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Sample records for dysarthria

  1. Dysarthria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Impairment of speech; Slurred speech; Speech disorders - dysarthria ... In a person with dysarthria, a nerve, brain, or muscle disorder makes it difficult to use or control the muscles of the mouth, tongue, larynx, ...

  2. Dysarthria - care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speech and language disorder - dysarthria care; Slurred speech - dysarthria; Articulation disorder - dysarthria ... Dysarthria is a condition that occurs when there are problems with the muscles that help you talk. ...

  3. Disorders of communication: dysarthria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enderby, Pam

    2013-01-01

    Dysarthria is a motor speech disorder which can be classified according to the underlying neuropathology and is associated with disturbances of respiration, laryngeal function, airflow direction, and articulation resulting in difficulties of speech quality and intelligibility. There are six major types of dysarthria: flaccid dysarthria associated with lower motor neuron impairment, spastic dysarthria associated with damaged upper motor neurons linked to the motor areas of the cerebral cortex, ataxic dysarthria primarily caused by cerebellar dysfunction, and hyperkinetic dysarthria and hypokinetic dysarthria, which are related to a disorder of the extrapyramidal system. The sixth is generally termed a mixed dysarthria and is associated with damage in more than one area, resulting in speech characteristics of at least two groups. The features of the speech disturbance of these six major types of dysarthria are distinctive and can assist with diagnosis. Dysarthria is a frequent symptom of many neurological conditions and is commonly associated with progressive neurological disease. It has a profound effect upon the patient and their families as communication is integrally related with expressing personality and social relationships. Speech and language therapy can be used to encourage the person to use the speech that is already available to them more effectively, can increase the range and consistency of sound production, can teach strategies for improving intelligibility and communicative effectiveness, can guide the individual to use methods that are less tiring and more successful, and can introduce the appropriate Augmentative and Alternative Communication approaches as and when required.

  4. Dysarthria and mutism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternic, Nadezda; Mijajlovic, Milija; Tomic, Gordana; Pavlovic, Aleksandra

    2012-01-01

    Dysarthria is a speech disorder associated with impairments of intelligibility, smoothness, loudness, and clarity of articulations. Dysarthria involves disability of reproducing various physical, tonal, and sound features of speech sounds in oral speech; unintelligible and slurred articulation with swallowing of sounds is characteristic. Articulatory movements and speech are slow, patients complain to the sensations of a 'thick' tongue and 'porridge' in the mouth. Patients'phrases are constructed correctly, vocabulary is not affected, and the grammatical structure of words is preserved. Reading, writing, internal speech, and understanding of speech are unaffected. Several types of dysarthria have been described on the basis of the lesion locations. Dysarthria can be associated with lacunar syndromes as well. Mutism represents a condition when patient cannot speak and answer the questions, but remains conscious and is able to produce written speech.

  5. Perceptual Ratings of Subgroups of Ataxic Dysarthria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Kristie A.; France, Ashley A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The speech characteristics of ataxic dysarthria are known to be quite diverse. The varied presentation of this dysarthria challenges researchers and clinicians alike, and brings into question whether it is a single entity. While the possibility of subtypes of ataxic dysarthria has been suggested, the nature of these putative groups…

  6. Pure dysarthria due to an insular infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraga, Akiyuki; Tanaka, Saiko; Kamitsukasa, Ikuo

    2010-06-01

    Cortical infarction presenting with pure dysarthria is rarely reported. Previous studies have reported pure dysarthria due to cortical stroke at the precentral gyrus or middle frontal gyrus. We report a 72-year-old man who developed pure dysarthria caused by an acute cortical infarction in the insular cortex. The role of the insula in language has been difficult to assess clinically because of the rarity of pure insular strokes. Our patient showed pure dysarthria without aphasia, indicating that pure dysarthria can be the sole manifestation of insular infarctions.

  7. Dysarthria in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomik, Barbara; Guiloff, Roberto J

    2010-01-01

    Dysarthria is a motor disorder of speech characterized by abnormalities of the articulation and intelligibility of speech. Phonation and the rate of facial movements may also be affected. Understanding the nature and course of dysarthria in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is important because loss of communication prevents patients from participating in many activities, may lead to social isolation, and reduces the quality of life. The goal of management of dysarthria in ALS patients is to optimize communication effectiveness for as long as possible. The information about dysarthria in ALS is dispersed in physiological, pathological, speech therapy, otorhinolaringological and neurological publications. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge on the clinical features, differential diagnosis, pathophysiology, investigations and management of dysarthria in ALS patients. There is a need to compare the different methods used to assess dysarthria and for controlled clinical trials to assess therapeutic strategies.

  8. Intensive Treatment of Dysarthria Secondary to Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahler, Leslie A.; Ramig, Lorraine O.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of a well-defined behavioral dysarthria treatment on acoustic and perceptual measures of speech in four adults with dysarthria secondary to stroke. A single-subject A-B-A experimental design was used to measure the effects of the Lee Silverman Voice Treatment (LSVT[R]LOUD) on the speech of individual…

  9. Patients' Experiences of Disruptions Associated with Post-Stroke Dysarthria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Sylvia; Barbour, Rosaline S.; Brady, Marian; Clark, Alexander M.; Paton, Gillian

    2008-01-01

    Background: Post-stroke dysarthria rehabilitation should consider social participation for people with dysarthria, but before this approach can be adopted, an understanding of the psychosocial impact of dysarthria is required. Despite the prevalence of dysarthria as a result of stroke, there is a paucity of research into this communication…

  10. Paroxysmal ataxia and dysarthria in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iorio, R; Capone, F; Plantone, D; Batocchi, A P

    2014-01-01

    Paroxysmal ataxia and dysarthria are part of the spectrum of transient neurological disturbances that can be frequently encountered in multiple sclerosis (MS). Prompt recognition of these symptoms is important because they can be the only manifestation of a MS relapse and symptomatic therapy is often beneficial. We report a patient who developed paroxysmal ataxia and dysarthria, documented by video imaging, while he was recovering from a MS relapse. Treatment with carbamazepine resulted in the complete reversal of the paroxysmal ataxia and dysarthria. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Dysarthria

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... More Than One Language Adult Speech and Language Child Speech and Language Swallowing and Feeding Self-Help Groups Find a Professional Advertising Disclaimer Advertise with us About Us The American ...

  12. Patterns of Apoplectic Dysarthria and Acupuncture Treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jian-bin; HUANG Guo-qi

    2003-01-01

    In accordance with the feature of apoplectic dysarthria, it is divided into three types of labial pattern, lingual pattern and laryngeal pattern.The therapeutic methods are respectively explained with case examples.

  13. Dysarthria in Friedreich's ataxia: a perceptual analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folker, Joanne; Murdoch, Bruce; Cahill, Louise; Delatycki, Martin; Corben, Louise; Vogel, Adam

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this study were to: (1) evaluate the perceptual speech dimensions, speech intelligibility and dysarthria severity of a group of individuals diagnosed with Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA); (2) determine the presence of subgroups within FRDA dysarthria; (3) investigate the relationship between the speech outcome and the clinical factors of disease progression. The study included 38 individuals (21 female, 17 male) with a confirmed diagnosis of FRDA. A group of 20 non-neurologically impaired individuals served as controls. Perceptual analysis, investigating 30 different dimensions of speech, was conducted on a speech sample obtained from each participant. In addition, the Assessment of Intelligibility of Dysarthria Speech was administered. All FRDA participants presented with dysarthria with severities ranging from mild to moderate. Cluster analysis revealed 3 subgroups, the first presenting with mild dysarthric symptoms, the second with increased velopharyngeal involvement and the third characterized by increased laryngeal dysfunction. Dysarthria severity showed a significant correlation to disease duration but to no other clinical measure. The findings support the notion of subgroups in FRDA dysarthria, representing distinct impairments of the speech mechanism and perhaps reflective of differing evolutions beyond the cerebellum.

  14. Behavioural Intervention Effects in Dysarthria Following Stroke: Communication Effectiveness, Intelligibility and Dysarthria Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Catherine; Lowit, Anja

    2007-01-01

    Background: Dysarthria is a common post-stroke presentation. Its management falls within the remit of the speech and language therapy profession. Little controlled evaluation of the effects of intervention for dysarthria in stroke has been reported. Aims: The study aimed to determine the effects of a period of behavioural communication…

  15. An Acoustic Study of the Relationships among Neurologic Disease, Dysarthria Type, and Severity of Dysarthria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yunjung; Kent, Raymond D.; Weismer, Gary

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined acoustic predictors of speech intelligibility in speakers with several types of dysarthria secondary to different diseases and conducted classification analysis solely by acoustic measures according to 3 variables (disease, speech severity, and dysarthria type). Method: Speech recordings from 107 speakers with…

  16. Acquired childhood dysarthria: review of its clinical presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Mourik, M; Catsman-Berrevoets, C E; Paquier, P F; Yousef-Bak, E; van Dongen, H R

    1997-11-01

    The adult classification of dysarthria correlating with the pathophysiology of the motor systems is usually applied to classify acquired childhood dysarthria. However, the validity of this adult model for children has not been studied systematically. All studies pertaining to analysis of speech features in acquired childhood dysarthria published since 1980 were reviewed. Studies were classified on the basis of neuroradiologic evidence of lesion site and associated motor disorder. This review demonstrates that knowledge of acquired childhood dysarthria is based on a limited number of single case studies, most of which pertain to dysarthria occurring after resection of cerebellar tumor. Definite similarities to adult dysarthria were not evident. Some similarity to acquired childhood dysarthria due to basal ganglia lesions was detected. We conclude that acquired childhood dysarthria requires its own classification.

  17. Quantitative Assessment of Interutterance Stability: Application to Dysarthria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, Fred; Lowit, Anja; van Brenk, Frits

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Following recent attempts to quantify articulatory impairment in speech, the present study evaluates the usefulness of a novel measure of motor stability to characterize dysarthria. Method: The study included 8 speakers with ataxic dysarthria (AD), 16 speakers with hypokinetic dysarthria (HD) as a result of Parkinson's disease, and…

  18. [Dysarthria across Parkinson's disease progression. Natural history of its components: dysphonia, dysprosody and dysarthria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, S; Ghio, A; Teston, B; Viallet, F

    2010-10-01

    Dysarthria refers to a collective name for a group of neurologic motor speech disorders, resulting from central and/or peripheral nervous system abnormalities. Speech alteration in Parkinson's disease, so-called hypokinetic dysarthria, presents with prosodic insufficiency, related to a monotony of pitch and intensity, a reduction of accentuation, variable speech rate and possible phoneme imprecision. In most cases, voice is harsh and breathy. This symptom can affect both voice and speech quality, as well as prosody and intelligibility. As a consequence, many patients complain about speech impairments, which affect their communication in daily living activities. Perceptual and instrumental assessments require different and numerous investigation methods, which use may help to further understand the specific dysarthria pathophysiology. This is of importance in order to adjust treatments for dysarthria; as a matter of fact, dopa-therapy, functional neurosurgery or even behavioural speech therapy have variable effects on voice and speech quality in Parkinson's disease.

  19. Vowel Acoustics in Dysarthria: Mapping to Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansford, Kaitlin L.; Liss, Julie M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the present report was to explore whether vowel metrics, demonstrated to distinguish dysarthric and healthy speech in a companion article (Lansford & Liss, 2014), are able to predict human perceptual performance. Method: Vowel metrics derived from vowels embedded in phrases produced by 45 speakers with dysarthria were…

  20. Vowel Acoustics in Dysarthria: Mapping to Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansford, Kaitlin L.; Liss, Julie M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the present report was to explore whether vowel metrics, demonstrated to distinguish dysarthric and healthy speech in a companion article (Lansford & Liss, 2014), are able to predict human perceptual performance. Method: Vowel metrics derived from vowels embedded in phrases produced by 45 speakers with dysarthria were…

  1. Discriminating Dysarthria Type from Envelope Modulation Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liss, Julie M.; LeGendre, Sue; Lotto, Andrew J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Previous research demonstrated the ability of temporally based rhythm metrics to distinguish among dysarthrias with different prosodic deficit profiles (J. M. Liss et al., 2009). The authors examined whether comparable results could be obtained by an automated analysis of speech envelope modulation spectra (EMS), which quantifies the…

  2. Changes to articulation following LSVT(R) and traditional dysarthria therapy in non-progressive dysarthria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenke, Rachel J; Cornwell, Petrea; Theodoros, Deborah G

    2010-06-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of the Lee Silverman Voice Treatment (LSVT(R)) on acoustic and perceptual measures of articulation in non-progressive dysarthria in comparison to traditional dysarthria therapy. The study involved 26 individuals with non-progressive dysarthria who were randomly allocated to receive either LSVT(R) or traditional dysarthria therapy (TRAD), both of which were administered for 16 hourly sessions over 4 weeks. Participants' speech samples were collected over a total of six testing sessions during three assessment phases: (1) prior to treatment, (2) immediately post-treatment, and (3) 6 months post-treatment (FU). Speech samples were analysed perceptually to determine articulatory precision and intelligibility as well as acoustically using vowel space (and vowel formant measures) and first moment differences. Results revealed short and long-term significant increases in vowel space area following LSVT(R). Significantly increased intelligibility was also found at FU in the LSVT(R) group. No significant differences between groups for any variables were found. The study reveals that LSVT(R) may be a suitable treatment option for improving vowel articulation and subsequent intelligibility in some individuals with non-progressive dysarthria.

  3. Clinical identification of dysarthria types among neurologists, residents in neurology and speech therapists.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaff, M. Van der; Kuiper, T.; Zwinderman, A.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Poels, P.J.E.; Offeringa, A.; Kooi, A. van der; Speelman, H.D.; Visser, M. de

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Classification of dysarthria types comprises flaccid, spastic, ataxic, hypo- and hyperkinetic and mixed dysarthria. This study focussed on the ability of neurologists to clinically identify the correct type of dysarthria in neurological patients. METHODS: Eighteen patients with dysarthri

  4. Implementing two treatment approaches to childhood dysarthria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Erika S

    2014-08-01

    The paucity of evidence and detail in the literature regarding speech treatment for children with dysarthria due to cerebral palsy (CP) renders it difficult for researchers to replicate studies and make further inroads into this area in need of exploration. Furthermore, for speech-language pathologists (SLPs) wishing to follow treatments that the literature indicates have promise, little guidance is available on the details of the treatments that yielded the positive results. The present article details the implementation of two treatment approaches in speech treatment research for children with dysarthria: Speech Systems Intelligibility Treatment (SSIT) and the Lee Silverman Voice Treatment LOUD (LSVT LOUD). Specific strategies, primarily for treatment, but also for outcome measurement and acoustic analysis of dysarthric speech, are described. These techniques are provided for researchers and clinicians to consider implementing in order to advance speech treatment for this population. New data from research using these approaches are presented, including findings of acoustic vowel space changes following both speech treatments.

  5. FATIGUE AND FAULTY POSTURE CONNECTION AMONG CHILDREN, DIAGNOSED WITH DYSARTHRIA

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Purpose : To analyze spastic dysarthria form in children population dependency of fatigue and faulty posture relationship. Methods: Research performed with the permission of the bioethics committee (RE-BK-063). The Dutch Fatigue Scale (DUFS). Posture in standing was assessed by Hoeger and Kendall. Research subjects n=40. n=20 children diagnosed with spastic dysarthria and n=20 of children without dysarthria. Their age was 10±2.1years. Boys were n=20 and girls - n=20.Results were statistically...

  6. Physiological investigation of dysarthria: recent advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdoch, Bruce E

    2011-02-01

    Recent years have seen the development and introduction of a range of new physiological instruments for investigating various aspects of articulatory function in persons with dysarthria. Included among these techniques are electromagnetic articulography (EMA), electropalatography (EPG), and pressure-sensing EPG. The aim of this paper is to describe and evaluate these techniques, highlighting their relative advantages, disadvantages, and specific applications in assessing articulation in speakers with dysarthria associated with a variety of neurological disorders. Emphasis will be given to those instruments that enable researchers and clinicians to examine articulatory functions in 3-dimensions, such as 3D-EMA (AG500) and 3D-EPG. In addition the application of pressure-sensing EPG and ultrasonography will be outlined. Each of these physiological techniques will be fully described in terms of their component hardware and underlying principles of operation. The use of each technique in the assessment of dysarthria will be illustrated wherever possible by reference to specific case examples, and especially cases drawn from various neuropathological groups. Research findings reported to date based on each of the above physiological instruments will be reviewed and the research summarized.

  7. Friedreich ataxia: dysarthria profile and clinical data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brendel, Bettina; Ackermann, Hermann; Berg, Daniela; Lindig, Tobias; Schölderle, Theresa; Schöls, Ludger; Synofzik, Matthis; Ziegler, Wolfram

    2013-08-01

    Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) is the most frequent recessive ataxia in the Western world. Dysarthria is a cardinal feature of FRDA, often leading to severe impairments in daily functioning, but its exact characteristics are only poorly understood so far. We performed a comprehensive evaluation of dysarthria severity and the profile of speech motor deficits in 20 patients with a genetic diagnosis of FRDA based on a carefully selected battery of speaking tasks and two widely used paraspeech tasks, i.e., oral diadochokinesis and sustained vowel productions. Perceptual ratings of the speech samples identified respiration, voice quality, voice instability, articulation, and tempo as the most affected speech dimensions. Whereas vocal instability predicted ataxia severity, tempo turned out as a significant correlate of disease duration. Furthermore, articulation predicted the overall intelligibility score as determined by a systematic speech pathology assessment tool. In contrast, neurologists' ratings of intelligibility--a component of the "Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia"--were found to be related to perceived speech tempo. Obviously, clinicians are more sensitive to slowness of speech than to any other feature of spoken language during dysarthria evaluation. Our results suggest that different components of speech production and trunk/limb motor functions are differentially susceptible to FRDA pathology. Furthermore, evidence emerged that paraspeech tasks do not allow for an adequate scaling of speech deficits in FRDA.

  8. FATIGUE AND FAULTY POSTURE CONNECTION AMONG CHILDREN, DIAGNOSED WITH DYSARTHRIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrejeva Julija

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To analyze spastic dysarthria form in children population dependency of fatigue and faulty posture relationship. Methods: Research performed with the permission of the bioethics committee (RE-BK-063. The Dutch Fatigue Scale (DUFS. Posture in standing was assessed by Hoeger and Kendall. Research subjects n=40. n=20 children diagnosed with spastic dysarthria and n=20 of children without dysarthria. Their age was 10±2.1years. Boys were n=20 and girls - n=20.Results were statistically significant at p<0.05. Microsoft Office 2013, Excel package were used to count a research results. Results: For children with dysarthria fatigue level is more significant that for children without dysarthria; results were statistically significant, p<0.05. Posture disorder for children with dysarthria was statistically significant higher than among children without dysarthria, p<0.05. Conclusions: For children with dysarthria fatigue level is higher than for healthy children, thus for the girls fatigue level is higher than for the boys. Spastic form dysarthria has an impact to a child posture, by creating a direct dependency between posture deformation and skeletal muscle system disease, which decreases muscle power and increasing fatigue for a child. To correct faulty posture thus to decrease fatigue the tight collaboration needed between rehabilitation team members.

  9. The "Living with Dysarthria" Group for Post-Stroke Dysarthria: The Participant Voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, C.; Kelly, S.; Paton, G.; Brady, M.; Muir, M.

    2013-01-01

    Background:The "Living with Dysarthria" group programme, devised for people with post-stroke dysarthia and family members, was piloted twice. Feedback from those who experience an intervention contributes to the evaluation of speech and language therapy programmes, giving the participant view of the intervention's value and guiding…

  10. Breath-Group Intelligibility in Dysarthria: Characteristics and Underlying Correlates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunusova, Yana; Weismer, Gary; Kent, Ray D.; Rusche, Nicole M.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This study was designed to determine whether within-speaker fluctuations in speech intelligibility occurred among speakers with dysarthria who produced a reading passage, and, if they did, whether selected linguistic and acoustic variables predicted the variations in speech intelligibility. Method: Participants with dysarthria included a…

  11. Rate and Loudness Manipulations in Dysarthria: Acoustic and Perceptual Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjaden, Kris; Wilding, Gregory E.

    2004-01-01

    Both rate reduction and increased loudness reportedly are associated with an increase in the size of the articulatory-acoustic working space and improved acoustic distinctiveness for speakers with dysarthria. Improved intelligibility also has been reported. Few studies have directly compared rate and loudness effects for speakers with dysarthria,…

  12. Acquired Dysarthria in Conversation: Identifying Sources of Understandability Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, Steven; Wilkinson, Ray

    2009-01-01

    Background: Acquired progressive dysarthria is traditionally assessed, rated, and researched using measures of speech perception and intelligibility. The focus is commonly on the individual with dysarthria and how speech deviates from a normative range. A complementary approach is to consider the features and consequences of dysarthric speech as…

  13. Progressive Dysarthria and Augmentative and Alternative Communication in Conversation: Establishing the Reliability of the Dysarthria-in-Interaction Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, Steven; Tuomainen, Jyrki

    2017-01-01

    Background: The Dysarthria-in-Interaction Profile's potential contribution to the clinical assessment of dysarthria-in-conversation has been outlined in the literature, but its consistency of use across different users has yet to be reported. Aims: To establish the level of consistency across raters on four different interaction categories. That…

  14. Free-classification of perceptually similar speakers with dysarthria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansford, Kaitlin L; Liss, Julie M; Norton, Rebecca E

    2014-12-01

    In this investigation, the construct of perceptual similarity was explored in the dysarthrias. Specifically, we employed an auditory free-classification task to determine whether listeners could cluster speakers by perceptual similarity, whether the clusters mapped to acoustic metrics, and whether the clusters were constrained by dysarthria subtype diagnosis. Twenty-three listeners blinded to speakers' medical and dysarthria subtype diagnoses participated. The task was to group together (drag and drop) the icons corresponding to 33 speakers with dysarthria on the basis of how similar they sounded. Cluster analysis and multidimensional scaling (MDS) modeled the perceptual dimensions underlying similarity. Acoustic metrics and perceptual judgments were used in correlation analyses to facilitate interpretation of the derived dimensions. Six clusters of similar-sounding speakers and 3 perceptual dimensions underlying similarity were revealed. The clusters of similar-sounding speakers were not constrained by dysarthria subtype diagnosis. The 3 perceptual dimensions revealed by MDS were correlated with metrics for articulation rate, intelligibility, and vocal quality, respectively. This study shows (a) feasibility of a free-classification approach for studying perceptual similarity in dysarthria, (b) correspondence between acoustic and perceptual metrics to clusters of similar-sounding speakers, and (c) similarity judgments transcended dysarthria subtype diagnosis.

  15. Studies of Chinese speakers with dysarthria: informing theoretical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehill, Tara L

    2010-01-01

    Most theoretical models of dysarthria have been developed based on research using individuals speaking English or other Indo-European languages. Studies of individuals with dysarthria speaking other languages can allow investigation into the universality of such models, and the interplay between language-specific and language-universal aspects of dysarthria. In this article, studies of Cantonese- and Mandarin-Chinese speakers with dysarthria are reviewed. The studies focused on 2 groups of speakers: those with cerebral palsy and those with Parkinson's disease. Key findings are compared with similar studies of English speakers. Since Chinese is tonal in nature, the impact of dysarthria on lexical tone has received considerable attention in the literature. The relationship between tone [which involves fundamental frequency (F(0)) control at the syllable level] and intonation (involving F(0) control at the sentential level) has received more recent attention. Many findings for Chinese speakers with dysarthria support earlier findings for English speakers, thus affirming the language-universal aspect of dysarthria. However, certain differences, which can be attributed to the distinct phonologies of Cantonese and Mandarin, highlight the language-specific aspects of the condition.

  16. Dysarthria in children with cerebellar or brainstem tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Mourik, M; Catsman-Berrevoets, C E; Yousef-Bak, E; Paquier, P F; van Dongen, H R

    1998-05-01

    Speech features were perceptually analyzed in two groups of children. The first group (n = 6) had undergone cerebellar tumor resection, and the second group (n = 6) included children with brainstem tumors. Children belonging to the first group became dysarthric after a postoperative mute phase. Slow speech rate was a specific feature, but scanning speech and irregular articulatory breakdown (i.e., prominent characteristics in adult ataxic dysarthria) were not observed. In the second group, hypernasality was a prominent characteristic and resembled flaccid dysarthria in adults. These findings suggest that acquired childhood dysarthria needs a proper classification.

  17. Isolated paroxysmal dysarthria caused by a single demyelinating midbrain lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codeluppi, Luca; Bigliardi, Guido; Chiari, Annalisa; Meletti, Stefano

    2013-10-16

    Paroxysmal dysarthria is an unusual condition characterised by brief episodes of dysarthria with the sudden onset and frequent recurrence. It has been mainly reported in multiple sclerosis and an association with midbrain lesions has been claimed; however, most of the reported patients had multiple brain alterations so it was difficult to associate this symptom with a specific lesion site. We illustrate the cases of two patients with an isolated demyelinating midbrain lesion presenting paroxysmal dysarthria as the only symptom; both participants had oligoclonal bands in the cerebrospinal fluid and an unremarkable follow-up. Both patients had benefit from carbamazepine treatment, similarly to previously reported cases. Our report confirms that a demyelinating midbrain lesion is sufficient to provoke paroxysmal dysarthria. It is noteworthy that an erroneous diagnosis of psychogenic disorders was initially made in both cases, highlighting the importance not to underestimate isolated paroxysmal symptoms in clinical practice.

  18. Relationship Between Prosody and Intelligibility in Children with Dysarthria

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Exaggerated and redundant prosodic cue use has been noted among adults with dysarthria secondary to cerebral palsy (CP) (Patel, 2004; van Doorn & Sheard, 2001). A possible explanation may be that speakers heighten prosodic contrasts to increase intelligibility. The current work examined whether children with dysarthria due to CP also produce exaggerated prosodic contours and if so, how prosodic cue use in these speakers impacts intelligibility. Acoustic analyses were conducted on a previously...

  19. PSYCHOSENSORIMOTOR DEVELOPMENT OF PRESCHOOLERS WITH MILD CASE OF PSEUDOBULBAR DYSARTHRIA

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The article covers the research of connection between mental, sensor and motor development, sensorimotor, ideomotor and emotional-motor reactions and also their variations by preschoolers with mild case of pseudobulbar dysarthria. The aim of the research is in theoretical study of specification of psychosensorimotor development of preschoolers with mild case of pseudobulbar dysarthria. Novelty of the research is in substantiation of the theoretical importance of studying psychosensorimotor de...

  20. Neurogenic Orofacial Weakness and Speech in Adults With Dysarthria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Nancy Pearl; Makashay, Matthew J; Helou, Leah B; Clark, Heather M

    2017-08-15

    This study compared orofacial strength between adults with dysarthria and neurologically normal (NN) matched controls. In addition, orofacial muscle weakness was examined for potential relationships to speech impairments in adults with dysarthria. Matched groups of 55 adults with dysarthria and 55 NN adults generated maximum pressure (Pmax) against an air-filled bulb during lingual elevation, protrusion and lateralization, and buccodental and labial compressions. These orofacial strength measures were compared with speech intelligibility, perceptual ratings of speech, articulation rate, and fast syllable-repetition rate. The dysarthria group demonstrated significantly lower orofacial strength than the NN group on all tasks. Lingual strength correlated moderately and buccal strength correlated weakly with most ratings of speech deficits. Speech intelligibility was not sensitive to dysarthria severity. Individuals with severely reduced anterior lingual elevation Pmax (orofacial muscle weakness in adults with dysarthrias of varying etiologies but reinforce tenuous links between orofacial strength and speech production disorders. By examining individual data, preliminary evidence emerges to suggest that speech, but not necessarily intelligibility, is likely to be impaired when lingual weakness is severe.

  1. [Language disorders in acute cerebellitis: beyond dysarthria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barragan-Martinez, D; Nunez-Enamorado, N; Berenguer-Potenciano, M; Villora-Morcillo, N; Martinez de Aragon, A; Camacho-Salas, A

    2017-01-01

    Acute cerebellitis is one of the main causes of cerebellar syndrome in infancy. Among the wide range of manifestations, headache and ataxia being the most predominant, we can find other less frequent, although nonetheless interesting, ones, such as language disorders, which go beyond the well-known cerebellar dysarthria. The different combinations in which the symptoms can appear, especially when not accompanied by ataxia, make the condition a real challenge for the clinician. Two patients, aged 2 and 4 years, with clinical features, lab tests and neuroimaging results consistent with parainfectious acute cerebellitis. Both of them also presented a striking language disorder, one in the form of cerebellar mutism and the other in the form of hypofluency and agrammatism, the latter also developing in the absence of ataxia. Both cases progressed favourably, and mild speech alterations persisted in the follow-up visits. Cases such as these expand the range of clinical manifestations of acute cerebellitis. The involvement of the cerebellum in neurocognitive processes like language is becoming increasingly more important and, although many aspects are still only speculations, managing to define its true role will have important repercussions on the diagnosis, treatment and long-term prognosis of these patients.

  2. Vowel Acoustics in Dysarthria: Mapping to Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansford, Kaitlin L.; Liss, Julie M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the present report was to explore whether vowel metrics, demonstrated to distinguish dysarthric and healthy speech in a companion article (Lansford & Liss, 2014), are able to predict human perceptual performance. Method Vowel metrics derived from vowels embedded in phrases produced by 45 speakers with dysarthria were compared with orthographic transcriptions of these phrases collected from 120 healthy listeners. First, correlation and stepwise multiple regressions were conducted to identify acoustic metrics that had predictive value for perceptual measures. Next, discriminant function analysis misclassifications were compared with listeners’ misperceptions to examine more directly the perceptual consequences of degraded vowel acoustics. Results Several moderate correlative relationships were found between acoustic metrics and perceptual measures, with predictive models accounting for 18%–75% of the variance in measures of intelligibility and vowel accuracy. Results of the second analysis showed that listeners better identified acoustically distinctive vowel tokens. In addition, the level of agreement between misclassified-to-misperceived vowel tokens supports some specificity of degraded acoustic profiles on the resulting percept. Conclusion Results provide evidence that degraded vowel acoustics have some effect on human perceptual performance, even in the presence of extravowel variables that naturally exert influence in phrase perception. PMID:24687468

  3. Dysarthria and dysphagia are highly prevalent among various types of neuromuscular diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knuijt, Simone; Kalf, Johanna G.; de Swart, Bert J. M.; Drost, Gea; Hendricks, Henk T.; Geurts, Alexander C. H.; van Engelen, Baziel G. M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Patients with a neuromuscular disease (NMD) can present with dysarthria and/or dysphagia. Literature regarding prevalence rates of dysarthria and dysphagia is scarce. The purpose of this study was to determine prevalence rates, severity and co-presence of dysarthria and dysphagia in adult

  4. Dysarthria and dysphagia are highly prevalent among various types of neuromuscular diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knuijt, S.; Kalf, J.G.; Swart, B.J. de; Drost, G.; Hendricks, H.T.; Geurts, A.C.; Engelen, B.G. van

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Patients with a neuromuscular disease (NMD) can present with dysarthria and/or dysphagia. Literature regarding prevalence rates of dysarthria and dysphagia is scarce. The purpose of this study was to determine prevalence rates, severity and co-presence of dysarthria and dysphagia in adult

  5. Dysarthria and dysphagia are highly prevalent among various types of neuromuscular diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knuijt, S.; Kalf, J.G.; Swart, B.J. de; Drost, G.; Hendricks, H.T.; Geurts, A.C.; Engelen, B.G. van

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Patients with a neuromuscular disease (NMD) can present with dysarthria and/or dysphagia. Literature regarding prevalence rates of dysarthria and dysphagia is scarce. The purpose of this study was to determine prevalence rates, severity and co-presence of dysarthria and dysphagia in adult p

  6. [A case of sigmoid colon cancer with temporary dysarthria associated with irinotecan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sogabe, Susumu; Yuki, Satoshi; Takano, Hironobu; Kobayashi, Yoshimitsu; Nakatsumi, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Takahide; Kawamoto, Yasuyuki; Fukushima, Hiraku; Iwanaga, Ichiro; Uehata, Yasuko; Komatsu, Yoshito; Asaka, Masahiro

    2011-08-01

    A40 -year-old woman visited our hospital with adenocaricinoma of the sigmoid colon with multiple liver metastases and ovarian metastasis. Because of a stenosis of the primary tumor, she underwent a colostomy before chemotherapy. 5-fluorouracil and irinotecan and leucovorin(FOLFIRI)was selected as first-line chemotherapy. At the start of chemotherapy, just after the end of irinotecan and leucovorin administration, the patient developed dysarthria. There were no neurological abnormalities or hematological abnormalities. The treatment was temporarily discontinued, and the dysarthria completely disappeared within 90 minutes. 5-fluorouracil was administered after the disappearance of dysarthria. Within 60 minutes of the administration of irinotecan and leucovorin at the second chemotherapy treatment, the patient developed dysarthria again. The patient had no neurological or hematological abnormalities. Magnetic resonance imaging(MRI)showed no abnormalities. The treatment was stopped and dysarthria disappeared within 60 minutes as it did the first time. At each time, no treatment for dysarthria was performed. This patient refused to continue irinotecan because of dysarthria. Therefore, chemotherapy without irinotecan was continued for the third time onward. In the previous literature, 8 cases of dysarthria caused by irinotecan were reported as a rare toxicity. In all cases, dysarthria was temporary and reversible. Because the mechanism of dysarthria is unclear, specific treatment and precaution for dysarthria is not recommended. Since dysarthria is reversible, however, irinotecan might be continued until progression.

  7. Dysarthria and dysphagia are highly prevalent among various types of neuromuscular diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knuijt, Simone; Kalf, Johanna G.; de Swart, Bert J. M.; Drost, Gea; Hendricks, Henk T.; Geurts, Alexander C. H.; van Engelen, Baziel G. M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Patients with a neuromuscular disease (NMD) can present with dysarthria and/or dysphagia. Literature regarding prevalence rates of dysarthria and dysphagia is scarce. The purpose of this study was to determine prevalence rates, severity and co-presence of dysarthria and dysphagia in adult p

  8. Degraded Vowel Acoustics and the Perceptual Consequences in Dysarthria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansford, Kaitlin L.

    Distorted vowel production is a hallmark characteristic of dysarthric speech, irrespective of the underlying neurological condition or dysarthria diagnosis. A variety of acoustic metrics have been used to study the nature of vowel production deficits in dysarthria; however, not all demonstrate sensitivity to the exhibited deficits. Less attention has been paid to quantifying the vowel production deficits associated with the specific dysarthrias. Attempts to characterize the relationship between naturally degraded vowel production in dysarthria with overall intelligibility have met with mixed results, leading some to question the nature of this relationship. It has been suggested that aberrant vowel acoustics may be an index of overall severity of the impairment and not an "integral component" of the intelligibility deficit. A limitation of previous work detailing perceptual consequences of disordered vowel acoustics is that overall intelligibility, not vowel identification accuracy, has been the perceptual measure of interest. A series of three experiments were conducted to address the problems outlined herein. The goals of the first experiment were to identify subsets of vowel metrics that reliably distinguish speakers with dysarthria from non-disordered speakers and differentiate the dysarthria subtypes. Vowel metrics that capture vowel centralization and reduced spectral distinctiveness among vowels differentiated dysarthric from non-disordered speakers. Vowel metrics generally failed to differentiate speakers according to their dysarthria diagnosis. The second and third experiments were conducted to evaluate the relationship between degraded vowel acoustics and the resulting percept. In the second experiment, correlation and regression analyses revealed vowel metrics that capture vowel centralization and distinctiveness and movement of the second formant frequency were most predictive of vowel identification accuracy and overall intelligibility. The third

  9. The effect of pacing strategies on the variability of speech movement sequences in dysarthria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHenry, Monica A

    2003-06-01

    There are many potential sources of variability in speech production, particularly in individuals with dysarthria. The degree and time course of stabilization of the speech production system during recovery from a neurological insult is not constant across individuals. Another source of variability in speech production is speaking rate. Although individuals with no neurological impairments typically show increased variability at reduced speaking rates, this phenomenon has not been explored extensively in individuals with dysarthria. Because rate control strategies are commonly used in dysarthria treatment, it is of clinical importance to know if individuals with dysarthria produce less variable speech with rate reduction. Six individuals with mild dysarthria, 6 with moderate-to-severe dysarthria, and 6 matched normal controls repeated an utterance in four speaking rate conditions: habitual, fast, breaks between words, and stretched. Data were analyzed using the spatiotemporal index (STI), a composite measure of spatial and temporal variability across token repetitions. The normal controls consistently demonstrated the least variability, regardless of rate condition. Both groups with dysarthria were the least variable in the stretched condition and the most variable in the fast condition. The STI values of the group with moderate-to-severe dysarthria were significantly different from both the individuals with mild dysarthria and the normal controls. There were no significant differences between the group with mild dysarthria and the normal controls. In general, slowing the speaking rate in individuals with dysarthria reduces spatiotemporal variability; however, the effect of reduced spatiotemporal variability on intelligibility requires further investigation.

  10. The scale for the assessment and rating of ataxia correlates with dysarthria assessment in Friedreich's ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eigentler, Andreas; Rhomberg, Johanna; Nachbauer, Wolfgang; Ritzer, Irmgard; Poewe, Werner; Boesch, Sylvia

    2012-03-01

    Dysarthria is an acquired neurogenic sensorimotor speech symptom and an integral part within the clinical spectrum of ataxia syndromes. Ataxia measurements and disability scores generally focus on the assessment of motor functions. Since comprehensive investigations of dysarthria in ataxias are sparse, we assessed dysarthria in ataxia patients using the Frenchay Dysarthria Assessment. The Frenchay Dysarthria Assessment is a ten-item validated test in which eight items focus on the observation of oral structures and speech functions. Fifteen Friedreich's ataxia patients and 15 healthy control individuals were analyzed using clinical and logopedic methodology. All patients underwent neurological assessment applying the Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia. In Friedreich's ataxia patients, the Frenchay sub-item voice showed to be most affected compared to healthy individuals followed by items such as reflexes, palate, tongue, and intelligibility. Scoring of lips, jaw, and respiration appeared to be mildly affected. Ataxia severity in Friedreich's ataxia patients revealed a significant correlation with the Frenchay dysarthria sum score. The introduction of a binary Adapted Dysarthria Score additionally allowed allocation to distinct dysarthria pattern in ataxias. The Frenchay Dysarthria Assessment proved to be a valid dysarthria measure in Friedreich's ataxia. Its availability in several languages provides a major advantage regarding the applicability in international clinical studies. Shortcomings of the Frenchay test are the multiplicity of items tested and its alphabetic coding. Numerical scoring and condensation of assessments in a modified version may, however, provide an excellent clinical tool for the measurement and scoring of dysarthria in ataxic speech disorders.

  11. Acoustic Analysis of Voice in Dysarthria following Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Tsai; Kent, Ray D.; Kent, Jane Finley; Duffy, Joseph R.; Thomas, Jack E.

    2009-01-01

    Although perceptual studies indicate the likelihood of voice disorders in persons with stroke, there have been few objective instrumental studies of voice dysfunction in dysarthria following stroke. This study reports automatic analysis of sustained vowel phonation for 61 speakers with stroke. The results show: (1) men with stroke and healthy…

  12. Vowel Acoustics in Dysarthria: Speech Disorder Diagnosis and Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansford, Kaitlin L.; Liss, Julie M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which vowel metrics are capable of distinguishing healthy from dysarthric speech and among different forms of dysarthria. Method: A variety of vowel metrics were derived from spectral and temporal measurements of vowel tokens embedded in phrases produced by 45 speakers with…

  13. Dysarthria and Friedreich's Ataxia: What Can Intelligibility Assessment Tell Us?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaney, Bronagh; Hewlett, Nigel

    2007-01-01

    Background: Friedreich's ataxia is one of the most common hereditary disorders of the nervous system. Dysarthria is a pervasive symptom of Friedreich's ataxia, yet the clinical presentation of speech symptoms remains poorly understood, leaving clinicians without the evidence required to develop therapy interventions. Aims: The research reported…

  14. Listener Agreement for Auditory-Perceptual Ratings of Dysarthria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunton, Kate; Kent, Raymond D.; Duffy, Joseph R.; Rosenbek, John C.; Kent, Jane F.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Darley, Aronson, and Brown (1969a, 1969b) detailed methods and results of auditory-perceptual assessment for speakers with dysarthrias of varying etiology. They reported adequate listener reliability for use of the rating system as a tool for differential diagnosis, but several more recent studies have raised concerns about listener…

  15. Vowel Acoustics in Dysarthria: Speech Disorder Diagnosis and Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansford, Kaitlin L.; Liss, Julie M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which vowel metrics are capable of distinguishing healthy from dysarthric speech and among different forms of dysarthria. Method: A variety of vowel metrics were derived from spectral and temporal measurements of vowel tokens embedded in phrases produced by 45 speakers with…

  16. Maximum Performance Tests in Children with Developmental Spastic Dysarthria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wit, J.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Three Maximum Performance Tasks (Maximum Sound Prolongation, Fundamental Frequency Range, and Maximum Repetition Rate) were administered to 11 children (ages 6-11) with spastic dysarthria resulting from cerebral palsy and 11 controls. Despite intrasubject and intersubject variability in normal and pathological speakers, the tasks were found to be…

  17. The "Living with Dysarthria" Group: Implementation and Feasibility of a Group Intervention for People with Dysarthria Following Stroke and Family Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Catherine; Paton, Gillian; Kelly, Shona; Brady, Marian; Muir, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    Background: The broad life implications of acquired dysarthria are recognized, but they have received little attention in stroke management. Reports of group therapy, which may be a suitable approach to intervention, are not available for stroke-related dysarthria. Aims: To examine the operational feasibility of and response to a new eight-session…

  18. An internal carotid artery aneurysm presenting with dysarthria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, P T; Rychlik, I; O'Donnell, M; Baker, R; Rennie, I

    2013-10-01

    A 72-year-old woman presented to her general practitioner with a 4-week history of right neck swelling. Clinical examination elicited a pulsatile mass consistent with a carotid artery aneurysm. Five days later the patient noticed her tongue movements had become awkward with associated dysarthria. Computed tomography confirmed a 4cm internal carotid artery aneurysm arising just distally to the carotid bifurcation. She proceeded to transfemoral diagnostic carotid angiography. Balloon occlusion of the right internal carotid artery origin was performed for a ten-minute period without any neurological deficit. The decision was taken to proceed to surgical ligation of the origin of the internal carotid artery. Her symptoms of dysarthria have resolved.

  19. Relationship between quality of life and dysarthria in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piacentini, Valentina; Mauri, Ilaria; Cattaneo, Davide; Gilardone, Marco; Montesano, Angelo; Schindler, Antonio

    2014-11-01

    To evaluate dysarthria and dysarthria-related quality of life (QOL) and analyze its relations with duration of disease, severity, and general QOL in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Cross-sectional observational study. Rehabilitation center. Consecutive patients with MS (N=163) were recruited (mean age, 52 ± 10.4 y; mean MS duration, 19 ± 10.4 y). Not applicable. Presence of dysarthria; dysarthria characteristics; MS severity and duration; and dysarthria-related and generic QOL were evaluated by means of the therapy outcome measure scale; Robertson profile; Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS), years of disease; QOL of the dysarthric speaker questionnaire; and Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36), respectively. The mean EDSS score was 6.5 ± 1.3. Dysarthria affected 57 (35%) of the 163 patients. Dysarthria severity was mild in most of the 57 patients with dysarthria. Median Robertson profile scores were slightly but significantly higher in the nondysarthric group compared with the dysarthric group (P=.001). The QOL for the dysarthric speaker questionnaire was significantly more compromised in patients with dysarthria (P=.001). No difference on the SF-36 scores between patients with and without dysarthria was found, with the exception of the physical activity and physical pain subscales. The QOL for the dysarthric speaker questionnaire showed no correlation with MS duration and a weak correlation with EDSS score (r=.25). Correlations between the SF-36 and QOL for the dysarthric speaker scores were few and weak, with the exception of the role limitations because of emotions (r=-.428) and mental health subscales (r=-.383). Dysarthria-related QOL is compromised in patients with MS and dysarthria and might be used as a supplementary measure in clinical practice and research for patients who have MS. Copyright © 2014 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Acoustic and Perceptual Cues to Contrastive Stress in Dysarthria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rupal; Campellone, Pamela

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors sought to understand acoustic and perceptual cues to contrastive stress in speakers with dysarthria (DYS) and healthy controls (HC). Method: The production experiment examined the ability of 12 DYS (9 male, 3 female; M = 39 years of age) and 12 age- and gender-matched HC (9 male, 3 female; M = 37.5 years of age)…

  1. A child with progressive dystonia, dysarthria, and spasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrock, Lauren E; Ostrem, Jill L

    2010-01-01

    Children presenting with progressive neurologic symptoms including dystonia, dysarthria, and spasticity can represent a diagnostic challenge. Here we describe the case of a 14-year-old boy who presented to our center with an 11-year history of gradual worsening neurologic symptoms. Diagnostic strategies focus on the use of neuroimaging and genetic testing to help establish the underlying diagnosis. Therapeutic options are also discussed.

  2. A Case of Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration with Progressive Dysarthria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nami Ihori

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the evolution of the neurological and neuropsychological characteristics in a right-handed woman who was 53-years-old at the onset and who showed personality changes and behavioral disorders accompanied by progressive dysarthria. She had hypernasality and a slow rate of speech with distorted consonants and vowels, which progressed as motor disturbances affecting her speech apparatus increased; finally, she became mute two years post onset. Her dysarthria due to bilateral voluntary facio-velo-linguo-pharyngeal paralysis accompanied with automatic-voluntary dissociation fit the description of anterior opercular syndrome. She showed personality changes and behavioral abnormalities from the initial stage of the disease, as is generally observed in frontotemporal degeneration (FTD, and her magnetic resonance image showed progressive atrophy in the frontotemporal lobes; thus, she was clinically diagnosed with FTLD. This patient’s symptoms suggest that FTLD, including bilateral anterior operculum degeneration, causes progressive pseudobulbar paretic dysarthria accompanied by clinical symptoms of FTD, which raises the possibility of a new clinical subtype in the FTLD spectrum.

  3. Non-Speech Oro-Motor Exercise Use in Acquired Dysarthria Management: Regimes and Rationales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Catherine; Muir, Margaret; Allen, Carolyn

    2010-01-01

    Background: Non-speech oro-motor exercises (NSOMExs) are described in speech and language therapy manuals and are thought to be much used in acquired dysarthria intervention, though there is no robust evidence of an influence on speech outcome. Opinions differ as to whether, and for which dysarthria presentations, NSOMExs are appropriate. Aims:…

  4. Dysarthria in Adults with Cerebral Palsy: Clinical Presentation and Impacts on Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schölderle, Theresa; Staiger, Anja; Lampe, Renée; Strecker, Katrin; Ziegler, Wolfram

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Although dysarthria affects the large majority of individuals with cerebral palsy (CP) and can substantially complicate everyday communication, previous research has provided an incomplete picture of its clinical features. We aimed to comprehensively describe characteristics of dysarthria in adults with CP and to elucidate the impact of…

  5. Dysarthria Impact Profile: Development of a Scale to Measure Psychosocial Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walshe, Margaret; Peach, Richard K.; Miller, Nick

    2009-01-01

    Background: The psychosocial impact of acquired dysarthria on the speaker is well recognized. To date, speech-and-language therapists have no instrument available to measure this construct. This has implications for outcome measurement and for planning intervention. This paper describes the Dysarthria Impact Profile (DIP), an instrument that has…

  6. Voice Dysfunction in Dysarthria: Application of the Multi-Dimensional Voice Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, R. D.; Vorperian, H. K.; Kent, J. F.; Duffy, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    Part 1 of this paper recommends procedures and standards for the acoustic analysis of voice in individuals with dysarthria. In Part 2, acoustic data are reviewed for dysarthria associated with Parkinson disease (PD), cerebellar disease, amytrophic lateral sclerosis, traumatic brain injury, unilateral hemispheric stroke, and essential tremor.…

  7. Addressing the Needs of Speakers with Longstanding Dysarthria: Computerized and Traditional Therapy Compared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Rebecca; Enderby, Pam; Hawley, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Background: In clinical practice, it is common for speech and language therapists to discontinue dysarthria treatment when a plateau in spontaneous recovery is reached. However, there is some evidence from single-case research studies that people with chronic dysarthria can improve their speech with intervention several years after the onset of…

  8. Dysarthria Associated with Traumatic Brain Injury: Speaking Rate and Emphatic Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.T.; Kent, R.D.; Duffy, J.R.; Thomas, J.E.

    2005-01-01

    Prosodic abnormality is common in the dysarthria associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI), and adjustments of speaking rate and emphatic stress are often used as steps in treating the speech disorder in patients with TBI-induced dysarthria. However, studies to date do not present a clear and detailed picture of how speaking rate and emphatic…

  9. Therapeutic Intervention in a Case of Ataxic Dysarthria Associated with a History of Amateur Boxing

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMicken, Betty L.; Ostergren, Jennifer A.; Vento-Wilson, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    The goals of this study were to (a) describe the presenting features of ataxic dysarthria present in a participant with a long history of amateur boxing, (b) describe a novel application of behavioral principles in the treatment of this participant, and (c) discuss implications in the treatment of ataxic dysarthria secondary to boxing. The…

  10. Therapeutic Intervention in a Case of Ataxic Dysarthria Associated with a History of Amateur Boxing

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMicken, Betty L.; Ostergren, Jennifer A.; Vento-Wilson, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    The goals of this study were to (a) describe the presenting features of ataxic dysarthria present in a participant with a long history of amateur boxing, (b) describe a novel application of behavioral principles in the treatment of this participant, and (c) discuss implications in the treatment of ataxic dysarthria secondary to boxing. The…

  11. Survey of UK Speech and Language Therapists' Assessment and Treatment Practices for People with Progressive Dysarthria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collis, Jessica; Bloch, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Background: Dysarthria knowledge is predominantly impairment-based. As a result, speech and language therapists (SLTs) have traditionally adopted impairment-focused management practices. However, guidance for best practice suggests that SLTs should consider the client holistically, including the impact of dysarthria beyond the impairment. Aims: To…

  12. Dysarthria in stroke: a narrative review of its description and the outcome of intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Catherine

    2011-04-01

    Dysarthria is a frequent and persisting sequel to stroke and arises from varied lesion locations. Although the presence of dysarthria is well documented, for stroke there are scant data on presentation and intervention outcome. A literature search was undertaken to evaluate (a) the features of dysarthria in adult stroke populations relative to the conventional Mayo system for classification, which was developed from diverse pathological groups, and (b) the current status of evidence for the effectiveness of intervention in dysarthria caused by stroke. A narrative review of results is presented. The limited data available indicate that, regardless of stroke location, imprecise articulation and slow speaking rate are consistent features, and voice disturbances, especially harshness, and reduced prosodic variation are also common. Dysarthria is more prevalent in left than in right hemisphere lesions. There is a need for comprehensive, thorough analysis of dysarthria features, involving larger populations, with stroke and other variables controlled and with appropriate age-referenced control data. There is low level evidence for benefits arising from intervention in stroke-related dysarthria. Because studies involve few participants, without external control, and sometimes include stroke with other aetiologies, their results lack the required weight for confident evidence-based practice.

  13. Paroxysmal dysarthria and ataxia in multiple sclerosis and corresponding magnetic resonance imaging findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongmei; Zeng, Chun; Luo, Tianyou

    2011-02-01

    Paroxysmal dysarthria (PD) and paroxysmal dysarthria-ataxia (PDA) syndromes are uncommon symptoms of the neurological dysfunction in multiple sclerosis (MS). We describe two patients who had clinically definite MS presented with symptomatic PD and PDA syndromes, respectively, related to demyelinating lesions. In one patient, the PD symptom was the initial manifestation of an acute episode. In the other patient, the episode of dysarthria was accompanied by ataxia disorders. Both patients had midbrain lesions at or below the level of the right red nucleus on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), confirming that this area is critically involved. Both responded well to carbamazepine (CBZ).

  14. Speech rate treatments for individuals with dysarthria: a tutorial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchet, Paul G; Snyder, Gregory J

    2010-06-01

    Research confirms the long-standing clinical observation that patients with dysarthria exhibit variability in speech rate. Thus, modifying speech rate has been documented as one of the best treatment options for these patients. In this tutorial, several published rate control interventions for dysarthric speakers are presented. Studies discussed utilized various interventions, including pacing boards, alphabet board supplementation, visual and auditory feedback, cueing and pacing strategies, and delayed auditory feedback. Interventions discussed represent a hierarchy from "rigid" strategies, which impose maximal rate control, to techniques allowing for greater speech naturalness and independent rate control. All procedures are examined with respect to effectiveness in reducing rate, effect on intelligibility and prosody, training requirements, specific alterations made to speech rate, and other relevant aspects.

  15. The Impact of Rate Reduction and Increased Loudness on Fundamental Frequency Characteristics in Dysarthria

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tjaden, Kris; Wilding, Greg

    2011-01-01

    ... with dysarthria and healthy controls. Patients and Methods: Eleven speakers with Parkinson's disease, 15 speakers with multiple sclerosis, and 14 healthy control speakers were audio recorded while reading a passage in habitual, loud, and slow conditions...

  16. Acoustic and tongue kinematic vowel space in speakers with and without dysarthria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jimin; Littlejohn, Meghan Anne; Simmons, Zachary

    2017-04-01

    The purpose is to investigate acoustic and tongue body kinematic vowel dispersion patterns and vowel space in speakers with and without dysarthria secondary to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Acoustic and tongue kinematic vowel spaces were examined at the same time sampling point using electromagnetic articulography in 11 speakers with dysarthria secondary to ALS and 11 speakers without dysarthria. Tongue kinematic data were collected from the tongue body sensor (∼25 mm posterior from the tongue apex). A number of acoustic and tongue body kinematic variables were tested. The result showed that the acoustic and tongue kinematic vowel dispersion patterns are different between the groups. Acoustic and tongue body kinematic vowel spaces are highly correlated; however, unlike acoustic vowel space, tongue body kinematic vowel space was not significantly different between the groups. Both acoustic and tongue kinematic vowel dispersion patterns are sensitive to the group difference, especially with high vowels. The tongue kinematic vowel space approach is too crude to differentiate the speakers with dysarthria secondary to ALS from speakers without dysarthria. To examine tongue range of motion in speakers with dysarthria, a more refined articulatory kinematic approach needs to be examined in the future.

  17. The impact of rate reduction and increased vocal intensity on coarticulation in dysarthria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjaden, Kris

    2003-04-01

    The dysarthrias are a group of speech disorders resulting from impairment to nervous system structures important for the motor execution of speech. Although numerous studies have examined how dysarthria impacts articulatory movements or changes in vocal tract shape, few studies of dysarthria consider that articulatory events and their acoustic consequences overlap or are coarticulated in connected speech. The impact of rate, loudness, and clarity on coarticulatory patterns in dysarthria also are poorly understood, although these prosodic manipulations frequently are employed as therapy strategies to improve intelligibility in dysarthria and also are known to affect coarticulatory patterns for at least some neurologically healthy speakers. The current study examined the effects of slowed rate and increased vocal intensity on anticipatory coarticulation for speakers with dysarthria secondary to Multiple Sclerosis (MS), as inferred from the acoustic signal. Healthy speakers were studied for comparison purposes. Three repetitions of twelve target words embedded in the carrier phrase ``It's a -- again'' were produced in habitual, loud, and slow speaking conditions. F2 frequencies and first moment coefficients were used to infer coarticulation. Both group and individual speaker trends will be examined in the data analyses.

