for the traditional animal-derived remedies, is another.

  3. Antimicrobial Susceptibility Patterns of Brachyspira Species Isolated in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Jih-Ching; Lo, Dan-Yuan; Chang, Shao-Kuang; Kuo, Hung-Chih

    2018-03-13

    Some members of the Brachyspira genus cause diseases such as swine dysentery (SD) and porcine intestinal (or colonic) spirochetosis. Severe economic losses are caused by decreased feed intake and increased feed conversion ratio, as well as costs associated with treatment and death. A loss of clinical efficacy of some antimicrobial agents authorized for treating SD has been observed in many countries. The aim of this study was to analyze the antimicrobial susceptibility of Brachyspira isolated from Taiwan and to investigate the mechanism of decreased susceptibility to macrolides. A total of 55 Brachyspira isolates obtained from the grower-finisher period were evaluated in this study. These isolates included B. hyodysenteriae (n = 37), B. murdochii (n = 11), B. pilosicoli (n = 5), B. intermedia (n = 1), and B. innocens (n = 1). Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed to examine 12 selected antimicrobial agents. The results showed that the 50% and 90% minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of the tested macrolides were all >256 μg/ml. The MIC 50 of lincomycin, tiamulin, carbadox, olaquindox, ampicillin, amoxicillin, doxycycline, oxytetracycline, and gentamicin were 32, 1, ≤0.125, ≤0.125, 0.5, 0.25, 2, 2, and 2 μg/ml. The genetic basis of the decreased susceptibility to tylosin and lincomycin in Brachyspira spp. was investigated and the results showed a possible connection to the mutations at position A2058 and G2032 of the 23S rRNA gene. These findings demonstrated that, in Taiwan, there may be a decrease in susceptibility of Brachyspira spp. to antimicrobials commonly used for the treatment of SD.

  4. Quality of groundwater resources in Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayat, Ehsanullah; Baba, Alper

    2017-07-01

    Water is the main source of energy production and economy in Afghanistan where agriculture accounts for more than 50% of the country's gross domestic product (GDP). Access to safe drinking water is still a problem in the country, which has caused different health issues and even child mortality especially in rural areas. Groundwater is the main source of drinking water in the country. However, little knowledge is available about the quality of groundwater throughout the entire country, and its quality has not been investigated extensively yet like in other countries in the world. While most people think that consuming groundwater is a reliable and safe source of drinking water for health, the United Nations (UN) agencies report various kinds of waterborne diseases and even child mortalities due to drinking water quality in the country. In this article, significant geogenic and anthropogenic factors that play a vital role in groundwater contamination of the country are identified and explained. Different geogenic contaminations such as arsenic, fluoride, sulfate, and boron occur in several areas of Afghanistan that have a direct effect on human health. The water quality mapping for Afghanistan is completed for half of the country, which shows that groundwater is plagued by high levels of fluoride and arsenic in some areas. The water quality mapping of the other half of the country cannot be completed due to security concerns currently. Also, there are different kinds of waterborne diseases such as diarrhea, cholera, and dysentery that can be seen in different parts of the country because of anthropogenic activities which continuously deteriorate groundwater.

  5. Status of water pollution in relation to industrialization in Rajasthan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajput, Ritu Singh; Pandey, Sonali; Bhadauria, Seema

    2017-09-26

    India is a large and densely populated country; its economy is largely agricultural. Making the best use of the country's manpower has always posed a challenge. Industrialization could become a dominant component of the economy and displace agriculture. Traditional livelihoods of occupational groups are threatened by the practice of disposing untreated industrial waste into rivers and bodies of water. These uncontrolled disposals impact local natural resources with negative long-term effects. Industrialization is the development of intellectual and financial trade that changes a predominantly rustic culture into a modern one. Many industrial units discharge wastewater locally without treatment. Many industries directly discharged their waste into lakes, rivers and ocean. Water contamination impacts the environment. Pesticides, chemical, waste oil and heavy metals are regularly transported into their waters. Humans and other living organisms can accumulate heavy metals from industrial discharges in their tissues. Industrial waste may be reactive, corrosive, flammable, or toxic. When untreated sewage is emptied into rivers, it causes diseases like typhoid, dysentery and cholera. Natural elements and plant supplements like nitrate and phosphates stimulate growth of algae on the water surface. The algae reduce the oxygen in the water and cause eutrophication. It is harmful to the water ecosystem. In Rajasthan proper, there are a number of sites bordering rivers and lakes where the pace of industrialization has proceeded far beyond the ability of regulators to establish and enforce meaningful limits on the amount of point source pollution permitted to the various industrial complexes, which include cement, chemical, fertilizer, textile, mining, quarrying, dyeing and printing facilities. The scale of the problem is obvious to the casual observer, but actual documentation of the total impact remains to be done.

  6. Vertebrates used for medicinal purposes by members of the Nyishi and Galo tribes in Arunachal Pradesh (North-East India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyer-Rochow V

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Arunachal Pradesh, the easternmost part of India, is endowed with diverse natural resources and inhabited by a variety of ethnic groups that have developed skills to exploit the biotic resources of the region for food and medicines. Information on animals and animal parts as components of folk remedies used by local healers and village headmen of the Nyishi and Galo tribes in their respective West Siang and Subansiri districts were obtained through interviews and structured questionnaires. Of a total of 36 vertebrate species used in treatments of ailments and diseases, mammals comprised 50%; they were followed by birds (22%, fishes (17%, reptiles (8% and amphibians (3%. Approximately 20 common complaints of humans as well as foot and mouth disease of cattle were targets of zootherapies. Most commonly treated were fevers, body aches and pains, tuberculosis, malaria, wounds and burns, typhoid, smallpox, dysentery and diarrhoea, jaundice, and early pregnancy pains. Very few domestic animal species (e.g., goat and cattle were used zootherapeutically. More frequently it was wild animals, including endangered or protective species like hornbill, pangolin, clouded leopard, tiger, bear, and wolf, whose various parts were either used in folk remedies or as food. Some of the animal-based traditional medicines or animal parts were sold at local markets, where they had to compete with modern, western pharmaceuticals. To record, document, analyze and test the animal-derived local medicines before they become replaced by western products is one challenge; to protect the already dwindling populations of certain wild animal species used as a resource for the traditional animal-derived remedies, is another.

  7. Presence and mechanisms of acquired antimicrobial resistance in Belgian Brachyspira hyodysenteriae isolates belonging to different clonal complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahu, M; Pasmans, F; Vranckx, K; De Pauw, N; Vande Maele, L; Vyt, Philip; Vandersmissen, Tamara; Martel, A; Haesebrouck, F; Boyen, F

    2017-08-01

    Swine dysentery (SD) is an economically important disease for which antimicrobial treatment still occupies an important place to control outbreaks. However, acquired antimicrobial resistance is increasingly observed in Brachyspira hyodysenteriae. In this study, the Minimal Inhibitory Concentrations (MIC) of six antimicrobial compounds for 30 recent Belgian B. hyodysenteriae isolates were determined using a broth microdilution method. In addition, relevant regions of the 16S rRNA, 23S rRNA and the L3 protein encoding genes were sequenced to reveal mutations associated with acquired resistance. Finally, a phylogeny was reconstructed using minimal spanning tree analysis of multi locus sequence typing of the isolates. For lincomycin, doxycycline, tylosin and tylvalosin, at least 70% of the isolates did not belong to the wild-type population and were considered to have acquired resistance. For valnemulin and tiamulin, this was over 50%. In all isolates with acquired resistance to doxycycline, the G1058C mutation was present in their 16S rRNA gene. All isolates showing acquired resistance to lincomycin and both macrolides displayed the A2058T mutation in their 23S rRNA gene. Other mutations in this gene and the N148S mutation in the L3 protein were present in both wild-type isolates and isolates considered to have acquired resistance. Multi locus sequence analysis revealed a previously undescribed clonal complex, with 4 novel sequence types in which the majority of isolates showed acquired resistance to all tested antimicrobial products. In conclusion, acquired antimicrobial resistance is widespread among Belgian B. hyodysenteriae isolates. The emergence of multi-resistant clonal complexes can pose a threat to swine industry. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Antibacterial screening of Rumex species native to the Carpathian Basin and bioactivity-guided isolation of compounds from Rumex aquaticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orbán-Gyapai, Orsolya; Liktor-Busa, Erika; Kúsz, Norbert; Stefkó, Dóra; Urbán, Edit; Hohmann, Judit; Vasas, Andrea

    2017-04-01

    Plants belonging to the genus Rumex (family Polygonaceae) are used worldwide in traditional medicine for the treatment of various diseases caused by different microorganisms (e.g. bacteria-related dermatologic conditions, dysentery and enteritis). The present study focused on the antibacterial screening of Rumex species native to the Carpathian Basin, and isolation of compounds from one of the most efficient species, Rumex aquaticus. The antibacterial effects of n-hexane, chloroform and aqueous fractions of methanol extracts prepared from different parts of 14 Rumex species (R. acetosella, R. acetosa, R. alpinus, R. aquaticus, R. conglomeratus, R. crispus, R. hydrolapathum, R. obtusifolius subsp. obtusifolius, R. obtusifolius subsp. subalpinus, R. patientia, R. pulcher, R. scutatus, R. stenophyllus and R. thyrsiflorus) were investigated against Staphylococcus epidermidis, S. aureus, MRSA, Bacillus subtilis, Moraxella catarrhalis, Streptococcus pyogenes, S. pneumoniae, S. agalactiae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae using the disc diffusion method. Mainly the n-hexane and chloroform extracts prepared from the roots of the plants displayed high antibacterial activity (inhibition zones>15mm) against one or more bacterial strains. The highly active extracts of the aerial part and root of R. aquaticus were subjected to a multistep separation procedure. 19 Compounds, among them naphthalenes (musizin, and its glucoside, torachrysone-glucoside, 2-methoxystypandrone), anthraquinones (emodin, chrysophanol, physcion, citreorosein, chrysophanol-8-O-glucoside), flavonoids (quercetin, quercetin-3,3'-dimethylether, isokaempferide, quercetin 3-O-arabinoside, quercetin 3-O-galactoside, catechin), stilbenes (resveratrol, piceid), and 1-stearoylglycerol were isolated from the plant. The antibacterial activities of isolated compounds were determined, and it was observed that especially naphthalenes exerted remarkable antibacterial effects against

  9. [Harmful practices affecting women's health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-07-01

    The harmful practices discussed in this article are based on case histories form the Central Maternity in Niamey, yet these practices universally affect women throughout Africa. Nutritional taboos are aimed at certain diseases such as measles, diarrhea, dysentery, malnutrition and anemia and consumption of foods rich in proteins and lipids are forbidden. Children are forbidden from eating eggs; pregnant women are forbidden from eating fruits and vegetables because of the fear of hemorrhaging from the sugar content in the fruit; camel meat is forbidden for fear of extending the pregnancy. Female circumcision, a dangerous practice, especially during childbirth, causes many medical problems that remain permanent. Adolescent pregnancy and marriages are practiced to avoid delinquency among children; yet such practices take place because of arranged marriages for a dowry to young men or to older rich men and these forced marriages to adolescents are the causes of increases in divorce, prostitution and desertion. These young marriages have serious consequences on the health status of the mother and the infant, often leading to maternal and infant death. The high level of fertility in Niger is a response to the social structure of the family. It is a patrilineal system that encourages women to have many children, especially sons. In Niger, pregnancy is surrounded by supernatural and mysterious forces, where a child is the intervention for ancestral spirits. In Islam a child is considered a "Gift of God". A woman is expected to work until the delivery of her baby otherwise she is jeered by her neighbors. During delivery women are not expected to cry or show any pain for fear of dishonoring her family irregardless of any medical compilations she faces. Women in Africa are exploited as free labor, deteriorate and age rapidly, are generally illiterate and are not protected under any laws.

