WorldWideScience

Sample records for dynamics underlie evolution

  1. Global migration dynamics underlie evolution and persistence of human influenza A (H3N2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedford, Trevor; Cobey, Sarah; Beerli, Peter; Pascual, Mercedes

    2010-05-27

    The global migration patterns of influenza viruses have profound implications for the evolutionary and epidemiological dynamics of the disease. We developed a novel approach to reconstruct the genetic history of human influenza A (H3N2) collected worldwide over 1998 to 2009 and used it to infer the global network of influenza transmission. Consistent with previous models, we find that China and Southeast Asia lie at the center of this global network. However, we also find that strains of influenza circulate outside of Asia for multiple seasons, persisting through dynamic migration between northern and southern regions. The USA acts as the primary hub of temperate transmission and, together with China and Southeast Asia, forms the trunk of influenza's evolutionary tree. These findings suggest that antiviral use outside of China and Southeast Asia may lead to the evolution of long-term local and potentially global antiviral resistance. Our results might also aid the design of surveillance efforts and of vaccines better tailored to different geographic regions.

  2. Complex dynamics underlie the evolution of imperfect wing pattern convergence in butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkbeiner, Susan D; Briscoe, Adriana D; Mullen, Sean P

    2017-01-04

    Adaptive radiation is characterized by rapid diversification that is strongly associated with ecological specialization. However, understanding the evolutionary mechanisms fueling adaptive diversification requires a detailed knowledge of how natural selection acts at multiple life-history stages. Butterflies within the genus Adelpha represent one of the largest and most diverse butterfly lineages in the Neotropics. Although Adelpha species feed on an extraordinary diversity of larval hosts, convergent evolution is widespread in this group, suggesting that selection for mimicry may contribute to adaptive divergence among species. To investigate this hypothesis, we conducted predation studies in Costa Rica using artificial butterfly facsimiles. Specifically, we predicted that nontoxic, palatable Adelpha species that do not feed on host plants in the family Rubiaceae would benefit from sharing a locally convergent wing pattern with the presumably toxic Rubiaceae-feeding species via reduced predation. Contrary to expectations, we found that the presumed mimic was attacked significantly more than its locally convergent model at a frequency paralleling attack rates on both novel and palatable prey. Although these data reveal the first evidence for protection from avian predators by the supposed toxic, Rubiaceae-feeding Adelpha species, we conclude that imprecise mimetic patterns have high costs for Batesian mimics in the tropics.

  3. Distinct neural and neuromuscular strategies underlie independent evolution of simplified advertisement calls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leininger, Elizabeth C; Kelley, Darcy B

    2013-04-07

    Independent or convergent evolution can underlie phenotypic similarity of derived behavioural characters. Determining the underlying neural and neuromuscular mechanisms sheds light on how these characters arose. One example of evolutionarily derived characters is a temporally simple advertisement call of male African clawed frogs (Xenopus) that arose at least twice independently from a more complex ancestral pattern. How did simplification occur in the vocal circuit? To distinguish shared from divergent mechanisms, we examined activity from the calling brain and vocal organ (larynx) in two species that independently evolved simplified calls. We find that each species uses distinct neural and neuromuscular strategies to produce the simplified calls. Isolated Xenopus borealis brains produce fictive vocal patterns that match temporal patterns of actual male calls; the larynx converts nerve activity faithfully into muscle contractions and single clicks. In contrast, fictive patterns from isolated Xenopus boumbaensis brains are short bursts of nerve activity; the isolated larynx requires stimulus bursts to produce a single click of sound. Thus, unlike X. borealis, the output of the X. boumbaensis hindbrain vocal pattern generator is an ancestral burst-type pattern, transformed by the larynx into single clicks. Temporally simple advertisement calls in genetically distant species of Xenopus have thus arisen independently via reconfigurations of central and peripheral vocal neuroeffectors.

  4. Two developmentally temporal quantitative trait loci underlie convergent evolution of increased branchial bone length in sticklebacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Priscilla A; Glazer, Andrew M; Cleves, Phillip A; Smith, Alyson S; Miller, Craig T

    2014-08-07

    In convergent evolution, similar phenotypes evolve repeatedly in independent populations, often reflecting adaptation to similar environments. Understanding whether convergent evolution proceeds via similar or different genetic and developmental mechanisms offers insight towards the repeatability and predictability of evolution. Oceanic populations of threespine stickleback fish, Gasterosteus aculeatus, have repeatedly colonized countless freshwater lakes and streams, where new diets lead to morphological adaptations related to feeding. Here, we show that heritable increases in branchial bone length have convergently evolved in two independently derived freshwater stickleback populations. In both populations, an increased bone growth rate in juveniles underlies the convergent adult phenotype, and one population also has a longer cartilage template. Using F2 crosses from these two freshwater populations, we show that two quantitative trait loci (QTL) control branchial bone length at distinct points in development. In both populations, a QTL on chromosome 21 controls bone length throughout juvenile development, and a QTL on chromosome 4 controls bone length only in adults. In addition to these similar developmental profiles, these QTL show similar chromosomal locations in both populations. Our results suggest that sticklebacks have convergently evolved longer branchial bones using similar genetic and developmental programmes in two independently derived populations. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  5. Do pollinator distributions underlie the evolution of pollination ecotypes in the Cape shrub Erica plukenetii?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Niet, Timotheüs; Pirie, Michael D; Shuttleworth, Adam; Johnson, Steven D; Midgley, Jeremy J

    2014-01-01

    According to the Grant-Stebbins model of pollinator-driven divergence, plants that disperse beyond the range of their specialized pollinator may adapt to a new pollination system. Although this model provides a compelling explanation for pollination ecotype formation, few studies have directly tested its validity in nature. Here we investigate the distribution and pollination biology of several subspecies of the shrub Erica plukenetii from the Cape Floristic Region in South Africa. We analyse these data in a phylogenetic context and combine these results with information on pollinator ranges to test whether the evolution of pollination ecotypes is consistent with the Grant-Stebbins model. Pollinator observations showed that the most common form of E. plukenetii with intermediate corolla length is pollinated by short-billed Orange-breasted sunbirds. Populations at the northern fringe of the distribution are characterized by long corollas, and are mainly pollinated by long-billed Malachite sunbirds. A population with short corollas in the centre of the range was mainly pollinated by insects, particularly short-tongued noctuid moths. Bird exclusion in this population did not have an effect on fruit set, while insect exclusion reduced fruit set. An analysis of floral scent across the range, using coupled gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, showed that the scent bouquets of flowers from moth-pollinated populations are characterized by a larger number of scent compounds and higher emission rates than those in bird-pollinated populations. This was also reflected in clear separation of moth- and bird-pollinated populations in a two-dimensional phenotype space based on non-metric multidimensional scaling analysis of scent data. Phylogenetic analyses of chloroplast and nuclear DNA sequences strongly supported monophyly of E. plukenetii, but not of all the subspecies. Reconstruction of ancestral character states suggests two shifts from traits associated with short

  6. Increased synchronization and decreased neural complexity underlie thalamocortical oscillatory dynamics in mild cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantero, Jose L; Atienza, Mercedes; Cruz-Vadell, Abel; Suarez-Gonzalez, Aida; Gil-Neciga, Eulogio

    2009-07-15

    Abnormal patterns of electroencephalographic (EEG) alpha oscillations in preclinical stages of dementia reveal a selective vulnerability of thalamocortical circuits to the cascade of neurodegenerative events heralding Alzheimer's disease (AD). EEG-alpha slowing characterizes both mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and healthy aging, but it remains ambiguous whether different neural mechanisms underlie this oscillatory behavior in normal and pathological senescence. In this study, we show that the strength of phase coupling and the level of phase predictability between thalamocortical and cortico-cortical EEG sources of low alpha frequency are abnormally facilitated in MCI patients when compared to healthy elderly subjects. Additionally, we found a loss of neural complexity intrinsic to both thalamic and cortical generators of lower alpha in MCI patients, which likely influenced the aberrant phase synchronization behavior between EEG-alpha sources in this high risk group of AD. Taken together, these results suggest that different neural mechanisms account for the well known slowing of alpha rhythm present in normal aging and MCI patients. Whether these anomalous neural coding mechanisms of lower alpha generation in MCI patients represent a potential electrophysiological marker of mild AD is a topic for future research.

  7. Nonstationary Stochastic Dynamics Underlie Spontaneous Transitions between Active and Inactive Behavioral States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melanson, Alexandre; Mejias, Jorge F; Jun, James J; Maler, Leonard; Longtin, André

    2017-01-01

    The neural basis of spontaneous movement generation is a fascinating open question. Long-term monitoring of fish, swimming freely in a constant sensory environment, has revealed a sequence of behavioral states that alternate randomly and spontaneously between periods of activity and inactivity. We show that key dynamical features of this sequence are captured by a 1-D diffusion process evolving in a nonlinear double well energy landscape, in which a slow variable modulates the relative depth of the wells. This combination of stochasticity, nonlinearity, and nonstationary forcing correctly captures the vastly different timescales of fluctuations observed in the data (∼1 to ∼1000 s), and yields long-tailed residence time distributions (RTDs) also consistent with the data. In fact, our model provides a simple mechanism for the emergence of long-tailed distributions in spontaneous animal behavior. We interpret the stochastic variable of this dynamical model as a decision-like variable that, upon reaching a threshold, triggers the transition between states. Our main finding is thus the identification of a threshold crossing process as the mechanism governing spontaneous movement initiation and termination, and to infer the presence of underlying nonstationary agents. Another important outcome of our work is a dimensionality reduction scheme that allows similar segments of data to be grouped together. This is done by first extracting geometrical features in the dataset and then applying principal component analysis over the feature space. Our study is novel in its ability to model nonstationary behavioral data over a wide range of timescales.

