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Sample records for dynesys spinal system

  1. Dynamic simulation of universal spacer in Dynesys dynamic stabilization system for human vertebra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sung-Min KIM; In-Chul YANG; Seung-Yeol LEE; Sung-Youn CHO

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the simulated behavior of universal spacer in Dynesys dynamic stabilization system inserted in human vertebra. Dynesys, so-called "Dynamic neutralization system for the spine", dynamic stabilization system is a new concept in the surgical treatment of lower back pain recently. Universal spacer used as flexible material is to stabilize the spine and the material property of universal spacer is polycarbonate urethane. Universal spacer may apply different kinematic behaviors at implanted level in vertebra. Spinal range of motion(SROM) of inter-vertebra with installed Dynesys dynamic stabilization system was studied using Adams+LifeMOD as simulation software package. The vertebra model was set up to closely resemble the in-vivo conditions. Inter-vertebra rotations were measured by post processor of Adams and compared with the intact values. SROMs of the flexion, extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation of human virtual models were measured, where three spinal fixation systems such as rigid system, Dynesys system, and fused system were installed. As a result, the value of SROM is decreased in flexion-extension and lateral bending when the spinal fixation system is implanted. The movement of Dynesys system is similar to that of intact model by allowing the movement of lumbar. This means that the Dynesys system is proved to be safe and effective in the treatment of unstable spinal condition.

  2. Clinical experiences of dynamic stabilizers: Dynesys and Dynesys top loading system for lumbar spine degenerative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Cheng-Ta; Chang, Chih-Ju; Su, I-Chang; Lin, Li-Ying

    2016-04-01

    Dynesys (Dynamic Neutralization System) was designed to overcome the shortcomings of fusion. The Dynesys top loading (DTL) system is a new alternative Dynesys system that can be applied via a minimally invasive procedure. This study aimed to ascertain whether DTL is a suitable device for motion preservation and prevention of instability, and to compare the clinical and radiological outcomes between DTL and Dynesys. In this study, 12 patients were treated with Dynesys and 21 patients were treated with DTL. Back and leg pain were evaluated using the visual analog scale. The Oswestry Disability Index was used to evaluate the patients' function. Range of motion (ROM) at the operative level and for the whole lumbar spine was measured pre- and postoperatively. The length of wound, blood loss, length of hospital stay, and operation duration were also compared. All patients were followed up for 12-76 months. Scores on the visual analog scale and Oswestry Disability Index were significantly improved postoperatively. The median ROM of the whole spine and index level ROM in all patients showed 12.5% and 79.6% loss, respectively. The DTL group exhibited significantly better results in terms of blood loss, wound length, and operation duration, in addition to early ambulation. In conclusion, Dynesys and DTL are semirigid fixation systems that can significantly improve clinical symptoms and signs. Our results suggested that DTL was better than Dynesys as a result of it being a minimally invasive procedure. However, further study with large sample sizes and longer follow-up durations is required to validate the effects of these dynamic stabilizers.

  3. Dynamic stabilization using the Dynesys system versus posterior lumbar interbody fusion for the treatment of degenerative lumbar spinal disease: a clinical and radiological outcomes-based meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang-Hyun; Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Hyun, Seung-Jae; Kim, Chi Heon; Park, Sung-Bae; Kim, Ki-Jeong; Chung, Chun Kee; Kim, Hyun-Jib; Lee, Soo-Eon

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The Dynesys, a pedicle-based dynamic stabilization (PDS) system, was introduced to overcome the drawbacks of fusion procedures. Nevertheless, the theoretical advantages of PDS over fusion have not been clearly confirmed. The aim of this study was to compare clinical and radiological outcomes of patients who underwent PDS using the Dynesys system with those who underwent posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). METHODS The authors searched PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Database. Studies that reported outcomes of patients who underwent PDS or PLIF for the treatment of degenerative lumbar spinal disease were included. The primary efficacy end points were perioperative outcomes. The secondary efficacy end points were changes in the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and back and leg pain visual analog scale (VAS) scores and in range of motion (ROM) at the treated and adjacent segments. A meta-analysis was performed to calculate weighted mean differences (WMDs), 95% confidence intervals, Q statistics, and I(2) values. Forest plots were constructed for each analysis group. RESULTS Of the 274 retrieved articles, 7 (which involved 506 participants [Dynesys, 250; PLIF, 256]) met the inclusion criteria. The Dynesys group showed a competitive advantage in mean surgery duration (20.73 minutes, 95% CI 8.76-32.70 minutes), blood loss (81.87 ml, 95% CI 45.11-118.63 ml), and length of hospital stay (1.32 days, 95% CI 0.23-2.41 days). Both the Dynesys and PLIF groups experienced improved ODI and VAS scores after 2 years of follow-up. Regarding the ODI and VAS scores, no statistically significant difference was noted according to surgical procedure (ODI: WMD 0.12, 95% CI -3.48 to 3.72; back pain VAS score: WMD -0.15; 95% CI -0.56 to 0.26; leg pain VAS score: WMD -0.07; 95% CI -0.47 to 0.32). The mean ROM at the adjacent segment increased in both groups, and there was no substantial difference between them (WMD 1.13; 95% CI -0.33 to 2.59). Although the

  4. Dynesys dynamic stabilization system for the lumbar degenerative disease: a preliminary report from China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hai-peng; LI Fang; GUAN Kai; ZHAO Guang-ming; SHAN Jian-lin; SUN Tian-sheng

    2013-01-01

    Background Dynesys dynamic stabilization system was first implanted in patients in 1994,and introduced to China in 2007.Therefore,it was a new technique for Chinese orthopedics and hence necessary to collect clinical data about Dynesys in China.The objective of this study was to report the preliminary results of Dynesys for the lumbar degenerative disease in China.Methods Twenty-seven patients were treated with the Dynesys between July 2007 and January 2009.The diagnosis included degenerative spondylolisthesis (12 cases),degenerative spinal stenosis (nine cases),and lumbar intervertebral disc herniation (six cases).Back pain and leg pain were evaluated using 100-mm visual analog scales (VAS).The Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) was used to evaluate the patients' function.The intervertebral disc height and range of motion at the operative level were taken on radiographs.Results All the patients were followed-up,with an average of (22.40±4.23) months (range 15-32 months).VAS of back pain and leg pain were improved significantly (P <0.05) at follow-up.The ODI scores were reduced from (62.58±12.01)%preoperatively to (15.01±5.71)% at follow-up (P <0.05).The preoperative mean height of the intervertebral disc was (11.21±1.58) mm (range 8.5-13.8 mm) and mean was (10.10±1.78) mm (range 7.0-13.4 mm) at follow-up (P <0.05).The mean range of motion of the implanted segment was (6.00±1.79)° (range 2.5-9.3°) preoperatively and (5.47±1.27)°(range 2.9-7.8°) at follow-up (P=0.11).Conclusions The preliminary results of Dynesys for the lumbar degenerative disease in China are similar to the published results of other countries.It can significantly improve the clinic symptoms and preserved motion at the level of implantation.However,the long-term follow-up data need to be collected.

  5. Comparison of the Dynesys Dynamic Stabilization System and Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Lumbar Degenerative Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhang

    Full Text Available There have been few studies comparing the clinical and radiographic outcomes between the Dynesys dynamic stabilization system and posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF. The objective of this study is to compare the clinical and radiographic outcomes of Dynesys and PLIF for lumbar degenerative disease.Of 96 patients with lumbar degenerative disease included in this retrospectively analysis, 46 were treated with the Dynesys system and 50 underwent PLIF from July 2008 to March 2011. Clinical and radiographic outcomes were evaluated. We also evaluated the occurrence of radiographic and symptomatic adjacent segment degeneration (ASD.The mean follow-up time in the Dynesys group was 53.6 ± 5.3 months, while that in the PLIF group was 55.2 ± 6.8 months. At the final follow-up, the Oswestry disability index and visual analogue scale score were significantly improved in both groups. The range of motion (ROM of stabilized segments in Dynesys group decreased from 7.1 ± 2.2° to 4.9 ± 2.2° (P < 0.05, while that of in PLIF group decreased from 7.3 ± 2.3° to 0° (P < 0.05. The ROM of the upper segments increased significantly in both groups at the final follow-up, the ROM was higher in the PLIF group. There were significantly more radiographic ASDs in the PLIF group than in the Dynesys group. The incidence of complications was comparable between groups.Both Dynesys and PLIF can improve the clinical outcomes for lumbar degenerative disease. Compared to PLIF, Dynesys stabilization partially preserves the ROM of the stabilized segments, limits hypermobility in the upper adjacent segment, and may prevent the occurrence of ASD.

  6. Dynesys 动态固定系统与腰椎相邻节段退变的研究进展%Research progress of Dynesys dynamic stabilization system and lumbar adjacent segment degeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张阳; 李放

    2013-01-01

      In recent years, the lumbar non-fusion technique remains a hot research topic in spine surgery, and the Dynesys dynamic stabilization system is one of the most widely applied non-fusion techniques clinically. The system is designed to stabilize the operated segments and meanwhile preserve some mobility, so as to prevent the stress concentration of adjacent segments and relieve adjacent segment degeneration. Many clinical studies show that the Dynesys system could have satisfied clinical results, but at present there are still some controversies about the role of the Dynesys dynamic stabilization system in reducing adjacent segment degeneration. The biomechanical and clinical research about the role of the Dynesys system in preventing adjacent segment degeneration is reviewed in this article, to provide clinical evidence.

  7. In vivo compatibility of Dynesys(®) spinal implants: a case series of five retrieved periprosthetic tissue samples and corresponding implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neukamp, M; Roeder, C; Veruva, S Y; MacDonald, D W; Kurtz, S M; Steinbeck, M J

    2015-05-01

    To determine whether particulate debris is present in periprosthetic tissue from revised Dynesys(®) devices, and if present, elicits a biological tissue reaction. Five Dynesys(®) dynamic stabilization systems consisting of pedicle screws (Ti alloy), polycarbonate-urethane (PCU) spacers and a polyethylene-terephthalate (PET) cord were explanted for pain and screw loosening after a mean of 2.86 years (1.9-5.3 years). Optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to evaluate wear, deformation and surface damage, and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to assess surface chemical composition of the spacers. Periprosthetic tissue morphology and wear debris were determined using light microscopy, and PCU and PET wear debris by polarized light microscopy. All implants had surface damage on the PCU spacers consistent with scratches and plastic deformation; 3 of 5 exhibited abrasive wear zones. In addition to fraying of the outer fibers of the PET cords in five implants, one case also evidenced cord fracture. The pedicle screws were unremarkable. Patient periprosthetic tissues around the three implants with visible PCU damage contained wear debris and a corresponding macrophage infiltration. For the patient revised for cord fracture, the tissues also contained large wear particles (>10 μm) and giant cells. Tissues from the other two patients showed comparable morphologies consisting of dense fibrous tissue with no inflammation or wear debris. This is the first study to evaluate wear accumulation and local tissue responses for explanted Dynesys(®) devices. Polymer wear debris and an associated foreign-body macrophage response were observed in three of five cases.

  8. K-Rod 动态稳定系统与 Dynesys 非融合系统在多节段腰椎退变中的近期疗效比较%Comparison of short-term clinical effect of K - Rod pedicle dynamic fixation system and Dynesys system for multiple segmental lumbar degeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢雁春; 刘军; 于海龙; 陈语

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the short-term clinical effect of K-Rod pedicle dynamic fixation system and Dynesys system for multiple segmental lumbar degeneration. Methods From January 2010 to October 2012,60 patients with multiple segmental lumbar degeneration who were accepted K -Rod pedicle dynamic fixation system and Dynesys system were retrospectively reviewed.The 60 patients were divided into K - Rod group and fusion group,30 cases of patients with K - Rod pedicle dynamic fixation system who were accepted responsibility segmental decompression intervertebral fusion and internal fixation,degenerative segmental unfusion internal fixation.30 cases with Dynesys system who were accepted posterior decompression,discectomy and Dynesys unfusion internal fixation.Clinical assessments were based on comparion of Oswestry disability index score,visual analogous scale (VAS),postoperative lumbar hyperextension,hyperbend X-ray film lumbar ROM value (lumbar flexion mobility),average operation time, intraoperative blood loss,the average length of stay of two groups. Results All of 60 cases were achieved 12 to 24 months follow-up,compared to preoperative,the difference of Oswestry disability index score and visual analogous scale (VAS) for two groups were statistically significant,but the difference of Oswestry disability index score and visual analogous scale (VAS),average operation time,blood loss, the average length of stay(ALOS) between two groups were unstatistically significant. Conclusion In the treatment of multiple segmental lumbar degeneration,both K - Rod pedicle dynamic fixation system and Dynesys system can obtain satisfactory short-term clinical effect and have advantages of less intraoperative blood loss,shorter operation time,postoperative small effects on lumbar spine mobility.%目的:探讨比较 K-Rod 椎弓根动态稳定系统与 Dynesys 非融合系统在多节段腰椎退变的近期临床疗效。方法选择2010年1月至2012年10月于沈阳军

  9. Continuous clinical observation of the Dynesys dynamic neutralization system for degenerative lumbar spine diseases%Dynesys动态稳定系统治疗下腰椎疾病效果观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘先哲; 许伟华; 叶树楠; 冯勇; 张波; 杨述华

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical indications and outcomes of dynesys neutralization system in the treatment of degenerative lumbar diseases.Methods From January 2007 to December 2011,102 consecutive patients with degenerative lumbar spine diseases underwent posterior decompression and internal fixation with the Dynesys dynamic neutralization system.Among them,69 patients were followed up,including 39 males and 30 females,aged from 30 to 62 years (average,44 years).The series of cases were composed of 24 cases of lumber disc herniation,35 cases of degenerative spinal stenosis,10 cases of degenerative changes of lumbar discs.Results The mean follow-up period was 35 months (range,6-44 months).The visual analogue scale (VAS) score decreased from preoperative 8.6 (range,6-9) to postoperative 2.8 (range,0-5),and the Oswestry disability index (ODI) improved from preoperative 73% (range,30%-91%) to postoperative 30% (range,0-61%).There were no implant failure or infection.According to the evaluation criteria of surgical treatment for low back pain,which was established by the Chinese Orthopaedic Association,the result was excellent in 53 patients,good in 12 patients,fair in 4 patients and poor in 1 patient.Conclusion The Dynesys dynamic neutralization system is effective in the treatment of degenerative lumbar spine disease,which can reserve the range of motion of stabilized segments,prevent degeneration of adjacent segments and improve clinical outcomes.%目的 探讨Dynesys动态稳定系统治疗腰椎退行性疾病的应用指征及安全性.方法 回顾性分析2007年1月至2011年12月采用后路减压+Dynesys动态内固定系统治疗102例腰椎退行性疾病患者中69例完整的随访资料,男39例,女30例;年龄30~62岁,平均44岁;单纯腰椎间盘突出24例,腰椎间盘突出并退行性椎管狭窄35例,椎间盘退行性改变10例.手术固定节段:L2,32例,L3,44例,L4,5 42例,L5S115例,L3~L5 5例,T12~L4 1

  10. Dynesys与后路椎间融合治疗腰椎管狭窄症的临床效果比较研究%Dynesys and posterior lumbar interbody fusion for lumbar spinal stenosis in the comparative study of clinical effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高洪亮

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the Dynesys and posterior lumbar interbody fusion in the treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis in.Methods:a total of August 2012 to 2014 years 5 months in our hospital from lumbar spinal stenosis were 85 cases, and were randomly divided into group A (n = 42) and group B (n = 43). The A group was treated by posterior lumbar interbody fusion, and the B group was treated by pedicle Dynesys operation, and the treatment effect was compared between the two groups. Results: there was no significant difference in the length of the incision in the A group and the B group (P>0.05). ODI score and VAS score were significantly lower in A group and B group (P0.05) and the VAS score at the end of groups (ODI).Conclusion: in lumbar spinal canal stenosis treatment in, posterior lumbar interbody fusion surgery and transpedicular Dynesys surgical treatment effect is similar, but the latter has a shorter operation time, less trauma and bleeding quantity low characteristic, can effectively stabilize the spine, and is worthy to be popularized.%目的:探讨Dynesys与后路椎间融合在腰椎管狭窄症中的治疗效果.方法:选取2012年8月到2014年5月我院收治的腰椎管狭窄症者85例,并随机分为A组(n=42)和B组(n=43).A组都采用后路椎间融合手术,B组均采用经椎弓根Dynesys手术治疗,对比两组的治疗效果.结果:A组、B组切口长度相比,差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).A组、B组末次随访ODI评分、VAS评分显著比手术前降低(P0.05).结论:在腰椎管狭窄症治疗中,后路椎间融合手术和经椎弓根Dynesys手术治疗效果相近,但后者具有手术时间短、创伤小和出血量低等特点,可有效地稳定脊柱,值得推广.

  11. Dynesys dynamic stabilization-related facet arthrodesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, Li-Yu; Chang, Peng-Yuan; Wu, Jau-Ching; Huang, Wen-Cheng; Wang, Chun-Hao; Tsai, Tzu-Yun; Tu, Tsung-Hsi; Chang, Hsuan-Kan; Wu, Ching-Lan; Cheng, Henrich

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Dynamic stabilization devices are designed to stabilize the spine while preserving some motion. However, there have been reports demonstrating limited motion at the instrumented level of the lumbar spine after Dynesys dynamic stabilization (DDS). The causes of this limited motion and its actual effects on outcomes after DDS remain elusive. In this study, the authors investigate the incidence of unintended facet arthrodesis after DDS and clinical outcomes. METHODS This retrospective study included 80 consecutive patients with 1- or 2-level lumbar spinal stenosis who underwent laminectomy and DDS. All medical records, radiological data, and clinical evaluations were analyzed. Imaging studies included pre- and postoperative radiographs, MR images, and CT scans. Clinical outcomes were measured by a visual analog scale (VAS) for back and leg pain, the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scores. Furthermore, all patients had undergone postoperative CT for the detection of unintended arthrodesis of the facets at the indexed level, and range of motion was measured on standing dynamic radiographs. RESULTS A total of 70 patients (87.5%) with a mean age of 64.0 years completed the minimum 24-month postoperative follow-up (mean duration 29.9 months). Unintended facet arthrodesis at the DDS instrumented level was demonstrated by CT in 38 (54.3%) of the 70 patients. The mean age of patients who had facet arthrodesis was 9.8 years greater than that of the patients who did not (68.3 vs 58.5 years, p = 0.009). There were no significant differences in clinical outcomes, including VAS back and leg pain, ODI, and JOA scores between patients with and without the unintended facet arthrodesis. Furthermore, those patients older than 60 years were more likely to have unintended facet arthrodesis (OR 12.42) and immobile spinal segments (OR 2.96) after DDS. Regardless of whether unintended facet arthrodesis was present or not, clinical

  12. 减压结合动态稳定系统(Dynesys)治疗腰椎退行性病变的临床疗效观察%Efficacy of dynamic stabilization system(Dynesys)in addition to decompression for the treatment of lumbar degenerative disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    凌超; 关凯; 刘智

    2013-01-01

      背景:传统的脊柱融合术治疗腰椎退行性病变产生了越来越多的临床问题,在此背景下,多种非融合技术逐渐应用于临床。目的:评价减压结合动态稳定系统(dynamic neutralization system for the spine, Dynesys)治疗腰椎退行性病变的效果。方法:2008年7月至2011年8月应用后路减压术结合单节段Dynesys固定系统治疗腰椎退行性病变患者29例,评价指标包括VAS、ODI评分及椎间高度和椎间活动度。结果:27例患者获得随访,随访时间3~41个月,平均17.8个月。患者术后及末次随访VAS、ODI评分较术前评分均显著降低(P=0.001),术后及末次随访评分的差异无统计学意义(P>0.05)。术后手术节段(L4-L5和L5-S1)椎间隙高度较术前显著增大(P=0.009、P=0.001),术后各时间点差异无统计学意义(P>0.05)。术后椎间活动度较术前显著减小(P=0.001)。上下邻近节段椎间隙高度及椎间活动度术后较术前无明显变化(P>0.05)。结论:Dynesys后路动态稳定系统为腰椎退行性疾病治疗提供了更多的选择,其短期疗效满意,长期效果则需要大样本随机对照研究证实。%Background: More and more clinical affairs happened after traditional spinal fusion for lumbar degenerative diseases. So a variety of non-fusion technology has been applied gradually. Objective: To evaluate the clinical efficacy of the dynamic stabilization system (Dynesys) in the treatment of lumbar degen-erative diseases. Methods: From July 2008 toAugust 2011, 29 patients with lumbar degenerative diseases underwent decompression and dynam-ic stabilization with the Dynesys system. Clinical outcomes were evaluated by using ODI and VAS before and after surgery. Im-agingexaminations for intervertebralspace,surgicalsegmentalmovementandadjacentsegmentchangeswereobtained. Results: A total of 27 patients completed the final follow-up. The mean duration of

  13. In Vitro Comparison of Dynesys, PEEK, and Titanium Constructs in the Lumbar Spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew S. Yeager

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Pedicle based posterior dynamic stabilization systems aim to stabilize the pathologic spine while also allowing sufficient motion to mitigate adjacent level effects. Two flexible constructs that have been proposed to act in such a manner, the Dynesys Dynamic Stabilization System and PEEK rod, have yet to be directly compared in vitro to a rigid Titanium rod. Methods. Human lumbar specimens were tested in flexion extension, lateral bending, and axial torsion to evaluate the following conditions at L4-L5: Intact, Dynesys, PEEK rod, Titanium rod, and Destabilized. Intervertebral range of motion, interpedicular travel, and interpedicular displacement metrics were evaluated from 3rd-cycle data using an optoelectric tracking system. Results. Statistically significant decreases in ROM compared to Intact and Destabilized conditions were detected for the instrumented conditions during flexion extension and lateral bending. AT ROM was significantly less than Destabilized but not the Intact condition. Similar trends were found for interpedicular displacement in all modes of loading; however, interpedicular travel trends were less consistent. More importantly, no metrics under any mode of loading revealed significant differences between Dynesys, PEEK, and Titanium. Conclusion. The results of this study support previous findings that Dynesys and PEEK constructs behave similarly to a Titanium rod in vitro.

  14. Dynesys dynamic neutralization system for the treatment of lumbar degenerative disease and the effect on the adjacent segment%Dynesys系统治疗腰椎退行性疾病对邻近节段的影响**☆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨波; 万盛钰; 曾勉东; 吕玉明; 方世兵; 谢景开

    2013-01-01

      背景:大多数文献报道Dynesys动态中和稳定系统在治疗腰椎退行性疾病中取得了较好的临床疗效,但能否防止邻近节段退行性病变发生仍然存在争议。  目的:观察Dynesys系统治疗腰椎退行性疾病的临床疗效及对邻近节段的影响。  方法:自2009年3月至2012年10月收治20例腰椎退行性疾病患者,均采用手术减压加Dynesys系统动态固定治疗。Dynesys动态系统由Zimmer公司提供,由钛合金椎弓根螺钉、聚氨基甲酸乙酯套管和聚对苯二甲酸乙酯绳索组成。以目测类比评分、Oswestry 功能障碍指数进行临床疗效评价;依照Woodend评分评估邻近椎间盘退变程度;治疗有效率按Macnab标准评价。  结果与结论:20例患者全部获得随访,时间22-31个月。临床疗效按Macnab标准评价:优11例,良6例,可3例,优良率达85%。末次随访时,患者目测类比评分显著低于治疗前[(2.25±1.67)分,(8.29±1.50)分,P0.05)。提示Dynesys系统动态固定治疗腰椎退变性疾病早期疗效确切,长期疗效及其防止或延缓邻近节段退变的作用尚需多中心随机对照临床试验来证实。%BACKGROUND:Numerous studies show Dynesys dynamic neutralization system has achieved good clinical efficacy in the treatment of lumbar degenerative disease. But whether Dynesys dynamic neutralization system can prevent the adjacent segment degenerative disease is stil controversial. OBJECTIVE:To investigate the efficacy of the Dynesys system for the treatment of lumbar degenerative disease and impact on adjacent segments. METHODS:From March 2009 to October 2012, 20 consecutive patients with lumbar degenerative disease were included in this study. Al the patients were treated with surgical decompression plus Dynesys system dynamic fixation. The Dynesys system was provided by Zimmer Company, and composed with titanium al oy pedicle screws, polyurethane sleeve and

  15. Dynesys动态稳定系统置入内固定与后路腰椎间融合修复腰椎退行性病的比较%Dynesys dynamic stabilization system versus posterior lumbar interbody fusion in treatment of lumbar degenerative disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭超; 何智勇; 母建松; 兰海; 李开南

    2014-01-01

    背景:后路腰椎椎体间融合是腰椎退行性疾病经典的治疗方法,目前大量研究表明,融合固定后的相邻节段会发生退变。近年来越来越多的学者关注脊柱的非融合固定技术发展。  目的:比较Dynesys动态稳定系统置入内固定和后路腰椎椎体间融合治疗腰椎退行性疾病的临床疗效。  方法:对2009年7月至2010年7月收治的56例退行性腰椎间盘疾病患者的临床资料进行回顾性对比分析,其中采用Dynesys动态稳定系统置入内固定治疗28例,采用后路腰椎椎体间融合治疗28例。比较两组患者的手术时间、出血量、治疗后住院时间,应用目测类比评分进行疼痛评估,以Oswestry功能评分评价临床疗效。  结果与结论:56例患者均获随访,随访时间18-24个月。两组患者治疗后12个月随访时的Oswestry功能评分、目测类比评分均较治疗前有明显改善(P OBJECTIVE:To compare clinical effects of Dynesys dynamic stabilization system fixation and posterior lumbar interbody fusion in treatment of lumbar degenerative disease. METHODS:From July 2009 to July 2011, clinical data of 56 patients with lumbar degenerative disease were retrospectively analyzed. There were 28 cases of Dynesys dynamic stabilization system fixation, and 28 cases of posterior lumbar interbody fusion. Operation time, bleeding volume, and postoperative hospitalization time were compared in both groups. Visual analog scale was used to assess pain. Oswestry disability index was utilized to evaluate clinical effects. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:A total of 56 patients were fol owed up for 18-24 months. Visual analog scale and Oswestry disability index scores were significantly improved at 12 months after treatment in both groups (P<0.01). Significant differences in operation time, bleeding volume, and postoperative hospitalization time were detected between both groups (P<0.01). Dynesys dynamic

  16. Dynesys动态稳定系统治疗腰椎退行性疾病的短期临床疗效观察%Dynesys dynamic stability system treatment the short-term clinical effect of the treatment of lumbar degenerative disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宁旭

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To retrospective analysis Dynesys dynamic stability system short-term clinical curative effect for the treatment of lumbar degener-ative disease.Methods:Collected in April 2011-April 2013 use Dynesys dynamic stability system treatment of the clinical data of 28 cases of lumbar degen-erative disease.Postoperative follow-up of 12 to 24 months,an average of 18.8 months.To observe the postoperative symptoms,compared preoperative VAS score,postoperative JOA scores and Oswestry scores,evaluate JOA postoperative period.Results:All cases of postoperative clinical symptoms im-proved significantly,the Dynesys screw loose rope without fracture,postoperative VAS score,Oswestry scores,preoperative JOA score difference statisti-cally (P<0.05),postoperative period JOA 68.2±3.66%.Conclusion:The treatment of lumbar degenerative disease Dynesys dynamic stability system short-term curative effect is satisfied,which get stability of lumbar spine and keep the function of lumbar spine lesions segment part activities at the same time. It is a kind of treatment of degenerative lumbar disease effective method of fusion elastic fixed,long-term clinical curative effect observation to be operation quantity and long-term follow-up.%目的:回顾分析Dynesys动态稳定系统治疗腰椎退行性疾病的短期临床疗效。方法:收集2011年4月-2013年4月使用Dynesys动态稳定系统治疗的腰椎退行性疾病28例临床资料。术后随访12-24个月,平均18.8个月。观察术后症状,比较术前术后 VAS评分、JOA评分以及 Oswestry评分,评估JOA术后改善率。结果:所有病例术后临床症状明显改善,Dynesys钉绳无松动断裂,术前术后 VAS评分、Oswestry评分、JOA评分具有统计学差异(P<0.05),JOA术后改善率68.2±3.66%。结论:Dynesys动态稳定系统治疗腰椎退行性疾病短期疗效满意,腰椎获得稳定性的同时,保留了腰椎病变节段部分活动功能,是一种治

  17. Biomechanical analysis and design of a dynamic spinal fixator using topology optimization: a finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hung-Ming; Liu, Chien-Lin; Pan, Yung-Ning; Huang, Chang-Hung; Shih, Shih-Liang; Wei, Shun-Hwa; Chen, Chen-Sheng

    2014-05-01

    Surgeons often use spinal fixators to manage spinal instability. Dynesys (DY) is a type of dynamic fixator that is designed to restore spinal stability and to provide flexibility. The aim of this study was to design a new spinal fixator using topology optimization [the topology design (TD) system]. Here, we constructed finite element (FE) models of degenerative disc disease, DY, and the TD system. A hybrid-controlled analysis was applied to each of the three FE models. The rod structure of the topology optimization was modelled at a 39 % reduced volume compared with the rigid rod. The TD system was similar to the DY system in terms of stiffness. In contrast, the TD system reduced the cranial adjacent disc stress and facet contact force at the adjacent level. The TD system also reduced pedicle screw stresses in flexion, extension, and lateral bending.

  18. 腰椎椎弓根动态内固定修复腰椎退行性疾病:K-Rod弹性棒、通用弹性棒及Dynesys系统比较%Dynamic lumbar pedicle fixation in repair of lumbar degenerative disease:K-Rod elastic rod, universal elastic rod and Dynesys system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘涛; 王振江; 陈凡; 张大鹏; 郭宁国; 马方南; 冯纪川; 强晓军

    2014-01-01

    December 2012, 62 cases of lumbar spinal stenosis and lumbar disc herniation treated with lumbar dynamic system were included. The involved segments included:5 cases at L 3/4 , 20 cases at L 4/5 , 20 cases at L 5 S 1 , 6 cases at double segment L 3/4 and L 4/5, 8 cases at double segment L 4/5 , L 5 S 1 , 3 cases at L 3/4 and L 5 S 1 . There were 34 males and 28 females with an average age of 50.8 years (range 32 to 72 years). According to different fixation systems, they were assigned to three groups:general dynamic lumbar fixation system in 17 cases, K-Rod posterior dynamic stabilization system in 28 cases, and Dynesys system in 17 cases. The fol ow-up time was from 24 to 48 months. Evaluation indexes included visual analogue scale, Oswestry disability index, imaging analysis and excellent and good rate of curative effects. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:Compared with before treatment, visual analogue scale score and Oswestry disability index were significantly improved at 6 months after treatment and final fol ow-up (P0.05). These data indicated that the lumbar dynamic system was an effective option for lumbar disc herniation and spinal stenosis. Although there are some differences in the structure of three kinds of flexible fixation, no obvious difference in early therapeutic effects was detected. Long-term effects deserve further investigations.

  19. Spinal Cord Injury Model System Information Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Go New to Website Managing Bowel Function After Spinal Cord Injury Resilience, Depression and Bouncing Back after SCI Getting ... the UAB-SCIMS Contact the UAB-SCIMS UAB Spinal Cord Injury Model System Newly Injured Health Daily Living Consumer ...

  20. Dynesys dynamic stabilization: less good outcome than lumbar fusion at 4-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Behrooz; Makki, Daoud; Konan, Sujith; Park, Derek; Khan, Wasim; Okafor, Ben

    2013-02-01

    Dynamic semirigid stabilization of the lumbar spine was introduced in 1994 in an attempt to overcome the drawbacks of fusion. It is supposed to preserve motion at the treated levels, while avoiding hypermobility and thus spondylosis at the adjacent levels. Although the early reports showed promising results, the long term effects are still debated. We retrospectively compared outcomes of Dynesys dynamic stabilization with those of the traditional fusion technique. Thirty-two patients who had undergone Dynesys between 2004 and 2006 (group 1) were compared to 32 patients who had been treated with fusion between 2005 and 2006 (group 2). VAS for back and leg pain, and ODI improved significantly in both groups (p < 0.001). These scores were all better in the fusion group, and even significantly so as far as VAS for back pain was concerned (p = 0.014). Similarly, more patients were satisfied or very satisfied after fusion than after Dynesys: 87.5% versus 68.8% (p = 0.04). Interestingly, in the Dynesys group scatter plot graphs showed a positive correlation between older age and improvement in the two VAS scores and in ODI. Dynamic stabilization with Dynesys remains controversial. Older patients are relatively more satisfied about it, probably because of their low level of demands.

  1. 后正中入路Dynesys置入对腰椎全椎板减压术后生理性稳定性的作用%Dynesys placement on lumbar spine stability during total lumbar laminectomy decompression via posterior midline approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯煜; 田少辉; 卜宏建; 冯建刚; 武士科; 李盼祥; 李志平; 尚爱加

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the role of Dynesys placement on lumbar spine stability during the total lumbar laminectomy decompression for intraspinal schwannoma via posterior midline approach Methods 6 patients with lumbar intraspinal schwannoma were underwent by the total laminectomy via posterior midline approach .After the operation , the lumbar spinal stability was rebuilt by Dynesys placement .Results Schwannoma were completely resected . The X-ray reexamination in 1 ,3 ,6 months showed the activitivies of each vertebral flexion were good including L-spine flexion-extension position and the width of intervertebral space were equal .Implants location was good without adjacent segment degeneration , spinal instability and spondylolisthesis . Conclusions Dynesys placement during total laminectomy resection for lumbar spine intraspinal schwannoma can fully expose tumor area field of vision , completely remove schwannoma , effectively avoid spinal cord injury .Dynesys placement can not only achieve the traditional fusion stiffness of spinal stability , but also can effectively rebuild the physiologic stability and prevent the adiacent segment degeneration .%目的:探讨经后正中入路切除腰椎椎管内神经鞘瘤同时行腰椎动态稳定重建系统( Dynesys )置入对重建脊柱生理性稳定的作用。方法对采用后正中入路全椎板切除上腰椎椎管内神经鞘瘤的6例患者,术后应用腰椎Dynesys进行脊柱稳定性重建。结果神经鞘瘤均完整切除。术后1周、3个月、6个月时X线片复查示腰椎过伸、过屈位各椎体活动度良好,椎间隙等宽;内置物位置良好,无临近节段退变、脊柱失稳、椎体滑脱现象。结论对腰椎椎管内神经鞘瘤采用全椎板切除后置入Dynesys能够充分暴露肿瘤所在区域的视野,完整切除神经鞘瘤,有效避免损伤脊髓神经。 Dynesys既能达到传统强直融合的脊柱稳定性,还能够有效重建生理性稳

  2. Sistema de fixação dinâmica de coluna lombar Dynesys: experiência clínica em 30 pacientes num período médio de 1 ano Sistema Dynesis de fijación dinámica de la columna lumbar: la experiencia clínica en 30 pacientes en un período promedio de 1 año Dynesys system of dynamic fixation for the lumbar spine: clinical experience in 30 patients in an average period of 1 year

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Rogério Costa de Sousa

    2012-01-01

    eran hombres y 11 mujeres con una edad promediode 40,11 años (22-56, nueve de ellos sometidos a abordaje de dos niveles adyacentes (L4 -L5 y L5-S1. La enfermedad tratada fue protrusión del disco en ocho casos, discopatía degenerativa en 16 casos y estenosis de canal en seis casos. El seguimiento se realizó en nivel de pacientes externos, variando desde 8 a 13 meses, con un promedio de 12,3, utilizando parámetros clínicos, escala analógica de dolor y Oswestry, así como notas dadas por los pacientes cuanto a la satisfacción con el procedimiento, mejora de la calidad de vida y vuelta a sus actividades laborales. RESULTADOS: El porcentaje de pacientes que alcanzó el pleno retorno a las actividades de trabajo fue 76,6% (21 pacientes en los primeros tres meses, y el resto retornó a trabajar hasta mediados del quinto mes. Se observó una mejoría significativa en el dolor lumbardemostrada por la disminución de la EVA (Preoperatorio: 8,6 y 12 meses; posoperatorio: 1,8. En cuanto a la calidad de vida, mejoró significativamente, siendo observada por la reducción de los índices de Oswestry (Preoperatorio: 68,6 y 12 meses; posoperatorio: 22,5. Todos los pacientes volvieron al trabajo después de seis meses de la operación. CONCLUSIÓN: Los resultados comprueban que el sistema dinámico ha demostrado ser eficaz en el tratamiento de enfermedades para las que se ha propuesto.OBJECTIVE: Using a new concept of dynamic stability instead of conventional fusion, in order to reproduce the results so far achieved by several services in Brazil and worldwide. METHODS: We evaluated 30 patients undergoing dynamic fixation of the lumbar spine. Nineteen were men and 11 women with a mean age of 40.11 years (22-56, nine of them needed two adjacent levels of stabilization (L4-L5 and L5-S1. The diseases being treated were disc protrusion in 8 cases, discopathy in 16 cases and degenerative spinal stenosis in 6 cases. Follow-up was done on an outpatient basis, ranging from 8 to 13

  3. The Effect of Lumbar Lordosis on Screw Loosening in Dynesys Dynamic Stabilization: Four-Year Follow-Up with Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Hung Kuo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of Dynesys dynamic stabilization (DDS on clinical and radiographic outcomes, including spinal pelvic alignment. Method. Consecutive patients who underwent 1- or 2-level DDS for lumbar spondylosis, mild degenerative spondylolisthesis, or degenerative disc disease were included. Clinical outcomes were evaluated by Visual Analogue Scale for back and leg pain, Oswestry Disability Index, and the Japanese Orthopedic Association scores. Radiographic outcomes were assessed by radiographs and computed tomography. Pelvic incidence and lumbar lordosis (LL were also compared. Results. In 206 patients with an average follow-up of 51.1 ± 20.8 months, there were 87 screws (8.2% in 42 patients (20.4% that were loose. All clinical outcomes improved at each time point after operation. Patients with loosened screws were 45 years older. Furthermore, there was a higher risk of screw loosening in DDS involving S1, and these patients were more likely to have loosened screws if the LL failed to increase after the operation. Conclusions. The DDS screw loosening rate was overall 8.2% per screw and 20.4% per patient at more than 4 years of follow-up. Older patients, S1 involvement, and those patients who failed to gain LL postoperatively were at higher risk of screw loosening.

  4. The Effect of Lumbar Lordosis on Screw Loosening in Dynesys Dynamic Stabilization: Four-Year Follow-Up with Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chao-Hung; Chang, Peng-Yuan; Tu, Tsung-Hsi; Fay, Li-Yu; Chang, Hsuan-Kan; Wu, Jau-Ching; Huang, Wen-Cheng; Cheng, Henrich

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of Dynesys dynamic stabilization (DDS) on clinical and radiographic outcomes, including spinal pelvic alignment. Consecutive patients who underwent 1- or 2-level DDS for lumbar spondylosis, mild degenerative spondylolisthesis, or degenerative disc disease were included. Clinical outcomes were evaluated by Visual Analogue Scale for back and leg pain, Oswestry Disability Index, and the Japanese Orthopedic Association scores. Radiographic outcomes were assessed by radiographs and computed tomography. Pelvic incidence and lumbar lordosis (LL) were also compared. In 206 patients with an average follow-up of 51.1 ± 20.8 months, there were 87 screws (8.2%) in 42 patients (20.4%) that were loose. All clinical outcomes improved at each time point after operation. Patients with loosened screws were 45 years older. Furthermore, there was a higher risk of screw loosening in DDS involving S1, and these patients were more likely to have loosened screws if the LL failed to increase after the operation. The DDS screw loosening rate was overall 8.2% per screw and 20.4% per patient at more than 4 years of follow-up. Older patients, S1 involvement, and those patients who failed to gain LL postoperatively were at higher risk of screw loosening.

  5. A System for Monitoring Pressures and Spinal Curvature in Spinally Injured People Immobilised on a Spinal Raft

    OpenAIRE

    de Fréin, Ruairí; Flinn, Eoin; Burke, Ted

    2004-01-01

    We present a system designed to study the pressure at various ‘hot spots’ on the back of the body and the deformation of the spine experienced by a patient when strapped to a spinal board, and the potential alleviation of both by the addition of an inflatable “spinal raft” (or other similar device). In measuring pressure we devised a system of air-filled sacks interfaced with a PC. Each sack, placed under a particular key point on the body, is inflated until its faces just begin to separate a...

  6. The Spinal Cord Injury-Interventions Classification System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Langeveld, A.H.B.

    2010-01-01

    Title: The Spinal Cord Injury-Interventions Classification System: development and evaluation of a documentation tool to record therapy to improve mobility and self-care in people with spinal cord injury. Background: Many rehabilitation researchers have emphasized the need to examine the actual cont

  7. The Spinal Cord Injury-Interventions Classification System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Langeveld, A.H.B.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304811416

    2010-01-01

    Title: The Spinal Cord Injury-Interventions Classification System: development and evaluation of a documentation tool to record therapy to improve mobility and self-care in people with spinal cord injury. Background: Many rehabilitation researchers have emphasized the need to examine the actual

  8. A new lumbar posterior fixation system, the memory metal spinal system : an in-vitro mechanical evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, Dennis; Firkins, Paul John; Wapstra, Frits H.; Veldhuizen, Albert G.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Spinal systems that are currently available for correction of spinal deformities or degeneration such as lumbar spondylolisthesis or degenerative disc disease use components manufactured from stainless steel or titanium and typically comprise two spinal rods with associated connection de

  9. 动态中和固定系统治疗腰椎退行性疾病的研究进展%Progress on dynamic neutralization system in treating lumbar degenerative diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈喜君; 范顺武

    2013-01-01

    动态固定技术治疗腰椎退行性疾病日益成为基础和临床研究的热点.动态中和固定系统(dynamic neutralization system,Dynesys)作为动态固定技术的一种,既能保持脊柱的活动能力,改善患者的临床症状,还在延缓邻近节段退变方面表现出一定的优势.Dynesys技术可作为腰椎融合之外治疗腰椎退行性疾病的另一最佳选择,主要适用于轻至中度的腰椎退变性疾病,但它缺乏保持和恢复腰椎前凸的机制需要患者主动伸展实现前凸.如何延长使用寿命、预防并发症发生等问题有待解决,其远期疗效及延缓邻近节段退变作用机制需进一步明确.%Dynamic stabilization technology has increasingly become the hot spot in basic and clinical research for treating lumbar degenerative diseases.As one kind of dynamic stabilization technology,dynamic neutralization system (Dynesys) keeps the spinal motion ability and improve clinical symptoms of patients,moreover,it shows a certain advantage in delaying the degeneration of adjacent segments.From the available documents,the preliminary biomechanical and clinical results of Dynesys were optimistically,it has become another choice in treating the lumbar degenerative diseases besides the lumbar fusion,and it primarily applies to the treatment of mild to moderate lumbar degenerative disease.However,it lacks a mechanism to maintain and restore the lumbar lordosis and patients need active stretching to achieve lordosis.What's more,how to extend the service life and prevent complications remain to be solved,the long-term effect and the mechanism of delaying the adjacent segment degeneration need further investigation.In this article,the design principle,biomechanical research,clinical outcome and clinical application of Dynesys was reviewed.

  10. A System for Monitoring Pressures and Spinal Curvature in Spinally Injured People Immobilised on a Spinal Raft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruairi de Frein

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a system designed to study the pressure at various "hot spot" on the back of the body and the deformation of the spine experienced by a patient when strapped to a spinal board, and the potential alleviation of both by the addition of an inflatable "spinal raft" (or other similar devices. In measuring pressure we devised a system of air-filled sacks interfaced with a PC. Each sack, placed under a particular key point on the body, is inflated until its faces just begin to separate and a switch thereby opens. The pressure reading is then captured and displayed by the computer. Seeking a noninvasive method of measuring the curvature of the vertebral columm, we discovered that we could use a magnetometer to measure the vertical displacement of magnetically-tagged verbrae from a fixed horizontal plane. The results of our study will be employed by an independent body to determine the metrits or demerit of the spinal raft.

  11. The organization of the brainstem and spinal cord of the mouse : Relationships between monoaminergic, cholinergic, and spinal projection systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VanderHorst, VGJM; Ulfhake, B

    2006-01-01

    Information regarding the organization of the CNS in terms of neurotransmitter systems and spinal connections in the mouse is sparse, especially at the level of the brainstem. An overview is presented of monoaminergic and cholinergic systems in the brainstem and spinal cord that were visualized immu

  12. 21 CFR 888.3070 - Pedicle screw spinal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... treatment of the following acute and chronic instabilities or deformities of the thoracic, lumbar, and... conditions are significant mechanical instability or deformity of the thoracic, lumbar, and sacral spine... screw spinal system because this is a technically demanding procedure presenting a risk of...

  13. Peripheral nervous system involvement in chronic spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tankisi, Hatice; Pugdahl, Kirsten; Rasmussen, Mikkel Mylius

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Upper motor neuron disorders are believed to leave the peripheral nervous system (PNS) intact. In this study we examined whether there is evidence of PNS involvement in spinal cord injury (SCI). Methods: Twelve subjects with chronic low cervical or thoracic SCI were included...

  14. 21 CFR 866.5860 - Total spinal fluid immuno-logical test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Total spinal fluid immuno-logical test system. 866.5860 Section 866.5860 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN....5860 Total spinal fluid immuno-logical test system. (a) Identification. A total spinal...

  15. Electrical Neuromodulation of the Respiratory System After Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachmann, Jan T; Grahn, Peter J; Calvert, Jonathan S; Drubach, Dina I; Lee, Kendall H; Lavrov, Igor A

    2017-09-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a complex and devastating condition characterized by disruption of descending, ascending, and intrinsic spinal circuitry resulting in chronic neurologic deficits. In addition to limb and trunk sensorimotor deficits, SCI can impair autonomic neurocircuitry such as the motor networks that support respiration and cough. High cervical SCI can cause complete respiratory paralysis, and even lower cervical or thoracic lesions commonly result in partial respiratory impairment. Although electrophrenic respiration can restore ventilator-independent breathing in select candidates, only a small subset of affected individuals can benefit from this technology at this moment. Over the past decades, spinal cord stimulation has shown promise for augmentation and recovery of neurologic function including motor control, cough, and breathing. The present review discusses the challenges and potentials of spinal cord stimulation for restoring respiratory function by overcoming some of the limitations of conventional respiratory functional electrical stimulation systems. Copyright © 2017 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Does the histaminergic system play a role in spinal nociception?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harasawa, K

    2000-07-01

    The author studied whether the histaminergic system is involved in spinal nociception or not. A nociception-related, slow ventral root potential of rats, which is an integrated output of motoneurons, was recorded as an index of the intensity of nociception when an electric stimulation was applied to the dorsal root. Histamine dissolved in an artificial cerebrospinal fluid caused small reduction in the potential; however, mepyramine (10 nM to 10 microM, as an H1 receptor antagonist), ranitidine (1 nM to 1 microM, as an H2 receptor antagonist), R(-)-alpha-methylhistamine (2 pM to 200 nM, as an H3 receptor agonist), and thioperamide (1 nM to 10 microM, as an H3 receptor antagonist) dose-dependently reduced the potential down to around a half of each control level. These results indicate that the histaminergic system may affect the spinal withdrawal reflex.

  17. Preliminary development of augmented reality systems for spinal surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nhu Q.; Ramjist, Joel M.; Jivraj, Jamil; Jakubovic, Raphael; Deorajh, Ryan; Yang, Victor X. D.

    2017-02-01

    Surgical navigation has been more actively deployed in open spinal surgeries due to the need for improved precision during procedures. This is increasingly difficult in minimally invasive surgeries due to the lack of visual cues caused by smaller exposure sites, and increases a surgeon's dependence on their knowledge of anatomical landmarks as well as the CT or MRI images. The use of augmented reality (AR) systems and registration technologies in spinal surgeries could allow for improvements to techniques by overlaying a 3D reconstruction of patient anatomy in the surgeon's field of view, creating a mixed reality visualization. The AR system will be capable of projecting the 3D reconstruction onto a field and preliminary object tracking on a phantom. Dimensional accuracy of the mixed media will also be quantified to account for distortions in tracking.

  18. Traumatic spinal cord injury in mice with human immune systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Randall S; Kigerl, Kristina A; Marbourg, Jessica M; Gaudet, Andrew D; Huey, Devra; Niewiesk, Stefan; Popovich, Phillip G

    2015-09-01

    Mouse models have provided key insight into the cellular and molecular control of human immune system function. However, recent data indicate that extrapolating the functional capabilities of the murine immune system into humans can be misleading. Since immune cells significantly affect neuron survival and axon growth and also are required to defend the body against infection, it is important to determine the pathophysiological significance of spinal cord injury (SCI)-induced changes in human immune system function. Research projects using monkeys or humans would be ideal; however, logistical and ethical barriers preclude detailed mechanistic studies in either species. Humanized mice, i.e., immunocompromised mice reconstituted with human immune cells, can help overcome these barriers and can be applied in various experimental conditions that are of interest to the SCI community. Specifically, newborn NOD-SCID-IL2rg(null) (NSG) mice engrafted with human CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells develop normally without neurological impairment. In this report, new data show that when mice with human immune systems receive a clinically-relevant spinal contusion injury, spontaneous functional recovery is indistinguishable from that achieved after SCI using conventional inbred mouse strains. Moreover, using routine immunohistochemical and flow cytometry techniques, one can easily phenotype circulating human immune cells and document the composition and distribution of these cells in the injured spinal cord. Lesion pathology in humanized mice is typical of mouse contusion injuries, producing a centralized lesion epicenter that becomes occupied by phagocytic macrophages and lymphocytes and enclosed by a dense astrocytic scar. Specific human immune cell types, including three distinct subsets of human monocytes, were readily detected in the blood, spleen and liver. Future studies that aim to understand the functional consequences of manipulating the neuro-immune axis after SCI

  19. Surgical correction of spinal deformity with the use of transpedicular screw spinal systems in children with idiopathic thoracic scoliosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurbek N Nadirov

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To compare the results of surgical correction of spinal deformity in children with idiopathic thoracic scoliosis with the use of transpedicular screw spinal systems with different pedicle screw placement. Material and methods. Thirty-one patients (14–17 years with spinal curvature with a Cobb angle from 40° to 79° were operated on. Surgical correction of the deformity was performed using two methods, depending on the possible placement of a pedicle screw. The first group included 16 patients for whom the transpedicular support elements were placed on both sides, throughout the completely deformed spine. The second group included 15 patients for whom the pedicle screws were not placed for two or more vertebrae on the concave side of the curve, at the top of the main curve. Results. The mean percent correction of the spinal deformity for the first and second groups was 92.5% and 82.6%, respectively. The mean percentage of derotation of the apical vertebra for the first and second groups was 73.9% and 23%, respectively. Conclusion. The use of data based on the anatomical and anthropometric features of the vertebral body with scoliosis facilitates selection of the best option for correction of thoracic curve in children with idiopathic scoliosis using pedicle multi-support metal construction. The use of the spinal pedicle system for correction of spinal deformity in children with idiopathic scoliosis enabled a uniform load distribution along the support elements of the metal construction and maintained the correction in the late postoperative follow-up period.

  20. Intraoperative computed tomography with integrated navigation system in spinal stabilizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zausinger, Stefan; Scheder, Ben; Uhl, Eberhard; Heigl, Thomas; Morhard, Dominik; Tonn, Joerg-Christian

    2009-12-15

    STUDY DESIGN.: A prospective interventional case-series study plus a retrospective analysis of historical patients for comparison of data. OBJECTIVE.: To evaluate workflow, feasibility, and clinical outcome of navigated stabilization procedures with data acquisition by intraoperative computed tomography. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA.: Routine fluoroscopy to assess pedicle screw placement is not consistently reliable. Our hypothesis was that image-guided spinal navigation using an intraoperative CT-scanner can improve the safety and precision of spinal stabilization surgery. METHODS.: CT data of 94 patients (thoracolumbar [n = 66], C1/2 [n = 12], cervicothoracic instability [n = 16]) were acquired after positioning the patient in the final surgical position. A sliding gantry 40-slice CT was used for image acquisition. Data were imported to a frameless infrared-based neuronavigation workstation. Intraoperative CT was obtained to assess the accuracy of instrumentation and, if necessary, the extent of decompression. All patients were clinically evaluated by Odom-criteria after surgery and after 3 months. RESULTS.: Computed accuracy of the navigation system reached /=2 mm without persistent neurologic or vascular damage in 20/414 screws (4.8%) leading to immediate correction of 10 screws (2.4%). Control-iCT changed the course of surgery in 8 cases (8.5% of all patients). The overall revision rate was 8.5% (4 wound revisions, 2 CSF fistulas, and 2 epidural hematomas). There was no reoperation due to implant malposition. According to Odom-criteria all patients experienced a clinical improvement. A retrospective analysis of 182 patients with navigated thoracolumbar transpedicular stabilizations in the preiCT era revealed an overall revision rate of 10.4% with 4.4% of patients requiring screw revision. CONCLUSION.: Intraoperative CT in combination with neuronavigation provides high accuracy of screw placement and thus safety for patients undergoing spinal stabilization

  1. Management of unstable spinal fractures with segmental spinal instrumentation (VSP System : Results at 5 year follow up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen Dipankar

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pedicle screw instrumentation has been widely used for spinal stabilisation following spinal injury with variable results. The controversial points associated with spinal injury are effects of canal compromise and decompression on neurological status. Methods: Thirty four patients of unstable thoraco-lumbar fracture with or without neuro-deficit were treated by decompression and stabilisation with VSP system and followed up for 22 - 39 months (mean 29 months. The results were evaluated by neurological recovery (ASIA score, pain relief, loss of surgical correction and functional rehabilitation (FIM score. Results: We achieved a mean post-operative correction of the kyphotic deformity by 14 degrees and an average gain of 30.2% in the canal diameter by decompression. However no correlation was established between degree of canal compromise before or after the surgery with the final neurological outcome. Conclusion: Although the infrastructure for spinal injury management in developing countries is inadequate in many aspects, we find that it is still possible to achieve results, which are comparable with standard literature by adequate decompression and stabilisation followed by appropriate rehabilitation according to the social and cultural demands of the patients.

  2. Predictive Value of Tokuhashi Scoring Systems in Spinal Metastases, Focusing on Various Primary Tumor Groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Miao; Bünger, Cody; Haisheng, Li

    2012-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: We conducted a prospective cohort study of 448 patients with spinal metastases from a variety of cancer groups. OBJECTIVE: To determine the specific predictive value of the Tokuhashi scoring system (T12) and its revised version (T15) in spinal metastases of various primary tumors. S...

  3. Dynesys动态中和系统治疗腰椎退行性疾病的研究近况%Recent developments of Dynesys for lumbar degenerative diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘园桐; 镇万新

    2015-01-01

    融合术后相邻节段退变(adjacent segment degeneration,ASDeg)或症状性相邻节段退变病(adjacent segment disease,ASDis)一直是脊柱外科医生争论的焦点.在此背景下,旨在保留节段运动及阻止邻近节段退变的非融合技术即动态稳定系统迅速发展.Dynesys动态中和系统(dynamic neutralization system,Dynesys)就是腰椎后路经椎弓根动态固定的代表之一,目前已历经20年的临床实践,在取得令人鼓舞的临床疗效的同时,也存在一些争议.本文主要对Dynesys的基础研究及临床经验作简要综述.

  4. Spinal Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pharyngitis, Adenitis Syndrome (Juvenile) Polymyalgia Rheumatica Psoriatic Arthritis Raynaud's Phenomenon Reactive Arthritis Rheumatoid Arthritis Scleroderma Sjogren's Syndrome Spinal Stenosis Spondyloarthritis Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (Juvenile) Takayasu's ...

  5. Spinal angioma demonstration using the DVI-2 system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, H.; Vogelsang, H.

    1984-01-01

    If the myelogramme suggests a pathological vessel structure, intravenous digital substraction angiography (DSA) can be used for screening. However, spinal angiomas without large-volume vessels and slow contrast medium flow may elude detection. We think DSA to be a particularly valuable method in terms of follow-up after embolization or operation of spinal angiomas in order to check therapeutic success. However, intravenous DSA does not allow identification of the arteries supplying the angioma. Spinal arteriography continues to be required for any planning of operation or embolization.

  6. Development of an integrated CAD-FEA system for patient-specific design of spinal cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingzheng; Pu, Fang; Xu, Liqiang; Zhang, Linlin; Liang, Hang; Li, Deyu; Wang, Yu; Fan, Yubo

    2017-03-01

    Spinal cages are used to create a suitable mechanical environment for interbody fusion in cases of degenerative spinal instability. Due to individual variations in bone structures and pathological conditions, patient-specific cages can provide optimal biomechanical conditions for fusion, strengthening patient recovery. Finite element analysis (FEA) is a valuable tool in the biomechanical evaluation of patient-specific cage designs, but the time- and labor-intensive process of modeling limits its clinical application. In an effort to facilitate the design and analysis of patient-specific spinal cages, an integrated CAD-FEA system (CASCaDeS, comprehensive analytical spinal cage design system) was developed. This system produces a biomechanical-based patient-specific design of spinal cages and is capable of rapid implementation of finite element modeling. By comparison with commercial software, this system was validated and proven to be both accurate and efficient. CASCaDeS can be used to design patient-specific cages with a superior biomechanical performance to commercial spinal cages.

  7. Combinational spinal GAD65 gene delivery and systemic GABA-mimetic treatment for modulation of spasticity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osamu Kakinohana

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Loss of GABA-mediated pre-synaptic inhibition after spinal injury plays a key role in the progressive increase in spinal reflexes and the appearance of spasticity. Clinical studies show that the use of baclofen (GABA(B receptor agonist, while effective in modulating spasticity is associated with major side effects such as general sedation and progressive tolerance development. The goal of the present study was to assess if a combined therapy composed of spinal segment-specific upregulation of GAD65 (glutamate decarboxylase gene once combined with systemic treatment with tiagabine (GABA uptake inhibitor will lead to an antispasticity effect and whether such an effect will only be present in GAD65 gene over-expressing spinal segments. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Adult Sprague-Dawley (SD rats were exposed to transient spinal ischemia (10 min to induce muscle spasticity. Animals then received lumbar injection of HIV1-CMV-GAD65 lentivirus (LVs targeting ventral α-motoneuronal pools. At 2-3 weeks after lentivirus delivery animals were treated systemically with tiagabine (4, 10, 20 or 40 mg/kg or vehicle and the degree of spasticity response measured. In a separate experiment the expression of GAD65 gene after spinal parenchymal delivery of GAD65-lentivirus in naive minipigs was studied. Spastic SD rats receiving spinal injections of the GAD65 gene and treated with systemic tiagabine showed potent and tiagabine-dose-dependent alleviation of spasticity. Neither treatment alone (i.e., GAD65-LVs injection only or tiagabine treatment only had any significant antispasticity effect nor had any detectable side effect. Measured antispasticity effect correlated with increase in spinal parenchymal GABA synthesis and was restricted to spinal segments overexpressing GAD65 gene. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data show that treatment with orally bioavailable GABA-mimetic drugs if combined with spinal-segment-specific GAD65 gene overexpression can

  8. Interneuronal systems of the cervical spinal cord assessed with BOLD imaging at 1.5 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stracke, C.P.; Schoth, F.; Moeller-Hartmann, W.; Krings, T. [University Hospital of the University of Technology, Departments of Neuroradiology and Diagnostic Radiology, Aachen (Germany); Pettersson, L.G. [University of Goeteborg, Department of Physiology, Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2005-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate if functional activity with spinal cord somatosensory stimulation can be visualized using BOLD fMRI. We investigated nine healthy volunteers using a somatosensory stimulus generator. The stimuli were applied in three different runs at the first, third, and fifth finger tip of the right hand, respectively, corresponding to dermatomes c6, c7, and c8. The stimuli gave an increase of BOLD signal (activation) in three different locations of the spinal cord and brain stem. First, activations could be seen in the spinal segment corresponding to the stimulated dermatome in seven out of nine volunteers for c6 stimulation, two out of eight for c7, and three out of eight for c8. These activations were located close to the posterior margin of the spinal cord, presumably reflecting synaptic transmission to dorsal horn interneurons. Second, activation in the medulla oblongata was evident in four subjects, most likely corresponding to the location of the nucleus cuneatus. The third location of activation, which was the strongest and most reliable observed was inside the spinal cord in the c3 and c4 segments. Activation at these spinal levels was almost invariably observed independently of the dermatome stimulated (9/9 for c6, 8/8 for c7, and 7/8 for c8 stimulation). These activations may pertain to an interneuronal system at this spinal level. The results are discussed in relation to neurophysiological studies on cervical spinal interneuronal pathways in animals and humans. (orig.)

  9. Influence of internal fixation systems on radiation therapy for spinal tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingfeng; Yan, Lei; Wang, Jianping; Cai, Lin; Hu, Dongcai

    2015-07-08

    In this study, the influence of internal fixation systems on radiation therapy for spinal tumor was investigated in order to derive a theoretical basis for adjustment of radiation dose for patients with spinal tumor and internal fixation. Based on a common method of internal fixation after resection of spinal tumor, different models of spinal internal fixation were constructed using the lumbar vertebra of fresh domestic pigs and titanium alloy as the internal fixation system. Variations in radiation dose in the vertebral body and partial spinal cord in different types of internal fixation were studied under the same radiation condition (6 MV and 600 mGy) in different fixation models and compared with those irradiated based on the treatment planning system (TPS). Our results showed that spinal internal fixation materials have great impact on the radiation dose absorbed by spinal tumors. Under the same radiation condition, the influence of anterior internal fixation material or combined anterior and posterior approach on radiation dose at the anterior border of the vertebral body was the greatest. Regardless of the kinds of internal fixation method employed, radiation dose at the anterior border of the vertebral body was significantly different from that at other positions. Notably, the influence of posterior internal fixation material on the anterior wall of the vertebral canal was the greatest. X-ray attenuation and scattering should be taken into consideration for most patients with bone metastasis that receive fixation of metal implants. Further evaluation should then be conducted with modified TPS in order to minimize the potentially harmful effects of inappropriate radiation dose.

  10. Noninvasive transcutaneous bionic baroreflex system prevents severe orthostatic hypotension in patients with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Masayoshi; Murayama, Yoshinori; Chishaki, Akiko; Sunagawa, Kenji

    2008-01-01

    Central baroreflex failure in patients with spinal cord injury results in serious orthostatic hypotension. We examined if transcutaneous electrical stimulation regulates arterial pressure in those patients. We identified skin regions capable of increasing arterial pressure and determined respective transfer function. Using the transfer function, we designed the feedback regulator (i.e., bionic baroreflex system) to control arterial pressure. Orthostatic stress decreased arterial pressure profoundly. Activation of bionic regulator restored and maintained arterial pressure at pre-specified levels. We conclude that the transcutaneous bionic system is noninvasive and capable of stabilizing arterial pressure in patients with spinal cord injury.

  11. Application of a novel spinal posture and motion measurement system in active and static sitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pries, Esther; Dreischarf, Marcel; Bashkuev, Maxim; Schmidt, Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    The quantification of work-related musculoskeletal risk factors is of great importance; however, only a few tools allow objective, unrestricted measurements of spinal posture and motion in workplaces. This study was performed to evaluate the applicability of the Epionics system in a sedentary workplace. The system is mobile and wireless and assesses lumbar lordosis, pelvic orientation and spinal motion, without restricting subjects in their movements. In total, 10 males were monitored while sitting for 2 h on static and dynamic office chairs and on an exercise ball, to evaluate the effect of dynamic sitting. The volunteers were able to perform their work unhampered. No differences among the tested furniture could be detected with respect to either the lordosis or the number of spinal movements after habituation to the furniture; however, differences in pelvic orientation were statistically significant. The results of the present study indicate that Epionics may be useful for the quantitative assessment of work-related risk factors. Practitioner Summary: Only a few tools allow objective, unrestricted measurements of spinal posture and motion in the workplace. Epionics SPINE measures lumbar lordosis, pelvic orientation and spinal motion under nearly unrestricted conditions and can be used to quantify work-related musculoskeletal risk factors. We demonstrated the use of this tool in the workplace-analysis.

  12. Spinal cord evoked magnetic field measurement using a magnetospinography system equipped with a cryocooler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Yoshiaki; Oyama, Daisuke; Kawai, Jun; Kawabata, Shigenori; Uehara, Gen

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a magnetospinography (MSG) system that detects weak magnetic fields associated with spinal cord neural activity using an array of low-temperature superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID)-based magnetic flux sensors. A functional image of the spinal cord can be obtained noninvasively by using this system, and it is effective for precise lesion localization in the diagnosis of spinal cord diseases. The running cost of the developed MSG system mainly depends on liquid helium (LHe) consumption, which is required to maintain the superconducting state of the SQUID sensors. To reduce the LHe consumption, we incorporate a pulse-tube-refrigerator-based cryocooler into the MSG system. Cold gaseous helium is circulated between the cryocooler and the MSG system for cooling the thermal radiation shield of the dewar vessel. Consequently, we achieved a 46% decrease in the LHe consumption rate. Conventional biomagnetic field detection such as magnetoencephalography is often hindered by severe low-frequency band noise from the cryocooler. However, in the case of MSG measurements, such noise can be filtered out because the band of the signal is much higher than that of the cryocooler noise. We demonstrated that the signal-to-noise ratio of the cervical spinal cord evoked magnetic field measurement performed with a working cryocooler is comparable to that of the measurement without a cryocooler.

  13. Spinal Headaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... who undergo a spinal tap (lumbar puncture) or spinal anesthesia. Both procedures require a puncture of the tough ... fluid is withdrawn from your spinal canal. During spinal anesthesia, medication is injected into your spinal canal to ...

  14. The Wiley Spinal Catheter-Over-Needle System for Continuous Spinal Anesthesia: A Case Series of 5 Cesarean Deliveries Complicated by Paresthesias and Headaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Christine P; Carvalho, Brendan; Riley, Edward T

    2016-01-01

    Intrathecal catheter devices using a catheter-over-needle design and softer flexible material have been introduced to clinical practice with the aim of reducing some of the complications such as postdural puncture headaches and paresthesias seen with previous versions of intrathecal catheters. We present a case series of 5 cesarean deliveries using the Wiley Spinal intrathecal system (Epimed, Johnstown, New York), which was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. The intrathecal catheter system consists of a flexible 23-gauge intrathecal cannula over a 27-gauge pencil-point spinal needle. The placement of the intrathecal catheter was successful in all 5 cases; however, paresthesias in 3 cases and postdural puncture headaches in 2 cases complicated the placement and use of the device. Although the unique catheter-over-needle design facilitates the use of smaller-gauge spinal needles for dural puncture and larger-gauge catheters for medication administration, this case series using the Wiley Spinal suggests that paresthesias and postdural puncture headaches may still limit its widespread utilization. Future studies are needed to determine the true incidence of complications and to determine the role of continuous spinal anesthesia in the obstetric population.

  15. Increasing Incidence of Degenerative Spinal Diseases in Japan during 25 Years: The Registration System of Spinal Surgery in Tohoku University Spine Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizawa, Toshimi; Kokubun, Shoichi; Ozawa, Hiroshi; Kusakabe, Takashi; Tanaka, Yasuhisa; Hoshikawa, Takeshi; Hashimoto, Ko; Kanno, Haruo; Morozumi, Naoki; Koizumi, Yutaka; Sato, Tetsuro; Hyodo, Hironori; Kasama, Fumio; Ogawa, Shinji; Murakami, Eiichi; Kawahara, Chikashi; Yahata, Jun-Ichiro; Ishii, Yushin; Itoi, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    Spinal disorders affect mainly older people and cause pain, paralysis and/or deformities of the trunk and/or extremities, which could eventually disturb locomotive functions. For ensuring safe and high-quality treatment of spinal disorders, in 1987, the Tohoku University Spine Society (TUSS) was established by orthopedic departments in Tohoku University School of Medicine and its affiliated hospitals in and around Miyagi Prefecture. All spine surgeries have been enrolled in the TUSS Spine Registry since 1988. Using the data from this registration system between 1988 and 2012, we demonstrate here the longitudinal changes in surgical trends for spinal disorders in Japan that has rushed into the most advanced "aging society" in the world. In total, data on 56,744 surgeries were retrieved. The number of spinal surgeries has annually increased approximately 4-fold. There was a particular increase among patients aged ≥ 70 years and those aged ≥ 80 years, with a 20- to 90-fold increase. Nearly 90% of the spinal operations were performed for degenerative disorders, with their number increasing approximately 5-fold from 705 to 3,448. The most common disease for surgery was lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) (35.9%), followed by lumbar disc herniation (27.7%) and cervical myelopathy (19.8%). In 2012, approximately half of the patients with LSS and cervical myelopathy were ≥ 70 years of age. In conclusion, the number of spinal operations markedly increased during the 25-year period, particularly among older patients. As Japan has a notably aged population, the present study could provide a near-future model for countries with aging population.

