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Sample records for dynamo pattern revealed

  1. Kinematic dynamo action in square and hexagonal patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favier, B; Proctor, M R E

    2013-11-01

    We consider kinematic dynamo action in rapidly rotating Boussinesq convection just above onset. The velocity is constrained to have either a square or a hexagonal pattern. For the square pattern, large-scale dynamo action is observed at onset, with most of the magnetic energy being contained in the horizontally averaged component. As the magnetic Reynolds number increases, small-scale dynamo action becomes possible, reducing the overall growth rate of the dynamo. For the hexagonal pattern, the breaking of symmetry between up and down flows results in an effective pumping velocity. For intermediate rotation rates, this additional effect can prevent the growth of any mean-field dynamo, so that only a small-scale dynamo is eventually possible at large enough magnetic Reynolds number. For very large rotation rates, this pumping term becomes negligible, and the dynamo properties of square and hexagonal patterns are qualitatively similar. These results hold for both perfectly conducting and infinite magnetic permeability boundary conditions.

  2. Azimuthal dynamo wave in spherical shell convection

    CERN Document Server

    Cole, Elizabeth; Mantere, Maarit J; Brandenburg, Axel

    2013-01-01

    We report the finding of an azimuthal dynamo wave of a low-order (m=1) mode in direct numerical simulations (DNS) of turbulent convection in spherical shells. Such waves are predicted by mean field dynamo theory and have been obtained previously in mean-field models. Observational results both from photometry and Doppler imaging have revealed persistent drifts of spots for several rapidly rotating stars, but, although an azimuthal dynamo wave has been proposed as a possible mechanism responsible for this behavior, it has been judged as unlikely, as practical evidence for such waves from DNS has been lacking. The large-scale magnetic field in our DNS, which is due to self-consistent dynamo action, is dominated by a retrograde m=1 mode. Its pattern speed is nearly independent of latitude and does not reflect the speed of the differential rotation at any depth. The extrema of magnetic m=1 structures coincide reasonably with the maxima of m=2 structures of the temperature. These results provide direct support for...

  3. Plasma dynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Rincon, F; Schekochihin, A A; Valentini, F

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic fields pervade the entire Universe and, through their dynamical interactions with matter, affect the formation and evolution of astrophysical systems from cosmological to planetary scales. How primordial cosmological seed fields arose and were further amplified to $\\mu$Gauss levels reported in nearby galaxy clusters, near equipartition with kinetic energy of plasma motions and on scales of at least tens of kiloparsecs, is a major theoretical puzzle still largely unconstrained by observations. Extragalactic plasmas are weakly collisional (as opposed to collisional magnetohydrodynamic fluids), and whether magnetic-field growth and its sustainment through an efficient dynamo instability driven by chaotic motions is possible in such plasmas is not known. Fully kinetic numerical simulations of the Vlasov equation in a six-dimensional phase space necessary to answer this question have until recently remained beyond computational capabilities. Here, we show by means of such simulations that magnetic-field a...

  4. Laminar Plasma Dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Z; Barnes, C W; Barnes, D C; Wang, Zhehui; Pariev, Vladimir I.; Barnes, Cris W.; Barnes, Daniel C.

    2002-01-01

    A new kind of dynamo utilizing flowing laboratory plasmas has been identified. Conversion of plasma kinetic energy to magnetic energy is verified numerically by kinematic dynamo simulations for magnetic Reynolds numbers above 210. As opposed to intrinsically-turbulent liquid-sodium dynamos, the proposed plasma dynamos correspond to laminar flow topology. Modest plasma parameters, 1-20 eV temperatures, 10^{19}-10^{20} m^{-3} densities in 0.3-1.0 m scale-lengths driven by velocities on the order of the Alfven Critical Ionization Velocity (CIV), self-consistently satisfy the conditions needed for the magnetic field amplication. Growth rates for the plasma dynamos are obtained numerically with different geometry and magnetic Reynolds numbers. Magnetic-field-free coaxial plasma guns can be used to sustain the plasma flow and the dynamo.

  5. The Solar Dynamo Zoo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egeland, Ricky; Soon, Willie H.; Baliunas, Sallie L.; Hall, Jeffrey C.; Pevtsov, Alexei A.; Henry, Gregory W.

    2016-05-01

    We present composite time series of Ca II H & K line core emission indices of up to 50 years in length for a set of 27 solar-analog stars (spectral types G0-G5; within ~10% of the solar mass) and the Sun. These unique data are available thanks to the long-term dedicated efforts of the Mount Wilson Observatory HK project, the Lowell Observatory Solar-Stellar Spectrograph, and the National Solar Observatory/Air Force Research Laboratory/Sacremento Peak K-line monitoring program. The Ca II H & K emission originates in the lower chromosphere and is strongly correlated with the presence of magnetic plage regions in the Sun. These synoptic observations allow us to trace the patterns long-term magnetic variability and explore dynamo behavior over a wide range of rotation regimes and stellar evolution timescales.

  6. Liquid Metal Dynamo Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luh, W. J.; Choi, Y. H.; Hardy, B. S.; Brown, M. R.

    1997-11-01

    Detection of convected magnetic fields in a small-scale liquid metal dynamo is attempted. Initial experiments will focus on the conversion of toroidal to poloidal flux (a version of the ω effect). A precision vector magnetometer will be used to measure the effect of a rotating magnetofluid on a static magnetic field. Water will be used as a control medium and effects will be compared with a conducting medium (liquid sodium or NaK). A small spherical flask (0.16 m diameter) houses 2 liters of fluid, a teflon stirrer creates an asymmetrical flow pattern, and Helmholtz coils generate a constant magnetic field on the order of 10 gauss. The Reynold's number will be of order unity.

  7. Ocean Dynamics: Dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Ocean Dynamics: Dynamo Robert Pinkel Marine Physical...execution of the Dynamo Leg IV Experiment in December 2011. Our objective was to document the development of the diurnal surface layer and its...2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Ocean Dynamics: Dynamo 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM

  8. Social patterns revealed through random matrix theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Camellia; Jalan, Sarika

    2014-11-01

    Despite the tremendous advancements in the field of network theory, very few studies have taken weights in the interactions into consideration that emerge naturally in all real-world systems. Using random matrix analysis of a weighted social network, we demonstrate the profound impact of weights in interactions on emerging structural properties. The analysis reveals that randomness existing in particular time frame affects the decisions of individuals rendering them more freedom of choice in situations of financial security. While the structural organization of networks remains the same throughout all datasets, random matrix theory provides insight into the interaction pattern of individuals of the society in situations of crisis. It has also been contemplated that individual accountability in terms of weighted interactions remains as a key to success unless segregation of tasks comes into play.

  9. Galactic Dynamos and Galactic Winds

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    Spiral galaxies host dynamically important magnetic fields which can affect gas flows in the disks and halos. Total magnetic fields in spiral galaxies are strongest (up to 30 \\muG) in the spiral arms where they are mostly turbulent or tangled. Polarized synchrotron emission shows that the resolved regular fields are generally strongest in the interarm regions (up to 15 \\muG). Faraday rotation measures of radio polarization vectors in the disks of several spiral galaxies reveal large-scale patterns which are signatures of coherent fields generated by a mean-field dynamo. -- Magnetic fields are also observed in radio halos around edge-on galaxies at heights of a few kpc above the disk. Cosmic-ray driven galactic winds transport gas and magnetic fields from the disk into the halo. The magnetic energy density is larger than the thermal energy density, but smaller than the kinetic energy density of the outflow. The orientation of field lines allows to estimate the wind speed and direction. There is no observation ...

  10. The lunar dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Benjamin P; Tikoo, Sonia M

    2014-12-05

    The inductive generation of magnetic fields in fluid planetary interiors is known as the dynamo process. Although the Moon today has no global magnetic field, it has been known since the Apollo era that the lunar rocks and crust are magnetized. Until recently, it was unclear whether this magnetization was the product of a core dynamo or fields generated externally to the Moon. New laboratory and spacecraft measurements strongly indicate that much of this magnetization is the product of an ancient core dynamo. The dynamo field persisted from at least 4.25 to 3.56 billion years ago (Ga), with an intensity reaching that of the present Earth. The field then declined by at least an order of magnitude by ∼3.3 Ga. The mechanisms for sustaining such an intense and long-lived dynamo are uncertain but may include mechanical stirring by the mantle and core crystallization.

  11. Coronal influence on dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Warnecke, Jörn

    2013-01-01

    We report on turbulent dynamo simulations in a spherical wedge with an outer coronal layer. We apply a two-layer model where the lower layer represents the convection zone and the upper layer the solar corona. This setup is used to study the coronal influence on the dynamo action beneath the surface. Increasing the radial coronal extent gradually to three times the solar radius and changing the magnetic Reynolds number, we find that dynamo action benefits from the additional coronal extent in terms of higher magnetic energy in the saturated stage. The flux of magnetic helicity can play an important role in this context.

  12. SADE: Starspot and Dynamo Explorer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, P. C. H.

    2003-05-01

    In soft X-rays the solar coronal radiance varies by a factor of 70 over the solar activity cycle. A similar variation in most stars in the existing X-ray database has not been found (Stern 2001); even stars which exhibit chromospheric activity cycles show only marginal evidence for X-ray cycles. This is rather puzzling as the time span and multiple coverage of the X-ray sky should reveal at least a hint of such a pronounced cyclical variation. By the time of the meeting we will have submitted a SMEX proposal with the above acronym to determine the nature and amplitude of the variation in X-ray emission of nearby solar analogs that have a cyclic chromospheric Ca-K variability similar to that of the Sun. In doing so we aim to expand our knowledge of the parameter space of stellar dynamos, which will lead to a better understanding of the dynamo process in general -- an unresolved fundamental problem in astrophysics -- and the solar dynamo in particular. This is an investigation at the cross-section of the NASA themes ``Structure and Evolution of the Universe", and the ``Sun-Earth Connection". In my presentation I will describe the SADE instrument design, observing strategy, and possible science results. SADE is proposed by a consortium led by MSU, including Swales, CfA, LMSAL, UCL, OAP, and Bangalore.

  13. Turbulence and dynamo interlinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gouveia Dal Pino, E. M.; Santos-Lima, R.; Kowal, G.; Falceta-Gonçalves, D.

    2013-07-01

    The role of turbulence in astrophysical environments and its interplay with magnetic fields is still highly debated. In this lecture, we will discuss this issue in the framework of dynamo processes. We will first present a very brief summary of turbulent dynamo theories, then will focus on small scale turbulent dynamos and their particular relevance on the origin and maintenance of magnetic fields in the intra-cluster media (ICM) of galaxies. In these environments, the very low density of the flow requires a collisionless-MHD treatment. We will show the implications of this approach in the turbulent amplification of the magnetic fields in these environments. To finalize, we will also briefly address the connection between MHD turbulence and fast magnetic reconnection and its possible implications in the diffusion of magnetic flux in the dynamo process.

  14. Turbulence and Dynamo Interlinks

    CERN Document Server

    Pino, E M de Gouveia Dal

    2013-01-01

    The role of turbulence in astrophysical environments and its interplay with magnetic fields is still highly debated. In this lecture, we will discuss this issue in the framework of dynamo processes. We will first present a very brief summary of turbulent dynamo theories, then will focus on small scale turbulent dynamos and their particular relevance on the origin and maintenance of magnetic fields in the intra-cluster media (ICM) of galaxies. In these environments, the very low density of the flow requires a collisionless-MHD treatment. We will show the implications of this approach in the turbulent amplification of the magnetic fields in these environments. To finalize, we will also briefly address the connection between MHD turbulence and fast magnetic reconnection and its possible implications in the diffusion of magnetic flux in the dynamo process.

  15. Dynamo in protostars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mahendra K Verma; Bidya Binay Karak; Rohit Kumar

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we estimate the magnetic Reynolds number of a typical protostar before and after deuterium burning, and claim for the existence of dynamo process in both the phases, because the magnetic Reynolds number of the protostar far exceeds the critical magnetic Reynolds number for dynamo action. Using the equipartition of kinetic and magnetic energies, we estimate the steady-state magnetic field of the protostar to be of the order of kilogauss, which is in good agreement with observations.

  16. The Solar Dynamo Zoo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egeland, Ricky; Soon, Willie; Baliunas, Sallie; Hall, Jeffrey C.; Pevtsov, Alexei A.; Henry, Gregory W.

    2016-07-01

    We present composite time series of Ca II H & K line core emission indices of up to 50 years in length for a set of 27 solar-analog stars (spectral types G0-G5; within 10% of the solar mass) and the Sun. These unique data are available thanks to the long-term dedicated efforts of the Mount Wilson Observatory HK project, the Lowell Observatory Solar-Stellar Spectrograph, and the National Solar Observatory/Air Force Research Laboratory/Sacramento Peak K-line monitoring program. The Ca II H & K emission originates in the lower chromosphere and is strongly correlated with the presence of magnetic plage regions in the Sun. These synoptic observations allow us to trace the patterns long-term magnetic variability and explore dynamo behavior over a wide range of rotation regimes and stellar evolution timescales.In this poster, the Ca HK observations are expressed using the Mount Wilson S-index. Each time series is accompanied by a Lomb-Scargle periodogram, fundemental stellar parameters derived from the Geneva-Copenhagen Survey, and statistics derived from the time series including the median S-index value and seasonal and long-term amplitudes. Statistically significant periodogram peaks are ranked according to a new cycle quality metric. We find that clear, simple, Sun-like cycles are the minority in this sample.

  17. Magnetic Helicity and the Solar Dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfield, Richard C.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this investigation is to open a new window into the solar dynamo, convection, and magnetic reconnection through measurement of the helicity density of magnetic fields in the photosphere and tracing of large-scale patterns of magnetic helicity in the corona.

  18. Magnetic Helicity and Planetary Dynamos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2012-01-01

    A model planetary dynamo based on the Boussinesq approximation along with homogeneous boundary conditions is considered. A statistical theory describing a large-scale MHD dynamo is found, in which magnetic helicity is the critical parameter

  19. The Solar Dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathaway, David H.

    1998-01-01

    The solar dynamo is the process by which the Sun's magnetic field is generated through the interaction of the field with convection and rotation. In this, it is kin to planetary dynamos and other stellar dynamos. Although the precise mechanism by which the Sun generates its field remains poorly understood despite decades of theoretical and observational work, recent advances suggest that solutions to this solar dynamo problem may be forthcoming. Two basic processes are involved in dynamo activity. When the fluid stresses dominate the magnetic stresses (high plasma beta = 8(pi)rho/B(sup 2)), shear flows can stretch magnetic field lines in the direction of the shear (the "alpha effect") and helical flows can lift and twist field lines into orthogonal planes (the "alpha effect"). These two processes can be active anywhere in the solar convection zone but with different results depending upon their relative strengths and signs. Little is known about how and where these processes occur. Other processes, such as magnetic diffusion and the effects of the fine scale structure of the solar magnetic field, pose additional problems.

  20. Strong Field Spherical Dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Dormy, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Numerical models of the geodynamo are usually classified in two categories: those denominated dipolar modes, observed when the inertial term is small enough, and multipolar fluctuating dynamos, for stronger forcing. I show that a third dynamo branch corresponding to a dominant force balance between the Coriolis force and the Lorentz force can be produced numerically. This force balance is usually referred to as the strong field limit. This solution co-exists with the often described viscous branch. Direct numerical simulations exhibit a transition from a weak-field dynamo branch, in which viscous effects set the dominant length scale, and the strong field branch in which viscous and inertial effects are largely negligible. These results indicate that a distinguished limit needs to be sought to produce numerical models relevant to the geodynamo and that the usual approach of minimizing the magnetic Prandtl number (ratio of the fluid kinematic viscosity to its magnetic diffusivity) at a given Ekman number is mi...

  1. The Global Solar Dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, R. H.; Dikpati, M.; Brandenburg, A.

    2017-09-01

    A brief summary of the various observations and constraints that underlie solar dynamo research are presented. The arguments that indicate that the solar dynamo is an alpha-omega dynamo of the Babcock-Leighton type are then shortly reviewed. The main open questions that remain are concerned with the subsurface dynamics, including why sunspots emerge at preferred latitudes as seen in the familiar butterfly wings, why the cycle is about 11 years long, and why the sunspot groups emerge tilted with respect to the equator (Joy's law). Next, we turn to magnetic helicity, whose conservation property has been identified with the decline of large-scale magnetic fields found in direct numerical simulations at large magnetic Reynolds numbers. However, magnetic helicity fluxes through the solar surface can alleviate this problem and connect theory with observations, as will be discussed.

  2. The Global Solar Dynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Cameron, R H; Brandenburg, A

    2016-01-01

    A brief summary of the various observations and constraints that underlie solar dynamo research are presented. The arguments that indicate that the solar dynamo is an alpha-omega dynamo of the Babcock-Leighton type are then shortly reviewed. The main open questions that remain are concerned with the subsurface dynamics, including why sunspots emerge at preferred latitudes as seen in the familiar butterfly wings, why the cycle is about 11 years long, and why the sunspot groups emerge tilted with respect to the equator (Joy's law). Next, we turn to magnetic helicity, whose conservation property has been identified with the decline of large-scale magnetic fields found in direct numerical simulations at large magnetic Reynolds numbers. However, magnetic helicity fluxes through the solar surface can alleviate this problem and connect theory with observations, as will be discussed.

  3. Dynamos of giant planets

    CERN Document Server

    Busse, F H; 10.1017/S1743921307000920

    2009-01-01

    Possibilities and difficulties of applying the theory of magnetic field generation by convection flows in rotating spherical fluid shells to the Giant Planets are outlined. Recent progress in the understanding of the distribution of electrical conductivity in the Giant Planets suggests that the dynamo process occurs predominantly in regions of semiconductivity. In contrast to the geodynamo the magnetic field generation in the Giant Planets is thus characterized by strong radial conductivity variations. The importance of the constraint on the Ohmic dissipation provided by the planetary luminosity is emphasized. Planetary dynamos are likely to be of an oscillatory type, although these oscillations may not be evident from the exterior of the planets.

  4. Kinematic dynamo induced by helical waves

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Xing

    2014-01-01

    We investigate numerically the kinematic dynamo induced by the superposition of two helical waves in a periodic box as a simplified model to understand the dynamo action in astronomical bodies. The effects of magnetic Reynolds number, wavenumber and wave frequency on the dynamo action are studied. It is found that this helical-wave dynamo is a slow dynamo. There exists an optimal wavenumber for the dynamo growth rate. A lower wave frequency facilitates the dynamo action and the oscillations o...

  5. The Karlsruhe Dynamo Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown theoretically in the past that homogeneous dynamos may occur in electrically conducting fluids for various vortical velocity fields. Roberts (1972 investigated spatially periodic, infinitely extended fields of vortices which Busse (1978, 1992 confined to a finite cylindrical domain. Based on Busse's vortex arrangement a conceptual design for an experimental homogeneous dynamo has been developed and a test facility was setup at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe. The first experiments demonstrated that permanent dynamo action can be generated in a cylindrical container filled with liquid sodium in which by means of guide tubes counterrotating and countercurrent spiral vortices are established. The dynamo is self-exciting and the magnetic field saturates at a mean value for fixed super-critical flow rates. The instantaneous magnetic field fluctuates around this mean value by an order of about 5%. As predicted by theory the mode of the observed magnetic field is non-axisymmetric. In a series of experiments a phase- and a bifurcation diagram has been derived as a function of the spiral and axial flow rates.

  6. Bifurcations and dynamo action in a Taylor Green flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubrulle, B.; Blaineau, P.; Mafra Lopes, O.; Daviaud, F.; Laval, J.-P.; Dolganov, R.

    2007-08-01

    We report successive bifurcations in direct numerical simulations (DNSs) of a Taylor-Green flow, in both a hydro- and a magneto-hydrodynamic case. Hydrodynamic bifurcations occur in between different metastable states with different dynamo action, and are triggered by the numerical noise. The various states encountered range from stationary to chaotic or turbulent through possible oscillatory states. The corresponding sequence of bifurcations is reminiscent of the sequence obtained in the von Karman (VK) flow, at aspect ratio Γ=2 (Nore et al 2003 J. Fluid Mech. 477 51). We then use kinematic simulations to compute the dynamo thresholds of the different metastable states. A more detailed study of the turbulent state reveals the existence of two windows of dynamo action. Stochastic numerical simulations are then used to mimic the influence of turbulence on the dynamo threshold of the turbulent state. We show that the dynamo threshold is increased (respectively decreased) by the presence of large scale (resp. small scale) turbulent velocity fluctuations. Finally, DNSs of the magneto-hydrodynamic equations are used to explore the linear and nonlinear stage of the dynamo instability. In the linear stage, we show that the magnetic field favours the bifurcation from the basic state directly towards the turbulent or chaotic stable state. The magnetic field can also temporarily stabilize a metastable state, resulting in cycles of dynamo action, with different Lyapunov exponents. The critical magnetic Reynolds number for dynamo action is found to increase strongly with the Reynolds number. Finally, we provide a preliminary study of the saturation regime above the dynamo threshold. At large magnetic Prandtl number, we have observed two main types of saturations, in agreement with an analytical prediction of Leprovost and Dubrulle (2005 Eur. Phys. J. B 44 395): (i) intermittent dynamo, with vanishing most probable value of the magnetic energy; (ii) dynamo with non vanishing

  7. Parker's dynamo and geomagnetic reversals

    CERN Document Server

    Reshetnyak, M

    2011-01-01

    Fluctuations of the alpha-effect which break equatorial symmetry of the flow in the kinematic Parker's dynamo are considered. We show, that even small (a few percents) fluctuation can leed to the substantial assymmetry of the magnetic field in the hemispheres as well as the propagation of the dynamo wave through the equator plane. We also consider how change of the dynamo number can be used to explain different regimes of magnetic field generation in geodynamo.

  8. Radiative transfer dynamo effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munirov, Vadim R.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic fields in rotating and radiating astrophysical plasma can be produced due to a radiative interaction between plasma layers moving relative to each other. The efficiency of current drive, and with it the associated dynamo effect, is considered in a number of limits. It is shown here, however, that predictions for these generated magnetic fields can be significantly higher when kinetic effects, previously neglected, are taken into account.

  9. Mathematical aspects of natural dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Dormy, Emmanuel

    2007-01-01

    Although the origin of Earth's and other celestial bodies' magnetic fields remains unknown, we do know that the motion of electrically conducting fluids generates and maintains these fields, forming the basis of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and, to a larger extent, dynamo theory. Answering the need for a comprehensive, interdisciplinary introduction to this area, ""Mathematical Aspects of Natural Dynamos"" provides a foundation in dynamo theory before moving on to modeling aspects of natural dynamos.Bringing together eminent international contributors, the book first introduces governing equatio

  10. Realistic modeling of local dynamo processes on the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Kitiashvili, I N; Mansour, N N; Wray, A A

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic fields are usually observed in the quiet Sun as small-scale elements that cover the entire solar surface (the `salt and pepper' patterns in line-of-sight magnetograms). By using 3D radiative MHD numerical simulations we find that these fields result from a local dynamo action in the top layers of the convection zone, where extremely weak 'seed' magnetic fields (e.g., from a $10^{-6}$ G) can locally grow above the mean equipartition field, to a stronger than 2000~G field localized in magnetic structures. Our results reveal that the magnetic flux is predominantly generated in regions of small-scale helical downflows. We find that the local dynamo action takes place mostly in a shallow, about 500~km deep, subsurface layer, from which the generated field is transported into the deeper layers by convective downdrafts. We demonstrate that the observed dominance of vertical magnetic fields at the photosphere and horizontal fields above the photosphere can be explained by small-scale magnetic loops produced ...

  11. Comparison of terrestrial and solar dynamos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Keke [Center for Geophysical and Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics, Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Exeter, EX4 4QE (United Kingdom); Schubert, Gerald [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095-1567 (United States)

    2006-05-01

    The Earth's magnetic field has undergone temporal and spatial variations including polarity reversals. Paleomagnetic and historical magnetic field measurements suggest persistent distinct patterns of variation of the geomagnetic field taking place in different regions of the Earth. These patterns can be explained by core-mantle thermal interaction in which lateral variations in heat flux across the core-mantle boundary drive core flows at the top of the Earth's fluid core. The solar magnetic field has also undergone variation on widely separated scales. It is generally believed that the nearly 22-year sunspot cycle and its spatial symmetry with respect to the equator are a consequence of magnetohydrodynamic processes taking place in a highly differentially rotating layer between the convective and radiative regions of the Sun. For the Earth, the task of modelling an Earth-like and self-sustaining dynamo remains a major challenge because of the length scale disparities associated with the extremely small Ekman number of the Earth's fluid outer core. The scale disparities are not only the root of severe difficulties in modelling the geodynamo but they are also characteristic of the geodynamo dynamics. For the Sun, the solar tachocline offers an ideal location for the generation and storage of the Sun's strong azimuthal magnetic fields while the large-scale solar surface magnetic activity represents the rising and emerging of deep-seated, strong toroidal magnetic fields driven by magnetic buoyancy. However, a global solar dynamo model which dynamically incorporates the radiative core and is capable of reproducing a self-consistent and nearly solid-body rotating core with an overlying strongly radial shear layer remains a major challenge. Significant progress has been made towards understanding the complex dynamo processes in the Earth and Sun. We discuss the main differences and similarities between the geomagnetic and solar magnetic fields. We

  12. Pattern classification of EEG signals reveals perceptual and attentional states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    List, Alexandra; Rosenberg, Monica D; Sherman, Aleksandra; Esterman, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Pattern classification techniques have been widely used to differentiate neural activity associated with different perceptual, attentional, or other cognitive states, often using fMRI, but more recently with EEG as well. Although these methods have identified EEG patterns (i.e., scalp topographies of EEG signals occurring at certain latencies) that decode perceptual and attentional states on a trial-by-trial basis, they have yet to be applied to the spatial scope of attention toward global or local features of the display. Here, we initially used pattern classification to replicate and extend the findings that perceptual states could be reliably decoded from EEG. We found that visual perceptual states, including stimulus location and object category, could be decoded with high accuracy peaking between 125-250 ms, and that the discriminative spatiotemporal patterns mirrored and extended our (and other well-established) ERP results. Next, we used pattern classification to investigate whether spatiotemporal EEG signals could reliably predict attentional states, and particularly, the scope of attention. The EEG data were reliably differentiated for local versus global attention on a trial-by-trial basis, emerging as a specific spatiotemporal activation pattern over posterior electrode sites during the 250-750 ms interval after stimulus onset. In sum, we demonstrate that multivariate pattern analysis of EEG, which reveals unique spatiotemporal patterns of neural activity distinguishing between behavioral states, is a sensitive tool for characterizing the neural correlates of perception and attention.

  13. Large Scale Dynamos in Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishniac, Ethan T.

    2015-01-01

    We show that a differentially rotating conducting fluid automatically creates a magnetic helicity flux with components along the rotation axis and in the direction of the local vorticity. This drives a rapid growth in the local density of current helicity, which in turn drives a large scale dynamo. The dynamo growth rate derived from this process is not constant, but depends inversely on the large scale magnetic field strength. This dynamo saturates when buoyant losses of magnetic flux compete with the large scale dynamo, providing a simple prediction for magnetic field strength as a function of Rossby number in stars. Increasing anisotropy in the turbulence produces a decreasing magnetic helicity flux, which explains the flattening of the B/Rossby number relation at low Rossby numbers. We also show that the kinetic helicity is always a subdominant effect. There is no kinematic dynamo in real stars.

  14. Properties of Nonlinear Dynamo Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, S. M.

    1997-01-01

    Dynamo theory offers the most promising explanation of the generation of the sun's magnetic cycle. Mean field electrodynamics has provided the platform for linear and nonlinear models of solar dynamos. However, the nonlinearities included are (necessarily) arbitrarily imposed in these models. This paper conducts a systematic survey of the role of nonlinearities in the dynamo process, by considering the behaviour of dynamo waves in the nonlinear regime. It is demonstrated that only by considering realistic nonlinearities that are non-local in space and time can modulation of the basic dynamo wave he achieved. Moreover, this modulation is greatest when there is a large separation of timescales provided by including a low magnetic Prandtl number in the equation for the velocity perturbations.

  15. Dynamo waves in Friedmann and Misner cosmologies

    OpenAIRE

    de Andrade, Garcia

    2015-01-01

    It is shown that Misner metric can be obtained as solution of dynamo waves equations and Friedmann hyperbolic metrics are obtained when the dynamo waves are absent. In the case of dynamo waves ICM fields are computed and galactic dynamos are obtained.

  16. The Kinematic Theory of Solar Dynamo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Generation of the Sun's magnetic fields by self-inductive processes inthe solar electrically conducting interior, the solar dynamo theory, is a fundamen-tally important subject in astrophysics. The kinematic dynamo theory concernshow the magnetic fields are produced by kinematically possible flows without beingconstrained by the dynamic equation. We review a number of basic aspects of thekinematic dynamo theory, including the magnetohydrodynamic approximation forthe dynamo equation, the impossibility of dynamo action with the solar differentialrotation, the Cowling's anti-dynamo theorem in the solar context, the turbulent al-pha effect and recently constructed three-dimensional interface dynamos controlledby the solar tachocline at the base of the convection zone.

  17. Turbulent Dynamos and Magnetic Helicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Hantao

    1999-04-01

    It is shown that the turbulent dynamo alpha-effect converts magnetic helicity from the turbulent field to the mean field when the turbulence is electromagnetic while the magnetic helicity of the mean-field is transported across space when the turbulence is elcetrostatic or due to the elcetron diamagnetic effect. In all cases, however, the dynamo effect strictly conserves the total helicity expect for a battery effect which vanishes in the limit of magnetohydrodynamics. Implications for astrophysical situations, especially for the solar dynamo, are discussed.

  18. A Reconnecting Flux Rope Dynamo

    OpenAIRE

    Baggaley, Andrew W.; Barenghi, Carlo F.; Shukurov, Anvar; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2009-01-01

    We develop a new model of the fluctuation dynamo in which the magnetic field is confined in thin flux ropes advected by a multi-scale flow modeling turbulence. Magnetic dissipation occurs only via reconnection of the flux ropes. We investigate the kinetic energy release into heat, mediated by the dynamo action, both in our model and by solving the induction equation with the same flow. We find that a flux rope dynamo is an order of magnitude more efficient at converting mechanical energy into...

  19. Intermittency in spherical Couette dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Raynaud, Raphaël; 10.1103/PhysRevE.87.033011

    2013-01-01

    We investigate dynamo action in three-dimensional numerical simulations of turbulent spherical Couette flows. Close to the onset of dynamo action, the magnetic field exhibits an intermittent behavior, characterized by a series of short bursts of the magnetic energy separated by low-energy phases. We show that this behavior corresponds to the so-called on-off intermittency. This behavior is here reported for dynamo action with realistic boundary conditions. We investigate the role of magnetic boundary conditions in this phenomenon.

  20. COSMIC PLASMA DYNAMO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A new dynamo model based on the polarization of plasma is presented in this paper.From the Maxwell equations in a moving medium, a magnetization vector can be causedwith Rongon current. The steady solar magnetic field is solved from the equations. Onthe assumption that the meridianal flow is ignored, the distribution of magnetic field isput out. In the model, there is no additional parameter considered. The intensity ofmagnetic field inside the sun ranges from 1-6T. The surface magnetic field around thepole is in the order of 1×10-3T, at low latitude the calculated surface magnetic fieldhas the order of 1×10-2 T. The maximum magnetic field is around 30° in latitude.

  1. Simulations of galactic dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Brandenburg, Axel

    2014-01-01

    We review our current understanding of galactic dynamo theory, paying particular attention to numerical simulations both of the mean-field equations and the original three-dimensional equations relevant to describing the magnetic field evolution for a turbulent flow. We emphasize the theoretical difficulties in explaining non-axisymmetric magnetic fields in galaxies and discuss the observational basis for such results in terms of rotation measure analysis. Next, we discuss nonlinear theory, the role of magnetic helicity conservation and magnetic helicity fluxes. This leads to the possibility that galactic magnetic fields may be bi-helical, with opposite signs of helicity and large and small length scales. We discuss their observational signatures and close by discussing the possibilities of explaining the origin of primordial magnetic fields.

  2. Interface dynamos in supernova progenitors

    CERN Document Server

    Blackman, E G; Thomas, J H; Blackman, Eric G.; Nordhaus, Jason T.; Thomas, John H.

    2004-01-01

    Observational evidence for anisotropy in supernovae (SN) and their phenomenological connection to jetted sources such as gamma-ray bursts^Mhave revived considerations of the role magnetohydrodynamic outflows might play therein. Understanding the types of dynamos that might operate in supernova progenitors is therefore relevant. In contrast to previous work, here we study an ``interface dynamo'' for the conditions of a rapidly rotating neutron star surrounded by a convective envelope. Such dynamos have been studied for the Sun, naked white dwarfs,and post-AGB stars, where analogous configurations of strong shear layers surrounded by convective envelopes are present. The interface dynamo provides estimates of large-scale poloidal and toroidal fields, whose product enters the Poynting flux. Because the poloidal field is much weaker than the toroidal magnetic field, the actual average Poynting flux is lower than rough estimates which invoke the only the magnitude of the total magnetic energy. The lower value is s...

  3. Multicolored Dynamos on Toroidal Meshes

    CERN Document Server

    Brunetti, Sara; Quattrociocchi, Walter

    2010-01-01

    Detecting on a graph the presence of the minimum number of nodes (target set) that will be able to "activate" a prescribed number of vertices in the graph is called the target set selection problem (TSS) proposed by Kempe, Kleinberg, and Tardos. In TSS's settings, nodes have two possible states (active or non-active) and the threshold triggering the activation of a node is given by the number of its active neighbors. Dealing with fault tolerance in a majority based system the two possible states are used to denote faulty or non-faulty nodes, and the threshold is given by the state of the majority of neighbors. Here, the major effort was in determining the distribution of initial faults leading the entire system to a faulty behavior. Such an activation pattern, also known as dynamic monopoly (or shortly dynamo), was introduced by Peleg in 1996. In this paper we extend the TSS problem's settings by representing nodes' states with a "multicolored" set. The extended version of the problem can be described as foll...

  4. On the saturation of astrophysical dynamos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dorch, Bertil; Archontis, Vasilis

    2004-01-01

    In the context of astrophysical dynamos we illustrate that the no-cosines flow, with zero mean helicity, can drive fast dynamo action and we study the dynamo's mode of operation during both the linear and non-linear saturation regimes. It turns out that in addition to a high growth rate in the li......In the context of astrophysical dynamos we illustrate that the no-cosines flow, with zero mean helicity, can drive fast dynamo action and we study the dynamo's mode of operation during both the linear and non-linear saturation regimes. It turns out that in addition to a high growth rate...

  5. Kinematic Dynamo In Turbulent Circumstellar Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepinski, T.

    1993-01-01

    Many circumstellar disks associated with objects ranging from protoplanetary nebulae, to accretion disks around compact stars allow for the generation of magnetic fields by an (alpha)omega dynamo. We have applied kinematic dynamo formalism to geometrically thin accretion disks. We calculate, in the framework of an adiabatic approximation, the normal mode solutions for dynamos operating in disks around compact stars. We then describe the criteria for a viable dynamo in protoplanetary nebulae, and discuss the particular features that make accretion disk dynamos different from planetary, stellar, and galactic dynamos.

  6. Pattern recognition algorithm reveals how birds evolve individual egg pattern signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoddard, Mary Caswell; Kilner, Rebecca M; Town, Christopher

    2014-06-18

    Pattern-based identity signatures are commonplace in the animal kingdom, but how they are recognized is poorly understood. Here we develop a computer vision tool for analysing visual patterns, NATUREPATTERNMATCH, which breaks new ground by mimicking visual and cognitive processes known to be involved in recognition tasks. We apply this tool to a long-standing question about the evolution of recognizable signatures. The common cuckoo (Cuculus canorus) is a notorious cheat that sneaks its mimetic eggs into nests of other species. Can host birds fight back against cuckoo forgery by evolving highly recognizable signatures? Using NATUREPATTERNMATCH, we show that hosts subjected to the best cuckoo mimicry have evolved the most recognizable egg pattern signatures. Theory predicts that effective pattern signatures should be simultaneously replicable, distinctive and complex. However, our results reveal that recognizable signatures need not incorporate all three of these features. Moreover, different hosts have evolved effective signatures in diverse ways.

  7. Inheritance Patterns in Citation Networks Reveal Scientific Memes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Kuhn

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Memes are the cultural equivalent of genes that spread across human culture by means of imitation. What makes a meme and what distinguishes it from other forms of information, however, is still poorly understood. Our analysis of memes in the scientific literature reveals that they are governed by a surprisingly simple relationship between frequency of occurrence and the degree to which they propagate along the citation graph. We propose a simple formalization of this pattern and validate it with data from close to 50 million publication records from the Web of Science, PubMed Central, and the American Physical Society. Evaluations relying on human annotators, citation network randomizations, and comparisons with several alternative approaches confirm that our formula is accurate and effective, without a dependence on linguistic or ontological knowledge and without the application of arbitrary thresholds or filters.

  8. Inheritance Patterns in Citation Networks Reveal Scientific Memes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Tobias; Perc, Matjaž; Helbing, Dirk

    2014-10-01

    Memes are the cultural equivalent of genes that spread across human culture by means of imitation. What makes a meme and what distinguishes it from other forms of information, however, is still poorly understood. Our analysis of memes in the scientific literature reveals that they are governed by a surprisingly simple relationship between frequency of occurrence and the degree to which they propagate along the citation graph. We propose a simple formalization of this pattern and validate it with data from close to 50 million publication records from the Web of Science, PubMed Central, and the American Physical Society. Evaluations relying on human annotators, citation network randomizations, and comparisons with several alternative approaches confirm that our formula is accurate and effective, without a dependence on linguistic or ontological knowledge and without the application of arbitrary thresholds or filters.

  9. The Dynamo Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, Thomas R.

    2016-04-01

    The Dynamo Clinical Trial evaluates long-term stellar magnetic health through periodic X-ray examinations (by the Chandra Observatory). So far, there are only three subjects enrolled in the DTC: Alpha Centauri A (a solar-like G dwarf), Alpha Cen B (an early K dwarf, more active than the Sun), and Alpha Canis Majoris A (Procyon, a mid-F subgiant similar in activity to the Sun). Of these, Procyon is a new candidate, so it is too early to judge how it will fare. Of the other two, Alpha Cen B has responded well, with a steady magnetic heartbeat of about 8 years duration. The sickest of the bunch, Alpha Cen A, was in magnetic cardiac arrest during 2005-2010, but has begun responding to treatment in recent years, and seems to be successfully cycling again, perhaps achieving a new peak of magnetic health in the 2016 time frame. If this is the case, it has been 20 years since A's last healthful peak, significantly longer than the middle-aged Sun's 11-year magnetic heartbeat, but perhaps in line with Alpha Cen A's more senescent state (in terms of "relative evolutionary age," apparently an important driver of activity). (By the way, don't miss the exciting movie of the Alpha Cen stars' 20-year X-ray dance.)

  10. Tsunami: ocean dynamo generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugioka, Hiroko; Hamano, Yozo; Baba, Kiyoshi; Kasaya, Takafumi; Tada, Noriko; Suetsugu, Daisuke

    2014-01-08

    Secondary magnetic fields are induced by the flow of electrically conducting seawater through the Earth's primary magnetic field ('ocean dynamo effect'), and hence it has long been speculated that tsunami flows should produce measurable magnetic field perturbations, although the signal-to-noise ratio would be small because of the influence of the solar magnetic fields. Here, we report on the detection of deep-seafloor electromagnetic perturbations of 10-micron-order induced by a tsunami, which propagated through a seafloor electromagnetometer array network. The observed data extracted tsunami characteristics, including the direction and velocity of propagation as well as sea-level change, first to verify the induction theory. Presently, offshore observation systems for the early forecasting of tsunami are based on the sea-level measurement by seafloor pressure gauges. In terms of tsunami forecasting accuracy, the integration of vectored electromagnetic measurements into existing scalar observation systems would represent a substantial improvement in the performance of tsunami early-warning systems.

  11. Conceptual recurrence plots: revealing patterns in human discourse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angus, Daniel; Smith, Andrew; Wiles, Janet

    2012-06-01

    Human discourse contains a rich mixture of conceptual information. Visualization of the global and local patterns within this data stream is a complex and challenging problem. Recurrence plots are an information visualization technique that can reveal trends and features in complex time series data. The recurrence plot technique works by measuring the similarity of points in a time series to all other points in the same time series and plotting the results in two dimensions. Previous studies have applied recurrence plotting techniques to textual data; however, these approaches plot recurrence using term-based similarity rather than conceptual similarity of the text. We introduce conceptual recurrence plots, which use a model of language to measure similarity between pairs of text utterances, and the similarity of all utterances is measured and displayed. In this paper, we explore how the descriptive power of the recurrence plotting technique can be used to discover patterns of interaction across a series of conversation transcripts. The results suggest that the conceptual recurrence plotting technique is a useful tool for exploring the structure of human discourse.

  12. Turbulent dynamo in a disk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruzmaikin, A.A.; Sokolov, D.D.; Turchaninov, V.I.

    1980-03-01

    The large-scale magnetic field in a rotating, turbulent gaseous disk will be generated by a dynamo process (the ..cap alpha omega..-dynamo) determined by the differential rotation ..omega..(r) and the spirality function ..cap alpha..(z). The generation is best described by a difference approximation to the dynamo equations, using a step greater than the turbulence correlation length and a smooth function ..cap alpha..(z). The critical dynamo-number for exciting the lowest even quadrupole mode is D/sub q/ = -8. The odd dipole mode will be excited only for large dynamo-numberabsolute value (D/sub d/) > or approx. = 500. When absolute value (D) > or approx. = 20, all modes other than the lowest quadrupole mode (for which the threshold Dapprox. =-500) are oscillatory. The results are applied to the Galaxy (D approx. = -10; characteristic growth time, 3 x 10/sup 8/ yr) and to accretion disks in binary systems containing a black hole, where several oscillatory modes can be excited.

  13. Strong horizontal photospheric magnetic field in a surface dynamo simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SchÜssler, M.; Vögler, A.

    2008-01-01

    Context. Observations with the Hinode spectro-polarimeter have revealed strong horizontal internetwork magnetic fields in the quiet solar photosphere. Aims. We aim to interpret the observations with results from numerical simulations. Methods. Radiative MHD simulations of dynamo action by near-surfa

  14. A Reconnecting Flux Rope Dynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Baggaley, Andrew W; Shukurov, Anvar; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2009-01-01

    We develop a new model of the fluctuation dynamo in which the magnetic field is confined in thin flux ropes advected by a multi-scale flow modeling turbulence. Magnetic dissipation occurs only via reconnection of the flux ropes. We investigate the kinetic energy release into heat, mediated by the dynamo action, both in our model and by solving the induction equation with the same flow. We find that a flux rope dynamo is an order of magnitude more efficient at converting mechanical energy into heat. The probability density of the magnetic energy release in reconnections has a power-law form with the slope -3, consistent with the Solar corona heating by nanoflares.

  15. Reconnecting flux-rope dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggaley, Andrew W.; Barenghi, Carlo F.; Shukurov, Anvar; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2009-11-01

    We develop a model of the fluctuation dynamo in which the magnetic field is confined to thin flux ropes advected by a multiscale model of turbulence. Magnetic dissipation occurs only via reconnection of the flux ropes. This model can be viewed as an implementation of the asymptotic limit Rm→∞ for a continuous magnetic field, where magnetic dissipation is strongly localized to small regions of strong-field gradients. We investigate the kinetic-energy release into heat mediated by the dynamo action, both in our model and by solving the induction equation with the same flow. We find that a flux-rope dynamo is an order of magnitude more efficient at converting mechanical energy into heat. The probability density of the magnetic energy release in reconnections has a power-law form with the slope -3 , consistent with the solar corona heating by nanoflares.

  16. Reconnecting flux-rope dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggaley, Andrew W; Barenghi, Carlo F; Shukurov, Anvar; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2009-11-01

    We develop a model of the fluctuation dynamo in which the magnetic field is confined to thin flux ropes advected by a multiscale model of turbulence. Magnetic dissipation occurs only via reconnection of the flux ropes. This model can be viewed as an implementation of the asymptotic limit R_{m}-->infinity for a continuous magnetic field, where magnetic dissipation is strongly localized to small regions of strong-field gradients. We investigate the kinetic-energy release into heat mediated by the dynamo action, both in our model and by solving the induction equation with the same flow. We find that a flux-rope dynamo is an order of magnitude more efficient at converting mechanical energy into heat. The probability density of the magnetic energy release in reconnections has a power-law form with the slope -3 , consistent with the solar corona heating by nanoflares.

  17. Global Considerations in Hierarchical Clustering Reveal Meaningful Patterns in Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varshavsky, Roy; Horn, David; Linial, Michal

    2008-01-01

    Background A hierarchy, characterized by tree-like relationships, is a natural method of organizing data in various domains. When considering an unsupervised machine learning routine, such as clustering, a bottom-up hierarchical (BU, agglomerative) algorithm is used as a default and is often the only method applied. Methodology/Principal Findings We show that hierarchical clustering that involve global considerations, such as top-down (TD, divisive), or glocal (global-local) algorithms are better suited to reveal meaningful patterns in the data. This is demonstrated, by testing the correspondence between the results of several algorithms (TD, glocal and BU) and the correct annotations provided by experts. The correspondence was tested in multiple domains including gene expression experiments, stock trade records and functional protein families. The performance of each of the algorithms is evaluated by statistical criteria that are assigned to clusters (nodes of the hierarchy tree) based on expert-labeled data. Whereas TD algorithms perform better on global patterns, BU algorithms perform well and are advantageous when finer granularity of the data is sought. In addition, a novel TD algorithm that is based on genuine density of the data points is presented and is shown to outperform other divisive and agglomerative methods. Application of the algorithm to more than 500 protein sequences belonging to ion-channels illustrates the potential of the method for inferring overlooked functional annotations. ClustTree, a graphical Matlab toolbox for applying various hierarchical clustering algorithms and testing their quality is made available. Conclusions Although currently rarely used, global approaches, in particular, TD or glocal algorithms, should be considered in the exploratory process of clustering. In general, applying unsupervised clustering methods can leverage the quality of manually-created mapping of proteins families. As demonstrated, it can also provide

  18. A Network Based Methodology to Reveal Patterns in Knowledge Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando López-Cruz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper motivates, presents and demonstrates in use a methodology based in complex network analysis to support research aimed at identification of sources in the process of knowledge transfer at the interorganizational level. The importance of this methodology is that it states a unified model to reveal knowledge sharing patterns and to compare results from multiple researches on data from different periods of time and different sectors of the economy. This methodology does not address the underlying statistical processes. To do this, national statistics departments (NSD provide documents and tools at their websites. But this proposal provides a guide to model information inferences gathered from data processing revealing links between sources and recipients of knowledge being transferred and that the recipient detects as main source to new knowledge creation. Some national statistics departments set as objective for these surveys the characterization of innovation dynamics in firms and to analyze the use of public support instruments. From this characterization scholars conduct different researches. Measures of dimensions of the network composed by manufacturing firms and other organizations conform the base to inquiry the structure that emerges from taking ideas from other organizations to incept innovations. These two sets of data are actors of a two- mode-network. The link between two actors (network nodes, one acting as the source of the idea. The second one acting as the destination comes from organizations or events organized by organizations that “provide” ideas to other group of firms. The resulting demonstrated design satisfies the objective of being a methodological model to identify sources in knowledge transfer of knowledge effectively used in innovation.

  19. Phylogeny of the Botryosphaeriaceae reveals patterns of host association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Wet, Juanita; Slippers, Bernard; Preisig, Oliver; Wingfield, Brenda D; Wingfield, Michael J

    2008-01-01

    Three anamorph genera of the Botryosphaeriaceae namely Diplodia, Lasiodiplodia and Dothiorella have typically dark, ovoid conidia with thick walls, and are consequently difficult to distinguish from each other. These genera are well-known pathogens of especially pine species. We generated a multiple gene genealogy to resolve the phylogenetic relationships of Botryosphaeriaceae with dark conidial anamorphs, and mapped host associations based on this phylogeny. The multiple gene genealogy separated Diplodia, Lasiodiplodia and Dothiorella and it revealed trends in the patterns of host association. The data set was expanded to include more lineages of the Botryosphaeriaceae, and included all isolates from different host species for which ITS sequence data are available. Results indicate that Diplodia species occur mainly on gymnosperms, with a few species on both gymnosperms and angiosperms. Lasiodiplodia species occur equally on both gymnosperms and angiosperms, Dothiorella species are restricted to angiosperms and Neofusicoccum species occur mainly on angiosperms with rare reports on Southern Hemisphere gymnosperms. Botryosphaeria species with Fusicoccum anamorphs occur mostly on angiosperms with rare reports on gymnosperms. Ancestral state reconstruction suggests that a putative ancestor of the Botryosphaeriaceae most likely evolved on the angiosperms. Another interesting observation was that both host generalist and specialist species were observed in all the lineages of the Botryosphaeriaceae, with little evidence of host associated co-evolution.

  20. Geometric Mechanics Reveals Optimal Complex Terrestrial Undulation Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Chaohui; Astley, Henry; Schiebel, Perrin; Dai, Jin; Travers, Matthew; Goldman, Daniel; Choset, Howie; CMU Team; GT Team

    Geometric mechanics offers useful tools for intuitively analyzing biological and robotic locomotion. However, utility of these tools were previously restricted to systems that have only two internal degrees of freedom and in uniform media. We show kinematics of complex locomotors that make intermittent contacts with substrates can be approximated as a linear combination of two shape bases, and can be represented using two variables. Therefore, the tools of geometric mechanics can be used to analyze motions of locomotors with many degrees of freedom. To demonstrate the proposed technique, we present studies on two different types of snake gaits which utilize combinations of waves in the horizontal and vertical planes: sidewinding (in the sidewinder rattlesnake C. cerastes) and lateral undulation (in the desert specialist snake C. occipitalis). C. cerastes moves by generating posteriorly traveling body waves in the horizontal and vertical directions, with a relative phase offset equal to +/-π/2 while C. occipitalismaintains a π/2 offset of a frequency doubled vertical wave. Geometric analysis reveals these coordination patterns enable optimal movement in the two different styles of undulatory terrestrial locomotion. More broadly, these examples demonstrate the utility of geometric mechanics in analyzing realistic biological and robotic locomotion.

  1. Helicity, Reconnection, and Dynamo Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Hantao

    1998-11-01

    The inter-relationships between magnetic helicity, magnetic reconnection, and dynamo effects are discussed. In laboratory experiments, where two plasmas are driven to merge, the helicity content of each plasma strongly affects the reconnection rate, as well as the shape of the diffusion region. Conversely, magnetic reconnection events also strongly affect the global helicity, resulting in efficient helicity cancellation (but not dissipation) during counter-helicity reconnection and a finite helicity increase or decrease (but less efficiently than dissipation of magnetic energy) during co-helicity reconnection. Close relationships also exist between magnetic helicity and dynamo effects. The turbulent electromotive force along the mean magnetic field (alpha-effect), due to either electrostatic turbulence or the electron diamagnetic effect, transports mean-field helicity across space without dissipation. This has been supported by direct measurements of helicity flux in a laboratory plasma. When the dynamo effect is driven by electromagnetic turbulence, helicity in the turbulent field is converted to mean-field helicity. In all cases, however, dynamo processes conserve total helicity except for a small battery effect, consistent with the observation that the helicity is approximately conserved during magnetic relaxation.

  2. Statistical dynamo theory: Mode excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyng, P

    2009-04-01

    We compute statistical properties of the lowest-order multipole coefficients of the magnetic field generated by a dynamo of arbitrary shape. To this end we expand the field in a complete biorthogonal set of base functions, viz. B= summation operator_{k}a;{k}(t)b;{k}(r) . The properties of these biorthogonal function sets are treated in detail. We consider a linear problem and the statistical properties of the fluid flow are supposed to be given. The turbulent convection may have an arbitrary distribution of spatial scales. The time evolution of the expansion coefficients a;{k} is governed by a stochastic differential equation from which we infer their averages a;{k} , autocorrelation functions a;{k}(t)a;{k *}(t+tau) , and an equation for the cross correlations a;{k}a;{l *} . The eigenfunctions of the dynamo equation (with eigenvalues lambda_{k} ) turn out to be a preferred set in terms of which our results assume their simplest form. The magnetic field of the dynamo is shown to consist of transiently excited eigenmodes whose frequency and coherence time is given by Ilambda_{k} and -1/Rlambda_{k} , respectively. The relative rms excitation level of the eigenmodes, and hence the distribution of magnetic energy over spatial scales, is determined by linear theory. An expression is derived for |a;{k}|;{2}/|a;{0}|;{2} in case the fundamental mode b;{0} has a dominant amplitude, and we outline how this expression may be evaluated. It is estimated that |a;{k}|;{2}/|a;{0}|;{2} approximately 1/N , where N is the number of convective cells in the dynamo. We show that the old problem of a short correlation time (or first-order smoothing approximation) has been partially eliminated. Finally we prove that for a simple statistically steady dynamo with finite resistivity all eigenvalues obey Rlambda_{k}<0 .

  3. Network based approaches reveal clustering in protein point patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Joshua; Barr, Valarie; Aldridge, Joshua; Samelson, Lawrence E.; Losert, Wolfgang

    2014-03-01

    Recent advances in super-resolution imaging have allowed for the sub-diffraction measurement of the spatial location of proteins on the surfaces of T-cells. The challenge is to connect these complex point patterns to the internal processes and interactions, both protein-protein and protein-membrane. We begin analyzing these patterns by forming a geometric network amongst the proteins and looking at network measures, such the degree distribution. This allows us to compare experimentally observed patterns to models. Specifically, we find that the experimental patterns differ from heterogeneous Poisson processes, highlighting an internal clustering structure. Further work will be to compare our results to simulated protein-protein interactions to determine clustering mechanisms.

  4. Turbulent dynamo with advective magnetic helicity flux

    CERN Document Server

    Del Sordo, Fabio; Brandenburg, Axel

    2012-01-01

    Many astrophysical bodies harbor magnetic fields that are thought to be sustained by dynamo processes. However, it has been argued that the production of large-scale magnetic fields by a mean-field dynamo is strongly suppressed at large magnetic Reynolds numbers owing to the conservation of magnetic helicity. This phenomenon is known as catastrophic quenching. Advection of magnetic field toward the outer boundaries and away from the dynamo is expected to alleviate such quenching. Examples are stellar and galactic winds. Such advection might be able to overcome the constraint imposed by the conservation of magnetic helicity, transporting a fraction of it outside the domain in which the dynamo operates. We study how the dynamo process is affected by advection. In particular, we study the relative roles played by advective and diffusive fluxes of magnetic helicity. We do this by performing direct numerical simulations of a turbulent dynamo of alpha^2 type driven by forced turbulence in a Cartesian domain in the ...

  5. NRL Satellite Support for DYNAMO Field Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NRL Satellite Support for DYNAMO Field Program Jeffrey...Jeff.Hawkins@nrlmry.navy.mil Document Number: N0001412WX20870 LONG-TERM GOALS To provide the ONR-sponsored DYNAMO field program with a...the Indian Ocean. OBJECTIVES Develop a NRL-MRY near real-time web page that enables DYNAMO field program participants to view the evolving

  6. A Vorticity-Magnetic Field Dynamo Instability

    OpenAIRE

    1997-01-01

    We generalize the mean field magnetic dynamo to include local evolution of the mean vorticity in addition to the mean magnetic field. The coupled equations exhibit a general mean field dynamo instability that enables the transfer of turbulent energy to the magnetic field and vorticity on larger scales. The growth of the vorticity and magnetic field both require helical turbulence which can be supplied by an underlying global rotation. The dynamo coefficients are derived including the backreac...

  7. adidas Dynamo Formotion 2 Lo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    随着天气越来越热,低帮款战靴也越来越受到球迷的喜爱。尤其是拥有高性能、低价位的战靴.会更加让人期待,而Dynamo Formotion 2 Lo就满足了以上两项要求。

  8. Magnetized Turbulent Dynamo in Protogalaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Malyshkin, L M; Malyshkin, Leonid; Kulsrud, Russell

    2002-01-01

    The prevailing theory for the origin of cosmic magnetic fields is that they have been amplified to their present values by the turbulent dynamo inductive action in the protogalactic and galactic medium. Up to now, in calculation of the turbulent dynamo, it has been customary to assume that there is no back reaction of the magnetic field on the turbulence, as long as the magnetic energy is less than the turbulent kinetic energy. This assumption leads to the kinematic dynamo theory. However, the applicability of this theory to protogalaxies is rather limited. The reason is that in protogalaxies the temperature is very high, and the viscosity is dominated by magnetized ions. As the magnetic field strength grows in time, the ion cyclotron time becomes shorter than the ion collision time, and the plasma becomes strongly magnetized. As a result, the ion viscosity becomes the Braginskii viscosity. Thus, in protogalaxies the back reaction sets in much earlier, at field strengths much lower than those which correspond...

  9. Optimization of the magnetic dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Ashley P

    2012-12-21

    In stars and planets, magnetic fields are believed to originate from the motion of electrically conducting fluids in their interior, through a process known as the dynamo mechanism. In this Letter, an optimization procedure is used to simultaneously address two fundamental questions of dynamo theory: "Which velocity field leads to the most magnetic energy growth?" and "How large does the velocity need to be relative to magnetic diffusion?" In general, this requires optimization over the full space of continuous solenoidal velocity fields possible within the geometry. Here the case of a periodic box is considered. Measuring the strength of the flow with the root-mean-square amplitude, an optimal velocity field is shown to exist, but without limitation on the strain rate, optimization is prone to divergence. Measuring the flow in terms of its associated dissipation leads to the identification of a single optimal at the critical magnetic Reynolds number necessary for a dynamo. This magnetic Reynolds number is found to be only 15% higher than that necessary for transient growth of the magnetic field.

  10. Inverse problem in Parker's dynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Reshetnyak, M Yu

    2015-01-01

    The inverse solution of the 1D Parker dynamo equations is considered. The method is based on minimization of the cost-function, which characterize deviation of the model solution properties from the desired ones. The output is the latitude distribution of the magnetic field generation sources: the $\\alpha$- and $\\omega$-effects. Minimization is made using the Monte-Carlo method. The details of the method, as well as some applications, which can be interesting for the broad dynamo community, are considered: conditions when the invisible for the observer at the surface of the planet toroidal part of the magnetic field is much larger than the poloidal counterpart. It is shown that at some particular distributions of $\\alpha$ and $\\omega$ the well-known thesis that sign of the dynamo-number defines equatorial symmetry of the magnetic field to the equator plane, is violated. It is also demonstrated in what circumstances magnetic field in the both hemispheres have different properties, and simple physical explanati...

  11. Are all species necessary to reveal ecologically important patterns?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pos, Edwin; Guevara Andino, Juan Ernesto; Sabatier, Daniel; Molino, Jean-François; Pitman, Nigel; Mogollón, Hugo; Neill, David; Cerón, Carlos; Rivas, Gonzalo; Di Fiore, Anthony; Thomas, Raquel; Tirado, Milton; Young, Kenneth R; Wang, Ophelia; Sierra, Rodrigo; García-Villacorta, Roosevelt; Zagt, Roderick; Palacios, Walter; Aulestia, Milton; Ter Steege, Hans

    2014-01-01

    While studying ecological patterns at large scales, ecologists are often unable to identify all collections, forcing them to either omit these unidentified records entirely, without knowing the effect of this, or pursue very costly and time-consuming efforts for identifying them. These "indets" may

  12. Are all species necessary to reveal ecologically important patterns?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pos, Edwin; Guevara Andino, Juan Ernesto; Sabatier, Daniel; Molino, Jean-François; Pitman, Nigel; Mogollón, Hugo; Neill, David; Cerón, Carlos; Rivas, Gonzalo; Di Fiore, Anthony; Thomas, Raquel; Tirado, Milton; Young, Kenneth R; Wang, Ophelia; Sierra, Rodrigo; García-Villacorta, Roosevelt; Zagt, Roderick; Palacios, Walter; Aulestia, Milton; Ter Steege, Hans

    2014-01-01

    While studying ecological patterns at large scales, ecologists are often unable to identify all collections, forcing them to either omit these unidentified records entirely, without knowing the effect of this, or pursue very costly and time-consuming efforts for identifying them. These "indets" may

  13. Weak and Strong Field Dynamos: from the Earth to the stars

    CERN Document Server

    Morin, J; Schrinner, M; Donati, J -F

    2011-01-01

    Observations of magnetism in very low mass stars recently made important progress, revealing characteristics that are now to be understood in the framework of dynamo theory. In parallel, there is growing evidence that dynamo processes in these stars share many similarities with planetary dynamos. We investigate the extent to which the weak \\emph{vs} strong field bistability predicted for the geodynamo can apply to recent observations of two groups of very low mass fully-convective stars sharing similar stellar parameters but generating radically different types of magnetic fields. Our analysis is based on previously published spectropolarimetric and spectroscopic data. We argue that these can be interpreted in the framework of weak and strong field dynamos.

  14. No Sun-like dynamo on the active star ζ Andromedae from starspot asymmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roettenbacher, R M; Monnier, J D; Korhonen, H; Aarnio, A N; Baron, F; Che, X; Harmon, R O; Kővári, Zs; Kraus, S; Schaefer, G H; Torres, G; Zhao, M; ten Brummelaar, T A; Sturmann, J; Sturmann, L

    2016-05-12

    Sunspots are cool areas caused by strong surface magnetic fields that inhibit convection. Moreover, strong magnetic fields can alter the average atmospheric structure, degrading our ability to measure stellar masses and ages. Stars that are more active than the Sun have more and stronger dark spots than does the Sun, including on the rotational pole. Doppler imaging, which has so far produced the most detailed images of surface structures on other stars, cannot always distinguish the hemisphere in which the starspots are located, especially in the equatorial region and if the data quality is not optimal. This leads to problems in investigating the north-south distribution of starspot active latitudes (those latitudes with more starspot activity); this distribution is a crucial constraint of dynamo theory. Polar spots, whose existence is inferred from Doppler tomography, could plausibly be observational artefacts. Here we report imaging of the old, magnetically active star ζ Andromedae using long-baseline infrared interferometry. In our data, a dark polar spot is seen in each of two observation epochs, whereas lower-latitude spot structures in both hemispheres do not persist between observations, revealing global starspot asymmetries. The north-south symmetry of active latitudes observed on the Sun is absent on ζ And, which hosts global spot patterns that cannot be produced by solar-type dynamos.

  15. Solar Dynamo Driven by Periodic Flow Oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, Hans G.; Hartle, Richard E.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We have proposed that the periodicity of the solar magnetic cycle is determined by wave mean flow interactions analogous to those driving the Quasi Biennial Oscillation in the Earth's atmosphere. Upward propagating gravity waves would produce oscillating flows near the top of the radiation zone that in turn would drive a kinematic dynamo to generate the 22-year solar magnetic cycle. The dynamo we propose is built on a given time independent magnetic field B, which allows us to estimate the time dependent, oscillating components of the magnetic field, (Delta)B. The toroidal magnetic field (Delta)B(sub phi) is directly driven by zonal flow and is relatively large in the source region, (Delta)(sub phi)/B(sub Theta) much greater than 1. Consistent with observations, this field peaks at low latitudes and has opposite polarities in both hemispheres. The oscillating poloidal magnetic field component, (Delta)B(sub Theta), is driven by the meridional circulation, which is difficult to assess without a numerical model that properly accounts for the solar atmosphere dynamics. Scale-analysis suggests that (Delta)B(sub Theta) is small compared to B(sub Theta) in the dynamo region. Relative to B(sub Theta), however, the oscillating magnetic field perturbations are expected to be transported more rapidly upwards in the convection zone to the solar surface. As a result, (Delta)B(sub Theta) (and (Delta)B(sub phi)) should grow relative to B(sub Theta), so that the magnetic fields reverse at the surface as observed. Since the meridional and zonai flow oscillations are out of phase, the poloidal magnetic field peaks during times when the toroidal field reverses direction, which is observed. With the proposed wave driven flow oscillation, the magnitude of the oscillating poloidal magnetic field increases with the mean rotation rate of the fluid. This is consistent with the Bode-Blackett empirical scaling law, which reveals that in massive astrophysical bodies the magnetic moment tends

  16. Cytometric patterns reveal growth states of Shewanella putrefaciens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melzer, Susanne; Winter, Gudrun; Jäger, Kathrin; Hübschmann, Thomas; Hause, Gerd; Syrowatka, Frank; Harms, Hauke; Tárnok, Attila; Müller, Susann

    2015-05-01

    Bacterial growth is often difficult to estimate beyond classical cultivation approaches. Low cell numbers, particles or coloured and dense media may disturb reliable growth assessment. Further difficulties appear when cells are attached to surfaces and detachment is incomplete. Therefore, flow cytometry was tested and used for analysis of bacterial growth on the single-cell level. Shewanella putrefaciens was cultivated as a model organism in planktonic or biofilm culture. Materials of smooth and rough surfaces were used for biofilm cultivation. Both aerobic and anaerobic as well as feast and famine conditions were applied. Visualization of growth was also done using Environmental Scanning and Phase Contrast Microscopy. Bioinformatic tools were applied for data interpretation. Cytometric proliferation patterns based on distributions of DNA contents per cell corresponded distinctly to the various lifestyles, electron acceptors and substrates tested. Therefore, cell cycling profiles of S. putrefaciens were found to mirror growth conditions. The cytometric patterns were consistently detectable with exception of some biofilm types whose resolution remained challenging. Corresponding heat maps proved to be useful for clear visualization of growth behaviour under all tested conditions. Therefore, flow cytometry in combination with bioinformatic tools proved to be powerful means to determine various growth states of S. putrefaciens, even in constrained environments. The approach is universal and will also be applicable for other bacterial species. © 2014 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  17. Sleep Deprivation Reveals Altered Brain Perfusion Patterns in Somnambulism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thien Thanh Dang-Vu

    Full Text Available Despite its high prevalence, relatively little is known about the pathophysiology of somnambulism. Increasing evidence indicates that somnambulism is associated with functional abnormalities during wakefulness and that sleep deprivation constitutes an important drive that facilitates sleepwalking in predisposed patients. Here, we studied the neural mechanisms associated with somnambulism using Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT with 99mTc-Ethylene Cysteinate Dimer (ECD, during wakefulness and after sleep deprivation.Ten adult sleepwalkers and twelve controls with normal sleep were scanned using 99mTc-ECD SPECT in morning wakefulness after a full night of sleep. Eight of the sleepwalkers and nine of the controls were also scanned during wakefulness after a night of total sleep deprivation. Between-group comparisons of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF were performed to characterize brain activity patterns during wakefulness in sleepwalkers.During wakefulness following a night of total sleep deprivation, rCBF was decreased bilaterally in the inferior temporal gyrus in sleepwalkers compared to controls.Functional neural abnormalities can be observed during wakefulness in somnambulism, particularly after sleep deprivation and in the inferior temporal cortex. Sleep deprivation thus not only facilitates the occurrence of sleepwalking episodes, but also uncovers patterns of neural dysfunction that characterize sleepwalkers during wakefulness.