  18. Assessment of voice and speech symptoms in early Parkinson's disease by the Robertson dysarthria profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defazio, Giovanni; Guerrieri, Marta; Liuzzi, Daniele; Gigante, Angelo Fabio; di Nicola, Vincenzo

    2016-03-01

    Changes in voice and speech are thought to involve 75-90% of people with PD, but the impact of PD progression on voice/speech parameters is not well defined. In this study, we assessed voice/speech symptoms in 48 parkinsonian patients staging dysarthria profile (a clinical-perceptual method exploring all components potentially involved in speech difficulties), the Voice handicap index (a validated measure of the impact of voice symptoms on quality of life) and the speech evaluation parameter contained in the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale part III (UPDRS-III). Accuracy and metric properties of the Robertson dysarthria profile were also measured. On Robertson dysarthria profile, all parkinsonian patients yielded lower scores than healthy control subjects. Differently, the Voice Handicap Index and the speech evaluation parameter contained in the UPDRS-III could detect speech/voice disturbances in 10 and 75% of PD patients, respectively. Validation procedure in Parkinson's disease patients showed that the Robertson dysarthria profile has acceptable reliability, satisfactory internal consistency and scaling assumptions, lack of floor and ceiling effects, and partial correlations with UPDRS-III and Voice Handicap Index. We concluded that speech/voice disturbances are widely identified by the Robertson dysarthria profile in early parkinsonian patients, even when the disturbances do not carry a significant level of disability. Robertson dysarthria profile may be a valuable tool to detect speech/voice disturbances in Parkinson's disease.

  19. Representation Learning Based Speech Assistive System for Persons With Dysarthria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrakala, S; Rajeswari, Natarajan

    2017-09-01

    An assistive system for persons with vocal impairment due to dysarthria converts dysarthric speech to normal speech or text. Because of the articulatory deficits, dysarthric speech recognition needs a robust learning technique. Representation learning is significant for complex tasks such as dysarthric speech recognition. We focus on robust representation for dysarthric speech recognition that involves recognizing sequential patterns of varying length utterances. We propose a hybrid framework that uses a generative learning based data representation with a discriminative learning based classifier. In this hybrid framework, we propose to use Example Specific Hidden Markov Models (ESHMMs) to obtain log-likelihood scores for a dysarthric speech utterance to form fixed dimensional score vector representation. This representation is used as an input to discriminative classifier such as support vector machine.The performance of the proposed approach is evaluatedusingUA-Speechdatabase.The recognitionaccuracy is much better than the conventional hidden Markov model based approach and Deep Neural Network-Hidden Markov Model (DNN-HMM). The efficiency of the discriminative nature of score vector representation is proved for "very low" intelligibility words.

  20. Acute Isolated Dysarthria Is Associated with a High Risk of Stroke

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    Alina Beliavsky

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Isolated dysarthria is an uncommon presentation of transient ischemic attack (TIA/minor stroke and has a broad differential diagnosis. There is little information in the literature about how often this presentation is confirmed to be a TIA/stroke, and therefore there is debate about the risk of subsequent vascular events. Given the uncertain prognosis, it is unclear how to best manage patients presenting to the emergency department (ED with isolated dysarthria. The objective of this study was to prospectively identify and follow a cohort of patients presenting to EDs with isolated dysarthria in order to explore their natural history and risk of recurrent cerebrovascular events. Specifically, we sought to determine early outcomes of individuals with this nonspecific and atypical presentation in order to appropriately expedite their management. Methods: Patients with isolated dysarthria having presented to 8 Canadian EDs between October 2006 and April 2009 were analyzed as part of a prospective multicenter cohort study of patients with acute neurological symptoms as assessed by emergency physicians. The study inclusion criteria were age ≥18 years, a normal level of consciousness, and a symptom onset Results: Between 2006 and 2009, 1,528 patients were enrolled and had a 90-day follow-up. Of these, 43 patients presented with isolated acute-onset dysarthria (2.8%. Recurrent stroke occurred in 6/43 (14.0% within 90 days of enrollment. The predicted maximal 90-day stroke rate was 9.8% (based on a median ABCD2 score of 5 for the isolated dysarthria cohort. After adjusting for covariates, isolated dysarthria independently predicted stroke within 90 days (aOR: 3.96; 95% CI: 1.3-11.9; p = 0.014. Conclusions: The isolated dysarthria cohort carried a recurrent stroke risk comparable to that predicted by the median ABCD2 scores. Although isolated dysarthria is a nonspecific and uncommon clinical presentation of TIA, these findings support the

  1. A distinct variant of mixed dysarthria reflects parkinsonism and dystonia due to ephedrone abuse.

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    Rusz, Jan; Megrelishvili, Marika; Bonnet, Cecilia; Okujava, Michael; Brožová, Hana; Khatiashvili, Irine; Sekhniashvili, Madona; Janelidze, Marina; Tolosa, Eduardo; Růžička, Evžen

    2014-06-01

    A distinctive alteration of speech has been reported in patients suffering from ephedrone-induced parkinsonism. However, an objective assessment of dysarthria has not been performed in ephedrone users. We studied 28 young Caucasian men from Georgia with a previous history of ephedrone abuse and compared them to 25 age-matched healthy controls. Speech examination, brain MRI, and NNIPPS-Parkinson plus scale were performed in all patients. The accurate differential diagnosis of dysarthria subtypes was based on the quantitative acoustic analyses of 15 speech dimensions. We revealed a distinct variant of mixed dysarthria with a combination of hyperkinetic and hypokinetic components representing the altered motor programming of dystonia and bradykinesia in ephedrone-induced parkinsonism. According to acoustic analyses, all patients presented at least one affected speech dimension, whereas dysarthria was moderate in 43% and severe in 36% of patients. Further findings indicated relationships between motor subscores of dystonia and bradykinesia and speech components of loudness (r = -0.54, p dysarthria occurs that appears related to marked dystonia and bradykinesia and probably reflects manganese induced toxic and neurodegenerative damage to the globus pallidus internus and substantia nigra.

  2. [A rare complication of dysarthria in a patient with inclusion body myositis: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isayama, Reina; Shiga, Kensuke; Tanaka, Eijirou; Itsukage, Masahiro; Tokuda, Takahiko; Nakagawa, Masanori

    2010-10-01

    We reported a 71-year-old man with inclusion body myositis with clinically overt dysarthria. He had been suffering from gradual progression of weakness in the hand muscles and lower extremities as well as dysarthria three years before admission. His neurological examination revealed muscle atrophy and weakness in the tongue, the forearm flexors, and the vastus medialis muscles. He had dysarthria to a moderate degree, while he denied any dysphasia. A biopsy from vastus lateralis muscle showed variation in fiber size, infiltration of mononucleated cells, and numerous fibers with rimmed vacuoles, leading to the diagnosis of definite inclusion body myositis. The EMG findings of the tongue demonstrated low amplitude motor unit potentials during voluntary contraction, abundant fibrillation potentials at rest, and preserved interference pattern at maximal contraction, implying myogenic changes. We surmised the dysarthria seen in this patient, an atypical clinical feature in IBM, presumably caused by muscle involvement in the tongue muscle. Dysphasia is common symptom in IBM patient and has been much reported previously. But dysarthria in IBM patient has not been aware, for this reason this report should be the rare case.

  3. Non-Speech Oro-Motor Exercises in Post-Stroke Dysarthria Intervention: A Randomized Feasibility Trial

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    Mackenzie, C.; Muir, M.; Allen, C.; Jensen, A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: There has been little robust evaluation of the outcome of speech and language therapy (SLT) intervention for post-stroke dysarthria. Non-speech oro-motor exercises (NSOMExs) are a common component of dysarthria intervention. A feasibility study was designed and executed, with participants randomized into two groups, in one of which…

  4. Management of Non-Progressive Dysarthria: Practice Patterns of Speech and Language Therapists in the Republic of Ireland

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    Conway, Aifric; Walshe, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dysarthria is a commonly acquired speech disorder. Rising numbers of people surviving stroke and traumatic brain injury (TBI) mean the numbers of people with non-progressive dysarthria are likely to increase, with increased challenges for speech and language therapists (SLTs), service providers and key stakeholders. The evidence base…

  5. Formant trajectory characteristics in speakers with dysarthria and homogeneous speech intelligibility scores: Further data

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    Kim, Yunjung; Weismer, Gary; Kent, Ray D.

    2005-09-01

    In previous work [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 117, 2605 (2005)], we reported on formant trajectory characteristics of a relatively large number of speakers with dysarthria and near-normal speech intelligibility. The purpose of that analysis was to begin a documentation of the variability, within relatively homogeneous speech-severity groups, of acoustic measures commonly used to predict across-speaker variation in speech intelligibility. In that study we found that even with near-normal speech intelligibility (90%-100%), many speakers had reduced formant slopes for some words and distributional characteristics of acoustic measures that were different than values obtained from normal speakers. In the current report we extend those findings to a group of speakers with dysarthria with somewhat poorer speech intelligibility than the original group. Results are discussed in terms of the utility of certain acoustic measures as indices of speech intelligibility, and as explanatory data for theories of dysarthria. [Work supported by NIH Award R01 DC00319.

  6. Perceptual and acoustic analysis of lexical stress in Greek speakers with dysarthria.

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    Papakyritsis, Ioannis; Müller, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    The study reported in this paper investigated the abilities of Greek speakers with dysarthria to signal lexical stress at the single word level. Three speakers with dysarthria and two unimpaired control participants were recorded completing a repetition task of a list of words consisting of minimal pairs of Greek disyllabic words contrasted by lexical stress location only. Fourteen listeners were asked to determine the attempted stress location for each word pair. Acoustic analyses of duration and intensity ratios, both within and across words, were undertaken to identify possible acoustic correlates of the listeners' judgments concerning stress location. Acoustic and perceptual data indicate that while each participant with dysarthria in this study had some difficulty in signaling stress unambiguously, the pattern of difficulty was different for each speaker. Further, it was found that the relationship between the listeners' judgments of stress location and the acoustic data was not conclusive.

  7. Myasthenia gravis mimicking stroke: a case series with sudden onset dysarthria.

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    Tremolizzo, Lucio; Giopato, Federico; Piatti, Maria Luisa; Rigamonti, Andrea; Ferrarese, Carlo; Appollonio, Ildebrando

    2015-06-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an immune-mediated disorder characterized by fluctuating fatigue of skeletal muscles, often involving extrinsic ocular or bulbar districts. Myasthenia gravis in the elderly is an under-recognized condition, sometimes confused with cerebrovascular disease. Here we present a case series of myasthenia patients which onset was characterized by sudden dysarthria, clearly raising this diagnostic dilemma. In the workout of sudden onset isolated dysarthria, MG should be always considered. In fact, even if myasthenia is a rare condition, lacunar stroke only with this clinical presentation is also unusual, and significant risks may arise (e.g., unexpected myasthenic crisis).

  8. Subthalamic Nucleus Stimulation and Dysarthria in Parkinson's Disease: A PET Study

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    Pinto, Serge; Thobois, Stephane; Costes, Nicolas; Le Bars, Didier; Benabid, Alim-Louis; Broussolle, Emmanuel; Pollak, Pierre; Gentil, Michele

    2004-01-01

    In Parkinson's disease, functional imaging studies during limb motor tasks reveal cerebral activation abnormalities that can be reversed by subthalamic nucleus (STN) stimulation. The effect of STN stimulation on parkinsonian dysarthria has not, however, been investigated using PET. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of STN…

  9. The Impact of Contrastive Stress on Vowel Acoustics and Intelligibility in Dysarthria

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    Connaghan, Kathryn P.; Patel, Rupal

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To compare vowel acoustics and intelligibility in words produced with and without contrastive stress by speakers with spastic (mixed-spastic) dysarthria secondary to cerebral palsy (DYS[subscript CP]) and healthy controls (HCs). Method: Fifteen participants (9 men, 6 women; age M = 42 years) with DYS[subscript CP] and 15 HCs (9 men, 6…

  10. Intonation Contrast in Cantonese Speakers with Hypokinetic Dysarthria Associated with Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Joan K.-Y.; Whitehill, Tara L.; So, Susanne Y.-S.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Speech produced by individuals with hypokinetic dysarthria associated with Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by a number of features including impaired speech prosody. The purpose of this study was to investigate intonation contrasts produced by this group of speakers. Method: Speech materials with a question-statement contrast…

  11. Vowel Intelligibility in Children with and without Dysarthria: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Erika S.; Leone, Dorothy; Moya-Gale, Gemma; Hsu, Sih-Chiao; Chen, Wenli; Ramig, Lorraine O.

    2016-01-01

    Children with dysarthria due to cerebral palsy (CP) present with decreased vowel space area and reduced word intelligibility. Although a robust relationship exists between vowel space and word intelligibility, little is known about the intelligibility of vowels in this population. This exploratory study investigated the intelligibility of American…

  12. The Impact of Contrastive Stress on Vowel Acoustics and Intelligibility in Dysarthria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connaghan, Kathryn P.; Patel, Rupal

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To compare vowel acoustics and intelligibility in words produced with and without contrastive stress by speakers with spastic (mixed-spastic) dysarthria secondary to cerebral palsy (DYS[subscript CP]) and healthy controls (HCs). Method: Fifteen participants (9 men, 6 women; age M = 42 years) with DYS[subscript CP] and 15 HCs (9 men, 6…

  13. Articulatory-to-Acoustic Relations in Talkers with Dysarthria: A First Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mefferd, Antje

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The primary purpose of this study was to determine the strength of interspeaker and intraspeaker articulatory-to-acoustic relations of vowel contrast produced by talkers with dysarthria and controls. Methods: Six talkers with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), six talkers with Parkinson's disease (PD), and 12 controls repeated a…

  14. The Relationship between Listener Comprehension and Intelligibility Scores for Speakers with Dysarthria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hustad, Katherine C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the relationship between listener comprehension and intelligibility scores for speakers with mild, moderate, severe, and profound dysarthria. Relationships were examined across all speakers and their listeners when severity effects were statistically controlled, within severity groups, and within individual speakers…

  15. Impact of Co-occurring Dysarthria and Aphasia on Functional Recovery in Post-stroke Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Objective To elucidate the impact of co-occurring dysarthria and aphasia on functional recovery in post-stroke patients. Methods The medical records, including results of primary screening tests and secondary definite examinations for language problems, of 130 patients admitted to our institute's Department of Rehabilitation Medicine were retrospectively reviewed. Functional outcomes were assessed longitudinally using the Functional Ambulation Category (FAC), Mini-Mental State Examination-Korean version (MMSE-K), European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions 3-Level version (EQ-5D-3L), the Korean version of the Modified Barthel index (K-MBI), and Motricity Index (MI) of the hemiplegic side. Results Patients were classified into four groups regarding language function: aphasia only (group A, n=9), dysarthria only (group D, n=12), aphasia and dysarthria (group AD, n=46), and none (group N, n=55). The initial functional outcome scores in the group AD were significantly poor compared to those of the groups N and A. Within groups, there were significant improvements in all outcome measurements in the groups AD and N. A between-group analysis revealed significant improvements in K-MBI for the group AD after adjusting for the initial severity and patient's age compared to other groups. Conclusion Post-stroke patients suffering from aphasia with dysarthria showed significantly lower initial functional level and relatively wide range of recovery potential in activities of daily living compared to patients without language problems. PMID:28119830

  16. Articulatory Movements during Vowels in Speakers with Dysarthria and Healthy Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunusova, Yana; Weismer, Gary; Westbury, John R.; Lindstrom, Mary J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This study compared movement characteristics of markers attached to the jaw, lower lip, tongue blade, and dorsum during production of selected English vowels by normal speakers and speakers with dysarthria due to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) or Parkinson disease (PD). The study asked the following questions: (a) Are movement…

  17. Telediagnostic Assessment of Intelligibility in Dysarthria: A Pilot Investigation of MVP-Online

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Wolfram; Zierdt, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    Background: A most important index of functional impairment in dysarthria is "intelligibility". The "Munich Intelligibility Profile" (MVP) is a computer-based method for the assessment of the intelligibility of dysarthric patients. A multi-user online version of MVP is now available. Aims: To describe the structure of…

  18. Influence of Familiarity on Identifying Prosodic Vocalizations Produced by Children with Severe Dysarthria

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    Patel, Rupal; Schroeder, Bethany

    2007-01-01

    Familiarity is thought to aid listeners in decoding disordered speech; however, as the speech signal degrades, the "familiarity advantage" becomes less beneficial. Despite highly unintelligible speech sound production, many children with dysarthria vocalize when interacting with familiar caregivers. Perhaps listeners can understand these…

  19. Relationship between Kinematics, F2 Slope and Speech Intelligibility in Dysarthria Due to Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Panying; Loucks, Torrey; Kim, Heejin; Hasegawa-Johnson, Mark

    2012-01-01

    A multimodal approach combining acoustics, intelligibility ratings, articulography and surface electromyography was used to examine the characteristics of dysarthria due to cerebral palsy (CP). CV syllables were studied by obtaining the slope of F2 transition during the diphthong, tongue-jaw kinematics during the release of the onset consonant,…

  20. Speech Recognition for Environmental Control: Effect of Microphone Type, Dysarthria, and Severity on Recognition Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fager, Susan Koch; Burnfield, Judith M

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the use of commercially available automatic speech recognition (ASR) across microphone options as access to environmental control for individuals with and without dysarthria. A study of two groups of speakers (typical speech and dysarthria), was conducted to understand their performance using ASR and various microphones for environmental control. Specifically, dependent variables examined included attempts per command, recognition accuracy, frequency of error type, and perceived workload. A further sub-analysis of the group of participants with dysarthria examined the impact of severity. Results indicated a significantly larger number of attempts were required (P = 0.007), and significantly lower recognition accuracies were achieved by the dysarthric participants (P = 0.010). A sub-analysis examining severity demonstrated no significant differences between the typical speakers and participants with mild dysarthria. However, significant differences were evident (P = 0.007, P = 0.008) between mild and moderate-severe dysarthric participants. No significant differences existed across microphones. A higher frequency of threshold errors occurred for typical participants and no response errors for moderate-severe dysarthrics. There were no significant differences on the NASA Task Load Index.

  1. The effects of familiarization on intelligibility and lexical segmentation in hypokinetic and ataxic dysarthria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liss, Julie M.; Spitzer, Stephanie M.; Caviness, John N.; Adler, Charles

    2002-12-01

    This study is the third in a series that has explored the source of intelligibility decrement in dysarthria by jointly considering signal characteristics and the cognitive-perceptual processes employed by listeners. A paradigm of lexical boundary error analysis was used to examine this interface by manipulating listener constraints with a brief familiarization procedure. If familiarization allows listeners to extract relevant segmental and suprasegmental information from dysarthric speech, they should obtain higher intelligibility scores than nonfamiliarized listeners, and their lexical boundary error patterns should approximate those obtained in misperceptions of normal speech. Listeners transcribed phrases produced by speakers with either hypokinetic or ataxic dysarthria after being familiarized with other phrases produced by these speakers. Data were compared to those of nonfamiliarized listeners [Liss et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 107, 3415-3424 (2000)]. The familiarized groups obtained higher intelligibility scores than nonfamiliarized groups, and the effects were greater when the dysarthria type of the familiarization procedure matched the dysarthria type of the transcription task. Remarkably, no differences in lexical boundary error patterns were discovered between the familiarized and nonfamiliarized groups. Transcribers of the ataxic speech appeared to have difficulty distinguishing strong and weak syllables in spite of the familiarization. Results suggest that intelligibility decrements arise from the perceptual challenges posed by the degraded segmental and suprasegmental aspects of the signal, but that this type of familiarization process may differentially facilitate mapping segmental information onto existing phonological categories.

  2. Intensive Voice Treatment (LSVT LOUD) for Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy and Dysarthria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Cynthia Marie; Boliek, Carol Ann

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of an intensive voice treatment (Lee Silverman Voice Treatment, commonly known as LSVT LOUD) for children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) and dysarthria. Method: A nonconcurrent multiple baseline single-subject design with replication across 5 children with spastic CP was used.…

  3. Isolated dysarthria-facial paresis syndrome: A rare clinical entity which is usually overlooked

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    Celebisoy Mehmet

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: The aim of the study is to search the lesion localization of the pure isolated facial paresis-dysarthria syndrome in patients who were admitted to our neurology clinic in a prospective study. Methods: Over a period of six years, the patients who had no prominent sensorimotor dysfunction were examined by neurologists and underwent computerized tomography (CT and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Results: Eleven patients out of more than 2000 had the aforementioned clinical picture. Lacunar infarctions were identified at the corona radiata in nine patients, and at the internal capsule in two patients. As reported previously, facial paresis was usually mild and temporary. Six of our eleven patients were seen at the outpatient clinic one month later. Four of them had completely recovered and the other two had mild dsyarthria without any facial paresis. The other five could not be reached after leaving the hospital. Conclusions: Dysarthria-facial paresis is a rare clinical entity and possibly a variation of dysarthria-clumsy hand syndrome, and we suggest that pure facial paresis (FP and pure dysarthria should be considered as very extreme examples of this syndrome.

  4. Classifications of Vocalic Segments from Articulatory Kinematics: Healthy Controls and Speakers with Dysarthria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunusova, Yana; Weismer, Gary G.; Lindstrom, Mary J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors classified vocalic segments produced by control speakers (C) and speakers with dysarthria due to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) or Parkinson's disease (PD); classification was based on movement measures. The researchers asked the following questions: (a) Can vowels be classified on the basis of selected…

  5. Vowel Intelligibility in Children with and without Dysarthria: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Erika S.; Leone, Dorothy; Moya-Gale, Gemma; Hsu, Sih-Chiao; Chen, Wenli; Ramig, Lorraine O.

    2016-01-01

    Children with dysarthria due to cerebral palsy (CP) present with decreased vowel space area and reduced word intelligibility. Although a robust relationship exists between vowel space and word intelligibility, little is known about the intelligibility of vowels in this population. This exploratory study investigated the intelligibility of American…

  6. Dysarthria and dysphagia following treatment for a fourth ventricle choroid plexus papilloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornwell, P L; Murdoch, B E; Ward, E C; Morgan, A

    2003-07-01

    The present case report describes the presence of a persistent dysarthria and dysphagia as a consequence of surgical intervention for a choroid plexus papilloma (CPP). WM was a nine year ten month old male who at the time of the present study was seven years post-surgery. A comprehensive perceptual and instrumental test battery was used to document the nature of the dysarthria incorporating all components of speech production including respiration, phonation, resonance, articulation, and prosody. The nature of the dysphagia was evaluated through the use of videofluoroscopic evaluation of swallowing (VFS). Assessments confirmed the presence of a LMN dysarthria, marked by deficits in phonation, respiration, and prosody. Dysphagia assessment revealed deficits in oral preparatory, oral and pharyngeal stages of the swallow. The presence of persistent dysarthria and dysphagia in this case has a number of important implications for the management of children undergoing surgery for fourth ventricle CPPs, in particular the need for appropriate treatment, as well as counselling prior to surgery of the possible negative outcomes related to speech and swallowing.

  7. The use of natural materials to form a motor praxis in children with dysarthria

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    Ekaterina Filippova

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available One of the main issues of - the role of the motor analyzer in the development of speech of the child. The paper presents a theoretical rationale, relevance, objectives and principles of the impact of speech therapy. Describes correctional-developing technology of motor praxis in children with dysarthria.

  8. Re-thinking diagnostic classification of the dysarthrias: a developmental perspective.

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    Morgan, A T; Liégeois, F

    2010-01-01

    Acquired childhood dysarthria (ACD) receives little attention in the research literature in contrast with the adult correlate of the disorder. Speech language pathologists working in this field find diagnosis and management challenging, arguably because there is no child-based dysarthria diagnostic classification. Clinicians are either dependent upon developmental speech models that are not specific to dysarthria and that ignore the neural basis of the disorder, or on adult-based neurobehavioural classification systems. Here we consider the necessary elements for developing a clinically useful and empirically driven diagnostic classification system for ACD. The paper is divided into 2 parts. First, we question whether an adult diagnostic model can be validly applied to children. Second, we propose a methodological approach to develop a classification system for ACD. Specifically, we propose that advancing knowledge in neurobehavioural correlations of ACD is contingent upon large-scale studies, likely requiring international collaboration, which pool brain and speech outcome data. Ideally, researchers across centres would apply standard protocols to: (1) characterize speech behaviour, and (2) brain structure, function and connectivity. When enough data is available to achieve statistical power, analysis could determine subgroups of dysarthria defined by speech behaviour. The commonalities of neural profiles of subgroups could then be examined to create an empirically driven theory of brain-behaviour relationships in ACD to underpin the classification system. Clinical diagnosis for children with ACD will remain limited until such data become available.

  9. Dysarthria and dysphagia as long-term sequelae in a child treated for posterior fossa tumour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornwell, Petrea L; Murdoch, Bruce E; Ward, Elizabeth C; Morgan, Angela

    2003-01-01

    The current case report provides a comprehensive description of the persistent dysarthria and dysphagia evident in a 7.5 year old child treated for recurrent posterior fossa tumour (PFT). AC was assessed on a comprehensive perceptual and instrumental test battery incorporating all components of the speech production system (respiration, phonation, resonance, articulation and prosody) 2 years and 4 months following completion of her treatment. The nature of her swallowing impairment was investigated through the use of videofluoroscopic evaluation of swallowing (VFS). A mild dysarthria with ataxic and LMN components was identified, although overall speech intelligibility was not affected. A moderate dysphagia was also identified with impairment in all three phases of the swallowing process; oral preparatory, oral and pharyngeal. Dysarthria and dysphagia as persistent sequelae in children treated for PFT have implications for the long-term management of these children. The need for appropriate treatment regimes, as well as pre-surgical counselling regarding dysarthria and dysphagia as possible outcomes following surgery are highlighted.

  10. The use of natural materials to form a motor praxis in children with dysarthria

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    One of the main issues of - the role of the motor analyzer in the development of speech of the child. The paper presents a theoretical rationale, relevance, objectives and principles of the impact of speech therapy. Describes correctional-developing technology of motor praxis in children with dysarthria.

  11. Intensive Voice Treatment (LSVT LOUD) for Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy and Dysarthria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Cynthia Marie; Boliek, Carol Ann

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of an intensive voice treatment (Lee Silverman Voice Treatment, commonly known as LSVT LOUD) for children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) and dysarthria. Method: A nonconcurrent multiple baseline single-subject design with replication across 5 children with spastic CP was used.…

  12. THE APPLICATION OF BEHAVIOR THERAPY MODEL FOR THE IMPROVEMENT OF SPEAKING ABILITY OF DYSARTHRIA PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gusdi Sastra

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Research on behavior therapy has been conducted on patients with dysarthria, a disorder of articulation due to impairment of the central nervous system, which directly controls the activity of the muscles that play a role in the process of articulation in the pronunciation production. This study discusses three issues: lingual form made by people with dysarthria before getting behavior therapy, emotional influences on lexical and semantic knowledge of the patient, and the achievement of the model of behavior therapy applied to patients with dysarthria speech impairment. The theory used in this study was from Prins (2004 and the method of analysis applied is the method from Nunan (1992combined with Sudaryanto (1993.The research found that there is an increased ability of patient to talk: nearly 40 percent of the index lingual knowledge or information, 20 percent of semantics, and 40 percent of feeling. Lingual index is significant as a means of therapy for patients with dysarthria. An increase in the speech ability improves confidence in facing social life.

  13. A 15-year-old boy with central nervous system vasculopathy presenting with dysarthria-clumsy hand syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golomb, Meredith R; Weiss, Shelly K; Ibrahim, Shahnaz H; deVeber, Gabrielle A

    2002-03-01

    Dysarthria-clumsy hand stroke syndrome has been described frequently in adults but not in children. We report a 15-year-old right-handed boy with sudden onset of dysarthria, dysphagia, right facial weakness, and mild right-hand clumsiness. Computed tomographic scan and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated infarction in the genu and posterior limb of the left internal capsule. Magnetic resonance angiography and conventional angiography demonstrated stenosis of the supraclinoid portion of the left internal carotid artery and the origin of the left ophthalmic artery. Lacunar infarction in an older adult is not the only mechanism leading to dysarthria-clumsy hand syndrome.

  14. Deep brain stimulation exacerbates hypokinetic dysarthria in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Nathaniel O; Anderson, Collin J; Dorval, Alan D

    2016-02-01

    Motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) follow the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) treats some parkinsonian symptoms, such as tremor, rigidity, and bradykinesia, but may worsen certain medial motor symptoms, including hypokinetic dysarthria. The mechanisms by which DBS exacerbates dysarthria while improving other symptoms are unclear and difficult to study in human patients. This study proposes an animal model of DBS-exacerbated dysarthria. We use the unilateral, 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) rat model of PD to test the hypothesis that DBS exacerbates quantifiable aspects of vocalization. Mating calls were recorded from sexually experienced male rats under healthy and parkinsonian conditions and during DBS of the subthalamic nucleus. Relative to healthy rats, parkinsonian animals made fewer calls with shorter and less complex vocalizations. In the parkinsonian rats, putatively therapeutic DBS further reduced call frequency, duration, and complexity. The individual utterances of parkinsonian rats spanned a greater bandwidth than those of healthy rats, potentially reducing the effectiveness of the vocal signal. This utterance bandwidth was further increased by DBS. We propose that the parkinsonism-associated changes in call frequency, duration, complexity, and dynamic range combine to constitute a rat analog of parkinsonian dysarthria. Because DBS exacerbates the parkinsonism-associated changes in each of these metrics, the subthalamic stimulated 6-OHDA rat is a good model of DBS-induced hypokinetic dysarthria in PD. This model will help researchers examine how DBS alleviates many motor symptoms of PD while exacerbating parkinsonian speech deficits that can greatly diminish patient quality of life.

  15. Tumour type and size are high risk factors for the syndrome of "cerebellar" mutism and subsequent dysarthria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.E. Catsman-Berrevoets (Coriene); H.R. van Dongen (Hugo); D. Paz y Geuze (Daniel); P.F. Paquier; M.H. Lequin (Maarten); P.G.H. Mulder (Paul)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: "Cerebellar mutis" and subsequent dysarthria (MSD) is a documented complication of posterior fossa surgery in children. In this prospective study the following risk factors for MSD were assessed: type, size and site of the tumour; hydrocephalus at

  16. Tumour type and size are high risk factors for the syndrome of "cerebellar" mutism and subsequent dysarthria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.E. Catsman-Berrevoets (Coriene); H.R. van Dongen (Hugo); D. Paz y Geuze; P.F. Paquier; M.H. Lequin (Maarten); P.G.H. Mulder (Paul)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: "Cerebellar mutis" and subsequent dysarthria (MSD) is a documented complication of posterior fossa surgery in children. In this prospective study the following risk factors for MSD were assessed: type, size and site of the tumour; hydrocephalus at

  17. A case of cerebellar dysarthria as the presenting symptom of HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqi, Zeba; Karoli, Ritu; Fatima, Jalees; Dey, Rahul; Kazmi, Khursheed

    2014-08-01

    A 37 year old man presented with progressive dysarthria for 2 weeks. A week later he developed ataxia and bilateral cerebellar signs including intention tremors, dysmetria and dysdiadokokinesia. During evaluation for aetiology of cerebellar dysarthria, MRI brain revealed asymmetric altered signal intensities in bilateral cerebellar hemispheres and right side of pons suggesting demyelinating lesions. ELISA for Human Immune Deficiency virus-1 was positive. We kept a presumptive diagnosis of Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy (PML) on the basis of clinico-radiological picture. PML is an under investigated and under diagnosed CNS infection seen in HIV patients with advanced disease. We present an unusual case report where isolated cerebellar involvement occurred as the first AIDS defining event in the absence of appreciable immunodeficiency in a patient with previously undiagnosed HIV infection.

  18. Sensory ataxic neuropathy with dysarthria/dysphagia and ophthalmoplegia (SANDO). Two case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gáti, István; Danielsson, Olof; Jonasson, Jon; Landtblom, Anne-Marie

    2011-12-01

    Case histories of two unrelated patients suffering from sensory ataxic neuropathy, dysarthria/dysphagia and external ophthalmoplegia (SANDO) are reported. Both patients showed compound heterozygosity for POLG1 gene mutations, and presented with symptom of the clinical characteristics of SANDO. A patient with a p.A467T and p.W748S, well-known mutations showed a progressive course with early onset and multisystem involvement, including symptoms characteristics for mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE). The second patient showed a less well-known p.T251I and p.G848S mutations with late onset and dysphagia/dysarthria dominated, moderate symptoms. This later is the second published case history, when these POLG1 gene mutations are the possible background of late onset SANDO, dominantly presenting with bulbar symptoms.

  19. A curious case of oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity: recurrent, self-limiting dysarthria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Ranjit; Dasanu, Constantin A

    2014-10-01

    This report presents a unique case of oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity featuring acute, recurrent, self-limiting dysarthria following multiple subsequent infusions of oxaliplatin. A 65-year-old man started chemotherapy for metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma with oxaliplatin-irinotecan-leucovorin-5-fluorouracil (FOLFIRINOX). During the first and subsequent infusions of oxaliplatin, the patient developed episodes of dysarthria that lasted between 2 and 4 h after oxaliplatin infusions, followed by their complete and uneventful resolution. A thorough neurological examination showed no new neurologic deficits except for very fine tongue fasciculations. Recognizing this self-limiting toxic effect of oxaliplatin is important in order to avoid dose reductions that may affect clinical outcomes.

  20. Articulatory movements during vowels in speakers with dysarthria and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunusova, Yana; Weismer, Gary; Westbury, John R; Lindstrom, Mary J

    2008-06-01

    This study compared movement characteristics of markers attached to the jaw, lower lip, tongue blade, and dorsum during production of selected English vowels by normal speakers and speakers with dysarthria due to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) or Parkinson disease (PD). The study asked the following questions: (a) Are movement measures different for healthy controls and speakers with ALS or PD, and (b) Are articulatory profiles comparable for speakers with ALS and speakers with PD? Nineteen healthy controls and 15 speakers with dysarthria participated in this study. The severity of dysarthria varied across individuals and between the 2 disorder groups. The stimuli were 10 words (i.e., seed, feed, big, dish, too, shoo, bad, cat, box, and dog) embedded into sentences read at a comfortable reading rate. Movement data were collected using the X-ray microbeam. Movement measures included distances, durations, and average speeds of vowel-related movement strokes. Differences were found (a) between speakers with ALS and healthy controls and (b) between speakers with ALS and PD, particularly in movement speed. Tongue movements in PD and ALS were more consistently different from healthy controls than jaw and lower lip movements. This study showed that the effects of neurologic disease on vowel production are often articulator-, vowel-, and context-specific. Differences in severity between the speakers with PD and ALS may have accounted for some of the differences in movement characteristics between the groups. These factors need to be carefully considered when describing the nature of speech disorder and developing empirically based evaluation and treatment strategies for dysarthria.

  1. Quadriparesis and dysarthria due to tetrabenazine therapy in a child with rheumatic chorea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaki, Syed Ahmed; Lad, Vijay; Shanbag, Preeti

    2011-09-01

    Tetrabenazine (TBZ) is widely used to treat hyperkinetic movement disorders in adults; however, published experience with the drug in children is limited. Common side effects of TBZ include drowsiness, sedation, weakness, Parkinsonism, depression, and acute akathisia, all of which are reversible with decreased doses. We report here a 7-year-old girl with rheumatic chorea who developed acute akinesia of all four limbs and dysarthria due to TBZ therapy. Withdrawal of the drug led to rapid improvement within 18 hours.

  2. A retrospective study of long-term treatment outcomes for reduced vocal intensity in hypokinetic dysarthria

    OpenAIRE

    Watts, Christopher R

    2016-01-01

    Background Reduced vocal intensity is a core impairment of hypokinetic dysarthria in Parkinson?s disease (PD). Speech treatments have been developed to rehabilitate the vocal subsystems underlying this impairment. Intensive treatment programs requiring high-intensity voice and speech exercises with clinician-guided prompting and feedback have been established as effective for improving vocal function. Less is known, however, regarding long-term outcomes of clinical benefit in speakers with PD...

  3. Paroxysmal dysarthria-ataxia in remitting-relapsing Bickerstaff's-like encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piffer, Silvio; Turri, Giulia; Acler, Michele; Richelli, Silvia; Cerini, Roberto; Fiaschi, Antonio; Monaco, Salvatore; Bonetti, Bruno

    2014-06-15

    Paroxysmal dysarthria-ataxia is a rare neurological condition due to ephaptic transmission, generally appearing in multiple sclerosis patients characterized by stereotyped attacks of slurred speech usually accompanied by ataxia, appearing many times a day. Here we describe a patient with an unusual remitting-relapsing form of Bickerstaff's-like brainstem encephalitis who manifested PDA after a relapse with the involvement of a peculiar region below the red nuclei and benefited from lamotrigine.

  4. Effect of visual biofeedback of posterior tongue movement on articulation rehabilitation in dysarthria patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, J; Shirahige, C; Oki, K; Oisaka, N; Kumakura, I; Tsubahara, A; Minagi, S

    2015-08-01

    Articulation is driven by various combinations of movements of the lip, tongue, soft palate, pharynx and larynx, where the tongue plays an especially important role. In patients with cerebrovascular disorder, lingual motor function is often affected, causing dysarthria. We aimed to evaluate the effect of visual biofeedback of posterior tongue movement on articulation rehabilitation in dysarthria patients with cerebrovascular disorder. Fifteen dysarthria patients (10 men and 5 women; mean age, 70.7 ± 10.3 years) agreed to participate in this study. A device for measuring the movement of the posterior part of the tongue was used for the visual biofeedback. Subjects were instructed to produce repetitive articulation of [ka] as fast and steadily as possible between a lungful with/without visual biofeedback. For both the unaffected and affected sides, the range of ascending and descending movement of the posterior tongue with visual biofeedback was significantly larger than that without visual biofeedback. The coefficient of variation for these movements with visual biofeedback was significantly smaller than that without visual biofeedback. With visual biofeedback, the range of ascent exhibited a significant and strong correlation with that of descent for both the unaffected and affected sides. The results of this study revealed that the use of visual biofeedback leads to prompt and preferable change in the movement of the posterior part of the tongue. From the standpoint of pursuing necessary rehabilitation for patients with attention and memory disorders, visualization of tongue movement would be of marked clinical benefit. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Improved status following behavioural intervention in a case of severe dysarthria with stroke aetiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Catherine; Lowit, Anja

    2012-08-01

    There is little published intervention outcome literature concerning dysarthria acquired from stroke. Single case studies have potential for more detailed specification and interpretation than is generally possible in larger studies so are informative for clinicians dealing with similar cases. Such research also contributes to planning of larger scale investigations. Behavioural intervention is described which was carried out between 7-9 months after stroke with a 69-year-old man with severe dysarthria. Pre-intervention stability between 5-7 months contrasted with post-intervention gains. Significant improvement was demonstrated using randomized, blinded assessment by 10 judges on measures of word and reading intelligibility and communication effectiveness in conversation. A range of speech analyses were undertaken (rate, pause, and intonation characteristics in connected speech and single word phonetic transcription), with the aim of identifying speech components which might explain the listeners' perceptions of improvement. Changes were detected mainly in parameters related to utterance segmentation and intonation. The basis of post-intervention improvement in dysarthria is complex, both in terms of the active therapeutic dimensions and also the specific speech alterations which account for changes to intelligibility and effectiveness.

  6. Physiological and perceptual features of dysarthria in Moebius syndrome: directions for treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdoch, B E; Johnson, S M; Theodoros, D G

    1997-01-01

    The functioning of the major subsystems of the speech production apparatus of a 12 year old female with Moebius syndrome was investigated using a battery of perceptual and physiological instrumental measures. Perceptual tests administered included: The Assessment of Intelligibility of Dysarthric Speech; the Frenchay Dysarthria Assessment; and a perceptual analysis of a speech sample based on a reading of the Grandfather Passage. Instrumental procedures included: spirometric and kinematic analysis of speech breathing; electroglottographic and aerodynamic evaluation of laryngeal function; nasometric assessment of velopharyngeal function; and evaluation of lip and tongue function using a variety of strain-gauge and pressure transducers. Consistent with the pathophysiological basis of Moebius syndrome, the major dysfunctions of the speech production mechanism were found at the level of the articulatory valve. Somewhat unexpectedly, however, impaired function was also identified at the level of the velopharyngeal and laryngeal valves by both the perceptual and instrumental assessments and at the level of the respiratory system by the physiological analysis alone. The results are discussed with reference to the neurological basis and clinical features of Moebius syndrome. The implications of the findings for the treatment of congenital dysarthria associated with Moebius syndrome are also discussed. The advantage of instrumental analysis over perceptual assessments in defining treatment goals for children with congenital dysarthria is highlighted.

  7. The Dysarthria Impact Profile: A Preliminary French Experience with Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alban Letanneux

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This preliminary study aimed to adapt the Dysarthria Impact Profile (DIP in French and to confirm its relevance for the assessment of the psychosocial impact of dysarthria in Parkinson's disease (PD. The DIP scale was administered to 10 people with PD and 10 age-matched control subjects. The DIP psychometric properties were calculated (discriminant validity, internal consistency, and concurrent validity, notably by using the Voice Handicap Index (VHI for interscale comparisons. The French version of the DIP discriminated people with PD from control subjects (χ2 test, P<0.05. Good internal consistency was observed in both populations (Cronbach’s α=0.93 for PD people and α=0.76 for control subjects. The DIP was highly correlated with the VHI (Spearman’s ρ=-0.70, P<0.01, confirming the external validity of the scale. There was no direct relationship between PD speech and quality of life as assessed by the Parkinson’s Disease Questionnaire-39 (PDQ-39. Our preliminary data suggest that the French version of the DIP has the potential to make a useful contribution for the assessment and outcome management in acquired dysarthria for both clinicians and researchers.

  8. Speech serial control in healthy speakers and speakers with hypokinetic or ataxic dysarthria: effects of sequence length and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Kevin J; Spencer, Kristie A

    2013-01-01

    The current study investigated the processes responsible for selection of sounds and syllables during production of speech sequences in 10 adults with hypokinetic dysarthria from Parkinson's disease, five adults with ataxic dysarthria, and 14 healthy control speakers. Speech production data from a choice reaction time task were analyzed to evaluate the effects of sequence length and practice on speech sound sequencing. Speakers produced sequences that were between one and five syllables in length over five experimental runs of 60 trials each. In contrast to the healthy speakers, speakers with hypokinetic dysarthria demonstrated exaggerated sequence length effects for both inter-syllable intervals (ISIs) and speech error rates. Conversely, speakers with ataxic dysarthria failed to demonstrate a sequence length effect on ISIs and were also the only group that did not exhibit practice-related changes in ISIs and speech error rates over the five experimental runs. The exaggerated sequence length effects in the hypokinetic speakers with Parkinson's disease are consistent with an impairment of action selection during speech sequence production. The absent length effects observed in the speakers with ataxic dysarthria is consistent with previous findings that indicate a limited capacity to buffer speech sequences in advance of their execution. In addition, the lack of practice effects in these speakers suggests that learning-related improvements in the production rate and accuracy of speech sequences involves processing by structures of the cerebellum. Together, the current findings inform models of serial control for speech in healthy speakers and support the notion that sequencing deficits contribute to speech symptoms in speakers with hypokinetic or ataxic dysarthria. In addition, these findings indicate that speech sequencing is differentially impaired in hypokinetic and ataxic dysarthria.

  9. Speech serial control in healthy speakers and speakers with hypokinetic or ataxic dysarthria: Effects of sequence length and practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin J Reilly

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The current study investigated the processes responsible for selection of sounds and syllables during production of speech sequences in 10 adults with hypokinetic dysarthria from Parkinson’s disease, 5 adults with ataxic dysarthria, and 14 healthy control speakers. Speech production data from a choice reaction time task were analyzed to evaluate the effects of sequence length and practice on speech sound sequencing. Speakers produced sequences that were between one and five syllables in length over five experimental runs of 60 trials each. In contrast to the healthy speakers, speakers with hypokinetic dysarthria demonstrated exaggerated sequence length effects for both inter-syllable intervals (ISIs and speech error rates. Conversely, speakers with ataxic dysarthria failed to demonstrate a sequence length effect on ISIs and were also the only group that did not exhibit practice-related changes in ISIs and speech error rates over the five experimental runs. The exaggerated sequence length effects in the hypokinetic speakers with Parkinson’s disease are consistent with an impairment of action selection during speech sequence production. The absent length effects observed in the speakers with ataxic dysarthria is consistent with previous findings that indicate a limited capacity to buffer speech sequences in advance of their execution. In addition, the lack of practice effects in these speakers suggests that learning-related improvements in the production rate and accuracy of speech sequences involves processing by structures of the cerebellum. Together, the current findings inform models of serial control for speech in healthy speakers and support the notion that sequencing deficits contribute to speech symptoms in speakers with hypokinetic or ataxic dysarthria. In addition, these findings indicate that speech sequencing is differentially impaired in hypokinetic and ataxic dysarthria.

  10. Listener deficits in hypokinetic dysarthria: Which cues are most important in speech segmentation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Carolyn Ann

    Listeners use prosodic cues to help them quickly process running speech. In English, listeners effortlessly use strong syllables to help them to find words in the continuous stream of speech produced by neurologically-intact individuals. However, listeners are not always presented with speech under such ideal circumstances. This thesis explores the question of word segmentation of English speech under one of these less ideal conditions; specifically, when the speaker may be impaired in his/her production of strong syllables, as in the case of hypokinetic dysarthria. Further, we attempt to discern which acoustic cue(s) are most degraded in hypokinetic dysarthria and the effect that this degradation has on listeners' segmentation when no additional semantic or pragmatic cues are present. Two individuals with Parkinson's disease, one with a rate disturbance and one with articulatory disruption, along with a typically aging control, were recorded repeating a series of nonsense syllables. Young adult listeners were then presented with recordings from one of these three speakers producing non-words (imprecise consonant articulation, rate disturbance, and control). After familiarization, the listeners were asked to rate the familiarity of the non-words produced by a second typically aging speaker. Results indicated speakers with hypokinetic dysarthria were able to modulate their intensity and duration for stressed and unstressed syllables in a way similar to that of control speakers. In addition, their mean and peak fundamental frequency for both stressed and unstressed syllables were significantly higher than that of the normally aging controls. ANOVA results revealed a marginal main effect of frequency in normal and consonant conditions for word versus nonwords listener ratings.

  11. The redesign and re-evaluation of an internet-based telerehabilitation system for the assessment of dysarthria in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Anne J; Theodoros, Deborah G; Russell, Trevor G; Ward, Elizabeth C

    2009-11-01

    A previous study revealed that reliable assessment of dysarthria was feasible. However, that study also revealed a number of system limitations and suggested that technological enhancements and improvements in study design and clinical assessment protocols were needed before validity and reliability of assessment of dysarthria via telerehabilitation could be confirmed. In the current study, improvements in technology, study design, and clinical assessment protocols were implemented in order to re-examine the validity and reliability of assessing and diagnosing dysarthria via the telerehabilitation medium. The aim of this study was to explore the validity and reliability of assessing dysarthria using both formal standardized and informal assessments via a purpose-built telerehabilitation system. Twenty-four participants with an acquired dysarthria were assessed simultaneously via telerehabilitation and face-to-face (FTF) on a battery of assessments. A custom-built telerehabilitation system enabled real-time telerehabilitation assessment over a 128 Kbps Internet connection. Data analysis included an analysis of strength of agreement between the two methods using percentage agreement and weighted ? statistics. Inter-rater and intrarater reliability were also examined for both the FTF and telerehabilitation-led assessments. Good strength of agreement was found between the FTF and telerehabilitation assessment methods. High intrarater and inter-rater reliability within both the FTF and telerehabilitation assessment methods supported these findings. Participants reported high overall satisfaction in the telerehabilitatin environment. This study describes the improvements made to the telerehabilitation system reported previously and confirms that valid and reliable assessment of dysarthria using both standardized and informal assessments over the Internet is possible using this system.

  12. Sudden Onset Monoparesis and Dysarthria in a 5-Year-Old boy: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okhovat

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Moyamoya disease (MD is a disorder caused by blocked arteries at the base of the brain. As the normal blood vessels narrow and become blocked, a person may suffer a stroke. The MD mainly affects children, although adults may have the condition. This is a rare condition, with a marked prevalence gradient between Asian countries. Case Presentation We report a 5-year-old boy, who was presented with sudden right hand monoparesis and dysarthria. Conclusions The patient was investigated with magnetic resonance angiography and diagnosed as MD.

  13. Use of the extended therapy outcome measure for children with dysarthria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enderby, Pam

    2014-08-01

    Increasing demand on healthcare resources has led to a greater emphasis on the examination of the impact of service delivery on outcomes. Clinical assessments frequently do not cover all aspects of change associated with interventions for those with complex conditions. This paper reviews the need for more comprehensive outcome measurement suitable for clinical practice and benchmarking. It describes an extension of the Therapy Outcome Measure for specific use in reflecting the impact of the broad range of interventions commonly required when managing children with dysarthria. Three case histories are used to illustrate the approach, and data from four speech-language pathology services are used to illustrate the value of benchmarking.

  14. Quadriparesis and dysarthria due to tetrabenazine therapy in a child with rheumatic chorea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Ahmed Zaki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Tetrabenazine (TBZ is widely used to treat hyperkinetic movement disorders in adults; however, published experience with the drug in children is limited. Common side effects of TBZ include drowsiness, sedation, weakness, Parkinsonism, depression, and acute akathisia, all of which are reversible with decreased doses. We report here a 7-year-old girl with rheumatic chorea who developed acute akinesia of all four limbs and dysarthria due to TBZ therapy. Withdrawal of the drug led to rapid improvement within 18 hours.

  15. Interventions for dysarthria due to stroke and other adult-acquired, non-progressive brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Claire; Bowen, Audrey; Tyson, Sarah; Butterfint, Zoe; Conroy, Paul

    2017-01-25

    Dysarthria is an acquired speech disorder following neurological injury that reduces intelligibility of speech due to weak, imprecise, slow and/or unco-ordinated muscle control. The impact of dysarthria goes beyond communication and affects psychosocial functioning. This is an update of a review previously published in 2005. The scope has been broadened to include additional interventions, and the title amended accordingly. To assess the effects of interventions to improve dysarthric speech following stroke and other non-progressive adult-acquired brain injury such as trauma, infection, tumour and surgery. We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (May 2016), CENTRAL (Cochrane Library 2016, Issue 4), MEDLINE, Embase, and CINAHL on 6 May 2016. We also searched Linguistics and Language Behavioral Abstracts (LLBA) (1976 to November 2016) and PsycINFO (1800 to September 2016). To identify further published, unpublished and ongoing trials, we searched major trials registers: WHO ICTRP, the ISRCTN registry, and ClinicalTrials.gov. We also handsearched the reference lists of relevant articles and contacted academic institutions and other researchers regarding other published, unpublished or ongoing trials. We did not impose any language restrictions. We selected randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing dysarthria interventions with 1) no intervention, 2) another intervention for dysarthria (this intervention may differ in methodology, timing of delivery, duration, frequency or theory), or 3) an attention control. Three review authors selected trials for inclusion, extracted data, and assessed risk of bias. We attempted to contact study authors for clarification and missing data as required. We calculated standardised mean difference (SMD) and 95% confidence interval (CI), using a random-effects model, and performed sensitivity analyses to assess the influence of methodological quality. We planned to conduct subgroup analyses for underlying clinical

  16. The Effects of Topic Knowledge on Intelligibility and Lexical Segmentation in Hypokinetic and Ataxic Dysarthria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utianski, Rene L; Lansford, Kaitlin L; Liss, Julie M; Azuma, Tamiko

    2011-12-01

    Benefits to speech intelligibility can be achieved by enhancing a listener's ability to decipher it. However, much remains to be learned about the variables that influence the effectiveness of various listener-based manipulations. This study examined the benefit of providing listeners with the topic of some phases produced by speakers with either hypokinetic or ataxic dysarthria. Total and topic word accuracy, topic-related substitutions, and lexical boundary errors were calculated from the listener transcripts. Data were compared with those who underwent a familiarization process (reported by Liss, Spitzer, Caviness, & Adler, 2002) and with those inexperienced with disordered speech (reported by Liss Spitzer, Caviness, & Adler, 2000). Results revealed that listeners of ataxic speech provided with topic knowledge obtained higher intelligibility scores than naïve listeners. The magnitude of benefit was similar to the familiarization condition. However, topic word and word substitution analyses revealed different underlying perceptual mechanisms responsible for the observed benefit. No differences attributable to listening condition were discovered in lexical segmentation patterns. Overall, the results support the need for further study of listener-based manipulations to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for the observed perceptual benefits for each dysarthria type.

  17. Sequence complexity effects on speech production in healthy speakers and speakers with hypokinetic or ataxic dysarthria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Kevin J; Spencer, Kristie A

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of sequence complexity, defined in terms of phonemic similarity and phonotoactic probability, on the timing and accuracy of serial ordering for speech production in healthy speakers and speakers with either hypokinetic or ataxic dysarthria. Sequences were comprised of strings of consonant-vowel (CV) syllables with each syllable containing the same vowel, /a/, paired with a different consonant. High complexity sequences contained phonemically similar consonants, and sounds and syllables that had low phonotactic probabilities; low complexity sequences contained phonemically dissimilar consonants and high probability sounds and syllables. Sequence complexity effects were evaluated by analyzing speech error rates and within-syllable vowel and pause durations. This analysis revealed that speech error rates were significantly higher and speech duration measures were significantly longer during production of high complexity sequences than during production of low complexity sequences. Although speakers with dysarthria produced longer overall speech durations than healthy speakers, the effects of sequence complexity on error rates and speech durations were comparable across all groups. These findings indicate that the duration and accuracy of processes for selecting items in a speech sequence is influenced by their phonemic similarity and/or phonotactic probability. Moreover, this robust complexity effect is present even in speakers with damage to subcortical circuits involved in serial control for speech.