  16. Transcutaneous spinal direct current stimulation modulates human corticospinal system excitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocci, Tommaso; Marceglia, Sara; Vergari, Maurizio; Cognetto, Valeria; Cogiamanian, Filippo; Sartucci, Ferdinando; Priori, Alberto

    2015-07-01

    This study aimed to assess the effects of thoracic anodal and cathodal transcutaneous spinal direct current stimulation (tsDCS) on upper and lower limb corticospinal excitability. Although there have been studies assessing how thoracic tsDCS influences the spinal ascending tract and reflexes, none has assessed the effects of this technique over upper and lower limb corticomotor neuronal connections. In 14 healthy subjects we recorded motor evoked potentials (MEPs) elicited by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) from abductor hallucis (AH) and hand abductor digiti minimi (ADM) muscles before (baseline) and at different time points (0 and 30 min) after anodal or cathodal tsDCS (2.5 mA, 20 min, T9-T11 level). In 8 of the 14 subjects we also tested the soleus H reflex and the F waves from AH and ADM before and after tsDCS. Both anodal and cathodal tsDCS left the upper limb MEPs and F wave unchanged. Conversely, while leaving lower limb H reflex unchanged, they oppositely affected lower limb MEPs: whereas anodal tsDCS increased resting motor threshold [(mean ± SE) 107.33 ± 3.3% increase immediately after tsDCS and 108.37 ± 3.2% increase 30 min after tsDCS compared with baseline] and had no effects on MEP area and latency, cathodal tsDCS increased MEP area (139.71 ± 12.9% increase immediately after tsDCS and 132.74 ± 22.0% increase 30 min after tsDCS compared with baseline) without affecting resting motor threshold and MEP latency. Our results show that tsDCS induces polarity-specific changes in corticospinal excitability that last for >30 min after tsDCS offset and selectively affect responses in lower limb muscles innervated by lumbar and sacral motor neurons.

  17. Involvement of Spinal Angiotensin II System in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Neuropathic Pain in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Yoshiki; Nemoto, Wataru; Nakagawasai, Osamu; Yamagata, Ryota; Tadano, Takeshi; Tan-No, Koichi

    2016-09-01

    Renin-angiotensin system (RAS) activity increases under hyperglycemic states, and is thought to be involved in diabetic complications. We previously demonstrated that angiotensin (Ang) II, a main bioactive component of the RAS, might act as a neurotransmitter and/or neuromodulator in the transmission of nociceptive information in the spinal cord. Here, we examined whether the spinal Ang II system is responsible for diabetic neuropathic pain induced by streptozotocin (STZ). Tactile allodynia was observed concurrently with an increase in blood glucose levels the day after mice received STZ (200 mg/kg, i.v.) injections. Tactile allodynia on day 14 was dose-dependently inhibited by intrathecal administration of losartan, an Ang II type 1 (AT1) receptor antagonist, but not by PD123319, an AT2 receptor antagonist. In the lumbar dorsal spinal cord, the expression of Ang II, Ang converting enzyme (ACE), and phospho-p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) were all significantly increased on day 14 after STZ injection compared with vehicle-treated controls, whereas no differences were observed among AT1 receptors or angiotensinogen levels. Moreover, the increase in phospho-p38 MAPK was significantly inhibited by intrathecal administration of losartan. These results indicate that the expression of spinal ACE increased in STZ-induced diabetic mice, which in turn led to an increase in Ang II levels and tactile allodynia. This increase in spinal Ang II was accompanied by the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, which was shown to be mediated by AT1 receptors.

  18. A Low-Cost, Passive Navigation Training System for Image-Guided Spinal Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorias-Espinoza, Daniel; Carranza, Vicente González; de León, Fernando Chico-Ponce; Escamirosa, Fernando Pérez; Martinez, Arturo Minor

    2016-11-01

    Navigation technology is used for training in various medical specialties, not least image-guided spinal interventions. Navigation practice is an important educational component that allows residents to understand how surgical instruments interact with complex anatomy and to learn basic surgical skills such as the tridimensional mental interpretation of bidimensional data. Inexpensive surgical simulators for spinal surgery, however, are lacking. We therefore designed a low-cost spinal surgery simulator (Spine MovDigSys 01) to allow 3-dimensional navigation via 2-dimensional images without altering or limiting the surgeon's natural movement. A training system was developed with an anatomical lumbar model and 2 webcams to passively digitize surgical instruments under MATLAB software control. A proof-of-concept recognition task (vertebral body cannulation) and a pilot test of the system with 12 neuro- and orthopedic surgeons were performed to obtain feedback on the system. Position, orientation, and kinematic variables were determined and the lateral, posteroanterior, and anteroposterior views obtained. The system was tested with a proof-of-concept experimental task. Operator metrics including time of execution (t), intracorporeal length (d), insertion angle (α), average speed (v¯), and acceleration (a) were obtained accurately. These metrics were converted into assessment metrics such as smoothness of operation and linearity of insertion. Results from initial testing are shown and the system advantages and disadvantages described. This low-cost spinal surgery training system digitized the position and orientation of the instruments and allowed image-guided navigation, the generation of metrics, and graphic recording of the instrumental route. Spine MovDigSys 01 is useful for development of basic, noninnate skills and allows the novice apprentice to quickly and economically move beyond the basics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Agreement between fiber optic and optoelectronic systems for quantifying sagittal plane spinal curvature in sitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloud, Beth A; Zhao, Kristin D; Breighner, Ryan; Giambini, Hugo; An, Kai-Nan

    2014-07-01

    Spinal posture affects how individuals function from a manual wheelchair. There is a need to directly quantify spinal posture in this population to ultimately improve function. A fiber optic system, comprised of an attached series of sensors, is promising for measuring large regions of the spine in individuals sitting in a wheelchair. The purpose of this study was to determine the agreement between fiber optic and optoelectronic systems for measuring spinal curvature, and describe the range of sagittal plane spinal curvatures in natural sitting. Able-bodied adults (n = 26, 13 male) participated. Each participant assumed three sitting postures: natural, slouched (accentuated kyphosis), and extension (accentuated lordosis) sitting. Fiber optic (ShapeTape) and optoelectronic (Optotrak) systems were applied to the skin over spinous processes from S1 to C7 and used to measure sagittal plane spinal curvature. Regions of kyphosis and lordosis were identified. A Cobb angle-like method was used to quantify lordosis and kyphosis. Generalized linear model and Bland-Altman analyses were used to assess agreement. A strong correlation exists between curvature values obtained with Optotrak and ShapeTape (R(2) = 0.98). The mean difference between Optotrak and ShapeTape for kyphosis in natural, extension, and slouched postures was 4.30° (95% LOA: -3.43 to 12.04°), 3.64° (95% LOA: -1.07 to 8.36°), and 4.02° (95% LOA: -2.80 to 10.84°), respectively. The mean difference for lordosis, when present, in natural and extension postures was 2.86° (95% LOA: -1.18 to 6.90°) and 2.55° (95% LOA: -3.38 to 8.48°), respectively. In natural sitting, the mean ± SD of kyphosis values was 35.07 ± 6.75°. Lordosis was detected in 8/26 participants: 11.72 ± 7.32°. The fiber optic and optoelectronic systems demonstrate acceptable agreement for measuring sagittal plane thoracolumbar spinal curvature.

  20. Agreement between Fiber Optic and Optoelectronic Systems for Quantifying Sagittal Plane Spinal Curvature in Sitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloud, Beth A.; Zhao, Kristin D.; Breighner, Ryan; Giambini, Hugo; An, Kai-Nan

    2014-01-01

    Spinal posture affects how individuals function from a manual wheelchair. There is a need to directly quantify spinal posture in this population to ultimately improve function. A fiber optic system, comprised of an attached series of sensors, is promising for measuring large regions of the spine in individuals sitting in a wheelchair. The purpose of this study was to determine the agreement between fiber optic and optoelectronic systems for measuring spinal curvature, and describe the range of sagittal plane spinal curvatures in natural sitting. Able-bodied adults (n=26, 13 male) participated. Each participant assumed three sitting postures: natural, slouched (accentuated kyphosis), and extension (accentuated lordosis) sitting. Fiber optic (ShapeTape) and optoelectronic (Optotrak) systems were applied to the skin over spinous processes from S1 to C7 and used to measure sagittal plane spinal curvature. Regions of kyphosis and lordosis were identified. A Cobb angle-like method was used to quantify lordosis and kyphosis. Generalized linear model and Bland-Altman analyses were used to assess agreement. A strong correlation exists between curvature values obtained with Optotrak and ShapeTape (R2=0.98). The mean difference between Optotrak and ShapeTape for kyphosis in natural, extension, and slouched postures was 4.30° (95%LOA: −3.43-12.04°), 3.64° (95%LOA: −1.07-8.36°), and 4.02° (95%LOA: −2.80-10.84°), respectively. The mean difference for lordosis, when present, in natural and extension postures is 2.86° (95%LOA: −1.18-6.90°) and 2.55° (95%LOA: −3.38-8.48°), respectively. In natural sitting, the mean±SD of kyphosis values was 35.07± 6.75°. Lordosis was detected in 8/26 participants: 11.72±7.32°. The fiber optic and optoelectronic systems demonstrate acceptable agreement for measuring sagittal plane thoracolumbar spinal curvature. PMID:24909579

  1. Systemic and spinal administration of the mu opioid, remifentanil, produces antinociception in amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Shekher; Stevens, Craig W

    2006-03-18

    Remifentanil is a relatively new opioid analgesic related to the fentanyl family of mu opioid receptor agonists and is used clinically for its unique property of having an ultra-short duration of action. However, there is little preclinical data on the analgesic (antinociceptive) effects of remifentanil and none obtained in non-mammalian animal models. The antinociceptive effects of remifentanil were assessed by using the acetic acid test in amphibians. Systemic and spinal administration of remifentanil was made by subcutaneous and intraspinal injections in the Northern grass frog, Rana pipiens. After administration, remifentanil produced dose-dependent and long-lasting antinociceptive effects which persisted for five hours after systemic administration but gave a shorter duration of action after spinal delivery. The antinociceptive effects of remifentanil were significantly blocked by pretreatment with systemic naltrexone. Systemic and spinal administration of remifentanil produced log dose-response curves which yielded ED50 values of 7.1 nmol/g and 3.2 nmol/animal respectively. The relative antinociceptive potency of remifentanil compared to other opioids administered to amphibians is similar to that found in mammalian models.

  2. The Role of the Serotonergic System in Locomotor Recovery after Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mousumi eGhosh

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Serotonin (5-HT, a monoamine neurotransmitter synthesized in various populations of brainstem neurons, plays an important role in modulating the activity of spinal networks involved in vertebrate locomotion. Following spinal cord injury (SCI there is a disruption of descending serotonergic projections to spinal motor areas, which results in a subsequent depletion in 5-HT, the dysregulation of serotonin transporters as well as the elevated expression, super-sensitivity and/or constitutive auto-activation of specific serotonin receptors. These changes in the serotonergic system can produce varying degrees of locomotor dysfunction through to paralysis. To date, various approaches targeting the different components of the serotonergic system have been employed to restore limb coordination and improve locomotor function in experimental models of SCI. These strategies have included pharmacological modulation of serotonergic receptors, through the administration of specific 5-HT receptor agonists, or by elevating the serotonin precursor 5-hydroxytryptophan, which produces a global activation of all classes of 5-HT receptors. Stimulation of these receptors leads to the activation of the locomotor central pattern generator (CPG below the site of injury to facilitate or improve the quality and frequency of movements, particularly when used in concert with the activation of other monoaminergic systems or coupled with electrical stimulation. Another approach has been to employ cell therapeutics to replace the loss of descending serotonergic input to the CPG, either through transplanted fetal brainstem 5-HT neurons at the site of injury that can supply 5-HT to below the level of the lesion or by other cell types to provide a substrate at the lesion for encouraging serotonergic axon regrowth across the lesion to the caudal spinal cord for restoring locomotion.

  3. Pilot study of strap-based custom wheelchair seating system in persons with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, John E; Wittig, Becky L; Payette, Mark; Goldish, Gary D; Hansen, Andrew H

    2014-01-01

    Custom wheelchair seats can be used to help prevent pressure ulcers in individuals with spinal cord injury. In this study, a strap-based system was evaluated in three Veterans with spinal cord injury. Interface pressure distributions were measured after transfers, wheeling, and pressure relief maneuvers and after fittings by three different therapists. We found that pressure distribution measures were not generally affected after transfers and wheeling using the strap-based wheelchair and that pressure relief maneuvers were able to be performed. Additionally, all therapists were able to customize the wheelchair seat to clinically acceptable levels in 4 to 40 min for the three subjects. Future studies can test the long-term effects of using the strap-based wheelchair seat and identifying individuals that would most benefit from a rapidly customizable wheelchair seat.

  4. Multi-modal sensor based weight drop spinal cord impact system for large animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyeongbeom; Kim, Jong-Wan; Hyun, Jung-Keun; Park, Ilyong

    2017-08-23

    A conventional weight drop spinal cord (SC) impact system for large animals is composed of a high-speed video camera, a vision system, and other things. However, a camera with high speed at over 5,000 frames per second (FPS) is very expensive. In addition, the utilization of the vision system involves complex pattern recognition algorithms and accurate arrangement of the camera and the target. The purpose of this study was to develop a large animal spinal cord injury modeling system using a multi-modal sensor instead of a high-speed video camera and vision system. Another objective of this study was to demonstrate the possibility of the developed system to measure the impact parameters in the experiments using different stiffness materials and an in-vivo porcine SC. A multi-modal sensor based spinal cord injury impact system was developed for large animals. The experiments to measure SC impact parameters were then performed using three different stiffness materials and a Yucatan miniature pig to verify the performance of system developed. A comparative experiment was performed using three different stiffness materials such as high density (HD) sponge, rubber, and clay to demonstrate the system and perform measurement for impact parameters such as impact velocity, impulsive force, and maximally compressed displacement reflecting physical properties of materials. In the animal experiment, a female Yucatan miniature pig of 60 kg weight was used. Impact conditions for all experiments were fixed at freefalling object mass of 50 g and height of 20 cm. In the impact test, measured impact velocities were almost the same for the three different stiffness materials at 1.84 ± 0.0153 m/s. Impulsive forces for the three materials of rubber, HD sponge, and clay were 50.88 N, 32.35 N, and 6.68 N, respectively. Maximally compressed displacements for rubber, HD sponge, and clay were 1.93 mm, 3.35 mm, and 15.01 mm, respectively. In the pig experiment, impact velocity, impulsive

  5. Fisetin exerts antihyperalgesic effect in a mouse model of neuropathic pain: engagement of spinal serotonergic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin; Wang, Chuang; Cui, Wu-Geng; Ma, Qing; Zhou, Wen-Hua

    2015-03-12

    Fisetin, a natural flavonoid, has been shown in our previous studies to exert antidepressant-like effect. As antidepressant drugs are clinically used to treat chronic neuropathic pain, this work aimed to investigate the potential antinociceptive efficacies of fisetin against neuropathic pain and explore mechanism(s). We subjected mice to chronic constriction injury (CCI) by loosely ligating the sciatic nerves, and Hargreaves test or von Frey test was used to assess thermal hyperalgesia or mechanical allodynia, respectively. Chronic fisetin treatment (5, 15 or 45 mg/kg, p.o.) ameliorated thermal hyperalgesia (but not mechanical allodynia) in CCI mice, concomitant with escalated levels of spinal monoamines and suppressed monoamine oxidase (MAO)-A activity. The antihyperalgesic action of fisetin was abolished by chemical depletion of spinal serotonin (5-HT) but potentiated by co-treatment with 5-HTP, a precursor of 5-HT. Moreover, intraperitoneal (i.p.) or intrathecal (i.t.) co-treatment with 5-HT7 receptor antagonist SB-258719 completely abrogated fisetin's antihyperalgesia. These findings confirm that chronic fisetin treatment exerts antinociceptive effect on thermal hyperalgesia in neuropathic mice, with spinal serotonergic system (coupled with 5-HT7) being critically involved. Of special benefit, fisetin attenuated co-morbidly behavioral symptoms of depression and anxiety (evaluated in forced swim test, novelty suppressed feeding test and light-dark test) evoked by neuropathic pain.

  6. Renin-angiotensin system inhibitors and troponin elevation in spinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClendon, Jamal; Smith, Timothy R; Thompson, Sara E; Sugrue, Patrick A; Sauer, Andrew J; O'Shaughnessy, Brian A; Carabini, Louanne; Koski, Tyler R

    2014-07-01

    Renin-angiotensin system (RAS) inhibition by angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI)/angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB) has been shown to reduce cardiovascular mortality and non-fatal myocardial infarction (MI) in high-risk surgical patients. However, their effect in spinal surgery has not been explored. Our objective was to determine the effect of RAS inhibitors on postoperative troponin elevation in spinal fusions, and to examine their correlation with hospital stay. We retrospectively analyzed 208 consecutive patients receiving spinal fusions ⩾5 levels between 2007-2010 with a mean follow-up of 1.7 years. Inclusion criteria were age ⩾18 years, elective fusions for kyphoscoliosis, and semi-elective fusions for tumor or infection. Exclusion criteria were trauma and follow-up troponin elevation (⩾0.04 ng/mL), peak troponin level, and hospital stay. The results featured 208 patients with a mean body mass index (BMI) 28.5 kg/m(2) who underwent 345 spinal fusions. ACEI/ARB were withheld the day prior to surgery in 121 patients with 11 patients noteworthy for intra-operative electrocardiogram changes, 126 patients with troponin elevation, and 14 MI identified prior to discharge. Multivariate logistic regression identified BMI (p=0.04), estimated blood loss (p=0.015), and preoperative ACEI/ARB (p=0.015, odds ratio=2.7) as significant independent predictors for postoperative troponin elevation. Multivariate linear regression showed preoperative Oswestry Disability Index (p=0.002), unplanned return to operating room (p=0.007), pneumonia prior to hospital discharge (ptroponin elevation and increased hospital stay.

  7. Spinal anesthesia for cesarean section in a patient with systemic sclerosis associated interstitial lung disease: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Guie Yong; Cho, Sooyoung

    2016-08-01

    Systemic sclerosis or scleroderma is a rare autoimmune disorder characterized by excessive fibrosis and, vasculopathy, with multiorgan involvement. Anesthetic considerations in patients with systemic sclerosis must take into account the degree of organ dysfunction as well as airway management. Regional anesthesia is a preferable alternative to general anesthesia despite the reports of prolonged sensory block. Spinal anesthesia in patients with systemic sclerosis has been reported for only one patients undergoing cesarean section. Concurrent systemic sclerosis and pregnancy raise many obstetric and anesthetic considerations. We describe the case of a pregnant patient with systemic sclerosis who had a history of dyspnea and interstitial lung disease. The cesarean section was performed uneventfully under spinal anesthesia.

  8. Walking after incomplete spinal cord injury using an implanted FES system: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, Elizabeth; Kobetic, Rudi; Murray, Lori; Corado-Ahmed, Michelle; Pinault, Gilles; Sakai, Jonathan; Bailey, Stephanie Nogan; Ho, Chester; Triolo, Ronald J

    2007-01-01

    Implanted functional electrical stimulation (FES) systems for walking are experimentally available to individuals with incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI); however, data on short-term therapeutic and functional outcomes are limited. The goal of this study was to quantify therapeutic and functional effects of an implanted FES system for walking after incomplete cervical SCI. After robotic-assisted treadmill training and overground gait training maximized his voluntary function, an individual with incomplete SCI (American Spinal Injury Association grade C, cervical level 6-7) who could stand volitionally but not step was surgically implanted with an 8-channel receiver stimulator and intramuscular electrodes. Electrodes were implanted bilaterally, recruiting iliopsoas, vastus intermedius and lateralis, tensor fasciae latae, tibialis anterior, and peroneus longus muscles. Twelve weeks of training followed limited activity post-surgery. Customized stimulation patterns addressed gait deficits via an external control unit. The system was well-tolerated and reliable. After the 12-week training, maximal walking distance increased (from 14 m to 309 m), maximal walking speed was 10 times greater (from 0.02 m/s to 0.20 m/s), and physiological cost index was 5 times less (from 44.4 beats/m to 8.6 beats/m). Voluntary locomotor function was unchanged. The implanted FES system was well-tolerated, reliable, and supplemented function, allowing the participant limited community ambulation. Physiological effort decreased and maximal walking distance increased dramatically over 12 weeks.

  9. A mechanical microconnector system for restoration of tissue continuity and long-term drug application into the injured spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazda, Nicole; Voss, Christian; Estrada, Veronica; Lodin, Homaira; Weinrich, Nils; Seide, Klaus; Müller, Jörg; Müller, Hans W

    2013-12-01

    Complete transection of the spinal cord leaves a gap of several mm which fills with fibrous scar tissue. Several approaches in rodent models have used tubes, foams, matrices or tissue implants to bridge this gap. Here, we describe a mechanical microconnector system (mMS) to re-adjust the retracted spinal cord stumps. The mMS is a multi-channel system of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), designed to fit into the spinal cord tissue gap after transection, with an outlet tubing system to apply negative pressure to the mMS thus sucking the spinal cord stumps into the honeycomb-structured holes. The stumps adhere to the microstructure of the mMS walls and remain in the mMS after removal of the vacuum. We show that the mMS preserves tissue integrity and allows axonal regrowth at 2, 5 and 19 weeks post lesion with no adverse tissue effects like in-bleeding or cyst formation. Preliminary assessment of locomotor function in the open field suggested beneficial effects of the mMS. Additional inner micro-channels enable local substance delivery into the lesion center via an attached osmotic minipump. We suggest that the mMS is a suitable device to adapt and stabilize the injured spinal cord after surgical resection of scar tissue (e.g., for chronic patients) or traumatic injuries with large tissue and bone damages.

  10. Simultaneous submicrometric 3D imaging of the micro-vascular network and the neuronal system in a mouse spinal cord

    CERN Document Server

    Fratini, Michela; Campi, Gaetano; Brun, Francesco; Tromba, Giuliana; Modregger, Peter; Bucci, Domenico; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Spadon, Raffaele; Mastrogiacomo, Maddalena; Requardt, Herwig; Giove, Federico; Bravin, Alberto; Cedola, Alessia

    2014-01-01

    Defaults in vascular (VN) and neuronal networks of spinal cord are responsible for serious neurodegenerative pathologies. Because of inadequate investigation tools, the lacking knowledge of the complete fine structure of VN and neuronal systems is a crucial problem. Conventional 2D imaging yields incomplete spatial coverage leading to possible data misinterpretation, whereas standard 3D computed tomography imaging achieves insufficient resolution and contrast. We show that X-ray high-resolution phase-contrast tomography allows the simultaneous visualization of three-dimensional VN and neuronal systems of mouse spinal cord at scales spanning from millimeters to hundreds of nanometers, with neither contrast agent nor a destructive sample-preparation. We image both the 3D distribution of micro-capillary network and the micrometric nerve fibers, axon-bundles and neuron soma. Our approach is a crucial tool for pre-clinical investigation of neurodegenerative pathologies and spinal-cord-injuries. In particular, it s...

  11. Overview of the Spinal Cord Injury--Quality of Life (SCI-QOL) measurement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulsky, David S; Kisala, Pamela A; Victorson, David; Tate, Denise G; Heinemann, Allen W; Charlifue, Susan; Kirshblum, Steve C; Fyffe, Denise; Gershon, Richard; Spungen, Ann M; Bombardier, Charles H; Dyson-Hudson, Trevor A; Amtmann, Dagmar; Kalpakjian, Claire Z; Choi, Seung W; Jette, Alan M; Forchheimer, Martin; Cella, David

    2015-05-01

    The Spinal Cord Injury--Quality of Life (SCI-QOL) measurement system was developed to address the shortage of relevant and psychometrically sound patient reported outcome (PRO) measures available for clinical care and research in spinal cord injury (SCI) rehabilitation. Using a computer adaptive testing (CAT) approach, the SCI-QOL builds on the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) and the Quality of Life in Neurological Disorders (Neuro-QOL) initiative. This initial manuscript introduces the background and development of the SCI-QOL measurement system. Greater detail is presented in the additional manuscripts of this special issue. Classical and contemporary test development methodologies were employed. Qualitative input was obtained from individuals with SCI and clinicians through interviews, focus groups, and cognitive debriefing. Item pools were field tested in a multi-site sample (n=877) and calibrated using item response theory methods. Initial reliability and validity testing was performed in a new sample of individuals with traumatic SCI (n=245). Five Model SCI System centers and one Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center across the United States. Adults with traumatic SCI. n/a n/a The SCI-QOL consists of 19 item banks, including the SCI-Functional Index banks, and 3 fixed-length scales measuring physical, emotional, and social aspects of health-related QOL (HRQOL). The SCI-QOL measurement system consists of psychometrically sound measures for individuals with SCI. The manuscripts in this special issue provide evidence of the reliability and initial validity of this measurement system. The SCI-QOL also links to other measures designed for a general medical population.

  12. Facet joint changes after application of lumbar nonfusion dynamic stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soo Eon; Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Kim, Hyun Jib

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The long-term effects on adjacent-segment pathology after nonfusion dynamic stabilization is unclear, and, in particular, changes at the adjacent facet joints have not been reported in a clinical study. This study aims to compare changes in the adjacent facet joints after lumbar spinal surgery. METHODS Patients who underwent monosegmental surgery at L4-5 with nonfusion dynamic stabilization using the Dynesys system (Dynesys group) or transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion with pedicle screw fixation (fusion group) were retrospectively compared. Facet joint degeneration was evaluated at each segment using the CT grading system. RESULTS The Dynesys group included 15 patients, while the fusion group included 22 patients. The preoperative facet joint degeneration CT grades were not different between the 2 groups. Compared with the preoperative CT grades, 1 side of the facet joints at L3-4 and L4-5 had significantly more degeneration in the Dynesys group. In the fusion group, significant facet joint degeneration developed on both sides at L2-3, L3-4, and L5-S1. The subjective back and leg pain scores were not different between the 2 groups during follow-up, but functional outcome based on the Oswestry Disability Index improved less in the fusion group than in the Dynesys group. CONCLUSIONS Nonfusion dynamic stabilization using the Dynesys system had a greater preventative effect on facet joint degeneration in comparison with that obtained using fusion surgery. The Dynesys system, however, resulted in facet joint degeneration at the instrumented segments and above. An improved physiological nonfusion dynamic stabilization system for lumbar spinal surgery should be developed.

  13. Rabbit IgG distribution in skin, spinal cord and DRG following systemic injection in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonra, J R; Mendell, L M

    1997-12-01

    In order to determine the distribution of antibodies such as anti-NGF following systemic injection in neonates, immunocytochemical techniques were used to examine the localization of rabbit IgG in rat skin, DRG, and spinal cord after treatments with normal rabbit serum or purified rabbit IgG. Daily subcutaneous injections beginning on postnatal day 2 or on day 15 were given for three days. On the fourth day the animals were sacrificed and tissues were processed for rabbit IgG-IR. In the dorsal and ventral spinal cord, staining intensities suggest a substantial increase in the blood-brain barrier during the first two weeks after birth. Staining intensity in the epidermis of the glabrous skin from the hindpaw was substantially lower than in the adjacent dermis. In addition, IgG infrequently accumulated intracellularly in intensely stained patches in the epidermis. IgG was also able to reach relatively high intracellular concentrations in a small number of sensory neurons. The IgG staining pattern in the skin was similar when anti-NGF itself was administered to the animals. The results are discussed in the context of the effects of anti-NGF on the development of nociceptive afferents.

  14. Superficial siderosis of the central nervous system secondary to spinal ependymoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikis, Stylianos; Cohen, José E; Vargas, Andres A; Gomori, J Moshe; Harnof, Sagi; Itshayek, Eyal

    2014-11-01

    Superficial siderosis of the central nervous system is a syndrome caused by deposition of hemosiderin in the subpial layers of the central nervous system, occurring as a result of recurrent asymptomatic or symptomatic bleeding into the subarachnoid space. We report a rare case of superficial siderosis in a 33-year-old man who presented with sensorineural hearing loss. The diagnosis of superficial siderosis on MRI brain studies led to further investigations with detection of a spinal ependymoma at L1-L2, compressing the cauda equina. Gross total resection of the tumor arrested the progression of the neurological deterioration. Our report underlies the importance of early diagnosis and surgical management, with imaging examination of the full neuroaxis to identify the source of bleeding, to halt disease progression and improve prognosis.

  15. Reciprocal inhibition becomes facilitation after spinal cord injury: clinical application of a system identification approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirbagheri, M M; Duffell, L D; Kotsapouikis, D; Rogers, L M

    2014-01-01

    Alteration in spinal inputs from descending pathways following spinal cord injury (SCI) affects different mechanisms including reciprocal Ia inhibition. However, whether there is a consistent pattern of change in reciprocal inhibition following SCI is uncertain. Typical attempts to evaluate reciprocal inhibition have been restricted to electrophysiological measurements, which may have limited translation to function. Our objective was to address the uncertainty regarding changes in reciprocal inhibition after SCI by quantitatively evaluating reciprocal inhibition of ankle extensors from ankle flexors using our novel, more functionally relevant system identification approach. To evaluate reciprocal inhibition using the system identification technique, a series of small-amplitude PseudoRandom Binary Sequence (PRBS) perturbations were applied to the ankle when subjects contracted their dorsiflexors. Depression of reflex stiffness with tibialis anterior (TA) activation was evaluated as reciprocal inhibition. Our results showed that reflex stiffness decreased continuously as dorsiflexor torque increased in the healthy control subjects whereas it remained almost unchanged in the SCI subjects, indicating the absence of reciprocal inhibition in patients. This pattern was consistent with the results obtained from electrophysiological measures in a exploratory control experiment revealing depression of the control H-reflex but no change to the SCI H-reflex. These findings suggest that our system identification mechanical technique is a reliable and valid approach for evaluating reciprocal inhibition. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that reciprocal inhibition can diminish or change to reciprocal facilitation after SCI, which in turn can result in reflex hyperexcitability and unwanted activity of ankle extensors triggered by TA activity. This suggests that reciprocal facilitation may play a major role in pathophysiology of spasticity and impaired function.

  16. The MAGEC system for spinal lengthening in children with scoliosis: A NICE Medical Technology Guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenks, Michelle; Craig, Joyce; Higgins, Joanne; Willits, Iain; Barata, Teresa; Wood, Hannah; Kimpton, Christine; Sims, Andrew

    2014-12-01

    Scoliosis-structural lateral curvature of the spine-affects around four children per 1,000. The MAGEC system comprises a magnetically distractible spinal rod implant and an external remote controller, which lengthens the rod; this system avoids repeated surgical lengthening. Rod implants brace the spine internally and are lengthened as the child grows, preventing worsening of scoliosis and delaying the need for spinal fusion. The Medical Technologies Advisory Committee at the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) selected the MAGEC system for evaluation in a NICE medical technologies guidance. Six studies were identified by the sponsor (Ellipse Technologies Inc.) as being relevant to the decision problem. Meta-analysis was used to compare the clinical evidence results with those of one conventional growth rod study, and equal efficacy of the two devices was concluded. The key weakness was selection of a single comparator study. The External Assessment Centre (EAC) identified 16 conventional growth rod studies and undertook meta-analyses of relevant outcomes. Its critique highlighted limitations around study heterogeneity and variations in baseline characteristics and follow-up duration, precluding the ability to draw firm conclusions. The sponsor constructed a de novo costing model showing that MAGEC rods generated cost savings of £9,946 per patient after 6 years, compared with conventional rods. The EAC critiqued and updated the model structure and inputs, calculating robust cost savings of £12,077 per patient with MAGEC rods compared with conventional rods over 6 years. The year of valuation was 2012. NICE issued a positive recommendation as supported by the evidence (Medical Technologies Guidance 18).

  17. Startle stimuli exert opposite effects on human cortical and spinal motor system excitability in leg muscles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ilic, T V; Pötter-Nerger, M; Holler, I

    2011-01-01

    Increased excitability of the spinal motor system has been observed after loud and unexpected acoustic stimuli (AS) preceding H-reflexes. The paradigm has been proposed as an electrophysiological marker of reticulospinal tract activity in humans. The brainstem reticular formation also maintains...... (ISI) varied between 20 to 160 ms. When given alone, the test stimulus evoked a MEP amplitude of approximately 0.5 mV in the slightly preinervated soleus muscle (SOL). In the second experiment, the startling AS was used to condition the size of the H-reflex in SOL muscle. Mean MEP amplitude...... was calculated for each ISI. The conditioning AS suppressed MEP amplitude at ISIs of 30-80 ms. By contrast, H-reflex amplitude was augmented at ISIs of 100-200 ms. In conclusions, acoustic stimulation exerts opposite and ISI-specific effects on the amplitude of MEPs and H-reflex in the SOL muscle, indicating...

  18. Vitamin B(12) dependent changes in mouse spinal cord expression of vitamin B(12) related proteins and the epidermal growth factor system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mutti, Elena; Lildballe, Dorte L; Kristensen, Lise

    2013-01-01

    Chronic vitamin B(12) (cobalamin) deficiency in the mammalian central nervous system causes degenerative damage, especially in the spinal cord. Previous studies have shown that cobalamin status alters spinal cord expression of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and its receptor in rats. Employing a mo...

  19. Spinal cord lesion by minor trauma as an early sign of Multiple System Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa Tavares Brum

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Multiple System Atrophy (MSA is characterized clinically by parkinsonism, cerebellar, autonomic and corticospinal features of variable severity. When the presentation is only parkinsonism, the disease might be difficult to differentiate from Parkinson´s Disease (PD. We present a case of an 80-year-old man with previous diagnosis of PD. One year after diagnosis he had a whiplash cervical trauma due to a tricycle accident caused by a hole in the road. This low-energy trauma caused an unstable C4-C5 cervical fracture with spinal cord injury which required surgical decompression and stabilization. Neurological examination showed marked postural instability, no rest and postural tremor, finger tapping slowed on the right, spastic tetraparesis (ASIA D—predominantly on the left side—, brisk deep tendon reflexes in the upper and lower extremities and bilateral extensor plantar response. He also presented with vertical gaze restriction, mild hypometria in horizontal saccades, moderate dysphagia and dysphonia. As atypical parkinsonism was suspected he underwent an MRI which revealed conjunction of findings suggestive of parkinsonian-type multiple system atrophy (MSA. In our case we hypothesise that the loss of postural reflexes, as an early manifestation of MSA, did not allow the patient to have an effective reaction response to a low-energy trauma, resulting in a more severe injury. With this case report we speculate that the severe spinal lesions caused by minor accidents can be an early sign of postural instability, which may lead to clinical suspicion of neurodegenerative disorder manifested by postural reflexes impairment.

  20. Vascular system of the human spinal cord in the prenatal period: a dye injection and corrosion casting study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawiliński, J; Litwin, J A; Nowogrodzka-Zagórska, M; Gorczyca, J; Miodoński, A J

    2001-07-01

    The vascularization of the spinal cord was investigated in 50 human fetuses aged from 10 to 28 gestational weeks using dye injection methods and corrosion casting accompanied by scanning electron microscopy. In the investigated period of fetal development, the general vascular architecture of the spinal cord, corresponding to that described postnatally, seemed to be already established. The observed changes included: (1) remodeling of the supplying (extrinsic) arterial branches, (2) transformation of the posterior anastomotic chain into two distinct posterior spinal arteries, and (3) development of the capillary networks in the gray and white matter. The remodeling of the radicular arteries supplying the spinal cord was accompanied by a decrease in their number and transition from regular to irregular distribution (appearance of intersegmental differences in their frequency). The anterior spinal artery and regular array of the central arteries were already present in the youngest fetuses examined, but the final remodeling of the posterior anastomotic chain into two posterior spinal arteries occurred between 15th and 20th week of fetal life indicating that the vascularization of the anterior region of the spinal cord in the investigated period of fetal life was more advanced as compared with that of the posterior region. The capillary network of the gray matter in the youngest fetuses had the form of discrete glomerular plexuses supplied by groups of central arteries and mainly vascularizing the anterior horns. Successively, the plexuses fused to form a continuous system along the anterior columns and the system expanded to fully vascularize the posterior horns. The white matter in the earlier fetal period seemed to be partially avascular, later the density of capillaries vascularizing those areas was still much lower than in the gray matter. The veins showed considerably greater variability than the arteries, as far as their topography and distribution was

  1. Clinical outcomes following spinal fusion using an intraoperative computed tomographic 3D imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Roy; Miller, Jacob A; Sabharwal, Navin C; Lubelski, Daniel; Alentado, Vincent J; Healy, Andrew T; Mroz, Thomas E; Benzel, Edward C

    2017-03-03

    OBJECTIVE Improvements in imaging technology have steadily advanced surgical approaches. Within the field of spine surgery, assistance from the O-arm Multidimensional Surgical Imaging System has been established to yield superior accuracy of pedicle screw insertion compared with freehand and fluoroscopic approaches. Despite this evidence, no studies have investigated the clinical relevance associated with increased accuracy. Accordingly, the objective of this study was to investigate the clinical outcomes following thoracolumbar spinal fusion associated with O-arm-assisted navigation. The authors hypothesized that increased accuracy achieved with O-arm-assisted navigation decreases the rate of reoperation secondary to reduced hardware failure and screw misplacement. METHODS A consecutive retrospective review of all patients who underwent open thoracolumbar spinal fusion at a single tertiary-care institution between December 2012 and December 2014 was conducted. Outcomes assessed included operative time, length of hospital stay, and rates of readmission and reoperation. Mixed-effects Cox proportional hazards modeling, with surgeon as a random effect, was used to investigate the association between O-arm-assisted navigation and postoperative outcomes. RESULTS Among 1208 procedures, 614 were performed with O-arm-assisted navigation, 356 using freehand techniques, and 238 using fluoroscopic guidance. The most common indication for surgery was spondylolisthesis (56.2%), and most patients underwent a posterolateral fusion only (59.4%). Although O-arm procedures involved more vertebral levels compared with the combined freehand/fluoroscopy cohort (4.79 vs 4.26 vertebral levels; p fusion only (HR 0.39; p fusion (HR 0.22; p = 0.03), but not posterior/transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion. CONCLUSIONS To the authors' knowledge, the present study is the first to investigate clinical outcomes associated with O-arm-assisted navigation following thoracolumbar spinal fusion. O

  2. Biocompatibility of a coacervate-based controlled release system for protein delivery to the injured spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauck, Britta M; Novosat, Tabitha L; Oudega, Martin; Wang, Yadong

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of protein-based therapies for treating injured nervous tissue is limited by the short half-life of free proteins in the body. Affinity-based biomaterial delivery systems provide sustained release of proteins, thereby extending the efficacy of such therapies. Here, we investigated the biocompatibility of a novel coacervate delivery system based on poly(ethylene argininylaspartate diglyceride) (PEAD) and heparin in the damaged spinal cord. We found that the presence of the [PEAD:heparin] coacervate did not affect the macrophage response, glial scarring or nervous tissue loss, which are hallmarks of spinal cord injury. Moreover, the density of axons, including serotonergic axons, at the injury site and the recovery of motor and sensorimotor function were comparable in rats with and without the coacervate. These results revealed the biocompatibility of our delivery system and supported its potential to deliver therapeutic proteins to the injured nervous system.

  3. AxiaLIF system: minimally invasive device for presacral lumbar interbody spinal fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rapp SM

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Steven M Rapp1, Larry E Miller2,3, Jon E Block31Michigan Spine Institute, Waterford, MI, USA; 2Miller Scientific Consulting Inc, Biltmore Lake, NC, USA; 3Jon E. Block, Ph.D., Inc., San Francisco, CA, USAAbstract: Lumbar fusion is commonly performed to alleviate chronic low back and leg pain secondary to disc degeneration, spondylolisthesis with or without concomitant lumbar spinal stenosis, or chronic lumbar instability. However, the risk of iatrogenic injury during traditional anterior, posterior, and transforaminal open fusion surgery is significant. The axial lumbar interbody fusion (AxiaLIF system is a minimally invasive fusion device that accesses the lumbar (L4–S1 intervertebral disc spaces via a reproducible presacral approach that avoids critical neurovascular and musculoligamentous structures. Since the AxiaLIF system received marketing clearance from the US Food and Drug Administration in 2004, clinical studies of this device have reported high fusion rates without implant subsidence, significant improvements in pain and function, and low complication rates. This paper describes the design and approach of this lumbar fusion system, details the indications for use, and summarizes the clinical experience with the AxiaLIF system to date.Keywords: AxiaLIF, fusion, lumbar, minimally invasive, presacral

  4. Spinal injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000029.htm Spinal injury To use the sharing features on this page, ... move anyone who you think may have a spinal injury, unless it is absolutely necessary. For example, if ...

  5. Evaluation of a novel spine and surface topography system for dynamic spinal curvature analysis during gait.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Betsch

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The assessment of spinal deformities with rasterstereography can enhance the understanding, as well as can reduce the number of x-rays needed. However, to date this technique only allows measurements under static conditions. Since it would be of great value to be able to also analyze the spine in dynamic conditions, the present study evaluated a novel rasterstereographic system. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A new rasterstereographic device was evaluated in a comparison with the gold standard in motion analysis, the VICON system. After initial testing using 12 flat infrared markers adhered to a solid plate, the two systems were evaluated with the markers adhered onto the backs of 8 test subjects. Four triangles were defined using the markers, and the sides of each triangle were measured under static and dynamic conditions. RESULTS: On the solid plate, the sides of the 4 triangles were measured with a measuring tape and then by the two optical systems. Rasterstereography showed a high accuracy in marker detection on the solid plate. Under dynamic conditions, with the subjects walking on a treadmill, the rasterstereographically-measured side lengths were compared with the lengths measured by the VICON system as an assessment of marker detection. No significant differences (p>0.05 were found between the systems, differing only 0.07-1.1% for all sides of the four triangles with both systems. DISCUSSION: A novel rasterstereographic measurement device that allows surface and spine topography under dynamic conditions was assessed. The accuracy of this system was with one millimeter on a solid plate and during dynamic measurements, to the gold standard for motion detection. The advantage of rasterstereography is that it can be used to determine a three-dimensional surface map and also allows the analysis of the underlying spine.

  6. Cysticercosis of the nervous system: less frequent clinical forms III- spinal cord forms

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    Horacio M. Canelas

    1963-06-01

    Full Text Available The spinal forms of cysticercosis are rather rare (2.7% of 296 cases of neurocysticercosis recorded in the Department of Neurology of the University of São Paulo Medical School. In a survey of the literature only 42 cases were found, most of them associated with cerebral symptoms. The reasons for this low incidence, as well as the possible routes followed by the parasite in its approach to the spinal cord, are discussed. After a review of the first cases reported in the literature, the authors refer the main syndromes (meningomyelitides, tabetiform pictures and spinal cord compressions and some of the clinico-pathologic features of spinal cysticercosis. Nine cases of spinal cysticercosis are reported. The diagnosis was based on laboratorial data (mainly the complement fixation test for cysticercosis in the cerebrospinal fluid or in the results of surgical therapy. Other cerebrospinal fluid findings (presence of eosinophile cells, protein contents, and the results of the manometric tests are discussed. Myelographic block was demonstrated in 5 cases. Three of these patients were submitted to laminectomy, with variable results. The prevailing neurological picture was that of spinal cord and/or root compression (4 cases. Two patients showed a dorsal funiculi syndrome closely simulating tabes dorsalis. Two other patients presented a picture of meningomyelitis with no systematization. One patient had a syndrome suggestive of subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord, but the presence of cerebral symptoms and the laboratorial data pointed to cysti-cercosis as the main disease process.

  7. Convenient diagnosis of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy using a microchip electrophoresis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Hirofumi; Morino, Hiroyuki; Izumi, Yuishin; Noda, Kouichi; Kawakami, Hideshi

    2013-01-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a slowly progressive motor neuron disease. Lower and primary sensory neuronopathy is one of the major neuropathological changes that occurs in SBMA. However, many sings are common to SBMA and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and SBMA patients are sometimes diagnosed with ALS. Leuprorelin may be used to treat SBMA, but an accurate diagnosis is necessary for treatment and care. Genetic diagnosis can be performed to detect the expansion of a CAG repeat in the androgen receptor gene in SBMA patients. To screen for this expansion, we used a microchip electrophoresis system. The discrepancy between the actual repeat length and that found by the microchip electrophoresis system was roughly dependent on the repeat length. The mean difference was -6.8 base pairs (bp) in SBMA patients, -0.30 bp in controls. The microchip electrophoresis results were approximately 2 CAG repeats shorter than the actual repeat length in SBMA patients. Using this method, we screened our ALS samples (31 were familial, 271 were sporadic): 4 subjects were diagnosed with SBMA; 2 had familial ALS, and 2 had sporadic ALS (0.7%). The microchip electrophoresis system is semi-quantitative, convenient and useful for screening a large number of samples.

  8. The early clinical observation about Dynesys and lumbar interbody fusion in treatment of lumbar degenerative diseases%非融合技术与腰椎融合术治疗腰椎退变性疾病的早期疗效观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王孟; 李坤; 王飞; 张元豫

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the difference of early clinical efficacy between Dynesys and lumbar interbody fusion in treatment of lumbar degenerative diseases. Methods Clinical data of 36 patients under two methods treatment of lumbar degenerative diseases with 18 examples in each were retrospectively analyzed. Patients were observed blood loss, VAS, ODI index, the rate for short-term excellent or good relief of symptoms and ROM. Results Two groups of VAS and ODI index had been significantly improved; Dynesys group maintained adjacent segment ROM to its original condition, while instrumented segment ROM decreased; In lumbar interbody fusion group, adjacent segment ROM increased, and instrumented segments fused. Conclusions Dynesys and the lumbar interbody fusion can all take the ideal early curative effect. Dynesys preserve partial ROM ,and prevent accelerated degeneration, which is a desirable method of treatment.%目的 探讨Dynesys和腰椎融合治疗腰椎退行性疾病早期临床疗效.方法 采用两种方法治疗36例腰椎退行性疾病患者,Dynesys组18例,腰椎融合组18例.观察两组手术时间、术中出血量、VAS评分、ODI指数、手术效果优良率及椎间活动度(ROM).结果 两组术后VAS及ODI都得到明显改善;Dynesys组邻近节段ROM维持在原来状态,手术节段ROM减小;腰椎融合组邻近节段ROM增大,手术节段融合.结论 Dynesys与腰椎融合术均可取的理想的早期疗效,Dynesys保持了部分椎间活动度,有利于防止退变加速.

  9. Lumbar Spinal Stenosis Minimally Invasive Treatment with Bilateral Transpedicular Facet Augmentation System

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    Masala, Salvatore, E-mail: salva.masala@tiscali.it [Interventional Radiology and Radiotherapy, University of Rome ' Tor Vergata' , Department of Diagnostic and Molecular Imaging (Italy); Tarantino, Umberto [University of Rome ' Tor Vergata' , Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology (Italy); Nano, Giovanni, E-mail: gionano@gmail.com [Interventional Radiology and Radiotherapy, University of Rome ' Tor Vergata' , Department of Diagnostic and Molecular Imaging (Italy); Iundusi, Riccardo [University of Rome ' Tor Vergata' , Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology (Italy); Fiori, Roberto, E-mail: fiori.r@libero.it; Da Ros, Valerio, E-mail: valeriodaros@hotmail.com; Simonetti, Giovanni [Interventional Radiology and Radiotherapy, University of Rome ' Tor Vergata' , Department of Diagnostic and Molecular Imaging (Italy)

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a new pedicle screw-based posterior dynamic stabilization device PDS Percudyn System Trade-Mark-Sign Anchor and Stabilizer (Interventional Spine Inc., Irvine, CA) as alternative minimally invasive treatment for patients with lumbar spine stenosis. Methods. Twenty-four consecutive patients (8 women, 16 men; mean age 61.8 yr) with lumbar spinal stenosis underwent implantation of the minimally invasive pedicle screw-based device for posterior dynamic stabilization. Inclusion criteria were lumbar stenosis without signs of instability, resistant to conservative treatment, and eligible to traditional surgical posterior decompression. Results. Twenty patients (83 %) progressively improved during the 1-year follow-up. Four (17 %) patients did not show any improvement and opted for surgical posterior decompression. For both responder and nonresponder patients, no device-related complications were reported. Conclusions. Minimally invasive PDS Percudyn System Trade-Mark-Sign has effectively improved the clinical setting of 83 % of highly selected patients treated, delaying the need for traditional surgical therapy.

  10. Systemic hypothermia improves histological and functional outcome after cervical spinal cord contusion in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Thomas Pang; Cho, Kyoung-Suok; Garg, Maneesh Sen; Lynch, Michael Patrick; Marcillo, Alexander Eduardo; Koivisto, Denise Leigh; Stagg, Monica; Abril, Rosa Marie; Patel, Samik; Dietrich, W Dalton; Pearse, Damien Daniel

    2009-06-10

    Hypothermia has been employed during the past 30 years as a therapeutic modality for spinal cord injury (SCI) in animal models and in humans. With our newly developed rat cervical model of contusive SCI, we investigated the therapeutic efficacy of transient systemic hypothermia (beginning 5 minutes post-injury for 4 hours, 33 degrees C) with gradual rewarming (1 degrees C per hour) for the preservation of tissue and the prevention of injury-induced functional loss. A moderate cervical displacement SCI was performed in female Fischer rats, and behavior was assessed for 8 weeks. Histologically, the application of hypothermia after SCI resulted in significant increases in normal-appearing white matter (31% increase) and gray matter (38% increase) volumes, greater preservation (four-fold) of neurons immediately rostral and caudal to the injury epicenter, and enhanced sparing of axonal connections from retrogradely traced reticulospinal neurons (127% increase) compared with normothermic controls. Functionally, a faster rate of recovery in open field locomotor ability (BBB score, weeks 1-3) and improved forelimb strength, as measured by both weight-supported hanging (43% increase) and grip strength (25% increase), were obtained after hypothermia. The current study demonstrates that mild systemic hypothermia is effective for retarding tissue damage and reducing neurological deficits following a clinically relevant contusive cervical SCI.

  11. Systemic bisperoxovanadium activates Akt/mTOR, reduces autophagy, and enhances recovery following cervical spinal cord injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandler L Walker

    Full Text Available Secondary damage following primary spinal cord injury extends pathology beyond the site of initial trauma, and effective management is imperative for maximizing anatomical and functional recovery. Bisperoxovanadium compounds have proven neuroprotective effects in several central nervous system injury/disease models, however, no mechanism has been linked to such neuroprotection from bisperoxovanadium treatment following spinal trauma. The goal of this study was to assess acute bisperoxovanadium treatment effects on neuroprotection and functional recovery following cervical unilateral contusive spinal cord injury, and investigate a potential mechanism of the compound's action. Two experimental groups of rats were established to 1 assess twice-daily 7 day treatment of the compound, potassium bisperoxo (picolinato vanadium, on long-term recovery of skilled forelimb activity using a novel food manipulation test, and neuroprotection 6 weeks following injury and 2 elucidate an acute mechanistic link for the action of the drug post-injury. Immunofluorescence and Western blotting were performed to assess cellular signaling 1 day following SCI, and histochemistry and forelimb functional analysis were utilized to assess neuroprotection and recovery 6 weeks after injury. Bisperoxovanadium promoted significant neuroprotection through reduced motorneuron death, increased tissue sparing, and minimized cavity formation in rats. Enhanced forelimb functional ability during a treat-eating assessment was also observed. Additionally, bisperoxovanadium significantly enhanced downstream Akt and mammalian target of rapamycin signaling and reduced autophagic activity, suggesting inhibition of the phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome ten as a potential mechanism of bisperoxovanadium action following traumatic spinal cord injury. Overall, this study demonstrates the efficacy of a clinically applicable pharmacological therapy for rapid initiation of

  12. The paradox of chronic neuroinflammation, systemic immune suppression and autoimmunity after traumatic chronic spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    Schwab, Jan M.; Zhang, Yi; Kopp, Marcel A; Brommer, Benedikt; Popovich, Phillip G.

    2014-01-01

    During the transition from acute to chronic stages of recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI), there is an evolving state of immunologic dysfunction that exacerbates the problems associated with the more clinically obvious neurologic deficits. Since injury directly affects cells embedded within the “immune privileged/specialized” milieu of the spinal cord, maladaptive or inefficient responses are likely to occur. Collectively, these responses qualify as part of the continuum of “SCI disease” ...

  13. Tokuhashi Scoring System has limited applicability in the majority of patients with spinal cord compression secondary to vertebral metastasis

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    Matheus Fernandes de Oliveira

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Spine is the primary bone site affected by systemic metastasis. Although there are scales that attempt to manage these patients, their real applicability is unknown. The Tokuhashi Scoring System (TSS is a widely used prognostic tool. At the time of treatment, the data necessary to complete TSS may be incomplete, making its application impossible. Objective To evaluate the number of TSS scores completed by the time the clinical therapeutic decision was made. Methods From July 2010 to January 2012, we selected patients who were diagnosed with spinal metastases. Results Sixty spinal metastasis patients (21 female, 39 male were evaluated between July 2010 and January 2012. At the time of the treatment decision, only 25% of the patients had completed the TSS items. Conclusion In the majority of patients with vertebral metastasis, TSS variables cannot be applied.

  14. Harnessing neural activity to promote repair of the damaged corticospinal system after spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John H Martin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As most spinal cord injuries (SCIs are incomplete, an important target for promoting neural repair and recovery of lost motor function is to promote the connections of spared descending spinal pathways with spinal motor circuits. Among the pathways, the corticospinal tract (CST is most associated with skilled voluntary functions in humans and many animals. CST loss, whether at its origin in the motor cortex or in the white matter tracts subcortically and in the spinal cord, leads to movement impairments and paralysis. To restore motor function after injury will require repair of the damaged CST. In this review, I discuss how knowledge of activity-dependent development of the CST-which establishes connectional specificity through axon pruning, axon outgrowth, and synaptic competition among CST terminals-informed a novel activity-based therapy for promoting sprouting of spared CST axons after injur in mature animals. This therapy, which comprises motor cortex electrical stimulation with and without concurrent trans-spinal direct current stimulation, leads to an increase in the gray matter axon length of spared CST axons in the rat spinal cord and, after a pyramidal tract lesion, restoration of skilled locomotor movements. I discuss how this approach is now being applied to a C 4 contusion rat model.

  15. Simulation system of spinal cord motor nuclei and associated nerves and muscles, in a Web-based architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisi, Rogerio R L; Kohn, André F

    2008-12-01

    A Web-based simulation system of the spinal cord circuitry responsible for muscle control is described. The simulator employs two-compartment motoneuron models for S, FR and FF types, with synaptic inputs acting through conductance variations. Four motoneuron pools with their associated interneurons are represented in the simulator, with the possibility of inclusion of more than 2,000 neurons and 2,000,000 synapses. Each motoneuron action potential is followed, after a conduction delay, by a motor unit potential and a motor unit twitch. The sums of all motor unit potentials and twitches result in the electromyogram (EMG), and the muscle force, respectively. Inputs to the motoneuron pool come from populations of interneurons (Ia reciprocal inhibitory interneurons, Ib interneurons, and Renshaw cells) and from stochastic point processes associated with descending tracts. To simulate human electrophysiological experiments, the simulator incorporates external nerve stimulation with orthodromic and antidromic propagation. This provides the mechanisms for reflex generation and activation of spinal neuronal circuits that modulate the activity of another motoneuron pool (e.g., by reciprocal inhibition). The generation of the H-reflex by the Ia-motoneuron pool system and its modulation by spinal cord interneurons is included in the simulation system. Studies with the simulator may include the statistics of individual motoneuron or interneuron spike trains or the collective effect of a motor nucleus on the dynamics of muscle force control. Properties associated with motor-unit recruitment, motor-unit synchronization, recurrent inhibition and reciprocal inhibition may be investigated.

  16. Spinal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Bobby K-B; Deckey, Jeffrey; Hu, Serena S

    2002-01-01

    Spinal infections can occur in a variety of clinical situations. Their presentation ranges from the infant with diskitis who is unwilling to crawl or walk to the adult who develops an infection after a spinal procedure. The most common types of spinal infections are hematogenous bacterial or fungal infections, pediatric diskitis, epidural abscess, and postoperative infections. Prompt and accurate diagnosis of spinal infections, the cornerstone of treatment, requires a high index of suspicion in at-risk patients and the appropriate evaluation to identify the organism and determine the extent of infection. Neurologic function and spinal stability also should be carefully evaluated. The goals of therapy should include eradicating the infection, relieving pain, preserving or restoring neurologic function, improving nutrition, and maintaining spinal stability.

  17. Harnessing neural activity to promote repair of the damaged corticospinal system after spinal cord injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John H. Martin

    2016-01-01

    As most spinal cord injuries (SCIs) are incomplete, an important target for promoting neural repair and recovery of lost motor function is to promote the connections of spared descending spinal pathways with spinal motor circuits. Among the pathways, the corticospinal tract (CST) is most associated with skilled voluntary functions in humans and many animals. CST loss, whether at its origin in the motor cortex or in the white matter tracts subcortically and in the spinal cord, leads to movement impairments and paraly-sis. To restore motor function after injury will require repair of the damaged CST. In this review, I discuss how knowledge of activity-dependent development of the CST—which establishes connectional speci-ifcity through axon pruning, axon outgrowth, and synaptic competition among CST terminals—informed a novel activity-based therapy for promoting sprouting of spared CST axons after injur in mature animals. This therapy, which comprises motor cortex electrical stimulation with and without concurrent trans-spi-nal direct current stimulation, leads to an increase in the gray matter axon length of spared CST axons in the rat spinal cord and, after a pyramidal tract lesion, restoration of skilled locomotor movements. I discuss how this approach is now being applied to a C4 contusion rat model.

  18. Diagnostic value and clinical problems of MR imaging in congenital anomalies of the central nervous system, 2. Spinal dysraphisms

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    Oi, Shizuo; Urui, Seishiro; Asano, Noboru; Masumura, Michio; Shose, Yoshiteru; Matsumoto, Satoshi

    1987-06-01

    Spina bifida and associated congenital anomalies in the central nervous system were evaluated by means of MRI, and the results compared with those obtained by conventional diagnostic procedures. Using the two-dimensional Fourier transform technique, a three-radiofrequency-pulse sequence (inversion recovery: IR 2100/500; spin-echo: SE 2100/40 or 2100/80) was routinely applied. Compared with X-ray CT, MR proved to be more accurate in the detection of the pathoanatomical relation between the lesion and the spinal cord, or that between the spinal dysraphic state and associated intracranial anomalies. MRI was also superior in the anatomical diagnosis of a spinal lipoma, a tethered cord, syringobulbia, syringomyelia, the Chiari anomaly, and so forth. The most considerable disadvantage of MRI in the diagnosis of the spina bifida is the poor information it provides about the bifid spine itself, but this information may be obtained by the use of conventional diagnostic procedures. Also, a regular-conducting MRI system is still insufficient to demonstrate the precise location of the canda equina nerve roots, especially in relation to a lipoma, although the spin-echo MR myelographic technique was helpful in demarcating the major structures, such as the lipoma and the cord. In syringomyelia and syringobulbia, further invasive study in analyzing the fluid dynamics is needed to determine the proper operative procedure. It was emphasized in this study that MRI is an extremely valuable diagnostic tool also in the diagnosis of spinal dysraphism, especially in the detection of a pathoanatomical structure, but can also be expected to be improved so as to make possible finer anatomical analysis and provide a higher quality of information on the fluid dynamics, at least so as to indicate operative procedures without any invasive methods. (J.P.N.).

  19. Poly(ethylene glycol) modification enhances penetration of fibroblast growth factor 2 to injured spinal cord tissue from an intrathecal delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Catherine E; Tator, Charles H; Shoichet, Molly S

    2010-05-21

    There is no effective treatment for spinal cord injury and clinical drug delivery techniques are limited by the blood-spinal cord barrier. Our lab has developed an injectable drug delivery system consisting of a biopolymer blend of hyaluronan and methylcellulose (HAMC) that can sustain drug release for up to 24h in the intrathecal space. Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) has great potential for treatment of spinal cord injury due to its angiogenic and trophic effects, but previous studies showed no penetration into spinal cord tissue when delivered locally. Conjugation to poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) is known to improve penetration of proteins into tissue by reducing clearance and providing immunogenic shielding. We investigated conjugation of PEG to FGF2 and compared its distribution relative to unmodified FGF2 in injured spinal cord tissue when delivered intrathecally from HAMC. Importantly, PEG conjugation nearly doubled the concentration of FGF2 in the injured spinal cord when delivered locally and, contrary to previous reports, we show that some FGF2 penetrated into the injured spinal cord using a more sensitive detection technique. Our results suggest that PEGylation of FGF2 enhanced tissue penetration by reducing its rate of elimination.

  20. Spinal brucellosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tali, E Turgut; Koc, A Murat; Oner, A Yusuf

    2015-05-01

    Spinal involvement in human brucellosis is a common condition and a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, particularly in endemic areas, because it is often associated with therapeutic failure. Most chronic brucellosis cases are the result of inadequate treatment of the initial episode. Recognition of spinal brucellosis is challenging. Early diagnosis is important to ensure proper treatment and decrease morbidity and mortality. Radiologic evaluation has gained importance in diagnosis and treatment planning, including interventional procedures and monitoring of all spinal infections.

  1. Vitamin B₁₂ dependent changes in mouse spinal cord expression of vitamin B₁₂ related proteins and the epidermal growth factor system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutti, Elena; Lildballe, Dorte L; Kristensen, Lise; Birn, Henrik; Nexo, Ebba

    2013-03-29

    Chronic vitamin B12 (cobalamin) deficiency in the mammalian central nervous system causes degenerative damage, especially in the spinal cord. Previous studies have shown that cobalamin status alters spinal cord expression of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and its receptor in rats. Employing a mouse model of cobalamin-depletion and loading, we have explored the influence of Cbl status on spinal cord expression of cobalamin related proteins, as well as all four known EGF receptors and their activating ligands. Following four weeks of osmotic minipump infusion (n=7 in each group) with cobinamide (4.25nmol/h), saline or cobalamin (1.75nmol/h) the spinal cords were analyzed for cobalamin and for the mRNA levels of cobalamin related proteins and members of the EGF system using quantitative reverse transcription PCR. The median spinal cord cobalamin content was 17, 32, and 52pmol/gr of tissues in cobinamide, saline, and cobalamin treated animals, respectively. Both cobinamide and cobalamin induced a significant decrease in the expression of the lysosomal membrane cobalamin transporter. All four EGF receptors and their activating ligands, except for EGF, were expressed in the spinal cord. Notably, the expression of one of the EGF receptors, HER3, and the ligands heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor, transforming growth factor-α, and neuregulins 1α was increased in cobalamin treated mice. Our studies show that four weeks treatment of mice with cobinamide induces spinal cord cobalamin depletion and that cobalamin loading induces an altered expression pattern of the EGF system thus confirming a spinal cord cross talk between Cbl and the EGF system.

  2. Economic assessment of pressure sore prevention using a computerized mattress system in patients with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catz, Amiram; Zifroni, Avi; Philo, Ora

    2005-11-15

    To assess the economic profitability of a new computerized mattress system in patients with spinal cord injuries (SCI) by comparison with two other alternatives, as an example of the use of a quantitative approach for decision-making in choosing between alternatives for sore prevention. The cost of achieving one day without signs of impending pressure sore was compared between the alternative options using cost minimization analysis. Savings in nursing costs for the three options were calculated for cost-benefit analysis. A foam mattress system is significantly cheaper than the other examined alternatives, and if the nursing manpower cost is constant and the nursing staff is capable of performing sufficient repositioning, this system would achieve the desired medical outcome at a minimal cost. However, if the nursing staff cannot perform sufficient repositioning, or if the use of nursing manpower can be adjusted to the actual need, then it is the computerized mattress system that achieves the desired outcome at the minimal cost. In this case, less than 20 New Israeli Shekels (NIS) per day spent on the equipment save NIS 45 per day in labor costs. The economic evaluation indicates that the computerized mattress system is advisable for patients with SCI who require assistance for repositioning, but its profitability depends on the employment terms of the nursing manpower. In addition, other possible alternative pressure management systems should be examined, and additional research may be needed to determine the optimal combination of such systems for a spinal cord rehabilitation department.

  3. [Information analysis of spinal ganglia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobko, P I; Kovaleva, D V; Kovalchuk, I E; Pivchenko, P G; Rudenok, V V; Davydova, L A

    2000-01-01

    Information parameters (entropia and redundancy) of cervical and thoracic spinal ganglia of albino rat foetuses, mature animals (cat and dog) and human subjects were analysed. Information characteristics of spinal ganglia were shown to be level-specified and to depend on their functional peculiarities. Information parameters of thoracic spinal ganglia of man and different animals are specie specified and may be used in assessment of morphological structures as information systems.

  4. Effect of robotic gait training on cardiorespiratory system in incomplete spinal cord injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, Femke; van Nunen, Michiel P. M.; Gerrits, Karin H. L.; Stolwijk-Swuste, Janneke M.; Crins, Martine H. P.; Janssen, Thomas W. J.

    2013-01-01

    The objectives in this study were to investigate the effect of robot-assisted gait training on cardiorespiratory fitness in subjects with motor incomplete spinal cord injury and document the exercise intensity of robotic walking in comparison with the recommended guidelines. Ten patients followed a

  5. The spinal cord ependymal region: a stem cell niche in the caudal central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugnot, Jean Philippe; Franzen, Rachelle

    2011-01-01

    In the brain, specific signalling pathways localized in highly organized regions called niches, allow the persistence of a pool of stem and progenitor cells that generate new neurons and glial cells in adulthood. Much less is known on the spinal cord central canal niche where a sustained adult neurogenesis is not observed. Here we review our current knowledge of this caudal niche in normal and pathological situations. Far from being a simple layer of homogenous cells, this region is composed of several cell types localized at specific locations, expressing characteristic markers and with different morphologies and functions. We further report on a screen of online gene-expression databases to better define this spinal cord niche. Several genes were found to be preferentially expressed within or around the central canal region (Bmp6, CXCR4, Gdf10, Fzd3, Mdk, Nrtn, Rbp1, Shh, Sox4, Wnt7a) some of which by specific cellular subtypes. In depth characterization of the spinal cord niche constitutes a framework to make the most out of this endogenous cell pool in spinal cord disorders.

  6. Effect of robotic gait training on cardiorespiratory system in incomplete spinal cord injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, Femke; van Nunen, Michiel P. M.; Gerrits, Karin H. L.; Stolwijk-Swuste, Janneke M.; Crins, Martine H. P.; Janssen, Thomas W. J.

    2013-01-01

    The objectives in this study were to investigate the effect of robot-assisted gait training on cardiorespiratory fitness in subjects with motor incomplete spinal cord injury and document the exercise intensity of robotic walking in comparison with the recommended guidelines. Ten patients followed a

  7. Inter- and intralimb adaptations to a sensory perturbation during activation of the serotonin system after a low spinal cord transection in neonatal rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misty M. Strain

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Activation of the serotonin system has been shown to induce locomotor activity following a spinal cord transection. This study examines how the isolated spinal cord adapts to a sensory perturbation during activation of the serotonergic system. Real-time and persistent effects of a perturbation were examined in intact and spinal transected newborn rats. Rats received a spinal surgery (sham or low thoracic transection on postnatal day one and were tested nine days later. At test, subjects were treated with the serotonergic receptor agonist quipazine (3.0 mg/kg to induce stepping behavior. Half of the subjects experienced range of motion (ROM restriction during stepping, while the other half did not. Differences in stepping behavior (interlimb coordination and limb trajectories (intralimb coordination were found to occur in both intact and spinal subjects. Adaptations were seen in the forelimbs and hindlimbs. Also, real-time and persistent effects of ROM restriction (following removal of the perturbation were seen in ROM-restricted subjects. This study demonstrates the sensitivity of the isolated spinal cord to sensory feedback in conjunction with serotonin modulation.

  8. Inter- and intralimb adaptations to a sensory perturbation during activation of the serotonin system after a low spinal cord transection in neonatal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strain, Misty M; Kauer, Sierra D; Kao, Tina; Brumley, Michele R

    2014-01-01

    Activation of the serotonin system has been shown to induce locomotor activity following a spinal cord transection. This study examines how the isolated spinal cord adapts to a sensory perturbation during activation of the serotonergic system. Real-time and persistent effects of a perturbation were examined in intact and spinal transected newborn rats. Rats received a spinal surgery (sham or low thoracic transection) on postnatal day 1 and were tested 9 days later. At test, subjects were treated with the serotonergic receptor agonist quipazine (3.0 mg/kg) to induce stepping behavior. Half of the subjects experienced range of motion (ROM) restriction during stepping, while the other half did not. Differences in stepping behavior (interlimb coordination) and limb trajectories (intralimb coordination) were found to occur in both intact and spinal subjects. Adaptations were seen in the forelimbs and hindlimbs. Also, real-time and persistent effects of ROM restriction (following removal of the perturbation) were seen in ROM-restricted subjects. This study demonstrates the sensitivity of the isolated spinal cord to sensory feedback in conjunction with serotonin modulation.