  18. Communities in Neuronal Complex Networks Revealed by Activation Patterns

    CERN Document Server

    Costa, Luciano da Fontoura

    2008-01-01

    Recently, it has been shown that the communities in neuronal networks of the integrate-and-fire type can be identified by considering patterns containing the beginning times for each cell to receive the first non-zero activation. The received activity was integrated in order to facilitate the spiking of each neuron and to constrain the activation inside the communities, but no time decay of such activation was considered. The present article shows that, by taking into account exponential decays of the stored activation, it is possible to identify the communities also in terms of the patterns of activation along the initial steps of the transient dynamics. The potential of this method is illustrated with respect to complex neuronal networks involving four communities, each of a different type (Erd\\H{o}s-R\\'eny, Barab\\'asi-Albert, Watts-Strogatz as well as a simple geographical model). Though the consideration of activation decay has been found to enhance the communities separation, too intense decays tend to y...

  19. Global Solar Dynamo Models: Simulations and Predictions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mausumi Dikpati; Peter A. Gilman

    2008-03-01

    Flux-transport type solar dynamos have achieved considerable success in correctly simulating many solar cycle features, and are now being used for prediction of solar cycle timing and amplitude.We first define flux-transport dynamos and demonstrate how they work. The essential added ingredient in this class of models is meridional circulation, which governs the dynamo period and also plays a crucial role in determining the Sun’s memory about its past magnetic fields.We show that flux-transport dynamo models can explain many key features of solar cycles. Then we show that a predictive tool can be built from this class of dynamo that can be used to predict mean solar cycle features by assimilating magnetic field data from previous cycles.

  20. Magnetic Helicity Conservation and Astrophysical Dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Vishniac, E T; Vishniac, Ethan T.; Cho, Jungyeon

    2000-01-01

    We construct a magnetic helicity conserving dynamo theory which incorporates a calculated magnetic helicity current. In this model the fluid helicity plays a small role in large scale magnetic field generation. Instead, the dynamo process is dominated by a new quantity, derived from asymmetries in the second derivative of the velocity correlation function, closely related to the `twist and fold' dynamo model. The turbulent damping term is, as expected, almost unchanged. Numerical simulations with a spatially constant fluid helicity and vanishing resistivity are not expected to generate large scale fields in equipartition with the turbulent energy density. In fact, there seems to be little prospect for driving a fast dynamo in a closed box containing homogeneous turbulence. On the other hand, there is an efficient analog to the $\\alpha-\\Omega$ dynamo. Systems whose turbulence is driven by some anisotropic local instability in shearing flow, like real stars and accretion disks, and some computer simulations, ma...

  1. New results on an equipartition dynamo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dorch, S. B. F.; Archontis, V.

    2006-01-01

    This contribution presents results from numerical computer experiments with a 3-d steady sine flow (with zero mean helicity) that drives fast dynamo action. The mode of operation of this so-called ``no-cosines" dynamo (recently dubbed ``the Archontis dynamo"" by David Galloway) was studied during...... linear and non-linear saturation regimes. The means were 3-d non-linear MHD simulations and visualization using the high resolution numerical scheme by Nordlund, Galsgaard and others. We have found that the dynamo has a high growth rate in the linear regime, and that it can saturate at a level...... significantly higher that intermittent turbulent dynamos: Namely very close to energy equipartition for high Reynolds numbers. The equipartition solution however is not turbulent but a laminar solution that acts as an attractor to other modes. Similarities and differences, in the way the magnetic field...

  2. Dynamo transition in low-dimensional models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Mahendra K; Lessinnes, Thomas; Carati, Daniele; Sarris, Ioannis; Kumar, Krishna; Singh, Meenakshi

    2008-09-01

    Two low-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic models containing three velocity and three magnetic modes are described. One of them (nonhelical model) has zero kinetic and current helicity, while the other model (helical) has nonzero kinetic and current helicity. The velocity modes are forced in both these models. These low-dimensional models exhibit a dynamo transition at a critical forcing amplitude that depends on the Prandtl number. In the nonhelical model, dynamo exists only for magnetic Prandtl number beyond 1, while the helical model exhibits dynamo for all magnetic Prandtl number. Although the model is far from reproducing all the possible features of dynamo mechanisms, its simplicity allows a very detailed study and the observed dynamo transition is shown to bear similarities with recent numerical and experimental results.

  3. A long-lived lunar core dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Erin K; Weiss, Benjamin P; Cassata, William S; Shuster, David L; Tikoo, Sonia M; Gattacceca, Jérôme; Grove, Timothy L; Fuller, Michael D

    2012-01-27

    Paleomagnetic measurements indicate that a core dynamo probably existed on the Moon 4.2 billion years ago. However, the subsequent history of the lunar core dynamo is unknown. Here we report paleomagnetic, petrologic, and (40)Ar/(39)Ar thermochronometry measurements on the 3.7-billion-year-old mare basalt sample 10020. This sample contains a high-coercivity magnetization acquired in a stable field of at least ~12 microteslas. These data extend the known lifetime of the lunar dynamo by 500 million years. Such a long-lived lunar dynamo probably required a power source other than thermochemical convection from secular cooling of the lunar interior. The inferred strong intensity of the lunar paleofield presents a challenge to current dynamo theory.

  4. Recombination patterns reveal information about centromere location on linkage maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Limborg, Morten T.; McKinney, Garrett J.; Seeb, Lisa W.

    2016-01-01

    , approximate centromere placement is possible by phasing the same data used to generate linkage maps. Assuming one obligate crossover per chromosome arm, information about centromere location can be revealed by tracking the accumulated recombination frequency along linkage groups, similar to half....... mykiss) characterized by low and unevenly distributed recombination – a general feature of male meiosis in many species. Further, a high frequency of double crossovers along chromosome arms in barley reduced resolution for locating centromeric regions on most linkage groups. Despite these limitations......, our method should work well for high‐density maps in species with strong recombination interference and will enrich many existing and future mapping resources....

  5. Continental patterns of submarine groundwater discharge reveal coastal vulnerabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Audrey H.; David, Cédric H.; Famiglietti, James S.

    2016-08-01

    Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) delivers water and dissolved chemicals from continents to oceans, and its spatial distribution affects coastal water quality. Unlike rivers, SGD is broadly distributed and relatively difficult to measure, especially at continental scales. We present spatially resolved estimates of fresh (land-derived) SGD for the contiguous United States based on historical climate records and high-resolution hydrographic data. Climate controls regional patterns in fresh SGD, while coastal drainage geometry imparts strong local variability. Because the recharge zones that contribute fresh SGD are densely populated, the quality and quantity of fresh SGD are both vulnerable to anthropogenic disturbance. Our analysis unveils hot spots for contaminant discharge to marine waters and saltwater intrusion into coastal aquifers.

  6. SADE, the Student Astrophysical Dynamo Explorer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, P.; Acton, L.; Klumpar, D.; Stern, R.; Peres, G.; Culhane, L.

    In soft x-rays the solar coronal radiance varies by a factor of 10-30 over the solar activity cycle. A similar variation in most stars in the existing x-ray database has not been found (Stern 2001); even stars which exhibit chromospheric activity cycles show only marginal evidence for X-ray cycles. This is rather puzzling as the time span and multiple coverage of the x-ray sky should reveal at least a hint of such a pronounced cyclical variation. We propose a mission called the Student Astrophysical Dynamo Explorer to measure the x-ray brightness of about 75 stars once every 5 days for up to 15 years. Selection of prime stars takes into account location (avoid eclipse), rotation rate, Ca-K observations, and magnetic field strength, to focus on the best candidates for dynamo studies. We baseline a nested 4-5 mirror system with 200 cm^2 geometric area, with a 1.5 to 2 meter focal length, 15 arcsec on-axis resolution, and Au or Ni coatings. The strawman detector is a back-illuminated CCD of 512x512 pixels, with pixels that can be large as a 15 arcseconds. Available exposure time per star per visit is about an hour and a half. We are exploring the option of adding a visible light detector for astroseismology. To minimize operations cost for this long duration mission we envisage tracking and commanding from a simple ground station at Montana State University, operated by students under the auspices of MSU's Space Science and Engineering Lab (SSEL).

  7. Current Challenges in Dynamo Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glatzmaier, G. A.

    2001-12-01

    Three-dimensional, dynamically self-consistent, numerical simulations have been used for two decades to study the generation of global magnetic fields in the deep fluid interiors of planets and stars. In particular, the number of geodynamo models has increased significantly within the last five years. These simulations of magnetic field generation by laminar convection have provided considerable insight to the dynamo process and have produced large-scale fields similar to those observed. However, no global convective dynamo simulation has yet been able to afford the spatial resolution required to simulate turbulent convection, which surely must exist in these low-viscosity fluids. They have all employed greatly enhanced eddy diffusivities to stabilize the low resolution numerical solutions and crudely account for the transport and mixing by the unresolved turbulence. A grand challenge for the next generation of geodynamo models is to produce a simulation with the thermal and viscous (eddy) diffusivities set no larger than the actual magnetic diffusivity of the Earth's fluid core (2 m2/s), while using the core's dimensions, mass, rotation rate and heat flow. This would correspond to the Ekman and magnetic Ekman numbers both set to 10-9 and the Rayleigh number being many orders of magnitude greater than critical. Dynamo models for stars and planets present an additional complication: the large variation of density with radius. A grand challenge for the next generation of these models is to reach similarly low Ekman numbers and high Rayleigh numbers with a density that decreases by at least three orders of magnitude from the base of the convection zone to the model's outer boundary. The advances in numerical methods and massively parallel computing needed to meet these challenges will be discussed.

  8. Mechanically-forced dynamos (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bars, M.

    2013-12-01

    It is a commonly accepted hypothesis that convection is responsible for planetary dynamos. However, the validity of the convective dynamo model can be questioned in various planets and moons as well as in asteroids, where the constraints from thermal evolution and compositional core models are sometimes difficult to reconcile with available data from paleomagnetism and in situ measurements. Over the last few years, researches have thus been pursued to find alternative mechanisms for sustaining intense three-dimensional motions in liquid cores, a necessary ingredient for planetary dynamo. In particular, mechanical forcings driven by libration, precession, nutation and tides, have received a renewed interest, following the first studies by Malkus in the 60's. A huge reservoir of energy is available in the rotational and orbital motions of all planetary systems. If planetary bodies were completely rigid and rotating at a constant spin rate, their fluid layers in the absence of convection would also behave rigidly and follow the spin of their boundaries. But small periodic perturbations of the shape of the core/mantle boundary (i.e. dynamic tides) and/or small periodic perturbations of the direction of the spin vector (i.e. precession and nutation) and/or small periodic perturbations of the spin rate (i.e. libration) systematically perturb this rigid state. Then, each of these small perturbations is capable of triggering instabilities in fluid layers, conveying energy from the spin and orbital motions to drive intense three-dimensional flows in the liquid cores. With the view to establish a general framework for planetary applications, I will present here the basic physical ingredients of these instabilities, which involve a resonance between the considered mechanical forcing and two inertial waves of the core. I will then review the numerical and experimental validations of this generic principle, and the few magnetohydrodynamic validations of their dynamo capacity

  9. Expression patterns reveal niche diversification in a marine microbial assemblage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifford, Scott M; Sharma, Shalabh; Booth, Melissa; Moran, Mary Ann

    2013-02-01

    Resolving the ecological niches of coexisting marine microbial taxa is challenging due to the high species richness of microbial communities and the apparent functional redundancy in bacterial genomes and metagenomes. Here, we generated over 11 million Illumina reads of protein-encoding transcripts collected from well-mixed southeastern US coastal waters to characterize gene expression patterns distinguishing the ecological roles of hundreds of microbial taxa sharing the same environment. The taxa with highest in situ growth rates (based on relative abundance of ribosomal protein transcripts) were typically not the greatest contributors to community transcription, suggesting strong top-down ecological control, and their diverse transcriptomes indicated roles as metabolic generalists. The taxa with low in situ growth rates typically had low diversity transcriptomes dominated by specialized metabolisms. By identifying protein-encoding genes with atypically high expression for their level of conservation, unique functional roles of community members emerged related to substrate use (such as complex carbohydrates, fatty acids, methanesulfonate, taurine, tartrate, ectoine), alternative energy-conservation strategies (proteorhodopsin, AAnP, V-type pyrophosphatases, sulfur oxidation, hydrogen oxidation) and mechanisms for negotiating a heterogeneous environment (flagellar motility, gliding motility, adhesion strategies). On average, the heterotrophic bacterioplankton dedicated 7% of their transcriptomes to obtaining energy by non-heterotrophic means. This deep sequencing of a coastal bacterioplankton transcriptome provides the most highly resolved view of bacterioplankton niche dimensions yet available, uncovering a spectrum of unrecognized ecological strategies.

  10. Buoyant Magnetic Loops Generated by Global Convective Dynamo Action

    CERN Document Server

    Nelson, Nicholas J; Brun, A Sacha; Miesch, Mark S; Toomre, Juri

    2012-01-01

    Our global 3D simulations of convection and dynamo action in a Sun-like star reveal that persistent wreaths of strong magnetism can be built within the bulk of the convention zone. Here we examine the characteristics of buoyant magnetic structures that are self-consistently created by dynamo action and turbulent convective motions in a simulation with solar stratification but rotating at three times the current solar rate. These buoyant loops originate within sections of the magnetic wreaths in which turbulent flows amplify the fields to much larger values than is possible through laminar processes. These amplified portions can rise through the convective layer by a combination of magnetic buoyancy and advection by convective giant cells, forming buoyant loops. We measure statistical trends in the polarity, twist, and tilt of these loops. Loops are shown to preferentially arise in longitudinal patches somewhat reminiscent of active longitudes in the Sun, although broader in extent. We show that the strength o...

  11. Evidence for dynamo bistability among very low mass stars

    CERN Document Server

    Morin, J; Donati, J -F; Dormy, E; Forveille, T; Jardine, M; Petit, P; Schrinner, M

    2012-01-01

    Dynamo action in fully convective stars is a debated issue that also questions our understanding of magnetic field generation in partly convective Sun-like stars. During the past few years, spectropolari- metric observations have demonstrated that fully convective objects are able to trigger strong large-scale and long-lived magnetic fields. We present here the first spectropolarimetric study of a sample of active late M dwarfs (M5-M8) carried out with ESPaDOnS@CFHT. It reveals the co-existence of two distinct types of magnetism among stars having similar masses and rotation rates. A possible explanation for this unexpected discovery is the existence of two dynamo branches in this parameter regime, we discuss here the possible identification with the weak vs strong field bistability predicted for the geodynamo.

  12. Beyond Contagion: Reality Mining Reveals Complex Patterns of Social Influence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aamena Alshamsi

    Full Text Available Contagion, a concept from epidemiology, has long been used to characterize social influence on people's behavior and affective (emotional states. While it has revealed many useful insights, it is not clear whether the contagion metaphor is sufficient to fully characterize the complex dynamics of psychological states in a social context. Using wearable sensors that capture daily face-to-face interaction, combined with three daily experience sampling surveys, we collected the most comprehensive data set of personality and emotion dynamics of an entire community of work. From this high-resolution data about actual (rather than self-reported face-to-face interaction, a complex picture emerges where contagion (that can be seen as adaptation of behavioral responses to the behavior of other people cannot fully capture the dynamics of transitory states. We found that social influence has two opposing effects on states: adaptation effects that go beyond mere contagion, and complementarity effects whereby individuals' behaviors tend to complement the behaviors of others. Surprisingly, these effects can exhibit completely different directions depending on the stable personality or emotional dispositions (stable traits of target individuals. Our findings provide a foundation for richer models of social dynamics, and have implications on organizational engineering and workplace well-being.

  13. Recent Progress in Understanding the Sun's Magnetic Dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathaway, David. H.

    2004-01-01

    100 years ago we thought that the Sun and stars shone as a result of slow gravitational contraction over a few tens of millions of years - putting astronomers at odds with geologists who claimed that the Earth was much, much older. That mystery was solved in the 1920s and 30s with the discovery of nuclear energy (proving that the geologists had it right all along). Other scientific mysteries concerning the Sun have come and gone but three major mysteries remain: 1) How does the Sun produce sunspots with an 11-year cycle? 2) What produces the huge explosions that result in solar flares, prominence eruptions, and coronal mass ejections? and 3) Why is the Sun's outer atmosphere, the corona, so darned hot? Recent progress in solar astronomy reveals a single key to understanding all three of these mysteries.The 11-year time scale for the sunspot cycle indicates the presence of a magnetic dynamo within the Sun. For decades this dynamo was though to operate within the Sun's convection zone - the outmost 30% of the Sun where convective currents transport heat and advect magnetic lines of force. The two leading theories for the dynamo had very different models for the dynamics of the convection zone. Actual measurements of the dynamics using the techniques of helioseismology showed that both of these models had to be wrong some 20 years ago. A thin layer of strongly sheared flow at the base of the convection zone (now called the tachocline) was then taken to be the seat of the dynamo. Over the last 10 years it has become apparent that a weak meridional circulation within the convection zone also plays a key role in the dynamo. This meridional circulation has plasma rising up from the tachocline in the equatorial regions, spreading out toward the poles at a top speed of about 10-20 m/s at the surface, sinking back down to the tachocline in the polar regions, and then flowing back toward the equator at a top speed of about 1-2 m/s in the tachocline itself. Recent dynamo

  14. Recent Progress in Understanding the Sun's Magnetic Dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathaway, David. H.

    2004-01-01

    100 years ago we thought that the Sun and stars shone as a result of slow gravitational contraction over a few tens of millions of years - putting astronomers at odds with geologists who claimed that the Earth was much, much older. That mystery was solved in the 1920s and 30s with the discovery of nuclear energy (proving that the geologists had it right all along). Other scientific mysteries concerning the Sun have come and gone but three major mysteries remain: 1) How does the Sun produce sunspots with an 11-year cycle? 2) What produces the huge explosions that result in solar flares, prominence eruptions, and coronal mass ejections? and 3) Why is the Sun's outer atmosphere, the corona, so darned hot? Recent progress in solar astronomy reveals a single key to understanding all three of these mysteries.The 11-year time scale for the sunspot cycle indicates the presence of a magnetic dynamo within the Sun. For decades this dynamo was though to operate within the Sun's convection zone - the outmost 30% of the Sun where convective currents transport heat and advect magnetic lines of force. The two leading theories for the dynamo had very different models for the dynamics of the convection zone. Actual measurements of the dynamics using the techniques of helioseismology showed that both of these models had to be wrong some 20 years ago. A thin layer of strongly sheared flow at the base of the convection zone (now called the tachocline) was then taken to be the seat of the dynamo. Over the last 10 years it has become apparent that a weak meridional circulation within the convection zone also plays a key role in the dynamo. This meridional circulation has plasma rising up from the tachocline in the equatorial regions, spreading out toward the poles at a top speed of about 10-20 m/s at the surface, sinking back down to the tachocline in the polar regions, and then flowing back toward the equator at a top speed of about 1-2 m/s in the tachocline itself. Recent dynamo

  15. Solar dynamo and geomagnetic activity

    CERN Document Server

    Georgieva, Katya

    2010-01-01

    The correlation between geomagnetic activity and the sunspot number in the 11-year solar cycle exhibits long-term variations due to the varying time lag between the sunspot-related and non-sunspot related geomagnetic activity, and the varying relative amplitude of the respective geomagnetic activity peaks. As the sunspot-related and non-sunspot related geomagnetic activity are caused by different solar agents, related to the solar toroidal and poloidal fields, respectively, we use their variations to derive the parameters of the solar dynamo transforming the poloidal field into toroidal field and back. We find that in the last 12 cycles the solar surface meridional circulation varied between 5 and 20 m/s (averaged over latitude and over the sunspot cycle), the deep circulation varied between 2.5 and 5.5 m/s, and the diffusivity in the whole of the convection zone was ~10**12 m2/s. In the last 12 cycles solar dynamo has been operating in moderately diffusion dominated regime in the bulk of the convection zone....

  16. The DYNAMO Project: An Introduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Ferrier

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available European concerns about the consequences of anthropogenic impacts on environmental quality have led to the establishment of various dynamic modelling approaches through which the consequences of impacts over time can be assessed. Similarly, throughout Europe, there has been extensive collection of regional data on 'environmental capital' resulting in the production of wide area mapping of environmental quality (soils, land use etc. The aim of the DYNAMO was to integrate data and models, specifically; (1 to enhance the existing process based models to evaluate the impacts of multiple drivers of environmental change; (2 to evaluate these models at intensively studied (and manipulated catchments and stands; (3 to scale up in time from observations collected over several years to predict the long term impacts over decades, and (4 to scale up in space from the individual site level to regional, National and European scale. The project aims to develop and enhance regional modelling approaches so that European scale impacts of acidic deposition, land use (forestry practices and global change can be determined without compromising process level understanding of ecosystem function. The DYNAMO project contributes to the EU TERI (Terrestrial Ecosystems Research Initiative framework of the Environment and Climate Programme of the European Commission.

  17. Solar Dynamo Near Tachocline and Magnetic Monopoly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryvodubskyj, Valery N.

    To explain the observed magnetic anomaly of the polar Sun's field the turbulent dynamo mechanism based on the joint action of mean helical turbulence and differential rotation (alpha-omega-dynamo) was used near tachocline in the solar convection zone (SCZ). The global magnetic field modes (odd or even ones) excited by dynamo depend on the eigenvalue Kh for a Parker dynamo-wave (K is the wave number of the dynamo-wave and h is the extent of the dynamo region). Estimations of the helicity-parameter and radial angular-velocity gradient based on the most recent helioseismological measurements at the growth phase of solar cycle 23 were obtained using the mixing-length approximation. For the SCZ model by Stix (1989) these estimations indicate that the alpha-omega-dynamo mechanism near the tachocline most efficiency excites the poloidal field main odd mode dipole (Kh ~ -7); while the physical conditions at latitudes above 50 degrees are more favourable for the exitation of the lowest even mode quadrupole (Kh ~ +8). The resulting north-south magnetic asymmetry of the poloidal field can explain the magnetic anomaly (""monopoly"" structure) of the polar fields observed near solar-cycle maxima.

  18. HYSTERESIS BETWEEN DISTINCT MODES OF TURBULENT DYNAMOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karak, Bidya Binay; Brandenburg, Axel [Nordita, KTH Royal Institute of Technology and Stockholm University, Roslagstullsbacken 23, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Kitchatinov, Leonid L., E-mail: bbkarak@nordita.org [Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Physics, P.O. Box 291, Irkutsk 664033 (Russian Federation)

    2015-04-20

    Nonlinear mean-field models of the solar dynamo show long-term variability, which may be relevant to different states of activity inferred from long-term radiocarbon data. This paper is aimed at probing the dynamo hysteresis predicted by the recent mean-field models of Kitchatinov and Olemskoy with direct numerical simulations. We perform three-dimensional (3D) simulations of large-scale dynamos in a shearing box with helically forced turbulence. As an initial condition, we either take a weak random magnetic field or we start from a snapshot of an earlier simulation. Two quasi-stable states are found to coexist in a certain range of parameters close to the onset of the large-scale dynamo. The simulations converge to one of these states depending on the initial conditions. When either the fractional helicity or the magnetic Prandtl number is increased between successive runs above the critical value for onset of the dynamo, the field strength jumps to a finite value. However, when the fractional helicity or the magnetic Prandtl number is then decreased again, the field strength stays at a similar value (strong field branch) even below the original onset. We also observe intermittent decaying phases away from the strong field branch close to the point where large-scale dynamo action is just possible. The dynamo hysteresis seen previously in mean-field models is thus reproduced by 3D simulations. Its possible relation to distinct modes of solar activity such as grand minima is discussed.

  19. Nonlinear MHD dynamo operating at equipartition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Archontis, V.; Dorch, Bertil; Nordlund, Åke

    2007-01-01

    Context.We present results from non linear MHD dynamo experiments with a three-dimensional steady and smooth flow that drives fast dynamo action in the kinematic regime. In the saturation regime, the system yields strong magnetic fields, which undergo transitions between an energy-equipartition a......Context.We present results from non linear MHD dynamo experiments with a three-dimensional steady and smooth flow that drives fast dynamo action in the kinematic regime. In the saturation regime, the system yields strong magnetic fields, which undergo transitions between an energy......-equipartition and a turbulent state. The generation and evolution of such strong magnetic fields is relevant for the understanding of dynamo action that occurs in stars and other astrophysical objects. Aims.We study the mode of operation of this dynamo, in the linear and non-linear saturation regimes. We also consider...... the effect of varying the magnetic and fluid Reymolds number on the non-linear behaviour of the system. Methods.We perform three-dimensional non-linear MHD simulations and visualization using a high resolution numerical scheme. Results.We find that this dynamo has a high growth rate in the linear regime...

  20. Some Recent Developments in Solar Dynamo Theory

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arnab Rai Choudhuri

    2006-06-01

    We discuss the current status of solar dynamo theory and describe the dynamo model developed by our group. The toroidal magnetic field is generated in the tachocline by the strong differential rotation and rises to the solar surface due to magnetic buoyancy to create active regions. The decay of these active regions at the surface gives rise to the poloidal magnetic field by the Babcock–Leighton mechanism. This poloidal field is advected by the meridional circulation first to high latitudes and then down below to the tachocline. Dynamo models based on these ideas match different aspects of observational data reasonably well.

  1. Statistical simulation of the magnetorotational dynamo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Squire, J. [PPPL; Bhattacharjee, A. [PPPL

    2014-08-01

    We analyze turbulence and dynamo induced by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) using quasi-linear statistical simulation methods. We find that homogenous turbulence is unstable to a large scale dynamo instability, which saturates to an inhomogenous equilibrium with a very strong dependence on the magnetic Prandtl number (Pm). Despite its enormously reduced nonlinearity, the quasi-linear model exhibits the same qualitative scaling of angular momentum transport with Pm as fully nonlinear turbulence. This demonstrates the relationship of recent convergence problems to the large scale dynamo and suggests possible methods for studying astrophysically relevant regimes at very low or high Pm.

  2. Statistical Simulation of the Magnetorotational Dynamo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Squire, Jonathan [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Dept. of Astrophysical Sciences; Bhattacharjee, Amitava [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Dept. of Astrophysical Sciences; Max Planck Society, Garching (Germany). Max Planck Inst. for Astrophysik

    2015-02-01

    Turbulence and dynamo induced by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) are analyzed using quasilinear statistical simulation methods. It is found that homogenous turbulence is unstable to a large-scale dynamo instability, which saturates to an inhomogenous equilibrium with a strong dependence on the magnetic Prandtl number (Pm). Despite its enormously reduced nonlinearity, the dependence of the angular momentum transport on Pm in the quasilinear model is qualitatively similar to that of nonlinear MRI turbulence. This demonstrates the importance of the large-scale dynamo and suggests how dramatically simplified models may be used to gain insight into the astrophysically relevant regimes of very low or high Pm.

  3. Statistical simulation of the magnetorotational dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, J; Bhattacharjee, A

    2015-02-27

    Turbulence and dynamo induced by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) are analyzed using quasilinear statistical simulation methods. It is found that homogenous turbulence is unstable to a large-scale dynamo instability, which saturates to an inhomogenous equilibrium with a strong dependence on the magnetic Prandtl number (Pm). Despite its enormously reduced nonlinearity, the dependence of the angular momentum transport on Pm in the quasilinear model is qualitatively similar to that of nonlinear MRI turbulence. This demonstrates the importance of the large-scale dynamo and suggests how dramatically simplified models may be used to gain insight into the astrophysically relevant regimes of very low or high Pm.

  4. Pattern recognition algorithm reveals how birds evolve individual egg pattern signatures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stoddard, Mary Caswell; Kilner, Rebecca M; Town, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    .... Here we develop a computer vision tool for analysing visual patterns, NATUREPATTERNMATCH, which breaks new ground by mimicking visual and cognitive processes known to be involved in recognition tasks...

  5. Some consequences of shear on galactic dynamos with helicity fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hongzhe; Blackman, Eric G.

    2017-08-01

    Galactic dynamo models sustained by supernova (SN) driven turbulence and differential rotation have revealed that the sustenance of large-scale fields requires a flux of small-scale magnetic helicity to be viable. Here we generalize a minimalist analytic version of such galactic dynamos to explore some heretofore unincluded contributions from shear on the total turbulent energy and turbulent correlation time, with the helicity fluxes maintained by either winds, diffusion or magnetic buoyancy. We construct an analytic framework for modelling the turbulent energy and correlation time as a function of SN rate and shear. We compare our prescription with previous approaches that include only rotation. The solutions depend separately on the rotation period and the eddy turnover time and not just on their ratio (the Rossby number). We consider models in which these two time-scales are allowed to be independent and also a case in which they are mutually dependent on radius when a radial-dependent SN rate model is invoked. For the case of a fixed rotation period (or a fixed radius), we show that the influence of shear is dramatic for low Rossby numbers, reducing the correlation time of the turbulence, which, in turn, strongly reduces the saturation value of the dynamo compared to the case when the shear is ignored. We also show that even in the absence of winds or diffusive fluxes, magnetic buoyancy may be able to sustain sufficient helicity fluxes to avoid quenching.

  6. Kinetic Magnetorotational Turbulence and Dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Matthew; Stone, James; Quataert, Eliot

    2016-10-01

    Low-luminosity black-hole accretion flows, such as that at the Galactic center, are collisionless. A kinetic approach is thus necessary to understand the transport of heat and angular momentum, the acceleration of particles, and the growth and structure of the magnetic field in these systems. We present results from the first 6D kinetic numerical simulation of magnetorotational turbulence and dynamo, using the local shearing-box model. Special attention will be paid to the enhanced transport of angular momentum by field-aligned pressure anisotropies, as well as to the ion-Larmor-scale kinetic instabilities (firehose, mirror, ion-cyclotron) which regulate those anisotropies. Energy spectra and phase-space evolution will be discussed. Time permitting, dedicated nonlinear studies of firehose and mirror instabilities in a shearing plasma will also be presented as a complement to the study of the magnetorotational instability. The profits, perils, and price of using a kinetic approach will be briefly mentioned.

  7. Comments on the kinetic dynamo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, T.K.

    1995-08-24

    It is conjectured that transport by parallel mass flow in a braided magnetic field, rather than hyper-resistivity, drives the dynamo effect after stochasticity is established. In this paper the authors do not attempt a rigorous proof of this conjecture, which requires showing that braiding introduces correlations analogous to those giving rise to the neoclassical bootstrap current. The authors do offer plausible arguments for the conjecture and show that it leads to interesting consequences if true. Namely, magnetic fluctuations would then scale with the magnetic Reynolds number S like {tilde B}/B {approximately} S{sup {minus}1/2} and the Rechester-Rosenbluth thermal diffusivity like {chi}e {proportional_to} S{sup {minus}1} . This scaling would explain the highest temperatures obtained in the CTX spheromak. It also suggests that a fully-bootstrapped current drive experiment could be carried out on-the DIII-D tokamak.

  8. Dynamo generated by the centrifugal instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcotte, Florence; Gissinger, Christophe

    2016-10-01

    We present a scenario for magnetic field amplification where an electrically conducting fluid is confined in a differentially rotating, spherical shell with thin aspect ratio. When the angular momentum sufficiently decreases outwards, a hydrodynamic instability develops in the equatorial region, characterized by pairs of counter-rotating toroidal vortices similar to those observed in cylindrical Couette flow. These spherical Taylor-Couette vortices generate a subcritical dynamo magnetic field dominated by nonaxisymmetric components. We show that the critical magnetic Reynolds number seems to reach a constant value at large Reynolds number and that the global rotation can strongly decrease the dynamo onset. Our numerical results are understood within the framework of a simple dynamical system, and we propose a low-dimensional model for subcritical dynamo bifurcations. Implications for both laboratory dynamos and astrophysical magnetic fields are finally discussed.

  9. Statistical tests of galactic dynamo theory

    CERN Document Server

    Chamandy, Luke; Taylor, A Russ

    2016-01-01

    Mean-field galactic dynamo theory is the leading theory to explain the prevalence of regular magnetic fields in spiral galaxies, but its systematic comparison with observations is still incomplete and fragmentary. Here we compare predictions of mean-field dynamo models to observational data on magnetic pitch angle and the strength of the mean magnetic field. We demonstrate that a standard $\\alpha^2\\Omega$ dynamo model produces pitch angles of the regular magnetic fields of nearby galaxies that are reasonably consistent with available data. The dynamo estimates of the magnetic field strength are generally within a factor of a few of the observational values. Reasonable agreement between theoretical and observed pitch angles generally requires the turbulent correlation time $\\tau$ to be in the range 10-20 Myr, in agreement with standard estimates. Moreover, good agreement also requires that the ratio of the ionized gas scale height to root-mean-square turbulent velocity increases with radius. Our results thus w...

  10. Dynamo generated by the centrifugal instability

    CERN Document Server

    Marcotte, Florence

    2016-01-01

    We present a new scenario for magnetic field amplification where an electrically conducting fluid is confined in a differentially rotating, spherical shell with thin aspect-ratio. When the angular momentum sufficiently decreases outwards, an hydrodynamic instability develops in the equatorial region, characterised by pairs of counter-rotating toroidal vortices similar to those observed in cylindrical Couette flow. These spherical Taylor-Couette vortices generate a subcritical dynamo magnetic field dominated by non-axisymmetric components. We show that the critical magnetic Reynolds number seems to reach a constant value at large Reynolds number and that the global rotation can strongly decrease the dynamo onset. Our numerical results are understood within the framework of a simple dynamical system, and we propose a low-dimensional model for subcritical dynamo bifurcations. Implications for both laboratory dynamos and astrophysical magnetic fields are finally discussed.

  11. Simple Scaling Relationships For Stellar Dynamos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustson, Kyle; Mathis, Stéphane; Brun, Allan Sacha

    2016-12-01

    This paper provides a brief overview of dynamo scaling relationships for the degree of equipartition between magnetic and kinetic energies. Three basic approaches are adopted to explore these scaling relationships, with a first look at two simple models: one assuming magnetostrophy and another that includes the effects of inertia. Next, a third scaling relationship is derived that utilizes the assumptions that the dynamo possesses two integral spatial scales and that it is driven by the balance of buoyancy work and ohmic dissipation as studied in Davidson 2013. The results of which are then compared to a suite of convective dynamo simulations that possess a fully convective domain with a weak density stratification and that captured the behavior of the resulting dynamo for a range of convective Rossby numbers (Augustson et al. 2016).

  12. Saturation of the turbulent dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schober, J; Schleicher, D R G; Federrath, C; Bovino, S; Klessen, R S

    2015-08-01

    The origin of strong magnetic fields in the Universe can be explained by amplifying weak seed fields via turbulent motions on small spatial scales and subsequently transporting the magnetic energy to larger scales. This process is known as the turbulent dynamo and depends on the properties of turbulence, i.e., on the hydrodynamical Reynolds number and the compressibility of the gas, and on the magnetic diffusivity. While we know the growth rate of the magnetic energy in the linear regime, the saturation level, i.e., the ratio of magnetic energy to turbulent kinetic energy that can be reached, is not known from analytical calculations. In this paper we present a scale-dependent saturation model based on an effective turbulent resistivity which is determined by the turnover time scale of turbulent eddies and the magnetic energy density. The magnetic resistivity increases compared to the Spitzer value and the effective scale on which the magnetic energy spectrum is at its maximum moves to larger spatial scales. This process ends when the peak reaches a characteristic wave number k☆ which is determined by the critical magnetic Reynolds number. The saturation level of the dynamo also depends on the type of turbulence and differs for the limits of large and small magnetic Prandtl numbers Pm. With our model we find saturation levels between 43.8% and 1.3% for Pm≫1 and between 2.43% and 0.135% for Pm≪1, where the higher values refer to incompressible turbulence and the lower ones to highly compressible turbulence.

  13. Chaotic flows and fast magnetic dynamos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, John M.; Ott, Edward

    1988-01-01

    The kinematic dynamo problem is considered in the R(m) approaching infinity limit. It is shown that the magnetic field tends to concentrate on a zero volume fractal set; moreover, it displays arbitrarily fine-scaled oscillations between parallel and antiparallel directions. Consideration is given to the relationship between the dynamo growth rate and quantitative measures of chaos, such as the Liapunov element and topological entropy.

  14. Heat flux modulation in domino dynamo model

    CERN Document Server

    Reshetnyak, Maxim

    2012-01-01

    Using domino dynamo model we show how variations of the heat flux at the core-mantle boundary change frequency of geomagnetic field reversals. In fact, we are able to demonstrate effect known from the modern 3D planetary dynamo models using ensemble of the interacting spins, which obey equations of the Langevin-type with a random force. We also consider applications to the giant- planets and offer explanations of some specific episodes of the geomagnetic field in the past.

  15. Magnetic field reversals and galactic dynamos

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    We argue that global magnetic field reversals similar to those observed in the Milky Way occur quite frequently in mean-field galactic dynamo models that have relatively strong, random, seed magnetic fields that are localized in discrete regions. The number of reversals decreases to zero with reduction of the seed strength, efficiency of the galactic dynamo and size of the spots of the seed field. A systematic observational search for magnetic field reversals in a representative sample of spi...

  16. Ultrastructure of stomatal development in early-divergent angiosperms reveals contrasting patterning and pre-patterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudall, Paula J; Knowles, Emma V W

    2013-10-01

    Angiosperm stomata consistently possess a pair of guard cells, but differ between taxa in the patterning and developmental origin of neighbour cells. Developmental studies of phylogenetically pivotal taxa are essential as comparative yardsticks for understanding the evolution of stomatal development. We present a novel ultrastructural study of developing stomata in leaves of Amborella (Amborellales), Nymphaea and Cabomba (Nymphaeales), and Austrobaileya and Schisandra (Austrobaileyales), representing the three earliest-divergent lineages of extant angiosperms (the ANITA-grade). Alternative developmental pathways occur in early-divergent angiosperms, resulting partly from differences in pre-patterning and partly from the presence or absence of highly polarized (asymmetric) mitoses in the stomatal cell lineage. Amplifying divisions are absent from ANITA-grade taxa, indicating that ostensible similarities with the stomatal patterning of Arabidopsis are superficial. In Amborella, 'squared' pre-patterning occurs in intercostal regions, with groups of four protodermal cells typically arranged in a rectangle; most guard-mother cells are formed by asymmetric division of a precursor cell (the mesoperigenous condition) and are typically triangular or trapezoidal. In contrast, water-lily stomata are always perigenous (lacking asymmetric divisions). Austrobaileya has occasional 'giant' stomata. Similar mature stomatal phenotypes can result from contrasting morphogenetic factors, although the results suggest that paracytic stomata are invariably the product of at least one asymmetric division. Loss of asymmetric divisions in stomatal development could be a significant factor in land plant evolution, with implications for the diversity of key structural and physiological pathways.

  17. A deep dynamo generating Mercury's magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Ulrich R

    2006-12-21

    Mercury has a global magnetic field of internal origin and it is thought that a dynamo operating in the fluid part of Mercury's large iron core is the most probable cause. However, the low intensity of Mercury's magnetic field--about 1% the strength of the Earth's field--cannot be reconciled with an Earth-like dynamo. With the common assumption that Coriolis and Lorentz forces balance in planetary dynamos, a field thirty times stronger is expected. Here I present a numerical model of a dynamo driven by thermo-compositional convection associated with inner core solidification. The thermal gradient at the core-mantle boundary is subadiabatic, and hence the outer region of the liquid core is stably stratified with the dynamo operating only at depth, where a strong field is generated. Because of the planet's slow rotation the resulting magnetic field is dominated by small-scale components that fluctuate rapidly with time. The dynamo field diffuses through the stable conducting region, where rapidly varying parts are strongly attenuated by the skin effect, while the slowly varying dipole and quadrupole components pass to some degree. The model explains the observed structure and strength of Mercury's surface magnetic field and makes predictions that are testable with space missions both presently flying and planned.

  18. Stretch-Twist-Fold and slow filamentary dynamos in liquid sodium Madison Dynamo Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    de Andrade, Garcia

    2009-01-01

    Recently Ricca and Maggione [MHD (2008)] have presented a very simple and interesting model of stretch-twist-fold dynamo in diffusive media based on numerical simulations of Riemannian flux tubes. In this paper we present a yet simpler way of analytically obtaining fast and slow dynamo, generated by by the curvature energy of magnetic filaments in diffusive media. geometrical model for the galactic or accretion disk dynamo in shear flows is presented. In the fast dynamo case it is shown that the absence of stretching leads to the absence of fast dynamos and when torsion of filaments vanishes the dynamo action cannot be support as well. This is the Cowling-Zeldovich theorem for planar flows. Isotropy of the magnetic fields hypothesis is used to compute the fast nature of dynamo. A similar result using non-holonomic Frenet frame has been recently obtained for filamentary dynamos [Garcia de Andrade, AN (2008)]. The stretch-twist-fold (STF) filamented models discussed here may serve to formulate future experiment...

  19. Magnetorotational dynamo chimeras. The missing link to turbulent accretion disk dynamo models?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riols, A.; Rincon, F.; Cossu, C.; Lesur, G.; Ogilvie, G. I.; Longaretti, P.-Y.

    2017-02-01

    In Keplerian accretion disks, turbulence and magnetic fields may be jointly excited through a subcritical dynamo mechanisminvolving magnetorotational instability (MRI). This dynamo may notably contribute to explaining the time-variability of various accreting systems, as high-resolution simulations of MRI dynamo turbulence exhibit statistical self-organization into large-scale cyclic dynamics. However, understanding the physics underlying these statistical states and assessing their exact astrophysical relevance is theoretically challenging. The study of simple periodic nonlinear MRI dynamo solutions has recently proven useful in this respect, and has highlighted the role of turbulent magnetic diffusion in the seeming impossibility of a dynamo at low magnetic Prandtl number (Pm), a common regime in disks. Arguably though, these simple laminar structures may not be fully representative of the complex, statistically self-organized states expected in astrophysical regimes. Here, we aim at closing this seeming discrepancy by reporting the numerical discovery of exactly periodic, yet semi-statistical "chimeral MRI dynamo states" which are the organized outcome of a succession of MRI-unstable, non-axisymmetric dynamical stages of different forms and amplitudes. Interestingly, these states, while reminiscent of the statistical complexity of turbulent simulations, involve the same physical principles as simpler laminar cycles, and their analysis further confirms the theory that subcritical turbulent magnetic diffusion impedes the sustainment of an MRI dynamo at low Pm. Overall, chimera dynamo cycles therefore offer an unprecedented dual physical and statistical perspective on dynamos in rotating shear flows, which may prove useful in devising more accurate, yet intuitive mean-field models of time-dependent turbulent disk dynamos. Movies associated to Fig. 1 are available at http://www.aanda.org

  20. Using Jupiter's gravitational field to probe the Jovian convective dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Dali; Zhang, Keke; Schubert, Gerald

    2016-03-23

    Convective motion in the deep metallic hydrogen region of Jupiter is believed to generate its magnetic field, the strongest in the solar system. The amplitude, structure and depth of the convective motion are unknown. A promising way of probing the Jovian convective dynamo is to measure its effect on the external gravitational field, a task to be soon undertaken by the Juno spacecraft. We calculate the gravitational signature of non-axisymmetric convective motion in the Jovian metallic hydrogen region and show that with sufficiently accurate measurements it can reveal the nature of the deep convection.

  1. Experimental realization of dynamo action: present status and prospects

    CERN Document Server

    Giesecke, Andre; Gundrum, Thomas; Gerbeth, Gunter; Nore, Caroline; Leorat, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    In the last decades, the experimental study of dynamo action has made great progress. However, after the dynamo experiments in Karlsruhe and Riga, the von-Karman-Sodium (VKS) dynamo is only the third facility that has been able to demonstrate fluid flow driven self-generation of magnetic fields in a laboratory experiment. Further progress in the experimental examination of dynamo action is expected from the planned precession driven dynamo experiment that will be designed in the framework of the liquid sodium facility DRESDYN (DREsden Sodium facility for DYNamo and thermohydraulic studies). In this paper, we briefly present numerical models of the VKS dynamo that demonstrate the close relation between the axisymmetric field observed in that experiment and the soft iron material used for the flow driving impellers. We further show recent results of preparatory water experiments and design studies related to the precession dynamo and delineate the scientific prospects for the final set-up.

  2. Statistical Tests of Galactic Dynamo Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamandy, Luke; Shukurov, Anvar; Taylor, A. Russ

    2016-12-01

    Mean-field galactic dynamo theory is the leading theory to explain the prevalence of regular magnetic fields in spiral galaxies, but its systematic comparison with observations is still incomplete and fragmentary. Here we compare predictions of mean-field dynamo models to observational data on magnetic pitch angle and the strength of the mean magnetic field. We demonstrate that a standard {α }2{{Ω }} dynamo model produces pitch angles of the regular magnetic fields of nearby galaxies that are reasonably consistent with available data. The dynamo estimates of the magnetic field strength are generally within a factor of a few of the observational values. Reasonable agreement between theoretical and observed pitch angles generally requires the turbulent correlation time τ to be in the range of 10-20 {Myr}, in agreement with standard estimates. Moreover, good agreement also requires that the ratio of the ionized gas scale height to root-mean-square turbulent velocity increases with radius. Our results thus widen the possibilities to constrain interstellar medium parameters using observations of magnetic fields. This work is a step toward systematic statistical tests of galactic dynamo theory. Such studies are becoming more and more feasible as larger data sets are acquired using current and up-and-coming instruments.

  3. Turbulent dynamo in a collisionless plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincon, François; Califano, Francesco; Schekochihin, Alexander A; Valentini, Francesco

    2016-04-12

    Magnetic fields pervade the entire universe and affect the formation and evolution of astrophysical systems from cosmological to planetary scales. The generation and dynamical amplification of extragalactic magnetic fields through cosmic times (up to microgauss levels reported in nearby galaxy clusters, near equipartition with kinetic energy of plasma motions, and on scales of at least tens of kiloparsecs) are major puzzles largely unconstrained by observations. A dynamo effect converting kinetic flow energy into magnetic energy is often invoked in that context; however, extragalactic plasmas are weakly collisional (as opposed to magnetohydrodynamic fluids), and whether magnetic field growth and sustainment through an efficient turbulent dynamo instability are possible in such plasmas is not established. Fully kinetic numerical simulations of the Vlasov equation in a 6D-phase space necessary to answer this question have, until recently, remained beyond computational capabilities. Here, we show by means of such simulations that magnetic field amplification by dynamo instability does occur in a stochastically driven, nonrelativistic subsonic flow of initially unmagnetized collisionless plasma. We also find that the dynamo self-accelerates and becomes entangled with kinetic instabilities as magnetization increases. The results suggest that such a plasma dynamo may be realizable in laboratory experiments, support the idea that intracluster medium turbulence may have significantly contributed to the amplification of cluster magnetic fields up to near-equipartition levels on a timescale shorter than the Hubble time, and emphasize the crucial role of multiscale kinetic physics in high-energy astrophysical plasmas.

  4. Proteomics analysis reveals a dynamic diurnal pattern of photosynthesis-related pathways in maize leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Dan; Wang, Yanwei; Lu, Tiegang; Zhang, Zhiguo; Han, Xiao

    2017-01-01

    Plant leaves exhibit differentiated patterns of photosynthesis rates under diurnal light regulation. Maize leaves show a single-peak pattern without photoinhibition at midday when the light intensity is maximized. This mechanism contributes to highly efficient photosynthesis in maize leaves. To understand the molecular basis of this process, an isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based proteomics analysis was performed to reveal the dynamic pattern of proteins related to photosynthetic reactions. Steady, single-peak and double-peak protein expression patterns were discovered in maize leaves, and antenna proteins in these leaves displayed a steady pattern. In contrast, the photosystem, carbon fixation and citrate pathways were highly controlled by diurnal light intensity. Most enzymes in the limiting steps of these pathways were major sites of regulation. Thus, maize leaves optimize photosynthesis and carbon fixation outside of light harvesting to adapt to the changes in diurnal light intensity at the protein level.

  5. Analysis of spatial-temporal gene expression patterns reveals dynamics and regionalization in developing mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Shen-Ju; Wang, Chindi; Sintupisut, Nardnisa; Niou, Zhen-Xian; Lin, Chih-Hsu; Li, Ker-Chau; Yeang, Chen-Hsiang

    2016-01-20

    Allen Brain Atlas (ABA) provides a valuable resource of spatial/temporal gene expressions in mammalian brains. Despite rich information extracted from this database, current analyses suffer from several limitations. First, most studies are either gene-centric or region-centric, thus are inadequate to capture the superposition of multiple spatial-temporal patterns. Second, standard tools of expression analysis such as matrix factorization can capture those patterns but do not explicitly incorporate spatial dependency. To overcome those limitations, we proposed a computational method to detect recurrent patterns in the spatial-temporal gene expression data of developing mouse brains. We demonstrated that regional distinction in brain development could be revealed by localized gene expression patterns. The patterns expressed in the forebrain, medullary and pontomedullary, and basal ganglia are enriched with genes involved in forebrain development, locomotory behavior, and dopamine metabolism respectively. In addition, the timing of global gene expression patterns reflects the general trends of molecular events in mouse brain development. Furthermore, we validated functional implications of the inferred patterns by showing genes sharing similar spatial-temporal expression patterns with Lhx2 exhibited differential expression in the embryonic forebrains of Lhx2 mutant mice. These analysis outcomes confirm the utility of recurrent expression patterns in studying brain development.

  6. Numerical simulation of Martian historical dynamo: Impact of the Rayleigh number on the dynamo state

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG TianYuan; KUANG WeiJia; MA ShiZhuang

    2009-01-01

    The observed Mars remnant magnetism suggests that there was an active dynamo in the Martian core.We use the MoSST core dynamics model to simulate the Martian historical dynamo,focusing on the variation of the dynamo states with the Rayleigh number Ra (a non-dimensional parameter describing the buoyancy force in the core).Our numerical results show that the mean field length scale does not vary monotonically with the Rayleigh number,and the field morphology at the core mantle boundary changes with Rayleigh number.In particular,it drifts westward with a speed decreasing with Rayleigh number.

  7. Numerical simulation of Martian historical dynamo:Impact of the Rayleigh number on the dynamo state

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The observed Mars remnant magnetism suggests that there was an active dynamo in the Martian core. We use the MoSST core dynamics model to simulate the Martian historical dynamo, focusing on the variation of the dynamo states with the Rayleigh number Ra (a non-dimensional parameter describing the buoyancy force in the core). Our numerical results show that the mean field length scale does not vary monotonically with the Rayleigh number, and the field morphology at the core mantle boundary changes with Rayleigh number. In particular, it drifts westward with a speed decreasing with Rayleigh number.

  8. Problems and Progress in Astrophysical Dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Vishniac, E T; Cho, J

    2002-01-01

    Astrophysical objects with negligible resistivity are often threaded by large scale magnetic fields. The generation of these fields is somewhat mysterious, since a magnetic field in a perfectly conducting fluid cannot change the flux threading a fluid element, or the field topology. Classical dynamo theory evades this limit by assuming that magnetic reconnection is fast, even for vanishing resistivity, and that the large scale field can be generated by the action of kinetic helicity. Both these claims have been severely criticized, and the latter appears to conflict with strong theoretical arguments based on magnetic helicity conservation and a series of numerical simulations. Here we discuss recent efforts to explain fast magnetic reconnection through the topological effects of a weak stochastic magnetic field component. We also show how mean-field dynamo theory can be recast in a form which respects magnetic helicity conservation, and how this changes our understanding of astrophysical dynamos. Finally, we ...

  9. Towards understanding dynamo action in M dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Shulyak, D; Kitchatinov, L; Moss, D

    2015-01-01

    Recent progress in observational studies of magnetic activity in M dwarfs urgently requires support from ideas of stellar dynamo theory. We propose a strategy to connect observational and theoretical studies. In particular, we suggest four magnetic configurations that appear relevant to dwarfs from the viewpoint of the most conservative version of dynamo theory, and discuss observational tests to identify the configurations observationally. As expected, any such identification contains substantial uncertainties. However the situation in general looks less pessimistic than might be expected. Several identifications between the phenomenology of individual stars and dynamo models are suggested. Remarkably, all models discussed predict substantial surface magnetic activity at rather high stellar latitudes. This prediction looks unexpected from the viewpoint of our experience observing the Sun (which of course differs in some fundamental ways from these late-type dwarfs). We stress that a fuller understanding of t...

  10. Magnetic Field Amplification via Protostellar Disc Dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Dyda, Sergei; Ustyugova, Galina V; Koldoba, Alexander V; Wasserman, Ira

    2015-01-01

    We model the generation of a magnetic field in a protostellar disc using an \\alpha-dynamo and perform axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations of a T Tauri star. We find that for small values of the dimensionless dynamo parameter $\\alpha_d$ the poloidal field grows exponentially at a rate ${\\sigma} \\propto {\\Omega}_K \\sqrt{\\alpha_d}$ , before saturating to a value $\\propto \\sqrt{\\alpha_d}$ . The dynamo excites dipole and octupole modes, but quadrupole modes are suppressed, because of the symmetries of the seed field. Initial seed fields too weak to launch MHD outflows are found to grow sufficiently to launch winds with observationally relevant mass fluxes of order $10^{-9} M_{\\odot}/\\rm{yr}$ for T Tauri stars. For large values of $\\alpha_d$ magnetic loops are generated over the entire disc. These quickly come to dominate the disc dynamics and cause the disc to break up due to the magnetic pressure.

  11. Dynamo Models of the Solar Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charbonneau Paul

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews recent advances and current debates in modeling the solar cycle as a hydromagnetic dynamo process. Emphasis is placed on (relatively simple dynamo models that are nonetheless detailed enough to be comparable to solar cycle observations. After a brief overview of the dynamo problem and of key observational constraints, we begin by reviewing the various magnetic field regeneration mechanisms that have been proposed in the solar context. We move on to a presentation and critical discussion of extant solar cycle models based on these mechanisms. We then turn to the origin of fluctuations in these models, including amplitude and parity modulation, chaotic behavior, and intermittency. The paper concludes with a discussion of our current state of ignorance regarding various key questions, the most pressing perhaps being the identification of the physical mechanism(s responsible for the generation of the Sun's poloidal magnetic field component.

  12. Shear dynamo problem: Quasilinear kinematic theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhar, S; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2009-04-01

    Large-scale dynamo action due to turbulence in the presence of a linear shear flow is studied. Our treatment is quasilinear and kinematic but is nonperturbative in the shear strength. We derive the integrodifferential equation for the evolution of the mean magnetic field by systematic use of the shearing coordinate transformation and the Galilean invariance of the linear shear flow. For nonhelical turbulence the time evolution of the cross-shear components of the mean field does not depend on any other components excepting themselves. This is valid for any Galilean-invariant velocity field, independent of its dynamics. Hence the shear-current assisted dynamo is essentially absent, although large-scale nonhelical dynamo action is not ruled out.

  13. The Shear Dynamo: quasilinear kinematic theory

    CERN Document Server

    Sridhar, S

    2008-01-01

    Large--scale dynamo action due to turbulence in the presence of a linear shear flow is studied. Our treatment is quasilinear and kinematic but is non perturbative in the strength of the background shear. We derive expressions for the turbulent transport coefficients of the mean magnetic field, by systematic use of the shearing coordinate transformation and the Galilean invariance of the linear shear flow. We prove that, for non helical turbulence, the equation governing the time evolution of the cross shear component of the mean magnetic field is closed, in the sense that it is independent of the other two components. This result is valid for any Galilean--invariant velocity field, independent of its dynamics. Thus we find the shear--current assisted dynamo is essentially absent, although large--scale non helical dynamo action is not ruled out.

  14. Dynamos and MHD theory of turbulence suppression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshizawa, Akira [Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Itoh, Sanae-I [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, 87, Kasuga 810- 8580 (Japan); Itoh, Kimitaka [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Yokoi, Nobumitsu [Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan)

    2004-03-01

    Characteristics of electrically conducting media are reviewed from the macroscopic viewpoint based on mean-field magnetohydrodynamics, while being compared using the methodology and knowledge in fluid mechanics. The themes covered in this review range from the mechanism of generating stellar magnetic fields (dynamo) to transport properties in fusion. The primary concern here is to see the characteristics common to these apparently different phenomena, within the framework of the mean-field theory. Owing to the intrinsic limitation of the approach, the present discussions are limited more or less to specific aspects of phenomena. They are supplemented with reference to theoretical, numerical, and observational approaches intrinsic to each theme. In the description of dynamo phenomena, emphasis is laid on the cross helicity dynamo. Features common to stellar magnetic-field generation and the rotational-motion drive in toroidal plasmas are illustrated on this basis. (topical review)

  15. Mean-field magnetohydrodynamics and dynamo theory

    CERN Document Server

    Krause, F

    2013-01-01

    Mean-Field Magnetohydrodynamics and Dynamo Theory provides a systematic introduction to mean-field magnetohydrodynamics and the dynamo theory, along with the results achieved. Topics covered include turbulence and large-scale structures; general properties of the turbulent electromotive force; homogeneity, isotropy, and mirror symmetry of turbulent fields; and turbulent electromotive force in the case of non-vanishing mean flow. The turbulent electromotive force in the case of rotational mean motion is also considered. This book is comprised of 17 chapters and opens with an overview of the gen

  16. Fluctuation dynamo based on magnetic reconnections

    OpenAIRE

    Baggaley, Andrew W.; Barenghi, Carlo F.; Shukurov, Anvar; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2009-01-01

    We develop a new model of the fluctuation dynamo in which the magnetic field is confined to thin flux ropes advected by a multi-scale flow which models turbulence. Magnetic dissipation occurs only via reconnections of flux ropes. The model is particularly suitable for rarefied plasma, such as the Solar corona or galactic halos. We investigate the kinetic energy release into heat, mediated by dynamo action, both in our model and by solving the induction equation with the same flow. We find tha...

  17. What is a large-scale dynamo?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigro, G.; Pongkitiwanichakul, P.; Cattaneo, F.; Tobias, S. M.

    2017-01-01

    We consider kinematic dynamo action in a sheared helical flow at moderate to high values of the magnetic Reynolds number (Rm). We find exponentially growing solutions which, for large enough shear, take the form of a coherent part embedded in incoherent fluctuations. We argue that at large Rm large-scale dynamo action should be identified by the presence of structures coherent in time, rather than those at large spatial scales. We further argue that although the growth rate is determined by small-scale processes, the period of the coherent structures is set by mean-field considerations.

  18. Spectral gaps, inertial manifolds and kinematic dynamos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunez, Manuel [Departamento de Analisis Matematico, Universidad de Valladolid, 47005 Valladolid (Spain)]. E-mail: mnjmhd@am.uva.es

    2005-10-17

    Inertial manifolds are desirable objects when ones wishes a dynamical process to behave asymptotically as a finite-dimensional ones. Recently [Physica D 194 (2004) 297] these manifolds are constructed for the kinematic dynamo problem with time-periodic velocity. It turns out, however, that the conditions imposed on the fluid velocity to guarantee the existence of inertial manifolds are too demanding, in the sense that they imply that all the solutions tend exponentially to zero. The inertial manifolds are meaningful because they represent different decay rates, but the classical dynamos where the magnetic field is maintained or grows are not covered by this approach, at least until more refined estimates are found.

  19. Higher helicity invariants and solar dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, D. D.; Illarionov, E. A.; Akhmet'ev, P. M.

    2017-01-01

    Modern models of nonlinear dynamo saturation in celestial bodies (specifically, on the Sun) are largely based on the consideration of the balance of magnetic helicity. This physical variable has also a topological meaning: it is associated with the linking coefficient of magnetic tubes. In addition to magnetic helicity, magnetohydrodynamics has a number of topological integrals of motion (the so-called higher helicity moments). We have compared these invariants with magnetic helicity properties and concluded that they can hardly serve as nonlinear constraints on dynamo action.

  20. Waves, Coriolis force and the dynamo effect

    CERN Document Server

    Mahajan, S M; Gómez, D O

    2004-01-01

    Dynamo activity caused by waves in a rotating magneto-plasma is investigated. In astrophysical environments such as accretion disks and at sufficiently small spatial scales, the Hall effect is likely to play an important role. It is shown that a combination of the Coriolis force and Hall effect can produce a finite $\\alpha$-effect by generating net helicity in the small scales. The shear/ion-cyclotron normal mode of the Hall plasma is the dominant contributor to the dynamo action for short scale motions.

  1. Working in Separate Silos? What Citation Patterns Reveal about Higher Education Research Internationally

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tight, Malcolm

    2014-01-01

    Higher education research is a growing, inter-disciplinary and increasingly international field of study. This article examines the citation patterns of articles published in six leading higher education journals--three published in the United States and three published elsewhere in the world--for what they reveal about the development of this…

  2. Dynamo and anomalous transport in the reversed field pinch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prager, S.C.

    1998-08-01

    The reversed field pinch is an effective tool to study the macroscopic consequences of magnetic fluctuations, such as the dynamo effect and anomalous transport. Several explanations exist for the dynamo (the self-generation of plasma current)--the MHD dynamo, the kinetic dynamo, and the diamagnetic dynamo. There is some experimental evidence for each, particularly from measurements of ion velocity and electron pressure fluctuations. Magnetic fluctuations are known to produce energy and particle flux in the RFP core. Current profile control is able to decrease fluctuation-induced transport by a factor of five. Improved confinement regimes are also obtained at deep reversal and, possibly, with flow shear.

  3. Dynamo transition in a five-mode helical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rohit; Wahi, Pankaj

    2017-09-01

    We construct a five-mode helical dynamo model containing three velocity and two magnetic modes and solve it analytically. This model exhibits dynamo transition via supercritical pitchfork bifurcation. We show that the critical magnetic Reynolds number for dynamo transition (Rmc) asymptotes to constant values for very low and very high magnetic Prandtl numbers (Pm). Beyond dynamo transition, secondary bifurcations lead to periodic, quasi-periodic, and chaotic dynamo states as the forcing amplitude is increased and chaos appears through a quasi-periodic route.

  4. Limited role of spectra in dynamo theory: coherent versus random dynamos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, Steven M; Cattaneo, Fausto

    2008-09-19

    We discuss the importance of phase information and coherence times in determining the dynamo properties of turbulent flows. We compare the kinematic dynamo properties of three flows with the same energy spectrum. The first flow is dominated by coherent structures with nontrivial phase information and long eddy coherence times, the second has random phases and long-coherence time, the third has nontrivial phase information, but short coherence time. We demonstrate that the first flow is the most efficient kinematic dynamo, owing to the presence of sustained stretching and constructive folding. We argue that these results place limitations on the possible inferences of the dynamo properties of flows from the use of spectra alone, and that the role of coherent structures must always be accounted for.

  5. MHD Dynamo phenomenon in our lab (Petrus Peregrinus Medal Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gailitis, Agris

    2016-04-01

    Celestial objects generate magnetic field very like technical dynamo do. Field induces current in a moving electroconductor. The induced current amplifies magnetic field. At large enough product conductivity time's velocity time's size amplification exceeds losses and situation without magnetic field is impossible. Such scenario is obvious for technical dynamo made from insolated wire but not so for uniform conductor as in celestial bodies. Development of the idea took literally the entire 20th century. Discovery of sunspot magnetic fields at the century rise and laboratory verification at the very fall. At thirties Cowling noticed that geometrically simple shaped (axially symmetrical) field can't sustain itself. Process must be more complex, somehow spatially fragmented. At the middle of century Parker and Steenbeck saw such fragmentation in a turbulent structure of hydrodynamic flow. Shortly after his α-effect approach was made ready Steenbeck invited us to think on molten Na experiments for theory verification. The first idea was to push the Na flow through the hand-blown pipe maze. Similar industrial scale experiment after years and regardless of us was realized in Karlsruhe. Seeking for something cheaper we stopped at Ponomarenko idea - axially symmetric helical flow can't generate axi-simmetric field but it can generate azimuthally structured one. The mathematical model was modified to experimental conditions and numerically optimized. The Dynamo stand was built and it works. Even after optimization Dynamo stand exceeds usual size of hydraulic experiments. 2m3 of molten Na circulate there by means of propeller powered from 200kW motor. When circulation exceeds 0.6 m3/s (at 120°C) seemingly from nowhere appears magnetic field. Twisted field pattern slowly (about 1.5Hz) rotates round flow axis. Up to 0.1T field stay as long as stay circulation and temperature. When sodium is heated up or slowed down the field is slowly dying out. Phenomenon is much richer

  6. Configuration Design of Novel Manually Operated Dynamo Flashlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hong-Sen; Wang, Hsin-Te

    This paper synthesizes novel configurations of manually operated dynamo flashlights. Topology and motion characteristics of existing gear dynamos are modified and concluded. The structural sketches and corresponding graph representations for gear trains and dynamos with the defined induced magnetic circuits are defined. Through the concepts of generalization and specialization, the atlas of the structural sketches and graphs of the embedded gear dynamos is obtained subject to the defined design requirements and constraints. And, a systematic approach is proposed to synthesize the novel mechanisms of the embedded gear dynamos. As a result, the embedded three-link and four-link gear dynamos have 12 and 24 novel design configurations, respectively. One prototype of the embedded three-link and another of the embedded four-link gear dynamo are built.