  18. Jaw Rotation in Dysarthria Measured With a Single Electromagnetic Articulography Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Jeff; Kolb, Andrew; Schroeder, James; Johnson, Michael T

    2017-06-22

    This study evaluated a novel method for characterizing jaw rotation using orientation data from a single electromagnetic articulography sensor. This method was optimized for clinical application, and a preliminary examination of clinical feasibility and value was undertaken. The computational adequacy of the single-sensor orientation method was evaluated through comparisons of jaw-rotation histories calculated from dual-sensor positional data for 16 typical talkers. The clinical feasibility and potential value of single-sensor jaw rotation were assessed through comparisons of 7 talkers with dysarthria and 19 typical talkers in connected speech. The single-sensor orientation method allowed faster and safer participant preparation, required lower data-acquisition costs, and generated less high-frequency artifact than the dual-sensor positional approach. All talkers with dysarthria, regardless of severity, demonstrated jaw-rotation histories with more numerous changes in movement direction and reduced smoothness compared with typical talkers. Results suggest that the single-sensor orientation method for calculating jaw rotation during speech is clinically feasible. Given the preliminary nature of this study and the small participant pool, the clinical value of such measures remains an open question. Further work must address the potential confound of reduced speaking rate on movement smoothness.

  19. Sequence complexity effects on speech production in healthy speakers and speakers with hypokinetic or ataxic dysarthria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin J Reilly

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the effects of sequence complexity, defined in terms of phonemic similarity and phonotoactic probability, on the timing and accuracy of serial ordering for speech production in healthy speakers and speakers with either hypokinetic or ataxic dysarthria. Sequences were comprised of strings of consonant-vowel (CV syllables with each syllable containing the same vowel, /a/, paired with a different consonant. High complexity sequences contained phonemically similar consonants, and sounds and syllables that had low phonotactic probabilities; low complexity sequences contained phonemically dissimilar consonants and high probability sounds and syllables. Sequence complexity effects were evaluated by analyzing speech error rates and within-syllable vowel and pause durations. This analysis revealed that speech error rates were significantly higher and speech duration measures were significantly longer during production of high complexity sequences than during production of low complexity sequences. Although speakers with dysarthria produced longer overall speech durations than healthy speakers, the effects of sequence complexity on error rates and speech durations were comparable across all groups. These findings indicate that the duration and accuracy of processes for selecting items in a speech sequence is influenced by their phonemic similarity and/or phonotactic probability. Moreover, this robust complexity effect is present even in speakers with damage to subcortical circuits involved in serial control for speech.

  20. Effects of listeners' working memory and noise on speech intelligibility in dysarthria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Youngmee; Sung, Jee Eu; Sim, Hyunsub

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of listeners' working memory (WM), types of noise and signal to noise ratios (SNRs) on speech intelligibility in dysarthria. Speech intelligibility was judged by using a word transcription task. A three-way mixed design (2 × 3 × 2) was used with the WM group (high/low group) as a between-subject factor and the types of noise (multi-talker babble/environmental noise) and SNRs (0, +10 and +20 dB) as within-subject factors. The dependent measure was the percentage of correctly transcribed words. The results revealed that the high WM group performed significantly better than the low WM group and listeners performed significantly better at higher levels of SNRs on the speech intelligibility test. The findings of this study suggested that listeners' cognitive abilities and SNRs should be considered as important factors when evaluating speech intelligibility in dysarthria.

  1. Study of accent-based music speech protocol development for improving voice problems in stroke patients with mixed dysarthria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo Ji; Jo, Uiri

    2013-01-01

    Based on the anatomical and functional commonality between singing and speech, various types of musical elements have been employed in music therapy research for speech rehabilitation. This study was to develop an accent-based music speech protocol to address voice problems of stroke patients with mixed dysarthria. Subjects were 6 stroke patients with mixed dysarthria and they received individual music therapy sessions. Each session was conducted for 30 minutes and 12 sessions including pre- and post-test were administered for each patient. For examining the protocol efficacy, the measures of maximum phonation time (MPT), fundamental frequency (F0), average intensity (dB), jitter, shimmer, noise to harmonics ratio (NHR), and diadochokinesis (DDK) were compared between pre and post-test and analyzed with a paired sample t-test. The results showed that the measures of MPT, F0, dB, and sequential motion rates (SMR) were significantly increased after administering the protocol. Also, there were statistically significant differences in the measures of shimmer, and alternating motion rates (AMR) of the syllable /K$\\inve$/ between pre- and post-test. The results indicated that the accent-based music speech protocol may improve speech motor coordination including respiration, phonation, articulation, resonance, and prosody of patients with dysarthria. This suggests the possibility of utilizing the music speech protocol to maximize immediate treatment effects in the course of a long-term treatment for patients with dysarthria.

  2. Use of palatal lift and palatal augmentation prostheses to improve dysarthria in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, S J; Mitsumoto, H; Shanks, M

    2000-01-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive, adult onset neurodegenerative disorder manifesting itself as a loss of motor capabilities and untimely death. The dysarthria seen in patients with ALS who have bulbar symptoms causes severe problems with communication. The struggle to be understood comes at a time when progressive cumulative disabilities make communication with family, friends, and healthcare workers vital. The use of palatal lift/augmentation prostheses for dysarthria in ALS is not a frequently requested procedure by neurologists. The purpose of this retrospective outcomes study was to evaluate the effectiveness of this treatment on improving speech function and intelligibility in this group of patients. This study also reviews the history, incidence, pathogenesis, and speech characteristics of the patient with ALS. A retrospective study of 25 patients treated with a prosthesis was performed using chart reviews and phone/office interviews to evaluate the efficacy of a palatal lift and/or augmentation prosthesis to improve speech in ALS patients. Twenty-one patients (84%) treated with a palatal lift demonstrated improvement in their dysarthria, specifically in reduction of hypernasality, with 19 (76%) benefiting at least moderately for 6 months. Of the 10 patients treated with a combination palatal lift and augmentation prosthesis, 6 (60%) demonstrated improvement in articulation. A majority of patients indicated it was easier to speak with less effort involved when wearing the prosthesis. On the basis of this preliminary retrospective study, the use of a palatal lift/augmentation prosthesis should be considered in ALS patients with dysarthria.

  3. Role of Cerebellum in Fine Speech Control in Childhood: Persistent Dysarthria after Surgical Treatment for Posterior Fossa Tumour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, A. T.; Liegeois, F.; Liederkerke, C.; Vogel, A. P.; Hayward, R.; Harkness, W.; Chong, K.; Vargha-Khadem, F.

    2011-01-01

    Dysarthria following surgical resection of childhood posterior fossa tumour (PFT) is most commonly documented in a select group of participants with mutism in the acute recovery phase, thus limiting knowledge of post-operative prognosis for this population of children as a whole. Here we report on the speech characteristics of 13 cases seen…

  4. Acoustic and Perceptual Effects of Dysarthria in Greek with a Focus on Lexical Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papakyritsis, Ioannis

    The field of motor speech disorders in Greek is substantially underresearched. Additionally, acoustic studies on lexical stress in dysarthria are generally very rare (Kim et al. 2010). This dissertation examined the acoustic and perceptual effects of Greek dysarthria focusing on lexical stress. Additional possibly deviant speech characteristics were acoustically analyzed. Data from three dysarthric participants and matched controls was analyzed using a case study design. The analysis of lexical stress was based on data drawn from a single word repetition task that included pairs of disyllabic words differentiated by stress location. This data was acoustically analyzed in terms of the use of the acoustic cues for Greek stress. The ability of the dysarthric participants to signal stress in single words was further assessed in a stress identification task carried out by 14 naive Greek listeners. Overall, the acoustic and perceptual data indicated that, although all three dysarthric speakers presented with some difficulty in the patterning of stressed and unstressed syllables, each had different underlying problems that gave rise to quite distinct patterns of deviant speech characteristics. The atypical use of lexical stress cues in Anna's data obscured the prominence relations of stressed and unstressed syllables to the extent that the position of lexical stress was usually not perceptually transparent. Chris and Maria on the other hand, did not have marked difficulties signaling lexical stress location, although listeners were not 100% successful in the stress identification task. For the most part, Chris' atypical phonation patterns and Maria's very slow rate of speech did not interfere with lexical stress signaling. The acoustic analysis of the lexical stress cues was generally in agreement with the participants' performance in the stress identification task. Interestingly, in all three dysarthric participants, but more so in Anna, targets stressed on the 1st

  5. Analysis of dysarthria in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis; MRI of the tongue and formant analysis of vowels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Sakae; Arasaki, Keisuke (Hitachi General Hospital, Ibaraki (Japan)); Nagata, Hiroshi; Shouji, Shinichi

    1994-03-01

    To evaluate dysarthria in patients with ALS, we used MRI (gradient rephasing echo method) and compared it with the computed acoustic analysis. Five ALS male patients of progressive bulbar palsy type and five normal males were asked to phonate the five Japanese vowels, /a/[center dot]/i/[center dot]/u/[center dot]/e/[center dot]/o/. MRI of the sagittal tongue and vocal tract was obtained by the gradient rephasing echo method (0.2 Tesla, TR: 30 ms, TE: 10 ms, FA: 25degC, Hitachi). We could clearly visualized the change of tongue shape and the narrow site of the vocal tract for each vowel phonation. In normal subjects, the tongue shape and the narrow site of the vocal tract were distinguishable between each vowel, but unclear in ALS. Acoustic analysis showed that the first formant frequency of /i/[center dot]/u/ in ALS was higher than normal and the second formant frequency of /i/[center dot]/e/ in ALS was significantly lower than normal. The discrepancy from the normal first, second and third formant frequency for each vowel of ALS was most seen in /i/[center dot]/ e/. It was speculated that /i/ and /e/ were the most disturbed vowels in ALS. The first and second formant frequency of vowel depends on the tongue shape and the width of the oral cavity. Therefore the results of the acoustic analysis in ALS indicated poor movement of tongue in /i/[center dot]/u/[center dot]/e/ and were compatible with the findings of the sagittal tongue MRI. The sagittal view of the tongue in the gradient rephasing echo MRI and the acoustic analysis are useful in evaluating dysarthria in ALS. (author).

  6. Tumour type and size are high risk factors for the syndrome of "cerebellar" mutism and subsequent dysarthria

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: "Cerebellar mutis" and subsequent dysarthria (MSD) is a documented complication of posterior fossa surgery in children. In this prospective study the following risk factors for MSD were assessed: type, size and site of the tumour; hydrocephalus at presentation and after surgery, cerebellar incision site, postoperative infection, and cerebellar swelling. METHODS: In a consecutive series of 42 children with a cerebellar tumour, speech and neuroradiological studies (CT and...

  7. [A case of sensory ataxic neuropathy, dysarthria, and ophthalmoparesis with multiple mitochondrial DNA deletions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Koji; Tateishi, Takahisa; Kawamura, Nobutoshi; Ohyagi, Yasumasa; Urata, Michiyo; Kira, Jun-ichi

    2013-01-01

    We report the case of a 62-year-old man with sensory ataxic neuropathy, dysarthria, and ophthalmoparesis (SANDO). He developed gait disturbance at 54 years of age, muscle weakness at 56 years, and difficulty hearing at 58 years. His brother had muscle weakness in both legs from age 20 years, and was diagnosed with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease because he had muscle weakness of the four extremities, decreased CMAP and SNAP amplitudes on peripheral nerve conduction tests, and loss of large myelinated fibers and onion-bulb formations on sural nerve biopsy. His brother died aged 46 years, but no accurate cause of death was identified. Neurological examination of the present patient revealed bilateral ptosis, external ophthalmoparesis, dysarthria, dysphagia, sensorineural hearing loss, mild weakness and atrophy of proximal muscles in all four limbs, severe sensory ataxia, and disturbance of deep sensation in his legs. He showed elevation of lactate and pyruvate levels in cerebrospinal fluid and serum. An aerobic exercise test disclosed a marked increase in lactate and pyruvate levels in serum. On nerve conduction study, amplitudes of CMAP and SNAP, and F wave-evoked frequency were decreased. Needle electromyography showed chronic neurogenic patterns with fibrillation potentials in the extremity muscles. Head MRI demonstrated T2 prolonged lesions in the bilateral basal ganglia, while brain MRS revealed a small lactate peak. Biopsy of his left lateral vastus muscle showed ragged-red fibers and group atrophy, and some muscle fibers had decreased cytochrome c activity. Left sural nerve biopsy revealed a marked loss of large myelinated fibers, and some onion-bulb formations. Genetic testing disclosed a large mtDNA deletion in the biopsied muscle. Among nuclear genes, we found point mutations in ANT-1 (exon 1 c.105G>A, 5' untranslated region) and POLG-1 (exon 4, c.1218G>A, p. and exon 23 c.3920C>T, p.A1217V). We diagnosed SANDO. This is the first case of SANDO with large

  8. Intonation contrast in Cantonese speakers with hypokinetic dysarthria associated with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Joan K-Y; Whitehill, Tara L; So, Susanne Y-S

    2010-08-01

    Speech produced by individuals with hypokinetic dysarthria associated with Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by a number of features including impaired speech prosody. The purpose of this study was to investigate intonation contrasts produced by this group of speakers. Speech materials with a question-statement contrast were collected from 14 Cantonese speakers with PD. Twenty listeners then classified the productions as either questions or statements. Acoustic analyses of F0, duration, and intensity were conducted to determine which acoustic cues distinguished the production of questions from statements, and which cues appeared to be exploited by listeners in identifying intonational contrasts. The results show that listeners identified statements with a high degree of accuracy, but the accuracy of question identification ranged from 0.56% to 96% across the 14 speakers. The speakers with PD used similar acoustic cues as nondysarthric Cantonese speakers to mark the question-statement contrast, although the contrasts were not observed in all speakers. Listeners mainly used F0 cues at the final syllable for intonation identification. These data contribute to the researchers' understanding of intonation marking in speakers with PD, with specific application to the production and perception of intonation in a lexical tone language.

  9. Small intragenic deletion in FOXP2 associated with childhood apraxia of speech and dysarthria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Samantha J; Hildebrand, Michael S; Block, Susan; Damiano, John; Fahey, Michael; Reilly, Sheena; Bahlo, Melanie; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Morgan, Angela T

    2013-09-01

    Relatively little is known about the neurobiological basis of speech disorders although genetic determinants are increasingly recognized. The first gene for primary speech disorder was FOXP2, identified in a large, informative family with verbal and oral dyspraxia. Subsequently, many de novo and familial cases with a severe speech disorder associated with FOXP2 mutations have been reported. These mutations include sequencing alterations, translocations, uniparental disomy, and genomic copy number variants. We studied eight probands with speech disorder and their families. Family members were phenotyped using a comprehensive assessment of speech, oral motor function, language, literacy skills, and cognition. Coding regions of FOXP2 were screened to identify novel variants. Segregation of the variant was determined in the probands' families. Variants were identified in two probands. One child with severe motor speech disorder had a small de novo intragenic FOXP2 deletion. His phenotype included features of childhood apraxia of speech and dysarthria, oral motor dyspraxia, receptive and expressive language disorder, and literacy difficulties. The other variant was found in a family in two of three family members with stuttering, and also in the mother with oral motor impairment. This variant was considered a benign polymorphism as it was predicted to be non-pathogenic with in silico tools and found in database controls. This is the first report of a small intragenic deletion of FOXP2 that is likely to be the cause of severe motor speech disorder associated with language and literacy problems.

  10. Impact of cognitive function and dysarthria on spoken language and perceived speech severity in multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feenaughty, Lynda

    Purpose: The current study sought to investigate the separate effects of dysarthria and cognitive status on global speech timing, speech hesitation, and linguistic complexity characteristics and how these speech behaviors impose on listener impressions for three connected speech tasks presumed to differ in cognitive-linguistic demand for four carefully defined speaker groups; 1) MS with cognitive deficits (MSCI), 2) MS with clinically diagnosed dysarthria and intact cognition (MSDYS), 3) MS without dysarthria or cognitive deficits (MS), and 4) healthy talkers (CON). The relationship between neuropsychological test scores and speech-language production and perceptual variables for speakers with cognitive deficits was also explored. Methods: 48 speakers, including 36 individuals reporting a neurological diagnosis of MS and 12 healthy talkers participated. The three MS groups and control group each contained 12 speakers (8 women and 4 men). Cognitive function was quantified using standard clinical tests of memory, information processing speed, and executive function. A standard z-score of ≤ -1.50 indicated deficits in a given cognitive domain. Three certified speech-language pathologists determined the clinical diagnosis of dysarthria for speakers with MS. Experimental speech tasks of interest included audio-recordings of an oral reading of the Grandfather passage and two spontaneous speech samples in the form of Familiar and Unfamiliar descriptive discourse. Various measures of spoken language were of interest. Suprasegmental acoustic measures included speech and articulatory rate. Linguistic speech hesitation measures included pause frequency (i.e., silent and filled pauses), mean silent pause duration, grammatical appropriateness of pauses, and interjection frequency. For the two discourse samples, three standard measures of language complexity were obtained including subordination index, inter-sentence cohesion adequacy, and lexical diversity. Ten listeners

  11. A retrospective study of long-term treatment outcomes for reduced vocal intensity in hypokinetic dysarthria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Christopher R

    2016-01-01

    Reduced vocal intensity is a core impairment of hypokinetic dysarthria in Parkinson's disease (PD). Speech treatments have been developed to rehabilitate the vocal subsystems underlying this impairment. Intensive treatment programs requiring high-intensity voice and speech exercises with clinician-guided prompting and feedback have been established as effective for improving vocal function. Less is known, however, regarding long-term outcomes of clinical benefit in speakers with PD who receive these treatments. A retrospective cohort design was utilized. Data from 78 patient files across a three year period were analyzed. All patients received a structured, intensive program of voice therapy focusing on speaking intent and loudness. The dependent variable for all analyses was vocal intensity in decibels (dBSPL). Vocal intensity during sustained vowel production, reading, and novel conversational speech was compared at pre-treatment, post-treatment, six month follow-up, and twelve month follow-up periods. Statistically significant increases in vocal intensity were found at post-treatment, 6 months, and 12 month follow-up periods with intensity gains ranging from 5 to 17 dB depending on speaking condition and measurement period. Significant treatment effects were found in all three speaking conditions. Effect sizes for all outcome measures were large, suggesting a strong degree of practical significance. Significant increases in vocal intensity measured at 6 and 12 moth follow-up periods suggested that the sample of patients maintained treatment benefit for up to a year. These findings are supported by outcome studies reporting treatment outcomes within a few months post-treatment, in addition to prior studies that have reported long-term outcome results. The positive treatment outcomes experienced by the PD cohort in this study are consistent with treatment responses subsequent to other treatment approaches which focus on high-intensity, clinician guided motor

  12. Automatic evaluation of speech rhythm instability and acceleration in dysarthrias associated with basal ganglia dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan eRusz

    2015-07-01

    in dysarthrias.

  13. Effectiveness of Lee Silverman Voice Treatment (LSVT)[R] on Hypernasality in Non-Progressive Dysarthria: The Need for Further Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenke, Rachel J.; Theodoros, Deborah; Cornwell, Petrea

    2010-01-01

    Background: Hypernasality is a common feature of non-progressive dysarthria. However, limited research has investigated the effectiveness of treatments for this impairment. Preliminary research has revealed positive effects on nasalance when using increased loudness in certain non-progressive dysarthric speakers. However, the long-term effects of…

  14. Multiple Factors Are Involved in the Dysarthria Associated with Parkinson's Disease: A Review with Implications for Clinical Practice and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapir, Shimon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Motor speech abnormalities are highly common and debilitating in individuals with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD). These abnormalities, collectively termed hypokinetic dysarthria (HKD), have been traditionally attributed to hypokinesia and bradykinesia secondary to muscle rigidity and dopamine deficits. However, the role of…

  15. Effectiveness of Lee Silverman Voice Treatment (LSVT)[R] on Hypernasality in Non-Progressive Dysarthria: The Need for Further Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenke, Rachel J.; Theodoros, Deborah; Cornwell, Petrea

    2010-01-01

    Background: Hypernasality is a common feature of non-progressive dysarthria. However, limited research has investigated the effectiveness of treatments for this impairment. Preliminary research has revealed positive effects on nasalance when using increased loudness in certain non-progressive dysarthric speakers. However, the long-term effects of…

  16. The impact of dysarthria strengthening training on cerebral infarction in patients with dysarthria%构音障碍强化训练对脑梗死患者构音障碍的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李延萍; 杨春琴; 杨莉; 杨宇绒; 张盼盼; 梁红

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore dysarthria strengthening training on cerebral infarction in patients with dysarthria.Methods 68 pa-tients with dysarthria and infarction treated in our department from January 2013 to June 2014 were selected ,and then divided into the observation group and the control group with 34 cases in each.Patients in the control group only received conventional treatment,while the observation group was treated with enhanced dysarthria training on the basis of conventional therapy.Speech intelligibility and Fren-chay assessment scores were compared between these two groups before and after dysarthria training to see the clinical efficacy after training.Results Observation group of patients with speech articulation was (57.15 ±15.95)%,the control group of patients with speech articulation was (51.31 ±22.95)%.Dysarthria patients observed before training speech clarity and control patients no differ-ence.The difference was not statistically significant (P >0.05).After the obstacle course articulation,speech intelligibility of patients in the observation group was (82.54 ±19.89)%,the control group of patients with speech articulation was (73.00 ±14.66)%.After the speech training before the two groups were superior speech intelligibility training,and the difference was statistically significant (P0.05).After the ob-stacle course articulation,Frenchay observation group were assessed a total score of (88.69 ±13.14)points,the control group of pa-tients with a total score of Frenchay assessment (77.38 ±13.97)points.After the speech training before the two groups were Frenchay assessment scores are better than training,the difference was statistically significant (P <0.05).Articulation disorder patients in the observation group after training Frenchay of the assessment scores were significantly higher in patients,compare the difference between the two groups was statistically significant (P <0.05).Dysarthria after training,the clinical efficacy of two groups

  17. Evaluation and rehabilitation of dysarthria%构音障碍的评定与康复治疗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李胜利

    2009-01-01

    @@ 1构音障碍的定义和分类 1.1构音障碍(dysarthria)是由于神经病变、与言语有关肌肉的麻痹、收缩力减弱或运动不协调所致的言语障碍.此定义强调呼吸运动、共鸣、发音和韵律方面的变化.从大脑到肌肉本身的病变都可引起言语症状.病因常见于脑血管意外、脑肿瘤、脑瘫、肌萎缩侧索硬化、重症肌无力、小脑损伤、帕金森氏病、多发性硬化等.

  18. [Cerebellar mutism syndromes with subsequent dysarthria: a study of three children and a review of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquier, P; van Mourik, M; van Dongen, H; Catsman-Berrevoets, C; Brison, A

    2003-11-01

    Cerebellar mutism and subsequent dysarthria (MSD) is a possible complication of posterior fossa surgery. It is usually seen in children after resection of a cerebellar mass lesion. Most patients become mute after a period of (near)normal postoperative speech, and are dysarthric once speech resumes. The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying MSD are most probably multifactorial, combining neuroanatomical, neurophysiological, neuropsychological, and psychological factors. The aim of the present article is to better define the MSD syndrome. The cerebellum is not only involved in motor control. It is also part of a distributed neural circuitry which underlies higher cognitive functions such as, for instance, those associated with the programming of kinetic parameters before motor initiation of a movement. We hypothesize that it could also be involved in the mental initiation which precedes the programming of any intentional bucco-phonatory movements to be performed in order to express oneself.

  19. Sensory ataxic neuropathy dysarthria and ophthalmoparesis (SANDO) in a sibling pair with a homozygous p.A467T POLG mutation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McHugh, John C

    2012-02-01

    Two siblings who developed fifth-decade-onset, concurrent progressive sensory ataxia, dysarthria, and ophthalmoparesis were found to be homozygous for the p.A467T mutation of the polymerase gamma (POLG) gene. The clinical course in both subjects was progression to severe disability. The enlarging spectrum of sensory ataxic neuropathies associated with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) instability and POLG mutations should be recognized and considered in the differential diagnosis of this unusual presentation.

  20. Acoustic changes in the speech of children with cerebral palsy following an intensive program of dysarthria therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, Lindsay; Lombardo, Eftychia; Steen, Nick; Miller, Nick

    2017-07-17

    The speech intelligibility of children with dysarthria and cerebral palsy has been observed to increase following therapy focusing on respiration and phonation. To determine if speech intelligibility change following intervention is associated with change in acoustic measures of voice. We recorded 16 young people with cerebral palsy and dysarthria (nine girls; mean age 14 years, SD = 2; nine spastic type, two dyskinetic, four mixed; one Worster-Drought) producing speech in two conditions (single words, connected speech) twice before and twice after therapy focusing on respiration, phonation and rate. In both single-word and connected speech we measured vocal intensity (root mean square-RMS), period-to-period variability (Shimmer APQ, Jitter RAP and PPQ) and harmonics-to-noise ratio (HNR). In connected speech we also measured mean fundamental frequency, utterance duration in seconds and speech and articulation rate (syllables/s with and without pauses respectively). All acoustic measures were made using Praat. Intelligibility was calculated in previous research. In single words statistically significant but very small reductions were observed in period-to-period variability following therapy: Shimmer APQ -0.15 (95% CI = -0.21 to -0.09); Jitter RAP -0.08 (95% CI = -0.14 to -0.01); Jitter PPQ -0.08 (95% CI = -0.15 to -0.01). No changes in period-to-period perturbation across phrases in connected speech were detected. However, changes in connected speech were observed in phrase length, rate and intensity. Following therapy, mean utterance duration increased by 1.11 s (95% CI = 0.37-1.86) when measured with pauses and by 1.13 s (95% CI = 0.40-1.85) when measured without pauses. Articulation rate increased by 0.07 syllables/s (95% CI = 0.02-0.13); speech rate increased by 0.06 syllables/s (95% CI = connected speech were associated with gains in intelligibility. Mean reductions in impairment in vocal function following therapy observed were small and most are unlikely to

  1. Individual and environmental contributions to treatment outcomes following a neuroplasticity-principled speech treatment (LSVT LOUD) in children with dysarthria secondary to cerebral palsy: a case study review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boliek, Carol A; Fox, Cynthia M

    2014-08-01

    This study describes the use of a neuroplasticity-principled speech treatment approach (LSVT(®)LOUD) with children who have dysarthria secondary to cerebral palsy. To date, the authors have treated 25 children with mild-to-severe dysarthria, a continuum of gross and fine motor functions, and variable cognitive abilities. From this data set, two case studies are presented that represent as weak or strong responders to LSVT LOUD. These case studies demonstrate how individual and environmental features may impact immediate and lasting responses to treatment. Principles that drive activity-dependent neuroplasticity are embedded in LSVT LOUD and may contribute to positive therapeutic and acoustic outcomes. However, examination of the response patterns indicated that intensity (within and across treatment sessions) is necessary but not sufficient for change. Weak responders may require a longer treatment phase, better timing (e.g., developmentally, socially), and a more prominent desire to communicate successfully during daily activities. Strong responders appear to benefit from the intensity and saliency of treatment as well as from intrinsic and extrinsic rewards for using the trained skills for everyday communication. Finally, possibilities are presented for technological solutions designed to promote accessibility to the intensive task repetition and maintenance required to drive lasting changes.

  2. Progressive dysarthria and ataxia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. 'Guillain-Barre syndrome' (GBS) is a broad term used to ... and slurred speech. Clinical ... upwards and lateral movement of the eye occurred on attempted eye .... A plan was made to give supportive therapy, continue correcting.

  3. Postoperative motor speech production in children with the syndrome of 'cerebellar' mutism and subsequent dysarthria: a critical review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Smet, Hyo Jung; Baillieux, Hanne; Catsman-Berrevoets, Coriene; De Deyn, Peter P; Mariën, Peter; Paquier, Philippe F

    2007-07-01

    Transient cerebellar mutism is a well-known clinical entity which may develop after surgery to the cerebellum. As the period of mutism is followed by motor speech deficits, the condition has also been termed the syndrome of (cerebellar) Mutism and Subsequent Dysarthria (MSD). In children, its incidence is estimated between 8% and 31%. Unfortunately, the literature provides contradictory information regarding motor speech production post-mutism. We therefore critically reviewed data on 283 childhood cases to chart the mode of recovery of motor speech production after the mute period. After applying stringent exclusion criteria, we found that 98.8% of the children displayed motor speech deficits. This percentage is much higher than commonly reported in the literature. In addition, recovery of speech appeared to be less favourable than previously ascertained. Future studies should investigate more carefully the patients' speech characteristics in order to be able to offer children an adequate and complete rehabilitation program.

  4. Dysarthria in individuals with Parkinson's disease: a protocol for a binational, cross-sectional, case-controlled study in French and European Portuguese (FraLusoPark)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Rita; Mercier, Céline; Santos, Helena; Atkinson-Clement, Cyril; Carvalho, Joana; Welby, Pauline; Oliveira, Pedro; D'Imperio, Mariapaola; Frota, Sónia; Letanneux, Alban; Vigario, Marina; Cruz, Marisa; Martins, Isabel Pavão; Viallet, François

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) have to deal with several aspects of voice and speech decline and thus alteration of communication ability during the course of the disease. Among these communication impairments, 3 major challenges include: (1) dysarthria, consisting of orofacial motor dysfunction and dysprosody, which is linked to the neurodegenerative processes; (2) effects of the pharmacological treatment, which vary according to the disease stage; and (3) particular speech modifications that may be language-specific, that is, dependent on the language spoken by the patients. The main objective of the FraLusoPark project is to provide a thorough evaluation of changes in PD speech as a result of pharmacological treatment and disease duration in 2 different languages (French vs European Portuguese). Methods and analysis Individuals with PD are enrolled in the study in France (N=60) and Portugal (N=60). Their global motor disability and orofacial motor functions is assessed with specific clinical rating scales, without (OFF) and with (ON) pharmacological treatment. 2 groups of 60 healthy age-matched volunteers provide the reference for between-group comparisons. Along with the clinical examinations, several speech tasks are recorded to obtain acoustic and perceptual measures. Patient-reported outcome measures are used to assess the psychosocial impact of dysarthria on quality of life. Ethics and dissemination The study has been approved by the local responsible committees on human experimentation and is conducted in accordance with the ethical standards. A valuable large-scale database of speech recordings and metadata from patients with PD in France and Portugal will be constructed. Results will be disseminated in several articles in peer-reviewed journals and in conference presentations. Recommendations on how to assess speech and voice disorders in individuals with PD to monitor the progression and management of symptoms will be provided

  5. Rehabilitation nursing research of hepatolenticular degeneration patients with dysarthria%肝豆状核变性患者构音障碍的康复护理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毕彩琴; 孙俊启; 赵红; 孔令环; 张平贵

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨肝豆状核变性患者构音障碍康复护理的疗效及其临床应用价值。方法 将136例肝豆状核变性构音障碍患者随机分为康复护理组和常规护理组各68例,均采用二巯基丙磺酸钠正规驱铜治疗,常规护理组患者给予一般护理,康复护理组患者给予一般护理和构音障碍康复护理。治疗8周后,通过Frenchay构音障碍评定法、型喉发声空气力学分析仪、肺功能检测仪、ADL量表及WHOQOL-BREF进行疗效评定并比较。结果 康复护理组治疗后构音障碍评定总有效率为95.6%,对照组为72.1%,两组疗效比较差异有统计学意义(x2= 13.88,P<0.01);康复护理组治疗前后MPT比较差异有统计学意义[(6.12 ±5.36)s比(8.94±6.43)s,t =2.78,P<0.01],FVC治疗前后比较差异有统计学意义(t =2.46,P<0.05);两组治疗后MPT、FVC比较差异均有统计学意义(P<0.05);康复组治疗后Barthel指数为(68.34 ±6.35)分,对照组为(60.81±5.44)分,两组疗效比较差异有统计学意义(t=7.43,P<0.01);康复组治疗前后WHOQOL-BREF测定结果比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.01),两组治 疗后WHOQOL-BREF测定结果比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.01或P<0.05)。结论 早期进行言语康复训练,可促进肝豆状核变性患者构音器官功能的恢复,改善患者的言语功能,提高其日常生活能力和生活质量,具有较高的临床应用价值。%Objective To explore the efficacy and the clinical practice value of rehabilitation nursing to hepatolenticular degeneration patients with dysarthria. Methods 136 hepatolenticular degeneration patients with dysarthria in hospital were enrolled in this study, and they were randomly assigned to rehabilitation nursing group and usual nursing group. Both groups were treated formally by sodium dimercaptosulphonate, the 68 patients of usual nursing group were given general nursing, the 68 patients of

  6. Effect of Manipulation Treatment in Fricative Training on Uygur Dysarthria%手法治疗在维吾尔族构音障碍患者舌擦音中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张虔

    2011-01-01

    Objective To observe the effect of manipulation treatment in fricative training on Uygur dysarthria patients.Methods 60 Uygur dysarthria patients were divided into phonetic training group and phonetic training adding manipulation treatment group.Results The fricative of manipulation treatment group is better than phonetic training group in pronunciation.Conclusion The manipulation treatment is needed in fricative training of Uygur dysarthria patients.%目的 探讨手法治疗在维吾尔族构音障碍患者舌擦音训练中的应用及疗效.方法 将60例维吾尔族构音障碍患者分为语音训练组30例,手法训练组30例除语音训练外加入手法治疗.结果 手法训练组舌擦音发音明显改善.结论 在维吾尔族构音障碍患者舌擦音中的训练中应注意加入手法治疗.

  7. 音乐节拍器在辅助治疗痉挛性构音障碍中的应用%The Application of Musical Metronome to the Treatment of Spastic Dysarthria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵艳玲; 杨勤

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the effects of musical metronome to the treatment of spastic dysarthria. Methods Twelve patients with spastic dysarthria were treated with musical metronome during routine speech training. Results After 3 months of treatment, all the patients showed different degrees of improvement. Conclusion Musical metronome treatment can improve the respiratory function and speech intelligibility of patients with spastic dysarthria.%目的 探讨音乐节拍器在辅助治疗痉挛性构音障碍中的作用.方法 对12例痉挛性构音障碍患者在常规构音障碍训练基础上加入音乐节拍器进行辅助治疗.结果 所有患者治疗3个月后均有不同程度的改善.结论 音乐节拍器辅助治疗可以提高痉挛性构音障碍患者的呼吸功能及言语清晰度.

  8. Effect of Oral Motor Therapy on Dysarthria in Children with Cerebral Palsy%口部运动治疗对脑瘫患儿构音障碍的疗效观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑钦; 沈敏; 何龙文

    2012-01-01

    目的 观察口部运动治疗对脑瘫患儿构音障碍的疗效.方法 将65 例伴有构音障碍的脑瘫患儿分为两组,两组均进行基础康复治疗,观察组在此基础上采用口部运动治疗,6 个月后观察其言语清晰度的变化.结果 观察组总有效率(84.8%)显著高于对照组(15.6%) (P<0.001).结论 口部运动治疗对脑瘫患儿构音障碍有较好疗效.%Objective To explore the effect of oral motor therapy on dysarthria in children with cerebral palsy. Methods 6? Cerebral palsy children with dysarthria were divided into observation group and control group. All the children received basic rehabilitation, and the observation group received oral motor therapy additionally. The articulation of children was observed before and after treatment. Results The efficiency rale of the observation group (84.8%) was Mgrificandy higher than that of the control group (15.6%) (P<0.001). Conclusion Oral motor therapy is effective on dysarthria in children with cerebral palsy.

  9. 喂养方式干预对改善脑瘫患儿构音障碍的影响%Effect of feeding patterns intervention on relieving dysarthria for cerebral palsy children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙江红; 陈小红; 汪捷峰

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨喂养方式干预对改善脑瘫患儿构音障碍的影响.方法 对26例脑瘫患儿家长进行喂养方式不当的调查,根据调查结果进行喂养方式干预,为期6个月,干预前后对患儿进行口腔运动功能检查、构音检查.结果 干预前后患儿的口腔运动功能、构音障碍比较,差异有统计学意义.结论喂养方式干预能改善脑瘫患儿口腔运动功能,提高构音能力.%Objective To study the effect of feeding patterns intervention on relieving dysarthria for cerebral palsy children. Method Investigate parents of 26 cerebral palsy children on improper feeding patterns. Parents receive intervention for 6 months based on the result. Test children's oral movement function and dysarthria before and after intervention. Result There is significant difference on oral movement function and dysarthria for children before and after intervention. Conclusion Feeding patterns intervention can improve the development of oral movement function and articulation ability for cerebral palsy children.

  10. Legionella pneumophila infection presenting as headache, confusion and dysarthria in a human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1 positive patient: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins Nathaniel M

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Legionella pneumophila is a common cause of community-acquired pneumonia. Central nervous system dysfunction is common, and diagnosis in the absence of pulmonary symptoms can be challenging. Here we describe an atypical clinical presentation of Legionella infection in a patient with HIV who was found to have an unusual neuroradiologic lesion that further served to obscure the diagnosis. This is the first such description in a patient with Legionellosis and HIV coinfection. Case presentation A 43 year-old HIV positive man presented to our hospital with dysarthria, fevers, headache, and altered mental status. Initial work-up revealed pneumonia and a lesion of the splenium of the corpus callosum on magnetic resonance imaging. He was subsequently diagnosed with Legionella pneumonia and treated with complete symptom resolution. Conclusions Neurologic abnormalities are frequent in Legionellosis, but the diagnosis may be difficult in the absence of overt respiratory symptoms and in the presence of HIV coinfection. A high index of suspicion and early initiation of empiric antibiotics is imperative since early treatment may help prevent long-term sequelae. Neuroimaging abnormalities, though rare, can help the physician narrow down the diagnosis and avoid unnecessary invasive testing. Future studies should aim to elucidate the as yet unknown role of neuroimaging in the diagnoses and prognostication of Legionellosis, as well as the interaction between Legionella infection and HIV.

  11. From dizziness to severe ataxia and dysarthria: New cases of anti-Ca/ARHGAP26 autoantibody-associated cerebellar ataxia suggest a broad clinical spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallwitz, Ulrike; Brock, Sebastian; Schunck, Antje; Wildemann, Brigitte; Jarius, Sven; Hoffmann, Frank

    2017-08-15

    In 2010, a novel anti-neuronal autoantibody, termed anti-Ca, was described in a patient with subacute cerebellar ataxia, and Rho GTPase-activating protein 26 (ARHGAP26) was identified as the target antigen. Recently, three additional cases of anti-Ca-positive cerebellar ataxia have been published. In addition to ataxia, cognitive decline and depression have been observed in some patients. Here, we report two new cases of anti-Ca-associated autoimmune cerebellar ataxia. Patient 1 presented with dizziness and acute yet mild limb and gait ataxia. Symptoms stabilized with long-term oral corticosteroid therapy but transiently worsened when steroids were tapered. Interestingly, both initial occurrence and worsening of the patient's neurological symptoms after steroid withdrawal were accompanied by spontaneous cutaneous hematomas. Patient 2 initially presented with an increased startle response and myoclonic jerks, and subsequently developed severe limb and gait ataxia, dysarthria, oculomotor disturbances, head and voice tremor, dysphagia, cognitive symptoms and depression. Steroid treatment was started five years after disease onset. The symptoms then responded only poorly to corticosteroids. At most recent follow-up, 19 years after disease onset, the patient was wheelchair-bound. These cases extend the clinical spectrum associated with anti-ARHGAP26 autoimmunity and suggest that early treatment may be important in patients with this rare syndrome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. 综合语言康复治疗对运动性构音障碍的疗效%Effect of Comprehensive Language Rehabilitation on Motility Dysarthria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于国华; 吴芬; 李俊

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨综合语言康复治疗对运动性构音障碍的疗效。方法采用中国康复研究中心版《构音障碍评定表》、失语症筛查表及简易精神状态检查量表(MMSE)排除失语症以及认知功能障碍;系统训练包括松弛训练、呼吸训练、构音器官运动训练、构音类似运动训练、构音训练、韵律训练、视、听觉反馈的训练以及低频电刺激结合发声训练。治疗1个月后再次采用《构音障碍评定表》进行构音器官运动及构音的评定。对患者治疗前后评分进行比较。结果61例患者在构音器官运动及构音方面均取得不同程度的提高。构音器官运动:治疗后在最长发音时间、头部控制、唇力度、舌外伸范围、灵活度方面改善率明显提高(P <0.01或 P <0.05)。构音检查:治疗后较治疗前50单词检查[(22.84±14.81)个比(30.83±14.97)个,P <0.01)]、142个音节复述检查均明显提高[(52.42±43.49)个比(70.27±49.36)个,P <0.05)],文章正答率亦明显提高[(0.38±0.32)%比(0.52±0.31)%,P <0.05)]。结论采用综合语言康复治疗对运动性构音障碍有较好的康复效果。%ABSTRACT:Objective To observe the clinical effect of comprehensive language rehabilitation on motility dysarthria.Methods The aphasia and cognitive dysfunction were excluded by using Dys-arthria Assessment Form (China Rehabilitation Research Center Edition),Aphasia Screening Scale and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE).Systematic training included relaxation train-ing,breathing training,articulator motion training,similar articulation motion training,articula-tion training,rhythm training,visual and auditory feedback training,and low frequency electrical stimulation combined with vocal training.After treatment for 1 month,articulator motion and ar-ticulation were evaluated again by using Dysarthria Assessment Form

  13. A Case Study of the Treatments for Mentally Retarded Children’s Dysarthria%智障儿童构音障碍矫治的个案报告

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张伟锋

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this research is to investigate the treatments for mentally-retarded children’s dysarthria through a case study of the treatment for dysarthria of a mentally retarded child six years and ten months old. First, his articulation function was assessed with the dysarthria assessment tools. Then, based on the assessment results, the training programs combining oral motor function training with articulation phoneme training were developed and implemented. Finally, the after-training assessment was done. The research findings show that the child’s articulation and oral motor function parameters are improved significantly after training. In conclusion, the implementation of articulation training targeted at mentally-retarded children with dysarthria can effectively improve their speech condition and therefore, it is feasible to implement the training program integrating oral motor function training with articulation phoneme training targeted at mentally retarded children.%为了探讨智障儿童构音障碍的矫治方法,文章采用个案研究方法,对一名6岁10个月中度智障儿童的构音障碍矫治进行研究。先用构音障碍评估工具对其构音功能进行评估,后根据评估结果制定口部运动功能训练和构音音位训练相结合的训练方案并实施训练,最后进行训练后的评估。训练后该患儿的口部运动功能、构音清晰度等构音功能指标有明显提高。结果显示:对存在构音障碍的智障儿童实施有针对性的构音训练,能有效改善其言语状况;对智障儿童实施口部运动功能训练和构音音位训练相结合的实施方案是可行的。

  14. 断乳期饮食添加时间与儿童构音障碍相关性研究%Study on the Dependablity of the Time Added Weaning Period Diet and Children Dysarthria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林芸; 陈亦旋; 刘运清; 刘才华

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the time to add weaning period diet to infants and young children whether had an effect on chiidren'cavitas otis motor function, pronunciation and dysarthria. METHODS Surveyed children' parents of experimental group (added weaning period diet earlily)and control group(addod weaning period diet as normal) by one to one questionnaire investigation, got the information of weaning period diet, evaluated the children cavitas otis motor function, pronunciation and misartieulation and analysed the dependability between the time and dysarthria. RESULTS There were significant difference between experimental and control group in dysarthria and motor functional disturbance(P<0.01 ). CONCLUSIONS Added weaning period diet eariily during 4 to 6 months old can promote cavitas otis motor function and diminish dysarthria opportunity.%目的 探讨婴幼儿时期添加断乳期饮食的时间对儿童口腔运动功能、儿童发音和构音障碍的影响.方法 通过对实验组及对照组儿童父母进行一对一问卷调查,了解其断乳期饮食添加情况,评价儿童的口腔运动功能、发音及构音情况,从而分析断乳期饮食添加时间与儿童构音障碍的相关性.结果 伴构音障碍的实验组儿童多伴有口腔运动的功能障碍,且未能及时添加断乳期饮食,与对照组比较,两者有显著性差异(P<0.01).结论 4~6月尽早添加断乳期饮食,能促进口腔运动功能,从而减少儿童构音异常的发生机会.

  15. Research progress on status quo of dysarthria in patients with Wilson’s disease and nursing care of it%Wilson病构音障碍的研究现状及护理进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金艳; 喻绪恩; 王训; 韩咏竹

    2016-01-01

    分析了 Wilson病(WD)构音障碍的研究现状,从摄食护理、言语训练护理、声音响度护理、口部运动护理、音乐疗法、心理护理方面总结了 WD病人构音障碍的有效护理方法,提出只有采取有效的、科学的护理干预措施,才能提高病人的生活质量。%It analyzed the research status quo of dysarthria in patients with Wilson’s disease,summarized the ef-fective nursing method of dysarthria from aspects of feeding care,speech training care,loudness care,care oral sports,music therapy and psychological care.It put forward that only the effective and scientific nursing inter-ventions were accepted,the quality of life of patients would be improved.

  16. Disartria e doença de Machado-Joseph: relato de caso Dysarthria in Machado-Joseph disease: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Ruviaro Busanello

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi descrever os principais aspectos fonoaudiológicos relacionados à fala na doença de Machado-Joseph, em um indivíduo do sexo masculino, selecionado entre outros pacientes portadores desta doença com limitações significativas de fala. O paciente foi atendido no Setor de Fonoaudiologia do Serviço de Fisiatria do Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre. Especificamente quanto à fala e seus processos, observou-se quadro disártrico predominantemente atáxico, que piorou com a evolução da doença, passando de leve para severo. Estes resultados permitiram a conclusão de que as alterações tornam-se significativas na fala do portador de doença de Machado-Joseph, associadas ao comprometimento da respiração, articulação, fonação e ressonância. Concluiu-se também quanto à importância do tratamento fonoaudiológico na doença de Machado-Joseph, sugerindo-se novos estudos, com número maior de indivíduos, sejam realizados, a fim de melhor caracterizar as alterações de fala observadas neste estudo.The aim of this study was to describe the essential speech aspects of Machado-Joseph disease in a male patient with this diagnosis, selected among others with the same disease that received treatment at the Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology department of Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre (Brazil. Regarding the speech process, it was observed ataxic dysarthria, which worsened from light to severe with the evolution of the disease. These results allowed the conclusion that speech alterations become more and more significant for Machado-Joseph patients, together with deficits in breathing, articulation, phonation and resonance. Finally, it was possible to suggest that Speech Pathology treatment is essential in Machado-Joseph disease, although more studies are necessary, with larger samples, in order to better characterize the speech alterations observed this study.

  17. 功能性构音障碍儿童语言能力和社交能力分析%Functional dysarthria children's language ability and social ability analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴晓华; 左桂秋; 陆玲玲; 高晓萍; 王惠云; 温丽萍; 李丽华; 范旭升

    2016-01-01

    Objective to study the functional dysarthria children with and without exception in terms of language skil s and social skil s .Methods from March 2015 to March 2015 in a medical check -up in children select 30 functional dysarthria children for the team,at the same time selecting 30 normal children as control group,compared two groups of children in the dif erences in language and social skil s,at the same time observation in a given language rehabilitation training after two groups of children in the above two aspects of the change .Results lan-guage rehabilitation training team before the language skil s and social skil s are weak in the control group ,the dif erence was statistical y dif erence( p <0.05),after language rehabilitation training team two ability are improved.Conclusion the functional dysarthria in language skil s and social skil s were abnormal,through early intervention can improve the abnormal degree,pro-mote their daily communication ability and social communication skil s .%目的:探讨功能性构音障碍儿童在语言能力和社交能力方面有无异常。方法于2015年3月至2016年3月在就诊体检儿童中选取30名功能性构音障碍儿童为研究组,同期选取30名正常儿童为对照组,比较两组儿童在语言能力和社交能力的差异,同时观察在给予语言康复训练后两组儿童在以上两方面的改变。结果语言康复训练前研究组语言能力和社交能力均弱于对照组,差异有统计学差异(p <0.05),经语言康复训练后研究组两项能力均有所提升。结论功能性构音障碍儿童在语言能力和社交能力方面存在异常,通过早期干预可以改善异常程度,促进日常交流能力和社会交往能力的提升。

  18. Effect of speech training on dysarthria for patients with hepatolenticular degeneration%言语训练对肝豆状核变性构音障碍的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周水连; 韩永升; 郭铁; 韩峰群; 汪萍; 杨海燕; 高青青; 秦玮

    2013-01-01

    Objective To observe the effect of speech training on dysarthria for HLD patients. Methods Sixty patients with dysarthria for HLD were randomly into the treatment group and control group with 30 cases in each group. The two groups were given routine clinical medical treatment. All patients were given Frenchay score before and after treatment. Results The clinical total recovery rate of speech training group and usual care group was 93.33% and 73.33%. After treatment, the Frenchay scores were improved significantly than before. There was a significant difference in Frenchay score of two groups (P<0.01). Conclusion The speech training can significantly promote the functional recovery of dysarthria with language for HLD patients and improve the quality of life and the clinical efficacy.%目的 观察言语训练对肝豆状核变性(HLD)构音障碍患者临床疗效的影响.方法 选取60 例HLD 构音障碍患者分为常规护理组和常规护理加言语训练组各30 例,2组均给予临床常规药物治疗,治疗前后给予Frenchay 评分.结果 言语训练组和常规护理组临床总有效率分别为93.33%和73.33%,2 组治疗后Frenchay 评分均较治疗前明显提高,言语训练组与常规护理组比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论 言语训练能明显促进HLD 构音障碍患者语言功能的恢复,改善患者的生活质量,提高临床疗效.

  19. 头项针结合舌针对脑卒中患者构音障碍的影响%Effect of Scalp- nape Combined with Tongue acupuncture Therapy on Dysarthria after Stroke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史术峰; 吴桂华; 张亚娟

    2012-01-01

    目的:通过对比研究观察头项针结合舌针对脑卒中患者构音障碍的临床疗效.方法:急性脑卒中合并构音障碍的患者60例随机分为两组.治疗组30例,在常规药物治疗及常规构音障碍训练基础上,采用头项针结合舌针治疗;对照组30例,采用常规药物治疗及常规构音障碍训练.结果:两组治疗前后言语功能改善情况比较有显著性差异(P<0.05);两组生活质量比较有显著性差异(P<0.05);治疗组有效率83.3%,对照组为66.7%,两组比较有显著性差异(P<0.05).结论:头项针结合舌针是一种有效的治疗急性脑梗死后言语障碍的方法,可以有效改善言语功能及生活质量,提高临床疗效.%Objective:To explore the curative effect of scalp - nape acupuncture combined with tongue acupuncture for dysarthria caused by Stroke. Methods: Sixty patients with dysarthria were randomly divided into two groups. The Treatment group with 30 patients were subjected to conventional drug and rehabilitation training combined with Scalp - nape acupuncture. The control group with 30 patients were subjected to conventional drug and rehabilitation training. Results: There was a significant difference of Speech function (P <0. 05). The Quality of life in both groups had a significant difference ( P < 0. 05 ) ; The efficiency of treatment group was 83. 3%. The control group was 66. 7% , and there was a significant difference between groups( P < 0. 05 ). Conclusion: Scalp - nape acupuncture combined with tongue acupuncture is an effective treatment for dysarthria caused by stroke. It can effectively promote the speech function and quality of life, and it can also improve the clinical efficacy, which should be recommended for clinical application.

  20. Characteristics of children with functional dysarthria pronouncing constants among different ages%不同年龄段功能性构音障碍儿童错误辅音分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜志宏; 毛丽珈; 彭炳蔚; 杨思渊; 黄志芳

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To study the characteristics of children with functional dysarthria pronouncing consonants a-mong different ages ,to understand whether they will be improved or cured along with age .Methods:The dysarthria examination scale from China Rehabilitation Research Center was applied in this study .Based on the different pro-nouncing parts ,the constant pronunciations were clustered to six groups (i .e .labial consonant ;supradental conso-nant ;blade-alveolar consonant ;blade-palatal consonant ;lingua-palatal consonant ;velar consonant);the children with functional dysarthria were divided into three age groups .The ratio of children pronouncing constants incorrectly and correctly was analyzed .Results:For the rate of pronouncing constants incorrectly among 90 cases ,there was no sta-tistically significant difference among four-year ,five-year and older than six years groups .For the analysis of six pronouncing parts ,the statistical significance was only found in pronouncing blade-palatal consonant among three age groups (P=0 .018) ,and the rest five pronouncing parts did not have statistically significant difference .Conclusion:The symptoms will not be improved or cured naturally with age .Immediate treatment should be conducted once the diagnosis of functional dysarthria is made .%目的:研究功能性构音障碍儿童错误辅音在不同年龄段内的具体表现,了解错误辅音在大年龄组儿童中是否存在好转或自愈倾向。方法:采用中国康复研究中心研制的汉语构音障碍评定法,按照6种不同发音部位(唇音、舌尖中音、舌根音、舌面音、舌尖前音、舌尖后音)的辅音分类方法,对不同年龄段功能性构音障碍儿童的错误辅音进行分析,收集3个年龄段6种不同发音部位发生错误构音的人数和未发生错误构音的人数。结果:90例患者在唇音发音时,不同等级错音个数时的人数分布状况在4岁年龄段、5岁年龄段以及6

  1. 痉挛型构音障碍脑性瘫痪患者不同发音部位辅音发音的特点%Consonant pronunciation in spastic dysarthria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈卓铭; 杜志宏

    2011-01-01

    目的 研究痉挛型构音障碍的脑瘫患者辅音发音的特点,为康复计划的制订提供理论依据.方法 采用中国康复研究中心制订的构音障碍检测法检测存在痉挛型构音障碍的脑瘫患者28例,同时使用Cool edit pro录音软件和Praat语音分析软件分析发音情况,计算所有患者21个辅音的各类错误发音,分析错误发音的方式,总结错误发音的特点.结果 按发音部位分类,痉挛型构音障碍的脑瘫患者辅音错误发音分为六类,28例患者中,唇音的错误率为20.54%,舌尖前音错误率为71.43%,舌尖中音的错误率为52.68%,舌尖后音错误率为71.43%,舌面音错误率为53.57%,舌根音的错误率为35.71%.结论 痉挛型构音障碍的脑瘫患者以舌尖前音和舌尖后音的辅音错误率最高,唇音的辅音错误率最低.%Objective To research the consonant pronunciation of patients with spastic dysarthria as a result of cerebral palsy and supply a theoretical basis for their rehabilitation.Methods Twenty-eight cerebral palsy patients with spastic dysarthria were examined using a dysarthria examination scale developed by the China Rehabilitation Research Center.The whole process of the tests was recorded using Cool Edit recording software.Praat4 was used to evaluate their pronunciation according to the pronunciation criteria of “experimental phonology”.Their error rates on 21 consonants were counted and the characteristics of the articulation errors were summarized.Results According to the location of articulation,the inaccuracy rates on labials,dentals,apicals,blade-palatals,palatals and velars in the 28 patients were 21%,71%,53%,71%,54% and 36% respectively.Conclusions Patients with spastic dysarthria as a result of cerebral palsy have the most difficulty pronouncing dentals and blade-palatal consonants.They find labial consonants the easiest.