  9. Differential expression of tenascin-C, tenascin-R, tenascin/J1, and tenascin-X in spinal cord scar tissue and in the olfactory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckner, M; Lindholm, T; Cullheim, S; Risling, M

    2000-12-01

    The members of the tenascin family are involved in a number of developmental processes, mainly by their ability to regulate cell adhesion. We have here studied the distribution of mRNAs for tenascin-X, -C, and -R and the closely related molecule tenascin/J1 in the olfactory system and spinal cord. The olfactory bulb and nasal mucosa were studied during late embryonic and early postnatal development as well as in the adult. The spinal cord was studied during late embryonic development and after mechanical lesions. In the normal rat, the spinal cord and olfactory bulb displayed similar patterns of tenascin expression. Tenascin-C, tenascin-R, and tenascin/J1 were all expressed in the olfactory bulb and spinal cord during development, while tenascin/J1 was the only extensively expressed tenascin molecule in the adult. In both regions tenascin/J1 was expressed in both nonneuronal and neuronal cells. After a spinal cord lesion, mRNAs for tenascin-C, -X, -R, and/J1 were all upregulated and had their own specific spatial and temporal expression patterns. Thus, even if axonal outgrowth occurs to some extent both in the adult rat primary olfactory system and in spinal cord scar tissue after lesion, the tenascin expression patterns in these two situations are totally different. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  10. Imaging of Spinal Metastatic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lubdha M. Shah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastases to the spine can involve the bone, epidural space, leptomeninges, and spinal cord. The spine is the third most common site for metastatic disease, following the lung and the liver. Approximately 60–70% of patients with systemic cancer will have spinal metastasis. Materials/Methods. This is a review of the imaging techniques and typical imaging appearances of spinal metastatic disease. Conclusions. Awareness of the different manifestations of spinal metastatic disease is essential as the spine is the most common site of osseous metastatic disease. Imaging modalities have complimentary roles in the evaluation of spinal metastatic disease. CT best delineates osseous integrity, while MRI is better at assessing soft tissue involvement. Physiologic properties, particularly in treated disease, can be evaluated with other imaging modalities such as FDG PET and advanced MRI sequences. Imaging plays a fundamental role in not only diagnosis but also treatment planning of spinal metastatic disease.

  11. Modeling spinal cord biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, Carlos; Shah, Sameer; Cohen, Avis; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim

    2012-02-01

    Regeneration after spinal cord injury is a serious health issue and there is no treatment for ailing patients. To understand regeneration of the spinal cord we used a system where regeneration occurs naturally, such as the lamprey. In this work, we analyzed the stress response of the spinal cord to tensile loading and obtained the mechanical properties of the cord both in vitro and in vivo. Physiological measurements showed that the spinal cord is pre-stressed to a strain of 10%, and during sinusoidal swimming, there is a local strain of 5% concentrated evenly at the mid-body and caudal sections. We found that the mechanical properties are homogeneous along the body and independent of the meninges. The mechanical behavior of the spinal cord can be characterized by a non-linear viscoelastic model, described by a modulus of 20 KPa for strains up to 15% and a modulus of 0.5 MPa for strains above 15%, in agreement with experimental data. However, this model does not offer a full understanding of the behavior of the spinal cord fibers. Using polymer physics we developed a model that relates the stress response as a function of the number of fibers.

  12. Histopathological Defects in Intestine in Severe Spinal Muscular Atrophy Mice Are Improved by Systemic Antisense Oligonucleotide Treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palittiya Sintusek

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal (GI defects, including gastroesophageal reflux, constipation and delayed gastric emptying, are common in patients with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA. Similar GI dysmotility has been identified in mouse models with survival of motor neuron (SMN protein deficiency. We previously described vascular defects in skeletal muscle and spinal cord of SMA mice and we hypothesized that similar defects could be involved in the GI pathology observed in these mice. We therefore investigated the gross anatomical structure, enteric vasculature and neurons in the small intestine in a severe mouse model of SMA. We also assessed the therapeutic response of GI histopathology to systemic administration of morpholino antisense oligonucleotide (AON designed to increase SMN protein expression. Significant anatomical and histopathological abnormalities, with striking reduction of vascular density, overabundance of enteric neurons and increased macrophage infiltration, were detected in the small intestine in SMA mice. After systemic AON treatment in neonatal mice, all the abnormalities observed were significantly restored to near-normal levels. We conclude that the observed GI histopathological phenotypes and functional defects observed in these SMA mice are strongly linked to SMN deficiency which can be rescued by systemic administration of AON. This study on the histopathological changes in the gastrointestinal system in severe SMA mice provides further indication of the complex role that SMN plays in multiple tissues and suggests that at least in SMA mice restoration of SMN production in peripheral tissues is essential for optimal outcome.

  13. Androgen regulates development of the sexually dimorphic gastrin-releasing peptide neuron system in the lumbar spinal cord: evidence from a mouse line lacking androgen receptor in the nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Hirotaka; Saito, Kazuhiro; Marie-Luce, Clarisse; Raskin, Kalina; Oti, Takumi; Satoh, Keita; Tamura, Kei; Sakamoto, Tatsuya; Mhaouty-Kodja, Sakina

    2014-01-13

    Androgens including testosterone, organize the nervous system as well as masculine external and internal genitalia during the perinatal period. Androgen organization involves promotion of masculine body features, usually by acting through androgen receptors (ARs). We have recently demonstrated that the gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) system in the lumbar spinal cord also mediates spinal centers promoting penile reflexes during male sexual behavior in rats. Testosterone may induce sexual differentiation of this spinal GRP system during development and maintain its activation in adulthood. In the present study, we examined the role of ARs in the nervous system regulating the development of the sexually dimorphic GRP system. For this purpose, we used a conditional mouse line selectively lacking the AR gene in the nervous system. AR floxed males carrying (mutants) or not (controls) the nestin-Cre transgene were castrated in adulthood and supplemented with physiological amounts of testosterone. Loss of AR expression in the nervous system resulted in a significant decrease in the number of GRP neurons compared to control littermates. Consequently, the intensity of GRP axonal projections onto the lower lumbar and upper sacral spinal cord was greater in control males than in mutant males. These results suggest that ARs expressed in the nervous system play a significant role in the development of the GRP system in the male lumbar spinal cord. The AR-deletion mutation may attenuate sexual behavior and activity of mutant males via spinal GRP system-mediated neural mechanisms.

  14. Detrimental effects of systemic hyperthermia on locomotor function and histopathological outcome after traumatic spinal cord injury in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, C G; Jagid, J; Ruenes, G; Dietrich, W D; Marcillo, A E; Yezierski, R P

    2001-07-01

    Posttraumatic hyperthermia has been demonstrated to worsen neurological outcome in models of brain injury. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of systemic hyperthermia on locomotor and morphological outcome measures after traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) in the rat. After a T10 laminectomy, spinal cord contusions were produced from a height of 12.5 mm onto exposed cords (NYU Impactor; New York University Neurosurgery Laboratory, New York, NY) in adult rats that were divided into three groups. Group 1 (n = 9) underwent whole body hyperthermia (rectal temperature, 39.5 degrees C) 30 minutes postinjury for 4 hours, Group 2 (n = 8) underwent normothermia (rectal temperature, 37 degrees C) 30 minutes postinjury for 4 hours, and Group 3 (n = 10) underwent traumatic SCI with no postinjury thermal treatment. Twice-weekly assessments of locomotor function were made during a 6-week survival period using the Basso-Beattie-Breshnahan locomotor rating scale. Forty-four days after injury, animals were perfused, and their spinal cords serially sectioned. Sections were stained with hematoxylin, eosin, and Luxol fast blue for histopathological analysis. The percentage of tissue damage was quantitatively determined by using computer-aided image analysis. The results showed that 4 hours of postinjury hyperthermia significantly worsened locomotor outcome (final Basso-Beattie-Breshnahan scores were 9.7 +/- 0.3 [Group 1] versus 10.8 +/- 0.4 [Group 2] versus 11.3 +/- 0.3 [Group 3]) and led to an increase in the percentage of tissue damage (32.9 + 3.2% [Group 1] versus 22.3 +/- 2.8% [Group 3]). These data suggest that complications of SCI (e.g., fever, infection) leading to an elevation of systemic temperature may add to the severity of secondary injury associated with traumatic SCI and significantly affect neurological outcome.

  15. Convenient diagnosis of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy using a microchip electrophoresis system

    OpenAIRE

    Maruyama, Hirofumi; Morino, Hiroyuki; Izumi, Yuishin; Noda, Kouichi; Kawakami, Hideshi

    2013-01-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a slowly progressive motor neuron disease. Lower and primary sensory neuronopathy is one of the major neuropathological changes that occurs in SBMA. However, many sings are common to SBMA and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and SBMA patients are sometimes diagnosed with ALS. Leuprorelin may be used to treat SBMA, but an accurate diagnosis is necessary for treatment and care. Genetic diagnosis can be performed to detect the expansion of a CAG r...

  16. Systemic gene delivery in large species for targeting spinal cord, brain, and peripheral tissues for pediatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevan, Adam K; Duque, Sandra; Foust, Kevin D; Morales, Pablo R; Braun, Lyndsey; Schmelzer, Leah; Chan, Curtis M; McCrate, Mary; Chicoine, Louis G; Coley, Brian D; Porensky, Paul N; Kolb, Stephen J; Mendell, Jerry R; Burghes, Arthur H M; Kaspar, Brian K

    2011-11-01

    Adeno-associated virus type 9 (AAV9) is a powerful tool for delivering genes throughout the central nervous system (CNS) following intravenous injection. Preclinical results in pediatric models of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) and lysosomal storage disorders provide a compelling case for advancing AAV9 to the clinic. An important translational step is to demonstrate efficient CNS targeting in large animals at various ages. In the present study, we tested systemically injected AAV9 in cynomolgus macaques, administered at birth through 3 years of age for targeting CNS and peripheral tissues. We show that AAV9 was efficient at crossing the blood-brain barrier (BBB) at all time points investigated. Transgene expression was detected primarily in glial cells throughout the brain, dorsal root ganglia neurons and motor neurons within the spinal cord, providing confidence for translation to SMA patients. Systemic injection also efficiently targeted skeletal muscle and peripheral organs. To specifically target the CNS, we explored AAV9 delivery to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). CSF injection efficiently targeted motor neurons, and restricted gene expression to the CNS, providing an alternate delivery route and potentially lower manufacturing requirements for older, larger patients. Our findings support the use of AAV9 for gene transfer to the CNS for disorders in pediatric populations.

  17. The Memory Metal Spinal System in a Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion (PLIF) Procedure: A Prospective, Non-Comparative Study to Evaluate the Safety and Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, D; Grevitt, M; Wapstra, Fh; Veldhuizen, Ag

    2012-01-01

    A prospective, non-comparative study of 27 patients to evaluate the safety and performance of the Memory Metal Spinal System used in a PLIF procedure in the treatment of spondylolisthesis, symptomatic spinal stenosis or degenerative disc disease (DDD). To evaluate the clinical performance, radiological outcome and safety of the Memory Metal Spinal System, used in a PLIF procedure, in the treatment of spondylolisthesis, symptomatic spinal stenosis or degenerative disc disease in human subjects. Spinal systems that are currently available for correction of spinal deformities or degeneration such as lumbar spondylosis or degenerative disc disease, use components manufactured from stainless steel or titanium and typically comprise two spinal rods with associated connection devices. The Memory Metal Spinal System consists of a single square spinal rod made from a nickel titanium alloy (Nitinol) used in conjunction with connection devices. Nitinol is characterized by its shape memory effect and is a more flexible material than either stainless steel or titanium. With current systems there is loss of achieved reposition due to the elastic properties of the spine. By using a memory metal in this new system the expectation was that this loss of reposition would be overcome due to the metal's inherent shape memory properties. Furthermore, we expect a higher fusion rate because of the elastic properties of the memory metal. Twenty-seven subjects with primary diagnosis of spondylolisthesis, symptomatic spinal stenosis or degenerative disc disease (DDD) were treated with the Memory Metal Spinal System in conjunction with the Brantigan IF® Cage in two consecutive years. Clinical performance of the device was evaluated over 2 years using the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Short Form 36 questionnaire (SF-36) and pain visual analogue scale (VAS) scores. Safety was studied by collection of adverse events intra-operative and during the followup. Interbody fusion status was

  18. Spinal Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lower part of the body. It resembles a “horse’s tail” ( cauda equina in Latin). What Causes Spinal ... of the spine fails, it usually places increased stress on other parts of the spine. For example, ...

  19. Spinal Hemangiomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.A. Norkin

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The given article considers the modern view on etiology, pathogenesis, classifications, clinical picture, diagnosis and treatment of spinal hemangiomas. Advantages of vertebroplasty over the other techniques of treatment of studied pathology are presented

  20. Spinal Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... risk. Diseases such as arthritis and scoliosis can cause spinal stenosis, too. Symptoms might appear gradually or not at all. They include Pain in your neck or back Numbness, weakness, cramping, or pain in ...

  1. Spinal Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... infections may occur following surgery or spontaneously in patients with certain risk factors. Risk factors for spinal infections include poor nutrition, immune suppression, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, cancer, diabetes and obesity. Surgical risk factors ...

  2. Spinal Hemangiomas

    OpenAIRE

    I.A. Norkin; S.V. Likhachev; A.Yu. Chomartov; A.I. Norkin; D.M. Puchinian

    2010-01-01

    The given article considers the modern view on etiology, pathogenesis, classifications, clinical picture, diagnosis and treatment of spinal hemangiomas. Advantages of vertebroplasty over the other techniques of treatment of studied pathology are presented

  3. Spinal Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vertebrae. These include: treatment of a fractured (broken) vertebra; correction of deformity (spinal curves or slippages); elimination of pain from painful motion; treatment of instability; and treatment of some cervical disc herniations. One of the less controversial reasons ...

  4. New developments in the treatment of early-onset spinal deformity: role of the Shilla growth guidance system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morell SM

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Sean M Morell,1 Richard E McCarthy2 1Department of Orthopaedics, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 2Department of Orthopaedics, Arkansas Children’s Hospital, Little Rock, AR, USA Abstract: Early-onset scoliosis is a complex condition with multiple facets. The goal of treating any spinal deformity is to improve the condition of the patient with the least intervention necessary. A system that allows for continuation of natural spinal growth while correcting the deformity should be the goal of treating this complex condition. The SHILLA growth guidance system allows for continued growth of the pediatric spine while correcting and guiding the apex and guiding the future growth of the curvature. The system involves selective fusion across the apex of the curvature, and minimally invasive instrumentation is then used above and below the apex to allow for continued growth of the spine. A review of recent literature on the SHILLA growth guidance system shows promising results. Early animal models showed continued growth across unfused levels with minimal facet articular damage. Comparative studies to traditional growing rods showed significantly less total surgeries along with comparable correction and longitudinal growth. The SHILLA growth guidance system is a good option for this complex patient group. Results are comparable with other growing constructs with significantly less operative interventions. The SHILLA system allows for natural growth of the pediatric spine while correcting the scoliotic deformity in a minimally invasive method. The goal of this article is to present a comprehensive review of the SHILLA system surgical technique and the associated literature concerning this topic. Keywords: scoliosis, SHILLA, growing, early-onset, growth friendly

  5. Brain-computer interface driven functional electrical stimulation system for overground walking in spinal cord injury participant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Christine E; Wang, Po T; McCrimmon, Colin M; Chou, Cathy C Y; Do, An H; Nenadic, Zoran

    2014-01-01

    The current treatment for ambulation after spinal cord injury (SCI) is to substitute the lost behavior with a wheelchair; however, this can result in many co-morbidities. Thus, novel solutions for the restoration of walking, such as brain-computer interfaces (BCI) and functional electrical stimulation (FES) devices, have been sought. This study reports on the first electroencephalogram (EEG) based BCI-FES system for overground walking, and its performance assessment in an individual with paraplegia due to SCI. The results revealed that the participant was able to purposefully operate the system continuously in real time. If tested in a larger population of SCI individuals, this system may pave the way for the restoration of overground walking after SCI.

  6. Antinociceptive effects of systemic lidocaine: involvement of the spinal glycinergic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muth-Selbach, Uta; Hermanns, Henning; Stegmann, Jens Ulrich; Kollosche, Kathrin; Freynhagen, Rainer; Bauer, Inge; Lipfert, Peter

    2009-06-24

    Beside their action on voltage-gated Na(+) channels, local anesthetics are known to exert a variety of effects via alternative mechanisms. The antinociceptive effect of lidocaine is well documented, yet the exact mechanism is not fully understood. Whether glycinergic mechanisms, which play a pivotal role in pain modulation, are involved in lidocaine-induced antinociception is hitherto unclear. In the present study, lidocaine was injected intravenously in rats using the formalin test for acute pain and the chronic constriction injury model for neuropathic pain. The effect of intrathecally administered d-serine (an agonist at the glycine-binding site at the NMDA-receptor), its inactive isomer l-serine, CGP 78608 (antagonist at the glycineB-site of the NMDA-receptor) and strychnine (antagonist at inhibitory glycine-receptors) on lidocaine-induced antinociception was examined. Systemically administered lidocaine was antinociceptive in both acute and chronic pain model. In the formalin test, the effect of lidocaine was antagonized by d-serine, but not by l-serine or strychnine. In the chronic constriction injury model, antinociception evoked by lidocaine was reduced by d-serine, strychnine and CGP 78608, while l-serine had no effect. These results indicate a modulatory effect of lidocaine on the NMDA-receptor. Additionally, since in our study lidocaine-induced antinociception was antagonized by both glycineB-site modulators and strychnine our results may favor the hypothesis of a general glycine-like action of lidocaine or some of its metabolites on inhibitory strychnine-sensitive receptors and on strychnine-insensitive glycine receptors.

  7. The effects of the alpha2-adrenergic receptor agonists clonidine and rilmenidine, and antagonists yohimbine and efaroxan, on the spinal cholinergic receptor system in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abelson, Klas S P; Höglund, A Urban

    2004-01-01

    Cholinergic agonists produce spinal antinociception via mechanisms involving an increased release of intraspinal acetylcholine. The cholinergic receptor system interacts with several other receptor types, such as alpha2-adrenergic receptors. To fully understand these interactions, the effects...... of various receptor ligands on the cholinergic system must be investigated in detail. This study was initiated to investigate the effects of the alpha2-adrenergic receptor agonists clonidine and rilmenidine and the alpha2-adrenergic receptor antagonists yohimbine and efaroxan on spinal cholinergic receptors...... in the rat. Spinal microdialysis was used to measure in vivo changes of acetylcholine after administration of the ligands, with or without nicotinic receptor blockade. In addition, in vitro binding properties of the ligands on muscarinic and nicotinic receptors were investigated. It was found that clonidine...

  8. Coordination impairment between the somatic and parasympathetic nervous system divisions in the human sacral micturition centre following spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalow, G

    2009-01-01

    The detrusor-sphincteric dyssynergia is analyzed by comparing the natural impulse patterns of secondary muscle spindle afferents (SP2) contributing to continence (SP2 fibre activity changes are similar to detrusor pressure changes) and sphincteric motoneurons in a brain-dead human with those in patients with spinal cord injuries. In the brain-dead the sphincteric motoneurons, subserving continence, were inhibited at a time, when preganglionic parasympathetic efferents and a SP2 fibre increased their activity (physiologic). In paraplegics the sphincteric motoneurons were not inhibited (pathophysiologic). In the brain-dead, an SP2 fibre showed doublet firing (interspike interval (II) 10 to 14 ms) for low level parasympathetic activation and multi-ending regular firing for high parasympathetic activation. In one paraplegic with strong bladder dysfunction, the multi-ending regular firing was replaced by a repeated burst firing with a shortest II of 0.2 ms (transmission frequency = 5000 Hz). The pathologic firing patterns of the SP2 fibres, the detrusor-sphincteric dyscoordination, and hyperreflexia in paraplegics are most likely a result of neuronal network changes in the parasympathetic and somatic nervous system divisions of the sacral micturition center after spinal cord injury. It is discussed that urinary bladder functions can be re-learned.

  9. EFFECTS OF DYNORPHIN A ( 1-17) ON MOTOR FUNCTION AND SPINAL INTRACELLULAR MESSENGER SYSTEMS IN RAT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张志媛; 李富春; 任民峰; 刘景生

    1996-01-01

    The effect of intrathecal injection of dynorphin A(1-17) on second messenger systems of spinal cord relative to behavioral change in rats was studied. Dynorphin A(1-17) 5,10 (20nmol) caused dose-depen-dent flaccid paralysis of hindlimbs. Dynorphin A (1-17) 10, 20 nmol do,e-dependently decreased spinal adenylate cyclase (AC) activity, cyclic AMP production, calmodulin (CAM) level and cyclic-nucleotidephosphodiesterase(PDE) activity 10 rain after intrathecal injection. They recovered to a varying extent two hours later. Pretreatment -with selective K-opioid receptor antagonist nor-BN| 30 nmol 10 min before dynorphin A(1-17) markedly antagonized the effects of dynorphin A(1-17) at 20 nmol on hindlimb paralysis and inhibition of intraeelhilar second messengers. The L-type calcium channel blocker verapamil (100nmol) also played a role in blocking dynorphin neurotoxicity. The NMDA receptor antagonist APV toddpartially or completely block dynorphin inhibition of CaM level and PDE activity without affecting paralysis and decrease of AC-cAMP level induced by dynorphin A(1-17) 10 rain after intrathecal injection.

  10. Moderate precision of prognostic scoring systems in a consecutive, prospective cohort of 544 patients with metastatic spinal cord compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgen, Søren Schmidt; Nielsen, Dennis Hallager; Larsen, Claus Falck

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Improved survival among cancer patients and diverse conclusions from recent studies make it relevant to reassess the performance of the Tokuhashi Revised score and the Tomita score. The aim of this study was to validate and compare these two scoring systems in a recent and unselected...... and compared to the observed survival. We assessed how precise the scoring systems predicted survival with McNemar's test. The prognostic value was illustrated with Kaplan-Meier curves, and the individual prognostic components were analyzed with Cox regression analysis. RESULTS: The mean age was 65 years...... cohort of patients with metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC). METHODS: In 2011, we conducted a prospective cohort study of 544 patients who were consecutively admitted with MSCC to one treatment facility. Patients estimated survival were assessed with the Tokuhashi Revised score and the Tomita score...

  11. Retraining the injured spinal cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgerton, V. R.; Leon, R. D.; Harkema, S. J.; Hodgson, J. A.; London, N.; Reinkensmeyer, D. J.; Roy, R. R.; Talmadge, R. J.; Tillakaratne, N. J.; Timoszyk, W.; Tobin, A.

    2001-01-01

    The present review presents a series of concepts that may be useful in developing rehabilitative strategies to enhance recovery of posture and locomotion following spinal cord injury. First, the loss of supraspinal input results in a marked change in the functional efficacy of the remaining synapses and neurons of intraspinal and peripheral afferent (dorsal root ganglion) origin. Second, following a complete transection the lumbrosacral spinal cord can recover greater levels of motor performance if it has been exposed to the afferent and intraspinal activation patterns that are associated with standing and stepping. Third, the spinal cord can more readily reacquire the ability to stand and step following spinal cord transection with repetitive exposure to standing and stepping. Fourth, robotic assistive devices can be used to guide the kinematics of the limbs and thus expose the spinal cord to the new normal activity patterns associated with a particular motor task following spinal cord injury. In addition, such robotic assistive devices can provide immediate quantification of the limb kinematics. Fifth, the behavioural and physiological effects of spinal cord transection are reflected in adaptations in most, if not all, neurotransmitter systems in the lumbosacral spinal cord. Evidence is presented that both the GABAergic and glycinergic inhibitory systems are up-regulated following complete spinal cord transection and that step training results in some aspects of these transmitter systems being down-regulated towards control levels. These concepts and observations demonstrate that (a) the spinal cord can interpret complex afferent information and generate the appropriate motor task; and (b) motor ability can be defined to a large degree by training.

  12. Antinociception by systemically-administered acetaminophen (paracetamol) involves spinal serotonin 5-HT7 and adenosine A1 receptors, as well as peripheral adenosine A1 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jean; Reid, Allison R; Sawynok, Jana

    2013-03-01

    Acetaminophen (paracetamol) is a widely used analgesic, but its sites and mechanisms of action remain incompletely understood. Recent studies have separately implicated spinal adenosine A(1) receptors (A(1)Rs) and serotonin 5-HT(7) receptors (5-HT(7)Rs) in the antinociceptive effects of systemically administered acetaminophen. In the present study, we determined whether these two actions are linked by delivering a selective 5-HT(7)R antagonist to the spinal cord of mice and examining nociception using the formalin 2% model. In normal and A(1)R wild type mice, antinociception by systemic (i.p.) acetaminophen 300mg/kg was reduced by intrathecal (i.t.) delivery of the selective 5-HT(7)R antagonist SB269970 3μg. In mice lacking A(1)Rs, i.t. SB269970 did not reverse antinociception by systemic acetaminophen, indicating a link between spinal 5-HT(7)R and A(1)R mechanisms. We also explored potential roles of peripheral A(1)Rs in antinociception by acetaminophen administered both locally and systemically. In normal mice, intraplantar (i.pl.) acetaminophen 200μg produced antinociception in the formalin test, and this was blocked by co-administration of the selective A(1)R antagonist DPCPX 4.5μg. Acetaminophen administered into the contralateral hindpaw had no effect, indicating a local peripheral action. When acetaminophen was administered systemically, its antinociceptive effect was reversed by i.pl. DPCPX in normal mice; this was also observed in A(1)R wild type mice, but not in those lacking A(1)Rs. In summary, we demonstrate a link between spinal 5-HT(7)Rs and A(1)Rs in the spinal cord relevant to antinociception by systemic acetaminophen. Furthermore, we implicate peripheral A(1)Rs in the antinociceptive effects of locally- and systemically-administered acetaminophen.

  13. Feasibility of a classification system for physical therapy, occupational therapy, and sports therapy interventions for mobility and self-care in spinal cord injury rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Langeveld, Sacha A.; Post, Marcel W.; van Asbeck, Floris W.; Postma, Karin; Leenders, Jacqueline; Pons, Kees

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To test the feasibility of a classification system developed to record the contents of treatment sessions intended to improve mobility and self-care by persons with a spinal cord injury (SCI) in clinical rehabilitation. Design: Descriptive study. Setting: Three Dutch SCI facilities. Parti

  14. Feasibility of a classification system for physical therapy, occupational therapy, and sports therapy interventions for mobility and self-care in spinal cord injury rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Langeveld, Sacha A.; Post, Marcel W.; van Asbeck, Floris W.; Postma, Karin; Leenders, Jacqueline; Pons, Kees

    Objective: To test the feasibility of a classification system developed to record the contents of treatment sessions intended to improve mobility and self-care by persons with a spinal cord injury (SCI) in clinical rehabilitation. Design: Descriptive study. Setting: Three Dutch SCI facilities.

  15. Mobility for persons with spinal cord injury: an evaluation of two systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, A W; Magiera-Planey, R; Schiro-Geist, C; Gimines, G

    1987-02-01

    Wheelchairs and knee-ankle-foot orthoses (KAFOs) were evaluated by 92 persons with spinal cord injuries resulting in paraplegia to determine reasons for use and to determine their adequacy. While 67% of the sample was prescribed KAFOs, only 16 (26%) persons who were prescribed braces were still using them for any purpose, and only 4% as their sole means of mobility. Reasons for disuse and problems with braces were examined. Wheelchairs were rated significantly higher than long leg braces on value, potency and activity level permitted. A needs assessment revealed that transportation and mobility concerns were more prevalent than other areas of concern. Differences between KAFO users and former users were examined by discriminant analyses. Former users tended to have complete lesions and to be older; current users tended to have incomplete lesions and to be younger. Despite the problems associated with KAFOs, it is clear that this technology will continue to be useful to some degree for about 10% of individuals.

  16. Anatomical and pathoanatomical studies on the spinal efferent systems innervating pelvic structures. 1. Organization of spinal nuclei in animals. 2. The nucleus X-pelvic motor system in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, H D

    1985-01-01

    By means of the aluminum-formaldehyde (ALFA) fluorescence technique for monoamine visualization the distribution of catecholamines was studied in the caudal spinal cord, particularly in relation to motoneurons innervating pelvic structures. In the lumbosacral cord all parts of the spinal gray mat...

  17. Stress affects a gastrin-releasing peptide system in the spinal cord that mediates sexual function: implications for psychogenic erectile dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirotaka Sakamoto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many men suffering from stress, including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD, report sexual dysfunction, which is traditionally treated via psychological counseling. Recently, we identified a gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP system in the lumbar spinal cord that is a primary mediator for male reproductive functions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To ask whether an acute severe stress could alter the male specific GRP system, we used a single-prolonged stress (SPS, a putative rat model for PTSD in the present study. Exposure of SPS to male rats decreases both the local content and axonal distribution of GRP in the lower lumbar spinal cord and results in an attenuation of penile reflexes in vivo. Remarkably, pharmacological stimulation of GRP receptors restores penile reflexes in SPS-exposed males, and induces spontaneous ejaculation in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, although the level of plasma testosterone is normal 7 days after SPS exposure, we found a significant decrease in the expression of androgen receptor protein in this spinal center. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that the spinal GRP system appears to be a stress-vulnerable center for male reproductive functions, which may provide new insight into a clinical target for the treatment of erectile dysfunction triggered by stress and psychiatric disorders.

  18. Systemic administration of an antagonist of the ATP-sensitive receptor P2X7 improves recovery after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Weiguo; Cotrina, Maria L; Han, Xiaoning; Yu, Hongmei; Bekar, Lane; Blum, Livnat; Takano, Takahiro; Tian, Guo-Feng; Goldman, Steven A; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2009-07-28

    Traumatic spinal cord injury is characterized by an immediate, irreversible loss of tissue at the lesion site, as well as a secondary expansion of tissue damage over time. Although secondary injury should, in principle, be preventable, no effective treatment options currently exist for patients with acute spinal cord injury (SCI). Excessive release of ATP by the traumatized tissue, followed by activation of high-affinity P2X7 receptors, has previously been implicated in secondary injury, but no clinically relevant strategy by which to antagonize P2X7 receptors has yet, to the best of our knowledge, been reported. Here we have tested the neuroprotective effects of a systemically administered P2X7R antagonist, Brilliant blue G (BBG), in a weight-drop model of thoracic SCI in rats. Administration of BBG 15 min after injury reduced spinal cord anatomic damage and improved motor recovery without evident toxicity. Moreover, BBG treatment directly reduced local activation of astrocytes and microglia, as well as neutrophil infiltration. These observations suggest that BBG not only protected spinal cord neurons from purinergic excitotoxicity, but also reduced local inflammatory responses. Importantly, BBG is a derivative of a commonly used blue food color (FD&C blue No. 1), which crosses the blood-brain barrier. Systemic administration of BBG may thus comprise a readily feasible approach by which to treat traumatic SCI in humans.

  19. Systems biology investigation of cAMP modulation to increase SMN levels for the treatment of spinal muscular atrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean G Mack

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA, a leading genetic cause of infant death worldwide, is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by the loss of SMN1 (survival motor neuron 1, which encodes the protein SMN. The loss of SMN1 causes a deficiency in SMN protein levels leading to motor neuron cell death in the anterior horn of the spinal cord. SMN2, however, can also produce some functional SMN to partially compensate for loss of SMN1 in SMA suggesting increasing transcription of SMN2 as a potential therapy to treat patients with SMA. A cAMP response element was identified on the SMN2 promoter, implicating cAMP activation as a step in the transcription of SMN2. Therefore, we investigated the effects of modulating the cAMP signaling cascade on SMN production in vitro and in silico. SMA patient fibroblasts were treated with the cAMP signaling modulators rolipram, salbutamol, dbcAMP, epinephrine and forskolin. All of the modulators tested were able to increase gem formation, a marker for SMN protein in the nucleus, in a dose-dependent manner. We then derived two possible mathematical models simulating the regulation of SMN2 expression by cAMP signaling. Both models fit well with our experimental data. In silico treatment of SMA fibroblasts simultaneously with two different cAMP modulators resulted in an additive increase in gem formation. This study shows how a systems biology approach can be used to develop potential therapeutic targets for treating SMA.

  20. The assessment of the spinal curvatures in the sagittal plane of children using an ultrasound-based motion analysing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takács, Mária; Rudner, Ervin; Kovács, Attila; Orlovits, Zsanett; Kiss, Rita M

    2015-02-01

    In children's posture examinations the question often arises whether an X-ray examination is necessary or appropriate. On screening and in other cases when X-ray is contraindicated, alternative-non-invasive-examinations are available. To measure the shapes of the children's spines beside the Spinal Mouse also the Zebris ultrasound-based spine measuring instrument is accessible and nowadays commonly used. The main aim of the study is to determine the shape of the school-age children's spines in the sagittal plane with an alternative, non-invasive, radiation-free measuring method. From the results calculated from the values measured with the ultrasound-based motion analysing system-geared to age and height-the normal range of the values of kyphosis (TK), lordosis (LL) and inclination (TTI and LI) is determined. The subjects were children between the ages of 6 and 15 and between the heights of 120 and 180 cm (530 healthy, 394 with bad posture and 332 with flat feet). They were divided into groups according to their height with 5 cm long intervals. The age within the groups was irrelevant. So it is appropriate to give normal values according to height and not according to age. It was revealed that both in healthy children, in children with bad posture and in those with pes planus in the height groups, there was a significant difference between the values of males and females. On the basis of these results, normal values should be divided according to the gender. The measurement results also showed that in some of the height groups the pes planus and bad posture significantly affected the spinal curvatures.

  1. Beneficial effects of modest systemic hypothermia on locomotor function and histopathological damage following contusion-induced spinal cord injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, C G; Jimenez, O; Marcillo, A E; Weider, B; Bangerter, K; Dietrich, W D; Castro, S; Yezierski, R P

    2000-07-01

    Local spinal cord cooling (LSCC) is associated with beneficial effects when applied following ischemic or traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). However, the clinical application of LSCC is associated with many technical difficulties such as the requirement of special cooling devices, emergency surgery, and complicated postoperative management. If hypothermia is to be considered for future application in the treatment of SCI, alternative approaches must be developed. The objectives of the present study were to evaluate 1) the relationship between systemic and epidural temperature after SCI; 2) the effects of modest systemic hypothermia on histopathological damage at 7 and 44 days post-SCI; and 3) the effects of modest systemic hypothermia on locomotor outcome at 44 days post-SCI. A spinal cord contusion (12.5 mm at T-10) was produced in adult rats that had been randomly divided into two groups. Group 1 rats (seven in Experiment 1; 12 in Experiment 2) received hypothermic treatment (epidural temperature 32-33 degrees C) 30 minutes postinjury for 4 hours; Group 2 rats (nine in Experiment 1; eight in Experiment 2) received normothermic treatment (epidural temperature 37 degrees C) 30 minutes postinjury for 4 hours. Blood pressure, blood gas levels, and temperatures (epidural and rectal) were monitored throughout the 4-hour treatment period. Twice weekly assessment of locomotor function was performed over a 6-week survival period by using the Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan locomotor rating scale. Seven (Experiment 1) and 44 (Experiment 2) days after injury, animals were killed, perfused, and their spinal cords were serially sectioned. The area of tissue damage was quantitatively analyzed from 16 longitudinal sections selected from the central core of the spinal cord. The results showed that 1) modest changes in the epidural temperature of the spinal cord can be produced using systemic hypothermia; 2) modest systemic hypothermia (32-33 degrees C) significantly protects against

  2. Reactions of the rat musculoskeletal system to compressive spinal cord injury (SCI) and whole body vibration (WBV) therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, A; Pick, C; Harrach, R; Stein, G; Bendella, H; Ozsoy, O; Ozsoy, U; Schoenau, E; Jaminet, P; Sarikcioglu, L; Dunlop, S; Angelov, D N

    2015-06-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) causes a loss of locomotor function with associated compromise of the musculo-skeletal system. Whole body vibration (WBV) is a potential therapy following SCI, but little is known about its effects on the musculo-skeletal system. Here, we examined locomotor recovery and the musculo-skeletal system after thoracic (T7-9) compression SCI in adult rats. Daily WBV was started at 1, 7, 14 and 28 days after injury (WBV1-WBV28 respectively) and continued over a 12-week post-injury period. Intact rats, rats with SCI but no WBV (sham-treated) and a group that received passive flexion and extension (PFE) of their hind limbs served as controls. Compared to sham-treated rats, neither WBV nor PFE improved motor function. Only WBV14 and PFE improved body support. In line with earlier studies we failed to detect signs of soleus muscle atrophy (weight, cross sectional diameter, total amount of fibers, mean fiber diameter) or bone loss in the femur (length, weight, bone mineral density). One possible explanation is that, despite of injury extent, the preservation of some axons in the white matter, in combination with quadripedal locomotion, may provide sufficient trophic and neuronal support for the musculoskeletal system.

  3. Expression patterns of Slit and Robo family members in adult mouse spinal cord and peripheral nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Lauren; Parkinson, David B; Dun, Xin-Peng

    2017-01-01

    The secreted glycoproteins, Slit1-3, are classic axon guidance molecules that act as repulsive cues through their well characterised receptors Robo1-2 to allow precise axon pathfinding and neuronal migration. The expression patterns of Slit1-3 and Robo1-2 have been most characterized in the rodent developing nervous system and the adult brain, but little is known about their expression patterns in the adult rodent peripheral nervous system. Here, we report a detailed expression analysis of Slit1-3 and Robo1-2 in the adult mouse sciatic nerve as well as their expression in the nerve cell bodies within the ventral spinal cord (motor neurons) and dorsal root ganglion (sensory neurons). Our results show that, in the adult mouse peripheral nervous system, Slit1-3 and Robo1-2 are expressed in the cell bodies and axons of both motor and sensory neurons. While Slit1 and Robo2 are only expressed in peripheral axons and their cell bodies, Slit2, Slit3 and Robo1 are also expressed in satellite cells of the dorsal root ganglion, Schwann cells and fibroblasts of peripheral nerves. In addition to these expression patterns, we also demonstrate the expression of Robo1 in blood vessels of the peripheral nerves. Our work gives important new data on the expression patterns of Slit and Robo family members within the peripheral nervous system that may relate both to nerve homeostasis and the reaction of the peripheral nerves to injury.

  4. Developing an early alert system for metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC): Red Flag credit cards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnpenney, Jackie; Greenhalgh, Sue; Richards, Lena; Crabtree, Annamaria; Selfe, James

    2015-01-01

    To produce a user-friendly list of metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) Red Flags for non-specialist 'generalist' front-line clinicians working in primary-care settings. The issue of identifying MSCC early to prevent serious long-term disability was a key theme identified by the Task and Finish Group at Greater Manchester and Cheshire Cancer Network (GMCCN) in 2009. It was this group who initially brokered and then coordinated the current development as part of their strategic approach to improving care for MSCC patients. A consensus-building approach that considered the essential minimum data requirements to raise the index of suspicion suggestive of MSCC was adopted. This followed a model of cross-boundary working to facilitate the mutual sharing of expertise across a variety of relevant clinical specialisms. A guideline aimed at helping clinicians to identify the early signs and symptoms of MSCC was produced in the form of a credit card. This credit card includes key statements about MSCC, signposting to key sources of additional information and a user-friendly list of Red Flags which has been developed into an eight-item Red Flag mnemonic. To date, an excess of 120,000 cards have been printed by a variety of organisations and the distribution of the cards is ongoing across the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland.

  5. Effect of robotic gait training on cardiorespiratory system in incomplete spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Femke Hoekstra, MSc

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The objectives in this study were to investigate the effect of robot-assisted gait training on cardiorespiratory fitness in subjects with motor incomplete spinal cord injury and document the exercise intensity of robotic walking in comparison with the recommended guidelines. Ten patients followed a 24-session training program with a robotic gait orthosis in addition to physiotherapy sessions completed within 10 to 16 wk. Cardiorespiratory fitness was determined in a graded arm crank exercise test before and after the training program. To assess the intensity of robot-assisted walking, oxygen consumption (VO2 and heart rate (HR were measured during a training session early in and at the end of the training program, and exercise intensity measures (percentage of VO2 reserve [%VO2R], percentage of HR reserve [%HRR], and metabolic equivalents [METs] were calculated. Whereas no changes were found in peak VO2, the resting and submaximal HR at a constant work load were significantly lower after training. Most subjects exercised at low intensity (3.0 METs. In spite of the low exercise intensity of the training program and no changes in peak VO2, robot-assisted gait training induced some improvement in cardiorespiratory fitness, as suggested by lower resting and submaximal HR values.

  6. Learning about Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Release Fischbeck Group Learning About Spinal Muscular Atrophy What is spinal muscular atrophy? What are the ... for Spinal Muscular Atrophy What is spinal muscular atrophy? Spinal muscular atrophy is a group of inherited ...

  7. Spinal Cord Contusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gong Ju; Jian Wang; Yazhou Wang; Xianghui Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord injury is a major cause of disability with devastating neurological outcomes and lim-ited therapeutic opportunities, even though there are thousands of publications on spinal cord injury annually. There are two major types of spinal cord injury, transaction of the spinal cord and spinal cord contusion. Both can theoretically be treated, but there is no well documented treatment in human being. As for spinal cord contusion, we have developed an operation with fabulous result.

  8. Acquired lumbar spinal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deasy, JoAnn

    2015-04-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis is the most frequent reason for spinal surgery in patients over age 65 years. In this condition, narrowing of the lumbar spinal canal and nerve root canals leads to painful, debilitating compression of spinal nerves and blood vessels. As the population ages, an increasing number of patients will be diagnosed and treated for lumbar spinal stenosis by primary care providers. This article reviews the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of lumbar spinal stenosis in adults over age 50 years.

  9. Speed and efficiency in walking and wheeling with novel stimulation and bracing systems after spinal cord injury: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Richard B; Hayday, Frank; Chong, Suling; Thompson, Aiko K; Rolf, Robert; James, Kelvin B; Bell, Gordon

    2005-10-01

    To compare various novel and conventional systems for locomotion, a 25-year-old man was studied with motor complete spinal cord injury at the T4/5 level. He used various devices in the community, and changes in speed, physiological cost index (PCI), and oxygen consumption were measured periodically. Speed was fastest with a conventional manual wheelchair (nearly 120 m/min in a 4-min test). Speed was about 30% less, but the PCI was lowest (highest efficiency) using functional electrical stimulation (FES) of the quadriceps and hamstring muscles to propel a novel wheelchair. He walked with knee-ankle-foot orthoses (KAFO) at much lower speed (8.8 m/min) and higher PCI. He walked with an alternating gait using a new stance-control KAFO with FES. The speed was still slow (5 m/min), but he prefers the more normal-looking gait and uses it daily. Walking with FES and ankle-foot orthoses (AFO) was slowest (3.5 m/min) and had the highest PCI. In conclusion, the leg-propelled wheelchair provides a more efficient method of locomotion. A new stance-controlled KAFO with FES may provide a more acceptable walking system, but must be tested on other subjects.

  10. What should an ideal spinal injury classification system consist of? A methodological review and conceptual proposal for future classifications.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middendorp, J.J. van; Audige, L.; Hanson, B.; Chapman, J.R.; Hosman, A.J.F.

    2010-01-01

    Since Bohler published the first categorization of spinal injuries based on plain radiographic examinations in 1929, numerous classifications have been proposed. Despite all these efforts, however, only a few have been tested for reliability and validity. This methodological, conceptual review

  11. Distribution of paired immunoglobulin-like receptor B in the nervous system related to regeneration dififculties after unilateral lumbar spinal cord injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wan-shu Peng; Chao Qi; Hong Zhang; Mei-ling Gao; Hong Wang; Fei Ren; Xia-qing Li

    2015-01-01

    Paired immunoglobulin-like receptor B (PirB) is a functional receptor of myelin-associated in-hibitors for axonal regeneration and synaptic plasticity in the central nervous system, and thus suppresses nerve regeneration. The regulatory effect of PirB on injured nerves has received a lot of attention. To better understand nerve regeneration inability after spinal cord injury, this study aimed to investigate the distribution of PirB (via immunolfuorescence) in the central nervous system and peripheral nervous system 10 days after injury. Immunoreactivity for PirB increased in the dorsal root ganglia, sciatic nerves, and spinal cord segments. In the dorsal root ganglia and sciatic nerves, PirB was mainly distributed along neuronal and axonal membranes. PirB was found to exhibit a diffuse, intricate distribution in the dorsal and ventral regions. Immunore-activity for PirB was enhanced in some cortical neurons located in the bilateral precentral gyri. Overall, the ifndings suggest a pattern of PirB immunoreactivity in the nervous system after uni-lateral spinal transection injury, and also indicate that PirB may suppress repair after injury.

  12. Spinal brucellosis: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chelli Bouaziz, Mouna; Ladeb, Mohamed Fethi; Chakroun, Mohamed; Chaabane, Skander [Institut M T Kassab d' orthopedie, Department of Radiology, Ksar Said (Tunisia)

    2008-09-15

    Brucellosis is a zoonosis of worldwide distribution, relatively frequent in Mediterranean countries and in the Middle East. It is a systemic infection, caused by facultative intra-cellular bacteria of the genus Brucella, that can involve many organs and tissues. The spine is the most common site of musculoskeletal involvement, followed by the sacroiliac joints. The aim of this study was to assess the clinical, biological and imaging features of spinal brucellosis. (orig.)

  13. Aspergillus spinal epidural abscess

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byrd, B.F. III (Vanderbilt Univ. School of Medicine, Nashville, TN); Weiner, M.H.; McGee, Z.A.

    1982-12-17

    A spinal epidural abscess developed in a renal transplant recipient; results of a serum radioimmunoassay for Aspergillus antigen were positive. Laminectomy disclosed an abscess of the L4-5 interspace and L-5 vertebral body that contained hyphal forms and from which Aspergillus species was cultured. Serum Aspergillus antigen radioimmunoassay may be a valuable, specific early diagnostic test when systemic aspergillosis is a consideration in an immunosuppressed host.

  14. Spinal and supraspinal postural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deliagina, T G; Beloozerova, I N; Zelenin, P V; Orlovsky, G N

    2008-01-01

    Different species maintain a particular body orientation in space (upright in humans, dorsal-side-up in quadrupeds, fish and lamprey) due to the activity of a closed-loop postural control system. We will discuss operation of spinal and supraspinal postural networks studied in a lower vertebrate (lamprey) and in two mammals (rabbit and cat). In the lamprey, the postural control system is driven by vestibular input. The key role in the postural network belongs to the reticulospinal (RS) neurons. Due to vestibular input, deviation from the stabilized body orientation in any (roll, pitch, yaw) plane leads to generation of RS commands, which are sent to the spinal cord and cause postural correction. For each of the planes, there are two groups of RS neurons responding to rotation in the opposite directions; they cause a turn opposite to the initial one. The command transmitted by an individual RS neuron causes the motor response, which contributes to the correction of posture. In each plane, the postural system stabilizes the orientation at which the antagonistic vestibular reflexes compensate for each other. Thus, in lamprey the supraspinal networks play a crucial role in stabilization of body orientation, and the function of the spinal networks is transformation of supraspinal commands into the motor pattern of postural corrections. In terrestrial quadrupeds, the postural system stabilizing the trunk orientation in the transversal plane was analyzed. It consists of two relatively independent sub-systems stabilizing orientation of the anterior and posterior parts of the trunk. They are driven by somatosensory input from limb mechanoreceptors. Each sub-system consists of two closed-loop mechanisms - spinal and spino-supraspinal. Operation of the supraspinal networks was studied by recording the posture-related activity of corticospinal neurons. The postural capacity of spinal networks was evaluated in animals with lesions to the spinal cord. Relative contribution of

  15. Identification of a Peptide for Systemic Brain Delivery of a Morpholino Oligonucleotide in Mouse Models of Spinal Muscular Atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabanpoor, Fazel; Hammond, Suzan M; Abendroth, Frank; Hazell, Gareth; Wood, Matthew J A; Gait, Michael J

    2017-06-01

    Splice-switching antisense oligonucleotides are emerging treatments for neuromuscular diseases, with several splice-switching oligonucleotides (SSOs) currently undergoing clinical trials such as for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). However, the development of systemically delivered antisense therapeutics has been hampered by poor tissue penetration and cellular uptake, including crossing of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to reach targets in the central nervous system (CNS). For SMA application, we have investigated the ability of various BBB-crossing peptides for CNS delivery of a splice-switching phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligonucleotide (PMO) targeting survival motor neuron 2 (SMN2) exon 7 inclusion. We identified a branched derivative of the well-known ApoE (141-150) peptide, which as a PMO conjugate was capable of exon inclusion in the CNS following systemic administration, leading to an increase in the level of full-length SMN2 transcript. Treatment of newborn SMA mice with this peptide-PMO (P-PMO) conjugate resulted in a significant increase in the average lifespan and gains in weight, muscle strength, and righting reflexes. Systemic treatment of adult SMA mice with this newly identified P-PMO also resulted in small but significant increases in the levels of SMN2 pre-messenger RNA (mRNA) exon inclusion in the CNS and peripheral tissues. This work provides proof of principle for the ability to select new peptide paradigms to enhance CNS delivery and activity of a PMO SSO through use of a peptide-based delivery platform for the treatment of SMA potentially extending to other neuromuscular and neurodegenerative diseases.

  16. Trigemino-cervical-spinal reflexes after traumatic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardone, Raffaele; Höller, Yvonne; Orioli, Andrea; Brigo, Francesco; Christova, Monica; Tezzon, Frediano; Golaszewski, Stefan; Trinka, Eugen

    2015-05-01

    After spinal cord injury (SCI) reorganization of spinal cord circuits occur both above and below the spinal lesion. These functional changes can be determined by assessing electrophysiological recording. We aimed at investigating the trigemino-cervical reflex (TCR) and trigemino-spinal reflex (TSR) responses after traumatic SCI. TCR and TSR were registered after stimulation of the infraorbital nerve from the sternocleidomastoid, splenius, deltoid, biceps and first dorsal interosseous muscles in 10 healthy subjects and 10 subjects with incomplete cervical SCI. In the control subjects reflex responses were registered from the sternocleidomastoid, and splenium muscles, while no responses were obtained from upper limb muscles. In contrast, smaller but clear short latency EMG potentials were recorded from deltoid and biceps muscles in about half of the SCI patients. Moreover, the amplitudes of the EMG responses in the neck muscles were significantly higher in patients than in control subjects. The reflex responses are likely to propagate up the brainstem and down the spinal cord along the reticulospinal tracts and the propriospinal system. Despite the loss of corticospinal axons, synaptic plasticity in pre-existing pathways and/or formation of new circuits through sprouting processes above the injury site may contribute to the findings of this preliminary study and may be involved in the functional recovery. Trigemino-cervical-spinal reflexes can be used to demonstrate and quantify plastic changes at brainstem and cervical level following SCI. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Dynamic Changes in Local Protein Synthetic Machinery in Regenerating Central Nervous System Axons after Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Sachdeva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Intra-axonal localization of mRNAs and protein synthesis machinery (PSM endows neurons with the capacity to generate proteins locally, allowing precise spatiotemporal regulation of the axonal response to extracellular stimuli. A number of studies suggest that this local translation is a promising target to enhance the regenerative capacity of damaged axons. Using a model of central nervous system (CNS axons regenerating into intraspinal peripheral nerve grafts (PNGs we established that adult regenerating CNS axons contain several different mRNAs and protein synthetic machinery (PSM components in vivo. After lower thoracic level spinal cord transection, ascending sensory axons regenerate into intraspinal PNGs but axon growth is stalled when they reach the distal end of the PNG (3 versus 7 weeks after grafting, resp.. By immunofluorescence with optical sectioning of axons by confocal microscopy, the total and phosphorylated forms of PSMs are significantly lower in stalled compared with actively regenerating axons. Reinjury of these stalled axons increased axonal localization of the PSM proteins, indicative of possible priming for a subcellular response to axotomy. These results suggest that axons downregulate protein synthetic capacity as they cease growing, yet they retain the ability to upregulate PSM after a second injury.

  18. New reliable scoring system, Toyama mouse score, to evaluate locomotor function following spinal cord injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigyo, Michiko; Tanabe, Norio; Kuboyama, Tomoharu; Choi, Song-Hyen; Tohda, Chihiro

    2014-06-03

    Among the variety of methods used to evaluate locomotor function following a spinal cord injury (SCI), the Basso Mouse Scale score (BMS) has been widely used for mice. However, the BMS mainly focuses on hindlimb movement rather than on graded changes in body support ability. In addition, some of the scoring methods include double or triple criteria within a single score, which likely leads to an increase in the deviation within the data. Therefore we aimed to establish a new scoring method reliable and easy to perform in mice with SCI. Our Toyama Mouse Score (TMS) was established by rearranging and simplifying the BMS score and combining it with the Body Support Scale score (BSS). The TMS reflects changes in both body support ability and hindlimb movement. The definition of single score is made by combing multiple criteria in the BMS. The ambiguity was improved in the TMS. Using contusive SCI mice, hindlimb function was measured using the TMS, BMS and BSS systems. The TMS could distinguish changes in hindlimb movements that were evaluated as the same score by the BMS. An analysis of the coefficient of variation (CV) of score points recorded for 11 days revealed that the CV for the TMS was significantly lower than the CV obtained using the BMS. A variation in intra evaluators was lower in the TMS than in the BMS. These results suggest that the TMS may be useful as a new reliable method for scoring locomotor function for SCI models.

  19. Muscle expression of mutant androgen receptor accounts for systemic and motor neuron disease phenotypes in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, Constanza J; Ling, Shuo-Chien; Guo, Ling T; Hung, Gene; Tsunemi, Taiji; Ly, Linda; Tokunaga, Seiya; Lopez, Edith; Sopher, Bryce L; Bennett, C Frank; Shelton, G Diane; Cleveland, Don W; La Spada, Albert R

    2014-04-16

    X-linked spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is characterized by adult-onset muscle weakness and lower motor neuron degeneration. SBMA is caused by CAG-polyglutamine (polyQ) repeat expansions in the androgen receptor (AR) gene. Pathological findings include motor neuron loss, with polyQ-AR accumulation in intranuclear inclusions. SBMA patients exhibit myopathic features, suggesting a role for muscle in disease pathogenesis. To determine the contribution of muscle, we developed a BAC mouse model featuring a floxed first exon to permit cell-type-specific excision of human AR121Q. BAC fxAR121 mice develop systemic and neuromuscular phenotypes, including shortened survival. After validating termination of AR121 expression and full rescue with ubiquitous Cre, we crossed BAC fxAR121 mice with Human Skeletal Actin-Cre mice. Muscle-specific excision prevented weight loss, motor phenotypes, muscle pathology, and motor neuronopathy and dramatically extended survival. Our results reveal a crucial role for muscle expression of polyQ-AR in SBMA and suggest muscle-directed therapies as effective treatments.

  20. Cortical and spinal assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, I W; Gram, Mikkel; Hansen, T M

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Standardized objective methods to assess the analgesic effects of opioids, enable identification of underlying mechanisms of drug actions in the central nervous system. Opioids may exert their effect on both cortical and spinal levels. In this study actions of morphine at both levels...... subjects was included in the data analysis. There was no change in the activity in resting EEG (P>0.05) after morphine administration as compared to placebo. During cold pressor stimulation, morphine significantly lowered the relative activity in the delta (1-4Hz) band (P=0.03) and increased the activity...... morphine administration (P>0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Cold pressor EEG and the nociceptive reflex were more sensitive to morphine analgesia than resting EEG and can be used as standardized objective methods to assess opioid effects. However, no correlation between the analgesic effect of morphine on the spinal...

  1. Increase of the ejaculatory potency by the systemic administration of aqueous crude extracts of cihuapatli (Montanoa genus) plants in spinal male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carro-Juárez, Miguel; Franco, Miguel Ángel; Rodríguez-Peña, María de Lourdes

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, evidence on the aphrodisiac activity of Montanoa frutescens and Montanoa grandiflora and a comparison with the aphrodisiac activity of Montanoa tomentosa is presented. By using the fictive ejaculation model in spinal male rats, electromyographic recordings of the genital motor pattern of ejaculation were obtained in the bulbospongiosus muscles and analyzed after the intravenous injection of aqueous crude extracts of Montanoa tomentosa, Montanoa frutescens, and Montanoa grandiflora. Results showed that the systemic administration of the aqueous crude extracts of Montanoa plants elicits a significant increase in the ejaculatory capacity of spinal male rats with very robust ejaculatory motor patterns that included the expression of tonic penile erections and penile movements and the potent expulsion of urethral contents. In conclusion, Montanoa frutescens and Montanoa grandiflora increase the ejaculatory potency with aphrodisiac activity similar to Montanoa tomentosa.

  2. Functional electrical stimulation post-spinal cord injury improves locomotion and increases afferent input into the central nervous system in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, Eric; Guevara, Edgar; Dubeau, Simon; Lesage, Frederic; Nagai, Mary; Popovic, Milos

    2014-01-01

    Functional electrical stimulation (FES) has been found to be effective in restoring voluntary functions after spinal cord injury (SCI) and stroke. However, the central nervous system (CNS) changes that occur in as a result of this therapy are largely unknown. To examine the effects of FES on the restoration of voluntary locomotor function of the CNS in a SCI rat model. SCI rats were instrumented with chronic FES electrodes in the hindlimb muscles and were divided into two groups: (a) FES therapy and (b) sedentary. At day 7 post-SCI, the animals were assessed for locomotion performance by using a Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan (BBB) scale. They were then anesthetized for a terminal in vivo experiment. The lumbar spinal cord and somatosensory cortex were exposed and the instrumented muscles were stimulated electrically. Associated neurovascular responses in the CNS were recorded with an intrinsic optical imaging system. FES greatly improved locomotion recovery by day 7 post-SCI, as measured by BBB scores (P spinal cord and somatosensory cortex when the muscles were stimulated between 1 and 3 motor threshold (MT). Hind limb rehabilitation with FES is an effective strategy to improve locomotion during the acute phase post-SCI. The results of this study indicate that after FES, the CNS preserves/acquires the capacity to respond to peripheral electrical stimulation.

  3. Descending motor pathways and the spinal motor system. Limbic and non-limbic components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Holstege (Gert)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractFor a thorough understanding of the descending pathways of the motor system originating in the forebrain, knowledge about the anatomy and function of the structures in the more caudally located parts of the central nervous system is indispensable. In this paper an overview will be

  4. Descending motor pathways and the spinal motor system. Limbic and non-limbic components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Holstege (Gert)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractFor a thorough understanding of the descending pathways of the motor system originating in the forebrain, knowledge about the anatomy and function of the structures in the more caudally located parts of the central nervous system is indispensable. In this paper an overview will be presen

  5. Descending motor pathways and the spinal motor system. Limbic and non-limbic components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holstege, G.

    1991-01-01

    For a thorough understanding of the descending pathways of the motor system originating in the forebrain, knowledge about the anatomy and function of the structures in the more caudally located parts of the central nervous system is indispensable. In this paper an overview will be presented of these

  6. Investigation of spinal cerebrospinal fluid-contacting neurons expressing PKD2L1: evidence for a conserved system from fish to primates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia eDjenoune

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Over ninety years ago, Kolmer and Agduhr identified spinal cerebrospinal fluid-contacting neurons (CSF-cNs based on their morphology and location within the spinal cord. In more than two hundred vertebrate species, they observed ciliated neurons around the central canal that extended a brush of microvilli into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. Although their morphology is suggestive of a primitive sensory cell, their function within the vertebrate spinal cord remains unknown. The identification of specific molecular markers for these neurons in vertebrates would benefit the investigation of their physiological roles. PKD2L1, a transient receptor potential channel that could play a role as a sensory receptor, has been found in cells contacting the central canal in mouse. In this study, we demonstrate that PKD2L1 is a specific marker for CSF-cNs in the spinal cord of mouse (Mus musculus, macaque (Macaca fascicularis and zebrafish (Danio rerio. In these species, the somata of spinal PKD2L1+ CSF-cNs were located below or within the ependymal layer and extended an apical bulbous extension into the central canal. We found GABAergic PKD2L1-expressing CSF-cNs in all three species. We took advantage of the zebrafish embryo for its transparency and rapid development to identify the progenitor domains from which pkd2l1+ CSF-cNs originate. pkd2l1+ CSF-cNs were all GABAergic and organized in two rows—one ventral and one dorsal to the central canal. Their location and marker expression is consistent with previously described Kolmer-Agduhr cells. Accordingly, pkd2l1+ CSF-cNs were derived from the progenitor domains p3 and pMN defined by the expression of nkx2.2a and olig2 transcription factors, respectively. Altogether our results suggest that a system of CSF-cNs expressing the PKD2L1 channel is conserved in the spinal cord across bony vertebrate species.

  7. Investigation of spinal cerebrospinal fluid-contacting neurons expressing PKD2L1: evidence for a conserved system from fish to primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djenoune, Lydia; Khabou, Hanen; Joubert, Fanny; Quan, Feng B; Nunes Figueiredo, Sophie; Bodineau, Laurence; Del Bene, Filippo; Burcklé, Céline; Tostivint, Hervé; Wyart, Claire

    2014-01-01

    Over 90 years ago, Kolmer and Agduhr identified spinal cerebrospinal fluid-contacting neurons (CSF-cNs) based on their morphology and location within the spinal cord. In more than 200 vertebrate species, they observed ciliated neurons around the central canal that extended a brush of microvilli into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Although their morphology is suggestive of a primitive sensory cell, their function within the vertebrate spinal cord remains unknown. The identification of specific molecular markers for these neurons in vertebrates would benefit the investigation of their physiological roles. PKD2L1, a transient receptor potential channel that could play a role as a sensory receptor, has been found in cells contacting the central canal in mouse. In this study, we demonstrate that PKD2L1 is a specific marker for CSF-cNs in the spinal cord of mouse (Mus musculus), macaque (Macaca fascicularis) and zebrafish (Danio rerio). In these species, the somata of spinal PKD2L1(+) CSF-cNs were located below or within the ependymal layer and extended an apical bulbous extension into the central canal. We found GABAergic PKD2L1-expressing CSF-cNs in all three species. We took advantage of the zebrafish embryo for its transparency and rapid development to identify the progenitor domains from which pkd2l1 (+) CSF-cNs originate. pkd2l1 (+) CSF-cNs were all GABAergic and organized in two rows-one ventral and one dorsal to the central canal. Their location and marker expression is consistent with previously described Kolmer-Agduhr cells. Accordingly, pkd2l1 (+) CSF-cNs were derived from the progenitor domains p3 and pMN defined by the expression of nkx2.2a and olig2 transcription factors, respectively. Altogether our results suggest that a system of CSF-cNs expressing the PKD2L1 channel is conserved in the spinal cord across bony vertebrate species.

  8. THE UBIQUITIN-PROTEASOME SYSTEM: POTENTIAL THERAPEUTIC TARGETS FOR ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE AND SPINAL CORD INJURY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing eGong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS is a crucial protein degradation system in eukaryotes. Herein we will review advances in the understanding of the role of several proteins of the UPS in Alzheimer’s disease (AD and functional recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI. The UPS consists of many factors that include E3 ubiquitin ligases, ubiquitin hydrolases, ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like molecules, and the proteasome itself. An extensive body of work links UPS dysfunction with AD pathogenesis and progression. More recently, the UPS has been shown to have vital roles in recovery of function after SCI. The ubiquitin hydrolase Uch-L1 has been proposed to increase cellular levels of mono-ubiquitin and hence to increase rates of protein turnover by the UPS. A low Uch-L1 level has been linked with Aß accumulation in AD and reduced neuroregeneration after SCI. One likely mechanism for these beneficial effects of Uch-L1 is reduced turnover of the PKA regulatory subunit and, consequently, reduced signaling via CREB. The neuron-specific F-box protein Fbx2 ubiquitinates ß-secretase thus targeting it for proteasomal degradation and reducing generation of Aß. Both Uch-L1 and Fbx2 improve synaptic plasticity and cognitive function in mouse AD models. The role of Fbx2 after SCI has not been examined, but abolishing ß-secretase reduces neuronal recovery after SCI, associated with reduced myelination. UBB+1, which arises through a frame-shift mutation in the ubiquitin gene that adds 19 amino acids to the C-terminus of ubiquitin, inhibits proteasomal function and is associated with increased neurofibrillary tangles in patients with AD, Pick’s disease and Downs syndrome. These advances in understanding of the roles of the UPS in AD and SCI raise new questions but, also, identify attractive and exciting targets for potential, future therapeutic interventions.

  9. Spinal pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izzo, R., E-mail: roberto1766@interfree.it [Neuroradiology Department, A. Cardarelli Hospital, Naples (Italy); Popolizio, T., E-mail: t.popolizio1@gmail.com [Radiology Department, Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza Hospital, San Giovanni Rotondo (Fg) (Italy); D’Aprile, P., E-mail: paoladaprile@yahoo.it [Neuroradiology Department, San Paolo Hospital, Bari (Italy); Muto, M., E-mail: mutomar@tiscali.it [Neuroradiology Department, A. Cardarelli Hospital, Napoli (Italy)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Purpose of this review is to address the current concepts on the pathophysiology of discogenic, radicular, facet and dysfunctional spinal pain, focusing on the role of the imaging in the diagnostic setting, to potentially address a correct approach also to minimally invasive interventional techniques. • Special attention will be given to the discogenic pain, actually considered as the most frequent cause of chronic low back pain. • The correct distinction between referred pain and radicular pain contributes to give a more correct approach to spinal pain. • The pathogenesis of chronic pain renders this pain a true pathology requiring a specific management. - Abstract: The spinal pain, and expecially the low back pain (LBP), represents the second cause for a medical consultation in primary care setting and a leading cause of disability worldwide [1]. LBP is more often idiopathic. It has as most frequent cause the internal disc disruption (IDD) and is referred to as discogenic pain. IDD refers to annular fissures, disc collapse and mechanical failure, with no significant modification of external disc shape, with or without endplates changes. IDD is described as a separate clinical entity in respect to disc herniation, segmental instability and degenerative disc desease (DDD). The radicular pain has as most frequent causes a disc herniation and a canal stenosis. Both discogenic and radicular pain also have either a mechanical and an inflammatory genesis. For to be richly innervated, facet joints can be a direct source of pain, while for their degenerative changes cause compression of nerve roots in lateral recesses and in the neural foramina. Degenerative instability is a common and often misdiagnosed cause of axial and radicular pain, being also a frequent indication for surgery. Acute pain tends to extinguish along with its cause, but the setting of complex processes of peripheral and central sensitization may influence its evolution in chronic

  10. Induction of central nervous system plasticity by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation to promote sensorimotor recovery in incomplete spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellaway, Peter H.; Vásquez, Natalia; Craggs, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Cortical and spinal cord plasticity may be induced with non-invasive transcranial magnetic stimulation to encourage long term potentiation or depression of neuronal circuits. Such plasticity inducing stimulation provides an attractive approach to promote changes in sensorimotor circuits that have been degraded by spinal cord injury (SCI). If residual corticospinal circuits can be conditioned appropriately there should be the possibility that the changes are accompanied by functional recovery. This article reviews the attempts that have been made to restore sensorimotor function and to obtain functional benefits from the application of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the cortex following incomplete spinal cord injury. The confounding issues that arise with the application of rTMS, specifically in SCI, are enumerated. Finally, consideration is given to the potential for rTMS to be used in the restoration of bladder and bowel sphincter function and consequent functional recovery of the guarding reflex. PMID:24904326

  11. Spinal infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tali, E. Turgut E-mail: turguttali@gazi.edu.tr

    2004-05-01

    Spinal infections can be thought of as a spectrum of disease comprising spondylitis, discitis, spondylodiscitis, pyogenic facet arthropathy, epidural infections, meningitis, polyradiculopathy and myelitis. Radiological evaluations have gained importance in the diagnosis, treatment planning, treatment and treatment monitoring of the spinal infections. Conventional radiographs are usually the initial imaging study. The sensitivity and specificity of the plain radiographs are very low. The sensitivity of CT is higher while it lacks of specificity. Conventional CT has played minor role for the diagnosis of early spondylitis and disc space infection and for follow-up, researches are going on the value of MDCT. MRI is as sensitive, specific and accurate as combined nuclear medicine studies and the method of choice for the spondylitis. Low signal areas of the vertebral body, loss of definition of the end plates and interruption of the cortical continuity, destruction of the cortical margins are typical on T1WI whereas high signal of affected areas of the vertebral body and disc is typical on T2WI. Contrast is mandatory and increases conspicuity, specificity, and observer confidence in the diagnosis and facilitates the treatment planning. Contrast enhancement is the earliest sign and pathognomonic in the acute inflammatory episode and even in the subtle infection then persists to a varying degree for several weeks or months. The outcome of the treatment is influenced by the type of infection and by the degree of neurologic compromise before treatment. There is an increasing move away from surgical intervention towards conservative therapy, percutaneous drainage of abscess or both. It is therefore critical to monitor treatment response, particularly in the immuno-deficient population.