  10. Oligomeric states of the Shigella translocator protein IpaB provide structural insights into formation of the type III secretion translocon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickenson, Nicholas E; Choudhari, Shyamal P; Adam, Philip R; Kramer, Ryan M; Joshi, Sangeeta B; Middaugh, C Russell; Picking, Wendy L; Picking, William D

    2013-01-01

    The Shigella flexneri Type III secretion system (T3SS) senses contact with human intestinal cells and injects effector proteins that promote pathogen entry as the first step in causing life threatening bacillary dysentery (shigellosis). The Shigella Type III secretion apparatus (T3SA) consists of an anchoring basal body, an exposed needle, and a temporally assembled tip complex. Exposure to environmental small molecules recruits IpaB, the first hydrophobic translocator protein, to the maturing tip complex. IpaB then senses contact with a host cell membrane, forming the translocon pore through which effectors are delivered to the host cytoplasm. Within the bacterium, IpaB exists as a heterodimer with its chaperone IpgC; however, IpaB's structural state following secretion is unknown due to difficulties isolating stable protein. We have overcome this by coexpressing the IpaB/IpgC heterodimer and isolating IpaB by incubating the complex in mild detergents. Interestingly, preparation of IpaB with n-octyl-oligo-oxyethylene (OPOE) results in the assembly of discrete oligomers while purification in N,N-dimethyldodecylamine N-oxide (LDAO) maintains IpaB as a monomer. In this study, we demonstrate that IpaB tetramers penetrate phospholipid membranes to allow a size-dependent release of small molecules, suggesting the formation of discrete pores. Monomeric IpaB also interacts with liposomes but fails to disrupt them. From these and additional findings, we propose that IpaB can exist as a tetramer having inherent flexibility, which allows it to cooperatively interact with and insert into host cell membranes. This event may then lay the foundation for formation of the Shigella T3SS translocon pore. PMID:23456854

  11. Binding Affects the Tertiary and Quaternary Structures of the Shigella Translocator Protein IpaB and its Chaperone IpgC†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Philip R.; Patil, Mrinalini K.; Dickenson, Nicholas E.; Choudhari, Shyamal; Barta, Michael; Geisbrecht, Brian V.; Picking, Wendy L.; Picking, William D.

    2012-01-01

    Shigella flexneri uses its type III secretion system (T3SS) to promote invasion of human intestinal epithelial cells as the first step in causing shigellosis, a life threatening form of dysentery. The Shigella type III secretion apparatus (T3SA) consists of a basal body that spans the bacterial envelope and an exposed needle that injects effector proteins into target cells. The nascent Shigella T3SA needle is topped with a pentamer of the needle tip protein invasion plasmid antigen D (IpaD). Bile salts trigger recruitment of the first hydrophobic translocator protein, IpaB, to the tip complex where it senses contact with a host membrane. In the bacterial cytoplasm, IpaB exists in a complex with its chaperone IpgC. Several structures of IpgC have been solved and we recently reported the 2.1-Å crystal structure of the N-terminal domain (IpaB74.224) of IpaB. Like IpgC, the IpaB N-terminal domain exists as a homodimer in solution. We now report that when the two are mixed, these homodimers dissociate and form heterodimers having a nanomolar dissociation constant. This is consistent with the equivalent complexes co-purified after being co-expressed in E. coli. Fluorescence data presented here also indicate that the N-terminal domain of IpaB possesses two regions that appear to contribute additively to chaperone binding. It is also likely that the IpaB N terminus adopts an alternative conformation as a result of chaperone binding. The importance of these findings within the functional context of these proteins is discussed. PMID:22497344

  12. Evaluation of antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiulcer properties of Vaccinium leschenaultii Wight: A therapeutic supplement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poornima Nagulsamy

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In folklore systems of medicine, bilberry fruit and leaf extracts have been used for the treatment of diarrhoea, dysentery, diabetes, inflammation, and ulcer. The present study was to determine antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiulcerogenic activities of Vaccinium leschenaultii Wight leaf and fruit. The phenolic, tannin, and flavonoid contents of V. leschenaultii leaf and fruit were quantified and were subjected to assess their antioxidant potential using various in vitro systems such as 1, 1 diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl, 2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid radical scavenging, phosphomolybdenum, and ferric reducing antioxidant power reduction activities. Based on the antioxidant potential, acetone and methanol extracts of leaf and fruit were used to evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity and protective effect against ethanol-induced gastric damage in a rat model. The quantification of secondary metabolites shows that the phenolic, flavonoid, and tannin contents are higher in methanol extracts of fruit and leaf. The results of antioxidant assays exhibited that the methanol extracts of leaf possesses better 1, 1 diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging and ferric reducing power activity. Oral administration of the acetone fruit and leaf extracts of V. leschenaultii were capable of reducing the edema formation in rats against carrageenan and egg albumin induced inflammation. Moreover, leaf and fruit acetone extracts at the dose of 400 mg/kg highly inhibited ulcer formation. The study concluded that the plant substances such as total phenols, flavonoids along with appreciable antioxidant potential could be the supportive evidence to prove both the anti-inflammatory and antiulcer activities of V. leschenaultii. The traditional importance of this plant will help to reveal the potential of plant to provide alternative phytotherapeutics for human health.

  13. Predictors of stunting and thinness in post-menarcheal adolescent girls in rural Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rah, Jee H; Christian, Parul; Shamim, Abu Ahmed; Arju, Ummeh T; Labrique, Alain B; Rashid, Mahbubur

    2009-12-01

    To assess the nutritional status and risk factors of undernutrition in post-menarcheal girls in rural northern Bangladesh. Cross-sectional data on anthropometric measurements, dietary intake, work activity, morbidity and socio-economic status were collected from 12- to 19-year-old primigravidae (n 209) and never-pregnant adolescents (n 456) matched on age and time since menarche. Multiple regression analyses were conducted to determine predictors of stunting, thinness, upper-arm muscle (UAMZ) and fat area Z-scores (UAFZ) among the adolescent girls. A large proportion of adolescents (49 %) were stunted (height-for-age Z-score <-2) and underweight (40 %; weight-for-age Z-score <-2), but not thin (BMI-for-age <5th percentile; approximately 10 %). The mean (sd) UAMZ and UAFZ of the adolescent girls was -0.3 (0.64) and -0.9 (0.40), respectively. Lean mass increased whereas fat mass declined with age. Both stunting and thinness were positively associated with age and time since menarche (P < 0.05). Young age (12-14 years) and literacy were protective against stunting among pregnant adolescents (OR = 0.29, 95 % CI 0.09, 0.88 and OR = 0.50, 95 % CI 0.26, 0.96, respectively). Having symptoms of diarrhoea or dysentery (OR = 7.40, 95 % CI 1.43, 38.29) predicted thinness and was associated with lower UAMZ and UAFZ among never-pregnant girls (both P < 0.05). Performing light-to-moderate activities was protective against thinness among never-pregnant girls (OR = 0.43, 95 % CI 0.22, 0.82), whereas pregnant adolescents who performed high levels of strenuous activities had greater UAMZ (P < 0.05). Undernutrition was widespread among this post-menarcheal adolescent population. Younger and literate adolescents were less likely to be stunted, whereas thinness and body composition were associated with morbidity and work activity.

  14. An O antigen capsule modulates bacterial pathogenesis in Shigella sonnei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caboni, Mariaelena; Pédron, Thierry; Rossi, Omar; Goulding, David; Pickard, Derek; Citiulo, Francesco; MacLennan, Calman A; Dougan, Gordon; Thomson, Nicholas R; Saul, Allan; Sansonetti, Philippe J; Gerke, Christiane

    2015-03-01

    Shigella is the leading cause for dysentery worldwide. Together with several virulence factors employed for invasion, the presence and length of the O antigen (OAg) of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) plays a key role in pathogenesis. S. flexneri 2a has a bimodal OAg chain length distribution regulated in a growth-dependent manner, whereas S. sonnei LPS comprises a monomodal OAg. Here we reveal that S. sonnei, but not S. flexneri 2a, possesses a high molecular weight, immunogenic group 4 capsule, characterized by structural similarity to LPS OAg. We found that a galU mutant of S. sonnei, that is unable to produce a complete LPS with OAg attached, can still assemble OAg material on the cell surface, but a galU mutant of S. flexneri 2a cannot. High molecular weight material not linked to the LPS was purified from S. sonnei and confirmed by NMR to contain the specific sugars of the S. sonnei OAg. Deletion of genes homologous to the group 4 capsule synthesis cluster, previously described in Escherichia coli, abolished the generation of the high molecular weight OAg material. This OAg capsule strongly affects the virulence of S. sonnei. Uncapsulated knockout bacteria were highly invasive in vitro and strongly inflammatory in the rabbit intestine. But, the lack of capsule reduced the ability of S. sonnei to resist complement-mediated killing and to spread from the gut to peripheral organs. In contrast, overexpression of the capsule decreased invasiveness in vitro and inflammation in vivo compared to the wild type. In conclusion, the data indicate that in S. sonnei expression of the capsule modulates bacterial pathogenesis resulting in balanced capabilities to invade and persist in the host environment.

  15. An O antigen capsule modulates bacterial pathogenesis in Shigella sonnei.

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    Mariaelena Caboni

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Shigella is the leading cause for dysentery worldwide. Together with several virulence factors employed for invasion, the presence and length of the O antigen (OAg of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS plays a key role in pathogenesis. S. flexneri 2a has a bimodal OAg chain length distribution regulated in a growth-dependent manner, whereas S. sonnei LPS comprises a monomodal OAg. Here we reveal that S. sonnei, but not S. flexneri 2a, possesses a high molecular weight, immunogenic group 4 capsule, characterized by structural similarity to LPS OAg. We found that a galU mutant of S. sonnei, that is unable to produce a complete LPS with OAg attached, can still assemble OAg material on the cell surface, but a galU mutant of S. flexneri 2a cannot. High molecular weight material not linked to the LPS was purified from S. sonnei and confirmed by NMR to contain the specific sugars of the S. sonnei OAg. Deletion of genes homologous to the group 4 capsule synthesis cluster, previously described in Escherichia coli, abolished the generation of the high molecular weight OAg material. This OAg capsule strongly affects the virulence of S. sonnei. Uncapsulated knockout bacteria were highly invasive in vitro and strongly inflammatory in the rabbit intestine. But, the lack of capsule reduced the ability of S. sonnei to resist complement-mediated killing and to spread from the gut to peripheral organs. In contrast, overexpression of the capsule decreased invasiveness in vitro and inflammation in vivo compared to the wild type. In conclusion, the data indicate that in S. sonnei expression of the capsule modulates bacterial pathogenesis resulting in balanced capabilities to invade and persist in the host environment.

  16. Ekiri syndrome: a report of 13 cases

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    Rahbarimanesh AA

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Ekiri syndrome or lethal toxic encephalopathy is a complication of shigellosis with dysentery, hyperpyrexia, seizures, headache and altered level of consiousness, which rapidly progresses to death. These children die at the beginning of the disease (8-48 hours from the beginning of symptoms, from brain edema. However they had no symptoms or signs of sepsis, dehydration, DIC or Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS. "nMethods: This survey is a case series study of children with Ekiri syndrome in Bahrami hospital from October 1998-2008 presented with loss of consciousness, colitis and high fever shortly after admission. Information about the patients was gathered from the documents according to physical signs and symptoms, lab data of those whom Ekiri syndrome had been diagnosed for them. Studied variables in this assessment were age, sex, fever, convulsions and loss of consciousness. Headache, encephalopathy, dehydration, elevated ICP, colitis, underline disease, stool, blood and CSF cultures. "nResults: The subjects contain 13 cases (10 male, 3 female, averaged 30/5 months of age. All had seizure, elevated ICP, encephalopathy and coma. All of the patients had fever between 39 and 40, averaged 39.5 degree of centigrade. Seven patients had headache and three ones was dehydrated. The first presentation symptom in three patients was gastroenteritis, in 9 was siezure and in 1 patient was headache. Stool culture in all patients was positive, but blood culture was positive in only one of them. CSF culture was negative in all of the patients. Mortality was 100%. "nConclusion: Symptoms, signs and presentation of Ekiri syndrome, a rare complication of infection with shigella, in the patients in Bahrami hospital was similar with the other studies beforehand in other countries. In this study, all the patients were died and supportive treatments were ineffective.