  2. 颈部电针治疗中风后痉挛型构音障碍30例%Efficacy of Neck Electrical Acupuncture on 30 Cases of Post-stroke Spastic Dysarthria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金泽; 曹晓婷

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the clinical efficacy on post-stroke spastic dysarthria by the point selection according to electrical acupuncture at lian quan ( RN23 ) , tian tu ( RN22 ) and ren ying ( ST9 ) on both sides based on conventional acupuncture and speech rehabilitation treatment.Methods:Sixty patients with spasm dys-arthria after strok were randomized into a treatment group and a control group (30 cases in each group).The patients in two groups received hearing -speech rehabilitation as the basic treatment.The control group re-ceived conventional acupuncture, acupuncturing at baihui ( DU20 ) , fengchi ( GB20 ) , tongli ( HT5 ) , neiguan (PC6),fengfu(DU16),yamen(DU15),yifeng(SJ17),zusanli(ST36)and hegu(LI4).The treatment group re-ceived therapies on the basis of control group,adding electrical acupuncture at lianquan,tiantu and renying on both sides,two times a day,6 days as a course, ten courses of the treatment and each time 30 min,one day in-terval between every two courses.Results:The treatment group and the control group were improved according to Frenchay dysarthria evaluation ( P<0.01) .But the treatment group improved more obviously than the control group,with a significant difference in statistics (P<0.01).Conclusion:Conventional acupuncture and speech rehabilitation training treatment with electrical acupuncture at lianquan,tiantu and renying on both sides for the treatment of post-stroke spastic dysarthria have a good clinical effect.%目的:在常规针刺及言语康复训练治疗基础上,观察廉泉、天突配合双侧人迎穴电针对中风后痉挛型构音障碍的治疗作用。方法:抽取60例患者,随机分为对照组、电针组,每组30例。在言语康复训练的基础上,对照组常规取穴针刺。电针组在对照组基础上,加以廉泉、天突及人迎(双侧)电针治疗。每次30 min,每日两次,6日为1个疗程,治疗10个疗程,每个疗程间隔1日。采用Frenchay构音障碍评定

  3. Rehabilitation effect of Cantonese training for Cantonese motility dysarthria%粤语训练对卒中后粤语运动性构音障碍患者的康复效果

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李敏; 王璇; 李胜活; 潘翠环; 陈艳; 张朝霞; 谢晓娜

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the treatment effect of using pronunciation standards of Canto nese romanization scheme in combination with motor function training of the articulatory organs in patients with Cantonese dvsarthria. Methods A total of 58 patients with motility dysarthria caused by cerebral infarction who met the inclusion criteria and whose native language was Cantonese were enrolled respectively according to the order of odd and even numbers. They were divided into either a Cantonese training group (n = 29) or a mandarin training group ( n - 29). The severity of dysfunction was assessed by Frenchay dysarthria assessment 4 weeks before and after treatment. Both groups received the motor function training and pronunciation training of the articulation organs. The pronunciation training program of the Cantonese training group was evaluated according to the Cantonese romanization scheme; and the mandarin training group was evaluated using the dysarthria assessment method of the China Rehabilitation Research Center (CRRC). Results ①Four weeks after treatment, the patients with normal pronunciation were 37.9% (11/29) and 17.2% (5/29) respectively, and those with mild, moderate, severe, and extremely severe dysarthria were 37. 9% (11/29) and 27.6% (8/29),13.8% (4/29) and 34.5% (10/29),7.0% (2/ 29) and 13.8% (4/29), 3.4% (1/29) and7.0% (2/29), respectively in the Cantonese training group and mandarin training group. There were significant differences between the two groups (P = 0. 04). ②There were significant differences in comparing the severity of dysarthria before and after treatment be- tween the two groups (χ2 =21.85, P =0. 000; χ2 =6. 33 , P = 0.012). ③The effective rates in the Cantonese training group and the mandarin training group after treatment were 89. 7% (26/29) and 65. 5% (19/29) respectively. The difference was statistically significant (χ2 =3.99, P= 0.028). Conclusion The therapeutic scheme used by the Cantonese training group may more

  4. 不同针刺方法治疗缺血性脑卒中后构音障碍的疗效对比研究%Comparative Study of the Therapeutic Effects of Different Acupuncture Methods on Post Ischemic Stroke Dysarthria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丛文杰; 杜忠衡; 胡欢; 洪显钗; 方剑乔

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the clinical therapeutic effects of different acupuncture methods on post ischemic stroke dysarthria using the Frenchay Dysarthria Assessment and provide reliable clinical evidence for its treatment.Methods Forty-five patients with post ischemic stroke dysarthria were randomly allocated to a treatment group of 22 cases and a control group of 23 cases. The treatment group received electroacupuncture and the control group, acupuncture with filiform needles alone. Treatment was given once daily in both groups. The therapeutic effects were evaluated using the NIHSS, the Barthel Index (BI) and the Frenchay Dysarthria Assessment as indicators after 20 days of treatment. The therapeutic effects were compared between the two groups after treatment.Results There were statistically significant pre-/post-treatment differences in the NIHSS score and the BI score in the two groups (P<0.01). There were statistically significant post-treatment differences in the NIHSS score and the BI score between the treatment and control groups (P<0.01). There were statistically significant pre-/post-treatment differences in dysarthria grades and the Modified Frenchay Score in the two groups (P<0.01,P<0.05). There were statistically significant post-treatment differences in dysarthria grades and the Modified Frenchay Score between the treatment and control groups (P<0.05).Conclusions Acupuncture is an effective way to treat post ischemic stroke dysarthria. The therapeutic effect of electroacupuncture is better than that of acupuncture alone.%目的:采用Frenchay构音障碍评定法比较不同针刺疗法治疗缺血性脑卒中后构音障碍的临床疗效,为治疗脑卒中后构音障碍提供可靠的临床证据。方法将45例缺血性脑卒中后构音障碍患者随机分为治疗组22例和对照组23例。治疗组采用电针治疗,对照组采用单纯毫针治疗。两组均每日治疗1次,治疗20 d后进行疗效评价,采用NIHSS评分和Barthel指

  5. Study of Rood-Technology in training the application of dysarthria patients with cerebral apoplexy%Rood技术在脑卒中患者构音障碍训练中的运用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    焦素芹; 言丽香

    2013-01-01

    目的:探讨Rood技术在脑卒中患者构音障训练中的实际运用效果。方法:选取60例有构音障碍的脑卒中患者随机分为治疗组和对照组各30例,对照组实施常规训练方法,治疗组在常规训练方法的基础上,采用Rood技术进行训练。比较2组治疗效果及治疗前后焦虑症状改善情况。结果:治疗组的治疗总有效率显著高于对照组,2组之间差异具有统计学意义( P<0.01);2组患者治疗前HAMA总评分、精神焦虑评分、躯体焦虑评分均无统计学差异(P>0.05);治疗4周后,治疗组患者HAMA总分、精神焦虑评分、躯体焦虑评分均显著低于对照组(P<0.01)。结论:对脑卒中并发构音障碍的患者采用 Rood技术进行言语训练,能提高了言语的清晰度,使患者重获信心,缓解焦虑抑郁情绪,利于疾病的全面康复,改善生活自理能力。%Objective To study the Rood -Technology composed -sound barrier technology in stroke patients who were in training practical application effect .Methods:A total of 60 cases with dysarthria patients with cerebral apoplexy were randomly divided into treat -ment group and control group , 30 cases each group implement regular training method , the treatment group in the conventional training method, on the basis of the Rood technology for training .Compare two groups of treatment effect and anxiety symptoms before and after treatment.Results:The total effective rate of treatment group is significantly higher than the control group , a statistically significant differ-ence between the two groups (P 0.05);4 weeks after treatment, the treatment group patients with HAMA overall score , mental anxiety score, somatic anxiety scores were significantly lower than control group (P<0.01).Conclusions:in patients with cerebral stroke complicated with dysarthria Rood technology is adopted to improve the speech training , can improve the definition of the

  6. The curative effect of early intervention of electro-acupuncture combined with functional electric stimulation on the treatment of spastic dysarthria in acute cerebral infarction patients%电针联合功能性电刺激早期干预对脑梗死后痉挛型构音障碍的疗效研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴海科; 谭峰; 万赛英; 王金良; 黄涛; 丁德权; 陈文霖; 霍绮雯; 张明霞

    2012-01-01

    目的:探讨早期电针(EA)联合功能性电刺激(FES)对脑梗死痉挛型构音障碍的临床疗效.方法:将180例脑梗死痉挛型构音障碍患者随机分为对照组、治疗组和联合组,对照组予常规药物治疗加灯盏细辛注射液静滴,治疗组在对照组基础上加电针,针刺风池、百会、大椎、翳明、廉泉、外金津玉液,联合组在治疗组基础上加FES治疗,治疗前及治疗2周后采用修改的Barthel指数(MBI)、NIHSS评分和Frenchay构音障碍评价法评定其疗效.结果:经治疗后,对照组、治疗组、联合组的MBI、NIHSS评分均较同组治疗前明显改善(P<0.001),经治疗后联合组的MBI高于对照组和治疗组(P<0.05),NIHSS评分则低于对照组和治疗组,三组间的MBI、NIHSS评分比较差异具有显著性意义(P<0.05);治疗后治疗组和联合组的Frenchay构音障碍评定级别均较治疗前明显改善(P<0.05,P<0.001),差异具有显著性.结论:EA联合FES能有效地改善脑梗死患者构音障碍及日常生活能力.%Objective: To observe the curative effect of electro-acupuncture(EA) combined with functional electric stimulation (FES) on the treatment of spastic dysarthria in acute cerebral infarction (ACI) patients at the early stage. Method:A total of 180 cases of ACI patients with spastic dysarthria were randomly divided into control group, treatment group and combined treatment group. Conventional drug therapy and fleabane injection were used in control group. Additionally, EA at acupoints of Fengchi(GB20), Baihui(DU20), Dazhui(BU14), Yiming(EX-HN14), Lianquan(RN23) and lateral Jinjinyuye was performed in treatment group and FES and EA combined treatment were applied in combined treatment group. Neurology grade and recovery of lower limb function were evaluated by using modified Barthel index (MBI), National Health Institate stroke scale (N1HSS) and dysarthria Frenchay score before treatment and after 2 weeks treatment. Result: MBI and

  7. Dysarthria spasm in patients with cerebral infarction including functional electrical stimulation com-bined the clinical effect of early intervention analysis%功能性电刺激联合电针早期干预对痉挛型构音障碍脑梗死患者的临床效果分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鄢圣娟

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨采用功能性电刺激联合电针早期干预对痉挛型构音障碍脑梗死患者的临床疗效。方法将132例痉挛型构音障碍脑梗死患者随机均分为两组,均给予灯盏细辛注射液静脉滴注加常规药物治疗,对照组患者在此基础上行电针治疗,研究组患者在对照组基础上行功能性电刺激联合电针治疗,比较两组临床疗效。结果治疗前两组患者MBI、NIHSS评分差异无显著性(P>0.05),治疗后MBI评分较治疗前提高,NIHSS评分较治疗前降低(P=0.000),治疗后研究组患者MBI评分高于对照组,NIHSS评分较对照组低,差异有显著性(t=6.617,P=0.000;t=2.724,P=0.007);两组治疗后Frenchay构音障碍等级较治疗前明显改善,研究组患者Frenchay构音障碍评定等级改善程度优于对照组,差异有显著性(Z=-2.235,P=0.025)。结论功能性电刺激联合电针早期干预治疗痉挛型构音障碍脑梗死具有疗效好,不良反应少等特点。%Objective To study the spastic dysarthria patients with cerebral infarction using functional electrical stimulation (FES) in combination with electric acupuncture (EA) the clinical curative effect of early intervention. Method 132 cases of cerebral infarction were spastic dysarthria patients were randomly divided into two groups, all give lamps asarum injection intravenous drip and regular medication, the control group on the basis of uplink cupping treatment, team based uplink functional electrical stimulation combined cupping treatment in the control group, compared two groups of clinical curative effect. Result The two groups before treatment MBI, NIHSS score difference has no statistical signiifcance (P>0.05), after treatment MBI scores was improved, the NIHSS score was lower (P=0.000), the team MBI scores higher than the control group after treatment, NIHSS score was lower than those of control group, the difference was

  8. 儿童舌系带过短的构音障碍及治疗效果分析%Clinical Analysis of Treatment for Dysarthria of Children with Ankylogolssia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓金煜; 张利之; 吴新华; 陈姬英

    2013-01-01

      目的:了解舌系带过短对儿童语音发育的影响,及舌系带矫正术后专业语言训练的重要性。方法:将78例舌系带过短并确诊为构音障碍的儿童,应用改良手术方法施行舌系带矫正术,术后随机分为专业语言训练组和非专业语言训练组,对两组的语音测试结果进行比较分析。结果:舌系带过短引起发音障碍的儿童,经手术矫正舌系带后,配合专业语言训练组的儿童发音清晰率明显优于非专业语言训练组的儿童。结论:舌系带过短可影响儿童的语音发育,对于已经发生构音障碍的儿童,术后配合系统的专业语言训练,可帮助患儿达到正确发音的最佳矫治效果。%Objective:To study the effects of ankylogolssia on children’s speech and the importance of the professional speech therapy after anaplasty. Methods:After the surgery of 78 children with ankylogolssia.Patients were randomly divided into two groups,including professional speech therapy group and non-professional speech therapy group.Results:The professional speech therapy can improve better their speech than non-professional speech therapy. Conclusion:The ankylogolssia affects children’s speech development,to the children with dysarthria,the professional speech therapy after operation can help to articulation.

  9. 针刺配合构音训练治疗脑卒中后运动性构音障碍的临床研究%The Application of Acupuncture and Articulation Training in the Treatment of Patients with Dysarthria after Stroke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李小霞; 陈红霞; 杨海芳; 王婷; 张兰芳

    2014-01-01

    目的:观察针刺配合构音训练治疗脑卒中后运动性构音障碍的疗效。方法将60例脑卒中构音障碍患者随机分为2组,每组30例。对照组只给予构音训练,治疗组进行构音训练时配合针刺颈项部穴位。治疗前和治疗后3周分别进行语音清晰度评估。结果治疗后治疗组和对照组语音清晰度总分均明显提高(P=0.00),语音清晰度提高程度一级、二级人员评估得分差值治疗组优于对照组(P<0.05)。结论针刺配合构音训练对脑卒中后运动性构音障碍的治疗是有效的,相对于单纯构音训练更能提高患者的言语交流能力。%Objective To observe the effectiveness of acupuncture and articulation training in the treatment of patients with dysarthria after stroke.Methods 60 patients with dysarthria after stroke were randomly divided into two groups with 30 patients in each group. The treatment group received the articulation training and acupuncture on the neck acupoints,while the control group only received the articulation training. Articulation was evaluated before and 3 weeks after the treatment. Results The articulation scores of the two groups were both significantly improved after the treatment (P= 0.00). The articulation scores of the treatment group given by the level 1 and level 2 evaluators were significantly higher than those of the control group after the treatment (P< 0.05).Conclusion The combined use of acupuncture and articulation training is effective in treating patients with dysarthria after stroke, and is significantly better than the articulation training only in improving the speech communication abilities of the patients.

  10. Quantifying Speech Rhythm Abnormalities in the Dysarthrias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liss, Julie M.; White, Laurence; Mattys, Sven L.; Lansford, Kaitlin; Lotto, Andrew J.; Spitzer, Stephanie M.; Caviness, John N.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors examined whether rhythm metrics capable of distinguishing languages with high and low temporal stress contrast also can distinguish among control and dysarthric speakers of American English with perceptually distinct rhythm patterns. Methods: Acoustic measures of vocalic and consonantal segment durations were…

  11. Automated Speech Rate Measurement in Dysarthria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Heidi; Dekens, Tomas; Van Nuffelen, Gwen; Latacz, Lukas; Verhelst, Werner; De Bodt, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, a new algorithm for automated determination of speech rate (SR) in dysarthric speech is evaluated. We investigated how reliably the algorithm calculates the SR of dysarthric speech samples when compared with calculation performed by speech-language pathologists. Method: The new algorithm was trained and tested using Dutch…

  12. Disartria na doença de Wilson: análise de dois casos em fases distintas Dysarthria in Wilson's disease: analysis of two cases in different stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Casagrande Brabo

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available TEMA: disartria na Doença de Wilson. PROCEDIMENTOS: estudo de caso de dois pacientes com o diagnóstico da doença, ambos adultos jovens, do sexo feminino e com seis anos de escolaridade. Quatro fonoaudiólogas realizaram a avaliação perceptivo-auditiva de modo independente, na qual foram investigados os seguintes parâmetros: tipo de voz, loudness, pitch, ataque vocal, instabilidade fonatória e ressonância. O grau de alteração de cada parâmetro foi mensurado através de uma escala analógico-visual. Além disso, foram obtidas medidas de inteligibilidade por transcrição ortográfica. A análise acústica foi realizada por meio do programa Praat, com a obtenção de medidas de frequência fundamental, de perturbação e ruído e medidas temporais. RESULTADOS: a fala de ambos os pacientes foi caracterizada por: redução do tempo máximo de fonação, voz soprosa e tensa, ataques vocais aspirados, instabilidade vocal, aumento de shimmer e proporção ruído-harmônico, hipernasalidade, redução da diadococinesia oral, da inteligibilidade e da velocidade da fala. Os resultados obtidos sugeriram que o paciente que cursa com a Doença de Wilson há mais tempo, apresentou prejuízo mais acentuado na maioria dos parâmetros perceptuais e acústicos analisados. CONCLUSÃO: foram identificadas manifestações comuns entre os casos, as quais podem constituir-se em traços característicos da fala de pacientes disártricos com Doença de Wilson. Todavia, diferenças também foram evidenciadas, as quais podem estar relacionadas ao tempo de evolução da doença.BACKGROUND: dysarthria in Wilson's disease. PROCEDURES: case study of two patients with disease's diagnosis, both young female adults, with six years of schooling. Perceptual analysis was done by four speech therapists. The following parameters were assessed: voice quality, loudness, pitch, vocal attack, vocal stability and resonance, as well as the degree of deviated parameters, measured

  13. The establishment andevaluation of examination tables of dysarthria among children with cerebral patsy%脑瘫儿童构音障碍检查量表的制定和评估

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴萍; 田鸿; 胡文广; 孙雪莲

    2012-01-01

    To establish the examination standard of dysarthria according to the movement characteristics of articulation organs among the children with cerebral palsy. Methods ①By adopting the function table of the articulation organs formulated by Tian hong, the expert working in the hearing and speech section of CRRC, we added the examing items suitable for the children with developmental stage and the quantitative indexes.② For evaluating the reliability of the function table of articulation organs , we examinated the respiratory frequency, the duration time of pronuncing a and s among the 20 normal children ;For evaluating the structure validity of the function tables, we evaluaed the respiratory stability, the existence or disappearence of reverse breathing and the separation of the nose and mouth breathing before and after training among the 107 children with cerebral palsy; For evaluating the reacting validity of the function tables, we evaluaed the respiratory frequency, the duration time of pronuncing "a" and "s" among the 107 children with cerebral palsy. Results The function tables of articulation organs among children with cerebral palsy is good reliability, parallel validity, reaction validity and structure validity. Conclusion Therefore, the function tables can serve as the efficient tool for the diagnostic classification, the observation of curative effect and the evaluation of language disorder rehabilitation of the children with cerebral palsy%目的 根据脑瘫患儿构音器官运动特点,建立脑瘫患儿构音障碍检查标准.方法 ①采用中国康复研究中心听力语言科田鸿制定的脑瘫患儿构音器官运动功能检查量表,并增加适合儿童发育阶段的检查项目以及能够量化的指标进行检查.②对20例正常儿童的呼吸次数、发a音和s音的持续时间进行检测,以评价我们制定的脑瘫患儿构音器官运动功能检查量表的信度;对100例正常儿童与107例治疗前脑瘫儿童的

  14. 灯盏细辛注射液配合电针早期干预对急性脑梗塞后构音障碍的临床观察%The clinical observation of early intervention of Fleabane combined with electric acupuncture on patients with Dysarthria after acute cerebral infarction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴海科; 谭峰; 丁德权; 万赛英; 黄涛; 王金良; 陈文霖; 张明霞; 方美凤

    2009-01-01

    目的 探讨灯盏细辛注射液配合电针早期干预对急性脑梗塞(acute cerebral infarction,ACI)患者构音障碍的疗效.方法 将60例ACI患者随机分为对照组和治疗组,对照组予常规药物治疗加川芎嗪注射液静滴,治疗组在常规药物治疗基础上加灯盏细辛注射液静滴及早期电针治疗,治疗前及治疗3周后采用Barthel指数、Frenchay构音障碍评价法评定其疗效.结果 治疗组和对照组的Barthel指数评分较同组治疗前显著增高(P<0.01),但治疗组较对照组增高更明显(P<0.05),两组的Frenchay构音障碍评定级别较同组治疗前显著改善(P<0.0005,P<0.05),但治疗组较对照组改善更明显,两者相比在统计学上具有显著性差异(P<0.05).结论 灯盏细辛注射液配合早期电针干预能改善ACI后构音障碍患者的构音功能及日常生活能力.%Objective To investigate the effects of early intervention of Fleabane combined with electric acupuncture on patients with Dysarthria after acute cerebral infarction.Methods 60 cases of ACI patients were randomly divided into control group and treatment group. The conventional therapy were used in each group, and Ligustrazine was added in control group, while the Fleahane combining with early electric acupuncture treatment was added in treatment group on the basis of conventional therapy. Before and after 3 weeks of treatment, all patients were evaluated by Barthel index and Frenchay dysarthria assessment.Results After treatment the Barthel index increased more remarkably in each group than before treatment(P<0.05).Compared with the control group, the Barthel index increased more significantly after treatment(P<0.05). The Frenchay dysarthria assessment improved obviously in each group(P<0.0005, P<0.05), and had marked difference between treatment group and con-trol group after treatment(P<0.05).Conclusion The early intervention of Fleabane combined with electric acu-puncture can improve dysarthria and

  15. Correlation between Dysarthria and Type of Cerebral Palsy,Motor Function,and Mental and Language Development Level for School-age Children with Cerebral Palsy%学龄期脑瘫儿童构音障碍与瘫痪类型、运动功能、智力和语言发育水平的相关性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阮景颜; 代早荣; 梁琪; 李初阳

    2012-01-01

    目的 分析学龄期脑瘫儿童的构音障碍与脑瘫类型、运动功能、智力及语言发育水平的关系.方法 采用Frenchay 活动量表、粗大运动功能分级系统、韦氏儿童智力量表、语言发育评定法(S-S)对全校102 名脑瘫学生进行评估.结果 与结论所有脑瘫学生均有不同程度的构音障碍,不同障碍程度在构音8 个分项的障碍表现不同.构音障碍的程度与脑瘫类型、智力水平及语言发育水平相关,与粗大运动障碍程度无关.%Objective To analyze the correlation ofdysartliria and the type of cerebral palsy, motor function, mental and language development level in school-age children with cerebral palsy. Methods 102 children with cerebral palsy in the school were assessed with Frenchay Activities Index, Gross Motor Function Classification System, Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, and Sign-Significate relations (S-S). Results and Conclusion All the children with cerebral palsy have dysarthria at different degrees in the 8 items of Frenchay Activities Index. The dysarthria degree is correlated with the type of cerebral palsy, the mental and the language development level, but not correlated to the motor function.

  16. 针刺联合言语训练、心理干预治疗肝豆状核变性构音障碍疗效观察%Therapeutic Observation of Acupuncture plus Speech Training and Psychological Intervention for Dysarthria in Hepatolenticular Degeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李钦潘; 王伟; 韩永升; 毛玉强; 郭铁; 韩峰群

    2015-01-01

    ObjectiveTo verify the therapeutic efficacy of acupuncture plus speech training and psychological intervention in treating dysarthria in hepatolenticular degeneration (Wilson’s disease).MethodSixty patients were randomized into a control group, a treatment group, and a combined group, 20 in each group. The three groups all received conventional treatments including removal of copper, liver protection, and brain protection, based on which, the control group also received speech training, the treatment group received acupuncture based on the treatments given to the control group, and the combined group received psychological intervention based on the treatments given to the treatment group.ResultAfter 2-month treatment, in comparing the Frenchay Dysarthria Assessment, the combined group showed a more significant improvement than the treatment group and control group (P<0.05); the total effective rate was 75% in the combined group, versus 25% in the treatment group and 10% in the control group, and the total effective rate of the combined group was significantly higher than that of both treatment group and control group (P<0.05).ConclusionAcupuncture plus speech training and psychological intervention can markedly improve the dysarthria symptoms of patients with Wilson’s disease, and recover their speech function and help them to go back to society.%目的:验证针刺联合言语训练、心理干预治疗对肝豆状核变性患者构音障碍的疗效。方法将60例患者随机分为对照组、治疗组、联合组,每组20例,每组均接受正规的驱铜、保肝、保脑治疗,对照组在正规治疗基础上结合言语训练,治疗组在对照组的基础上结合针刺,联合组在治疗组的基础上配合心理干预。结果治疗2个月后,3组患者Frenchay构音障碍评分级别比较,联合组改善程度优于治疗组和对照组,差异具有统计学意义(P<0.05);联合组总有效率为75%,治疗组为25%,对照组为10%,联合

  17. Adaptação para a língua Portuguesa e aplicação de protocolo de avaliação das disartrias de origem central em pacientes com Doença de Parkinson Adjustment to the Portuguese and application to patients with Parkinson's disease of protocol within central origin dysarthrias' assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélica Suelen Fracassi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: traduzir e adaptar protocolo desenvolvido por pesquisadores alemães, adequando-o às características fonéticas e linguísticas do português falado no Brasil. Caracterizar os componentes de fala mais alterados na população com doença de Parkinson, comparando-os com grupo de sujeitos normais na mesma faixa etária. MÉTODOS: realizou-se a tradução e adaptação do protocolo. Posteriormente foram avaliados 21 pacientes com diagnóstico neurológico de Doença de Parkinson nos estágios Hoehn &Yarh, entre 2 e 3, e 10 sujeitos normais. O protocolo incluía avaliação da respiração, fonação, ressonância, articulação, prosódia e a análise acústica dos parâmetros vocais. RESULTADOS: o protocolo mostrou-se de fácil aplicação clínica. Nos sujeitos com doença de Parkinson foram observadas alterações predominantes na fonação (85,9% e articulação (42,9%. CONCLUSÃO: o estudo demonstrou ser o protocolo uma ferramenta eficiente para a avaliação da disartria em pacientes com doença de Parkinson.PURPOSE: to translate and adapt the protocol developed by German researchers, adjusting it to the phonetic and linguistic characteristics of Brazilian Portuguese. Observe the amended speech components in a group of patients with Parkinson's disease, and comparing them with normal subjects in the same age. METHOD: twenty one patients with neurological diagnosis of Parkinson's disease in the Hoehn & Yarh stages (2-3, and 10 control subjects were assessed. The protocol was translated, adjusted and applied to the subjects of both control and Parkinson's disease group, assessing the breathing, phonation, resonance, articulation, prosody and acoustic analysis. RESULTS: in the dysarthria evaluation, the protocol showed to be simple and it presented a fast clinical application. In the subjects with Parkinson's disease, we observed alterations in both phonation (85.9% and articulation (42.9%. CONCLUSION: the study demonstrated that the

  18. Clinical Study of Acupuncture Guided by Liugui 8 Methods Theory for Spasmodic Dysarthria Caused by Cerebrovascular Infarction%灵龟八法治疗急性脑梗塞痉挛性构音障碍的临床研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    樊莉; 朱晓平; 杨海芳; 曾令虹

    2012-01-01

    目的:对比观察灵龟八法与石氏醒脑开窍法对急性脑梗塞痉挛性构音障碍的临床疗效.方法:将受试者随机分为灵龟八法组、醒脑开窍组、灵龟加醒脑组3组,每组各31例,均进行3周治疗.结果:(1)治疗1周、2周、3周后,各组日本言语和嗓音医学学会GRBAS分级G项等级分布情况、Frenchay相关评分均较前1周有显著性差异(P<0.05);治疗3周后,灵龟加醒脑组较灵龟组、醒脑组有显著性差异(P<0.05).(2)治疗3周后,灵龟组总有效率71.0%,醒脑组74.2%,两组无显著性差异(P>0.05),灵龟加醒脑组93.5%,与前两组比较,均有显著性差异(P<0.05).结论:灵龟八法、醒脑开窍法对急性脑梗塞痉挛性构音障碍都有较好治疗效果,两者疗效相似,且联用后疗效明显优于任一单用疗法.灵龟八法取穴少而精,方便安全,刺激量小,值得临床推广运用.%Objective:To estimate the validity of acupuncture guided by Liugui 8 Methods Theory for Spasmodic Dysarthria caused by Cerebrovascular Infarction. Methods; 93 patients were randomly distributed into Lingui Group ( group A) , Xingnao Kaiqiao Group (group B) , Lingui plus Xingnao Kaiqiao Group (group C) ,with 31 cases in each group. Results:We used GRBAS and Frenchay Index as efficacy indexes. After 1,2 and 3 weeks,we found all groups showed significant changes compared with the beginning point(P<0.05). After 3 weeks,we found Group C earned better scores both in GRBAS and Frenchay Index compared with the other 2 groups (P <0. 05) . After 3 weeks'therapy ,Group A gained 71% efficacy, Group B gained 74. 2% ,and Group C 93.5%. Conclusion:Both Linagui Methods and Xingnao Kaiqiao showed satisfying similar effect on Spasmodic Dysarthria caused by Cerebrovascular Infarction,however,when the 2 methods were combined,better effects would be gained.

  19. 低频电脉冲刺激结合针刺治疗对急性脑梗死后痉挛型构音障碍的临床观察%Curative effect of acupuncture combined with low frequency electrical stimulation on spastic dysarthria in acute cerebral infarction patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵佳; 李克娇; 李美荣

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨低频电脉冲刺激结合针刺治疗对急性脑梗死后痉挛型构音障碍的临床疗效。方法选择2011年1月至2014年10月廊坊市第四人民医院神经内科住院治疗的160例急性脑梗死后痉挛型构音障碍患者为研究对象,按入院顺序随机分为对照组和观察组,每组80例,对照组在灯盏细辛活血祛瘀、阿司匹林抗血小板聚集等一般治疗的基础上进行言语训练康复治疗,观察组在对照组基础上实施针刺治疗和功能性低频电脉冲刺激治疗。采用神经功能评分(NIHSS)评定神经功能,采用修订的Barthel指数(MBI)评价日常生活能力,采用Frenchay构音障碍评定法评价构音障碍等级。结果治疗前两组患者NIHSS评分、MBI指数比较,差异无统计学意义(P>0.05);治疗后两组NIHSS评分及MBI指数均较同组治疗前明显改善(P0.05). NIHSS score and MBI index were improved significantly after treatment in two groups (P<0.05). NIHSS score was lower than that in the control group and MBI index was higher than that in the control group after treatment;the difference was significant (t=2.687, P<0.05;t=7.013, P<0.05). Frenchay scores were obviously improved after treatment in two groups (P<0.05);the degree of improvement in observation group was obviously better than that in the control group; the difference was statistically significant (Z=-2.308, P<0.05). Conclusion Treatment of acupuncture combined with low frequency electrical stimulation for spastic dysarthria in acute cerebral infarction patients has good curative effect , and can effectively reduce the NIHSS score and MBI index.

  20. Kinematic analysis of lower lip movements in ataxic dysarthria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, H; Hertrich, I; Scharf, G

    1995-12-01

    The present study investigates the influence of cerebellar disorders on articulatory performance. A linear trend between peak velocity and movement amplitude seems to represent a basic organizational principle both of upper limb and speech motor control. This relationship is preserved in arm movements of patients with cerebellar dysfunction. However, these subjects show a decreased slope of the respective regression lines under the instruction to perform movements as fast as possible. In order to find out whether these findings also hold for speech motor control, peak velocity, range, and duration both of the opening and closing gestures during production of /pap/- as well as /pa:p/-sequences-embedded into a carrier phrase each-were measured using an optoelectric system. In addition, vowel length (/a/, /a:/) was determined at the acoustic speech signal: (a) The cerebellar patients showed a prolongation of both vowel targets. Most of them, nevertheless, presented with discernible durational contrasts; (b) The articulatory gestures were characterized by a highly linear relationship between peak velocity and movement range in the cerebellar as well as in the control group; (c) As a rule, the cerebellar subjects had decreased velocity-displacement ratios as compared to the normals; (d) The discrepancy in slope of the computed regression lines between the controls and the patients varied according to the type of movement (opening vs. closing gesture) and-to a lesser decree-linguistic demands (short vs. long vowel). These data indicate an impaired ability of cerebellar patients to increase muscular forces in order to produce adequately scaled articulatory gestures of short duration.

  1. Cognitive-Perceptual Examination of Remediation Approaches to Hypokinetic Dysarthria

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAuliffe, Megan J.; Kerr, Sarah E.; Gibson, Elizabeth M. R.; Anderson, Tim; LaShell, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To determine how increased vocal loudness and reduced speech rate affect listeners' cognitive-perceptual processing of hypokinetic dysarthric speech associated with Parkinson's disease. Method: Fifty-one healthy listener participants completed a speech perception experiment. Listeners repeated phrases produced by 5 individuals…

  2. Speech Motor Programming in Hypokinetic and Ataxic Dysarthria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, K.A.; Rogers, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the cerebellar and basal ganglia control circuits contribute to the programming of movement. Converging evidence from neuroimaging, limb control, and neuropsychological studies suggests that (1) people with cerebellar disease have reduced ability to program movement sequences in advance of movement onset and (2) people…

  3. Clinical aspects of acquired aphasia and dysarthria in childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.R. van Dongen (Hugo)

    1988-01-01

    textabstractFor the last decade, it has been a common clinical belief that the prognosis of acquired childhood aphasia is good. However, our own clinical experiences were rather conflicting on this point. As a consequence, we re-examined all the children (15) with an acquired aphasia who in a period

  4. Prosodic Features and Speech Naturalness in Individuals with Dysarthria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klopfenstein, Marie I.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the importance of speech naturalness to treatment outcomes, little research has been done on what constitutes speech naturalness and how to best maximize naturalness in relationship to other treatment goals like intelligibility. In addition, previous literature alludes to the relationship between prosodic aspects of speech and speech…

  5. Ataxic dysarthria: treatment sequences based on intelligibility and prosodic considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorkston, K M; Beukelman, D R

    1981-11-01

    Treatment programs of four improving ataxic dysarthric speakers are reviewed. Treatment sequences were based on two overall measures of speech performance-intelligibility and prosody. Increases in intelligibility were initially achieved by control of speaking rate. A hierarchy of rate control strategies, ranging from a rigid imposition of rate through thythmic cueing to self-monitored rate control is discussed. As speakers improved their monitoring skills, a compromise was made between intelligibility and rate. Normal prosodic patterns were not achieved by the ataxic speakers due to difficulty in precisely coordinating the subtle fundamental frequency, loudness and timing adjustments needed to signal stress. Three of the four subjects were taught to use only durational adjustments to signal stress. In this way, they were able to achieve stress on targeted words consistently and minimize bizarreness which resulted from sweeping changes in fundamental frequency and bursts of loudness. The need for further clinically oriented research is discussed.

  6. Characterizing Intonation Deficit in Motor Speech Disorders: An Autosegmental-Metrical Analysis of Spontaneous Speech in Hypokinetic Dysarthria, Ataxic Dysarthria, and Foreign Accent Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowit, Anja; Kuschmann, Anja

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The autosegmental-metrical (AM) framework represents an established methodology for intonational analysis in unimpaired speaker populations but has found little application in describing intonation in motor speech disorders (MSDs). This study compared the intonation patterns of unimpaired participants (CON) and those with Parkinson's…

  7. Characterizing Intonation Deficit in Motor Speech Disorders: An Autosegmental-Metrical Analysis of Spontaneous Speech in Hypokinetic Dysarthria, Ataxic Dysarthria, and Foreign Accent Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowit, Anja; Kuschmann, Anja

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The autosegmental-metrical (AM) framework represents an established methodology for intonational analysis in unimpaired speaker populations but has found little application in describing intonation in motor speech disorders (MSDs). This study compared the intonation patterns of unimpaired participants (CON) and those with Parkinson's…

  8. Myotonia and flaccid dysarthria in patients with adult onset myotonic dystrophy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swart, B.J.M. de; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Kerkhof, J.P. van de; Maassen, B.A.M.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Myotonia and weakness are the most important components of dysarthric speech in myotonic dystrophy. OBJECTIVE: To specify and quantify possible defects in speech execution in patients with adult onset myotonic dystrophy. METHODS: Studies on speech production were done on 30 mildly affect

  9. Co-Constructed Talk in the Conversations of People with Dysarthria and Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, Steven; Beeke, Suzanne

    2008-01-01

    This paper uses the methodology of conversation analysis (CA) to examine the practice of co-constructed turn and utterance production in impaired communication. An investigation of the conversations between two family dyads, featuring one person with dysarthric speech and one with aphasic language, reveals one way in which single turns and…

  10. Incidence of Dysarthria in Children with Cerebellar Tumors: A Prospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, S.; Schoch, B.; Ozimek, A.; Gorissen, B.; Hein-Kropp, C.; Kaiser, O.; Hovel, M.; Wieland, R.; Gizewski, E.; Timmann, D.

    2005-01-01

    The present study investigated dysarthric symptoms in children with cerebellar tumors. Ten children with cerebellar tumors and 10 orthopedic control children were tested prior and one week after surgery. Clinical dysarthric symptoms were quantified in spontaneous speech. Syllable durations were analyzed in syllable repetition and sentence…

  11. Intensive Dysarthria Therapy for Older Children with Cerebral Palsy: Findings from Six Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, Lindsay; Smallman, Claire; Farrier, Faith

    2006-01-01

    Children with cerebral palsy often have speech, language and communication difficulties that affect their access to social and educational activities. Speech and language therapy to improve the intelligibility of the speech of children with cerebral palsy has long been advocated, but there is a dearth of research investigating therapy…

  12. [Pilot study of the acoustic values of the vowels in Spanish as indicators of the severity of dysarthria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Hernandez, J

    2017-02-01

    Introduccion. El analisis acustico es una herramienta que proporciona datos objetivos sobre las alteraciones del habla en la disartria. Objetivos. Evaluar en la disartria ataxica la relacion del nivel de inteligibilidad del habla con el area del espacio vocalico (VSA), la ratio de centralizacion de los dos primeros formantes (FCR) y la media de las distancias primarias. Sujetos y metodos. Se utilizo una muestra de 14 hablantes de español, 10 con disartria y cuatro controles. Se analizaron los valores del primer y segundo formante en 140 vocales extraidas de 140 palabras. Para calcular el nivel de inteligibilidad participaron siete oyentes y se utilizo una tarea de identificacion de estimulos verbales. Resultados. Los sujetos disartricos tienen un menor contraste entre las vocales medias y altas y entre las vocales posteriores. Se observan diferencias significativas del VSA, la FCR y la media de las distancias primarias respecto a los sujetos controles (p = 0,007, 0,005 y 0,030, respectivamente). Los analisis de regresion muestran la relacion del VSA y la media de las distancias primarias con el nivel de inteligibilidad del habla (r = 0,60 y 0,74, respectivamente). Conclusiones. Los sujetos con disartria ataxica presentan un menor contraste vocalico y una centralizacion en la realizacion de las vocales. Las medidas acusticas estudiadas en este trabajo preliminar tienen una alta sensibilidad en la deteccion de la disartria, pero solo el VSA y la media de las distancias primarias informan sobre la gravedad de este tipo de alteracion del habla.

  13. Dysarthria in patients with Parkinson's disease%帕金森病患者的言语功能障碍

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘琳; 罗晓光; 任艳; 何志义

    2011-01-01

    @@ 帕金森病(PD)又称震颤麻痹,是一种常见的中老年神经变性病,临床上以静止性震颤、运动迟缓、肌强直和姿势步态异常为主要特征.随着病情的进展,患者还可能出现言语障碍和吞咽困难、视觉障碍、乏力、疼痛、睡眠障碍、抑郁及痴呆等.其中约有90%的PD患者存在不同程度的言语障碍[1-2].言语困难不仅影响了患者的生活能力,更降低了患者的生活质量[3].近年来,许多学者对PD患者的言语功能障碍进行了较深入的研究.

  14. The effect of botulinum toxin A (Botox) injections used to treat limb spasticity on speech patterns in children with dysarthria and cerebral palsy: A report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workinger, Marilyn Seif; Kent, Raymond D; Meilahn, Jill R

    2017-05-19

    Botulinum toxin A (Btx-A) injections are used to treat limb spasticity in children with cerebral palsy (CP) resulting in improved gross and fine motor control. This treatment has also been reported to have additional functional effects, but the effect of treatment on speech has not been reported. This report presents results of longitudinal speech evaluation of two children with CP given injections of Btx-A for treatment of limb spasticity. Speech evaluations were accomplished at baseline (date of injections) and 4- and 10-weeks post-injections. Improvements in production of consonants, loudness control, and syllables produced per breath were found. Parental survey also suggested improvements in subjects' speech production and willingness to speak outside the testing situation. Future larger studies are warranted to assess the nature of the changes observed related to Btx-A.

  15. 脑卒中患者构音障碍的康复治疗%Rehabilitation therapy of dysarthria inpatients with stroke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙波; 常俊玲

    2000-01-01

    目的:探讨脑卒中患者构音障碍接受康复治疗的疗效.方法:将50例脑卒中合并构音障碍的患者,根据病程分为三组.接受发音器官及颜面肌肉的康复训练,并进行效果比较.结果:每组治疗后较治疗前构音障碍与生活质量明显改善,日常生活自理能力得到提高.有显著性差异.结论:构音障碍早期康复治疗效果最佳,但对于早期未得到正规康复治疗的患者,无论其病程多长短,只要坚持正规康复治疗,均有疗效.

  16. 外伤后运动性构音障碍病人的早期康复训练%Early stage rehabilitation training for posttraumatic patients with dysarthria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈敏慧

    2005-01-01

    [目的]探讨脑外伤后运动性构音障碍病人早期康复训练的意义.[方法]早期给予病人积极的心理支持,指导病人进行言语训练、肢体功能训练.[结果]经早期康复训练,病人言语功能与肢体功能恢复同步进行,不仅提高了病人的生活质量,且有利于整体康复.[结论]脑外伤后运动性构音障碍病人进行早期康复训练对整体康复具有一定的临床意义.

  17. 小脑性缄默和继发构音障碍综合征%Syndrome of cerebellar mutism and subsequent dysarthria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吐尔逊·肉苏力; 朱国华; 杜郭佳; 吴昊; 汪永新

    2010-01-01

    @@ 小脑性缄默是指继发于小脑肿瘤术后的暂时性不能讲话,但发音器官正常,恢复后常伴有构音障碍.本文报道2004年1月至2009年6月收治的8例小脑性缄默症如下: 一、对象与方法 1. 一般资料:本组8例患者,男3例,女5例;年龄3~14岁.术前主要症状为头痛、恶心、呕吐;共济失调4例.水平眼震3例,所有患者均有眼底视乳头水肿.

  18. Acupuncture combined with language training for poststroke dysarthria%针刺联合言语训练治疗脑卒中后构音障碍

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁娇

    2014-01-01

    目的 观察针刺联合言语训练治疗脑卒中后构音障碍的治疗效果.方法 193例病例随机分为A,B,C组,A组63例单纯采用针灸治疗(百会、舌三针、金津、玉液),B组65例进行言语训练治疗(呼吸训练、松弛训练等),C组65例采用针刺联合言语训练治疗,观察3组患者治疗后临床疗效及不良反应.结果 A,B,C3组治疗2周后总有效率分别为46.0%,44.6%,49.2%,组间比较无统计学意义(P>0.05);C组治疗第4,6,8周后总有效率分别为76.9%,90.8%,93.8%,显著高于A组的55.6%,65.1%,69.8%,及B组的49.2%,61.5%,60.2%,组间比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论 针刺联合言语训练治疗脑卒中后构音障碍可调补肝肾之虚,通络利窍,改善发音不清.疗效确切,且无明显不良反应.

  19. 基于Matlab的构音异常声道动态仿真%Dynamic simulation on vocal tract of dysarthria based on Matlab

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘佛生; 陈东帆

    2009-01-01

    为对构音异常声道实行辅助治疗,使用Matlab对声道进行动态仿真.采用极点形式在牛顿插值的基础上进行迭代计算出共振峰,对声道进行非线性分段,使用Matlab实现分段后声道形状显示;使用参数Corana改进算法,优化9个声道参数.在进行大量迭代计算获得合适的声道参数后,显示优化后的声道形状.该形状可以为构音治疗师的治疗提供参考.使用声门激励模型产生用于激励的声音,能够合成用于反馈的声音.实验证明该声道仿真模型可以为治疗提供参考.

  20. Speech Rehabilitation for Severe Hyperkinetic Dysarthria: 30 Cases Report%30例重度痉挛型构音障碍患者的言语康复

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何怡

    2010-01-01

    目的 观察言语训练对于重度痉挛型构音障碍效果分析.方法 对于重度构音障碍的患者采用呼吸训练,头颈部放松训练,冰刺激训练,唇、舌、下颌训练,发音训练等言语训练,用中国康复研究中心构音障碍评定法进行评定.结果 患者的改善率为90%.结论 言语训练可以改善重度痉挛型构音障碍患者的症状.

  1. Formation of intonational party of speech in the structure of the correction letter at younger schoolboys with mild expressed general underdevelopment of speech with erased form of dysarthria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoya Kyrbanova

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The problem of reading and writing disorders in children with speech underdevelopment with dizartricheskim component. The methodology of the survey speech capabilities for this category of children. The directions of correctional and developmental work on the formation of intonational party of speech in order to prevent violations of reading and writing.

  2. Voice disorders in children with classic galactosemia

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Children with classic galactosemia are at risk for motor speech disorders resulting from disruptions in motor planning and programming (childhood apraxia of speech or CAS) or motor execution (dysarthria). In the present study of 33 children with classic galactosemia, 21% were diagnosed with CAS, 3% with ataxic dysarthria, and 3% with mixed CAS-dysarthria. Voice disorders due to laryngeal insufficiency were common in children with dysarthria and co-occurred with CAS. Most (58%) of the children...

  3. A Case Study on Dysarthria Treatment of the Mild Mentally Disability Children%轻度智力障碍儿童构音矫治个案研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵曼; 王国英; 殷永清

    2016-01-01

    采用个案研究法,对1名3岁9个月的轻度智力障碍儿童进行构音矫治研究.采用前后测的方式,对个案的构音能力进行评估,观察个案的构音能力改善情况.结果表明,个案的口部运动功能和构音清晰度都得到了显著提升.构音训练的效果与以下几个因素有关:口肌训练与语音训练相结合、构音与认知训练相结合、找准个案构音障碍原因、遵循音位习得规律、选择趣味性游戏活动.

  4. 脑卒中所致痉挛型构音障碍的康复训练方法及疗效%Rehabilitation Training for Post-stroke Spasmodism Model Dysarthria and Its Efficacy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘莉; 邵伟波

    2008-01-01

    目的 探讨脑卒中所致痉挛型构音障碍的临床康复训练方法及疗效.方法 对45例脑卒中所致痉挛型构音障碍患者给予针对性言语训练,采用改良Frenchay构音障碍评价法评定疗效.结果 45例患者的康复训练总有效率为93%,其中病程在1个月内的患者有效率100%,病程1~3个月的患者有效率96%,病程3个月以上的患者有效率85%.结论 针对性的言语训练可以恢复和改善脑卒中所致痉挛型构音障碍患者的言语功能,介入时间越早疗效越显著.

  5. 手法治疗在重度构音障碍训练中的应用%Effect of Manual Treatment on Speech Rehabilitation in Severer Dysarthria Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦江天

    2007-01-01

    目的 观察手法治疗对重度构音障碍患者语言能力康复的影响.方法 将16例重度构音障碍患者在常规构音障碍训练基础上强调手法治疗.结果 所有患者治疗1个月后均有不同程度改善.结论 在对重度构音障碍患者的训练中应注意手法治疗.

  6. 构音障碍儿童实施言语治疗效果的临床观察%Clinical observation on effect of carrying out speech therapy for children with dysarthria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨丽兰; 曹建国; 李蔷; 贠国俊

    2010-01-01

    [目的]对159例构音障碍儿童语音矫正效果进行疗效分析.[方法]应用语音发音技巧和家庭配合训练治疗159例构音障碍儿童,对其各年龄段音位发音矫错及疗效进行分析.[结果]159例学龄儿童中语音矫正正常化27例(17.0%);显效82例(51.6%);有效39例(24.5%);无效11例(6.9%),总有效率93.1%.[结论]利用语音发音技巧、家庭配合训练和保持欢快心情治疗儿童构音障碍疗效显著.

  7. Clinical Analysis of 70 Cases with Dysarthria-clumsy Hand Syndrome%构音障碍-手笨拙综合征70例临床分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭旭

    2008-01-01

    构音障碍-手笨拙综合征是腔隙性脑梗死的各种综合征之中罕见的一种,笔者对70例既往没有脑卒中史、首次诊断构音障碍-手笨拙综合征的患者进行定期随访,观察构音障碍-手笨拙综合征的康复情况,以探讨构音障碍-手笨拙综合征的主要危险因素、预后以及防治措施,现报道如下。

  8. Effect of acupuncture on the speech and acoustics level in patients with dysarthria%针刺对构音障碍患者言语和声学水平的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐基民; 李惠兰; 卢虎英; 陈之罡; 刘兰群; 景珊

    2010-01-01

    目的:观察针刺配合言语治疗对脑卒中和脑外伤后构音障碍的疗效.方法:将61例构音障碍患者随机分为两组.观察组(30例)在言语治疗同时配合针刺颈项部廉泉、金津、玉液、风池、翳风和完骨为主,对照组(31例)只给予言语治疗,治疗9周后评价言语和声学指标的变化.结果:治疗后两组患者单词清晰度和篇章正答率均明显提高(均P<0.01),观察组总有效率为96.7%(29/30),优于对照组的67.7%(21/31)(P<0.01);治疗后观察组(12例)和对照组(11例)经喉发声空气力学分析仪检测的最长发声时间(MPT)均显著延长(均P<0.01),且观察组改善更明显(P<0.01).结论:针刺配合言语治疗能改善构音障碍患者的言语和声学水平.

  9. Characteristics and Evaluation of Oral Dyskinesia and Dysarthria in Children with Cerebral Palsy%脑性瘫痪患儿口运动与构音障碍特征及其临床评定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    纪静丽; 李欣; 侯梅; 李淑秋; 乔卫卫

    2015-01-01

    Objective To observe the efficacy of Complex Oral Motor Scoring (COMS) and diadochokinetic rate (DR) on evaluation of oral motor dysfunction and speech disorders in children with cerebral palsy. Methods 107 children with cerebral palsy were tested with Chi-nese-version Articulation Test, Simple Oral Motor Scoring (SOMS), COMS and DR. The correlation among SOMS, COMS and DR was analysesd. Results 85 children were abnormal in SOMS and 94 in COMS. Oral dyskinesia was found in all the children with spastic quadri-plegia, dyskinetic, ataxia and mixed type of cerebral palsy, and less in the type of spastic diplegia and hemiplegia. DR was the least in spas-tic quadriplegia, dyskinetic, mixed type of cerebral palsy, more in the type of ataxia and spastic diplegia, and the most in hemiplegia. The co-efficient of correlation among the SOMS, COMS, the longest pronunciation and DR were more than 0.8 (P0.8(P<0.01)。结论脑瘫患儿口运动障碍及构音障碍的发生率和严重程度与脑瘫类型有关。SOMS、COMS与DR、最长发音评估相关性良好。

  10. Applications of Sona-Match in Speech Dysarthria Physiological Correcting and Treatment%Sona-Match软件在言语构音障碍生理矫正中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方华萍; 李永宏; 张金爽

    2011-01-01

    Sona-Match软件能够为构音患者提供其在言语发音过程中的实时的声学和生理反馈,用以纠正和治疗发音过程中的各种问题.本文主要介绍Sona-Match软件元音频响模式、元音语音图表模式、咝音语图模式和歌唱反馈模式四种工作模式,阐述每种模式的工作原理、提取参数和在寿语构音障碍生理研究中的应用.

  11. Speech Therapy for Hyperkinetic Dysarthria in Child with Athetoid Cerebral Palsy: A Case Report%手足徐动型脑瘫患儿运动过强性构音障碍的语言治疗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何怡

    2012-01-01

    10.3969/j.issn.1006-9771.2012.07.030%  目的目的探讨手足徐动型脑瘫患儿运动过强性构音障碍的语言康复。方法回顾1例手足徐动型脑瘫患儿运动过强性构音障碍的语言治疗。结果治疗后错误的构音方式基本纠正,言语清晰度提高。结论语言训练对脑瘫患儿构音障碍有效。

  12. 综合应用电刺激结合康复训练治疗脑卒中构音障碍%The Curative Effect of Electrostimulation and Rehabilitation Training for Dysarthria Caused by Stroke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐颖

    2010-01-01

    目的:探讨应用电刺激结合康复训练治疗脑卒中所致构音障碍患者的疗效.方法:60例脑卒中构音障碍患者随机分为A、B 2组各30例,均采用常规药物治疗和康复训练,A组加用发音肌电刺激,患者同时配合主动肌肉收缩.结果:治疗28 d后,2组构音障碍检查法分级评定均有显著提高(P3级的患者明显多于B组(P<0.05);有效率高于B组(97%与77%,P<0.05);生活质量评定量表(WHQQL-100)评分,A组亦明显高于B组(P<0.05).结论:发音肌电刺激配合主动训练对脑卒中构音障碍的恢复有显著促进作用.

  13. 大龄脑瘫患儿并发重度运动性构音障碍言语康复1例%Speech Therapy on Older Child with Cerebral Palsy following Severe Dysarthria: Case Report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李爱霞; 冯宗怀; 贾革红

    2010-01-01

    目的 观察大龄脑瘫患儿并发重度运动性构音障碍言语训练的效果.方法 采用冰刺激训练,唇、舌、下颌训练,发音训练,中医手法按摩等训练,用中国康复研究中心构音障碍评定法进行评定.结果 患儿的言语状况明显改善.结论 言语训练可以改善大龄脑瘫患儿并发重度运动性构音障碍的症状.

  14. Effect of acupuncture on the speech and acoustics level in patients with dysarthria%针刺对构音障碍患者言语和声学水平的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐基民; 李惠兰; 卢虎英; 陈之罡; 刘兰群; 景珊; WANG You-jing

    2011-01-01

    目的:观察针刺配合言语治疗对脑卒中和脑外伤后构音障碍的疗效.方法:将61例构音障碍患者随机分为两组.观察组(30例)在言语治疗同时配合针刺颈项部廉泉、金津、玉液、风池、翳风和完骨为主,对照组(31例) 只给予言语治疗,治疗9周后评价言语和声学指标的变化.结果:治疗后两组患者单词清晰度和篇章正答率均明显提高(均P<0.01),观察组总有效率为96.7%(29/30),优于对照组的67.7%(21/31)(P<0.01);治疗后观察组(12例)和对照组(11例)经喉发声空气力学分析仪检测的最长发声时间(MPT)均显著延长(均JP<0.01),且观察组改善更明显(P<0.01).结论:针刺配合言语治疗能改善构音障碍患者的言语和声学水平.