  8. Nonstationary Stochastic Dynamics Underlie Spontaneous Transitions between Active and Inactive Behavioral States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, James J.; Longtin, André

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The neural basis of spontaneous movement generation is a fascinating open question. Long-term monitoring of fish, swimming freely in a constant sensory environment, has revealed a sequence of behavioral states that alternate randomly and spontaneously between periods of activity and inactivity. We show that key dynamical features of this sequence are captured by a 1-D diffusion process evolving in a nonlinear double well energy landscape, in which a slow variable modulates the relative depth of the wells. This combination of stochasticity, nonlinearity, and nonstationary forcing correctly captures the vastly different timescales of fluctuations observed in the data (∼1 to ∼1000 s), and yields long-tailed residence time distributions (RTDs) also consistent with the data. In fact, our model provides a simple mechanism for the emergence of long-tailed distributions in spontaneous animal behavior. We interpret the stochastic variable of this dynamical model as a decision-like variable that, upon reaching a threshold, triggers the transition between states. Our main finding is thus the identification of a threshold crossing process as the mechanism governing spontaneous movement initiation and termination, and to infer the presence of underlying nonstationary agents. Another important outcome of our work is a dimensionality reduction scheme that allows similar segments of data to be grouped together. This is done by first extracting geometrical features in the dataset and then applying principal component analysis over the feature space. Our study is novel in its ability to model nonstationary behavioral data over a wide range of timescales. PMID:28374017

  9. Dynamic microglial alterations underlie stress-induced depressive-like behavior and suppressed neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreisel, T; Frank, M G; Licht, T; Reshef, R; Ben-Menachem-Zidon, O; Baratta, M V; Maier, S F; Yirmiya, R

    2014-06-01

    The limited success in understanding the pathophysiology of major depression may result from excessive focus on the dysfunctioning of neurons, as compared with other types of brain cells. Therefore, we examined the role of dynamic alterations in microglia activation status in the development of chronic unpredictable stress (CUS)-induced depressive-like condition in rodents. We report that following an initial period (2-3 days) of stress-induced microglial proliferation and activation, some microglia underwent apoptosis, leading to reductions in their numbers within the hippocampus, but not in other brain regions, following 5 weeks of CUS exposure. At that time, microglia displayed reduced expression of activation markers as well as dystrophic morphology. Blockade of the initial stress-induced microglial activation by minocycline or by transgenic interleukin-1 receptor antagonist overexpression rescued the subsequent microglial apoptosis and decline, as well as the CUS-induced depressive-like behavior and suppressed neurogenesis. Similarly, the antidepressant drug imipramine blocked the initial stress-induced microglial activation as well as the CUS-induced microglial decline and depressive-like behavior. Treatment of CUS-exposed mice with either endotoxin, macrophage colony-stimulating factor or granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, all of which stimulated hippocampal microglial proliferation, partially or completely reversed the depressive-like behavior and dramatically increased hippocampal neurogenesis, whereas treatment with imipramine or minocycline had minimal or no anti-depressive effects, respectively, in these mice. These findings provide direct causal evidence that disturbances in microglial functioning has an etiological role in chronic stress-induced depression, suggesting that microglia stimulators could serve as fast-acting anti-depressants in some forms of depressive and stress-related conditions.

  10. Comparative transcriptomics of convergent evolution: different genes but conserved pathways underlie caste phenotypes across lineages of eusocial insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berens, Ali J; Hunt, James H; Toth, Amy L

    2015-03-01

    An area of great interest in evolutionary genomics is whether convergently evolved traits are the result of convergent molecular mechanisms. The presence of queen and worker castes in insect societies is a spectacular example of convergent evolution and phenotypic plasticity. Multiple insect lineages have evolved environmentally induced alternative castes. Given multiple origins of eusociality in Hymenoptera (bees, ants, and wasps), it has been proposed that insect castes evolved from common genetic "toolkits" consisting of deeply conserved genes. Here, we combine data from previously published studies on fire ants and honey bees with new data for Polistes metricus paper wasps to assess the toolkit idea by presenting the first comparative transcriptome-wide analysis of caste determination among three major hymenopteran social lineages. Overall, we found few shared caste differentially expressed transcripts across the three social lineages. However, there is substantially more overlap at the levels of pathways and biological functions. Thus, there are shared elements but not on the level of specific genes. Instead, the toolkit appears to be relatively "loose," that is, different lineages show convergent molecular evolution involving similar metabolic pathways and molecular functions but not the exact same genes. Additionally, our paper wasp data do not support a complementary hypothesis that "novel" taxonomically restricted genes are related to caste differences. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Dynamics of DNA in vitro evolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaojing Yang; Xili Liu; Chunbo Lou; Qi Ouyang

    2009-01-01

    In vitro evolution has become a very important research area in recent years. From a practical point of view, it provides a powerful and reliable tool for engineering functional molecules (DNA, RNA or proteins) in reasonably short periods of time. From a theoretical point of view, since in vitro evolution is analogous to natural evolution in many respects, the study of the dynamic details of in vitro evolution may provide some instructive insights into the process of evolution. In this review, we summarize current theoretical and exper-imental studies, including several efforts made by our group, on the dynamics of DNA in vitro evolution.

  12. Dynamical Evolution of Wide Binaries

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    Esmeralda H. Mallada

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We simulate numerically encounters of wide binaries with field stars and Giant Molecular Clouds (GMCs by means of the impulse approximation. We analyze the time evolution of the distributions of eccentricities and semimajor axes of wide binaries with given initial conditions, at intervals of 109 yr, up to 1010 yr (assumed age of the Galaxy. We compute the fraction of surviving binaries for stellar encounters, for GMC encounters and for a combination of both, and hence, the dynamical lifetime for different semimajor axes and different masses of binaries (0.5, 1, 1.2, 1.5, 2.5, and 3 Msolar. We find that the dynamical lifetime of wide binaries considering only GMCs is half than that considering only stars. For encounters with GMCs we analyze the influence of the initial inclination of the orbital plane of the binary with respect to the plane perpendicular to the relative velocity vector of the binary and the GMC. We find that the perturbation is maximum when the angle is minimum.

  13. Molecular Mechanisms That Underlie the Dynamic Adaptation of Innate Monocyte Memory to Varying Stimulant Strength of TLR Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ruoxi; Geng, Shuo; Li, Liwu

    2016-01-01

    In adaptation to rising stimulant strength, innate monocytes can be dynamically programed to preferentially express either pro- or anti-inflammatory mediators. Such dynamic innate adaptation or programing may bear profound relevance in host health and disease. However, molecular mechanisms that govern innate adaptation to varying strength of stimulants are not well understood. Using lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the model stimulant of toll-like-receptor 4 (TLR4), we reported that the expressions of pro-inflammatory mediators are preferentially sustained in monocytes adapted by lower doses of LPS, and suppressed/tolerized in monocytes adapted by higher doses of LPS. Mechanistically, monocytes adapted by super-low dose LPS exhibited higher levels of transcription factor, interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5), and reduced levels of transcriptional modulator B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein-1 (Blimp-1). Intriguingly, the inflammatory monocyte adaptation by super-low dose LPS is dependent upon TRAM/TRIF but not MyD88. Similar to LPS, we also observed biphasic inflammatory adaptation and tolerance in monocytes challenged with varying dosages of TLR7 agonist. In sharp contrast, rising doses of TLR3 agonist preferentially caused inflammatory adaptation without inducing tolerance. At the molecular level, the differential regulation of IRF5 and Blimp-1 coincides with unique monocyte adaptation dynamics by TLR4/7 and TLR3 agonists. Our study provides novel clue toward the understanding of monocyte adaptation and memory toward distinct TLR ligands.

  14. Vigorous dynamics underlie a stable population of the endangered snow leopard Panthera uncia in Tost Mountains, South Gobi, Mongolia.

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    Koustubh Sharma

    Full Text Available Population monitoring programmes and estimation of vital rates are key to understanding the mechanisms of population growth, decline or stability, and are important for effective conservation action. We report, for the first time, the population trends and vital rates of the endangered snow leopard based on camera trapping over four years in the Tost Mountains, South Gobi, Mongolia. We used robust design multi-season mark-recapture analysis to estimate the trends in abundance, sex ratio, survival probability and the probability of temporary emigration and immigration for adult and young snow leopards. The snow leopard population remained constant over most of the study period, with no apparent growth (λ = 1.08+-0.25. Comparison of model results with the "known population" of radio-collared snow leopards suggested high accuracy in our estimates. Although seemingly stable, vigorous underlying dynamics were evident in this population, with the adult sex ratio shifting from being male-biased to female-biased (1.67 to 0.38 males per female during the study. Adult survival probability was 0.82 (SE+-0.08 and that of young was 0.83 (SE+-0.15 and 0.77 (SE +-0.2 respectively, before and after the age of 2 years. Young snow leopards showed a high probability of temporary emigration and immigration (0.6, SE +-0.19 and 0.68, SE +-0.32 before and after the age of 2 years though not the adults (0.02 SE+-0.07. While the current female-bias in the population and the number of cubs born each year seemingly render the study population safe, the vigorous dynamics suggests that the situation can change quickly. The reduction in the proportion of male snow leopards may be indicative of continuing anthropogenic pressures. Our work reiterates the importance of monitoring both the abundance and population dynamics of species for effective conservation.