  17. Preliminary insights into the impact of dietary starch on the ciliate, Neobalantidium coli, in captive chimpanzees.

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    Kateřina Schovancová

    Full Text Available Infections caused by the intestinal ciliate Neobalantidium coli are asymptomatic in most hosts. In humans and captive African great apes clinical infections occasionally occur, manifested mainly by dysentery; however, factors responsible for development of clinical balantidiasis have not been fully clarified. We studied the effect of dietary starch on the intensities of infection by N. coli in two groups of captive chimpanzees. Adult chimpanzees infected by N. coli from the Hodonín Zoo and from the Brno Zoo, Czech Republic, were fed with a high starch diet (HSD (average 14.7% of starch for 14 days, followed by a five-day transition period and subsequently with a period of low starch diet (LoSD (average 0.1% of starch for another 14 days. We collected fecal samples during the last seven days of HSD and LoSD and fixed them in 10% formalin. We quantified trophozoites of N. coli using the FLOTAC method. The numbers of N. coli trophozoites were higher during the HSD (mean ± SD: 49.0 ± 134.7 than during the LoSD (3.5 ± 6.8. A generalized linear mixed-effects model revealed significantly lower numbers of the N. coli trophozoites in the feces during the LoSD period in comparison to the HSD period (treatment contrast LoSD vs. HSD: 2.7 ± 0.06 (SE, z = 47.7; p<<0.001. We conclude that our data provide a first indication that starch-rich diet might be responsible for high intensities of infection of N. coli in captive individuals and might predispose them for clinically manifested balantidiasis. We discuss the potential nutritional modifications to host diets that can be implemented in part to control N. coli infections.

  18. Optimization of fixed titanium dioxide film on PET bottles and visual indicator for water disinfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heredia-Munoz, Manuel Antonio

    Water is perhaps the most important resource that sustains human life. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), almost two billion people do not have access to the required water that is needed to satisfy their daily needs and one billion do not have access to clean sources of water for consumption, most of them living in isolated and poor areas around the globe. Poor quality water increases the risk of cholera, typhoid fever and dysentery, and other water-borne illness making this problem a real crisis that humankind is facing. Several water disinfection technologies have been proposed as solutions for this problem. Solar water disinfection using TiO2 coated PET bottles was the alternative that is studied in this work. This technology does not only inactivate bacteria but also disintegrates organic chemicals that can be present in water. The objectives of this work address the optimization of the TiO 2 coated PET bottles technologies. The improvement on the bottle coating process, using two coats of 10% W/V of TiO2 in a solution of vinegar and sodium bicarbonate to form the TiO2 film, the use of a different indigo carmine (1.25 X 10-1mg/pill) concentration in the pill indicator of contamination, the increase of the disinfection rate through shaking the bottles, degradation under intermittent UV radiation and the effect of bottle size on photocatalytic water disinfection were among the most important findings. A new mathematical model that describes better photocatalytic water disinfection in TiO2 coated bottles and simulates water disinfection under different working conditions was another important achievement. These results can now be used to design a strategy for disseminating this technology in areas where it is required and, in that way, generate the greatest positive impact on the people needing safe drinking water.

  19. A comparative evaluation of efficacy of Punica granatum and chlorhexidine on plaque and gingivitis

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    Sakshi Ahuja

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Periodontal diseases are chronic bacterial infections that lead to gingival inflammation, periodontal tissue destruction, and alveolar bone loss. Acting as powerful allies in the fight against periodontal disease, natural compounds can help safeguard against lethal age-related diseases that emanate from our mouths. Punica granatum (pomegranate shrub belongs to the Punicaceae family which has been used as an astringent, hemostatic, antidiabetic, antihelmintic, and also for diarrhea and dysentery. The aim of the present work was to investigate the possible efficacy of hydroalcoholic extract from Punica granatum fruit as an antiplaque and antigingivitis agent when compared with chlorhexidine. Materials and Methods: Twenty subjects diagnosed with chronic generalized gingivitis were selected and randomly divided into two groups: Group 1 - Pomegranate mouthwash and Group 2 - Chlorhexidine mouthwash. Punica granatum mouthwash was prepared using raw Punica granatum fruit. Patients were instructed to use the prescribed mouthwash for 15 days. Clinical evaluation was undertaken using the gingival index, the plaque index, and bleeding on probing at baseline, 7 days, and 15 days. Results: The clinical study observed significant improvement in gingival status in both the sites (P<0.05. Subjects using Punica granatum mouthwash showed significant improvement in bleeding and gingivitis score as compared with chlorhexidine. In contrast, Punica granatum was shown not to be so effective in reducing plaque scores. Chlorhexidine still remains as a standard in the reduction of plaque in subjects with gingivitis. Conclusion: Punica granatum mouthwash is beneficial in improving gingival status due to its profound styptic action, with sufficient reduction in plaque scores.

  20. Coptidis rhizoma and its main bioactive components: recent advances in chemical investigation, quality evaluation and pharmacological activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fan-Cheng; Wu, Zheng-Feng; Yin, Zhi-Qi; Lin, Li-Gen; Wang, Ruibing; Zhang, Qing-Wen

    2018-01-01

    Coptidis rhizoma (CR) is the dried rhizome of Coptis chinensis Franch., C. deltoidea C. Y. Cheng et Hsiao or C. teeta Wall. (Ranunculaceae) and is commonly used in Traditional Chinese Medicine for the treatment of various diseases including bacillary dysentery, typhoid, tuberculosis, epidemic cerebrospinal meningitis, empyrosis, pertussis, and other illnesses. A literature survey was conducted via SciFinder, ScieneDirect, PubMed, Springer, and Wiley databases. A total of 139 selected references were classified on the basis of their research scopes, including chemical investigation, quality evaluation and pharmacological studies. Many types of secondary metabolites including alkaloids, lignans, phenylpropanoids, flavonoids, phenolic compounds, saccharides, and steroids have been isolated from CR. Among them, protoberberine-type alkaloids, such as berberine, palmatine, coptisine, epiberberine, jatrorrhizine, columamine, are the main components of CR. Quantitative determination of these alkaloids is a very important aspect in the quality evaluation of CR. In recent years, with the advances in isolation and detection technologies, many new instruments and methods have been developed for the quantitative and qualitative analysis of the main alkaloids from CR. The quality control of CR has provided safety for pharmacological applications. These quality evaluation methods are also frequently employed to screen the active components from CR. Various investigations have shown that CR and its main alkaloids exhibited many powerful pharmacological effects including anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, anti-diabetic, neuroprotective, cardioprotective, hypoglycemic, anti-Alzheimer and hepatoprotective activities. This review summarizes the recent phytochemical investigations, quality evaluation methods, the biological studies focusing on CR as well as its main alkaloids.

  1. Carbadox has both temporary and lasting effects on the swine gut microbiota

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    Torey eLooft

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics are used in livestock and poultry production to treat and prevent disease as well as to promote animal growth. Carbadox is an in-feed antibiotic that is widely used in swine production to prevent dysentery and to improve feed efficiency. The goal of this study was to characterize the effects of carbadox and its withdrawal on the swine gut microbiota. Six pigs (initially 3-weeks old received feed containing carbadox and six received unamended feed. After 3-weeks of continuous carbadox administration, all pigs were switched to a maintenance diet without carbadox. DNA was extracted from feces (n=142 taken before, during, and following (6-week withdrawal carbadox treatment. Phylotype analysis using 16S rRNA sequences showed the gradual development of the non-medicated swine gut microbiota over the 8-week study, and that the carbadox-treated pigs had significant differences in bacterial membership relative to non-medicated pigs. Enumeration of fecal Escherichia coli showed that a diet change concurrent with carbadox withdrawal was associated with an increase in the E. coli in the non-medicated pigs, suggesting that carbadox pretreatment prevented an increase of E. coli populations. In-feed carbadox caused striking effects within four days of administration, with significant alterations in both community structure and bacterial membership, notably a large relative increase in Prevotella populations in medicated pigs. Digital PCR was used to show that the absolute abundance of Prevotella was unchanged between the medicated and non-medicated pigs despite the relative increase shown in the phylotype analysis. Carbadox therefore caused a decrease in the abundance of other gut bacteria but did not affect the absolute abundance of Prevotella. The pending regulation on antibiotics used in animal production underscores the importance of understanding how they modulate the microbiota and impact animal health, which will inform the search for

  2. The Agricultural Antibiotic Carbadox Induces Phage-mediated Gene Transfer in Salmonella

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    Bradley L. Bearson

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics are used for disease therapeutic or preventative effects in humans and animals, as well as for enhanced feed conversion efficiency in livestock. Antibiotics can also cause undesirable effects in microbial populations, including selection for antibiotic resistance, enhanced pathogen invasion, and stimulation of horizontal gene transfer. Carbadox is a veterinary antibiotic used in the U.S. during the starter phase of swine production for improved feed efficiency and control of swine dysentery and bacterial swine enteritis. Carbadox has been shown in vitro to induce phage-encoded Shiga toxin in Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli and a phage-like element transferring antibiotic resistance genes in Brachyspira hyodysenteriae, but the effect of carbadox on prophages in other bacteria is unknown. This study examined carbadox exposure on prophage induction and genetic transfer in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, a human foodborne pathogen that frequently colonizes swine without causing disease. S. Typhimurium LT2 exposed to carbadox induced prophage production, resulting in bacterial cell lysis and release of virions that were visible by electron microscopy. Carbadox induction of phage-mediated gene transfer was confirmed by monitoring the transduction of a sodCIII::neo cassette in the Fels-1 prophage from LT2 to a recipient Salmonella strain. Furthermore, carbadox frequently induced generalized transducing phages in multidrug-resistant phage type DT104 and DT120 isolates, resulting in the transfer of chromosomal and plasmid DNA that included antibiotic resistance genes. Our research indicates that exposure of Salmonella to carbadox induces prophages that can transfer virulence and antibiotic resistance genes to susceptible bacterial hosts. Carbadox-induced, phage-mediated gene transfer could serve as a contributing factor in bacterial evolution during animal production, with prophages being a reservoir for bacterial fitness

  3. Anti-inflammatory effect of extract and fractions from the leaves of Byrsonima intermedia A. Juss. in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Lucimara Q; Vilela, Fabiana C; Orlandi, Lidiane; Dias, Danielle F; Santos, Ana Laura A; da Silva, Marcelo A; Paiva, Renato; Alves-da-Silva, Geraldo; Giusti-Paiva, Alexandre

    2011-11-18

    Byrsonima intermedia is commonly used for its antiseptic, antimicrobial, and anti-inflammatory properties in the treatment of diarrhea and dysentery in Brazilian folk medicine. The purpose of this study was to examine the anti-inflammatory activity of the aqueous extract and fractions of Byrsonima intermedia leaves. Rats with carrageenan-induced paw edema and fibrovascular tissue growth, which was induced by subcutaneous implantation of a cotton pellet, were used as acute and chronic animal models of inflammation to investigate the anti-inflammatory effects of the aqueous extract and the individual ethyl acetate (EtOAc) and aqueous fractions of Byrsonima intermedia and catechin. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to determine the fingerprint chromatogram of the aqueous extract and fractions of Byrsonima intermedia. The crude aqueous extract at test doses of 30-300 mg/kg p.o. clearly demonstrated anti-inflammatory effects by reducing carrageenan-induced paw edema, as did the ethyl acetate (100mg/kg) and aqueous fractions (30-100mg/kg). In the chronic inflammation rat animal model with fibrovascular tissue growth, the aqueous extract of Byrsonima intermedia (BiAE) at doses of 30-300 mg/kg and the individual EtOAc and aqueous fractions at doses of 30-100mg/kg and catechin significantly reduced the formation of granulomatous tissue. The presence of catechin and phenolic compounds in the extract and fractions of Byrsonima intermedia was confirmed using HPLC. BiAE and the individual EtOAc and aqueous fractions of Byrsonima intermedia exhibited chronic and acute anti-inflammatory efficacy in rats, which supports previous claims of its use in traditional medicine. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Pharmacognostical studies of leaves of Combretum albidum G. Don

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    Ashish S Zalke

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Combretum albidum Don belonging to family Combretaceae is an unexplored medicinal plant in the Indian medicinal system. According to ethnobotanical information, the leaves are used in the treatment of peptic ulcer and its fruits are used in diarrhoea and dysentery. Stem bark is used in the treatment of jaundice and skin diseases. The problem encountered in standardisation of this medicinal plant is its identification by source. Materials and Methods: The pharmacognostical studies were carried out in terms of organoleptic, macroscopic, microscopic, physicochemical, florescence and phytochemical analysis. Physicochemical parameters such as total ash, moisture content and extractive values are determined by World Health Organization guidelines. The microscopic features of leaf components are observed with Nikon lab photo device with microscopic units. Results: Macroscopically, the leaves are simple, obovate in shape, acuminate apex, entire margin and smooth surface. Microscopically, the leaves showed a large vascular strand that consists of thick walled xylem elements mixed with xylem fibres and phloem which is present in a thin layer along inner and outer portions of xylem. External to the xylem occur a thin line of sclerenchyma. Powder microscopy revealed glandular trichomes in the adaxial epidermal peelings also shows the non-glandular trichomes fairly common in powder and epidermis with anisocytic stomata. Vessels elements are narrow, long, cylindrical and dense multi-seriate bordered pits. Xylem fibres are thin and long, with thick walls, which are lignified. Preliminary phytochemical screening showed the presence of carbohydrate, glycoside, saponin, flavonoid, phytosterols and phenolic compounds. Conclusions: The results of the study can serve as a valuable source of pharmacognostic information as suitable standards for identification of this plant material in future investigations and applications.