  15. Hashimoto's encephalopathy manifested as dysarthria: a case report%以构音障碍为临床表现的桥本脑病1例报告

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵玫; 李颖; 肖亚平

    2012-01-01

    1病例资料患者女性,49岁,以"口齿不清2d"为主诉于2011年10月27日收入我院神经内科.患者于2011年10月25日晨起出现口齿不清、舌头僵硬,无法发"斯"等平舌音,无发热,无头痛、头晕、恶心、呕吐,无视物旋转、复视、耳鸣,无语言理解障碍,无吞咽困难、饮水呛咳,无肢体麻木、肢体活动障碍,无意识障碍、抽搐、二便失禁.

  16. Curative effect analysis of speech training and acupuncture therapy for dysarthria caused by stroke%言语训练结合针刺治疗脑卒中构音障碍的临床研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘诗丹

    2012-01-01

    目的 观察言语训练配合针刺对脑卒中后构音障碍的疗效.方法 将90例脑卒中后构音障碍患者随机分为三组,每组30例.观察组采取针刺配合言语训练;对照1组单给予针刺治疗;对照2组单给予言语训练.疗程结束后,各组分别进行疗效评定.结果 观察组言语功能、Frenchay构音评定、临床疗效及生活质量上均较对照1、2组有显著提高(P<0.05).结论 针刺配合言语训练对脑卒中构音障碍的恢复有明显促进作用,且可以提高该病的临床疗效.

  17. The characters of consonant pronunciation in spastic dysarthria cerebral palsy patients%痉挛型构音障碍脑瘫患儿不同发音方法的辅音发音特点研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜志宏; 陈卓铭; 王红

    2009-01-01

    目的 探讨痉挛型构音障碍的脑瘫患儿辅音发音的特点,为康复计划的制定提供理论依据.方法 采用构音障碍检测法对存在痉挛型构音障碍的28例脑瘫患儿进行检测,同时使用Cool edit pro录音软件进行录音,由听音小组进行辨音,Praat语音分析软件分析患儿的发音情况,计算21个辅音的各类错误发音的错误率,分析错误发音方式的构成比,总结错误发音特点.结果 按照发音方法 分类,痉挛型构音障碍的脑瘫患儿辅音错误发音的类型及其错误率分别为:边音64.29%,塞擦音63.70%,擦音58.33%,塞音36.91%,鼻音21.42%,送气音57.47%,不迭气音42.85%.结论 按照发音方法 分类,痉挛型构音障碍的脑瘫患儿辅音错误率以边音、送气音两个类型最高.

  18. 功能性构音障碍儿童辅音错误模式研究%Study on Error Pattern of Consonant of Children with Functional Dysarthria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜志宏; 彭炳蔚; 杨思渊; 黄志芳; 陈卓铭

    2015-01-01

    目的:研究功能性构音障碍儿童错误辅音的分布特点、错误模式及形成特征,为设计语音康复方案提供一定的理论指导.方法:以90例3个年龄段(4、5、6及6岁以上年龄段)的功能性构音障碍儿童为研究对象,采用中国康复研究中心研制的汉语构音障碍评定法,对受试者的错误辅音进行分析,分别计算患儿6个发音部位(唇音、舌尖中音、舌根音、舌面音、舌尖前音、舌尖后音)的辅音错误率.结果:90例研究对象不进行年龄分组时,上述6个发音部位的辅音错误率依次为26.9%、41.7%、42.6%、38.9%、58.5%、55.0%;当对研究对象进行3个年龄段分组时,每个年龄段内错误率最高的辅音均集中在舌尖前音或舌尖后音上(47.4%~70.7%),错误率最低的辅音均集中在唇音上(25.0%~32.8%).3种辅音错误类型(替代、省略、歪曲)中,错误率最高者为替代性错误.研究对象不进行年龄段分组时,上述6个发音部位的替代性错误占总错误的百分比依次为69.1%、45.3%、84.3%、77.1%、70.3%、74.2%;省略性错误在舌尖中音时百分比较高,为44.0%;而舌尖前音和舌尖后音中很少出现省略性错误,百分比仅为1.9%和1.5%,却较多出现歪曲性错误,百分比分别达到27.5%和24.2%.结论:无论是学龄前期还是学龄期,功能性构音障碍儿童发舌尖前音、舌尖后音时的辅音错误率最高,发唇音时的辅音错误率最低.辅音错误方式以替代性错误为主;发舌尖中音时较易出现省略性错误,发舌尖前音和舌尖后音时较易出现歪曲性错误.功能性构音障碍儿童习得语音与正常儿童相似,错误类型与发音部位相关,制订康复计划时要兼顾辅音错误特征.

  19. 构音障碍强化训练在脑性瘫痪儿童中的应用效果%Application effect of dysarthria intensive training in children with cerebral palsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒙艳; 刘宝琼; 周贤丽

    2015-01-01

    目的 探讨构音障碍强化训练在脑性瘫痪儿童中的应用效果.方法 选取首次就诊的脑性瘫痪儿童80例,根据患儿在训练过程中接受的训练方式不同,将患儿分为对照组和观察组,每组40例.对照组接受常规的构音障碍训练,观察组接受构音障碍强化训练,评价两组患者治疗前及治疗4周后的构音障碍评分、语言清晰度评分和患儿自理能力.结果 干预后,对照组患儿的唇运动、舌运动、喉控制以及言语理解能力方面均比本组干预前显著提升,差异有统计学意义;观察组患儿的反射、呼吸、唇运动、舌运动、软腭运动、喉控制以及言语理解比本组干预前显著改善,差异有统计学意义.与对照组比较,观察组患儿的唇运动、舌运动以及言语理解能力显著改善,差异有统计学意义;两组患儿语言清晰度以及Frenchhay总分均比组内干预前显著提升,差异有统计学意义;干预后观察组患儿的语言清晰度以及Frenchhay总分显著高于对照组,差异有统计学意义;两组患儿功能技巧部分评分以及看护人员帮助部分评分比组内干预前显著提升,差异有统计学意义;干预后观察组患者的功能技巧部分评分以及看护人员帮助部分评分显著高于对照组,差异有统计学意义.结论 构音障碍强化训练不仅可以有效的改善脑性瘫痪儿童的唇运动、舌运动以及言语理解能力,可以有效的提升患儿的言清晰度以及Frenchhay总分,还可以有效的改善患儿的自理能力,值得临床推广.

  20. 延髓背外侧综合征患者吞咽及构音障碍的综合治疗%Clinic research of combination therapy on dysphasia and dysarthria due to wallenberg syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘路然; 马艳春

    2008-01-01

    目的 观察Vocastim-master吞咽言语诊治仪、电针配合康复训练对脑卒中延髓背外侧综合征患者吞咽困难及构音障碍的治疗效果.方法 选取延髓背外侧综合征后吞咽困难的患者90例,随机分2组,单纯组60例和综合组30例,单纯组分为1、2、3组分别选用Vocastim-master吞咽言语诊治仪、针刺及康复训练;综合组则3种方法联合治疗,并对患者的吞咽和构音功能进行评定.结果 综合组吞咽功能愈显率71%,单纯组分别40%,61%,21%,两组疗效差异有统计学意义(P<0.01);综合组构音功能愈显率61%.单纯组分别25%,50%,16%,两组疗效差异有统计学意义(P<0.01).结论 对延髓背外侧综合征患者后采用综合治疗能明显改善吞咽和构音功能,且吞咽功能的恢复明显优于构音功能.

  1. Cognitive-Linguistic Deficit and Speech Intelligibility in Chronic Progressive Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Catherine; Green, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Background: Multiple sclerosis is a disabling neurological disease with varied symptoms, including dysarthria and cognitive and linguistic impairments. Association between dysarthria and cognitive-linguistic deficit has not been explored in clinical multiple sclerosis studies. Aims: In patients with chronic progressive multiple sclerosis, the…

  2. Automatic Speech Recognition and Training for Severely Dysarthric Users of Assistive Technology: The STARDUST Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Mark; Cunningham, Stuart; Enderby, Pam; Hawley, Mark; Green, Phil

    2006-01-01

    The STARDUST project developed robust computer speech recognizers for use by eight people with severe dysarthria and concomitant physical disability to access assistive technologies. Independent computer speech recognizers trained with normal speech are of limited functional use by those with severe dysarthria due to limited and inconsistent…

  3. Two Siblings Diagnosed as Lafora Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasemin Biçer Gömceli

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Lafora disease is a typical progressive myoclonic epilepsy that is characterized by autosomal recessive inheritance, myoclonic and occipital seizures, progressive dementia, ataxia, and dysarthria. Two siblings with myoclonic and generalized tonic clonic seizures, progressive dementia, ataxia and dysarthria, who were diagnosed as Lafora disease by sweat gland biopsy, are discussed.

  4. Intensive Speech and Language Therapy for Older Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Systems Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, Lindsay; Miller, Nick; Robson, Sheila; Steen, Nick

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To investigate whether speech therapy using a speech systems approach to controlling breath support, phonation, and speech rate can increase the speech intelligibility of children with dysarthria and cerebral palsy (CP). Method: Sixteen children with dysarthria and CP participated in a modified time series design. Group characteristics were…

  5. Electropalatographic (EPG) Assessment of Tongue-to-Palate Contacts in Dysarthric Speakers Following TBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuruvilla, Mili S.; Murdoch, Bruce E.; Goozee, Justine V.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the investigation was to compare EPG-derived spatial and timing measures between a group of 11 dysarthric individuals post-severe TBI and 10 age- and sex-matched neurologically non-impaired individuals. Participants of the TBI group were diagnosed with dysarthria ranging from mild-to-moderate-severe dysarthria. Each participant from the…

  6. Speech disorders reflect differing pathophysiology in Parkinson's disease, progressive supranuclear palsy and multiple system atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusz, Jan; Bonnet, Cecilia; Klempíř, Jiří; Tykalová, Tereza; Baborová, Eva; Novotný, Michal; Rulseh, Aaron; Růžička, Evžen

    2015-01-01

    Although speech disorder is frequently an early and prominent clinical feature of Parkinson's disease (PD) as well as atypical parkinsonian syndromes (APS) such as progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and multiple system atrophy (MSA), there is a lack of objective and quantitative evidence to verify whether any specific speech characteristics allow differentiation between PD, PSP and MSA. Speech samples were acquired from 77 subjects including 15 PD, 12 PSP, 13 MSA and 37 healthy controls. The accurate differential diagnosis of dysarthria subtypes was based on the quantitative acoustic analysis of 16 speech dimensions. Dysarthria was uniformly present in all parkinsonian patients but was more severe in PSP and MSA than in PD. Whilst PD speakers manifested pure hypokinetic dysarthria, ataxic components were more affected in MSA whilst PSP subjects demonstrated severe deficits in hypokinetic and spastic elements of dysarthria. Dysarthria in PSP was dominated by increased dysfluency, decreased slow rate, inappropriate silences, deficits in vowel articulation and harsh voice quality whereas MSA by pitch fluctuations, excess intensity variations, prolonged phonemes, vocal tremor and strained-strangled voice quality. Objective speech measurements were able to discriminate between APS and PD with 95% accuracy and between PSP and MSA with 75% accuracy. Dysarthria severity in APS was related to overall disease severity (r = 0.54, p = 0.006). Dysarthria with various combinations of hypokinetic, spastic and ataxic components reflects differing pathophysiology in PD, PSP and MSA. Thus, motor speech examination may provide useful information in the evaluation of these diseases with similar manifestations.

  7. 急性缺血性脑卒中构音障碍及磁共振弥散加权影像特点研究%Study on the clinical features of dysarthria and diffusion-weighted imaging in acute ischemic stroke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄小钦

    2010-01-01

    目的 通过分析急性缺血性脑卒中构音障碍的临床及磁共振弥散加权影像特点,探讨构音障碍与脑梗死损害部位关系.方法 总结155例早期表现构音障碍的急性缺血性脑梗死患者的临床表现,同时进行磁共振T1加权、T2加权、FLAIR及弥散加权成像检查(diffusion-weighted imaging,DWI),分析构音障碍患者临床与DWI显示梗死灶部位关系.结果 155例急性缺血性脑梗死患者中,8例表现为单纯构音障碍(5.2%),141例伴有肢体偏瘫(91%),123例伴有椎体束征(79.4%).DWI显示梗死病灶主要位于幕上96例(61.9%),病变灶位于左侧.28例患者的DWI显示为腔隙性梗死,其中20例(71%)临床表现为典型的伴构音障碍的腔隙性梗死综合征.结论 急性脑梗死引起构音障碍多伴随其它神经功能障碍.梗死病灶多沿皮质延髓束分布,以幕上梗死多见,病灶多位于左半侧,可能与左侧半球对言语功能控制占优势有关.

  8. Therapeutical Effect on Rehabilitation Training Combined with Electrical Stimulation on Part of Phonetic Muscles on Exercise Spasmodic Dysarthria during Cerebrovascular Sequela by Treatment%康复训练结合部分发音肌电刺激治疗脑卒中后遗症期运动性痉挛型构音障碍的疗效观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周洁信; 王凭; 张强

    2006-01-01

    目的:通过与康复训练治疗相比较,观察康复训练结合部分发音肌电刺激治疗脑卒中后遗症期运动性痉挛型构音障碍的疗效.方法:2001年5月~2004年6月共选取符合入选标准并完成临床观察病例共44例,其中康复训练组22例,康复训练结合部分发音肌电刺激组22例,病程1~3年.结果:康复训练结合部分发音肌电刺激治疗组与康复训练组治疗运动性痉挛型构音障碍疗效比较,治疗后构音障碍评分的变化有显著差异(P<0.01),结论:康复训练与部分发间肌电刺激治疗脑卒中后遗症期运动性痉挛型构音障碍的疗效优于康复训练组.

  9. 合谷雀啄刺法治疗脑卒中后假性球麻痹构音障碍30例%Clinical Observation of Sparrow -pecking Acupuncture Needling in He -gu on Supranuclear Paralysis Dysarthria, A Report of 30 Cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵红义; 郑健刚; 焦蕾

    2009-01-01

    目的:观察针刺治疗假性球麻痹构音障碍的临床疗效.方法:在"醒脑开窍针刺法"治疗脑卒中的基础上采用毫针雀啄刺法针刺合谷穴为主治疗假性球麻痹构音障碍30例.结果:痊愈10例,显效16例,有效3例,无效1例,总有效率为96.7%.结论:毫针雀啄刺法针刺合谷穴为主治疗假性球麻痹构音障碍醒脑开音利窍,有一定疗效.

  10. Clinical Research of Daoma Acupuncture in the Treatment of Dysarthria Caused by Pseudobulbar Paralysis After Apoplexy%倒马针法治疗中风后假性球麻痹所致构音障碍临床研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龚晓强; 任毅; 李振; 夏玮

    2013-01-01

    目的:观察倒马针法治疗中风后假性球麻痹所致构音障碍的临床疗效.方法:将70例患者按照随机数字表法分为治疗组30例、对照组20例和空白组20例.治疗组运用倒马针法进行治疗;对照组运用传统针灸治疗;空白组不采用针刺治疗,按常规用量给药.结果:治疗组有效率为86.7%,对照组有效率为80.0%,空白组有效率为70.0%,治疗组的有效率优于对照组及空白组,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论:倒马针法治疗中风后假性球麻痹疗效显著.

  11. The United States Army Medical Department Journal, January - March 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    hyperesthesia, paresthesia, diplopia . ataxia, confusion, urinary retention, convulsions, dysphagia, and an ascending flaccid paralysis.7 > Some...confusion, diplopia , dysphagia, dizziness, dysarthria, cranial nerve palsies, and ataxia. Seizures, hemiplegia, hemiparesis, ascending paralysis

  12. Diet and Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... need to know about Wilson Disease Diet and Nutrition Food . . . . Adherence to a low copper diet is ... dysarthria; rigid dystonia; pseudobulbar palsy; seizures; migraine headaches; insomnia Psychiatric: Depression; neuroses; personality changes; psychosis Other symptoms: ...

  13. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 401 - 450 of 623 ... OO Taiwo, EN Okeke, PH Jalo, IS Danfillo ... Vol 23, No 1 (2004), Pattern of skin surface lipids in some South-Western Nigerians with ... Dysarthria: Importance of Aerodynamic Parameters Measurements, Abstract PDF.

  14. Pediatric traumatic brain injury: language outcomes and their relationship to the arcuate fasciculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liégeois, Frédérique J; Mahony, Kate; Connelly, Alan; Pigdon, Lauren; Tournier, Jacques-Donald; Morgan, Angela T

    2013-12-01

    Pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) may result in long-lasting language impairments alongside dysarthria, a motor-speech disorder. Whether this co-morbidity is due to the functional links between speech and language networks, or to widespread damage affecting both motor and language tracts, remains unknown. Here we investigated language function and diffusion metrics (using diffusion-weighted tractography) within the arcuate fasciculus, the uncinate fasciculus, and the corpus callosum in 32 young people after TBI (approximately half with dysarthria) and age-matched healthy controls (n=17). Only participants with dysarthria showed impairments in language, affecting sentence formulation and semantic association. In the whole TBI group, sentence formulation was best predicted by combined corpus callosum and left arcuate volumes, suggesting this "dual blow" seriously reduces the potential for functional reorganisation. Word comprehension was predicted by fractional anisotropy in the right arcuate. The co-morbidity between dysarthria and language deficits therefore seems to be the consequence of multiple tract damage.

  15. Pantethine treatment is effective in recovering the disease phenotype induced by ketogenic diet in a pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration mouse model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brunetti, Dario; Dusi, Sabrina; Giordano, Carla; Lamperti, Costanza; Morbin, Michela; Fugnanesi, Valeria; Marchet, Silvia; Fagiolari, Gigliola; Sibon, Ody; Moggio, Maurizio; d'Amati, Giulia; Tiranti, Valeria

    Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration, caused by mutations in the PANK2 gene, is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by dystonia, dysarthria, rigidity, pigmentary retinal degeneration and brain iron accumulation. PANK2 encodes the mitochondrial enzyme pantothenate kinase type 2,

  16. Pantethine treatment is effective in recovering the disease phenotype induced by ketogenic diet in a pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration mouse model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brunetti, Dario; Dusi, Sabrina; Giordano, Carla; Lamperti, Costanza; Morbin, Michela; Fugnanesi, Valeria; Marchet, Silvia; Fagiolari, Gigliola; Sibon, Ody; Moggio, Maurizio; d'Amati, Giulia; Tiranti, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration, caused by mutations in the PANK2 gene, is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by dystonia, dysarthria, rigidity, pigmentary retinal degeneration and brain iron accumulation. PANK2 encodes the mitochondrial enzyme pantothenate kinase type 2,

  17. Voice disorders in children with classic galactosemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Nancy L

    2011-04-01

    Children with classic galactosemia are at risk for motor speech disorders resulting from disruptions in motor planning and programming (childhood apraxia of speech or CAS) or motor execution (dysarthria). In the present study of 33 children with classic galactosemia, 21% were diagnosed with CAS, 3% with ataxic dysarthria, and 3% with mixed CAS-dysarthria. Voice disorders due to laryngeal insufficiency were common in children with dysarthria and co-occurred with CAS. Most (58%) of the children with classic galactosemia had decreased respiratory-phonatory support for speech, and 33% had disturbed vocal quality that was indicative of cerebellar dysfunction. Three children, two diagnosed with CAS and one not diagnosed with a motor speech disorder, had vocal tremors. Treatment of voice dysfunction in neurogenic speech disorders is discussed.

  18. Pantethine treatment is effective in recovering the disease phenotype induced by ketogenic diet in a pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration mouse model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brunetti, Dario; Dusi, Sabrina; Giordano, Carla; Lamperti, Costanza; Morbin, Michela; Fugnanesi, Valeria; Marchet, Silvia; Fagiolari, Gigliola; Sibon, Ody; Moggio, Maurizio; d'Amati, Giulia; Tiranti, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration, caused by mutations in the PANK2 gene, is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by dystonia, dysarthria, rigidity, pigmentary retinal degeneration and brain iron accumulation. PANK2 encodes the mitochondrial enzyme pantothenate kinase type 2,

  19. Oculopharyngeal Weakness, Hypophrenia, Deafness, and Impaired Vision: A Novel Autosomal Dominant Myopathy with Rimmed Vacuoles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Chen

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: We reported a novel autosomal dominant myopathy with rimmed vacuoles characterized by dysarthria, dysphagia, external ophthalmoplegia, limb weakness, hypophrenia, deafness, and impaired vision, but the causative gene has not been found and needs further study.

  20. Cerebellar Mutism

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    Of a series of 15 children operated for cerebellar tumor at University Hospital Rotterdam-Dijkzigt, The Netherlands, 5 developed “cerebellar mutism” and subsequent dysarthria after surgery, and 2 had mild speech problems.

  1. Dysphagia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    evaluations, treatments and rehabilitation options available to patients with ... control via the cortical and subcortical areas of the brain. Once sensory .... compensatory strategies. Contrary to ... Dysarthria. Speech .... Modify rate of delivery.

  2. Ataxia Telangiectasia - A Report of a case in Port Harcourt

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    TNHJOURNALPH

    also had human immunoglobulin therapy and was ... and mortality in children. Delay in diagnosis and pulmonary complications contribute to a .... Eye movement disorder was seen in ... speech dysarthria was seen in almost all the patients.

  3. Impact of sentence length and phonetic complexity on intelligibility of 5-year-old children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Kristen M; Hustad, Katherine C

    2014-08-01

    Reduced speech intelligibility is a barrier to effective communication for many children with cerebral palsy (CP). Many variables may impact intelligibility, yet little research attention has sought to quantify these variables. This study examined the influence of sentence characteristics on intelligibility in two groups of children with CP (those with and without dysarthria) and typically-developing children. Questions addressed effects of sentence length on transcription intelligibility among groups; effects of phonetic complexity on intelligibility; and differences in the relationship between sentence characteristics and intelligibility across individual children with dysarthria. Speech samples varying in length from 2-7 words were elicited from 16 children with CP (mean age 59.6 months) and eight typically-developing children (mean age = 59.8 months). One hundred and nineteen naïve listeners made orthographic transcriptions of the children's sentence productions. Sentence length and phonetic complexity affected intelligibility for all groups of children, but had a greater impact on intelligibility for children with dysarthria than those without speech motor impairment. Variable relationships between sentence characteristics and intelligibility were found across individual children with dysarthria. Results suggest that reducing both the length and phonetic complexity of utterances may enhance intelligibility for children with dysarthria. However, there may be important individual differences in the impact of one or both types of sentence characteristics. This highlights the importance of considering individual speech motor profiles when deciding on treatment strategies.

  4. Speech and Pause Characteristics Associated with Voluntary Rate Reduction in Parkinson’s disease and Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjaden, Kris; Wilding, Greg

    2011-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to investigate how speakers with Parkinson’s disease (PD) and Multiple Sclerosis (MS) accomplish voluntary reductions in speech rate. A group of talkers with no history of neurological disease was included for comparison. This study was motivated by the idea that knowledge of how speakers with dysarthria voluntarily accomplish a reduced speech rate would contribute toward a descriptive model of speaking rate change in dysarthria. Such a model has the potential to assist in identifying rate control strategies to receive focus in clinical treatment programs and also would advance understanding of global speech timing in dysarthria. All speakers read a passage in Habitual and Slow conditions. Speech rate, articulation rate, pause duration, and pause frequency were measured. All speaker groups adjusted articulation time as well as pause time to reduce overall speech rate. Group differences in how voluntary rate reduction was accomplished were primarily one of quantity or degree. Overall, a slower-than-normal rate was associated with a reduced articulation rate, shorter speech runs that included fewer syllables, and longer more frequent pauses. Taken together, these results suggest that existing skills or strategies used by patients should be emphasized in dysarthria training programs focusing on rate reduction. Results further suggest that a model of voluntary speech rate reduction based on neurologically normal speech shows promise as being applicable for mild to moderate dysarthria. PMID:21767851

  5. Watershed Cerebral Infarction in a Patient with Acute Renal Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruya Ozelsancak

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Acute renal failure can cause neurologic manifestations such as mood swings, impaired concentration, tremor, stupor, coma, asterixis, dysarthria. Those findings can also be a sign of cerebral infarct. Here, we report a case of watershed cerebral infarction in a 70-year-old female patient with acute renal failure secondary to contrast administration and use of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor. Patient was evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging because of dysarthria. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed milimmetric acute ischemic lesion in the frontal and parietal deep white matter region of both cerebral hemisphere which clearly demonstrated watershed cerebral infarction affecting internal border zone. Her renal function returned to normal levels on fifth day of admission (BUN 32 mg/dl, creatinine 1.36 mg/dl and she was discharged. Dysarthria continued for 20 days.

  6. Comparing speech characteristics in spinocerebellar ataxias type 3 and type 6 with Friedreich ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brendel, Bettina; Synofzik, Matthis; Ackermann, Hermann; Lindig, Tobias; Schölderle, Theresa; Schöls, Ludger; Ziegler, Wolfram

    2015-01-01

    Patterns of dysarthria in spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) and their discriminative features still remain elusive. Here we aimed to compare dysarthria profiles of patients with (SCA3 and SCA6 vs. Friedreich ataxia (FRDA), focussing on three particularly vulnerable speech parameters (speaking rate, prosodic modulation, and intelligibility) in ataxic dysarthria as well as on a specific oral non-speech variable of ataxic impairment, i.e., the irregularity of oral motor diadochokinesis (DDK). 30 Patients with SCA3, SCA6, and FRDA, matched for group size (n = 10 each), disease severity, and disease duration produced various speech samples and DDK tasks. A discriminant analysis was used to differentiate speech and non-speech parameters between groups. Regularity of DDK was specifically impaired in SCA3, whereas impairments of speech parameters, i.e., rate and modulation were stronger affected in SCA6. Speech parameters are particularly vulnerable in SCA6, while non-speech oral motor features are notably impaired in SCA3.

  7. Distinct phenotypes of speech and voice disorders in Parkinson's disease after subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuboi, Takashi; Watanabe, Hirohisa; Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Ohdake, Reiko; Yoneyama, Noritaka; Hara, Kazuhiro; Nakamura, Ryoichi; Watanabe, Hazuki; Senda, Jo; Atsuta, Naoki; Ito, Mizuki; Hirayama, Masaaki; Yamamoto, Masahiko; Fujimoto, Yasushi; Kajita, Yasukazu; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko; Sobue, Gen

    2015-08-01

    To elucidate the phenotypes and pathophysiology of speech and voice disorders in Parkinson's disease (PD) with subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS). We conducted a cross-sectional study on 76 PD patients treated with bilateral STN-DBS (PD-DBS) and 33 medically treated PD patients (PD-Med). Speech and voice functions, electrode positions, motor function and cognitive function were comprehensively assessed. Moreover, speech and voice functions were compared between the on-stimulation and off-stimulation conditions in 42 PD-DBS patients. Speech and voice disorders in PD-DBS patients were significantly worse than those in PD-Med patients. Factor analysis and subsequent cluster analysis classified PD-DBS patients into five clusters: relatively good speech and voice function type, 25%; stuttering type, 24%; breathy voice type, 16%; strained voice type, 18%; and spastic dysarthria type, 17%. STN-DBS ameliorated voice tremor or low volume; however, it deteriorated the overall speech intelligibility in most patients. Breathy voice did not show significant changes and stuttering exhibited slight improvement after stopping stimulation. In contrast, patients with strained voice type or spastic dysarthria type showed a greater improvement after stopping stimulation. Spastic dysarthria type patients showed speech disorders similar to spastic dysarthria, which is associated with bilateral upper motor neuron involvement. Strained voice type and spastic dysarthria type appeared to be related to current diffusion to the corticobulbar fibres. Stuttering and breathy voice can be aggravated by STN-DBS, but are mainly due to aging or PD itself. Strained voice and spastic dysarthria are considered corticobulbar side effects. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  8. Botulinum Toxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    atypical disease symptoms of nausea, vomiting, diplopia , dysphagia, phagodynia, and instability within 7 h of exposure (Meyer and Eddie, 1951). The man...routes of exposure include, in order of descending frequency: dysphagia, xerostomia, diplopia , dysarthria, fatigue, ptosis of the eyelids

  9. Methods of Communication at End of Life for the Person with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownlee, Alisa; Bruening, Lisa M.

    2012-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease that results in loss of most motor functions by the time of death. Most persons with ALS experience a dysarthria that eventually renders oral/vocal communication unintelligible. This article reviews the communication needs of persons with ALS and the range of communication…

  10. The cognitive profile of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raaphorst, J.; de Visser, M.; Linssen, W.H.J.P.; de Haan, R.J.; Schmand, B.

    2010-01-01

    We aimed to clarify the profile of cognitive impairment in ALS, by meta-analysis of published studies. Criteria for inclusion were: ALS diagnosed according to El Escorial criteria; control group matched for age and education; correction for bias due to motor impairment or dysarthria; no dementia in

  11. Physical Linguistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tice, Bradley S.

    Physical linguistics is defined as the use of treatments from the field of speech pathology to enhance first and second language production in healthy individuals, resulting in increased quality and strength of phonation and articulation. A series of exercises for treating dysarthria (weakness, paralysis, discoordination, primary and secondary…

  12. Speech Intelligibility and Marital Communication in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joubert, Karin; Bornman, Juan; Alant, Erna

    2011-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a rapidly progressive neuromuscular disease, has a devastating impact not only on individuals diagnosed with ALS but also their spouses. Speech intelligibility, often compromised as a result of dysarthria, affects the couple's ability to maintain effective, intimate communication. The purpose of this…

  13. Methods of Communication at End of Life for the Person with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownlee, Alisa; Bruening, Lisa M.

    2012-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease that results in loss of most motor functions by the time of death. Most persons with ALS experience a dysarthria that eventually renders oral/vocal communication unintelligible. This article reviews the communication needs of persons with ALS and the range of communication…

  14. "The Caterpillar": A Novel Reading Passage for Assessment of Motor Speech Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rupal; Connaghan, Kathryn; Franco, Diana; Edsall, Erika; Forgit, Dory; Olsen, Laura; Ramage, Lianna; Tyler, Emily; Russell, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: A review of the salient characteristics of motor speech disorders and common assessment protocols revealed the need for a novel reading passage tailored specifically to differentiate between and among the dysarthrias (DYSs) and apraxia of speech (AOS). Method: "The Caterpillar" passage was designed to provide a contemporary, easily read,…

  15. Side-effects of subthalamic stimulation in Parkinson's disease: clinical evolution and predictive factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guehl, D; Cuny, E; Benazzouz, A; Rougier, A; Tison, F; Machado, S; Grabot, D; Gross, C; Bioulac, B; Burbaud, P

    2006-09-01

    Chronic bilateral high-frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is an alternative treatment for disabling forms of Parkinson's disease when on-off fluctuations and levodopa-induced dyskinesias compromise patients' quality of life. The aim of this study was to assess the evolution of side-effects during the first year of follow-up and search for clinical predictive factors accounting for their occurrence. We compared the frequency of side-effects at 3 and 12 months after surgery in a cohort of 44 patients. The off-medication scores of Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) II, III, axial symptoms, disease duration and age at surgery were retained for correlation analysis. Dysarthria/hypophonia, weight gain and postural instability were the most frequent chronic side-effects. Whereas dysarthria/hypophonia remained stable over time, weight gain and postural instability increased during the first year post-op. High axial and UPDRS II scores at surgery were predictive of dysarthria/hypophonia. Age and axial score at surgery were positively correlated with postural instability. Despite the occurrence of side-effects, the benefit/side-effects ratio of STN stimulation was largely positive during the first year of follow-up. Age, intensity of axial symptoms and UDPRS II off-medication score before surgery are predictive factors of dysarthria/hypophonia and postural instability after surgery.

  16. Dermatomyositis som markør for lungecancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Bibi; Bygum, Anette

    2009-01-01

    A 76-year-old female was referred because of violaceous dermatitis on sun-exposed skin. She had associated muscle weakness, dysphagia, dysarthria and reported an unintended weight loss. The clinical presentation gave a suspicion of dermatomyositis, and diagnostic procedures revealed a small-cell ...

  17. Research on Speech Motor Control and Its Disorders: A Review and Prospective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Ray D.

    2000-01-01

    This article reviews issues in speech motor control and a class of communication disorders known as motor speech disorders that include dysarthrias, apraxia of speech, developmental apraxia of speech, developmental stuttering, acquired (neurogenic and psychogenic) stuttering, and cluttering. Assessment, classification, and treatment of these…

  18. Electropalatography in the Description and Treatment of Speech Disorders in Five Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordberg, Ann; Carlsson, Goran; Lohmander, Anette

    2011-01-01

    Some children with cerebral palsy have articulation disorders that are resistant to conventional speech therapy. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the visual feedback method of electropalatography (EPG) could be an effective tool for treating five children (mean age of 9.4 years) with dysarthria and cerebral palsy and to explore…

  19. An autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia syndrome with upward gaze palsy, neuropathy, and seizures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Straussberg, R; Basel-Vanagaite, L; Kivity, S; Dabby, R; Cirak, S; Nurnberg, P; Voit, T; Mahajnah, M; Inbar, D; Saifi, GM; Lupski, [No Value; Delague, [No Value; Megarbane, A; Richter, A; Leshinsky, E; Berkovic, SF

    2005-01-01

    The authors describe three siblings born to consanguineous parents with early onset ataxia, dysarthria, myoclonic, generalized tonic clonic seizures, upward gaze palsy, extensor plantar reflexes, sensory neuropathy, and normal cognition. Direct screening excluded mutations in FRDA, TDP1, and SACS ge

  20. Distal renal tubular acidosis with multiorgan autoimmunity: A case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Van Den Wildenberg (Maria J.); E.J. Hoorn (Ewout); N. Mohebbi (Nilufar); C.A. Wagner (Carsten); A.J.J. Woittiez; P.A.M. de Vries; P. Laverman (Peter)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractA 61-year-old woman with a history of pernicious anemia presented with progressive muscle weakness and dysarthria. Hypokalemic paralysis (serum potassium, 1.4 mEq/L) due to distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA) was diagnosed. After excluding several possible causes, dRTA was considered au

  1. Correlates of older adults' discrimination of acoustic properties in speech

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neger, T.M.; Janse, E.; Rietveld, A.C.M.

    2015-01-01

    Auditory discrimination of speech stimuli is an essential tool in speech and language therapy, e.g., in dysarthria rehabilitation. It is unclear, however, which listener characteristics are associated with the ability to perceive differences between one's own utterance and target speech. Knowledge a

  2. Genetics Home Reference: dystonia 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... impacts muscles of the head and neck, causing problems with speaking (dysarthria) and eating (dysphagia). Eyelid twitching (blepharospasm) may also occur. Involvement of one or more limbs is common, and in some cases occurs before the head and neck problems. Dystonia 6 gradually gets worse, and it may ...

  3. Longitudinal Cerebral Blood Flow Changes during Speech in Hereditary Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidtis, John J.; Strother, Stephen C.; Naoum, Ansam; Rottenberg, David A.; Gomez, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    The hereditary ataxias constitute a group of degenerative diseases that progress over years or decades. With principal pathology involving the cerebellum, dysarthria is an early feature of many of the ataxias. Positron emission tomography was used to study regional cerebral blood flow changes during speech production over a 21 month period in a…

  4. Hereditary haemochromatosis: a case of iron accumulation in the basal ganglia associated with a parkinsonian syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J.E.; Jensen, L. Neerup; Krabbe, K.

    1995-01-01

    . A patient is reported with hereditary haemochromatosis and a syndrome of dementia, dysarthria, a slowly progressive gait disturbance, imbalance, muscle weakness, rigidity, bradykinesia, tremor, ataxia, and dyssynergia. The findings on MRI of a large signal decrease in the basal ganglia, consistent...

  5. Utility of Language Comprehension Tests for Unintelligible or Non-Speaking Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geytenbeek, Joke; Harlaar, Laurike; Stam, Marloes; Ket, Hans; Becher, Jules G.; Oostrom, Kim; Vermeulen, Jeroen

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To identify the use and utility of language comprehension tests for unintelligible or non-speaking children with severe cerebral palsy (CP). Method: Severe CP was defined as severe dysarthria (unintelligible speech) or anarthria (absence of speech) combined with severe limited mobility, corresponding to Gross Motor Function Classification…

  6. Verbal Short-Term Memory in Individuals with Congenital Articulatory Disorders: New Empirical Data and Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlesimo, G. A.; Galloni, F.; Bonanni, R.; Sabbadini, M.

    2006-01-01

    Background: To investigate the nature of the articulatory rehearsal mechanism of the Articulatory Loop in Baddeley's Working Memory model, it seems particularly important to study individuals who developed a deficit (dysarthria) or total abolition (anarthria) of the ability to articulate language following a cerebral lesion. Method: In this study,…

  7. Semantic Trouble Sources and Their Repair in Conversations Affected by Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldert, Charlotta; Ferm, Ulrika; Bloch, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Background: It is known that dysarthria arising from Parkinson's disease may affect intelligibility in conversational interaction. Research has also shown that Parkinson's disease may affect cognition and cause word-retrieval difficulties and pragmatic problems in the use of language. However, it is not known whether or how these…

  8. Effects of Speaking Task on Intelligibility in Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjaden, Kris; Wilding, Greg

    2011-01-01

    Intelligibility tests for dysarthria typically provide an estimate of overall severity for speech materials elicited through imitation or read from a printed script. The extent to which these types of tasks and procedures reflect intelligibility for extemporaneous speech is not well understood. The purpose of this study was to compare…

  9. Dysprosody and Stimulus Effects in Cantonese Speakers with Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Joan K.-Y.; Whitehill, Tara; Cheung, Katherine S.-K.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Dysprosody is a common feature in speakers with hypokinetic dysarthria. However, speech prosody varies across different types of speech materials. This raises the question of what is the most appropriate speech material for the evaluation of dysprosody. Aims: To characterize the prosodic impairment in Cantonese speakers with…

  10. Multiple Repair Sequences in Everyday Conversations Involving People with Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Sarah; Barnes, Rebecca; Britten, Nicky; Wilkinson, Ray

    2015-01-01

    Background: Features of dysarthria associated with Parkinson's disease (PD), such as low volume, variable rate of speech and increased pauses, impact speaker intelligibility. Those affected report restricted interactional participation, although this area is under explored. Aims: To examine naturally occurring instances of problems with…

  11. ISSN 2073 ISSN 2073 9990 East Cent. Afr. J. s 9990 East Cent. Afr ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hp 630 Dual Core

    ... nystagmus, hoarness, dysarthria, and dysphagia, gait disturbances ... Tip of odontoid mat normally extend above it by 6mm in women 7mm in men thus ... This was 14 year old male teenager who has had neck pains over the last 18 months.

  12. Phoniatrie und Epidemiologie: aktueller Stand

    OpenAIRE

    Schindler, A.; Favero, E; Musto, R; Ginocchio, D.; OTTAVIANI, F.

    2005-01-01

    The field of communication disorders is primarily involved in the knowledge of the normal functioning of some human abilities and specifically of the following: voice, speech, language, non verbal and verbal communication, fluency of the above mentioned functions, swallowing, academic learning, and interpersonal relationship. The nosological catalogue could be divided into the following chapters: voice disorders, organic speech disorders, fluency disorders, aphasias, dysarthrias, retardations...

  13. Electropalatography in the Description and Treatment of Speech Disorders in Five Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordberg, Ann; Carlsson, Goran; Lohmander, Anette

    2011-01-01

    Some children with cerebral palsy have articulation disorders that are resistant to conventional speech therapy. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the visual feedback method of electropalatography (EPG) could be an effective tool for treating five children (mean age of 9.4 years) with dysarthria and cerebral palsy and to explore…

  14. Two cases of autosomal recessive generalized dystonia in childhood: 5 year follow-up and bilateral globus pallidus stimulation results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenders, Mathieu W.; Vergouwen, Mervyn D.; Hageman, Gerard; Hoek, van der Joffrey A.; Ippel, Elly F.; Jansen Steur, Ernst N.; Buschman, Hendrik P.J.; Hariz, Marwan

    2006-01-01

    We report two brothers with an unknown form of early-onset familiar dystonia. Characteristic clinical features are (1) childhood-onset; (2) extrapyramidal motor symptoms; (3) dysarthria; and (4) mental retardation. Additional findings include loss of D2-receptors in both basal ganglia and hypoplasia

  15. The cognitive profile of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raaphorst, J.; de Visser, M.; Linssen, W.H.J.P.; de Haan, R.J.; Schmand, B.

    2010-01-01

    We aimed to clarify the profile of cognitive impairment in ALS, by meta-analysis of published studies. Criteria for inclusion were: ALS diagnosed according to El Escorial criteria; control group matched for age and education; correction for bias due to motor impairment or dysarthria; no dementia in

  16. Chronic hepatitis B infection presenting with chronic lymphocytic inflammation with pontine perivascular enhancement responsive to steroids (CLIPPERS): a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Weng, Ching-Fu; Chan, Ding-Cheng; Chen, Ya-Fang; Liu, Fei-Chih; Liou, Horng-Huei

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Chronic lymphocytic inflammation with pontine perivascular enhancement responsive to steroids is a brainstem disorder characterized by perivascular pathologic reaction with lymphocyte infiltration and leading to diplopia, facial palsy, dysarthria, and gait ataxia. It was thought to be an autoimmune disorder without distinct pathogenesis. Chronic hepatitis B virus infection has been proposed in correlation with autoimmune diseases, including central nervous system demyelinating di...

  17. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: genetic susceptibility factors and pleiotropy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diekstra, F.P.

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive muscle weakness, spasticity, dysarthria and, ultimately, respiratory muscle insufficiency. These symptoms are caused by the loss of motor neurons in both the brain and in the anterior horn of the sp

  18. Parkinsonism following Bee Sting: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchika Mittal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We are reporting here a rare case of Parkinsonism (Hypokinetic dysarthria caused after a bee stung, a member of the hymenoptera order. The main aim of this report is to orient the clinicians with the possibility of extrapyramidal syndromes because of hymenoptera stings.

  19. A case with unilateral hypoglossal nerve injury in branchial cyst surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukherjee Sudipta

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract An 11 years old boy came, with complain of mild dysarthria. Examination revealed marked hemiatrophy of left side of the tongue. Five months back he underwent ipsilateral branchial cyst operation. To our knowledge, no case was reported. After branchial cyst operation if there is any residual remnant chance of recurrence is very high.

  20. [The clinical diagnosis 'wound botulism' in an injecting drug addict

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rundervoort, R.S.; Ven, A.J.A.M. van der; Vermeulen, C.M.; Oostenbrugge, R.J. van

    2003-01-01

    A 38-year-old subcutaneous injecting heroin addict had subacute blurred vision, dysarthria and dysphagia. The next day she could not swallow or speak and developed weakness of all limbs and respiratory failure. Electromyography showed abnormalities compatible with a presynaptic neuromuscular transmi

  1. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Chronic Dysarthric Speech after Childhood Brain Injury: Reliance on a Left-Hemisphere Compensatory Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Angela T.; Masterton, Richard; Pigdon, Lauren; Connelly, Alan; Liegeois, Frederique J.

    2013-01-01

    Severe and persistent speech disorder, dysarthria, may be present for life after brain injury in childhood, yet the neural correlates of this chronic disorder remain elusive. Although abundant literature is available on language reorganization after lesions in childhood, little is known about the capacity of motor speech networks to reorganize…

  2. Local intra-arterial thrombolysis in a 4-year-old male with vertebrobasilar artery thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janmaat, Mirjam; Gravendeel, Joost P; Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; Vroomen, Patrick C; Brouwer, Oebele F; Luijckx, Gert-Jan

    2009-01-01

    We report the case of a 4-year-old male with vertebrobasilar artery thrombosis for which he was treated with local intra-arterial urokinase 60 hours after onset of symptoms. Initially the patient had dysarthria and dysphagia. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a community hospital showed abno

  3. Research on Speech Motor Control and Its Disorders: A Review and Prospective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Ray D.

    2000-01-01

    This article reviews issues in speech motor control and a class of communication disorders known as motor speech disorders that include dysarthrias, apraxia of speech, developmental apraxia of speech, developmental stuttering, acquired (neurogenic and psychogenic) stuttering, and cluttering. Assessment, classification, and treatment of these…

  4. Assessment of Dysarthric Speech: A Case for a Combined Perceptual and Physiological Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodoros, Deborah; Murdoch, Bruce; Horton, Sue

    1999-01-01

    Highlights the importance of a combined approach to the assessment of dysarthria with reference to two case studies of individuals with dysarthric speech: a 32-year-old adult who suffered a severe closed head injury and a 9-year-old child who experienced a cerebrovascular accident involving the basilar artery. (Author/VWL)

  5. Effects of Age, Sex, and Body Position on Orofacial Muscle Tone in Healthy Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietsch, Angela M.; Clark, Heather M.; Steiner, Jessica N.; Solomon, Nancy Pearl

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Quantification of tissue stiffness may facilitate identification of abnormalities in orofacial muscle tone and thus contribute to differential diagnosis of dysarthria. Tissue stiffness is affected by muscle tone as well as age-related changes in muscle and connective tissue. Method: The Myoton-3 measured tissue stiffness in 40 healthy…

  6. Hereditary haemochromatosis: a case of iron accumulation in the basal ganglia associated with a parkinsonian syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J.E.; Jensen, L.N.; Krabbe, K

    1995-01-01

    . A patient is reported with hereditary haemochromatosis and a syndrome of dementia, dysarthria, a slowly progressive gait disturbance, imbalance, muscle weakness, rigidity, bradykinesia, tremor, ataxia, and dyssynergia. The findings on MRI of a large signal decrease in the basal ganglia, consistent...

  7. Longitudinal Cerebral Blood Flow Changes during Speech in Hereditary Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidtis, John J.; Strother, Stephen C.; Naoum, Ansam; Rottenberg, David A.; Gomez, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    The hereditary ataxias constitute a group of degenerative diseases that progress over years or decades. With principal pathology involving the cerebellum, dysarthria is an early feature of many of the ataxias. Positron emission tomography was used to study regional cerebral blood flow changes during speech production over a 21 month period in a…

  8. Effects of Age, Sex, and Body Position on Orofacial Muscle Tone in Healthy Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietsch, Angela M.; Clark, Heather M.; Steiner, Jessica N.; Solomon, Nancy Pearl

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Quantification of tissue stiffness may facilitate identification of abnormalities in orofacial muscle tone and thus contribute to differential diagnosis of dysarthria. Tissue stiffness is affected by muscle tone as well as age-related changes in muscle and connective tissue. Method: The Myoton-3 measured tissue stiffness in 40 healthy…

  9. Semantic Trouble Sources and Their Repair in Conversations Affected by Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldert, Charlotta; Ferm, Ulrika; Bloch, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Background: It is known that dysarthria arising from Parkinson's disease may affect intelligibility in conversational interaction. Research has also shown that Parkinson's disease may affect cognition and cause word-retrieval difficulties and pragmatic problems in the use of language. However, it is not known whether or how these…

  10. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Chronic Dysarthric Speech after Childhood Brain Injury: Reliance on a Left-Hemisphere Compensatory Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Angela T.; Masterton, Richard; Pigdon, Lauren; Connelly, Alan; Liegeois, Frederique J.

    2013-01-01

    Severe and persistent speech disorder, dysarthria, may be present for life after brain injury in childhood, yet the neural correlates of this chronic disorder remain elusive. Although abundant literature is available on language reorganization after lesions in childhood, little is known about the capacity of motor speech networks to reorganize…

  11. A case of neuromuscular mimicry.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, M.M.; Overeem, S.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Scheffer, H.; Elzen, C. van der; Laak, H.J. ter; Lammens, M.M.Y.; Schelhaas, H.J.; Zwarts, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    Recognizing an ALS-mimic can be challenging. Here, we describe a patient with a slowly progressive dysarthria and dysphagia, with fasciculations of the tongue and general hyperreflexia, fulfilling the diagnostic criteria of 'clinical probable ALS'. Because of a non-conclusive EMG, a muscle biopsy

  12. Downward vertical gaze palsy as a prominent manifestation of episodic ataxia type 2: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shervin Badv, Reza; Niksirat, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2) is an inherited autosomal dominant disorder characterized by intermittent ataxia, nausea, vomiting, dysarthria, or nystagmus. We report a case of EA2, which downward gaze palsy exists as a common sign in all her attacks. Responsiveness of EA2 to acetazolamide was observed in this patient.

  13. E-learning-based speech therapy: a web application for speech training.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beijer, L.J.; Rietveld, T.C.; Beers, M.M. van; Slangen, R.M.; Heuvel, H. van den; Swart, B.J.M. de; Geurts, A.C.H.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract In The Netherlands, a web application for speech training, E-learning-based speech therapy (EST), has been developed for patients with dysarthria, a speech disorder resulting from acquired neurological impairments such as stroke or Parkinson's disease. In this report, the EST infrastructure

  14. Perceptual and instrumental assessments of orofacial muscle tone in dysarthric and normal speakers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela M. Dietsch, PhD

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Clinical assessment of orofacial muscle tone is of interest for differential diagnosis of the dysarthrias, but standardized procedures and normative data are lacking. In this study, perceptual ratings of tone were compared with instrumental measures of tissue stiffness for facial, lingual, and masticatory muscles in 70 individuals with dysarthria. Perceptual and instrumental tone data were discordant and failed to discriminate between five dysarthria types. These results raised concerns about the validity of Myoton-3 stiffness measures in the orofacial muscles. Therefore, a second study evaluated contracted and relaxed orofacial muscles in 10 neurotypical adults. Results for the cheek, masseter, and lateral tongue surface followed predictions, with significantly higher tissue stiffness during contraction. In contradiction, stiffness measures from the superior surface of the tongue were lower during contraction. Superior-to-inferior tongue thickness was notably increased during contraction. A third study revealed that tissue thickness up to ~10 mm significantly affected Myoton-3 measures. Altered tissue thickness due to neuromuscular conditions like spasticity and atrophy may have undermined the detection of group differences in the original sample of dysarthric speakers. These experiments underscore the challenges of assessing orofacial muscle tone and identify considerations for quantification of tone-related differences across dysarthria groups in future studies.

  15. Dysprosody and stimulus effects in Cantonese speakers with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Joan K-Y; Whitehill, Tara; Cheung, Katherine S-K

    2010-01-01

    Dysprosody is a common feature in speakers with hypokinetic dysarthria. However, speech prosody varies across different types of speech materials. This raises the question of what is the most appropriate speech material for the evaluation of dysprosody. To characterize the prosodic impairment in Cantonese speakers with hypokinetic dysarthria associated with Parkinson's disease, and to determine the effect of different types of speech stimuli on the perceptual rating of prosody. Speech data in the form of sentence reading, passage reading, and monologue were collected from ten Cantonese speakers with Parkinson's disease. Perceptual analysis was conducted on ten prosodic parameters to evaluate five dimensions of prosody, based on a theoretical framework: pitch, loudness, duration, voice quality, and degree of reduction. The results showed that the most severely affected prosodic parameters were monopitch, harsh voice, and monoloudness, followed by breathy voice and prolonged interval. Differences were noted between speakers with mild and moderate dysprosody. No statistically significant differences were found between the three types of stimuli. However, qualitative analysis revealed noticeable differences between the three stimuli in two speakers. The prosodic profile of Cantonese speakers with hypokinetic dysarthria is similar to those of other languages (for example, English). The involvement of two new dimensions in the definition of prosody (voice quality and degree of reduction) provides additional insight in differentiating patients with mild and moderate dysarthria. Further investigation on the use of speech materials in the clinical evaluation of speech prosody in speakers with dysarthria is needed, as no single task was found to represent a patient's performance under all circumstances.

  16. A Swedish family with de novo alpha-synuclein A53T mutation: evidence for early cortical dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puschmann, Andreas; Ross, Owen A; Vilariño-Güell, Carles;

    2009-01-01

    A de novo alpha-synuclein A53T (p.Ala53 Th; c.209G > A) mutation has been identified in a Swedish family with autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease (PD). Two affected individuals had early-onset (before 31 and 40 years), severe levodopa-responsive PD with prominent dysphasia, dysarthria, and cog......A de novo alpha-synuclein A53T (p.Ala53 Th; c.209G > A) mutation has been identified in a Swedish family with autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease (PD). Two affected individuals had early-onset (before 31 and 40 years), severe levodopa-responsive PD with prominent dysphasia, dysarthria......, and cognitive decline. Longitudinal clinical follow-up, EEG, SPECT and CSF biomarker examinations suggested an underlying encephalopathy with cortical involvement. The mutated allele (c.209A) was present within a haplotype different from that shared among mutation carriers in the Italian (Contursi...

  17. 腰骶段选择性脊神经后根切断术对痉挛型脑性瘫痪患者伴随症状的影响%The effects of selective posterior rhizotomy on combined symptoms of patients with spastic cerebral palsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王业华; 徐林; 龚维成

    2002-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of lumbar sacral selective posterior rhizotomy on spasticity of upper limbs,epilepsy, strabismus, sialorrhea and dysarthria of patients with spastic cerebral palsy.Methods 825 patients with cerebral palsy who had received SPR between 1990 and 1998 were followed up for two years at least.Results Of 328 cases with spasticity of upper limbs,67(20.4% ) had partial amelioration of spasticity of upper limbs.Of 35 cases with epilepsy, 31(88.6% ) had lower frequency of onset or needed to take lower dose drug to control than ever.Of 386 cases with strabismus,132(34.2% ) had improved.Of 73 cases with sialorrhea,49(67.1% ) had improved, 21(28.8% ) had found sialorrhea disappeararnce.Of 456 cases with dysarthria,72(15.8% ) had improved.Conclusion Selective posterior rhizotomy has curative effect on combined symptoms in some of patients with cerebral palsy.

  18. Opercular syndrome: A case report and review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soaham Dilip Desai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a 9-year-old boy with history of perinatal asphyxia and neonatal seizures; who presented with delayed development of speech, with predominant dysarthria, dysphagia, and drooling of saliva and unable to protrude tongue along with delayed motor and mental milestones. He had complex partial seizures since last 3 years requiring multiple anti-epileptic drugs. He had dysarthria, nasal twang, and drooling of saliva with difficulty in chewing and swallowing. Hearing and understanding were normal. Bilateral trigemino-facio-linguo-pharyngeal palsy was noticed on voluntary movements with normal jaw jerk with preserved automatic and emotional motor movements. Electroencephalography revealed focal left fronto-temporal epileptiform discharges and brain imaging was suggestive of bilateral cortical and subcortical region encephalomalacia, predominantly involving bilateral opercular region. The clinical and neuroimaging features correspond to bilateral opercular syndrome which could have resulted from the perinatal insult in this case.

  19. Clinical and MRI findings of cerebellar agenesis in two living adult patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazil Mustafa Gelal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar agenesis (CA is an extremely rare entity. We present two adult patients with CA. The 61-year-old man had ataxia, dysarthria, abnormalities in cerebellar tests, severe cognitive impairment, and moderate mental retardation. The 26-year-old woman had dysmetria, dysdiadochokinesia, and dysarthria as well as mild cognitive impairment and mild mental retardation. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed complete absence of the cerebellum with small residual vermis. Brainstem was hypoplastic and structures above tentorium were normal. Supratentorial white matter bundles were unaffected in diffusion tensor tractography. Only few adult patients with CA have so far been published. These cases show that patients with CA present with a variety of developmental, clinical, and mental abnormalities; and emphasize the role of the cerebellum in normal motor, language, and mental development.