  7. QUOTUS: The Structure of Political Media Coverage as Revealed by Quoting Patterns

    CERN Document Server

    Niculae, Vlad; Zhang, Justine; Danescu-Niculescu-Mizil, Cristian; Leskovec, Jure

    2015-01-01

    Given the extremely large pool of events and stories available, media outlets need to focus on a subset of issues and aspects to convey to their audience. Outlets are often accused of exhibiting a systematic bias in this selection process, with different outlets portraying different versions of reality. However, in the absence of objective measures and empirical evidence, the direction and extent of systematicity remains widely disputed. In this paper we propose a framework based on quoting patterns for quantifying and characterizing the degree to which media outlets exhibit systematic bias. We apply this framework to a massive dataset of news articles spanning the six years of Obama's presidency and all of his speeches, and reveal that a systematic pattern does indeed emerge from the outlet's quoting behavior. Moreover, we show that this pattern can be successfully exploited in an unsupervised prediction setting, to determine which new quotes an outlet will select to broadcast. By encoding bias patterns in a...

  8. Dynamos, Super-pulsars and Gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Rosswog, S; Rosswog, Stephan; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2003-01-01

    The remnant of a neutron star binary coalescence is expected to be temporarily stabilised against gravitational collapse by its differential rotation. We explore the possibility of dynamo activity in this remnant and assess the potential for powering a short-duration gamma-ray burst (GRB). We analyse our three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of neutron star mergers with respect to the flow pattern inside the remnant. If the central, newly formed super-massive neutron star remains stable for a good fraction of a second an efficient low-Rossby number $\\alpha-\\Omega$-dynamo will amplify the initial seed magnetic fields exponentially. We expect that values close to equipartition field strength will be reached within several tens of milliseconds. Such a super-pulsar could power a GRB via a relativistic wind, with an associated spin-down time scale close to the typical duration of a short GRB. Similar mechanisms are expected to be operational in the surrounding torus formed from neutron star debris.

  9. Magnetic reversals from planetary dynamo waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheyko, Andrey; Finlay, Christopher C; Jackson, Andrew

    2016-11-24

    A striking feature of many natural dynamos is their ability to undergo polarity reversals. The best documented example is Earth's magnetic field, which has reversed hundreds of times during its history. The origin of geomagnetic polarity reversals lies in a magnetohydrodynamic process that takes place in Earth's core, but the precise mechanism is debated. The majority of numerical geodynamo simulations that exhibit reversals operate in a regime in which the viscosity of the fluid remains important, and in which the dynamo mechanism primarily involves stretching and twisting of field lines by columnar convection. Here we present an example of another class of reversing-geodynamo model, which operates in a regime of comparatively low viscosity and high magnetic diffusivity. This class does not fit into the paradigm of reversal regimes that are dictated by the value of the local Rossby number (the ratio of advection to Coriolis force). Instead, stretching of the magnetic field by a strong shear in the east-west flow near the imaginary cylinder just touching the inner core and parallel to the axis of rotation is crucial to the reversal mechanism in our models, which involves a process akin to kinematic dynamo waves. Because our results are relevant in a regime of low viscosity and high magnetic diffusivity, and with geophysically appropriate boundary conditions, this form of dynamo wave may also be involved in geomagnetic reversals.

  10. Converting DYNAMO simulations to Powersim Studio simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, La Tonya Nicole; Malczynski, Leonard A.

    2014-02-01

    DYNAMO is a computer program for building and running 'continuous' simulation models. It was developed by the Industrial Dynamics Group at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology for simulating dynamic feedback models of business, economic, and social systems. The history of the system dynamics method since 1957 includes many classic models built in DYANMO. It was not until the late 1980s that software was built to take advantage of the rise of personal computers and graphical user interfaces that DYNAMO was supplanted. There is much learning and insight to be gained from examining the DYANMO models and their accompanying research papers. We believe that it is a worthwhile exercise to convert DYNAMO models to more recent software packages. We have made an attempt to make it easier to turn these models into a more current system dynamics software language, Powersim © Studio produced by Powersim AS2 of Bergen, Norway. This guide shows how to convert DYNAMO syntax into Studio syntax.

  11. Fluctuation dynamo based on magnetic reconnections

    CERN Document Server

    Baggaley, Andrew W; Shukurov, Anvar; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2009-01-01

    We develop a new model of the fluctuation dynamo in which the magnetic field is confined to thin flux ropes advected by a multi-scale flow which models turbulence. Magnetic dissipation occurs only via reconnections of flux ropes. The model is particularly suitable for rarefied plasma, such as the Solar corona or galactic halos. We investigate the kinetic energy release into heat, mediated by dynamo action, both in our model and by solving the induction equation with the same flow. We find that the flux rope dynamo is more than an order of magnitude more efficient at converting mechanical energy into heat. The probability density of the magnetic energy released during reconnections has a power-law form with the slope -3, consistent with the Solar corona heating by nanoflares. We also present a nonlinear extension of the model. This shows that a plausible saturation mechanism of the fluctuation dynamo is the suppression of turbulent magnetic diffusivity, due to suppression of random stretching at the location o...

  12. Fluctuation dynamo based on magnetic reconnections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggaley, A. W.; Shukurov, A.; Barenghi, C. F.; Subramanian, K.

    2010-01-01

    We develop a new model of the fluctuation dynamo in which the magnetic field is confined to thin flux ropes advected by a multi-scale flow which models turbulence. Magnetic dissipation occurs only via reconnections of flux ropes. The model is particularly suitable for rarefied plasma, such as the solar corona or galactic halos. We investigate the kinetic energy release into heat, mediated by dynamo action, both in our model and by solving the induction equation with the same flow. We find that the flux rope dynamo is more than an order of magnitude more efficient at converting mechanical energy into heat. The probability density of the magnetic energy released during reconnections has a power-law form with the slope -3, consistent with the solar corona heating by nanoflares. We also present a nonlinear extension of the model. This shows that a plausible saturation mechanism of the fluctuation dynamo is the suppression of turbulent magnetic diffusivity, due to suppression of random stretching at the location of the flux ropes. We confirm that the probability distribution function of the magnetic line curvature has a power-law form suggested by \\citet{Sheck:2002b}. We argue, however, using our results that this does not imply a persistent folded structure of magnetic field, at least in the nonlinear stage.

  13. Stochastic flux freezing and magnetic dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyink, Gregory L

    2011-05-01

    Magnetic flux conservation in turbulent plasmas at high magnetic Reynolds numbers is argued neither to hold in the conventional sense nor to be entirely broken, but instead to be valid in a statistical sense associated to the "spontaneous stochasticity" of Lagrangian particle trajectories. The latter phenomenon is due to the explosive separation of particles undergoing turbulent Richardson diffusion, which leads to a breakdown of Laplacian determinism for classical dynamics. Empirical evidence is presented for spontaneous stochasticity, including numerical results. A Lagrangian path-integral approach is then exploited to establish stochastic flux freezing for resistive hydromagnetic equations and to argue, based on the properties of Richardson diffusion, that flux conservation must remain stochastic at infinite magnetic Reynolds number. An important application of these results is the kinematic, fluctuation dynamo in nonhelical, incompressible turbulence at magnetic Prandtl number (Pr(m)) equal to unity. Numerical results on the Lagrangian dynamo mechanisms by a stochastic particle method demonstrate a strong similarity between the Pr(m)=1 and 0 dynamos. Stochasticity of field-line motion is an essential ingredient of both. Finally, some consequences for nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic turbulence, dynamo, and reconnection are briefly considered.

  14. Magnetic Helicity in a Cyclic Convective Dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miesch, Mark S.; Zhang, Mei; Augustson, Kyle C.

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic helicity is a fundamental agent for magnetic self-organization in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) dynamos. As a conserved quantity in ideal MHD, it establishes a strict topological coupling between large and small-scale magnetic fields. The generation of magnetic fields on scales larger than the velocity field is linked to an upscale transfer of magnetic helicity, either locally in spectral space as in the inverse cascade of magnetic helicity in MHD turbulence or non-locally, as in the turbulent alpha-effect of mean-field dynamo theory. Thus, understanding the generation, transport, and dissipation of magnetic helicity is an essential prerequisite to understanding manifestations of magnetic self-organization in the solar dynamo, including sunspots, the prominent dipole and quadrupole moments, and the 22-year magnetic activity cycle. We investigate the role of magnetic helicity in a convective dynamo model that exhibits regular magnetic cycles. The cycle is marked by coherent bands of toroidal field that persist within the convection zone and that are antisymmetric about the equator. When these toriodal bands interact across the equator, it initiates a global restructuring of the magnetic topology that contributes to the reversal of the dipole moment. Thus, the polar field reversals are preceeded by a brief reversal of the subsurface magnetic helicity. There is some evidence that the Sun may exhibit a similar magnetic helicity reversal prior to its polar field reversals.

  15. Fluctuation dynamos and their Faraday rotation signatures

    CERN Document Server

    Bhat, Pallavi

    2012-01-01

    Turbulence is ubiquitous in many astrophysical systems like galaxies, galaxy clusters and possibly even the IGM filaments. We study fluctuation dynamo action in turbulent systems focusing on one observational signature; the Faraday rotation measure (RM) from background radio sources seen through the magnetic field generated by such a dynamo. We simulate the fluctuation dynamo (FD) in periodic boxes up to resolutions of 512^3, with varying fluid and magnetic Reynolds numbers, and measure the resulting random RMs. We show that the resulting rms value of RM is quite significant, given that the FD produces intermittent fields. When the dynamo saturates, it is of order 40%-50% of the value expected in a model where fields of strength B_rms uniformly fill cells of the largest turbulent eddy but are randomly oriented from one cell to another. This level of RM dispersion obtains across different values of magnetic Reynolds number and Prandtl number explored. We also use the random RMs to probe the structure of the ge...

  16. Extrapolating Solar Dynamo Models Throughout the Heliosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, B. T.; Miesch, M. S.; Augustson, K.; Featherstone, N. A.

    2014-12-01

    There are multiple theories that aim to explain the behavior of the solar dynamo, and their associated models have been fiercely contested. The two prevailing theories investigated in this project are the Convective Dynamo model that arises from the pure solving of the magnetohydrodynamic equations, as well as the Babcock-Leighton model that relies on sunspot dissipation and reconnection. Recently, the supercomputer simulations CASH and BASH have formed models of the behavior of the Convective and Babcock-Leighton models, respectively, in the convective zone of the sun. These models show the behavior of the models within the sun, while much less is known about the effects these models may have further away from the solar surface. The goal of this work is to investigate any fundamental differences between the Convective and Babcock-Leighton models of the solar dynamo outside of the sun and extending into the solar system via the use of potential field source surface extrapolations implemented via python code that operates on data from CASH and BASH. The use of real solar data to visualize supergranular flow data in the BASH model is also used to learn more about the behavior of the Babcock-Leighton Dynamo. From the process of these extrapolations it has been determined that the Babcock-Leighton model, as represented by BASH, maintains complex magnetic fields much further into the heliosphere before reverting into a basic dipole field, providing 3D visualisations of the models distant from the sun.

  17. Solar Cycle #24 and the Solar Dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatten, Kenneth; Pesnell, W. Dean

    2007-01-01

    We focus on two solar aspects related to flight dynamics. These are the solar dynamo and long-term solar activity predictions. The nature of the solar dynamo is central to solar activity predictions, and these predictions are important for orbital planning of satellites in low earth orbit (LEO). The reason is that the solar ultraviolet (UV) and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectral irradiances inflate the upper atmospheric layers of the Earth, forming the thermosphere and exosphere through which these satellites orbit. Concerning the dynamo, we discuss some recent novel approaches towards its understanding. For solar predictions we concentrate on a solar precursor method, in which the Sun's polar field plays a major role in forecasting the next cycle s activity based upon the Babcock-Leighton dynamo. With a current low value for the Sun s polar field, this method predicts that solar cycle #24 will be one of the lowest in recent times, with smoothed F10.7 radio flux values peaking near 130 plus or minus 30 (2 sigma), in the 2013 timeframe. One may have to consider solar activity as far back as the early 20th century to find a cycle of comparable magnitude. Concomitant effects of low solar activity upon satellites in LEO will need to be considered, such as enhancements in orbital debris. Support for our prediction of a low solar cycle #24 is borne out by the lack of new cycle sunspots at least through the first half of 2007. Usually at the present epoch in the solar cycle (approx. 7+ years after the last solar maximum), for a normal size following cycle, new cycle sunspots would be seen. The lack of their appearance at this time is only consistent with a low cycle #24. Polar field observations of a weak magnitude are consistent with unusual structures seen in the Sun s corona. Polar coronal holes are the hallmarks of the Sun's open field structures. At present, it appears that the polar coronal holes are relatively weak, and there have been many equatorial coronal holes

  18. Simulation of an Ice Giant-style Dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderlund, K. M.; Aurnou, J. M.

    2010-12-01

    The Ice Giants, Uranus and Neptune, are unique in the solar system. These planets are the only known bodies to have multipolar magnetic fields where the quadrupole and octopole components have strengths comparable to or greater than that of the dipole. Cloud layer observations show that the planets also have zonal (east-west) flows that are fundamentally different from the banded winds of Jupiter and Saturn. The surface winds are characterized by strong retrograde equatorial jets that are flanked on either side by prograde jets at high latitudes. Thermal emission measurements of Neptune show that the surface energy flux pattern peaks in the equatorial and polar regions with minima at mid-latitudes. (The measurements for Uranus cannot adequately resolve the emission pattern.) The winds and magnetic fields are thought to be the result of convection in the planetary interior, which will also affect the heat flux pattern. Typically, it is implicitly assumed that the zonal winds are generated in a shallow layer, separate from the dynamo generation region. However, if the magnetic fields are driven near the surface, a single region can simultaneously generate both the zonal flows and the magnetic fields. Here, we present a novel numerical model of an Ice Giant-style dynamo to investigate this possibility. An order unity convective Rossby number (ratio of buoyancy to Coriolis forces) has been chosen because retrograde equatorial jets tend to occur in spherical shells when the effects of rotation are relatively weak. Our modeling results qualitatively reproduce all of the structural features of the global dynamical observations. Thus, a self-consistent model can generate magnetic field, zonal flow, and thermal emission patterns that agree with those of Uranus and Neptune. This model, then, leads us to hypothesize that the Ice Giants' zonal flows and magnetic fields are generated via dynamically coupled deep convection processes.

  19. TIDALLY DRIVEN DYNAMOS IN A ROTATING SPHERE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cébron, D.; Hollerbach, R., E-mail: david.cebron@ujf-grenoble.fr, E-mail: r.hollerbach@leeds.ac.uk [Institut für Geophysik, Sonneggstrasse 5, ETH Zürich, Zürich CH-8092 (Switzerland)

    2014-07-01

    Large-scale planetary or stellar magnetic fields generated by a dynamo effect are mostly attributed to flows forced by buoyancy forces in electrically conducting fluid layers. However, these large-scale fields may also be controlled by tides, as previously suggested for the star τ-boo, Mars, or the early Moon. By simulating a small local patch of a rotating fluid, Barker and Lithwick have recently shown that tides can drive small-scale dynamos by exciting a hydrodynamic instability, the so-called elliptical (or tidal) instability. By performing global magnetohydrodynamic simulations of a rotating spherical fluid body, we investigate if this instability can also drive the observed large-scale magnetic fields. We are thus interested in the dynamo threshold and the generated magnetic field in order to test if such a mechanism is relevant for planets and stars. Rather than solving the problem in a geometry deformed by tides, we consider a spherical fluid body and add a body force to mimic the tidal deformation in the bulk of the fluid. This allows us to use an efficient spectral code to solve the magnetohydrodynamic problem. We first compare the hydrodynamic results with theoretical asymptotic results and numerical results obtained in a truly deformed ellipsoid, which confirms the presence of elliptical instability. We then perform magnetohydrodynamic simulations and investigate the dynamo capability of the flow. Kinematic and self-consistent dynamos are finally simulated, showing that the elliptical instability is capable of generating a dipole-dominated large-scale magnetic field in global simulations of a fluid rotating sphere.

  20. Energy fluxes in helical magnetohydrodynamics and dynamo action

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mahendra K Verma

    2003-10-01

    Renormalized viscosity, renormalized resistivity, and various energy fluxes are calculated for helical magnetohydrodynamics using perturbative field theory. The calculation is of first-order in perturbation. Kinetic and magnetic helicities do not affect the renormalized parameters, but they induce an inverse cascade of magnetic energy. The sources for the large-scale magnetic field have been shown to be (1) energy flux from large-scale velocity field to large-scale magnetic field arising due to non-helical interactions and (2) inverse energy flux of magnetic energy caused by helical interactions. Based on our flux results, a primitive model for galactic dynamo has been constructed. Our calculations yield dynamo time-scale for a typical galaxy to be of the order of 108 years. Our field-theoretic calculations also reveal that the flux of magnetic helicity is backward, consistent with the earlier observations based on absolute equilibrium theory.

  1. A filtering method to reveal crystalline patterns from atom probe microscopy desorption maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Lan

    2016-01-01

    A filtering method to reveal the crystallographic information present in Atom Probe Microscopy (APM) data is presented. The method filters atoms based on the time difference between their evaporation and the evaporation of the previous atom. Since this time difference correlates with the location and the local structure of the evaporating atoms on the surface, it can be used to reveal any crystallographic information contained within APM data. The demonstration of this method is illustrated on: •A pure Al specimen for which crystallographic poles are clearly visible on the desorption patterns easily indexed.•Three Fe-15at.% Cr datasets where crystallographic patterns are less obvious and require this filtering method.

  2. Saturation of Zeldovich Stretch-Twist-Fold Map Dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Seta, Amit; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2014-01-01

    Zeldovich's stretch-twist fold (STF) dynamo provided a breakthrough in conceptual understanding of fast dynamos, including fluctuation or small scale dynamos. We study the evolution and saturation behaviour of two types of Baker's map dynamos, which have been used to model Zeldovich's STF dynamo process. Using such maps allows one to analyze dynamos at much higher magnetic Reynolds numbers $R_M$ as compared to direct numerical simulations. In the 2-strip map dynamo there is constant constructive folding while the 4-strip map dynamo also allows the possibility of field reversal. Incorporating a diffusive step parameterised by $R_M$, we find that the magnetic field $B(x)$ is amplified only above a critical $R_M=R_{crit} \\sim 4$ for both types of dynamos. We explore the saturation of these dynamos in 3 ways; by a renormalized decrease of the effective $R_M$ (Case I) or due to a decrease in the efficiency of field amplification by stretching (Case II), or a combination of both effects (Case III). For Case I, we s...

  3. Complex patterns in fossilized stromatolites revealed by hyperspectral imaging (400-2496 nm).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, R J; Van Kranendonk, M J; Kelloway, S J; Wainwright, I E

    2016-09-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (400-2496 nm) was used to quantitatively map surface textures and compositional variations in stromatolites to determine whether complexity of textures could be used as evidence to support biogenicity in the absence of preserved biomarkers. Four samples of 2.72-2.4 Ga stromatolites from a variety of settings, encompassing marine and lacustrine environments, were selected for hyperspectral imaging. Images of the sawn surfaces of samples were processed to identify reflectance and mineral absorption features and quantify their intensity (as an index of mineral abundance) using automated feature extraction. Amounts of ferrous iron were quantified using a ratio of reflectance at 1650 and 1299 nm. Visible near infrared imagery (400-970 nm) did not reveal additional textural patterns to those obtained from visual inspection. Shortwave infrared imagery (1000-2496 nm), however, revealed complex laminar and convoluted patterns, including a distinctive texture of sharp peaks and broad, low troughs in one sample, similar to living tufted microbial mats. Spectral analysis revealed another sample to be composed of dolomite. Two other samples were dominated by calcite or chlorite ± illite. Large variations in amounts of ferrous iron were found, but ferric iron was exclusively located in the oxidation crust. Hyperspectral imaging revealed large differences between parts of a sample of biogenic and non-biogenic origin. The former was characterized by calcite with varying amounts of ferrous iron, distributed in lenticular, convoluted patterns; the latter by Mg-Fe chlorite with large amounts of aluminium silicate, distributed as fine laminar layers. All minerals identified by hyperspectral imaging were confirmed by thin section petrography and XRD analyses. Spatial statistics generated from quantitative minerals maps showed different patterns between these different parts of the sample. Thus, hyperspectral imaging was shown to be a powerful tool for

  4. Investigations of fine-scale phylogeography in Tigriopus californicus reveal historical patterns of population divergence

    OpenAIRE

    Ladner Jason T; Willett Christopher S

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background The intertidal copepod Tigriopus californicus is a model for studying the process of genetic divergence in allopatry and for probing the nature of genetic changes that lead to reproductive isolation. Although previous studies have revealed a pattern of remarkably high levels of genetic divergence between the populations of this species at several spatial scales, it is not clear what types of historical processes are responsible. Particularly lacking are data that can yield...

  5. Statistical Mechanics of Turbulent Dynamos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2014-01-01

    Incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence and magnetic dynamos, which occur in magnetofluids with large fluid and magnetic Reynolds numbers, will be discussed. When Reynolds numbers are large and energy decays slowly, the distribution of energy with respect to length scale becomes quasi-stationary and MHD turbulence can be described statistically. In the limit of infinite Reynolds numbers, viscosity and resistivity become zero and if these values are used in the MHD equations ab initio, a model system called ideal MHD turbulence results. This model system is typically confined in simple geometries with some form of homogeneous boundary conditions, allowing for velocity and magnetic field to be represented by orthogonal function expansions. One advantage to this is that the coefficients of the expansions form a set of nonlinearly interacting variables whose behavior can be described by equilibrium statistical mechanics, i.e., by a canonical ensemble theory based on the global invariants (energy, cross helicity and magnetic helicity) of ideal MHD turbulence. Another advantage is that truncated expansions provide a finite dynamical system whose time evolution can be numerically simulated to test the predictions of the associated statistical mechanics. If ensemble predictions are the same as time averages, then the system is said to be ergodic; if not, the system is nonergodic. Although it had been implicitly assumed in the early days of ideal MHD statistical theory development that these finite dynamical systems were ergodic, numerical simulations provided sufficient evidence that they were, in fact, nonergodic. Specifically, while canonical ensemble theory predicted that expansion coefficients would be (i) zero-mean random variables with (ii) energy that decreased with length scale, it was found that although (ii) was correct, (i) was not and the expected ergodicity was broken. The exact cause of this broken ergodicity was explained, after much

  6. MHD Turbulence and Magnetic Dynamos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shebalin, John V

    2014-01-01

    Incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence and magnetic dynamos, which occur in magnetofluids with large fluid and magnetic Reynolds numbers, will be discussed. When Reynolds numbers are large and energy decays slowly, the distribution of energy with respect to length scale becomes quasi-stationary and MHD turbulence can be described statistically. In the limit of infinite Reynolds numbers, viscosity and resistivity become zero and if these values are used in the MHD equations ab initio, a model system called ideal MHD turbulence results. This model system is typically confined in simple geometries with some form of homogeneous boundary conditions, allowing for velocity and magnetic field to be represented by orthogonal function expansions. One advantage to this is that the coefficients of the expansions form a set of nonlinearly interacting variables whose behavior can be described by equilibrium statistical mechanics, i.e., by a canonical ensemble theory based on the global invariants (energy, cross helicity and magnetic helicity) of ideal MHD turbulence. Another advantage is that truncated expansions provide a finite dynamical system whose time evolution can be numerically simulated to test the predictions of the associated statistical mechanics. If ensemble predictions are the same as time averages, then the system is said to be ergodic; if not, the system is nonergodic. Although it had been implicitly assumed in the early days of ideal MHD statistical theory development that these finite dynamical systems were ergodic, numerical simulations provided sufficient evidence that they were, in fact, nonergodic. Specifically, while canonical ensemble theory predicted that expansion coefficients would be (i) zero-mean random variables with (ii) energy that decreased with length scale, it was found that although (ii) was correct, (i) was not and the expected ergodicity was broken. The exact cause of this broken ergodicity was explained, after much

  7. Comparative transcriptomics of three Poaceae species reveals patterns of gene expression evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Rebecca M; Gowda, Malali; Moghe, Gaurav; Lin, Haining; Vaillancourt, Brieanne; Shiu, Shin-Han; Jiang, Ning; Robin Buell, C

    2012-08-01

    The Poaceae family, also known as the grasses, includes agronomically important cereal crops such as rice, maize, sorghum, and wheat. Previous comparative studies have shown that much of the gene content is shared among the grasses; however, functional conservation of orthologous genes has yet to be explored. To gain an understanding of the genome-wide patterns of evolution of gene expression across reproductive tissues, we employed a sequence-based approach to compare analogous transcriptomes in species representing three Poaceae subgroups including the Pooideae (Brachypodium distachyon), the Panicoideae (sorghum), and the Ehrhartoideae (rice). Our transcriptome analyses reveal that only a fraction of orthologous genes exhibit conserved expression patterns. A high proportion of conserved orthologs include genes that are upregulated in physiologically similar tissues such as leaves, anther, pistil, and embryo, while orthologs that are highly expressed in seeds show the most diverged expression patterns. More generally, we show that evolution of gene expression profiles and coding sequences in the grasses may be linked. Genes that are highly and broadly expressed tend to be conserved at the coding sequence level while genes with narrow expression patterns show accelerated rates of sequence evolution. We further show that orthologs in syntenic genomic blocks are more likely to share correlated expression patterns compared with non-syntenic orthologs. These findings are important for agricultural improvement because sequence information is transferred from model species, such as Brachypodium, rice, and sorghum to crop plants without sequenced genomes. © 2012 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Dynamo effect in a driven helical flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feudel, F; Gellert, M; Rüdiger, S; Witt, A; Seehafer, N

    2003-10-01

    The Roberts flow, a helical flow in the form of convectionlike rolls, is known to be capable of both kinematic and nonlinear dynamo action. We study the Roberts dynamo with particular attention being paid to the spatial structure of the generated magnetic field and its back-reaction on the flow. The dynamo bifurcation is decisively determined by the symmetry group of the problem, which is given by a subgroup of discrete transformations and a continuous translational invariance of the flow. In the bifurcation the continuous symmetry is broken while the discrete subgroup symmetry completely survives. Its actions help in understanding the spatial structures of the magnetic field and of the modified flow. In accordance with experimental observations, the magnetic field component perpendicular to the originally invariant direction is much stronger than the component in this direction. Furthermore, the magnetic field is largely concentrated in layers separating the convectionlike rolls of the flow and containing, in particular, its stagnation points, which are isolated for the modified flow while they are line filling for the original Roberts flow. The magnetic field is strongest near beta-type stagnation points, with a two-dimensional unstable and a one-dimensional stable manifold, and is weak near alpha-type stagnation points, with a two-dimensional stable and a one-dimensional unstable manifold. This contrasts with the usual picture that dynamo action is promoted at the alpha points and impeded at the beta points. Both the creation of isolated stagnation points and the concentration of strong fields at the beta points may be understood as a result of the way in which the Roberts dynamo saturates. It is also found that, while the original Roberts flow is regular, the modified flow is chaotic in the layers between the convectionlike rolls where the magnetic field is concentrated. This chaoticity, which results from the back-reaction of the magnetic field on the flow

  9. Ensemble Kalman filter data assimilation in a Babcock-Leighton solar dynamo model: an observation system simulation experiment for reconstructing meridional flow-speed

    CERN Document Server

    Dikpati, Mausumi; Mitra, Dhrubaditya

    2014-01-01

    Accurate knowledge of time-variation in meridional flow-speed and profile is crucial for estimating a solar cycle's features, which are ultimately responsible for causing space climate variations. However, no consensus has been reached yet about the Sun's meridional circulation pattern observations and theories. By implementing an Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) data assimilation in a Babcock-Leighton solar dynamo model using Data Assimilation Research Testbed (DART) framework, we find that the best reconstruction of time-variation in meridional flow-speed can be obtained when ten or more observations are used with an updating time of 15 days and a $\\le 10\\%$ observational error. Increasing ensemble-size from 16 to 160 improves reconstruction. Comparison of reconstructed flow-speed with "true-state" reveals that EnKF data assimilation is very powerful for reconstructing meridional flow-speeds and suggests that it can be implemented for reconstructing spatio-temporal patterns of meridional circulation.

  10. The New Mexico alpha-omega Dynamo Experiment Modeling Astrophysical Dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Colgate, S A; Beckley, H F; Ferrel, R; Romero, V D; Weatherall, J C

    2001-01-01

    A magnetic dynamo experiment is under construction at the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology. The experiment is designed to demonstrate in the laboratory the alpha-omega magnetic dynamo, which is believed to operate in many rotating and conducting astrophysical objects. The experiment uses the Couette flow of liquid sodium between two cylinders rotating with different angular velocities to model the omega-effect. The alpha-effect is created by the rising and expanding jets of liquid sodium driven through a pair of orifices in the end plates of the cylindrical vessel, presumably simulating plumes driven by buoyancy in astrophysical objects. The water analog of the dynamo device has been constructed and the flow necessary for the dynamo has been demonstrated. Results of the numerical simulations of the kinematic dynamo are presented. The toroidal field produced by the omega-effect is predicted to be B_{\\phi} \\simeq (R_m/2\\pi) B_{poloidal}\\simeq 20 \\times B_{poloidal} for the expected magnetic Reynold...

  11. Dynamos and anti-dynamos as thin magnetic flux ropes in Riemannian spaces

    CERN Document Server

    de Andrade, L Garcia

    2007-01-01

    Two examples of magnetic anti-dynamos in magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) are given. The first is a 3D metric conformally related to Arnold cat fast dynamo metric: ${ds_{A}}^{2}=e^{-{\\lambda}z}dp^{2}+e^{{\\lambda}z}dq^{2}+dz^{2}$ is shown to present a behaviour of non-dynamos where the magnetic field exponentially decay in time. The curvature decay as z-coordinates increases without bounds. Some of the Riemann curvature components such as $R_{pzpz}$ also undergoes dissipation while component $R_{qzqz}$ increases without bounds. The remaining curvature component $R_{pqpq}$ is constant on the torus surface. The other anti-dynamo which may be useful in plasma astrophysics is the thin magnetic flux rope or twisted magnetic thin flux tube which also behaves as anti-dynamo since it also decays with time. This model is based on the Riemannian metric of the magnetic twisted flux tube where the axis possesses Frenet curvature and torsion. Since in this last example the Frenet torsion of the axis of the rope is almost zero, o...

  12. History and results of the Riga dynamo experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Gailitis, Agris; Gundrum, Thomas; Lielausis, Olgerts; Platacis, Ernests; Stefani, Frank

    2008-01-01

    On 11 November 1999, a self-exciting magnetic eigenfield was detected for the first time in the Riga liquid sodium dynamo experiment. We report on the long history leading to this event, and on the subsequent experimental campaigns which provided a wealth of data on the kinematic and the saturated regime of this dynamo. The present state of the theoretical understanding of both regimes is delineated, and some comparisons with other laboratory dynamo experiments are made.

  13. Predictability and Coupled Dynamics of MJO During DYNAMO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-03

    3. DATES COVERED (From - To) Jan 2013-Dec 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Predictability and Coupled Dynamics of MJO During DYNAMO 5a. CONTRACT...release: distribution is unlimited. Predictability and Coupled Dynamics of MJO During DYNAMO Hyodae Seo Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Woods...scientific goals of the proposed research are: 1. Examine the process by which the SST variability affects the MJO during the DYNAMO using a SCOAR2 regional

  14. Subcritical dynamo bifurcation in the Taylor-Green flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponty, Y; Laval, J-P; Dubrulle, B; Daviaud, F; Pinton, J-F

    2007-11-30

    We report direct numerical simulations of dynamo generation for flow generated using a Taylor-Green forcing. We find that the bifurcation is subcritical and show its bifurcation diagram. We connect the associated hysteretic behavior with hydrodynamics changes induced by the action of the Lorentz force. We show the geometry of the dynamo magnetic field and discuss how the dynamo transition can be induced when an external field is applied to the flow.

  15. Extracting scaling laws from numerical dynamo models

    CERN Document Server

    Stelzer, Z

    2013-01-01

    Earth's magnetic field is generated by processes in the electrically conducting, liquid outer core, subsumed under the term `geodynamo'. In the last decades, great effort has been put into the numerical simulation of core dynamics following from the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations. However, the numerical simulations are far from Earth's core in terms of several control parameters. Different scaling analyses found simple scaling laws for quantities like heat transport, flow velocity, magnetic field strength and magnetic dissipation time. We use an extensive dataset of 116 numerical dynamo models compiled by Christensen and co-workers to analyse these scalings from a rigorous model selection point of view. Our method of choice is leave-one-out cross-validation which rates models according to their predictive abilities. In contrast to earlier results, we find that diffusive processes are not negligible for the flow velocity and magnetic field strength in the numerical dynamos. Also the scaling of the magneti...

  16. Dynamo theory prediction of solar activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatten, Kenneth H.

    1988-01-01

    The dynamo theory technique to predict decadal time scale solar activity variations is introduced. The technique was developed following puzzling correlations involved with geomagnetic precursors of solar activity. Based upon this, a dynamo theory method was developed to predict solar activity. The method was used successfully in solar cycle 21 by Schatten, Scherrer, Svalgaard, and Wilcox, after testing with 8 prior solar cycles. Schatten and Sofia used the technique to predict an exceptionally large cycle, peaking early (in 1990) with a sunspot value near 170, likely the second largest on record. Sunspot numbers are increasing, suggesting that: (1) a large cycle is developing, and (2) that the cycle may even surpass the largest cycle (19). A Sporer Butterfly method shows that the cycle can now be expected to peak in the latter half of 1989, consistent with an amplitude comparable to the value predicted near the last solar minimum.

  17. Differential Rotation in Solar Convective Dynamo Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Yuhong

    2015-01-01

    We carry out a magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) simulation of convective dynamo in the rotating solar convective envelope driven by the solar radiative diffusive heat flux. The simulation is similar to that reported in Fan & Fang (2014) but with further reduced viscosity and magnetic diffusion. The resulting convective dynamo produces a large scale mean field that exhibits similar irregular cyclic behavior and polarity reversals, and self-consistently maintains a solar-like differential rotation. The main driver for the solar-like differential rotation (with faster rotating equator) is a net outward transport of angular momentum away from the rotation axis by the Reynolds stress, and we found that this transport is enhanced with reduced viscosity and magnetic diffusion.

  18. SADE: The starspot and dynamo explorer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, P. C. H.; Acton, L. W. A.; Klumpar, D.; Kankelborg, C.; Stern, R. A.; Peres, G.; Culhane, J. L.

    2003-09-01

    We propose a mission called SADE, the Starspot And Dynamo Explorer, to study dynamo activity in nearby late-type stars. The onboard instruments will be a Ca-K telescope for magnetically dominated chromospheric emission, and an X-ray grazing incidence telescope to study coronal emission. We design the mission for a life-time of 15 years or longer to capture a full activity cycle for most solar-type stars. We aim to firmly establish the spectrum of the relation between chromospheric and corona' emission in late-type stars, and capture one or more stars going into or coming out of a Maunder type minimum. Operation costs will be kept to a minimum by automating mission operations to a maximum, and have the science operations be carried out by students at Montana State University.

  19. An ancient core dynamo in asteroid Vesta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Roger R; Weiss, Benjamin P; Shuster, David L; Gattacceca, Jérôme; Grove, Timothy L; Suavet, Clément; Lima, Eduardo A; Li, Luyao; Kuan, Aaron T

    2012-10-12

    The asteroid Vesta is the smallest known planetary body that has experienced large-scale igneous differentiation. However, it has been previously uncertain whether Vesta and similarly sized planetesimals formed advecting metallic cores and dynamo magnetic fields. Here we show that remanent magnetization in the eucrite meteorite Allan Hills A81001 formed during cooling on Vesta 3.69 billion years ago in a surface magnetic field of at least 2 microteslas. This field most likely originated from crustal remanence produced by an earlier dynamo, suggesting that Vesta formed an advecting liquid metallic core. Furthermore, the inferred present-day crustal fields can account for the lack of solar wind ion-generated space weathering effects on Vesta.

  20. Universal nonlinear small-scale dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beresnyak, A

    2012-01-20

    We consider astrophysically relevant nonlinear MHD dynamo at large Reynolds numbers (Re). We argue that it is universal in a sense that magnetic energy grows at a rate which is a constant fraction C(E) of the total turbulent dissipation rate. On the basis of locality bounds we claim that this "efficiency of the small-scale dynamo", C(E), is a true constant for large Re and is determined only by strongly nonlinear dynamics at the equipartition scale. We measured C(E) in numerical simulations and observed a value around 0.05 in the highest resolution simulations. We address the issue of C(E) being small, unlike the Kolmogorov constant which is of order unity.

  1. Invisible dynamo in mean-field models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshetnyak, M. Yu.

    2016-07-01

    The inverse problem in a spherical shell to find the two-dimensional spatial distributions of the α-effect and differential rotation in a mean-field dynamo model has been solved. The derived distributions lead to the generation of a magnetic field concentrated inside the convection zone. The magnetic field is shown to have no time to rise from the region of maximum generation located in the lower layers to the surface in the polarity reversal time due to magnetic diffusion. The ratio of the maximum magnetic energy in the convection zone to its value at the outer boundary reaches two orders of magnitude or more. This result is important in interpreting the observed stellar and planetary magnetic fields. The proposed method of solving the inverse nonlinear dynamo problem is easily adapted for a wide class of mathematical-physics problems.

  2. Helioseismic Data Assimilation in Solar Dynamo Models

    CERN Document Server

    Muñoz-Jaramillo, Andrés; Martens, Petrus C H

    2008-01-01

    An essential ingredient in kinematic dynamo models is the velocity field within the solar convection zone. In particular, the differential rotation is now well constrained by helioseismic observations. Helioseismology also gives us information about the depth-dependence of the meridional circulation in the near-surface layers. The typical velocity inputs used in solar dynamo models, however, continue to be an analytic fit to the observed differential rotation and a theoretically constructed meridional flow profile that matches only the peak flow speed at the surface. Here we take the first steps towards realistic helioseismic data assimilation, by presenting methodologies for constructing differential rotation and meridional circulation profiles that more closely conform to the observational constraints currently available. We also present simulations driven by the assimilated rotation and four plausible profiles for the internal meridional circulation -- all of which match the helioseismically inferred near-...

  3. Differential rotation in solar convective dynamo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yuhong; Fang, Fang

    2016-10-01

    We carry out a magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) simulation of convective dynamo in the rotating solar convective envelope driven by the solar radiative diffusive heat flux. The simulation is similar to that reported in Fan and Fang (2014) but with further reduced viscosity and magnetic diffusion. The resulting convective dynamo produces a large scale mean field that exhibits similar irregular cyclic behavior and polarity reversals, and self-consistently maintains a solar-like differential rotation. The main driver for the solar-like differential rotation (with faster rotating equator) is a net outward transport of angular momentum away from the rotation axis by the Reynolds stress, and we found that this transport is enhanced with reduced viscosity and magnetic diffusion.

  4. Investigations of fine-scale phylogeography in Tigriopus californicus reveal historical patterns of population divergence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladner Jason T

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The intertidal copepod Tigriopus californicus is a model for studying the process of genetic divergence in allopatry and for probing the nature of genetic changes that lead to reproductive isolation. Although previous studies have revealed a pattern of remarkably high levels of genetic divergence between the populations of this species at several spatial scales, it is not clear what types of historical processes are responsible. Particularly lacking are data that can yield insights into population history from the finest scales of geographic resolution. Results Sequence variation in both cytochrome b (CYTB, mtDNA and the rieske iron-sulfur protein (RISP, nuclear are examined at a fine scale within four different regions for populations of T. californicus. High levels of genetic divergence are seen for both genes at the broader scale, and genetic subdivision is apparent at nearly all scales in these populations for these two genes. Patterns of polymorphism and divergence in both CYTB and RISP suggest that selection may be leading to non-neutral evolution of these genes in several cases but a pervasive pattern of neither selection nor coadaptation is seen for these markers. Conclusion The use of sequence data at a fine-scale of resolution in this species has provided novel insights into the processes that have resulted in the accumulation of genetic divergence among populations. This divergence is likely to result from an interplay between a limited dispersal ability for this copepod and the temporal instability of copepod habitat. Both shorter-term processes such as the extinction/recolonization dynamics of copepod pools and longer-term processes such as geological uplift of coastline and sea level changes appear to have impacted the patterns of differentiation. Some patterns of sequence variation are consistent with selection acting upon the loci used in this study; however, it appears that most phylogeographic patterns are

  5. Predictive Scaling Laws for Spherical Rotating Dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Oruba, Ludivine

    2013-01-01

    State of the art numerical models of the Geodynamo are still performed in a parameter regime extremely remote from the values relevant to the physics of the Earth's core. In order to establish a connection between dynamo modeling and the geophysical motivation, scaling laws have been proposed. Such scaling laws establish the dependence of essential quantities (such as the magnetic field strength) on measured or controlled quantities. They allow for a direct confrontation of advanced models with geophysical observations.(...)

  6. Does the butterfly diagram indicate asolar flux-transport dynamo?

    CERN Document Server

    Schüssler, M

    2004-01-01

    We address the question whether the properties of the observed latitude-time diagram of sunspot occurence (the butterfly diagram) provide evidence for the operation of a flux-transport dynamo, which explains the migration of the sunspot zones and the period of the solar cycle in terms of a deep equatorward meridional flow. We show that the properties of the butterfly diagram are equally well reproduced by a conventional dynamo model with migrating dynamo waves, but without transport of magnetic flux by a flow. These properties seem to be generic for an oscillatory and migratory field of dipole parity and thus do not permit an observational distinction between different dynamo approaches.

  7. Magnetic dynamo action at low magnetic Prandtl numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malyshkin, Leonid M; Boldyrev, Stanislav

    2010-11-19

    Amplification of magnetic field due to kinematic turbulent dynamo action is studied in the regime of small magnetic Prandtl numbers. Such a regime is relevant for planets and stars interiors, as well as for liquid-metal laboratory experiments. A comprehensive analysis based on the Kazantsev-Kraichnan model is reported, which establishes the dynamo threshold and the dynamo growth rates for varying kinetic helicity of turbulent fluctuations. It is proposed that in contrast with the case of large magnetic Prandtl numbers, the kinematic dynamo action at small magnetic Prandtl numbers is significantly affected by kinetic helicity, and it can be made quite efficient with an appropriate choice of the helicity spectrum.

  8. Bistability and chaos in the Taylor-Green dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Rakesh K; Verma, Mahendra K; Wahi, Pankaj

    2012-03-01

    Using direct numerical simulations, we study dynamo action under Taylor-Green forcing for a magnetic Prandtl number of 0.5. We observe bistability with weak- and strong-magnetic-field branches. Both the dynamo branches undergo subcritical dynamo transition. We also observe a host of dynamo states including constant, periodic, quasiperiodic, and chaotic magnetic fields. One of the chaotic states originates through a quasiperiodic route with phase locking, while the other chaotic attractor appears to follow the Newhouse-Ruelle-Takens route to chaos. We also observe intermittent transitions between quasiperiodic and chaotic states for a given Taylor-Green forcing.

  9. Nonlinear dynamo action in a precessing cylindrical container.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nore, C; Léorat, J; Guermond, J-L; Luddens, F

    2011-07-01

    It is numerically demonstrated by means of a magnetohydrodynamics code that precession can trigger the dynamo effect in a cylindrical container. When the Reynolds number, based on the radius of the cylinder and its angular velocity, increases, the flow, which is initially centrosymmetric, loses its stability and bifurcates to a quasiperiodic motion. This unsteady and asymmetric flow is shown to be capable of sustaining dynamo action in the linear and nonlinear regimes. The magnetic field thus generated is unsteady and quadrupolar. These numerical evidences of dynamo action in a precessing cylindrical container may be useful for an experiment now planned at the Dresden sodium facility for dynamo and thermohydraulic studies in Germany.

  10. Magnetorotational dynamo chimeras. The missing link to turbulent accretion disk dynamo models?

    CERN Document Server

    Riols, A; Cossu, C; Lesur, G; Ogilvie, G I; Longaretti, P-Y

    2016-01-01

    In Keplerian accretion disks, turbulence and magnetic fields may be jointly excited through a subcritical dynamo process involving the magnetorotational instability (MRI). High-resolution simulations exhibit a tendency towards statistical self-organization of MRI dynamo turbulence into large-scale cyclic dynamics. Understanding the physical origin of these structures, and whether they can be sustained and transport angular momentum efficiently in astrophysical conditions, represents a significant theoretical challenge. The discovery of simple periodic nonlinear MRI dynamo solutions has recently proven useful in this respect, and has notably served to highlight the role of turbulent magnetic diffusion in the seeming decay of the dynamics at low magnetic Prandtl number Pm (magnetic diffusivity larger than viscosity), a common regime in accretion disks. The connection between these simple structures and the statistical organization reported in turbulent simulations remained elusive, though. Here, we report the n...

  11. Constraints on dynamo action in plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helander, P.; Strumik, M.; Schekochihin, A. A.

    2016-12-01

    Upper bounds are derived on the amount of magnetic energy that can be generated by dynamo action in collisional and collisionless plasmas with and without external forcing. A hierarchy of mathematical descriptions is considered for the plasma dynamics: ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), visco-resistive MHD, the double-adiabatic theory of Chew, Goldberger and Low (CGL), kinetic MHD and other kinetic models. It is found that dynamo action is greatly constrained in models where the magnetic moment of any particle species is conserved. In the absence of external forcing, the magnetic energy then remains small at all times if it is small in the initial state. In other words, a small `seed' magnetic field cannot be amplified significantly, regardless of the nature of flow, as long as the collision frequency and gyroradius are small enough to be negligible. A similar conclusion also holds if the system is subject to external forcing as long as this forcing conserves the magnetic moment of at least one plasma species and does not greatly increase the total energy of the plasma (i.e. in practice, is subsonic). Dynamo action therefore always requires collisions or some small-scale kinetic mechanism for breaking the adiabatic invariance of the magnetic moment.

  12. Convective Dynamo Simulation with a Grand Minimum

    CERN Document Server

    Augustson, Kyle; Miesch, Mark; Toomre, Juri

    2015-01-01

    The global-scale dynamo action achieved in a simulation of a Sun-like star rotating at thrice the solar rate is assessed. The 3-D MHD Anelastic Spherical Harmonic (ASH) code, augmented with a viscosity minimization scheme, is employed to capture convection and dynamo processes in this G-type star. The simulation is carried out in a spherical shell that encompasses 3.8 density scale heights of the solar convection zone. It is found that dynamo action with a high degree of time variation occurs, with many periodic polarity reversals occurring roughly every 6.2 years. The magnetic energy also rises and falls with a regular period. The magnetic energy cycles arise from a Lorentz-force feedback on the differential rotation, whereas the processes leading to polarity reversals are more complex, appearing to arise from the interaction of convection with the mean toroidal fields. Moreover, an equatorial migration of toroidal field is found, which is linked to the changing differential rotation, and potentially to a no...

  13. Galactic dynamos supported by magnetic helicity fluxes

    CERN Document Server

    Sur, S; Subramanian, K; Sur, Sharanya; Shukurov, Anvar; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2006-01-01

    We present a simple semi-analytical model of nonlinear, mean-field galactic dynamos and use it to study the effects of various magnetic helicity fluxes. The dynamo equations are reduced using the `no-$z$' approximation to a nonlinear system of ordinary differential equations in time; we demonstrate that the model reproduces accurately earlier results, including those where nonlinear behaviour is driven by a magnetic helicity flux. We discuss the implications and interplay of two types of magnetic helicity flux, one produced by advection (e.g., due to the galactic fountain or wind) and the other, arising from anisotropy of turbulence as suggested by Vishniac & Cho(2001). We argue that the latter is significant if the galactic differential rotation is strong enough: in our model, for $\\Rw\\la-10$ in terms of the corresponding turbulent magnetic Reynolds number. We confirm that the intensity of gas outflow from the galactic disc optimal for the dynamo action is close to that expected for normal spiral galaxie...

  14. Resonance in Forced Flux Transport Dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Gilman, Peter A

    2011-01-01

    We show that simple 2 and 3-layer flux-transport dynamos, when forced at the top by a poloidal source term, can produce a widely varying amplitude of toroidal field at the bottom, depending on how close the meridional flow speed of the bottom layer is to the propagation speed of the forcing applied above the top layer, and how close the amplitude of the $\\alpha$-effect is to two values that give rise to a resonant response. This effect should be present in this class of dynamo model no matter how many layers are included. This result could have implications for the prediction of future solar cycles from the surface magnetic fields of prior cycles. It could be looked for in flux-transport dynamos that are more realistic for the Sun, done in spherical geometry with differential rotation, meridional flow and $\\alpha$-effect that vary with latitude and time as well as radius. Because of these variations, if resonance occurs, it should be more localized in time, latitude and radius.

  15. Kinematic dynamo, supersymmetry breaking, and chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovchinnikov, Igor V.; Enßlin, Torsten A.

    2016-04-01

    The kinematic dynamo (KD) describes the growth of magnetic fields generated by the flow of a conducting medium in the limit of vanishing backaction of the fields onto the flow. The KD is therefore an important model system for understanding astrophysical magnetism. Here, the mathematical correspondence between the KD and a specific stochastic differential equation (SDE) viewed from the perspective of the supersymmetric theory of stochastics (STS) is discussed. The STS is a novel, approximation-free framework to investigate SDEs. The correspondence reported here permits insights from the STS to be applied to the theory of KD and vice versa. It was previously known that the fast KD in the idealistic limit of no magnetic diffusion requires chaotic flows. The KD-STS correspondence shows that this is also true for the diffusive KD. From the STS perspective, the KD possesses a topological supersymmetry, and the dynamo effect can be viewed as its spontaneous breakdown. This supersymmetry breaking can be regarded as the stochastic generalization of the concept of dynamical chaos. As this supersymmetry breaking happens in both the diffusive and the nondiffusive cases, the necessity of the underlying SDE being chaotic is given in either case. The observed exponentially growing and oscillating KD modes prove physically that dynamical spectra of the STS evolution operator that break the topological supersymmetry exist with both real and complex ground state eigenvalues. Finally, we comment on the nonexistence of dynamos for scalar quantities.

  16. The Alpha Dynamo Effects in Laboratory Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hantao Ji; Stewart C. Prager

    2001-10-16

    A concise review of observations of the alpha dynamo effect in laboratory plasmas is given. Unlike many astrophysical systems, the laboratory pinch plasmas are driven magnetically. When the system is overdriven, the resultant instabilities cause magnetic and flow fields to fluctuate, and their correlation induces electromotive forces along the mean magnetic field. This alpha-effect drives mean parallel electric current, which, in turn, modifies the initial background mean magnetic structure towards the stable regime. This drive-and-relax cycle, or the so-called self-organization process, happens in magnetized plasmas in a timescale much shorter than resistive diffusion time, thus it is a fast and unquenched dynamo process. The observed alpha-effect redistributes magnetic helicity (a measure of twistedness and knottedness of magnetic field lines) but conserves its total value. It can be shown that fast and unquenched dynamos are natural consequences of a driven system where fluctuations are statistically either not stationary in time or not homogeneous in space, or both. Implications to astrophysical phenomena will be discussed.

  17. MHD Turbulence, Turbulent Dynamo and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Beresnyak, Andrey

    2014-01-01

    MHD Turbulence is common in many space physics and astrophysics environments. We first discuss the properties of incompressible MHD turbulence. A well-conductive fluid amplifies initial magnetic fields in a process called small-scale dynamo. Below equipartition scale for kinetic and magnetic energies the spectrum is steep (Kolmogorov -5/3) and is represented by critically balanced strong MHD turbulence. In this paper we report the basic reasoning behind universal nonlinear small-scale dynamo and the inertial range of MHD turbulence. We measured the efficiency of the small-scale dynamo $C_E=0.05$, Kolmogorov constant $C_K=4.2$ and anisotropy constant $C_A=0.63$ for MHD turbulence in high-resolution direct numerical simulations. We also discuss so-called imbalanced or cross-helical MHD turbulence which is relevant for in many objects, most prominently in the solar wind. We show that properties of incompressible MHD turbulence are similar to the properties of Alfv\\'enic part of MHD cascade in compressible turbul...

  18. Source-based morphometry reveals distinct patterns of aberrant brain volume in delusional infestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Robert Ch; Huber, Markus; Lepping, Peter; Sambataro, Fabio; Depping, Malte S; Karner, Martin; Freudenmann, Roland W

    2014-01-03

    Little is known about the neural correlates of delusional infestation (DI), the delusional belief to be infested with pathogens. So far, evidence comes mainly from case reports and case series. We investigated brain morphology in 16 DI patients and 16 healthy controls using structural magnetic resonance imaging and a multivariate data analysis technique, i.e. source-based morphometry (SBM). In addition, we explored differences in brain structure in patient subgroups based on disease aetiology. SBM revealed two patterns exhibiting significantly (pdisorder) and "organic" DI (DI due to a medical condition). In contrast, aberrant white matter volume was only confirmed for the "organic" DI patient subgroup. These results suggest prefrontal, temporal, parietal, insular, thalamic and striatal dysfunction underlying DI. Moreover, the data suggest that aetiologically distinct presentations of DI share similar patterns of abnormal grey matter volume, whereas aberrant white matter volume appears to be restricted to organic cases. © 2013.

  19. Satellite altimetry reveals spatial patterns of variations in the Baltic Sea wave climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryavtseva, Nadezhda; Soomere, Tarmo

    2017-08-01

    The main properties of the climate of waves in the seasonally ice-covered Baltic Sea and its decadal changes since 1990 are estimated from satellite altimetry data. The data set of significant wave heights (SWHs) from all existing nine satellites, cleaned and cross-validated against in situ measurements, shows overall a very consistent picture. A comparison with visual observations shows a good correspondence with correlation coefficients of 0.6-0.8. The annual mean SWH reveals a tentative increase of 0.005 m yr-1, but higher quantiles behave in a cyclic manner with a timescale of 10-15 years. Changes in the basin-wide average SWH have a strong meridional pattern: an increase in the central and western parts of the sea and a decrease in the east. This pattern is likely caused by a rotation of wind directions rather than by an increase in the wind speed.

  20. Revealing daily travel patterns and city structure with taxi trip data

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Xi; Gong, Yongxi; Liu, Yu

    2013-01-01

    Detecting regional spatial structures based on spatial interactions is crucial in applications ranging from urban planning to traffic control. In the big data era, various movement trajectories are available for studying spatial structures. This research uses large scale Shanghai taxi trip data extracted from GPS-enabled taxi trajectories to reveal traffic flow patterns and urban structure of the city. Using the network science methods, 15 temporally stable regions reflecting the scope of people's daily travels are found using community detection method on the network built from short trips, which represent residents' daily intra-urban travels and exhibit a clear pattern. In each region, taxi traffic flows are dominated by a few 'hubs' and 'hubs' in suburbs impact more trips than 'hubs' in urban areas. Land use conditions in urban regions are different from those in suburban areas. Additionally, 'hubs' in urban area associate with office buildings and commercial areas more, whereas residential land use is mor...

  1. A BABCOCK–LEIGHTON SOLAR DYNAMO MODEL WITH MULTI-CELLULAR MERIDIONAL CIRCULATION IN ADVECTION- AND DIFFUSION-DOMINATED REGIMES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belucz, Bernadett; Forgács-Dajka, Emese [Eötvös University, Department of Astronomy, 1518 Budapest, Pf. 32 (Hungary); Dikpati, Mausumi, E-mail: bbelucz@astro.elte.hu, E-mail: dikpati@ucar.edu [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, 3080 Center Green, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 (United States)

    2015-06-20

    Babcock–Leighton type-solar dynamo models with single-celled meridional circulation are successful in reproducing many solar cycle features. Recent observations and theoretical models of meridional circulation do not indicate a single-celled flow pattern. We examine the role of complex multi-cellular circulation patterns in a Babcock–Leighton solar dynamo in advection- and diffusion-dominated regimes. We show from simulations that the presence of a weak, second, high-latitude reverse cell speeds up the cycle and slightly enhances the poleward branch in the butterfly diagram, whereas the presence of a second cell in depth reverses the tilt of the butterfly wing to an antisolar type. A butterfly diagram constructed from the middle of convection zone yields a solar-like pattern, but this may be difficult to realize in the Sun because of magnetic buoyancy effects. Each of the above cases behaves similarly in higher and lower magnetic diffusivity regimes. However, our dynamo with a meridional circulation containing four cells in latitude behaves distinctly differently in the two regimes, producing solar-like butterfly diagrams with fast cycles in the higher diffusivity regime, and complex branches in butterfly diagrams in the lower diffusivity regime. We also find that dynamo solutions for a four-celled pattern, two in radius and two in latitude, prefer to quickly relax to quadrupolar parity if the bottom flow speed is strong enough, of similar order of magnitude as the surface flow speed.

  2. Proteomic analysis of lysine acetylation sites in rat tissues reveals organ specificity and subcellular patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundby, Alicia; Hansen, Kasper Lage; Weinert, Brian Tate;

    2012-01-01

    ,541 proteins and provide the data set as a web-based database. We demonstrate that lysine acetylation displays site-specific sequence motifs that diverge between cellular compartments, with a significant fraction of nuclear sites conforming to the consensus motifs G-AcK and AcK-P. Our data set reveals...... that the subcellular acetylation distribution is tissue-type dependent and that acetylation targets tissue-specific pathways involved in fundamental physiological processes. We compare lysine acetylation patterns for rat as well as human skeletal muscle biopsies and demonstrate its general involvement in muscle...

  3. Shear dynamo, turbulence, and the magnetorotational instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, Jonathan

    The formation, evolution, and detailed structure of accretion disks remain poorly understood, with wide implications across a variety of astrophysical disciplines. While the most pressing question --- what causes the high angular momentum fluxes that are necessary to explain observations? --- is nicely answered by the idea that the disk is turbulent, a more complete grasp of the fundamental processes is necessary to capture the wide variety of behaviors observed in the night sky. This thesis studies the turbulence in ionized accretion disks from a theoretical standpoint, in particular focusing on the generation of magnetic fields in these processes, known as dynamo. Such fields are expected to be enormously important, both by enabling the magnetorotational instability (which evolves into virulent turbulence), and through large-scale structure formation, which may transport angular momentum in different ways and be fundamental for the formation of jets. The central result of this thesis is the suggestion of a new large-scale dynamo mechanism in shear flows --- the "magnetic shear-current effect" --- which relies on a positive feedback from small-scale magnetic fields. As well as being a very promising candidate for driving field generation in the central regions of accretion disks, this effect is interesting because small-scale magnetic fields have historically been considered to have a negative effect on the large-scale dynamo, damping growth and leading to dire predictions for final saturation amplitudes. Given that small-scale fields are ubiquitous in plasma turbulence above moderate Reynolds numbers, the finding that they could instead have a positive effect in some situations is interesting from a theoretical and practical standpoint. The effect is studied using direct numerical simulation, analytic techniques, and novel statistical simulation methods. In addition to the dynamo, much attention is given to the linear physics of disks and its relevance to

  4. Multiple oxygen tension environments reveal diverse patterns of transcriptional regulation in primary astrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne Chadwick

    Full Text Available The central nervous system normally functions at O(2 levels which would be regarded as hypoxic by most other tissues. However, most in vitro studies of neurons and astrocytes are conducted under hyperoxic conditions without consideration of O(2-dependent cellular adaptation. We analyzed the reactivity of astrocytes to 1, 4 and 9% O(2 tensions compared to the cell culture standard of 20% O(2, to investigate their ability to sense and translate this O(2 information to transcriptional activity. Variance of ambient O(2 tension for rat astrocytes resulted in profound changes in ribosomal activity, cytoskeletal and energy-regulatory mechanisms and cytokine-related signaling. Clustering of transcriptional regulation patterns revealed four distinct response pattern groups that directionally pivoted around the 4% O(2 tension, or demonstrated coherent ascending/decreasing gene expression patterns in response to diverse oxygen tensions. Immune response and cell cycle/cancer-related signaling pathway transcriptomic subsets were significantly activated with increasing hypoxia, whilst hemostatic and cardiovascular signaling mechanisms were attenuated with increasing hypoxia. Our data indicate that variant O(2 tensions induce specific and physiologically-focused transcript regulation patterns that may underpin important physiological mechanisms that connect higher neurological activity to astrocytic function and ambient oxygen environments. These strongly defined patterns demonstrate a strong bias for physiological transcript programs to pivot around the 4% O(2 tension, while uni-modal programs that do not, appear more related to pathological actions. The functional interaction of these transcriptional 'programs' may serve to regulate the dynamic vascular responsivity of the central nervous system during periods of stress or heightened activity.

  5. Transcription profiling reveals stage- and function-dependent expression patterns in the filarial nematode Brugia malayi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Ben-Wen

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brugia malayi is a nematode parasite that causes lymphatic filariasis, a disfiguring and disabiling tropical disease. Although a first draft genome sequence was released in 2007, very little is understood about transcription programs that govern developmental changes required for the parasite’s development and survival in its mammalian and insect hosts. Results We used a microarray with probes that represent some 85% of predicted genes to generate gene expression profiles for seven parasite life cycle stages/sexes. Approximately 41% of transcripts with detectable expression signals were differentially expressed across lifecycle stages. Twenty-six percent of transcripts were exclusively expressed in a single parasite stage, and 27% were expressed in all stages studied. K-means clustering of differentially expressed transcripts revealed five major transcription patterns that were associated with parasite lifecycle stages or gender. Examination of known stage-associated transcripts validated these data sets and suggested that newly identified stage or gender-associated transcripts may exercise biological functions in development and reproduction. The results also indicate that genes with similar transcription patterns were often involved in similar functions or cellular processes. For example, nuclear receptor family gene transcripts were upregulated in gene expression pattern four (female-enriched while protein kinase gene family transcripts were upregulated in expression pattern five (male-enriched. We also used pair-wise comparisons to identify transcriptional changes between life cycle stages and sexes. Conclusions Analysis of gene expression patterns of lifecycle in B. malayi has provided novel insights into the biology of filarial parasites. Proteins encoded by stage-associated and/or stage-specific transcripts are likely to be critically important for key parasite functions such as establishment and maintenance of

  6. Individual Movement Strategies Revealed through Novel Clustering of Emergent Movement Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, Denis; Cvetojevic, Sreten; Robertson, Ellen P.; Reichert, Brian E.; Hochmair, Hartwig H.; Fletcher, Robert J.

    2017-03-01

    Understanding movement is critical in several disciplines but analysis methods often neglect key information by adopting each location as sampling unit, rather than each individual. We introduce a novel statistical method that, by focusing on individuals, enables better identification of temporal dynamics of connectivity, traits of individuals that explain emergent movement patterns, and sites that play a critical role in connecting subpopulations. We apply this method to two examples that span movement networks that vary considerably in size and questions: movements of an endangered raptor, the snail kite (Rostrhamus sociabilis plumbeus), and human movement in Florida inferred from Twitter. For snail kites, our method reveals substantial differences in movement strategies for different bird cohorts and temporal changes in connectivity driven by the invasion of an exotic food resource, illustrating the challenge of identifying critical connectivity sites for conservation in the presence of global change. For human movement, our method is able to reliably determine the origin of Florida visitors and identify distinct movement patterns within Florida for visitors from different places, providing near real-time information on the spatial and temporal patterns of tourists. These results emphasize the need to integrate individual variation to generate new insights when modeling movement data.

  7. Complex evolutionary patterns revealed by mitochondrial genomes of the domestic horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, T; Li, J; Lin, K; Xiao, H; Wylie, S; Hua, S; Li, H; Zhang, Y-P

    2014-01-01

    The domestic horse is the most widely used and important stock and recreational animal, valued for its strength and endurance. The energy required by the domestic horse is mainly supplied by mitochondria via oxidative phosphorylation. Thus, selection may have played an essential role in the evolution of the horse mitochondria. Besides, demographic events also affect the DNA polymorphic pattern on mitochondria. To understand the evolutionary patterns of the mitochondria of the domestic horse, we used a deep sequencing approach to obtain the complete sequences of 15 mitochondrial genomes, and four mitochondrial gene sequences, ND6, ATP8, ATP6 and CYTB, collected from 509, 363, 363 and 409 domestic horses, respectively. Evidence of strong substitution rate heterogeneity was found at nonsynonymous sites across the genomes. Signatures of recent positive selection on mtDNA of domestic horse were detected. Specifically, five amino acids in the four mitochondrial genes were identified as the targets of positive selection. Coalescentbased simulations imply that recent population expansion is the most probable explanation for the matrilineal population history for domestic horse. Our findings reveal a complex pattern of non-neutral evolution of the mitochondrial genome in the domestic horses.

  8. Cell-material interactions revealed via material techniques of surface patterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xiang; Peng, Rong; Ding, Jiandong

    2013-10-04

    Cell-material interactions constitute a key fundamental topic in biomaterials study. Various cell cues and matrix cues as well as soluble factors regulate cell behaviors on materials. These factors are coupled with each other as usual, and thus it is very difficult to unambiguously elucidate the role of each regulator. The recently developed material techniques of surface patterning afford unique ways to reveal the underlying science. This paper reviews the pertinent material techniques to fabricate patterns of microscale and nanoscale resolutions, and corresponding cell studies. Some issues are emphasized, such as cell localization on patterned surfaces of chemical contrast, and effects of cell shape, cell size, cell-cell contact, and seeding density on differentiation of stem cells. Material cues to regulate cell adhesion, cell differentiation and other cell events are further summed up. Effects of some physical properties, such as surface topography and matrix stiffness, on cell behaviors are also discussed; nanoscaled features of substrate surfaces to regulate cell fate are summarized as well. The pertinent work sheds new insight into the cell-material interactions, and is stimulating for biomaterial design in regenerative medicine, tissue engineering, and high-throughput detection, diagnosis, and drug screening. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Analysis of surface protein expression reveals the growth pattern of the gram-negative outer membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tristan S Ursell

    Full Text Available The outer membrane (OM of Gram-negative bacteria is a complex bilayer composed of proteins, phospholipids, lipoproteins, and lipopolysaccharides. Despite recent advances revealing the molecular pathways underlying protein and lipopolysaccharide incorporation into the OM, the spatial distribution and dynamic regulation of these processes remain poorly understood. Here, we used sequence-specific fluorescent labeling to map the incorporation patterns of an OM-porin protein, LamB, by labeling proteins only after epitope exposure on the cell surface. Newly synthesized LamB appeared in discrete puncta, rather than evenly distributed over the cell surface. Further growth of bacteria after labeling resulted in divergence of labeled LamB puncta, consistent with a spatial pattern of OM growth in which new, unlabeled material was also inserted in patches. At the poles, puncta remained relatively stationary through several rounds of division, a salient characteristic of the OM protein population as a whole. We propose a biophysical model of growth in which patches of new OM material are added in discrete bursts that evolve in time according to Stokes flow and are randomly distributed over the cell surface. Simulations based on this model demonstrate that our experimental observations are consistent with a bursty insertion pattern without spatial bias across the cylindrical cell surface, with approximately one burst of ≈ 10(-2 µm(2 of OM material per two minutes per µm(2. Growth by insertion of discrete patches suggests that stochasticity plays a major role in patterning and material organization in the OM.