  15. Interlinked nonlinear subnetworks underlie the formation of robust cellular patterns in Arabidopsis epidermis: a dynamic spatial model

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    Padilla-Longoria Pablo

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dynamical models are instrumental for exploring the way information required to generate robust developmental patterns arises from complex interactions among genetic and non-genetic factors. We address this fundamental issue of developmental biology studying the leaf and root epidermis of Arabidopsis. We propose an experimentally-grounded model of gene regulatory networks (GRNs that are coupled by protein diffusion and comprise a meta-GRN implemented on cellularised domains. Results Steady states of the meta-GRN model correspond to gene expression profiles typical of hair and non-hair epidermal cells. The simulations also render spatial patterns that match the cellular arrangements observed in root and leaf epidermis. As in actual plants, such patterns are robust in the face of diverse perturbations. We validated the model by checking that it also reproduced the patterns of reported mutants. The meta-GRN model shows that interlinked sub-networks contribute redundantly to the formation of robust hair patterns and permits to advance novel and testable predictions regarding the effect of cell shape, signalling pathways and additional gene interactions affecting spatial cell-patterning. Conclusion The spatial meta-GRN model integrates available experimental data and contributes to further understanding of the Arabidopsis epidermal system. It also provides a systems biology framework to explore the interplay among sub-networks of a GRN, cell-to-cell communication, cell shape and domain traits, which could help understanding of general aspects of patterning processes. For instance, our model suggests that the information needed for cell fate determination emerges from dynamic processes that depend upon molecular components inside and outside differentiating cells, suggesting that the classical distinction of lineage versus positional cell differentiation may be instrumental but rather artificial. It also suggests that interlinkage

  16. Prevolutionary dynamics and the origin of evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Nowak, Martin A.; Ohtsuki, Hisashi

    2008-01-01

    Life is that which replicates and evolves. The origin of life is also the origin of evolution. A fundamental question is when do chemical kinetics become evolutionary dynamics? Here, we formulate a general mathematical theory for the origin of evolution. All known life on earth is based on biological polymers, which act as information carriers and catalysts. Therefore, any theory for the origin of life must address the emergence of such a system. We describe prelife as an alphabet of active m...

  17. Sex speeds adaptation by altering the dynamics of molecular evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Michael J; Rice, Daniel P; Desai, Michael M

    2016-03-10

    Sex and recombination are pervasive throughout nature despite their substantial costs. Understanding the evolutionary forces that maintain these phenomena is a central challenge in biology. One longstanding hypothesis argues that sex is beneficial because recombination speeds adaptation. Theory has proposed several distinct population genetic mechanisms that could underlie this advantage. For example, sex can promote the fixation of beneficial mutations either by alleviating interference competition (the Fisher-Muller effect) or by separating them from deleterious load (the ruby in the rubbish effect). Previous experiments confirm that sex can increase the rate of adaptation, but these studies did not observe the evolutionary dynamics that drive this effect at the genomic level. Here we present the first, to our knowledge, comparison between the sequence-level dynamics of adaptation in experimental sexual and asexual Saccharomyces cerevisiae populations, which allows us to identify the specific mechanisms by which sex speeds adaptation. We find that sex alters the molecular signatures of evolution by changing the spectrum of mutations that fix, and confirm theoretical predictions that it does so by alleviating clonal interference. We also show that substantially deleterious mutations hitchhike to fixation in adapting asexual populations. In contrast, recombination prevents such mutations from fixing. Our results demonstrate that sex both speeds adaptation and alters its molecular signature by allowing natural selection to more efficiently sort beneficial from deleterious mutations.

  18. Evolution of entanglement under echo dynamics

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    Prosen, Tomaž; Seligman, Thomas H.; Žnidarič, Marko

    2003-04-01

    Echo dynamics and fidelity are often used to discuss stability in quantum-information processing and quantum chaos. Yet fidelity yields no information about entanglement, the characteristic property of quantum mechanics. We study the evolution of entanglement in echo dynamics. We find qualitatively different behavior between integrable and chaotic systems on one hand and between random and coherent initial states for integrable systems on the other. For the latter the evolution of entanglement is given by a classical time scale. Analytic results are illustrated numerically in a Jaynes-Cummings model.

  19. Time Evolution in Dynamical Spacetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Tiemblo, A

    1996-01-01

    We present a gauge--theoretical derivation of the notion of time, suitable to describe the Hamiltonian time evolution of gravitational systems. It is based on a nonlinear coset realization of the Poincaré group, implying the time component of the coframe to be invariant, and thus to represent a metric time. The unitary gauge fixing of the boosts gives rise to the foliation of spacetime along the time direction. The three supressed degrees of freedom correspond to Goldstone--like fields, whereas the remaining time component is a Higgs--like boson.

  20. Dynamical evolution of two associated galactic bars

    CERN Document Server

    Garzon, F

    2014-01-01

    We study the dynamical interactions of mass systems in equilibrium under their own gravity that mutually exert and experience gravitational forces. The method we employ is to model the dynamical evolution of two isolated bars, hosted within the same galactic system, under their mutual gravitational interaction. In this study we present an analytical treatment of the secular evolution of two bars that oscillate with respect one another. Two cases of interaction, with and without geometrical deformation, are discussed. In the latter case, the bars are described as modified Jacobi ellipsoids. These triaxial systems are formed by a rotating fluid mass in gravitational equilibrium with its own rotational velocity and the gravitational field of the other bar. The governing equation for the variation of their relative angular separation is then numerically integrated, which also provides the time evolution of the geometrical parameters of the bodies. The case of rigid, non-deformable, bars produces in some cases an ...

  1. Loss of YABBY2-like gene expression may underlie the evolution of the laminar style in Canna and contribute to floral morphological diversity in the Zingiberales

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    Kelsie eMorioka

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Zingiberales is an order of tropical monocots that exhibits diverse floral morphologies. The evolution of petaloid, laminar stamens, staminodes, and styles contributes to this diversity. The laminar style is a derived trait in the family Cannaceae and plays an important role in pollination as its surface is used for secondary pollen presentation. Previous work in the Zingiberales has implicated YABBY2-like genes, which function in promoting laminar outgrowth, in the evolution of stamen morphology. Here, we investigate the evolution and expression of Zingiberales YABBY2-like genes in order to understand the evolution of the laminar style in Canna. Phylogenetic analyses show that multiple duplication events have occurred in this gene lineage prior to the diversification of the Zingiberales. Reverse transcription-PCR in Canna, Costus, and Musa reveals differential expression across floral organs, taxa, and gene copies, and a role for YABBY2-like genes in the evolution of the laminar style is proposed. Selection tests indicate that almost all sites in conserved domains are under purifying selection, consistent with their functional relevance, and a motif unique to monocot YABBY2-like genes is identified. These results contribute to our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the evolution of floral morphologies.

  2. Dynamical evolution of star forming regions

    CERN Document Server

    Parker, Richard J; Goodwin, Simon P; Meyer, Michael R

    2013-01-01

    We model the dynamical evolution of star forming regions with a wide range of initial properties. We follow the evolution of the regions' substructure using the Q-parameter, we search for dynamical mass segregation using the Lambda_MSR technique, and we also quantify the evolution of local density around stars as a function of mass using the Sigma_LDR method. The amount of dynamical mass segregation measured by Lambda_MSR is generally only significant for subvirial and virialised, substructured regions - which usually evolve to form bound clusters. The Sigma_LDR method shows that massive stars attain higher local densities than the median value in all regions, even those that are supervirial and evolve to form (unbound) associations. We also introduce the Q-Sigma_LDR plot, which describes the evolution of spatial structure as a function of mass-weighted local density in a star forming region. Initially dense (>1000 stars pc^{-2}), bound regions always have Q >1, Sigma_LDR > 2 after 5Myr, whereas dense unbound...

  3. Effective evolution equations from quantum dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Benedikter, Niels; Schlein, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    These notes investigate the time evolution of quantum systems, and in particular the rigorous derivation of effective equations approximating the many-body Schrödinger dynamics in certain physically interesting regimes. The focus is primarily on the derivation of time-dependent effective theories (non-equilibrium question) approximating many-body quantum dynamics. The book is divided into seven sections, the first of which briefly reviews the main properties of many-body quantum systems and their time evolution. Section 2 introduces the mean-field regime for bosonic systems and explains how the many-body dynamics can be approximated in this limit using the Hartree equation. Section 3 presents a method, based on the use of coherent states, for rigorously proving the convergence towards the Hartree dynamics, while the fluctuations around the Hartree equation are considered in Section 4. Section 5 focuses on a discussion of a more subtle regime, in which the many-body evolution can be approximated by means of t...