  20. Case of subacute cerebellar degeneration associated with pleocytosis and cerebellar swelling shown in computed tomography scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshino, Hiide; Anezaki, Toshiharu; Takashima, Noriko; Inuzuka, Takashi; Miyatake, Tadashi

    1988-02-01

    A 44 year old woman was healthy until January 3, 1986, when she had headache. On January 9, she developed gait ataxia and dysarthria. Cerebellar ataxia worsened rapidly. Aftar a week she could not sit without support and her consciousness was disturbed. Corticosteroid was administrated and consciousness proved alert, but cerebellar ataxia and dysarthria remained unchanged. The patient was found carcinoma of the lung in August 1986. Characteristic features of clinical and laboratory findings of this patient are acute progression, cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis of 1,064/3 cells (860 mononuclear cell, 204 polymorphonuclear cell), and cerebellar swelling shown in computed tomography scanning. Though the mechanism of acute cerebellar degeneration is still uncertained, inflammatory process was supported to exist in cerebellum of this case.

  1. Perceptual evaluation of motor speech following treatment for childhood cerebellar tumour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornwell, Petrea L; Murdoch, Bruce E; Ward, Elizabeth C; Kellie, Stewart

    2003-12-01

    The speech characteristics, oromotor function and speech intelligibility of a group of children treated for cerebellar tumour (CT) was investigated perceptually. Assessment of these areas was performed on 11 children treated for CT with dysarthric speech as well as 21 non-neurologically impaired controls matched for age and sex to obtain a comprehensive perceptual profile of their speech and oromotor mechanism. Contributing to the perception of dysarthria were a number of deviant speech dimensions including imprecision of consonants, hoarseness and decreased pitch variation, as well as a reduction in overall speech intelligibility for both sentences and connected speech. Oromotor assessment revealed deficits in lip, tongue and laryngeal function, particularly relating to deficits in timing and coordination of movements. The most salient features of the dysarthria seen in children treated for CT were the mild nature of the speech disorder and clustering of speech deficits in the prosodic, phonatory and articulatory aspects of speech production.

  2. Auditory-perceptual speech analysis in children with cerebellar tumours: a long-term follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Smet, Hyo Jung; Catsman-Berrevoets, Coriene; Aarsen, Femke; Verhoeven, Jo; Mariën, Peter; Paquier, Philippe F

    2012-09-01

    Mutism and Subsequent Dysarthria (MSD) and the Posterior Fossa Syndrome (PFS) have become well-recognized clinical entities which may develop after resection of cerebellar tumours. However, speech characteristics following a period of mutism have not been documented in much detail. This study carried out a perceptual speech analysis in 24 children and adolescents (of whom 12 became mute in the immediate postoperative phase) 1-12.2 years after cerebellar tumour resection. The most prominent speech deficits in this study were distorted vowels, slow rate, voice tremor, and monopitch. Factors influencing long-term speech disturbances are presence or absence of postoperative PFS, the localisation of the surgical lesion and the type of adjuvant treatment. Long-term speech deficits may be present up to 12 years post-surgery. The speech deficits found in children and adolescents with cerebellar lesions following cerebellar tumour surgery do not necessarily resemble adult speech characteristics of ataxic dysarthria.

  3. Relative fundamental frequency during vocal onset and offset in older speakers with and without Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepp, Cara E

    2013-03-01

    The relative fundamental frequency (RFF) surrounding production of a voiceless consonant has previously been shown to be lower in speakers with hypokinetic dysarthria and Parkinson's disease (PD) relative to age/sex matched controls. Here RFF was calculated in 32 speakers with PD without overt hypokinetic dysarthria and 32 age and sex matched controls to better understand the relationships between RFF and PD progression, medication status, and sex. Results showed that RFF was statistically significantly lower in individuals with PD compared with healthy age-matched controls and was statistically significantly lower in individuals diagnosed at least 5 yrs prior to experimentation relative to individuals recorded less than 5 yrs past diagnosis. Contrary to previous trends, no effect of medication was found. However, a statistically significant effect of sex on offset RFF was shown, with lower values in males relative to females. Future work examining the physiological bases of RFF is warranted.

  4. Diphenhydramine-induced acute dystonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etzel, J V

    1994-01-01

    A 45-year-old woman was administered oral and intravenous diphenhydramine 25 mg for the treatment of an allergic reaction. Within 2 minutes she rapidly developed trismus, dysarthria, tremors of the upper extremities, left-sided weakness, and diminished consciousness. She was treated with intravenous diazepam and benztropine with good response. After approximately 12 hours the patient's condition was completely resolved except for minor subjective weakness of her left extremities. Her hospital stay was uneventful, and she was discharged after 4 days after refusing rechallenge with the drug. Several cases of acute dystonic reactions secondary to antihistamines have been reported in the literature, four of which involved diphenhydramine. Such reactions may occur after short- or long-term therapy. Most patients experienced rapidly developing trismus, facial dystonia, dysarthria, and occasionally, decreases in consciousness, motor incoordination, and weakness. Because of the widespread availability of diphenhydramine and other antihistamines to the general public, awareness of this effect is of great importance.

  5. Hydrocephalus in an elderly man with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Sheng; Wu, Tsai-Hung; Chou, Chung-Tei; Tsai, Chang-Youh

    2009-06-01

    A 71-year-old man presented with quadriplegia, seizures, dysarthria, motor aphasia and urinary incontinence lasting for several years. The development of proteinuria and increased susceptibility to infections brought the physician's attention to possible underlying autoimmune diseases. Laboratory investigations revealed evidence for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and antiphospholipid syndrome. Imaging studies showed obstructive hydrocephalus. Several courses of methylprednisolone therapies followed by maintenance therapy with low-dose steroid, ventriculoperitoneal shunt, and antihypertensives improved the proteinuria and dysarthria but not the urinary incontinence or dementia. A thromboembolic event in the central nervous system secondary to phospholipid antibodies or lupus activity may represent a pathogenetic basis for hydrocephalus. When encountering a patient with hydrocephalus but without apparent predisposing factors, it is always important to include SLE as a differential diagnosis.

  6. Speech in spinocerebellar ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalling, Ellika; Hartelius, Lena

    2013-12-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are a heterogeneous group of autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias clinically characterized by progressive ataxia, dysarthria and a range of other concomitant neurological symptoms. Only a few studies include detailed characterization of speech symptoms in SCA. Speech symptoms in SCA resemble ataxic dysarthria but symptoms related to phonation may be more prominent. One study to date has shown an association between differences in speech and voice symptoms related to genotype. More studies of speech and voice phenotypes are motivated, to possibly aid in clinical diagnosis. In addition, instrumental speech analysis has been demonstrated to be a reliable measure that may be used to monitor disease progression or therapy outcomes in possible future pharmacological treatments. Intervention by speech and language pathologists should go beyond assessment. Clinical guidelines for management of speech, communication and swallowing need to be developed for individuals with progressive cerebellar ataxia.

  7. Isolated Post-Traumatic Syringobulbia; Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mousa Taghipour

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Syringobulbiais very rare condition defined as slit-like fluid cavity in the brain stem. Several conditions have been reported to be associated with syringobulbia including neoplasms, spinal cord traumas or lesions such as tethered cord, hind-brain herniation, infections such as meningitis and in isolation. Although post-traumatic syringomyelia has been wieldy described previously, traumatic brain injury has not been reported as the mechanism and etiology of isolated syringobulbia. We herein report a 24-year old man with previous history of severe traumatic brain injury who presented with recent onset inability to walk or coordinate movements, ataxia, dysphonia, dysarthria, bilateral third nerve palsy with fixed dilated pupils and eyes deviated outward and downward. He was further diagnosed to have isolated syringobulbia extending to upper pons and lower midbrain. Isolated post-traumatic syringobulbia is extremely rare condition presenting insidiously with cranial nerve palsies, ataxia and dysarthria.

  8. Behavioral treatments for speech in Parkinson's disease: meta-analyses and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson-Clement, Cyril; Sadat, Jasmin; Pinto, Serge

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) results from neurodegenerative processes leading to alteration of motor functions. Most motor symptoms respond well to pharmacological and neurosurgical treatments, except some axial symptoms such as speech impairment, so-called dysarthria. However, speech therapy is rarely proposed to PD patients. This review aims at evaluating previous research on the effects of speech behavioral therapies in patients with PD. We also performed two meta-analyses focusing on speech loudness and voice pitch. We showed that intensive therapies in PD are the most effective for hypophonia and can lead to some improvement of voice pitch. Although speech therapy is effective in handling PD dysarthria, behavioral speech rehabilitation in PD still needs further validation.

  9. Bilateral basal ganglia and unilateral cortical involvement in a diabetic uremic patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Chang Hyo; Seok, Jung Im; Lee, Dong Kuck; An, Gee Sung

    2009-06-01

    We report a 57-year-old woman with uremic encephalopathy who presented with dysarthria, dysphagia, hypophonia, and drowsiness. The patient's radiologic findings were rather unusual in that magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed abnormal findings involving the basal ganglia bilaterally and frontal cortex unilaterally. After intensified hemodialysis, her symptoms and follow-up brain MRI showed marked improvement. We postulated that the underlying mechanism of uremic encephalopathy based on diffusion-weighted imaging and apparent diffusion coefficient maps.

  10. Addenda to Allied Medical Publication 8, NATO Planning Guide for the Estimation of Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear (CBRN) Casualties (AMedP-8(C)) to Consider the Impact of Medical Treatment on Casualty Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Botulism Survivor Injury Profile Stage 1 Stage 2 Stage 3 Signs and Symptoms (S/S) Fatigue; dry mouth; ptosis; diplopia (blurred or double vision...reflex; diplopia ; dysarthria; dysphonia; fatigue. Gradual reversal of muscle paralysis. The title of Table C-50 should be changed to read...signs and symptoms provided in Table C-50 should be changed to read: Fatigue; dry mouth; ptosis; diplopia (blurred or double vision); photophobia

  11. Internal carotid artery pseudo occlusion with embolic cerebral ischemia and low flow in the central retinal artery: a diagnostic challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Roehrer

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We present a rare case of internal carotid artery pseudoocclusion (ICAPO in a 60-yearold male Caucasian patient who experienced a reversible sudden loss of vision of the right eye for 10 min followed by recurrent blurring of vision as well as dysarthria and numbness in the left face. The referring ophthalmologist admitted the patient for suspicious occlusion of the internal carotid artery causing anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (AION.

  12. Cardiac transplantation in Friedreich ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Grace; Soman, Teesta; Wilson, Judith; George, Kristen; Mital, Seema; Dipchand, Anne I; McCabe, Jane; Logan, William; Kantor, Paul

    2012-09-01

    In this article, we describe a 14-year-old boy with a confirmed diagnosis of Friedreich ataxia who underwent cardiac transplantation for left ventricular failure secondary to dilated cardiomyopathy with restrictive physiology. His neurological status prior to transplantation reflected early signs of neurological disease, with evidence of dysarthria, weakness, mild gait impairment, and limb ataxia. We review the ethical issues considered during the process leading to the decision to offer cardiac transplantation.

  13. Cardiac Transplantation in Friedreich Ataxia

    OpenAIRE

    Yoon, Grace; Soman, Teesta; Wilson, Judith; George, Kristen; Mital, Seema; Dipchand, Anne I; McCabe, Jane; Logan, William; Kantor, Paul

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a 14-year-old boy with a confirmed diagnosis of Friedreich ataxia who underwent cardiac transplantation for left ventricular failure secondary to dilated cardiomyopathy with restrictive physiology. His neurological status prior to transplantation reflected early signs of neurologic disease, with evidence of dysarthria, weakness, mild gait impairment, and limb ataxia. We review the ethical issues considered during the process leading to the decision to offer cardiac ...

  14. Polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis associated with Fahr′s syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U Dundar

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Bilateral symmetric calcification involving striatum pallidum with or without deposits in the dentate nucleus, thalamus and white matter is commonly referred to as Fahr′s syndrome. Symptoms of the disorder may include deterioration of motor function, spasticity, spastic paralysis, dysarthria, dementia, seizures, headache and athetosis. The clinical and imaging abnormalities are restricted to the central nervous system (CNS. We report an unusual association of Fahr′s syndrome with polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis in a girl.

  15. Delayed oedema in the pyramidal tracts remote from intracerebral missile path following gunshot injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiex, R.; Uhl, E. [Department of Neurosurgery, Aachen University, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52057, Aachen (Germany); Thron, A. [Department of Neuroradiology, Aachen University, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52057, Aachen (Germany)

    2004-02-01

    A 60-year-old man developed a severe left hemiparesis and central facial palsy, accompanied by somnolence and dysarthria 9 days after a gunshot wound to the right temporal region, from which he slowly recovered over 3 months. MRI disclosed bilateral oedema of the pyramidal tracts. This was interpreted as a consequence of the impact of the pressure wave caused by the bullet, after excluding an infectious or vascular cause. (orig.)

  16. Pantethine treatment is effective in recovering the disease phenotype induced by ketogenic diet in a pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration mouse model

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration, caused by mutations in the PANK2 gene, is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by dystonia, dysarthria, rigidity, pigmentary retinal degeneration and brain iron accumulation. PANK2 encodes the mitochondrial enzyme pantothenate kinase type 2, responsible for the phosphorylation of pantothenate or vitamin B5 in the biosynthesis of co-enzyme A. A Pank2 knockout (Pank2−/− ) mouse model did not recapitulate the human disease but showed azo...

  17. Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration: altered mitochondria membrane potential and defective respiration in Pank2 knock-out mouse model

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) comprises a group of neurodegenerative disorders characterized by high brain content of iron and presence of axonal spheroids. Mutations in the PANK2 gene, which encodes pantothenate kinase 2, underlie an autosomal recessive inborn error of coenzyme A metabolism, called pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN). PKAN is characterized by dystonia, dysarthria, rigidity and pigmentary retinal degeneration. The pathogenesis of th...

  18. Association between coenzyme Q10 and glucose transporter (GLUT1) deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Yubero, Delia; O’Callaghan, Mar; Montero, Raquel; Ormazabal, Aida; Armstrong, Judith; Espinos, Carmina; Rodríguez, Maria A; Jou, Cristina; Castejon, Esperanza; Aracil, Maria A; Cascajo, Maria V; Gavilan, Angela; Briones, Paz; Jimenez-Mallebrera, Cecilia; Pineda, Mercedes

    2014-01-01

    Background It has been demonstrated that glucose transporter (GLUT1) deficiency in a mouse model causes a diminished cerebral lipid synthesis. This deficient lipid biosynthesis could contribute to secondary CoQ deficiency. We report here, for the first time an association between GLUT1 and coenzyme Q10 deficiency in a pediatric patient. Case presentation We report a 15 year-old girl with truncal ataxia, nystagmus, dysarthria and myoclonic epilepsy as the main clinical features. Blood lactate ...

  19. United States Air Force Summer Faculty Research Program (1984). Program Management Report. Volume 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-12-01

    Approximation Theory and Old Dominion University Numerical Analysis Mathematics Department Assigned: AL Norfolk, VA 23508 (804) 440-3911 xxi ","’-’" i...Squires High- and Low-Fit Men to Head- - - Down Rest Followed by Ortho- stasis and Exercise 135 Recomnmendations on Combustion Dr. Arthur M. Sterling...behavioral functions can be dramatic (dysarthria, dysphonia, dysphagia , dysdipsia, and, possibly, convulsions terminating in coma). These outcomes suggested

  20. [Pure motor hemiplegia with ipsilateral lingual palsy caused by pontine infarction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aidi, S; el Alaoui Faris, M; Essalhi, M; Jiddane, M; Chkili, T

    1996-12-01

    A 36 year old diabetic man developed a pure motor hemiplegia (PMH) associated with an ipsilateral lingual palsy. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a pontine infarct. Lingual palsies have never been reported in patients with PMH so far, but may be associated with other lacunar syndromes such as the "dysarthria-clumsy hand syndrome". This observation supports the hypothesis that corticohypoglossal pathways may have bilateral and assymetrical projections.

  1. Acute Motor Axonal Neuropathy (Aman) With Motor Conduction Blocks In Childhood; Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Yildirim, Serhan; Adviye, Rahşan; Gül, Hakan Levent; Türk Börü, Ülkü

    2016-01-01

    Objective Acute motor axonal neuropathy (AMAN), characterized with decreased compound muscle action potentials (CMAP) and absence of demyelinating findings in electrophysiological studies, is a subtype of Guillain-Barre Syndrome (GBS). A 4 yr-old male patient presented with ascending weakness, dysarthria and dysphagia to İstanbul Dr. Lütfi Kırdar Kartal Training and Research Hospital Neurology outpatient for three days to in 2012. Dysphonia, restricted eye movements, flaccid tetraplegia and a...

  2. Cerebellar involvement that occurred during treatment of Legionella pneumonia: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozlem Alici

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Legionnaires’ disease can appear with different levels of severity. A case of a previously healthy lady with communityacquiredpneumonia who progressed to severe acute respiratory distress syndrome and developed cerebellar dysfunctionis reported. In patients presenting with neurological symptoms after an episode of pneumonia, Legionella infectionshould be considered. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2013; 3(2: 83-85Key words: Legionella, cerebellar dysfunction, dysarthria, ataxia

  3. Hypereosinophilia with Multiple Thromboembolic Cerebral Infarcts and Focal Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Ju; Lee, Young Jun; Lee, Seung Ro; Park, Dong Woo; Kim, Hyun Young [Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    We report a case of hypereosinophilia causing multiple areas of cerebral infarcts. A 52-year-old Korean man presented with dysarthria and weakness in both arms. A brain MRI revealed multiple acute infarcts in the distal border zone with focal intracerebral hemorrhage, whereas a cerebral angiogram was not remarkable. The eosinophil count was 5,500/{mu}L and was accompanied by elevated cardiac enzyme levels. The pattern of cerebral infarcts and laboratory results suggest a thromboembolic infarction associated with hypereosinophilia.

  4. UNUSUAL PRESENTATION OF BRAINSTEM GLIOMA AS PROGRESSIVE BULBAR PALSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suma

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Brain stem gliomas/astrocytomas are slowly growing tumors affecting children and young adults. They usually present with unilateral cranial nerve palsies followed by long tract signs. Here we present a case report of a 42 year old male patient, who initially presented with thyrotoxicosis and slowly progressing dysphagia, dysarthria and dysphonia with no other long tract signs, and was later found to have brain stem glioma.

  5. Capecitabine Induced Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy: Do We Have Always to Switch off the Chemotherapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia Bougea

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Capecitabine is a well tolerated and safe 5-fluorouracil agent for adjuvant, neoadjuvant chemotherapy or metastatic cases. Neurological side effects require discontinuation of chemotherapy. We report this unique case of a 50-year-old female, who presented an isolated episode of dysarthria and ataxia under bevacizumab, capecitabine, and oxaliplatin treatment due to reversible multifocal leukoencephalopathy that did not recur after readministration of chemotherapy.

  6. Electronystagmography findings in spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3) and type 2 (SCA2)

    OpenAIRE

    Bianca Simone Zeigelboim; Hélio A.G. Teive; Rosane Sampaio; Ari Leon Jurkiewicz; Liberalesso,Paulo B.N.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the alterations observed in electronystagmography (ENG) of patients with spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) types 2 and 3. METHOD: Sixteen patients were studied and the following procedures were carried out: anamnesis, otorhinolaryngological and vestibular evaluations. RESULTS: The clinical findings in the entire group of patients were: gait disturbances (93.75%), dysarthria (43.75%), headache (43.75%), dizziness (37.50%) and dysphagia (37.50%). In the vestibular exam, the ro...

  7. Hereditary spastic paraplegia with cerebellar ataxia: a complex phenotype associated with a new SPG4 gene mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jørgen Erik; Johnson, B; Koefoed, Pernille

    2004-01-01

    Complex forms of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) are rare and usually transmitted in an autosomal recessive pattern. A family of four generations with autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (AD-HSP) and a complex phenotype with variably expressed co-existing ataxia, dysarthria...... relatively decreased regional cerebral blood flow in most of the cerebellum. We conclude that this kindred demonstrates a considerable overlap between cerebellar ataxia and spastic paraplegia, emphasizing the marked clinical heterogeneity of HSP associated with spastin mutations...

  8. Progressive loss of speech output and orofacial dyspraxia associated with frontal lobe hypometabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyrrell, P J; Kartsounis, L D; Frackowiak, R S; Findley, L J; Rossor, M N

    1991-01-01

    Three patients are described with slowly progressive loss of speech and dysarthria associated with orofacial dyspraxia, initially with intact written language, who subsequently developed more widespread cognitive abnormalities. Positron emission tomography (PET) revealed bifrontal hypometabolism in all of the patients, most marked in the inferior and lateral portions of both frontal lobes, with some extension into the parietal and temporal cortices in one case. These patients may represent a further example of focal progressive cortical degeneration. Images PMID:2056322

  9. Schwannoma (Neurilemmoma) on the Base of the Tongue: A Rare Clinical Case

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 20 Final Diagnosis: Schwannoma of the tongue Symptoms: Dysarthria • dysphagia Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Excision of the mass via trans-oral approach Specialty: Surgery Objective: Rare disease Background: Schwannomas are slow-growing benign tumors. They can arise from any peripheral nerve, including the cranial nerves (except the olfactory and optic nerves), spinal nerves, and autonomic nerves. Schwannomas of the head and neck account for 25–40% of all cases. However, ...

  10. Neural bases of childhood speech disorders: lateralization and plasticity for speech functions during development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liégeois, Frédérique J; Morgan, Angela T

    2012-01-01

    Current models of speech production in adults emphasize the crucial role played by the left perisylvian cortex, primary and pre-motor cortices, the basal ganglia, and the cerebellum for normal speech production. Whether similar brain-behaviour relationships and leftward cortical dominance are found in childhood remains unclear. Here we reviewed recent evidence linking motor speech disorders (apraxia of speech and dysarthria) and brain abnormalities in children and adolescents with developmental, progressive, or childhood-acquired conditions. We found no evidence that unilateral damage can result in apraxia of speech, or that left hemisphere lesions are more likely to result in dysarthria than lesion to the right. The few studies reporting on childhood apraxia of speech converged towards morphological, structural, metabolic or epileptic anomalies affecting the basal ganglia, perisylvian and rolandic cortices bilaterally. Persistent dysarthria, similarly, was commonly reported in individuals with syndromes and conditions affecting these same structures bilaterally. In conclusion, for the first time we provide evidence that longterm and severe childhood speech disorders result predominantly from bilateral disruption of the neural networks involved in speech production.

  11. Speech therapy and communication device: impact on quality of life and mood in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körner, Sonja; Sieniawski, Michael; Siniawski, Michael; Kollewe, Katja; Rath, Klaus Jan; Krampfl, Klaus; Zapf, Antonia; Dengler, Reinhard; Petri, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    Dysarthria has a drastic impact on the quality of life of ALS patients. Most patients suffering from dysarthria are offered speech therapy. Communication devices are prescribed less frequently. In the present study we investigated the impact of these therapeutic arrangements on quality of life in ALS patients. Thirty-eight ALS patients with dysarthria or anarthria, who underwent speech therapy and/or used communication devices answered three standardized questionnaires (Beck Depression Inventory - II (BDI), SF-36 Health Survey questionnaire (SF-36) and ALS Functional Rating Scale-revised (ALSFRS-R)) and were further interviewed about their experience with and benefit of speech therapy and communication devices. Most of the patients described a high impact of the communication device on their quality of life while the influence of speech therapy was rated less. By multiple regression analysis we confirmed an independent positive effect of communication device use on depression and psychological distress. In conclusion, communication systems improve or at least stabilize quality of life and mood in dysarthric ALS patients, and should be provided early in the disease course.

  12. Estimation of Phoneme-Specific HMM Topologies for the Automatic Recognition of Dysarthric Speech

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago-Omar Caballero-Morales

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dysarthria is a frequently occurring motor speech disorder which can be caused by neurological trauma, cerebral palsy, or degenerative neurological diseases. Because dysarthria affects phonation, articulation, and prosody, spoken communication of dysarthric speakers gets seriously restricted, affecting their quality of life and confidence. Assistive technology has led to the development of speech applications to improve the spoken communication of dysarthric speakers. In this field, this paper presents an approach to improve the accuracy of HMM-based speech recognition systems. Because phonatory dysfunction is a main characteristic of dysarthric speech, the phonemes of a dysarthric speaker are affected at different levels. Thus, the approach consists in finding the most suitable type of HMM topology (Bakis, Ergodic for each phoneme in the speaker’s phonetic repertoire. The topology is further refined with a suitable number of states and Gaussian mixture components for acoustic modelling. This represents a difference when compared with studies where a single topology is assumed for all phonemes. Finding the suitable parameters (topology and mixtures components is performed with a Genetic Algorithm (GA. Experiments with a well-known dysarthric speech database showed statistically significant improvements of the proposed approach when compared with the single topology approach, even for speakers with severe dysarthria.

  13. Consonant production and overall speech characteristics in school-aged children with cerebral palsy and speech impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordberg, Ann; Miniscalco, Carmela; Lohmander, Anette

    2014-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the speech characteristics of school-aged children with cerebral palsy (CP) and speech impairment at various cognitive levels. Nineteen children with a mean age of 11;2 years (9;2-12;9 years) with spastic, dyskinetic, and ataxic CP and speech impairment participated. Phonetic transcription of oral consonants, ratings of hypernasality, and severity of overall dysarthria, together with free field descriptions of respiration, voice quality, and prosody, were performed independently by two speech-language pathologists. The non-verbal cognitive level was also studied. More than half of the children had large problems with the articulation of consonants, and the children with ataxic CP were most affected. The majority was rated as having dysarthria, mostly mild, but hypernasality was rare. Gross motor problems were not significantly associated with the articulation of consonants or the severity of dysarthria, whereas non-verbal cognitive level was. This underlines the importance of taking non-verbal cognitive level into account, when designing individual speech treatment programs for this group of children. Finally, a careful examination of the articulation of consonants is recommended in order to study speech production thoroughly in children with CP.

  14. Predicting speech intelligibility with a multiple speech subsystems approach in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jimin; Hustad, Katherine C; Weismer, Gary

    2014-10-01

    Speech acoustic characteristics of children with cerebral palsy (CP) were examined with a multiple speech subsystems approach; speech intelligibility was evaluated using a prediction model in which acoustic measures were selected to represent three speech subsystems. Nine acoustic variables reflecting different subsystems, and speech intelligibility, were measured in 22 children with CP. These children included 13 with a clinical diagnosis of dysarthria (speech motor impairment [SMI] group) and 9 judged to be free of dysarthria (no SMI [NSMI] group). Data from children with CP were compared to data from age-matched typically developing children. Multiple acoustic variables reflecting the articulatory subsystem were different in the SMI group, compared to the NSMI and typically developing groups. A significant speech intelligibility prediction model was obtained with all variables entered into the model (adjusted R2 = .801). The articulatory subsystem showed the most substantial independent contribution (58%) to speech intelligibility. Incremental R2 analyses revealed that any single variable explained less than 9% of speech intelligibility variability. Children in the SMI group had articulatory subsystem problems as indexed by acoustic measures. As in the adult literature, the articulatory subsystem makes the primary contribution to speech intelligibility variance in dysarthria, with minimal or no contribution from other systems.

  15. E-learning-based speech therapy: a web application for speech training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beijer, Lilian J; Rietveld, Toni C M; van Beers, Marijn M A; Slangen, Robert M L; van den Heuvel, Henk; de Swart, Bert J M; Geurts, Alexander C H

    2010-03-01

    Abstract In The Netherlands, a web application for speech training, E-learning-based speech therapy (EST), has been developed for patients with dysarthria, a speech disorder resulting from acquired neurological impairments such as stroke or Parkinson's disease. In this report, the EST infrastructure and its potentials for both therapists and patients are elucidated. EST provides patients with dysarthria the opportunity to engage in intensive speech training in their own environment, in addition to undergoing the traditional face-to-face therapy. Moreover, patients with chronic dysarthria can use EST to independently maintain the quality of their speech once the face-to-face sessions with their speech therapist have been completed. This telerehabilitation application allows therapists to remotely compose speech training programs tailored to suit each individual patient. Moreover, therapists can remotely monitor and evaluate changes in the patient's speech. In addition to its value as a device for composing, monitoring, and carrying out web-based speech training, the EST system compiles a database of dysarthric speech. This database is vital for further scientific research in this area.

  16. Efficacy of Qiangli Yiqi Formula on Myasthenia Gravis and Acoustic Evaluation%强力益气方治疗重症肌无力的疗效及声学评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    盛昭园; 董云; 俞淼青; 应汝炯; 胡粤杭; 陈钢; 李庚和

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the efficacy of qiangli yiqi formula on myasthenia gravis( MG)and computer acoustic evaluation, Methods Eighty patients of MG of spleen qi deficiency type were divided into a dysarthria group(40 cases)and a non - dysarthria group(40 cases), Each group was subdivided into a male group and a female group,20 cases in each one, The modified qiangli yiqi formula was adopted and the duration of treatment was 6 weeks, Additionally,the healthy voice control subgroups were set up,for males and females separately,20 cases in each one, The absolute score scale,TCM spleen deficiency scale and computer acoustic detection including jitter,shimmer,F0 SD and NNE were selected for the quantitative comparison of efficacy and efficacy assessment before and after treatment separately, Results The total effective rate was 85, 00% in the dysarthria group, The differences in F0 SD,shimmer and NNE were significant as compared with those before treatment (P <0, 05,P <0, 01), The total effective rate was 95, 00% in the non - dysarthria group, The difference in acoustic detection was not apparent, Conclusion Qiangli yiqi formula achieves the definite efficacy on dysarthria in MG patients, The acoustic evaluation method is significant clinically in the diagnosis and efficacy evaluation on MG dysarthria.%目的:研究强力益气方治疗重症肌无力( Myasthenia gravis,MG)的疗效及计算机声学评价。方法将80例脾气虚型重症肌无力( MG)患者,分为MG构音障碍组40例,MG非构音障碍组40例,每组又分为男女两小组,每小组20例。均采用强力益气方加减治疗,疗程6周。另设健康嗓音对照组男女各20例。治疗前后分别选用绝对评分量表、脾气虚型中医症候量表、计算机声学检测包括基频微扰( jitter)、振幅微扰( shimmer)、F0标准差和标准声门噪声能量( NNE),对疗效进行量化比较及疗效评定。结果构音障碍组总有效率85,00%

  17. Sensorimotor speech disorders in Parkinson's disease: Programming and execution deficits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Zazo Ortiz

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: Dysfunction in the basal ganglia circuits is a determining factor in the physiopathology of the classic signs of Parkinson's disease (PD and hypokinetic dysarthria is commonly related to PD. Regarding speech disorders associated with PD, the latest four-level framework of speech complicates the traditional view of dysarthria as a motor execution disorder. Based on findings that dysfunctions in basal ganglia can cause speech disorders, and on the premise that the speech deficits seen in PD are not related to an execution motor disorder alone but also to a disorder at the motor programming level, the main objective of this study was to investigate the presence of sensorimotor disorders of programming (besides the execution disorders previously described in PD patients. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in a sample of 60 adults matched for gender, age and education: 30 adult patients diagnosed with idiopathic PD (PDG and 30 healthy adults (CG. All types of articulation errors were reanalyzed to investigate the nature of these errors. Interjections, hesitations and repetitions of words or sentences (during discourse were considered typical disfluencies; blocking, episodes of palilalia (words or syllables were analyzed as atypical disfluencies. We analysed features including successive self-initiated trial, phoneme distortions, self-correction, repetition of sounds and syllables, prolonged movement transitions, additions or omissions of sounds and syllables, in order to identify programming and/or execution failures. Orofacial agility was also investigated. Results: The PDG had worse performance on all sensorimotor speech tasks. All PD patients had hypokinetic dysarthria. Conclusion: The clinical characteristics found suggest both execution and programming sensorimotor speech disorders in PD patients.

  18. Clinical speech impairment in Parkinson′s disease, progressive supranuclear palsy, and multiple system atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachin S

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Speech abnormalities are common to the three Parkinsonian syndromes, namely Parkinson′s disease (PD, progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP and multiple system atrophy (MSA, the nature and severity of which is of clinical interest and diagnostic value. Aim: To evaluate the clinical pattern of speech impairment in patients with PD, PSP and MSA and to identify significant differences on quantitative speech parameters when compared to controls. Design and Setting: Cross-sectional study conducted in a tertiary medical teaching institute. Materials and Methods: Twenty-two patients with PD, 18 patients with PSP and 20 patients with MSA and 10 age-matched healthy controls were recruited over a period of 1.5 years. The patients were clinically evaluated for the presence and characteristics of dysarthria. This was followed by quantitative assessment of three parameters: maximum phonation time (MPT, semantic fluency and reading speed. The outcome measures were compared between the patient groups and with controls. Results: Patients with PD had hypophonic monotonous speech with occasional rushes of speech while patients with MSA and PSP had mixed dysarthria with ataxic and spastic elements respectively. All quantitative parameters were affected when compared to controls ( P values < 0.001, 0.012 and 0.008 respectively. Maximum phonation time was significantly less in PSP when compared to MSA and PD ( P =0.015. Reading speed also showed a similar trend which was not statistically significant. Semantic fluency was comparable in all three groups. Conclusion: Dysarthria in PD, PSP and MSA have many overlapping but certain distinctive features as well which could serve as a diagnostic clue. Patients with PSP had profound speech impairment probably indicative of the more severe frontostriatial pathology.

  19. Are Upper-Body Axial Symptoms a Feature of Early Parkinson’s Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Caroline; Baille, Guillaume; Delval, Arnaud; Tard, Céline; Perez, Thierry; Danel-Buhl, Nicolas; Seguy, David; Labreuche, Julien; Duhamel, Alain; Delliaux, Marie; Dujardin, Kathy; Defebvre, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Background Axial disorders are considered to appear late in the course of Parkinson’s disease (PD). The associated impact on quality of life (QoL) and survival and the lack of an effective treatment mean that understanding and treating axial disorders is a key challenge. However, upper-body axial disorders (namely dysarthria, swallowing and breathing disorders) have never been prospectively assessed in early-stage PD patients. Objectives To characterize upper-body axial symptoms and QoL in consecutive patients with early-stage PD. Methods We prospectively enrolled 66 consecutive patients with early-stage PD (less than 3 years of disease progression) and assessed dysarthria, dysphagia and respiratory function (relative to 36 controls) using both objective and patient-reported outcomes. Results The mean disease duration was 1.26 years and the mean UPDRS motor score was 19.4 out of 108. 74% of the patients presented slight dysarthria (primarily dysprosodia). Men appeared to be more severely affected (i.e. dysphonia). This dysfunction was strongly correlated with low swallowing speed (despite the absence of complaints about dysphagia), respiratory insufficiency and poor QoL. Videofluorography showed that oral-phase swallowing disorders affected 60% of the 31 tested patients and that pharyngeal-phase disorders affected 21%. 24% of the patients reported occasional dyspnea, which was correlated with anxiety in women but not in men. Marked diaphragmatic dysfunction was suspected in 42% of the patients (predominantly in men). Conclusion Upper body axial symptoms were frequent in men with early-stage PD, whereas women presented worst non-motor impairments. New assessment methods are required because currently available tools do not reliably detect these upper-body axial disorders. PMID:27654040

  20. Vowel articulation in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skodda, Sabine; Visser, Wenke; Schlegel, Uwe

    2011-07-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze vowel articulation in Parkinson's disease (PD) speakers suffering from mild hypokinetic dysarthria as compared with healthy controls in correlation to net speech rate (NSR) and intonation variability (F(0)SD). Furthermore, we intended to reveal possible correlations among vowel articulation, global motor performance, and stage of disease. We examined 68 PD patients (34 male) with mild dysarthria (1 point according to the "speech" item 18 of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale/UPDRS-III) and 32 age-matched control persons (16 male) using a reading task with subsequent acoustical analysis. F1 and F2 frequency values of the vowels /a/, /i/, and /u/ were extracted from defined words within the text. Description of vowel articulation was based on measures of triangular vowel space area (tVSA) and Vowel Articulation Index (VAI). PD patients were scored according to UPDRS-III and Hoehn and Yahr stages. VAI values were significantly reduced in male and female PD patients as compared with the accordant control group, whereas tVSA was only reduced in the male PD speakers. NSR was negatively correlated to tVSA and VAI only in female PD speakers. No correlations were seen between vowel articulation and UPDRS-III and stage of disease. VAI seem to be superior to tVSA in the description of impaired vowel articulation in PD. Reduced VAI could be detected in male and female parkinsonian speakers suffering only from mild dysarthria with preserved speech intelligibility and therefore might be applicable to identify subclinical changes of vowel articulation. Moreover, some aspects of altered speech performance in PD seem to feature some gender-specific patterns, which justify further investigation. Copyright © 2011 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Bilateral maculopathy in a patient with ataxia telangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioia, Lauren V; Bonsall, Dean; Moffett, Kathryn; Leys, Monique

    2016-02-01

    We report a case of toxoplasmosis with bilateral maculopathy in a 7-year-old boy diagnosed with ataxia telangiectasia (AT) at age 6. AT manifests as ataxia, apraxia, telangiectasia, and dysarthria. Common ophthalmologic findings in AT include fine conjunctival telangiectasia. Patients also suffer from recurrent sinopulmonary infections; however, serious opportunistic infection is rarely diagnosed. At 8 years of age he developed disseminated Toxoplasma gondii (toxoplasmosis) infection and meningoencephalitis. This ophthalmologic finding and the subsequent toxoplasmosis meningoencephalitis have not been previously reported in AT. Copyright © 2016 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Pseudopapillary fibroelastoma of the mitral valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madu, E; Myles, J; Fraker, T D

    1995-01-01

    Papillary fibroelastomas are well-recognized benign cardiac neoplasms. They are primarily asymptomatic, but occasionally are associated with neurologic and cardiac symptoms. Pseudopapillary fibroelastomas presenting with usual clinical and echocardiographic manifestations of papillary fibroelastoma but lacking characteristic histologic features have not been described previously. This article describes a 42-year-old, previously healthy female admitted with sudden hemiparesis and dysarthria. Symptoms completely resolved within 4 days. Extensive investigations revealed no etiology except for a pedunculated mitral valve mass with echocardiographic appearance suggestive of papillary fibroelastoma. Histologic staining, however, failed to reveal characteristic features of papillary fibroelastoma.

  3. Clinical and electrodiagnostic findings in cyhalothrine poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keivan Basiri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute onset bulbar symptoms with respiratory failure and descending paralysis may occur in several neuromuscular disorders including variants of Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS, diphtheria, botulism and toxins. We present a 51-year-old man who presented with complains of ptosis and dyspnea following pyrethroids spraying in an enclosed area for eradication of flea. Within 5-6 days of admission limb weakness, dysphagia, dysarthria, blurred vision, diplopia, tremor and respiratory distress added to previous symptoms. Temporal profile of events after exposure, development of similar symptoms in patient's son, electrodiagnostic findings and exclusion of other etiologies confirms intoxication etiology. We reviewed the literature and provide an extensive electrodiagnostic overview.

  4. Mood Disorder as the Presenting Manifestation of Demyelination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Tapos

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To report an unusual presenting manifestation of multiple sclerosis in a teenager. Case Report: We report the case of a 16-year-old male who was diagnosed with schizoaffective disorder a year prior to his neurological consultation. Neurological examination showed evidence of mild lower extremity spasticity with ataxia and dysarthria. Imaging revealed lesions suggestive of multiple sclerosis. Conclusion: An organic basis for psychiatric disorders is often overlooked. Children presenting with symptoms suggestive of a mood disorder, decline in cognition or psychosis deserve a detailed neurological examination and appropriate imaging if indicated, before starting them on antidepressant or neuroleptic medication.

  5. A new autosomal recessive non-progressive congenital cerebellar ataxia associated with mental retardation, optic atrophy, and skin abnormalities (CAMOS) maps to chromosome 15q24-q26 in a large consanguineous Lebanese Druze Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delague, Valérie; Bareil, Corinne; Bouvagnet, Patrice; Salem, Nabiha; Chouery, Eliane; Loiselet, Jacques; Mégarbané, André; Claustres, Mireille

    2002-03-01

    Congenital cerebellar ataxias are a heterogeneous group of non-progressive disorders characterized by hypotonia and developmental delay followed by the appearance of ataxia, and often associated with dysarthria, mental retardation, and atrophy of the cerebellum. We report the mapping of a disease gene in a large inbred Lebanese Druze family, with five cases of a new form of non-progressive autosomal recessive congenital ataxia associated with optic atrophy, severe mental retardation, and structural skin abnormalities, to a 3.6-cM interval on chromosome 15q24-15q26.

  6. Wallenberg Syndrome with Associated Motor Weakness in a Two-Week-Postpartum Female

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W. Louis

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A 30-year-old, right-handed female presented 2 weeks postpartum with acute-onset severe headache, vertigo, and vomiting. Initial neurologic examination illustrated lingual dysarthria, horizontal nystagmus, right dysmetria on finger-to-nose testing, and weakness of the extremities. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a large, left lateral medullary infarction (Wallenberg syndrome with cephalad extension into the ipsilateral pons as well as involvement of the left middle cerebellar peduncle. The patient was discharged 3 weeks later to an inpatient rehabilitation facility with gradual improvement of her symptoms.

  7. Intracranial subdural hematoma after spinal anesthesia for cesarean section: Case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uma Srivastava

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Subdural hematoma (SDH is a rare but serious complication of spinal anesthesia. We report a case of intracranial SDH in a patient developing 11 days after spinal anesthesia for cesarean section. The patient complained of headache on the 2nd post-operative day that was relieved by analgesics, bed rest and hydration. Later she presented with severe headache, vomiting, dizziness, dysarthria, irritability and somnolence. Diagnosis of the left sided SDH was confirmed radiologically and treated surgically. The patient recovered completely. The report highlights the need of considering the possibility of SDH in patients when postdural puncture headache is prolonged or recurs after a headache free period with neurological symptoms.

  8. F-18 FDG PET findings for Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hye Lim; Yoo, Ie Ryung; Park Sonya Young Ju [Dept. of of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of MedicineThe Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease is a rare multisystemic granulomatous autoimmune disorder affecting pigmented tissues such as the choroid, meninges, inner ear, and the skin. Neurologic symptoms are usually mild. Clinical manifestations include generalized muscle weakness, headache, meningismus, vertigo, decreased visual acuity, hearing loss and mental changes ranging from mild confusion to psychosis, hemiparesis, dysarthria, and aphasia. Seizures are very rare. We describe a case of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (F-18 FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) and software-fused PET-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease with seizure.

  9. A new member of the multidisciplinary ALS team: the otolaryngologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Adam D; Griffin, Garrett R; Hogikyan, Norman D; Feldman, Eva L

    2012-02-01

    The multidisciplinary approach to treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) has improved the overall care of patients suffering from this disease ( 1 , 2 ). This approach typically has included neurologists, physiatrists, occupational therapists, respiratory therapists and speech therapists. Dysphonia, dysarthria, and dysphagia are three of the most common bulbar manifestations of ALS, and are often the presenting symptoms in bulbar-onset patients. Despite this, otolaryngologists are often not included in ALS management until a tracheostomy is considered. The otolaryngologist can play an important role in early diagnosis and subsequent management of bulbar manifestations of ALS, and would be a valuable member of the multidisciplinary team.

  10. Isolated lingual involvement in Wilson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Neera; Joshi, Laxmikant; Duggal, Ashish; Puri, Vinod; Khwaja, Geeta Anjum

    2015-01-01

    Lingual involvement can occur in a variety of neurological disorders including pyramidal, extrapyramidal and lower motor neuron disorders. It can be seen in the form of tremor, bradykinesia, dystonia, atrophy and weakness of tongue movements and can clinically present as difficulty in swallowing and dysarthria which can be a source of great discomfort to the patient. We describe a patient who presented with isolated lingual involvement and was diagnosed to have Wilsons's disease. This case emphasizes the clinical variability in presentation of Wilson's disease and importance of early clinical diagnosis.

  11. A pernicious leucoencephalopathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Molloy, A

    2012-02-01

    Pernicious anaemia may manifest various neurological symptoms and signs ranging from the subtle to the dramatic. We describe a young man with cobalamin deficiency presenting with sensorimotor deficits, ataxia, dysarthria, mild cognitive deterioration and altered mood of insidious onset. The MRI brain findings were in keeping with a leucoencephalopathy without evidence of MRI changes in the spinal cord. This constellation of features has been reported rarely. His response to treatment as well as the marked improvement of the leucoencephalopathy on imaging suggests at least partial reversibility of the neurological deficits.

  12. Embolic Stroke Caused by Staphylococcus lugdunensis Endocarditis Complicating Vasectomy in a 36-Year-Old Man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Manova; Loftsgaarden, Megan; Chukwudelunzu, Felix

    2015-12-01

    Staphylococcus lugdunensis is part of the native flora in the inguinal region of the body. Inguinal surgeries, such as vasectomy, place carriers of this aggressive pathogen at risk for contamination. Native-valve endocarditis caused by coagulase-negative S. lugdunensis has a rapid and complicated clinical course. The pathogenicity of this organism is not limited to cardiac valvular destruction. We report the case of a 36-year-old man who presented with S. lugdunensis endocarditis, dysarthria, and hemiparesis 5 weeks after a vasectomy. To our knowledge, this is the first report of embolic stroke caused by S. lugdunensis endocarditis. In addition, we discuss the relevant medical literature.

  13. [Hemiparesis and facial palsy caused by methotrexate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda Arenas, E; García Corzo, J; Franco Ospina, L

    2013-12-01

    Methotrexate used in the treatment of acute lymphocytic leukemia, can cause neurotoxicity, including a rare presentation with hemiparesis. We describe two teenagers, who during the implementation of the M phase of the protocol, suffered hemiparesis, facial paresis and dysarthria which quickly reversed. Leukemia involvement of the central nervous system and stroke, were ruled out. We briefly review the pathophysiology of methotrexate neurotoxicity, the characteristics of the focal paresis presentation and magnetic resonance image findings. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. Free Floating Thrombus in Carotid Artery in a Patient with Recurrent Strokes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Moni; Roy, Ashish Kumar; DeSanto, Jeffrey R; Abdelsalam, Murad

    2017-01-01

    We present a case of 72-year-old male with reported past medical history of recurrent transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) presenting with myriad of neurological symptoms. Patient was transferred from outlying hospital with complaints of right sided facial droop and dysarthria. Computed tomography angiography (CTA) showed high grade proximal left internal carotid artery (ICA) stenosis along with interesting finding of a free floating thrombus (FFT) in the left ICA. After discussion with the neurosurgical team, our case was treated conservatively with combination of antiplatelet therapy with Aspirin and anticoagulation with Warfarin without recurrence of TIAs or strokes on six-month follow-up.

  15. Primaer cerebral vaskulitis hos børn

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pradsgaard, Dan Østergaard; Stausbøl-Grøn, Brian; Østergaard, John Rosendahl;

    2010-01-01

    detected by magnetic resonance were diagnosed with primary CNS vasculitis. Age at onset was three to 12 years. Acutely acquired hemiparesis was seen in five children, two had facial palsy. Among other symptoms were headache, ataxia, dysarthria, loss of consciousness and seizures. Only modest changes......INTRODUCTION: Primary cerebral vasculitis in children is a newly recognized, rare inflammatory condition affecting the vessels of the brain. It is characterized by newly acquired neurological deficit(s) with angiographic or histological evidence of central nervous system (CNS) vasculitis...

  16. SCA28

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenstrup, Kirsten; Nielsen, Troels Tolstrup; Aidt, Frederik

    2017-01-01

    The spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA) are a group of rare inherited neurodegenerative diseases characterized by slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia, resulting in unsteady gait, clumsiness, and dysarthria. The disorders are predominantly inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. Mutations in the gene...... AFG3L2 that encodes a subunit of the mitochondrial m-AAA protease have previously been shown to cause spinocerebellar ataxia type 28 (SCA28). Here, we present the clinical phenotypes of three patients from a family with autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia and show by molecular genetics and in silico...

  17. Subcortical anarthria: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ure, J; Morasso, C; Funes, J; Ollari, J; Videla, H; Diez, M

    2001-07-01

    A 56-year-old right-handed male with a history of hypertension and diabetes presented two episodes of stroke: The first affected territory was the left anterior coroidal artery (capsular and paracapsular infarcts at the level of the genu and posterior arm of the internal capsule) and the second was the right thalamus, due to a hematoma. Following the first stroke, the patient developed severe dysarthria and after the second stroke remained anarthric. The pathophysiology of the disorder is discussed, and the role of the left and right thalamus as far as speech is concerned is reviewed.

  18. On the intersection of phonetic detail and the organization of interaction: clinical connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Gareth; Local, John

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of language use in real-world contexts poses particular methodological challenges. We codify responses to these challenges as a series of methodological imperatives. To demonstrate the relevance of these imperatives to clinical investigation, we present analyses of single episodes of interaction where one participant has a speech and/or language impairment: atypical prosody, echolalia and dysarthria. We demonstrate there is considerable heuristic and analytic value in taking this approach to analysing the organization of interaction involving individuals with a speech and/or language impairment.

  19. Augmentative and alternative communication intervention for persons with severe aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Molly; DeRuyter, Frank

    1995-03-01

    Many individuals with severe aphasia are effective in using nonverbal methods of communication to meet their wants and needs. However, their difficulty lies in conveying specific and novel information. Through the use of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) techniques, severely aphasie individuals can share unique information during interactions. This article focuses on designing AAC intervention programs based on the individual's residual strengths, communication needs, and treatment setting. Individuals who have suffered brainstem strokes or individuals with dysarthria as the primary factor influencing communication are not discussed. Rather, this articlefocuses on individuals with permanent communication disorders due to severe aphasia.

  20. Familial pellagra-like skin rash with neurological manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freundlich, E; Statter, M; Yatziv, S

    1981-01-01

    A 14-year-old boy of Arabic origin presented with a pellagra-like rash and neurological manifestations including ataxia, dysarthria, nystagmus, and coma. There was a striking response to oral nicotinamide. The laboratory findings were not typical of Hartnup disease: aminoaciduris and indicanuria were absent and there was no evidence of tryptophan malabsorption. Tryptophan loading did not induce tryptophanuria nor did it increase excretion of xanthurenic or kynurenic acids. These findings support the possibility of a block in tryptophan degradation. The family history suggests a genetically-determined disorder. PMID:6451201

  1. Skull Base Clear Cell Carcinoma, Metastasis of Renal Primary Tumor: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilson Sepúlveda

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We report on a patient who presented with cranial nerve VI bilateral paresis, absence of pharyngeal reflex, dysarthria, right tongue deviation, and right facial paralysis. Imaging studies showed an expansive process in the cranial base with clivus and petrous apex osteolysis. A biopsy confirmed the presence of clear cell adenocarcinoma and suspicion of renal tumor metastases. Abdominal imaging studies revealed a mass in the right kidney. Consequently, radiotherapy was performed, and the patient was enrolled in a palliative care and pain control program.

  2. Posterior ankyloglossia: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Michael W; Bloom, David C

    2009-06-01

    Ankyloglossia, or tongue-tie, refers to an abnormally short lingual frenulum. Ankyloglossia is a recognized but poorly defined condition and has been reported to cause feeding difficulties, dysarthria, dyspnea, and social or mechanical problems. In infants, the most concerning symptoms are feeding difficulties and inability to breastfeed. While a recent trend toward breastfeeding has brought frenulectomy back into favor, the literature regarding treatment remains inconclusive. We report a case of posterior ankyloglossia with anterior mucosal hooding and a simple, safe, and effective way to treat it to improve breastfeeding.

  3. Alcoholism with central pontine demyelination: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohit Arora

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Central pontine myelinolysis is a non-inflammatory demyelinating disease characterized by loss of myelin with relative neuron sparing, associated with rapid correction of hyponatremia and sometimes hypernatremia or chronic alcoholism. We are reporting a case of 52 year old male patient who was chronic alcoholic from past 20 years, presented to us with complaints of altered sensorium and dysarthria of 5 days duration .He was investigated and diagnosed as case of central pontine myelinosis associated with chronic alcoholism. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2014; 3(1.000: 230-232

  4. Cardiac Fibroelastoma: A Rare Cause of Stroke in Young Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Mirdamadi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 26-year-old man presenting with a transient episode of dysarthria and dizziness, 3 weeks prior to admission, was referred to our center to be evaluated for transient ischemic attack (TIA. The patient had been previously admitted to a different hospital and echocardiography was reported normal at that center, but upon presenting to our institution strand-like masses in the left ventricle (LV were detected. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE revealed two distinct mobile LV masses suggesting a diagnosis of papillary fibroelastoma. CT angiography and histopathological studies confirmed this diagnosis.

  5. Painless Legs and Moving Toes as an Initial Presentation of Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Se Mi Oh

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Painless legs and moving toes is an unusual syndrome, which has not previously been reported as an initial presentation of ischemic stroke. We encountered a 78-year-old woman who developed dysarthria and involuntary movement of her left toes that was clinically regarded as painless legs and moving toes. These symptoms appeared abruptly and simultaneously as the initial symptoms of stroke, and improved gradually with conservative management by intravenous hydration for a month. We suggest that, in our case, a cortical brain lesion caused by ischemic stroke might be associated with the development of painless legs and moving toes.

  6. Anesthetic considerations in Leigh disease: Case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Sulieman Terkawi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Leigh disease is an extremely rare disorder, characterized by a progressive neurodegenerative course, with subacute necrotizing encephalomyelopathy. It usually presents in infancy with developmental delay, seizures, dysarthria, and ataxia. These patients may also develop episodes of lactic acidosis that usually lead to respiratory failure and death. Due to the rarity of the condition, the most appropriate anesthetic plan remains unclear. We present a patient with Leigh disease, who required general anesthesia. The pathogenesis of the disease is discussed and previous reports of perioperative care from the literature are reviewed.

  7. Radiation necrosis of the optic chiasm, optic tract, hypothalamus, and upper pons after radiotherapy for pituitary adenoma, detected by gadolinium-enhanced, T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging: Case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tachibana, O.; Yamaguchi, N.; Yamashima, T.; Yamashita, J. (Univ. of Kanazawa School of Medicine (Japan))

    1990-10-01

    A 26-year-old woman was treated for a prolactin secreting pituitary adenoma by surgery and radiotherapy (5860 rads). Fourteen months later, she developed right hemiparesis and dysarthria. A T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scan using gadolinium contrast showed a small, enhanced lesion in the upper pons. Seven months later, she had a sudden onset of loss of vision, and radiation optic neuropathy was diagnosed. A T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scan showed widespread gadolinium-enhanced lesions in the optic chiasm, optic tract, and hypothalamus. Magnetic resonance imaging is indispensable for the early diagnosis of radiation necrosis, which is not visualized by radiography or computed tomography.