  5. Hydroclimatic drivers, Water-borne Diseases, and Population Vulnerability in Bengal Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akanda, A. S.; Jutla, A. S.

    2012-04-01

    Water-borne diarrheal disease outbreaks in the Bengal Delta region, such as cholera, rotavirus, and dysentery, show distinct seasonal peaks and spatial signatures in their origin and progression. However, the mechanisms behind these seasonal phenomena, especially the role of regional climatic and hydrologic processes behind the disease outbreaks, are not fully understood. Overall diarrheal disease prevalence and the population vulnerability to transmission mechanisms thus remain severely underestimated. Recent findings suggest that diarrheal incidence in the spring is strongly associated with scarcity of freshwater flow volumes, while the abundance of water in monsoon show strong positive correlation with autumn diarrheal burden. The role of large-scale ocean-atmospheric processes that tend to modulate meteorological, hydrological, and environmental conditions over large regions and the effects on the ecological states conducive to the vectors and triggers of diarrheal outbreaks over large geographic regions are not well understood. We take a large scale approach to conduct detailed diagnostic analyses of a range of climate, hydrological, and ecosystem variables to investigate their links to outbreaks, occurrence, and transmission of the most prevalent water-borne diarrheal diseases. We employ satellite remote sensing data products to track coastal ecosystems and plankton processes related to cholera outbreaks. In addition, we investigate the effect of large scale hydroclimatic extremes (e.g., droughts and floods, El Nino) to identify how diarrheal transmission and epidemic outbreaks are most likely to respond to shifts in climatic, hydrologic, and ecological changes over coming decades. We argue that controlling diarrheal disease burden will require an integrated predictive surveillance approach - a combination of prediction and prevention - with recent advances in climate-based predictive capabilities and demonstrated successes in primary and tertiary prevention

  6. In silico analysis to identify vaccine candidates common to multiple serotypes of Shigella and evaluation of their immunogenicity

    KAUST Repository

    Pahil, Sapna; Taneja, Neelam; Ansari, Hifzur Rahman; Raghava, G. P. S.

    2017-01-01

    Shigellosis or bacillary dysentery is an important cause of diarrhea, with the majority of the cases occurring in developing countries. Considering the high disease burden, increasing antibiotic resistance, serotype-specific immunity and the post-infectious sequelae associated with shigellosis, there is a pressing need of an effective vaccine against multiple serotypes of the pathogen. In the present study, we used bio-informatics approach to identify antigens shared among multiple serotypes of Shigella spp. This approach led to the identification of many immunogenic peptides. The five most promising peptides based on MHC binding efficiency were a putative lipoprotein (EL PGI I), a putative heat shock protein (EL PGI II), Spa32 (EL PGI III), IcsB (EL PGI IV) and a hypothetical protein (EL PGI V). These peptides were synthesized and the immunogenicity was evaluated in BALB/c mice by ELISA and cytokine assays. The putative heat shock protein (HSP) and the hypothetical protein elicited good humoral response, whereas putative lipoprotein, Spa32 and IcsB elicited good T-cell response as revealed by increased IFN-γ and TNF-α cytokine levels. The patient sera from confirmed cases of shigellosis were also evaluated for the presence of peptide specific antibodies with significant IgG and IgA antibodies against the HSP and the hypothetical protein, bestowing them as potential future vaccine candidates. The antigens reported in this study are novel and have not been tested as vaccine candidates against Shigella. This study offers time and cost-effective way of identifying unprecedented immunogenic antigens to be used as potential vaccine candidates. Moreover, this approach should easily be extendable to find new potential vaccine candidates for other pathogenic bacteria.

  7. Surveillance Data Highlights Feed Form, Biosecurity, and Disease Control as Significant Factors Associated with Salmonella Infection on Farrow-to-Finish Pig Farms

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    Hector Argüello

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Among the zoonotic pathogens affecting pigs, Salmonella stands out due to the high number of human cases linked to pork consumption. In the last two decades many countries have put considerable effort into the control of the infection by surveillance and control strategies on farm. Despite this effort, many herds still have a high Salmonella prevalence and they require guidance to address this problem. The present study, using the serological surveillance data of finishing pigs from the Irish National pig Salmonella Control Programme, aimed to highlight factors associated with increased risk or that might mitigate Salmonella occurrence on farm. A questionnaire with 33 questions regarding herd characteristics, management, feeding, biosecurity, and health was completed for 61 individual herds. After the multivariate analysis by linear regression, nine variables were retained in the final model and linked to herd seroprevalence. Home produced-feed linked to the use of meal showed an eight points reduction in Salmonella prevalence compared to purchased feed (p = 0.042. Different biosecurity measures were associated to lower seroprevalence. Changing of footwear from outside to inside the farm decreased seroprevalence nearly 20 units (p = 0.014 and policies not permitting access to the farmyard to feed trucks (p = 0.048 or avoiding the presence of cats on the farm (p = 0.05 were estimated in 10 units less of seroprevalence. In contrast, the lack of perimeter fence increased the chance to have higher seroprevalence in five units (p = 0.05. Finally, intestinal diseases such as swine dysentery (p = 0.044 and E. coli diarrhea (p = 0.1 were estimated to increase Salmonella prevalence in ~20 and 10 units, respectively, demonstrating the importance of controlling other enteric pathogens in an on-farm Salmonella control programme. These results show the usefulness of surveillance data to improve on-farm control and confirm that Salmonella infection in pigs is

  8. Identification of novel substrates of Shigella T3SA through analysis of its virulence plasmid-encoded secretome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinaud, Laurie; Ferrari, Mariana L.; Friedman, Robin; Jehmlich, Nico; von Bergen, Martin; Phalipon, Armelle; Sansonetti, Philippe J.

    2017-01-01

    Many human Gram-negative bacterial pathogens express a Type Three Secretion Apparatus (T3SA), including among the most notorious Shigella spp., Salmonella enterica, Yersinia enterocolitica and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC). These bacteria express on their surface multiple copies of the T3SA that mediate the delivery into host cells of specific protein substrates critical to pathogenesis. Shigella spp. are Gram-negative bacterial pathogens responsible for human bacillary dysentery. The effector function of several Shigella T3SA substrates has largely been studied but their potential cellular targets are far from having been comprehensively delineated. In addition, it is likely that some T3SA substrates have escaped scrutiny as yet. Indeed, sequencing of the virulence plasmid of Shigella flexneri has revealed numerous open reading frames with unknown functions that could encode additional T3SA substrates. Taking advantage of label-free mass spectrometry detection of proteins secreted by a constitutively secreting strain of S. flexneri, we identified five novel substrates of the T3SA. We further confirmed their secretion through the T3SA and translocation into host cells using β-lactamase assays. The coding sequences of two of these novel T3SA substrates (Orf13 and Orf131a) have a guanine-cytosine content comparable to those of T3SA components and effectors. The three other T3SA substrates identified (Orf48, Orf86 and Orf176) have significant homology with antitoxin moieties of type II Toxin-Antitoxin systems usually implicated in the maintenance of low copy plasmids. While Orf13 and Orf131a might constitute new virulence effectors contributing to S. flexneri pathogenicity, potential roles for the translocation into host cells of antitoxins or antitoxin-like proteins during Shigella infection are discussed. PMID:29073283

  9. Status of vaccine research and development for Shigella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Sachin; Wierzba, Thomas; Walker, Richard I

    2016-06-03

    Shigella are gram-negative bacteria that cause severe diarrhea and dysentery. In 2013, Shigella infections caused an estimated 34,400 deaths in children less than five years old and, in 2010, an estimated 40,000 deaths in persons older than five years globally. New disease burden estimates from newly deployed molecular diagnostic assays with increased sensitivity suggest that Shigella-associated morbidity may be much greater than previous disease estimates from culture-based methods. Primary prevention of this disease should be based on universal provision of potable water and sanitation methods and improved personal and food hygiene. However, an efficacious and low-cost vaccine would complement and accelerate disease reduction while waiting for universal access to water, sanitation, and hygiene improvements. This review article provides a landscape of Shigella vaccine development efforts. No vaccine is yet available, but human and animal challenge-rechallenge trials with virulent Shigella as well as observational studies in Shigella-endemic areas have shown that the incidence of disease decreases following Shigella infection, pointing to biological feasibility of a vaccine. Immunity to Shigella appears to be strain-specific, so a vaccine that covers the most commonly detected strains (i.e., S. flexneri 2a, 3a, 6, and S. sonnei) or a vaccine using cross-species conserved antigens would likely be most effective. Vaccine development and testing may be accelerated by use of animal models, such as the guinea pig keratoconjunctivitis or murine pneumonia models. Because there is no correlate of protection, however, human studies will be necessary to evaluate vaccine efficacy prior to deployment. A diversity of Shigella vaccine constructs are under development, including live attenuated, formalin-killed whole-cell, glycoconjugate, subunit, and novel antigen vaccines (e.g., Type III secretion system and outer membrane proteins). Copyright © 2016 World Health Organization

  10. How Do the Virulence Factors of Shigella Work Together to Cause Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattock, Emily; Blocker, Ariel J

    2017-01-01

    Shigella is the major cause of bacillary dysentery world-wide. It is divided into four species, named S. flexneri, S. sonnei, S. dysenteriae , and S. boydii , which are distinct genomically and in their ability to cause disease. Shigellosis, the clinical presentation of Shigella infection, is characterized by watery diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and fever. Shigella 's ability to cause disease has been attributed to virulence factors, which are encoded on chromosomal pathogenicity islands and the virulence plasmid. However, information on these virulence factors is not often brought together to create a detailed picture of infection, and how this translates into shigellosis symptoms. Firstly, Shigella secretes virulence factors that induce severe inflammation and mediate enterotoxic effects on the colon, producing the classic watery diarrhea seen early in infection. Secondly, Shigella injects virulence effectors into epithelial cells via its Type III Secretion System to subvert the host cell structure and function. This allows invasion of epithelial cells, establishing a replicative niche, and causes erratic destruction of the colonic epithelium. Thirdly, Shigella produces effectors to down-regulate inflammation and the innate immune response. This promotes infection and limits the adaptive immune response, causing the host to remain partially susceptible to re-infection. Combinations of these virulence factors may contribute to the different symptoms and infection capabilities of the diverse Shigella species, in addition to distinct transmission patterns. Further investigation of the dominant species causing disease, using whole-genome sequencing and genotyping, will allow comparison and identification of crucial virulence factors and may contribute to the production of a pan- Shigella vaccine.

  11. In silico analysis to identify vaccine candidates common to multiple serotypes of Shigella and evaluation of their immunogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahil, Sapna; Taneja, Neelam; Ansari, Hifzur Rahman; Raghava, G P S

    2017-01-01

    Shigellosis or bacillary dysentery is an important cause of diarrhea, with the majority of the cases occurring in developing countries. Considering the high disease burden, increasing antibiotic resistance, serotype-specific immunity and the post-infectious sequelae associated with shigellosis, there is a pressing need of an effective vaccine against multiple serotypes of the pathogen. In the present study, we used bio-informatics approach to identify antigens shared among multiple serotypes of Shigella spp. This approach led to the identification of many immunogenic peptides. The five most promising peptides based on MHC binding efficiency were a putative lipoprotein (EL PGI I), a putative heat shock protein (EL PGI II), Spa32 (EL PGI III), IcsB (EL PGI IV) and a hypothetical protein (EL PGI V). These peptides were synthesized and the immunogenicity was evaluated in BALB/c mice by ELISA and cytokine assays. The putative heat shock protein (HSP) and the hypothetical protein elicited good humoral response, whereas putative lipoprotein, Spa32 and IcsB elicited good T-cell response as revealed by increased IFN-γ and TNF-α cytokine levels. The patient sera from confirmed cases of shigellosis were also evaluated for the presence of peptide specific antibodies with significant IgG and IgA antibodies against the HSP and the hypothetical protein, bestowing them as potential future vaccine candidates. The antigens reported in this study are novel and have not been tested as vaccine candidates against Shigella. This study offers time and cost-effective way of identifying unprecedented immunogenic antigens to be used as potential vaccine candidates. Moreover, this approach should easily be extendable to find new potential vaccine candidates for other pathogenic bacteria.