  10. Polar spots and stellar spindown: Is dynamo saturation needed?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Solanki, S. K.; Motamen, S.; Keppens, R.

    1997-01-01

    Dynamo saturation is often invoked when calculating the rotational evolution of cool stars. At rapid rotation rates a saturated dynamo reduces the angular momentum carried away by the stellar wind. This, in turn, may explain the high rotation rates present in the distribution of rotation periods in

  11. Numerical insights into magnetic dynamo action in a turbulent regime

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kenjeres, S.; Hanjalic, K.

    2007-01-01

    We report on hybrid numerical simulations of a turbulent magnetic dynamo. The simulated set-up mimics the Riga dynamo experiment characterized by Re ≈ 3.5 × 106 and (Gailitis et al 2000 Phys. Rev. Lett. 84 4365–8). The simulations were performed by a simultaneous fully coupled solution of the trans

  12. Polar spots and stellar spindown: is dynamo saturation needed?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Solanki, S. K.; Motamen, S.; Keppens, R.

    1997-01-01

    Dynamo saturation is often invoked when calculating the rotational evolution of cool stars. At rapid rotation rates a saturated dynamo reduces the angular momentum carried away by the stellar wind. This, in turn, may explain the high rotation rates present in the distribution of rotation periods in

  13. Helioseismic Constraints and Paradigm Shift in Solar Dynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Kosovichev, Alexander G; Zhao, Junwei

    2014-01-01

    Helioseismology provides important constraints for the solar dynamo problem. However, the basic properties and even the depth of the dynamo process, which operates also in other stars, are unknown. Most of the dynamo models suggest that the toroidal magnetic field that emerges on the surface and forms sunspots is generated near the bottom of the convection zone, in the tachocline. However, there is a number of theoretical and observational problems with justifying the deep-seated dynamo models. This leads to the idea that the subsurface angular velocity shear may play an important role in the solar dynamo. Using helioseismology measurements of the internal rotation and meridional circulation, we investigate a mean-field MHD model of dynamo distributed in the bulk of the convection zone but shaped in a near-surface layer. We show that if the boundary conditions at the top of the dynamo region allow the large-scale toroidal magnetic fields to penetrate into the surface, then the dynamo wave propagates along the...

  14. Polar spots and stellar spindown: Is dynamo saturation needed?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Solanki, S. K.; Motamen, S.; Keppens, R.

    1997-01-01

    Dynamo saturation is often invoked when calculating the rotational evolution of cool stars. At rapid rotation rates a saturated dynamo reduces the angular momentum carried away by the stellar wind. This, in turn, may explain the high rotation rates present in the distribution of rotation periods in

  15. Polar spots and stellar spindown: is dynamo saturation needed?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Solanki, S. K.; Motamen, S.; Keppens, R.

    1997-01-01

    Dynamo saturation is often invoked when calculating the rotational evolution of cool stars. At rapid rotation rates a saturated dynamo reduces the angular momentum carried away by the stellar wind. This, in turn, may explain the high rotation rates present in the distribution of rotation periods in

  16. Efficiency Measurement Using a Motor-Dynamo Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Pun-hon; Wong, Siu-ling; Mak, Se-yuen

    2009-01-01

    In this article, we describe a simple method which can be used to measure the efficiency of a low power dc motor, a motor-converted dynamo and a coupled motor-dynamo module as a function of the speed of rotation. The result can also be used to verify Faraday's law of electromagnetic induction. (Contains 1 table and 8 figures.)

  17. A two-layer $\\alpha\\omega$ dynamo model, and its implications for 1-D dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Roald, C B

    1999-01-01

    I will discuss an attempt at representing an interface dynamo in a simplified, essentially 1D framework. The operation of the dynamo is broken up into two 1D layers, one containing the $\\alpha$ effect and the other containing the $\\omega$ effect, and these two layers are allowed to communicate with each other by the simplest possible representation of diffusion, an analogue of Newton's law of cooling. Dynamical back-reaction of the magnetic field on them with diagrams I computed for a comparable purely 1D model. The bifurcation structure shows remarkable similarity, but a couple of subtle changes imply dramatically different physical behaviour for the model. In particular, the solar-like dynamo mode found in the 1-layer model is not stable in the 2-layer version; instead there is an (apparent) homoclinic bifurcation and a sequence of periodic, quasiperiodic, and chaotic modes. I argue that the fragility of these models makes them effectively useless as predictors or interpreters of more complex dynamos.

  18. Axial dipolar dynamo action in the Taylor-Green vortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krstulovic, Giorgio; Thorner, Gentien; Vest, Julien-Piera; Fauve, Stephan; Brachet, Marc

    2011-12-01

    We present a numerical study of the magnetic field generated by the Taylor-Green vortex. We show that periodic boundary conditions can be used to mimic realistic boundary conditions by prescribing the symmetries of the velocity and magnetic fields. This gives insight into some problems of central interest for dynamos: the possible effect of velocity fluctuations on the dynamo threshold, and the role of boundary conditions on the threshold and on the geometry of the magnetic field generated by dynamo action. In particular, we show that an axial dipolar dynamo similar to the one observed in a recent experiment can be obtained with an appropriate choice of the symmetries of the magnetic field. The nonlinear saturation is studied and a simple model explaining the magnetic Prandtl number dependence of the super- and subcritical nature of the dynamo transition is given.

  19. Persistence and origin of the lunar core dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suavet, Clément; Weiss, Benjamin P; Cassata, William S; Shuster, David L; Gattacceca, Jérôme; Chan, Lindsey; Garrick-Bethell, Ian; Head, James W; Grove, Timothy L; Fuller, Michael D

    2013-05-21

    The lifetime of the ancient lunar core dynamo has implications for its power source and the mechanism of field generation. Here, we report analyses of two 3.56-Gy-old mare basalts demonstrating that they were magnetized in a stable and surprisingly intense dynamo magnetic field of at least ~13 μT. These data extend the known lifetime of the lunar dynamo by ~160 My and indicate that the field was likely continuously active until well after the final large basin-forming impact. This likely excludes impact-driven changes in rotation rate as the source of the dynamo at this time in lunar history. Rather, our results require a persistent power source like precession of the lunar mantle or a compositional convection dynamo.

  20. Analytic solution of an oscillatory migratory alpha^2 stellar dynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Brandenburg, Axel

    2016-01-01

    Analytic solutions of the mean-field induction equation predict a nonoscillatory dynamo for uniform helical turbulence or constant alpha effect in unbounded or periodic domains. Oscillatory dynamos are generally thought impossible for constant alpha. We present an analytic solution for a one-dimensional bounded domain resulting in oscillatory solutions for constant alpha, but different (Dirichlet and von Neumann or perfect conductor and vacuum) boundary conditions on the two ends. We solve a second order complex equation and superimpose two independent solutions to obey both boundary conditions. The solution has time-independent energy density. On one end where the function value vanishes, the second derivative is finite, which would not be correctly reproduced with sine-like expansion functions where a node coincides with an inflection point. The obtained solution may serve as a benchmark for numerical dynamo experiments and as a pedagogical illustration that oscillatory dynamos are possible for dynamos with...

  1. Transition from large-scale to small-scale dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponty, Y; Plunian, F

    2011-04-15

    The dynamo equations are solved numerically with a helical forcing corresponding to the Roberts flow. In the fully turbulent regime the flow behaves as a Roberts flow on long time scales, plus turbulent fluctuations at short time scales. The dynamo onset is controlled by the long time scales of the flow, in agreement with the former Karlsruhe experimental results. The dynamo mechanism is governed by a generalized α effect, which includes both the usual α effect and turbulent diffusion, plus all higher order effects. Beyond the onset we find that this generalized α effect scales as O(Rm(-1)), suggesting the takeover of small-scale dynamo action. This is confirmed by simulations in which dynamo occurs even if the large-scale field is artificially suppressed.

  2. Could Giant Basin-Forming Impacts Have Killed Martian Dynamo?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, W.; Jiang, W.; Roberts, J.; Frey, H. V.

    2014-01-01

    The observed strong remanent crustal magnetization at the surface of Mars suggests an active dynamo in the past and ceased to exist around early to middle Noachian era, estimated by examining remagnetization strengths in extant and buried impact basins. We investigate whether the Martian dynamo could have been killed by these large basin-forming impacts, via numerical simulation of subcritical dynamos with impact-induced thermal heterogeneity across the core-mantle boundary. We find that subcritical dynamos are prone to the impacts centered on locations within 30 deg of the equator but can easily survive those at higher latitudes. Our results further suggest that magnetic timing places a strong constraint on postimpact polar reorientation, e.g., a minimum 16 deg polar reorientation is needed if Utopia is the dynamo killer.

  3. The Turbulent Dynamo in Highly Compressible Supersonic Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Federrath, Christoph; Bovino, Stefano; Schleicher, Dominik R G

    2014-01-01

    The turbulent dynamo may explain the origin of cosmic magnetism. While the exponential amplification of magnetic fields has been studied for incompressible gases, little is known about dynamo action in highly-compressible, supersonic plasmas, such as the interstellar medium of galaxies and the early Universe. Here we perform the first quantitative comparison of theoretical models of the dynamo growth rate and saturation level with three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical simulations of supersonic turbulence with grid resolutions of up to 1024^3 cells. We obtain numerical convergence and find that dynamo action occurs for both low and high magnetic Prandtl numbers Pm = nu/eta = 0.1-10 (the ratio of viscous to magnetic dissipation), which had so far only been seen for Pm >= 1 in supersonic turbulence. We measure the critical magnetic Reynolds number, Rm_crit = 129 (+43, -31), showing that the compressible dynamo is almost as efficient as in incompressible gas. Considering the physical conditions of the present a...

  4. Generation of dynamo magnetic fields in thin Keplerian disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepinski, T. F.; Levy, E. H.

    1990-01-01

    The combined action of nonuniform rotation and helical convection in protoplanetary disks, in the Galaxy, or in accretion disks surrounding black holes and other compact objects, enables an alpha-omega dynamo to generate a large-scale magnetic field. In this paper, the properties of such magnetic fields are investigated using a two-dimensional, partially numerical method. The structures of the lowest-order steady state and oscillatory modes are calculated for two kinds of external boundary conditions. A quadruple, steady state, highly localized mode is the most easily excited for low values of the dynamo number. The results indicate that, except under special conditions, disk dynamo modes tend to consist of relatively localized rings structures. For large values of the dynamo number, the magnetic field consists of a number of quasi-independent, spatially localized modes generated in various concentric rings filling the disk inward of a dynamo generation 'front'.

  5. Generation of dynamo magnetic fields in thin Keplerian disks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stepinski, T.F.; Levy, E.H. (Arizona Univ., Tucson (USA))

    1990-10-01

    The combined action of nonuniform rotation and helical convection in protoplanetary disks, in the Galaxy, or in accretion disks surrounding black holes and other compact objects, enables an alpha-omega dynamo to generate a large-scale magnetic field. In this paper, the properties of such magnetic fields are investigated using a two-dimensional, partially numerical method. The structures of the lowest-order steady state and oscillatory modes are calculated for two kinds of external boundary conditions. A quadruple, steady state, highly localized mode is the most easily excited for low values of the dynamo number. The results indicate that, except under special conditions, disk dynamo modes tend to consist of relatively localized rings structures. For large values of the dynamo number, the magnetic field consists of a number of quasi-independent, spatially localized modes generated in various concentric rings filling the disk inward of a dynamo generation front. 36 refs.

  6. On the connections between solar and stellar dynamo models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouve, Laurène; Kumar, Rohit

    2017-10-01

    We here discuss the various dynamo models which have been designed to explain the generation and evolution of large-scale magnetic fields in stars. We focus on the models that have been applied to the Sun and can be tested for other solar-type stars now that modern observational techniques provide us with detailed stellar magnetic field observations. Mean-field flux-transport dynamo models have been developed for decades to explain the solar cycle and applications to more rapidly-rotating stars are discussed. Tremendous recent progress has been made on 3D global convective dynamo models. They do not however for now produce regular flux emergence that could be responsible for surface active regions and questions about the role of these active regions in the dynamo mechanism are still difficult to address with such models. We finally discuss 3D kinematic dynamo models which could constitute a promising combined approach, in which data assimilation could be applied.

  7. The MSE Budget in Hindcast Experiments During DYNAMO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannah, W.; Maloney, E. D.

    2013-12-01

    The Dynamics of the MJO (DYNAMO) field campaign took place in the Indian Ocean during boreal fall and winter of 2011-2012 to collect observations of the initiation of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO). Hindcast experiments are conducted with an atmospheric general circulation model with varying values of a dilute CAPE entrainment rate parameter for the first two MJO events of DYNAMO from 01 October - 15 December 2011. Higher entrainment rates better reproduce the gross features of precipitation and zonal wind, with MJO hindcast skill up to 20 days. Simulations with lower entrainment rapidly diverge from observations such that no coherent MJO convective signal is present after five days, and the model has no MJO skill beyond 12 days. Analysis of the tropical Indian Ocean column moist static energy (MSE) budget reveals that the simulations with superior MJO performance are characterized by strong positive vertical MSE advection, indicating that convection and associated divergent circulations act to moisten the column. This is inconsistent with ERA-I reanalysis in which vertical MSE advection contributes a drying tendency on average. All simulations have weaker MSE tendency due to MSE sources such as radiation and surface fluxes compared to reanalysis. The concept of gross moist stability (GMS) is invoked to interpret these MSE budget results in a normalized framework relevant to moisture mode theory. A larger entrainment rate is found to produce negative effective GMS (which includes vertical advection and all MSE sources), in agreement with observations, indicating a favorable environment for moisture mode amplification. However, the simulations with higher entrainment appear to get the right answer for the wrong reason because unrealistically strong positive vertical MSE advective tendencies per unit convective activity appear to compensate for weak radiation and surface flux feedbacks.

  8. Solar Cycle 24 and the Solar Dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesnell, W. D.; Schatten, K.

    2007-01-01

    We will discuss the polar field precursor method for solar activity prediction, which predicts cycle 24 will be significantly lower than recent activity cycles, and some new ideas rejuvenating Babcock's shallow surface dynamo. The polar field precursor method is based on Babcock and Leighton's dynamo models wherein the polar field at solar minimum plays a major role in generating the next cycle's toroidal field and sunspots. Thus, by examining the polar fields of the Sun near solar minimum, a forecast for the next cycle's activity is obtained. With the current low value for the Sun's polar fields, this method predicts solar cycle 24 will be one of the lowest in recent times, with smoothed F10.7 radio flux values peaking near 135 plus or minus 35 (2 sigma), in the 2012-2013 timeframe (equivalent to smoothed Rz near 80 plus or minus 35 [2 sigma]). One may have to consider solar activity as far back as the early 20th century to find a cycle of comparable magnitude. We discuss unusual behavior in the Sun's polar fields that support this prediction. Normally, the solar precursor method is consistent with the geomagnetic precursor method, wherein geomagnetic variations are thought to be a good measure of the Sun's polar field strength. Because of the unusual polar field, the Earth does not appear to be currently bathed in the Sun's extended polar field (the interplanetary field), hence negating the primal cause behind the geomagnetic precursor technique. We also discuss how percolation may support Babcock's original shallow solar dynamo. In this process ephemeral regions from the solar magnetic carpet, guided by shallow surface fields, may collect to form pores and sunspots.

  9. Overview of the Madison Dynamo Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Nicholas Z.; Forest, C. B.; Kaplan, E. J.; Kendrick, R. D.; Nornberg, M. D.; Spence, E. J.

    2010-05-01

    The observation of the dynamo effect in a simply connected turbulent system has yet to be observed in the laboratory without the use of highly ferromagnetic materials. In the Madison Dynamo Experiment, two counter-rotating impellers drive a turbulent flow of liquid sodium in a one meter-diameter sphere. Two main results have been discovered so far: first, no sustained self-excited field was seen, but intermittent bursts of a transverse dipole field similar to the induced field predicted by laminar kinematics were observed. Second, a weak, DC external seed field, sharing the symmetry axis of the mean flow, was applied to the flowing sodium. Data modeling showed that the currents measured in the sodium could not be explained from the mean flow alone. However, the overall trend was consistent with an enhanced resistivity (a beta effect). These experiments have demonstrated the need for a turbulent electromotive force to describe the dynamics of the magnetic field evolution. This poster will present efforts to optimize the flow in order to observe spontaneous magnetic field generation as well as methods to characterize the turbulent EMF. The addition of an equatorial and poloidal baffles to the experiment will help in the reduction of large-scale turbulence and optimization of the helicity of the mean flow. A high current H-bridge signal generator has been constructed to apply 500 Gauss, sinusoidal fields with frequencies up to 10 Hz. The profile of the response will be measured by an internal array of 3D hall probes. This profile should provide an indication of the turbulent enhancement to resistivity. The strengthened externally applied field will also be used to explore a sub-critical dynamo transition that has recently been discovered in numerical simulations.

  10. Magnetic reversals from planetary dynamo waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sheyko, Andrey; Finlay, Chris; Jackson, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    place in Earth's core, but the precise mechanism is debated. The majority of numerical geodynamo simulations that exhibit reversals operate in a regime in which the viscosity of the fluid remains important, and in which the dynamo mechanism primarily involves stretching and twisting of field lines...... by columnar convection. Here we present an example of another class of reversing-geodynamo model, which operates in a regime of comparatively low viscosity and high magnetic diffusivity. This class does not fit into the paradigm of reversal regimes that are dictated by the value of the local Rossby number...

  11. The dynamo bifurcation in rotating spherical shells

    CERN Document Server

    Morin, Vincent; 10.1142/S021797920906378X

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the nature of the dynamo bifurcation in a configuration applicable to the Earth's liquid outer core, i.e. in a rotating spherical shell with thermally driven motions. We show that the nature of the bifurcation, which can be either supercritical or subcritical or even take the form of isola (or detached lobes) strongly depends on the parameters. This dependence is described in a range of parameters numerically accessible (which unfortunately remains remote from geophysical application), and we show how the magnetic Prandtl number and the Ekman number control these transitions.

  12. Objective vortex detection in an astrophysical dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rempel, E. L.; Chian, A. C.-L.; Beron-Vera, F. J.; Szanyi, S.; Haller, G.

    2017-03-01

    A novel technique for detecting Lagrangian vortices is applied to a helical magnetohydrodynamic dynamo simulation. The vortices are given by tubular level surfaces of the Lagrangian averaged vorticity deviation, the trajectory integral of the normed difference of the vorticity from its spatial mean. This simple method is objective, i.e. invariant under time-dependent rotations and translations of the coordinate frame. We also adapt the technique to use it on magnetic fields and propose the method of integrated averaged current deviation to determine precisely the boundary of magnetic vortices. The relevance of the results for the study of vortices in solar plasmas is discussed.

  13. Phylogeographic patterns of Merodon hoverflies in the Eastern Mediterranean region: revealing connections and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ståhls, Gunilla; Vujić, Ante; Petanidou, Theodora; Cardoso, Pedro; Radenković, Snezana; Ačanski, Jelena; Pérez Bañón, Celeste; Rojo, Santos

    2016-04-01

    We investigated the phylogeographic patterns of Merodon species (Diptera, Syrphidae) in the Eastern Mediterranean. Ten species were sampled on five different islands and mainland sites as a minimum. All samples were screened for their mtDNA COI barcode haplotype diversity, and for some samples, we additionally generated genomic fingerprints. The recently established zoogeographic distribution categories classify these species as having (1) Balkan distribution; (2) Anatolian distribution; (3) continental areas and large islands distribution; and (4) with wide distribution. The ancestral haplotypes and their geographical localities were estimated with statistical parsimony (TCS). TCS networks identified as the ancestral haplotype samples that originated from localities situated within the distributional category of the species in question. Strong geographical haplotype structuring was detected for many Merodon species. We were particularly interested to test the relative importance of current (Aegean Sea) and past Mid-Aegean Trench) barriers to dispersal for Merodon flies in the Aegean. We employed phylogenetic β-diversity (Pβ total) and its partition in replacement (Pβ repl) and richness difference (Pβ rich) to test the importance of each explanatory variable (interisland distance, MAT, and island area) in interisland differences using partial Mantel tests and hierarchical partitioning of variation. β-Analyses confirmed the importance of both current and past barriers to dispersal on the evolution of group. Current interisland distance was particularly important to explain the replacement of haplotypes, while the MAT was driving differences in richness of haplotypes, revealing the MAT as a strong past barrier whose effects are still visible today in the phylogenetic history of the clade in the Aegean. These results support the hypothesis of a highly restricted dispersal and gene flow among Merodon populations between islands since late Pleistocene. Additionally

  14. Magnetic material in mean-field dynamos driven by small scale helical flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giesecke, A.; Stefani, F.; Gerbeth, G.

    2014-07-01

    We perform kinematic simulations of dynamo action driven by a helical small scale flow of a conducting fluid in order to deduce mean-field properties of the combined induction action of small scale eddies. We examine two different flow patterns in the style of the G O Roberts flow but with a mean vertical component and with internal fixtures that are modelled by regions with vanishing flow. These fixtures represent either rods that lie in the center of individual eddies, or internal dividing walls that provide a separation of the eddies from each other. The fixtures can be made of magnetic material with a relative permeability larger than one which can alter the dynamo behavior. The investigations are motivated by the widely unknown induction effects of the forced helical flow that is used in the core of liquid sodium cooled fast reactors, and from the key role of soft iron impellers in the von-Kármán-sodium dynamo. For both examined flow configurations the consideration of magnetic material within the fluid flow causes a reduction of the critical magnetic Reynolds number of up to 25%. The development of the growth-rate in the limit of the largest achievable permeabilities suggests no further significant reduction for even larger values of the permeability. In order to study the dynamo behavior of systems that consist of tens of thousands of helical cells we resort to the mean-field dynamo theory (Krause and Rädler 1980 Mean-field Magnetohydrodynamics and Dynamo Theory (Oxford: Pergamon)) in which the action of the small scale flow is parameterized in terms of an α- and β-effect. We compute the relevant elements of the α- and the β-tensor using the so called testfield method. We find a reasonable agreement between the fully resolved models and the corresponding mean-field models for wall or rod materials in the considered range 1\\leqslant {{\\mu }_{r}}\\leqslant 20. Our results may be used for the development of global large scale models with recirculation

  15. 13C Tracking after 13CO2 Supply Revealed Diurnal Patterns of Wood Formation in Aspen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahboubi, Amir; Linden, Pernilla; Hedenström, Mattias; Moritz, Thomas; Niittylä, Totte

    2015-06-01

    Wood of trees is formed from carbon assimilated in the photosynthetic tissues. Determining the temporal dynamics of carbon assimilation, subsequent transport into developing wood, and incorporation to cell walls would further our understanding of wood formation in particular and tree growth in general. To investigate these questions, we designed a (13)CO2 labeling system to study carbon transport and incorporation to developing wood of hybrid aspen (Populus tremula × tremuloides). Tracking of (13)C incorporation to wood over a time course using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed diurnal patterns in wood cell wall biosynthesis. The dark period had a differential effect on (13)C incorporation to lignin and cell wall carbohydrates. No (13)C was incorporated into aromatic amino acids of cell wall proteins in the dark, suggesting that cell wall protein biosynthesis ceased during the night. The results show previously unrecognized temporal patterns in wood cell wall biosynthesis, suggest diurnal cycle as a possible cue in the regulation of carbon incorporation to wood, and establish a unique (13)C labeling method for the analysis of wood formation and secondary growth in trees.

  16. Arterial spin labelling reveals an abnormal cerebral perfusion pattern in Parkinson’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Richard; MacAskill, Michael R.; Pearson, John F.; Rüeger, Sina; Pitcher, Toni L.; Livingston, Leslie; Graham, Charlotte; Keenan, Ross; Shankaranarayanan, Ajit; Alsop, David C.; Dalrymple-Alford, John C.; Anderson, Tim J.

    2011-01-01

    There is a need for objective imaging markers of Parkinson’s disease status and progression. Positron emission tomography and single photon emission computed tomography studies have suggested patterns of abnormal cerebral perfusion in Parkinson’s disease as potential functional biomarkers. This study aimed to identify an arterial spin labelling magnetic resonance-derived perfusion network as an accessible, non-invasive alternative. We used pseudo-continuous arterial spin labelling to measure cerebral grey matter perfusion in 61 subjects with Parkinson’s disease with a range of motor and cognitive impairment, including patients with dementia and 29 age- and sex-matched controls. Principal component analysis was used to derive a Parkinson’s disease-related perfusion network via logistic regression. Region of interest analysis of absolute perfusion values revealed that the Parkinson’s disease pattern was characterized by decreased perfusion in posterior parieto-occipital cortex, precuneus and cuneus, and middle frontal gyri compared with healthy controls. Perfusion was preserved in globus pallidus, putamen, anterior cingulate and post- and pre-central gyri. Both motor and cognitive statuses were significant factors related to network score. A network approach, supported by arterial spin labelling-derived absolute perfusion values may provide a readily accessible neuroimaging method to characterize and track progression of both motor and cognitive status in Parkinson’s disease. PMID:21310726

  17. Patterned biofilm formation reveals a mechanism for structural heterogeneity in bacterial biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Huan; Hou, Shuyu; Yongyat, Chanokpon; De Tore, Suzanne; Ren, Dacheng

    2013-09-03

    Bacterial biofilms are ubiquitous and are the major cause of chronic infections in humans and persistent biofouling in industry. Despite the significance of bacterial biofilms, the mechanism of biofilm formation and associated drug tolerance is still not fully understood. A major challenge in biofilm research is the intrinsic heterogeneity in the biofilm structure, which leads to temporal and spatial variation in cell density and gene expression. To understand and control such structural heterogeneity, surfaces with patterned functional alkanthiols were used in this study to obtain Escherichia coli cell clusters with systematically varied cluster size and distance between clusters. The results from quantitative imaging analysis revealed an interesting phenomenon in which multicellular connections can be formed between cell clusters depending on the size of interacting clusters and the distance between them. In addition, significant differences in patterned biofilm formation were observed between wild-type E. coli RP437 and some of its isogenic mutants, indicating that certain cellular and genetic factors are involved in interactions among cell clusters. In particular, autoinducer-2-mediated quorum sensing was found to be important. Collectively, these results provide missing information that links cell-to-cell signaling and interaction among cell clusters to the structural organization of bacterial biofilms.

  18. Nanoscale electrochemical patterning reveals the active sites for catechol oxidation at graphite surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Anisha N; McKelvey, Kim; Unwin, Patrick R

    2012-12-19

    Graphite-based electrodes (graphite, graphene, and nanotubes) are used widely in electrochemistry, and there is a long-standing view that graphite step edges are needed to catalyze many reactions, with the basal surface considered to be inert. In the present work, this model was tested directly for the first time using scanning electrochemical cell microscopy reactive patterning and shown to be incorrect. For the electro-oxidation of dopamine as a model process, the reaction rate was measured at high spatial resolution across a surface of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. Oxidation products left behind in a pattern defined by the scanned electrochemical cell served as surface-site markers, allowing the electrochemical activity to be correlated directly with the graphite structure on the nanoscale. This process produced tens of thousands of electrochemical measurements at different locations across the basal surface, unambiguously revealing it to be highly electrochemically active, with step edges providing no enhanced activity. This new model of graphite electrodes has significant implications for the design of carbon-based biosensors, and the results are additionally important for understanding electrochemical processes on related sp(2)-hybridized materials such as pristine graphene and nanotubes.

  19. On Magnetic Dynamos in Thin Accretion Disks around Compact and Young Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepinski, T. F.

    1993-01-01

    A variety of geometrically thin accretion disks commonly associated with such astronomical objects as X-ray binaries, cataclysmic variables, and protostars are likely to be seats of MHD dynamo actions. Thin disk geometry and the particular physical environment make accretion disk dynamos different from stellar, planetary, or even galactic dynamos. We discuss those particular features of disk dynamos with emphasis on the difference between protoplanetary disk dynamos and those associated with compact stars. We then describe normal mode solutions for thin disk dynamos and discuss implications for the dynamical behavior of dynamo-magnetized accretion disks.

  20. Feasibility study of spectral pattern recognition reveals distinct classes of volcanic tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unglert, K.; Jellinek, A. M.

    2017-04-01

    Systematic investigations of the similarities and differences among volcanic tremor at a range of volcano types may hold crucial information about the plausibility of inferred source mechanisms, which, in turn, may be important for eruption forecasting. However, such studies are rare, in part because of an intrinsic difficulty with identifying tremor signals within very long time series of volcano seismic data. Accordingly, we develop an efficient tremor detection algorithm and identify over 12,000h of volcanic tremor on 24 stations at Kīlauea, Okmok, Pavlof, and Redoubt volcanoes. We estimate spectral content over 5-minute tremor windows, and apply a novel combination of Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and hierarchical clustering to identify patterns in the tremor spectra. Analyzing several stations from a given volcano together reveals different styles of tremor within individual volcanic settings. In addition to identifying tremor properties common to all stations in a given network, we find localized tremor signals including those related to processes such as lahars or dike intrusions that are only observed on some of the stations within a network. Subsequent application of our analysis to a combination of stations from the different volcanoes reveals that at least three main tremor classes can be detected across all settings. Whereas a regime with a ridge of high power distributed over 1-2Hz and a gradual decay of spectral power towards higher frequencies is observed dominantly at three volcanoes (Kīlauea, Okmok, Redoubt) with magma reservoirs centered at less than 5km below sea level (b.s.l.), a spectrum with a steeper slope and a narrower peak at 1-2Hz is observed only in association with open vents (Kīlauea and Pavlof). A third regime with a peak at approximately 3Hz is confined to two stratovolcanoes (Pavlof and Redoubt). These observations suggest generic relationships between the spectral character of the observed signals and volcano

  1. Stable isotopes reveal ecotypic variation of water uptake patterns in Aleppo pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrio, Juan Pedro; Lucabaugh, Devon; Chambel, Regina; Voltas, Jordi

    2014-05-01

    Aleppo pine (Pinus halepensis Mill.) has a large natural distribution range that encompasses a multitude of thermal and moisture conditions found in the Mediterranean basin. We hypothesized that due to the recurrent incidences of drought stress and high temperatures that occur at varying degrees along its distribution range, populations of Aleppo pine have undergone ecotypic differentiation in soil water uptake patterns. This study analyzed stable isotopic compositions (δ18O and δ2H) of xylem water to identify adaptive divergence associated to the pattern of soil water consumption by roots of Aleppo pine populations originating from the Mediterranean region. The results from this study show that genetic diversity in the extraction pattern of soil water can be found among populations and ecological regions of Aleppo pine under common garden conditions. However, the ability to detect such differences depended on the period of the year examined. In particular, data collection in full summer (end of July) proved to be the most adequate in revealing genetic divergence among populations, while end of spring and, to a lesser extent, end of summer, were less successful for this purpose. Both water uptake patterns (as estimated by δ18O and δ2H) and above-ground growth, exhibited significant relationships with both climatic and geographical variables. This suggests that the underlying variation among populations can be explained by certain characteristics at origin. In addition, we used a bayesian mixing model (SIAR package for R) that incorporated isotopic signatures from xylem and soil water in order to determine the predominant soil layer of water source consumption at the aforementioned periods of the growing season, where water availably ranged from lowest to highest. This allowed us to gain some understanding of Aleppo pines' differential reaction to drought, at the intraspecific level, across the fluctuating conditions of the growing season by comparing the

  2. Superbubbles, Galactic Dynamos and the Spike Instability

    CERN Document Server

    Kulsrud, Russell M

    2015-01-01

    We draw attention to a problem with the alpha-Omega dynamo when it is applied to the origin of the galactic magnetic field under the assumption of perfect flux freezing. The standard theory involves the expulsion of undesirable flux and, because of flux freezing, the mass anchored on this flux also must be expelled. The strong galactic gravitational field makes this impossible on energetic grounds. It is shown that if only short pieces of the undesirable field lines are expelled, then mass can flow down along these field lines without requiring much energy. This expulsion of only short lines of force can be accomplished by a spike instability associated with gigantic astrophysical superbubbles. The physics of this instability is discussed and the results enable an estimate to be made of the number of spikes in the galaxy. It appears that there are probably enough spikes to cut all the undesirable lines into pieces as short as a couple of kiloparsecs during a dynamo time of a billion years. These cut pieces th...

  3. Two spinning ways for precession dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappanera, L; Guermond, J-L; Léorat, J; Nore, C

    2016-04-01

    It is numerically demonstrated by means of a magnetohydrodynamic code that precession can trigger dynamo action in a cylindrical container. Fixing the angle between the spin and the precession axis to be 1/2π, two limit configurations of the spinning axis are explored: either the symmetry axis of the cylinder is parallel to the spin axis (this configuration is henceforth referred to as the axial spin case), or it is perpendicular to the spin axis (this configuration is referred to as the equatorial spin case). In both cases, the centro-symmetry of the flow breaks when the kinetic Reynolds number increases. Equatorial spinning is found to be more efficient in breaking the centro-symmetry of the flow. In both cases, the average flow in the reference frame of the mantle converges to a counter-rotation with respect to the spin axis as the Reynolds number grows. We find a scaling law for the average kinetic energy in term of the Reynolds number in the axial spin case. In the equatorial spin case, the unsteady asymmetric flow is shown to be capable of sustaining dynamo action in the linear and nonlinear regimes. The magnetic field is mainly dipolar in the equatorial spin case, while it is is mainly quadrupolar in the axial spin case.

  4. Optimal Length Scale for a Turbulent Dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadek, Mira; Alexakis, Alexandros; Fauve, Stephan

    2016-02-19

    We demonstrate that there is an optimal forcing length scale for low Prandtl number dynamo flows that can significantly reduce the required energy injection rate. The investigation is based on simulations of the induction equation in a periodic box of size 2πL. The flows considered are the laminar and turbulent ABC flows forced at different forcing wave numbers k_{f}, where the turbulent case is simulated using a subgrid turbulence model. At the smallest allowed forcing wave number k_{f}=k_{min}=1/L the laminar critical magnetic Reynolds number Rm_{c}^{lam} is more than an order of magnitude smaller than the turbulent critical magnetic Reynolds number Rm_{c}^{turb} due to the hindering effect of turbulent fluctuations. We show that this hindering effect is almost suppressed when the forcing wave number k_{f} is increased above an optimum wave number k_{f}L≃4 for which Rm_{c}^{turb} is minimum. At this optimal wave number, Rm_{c}^{turb} is smaller by more than a factor of 10 than the case forced in k_{f}=1. This leads to a reduction of the energy injection rate by 3 orders of magnitude when compared to the case where the system is forced at the largest scales and thus provides a new strategy for the design of a fully turbulent experimental dynamo.

  5. Constraints on dynamo action in plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Helander, P; Schekochihin, A A

    2016-01-01

    Upper bounds are derived on the amount of magnetic energy that can be generated by dynamo action in collisional and collisionless plasmas with and without external forcing. A hierarchy of mathematical descriptions is considered for the plasma dynamics: ideal MHD, visco-resistive MHD, the double-adiabatic theory of Chew, Goldberger and Low (CGL), kinetic MHD, and other kinetic models. It is found that dynamo action is greatly constrained in models where the magnetic moment of any particle species is conserved. In the absence of external forcing, the magnetic energy then remains small at all times if it is small in the initial state. In other words, a small "seed" magnetic field cannot be amplified significantly, regardless of the nature of flow, as long as the collision frequency and gyroradius are small enough to be negligible. A similar conclusion also holds if the system is subject to external forcing as long as this forcing conserves the magnetic moment of at least one plasma species and does not greatly i...

  6. Kinematic Dynamo, Supersymmetry Breaking, and Chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Ovchinnikov, Igor V

    2015-01-01

    The kinematic dynamo (KD) describes the growth of magnetic fields generated by the flow of a conducting medium in the limit of vanishing backaction of the fields onto the flow. The KD is therefore an important model system for understanding astrophysical magnetism. Here, the mathematical correspondence between the KD and a specific stochastic differential equation (SDE) viewed from the perspective of the supersymmetric theory of stochastics (STS) is discussed. The STS is a novel, approximation-free framework to investigate SDEs. The correspondence reported here permits insights from the STS to be applied to the theory of KD and vice versa. It was previously known that the fast KD in the idealistic limit of no magnetic diffusion requires chaotic flows. The KD-STS correspondence shows that this is also true for the diffusive KD. From the STS perspective, the KD possesses a topological supersymmetry and the dynamo effect can be viewed as its spontaneous breakdown. This supersymmetry breaking can be regarded as t...

  7. On the mean-field theory of the Karlsruhe Dynamo Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.-H. Rädler

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe an experiment has been constructed which demonstrates a homogeneous dynamo as is expected to exist in the Earth's interior. This experiment is discussed within the framework of mean-field dynamo theory. The main predictions of this theory are explained and compared with the experimental results. Key words. Dynamo, geodynamo, dynamo experiment, mean-field dynamo theory, a-effect

  8. Stretch fast dynamo mechanism via conformal mapping in Riemannian manifolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia de Andrade, L. C.

    2007-10-01

    Two new analytical solutions of the self-induction equation in Riemannian manifolds are presented. The first represents a twisted magnetic flux tube or flux rope in plasma astrophysics, where the rotation of the flow implies that the poloidal field is amplified from toroidal field, in the spirit of dynamo theory. The value of the amplification depends on the Frenet torsion of the magnetic axis of the tube. Actually this result illustrates the Zeldovich stretch, twist, and fold method to generate dynamos from straight and untwisted ropes. Based on the fact that this problem was previously handled, using a Riemannian geometry of twisted magnetic flux ropes [Phys Plasmas 13, 022309 (2006)], investigation of a second dynamo solution, conformally related to the Arnold kinematic fast dynamo, is obtained. In this solution, it is shown that the conformal effect on the fast dynamo metric enhances the Zeldovich stretch, and therefore a new dynamo solution is obtained. When a conformal mapping is performed in an Arnold fast dynamo line element, a uniform stretch is obtained in the original line element.

  9. Magnetic material in mean-field dynamos driven by small scale helical flows

    CERN Document Server

    Giesecke, Andre; Gerbeth, Gunter

    2014-01-01

    We perform kinematic simulations of dynamo action driven by a helical small scale flow of a conducting fluid in order to deduce mean-field properties of the combined induction action of small scale eddies. We examine two different flow patterns in the style of the G.O. Roberts flow but with a mean vertical component and with internal fixtures that are modelled by regions with vanishing flow. These fixtures represent either rods that lie in the center of individual eddies, or internal dividing walls that provide a separation of the eddies from each other. The fixtures can be made of magnetic material with a relative permeability larger than one which can alter the dynamo behavior. The investigations are motivated by the widely unknown induction effects of the forced helical flow that is used in the core of liquid sodium cooled fast reactors, and from the key role of soft iron impellers in the von-K\\'arm\\'an-Sodium (VKS) dynamo. For both examined flow configurations the consideration of magnetic material within...

  10. Is a deep one-cell meridional circulation essential for the flux transport Solar Dynamo?

    CERN Document Server

    Hazra, Gopal; Choudhuri, Arnab Rai

    2014-01-01

    The solar activity cycle is successfully modeled by the flux transport dynamo, in which the meridional circulation of the Sun plays an important role. Most of the kinematic dynamo simulations assume a one-cell structure of the meridional circulation within the convection zone, with the equatorward return flow at its bottom. In view of the recent claims that the return flow occurs at a much shallower depth, we explore whether a meridional circulation with such a shallow return flow can still retain the attractive features of the flux transport dynamo (such as proper butterfly diagram, proper phase relation between the toroidal and poloidal fields). We consider additional cells of the meridional circulation below the shallow return flow---both the case of multiple cells radially stacked above one another and the case of more complicated cell patterns. As long as there is an equatorward flow in low latitudes at the bottom of the convection zone, we find that the solar behavior is approximately reproduced. Howeve...

  11. Patterns of hybrid loss of imprinting reveal tissue- and cluster-specific regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher D Wiley

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Crosses between natural populations of two species of deer mice, Peromyscus maniculatus (BW, and P. polionotus (PO, produce parent-of-origin effects on growth and development. BW females mated to PO males (bwxpo produce growth-retarded but otherwise healthy offspring. In contrast, PO females mated to BW males (POxBW produce overgrown and severely defective offspring. The hybrid phenotypes are pronounced in the placenta and include POxBW conceptuses which lack embryonic structures. Evidence to date links variation in control of genomic imprinting with the hybrid defects, particularly in the POxBW offspring. Establishment of genomic imprinting is typically mediated by gametic DNA methylation at sites known as gDMRs. However, imprinted gene clusters vary in their regulation by gDMR sequences. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we further assess imprinted gene expression and DNA methylation at different cluster types in order to discern patterns. These data reveal POxBW misexpression at the Kcnq1ot1 and Peg3 clusters, both of which lose ICR methylation in placental tissues. In contrast, some embryonic transcripts (Peg10, Kcnq1ot1 reactivated the silenced allele with little or no loss of DNA methylation. Hybrid brains also display different patterns of imprinting perturbations. Several cluster pairs thought to use analogous regulatory mechanisms are differentially affected in the hybrids. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data reinforce the hypothesis that placental and somatic gene regulation differs significantly, as does that between imprinted gene clusters and between species. That such epigenetic regulatory variation exists in recently diverged species suggests a role in reproductive isolation, and that this variation is likely to be adaptive.

  12. Evolutionarily Conserved Pattern of Interactions in a Protein Revealed by Local Thermal Expansion Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellarole, Mariano; Caro, Jose A; Roche, Julien; Fossat, Martin; Barthe, Philippe; García-Moreno E, Bertrand; Royer, Catherine A; Roumestand, Christian

    2015-07-29

    The way in which the network of intramolecular interactions determines the cooperative folding and conformational dynamics of a protein remains poorly understood. High-pressure NMR spectroscopy is uniquely suited to examine this problem because it combines the site-specific resolution of the NMR experiments with the local character of pressure perturbations. Here we report on the temperature dependence of the site-specific volumetric properties of various forms of staphylococcal nuclease (SNase), including three variants with engineered internal cavities, as measured with high-pressure NMR spectroscopy. The strong temperature dependence of pressure-induced unfolding arises from poorly understood differences in thermal expansion between the folded and unfolded states. A significant inverse correlation was observed between the global thermal expansion of the folded proteins and the number of strong intramolecular hydrogen bonds, as determined by the temperature coefficient of the backbone amide chemical shifts. Comparison of the identity of these strong H-bonds with the co-evolution of pairs of residues in the SNase protein family suggests that the architecture of the interactions detected in the NMR experiments could be linked to a functional aspect of the protein. Moreover, the temperature dependence of the residue-specific volume changes of unfolding yielded residue-specific differences in expansivity and revealed how mutations impact intramolecular interaction patterns. These results show that intramolecular interactions in the folded states of proteins impose constraints against thermal expansion and that, hence, knowledge of site-specific thermal expansivity offers insight into the patterns of strong intramolecular interactions and other local determinants of protein stability, cooperativity, and potentially also of function.

  13. Immunoprofiling reveals unique cell-specific patterns of wall epitopes in the expanding Arabidopsis stem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Hardy C; Cheung, Jingling; Ellis, Brian E

    2013-04-01

    The Arabidopsis inflorescence stem undergoes rapid directional growth, requiring massive axial cell-wall extension in all its tissues, but, at maturity, these tissues are composed of cell types that exhibit markedly different cell-wall structures. It is not clear whether the cell-wall compositions of these cell types diverge rapidly following axial growth cessation, or whether compositional divergence occurs at earlier stages in differentiation, despite the common requirement for cell-wall extensibility. To examine this question, seven cell types were assayed for the abundance and distribution of 18 major cell-wall glycan classes at three developmental stages along the developing inflorescence stem, using a high-throughput immunolabelling strategy. These stages represent a phase of juvenile growth, a phase displaying the maximum rate of stem extension, and a phase in which extension growth is ceasing. The immunolabelling patterns detected demonstrate that the cell-wall composition of most stem tissues undergoes pronounced changes both during and after rapid extension growth. Hierarchical clustering of the immunolabelling signals identified cell-specific binding patterns for some antibodies, including a sub-group of arabinogalactan side chain-directed antibodies whose epitope targets are specifically associated with the inter-fascicular fibre region during the rapid cell expansion phase. The data reveal dynamic, cell type-specific changes in cell-wall chemistry across diverse cell types during cell-wall expansion and maturation in the Arabidopsis inflorescence stem, and highlight the paradox between this structural diversity and the uniform anisotropic cell expansion taking place across all tissues during stem growth.

  14. Multivariate pattern analysis reveals anatomical connectivity differences between the left and right mesial temporal lobe epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Fang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have demonstrated differences of clinical signs and functional brain network organizations between the left and right mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE, but the anatomical connectivity differences underlying functional variance between the left and right mTLE remain uncharacterized. We examined 43 (22 left, 21 right mTLE patients with hippocampal sclerosis and 39 healthy controls using diffusion tensor imaging. After the whole-brain anatomical networks were constructed for each subject, multivariate pattern analysis was applied to classify the left mTLE from the right mTLE and extract the anatomical connectivity differences between the left and right mTLE patients. The classification results reveal 93.0% accuracy for the left mTLE versus the right mTLE, 93.4% accuracy for the left mTLE versus controls and 90.0% accuracy for the right mTLE versus controls. Compared with the right mTLE, the left mTLE exhibited a different connectivity pattern in the cortical-limbic network and cerebellum. The majority of the most discriminating anatomical connections were located within or across the cortical-limbic network and cerebellum, thereby indicating that these disease-related anatomical network alterations may give rise to a portion of the complex of emotional and memory deficit between the left and right mTLE. Moreover, the orbitofrontal gyrus, cingulate cortex, hippocampus and parahippocampal gyrus, which exhibit high discriminative power in classification, may play critical roles in the pathophysiology of mTLE. The current study demonstrated that anatomical connectivity differences between the left mTLE and the right mTLE may have the potential to serve as a neuroimaging biomarker to guide personalized diagnosis of the left and right mTLE.

  15. Spatial patterns of African ungulate aggregation reveal complex but limited risk effects from reintroduced carnivores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moll, Remington J; Killion, Alexander K; Montgomery, Robert A; Tambling, Craig J; Hayward, Matt W

    2016-05-01

    The "landscape of fear" model, recently advanced in research on the non-lethal effects of carnivores on ungulates, predicts that prey will exhibit detectable antipredator behavior not only during risky times (i.e., predators in close proximity) but also in risky places (i.e., habitat where predators kill prey or tend to occur). Aggregation is an important antipredator response in numerous ungulate species, making it a useful metric to evaluate the strength and scope of the landscape of fear in a multi-carnivore, multi-ungulate system. We conducted ungulate surveys over a 2-year period in South Africa to test the influence of three broad-scale sources of variation in the landscape on spatial patterns in aggregation: (1) habitat structure, (2) where carnivores tended to occur (i.e., population-level utilization distributions), and (3) where carnivores tended to kill ungulate prey (i.e., probabilistic kill site maps). We analyzed spatial variation in aggregation for six ungulate species exposed to predation from recently reintroduced lion (Panthera leo) and spotted hyena (Crocuta crocuta). Although we did detect larger aggregations of ungulates in "risky places," these effects existed primarily for smaller-bodied (lion, an ambush (stalking) carnivore, had stronger influence on ungulate aggregation than the hyena, an active (coursing) carnivore. In addition, places where lions tended to kill prey had a greater effect on ungulate aggregation than places where lions tended to occur, but an opposing pattern existed for hyena. Our study reveals heterogeneity in the landscape of fear and suggests broad-scale risk effects following carnivore reintroduction only moderately influence ungulate aggregation size and vary considerably by predator hunting mode, type of predation risk, and prey species.

  16. Functional redundancy patterns reveal non-random assembly rules in a species-rich marine assemblage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Guillemot

    Full Text Available The relationship between species and the functional diversity of assemblages is fundamental in ecology because it contains key information on functional redundancy, and functionally redundant ecosystems are thought to be more resilient, resistant and stable. However, this relationship is poorly understood and undocumented for species-rich coastal marine ecosystems. Here, we used underwater visual censuses to examine the patterns of functional redundancy for one of the most diverse vertebrate assemblages, the coral reef fishes of New Caledonia, South Pacific. First, we found that the relationship between functional and species diversity displayed a non-asymptotic power-shaped curve, implying that rare functions and species mainly occur in highly diverse assemblages. Second, we showed that the distribution of species amongst possible functions was significantly different from a random distribution up to a threshold of ∼90 species/transect. Redundancy patterns for each function further revealed that some functions displayed fast rates of increase in redundancy at low species diversity, whereas others were only becoming redundant past a certain threshold. This suggested non-random assembly rules and the existence of some primordial functions that would need to be fulfilled in priority so that coral reef fish assemblages can gain a basic ecological structure. Last, we found little effect of habitat on the shape of the functional-species diversity relationship and on the redundancy of functions, although habitat is known to largely determine assemblage characteristics such as species composition, biomass, and abundance. Our study shows that low functional redundancy is characteristic of this highly diverse fish assemblage, and, therefore, that even species-rich ecosystems such as coral reefs may be vulnerable to the removal of a few keystone species.

  17. [A case of optic neuritis associated with lymphocytic hypophysitis revealed by pattern-reversal VEP].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Satoshi; Mori, Chiaki; Toma, Keiichiro; Kubori, Tamotsu; Nishinaka, Kazuto; Udaka, Fukashi

    2011-01-01

    Lymphocytic hypophysitis (LYH) is a rare neuroendocrine disorder characterized by autoimmune inflammation of the pituitary gland. Visual disturbance is one of the most common and serious symptoms of LYH. Most of the visual symptoms in LYH are secondary to compression of the optic chiasm and some reports have described direct inflammatory involvement of the optic pathways. We describe a 30-year-old man with a 9-day history of bilateral blurred vision. Ophthalmic examination demonstrated severely impaired vision without temporal hemianopsia. Hypothyroidism, hypocortisolism, and hypogonadism were detected in laboratory tests. Central diabetes insipidus was diagnosed by a hypertonic saline infusion test. MRI revealed thickening of the pituitary stalk and enlargement of the hypophysis, which was enhanced with gadolinium. High intensity of the posterior lobe was not recognized on T1-weighted images. These findings established a clinical diagnosis of lymphocytic panhypophysitis. Methylprednisolone pulse therapy was introduced and his visual acuity gradually recovered. The anterior pituitary function improved, but desmopressin was still required. Pattern-reversal visual evoked potentials (VEP) have been widely used to detect optic nerve lesions caused by multiple sclerosis and brain tumors. However, there have been no previous reports of their usefulness for LYH. The P100 latency in our case was slightly prolonged and the amplitude was markedly reduced. These findings are similar to ischemic optic neuropathy and other conditions in which axonal damage is prominent. The prolonged latency and low amplitude on VEP examination in this case showed rapid improvement in parallel with the recovery of visual acuity. Taken together, our case implies the usefulness of pattern-reversal VEP for the diagnosis of optic neuritis in LYH, especially for the evaluation of its pathogenic mechanisms.

  18. Coherent heat patterns revealed by unsupervised classification of Argo temperature profiles in the North Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maze, Guillaume; Mercier, Herlé; Fablet, Ronan; Tandeo, Pierre; Lopez Radcenco, Manuel; Lenca, Philippe; Feucher, Charlène; Le Goff, Clément

    2017-02-01

    A quantitative understanding of the integrated ocean heat content depends on our ability to determine how heat is distributed in the ocean and identify the associated coherent patterns. This study demonstrates how this can be achieved using unsupervised classification of Argo temperature profiles. The classification method used is a Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM) that decomposes the Probability Density Function of a dataset into a weighted sum of Gaussian modes. It is determined that the North Atlantic Argo dataset of temperature profiles contains 8 groups of vertically coherent heat patterns, or classes. Each of the temperature profile classes reveals unique and physically coherent heat distributions along the vertical axis. A key result of this study is that, when mapped in space, each of the 8 classes is found to define an oceanic region, even if no spatial information was used in the model determination. The classification result is independent of the location and time of the ARGO profiles. Two classes show cold anomalies throughout the water column with amplitude decreasing with depth. They are found to be localized in the subpolar gyre and along the poleward flank of the Gulf Stream and North Atlantic Current (NAC). One class has nearly zero anomalies and a large spread throughout the water column. It is found mostly along the NAC. One class has warm anomalies near the surface (50 m) and cold ones below 200 m. It is found in the tropical/equatorial region. The remaining four classes have warm anomalies throughout the water column, one without depth dependance (in the southeastern part of the subtropical gyre), the other three with clear maximums at different depths (100 m, 400 m and 1000 m). These are found along the southern flank of the North Equatorial Current, the western part of the subtropical gyre and over the West European Basin. These results are robust to both the seasonal variability and to method parameters such as the size of the analyzed domain.

  19. The Current Status of Kinematic Solar Dynamo Models

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arnab Rai Choudhuri

    2000-09-01

    This review provides a historical overview of how research in kinematic solar dynamo modeling evolved during the last few decades and assesses the present state of research. The early pioneering papers assumed the dynamo to operate in the convection zone. It was suggested in the 1980s that the dynamo operates in a thin layer at the bottom of the convection zone. Some researchers in recent years are arguing that the poloidal field is produced near the surface—an idea that goes back to Babcock (1961) and Leighton (1969).

  20. Galactic dynamo and helicity losses through fountain flow

    CERN Document Server

    Shukurov, A; Subramanian, K; Brandenburg, A; Shukurov, Anvar; Sokoloff, Dmitry; Subramanian, Kandaswamy; Brandenburg, Axel

    2006-01-01

    Nonlinear behaviour of galactic dynamos is studied, allowing for magnetic helicity removal by the galactic fountain flow. A suitable advection speed is estimated, and a one-dimensional mean-field dynamo model with dynamic alpha-effect is explored. It is shown that the galactic fountain flow is efficient in removing magnetic helicity from galactic discs. This alleviates the constraint on the galactic mean-field dynamo resulting from magnetic helicity conservation and thereby allows the mean magnetic field to saturate at a strength comparable to equipartition with the turbulent kinetic energy.

  1. Facilitating dynamo action via control of large-scale turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limone, A; Hatch, D R; Forest, C B; Jenko, F

    2012-12-01

    The magnetohydrodynamic dynamo effect is considered to be the major cause of magnetic field generation in geo- and astrophysical systems. Recent experimental and numerical results show that turbulence constitutes an obstacle to dynamos; yet its role in this context is not totally clear. Via numerical simulations, we identify large-scale turbulent vortices with a detrimental effect on the amplification of the magnetic field in a geometry of experimental interest and propose a strategy for facilitating the dynamo instability by manipulating these detrimental "hidden" dynamics.

  2. Experimental observation of spatially localized dynamo magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallet, B; Aumaître, S; Boisson, J; Daviaud, F; Dubrulle, B; Bonnefoy, N; Bourgoin, M; Odier, Ph; Pinton, J-F; Plihon, N; Verhille, G; Fauve, S; Pétrélis, F

    2012-04-06

    We report the first experimental observation of a spatially localized dynamo magnetic field, a common feature of astrophysical dynamos and convective dynamo simulations. When the two propellers of the von Kármán sodium experiment are driven at frequencies that differ by 15%, the mean magnetic field's energy measured close to the slower disk is nearly 10 times larger than the one close to the faster one. This strong localization of the magnetic field when a symmetry of the forcing is broken is in good agreement with a prediction based on the interaction between a dipolar and a quadrupolar magnetic mode.

  3. Magnetic dipole moment estimates for an ancient lunar dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, K. A.

    1983-01-01

    The four measured planetary magnetic moments combined with a recent theoretical prediction for dynamo magnetic fields suggests that no dynamo exists in the moon's interior today. For the moon to have had a magnetic moment in the past of sufficient strength to account for at least some of the lunar rock magnetism, the rotation would have been about twenty times faster than it is today and the radius of the fluid, conducting core must have been about 750 km. The argument depends on the validity of the Busse solution to the validity of the MHD problem of planetary dynamos.

  4. Mean-field theory and self-consistent dynamo modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshizawa, Akira; Yokoi, Nobumitsu [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Inst. of Industrial Science; Itoh, Sanae-I [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics; Itoh, Kimitaka [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    2001-12-01

    Mean-field theory of dynamo is discussed with emphasis on the statistical formulation of turbulence effects on the magnetohydrodynamic equations and the construction of a self-consistent dynamo model. The dynamo mechanism is sought in the combination of the turbulent residual-helicity and cross-helicity effects. On the basis of this mechanism, discussions are made on the generation of planetary magnetic fields such as geomagnetic field and sunspots and on the occurrence of flow by magnetic fields in planetary and fusion phenomena. (author)

  5. A coupled $2\\times2$D Babcock-Leighton solar dynamo model. II. Reference dynamo solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Lemerle, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we complete the presentation of a new hybrid $2\\times2$D flux transport dynamo (FTD) model of the solar cycle based on the Babcock-Leighton mechanism of poloidal magnetic field regeneration via the surface decay of bipolar magnetic regions (BMRs). This hybrid model is constructed by allowing the surface flux transport (SFT) simulation described in Lemerle et al. 2015 to provide the poloidal source term to an axisymmetric FTD simulation defined in a meridional plane, which in turn generates the BMRs required by the SFT. A key aspect of this coupling is the definition of an emergence function describing the probability of BMR emergence as a function of the spatial distribution of the internal axisymmetric magnetic field. We use a genetic algorithm to calibrate this function, together with other model parameters, against observed cycle 21 emergence data. We present a reference dynamo solution reproducing many solar cycle characteristics, including good hemispheric coupling, phase relationship betwe...

  6. A simple stochastic model for dipole moment fluctuations in numerical dynamo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meduri, Domenico G.; Wicht, Johannes

    2016-04-01

    Earth's axial dipole field changes in a complex fashion on many different time scales ranging from less than a year to tens of million years. Documenting, analysing, and replicating this intricate signal is a challenge for data acquisition, theoretical interpretation, and dynamo modelling alike. Here we explore whether axial dipole variations can be described by the superposition of a slow deterministic drift and fast stochastic fluctuations, i.e. by a Langevin-type system. The drift term describes the time averaged behaviour of the axial dipole variations, whereas the stochastic part mimics complex flow interactions over convective time scales. The statistical behaviour of the system is described by a Fokker-Planck equation which allows useful predictions, including the average rates of dipole reversals and excursions. We analyse several numerical dynamo simulations, most of which have been integrated particularly long in time, and also the palaeomagnetic model PADM2M which covers the past 2 Myr. The results show that the Langevin description provides a viable statistical model of the axial dipole variations on time scales longer than about 1 kyr. For example, the axial dipole probability distribution and the average reversal rate are successfully predicted. The exception is PADM2M where the stochastic model reversal rate seems too low. The dependence of the drift on the axial dipole moment reveals the nonlinear interactions that establish the dynamo balance. A separate analysis of inductive and diffusive magnetic effects in three dynamo simulations suggests that the classical quadratic quenching of induction predicted by mean-field theory seems at work.

  7. Global Solar Convective Dynamo with Cycles, Equatorward Propagation and Grand Minima

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toomre, Juri; Augustson, Kyle C.; Brun, Allan Sacha; Miesch, Mark S.

    2016-05-01

    The 3-D MHD Anelastic Spherical Harmonic (ASH) code, using slope-limited diffusion, is used to study the interaction of turbulent convection, rotation and magnetism in a full spherical shell comparable to the solar convection zone. Here a star of one solar mass, with a solar luminosity, is considered that is rotating at three times the solar rate. The dynamo generated magnetic field forms large-scale toroidal wreaths, whose formation is tied to the low Rossby number of the convection in this simulation which we have labeled K3S. This case displays prominent polarity cycles with regular reversals occurring roughly every 6.2 years. These reversals are linked to the weakened differential rotation and a resistive collapse of the large-scale magnetic field. Distinctive equatorial migration of the strong magnetic wreaths is seen, arising from modulation of the differential rotation rather than a dynamo wave. As the wreaths approach the equator, cross-equatorial magnetic flux is achieved that permits the low-latitude convection to generate poloidal magnetic field with opposite polarity. Poleward migration of such magnetic flux from the equator eventually leads to the reversal of the polarity of the high-latitude magnetic field. This K3S simulation also enters an interval with reduced magnetic energy at low latitudes lasting roughly 16 years (about 2.5 polarity cycles), during which the polarity cycles are disrupted and after which the dynamo recovers its regular polarity cycles. An analysis of this striking grand minimum reveals that it likely arises through the interplay of symmetric and antisymmetric dynamo families.

  8. Transcriptomics reveal several gene expression patterns in the piezophile Desulfovibrio hydrothermalis in response to hydrostatic pressure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amira Amrani

    Full Text Available RNA-seq was used to study the response of Desulfovibrio hydrothermalis, isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal chimney on the East-Pacific Rise at a depth of 2,600 m, to various hydrostatic pressure growth conditions. The transcriptomic datasets obtained after growth at 26, 10 and 0.1 MPa identified only 65 differentially expressed genes that were distributed among four main categories: aromatic amino acid and glutamate metabolisms, energy metabolism, signal transduction, and unknown function. The gene expression patterns suggest that D. hydrothermalis uses at least three different adaptation mechanisms, according to a hydrostatic pressure threshold (HPt that was estimated to be above 10 MPa. Both glutamate and energy metabolism were found to play crucial roles in these mechanisms. Quantitation of the glutamate levels in cells revealed its accumulation at high hydrostatic pressure, suggesting its role as a piezolyte. ATP measurements showed that the energy metabolism of this bacterium is optimized for deep-sea life conditions. This study provides new insights into the molecular mechanisms linked to hydrostatic pressure adaptation in sulfate-reducing bacteria.

  9. Revealing the Source of the Radial Flow Patterns in Proton-Proton Collisions using Hard Probes

    CERN Document Server

    Ortiz, Antonio; Bello, Héctor

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we propose a tool to reveal the origin of the collective-like phenomena observed in proton-proton collisions. We exploit the fundamental difference between the underlying mechanisms, color reconnection (CR) and hydrodynamics, which produce radial flow patterns in PYTHIA 8 and EPOS 3, respectively. Namely, the strength of the coupling between the soft and hard components which by construction is larger in PYTHIA 8 than in EPOS 3. We, therefore, study the transverse momentum ($p_{\\rm T}$) distributions of charged pions, kaons and (anti)protons as a function of the event multiplicity and the transverse momentum of the leading jet ($p_{\\rm T}^{\\rm jet}$), being all of them determined within a pseudorapidity interval of $|\\eta|<1$. Quantitative and qualitative differences between PYTHIA 8 and EPOS 3 are found in the $p_{\\rm T}$ spectra when (for a given multiplicity class) the leading jet $p_{\\rm T}$ is increased. In addition, we show that for low-multiplicity events jets can produce radial flow-l...

  10. Proteomic Analysis of Lysine Acetylation Sites in Rat Tissues Reveals Organ Specificity and Subcellular Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Lundby

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Lysine acetylation is a major posttranslational modification involved in a broad array of physiological functions. Here, we provide an organ-wide map of lysine acetylation sites from 16 rat tissues analyzed by high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry. We quantify 15,474 modification sites on 4,541 proteins and provide the data set as a web-based database. We demonstrate that lysine acetylation displays site-specific sequence motifs that diverge between cellular compartments, with a significant fraction of nuclear sites conforming to the consensus motifs G-AcK and AcK-P. Our data set reveals that the subcellular acetylation distribution is tissue-type dependent and that acetylation targets tissue-specific pathways involved in fundamental physiological processes. We compare lysine acetylation patterns for rat as well as human skeletal muscle biopsies and demonstrate its general involvement in muscle contraction. Furthermore, we illustrate that acetylation of fructose-bisphosphate aldolase and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase serves as a cellular mechanism to switch off enzymatic activity.

  11. Revealing the source of the radial flow patterns in proton-proton collisions using hard probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Antonio; Bencédi, Gyula; Bello, Héctor

    2017-06-01

    In this work, we propose a tool to reveal the origin of the collective-like phenomena observed in proton-proton collisions. We exploit the fundamental difference between the underlying mechanisms, color reconnection and hydrodynamics, which produce radial flow patterns in Pythia 8 and Epos 3, respectively. Specifically, we proceed by examining the strength of the coupling between the soft and hard components which, by construction, is larger in Pythia 8 than in Epos 3. We study the transverse momentum ({p}{{T}}) distributions of charged pions, kaons and (anti) protons in inelastic pp collisions at \\sqrt{s}=7 TeV produced at mid-rapidity. Specific selections are made on an event-by-event basis as a function of the charged particle multiplicity and the transverse momentum of the leading jet ({p}{{T}}{jet}) reconstructed using the FastJet algorithm at mid-pseudorapidity (| η | events the presence of jets can produce radial flow-like behavior. Motivated by our findings, we propose to perform a similar analysis using experimental data from RHIC and LHC.

  12. Reliable and rapid characterization of functional FCN2 gene variants reveals diverse geographical patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ojurongbe Olusola

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ficolin-2 coded by FCN2 gene is a soluble serum protein and an innate immune recognition element of the complement system. FCN2 gene polymorphisms reveal distinct geographical patterns and are documented to alter serum ficolin levels and modulate disease susceptibility. Methods We employed a real-time PCR based on Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET method to genotype four functional SNPs including -986 G > A (#rs3124952, -602 G > A (#rs3124953, -4A > G (#rs17514136 and +6424 G > T (#rs7851696 in the ficolin-2 (FCN2 gene. We characterized the FCN2 variants in individuals representing Brazilian (n = 176, Nigerian (n = 180, Vietnamese (n = 172 and European Caucasian ethnicity (n = 165. Results We observed that the genotype distribution of three functional SNP variants (−986 G > A, -602 G > A and -4A > G differ significantly between the populations investigated (p p  Conclusions The observed distribution of the FCN2 functional SNP variants may likely contribute to altered serum ficolin levels and this may depend on the different disease settings in world populations. To conclude, the use of FRET based real-time PCR especially for FCN2 gene will benefit a larger scientific community who extensively depend on rapid, reliable method for FCN2 genotyping.