  12. Investigation of the spinal cord as a natural receptor antenna for incident electromagnetic waves and possible impact on the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaguru, Sevaiyan; Uppal, Rajan; Vaid, Ravinder Pal; Kumar, Balasubramaniam Preetham

    2012-06-01

    The effects of electromagnetic field (EMF) exposure on biological systems have been studied for many years, both as a source of medical therapy and also for potential health risks. In particular, the mechanisms of EMF absorption in the human or animal body is of medical/engineering interest, and modern modelling techniques, such as the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD), can be utilized to simulate the voltages and currents induced in different parts of the body. The simulation of one particular component, the spinal cord, is the focus of this article, and this study is motivated by the fact that the spinal cord can be modelled as a linear conducting structure, capable of generating a significant amount of voltage from incident EMF. In this article, we show, through a FDTD simulation analysis of an incoming electromagnetic field (EMF), that the spinal cord acts as a natural antenna, with frequency dependent induced electric voltage and current distribution. The multi-frequency (100-2400 MHz) simulation results show that peak voltage and current response is observed in the FM radio range around 100 MHz, with significant strength to potentially cause changes in the CNS. This work can contribute to the understanding of the mechanism behind EMF energy leakage into the CNS, and the possible contribution of the latter energy leakage towards the weakening of the blood brain barrier (BBB), whose degradation is associated with the progress of many diseases, including Acquired Immuno-Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS).

  13. Quantification of the effects of an alpha-2 adrenergic agonist on reflex properties in spinal cord injury using a system identification technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen David

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite numerous investigations, the impact of tizanidine, an anti-spastic medication, on changes in reflex and muscle mechanical properties in spasticity remains unclear. This study was designed to help us understand the mechanisms of action of tizanidine on spasticity in spinal cord injured subjects with incomplete injury, by quantifying the effects of a single dose of tizanidine on ankle muscle intrinsic and reflex components. Methods A series of perturbations was applied to the spastic ankle joint of twenty-one spinal cord injured subjects, and the resulting torques were recorded. A parallel-cascade system identification method was used to separate intrinsic and reflex torques, and to identify the contribution of these components to dynamic ankle stiffness at different ankle positions, while subjects remained relaxed. Results Following administration of a single oral dose of Tizanidine, stretch evoked joint torque at the ankle decreased significantly (p Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that tizanidine acts to reduce reflex mechanical responses substantially, without inducing comparable changes in intrinsic muscle properties in individuals with spinal cord injury. Thus, the pre-post difference in joint mechanical properties can be attributed to reflex changes alone. From a practical standpoint, use of a single "test" dose of Tizanidine may help clinicians decide whether the drug can helpful in controlling symptoms in particular subjects.

  14. Systemic vascular resistance is increased and associated with accelerated arterial stiffening change in patients with chronic cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, S C; May-Kuen Wong, A; Lien, H Y; Fuk-Tan Tang, S; Fu, T C; Lin, Y; Wang, J S

    2013-02-01

    Despite of stiffening change of conduit arteries, how total peripheral resistance (TPR) is adapted to chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) remains unclear. To investigate how chronic cervical SCI influences hemodynamic characteristics Cross-sectional, case-control study. Rehabilitation department in the tertiary medical center. Twenty-one male patients with traumatic SCI resulting from cervical spine fracture were recruited. The injury occurred three to 289 months (46 months in average) previously. Twenty-one healthy male participants with matched age and body mass index were enrolled as control group. The subjects were asked to maintain supine rest (SR) and then head-up tilt (HUT) at 60 degree for five minutes, respectively. A novel noninvasive bio-reactance device was employed to measure cardiac hemodynamics, whereas heart rate variability was used to determine cardiac autonomic activity. Additionally, the digital volume pulse analysis was applied to calculate arterial stiffness index (SI) and arteriolar reflection index (RI). SCI patients revealed less stroke volume and cardiac output (CO), as well as, greater total peripheral resistance (TPR) and SI during SR than normal subjects did. Moreover, the positive correlation between TPR and SI was observed in SCI patients rather than normal subjects. In SCI patients, HUT (1) markedly decreased TPR while CO and cardio-acceleration responses remained intact and (2) decreased HF power value but failed to change LF/HF ratio. Furthermore, the degree of orthostatic hypotension was correlated with the TPRHUT/TPRSR ratio but not the COHUT/COSR ratio. Chronic cervical SCI leads to a progressively accelerated increase in vascular stiffness, which is associated with increase in systemic vascular resistance. Furthermore, the cervical SCI-related orthostatic hypotension lies in the impairment of vasoconstriction without cardiac dysfunction. Clinical Rehabilitation Impact. SI, rather than blood pressure, reflects not only

  15. Comparative Analysis of Gelsemine and Gelsemium sempervirens Activity on Neurosteroid Allopregnanolone Formation in the Spinal Cord and Limbic System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Venard

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Centesimal dilutions (5, 9 and 15 cH of Gelsemium sempervirens are claimed to be capable of exerting anxiolytic and analgesic effects. However, basic results supporting this assertion are rare, and the mechanism of action of G. sempervirens is completely unknown. To clarify the point, we performed a comparative analysis of the effects of dilutions 5, 9 and 15 cH of G. sempervirens or gelsemine (the major active principle of G. sempervirens on allopregnanolone (3α,5α-THP production in the rat limbic system (hippocampus and amygdala or H-A and spinal cord (SC. Indeed, H-A and SC are two pivotal structures controlling, respectively, anxiety and pain that are also modulated by the neurosteroid 3α,5α-THP. At the dilution 5 cH, both G. sempervirens and gelsemine stimulated [3H]progesterone conversion into [3H]3α,5α-THP by H-A and SC slices, and the stimulatory effect was fully (100% reproducible in all assays. The dilution 9 cH of G. sempervirens or gelsemine also stimulated 3α,5α-THP formation in H-A and SC but the reproducibility rate decreased to 75%. At 15 cH of G. sempervirens or gelsemine, no effect was observed on 3α,5α-THP neosynthesis in H-A and SC slices. The stimulatory action of G. sempervirens and gelsemine (5 cH on 3α,5α-THP production was blocked by strychnine, the selective antagonist of glycine receptors. Altogether, these results, which constitute the first basic demonstration of cellular effects of G. sempervirens, also offer interesting possibilities for the improvement of G. sempervirens-based therapeutic strategies.

  16. What should an ideal spinal injury classification system consist of? A methodological review and conceptual proposal for future classifications.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middendorp, J.J. van; Audige, L.; Hanson, B.; Chapman, J.R.; Hosman, A.J.F.

    2010-01-01

    Since Bohler published the first categorization of spinal injuries based on plain radiographic examinations in 1929, numerous classifications have been proposed. Despite all these efforts, however, only a few have been tested for reliability and validity. This methodological, conceptual review summa

  17. Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation in Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabina Shah

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury is a major trauma, with its short and long term effects and consequences to the patient, his friends and family. Spinal cord injury is addressed in the developed countries with standard trauma care system commencing immediately after injury and continuing to the specialized rehabilitation units. Rehabilitation is important to those with spinal injury for both functional and psychosocial reintegration. It has been an emerging concept in Nepal, which has been evident with the establishment of the various hospitals with rehabilitation units, rehabilitation centres and physical therapy units in different institutions. However, the spinal cord injury rehabilitation setting and scenario is different in Nepal from those in the developed countries since spinal cord injury rehabilitation care has not been adequately incorporated into the health care delivery system nor its importance has been realized within the medical community of Nepal. To name few, lack of human resource for the rehabilitation care, awareness among the medical personnel and general population, adequate scientific research evidence regarding situation of spinal injury and exorbitant health care policy are the important hurdles that has led to the current situation. Hence, it is our responsibility to address these apparent barriers to successful implementation and functioning of rehabilitation so that those with spinal injury would benefit from enhanced quality of life. Keywords: rehabilitation; spinal injury.

  18. fMRI investigation of the effect of local and systemic lidocaine on noxious electrical stimulation-induced activation in spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fuqiang; Williams, Mangay; Welsh, Denise C; Meng, Xiangjun; Ritter, Amy; Abbadie, Catherine; Cook, Jacquelynn J; Reicin, Alise S; Hargreaves, Richard; Williams, Donald S

    2009-09-01

    Spinal cord fMRI offers an excellent opportunity to quantify nociception using neuronal activation induced by painful stimuli. Measurement of the magnitude of stimulation-induced activation, and its suppression with analgesics can provide objective measures of pain and efficacy of analgesics. This study investigates the feasibility of using spinal cord fMRI in anesthetized rats as a pain assay to test the analgesic effect of locally and systemically administered lidocaine. Blood volume (BV)-weighted fMRI signal acquired after intravenous injection of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) particles was used as an indirect readout of the neuronal activity. Transcutaneous noxious electrical stimulation was used as the pain model. BV-weighted fMRI signal could be robustly quantified on a run-by-run basis, opening the possibility of measuring pharmacodynamics (PD) of the analgesics with a temporal resolution of approximately 2 min. Local administration of lidocaine was shown to ablate all stimulation-induced fMRI signals by the total blockage of peripheral nerve transmission, while the analgesic effect of systemically administered lidocaine was robustly detected after intravenous infusion of approximately 3mg/kg, which is similar to clinical dosage for human. This study establishes spinal cord fMRI as a viable assay for analgesics. With respect to the mode of action of lidocaine, this study suggests that systemic lidocaine, which is clinically used for the treatment of neuropathic pain, and believed to only block the peripheral nerve transmission of abnormal neural activity (ectopic discharge) originating from the damaged peripheral nerves, also blocks the peripheral nerve transmission of normal neural activity induced by transcutaneous noxious electrical stimulation.

  19. Spinal cord abscess

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... drugs The infection often begins in the bone ( osteomyelitis ). The bone infection may cause an epidural abscess ... Boils Cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) collection Epidural abscess Osteomyelitis Pulmonary tuberculosis Sepsis Spinal cord trauma Swelling Review ...

  20. Spinal and epidural anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you epidural or spinal anesthesia is called an anesthesiologist. First, the area of your back where the ... Chan VWS. Spinal, epidural, and caudal anesthesia. In: Miller RD, ed. Miller's Anesthesia . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  1. Extradural spinal meningioma: MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, N. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, P. O. Box 20 8042, New Haven, CT 06520-8042 (United States); Sze, G. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, P. O. Box 20 8042, New Haven, CT 06520-8042 (United States)

    1997-06-01

    We report a case of extradural spinal meningioma with pathologically proven features of malignant transformation. The MRI findings of extradural spinal meningioma and differences in the findings from intradural meningiomas are discussed. (orig.). With 1 fig.

  2. Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) KidsHealth > For Parents > Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) Print ... treatment for the disease's most troubling symptoms. About SMA Normally, healthy nerve cells in the brain called ...

  3. Tethered Spinal Cord Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... roots may be cut to relieve pain. In adults, surgery to free (detether) the spinal cord can reduce the size ... is a neurological disorder caused by tissue attachments that limit the movement of the spinal cord ...

  4. Spinal Cord Dysfunction (SCD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Spinal Cord Dysfunction (SCD) module supports the maintenance of local and national registries for the tracking of patients with spinal cord injury and disease...

  5. Spinal muscular atrophy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    D'Amico, Adele; Mercuri, Eugenio; Tiziano, Francesco D; Bertini, Enrico

    2011-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disease characterized by degeneration of alpha motor neurons in the spinal cord, resulting in progressive proximal muscle weakness and paralysis...

  6. Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a genetic disease that attacks nerve cells, called motor neurons, in the spinal cord. These cells communicate with your voluntary muscles - the ones you can control, like in your ...

  7. Exposure levels of anti-LINGO-1 Li81 antibody in the central nervous system and dose-efficacy relationships in rat spinal cord remyelination models after systemic administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepinsky, R Blake; Shao, Zhaohui; Ji, Benxiu; Wang, Qin; Meng, Gym; Walus, Lee; Lee, Xinhua; Hu, Yinghui; Graff, Christilyn; Garber, Ellen; Meier, Werner; Mi, Sha

    2011-11-01

    LINGO-1 (leucine-rich repeat and Ig domain containing NOGO receptor interacting protein-1) is a negative regulator of myelination and repair of damaged axons in the central nervous system (CNS). Blocking LINGO-1 function leads to robust remyelination. The anti-LINGO-1 Li81 antibody is currently being evaluated in clinical trials for multiple sclerosis (MS) and is the first MS therapy that directly targets myelin repair. LINGO-1 is selectively expressed in brain and spinal cord but not in peripheral tissues. Perhaps the greatest concern for Li81 therapy is the limited access of the drug to the CNS. Here, we measured Li81 concentrations in brain, spinal cord, and cerebral spinal fluid in rats after systemic administration and correlated them with dose-efficacy responses in rat lysolecithin and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis spinal cord models of remyelination. Remyelination was dose-dependent, and levels of Li81 in spinal cord that promoted myelination correlated well with affinity measurements for the binding of Li81 to LINGO-1. Observed Li81 concentrations in the CNS of 0.1 to 0.4% of blood levels are consistent with values reported for other antibodies. To understand the features of the antibody that affect CNS penetration, we also evaluated the pharmacokinetics of Li81 Fab2, Fab, and poly(ethylene glycol)-modified Fab. The reagents all showed similar CNS exposure despite large differences in their sizes, serum half-lives, and volumes of distribution, and area under the curve (AUC) measurements in the CNS directly correlated with AUC measurements in serum. These studies demonstrate that exposure levels achieved by passive diffusion of the Li81 monoclonal antibody into the CNS are sufficient and lead to robust remyelination.

  8. Aquaporins in the Spinal Cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal K. Oklinski

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Aquaporins (AQPs are water channel proteins robustly expressed in the central nervous system (CNS. A number of previous studies described the cellular expression sites and investigated their major roles and function in the brain and spinal cord. Among thirteen different mammalian AQPs, AQP1 and AQP4 have been mainly studied in the CNS and evidence has been presented that they play important roles in the pathogenesis of CNS injury, edema and multiple diseases such as multiple sclerosis, neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, glioblastoma multiforme, Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. The objective of this review is to highlight the current knowledge about AQPs in the spinal cord and their proposed roles in pathophysiology and pathogenesis related to spinal cord lesions and injury.

  9. Spinal Cord Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... damages the vertebrae or other parts of the spine, this can also injure the spinal cord. Other spinal cord problems include Tumors Infections such as meningitis and polio Inflammatory diseases Autoimmune diseases Degenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and spinal ...

  10. Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) KidsHealth > For Parents > Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) A A A What's in this article? ... Outlook en español Atrofia muscular espinal Spinal muscular atrophy, or SMA, is an inherited condition that causes ...

  11. Spinal Cord Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your body and your brain. A spinal cord injury disrupts the signals. Spinal cord injuries usually begin with a blow that fractures or ... bone disks that make up your spine. Most injuries don't cut through your spinal cord. Instead, ...

  12. STP position paper: Recommended practices for sampling and processing the nervous system (brain, spinal cord, nerve, and eye) during nonclinical general toxicity studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolon, Brad; Garman, Robert H; Pardo, Ingrid D; Jensen, Karl; Sills, Robert C; Roulois, Aude; Radovsky, Ann; Bradley, Alys; Andrews-Jones, Lydia; Butt, Mark; Gumprecht, Laura

    2013-01-01

    The Society of Toxicologic Pathology charged a Nervous System Sampling Working Group with devising recommended practices to routinely screen the central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral nervous system (PNS) in Good Laboratory Practice-type nonclinical general toxicity studies. Brains should be weighed and trimmed similarly for all animals in a study. Certain structures should be sampled regularly: caudate/putamen, cerebellum, cerebral cortex, choroid plexus, eye (with optic nerve), hippocampus, hypothalamus, medulla oblongata, midbrain, nerve, olfactory bulb (rodents only), pons, spinal cord, and thalamus. Brain regions may be sampled bilaterally in rodents using 6 to 7 coronal sections, and unilaterally in nonrodents with 6 to 7 coronal hemisections. Spinal cord and nerves should be examined in transverse and longitudinal (or oblique) orientations. Most Working Group members considered immersion fixation in formalin (for CNS or PNS) or a solution containing acetic acid (for eye), paraffin embedding, and initial evaluation limited to hematoxylin and eosin (H&E)-stained sections to be acceptable for routine microscopic evaluation during general toxicity studies; other neurohistological methods may be undertaken if needed to better characterize H&E findings. Initial microscopic analyses should be qualitative and done with foreknowledge of treatments and doses (i.e., "unblinded"). The pathology report should clearly communicate structures that were assessed and methodological details. Since neuropathologic assessment is only one aspect of general toxicity studies, institutions should retain flexibility in customizing their sampling, processing, analytical, and reporting procedures as long as major neural targets are evaluated systematically.

  13. Spinal epidural hematoma; Spinales epidurales Haematom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papanagiotou, P. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2012-05-15

    Spinal epidural hematoma is an accumulation of blood in the potential space between the dura and bone. On unenhanced computed tomography epidural hemorrhage appears as a high-density spinal canal mass with variable cord compression. Magnetic resonance imaging is the modality of choice for evaluating spinal epidural hematoma and can demonstrate the extent of the hematoma and degree of cord compression. When treated surgically the outcome depends on the extent of preoperative neurological deficits and on the operative timing interval. (orig.) [German] Das spinale epidurale Haematom ist eine Blutansammlung zwischen Dura und Knochen. Die klinische Praesentation ist aehnlich dem akuten Bandscheibenvorfall, die Symptomatik ist allerdings in der Regel progredient. In der CT stellt sich ein frisches Haematom hyperdens dar. Die MRT ist die Methode der Wahl zur Diagnose spinaler epiduraler Haematome und kann die Ausdehnung sowie auch das Ausmass der Kompression darstellen. Die wichtigste Differenzialdiagnose vom epiduralen Haematom ist das epidurale Empyem. (orig.)

  14. Postoperative Management of the Physiological Effects of Spinal Anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Jennifer; Helwig, Elizabeth

    2016-08-01

    Spinal anesthesia is a common regional anesthesia used in ambulatory and hospital settings. Spinal anesthesia has been shown to reduce postoperative pain and morbidity in certain populations. Understanding the physiological changes during spinal anesthesia can help predict and manage side effects including hypotension, bradycardia, decreased expiration, nausea, vomiting, and urinary retention. This article describes the physiological effects of spinal anesthesia in a body systems approach, describes how to assess the spinal level, and presents common side effects seen postoperatively and how to successfully manage and treat these patients. Copyright © 2016 American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Imaging diagnosis--spinal cord histiocytic sarcoma in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Amanda; Eichelberger, Bunita; Hodo, Carolyn; Cooper, Jocelyn; Porter, Brian

    2015-01-01

    A 12-year-old mixed breed dog was presented for evaluation of progressive paraparesis and ataxia. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was performed and identified multifocal intradural spinal cord mass lesions. The lesions were hyperintense in T2-weighted sequences, isointense to mildly hyperintense in T1-weighted sequences with strong contrast enhancement of the intradural lesions and spinal cord meninges. Spinal cord neoplasia was suspected. A diagnosis of intramedullary spinal cord histiocytic sarcoma, confined to the central nervous system, was confirmed histopathologically. Spinal cord histiocytic sarcoma is a rare neoplasm, but should be included in the differential diagnosis for dogs with clinical signs of myelopathy.

  16. Novalis Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Spinal Dural Arteriovenous Fistula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Kyoung-Su; Song, Young-Jin; Kim, Ki-Uk

    2016-07-01

    The spinal dural arteriovenous fistula (SDAVF) is rare, presenting with progressive, insidious symptoms, and inducing spinal cord ischemia and myelopathy, resulting in severe neurological deficits. If physicians have accurate and enough information about vascular anatomy and hemodynamics, they achieve the good results though the surgery or endovascular embolization. However, when selective spinal angiography is unsuccessful due to neurological deficits, surgery and endovascular embolization might be failed because of inadequate information. We describe a patient with a history of vasospasm during spinal angiography, who was successfully treated by spinal stereotactic radiosurgery using Novalis system.

  17. Feasibility study of a novel approach to sore prevention in patients with spinal cord lesions: the computerized dynamic control Matrix 200 system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catz, A; Philo, O; Gilad, N; Barel, O; Geva, T

    1999-02-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of a computerized mattress system based on a novel concept in sore prevention: continuous monitoring and adjustment of the interface pressure in small segments of contact between the skin and the supporting surface. A preliminary observational study. The Spinal Department, Loewenstein Rehabilitation Hospital, Raanana, Israel. Twelve patients with spinal cord lesions. Patients were examined for signs of impending sores after lying on the mattress for up to 4 successive hours. The pressure within each of the mattress's air cells was continuously measured and adjusted. No evidence of redness or excessive perspiration was found in any of the areas considered to be high risk for bed sores. Maximal interface pressure was 22-30 mm Hg in most of the examinations. Most of the patients felt comfortable on the mattress and the staff adapted easily to its operation. The system is apparently safe, and at least as efficient as other existing means for preventing sores. In addition, it may allow for increased intervals between bed positionings. We conclude that this approach of pressure control has the potential to improve bed sore prevention in a rehabilitation hospital setting.

  18. Kinematic Metrics Based on the Virtual Reality System Toyra as an Assessment of the Upper Limb Rehabilitation in People with Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Trincado-Alonso

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to develop new strategies based on virtual reality that can provide additional information to clinicians for the rehabilitation assessment. Virtual reality system Toyra has been used to record kinematic information of 15 patients with cervical spinal cord injury (SCI while performing evaluation sessions using the mentioned system. Positive correlation, with a moderate and very strong association, has been found between clinical scales and kinematic data, considering only the subscales more closely related to the upper limb function. A set of metrics was defined combining these kinematic data to obtain parameters of reaching amplitude, joint amplitude, agility, accuracy, and repeatability during the evaluation sessions of the virtual reality system Toyra. Strong and moderate correlations have been also found between the metrics reaching and joint amplitude and the clinical scales.

  19. Spinal cord infarction: a rare cause of admission to Internal Medicine Departments but a condition with relevant systemic complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Galimberti

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Spinal cord infarction is a rare cause of admission to Internal Medicine Departments as it is of infrequent occurrence and it is usually addressed to Neurologic Units. Diagnosis at admission however may be challenging expecially in the elderly because of several co-morbidities and variable presentation. Clinical course is often complicated by autonomic, infective and cardiovascular problems as well as a long stay-in-bed period. Outcome is poor in case of severe motor, autonomic (bladder and bowel and sensitive impairment at presentation, it’s related to anatomic damage site and extension and it’s worse in case of anterior bilateral infarcts. CLINICAL CASE The authors describe the case of an 81- year-old woman who was admitted to an Internal Medicine Department because of cervical spinal cord infarction. The diagnostic evaluation as well as the management of cardiovascular, infective, rheumatologic and autonomic complications needed skillful internistic competence and a long in-hospital period. MR allowed a correct diagnosis a few hours after presentation, but the pathogenesis was never clearly established. The most invalidating symptoms were loss of bowel control lasting for several weeks during hospitalization and neuropathic pain still present at discharge. As for the outcome, the patient was able to go home after 3 months from admission able to walk with aids, with full bowel and bladder control and no sensitive impairment.

  20. Muscular, Skeletal, and Neural Adaptations Following Spinal Cord Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Shields, Richard K.

    2002-01-01

    Spinal cord injury is associated with adaptations to the muscular, skeletal, and spinal systems. Experimental data are lacking regarding the extent to which rehabilitative methods may influence these adaptations. An understanding of the plasticity of the muscular, skeletal, and spinal systems after paralysis may be important as new rehabilitative technologies emerge in the 21st century. Moreover, individuals injured today may become poor candidates for future scientific advancements (cure) if...

  1. Role of descending noradrenergic system and spinal alpha2-adrenergic receptors in the effects of gabapentin on thermal and mechanical nociception after partial nerve injury in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Mitsuo; Takasu, Keiko; Kasuya, Noriyo; Shimizu, Shinobu; Honda, Motoko; Ono, Hideki

    2005-03-01

    1. To gain further insight into the mechanisms underlying the antihyperalgesic and antiallodynic actions of gabapentin, a chronic pain model was prepared by partially ligating the sciatic nerve in mice. The mice then received systemic or local injections of gabapentin combined with either central noradrenaline (NA) depletion by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) or alpha-adrenergic receptor blockade. 2. Intraperitoneally (i.p.) administered gabapentin produced antihyperalgesic and antiallodynic effects that were manifested by elevation of the withdrawal threshold to a thermal (plantar test) or mechanical (von Frey test) stimulus, respectively. 3. Similar effects were obtained in both the plantar and von Frey tests when gabapentin was injected intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) or intrathecally (i.t.), suggesting that it acts at both supraspinal and spinal loci. This novel supraspinal analgesic action of gabapentin was only obtained in ligated neuropathic mice, and gabapentin (i.p. and i.c.v.) did not affect acute thermal and mechanical nociception. 4. In mice in which central NA levels were depleted by 6-OHDA, the antihyperalgesic and antiallodynic effects of i.p. and i.c.v. gabapentin were strongly suppressed. 5. The antihyperalgesic and antiallodynic effects of systemic gabapentin were reduced by both systemic and i.t. administration of yohimbine, an alpha2-adrenergic receptor antagonist. By contrast, prazosin (i.p. or i.t.), an alpha1-adrenergic receptor antagonist, did not alter the effects of gabapentin. 6. It was concluded that the antihyperalgesic and antiallodynic effects of gabapentin are mediated substantially by the descending noradrenergic system, resulting in the activation of spinal alpha2-adrenergic receptors.

  2. Management of Spinal Meningiomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindra, Vijay M; Schmidt, Meic H

    2016-04-01

    Spinal meningiomas are the most common spinal tumors encountered in adults, and account for 6.5% of all craniospinal tumors. The treatment for these lesions is primarily surgical, but emerging modalities may include chemotherapy and radiosurgery. In this article, the current management of spinal meningiomas and the body of literature surrounding conventional treatment is reviewed and discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Acute rehabilitation of spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    KIDRIČ-SIVEC, Urška; SEDEJ, Bogdana; MAROLT, Melita

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury presents with loss of function of neuromuscular and other systems below the level of injury. Patients may suffer from minor loss of strength to complete quadriplegia with respiratory distress. All the patients with traumatic spinal cord injury who are admitted and treated in University Medical Centre Ljubljana are evaluated after admission and individualized plan of rehabilitation is made. The neurological level of injury is documented with international standa...

  4. MULTIPLE SPINAL CANAL MENINGIOMAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandigama Pratap Kumar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Meningiomas of the spinal canal are common tumours with the incidence of 25 percent of all spinal cord tumours. But multiple spinal canal meningiomas are rare in compare to solitary lesions and account for 2 to 3.5% of all spinal meningiomas. Most of the reported cases are both intra cranial and spinal. Exclusive involvement of the spinal canal by multiple meningiomas are very rare. We could find only sixteen cases in the literature to the best of our knowledge. Exclusive multiple spinal canal meningiomas occurring in the first two decades of life are seldom reported in the literature. We are presenting a case of multiple spinal canal meningiomas in a young patient of 17 years, who was earlier operated for single lesion. We analysed the literature, with illustration of our case. MATERIALS AND METHODS In September 2016, we performed a literature search for multiple spinal canal meningiomas involving exclusively the spinal canal with no limitation for language and publication date. The search was conducted through http://pubmed.com, a wellknown worldwide internet medical address. To the best of our knowledge, we could find only sixteen cases of multiple meningiomas exclusively confined to the spinal canal. Exclusive multiple spinal canal meningiomas occurring in the first two decades of life are seldom reported in the literature. We are presenting a case of multiple spinal canal meningiomas in a young patient of 17 years, who was earlier operated for solitary intradural extra medullary spinal canal meningioma at D4-D6 level, again presented with spastic quadriparesis of two years duration and MRI whole spine demonstrated multiple intradural extra medullary lesions, which were excised completely and the histopathological diagnosis was transitional meningioma. RESULTS Patient recovered from his weakness and sensory symptoms gradually and bladder and bowel symptoms improved gradually over a period of two to three weeks. CONCLUSION Multiple

  5. Development of an implanted intramuscular EMG-triggered FES system for ambulation after incomplete spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Anirban; Kobetic, Rudi; Triolo, Ronald

    2009-01-01

    Ambulation after spinal cord injury is possible with the aid of neuroprosthesis employing functional electrical stimulation (FES). Individuals with incomplete spinal cord injury (iSCI) retain partial volitional control of muscles below the level of injury, necessitating careful integration of FES with intact voluntary motor function for efficient walking. In this study, the intramuscular electromyogram (iEMG) was used to detect the intent to step and trigger FES-assisted walking in a volunteer with iSCI via an implanted neuroprosthesis consisting of two channels of bipolar iEMG signal acquisition and 12 independent channels of stimulation. The detection was performed with two types of classifiers- a threshold-based classifier that compared the running mean of the iEMG with a discrimination threshold to generate the trigger and a pattern recognition classifier that compared the time-history of the iEMG with a specified template of activity to generate the trigger whenever the cross-correlation coefficient exceeded a discrimination threshold. The pattern recognition classifier generally outperformed the threshold-based classifier, particularly with respect to minimizing False Positive triggers. The overall True Positive rates for the threshold-based classifier were 61.6% and 87.2% for the right and left steps with overall False Positive rates of 38.4% and 33.3%. The overall True Positive rates for the left and right step with the pattern recognition classifier were 57.2% and 93.3% and the overall False Positive rates were 11.9% and 24.4%. The subject showed no preference for either the threshold or pattern recognition-based classifier as determined by the Usability Rating Scale (URS) score collected after each trial and both the classifiers were perceived as moderately easy to use.

  6. Reference system of competence and engagement in adapted physical activities of people with recent spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gernigon, Christophe; Pereira Dias, Catarina; Riou, François; Briki, Walid; Ninot, Grégory

    2015-01-01

    This study tested whether persons with Recent Spinal Cord Injury (RSCI) who practice adapted physical activities (APA) and those who do not differ with regard to achievement goals, physical self-perceptions, and global self-esteem. Adults with RSCI in rehabilitation centers voluntarily completed questionnaires of achievement goals and self-esteem. Then, based on whether they engaged or not in APA programs, they were considered participants or non-participants in APA. Compared to participants in APA, non-participants were more oriented toward mastery-avoidance goals and had lower scores of physical self-worth and global self-esteem. No differences were found for other achievement goals and for low-level dimensions of physical self. These findings suggest that mastery-avoidance goals are associated with a maladaptive motivational pattern when intrapersonal comparison conveys a threat for the self. Practical implications for rehabilitation programs for persons with RSCI are offered. Adapted Physical Activities (APA) programs are supervised physical activity programs in which the choice of the activity as well as the frequency, the duration, and the intensity of practice are adapted to the inpatients' capabilities. Attempts to master physical activities can be seen as threatening experiences to be avoided by persons with Recent Spinal Cord Injury (RSCI) in rehabilitation centers. Comparing one's capabilities in physical activities with those of other persons with RSCI is not motivationally detrimental with respect to the practice of these activities. Upon persons with RSCI' arrival in rehabilitation centers, physical educators should promote a friendly competitive climate in the practice of APA to help inpatients recover healthy levels of physical self-perceptions and global self-esteem as well as motivation to exercise.

  7. Primary Dural Spinal Lymphoma Presentation of a Rare Spinal Tumor Case

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    Dilber Ayçiçek Çeçen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Primary spinal dural lymphomas (PSDL are tumors with characteristic histopathology of a lymphoma, which are completely in the spinal epidural space without any other systemic involvement. Extranodal primary lymphoma involving nervous system prefers thalamus/basal ganglia, periventricular region, cerebellum, eyes, meninges/dura, and cranial nerves or spinal cord. Rare spinal localization with acute spinal cord compression is worth attention. Case Presentation. A 48-year-old male presented with a several-month-long history of upper back pain. Lately, he had numbness and weakness at both lower extremities and was unable to walk for one week. A spinal MRI showed a thoracic lesion with cord compression at T2–T4 levels. The patient underwent surgical decompression, with his final histopathology showing diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Systemic work-up was negative for nodal disease. Following surgery, he received radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy. He experienced a good outcome after four years. Conclusion. The upper thoracic cord is a rare location for primary spinal lesions/metastases, both of which prefer the lower thoracic and upper lumbar regions. In cases of progressive paraparesis, there should be immediate surgical intervention in the case of denovo disease, followed by combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy procedures.

  8. Cervical spinal meningioma mimicking intramedullary spinal tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senturk, Senem; Guzel, Aslan; Guzel, Ebru; Bayrak, Aylin Hasanefendioğlu; Sav, Aydin

    2009-01-01

    Case report. To report a very unusual spinal meningioma, mimicking an intramedullary spinal tumor. Spinal meningiomas, usually associated with signs and symptoms of cord or nerve root compression, are generally encountered in women aged over 40. Radiologic diagnosis is often established by their intradural extramedullary location on magnetic resonance images. A 60-year-old woman had a 6-month history of progressive weakness in her upper extremities, difficulty in walking, and cervical pain radiating through both arms. Neurologic examination revealed motor strength deficiency in all her extremities, with extensor reflexes, clonus, and bilateral hyper-reflexiveness. A sensory deficit was present all over her body. Magnetic resonance images revealed that the spinal cord appeared expanded with an ill-defined, homogeneously contrast-enhanced, lobulated, eccentric mass at the C1-C3 level. The patient was operated with a preliminary diagnosis of an intramedullary tumor. At surgery, the mass was found to be extramedullary, and gross total resection was performed. Histopathological examination revealed a meningioma characterized by the presence of fibrous and meningothelial components. The patient was able to ambulate with a cane, and extremity strength and sensation improved 2 months after surgery. Spinal meningiomas can mimic intramedullary tumors, and should be considered in differential diagnosis of intradural tumors with atypical appearance.

  9. Spinal arteriography: a primer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David A KUMPE

    2005-01-01

    Spinal arteriography is an esoteric procedure that is seldom performed by peripheral interventionalists. This presentation is intended to outline some of the essential points that the interventionalist performing the procedure should be aware of, especially about spinal dural arteriovenous fistulae (SDAVF).

  10. Glioblastoma with spinal seeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fakhrai, N.; Fazeny-Doerner, B.; Marosi, C. [Clinical Div. of Oncology, Dept. of Medicine I, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Czech, T. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Diekmann, K. [Dept. of Radiooncology, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Birner, P.; Hainfellner, J.A. [Clinical Inst. for Neurology, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Prayer, D. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Univ. of Vienna (Austria)

    2004-07-01

    Background: extracranial seeding of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is very rare and its development depends on several factors. This case report describes two patients suffering from GBM with spinal seeding. In both cases, the anatomic localization of the primary tumor close to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was the main factor for spinal seeding. Case reports: two patients with GBM and spinal seeding are presented. After diagnosis of spinal seeding, both patients were highly symptomatic from their spinal lesions. Case 1 experienced severe pain requiring opiates, and case 2 had paresis of lower limbs as well as urinary retention/incontinence. Both patients were treated with spinal radiation therapy. Nevertheless, they died 3 months after diagnosis of spinal seeding. Results: in both patients the diagnosis of spinal seeding was made at the time of cranial recurrence. Both tumors showed close contact to the CSF initially. Even though the patients underwent intensive treatment, it was not possible to keep them in a symptom-free state. Conclusion: because of short survival periods, patients deserve optimal pain management and dedicated palliative care. (orig.)

  11. Spinal tuberculosis: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Ravindra Kumar; Somvanshi, Dilip Singh

    2011-01-01

    Spinal tuberculosis is a destructive form of tuberculosis. It accounts for approximately half of all cases of musculoskeletal tuberculosis. Spinal tuberculosis is more common in children and young adults. The incidence of spinal tuberculosis is increasing in developed nations. Genetic susceptibility to spinal tuberculosis has recently been demonstrated. Characteristically, there is destruction of the intervertebral disk space and the adjacent vertebral bodies, collapse of the spinal elements, and anterior wedging leading to kyphosis and gibbus formation. The thoracic region of vertebral column is most frequently affected. Formation of a ‘cold’ abscess around the lesion is another characteristic feature. The incidence of multi-level noncontiguous vertebral tuberculosis occurs more frequently than previously recognized. Common clinical manifestations include constitutional symptoms, back pain, spinal tenderness, paraplegia, and spinal deformities. For the diagnosis of spinal tuberculosis magnetic resonance imaging is more sensitive imaging technique than x-ray and more specific than computed tomography. Magnetic resonance imaging frequently demonstrates involvement of the vertebral bodies on either side of the disk, disk destruction, cold abscess, vertebral collapse, and presence of vertebral column deformities. Neuroimaging-guided needle biopsy from the affected site in the center of the vertebral body is the gold standard technique for early histopathological diagnosis. Antituberculous treatment remains the cornerstone of treatment. Surgery may be required in selected cases, e.g. large abscess formation, severe kyphosis, an evolving neurological deficit, or lack of response to medical treatment. With early diagnosis and early treatment, prognosis is generally good. PMID:22118251

  12. Spinal pain in adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aartun, Ellen; Hartvigsen, Jan; Wedderkopp, Niels

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The severity and course of spinal pain is poorly understood in adolescents. The study aimed to determine the prevalence and two-year incidence, as well as the course, frequency, and intensity of pain in the neck, mid back, and low back (spinal pain). METHODS: This study was a school...

  13. Dopamine is produced in the rat spinal cord and regulates micturition reflex after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Shaoping; Carson, David M; Wu, Di; Klaw, Michelle C; Houlé, John D; Tom, Veronica J

    2016-11-01

    Dopamine (DA) neurons in the mammalian central nervous system are thought to be restricted to the brain. DA-mediated regulation of urinary activity is considered to occur through an interaction between midbrain DA neurons and the pontine micturition center. Here we show that DA is produced in the rat spinal cord and modulates the bladder reflex. We observed numerous tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)(+) neurons in the autonomic nuclei and superficial dorsal horn in L6-S3 spinal segments. These neurons are dopamine-β-hydroxylase (DBH)(-) and some contain detectable dopamine decarboxylase (DDC), suggesting their capacity to produce DA. Interestingly, following a complete thoracic spinal cord injury (SCI) to interrupt supraspinal projections, more TH(+) neurons emerged in the lumbosacral spinal cord, coincident with a sustained, low level of DA expression there and a partially recovered micturition reflex. Non-selective blockade of spinal DA receptors reduced bladder activity whereas activation of spinal D2-like receptors increased bladder activity and facilitated voiding. Additionally, depletion of lumbosacral TH(+) neurons with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) decreased bladder non-voiding contractions and voiding efficiency. Furthermore, injecting the transsynaptic neuronal tracer pseudorabies virus (PRV) into the bladder detrusor labeled TH(+) cells in the lumbosacral cord, confirming their involvement in spinal micturition reflex circuits. These results illustrate that DA is synthesized in the rat spinal cord; plasticity of lumbosacral TH(+) neurons following SCI may contribute to DA expression and modulate the spinal bladder reflex. Thus, spinally-derived DA and receptors could be a novel therapeutic target to improve micturition recovery after SCI. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Cerebral and spinal cord involvement resulting from invasive aspergillosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guermazi, A.; Benchaib, N.; Zagdanski, A.M.; Rili, M.; Kerviler, E. de [Department of Radiology, Saint-Louis Hospital, Paris (France); Hocqueloux, L.; Molina, J.M. [Department of Infectious Diseases, Saint-Louis Hospital, Paris (France)

    2002-01-01

    Although central nervous system involvement in disseminated aspergillosis is known to occur in immunocompromised patients, particularly after bone marrow transplantation, localized involvement of the spinal cord is exceedingly rare. In this report we present and illustrate detailed imaging findings of central nervous system invasion by Aspergillus fumigatus in a 30-year-old woman, with emphasis on the spinal cord involvement. (orig.)

  15. Human spinal motor control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2016-01-01

    interneurons and exert a direct (willful) muscle control with the aid of a context-dependent integration of somatosensory and visual information at cortical level. However, spinal networks also play an important role. Sensory feedback through spinal circuitries is integrated with central motor commands...... the central motor command by opening or closing sensory feedback pathways. In the future, human studies of spinal motor control, in close collaboration with animal studies on the molecular biology of the spinal cord, will continue to document the neural basis for human behavior. Expected final online...... and contributes importantly to the muscle activity underlying voluntary movements. Regulation of spinal interneurons is used to switch between motor states such as locomotion (reciprocal innervation) and stance (coactivation pattern). Cortical regulation of presynaptic inhibition of sensory afferents may focus...

  16. [Spontaneous spinal cord herniation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, J J; de la Lama, A; Gonza Lez, P; Ramos, A; Zurdo, M; Alday, R

    2004-10-01

    Spontaneous spinal cord herniation through a dural defect is an unusual condition. This entity has been probably underestimated before the introduction of MRI. We report a case of a 49-year-old man with a progressive Brown-Sequard syndrome. MRI and CT myelogram showed a ventrally displaced spinal cord at level T6-T7 and expansion of the posterior subarachnoid space. Through a laminectomy, a spinal cord herniation was identified and reduced. The anterior dural defect was repaired with a patch of lyophilized dura. The patient recovered muscle power but there was no improvement of the sensory disturbance. The diagnosis of spontaneous spinal cord herniation must be considered when progressive myelopathy occurs in middle-aged patients, without signs of spinal cord compression and typical radiological findings. Surgical treatment may halt the progressive deficits and even yield improvement in many cases.

  17. International Spinal Cord Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dvorak, M F; Itshayek, E; Fehlings, M G

    2015-01-01

    the final version. RESULTS: The data set consists of nine variables: (1) Intervention/Procedure Date and start time (2) Non-surgical bed rest and external immobilization, (3) Spinal intervention-closed manipulation and/or reduction of spinal elements, (4) Surgical procedure-approach, (5) Date and time......STUDY DESIGN: Survey of expert opinion, feedback and final consensus. OBJECTIVE: To describe the development and the variables included in the International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Spinal Interventions and Surgical Procedures Basic Data set. SETTING: International working group. METHODS...... of the completion of the intervention or surgical closure; (6) Surgical procedure-open reduction, (7) Surgical procedure-direct decompression of neural elements, and (8 and 9) Surgical procedure-stabilization and fusion (spinal segment number and level). All variables are coded using numbers or characters. Each...

  18. Three-year follow-up of an implanted functional electrical stimulation system for upright mobility in a child with a thoracic level spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betz, Randal R; Johnston, Therese E; Smith, Brian T; Mulcahey, M J; McCarthy, James J

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the use of a functional electrical stimulation (FES) system with the use of knee-ankle-foot orthoses (KAFO) for upright mobility over a 3-year period in a child with a spinal cord injury (SCI). A 13-year-old boy with a T8 complete SCI received a lower extremity implanted FES system. Electrodes were implanted for knee extension and for hip extension, abduction, and adduction. After training and at annual intervals, independence and timeliness in completing 7 upright mobility activities with FES and KAFO, as well as stimulated muscle strength, were assessed. Results have shown that FES provided independence equal to that of KAFO for all activities. Four activities were accomplished more quickly with FES, including donning the system, reaching a high object, transferring to a high surface, and walking 6 m. A floor-to-stand transfer was faster with KAFO. Functional results and stimulated muscle strength have remained stable over the 3-year period. The results indicate that FES can provide function equal to or faster than KAFO in a child with a T8 complete SCI and that performance with the FES system can remain stable for at least 3 years.

  19. Protocol of a prospective cohort study of the effect of different methods of drainage of neuropathic bladder on occurrence of symptomatic urinary infection, and adverse events related to the urinary drainage system in spinal cord injury patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oo Tun

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To present a protocol of a prospective, cohort study in which four groups of spinal cord injury (SCI patients will participate. (Patients with indwelling urethral catheter; patients who perform intermittent catheterisation without wearing a penile sheath; patients who perform intermittent catheterisation and wear penile sheath as well; and patients with penile sheath drainage. Objectives (1 What is the incidence of symptomatic urinary infection in men with spinal cord injury who use different types of bladder drainage? (2 Which are predisposing factors for the occurrence of symptomatic urinary infection in men with spinal cord injury who practise different methods of bladder drainage? (3 What is the incidence of catheter and urinary drainage system-related adverse events in the four groups of SCI patients? Patients The criteria for inclusion are as follow: (1 Male patients with neuropathic bladder due to spinal cord injury, who are registered with the Regional Spinal Injuries Centre, Southport, England. (2 Age: 18 years or above. (3 Patients who are willing to give informed consent for participation in the study. (4 Patients willing to be contacted every two weeks by a staff of the spinal unit for 36 months. (5 Patients who are willing to maintain an accurate record of adverse events related to urinary catheter and urinary drainage system and predisposing factors for the occurrence of symptomatic urinary infection. (6 Patients, who are stabilised in a particular method of bladder drainage, and therefore, unlikely to make a permanent change in the method of bladder drainage (e.g. from penile sheath drainage to the use of long-term indwelling catheter during a foreseeable future. Methods The participants will be observed for a period of 36 months. A staff of the spinal injuries unit will contact the participants by telephone every two weeks on a mutually agreed day and time. The information obtained during this standardised

  20. Does repair of spinal cord injury follow the evolutionary theory?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhicheng Zhang; Fang Li; Tiansheng Sun

    2012-01-01

    Lower vertebrates, such as fish and amphibians, and higher vertebrates in embryonic development can acquire complete regeneration of complex body structures, including the spinal cord, an important part of the central nervous system. However, with species evolution and development, this regenerative capacity gradually weakens and even disappears, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. We explored the differences in mechanisms of spinal cord regeneration capability between lower and higher vertebrates, investigated differences in their cellular and molecular mechanisms and between the spinal cord structures of lower vertebrates and mammals, such as rat and monkey, to search for theoretical evidence and therapeutic targets for nerve regeneration in human spinal cord.

  1. Concentration of nitric oxide (NO in spinal fluid of chronic spinal disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumite Y

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available We studied total nitric oxide (nitrite + nitrate (NO levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of chronic spinal diseases in nonsmokers (133 patients: 76 men and 57 women; mean age, 63 years; range, 15-92 years by the Griess method to clarify the role of NO in different spinal diseases. The extent of compression in terms of numbers of disc level at the compressed spinal nerve and neurological evaluation were also assessed according to the Japanese Orthopaedic Association scores. The spinal diseases included cervical myelopathy and radiculopathy (cervical disease group, ossification of yellow ligament (thoracic disease group, and lumbar disc herniation, lumbar canal stenosis and lumbar spondylolisthesis (lumbar disease group. NO levels in the spinal disease groups (4.98+/-2.28 micromol/l: mean +/- SD were significantly higher than that in the control group (2.53+/-0.94 micromol/l. An inverse correlation was detected between the elevated levels of NO and the grade of clinical symptoms in the cervical disorders. The number of disc level at the compressed spinal nerve was positively correlated with elevated NO levels in CSF in the cervical and lumbar disorder groups. These results indicate that nerve compression may elevate NO levels in CSF, and that NO concentration in the CSF might be a useful marker of damage to nervous system in spinal disorders.

  2. Multiple, primary spinal-paraspinal hydatid cysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sener, R.N.; Calli, C.; Kitis, O.; Yalman, O. [Dept. of Radiology, Ege University Hospital, Izmir (Turkey)

    2001-11-01

    A patient is presented with widespread primary hydatid cysts in spinal-paraspinal locations, secondary to Echinococcus granulosus. An alternative mechanism to explain how the embryos gained access to the body is proposed: The embryos penetrated the intestinal muscle and may have directly entered into the inferior vena cava system through small venous connections between this system and portal circulation. Various conditions in daily life associated with Valsalva maneuver might have caused such an atypical passage of the embryos to the inferior caval system toward the retroperitoneum and spinal-paraspinal structures via lumber epidural venous plexuses. (orig.)

  3. Involvement of the histaminergic system in the nociceptin-induced pain-related behaviors in the mouse spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurada, Shinobu; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Mizoguchi, Hirokazu; Yonezawa, Akihiko; Orito, Tohru; Katsuyama, Sou; Kuramasu, Atsuo; Sakurada, Chikai; Yanai, Kazuhiko; Sakurada, Tsukasa

    2004-11-01

    Intrathecal (i.t.) injection of nociceptin elicited a behavioral response mainly consisting of biting and licking, which were eliminated by the i.t. co-administration of opioid receptor-like-1 (ORL-1) receptor antagonists. The behavioral response induced by nociceptin was characteristically similar to that by i.t.-administered histamine, and was attenuated by i.t. co-administration of the H1 receptor antagonists, but not by the H2 receptor antagonists, whereas the H3 receptor antagonist promoted the nociceptin-induced behavior. H1 receptor knockout (H1R-KO) mice did not show the nociceptin-induced nociceptive behavior, which was observed in wild-type mice. Pretreatment with a histamine antiserum or a histidine decarboxylase inhibitor resulted in a significant reduction of the response to nociceptin. The previous studies showed that NK1 receptor antagonists and a novel substance P (SP)-specific antagonist given i.t. could reduce the behavioral response to nociceptin and histamine. On the other hand, the nociceptive response induced by nociceptin, but not histamine, was completely attenuated by the i.t. co-administration of agonists for GABAA and GABAB receptors. In contrast, the antagonists for GABAA and GABAB receptors injected i.t. showed same nociceptive response with nociceptin and histamine, and their nociceptive responses were significantly blocked by the i.t. co-administration of the H1 receptor antagonists, but not H2 receptor antagonists or ORL-1 receptor antagonists. The present results suggest that the activation of the ORL-1 receptor by nociceptin may induce the disinhibition of histaminergic neuron and enhance the release of histamine, which subsequently acts on the H1 receptor located on the SP-containing neurons to produce the spinal cord-mediated nociceptive response.

  4. Surgical treatment of hydrocephalus and spinal dysraphism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Besnik Elshani; Basri Lenjani

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To identify during intrauterine congenital malformations;Surgery to dysraphism and hydrocephalus neurological benefit, the ability to live independently;Forecast possibility of lowering birth rates with congenital malformations.Methods:Epidemiological and congenital malformations of the spinal dysraphism were included in this prospective clinical study-research.Its forms were manifested by the appearance of hydrocephalus inNeurosurgicalClinic inPristina for the period2010-2012.All cases of spinal dysraphism operated in theNeurosurgery Clinic inPrishtina for the period2010-2012 were analyzed.Results:In theNeurosurgeryClinic atUCC since2010 to2012 are operated total55 cases of spinal dysraphism;The largest number of operations were recorded in2011 with20 operated cases or36.36%, while smaller in2010 with17 operated cases or30.91%,Number of patients varies by year, with some variations of the graph, where at the beginning of the graph have gradually increased over the years, following the continuous growing and finally landing back with graph;By sex and years, the largest number of cases in male gender with spinal dysraphism were registered in2012 with14 cases or37.8%, while the smallest number in2010 with11 cases or29.7%,Whereas the female gender, number of large backlog of cases was registered in2011 with8 cases or44.4%, while the smallest number in 2012 with4 cases or22.2%.Divided by types of spinal dysraphism total were identified:13 with spinal dysraphism meningocele or23.6% and42 spinal dysraphism myelomeningocele or76.4% of which were male dominance in relation to female sex ratio(M:F =40:15 occasions), by gender and spinal dysraphism species, the males are identified with many cases, the spinal dysraphism meningocele8 or20% and32 with spinal dysraphism myelomeningocele or80%,Eksterioizm Shanti where the body rejects foreign body system as the one we had at1 patient.Conclusions:Shant meningitis due to infection or eventual reduction in immune

  5. Minimally invasive treatment of multilevel spinal epidural abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safavi-Abbasi, Sam; Maurer, Adrian J; Rabb, Craig H

    2013-01-01

    The use of minimally invasive tubular retractor microsurgery for treatment of multilevel spinal epidural abscess is described. This technique was used in 3 cases, and excellent results were achieved. The authors conclude that multilevel spinal epidural abscesses can be safely and effectively managed using microsurgery via a minimally invasive tubular retractor system.

  6. Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... indicated by a total lack of sensory and motor function below the level of injury. People who survive a spinal cord injury will most likely have medical complications such as chronic pain and bladder and bowel ...

  7. Conventional Spinal Anaesthesia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    patients scheduled for clcctive unilateral lower limb surgery. ... the conventional group were turned supine immediately after injection. Blood pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate and oxygen .... Characteristic Type of spinal anaesthcsia P-value.

  8. Spinal curves (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    There are four natural curves in the spinal column. The cervical, thoracic, lumbar, and sacral curvature. The curves, along with the intervertebral disks, help to absorb and distribute stresses that occur from everyday activities such as walking or from ...

  9. Meningitis after spinal anesthesia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mouchrif, Issam; Berdaii, Adnane; Labib, Ismail; Harrandou, Moustapha

    2016-01-01

    Meningitis is a rare but serious complication of epidural and spinal anesthesia. Bacterial meningitis is mainly caused by Gram-positive cocci, implying an exogenous contamination which suggests a lack of asepsis...

  10. Spinal Cord Injury Map

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos by Topic and Question Videos by Family Relationship Videos by Experts Resources The Short List Government Programs Family and Caregiver Support Financial Help Active Lifestyle Advocacy Employment and Education Adaptive Technology Recent Medical Research Good Things to Read Spinal ...

  11. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos by Topic and Question Videos by Family Relationship Videos by Experts Resources The Short List Government Programs Family and Caregiver Support Financial Help Active Lifestyle Advocacy Employment and Education Adaptive Technology Recent Medical Research Good Things to Read Spinal ...

  12. Extradural Spinal Arachnoid Cysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available A 14-year-old boy with multiple spinal arachnoid cysts and paraplegia, and 37 similar cases in the literature are reviewed by neurosurgeons and radiologist at Univ of Sao Paulo, Brazil.

  13. Applications in spinal imbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husson, J-L; Mallet, J-F; Parent, H; Cavagna, R; Vital, J-M; Blamoutier, A; Violas, P

    2010-05-04

    The pelvis may be seen as a single vertebra, between the spine and the femurs. The anatomy of this pelvic vertebra has changed with the evolution of species, notably with the transition to bipedalism, with the consequent appearance of lumbar lordosis. The lumbosacral angle, almost non-existent in other mammals, is at its greatest in humans. Pelvic and spinal radiological parameters reflect the sagittal balance of the spine in bipedal humanity. Applications in the management of spinal imbalance are numerous. Arthrogenic or degenerative kyphosis is the stereotypic example of spinal aging. Postoperative flat back following spine surgery is hard to prevent. Scoliosis surgery in adults should now take greater account of the patient's individual sagittal balance, by analyzing the pelvic and spinal parameters. The extent of arthrodeses performed during adolescence to manage idiopathic scoliosis may also induce problems of balance in adulthood if these elements are not taken into account. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Pharmacokinetics of levobupivacaine following infant spinal anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frawley, Geoff; Hallett, Ben; Velkov, Tony; Bjorksten, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    Infant spinal anesthesia with levobupivacaine has been promoted as a technique to reduce both the risk of postoperative apnea and exposure to volatile anesthesia. There is, however, no pharmacokinetic data to support the currently recommended doses. Our aim was to determine whether infant levobupivacaine spinal anesthesia is associated with plasma concentrations consistent with a low risk of local anesthetic systemic toxicity. This was an open-label pharmacokinetic safety and tolerability study of levobupivacaine spinal anesthesia in infants spinal anesthetic with levobupivacaine 1 mg·kg(-1) in the left lateral position. Spinal anesthesia was successful in 25 (86.2%) of 29 infants (postmenstrual age 36-52 weeks; weight 2.2-4.7 kg). The median (IQR) total venous levobupivacaine plasma concentrations was 0.33 (0.25-0.42) μg·ml(-1) and unbound venous levobupivacaine was 19.5 (14.5-38) ng·ml(-1) . Median protein binding was 93.5 (91.4-96%). Alpha-1 acid glycoprotein concentrations were 0.25 (0.17-0.37) g·l(-1) and albumin concentrations were 29 (24-32) g·l(-1) . Total plasma concentrations and unbound (free) concentration of levobupivacaine were consistently lower than concentrations reported in cases of pediatric local anesthetic toxicity. In a small number of infants requiring a repeat spinal of 1 mg·kg(-1) was also associated with acceptable total and free concentrations. We conclude that levobupivacaine at 1 mg·kg(-1) is associated with no systemic side effects in infants receiving awake spinal anesthesia. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Epidemiologic evidence of spinal cord injury in Tamil Nadu, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelamegan Sridharan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Spinal cord injury is a fearsome disability leading to increased rate of morbidity and mortality. Information about the incidence of spinal cord injury may provide support for the healthcare advancements. The aim of the present study is to investigate the epidemiology of spinal cord injury. Methods: The present study was carried out in Rajiv Gandhi government general hospital, Chennai, India. The study design was approved by the institutional human ethical committee. Questionnaire was used to collect the information from the patients in a prospective manner. The American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA scoring systems was used to evaluate the severity of spinal cord injury. Results: A total of 245 cases of spinal injury were studied. Among them, 88 % (n=216 were male and 12% (n=29 were female. Spinal cord injuries of falls from height were prominent over the road traffic accident. Cervical level injuries are widespread in males and dorsal level Injuries are common in females. Conclusion: Hence awareness of the spinal cord injury and availability of healthcare facilities may minimise the consequences of spinal cord injury. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(1.000: 220-223

  16. Spinal dysraphism: MRI evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramacharya

    2015-08-01

    Conclusion: Thus we conclude that Spinal dysraphism were common in young females, with commonest anomaly being vertebral anomaly (Spina bifida, commonest location is lumbar region, Diastematomyelia common in young aged female. Magnetic resonance imaging is an accurate, noninvasive, safe and advanced modality for evaluation of the congenital spinal disorders and help in better management of these patients with prompt and accurate diagnosis. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(8.000: 1937-1941

  17. Spinal epidural abscess: a rare complication of ulcerative colitis after ileal pouch anal anastomosis

    OpenAIRE

    Kawamura, Mikio; ARAKI, TOSHIMITSU; Okita, Yoshiki; Kondo, Satoru; Ichikawa, Takashi; FUJIKAWA, HIROYUKI; Uchida, Keiichi; Mohri, Yasuhiko; KUSUNOKI, MASATO

    2016-01-01

    Background Spinal epidural abscess is a rare condition with high morbidity and mortality, for which a delay in diagnosis and treatment can lead to irreversible neurologic deficit or even death. Although patients with spinal epidural abscess have systemic predisposing immunocompromised conditions, spinal intervention, or trauma, this condition has been reported as a result of perforation or fistulization arising from inflammatory bowel disease. We describe herein a rare case of spinal epidural...

  18. Cholinergic Mechanisms in Spinal Locomotion - Potential Target for Rehabilitation Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L M Jordan

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Previous experiments implicate cholinergic brainstem and spinal systems in the control of locomotion. Our results demonstrate that the endogenous cholinergic propriospinal system, acting via M2 and M3 muscarinic receptors, is capable of consistently producing well-coordinated locomotor activity in the in vitro neonatal preparation, placing it in a position to contribute to normal locomotion and to provide a basis for recovery of locomotor capability in the absence of descending pathways. Tests of these suggestions, however, reveal that the spinal cholinergic system plays little if any role in the induction of locomotion, because MLR-evoked locomotion in decerebrate cats is not prevented by cholinergic antagonists. Furthermore, it is not required for the development of stepping movements after spinal cord injury, because cholinergic agonists do not facilitate the appearance of locomotion after spinal cord injury, unlike the dramatic locomotion-promoting effects of clonidine, a noradrenergic α-2 agonist. Furthermore, cholinergic antagonists actually improve locomotor activity after spinal cord injury, suggesting that plastic changes in the spinal cholinergic system interfere with locomotion rather than facilitating it. Changes that have been observed in the cholinergic innervation of motoneurons after spinal cord injury do not decrease motoneuron excitability, as expected. Instead, the development of a hyper-cholinergic state after spinal cord injury appears to enhance motoneuron output and suppress locomotion. A cholinergic suppression of afferent input from the limb after spinal cord injury is also evident from our data, and this may contribute to the ability of cholinergic antagonists to improve locomotion. Not only is a role for the spinal cholinergic system in supressing locomotion after SCI suggested by our results, but an obligatory contribution of a brainstem cholinergic relay to reticulospinal locomotor command systems is not confirmed

  19. TRPV1, NK1 receptor and substance P immunoreactivity and gene expression in the rat lumbosacral spinal cord and urinary bladder after systemic, low dose vanilloid administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heng, Yujing J; Saunders, Cassandra I M; Kunde, Dale A; Geraghty, Dominic P

    2011-04-11

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), neurokinin 1 (NK1) receptor and substance P (SP) immunoreactivity (-ir) and mRNA in the rat lumbosacral spinal cord and urinary bladder were measured 24h after s.c. injection of the vanilloids, capsaicin (50mg/kg) and resiniferatoxin (RTX, 100μg/kg), or vehicle (10% ethanol/10% Tween 80/saline). In the spinal cord, capsaicin significantly reduced TRPV1 and SP-ir (40-45%) in laminae I/II compared to controls, while RTX produced decreases of ~35%. NK1-ir in the spinal cord was unaffected by both vanilloid treatments. In the bladder, SP-ir was reduced in urothelial cells of some capsaicin- and RTX-treated rats, while SP-ir in the suburothelium and muscularis was significantly reduced by RTX. A significant increase in NK1-ir was observed in the urothelium and muscularis after capsaicin administration. Capsaicin significantly increased SP mRNA in the spinal cord, and TRPV1 and SP mRNA in the bladder, whereas RTX increased TRPV1, SP and NK1 mRNA in the spinal cord, and TRPV1 and SP mRNA in the bladder. These data suggest that stimulation of TRPV1 by low dose vanilloid administration can rapidly (within 24h) alter both transcription and translation of TRPV1 channels, SP and NK1 receptors in the rat urinary bladder and spinal cord. 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Role of fetal surgery in spinal dysraphism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Martina Messing-Jünger

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Open spinal dysraphism is a common and clinically challenging organo-genetic malformation. Due to the well-known multi-organ affection with significant implication on the lives of patients and their families, abortion after prenatal diagnosis became reality in most parts of the world. After publication of the Management of Myelomeningocele Study (MOMS results fetal surgery seems to be a new option and a broad discussion arose regarding advantages and risks of in utero treatment of spina bifida. This paper tries to evaluate objectively the actual state of knowledge and experience. This review article gives a historical overview as well as the experimental and pathophysiological background of fetal surgery in open spinal dysraphism. Additionally clinical follow-up experience of foetoscopically treated patients are presented and discussed. After carefully outweighing all available information on fetal surgery for spina bifida, one has to conclude, in accordance with the MOMS investigators, that in utero surgery cannot be considered a standard option at present time. But there is clear evidence of the hypothesis that early closure of the spinal canal has a positive influence on spinal cord function and severity of Chiari malformation type II, has been proven. A persisting problem is the fetal risk of prematurity and the maternal risk of uterus damage. There is also evidence that due to technical restrictions, fetal closure of the spinal canal bears unsolved problems leading to a higher postnatal incidence of complication surgery. Finally, missing long-term results make a definite evaluation impossible so far. At the moment, fetal surgery in open spinal dysraphism is not a standard of care despite promising results regarding central nervous system protection due to early spinal canal closure. Many technical problems need to be solved in the future in order to make this option a safe and standard one.

  1. Congenital spinal malformations; Kongenitale spinale Malformationen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ertl-Wagner, B.B.; Reiser, M.F. [Klinikum Grosshadern, Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie

    2001-12-01

    Congenital spinal malformations form a complex and heterogeneous group of disorders whose pathogenesis is best explained embryologically. Radiologically, it is important to formulate a diagnosis when the disorder first becomes symptomatic. However, it is also crucial to detect complications of the disorder or of the respective therapeutic interventions in the further course of the disease such as hydromyelia or re-tethering after repair of a meningomyelocele. Moreover, once a congenital spinal malformation is diagnosed, associated malformations should be sought after. A possible syndromal classification such as in OEIS- or VACTERL-syndromes should also be considered. (orig.) [German] Kongenitale spinale Malformationen stellen eine komplexe Gruppe an Stoerungen dar, deren Genese sich am einfachsten aus der Embryologie heraus erklaeren laesst. Bei der klinisch-radiologischen Begutachtung ist zunaechst ihre korrekte Klassifikation im Rahmen der Erstdiagnose wichtig. Im weiteren Verlauf ist es jedoch zudem entscheidend, moegliche Komplikationen wie beispielsweise eine Hydromyelie oder ein Wiederanheften des Myelons nach Operation einer Spina bifida aperta zu erkennen. Zudem sollte bei der Diagnosestellung einer kongenitalen spinalen Malformation immer auch auf assoziierte Fehlbildungen, wie z.B. die Diastematomyelie oder das intraspinale Lipom bei der Spina bifida aperta, sowie auf eine moegliche syndromale Einordnung wie beispielsweise beim OEIS-oder VACTERL-Syndrom geachtet werden. (orig.)

  2. Vascular dysfunctions following spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa, Constantin; Popa, Florian; Grigorean, Valentin Titus; Onose, Gelu; Sandu, Aurelia Mihaela; Popescu, Mihai; Burnei, Gheorghe; Strambu, Victor; Sinescu, Crina

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this article is to analyze the vascular dysfunctions occurring after spinal cord injury (SCI). Vascular dysfunctions are common complications of SCI. Cardiovascular disturbances are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in both acute and chronic stages of SCI. Neuroanatomy and physiology of autonomic nervous system, sympathetic and parasympathetic, is reviewed. SCI implies disruption of descendent pathways from central centers to spinal sympathetic neurons, originating in intermediolateral nuclei of T1-L2 cord segments. Loss of supraspinal control over sympathetic nervous system results in reduced overall sympathetic activity below the level of injury and unopposed parasympathetic outflow through intact vagal nerve. SCI associates significant vascular dysfunction. Spinal shock occurs during the acute phase following SCI and it is a transitory suspension of function and reflexes below the level of the injury. Neurogenic shock, part of spinal shock, consists of severe arterial hypotension and bradycardia. Autonomic dysreflexia appears during the chronic phase, after spinal shock resolution, and it is a life-threatening syndrome of massive imbalanced reflex sympathetic discharge occurring in patients with SCI above the splanchnic sympathetic outflow (T5-T6). Arterial hypotension with orthostatic hypotension occurs in both acute and chronic phases. The etiology is multifactorial. We described a few factors influencing the orthostatic hypotension occurrence in SCI: sympathetic nervous system dysfunction, low plasma catecholamine levels, rennin-angiotensin-aldosterone activity, peripheral alpha-adrenoceptor hyperresponsiveness, impaired function of baroreceptors, hyponatremia and low plasmatic volume, cardiovascular deconditioning, morphologic changes in sympathetic neurons, plasticity within spinal circuits, and motor deficit leading to loss of skeletal muscle pumping activity. Additional associated cardiovascular concerns in SCI, such as deep vein

  3. Registration of 2D C-Arm and 3D CT Images for a C-Arm Image-Assisted Navigation System for Spinal Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ju Chang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available C-Arm image-assisted surgical navigation system has been broadly applied to spinal surgery. However, accurate path planning on the C-Arm AP-view image is difficult. This research studies 2D-3D image registration methods to obtain the optimum transformation matrix between C-Arm and CT image frames. Through the transformation matrix, the surgical path planned on preoperative CT images can be transformed and displayed on the C-Arm images for surgical guidance. The positions of surgical instruments will also be displayed on both CT and C-Arm in the real time. Five similarity measure methods of 2D-3D image registration including Normalized Cross-Correlation, Gradient Correlation, Pattern Intensity, Gradient Difference Correlation, and Mutual Information combined with three optimization methods including Powell’s method, Downhill simplex algorithm, and genetic algorithm are applied to evaluate their performance in converge range, efficiency, and accuracy. Experimental results show that the combination of Normalized Cross-Correlation measure method with Downhill simplex algorithm obtains maximum correlation and similarity in C-Arm and Digital Reconstructed Radiograph (DRR images. Spine saw bones are used in the experiment to evaluate 2D-3D image registration accuracy. The average error in displacement is 0.22 mm. The success rate is approximately 90% and average registration time takes 16 seconds.