  4. ICM METALLICITY EVOLUTION: EFFECTS OF DYNAMICAL PROCESSES

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    S. Cora

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a study on the origin of the metallicity evolution of the intracluster medium (ICM by applying a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation to N-Body/SPH non-radiative cosmological simulations of clusters of galaxies. The results obtained for a set of clusters with virial masses of - 1:5 - 1015 h-1M contribute to the theoretical interpretation of recent observational X-ray data, which indicate a decrease of the average iron content of the intracluster gas with increasing redshift, z. We nd that this evolution is mainly due to a progressive increase of the iron content within 15 per cent of the virial radius as a result of dynamical processes. The clusters have been considerably enriched by z - 1 with very low contribution from recent star formation. Low entropy gas that has been enriched at high z sink to the cluster centre contributing to the evolution of the metallicity pro les.

  5. Dynamic Origin of Evolution and Social Transformation

    CERN Document Server

    Kirilyuk, Andrei P

    2012-01-01

    We analyse the unreduced, nonperturbative dynamics of an arbitrary many-body interaction process with the help of the generalised effective potential method and reveal the well-specified universal origin of change (emergence), time and evolution in an a priori conservative, time-independent system. It appears together with the universal dynamic complexity definition, where this unified complexity conservation and transformation constitutes the essence of evolution. We then consider the detailed structure of this universal evolutionary process showing its step-wise, "punctuated" character, now provided with the exact mathematical description. Comparing the expected features of a revolutionary complexity transition near a step-like complexity upgrade with the currently observed behaviour of world's social and economic systems, we prove the necessity of complexity revolution towards the superior civilisation level of well-defined nature, the only alternative being an equally dramatic and irreversible degradation...

  6. DYNAMIC BIFURCATION OF NONLINEAR EVOLUTION EQUATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA TIAN; WANG SHOUHONG

    2005-01-01

    The authors introduce a notion of dynamic bifurcation for nonlinear evolution equations, which can be called attractor bifurcation. It is proved that as the control parameter crosses certain critical value, the system bifurcates from a trivial steady state solution to an attractor with dimension between m and m + 1, where m + 1 is the number of eigenvalues crossing the imaginary axis. The attractor bifurcation theory presented in this article generalizes the existing steady state bifurcations and the Hopf bifurcations. It provides a unified point of view on dynamic bifurcation and can be applied to many problems in physics and mechanics.

  7. Brand Equity Evolution: a System Dynamics Model

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    Edson Crescitelli

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available One of the greatest challenges in brand management lies in monitoring brand equity over time. This paper aimsto present a simulation model able to represent this evolution. The model was drawn on brand equity concepts developed by Aaker and Joachimsthaler (2000, using the system dynamics methodology. The use ofcomputational dynamic models aims to create new sources of information able to sensitize academics and managers alike to the dynamic implications of their brand management. As a result, an easily implementable model was generated, capable of executing continuous scenario simulations by surveying casual relations among the variables that explain brand equity. Moreover, the existence of a number of system modeling tools will allow extensive application of the concepts used in this study in practical situations, both in professional and educational settings

  8. Evolution of cooperation on stochastic dynamical networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Wu

    Full Text Available Cooperative behavior that increases the fitness of others at a cost to oneself can be promoted by natural selection only in the presence of an additional mechanism. One such mechanism is based on population structure, which can lead to clustering of cooperating agents. Recently, the focus has turned to complex dynamical population structures such as social networks, where the nodes represent individuals and links represent social relationships. We investigate how the dynamics of a social network can change the level of cooperation in the network. Individuals either update their strategies by imitating their partners or adjust their social ties. For the dynamics of the network structure, a random link is selected and breaks with a probability determined by the adjacent individuals. Once it is broken, a new one is established. This linking dynamics can be conveniently characterized by a Markov chain in the configuration space of an ever-changing network of interacting agents. Our model can be analytically solved provided the dynamics of links proceeds much faster than the dynamics of strategies. This leads to a simple rule for the evolution of cooperation: The more fragile links between cooperating players and non-cooperating players are (or the more robust links between cooperators are, the more likely cooperation prevails. Our approach may pave the way for analytically investigating coevolution of strategy and structure.

  9. Early dynamical evolution of young substructured clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorval, Julien; Boily, Christian

    2017-03-01

    Stellar clusters form with a high level of substructure, inherited from the molecular cloud and the star formation process. Evidence from observations and simulations also indicate the stars in such young clusters form a subvirial system. The subsequent dynamical evolution can cause important mass loss, ejecting a large part of the birth population in the field. It can also imprint the stellar population and still be inferred from observations of evolved clusters. Nbody simulations allow a better understanding of these early twists and turns, given realistic initial conditions. Nowadays, substructured, clumpy young clusters are usually obtained through pseudo-fractal growth and velocity inheritance. We introduce a new way to create clumpy initial conditions through a ''Hubble expansion'' which naturally produces self consistent clumps, velocity-wise. In depth analysis of the resulting clumps shows consistency with hydrodynamical simulations of young star clusters. We use these initial conditions to investigate the dynamical evolution of young subvirial clusters. We find the collapse to be soft, with hierarchical merging leading to a high level of mass segregation. The subsequent evolution is less pronounced than the equilibrium achieved from a cold collapse formation scenario.

  10. Genome Size Dynamics and Evolution in Monocots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilia J. Leitch

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Monocot genomic diversity includes striking variation at many levels. This paper compares various genomic characters (e.g., range of chromosome numbers and ploidy levels, occurrence of endopolyploidy, GC content, chromosome packaging and organization, genome size between monocots and the remaining angiosperms to discern just how distinctive monocot genomes are. One of the most notable features of monocots is their wide range and diversity of genome sizes, including the species with the largest genome so far reported in plants. This genomic character is analysed in greater detail, within a phylogenetic context. By surveying available genome size and chromosome data it is apparent that different monocot orders follow distinctive modes of genome size and chromosome evolution. Further insights into genome size-evolution and dynamics were obtained using statistical modelling approaches to reconstruct the ancestral genome size at key nodes across the monocot phylogenetic tree. Such approaches reveal that while the ancestral genome size of all monocots was small (1C=1.9 pg, there have been several major increases and decreases during monocot evolution. In addition, notable increases in the rates of genome size-evolution were found in Asparagales and Poales compared with other monocot lineages.

  11. Dynamic system evolution and markov chain approximation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roderick V. Nicholas Melnik

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper computational aspects of the mathematical modelling of dynamic system evolution have been considered as a problem in information theory. The construction of mathematical models is treated as a decision making process with limited available information.The solution of the problem is associated with a computational model based on heuristics of a Markov Chain in a discrete space–time of events. A stable approximation of the chain has been derived and the limiting cases are discussed. An intrinsic interconnection of constructive, sequential, and evolutionary approaches in related optimization problems provides new challenges for future work.

  12. Duplication and concerted evolution of MiSp-encoding genes underlie the material properties of minor ampullate silks of cobweb weaving spiders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vienneau-Hathaway, Jannelle M; Brassfield, Elizabeth R; Lane, Amanda Kelly; Collin, Matthew A; Correa-Garhwal, Sandra M; Clarke, Thomas H; Schwager, Evelyn E; Garb, Jessica E; Hayashi, Cheryl Y; Ayoub, Nadia A

    2017-03-14

    Orb-web weaving spiders and their relatives use multiple types of task-specific silks. The majority of spider silk studies have focused on the ultra-tough dragline silk synthesized in major ampullate glands, but other silk types have impressive material properties. For instance, minor ampullate silks of orb-web weaving spiders are as tough as draglines, due to their higher extensibility despite lower strength. Differences in material properties between silk types result from differences in their component proteins, particularly members of the spidroin (spider fibroin) gene family. However, the extent to which variation in material properties within a single silk type can be explained by variation in spidroin sequences is unknown. Here, we compare the minor ampullate spidroins (MiSp) of orb-weavers and cobweb weavers. Orb-web weavers use minor ampullate silk to form the auxiliary spiral of the orb-web while cobweb weavers use it to wrap prey, suggesting that selection pressures on minor ampullate spidroins (MiSp) may differ between the two groups. We report complete or nearly complete MiSp sequences from five cobweb weaving spider species and measure material properties of minor ampullate silks in a subset of these species. We also compare MiSp sequences and silk properties of our cobweb weavers to published data for orb-web weavers. We demonstrate that all our cobweb weavers possess multiple MiSp loci and that one locus is more highly expressed in at least two species. We also find that the proportion of β-spiral-forming amino acid motifs in MiSp positively correlates with minor ampullate silk extensibility across orb-web and cobweb weavers. MiSp sequences vary dramatically within and among spider species, and have likely been subject to multiple rounds of gene duplication and concerted evolution, which have contributed to the diverse material properties of minor ampullate silks. Our sequences also provide templates for recombinant silk proteins with tailored

  13. Evolution of taxis responses in virtual bacteria: non-adaptive dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A Goldstein

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria are able to sense and respond to a variety of external stimuli, with responses that vary from stimuli to stimuli and from species to species. The best-understood is chemotaxis in the model organism Escherichia coli, where the dynamics and the structure of the underlying pathway are well characterised. It is not clear, however, how well this detailed knowledge applies to mechanisms mediating responses to other stimuli or to pathways in other species. Furthermore, there is increasing experimental evidence that bacteria integrate responses from different stimuli to generate a coherent taxis response. We currently lack a full understanding of the different pathway structures and dynamics and how this integration is achieved. In order to explore different pathway structures and dynamics that can underlie taxis responses in bacteria, we perform a computational simulation of the evolution of taxis. This approach starts with a population of virtual bacteria that move in a virtual environment based on the dynamics of the simple biochemical pathways they harbour. As mutations lead to changes in pathway structure and dynamics, bacteria better able to localise with favourable conditions gain a selective advantage. We find that a certain dynamics evolves consistently under different model assumptions and environments. These dynamics, which we call non-adaptive dynamics, directly couple tumbling probability of the cell to increasing stimuli. Dynamics that are adaptive under a wide range of conditions, as seen in the chemotaxis pathway of E. coli, do not evolve in these evolutionary simulations. However, we find that stimulus scarcity and fluctuations during evolution results in complex pathway dynamics that result both in adaptive and non-adaptive dynamics depending on basal stimuli levels. Further analyses of evolved pathway structures show that effective taxis dynamics can be mediated with as few as two components. The non-adaptive dynamics

  14. Dynamics of dental evolution in ornithopod dinosaurs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickson, Edward; Prieto-Márquez, Albert; Benton, Michael J.; Stubbs, Thomas L.