  13. An update of Leighton's solar dynamo model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, R. H.; Schüssler, M.

    2017-02-01

    In 1969, Leighton developed a quasi-1D mathematical model of the solar dynamo, building upon the phenomenological scenario of Babcock published in 1961. Here we present a modification and extension of Leighton's model. Using the axisymmetric component (longitudinal average) of the magnetic field, we consider the radial field component at the solar surface and the radially integrated toroidal magnetic flux in the convection zone, both as functions of latitude. No assumptions are made with regard to the radial location of the toroidal flux. The model includes the effects of (i) turbulent diffusion at the surface and in the convection zone; (ii) poleward meridional flow at the surface and an equatorward return flow affecting the toroidal flux; (iii) latitudinal differential rotation and the near-surface layer of radial rotational shear; (iv) downward convective pumping of magnetic flux in the shear layer; and (v) flux emergence in the form of tilted bipolar magnetic regions treated as a source term for the radial surface field. While the parameters relevant for the transport of the surface field are taken from observations, the model condenses the unknown properties of magnetic field and flow in the convection zone into a few free parameters (turbulent diffusivity, effective return flow, amplitude of the source term, and a parameter describing the effective radial shear). Comparison with the results of 2D flux transport dynamo codes shows that the model captures the essential features of these simulations. We make use of the computational efficiency of the model to carry out an extended parameter study. We cover an extended domain of the 4D parameter space and identify the parameter ranges that provide solar-like solutions. Dipole parity is always preferred and solutions with periods around 22 yr and a correct phase difference between flux emergence in low latitudes and the strength of the polar fields are found for a return flow speed around 2 m s-1, turbulent

  14. An update of Leighton's solar dynamo model

    CERN Document Server

    Cameron, R H

    2016-01-01

    In 1969 Leighton developed a quasi-1D mathematical model of the solar dynamo, building upon the phenomenological scenario of Babcock(1961). Here we present a modification and extension of Leighton's model. Using the axisymmetric component of the magnetic field, we consider the radial field component at the solar surface and the radially integrated toroidal magnetic flux in the convection zone, both as functions of latitude. No assumptions are made with regard to the radial location of the toroidal flux. The model includes the effects of turbulent diffusion at the surface and in the convection zone, poleward meridional flow at the surface and an equatorward return flow affecting the toroidal flux, latitudinal differential rotation and the near-surface layer of radial rotational shear, downward convective pumping of magnetic flux in the shear layer, and flux emergence in the form of tilted bipolar magnetic regions. While the parameters relevant for the transport of the surface field are taken from observations,...

  15. Introduction to Plasma Dynamo, Reconnection and Shocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Intrator, Thomas P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-30

    In our plasma universe, most of what we can observe is composed of ionized gas, or plasma. This plasma is a conducting fluid, which advects magnetic fields when it flows. Magnetic structure occurs from the smallest planetary to the largest cosmic scales. We introduce at a basic level some interesting features of non linear magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). For example, in our plasma universe, dynamo creates magnetic fields from gravitationally driven flow energy in an electrically conducting medium, and conversely magnetic reconnection annihilates magnetic field and accelerates particles. Shocks occur when flows move faster than the local velocity (sonic or Alfven speed) for the propagation of information. Both reconnection and shocks can accelerate particles, perhaps to gigantic energies, for example as observed with 10{sup 20} eV cosmic rays.

  16. Dynamo efficiency controlled by hydrodynamic bistability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miralles, Sophie; Herault, Johann; Herault, Johann; Fauve, Stephan; Gissinger, Christophe; Pétrélis, François; Daviaud, François; Dubrulle, Bérengère; Boisson, Jean; Bourgoin, Mickaël; Verhille, Gautier; Odier, Philippe; Pinton, Jean-François; Plihon, Nicolas

    2014-06-01

    Hydrodynamic and magnetic behaviors in a modified experimental setup of the von Kármán sodium flow-where one disk has been replaced by a propeller-are investigated. When the rotation frequencies of the disk and the propeller are different, we show that the fully turbulent hydrodynamic flow undergoes a global bifurcation between two configurations. The bistability of these flow configurations is associated with the dynamics of the central shear layer. The bistable flows are shown to have different dynamo efficiencies; thus for a given rotation rate of the soft-iron disk, two distinct magnetic behaviors are observed depending on the flow configuration. The hydrodynamic transition controls the magnetic field behavior, and bifurcations between high and low magnetic field branches are investigated.

  17. Computer simulation of a magnetohydrodynamic dynamo. II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kageyama, Akira; Sato, Tetsuya; Complexity Simulation Group

    1995-05-01

    A computer simulation of a magnetohydrodynamic dynamo in a rapidly rotating spherical shell is performed. Extensive parameter runs are carried out changing electrical resistivity. When resistivity is sufficiently small, total magnetic energy can grow more than ten times larger than total kinetic energy of convection motion which is driven by an unlimited external energy source. When resistivity is relatively large and magnetic energy is comparable or smaller than kinetic energy, the convection motion maintains its well-organized structure. However, when resistivity is small and magnetic energy becomes larger than kinetic energy, the well-organized convection motion is highly irregular. The magnetic field is organized in two ways. One is the concentration of component parallel to the rotation axis and the other is the concentration of perpendicular component. The parallel component tends to be confined inside anticyclonic columnar convection cells, while the perpendicular component is confined outside convection cells.

  18. Solar Magnetic Field Reversals and the Role of Dynamo Families

    CERN Document Server

    DeRosa, M L; Hoeksema, J T

    2012-01-01

    The variable magnetic field of the solar photosphere exhibits periodic reversals as a result of dynamo activity occurring within the solar interior. We decompose the surface field as observed by both the Wilcox Solar Observatory and the Michelson Doppler Imager into its harmonic constituents, and present the time evolution of the mode coefficients for the past three sunspot cycles. The interplay between the various modes is then interpreted from the perspective of general dynamo theory, where the coupling between the primary and secondary families of modes is found to correlate with large-scale polarity reversals for many examples of cyclic dynamos. Mean-field dynamos based on the solar parameter regime are then used to explore how such couplings may result in the various long-term trends in the surface magnetic field observed to occur in the solar case.

  19. Planetary Dynamos: Investigations of Saturn and Ancient Mars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanley, Sabine [University of Toronto

    2012-04-18

    Magnetic field observations by spacecraft missions have provided vital information on planetary dynamos. The four giant planets as well as Earth, Mercury and Ganymede have observable magnetic fields generated by active dynamos. In contrast, Moon and Mars only have remanent crustal fields from dynamo action in their early histories. A variety of magnetic field morphologies and intensities can be found in the solar system. We have found that some of the differences between planetary magnetic fields can be explained as the result of the presence of boundary thermal variations or stably-stratified layers. In this talk, I will discuss how dynamos are affected by these complications and discuss the implications for Mars’ magnetic dichotomy and Saturn’s extremely axisymmetric magnetic field.

  20. A 5-D hyperchaotic Rikitake dynamo system with hidden attractors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidyanathan, S.; Pham, V.-T.; Volos, C. K.

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents a 5-D hyperchaotic Rikitake dynamo system with three positive Lyapunov exponents which is derived by adding two state feedback controls to the famous 3-D Rikitake two-disk dynamo system. It is noted that the proposed hyperchaotic system has no equilibrium points and hence it exhibits hidden attractors. In addition, the qualitative properties, as well as the adaptive synchronization of the hyperchaotic Rikitake dynamo system with unknown system parameters, are discussed in details. The main results are proved using Lyapunov stability theory and numerical simulations are shown using MATLAB. Moreover, an electronic circuit realization in SPICE has been detailed to confirm the feasibility of the theoretical 5-D hyperchaotic Rikitake dynamo model.

  1. Direct numerical simulation of dynamo transition for nonhelical MHD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nath, Dinesh; Verma, Mahendra K [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208016 (India); Lessinnes, Thomas; Carati, Daniele [Physique Statistique et Plasmas, Universite Libre de Bruxellers, B-1050 Bruxelles (Belgium); Sarris, Ioannis [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Thessaly, Volos (Greece)

    2010-02-01

    Pseudospectral Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) has been performed to simulate dynamo transition for nonhelical magnetohydrodynamics turbulence. The numerical results are compared with a recent low-dimensional model [Verma et al. [13

  2. A two-billion-year history for the lunar dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikoo, Sonia M; Weiss, Benjamin P; Shuster, David L; Suavet, Clément; Wang, Huapei; Grove, Timothy L

    2017-08-01

    Magnetic studies of lunar rocks indicate that the Moon generated a core dynamo with surface field intensities of ~20 to 110 μT between at least 4.25 and 3.56 billion years ago (Ga). The field subsequently declined to history requires an extraordinarily long-lived power source like core crystallization or precession. No single dynamo mechanism proposed thus far can explain the strong fields inferred for the period before 3.56 Ga while also allowing the dynamo to persist in such a weakened state beyond ~2.5 Ga. Therefore, our results suggest that the dynamo was powered by at least two distinct mechanisms operating during early and late lunar history.

  3. Hemispherical Parker waves driven by thermal shear in planetary dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Dietrich, Wieland; Wicht, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Planetary and stellar magnetic fields are thought to be sustained by helical motions ($\\alpha$-effect) and, if present, differential rotation ($\\Omega$-effect). In the Sun, the strong differential rotation in the tachocline is responsible for an efficient $\\Omega$-effect creating a strong axisymmetric azimuthal magnetic field. This is a prerequisite for Parker dynamo waves that may be responsible for the solar cycle. In the liquid iron cores of terrestrial planets, the Coriolis force organizes convection into columns with a strong helical flow component. These likely dominate magnetic field generation while the $\\Omega$-effect is of secondary importance. Here we use numerical simulations to show that the planetary dynamo scenario may change when the heat flux through the outer boundary is higher in one hemisphere than in the other. A hemispherical dynamo is promoted that is dominated by fierce thermal wind responsible for a strong $\\Omega$-effect. As a consequence Parker dynamo waves are excited equivalent to...

  4. Wave-driven dynamo action in spherical magnetohydrodynamic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, K; Jenko, F; Tilgner, A; Forest, C B

    2009-11-01

    Hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic numerical studies of a mechanically forced two-vortex flow inside a sphere are reported. The simulations are performed in the intermediate regime between the laminar flow and developed turbulence, where a hydrodynamic instability is found to generate internal waves with a characteristic m=2 zonal wave number. It is shown that this time-periodic flow acts as a dynamo, although snapshots of the flow as well as the mean flow are not dynamos. The magnetic fields' growth rate exhibits resonance effects depending on the wave frequency. Furthermore, a cyclic self-killing and self-recovering dynamo based on the relative alignment of the velocity and magnetic fields is presented. The phenomena are explained in terms of a mixing of nonorthogonal eigenstates of the time-dependent linear operator of the magnetic induction equation. The potential relevance of this mechanism to dynamo experiments is discussed.

  5. A Non-axisymmetric Spherical α2-Dynamo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Using the Chebyshev-tau method, the generation of oscillatory nonaxisymmetric stellar magnetic fields by the α2-dynamo is studied in spherical geometry. Following the boundary conditions given by Schubert & Zhang, the spherical α2-dynamo consists of a fully convective spherical shell with inner radius ri and outer radius ro. A comparison of the critical dynamo numbers of axisymmetric and φ-dependent modes for different thicknesses of the convective shell and different α-profiles leads to the following qualitative results: (I) when the angular factor of α-profile is sinnθ cosθ (n = 1, 2, 4) the solutions of the α2-dynamo are oscillatory and non-axisymmetric, (ii) the thinner the convective shell, the more easily is the nonaxisymmetric mode excited and the higher is the latitudinal wave number, (iii) the thickness of the outer convective shell has an effect on the symmetries of the magnetic fields.

  6. Saturation of Zeldovich stretch-twist-fold map dynamos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seta, Amit; Bhat, Pallavi; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2015-10-01

    > value is determined by the relative importance of the increased diffusion versus the reduced stretching. These saturation properties are akin to the range of possibilities that have been discussed in the context of fluctuation dynamos.

  7. Energy transfers in dynamos with small magnetic Prandtl numbers

    KAUST Repository

    Kumar, Rohit

    2015-06-25

    We perform numerical simulation of dynamo with magnetic Prandtl number Pm = 0.2 on 10243 grid, and compute the energy fluxes and the shell-to-shell energy transfers. These computations indicate that the magnetic energy growth takes place mainly due to the energy transfers from large-scale velocity field to large-scale magnetic field and that the magnetic energy flux is forward. The steady-state magnetic energy is much smaller than the kinetic energy, rather than equipartition; this is because the magnetic Reynolds number is near the dynamo transition regime. We also contrast our results with those for dynamo with Pm = 20 and decaying dynamo. © 2015 Taylor & Francis.

  8. Generation of dynamo magnetic fields in the primordial solar nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepinski, Tomasz F.

    1992-01-01

    The present treatment of dynamo-generated magnetic fields in the primordial solar nebula proceeds in view of the ability of the combined action of Keplerian rotation and helical convention to generate, via alpha-omega dynamo, large-scale magnetic fields in those parts of the nebula with sufficiently high, gas-and magnetic field coupling electrical conductivity. Nebular gas electrical conductivity and the radial distribution of the local dynamo number are calculated for both a viscous-accretion disk model and the quiescent-minimum mass nebula. It is found that magnetic fields can be easily generated and maintained by alpha-omega dynamos occupying the inner and outer parts of the nebula.

  9. Sharp magnetic structures from dynamos with density stratification

    CERN Document Server

    Jabbari, Sarah; Kleeorin, Nathan; Rogachevskii, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Recent direct numerical simulations (DNS) of large-scale turbulent dynamos in strongly stratified layers have resulted in surprisingly sharp bipolar structures at the surface. Here we present new DNS of helically and non-helically forced turbulence with and without rotation and compare with corresponding mean-field simulations (MFS) to show that these structures are a generic outcome of a broader class of dynamos in density-stratified layers. The MFS agree qualitatively with the DNS, but the period of oscillations tends to be longer in the DNS. In both DNS and MFS, the sharp structures are produced by converging flows at the surface and are driven by the Lorentz force associated with the large-scale dynamo-driven magnetic field if the dynamo number is at least 5 times supercritical.

  10. Sharp magnetic structures from dynamos with density stratification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbari, Sarah; Brandenburg, Axel; Kleeorin, Nathan; Rogachevskii, Igor

    2017-01-01

    Recent direct numerical simulations (DNS) of large-scale turbulent dynamos in strongly stratified layers have resulted in surprisingly sharp bipolar structures at the surface. Here we present new DNS of helically and non-helically forced turbulence with and without rotation and compare with corresponding mean-field simulations (MFS) to show that these structures are a generic outcome of a broader class of dynamos in density-stratified layers. The MFS agree qualitatively with the DNS, but the period of oscillations tends to be longer in the DNS. In both DNS and MFS, the sharp structures are produced by converging flows at the surface and might be driven in nonlinear stage of evolution by the Lorentz force associated with the large-scale dynamo-driven magnetic field if the dynamo number is at least 2.5 times supercritical.

  11. A global analysis of bird plumage patterns reveals no association between habitat and camouflage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Somveille

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Evidence suggests that animal patterns (motifs function in camouflage. Irregular mottled patterns can facilitate concealment when stationary in cluttered habitats, whereas regular patterns typically prevent capture during movement in open habitats. Bird plumage patterns have predominantly converged on just four types—mottled (irregular, scales, bars and spots (regular—and habitat could be driving convergent evolution in avian patterning. Based on sensory ecology, we therefore predict that irregular patterns would be associated with visually noisy closed habitats and that regular patterns would be associated with open habitats. Regular patterns have also been shown to function in communication for sexually competing males to stand-out and attract females, so we predict that male breeding plumage patterns evolved in both open and closed habitats. Here, taking phylogenetic relatedness into account, we investigate ecological selection for bird plumage patterns across the class Aves. We surveyed plumage patterns in 80% of all avian species worldwide. Of these, 2,756 bird species have regular and irregular plumage patterns as well as habitat information. In this subset, we tested whether adult breeding/non-breeding plumages in each sex, and juvenile plumages, were associated with the habitat types found within the species’ geographical distributions. We found no evidence for an association between habitat and plumage patterns across the world’s birds and little phylogenetic signal. We also found that species with regular and irregular plumage patterns were distributed randomly across the world’s eco-regions without being affected by habitat type. These results indicate that at the global spatial and taxonomic scale, habitat does not predict convergent evolution in bird plumage patterns, contrary to the camouflage hypothesis.

  12. Dynamo magnetic field modes in thin astrophysical disks - An adiabatic computational approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepinski, T. F.; Levy, E. H.

    1991-01-01

    An adiabatic approximation is applied to the calculation of turbulent MHD dynamo magnetic fields in thin disks. The adiabatic method is employed to investigate conditions under which magnetic fields generated by disk dynamos permeate the entire disk or are localized to restricted regions of a disk. Two specific cases of Keplerian disks are considered. In the first, magnetic field diffusion is assumed to be dominated by turbulent mixing leading to a dynamo number independent of distance from the center of the disk. In the second, the dynamo number is allowed to vary with distance from the disk's center. Localization of dynamo magnetic field structures is found to be a general feature of disk dynamos, except in the special case of stationary modes in dynamos with constant dynamo number. The implications for the dynamical behavior of dynamo magnetized accretion disks are discussed and the results of these exploratory calculations are examined in the context of the protosolar nebula and accretion disks around compact objects.

  13. Tomography of reaction-diffusion microemulsions reveals three-dimensional Turing patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bánsági, Tamás; Vanag, Vladimir K; Epstein, Irving R

    2011-03-11

    Spatially periodic, temporally stationary patterns that emerge from instability of a homogeneous steady state were proposed by Alan Turing in 1952 as a mechanism for morphogenesis in living systems and have attracted increasing attention in biology, chemistry, and physics. Patterns found to date have been confined to one or two spatial dimensions. We used tomography to study the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction in a microemulsion in which the polar reactants are confined to aqueous nanodroplets much smaller than the scale of the stationary patterns. We demonstrate the existence of Turing patterns that can exist only in three dimensions, including curved surfaces, hexagonally packed cylinders, spots, and labyrinthine and lamellar patterns.

  14. Searching for the fastest dynamo: laminar ABC flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexakis, Alexandros

    2011-08-01

    The growth rate of the dynamo instability as a function of the magnetic Reynolds number R(M) is investigated by means of numerical simulations for the family of the Arnold-Beltrami-Childress (ABC) flows and for two different forcing scales. For the ABC flows that are driven at the largest available length scale, it is found that, as the magnetic Reynolds number is increased: (a) The flow that results first in a dynamo is the 2 1/2-dimensional flow for which A=B and C=0 (and all permutations). (b) The second type of flow that results in a dynamo is the one for which A=B≃2C/5 (and permutations). (c) The most symmetric flow, A=B=C, is the third type of flow that results in a dynamo. (d) As R(M) is increased, the A=B=C flow stops being a dynamo and transitions from a local maximum to a third-order saddle point. (e) At larger R(M), the A=B=C flow reestablishes itself as a dynamo but remains a saddle point. (f) At the largest examined R(M), the growth rate of the 2 1/2-dimensional flows starts to decay, the A=B=C flow comes close to a local maximum again, and the flow A=B≃2C/5 (and permutations) results in the fastest dynamo with growth rate γ≃0.12 at the largest examined R(M). For the ABC flows that are driven at the second largest available length scale, it is found that (a) the 2 1/2-dimensional flows A=B,C=0 (and permutations) are again the first flows that result in a dynamo with a decreased onset. (b) The most symmetric flow, A=B=C, is the second type of flow that results in a dynamo. It is, and it remains, a local maximum. (c) At larger R(M), the flow A=B≃2C/5 (and permutations) appears as the third type of flow that results in a dynamo. As R(M) is increased, it becomes the flow with the largest growth rate. The growth rates appear to have some correlation with the Lyapunov exponents, but constructive refolding of the field lines appears equally important in determining the fastest dynamo flow.

  15. Magnetic Field Saturation in the Riga Dynamo Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Gailitis, A; Platacis, E; Dementev, S; Cifersons, A; Gerbeth, G; Gundrum, T; Stefani, F; Christen, M; Will, G; Gailitis, Agris; Lielausis, Olgerts; Platacis, Ernests; Dement'ev, Sergej; Cifersons, Arnis; Gerbeth, Gunter; Gundrum, Thomas; Stefani, Frank; Christen, Michael; Will, Gotthard

    2001-01-01

    After the dynamo experiment in November 1999 had shown magnetic field self-excitation in a spiraling liquid metal flow, in a second series of experiments emphasis was placed on the magnetic field saturation regime as the next principal step in the dynamo process. The dependence of the strength of the magnetic field on the rotation rate is studied. Various features of the saturated magnetic field are outlined and possible saturation mechanisms are discussed.

  16. What can we say about seed fields for galactic dynamos?

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate that a quasi-uniform cosmological seed field is a much less suitable seed for a galactic dynamo than has often been believed. The age of the Universe is insufficient for a conventional galactic dynamo to generate a contemporary galactic magnetic field starting from such a seed, accepting conventional estimates for physical quantities. We discuss modifications to the scenario for the evolution of galactic magnetic fields implied by this result. We also consider briefly the impli...

  17. Meta-analysis of muscle transcriptome data using the MADMuscle database reveals biologically relevant gene patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teusan Raluca

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA microarray technology has had a great impact on muscle research and microarray gene expression data has been widely used to identify gene signatures characteristic of the studied conditions. With the rapid accumulation of muscle microarray data, it is of great interest to understand how to compare and combine data across multiple studies. Meta-analysis of transcriptome data is a valuable method to achieve it. It enables to highlight conserved gene signatures between multiple independent studies. However, using it is made difficult by the diversity of the available data: different microarray platforms, different gene nomenclature, different species studied, etc. Description We have developed a system tool dedicated to muscle transcriptome data. This system comprises a collection of microarray data as well as a query tool. This latter allows the user to extract similar clusters of co-expressed genes from the database, using an input gene list. Common and relevant gene signatures can thus be searched more easily. The dedicated database consists in a large compendium of public data (more than 500 data sets related to muscle (skeletal and heart. These studies included seven different animal species from invertebrates (Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans and vertebrates (Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Rattus norvegicus, Canis familiaris, Gallus gallus. After a renormalization step, clusters of co-expressed genes were identified in each dataset. The lists of co-expressed genes were annotated using a unified re-annotation procedure. These gene lists were compared to find significant overlaps between studies. Conclusions Applied to this large compendium of data sets, meta-analyses demonstrated that conserved patterns between species could be identified. Focusing on a specific pathology (Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy we validated results across independent studies and revealed robust biomarkers and new pathways of interest

  18. The enhancer landscape during early neocortical development reveals patterns of dense regulation and co-option.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron M Wenger

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Genetic studies have identified a core set of transcription factors and target genes that control the development of the neocortex, the region of the human brain responsible for higher cognition. The specific regulatory interactions between these factors, many key upstream and downstream genes, and the enhancers that mediate all these interactions remain mostly uncharacterized. We perform p300 ChIP-seq to identify over 6,600 candidate enhancers active in the dorsal cerebral wall of embryonic day 14.5 (E14.5 mice. Over 95% of the peaks we measure are conserved to human. Eight of ten (80% candidates tested using mouse transgenesis drive activity in restricted laminar patterns within the neocortex. GREAT based computational analysis reveals highly significant correlation with genes expressed at E14.5 in key areas for neocortex development, and allows the grouping of enhancers by known biological functions and pathways for further studies. We find that multiple genes are flanked by dozens of candidate enhancers each, including well-known key neocortical genes as well as suspected and novel genes. Nearly a quarter of our candidate enhancers are conserved well beyond mammals. Human and zebrafish regions orthologous to our candidate enhancers are shown to most often function in other aspects of central nervous system development. Finally, we find strong evidence that specific interspersed repeat families have contributed potentially key developmental enhancers via co-option. Our analysis expands the methodologies available for extracting the richness of information found in genome-wide functional maps.

  19. Experimental demonstration of a homogeneous two-scale dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieglitz, R.; Muller, U.

    2002-06-01

    It has been shown theoretically in the past that homogeneous dynamos may occur for various velocity fields. G.O. Roberts investigated spatially periodic velocity fields, which Busse confined to a finite cylindrical domain. Using a mean field approach he derived an approximate condition for the onset of dynamo action. Based on Busse's idea at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe a conceptual design for an experimental homogeneous dynamo was developed, and a test facility was set up. The first experiments demonstrated that a permanent dynamo can exist in a cylindrical container filled with liquid sodium in which by means of guide vanes counter rotating and counter current spiral vortices are arranged. The dynamo is self-exciting at sufficiently high flow rates, and the magnetic field saturates at a mean value. The instantaneous magnetic field fluctuates around this mean value by about 5%. As predicted by theory the mode of the observed magnetic field is strongly non-axisymmetric. In a series of experiments a phase and a bifurcation diagramm for dynamo action was derived which depend on the spiral and axial flow rates. Figs 5, Refs 14.

  20. Nonlinear regimes in mean-field full-sphere dynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Pipin, V V

    2016-01-01

    The mean-field dynamo model is employed to study the non-linear dynamo regimes in a fully convective star of mass 0.3$M_{\\odot}$ rotating with period of 10 days. The differential rotation law was estimated using the mean-field hydrodynamic and heat transport equations. For the intermediate parameter of the turbulent magnetic Reynolds number, $Pm_{T}=3$ we found the oscillating dynamo regimes with period about 40Yr. The higher $Pm_{T}$ results to longer dynamo periods. The meridional circulation has one cell per hemisphere. It is counter-clockwise in the Northen hemisphere. The amplitude of the flow at the surface around 1 m/s. Tne models with regards for meridional circulation show the anti-symmetric relative to equator magnetic field. If the large-scale flows is fixed we find that the dynamo transits from axisymmetric to non-axisymmetric regimes for the overcritical parameter of the $\\alpha$effect. The change of dynamo regime occurs because of the non-axisymmetric non-linear $\\alpha$-effect. The situation pe...

  1. Magnetic Helicities and Dynamo Action in Magneto-rotational Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodo, G.; Cattaneo, F.; Mignone, A.; Rossi, P.

    2017-07-01

    We examine the relationship between magnetic flux generation, taken as an indicator of large-scale dynamo action, and magnetic helicity, computed as an integral over the dynamo volume, in a simple dynamo. We consider dynamo action driven by magneto-rotational turbulence (MRT) within the shearing-box approximation. We consider magnetically open boundary conditions that allow a flux of helicity in or out of the computational domain. We circumvent the problem of the lack of gauge invariance in open domains by choosing a particular gauge—the winding gauge—that provides a natural interpretation in terms of the average winding number of pairwise field lines. We use this gauge precisely to define and measure the helicity and the helicity flux for several realizations of dynamo action. We find in these cases that the system as a whole does not break reflectional symmetry and that the total helicity remains small even in cases when substantial magnetic flux is generated. We find no particular connection between the generation of magnetic flux and the helicity or the helicity flux through the boundaries. We suggest that this result may be due to the essentially nonlinear nature of the dynamo processes in MRT.

  2. Basal magnetic flux and the local solar dynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Stenflo, J O

    2012-01-01

    The average unsigned magnetic flux density in magnetograms of the quiet Sun is generally dominated by instrumental noise. Due to the entirely different scaling behavior of the noise and the solar magnetic pattern it has been possible to determine the standard deviation of the Gaussian noise distribution and remove the noise contribution from the average unsigned flux density for the whole 15-yr SOHO/MDI data set and for a selection of SDO/HMI magnetograms. There is a very close correlation between the MDI disk-averaged unsigned vertical flux density and the sunspot number, and regression analysis gives a residual level of 2.7 G when the sunspot number is zero. The selected set of HMI magnetograms, which spans the most quiet phase of solar activity, has a lower limit of 3.0 G to the noise-corrected average flux density. These apparently cycle-independent levels may be identified as a basal flux density, which represents an upper limit to the possible flux contribution from a local dynamo, but not evidence for ...

  3. Interplay of CR-driven galactic wind, magnetic field, and galactic dynamo in spiral galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Krause, Marita

    2009-01-01

    From our radio observations of the magnetic field strength and large-scale pattern of spiral galaxies of different Hubble types and star formation rates (SFR) we conclude that - though a high SFR in the disk increases the total magnetic field strength in the disk and the halo - the SFR does not change the global field configuration nor influence the global scale heights of the radio emission. The similar scale heights indicate that the total magnetic field regulates the galactic wind velocities. The galactic wind itself may be essential for an effective dynamo action.

  4. An Atlas of Network Topologies Reveals Design Principles for Caenorhabditis elegans Vulval Precursor Cell Fate Patterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping, Xianfeng; Tang, Chao

    2015-01-01

    The vulval precursor cell (VPC) fate patterning in Caenorhabditis elegans is a classic model experimental system for cell fate determination and patterning in development. Despite its apparent simplicity (six neighboring cells arranged in one dimension) and many experimental and computational efforts, the patterning strategy and mechanism remain controversial due to incomplete knowledge of the complex biology. Here, we carry out a comprehensive computational analysis and obtain a reservoir of all possible network topologies that are capable of VPC fate patterning under the simulation of various biological environments and regulatory rules. We identify three patterning strategies: sequential induction, morphogen gradient and lateral antagonism, depending on the features of the signal secreted from the anchor cell. The strategy of lateral antagonism, which has not been reported in previous studies of VPC patterning, employs a mutual inhibition of the 2° cell fate in neighboring cells. Robust topologies are built upon minimal topologies with basic patterning strategies and have more flexible and redundant implementations of modular functions. By simulated mutation, we find that all three strategies can reproduce experimental error patterns of mutants. We show that the topology derived by mapping currently known biochemical pathways to our model matches one of our identified functional topologies. Furthermore, our robustness analysis predicts a possible missing link related to the lateral antagonism strategy. Overall, we provide a theoretical atlas of all possible functional networks in varying environments, which may guide novel discoveries of the biological interactions in vulval development of Caenorhabditis elegans and related species.

  5. Complex patterns of faulting revealed by 3D seismic data at the West Galicia rifted margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reston, Timothy; Cresswell, Derren; Sawyer, Dale; Ranero, Cesar; Shillington, Donna; Morgan, Julia; Lymer, Gael

    2015-04-01

    The west Galicia margin is characterised by crust thinning to less than 3 km, well-defined fault blocks, which overlie a bright reflection (the S reflector) generally interpreted as a tectonic Moho. The margin exhibits neither voluminous magmatism nor thick sediment piles to obscure the structures and the amount of extension. As such is represents an ideal location to study the process of continental breakup both through seismic imaging and potentially through drilling. Prestack depth migration of existing 2D profiles has strongly supported the interpretation of the S reflector as both a detachment and as the crust-mantle boundary; wide-angle seismic has also shown that the mantle beneath S is serpentinised. Despite the quality of the existing 2D seismic images, a number of competing models have been advanced to explain the formation of this margin, including sequential faulting, polyphase faulting, multiple detachments and the gravitational collapse of the margin over exhumed mantle. As these models, all developed for the Galicia margin, have been subsequently applied to other margins, distinguishing between them has implications not only for the structure of the Galicia margin but for the process of rifting through to breakup more generally. To address these issues in summer of 2013 we collected a 3D combined seismic reflection and wide-angle dataset over this margin. Here we present some of the results of ongoing processing of the 3D volume, focussing on the internal structure of some of the fault blocks that overlies the S detachment. 2D processing of the data shows a relatively simple series of tilted fault block, bound by west-dipping faults that detach downwards onto the bright S reflector. However, inspection of the 3D volume produced by 3D pre-stack time migration reveals that the fault blocks contain a complex set of sedimentary packages, with strata tilted to the east, west, north and south, each package bound by faults. Furthermore, the top of crustal

  6. Clustering Patterns of Engagement in Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs): The Use of Learning Analytics to Reveal Student Categories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Mohammad; Ebner, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) are remote courses that excel in their students' heterogeneity and quantity. Due to the peculiarity of being massiveness, the large datasets generated by MOOC platforms require advanced tools and techniques to reveal hidden patterns for purposes of enhancing learning and educational behaviors. This publication…

  7. A Babcock-Leighton solar dynamo model with multi-cellular meridional circulation in advection- and diffusion-dominated regimes

    CERN Document Server

    Belucz, Bernadett; Forgacs-Dajka, Emese

    2015-01-01

    Babcock-Leighton type solar dynamo models with single-celled meridional circulation are successful in reproducing many solar cycle features. Recent observations and theoretical models of meridional circulation do not indicate a single-celled flow pattern. We examine the role of complex multi-cellular circulation patterns in a Babcock-Leighton solar dynamo in advection- and diffusion-dominated regimes. We show from simulations that presence of a weak, second, high-latitude reverse cell speeds up the cycle and slightly enhances the poleward branch in butterfly diagram, whereas the presence of a second cell in depth reverses the tilt of butterfly wing to an anti-solar type. A butterfly diagram constructed from middle of convection zone yields a solar-like pattern, but this may be difficult to realize in the Sun because of magnetic buoyancy effects. Each of the above cases behaves similarly in higher and lower magnetic diffusivity regimes. However, our dynamo with a meridional circulation containing four cells in...

  8. ON THE ROLE OF TACHOCLINES IN SOLAR AND STELLAR DYNAMOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerrero, G. [Physics Department, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Av. Antonio Carlos, 6627, Belo Horizonte, MG, 31270-901 (Brazil); Smolarkiewicz, P. K. [European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts, Reading RG2 9AX (United Kingdom); De Gouveia Dal Pino, E. M. [Astronomy Department, IAG-USP Rua do mato, 1226, São Paulo, SP, 05508-090 (Brazil); Kosovichev, A. G. [New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ 07103 (United States); Mansour, N. N., E-mail: guerrero@fisica.ufmg.br, E-mail: smolar@ecmwf.int, E-mail: dalpino@astro.iag.usp.br, E-mail: sasha@bbso.njit.edu, E-mail: Nagi.N.Mansour@nasa.gov [NASA, Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, Mountain View, CA 94040 (United States)

    2016-03-10

    Rotational shear layers at the boundary between radiative and convective zones, tachoclines, play a key role in the process of magnetic field generation in solar-like stars. We present two sets of global simulations of rotating turbulent convection and dynamo. The first set considers a stellar convective envelope only; the second one, aiming at the formation of a tachocline, also considers the upper part of the radiative zone. Our results indicate that the resulting properties of the mean flows and dynamo, such as the growth rate, saturation energy, and mode, depend on the Rossby number (Ro). For the first set of models either oscillatory (with ∼2 yr period) or steady dynamo solutions are obtained. The models in the second set naturally develop a tachocline, which in turn leads to the generation of a strong mean magnetic field. Since the field is also deposited in the stable deeper layer, its evolutionary timescale is much longer than in the models without a tachocline. Surprisingly, the magnetic field in the upper turbulent convection zone evolves on the same timescale as the deep field. These models result in either an oscillatory dynamo with a ∼30 yr period or a steady dynamo depending on Ro. In terms of the mean-field dynamo coefficients computed using the first-order smoothing approximation, the field evolution in the oscillatory models without a tachocline seems to be consistent with dynamo waves propagating according to the Parker–Yoshimura sign rule. In the models with tachoclines the dynamics is more complex and involves other transport mechanisms as well as tachocline instabilities.

  9. Simulating and Predicting Solar Cycles Using a Flux-Transport Dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikpati, Mausumi; Gilman, Peter A.

    2006-09-01

    We construct a predictive tool based on a Babcock-Leighton-type flux-transport dynamo model of a solar cycle, run the model by updating the surface magnetic source using old cycles' data since cycle 12, and show that the model can correctly simulate the relative peaks of cycles 16-23. The simulations use the first four cycles to load the meridional circulation conveyor belt to create the Sun's memory about its past magnetic fields. Extending the simulation into the future, we predict that cycle 24 will be 30%-50% stronger than the current cycle 23. These simulations and predictions are robust for a wide range of convection zone magnetic diffusivity values between 3×1010 and 2×1011 cm2 s-1. Our model predictions are the same for three different treatments of the unknown surface magnetic source for the cycles to be predicted, namely (1) assuming some cyclic pattern, (2) incorporating ``zero'' surface source, or (3) including a surface source derived from the self-excited version of the dynamo model. Technique 3, for treating the surface source for cycles to be predicted, also shows significant skill in predicting two cycles ahead. Analyzing the evolution of magnetic field patterns over a full magnetic cycle, we show that the key to success of our prediction model lies in the formation of a ``seed'' for producing cycle n from the combination of latitudinal fields at high latitudes from three past cycles, n-1, n-2, and n-3, instead of the previous cycle's polar fields. These results have many implications for both solar and stellar dynamo modeling.

  10. Big data analyses reveal patterns and drivers of the movements of southern elephant seals

    KAUST Repository

    Rodríguez, Jorge P.

    2017-03-02

    The growing number of large databases of animal tracking provides an opportunity for analyses of movement patterns at the scales of populations and even species. We used analytical approaches, developed to cope with

  11. Phylogenomic Analyses Reveal Convergent Patterns of Adaptive Evolution in Elephant and Human Ancestries

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Morris Goodman; Kirstin N. Sterner; Munirul Islam; Monica Uddin; Chet C. Sherwood; Patrick R. Hof; Zhuo-Cheng Hou; Leonard Lipovich; Hui Jia; Lawrence I. Grossman; Derek E. Wildman

    2009-01-01

    .... Thus, we investigated whether the phylogenomic patterns of adaptive evolution are more similar between elephant and human than between either elephant and tenrec lineages or human and mouse lineages...

  12. Network catastrophe: self-organized patterns reveal both the instability and the structure of complex networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Hankyu; Lu, Tsai-Ching

    2015-03-30

    Critical events in society or biological systems can be understood as large-scale self-emergent phenomena due to deteriorating stability. We often observe peculiar patterns preceding these events, posing a question of-how to interpret the self-organized patterns to know more about the imminent crisis. We start with a very general description - of interacting population giving rise to large-scale emergent behaviors that constitute critical events. Then we pose a key question: is there a quantifiable relation between the network of interactions and the emergent patterns? Our investigation leads to a fundamental understanding to: 1. Detect the system's transition based on the principal mode of the pattern dynamics; 2. Identify its evolving structure based on the observed patterns. The main finding of this study is that while the pattern is distorted by the network of interactions, its principal mode is invariant to the distortion even when the network constantly evolves. Our analysis on real-world markets show common self-organized behavior near the critical transitions, such as housing market collapse and stock market crashes, thus detection of critical events before they are in full effect is possible.

  13. A DYNAMO application of microcomputer-based simulation in health sciences teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez Navarro, J D; Toval Alvarez, J A; Palacios Ortega, F; Sanchez Casado, M P; Perez Polo, M

    1993-10-01

    This paper presents a concrete application of microcomputer-based simulation in health sciences education. It shows a pharmacological system dynamics model representing graphics and numerical behaviour and relations between variables, which in addition allows interaction with students for experimentation. The work also illustrates a strategy for introducing this kind of model in the classroom, as well as the suitability of their implementation, in educational environments, using professional tools such as DYNAMO and DYNEX. Subsequent evaluation of the results and comments given by the students revealed more positive attitudes towards the discipline.

  14. UV Light Reveals the Diversity of Jurassic Shell Colour Patterns: Examples from the Cordebugle Lagerstätte (Calvados, France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caze, Bruno; Merle, Didier; Schneider, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Viewed under UV light the diverse and exceptionally well-preserved molluscs from the Late Jurassic Cordebugle Konservat Lagerstätte (Calvados, Normandy, France) reveal fluorescent fossil shell colour patterns predating the oldest previously known instance of such patterns by 100 Myr. Evidently, residual colour patterns are observable in Mesozoic molluscs by application of this non-destructive method, provided the shells are not decalcified or recrystallized. Among 46 species which are assigned to twelve gastropod families and eight bivalve families, no less than 25 species yielded positive results. Out of nine colour pattern morphologies that have been distinguished six occur in gastropods and three in bivalves. The presence of these variant morphologies clearly indicates a significant pre-Cenozoic diversification of colour patterns, especially in gastropods. In addition, the occurrence of two distinct types of fluorescence highlights a major difference in the chemical composition of the pigments involved in colour pattern formation in gastropods. This discovery enables us to discriminate members of higher clades, i.e. the Vetigastropoda emitting red fluorescence from the Caenogastropoda and Heterobranchia emitting whitish-beige to yellow fluorescence. Consequently, fluorescent colour patterns may help to allocate part of the numerous enigmatic Mesozoic gastropod taxa to their correct systematic position. PMID:26039592

  15. UV Light Reveals the Diversity of Jurassic Shell Colour Patterns: Examples from the Cordebugle Lagerstatte (Calvados, France.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Caze

    Full Text Available Viewed under UV light the diverse and exceptionally well-preserved molluscs from the Late Jurassic Cordebugle Konservat Lagerstätte (Calvados, Normandy, France reveal fluorescent fossil shell colour patterns predating the oldest previously known instance of such patterns by 100 Myr. Evidently, residual colour patterns are observable in Mesozoic molluscs by application of this non-destructive method, provided the shells are not decalcified or recrystallized. Among 46 species which are assigned to twelve gastropod families and eight bivalve families, no less than 25 species yielded positive results. Out of nine colour pattern morphologies that have been distinguished six occur in gastropods and three in bivalves. The presence of these variant morphologies clearly indicates a significant pre-Cenozoic diversification of colour patterns, especially in gastropods. In addition, the occurrence of two distinct types of fluorescence highlights a major difference in the chemical composition of the pigments involved in colour pattern formation in gastropods. This discovery enables us to discriminate members of higher clades, i.e. the Vetigastropoda emitting red fluorescence from the Caenogastropoda and Heterobranchia emitting whitish-beige to yellow fluorescence. Consequently, fluorescent colour patterns may help to allocate part of the numerous enigmatic Mesozoic gastropod taxa to their correct systematic position.

  16. Dynamos at extreme magnetic Prandtl numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Verma, Mahendra K

    2015-01-01

    We present a MHD shell model suitable for the computation of various energy fluxes of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence for very small and very large magnetic Prandtl numbers $\\mathrm{Pm}$; such computations are inaccessible to direct numerical simulations. For small $\\mathrm{Pm}$, we observe that the both kinetic and magnetic energy spectra scale as $k^{-5/3}$ in the inertial range, but the dissipative magnetic energy scales as $k^{-17/3}$. Here, the kinetic energy at large length scale feeds the large-scale magnetic field that cascades to small-scale magnetic field, which gets dissipated by Joule heating. The large $\\mathrm{Pm}$ dynamo has a similar behaviour except that the dissipative kinetic energy scales as $k^{-13/3}$. For this case, the large-scale velocity field transfers energy to large-scale magnetic field, which gets transferred to small-scale velocity and magnetic fields. The energy of the small-scale magnetic field also gets transferred to the small-scale velocity field. The energy accumulated at s...

  17. ECH on the Madison Plasma Dynamo Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milhone, Jason; Clark, Mike; Collins, Cami; Cooper, Chris; Katz, Noam; Nonn, Paul; Wallace, John; Forest, Cary

    2012-10-01

    The Madison Plasma Dynamo Experiment (MPDX) is a 3 meter diameter sphere consisting of 36 axisymmetric rings of samarium cobalt magnets in a ring-cusp configuration. Electrostatic electrodes on the edge will be used to spin the plasma. The purpose of MPDX is to study flow-driven magnetohydrodynamic instabilities. Electron cyclotron heating will be used for the ionization and heating of the plasma. A benefit of the ECH is the plasma will have hot electrons leading to good electrical conduction and high magnetic Reynolds number. In addition, direct heating of the electrons helps to obtain a large ionization fraction and a low neutral density. The ECH system on MPDX will consist of 5 separate lines distributed at various positions around the vacuum vessel. Each line will have a 20 kW magnetron operating in continuous wave mode at 2.45 GHz outputting in WR-340 waveguide. The power will be transferred to the vacuum vessel through WR-284 waveguide. Each line will contain a directional coupler for measuring reflected power. A manual 3-stub tuner will be used for impedance matching. The purpose of these elements is to optimize the efficiency of energy transfer to the plasma.

  18. Metric-torsion preheating: cosmic dynamo mechanism?

    CERN Document Server

    de Andrade, L C Garcia

    2014-01-01

    Earlier Bassett et al [Phys Rev D 63 (2001) 023506] investigated the amplification of large scale magnetic fields during preheating and inflation in several different models. They argued that in the presence of conductivity resonance effect is weakened. From a dynamo equation in spacetimes endowed with torsion recently derived by Garcia de Andrade [Phys Lett B 711: 143 (2012)] it is shown that a in a universe with pure torsion in Minkowski spacetime the cosmological magnetic field is enhanced by ohmic or non-conductivity effect, which shows that the metric-torsion effects is worth while of being studied. In this paper we investigated the metric-torsion preheating perturbation, which leads to the seed cosmological magnetic field in the universe with torsion is of the order of $B_{seed}\\sim{10^{-37}Gauss}$ which is several orders of magnitude weaker than the decoupling value obtained from pure metric preheating of $10^{-15}Gauss$. Despite of the weakness of the magnetic field this seed field may seed the galact...

  19. Transcriptome Analysis Revealed the Embryo-Induced Gene Expression Patterns in the Endometrium from Meishan and Yorkshire Pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiangnan Huang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The expression patterns in Meishan- and Yorkshire-derived endometrium during early (gestational day 15 and mid-gestation (gestational days 26 and 50 were investigated, respectively. Totally, 689 and 1649 annotated genes were identified to be differentially expressed in Meishan and Yorkshire endometrium during the three gestational stages, respectively. Hierarchical clustering analysis identified that, of the annotated differentially expressed genes (DEGs, 73 DEGs were unique to Meishan endometrium, 536 DEGs were unique to Yorkshire endometrium, and 228 DEGs were common in Meishan and Yorkshire endometriums. Subsequently, DEGs in each of the three types of expression patterns were grouped into four distinct categories according to the similarities in their temporal expression patterns. The expression patterns identified from the microarray analysis were validated by quantitative RT-PCR. The functional enrichment analysis revealed that the common DEGs were enriched in pathways of steroid metabolic process and regulation of retinoic acid receptor signaling. These unique DEGs in Meishan endometrium were involved in cell cycle and adherens junction. The DEGs unique to Yorkshire endometrium were associated with regulation of Rho protein signal transduction, maternal placenta development and cell proliferation. This study revealed the different gene expression patterns or pathways related to the endometrium remodeling in Meishan and Yorkshire pigs, respectively. These unique DEGs in either Meishan or Yorkshire endometriums may contribute to the divergence of the endometrium environment in the two pig breeds.

  20. The fate of alpha dynamos at large $Rm$

    CERN Document Server

    Cameron, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    At the heart of today's solar magnetic field evolution models lies the alpha dynamo description. In this work, we investigate the fate of alpha-dynamos as the magnetic Reynolds number $Rm$ is increased. Using Floquet theory, we are able to precisely quantify mean field effects like the alpha and beta effect (i) by rigorously distinguishing dynamo modes that involve large scale components from the ones that only involve small scales, and by (ii) providing a way to investigate arbitrary large scale separations with minimal computational cost. We apply this framework to helical and non-helical flows as well as to random flows with short correlation time. Our results determine that the alpha-description is valid for $Rm$ smaller than a critical value $Rm_c$ at which small scale dynamo instability starts. When $Rm$ is above $Rm_c$ the dynamo ceases to follow the mean field description and the growth rate of the large scale modes becomes independent of the scale separation while the energy in the large scale modes ...

  1. Shear-driven dynamo waves at high magnetic Reynolds number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, S M; Cattaneo, F

    2013-05-23

    Astrophysical magnetic fields often display remarkable organization, despite being generated by dynamo action driven by turbulent flows at high conductivity. An example is the eleven-year solar cycle, which shows spatial coherence over the entire solar surface. The difficulty in understanding the emergence of this large-scale organization is that whereas at low conductivity (measured by the magnetic Reynolds number, Rm) dynamo fields are well organized, at high Rm their structure is dominated by rapidly varying small-scale fluctuations. This arises because the smallest scales have the highest rate of strain, and can amplify magnetic field most efficiently. Therefore most of the effort to find flows whose large-scale dynamo properties persist at high Rm has been frustrated. Here we report high-resolution simulations of a dynamo that can generate organized fields at high Rm; indeed, the generation mechanism, which involves the interaction between helical flows and shear, only becomes effective at large Rm. The shear does not enhance generation at large scales, as is commonly thought; instead it reduces generation at small scales. The solution consists of propagating dynamo waves, whose existence was postulated more than 60 years ago and which have since been used to model the solar cycle.

  2. THE TURBULENT DYNAMO IN HIGHLY COMPRESSIBLE SUPERSONIC PLASMAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Federrath, Christoph [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia); Schober, Jennifer [Universität Heidelberg, Zentrum für Astronomie, Institut für Theoretische Astrophysik, Albert-Ueberle-Strasse 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Bovino, Stefano; Schleicher, Dominik R. G., E-mail: christoph.federrath@anu.edu.au [Institut für Astrophysik, Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany)

    2014-12-20

    The turbulent dynamo may explain the origin of cosmic magnetism. While the exponential amplification of magnetic fields has been studied for incompressible gases, little is known about dynamo action in highly compressible, supersonic plasmas, such as the interstellar medium of galaxies and the early universe. Here we perform the first quantitative comparison of theoretical models of the dynamo growth rate and saturation level with three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical simulations of supersonic turbulence with grid resolutions of up to 1024{sup 3} cells. We obtain numerical convergence and find that dynamo action occurs for both low and high magnetic Prandtl numbers Pm = ν/η = 0.1-10 (the ratio of viscous to magnetic dissipation), which had so far only been seen for Pm ≥ 1 in supersonic turbulence. We measure the critical magnetic Reynolds number, Rm{sub crit}=129{sub −31}{sup +43}, showing that the compressible dynamo is almost as efficient as in incompressible gas. Considering the physical conditions of the present and early universe, we conclude that magnetic fields need to be taken into account during structure formation from the early to the present cosmic ages, because they suppress gas fragmentation and drive powerful jets and outflows, both greatly affecting the initial mass function of stars.

  3. Modelling the dynamo in fully convective M-stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Rakesh Kumar; Christensen, Ulrich; Morin, Julien; Wolk, Scott; Poppenhaeger, Katja; Reiners, Ansgar; gastine, Thomas

    2017-05-01

    M-stars are among the most active and numerous stars in our galaxy. Their activity plays a fundamentally important role in shaping the exoplanetary biosphere since the habitable zones are very close to these stars. Therefore, modeling M-star activity has become a focal point in habitability studies. The fully convective members of the M-star population demand more immediate attention due to the discovery of Earth-like exoplanets around our stellar neighbors Proxima Centauri and TRAPPIST-1 which are both fully convective. The activity of these stars is driven by their convective dynamo, which may be fundamentally different from the solar dynamo due the absence of radiative cores. We model this dynamo mechanism using high-resolution 3D anelastic MHD simulations. To understand the evolution of the dynamo mechanism we simulate two cases, one with a fast enough rotation period to model a star in the `saturated' regime of the rotation-activity realtionship and the other with a slower period to represent cases in the `unsaturated' regime. We find the rotation period fundamentally controls the behavior of the dynamo solution: faster rotation promotes strong magnetic fields (of order kG) on both small and large length scales and the dipolar component of the magnetic field is dominant and stable, however, slower rotation leads to weaker magnetic fields which exhibit cyclic behavior. In this talk, I will present the simulation results and discuss how we can use them to interpret several observed features of the M-star activity.

  4. Numerical Simulations of Dynamos Generated in Spherical Couette Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Guervilly, Céline; 10.1080/03091920903550955

    2010-01-01

    We numerically investigate the efficiency of a spherical Couette flow at generating a self-sustained magnetic field. No dynamo action occurs for axisymmetric flow while we always found a dynamo when non-axisymmetric hydrodynamical instabilities are excited. Without rotation of the outer sphere, typical critical magnetic Reynolds numbers $Rm_c$ are of the order of a few thousands. They increase as the mechanical forcing imposed by the inner core on the flow increases (Reynolds number $Re$). Namely, no dynamo is found if the magnetic Prandtl number $Pm=Rm/Re$ is less than a critical value $Pm_c\\sim 1$. Oscillating quadrupolar dynamos are present in the vicinity of the dynamo onset. Saturated magnetic fields obtained in supercritical regimes (either $Re>2 Re_c$ or $Pm>2Pm_c$) correspond to the equipartition between magnetic and kinetic energies. A global rotation of the system (Ekman numbers $E=10^{-3}, 10^{-4}$) yields to a slight decrease (factor 2) of the critical magnetic Prandtl number, but we find a peculi...

  5. Spatial Nonlocality of the Small-Scale Solar Dynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Lamb, Derek A; DeForest, Craig E

    2014-01-01

    We explore the nature of the small-scale solar dynamo by tracking magnetic features. We investigate two previously-explored categories of the small-scale solar dynamo: shallow and deep. Recent modeling work on the shallow dynamo has produced a number of scenarios for how a strong network concentration can influence the formation and polarity of nearby small-scale magnetic features. These scenarios have measurable signatures, which we test for here using magnetograms from the Narrowband Filter Imager (NFI) on Hinode. We find no statistical tendency for newly-formed magnetic features to cluster around or away from network concentrations, nor do we find any statistical relationship between their polarities. We conclude that there is no shallow or "surface" dynamo on the spatial scales observable by Hinode/NFI. In light of these results, we offer a scenario in which the sub-surface field in a deep solar dynamo is stretched and distorted via turbulence, allowing the field to emerge at random locations on the photo...

  6. Fluctuation Dynamo and Turbulent Induction at Small Prandtl Number

    CERN Document Server

    Eyink, Gregory L

    2010-01-01

    We study the Lagrangian mechanism of the fluctuation dynamo at zero Prandtl number and infinite magnetic Reynolds number, in the Kazantsev-Kraichnan model of white-noise advection. With a rough velocity field corresponding to a turbulent inertial-range, flux-freezing holds only in a stochastic sense. We show that field-lines arriving to the same point which were initially separated by many resistive lengths are important to the dynamo. Magnetic vectors of the seed field that point parallel to the initial separation vector arrive anti-correlated and produce an "anti-dynamo" effect. We also study the problem of "magnetic induction" of a spatially uniform seed field. We find no essential distinction between this process and fluctuation dynamo, both producing the same growth-rates and small-scale magnetic correlations. In the regime of very rough velocity fields where fluctuation dynamo fails, we obtain the induced magnetic energy spectra. We use these results to evaluate theories proposed for magnetic spectra in...

  7. Measurement of the dynamo effect in a plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, H. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Prager, S.C.; Almagri, A.F.; Sarff, J.S. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Physics; Hirano, Y. [Electrotechnical Lab., Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan). Plasma Section; Toyama, H. [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Physics

    1995-11-01

    A series of the detailed experiments has been conducted in three laboratory plasma devices to measure the dynamo electric field along the equilibrium field line (the {alpha} effect) arising from the correlation between the fluctuating flow velocity and magnetic field. The fluctuating flow velocity is obtained from probe measurement of the fluctuating E x B drift and electron diamagnetic drift. The three major findings are (1) the {alpha} effect accounts for the dynamo current generation, even in the time dependence through a ``sawtooth`` cycle; (2) at low collisionality the dynamo is explained primarily by the widely studied pressureless Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model, i.e., the fluctuating velocity is dominated by the E x B drift; (3) at high collisionality, a new ``electron diamagnetic dynamo`` is observed, in which the fluctuating velocity is dominated by the diamagnetic drift. In addition, direct measurements of the helicity flux indicate that the dynamo activity transports magnetic helicity from one part of the plasma to another, but the total helicity is roughly conserved, verifying J.B. Taylor`s conjecture.

  8. Genome editing in butterflies reveals that spalt promotes and Distal-less represses eyespot colour patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Linlin; Reed, Robert D

    2016-06-15

    Butterfly eyespot colour patterns are a key example of how a novel trait can appear in association with the co-option of developmental patterning genes. Little is known, however, about how, or even whether, co-opted genes function in eyespot development. Here we use CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing to determine the roles of two co-opted transcription factors that are expressed during early eyespot determination. We found that deletions in a single gene, spalt, are sufficient to reduce or completely delete eyespot colour patterns, thus demonstrating a positive regulatory role for this gene in eyespot determination. Conversely, and contrary to previous predictions, deletions in Distal-less (Dll) result in an increase in the size and number of eyespots, illustrating a repressive role for this gene in eyespot development. Altogether our results show that the presence, absence and shape of butterfly eyespots can be controlled by the activity of two co-opted transcription factors.

  9. Temporal motifs reveal homophily, gender-specific patterns and group talk in mobile communication networks

    CERN Document Server

    Kovanen, Lauri; Kertész, János; Saramäki, Jari

    2013-01-01

    Electronic communication records provide detailed information about temporal aspects of human interaction. Previous studies have shown that individuals' communication patterns have complex temporal structure, and that this structure has system-wide effects. In this paper we use mobile phone records to show that interaction patterns involving multiple individuals have non-trivial temporal structure that cannot be deduced from a network presentation where only interaction frequencies are taken into account. We apply a recently introduced method, temporal motifs, to identify interaction patterns in a temporal network where nodes have additional attributes such as gender and age. We then develop a null model that allows identifying differences between various types of nodes so that these differences are independent of the network based on interaction frequencies. We find gender-related differences in communication patters, and show the existence of temporal homophily, the tendency of similar individuals to partic...

  10. Genome-wide analysis reveals a complex pattern of genomic imprinting in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason B Wolf

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Parent-of-origin-dependent gene expression resulting from genomic imprinting plays an important role in modulating complex traits ranging from developmental processes to cognitive abilities and associated disorders. However, while gene-targeting techniques have allowed for the identification of imprinted loci, very little is known about the contribution of imprinting to quantitative variation in complex traits. Most studies, furthermore, assume a simple pattern of imprinting, resulting in either paternal or maternal gene expression; yet, more complex patterns of effects also exist. As a result, the distribution and number of different imprinting patterns across the genome remain largely unexplored. We address these unresolved issues using a genome-wide scan for imprinted quantitative trait loci (iQTL affecting body weight and growth in mice using a novel three-generation design. We identified ten iQTL that display much more complex and diverse effect patterns than previously assumed, including four loci with effects similar to the callipyge mutation found in sheep. Three loci display a new phenotypic pattern that we refer to as bipolar dominance, where the two heterozygotes are different from each other while the two homozygotes are identical to each other. Our study furthermore detected a paternally expressed iQTL on Chromosome 7 in a region containing a known imprinting cluster with many paternally expressed genes. Surprisingly, the effects of the iQTL were mostly restricted to traits expressed after weaning. Our results imply that the quantitative effects of an imprinted allele at a locus depend both on its parent of origin and the allele it is paired with. Our findings also show that the imprinting pattern of a locus can be variable over ontogenetic time and, in contrast to current views, may often be stronger at later stages in life.

  11. Substrates with patterned extracellular matrix and subcellular stiffness gradients reveal local biomechanical responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Peter; Di Carlo, Dino

    2014-02-26

    A substrate fabrication process is developed to pattern both the extracellular matrix (ECM) and rigidity at sub-cellular spatial resolution. When growing cells on these substrates, it is found that cells respond locally in their cytoskeleton assembly. The presented method allows unique insight into the biological interpretation of mechanical signals, whereas photolithography-based fabrication is amenable to integration with complex microfabricated substructures.

  12. Activity patterns of free-ranging koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus revealed by accelerometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle A Ryan

    Full Text Available An understanding of koala activity patterns is important for measuring the behavioral response of this species to environmental change, but to date has been limited by the logistical challenges of traditional field methodologies. We addressed this knowledge gap by using tri-axial accelerometer data loggers attached to VHF radio collars to examine activity patterns of adult male and female koalas in a high-density population at Cape Otway, Victoria, Australia. Data were obtained from 27 adult koalas over two 7-d periods during the breeding season: 12 in the early-breeding season in November 2010, and 15 in the late-breeding season in January 2011. Multiple 15 minute observation blocks on each animal were used for validation of activity patterns determined from the accelerometer data loggers. Accelerometry was effective in distinguishing between inactive (sleeping, resting and active (grooming, feeding and moving behaviors. Koalas were more active during the early-breeding season with a higher index of movement (overall dynamic body acceleration [ODBA] for both males and females. Koalas showed a distinct temporal pattern of behavior, with most activity occurring from mid-afternoon to early morning. Accelerometry has potential for examining fine-scale behavior of a wide range of arboreal and terrestrial species.

  13. Multivoxel Patterns Reveal Functionally Differentiated Networks Underlying Auditory Feedback Processing of Speech

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Zane Z.; Vicente-Grabovetsky, Alejandro; MacDonald, Ewen N.

    2013-01-01

    within a multivoxel pattern analysis framework, that this sensorimotor process is supported by functionally differentiated brain networks. During scanning, a real-time speech-tracking system was used to deliver two acoustically different types of distorted auditory feedback or unaltered feedback while...

  14. Activity Patterns of Free-Ranging Koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus) Revealed by Accelerometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Michelle A.; Whisson, Desley A.; Holland, Greg J.; Arnould, John P. Y.

    2013-01-01

    An understanding of koala activity patterns is important for measuring the behavioral response of this species to environmental change, but to date has been limited by the logistical challenges of traditional field methodologies. We addressed this knowledge gap by using tri-axial accelerometer data loggers attached to VHF radio collars to examine activity patterns of adult male and female koalas in a high-density population at Cape Otway, Victoria, Australia. Data were obtained from 27 adult koalas over two 7-d periods during the breeding season: 12 in the early-breeding season in November 2010, and 15 in the late-breeding season in January 2011. Multiple 15 minute observation blocks on each animal were used for validation of activity patterns determined from the accelerometer data loggers. Accelerometry was effective in distinguishing between inactive (sleeping, resting) and active (grooming, feeding and moving) behaviors. Koalas were more active during the early-breeding season with a higher index of movement (overall dynamic body acceleration [ODBA]) for both males and females. Koalas showed a distinct temporal pattern of behavior, with most activity occurring from mid-afternoon to early morning. Accelerometry has potential for examining fine-scale behavior of a wide range of arboreal and terrestrial species. PMID:24224050

  15. Activity patterns of free-ranging koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus) revealed by accelerometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Michelle A; Whisson, Desley A; Holland, Greg J; Arnould, John P Y

    2013-01-01

    An understanding of koala activity patterns is important for measuring the behavioral response of this species to environmental change, but to date has been limited by the logistical challenges of traditional field methodologies. We addressed this knowledge gap by using tri-axial accelerometer data loggers attached to VHF radio collars to examine activity patterns of adult male and female koalas in a high-density population at Cape Otway, Victoria, Australia. Data were obtained from 27 adult koalas over two 7-d periods during the breeding season: 12 in the early-breeding season in November 2010, and 15 in the late-breeding season in January 2011. Multiple 15 minute observation blocks on each animal were used for validation of activity patterns determined from the accelerometer data loggers. Accelerometry was effective in distinguishing between inactive (sleeping, resting) and active (grooming, feeding and moving) behaviors. Koalas were more active during the early-breeding season with a higher index of movement (overall dynamic body acceleration [ODBA]) for both males and females. Koalas showed a distinct temporal pattern of behavior, with most activity occurring from mid-afternoon to early morning. Accelerometry has potential for examining fine-scale behavior of a wide range of arboreal and terrestrial species.

  16. Reduced representation bisulphite sequencing of the cattle genome reveals DNA methylation patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Using reduced representation bisulphite sequencing (RRBS), we obtained the first single-base-resolution maps of bovine DNA methylation in ten somatic tissues. In total, we observed 1,868,049 cytosines in the CG-enriched regions. Similar to the methylation patterns in other species, the CG context wa...

  17. Chronic malaria revealed by a new fluorescence pattern on the antinuclear autoantibodies test.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Hommel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several clinical forms of malaria such as chronic carriage, gestational malaria or hyper-reactive malarial splenomegaly may follow a cryptic evolution with afebrile chronic fatigue sometimes accompanied by anemia and/or splenomegaly. Conventional parasitological tests are often negative or not performed, and severe complications may occur. Extensive explorations of these conditions often include the search for antinuclear autoantibodies (ANA. METHODS: We analysed fluorescence patterns in the ANA test in patients with either chronic cryptic or acute symptomatic malaria, then conducted a one-year prospective study at a single hospital on all available sera drawn for ANA detections. We then identified autoantibodies differentially expressed in malaria patients and in controls using human protein microarray. RESULTS: We uncovered and defined a new, malaria-related, nucleo-cytoplasmic ANA pattern displaying the specific association of a nuclear speckled pattern with diffuse cytoplasmic perinuclearly-enhanced fluorescence. In the one-year prospective analysis, 79% of sera displaying this new nucleo-cytoplasmic fluorescence were from patients with malaria. This specific pattern, not seen in other parasitic diseases, allowed a timely reorientation of the diagnosis toward malaria. To assess if the autoantibody immune response was due to autoreactivity or molecular mimicry we isolated 42 autoantigens, targets of malarial autoantibodies. BLAST analysis indicated that 23 of recognized autoantigens were homologous to plasmodial proteins suggesting autoimmune responses directly driven by the plasmodial infection. CONCLUSION: In patients with malaria in whom parasitological tests have not been performed recognition of this new, malaria-related fluorescence pattern on the ANA test is highly suggestive of the diagnosis and triggers immediate, easy confirmation and adapted therapy.