  4. Identification in the human central nervous system, pituitary, and thyroid of a novel calcitonin gene-related peptide, and partial amino acid sequence in the spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petermann, J B; Born, W; Chang, J Y; Fischer, J A

    1987-01-15

    Two human genes encoding precursors for two calcitonin gene-related peptides (CGRP) I (or alpha) and II (or beta) have been identified (Steenbergh, P. H., Höppener, J. W. M., Zandberg, J., Lips, C. J. M., and Jansz, H. S. (1985) FEBS Lett. 183, 403-407). The amino acid sequence of CGRP-I was obtained in medullary thyroid carcinoma extracts (Morris, H. R., Panico, M., Etienne, T., Tippins, J., Girgis, S. I., and MacIntyre, I. (1984) Nature 308, 746-748), but not in normal human tissues. The human CGRP-II peptide remained to be discovered. Here we have determined in the human spinal cord the amino acid composition and the partial amino acid sequence of the DNA-predicted CGRP-I and -II. The data indicate for the first time the existence of a second CGRP different from the known CGRP-I. CGRP-II has been identified in the central nervous system, pituitary, thyroid, and in medullary thyroid carcinoma as a major CGRP form together with CGRP-I.

  5. Multifocal spinal hemangioblastoma in von Hippel-Lindau syndrome: A case report and literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ok Hwa [Dept. of Radiology, Inje University College of Medicine, Haeundae Paik Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    Hemangioblastoma is a benign vascular neoplasm of the central nervous system that occurs frequently in the cerebellum and other areas of the central nervous system including spinal cord and brainstem. Spinal hemangioblastoma can present as a sporadic isolated lesion or as a component of von Hippel-Lindau syndrome. The author presents a case of 32-year-old man with von Hippel-Lindau syndrome and spinal hemangioblastomas represented by multiple small spinal lesions, with an emphasis on the magnetic resonance imaging findings and clinical characteristics of von Hippel-Lindau syndrome-associated spinal hemangioblastomas.

  6. Imaging in spinal trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goethem, J.W.M. van [Universitair Ziekenhuis Antwerpen, University of Antwerp, Belgium, Department of Radiology, Edegem (Belgium); Algemeen Ziekenhuis Maria Middelares, Department of Radiology, Sint-Niklaas (Belgium); Maes, Menno; Oezsarlak, Oezkan; Hauwe, Luc van den; Parizel, Paul M. [Universitair Ziekenhuis Antwerpen, University of Antwerp, Belgium, Department of Radiology, Edegem (Belgium)

    2005-03-01

    Because it may cause paralysis, injury to the spine is one of the most feared traumas, and spinal cord injury is a major cause of disability. In the USA approximately 10,000 traumatic cervical spine fractures and 4000 traumatic thoracolumbar fractures are diagnosed each year. Although the number of individuals sustaining paralysis is far less than those with moderate or severe brain injury, the socioeconomic costs are significant. Since most of the spinal trauma patients survive their injuries, almost one out of 1000 inhabitants in the USA are currently being cared for partial or complete paralysis. Little controversy exists regarding the need for accurate and emergent imaging assessment of the traumatized spine in order to evaluate spinal stability and integrity of neural elements. Because clinicians fear missing occult spine injuries, they obtain radiographs for nearly all patients who present with blunt trauma. We are influenced on one side by fear of litigation and the possible devastating medical, psychologic and financial consequences of cervical spine injury, and on the other side by pressure to reduce health care costs. A set of clinical and/or anamnestic criteria, however, can be very useful in identifying patients who have an extremely low probability of injury and who consequently have no need for imaging studies. Multidetector (or multislice) computed tomography (MDCT) is the preferred primary imaging modality in blunt spinal trauma patients who do need imaging. Not only is CT more accurate in diagnosing spinal injury, it also reduces imaging time and patient manipulation. Evidence-based research has established that MDCT improves patient outcome and saves money in comparison to plain film. This review discusses the use, advantages and disadvantages of the different imaging techniques used in spinal trauma patients and the criteria used in selecting patients who do not need imaging. Finally an overview of different types of spinal injuries is given

  7. Robotic-locomotor training as a tool to reduce neuromuscular abnormality in spinal cord injury: the application of system identification and advanced longitudinal modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirbagheri, Mehdi M; Kindig, Matthew; Niu, Xun; Varoqui, Deborah; Conaway, Petra

    2013-06-01

    In this study, the effect of the LOKOMAT, a robotic-assisted locomotor training system, on the reduction of neuromuscular abnormalities associated with spasticity was examined, for the first time in the spinal cord injury (SCI) population. Twenty-three individuals with chronic incomplete SCI received 1-hour training sessions in the LOKOMAT three times per week, with up to 45 minutes of training per session; matched control group received no intervention. The neuromuscular properties of the spastic ankle were then evaluated prior to training and after 1, 2, and 4 weeks of training. A parallel-cascade system identification technique was used to determine the reflex and intrinsic stiffness of the ankle joint as a function of ankle position at each time point. The slope of the stiffness vs. joint angle curve, i.e. the modulation of stiffness with joint position, was then calculated and tracked over the four-week period. Growth Mixture Modeling (GMM), an advanced statistical method, was then used to classify subjects into subgroups based on similar trends in recovery pattern of slope over time, and Random Coefficient Regression (RCR) was used to model the recovery patterns within each subgroup. All groups showed significant reductions in both reflex and intrinsic slope over time, but subjects in classes with higher baseline values of the slope showed larger improvements over the four weeks of training. These findings suggest that LOKOMAT training may also be useful for reducing the abnormal modulation of neuromuscular properties that arises as secondary effects after SCI. This can advise clinicians as to which patients can benefit the most from LOKOMAT training prior to beginning the training. Further, this study shows that system identification and GMM/RCR can serve as powerful tools to quantify and track spasticity over time in the SCI population.

  8. Application of computer graphics for assessment of spinal deformities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandegriend, B; Hill, D; Raso, J; Durdle, N; Zhang, Z

    1995-03-01

    A graphical portrayal system to assess spinal deformities is described. The system is based on software to display and manipulate three-dimensional images of the spine and trunk surface. Qualitative measurements of internal spinal alignment and trunk appearance are provided. The graphics display is developed using graPHIGS routines in conjunction with the C programming language and the UNIX operating system. This software provides clinicians with a computer-aided measurement tool that rapidly conveys clear and concise information about the deformities associated with abnormal spinal curvatures.

  9. Glutamine synthetase induced spinal seizures in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong Won; Yoon, Young Sul; Matsumoto, Masato; Huang, Wencheng; Ceraulo, Phil; Young, Wise

    2003-02-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) is a key enzyme in the regulation of glutamate neurotransmission in the central nervous system. It is responsible for converting glutamate to glutamine, consuming one ATP and NH3 in the process. Glutamate is neurotoxic when it accumulates in extracellular fluids. We investigated the effects of GS in both a spinal cord injury (SCI) model and normal rats. 0.1-ml of low (2- micro M) and high (55- micro M) concentrations of GS were applied, intrathecally, to the spinal cord of rats under pentobarbital anesthesia. Immediately after an intrathecal injection into the L1-L3 space, the rats developed convulsive movements. These movements initially consisted of myoclonic twitches of the paravertebral muscles close to the injection site, repeated tonic and clonic contractions and extensions of the hind limbs (hind limb seizures) that spread to the fore limbs, and finally rotational axial movements of the body. An EMG of the paravertebral muscles, fore and hind limbs, showed the extent of the muscle activities. GS (2- micro M) caused spinal seizures in the rats after the SCI, and GS (6- micro M) produced seizures in the uninjured anesthetized rats. Denatured GS (70 degrees C, 1 hour) also produced spinal seizures, although higher concentrations were required. We suggest that GS may be directly blocking the release of GABA, or the receptors, in the spinal cord.

  10. [Primary Spinal Tumor Registry at the National Centre for Spinal Disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szövérfi, Zsolt; Lazáry, Aron; Varga, Péter Pál

    2014-05-11

    Primary spinal tumors are rare diseases. Primary spinal tumor registry would be useful to help decision making in this complex field of spine surgery. In this article the authors present the latest findings from the Primary Spinal Tumor Registry at the National Centre for Spinal Disorders, Hungary. The registry is based on a novel database management software, the REDCap electronic data capture system. It contains data of 323 patients treated surgically during an 18-year period. Among the 126 malignant tumors, the most frequent was chordoma (61 cases). In the case of benign tumors schwannoma showed the largest prevalence (45 cases). The authors conclude that due to the rarity of the disease and the complexity of the management, multicenter, prospective registries are required to provide high level of evidence. The structure of the Primary Spinal Tumor Registry in the National Centre for Spinal Disorders in Hungary is optimal for user-friendly, fast and secure data collection providing a prospective database for scientific researches and clinical follow-up.

  11. Spinal canal stenosis; Spinalkanalstenose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papanagiotou, P.; Boutchakova, M. [Klinikum Bremen-Mitte/Bremen-Ost, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Bremen (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    Spinal stenosis is a narrowing of the spinal canal by a combination of bone and soft tissues, which can lead to mechanical compression of spinal nerve roots or the dural sac. The lumbal spinal compression of these nerve roots can be symptomatic, resulting in weakness, reflex alterations, gait disturbances, bowel or bladder dysfunction, motor and sensory changes, radicular pain or atypical leg pain and neurogenic claudication. The anatomical presence of spinal canal stenosis is confirmed radiologically with computerized tomography, myelography or magnetic resonance imaging and play a decisive role in optimal patient-oriented therapy decision-making. (orig.) [German] Die Spinalkanalstenose ist eine umschriebene, knoechern-ligamentaer bedingte Einengung des Spinalkanals, die zur Kompression der Nervenwurzeln oder des Duralsacks fuehren kann. Die lumbale Spinalkanalstenose manifestiert sich klinisch als Komplex aus Rueckenschmerzen sowie sensiblen und motorischen neurologischen Ausfaellen, die in der Regel belastungsabhaengig sind (Claudicatio spinalis). Die bildgebende Diagnostik mittels Magnetresonanztomographie, Computertomographie und Myelographie spielt eine entscheidende Rolle bei der optimalen patientenbezogenen Therapieentscheidung. (orig.)

  12. Metastatic carcinoid tumour with spinal cord compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Si; Antwi-Yeboah, Y; Bucur, Sd

    2012-07-01

    Carcinoid tumours are rare with an incidence of 5.25/100,000. They predominantly originate in the gastrointestinal tract (50-60%) or bronchopulmonary system (25-30%). Common sites of metastasis are lymph nodes, liver, lungs and bone. Spinal metastasis are rare, but has been reported in patients with symptoms of spinal cord compression including neurological deficits. We report a rare case of carcinoid metastasis with spinal cord compression, in a 63-year-old man, presenting with a one-year history of back pain without any neurological symptoms. The patient underwent a two-level decompressive laminectomy of T10 and T11 as well as piecemeal tumour resection. Post-operatively the patient made a good recovery without complications.

  13. [Management of wound infection after spinal operation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yun; Chen, Zhong-Qiang; Zhou, Fang; Liu, Zhong-Jun

    2005-02-15

    To elucidate the treatment of wound infection after spinal operation. Thirty-six cases of wound infection after spinal operation were analyzed retrospectively. Sixteen cases had debridement and dressing changing, 20 cases had debridement and irrigation-suction system. Thirty-four cases had wound healed and 2 case dead of septicemia. Irrigation-suction had better result than that of only debridement. Among the 11 cases of internal fixation, 9 cases reserved the implants. (1) Wound infection after spinal operation is a serious postoperative complication and should be treated carefully; (2) Nutrition support, reasonable antibiotic and irrigation-suction are effective methods; (3) When wound infection occurs, removing the implants out is not indispensible.

  14. Primary multifocal gliosarcoma of the spinal cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh M. Kumar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Gliosarcoma (GS is a rare and exceedingly malignant neoplasm of the central nervous system. It displays clinical features similar to glioblastoma, yet is histologically unique as it harbors both gliomatous and sarcomatous cellular components. Involvement of the neuroaxis is predominantly limited to the cerebral parenchyma and meninges. Primary GS of the spinal cord is rarely encountered. We report a case of a 54 year old male who presented with 2 months of progressive, bilateral lower extremity sensory deficits. Magnetic resonance imaging of the neuro-axis revealed multiple intradural lesions involving the cervical and thoracic spinal cord without evidence of intracranial involvement. Surgical resection of a dural based, extramedullary cervical lesion and two exophytic, intramedullary thoracic lesions revealed gliosarcoma, WHO grade IV. The patient died approximately 11 months after presentation. This report confirms that GS is not limited to supratentorial involvement and can primarily affect the spinal cord.

  15. Transcutaneous spinal stimulation as a therapeutic strategy for spinal cord injury: state of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grecco LH

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Leandro H Grecco,1,3,4,* Shasha Li,1,5,* Sarah Michel,1,6,* Laura Castillo-Saavedra,1 Andoni Mourdoukoutas,7 Marom Bikson,7 Felipe Fregni1,21Spaulding Neuromodulation Center, Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, 2Spaulding-Harvard Spinal Cord Injury Model System, Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA, USA; 3Special Laboratory of Pain and Signaling, Butantan Institute, 4Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Biomedical Science, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; 5Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, People's Republic of China; 6Department of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences, University of Namur, Belgium; 7Department of Biomedical Engineering, The City College of New York, New York, NY, USA*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Treatments for spinal cord injury (SCI still have limited effects. Electrical stimulation might facilitate plastic changes in affected spinal circuitries that may be beneficial in improving motor function and spasticity or SCI-related neuropathic pain. Based on available animal and clinical evidence, we critically reviewed the physiological basis and therapeutic action of transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation in SCI. We analyzed the literature published on PubMed to date, looking for the role of three main noninvasive stimulation techniques in the recovery process of SCI and focusing mainly on transcutaneous spinal stimulation. This review discusses the main clinical applications, latest advances, and limitations of noninvasive electrical stimulation of the spinal cord. Although most recent research in this topic has focused on transcutaneous spinal direct current stimulation (tsDCS, we also reviewed the technique of transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS and neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES as potential methods to modulate spinal cord

  16. Spinal actinomycosis: A rare disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dua Rakesh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Actinomycosis is an indolent, slowly progressive infection caused by Actinomyces species. Of human actinomycosis, the spinal form is rare and actinomycosis-related spinal neurological deficit is uncommon. We report two cases with cervical and dorsal actinomycosis and one of them with spinal neurological deficit.

  17. Spinal cord swelling and candidiasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, K.; Gronseth, G.; Aldrich, M.; Williams, A.

    1982-11-01

    Fusiform swelling of the spinal cord was noted myelographically in a patient with Hodgkin's disease. Autopsy revealed that the swelling was caused by Candida infection of the spinal cord. It is suggested that fungal infection be included in the differential diagnosis of spinal cord swelling in the immunosuppressed cancer patient.

  18. Intramedullary spinal melanocytoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meic H. Schmidt

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Meningeal melanocytoma is a benign lesion arising from leptomeningeal melanocytes that at times can mimic its malignant counterpart, melanoma. Lesions of the spine usually occur in extramedullary locations and present with spinal cord compression symptoms. Because most reported spinal cases occur in the thoracic region, these symptoms usually include lower extremity weakness or numbness. The authors present a case of primary intrame­dullary spinal meningeal melanocytoma presenting with bilateral lower extremity symptoms in which the patient had no known supratentorial primary lesions. Gross total surgical resection allowed for full recovery, but early recurrence of tumor was detected on close follow-up monitoring, allowing for elective local radiation without loss of neurological function. Case reports of such tumors discuss different treatment strategies, but just as important is the close follow-up monitoring in these patients even after gross total surgical resection, since these tumors can recur.

  19. [Spinal cord infarction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumann, N; Shariat, K; Ulmer, S; Stippich, C; Ahlhelm, F J

    2012-05-01

    Infarction of the spinal cord can cause a variety of symptoms and neurological deficits because of the complex vascular supply of the myelon. The most common leading symptom is distal paresis ranging from paraparesis to tetraplegia caused by arterial ischemia or infarction of the myelon. Venous infarction, however, cannot always be distinguished from arterial infarction based on the symptoms alone.Modern imaging techniques, such as computed tomography angiography (CTA) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) assist in preoperative planning of aortic operations to reliably identify not only the most important vascular structure supplying the spinal cord, the artery of Adamkiewicz, but also other pathologies such as tumors or infectious disorders. In contrast to CT, MRI can reliably depict infarction of the spinal cord.

  20. Endogenous neurotrophins and plasticity following spinal deafferentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramer, Matt S

    2012-05-01

    Neurons intrinsic to the spinal cord dorsal horn receive input from various classes of long-distance projection systems. Two of the best known of these are primary afferent and descending monoaminergic axons. Together with intrinsic interneurons, activity in these axonal populations shapes the early part of the sensory experience before it is transmitted to supraspinal structures via ascending projection axons. Injury to dorsal roots, which contain the centrally projecting branches of primary afferent axons, results in their permanent disconnection from the spinal cord, as well as sensory dysfunction such as pain. In animals, experimental dorsal root injuries affecting a small number of roots produce dynamic behavioural changes, providing evidence for the now familiar concept that sensory processing at the level of the spinal cord is not hard-wired. Changes in behaviour following rhizotomy suggest changes in spinal sensory circuitry, and we and others have shown that the density of spinal serotonergic axons as well as processes of inhibitory interneurons increases following rhizotomy. Intact primary afferent axons are less apt to sprout into denervated territory. Recent work from our group has asked (1) what is the stimulus that induces sprouting of serotonergic (and other) axons and (2) what prevents spared primary afferent axons from occupying the territory of those lost to injury. This article will review the evidence that a single factor upregulated by dorsal root injury, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), underpins both serotonergic sprouting and a lack of primary afferent plasticity. BDNF also differentially modulates some of the behavioural consequences of dorsal root injury: antagonizing endogenous BDNF improves spontaneous mechanosensory recovery but prevents recovery from rhizotomy-induced hypersensitivity to cold. These findings reinforce the notion that in disease states as complex and variable as spinal cord injury, single pharmacological

  1. Congenital spine anomalies: the closed spinal dysraphisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, Erin Simon [University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Rossi, Andrea [G. Gaslini Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Genoa (Italy)

    2015-09-15

    The term congenital spinal anomalies encompasses a wide variety of dysmorphology that occurs during early development. Familiarity with current terminology and a practical, clinico-radiologic classification system allows the radiologist to have a more complete understanding of malformations of the spine and improves accuracy of diagnosis when these entities are encountered in practice. (orig.)

  2. Segmental Kinematic Coupling of the Human Spinal Column during Locomotion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-ru Zhao; Lei Ren; Lu-quan Ren; John R.Hutchinson; Li-mei Tian; Jian S.Dai

    2008-01-01

    As one of the most important daily motor activities, human locomotion has been investigated intensively in recent decades. The locomotor functions and mechanics of human lower limbs have become relatively well understood. However, so far our understanding of the motions and functional contributions of the human spine during locomotion is still very poor and simul-taneous in-vivo limb and spinal column motion data are scarce. The objective of this study is to investigate the delicate in-vivo kinematic coupling between different functional regions of the human spinal column during locomotion as a stepping stone to explore the locomotor function of the human spine complex. A novel infrared reflective marker cluster system was constructed using stereophotogrammetry techniques to record the 3D in-vivo geometric shape of the spinal column and the segmental position and orientation of each functional spinal region simultaneously. Gait measurements of normal walking were conducted. The preliminary results show that the spinal column shape changes periodically in the frontal plane during locomotion. The segmental motions of different spinal functional regions appear to be strongly coupled, indicating some synergistic strategy may be employed by the human spinal column to facilitate locomotion. In contrast to traditional medical imaging-based methods, the proposed technique can be used to investigate the dynamic characteristics of the spinal column, hence providing more insight into the functional biomechanies of the human spine.

  3. Spinal Cord Stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Kaare

    2014-01-01

    pain after failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS)(4), pain due to peripheral nerve injury, stump pain(5), peripheral vascular disease(6) and diabetic neuropathy(7,8); whereas phantom pain(9), postherpetic neuralgia(10), chronic visceral pain(11), and pain after partial spinal cord injury(12) remain more......Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is a surgical treatment for chronic neuropathic pain that is refractory to other treatment. Originally described by Shealy et al. in 1967(1), it is used to treat a range of conditions such as complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS I)(2), angina pectoris(3), radicular...

  4. Maladaptive spinal plasticity opposes spinal learning and recovery in spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam R Ferguson

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic plasticity within the spinal cord has great potential to facilitate recovery of function after spinal cord injury (SCI. Spinal plasticity can be induced in an activity-dependent manner even without input from the brain after complete SCI. The mechanistic basis for these effects is provided by research demonstrating that spinal synapses have many of the same plasticity mechanisms that are known to underlie learning and memory in the brain. In addition, the lumbar spinal cord can sustain several forms of learning and memory, including limb-position training. However, not all spinal plasticity promotes recovery of function. Central sensitization of nociceptive (pain pathways in the spinal cord may emerge with certain patterns of activity, demonstrating that plasticity within the spinal cord may contribute to maladaptive pain states. In this review we discuss interactions between adaptive and maladaptive forms of activity-dependent plasticity in the spinal cord. The literature demonstrates that activity-dependent plasticity within the spinal cord must be carefully tuned to promote adaptive spinal training. Stimulation that is delivered in a limb position-dependent manner or on a fixed interval can induce adaptive plasticity that promotes future spinal cord learning and reduces nociceptive hyper-reactivity. On the other hand, stimulation that is delivered in an unsynchronized fashion, such as randomized electrical stimulation or peripheral skin injuries, can generate maladaptive spinal plasticity that undermines future spinal cord learning, reduces recovery of locomotor function, and promotes nociceptive hyper-reactivity after spinal cord injury. We review these basic phenomena, discuss the cellular and molecular mechanisms, and discuss implications of these findings for improved rehabilitative therapies after spinal cord injury.

  5. MRI and neurological findings in patients with spinal metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Switlyk, M.D.; Hole, K.H.; Knutstad, K. [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo (Norway)], E-mail: marta.switlyk@radiumhospitalet.no; Skjeldal, S.; Zaikova, O. [Department of Orthopedics, Oslo University Hospital, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Hald, J.K. [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Oslo (Norway); Seierstad, T. [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Faculty of Health Sciences, Buskerud University College, Drammen (Norway)

    2012-12-15

    Background. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the recommended primary investigation method for metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC). Initiating treatment before the development of motor deficits is essential to preserve neurological function. However, the relationship between MRI-assessed grades of spinal metastatic disease and neurological status has not been widely investigated. Purpose. To analyze the association between neurological function and MRI-based assessment of the extent of spinal metastases using two different grading systems. Material and Methods. A total of 284 patients admitted to our institution for initial radiotherapy or surgery for symptomatic spinal metastases were included in the study. Motor and sensory deficits were categorized according to the Frankel classification system. Pre-treatment MRI evaluations of the entire spine were scored for the extent of spinal metastases, presence and severity of spinal cord compression, and nerve root compression. Two MRI-based scales were used to evaluate the degree of cord compression and spinal canal narrowing and relate these findings to neurological function. Results. Of the patients included in the study, 28 were non-ambulatory, 49 were ambulatory with minor motor deficits, and 207 had normal motor function. Spinal cord compression was present in all patients with Frankel scores of B or C, 23 of 35 patients with a Frankel score of D (66%), and 48 of 152 patients with a Frankel score of E (32%). The percentage of patients with severe spinal canal narrowing increased with increasing Frankel grades. The grading according to the scales showed a significant association with the symptoms according to the Frankel scale (P < 0.001). Conclusion. In patients with neurological dysfunction, the presence and severity of impairment was associated with the epidural tumor burden. A significant number of patients had radiological spinal cord compression and normal motor function (occult MSCC)

  6. Accuracy analysis of an image-guided system for vertebroplasty spinal therapy based on electromagnetic tracking of instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jienan; Khan, Noureen; Cheng, Patrick; Wilson, Emmanuel; Watson, Vance; Cleary, Kevin; Yaniv, Ziv

    2008-03-01

    Vertebroplasty is a minimally invasive procedure in which bone cement is pumped into a fractured vertebral body that has been weakened by osteoporosis, long-term steroid use, or cancer. In this therapy, a trocar (large bore hollow needle) is inserted through the pedicle of the vertebral body which is a narrow passage and requires great skill on the part of the physician to avoid going outside of the pathway. In clinical practice, this procedure is typically done using 2D X-ray fluoroscopy. To investigate the feasibility of providing 3D image guidance, we developed an image-guided system based on electromagnetic tracking and our open source software platform the Image-Guided Surgery Toolkit (IGSTK). The system includes path planning, interactive 3D navigation, and dynamic referencing. This paper will describe the system and our initial evaluation.

  7. Artificial disc and vertebra system: a novel motion preservation device for cervical spinal disease after vertebral corpectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jun; Lu, Meng; Lu, Teng; Liang, Baobao; Xu, Junkui; Qin, Jie; Cai, Xuan; Huang, Sihua; Wang, Dong; Li, Haopeng; He, Xijing

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the range of motion and stability of the human cadaveric cervical spine after the implantation of a novel artificial disc and vertebra system by comparing an intact group and a fusion group. METHODS: Biomechanical tests were conducted on 18 human cadaveric cervical specimens. The range of motion and the stability index range of motion were measured to study the function and stability of the artificial disc and vertebra system of the intact group compared with the fusion group. RESULTS: In all cases, the artificial disc and vertebra system maintained intervertebral motion and reestablished vertebral height at the operative level. After its implantation, there was no significant difference in the range of motion (ROM) of C3–7 in all directions in the non-fusion group compared with the intact group (p>0.05), but significant differences were detected in flexion, extension and axial rotation compared with the fusion group (pvertebra system could restore vertebral height and preserve the dynamic function of the surgical area and could theoretically reduce the risk of adjacent segment degeneration compared with the anterior fusion procedure. However, our results should be considered with caution because of the low power of the study. The use of a larger sample should be considered in future studies. PMID:26222819

  8. Maladaptive spinal plasticity opposes spinal learning and recovery in spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Adam R.; Huie, J. Russell; Crown, Eric D.; Baumbauer, Kyle M.; Hook, Michelle A.; Garraway, Sandra M.; Lee, Kuan H.; Hoy, Kevin C.; Grau, James W.

    2012-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity within the spinal cord has great potential to facilitate recovery of function after spinal cord injury (SCI). Spinal plasticity can be induced in an activity-dependent manner even without input from the brain after complete SCI. A mechanistic basis for these effects is provided by research demonstrating that spinal synapses have many of the same plasticity mechanisms that are known to underlie learning and memory in the brain. In addition, the lumbar spinal cord can sustain several forms of learning and memory, including limb-position training. However, not all spinal plasticity promotes recovery of function. Central sensitization of nociceptive (pain) pathways in the spinal cord may emerge in response to various noxious inputs, demonstrating that plasticity within the spinal cord may contribute to maladaptive pain states. In this review we discuss interactions between adaptive and maladaptive forms of activity-dependent plasticity in the spinal cord below the level of SCI. The literature demonstrates that activity-dependent plasticity within the spinal cord must be carefully tuned to promote adaptive spinal training. Prior work from our group has shown that stimulation that is delivered in a limb position-dependent manner or on a fixed interval can induce adaptive plasticity that promotes future spinal cord learning and reduces nociceptive hyper-reactivity. On the other hand, stimulation that is delivered in an unsynchronized fashion, such as randomized electrical stimulation or peripheral skin injuries, can generate maladaptive spinal plasticity that undermines future spinal cord learning, reduces recovery of locomotor function, and promotes nociceptive hyper-reactivity after SCI. We review these basic phenomena, how these findings relate to the broader spinal plasticity literature, discuss the cellular and molecular mechanisms, and finally discuss implications of these and other findings for improved rehabilitative therapies after SCI. PMID

  9. Spinal Cord Stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Kaare

    2014-01-01

    pain after failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS)(4), pain due to peripheral nerve injury, stump pain(5), peripheral vascular disease(6) and diabetic neuropathy(7,8); whereas phantom pain(9), postherpetic neuralgia(10), chronic visceral pain(11), and pain after partial spinal cord injury(12) remain more...

  10. Cervical spinal canal narrowing and cervical neurologi-cal injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Ling

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Cervical spinal canal narrowing can lead to injury of the spinal cord and neurological symptoms in-cluding neck pain, headache, weakness and parasthesisas. According to previous and recent clinical researches, we investigated the geometric parameters of normal cervical spinal canal including the sagittal and transverse diameters as well as Torg ratio. The mean sagittal diameter of cervical spinal canal at C 1 to C 7 ranges from 15.33 mm to 20.46 mm, the mean transverse diameter at the same levels ranges from 24.45 mm to 27.00 mm and the mean value of Torg ratio is 0.96. With respect to narrow cervical spinal canal, the following charaterstics are found: firstly, extension of the cervical spine results in statistically significant stenosis as compared with the flexed or neutral positions; secondly, females sustain cervical spinal canal narrowing more easily than males; finally, the consistent narrowest cervical canal level is at C 4 for all ethnicity, but there is a slight variation in the sagittal diameter of cervical spinal stenosis (≤14 mm in Whites, ≤ 12 mm in Japanese, ≤13.7 mm in Chinese. Narrow sagittal cervical canal diameter brings about an increased risk of neurological injuries in traumatic, degenerative and inflam-matory conditions and is related with extension of cervical spine, gender, as well as ethnicity. It is hoped that this re-view will be helpful in diagnosing spinal cord and neuro-logical injuries with the geometric parameters of cervical spine in the future. Key words: Spinal cord injuries; Spinal stenosis; Trauma, nervous system

  11. Spinal neurofibromatosis with central nervous system involvement in a set of twin girls and a boy: further expansion of the phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggieri, Martino; Polizzi, Agata; Salpietro, Vincenzo; Incorpora, Gemma; Nicita, Francesco; Pavone, Piero; Falsaperla, Raffaele; Nucifora, Caterina; Granata, Francesca; Distefano, Angela; Padua, Luca; Caltabiano, Rosario; Lanzafame, Salvatore; Gabriele, Anna Lia; Ortensi, Andrea; D'Orazi, Valerio; Panunzi, Andrea; Milone, Pietro; Mankad, Kshitij; Platania, Nunzio; Albanese, Vincenzo; Pavone, Vito

    2013-10-01

    Familial spinal neurofibromatosis is a form of neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1), consisting of extensive, symmetrical, histologically proven, multiple neurofibromas of the spinal roots at every level and of all major peripheral nerves sometimes associated with typical NF1 stigmata; most cases underlie NF1 gene mutations. The objectives of this study are (1) to report the findings in a set of 16-year-old monozygotic twin girls and a 14-year-old boy and (2) to review the existing literature. In this article, we report the cases of three children who (1) had manifested mildly different symptomatic neuropathy (twins, aged 4 years; and a boy, aged 9 years) associated with massive, symmetrical neurofibromas; (2) had few café-au-lait spots with irregular margins and pale brown pigmentation; (3) were presented with, at brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), bilateral, NF1-like high-signal abnormalities in the basal ganglia; (4) yielded missense NF1 gene mutations in exon 39; and (5) had unaffected parents with negative NF1 genetic testing as well as discuss 12 families and 20 sporadic and 5 additional cases that presented spinal neurofibromatosis within classical NF1 families (53 cases) that were reported in the literature. This article presents the first report on (1) spinal neurofibromatosis in a set of affected monozygotic twins; (2) the earliest onset of the disease; and (3) the occurrence of high signal lesions in the brain at MRI. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Development of a sexually dimorphic neuromuscular system in male rats after spinal transection: morphologic changes and implications for estrogen sites of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebbeler, Sara L; Sengelaub, Dale R

    2003-12-01

    The lumbar spinal cord of rats contains the sexually dimorphic, steroid-sensitive spinal nucleus of the bulbocavernosus (SNB). In male rats, SNB motoneurons exhibit a biphasic pattern of dendritic growth, having an initial period of exuberant growth followed by a period of retraction to mature lengths by 7 weeks of age. This growth is steroid dependent: dendrites fail to grow after castration, but growth is supported in castrates treated with estradiol. In this experiment, we examined whether supraspinal afferent input by means of descending spinal tracts to the SNB was involved in the normal postnatal development of SNB motoneurons, and whether the effect of estradiol on SNB dendritic growth could be explained by an indirect action of estradiol on supraspinal afferents. Motoneuron morphology was assessed in normal males, early- or late-postnatally transected males, castrated males left untreated or treated with estradiol, and transected castrates treated with estradiol. SNB motoneurons were retrogradely labeled with cholera toxin-horseradish peroxidase during both the growth and retraction phases of dendritic development and reconstructed in three dimensions. The removal of supraspinal afferents resulted in extremely local effects within the developing SNB arbor, as well as transient alterations in somal growth. Furthermore, spinal transection did not block the trophic effect of estradiol on supporting SNB dendritic growth, indicating that estrogens do not act by means of supraspinal input to support SNB motoneuron development. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Cranial and spinal leptomeningeal dissemination in esthesioneuroblastoma: Two reports of distant central nervous system metastasis and rationale for treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakumar, Walavan; Oh, Nathan; Cutler, Aaron; Colman, Howard; Couldwell, William T.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Esthesioneuroblastoma is a locally aggressive cancer of the nasal cavity. While systemic metastasis can occur in 10-30% of patients, there are only six reported cases of distal metastasis from leptomeningeal dissemination. Case Description: The authors report two cases of esthesioneuroblastoma treated previously with multimodal therapy in which distal metastatic recurrence was found and describe their treatment protocol, which has resulted in long-term success. Conclusion: Understanding the drivers of leptomeningeal dissemination in more prevalent primary neuroectodermal tumors may hold the key to developing successful treatment algorithms for this disease. PMID:26682087

  14. Artificial disc and vertebra system: a novel motion preservation device for cervical spinal disease after vertebral corpectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Dong

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the range of motion and stability of the human cadaveric cervical spine after the implantation of a novel artificial disc and vertebra system by comparing an intact group and a fusion group. METHODS: Biomechanical tests were conducted on 18 human cadaveric cervical specimens. The range of motion and the stability index range of motion were measured to study the function and stability of the artificial disc and vertebra system of the intact group compared with the fusion group. RESULTS: In all cases, the artificial disc and vertebra system maintained intervertebral motion and reestablished vertebral height at the operative level. After its implantation, there was no significant difference in the range of motion (ROM of C3-7 in all directions in the non-fusion group compared with the intact group (p>0.05, but significant differences were detected in flexion, extension and axial rotation compared with the fusion group (p<0.05. The ROM of adjacent segments (C3-4, C6-7 of the non-fusion group decreased significantly in some directions compared with the fusion group (p<0.05. Significant differences in the C4-6 ROM in some directions were detected between the non-fusion group and the intact group. In the fusion group, the C4-6 ROM in all directions decreased significantly compared with the intact and non-fusion groups (p<0.01. The stability index ROM (SI-ROM of some directions was negative in the non-fusion group, and a significant difference in SI-ROM was only found in the C4-6 segment of the non-fusion group compared with the fusion group. CONCLUSION: An artificial disc and vertebra system could restore vertebral height and preserve the dynamic function of the surgical area and could theoretically reduce the risk of adjacent segment degeneration compared with the anterior fusion procedure. However, our results should be considered with caution because of the low power of the study. The use of a larger sample should be

  15. Localization of Brain Natriuretic Peptide Immunoreactivity in Rat Spinal Cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Essam M Abdelalim

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP exerts its functions through natriuretic peptide receptors. Recently, BNP has been shown to be involved in a wide range of functions. Previous studies reported BNP expression in the sensory afferent fibers in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. However, BNP expression and function in the neurons of the central nervous system are still controversial. Therefore, in this study, we investigated BNP expression in the rat spinal cord in detail using RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. RT-PCR analysis showed that BNP mRNA was present in the spinal cord and DRG. BNP immunoreactivity was observed in different structures of the spinal cord, including the neuronal cell bodies and neuronal processes. BNP immunoreactivity was observed in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord and in the neurons of the intermediate column and ventral horn. Double-immunolabeling showed a high level of BNP expression in the afferent fibers (laminae I-II labeled with calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP, suggesting BNP involvement in sensory function. In addition, BNP was co-localized with CGRP and choline acetyltransferase in the motor neurons of the ventral horn. Together, these results indicate that BNP is expressed in sensory and motor systems of the spinal cord, suggesting its involvement in several biological actions on sensory and motor neurons via its binding to NPR-A and/or NPR-B in the DRG and spinal cord.

  16. Biomechanics of the spine. Part I: Spinal stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izzo, Roberto, E-mail: roberto1766@interfree.it [Neuroradiology Department, “A. Cardarelli” Hospital, Napoli (Italy); Guarnieri, Gianluigi, E-mail: gianluigiguarnieri@hotmail.it [Neuroradiology Department, “A. Cardarelli” Hospital, Napoli (Italy); Guglielmi, Giuseppe, E-mail: g.gugliemi@unifg.it [Department of Radiology, University of Foggia, Foggia (Italy); Muto, Mario, E-mail: mutomar@tiscali.it [Neuroradiology Department, “A. Cardarelli” Hospital, Napoli (Italy)

    2013-01-15

    Biomechanics, the application of mechanical principles to living organisms, helps us to understand how all the bony and soft spinal components contribute individually and together to ensure spinal stability, and how traumas, tumours and degenerative disorders exert destabilizing effects. Spine stability is the basic requirement to protect nervous structures and prevent the early mechanical deterioration of spinal components. The literature reports a number of biomechanical and clinical definitions of spinal stability, but a consensus definition is lacking. Any vertebra in each spinal motion segment, the smallest functional unit of the spine, can perform various combinations of the main and coupled movements during which a number of bony and soft restraints maintain spine stability. Bones, disks and ligaments contribute by playing a structural role and by acting as transducers through their mechanoreceptors. Mechanoreceptors send proprioceptive impulses to the central nervous system which coordinates muscle tone, movement and reflexes. Damage to any spinal structure gives rise to some degree of instability. Instability is classically considered as a global increase in the movements associated with the occurrence of back and/or nerve root pain. The assessment of spinal instability remains a major challenge for diagnostic imaging experts. Knowledge of biomechanics is essential in view of the increasing involvement of radiologists and neuroradiologists in spinal interventional procedures and the ongoing development of new techniques and devices. Bioengineers and surgeons are currently focusing on mobile stabilization systems. These systems represent a new frontier in the treatment of painful degenerative spine and aim to neutralize noxious forces, restore the normal function of spinal segments and protect the adjacent segments. This review discusses the current concepts of spine stability.

  17. Spinal Surgery Complications and Failures in Patients with Parkinsons Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapkas, George S; Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Papastathis, Elias; Tsiavos, Kostas; Igoumenou, Vasilios; Megaloikonomos, Panayiotis D; Galanopoulos, Ioannis; Soultanis, Konstantinos; Papadopoulos, Elias C; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis J

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a degenerative disorder of the central nervous system affecting the substantia nigra in the midbrain. It accounts for 1.5% of the population in Europe over 60 years of age. Recent advances in the medical treatment of Parkinson's disease have improved the quality of life and life expectancy of the patients. However, it remains a debilitating disease. Spinal disorders are frequent in these patients, and as the population ages, more patients with Parkinson's disease are expected to require spinal surgery. Spinal surgery in patients with Parkinson's disease has been associated with an exceptionally high rate of complications; failures and reoperations are common, and patient outcomes are dismal.

  18. Dexmedetomidine Attenuates Blood-Spinal Cord Barrier Disruption Induced by Spinal Cord Ischemia Reperfusion Injury in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Fang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Dexmedetomidine has beneficial effects on ischemia reperfusion (I/R injury to the spinal cord, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. This study investigated the effects and possible mechanisms of dexmedetomidine on blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB disruption induced by spinal cord I/R injury. Methods: Rats were intrathecally pretreated with dexmedetomidine or PBS control 30 minutes before undergoing 14-minute occlusion of aortic arch. Hind-limb motor function was assessed using Tarlov criteria, and motor neurons in the ventral gray matter were counted by histological examination. The permeability of the BSCB was examined using Evans blue (EB as a vascular tracer. The spinal cord edema was evaluated using the wet-dry method. The expression and localization of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9, Angiopoietin-1 (Ang1 and Tie2 were assessed by western blot, real-time polymerase chain reaction, and immunofluorescence. Results: Intrathecal preconditioning with dexmedetomidine minimized the neuromotor dysfunction and histopathological deficits, and attenuated EB extravasation after spinal cord I/R injury. In addition, dexmedetomidine preconditioning suppressed I/R-induced increase in MMP-9. Finally, Dexmedetomidine preconditioning enhanced the Ang1-Tie2 system activity after spinal cord I/R injury. Conclusions: Dexmedetomidine preconditioning stabilized the BSCB integrity against spinal cord I/R injury by inhibition of MMP-9, and enhancing the Ang1-Tie2 system.

  19. Differential diagnoses of spinal tumors; Differenzialdiagnose spinaler Tumoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilmaz, U. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2011-12-15

    A wide variety of degenerative, inflammatory and vascular diseases can resemble the clinical presentation and imaging findings of spinal tumors. This article provides an overview of the most frequent diseases which are important to recognize for diagnostic imaging of the spine. (orig.) [German] Eine Vielzahl degenerativer, entzuendlicher und vaskulaerer Erkrankungen kann das klinische Bild und radiologische Befunde spinaler Tumoren imitieren. Dieser Artikel dient der Uebersicht ueber die haeufigsten dieser Erkrankungen, deren Kenntnis wichtig fuer die spinale Bildgebung ist. (orig.)

  20. Effect of fetal spinal cord graft with different methods on axonal pathology after spinal cord contusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of fetal spinal cord (FSC) graft with different methods on axonal pathology and neurological function recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI).   Methods: Forty Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups. In Group A, the spinal cord was injured and hemisected. In Group B, fetal spinal cord (FSC) was transferred into the injured site. In Group C, after having done as Group B, the upper and lower spinal nerve roots were anastomosed. And in Group D, after having done as Group B, the pedicled omentum was transferred into the hemisection cavity. At 6 weeks after operation, light and electronic microscopes were used to examine the axonal pathology. The neurological function was assessed with inclined plane tests in the open field. The number of axons was quantitated by a computer image analysis system.   Results: A greater loss of axons was observed in Group A than that of other groups at 6 weeks. The sequence of the reduced rate of the axons was as following, Group A>Group B>Group C>Group D (P<0.05). The remaining axons were paralleled with the significant improvement in neurological function recovery of the rats.   Conclusions: It indicates that FSC and pedicled omentum grafts after SCI can protect the axons and promote the neurological function recovery of the rats.

  1. Spinal Intramedullary Metastasis of Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Recep Basaran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Breast cancer accounts for approximately one-third of all cancers in females. Approximately 8.5 % of all central nervous system metastases are located in the spinal cord. These patients have rapidly progressing neurological deficits and require immediate examination. The aim of surgery is decompression of neural tissue and histological evaluation of the tumor. In this paper, we present a case of breast cancer metastasis in thoracic spinal intramedullary area which had been partially excised and then given adjuvant radiotherapy. Case. A 43-year-old female patient with breast cancer for 8 years was admitted to our hospital with complaints of weakness in both legs. Eight years ago, she received chemotherapy and radiotherapy. On her neurological examination, she had paraparesis (left lower extremity: 2/5, right lower extremity: 3/5 and urinary incontinence. Spinal MRI revealed a gadolinium enhancing intramedullary lesion. Pathologic examination of the lesion was consistent with breast carcinoma metastasis. The patient has been taken into radiotherapy. Conclusion. Spinal intramedullary metastasis of breast cancer is an extremely rare situation, but it has a high morbidity and mortality rate. Microsurgical resection is necessary for preservation or amelioration of neurological state and also for increased life expectancy and quality.

  2. Spinal Metaplasticity in Respiratory Motor Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon S Mitchell

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A hallmark feature of the neural system controlling breathing is its ability to exhibit plasticity. Less appreciated is the ability to exhibit metaplasticity, a change in the capacity to express plasticity (ie. plastic plasticity. Recent advances in our understanding of cellular mechanisms giving rise to respiratory motor plasticity lay the groundwork for (ongoing investigations of metaplasticity. This detailed understanding of respiratory metaplasticity will be essential as we harness metaplasticity to restore breathing capacity in clinical disorders that compromise breathing, such as cervical spinal injury, motor neuron disease and other neuromuscular diseases. In this brief review, we discuss key examples of metaplasticity in respiratory motor control, and our current understanding of mechanisms giving rise to spinal plasticity and metaplasticity in phrenic motor output; particularly after pre-conditioning with intermittent hypoxia. Progress in this area has led to the realization that similar mechanisms are operative in other spinal motor networks, including those governing limb movement. Further, these mechanisms can be harnessed to restore respiratory and non-respiratory motor function after spinal injury.

  3. The Spinal Ependymal Layer in Health and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, S A

    2016-07-01

    Ependymal cells are epithelial support cells that line the central canal and ventricular cavities of the central nervous system, providing the interface between the cerebrospinal fluid and the parenchyma of the brain and spinal cord. The spinal ependymal layer (SEL) is composed of 3 main cell types: tanycytes, ependymocytes, and cerebrospinal fluid-contacting neurons. A fourth cell type, termed the supraependymal cell, is also occasionally described. Cells of the SEL show restricted proliferative capacity in health but display neural stem cell properties both in vitro and in vivo in various disease states. A growing body of literature is devoted to the regenerative roles of the SEL, particularly in the context of spinal cord injury, where mechanical damage to the spinal cord leads to a significant increase in SEL proliferation. SEL-derived cell progeny migrate to sites of injury within the injured spinal cord parenchyma and contribute primarily to glial scar formation. In additional to their role as endogenous neural stem cells, cells of the SEL may be an important source of cytokines and other cell signaling molecules, such as tumor necrosis factor, heat shock proteins, and various growth factors. The SEL has become of recent interest to neuroscience researchers because of its potential to participate in and respond to diseases affecting the spinal cord (eg, traumatic spinal cord injury) and neurodegenerative disease. The intimate association of the SEL with the cerebrospinal fluid makes intrathecal therapies a viable option, and recent studies highlight the potential promise of treatments that augment SEL responses to disease.

  4. Spinal Cord Monitoring Data in Pediatric Spinal Deformity Patients With Spinal Cord Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleem, Alexander W; Thuet, Earl D; Padberg, Anne M; Wallendorf, Michael; Luhmann, Scott J

    2015-01-01

    Retrospective. The purpose of this study is to review the efficacy of monitoring data and outcomes in pediatric patients with spinal cord pathology. The incidence of spinal cord pathology in pediatric patients with scoliosis has been reported between 3% and 20%. Previous studies demonstrated that intraoperative spinal cord monitoring (IOM) during scoliosis surgery can be reliable despite underlying pathology. A single-center retrospective review of 119 spinal surgery procedures in 82 patients with spinal cord pathology was performed. Diagnoses included Arnold-Chiari malformation, syringomyelia, myelomeningocele, spinal cord tumor, tethered cord, and diastematomyelia. Baseline neurologic function and history of prior neurosurgical intervention were identified. Outcome measures included ability to obtain reliable monitoring data during surgery and presence of postoperative neurologic deficits. Results were compared for 82 patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). Usable IOM data were obtained in 82% of cases (97/119). Twenty-two cases (18%) had no lower extremity data. Patients with Arnold-Chiari malformation or syringomyelia pathologies, in isolation or together, had a significantly higher rate of reliable data compared to other pathologies (p < .0001). Among study group cases with usable data, there were 1 false negative (1%) and 4 true positive (4%) outcomes. There were no permanent neurologic deficits. The spinal cord pathology group demonstrated 80% sensitivity and 92% specificity. Spinal cord monitoring is a valuable tool in pediatric patients with spinal cord pathology undergoing spinal deformity surgeries. When obtained, data allow to detect changes in spinal cord function. Patients with a diagnosis of Arnold-Chiari or syringomyelia have monitoring data similar to those patients with AIS. Patients with other spinal cord pathologies have less reliable data, and surgeons should have a lower threshold for performing wake-up tests to assess spinal cord

  5. Intramedullary spinal cord primitive neuroectodermal tumor presenting with hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexiou, George A; Siozos, George; Stefanaki, Kalliopi; Moschovi, Maria; Prodromou, Neofytos

    2013-02-01

    Spinal primitive neuroectodermal tumors are exceedingly rare. Herewith, we present the first case of an intramedullary spinal cord tumor associated with hydrocephalus in a 2-month-old boy that presented with left hemiparesis. The patient had been diagnosed on prenatal ultrasound with enlarged ventricular system. At his current admission, a brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed hydrocephalus and an intramedullary lesion extending from the second cervical to the first thoracic vertebrae. Dissemination of the tumor was revealed intracranially and in the spinal canal. After a ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement a radical resection of the tumor was performed, however some small tumor remnants could not be safely removed. Postoperative there was no neurologic deterioration. The tumor was diagnosed as a central nervous system primitive neuroectodermal tumor (World Health Organization grade IV). Spinal intramedullary primitive neuroectodermal tumors are extremely rare. In such rare tumors, multiinstitutional studies are needed for treatment guidelines to be established.

  6. Transverse myelitis following spinal anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jha Sanjeev

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal anesthesia is widely used during surgical procedures. It is generally safe and the frequency of severe, permanent neurological complications associated with it has been reported to be extremely low. We report a patient, who developed paraplegia following spinal anesthesia. A 29-year-old male was referred with acute, flaccid, sensory motor paraplegia, with bladder and bowel involvement. He developed this immediately after an operation for inguinal hernia under spinal anesthesia. Spinal magnetic resonance imaging revealed hemorrhagic myelitis in the conus at D12. He was referred after he did not respond to intravenous methylprednisolone for 10 days. This case brings up the difficulty encountered in determination of the interspace used for spinal anesthesia and the potential for traumatic injury to the spinal cord. It also demonstrates the tragic outcome after a clinician violates some important, standard and established guidelines.

  7. Changes in spinal alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veintemillas Aráiz, M T; Beltrán Salazar, V P; Rivera Valladares, L; Marín Aznar, A; Melloni Ribas, P; Valls Pascual, R

    2016-04-01

    Spinal misalignments are a common reason for consultation at primary care centers and specialized departments. Misalignment has diverse causes and is influenced by multiple factors: in adolescence, the most frequent misalignment is scoliosis, which is idiopathic in 80% of cases and normally asymptomatic. In adults, the most common cause is degenerative. It is important to know the natural history and to detect factors that might predict progression. The correct diagnosis of spinal deformities requires specific imaging studies. The degree of deformity determines the type of treatment. The aim is to prevent progression of the deformity and to recover the flexibility and balance of the body. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Two spinal arachnoid cysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puijlaert, J.B.C.M.; Vielvoye, G.J.; Dulken, H. van

    1985-05-01

    Two cases of spinal arachnoid cysts are reported. One is extradurally located, the other intradurally. The first is only documented with myelography, the second also by subsequent CT scanning. Some clinical and diagnostic aspects of the lesion are discussed. The aim of this report is to add two new cases to the literature and to emphasize the role of high-resolution CT scanning in the diagnosis of these lesions.

  9. Spontaneous spinal epidural abscess.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ellanti, P

    2011-10-01

    Spinal epidural abscess is an uncommon entity, the frequency of which is increasing. They occur spontaneously or as a complication of intervention. The classical triad of fever, back pain and neurological symptoms are not always present. High index of suspicion is key to diagnosis. Any delay in diagnosis and treatment can have significant neurological consequences. We present the case of a previously well man with a one month history of back pain resulting from an epidural abscess.

  10. Spinal sensory circuits in motion

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    International audience; The role of sensory feedback in shaping locomotion has been long debated. Recent advances in genetics and behavior analysis revealed the importance of proprioceptive pathways in spinal circuits. The mechanisms underlying peripheral mechanosensation enabled to unravel the networks that feedback to spinal circuits in order to modulate locomotion. Sensory inputs to the vertebrate spinal cord were long thought to originate from the periphery. Recent studies challenge this ...

  11. Pain following spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    The aims of this thesis were to assess and characterise nociceptive and neuropathic pain, the use of pharmacological and non-pharmacological pain treatment, and the influence of pain on the quality of sleep in a population following spinal cord injury (SCI). This thesis is divided into five separate studies: I. Pain in a Swedish spinal cord injury population. II. Gender related differences in pain in spinal cord injured individuals. III. Use of analgesic drugs in indi...

  12. Systemically administered interleukin-10 reduces tumor necrosis factor-alpha production and significantly improves functional recovery following traumatic spinal cord injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethea, J R; Nagashima, H; Acosta, M C; Briceno, C; Gomez, F; Marcillo, A E; Loor, K; Green, J; Dietrich, W D

    1999-10-01

    In these studies, we examined the neuroprotective effects of the potent antiinflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10) following spinal cord injury (SCI). Neuroprotection was assessed by using behavioral and morphological end points. We hypothesized that injury-induced inflammation contributes to the resulting neuropathology and subsequent loss of function. Therefore, by attenuating injury-induced inflammation, we should promote functional recovery. The New York University device was used to induce moderate SCI and study the resulting inflammatory response and functional consequences of inhibiting this response in rats. We determined that SCI induces the expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) in the spinal cord and by SCI-activated monocytes isolated from the peripheral circulation. IL-10 (5.0 microg) administered 30 minutes after-injury significantly reduced the expression of TNF-alpha protein in the spinal cord and in vitro by SCI-activated monocytes. Next, we investigated whether IL-10 would improve functional recovery after SCI. Randomized, double-blinded studies demonstrated that a single injection of IL-10 significantly improves hind limb motor function 2 months after injury, as determined by the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan (BBB) open-field behavioral test. IL-10-treated animals had a mean BBB score of 18.0+/-0.5 (SEM, n = 9) compared with a score of 12.9+/-0.6 (SEM, n = 9) for the saline-treated controls. Morphological analysis demonstrated that IL-10 reduces lesion volume by approximately 49% 2 months after injury. These data suggest that acute administration of IL-10 reduces TNF-alpha synthesis in the spinal cord and by activated macrophages, is neuroprotective, and promotes functional recovery following SCI.

  13. Fusionless instrumentation systems for congenital scoliosis: expandable spinal rods and vertical expandable prosthetic titanium rib in the management of congenital spine deformities in the growing child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazici, Muharrem; Emans, John

    2009-08-01

    Review of relevant literature including personal opinions. To review the current researches investigating the efficacy of growing rod and thoracic expansion techniques in the treatment of congenital spine deformity of young children, and to highlight the contrasting advantages and limitations in the fusionless treatment of progressive congenital scoliosis. Congenital scoliosis has the potential for severe spinal deformity and thoracic insufficiency syndrome (TIS). Conventional fusion treatments in children tend to shorten the spine further exacerbating trunk shortening and TIS. In the surgical treatment of congenital spinal deformities in young children, while reconstructing the spinal deformity, one should simultaneously pursue preserving the growth potential of the vertebrae, improving the volume, symmetry, and functions of the thorax, and protecting this improvement during the growth. Today, employed in the treatment of spinal deformities of young children, there are 2 deformity reconstruction methods serving these targets: Growing rod technique and vertical expandable prosthetic titanium rib (VEPTR) with or without expansion thoracostomy. Peer-reviewed research articles and major international meeting presentations were reviewed. Methods were compared in terms of advantages and limitations. The growing rod technique is a safe and reliable method in the treatment of congenital spine deformity of young children who present some flexibility in the anomalous segment, or when the congenital anomaly involves a vertebral segment too long for resection, or with compensating curve with structural pattern concomitant to the congenital deformity. Expansion thoracostomy and VEPTR are the appropriate choice for severe congenital spine deformity when a large amount of growth remains. Although ventilator dependence is significantly decreasing, thoracic volume and space available for the lung are increased after expansion thoracostomy and VEPTR. Growing rod technique should be

  14. Spinal dysraphism: MR imaging rationale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, A; Cama, A; Piatelli, G; Ravegnani, M; Biancheri, R; Tortori-Donati, P

    2004-01-01

    Spinal cord development occurs through the three consecutive periods of gastrulation (weeks 2-3), primary neurulation (weeks 3-4), and secondary neurulation (weeks 5-6). Spinal cord malformations derive from defects in these early embryonic stages, and are collectively called spinal dysraphisms. Spinal dysraphisms may be categorized clinically into open and closed, based on whether the abnormal nervous tissue is exposed to the environment or covered by skin. Open spinal dysraphisms include myelomeningocele and other rare abnormalities such as myelocele, hemimyelomeningocele, and hemimyelocele, and are always associated with a Chiari II malformation. Closed spinal dysraphisms are further divided into two subsets based on whether a subcutaneous mass is present in the low back. Closed spinal dysraphisms with mass comprise lipomyelocele, lipomyelomeningocele, meningocele, and myelocystocele. Closed spinal dysraphisms without mass comprise simple dysraphic states (tight filum terminale, filar and intradural lipomas, persistent terminal ventricle, and dermal sinuses) and complex dysraphic states. The latter category involves abnormal notochordal development, either in the form of failed midline integration (ranging from complete dorsal enteric fistula to neurenteric cysts and diastematomyelia) or of segmental agenesis (caudal agenesis and spinal segmental dysgenesis). Magnetic resonance imaging is the imaging modality of choice for evaluation of this complex group of disorders.

  15. Altered activation patterns by triceps surae stretch reflex pathways in acute and chronic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frigon, Alain; Johnson, Michael D; Heckman, C J

    2011-10-01

    Spinal reflexes are modified by spinal cord injury (SCI) due the loss of excitatory inputs from supraspinal structures and changes within the spinal cord. The stretch reflex is one of the simplest pathways of the central nervous system and was used presently to evaluate how inputs from primary and secondary muscle spindles interact with spinal circuits before and after spinal transection (i.e., spinalization) in 12 adult decerebrate cats. Seven cats were spinalized and allowed to recover for 1 mo (i.e., chronic spinal state), whereas 5 cats were evaluated before (i.e., intact state) and after acute spinalization (i.e., acute spinal state). Stretch reflexes were evoked by stretching the left triceps surae (TS) muscles. The force evoked by TS muscles was recorded along with the activity of several hindlimb muscles. Stretch reflexes were abolished in the acute spinal state due to an inability to activate TS muscles, such as soleus (Sol) and lateral gastrocnemius (LG). In chronic spinal cats, reflex force had partly recovered but Sol and LG activity remained considerably depressed, despite the fact that injecting clonidine could recruit these muscles during locomotor-like activity. In contrast, other muscles not recruited in the intact state, most notably semitendinosus and sartorius, were strongly activated by stretching TS muscles in chronic spinal cats. Therefore, stretch reflex pathways from TS muscles to multiple hindlimb muscles undergo functional reorganization following spinalization, both acute and chronic. Altered activation patterns by stretch reflex pathways could explain some sensorimotor deficits observed during locomotion and postural corrections after SCI.

  16. Spinal epidural abscess in brucellosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyaci, Ahmet; Boyaci, Nurefsan; Tutoglu, Ahmet; Dokumaci, Dilek Sen

    2013-09-26

    Involvement of the skeletal system is a common complication of brucellosis. However, muscle involvement or paraspinal abscess formation are rare complications. Paraspinal abscess usually develops secondary to spondylitis. A case is reported here of a 33-year-old woman with symptoms of night sweats, fever and low back pain. Rose-Bengal test for brucellosis was positive and Brucella standard tube agglutination test was positive at a titre of 1/160. The diagnosis was made on MRI. The patient was treated with doxycycline and rifampin daily for 16 weeks. On day 14 of treatment, decline was observed in the patient's symptoms. In the presence of inflammatory lower back pain and fever, brucellosis should be considered particularly in the endemic areas. Furthermore, tuberculosis should be remembered in the differential diagnosis when a spinal epidural abscess is determined.

  17. Transient neurological symptoms after spinal anesthesia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Muhammet Gozdemir; Bunyamin Muslu; Huseyin Sert; Burhanettin Usta; Ruveyda Irem Demircioglu; Hulya Kasikara

    2016-01-01

    ...) after spinal anesthesia with levobupivacaine, bupivacaine, articaine or lidocaine. The patients (n=400) were randomly assigned to receive spinal anesthesia with levobupivacaine, bupivacaine, articaine or isobaric lidocaine...

  18. Muscular, skeletal, and neural adaptations following spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Richard K

    2002-02-01

    Spinal cord injury is associated with adaptations to the muscular, skeletal, and spinal systems. Experimental data are lacking regarding the extent to which rehabilitative methods may influence these adaptations. An understanding of the plasticity of the muscular, skeletal, and spinal systems after paralysis may be important as new rehabilitative technologies emerge in the 21st century. Moreover, individuals injured today may become poor candidates for future scientific advancements (cure) if their neuromusculoskeletal systems are irreversibly impaired. The primary purpose of this paper is to explore the physiological properties of skeletal muscle as a result of spinal cord injury; secondarily, to consider associated changes at the skeletal and spinal levels. Muscular adaptations include a transformation to faster myosin, increased contractile speeds, shift to the right on the torque-frequency curve, increased fatigue, and enhanced doublet potentiation. These muscular adaptations may be prevented in individuals with acute paralysis and partially reversed in individuals with chronic paralysis. Moreover, the muscular changes may be coordinated with motor unit and spinal circuitry adaptations. Concurrently, skeletal adaptations, as measured by bone mineral density, show extensive loss within the first six months after paralysis. The underlying science governing neuromusculoskeletal adaptations after paralysis will help guide professionals as new rehabilitation strategies evolve in the future.

  19. Viabilidade de células do sistema nervoso central fetal no tratamento da lesão medular em ratos Viability of fetal central nervous system cells in the treatment of spinal cord injury in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Fogaça Cristante

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Propor um modelo experimental de transplante de células do sistema nervoso fetal de ratos Wistar para o sítio de lesão medular de ratos adultos que permitisse sua sobrevivência e integração para possibilitar protocolos de pesquisa que identificarão outros fatores de regeneração e recuperação funcional pós trauma raquimedular. MÉTODOS: Vinte ratos adultos foram submetidos a laminectomia, e lesão de 5mm de hemimedula realizada com auxílio de microscópio óptico. Quinze deste ratos tiveram seu sítio de lesão medular transplantado com células do sistema nervoso central de fetos de rato; os ratos foram monitorados por 2 dias e tiveram sua coluna vertebral extraída para análise histológica. RESULTADOS: Evidenciou-se que em 60% dos casos as células transplantadas permaneciam viáveis no sítio da lesão e que a reação inflamatória no grupo transplantado era sempre maior que no grupo controle. CONCLUSÃO: O presente trabalho demonstrou a possibilidade de contar com o modelo de pesquisa para transplante de células fetais que permanecem viáveis 2 dias após seu implante.OBJECTIVE: To propose an experimental model for transplantation of fetal cells from the nervous system of Wistar rats to the site of spinal cord injury in adult rats, to enable their survival and integration for research protocols that identify other factors of regeneration and functional recovery following spinal cord trauma. METHODS: Twenty adult rats were submitted to laminectomy and a 5mm incision was made, using an optical microscope, In fifteen of these rats, the site of the spinal cord lesion was transplanted with cells from the fetal rat central nervous system; the rats were monitored for two days, then the spinal cord was removed for histological analysis. RESULTS: In 60% of cases, the transplanted cells remained viable in the site of the lesion; the inflammatory response in the transplanted group was always greater than in the control group

  20. Medicolegal cases for spinal epidural hematoma and spinal epidural abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Keisha L; Daniels, Eldra W; Ahn, Uri M; Ahn, Nicholas U

    2013-01-01

    Spinal epidural hematoma and spinal epidural abscess are rare surgical emergencies resulting in significant neurologic deficits. Making the diagnosis for spinal epidural hematoma and spinal epidural abscess can be challenging; however, a delay in recognition and treatment can be devastating. The objective of this retrospective analysis study was to identify risk factors for an adverse outcome for the provider. The LexisNexis Academic legal search database was used to identify a total of 19 cases of spinal epidural hematoma and spinal epidural abscess filed against medical providers. Outcome data on trial verdicts, age, sex, initial site of injury, time to consultation, time to appropriate imaging studies, time to surgery, and whether a rectal examination was performed or not were recorded. The results demonstrated a significant association between time to surgery more than 48 hours and an unfavorable verdict for the provider. The degree of permanent neurologic impairment did not appear to affect the verdicts. Fifty-eight percent of the cases did not present with an initial deficit, including loss of bowel or bladder control. All medical professionals must maintain a high level of suspicion and act quickly. Physicians who are able to identify early clinical features, appropriately image, and treat within a 48 hour time frame have demonstrated a more favorable medicolegal outcome compared with their counterparts in filed lawsuits for spinal epidural hematoma and spinal epidural abscess cases.

  1. Performance of a closed-loop feedback computer-controlled infusion system for maintaining blood pressure during spinal anaesthesia for caesarean section: a randomized controlled comparison of norepinephrine versus phenylephrine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngan Kee, Warwick D; Khaw, Kim S; Tam, Yuk-Ho; Ng, Floria F; Lee, Shara W

    2017-06-01

    Closed-loop feedback computer-controlled vasopressor infusion has been previously described for maintaining blood pressure during spinal anaesthesia for caesarean section but there are limited data available comparing the relative performance of different vasopressors. The aim of this study was to compare the performance of norepinephrine versus phenylephrine in this system. Data from a randomized, two-arm parallel group, double-blinded controlled trial were reanalyzed. 104 patients scheduled for elective caesarean section under spinal anaesthesia were randomized to receive computer-controlled closed-loop infusion of either norepinephrine 5 µg ml(-1) or phenylephrine 100 µg ml(-1). This was started immediately after induction of spinal anaesthesia and used an algorithm designed to maintain systolic blood pressure near baseline until fetal delivery. Performance error calculations were used to compare the performance of the two vasopressors. The primary outcome was defined as the median absolute performance error. Median performance error, wobble and divergence were also compared. Median absolute performance error was smaller in the norepinephrine group (median 3.79 [interquartile range 2.82-5.17] %) versus the phenylephrine group (4.70 [3.23-6.57] %, P = 0.028). In addition, median performance error was smaller (0.75 [-1.56-2.52] %) versus 2.61 [0.83-4.57] %, P = 0.002) and wobble was smaller (2.85 [2.07-5.17] %) versus 3.39 [2.62-4.90] %, P = 0.028) in the norepinephrine group versus the phenylephrine group. Divergence was similar between groups. The precision of the control of blood pressure was greater with norepinephrine compared with phenylephrine at the drug concentrations used.

  2. Surgical treatment of lumbar spinal canal stenosis%腰椎椎管狭窄症的外科治疗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庞晓东; 彭宝淦; 杨洪; 李端明; 高春华

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨腰椎椎管狭窄症外科治疗的临床疗效.方法 回顾性研究手术治疗退变性腰椎椎管狭窄患者共172例,其中10例有脊柱侧凸改变,22例I~Ⅱ度滑脱.单节段狭窄者90例,双节段狭窄者51例,3个节段狭窄者31例.采用单纯开窗减压者5例,后路融合固定者100例,后路椎间融合固定62例,Dynesys弹性内固定5例.临床疗效评定采用疼痛视觉模拟量表(visual analogue scale,VAS)评分,功能评分采用北美脊柱外科学会改良腰椎功能障碍指数(modified Oswestry low back pain disability questionaire index,MODI),从腰腿痛、生活自理、行走和举重物等10个方面评估患者腰椎的ODI分数.结果 所有病例随访6~72个月,平均50个月.术前腰腿痛平均评分为7.5分,术后3个月为3.2分,末次随访时为3.6分.术后3个月随访,MODI改善的优良率为94.3%;末次随访时优良率为87.6%.结论 对退行性腰椎椎管狭窄根据术前临床及影像学检查,有针对性地进行椎管减压或联合椎弓根螺钉内固定治疗均可取得较好疗效.%Objective To evaluate the clinical outcomes of surgical treatment for the patients with degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis ( DLSS ). Methods A retrospective study was conducted with a total of 172 DLSS patients who underwent decompression surgery with or without arthrodesis. The patients included 90 with single segment stenosis, 51 with double stenoses, and 31 with triple stenosis. Ten of the patients also had scoliosis and 22 had Ⅰ - Ⅱ degrees of spondylolysis. Five patients underwent simple decompression, 100 patients underwent posterior spinal fusion and fixation, 62 underwent posterior spinal fusion and fixation, and 5 underwent Dynesys semirigid fixation. The symptom relief and function improvement were assessed with a visual analogue scale ( VAS ) and modified Oswestry low back pain disability questionaire index ( MODI ), respectively. Results The patients were followed-up for 6

  3. Problems of sexual function after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Stacy L

    2006-01-01

    Sex is a legitimate and fundamental need in humans. Substantial changes to both the autonomic and somatic nervous system occur after spinal cord injury, and result in altered sexual function and fertility potential. This chapter provides a clinical overview of the main sexual and reproductive concerns and priorities men and women face after spinal cord injury. Besides genital functioning, other autonomic functions affect sexuality, such as bladder and bowel function, cardiovascular control and temperature regulation. These interlinked autonomic functions are presented in their impact on sexuality. The mind-body interaction and spinal feedback loops are discussed. It is proposed that human sexuality after spinal cord injury can be a model for investigating integrated autonomic function. Recent research on the measurement of cardiovascular parameters during vibrostimulation and ejaculation demonstrates the discordance between objective and subjective signs of autonomic dysreflexia. It is hoped that health care professionals and researchers will become motivated to attend to the unmet sexual health care needs of this population.