    2016-01-01

    Ornithopods were key herbivorous dinosaurs in Mesozoic terrestrial ecosystems, with a variety of tooth morphologies. Several clades, especially the ‘duck-billed’ hadrosaurids, became hugely diverse and abundant almost worldwide. Yet their evolutionary dynamics have been disputed, particularly whether they diversified in response to events in plant evolution. Here we focus on their remarkable dietary adaptations, using tooth and jaw characters to examine changes in dental disparity and evolutionary rate. Ornithopods explored different areas of dental morphospace throughout their evolution, showing a long-term expansion. There were four major evolutionary rate increases, the first among basal iguanodontians in the Middle-Late Jurassic, and the three others among the Hadrosauridae, above and below the split of their two major clades, in the middle of the Late Cretaceous. These evolutionary bursts do not correspond to times of plant diversification, including the radiation of the flowering plants, and suggest that dental innovation rather than coevolution with major plant clades was a major driver in ornithopod evolution. PMID:27412496

  15. Dynamics of dental evolution in ornithopod dinosaurs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickson, Edward; Prieto-Márquez, Albert; Benton, Michael J.; Stubbs, Thomas L.

    2016-07-01

    Ornithopods were key herbivorous dinosaurs in Mesozoic terrestrial ecosystems, with a variety of tooth morphologies. Several clades, especially the ‘duck-billed’ hadrosaurids, became hugely diverse and abundant almost worldwide. Yet their evolutionary dynamics have been disputed, particularly whether they diversified in response to events in plant evolution. Here we focus on their remarkable dietary adaptations, using tooth and jaw characters to examine changes in dental disparity and evolutionary rate. Ornithopods explored different areas of dental morphospace throughout their evolution, showing a long-term expansion. There were four major evolutionary rate increases, the first among basal iguanodontians in the Middle-Late Jurassic, and the three others among the Hadrosauridae, above and below the split of their two major clades, in the middle of the Late Cretaceous. These evolutionary bursts do not correspond to times of plant diversification, including the radiation of the flowering plants, and suggest that dental innovation rather than coevolution with major plant clades was a major driver in ornithopod evolution.

  16. The Chemical Evolution of Dynamically Hot Galaxies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G. Richer

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the chemical properties of M32, the bulges of M31 and the Milky Way, and the dwarf spheroidal galaxies NGC 205, NGC 185, Sagittarius, and Fornax using oxygen abundances for their planetary nebulae. Our principal result is that the mean stellar oxygen abundances correlate very well with thei r mean velocity dispersions, implying that the balance between energy input from type II supernovae and the gravitational potential controls chemical evolution in bulges, ellipticals, and dwarf spheroidals. It appears that chemical evolution ceases once supernovae have injected sufficient energy that a galacti c wind develops. All of the galaxies follow a single relation between oxygen abundance and luminosity, but the dwarf spheroidals have systematically higher [O/Fe] ratios than the other galaxies. Consequently, dynamically hot galaxies do not share a common star formation history nor need to a common chemical evolution, despite attaining similar mean stellar oxygen abundances when formin g similar masses. The oxygen abundances support previous indications that stars in higher luminosity ellipticals and bulges were formed on a shorter time scale than their counterparts in less luminous systems.

  17. Prevolutionary dynamics and the origin of evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Martin A; Ohtsuki, Hisashi

    2008-09-30

    Life is that which replicates and evolves. The origin of life is also the origin of evolution. A fundamental question is when do chemical kinetics become evolutionary dynamics? Here, we formulate a general mathematical theory for the origin of evolution. All known life on earth is based on biological polymers, which act as information carriers and catalysts. Therefore, any theory for the origin of life must address the emergence of such a system. We describe prelife as an alphabet of active monomers that form random polymers. Prelife is a generative system that can produce information. Prevolutionary dynamics have selection and mutation, but no replication. Life marches in with the ability of replication: Polymers act as templates for their own reproduction. Prelife is a scaffold that builds life. Yet, there is competition between life and prelife. There is a phase transition: If the effective replication rate exceeds a critical value, then life outcompetes prelife. Replication is not a prerequisite for selection, but instead, there can be selection for replication. Mutation leads to an error threshold between life and prelife.

  18. Algebraic dynamics solutions and algebraic dynamics algorithm for nonlinear partial differential evolution equations of dynamical systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Using functional derivative technique in quantum field theory, the algebraic dy-namics approach for solution of ordinary differential evolution equations was gen-eralized to treat partial differential evolution equations. The partial differential evo-lution equations were lifted to the corresponding functional partial differential equations in functional space by introducing the time translation operator. The functional partial differential evolution equations were solved by algebraic dynam-ics. The algebraic dynamics solutions are analytical in Taylor series in terms of both initial functions and time. Based on the exact analytical solutions, a new nu-merical algorithm—algebraic dynamics algorithm was proposed for partial differ-ential evolution equations. The difficulty of and the way out for the algorithm were discussed. The application of the approach to and computer numerical experi-ments on the nonlinear Burgers equation and meteorological advection equation indicate that the algebraic dynamics approach and algebraic dynamics algorithm are effective to the solution of nonlinear partial differential evolution equations both analytically and numerically.

  19. Dynamic Evolution of Microscopic Wet Cracking Noises

    CERN Document Server

    Ghaffari, H O; Benson, P M

    2015-01-01

    Characterizing the interaction between water and microscopic defects is one of the long-standing challenges in understanding a broad range of cracking processes. Different physical aspects of microscopic events, driven or influenced by water, have been extensively discussed in atomistic calculations but have not been accessible in microscale experiments. Through the analysis of the emitted noises during the evolution of individual, dynamic microcracking events, we show that the onset of a secondary instability known as hybrid events occurs during the fast healing phase of microcracking, which leads to (local) sudden increase of pore water pressure in the process zone, inducing a secondary instability, which is followed by a fast-locking phase on the microscopic faults (pulse-like rupture).

  20. Ising Ferromagnet: Zero-Temperature Dynamic Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Murilo-Castro de Oliveira, P; Sidoravicious, V; Stein, D L

    2006-01-01

    The dynamic evolution at zero temperature of a uniform Ising ferromagnet on a square lattice is followed by Monte Carlo computer simulations. The system always eventually reaches a final, absorbing state, which sometimes coincides with a ground state (all spins parallel), and sometimes does not (parallel stripes of spins up and down). We initiate here the numerical study of ``Chaotic Time Dependence'' (CTD) by seeing how much information about the final state is predictable from the randomly generated quenched initial state. CTD was originally proposed to explain how nonequilibrium spin glasses could manifest equilibrium pure state structure, but in simpler systems such as homogeneous ferromagnets it is closely related to long-term predictability and our results suggest that CTD might indeed occur in the infinite volume limit.

  1. Molecular dynamics study of ice structural evolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Yan; Dong Shun-Le

    2008-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation is employed to study the structural evolution of low density amorphous ice during its compression from one atmosphere to 2.5 GPa. Calculated results show that high density amorphous ice is formed at an intermediate pressure of~1.0GPa; the O-O-O bond angle ranges from 83° to 113°, and the O-H...O bond is bent from 112° to 160°. Very high density amorphous ice is obtained by quenching to 80K and decompressing the ice to ambient pressure from 160 K/1.3 GPa or 160 K/1.7 GPa; and the next-nearest O-O length is found to be 0.310 nm, just 0.035 nm beyond the nearest O-O distance of 0.275 nm.

  2. Dynamic landscapes in human evolution and dispersal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devès, Maud; King, Geoffrey; Bailey, Geoffrey; Inglis, Robyn; Williams, Matthew; Winder, Isabelle

    2013-04-01

    Archaeological studies of human settlement in its wider landscape setting usually focus on climate change as the principal environmental driver of change in the physical features of the landscape, even on the long time scales of early human evolution. We emphasize that landscapes evolve dynamically due to an interplay of processes occurring over different timescales. Tectonic deformation, volcanism, sea level changes, by acting on the topography, the lithology and on the patterns of erosion-deposition in a given area, can moderate or amplify the influence of climate at the regional and local scale. These processes impose or alleviate physical barriers to movement, and modify the distribution and accessibility of plant and animal resources in ways critical to human ecological and evolutionary success (King and Bailey, JHE 2006; Bailey and King, Antiquity 2011, Winder et al. Antiquity in press). The DISPERSE project, an ERC-funded collaboration between the University of York and the Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, aims to develop systematic methods for reconstructing landscapes associated with active tectonics, volcanism and sea level change at a variety of scales in order to study their potential impact on patterns of human evolution and dispersal. Examples are shown to illustrate the ways in which changes of significance to human settlement can occur at a range of geographical scales and on time scales that range from lifetimes to tens of millennia, creating and sustaining attractive conditions for human settlement and exercising powerful selective pressures on human development.