  18. Nonlinear Magnetic Diffusion and Magnetic Helicity Transport in Galactic Dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Kleeorin, N; Rogachevskii, I; Sokoloff, D D

    2003-01-01

    We have extended our previous mean-field galactic dynamo model which included algebraic and dynamic alpha nonlinearities (Kleeorin et al., A&A, v. 387, 453, 2002), to include also a quenching of turbulent diffusivity. We readily obtain equilibrium states for the large-scale magnetic field in the local disc dynamo model, and these fields have strengths that are comparable to the equipartition field strength. We find that the algebraic nonlinearity alone (i.e. quenching of both the alpha effect and turbulent magnetic diffusion) cannot saturate the growth of the mean magnetic field; only the combined effect of algebraic and dynamic nonlinearities can limit the growth of the mean magnetic field. However, in contrast to our earlier work without quenching of the turbulent diffusivity, we cannot now find satisfactory solutions in the no-z approximation to the axisymmetric galactic dynamo problem.

  19. Suppression of a kinematic dynamo by large shear

    CERN Document Server

    Sood, Aditi; Kim, Eun-jin

    2016-01-01

    We numerically solve the magnetic induction equation in a spherical shell geometry, with a kinematically prescribed axisymmetric flow that consists of a superposition of a small-scale helical flow and a large-scale shear flow. The small-scale flow is chosen to be a local analog of the classical Roberts cells, consisting of strongly helical vortex rolls. The large-scale flow is a shearing motion in either the radial or the latitudinal directions. In the absence of large-scale shear, the small-scale flow is an efficient dynamo, in agreement with previous results. Adding increasingly large shear flows strongly suppresses the dynamo efficiency, indicating that shear is not always a favourable ingredient in dynamo action.

  20. The solar dynamo: inferences from observations and modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Kitchatinov, L L

    2014-01-01

    It can be shown on observational grounds that two basic effects of dynamo theory for solar activity - production of the toroidal field from the poloidal one by differential rotation and reverse conversion of the toroidal field to the poloidal configuration by helical motions - are operating in the Sun. These two effects, however, do not suffice for constructing a realistic model for the solar dynamo. Only when a non-local version of the alpha-effect is applied, is downward diamagnetic pumping included and field advection by the equatorward meridional flow near the base of the convection zone allowed for, can the observed activity cycles be closely reproduced. Fluctuations in the alpha-effect can be estimated from sunspot data. Dynamo models with fluctuating parameters reproduce irregularities of solar cycles including the grand activity minima. The physics of parametric excitation of irregularities remains, however, to be understood.

  1. The Magnetic Furnace: Intense Core Dynamos in B-stars

    CERN Document Server

    Augustson, Kyle C; Toomre, Juri

    2016-01-01

    The dynamo action achieved in the convective cores of main-sequence massive stars is explored here through 3-D global simulations of convective core dynamos operating within a young 10$M_{\\mathrm{sun}}$ B-type star, using the anelastic spherical harmonic (ASH) code. These simulations capture the inner 65% of this star by radius, encompassing the convective nuclear-burning core (about 23% by radius) and a portion of the overlying radiative envelope. Eight rotation rates are considered, ranging from 0.05% to 16% of the surface breakup velocity, thereby capturing both convection barely sensing the effects of rotation to others in which the Coriolis forces are prominent. The vigorous dynamo action realized within all of these turbulent convective cores builds magnetic fields with peak strengths exceeding a megagauss, with the overall magnetic energy (ME) in the faster rotators reaching super-equipartition levels compared to the convective kinetic energy (KE). The core convection typically involves turbulent colum...

  2. Direct numerical simulations of helical dynamo action: MHD and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. O. Gómez

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetohydrodynamic dynamo action is often invoked to explain the existence of magnetic fields in several astronomical objects. In this work, we present direct numerical simulations of MHD helical dynamos, to study the exponential growth and saturation of magnetic fields. Simulations are made within the framework of incompressible flows and using periodic boundary conditions. The statistical properties of the flow are studied, and it is found that its helicity displays strong spatial fluctuations. Regions with large kinetic helicity are also strongly concentrated in space, forming elongated structures. In dynamo simulations using these flows, we found that the growth rate and the saturation level of magnetic energy and magnetic helicity reach an asymptotic value as the Reynolds number is increased. Finally, extensions of the MHD theory to include kinetic effects relevant in astrophysical environments are discussed.

  3. Predicting cycle 24 using various dynamo-based tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dikpati

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Various dynamo-based techniques have been used to predict the mean solar cycle features, namely the amplitude and the timings of onset and peak. All methods use information from previous cycles, including particularly polar fields, drift-speed of the sunspot zone to the equator, and remnant magnetic flux from the decay of active regions. Polar fields predict a low cycle 24, while spot zone migration and remnant flux both lead to predictions of a high cycle 24. These methods both predict delayed onset for cycle 24. We will describe how each of these methods relates to dynamo processes. We will present the latest results from our flux-transport dynamo, including some sensitivity tests and how our model relates to polar fields and spot zone drift methods.

  4. Hall current effects in mean-field dynamo theory

    CERN Document Server

    Lingam, Manasvi

    2016-01-01

    The role of the Hall term on large scale dynamo action is investigated by means of the First Order Smoothing Approximation. It is shown that the standard $\\alpha$ coefficient is altered, and is zero when a specific double Beltrami state is attained, in contrast to the Alfv\\'enic state for MHD dynamos. The $\\beta$ coefficient is no longer positive definite, and thereby enables dynamo action even if $\\alpha$-quenching were to operate. The similarities and differences with the (magnetic) shear-current effect are pointed out, and a mechanism that may be potentially responsible for $\\beta < 0$ is advanced. The results are compared against previous studies, and their astrophysical relevance is also highlighted.

  5. Small-Scale Dynamo Action in Primordial Halos

    CERN Document Server

    Schober, Jennifer; Klessen, Ralf S; Federrath, Christoph; Bovino, Stefano; Glover, Simon; Banerjee, Robi

    2012-01-01

    The first galaxies form due to gravitational collapse of primordial halos. During this collapse, weak magnetic seed fields get amplified exponentially by the small-scale dynamo - a process converting kinetic energy from turbulence into magnetic energy. We use the Kazantsev theory, which describes the small-scale dynamo analytically, to study magnetic field amplification for different turbulent velocity correlation functions. For incompressible turbulence (Kolmogorov turbulence), we find that the growth rate is proportional to the square root of the hydrodynamic Reynolds number, Re^(1/2). In the case of highly compressible turbulence (Burgers turbulence) the growth rate increases proportional to Re^(1/3). With a detailed chemical network we are able to follow the chemical evolution and determine the kinetic and magnetic viscosities (due to Ohmic and ambipolar diffusion) during the collapse of the halo. This way, we can calculate the growth rate of the small-scale dynamo quantitatively and predict the evolution...

  6. Convection-driven dynamos in the limit of rapid rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calkins, Michael; Long, Louie; Nieves, David; Julien, Keith; Tobias, Steven

    2016-11-01

    Most large-scale planetary magnetic fields are thought to be driven by rapidly rotating convection. Direct numerical simulation (DNS) remains an important tool for investigating the physics of dynamos, but remains severely restricted in parameter space relative to geo- and astrophysical systems. Asymptotic models provide a complimentary approach to DNS that have the ability to access planetary-like magnetohydrodynamical regimes. We utilize an asymptotic dynamo model to investigate the influence of convective flow regime on dynamo action. We find that the spatial characteristics of the large-scale magnetic field are dependent only weakly on changes in flow behavior. In contrast, the behavior of the small-scale magnetic field is directly dependent on, and therefore shows significant variations with, the small-scale convective flow field. These results may suggest why many previous DNS studies, which reside in a vastly different parameter space relative to planets, are nonetheless successful in reproducing many of the observed features of planetary magnetic fields.

  7. Low Cost X-ray Optics for Studying StellarDynamo Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rust, Thomas; Acton, L.; Kankelborg, C.; Martens, P.

    2007-05-01

    Comparison of measured coronal X-ray variability over stellar magnetic dynamo cycles with theoretical models will yield new understanding of the solar magnetic dynamo cycle. We present the results of a study comparing surface roughnesses of three candidate materials for use as glancing angle X-ray reflectors. This work is part of a continuing effort by MSU's Solar Physics Group and Space Science Engineering Laboratory (SSEL) to design and build large aperture, low cost X-ray optics for space experiments. The MSU proposed SADE (Starspot and Dynamo Explorer) instrument would use arrays of nested Kirkpatrick-Baez reflectors, called STAX (Sade Telescope Array for X-rays), for long term measurements of soft X-ray fluxes from about a hundred nearby solar-type stars. The advantage of the STAX design is that it uses "off the shelf" materials bent to shape, which is far cheaper and easier to manufacture than the polished cylindrical optics typically used in X-ray telescopes. In order to determine whether off the shelf materials satisfy the stringent surface smoothness requirements for glancing angle reflectors, we have undertaken an atomic force microscope investigation of three candidate materials. In addition, we compare the measured and theoretical diffraction pattern of our existing STAX test article. This comparison will provide insight into the suitability of the candidate material, as well as the feasibility of maintaining proper shape over the surface of the reflector by constraining the edges in precision machined grooves. This work is supported by a grant from MSU/NASA EPSCOR.

  8. EFFECTS OF LARGE-SCALE NON-AXISYMMETRIC PERTURBATIONS IN THE MEAN-FIELD SOLAR DYNAMO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pipin, V. V. [Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences (Russian Federation); Kosovichev, A. G. [W.W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2015-11-10

    We explore the response of a nonlinear non-axisymmetric mean-field solar dynamo model to shallow non-axisymmetric perturbations. After a relaxation period, the amplitude of the non-axisymmetric field depends on the initial condition, helicity conservation, and the depth of perturbation. It is found that a perturbation that is anchored at 0.9 R{sub ⊙} has a profound effect on the dynamo process, producing a transient magnetic cycle of the axisymmetric magnetic field, if it is initiated at the growing phase of the cycle. The non-symmetric, with respect to the equator, perturbation results in a hemispheric asymmetry of the magnetic activity. The evolution of the axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric fields depends on the turbulent magnetic Reynolds number R{sub m}. In the range of R{sub m} = 10{sup 4}–10{sup 6} the evolution returns to the normal course in the next cycle, in which the non-axisymmetric field is generated due to a nonlinear α-effect and magnetic buoyancy. In the stationary state, the large-scale magnetic field demonstrates a phenomenon of “active longitudes” with cyclic 180° “flip-flop” changes of the large-scale magnetic field orientation. The flip-flop effect is known from observations of solar and stellar magnetic cycles. However, this effect disappears in the model, which includes the meridional circulation pattern determined by helioseismology. The rotation rate of the non-axisymmetric field components varies during the relaxation period and carries important information about the dynamo process.

  9. Pattern of trends in stock markets as revealed by the renormalization method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H. S.; Shen, X. Y.; Huang, J. P.

    2016-08-01

    Predicting the movement of prices is a challenging topic in financial markets. So far, many investigations have been performed to help understand the dynamics of stock prices. In this work, we utilize the renormalization method to analyze the scaling and pattern of stock price trends. According to the analysis of length and changing velocity of the price trends, we find that there exist asymmetric phenomena of the trends in American stock market. In addition, a stronger Herd behavior is also discovered in the Chinese stock market. Since the Chinese (American) stock market is a representative of emerging (mature) market, the study on comparing the markets between these two countries is of potential value, which can leave us a wiser about both the pattern of the markets and the underlying physical mechanisms.

  10. Development of Betta splendens embryos and larvae reveals variation in pigmentation patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Alexis N; Lyvers, Benjamin H; Ferrill, Rachel N; Johnson, Rachel L; Dumaine, Anne Marie; Sly, Belinda J

    2016-06-01

    Vertebrate pigmentation provides an ideal system for studying the intersections between evolution, genetics, and developmental biology. Teleost fish, with their accessible developmental stages and intense and diverse colours produced by chromatophores, are an ideal group for study. We set out to test whether Betta splendens is a good model organism for studying the evolution and development of diverse pigmentation. Our results demonstrate that B. splendens can be bred to produce large numbers of offspring with easily visualized pigment cells. Depending on the colour of the parents, there was variation in larval pigmentation patterns both within and between breeding events. In juveniles the developing adult pigmentation patterns showed even greater variation. These results suggest that B. splendens has great potential as a model organism for pigmentation studies.

  11. Aging in the natural world: comparative data reveal similar mortality patterns across primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronikowski, Anne M; Altmann, Jeanne; Brockman, Diane K; Cords, Marina; Fedigan, Linda M; Pusey, Anne; Stoinski, Tara; Morris, William F; Strier, Karen B; Alberts, Susan C

    2011-03-11

    Human senescence patterns-late onset of mortality increase, slow mortality acceleration, and exceptional longevity-are often described as unique in the animal world. Using an individual-based data set from longitudinal studies of wild populations of seven primate species, we show that contrary to assumptions of human uniqueness, human senescence falls within the primate continuum of aging; the tendency for males to have shorter life spans and higher age-specific mortality than females throughout much of adulthood is a common feature in many, but not all, primates; and the aging profiles of primate species do not reflect phylogenetic position. These findings suggest that mortality patterns in primates are shaped by local selective forces rather than phylogenetic history.

  12. Mixture model of pottery decorations from Lake Chad Basin archaeological sites reveals ancient segregation patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, John D; Lin, Kathryn; MacEachern, Scott

    2016-03-30

    We present a new statistical approach to analysing an extremely common archaeological data type--potsherds--that infers the structure of cultural relationships across a set of excavation units (EUs). This method, applied to data from a set of complex, culturally heterogeneous sites around the Mandara mountains in the Lake Chad Basin, helps elucidate cultural succession through the Neolithic and Iron Age. We show how the approach can be integrated with radiocarbon dates to provide detailed portraits of cultural dynamics and deposition patterns within single EUs. In this context, the analysis supports ancient cultural segregation analogous to historical ethnolinguistic patterning in the region. We conclude with a discussion of the many possible model extensions using other archaeological data types.

  13. Age differences in the neural representation of working memory revealed by multi-voxel pattern analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua eCarp

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Working memory function declines across the lifespan. Computational models of aging attribute such memory impairments to reduced distinctiveness between neural representations of different mental states in old age, a phenomenon termed dedifferentiation. These models predict that neural distinctiveness should be reduced uniformly across experimental conditions in older adults. In contrast, the Compensation-Related Utilization of Neural Circuits Hypothesis (CRUNCH model predicts that the distinctiveness of neural representations should be increased in older adults (relative to young adults at low levels of task demand but reduced at high levels of demand. The present study used multi-voxel pattern analysis (MVPA to measure the effects of age and task demands on the distinctiveness of the neural representations of verbal and visuospatial working memory. Neural distinctiveness was estimated separately for memory encoding, maintenance, and retrieval, and for low, medium, and high memory loads. Results from sensory cortex during encoding and retrieval were consistent with the dedifferentiation hypothesis: distinctiveness of visual cortical representations during these phases was uniformly reduced in older adults, irrespective of memory load. However, maintenance-related responses in prefrontal and parietal regions yielded a strikingly different pattern of results. At low loads, older adults showed higher distinctiveness than younger adults; at high loads, this pattern reversed, such that distinctiveness was higher in young adults. This interaction between age group and memory load is at odds with the dedifferentiation hypothesis but consistent with CRUNCH. In sum, our results provide partial support for both dedifferentiation- and compensation-based models; we argue that comprehensive theories of cognitive aging must incorporate aspects of both models to fully explain complex patterns of age-related neuro-cognitive change.

  14. I can see where you would be: Patterns of fMRI activity reveal imagined landmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccia, Maddalena; Sulpizio, Valentina; Palermo, Liana; Piccardi, Laura; Guariglia, Cecilia; Galati, Gaspare

    2017-01-01

    Visual mental imagery arises when perceptual information is accessed from memory, originating the experience of "seeing with the mind's eye". Different content-dependent brain areas in the human ventral visual stream are activated during visual mental imagery, similarly to what happens during visual perception. The neural patterns within these regions, but not in the early visual cortex, are similar during imagery and perception, suggesting that, in the absence of perceptual stimulation, content-dependent brain areas are able to re-instantiate specific neural patterns allowing for mental imagery. However, it remains unknown whether these areas contain adequate neural representations that create mental images or need to interact with other regions in the brain, such as the hippocampus (HC), to access the necessary information from memory. To test this hypothesis, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging and both multivoxel pattern classification and psychophysiological interaction analyses. Participants were scanned while viewing or imagining scenes of familiar environments. We found that the identity of familiar places can be decoded from the neural patterns in the parahippocampal place area (PPA), retrosplenial complex/parieto-occipital sulcus (RSC/POS) and HC, during both imagery and perception, and that item-specific information from perceived places was re-instantiated during mental imagery of the same places and vice versa. Furthermore, the right PPA significantly interacted with the right HC and RSC/POS according to the performed task. Specifically, the functional coupling between PPA and HC was higher during mental imagery, whereas the functional coupling between PPA and RSC/POS was higher during perception. Our investigation provides an important contribution to the understanding of how the brain uses previously acquired knowledge to build a mental representation of the world. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Mass spectrometric profiling reveals association of N-glycan patterns with epithelial ovarian cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huanhuan; Deng, Zaian; Huang, Chuncui; Wu, Hongmei; Zhao, Xia; Li, Yan

    2017-07-01

    Aberrant changes of N-glycan modifications on proteins have been linked to various diseases including different cancers, suggesting possible avenue for exploring their etiologies based on N-glycomic analysis. Changes in N-glycan patterns during epithelial ovarian cancer development have so far been investigated mainly using serum, plasma, ascites, and cell lines. However, changes in patterns of N-glycans in tumor tissues during epithelial ovarian cancer progression have remained largely undefined. To investigate whether changes in N-glycan patterns correlate with oncogenesis and progression of epithelial ovarian cancer, we profiled N-glycans from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue slides using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and quantitatively compared among different pathological grades of epithelial ovarian cancer and healthy controls. Our results show that among the 80 compositions of N-glycan detected, expression levels of high-mannose type were higher in epithelial ovarian cancer samples than that observed in healthy controls, accompanied by reduced levels of hybrid-type glycans. By applying receiver operating characteristic analysis, we show that a combined panel composed of four high-mannose and three fucosylated neutral complex N-glycans allows for good discrimination of epithelial ovarian cancer from healthy controls. Furthermore, using a statistical analysis of variance assay, we found that different N-glycan patterns, including 2 high-mannose-type, 2 fucosylated and sialylated complex structures, and 10 fucosylated neutral complex N-glycans, exhibited specific changes in N-glycan abundance across epithelial ovarian cancer grades. Together, our results provide strong evidence that N-glycomic changes are a strong indicator for epithelial ovarian cancer pathological grades and should provide avenues to identify novel biomarkers for epithelial ovarian cancer diagnosis and monitoring.

  16. The Hall current system revealed as a statistical significant pattern during fast flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Snekvik

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available We have examined the dawn-dusk component of the magnetic field, BY, in the night side current sheet during fast flows in the neutral sheet. 237 h of Cluster data from the plasma sheet between 2 August 2002 and 2 October 2002 have been analysed. The spatial pattern of BY as a function of the distance from the centre of the current sheet has been estimated by using a Harris current sheet model. We have used the average slopes of these patterns to estimate earthward and tailward currents. For earthward fast flows there is a tailward current in the inner central plasma sheet and an earthward current in the outer central plasma sheet on average. For tailward fast flows the currents are oppositely directed. These observations are interpreted as signatures of Hall currents in the reconnection region or as field aligned currents which are connected with these currents. Although fast flows often are associated with a dawn-dusk current wedge, we believe that we have managed to filter out such currents from our statistical patterns.

  17. Correlation in the sequential evolutionary pattern of influenza hemagglutinin reveals its immunogenic and structural characters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Keyao; Deem, Michael

    2010-03-01

    The immune system recognizes the hemagglutinin (HA) protein on the surface of the influenza virus. It is this protein that evolves to escape immune recognition. Correlation analysis is performed for all pairs of positions in the alignment of HA sequences collected in history. Spectral decomposition of the resulting matrix yields several independent eigenvectors that clusters those positions into several sectors, each of which corresponds to a subset of the positions and follows a relatively independent evolutionary pattern. Some of the obtained sectors match well with the five experimentally and statistically (using Shannon entropy) determined epitopes that are the sites of antibody binding. This result implies that different immunogenic epitopes of HA have characteristic patterns of escape mutation, arguably due to the distinct structures of the epitopes and properties of corresponding antibodies. In the three dimensional structure of HA, each sector is located in a compact surface region, thus the correlations in the evolution pattern occur locally in the tertiary structure. Novel sectors found, beyond the five known HA epitopes, may also possess certain biophysical functions.

  18. metagene Profiles Analyses Reveal Regulatory Element's Factor-Specific Recruitment Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joly Beauparlant, Charles; Lamaze, Fabien C; Deschênes, Astrid; Samb, Rawane; Lemaçon, Audrey; Belleau, Pascal; Bilodeau, Steve; Droit, Arnaud

    2016-08-01

    ChIP-Sequencing (ChIP-Seq) provides a vast amount of information regarding the localization of proteins across the genome. The aggregation of ChIP-Seq enrichment signal in a metagene plot is an approach commonly used to summarize data complexity and to obtain a high level visual representation of the general occupancy pattern of a protein. Here we present the R package metagene, the graphical interface Imetagene and the companion package similaRpeak. Together, they provide a framework to integrate, summarize and compare the ChIP-Seq enrichment signal from complex experimental designs. Those packages identify and quantify similarities or dissimilarities in patterns between large numbers of ChIP-Seq profiles. We used metagene to investigate the differential occupancy of regulatory factors at noncoding regulatory regions (promoters and enhancers) in relation to transcriptional activity in GM12878 B-lymphocytes. The relationships between occupancy patterns and transcriptional activity suggest two different mechanisms of action for transcriptional control: i) a "gradient effect" where the regulatory factor occupancy levels follow transcription and ii) a "threshold effect" where the regulatory factor occupancy levels max out prior to reaching maximal transcription. metagene, Imetagene and similaRpeak are implemented in R under the Artistic license 2.0 and are available on Bioconductor.

  19. metagene Profiles Analyses Reveal Regulatory Element’s Factor-Specific Recruitment Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samb, Rawane; Lemaçon, Audrey; Bilodeau, Steve; Droit, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    ChIP-Sequencing (ChIP-Seq) provides a vast amount of information regarding the localization of proteins across the genome. The aggregation of ChIP-Seq enrichment signal in a metagene plot is an approach commonly used to summarize data complexity and to obtain a high level visual representation of the general occupancy pattern of a protein. Here we present the R package metagene, the graphical interface Imetagene and the companion package similaRpeak. Together, they provide a framework to integrate, summarize and compare the ChIP-Seq enrichment signal from complex experimental designs. Those packages identify and quantify similarities or dissimilarities in patterns between large numbers of ChIP-Seq profiles. We used metagene to investigate the differential occupancy of regulatory factors at noncoding regulatory regions (promoters and enhancers) in relation to transcriptional activity in GM12878 B-lymphocytes. The relationships between occupancy patterns and transcriptional activity suggest two different mechanisms of action for transcriptional control: i) a “gradient effect” where the regulatory factor occupancy levels follow transcription and ii) a “threshold effect” where the regulatory factor occupancy levels max out prior to reaching maximal transcription. metagene, Imetagene and similaRpeak are implemented in R under the Artistic license 2.0 and are available on Bioconductor. PMID:27538250

  20. An Instability-driven Dynamo for $\\gamma$ Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Araya-Gochez, R A

    2000-01-01

    We show that an MHD-instability driven dynamo (IDD) operating in a hot accretion disk is capable of generating energetically adequate magnetic flux deposition rates above and below a mildly advective accretion disk structure. The dynamo is driven by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) of a toroidal field in a shear flow and is limited by the buoyancy of `horizontal' flux and by reconnection in the turbulent medium. The efficiency of magnetic energy deposition is estimated to be comparable to the neutrino losses although an MHD collimation mechanism may deem this process a more viable alternative to neutrino-burst-driven models of gamma ray bursts.

  1. Cause of equatorward migration in global convective dynamo simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Warnecke, Jörn; Käpylä, Maarit J; Brandenburg, Axel

    2014-01-01

    We present results from four convectively-driven stellar dynamo simulations in spherical wedge geometry. All of these simulations produce cyclic and migrating mean magnetic fields. Through detailed comparisons we show that the migration direction can be explained by an $\\alpha\\Omega$ dynamo wave following the Parker--Yoshimura rule. We conclude that the equatorward migration in this and previous work is due to a positive (negative) $\\alpha$ effect in the northern (southern) hemisphere and a negative radial gradient of $\\Omega$ outside the inner tangent cylinder of these models. This idea is supported by a strong correlation between negative radial shear and toroidal field strength in the region of equatorward propagation.

  2. Magnetohydrodynamic dynamo: global flow generation in plasma turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoi, Nobumitsu; Yoshizawa, Akira [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Inst. of Industrial Science; Itoh, Kimitaka; Itoh, Sanae-I.

    1999-07-01

    Generation mechanism of the spontaneous plasma rotation observed in an improved confinement mode in tokamak's is examined from the viewpoint of the turbulent magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) dynamo. A dynamo model, where the concept of cross helicity (velocity/magnetic-field correlation) plays a key role, is applied to the reversed shear (RS) modes. The concave electric-current profile occurred in the RS modes is shown to be a cause of the global plasma rotation through a numerical simulation of the cross-helicity turbulence model. (author)

  3. Dynamo action at low magnetic Prandtl numbers: mean flow versus fully turbulent motions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponty, Y [CNRS UMR6202, Laboratoire Cassiopee, Observatoire de la Cote d' Azur, BP 4229, Nice Cedex 04 (France); Mininni, P D [NCAR, P O Box 3000, Boulder Colorado 80307-3000 (United States); Pinton, J-F [CNRS UMR5672, Laboratoire de Physique, Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, 46 Allee d' Italie, 69007 Lyon (France); Politano, H [CNRS UMR6202, Laboratoire Cassiopee, Observatoire de la Cote d' Azur, BP 4229, Nice Cedex 04 (France); Pouquet, A [NCAR, P O Box 3000, Boulder Colorado 80307-3000 (United States)

    2007-08-15

    We compute numerically the threshold for dynamo action in Taylor-Green (TG) swirling flows. Kinematic dynamo calculations, for which the flow field is fixed to its time average, are compared to dynamical runs, with the Navier-Stokes and induction equations jointly solved. The dynamo instability for the kinematic calculations is found to have two branches. The dynamical dynamo threshold at low Reynolds numbers lies within the low branch, while at high Reynolds numbers it gets closer to the high branch. Based on these results, the effect of the mean flow and of the turbulent fluctuations in TG dynamos are discussed.

  4. A technique for revealing scale-dependent patterns in fracture spacing data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Ankur; Perfect, Edmund; Dunne, William M.; McKay, Larry D.

    2014-07-01

    Data on fracture spacing along scan lines have been widely analyzed for the purposes of characterization. Most of these studies, however, either consider the cumulative frequency of spacing data without regard to the actual sequence of the spacing values or compute an average spacing that may not work for clustered fractures. The coefficient of variation parameter is often used to differentiate between clustered, random, and anticlustered fractures in a scan line but does not address the issue of scale-dependent variations in spacing. Lacunarity is a parameter that has been previously used for delineating scale-dependent clustering in fracture networks with similar fractal dimensions. This technique has the further capability of identifying scales at which different patterns emerge within the same data set. Lacunarity can also delineate possible fractal behavior. This paper tests the ability of lacunarity to find patterns (fractal/uniform/random) within synthetic and natural fracture clusters. A set of four model scan lines (uniformly spaced fractures, periodically spaced fracture clusters, fractal fracture clusters, and random fractures) was considered. The first derivative of the lacunarity curves of these models was used to find the intercluster distance and organization of fractures within the clusters. The same technique was then applied to a set of two natural fracture scan line data, one with fracture clusters with fractal organization within and the other with randomly spaced fractures. It was found that the proposed technique could discriminate between the random and clustered patterns, find the intercluster distance, and identify the type of spatial organization within the clusters.

  5. Analysis of image versus position, scale and direction reveals pattern texture anisotropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland eLehoucq

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pattern heterogeneities and anisotropies often carry significant physical information. We provide a toolbox which: (i cumulates analysis in terms of position, direction and scale; (ii is as general as possible; (iii is simple and fast to understand, implement, execute and exploit.It consists in dividing the image into analysis boxes at a chosen scale; in each box an ellipse (the inertia tensor is fitted to the signal and thus determines the direction in which the signal is more present. This tensor can be averaged in position and/or be used to study the dependence with scale. This choice is formally linked with Leray transforms and anisotropic wavelet analysis. Such protocol is intutively interpreted and consistent with what the eye detects: relevant scales, local variations in space, priviledged directions. It is fast and parallelizable.Its several variants are adaptable to the user's data and needs. It is useful to statistically characterize anisotropies of 2D or 3D patterns in which individual objects are not easily distinguished, with only minimal pre-processing of the raw image, and more generally applies to data in higher dimensions.It is less sensitive to edge effects, and thus better adapted for a multiscale analysis down to small scale boxes, than pair correlation function or Fourier transform.Easy to understand and implement,it complements more sophisticated methods such as Hough transform or diffusion tensor imaging.We use it on various fracture patterns (sea ice cover, thin sections of granite, granular materials, to pinpoint the maximal anisotropy scales. The results are robust to noise and to user choices. This toolbox could turn also useful for granular materials, hard condensed matter, geophysics, thin films, statistical mechanics, characterisation of networks, fluctuating amorphous systems, inhomogeneous and disordered systems, or medical imaging, among others.

  6. Pattern Analyses Reveal Separate Experience-Based Fear Memories in the Human Right Amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braem, Senne; De Houwer, Jan; Demanet, Jelle; Yuen, Kenneth S L; Kalisch, Raffael; Brass, Marcel

    2017-08-23

    Learning fear via the experience of contingencies between a conditioned stimulus (CS) and an aversive unconditioned stimulus (US) is often assumed to be fundamentally different from learning fear via instructions. An open question is whether fear-related brain areas respond differently to experienced CS-US contingencies than to merely instructed CS-US contingencies. Here, we contrasted two experimental conditions where subjects were instructed to expect the same CS-US contingencies while only one condition was characterized by prior experience with the CS-US contingency. Using multivoxel pattern analysis of fMRI data, we found CS-related neural activation patterns in the right amygdala (but not in other fear-related regions) that dissociated between whether a CS-US contingency had been instructed and experienced versus merely instructed. A second experiment further corroborated this finding by showing a category-independent neural response to instructed and experienced, but not merely instructed, CS presentations in the human right amygdala. Together, these findings are in line with previous studies showing that verbal fear instructions have a strong impact on both brain and behavior. However, even in the face of fear instructions, the human right amygdala still shows a separable neural pattern response to experience-based fear contingencies.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In our study, we addressed a fundamental problem of the science of human fear learning and memory, namely whether fear learning via experience in humans relies on a neural pathway that can be separated from fear learning via verbal information. Using two new procedures and recent advances in the analysis of brain imaging data, we localized purely experience-based fear processing and memory in the right amygdala, thereby making a direct link between human and animal research. Copyright © 2017 the authors 0270-6474/17/378116-15$15.00/0.

  7. An integrated model for Jupiter's dynamo action and mean jet dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastine, Thomas; Wicht, Johannes; Duarte, Lucia; Heimpel, Moritz

    2014-05-01

    Data from various space crafts revealed that Jupiter's large scale interior magnetic field is very Earth-like. This is surprising since numerical simulations have demonstrated that, for example, the radial dependence of density, electrical conductivity and other physical properties, which is only mild in the iron cores of terrestrial planets but very drastic in gas planets, can significantly affect the interior dynamics. Jupiter's dynamo action is thought to take place in the deeper envelope where hydrogen, the main constituent of Jupiter's atmosphere, assumes metallic properties. The potential interaction between the observed zonal jets and the deeper dynamo region is an unresolved problem with important consequences for the magnetic field generation. Here we present the first numerical simulation that is based on recent interior models and covers 99% of the planetary radius (below the 1 bar level). A steep decease in the electrical conductivity over the outer 10% in radius allowed us to model both the deeper metallic region and the outer molecular layer in an integrated approach. The magnetic field very closely reproduces Jupiter's known large scale field. A strong equatorial zonal jet remains constrained to the molecular layer while higher latitude jets are suppressed by Lorentz forces. This suggests that Jupiter's higher latitude jets remain shallow and are driven by an additional effect not captured in our deep convection model. The dynamo action of the equatorial jet produces a band of magnetic field located around the equator. The unprecedented magnetic field resolution expected from the Juno mission will allow to resolve this feature allowing a direct detection of the equatorial jet dynamics at depth. Typical secular variation times scales amount to around 750 yr for the dipole contribution but decrease to about 5 yr at the expected Juno resolution (spherical harmonic degree 20). At a nominal mission duration of one year Juno should therefore be able to

  8. A simple stochastic model for dipole moment fluctuations in numerical dynamo simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico G. eMeduri

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Earth's axial dipole field changes in a complex fashion on many differenttime scales ranging from less than a year to tens of million years.Documenting, analysing, and replicating this intricate signalis a challenge for data acquisition, theoretical interpretation,and dynamo modelling alike. Here we explore whether axial dipole variationscan be described by the superposition of a slow deterministic driftand fast stochastic fluctuations, i.e. by a Langevin-type system.The drift term describes the time averaged behaviour of the axial dipole variations,whereas the stochastic part mimics complex flow interactions over convective time scales.The statistical behaviour of the system is described by a Fokker-Planck equation whichallows useful predictions, including the average rates of dipole reversals and excursions.We analyse several numerical dynamo simulations, most of which havebeen integrated particularly long in time, and also the palaeomagneticmodel PADM2M which covers the past 2 Myr.The results show that the Langevin description provides a viable statistical modelof the axial dipole variations on time scales longer than about 1 kyr.For example, the axial dipole probability distribution and the average reversalrate are successfully predicted.The exception is PADM2M where the stochastic model reversal rate seems too low.The dependence of the drift on the axial dipolemoment reveals the nonlinear interactions that establish thedynamo balance. A separate analysis of inductive and diffusive magnetic effectsin three dynamo simulations suggests that the classical quadraticquenching of induction predicted by mean-field theory seems at work.

  9. Latitudinal profile of the ionospheric disturbance dynamo magnetic signature: comparison with the DP2 magnetic disturbance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Z. Zaka

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available During magnetic storms, the auroral electrojets intensification affects the thermospheric circulation on a global scale. This process which leads to electric field and current disturbance at middle and low latitudes, on the quiet day after the end of a storm, has been attributed to the ionospheric disturbance dynamo (Ddyn. The magnetic field disturbance observed as a result of this process is the reduction of the H component amplitude in the equatorial region which constitutes the main characteristic of the ionospheric disturbance dynamo process, associated with a westward electric current flow. The latitudinal profile of the Ddyn disturbance dynamo magnetic signature exhibits an eastward current at mid latitudes and a westward one at low latitudes with a substantial amplification at the magnetic equator. Such current flow reveals an "anti-Sq" system established between the mid latitudes and the equatorial region and opposes the normal Sq current vortex. However, the localization of the eastward current and consequently the position and the extent of the "anti-Sq" current vortex changes from one storm to another. Indeed, for a strong magnetic storm, the eastward current is well established at mid latitudes about 45° N and for a weak magnetic storm, the eastward current is established toward the high latitudes (about 60° N, near the Joule heating region, resulting in a large "anti-Sq" current cell. The latitudinal profile of the Ddyn disturbance as well as the magnetic disturbance DP2 generated by the mechanism of prompt penetration of the magnetospheric convection electric field in general, show a weak disturbance at the low latitudes with a substantial amplification at the magnetic equator. Due to the intensity of the storm, the magnitude of the DP2 appears higher than the Ddyn over the American and Asian sector contrary to the African sector.

  10. Turbulent Dynamo Amplification of Magnetic Fields in Laser-Produced Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeferacos, Petros

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic fields are ubiquitous in the Universe, as revealed by diffuse radio-synchrotron emission and Faraday rotation observations, with strengths from a few nG to tens of μG. The energy density of these fields is typically comparable to the energy density of the fluid motions of the plasma in which they are embedded, making magnetic fields essential players in the dynamics of the luminous matter in the Universe. The standard model for the origin of these intergalactic magnetic fields is through the amplification of seed fields via turbulent dynamo to the level consistent with current observations. We have conceived and conducted a series of experiments using high-power laser facilities to study the amplification of magnetic fields via turbulence. In these experiments, we characterize the properties of the fluid and the magnetic field turbulence using a comprehensive suite of plasma and magnetic field diagnostics. We describe the large-scale 3D simulations we performed with the radiation-MHD code FLASH on ANL's Mira to help design and interpret the experiments. We then discuss the results of the experiments, which indicate magnetic Reynolds numbers above the expected dynamo threshold are achieved and seed magnetic fields produced by the Biermann battery mechanism are amplified by turbulent dynamo. We relate our findings to processes occurring in galaxy clusters. We acknowledge funding and resources from the ERC (FP7/2007-2013, no. 256973 and 247039), and the U.S. DOE, Contract No. B591485 to LLNL, FWP 57789 to ANL, Grant No. DE-NA0002724 to the University of Chicago, and contract DE-AC02-06CH11357 to ALCF at ANL.

  11. Structures of pattern recognition receptors reveal molecular mechanisms of autoinhibition, ligand recognition and oligomerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuenchor, Watchalee; Jin, Tengchuan; Ravilious, Geoffrey; Xiao, T Sam

    2014-02-01

    Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) are essential sentinels for pathogens or tissue damage and integral components of the innate immune system. Recent structural studies have provided unprecedented insights into the molecular mechanisms of ligand recognition and signal transduction by several PRR families at distinct subcellular compartments. Here we highlight some of the recent discoveries and summarize the common themes that are emerging from these exciting studies. Better mechanistic understanding of the structure and function of the PRRs will improve future prospects of therapeutic targeting of these important innate immune receptors.

  12. Genome-wide methylome analyses reveal novel epigenetic regulation patterns in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongsheng; Camarillo, Cynthia; Xu, Juan; Arana, Tania Bedard; Xiao, Yun; Zhao, Zheng; Chen, Hong; Ramirez, Mercedes; Zavala, Juan; Escamilla, Michael A; Armas, Regina; Mendoza, Ricardo; Ontiveros, Alfonso; Nicolini, Humberto; Magaña, Alvaro Antonio Jerez; Rubin, Lewis P; Li, Xia; Xu, Chun

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BP) are complex genetic disorders. Their appearance is also likely informed by as yet only partially described epigenetic contributions. Using a sequencing-based method for genome-wide analysis, we quantitatively compared the blood DNA methylation landscapes in SZ and BP subjects to control, both in an understudied population, Hispanics along the US-Mexico border. Remarkably, we identified thousands of differentially methylated regions for SZ and BP preferentially located in promoters 3'-UTRs and 5'-UTRs of genes. Distinct patterns of aberrant methylation of promoter sequences were located surrounding transcription start sites. In these instances, aberrant methylation occurred in CpG islands (CGIs) as well as in flanking regions as well as in CGI sparse promoters. Pathway analysis of genes displaying these distinct aberrant promoter methylation patterns showed enhancement of epigenetic changes in numerous genes previously related to psychiatric disorders and neurodevelopment. Integration of gene expression data further suggests that in SZ aberrant promoter methylation is significantly associated with altered gene transcription. In particular, we found significant associations between (1) promoter CGIs hypermethylation with gene repression and (2) CGI 3'-shore hypomethylation with increased gene expression. Finally, we constructed a specific methylation analysis platform that facilitates viewing and comparing aberrant genome methylation in human neuropsychiatric disorders.

  13. Genome-Wide Methylome Analyses Reveal Novel Epigenetic Regulation Patterns in Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongsheng Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia (SZ and bipolar disorder (BP are complex genetic disorders. Their appearance is also likely informed by as yet only partially described epigenetic contributions. Using a sequencing-based method for genome-wide analysis, we quantitatively compared the blood DNA methylation landscapes in SZ and BP subjects to control, both in an understudied population, Hispanics along the US-Mexico border. Remarkably, we identified thousands of differentially methylated regions for SZ and BP preferentially located in promoters 3′-UTRs and 5′-UTRs of genes. Distinct patterns of aberrant methylation of promoter sequences were located surrounding transcription start sites. In these instances, aberrant methylation occurred in CpG islands (CGIs as well as in flanking regions as well as in CGI sparse promoters. Pathway analysis of genes displaying these distinct aberrant promoter methylation patterns showed enhancement of epigenetic changes in numerous genes previously related to psychiatric disorders and neurodevelopment. Integration of gene expression data further suggests that in SZ aberrant promoter methylation is significantly associated with altered gene transcription. In particular, we found significant associations between (1 promoter CGIs hypermethylation with gene repression and (2 CGI 3′-shore hypomethylation with increased gene expression. Finally, we constructed a specific methylation analysis platform that facilitates viewing and comparing aberrant genome methylation in human neuropsychiatric disorders.

  14. Genome-Wide Methylome Analyses Reveal Novel Epigenetic Regulation Patterns in Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongsheng; Camarillo, Cynthia; Xu, Juan; Arana, Tania Bedard; Xiao, Yun; Zhao, Zheng; Chen, Hong; Ramirez, Mercedes; Zavala, Juan; Escamilla, Michael A.; Armas, Regina; Mendoza, Ricardo; Ontiveros, Alfonso; Nicolini, Humberto; Jerez Magaña, Alvaro Antonio; Rubin, Lewis P.; Li, Xia; Xu, Chun

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BP) are complex genetic disorders. Their appearance is also likely informed by as yet only partially described epigenetic contributions. Using a sequencing-based method for genome-wide analysis, we quantitatively compared the blood DNA methylation landscapes in SZ and BP subjects to control, both in an understudied population, Hispanics along the US-Mexico border. Remarkably, we identified thousands of differentially methylated regions for SZ and BP preferentially located in promoters 3′-UTRs and 5′-UTRs of genes. Distinct patterns of aberrant methylation of promoter sequences were located surrounding transcription start sites. In these instances, aberrant methylation occurred in CpG islands (CGIs) as well as in flanking regions as well as in CGI sparse promoters. Pathway analysis of genes displaying these distinct aberrant promoter methylation patterns showed enhancement of epigenetic changes in numerous genes previously related to psychiatric disorders and neurodevelopment. Integration of gene expression data further suggests that in SZ aberrant promoter methylation is significantly associated with altered gene transcription. In particular, we found significant associations between (1) promoter CGIs hypermethylation with gene repression and (2) CGI 3′-shore hypomethylation with increased gene expression. Finally, we constructed a specific methylation analysis platform that facilitates viewing and comparing aberrant genome methylation in human neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:25734057

  15. Migration history of air-breathing fishes reveals Neogene atmospheric circulation patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhme, M.

    2004-05-01

    The migration history of an air-breathing fish group (Channidae; snakehead fishes) is used for reconstructing Neogene Eurasian precipitation and atmospheric circulation patterns. The study shows that snakeheads are sensitive indicators of summer precipitation maxima in subtropical and temperate regions, and are present regularly if the wettest month exceeds 150 mm precipitation and 20 °C mean temperature. The analysis of 515 fossil freshwater fish deposits of the past 50 m.y. from Africa and Eurasia shows two continental-scale migration events from the snakeheads' center of origin in the south Himalayan region, events that can be related to changes in the Northern Hemisphere circulation pattern. The first migration, ca. 17.5 Ma, into western and central Eurasia may have been caused by a northward shift of the Intertropical Convergence Zone that brought western Eurasia under the influence of trade winds that produced a zonal and meridional precipitation gradient in Europe. During the second migration, between 8 and 4 Ma, into Africa and East Asia, snakeheads reached their present-day distribution. This migration could have been related to the intensification of the Asian monsoon that brought summer precipitation to their migratory pathways in East Africa Arabia and East Asia.

  16. Analysis of chlorophyll fluorescence reveals stage specific patterns of chloroplast-containing cells during Arabidopsis embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejos, Ricardo I; Mercado, Ana V; Meisel, Lee A

    2010-01-01

    The basic body plan of a plant is established early in embryogenesis when cells differentiate, giving rise to the apical and basal regions of the embryo. Using chlorophyll fluorescence as a marker for chloroplasts, we have detected specific patterns of chloroplast-containing cells at specific stages of embryogenesis. Non-randomly distributed chloroplast-containing cells are seen as early as the globular stage of embryogenesis in Arabidopsis. In the heart stage of embryogenesis, chloroplast containing cells are detected in epidermal cells as well as a central region of the heart stage embryo, forming a triangular septum of chloroplast-containing cells that divides the embryo into three equal sectors. Torpedo stage embryos have chloroplast-containing epidermal cells and a central band of chloroplast-containing cells in the cortex layer, just below the shoot apical meristem. In the walking-stick stage of embryogenesis, chloroplasts are present in the epidermal, cortex and endodermal cells. The chloroplasts appear reduced or absent from the provascular and columella cells of walking-stick stage embryos. These results suggest that there is a tight regulation of plastid differentiation during embryogenesis that generates specific patterns of chloroplast-containing cells in specific cell layers at specific stages of embryogenesis.

  17. Powering Earth's dynamo with magnesium precipitation from the core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rourke, Joseph G; Stevenson, David J

    2016-01-21

    Earth's global magnetic field arises from vigorous convection within the liquid outer core. Palaeomagnetic evidence reveals that the geodynamo has operated for at least 3.4 billion years, which places constraints on Earth's formation and evolution. Available power sources in standard models include compositional convection (driven by the solidifying inner core's expulsion of light elements), thermal convection (from slow cooling), and perhaps heat from the decay of radioactive isotopes. However, recent first-principles calculations and diamond-anvil cell experiments indicate that the thermal conductivity of iron is two or three times larger than typically assumed in these models. This presents a problem: a large increase in the conductive heat flux along the adiabat (due to the higher conductivity of iron) implies that the inner core is young (less than one billion years old), but thermal convection and radiogenic heating alone may not have been able to sustain the geodynamo during earlier epochs. Here we show that the precipitation of magnesium-bearing minerals from the core could have served as an alternative power source. Equilibration at high temperatures in the aftermath of giant impacts allows a small amount of magnesium (one or two weight per cent) to partition into the core while still producing the observed abundances of siderophile elements in the mantle and avoiding an excess of silicon and oxygen in the core. The transport of magnesium as oxide or silicate from the cooling core to underneath the mantle is an order of magnitude more efficient per unit mass as a source of buoyancy than inner-core growth. We therefore conclude that Earth's dynamo would survive throughout geologic time (from at least 3.4 billion years ago to the present) even if core radiogenic heating were minimal and core cooling were slow.

  18. A self-consistent dynamo model for fully convective stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Rakesh Kumar; Christensen, Ulrich; Morin, Julien; Gastine, Thomas; Reiners, Ansgar; Poppenhaeger, Katja; Wolk, Scott J.

    2016-01-01

    The tachocline region inside the Sun, where the rigidly rotating radiative core meets the differentially rotating convection zone, is thought to be crucial for generating the Sun's magnetic field. Low-mass fully convective stars do not possess a tachocline and were originally expected to generate only weak small-scale magnetic fields. Observations, however, have painted a different picture of magnetism in rapidly-rotating fully convective stars: (1) Zeeman broadening measurements revealed average surface field of several kiloGauss (kG), which is similar to the typical field strength found in sunspots. (2) Zeeman-Doppler-Imaging (ZDI) technique discovered large-scale magnetic fields with a morphology often similar to the Earth's dipole-dominated field. (3) Comparison of Zeeman broadening and ZDI results showed that more than 80% of the magnetic flux resides at small scales. So far, theoretical and computer simulation efforts have not been able to reproduce these features simultaneously. Here we present a self-consistent global model of magnetic field generation in low-mass fully convective stars. A distributed dynamo working in the model spontaneously produces a dipole-dominated surface magnetic field of the observed strength. The interaction of this field with the turbulent convection in outer layers shreds it, producing small-scale fields that carry most of the magnetic flux. The ZDI technique applied to synthetic spectropolarimetric data based on our model recovers most of the large-scale field. Our model simultaneously reproduces the morphology and magnitude of the large-scale field as well as the magnitude of the small-scale field observed on low-mass fully convective stars.

  19. Precision phenotyping of biomass accumulation in triticale reveals temporal genetic patterns of regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busemeyer, Lucas; Ruckelshausen, Arno; Möller, Kim; Melchinger, Albrecht E.; Alheit, Katharina V.; Maurer, Hans Peter; Hahn, Volker; Weissmann, Elmar A.; Reif, Jochen C.; Würschum, Tobias

    2013-08-01

    To extend agricultural productivity by knowledge-based breeding and tailor varieties adapted to specific environmental conditions, it is imperative to improve our ability to assess the dynamic changes of the phenome of crops under field conditions. To this end, we have developed a precision phenotyping platform that combines various sensors for a non-invasive, high-throughput and high-dimensional phenotyping of small grain cereals. This platform yielded high prediction accuracies and heritabilities for biomass of triticale. Genetic variation for biomass accumulation was dissected with 647 doubled haploid lines derived from four families. Employing a genome-wide association mapping approach, two major quantitative trait loci (QTL) for biomass were identified and the genetic architecture of biomass accumulation was found to be characterized by dynamic temporal patterns. Our findings highlight the potential of precision phenotyping to assess the dynamic genetics of complex traits, especially those not amenable to traditional phenotyping.

  20. Larval neurogenesis in Sabellaria alveolata reveals plasticity in polychaete neural patterning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinkmann, Nora; Wanninger, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    The investigation of neurogenesis in polychaetes not only facilitates insights into the developmental biology of this group, but also provides new data for phylogenetic analyses. This should eventually lead toward a better understanding of metazoan evolution including key issues such as the ontog......The investigation of neurogenesis in polychaetes not only facilitates insights into the developmental biology of this group, but also provides new data for phylogenetic analyses. This should eventually lead toward a better understanding of metazoan evolution including key issues...... reconstruction software. The overall pattern of neurogenesis in S. alveolata resembles the condition found in other planktonic polychaete trochophores where the larval neural body plan including a serotonergic prototroch nerve ring is directly followed by adult features of the nervous system...

  1. Phylogeographical analyses reveal global migration patterns of the barley scald pathogen Rhynchosporium secalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaffarano, Pascal L; McDonald, Bruce A; Linde, Celeste C

    2009-01-01

    A phylogeographical analysis of the scald pathogen Rhynchosporium secalis was conducted using nuclear DNA sequences from two neutral restriction fragment length polymorphism loci and the mating-type idiomorphs. Approximately 500 isolates sampled from more than 60 field populations from five continents were analysed to infer migration patterns and the demographic history of the fungus. Migration rates among continents were generally low, consistent with earlier reports of significant population subdivision among continents. Northern Europe was mainly a source population for global migration. We hypothesize that the pathogen only recently moved out of its centre of origin, resulting in founder populations that are reproductively isolated due to the contemporary absence of long-distance gene flow.

  2. Semantic mapping reveals distinct patterns in descriptions of social relations in adults with autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Sean X; Shinall, Jacqueline A; Peterson, Bradley S; Gerber, Andrew J

    2016-08-01

    Adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) may describe other individuals differently compared with typical adults. In this study, we first asked participants to describe closely related individuals such as parents and close friends with 10 positive and 10 negative characteristics. We then used standard natural language processing methods to digitize and visualize these descriptions. The complex patterns of these descriptive sentences exhibited a difference in semantic space between individuals with ASD and control participants. Machine learning algorithms were able to automatically detect and discriminate between these two groups. Furthermore, we showed that these descriptive sentences from adults with ASD exhibited fewer connections as defined by word-word co-occurrences in descriptions, and these connections in words formed a less "small-world" like network. Autism Res 2016, 9: 846-853. © 2015 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Multilocus DNA sequencing of the whiskey fungus reveals a continental-scale speciation pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, J A; Ewaze, J O; Summerbell, R C; Arocha-Rosete, Y; Maharaj, A; Guardiola, Y; Saleh, M; Wong, B; Bogale, M; O'Hara, M J; Untereiner, W A

    2017-01-01

    Baudoinia was described to accommodate a single species, B. compniacensis. Known as the 'whiskey fungus', this species is the predominant member of a ubiquitous microbial community known colloquially as 'warehouse staining' that develops on outdoor surfaces subject to periodic exposure to ethanolic vapours near distilleries and bakeries. Here we examine 19 strains recovered from environmental samples near industrial settings in North America, South America, the Caribbean, Europe and the Far East. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of a portion of the nucLSU rRNA gene confirms that Baudoinia is a monophyletic lineage within the Teratosphaeriaceae (Capnodiales). Multilocus phylogenetic analysis of nucITS rRNA (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2) and partial nucLSU rRNA, beta-tubulin (TUB) and elongation factor 1-alpha (TEF1) gene sequences further indicates that Baudoinia consists of five strongly supported, geographically patterned lineages representing four new species (viz. Baudoinia antilliensis, B. caledoniensis, B. orientalis and B. panamericana).

  4. Ultra-deep sequencing reveals the microRNA expression pattern of the human stomach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ândrea Ribeiro-dos-Santos

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: While microRNAs (miRNAs play important roles in tissue differentiation and in maintaining basal physiology, little is known about the miRNA expression levels in stomach tissue. Alterations in the miRNA profile can lead to cell deregulation, which can induce neoplasia. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A small RNA library of stomach tissue was sequenced using high-throughput SOLiD sequencing technology. We obtained 261,274 quality reads with perfect matches to the human miRnome, and 42% of known miRNAs were identified. Digital Gene Expression profiling (DGE was performed based on read abundance and showed that fifteen miRNAs were highly expressed in gastric tissue. Subsequently, the expression of these miRNAs was validated in 10 healthy individuals by RT-PCR showed a significant correlation of 83.97% (P<0.05. Six miRNAs showed a low variable pattern of expression (miR-29b, miR-29c, miR-19b, miR-31, miR-148a, miR-451 and could be considered part of the expression pattern of the healthy gastric tissue. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study aimed to validate normal miRNA profiles of human gastric tissue to establish a reference profile for healthy individuals. Determining the regulatory processes acting in the stomach will be important in the fight against gastric cancer, which is the second-leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide.

  5. Patterns of hypothalamic regionalization in amphibians and reptiles: common traits revealed by a genoarchitectonic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura eDominguez

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Most studies in mammals and birds have demonstrated common patterns of hypothalamic development highlighted by the combination of developmental regulatory genes (genoarchitecture, supporting the notion of the hypothalamus as a component of the secondary prosencephalon, topologically rostral to the diencephalon. In our comparative analysis we have summarized the data on the expression patterns of different transcription factors and neuroactive substances, used as anatomical markers, in the developing hypothalamus of the amphibian Xenopus laevis and the juvenile turtle Pseudemys scripta. This analysis served to highlight the organization of the hypothalamus in the anamniote/amniotic transition. We have identified supraoptoparaventricular and the suprachiasmatic regions in the alar part of the hypothalamus, and tuberal and mammillary regions in the basal hypothalamus. Shared features in the two species are: 1 The supraoptoparaventricular region is defined by the expression of Otp and the lack of Nkx2.1/Isl1. It is subdivided into rostral, rich in Otp and Nkx2.2, and caudal, only Otp-positive, portions. 2 The suprachiasmatic area contains catecholaminergic cell groups and lacks Otp, and can be further divided into rostral (rich in Nkx2.1 and Nkx2.2 and a caudal (rich in Isl1 and devoid of Nkx2.1 portions. 3 Expression of Nkx2.1 and Isl1 define the tuberal hypothalamus and only the rostral portion expresses Otp. 4 Its caudal boundary is evident by the lack of Isl1 in the adjacent mammillary region, which expresses Nkx2.1 and Otp. Differences in the anamnio-amniote transition were noted since in the turtle, like in other amniotes, the boundary between the alar hypothalamus and the telencephalic preoptic area shows distinct Nkx2.2 and Otp expressions but not in the amphibian (anamniote, and the alar supraoptoparaventricular region is defined by the expression of Otp/Pax6, whereas in Xenopus only Otp is expressed.

  6. Phylogenomic analyses reveal convergent patterns of adaptive evolution in elephant and human ancestries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Morris; Sterner, Kirstin N; Islam, Munirul; Uddin, Monica; Sherwood, Chet C; Hof, Patrick R; Hou, Zhuo-Cheng; Lipovich, Leonard; Jia, Hui; Grossman, Lawrence I; Wildman, Derek E

    2009-12-08

    Specific sets of brain-expressed genes, such as aerobic energy metabolism genes, evolved adaptively in the ancestry of humans and may have evolved adaptively in the ancestry of other large-brained mammals. The recent addition of genomes from two afrotherians (elephant and tenrec) to the expanding set of publically available sequenced mammalian genomes provided an opportunity to test this hypothesis. Elephants resemble humans by having large brains and long life spans; tenrecs, in contrast, have small brains and short life spans. Thus, we investigated whether the phylogenomic patterns of adaptive evolution are more similar between elephant and human than between either elephant and tenrec lineages or human and mouse lineages, and whether aerobic energy metabolism genes are especially well represented in the elephant and human patterns. Our analyses encompassed approximately 6,000 genes in each of these lineages with each gene yielding extensive coding sequence matches in interordinal comparisons. Each gene's nonsynonymous and synonymous nucleotide substitution rates and dN/dS ratios were determined. Then, from gene ontology information on genes with the higher dN/dS ratios, we identified the more prevalent sets of genes that belong to specific functional categories and that evolved adaptively. Elephant and human lineages showed much slower nucleotide substitution rates than tenrec and mouse lineages but more adaptively evolved genes. In correlation with absolute brain size and brain oxygen consumption being largest in elephants and next largest in humans, adaptively evolved aerobic energy metabolism genes were most evident in the elephant lineage and next most evident in the human lineage.

  7. Patterns of hypothalamic regionalization in amphibians and reptiles: common traits revealed by a genoarchitectonic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, Laura; González, Agustín; Moreno, Nerea

    2015-01-01

    Most studies in mammals and birds have demonstrated common patterns of hypothalamic development highlighted by the combination of developmental regulatory genes (genoarchitecture), supporting the notion of the hypothalamus as a component of the secondary prosencephalon, topologically rostral to the diencephalon. In our comparative analysis we have summarized the data on the expression patterns of different transcription factors and neuroactive substances, used as anatomical markers, in the developing hypothalamus of the amphibian Xenopus laevis and the juvenile turtle Pseudemys scripta. This analysis served to highlight the organization of the hypothalamus in the anamniote/amniotic transition. We have identified supraoptoparaventricular and the suprachiasmatic regions (SCs) in the alar part of the hypothalamus, and tuberal and mammillary regions in the basal hypothalamus. Shared features in the two species are: (1) The supraoptoparaventricular region (SPV) is defined by the expression of Otp and the lack of Nkx2.1/Isl1. It is subdivided into rostral, rich in Otp and Nkx2.2, and caudal, only Otp-positive, portions. (2) The suprachiasmatic area contains catecholaminergic cell groups and lacks Otp, and can be further divided into rostral (rich in Nkx2.1 and Nkx2.2) and a caudal (rich in Isl1 and devoid of Nkx2.1) portions. (3) Expression of Nkx2.1 and Isl1 define the tuberal hypothalamus and only the rostral portion expresses Otp. (4) Its caudal boundary is evident by the lack of Isl1 in the adjacent mammillary region, which expresses Nkx2.1 and Otp. Differences in the anamnio-amniote transition were noted since in the turtle, like in other amniotes, the boundary between the alar hypothalamus and the telencephalic preoptic area shows distinct Nkx2.2 and Otp expressions but not in the amphibian (anamniote), and the alar SPV is defined by the expression of Otp/Pax6, whereas in Xenopus only Otp is expressed.

  8. Optical Coherence Tomography Reveals Distinct Patterns of Retinal Damage in Neuromyelitis Optica and Multiple Sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Schneider

    Full Text Available Neuromyelitis optica (NMO and relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS are difficult to differentiate solely on clinical grounds. Optical coherence tomography (OCT studies investigating retinal changes in both diseases focused primarily on the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL while rare data are available on deeper intra-retinal layers.To detect different patterns of intra-retinal layer alterations in patients with NMO spectrum disorders (NMOSD and RRMS with focus on the influence of a previous optic neuritis (ON.We applied spectral-domain OCT in eyes of NMOSD patients and compared them to matched RRMS patients and healthy controls (HC. Semi-automatic intra-retinal layer segmentation was used to quantify intra-retinal layer thicknesses. In a subgroup low contrast visual acuity (LCVA was assessed.NMOSD-, MS- and HC-groups, each comprising 17 subjects, were included in analysis. RNFL thickness was more severely reduced in NMOSD compared to MS following ON. In MS-ON eyes, RNFL thinning showed a clear temporal preponderance, whereas in NMOSD-ON eyes RNFL was more evenly reduced, resulting in a significantly lower ratio of the nasal versus temporal RNFL thickness. In comparison to HC, ganglion cell layer thickness was stronger reduced in NMOSD-ON than in MS-ON, accompanied by a more severe impairment of LCVA. The inner nuclear layer and the outer retinal layers were thicker in NMOSD-ON patients compared to NMOSD without ON and HC eyes while these differences were primarily driven by microcystic macular edema.Our study supports previous findings that ON in NMOSD leads to more pronounced retinal thinning and visual function impairment than in RRMS. The different retinal damage patterns in NMOSD versus RRMS support the current notion of distinct pathomechanisms of both conditions. However, OCT is still insufficient to help with the clinically relevant differentiation of both conditions in an individual patient.

  9. Systematic expression analysis of Hox genes at adulthood reveals novel patterns in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutlet, Bertrand; Theys, Nicolas; Coste, Cécile; Ahn, Marie-Thérèse; Doshishti-Agolli, Konstantin; Lizen, Benoît; Gofflot, Françoise

    2016-04-01

    Hox proteins are key regulators of animal development, providing positional identity and patterning information to cells along the rostrocaudal axis of the embryo. Although their embryonic expression and function are well characterized, their presence and biological importance in adulthood remains poorly investigated. We provide here the first detailed quantitative and neuroanatomical characterization of the expression of the 39 Hox genes in the adult mouse brain. Using RT-qPCR we determined the expression of 24 Hox genes mainly in the brainstem of the adult brain, with low expression of a few genes in the cerebellum and the forebrain. Using in situ hybridization (ISH) we have demonstrated that expression of Hox genes is maintained in territories derived from the early segmental Hox expression domains in the hindbrain. Indeed, we show that expression of genes belonging to paralogy groups PG2-8 is maintained in the hindbrain derivatives at adulthood. The spatial colinearity, which characterizes the early embryonic expression of Hox genes, is still observed in sequential antero-posterior boundaries of expression. Moreover, the main mossy and climbing fibres precerebellar nuclei express PG2-8 Hox genes according to their migration origins. Second, ISH confirms the presence of Hox gene transcripts in territories where they are not detected during development, suggesting neo-expression in these territories in adulthood. Within the forebrain, we have mapped Hoxb1, Hoxb3, Hoxb4, Hoxd3 and Hoxa5 expression in restricted areas of the sensory cerebral cortices as well as in specific thalamic relay nuclei. Our data thus suggest a requirement of Hox genes beyond their role of patterning genes, providing a new dimension to their functional relevance in the central nervous system.

  10. An interspecific fungal hybrid reveals cross-kingdom rules for allopolyploid gene expression patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murray P Cox

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Polyploidy, a state in which the chromosome complement has undergone an increase, is a major force in evolution. Understanding the consequences of polyploidy has received much attention, and allopolyploids, which result from the union of two different parental genomes, are of particular interest because they must overcome a suite of biological responses to this merger, known as "genome shock." A key question is what happens to gene expression of the two gene copies following allopolyploidization, but until recently the tools to answer this question on a genome-wide basis were lacking. Here we utilize high throughput transcriptome sequencing to produce the first genome-wide picture of gene expression response to allopolyploidy in fungi. A novel pipeline for assigning sequence reads to the gene copies was used to quantify their expression in a fungal allopolyploid. We find that the transcriptional response to allopolyploidy is predominantly conservative: both copies of most genes are retained; over half the genes inherit parental gene expression patterns; and parental differential expression is often lost in the allopolyploid. Strikingly, the patterns of gene expression change are highly concordant with the genome-wide expression results of a cotton allopolyploid. The very different nature of these two allopolyploids implies a conserved, eukaryote-wide transcriptional response to genome merger. We provide evidence that the transcriptional responses we observe are mostly driven by intrinsic differences between the regulatory systems in the parent species, and from this propose a mechanistic model in which the cross-kingdom conservation in transcriptional response reflects conservation of the mutational processes underlying eukaryotic gene regulatory evolution. This work provides a platform to develop a universal understanding of gene expression response to allopolyploidy and suggests that allopolyploids are an exceptional system to investigate gene

  11. Multilocus sequence analysis of nectar pseudomonads reveals high genetic diversity and contrasting recombination patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Alvarez-Pérez

    Full Text Available The genetic and evolutionary relationships among floral nectar-dwelling Pseudomonas 'sensu stricto' isolates associated to South African and Mediterranean plants were investigated by multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA of four core housekeeping genes (rrs, gyrB, rpoB and rpoD. A total of 35 different sequence types were found for the 38 nectar bacterial isolates characterised. Phylogenetic analyses resulted in the identification of three main clades [nectar groups (NGs 1, 2 and 3] of nectar pseudomonads, which were closely related to five intrageneric groups: Pseudomonas oryzihabitans (NG 1; P. fluorescens, P. lutea and P. syringae (NG 2; and P. rhizosphaerae (NG 3. Linkage disequilibrium analysis pointed to a mostly clonal population structure, even when the analysis was restricted to isolates from the same floristic region or belonging to the same NG. Nevertheless, signatures of recombination were observed for NG 3, which exclusively included isolates retrieved from the floral nectar of insect-pollinated Mediterranean plants. In contrast, the other two NGs comprised both South African and Mediterranean isolates. Analyses relating diversification to floristic region and pollinator type revealed that there has been more unique evolution of the nectar pseudomonads within the Mediterranean region than would be expected by chance. This is the first work analysing the sequence of multiple loci to reveal geno- and ecotypes of nectar bacteria.

  12. Reduction of Large-scale Turbulence and Optimization of Flows in the Madison Dynamo Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, N. Z.