  4. Optical measurement of blood flow changes in spinal cord injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, J P; Kyriacou, P A [Biomedical Engineering Research Group, City University London, Northampton Square, London (United Kingdom); George, K J [Neuroscience Centre, Queen Mary, University of London, Mile End, London (United Kingdom); Langford, R M, E-mail: justin.phillips.1@city.ac.u [Pain and Anaesthesia Research Centre, St Bartholomew' s Hospital, West Smithfield, London (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-01

    Little is known about cell death in spinal cord tissue following compression injury, despite compression being a key component of spinal injuries. Currently models are used to mimic compression injury in animals and the effects of the compression evaluated by observing the extent and duration of recovery of normal motor function in the days and weeks following the injury. A fibreoptic photoplethysmography system was used to investigate whether pulsation of the small arteries in the spinal cord occurred before, during and after compressive loads were applied to the tissue. It was found that the signal amplitudes were reduced and this reduction persisted for at least five minutes after the compression ceased. It is hoped that results from this preliminary study may improve knowledge of the mechanism of spinal cord injury.

  5. Posterior spinal artery aneurysm rupture after 'Ecstasy' abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jeremiah; Patel, Shnehal; Saraf-Lavi, Efrat; Aziz-Sultan, Mohammad Ali; Yavagal, Dileep R

    2015-07-01

    Posterior spinal artery (PSA) aneurysms are a rare cause of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The commonly abused street drug 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) or 'Ecstasy' has been linked to both systemic and neurological complications. A teenager presented with neck stiffness, headaches and nausea after ingesting 'Ecstasy'. A brain CT was negative for SAH but a CT angiogram suggested cerebral vasculitis. A lumbar puncture showed SAH but a cerebral angiogram was negative. After a spinal MR angiogram identified abnormalities on the dorsal surface of the cervical spinal cord, a spinal angiogram demonstrated a left PSA 2 mm fusiform aneurysm. The patient underwent surgery and the aneurysmal portion of the PSA was excised without postoperative neurological sequelae. 'Ecstasy' can lead to neurovascular inflammation, intracranial hemorrhage, SAH and potentially even de novo aneurysm formation and subsequent rupture. PSA aneurysms may be treated by endovascular proximal vessel occlusion or open surgical excision.

  6. Gene therapy approaches for spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, Corinne

    As the biomedical engineering field expands, combination technologies are demonstrating enormous potential for treating human disease. In particular, intersections between the rapidly developing fields of gene therapy and tissue engineering hold promise to achieve tissue regeneration. Nonviral gene therapy uses plasmid DNA to deliver therapeutic proteins in vivo for extended periods of time. Tissue engineering employs biomedical materials, such as polymers, to support the regrowth of injured tissue. In this thesis, a combination strategy to deliver genes and drugs in a polymeric scaffold was applied to a spinal cord injury model. In order to develop a platform technology to treat spinal cord injury, several nonviral gene delivery systems and polymeric scaffolds were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Nonviral vector trafficking was evaluated in primary neuronal culture to develop an understanding of the barriers to gene transfer in neurons and their supporting glia. Although the most efficient gene carrier in vitro differed from the optimal gene carrier in vivo, confocal and electron microscopy of these nonviral vectors provided insights into the interaction of these vectors with the nucleus. A novel pathway for delivering nanoparticles into the nuclei of neurons and Schwann cells via vesicle trafficking was observed in this study. Reporter gene expression levels were evaluated after direct and remote delivery to the spinal cord, and the optimal nonviral vector, dose, and delivery strategy were applied to deliver the gene encoding the basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) to the spinal cord. An injectable and biocompatible gel, composed of the amphiphillic polymer poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(epsilon-caprolactone)-poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG-PCL-PEG) was evaluated as a drug and gene delivery system in vitro, and combined with the optimized nonviral gene delivery system to treat spinal cord injury. Plasmid DNA encoding the bFGF gene and the therapeutic NEP1--40 peptide

  7. Biomarkers in spinal cord injury.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pouw, M.H.; Hosman, A.J.F.; Middendorp, J.J. van; Verbeek, M.M.; Vos, P.E.; Meent, H. van de

    2009-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Literature review. OBJECTIVES: In traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI), much effort has been put into the evaluation of SCI severity and the prediction of recovery potential. An accurate prediction of the initial damage of the spinal cord that differentiates between the severities of SCI

  8. Role of Intrinsic and Reflexive Dynamics in the Control of Spinal Stability

    OpenAIRE

    Moorhouse, Kevin Michael

    2005-01-01

    Role of Intrinsic and Reflexive Dynamics in the Control of Spinal Stability Kevin M. Moorhouse Abstract Spinal stability describes the ability of the neuromuscular system to maintain equilibrium in the presence of kinematic and control variability, and may play an important role in the etiology of low-back disorders (LBDs). The primary mechanism for the neuromuscular control of spinal stability is the recruitment and control of active paraspinal muscle stiffness (i.e., trunk stif...

  9. Safety and tolerance of the ReWalk™ exoskeleton suit for ambulation by people with complete spinal cord injury: a pilot study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zeilig, Gabi; Weingarden, Harold; Zwecker, Manuel; Dudkiewicz, Israel; Bloch, Ayala; Esquenazi, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    ...™ exoskeleton ambulation system in people with spinal cord injury. Measures of functional ambulation were also assessed and correlated to neurological spinal cord level, age, and duration since injury...

  10. Cerebral activation is correlated to regional atrophy of the spinal cord and functional motor disability in spinal cord injured individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundell, Henrik; Christensen, Mark Schram; Barthélemy, Dorothy

    2011-01-01

    Recovery of function following lesions in the nervous system requires adaptive changes in surviving circuitries. Here we investigate whether changes in cerebral activation are correlated to spinal cord atrophy and recovery of functionality in individuals with incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI). 19...... in the tibialis anterior muscle elicited by transcranial magnetic stimulation, but this did not reach statistical significance. There was no correlation between motor score or spinal cord dimensions and the volume of the cortical motor areas. The observations show that lesion of descending tracts in the lateral...... to the width of the spinal cord in the left-right direction, where the corticospinal tract is located, but not in the antero-posterior direction. There was a tendency for a negative correlation between cerebral activation in ipsilateral S1, M1 and PMC and the amplitude of motor evoked potentials...

  11. Totally ossified metaplastic spinal meningioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Chang Il; Hida, Kazutoshi; Yamauchi, Tomohiro; Houkin, Kiyohiro

    2013-09-01

    A 61-year-old woman with a very rare case of totally ossified large thoracic spinal metaplastic meningioma, showing progressing myelopathy is presented. Computed tomographic images showed a large totally ossfied intradural round mass occupying the spinal canal on T9-10 level. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large T9-10 intradural extramedullary mass that was hypointense to spinal cord on T1- and T2-weighted sequences, partial enhancement was apparent after Gadolinium administration. The spinal cord was severely compressed and displaced toward the right at the level of T9-10. Surgical removal of the tumor was successfully accomplished via the posterior midline approach and the histological diagnosis verified an ossified metaplastic meningioma. The clinical neurological symptoms of patient were improved postoperatively. In this article we discuss the surgical and pathological aspects of rare case of spinal totally ossified metaplastic meningioma.

  12. [Extradural spinal meningioma: case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagain, A; Dulou, R; Lahutte, M; Dutertre, G; Pouit, B; Delmas, J-M; Camparo, P; Pernot, P

    2009-12-01

    We report a case of purely extradural spinal meningioma and discuss the potential pitfalls in differential diagnosis. Spinal meningiomas account for 20-30% of all spinal neoplasms. Epidural meningiomas are infrequent intraspinal tumors that can be easily confused with malignant neoplasms or spinal schwannomas. A 62-year-old man with a previous history of malignant disease presented with back pain and weakness of the lower limbs. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a well-enhanced T4 intraspinal lesion. The intraoperative histological examination showed a meningioma (confirmed by postoperative examination). Opening the dura mater confirmed the purely epidural location of the lesion. The postoperative course was uneventful with no recurrence 12 months after surgery. Purely extradural spinal meningiomas can mimic metastatic tumors or schwannomas. Intraoperative histology is mandatory for optimal surgical decision making.

  13. The CanPain SCI Clinical Practice Guideline for Rehabilitation Management of Neuropathic Pain after Spinal Cord: recommendations for model systems of care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guy, S D; Mehta, S; Harvey, D;

    2016-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Clinical practice guidelines. OBJECTIVES: The project objectives were to develop the first Canadian recommendations on a model of care for the management of at- and below-level neuropathic pain in people with spinal cord injury (SCI). SETTING: The guidelines are relevant for inpatient...... process. RESULTS: The Working Group developed five recommendations for the organization of neuropathic pain rehabilitation care in people with SCI. CONCLUSIONS: The Working Group recommendations for a model of care for at- and below-level neuropathic pain after SCI should be used to inform clinical...

  14. Central nervous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    The central nervous system is composed of the brain and spinal cord. Your brain and spinal cord serve as the main "processing center" for your entire nervous system. They control all the workings of your body.

  15. Attitudes Towards Individuals with Spinal Cord Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Cassandra Sligh D.; Gooden, Randy; Nowell, Jennifer; Wilson, Navodda

    2010-01-01

    This paper will shed light on the lives of persons with spinal cord injuries by revealing the literature on spinal cord injuries that focuses on research that can shed light on attitudes towards persons with spinal cord injuries. The background literature related to incidences, the definition of spinal cord injury, and vocational opportunities are…

  16. Phrenic nerve afferents elicited cord dorsum potential in the cat cervical spinal cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davenport Paul W

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The diaphragm has sensory innervation from mechanoreceptors with myelinated axons entering the spinal cord via the phrenic nerve that project to the thalamus and somatosensory cortex. It was hypothesized that phrenic nerve afferent (PnA projection to the central nervous system is via the spinal dorsal column pathway. Results A single N1 peak of the CDP was found in the C4 and C7 spinal segments. Three peaks (N1, N2, and N3 were found in the C5 and C6 segments. No CDP was recorded at C8 dorsal spinal cord surface in cats. Conclusion These results demonstrate PnA activation of neurons in the cervical spinal cord. Three populations of myelinated PnA (Group I, Group II, and Group III enter the cat's cervical spinal segments that supply the phrenic nerve

  17. Restoring function after spinal cord injury: towards clinical translation of experimental strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramer, Leanne M; Ramer, Matt S; Bradbury, Elizabeth J

    2014-12-01

    Spinal cord injury is currently incurable and treatment is limited to minimising secondary complications and maximising residual function by rehabilitation. Improved understanding of the pathophysiology of spinal cord injury and the factors that prevent nerve and tissue repair has fuelled a move towards more ambitious experimental treatments aimed at promoting neuroprotection, axonal regeneration, and neuroplasticity. By necessity, these new options are more invasive. However, in view of recent advances in spinal cord injury research and demand from patients, clinicians, and the scientific community to push promising experimental treatments to the clinic, momentum and optimism exist for the translation of candidate experimental treatments to clinical spinal cord injury. The ability to rescue, reactivate, and rewire spinal systems to restore function after spinal cord injury might soon be within reach. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Ependymal variations in the caudal spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoltenburg-Didinger, G; Bienentreu, R

    1981-01-01

    The lumbosacral spinal cord including the cauda equina was examined in 100 unselected autopsied cases of infants dying at or near term. A striking finding in 10% of these cases was the occurrence of bilateral collections of ependymal cells lying in rows on the surface of the lumbosacral cord. In another 25% the central canal was forked or duplicate. These foci were not associated with evidence of defective neural tube closure or spina bifida; the central canal was of normal length. There was no relationship between the ependymal structures and systemic clinical or pathological findings. The pathogenesis and significance of these lesions is unclear. Our observations suggest that they occur regularly and are not associated with neurological disturbances. The relationship of the ependymal cell collections to ependymomas of the caudal spinal cord is open to speculation.

  19. Spinal manipulative therapy in sports medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldeman, S

    1986-04-01

    Spinal manipulation or manual therapy is becoming an increasingly popular method of treating athletes with spinal problems. The primary theoretic basis for the claimed beneficial results of manipulation is the restoration of motion with subsequent effect on ligamentous adhesions, muscle spasm, disk nutrition, and central nervous system endorphin systems. The concept of joint barriers has been developed to differentiate among exercise therapy, mobilization, and manipulation. Research trials suggest that spinal manipulation is beneficial in relieving or reducing the duration of acute low back pain and acute neck pain but has much less effect on chronic low back pain and neck pain. There is evidence that manipulation increases certain parameters of motion of the spine but this evidence is not yet conclusive. There are a wide variety of manipulative procedures that are utilized to manipulate the spine to increase range of motion, and the selection of the procedures is based on manual diagnostic skills. Manipulation, however, is not a benign procedure and has been implicated in the aggravation of disk herniation or bony fractures as well as the precipitation of vertebrobasilar artery occlusion.

  20. Computed tomographic evaluation of lumbar spinal structures during traction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Hidayet; Akarirmak, Ulkü; Karacan, Ilhan; Akman, Haluk

    2005-01-01

    In the previous studies, it is reported that traction diminishes the compressive load on intervertebral discs, reduces herniation, stretches lumbar spinal muscle and ligaments, decreases muscle spasm, and widens intervertebral foramina. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of horizontal motorized static traction on spinal anatomic structures (herniated area, spinal canal area, intervertebral disc heights, neural foraminal diameter, and m.psoas diameter) by quantitative measures in patients with lumbar disc herniation (LDH). At the same time the effect of traction in different localizations (median and posterolateral herniation) and at different levels (L4-L5 and L5-S1) was assessed. Thirty two patients with acute LDH participated in the study. A special traction system was used to apply horizontally-motorized static lumbar traction. Before and during traction a CT- scan was made to observe the changes in the area of spinal canal and herniated disc material, in the width of neural foramina, intervertebral disc heights, and in the thickness of psoas muscle. During traction, the area of protruded disc area, and the thickness of psoas muscle decreased 24.5% (p = 0.0001), and 5.7% (p = 0.0001), respectively. The area of the spinal canal and the width of the neural foramen increased 21.6% (p = 0.0001) and 26.7% (p = 0.0001), respectively. The anterior intervertebral disc height remained unchanged with traction however the posterior intervertebral disc height was significantly expanded. This study is the first to evaluated in detail and quantitatively the effect of motorized horizontal lumbar spinal traction on spinal structures and herniated area. According to detailed measures it was concluded that during traction of individuals with acute LDH there was a reduction of the size of the herniation, increased space within the spinal canal, widening of the neural foramina, and decreased thickness of the psoas muscle.

  1. Immediate Return to Ambulation and Improved Functional Capacity for Rehabilitation in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome following Early Implantation of a Spinal Cord Stimulation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon Jesse Goff

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS is a neuropathic pain condition that is characterized by vasomotor, sensory, sudomotor, and motor symptoms. Spinal cord stimulation (SCS has been successfully utilized for the treatment of pain refractory to conventional therapies. We present a case of a previously highly functioning 54-year-old female who developed a rarely reported case of idiopathic CRPS of the right ankle which spontaneously occurred four months after an uncomplicated anterior cervical disc fusion. This condition resulted in severe pain and functional impairment that was unresponsive to pharmacological management. The patient’s rehabilitation was severely stymied by her excruciating pain. However, with the initiation of spinal cord stimulation, her pain was adequately controlled allowing for progression to full unassisted ambulation, advancing functional capacity, and improving quality of life. This case report supports the concept that rapid progression to neuromodulation, rather than delays that occur due to attempts at serial sympathetic blocks, may better control symptoms leading allowing for a more meaningful recovery.

  2. Structural and Functional Substitution of Deleted Primary Sensory Neurons by New Growth from Intrinsic Spinal Cord Nerve Cells: An Alternative Concept in Reconstruction of Spinal Cord Circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas D. James

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In a recent clinical report, return of the tendon stretch reflex was demonstrated after spinal cord surgery in a case of total traumatic brachial plexus avulsion injury. Peripheral nerve grafts had been implanted into the spinal cord to reconnect to the peripheral nerves for motor and sensory function. The dorsal root ganglia (DRG containing the primary sensory nerve cells had been surgically removed in order for secondary or spinal cord sensory neurons to extend into the periphery and replace the deleted DRG neurons. The present experimental study uses a rat injury model first to corroborate the clinical finding of a re-established spinal reflex arch, and second, to elucidate some of the potential mechanisms underlying these findings by means of morphological, immunohistochemical, and electrophysiological assessments. Our findings indicate that, after spinal cord surgery, the central nervous system sensory system could replace the traumatically detached original peripheral sensory connections through new neurite growth from dendrites.

  3. Termination of vestibulospinal fibers arising from the spinal vestibular nucleus in the mouse spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, H; Bácskai, T; Paxinos, G

    2015-05-21

    The present study investigated the vestibulospinal system which originates from the spinal vestibular nucleus (SpVe) with both retrograde and anterograde tracer injections. We found that fluoro-gold (FG) labeled neurons were found bilaterally with a contralateral predominance after FG injections into the upper lumbar cord. Anterogradely labeled fibers from the rostral SpVe traveled in the medial part of the ventral funiculus ipsilaterally and the dorsolateral funiculus bilaterally in the cervical cord. They mainly terminated in laminae 5-8, and 10 of the ipsilateral spinal cord. The contralateral side had fewer fibers and they were found in laminae 6-8, and 10. In the thoracic cord, fibers were also found to terminate in bilateral intermediolateral columns. In the lumbar and lower cord, fibers were mainly found in the dorsolateral funiculus bilaterally and they terminated predominantly in laminae 3-7 contralaterally. Anterogradely labeled fibers from the caudal SpVe did not travel in the medial part of the ventral funiculus but in the dorsolateral funiculus bilaterally. They mainly terminated in laminae 3-8 and 10 contralaterally. The present study is the first to describe the termination of vestibulospinal fibers arising from the SpVe in the spinal cord. It will lay the anatomical foundation for those who investigate the physiological role of vestibulospinal fibers and potentially target these fibers during rehabilitation after stroke, spinal cord injury, or vestibular organ injury.

  4. The Relationship Between Cervical Degeneration and Global Spinal Alignment in Patients With Adult Spinal Deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimori, Takahito; Le, Hai; Schairer, William; Inoue, Shinichi; Iwasaki, Motoki; Oda, Takenori; Hu, Serena S

    2017-05-01

    To examine the relationship between cervical degeneration and spinal alignment by comparing patients with adult spinal deformity versus the control cohort. The effect of degeneration on cervical alignment has been controversial. Cervical and full-length spine radiographs of 57 patients with adult spinal deformity and 78 patients in the control group were reviewed. Adult spinal deformity was classified into 3 types based on the primary characteristics of the deformity: "Degenerative flatback" group, "Positive sagittal imbalance" group, and "Hyperthoracic kyphosis" group. Cervical degeneration was assessed using the cervical degeneration index scoring system. The "Degenerative flatback" group had significantly higher total cervical degeneration index score (25±7) than the control group (16±8), the "Positive sagittal imbalance" group (18±8), and the "Hyperthoracic kyphosis" group (12±7) (Psagittal imbalance" group (20±15 degrees) and the "Hyperthoracic kyphosis" group (26±9 degrees) compared with the control group (11±12 degrees) (PFlat cervical spine coexisted with cervical degeneration when compensatory hypothoracic kyphosis was induced by degenerative flatback. In other situations, cervical lordosis could increase as a compensatory reaction against sagittal imbalance or hyperthoracic kyphosis.

  5. Thoracic rat spinal cord contusion injury induces remote spinal gliogenesis but not neurogenesis or gliogenesis in the brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Franz

    Full Text Available After spinal cord injury, transected axons fail to regenerate, yet significant, spontaneous functional improvement can be observed over time. Distinct central nervous system regions retain the capacity to generate new neurons and glia from an endogenous pool of progenitor cells and to compensate neural cell loss following certain lesions. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether endogenous cell replacement (neurogenesis or gliogenesis in the brain (subventricular zone, SVZ; corpus callosum, CC; hippocampus, HC; and motor cortex, MC or cervical spinal cord might represent a structural correlate for spontaneous locomotor recovery after a thoracic spinal cord injury. Adult Fischer 344 rats received severe contusion injuries (200 kDyn of the mid-thoracic spinal cord using an Infinite Horizon Impactor. Uninjured rats served as controls. From 4 to 14 days post-injury, both groups received injections of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU to label dividing cells. Over the course of six weeks post-injury, spontaneous recovery of locomotor function occurred. Survival of newly generated cells was unaltered in the SVZ, HC, CC, and the MC. Neurogenesis, as determined by identification and quantification of doublecortin immunoreactive neuroblasts or BrdU/neuronal nuclear antigen double positive newly generated neurons, was not present in non-neurogenic regions (MC, CC, and cervical spinal cord and unaltered in neurogenic regions (dentate gyrus and SVZ of the brain. The lack of neuronal replacement in the brain and spinal cord after spinal cord injury precludes any relevance for spontaneous recovery of locomotor function. Gliogenesis was increased in the cervical spinal cord remote from the injury site, however, is unlikely to contribute to functional improvement.

  6. Thoracic rat spinal cord contusion injury induces remote spinal gliogenesis but not neurogenesis or gliogenesis in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Steffen; Ciatipis, Mareva; Pfeifer, Kathrin; Kierdorf, Birthe; Sandner, Beatrice; Bogdahn, Ulrich; Blesch, Armin; Winner, Beate; Weidner, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    After spinal cord injury, transected axons fail to regenerate, yet significant, spontaneous functional improvement can be observed over time. Distinct central nervous system regions retain the capacity to generate new neurons and glia from an endogenous pool of progenitor cells and to compensate neural cell loss following certain lesions. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether endogenous cell replacement (neurogenesis or gliogenesis) in the brain (subventricular zone, SVZ; corpus callosum, CC; hippocampus, HC; and motor cortex, MC) or cervical spinal cord might represent a structural correlate for spontaneous locomotor recovery after a thoracic spinal cord injury. Adult Fischer 344 rats received severe contusion injuries (200 kDyn) of the mid-thoracic spinal cord using an Infinite Horizon Impactor. Uninjured rats served as controls. From 4 to 14 days post-injury, both groups received injections of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) to label dividing cells. Over the course of six weeks post-injury, spontaneous recovery of locomotor function occurred. Survival of newly generated cells was unaltered in the SVZ, HC, CC, and the MC. Neurogenesis, as determined by identification and quantification of doublecortin immunoreactive neuroblasts or BrdU/neuronal nuclear antigen double positive newly generated neurons, was not present in non-neurogenic regions (MC, CC, and cervical spinal cord) and unaltered in neurogenic regions (dentate gyrus and SVZ) of the brain. The lack of neuronal replacement in the brain and spinal cord after spinal cord injury precludes any relevance for spontaneous recovery of locomotor function. Gliogenesis was increased in the cervical spinal cord remote from the injury site, however, is unlikely to contribute to functional improvement.

  7. Epidural lipomatosis and congenital small spinal canal in spinal anaesthesia: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flisberg Per

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Complications after lumbar anaesthesia and epidural blood patch have been described in patients with congenital small spinal canal and increased epidural fat or epidural lipomatosis. These conditions, whether occurring separately or in combination, require magnetic resonance imaging for diagnosis and grading, but their clinical significance is still unclear. Case presentation A 35-year-old Caucasian woman who was undergoing a Caesarean section developed a longstanding L4-L5 unilateral neuropathy after the administration of spinal anaesthesia. There were several attempts to correctly position the needle, one of which resulted in paraesthesia. A magnetic resonance image revealed that the patient's bony spinal canal was congenitally small and had excess epidural fat. The cross-sectional area of the dural sac was then reduced, which left practically no free cerebrospinal fluid space. Conclusion The combination of epidural lipomatosis of varying degrees and congenital small spinal canal has not been previously discussed with spinal anaesthesia. Due to the low cerebrospinal fluid content of the small dural sac, the cauda equina becomes a firm system with a very limited possibility for the nerve roots to move away from the puncture needle when it is inserted into the dural sac. This constitutes risks of technical difficulties and neuropathies with spinal anaesthesia.

  8. Therapy of acute and delayed spinal infections after spinal surgery treated with negative pressure wound therapy in adult patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Zwolak

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of the treatment of infected primary or delayed spine wounds after spinal surgery using negative pressure wound therapy. In our institution (University Hospital Zurich, Switzerland nine patients (three women and six men; mean age 68.6, range 43- 87 years were treated in the period between January to December 2011 for non-healing spinal wounds. The treatment consisted of repeated debridements, irrigation and temporary closure with negative pressure wound therapy system. Three patients were admitted with a spinal epidural abscess; two with osteoporotic lumbar fracture; two with pathologic vertebra fracture and spinal cord compression, and two with vertebra fracture after trauma. All nine patients have been treated with antibiotic therapy. In one case the hardware has been removed, in three patients laminectomy was performed without instrumentation, in five patients there was no need to remove the hardware. The average hospital stay was 16.6 days (range 11-30. The average follow-up was 3.8, range 0.5-14 months. The average number of negative pressure wound therapy procedures was three, with the range 1-11. Our retrospective study focuses on the clinical problems faced by the spinal surgeon, clinical outcomes after spinal surgery followed by wound infection, and negative pressure wound therapy. Moreover, we would like to emphasize the importance for the patients and their relatives to be fully informed about the increased complications of surgery and about the limitations of treatment of these wounds with negative pressure wound therapy.

  9. [Technical Tips for Spinal Anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shima, Takeshi

    2015-09-01

    Spinal anesthesia is a standard technique for all anesthesiologists and surgeons. This review deals with basic knowledge and tips for spinal anesthesia in an empirical manner. It is important to understand practical knowledge about specific character of each local anesthetic, spread patterns of the anesthetics in the subarachnoid space and relation between anesthesia level and puncture site. This review also introduces tips for subarachnoid puncture and divided administration method of isobaric local anesthetic solution based on the literature. Anesthesiologists and surgeons have to recognize that it is necessary to take enough time to perform precious and optimal spinal anesthesia.

  10. "INTRAOPERATIVE SPINAL STIFFNESS MEASUREMENT IN MANAGEMENT OF SPINAL CANAL STENOSIS "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Karami

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study to determine whether spine stiffness is predictive of clinical results after lumbar spinal fusion for spinal stenosis, a total of 78 patients were measured intraoperatively with Kocher clamp manual distraction technique to determine motion segment stiffness then spinal fusion was performed for any loose segment. ‎Statistical analysis revealed that stiffness measurement correlate with clinical results of surgery. During a minimum of 2 years follow up after surgery, patients who had loose motion segment before or after decompression and were fused had the same level of satisfaction with surgical results as patients without loose segments and fusion. ‎We concluded that intraoperative spinal stiffness measurement provide a good indicator to spine fusion after lumbar canal stenosis ‎surgery.

  11. Comparative analysis of international standards for the fatigue testing of posterior spinal fixation systems: the importance of preload in ISO 12189.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Barbera, Luigi; Ottardi, Claudia; Villa, Tomaso

    2015-10-01

    Preclinical evaluation of the mechanical reliability of fixation devices is a mandatory activity before their introduction into market. There are two standardized protocols for preclinical testing of spinal implants. The American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM) recommends the F1717 standard, which describes a vertebrectomy condition that is relatively simple to implement, whereas the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) suggests the 12189 standard, which describes a more complex physiological anterior support-based setup. Moreover, ASTM F1717 is nowadays well established, whereas ISO 12189 has received little attention: A few studies tried to accurately describe the ISO experimental procedure through numeric models, but these studies totally neglect the recommended precompression step. This study aimed to build up a reliable, validated numeric model capable of describing the stress on the rods of a spinal fixator assembled according to ISO 12189 standard procedure. Such a model would more adequately represent the in vitro testing condition. This study used finite element (FE) simulations and experimental validation testing. An FE model of the ISO setup was built to calculate the stress on the rods. Simulation was validated by comparison with experimental strain gauges measurements. The same fixator has been previously virtually mounted in an L2-L4 FE model of the lumbar spine, and stresses in the rods were calculated when the spine was subjected to physiological forces and moments. The comparison between the FE predictions and experimental measurements is in good agreement, thus confirming the suitability of the FE method to evaluate the stresses in the device. The initial precompression induces a significant extension of the assembled construct. As the applied load increases, the initial extension is gradually compensated, so that at peak load the rods are bent in flexion: The final stress value predicted is thus reduced to about 50%, if

  12. Epidural Cystic Spinal Meningioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ji; Chen, Zheng-he; Wang, Zi-feng; Sun, Peng; Jin, Jie-tian; Zhang, Xiang-heng; Zhao, Yi-ying; Wang, Jian; Mou, Yong-gao; Chen, Zhong-ping

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cystic spinal meningioma (CSM) is an uncommon meningioma variant. Extradural CSMs are particularly rare and difficult to distinguish from other intraaxial tumors. This study presents a case of a 36-year-old woman with intraspinal extradual CSM at the thoracolumbar spine. She experienced persistent weakness, progressive numbness, and sensory disturbance in the right lower limb. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the patient revealed an irregular cystic mass at the thoracic 11 to lumbar 3 levels dorsally. This case was misdiagnosed as other neoplasms prior to surgery because of the atypical radiographic features and location of the tumor. Extradural CSMs should be considered in the differential diagnosis of intraspinal extradural cystic neoplasms. Complete removal of cystic wall provides an optimal outcome, rendering the lesion curable. PMID:26986119

  13. Chronic spinal subdural hematoma; Spinales chronisches subdurales Haematom

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    Hagen, T.; Lensch, T. [Radiologengemeinschaft, Augsburg (Germany)

    2008-10-15

    Compared with spinal epidural hematomas, spinal subdural hematomas are rare; chronic forms are even more uncommon. These hematomas are associated not only with lumbar puncture and spinal trauma, but also with coagulopathies, vascular malformations and tumors. Compression of the spinal cord and the cauda equina means that the patients develop increasing back or radicular pain, followed by paraparesis and bladder and bowel paralysis, so that in most cases surgical decompression is carried out. On magnetic resonance imaging these hematomas present as thoracic or lumbar subdural masses, their signal intensity varying with the age of the hematoma. We report the clinical course and the findings revealed by imaging that led to the diagnosis in three cases of chronic spinal subdural hematoma. (orig.) [German] Spinale subdurale Haematome sind im Vergleich zu epiduralen Haematomen selten, chronische Verlaufsformen noch seltener. Ursaechlich sind neben Lumbalpunktionen und traumatischen Verletzungen auch Blutgerinnungsstoerungen, Gefaessmalformationen und Tumoren. Aufgrund der Kompression von Myelon und Cauda equina kommt es zu zunehmenden Ruecken- oder radikulaeren Schmerzen mit anschliessender Paraparese sowie einer Darm- und Blasenstoerung, weshalb in den meisten Faellen eine operative Entlastung durchgefuehrt wird. Magnetresonanztomographisch stellen sich die Haematome meist als thorakale bzw. lumbale subdurale Raumforderungen dar, die Signalintensitaet variiert mit dem Blutungsalter. Wir berichten ueber den klinischen Verlauf und die bildgebende Diagnostik von 3 Patienten mit spinalen chronischen subduralen Haematomen. (orig.)

  14. Spinal robotics: current applications and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roser, Florian; Tatagiba, Marcos; Maier, Gottlieb

    2013-01-01

    Even though robotic technology holds great potential for performing spinal surgery and advancing neurosurgical techniques, it is of utmost importance to establish its practicality and to demonstrate better clinical outcomes compared with traditional techniques, especially in the current cost-effective era. Several systems have proved to be safe and reliable in the execution of tasks on a routine basis, are commercially available, and are used for specific indications in spine surgery. However, workflow, usability, interdisciplinary setups, efficacy, and cost-effectiveness have to be proven prospectively. This article includes a short description of robotic structures and workflow, followed by preliminary results of a randomized prospective study comparing conventional free-hand techniques with routine spine navigation and robotic-assisted procedures. Additionally, we present cases performed with a spinal robotic device, assessing not only the accuracy of the robotic-assisted procedure but also other factors (eg, minimal invasiveness, radiation dosage, and learning curves). Currently, the use of robotics in spinal surgery greatly enhances the application of minimally invasive procedures by increasing accuracy and reducing radiation exposure for patients and surgeons compared with standard procedures. Second-generation hardware and software upgrades of existing devices will enhance workflow and intraoperative setup. As more studies are published in this field, robot-assisted therapies will gain wider acceptance in the near future.

  15. Robust upregulation of serotonin 2A receptors after chronic spinal transection of rats: An immunohistochemical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kong, Xiang-Yu; Wienecke, Jacob; Hultborn, Hans;

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that spinal motoneurons below a spinal transection become supersensitive to a systemic administration of serotonin (5-HT) precursors, such as 5-hydroxytryptophan. This supersensitivity has been implicated in both the process of functional recovery following chronic lesions, and a...

  16. Loss of Hoxb8 alters spinal dorsal laminae and sensory responses in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C. Holstege (Jan); W. de Graaff (Wim); S.M. Hossaini (Mehdi); S.C. Cano; D. Jaarsma (Dick); J. Deschamps (Jacqueline); E. van den Akker (Eric)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractAlthough Hox gene expression has been linked to motoneuron identity, a role of these genes in development of the spinal sensory system remained undocumented. Hoxb genes are expressed at high levels in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. Hoxb8 null mutants manifest a striking phenotype of

  17. Loss of Hoxb8 alters spinal dorsal laminae and sensory responses in mice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holstege, J.C.; de Graaff, W.G.A.J.; Hossaini, M.; Cano, S.C.; Jaarsma, D.; van den Akker, E.; Deschamps, J.

    2008-01-01

    Although Hox gene expression has been linked to motoneuron identity, a role of these genes in development of the spinal sensory system remained undocumented. Hoxb genes are expressed at high levels in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. Hoxb8 null mutants manifest a striking phenotype of excessive g

  18. Assessment of autonomic function after acute spinal cord injury using heart rate variability analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmqvist, Lasse; Biering-Sørensen, Tor; Bartholdy, Kim

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Spinal cord injury (SCI) often results in severe dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system. C1-C8 SCI affects the supraspinal control to the heart, T1-T5 SCI affects the spinal sympathetic outflow to the heart, and T6-T12 SCI leaves sympathetic control to the heart intact. Heart rat...

  19. Relationship between Spinal Cord Volume and Spinal Cord Injury due to Spinal Shortening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Qiu

    Full Text Available Vertebral column resection is associated with a risk of spinal cord injury. In the present study, using a goat model, we aimed to investigate the relationship between changes in spinal cord volume and spinal cord injury due to spinal shortening, and to quantify the spinal cord volume per 1-mm height in order to clarify a safe limit for shortening. Vertebral column resection was performed at T10 in 10 goats. The spinal cord was shortened until the somatosensory-evoked potential was decreased by 50% from the baseline amplitude or delayed by 10% relative to the baseline peak latency. A wake-up test was performed, and the goats were observed for two days postoperatively. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to measure the spinal cord volume, T10 height, disc height, osteotomy segment height, and spinal segment height pre- and postoperatively. Two of the 10 goats were excluded, and hence, only data from eight goats were analyzed. The somatosensory-evoked potential of these eight goats demonstrated meaningful changes. With regard to neurologic function, five and three goats were classified as Tarlov grades 5 and 4 at two days postoperatively. The mean shortening distance was 23.6 ± 1.51 mm, which correlated with the d-value (post-pre of the spinal cord volume per 1-mm height of the osteotomy segment (r = 0.95, p < 0.001 and with the height of the T10 body (r = 0.79, p = 0.02. The mean d-value (post-pre of the spinal cord volume per 1-mm height of the osteotomy segment was 142.87 ± 0.59 mm3 (range, 142.19-143.67 mm3. The limit for shortening was approximately 106% of the vertebral height. The mean volumes of the osteotomy and spinal segments did not significantly change after surgery (t = 0.310, p = 0.765 and t = 1.241, p = 0.255, respectively. Thus, our results indicate that the safe limit for shortening can be calculated using the change in spinal cord volume per 1-mm height.

  20. Spinal and Intracranial Epidural Abscess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Presentation, epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment of spinal epidural abscess (SEA and intracranial epidural abscess (ICEA are reviewed by researchers at The John's Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, and Universidad de Santander, Columbia.

  1. En Bloc Resection of Solitary Functional Secreting Spinal Metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, C Rory; Clarke, Michelle J; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Fisher, Charles; Laufer, Ilya; Weber, Michael H; Sciubba, Daniel M

    2016-05-01

    Study Design Literature review. Objective Functional secretory tumors metastatic to the spine can secrete hormones, growth factors, peptides, and/or molecules into the systemic circulation that cause distinct syndromes, clinically symptomatic effects, and/or additional morbidity and mortality. En bloc resection has a limited role in metastatic spine disease due to the current paradigm that systemic burden usually determines morbidity and mortality. Our objective is to review the literature for studies focused on en bloc resection of functionally active spinal metastasis as the primary indication. Methods A review of the PubMed literature was performed to identify studies focused on functional secreting metastatic tumors to the spinal column. We identified five cases of patients undergoing en bloc resection of spinal metastases from functional secreting tumors. Results The primary histologies of these spinal metastases were pheochromocytoma, carcinoid tumor, choriocarcinoma, and a fibroblast growth factor 23-secreting phosphaturic mesenchymal tumor. Although studies of en bloc resection for these rare tumor subtypes are confined to case reports, this surgical treatment option resulted in metabolic cures and decreased clinical symptoms postoperatively for patients diagnosed with solitary functional secretory spinal metastasis. Conclusion Although the ability to formulate comprehensive conclusions is limited, case reports demonstrate that en bloc resection may be considered as a potential surgical option for the treatment of patients diagnosed with solitary functional secretory spinal metastatic tumors. Future prospective investigations into clinical outcomes should be conducted comparing intralesional resection and en bloc resection for patients diagnosed with solitary functional secretory spinal metastasis.

  2. In-vivo spinal nerve sensing in MISS using Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; Xu, Weiliang; Broderick, Neil

    2016-04-01

    In modern Minimally Invasive Spine Surgery (MISS), lack of visualization and haptic feedback information are the main obstacles. The spinal cord is a part of the central nervous system (CNS). It is a continuation of the brain stem, carries motor and sensory messages between CNS and the rest of body, and mediates numerous spinal reflexes. Spinal cord and spinal nerves are of great importance but vulnerable, once injured it may result in severe consequences to patients, e.g. paralysis. Raman Spectroscopy has been proved to be an effective and powerful tool in biological and biomedical applications as it works in a rapid, non-invasive and label-free way. It can provide molecular vibrational features of tissue samples and reflect content and proportion of protein, nucleic acids lipids etc. Due to the distinct chemical compositions spinal nerves have, we proposed that spinal nerves can be identified from other types of tissues by using Raman spectroscopy. Ex vivo experiments were first done on samples taken from swine backbones. Comparative spectral data of swine spinal cord, spinal nerves and adjacent tissues (i.e. membrane layer of the spinal cord, muscle, bone and fatty tissue) are obtained by a Raman micro-spectroscopic system and the peak assignment is done. Then the average spectra of all categories of samples are averaged and normalized to the same scale to see the difference against each other. The results verified the feasibility of spinal cord and spinal nerves identification by using Raman spectroscopy. Besides, a fiber-optic Raman sensing system including a miniature Raman sensor for future study is also introduced. This Raman sensor can be embedded into surgical tools for MISS.

  3. Isolated spinal neurosarcoidosis: An enigmatic intramedullary spinal cord pathology-case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish K Kasliwal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Isolated spinal cord neurosarcoidosis (NS in the absence of systemic disease or intracranial involvement is exceptionally rare. Adjunctive laboratory tests though useful may not be reliable and the absence of any pathognomonic radiological features makes the diagnosis difficult. As spinal cord NS may be a presenting feature of systemic sarcoidosis which may be occult on routine workup, 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET may be of value in unraveling this systemic involvement avoiding biopsying the spinal cord. A case of truly isolated NS is described with review of literature on this enigmatic pathology. Long segment intramedullary signal changes with focal parenchymal along with dural/meningeal enhancement in the absence of significant cervical stenosis in a young patient of northern European or African-American decent is very suggestive of NS and although may be presumably treated with steroids; there should be a low threshold for spinal cord biopsy especially in the absence of response to steroids to confirm isolated spinal cord NS in a patient with clinical neurological deterioration.

  4. Spinal syringomyelia following subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Kinya; Uchiyama, Takuya; Nakano, Naoki; Fukawa, Norihito; Yamada, Kimito; Yabuuchi, Tomonari; Kato, Amami

    2012-04-01

    Subarachnoid blood has been reported as a cause of chronic spinal arachnoiditis. Although syringomyelia has been thought to be caused by spinal arachnoiditis, reports of syringomyelia following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) are very rare. We describe two patients with syringomyelia associated with chronic spinal arachnoiditis following SAH. From January 2001 to December 2010, 198 patients with aneurysmal SAH were treated at Kinki University School of Medicine. Two of the 198 patients had syringomyelia following aneurysmal SAH; thus the rate of syringomyelia associated with aneurysmal SAH was 1.0%. Patient 1 was a 54-year-old woman who presented with back pain, back numbness and gait disturbance 20 months after SAH. Her MRI revealed syringomyelia of the spinal cord from C2 to T10. She underwent shunting of the syrinx to the subarachnoid space. Patient 2 was a 49-year-old man, who was admitted to the hospital with headache, diplopia, hoarseness, dysphagia and ataxia five months after SAH. MRI revealed syringomyelia from the medulla oblongata to C6, and an enlargement of the lateral and fourth ventricles. After foramen magnum decompression and C1 laminectomy, a fourth ventricle-subarachnoid shunt was placed by insertion of a catheter. Spinal arachnoiditis and spinal syringomyelia are rare but important chronic complications after SAH.

  5. Disseminated coccidioidomycosis presenting with intramedullary spinal cord abscesses: Management challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina L. Bajema

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Coccidioides species are endemic to the southwestern United States and typically cause a mild or asymptomatic primary infection. In some instances, infection can disseminate and involve the central nervous system with meningitis being the most common manifestation. Non-osseous spinal cord involvement is exceedingly rare. We report a case of disseminated coccidioidomycosis in an otherwise healthy 20 year old man with diffuse leptomeningeal enhancement, cerebrospinal fluid findings suggestive of meningitis, and intramedullary spinal cord abscesses. Response to treatment occurred with prolonged systemic liposomal amphotericin B and voriconazole. An extended course of steroids was needed to blunt inflammation.

  6. Optimization of the examination posture in spinal curvature assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krejci Jakub

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract To decrease the influence of postural sway during spinal measurements, an instrumented fixation posture (called G was proposed and tested in comparison with the free standing posture (A using the DTP-3 system in a group of 70 healthy volunteers. The measurement was performed 5 times on each subject and each position was tested by a newly developed device for non-invasive spinal measurements called DTP-3 system. Changes in postural stability of the spinous processes for each subject/the whole group were evaluated by employing standard statistical tools. Posture G, when compared to posture A, reduced postural sway significantly in all spinous processes from C3 to L5 in both the mediolateral and anterioposterior directions. Posture G also significantly reduced postural sway in the vertical direction in 18 out of 22 spinous processes. Importantly, posture G did not significantly influence the spinal curvature.

  7. Optimization of the examination posture in spinal curvature assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krejci, Jakub; Gallo, Jiri; Stepanik, Petr; Salinger, Jiri

    2012-04-30

    To decrease the influence of postural sway during spinal measurements, an instrumented fixation posture (called G) was proposed and tested in comparison with the free standing posture (A) using the DTP-3 system in a group of 70 healthy volunteers. The measurement was performed 5 times on each subject and each position was tested by a newly developed device for non-invasive spinal measurements called DTP-3 system. Changes in postural stability of the spinous processes for each subject/the whole group were evaluated by employing standard statistical tools. Posture G, when compared to posture A, reduced postural sway significantly in all spinous processes from C3 to L5 in both the mediolateral and anterioposterior directions. Posture G also significantly reduced postural sway in the vertical direction in 18 out of 22 spinous processes. Importantly, posture G did not significantly influence the spinal curvature.

  8. Radionuclide imaging of spinal infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gemmel, Filip [Ghent Maria-Middelares, General Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Ghent (Belgium); Medical Center Leeuwarden (MCL), Division of Nuclear Medicine, Henri Dunantweg 2, Postbus 888, Leeuwarden (Netherlands); Dumarey, Nicolas [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Hopital Erasme, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Brussels (Belgium); Palestro, Christopher J. [Long Island Jewish Medical Center, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Long Island, NY (United States)

    2006-10-15

    The diagnosis of spinal infection, with or without implants, has been a challenge for physicians for many years. Spinal infections are now being recognised more frequently, owing to aging of the population and the increasing use of spinal-fusion surgery. The diagnosis in many cases is delayed, and this may result in permanent neurological damage or even death. Laboratory evidence of infection is variable. Conventional radiography and radionuclide bone imaging lack both sensitivity and specificity. Neither in vitro labelled leucocyte scintigraphy nor {sup 99m}Tc-anti-granulocyte antibody scintigraphy is especially useful, because of the frequency with which spinal infection presents as a non-specific photopenic area on these tests. Sequential bone/gallium imaging and {sup 67}Ga-SPECT are currently the radionuclide procedures of choice for spinal osteomyelitis, but these tests lack specificity, suffer from poor spatial resolution and require several days to complete. [{sup 18}F]Fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) PET is a promising technique for diagnosing spinal infection, and has several potential advantages over conventional radionuclide tests. The study is sensitive and is completed in a single session, and image quality is superior to that obtained with single-photon emitting tracers. The specificity of FDG-PET may also be superior to that of conventional tracers because degenerative bone disease and fractures usually do not produce intense FDG uptake; moreover, spinal implants do not affect FDG imaging. However, FDG-PET images have to be read with caution in patients with instrumented spinal-fusion surgery since non-specific accumulation of FDG around the fusion material is not uncommon. In the future, PET-CT will likely provide more precise localisation of abnormalities. FDG-PET may prove to be useful for monitoring response to treatment in patients with spinal osteomyelitis. Other tracers for diagnosing spinal osteomyelitis are also under investigation, including

  9. Surgical management of ventrally located spinal meningiomas via posterior approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notani, Naoki; Miyazaki, Masashi; Kanezaki, Shozo; Ishihara, Toshinobu; Kawano, Masanori; Tsumura, Hiroshi

    2017-02-01

    Spinal meningioma is a relatively common tumor among intradural extramedullary spinal tumors. When the locus of the meningioma is located on the ventral side, tumor removal, dura mater resection, and reconstruction via a posterior approach safety become technically difficult. Twelve patients, who received surgical treatment for ventral spinal meningioma via a posterior approach, were included. There were three male and nine female patients, with an average age of 66.3 years (47-88 years). The average observation period was 55.4 months (22-132 months). In these cases, we analyzed the spinal level of tumor position, histopathological type (subtype), the grade of tumor resection (Simpson grade), pre- and post-operative walking state (Nurick grade), perioperative neurological complications, and the recurrence. Spinal meningioma occurred in the cervical spinal cord in three cases, with a further nine cases in the thoracic spinal cord. Histopathologically, all 12 tumors were assessed as grade I on the WHO classification system (eight cases of meningothelial type and four cases of psammomatous type). The level of tumor resection was Simpson grade I resection for two cases and Simpson grade II resection for the remaining ten cases. The average of Nurick grade improved from 3.3 preoperatively to 1.3 postoperatively. In all cases, we identified no neurological complications. One incident of tumor recurrence was identified 11 years after an operation involving a Simpson grade II resection CONCLUSION: Posterior approaches provide adequate exposure to safely remove ventrally located meningioma. Posterior exposures with lateral bone resection, dentate ligament division, provide also adequate exposure for safe removal.

  10. Control and role of plateau potential properties in the spinal cord

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hultborn, Hans; Zhang, Mengliang; Meehan, Claire F

    2013-01-01

    is to serve as an adjustable amplifier of classical synaptic inputs. The complex control of this, and other intrinsic properties, certainly adjusts the performance of the motoneurons to the needs of the behavioral settings. It has emerged that supraspinal facilitation, mainly by monoaminergic projections......" of the motoneurons return - now without descending monoaminergic control. This plasticity after spinal lesion is likely to contribute to the hyperreflexia (spasticity) seen after spinal lesions. We then review the current knowledge on PICs in other spinal (inter-)neurons. The monoaminergic systems seem to play...... a pivotal role in activating the spinal network generating the rhythm and basic motor pattern of locomotion and scratch - the spinal "central pattern generators" (CPGs). We give a short historical background of this research with a special emphasis on the importance of the descending monoaminergic systems....

  11. Solitary spinal dural syphilis granuloma mimicking a spinal meningioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Heng-Jun; Zhan, Ren-Ya; Chen, Man-Tao; Cao, Fei; Zheng, Xiu-Jue

    2014-01-01

    Dural granuloma is extremely rare. To our knowledge, there has no case reported solitary spinal dural syphilis granuloma worldwide so far. Here we report our findings in a 49-year-old woman, who presented with 10-year progressive left lower-limb numbness and two weeks of right lower-limb numbness. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) suggested a homogeneous enhanced spindle-shaped lesion, 2.9 × 1.5 cm in size, occupying the spinal intradural extramedullary space, at the level of Thoracic (T)-2/3, which mimicked the appearance of spinal meningioma. The Treponema pallidum particle agglutination (TPPA) test titer of 1:8, and the venereal diseases research laboratory of cerebral spinal fluid (VDRL-CSF) was reactive, so confirmed neurosyphilis was considered. After formal anti-syphilis treatment, posterior laminectomy surgery was performed, and the lesion was completely separated and extirpated. Final histopathologic diagnosis of the lesion was confirmed as chronic granulomatous inflammation, combined with the neurosyphilis history, spinal dural syphilis granuloma was finally diagnosed. Postoperatively, the patient recovered without any further treatment.

  12. An analysis of plasticity in the rat respiratory system following cervical spinal cord injury and the application of nanotechnology to induce or enhance recovery of diaphragm function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Janelle

    Second cervical segment spinal cord hemisection (C2Hx) results in ipsilateral hemidiaphragm paralysis. However, the intact latent crossed phrenic pathway can restore function spontaneously over time or immediately following drug administration. WGA bound fluorochromes were administered to identify nuclei associated with diaphragm function in both the acute and chronic C2Hx models. WGA is unique in that it undergoes receptor mediated endocytosis and is transsynaptically transported across select physiologically active synapses. Comparison of labeling in the acutely injured to the chronically injured rat provided an anatomical map of spinal and supraspinal injury induced synaptic plasticity. The plasticity occurs over time in the chronic C2Hx model in an effort to adapt to the loss of hemidiaphragm function. Utilizing the selectivity of WGA, a nanoconjugate was developed to target drug delivery to nuclei involved in diaphragm function post C2Hx in an effort to restore lost function. Theophylline was selected due to its established history as a respiratory stimulant. Theophylline was attached to gold nanoparticles by a transient bond designed to degrade intracellularly. The gold nanoparticles were then permanently attached to WGA-HRP. Following intradiaphragmatic injection, the WGA portion was identified in the ipsilateral phrenic nuclei and bilaterally in the rVRGs. The location of WGA should reflect the location of the AuNP since the peptide bond between them is permanent. The effectiveness of the nanoconjugate was verified with EMG analysis of the diaphragm and recordings from the phrenic nerves. All doses administered in the acute C2Hx model resulted in resorted hemidiaphragm and phrenic nerve activity. A dose of 0.14mg/kg had a significantly higher percent recovery on day 3, whereas 0.03mg/kg was significantly higher on day 14. The change in most effective dose over time is likely due to the availability or concentration of the drug and location of drug release

  13. Endocannabinoid regulation of spinal nociceptive processing in a model of neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagar, Devi Rani; Jhaveri, Maulik D; Richardson, Denise; Gray, Roy A; de Lago, Eva; Fernández-Ruiz, Javier; Barrett, David A; Kendall, David A; Chapman, Victoria

    2010-04-01

    Models of neuropathic pain are associated with elevated spinal levels of endocannabinoids (ECs) and altered expression of cannabinoid receptors on primary sensory afferents and post-synaptic cells in the spinal cord. We investigated the impact of these changes on the spinal processing of sensory inputs in a model of neuropathic pain. Extracellular single-unit recordings of spinal neurones were made in anaesthetized neuropathic and sham-operated rats. The effects of spinal administration of the cannabinoid CB(1) receptor antagonist N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (AM251) and the cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB(2)) receptor antagonist N-[(1S)-endo-1,3,3-trimethylbicycloheptan-2-yl]-5-(4-chloro-3-methylphenyl)-1-(4-methylbenzyl)-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (SR144528) on mechanically-evoked responses of spinal neurones were determined. The effects of spinal administration of (5Z,8Z11Z,14Z)-N-(3-furanylmethyl)-5,8,11,14-eicosatetraenamide (UCM707), which binds to CB(2) receptors and alters transport of ECs, on evoked responses of spinal neurones and spinal levels of ECs were also determined. The cannabinoid CB(1) receptor antagonist AM251, but not the CB(2) receptor antagonist, significantly facilitated 10-g-evoked responses of spinal neurones in neuropathic, but not sham-operated, rats. Spinal administration of UCM707 did not alter spinal levels of ECs but did significantly inhibit mechanically-evoked responses of neurones in neuropathic, but not sham-operated, rats. Pharmacological studies indicated that the selective inhibitory effects of spinal UCM707 in neuropathic rats were mediated by activation of spinal CB(2) receptors, as well as a contribution from transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channels. This work demonstrates that changes in the EC receptor system in the spinal cord of neuropathic rats influence the processing of sensory inputs, in particular low-weight inputs that drive allodynia

  14. A case of acute spinal intradural hematoma due to spinal anesthesia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Josu M Avecillas-Chasn; Jordi A Matias-Guiu; Gustavo Gomez; Javier Saceda-Gutierrez

    2015-01-01

    Spinal intradural hematoma is a rare complication of diagnostic lumbar puncture or spinal anesthesia. This complication could be overlooked with devastating neurological consequences due to a delay in diagnosis. Here, we reported a case of a patient with a lumbar spinal intradural hematoma as a result of a difficult spinal anesthesia.

  15. [Toxic demyelination of the central nervous system. I. Effect of an intercalating gliotoxic drug on the spinal cord in Wistar rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graça, D L

    1989-09-01

    Small volumes of ethidium bromide were injected into the dorsal columns of the spinal cord of Wistar rats. It was induced a demyelinating process, variable in nature and speed of repair according to the dose used. The induced lesions were classified into three groups (type I or fast lesions; type II or slow lesions; type III or intermediate lesions) according to the histological appearance and extension of remyelination. In some lesions or in areas within the same lesion, myelin and glial cell debris were rapidly processed by macrophages and the naked axons soon remyelinated by Schwann cells. In other lesions of similar duration, or areas within the lesions, myelin underwent transformation into mazes of membranes which persisted around the axons for long periods of time. In the lesions which contained such myelin-derived membranes, macrophages were scant and remyelination by Schwann cells was slow and arduous. It may be concluded that the slow resolution of some lesions resulted from the time elapsed between intoxication and disappearance of myelin-related cells. That time difference determined that the cellular responses to demyelination took place in an area devoid of glial cells and therefore without a support for the cellular migration needed for the removal of myelin debris and eventual remyelination. This investigation indicates that the development and outcome of demyelination may be altered by the cellular events that occur during oligodendrocyte degeneration.

  16. Minimal Invasive Decompression for Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Popov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lumbar spinal stenosis is a common condition in elderly patients and may lead to progressive back and leg pain, muscular weakness, sensory disturbance, and/or problems with ambulation. Multiple studies suggest that surgical decompression is an effective therapy for patients with symptomatic lumbar stenosis. Although traditional lumbar decompression is a time-honored procedure, minimally invasive procedures are now available which can achieve the goals of decompression with less bleeding, smaller incisions, and quicker patient recovery. This paper will review the technique of performing ipsilateral and bilateral decompressions using a tubular retractor system and microscope.

  17. Fibromyalgia and arachnoiditis presented as an acute spinal disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zamzuri Idris

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adhesive arachnoiditis is a chronic, insidious condition that causes debilitating intractable pain and a range of other neurological problems. Its pathophysiology is not well understood. This manuscript discusses its presentations, which can mimic an acute spinal disorder, its hypothetical pathophysiology, treatment, and its relationship with fibromyalgia. Case Description: The authors present a case of a 47-year-old female who presented with clinical features mimicking an acute spinal disorder but later found to have an adhesive arachnoiditis. She was admitted following a trauma with complaints of back pain and paraplegia. On examination, there was marked tenderness over thoracolumbar spine with lower limbs upper motor neuron weakness. An urgent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the spine revealed multiple lesions at her thoracic and lumbar spinal canals, which did not compress the spinal cord. Therefore, conservative management was initiated. Despite on regular therapies, her back and body pain worsened and little improvement in her limbs power was noted. Laminectomy was pursued and found to have spinal cord arachnoiditis. Subsequently, she was operated by other team members for multiple pelvic masses, which later proved to be benign. After gathering all the clinical information obtained at surgery and after taking detailed history inclusive of cognitive functions, diagnosis of an adhesive arachnoiditis syndrome was made. Currently, she is managed by neuropsychologist and pain specialist. Conclusion: This case report highlights the importance of knowing an adhesive arachnoiditis syndrome - a rarely discussed pathology by the neurosurgeon, which discloses a significant relationship between immune and nervous systems.

  18. Fibromyalgia and arachnoiditis presented as an acute spinal disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, Zamzuri; Ghazali, Faizul H.; Abdullah, Jafri M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Adhesive arachnoiditis is a chronic, insidious condition that causes debilitating intractable pain and a range of other neurological problems. Its pathophysiology is not well understood. This manuscript discusses its presentations, which can mimic an acute spinal disorder, its hypothetical pathophysiology, treatment, and its relationship with fibromyalgia. Case Description: The authors present a case of a 47-year-old female who presented with clinical features mimicking an acute spinal disorder but later found to have an adhesive arachnoiditis. She was admitted following a trauma with complaints of back pain and paraplegia. On examination, there was marked tenderness over thoracolumbar spine with lower limbs upper motor neuron weakness. An urgent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the spine revealed multiple lesions at her thoracic and lumbar spinal canals, which did not compress the spinal cord. Therefore, conservative management was initiated. Despite on regular therapies, her back and body pain worsened and little improvement in her limbs power was noted. Laminectomy was pursued and found to have spinal cord arachnoiditis. Subsequently, she was operated by other team members for multiple pelvic masses, which later proved to be benign. After gathering all the clinical information obtained at surgery and after taking detailed history inclusive of cognitive functions, diagnosis of an adhesive arachnoiditis syndrome was made. Currently, she is managed by neuropsychologist and pain specialist. Conclusion: This case report highlights the importance of knowing an adhesive arachnoiditis syndrome – a rarely discussed pathology by the neurosurgeon, which discloses a significant relationship between immune and nervous systems. PMID:25396073

  19. Automatic Segmentation of the Spinal Cord and Spinal Canal Coupled With Vertebral Labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Leener, Benjamin; Cohen-Adad, Julien; Kadoury, Samuel

    2015-08-01

    Quantifying spinal cord (SC) atrophy in neurodegenerative and traumatic diseases brings important diagnosis and prognosis information for the clinician. We recently developed the PropSeg method, which allows for fast, accurate and automatic segmentation of the SC on different types of MRI contrast (e.g., T1-, T2- and T2(∗) -weighted sequences) and any field of view. However, comparing measurements from the SC between subjects is hindered by the lack of a generic coordinate system for the SC. In this paper, we present a new framework combining PropSeg and a vertebral level identification method, thereby enabling direct inter- and intra-subject comparison of SC measurements for large cohort studies as well as for longitudinal studies. Our segmentation method is based on the multi-resolution propagation of tubular deformable models. Coupled with an automatic intervertebral disk identification method, our segmentation pipeline provides quantitative metrics of the SC and spinal canal such as cross-sectional areas and volumes in a generic coordinate system based on vertebral levels. This framework was validated on 17 healthy subjects and on one patient with SC injury against manual segmentation. Results have been compared with an existing active surface method and show high local and global accuracy for both SC and spinal canal (Dice coefficients =0.91 ± 0.02) segmentation. Having a robust and automatic framework for SC segmentation and vertebral-based normalization opens the door to bias-free measurement of SC atrophy in large cohorts.

  20. Suicide in a spinal cord injured population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartkopp, A; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Seidenschnur, A M

    1998-01-01

    To determine the relation between functional status and risk of suicide among individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI).......To determine the relation between functional status and risk of suicide among individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI)....

  1. Uncommon progression of an extradural spinal meningioma

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ben Nsir, Atef; Boughamoura, Mohamed; Mahmoudi, Houda; Kilani, Mohamed; Hattab, Nejib

    2014-01-01

    Extradural spinal meningiomas are rare. Our understanding of purely extradural spinal meningiomas is still incomplete and they may be easily confused with malignant neoplasms, much more common in this location...

  2. Diaphragm activation via high frequency spinal cord stimulation in a rodent model of spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Krzysztof E; Hsieh, Yee-Hsee; Dick, Thomas E; DiMarco, Anthony F

    2013-09-01

    As demonstrated in a canine model, high frequency spinal cord stimulation (HF-SCS) is a novel and more physiologic method of electrical activation of the inspiratory muscles compared to current techniques. The dog model, however, has significant limitations due to cost and societal concerns. Since the rodent respiratory system is also a relevant model for the study of neuronal circuitry function, the aims of the present study were to a) assess the effects of HF-SCS and b) determine the methodology of application of this technique in rats. In 9 Sprague Dawley rats, diaphragm multiunit and single motor unit EMG activity were assessed during spontaneous breathing and HF-SCS applied on the ventral epidural surface of the spinal cord at the T2 level following C1 spinal section. As in dogs, HF-SCS results in the activation of the diaphragm at physiological firing frequencies and the generation of large inspired volumes. Mean maximum firing frequencies of the diaphragm during spontaneous breathing and HF-SCS were 23.3 ± 1.4 Hz (range: 9.8-51.6 Hz) and 26.6 ± 1.3 Hz; range: 12.0-72.9 Hz, respectively, at comparable inspired volumes. Moreover, HF-SCS was successful in pacing these animals over a 60-min period without evidence of system fatigue. Our results suggest that, similar to the dog model, HF-SCS in the rat results in the activation of spinal cord tracts which synapse with the phrenic motoneuron pool, allowing the processing of the stimulus and consequent physiologic activation of the inspiratory muscles. The rat may be a useful model for further studies evaluating phrenic motoneuron physiology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. MRI Findings in Spinal Canal Stenosis

    OpenAIRE

    Maryam Barzin

    2010-01-01

    Spinal canal stenosis results from progressive narrowing of the central spinal canal and the lateral recesses. Primary (congenital) lumbar spinal stenosis is associated with achondroplastic dwarfism. The spinal canal may become narrowed by bulging or protrusion of the intervertebral disc annulus, herniation of the nucleus pulposus posteriorly, thickening of the posterior longitudinal ligament, hypertrophy of the facet joints, hypertrophy of the ligamentum flavum, epidural fat deposition, spon...

  4. Timing of Surgery After Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Matthew; Schuster, James

    2017-01-01

    Although timing for surgical intervention after spinal cord injury remains controversial, there is accumulating evidence suggesting that early surgery may improve neurologic outcomes, particularly with incomplete spinal cord injury, and may reduce non-neurologic complications and health care resource utilization. Moreover, even in patients with complete spinal cord injury, minor improvement in neurologic function can lead to significant changes in quality of life. This article reviews the experimental and clinical data examining surgical timing after spinal cord injury.

  5. Intramedullary spinal neurocysticercosis treated successfully with medical therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Shameem; Paul, Siba Prosad

    2014-12-01

    Neurocysticercosis caused by Taenia solium and is a common parasitic disease of the cental nervous system. It usually presents with seizures, headaches, progressively worsening focal neurologic symptoms, visual disturbances, loss of bladder control, etc. However, acute onset symptoms may also be seen. MRI scans can accurately diagnose spinal or cerebral lesions and is also helpful in monitoring progress while on treatment. Albendazole is currently the drug of choice along with steroids for medical management of neurocysticercosis. The case of intramedullary spinal neurocysticercosis was treated with praziquantel.

  6. Primary spinal extradural hydatid cyst associated with acute bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guohua Zhu

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To report a case of unilocular primary spinal extradural hydatid cyst which manifested as acute bleeding. Methods: The clinical presentation, diagnosis, and surgical treatment of this rare case are discussed. Published cases of primary extradural hydatid cysts are reviewed. Results: Complete recovery was achieved. Repeated clinical, radiological, and serological examinations did not show any evidence of local recurrence or systemic hydatidosis during the follow-up period of 50 months. Conclusions: Primary spinal extradural hydatid cyst may present as acute bleeding.

  7. Primary spinal extradural hydatid cyst associated with acute bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongxin Wang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The purpose of this article is to report a case of unilocular primary spinal extradural hydatid cyst which manifested as acute bleeding. Methods: The clinical presentation, diagnosis, and surgical treatment of this rare case are discussed and published cases of primary extradural hydatid cysts are reviewed. Results: Complete recovery was achieved. Repeated clinical, radiological, and serological examinations did not show any evidence of local recurrence or systemic hydatidosis during the follow-up period of 50 months. Conclusions: Primary spinal extradural hydatid cyst may present as acute bleeding. (Wang Y, Geng D, Zhu G, Du G.

  8. Neuropathology and Therapeutic Intervention in Spinal and Bulbar Muscular Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruhiko Banno

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA is a hereditary motor neuron disease caused by the expansion of a polyglutamine tract in the androgen receptor (AR. The histopathological finding in SBMA is loss of lower motor neurons in the anterior horn of the spinal cord as well as in the brainstem motor nuclei. Animal studies have revealed that the pathogenesis of SBMA depends on the level of serum testosterone, and that androgen deprivation mitigates neurodegeneration through inhibition of nuclear accumulation of the pathogenic AR. Heat shock proteins, ubiquitin-proteasome system and transcriptional regulation are also potential targets of therapy development for SBMA.

  9. Microglia and Spinal Cord Synaptic Plasticity in Persistent Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Taves

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Microglia are regarded as macrophages in the central nervous system (CNS and play an important role in neuroinflammation in the CNS. Microglial activation has been strongly implicated in neurodegeneration in the brain. Increasing evidence also suggests an important role of spinal cord microglia in the genesis of persistent pain, by releasing the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα, Interleukine-1beta (IL-1β, and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF. In this review, we discuss the recent findings illustrating the importance of microglial mediators in regulating synaptic plasticity of the excitatory and inhibitory pain circuits in the spinal cord, leading to enhanced pain states. Insights into microglial-neuronal interactions in the spinal cord dorsal horn will not only further our understanding of neural plasticity but may also lead to novel therapeutics for chronic pain management.

  10. Navigation, robotics, and intraoperative imaging in spinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringel, Florian; Villard, Jimmy; Ryang, Yu-Mi; Meyer, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    Spinal navigation is a technique gaining increasing popularity. Different approaches as CT-based or intraoperative imaging-based navigation are available, requiring different methods of patient registration, bearing certain advantages and disadvantages. So far, a large number of studies assessed the accuracy of pedicle screw implantation in the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine, elucidating the advantages of image guidance. However, a clear proof of patient benefit is missing, so far. Spinal navigation is closely related to intraoperative 3D imaging providing an imaging dataset for navigational use and the opportunity for immediate intraoperative assessment of final screw position giving the option of immediate screw revision if necessary. Thus, postoperative imaging and a potential revision surgery for screw correction become dispensable.Different concept of spinal robotics as the DaVinci system and SpineAssist are under investigation.