  3. Dynamic Evolution Equations for Isolated Smoke Vortexes in Rational Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Jianhua, Xiao

    2011-01-01

    Smoke circle vortexes are a typical dynamic phenomenon in nature. The similar circle vortexes phenomenon appears in hurricane, turbulence, and many others. A semi-empirical method is constructed to get some intrinsic understanding about such circle vortex structures. Firstly, the geometrical motion equations for smoke circle is formulated based on empirical observations. Based on them, the mechanic dynamic motion equations are established. Finally, the general dynamic evolution equations for smoke vortex are formulated. They are dynamic evolution equations for exact stress field and dynamic evolution equations for average stress field. For industrial application and experimental data processing, their corresponding approximation equations for viscous fluid are given. Some simple discussions are made.

  4. Algebraic dynamics solutions and algebraic dynamics algorithm for nonlinear partial differential evolution equations of dynamical systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shundin; ZHANG Hua

    2008-01-01

    Using functional derivative technique In quantum field theory,the algebraic dy-namics approach for solution of ordinary differential evolution equations was gen-eralized to treat partial differential evolution equations.The partial differential evo-lution equations were lifted to the corresponding functional partial differential equations in functional space by Introducing the time translation operator.The functional partial differential evolution equations were solved by algebraic dynam-ics.The algebraic dynamics solutions are analytical In Taylor series In terms of both initial functions and time.Based on the exact analytical solutions,a new nu-merical algorithm-algebraic dynamics algorithm was proposed for partial differ-ential evolution equations.The difficulty of and the way out for the algorithm were discussed.The application of the approach to and computer numerical experi-ments on the nonlinear Burgers equation and meteorological advection equation indicate that the algebraic dynamics approach and algebraic dynamics algorithm are effective to the solution of nonlinear partial differential evolution equations both analytically and numerically.

  5. Modeling Dynamic Evolution of Online Friendship Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴联仁; 闫强

    2012-01-01

    In this paper,we study the dynamic evolution of friendship network in SNS (Social Networking Site).Our analysis suggests that an individual joining a community depends not only on the number of friends he or she has within the community,but also on the friendship network generated by those friends.In addition,we propose a model which is based on two processes:first,connecting nearest neighbors;second,strength driven attachment mechanism.The model reflects two facts:first,in the social network it is a universal phenomenon that two nodes are connected when they have at least one common neighbor;second,new nodes connect more likely to nodes which have larger weights and interactions,a phenomenon called strength driven attachment (also called weight driven attachment).From the simulation results,we find that degree distribution P(k),strength distribution P(s),and degree-strength correlation are all consistent with empirical data.

  6. Construction of a state evolution for Kawasaki dynamics in continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berns, Christoph; Kondratiev, Yuri; Kutoviy, Oleksandr

    2013-06-01

    We consider conservative, non-equilibrium stochastic jump dynamics of interacting particles in continuum. These dynamics have a (grand canonical) Gibbs measure as invariant measure. The problem of existence of these dynamics is studied. The corresponding time evolution of correlation functions is constructed.

  7. Dynamics of actin evolution in dinoflagellates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sunju; Bachvaroff, Tsvetan R; Handy, Sara M; Delwiche, Charles F

    2011-04-01

    Dinoflagellates have unique nuclei and intriguing genome characteristics with very high DNA content making complete genome sequencing difficult. In dinoflagellates, many genes are found in multicopy gene families, but the processes involved in the establishment and maintenance of these gene families are poorly understood. Understanding the dynamics of gene family evolution in dinoflagellates requires comparisons at different evolutionary scales. Studies of closely related species provide fine-scale information relative to species divergence, whereas comparisons of more distantly related species provides broad context. We selected the actin gene family as a highly expressed conserved gene previously studied in dinoflagellates. Of the 142 sequences determined in this study, 103 were from the two closely related species, Dinophysis acuminata and D. caudata, including full length and partial cDNA sequences as well as partial genomic amplicons. For these two Dinophysis species, at least three types of sequences could be identified. Most copies (79%) were relatively similar and in nucleotide trees, the sequences formed two bushy clades corresponding to the two species. In comparisons within species, only eight to ten nucleotide differences were found between these copies. The two remaining types formed clades containing sequences from both species. One type included the most similar sequences in between-species comparisons with as few as 12 nucleotide differences between species. The second type included the most divergent sequences in comparisons between and within species with up to 93 nucleotide differences between sequences. In all the sequences, most variation occurred in synonymous sites or the 5' UnTranslated Region (UTR), although there was still limited amino acid variation between most sequences. Several potential pseudogenes were found (approximately 10% of all sequences depending on species) with incomplete open reading frames due to frameshifts or early stop

  8. Dynamic interactions of an intracellular Ca2+ clock and membrane ion channel clock underlie robust initiation and regulation of cardiac pacemaker function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltsev, Victor A; Lakatta, Edward G

    2008-01-15

    For almost half a century it has been thought that the initiation of each heartbeat is driven by surface membrane voltage-gated ion channels (M clocks) within sinoatrial nodal cells. It has also been assumed that pacemaker cell automaticity is initiated at the maximum diastolic potential (MDP). Recent experimental evidence based on confocal cell imaging and supported by numerical modelling, however, shows that initiation of cardiac impulse is a more complex phenomenon and involves yet another clock that resides under the sarcolemma. This clock is the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR): it generates spontaneous, but precisely timed, rhythmic, submembrane, local Ca(2+) releases (LCR) that appear not at the MDP but during the late, diastolic depolarization (DD). The Ca(2+) clock and M clock dynamically interact, defining a novel paradigm of robust cardiac pacemaker function and regulation. Rhythmic LCRs during the late DD activate inward Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger currents and ignite action potentials, which in turn induceCa(2+) transients and SR depletions, resetting the Ca(2+) clock. Both basal and reserve protein kinaseA-dependent phosphorylation of Ca(2+) cycling proteins control the speed and amplitude of SR Ca(2+) cycling to regulate the beating rate by strongly coupled Ca(2+) and M clocks.

  9. Mercury's Thermal Evolution, Dynamical Topography and Geoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziethe, Ruth; Benkhoff, Johannes

    stagnant lid comprises roughly half the mantle after only 0.5Ga. Since the rigid lithosphere does not take part in the convection anymore, the heat coming from the interior (due to the cooling of the large core) can only be transported through the lithosphere by thermal conduction. This is a significantly less effective mechanism of heat transport than convection and hence the lithosphere forms an insulating layer. As a result, the interior is kept relatively warm.Because the mantle is relatively shallow compared to the planet's radius, and additionally the thick stagnant lid is formed relatively rapid, the convection is confined to a layer of only about 200km to 300km. Convection structures are therefore relatively small structured. The flow patterns in the early evolution show that mantle convection is characterized by numerous upwelling plumes, which are fed by the heat flow from the cooling core. These upwellings are relatively stable regarding their spatial position. As the core cools down the temperature anomalies become colder and less pronounced but not less numerous. In our calculations, a region of partial melt in the mantle forms immediately after the start of the model at a depths of roughly 220km. While in the entire lower mantle the temperature exceeds the solidus, the highest melt degrees can be found in the upwelling plumes. The partial molten region persists a significant time (up to 2.5Ga). How long the partial molten zone actually survives depends strongly on the initial conditions of the model. For instance, an outer layer with a reduced thermal conductivity would keep the lower mantle significantly warmer and a molten layer survives longer. The hot upwellings cause a surface deformation (dynamical topography) which itself causes a gravity anomaly. Due to the weak constraints of important parameters (e.g. sulfur content of the core, mantle rheology, amount and distribution of radiogenic heat sources, planetary contraction, thermal conductivity, etc

  10. Galactic evolution. I - Single-zone models. [encompassing stellar evolution and gas-star dynamic theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuan, T. X.; Hart, M. H.; Ostriker, J. P.

    1975-01-01

    The two basic approaches of physical theory required to calculate the evolution of a galactic system are considered, taking into account stellar evolution theory and the dynamics of a gas-star system. Attention is given to intrinsic (stellar) physics, extrinsic (dynamical) physics, and computations concerning the fractionation of an initial mass of gas into stars. The characteristics of a 'standard' model and its variants are discussed along with the results obtained with the aid of these models.

  11. Functional evolutions for homogeneous stationary death-immigration spatial dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Finkelshtein, Dmitri

    2011-01-01

    We discover death-immigration non-equilibrium stochastic dynamics in the continuum also known as the Surgailis process. Explicit expression for the correlation functions is presented. Dynamics of states and their generating functionals are studied. Ergodic properties for the evolutions are considered.

  12. The statistical dynamics of epochal evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Nimwegen, Erik Jan van

    2001-01-01

    In this thesis, a new mathematical formalism for analyzing evolutionary dynamics is developed. This formalism combines ideas and methods from statistical mechanics, mathematical population genetics, and dynamical systems theory to describe the dynamics of evolving populations. In particular, the work shows how the maximum entropy formalism of statistical mechanics can be extended to apply to simple evolutionary systems, such that "macroscopic" equations of motion can be constructed from an un...