    2011-10-01

    The Madison Dynamo Experiment seeks to observe a magnetic field grow at the expense of kinetic energy in a flow of liquid sodium. The enormous Reynolds numbers of the experiment and its two vortex geometry creates strong turbulence, which in turn leads to transport of magnetic flux consistent with an increase of the effective resistivity. The increased effective resistivity implies that faster flows are required for the dynamo to operate. Three major results from the experiment will be reported in this talk. 1) A new probe technique has been developed for measuring both the fluctuating velocity and magnetic fields which has allowed a direct measurement of the turbulent EMF from . 2) The scale of the largest eddies in the experiment has been reduced by an equatorial baffle on the vessel boundary. This modification of the flow at the boundary results in strong field generation and amplification by the mean velocity of the flow, and the role of turbulence in generating currents is reduced. The motor power required to drive a given flow speed is reduced by 20%, the effective Rm, as measured by the toroidal windup of the field(omega effect), increased by a factor of ~2.4, and the turbulent EMF (previously measured to be as large as the induction by the mean flow) is eliminated. These results all indicate that the equatorial baffle has eliminated the largest-scale eddies in the flow. 3) Flow optimization is now possible by adjusting the pitch of vanes installed on the vessel wall. An analysis of the kinematic prediction for dynamo excitation reveals that the threshold for excitation is quite sensitive to the helical pitch of the flow. Computational fluid dynamics simulations of the flow showed that by adjusting the angle of the vanes on the vessel wall (which control the helical pitch of the flow) we should be able to minimize the critical velocity at which the dynamo onset occurs. Experiments are now underway to exploit this new capability in tailoring the large

  13. Seasonal Environmental Characteristics for the Tropical Cyclone Genesis in the Indian Ocean during the CINDY2011/DYNAMO Field Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aya Tsuboi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the seasonal environmental characteristics for tropical cyclone genesis (TCG over the Indian Ocean during the Cooperative Indian Ocean Experiment on Intraseasonal Variability in the Year 2011 and the Dynamics of the Madden–Julian Oscillation (MJO (CINDY2011/DYNAMO field experiment and compare them with long-term climatological features. It was found that the spatial pattern of an empirical environmental index for TCG over the tropical Indian Ocean in 2011 is very similar to the feature composited over the years with high activity of MJO. The analyses of the contributions from each environmental factor indicated that relative humidity, absolute vorticity, and vertical velocity contribute to generate positive influences on the conditions for TCG in 2011. The influences of La Niña appear only through a shear effect over the Indian Ocean in 2011. Under the influences of active MJO events during the CINDY2011/DYNAMO period, the environmental conditions for TCG over the Indian Ocean are determined more strongly by MJO than by La Niña, through modifications of some environmental properties favorable for TCG. The environmental characteristics during CINDY2011/DYNAMO seem to be quite typical of the MJO active years; in such a case, the influences of El Niño/La Niña would not appear in determining the environmental conditions for TCG over the Indian Ocean.

  14. Increasing Climate Literacy in Introductory Oceanography Classes Using Ocean Observation Data from Project Dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hams, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    This session will present educational activities developed for an introductory Oceanography lecture and laboratory class by NOAA Teacher-at-Sea Jacquelyn Hams following participation in Leg 3 of Project DYNAMO (Dynamics of the Madden-Julian Oscillation) in November-December 2011. The Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) is an important tropical weather phenomenon with origins in the Indian Ocean that impacts many other global climate patterns such as the El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO), Northern Hemisphere monsoons, tropical storm development, and pineapple express events. The educational activities presented include a series of lessons based on the observational data collected during Project DYNAMO which include atmospheric conditions, wind speeds and direction, surface energy flux, and upper ocean turbulence and mixing. The lessons can be incorporated into any introductory Oceanography class discussion on ocean properties such as conductivity, temperature, and density, ocean circulation, and layers of the atmosphere. A variety of hands-on lessons will be presented ranging from short activities used to complement a lecture to complete laboratory exercises.

  15. A Critical Assessment of the Flux Transport Dynamo

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arnab Rai Choudhuri

    2015-03-01

    We first discuss how the flux transport dynamo with reasonably high diffusion can explain both the regular and the irregular features of the solar cycle quite well. Then, we critically examine the inadequacies of the model and the challenge posed by some recent observational data about meridional circulation, arriving at a conclusion that this model can still work within the bounds of observational data.

  16. Helicity of Solar Active Regions from a Dynamo Model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Piyali Chatterjee

    2006-06-01

    We calculate helicities of solar active regions based on the idea that poloidal flux lines get wrapped around a toroidal flux tube rising through the convection zone, thereby giving rise to the helicity. We use our solar dynamo model based on the Babcock–Leighton -effect to study how helicity varies with latitude and time.

  17. Gravitational dynamos and the low-frequency geomagnetic secular variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, P.

    2007-01-01

    Self-sustaining numerical dynamos are used to infer the sources of low-frequency secular variation of the geomagnetic field. Gravitational dynamo models powered by compositional convection in an electrically conducting, rotating fluid shell exhibit several regimes of magnetic field behavior with an increasing Rayleigh number of the convection, including nearly steady dipoles, chaotic nonreversing dipoles, and chaotic reversing dipoles. The time average dipole strength and dipolarity of the magnetic field decrease, whereas the dipole variability, average dipole tilt angle, and frequency of polarity reversals increase with Rayleigh number. Chaotic gravitational dynamos have large-amplitude dipole secular variation with maximum power at frequencies corresponding to a few cycles per million years on Earth. Their external magnetic field structure, dipole statistics, low-frequency power spectra, and polarity reversal frequency are comparable to the geomagnetic field. The magnetic variability is driven by the Lorentz force and is characterized by an inverse correlation between dynamo magnetic and kinetic energy fluctuations. A constant energy dissipation theory accounts for this inverse energy correlation, which is shown to produce conditions favorable for dipole drift, polarity reversals, and excursions. PMID:18048345

  18. A 3D Babcock-Leighton Solar Dynamo Model

    CERN Document Server

    Miesch, Mark S

    2014-01-01

    We present a 3D kinematic solar dynamo model in which poloidal field is generated by the emergence and dispersal of tilted sunspot pairs (more generally Bipolar Magnetic Regions, or BMRs). The axisymmetric component of this model functions similarly to previous 2D Babcock-Leighton (BL) dynamo models that employ a double-ring prescription for poloidal field generation but we generalize this prescription into a 3D flux emergence algorithm that places BMRs on the surface in response to the dynamo-generated toroidal field. In this way, the model can be regarded as a unification of BL dynamo models (2D in radius/latitude) and surface flux transport models (2D in latitude/longitude) into a more self-consistent framework that captures the full 3D structure of the evolving magnetic field. The model reproduces some basic features of the solar cycle including an 11-yr periodicity, equatorward migration of toroidal flux in the deep convection zone, and poleward propagation of poloidal flux at the surface. The poleward-p...

  19. Toward an asymptotic behaviour of the ABC dynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Bouya, Ismaël

    2016-01-01

    The ABC flow was originally introduced by Arnol'd to investigate Lagrangian chaos. It soon became the prototype example to illustrate magnetic-field amplification via fast dynamo action, i.e. dynamo action exhibiting magnetic-field amplification on a typical timescale independent of the electrical resistivity of the medium. Even though this flow is the most classical example for this important class of dynamos (with application to large-scale astrophysical objects), it was recently pointed out (Bouya Isma\\"el and Dormy Emmanuel, Phys. Fluids, 25 (2013) 037103) that the fast dynamo nature of this flow was unclear, as the growth rate still depended on the magnetic Reynolds number at the largest values available so far $(\\text{Rm} = 25000)$ . Using state-of-the-art high-performance computing, we present high-resolution simulations (up to 40963) and extend the value of $\\text{Rm}$ up to $ 5\\cdot10^5$ . Interestingly, even at these huge values, the growth rate of the leading eigenmode still depends on the controll...

  20. Fluctuation dynamo and turbulent induction at small Prandtl number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyink, Gregory L

    2010-10-01

    We study the Lagrangian mechanism of the fluctuation dynamo at zero Prandtl number and infinite magnetic Reynolds number, in the Kazantsev-Kraichnan model of white-noise advection. With a rough velocity field corresponding to a turbulent inertial range, flux freezing holds only in a stochastic sense. We show that field lines arriving to the same point which were initially separated by many resistive lengths are important to the dynamo. Magnetic vectors of the seed field that point parallel to the initial separation vector arrive anticorrelated and produce an "antidynamo" effect. We also study the problem of "magnetic induction" of a spatially uniform seed field. We find no essential distinction between this process and fluctuation dynamo, both producing the same growth rates and small-scale magnetic correlations. In the regime of very rough velocity fields where fluctuation dynamo fails, we obtain the induced magnetic energy spectra. We use these results to evaluate theories proposed for magnetic spectra in laboratory experiments of turbulent induction.

  1. Analytic solution of an oscillatory migratory α2 stellar dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandenburg, A.

    2017-02-01

    Context. Analytic solutions of the mean-field induction equation predict a nonoscillatory dynamo for homogeneous helical turbulence or constant α effect in unbounded or periodic domains. Oscillatory dynamos are generally thought impossible for constant α. Aims: We present an analytic solution for a one-dimensional bounded domain resulting in oscillatory solutions for constant α, but different (Dirichlet and von Neumann or perfect conductor and vacuum) boundary conditions on the two boundaries. Methods: We solve a second order complex equation and superimpose two independent solutions to obey both boundary conditions. Results: The solution has time-independent energy density. On one end where the function value vanishes, the second derivative is finite, which would not be correctly reproduced with sine-like expansion functions where a node coincides with an inflection point. The field always migrates away from the perfect conductor boundary toward the vacuum boundary, independently of the sign of α. Conclusions: The obtained solution may serve as a benchmark for numerical dynamo experiments and as a pedagogical illustration that oscillatory migratory dynamos are possible with constant α.

  2. Mean-field dynamo action in renovating shearing flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolekar, Sanved; Subramanian, Kandaswamy; Sridhar, S

    2012-08-01

    We study mean-field dynamo action in renovating flows with finite and nonzero correlation time (τ) in the presence of shear. Previous results obtained when shear was absent are generalized to the case with shear. The question of whether the mean magnetic field can grow in the presence of shear and nonhelical turbulence, as seen in numerical simulations, is examined. We show in a general manner that, if the motions are strictly nonhelical, then such mean-field dynamo action is not possible. This result is not limited to low (fluid or magnetic) Reynolds numbers nor does it use any closure approximation; it only assumes that the flow renovates itself after each time interval τ. Specifying to a particular form of the renovating flow with helicity, we recover the standard dispersion relation of the α(2)Ω dynamo, in the small τ or large wavelength limit. Thus mean fields grow even in the presence of rapidly growing fluctuations, surprisingly, in a manner predicted by the standard quasilinear closure, even though such a closure is not strictly justified. Our work also suggests the possibility of obtaining mean-field dynamo growth in the presence of helicity fluctuations, although having a coherent helicity will be more efficient.

  3. Solar small-scale dynamo and polarity of sunspot groups

    CERN Document Server

    Sokoloff, D; Abramenko, V

    2015-01-01

    In order to clarify a possible role of small-scale dynamo in formation of solar magnetic field, we suggest an observational test for small-scale dynamo action based on statistics of anti-Hale sunspot groups. As we have shown, according to theoretical expectations the small-scale dynamo action has to provide a population of sunspot groups which do not follow the Hale polarity law, and the density of such groups on the time-latitude diagram is expected to be independent on the phase of the solar cycle. Correspondingly, a percentage of the anti-Hale groups is expected to reach its maximum values during solar minima. For several solar cycles, we considered statistics of anti-Hale groups obtained by several scientific teams, including ours, to find that the percentage of anti-Hale groups becomes indeed maximal during a solar minimum. Our interpretation is that this fact may be explained by the small-scale dynamo action inside the solar convective zone.

  4. Solar small-scale dynamo and polarity of sunspot groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokoloff, D.; Khlystova, A.; Abramenko, V.

    2015-08-01

    In order to clarify a possible role of small-scale dynamo in formation of solar magnetic field, we suggest an observational test for small-scale dynamo action based on statistics of anti-Hale sunspot groups. As we have shown, according to theoretical expectations the small-scale dynamo action has to provide a population of sunspot groups which do not follow the Hale polarity law, and the density of such groups on the time-latitude diagram is expected to be independent on the phase of the solar cycle. Correspondingly, a percentage of the anti-Hale groups is expected to reach its maximum values during solar minima. For several solar cycles, we considered statistics of anti-Hale groups obtained by several scientific teams, including ours, to find that the percentage of anti-Hale groups becomes indeed maximal during a solar minimum. Our interpretation is that this fact may be explained by the small-scale dynamo action inside the solar convective zone.

  5. Turbulent dynamo in a conducting fluid and partially ionized gas

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Siyao

    2016-01-01

    By following the Kazantsev theory and taking into account both microscopic and turbulent diffusion of magnetic fields, we develop a unified treatment of the kinematic and nonlinear stages of turbulent dynamo, and study the dynamo process for a full range of magnetic Prandtl number Pm and ionization fractions. We find a striking similarity between the dependence of dynamo behavior on Pm in a conducting fluid and R (a function of ionization fraction) in partially ionized gas. In a weakly ionized medium, the kinematic stage is largely extended, including not only exponential growth but a new regime of dynamo characterized by linear-in-time growth of magnetic field strength, and the resulting magnetic energy is much higher than the kinetic energy carried by viscous-scale eddies. Unlike the kinematic stage, the subsequent nonlinear stage is unaffected by microscopic diffusion processes and has a universal linear-in-time growth of magnetic energy with the growth rate as a constant fraction $3/38$ of the turbulent e...

  6. Magnetohydrodynamic dynamo in disc-like astrophysical bodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stepinski, T.F.

    1986-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic dynamos in disc-like astrophysical bodies have been considered for some time. Important astrophysical objects like accretion discs, protostellar and protoplanetary nebulae, and galaxies are thought to regenerate a magnetic field through a dynamo mechanism. Although there is a well-developed theory for describing the regeneration of magnetic fields in these objects, there are not any specific methods to calculate such magnetic fields in the general case. In this work, after a description of the dynamo theory, the specific method for solving the nonspherical dynamo is introduced. The unique feature of this method is accommodation of variable magnetic diffusivity in order to model the shape of a disc-like body. The detailed construction of the method is presented, as well as description of mathematical and numerical methods used for obtaining the solution. The method of checking the model with respect to sell-established spherical models is also presented. Finally, some examples are calculated and discussion is given on the behavior of calculated magnetic fields and possible astrophysical implications.

  7. On the role of tachoclines in solar and stellar dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Guerrero, G; Pino, E M de Gouveia Dal; Kosovichev, A G; Mansour, N N

    2015-01-01

    Rotational shear layers at the boundary between radiative and convective zones, tachoclines, play a key role in the dynamo process of magnetic field generation in the Sun and solar-like stars. We present two sets of global simulations of rotating turbulent convection and dynamo. The first set considers a stellar convective envelope only; the second one, aiming at the formation of a tachocline, considers also the upper part of the radiative zone. Our results indicate that dynamo properties like the growth rate, the saturation energy and mode depend on the Rossby (Ro) number. The models with slow rotation in the first set of simulations reproduce remarkably well the solar differential rotation in the convection zone. Depending on the value of Ro either oscillatory (with ~2 yr period) or steady dynamo solutions are obtained. The models in the second set naturally develop a tachocline which, in turn, leads to the generation of strong mean magnetic field (~1 Tesla). Since the field is also deposited into the stabl...

  8. Fluctuation dynamo at finite correlation times using renewing flows

    CERN Document Server

    Bhat, Pallavi

    2014-01-01

    Fluctuation dynamos are generic to turbulent astrophysical systems. The only analytical model of the fluctuation dynamo, due to Kazantsev, assumes the velocity to be delta-correlated in time. This assumption breaks down for any realistic turbulent flow. We generalize the analytic model of fluctuation dynamo to include the effects of a finite correlation time, $\\tau$, using renewing flows. The generalized evolution equation for the longitudinal correlation function $M_L$ leads to the standard Kazantsev equation in the $\\tau \\to 0$ limit, and extends it to the next order in $\\tau$. We find that this evolution equation involves also third and fourth spatial derivatives of $M_L$, indicating that the evolution for finite $\\tau$ will be non-local in general. In the perturbative case of small-$\\tau$ (or small Strouhl number), it can be recast using the Landau-Lifschitz approach, to one with at most second derivatives of $M_L$. Using both a scaling solution and the WKBJ approximation, we show that the dynamo growth r...

  9. Joint independent component analysis of structural and functional images reveals complex patterns of functional reorganisation in stroke aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Specht, Karsten; Zahn, Roland; Willmes, Klaus; Weis, Susanne; Holtel, Christiane; Krause, Bernd J; Herzog, Hans; Huber, Walter

    2009-10-01

    Previous functional activation studies in patients with aphasia have mostly relied on standard group comparisons of aphasic patients with healthy controls, which are biased towards regions showing the most consistent effects and disregard variability within groups. Groups of aphasic patients, however, show considerable variability with respect to lesion localisation and extent. Here, we use a novel method, joint independent component analysis (jICA), which allowed us to investigate abnormal patterns of functional activation with O(15)-PET during lexical decision in aphasic patients after middle cerebral artery stroke and to directly relate them to lesion information from structural MRI. Our results demonstrate that with jICA we could detect a network of compensatory increases in activity within bilateral anterior inferior temporal areas (BA20), which was not revealed by standard group comparisons. In addition, both types of analyses, jICA and group comparison, showed increased activity in the right posterior superior temporal gyrus in aphasic patients. Further, whereas standard analyses revealed no decreases in activation, jICA identified that left perisylvian lesions were associated with decreased activation of left posterior inferior frontal cortex, damaged in most patients, and extralesional remote decreases of activity within polar parts of the inferior temporal gyrus (BA38/20) and the occipital cortex (BA19). Taken together, our results demonstrate that jICA may be superior in revealing complex patterns of functional reorganisation in aphasia.

  10. Multivoxel pattern analysis reveals 3D place information in the human hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Misun; Jeffery, Kate J; Maguire, Eleanor A

    2017-03-20

    The spatial world is three-dimensional (3D), and humans and other animals move both horizontally and vertically within it. Extant neuroscientific studies have typically investigated spatial navigation on a horizontal two-dimensional plane, leaving much unknown about how 3D spatial information is represented in the brain. Specifically, horizontal and vertical information may be encoded in the same or different neural structures with equal or unequal sensitivity. Here, we investigated these possibilities using functional MRI (fMRI) while participants were passively moved within a 3D lattice structure as if riding a rollercoaster. Multivoxel pattern analysis was used to test for the existence of information relating to where and in which direction participants were heading in this virtual environment. Behaviorally, participants had similarly accurate memory for vertical and horizontal locations, and the right anterior hippocampus expressed place information that was sensitive to changes along both horizontal and vertical axes. This is suggestive of isotropic 3D place encoding. By contrast, participants indicated their heading direction faster and more accurately when they were heading in a tilted-up or tilted-down direction. This direction information was expressed in the right retrosplenial cortex and posterior hippocampus, and was only sensitive to vertical pitch, which could reflect the importance of the vertical (gravity) axis as a reference frame. Overall, our findings extend previous knowledge of how we represent the spatial world and navigate within it, by taking into account the important third dimension.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENTThe spatial world is three-dimensional (3D) -- we can move horizontally across surfaces, but also vertically, going up slopes or stairs. Little is known about how the brain supports representations of 3D space. A key question is whether or not horizontal and vertical information is equally well represented. Here we measured functional MRI

  11. The eye of the beholder: Can patterns in eye movement reveal aptitudes for spatial reasoning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Victoria A; Fraser, Graham M; Kryklywy, James H; Mitchell, Derek G V; Wilson, Timothy D

    2016-07-08

    Mental rotation ability (MRA) is linked to academic success in the spatially complex Science, Technology, Engineering, Medicine, and Mathematics (STEMM) disciplines, and anatomical sciences. Mental rotation literature suggests that MRA may manifest in the movement of the eyes. Quantification of eye movement data may serve to distinguish MRA across individuals, and serve as a consideration when designing visualizations for instruction. It is hypothesized that high-MRA individuals will demonstrate fewer eye fixations, conduct shorter average fixation durations (AFD), and demonstrate shorter response times, than low-MRA individuals. Additionally, individuals with different levels of MRA will attend to different features of the block-figures presented in the electronic mental rotations test (EMRT). All participants (n = 23) completed the EMRT while metrics of eye movement were collected. The test required participants view pairs of three-dimensional (3D) shapes, and identify if the pair is rotated but identical, or two different structures. Temporal analysis revealed no significant correlations between response time, average fixation durations, or number of fixations and mental rotation ability. Further analysis of within-participant variability yielded a significant correlation for response time variability, but no correlation between AFD variability and variability in the number of fixations. Additional analysis of salience revealed that during problem solving, individuals of differing MRA attended to different features of the block images; suggesting that eye movements directed at salient features may contribute to differences in mental rotations ability, and may ultimately serve to predict success in anatomy. Anat Sci Educ 9: 357-366. © 2015 American Association of Anatomists.

  12. Robustness of oscillatory α2 dynamos in spherical wedges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, E.; Brandenburg, A.; Käpylä, P. J.; Käpylä, M. J.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Large-scale dynamo simulations are sometimes confined to spherical wedge geometries by imposing artificial boundary conditions at high latitudes. This may lead to spatio-temporal behaviours that are not representative of those in full spherical shells. Aims: We study the connection between spherical wedge and full spherical shell geometries using simple mean-field dynamos. Methods: We solve the equations for one-dimensional time-dependent α2 and α2Ω mean-field dynamos with only latitudinal extent to examine the effects of varying the polar angle θ0 between the latitudinal boundaries and the poles in spherical coordinates. Results: In the case of constant α and ηt profiles, we find oscillatory solutions only with the commonly used perfect conductor boundary condition in a wedge geometry, while for full spheres all boundary conditions produce stationary solutions, indicating that perfect conductor conditions lead to unphysical solutions in such a wedge setup. To search for configurations in which this problem can be alleviated we choose a profile of the turbulent magnetic diffusivity that decreases toward the poles, corresponding to high conductivity there. Oscillatory solutions are now achieved with models extending to the poles, but the magnetic field is strongly concentrated near the poles and the oscillation period is very long. By changing both the turbulent magnetic diffusivity and α profiles so that both effects are more concentrated toward the equator, we see oscillatory dynamos with equatorward drift, shorter cycles, and magnetic fields distributed over a wider range of latitudes. Those profiles thus remove the sensitive and unphysical dependence on θ0. When introducing radial shear, we again see oscillatory dynamos, and the direction of drift follows the Parker-Yoshimura rule. Conclusions: A reduced α effect near the poles with a turbulent diffusivity concentrated toward the equator yields oscillatory dynamos with equatorward migration and

  13. Molecular phylogeny of echiuran worms (Phylum: Annelida reveals evolutionary pattern of feeding mode and sexual dimorphism.

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    Ryutaro Goto

    Full Text Available The Echiura, or spoon worms, are a group of marine worms, most of which live in burrows in soft sediments. This annelid-like animal group was once considered as a separate phylum because of the absence of segmentation, although recent molecular analyses have placed it within the annelids. In this study, we elucidate the interfamily relationships of echiuran worms and their evolutionary pattern of feeding mode and sexual dimorphism, by performing molecular phylogenetic analyses using four genes (18S, 28S, H3, and COI of representatives of all extant echiuran families. Our results suggest that Echiura is monophyletic and comprises two unexpected groups: [Echiuridae+Urechidae+Thalassematidae] and [Bonelliidae+Ikedidae]. This grouping agrees with the presence/absence of marked sexual dimorphism involving dwarf males and the paired/non-paired configuration of the gonoducts (genital sacs. Furthermore, the data supports the sister group relationship of Echiuridae and Urechidae. These two families share the character of having anal chaetae rings around the posterior trunk as a synapomorphy. The analyses also suggest that deposit feeding is a basal feeding mode in echiurans and that filter feeding originated once in the common ancestor of Urechidae. Overall, our results contradict the currently accepted order-level classification, especially in that Echiuroinea is polyphyletic, and provide novel insights into the evolution of echiuran worms.

  14. Fibrillar organization in tendons: A pattern revealed by percolation characteristics of the respective geometric network

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    Daniel Andres Dos Santos

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the tendon is composed by collagen fibrils of various sizes connected between them through molecular cross-links, it sounds logical to model it via a heterogeneous network of fibrils. Using cross sectional images, that network is operatively inferred from the respective Gabriel graph of the fibril mass centers. We focus on network percolation characteristics under an ordered activation of fibrils (progressive recruitment going from the smallest to the largest fibril. Analyses of percolation were carried out on a repository of images of digital flexor tendons obtained from samples of lizards and frogs. Observed percolation thresholds were compared against values derived from hypothetical scenarios of random activation of nodes. Strikingly, we found a significant delay for the occurrence of percolation in actual data. We interpret this finding as the consequence of some non-random packing of fibrillar units into a size-constrained geometric pattern. We erect an ideal geometric model of balanced interspersion of polymorphic units that accounts for the delayed percolating instance. We also address the circumstance of being percolation curves mirrored by the empirical curves of stress-strain obtained from the same studied tendons. By virtue of this isomorphism, we hypothesize that the inflection points of both curves are different quantitative manifestations of a common transitional process during mechanical load transference.

  15. Monitoring of Water Spectral Pattern Reveals Differences in Probiotics Growth When Used for Rapid Bacteria Selection.

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    Aleksandar Slavchev

    Full Text Available Development of efficient screening method coupled with cell functionality evaluation is highly needed in contemporary microbiology. The presented novel concept and fast non-destructive method brings in to play the water spectral pattern of the solution as a molecular fingerprint of the cell culture system. To elucidate the concept, NIR spectroscopy with Aquaphotomics were applied to monitor the growth of sixteen Lactobacillus bulgaricus one Lactobacillus pentosus and one Lactobacillus gasseri bacteria strains. Their growth rate, maximal optical density, low pH and bile tolerances were measured and further used as a reference data for analysis of the simultaneously acquired spectral data. The acquired spectral data in the region of 1100-1850nm was subjected to various multivariate data analyses - PCA, OPLS-DA, PLSR. The results showed high accuracy of bacteria strains classification according to their probiotic strength. Most informative spectral fingerprints covered the first overtone of water, emphasizing the relation of water molecular system to cell functionality.

  16. We'll meet again: revealing distributional and temporal patterns of social contact.

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    Thorsten Pachur

    Full Text Available What are the dynamics and regularities underlying social contact, and how can contact with the people in one's social network be predicted? In order to characterize distributional and temporal patterns underlying contact probability, we asked 40 participants to keep a diary of their social contacts for 100 consecutive days. Using a memory framework previously used to study environmental regularities, we predicted that the probability of future contact would follow in systematic ways from the frequency, recency, and spacing of previous contact. The distribution of contact probability across the members of a person's social network was highly skewed, following an exponential function. As predicted, it emerged that future contact scaled linearly with frequency of past contact, proportionally to a power function with recency of past contact, and differentially according to the spacing of past contact. These relations emerged across different contact media and irrespective of whether the participant initiated or received contact. We discuss how the identification of these regularities might inspire more realistic analyses of behavior in social networks (e.g., attitude formation, cooperation.

  17. Resistivity imaging reveals complex pattern of saltwater intrusion along Monterey coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, Meredith; Pidlisecky, Adam; Knight, Rosemary

    2017-08-01

    Electrical Resistivity Tomography data were acquired along 40 km of the Monterey Bay coast in central California. These data resulted in electrical resistivity images to depths of approximately 280 m.b.s.l., which were used to understand the distribution of freshwater and saltwater in the subsurface, and factors controlling this distribution. The resulting resistivity sections were interpreted in conjunction with existing data sets, including well logs, seismic reflection data, geologic reports, hydrologic reports, and land use maps from the region. Interpretation of these data shows a complex pattern of saltwater intrusion resulting from geology, pumping, and recharge. The resistivity profiles were used to identify geological flow conduits and barriers such as palaeo-channels and faults, localized saltwater intrusion from individual pumping wells, infiltration zones of surface fresh and brackish water, and regions showing improvements in water quality due to management actions. The use of ERT data for characterizing the subsurface in this region has led to an understanding of the spatial distribution of freshwater and saltwater at a level of detail unattainable with the previously deployed traditional well based salinity mapping and monitoring techniques alone. Significant spatial variability in the extent and geometry of intrusion observed in the acquired data highlights the importance of adopting continuous subsurface characterization methods such as this one.

  18. Shotgun Bisulfite Sequencing of the Betula platyphylla Genome Reveals the Tree’s DNA Methylation Patterning

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    Chang Su

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available DNA methylation plays a critical role in the regulation of gene expression. Most studies of DNA methylation have been performed in herbaceous plants, and little is known about the methylation patterns in tree genomes. In the present study, we generated a map of methylated cytosines at single base pair resolution for Betula platyphylla (white birch by bisulfite sequencing combined with transcriptomics to analyze DNA methylation and its effects on gene expression. We obtained a detailed view of the function of DNA methylation sequence composition and distribution in the genome of B. platyphylla. There are 34,460 genes in the whole genome of birch, and 31,297 genes are methylated. Conservatively, we estimated that 14.29% of genomic cytosines are methylcytosines in birch. Among the methylation sites, the CHH context accounts for 48.86%, and is the largest proportion. Combined transcriptome and methylation analysis showed that the genes with moderate methylation levels had higher expression levels than genes with high and low methylation. In addition, methylated genes are highly enriched for the GO subcategories of binding activities, catalytic activities, cellular processes, response to stimulus and cell death, suggesting that methylation mediates these pathways in birch trees.

  19. DNA Methylation Profiling Reveals Correlation of Differential Methylation Patterns with Gene Expression in Human Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liang; Fu, Xinwei; Peng, Xi; Xiao, Zheng; Li, Zhonggui; Chen, Guojun; Wang, Xuefeng

    2016-05-01

    DNA methylation plays important roles in regulating gene expression and has been reported to be related with epilepsy. This study aimed to define differential DNA methylation patterns in drug-refractory epilepsy patients and to investigate the role of DNA methylation in human epilepsy. We performed DNA methylation profiling in brain tissues from epileptic and control patients via methylated-cytosine DNA immunoprecipitation microarray chip. Differentially methylated loci were validated by bisulfite sequencing PCR, and the messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of candidate genes were evaluated by reverse transcriptase PCR. We found 224 genes that showed differential DNA methylation between epileptic patients and controls. Among the seven candidate genes, three genes (TUBB2B, ATPGD1, and HTR6) showed relative transcriptional regulation by DNA methylation. TUBB2B and ATPGD1 exhibited hypermethylation and decreased mRNA levels, whereas HTR6 displayed hypomethylation and increased mRNA levels in the epileptic samples. Our findings suggest that certain genes become differentially regulated by DNA methylation in human epilepsy.

  20. Classification of microvascular patterns via cluster analysis reveals their prognostic significance in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Long; Lin, Zhi-Xiong; Lin, Guo-Shi; Zhou, Chang-Fu; Chen, Yu-Peng; Wang, Xing-Fu; Zheng, Zong-Qing

    2015-01-01

    There are limited researches focusing on microvascular patterns (MVPs) in human glioblastoma and their prognostic impact. We evaluated MVPs of 78 glioblastomas by CD34/periodic acid-Schiff dual staining and by cluster analysis of the percentage of microvascular area for distinct microvascular formations. The distribution of 5 types of basic microvascular formations, that is, microvascular sprouting (MS), vascular cluster (VC), vascular garland (VG), glomeruloid vascular proliferation (GVP), and vasculogenic mimicry (VM), was variable. Accordingly, cluster analysis classified MVPs into 2 types: type I MVP displayed prominent MSs and VCs, whereas type II MVP had numerous VGs, GVPs, and VMs. By analyzing the proportion of microvascular area for each type of formation, we determined that glioblastomas with few MSs and VCs had many GVPs and VMs, and vice versa. VG seemed to be a transitional type of formation. In case of type I MVP, expression of Ki-67 and p53 but not MGMT was significantly higher as compared with those of type II MVP (P analysis showed that the type of MVPs presented as an independent prognostic factor of progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) (both P < .001). Type II MVP had a more negative influence on PFS and OS than did type I MVP. We conclude that the heterogeneous MVPs in glioblastoma can be categorized properly by certain histopathologic and statistical analyses and may influence clinical outcome. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. New patterns in human biogeography revealed by networks of contacts between linguistic groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitán, José A; Bock Axelsen, Jacob; Manrubia, Susanna

    2015-03-07

    Human languages differ broadly in abundance and are distributed highly unevenly on the Earth. In many qualitative and quantitative aspects, they strongly resemble biodiversity distributions. An intriguing and previously unexplored issue is the architecture of the neighbouring relationships between human linguistic groups. Here we construct and characterize these networks of contacts and show that they represent a new kind of spatial network with uncommon structural properties. Remarkably, language networks share a meaningful property with food webs: both are quasi-interval graphs. In food webs, intervality is linked to the existence of a niche space of low dimensionality; in language networks, we show that the unique relevant variable is the area occupied by the speakers of a language. By means of a range model analogous to niche models in ecology, we show that a geometric restriction of perimeter covering by neighbouring linguistic domains explains the structural patterns observed. Our findings may be of interest in the development of models for language dynamics or regarding the propagation of cultural innovations. In relation to species distribution, they pose the question of whether the spatial features of species ranges share architecture, and eventually generating mechanism, with the distribution of human linguistic groups. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  2. Different gene expression patterns between leaves and flowers in Lonicera japonica revealed by transcriptome analysis

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    Libin eZhang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The perennial and evergreen twining vine, Lonicera japonica is an important herbal medicine with great economic value. However, gene expression information for flowers and leaves of L. japonica remains elusive, which greatly impedes functional genomics research on this species. In this study, transcriptome profiles from leaves and flowers of L. japonica were examined using next-generation sequencing technology. A total of 239.41 million clean reads were used for de novo assembly with Trinity software, which generated 150,523 unigenes with N50 containing 947 bp. All the unigenes were annotated using Nr, SwissProt, COGs (Clusters of Orthologous Groups, GO (Gene Ontology and KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes databases. A total of 35,327 differentially expressed genes (DEGs, P≤0.05 between leaves and flowers were detected. Among them, a total of 6,602 DEGs were assigned with important biological processes including Metabolic process, Response to stimulus, Cellular process and etc. KEGG analysis showed that three possible enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of chlorogenic acid were up-regulated in flowers. Furthermore, the TF-based regulation network in L. japonica identified three differentially expressed transcription factors between leaves and flowers, suggesting distinct regulatory roles in L. japonica. Taken together, this study has provided a global picture of differential gene expression patterns between leaves and flowers in L japonica, providing a useful genomic resource that can also be used for functional genomics research on L. japonica in the future.

  3. Race, Religion and the City: Twitter Word Frequency Patterns Reveal Dominant Demographic Dimensions in the United States

    CERN Document Server

    Bokányi, Eszter; Dobos, László; Sebők, Tamás; Stéger, József; Csabai, István; Vattay, Gábor

    2016-01-01

    Recently, numerous approaches have emerged in the social sciences to exploit the opportunities made possible by the vast amounts of data generated by online social networks (OSNs). Having access to information about users on such a scale opens up a range of possibilities, all without the limitations associated with often slow and expensive paper-based polls. A question that remains to be satisfactorily addressed, however, is how demography is represented in the OSN content? Here, we study language use in the US using a corpus of text compiled from over half a billion geo-tagged messages from the online microblogging platform Twitter. Our intention is to reveal the most important spatial patterns in language use in an unsupervised manner and relate them to demographics. Our approach is based on Latent Semantic Analysis (LSA) augmented with the Robust Principal Component Analysis (RPCA) methodology. We find spatially correlated patterns that can be interpreted based on the words associated with them. The main l...

  4. CO I barcoding reveals new clades and radiation patterns of Indo-Pacific sponges of the family Irciniidae (Demospongiae: Dictyoceratida.

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    Judith Pöppe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: DNA barcoding is a promising tool to facilitate a rapid and unambiguous identification of sponge species. Demosponges of the order Dictyoceratida are particularly challenging to identify, but are of ecological as well as biochemical importance. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we apply DNA barcoding with the standard CO1-barcoding marker on selected Indo-Pacific specimens of two genera, Ircinia and Psammocinia of the family Irciniidae. We show that the CO1 marker identifies several species new to science, reveals separate radiation patterns of deep-sea Ircinia sponges and indicates dispersal patterns of Psammocinia species. However, some species cannot be unambiguously barcoded by solely this marker due to low evolutionary rates. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We support previous suggestions for a combination of the standard CO1 fragment with an additional fragment for sponge DNA barcoding.

  5. RNA-Seq profiling reveals novel hepatic gene expression pattern in aflatoxin B1 treated rats.

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    B Alex Merrick

    Full Text Available Deep sequencing was used to investigate the subchronic effects of 1 ppm aflatoxin B1 (AFB1, a potent hepatocarcinogen, on the male rat liver transcriptome prior to onset of histopathological lesions or tumors. We hypothesized RNA-Seq would reveal more differentially expressed genes (DEG than microarray analysis, including low copy and novel transcripts related to AFB1's carcinogenic activity compared to feed controls (CTRL. Paired-end reads were mapped to the rat genome (Rn4 with TopHat and further analyzed by DESeq and Cufflinks-Cuffdiff pipelines to identify differentially expressed transcripts, new exons and unannotated transcripts. PCA and cluster analysis of DEGs showed clear separation between AFB1 and CTRL treatments and concordance among group replicates. qPCR of eight high and medium DEGs and three low DEGs showed good comparability among RNA-Seq and microarray transcripts. DESeq analysis identified 1,026 differentially expressed transcripts at greater than two-fold change (p<0.005 compared to 626 transcripts by microarray due to base pair resolution of transcripts by RNA-Seq, probe placement within transcripts or an absence of probes to detect novel transcripts, splice variants and exons. Pathway analysis among DEGs revealed signaling of Ahr, Nrf2, GSH, xenobiotic, cell cycle, extracellular matrix, and cell differentiation networks consistent with pathways leading to AFB1 carcinogenesis, including almost 200 upregulated transcripts controlled by E2f1-related pathways related to kinetochore structure, mitotic spindle assembly and tissue remodeling. We report 49 novel, differentially-expressed transcripts including confirmation by PCR-cloning of two unique, unannotated, hepatic AFB1-responsive transcripts (HAfT's on chromosomes 1.q55 and 15.q11, overexpressed by 10 to 25-fold. Several potentially novel exons were found and exon refinements were made including AFB1 exon-specific induction of homologous family members, Ugt1a6 and Ugt1a7c

  6. Solar Activity Predictions Based on Solar Dynamo Theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatten, Kenneth H.

    2009-05-01

    We review solar activity prediction methods, statistical, precursor, and recently the Dikpati and the Choudhury groups’ use of numerical flux-dynamo methods. Outlining various methods, we compare precursor techniques with weather forecasting. Precursors involve events prior to a solar cycle. First started by the Russian geomagnetician Ohl, and then Brown and Williams; the Earth's field variations near solar minimum was used to predict the next solar cycle, with a correlation of 0.95. From the standpoint of causality, as well as energetically, these relationships were somewhat bizarre. One index used was the "number of anomalous quiet days,” an antiquated, subjective index. Scientific progress cannot be made without some suspension of disbelief; otherwise old paradigms become tautologies. So, with youthful naïveté, Svalgaard, Scherrer, Wilcox and I viewed the results through rose-colored glasses and pressed ahead searching for understanding. We eventually fumbled our way to explaining how the Sun could broadcast the state of its internal dynamo to Earth. We noted one key aspect of the Babcock-Leighton Flux Dynamo theory: the polar field at the end of a cycle serves as a seed for the next cycle's growth. Near solar minimum this field usually bathes the Earth, and thereby affects geomagnetic indices then. We found support by examining 8 previous solar cycles. Using our solar precursor technique we successfully predicted cycles 21, 22 and 23 using WSO and MWSO data. Pesnell and I improved the method using a SODA (SOlar Dynamo Amplitude) Index. In 2005, nearing cycle 23's minimum, Svalgaard and I noted an unusually weak polar field, and forecasted a small cycle 24. We discuss future advances: the flux-dynamo methods. As far as future solar activity, I shall let the Sun decide; it will do so anyhow.

  7. Dynamo Action and Magnetic Cycles in F-type Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustson, Kyle C.; Brun, Allan Sacha; Toomre, Juri

    2013-11-01

    Magnetic activity and differential rotation are commonly observed features on main-sequence F-type stars. We seek to make contact with such observations and to provide a self-consistent picture of how differential rotation and magnetic fields arise in the interiors of these stars. The three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic anelastic spherical harmonic code is employed to simulate global-scale convection and dynamo processes in a 1.2 M ⊙ F-type star at two rotation rates. The simulations are carried out in spherical shells that encompass most of the convection zone and a portion of the stably stratified radiative zone below it, allowing us to explore the effects a stable zone has upon the morphology of the global-scale magnetic fields. We find that dynamo action with a high degree of time variation occurs in the star rotating more rapidly at 20 Ω⊙, with the polarity of the mean field reversing on a timescale of about 1600 days. Between reversals, the magnetic energy rises and falls with a fairly regular period, with three magnetic energy cycles required to complete a reversal. The magnetic energy cycles and polarity reversals arise due to a linking of the polar-slip instability in the stable region and dynamo action present in the convection zone. For the more slowly rotating case (10 Ω⊙), persistent wreaths of magnetism are established and maintained by dynamo action. Compared to their hydrodynamic progenitors, the dynamo states here involve a marked reduction in the exhibited latitudinal differential rotation, which also vary during the course of a cycle.

  8. Small-scale dynamo at low magnetic Prandtl numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schober, Jennifer; Schleicher, Dominik; Bovino, Stefano; Klessen, Ralf S

    2012-12-01

    The present-day Universe is highly magnetized, even though the first magnetic seed fields were most probably extremely weak. To explain the growth of the magnetic field strength over many orders of magnitude, fast amplification processes need to operate. The most efficient mechanism known today is the small-scale dynamo, which converts turbulent kinetic energy into magnetic energy leading to an exponential growth of the magnetic field. The efficiency of the dynamo depends on the type of turbulence indicated by the slope of the turbulence spectrum v(ℓ)∝ℓ^{ϑ}, where v(ℓ) is the eddy velocity at a scale ℓ. We explore turbulent spectra ranging from incompressible Kolmogorov turbulence with ϑ=1/3 to highly compressible Burgers turbulence with ϑ=1/2. In this work, we analyze the properties of the small-scale dynamo for low magnetic Prandtl numbers Pm, which denotes the ratio of the magnetic Reynolds number, Rm, to the hydrodynamical one, Re. We solve the Kazantsev equation, which describes the evolution of the small-scale magnetic field, using the WKB approximation. In the limit of low magnetic Prandtl numbers, the growth rate is proportional to Rm^{(1-ϑ)/(1+ϑ)}. We furthermore discuss the critical magnetic Reynolds number Rm_{crit}, which is required for small-scale dynamo action. The value of Rm_{crit} is roughly 100 for Kolmogorov turbulence and 2700 for Burgers. Furthermore, we discuss that Rm_{crit} provides a stronger constraint in the limit of low Pm than it does for large Pm. We conclude that the small-scale dynamo can operate in the regime of low magnetic Prandtl numbers if the magnetic Reynolds number is large enough. Thus, the magnetic field amplification on small scales can take place in a broad range of physical environments and amplify week magnetic seed fields on short time scales.

  9. Small-scale dynamo at low magnetic Prandtl numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schober, Jennifer; Schleicher, Dominik; Bovino, Stefano; Klessen, Ralf S.

    2012-12-01

    The present-day Universe is highly magnetized, even though the first magnetic seed fields were most probably extremely weak. To explain the growth of the magnetic field strength over many orders of magnitude, fast amplification processes need to operate. The most efficient mechanism known today is the small-scale dynamo, which converts turbulent kinetic energy into magnetic energy leading to an exponential growth of the magnetic field. The efficiency of the dynamo depends on the type of turbulence indicated by the slope of the turbulence spectrum v(ℓ)∝ℓϑ, where v(ℓ) is the eddy velocity at a scale ℓ. We explore turbulent spectra ranging from incompressible Kolmogorov turbulence with ϑ=1/3 to highly compressible Burgers turbulence with ϑ=1/2. In this work, we analyze the properties of the small-scale dynamo for low magnetic Prandtl numbers Pm, which denotes the ratio of the magnetic Reynolds number, Rm, to the hydrodynamical one, Re. We solve the Kazantsev equation, which describes the evolution of the small-scale magnetic field, using the WKB approximation. In the limit of low magnetic Prandtl numbers, the growth rate is proportional to Rm(1-ϑ)/(1+ϑ). We furthermore discuss the critical magnetic Reynolds number Rmcrit, which is required for small-scale dynamo action. The value of Rmcrit is roughly 100 for Kolmogorov turbulence and 2700 for Burgers. Furthermore, we discuss that Rmcrit provides a stronger constraint in the limit of low Pm than it does for large Pm. We conclude that the small-scale dynamo can operate in the regime of low magnetic Prandtl numbers if the magnetic Reynolds number is large enough. Thus, the magnetic field amplification on small scales can take place in a broad range of physical environments and amplify week magnetic seed fields on short time scales.

  10. Using spatial patterns in illegal wildlife uses to reveal connections between subsistence hunting and trade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Mercado, Ada; Asmüssen, Marianne; Rodríguez-Clark, Kathryn M; Rodríguez, Jon Paul; Jedrzejewski, Wlodzimierz

    2016-12-01

    Although most often considered independently, subsistence hunting, domestic trade, and international trade as components of illegal wildlife use (IWU) may be spatially correlated. Understanding how and where subsistence and commercial uses may co-occur has important implications for the design and implementation of effective conservation actions. We analyzed patterns in the joint geographical distribution of illegal commercial and subsistence use of multiple wildlife species in Venezuela and evaluated whether available data were sufficient to provide accurate estimates of the magnitude, scope, and detectability of IWU. We compiled records of illegal subsistence hunting and trade from several sources and fitted a random-forest classification model to predict the spatial distribution of IWUs. From 1969 to 2014, 404 species and 8,340,921 specimens were involved in IWU, for a mean extraction rate of 185,354 individuals/year. Birds were the most speciose group involved (248 spp.), but reptiles had the highest extraction rates (126,414 individuals/year vs. 3,133 individuals/year for birds). Eighty-eight percent of international trade records spatially overlapped with domestic trade, especially in the north and along the coast but also in western inland areas. The distribution of domestic trade was broadly distributed along roads, suggesting that domestic trade does not depend on large markets in cities. Seventeen percent of domestic trade records overlapped with subsistence hunting, but the spatial distribution of this overlap covered a much larger area than between commercial uses. Domestic trade seems to respond to demand from rural more than urban communities. Our approach will be useful for understanding how IWU works at national scales in other parts of the world. © 2016 Society for Conservation Biology.

  11. Evolution of the insect body plan as revealed by the Sex combs reduced expression pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, B T; Peterson, M D; Kaufman, T C

    1997-01-01

    The products of the HOM/Hox homeotic genes form a set of evolutionarily conserved transcription factors that control elaborate developmental processes and specify cell fates in many metazoans. We examined the expression of the ortholog of the homeotic gene Sex combs reduced (Scr) of Drosophila melanogaster in insects of three divergent orders: Hemiptera, Orthoptera and Thysanura. Our data reflect how the conservation and variation of Scr expression has affected the morphological evolution of insects. Whereas the anterior epidermal expression of Scr, in a small part of the posterior maxillary and all of the labial segment, is found to be in common among all four insect orders, the posterior (thoracic) expression domains vary. Unlike what is observed in flies, the Scr orthologs of other insects are not expressed broadly over the first thoracic segment, but are restricted to small patches. We show here that Scr is required for suppression of wings on the prothorax of Drosophila. Moreover, Scr expression at the dorsal base of the prothoracic limb in two other winged insects, crickets (Orthoptera) and milkweed bugs (Hemiptera), is consistent with Scr acting as a suppressor of prothoracic wings in these insects. Scr is also expressed in a small patch of cells near the basitarsal-tibial junction of milkweed bugs, precisely where a leg comb develops, suggesting that Scr promotes comb formation, as it does in Drosophila. Surprisingly, the dorsal prothoracic expression of Scr is also present in the primitively wingless firebrat (Thysanura) and the leg patch is seen in crickets, which have no comb. Mapping both gene expression patterns and morphological characters onto the insect phylogenetic tree demonstrates that in the cases of wing suppression and comb formation the appearance of expression of Scr in the prothorax apparently precedes these specific functions.

  12. Risk and Ambiguity in Information Seeking: Eye Gaze Patterns Reveal Contextual Behavior in Dealing with Uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittek, Peter; Liu, Ying-Hsang; Darányi, Sándor; Gedeon, Tom; Lim, Ik Soo

    2016-01-01

    Information foraging connects optimal foraging theory in ecology with how humans search for information. The theory suggests that, following an information scent, the information seeker must optimize the tradeoff between exploration by repeated steps in the search space vs. exploitation, using the resources encountered. We conjecture that this tradeoff characterizes how a user deals with uncertainty and its two aspects, risk and ambiguity in economic theory. Risk is related to the perceived quality of the actually visited patch of information, and can be reduced by exploiting and understanding the patch to a better extent. Ambiguity, on the other hand, is the opportunity cost of having higher quality patches elsewhere in the search space. The aforementioned tradeoff depends on many attributes, including traits of the user: at the two extreme ends of the spectrum, analytic and wholistic searchers employ entirely different strategies. The former type focuses on exploitation first, interspersed with bouts of exploration, whereas the latter type prefers to explore the search space first and consume later. Our findings from an eye-tracking study of experts' interactions with novel search interfaces in the biomedical domain suggest that user traits of cognitive styles and perceived search task difficulty are significantly correlated with eye gaze and search behavior. We also demonstrate that perceived risk shifts the balance between exploration and exploitation in either type of users, tilting it against vs. in favor of ambiguity minimization. Since the pattern of behavior in information foraging is quintessentially sequential, risk and ambiguity minimization cannot happen simultaneously, leading to a fundamental limit on how good such a tradeoff can be. This in turn connects information seeking with the emergent field of quantum decision theory.

  13. Risk and Ambiguity in Information Seeking: Eye Gaze Patterns Reveal Contextual Behaviour in Dealing with Uncertainty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Wittek

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Information foraging connects optimal foraging theory in ecology withhow humans search for information. The theory suggests that, followingan information scent, the information seeker must optimize the tradeoffbetween exploration by repeated steps in the search space vs.exploitation, using the resources encountered. We conjecture that thistradeoff characterizes how a user deals with uncertainty and its twoaspects, risk and ambiguity in economic theory. Risk is related to theperceived quality of the actually visited patch of information, and canbe reduced by exploiting and understanding the patch to a better extent.Ambiguity, on the other hand, is the opportunity cost of having higherquality patches elsewhere in the search space. The aforementionedtradeoff depends on many attributes, including traits of the user: atthe two extreme ends of the spectrum, analytic and wholistic searchersemploy entirely different strategies. The former type focuses onexploitation first, interspersed with bouts of exploration, whereas thelatter type prefers to explore the search space first and consume later.Our findings from an eye-tracking study of experts' interactions withnovel search interfaces in the biomedical domain suggest that usertraits of cognitive styles and perceived search task difficultyare significantly correlated with eye gaze and search behaviour. Wealso demonstrate that perceived risk shifts the balance betweenexploration and exploitation in either type of users, tilting it againstvs. in favour of ambiguity minimization. Since the pattern of behaviourin information foraging is quintessentially sequential, risk andambiguity minimization cannot happen simultaneously, leading to afundamental limit on how good such a tradeoff can be. This in turnconnects information seeking with the emergent field of quantum decisiontheory.

  14. Endpoint force fluctuations reveal flexible rather than synergistic patterns of muscle cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutch, Jason J; Kuo, Arthur D; Bloch, Anthony M; Rymer, William Z

    2008-11-01

    We developed a new approach to investigate how the nervous system activates multiple redundant muscles by studying the endpoint force fluctuations during isometric force generation at a multi-degree-of-freedom joint. We hypothesized that, due to signal-dependent muscle force noise, endpoint force fluctuations would depend on the target direction of index finger force and that this dependence could be used to distinguish flexible from synergistic activation of the musculature. We made high-gain measurements of isometric forces generated to different target magnitudes and directions, in the plane of index finger metacarpophalangeal joint abduction-adduction/flexion-extension. Force fluctuations from each target were used to calculate a covariance ellipse, the shape of which varied as a function of target direction. Directions with narrow ellipses were approximately aligned with the estimated mechanical actions of key muscles. For example, targets directed along the mechanical action of the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) yielded narrow ellipses, with 88% of the variance directed along those target directions. It follows the FDI is likely a prime mover in this target direction and that, at most, 12% of the force variance could be explained by synergistic coupling with other muscles. In contrast, other target directions exhibited broader covariance ellipses with as little as 30% of force variance directed along those target directions. This is the result of cooperation among multiple muscles, based on independent electromyographic recordings. However, the pattern of cooperation across target directions indicates that muscles are recruited flexibly in accordance with their mechanical action, rather than in fixed groupings.

  15. Analysis of patterns of bushmeat consumption reveals extensive exploitation of protected species in eastern Madagascar.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard K B Jenkins

    Full Text Available Understanding the patterns of wild meat consumption from tropical forests is important for designing approaches to address this major threat to biodiversity and mitigate potential pathways for transmission of emerging diseases. Bushmeat consumption has been particularly poorly studied in Madagascar, one of the world's hottest biodiversity hotspots. Studying bushmeat consumption is challenging as many species are protected and researchers must consider the incentives faced by informants. Using interviews with 1154 households in 12 communes in eastern Madagascar, as well as local monitoring data, we investigated the importance of socio-economic variables, taste preference and traditional taboos on consumption of 50 wild and domestic species. The majority of meals contain no animal protein. However, respondents consume a wide range of wild species and 95% of respondents have eaten at least one protected species (and nearly 45% have eaten more than 10. The rural/urban divide and wealth are important predictors of bushmeat consumption, but the magnitude and direction of the effect varies between species. Bushmeat species are not preferred and are considered inferior to fish and domestic animals. Taboos have provided protection to some species, particularly the Endangered Indri, but we present evidence that this taboo is rapidly eroding. By considering a variety of potential influences on consumption in a single study we have improved understanding of who is eating bushmeat and why. Evidence that bushmeat species are not generally preferred meats suggest that projects which increase the availability of domestic meat and fish may have success at reducing demand. We also suggest that enforcement of existing wildlife and firearm laws should be a priority, particularly in areas undergoing rapid social change. The issue of hunting as an important threat to biodiversity in Madagascar is only now being fully recognised. Urgent action is required to ensure

  16. Analysis of patterns of bushmeat consumption reveals extensive exploitation of protected species in eastern Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Richard K B; Keane, Aidan; Rakotoarivelo, Andrinajoro R; Rakotomboavonjy, Victor; Randrianandrianina, Felicien H; Razafimanahaka, H Julie; Ralaiarimalala, Sylvain R; Jones, Julia P G

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the patterns of wild meat consumption from tropical forests is important for designing approaches to address this major threat to biodiversity and mitigate potential pathways for transmission of emerging diseases. Bushmeat consumption has been particularly poorly studied in Madagascar, one of the world's hottest biodiversity hotspots. Studying bushmeat consumption is challenging as many species are protected and researchers must consider the incentives faced by informants. Using interviews with 1154 households in 12 communes in eastern Madagascar, as well as local monitoring data, we investigated the importance of socio-economic variables, taste preference and traditional taboos on consumption of 50 wild and domestic species. The majority of meals contain no animal protein. However, respondents consume a wide range of wild species and 95% of respondents have eaten at least one protected species (and nearly 45% have eaten more than 10). The rural/urban divide and wealth are important predictors of bushmeat consumption, but the magnitude and direction of the effect varies between species. Bushmeat species are not preferred and are considered inferior to fish and domestic animals. Taboos have provided protection to some species, particularly the Endangered Indri, but we present evidence that this taboo is rapidly eroding. By considering a variety of potential influences on consumption in a single study we have improved understanding of who is eating bushmeat and why. Evidence that bushmeat species are not generally preferred meats suggest that projects which increase the availability of domestic meat and fish may have success at reducing demand. We also suggest that enforcement of existing wildlife and firearm laws should be a priority, particularly in areas undergoing rapid social change. The issue of hunting as an important threat to biodiversity in Madagascar is only now being fully recognised. Urgent action is required to ensure that heavily hunted

  17. A tobacco cDNA reveals two different transcription patterns in vegetative and reproductive organs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. da Silva

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available In order to identify genes expressed in the pistil that may have a role in the reproduction process, we have established an expressed sequence tags project to randomly sequence clones from a Nicotiana tabacum stigma/style cDNA library. A cDNA clone (MTL-8 showing high sequence similarity to genes encoding glycine-rich RNA-binding proteins was chosen for further characterization. Based on the extensive identity of MTL-8 to the RGP-1a sequence of N. sylvestris, a primer was defined to extend the 5' sequence of MTL-8 by RT-PCR from stigma/style RNAs. The amplification product was sequenced and it was confirmed that MTL-8 corresponds to an mRNA encoding a glycine-rich RNA-binding protein. Two transcripts of different sizes and expression patterns were identified when the MTL-8 cDNA insert was used as a probe in RNA blots. The largest is 1,100 nucleotides (nt long and markedly predominant in ovaries. The smaller transcript, with 600 nt, is ubiquitous to the vegetative and reproductive organs analyzed (roots, stems, leaves, sepals, petals, stamens, stigmas/styles and ovaries. Plants submitted to stress (wounding, virus infection and ethylene treatment presented an increased level of the 600-nt transcript in leaves, especially after tobacco necrosis virus infection. In contrast, the level of the 1,100-nt transcript seems to be unaffected by the stress conditions tested. Results of Southern blot experiments have suggested that MTL-8 is present in one or two copies in the tobacco genome. Our results suggest that the shorter transcript is related to stress while the larger one is a flower predominant and nonstress-inducible messenger.

  18. The spatiotemporal pattern of Src activation at lipid rafts revealed by diffusion-corrected FRET imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaoying Lu

    Full Text Available Genetically encoded biosensors based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET have been widely applied to visualize the molecular activity in live cells with high spatiotemporal resolution. However, the rapid diffusion of biosensor proteins hinders a precise reconstruction of the actual molecular activation map. Based on fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP experiments, we have developed a finite element (FE method to analyze, simulate, and subtract the diffusion effect of mobile biosensors. This method has been applied to analyze the mobility of Src FRET biosensors engineered to reside at different subcompartments in live cells. The results indicate that the Src biosensor located in the cytoplasm moves 4-8 folds faster (0.93+/-0.06 microm(2/sec than those anchored on different compartments in plasma membrane (at lipid raft: 0.11+/-0.01 microm(2/sec and outside: 0.18+/-0.02 microm(2/sec. The mobility of biosensor at lipid rafts is slower than that outside of lipid rafts and is dominated by two-dimensional diffusion. When this diffusion effect was subtracted from the FRET ratio images, high Src activity at lipid rafts was observed at clustered regions proximal to the cell periphery, which remained relatively stationary upon epidermal growth factor (EGF stimulation. This result suggests that EGF induced a Src activation at lipid rafts with well-coordinated spatiotemporal patterns. Our FE-based method also provides an integrated platform of image analysis for studying molecular mobility and reconstructing the spatiotemporal activation maps of signaling molecules in live cells.

  19. Acoustic telemetry reveals large-scale migration patterns of walleye in Lake Huron.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd A Hayden

    Full Text Available Fish migration in large freshwater lacustrine systems such as the Laurentian Great Lakes is not well understood. The walleye (Sander vitreus is an economically and ecologically important native fish species throughout the Great Lakes. In Lake Huron walleye has recently undergone a population expansion as a result of recovery of the primary stock, stemming from changing food web dynamics. During 2011 and 2012, we used acoustic telemetry to document the timing and spatial scale of walleye migration in Lake Huron and Saginaw Bay. Spawning walleye (n = 199 collected from a tributary of Saginaw Bay were implanted with acoustic tags and their migrations were documented using acoustic receivers (n = 140 deployed throughout U.S. nearshore waters of Lake Huron. Three migration pathways were described using multistate mark-recapture models. Models were evaluated using the Akaike Information Criterion. Fish sex did not influence migratory behavior but did affect migration rate and walleye were detected on all acoustic receiver lines. Most (95% tagged fish migrated downstream from the riverine tagging and release location to Saginaw Bay, and 37% of these fish emigrated from Saginaw Bay into Lake Huron. Remarkably, 8% of walleye that emigrated from Saginaw Bay were detected at the acoustic receiver line located farthest from the release location more than 350 km away. Most (64% walleye returned to the Saginaw River in 2012, presumably for spawning. Our findings reveal that fish from this stock use virtually the entirety of U.S. nearshore waters of Lake Huron.

  20. The culturome of the human nose habitats reveals individual bacterial fingerprint patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaspar, Ursula; Kriegeskorte, André; Schubert, Tanja; Peters, Georg; Rudack, Claudia; Pieper, Dietmar H; Wos-Oxley, Melissa; Becker, Karsten

    2016-07-01

    The complex anatomy of the human nose might offer distinct microbial niches. Microbiota composition may affect nose inflammatory diseases and Staphylococcus aureus carriage. Considering different nasal cavity locations, microbial colonization was analysed across individuals exhibiting chronic nasal inflammatory diseases (n = 18) and those without local inflammation signs (n = 16). Samples were collected systematically during surgery and examined by an extensive culture-based approach and, for a subset, by 16S rRNA gene community profiling. Cultivation yielded 141 taxa with members of Staphylococcus, Corynebacterium and Propionibacterium as most common isolates comprising the nasal core culturome together with Finegoldia magna. Staphylococcus aureus was most frequently found in association with Staphylococcus epidermidis and Propionibacterium acnes, and the posterior vestibules were redefined as S. aureus' principle habitat. Culturome analysis revealed host-specific bacterial 'fingerprints' irrespective of host-driven factors or intranasal sites. Comparisons between cultivable and molecular fingerprints demonstrated that only a small fraction of phylotypes (6.2%) was correlated. While the total number of different phylotypes was higher in the molecular dataset, the total number of identifications down to the species level was higher in the culturomic approach. To determine host-specific microbiomes, the advantages of molecular approaches should be combined with the resolution and reliability of species identification by culturomic analyses.

  1. Different human gut models reveal the distinct fermentation patterns of Arabinoxylan versus inulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Abbeele, Pieter; Venema, Koen; Van de Wiele, Tom; Verstraete, Willy; Possemiers, Sam

    2013-10-16

    Different in vitro models have been developed to assess how food compounds affect the human gut microbiota. Using two such models (SHIME(R) and TIM-2), we compared how long-chain arabinoxylan (LC-AX), a wheat-derived potentially prebiotic fiber, and inulin (IN), a well-established prebiotic compound, modulate SCFA production and bifidobacteria composition. While both the SHIME and TIM-2 differ in experimental design, they both demonstrated that LC-AX and IN specifically increased the health-promoting metabolites propionate and butyrate, respectively. Furthermore, LC-AX stimulated Bifidobacterium longum, while IN stimulated other bifidobacteria including Bifidobacterium adolescentis. The SHIME experiment also revealed that effects of LC-AX were more persistent during the 2-week wash-out period. These results confirm a recent in vivo study, during which humanized rats were treated with the same LC-AX/IN. In conclusion, results from different human gut models suggest that, besides IN, LC-AX are promising prebiotic candidates with high specificity toward Bifidobacterium longum and a selective propionate increase.

  2. Different migration patterns of sea urchin and mouse sperm revealed by a microfluidic chemotaxis device.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haixin Chang

    Full Text Available Chemotaxis refers to a process whereby cells move up or down a chemical gradient. Sperm chemotaxis is known to be a strategy exploited by marine invertebrates such as sea urchins to reach eggs efficiently in moving water. Less is understood about how or whether chemotaxis is used by mammalian sperm to reach eggs, where fertilization takes place within the confinement of a reproductive tract. In this report, we quantitatively assessed sea urchin and mouse sperm chemotaxis using a recently developed microfluidic model and high-speed imaging. Results demonstrated that sea urchin Arbacia punctulata sperm were chemotactic toward the peptide resact with high chemotactic sensitivity, with an average velocity Vx up the chemical gradient as high as 20% of its average speed (238 μm/s, while mouse sperm displayed no statistically significant chemotactic behavior in progesterone gradients, which had been proposed to guide mammalian sperm toward eggs. This work demonstrates the validity of a microfluidic model for quantitative sperm chemotaxis studies, and reveals a biological insight that chemotaxis up a progesterone gradient may not be a universal strategy for mammalian sperm to reach eggs.