  11. Posterior spinal fusion using pedicle screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasakopoulos, Michael; Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Triantafyllopoulos, George; Koufos, Spiros; Pneumaticos, Spiros G

    2013-07-01

    Few clinical studies have reported polyetheretherketone (PEEK) rod pedicle screw spinal instrumentation systems (CD-Horizon Legacy PEEK rods; Medtronic, Minneapolis, Minnesota). This article describes a clinical series of 52 patients who underwent posterior spinal fusion using the PEEK Rod System between 2007 and 2010. Of the 52 patients, 25 had degenerative disk disease, 10 had lateral recess stenosis, 6 had degenerative spondylolisthesis, 6 had lumbar spine vertebral fracture, 4 had combined lateral recess stenosis and degenerative spondylolisthesis, and 1 had an L5 giant cell tumor. Ten patients had 1-segment fusion, 29 had 2-segment fusion, and 13 had 3-segment fusion. Mean follow-up was 3 years (range, 1.5-4 years); no patient was lost to follow-up. Clinical evaluation was performed using the Oswestry Disability Index and a low back and leg visual analog pain scale. Imaging evaluation of fusion was performed with standard and dynamic radiographs. Complications were recorded. Mean Oswestry Disability Index scores improved from 76% preoperatively (range, 52%-90%) to 48% at 6 weeks postoperatively, and to 34%, 28%, and 30% at 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively, respectively. Mean low back and leg pain improved from 8 and 9 points preoperatively, respectively, to 6 and 5 points immediately postoperatively, respectively, and to 2 points each thereafter. Imaging union of the arthrodesis was observed in 50 (96%) patients by 1-year follow-up. Two patients sustained screw breakage: 1 had painful loss of sagittal alignment of the lumbar spine and underwent revision spinal surgery with pedicle screws and titanium rods and the other had superficial wound infection and was treated with wound dressing changes and antibiotics for 6 weeks. No adjacent segment degeneration was observed in any patient until the time of this writing. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. Expression and cellular distribution of ubiquitin in response to injury in the developing spinal cord of Monodelphis domestica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noor, Natassya M; Møllgård, Kjeld; Wheaton, Benjamin J;

    2013-01-01

    Ubiquitin, an 8.5 kDa protein associated with the proteasome degradation pathway has been recently identified as differentially expressed in segment of cord caudal to site of injury in developing spinal cord. Here we describe ubiquitin expression and cellular distribution in spinal cord up to pos...... changes in ubiquitin expression and cellular distribution in development and response to spinal injury suggest an intricate regulatory system that modulates these responses which, when better understood, may lead to potential therapeutic targets....

  13. Evaluation of spinal cord injury animal models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning Zhang; Marong Fang; Haohao Chen; Fangming Gou; Mingxing Ding

    2014-01-01

    Because there is no curative treatment for spinal cord injury, establishing an ideal animal model is important to identify injury mechanisms and develop therapies for individuals suffering from spinal cord injuries. In this article, we systematically review and analyze various kinds of animal models of spinal cord injury and assess their advantages and disadvantages for further studies.

  14. Venous manifestations of spinal arteriovenous fistulas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andersson, T; van Dijk, JMC; Willinsky, RA

    2003-01-01

    Impairment of the spinal cord venous outflow may create symptoms caused by venous hypertension and congestion. This has been referred to as venous congestive myelopathy. Spinal dural arteriovenous fistulas, as well as some of the epidural arteriovenous fistulas and perimedullary spinal cord arteriov

  15. Functional outcome after a spinal fracture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, Richard Bernardus

    2008-01-01

    This thesis takes a closer look at the functional outcome after a spinal fracture. An introduction to different aspects regarding spinal fractures is presented in Chapter 1. The incidence of traumatic thoracolumbar spinal fractures without neurological deficit in the Netherlands is approximately 1.2

  16. Functional outcome after a spinal fracture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, Richard Bernardus

    2008-01-01

    This thesis takes a closer look at the functional outcome after a spinal fracture. An introduction to different aspects regarding spinal fractures is presented in Chapter 1. The incidence of traumatic thoracolumbar spinal fractures without neurological deficit in the Netherlands is approximately 1.2

  17. SURGICAL CORRECTION OF SPINAL DEFORMITY IN IDIOPATHIC SCOLIOSIS: THE HISTORY AND CURRENT STATE (REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Vissarionov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the historical and contemporary aspects of the state of the question correct scoliosis spine with dorsal and ventral spinal systems. The variants of spinal deformity correction method from Harrington to modern surgical techniques using both hook and metal screw. Detailed technological aspects of surgical interventions for the correction of spinal deformity using a variety of spinal structures. A comparative estimate of the correction of spinal deformity, the impact on the result of the initial mobility of the spine, level metallofiksatsii vertebral-motor segment, as well as the degree of true derotation vertebrae at the top of the curvature in a variety of surgical procedures. Describes the advantages and disadvantages of options for surgery.

  18. Extrinsic and Intrinsic Regulation of Axon Regeneration by MicroRNAs after Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury is a devastating disease which disrupts the connections between the brain and spinal cord, often resulting in the loss of sensory and motor function below the lesion site. Most injured neurons fail to regenerate in the central nervous system after injury. Multiple intrinsic and extrinsic factors contribute to the general failure of axonal regeneration after injury. MicroRNAs can modulate multiple genes’ expression and are tightly controlled during nerve development or the injury process. Evidence has demonstrated that microRNAs and their signaling pathways play important roles in mediating axon regeneration and glial scar formation after spinal cord injury. This article reviews the role and mechanism of differentially expressed microRNAs in regulating axon regeneration and glial scar formation after spinal cord injury, as well as their therapeutic potential for promoting axonal regeneration and repair of the injured spinal cord.

  19. Spinal intradural extraosseous Ewing’s sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Lachance

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Extraosseous Ewing’s sarcoma (EES involving the central nervous system is rare, but can be diagnosed and distinguished from other primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNET by identification of the chromosomal translocation (11;22(q24;q12. We report EES arising from the spinal intradural extramedullary space, based on imaging, histopathological, and molecular data in two men, ages 50 and 60 years old and a review of the literature using PubMed (1970-2009. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR identified the fusion product FL1-EWS. Multimodal therapy, including radiation and alternating chemotherapy including vincristine, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin and ifosfamide and etoposide led to local tumor control and an initial, favorable therapeutic response. No systemic involvement was seen from the time of diagnosis to the time of last follow-up (26 months or death (4 years. This report confirms that EES is not confined to the earliest decades of life, and like its rare occurrence as an extra-axial meningeal based mass intracranially, can occasionally present as an intradural mass in the spinal canal without evidence of systemic tumor. Gross total resection followed by multimodal therapy may provide for extended progression free and overall survival.

  20. Spinal reflexes in brain death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Yesim; Çiftçi, Yeliz; Incesu, Tülay Kurt; Seçil, Yaprak; Akhan, Galip

    2014-12-01

    Spontaneous and reflex movements have been described in brain death and these unusual movements might cause uncertainties in diagnosis. In this study we evaluated the presence of spinal reflexes in patients who fulfilled the criteria for brain death. Thirty-two (22 %) of 144 patients presented unexpected motor movements spontaneously or during examinations. These patients exhibited the following signs: undulating toe, increased deep tendon reflexes, plantar responses, Lazarus sign, flexion-withdrawal reflex, facial myokymia, neck-arm flexion, finger jerks and fasciculations. In comparison, there were no significant differences in age, sex, etiology of brain death and hemodynamic laboratory findings in patients with and without reflex motor movement. Spinal reflexes should be well recognized by physicians and it should be born in mind that brain death can be determined in the presence of spinal reflexes.

  1. Recurrent Primary Spinal Hydatid Cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okan Turk

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Primary hydatid disease of spine is rare and spinal hydatitosis constitute only 1% of all hydatitosis. We report a case of recurrent primary intraspinal extradural hydatid cyst of the thoracic region causing progressive paraparesis. The patient was operated 16 years ago for primary spinal hydatid disease involvement and was instrumented dorsally for stabilization. The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of thoracic spine showed a cystic lesion at T11-12 level and compressed spinal cord posterolaterally. Intraspinal cyst was excised through T11-12 laminectomy which made formerly. The early postoperative period showed a progressive improvement of his neurological deficit and he was discharged with antihelmintic treatment consisting of albendazole and amoxicillin-sulbactam combination. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(Suppl 1: 84-89

  2. ATYPICAL GOUT: SPINAL TOPHACEOUS INJURY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksim Sergeevich Eliseev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal injury in gout occurs rarely at a young age. In the past 5 years, the Pubmed has published only 44 papers on this site of tophi mainly in gouty patients over 40 years of age. We report two such cases in patients with chronic tophaceous gout in a 28-year-old man with a 3-year history of gout and in a 30-year-old man with its 7-year history. In both cases, spinal injury with tophus masses gave rise to neurological symptomatology. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging were of informative value in identifying the causes of pain. In one case, the patient underwent laminectomy; histological evidence confirmed the gouty genesis of spinal injury.

  3. Pharmacological management of hemodynamic complications following spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Deanna; Tutt, Matthew; Cook, Aaron M

    2009-05-01

    Damage from spinal cord injury (SCI) may be complicated by concomitant hemodynamic alterations within hours to months of the initial insult. Neurogenic shock, symptomatic bradycardia, autonomic dysreflexia, and orthostatic hypotension are specific conditions occurring commonly with SCI. Early recognition and appropriate management of each disorder may minimize secondary injury to the cord, avert systemic complications, and help alleviate patient discomfort.

  4. Optimization of Spinal Anesthesia in Surgery of Intervertebral Disks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Gorbachev

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives the data of preoperative evaluation of autonomous nervous system tone and its correction, pharmacokinetics of local anesthetics in the subarachnoidal space, as well as the optimization of a procedure for spinal anesthesia in patients operated on for lumbosacral radiculitis. 

  5. Spontaneous Functional Recovery from Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rune; Carlsen, Eva Maria Meier

    2016-01-01

    Our interactions with the world occur via precise coordination of our motor system. Even a movement as seemingly simple as reaching for an object is a complex motor behavior that requires precise neuronal activity in supraspinal areas (Lemon, 2008) and spinal areas (Azim et al., 2014). Motor...

  6. Long-term urological outcomes in spinal dysraphism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenboer, P.W.

    2014-01-01

    Spinal dysraphism (SD) is a common name for a group of heterogeneous congenital conditions of the central nervous system, of which myelomeningocele is the most well-known form. SD has a wide spectrum of symptoms, mainly caused by neurological deficits. The bladder and pelvic floor are also affected

  7. The Function of FGFR1 Signalling in the Spinal Cord: Therapeutic Approaches Using FGFR1 Ligands after Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Lawrence D. F.

    2017-01-01

    Extensive research is ongoing that concentrates on finding therapies to enhance CNS regeneration after spinal cord injury (SCI) and to cure paralysis. This review sheds light on the role of the FGFR pathway in the injured spinal cord and discusses various therapies that use FGFR activating ligands to promote regeneration after SCI. We discuss studies that use peripheral nerve grafts or Schwann cell grafts in combination with FGF1 or FGF2 supplementation. Most of these studies show evidence that these therapies successfully enhance axon regeneration into the graft. Further they provide evidence for partial recovery of sensory function shown by electrophysiology and motor activity evidenced by behavioural data. We also present one study that indicates that combination with additional, synergistic factors might further drive the system towards functional regeneration. In essence, this review summarises the potential of nerve and cell grafts combined with FGF1/2 supplementation to improve outcome even after severe spinal cord injury. PMID:28197342

  8. Substance P Promotes the Proliferation, but Inhibits Differentiation and Mineralization of Osteoblasts from Rats with Spinal Cord Injury via RANKL/OPG System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Chen, Liang; Han, Li-Ren; Yang, Xiao-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) causes a significant amount of bone loss, which results in osteoporosis (OP). The neuropeptide substance P (SP) and SP receptors may play important roles in the pathogenesis of OP after SCI. To identify the roles of SP in the bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell derived osteoblasts (BMSC-OB) in SCI rats, we investigated the expression of neurokinin-1 receptors (NK1R) in BMSC-OB and the effects of SP on bone formation by development of BMSC-OB cultures. Sixty young male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into two groups: SHAM and SCI. The expression of NK1R protein in BMSC-OB was observed using immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. The dose- and time-dependent effects of SP on the proliferation, differentiation and mineralization of BMSC-OB and the expression of osteoblastic markers by in vitro experiments. The expression of NK1R in BMSC-OB was observed on plasma membranes and in cytoplasm. One week after osteogenic differentiation, the expression of NK1R was significantly increased after SCI at mRNA and protein levels. However, this difference was gradually attenuated at 2 or 3 weeks later. SP have the function to enhance cell proliferation, inhibite cell differentiation and mineralization at a proper concentration and incubation time, and this effect would be inhibited by adding SP or NK1R antagonist. The expression of RANKL/OPG was significantly increased in tibiae after SCI. Similarly, the RANKL/OPG expression in SCI rats was significantly increased when treating with 10−8 M SP. SP plays a very important role in the pathogenesis of OP after SCI. The direct effect of SP may lead to increased bone resorption through the RANKL/OPG axis after SCI. In addition, high expression of SP also results in the suppression of osteogenesis in SCI rats. Then, the balance between bone resorption and bone formation was broken and finally osteoporosis occurred. PMID:27764190

  9. Metastasis to a spinal meningioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansil, Rohit; Walia, Bipin S; Khan, Zahid; Abrari, Andleeb

    2017-01-01

    Metastasis of one cancer to another is rare. Here, we report a spinal meningioma that was infiltrated by metastatic deposits from another cancer. A 62-year-old male presented with a progressive spastic paraparesis. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the spine suggested a well-defined intradural extramedullary (IDEM) T8 mass in the dorsal spinal canal. When excised, it proved histologically to be a meningothelial meningioma infiltrated by metastatic deposits from an adenocarcinoma. Tumor to tumor metastasis rarely occurs, and meningioma, owing to its biological character and increased vascularity, is one of the most common recipients of a metastases from other lesions.

  10. Propitious Therapeutic Modulators to Prevent Blood-Spinal Cord Barrier Disruption in Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Hemant; Ropper, Alexander E; Lee, Soo-Hong; Han, Inbo

    2016-05-18

    The blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) is a specialized protective barrier that regulates the movement of molecules between blood vessels and the spinal cord parenchyma. Analogous to the blood-brain barrier (BBB), the BSCB plays a crucial role in maintaining the homeostasis and internal environmental stability of the central nervous system (CNS). After spinal cord injury (SCI), BSCB disruption leads to inflammatory cell invasion such as neutrophils and macrophages, contributing to permanent neurological disability. In this review, we focus on the major proteins mediating the BSCB disruption or BSCB repair after SCI. This review is composed of three parts. Section 1. SCI and the BSCB of the review describes critical events involved in the pathophysiology of SCI and their correlation with BSCB integrity/disruption. Section 2. Major proteins involved in BSCB disruption in SCI focuses on the actions of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), angiopoietins (Angs), bradykinin, nitric oxide (NO), and endothelins (ETs) in BSCB disruption and repair. Section 3. Therapeutic approaches discusses the major therapeutic compounds utilized to date for the prevention of BSCB disruption in animal model of SCI through modulation of several proteins.

  11. Influence of Spinal Cord Integrity on Gait Control in Human Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awai, Lea; Bolliger, Marc; Ferguson, Adam R; Courtine, Grégoire; Curt, Armin

    2016-07-01

    Background Clinical trials in spinal cord injury (SCI) primarily rely on simplified outcome metrics (ie, speed, distance) to obtain a global surrogate for the complex alterations of gait control. However, these assessments lack sufficient sensitivity to identify specific patterns of underlying impairment and to target more specific treatment interventions. Objective To disentangle the differential control of gait patterns following SCI beyond measures of time and distance. Methods The gait of 22 individuals with motor-incomplete SCI and 21 healthy controls was assessed using a high-resolution 3-dimensional motion tracking system and complemented by clinical and electrophysiological evaluations applying unbiased multivariate analysis. Results Motor-incomplete SCI patients showed varying degrees of spinal cord integrity (spinal conductivity) with severe limitations in walking speed and altered gait patterns. Principal component (PC) analysis applied on all the collected data uncovered robust coherence between parameters related to walking speed, distortion of intralimb coordination, and spinal cord integrity, explaining 45% of outcome variance (PC 1). Distinct from the first PC, the modulation of gait-cycle variables (step length, gait-cycle phases, cadence; PC 2) remained normal with respect to regained walking speed, whereas hip and knee ranges of motion were distinctly altered with respect to walking speed (PC 3). Conclusions In motor-incomplete SCI, distinct clusters of discretely controlled gait parameters can be discerned that refine the evaluation of gait impairment beyond outcomes of walking speed and distance. These findings are specifically different from that in other neurological disorders (stroke, Parkinson) and are more discrete at targeting and disentangling the complex effects of interventions to improve walking outcome following motor-incomplete SCI.

  12. Intermittent Hypoxia-Induced Spinal Inflammation Impairs Respiratory Motor Plasticity by a Spinal p38 MAP Kinase-Dependent Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huxtable, Adrianne G; Smith, Stephanie M C; Peterson, Timothy J; Watters, Jyoti J; Mitchell, Gordon S

    2015-04-29

    Inflammation is characteristic of most clinical disorders that challenge the neural control of breathing. Since inflammation modulates neuroplasticity, we studied the impact of inflammation caused by prolonged intermittent hypoxia on an important form of respiratory plasticity, acute intermittent hypoxia (three, 5 min hypoxic episodes, 5 min normoxic intervals) induced phrenic long-term facilitation (pLTF). Because chronic intermittent hypoxia elicits neuroinflammation and pLTF is undermined by lipopolysaccharide-induced systemic inflammation, we hypothesized that one night of intermittent hypoxia (IH-1) elicits spinal inflammation, thereby impairing pLTF by a p38 MAP kinase-dependent mechanism. pLTF and spinal inflammation were assessed in anesthetized rats pretreated with IH-1 (2 min hypoxia, 2 min normoxia; 8 h) or sham normoxia and allowed 16 h for recovery. IH-1 (1) transiently increased IL-6 (1.5 ± 0.2-fold; p = 0.02) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) (2.4 ± 0.4-fold; p = 0.01) mRNA in cervical spinal homogenates, (2) elicited a sustained increase in IL-1β mRNA (2.4 ± 0.2-fold; p < 0.001) in isolated cervical spinal microglia, and (3) abolished pLTF (-1 ± 5% vs 56 ± 10% in controls; p < 0.001). pLTF was restored after IH-1 by systemic NSAID administration (ketoprofen; 55 ± 9%; p < 0.001) or spinal p38 MAP kinase inhibition (58 ± 2%; p < 0.001). IH-1 increased phosphorylated (activated) p38 MAP kinase immunofluorescence in identified phrenic motoneurons and adjacent microglia. In conclusion, IH-1 elicits spinal inflammation and impairs pLTF by a spinal p38 MAP kinase-dependent mechanism. By targeting inflammation, we may develop strategies to manipulate respiratory motor plasticity for therapeutic advantage when the respiratory control system is compromised (e.g., sleep apnea, apnea of prematurity, spinal injury, or motor neuron disease).

  13. The physiological basis of neurorehabilitation--locomotor training after spinal cord injury

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hubli, Michèle; Dietz, Volker

    2013-01-01

    Advances in our understanding of the physiological basis of locomotion enable us to optimize the neurorehabilitation of patients with lesions to the central nervous system, such as stroke or spinal cord injury (SCI...

  14. Imaging in spine and spinal cord malformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, Andrea E-mail: a.rossi@panet.itandrearossi@ospedale-gaslini.ge.it; Biancheri, Roberta; Cama, Armando; Piatelli, Gianluca; Ravegnani, Marcello; Tortori-Donati, Paolo

    2004-05-01

    Spinal and spinal cord malformations are collectively named spinal dysraphisms. They arise from defects occurring in the early embryological stages of gastrulation (weeks 2-3), primary neurulation (weeks 3-4), and secondary neurulation (weeks 5-6). Spinal dysraphisms are categorized into open spinal dysraphisms (OSDs), in which there is exposure of abnormal nervous tissues through a skin defect, and closed spinal dysraphisms (CSD), in which there is a continuous skin coverage to the underlying malformation. Open spinal dysraphisms basically include myelomeningocele and other rare abnormalities such as myelocele and hemimyelo(meningo)cele. Closed spinal dysraphisms are further categorized based on the association with low-back subcutaneous masses. Closed spinal dysraphisms with mass are represented by lipomyelocele, lipomyelomeningocele, meningocele, and myelocystocele. Closed spinal dysraphisms without mass comprise simple dysraphic states (tight filum terminale, filar and intradural lipomas, persistent terminal ventricle, and dermal sinuses) and complex dysraphic states. The latter category further comprises defects of midline notochordal integration (basically represented by diastematomyelia) and defects of segmental notochordal formation (represented by caudal agenesis and spinal segmental dysgenesis). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the preferred modality for imaging these complex abnormalities. The use of the aforementioned classification scheme is greatly helpful to make the diagnosis.

  15. Imaging in spine and spinal cord malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Andrea; Biancheri, Roberta; Cama, Armando; Piatelli, Gianluca; Ravegnani, Marcello; Tortori-Donati, Paolo

    2004-05-01

    Spinal and spinal cord malformations are collectively named spinal dysraphisms. They arise from defects occurring in the early embryological stages of gastrulation (weeks 2-3), primary neurulation (weeks 3-4), and secondary neurulation (weeks 5-6). Spinal dysraphisms are categorized into open spinal dysraphisms (OSDs), in which there is exposure of abnormal nervous tissues through a skin defect, and closed spinal dysraphisms (CSD), in which there is a continuous skin coverage to the underlying malformation. Open spinal dysraphisms basically include myelomeningocele and other rare abnormalities such as myelocele and hemimyelo(meningo)cele. Closed spinal dysraphisms are further categorized based on the association with low-back subcutaneous masses. Closed spinal dysraphisms with mass are represented by lipomyelocele, lipomyelomeningocele, meningocele, and myelocystocele. Closed spinal dysraphisms without mass comprise simple dysraphic states (tight filum terminale, filar and intradural lipomas, persistent terminal ventricle, and dermal sinuses) and complex dysraphic states. The latter category further comprises defects of midline notochordal integration (basically represented by diastematomyelia) and defects of segmental notochordal formation (represented by caudal agenesis and spinal segmental dysgenesis). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the preferred modality for imaging these complex abnormalities. The use of the aforementioned classification scheme is greatly helpful to make the diagnosis.

  16. Spinal angiography: vascular anatomy, technique, indications; Spinale Angiographie: Gefaessanatomie, Technik und Indikationsstellung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grunwald, I.; Reith, W. [Universitaet des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany). Abt. fuer Neuroradiologie; Thron, A. [Universitaetsklinik der RWTH Aachen (Germany). Abteilung fuer Neuroradiologie

    2001-11-01

    The indication for spinal angiography has to be closely set as in case of inadequate handling this procedure bares the risk of paraplegia. In unclear spinal symptoms lasting over a longer periode of time, spinal vascular malformation have to be considered. Spinal vascular malformations are often reversibel, especially if diagnosed early. Diagnostic methods have to include spinal angiography if other non-invasive methods do not lead to results. The main point is to consider spinal vascular malformations in unclear cases. (orig.) [German] Die Indikation zu einer spinalen Angiographie muss streng gestellt werden, da bei unsachgemaesser Durchfuehrung dieser Untersuchung die Gefahr einer bleibenden Querschnittsymptomatik besteht. Bei unklarer spinaler Symptomatik, die ueber einen laengeren Zeitraum progredient ist, muss jedoch immer auch an eine spinale Gefaessfehlbildung gedacht werden. Die durch alle diagnostischen Moeglichkeiten einschliesslich der spinalen Angiographie diagnostizierten spinalen Gefaessfehlbildungen sind haeufig kurabel, insbesondere bei frueher Diagnosestellung. Der wichtigste Punkt ist jedoch, dass differenzialdiagnostisch auch an eine spinale Gefaessfehlbildung gedacht wird. (orig.)

  17. Novel spinal instrumentation to enhance osteogenesis and fusion: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacEwan, Matthew R; Talcott, Michael R; Moran, Daniel W; Leuthardt, Eric C

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE Instrumented spinal fusion continues to exhibit high failure rates in patients undergoing multilevel lumbar fusion or pseudarthrosis revision; with Grade II or higher spondylolisthesis; or in those possessing risk factors such as obesity, tobacco use, or metabolic disorders. Direct current (DC) electrical stimulation of bone growth represents a unique surgical adjunct in vertebral fusion procedures, yet existing spinal fusion stimulators are not optimized to enhance interbody fusion. To develop an advanced method of applying DC electrical stimulation to promote interbody fusion, a novel osteogenic spinal system capable of routing DC through rigid instrumentation and into the vertebral bodies was fabricated. A pilot study was designed to assess the feasibility of osteogenic instrumentation and compare the ability of osteogenic instrumentation to promote successful interbody fusion in vivo to standard spinal instrumentation with autograft. METHODS Instrumented, single-level, posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) with autologous graft was performed at L4-5 in adult Toggenburg/Alpine goats, using both osteogenic spinal instrumentation (plus electrical stimulation) and standard spinal instrumentation (no electrical stimulation). At terminal time points (3 months, 6 months), animals were killed and lumbar spines were explanted for radiographic analysis using a SOMATOM Dual Source Definition CT Scanner and high-resolution Microcat II CT Scanner. Trabecular continuity, radiodensity within the fusion mass, and regional bone formation were examined to determine successful spinal fusion. RESULTS Quantitative analysis of average bone density in pedicle screw beds confirmed that electroactive pedicle screws used in the osteogenic spinal system focally enhanced bone density in instrumented vertebral bodies. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of high-resolution CT scans of explanted lumbar spines further demonstrated that the osteogenic spinal system induced solid

  18. Spinal cord injury at birth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenger-Gron, Jesper; Kock, Kirsten; Nielsen, Rasmus G

    2008-01-01

    UNLABELLED: A case of perinatally acquired spinal cord injury (SCI) is presented. The foetus was vigorous until birth, the breech presented and delivery was performed by a non-traumatic Caesarean section. The infant displayed symptoms of severe SCI but diagnosis was delayed due to severe co...

  19. Immunotherapy strategies for spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong-Tang; Lu, Xiu-Min; Chen, Kai-Ting; Shu, Ya-Hai; Qiu, Chun-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Regeneration in the central nervous system (CNS) of adult mammalian after traumatic injury is limited, which often causes permanent functional motor and sensory loss. After spinal cord injury (SCI), the lack of regeneration is mainly attributed to the presence of a hostile microenvironment, glial scarring, and cavitation. Besides, inflammation has also been proved to play a crucial role in secondary degeneration following SCI. The more prominent treatment strategies in experimental models focus mainly on drugs and cell therapies, however, only a few strategies applied in clinical studies and therapies still have only limited effects on the repair of SCI. Recently, the interests in immunotherapy strategies for CNS are increasing in number and breadth. Immunotherapy strategies have made good progresses in treating many CNS degenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), stroke, and multiple sclerosis (MS). However, the strategies begin to be considered to the treatment of SCI and other neurological disorders in recent years. Besides anti-inflamatory therapy, immunization with protein vaccines and DNA vaccines has emerged as a novel therapy strategy because of the simplicity of preparation and application. An inflammatory response followed by spinal cord injury, and is controled by specific signaling molecules, such as some cytokines playing a crucial role. As a result, appropriate immunoregulation, the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and anti-inflammatory cytokines may be an effective therapy strategy for earlier injury of spinal cord. In addition, myelinassociated inhibitors (MAIs) in the injured spinal cord, such as Nogo, myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) and oligodendrocyte- myelin glycoprotein (OMgp) are known to prevent axonal regeneration through their co-receptors, and to trigger demyelinating autoimmunity through T cell-mediated harmful autoimmune response. The antagonism of the MAIs through vaccinating with

  20. Restoration of Bladder and Bowel Function Using Electrical Stimulation and Block after Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) VA Palo Alto Health Care System /PAVIR 3801 Miranda...records of 779 patients with spinal cord injury attending the Spinal Cord Injury Service of the VA Palo Alto Health Care System have been examined to...DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response

  1. Exercise-Dependent Modulation of Neurourological Health Following Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    complete cervical spinal cord injury in human. Electromyogr Clin Neurophysiol 50, 155 (Apr-Jun, 2010). 4. P. J. Ward et al., Novel multi-system functional...laminectomy of the T9 vertebra , which overlies the T10 por- tion of the spinal cord.21 The Infinite Horizon impactor device (Precision Systems and...Instrumentation, LLC; Fairfax Station, VA) was used to make a 210 kilodyne contusion injury.22 The rostral and caudal sections of vertebrae (T8 and T10) were

  2. Transplantation of olfactory ensheathing cells for promoting regeneration following spinal cord injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kaijun Liu

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the status of olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) transplantation in facilitating the regeneration of spinal cord injury.DATA SOURCES: Articles about OECs transplantation in treating spinal cord injury were searched in Pubmed database published in English from January 1981 to December 2005 by using the keywords of "olfactory ensheathing cells, transplantation, spinal cord injury".STUDY SELECTION: The data were checked primarily, literatures related to OECs transplantation and the regeneration of spinal cord injury were selected, whereas the repetitive studies and reviews were excluded.DATA EXTRACTION: Totally 43 articles about OECs transplantation and the regeneration and repair of spinal cord injury were collected, and the repetitive ones were excluded.DATA SYNTHESIS: There were 35 articles accorded with the criteria. OECs are the olfactory ensheathing glias isolated from olfactory bulb and olfactory nerve tissue. OECs have the characters of both Schwann cells in central nervous system and peripheral astrocytes. The transplanted OECs can migrate in the damaged spinal cord of host, can induce and support the regeneration, growth and extension of damaged neuritis.Besides, transgenic technique can enable it to carry some exogenous genes that promote neuronal regeneration, and express some molecules that can facilitate neural regeneration, so as to ameliorate the internal environment of nerve injury, induce the regeneration of damaged spinal cord neurons, which can stimulate the regeneration potential of the damaged spinal cord to reach the purpose of spinal cord regeneration and functional recovery.CONCLUSION: OECs are the glial cells with the energy for growth at mature phase, they can myelinize axons, secrete various biological nutrition factors, and then protect and support neurons, also facilitate neural regeneration. OECs have been successfully isolated from nasal olfactory mucosa and olfactory nerve.Therefore, autologous transplantation

  3. Pressure changes in spinal canal and evaluation of spinal cord injuries in spinal section subjected to impact

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To observe pressure changes in the spinal canal of the vertebrarium subjected to impact. From the point of view of impact, pressure changes and spinal cord injuries, the relationship between the type of spinal fracture and the severity of spinal cord injuries were analyzed and some experimental data were provided for early evaluation of severity of spinal cord injuries.   Methods: An experimental model of spinal burst fracture was made with Type BIM-I bio-impact machine and techniques of high velocity vertical loading in static pattern and stress shielding were adopted. Vertebral sections T10-L4 taken from fresh cadavers were impacted and pressure changes in the spinal canal were observed. The types and severity of spinal fracture were studied with gross and radiography examination.   Results: Great positive pressure wave (wave A) in the spinal canal of the 4 vertebral specimens with burst fracture was recorded. The peak value of pressure was correlated with the severity of posterior column injuries. Generally, the peak value of pressure was low in the samples with posterior column injuries, but high in the samples without injuries. The predominant features of fractures were burst fractures of vertebral body and severe destruction of the skeletal and fiber structure of the spinal canal. Positive and negative pressure waves (wave B) were recorded in 2 vertebral samples in which no significant abnormal changes were found by radiography examination, however, a little liquid effusion in the vertebral body was found by gross examination.   Conclusions: The type of pressure wave in the spinal canal is related to the deformation or the destruction of the spinal canal structure. The peak value of the pressure is non-linearly related to the obstruction in the spinal canal, but related to posterior column injuries.

  4. Imaging Serotonergic Fibers in the Mouse Spinal Cord Using the CLARITY/CUBIC Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Huazheng; Schofield, Emma; Paxinos, George

    2016-02-26

    Long descending fibers to the spinal cord are essential for locomotion, pain perception, and other behaviors. The fiber termination pattern in the spinal cord of the majority of these fiber systems have not been thoroughly investigated in any species. Serotonergic fibers, which project to the spinal cord, have been studied in rats and opossums on histological sections and their functional significance has been deduced based on their fiber termination pattern in the spinal cord. With the development of CLARITY and CUBIC techniques, it is possible to investigate this fiber system and its distribution in the spinal cord, which is likely to reveal previously unknown features of serotonergic supraspinal pathways. Here, we provide a detailed protocol for imaging the serotonergic fibers in the mouse spinal cord using the combined CLARITY and CUBIC techniques. The method involves perfusion of a mouse with a hydrogel solution and clarification of the tissue with a combination of clearing reagents. Spinal cord tissue was cleared in just under two weeks, and the subsequent immunofluorescent staining against serotonin was completed in less than ten days. With a multi-photon fluorescent microscope, the tissue was scanned and a 3D image was reconstructed using Osirix software.

  5. Computation of trunk muscle forces, spinal loads and stability in whole-body vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazrgari, B.; Shirazi-Adl, A.; Kasra, M.

    2008-12-01

    Whole-body vibration has been indicated as a risk factor in back disorders. Proper prevention and treatment management, however, requires a sound knowledge of associated muscle forces and loads on the spine. Previous trunk model studies have either neglected or over-simplified the trunk redundancy with time-varying unknown muscle forces. Trunk stability has neither been addressed. A novel iterative dynamic kinematics-driven approach was employed to evaluate muscle forces, spinal loads and system stability in a seated subject under a random vertical base excitation with ˜±1 g peak acceleration contents. This iterative approach satisfied equations of motion in all directions/levels while accounting for the nonlinear passive resistance of the ligamentous spine. The effect of posture, co-activity in abdominal muscles and changes in buttocks stiffness were also investigated. The computed vertical accelerations were in good agreement with measurements. The input base excitation, via inertial and muscle forces, substantially influenced spinal loads and system stability. The flexed posture in sitting increased the net moment, muscle forces and passive spinal loads while improving the trunk stability. Similarly, the introduction of low to moderate antagonistic coactivity in abdominal muscles increased the passive spinal loads and improved the spinal stability. A trade-off, hence, exists between lower muscle forces and spinal loads on one hand and more stable spine on the other. Base excitations with larger peak acceleration contents substantially increase muscle forces/spinal loads and, hence, the risk of injury.

  6. Oxygenation status of cervical carcinomas before and during spinal anesthesia for application of brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weitmann, H.D.; Knocke, T.H.; Poetter, R. [Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiobiology, Univ. of Vienna, General Hospital of Vienna (Austria); Gustorff, B. [Dept. of Anesthesia and General Intensive Care B, Univ. of Vienna, General Hospital of Vienna (Austria); Vaupel, P. [Inst. of Physiology and Pathophysiology, Univ. of Mainz (Germany)

    2003-09-01

    Background and Purpose: To date, no information is available concerning the impact of spinal anesthesia on the oxygenation status of carcinomas of the uterine cervix. The aim of this study was therefore to determine the influence of spinal anesthesia on the oxygenation status of cervical carcinomas. Patients and Methods: In ten patients with cervical carcinoma who received spinal anesthesia for a first application of brachytherapy, intratumoral pO{sub 2} measurements (pO{sub 2} histography system, Eppendorf-Netheler-Hinz, Hamburg, Germany) were performed. Systemic parameters were documented prior to and during spinal anesthesia. Patients breathed room air spontaneously. For further evaluation, all intratumoral pO{sub 2} values were pooled, and overall median pO{sub 2} values and fractions of hypoxic pO{sub 2} values {<=} 5 mm Hg were calculated. Overall median pO{sub 2} values in the subcutis were also calculated. Results: There were no significant changes of systemic parameters, median subcutaneous pO{sub 2} values, median intratumoral pO{sub 2} values, and the fractions of hypoxic pO{sub 2} values {<=} 5 mm Hg in the tumor upon administration of spinal anesthesia. The variability of measured pO{sub 2} values increased during spinal anesthesia, although substantial changes in the oxygenation status were only seen in individual cases (n = 2). Conclusion: This study shows for the first time that the oxygenation status of cervical carcinomas, in general, is not influenced by spinal anesthesia prior to application of brachytherapy. To conclude, the data presented suggest that reliable pO{sub 2} measurements can be performed under spinal anesthesia. At the same time, since no substantial changes in tumor oxygenation were observed, spinal anesthesia should not affect the O{sub 2}-related efficacy of high-dose-rate brachytherapy. (orig.)

  7. STP Position Paper: Recommended Practices for Sampling and Processing the Nervous System (Brain, Spinal Cord, Nerve, and Eye) during Nonclinical General Toxicity Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Society of Toxicologic Pathology charged a Nervous System Sampling Working Group with devising recommended practices to routinely screen the central and peripheral nervous systems in Good Laboratory Practice-type nonclinical general toxicity studies. Brains should be trimmed ...

  8. STP Position Paper: Recommended Practices for Sampling and Processing the Nervous System (Brain, Spinal Cord, Nerve, and Eye) during Nonclinical General Toxicity Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Society of Toxicologic Pathology charged a Nervous System Sampling Working Group with devising recommended practices to routinely screen the central and peripheral nervous systems in Good Laboratory Practice-type nonclinical general toxicity studies. Brains should be trimmed ...

  9. Spinal curvature measurement by tracked ultrasound snapshots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungi, Tamas; King, Franklin; Kempston, Michael; Keri, Zsuzsanna; Lasso, Andras; Mousavi, Parvin; Rudan, John; Borschneck, Daniel P; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2014-02-01

    Monitoring spinal curvature in adolescent kyphoscoliosis requires regular radiographic examinations; however, the applied ionizing radiation increases the risk of cancer. Ultrasound imaging is favored over radiography because it does not emit ionizing radiation. Therefore, we tested an ultrasound system for spinal curvature measurement, with the help of spatial tracking of the ultrasound transducer. Tracked ultrasound was used to localize vertebral transverse processes as landmarks along the spine to measure curvature angles. The method was tested in two scoliotic spine models by localizing the same landmarks using both ultrasound and radiographic imaging and comparing the angles obtained. A close correlation was found between tracked ultrasound and radiographic curvature measurements. Differences between results of the two methods were 1.27 ± 0.84° (average ± SD) in an adult model and 0.96 ± 0.87° in a pediatric model. Our results suggest that tracked ultrasound may become a more tolerable and more accessible alternative to radiographic spine monitoring in adolescent kyphoscoliosis.

  10. A clinicopathological analysis of unusual extraventricular neurocytoma of spinal cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Zhi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Extraventricular neurocytoma (EVN is an unusual tumor and has been recently accepted as a new brain tumor entity by World Health Organization (WHO classification. It has been reported in several locations outside the typical supratentorial ventricular system, including the cerebral hemispheres, cerebellum, pons, spinal cord, cauda equine and retina. Only a few cases have been described in the spinal cord in the literature. It is a diagnostic challenge for clinicians and histopathologists to differentiate EVN from other spinal tumors because of its similarities in histological and immunohistochemical findings, as well as its non-specific radiological manifestation. Herein we describe a case of unusual intramedullary EVN in spinal cord. The clinicopathology of this tumor and its differential diagnosis are discussed. Methods The clinical manifestation of a patient with primary EVN occurring C6-T3 level of spinal cord was presented retrospectively. Gross totally resected mass was routinely paraffin-embedded and stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Dako EnVision immunohistochemical staining system was used to detect the tumor antigen expressions, including vimentin (Vim, cytokeratin (CK, epithelial membrane antigen (EMA, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, S-100 protein (S-100, synaptophysin (Syn, chromogranin (CgA, neuron-specific enolase (NSE, Neuronal nuclei (NeuN, oligodendrocytes transcription factor-2 (Oligo-2 and Ki-67. Results A 47-year-old male patient presented with 1 year history of weakness in both upper limbs associated with an increasing neck back pain. There was no paraesthesia in limbs. MRI of the whole spine revealed a heterogeneous intramedullary mass resembling an ependymoma extending from the C6 to T3 level with heterogeneous enhancement after contrast administration. Laminectomy and midline opening of the dura were performed. The spinal lesion appeared to have no capsule and locate intramedullary. The lesion did not

  11. Neuroimaging for spine and spinal cord surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyanagi, Izumi [Hokkaido Neurosurgical Memorial Hospital (Japan); Iwasaki, Yoshinobu; Hida, Kazutoshi

    2001-01-01

    Recent advances in neuroimaging of the spine and spinal cord are described based upon our clinical experiences with spinal disorders. Preoperative neuroradiological examinations, including magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and computerized tomography (CT) with three-dimensional reconstruction (3D-CT), were retrospectively analyzed in patients with cervical spondylosis or ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (130 cases), spinal trauma (43 cases) and intramedullary spinal cord tumors (92 cases). CT scan and 3D-CT were useful in elucidating the spine pathology associated with degenerative and traumatic spine diseases. Visualization of the deformity of the spine or fracture-dislocation of the spinal column with 3D-CT helped to determine the correct surgical treatment. MR imaging was most important in the diagnosis of both spine and spinal cord abnormalities. The axial MR images of the spinal cord were essential in understanding the laterality of the spinal cord compression in spinal column disorders and in determining surgical approaches to the intramedullary lesions. Although non-invasive diagnostic modalities such as MR imaging and CT scans are adequate for deciding which surgical treatment to use in the majority of spine and spinal cord disorders, conventional myelography is still needed in the diagnosis of nerve root compression in some cases of cervical spondylosis. (author)

  12. Pathogenesis of spinally mediated hyperalgesia in diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Khara M; Jiang, Yun; Svensson, Camilla I; Calcutt, Nigel A

    2007-06-01

    Hyperalgesia to noxious stimuli is accompanied by increased spinal cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 protein in diabetic rats. The present studies were initiated to establish causality between increased spinal COX-2 activity and hyperalgesia during diabetes and to assess the potential involvement of polyol pathway activity in the pathogenesis of spinally mediated hyperalgesia. Rats with 1, 2, or 4 weeks of streptozotocin-induced diabetes exhibited significantly increased levels of spinal COX-2 protein and activity, along with exaggerated paw flinching in response to 0.5% paw formalin injection. Increased flinching of diabetic rats was attenuated by intrathecal pretreatment with a selective COX-2 inhibitor immediately before formalin injection, confirming the involvement of COX-2 activity in diabetic hyperalgesia. Chronic treatment with insulin or ICI222155, an aldose reductase inhibitor (ARI) previously shown to prevent spinal polyol accumulation and formalin-evoked hyperalgesia in diabetic rats, prevented elevated spinal COX-2 protein and activity in diabetic rats. In contrast, the ARI IDD676 had no effect on spinal polyol accumulation, elevated spinal COX-2, or hyperalgesia to paw formalin injection. In the spinal cord, aldose reductase immunoreactivity was present solely in oligodendrocytes, which also contained COX-2 immunoreactivity. Polyol pathway flux in spinal oligodendrocytes provides a pathogenic mechanism linking hyperglycemia to hyperalgesia in diabetic rats.

  13. Regeneration of descending projections to the spinal motor neurons after spinal hemisection in the goldfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Akihito; Goris, Richard C; Funakoshi, Kengo

    2007-06-25

    Following spinal transection, descending spinal projections from goldfish brainstem neurons spontaneously regenerate beyond the lesion site. The nucleus of the medial longitudinal fasciculus (nFLM), which has a critical role in swimming, also sends regenerated axons over a long distance to the ipsilateral spinal cord. To examine whether regenerated axons re-innervate the appropriate targets, we injected rhodamine dextran amine (RDA) into the nFLM of spinally transected goldfish and examined anterogradely labeled axons in the spinal cord. In intact controls, there were many RDA-labeled boutons or varicosities in the spinal cord in close apposition to both neurons positive for calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), and those negative for CGRP. This suggests that the nFLM neurons project axons directly to the motoneurons and interneurons in the spinal cord. Four days after hemisection 1 mm caudal to the rostral end of the spinal cord, the number of RDA-labeled boutons in close apposition to the spinal neurons was significantly decreased on the side ipsilateral to the injection. Six to twelve weeks after spinal hemisection, regenerated axons ran through the repaired lesion site, and the number of RDA-labeled boutons or varicosities in close apposition to the ipsilateral spinal neurons had returned to the control level. These findings suggest that the midbrain-spinal pathway, critical for locomotion in fish, spontaneously regenerates beyond the lesion site to re-innervate the appropriately innervated targets after spinal lesion.

  14. Electronic spinal posture detection

    OpenAIRE

    Thoné, Jef; Jourand, Philippe; Puers, Robert

    2009-01-01

    A wearable automatic monitoring system for back posture has been developed and tested. Making use of only five accelerometers placed on strategic locations on the back, a stand alone system enables detection, logging and feedback of the patient’s posture. The system enables alerting the patient of a bad posture, or long-term data logging to analyze the patient’s posture over a prolonged period.

  15. Akhirin regulates the proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells in intact and injured mouse spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulhaleem, Felemban Athary M; Song, Xiaohong; Kawano, Rie; Uezono, Naohiro; Ito, Ayako; Ahmed, Giasuddin; Hossain, Mahmud; Nakashima, Kinichi; Tanaka, Hideaki; Ohta, Kunimasa

    2015-05-01

    Although the central nervous system is considered a comparatively static tissue with limited cell turnover, cells with stem cell properties have been isolated from most neural tissues. The spinal cord ependymal cells show neural stem cell potential in vitro and in vivo in injured spinal cord. However, very little is known regarding the ependymal niche in the mouse spinal cord. We previously reported that a secreted factor, chick Akhirin, is expressed in the ciliary marginal zone of the eye, where it works as a heterophilic cell-adhesion molecule. Here, we describe a new crucial function for mouse Akhirin (M-AKH) in regulating the proliferation and differentiation of progenitors in the mouse spinal cord. During embryonic spinal cord development, M-AKH is transiently expressed in the central canal ependymal cells, which possess latent neural stem cell properties. Targeted inactivation of the AKH gene in mice causes a reduction in the size of the spinal cord and decreases BrdU incorporation in the spinal cord. Remarkably, the expression patterns of ependymal niche molecules in AKH knockout (AKH-/-) mice are different from those of AKH+/+, both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, we provide evidence that AKH expression in the central canal is rapidly upregulated in the injured spinal cord. Taken together, these results indicate that M-AKH plays a crucial role in mouse spinal cord formation by regulating the ependymal niche in the central canal.

  16. Spinal tuberculoma in a patient with spinal myxopapillary ependymoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arora Brijesh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Intramedullary spinal tuberculosis is a clinical curiosity. A 19-year-old female was diagnosed and treated for lumbosacral myxopapllary ependy moma (MPE. Three years later, she presented with back pain and hypoesthesia of the left upper limb. Besides revealing local recurrence, the MRI demonstrated a fresh lesion in the cervicomedullary area. The latter was operated and the histopathology revealed a tuberculoma.

  17. Clinical outcome after traumatic spinal fractures in patients with ankylosing spinal disorders compared with control patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerveld, L.A.; van Bemmel, J.C.; Dhert, W.J.A.; Öner, F.C.; Verlaan, J.J.

    2014-01-01

    Background context The clinical outcome of patients with ankylosing spinal disorders (ASDs) sustaining a spinal fracture has been described to be worse compared with the general trauma population. Purpose To investigate clinical outcome (neurologic deficits, complications, and mortality) after spina

  18. Repair, reconstruction, regeneration and rehabilitation strategies to spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turbes, C C

    1997-01-01

    The structural changes seen in the transected spinal cord followed by transplantation of the distal ends (neuroma) of intercostal nerve inserted into the spinal cord proximal and distal to the transection lesion site. This activates CNS axonal regeneration. 2,3,4 These changes refer to the plasticity in the nervous system following damage to the spinal cord. There is regeneration and growth and synapotogenesis and remodeling of synaptic connections, development of reflex activity in the denervated cord. Nerve growth factors and neurotrophic factors sustain and maintain a degree of functional integrity of structural neural circuitry. 2,3,4,13 The end result is standing, stepping, and reflex walking in 28 female mature dogs. 2,3,4,5 Electrical stimulation of the anastomosed intercostal nerves resulted in hind limb movements and recording of the electromyograms of the contracting muscles. Twenty-six control dogs and animals with behavioral depression are unable to follow rehabilitative procedures developed muscle atrophy, ankylosis of joints, decrease in bone density, decrease in reflex activity of the spinal cord distal to the transection. 2,3,4,5

  19. Spinal epidural abscess: correlation between MRI findings and outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tung, G.A.; Yim, J.W.K.; Rogg, J.M. [Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Brown University School of Medicine, Providence, RI (United States); Mermel, L.A.; Philip, L. [Dept. of Internal Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Brown University School of Medicine and Rhode Island Hospital, Providence (United States)

    1999-12-01

    Our purpose was to determine if specific MRI findings in spinal epidural abscess (SEA), at the time of diagnosis, are associated with the clinical outcome. The clinical records and MRI studies of 18 patients with SEA were reviewed and follow-up was obtained from the outpatient medical record, telephone interview, or both. The association between findings on contrast-enhanced MRI and clinical outcome (weakness, neck or back pain, and incomplete functional recovery) was evaluated. With univariate analysis, narrowing of 50 % or more of the central spinal canal (P = 0.03), peripheral contrast-enhancement (P = 0.05), and abnormal spinal cord signal intensity (P = 0.05) were associated with weakness at follow-up. Persistent neck or back pain was associated with spinal canal narrowing (P = 0.02), peripheral contrast-enhancement (P = 0.02), and an abscess longer than 3 cm (P = 0.04) on MRI. Incomplete clinical recovery was associated with both abscess length (P = 0.01) and the severity of canal narrowing (P = 0.01). Abscess length, enhancement pattern, and severity of canal narrowing can be incorporated in a grading system that can be used to predict outcome. (orig.)

  20. Spinal pharmacology of tactile allodynia in diabetic rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcutt, Nigel A; Chaplan, Sandra R

    1997-01-01

    Rats develop tactile allodynia to stimulation of the plantar surface of the hindpaw with von Frey filaments within days of the onset of streptozotocin-induced diabetes. This is prevented by insulin and alleviated by systemic lignocaine, but the aetiology is unknown.Using indwelling lumbar intrathecal catheters to deliver pharmacological agents, we have investigated whether tactile allodynia in streptozotocin-diabetic rats is dependent on mechanisms associated with spinal sensitization, by assessing the efficacy of agents that inhibit specific components of spinal nociceptive processing.Dose-dependent inhibition of tactile allodynia in diabetic rats was noted with the N-type calcium channel antagonist SNX 239, the α2-adrenoceptor agonist dexmedetomidine, the μ-opioid receptor agonist morphine, the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist AP5 and the non-NMDA receptor antagonist NBQX.No effect on tactile allodynia was noted after intrathecal administration of the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), the cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor ketorolac, the L-type calcium channel inhibitor diltiazem or any vehicle.These data suggest that the tactile allodynia of diabetic rats involves spinal glutamatergic pathways but is not associated with spinal release of nitric oxide or prostaglandins. PMID:9421298

  1. Glial implications in transplantation therapy of spinal cord injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Shi-wen; XIE Yu-feng

    2009-01-01

    Spinal cord injuries are damages that result in complete or partial loss of sensation and/or mobility and affect the life qualities of many patients. Their pathophysiology in-cludes primary and secondary processes, which are related with the activation of astrocytes and microgliacytes and the degeneration of oligodendrocytes. Although transplan-tation of embryonic stem cells or neural progenitor cells is an attractive strategy for repair of the injured central ner-vous system (CNS), transplantation of these cells alone for acute spinal cord injuries has not resulted in robust axon regeneration beyond the injury sites. This may be due to the progenitor cells differentiating to the cell types that sup-port axon growth poorly and/or their inability to modify the inhibitory environment of adult CNS after injury. Recent studies indicate that transplantation of glial progenitor cells has exhibited beneficial effects on the recovery and promis-ing future for the therapy strategy of spinal cord injury. In this review, we summarized the data from recent literature regarding glial implications in transplantation therapy of spinal cord injury.

  2. Non-traumatic spinal extradural haematoma: magnetic resonance findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Law, E.M.; Smith, P.J.; Fitt, G.; Hennessy, O.F. [St. Vincent`s Hospital, Fitzroy, VIC (Australia). University of Melbourne, Department of Medical Imaging

    1999-05-01

    Non-traumatic extradural spinal haematoma is an uncommon condition that is usually associated with a poor outcome. It may present acutely with signs and symptoms of major neurological dysfunction secondary to cord compression, or subacutely over a number of days or weeks with fluctuating symptoms. The exact aetiology of this condition is incompletely understood, but it is believed that the blood is venous in origin, as distinct from the arterial origin of intracranial extradural haematomas. Causes of non-traumatic extradural spinal haematoma include anticoagulation, vasculitis such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and spinal arteriovenous malformations. Conditions that may mimic an acute spinal haematoma include extradural abscess and extradural metastatic infiltration. It is important to make a diagnosis of extradural compression because surgery may offer the best hope in restoring neurological function in these patients. Imaging modalities used for the investigation of extradural haematomas include myelography, CT myelography (CTM) and MRI with or without gadolinium enhancement. The MR appearances of acute extradural abscess and extradural tumour can mimic an extradural haematoma. In subacute haematoma, owing to the magnetic properties of blood degradation products, MR is more specific in diagnosing and ageing of the haematoma. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd 11 refs., 3 figs.

  3. Spinal cord injuries in older children: is there a role for high-dose methylprednisolone?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Bhawana; Suresh, Srinivasan

    2011-12-01

    We present a retrospective case series of 15 children (aged 8-16 years) with blunt traumatic spinal cord injury who were treated with methylprednisolone as per the National Acute Spinal Cord Injury Study protocol. Of all patients, 12 (80%) were male. Causes were sports injuries (n = 9), motor vehicle crashes (n = 2), and falls (n = 4). Most injuries were nonskeletal (n = 14), and all patients had incomplete injury of the spinal cord. The most common location of tenderness was cervical (n = 7). Of the 15 patients, methylprednisolone was initiated within 3 hours in 13 patients and between 3 and 8 hours in 2 patients. All patients received the medication for 23 hours as per the National Acute Spinal Cord Injury Study protocol. Of the 15 patients, 13 recovered completely by 24 hours and were discharged with a diagnosis of spinal cord concussion. One patient had compression fracture of T5 and T3-T5 spinal contusion but no long-term neurological deficit. One patient was discharged with diagnosis of C1-C3 spinal cord contusion (by magnetic resonance imaging) and had partial recovery at 2 years after injury. All patients with a diagnosis of cord concussion had normal plain films of the spine and computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging findings. None of the patients had any associated major traumatic injuries to other organ systems. The high-dose steroid therapy did not result in any serious bacterial infections.

  4. Sensory and spinal inhibitory dorsal midline crossing is independent of Robo3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Daniel Comer

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Commissural neurons project across the midline at all levels of the central nervous system, providing bilateral communication critical for the coordination of motor activity and sensory perception. Midline crossing at the spinal ventral midline has been extensively studied and has revealed that multiple developmental lineages contribute to this commissural neuron population. Ventral midline crossing occurs in a manner dependent on Robo3 regulation of Robo/Slit signaling and the ventral commissure is absent in the spinal cord and hindbrain of Robo3 mutants. Midline crossing in the spinal cord is not limited to the ventral midline, however. While prior anatomical studies provide evidence that commissural axons also cross the midline dorsally, little is known of the genetic and molecular properties of dorsally-crossing neurons or of the mechanisms that regulate dorsal midline crossing. In this study, we describe a commissural neuron population that crosses the spinal dorsal midline during the last quarter of embryogenesis in discrete fiber bundles present throughout the rostrocaudal extent of the spinal cord. Using immunohistochemistry, neurotracing, and mouse genetics, we show that this commissural neuron population includes spinal inhibitory neurons and sensory nociceptors. While the floor plate and roof plate are dispensable for dorsal midline crossing, we show that this population depends on Robo/Slit signaling yet crosses the dorsal midline in a Robo3-independent manner. The dorsally-crossing commissural neuron population we describe suggests a substrate circuitry for pain processing in the dorsal spinal cord.

  5. Recurrent spinal meningioma: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hoi Jung; Paeng, Sung Hwa; Kim, Sung Tae; Jung, Yong Tae

    2012-09-01

    Meningiomas are the second most common intradural spinal tumors accounting for 25% of all spinal tumors. Being a slow growing and invariably benign tumor, it responds favorably to surgical excision. In addition, spinal meningioma has low recurrence rates. However, we experienced a case of intradural extramedullary spinal meningioma which recurred 16 years after the initial surgery on a 64-year-old woman. She presented with progressive neurological symptoms and had a surgical history of removal of thoracic spinal meningioma 16 years ago due to bilateral low leg weakness. She underwent a second operation at the same site and a pale yellowish tumor was excised, which was histopathologically confirmed as meningothelial meningioma, compared with previously transitional type. she showed neurological recovery after the operation. We, therefore, report the good results of this recurrent intradural spinal meningioma case developed after 16 years with literature review.

  6. Non-contiguous spinal injury in cervical spinal trauma: evaluation with cervical spine MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Soo Jung; Shin, Myung Jin; Kim, Sung Moon [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Sang Jin [Sanggyepaik Hospital, Inje University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-12-15

    We wished to evaluate the incidence of non-contiguous spinal injury in the cervicothoracic junction (CTJ) or the upper thoracic spines on cervical spinal MR images in the patients with cervical spinal injuries. Seventy-five cervical spine MR imagings for acute cervical spinal injury were retrospectively reviewed (58 men and 17 women, mean age: 35.3, range: 18-81 years). They were divided into three groups based on the mechanism of injury; axial compression, hyperflexion or hyperextension injury, according to the findings on the MR and CT images. On cervical spine MR images, we evaluated the presence of non-contiguous spinal injury in the CTJ or upper thoracic spine with regard to the presence of marrow contusion or fracture, ligament injury, traumatic disc herniation and spinal cord injury. Twenty-one cases (28%) showed CTJ or upper thoracic spinal injuries (C7-T5) on cervical spinal MR images that were separated from the cervical spinal injuries. Seven of 21 cases revealed overt fractures in the CTJs or upper thoracic spines. Ligament injury in these regions was found in three cases. Traumatic disc herniation and spinal cord injury in these regions were shown in one and two cases, respectively. The incidence of the non-contiguous spinal injuries in CTJ or upper thoracic spines was higher in the axial compression injury group (35.5%) than in the hyperflexion injury group (26.9%) or the hyperextension (25%) injury group. However, there was no statistical significance ({rho} > 0.05). Cervical spinal MR revealed non-contiguous CTJ or upper thoracic spinal injuries in 28% of the patients with cervical spinal injury. The mechanism of cervical spinal injury did not significantly affect the incidence of the non-contiguous CTJ or upper thoracic spinal injury.

  7. Spinal deformities in tall girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skogland, L B; Steen, H; Trygstad, O

    1985-04-01

    In a prospective study, 62 girls who consulted the paediatric department because of tall stature were examined for spinal deformities. Thirteen cases of scoliosis measuring 10 degrees or more were found. Eighteen girls had a thoracic kyphosis of more than 40 degrees and 11 had additional vertebral abnormalities indicating Scheuermann's disease. The incidence of scoliosis and Scheuermann's disease was much higher in our material than normal.

  8. Spinal trauma. An imaging approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cassar-Pullicino, V.N. [The Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital, Oswestry, Shropshire (United Kingdom). Dept. of Radiology; Imhof, H. [University and General Hospital Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Radiodiagnostics

    2006-07-01

    The diagnosis of trauma to the spine - where the slightest oversight may have catastrophic results - requires a thorough grasp of the spectrum of resultant pathology as well as the imaging modalities used in making an accurate diagnosis. In Spinal Trauma, the internationally renowned team of experts provides a comprehensive, cutting-edge exposition of the current vital role of imaging in the diagnosis and treatment of injuries to the axial skeleton. Beginning with a valuable clinical perspective of spinal trauma, the book offers the reader a unique overview of the biomechanics underlying the pathology of cervical trauma. Acute trauma topics include: - Optimization of imaging modalities - Malalignment - signs and significance - Vertebral fractures - detection and implications - Classification of thoraco-lumbar fractures - rationale and relevance - Neurovascular injury. Distilling decades of clinical and teaching expertise, the contributors further discuss the current role of imaging in special focus topics, which include: - The pediatric spine - Sports injuries - The rigid spine - Trauma in the elderly - Vertebral collapse, benign and malignant - Spinal trauma therapy - Vertebral fractures and osteoporosis - Neuropathic spine. All throughout the book, the focus is on understanding the injury, and its implications and complications, through 'an imaging approach'. Lavishly illustrated with hundreds of superb MR images and CT scans, and clear full-color drawings, the authors conclude with a look into the future, defining clinical trends and research directions. Spinal Trauma - with its broad scope, practical imaging approach, and current focus - is designed to enhance confidence and accuracy, making it essential reading for clinicians and radiologists at all levels. (orig.)

  9. Effectiveness of intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring during spinal surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina А. Kuzmina

    2016-12-01

    Conclusions. The application of IONM minimized the need for the wake-up test and significantly decreased the incidence of neurological complications caused by injury to the spinal cord and spinal roots during execution of spinal manipulations.

  10. Genetics Home Reference: spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kennedy spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy Kennedy's disease SBMA X-linked spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy Related ... Natural history of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA): a study of 223 Japanese patients. Brain. 2006 ...

  11. Spinal Cord Studies in the African Giant Rat (Cricetomys gambianus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    Keywords: African giant rat; spinal cord; spinal tract; nuclei; spinal segment; morphometry. ©Physiological Society .... cervical segment appeared as a vertical slit (Figure 3a), the second to the sixth ... Intermediomedial column. Lsg. Laminae of ...

  12. MRI Findings in Spinal Canal Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Barzin

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Spinal canal stenosis results from progressive narrowing of the central spinal canal and the lateral recesses. Primary (congenital lumbar spinal stenosis is associated with achondroplastic dwarfism. The spinal canal may become narrowed by bulging or protrusion of the intervertebral disc annulus, herniation of the nucleus pulposus posteriorly, thickening of the posterior longitudinal ligament, hypertrophy of the facet joints, hypertrophy of the ligamentum flavum, epidural fat deposition, spondylosis of the intervertebral disc margins and uncovertebral joint hypertrophy in the neck. The central canal and the neurorecess may be compromised by tumor infiltration, such as metastatic disease, or by infectious spondylitis."nAP diameter of the normal adult cervical canal has a mean value of 17-18 mm at vertebral levels C3-5. The lower cervical canal measures 12-14 mm. Cervical stenosis is associated with an AP diameter of less than 10 mm. The thoracic spinal canal varies from 12 to 14 mm in diameter in the adult. The diameter of the normal lumbar spinal canal varies from 15 to 27 mm. Lumbar stenosis results from a spinal canal diameter of less than 12 mm in some patients; a diameter of 10 mm is definitely stenotic."nSpinal MRI is the most suitable technique for the diagnosis of spinal stenosis. The examination should be performed using thin sections (3 mm and high resolution, including the axial and sagittal planes using T1-weighted, proton-density, and T2-weighted techniques. The bony and osteophytic components are seen best using a T2-weighted gradient-echo technique."nOn MRI, findings of spinal stenosis have a variable presentation depending on the specific disease. The goal of spinal imaging is to localize the site and level of disease and to help differentiate between conditions in which patients require surgery or conservative treatment."nIn this presentation, different kinds of spinal canal stenosis and their MRI findings would be discussed.

  13. Advanced Restoration Therapies in Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    including but not limited to traumatic brain injury , Alzheimer’s disease, cerebrovascular insults, and leukodystrophy. SECTION 2 – KEYWORDS Spinal...Spinal Cord Injury Annual Report to change our proposed anesthesia method from isofluorane to medetomidine. We have made the appropriate changes and...McKinley, W., and Tulsky, D. (2004). Late neurologic recovery after traumatic spinal cord injury . Arch Phys Med Rehabil 85, 1811-1817. Lorenz, D.J

  14. Spinal cord injury drives chronic brain changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Jure

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Only a few studies have considered changes in brain structures other than sensory and motor cortex after spinal cord injury, although cognitive impairments have been reported in these patients. Spinal cord injury results in chronic brain neuroinflammation with consequent neurodegeneration and cognitive decline in rodents. Regarding the hippocampus, neurogenesis is reduced and reactive gliosis increased. These long-term abnormalities could explain behavioral impairments exhibited in humans patients suffering from spinal cord trauma.

  15. An atypical case of segmental spinal dysgenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zana, Elodie; Chalard, Francois; Sebag, Guy [Hopital Robert Debre, Department of Paediatric Imaging, Paris (France); Mazda, Keyvan [Hopital Robert Debre, Department of Paediatric Orthopaedic Surgery, Paris (France)

    2005-09-01

    Spinal segmental dysgenesis is a complex closed dysraphism. The diagnostic criteria are: lumbar or thoracolumbar vertebral dysgenesis causing kyphosis, focal spinal cord narrowing without exiting roots, deformity of the lower limbs and paraplegia or paraparesis. We present a newborn who showed atypical features of bifocal spinal cord narrowing, without any vertebral abnormality at the proximal level. This seems to be a variant of this rare entity, whose early diagnosis is important, as surgical stabilisation of the spine is required. (orig.)

  16. Spinal myoclonus resembling belly dance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, I; Ueda, Y; Araki, K; Nakajima, K; Shibasaki, H

    1994-05-01

    A 63-year-old man presented with an 11-month history of progressive myoclonus in the right abdominal wall. Administration of clonazepam reduced the frequency and amplitude. When the therapy was discontinued, the frequency and amplitude of the myoclonus increased, and synchronous and weak myoclonus also was observed in the left abdomen. The trunk was twisted just after the appearance of the abdominal myoclonus associated with myoclonic jerks spreading from the rostral to caudal paraspinal muscles. Later in the clinical course, the myoclonus became stimulus sensitive and was induced by tendon tap given anywhere on the body, with the latency ranging from 50 to 150 ms irrespective of the sites of tapping. Myoclonus seen in the abdominal wall was segmental and considered to be of spinal origin. The reflex myoclonus had a 150-ms refractory period. It can be postulated that increased excitability of anterior horn cells at a certain segment might make a spino-bulbo-spinal reflex manifest at the corresponding segment. This myoclonus is considered to be a new form of spinal reflex myoclonus, because the abdominal myoclonic jerk seems to trigger another myoclonic jerk involving the paraspinal muscles.

  17. Perioperative Respiratory Disorders in Spinal Cord Compressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. A. Churlyaev

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study external respiration in patients with damage to the spinal cord of various genesis (compression myelopathy at the lower cervical and thoracic levels depending on the degree of its conduction disturbances in order to select an analgesic mode as part of postoperative intensive care. Subjects and methods. Before and 1—3, and 5—7 days after surgery, 30 patients with spinal cord damage at the lower cervical and thoracic levels were examined, by determining external respiratory function (vital capacity (VC, forced VC (FVC, forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1, Gaenslar index, average forced expiratory volume velocity (AFEVV25—75%; by performing cliniconeuro-logical and neurophysiological (electromyography (EMG, needle EMG, and somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP studies; according to these indices, the gender- and age-matched patients were divided into 2 groups: 1 those who had complete spinal cord conduction disturbances and 2 those who had incomplete one. According to the postoperative analgesia mode, the following groups were identified: A conventional systemic administration of opioid analgesics (promedol; B prolonged epidural blockade with anecaine solution at the Th2—3 level. External respiration was studied after disconnecting the patient from a respirator before and after analgesia. A control group comprised 18 apparently healthy volunteers. Results. Before surgery, restrictive respiratory disorders were observed in Group 1 and they were absent in Group 2. In the postoperative period, all the patients were found to have mixed disorders that were most pronounced in Group 1. In Group A, the postoperative duration of artificial ventilation was significantly greater and it was 160.0±21.0 minutes whereas it was 90.0±25.0 minutes in Group 2 (p<0.05. With postoperative analgesia, Group A showed 1.7—2.2-fold decreases in VC, FVC, FEV1, and AFEVV25—75% (p<0.05 as compared with the baseline levels. There was a

  18. A RARE CASE OF QUADRIPLEGIA DUE TO SPINAL EPIDURAL HAEMATOMA FOLLOWING SPINAL ANAESTHESIA

    OpenAIRE

    Meher Kumar; Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    Quadriplegia following spinal anaesthesia due to spinal epidural haematoma is a rare but critical complication that usually occurs within 24 hours to a few days of the procedure. I report a case of a 32 year old male who underwent Uretero - Renal Scopy (URS) and double ‘J’ (DJ) stenting for right ureteric calculus under spinal ...