  12. Intracellular and membrane-damaging activities of methyl gallate isolated from Terminalia chebula against multidrug-resistant Shigella spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharyya, Saurabh; Sarkar, Prodipta; Saha, Dhira R; Patra, Amarendra; Ramamurthy, T; Bag, Prasanta K

    2015-08-01

    Shigella spp. (Shigella dysenteriae, Shigella flexneri, Shigella boydii and Shigella sonnei) cause bacillary dysentery (shigellosis), which is characterized by bloody mucous diarrhoea. Although a variety of antibiotics have been effective for treatment of shigellosis, options are becoming limited due to globally emerging drug resistance. In the present study, in vitro antibacterial activity of methyl gallate (MG) isolated from Terminalia chebula was determined by performing MIC, minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC) and time-kill kinetic studies. Bacterial membrane-damaging activity of MG was determined by membrane perturbation and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Cellular drug accumulation, cell infection and assessment of intracellular activities of MG and reference antibiotics were performed using HeLa cell cultures. The bactericidal activity of MG against multidrug-resistant (MDR) Shigella spp. in comparison with other commonly used drugs including fluoroquinolone was demonstrated here. TEM findings in the present study revealed that MG caused the total disintegration of inner and outer membranes, and leakage of the cytoplasmic contents of S. dysenteriae. The level of accumulation of MG and tetracycline in HeLa cells incubated for 24  h was relatively higher than that of ciprofloxacin and nalidixic acid (ratio of intracellular concentration/extracellular concentration of antibiotic for MG and tetracycline>ciprofloxacin and nalidixic acid). The viable number of intracellular S. dysenteriae was decreased in a time-dependent manner in the presence of MG (4 × MBC) and reduced to zero within 20  h. The significant intracellular activities of MG suggested that it could potentially be used as an effective antibacterial agent for the treatment of severe infections caused by MDR Shigella spp.

  13. Virulence variations in Shigella and enteroinvasive Escherichia coli using the Caenorhabditis elegans model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Crystal Ching; Octavia, Sophie; Mooney, Anne-Marie; Lan, Ruiting

    2015-01-01

    Shigella species and enteroinvasive Escherichia coli (EIEC) belong to the same species genetically, with remarkable phenotypic and genomic similarities. Shigella is the main cause of bacillary dysentery with around 160 million annual cases, while EIEC generally induces a milder disease compared to Shigella. This study aimed to determine virulence variations between Shigella and EIEC using the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as a model host. Caenorhabditis elegans killing- and bacterial colonization assays were performed to examine the potential difference in virulence between Shigella and EIEC strains. Statistically significant difference in the survival rates of nematodes was demonstrated, with Shigella causing death at 88.24 ± 1.20% and EIEC at 94.37 ± 0.70%. The intestinal load of bacteria in the nematodes was found to be 7.65 × 10(4) ± 8.83 × 10(3) and 2.92 × 10(4) ± 6.26 × 10(3) CFU ml(-1) per nematode for Shigella and EIEC, respectively. Shigella dysenteriae serotype 1 which carries the Shiga toxin showed the lowest nematode survival rate at 82.6 ± 3.97% and highest bacterial colonization of 1.75 × 10(5) ± 8.17 × 10(4) CFU ml(-1), whereas a virulence plasmid-negative Shigella strain demonstrated 100 ± 0% nematode survival and lowest bacterial accumulation of 1.02 × 10(4) ± 7.23 × 10(2) CFU ml(-1). This study demonstrates C. elegans as an effective model for examining and comparing Shigella and EIEC virulence variation. © FEMS 2014. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. One Gene and Two Proteins: a Leaderless mRNA Supports the Translation of a Shorter Form of the Shigella VirF Regulator

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    Maria Letizia Di Martino

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available VirF, an AraC-like activator, is required to trigger a regulatory cascade that initiates the invasive program of Shigella spp., the etiological agents of bacillary dysentery in humans. VirF expression is activated upon entry into the host and depends on many environmental signals. Here, we show that the virF mRNA is translated into two proteins, the major form, VirF30 (30 kDa, and the shorter VirF21 (21 kDa, lacking the N-terminal segment. By site-specific mutagenesis and toeprint analysis, we identified the translation start sites of VirF30 and VirF21 and showed that the two different forms of VirF arise from differential translation. Interestingly, in vitro and in vivo translation experiments showed that VirF21 is also translated from a leaderless mRNA (llmRNA whose 5′ end is at position +309/+310, only 1 or 2 nucleotides upstream of the ATG84 start codon of VirF21. The llmRNA is transcribed from a gene-internal promoter, which we identified here. Functional analysis revealed that while VirF30 is responsible for activation of the virulence system, VirF21 negatively autoregulates virF expression itself. Since VirF21 modulates the intracellular VirF levels, this suggests that transcription of the llmRNA might occur when the onset of the virulence program is not required. We speculate that environmental cues, like stress conditions, may promote changes in virF mRNA transcription and preferential translation of llmRNA.

  15. Bacterial enteropathogens associated with diarrhea in a rural population of Haiti

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    Jackson JC

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available John C Jackson, Anthony L Farone, Mary B Farone Biology Department, Middle Tennessee State University, Murfreesboro, Tennessee, USA Purpose: Diarrheal disease is one of the leading causes of morbidity in developing countries. To further understand the epidemiology of diarrheal disease among a rural population surrounding Robillard, Haiti, fecal swabs from patients with diarrhea were screened for the presence of enteropathogenic bacteria. Patients and methods: Fecal swabs were collected from 34 patients with signs and symptoms of diarrhea and stored in BBLTM Cary-Blair transport medium (Becton, Dickinson and Company, Sparks, MD until transit to the USA. Swab material was inoculated on to different enrichment and selective agars for incubation. Fermenting and nonfermenting bacteria that grew on the enteric selection media were identified by the BBLTM CrystalTM Enteric/Nonferementing Identification system (Becton, Dickinson and Company. Organisms identified as Escherichia coli were further screened for the presence of virulence factors by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Results: Of 34 patients, no Campylobacter, Shigella, Salmonella, or Vibrio spp. were isolated from swabs transported to the USA for culture. Of 73 E. coli isolates cultured from the swabs, one enteropathogenic strain of E. coli was identified by multiplex PCR. Escherichia fergusonii and Cronobacter sakazakii, both potential gastrointestinal pathogens, were also isolated from patient stools. Conclusion: This study was undertaken to determine if bacterial enteropathogens could be detected in the stools of patients suffering from diarrhea or dysentery and, in the absence of sufficient facilities, rectal swabs could be transported to the USA for culture. Although several genera of overt enteropathogens were not detected, one enteropathogenic E. coli and other pathogenic enterobacteriaceae were successfully cultured and identified. Keywords: Escherichia, Cronobacter, diarrheagenic, stool

  16. Bacteriophages for detection of bacterial pathogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutateladze, M.

    2009-01-01

    The G. Eliava Institute of Bacteriophages, Microbiology and Virology (Tbilisi, Georgia) is one of the most famous institutions focused on bacteriophage research for the elaboration of appropriate phage methodologies for human and animal protection. The main direction of the institute is the study and production of bacteriophages against intestinal disorders (dysentery, typhoid, intesti) and purulent-septic infections (staphylococcus, streptococcus, pyophage, etc.). These preparations were successfully introduced during the Soviet era, and for decades were used throughout the former Soviet Union and in other Socialist countries for the treatment, prophylaxis, and diagnosis of various infectious diseases, including those caused by antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains. Bacteriophages were widely used for identifying and detecting infections caused by the most dangerous pathogens and causative agents of epidemiological outbreaks. The specific topic of this presentation is the phage typing of bacterial species, which can be an important method for epidemiological diagnostics. Together with different genetic methodologies - such as PCR-based methods, PFGE, plasmid fingerprinting, and ribosomal typing - phage typing is one method for identifying bacterial pathogens. The method has a high percentage of determination of phage types, high specificity of reaction, and is easy for interpretation and use by health workers. Phage typing was applied for inter-species differentiation of different species of Salmonella, S. typhi, Brucella spp, Staphylococcus aureus, E. col,i Clostridium deficile, Vibrio cholerae, Yersinia pestis, Yersinia enterocolitica, Lysteria monocytogenes, Clostridium perfringens, Clostridium tetani, plant pathogens, and other bacterial pathogens. In addition to addressing the utility and efficacy of phage typing, the paper will discuss the isolation and selection of diagnostic typing phages for interspecies differentiation of pathogens that is necessary

  17. Leptadenia reticulata (Retz.) Wight & Arn. (Jivanti): Botanical, Agronomical, Phytochemical, Pharmacological, and Biotechnological Aspects.

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    Mohanty, Sudipta Kumar; Swamy, Mallappa Kumara; Sinniah, Uma Rani; Anuradha, Maniyam

    2017-06-19

    Leptadenia reticulata (Retz.) Wight & Arn. (Apocynaceae), is a traditional medicinal plant species widely used to treat various ailments such as tuberculosis, hematopoiesis, emaciation, cough, dyspnea, fever, burning sensation, night blindness, cancer, and dysentery. In Ayurveda, it is known for its revitalizing, rejuvenating, and lactogenic properties. This plant is one of the major ingredients in many commercial herbal formulations, including Speman, Envirocare, Calshakti, Antisept, and Chyawanprash. The therapeutic potential of this herb is because of the presence of diverse bioactive compounds such as α-amyrin, β-amyrin, ferulic acid, luteolin, diosmetin, rutin, β-sitosterol, stigmasterol, hentricontanol, a triterpene alcohol simiarenol, apigenin, reticulin, deniculatin, and leptaculatin. However, most biological studies on L. reticulata are restricted to crude extracts, and many biologically active compounds are yet to be identified in order to base the traditional uses of L. reticulata on evidence-based data. At present, L. reticulata is a threatened endangered plant because of overexploitation, unscientific harvesting, and habitat loss. The increased demand from pharmaceutical, nutraceutical, and veterinary industries has prompted its large-scale propagation. However, its commercial cultivation is hampered because of the non-availability of genuine planting material and the lack of knowledge about its agronomical practices. In this regard, micropropagation techniques will be useful to obtain true-to-type L. reticulata planting materials from an elite germplasm to meet the current demand. Adopting other biotechnological approaches such as synthetic seed technology, cryopreservation, cell culture, and genetic transformation can help conservation as well as increased metabolite production from L. reticulata. The present review summarizes scientific information on the botanical, agronomical, phytochemical, pharmacological, and biotechnological aspects of L

  18. Pathogenicity of porcine intestinal spirochetes in gnotobiotic pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neef, N A; Lysons, R J; Trott, D J; Hampson, D J; Jones, P W; Morgan, J H

    1994-06-01

    Twelve intestinal spirochete strains of porcine origin were characterized on the basis of their phenotypic properties, by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis, and by pathogenicity testing in gnotobiotic pigs. The spirochetes used included two strains of Serpulina hyodysenteriae (B204 and P18A), two strains of Serpulina innocens (B256 and 4/71), one strain from the proposed new genus and species "Anguillina coli" (P43/6/78), and seven non-S. hyodysenteriae strains recently isolated from United Kingdom pig herds with a history of nonspecific diarrhea and typhlocolitis. By multilocus enzyme electrophoresis, five of these were identified as S. innocens, one was identified as an unspecified Serpulina sp., and one was identified as "A. coli." S. hyodysenteriae B204 and P18A, "A. coli" P43/6/78 and 2/7, and three (22/7, P280/1, and 14/5) of the five S. innocens field isolates induced mucoid feces and typhlocolitis in gnotobiotic pigs. None of the other spirochetes produced clinical signs or large intestinal pathology in this model. The "A. coli" strains induced a more watery diarrhea, with lesions present more proximally in the large intestine, than did the other pathogenic spirochetes. S. innocens 22/7 was also tested for pathogenicity in hysterotomy-derived pigs that had previously been artificially colonized with a spirochete-free intestinal flora and shown to be susceptible to swine dysentery. Despite effective colonization, strain 22/7 did not produce any disease, nor was there any exacerbation of large intestinal pathology or clinical signs when pigs with an experimentally induced existing colitis caused by Yersinia pseudotuberculosis were superinfected with strain 22/7. Certain non-S. hyodysenteriae spirochetes are therefore capable of inducing disease in gnotobiotic pigs, but their role as primary or opportunistic pathogens in conventional pigs remains equivocal.