  8. Hallervorden-Spatz disease: 2 cases of siblings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Jong Gi; Kim, In One; Kim, Woo Sun; Yeon, Kyung Mo [College of Medicine Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-04-15

    We report two patients with Hallervorden-Spatz disease, who were diagnosed by same MR findings of marked low signal intensity in the globus and substantia nigra. They presented with ataxic and spastic gait, intention tremor, delayed mental development, and dysarthria. They were 7 year-old male and 8 year-old female siblings, who were healthy until 3 years of age when they suffered from progressive symptoms. T2-weighted images showed marked low signal intensity in the globus pallidus and substantia nigra indicating an increased iron deposition, and it might suggest Hallervorden-Spatz disease.

  9. A case of neuro-Behcet's disease: comparison of neurological symptoms with PET, SPECT, and MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Wook; An, Min; Kim, So Yon; Kim, Young Jung; Cho, Min Koo; Lee, Gwon Jun; Lim, Sang Mun; Hong, Sung Woon; Choi, Chang Woon [Korea Cancer Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-08-01

    We describe a 27-year-old man who developed gait disturbance and dysarthria 2 years after the onset of cardinal symptoms of Behect's disease. Position emission tomography with {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose revealed severe hypometabolism in the cerebellum, in accordance with cerebellar symptoms and signs of the patients. However, single-photon emission tomography with {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO and {sup 99m}Tc-ECD did not disclose significant perfusion abnormalities in the brain. Routine brain magnetic resonance imaging did not show signal abnormalities. The findings of imaging studies compared with neurological manifestations of the patient are discussed.

  10. 小脑性缄默症研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    延鹏翔; 王树荚; 张汉伟

    2000-01-01

    @@ 小脑本身的病变或其传入、传出通路受损后可因语言肌肉的共济运动失调而导致构音障碍(dysarthria).此类病人除表现出这种运动失调性构音障碍外,多伴有肢体共济运动失调、眼球震颤等小脑的其他体征[1,2].

  11. Thalamic hemorrhage in a 4-year-old child induced by nephro-vascular hypertension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bianchi, E.; Savasta, S.; Torcetta, F.; Solmi, M.; Beluffi, G.; Gajno, T.M.

    1989-08-01

    A child affected by cardiomyopathy from the age of 12 months suddenly manifested right hemiparesis and dysarthria at the age of 48/12 years. Emergency brain CT showed a hemorrhage in progress in the left thalamic area. A serve from of hypertension was concomitant and resisted all pharmacological treatment. Retrograde transfemural aortography pointed out an atrophy of the right renal artery. This finding, together with the high renin and aldosterone values, indicated a nephrogenic hypertension causing both the cardiomyopathy found at 12 months of age and the endocranial hermorrhage. Right nephrectomy led to the normalization of blood pressure. (orig.).

  12. Fast Frequency-Weighted Formant Tracking Using Analysis by Synthesis Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGJianping; YANYonghong

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we present our current research on formant trajectory estimation using analysis by synthesis method for English Dysarthric speech. The algorithm is implemented in both frequency domain and time domain. Theoretic background and implementation issues are discussed in detail. Experiments show that the frequency-domain implementation is faster than the timedomain implementation. Our algorithm performance is comparable to those from LPC pole-zero analysis method using Esps/Xwaves+. The frequency domain algorithm is also applied to analyze speakers' vowel tri-angle properties using our dysarthria database.

  13. Tegmental pontine hemorrhages: clinical features and prognostic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancman, M; Norscini, J; Mesropian, H; Bardeci, C; Bauso, T; Granillo, R

    1992-05-01

    We report six patients with partial, predominantly paramedian, tegmental pontine hemorrhages. Constant clinical manifestations consisted of: ipsilateral miosis, horizontal gaze paresis, lower motor neuron facial paresis, contralateral hemisensory loss and mild and transitory hemiparesis, dysarthria and mild or no compromise of consciousness. Five out of six were hypertensive. All patients survived with mild sequelae, oculomotor disturbances being the most persistent deficit. We found in our patients that a transverse diameter of less than 17 mm, unilaterality of the injury and absence of coma were the major indicators of a favorable outcome.

  14. Isolated lingual involvement in Wilson′s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neera Choudhary

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lingual involvement can occur in a variety of neurological disorders including pyramidal, extrapyramidal and lower motor neuron disorders. It can be seen in the form of tremor, bradykinesia, dystonia, atrophy and weakness of tongue movements and can clinically present as difficulty in swallowing and dysarthria which can be a source of great discomfort to the patient. We describe a patient who presented with isolated lingual involvement and was diagnosed to have Wilsons′s disease. This case emphasizes the clinical variability in presentation of Wilson′s disease and importance of early clinical diagnosis.

  15. rt-PA with Antithrombotic Therapies in a Case with Capsular Warning Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuseya, Yasuhiro; Kawamura, Miyuki; Matsuda, Eri; Takada, Kozue; Watanabe, Kiwamu; Fujitake, Junko; Nakaya, Yoshifumi

    2017-01-01

    We herein report a case of capsular warning syndrome (CWS) that was successfully treated with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA). A 70-year-old woman had repeated stereotyped transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) of right hemiparesis and dysarthria. After hospitalization, argatroban, aspirin, and cilostazol were started but were ineffective. Thirteen hours after the first episode of TIAs, severe symptoms occurred. Magnetic resonance imaging showed acute infarctions in the internal capsule to corona radiata, so we used rt-PA. Since then, the TIAs have not occurred, and the symptoms have considerably improved. This case suggests that rt-PA might be effective and safe for use in treating CWS. PMID:28202868

  16. Manganese-Induced Parkinsonism due to Ephedrone Abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Sikk

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available During recent years, a syndrome of hypokinesia, dysarthria, dystonia, and postural impairment, related to intravenous use of a “designer” psychostimulant derived from pseudoephedrine using potassium permanganate as the oxidant, has been observed in drug addicts in several countries in Eastern Europe with some cases also in Western countries. A levodopa unresponsive Parkinsonian syndrome occurs within a few months of abusing the homemade drug mixture containing ephedrone (methcathinone and manganese. The development of this neurological syndrome has been attributed to toxic effects of manganese, but the role of the psychostimulant ephedrone is unclear. This paper describes the clinical syndrome, results of neuroimaging, and therapeutic attempts.

  17. CAG repeat polymorphism in the androgen receptor (AR) gene of SBMA patients and a control group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sułek, Anna; Hoffman-Zacharska, Dorota; Krysa, Wioletta; Szirkowiec, Walentyna; Fidziańska, Elzbieta; Zaremba, Jacek

    2005-01-01

    Spinobulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is an X-linked form of motor neuron disease characterized by progressive atrophy of the muscles, dysphagia, dysarthria and mild androgen insensitivity. SBMA is caused by CAG repeat expansion in the androgen receptor gene. CAG repeat polymorphism was analysed in a Polish control group (n = 150) and patients suspected of SBMA (n = 60). Normal and abnormal ranges of CAG repeats were established in the control group and in 21 patients whose clinical diagnosis of SBMA was molecularly confirmed. The ranges are similar to those reported for other populations.

  18. [Physiopathology of ocular movements in infantile cerebral paralysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, R; Ronquillo, A; Escobar, F; Alvarez-Morujo, M

    1989-01-01

    Cerebral palsy is a permanent and non-progressive brain damage due to various causes affecting a child from the intrauterine life up to the first two years of life. Its most common cause is neonatal hypoxic encephalopathy. The cerebral damage is diffuse so that it is commonly associated with epilepsy, mental retardation, dysarthria, hearing loss and oculomotor abnormalities. Strabismus is found in 50% of children with cerebral palsy. This prevalence is significantly different from the 2% incidence of oculomotor abnormalities in the pre-school age, it is noteworthy that strabismus and refractive errors respond to the classical therapeutic measures.

  19. Vestibular stimulation after head injury: effect on reaction times and motor speech parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, A

    1989-01-01

    motor speech parameters (reflecting dysarthria) was investigated. After eight weeks with regular stimulation, it was concluded that reaction time changes were individual and consistent for a given subject. Only occasionally were they shortened after stimulation. However, reaction time was lengthened...... in three cases, prohibiting further stimulation in one case. Motion sickness was prohibitive in a second case. However, after-stimulation increase of phonation time and/or vital capacity was found in one patient and four controls. Oral diadochokinetic rates were slowed in several cases. Collectively, when...... stimulation induced changes of reaction times or motor speech parameters, the changes were more pronounced in patients than in controls....

  20. Episodic ataxia : a case report and review of literature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singhvi J

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available This report describes the clinical features of a 29 year female presenting with a 3 years history of episodes of cerebellar ataxia, dysarthria and nystagmus lasting 3-5 days, recurring almost every month. Sleep disturbance and buzzing in ears were noted 3-4 days before each episode. No other precipitant factor was present. Family history was negative. She was diagnosed as a case of episodic ataxia type-2 and was successfully treated with acetazolamide, a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor. She was asymptomatic at 2 year followup.

  1. Inherited ataxia with slow saccades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R T Chakor

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ataxia is a symptom of cerebellar dysfunction. Slowly progressive ataxia, dysarthria in an adult with a positive family history suggests an inherited cerebellar ataxia. We present an adult with gradually progressive ataxia and slow saccades. There was history of similar illness in his son. Genetic testing for spinocerebellar ataxia 2 was positive. We discuss the various inherited ataxias, causes of acute, progressive ataxia syndromes, episodic ataxias and ataxia associated with other neurological signs like peripheral neuropathy, pyramidal features, movement disorders and cognitive decline.

  2. Clinical and electrodiagnostic findings in cyhalothrine poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basiri, Keivan; Mohaghegh, Mohammad Reza; Teimouri, Somayyeh Sadat; Okhovat, Ali Asghar

    2016-01-01

    Acute onset bulbar symptoms with respiratory failure and descending paralysis may occur in several neuromuscular disorders including variants of Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS), diphtheria, botulism and toxins. We present a 51-year-old man who presented with complains of ptosis and dyspnea following pyrethroids spraying in an enclosed area for eradication of flea. Within 5-6 days of admission limb weakness, dysphagia, dysarthria, blurred vision, diplopia, tremor and respiratory distress added to previous symptoms. Temporal profile of events after exposure, development of similar symptoms in patient's son, electrodiagnostic findings and exclusion of other etiologies confirms intoxication etiology. We reviewed the literature and provide an extensive electrodiagnostic overview. PMID:27099845

  3. Reorganização prosódica na disartria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Reviglio Iliovitz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available According to Felizatti (1998, dysarthria is a disorder in motor production that affects patterns of movement, coordination and strenght of articulatory organs. It can be caused by brain damage and it is usually characterized by slow speech. The analysis of some prosodic aspects of almost unintelligible dysarthric patients’speech indicates that the strange reaction their speech causes in their listeners is mainly due to the prosodic strategies they use (consciouslly or not to improve their oral language intelligibility.In other words, despite the fact that dysarthric patients’s brain lesions cause articulatory difficulties, they are able to compensate them through prosody.

  4. Brain Recovery after a Plane Crash: Treatment with Growth Hormone (GH and Neurorehabilitation: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Devesa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to describe the results obtained after growth hormone (GH treatment and neurorehabilitation in a young man that suffered a very grave traumatic brain injury (TBI after a plane crash. Methods: Fifteen months after the accident, the patient was treated with GH, 1 mg/day, at three-month intervals, followed by one-month resting, together with daily neurorehabilitation. Blood analysis at admission showed that no pituitary deficits existed. At admission, the patient presented: spastic tetraplegia, dysarthria, dysphagia, very severe cognitive deficits and joint deformities. Computerized tomography scanners (CT-Scans revealed the practical loss of the right brain hemisphere and important injuries in the left one. Clinical and blood analysis assessments were performed every three months for three years. Feet surgery was needed because of irreducible equinovarus. Results: Clinical and kinesitherapy assessments revealed a prompt improvement in cognitive functions, dysarthria and dysphagia disappeared and three years later the patient was able to live a practically normal life, walking alone and coming back to his studies. No adverse effects were observed during and after GH administration. Conclusions: These results, together with previous results from our group, indicate that GH treatment is safe and effective for helping neurorehabilitation in TBI patients, once the acute phase is resolved, regardless of whether or not they have GH-deficiency (GHD.

  5. Rehabilitation for a Patient with Hemiplegia, Ataxia, and Cognitive Dysfunction Caused by Pontine Hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuya Tsunoda

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Patients with pontine hemorrhage usually experience severe disturbances of consciousness, pupillary abnormalities, quadriparesis, and respiratory failure. However, little is known regarding cognitive dysfunction in patients with pontine hemorrhage. We report the case of a rehabilitation patient presenting with hemiplegia, ataxia, and cognitive dysfunction caused by a pontine hemorrhage. A 55-year-old, right-handed male suffered sudden onset of vertigo, dysarthria, and hemiplegia on the right side. He was diagnosed with brain stem hemorrhage, and conservative treatment was administered. The vertigo improved, but dysarthria, ataxia, hemiplegia, and gait disorder persisted. He was disoriented with respect to time and place and showed a poor attention span, impaired executive function, and reduced volition. A computed tomography revealed hematomas across the pons on both sides, but no lesions were obvious in the cerebellum and cerebrum. Single-photon emission tomography showed decreased perfusion in the brain stem, bilateral basal ganglia, and frontal and parietal lobes in the left hemisphere. The patient received exercise therapy and cognitive rehabilitation, and home modifications were performed to allow him to continue living at home under the supervision of his family. His symptoms improved, along with enhanced regional cerebral blood flow to the frontal and temporal lobes. These findings suggest that the pontine hemorrhage caused diaschisis resulting in secondary reduction of activity in the cerebral hemisphere and the occurrence of cortical symptoms. Therefore, rehabilitation is necessary, along with active instructions for the family members of patients with severe neurological deficits.

  6. Transplantation of autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells in the subarachnoid space for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a safety analysis of 14 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Yan; Liang, Zhan-Hua; Han, Chao; Wei, Wen-Juan; Song, Chun-Li; Zhou, Li-Na; Liu, Yang; Li, Ying; Ji, Xiao-Fei; Liu, Jing

    2017-03-01

    There is a small amount of clinical data regarding the safety and feasibility of autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cell transplantation into the subarachnoid space for the treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The objectives of this retrospective study were to assess the safety and efficacy of peripheral blood mononuclear cell transplantation in 14 amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients to provide more objective data for future clinical trials. After stem cell mobilization and collection, autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells (1 × 10(9)) were isolated and directly transplanted into the subarachnoid space of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients. The primary outcome measure was incidence of adverse events. Secondary outcome measures were electromyography 1 week before operation and 4 weeks after operation, Functional Independence Measurement, Berg Balance Scale, and Dysarthria Assessment Scale 1 week preoperatively and 1, 2, 4 and 12 weeks postoperatively. There was no immediate or delayed transplant-related cytotoxicity. The number of leukocytes, serum alanine aminotransferase and creatinine levels, and body temperature were within the normal ranges. Radiographic evaluation showed no serious transplant-related adverse events. Muscle strength grade, results of Functional Independence Measurement, Berg Balance Scale, and Dysarthria Assessment Scale were not significantly different before and after treatment. These findings suggest that peripheral blood mononuclear cell transplantation into the subarachnoid space for the treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is safe, but its therapeutic effect is not remarkable. Thus, a large-sample investigation is needed to assess its efficacy further.

  7. Alternative Speech Communication System for Persons with Severe Speech Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selouani, Sid-Ahmed; Sidi Yakoub, Mohammed; O'Shaughnessy, Douglas

    2009-12-01

    Assistive speech-enabled systems are proposed to help both French and English speaking persons with various speech disorders. The proposed assistive systems use automatic speech recognition (ASR) and speech synthesis in order to enhance the quality of communication. These systems aim at improving the intelligibility of pathologic speech making it as natural as possible and close to the original voice of the speaker. The resynthesized utterances use new basic units, a new concatenating algorithm and a grafting technique to correct the poorly pronounced phonemes. The ASR responses are uttered by the new speech synthesis system in order to convey an intelligible message to listeners. Experiments involving four American speakers with severe dysarthria and two Acadian French speakers with sound substitution disorders (SSDs) are carried out to demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed methods. An improvement of the Perceptual Evaluation of the Speech Quality (PESQ) value of 5% and more than 20% is achieved by the speech synthesis systems that deal with SSD and dysarthria, respectively.

  8. Pathomechanisms and compensatory efforts related to Parkinsonian speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Christiane; Gehrig, Johannes; Gispert, Suzana; Seifried, Carola; Kell, Christian A

    2014-01-01

    Voice and speech in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients are classically affected by a hypophonia, dysprosody, and dysarthria. The underlying pathomechanisms of these disabling symptoms are not well understood. To identify functional anomalies related to pathophysiology and compensation we compared speech-related brain activity and effective connectivity in early PD patients who did not yet develop voice or speech symptoms and matched controls. During fMRI 20 PD patients ON and OFF levodopa and 20 control participants read 75 sentences covertly, overtly with neutral, or with happy intonation. A cue-target reading paradigm allowed for dissociating task preparation from execution. We found pathologically reduced striato-prefrontal preparatory effective connectivity in early PD patients associated with subcortical (OFF state) or cortical (ON state) compensatory networks. While speaking, PD patients showed signs of diminished monitoring of external auditory feedback. During generation of affective prosody, a reduced functional coupling between the ventral and dorsal striatum was observed. Our results suggest three pathomechanisms affecting speech in PD: While diminished energization on the basis of striato-prefrontal hypo-connectivity together with dysfunctional self-monitoring mechanisms could underlie hypophonia, dysarthria may result from fading speech motor representations given that they are not sufficiently well updated by external auditory feedback. A pathological interplay between the limbic and sensorimotor striatum could interfere with affective modulation of speech routines, which affects emotional prosody generation. However, early PD patients show compensatory mechanisms that could help improve future speech therapies.

  9. Effect of edaravone on acute brainstem-cerebellar infarction with vertigo and sudden hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Yuta; Yabe, Takao; Okada, Kazunari; Nakamura, Yuka

    2014-06-01

    We report 2 cases with acute brainstem and brainstem-cerebellar infarction showed improvement of their signs and symptoms after administration of edaravone. Case 1, a 74-year-old woman who experienced sudden vertigo, also had dysarthria and left hemiplegia. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed an abnormal region in the right ventrolateral medulla oblongata. The patient's vertigo and hemiplegia improved completely after treatment. Case 2, a 50-year-old man who experienced sudden vertigo and sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), developed dysarthria after admission. MRI revealed acute infarction in the right cerebellar hemisphere. Magnetic resonance angiography revealed dissection of the basilar artery and occlusion of the right anterior inferior cerebellar artery. The patient's vertigo and hearing remarkably improved. We have described 2 patients whose early symptoms were vertigo and sudden SNHL, but who were later shown to have ischemic lesions of the central nervous system. Edaravone is neuroprotective drug with free radical-scavenging actions. Free radicals in the ear are responsible for ischemic damage. Edaravone, a free radical scavenger, may be useful in the treatment of vertigo and SNHL. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The central nervous system phenotype of X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease: a transient disorder of children and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mateen, Majeed; Craig, Alexa Kanwit; Chance, Phillip F

    2014-03-01

    We describe 2 patients with X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, type 1 (CMTX1) disease and central nervous system manifestations and review 19 cases from the literature. Our first case had not been previously diagnosed with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, and the second case, although known to have Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, was suspected of having CMTX1 after presentation with central nervous system manifestations. The most common central nervous system manifestations were transient and included dysarthria, ataxia, hemiparesis, and tetraparesis resembling periodic paralysis. Of the 21 patients, 19 presented at 21 years of age or younger, implicating CMTX1 with transient central nervous system manifestations as a disorder that predominantly affects children and adolescents. CMTX1 should be included in the differential diagnosis of patients who present with transient central nervous system phenomena, including stroke-like episodes, tetraparesis suggestive of periodic paralysis, dysarthria, ataxia, or combinations of these deficits. Reversible, bilateral, nonenhancing white matter lesions and restricted diffusion on magnetic resonance imaging are characteristic features of the central nervous system phenotype of CMTX1.

  11. Facial Dystonia with Facial Grimacing and Vertical Gaze Palsy with "Round the Houses" Sign in a 29-Year-Old Woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespi, J; Bråthen, G; Quist-Paulsen, P; Pagonabarraga, J; Roig-Arnall, C

    2016-02-01

    A 29-year-old woman developed progressive dysarthria and coordination problems from the age of 15. Examination showed dysarthria, facial dystonia, bibrachial dystonia, hyperreflexia, ataxia, and emotional incontinence. Downward supranuclear gaze palsy was prominent with a "Round the Houses" sign. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and medulla, electroneurography, and cerebrospinal fluid were normal. A computed tomography scan showed hepatosplenomegaly. This combination of progressive neurological symptoms together with hepatosplenomegaly was suggestive of inborn error of metabolism. A bone marrow biopsy showed an increased number of macrophages with foamy content, highly suggestive of lysosomal disease. Plasmatic chitotriosidase activity and CCL18 were increased. Genetic testing showed heterozygosis for the variation c.1070C→T (p.Ser357Leu) and c.1843→T (Arg615Cys), confirming the diagnosis of Niemann-Pick type C (NPC). The "Round the Houses" sign has only been described in patients with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). This sign is described as an inability to produce pure vertical saccades along the midline and instead moving the eyes in a lateral arc to accomplish the movement. The observation of this sign in a patient with NPC indicates that this bedside finding is not specific for PSP, but a sign of medial longitudinal fasciculus dysfunction. The presence of facial dystonia with facial grimacing together with supranuclear gaze palsy is highly characteristic and useful for the diagnosis of NPC. NPC is an important underdiagnosed condition, given the availability of treatment and a mean diagnostic delay of 6 years.

  12. Communicative aspects and coping strategies in patients with Parkinson's disease

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    Flávia Pereira da Costa

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To investigate in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD, which are the coping strategies used and the relation between type of coping, voice symptoms and communicative aspects. Method: 73 subjects, 33 in the experimental group, with diagnosis of PD, and 40 subjects in the control group, healthy and without vocal complaints. They underwent the following procedures: application of the Voice Symptons Scale – VoiSS – Brazilian Version, Voice Disability Coping Questionnaire – VDCQ – Brazilian Version, and the questionnaire Living with Dysarthria – LwD. Results: The experimental group showed deviations in all protocols: VDCQ (p<0.001, VoiSS (p<0.001, LwD (p<0.001. The most frequently used coping strategy was self-control (p<0.001. The correlation between vocal symptoms and communicative aspects showed that the greater the impairment in communication, the greater the VoiSS emotional scores and the greater will be the amount of voice symptoms and signs. However, the vocal signs and symptoms and communicative aspects showed no correlation with coping. Conclusion: Patients with PD have a high amount of vocal signs and symptoms and the higher the occurrence, the more the patient reports being difficult to live with dysarthria, particularly when there are deviations in the emotional domain.

  13. Medullary metastasis of a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor: A case report

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    Hagi, Tomohito; Nakamura, Tomoki; Yokoji, Ayumu; Matsumine, Akihiko; Sudo, Akihiro

    2016-01-01

    The present study reports a case of medullary metastasis without lung metastasis that occurred as a result of a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST). An 81-year-old woman presented with a MPNST in the left brachial plexus, arising from the cervical nerve root. The patient underwent carbon ion radiotherapy; however, tumor recurrence was identified in the left shoulder. Subsequently, the patient underwent wide excision. Three weeks subsequent to surgery, imbalance and dysarthria developed suddenly. Dysphagia emerged and left upper limb pain disappeared on the day after symptom development. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed that this was due to metastasis to the medulla. Five days subsequent to the onset of dysarthria, the patient succumbed due to respiratory failure. To the best of our knowledge, no previous cases of medullary metastasis arising from a MPNST in the absence of lung metastasis have been reported. MRI is a useful examination tool for the identification of brain metastases; however, the high cost of MRI as a routine examination must be considered due to the rarity of brain metastases. Therefore, methods to detect brain metastasis warrant further investigation. PMID:27588138

  14. [The left central gyral lesion and pure anarthria].

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    Tabuchi, M; Odashima, K; Fujii, T; Suzuki, K; Saitou, J; Yamadori, A

    2000-05-01

    We report a very rare case of pure anarthria with lesion analysis. A 44-year-old right-handed man suffered from a cerebral infarction with a mild right hemiparesis and speech disturbance. An MRI of the brain 1.5 months post onset revealed a lesion confined to the left central gyrus. One month after the onset, his spontaneous speech was dysprosodic and laborious. It was contaminated with dysarthria and phonological paraphasias. However, language comprehension, repetition and naming abilities were normal. Most remarkably he showed no impairment in writing with his left hand. Over the following months, his difficulties in verbal output showed general amelioration, but the isolated impairment in the domain of articulation characterized by dysprosody, dysarthria, and phonological paraphasia persisted. As for the symptomatology of pure anarthria resulting from precentral gyral lesions, there have been controversies about its pureness. Some argue that the so called pure anarthria always shows some degree of writing disturbances, albeit mild in degree. Others maintain there certainly exists the pure type without any signs of agraphia. In the present case lesions were limited to the central gyrus but spared the lowest opercular portion. The previous reports of pure anarthria that had mild agraphia all had lesions involving the opercular portion. We conclude the sparing of this area is most likely related with sparing of writing capacity in pure anarthria.

  15. Rehabilitation for a Patient with Hemiplegia, Ataxia, and Cognitive Dysfunction Caused by Pontine Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunoda, Tetsuya; Maeshima, Shinichiro; Watanabe, Makoto; Nagai, Ayako; Ueno, Yoshiya; Ozeki, Yasunori; Okamoto, Sayaka; Mizuno, Shiho; Sonoda, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    Patients with pontine hemorrhage usually experience severe disturbances of consciousness, pupillary abnormalities, quadriparesis, and respiratory failure. However, little is known regarding cognitive dysfunction in patients with pontine hemorrhage. We report the case of a rehabilitation patient presenting with hemiplegia, ataxia, and cognitive dysfunction caused by a pontine hemorrhage. A 55-year-old, right-handed male suffered sudden onset of vertigo, dysarthria, and hemiplegia on the right side. He was diagnosed with brain stem hemorrhage, and conservative treatment was administered. The vertigo improved, but dysarthria, ataxia, hemiplegia, and gait disorder persisted. He was disoriented with respect to time and place and showed a poor attention span, impaired executive function, and reduced volition. A computed tomography revealed hematomas across the pons on both sides, but no lesions were obvious in the cerebellum and cerebrum. Single-photon emission tomography showed decreased perfusion in the brain stem, bilateral basal ganglia, and frontal and parietal lobes in the left hemisphere. The patient received exercise therapy and cognitive rehabilitation, and home modifications were performed to allow him to continue living at home under the supervision of his family. His symptoms improved, along with enhanced regional cerebral blood flow to the frontal and temporal lobes. These findings suggest that the pontine hemorrhage caused diaschisis resulting in secondary reduction of activity in the cerebral hemisphere and the occurrence of cortical symptoms. Therefore, rehabilitation is necessary, along with active instructions for the family members of patients with severe neurological deficits.

  16. Agraphia in Bulbar-Onset Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: Not Merely a Consequence of Dementia or Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Hiroo; Takahashi, Nobuyoshi; Hieda, Soutaro; Ohno, Hideki; Kawamura, Mitsuru

    2008-01-01

    The clinical significance and characteristics of writing errors in bulbar-onset amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are not clear. We retrospectively investigated writing samples in 19 patients with bulbar-onset ALS without preceding extra-motor symptoms. Co-development of dementia and/or aphasia was also explored and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images of the brain were reviewed. As a result, a high prevalence of writing errors (15 of the 19 patients) was found. Of note were isolated writing errors with neither dementia nor aphasia verified in 2 patients whose dysarthria was mild enough to evaluate spoken language. The remaining 13 patients also showed agraphia, but either dysarthria was too severe to evaluate aphasia or frontotemporal dementia (FTD)-like features co-existed. Of these patients, one who initially lacked dementia subsequently developed FTD-like features. The frequent writing errors were omission or substitution of kana letters and syntactic errors. SPECT images showed bilateral or left-side dominant hypoperfusion in the frontotemporal lobes as a consistent feature. These results show that patients with bulbar-onset ALS frequently exhibit agraphic writing errors and that these are not merely consequences of dementia or aphasia. However, these writing errors may indicate the involvement of frontotemporal language-related areas beyond the primary motor cortex. PMID:19641246

  17. Acute stroke-like presentation of acquired hepatocerebral degeneration

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    B. Smita

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurological manifestations in liver diseases have been well-described. Parkinsonism developing in cirrhotic patients is a unique clinical, neuroradiological, and biological entity. The symptoms are often insidious in onset and occur after liver disease has made its presentation. Acute dysarthria as the presenting manifestation of cirrhosis is rare. Here we report three cases where liver disease made an unusual presentation as acute dysarthria. In all cases the abruptness of the onset prompted the treating physicians to make a diagnosis of stroke. The computed tomography (CT scans of all these patients did not show any evidence of stroke. This was followed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI which showed the characteristic symmetric high-signal intensities in globus pallidus and substantia nigra in T1-weighted images, a reflection of increased tissue concentrations of manganese that helped in making a retrospective diagnosis of liver disease, confirmed later by altered serum albumin to globulin ratios and altered liver echo texture in ultra sonogram.

  18. Clinical features, MRI brain, and MRS abnormalities of drug-naïve neurologic Wilson′s disease

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    Satyabrata Pulai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI helps in the diagnosis of neurologic Wilson′s disease (WD. The literature regarding MR spectroscopy (MRS and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI in WD is limited. Objectives: To evaluate the clinical features and neuroimaging findings in drug-naοve neurologic WD and to find correlation between clinical stage and disease duration with different imaging findings. Materials and Methods: The study subjects included consecutive and follow-up neurologic WD patients attending movement disorder clinic. The initial clinical and MRI features before commencement of chelation therapy were noted. Of 78 patients, 34 underwent DWI study and MRS was done in 38 patients and in 32 control subjects. Results: Dystonia, dysarthria, tremor, and behavioral abnormality were common presenting features. All patients had MRI abnormality with major affection of basal ganglia. The clinical severity and anatomical extent of MRI abnormalities were positively correlated (P < 0.001; r s = 0.709. Presence of diffusion restriction was inversely related to duration of disease (P < 0.001; r s = 0.760. WD patients had reduced N-acetylaspartate/creatine (Cr and choline (Cho/Cr ratio (P < 0.001 as compared with control subjects in MRS study. Conclusion: Dystonia, dysarthria and tremor are common neurological features of WD. In this study, MRI abnormalities were positively correlated with disease severity; diffusion restriction was inversely correlated with the duration of the disease process. MRS was also a sensitive tool for diagnosing patient of neurologic WD.

  19. October 2016 critical care case of the month

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    Fountain S

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after first 150 words. A 27-year-old Caucasian man with past medical history of opioid abuse (reportedly sober for 10 years on buprenorphine, post traumatic stress disorder, depression and anxiety presented to the emergency department complaining of dysarthria after taking diphenhydramine and meclizine in addition to his prescribed trazodone and buprenorphine to try to sleep. He was discharged to home after his symptoms appeared to improve with intravenous fluid. He returned to the emergency department the following afternoon with worsening dysarthria, dysphagia, and subjective weakness. The patient was non toxic appearing, afebrile, vital signs were stable and his strength was reported as 5/5. Computed tomography of his head did not show any evidence of acute intracranial abnormality. Given his ongoing complaints, he was admitted for observation to the general medicine wards. That night a rapid response was initiated when the nurse found the patient to be unresponsive, but spontaneously breathing. The patient’s clinical status did ...

  20. 高血压合并脑梗死的106例护理体会%Nursing experience of 106 cases of hypertension complicated with cerebral infarction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙莘

    2013-01-01

      目的:探讨高血压合并脑梗死患者的临床护理方法.方法:对照组给予常规护理,观察组于常规护理基础上给予综合护理,对比分析两组患者的护理效果.结果:两组患者护理前失语症、构音障碍、肌力0-4级的例数差异不明显,无统计学意义(P >0.05);观察组护理后失语症、构音障碍、肌力0-4级的例数明显少于对照组,两组差异存在统计学意义(P 0.05); observation group nursing after aphasia, dysarthria, muscle strength with 0-4 level significantly less than the control group, statisticaly significant differences between the two groups (P < 0.05).Conclusion: the hypertension with cerebral infarction patients were given comprehensive nursing care, nursing effect can be achieved ideal, improve the aphasia, dysarthria, is worthy to be popularized in nursing practice.

  1. Predictors of extubation success in acute ischemic stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lioutas, Vasileios-Arsenios; Hanafy, Khalid A; Kumar, Sandeep

    2016-09-15

    Acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients often undergo intubation and mechanical ventilation (MV). Prolonged intubation and MV have disadvantages and complications. Conventional extubation criteria based only on respiratory parameters are insufficient to guide extubation practices in stroke patients where capacity for airway protection is a major concern. To identify clinical and neuroanatomical markers of successful extubation in AIS patients requiring MV. Retrospective review of tertiary care hospital patient database from May 2009-November 2012 to identify consecutive patients with AIS intubated during hospitalization. We assessed the effect of age, sex, baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score, level of consciousness, facial weakness, dysarthria, neglect, infarct location, dysphagia, respiratory parameters and history of pneumonia on successful extubation by hospital discharge using multivariate logistic regression analysis. 112 subjects met study criteria and were included in the analysis. Age and NIHSS scores (mean±standard deviation) were 74.5±16.1years and 19±9.8, respectively; 56% were women. In multivariate analysis, NIHSS score≤15 (Odds Ratio 4.6, 95% Confidence Interval 1.9-11.3, pstroke and absence of dysarthria prior to intubation were independently associated with extubation success. Our findings could help inform extubation practices in patients with AIS though prospective validation is necessary. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Clinical study and haplotype analysis in two brothers with Partington syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frints, Suzanna G M; Borghgraef, Martine; Froyen, Guy; Marynen, Peter; Fryns, Jean-Pierre

    2002-11-01

    Partington et al. [1988] described a three-generation family (MRXS1, MIM *309510, PRTS) with a syndromic form of X-linked mental retardation (XLMR). The clinical features in 10 affected males included mild to moderate MR, dystonic movements of the hands, and dysarthria. After refinement, the PRTS locus was mapped to marker DXS989 (with maximum LOD score of 3.1) with flanking markers DXS365 and DXS28. Since then, no other patients with a similar phenotype have been described. We present a detailed description of the neurological symptoms and the disease history of two brothers with the clinical features of PRTS. Psychomotor development was delayed in both, and neurological features included mild to moderate mental retardation, dysarthria, facial muscle weakness, severe dysdiadochokinesis, slow dystonic movements, and mild spasticity of the hands, without ataxia or spasticity of the legs. The symptoms were nonprogressive and extrapyramidal, and without cerebellar involvement. In general, behavior of the two brothers was friendly and quiet, although the elder brother had periods of depressed mood and outbursts of anger. Karyotypes and subsequent investigation of the subtelomeres as well as DNA analysis of the FMR1 gene, the androgen receptor gene, and the DM locus did not reveal a genetic abnormality. Haplotype analysis showed that the affected brothers share the PRTS region at Xp22.1. Mutation screening of the PDH-E1alpha gene did not reveal a pathogenic mutation.

  3. Speech and oral motor profile after childhood hemispherectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liégeois, Frédérique; Morgan, Angela T; Stewart, Lorna H; Helen Cross, J; Vogel, Adam P; Vargha-Khadem, Faraneh

    2010-08-01

    Hemispherectomy (disconnection or removal of an entire cerebral hemisphere) is a rare surgical procedure used for the relief of drug-resistant epilepsy in children. After hemispherectomy, contralateral hemiplegia persists whereas gross expressive and receptive language functions can be remarkably spared. Motor speech deficits have rarely been examined systematically, thus limiting the accuracy of postoperative prognosis. We describe the speech profiles of hemispherectomized participants characterizing their intelligibility, articulation, phonological speech errors, dysarthric features, and execution and sequencing of orofacial speech and non-speech movements. Thirteen participants who had undergone hemispherectomy (six left, seven right; nine with congenital, four with acquired hemiplegia; operated between four months and 13 years) were investigated. Results showed that all participants were intelligible but showed a mild dysarthric profile characterized by neuromuscular asymmetry and reduced quality and coordination of movements, features that are characteristic of adult-onset unilateral upper motor neuron dysarthria, flaccid-ataxic variant. In addition, one left and four right hemispherectomy cases presented with impaired production of speech and non-speech sequences. No participant showed evidence of verbal or oral dyspraxia. It is concluded that mild dysarthria is persistent after left or right hemispherectomy, irrespective of age at onset of hemiplegia. These results indicate incomplete functional re-organization for the control of fine speech motor movements throughout childhood, and provide no evidence of hemispheric differences. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Accidental carbon monoxide poisoning presenting without a history of exposure: A case report

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    Bennetto Luke

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Carbon monoxide poisoning is easy to diagnose when there is a history of exposure. When the exposure history is absent, or delayed, the diagnosis is more difficult and relies on recognising the importance of multi-system disease. We present a case of accidental carbon monoxide poisoning. Case presentation A middle-aged man, who lived alone in his mobile home was found by friends in a confused, incontinent state. Initial signs included respiratory failure, cardiac ischaemia, hypotension, encephalopathy and a rash, whilst subsequent features included rhabdomyolysis, renal failure, amnesia, dysarthria, parkinsonism, peripheral neuropathy, supranuclear gaze palsy and cerebral haemorrhage. Despite numerous investigations including magnetic resonance cerebral imaging, lumbar puncture, skin biopsy, muscle biopsy and electroencephalogram a diagnosis remained elusive. Several weeks after admission, diagnostic breakthrough was achieved when the gradual resolution of the patient's amnesia, encephalopathy and dysarthria allowed an accurate history to be taken for the first time. The patient's last recollection was turning on his gas heating for the first time since the spring. A gas heating engineer found the patient's gas boiler to be in a dangerous state of disrepair and it was immediately decommissioned. Conclusion This case highlights several important issues: the bewildering myriad of clinical features of carbon monoxide poisoning, the importance of making the diagnosis even at a late stage and preventing the patient's return to a potentially fatal toxic environment, and the paramount importance of the history in the diagnostic method.

  5. Construct-related validity of the TOCS measures: comparison of intelligibility and speaking rate scores in children with and without speech disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, Megan M; Gotzke, Carrie L

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated construct-related validity of the Test of Children's Speech (TOCS). Intelligibility scores obtained using open-set word identification tasks (orthographic transcription) for the TOCS word and sentence tests and rate scores for the TOCS sentence test (words per minute or WPM and intelligible words per minute or IWPM) were compared for a group of 15 adults (18-30 years of age) with normal speech production and three groups of children: 48 3-6 year-olds with typical speech development and neurological histories (TDS), 48 3-6 year-olds with a speech sound disorder of unknown origin and no identified neurological impairment (SSD-UNK), and 22 3-10 year-olds with dysarthria and cerebral palsy (DYS). As expected, mean intelligibility scores and rates increased with age in the TDS group. However, word test intelligibility, WPM and IWPM scores for the 6 year-olds in the TDS group were significantly lower than those for the adults. The DYS group had significantly lower word and sentence test intelligibility and WPM and IWPM scores than the TDS and SSD-UNK groups. Compared to the TDS group, the SSD-UNK group also had significantly lower intelligibility scores for the word and sentence tests, and significantly lower IWPM, but not WPM scores on the sentence test. The results support the construct-related validity of TOCS as a tool for obtaining intelligibility and rate scores that are sensitive to group differences in 3-6 year-old children, with and without speech sound disorders, and to 3+ year-old children with speech disorders, with and without dysarthria. Readers will describe the word and sentence intelligibility and speaking rate performance of children with typically developing speech at age levels of 3, 4, 5 and 6 years, as measured by the Test of Children's Speech, and how these compare with adult speakers and two groups of children with speech disorders. They will also recognize what measures on this test differentiate children with speech sound

  6. The return of an old worm: cerebral paragonimiasis presenting with intracerebral hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Eun Jung; Kim, Seung-Ki; Wang, Kyu-Chang; Chai, Jong-Yil; Chong, Sangjoon; Park, Sung-Hye; Cheon, Jung-Eun; Phi, Ji Hoon

    2012-11-01

    Paragonimiasis is caused by ingesting crustaceans, which are the intermediate hosts of Paragonimus. The involvement of the brain was a common presentation in Korea decades ago, but it becomes much less frequent in domestic medical practices. We observed a rare case of cerebral paragonimiasis manifesting with intracerebral hemorrhage. A 10-yr-old girl presented with sudden-onset dysarthria, right facial palsy and clumsiness of the right hand. Brain imaging showed acute intracerebral hemorrhage in the left frontal area. An occult vascular malformation or small arteriovenous malformation compressed by the hematoma was initially suspected. The lesion progressed for over 2 months until a delayed surgery was undertaken. Pathologic examination was consistent with cerebral paragonimiasis. After chemotherapy with praziquantel, the patient was monitored without neurological deficits or seizure attacks for 6 months. This case alerts practicing clinicians to the domestic transmission of a forgotten parasitic disease due to environmental changes.

  7. Acute cerebral paragonimiasis presenting as hemorrhagic stroke in a child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhi; Zhu, Gang; Lin, Jiangkai; Wu, Nan; Feng, Hua

    2008-08-01

    A hemorrhagic stroke in children is rarely secondary to cerebral paragonimiasis. We describe a 9-year-old boy in whom an intracerebral hemorrhage was the leading clinical indication of acute cerebral paragonimiasis. He was hospitalized because of a sudden onset of headache, right hemiparesis, and dysarthria. A computed tomography scan revealed an intracerebral hemorrhage in the left parietal lobe. Magnetic resonance angiography did not confirm any vascular abnormalities at the location of the hematoma. Four weeks later, he presented with right hemiparesis again, and fever. A diagnosis of cerebral paragonimiasis was based on repeated magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for paragonimiasis. The patient gradually recovered with praziquantel treatment. Cerebral paragonimiasis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of hemorrhagic strokes in children in areas where paragonimiasis is epidemic.

  8. Anti-Yo Mediated Paraneoplastic Cerebellar Degeneration Associated with Pseudobulbar Affect in a Patient with Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Allison N.; Jones, David E.; Brenin, David R.; Lapides, David A.

    2017-01-01

    Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD) is a rare anti-Yo mediated paraneoplastic syndromes rarely that is infrequently associated with breast cancer. We present a case of a 52-year-old female presenting with diplopia, gait instability, dysarthria, dysphagia, nystagmus, and, most notably, new onset paroxysmal episodes of uncontrollable crying concerning for pseudobulbar affect (PBA). Serologic testing showed anti-Yo antibodies. The patient was found to have stage IIIA breast cancer as the inciting cause of the paraneoplastic syndrome. The patient was treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy, modified radical mastectomy, adjuvant Herceptin, and pertuzumab. She was given IVIG for paraneoplastic syndrome, antidepressants, and dextromethorphan-quinidine (Nuedexta), the first FDA-approved therapy for PBA. With multimodality therapy, she demonstrated significant improvement in neurologic and mood symptoms associated with PCD and PBA. PMID:28377827

  9. Poison as cure: a clinical review of botulinum toxin as an invaluable drug

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    J. Bali

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxin is the most potent toxin known. It is readily absorbed from mucosal surfaces. If dispersed as an aerosol or mixed in the food or water it can lead to a large outbreak of botulism. The disease presents as a symmetric descending paralysis in an afebrile patient. Cranial nerve involvement with diplopia, dysarthria, dysphonia, dysphagia and respiratory paralysis is seen after a variable incubation period. The treatment is mainly supportive. The source of the toxin is Clostridium botulinum, an anaerobic gram-positive spore-forming organism. Some other species of Clostridium like C. butyricum and C. baratii also produce the toxin. The toxin is heat labile and can be inactivated by heating at 100°C for 10 minutes. The toxin acts at the peripheral cholinergic nerve terminals at the neuromuscular junctions, postganglionic parasympathetic ganglia, etc, and affects neurotransmitter release by inhibiting exocytosis. Clinical uses in various medical fields were found for it.

  10. [Suprasegmental effects of selective posterior rhizotomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horínek, D; Tichý, M; Cerný, R; Vlková, J

    2004-01-01

    The occurrence of spasticity is most commonly attributed to the lack of presynaptic inhibition. Perinatal damage to the central nervous system, as it happens in cerebral palsy, leads to pathological reflex response both on segmental and polysegmental levels. It results not only in clinical signs typical for spasticity but also in alterations of brainstem function, such as dysarthria or congenital nystagmus. Selective posterior rhizotomy is a neurosurgical method, routinely used in the treatment of spasticity. The lumbosacral posterior roots are partially cut under perioperative neurophysiological control. The aim of the treatment is the reduction of afferentation for posterior horns resulting in a decrease of pathological reflex responses. Selective posterior rhizotomy consequently decreases lower limbs spasticity. The improvement of upper extremities fine skills, the improvement of speech and cognitive functions has been also observed after selective posterior rhizotomy. The possible pathophysiological explanations of these so-called suprasegmental effects are discussed in the article.

  11. Various Neurological Symptoms by Neurolymphomatosis as the Initial Presentation of Primary Testicular Lymphoma

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    Yoshitaka Sunami

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Neurological symptoms induced by the infiltration of malignant lymphoma into the nervous systems are subsumed under the term neurolymphomatosis (NL. Here, we report the case of a 30-year-old Japanese man with primary testicular lymphoma complicated, as seen in various neurological findings, by secondary NL prior to testicular swelling. Painless right scrotal enlargement was noticed more than 1 month after the appearance of neurological complications such as right upper extremity numbness, dysarthria, facial palsy, and diplopia. Proactive investigation and biopsies of extranodal sites at high risk of central nervous system infiltration of malignant lymphoma, such as the testes, should be considered when secondary NL is suspected based on imaging findings.

  12. Atypical Hallervorden-Spatz disease with preserved cognition and obtrusive obsessions and compulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, Anthony P; Earnst, Kelly S; Marson, Daniel C

    2005-07-01

    We describe the case of an adult female with Hallervorden-Spatz disease (HSD), "eye-of-the-tiger" sign on cranial magnetic resonance imaging scan, and two mutations in the pantothenate kinase 2 (PANK2) gene. Symptomatic presentation included stuttering dysarthria, dystonic posturing, increased limb and axial muscle tone, choreoathetosis, stereotyped motor behaviors, and obsessive-compulsive symptomatology since adolescence. Extensive neuropsychological testing at 40 and 44 years of age revealed a relatively normal IQ and stable cognitive pattern overall. This case demonstrates that HSD patients who survive into middle age should not be assumed to have a progressive dementia. In such cases, atypical behavioral problems such as persistent obsessions and compulsions may be present instead.

  13. Recent Advances and Review on Treatment of Stiff Person Syndrome in Adults and Pediatric Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatti, Adnan Bashir; Gazali, Zarine Anwar

    2015-12-22

    Stiff Person Syndrome (SPS) is one of the rarest autoimmune neurological disorders, which is mostly reported in women. It is characterised by fluctuating muscle rigidity and spasms. There are many variants of SPS, these include the classical SPS, Stiff Leg Syndrome (SLS), paraneoplastic variant, gait ataxia, dysarthria, and abnormal eye movements. Studies have shown that the paraneoplastic variant of SPS is more common in patients with breast cancer who harbour amphiphysin antibodies, followed by colon cancer, lung cancer, Hodgkin's disease, and malignant thymoma.  Currently, the treatment for SPS revolves around improving the quality of life by reducing the symptoms as far as possible with the use of GABAergic agonists, such as diazepam or other benzodiazepines, steroids, plasmapheresis, and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). There have been random clinical trials with Rituximab, but nothing concrete has been suggested. A treatment approach with standard drugs and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) seems to be promising.

  14. Migraine Infarction. Case Report

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    Yoany Mesa Barrera

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Migraine is considered like a risk factor for ischemic ictus in adult young people. In spite of the criteria established for the treatment of the migraine infarct, they are not always fulfilled strictly, permitting certain flexibility in the aforementioned treatment. The case of a patient with a background of migraine with auras, who suffers an ischemic cerebral migraine infarct at the course of a migraine crisis, is presented. The ictus was manifested like an especial right hemiparesis of the female sex in fertile age. The prognosis is good with low risk of recurrence, with unstable disorders and dysarthria. The laboratories studies were normal and the cerebral infarct was detected in the magnetic resonance, at the half left cerebral artery's territory. The patient had favorable evolution without sequel.

  15. Profile of communication disorders in HIV-infected individuals: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Mili Mary; Bhat, Jayashree S

    2008-01-01

    Communication is the very essence of life for humans. This is made possible by the highly complex neurophysiological mechanisms governing humans. Any disturbance to this system can result in impairments of communication. HIV infection is one such disease. In India, the management of such individuals is usually restricted to life sustenance. Little importance is given to their communication problems, which play a vital role in day-to-day functioning. It is with this background that this study was conducted. Eight HIV-infected individuals participated in the study. They were subjected to assessment procedures that included the following tests: Western Aphasia Battery, Frenchay Dysarthria Assessment, Standard Articulation test, Fluency test, and subjective assessment of vocal parameters by a speech language pathologist. The results of the study reveal that individuals with HIV-1 infection show a varied picture of affected parameters of voice, swallowing, and oral motor functioning.

  16. An unusual case of osmotic demyelination syndrome without electrolyte changes in a patient with diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrikant S Kote

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Central pontine myelinolysis (CPM is a demyelinating disease of the pons which is also associated with the demyelination of extrapontine areas of the central nervous system. Although the aetiology and pathogenesis are unclear, CPM is usually associated with hyponatremia or its rapid correction. Malnutrition and chronic alcoholism are also the common underlying conditions. Herein, we report a rare presentation of ODS, secondary to hyperosmolar hyperglycaemic state. We observed a 37-year-old female with diabetes type 1 and hypertension who presented with ataxia, dysarthria and pseudobulbar effect which evolved over a duration of few weeks at home with no evidence of hyponatremia or its rapid correction and no history of alcohol abuse or malnutrition.

  17. Improvement in freezing phenomenon of Parkinson's disease after DL-threo-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylserine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogawa,Norio

    1984-06-01

    Full Text Available A 77-year-old man with Parkinson's disease of long standing, under treatment with L-DOPA and benserazide, was administered DL-threo-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylserine (DL-threo-DOPS, a precursor of norepinephrine, for 10 days. With this administration the patient's freezing phenomenon was remarkably improved, and his dysarthria also showed improvement. When DL-threo-DOPS was suspended, the frozen gait returned on the third day to almost the former level, even though he continued to receive L-DOPA and benserazide. After administration of DL-threo-DOPS, the CSF level of 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG, a major metabolite of norepinephrine, was 127.5% of the pretreatment level. These observations suggest that DL-threo-DOPS can pass through the blood-brain barrier and change to norepinephrine, and that DL-threo-DOPS may be beneficial in the treatment of the freezing phenomenon of Parkinson's disease.

  18. Clinical correlates of leukoaraiosis: A study of 175 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rustom S Wadia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In India, the correlates of leukoaraiosis (LA have not been widely reported. This study was designed to investigate the factors which correlate with LA. Materials and Methods: We included patients with LA who consented for the study and graded their severity on the basis of Fazekas scale. We excluded patients with LA who did not consent/cooperate for the study as also patients with other white matter changes which mimic LA. Results: LA is a common and under-rated cause of disability. Presentations include cognitive decline, gait disturbance, dysarthria, bladder/bowel sphincter disturbances, and increased risk of stroke. The comorbidities include hyperhomocysteinemia, hypertension, dyslipidemia, tobacco use, ischemic heart disease, previous stroke, atrial fibrillation, chronic renal failure, and bariatric surgery.

  19. A progressive multifocal neurological syndrome in a 42-year-old woman.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cryan, Jane

    2012-02-01

    This is the case of a 42-year-old female who presented with transient dizziness. Her symptoms and signs progressed to include dysarthria, ataxia and cognitive decline over 2 years, such that she was unable to care for herself. She died 4 years after first presentation without a diagnosis. Investigations revealed a normochromic normocytic anaemia. Cerebrospinal fluid was normal. Serial computed tomography brain showed a wedge-shaped frontal infarct but no progressive changes. Examination at autopsy showed discoloration of the gray and white matter of the brain and spinal cord.Microscopy of leptomeningeal and parenchymal vessels showed they were filled with atypical B lymphocytes confined to the intravascular space with multiple infarcts in the brain, cerebellum and spinal cord. A diagnosis of intravascular B cell lymphoma was made and is discussed.

  20. Dysfunctions of the stomatognathic system and vocal aspects in Fahr disease: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Karoline Weber dos; Fraga, Bruno Francisco de; Cardoso, Maria Cristina de Almeida Freitas

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to report the case of a patient with Fahr's Disease in order to describe the main stomatognathic and vocal changes that can be found in individuals with this disease. In order to establish the diagnosis, an assessment of the conditions of orofacial motor system and speech production, as well the efficiency of swallowing, was realized. Based on these assessments, there were difficulties in coordinating and sustaining muscle during speech and presence of oropharyngeal dysphagia. Speech disorders found in Fahr's disease manifest themselves in complex and cover various aspects of phonological knowledge and the diseases that affect the basal ganglia have similar frames of speech-language disorders of the stomatognathic system, being able to present a picture of dysarthria.

  1. Cortical Blindness in a Child Secondary to Mycoplasma pneumoniae Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Tirado, A; Jimenez-Rolando, B; Noval, S; Martinez Bermejo, A

    2017-01-01

    Our objective is to present a case of an uncommon complication associated with Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection in a child where cortical blindness was the main clinical feature. Stroke due to an infection by M. pneumoniae is very uncommon. No consensus has been reached on the pathogenesis, although several pathogenic mechanisms have been proposed. Occlusion of posterior cerebral circulation is the most uncommon central nervous system complication of M. pneumoniae infection being reported. Symptoms are usually hemiplegia and dysarthria. We report a case of a 6-year-old boy who suffered cortical blindness due to a stroke 2 days after M. pneumoniae infection. This is the first case of documented cortical blindness due to posterior cerebral arteries occlusion in children after M. pneumoniae infection.

  2. SCA2 Presenting With Cognitive Regression in Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramocki, Melissa B.; Chapieski, Lynn; McDonald, Ryan O.; Fernandez, Fabio; Malphrus, Amy D.