  13. Subsystem's dynamics under random Hamiltonian evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Vinayak,

    2011-01-01

    We study time evolution of a subsystem's density matrix under a unitary evolution, generated by a sufficiently complex, say quantum chaotic, Hamiltonian. We exactly calculate all coherences, purity and fluctuations. The reduced density matrix is described in terms of a noncentral correlated Wishart ensemble. Our description accounts for a transition from an arbitrary initial state towards a random state at large times, enabling us to determine the convergence time after which random states are reached. We identify and describe a number of other interesting features, like a series of collisions between the largest eigenvalue and the bulk, accompanied by a phase transition in its distribution function.

  14. On learning dynamics underlying the evolution of learning rules.

    OpenAIRE

    Dridi, S; Lehmann, L.

    2014-01-01

    In order to understand the development of non-genetically encoded actions during an animal's lifespan, it is necessary to analyze the dynamics and evolution of learning rules producing behavior. Owing to the intrinsic stochastic and frequency-dependent nature of learning dynamics, these rules are often studied in evolutionary biology via agent-based computer simulations. In this paper, we show that stochastic approximation theory can help to qualitatively understand learning dynamics and form...

  15. Dynamic Evolution Equations for Isolated Smoke Vortexes in Rational Mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Smoke circle vortexes are a typical dynamic phenomenon in nature. The similar circle vortexes phenomenon appears in hurricane, turbulence, and many others. A semi-empirical method is constructed to get some intrinsic understanding about such circle vortex structures. Firstly, the geometrical motion equations for smoke circle is formulated based on empirical observations. Based on them, the mechanic dynamic motion equations are established. Finally, the general dynamic evolution equations for ...

  16. Predicting the evolution of complex networks via similarity dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tao; Chen, Leiting; Zhong, Linfeng; Xian, Xingping

    2017-01-01

    Almost all real-world networks are subject to constant evolution, and plenty of them have been investigated empirically to uncover the underlying evolution mechanism. However, the evolution prediction of dynamic networks still remains a challenging problem. The crux of this matter is to estimate the future network links of dynamic networks. This paper studies the evolution prediction of dynamic networks with link prediction paradigm. To estimate the likelihood of the existence of links more accurate, an effective and robust similarity index is presented by exploiting network structure adaptively. Moreover, most of the existing link prediction methods do not make a clear distinction between future links and missing links. In order to predict the future links, the networks are regarded as dynamic systems in this paper, and a similarity updating method, spatial-temporal position drift model, is developed to simulate the evolutionary dynamics of node similarity. Then the updated similarities are used as input information for the future links' likelihood estimation. Extensive experiments on real-world networks suggest that the proposed similarity index performs better than baseline methods and the position drift model performs well for evolution prediction in real-world evolving networks.

  17. Dynamical stability and evolution of the discs of Sc galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Fuchs, B

    1997-01-01

    We examine the local stability of galactic discs against axisymmetric density perturbations with special attention to the different dynamics of the stellar and gaseous components. In particular the discs of the Milky Way and of NGC 6946 are studied. The Milky Way is shown to be stable, whereas the inner parts of NGC 6946, a typical Sc galaxy from the Kennicutt (1989) sample, are dynamically unstable. The ensuing dynamical evolution of the composite disc is studied by numerical simulations. The evolution is so fierce that the stellar disc heats up dynamically on a short time scale to such a degree, which seems to contradict the morphological appearance of the galaxy. The star formation rate required to cool the disc dynamically is estimated. Even if the star formation rate in NGC 6946 is at present high enough to meet this requirement, it is argued that the discs of Sc galaxies cannot sustain such a high star formation rate for longer periods.

  18. Area evolution, bulk viscosity and entropy principles for dynamical horizons

    CERN Document Server

    Gourgoulhon, E; Gourgoulhon, Eric; Jaramillo, Jose Luis

    2006-01-01

    We derive from Einstein equation an evolution law for the area of a trapping or dynamical horizon. The solutions to this differential equation show a causal behavior. Moreover, in a viscous fluid analogy, the equation can be interpreted as an energy balance law, yielding to a positive bulk viscosity. These two features contrast with the event horizon case, where the non-causal evolution of the area and the negative bulk viscosity require teleological boundary conditions. This reflects the local character of trapping horizons as opposed to event horizons. Interpreting the area as the entropy, we propose to use an area/entropy evolution principle to select a unique dynamical horizon and time slicing in the Cauchy evolution of an initial marginally trapped surface.

  19. Dynamical Evolution of Modified Chaplygin Gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Ming-Hui; WU Ya-Bo; HE Jing

    2008-01-01

    Based our previous work [Mod.Phys.Lett.A 22 (2007) 783,Gen.Relat.Grav.39 (2007) 653],some properties of modified Chaplygin gas (MCG) as a dark energy model continue to be studied mainly in two aspects: one is the change rates of the energy density and energy transfer,and the other is the evolution of the growth index.It is pointed that the density of dark energy undergoes the change from decrease to increase no matter whether the interaction between dark energy and dark matter exists or not,but the corresponding transformation points are different from each other.Furthermore,it is stressed that the MCG model even supports the existence of interaction between dark energy and dark matter,and the energy of transfer flows from dark energy to dark matter.The evolution of the interaction term with an ansatz 3Hc2p is discussed with the MCG model.Moreover,the evolution of the growth index f in the MCG model without interaction is illustrated,from which we find that the evolutionary trajectory of f overlaps with that of the ACDM model when α> 0.7 and its theoretical value f≈0.566 given by us at z=0.15 is consistent with the observations.

  20. Dynamic landscapes: a model of context and contingency in evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, David V; Rorick, Mary M; Gesell, Tanja; Feeney, Laura M; Foster, Jacob G

    2013-10-01

    Although the basic mechanics of evolution have been understood since Darwin, debate continues over whether macroevolutionary phenomena are driven by the fitness structure of genotype space or by ecological interaction. In this paper we propose a simple model capturing key features of fitness-landscape and ecological models of evolution. Our model describes evolutionary dynamics in a high-dimensional, structured genotype space with interspecies interaction. We find promising qualitative similarity with the empirical facts about macroevolution, including broadly distributed extinction sizes and realistic exploration of the genotype space. The abstraction of our model permits numerous applications beyond macroevolution, including protein and RNA evolution.

  1. Codification dynamics and R&D subsidiary evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søberg, Peder Veng

    2010-01-01

    The paper contributes to the subsidiary evolution literature by providing new evidence of location quality in emerging markets, as well as it opens the “black box” of industry effects on subsidiary evolution. The paper illustrates that industrial characteristics are likely to influence subsidiary...... evolution within newly established foreign invested R&D units in emerging markets. The findings of the paper further suggest that dynamics, at company and industry level, which nurtures codification of innovation related knowledge, make it easier for foreign invested R&D subsidiaries in distant emerging...... markets to develop capabilities - and gain charters....

  2. Evolution of dwarf galaxies : A dynamical perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lelli, Federico; Fraternali, Filippo; Verheijen, Marc

    2014-01-01

    For a rotating galaxy, the inner circular-velocity gradient dRV(0) provides a direct estimate of the central dynamical mass density, including gas, stars, and dark matter. We consider 60 low-mass galaxies with high-quality H I and/or stellar rotation curves (including starbursting dwarfs, irregulars

  3. Evolution of dwarf galaxies: a dynamical perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lelli, Federico; Fraternali, Filippo; Verheijen, Marc

    2014-01-01

    For a rotating galaxy, the inner circular-velocity gradient dRV(0) provides a direct estimate of the central dynamical mass density, including gas, stars, and dark matter. We consider 60 low-mass galaxies with high-quality H I and/or stellar rotation curves (including starbursting dwarfs, irregulars

  4. Dynamics in genome evolution of Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Rachana; Das, Bhabatosh; Balakrish Nair, G; Basak, Surajit

    2014-04-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the etiological agent of the acute secretary diarrheal disease cholera, is still a major public health concern in developing countries. In former centuries cholera was a permanent threat even to the highly developed populations of Europe, North America, and the northern part of Asia. Extensive studies on the cholera bug over more than a century have made significant advances in our understanding of the disease and ways of treating patients. V. cholerae has more than 200 serogroups, but only few serogroups have caused disease on a worldwide scale. Until the present, the evolutionary relationship of these pandemic causing serogroups was not clear. In the last decades, we have witnessed a shift involving genetically and phenotypically varied pandemic clones of V. cholerae in Asia and Africa. The exponential knowledge on the genome of several representatives V. cholerae strains has been used to identify and analyze the key determinants for rapid evolution of cholera pathogen. Recent comparative genomic studies have identified the presence of various integrative mobile genetic elements (IMGEs) in V. cholerae genome, which can be used as a marker of differentiation of all seventh pandemic clones with very similar core genome. This review attempts to bring together some of the important researches in recent times that have contributed towards understanding the genetics, epidemiology and evolution of toxigenic V. cholerae strains.