  3. Proteomic Stable Isotope Probing Reveals Taxonomically Distinct Patterns in Amino Acid Assimilation by Coastal Marine Bacterioplankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryson, Samuel; Li, Zhou; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Hettich, Robert L; Mayali, Xavier; Pan, Chongle; Mueller, Ryan S

    2016-01-01

    Heterotrophic marine bacterioplankton are a critical component of the carbon cycle, processing nearly a quarter of annual primary production, yet defining how substrate utilization preferences and resource partitioning structure microbial communities remains a challenge. In this study, proteomic stable isotope probing (proteomic SIP) was used to characterize population-specific assimilation of dissolved free amino acids (DFAAs), a major source of dissolved organic carbon for bacterial secondary production in aquatic environments. Microcosms of seawater collected from Newport, Oregon, and Monterey Bay, California, were incubated with 1 µM (13)C-labeled amino acids for 15 and 32 h. The taxonomic compositions of microcosm metaproteomes were highly similar to those of the sampled natural communities, with Rhodobacteriales, SAR11, and Flavobacteriales representing the dominant taxa. Analysis of (13)C incorporation into protein biomass allowed for quantification of the isotopic enrichment of identified proteins and subsequent determination of differential amino acid assimilation patterns between specific bacterioplankton populations. Proteins associated with Rhodobacterales tended to have a significantly high frequency of (13)C-enriched peptides, opposite the trend for Flavobacteriales and SAR11 proteins. Rhodobacterales proteins associated with amino acid transport and metabolism had an increased frequency of (13)C-enriched spectra at time point 2. Alteromonadales proteins also had a significantly high frequency of (13)C-enriched peptides, particularly within ribosomal proteins, demonstrating their rapid growth during incubations. Overall, proteomic SIP facilitated quantitative comparisons of DFAA assimilation by specific taxa, both between sympatric populations and between protein functional groups within discrete populations, allowing an unprecedented examination of population level metabolic responses to resource acquisition in complex microbial communities

  4. Epigenomic analysis of lung adenocarcinoma reveals novel DNA methylation patterns associated with smoking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Q

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Qiang Tan,1,* Guan Wang,1,* Jia Huang,1 Zhengping Ding,1 Qingquan Luo,1 Tony Mok,2 Qian Tao,2 Shun Lu1 1Department of Shanghai Lung Cancer Center, Shanghai Chest Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; 2Cancer Epigenetics Laboratory, Department of Clinical Oncology, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Sir YK Pao Center for Cancer and Li Ka Shing Institute of Health Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong *These authors contributed equally to this paper Abstract: The importance of epigenetic regulation has been increasingly recognized in the development of cancer. In this study, we investigated the impact of smoking, a major risk factor of lung cancer, on DNA methylation by comparing the genome-wide DNA methylation patterns between lung adenocarcinoma samples from six smokers and six nonsmokers. We identified that smoking-induced DNA methylations were enriched in the calcium signaling and neuroactive ligand receptor signaling pathways, which are closely related to smoking-induced lung cancers. Interestingly, we discovered that two genes in the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway (RPS6KA3 and ARAF were hypomethylated in smokers but not in nonsmokers. In addition, we found that the smoking-induced lung cancer-specific DNA methylations were mostly enriched in nuclear activities, including regulation of gene expression and chromatin remodeling. Moreover, the smoking-induced hypermethylation could only be seen in lung adenocarcinoma tissue but not in adjacent normal lung tissue. We also used differentially methylated DNA loci to construct a diagnostic model to distinguish smoking-associated lung cancer from nonsmoking lung cancer with a sensitivity of 88.9% and specificity of 83.2%. Our results provided novel evidence to support that smoking can cause dramatic changes in the DNA methylation landscape of lung cancer, suggesting that epigenetic

  5. Genetic networking of the Bemisia tabaci cryptic species complex reveals pattern of biological invasions.

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    Paul De Barro

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A challenge within the context of cryptic species is the delimitation of individual species within the complex. Statistical parsimony network analytics offers the opportunity to explore limits in situations where there are insufficient species-specific morphological characters to separate taxa. The results also enable us to explore the spread in taxa that have invaded globally. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a 657 bp portion of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase 1 from 352 unique haplotypes belonging to the Bemisia tabaci cryptic species complex, the analysis revealed 28 networks plus 7 unconnected individual haplotypes. Of the networks, 24 corresponded to the putative species identified using the rule set devised by Dinsdale et al. (2010. Only two species proposed in Dinsdale et al. (2010 departed substantially from the structure suggested by the analysis. The analysis of the two invasive members of the complex, Mediterranean (MED and Middle East - Asia Minor 1 (MEAM1, showed that in both cases only a small number of haplotypes represent the majority that have spread beyond the home range; one MEAM1 and three MED haplotypes account for >80% of the GenBank records. Israel is a possible source of the globally invasive MEAM1 whereas MED has two possible sources. The first is the eastern Mediterranean which has invaded only the USA, primarily Florida and to a lesser extent California. The second are western Mediterranean haplotypes that have spread to the USA, Asia and South America. The structure for MED supports two home range distributions, a Sub-Saharan range and a Mediterranean range. The MEAM1 network supports the Middle East - Asia Minor region. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The network analyses show a high level of congruence with the species identified in a previous phylogenetic analysis. The analysis of the two globally invasive members of the complex support the view that global invasion often involve very small portions of

  6. Prokaryotic caspase homologs: phylogenetic patterns and functional characteristics reveal considerable diversity.

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    Johannes Asplund-Samuelsson

    Full Text Available Caspases accomplish initiation and execution of apoptosis, a programmed cell death process specific to metazoans. The existence of prokaryotic caspase homologs, termed metacaspases, has been known for slightly more than a decade. Despite their potential connection to the evolution of programmed cell death in eukaryotes, the phylogenetic distribution and functions of these prokaryotic metacaspase sequences are largely uncharted, while a few experiments imply involvement in programmed cell death. Aiming at providing a more detailed picture of prokaryotic caspase homologs, we applied a computational approach based on Hidden Markov Model search profiles to identify and functionally characterize putative metacaspases in bacterial and archaeal genomes. Out of the total of 1463 analyzed genomes, merely 267 (18% were identified to contain putative metacaspases, but their taxonomic distribution included most prokaryotic phyla and a few archaea (Euryarchaeota. Metacaspases were particularly abundant in Alphaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria and Cyanobacteria, which harbor many morphologically and developmentally complex organisms, and a distinct correlation was found between abundance and phenotypic complexity in Cyanobacteria. Notably, Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli, known to undergo genetically regulated autolysis, lacked metacaspases. Pfam domain architecture analysis combined with operon identification revealed rich and varied configurations among the metacaspase sequences. These imply roles in programmed cell death, but also e.g. in signaling, various enzymatic activities and protein modification. Together our data show a wide and scattered distribution of caspase homologs in prokaryotes with structurally and functionally diverse sub-groups, and with a potentially intriguing evolutionary role. These features will help delineate future characterizations of death pathways in prokaryotes.

  7. Genetic patterns in European geometrid moths revealed by the Barcode Index Number (BIN system.

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    Axel Hausmann

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The geometrid moths of Europe are one of the best investigated insect groups in traditional taxonomy making them an ideal model group to test the accuracy of the Barcode Index Number (BIN system of BOLD (Barcode of Life Datasystems, a method that supports automated, rapid species delineation and identification. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This study provides a DNA barcode library for 219 of the 249 European geometrid moth species (88% in five selected subfamilies. The data set includes COI sequences for 2130 specimens. Most species (93% were found to possess diagnostic barcode sequences at the European level while only three species pairs (3% were genetically indistinguishable in areas of sympatry. As a consequence, 97% of the European species we examined were unequivocally discriminated by barcodes within their natural areas of distribution. We found a 1:1 correspondence between BINs and traditionally recognized species for 67% of these species. Another 17% of the species (15 pairs, three triads shared BINs, while specimens from the remaining species (18% were divided among two or more BINs. Five of these species are mixtures, both sharing and splitting BINs. For 82% of the species with two or more BINs, the genetic splits involved allopatric populations, many of which have previously been hypothesized to represent distinct species or subspecies. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study confirms the effectiveness of DNA barcoding as a tool for species identification and illustrates the potential of the BIN system to characterize formal genetic units independently of an existing classification. This suggests the system can be used to efficiently assess the biodiversity of large, poorly known assemblages of organisms. For the moths examined in this study, cases of discordance between traditionally recognized species and BINs arose from several causes including overlooked species, synonymy, and cases where DNA barcodes revealed

  8. Solar and Stellar Dynamos Saas-Fee Advanced Course 39 Swiss Society for Astrophysics and Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Astrophysical dynamos are at the heart of cosmic magnetic fields of a wide range of scales, from planets and stars to entire galaxies. This book presents a thorough, step-by-step introduction to solar and stellar dynamos. Looking first at the ultimate origin of cosmic seed magnetic fields, the antagonists of field amplification are next considered: resistive decay, flux expulsion, and flows ruled out by anti-dynamo theorems. Two kinematic flows that can act as dynamos are then studied: the Roberts cell and the CP-flow. Mean-field electrodynamics and derivation of the mean-field dynamo equations lead to the alpha Omega-dynamo, the flux transport dynamo, and dynamos based on the Babcock-Leighton mechanism. Alternatives to the mean-field theory are also presented, as are global MHD dynamo simulations. Fluctuations and grand minima in the solar cycle are discussed in terms of dynamo modulations through stochastic forcing and nonlinear effects. The book concludes with an overview of the major challenges in underst...

  9. Inherited cobalamin malabsorption. Mutations in three genes reveal functional and ethnic patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Inherited malabsorption of cobalamin (Cbl) causes hematological and neurological abnormalities that can be fatal. Three genes have been implicated in Cbl malabsorption; yet, only about 10% of ~400-500 reported cases have been molecularly studied to date. Recessive mutations in CUBN or AMN cause Imerslund-Gräsbeck Syndrome (IGS), while recessive mutations in GIF cause Intrinsic Factor Deficiency (IFD). IGS and IFD differ in that IGS usually presents with proteinuria, which is not observed in IFD. The genetic heterogeneity and numerous differential diagnoses make clinical assessment difficult. Methods We present a large genetic screening study of 154 families or patients with suspected hereditary Cbl malabsorption. Patients and their families have been accrued over a period spanning >12 years. Systematic genetic testing of the three genes CUBN, AMN, and GIF was accomplished using a combination of single strand conformation polymorphism and DNA and RNA sequencing. In addition, six genes that were contenders for a role in inherited Cbl malabsorption were studied in a subset of these patients. Results Our results revealed population-specific mutations, mutational hotspots, and functionally distinct regions in the three causal genes. We identified mutations in 126/154 unrelated cases (82%). Fifty-three of 126 cases (42%) were mutated in CUBN, 45/126 (36%) were mutated in AMN, and 28/126 (22%) had mutations in GIF. We found 26 undescribed mutations in CUBN, 19 in AMN, and 7 in GIF for a total of 52 novel defects described herein. We excluded six other candidate genes as culprits and concluded that additional genes might be involved. Conclusions Cbl malabsorption is found worldwide and genetically complex. However, our results indicate that population-specific founder mutations are quite common. Consequently, targeted genetic testing has become feasible if ethnic ancestry is considered. These results will facilitate clinical and molecular genetic testing of

  10. Inherited cobalamin malabsorption. Mutations in three genes reveal functional and ethnic patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanner Stephan M

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inherited malabsorption of cobalamin (Cbl causes hematological and neurological abnormalities that can be fatal. Three genes have been implicated in Cbl malabsorption; yet, only about 10% of ~400-500 reported cases have been molecularly studied to date. Recessive mutations in CUBN or AMN cause Imerslund-Gräsbeck Syndrome (IGS, while recessive mutations in GIF cause Intrinsic Factor Deficiency (IFD. IGS and IFD differ in that IGS usually presents with proteinuria, which is not observed in IFD. The genetic heterogeneity and numerous differential diagnoses make clinical assessment difficult. Methods We present a large genetic screening study of 154 families or patients with suspected hereditary Cbl malabsorption. Patients and their families have been accrued over a period spanning >12 years. Systematic genetic testing of the three genes CUBN, AMN, and GIF was accomplished using a combination of single strand conformation polymorphism and DNA and RNA sequencing. In addition, six genes that were contenders for a role in inherited Cbl malabsorption were studied in a subset of these patients. Results Our results revealed population-specific mutations, mutational hotspots, and functionally distinct regions in the three causal genes. We identified mutations in 126/154 unrelated cases (82%. Fifty-three of 126 cases (42% were mutated in CUBN, 45/126 (36% were mutated in AMN, and 28/126 (22% had mutations in GIF. We found 26 undescribed mutations in CUBN, 19 in AMN, and 7 in GIF for a total of 52 novel defects described herein. We excluded six other candidate genes as culprits and concluded that additional genes might be involved. Conclusions Cbl malabsorption is found worldwide and genetically complex. However, our results indicate that population-specific founder mutations are quite common. Consequently, targeted genetic testing has become feasible if ethnic ancestry is considered. These results will facilitate clinical and

  11. Surface N-glycoproteome patterns reveal key proteins of neuronal differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyleckova, Jirina; Valekova, Ivona; Zizkova, Martina; Rakocyova, Michaela; Marsala, Silvia; Marsala, Martin; Gadher, Suresh Jivan; Kovarova, Hana

    2016-01-30

    Pluripotent stem cell-derived committed neural precursors are an important source of cells to treat neurodegenerative diseases including spinal cord injury. There remains an urgency to identify markers for monitoring of neural progenitor specificity, estimation of neural fate and follow-up correlation with therapeutic effect in preclinical studies using animal disease models. Cell surface capture technology was used to uncover the cell surface exposed N-glycoproteome of neural precursor cells upon neuronal differentiation as well as post-mitotic mature hNT neurons. The data presented depict an extensive study of surfaceome during neuronal differentiation, confirming glycosylation at a particular predicted site of many of the identified proteins. Quantitative changes detected in cell surface protein levels reveal a set of proteins that highlight the complexity of the neuronal differentiation process. Several of these proteins including the cell adhesion molecules ICAM1, CHL1, and astrotactin1 as well as LAMP1 were validated by SRM. Combination of immunofluorescence staining of ICAM1 and flow cytometry indicated a possible direction for future scrutiny of such proteins as targets for enrichment of the neuronal subpopulation from mixed cultures after differentiation of neural precursor cells. These surface proteins hold an important key for development of safe strategies in cell-replacement therapies of neuronal disorders. Neural stem and/or precursor cells have a great potential for cell-replacement therapies of neuronal diseases. Availability of well characterised and expandable neural cell lineage specific populations is critical for addressing such a challenge. In our study we identified and relatively quantified several hundred surface N-glycoproteins in the course of neuronal differentiation. We further confirmed the abundant changes for several cell adhesion proteins by SRM and outlined a strategy for utilisation of such N-glycoproteins in antibody based cell

  12. Trace metal depositional patterns from an open pit mining activity as revealed by archived avian gizzard contents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendell, L I

    2011-02-15

    Archived samples of blue grouse (Dendragapus obscurus) gizzard contents, inclusive of grit, collected yearly between 1959 and 1970 were analyzed for cadmium, lead, zinc, and copper content. Approximately halfway through the 12-year sampling period, an open-pit copper mine began activities, then ceased operations 2 years later. Thus the archived samples provided a unique opportunity to determine if avian gizzard contents, inclusive of grit, could reveal patterns in the anthropogenic deposition of trace metals associated with mining activities. Gizzard concentrations of cadmium and copper strongly coincided with the onset of opening and the closing of the pit mining activity. Gizzard zinc and lead demonstrated significant among year variation; however, maximum concentrations did not correlate to mining activity. The archived gizzard contents did provide a useful tool for documenting trends in metal depositional patterns related to an anthropogenic activity. Further, blue grouse ingesting grit particles during the time of active mining activity would have been exposed to toxicologically significant levels of cadmium. Gizzard lead concentrations were also of toxicological significance but not related to mining activity. This type of "pulse" toxic metal exposure as a consequence of open-pit mining activity would not necessarily have been revealed through a "snap-shot" of soil, plant or avian tissue trace metal analysis post-mining activity.

  13. Reiterative pattern of sonic hedgehog expression in the catshark dentition reveals a phylogenetic template for jawed vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Moya M; Fraser, Gareth J; Chaplin, Natalie; Hobbs, Carl; Graham, Anthony

    2009-04-01

    For a dentition representing the most basal extant gnathostomes, that of the shark can provide us with key insights into the evolution of vertebrate dentitions. To detail the pattern of odontogenesis, we have profiled the expression of sonic hedgehog, a key regulator of tooth induction. We find in the catshark (Scyliorhinus canicula) that intense shh expression first occurs in a bilaterally symmetrical pattern restricted to broad regions in each half of the dentition in the embryo jaw. As in the mouse, there follows a changing temporal pattern of shh spatial restriction corresponding to epithelial bands of left and right dental fields, but also a subfield for symphyseal teeth. Then, intense shh expression is restricted to loci coincident with a temporal series of teeth in iterative jaw positions. The developmental expression of shh reveals previously undetected timing within epithelial stages of tooth formation. Each locus at alternate, even then odd, jaw positions establishes precise sequential timing for successive replacement within each tooth family. Shh appears first in the central cusp, iteratively along the jaw, then reiteratively within each tooth for secondary cusps. This progressive, sequential restriction of shh is shared by toothed gnathostomes and conserved through 500 million years of evolution.

  14. Transcriptome-wide analysis reveals candidate genes responsible for the asymmetric pigment pattern in scallop Patinopecten yessoensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XJ Sun

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Transcriptome-wide analysis reveals candidate genes responsible for the asymmetric pigment pattern in scallop Patinopecten yessoensis XJ Sun, LQ Zhou, ZH Liu, B Wu, AG Yang Yellow Sea Fisheries Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Fishery Sciences, Qingdao 266071, China Accepted September 14, 2016 Abstract Yesso scallop Patinopecten yessoensis is an economically important marine bivalve species in aquaculture and fishery in Asian countries. The colors of the left and right shells are obviously distinct, typically having reddish-brown for the left and white for the right. This left-right asymmetric pigment pattern is a very unique phenomenon among invertebrates, whereas the molecular mechanisms that control regional differences in pigmentation are not clear. To better understand the left-right asymmetric pigment pattern, we apply Illumina digital gene expression (DGE to characterize the gene expression profiles in left and right mantle tissues, and identify five differentially expressed genes, including Cytochrome P450 and other four unknown genes. Among the five genes, one gene shows significantly higher expression in the right mantle, while other four exhibit significantly higher expression in the left mantle. We further validate the DGE results by using quantitative real-time PCR for P450, resulting in approximately 32-fold higher expression in the left mantle than that in the right mantle. These findings will not only help assist our understanding of the sophisticated processes of shell pigmentation in scallops, but also provide new insights into the adaptive evolution of phenotypes to maximize survival that underlie the left-right asymmetric pigment pattern in molluscs.

  15. Geomagnetic Instability Time Scale 2008 (GITS-08) and dynamo processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, B. S.; Hoffman, K. A.

    2008-12-01

    During the past 2.6 million years Earth's outer core geodynamo has produced at least 18 geomagnetic excursions and 5 full polarity reversals. This record has been compiled from terrestrial volcanic rocks, including mainly basaltic lava flow sequences, but also two silicic ash beds, that have been analyzed using modern paleomagnetic techniques and dated using the 40Ar/39Ar method. Several brief periods of field instability associated with excursions correlate with lows in paleointensity or directional changes recorded in marine sediments, for example in the SINT2000 or GLOPIS75 composite records, or the more detailed records found at ODP site 919, that are dated using astronomically-forced oxygen isotope signals or ice layer counting. However, the lack of correlation of several excursions between marine and terrestrial records indicates that neither sediments, nor lava flows, are ideal recording media. Another factor complicating correlation is that some excursions may be geographically localized and not expressed globally. Despite decades of observation, these records remain fragmentary, especially when periods of millions of years are considered. Recent 40Ar/39Ar dating in our laboratory, that includes age determinations for the Mono Lake, Laschamp, Blake, Pringle Falls, Big Lost, West Eifel, and Agua Nova excursions, as well as the Halawa (C2r.2r-1) cryptochron, prompt us to critically review the terrestrial record of geodynamo instability and propose a GITS for the entire Quaternary period. Both the ca. 4:1 ratio of excursions to reversals during the past 2.6 Ma as well as the temporal pattern of occurrence of these events provide fundamental input as to the long-term behavior and, possibly, the structure of the core dynamo. On the one hand, intervals of significant temporal clustering of excursions have highlighted a relatively stable period of high field strength lasting >250 ka in the middle of the Brunhes chron during which time few, or no, excursions took

  16. Resonant oscillations in ${\\alpha}^{2}$-dynamos on a closed, twisted Riemannian 2D flux tubes

    CERN Document Server

    de Andrade, Garcia

    2009-01-01

    Chicone et al [CMP (1995)] have shown that, kinematic fast dynamos in diffusive media, could exist only on a closed, 2D Riemannian manifold of constant negative curvature. This report, shows that their result cannot be extended to oscillatory ${\\alpha}^{2}$-dynamos, when there are resonance modes, between toroidal and poloidal frequencies of twisted magnetic flux tubes. Thus, dynamo action can be supported in regions, where Riemannian curvature is positive. For turbulent dynamos, this seems physically reasonable, since recently, [Shukurov et al PRE (2008)] have obtained a Moebius flow strip in sodium liquid, torus Perm dynamo where curvature is also connected to the magnetic fields via diffusion. This could be done, by adjusting the corresponding frequencies till they achieved resonance. Actually 2D torus, is a manifold of zero mean curvature, where regions of positive and negative curvatures exist. It is shown that, Riemannian solitonic surface, endowed with a steady ${\\alpha}^{2}$-dynamo from magnetic filam...

  17. Dynamo onset as a first-order transition: lessons from a shell model for magnetohydrodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Ganapati; Mitra, Dhrubaditya; Pandit, Rahul

    2010-03-01

    We carry out systematic and high-resolution studies of dynamo action in a shell model for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence over wide ranges of the magnetic Prandtl number PrM and the magnetic Reynolds number ReM. Our study suggests that it is natural to think of dynamo onset as a nonequilibrium first-order phase transition between two different turbulent, but statistically steady, states. The ratio of the magnetic and kinetic energies is a convenient order parameter for this transition. By using this order parameter, we obtain the stability diagram (or nonequilibrium phase diagram) for dynamo formation in our MHD shell model in the (PrM-1,ReM) plane. The dynamo boundary, which separates dynamo and no-dynamo regions, appears to have a fractal character. We obtain a hysteretic behavior of the order parameter across this boundary and suggestions of nucleation-type phenomena.

  18. Turbulent ${\\alpha}$-effect in twisted magnetic flux tubes dynamos in Riemannian space

    CERN Document Server

    de Andrade, Garcia

    2007-01-01

    Analytical solution of first order torsion ${\\alpha}$-effect in twisted magnetic flux tubes representing a flux tube dynamo in Riemannian space is presented. Toroidal and poloidal component of the magnetic field decays as $r^{-1}$, while grow exponentially in time. The rate of speed of the helical dynamo depends upon the value of Frenet curvature of the tube. The $\\alpha$ factor possesses a fundamental contribution from constant torsion tube approximation. It is also assumed that the curvature of the magnetic axis of the tube is constant. Though ${\\alpha}$-effect dynamo equations are rather more complex in Riemann flux tube coordinates, a simple solution assuming force-free magnetic fields is shown to be possible. Dynamo solutions are possible if the dynamo action is able to change the signs of torsion and curvature of the dynamo flux tube simultaneously.

  19. A global galactic dynamo with a corona constrained by relative helicity

    CERN Document Server

    Prasad, A

    2015-01-01

    We present a model for a global axisymmetric turbulent dynamo operating in a galaxy with a corona which treats the supernovae (SNe) and magneto-rotational instability (MRI) driven turbulence parameters under a common formalism. The nonlinear quenching of the dynamo is alleviated by inclusion of small-scale advective and diffusive magnetic helicity fluxes, which allow the gauge invariant magnetic helicity to be transferred outside the disk and consequently build up a corona during the course of dynamo action. The time-dependent dynamo equations are expressed in a separable form and solved through an eigenvector expansion constructed using the steady-state solutions of the dynamo equation. The parametric evolution of the dynamo solution allows us to estimate the final structure of the global magnetic field and the saturated value of the turbulence parameter $\\alpha_m$, even before solving the dynamical equations for evolution of magnetic fields in the disk and the corona, along with $\\alpha$-quenching. We then ...

  20. Large-scale dynamo action driven by velocity shear and rotating convection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, David W; Proctor, Michael R E

    2009-01-30

    By incorporating a large-scale shear flow into turbulent rotating convection, we show that a sufficiently strong shear can promote dynamo action in flows that are otherwise nondynamos. Our results are consistent with a dynamo driven either by the shear-current effect or by a fluctuating alpha effect interacting with the shear, but not with either a classical alpha(2) or alpha omega dynamo.

  1. Convection-driven spherical shell dynamos at varying Prandtl numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Käpylä, P J; Olspert, N; Warnecke, J; Brandenburg, A

    2016-01-01

    (abidged) Context: Stellar convection zones are characterized by vigorous high-Reynolds number turbulence at low Prandtl numbers. Aims: We study the dynamo and differential rotation regimes at varying levels of viscous, thermal, and magnetic diffusion. Methods: We perform three-dimensional simulations of stratified fully compressible magnetohydrodynamic convection in rotating spherical wedges at various thermal and magnetic Prandtl numbers. Results: We find that the rotation profiles for high thermal diffusivity show a monotonically increasing angular velocity from the bottom of the convection zone to the top and from the poles toward the equator. For sufficiently rapid rotation, a region of negative radial shear develops at mid-latitudes as the thermal diffusivity is decreased. This coincides with a change in the dynamo mode from poleward propagating activity belts to equatorward propagating ones. Furthermore, the cyclic solutions disappear at the highest magnetic Reynolds numbers. The total magnetic energy ...

  2. Magnetic helicity in stellar dynamos new numerical experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Brandenburg, A; Subramanian, K

    2002-01-01

    The theory of large scale dynamos is reviewed with particular emphasis on the problem of magnetic helicity conservation in the presence of closed and open boundaries. It is concluded that in solar and stellar large scale dynamos the production and destruction of magnetic helicity during one cycle may still be accomplished by ordinary Spitzer resistivity. This is mainly because of geometric effects causing significant magnetic helicity cancellation on each hemisphere, but also partly because the generation of toroidal field by shear does not involve the production of magnetic helicity. A number of alternatives are discussed and dismissed. These include open boundaries which lead to preferential loss of large scale magnetic helicity together with large scale magnetic fields. It is also shown that artificially induced losses of small scale field do not accelerate the production of large scale (poloidal) field. In fact, resistively limited evolution towards saturation is also found at intermediate scales before t...

  3. Emission of Gravitational Waves from a Magnetohydrodynamic Dynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Winterberg, Friedwardt

    2015-01-01

    The failure of the laser-interferometer gravitational wave antennas to measure the tiny changes of lengths many orders of magnitude smaller than the diameter of a proton raises the question of whether the reason for this failure is a large gravitational wave background noise, and if so, where this background noise is coming from. It is conjectured that it comes from gravitational waves emitted from a magnetohydrodynamic dynamo in the center of the sun, with the large magnetic field from this dynamo shielded by thermomagnetic currents in the tachocline. Using the moon as a large Weber bar, these gravitational waves could possibly be detected by the Poisson diffraction into the center of the lunar shadow during a total solar eclipse.

  4. Coherent structures and the saturation of a nonlinear dynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Rempel, Erico L; Brandenburg, Axel; Muñoz, Pablo R

    2012-01-01

    Eulerian and Lagrangian tools are used to detect coherent structures in the velocity and magnetic fields of a mean--field dynamo, produced by direct numerical simulations of the three--dimensional compressible magnetohydrodynamic equations with an isotropic helical forcing and moderate Reynolds number. Two distinct stages of the dynamo are studied, the kinematic stage, where a seed magnetic field undergoes exponential growth, and the saturated regime. It is shown that the Lagrangian analysis detects structures with greater detail, besides providing information on the chaotic mixing properties of the flow and the magnetic fields. The traditional way of detecting Lagrangian coherent structures using finite--time Lyapunov exponents is compared with a recently developed method called function M. The latter is shown to produce clearer pictures which readily permit the identification of hyperbolic regions in the magnetic field, where chaotic transport/dispersion of magnetic field lines is highly enhanced.

  5. The small-scale turbulent dynamo in smoothed particle magnetohydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Tricco, Terrence S; Federrath, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Supersonic turbulence is believed to be at the heart of star formation. We have performed smoothed particle magnetohydrodynamics (SPMHD) simulations of the small-scale dynamo amplification of magnetic fields in supersonic turbulence. The calculations use isothermal gas driven at rms velocity of Mach 10 so that conditions are representative of star-forming molecular clouds in the Milky Way. The growth of magnetic energy is followed for 10 orders in magnitude until it reaches saturation, a few percent of the kinetic energy. The results of our dynamo calculations are compared with results from grid-based methods, finding excellent agreement on their statistics and their qualitative behaviour. The simulations utilise the latest algorithmic developments we have developed, in particular, a new divergence cleaning approach to maintain the solenoidal constraint on the magnetic field and a method to reduce the numerical dissipation of the magnetic shock capturing scheme. We demonstrate that our divergence cleaning met...

  6. Dynamo generated field emergence through recurrent plasmoid ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Warnecke, Jörn

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic buoyancy is believed to drive the transport of magnetic flux tubes from the convection zone to the surface of the Sun. The magnetic fields form twisted loop-like structures in the solar atmosphere. In this paper we use helical forcing to produce a large-scale dynamo-generated magnetic field, which rises even without magnetic buoyancy. A two layer system is used as computational domain where the upper part represents the solar atmosphere. Here, the evolution of the magnetic field is solved with the stress--and--relax method. Below this region a magnetic field is produced by a helical forcing function in the momentum equation, which leads to dynamo action. We find twisted magnetic fields emerging frequently to the outer layer, forming arch-like structures. In addition, recurrent plasmoid ejections can be found by looking at space--time diagrams of the magnetic field. Recent simulations in spherical coordinates show similar results.

  7. Stellar dynamo models with prominent surface toroidal fields

    CERN Document Server

    Bonanno, Alfio

    2016-01-01

    Recent spectro-polarimetric observations of solar-type stars have shown the presence of photospheric magnetic fields with a predominant toroidal component. If the external field is assumed to be current-free it is impossible to explain these observations within the framework of standard mean-field dynamo theory. In this work it will be shown that if the coronal field of these stars is assumed to be harmonic, the underlying stellar dynamo mechanism can support photospheric magnetic fields with a prominent toroidal component even in the presence of axisymmetric magnetic topologies. In particular it is argued that the observed increase in the toroidal energy in low mass fast rotating stars can be naturally explained with an underlying $\\alpha\\Omega$ mechanism.

  8. Numerical demonstration of fluctuation dynamo at low magnetic Prandtl numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskakov, A B; Schekochihin, A A; Cowley, S C; McWilliams, J C; Proctor, M R E

    2007-05-18

    Direct numerical simulations of incompressible nonhelical randomly forced MHD turbulence are used to demonstrate for the first time that the fluctuation dynamo exists in the limit of large magnetic Reynolds number Rm>1 and small magnetic Prandtl number Pmdynamo on the hydrodynamic Reynolds number Re is obtained for 1 less than or similar Re less than or similar 6700. In the limit Pmdynamo at large and moderate Prandtl numbers: Rmc less than or similar 200 for Re greater than or similar 6000 compared to Rmc approximately 60 for Pm>or=1. It is not yet possible to determine numerically whether the growth rate of the magnetic energy is proportional, Rm1/2 in the limit Rm-->infinity, as it should be if the dynamo is driven by the inertial-range motions at the resistive scale.

  9. Stellar Dynamo Models with Prominent Surface Toroidal Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonanno, Alfio

    2016-12-01

    Recent spectro-polarimetric observations of solar-type stars have shown the presence of photospheric magnetic fields with a predominant toroidal component. If the external field is assumed to be current-free it is impossible to explain these observations within the framework of standard mean-field dynamo theory. In this work, it will be shown that if the coronal field of these stars is assumed to be harmonic, the underlying stellar dynamo mechanism can support photospheric magnetic fields with a prominent toroidal component even in the presence of axisymmetric magnetic topologies. In particular, it is argued that the observed increase in the toroidal energy in low-mass fast-rotating stars can be naturally explained with an underlying αΩ mechanism.

  10. Convective dynamo action in a spherical shell: symmetries and modulation

    CERN Document Server

    Raynaud, Raphaël

    2016-01-01

    We consider dynamo action driven by three-dimensional rotating anelastic convection in a spherical shell. Motivated by the behaviour of the solar dynamo, we examine the interaction of hydromagnetic modes with different symmetries and demonstrate how complicated interactions between convection, differential rotation and magnetic fields may lead to modulation of the basic cycle. For some parameters, Type 1 modulation occurs by the transfer of energy between modes of different symmetries with little change in the overall amplitude, for other parameters, the modulation is of Type 2, where the amplitude is significantly affected (leading to grand minima in activity) without significant changes in symmetry. Most importantly, we identify the presence of "supermodulation" in the solutions, where the activity switches chaotically between Type 1 and Type 2 modulation, this is believed to be an important process in solar activity.

  11. Smoothed Particle Magnetohydrodynamics Simulations of Protostellar Jets and Turbulent Dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Tricco, Terrence S; Federrath, Christoph; Bate, Matthew R

    2013-01-01

    We presents results from Smoothed Particle Magnetohydrodynamics simulations of collapsing molecular cloud cores, and dynamo amplification of the magnetic field in the presence of Mach 10 magnetised turbulence. Our star formation simulations have produced, for the first time ever, highly collimated magnetised protostellar jets from the first hydrostatic core phase. Up to 40% of the initial core mass may be ejected through this outflow. The primary difficulty in performing these simulations is maintaining the divergence free constraint of the magnetic field, and to address this issue, we have developed a new divergence cleaning method which has allowed us to stably follow the evolution of these protostellar jets for long periods. The simulations performed of supersonic MHD turbulence are able to exponentially amplify magnetic energy by up to 10 orders of magnitude via turbulent dynamo. To reduce numerical dissipation, a new shock detection algorithm is utilised which is able to track magnetic shocks throughout ...

  12. Dynamo magnetic-field generation in turbulent accretion disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepinski, T. F.

    1991-01-01

    Magnetic fields can play important roles in the dynamics and evolution of accretion disks. The presence of strong differential rotation and vertical density gradients in turbulent disks allows the alpha-omega dynamo mechanism to offset the turbulent dissipation and maintain strong magnetic fields. It is found that MHD dynamo magnetic-field normal modes in an accretion disk are highly localized to restricted regions of a disk. Implications for the character of real, dynamically constrained magnetic fields in accretion disks are discussed. The magnetic stress due to the mean magnetic field is found to be of the order of a viscous stress. The dominant stress, however, is likely to come from small-scale fluctuating magnetic fields. These fields may also give rise to energetic flares above the disk surface, providing a possible explanation for the highly variable hard X-ray emission from objects like Cyg X-l.

  13. BigTable, Dynamo & Cassandra – A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kala Karun A,

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The main aspect of NoSQL data stores is “shared nothing” horizontal scaling, which enables them to support a large number of simple read/write operations per second. Most of the NoSQL data stores generally do not provide strict ACID properties. The idea is that by giving up strict ACID constraints high performance and scalability can be achieved. The objective of this paper is to study and compare the features of the most popular NoSQL data stores like Bigtable (used in Google, Dynamo (used in Amazon and Cassandra (used in Facebook. The significance of these data stores is that most of the NoSQL data stores available today are developed using the concepts put forwarded by Bigtable and Dynamo. They can be considered as the foundation stones of today’s NoSQL data stores.

  14. Pattern analysis approach reveals restriction enzyme cutting abnormalities and other cDNA library construction artifacts using raw EST data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Sun

    2012-05-01

    or filtered by AFST. Conclusions cDNA terminal pattern analysis, as implemented in the AFST software tool, can be utilized to reveal wet-lab errors such as restriction enzyme cutting abnormities and chimeric EST sequences, detect various data abnormalities embedded in existing Sanger EST datasets, improve the accuracy of identifying and extracting bona fide cDNA inserts from raw ESTs, and therefore greatly benefit downstream EST-based applications.

  15. Genomic Characterization of a Pattern D Streptococcus pyogenes emm53 Isolate Reveals a Genetic Rationale for Invasive Skin Tropicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yun-Juan; Liang, Zhong; Mayfield, Jeffrey A; Donahue, Deborah L; Carothers, Katelyn E; Lee, Shaun W; Ploplis, Victoria A; Castellino, Francis J

    2016-06-15

    The genome of an invasive skin-tropic strain (AP53) of serotype M53 group A Streptococcus pyogenes (GAS) is composed of a circular chromosome of 1,860,554 bp and carries genetic markers for infection at skin locales, viz, emm gene family pattern D and FCT type 3. Through genome-scale comparisons of AP53 with other GAS genomes, we identified 596 candidate single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that reveal a potential genetic basis for skin tropism. The genome of AP53 differed by ∼30 point mutations from a noninvasive pattern D serotype M53 strain (Alab49), 4 of which are located in virulence genes. One pseudogene, yielding an inactive sensor kinase (CovS(-)) of the two-component transcriptional regulator CovRS, a major determinant for invasiveness, severely attenuated the expression of the secreted cysteine protease SpeB and enhanced the expression of the hyaluronic acid capsule compared to the isogenic noninvasive AP53/CovS(+) strain. The collagen-binding protein transcript sclB differed in the number of 5'-pentanucleotide repeats in the signal peptides of AP53 and Alab49 (9 versus 15), translating into different lengths of their signal peptides, which nonetheless maintained a full-length translatable coding frame. Furthermore, GAS strain AP53 acquired two phages that are absent in Alab49. One such phage (ΦAP53.2) contains the known virulence factor superantigen exotoxin gene tandem speK-slaA Overall, we conclude that this bacterium has evolved in multiple ways, including mutational variations of regulatory genes, short-tandem-repeat polymorphisms, large-scale genomic alterations, and acquisition of phages, all of which may be involved in shaping the adaptation of GAS in specific infectious environments and contribute to its enhanced virulence. Infectious strains of S. pyogenes (GAS) are classified by their serotypes, relating to the surface M protein, the emm-like subfamily pattern, and their tropicity toward the nasopharynx and/or skin. It is generally agreed

  16. A statistical feature of anomalous seismic activities prior to large shallow earthquakes in Japan revealed by the Pattern Informatics method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kawamura

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available For revealing the preparatory processes of large inland earthquakes, we systematically applied the Pattern Informatics method (PI method to the earthquake data of Japan. We focused on 12 large earthquakes with magnitudes larger than M = 6.4 (an official magnitude of the Japan Meteorological Agency that occurred at depths shallower than 30 km between 2000 and 2010. We examined the relation between the spatiotemporal locations of such large shallow earthquakes and those of PI hotspots, which correspond to the grid cells of anomalous seismic activities in a designated time span. Based on a statistical test using Molchan's error diagram, we inquired into the existence of precursory anomalous seismic activities of the large earthquakes and, if any, their characteristic time span. The test indicated that the Japanese M ≧ 6.4 inland earthquakes tend to be preceded by anomalous seismic activities of 8-to-10-yr time scales.

  17. On dynamo action in the giant star Pollux : first results

    CERN Document Server

    Palacios, A

    2013-01-01

    We present preliminary results of a 3D MHD simulation of the convective envelope of the giant star Pollux for which the rotation period and the magnetic ?eld intensity have been measured from spectroscopic and spectropolarimetric observations. This giant is one of the ?rst single giants with a detected magnetic ?eld, and the one with the weakest ?eld so far. Our aim is to understand the development and the action of the dynamo in its extended convective envelope.

  18. Maximizing Science Return: A Representative Trajectory for Dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Daniel T.

    1999-01-01

    This presentation discusses a possible Dynamo Orbit for a future Mars global surveyor. The goal of the proposed orbit is to allow for the greatest amount of mapping of the Martian surface during the mission. The presentation discusses the dynamic pressure, periapsis altitude, the Apoapsis Altitude, the aerodynamic heating rate,and the change in velocity during the aerobraking phase of the orbit and the orbital insertion.

  19. Constraining Substellar Magnetic Dynamos using Auroral Radio Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Melodie; Hallinan, Gregg; Pineda, J. Sebastian; Escala, Ivanna; Burgasser, Adam J.; Stevenson, David J.

    2017-01-01

    An important outstanding problem in dynamo theory is understanding how magnetic fields are generated and sustained in fully convective stellar objects. A number of models for possible dynamo mechanisms in this regime have been proposed but constraining data on magnetic field strengths and topologies across a wide range of mass, age, rotation rate, and temperature are sorely lacking, particularly in the brown dwarf regime. Detections of highly circularly polarized pulsed radio emission provide our only window into magnetic field measurements for objects in the ultracool brown dwarf regime. However, these detections are very rare; previous radio surveys encompassing ˜60 L6 or later targets have yielded only one detection. We have developed a selection strategy for biasing survey targets based on possible optical and infrared tracers of auroral activity. Using our selection strategy, we previously observed six late L and T dwarfs with the Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) and detected the presence of highly circularly polarized radio emission for five targets. Our initial detections at 4-8 GHz provided the most robust constraints on dynamo theory in this regime, confirming magnetic fields >2.5 kG. To further develop our understanding of magnetic fields in the ultracool brown dwarf mass regime bridging planets and stars, we present constraints on surface magnetic field strengths for two Y-dwarfs as well as higher frequency observations of the previously detected L/T dwarfs corresponding ~3.6 kG fields. By carefully comparing magnetic field measurements derived from auroral radio emission to measurements derived from Zeeman broadening and Zeeman Doppler imaging, we provide tentative evidence that the dynamo operating in this mass regime may be inconsistent with predicted values from currently in vogue models. This suggests that parameters beyond convective flux may influence magnetic field generation in brown dwarfs.

  20. Laminar and Turbulent Dynamos in Chiral Magnetohydrodynamics. I. Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogachevskii, Igor; Ruchayskiy, Oleg; Boyarsky, Alexey; Fröhlich, Jürg; Kleeorin, Nathan; Brandenburg, Axel; Schober, Jennifer

    2017-09-01

    The magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) description of plasmas with relativistic particles necessarily includes an additional new field, the chiral chemical potential associated with the axial charge (i.e., the number difference between right- and left-handed relativistic fermions). This chiral chemical potential gives rise to a contribution to the electric current density of the plasma (chiral magnetic effect). We present a self-consistent treatment of the chiral MHD equations, which include the back-reaction of the magnetic field on a chiral chemical potential and its interaction with the plasma velocity field. A number of novel phenomena are exhibited. First, we show that the chiral magnetic effect decreases the frequency of the Alfvén wave for incompressible flows, increases the frequencies of the Alfvén wave and of the fast magnetosonic wave for compressible flows, and decreases the frequency of the slow magnetosonic wave. Second, we show that, in addition to the well-known laminar chiral dynamo effect, which is not related to fluid motions, there is a dynamo caused by the joint action of velocity shear and chiral magnetic effect. In the presence of turbulence with vanishing mean kinetic helicity, the derived mean-field chiral MHD equations describe turbulent large-scale dynamos caused by the chiral alpha effect, which is dominant for large fluid and magnetic Reynolds numbers. The chiral alpha effect is due to an interaction of the chiral magnetic effect and fluctuations of the small-scale current produced by tangling magnetic fluctuations (which are generated by tangling of the large-scale magnetic field by sheared velocity fluctuations). These dynamo effects may have interesting consequences in the dynamics of the early universe, neutron stars, and the quark–gluon plasma.

  1. Acceleration of Plasma Flows Due to Inverse Dynamo Mechanism

    CERN Document Server

    Mahajan, S M; Mikeladze, S V; Sigua, K I; Mahajan, Swadesh M.; Shatashvili, Nana L.; Mikeladze, Solomon V.; Sigua, Ketevan I.

    2005-01-01

    The "inverse-dynamo" mechanism - the amplification/generation of fast plasma flows by short scale (turbulent) magnetic fields via magneto-fluid coupling is recognized and explored. It is shown that large-scale magnetic fields and flows are generated simultaneously and proportionately from short scale fields and flows. The stronger the short-scale driver, the stronger are the large-scale products. Stellar and astrophysical applications are suggested.

  2. On chaos synchronization of a complex two coupled dynamos system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmoud, Gamal M. [Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Science, Assiut University, Assiut 71516 (Egypt)]. E-mail: gmahmoud@aun.edu.eg; Aly, Shaban A. [Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Science, Al-Azhar University, Assiut 71511 (Egypt)]. E-mail: shhalyl2@yahoo.com; Farghaly, Ahmed A. [Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Science, Assiut University, Assiut 71516 (Egypt)]. E-mail: ahmed_l_66@yahoo.com

    2007-07-15

    The main objective of this work is to investigate the chaotic behavior and chaos synchronization of a complex two coupled dynamos system subject to different initial conditions. This system exhibits a chaotic attractor which is found numerically. The global synchronization and active control techniques are used in this investigation. The feedback gain matrix and Lyapunov function are calculated and used to show that the linear error dynamical system is asymptotically stable. The analytical results are tested numerically and excellent agreement is found.

  3. Effect of small scale motions on dynamo actions generated by the Beltrami-like flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Mingtian, E-mail: mingtian@sdu.edu.cn

    2016-08-12

    The geodynamo and solar dynamo are driven by the turbulent flows which involve motions of various scales. Of particular interest is what role is played by the small scale motions in these dynamos. In this paper, the integral equation approach is employed to investigate the effect of the small scale motions on dynamo actions driven by multiscale Beltrami-like flows in a cylindrical vessel. The result shows that some small scale motions can trigger a transition of a dynamo from a steady to an unsteady state. Our results also show that when the poloidal components of the small and large scale flows share the same direction in the equatorial plane, the small scale flows have more positive or less detrimental effect on the onsets of the dynamo actions in comparison with the case that the poloidal components have different directions. These findings shed light on the effect of the small scale turbulence on dynamo actions. - Highlights: • Dynamo actions driven by multiscale Beltrami-like flows are investigated. • Some small scale motions induce transition of dynamo from steady to unsteady state. • Direction of small scale poloidal flow has a significant effect on dynamo threshold.

  4. Simple Model of the (alpha)(omega) Dynamo: Self-Excited Spheromaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, T K

    2010-01-26

    The astrophysical {alpha}{omega} dynamo converting angular momentum to magnetic energy can be interpreted as a self-excited Faraday dynamo together with magnetic relaxation coupling the dynamo poloidal field to the toroidal field produced by dynamo currents. Since both toroidal and poloidal fields are involved, the system can be modeled as helicity creation and transport, in a spheromak plasma configuration in quasi-equilibrium on the time scale of changes in magnetic energy. Neutral beams or plasma gun injection across field lines could create self-excited spheromaks in the laboratory.

  5. Mars' paleomagnetic field as the result of a single-hemisphere dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Sabine; Elkins-Tanton, Linda; Zuber, Maria T; Parmentier, E Marc

    2008-09-26

    Mars' crustal magnetic field was most likely generated by dynamo action in the planet's early history. Unexplained characteristics of the field include its strength, concentration in the southern hemisphere, and lack of correlation with any surface features except for the hemispheric crustal dichotomy. We used numerical dynamo modeling to demonstrate that the mechanisms proposed to explain crustal dichotomy formation can result in a single-hemisphere dynamo. This dynamo produces strong magnetic fields in only the southern hemisphere. This magnetic field morphology can explain why Mars' crustal magnetic field intensities are substantially stronger in the southern hemisphere without relying on any postdynamo mechanisms.

  6. Phylogenetic analysis and expression patterns of Pax genes in the onychophoran Euperipatoides rowelli reveal a novel bilaterian Pax subfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, Franziska Anni; Schumann, Isabell; Hering, Lars; Mayer, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Pax family genes encode a class of transcription factors that regulate various developmental processes. To shed light on the evolutionary history of these genes in Panarthropoda (Onychophora + Tardigrada + Arthropoda), we analyzed the Pax repertoire in the embryonic and adult transcriptomes of the onychophoran Euperipatoides rowelli. Our data revealed homologs of all five major bilaterian Pax subfamilies in this species, including Pax2/5/8, Pax4/6, Pox-neuro, Pax1/9/Pox-meso, and Pax3/7. In addition, we identified a new Pax member, pax-α, which does not fall into any other known Pax subfamily but instead clusters in the heterogenic Pax-α/β clade containing deuterostome, ecdysozoan, and lophotrochozoan gene sequences. These findings suggest that the last common bilaterian ancestor possessed six rather than five Pax genes, which have been retained in the panarthropod lineage. The expression data of Pax orthologs in the onychophoran embryo revealed distinctive patterns, some of which might be related to their ancestral roles in the last common panarthropod ancestor, whereas others might be specific to the onychophoran lineage. The derived roles include, for example, an involvement of pax2/5/8, pox-neuro, and pax3/7 in onychophoran nephridiogenesis, and an additional function of pax2/5/8 in the formation of the ventral and preventral organs. Furthermore, our transcriptomic analyses suggest that at least some Pax genes, including pax6 and pax-α, are expressed in the adult onychophoran head, although the corresponding functions remain to be clarified. The remarkable diversity of the Pax expression patterns highlights the functional and evolutionary plasticity of these genes in panarthropods.

  7. Comparative Phylogeography Reveals Cryptic Diversity and Repeated Patterns of Cladogenesis for Amphibians and Reptiles in Northwestern Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arteaga, Alejandro; Pyron, R Alexander; Peñafiel, Nicolás; Romero-Barreto, Paulina; Culebras, Jaime; Bustamante, Lucas; Yánez-Muñoz, Mario H; Guayasamin, Juan M

    2016-01-01

    Comparative phylogeography allow us to understand how shared historical circumstances have shaped the formation of lineages, by examining a broad spectrum of co-distributed populations of different taxa. However, these types of studies are scarce in the Neotropics, a region that is characterized by high diversity, complex geology, and poorly understood biogeography. Here, we investigate the diversification patterns of five lineages of amphibians and reptiles, co-distributed across the Choco and Andes ecoregions in northwestern Ecuador. Mitochondrial DNA and occurrence records were used to determine the degree of geographic genetic divergence within species. Our results highlight congruent patterns of parapatric speciation and common geographical barriers for distantly related taxa. These comparisons indicate similar biological and demographic characteristics for the included clades, and reveal the existence of two new species of Pristimantis previously subsumed under P. walkeri, which we describe herein. Our data supports the hypothesis that widely distributed Chocoan taxa may generally experience their greatest opportunities for isolation and parapatric speciation across thermal elevational gradients. Finally, our study provides critical information to predict which unstudied lineages may harbor cryptic diversity, and how geology and climate are likely to have shaped their evolutionary history.

  8. Comparative Phylogeography Reveals Cryptic Diversity and Repeated Patterns of Cladogenesis for Amphibians and Reptiles in Northwestern Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyron, R. Alexander; Peñafiel, Nicolás; Romero-Barreto, Paulina; Culebras, Jaime; Bustamante, Lucas; Yánez-Muñoz, Mario H.; Guayasamin, Juan M.

    2016-01-01

    Comparative phylogeography allow us to understand how shared historical circumstances have shaped the formation of lineages, by examining a broad spectrum of co-distributed populations of different taxa. However, these types of studies are scarce in the Neotropics, a region that is characterized by high diversity, complex geology, and poorly understood biogeography. Here, we investigate the diversification patterns of five lineages of amphibians and reptiles, co-distributed across the Choco and Andes ecoregions in northwestern Ecuador. Mitochondrial DNA and occurrence records were used to determine the degree of geographic genetic divergence within species. Our results highlight congruent patterns of parapatric speciation and common geographical barriers for distantly related taxa. These comparisons indicate similar biological and demographic characteristics for the included clades, and reveal the existence of two new species of Pristimantis previously subsumed under P. walkeri, which we describe herein. Our data supports the hypothesis that widely distributed Chocoan taxa may generally experience their greatest opportunities for isolation and parapatric speciation across thermal elevational gradients. Finally, our study provides critical information to predict which unstudied lineages may harbor cryptic diversity, and how geology and climate are likely to have shaped their evolutionary history. PMID:27120100

  9. Population genetic patterns revealed by microsatellite data challenge the mitochondrial DNA based taxonomy of Astyanax in Mexico (Characidae, Teleostei).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausdorf, Bernhard; Wilkens, Horst; Strecker, Ulrike

    2011-07-01

    Astyanax has become an important model system for evolutionary studies of cave animals. We investigated correlations of population genetic patterns revealed by microsatellite data and phylogeographic patterns shown by mitochondrial DNA sequences in Mexican cave and surface fish of the genus Astyanax (Characidae, Teleostei) to improve the understanding of the colonization history of this neotropical fish in Central and North America and to assess a recent taxonomic classification. The distribution of nuclear genotypes is not congruent with that of the mitochondrial clades. Admixture analyses suggest there has been nuclear gene flow between populations defined by different mitochondrial clades. The microsatellite data indicate that there was mitochondrial capture of a cave population from adjacent populations. Furthermore, gene flow also occurred between populations belonging to different nuclear genotypic clusters. This indicates that neither the nuclear genotypic clusters nor the mitochondrial clades represent independent evolutionary units, although the mitochondrial divergences are high and in a range usually characteristic for different fish species. This conclusion is supported by the presence of morphologically intermediate forms. Our analyses show that the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt limited gene flow, but has been crossed by Astyanax several times. In Yucatán, where obvious geographic barriers are missing, the incongruence between the distribution of nuclear and mitochondrial markers reflects random colonization events caused by inundations or marine transgressions resulting in random phylogeographic breaks. Thus, conclusions about the phylogeographic history and even more about the delimitation of species should not be based on single genetic markers.

  10. Exome sequencing of a colorectal cancer family reveals shared mutation pattern and predisposition circuitry along tumor pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suleiman H Suleiman

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The molecular basis of cancer and cancer multiple phenotypes are not yet fully understood. Next Generation Sequencing promises new insight into the role of genetic interactions in shaping the complexity of cancer. Aiming to outline the differences in mutation patterns between familial colorectal cancer cases and controls we analyzed whole exomes of cancer tissues and control samples from an extended colorectal cancer pedigree, providing one of the first data sets of exome sequencing of cancer in an African population against a background of large effective size typically with excess of variants. Tumors showed hMSH2 loss of function SNV consistent with Lynch syndrome. Sets of genes harboring insertions-deletions in tumor tissues revealed, however, significant GO enrichment, a feature that was not seen in control samples, suggesting that ordered insertions-deletions are central to tumorigenesis in this type of cancer. Network analysis identified multiple hub genes of centrality. ELAVL1/HuR showed remarkable centrality, interacting specially with genes harboring non-synonymous SNVs thus reinforcing the proposition of targeted mutagenesis in cancer pathways. A likely explanation to such mutation pattern is DNA/RNA editing, suggested here by nucleotide transition-to-transversion ratio that significantly departed from expected values (p-value 5e-6. NFKB1 also showed significant centrality along with ELAVL1, raising the suspicion of viral etiology given the known interaction between oncogenic viruses and these proteins.

  11. Exome sequencing of a colorectal cancer family reveals shared mutation pattern and predisposition circuitry along tumor pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleiman, Suleiman H; Koko, Mahmoud E; Nasir, Wafaa H; Elfateh, Ommnyiah; Elgizouli, Ubai K; Abdallah, Mohammed O E; Alfarouk, Khalid O; Hussain, Ayman; Faisal, Shima; Ibrahim, Fathelrahamn M A; Romano, Maurizio; Sultan, Ali; Banks, Lawrence; Newport, Melanie; Baralle, Francesco; Elhassan, Ahmed M; Mohamed, Hiba S; Ibrahim, Muntaser E

    2015-01-01

    The molecular basis of cancer and cancer multiple phenotypes are not yet fully understood. Next Generation Sequencing promises new insight into the role of genetic interactions in shaping the complexity of cancer. Aiming to outline the differences in mutation patterns between familial colorectal cancer cases and controls we analyzed whole exomes of cancer tissues and control samples from an extended colorectal cancer pedigree, providing one of the first data sets of exome sequencing of cancer in an African population against a background of large effective size typically with excess of variants. Tumors showed hMSH2 loss of function SNV consistent with Lynch syndrome. Sets of genes harboring insertions-deletions in tumor tissues revealed, however, significant GO enrichment, a feature that was not seen in control samples, suggesting that ordered insertions-deletions are central to tumorigenesis in this type of cancer. Network analysis identified multiple hub genes of centrality. ELAVL1/HuR showed remarkable centrality, interacting specially with genes harboring non-synonymous SNVs thus reinforcing the proposition of targeted mutagenesis in cancer pathways. A likely explanation to such mutation pattern is DNA/RNA editing, suggested here by nucleotide transition-to-transversion ratio that significantly departed from expected values (p-value 5e-6). NFKB1 also showed significant centrality along with ELAVL1, raising the suspicion of viral etiology given the known interaction between oncogenic viruses and these proteins.

  12. Abnormal patterns of cerebral lateralisation as revealed by the Universal Chimeric Faces Task in individuals with autistic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Sandie; Workman, Lance; Yeomans, Heather

    2012-01-01

    A previous study by Workman, Chilvers, Yeomans, and Taylor (2006), using the "Universal" Chimeric Faces Task (UCFT) for six emotional expressions, demonstrated that an overall left hemispatial/right hemisphere (RH) advantage has begun to develop by the age of 7-8. Moreover, the development of this left hemispatial advantage was observed to correlate positively with the ability to read emotions in the faces of others. Adopting the UCFT, the current study compared autistic children (11-15) with unimpaired children of two age groups (5-6 and 7-8) from this previous study. The autistic children showed a left hemispatial/RH advantage only for the two emotional expressions of "happiness" and "anger". Results for the autistic children revealed a similar overall pattern of lateralisation to the 5-6-year-olds and one that is less lateralised than the pattern for the 7-8-year-olds. Autistic children appear to show a developmental deficit for left hemispatial/RH advantage for emotional expression with the exception of "happiness" and "anger." The findings are discussed in terms of role hemisphericity and an approach-avoidance model.

  13. Anteroposterior patterning in Xenopus embryos: egg fragment assay system reveals a synergy of dorsalizing and posteriorizing embryonic domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Hidefumi; Nagai, Takeharu; Shirasawa, Hiroki; Doi, Jun-ya; Yasui, Kinya; Nishimatsu, Shin-ichirou; Takeda, Hiroyuki; Sakai, Masao

    2002-12-01

    Two distinct types of axis lacking embryos resulted from partial deletion of the vegetal part of early one-cell-stage embryos. When the deleted volume was 20-40% (relative surface area), the embryos underwent ventral-type gastrulation and formed ventral mesodermal tissues. When the deleted volume was more than 60%, the embryo did not gastrulate nor make mesodermal structures (M. Sakai, 1996, Development 122, 2207-2214). We have designated these two types of embryos as "gastrulating nonaxial embryos (GNEs)" and "permanent blastula-type embryos (PBEs)," respectively. Using these embryos as recipients, a series of Einsteck transplantation experiments were carried out to investigate mechanisms controlling anteroposterior patterning during early Xenopus development. GNEs receiving dorsal marginal zone (DMZ) transplants (GNE/DMZs) elongated and formed posteriorized phenotypes, which had muscle cells, melanocytes, and tail fins. In contrast, PBE/DMZs did not elongate but formed cement glands and brain-like structures showing strong anteriorization. Simultaneous transplantation of the cells from various regions of normal embryos with the DMZ into PBEs revealed that the entire vegetal half of normal embryos, except for the DMZ, showed posteriorizing activity. These results strongly suggest that anteroposterior patterning in Xenopus is not achieved solely by the dorsal marginal zone (the Spemann organizer), but instead by a synergistic mechanism of the dorsalizing domain (DMZ) and the posteriorizing domain (the entire vegetal half except for the DMZ).

  14. Comparative Phylogeography Reveals Cryptic Diversity and Repeated Patterns of Cladogenesis for Amphibians and Reptiles in Northwestern Ecuador.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Arteaga

    Full Text Available Comparative phylogeography allow us to understand how shared historical circumstances have shaped the formation of lineages, by examining a broad spectrum of co-distributed populations of different taxa. However, these types of studies are scarce in the Neotropics, a region that is characterized by high diversity, complex geology, and poorly understood biogeography. Here, we investigate the diversification patterns of five lineages of amphibians and reptiles, co-distributed across the Choco and Andes ecoregions in northwestern Ecuador. Mitochondrial DNA and occurrence records were used to determine the degree of geographic genetic divergence within species. Our results highlight congruent patterns of parapatric speciation and common geographical barriers for distantly related taxa. These comparisons indicate similar biological and demographic characteristics for the included clades, and reveal the existence of two new species of Pristimantis previously subsumed under P. walkeri, which we describe herein. Our data supports the hypothesis that widely distributed Chocoan taxa may generally experience their greatest opportunities for isolation and parapatric speciation across thermal elevational gradients. Finally, our study provides critical information to predict which unstudied lineages may harbor cryptic diversity, and how geology and climate are likely to have shaped their evolutionary history.

  15. Imaging with the fluorogenic dye Basic Fuchsin reveals subcellular patterning and ecotype variation of lignification in Brachypodium distachyon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapp, Nikki; Barnes, William J.; Richard, Tom L.; Anderson, Charles T.

    2015-01-01

    Lignin is a complex polyphenolic heteropolymer that is abundant in the secondary cell walls of plants and functions in growth and defence. It is also a major barrier to the deconstruction of plant biomass for bioenergy production, but the spatiotemporal details of how lignin is deposited in actively lignifying tissues and the precise relationships between wall lignification in different cell types and developmental events, such as flowering, are incompletely understood. Here, the lignin-detecting fluorogenic dye, Basic Fuchsin, was adapted to enable comparative fluorescence-based imaging of lignin in the basal internodes of three Brachypodium distachyon ecotypes that display divergent flowering times. It was found that the extent and intensity of Basic Fuchsin fluorescence increase over time in the Bd21-3 ecotype, that Basic Fuchsin staining is more widespread and intense in 4-week-old Bd21-3 and Adi-10 basal internodes than in Bd1-1 internodes, and that Basic Fuchsin staining reveals subcellular patterns of lignin in vascular and interfascicular fibre cell walls. Basic Fuchsin fluorescence did not correlate with lignin quantification by acetyl bromide analysis, indicating that whole-plant and subcellular lignin analyses provide distinct information about the extent and patterns of lignification in B. distachyon. Finally, it was found that flowering time correlated with a transient increase in total lignin, but did not correlate strongly with the patterning of stem lignification, suggesting that additional developmental pathways might regulate secondary wall formation in grasses. This study provides a new comparative tool for imaging lignin in plants and helps inform our views of how lignification proceeds in grasses. PMID:25922482

  16. Rotating convection-driven dynamos at low Ekman number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotvig, Jon; Jones, Chris A

    2002-11-01

    We present a fully 3D self-consistent convection-driven dynamo model with reference to the geodynamo. A relatively low Ekman number regime is reached, with the aim of investigating the dynamical behavior at low viscosity. This regime is computationally very demanding, which has prompted us to adopt a plane layer model with an inclined rotation vector, and to make use of efficiently parallelized code. No hyperdiffusion is used, all diffusive operators are in the classical form. Our model has infinite Prandtl number, a Rayleigh number that scales as E(-1/3) (E being the Ekman number), and a constant Roberts number. The optimized model allows us to study dynamos with Ekman numbers in the range [10(-5),10(-4)]. In this regime we find strong-field dynamos where the induced magnetic fields satisfy Taylor's constraint to good accuracy. The solutions are characterized by (i) a MAC balance within the bulk, i.e., Coriolis, pressure, Lorentz, and buoyancy forces are of comparable magnitude, while viscous forces are only significant in thin boundary layers, (ii) the Elsasser number is O(10), (iii) the strong magnetic fields cannot prevent small-scale structures from becoming dominant over the large-scale components, (iv) the Taylor-Proudman effect is detectable, (v) the Taylorization decreases as the Ekman number is lowered, and (vi) the ageostrophic velocity component makes up 80% of the flow.

  17. Large-scale-vortex dynamos in planar rotating convection

    CERN Document Server

    Guervilly, Céline; Jones, Chris A

    2016-01-01

    Several recent studies have demonstrated how large-scale vortices may arise spontaneously in rotating planar convection. Here we examine the dynamo properties of such flows in rotating Boussinesq convection. For moderate values of the magnetic Reynolds number ($100 \\lesssim Rm \\lesssim 550$, with $Rm$ based on the box depth and the convective velocity), a large-scale (i.e. system-size) magnetic field is generated. The amplitude of the magnetic energy oscillates in time, out of phase with the oscillating amplitude of the large-scale vortex. The dynamo mechanism relies on those components of the flow that have length scales lying between that of the large-scale vortex and the typical convective cell size; smaller-scale flows are not required. The large-scale vortex plays a crucial role in the magnetic induction despite being essentially two-dimensional. For larger magnetic Reynolds numbers, the dynamo is small scale, with a magnetic energy spectrum that peaks at the scale of the convective cells. In this case, ...

  18. DYNAMO: A Dynamic Architectural Memory On-line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Heylighen

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the current status of DYNAMO, a web-based design assistant for students and professional designers in the field of architecture. The tool can be considered a Case-Based Design (CBD system in so far that it was inspired by the view of cognition underlying CBD. The paper points out how DYNAMO incorporates this view, and at the same time extrapolates it beyond the individual. In this way, the tool attempts to embrace and profit from several kinds of interaction that are crucial for the development and renewal of design knowledge. This should result in a design tool that both feels cognitively comfortable to (student- designers, and offers them a platform for exchanging knowledge and insights with colleagues in different contexts and at different levels of experience. In addition, the paper describes the implementation of these theoretical ideas as a working prototype, which has recently been tested by 4th year design students. Finally, DYNAMO is situated in the context of other comparable tools that have been or are being developed in the field of architectural design.

  19. An impact-driven dynamo for the early Moon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bars, M; Wieczorek, M A; Karatekin, O; Cébron, D; Laneuville, M

    2011-11-09

    The origin of lunar magnetic anomalies remains unresolved after their discovery more than four decades ago. A commonly invoked hypothesis is that the Moon might once have possessed a thermally driven core dynamo, but this theory is problematical given the small size of the core and the required surface magnetic field strengths. An alternative hypothesis is that impact events might have amplified ambient fields near the antipodes of the largest basins, but many magnetic anomalies exist that are not associated with basin antipodes. Here we propose a new model for magnetic field generation, in which dynamo action comes from impact-induced changes in the Moon's rotation rate. Basin-forming impact events are energetic enough to have unlocked the Moon from synchronous rotation, and we demonstrate that the subsequent large-scale fluid flows in the core, excited by the tidal distortion of the core-mantle boundary, could have powered a lunar dynamo. Predicted surface magnetic field strengths are on the order of several microteslas, consistent with palaeomagnetic measurements, and the duration of these fields is sufficient to explain the central magnetic anomalies associated with several large impact basins.

  20. The Small-Scale Dynamo at Low Magnetic Prandtl Numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Schober, Jennifer; Bovino, Stefano; Klessen, Ralf S

    2012-01-01

    The present-day Universe is highly magnetized, even though the first magnetic seed fields were most probably extremely weak. To explain the growth of the magnetic field strength over many orders of magnitude fast amplification processes need to operate. The most efficient mechanism known today is the small-scale dynamo, which converts turbulent kinetic energy into magnetic energy leading to an exponential growth of the magnetic field. The efficiency of the dynamo depends on the type of turbulence indicated by the slope of the turbulence spectrum v(l) \\propto l^{theta}, where v(l) is the eddy velocity at a scale l. We explore turbulent spectra ranging from incompressible Kolmogorov turbulence with theta = 1/3 to highly compressible Burgers turbulence with theta = 1/2. In this work we analyze the properties of the small-scale dynamo for low magnetic Prandtl numbers Pm, which denotes the ratio of the magnetic Reynolds number, Rm, to the hydrodynamical one, Re. We solve the Kazantsev equation, which describes the...