  19. The expression of chemorepulsive guidance receptors and the regenerative abilities of spinal-projecting neurons after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jie; Laramore, Cindy; Shifman, Michael I

    2017-01-26

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) in mammals leads to permanent loss of function because axons do not regenerate in the central nervous system (CNS). To date, treatments based on neutralizing inhibitory environmental cues, such as the myelin-associated growth inhibitors and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans, or on adding neurotrophic factors, have had limited success in enhancing regeneration. Published studies suggested that multiple axon guidance cues (repulsive guidance molecule (RGM) family, semaphorins, ephrins, and netrins) persist in adult animals, and that their expression is upregulated after CNS injury. Moreover, many adult CNS neurons continue to express axon guidance receptors. We used the advantages of the lamprey CNS to test the hypotheses that the regenerative abilities of spinal-projecting neurons depend upon their expression of chemorepulsive guidance receptors. After complete spinal transection, lampreys recover behaviorally, and injured axons grow selectively in their correct paths. However, the large identified reticulospinal (RS) neurons in the lamprey brain are heterogeneous in their regenerative abilities - some are high regeneration capacity neurons (probability of axon regeneration >50%), others are low regeneration capacity neurons (regeneration capacity RS neurons that regenerate poorly, and that downregulation of Neogenin by morpholino antisense oligonucleotides enhances regeneration of RS axons after SCI. Moreover, lamprey CNS neurons co-express multiple guidance receptors (Neogenin, UNC5 and PlexinA), suggesting that the regenerative abilities of spinal-projecting neurons might reflect the summed influences of the chemorepulsive guidance receptors that they express. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Matrix Metalloproteinases as a Therapeutic Target to Improve Neurologic Recovery After Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    systemic side-effects, including bronchospasm, hypertension, and renal failure have been reported by others (Santos et al. , 2003) and published findings...inhibitor in a murine model of spinal cord injury (UCSF) and in dogs (Texas A & M, TAMU) that sustain naturally occurring spinal cord injuries...of GM6001 in 10 dogs supports the short-term safety of the drug. Plasma drug levels following a single dose are sustained at a significant level

  1. Spinal cord compression due to ethmoid adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, D R; Sweriduk, S T

    1987-10-15

    Adenocarcinoma of the ethmoid sinus is a rare tumor which has been epidemiologically linked to woodworking in the furniture industry. It has a low propensity to metastasize and has not been previously reported to cause spinal cord compression. A symptomatic epidural spinal cord compression was confirmed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan in a former furniture worker with widely disseminated metastases. The clinical features of ethmoid sinus adenocarcinoma and neoplastic spinal cord compression, and the comparative value of MRI scanning in the neuroradiologic diagnosis of spinal cord compression are reviewed.

  2. Improvements in spinal alignment after high tibial osteotomy in patients with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoon Hyuk; Dorj, Ariunzaya; Han, Ahreum; Kim, Kyungsoo; Nha, Kyung Wook

    2016-07-01

    Since the correlation between spinal and lower extremity alignments is high, high tibial osteotomy (HTO) surgery may also affect spinal alignment, where the spinal alignment parameters are the most important parameters for the evaluation of spinal disorders. In this study, the effect of HTO surgery on spinal alignment during gait was investigated by comparing spinal alignment parameters between patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) and healthy young controls. Eight patients (age, 55.0±5.1years; height, 160.3±7.0cm; weight, 71.3±14.1kg) with a medial compartment knee OA participated in the gait experiment two times approximately one week before and one year after HTO surgery and eight healthy young controls (age, 26.7±1.7years; height, 163.4±6.5cm; weight, 58.4±11.3kg) participated only once. Cervical curvature angle, thoracic curvature angle, lumbar curvature angle, coronal vertical axis, and coronal pelvic tilt in the coronal plane and cervical lordosis, thoracic kyphosis, lumbar lordosis, sagittal vertical axis, and sagittal pelvic tilt in the sagittal plane were estimated using motion analysis system with skin markers. All spinal alignment parameters after HTO surgery were significantly closer to those of healthy young subjects than those before HTO, especially in the coronal plane. These findings suggest that the HTO had a positive effect on spinal alignment, as well as lower extremity alignment, and moreover, reduced the abnormality that may result in spinal problems such as degeneration or pain.

  3. Preliminary Results of the Effect of Spinal Elongation in Microgravity on Seated Height

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajulu, Sudhakar; Young, Karen; Mesloh, Miranda

    2009-01-01

    The Constellation Program is designing a new vehicle for future space travel to the International Space Station and to the Moon and beyond. One major accommodation and design issue that needs to be addressed with the current seat layout design is spinal elongation. Spinal elongation is the spinal growth that occurs due to straightening of the spinal curve and expansion of the inter-verbal discs in microgravity. Spinal elongation is critical to the design of the seats, seat layout, suit fit, and crew accommodation because of the implications it can have on the a safe return of the crewmembers or during the mission. Inadequate clearance between crewmembers and/or between crewmember hardware interfaces may potentially result in injury during the mission or upon returning to earth. Therefore, design requirements need to be determined that will allow for the elongation of the spine. The current requirement as specified in the Human Systems Integration Requirement (HSIR) document states that a 3% increase in standing height must be accommodated. However, it cannot be assumed that the amount of standing height growth is equivalent to the amount of spinal elongation because of the variation in body proportions between the lower body and torso. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine the amount of spinal elongation for a seated posture for 6 Shuttle and 7 ISS missions. Crewmembers seated heights were collected before, during, and after spaceflight to determine the change in seated height and the amount of spinal growth that occurs due to microgravity. The changes in seated height will provide the designers with a design requirement that will allow for change in spinal growth for a seated posture. Preliminary results have shown that increase in seated height is greater than the 3% increase currently stated in the requirement.

  4. Inexpensive Attachment Device for Cell Therapy Administration into Injured Spinal Cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaquero, Jesús; Zurita, Mercedes; Fernández, Cecilia; Cotua, Carlos

    2016-12-01

    Cell therapy is configured as a promising strategy for the treatment of spinal cord injury (SCI), but it requires reliable systems to achieve microinjections with different rates and volumes, according to the different characteristics of the injured spinal cord tissue and the targets previously selected. We sought to describe an original and inexpensive device for support of microinjection systems in the course of spinal cord surgery. Our attachment device consists of an arch and a system of bars that can be fixed to the operating table and on which a microinjection pump can be displaced and fixed in the course of surgery. This device has been used for therapy administration into injured spinal cords. It is easy to use and permits reproducible results. We have described an original attachment device for the support of a microinjection pump. It is applicable to spinal cord surgery and should be considered as a cheap solution for intralesional administration of cell therapy after spinal cord injury. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. On-scene treatment of spinal injuries in motor sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreinest, M; Scholz, M; Trafford, P

    2016-12-22

    Because spinal cord injuries can have fatal consequences for injured race car drivers, prehospital treatment of spinal injuries is a major concern in motor sports. A structured procedure for assessing trauma patients and their treatment should follow established ABCDE principles. Only then, a stable patient could be further examined and appropriate measures can be undertaken. For patients in an acute life-threatening condition, rapid transport must be initiated and should not be delayed by measures that are not indicated. If a competitor must first be extricated from the racing vehicle, the correct method of extrication must be chosen. To avoid secondary injury to the spine after a racing accident, in-line extrication from the vehicle and immobilization of the patient are standard procedures in motor sports and have been used for decades. Since immobilization can be associated with disadvantages and complications, the need for immobilization of trauma patients outside of motor sports medicine has become the subject of an increasing number of reports in the scientific literature. Even in motor sports, where specific safety systems that offer spinal protection are present, the indications for spinal immobilization need to be carefully considered rather than being blindly adopted as a matter of course. The aim of this article is to use recent literature to present an overview about the treatment of spinal injuries in motor sports. Further, we present a new protocol for indications for immobilizing the spine in motor sports that is based on the ABCDE principles and takes into account the condition of the patient.

  6. Spinal cord injury and its association with blunt head trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paiva WS

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Wellingson S Paiva, Arthur MP Oliveira, Almir F Andrade, Robson LO Amorim, Leonardo JO Lourenço, Manoel J TeixeiraDivision of Neurosurgery, University of São Paulo, BrazilBackground: Severe and moderate head injury can cause misdiagnosis of a spinal cord injury, leading to devastating long-term consequences. The objective of this study is to identify risk factors involving spine trauma and moderate-to-severe brain injury.Methods: A prospective study involving 1617 patients admitted in the emergency unit was carried out. Of these patients, 180 with moderate or severe head injury were enrolled. All patients were submitted to three-view spine series X-ray and thin cut axial CT scans for spine trauma investigations.Results: 112 male patients and 78 female patients, whose ages ranged from 11 to 76 years (mean age, 34 years. The most common causes of brain trauma were pedestrians struck by motor vehicles (31.1%, car crashes (27.7%, and falls (25%. Systemic lesions were present in 80 (44.4% patients and the most common were fractures, and lung and spleen injuries. 52.8% had severe and 47.2% moderate head trauma. Fourteen patients (7.8% suffered spinal cord injury (12 in cervical spine, one in lumbar, and one thoracic spine. In elderly patients, the presence of associated lesions and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS < 9 were statistically significant as risk factors (P < 0.05 for spine injury.Conclusion: Spinal cord injury related to moderate and severe brain trauma usually affects the cervical spine. The incidence of spinal lesions and GCS < 9 points were related to greater incidence of spinal cord injury.Keywords: head injury, spine trauma, risk factors

  7. [Vascular and autonomic disorders of the spinal cord in dystopia of the spinal motor segment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gongal'skiĭ, V V; Kuftyreva, T P

    1992-01-01

    Microcirculation disorders may cause functional deviation in gray matter cells of the spinal cord. One of the setting moments of the disorders is the subluxation of a vertebra as a result of the disturbance in carrying ability of the spinal disc in case of spinal osteochondrosis. In this position the soft tissues of the spinal motional well innervated segment are stretched, which induces irritation in the segmental part of the spinal cord including vegetative nervous structures. Subluxation of a vertebra causes changes in the structures and in the microcirculation vessels which grow simultaneously and this permits supposing their interrelation.

  8. Robust local intervertebral disc alignment for spinal MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisman, James; Höppner, Jan; Huang, Szu-Hao; Zhang, Li; Lai, Shang-Hong; Odry, Benjamin; Novak, Carol L.

    2006-03-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is frequently used to diagnose abnormalities in the spinal intervertebral discs. Owing to the non-isotropic resolution of typical MR spinal scans, physicians prefer to align the scanner plane with the disc in order to maximize the diagnostic value and to facilitate comparison with prior and follow-up studies. Commonly a planning scan is acquired of the whole spine, followed by a diagnostic scan aligned with selected discs of interest. Manual determination of the optimal disc plane is tedious and prone to operator variation. A fast and accurate method to automatically determine the disc alignment can decrease examination time and increase the reliability of diagnosis. We present a validation study of an automatic spine alignment system for determining the orientation of intervertebral discs in MR studies. In order to measure the effectiveness of the automatic alignment system, we compared its performance with human observers. 12 MR spinal scans of adult spines were tested. Two observers independently indicated the intervertebral plane for each disc, and then repeated the procedure on another day, in order to determine the inter- and intra-observer variability associated with manual alignment. Results were also collected for the observers utilizing the automatic spine alignment system, in order to determine the method's consistency and its accuracy with respect to human observers. We found that the results from the automatic alignment system are comparable with the alignment determined by human observers, with the computer showing greater speed and consistency.

  9. 腰椎融合联合Coflex动态固定手术治疗腰椎退行性疾病%Spinal fusion combined with dynamic interspinous fixation with Coflex system for lumbar degenerative disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李忠海; 王诗媛; 唐昊; 马辉; 张秋林; 侯铁胜

    2011-01-01

    目的:总结腰椎后路椎间融合术联合Coflex动态固定术治疗腰椎退行性疾病的临床疗效.方法:对2008年3月至2010年3月应用腰椎后路椎间融合术联合Coflex动态固定治疗的18例腰椎退行性疾病患者(均为双节段)的临床资料进行回顾性总结分析.男11例,女7例;年龄41~62岁,平均50.2岁.分析内容包括:ODI指数、腰痛和下肢痛的VAS评分,并通过腰椎动力位X线观察活动度(ROM)、椎间隙高度(DHI)的变化情况.结果:所有患者获得随访,时间6~30个月,平均12个月.在末次随访时.腰痛VAS评分、下肢痛VAS评分及ODI指数均较术前明显改善(P<0.001).腰痛VAS评分术前(7.20±0.90)分.末次随访(1.50±0.90)分;下肢痛VAS评分术前(5.20±0.90)分,末次随访(1.10±0.80)分.ODI指数术前(52.50±5.90)%,未次随访(15.90±5.80)%.Coflex置入节段的DHI术前0.23±O.05,术后0.35±0.06,末次随访0.33±0.04,椎间隙高度未见明显丢失.Coflex置入节段的ROM术前(8.90±1.80)°,术后降至(8.30±1.90)°,末次随访(8.10±1.80)°.与术前差异无统计学意义(P=0.19).Conex置入节段活动度未见明显改变.L2-S1 ROM术前为(20.20±5.60)°,术后(14.40±5.70)°,末次随访(15.50±5.20)°.与术前比较有统计学差异(P=0.01).结论:腰椎后路椎间融合术联合Coflex动态固定治疗双节段腰椎退变性疾病能取得满意的中短期临床疗效,但没有充分证据证明这项技术优于多节段融合术.手术适应证的合理选择十分重要.%Objective:To summarize the effect of the implantation of Coflex interspious stabilization device combined with spinal fusion for the treatment of lumbar degenerative disease.Methods: From March 2008 to March 2010, 1 8 patients with two levels lumbar degenerative disease were treated with spinal fusion and dynamic interspinous fixation with Coflex system. There were 11 males and 7 females. The average age was 50.2 years (range 41 to 62 years). The VAS and the Oswestry

  10. Experimental study on spinal cord injury treated by embryonic spinal cord transplantation and greater omental transposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Dingjun(郝定均); Zheng Yonghong(郑永宏); Yuan Fuyong(袁福镛); He Liming; Wang Rong; Yuan Yong

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To observe the clinical efficacy of the embryonic spinal cellular transplantation and greater omental transposition for treatment of the spinal cord injury in 24 mongrel dogs. Methods: 24 adult mongrel dogs, weighing 10 ~ 13kg,bryonic spinal cellular transplantation and greater omental transposition group (group D). Each group consisted of 6 dogs. SEP(somatosensory evoked potential) and MEP (motor evoked potential) of the spinal cord were examed prior to the spinal cord injury and 2 months after the treatment to observe the changes of the animals' behavior. All dogs were killed 2 months after surgery and the spinal cord sections were obtained from T12 to L1 level for pathological analysis and observation under the electron microscope.Results: There was an obvious difference in the spinal somatosensory evoked potential and the motor evoked potential between the group D and the other three groups (group A, B, and C). Recovery of the behavior was noted. The spinal cells had survived for two months following the transplantation. Conclusion: Transplantation of the embryonic spinal cell and greater omentum for treatment of the spinal cord injury in dogs can gain a better outcome than the other groups in behavior and spinal somatosensory and motor evoked potential, but the further study is still essential to confirm its clinical efficacy.

  11. Role of descending noradrenergic system and spinal α2-adrenergic receptors in the effects of gabapentin on thermal and mechanical nociception after partial nerve injury in the mouse

    OpenAIRE

    Tanabe, Mitsuo; Takasu, Keiko; Kasuya, Noriyo; Shimizu, Shinobu; Honda, Motoko; Ono, Hideki

    2005-01-01

    To gain further insight into the mechanisms underlying the antihyperalgesic and antiallodynic actions of gabapentin, a chronic pain model was prepared by partially ligating the sciatic nerve in mice. The mice then received systemic or local injections of gabapentin combined with either central noradrenaline (NA) depletion by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) or α-adrenergic receptor blockade.Intraperitoneally (i.p.) administered gabapentin produced antihyperalgesic and antiallodynic effects that wer...

  12. Impaired transmission in the corticospinal tract and gait disability in spinal cord injured persons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barthélemy, Dorothy; Willerslev-Olsen, Maria; Lundell, Hans Magnus Henrik;

    2010-01-01

    of foot drop. Spinal cord injured participants who exhibited a large foot drop had little or no MEP at rest in the TA muscle and had little or no coherence in the same muscle during walking. Gait speed was correlated to foot drop, and was the lowest in participants with no MEP at rest. The data confirm......Rehabilitation following spinal cord injury is likely to depend on recovery of corticospinal systems. Here we investigate whether transmission in the corticospinal tract may explain foot drop (inability to dorsiflex ankle) in persons with spinal cord lesion. The study was performed in 24 persons...... with incomplete spinal cord lesion (C1 to L1) and 15 healthy controls. Coherence in the 10-20 Hz frequency band between paired tibialis anterior muscle (TA) electromyographic recordings obtained in the swing phase of walking, which is taken as a measure of motor unit synchronization, was significantly correlated...

  13. Sensory feedback synchronizes motor and sensory neuronal networks in the neonatal rat spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inácio, Ana R; Nasretdinov, Azat; Lebedeva, Julia; Khazipov, Roustem

    2016-10-07

    Early stages of sensorimotor system development in mammals are characterized by the occurrence of spontaneous movements. Whether and how these movements support correlated activity in developing sensorimotor spinal cord circuits remains unknown. Here we show highly correlated activity in sensory and motor zones in the spinal cord of neonatal rats in vivo. Both during twitches and complex movements, movement-generating bursts in motor zones are followed by bursts in sensory zones. Deafferentation does not affect activity in motor zones and movements, but profoundly suppresses activity bursts in sensory laminae and results in sensorimotor uncoupling, implying a primary role of sensory feedback in sensorimotor synchronization. This is further supported by largely dissociated activity in sensory and motor zones observed in the isolated spinal cord in vitro. Thus, sensory feedback resulting from spontaneous movements is instrumental for coordination of activity in developing sensorimotor spinal cord circuits.

  14. Perfusion assessment in rat spinal cord tissue using photoplethysmography and laser Doppler flux measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Justin P.; Cibert-Goton, Vincent; Langford, Richard M.; Shortland, Peter J.

    2013-03-01

    Animal models are widely used to investigate the pathological mechanisms of spinal cord injury (SCI), most commonly in rats. It is well known that compromised blood flow caused by mechanical disruption of the vasculature can produce irreversible damage and cell death in hypoperfused tissue regions and spinal cord tissue is particularly susceptible to such damage. A fiberoptic photoplethysmography (PPG) probe and instrumentation system were used to investigate the practical considerations of making measurements from rat spinal cord and to assess its suitability for use in SCI models. Experiments to assess the regional perfusion of exposed spinal cord in anesthetized adult rats using both PPG and laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) were performed. It was found that signals could be obtained reliably from all subjects, although considerable intersite and intersubject variability was seen in the PPG signal amplitude compared to LDF. We present results from 30 measurements in five subjects, the two methods are compared, and practical application to SCI animal models is discussed.

  15. Drug distribution in spinal cord during administration with spinal loop dialysis probes in anaesthetized rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uustalu, Maria; Abelson, Klas S P

    2007-01-01

    The present investigation aimed to study two methodological concerns of an experimental model, where a spinal loop dialysis probe is used for administration of substances to the spinal cord and sampling of neurotransmitters by microdialysis from the same area of anaesthetized rats. [(3)H]Epibatid......The present investigation aimed to study two methodological concerns of an experimental model, where a spinal loop dialysis probe is used for administration of substances to the spinal cord and sampling of neurotransmitters by microdialysis from the same area of anaesthetized rats. [(3)H...... over time. Then, the distribution of the different [(3)H]epibatidine concentrations along the spinal cord was studied. It was found that the percentage of [(3)H]epibatidine entering the spinal cord did not differ between different administered concentrations after a stabilization period of 60 min...... intraspinal administration of substances through the spinal loop dialysis probe....

  16. Earthquake-related versus non-earthquake-related injuries in spinal injury patients: differentiation with multidetector computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Introduction In recent years, several massive earthquakes have occurred across the globe. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) is reliable in detecting spinal injuries. The purpose of this study was to compare the features of spinal injuries resulting from the Sichuan earthquake with those of non-earthquake-related spinal trauma using MDCT. Methods Features of spinal injuries of 223 Sichuan earthquake-exposed patients and 223 non-earthquake-related spinal injury patients were retrospectively compared using MDCT. The date of non-earthquake-related spinal injury patients was collected from 1 May 2009 to 22 July 2009 to avoid the confounding effects of seasonal activity and clothing. We focused on anatomic sites, injury types and neurologic deficits related to spinal injuries. Major injuries were classified according to the grid 3-3-3 scheme of the Magerl (AO) classification system. Results A total of 185 patients (82.96%) in the earthquake-exposed cohort experienced crush injuries. In the earthquake and control groups, 65 and 92 patients, respectively, had neurologic deficits. The anatomic distribution of these two cohorts was significantly different (P spinal injuries were more common in the control group (risk ratio (RR) = 2.12, P spinal injuries were more common in the earthquake-related spinal injuries group (277 of 501 injured vertebrae; 55.29%). The major types of injuries were significantly different between these cohorts (P = 0.002). Magerl AO type A lesions composed most of the lesions seen in both of these cohorts. Type B lesions were more frequently seen in earthquake-related spinal injuries (RR = 1.27), while we observed type C lesions more frequently in subjects with non-earthquake-related spinal injuries (RR = 1.98, P = 0.0029). Conclusions Spinal injuries sustained in the Sichuan earthquake were located mainly in the lumbar spine, with a peak prevalence of type A lesions and a high occurrence of neurologic deficits. The anatomic distribution and

  17. TUBERCULAR MENINGITIS WITH CONCURRENT INTRACRANIAL AND INTRA-SPINAL TUBERCULOMAS

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    K.S.Hegde Medical Academy, Departments of Medicine, Neurosurgery, Pathology and Radiology, Mangalore, Karnataka, India Central nervous system (CNS) tuberculosis commonly manifests as tubercular meningitis CNS tuberculomas are more common intracranially and less frequently involve the spinal cord. We report an unusual case of CNS tuberculosis presented with predominant features of tubercular meningitis with concurrent intra-cranial and intra-medullary tuberculomas in any evidence of pulm...

  18. Spinal pharmacology of tactile allodynia in diabetic rats

    OpenAIRE

    1997-01-01

    Rats develop tactile allodynia to stimulation of the plantar surface of the hindpaw with von Frey filaments within days of the onset of streptozotocin-induced diabetes. This is prevented by insulin and alleviated by systemic lignocaine, but the aetiology is unknown.Using indwelling lumbar intrathecal catheters to deliver pharmacological agents, we have investigated whether tactile allodynia in streptozotocin-diabetic rats is dependent on mechanisms associated with spinal sensitization, by ass...

  19. Spinal cord involvement in a child with familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muge Gokce

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The involvement of the central nervous system (CNS in familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL has known to be limited to the brain, brain stem, and cerebellum. Herein, we report an 11-year-old boy who presented with neurological symptoms and was diagnosed as FHL by molecular diagnosis. The hemophagocytic lesions in the CNS were shown to extend to the thoracal level of spinal cord which completely disappeared after the completion of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis-2004 protocol.

  20. Cryptic organisation within an apparently irregular rostrocaudal distribution of interneurons in the embryonic zebrafish spinal cord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wells, Simon, E-mail: simon.wells@adelaide.edu.au [Discipline of Genetics, School of Molecular and Biomedical Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia 5005 (Australia); The Special Research Centre for the Molecular Genetics of Development, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia 5005 (Australia); Conran, John G., E-mail: john.conran@adelaide.edu.au [Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia 5005 (Australia); Tamme, Richard, E-mail: rtamme@ttu.ee [Discipline of Genetics, School of Molecular and Biomedical Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia 5005 (Australia); Gaudin, Arnaud, E-mail: a.gaudin@uq.edu.au [School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland 4072 (Australia); Webb, Jonathan, E-mail: jonathan.webb@worc.ox.ac.uk [Discipline of Genetics, School of Molecular and Biomedical Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia 5005 (Australia); Lardelli, Michael, E-mail: michael.lardelli@adelaide.edu.au [Discipline of Genetics, School of Molecular and Biomedical Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia 5005 (Australia); The Special Research Centre for the Molecular Genetics of Development, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia 5005 (Australia)

    2010-11-15

    The molecules and mechanisms involved in patterning the dorsoventral axis of the developing vertebrate spinal cord have been investigated extensively and many are well known. Conversely, knowledge of mechanisms patterning cellular distributions along the rostrocaudal axis is relatively more restricted. Much is known about the rostrocaudal distribution of motoneurons and spinal cord cells derived from neural crest but there is little known about the rostrocaudal patterning of most of the other spinal cord neurons. Here we report data from our analyses of the distribution of dorsal longitudinal ascending (DoLA) interneurons in the developing zebrafish spinal cord. We show that, although apparently distributed irregularly, these cells have cryptic organisation. We present a novel cell-labelling technique that reveals that DoLA interneurons migrate rostrally along the dorsal longitudinal fasciculus of the spinal cord during development. This cell-labelling strategy may be useful for in vivo analysis of factors controlling neuron migration in the central nervous system. Additionally, we show that DoLA interneurons persist in the developing spinal cord for longer than previously reported. These findings illustrate the need to investigate factors and mechanisms that determine 'irregular' patterns of cell distribution, particularly in the central nervous system but also in other tissues of developing embryos.

  1. ROPIVACAINE CONTINUOUS WOUND INFUSION VERSUS CONTINUOUS EPIDURAL VERSUS SYSTEMIC ANALGESIA FOR POST CAESAREAN DELIVERY UNDER SPINAL ANAESTHESIA: A PROSPECTIVE RANDOMISED CONTROLLED STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paleti

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Opioid based analgesic regimens have been the gold standard for post caesarean analgesia until recently. Regional techniques like local intra-wound infusion techniques are becoming popular now. Our aim is to evaluate the efficacy of 0.2% Ropivacaine continuous wound infusion versus continuous epidural versus conventional systemic analgesia for post caesarean delivery. METHODOLOGY: 60 healthy parturients of ASA I/II were randomized after elective caesarean section into 3 groups of 20 each. Group-A: Received 0.2% Ropivacaine via an epidural catheter placed into subcutaneous tissue and fascia before skin closure at the rate of 5ml/hr. through infusion pump. Group-B: Received 0.2% Ropivacaine continuous epidural infusion via an epidural catheter at the rate of 8ml/hr. An initial bolus of 10ml was given in groups A&B. Group-C: Received standard systemic analgesia with diclofenac sodium and rescue opioid. Post operatively parturients were assessed for VAS scores for pain at rest and during movement, total Ropivacaine consumption, Tramadol consumption and side effects. Data were analyzed using SPSS software version 22. RESULTS: There were no significant differences in the mean VAS scores at rest and at movement between groups A or B and C. The consumption of Tramadol was significantly greater in Group C (p value AC=0.025, BC=0.0000 than A or B. Mean Ropivacaine consumption is significantly higher in Group B (p=0.000 than Group A. CONCLUSION: Continuous local intra-wound analgesia with Ropivacaine produced comparable analgesia to that of continuous epidural and superior analgesia compared to standard systemic analgesia.

  2. Psychological Aspects of Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Daniel W.

    1976-01-01

    Reviewing literature on the psychological impact of spinal cord injury suggests: (a) depression may not be a precondition for injury adjustment; (b) many persons sustaining cord injury may have experienced psychological disruption prior to injury; and (c) indexes of rehabilitation success need to be developed for the spinal cord injured. (Author)

  3. Remote cerebellar hemorrhage after lumbar spinal surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cevik, Belma [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Fevzi Cakmak Cad. 10. sok. No: 45, Bahcelievler, Ankara 06490 (Turkey)], E-mail: belmac@baskent-ank.edu.tr; Kirbas, Ismail; Cakir, Banu; Akin, Kayihan; Teksam, Mehmet [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Fevzi Cakmak Cad. 10. sok. No: 45, Bahcelievler, Ankara 06490 (Turkey)

    2009-04-15

    Background: Postoperative remote cerebellar hemorrhage (RCH) as a complication of lumbar spinal surgery is an increasingly recognized clinical entity. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of RCH after lumbar spinal surgery and to describe diagnostic imaging findings of RCH. Methods: Between October 1996 and March 2007, 2444 patients who had undergone lumbar spinal surgery were included in the study. Thirty-seven of 2444 patients were scanned by CT or MRI due to neurologic symptoms within the first 7 days of postoperative period. The data of all the patients were studied with regard to the following variables: incidence of RCH after lumbar spinal surgery, gender and age, coagulation parameters, history of previous arterial hypertension, and position of lumbar spinal surgery. Results: The retrospective study led to the identification of two patients who had RCH after lumbar spinal surgery. Of 37 patients who had neurologic symptoms, 29 patients were women and 8 patients were men. CT and MRI showed subarachnoid hemorrhage in the folia of bilateral cerebellar hemispheres in both patients with RCH. The incidence of RCH was 0.08% among patients who underwent lumbar spinal surgery. Conclusion: RCH is a rare complication of lumbar spinal surgery, self-limiting phenomenon that should not be mistaken for more ominous pathologic findings such as hemorrhagic infarction. This type of bleeding is thought to occur secondary to venous infarction, but the exact pathogenetic mechanism is unknown. CT or MRI allowed immediate diagnosis of this complication and guided conservative management.

  4. Recurrent spinal adhesive arachnoiditis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Pitágoras de Mattos

    1988-03-01

    Full Text Available Spinal adhesive arachnoiditis is not an uncommon disease, usually having a monophasic course. We studied an atypical patient with recurrent spinal adhesive arachnoiditis nine years after intrathecal anesthesia and the first attack of the disease. Also noteworthy was the favorable evolution after surgery.

  5. Nutrition of People with Spinal Cord Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    This conference proceeding summarizes current knowledge about the nutritional status and needs of the spinal cord injured patient. Topics covered include the aspects of spinal cord injury that influence nutrient intakes and status, and the nutrients most likely to be problematic in this diverse gro...

  6. FUNCTIONAL PATHOLOGY OF LUMBAR SPINAL STENOSIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PENNING, L

    1992-01-01

    This paper deals with the effect of motion upon the stenotic lumbar spinal canal and its contents. A review is presented of personal investigations and relevant data from the literature. The normal spinal canal and its lateral recesses are naturally narrowed by retroflexion and/or axial loading, as

  7. Therapeutic approaches for spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Fogaça Cristante

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This study reviews the literature concerning possible therapeutic approaches for spinal cord injury. Spinal cord injury is a disabling and irreversible condition that has high economic and social costs. There are both primary and secondary mechanisms of damage to the spinal cord. The primary lesion is the mechanical injury itself. The secondary lesion results from one or more biochemical and cellular processes that are triggered by the primary lesion. The frustration of health professionals in treating a severe spinal cord injury was described in 1700 BC in an Egyptian surgical papyrus that was translated by Edwin Smith; the papyrus reported spinal fractures as a ''disease that should not be treated.'' Over the last biological or pharmacological treatment method. Science is unraveling the mechanisms of cell protection and neuroregeneration, but clinically, we only provide supportive care for patients with spinal cord injuries. By combining these treatments, researchers attempt to enhance the functional recovery of patients with spinal cord injuries. Advances in the last decade have allowed us to encourage the development of experimental studies in the field of spinal cord regeneration. The combination of several therapeutic strategies should, at minimum, allow for partial functional recoveries for these patients, which could improve their quality of life.

  8. Spinal gout: A review with case illustration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgafy, Hossein; Liu, Xiaochen; Herron, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    AIM To summarize clinical presentations and treatment options of spinal gout in the literature from 2000 to 2014, and present theories for possible mechanism of spinal gout formation. METHODS The authors reviewed 68 published cases of spinal gout, which were collected by searching “spinal gout” on PubMed from 2000 to 2014. The data were analyzed for clinical features, anatomical location of spinal gout, laboratory studies, imaging studies, and treatment choices. RESULTS Of the 68 patients reviewed, the most common clinical presentation was back or neck pain in 69.1% of patients. The most common laboratory study was elevated uric acid levels in 66.2% of patients. The most common diagnostic image finding was hypointense lesion of the gout tophi on the T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scan. The most common surgical treatment performed was a laminectomy in 51.5% and non-surgical treatment was performed in 29.4% of patients. CONCLUSION Spinal gout most commonly present as back or neck pain with majority of reported patients with elevated uric acid. The diagnosis of spinal gout is confirmed with the presence of negatively birefringent monosodium urate crystals in tissue. Treatment for spinal gout involves medication for the reduction of uric acid level and surgery if patient symptoms failed to respond to medical treatment. PMID:27900275

  9. Role of plasma membrane calcium ATPase 2 in spinal cord pathology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amanda; Kathleen; Fakira; Stella; Elkabes

    2010-01-01

    A number of studies have indicated that plasma membrane calcium ATPases(PMCAs) are expressed in the brain and spinal cord and could play important roles not only in the maintenance of cellular calcium homeostasis but also in the survival and function of central nervous system cells under pathological conditions.The different regional and cellular distributions of the various PMCA isoforms and splice variants in the nervous system and the diverse phenotypes of PMCA knockout mice support the notion that each isoform might play a distinct role. Especially in the spinal cord,the survival of neurons and,in particular,motor neurons could be dependent on PMCA2.This is indicated by the knockdown of PMCA2 in pure spinal cord neuronal cultures that leads to cell death via a decrease in collapsing response mediator protein 1 levels.Moreover,the progressive decline in the number of motor neurons in PMCA2-null mice andheterozygous mice further supports this notion.Therefore,the reported reduction in PMCA2 mRNA and protein levels in the inflamed spinal cord of mice affected by experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis(EAE) ,an animal model of multiple sclerosis,and after spinal cord contusion injury,suggests that changes in PMCA2 expression could be a cause of neuronal pathology and death during inflammation and injury.Glutamate excitotoxicity mediated via kainate receptors has been implicated in the neuropathology of both EAE and spinal cord injury,and has been identified as a trigger that reduces PMCA2 levels in pure spinal cord neuronal cultures through degradation of the pump by calpain without affecting PMCA2 transcript levels.It remains to be determined which other stimuli modulate PMCA2 mRNA expression in the aforementioned pathological conditions of the spinal cord.

  10. Structural and functional reorganization of propriospinal connections promotes functional recovery after spinal cord injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Linard Filli; Martin E Schwab

    2015-01-01

    Axonal regeneration and ifber regrowth is limited in the adult central nervous system, but re-search over the last decades has revealed a high intrinsic capacity of brain and spinal cord circuits to adapt and reorganize after smaller injuries or denervation. Short-distance ifber growth and synaptic rewiring was found in cortex, brain stem and spinal cord and could be associated with restoration of sensorimotor functions that were impaired by the injury. Such processes of struc-tural plasticity were initially observed in the corticospinal system following spinal cord injury or stroke, but recent studies showed an equally high potential for structural and functional reorganization in reticulospinal, rubrospinal or propriospinal projections. Here we review the lesion-induced plastic changes in the propriospinal pathways, and we argue that they represent a key mechanism triggering sensorimotor recovery upon incomplete spinal cord injury. The for-mation or strengthening of spinal detour pathways bypassing supraspinal commands around the lesion site to the denervated spinal cord were identiifed as prominent neural substrate inducing substantial motor recovery in different species from mice to primates. Indications for the exis-tence of propriospinal bypasses were also found in humans after cortical stroke. It is mandatory for current research to dissect the biological mechanisms underlying spinal circuit remodeling and to investigate how these processes can be stimulated in an optimal way by therapeutic inter-ventions (e.g., ifber-growth enhancing interventions, rehabilitation). This knowledge will clear the way for the development of novel strategies targeting the remarkable plastic potential of pro-priospinal circuits to maximize functional recovery after spinal cord injury.

  11. Structural and functional reorganization of propriospinal connections promotes functional recovery after spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linard Filli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Axonal regeneration and fiber regrowth is limited in the adult central nervous system, but research over the last decades has revealed a high intrinsic capacity of brain and spinal cord circuits to adapt and reorganize after smaller injuries or denervation. Short-distance fiber growth and synaptic rewiring was found in cortex, brain stem and spinal cord and could be associated with restoration of sensorimotor functions that were impaired by the injury. Such processes of structural plasticity were initially observed in the corticospinal system following spinal cord injury or stroke, but recent studies showed an equally high potential for structural and functional reorganization in reticulospinal, rubrospinal or propriospinal projections. Here we review the lesion-induced plastic changes in the propriospinal pathways, and we argue that they represent a key mechanism triggering sensorimotor recovery upon incomplete spinal cord injury. The formation or strengthening of spinal detour pathways bypassing supraspinal commands around the lesion site to the denervated spinal cord were identified as prominent neural substrate inducing substantial motor recovery in different species from mice to primates. Indications for the existence of propriospinal bypasses were also found in humans after cortical stroke. It is mandatory for current research to dissect the biological mechanisms underlying spinal circuit remodeling and to investigate how these processes can be stimulated in an optimal way by therapeutic interventions (e.g., fiber-growth enhancing interventions, rehabilitation. This knowledge will clear the way for the development of novel strategies targeting the remarkable plastic potential of propriospinal circuits to maximize functional recovery after spinal cord injury.

  12. Standardized way for imaging of the sagittal spinal balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morvan, Gérard; Mathieu, Philippe; Vuillemin, Valérie; Guerini, Henri; Bossard, Philippe; Zeitoun, Frédéric; Wybier, Marc

    2011-09-01

    Nowadays, conventional or digitalized teleradiography remains the most commonly used tool for the study of the sagittal balance, sometimes with secondary digitalization. The irradiation given by this technique is important and the photographic results are often poor. Some radiographic tables allow the realization of digitalized spinal radiographs by simultaneous translation of X-ray tube and receptor. EOS system is a new, very low dose system which gives good quality images, permits a simultaneous acquisition of upright frontal and sagittal views, is able to cover in the same time the spine and the lower limbs and study the axial plane on 3D envelope reconstructions. In the future, this low dose system should take a great place in the study of the pelvispinal balance. On the lateral view, several pelvic (incidence, pelvic tilt, sacral slope) and spinal (lumbar lordosis, thoracic kyphosis, Th9 sagittal offset, C7 plumb line) parameters are drawn to define the pelvispinal balance. All are interdependent. Pelvic incidence is an individual anatomic characteristic that corresponds to the "thickness" of the pelvis and governs the spinal balance. Pelvis and spine, in a harmonious whole, can be compared to an accordion, more or less compressed or stretched.

  13. Spinal cord ischemia secondary to hypovolemic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jacob Yl; Kapoor, Siddhant; Koh, Roy Km; Yang, Eugene Wr; Hee, Hwan-Tak

    2014-12-01

    A 44-year-old male presented with symptoms of spinal cord compression secondary to metastatic prostate cancer. An urgent decompression at the cervical-thoracic region was performed, and there were no complications intraoperatively. Three hours postoperatively, the patient developed acute bilateral lower-limb paralysis (motor grade 0). Clinically, he was in class 3 hypovolemic shock. An urgent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed, showing no epidural hematoma. He was managed aggressively with medical therapy to improve his spinal cord perfusion. The patient improved significantly, and after one week, he was able to regain most of his motor functions. Although not commonly reported, spinal cord ischemia post-surgery should be recognized early, especially in the presence of hypovolemic shock. MRI should be performed to exclude other potential causes of compression. Spinal cord ischemia needs to be managed aggressively with medical treatment to improve spinal cord perfusion. The prognosis depends on the severity of deficits, and is usually favorable.

  14. Oriental Medical Treatment of Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

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    Hae-Yeon Lee

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Lumbar spinal stenosis results from the progressive combined narrowing of the central spinal canal, the neurorecesses, and the neuroforaminal canals. In the absence of prior surgery, tumor, or infection, the spinal canal may become narrowed by bulging or protrusion of the intervertebral disc annulus, herniation of the nucleus pulposis posteriorly, thickening of the posterior longitudinal ligament, hypertrophy of the ligamentum flavum, epidural fat deposition, spondylosis of the intervertebral disc margins, or a combination of two or more of the above factors. Patients with spinal stenosis become symptomatic when pain, motor weakness, paresthesia, or other neurologic compromise causes distress. In one case, we administrated oriental medical treatment with acupuncture treatment and herb-medicine. Oriental medical treatment showed desirable effect on lumbar spinal stenosis.

  15. Galactorrhea: a complication of spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarkony, G M; Novick, A K; Roth, E J; Kirschner, K L; Rayner, S; Betts, H B

    1992-09-01

    Galactorrhea, a secretion of milk or milk-like products from the breast in the absence of parturition, has been reported to occur in women with spinal cord injuries in association with amenorrhea and hyperprolactinemia. Four cases of galactorrhea in association with spinal cord injury are reported. Galactorrhea developed in four spinal cord injured women who had thoracic paraplegia. The onset of galactorrhea was from one month to five months after injury. Although the onset of galactorrhea may have been related to prescribed medications in all four cases, insufficient data exist to draw conclusions. The three women whose galactorrhea persisted declined treatment and galactorrhea continuing for more than two years in one instance. We conclude that galactorrhea with or without amenorrhea may develop after a spinal cord injury and that spinal cord injured women may have an enhanced sensitivity to medication-induced galactorrhea.

  16. Spinal morphine anesthesia and urinary retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahan, K T; Wang, J

    1993-11-01

    Spinal anesthetic is a common form of surgical anesthetic used in foot and ankle surgery. Spinal morphine anesthetic is less common, but has the advantage of providing postoperative analgesia for 12 to 24 hr. A number of complications can occur with spinal anesthesia, including urinary retention that may be a source of severe and often prolonged discomfort and pain for the patient. Management of this problem may require repeated bladder catheterization, which may lead to urinary tract infections or impairment of urethrovesicular function. This study reviews the incidence of urinary retention in 80 patients (40 after general anesthesia and 40 after spinal anesthesia) who underwent foot and ankle surgery at Saint Joseph's Hospital, Philadelphia, PA. Twenty-five percent of the patients who had spinal anesthesia experienced urinary retention, while only 7 1/2% of the group who had general anesthesia had this complication. Predisposing factors, treatment regimen, and recommendations for the prevention and management of urinary retention are presented.

  17. Contiguous spinal metastasis mimicking infectious spondylodiscitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chul Min; Lee, Seung Hun [Dept. of Radiology, Hanyang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Ji Yoon [Dept. of Pathology, National Police Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Differential diagnosis between spinal metastasis and infectious spondylodiscitis is one of the occasional challenges in daily clinical practice. We encountered an unusual case of spinal metastasis in a 75-year-old female breast cancer patient that mimicked infectious spondylodiscitis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed diffuse bone marrow infiltrations with paraspinal soft tissue infiltrative changes in 5 contiguous cervical vertebrae without significant compression fracture or cortical destruction. These MRI findings made it difficult to differentiate between spinal metastasis and infectious spondylodiscitis. Infectious spondylodiscitis such as tuberculous spondylodiscitis was regarded as the more appropriate diagnosis due to the continuous involvement of > 5 cervical vertebrae. The patient's clinical presentation also supported the presumptive diagnosis of infectious spondylodiscitis rather than spinal metastasis. Intravenous antibiotics were administered, but clinical symptoms worsened despite treatment. After pathologic confirmation by computed tomography-guided biopsy, we were able to confirm a final diagnosis of spinal metastasis.

  18. Ambulation and spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, Elizabeth C; Kobetic, Rudi; Triolo, Ronald J

    2013-05-01

    Walking is possible for many patients with a spinal cord injury. Avenues enabling walking include braces, robotics and FES. Among the benefits are improved musculoskeletal and mental health, however unrealistic expectations may lead to negative changes in quality of life. Use rigorous assessment standards to gauge the improvement of walking during the rehabilitation process, but also yearly. Continued walking after discharge may be limited by challenges, such as lack of accessibility in and outside the home, and complications, such as shoulder pain or injuries from falls. It is critical to determine the risks and benefits of walking for each patient.

  19. Degenerative spinal disease in large felids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolmstetter, C; Munson, L; Ramsay, E C

    2000-03-01

    Degenerative spinal disorders, including intervertebral disc disease and spondylosis, seldom occur in domestic cats. In contrast, a retrospective study of 13 lions (Panthera leo), 16 tigers (Panthera tigris), 4 leopards (Panthera pardis), 1 snow leopard (Panthera uncia), and 3 jaguars (Panthera onca) from the Knoxville Zoo that died or were euthanatized from 1976 to 1996 indicated that degenerative spinal disease is an important problem in large nondomestic felids. The medical record, radiographic data, and the necropsy report of each animal were examined for evidence of intervertebral disc disease or spondylosis. Eight (three lions, four tigers, and one leopard) animals were diagnosed with degenerative spinal disease. Clinical signs included progressively decreased activity, moderate to severe rear limb muscle atrophy, chronic intermittent rear limb paresis, and ataxia. The age at onset of clinical signs was 10-19 yr (median = 18 yr). Radiographic evaluation of the spinal column was useful in assessing the severity of spinal lesions, and results were correlated with necropsy findings. Lesions were frequently multifocal, included intervertebral disc mineralization or herniation with collapsed intervertebral disc spaces, and were most common in the lumbar area but also involved cervical and thoracic vertebrae. Marked spondylosis was present in the cats with intervertebral disc disease, presumably subsequent to vertebral instability. Six of the animals' spinal cords were examined histologically, and five had acute or chronic damage to the spinal cord secondary to disc protrusion. Spinal disease should be suspected in geriatric large felids with decreased appetite or activity. Radiographic evaluation of the spinal column is the most useful method to assess the type and severity of spinal lesions.

  20. An experimental model for the transplantation of fetal central nervous system cells to the injured spinal cord in rats Modelo experimental de transplante de células do sistema nervoso central fetal para lesão de medula espinal em ratos

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    Tarcísio Eloy Pessoa de Barros Filho

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Traumatic spinal cord injury is one of the most disabling conditions occurring in man and thus stimulates a strong interest in its histopathological, biochemical, and functional changes, primarily as we search for preventive and therapeutic methods. PURPOSE: To develop an experimental model for transplantation of cells from the fetal rat central nervous system to the site of an injured spinal cord of an adult rat in which the transplanted cells survive and become integrated. This experimental model will facilitate investigations of factors that promote regeneration and functional recovery after spinal cord trauma. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Fifteen adult Wistar rats underwent laminectomy, and an spinal cord lesion was made with microdissection. Fetal spinal cord tissue was then transplanted to the site of the injury. The rats were monitored over a 48-hour period, and then their vertebral column was completely removed for histological analysis. RESULTS: In 60% of transplanted rats, the fetal tissue at the injured site remained viable in the site of the lesion.INTRODUÇÃO: A lesão traumática da medula espinal consiste numa das mais incapacitantes lesões que o ser humano pode sofrer e tem despertado grande interesse no conhecimento das alterações histopatológicas, bioquímicas, funcionais e principalmente na busca de métodos de prevenção e tratamento. OBJETIVO: Propor um modelo experimental de transplante de células do sistema nervoso fetal de ratos para o sítio de lesão medular de ratos adultos que permitisse sua sobrevivência e integração para possibilitar protocolos de pesquisa para identificar outros fatores de regeneração e recuperação funcional pós trauma raquimedular. MATERIAL E MÉTODOS: Utilizaram-se 15 ratos adultos que foram submetidos a laminectomia e lesão de 5mm de hemimelula realizada com auxílio de microscópio óptico. Os ratos tiveram seu sítio de lesão medular transplantado com células do

  1. Systemic lidocaine inhibits remifentanil-induced hyperalgesia via the inhibition of cPKCgamma membrane translocation in spinal dorsal horn of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Weihua; Li, Yanping; Li, Shuren; Yang, Weiwei; Jiang, Jun; Han, Song; Li, Junfa

    2009-10-01

    Remifentanil is being used increasingly as one component of total intravenous anesthesia. Severe postoperative pain has occasionally been reported with discontinuation of remifentanil. This study was designed to determine the involvement of conventional protein kinase Cgamma (cPKCgamma) in the inhibitory action of lidocaine on remifentanil-induced hyperalgesia of rats after propofol-remifentanil-based anesthesia. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were allocated into the following groups randomly: propofol only (P), propofol+remifentanil (R), propofol+remifentanil+lidocaine (RL), and propofol+lidocaine (L). Cumulative pain score and withdrawal response to mechanical stimulation, immunoblotting, and immunofluorescence were applied to observe remifentanil-induced hyperalgesia and cPKCgamma membrane translocation. We found that the cumulative pain score of group R increased significantly at 30, 120, and 300 minutes postanesthesia (Plidocaine. These results suggested that increased cPKCgamma membrane translocation was involved in remifentanil-induced hyperalgesia, which was inhibited by systemic lidocaine and may contribute to reduced postoperative pain in rats after propofol-remifentanil-based anesthesia.

  2. Operative treatment of the lumbar spondylolisthesis with general spinal system%通用型脊柱内固定治疗腰椎滑脱症

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘华彦; 唐运鹏; 胡朝晖

    2012-01-01

      目的探讨通用型脊柱内固定系统治疗腰椎滑脱症的临床效果. 方法 将67例腰椎滑脱症患者行后路椎管减压并应用通用型脊柱内固定系统内固定植骨融合治疗. 结果 67例患者随访8~36个月,平均(11.5±1.2)个月,临床优良率为92.54%,植骨融合率为95.52%. 结论 通用型脊柱内固定系统治疗腰椎滑脱症疗效确切,植骨融合率高,具有安装简便、省时、短节段固定、固定安全可靠、创伤小等优点.%  Objective To discuss the clinical effect of the general spinal system treatment for the lumbar spondylolisthesis. Methods 67 patients with lumbar spondylolisthesis,who were treated by the posterior decompression and general spinal system to plsterior lumbar interbody fusion. Results 67 patients were followed-up for eight to thirty-six months,and average (11.5±1.2)months, choiceness rate in the clinical was 92.54%,bone grafting fusion rate was 95.52%. Conclusion The lumbar spondylolisthesis is treated by the general spinal system,it has an exact effect,the bone grafting fusion rate is high,and it is easy to fix,timesaving,short fixing,safe and reliable,less inasie and so on the advantages.

  3. Serum thyroid-stimulating hormone and anti-thyroglobulin antibody are independently associated with lesions in spinal cord in central nervous system demyelinating diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youming Long

    Full Text Available Transverse myelitis (TM is associated with neuromyelitis optica (NMO and multiple sclerosis (MS. Early recognition of useful parameters may be helpful to distinguish their difference. This retrospective study analyzed thyroid parameters from 243 serum samples (relapse = 128; remission = 115 of 178 patients with demyelinating diseases (NMO, n = 25; TM, n = 48; MS, n = 105. The relationship between thyroid and clinical parameters was analyzed. Patients with NMO and TM had a higher frequency of abnormal thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH, anti-thyroglobulin antibodies (TG-Ab, and antithyroid peroxidase antibody (TPO-Ab than MS patients (p<0.05. The level of TSH and TG-Ab returned to normal levels after administration of high-dose intravenous methylprednisolone (p<0.05. In 96 patients (NMO, n = 19; TM, n = 25; MS, n = 52 without treatment, serum levels of TSH, TG-Ab and TPO-Ab were significantly different between patients with and without myelitis (p<0.01. Patients positive for aquaporin-4 (AQP4 antibodies showed higher abnormalities of TSH (p = 0.001, TG-Ab (p = 0.004 and TPO-Ab (p<0.0001 levels than AQP4 antibodies negative patients. Logistic regression analyses revealed independent relationships between TSH (odds ratio [OR]  = 33.994; p<0.0001, TG-Ab (OR = 7.703; p = 0.017 and myelitis occurrence in 96 patients at the active stage. In 52 MS patients experiencing their first attack, MS patients with myelitis were associated with TSH abnormalities (OR = 42.778; p<0.0001. This study showed increased abnormalities of thyroid parameters in patients with NMO and TM than in MS patients. MS patients with myelitis also had greater TSH abnormality than in MS patients without myelitis. Abnormal TSH and TG-Ab were independently associated with myelitis occurrence in central nervous system demyelinating disorders.

  4. Clinical radiology of the spine and spinal cord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banna, M.

    1985-01-01

    This book is a source of information about aspects of radiology of the spine and spinal column. It presents coverage of both normal and abnormal conditions. Contents: Spinal fractures and dislocations. Degenerative diseases of the spine. Gross anatomy of the spinal cord and meninges. Intraspinal mass lesions. Spinal dysraphism. Congenital anomalies. Tumors of the vertebral column, and more.

  5. Treatment of spinal synovial cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bydon, Mohamad; Papadimitriou, Kyriakos; Witham, Timothy; Wolinsky, Jean-Paul; Sciubba, Daniel; Gokaslan, Ziya; Bydon, Ali

    2013-02-01

    Spinal synovial cysts are a known cause of back pain and radiculopathy. With the advent of high-resolution imaging techniques, synovial cysts are increasingly diagnosed. There are a variety of treatment options for these lesions. A systematic literature review of published articles reporting outcomes after nonsurgical and surgical management of spinal synovial cysts was performed. There were 51 published studies regarding the treatment of synovial cysts identified. Treatment modalities include observation, steroid injections, percutaneous cyst aspiration, hemilaminectomy or bilateral laminectomy with and without instrumented fusion, and minimally invasive cyst excision. Based on review of the treatment modalities and outcomes, recommendations for the management of patients with synovial cysts are proposed. Observation can be considered in cases where there is no intractable pain. High-risk surgical patients with intractable pain may consider corticosteroid injection or percutaneous cyst aspiration; however, the failure rate of such a procedure approaches 50%. Patients with intractable pain are candidates for surgical resection of the symptomatic cyst. In cases of significant neurologic deficit, motor weakness, back pain, multiple synovial cysts, or spondylolisthesis, bilateral laminectomy and instrumented fusion may offer the best long-term outcome. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Dorsal spinal epidural cavernous hemangioma

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    Darshana Sanghvi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A 61-year-old female patient presented with diffuse pain in the dorsal region of the back of 3 months duration. The magnetic resonance imaging showed an extramedullary, extradural space occupative lesion on the right side of the spinal canal from D5 to D7 vertebral levels. The mass was well marginated and there was no bone involvement. Compression of the adjacent thecal sac was observed, with displacement to the left side. Radiological differential diagnosis included nerve sheath tumor and meningioma. The patient underwent D6 hemilaminectomy under general anesthesia. Intraoperatively, the tumor was purely extradural in location with mild extension into the right foramina. No attachment to the nerves or dura was found. Total excision of the extradural compressing mass was possible as there were preserved planes all around. Histopathology revealed cavernous hemangioma. As illustrated in our case, purely epidural hemangiomas, although uncommon, ought to be considered in the differential diagnosis of spinal epidural soft tissue masses. Findings that may help to differentiate this lesion from the ubiquitous disk prolapse, more common meningiomas and nerve sheath tumors are its ovoid shape, uniform T2 hyperintense signal and lack of anatomic connection with the neighboring intervertebral disk or the exiting nerve root. Entirely extradural lesions with no bone involvement are rare and represent about 12% of all intraspinal hemangiomas.

  7. Dorsal spinal epidural cavernous hemangioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanghvi, Darshana; Munshi, Mihir; Kulkarni, Bijal; Kumar, Abhaya

    2010-07-01

    A 61-year-old female patient presented with diffuse pain in the dorsal region of the back of 3 months duration. The magnetic resonance imaging showed an extramedullary, extradural space occupative lesion on the right side of the spinal canal from D5 to D7 vertebral levels. The mass was well marginated and there was no bone involvement. Compression of the adjacent thecal sac was observed, with displacement to the left side. Radiological differential diagnosis included nerve sheath tumor and meningioma. The patient underwent D6 hemilaminectomy under general anesthesia. Intraoperatively, the tumor was purely extradural in location with mild extension into the right foramina. No attachment to the nerves or dura was found. Total excision of the extradural compressing mass was possible as there were preserved planes all around. Histopathology revealed cavernous hemangioma. As illustrated in our case, purely epidural hemangiomas, although uncommon, ought to be considered in the differential diagnosis of spinal epidural soft tissue masses. Findings that may help to differentiate this lesion from the ubiquitous disk prolapse, more common meningiomas and nerve sheath tumors are its ovoid shape, uniform T2 hyperintense signal and lack of anatomic connection with the neighboring intervertebral disk or the exiting nerve root. Entirely extradural lesions with no bone involvement are rare and represent about 12% of all intraspinal hemangiomas.

  8. Use of Actuator-Driven Pulsed Water Jet in Brain and Spinal Cord Cavernous Malformations Resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Toshiki; Takahashi, Yoko; Nakagawa, Atsuhiro; Niizuma, Kuniyasu; Fujimura, Miki; Tominaga, Teiji

    2015-09-01

    A piezo actuator-driven pulsed water jet (ADPJ) system is a novel surgical instrument that enables dissection of tissue without thermal damage. It can potentially resect intra-axial lesions while preserving neurological function. To report our first experience of applying an ADPJ system to brain and spinal cord cavernous malformations. Four patients (2 women and 2 men, mean age 44.5 years) with brain (n = 3) and spinal cord (n = 1) cavernous malformations were enrolled in the study. All surgeries were performed with the aid of the ADPJ system. Postoperative neurological function and radiological findings were evaluated. The ADPJ system was useful in dissecting boundaries between the lesion and surrounding brain/spinal cord tissues. The pulsed water jet provided a clear surgical view and helped surgeons follow the margins. Water jet dissection peeled off the brain and spinal cord tissues from the lesion wall. Surrounding gliotic tissue was preserved. As a consequence, the cavernous malformations were successfully removed. Postoperative magnetic resonance imaging confirmed total removal of lesions in all cases. Preoperative neurological symptoms completely resolved in 2 patients. The others experienced partial recovery. No patients developed new postoperative neurological deficits; facial palsy temporarily worsened in 1 patient who underwent a suprafacial colliculus approach for the brainstem lesion. The ADPJ provided a clear surgical field and enabled surgeons to dissect boundaries between lesions and surrounding brain and spinal cord gliotic tissue. The ADPJ system is a feasible option for cavernous malformation surgery, enabling successful tumor removal and preservation of neurological function.

  9. 应用改良AF脊柱内固定系统经皮微创内固定治疗胸腰椎压缩骨折%The Application of Improved AF Spinal Internal Fixation System With Percutaneous Minimally Invasive Internal Fixation for the Treatment of Thoracic and Lumbar Vertebral Compression Fracture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晓龙; 王志军

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the efficacy of the AF spinal internal fixation system with percutaneous minimally invasive internal fixation for the treatment of thoracic and lumbar vertebral compression fracture. Methods Collected in our hospital 48 cases of thoracolumbar compression fractures, application of improved percutaneous minimally invasive internal fixation of AF spinal internal fixation system in the treatment of thoracolumbar compression fractures, postoperative review X-ray for curative effect analysis. Results 48 cases of compression injury vertebral height of vertebral body than preoperative obviously restoration, 90%of the average recovery to normal height of vertebral body Conclusion Application of improved percutaneous minimally invasive internal ifxation of AF spinal internal fixation system in the treatment of thoracolumbar compression fractures curative effect is distinct.%目的:探讨应用AF脊柱内固定系统经皮微创内固定治疗胸腰椎压缩骨折的疗效。方法收集本院48例胸腰椎压缩骨折,应用改良AF脊柱内固定系统经皮微创内固定治疗胸腰椎压缩骨折,术后复查X片进行疗效分析。结果48例压缩的伤椎椎体高度比术前明显得到恢复,平均恢复至正常椎体高度的90%。结论应用改良AF脊柱内固定系统经皮微创内固定治疗胸腰椎压缩骨折疗效显著。

  10. Shedding light on restoring respiratory function after spinal cord injury

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    Warren J Alilain

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Loss of respiratory function is one of the leading causes of death following spinal cord injury. Because of this, much work has been done in studying ways to restore respiratory function following SCI - including pharmacological and regeneration strategies. With the emergence of new and powerful tools from molecular neuroscience, new therapeutically relevant alternatives to these approaches have become available, including expression of light sensitive proteins called channelrhodopsins. In this article we briefly review the history of various attempts to restore breathing after C2 hemisection, and focus on our recent work using the activation of light sensitive channels to restore respiratory function after experimental spinal cord injury. We also discuss how such light induced activity can help shed light on the inner workings of the central nervous system respiratory circuitry that controls diaphragmatic function.

  11. Macrophage and microglial plasticity in the injured spinal cord.

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    David, S; Greenhalgh, A D; Kroner, A

    2015-10-29

    Macrophages in the injured spinal cord arise from resident microglia and from infiltrating peripheral myeloid cells. Microglia respond within minutes after central nervous system (CNS) injury and along with other CNS cells signal the influx of their peripheral counterpart. Although some of the functions they carry out are similar, they appear to be specialized to perform particular roles after CNS injury. Microglia and macrophages are very plastic cells that can change their phenotype drastically in response to in vitro and in vivo conditions. They can change from pro-inflammatory, cytotoxic cells to anti-inflammatory, pro-repair phenotypes. The microenvironment of the injured CNS importantly influences macrophage plasticity. This review discusses the phagocytosis and cytokine-mediated effects on macrophage plasticity in the context of spinal cord injury.

  12. Molecular Imaging in Stem Cell Therapy for Spinal Cord Injury

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    Fahuan Song

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury (SCI is a serious disease of the center nervous system (CNS. It is a devastating injury with sudden loss of motor, sensory, and autonomic function distal to the level of trauma and produces great personal and societal costs. Currently, there are no remarkable effective therapies for the treatment of SCI. Compared to traditional treatment methods, stem cell transplantation therapy holds potential for repair and functional plasticity after SCI. However, the mechanism of stem cell therapy for SCI remains largely unknown and obscure partly due to the lack of efficient stem cell trafficking methods. Molecular imaging technology including positron emission tomography (PET, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, optical imaging (i.e., bioluminescence imaging (BLI gives the hope to complete the knowledge concerning basic stem cell biology survival, migration, differentiation, and integration in real time when transplanted into damaged spinal cord. In this paper, we mainly review the molecular imaging technology in stem cell therapy for SCI.

  13. Acute lymphocytic leukemia recurring in the spinal epidural space.

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    Higashida, Tetsuhiro; Kawasaki, Takashi; Sakata, Katsumi; Tanabe, Yutaka; Kanno, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Isao

    2007-08-01

    A 27-year-old man presented with a very rare spinal epidural mass associated with recurrence of acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) manifesting as acute progressive neurological deficits. The patient presented with shoulder pain and ambulatory difficulties 3 years after remission of ALL treated by bone marrow transplantation. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an epidural mass extending from C-7 to T-3, which compressed the cord and extended to the intervertebral foramen along the roots. After decompression surgery, the symptoms dramatically improved. Histological examination showed clusters of immature lymphocytes consistent with recurrence of leukemia, so chemotherapy and radiation therapy were carried out. At 1 year after the operation, no local mass expansion or systemic progression of leukemia had occurred. Leukemic mass must be considered in the differential diagnosis of spinal epidural mass, even in patients with ALL.

  14. Schwann cells in therapy of spinal cord injuries

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    Izabella Woszczycka-Korczyńska

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Schwann cells (SC have a special activity in the repair processes after injury of the nervous system because of the capability of differentiation, migration, proliferation and myelinization of axons. They enhance production of numerous neurotrophic factors, thus creating a permissive environment for axonal regeneration. Experimental studies using SC in neuronal transplants showed that these cells with their basal membrane with adhesion molecules are attractive material for neural prostheses facilitating axon growth. Moreover, SC can produce stable myelin, restoring normal function of the neuron. Transplantations of SC in myelin injury have been used in animal models of multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, and brain and spinal cord injuries. Because the transplanted SC have no ability to migrate within the normal nervous system, in many experiments SC derived from rat embryos were applied. Such cells migrated through normal nervous tissue and co-operated with host cells, their survival was longer, and myelin was not destroyed in multiple sclerosis. Also, fast recovery of motor activity in injured axons in rat spinal cord was observed, especially after transplantation of SC derived from skin progenitor cells or progenitor cells which have a phenotype characteristic for SC. Many authors have reported early apoptosis of transplanted SC, so a more complex repair strategy is needed that combines SC transplantation with other methods in order to achieve longer survival and optimal functional recovery following spinal cord injury.

  15. Intramedullary spinal cord ganglioglioma presenting as hyperhidrosis: unique symptoms and magnetic resonance imaging findings: case report.

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    Murakami, Tomohiro; Koyanagi, Izumi; Kaneko, Takahisa; Yoneta, Akihiro; Keira, Yoshiko; Wanibuchi, Masahiko; Hasegawa, Tadashi; Mikuni, Nobuhiro

    2013-02-01

    Hyperhidrosis is caused by a sympathetic dysfunction of the central or peripheral nervous system. Intramedullary spinal cord lesions can be a cause of hyperhidrosis. The authors report a rare case of intramedullary thoracic spinal cord ganglioglioma presenting as hyperhidrosis. This 16-year-old boy presented with abnormal sweating on the right side of the neck, chest, and the right arm that had been occurring for 6 years. Neurological examination revealed mild motor weakness of the right lower extremity and slightly decreased sensation in the left lower extremity. Hyperhidrosis was observed in the right C3-T8 dermatomes. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an intramedullary tumor at the right side of the spinal cord at the T2-3 level. The tumor showed partial enhancement after Gd administration. The patient underwent removal of the tumor via hemilaminectomy of T2-3. Only subtotal resection was achieved because the margins of the tumor were unclear. Histopathological examination revealed ganglioglioma. Hyperhidrosis gradually improved after surgery. Hyperhidrosis is a rare clinical manifestation of intramedullary spinal cord tumors, and only a few cases have been reported in the literature. The location of the tumor origin, around the right gray matter of the lateral spinal cord, may account for the hyperhidrosis as the initial symptom in this patient. Physicians should examine the spinal cord using MRI studies when a patient has hyperhidrosis with some motor or sensory symptoms of the extremities.

  16. Spinal cord involvement in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy: a clinical and MRI study.

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    Ioannidis, Panagiotis; Parissis, Dimitris; Karapanayiotides, Theodoros; Maiovis, Pantelis; Karacostas, Dimitris; Grigoriadis, Nikolaos

    2015-06-01

    Concomitant central nervous system (CNS) involvement in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is rare. Although the spinal nerve roots may present MRI abnormalities in CIDP, hitherto, the spinal cord has been investigated in a single study. We retrospectively investigated clinically and with MRI a cohort of patients with definite CIDP diagnosis (EFNS/PNS criteria) for evidence of brain and spinal cord involvement, who were initially admitted in our department during the last 4 years. Among 12 patients with CIDP (men: 8, mean age: 59.3 years, mean disease duration: 3.8 years), nine patients had their MRI scan during a clinical relapse and three during remission. Brain MRI did not document typical multiple sclerosis lesions in any patient. We did not identify any MRI abnormalities in ten patients without clinical evidence of spinal cord involvement. Conversely, MRI disclosed extensive lesions of the thoracic cord in two patients with an overt spinal cord syndrome, whom we describe. This represents the biggest MRI study of CIDP patients who have been investigated for spinal cord involvement. Our data support earlier observations that a minority of CIDP patients may additionally develop CNS involvement of variable degree.

  17. The effect of school bag design and load on spinal posture during stair use by children.

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    Hong, Youlian; Fong, Daniel Tik-Pui; Li, Jing Xian

    2011-12-01

    Thirteen male children ascending and descending stairs with loads that equalled 0%, 10%, 15% and 20% of their body weight were the subject of our research: the boys were wearing an asymmetrical single-strap athletic bag or a symmetrical double-strap backpack during our experiments with them. The maximum spinal tilt to the loading side and to the support side, and the range of spinal motions, were obtained by using a motion analysis system. Our results showed that symmetry of spinal posture was observed both when they ascended staircase with all loads and descended in a backpack. When carrying an athletic bag with 15% and 20% of their body weight while ascending the staircase, the lateral spinal tilt to the supporting side was significantly increased. We concluded that a symmetrical backpack with a load not exceeding 20% or an asymmetrical single-strap athletic bag with a load not exceeding 10% should be recommended for school children in order to promote safer staircase use. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: Children carrying heavy school bags may develop spinal problems. This study suggested that when they are using stairs, a symmetrical backpack with a load within 20% body weight is acceptable for them. When they are carrying an asymmetrical single-strap athletic bag, the bag's weight should not exceed 10% of the body weight in order to avoid excessive spinal tilt.

  18. Use of vacuum assisted closure in instrumented spinal deformities for children with postoperative deep infections

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    Canavese Federico

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Postoperative deep infections are relatively common in children with instrumented spinal deformities, whose healing potential is somewhat compromised. Children with underlying diagnosis of cerebral palsy, spina bifida and other chronic debilitating conditions are particularly susceptible. Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC is a newer technique to promote healing of wounds resistant to treatment by established methods. This article aims to review the efficacy of the VAC system in the treatment of deep spinal infections following spinal instrumentation and fusion in children and adolescents. Materials and Methods: We reviewed 33 patients with deep postoperative surgical site infection treated with wound VAC technique. We reviewed clinical and laboratory data, including the ability to retain the spinal hardware, loss of correction and recurrent infections. Results : All patients successfully completed their wound VAC treatment regime. None had significant loss of correction and one had persistent infection requiring partial hardware removal. The laboratory indices normalized in all but three patients. Conclusions: Wound VAC technique is a useful tool in the armamentarium of the spinal surgeon dealing with patients susceptible to wound infections, especially those with neuromuscular diseases. It allows for retention of the instrumentation and maintenance of the spinal correction. It is reliable and easy to use.

  19. The distribution of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-diaphorase (NADPH-d) in the medulla oblongata, spinal cord, cranial and spinal nerves of frog, Microhyla orn