    2009-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) typically presents in adulthood with progressive ataxia, dysarthria, tremor, and slow saccadic eye movements. Childhood onset SCA2 is rare and only the infantile onset form has been well-characterized clinically. This article describes a girl who met all developmental milestones until age 3 ½ years when she experienced cognitive regression that preceded motor regression by 6 months. A diagnosis of SCA2 was delayed until she presented to our emergency room at age 7 years. We document the results of her neuropsychological evaluation at both timepoints. This case broadens the spectrum of SCA2 presentation in childhood, highlights the importance of considering a spinocerebellar ataxia in a child who presents with cognitive regression only, and extends currently available clinical information to help clinicians discuss prognosis in childhood SCA2. PMID:18344458

  3. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 presenting with cognitive regression in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramocki, Melissa B; Chapieski, Lynn; McDonald, Ryan O; Fernandez, Fabio; Malphrus, Amy D

    2008-09-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 typically presents in adulthood with progressive ataxia, dysarthria, tremor, and slow saccadic eye movements. Childhood-onset spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 is rare, and only the infantile-onset form has been well characterized clinically. This article describes a girl who met all developmental milestones until age 3(1/2) years, when she experienced cognitive regression that preceded motor regression by 6 months. A diagnosis of spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 was delayed until she presented to the emergency department at age 7 years. This report documents the results of her neuropsychologic evaluation at both time points. This case broadens the spectrum of spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 presentation in childhood, highlights the importance of considering a spinocerebellar ataxia in a child who presents with cognitive regression only, and extends currently available clinical information to help clinicians discuss the prognosis in childhood spinocerebellar ataxia type 2.

  4. Psychiatric disorder in two siblings with hallervorden-spatz disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunwoo, Young-Kyung; Lee, Jeong-Seop; Kim, Won-Hyoung; Shin, Yong-Bum; Lee, Myung-Ji; Cho, In-Hee; Ock, Sun-Myeong

    2009-09-01

    Hallervorden-Spatz disease (HSD) is a rare autosomal-recessive hereditary disorder characterized by the early onset of progressive movement alterations, including dystonia, rigidity, choreoathetosis, and mental deterioration. HSD is also associated with a variety of psychiatric symptoms, primarily depression and mental deterioration. However, psychosis has rarely been reported as a major symptom of HSD. We report two siblings who presented psychiatric symptoms as major clinical presentations, accompanied by ataxic and spastic gait, dysarthria, and typical neuroimaging findings of HSD. A 14-year-old girl presented complex motor tics, stereotypic behavior and anxiety symptoms. Her older brother, a 16-year-old boy, presented prominent auditory hallucinations, persecutory delusions and social withdrawal symptoms. Psychiatric symptoms were improved after atypical antipsychotic treatment. HSD is a rare disease but should be carefully considered in the diagnosis of patients with both motor disorder and various psychiatric symptoms.

  5. Music therapy protocol development to enhance swallowing training for stroke patients with dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo Ji

    2010-01-01

    Considering the devastating condition of dysphagia, it is necessary to provide intensive therapeutic regimen based on interdisciplinary approach. In this aspect, music-enhanced swallowing protocol was developed through a pilot study. Then, the modified protocol from a pilot study was examined with 8 stroke patients in a local hospital. The protocol was designed to improve oral motor control, laryngeal elevation, breathing, and swallowing functions. The dependent variables measured included reflex, respiration, and laryngeal functions using the Frenchay Dysarthria assessment. Results from the initial to the midevaluation showed that pitch in the laryngeal category were statistically significant after 6th sessions. After the 12th session, when the final evaluation was compared with the initial assessment, additional categories revealed statistically significant changes. It is recommended that this study should be replicated with a control group and a larger sample using either FEES or video fluoroscopy for scientific data to further substantiate music therapy outcomes in stroke rehabilitation.

  6. An unusual cause of adult onset cerebellar ataxia with hypogonadism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menon Ramshekhar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We report an unusual case of sporadic adult onset cerebellar ataxia with hypogonadism. A 40-year-old unmarried man presented with progressive ataxia and dysarthria along with complaints of non-development of secondary sexual characteristics and erectile dysfunction. There were complaints of intermittent diarrhea. Clinical examination revealed a pan-cerebellar syndrome with features of hypoandrogenism. No eye movement abnormalities were evident. There were signs of malabsorption. Investigations confirmed the presence of auto-antibodies found in celiac disease, and a duodenal biopsy confirmed the same. Hypoandrogenism was postulated to be due to hypergonadotropic hypogonadism which has been mentioned in a few patients of celiac disease. However, the pattern seen in our patient was of a hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. This is probably secondary to an autoimmune hypophysitis seen in some patients in the absence of other clinical manifestations. Autoantibody testing should be a diagnostic necessity in any adult with a sporadic cerebellar ataxia.

  7. Acute functional deterioration in a child with cerebral palsy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Smyth, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    We describe a case of acute functional deterioration in a 13-year-old girl with severe spastic diplegia (GMFCS III) and a new diagnosis of diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG). She presented with acute deterioration in mobility and motor function over 1 month, which was associated with dysarthria, dysphagia and behavioural change. Her mother had noticed subtle functional deterioration over the 2 months prior to this. Her physiotherapist who was concerned about her acute functional deterioration referred her for emergency review. Neurological imaging revealed a diffuse pontine lesion consistent with DIPG. She was subsequently referred to oncology. She deteriorated further, clinically, over the next few days and following discussion with the team; her family opted for palliative treatment, given the poor prognosis associated with DIPG.

  8. Relationship between acoustic measures and judgments of intelligibility in Parkinson’s disease: A within-speaker approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    FEENAUGHTY, LYNDA; TJADEN, KRIS; SUSSMAN, JOAN

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the acoustic basis of within-speaker, across-utterance variation in sentence intelligibility for 12 speakers with dysarthria secondary to Parkinson’s disease (PD). Acoustic measures were also obtained for 12 healthy controls for comparison to speakers with PD. Speakers read sentences using their typical speech style. Acoustic measures of speech rate, articulatory rate, fundamental frequency, sound pressure level and F2 interquartile range (F2 IQR) were obtained. A group of listeners judged sentence intelligibility using a computerized visual-analog scale. Relationships between judgments of intelligibility and acoustic measures were determined for individual speakers with PD. Relationships among acoustic measures were also quantified. Although considerable variability was noted, articulatory rate, fundamental frequency and F2 IQR were most frequently associated with within-speaker variation in sentence intelligibility. Results suggest that diversity among speakers with PD should be considered when interpreting results from group analyses. PMID:24874184

  9. [Chronic subdural hematoma with a markedly fibrous hypertrophic membrane. Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, M; Kuwana, N; Kojima, Y; Tanaka, N; Kitamura, H

    1990-01-01

    A 40-year-old female, who had taken low-dose oral contraceptives for 2 months before onset, developed transient dysarthria, left hemiparesis, and left hemihypesthesia. One month later, a computed tomography (CT) scan revealed a uniformly enhanced, convex-shaped, hypertrophic membrane with a lobulated lumen in the subdural space of the right parietal region. A right parietal craniotomy was performed. The membrane, consisting of elastic-hard, hypertrophic granulation tissue and yellowish, sticky fluid in the lumen, was readily freed and totally extirpated. Subsequently, the patient recovered without persistent symptoms. Light microscopic examination detected the sinusoidal channel layer and the fibrous layer in an alternating configuration, along with intramembranous hemorrhagic foci. Such hypertrophy must have been caused by repeated intramembranous hemorrhages and reactive granulation. Such findings of hematoma membrane have never previously been reported. Thus, this is an interesting case, clearly distinguished from typical chronic subdural hematoma.

  10. Toxic Effects of Mercury on the Cardiovascular and Central Nervous Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Fernandes Azevedo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental contamination has exposed humans to various metal agents, including mercury. This exposure is more common than expected, and the health consequences of such exposure remain unclear. For many years, mercury was used in a wide variety of human activities, and now, exposure to this metal from both natural and artificial sources is significantly increasing. Many studies show that high exposure to mercury induces changes in the central nervous system, potentially resulting in irritability, fatigue, behavioral changes, tremors, headaches, hearing and cognitive loss, dysarthria, incoordination, hallucinations, and death. In the cardiovascular system, mercury induces hypertension in humans and animals that has wide-ranging consequences, including alterations in endothelial function. The results described in this paper indicate that mercury exposure, even at low doses, affects endothelial and cardiovascular function. As a result, the reference values defining the limits for the absence of danger should be reduced.

  11. A prospective study of 137 patients with Parkinson's disease and anosmia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soltanzadeh A

    1997-08-01

    Full Text Available In this research we tried to study frequency of clinical manifestations in Parkinson's disease. Hence, a prospective study was conducted in 317 patients who were affected by Parkinson's disease. In a questionnaire we collected data of patient's age, gender and signs and symptoms and then analyzed them. The most common features in our patients were tremor and muscular rigidity. Olfactory dysfunction was observed in 61% of our patients. Dysarthria, stooped posture, fixed facial expression, intellectual deterioration and the on-off response had various frequency among the patients. A new and important point in our research was considerable frequency of Anosmia or Hyposmia in spite of it's low prevalence among the patients of previous studies.

  12. Acquired hepatocerebral degeneration: A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-Xing Chen; Ping Wang; Sen-Xiang Yan; You-Ming Li; Chao-Hui Yu; Ling-Ling Jiang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Acquired hepatocerebral degeneration (AHD) is an exceptional type of hepatic encephalopathies (HE). It is characterized by neuropsychiatric and extrapyramidal symptomathology similar to that seen in hepatolenticular degeneration (Wilson's disease). In this paper, we report a case of AHD with unusual presenting features.METHODS: A 28-year-old man with AHD was described and the literature was reviewed.RESULTS: The man had a history of HBV-related liver cirrhosis. He was admitted to our hospital with apathy,dysarthria, mild consciousness impairment and extrapyramidal symptoms after hematemesis. By review of the literature,cases with AHD often did not present consciousness impairment. So our case was once diagnosed incorrectly as Wilson's disease.CONCLUSION: AHD is a rare syndrome and its variable clinical manifestations make it difficult to be diagnosed.But we believe that extensive examination and thorough understanding of the disease are beneficial to a correct diagnosis. Moreover, biocoene is effective in treating the case.

  13. A case of hypoglycemic hemiparesis and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, Tetsuhiro; Meguro, Shu; Soeda, Yukie; Itoh, Arata; Kawai, Toshihide; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2012-08-01

    An 89-year-old man with diabetes treated with metformin 500 mg/day and glimepiride 4 mg/day was hospitalized because of hypoglycemic right hemiparesis and dysarthria (casual glucose value 1.8 mmol/L), which resolved quickly following administration of 40 mL of 40% dextrose. Hemiparesis is a rare symptom (4.2%) of hypoglycemia. There are about 200 case reports of hypoglycemic hemiparesis. The average glucose level at which hemiparesis developed was 1.8 mmol/L. Right-sided hemiparesis predominated (R 66%; L 34%). On imaging studies, abnormal findings were frequently observed in the internal capsule or splenium of the corpus callosum. The mechanism of hemiparesis is not fully understood. The existence of cases in which hypoglycemia cannot be distinguished from stroke on imaging studies suggests the importance of measurement of the blood glucose level when the symptoms of stroke are first recognized.

  14. [Cerebral artery thrombosis in pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charco Roca, L M; Ortiz Sanchez, V E; Hernandez Gutierrez-Manchon, O; Quesada Villar, J; Bonmatí García, L; Rubio Postigo, G

    2015-11-01

    A 28 year old woman, ASA I, who, in the final stages of her pregnancy presented with signs of neural deficit that consisted of distortion of the oral commissure, dysphagia, dysarthria, and weakness on the left side of the body. She was diagnosed with thrombosis in a segment of the right middle cerebral artery which led to an ischemic area in the right frontal lobe. Termination of pregnancy and conservative treatment was decided, with good resolution of the symptoms. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. HALLERVORDEN-SPATZ DISEASE - A RARE CASE REPORT - “Eye of th e Tiger” Sign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mallikarjunaiah H. S.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background:Hallervorden-Spatz disease (HSD is a rare neurological disease characterized by progressivedegeneration of basal ganglia, globuspallidus and reticular part of the substantianigra, produced byironaccumulation. The defect has been found in the pantothenate kinase 2 (PANK2 producing gene locatedinchromosome 20p13-p12.3. Clinical presentations include dystonia, dysarthria, dysphasia, dementia, severemental retardation and severe movement disability may develop at later stages. Rare clinical features includerigidity, choreoathetosis, seizures, optic atrophy and pigmentary retinopathy. The characteristic MRI brainpattern of HSD shows the “eye of the tiger ” pattern. Treatment is symptomatic. We present the case of apatient, 19 years old boy with Hallervorden-Spatz disease who came to our physiotherapy department withfeatures of spasticity, dystonia and gait difficulty. He was diagnosed on the basis of clinical findings and typicalMRI brain of “eye of the tiger” pattern. His detailed evaluation was carried out and physiotherapy treatmentwas started.

  16. Absence of the Autophagy Adaptor SQSTM1/p62 Causes Childhood-Onset Neurodegeneration with Ataxia, Dystonia, and Gaze Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haack, Tobias B; Ignatius, Erika; Calvo-Garrido, Javier; Iuso, Arcangela; Isohanni, Pirjo; Maffezzini, Camilla; Lönnqvist, Tuula; Suomalainen, Anu; Gorza, Matteo; Kremer, Laura S; Graf, Elisabeth; Hartig, Monika; Berutti, Riccardo; Paucar, Martin; Svenningsson, Per; Stranneheim, Henrik; Brandberg, Göran; Wedell, Anna; Kurian, Manju A; Hayflick, Susan A; Venco, Paola; Tiranti, Valeria; Strom, Tim M; Dichgans, Martin; Horvath, Rita; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Freyer, Christoph; Meitinger, Thomas; Prokisch, Holger; Senderek, Jan; Wredenberg, Anna; Carroll, Christopher J; Klopstock, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    SQSTM1 (sequestosome 1; also known as p62) encodes a multidomain scaffolding protein involved in various key cellular processes, including the removal of damaged mitochondria by its function as a selective autophagy receptor. Heterozygous variants in SQSTM1 have been associated with Paget disease of the bone and might contribute to neurodegeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Using exome sequencing, we identified three different biallelic loss-of-function variants in SQSTM1 in nine affected individuals from four families with a childhood- or adolescence-onset neurodegenerative disorder characterized by gait abnormalities, ataxia, dysarthria, dystonia, vertical gaze palsy, and cognitive decline. We confirmed absence of the SQSTM1/p62 protein in affected individuals' fibroblasts and found evidence of a defect in the early response to mitochondrial depolarization and autophagosome formation. Our findings expand the SQSTM1-associated phenotypic spectrum and lend further support to the concept of disturbed selective autophagy pathways in neurodegenerative diseases.

  17. Percutaneous reconstruction of the innominate bifurcation using the retrograde 'kissing stents' technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagata, Shun-ichi; Kazekawa, Kiyoshi; Matsubara, Shuko [Fukuoka University Chikushi Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Chikushino, Fukuoka (Japan); Sugata, Sei [Bironoki Neurosurgical Hospital, Shibushi, Kagoshima (Japan)

    2006-08-15

    Obstructions of the supraaortic vessels are an important cause of morbidity associated with a variety of symptoms. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty has evolved as an effective and safe treatment modality for occlusive lesions of the supraaortic vessels. However, the endovascular management of an innominate bifurcation has not previously been reported. A 53-year-old female with a history of systematic hypertension, diabetes mellitus and hypercholesterolemia presented with left hemiparesis and dysarthria. Angiography of the innominate artery showed a stenosis of the innominate bifurcation. The lesion was successfully treated using the retrograde kissing stent technique via a brachial approach and an exposed direct carotid approach. The retrograde kissing stent technique for the treatment of a stenosis of the innominate bifurcation was found to be a safe and effective alternative to conventional surgery. (orig.)

  18. Five cases of a Joseph disease family with non-REM sleep apnea and MRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitamura, Junichi; Tsuruta, Kazuhito; Yamamura, Yoshinori; Kurihara, Teruyuki; Matsukura, Shigeru

    1987-09-01

    Four male and one female patients of a new Joseph disease family in southern Kyushu are presented. This disorder is inherited by autosomal dominant trait. The clinical symptoms are characterized by bulging eyes, ophthalmoplegia, dysarthria, rigospasticity of the lower limbs, marked dystonia and bradykinesia. In our cases, extrapyramidal symptoms were improved by amantadine and L-dopa therapy. CSF homovanilic acid (HVA) was markedly reduced. Muscle biopsy and electromyographic studies revealed neurogenic changes. MRI revealed mild atrophy of frontal lobe and cerebellum, and marked atrophy of brain stem. These findings were consistent with the clinical manifestations. Our case had central type sleep apnea by sleep EEG and polygraphic studies. This is the first report about sleep apnea and MRI of Joseph disease.

  19. Ramsay Hunt Syndrome Associated with Central Nervous System Involvement in an Adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommy L. H. Chan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ramsay Hunt syndrome associated with varicella zoster virus reactivation affecting the central nervous system is rare. We describe a 55-year-old diabetic female who presented with gait ataxia, right peripheral facial palsy, and painful vesicular lesions involving her right ear. Later, she developed dysmetria, fluctuating diplopia, and dysarthria. Varicella zoster virus was detected in the cerebrospinal fluid by polymerase chain reaction. She was diagnosed with Ramsay Hunt syndrome associated with spread to the central nervous system. Her facial palsy completely resolved within 48 hours of treatment with intravenous acyclovir 10 mg/kg every 8 hours. However, cerebellar symptoms did not improve until a tapering course of steroid therapy was initiated.

  20. Central retinal artery occlusion with concomitant ipsilateral cerebral infarction after cosmetic facial injections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jeong-Ho; Ahn, Seong Joon; Woo, Se Joon; Jung, Cheolkyu; Chang, Jun Young; Chung, Jin-Heon; Han, Moon-Ku

    2014-11-15

    We report 2 cases of central retinal artery occlusion with concomitant ipsilateral cerebral infarction after cosmetic facial injections and a literature review. The 2 patients were two healthy women, in which cosmetic facial injections with autologous fat and filler were performed, respectively. The patients had no light perception at the final visit and their conditions led to memory retrieval disturbance in case 1 and right arm weakness, dysarthria, facial palsy, and ophthalmoplegia in case 2. Neuroimaging showed multifocal small infarctions in the ipsilateral frontal lobe with occlusion of the ophthalmic artery in case 1 and multiple infarctions in the ipsilateral anterior and middle cerebral artery territories with subsequent hemorrhagic transformation in case 2. Poor visual prognosis and neurological complications can occur in healthy adults undergoing cosmetic facial injection, and all patients should be informed of this risk before the procedure.

  1. Friedreich Ataxia Clinical Outcome Measures: Natural History Evaluation in 410 Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regner, Sean R.; Wilcox, Nicholas; Friedman, Lisa S.; Seyer, Lauren; Schadt, Kim; Brigatti, Karlla W.; Perlman, Susan; Delatycki, Martin; Wilmot, George R.; Gomez, Christopher M.; Bushara, Khalaf O.; Mathews, Katherine D.; Subramony, S.H.; Ashizawa, Tetsuo; Ravina, Bernard; Brocht, Alicia; Farmer, Jennifer M.; Lynch, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Friedreich ataxia is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by ataxia, dysarthria, and areflexia. We report the progress of a large international non-interventional cohort (n = 410), tracking the natural history of disease progression using the neurological exam-based Friedreich Ataxia Rating Scale. We analyzed the rate of progression with cross-sectional analysis and longitudinal analysis over a 2-year period. The Friedreich Ataxia Rating Scale captured disease progression when used at 1 and 2 years following initial evaluation, with a lower ratio of standard deviation of change to mean change over 2 years of evaluation. However, modeling of disease progression identified substantial ceiling effects in the Friedreich Ataxia Rating Scale, suggesting this measure is most useful in patients before maximal deficit is approached. PMID:22752494

  2. Hereditary spastic paraplegia with cerebellar ataxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J E; Johnsen, B; Koefoed, P

    2004-01-01

    Complex forms of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) are rare and usually transmitted in an autosomal recessive pattern. A family of four generations with autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (AD-HSP) and a complex phenotype with variably expressed co-existing ataxia, dysarthria...... in those individuals who were clinically affected by a complex phenotype consisting of HSP and cerebellar ataxia. Other features noted in this kindred including epilepsy, cognitive impairment, depression, and migraine did not segregate with the HSP phenotype or mutation, and therefore the significance...... relatively decreased regional cerebral blood flow in most of the cerebellum. We conclude that this kindred demonstrates a considerable overlap between cerebellar ataxia and spastic paraplegia, emphasizing the marked clinical heterogeneity of HSP associated with spastin mutations....

  3. Central pontine and extrapontine myelinolysis that developed during alcohol withdrawal, without hyponatremia, in a chronic alcoholic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Jae Young; Park, Sung Kyung; Han, Si Ryung; Song, In Uk

    2010-01-01

    Central pontine myelinolysis (CPM) and extrapontine myelinolysis (EPM) are osmotic demyelination syndrome. A 45-year-old man with a history of alcoholism visited the ER with dysarthria and dysphagia for 2 days. These symptoms occurred 3 days after he had stopped drinking alcohol. The neurological symptoms progressed to anarthria, pseudobulbar palsy and gait disturbance. During admission, the electrolyte studies were within the normal range. Diffusion-weighted images revealed high signal intensities in the pons, thalamus and basal ganglia. Apparent diffusion coefficient image showed low signal intensities in the pontine lesion, but isosignal intensities in the extrapontine lesion. The symptoms gradually improved after 1 month with only conservative treatment. The 1 month-follow-up MRI showed significant reduction of the previous extrapontine lesions. These findings suggest that cytotoxic edema is central to the pathogenesis of CPM, but vasogenic edema plays an important role in the pathogenesis of EPM occurring during alcohol withdrawal.

  4. Opercular myoclonic-anarthric status epilepticus: A report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janapareddy Vijaya Bhaskara Rao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Opercular myoclonic-anarthric status epilepticus (OMASE is an uncommon disorder of diverse etiology. This condition is characterized by fluctuating cortical dysarthria associated with epileptic myoclonus involving glossopharyngeal musculature bilaterally. We report two cases of OMASE of vascular etiology in adults. In both patients, ictally clonic expression was consistent with epilepsia partialis continua and bilateral, symmetrical involvement of soft palate in one patient and tongue, lips, chin and inferior jaw in both patients due to bilateral projections of the inferior corticonuclear pathways. The inferior rolandic area of dominant and high frontal region in non-dominant hemispheres were involved by an epileptogenic lesion of vascular etiology, which was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging of brain and single photon emission computerized tomography. Carotid Doppler study showed thrombosis of internal carotid artery in both patients, suggestive of an embolic origin. Early recognition of OMASE is important for early management of carotid occlusive disease.

  5. Hashimoto′s encephalopathy and motor neuron disease: A common autoimmune pathogenesis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harzheim Michael

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Hashimoto′s encephalopathy is a rare complication of autoimmune thyroiditis not associated with thyroidal function decline. We report a 50-year-old man presenting with lower motor neuron symptoms evolving over 3 years and changes in behavior associated with attentive and cognitive impairment occurring in the last few months. Memory deficits, emotional instability, marked dysarthria, mild symmetric weakness of the lower extremities, and fasciculations were the most striking clinical features. EEG was diffusely slow, cranial MRI revealed multiple subcortical white matter lesions, CSF protein was slightly elevated, electromyographic recordings showed acute and chronic denervation, and extremely high TPO antibody titers were found in the serum. Hashimoto′s encephalopathy and lower motor neuron disease were diagnosed. As repeated high-dose intravenous methylprednisolone administration followed by oral tapering improved both central nervous system and lower motor neuron symptoms, the question was raised whether there was a common autoimmune pathogenesis of both clinically distinct diseases.

  6. NIPA1 mutation in complex hereditary spastic paraplegia with epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenstrup, Kirsten; Møller, R S; Christensen, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    or signs are found. Mutations in the NIPA1 gene have been reported to cause spastic paraplegia type 6 (SPG6) in 10 families. SPG6 is a rare form of autosomal dominantly inherited HSP associated with a pure phenotype; however, in one complex SPG6 family, idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) has been...... reported missense mutation c.316G>A, p.Gly106Arg, was identified in a complex HSP patient with spastic dysarthria, facial dystonia, atrophy of the small hand muscles, upper limb spasticity, and presumably IGE. The epilepsy co-segregated with HSP in the family. Conclusion: NIPA1 mutations were rare in our...... population of patients with HSP, but can be found in patients with complex HSP. Epilepsy might be more common in SPG6 than in other forms of HSP because of a genetic risk factor closely linked to NIPA1....

  7. Anti-Yo Mediated Paraneoplastic Cerebellar Degeneration Associated with Pseudobulbar Affect in a Patient with Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison N. Martin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD is a rare anti-Yo mediated paraneoplastic syndromes rarely that is infrequently associated with breast cancer. We present a case of a 52-year-old female presenting with diplopia, gait instability, dysarthria, dysphagia, nystagmus, and, most notably, new onset paroxysmal episodes of uncontrollable crying concerning for pseudobulbar affect (PBA. Serologic testing showed anti-Yo antibodies. The patient was found to have stage IIIA breast cancer as the inciting cause of the paraneoplastic syndrome. The patient was treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy, modified radical mastectomy, adjuvant Herceptin, and pertuzumab. She was given IVIG for paraneoplastic syndrome, antidepressants, and dextromethorphan-quinidine (Nuedexta, the first FDA-approved therapy for PBA. With multimodality therapy, she demonstrated significant improvement in neurologic and mood symptoms associated with PCD and PBA.

  8. [A young patient of acute encephalitis complicated with acyclovir encephalopathy without renal dysfunction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomori, Koji; Isozumi, Kazuo; Motohashi, Sachiko; Komatsumoto, Satoru; Fukuuchi, Yasuo

    2003-08-01

    A previously healthy 30-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital because of impaired consciousness after convulsion. A temporary diagnosis of herpes simplex encephalitis was made, and intravenous acyclovir (ACV) therapy (250 mg four times daily in normal saline over 2 hours) was started. Three days later, she became confused, and was having hallucinations, dysarthria and generalized painful seizures occurred without focal neurologic deficit. Whether the neuropsychiatric symptoms were related to herpes simplex encephalitis or acyclovir neurotoxity was initially unclear. The brain MRI and lumbar puncture findings were initially normal, but abnormal FLAIR lesions appeared later. ACV-associated encephalopathy was considered. ACV was discontinued, and she recovered from the neurological disorder within 24 hours. Although blood levels of acyclovir were not determined, it is unlikely that they were in a toxic range, in view of her normal renal function.

  9. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis associated with pregnancy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyagi A

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is the most common, progressive motor neurone disease but is rare in the obstetric population. Only 4 cases have been described in the English literature since 1975. We describe a 29 year old woman who presented with ataxia, lower limb weakness and dysarthria 4 weeks after the birth of her first child. The symptoms had onset during the pregnancy but had not been considered remarkable. There were clinical features of upper and lower motor neurone involvement without any sensory loss. MRI of brain and spine was normal. CSF analysis was negative. EMG studies confirmed the presence of widespread anterior horn cell dysfunction compatible with ALS. The patient was commenced on Riluzole and has progressed clinically, at 12 months post diagnosis.

  10. Psycholinguistic and motor theories of apraxia of speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Wolfram

    2002-11-01

    This article sketches the relationships between modern conceptions of apraxia of speech (AOS) and current models of neuromotor and neurolinguistic disorders. The first section is devoted to neurophysiological perspectives of AOS, and its relation to dysarthrias and to limb apraxia is discussed. The second section introduces the logogen model and considers AOS in relation to supramodal aspects of aphasia. In the third section, AOS with the background of psycholinguistic models of spoken language production, including the Levelt model and connectionist models, is discussed. In the fourth section, the view of AOS as a disorder of speech motor programming is discussed against the background of theories from experimental psychology. The final section considers two models of speech motor control and their relation to AOS. The article discusses the strengths and weaknesses of these approaches.

  11. Acanthocytosis, retinitis pigmentosa, and pallidal degeneration: a report of three patients, including the second reported case with hypoprebetalipoproteinemia (HARP syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orrell, R W; Amrolia, P J; Heald, A; Cleland, P G; Owen, J S; Morgan-Hughes, J A; Harding, A E; Marsden, C D

    1995-03-01

    We describe an example of a variant of Hallervorden-Spatz disease, characterized by hypoprebeta-lipoproteinemia, acanthocytosis, retinitis pigmentosa, and pallidal degeneration (HARP syndrome), in an 18-year-old woman who presented with longstanding intellectual subnormality, night blindness, and a 2-year history of orobuccolingual dystonia causing dysarthria and dysphagia. Investigation showed acanthocytosis and hypoprebetalipoproteinemia, and electroretinograms were typical of tapetoretinal degeneration. T2-weighted MRI showed decreased signal intensity in the pallidal nuclei with central hyperintensity, constituting the "eye-of-the-tiger" sign. The patient's sister and mother have a similar lipid disorder but no retinal or neurologic disease. We also report two patients with clinical and radiologic features similar to those of the patient with HARP syndrome but who had normal lipid studies. These various combinations of components of HARP syndrome may be caused by several distinct genetic diseases or may represent variable manifestations of a contiguous gene defect.

  12. Concomitant amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and paraclinical laboratory features of multiple sclerosis: coincidence or causal relationship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisow, Nadja; Meyer, Thomas; Paul, Friedemann

    2013-01-23

    We report a 55-year-old patient, presenting with paresis, muscle atrophy and dysarthria, all symptoms accordable to definite amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). However, MRI and cerebrospinal fluid show abnormalities typical of multiple sclerosis (MS). On the basis of this case report, we discuss possible overlaps between both diseases by comparing clinical and paraclinical features including laboratory, radiological and electrophysiological diagnostics. As genetic, as well as environmental, factors are assumed to be involved in the development of both the diseases, literature is reviewed according to similar cases, results of autopsies and possible parallels in pathogenesis. In summary, based on the data currently available, the hypothesis of ALS being a neurodegenerative multisystem disorder, a common pathophysiological pathway or, alternatively, a random comorbidity of ALS and MS in this patient has to be discussed.

  13. Wernicke’s encephalopathy following hyperemesis gravidarum: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    leila pourali

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Wernicke’s Korsakoff syndrome is the most important complication of severe thiamine deficiency. Confusion and gait ataxia are the most prevalent symptoms, respectively. The aim of this study was report of a case of Wernicke’s encephalopathy following hyperemesis gravidarum. Case report: A 28-years-old pregnant woman in 19th weeks of gestation referred to the hospital with hyperemesis, gait ataxia, and dysarthria. MRI showed hyperdense lesion which was characteristic of wernicke’s encephalopathy. Rapid improvement in patient’s condition occurred after thiamine infusion. Conclusion: In hyperemesis gravidarum, presence of either symptoms of ocular or mental disorder or ataxia must be considered to rull out Wernicke’s syndrome which can cause maternal death.

  14. Toxic Effects of Mercury on the Cardiovascular and Central Nervous Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes Azevedo, Bruna; Barros Furieri, Lorena; Peçanha, Franck Maciel; Wiggers, Giulia Alessandra; Frizera Vassallo, Paula; Ronacher Simões, Maylla; Fiorim, Jonaina; Rossi de Batista, Priscila; Fioresi, Mirian; Rossoni, Luciana; Stefanon, Ivanita; Alonso, María Jesus; Salaices, Mercedes; Valentim Vassallo, Dalton

    2012-01-01

    Environmental contamination has exposed humans to various metal agents, including mercury. This exposure is more common than expected, and the health consequences of such exposure remain unclear. For many years, mercury was used in a wide variety of human activities, and now, exposure to this metal from both natural and artificial sources is significantly increasing. Many studies show that high exposure to mercury induces changes in the central nervous system, potentially resulting in irritability, fatigue, behavioral changes, tremors, headaches, hearing and cognitive loss, dysarthria, incoordination, hallucinations, and death. In the cardiovascular system, mercury induces hypertension in humans and animals that has wide-ranging consequences, including alterations in endothelial function. The results described in this paper indicate that mercury exposure, even at low doses, affects endothelial and cardiovascular function. As a result, the reference values defining the limits for the absence of danger should be reduced. PMID:22811600

  15. Effortful echolalia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadano, K; Nakamura, H; Hamanaka, T

    1998-02-01

    We report three cases of effortful echolalia in patients with cerebral infarction. The clinical picture of speech disturbance is associated with Type 1 Transcortical Motor Aphasia (TCMA, Goldstein, 1915). The patients always spoke nonfluently with loss of speech initiative, dysarthria, dysprosody, agrammatism, and increased effort and were unable to repeat sentences longer than those containing four or six words. In conversation, they first repeated a few words spoken to them, and then produced self initiated speech. The initial repetition as well as the subsequent self initiated speech, which were realized equally laboriously, can be regarded as mitigated echolalia (Pick, 1924). They were always aware of their own echolalia and tried to control it without effect. These cases demonstrate that neither the ability to repeat nor fluent speech are always necessary for echolalia. The possibility that a lesion in the left medial frontal lobe, including the supplementary motor area, plays an important role in effortful echolalia is discussed.

  16. Myasthenia gravis as a 'stroke mimic'--it's all in the history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaik, Saiffuddin; Ul-Haq, Mian Ayaz; Emsley, Hedley C A

    2014-12-01

    An 85-year-old man presented to hospital as an emergency having difficulties with swallowing and speech. In the emergency department, he was assessed as having acute onset dysphagia and dysarthria in keeping with an acute stroke. Subsequently, it became apparent that although the symptoms were indeed of relatively acute onset, there was a clear description by the patient of fatigability and diurnal variation, prompting a working clinical diagnosis of myasthenia gravis. The patient followed a turbulent clinical course, and interpretation of investigation results proved not to be straightforward in the acute setting. Myasthenia gravis is an uncommon disorder but it is more common in the elderly. This case provides key learning points, particularly highlighting the value of prompt, accurate clinical assessment and the importance of adhering to the clinical diagnostic formulation.

  17. Neurofibromatosis type 1 associated with vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia and pontine ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannantoni, Nadia Mariagrazia; Broccolini, Aldobrando; Frisullo, Giovanni; Pilato, Fabio; Profice, Paolo; Morosetti, Roberta; Di Lella, Giuseppe; Zampino, Giuseppe; Della Marca, Giacomo

    2015-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a heterogeneous, common, neurocutaneous disorder presenting different complications during a life span, including cerebrovascular dysplasia. To our knowledge this is the first reported case of NF1 associated with vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia and pontine ischemic stroke. We describe a 57-year-old man with NF1 who presented an acute onset right-sided facial palsy and hemiplegia, dysarthria, and gait imbalance. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an acute left paramedian pontine infarct and a hypoplastic right vertebral artery. Brain Computed Tomography Angiography revealed the occurrence of vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia. Co-occurrence of VBD and NF1 might not be merely casual and it may significantly heighten the mortality rate in this multisystem disorder. We suggest a possible role of VBD in the genesis of our patient's clinical-radiological features and prompt the early detection of asymptomatic arteriopathy in individuals with NF1 in order to ameliorate patients' quality of life and life expectancy.

  18. Compulsive masturbation and chronic penile lymphedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrò, Rocco Salvatore; Galì, Alessandro; Marino, Silvia; Bramanti, Placido

    2012-06-01

    Chronic penile lymphedema arises from the abnormal retention of lymphatic fluid in the subcutaneous tissues and may be secondary to local and systemic medical conditions such as sexually transmitted diseases, filariasis, malignancy, local radiotherapy, and surgery. This case report aims to consider compulsive masturbation as a possible cause of chronic penile edema. A 40-year-old man was referred to our institute for behavioral disturbance, including compulsive masturbation. Neuropsychiatric evaluation showed moderate mental retardation, mild dysarthria and limb incoordination, anxiety, depressed mood, and impulse dyscontrol. Brain MRI pointed out diffuse white matter lesions. Urogenital examination revealed an uncircumcised penis with non-tender edema of the shaft and prepuce with areas of lichenification. Since the most common local and systemic causes of edema were excluded, chronic penile edema due to compulsive masturbation was diagnosed and the compulsive behavior treated with an antidepressant and low-dose neuroleptics. Compulsive masturbation should be taken into account when counselling patients with penile edema.

  19. Wilson′s disease presenting as isolated obsessive-compulsive disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumawat B

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Wilson′s disease (WD is a genetic neurodegenerative disorder; it exhibits wide heterogeneity in symptoms and usually presents with liver disease and/ or neuropsychiatric manifestations. The common neurological manifestations observed are dysarthria, gait disturbance, dystonia, rigidity, tremor, dysphagia and chorea. The frequent psychiatric manifestations reported are personality and mood changes, depression, phobias, cognitive impairment, psychosis, anxiety, compulsive and impulsive behavior. Isolated obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD is a rare presentation of WD. Reported herein is a case of a 17-year-old boy with isolated OCD. He presented to the psychiatrist with symptoms of contamination obsessions and washing compulsions, along with compulsion of repeated feet tapping, and was treated with adequate doses of fluoxetine for 6 months but did not improve. Later on, he was diagnosed as a case of WD and showed improvement with chelating and behavior therapy. This implies the importance of the occurrence of isolated psychological symptoms in WD.

  20. Neurobehavioral estimation of children with life-long increased lead exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benetou-Marantidou, A.; Nakou, S.; Micheloyannis, J.

    1988-11-01

    A battery of neurobehavioral examinations was carried out on 30 children who were 6-11 yr of age and who had resided near a lead smelter all their lives. Their blood lead levels were 35-60 micrograms/100 ml and erythrocyte protoporphyrin levels were greater than 100 micrograms/100 ml. Neurological examination revealed that they had a significantly higher incidence of pathological findings (e.g., muscle hypotonia, increased tendon reflexes, dysarthria, and dysdiadochokinesia) than children from an unpolluted area who were matched for age, sex, family size, and educational and socioeconomic status of the parents, but who had normal erythrocyte protoporphyrin levels. The children with elevated blood lead levels showed, after assessment by the Oseretsky test, retardation of motor maturation; they also scored higher on the minimal brain damage scale of the Rutter behavioral questionnaire. These differences persisted at a 4-yr follow-up, and their school performance was consistently poorer than that of the controls.

  1. Communication Support for People with ALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Beukelman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Almost all people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS experience a motor speech disorder, such as dysarthria, as the disease progresses. At some point, 80 to 95% of people with ALS are unable to meet their daily communication needs using natural speech. Unfortunately, once intelligibility begins to decrease, speech performance often deteriorates so rapidly that there is little time to implement an appropriate augmentative and alternative communication (AAC intervention; therefore, appropriate timing of referral for AAC assessment and intervention continues to be a most important clinical decision-making issue. AAC acceptance and use have increased considerably during the past decade. Many people use AAC until within a few weeks of their deaths.

  2. Abnormal uptake of technetium-99m hexakis-2-methoxyisobutylisonitrile in a primary cardiac lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medolago, G.; Virotta, G.; Bertocchi, C. (Ospedali Riuniti di Bergamo (Italy). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine); Piti, A.; Tespili, M.; D' Adda, F. (Ospedali Riuniti di Bergamo (Italy). Dept. of Cardiology); Rottoli, M.R. (Ospedali Riuniti di Bergamo (Italy). Dept. of Neurology); Comotti, B. (Ospedali Riuniti di Bergamo (Italy). Dept. of Hematology); Motta, T. (Ospedali Riuniti di Bergamo (Italy). Dept. of Pathology); Orlandi, C. (Du Pont Pharma, North Billerica, MA (United States))

    1992-03-01

    Abnormally high uptake of technetium-99m hexakis-2-methoxyisobutylisonitrile ({sup 99m}Tc-SESTAMIBI) in the right ventricle and in the septum was observed in a 47-year-old woman initially presenting with dysarthria and left hemiparesis. Endomyocardial biopsy demonstrated a high-grade malignant non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Complete remission was achieved by combined cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone (CHOP) chemotherpay and radiotherapy of the heart and mediastinum. The post-remission single photon emission tomography (SPET) {sup 99m}Tc-SESTAMIBI study showed a homogeneous distribution pattern, in agreement with echocardiography computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Increased uptake of {sup 99m}Tc-SESTAMIBI, a myocardial perfusion agent, has been observed in some benign and malignant tumours. It may prove to be useful in the diagnosis and follow-up of malignancies. (orig.).

  3. Location of the spinal cerebellar ataxia 2 locus to a 1 cM interval on chromsome 12q23-24.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allotey, R.; Twells, R.; Orozco, G. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia 2 (SCA2) is a dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disorder characterised by progressive ataxia, dysarthria, dysmetria and dysdiadochokinesia. We have previously assigned the disease locus to chromosome 12q23-24.1 in a population from the Holguin province, Cuba, within a 31 cM interval flanked by the anonymous marker D12S53 and the phospholipase A2 gene (PLA2). Clinical as much as genealogical and geographical evidence indicate that the Cuban pedigrees are homogeneous and descend from a common ancestor. We now report fine genetic mapping of the disease locus with fourteen microsatellite loci known to span this region, which positions SCA2 in a 1 cM interval defined by the loci D12S84-AFM291xe9. Observation of a common haplotype segregating with the disease supports the existence of a founder effect in the Holguin pedigrees.

  4. Case report macroglossia: Review and application of tongue reduction technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilommi R. Irhamni

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Congenital macroglossia is uncommon condition, Enlargement can be true as seen in vascular malformations or muscular enlargement. It may cause significant symptoms in children such as sleep apnea, respiratory distress, drooling, difficulty in swallowing and dysarthria. Long-standing macroglossia leads to an anterior open bite deformity, mucosal changes, exposure to potential trauma, increased incidence of upper respiratory tract infections and failure to thrive. Tongue movements, sounds and Speech articulation may also be affected. It is important to achieve uniform global reduction of the enlarged tongue for functional as well as esthetic reasons. The multiple techniques advocated for tongue reduction reveal that an ideal procedure has yet to emerge. In our case report we describe a modified reduction technique of the tongue globally preserving the taste, sensation and mobility of the tongue suitable for cases of enlargement of the tongue as in muscular hypertrophy. It can be used for repeat reductions without jeopardizing the mobility and sensibility of the tongue.

  5. PCA Infarction With Its Cognitive Findings: More Than Hemianopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zehra Bozdoğan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Posterior cerebral artery infarctions constitute 5-10 % of all ischemic strokes.In this case report, a 62 year-old man presenting with right hemiparesia and dysarthria is going to be discussed. The patient had acute onset- demential symptoms and difficulty in reading, and acute infarction in the territory of left posterior cerebral artery was detected in cranial magnetic resonance imaging. The patient who had acute ischemic lesions in left parahippocampus, splenium of corpus callosum, left fusiform gyrus and left thalamus was evaluated with detailed neuropsychological tests. Cognitive deficits severe enough to affect daily living were detected. Pure alexia, anterograde amnesia and anomia, being often neglected manifestations of unilateral posterior cerebral artery infarction, are going to be reviewed with corresponding radiological findings.

  6. Cognitive impairment in Wilson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norberto Anizio Ferreira Frota

    Full Text Available Abstract Wilson's disease (WD or hepatolenticular degeneration is a rare, genetic and systemic disease, caused by a deficit in the metabolism of copper, leading to its accumulation in different organs, mainly the liver, followed by the central nervous system, especially the basal ganglia. When symptoms begin between the second and third decades of life, approximately 50% of the patients show neurological symptoms. Although dystonia and dysarthria are the most common neurological signs, cognitive changes have been reported since the first cases were described in 1912. Memory change is one of the most common impairments, but other cognitive changes have been reported, including dementia in untreated cases. In this article we review the cognitive changes in WD patients and the occurrence of dementia.

  7. 运动性构音障碍的评估进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱守娟; 屈云; 刘珂

    2012-01-01

    运动性构音障碍(dysarthria)是指由于中枢神经系统或周围神经系统损害导致,肌肉的控制紊乱而形成的一组言语障碍,特指由于言语相关肌肉的麻痹、肌力减弱或者不协调所导致的口语交流方面的障碍.运动性构音障碍常表现为言语相关肌肉组织运动减慢、减弱、不精确、不协调,也可能影响到呼吸、共鸣、喉发声的控制、构音和韵律[1-2],临床上常简称为构音障碍.

  8. Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy in a Chinese pedigree

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Erhe Xu; Huiqing Dong; Milan Zhang; Min Xu

    2012-01-01

    The present study enrolled a Chinese family that comprised 34 members and spanned three generations. Eight members were diagnosed with cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy, and disease diagnoses corresponded with autosomal incomplete dominance inheritance. The primary clinical manifestations included paralysis, dysarthria, and mild cognitive deficits. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed diffuse leukoencephalopathy with involvement of bilateral anterior temporal lobes, in particular the pons. In addition, multiple cerebral infarction was identified in the proband. Sural nerve biopsy findings of the proband revealed granular osmophilic material deposits in the extracellular matrix, which were adjacent to smooth muscle cells of dermal arterioles. Screening exons 2-4 for NOTCH 3 mutations by direct sequencing did not reveal any abnormalities.

  9. Pseudotumoral form of neuroschistosomiasis: report of three cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio S. Andrade Filho

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Central nervous system (CSN involvement in schistosomiasis is an ectopic manifestation with a large variety of clinical forms, including pseudotumoral, which occurs in isolated cases and is rare. Three patients with epidemiological indications of this pathology were examined; the clinical picture included lower-back pain irradiating to lower limbs, associated with progressive flaccid paraparesis and sphincterial disturbances in cases in which the spinal chord was involved; while in cases with encephalitic impairment, headache, dizziness and cerebellar syndrome, characterized by dysarthria and right-side dysgraphia, were present. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed a growing process in all cases; cerebrospinal fluid (CSF characteristics and biological markers were compatible with neuroschistosomiasis (NS. Biopsy of the lesions confirmed this diagnosis in one case. After specific treatment with schistosomicides and corticosteroids, clinical, radiological and laboratorial improvement was observed.

  10. Atypical Presentation of Atypical Teratoid Rhabdoid Tumor in a Child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. T. Udaka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Atypical Teratoid Rhabdoid Tumor (ATRT is a rare malignant intracranial neoplasm more commonly diagnosed in young children. The authors report the case of an 11-year-old boy with a long standing history of slowly progressive weight loss, fatigue, and weakness over 1.5 years whose magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large heterogeneous enhancing dorsally exophytic lower brainstem mass. Examination revealed extreme cachexia, gaze-evoked nystagmus, dysphagia, dysarthria, bilateral dysmetria, and global weakness without ambulation. The protracted history and neuroimaging features were most suggestive of a low grade glioma. However, pathology revealed a hypercellular tumor with large hyperchromatic nucleoli and loss of INI-1 staining on immunohistochemistry consistent with a diagnosis of an ATRT. The child died shortly after surgery due to complications from his brainstem infiltrative disease. This case illustrates the diverse presentation of ATRT in childhood that can clinically and radiographically mimic that of low grade glioma.

  11. Cerebral infarction in an HIV-infected patient with combined protein S and C deficiency and a patent foramen ovale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomomasa, Ran; Yamashiro, Kazuo; Tanaka, Ryota; Hattori, Nobutaka

    2013-11-01

    A 41-year-old male with a history of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection developed motor aphasia, dysarthria, and right hemiparesis. A magnetic resonance imaging scan of the brain revealed a cerebral infarction in the territory of the left middle cerebral artery. The laboratory data showed decreased levels of protein S and protein C. Transesophageal contrast-enhanced echocardiography revealed a patent foramen ovale (PFO). Prothrombotic states, such as protein S and C deficiency, have been reported in HIV-infected patients. In addition, previous studies have reported prothrombotic states to be risk factors for PFO-related cerebral infarction. An association between combined protein S and C deficiency caused by HIV infection and PFO-related cerebral infarction was suggested in our patient.

  12. 针刺治疗脑梗死所致假性延髓麻痹吞咽困难60例%Sixty cases of pseudobulbar palsy dysphagia induced by cerebral infarction treated with acupuncture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝服; 董宇翔; HU Jing

    2010-01-01

    @@ Pseudobulbar palsy is one of the severe complications of cerebral infarction.The etiology is central paralysis induced by that bilateral upper motor neuron injury(including to motor cortex and corticobulbar tract mainly)makes cranial motor nuclei in medulla lose the innervation from upper motor neuron.Its clinical manifestation is the central paralysis of tongue,soft palate,throat,facial muscle and masticatory muscles.It mainly manifests as dysphagia,irritating cough,dysarthria and so on.Among them,respiratory tract infection,nutritional deficiency,water-electrolyte imbalance and even lifethreatening sequelae usually appear in patients with dysphagia,and there has not a relatively ideal therapy aiming at this condition currently.The authors treated sixty cases of pseudobulbar palsy dysphagia induced by cerebral infarction with acupuncture combined with routine medicine.The report is as follows.

  13. Primaer cerebral vaskulitis hos børn

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pradsgaard, Dan Østergaard; Stausbøl-Grøn, Brian; Østergaard, John Rosendahl

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Primary cerebral vasculitis in children is a newly recognized, rare inflammatory condition affecting the vessels of the brain. It is characterized by newly acquired neurological deficit(s) with angiographic or histological evidence of central nervous system (CNS) vasculitis......, in the absence of other known diseases with these findings. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We performed a retrospective review of children below 15 years submitted with CNS vasculitis to the department between 1999 and 2008. RESULTS: Six (two boys, four girls) of ten children with clinical and vascular imaging findings...... detected by magnetic resonance were diagnosed with primary CNS vasculitis. Age at onset was three to 12 years. Acutely acquired hemiparesis was seen in five children, two had facial palsy. Among other symptoms were headache, ataxia, dysarthria, loss of consciousness and seizures. Only modest changes...

  14. [Basilar-type migraine: pathophysiology, symptoms and signs, and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozubski, Wojciech

    2005-01-01

    Basilar-type migraine (BTM) is a type of migraine with aura symptoms resulting from brain stem or bi-hemispheric structures but without motor elements. There are no precise data on the frequency of BTM. The main cohort of the patients includes young people and children with female predomination. The onset of the disease usually occurs before the age of 25. The diagnosis of BTM is based on the finding of two migraine attacks accompanied by a specific aura, with dysarthria, vertigo, tinnitus, impaired hearing, double vision, visual aura elements, ataxia of a cerebellar type, loss of consciousness, and bilateral paresthesias. In the differential diagnosis one should consider the pathology of posterior fossa, diseases with recurrent vertigo, complex epileptic seizures, CADASIL and MELAS syndromes, and alternative hemiplegic migraine with cerebellar symptoms and signs. In the prophylaxis sodium valproate and calcium-entry blockers and, especially in the prophylaxis of vertigo, betahistine chloride are used.

  15. Niemann-Pick disease Type C - Sea-blue histiocytosis: Phenotypic and imaging observations and mini review

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    Praveen K

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a report on an 18-year-old boy with Niemann-Pick disease Type C (NP-C who presented with progressive decline in scholastic performance since 9 years of age. At 12 years, he developed abnormal behavior and after 2 years had insidious onset, progressive gait ataxia and dysarthria followed by dystonia of the right upper extremity, excessive drooling, dysphagia and nasal regurgitation. He had coarse facies, depressed nasal bridge, high arched palate, crowded teeth, splenomegaly and peculiar facial grin. In addition, impaired vertical saccadic and pursuit eye movements, brisk muscle stretch reflexes and limb and gait ataxia were observed. He had a low IQ of 47 on Binet-Kamat test. The ultrasound examination of the abdomen confirmed the presence of moderate splenomegaly. Magnetic resonance imaging brain showed symmetrical leucoencephalopathy and mild cerebellar atrophy. Bone marrow aspiration showed numerous foamy macrophages and sea-blue histiocytes suggesting the diagnosis of NP-C.

  16. Miller-Fisher syndrome associated with chronic lymphocytic leukemia

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    Aki Zeynep

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL is a frequent hematological malignancy, with meningeal or peripheral nerve infiltrations being the most commonly encountered neurological complications. In this report, we describe a CLL patient with Miller-Fisher syndrome (MFS who responded to immune modulation with plasmapheresis. A 47-year-old man diagnosed as B-cell CLL admitted with neutropenic fever. He complained of diplopia and numbness of both arms. Neurological examination revealed a bilateral external ophthalmoplegia, dysphagia, dysarthria, mild shoulder girdle muscle weakness and gait ataxia, accompanied by absent tendon reflexes. Nerve conduction studies were indicative of a predominantly axonal sensori-motor peripheral neuropathy. This association of CLL with MFS had not been previously reported in the literature.

  17. Recurrent abdominal pain: when an epileptic seizure should be suspected?

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    Franzon Renata C.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent episodes of abdominal pain are common in childhood. Among the diagnostic possibilities are migraine and abdominal epilepsy (AE. AE is an infrequent syndrome with paroxystic episodes of abdominal pain, awareness disturbance, EEG abnormalities and positive results with the introduction of antiepileptic drugs. We present one 6 year-old girl who had short episodes of abdominal pain since the age of 4. The pain was followed by cry, fear and occasionally secondary generalization. MRI showed tumor in the left temporal region. As a differential diagnosis, we report a 10 year-old boy who had long episodes of abdominal pain accompanied by blurring of vision, vertigo, gait ataxia, dysarthria, acroparesthesias and vomiting. He received the diagnosis of basilar migraine. In our opinion, AE is part of a large group (partial epilepsies and does not require a special classification. Pediatric neurologists must be aware of these two entities that may cause abdominal pain.

  18. Electronystagmography findings in spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3 and type 2 (SCA2

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    Bianca Simone Zeigelboim

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the alterations observed in electronystagmography (ENG of patients with spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA types 2 and 3. METHOD: Sixteen patients were studied and the following procedures were carried out: anamnesis, otorhinolaryngological and vestibular evaluations. RESULTS: The clinical findings in the entire group of patients were: gait disturbances (93.75%, dysarthria (43.75%, headache (43.75%, dizziness (37.50% and dysphagia (37.50%. In the vestibular exam, the rotatory (62.50% and caloric (75% tests were among those which presented the largest indexes of abnormalities; the presence of alterations in the exams was 87.50%, with a predominance of central vestibular disorders in 68.75% of the exams. CONCLUSION: Vestibular exams could be an auxiliary tool to investigate SCAs, besides a precise clinical approach and, particularly, molecular genetic tests.

  19. A Study Of Sporadic Adult Onset Degenerative Cerebellar Ataxias

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    Sinha K K

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-four cases of sporadic olivo-ponto-cerebellar atrophy (OPCA of adult onset were studied over a period of two years. Results suggest that this disorder has its usual onset in the 5th and 6th decade of life with a male: female ratio of 2:1. It manifests clinically with gait ataxia in all, dysarthria, other cerebellar signs and autonomic involvement in vast majority. There were features of basal ganglia involvement in some. No known identifiable environmental cause was found and genetically they are quite distinct from the known autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxias though sporadic occurrence in recessive inheritance or a de novo mutation could not be ruled out completely, but it is unlikely.

  20. Metronidazole neurotoxicity: Sequential neuroaxis involvement

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    Kyung-Il Park

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurological manifestation of metronidazole toxicity include neuropathy and encephalopathy. We report a 67-year-old man with progressive painful paresthesias involving all the four limbs of 3 weeks′ duration before admission. He had been treated with metronidazole and cephalosporin for 10 weeks for a hepatic abscess. Five weeks after the symptom onset, he complained of dysarthria and limb ataxia. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed signal abnormalities in the splenium of the corpus callosum and bilateral dentate nuclei. A few hours after brain imaging, the patient exhibited excessive diaphoresis and fluctuation in blood pressure, which resolved within several hours after discontinuation of metronidazole. Whereas his speech returned to near normal within approximately 1 week, a burning sensation was not completely relieved, even 6 months after discharge.