  19. Cholera epidemic among Rwandan refugees: experience of ICDDR,B in Goma, Zaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddique, A K

    1994-01-01

    In July 1994, one of the worst cholera epidemics broke out among the nearly a million Rwandan refugees in Goma, eastern Zaire. The United Nations High Commission for Refugees estimated that nearly 12,000 people died during the epidemic. The International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (ICDDR,B) sent an eight-member medical team to Goma headed by Dr AK Siddique, a senior scientist of the Center and head of the Epidemic Control Preparedness Program, Dacca, Bangladesh. During their two-week stay, the team, in collaboration with UNICEF and the Ministry of Health, Zaire, conducted epidemiological assessment, operated a temporary treatment center and provided technical advice on case management of cholera and shigellosis to other health workers. The team also set up a microbiology laboratory in Goma to identify the pathogens responsible for the epidemic and their drug sensitivity patterns. The team visited a number of temporary treatment facilities in two of the five camp sites and provided technical advice to the health-care providers. They also visited treatment facilities in Goma city, where an estimated 200,000 refugees were affected by the epidemic. Deaths from cholera even in the treatment centers were much higher than expected. The overall case-fatality rate in the treatment centers was nearly 15%. Laboratory investigations showed that the initial epidemic was indeed caused by Vibrio cholerae strains resistant to tetracycline and doxycycline. By the first week of August, the number of cholera cases was declining, but the number of dysentery cases was increasing rapidly. Predominantly Shigella dysenteriae type 1 was responsible, which was resistant to most drugs used for treating shigellosis, except mecillinam. Inappropriate rehydration therapy and inadequate experience of health workers failed to prevent deaths. The team took over the operation of temporary treatment center at Katindo in Goma city with one of the highest case-fatality rates (14

  20. Proteomic comparison of Entamoeba histolytica and Entamoeba dispar and the role of E. histolytica alcohol dehydrogenase 3 in virulence.

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    Paul H Davis

    Full Text Available The protozoan intestinal parasite Entamoeba histolytica infects millions of people worldwide and is capable of causing amebic dysentery and amebic liver abscess. The closely related species Entamoeba dispar colonizes many more individuals, but this organism does not induce disease. To identify molecular differences between these two organisms that may account for their differential ability to cause disease in humans, we used two-dimensional gel-based (DIGE proteomic analysis to compare whole cell lysates of E. histolytica and E. dispar. We observed 141 spots expressed at a substantially (>5-fold higher level in E. histolytica HM-1:IMSS than E. dispar and 189 spots showing the opposite pattern. Strikingly, 3 of 4 proteins consistently identified as different at a greater than 5-fold level between E. histolytica HM-1:IMSS and E. dispar were identical to proteins recently identified as differentially expressed between E. histolytica HM-1:IMSS and the reduced virulence strain E. histolytica Rahman. One of these was E. histolytica alcohol dehydrogenase 3 (EhADH3. We found that E. histolytica possesses a higher level of NADP-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase activity than E. dispar and that some EhADH3 can be localized to the surface of E. histolytica. Episomal overexpression of EhADH3 in E. histolytica trophozoites resulted in only subtle phenotypic differences in E. histolytica virulence in animal models of amebic colitis and amebic liver abscess, making it difficult to directly link EhADH3 levels to virulence differences between E. histolytica and less-pathogenic Entamoeba.

  1. KIRKIA ACUMINATA OLIV.: A REVIEW OF ITS ETHNOBOTANY AND PHARMACOLOGY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroyi, Alfred

    2017-01-01

    Local communities in sub-Saharan Africa have a long history of medicinal plant usage. Like in other parts of the developing world, rural and urban communities are still dependent on herbal medicines for primary health care, and the use of herbal medicines is still an integral part of their daily life and socio-cultural life style. The objective of this paper is to summarise information on the ethnobotany and pharmacology of Kirkia acuminata Oliv. throughout its distributional range. The information documented in this article is derived from books, theses, scientific journals and reports obtained from library collections, Scopus, Pubmed, MEDLINE, ISI Web of Science, Google Scholar and Science Direct. Kirkia acuminata is the most known and widely distributed Kirkia species in the genus and is one of the most popular and promising plant resources due to its several beneficial uses. Kirkia acuminata is used to treat abdominal pains, backache, cholera, constipation, cough, diarrhea, dysentery, snake bites, toothache and wounds. Other applications include its use as charcoal; hedge, ornamental or shade; stock feed, timber and source of water during drought periods. Preliminary phytochemical assessment of roots and stem bark of K. acuminata showed presence of lignans, neo-lignans, nor-carotinoids and other compounds. The extracts of K. acuminata exhibited antibacterial and antimycobacterial activities. These phytochemical compounds may be responsible for the medicinal uses and biological activities demonstrated by K. acuminata . Detailed research is required aimed at exploring mode of action of bioactive compounds of Kirkia acuminata that are responsible for the documented pharmacological effects. Kirkia acuminata is an important plant species that has potential to contribute to the primary health care and livelihood improvement of local communities in the geographical areas where it is indigenous and found in abundance.

  2. A review of the taxonomy, ethnobotany, chemistry and pharmacology of Sutherlandia frutescens (Fabaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wyk, B-E; Albrecht, C

    2008-10-28

    Sutherlandia frutescens (tribe Galegeae, Fabaceae), a popular plant in traditional medicine, is indigenous to South Africa, Lesotho, southern Namibia and southeastern Botswana. It is chemically, genetically and geographically extremely variable and has been divided into three subspecies and several regional forms. A second species, Sutherlandia tomentosa, is localized along the Cape coast. Sutherlandia is sometimes treated as part of the genus Lessertia. There are numerous vernacular names and a wide diversity of uses, including poor appetite, indigestion, stomach complaints, dysentery, colds, influenza, kidney conditions, fever, diabetes, internal cancers, uterine troubles, liver conditions, backache, rheumatoid arthritis, urinary tract infections, stress and anxiety, dropsy and heart failure. Notable is the use as a bitter tonic ("blood purifier"), anti-stress medication ('musa-pelo) and, at least since 1895, specifically as a cancer tonic (both as treatment and as prophylaxis). Externally it is applied to haemorrhoids, inflamed wounds and eye infections. Recent in vitro and in vivo studies have shown antiproliferative, anti-HIV, anti-diabetic, anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antibacterial, anti-stress, anticonvulsant and antithrombotic activities. Aqueous extracts often differ in activity from organic solvent extracts. The presence of high levels of free amino acids, non-protein amino acids such as canavanine and GABA, the cyclitol pinitol, flavonols and triterpenes (including SU1, a cycloartane-type triterpene saponin) provide plausible hypotheses on how these compounds, individually or collectively, may be responsible for the reputed efficacy in a wide range of ailments. Results of animal studies, as well as a phase I clinical study, have shown no indications of toxicity. Sufficient preclinical data are now available to justify controlled clinical studies.

  3. Induction of apoptosis in human cervical carcinoma HeLa cells by active compounds from Hypericum ascyron L.

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    Li, Xiu-Mei; Luo, Xue-Gang; He, Jun-Fang; Wang, Nan; Zhou, Hao; Yang, Pei-Long; Zhang, Tong-Cun

    2018-03-01

    Hypericum ascyron L. (Great St. Johnswort), which belongs to the Hypericaceae family, has been used for the treatment of hematemesis, metrorrhagia, rheumatism, swelling, stomach ache, abscesses, dysentery and irregular menstruation for >2,000 years in China. The aim of the present study was to clarify the anticancer activity compounds from H. ascyron L. and the underlying molecular mechanism. Anticancer activity of H. ascyron L. extract was evaluated using an MTT assay. To confirm the anticancer mechanism of activity compounds, Hoechst 33258, Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide, 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate, rhodamine 123 staining and caspase-3 activity analysis were performed. The results demonstrated that the anti-proliferative action of the mixture of kaempferol 3-O-β-(2″-acetyl) galactopyranoside (K) and quercetin (Q) (molar ratio, 1:1) was significantly increased compared with either of these two compounds separately, and the active fraction of the H. ascyron L. extract |(HALE). HALE, indicating that the anti-proliferative function of H. ascyron L. may be a synergic effect of K and Q. Furthermore, the inhibitory effect of KQ on the growth of HeLa cells was mediated by the induction of apoptosis. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to identify that KQ exhibits significant anti-proliferation activity on HeLa cells via the apoptotic pathway, and is also the first to evaluate the anticancer potential of H. ascyron L. The results of the present study may provide a rational base for the use of H. ascyron L. in the clinic, and shed light on the development of novel anticancer drugs.

  4. Macropinosomes are Key Players in Early Shigella Invasion and Vacuolar Escape in Epithelial Cells.

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    Allon Weiner

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular pathogens include all viruses, many bacteria and parasites capable of invading and surviving within host cells. Key to survival is the subversion of host cell pathways by the pathogen for the purpose of propagation and evading the immune system. The intracellular bacterium Shigella flexneri, the causative agent of bacillary dysentery, invades host cells in a vacuole that is subsequently ruptured to allow growth of the pathogen within the host cytoplasm. S. flexneri invasion has been classically described as a macropinocytosis-like process, however the underlying details and the role of macropinosomes in the intracellular bacterial lifestyle have remained elusive. We applied dynamic imaging and advanced large volume correlative light electron microscopy (CLEM to study the highly transient events of S. flexneri's early invasion into host epithelial cells and elucidate some of its fundamental features. First, we demonstrate a clear distinction between two compartments formed during the first step of invasion: the bacterial containing vacuole and surrounding macropinosomes, often considered identical. Next, we report a functional link between macropinosomes and the process of vacuolar rupture, demonstrating that rupture timing is dependent on the availability of macropinosomes as well as the activity of the small GTPase Rab11 recruited directly to macropinosomes. We go on to reveal that the bacterial containing vacuole and macropinosomes come into direct contact at the onset of vacuolar rupture. Finally, we demonstrate that S. flexneri does not subvert pre-existing host endocytic vesicles during the invasion steps leading to vacuolar rupture, and propose that macropinosomes are the major compartment involved in these events. These results provide the basis for a new model of the early steps of S. flexneri epithelial cell invasion, establishing a different view of the enigmatic process of cytoplasmic access by invasive bacterial

  5. Identification of novel substrates of Shigella T3SA through analysis of its virulence plasmid-encoded secretome.

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    Laurie Pinaud

    Full Text Available Many human Gram-negative bacterial pathogens express a Type Three Secretion Apparatus (T3SA, including among the most notorious Shigella spp., Salmonella enterica, Yersinia enterocolitica and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC. These bacteria express on their surface multiple copies of the T3SA that mediate the delivery into host cells of specific protein substrates critical to pathogenesis. Shigella spp. are Gram-negative bacterial pathogens responsible for human bacillary dysentery. The effector function of several Shigella T3SA substrates has largely been studied but their potential cellular targets are far from having been comprehensively delineated. In addition, it is likely that some T3SA substrates have escaped scrutiny as yet. Indeed, sequencing of the virulence plasmid of Shigella flexneri has revealed numerous open reading frames with unknown functions that could encode additional T3SA substrates. Taking advantage of label-free mass spectrometry detection of proteins secreted by a constitutively secreting strain of S. flexneri, we identified five novel substrates of the T3SA. We further confirmed their secretion through the T3SA and translocation into host cells using β-lactamase assays. The coding sequences of two of these novel T3SA substrates (Orf13 and Orf131a have a guanine-cytosine content comparable to those of T3SA components and effectors. The three other T3SA substrates identified (Orf48, Orf86 and Orf176 have significant homology with antitoxin moieties of type II Toxin-Antitoxin systems usually implicated in the maintenance of low copy plasmids. While Orf13 and Orf131a might constitute new virulence effectors contributing to S. flexneri pathogenicity, potential roles for the translocation into host cells of antitoxins or antitoxin-like proteins during Shigella infection are discussed.

  6. The Intriguing Evolutionary Journey of Enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC toward Pathogenicity

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    Martina Pasqua

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Among the intestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli, enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC are a group of intracellular pathogens able to enter epithelial cells of colon, multiplicate within them, and move between adjacent cells with a mechanism similar to Shigella, the ethiological agent of bacillary dysentery. Despite EIEC belong to the same pathotype of Shigella, they neither have the full set of traits that define Shigella nor have undergone the extensive gene decay observed in Shigella. Molecular analysis confirms that EIEC are widely distributed among E. coli phylogenetic groups and correspond to bioserotypes found in many E. coli serogroups. Like Shigella, also in EIEC the critical event toward a pathogenic life-style consisted in the acquisition by horizontal gene transfer of a large F-type plasmid (pINV containing the genes required for invasion, intracellular survival, and spreading through the intestinal mucosa. In Shigella, the ample gain in virulence determinants has been counteracted by a substantial loss of functions that, although important for the survival in the environment, are redundant or deleterious for the life inside the host. The pathoadaptation process that has led Shigella to modify its metabolic profile and increase its pathogenic potential is still in infancy in EIEC, although maintenance of some features typical of E. coli might favor their emerging relevance as intestinal pathogens worldwide, as documented by recent outbreaks in industrialized countries. In this review, we will discuss the evolution of EIEC toward Shigella-like invasive forms going through the epidemiology, including the emergence of new virulent strains, their genome organization, and the complex interactions they establish with the host.

  7. Differential regulation of caspase-1 activation, pyroptosis, and autophagy via Ipaf and ASC in Shigella-infected macrophages.

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    Toshihiko Suzuki

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Shigella infection, the cause of bacillary dysentery, induces caspase-1 activation and cell death in macrophages, but the precise mechanisms of this activation remain poorly understood. We demonstrate here that caspase-1 activation and IL-1beta processing induced by Shigella are mediated through Ipaf, a cytosolic pattern-recognition receptor of the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD-like receptor (NLR family, and the adaptor protein apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a C-terminal caspase recruitment domain (ASC. We also show that Ipaf was critical for pyroptosis, a specialized form of caspase-1-dependent cell death induced in macrophages by bacterial infection, whereas ASC was dispensable. Unlike that observed in Salmonella and Legionella, caspase-1 activation induced by Shigella infection was independent of flagellin. Notably, infection of macrophages with Shigella induced autophagy, which was dramatically increased by the absence of caspase-1 or Ipaf, but not ASC. Autophagy induced by Shigella required an intact bacterial type III secretion system but not VirG protein, a bacterial factor required for autophagy in epithelial-infected cells. Treatment of macrophages with 3-methyladenine, an inhibitor of autophagy, enhanced pyroptosis induced by Shigella infection, suggesting that autophagy protects infected macrophages from pyroptosis. Thus, Ipaf plays a critical role in caspase-1 activation induced by Shigella independently of flagellin. Furthermore, the absence of Ipaf or caspase-1, but not ASC, regulates pyroptosis and the induction of autophagy in Shigella-infected macrophages, providing a novel function for NLR proteins in bacterial-host interactions.

  8. A new piece of the Shigella Pathogenicity puzzle: spermidine accumulation by silencing of the speG gene [corrected].

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    Marialuisa Barbagallo

    Full Text Available The genome of Shigella, a gram negative bacterium which is the causative agent of bacillary dysentery, shares strong homologies with that of its commensal ancestor, Escherichia coli. The acquisition, by lateral gene transfer, of a large plasmid carrying virulence determinants has been a crucial event in the evolution towards the pathogenic lifestyle and has been paralleled by the occurrence of mutations affecting genes, which negatively interfere with the expression of virulence factors. In this context, we have analysed to what extent the presence of the plasmid-encoded virF gene, the major activator of the Shigella regulon for invasive phenotype, has modified the transcriptional profile of E. coli. Combining results from transcriptome assays and comparative genome analyses we show that in E. coli VirF, besides being able to up-regulate several chromosomal genes, which potentially influence bacterial fitness within the host, also activates genes which have been lost by Shigella. We have focused our attention on the speG gene, which encodes spermidine acetyltransferase, an enzyme catalysing the conversion of spermidine into the physiologically inert acetylspermidine, since recent evidence stresses the involvement of polyamines in microbial pathogenesis. Through identification of diverse mutations, which prevent expression of a functional SpeG protein, we show that the speG gene has been silenced by convergent evolution and that its inactivation causes the marked increase of intracellular spermidine in all Shigella spp. This enhances the survival of Shigella under oxidative stress and allows it to better face the adverse conditions it encounters inside macrophage. This is supported by the outcome of infection assays performed in mouse peritoneal macrophages and of a competitive-infection assay on J774 macrophage cell culture. Our observations fully support the pathoadaptive nature of speG inactivation in Shigella and reveal that the accumulation

  9. In silico analysis to identify vaccine candidates common to multiple serotypes of Shigella and evaluation of their immunogenicity.

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    Sapna Pahil

    Full Text Available Shigellosis or bacillary dysentery is an important cause of diarrhea, with the majority of the cases occurring in developing countries. Considering the high disease burden, increasing antibiotic resistance, serotype-specific immunity and the post-infectious sequelae associated with shigellosis, there is a pressing need of an effective vaccine against multiple serotypes of the pathogen. In the present study, we used bio-informatics approach to identify antigens shared among multiple serotypes of Shigella spp. This approach led to the identification of many immunogenic peptides. The five most promising peptides based on MHC binding efficiency were a putative lipoprotein (EL PGI I, a putative heat shock protein (EL PGI II, Spa32 (EL PGI III, IcsB (EL PGI IV and a hypothetical protein (EL PGI V. These peptides were synthesized and the immunogenicity was evaluated in BALB/c mice by ELISA and cytokine assays. The putative heat shock protein (HSP and the hypothetical protein elicited good humoral response, whereas putative lipoprotein, Spa32 and IcsB elicited good T-cell response as revealed by increased IFN-γ and TNF-α cytokine levels. The patient sera from confirmed cases of shigellosis were also evaluated for the presence of peptide specific antibodies with significant IgG and IgA antibodies against the HSP and the hypothetical protein, bestowing them as potential future vaccine candidates. The antigens reported in this study are novel and have not been tested as vaccine candidates against Shigella. This study offers time and cost-effective way of identifying unprecedented immunogenic antigens to be used as potential vaccine candidates. Moreover, this approach should easily be extendable to find new potential vaccine candidates for other pathogenic bacteria.

  10. Multifactor Regulation of the MdtJI Polyamine Transporter in Shigella.

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    Adriano Leuzzi

    Full Text Available The polyamine profile of Shigella, the etiological agent of bacillary dysentery in humans, differs markedly from that of E. coli, its innocuous commensal ancestor. Pathoadaptive mutations such as the loss of cadaverine and the increase of spermidine favour the full expression of the virulent phenotype of Shigella. Spermidine levels affect the expression of the MdtJI complex, a recently identified efflux pump belonging to the small multi-drug resistance family of transporters. In the present study, we have addressed the regulation of the mdtJI operon in Shigella by asking which factors influence its expression as compared to E. coli. In particular, after identifying the mdtJI promoter by primer extension analysis, in vivo transcription assays and gel-retardation experiments were carried out to get insight on the silencing of mdtJI in E. coli. The results indicate that H-NS, a major nucleoid protein, plays a key role in repressing the mdtJI operon by direct binding to the regulatory region. In the Shigella background mdtJI expression is increased by the high levels of spermidine typically found in this microorganism and by VirF, the plasmid-encoded regulator of the Shigella virulence regulatory cascade. We also show that the expression of mdtJI is stimulated by bile components. Functional analyses reveal that MdtJI is able to promote the excretion of putrescine, the spermidine precursor. This leads us to consider the MdtJI complex as a possible safety valve allowing Shigella to maintain spermidine to a level optimally suited to survival within infected macrophages and, at the same time, prevent toxicity due to spermidine over-accumulation.

  11. Targeting of chromatin readers: a novel strategy used by the Shigella flexneri virulence effector OspF to reprogram transcription

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    Habiba Harouz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Shigella flexneri, a gram-negative bacterium responsible of bacillary dysentery, uses multiple strategies to overcome host immune defense. We have decrypted how this bacterium manipulates host-cell chromatin binders to take control of immune gene expression. We found that OspF, an injected virulence factor previously identified as a repressor of immune gene expression, targets the chromatin reader HP1γ. Heterochromatin Protein 1 family members specifically recognize and bind histone H3 methylated at Lys 9. Although initially identified as chromatin-associated transcriptional silencers in heterochromatin, their location in euchromatin indicates an active role in gene expression. Notably, HP1γ phosphorylation at Serine 83 defines a subpopulation exclusively located to euchromatin, targeted to the site of transcriptional elongation. We showed that OspF directly interacts with HP1γ, and causes HP1 dephosphorylation, suggesting a model in which this virulence effector “uses” HP1 proteins as beacons to target and repress immune gene expression (Harouz, et al. EMBO J (2014. OspF alters HP1γ phosphorylation mainly by inactivating the Erk-activated kinase MSK1, spotlighting it as a new HP1 kinase. In vivo, infectious stresses trigger HP1γ phosphorylation in the colon, principally in the lamina propria and the intestinal crypts. Several lines of evidence suggest that HP1 proteins are modified as extensively as histones, and decrypting the impact of these HP1 post-translational modifications on their transcriptional activities in vivo will be the next challenges to be taken up.

  12. ANALISIS KUANTITATIF BAKTERI Coliform PADA DEPOT AIR MINUM ISI ULANG YANG BERADA DI WILAYAH KAYUTANGI KOTA BANJARMASIN

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    Eka Kumalasari

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Water was one of the natural resources, which was needed by all of living creatures. Safe drinking-water supply should be sought because there was a probability of microorganism contamination in the drinking water, such as Coliform bacteria contamination. The dangerous of Coliform bacteria was that it could cause various illnesses, such as diarrhea, typhus and bacillary dysentery. According to Indonesia National Standard 01- 3553-2006 for packaged drinking water quality requirements, the maximum acceptable contaminant level for Coliform bacteria in each 100 ml refill drinking water sample was <2/100 ml. The purpose of this research is to know or no Coliform bacteria in refill drinking-water and the amount of contaminant in MPN/100 ml, and also to find out whether the drinking-water in various refilling stations in Kayutangi Banjarmasin had fulfilled the requirements of Indonesia National Standard or not. The method of this research was quantitative descriptive research a research which described a phenomenon in a certain population. Saturation sampling technique was used to collect data, and this research used the method of Most Probable Number MPN/100 ml. The results showed that 5 (31,25% samples were positive for containing Coliform bacteria and 11 (65,78% samples were negative for containing Coliform bacteria. The highest MPN/100 ml amount of Coliform bacteria was 190 MPN/100 ml and the lowest MPN/100ml amount of Coliform bacteria was 4 MPN/100 ml. According to the calculation of colony amount using MPN/100 ml table, it was found that all of the five positive samples exceeded the Indonesia National Standard limit, in which the maximum contaminant level was <2/100 ml.

  13. Dipstick for rapid diagnosis of Shigella flexneri 2a in stool.

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    Faridabano Nato

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Shigellosis or bacillary dysentery, an acute bloody diarrhoea, is a major public health burden in developing countries. In the absence of prompt and appropriate treatment, the infection is often fatal, particularly in young malnourished children. Here, we describe a new diagnostic test for rapid detection, in stool, at the bedside of patients, of Shigella flexneri 2a, the most predominant agent of the endemic form of the disease.The test is based on the detection of S.flexneri 2a lipopolysaccharide (LPS using serotype 2a-specific monoclonal antibodies coupled to gold particles and displayed on one-step immunochromatographic dipstick. A concentration as low as 20 ng/ml of LPS is detected in distilled water and in reconstituted stools in under 15 minutes. The threshold of detection corresponds to a concentration of 5x10(7 CFU/ml of S. flexneri 2a, which provides an unequivocal positive reaction in three minutes in distilled water and reconstituted stools. The specificity is 100% when tested with a battery of Shigella and unrelated strains, in culture. When tested in Vietnam, on clinical samples, the specificity and sensitivity were 99.2 and 91.5%, respectively. A decrease of the sensitivity during the evaluation on stool samples was observed after five weeks at room temperature and was due to moistening of the dipsticks caused by the humidity of the air during the fifth week of the evaluation. This drawback is now overcome by improving the packaging and providing dipsticks individually wrapped in waterproof bags.This simple dipstick-bases test represents a powerful tool for case management and epidemiological surveys.

  14. The Structures of Coiled-Coil Domains from Type III Secretion System Translocators Reveal Homology to Pore-Forming Toxins

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    Barta, Michael L.; Dickenson, Nicholas E.; Patil, Mrinalini; Keightley, Andrew; Wyckoff, Gerald J.; Picking, William D.; Picking, Wendy L.; Geisbrecht, Brian V. (UMKC); (OKLU)

    2012-03-26

    Many pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria utilize type III secretion systems (T3SSs) to alter the normal functions of target cells. Shigella flexneri uses its T3SS to invade human intestinal cells to cause bacillary dysentery (shigellosis) that is responsible for over one million deaths per year. The Shigella type III secretion apparatus is composed of a basal body spanning both bacterial membranes and an exposed oligomeric needle. Host altering effectors are secreted through this energized unidirectional conduit to promote bacterial invasion. The active needle tip complex of S. flexneri is composed of a tip protein, IpaD, and two pore-forming translocators, IpaB and IpaC. While the atomic structure of IpaD has been elucidated and studied, structural data on the hydrophobic translocators from the T3SS family remain elusive. We present here the crystal structures of a protease-stable fragment identified within the N-terminal regions of IpaB from S. flexneri and SipB from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium determined at 2.1 {angstrom} and 2.8 {angstrom} limiting resolution, respectively. These newly identified domains are composed of extended-length (114 {angstrom} in IpaB and 71 {angstrom} in SipB) coiled-coil motifs that display a high degree of structural homology to one another despite the fact that they share only 21% sequence identity. Further structural comparisons also reveal substantial similarity to the coiled-coil regions of pore-forming proteins from other Gram-negative pathogens, notably, colicin Ia. This suggests that these mechanistically separate and functionally distinct membrane-targeting proteins may have diverged from a common ancestor during the course of pathogen-specific evolutionary events.

  15. Development of multiple cross displacement amplification label-based gold nanoparticles lateral flow biosensor for detection of Shigella spp.

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    Yi Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Shigella spp., the etiological agent of shigellosis or bacillary dysentery, are responsible for considerable morbidity and mortality in excess of a million deaths globally per year. Although PCR-based techniques (such as PCR-based dipstick biosensors have been used for the molecular diagnosis of infectious disease, these assays were restricted due to the need for a sophisticated thermal cycling apparatus to denature target templates. To facilitate simple and rapid detection of target pathogens, we successfully devised an inexpensive, reliable and nearly instrument-free molecular technique, which incorporates multiple cross displacement amplification (MCDA combined with a newly designed lateral flow biosensor (LFB for visual, sensitive and specific detection of Shigella. The MCDA-LFB assay was conducted at 65 ˚C for only 20 min during the amplification stage, and then products were directly analyzed on the biosensor, alleviating the use of special reagents, electrophoresis equipment and amplicon detection instruments. The entire process, including specimen processing (35 min, amplification (20 and detection (2-5 min, can be finished within 1 h. The MCDA-LFB assay demonstrated high specificity for Shigella detection. The analytical sensitivity of the assay was 10 fg of genomic templates per reaction in pure culture and 5.86 CFU per tube in human fecal samples, which was consistent with MCDA by colorimetric indicator, gel electrophoresis, real time turbidity and fluorescence detection. Hence, the simplicity, rapidity and nearly instrument-free platform of the MCDA-LFB assay make it practical for ‘on-site’ diagnosis, point-of-care testing and more. Moreover, the proof-of-concept approach can be reconfigured to detect a wide variety of target sequences by re-designing the specific MCDA primers.

  16. Soaking suggests "alternative facts": Only co-crystallization discloses major ligand-induced interface rearrangements of a homodimeric tRNA-binding protein indicating a novel mode-of-inhibition.

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    Frederik Rainer Ehrmann

    Full Text Available For the efficient pathogenesis of Shigella, the causative agent of bacillary dysentery, full functionality of tRNA-guanine transglycosylase (TGT is mandatory. TGT performs post-transcriptional modifications of tRNAs in the anticodon loop taking impact on virulence development. This suggests TGT as a putative target for selective anti-shigellosis drug therapy. Since bacterial TGT is only functional as homodimer, its activity can be inhibited either by blocking its active site or by preventing dimerization. Recently, we discovered that in some crystal structures obtained by soaking the full conformational adaptation most likely induced in solution upon ligand binding is not displayed. Thus, soaked structures may be misleading and suggest irrelevant binding modes. Accordingly, we re-investigated these complexes by co-crystallization. The obtained structures revealed large conformational rearrangements not visible in the soaked complexes. They result from spatial perturbations in the ribose-34/phosphate-35 recognition pocket and, consequently, an extended loop-helix motif required to prevent access of water molecules into the dimer interface loses its geometric integrity. Thermodynamic profiles of ligand binding in solution indicate favorable entropic contributions to complex formation when large conformational adaptations in the dimer interface are involved. Native MS titration experiments reveal the extent to which the homodimer is destabilized in the presence of each inhibitor. Unexpectedly, one ligand causes a complete rearrangement of subunit packing within the homodimer, never observed in any other TGT crystal structure before. Likely, this novel twisted dimer is catalytically inactive and, therefore, suggests that stabilizing this non-productive subunit arrangement may be used as a further strategy for TGT inhibition.

  17. Molecular and Cellular mechanisms of Shigella flexneri dissemination

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    Herve eAgaisse

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The intracellular pathogen Shigella flexneri is the causative agent of bacillary dysentery in humans. The disease is characterized by bacterial invasion of intestinal cells, dissemination within the colonic epithelium through direct spread from cell to cell, and massive inflammation of the intestinal mucosa. Here, we review the mechanisms supporting S. flexneri dissemination. The dissemination process primarily relies on actin assembly at the bacterial pole, which propels the pathogen throughout the cytosol of primary infected cells. Polar actin assembly is supported by polar expression of the bacterial autotransporter family member IcsA, which recruits the N-WASP/ARP2/3 actin assembly machinery. As motile bacteria encounter cell-cell contacts, they form plasma membrane protrusions that project into adjacent cells. In addition to the ARP2/3-dependent actin assembly machinery, protrusion formation relies on formins and myosins. The resolution of protrusions into vacuoles occurs through the collapse of the protrusion neck, leading to the formation of an intermediate membrane-bound compartment termed vacuole-like protrusions (VLPs. VLP formation requires tyrosine kinase and phosphoinositide signaling in protrusions, which relies on the integrity of the bacterial type 3 secretion system (T3SS. The T3SS is also required for escaping double membrane vacuoles through the activity of the T3SS translocases IpaB and IpaC, and the effector proteins VirA and IcsB. Numerous factors supporting envelope biogenesis contribute to IcsA exposure and maintenance at the bacterial pole, including LPS synthesis, membrane proteases, and periplasmic chaperones. Although less characterized, the assembly and function of the T3SS in the context of bacterial dissemination also relies on factors supporting envelope biogenesis. Finally, the dissemination process requires the adaptation of the pathogen to various cellular compartments through transcriptional and post

  18. Investigation of specificity determinants in bacterial tRNA-guanine transglycosylase reveals queuine, the substrate of its eucaryotic counterpart, as inhibitor.

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    Inna Biela

    Full Text Available Bacterial tRNA-guanine transglycosylase (Tgt catalyses the exchange of the genetically encoded guanine at the wobble position of tRNAs(His,Tyr,Asp,Asn by the premodified base preQ1, which is further converted to queuine at the tRNA level. As eucaryotes are not able to synthesise queuine de novo but acquire it through their diet, eucaryotic Tgt directly inserts the hypermodified base into the wobble position of the tRNAs mentioned above. Bacterial Tgt is required for the efficient pathogenicity of Shigella sp, the causative agent of bacillary dysentery and, hence, it constitutes a putative target for the rational design of anti-Shigellosis compounds. Since mammalian Tgt is known to be indirectly essential to the conversion of phenylalanine to tyrosine, it is necessary to create substances which only inhibit bacterial but not eucaryotic Tgt. Therefore, it seems of utmost importance to study selectivity-determining features within both types of proteins. Homology models of Caenorhabditis elegans Tgt and human Tgt suggest that the replacement of Cys158 and Val233 in bacterial Tgt (Zymomonas mobilis Tgt numbering by valine and accordingly glycine in eucaryotic Tgt largely accounts for the different substrate specificities. In the present study we have created mutated variants of Z. mobilis Tgt in order to investigate the impact of a Cys158Val and a Val233Gly exchange on catalytic activity and substrate specificity. Using enzyme kinetics and X-ray crystallography, we gained evidence that the Cys158Val mutation reduces the affinity to preQ1 while leaving the affinity to guanine unaffected. The Val233Gly exchange leads to an enlarged substrate binding pocket, that is necessary to accommodate queuine in a conformation compatible with the intermediately covalently bound tRNA molecule. Contrary to our expectations, we found that a priori queuine is recognised by the binding pocket of bacterial Tgt without, however, being used as a substrate.

  19. Role of 30 kDa antigen of enteric bacterial pathogens as a possible arthritogenic factor in post-dysenteric reactive arthritis

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    Malkit Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Reactive arthritis (ReA/Reiter′s syndrome (RS may be caused as a sequel of infections caused by enteric bacterial pathogens, although the mechanisms through, which different pathogens cause similar disease are not clear. Aim: This study was done to look for the presence and role of any common bacterial antigen among the pathogens isolated from such patients. Materials and Methods: A total of 51 patients of ReA and 75 controls (three groups of 25 subjects each: Group 1: Patients who did not develop arthritic complications within 3 months after bacillary dysentery/diarrhea; Group 2: Patients with other arthritic diseases and Group 3: Normal healthy subjects were included. The isolated enteric pathogens were tested to detect the immunodominant antigens. Results and Conclusions: A common 30 kDa antigen was found to be specifically present among seven arthritogenic enteric bacterial strains belonging to three genera, Salmonella, Shigella and Hafnia. Post-dysenteric ReA patients′ sera show higher levels of immunoglobulin G, immunoglobulin M and immunoglobulin A antibodies against this antigen as compared to the controls. Lymphocytes of ReA patients recognize this antigen, proliferate and produce interleukin-2 in response to this antigen more than the lymphocytes of controls. 30 kDa antigen may be a common arthritogenic factor associated with post-dysenteric ReA/RS. The association of Hafnia alvei with post-dysenteric ReA is described for the first time. Four cases of mycobacterial ReA had an association with this antigen, suggesting that the arthritogenic antigen of mycobacteria and enteric bacteria may be of a similar nature.

  20. Cucurbitacin IIb exhibits anti-inflammatory activity through modulating multiple cellular behaviors of mouse lymphocytes.

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    Yao Wang

    Full Text Available Cucurbitacin IIb (CuIIb is one of the major active compounds in Hemsleyadine tablets which have been used for clinical treatment of bacillary dysentery, enteritis and acute tonsilitis. However, its action mechanism has not been completely understood. This study aimed to explore the anti-inflammatory activity of CuIIb and its underlying mechanism in mitogen-activated lymphocytes isolated from mouse mesenteric lymph nodes. The results showed that CuIIb inhibited the proliferation of concanavalin A (Con A-activated lymphocytes in a time- and dose-dependent manner. CuIIb treatment arrested their cell cycle in S and G2/M phases probably due to the disruption of the actin cytoskeleton and the modulation of p27(Kip1 and cyclin levels. Moreover, the surface expression of activation markers CD69 and CD25 on Con A-activated CD3(+ T lymphocytes was suppressed by CuIIb treatment. Both Con A- and phorbol ester plus ionomycin-induced expression of TNF-α, IFN-γ and IL-6 proteins was attenuated upon exposure to CuIIb. Mechanistically, CuIIb treatment suppressed the phosphorylation of JNK and Erk1/2 but not p38 in Con A-activated lymphocytes. Although CuIIb unexpectedly enhanced the phosphorylation of IκB and NF-κB (p65, it blocked the nuclear translocation of NF-κB (p65. In support of this, CuIIb significantly decreased the mRNA levels of IκBα and TNF-α, two target genes of NF-κB, in Con A-activated lymphocytes. In addition, CuIIb downregulated Con A-induced STAT3 phosphorylation and increased cell apoptosis. Collectively, these results suggest that CuIIb exhibits its anti-inflammatory activity through modulating multiple cellular behaviors and signaling pathways, leading to the suppression of the adaptive immune response.