  5. Dynamical evolution of the Cybele asteroids

    CERN Document Server

    Carruba, Valerio; Aljbaae, Safwan; Huaman, Mariela Espinoza

    2015-01-01

    The Cybele region, located between the 2J:-1A and 5J:-3A mean-motion resonances, is adjacent and exterior to the asteroid main belt. An increasing density of three-body resonances makes the region between the Cybele and Hilda populations dynamically unstable, so that the Cybele zone could be considered the last outpost of an extended main belt. The presence of binary asteroids with large primaries and small secondaries suggested that asteroid families should be found in this region, but only relatively recently the first dynamical groups were identified in this area. Among these, the Sylvia group has been proposed to be one of the oldest families in the extended main belt. In this work we identify families in the Cybele region in the context of the local dynamics and non-gravitational forces such as the Yarkovsky and stochastic YORP effects. We confirm the detection of the new Helga group at $\\simeq$3.65~AU, that could extend the outer boundary of the Cybele region up to the 5J:-3A mean-motion resonance. We o...

  6. Dynamic structure evolution of time-dependent network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Beibei; Zhou, Yadong; Xu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Dai; Guan, Xiaohong

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we research the long-voided problem of formulating the time-dependent network structure evolution scheme, it focus not only on finding new emerging vertices in evolving communities and new emerging communities over the specified time range but also formulating the complex network structure evolution schematic. Previous approaches basically applied to community detection on time static networks and thus failed to consider the potentially crucial and useful information latently embedded in the dynamic structure evolution process of time-dependent network. To address these problems and to tackle the network non-scalability dilemma, we propose the dynamic hierarchical method for detecting and revealing structure evolution schematic of the time-dependent network. In practice and specificity, we propose an explicit hierarchical network evolution uncovering algorithm framework originated from and widely expanded from time-dependent and dynamic spectral optimization theory. Our method yields preferable results compared with previous approaches on a vast variety of test network data, including both real on-line networks and computer generated complex networks.

  7. Time evolution of the autocorrelation function in dynamical replica theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, A.

    2013-04-01

    Asynchronous dynamics given by the master equation in the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick (SK) spin-glass model is studied based on dynamical replica theory (DRT) with an extension to take into account the autocorrelation function. The dynamical behaviour of the system is approximately described by dynamical equations of the macroscopic quantities: magnetization, energy contributed by randomness and the autocorrelation function. The dynamical equations under the replica symmetry assumption are derived by introducing the subshell equipartitioning assumption and exploiting the replica method. The obtained dynamical equations are compared with Monte Carlo simulations, and it is demonstrated that the proposed formula describes well the time evolution of the autocorrelation function in some parameter regions. The study offers a reasonable description of the autocorrelation function in the SK spin-glass system.

  8. The Dynamic Evolution of Young Extragalactic Radio Sources

    CERN Document Server

    An, Tao; 10.1088/0004-637X/760/1/77

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of symmetric extragalactic radio sources can be characterized by four distinct growth stages of the radio luminosity versus size of the source. The interaction of the jet with the ambient medium results in the formation and evolution of sources with non-standard (flaring) morphology. In addition, cessation or restarting of the jet power and obstruction of the jet will also result in distinct morphological structures. The radio source population may thus be classified in morphological types that indicate the prevailing physical processes. Compact symmetric objects (CSOs) occupy the earliest evolutionary phase of symmetric radio sources and their dynamical behavior is fundamental for any further evolution. Analysis of CSO dynamics is presented for a sample of 24 CSOs with known redshift and hotspot separation velocity and with a large range of radio power. Observables such as radio power, separation between two hotspots, hotspot separation velocity, and kinematic age of the source are found to be ...

  9. Dynamic Actin Gene Family Evolution in Primates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liucun Zhu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Actin is one of the most highly conserved proteins and plays crucial roles in many vital cellular functions. In most eukaryotes, it is encoded by a multigene family. Although the actin gene family has been studied a lot, few investigators focus on the comparison of actin gene family in relative species. Here, the purpose of our study is to systematically investigate characteristics and evolutionary pattern of actin gene family in primates. We identified 233 actin genes in human, chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan, gibbon, rhesus monkey, and marmoset genomes. Phylogenetic analysis showed that actin genes in the seven species could be divided into two major types of clades: orthologous group versus complex group. Codon usages and gene expression patterns of actin gene copies were highly consistent among the groups because of basic functions needed by the organisms, but much diverged within species due to functional diversification. Besides, many great potential pseudogenes were found with incomplete open reading frames due to frameshifts or early stop codons. These results implied that actin gene family in primates went through “birth and death” model of evolution process. Under this model, actin genes experienced strong negative selection and increased the functional complexity by reproducing themselves.

  10. The formation and dynamical evolution of young star clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Fujii, Michiko

    2015-01-01

    Recent observations have revealed a variety of young star clusters, including embedded systems, young massive clusters, and associations. We study the formation and dynamical evolution of these clusters using a combination of simulations and theoretical models. Our simulations start with a turbulent molecular cloud that collapses under its own gravity. The stars are assumed to form in the densest regions in the collapsing cloud after an initial free-fall times of the molecular cloud. The dynamical evolution of these stellar distributions are continued by means of direct $N$-body simulations. The molecular clouds typical for the Milky Way Galaxy tend to form embedded clusters which evolve to resemble open clusters. The associations were initially considerably more clumpy, but lost their irregularity in about a dynamical time scale due to the relaxation process. The densest molecular clouds, which are absent in the Milky Way but are typical in starburst galaxies, form massive young star clusters. They indeed ar...

  11. Neutral evolution: A null model for language dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Blythe, R A

    2011-01-01

    We review the task of aligning simple models for language dynamics with relevant empirical data, motivated by the fact that this is rarely attempted in practice despite an abundance of abstract models. We propose that one way to meet this challenge is through the careful construction of null models. We argue in particular that rejection of a null model must have important consequences for theories about language dynamics if modelling is truly to be worthwhile. Our main claim is that the stochastic process of neutral evolution (also known as genetic drift or random copying) is a viable null model for language dynamics. We survey empirical evidence in favour and against neutral evolution as a mechanism behind historical language changes, highlighting the theoretical implications in each case.

  12. Network evolution driven by dynamics applied to graph coloring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Jian-She; Li Li-Guang; Wang Xiao-Hua; Yu Xin; Jiao Li-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    An evolutionary network driven by dynamics is studied and applied to the graph coloring problem.From an initial structure,both the topology and the coupling weights evolve according to the dynamics.On the other hand,the dynamics of the network are determined by the topology and the coupling weights,so an interesting structure-dynamics co-evolutionary scheme appears.By providing two evolutionary strategies,a network described by the complement of a graph will evolve into several clusters of nodes according to their dynamics.The nodes in each cluster can be assigned the same color and nodes in different clusters assigned different colors.In this way,a co-evolution phenomenon is applied to the graph coloring problem.The proposed scheme is tested on several benchmark graphs for graph coloring.

  13. The Dynamical Evolution of the Asteroid Belt

    CERN Document Server

    Morbidelli, Alessandro; O'Brien, David P; Minton, David A; Bottke, William F

    2015-01-01

    The asteroid belt is the leftover of the original planetesimal population in the inner solar system. However, currently the asteroids have orbits with all possible values of eccentricities and inclinations compatible with long-term dynamical stability, whereas the initial planetesimal orbits should have been quasi-circular and almost co-planar. The total mass in the asteroid population is a small fraction of that existing primordially. Also, asteroids with different chemical/mineralogical properties are not ranked in an orderly manner with mean heliocentric distance as one could expect from the existence of a radial gradient of the temperature in the proto-planetary disk, but they are partially mixed. These properties show that the asteroid belt has been severely sculpted by one or a series of processes during its lifetime. This paper reviews the processes that have been proposed so far, discussing the properties that they explain and the problems that they are confronted with. Emphasis is paid to the interpl...

  14. Dynamical Evolution of Globular Clusters in the Galaxy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武振宇; 束成钢; 陈文屏

    2003-01-01

    Given the initial conditions of spatial density distribution, velocity distribution and mass function, the dynamical evolution of globular clusters in the Milky Way is investigated in details by means of Monte Carlo simulations.Four dynamic mechanisms are considered: stellar evaporation, stellar evolution, tidal shocks due to both the disc and bulge, and dynamical friction. It is found that stellar evaporation dominates the evolution of low-mass clusters and all four are important for massive ones. For both the power-law and lognormal initial clusters mass functions, we can find the best-fitting models which can match the present-day observations with their main features of the mass function almost unchanged after evolution of several Gyr. This implies that it is not possible to determine the initial mass function only based on the observed mass function today. The dispersion of the modelled mass functions mainly depends on the potential wells of host galaxies with the almost constant peaks,which is consistent with current observations

  15. Evolution properties of the community members for dynamic networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kai; Guo, Qiang; Li, Sheng-Nan; Han, Jing-Ti; Liu, Jian-Guo

    2017-03-01

    The collective behaviors of community members for dynamic social networks are significant for understanding evolution features of communities. In this Letter, we empirically investigate the evolution properties of the new community members for dynamic networks. Firstly, we separate data sets into different slices, and analyze the statistical properties of new members as well as communities they joined in for these data sets. Then we introduce a parameter φ to describe community evolution between different slices and investigate the dynamic community properties of the new community members. The empirical analyses for the Facebook, APS, Enron and Wiki data sets indicate that both the number of new members and joint communities increase, the ratio declines rapidly and then becomes stable over time, and most of the new members will join in the small size communities that is s ≤ 10. Furthermore, the proportion of new members in existed communities decreases firstly and then becomes stable and relatively small for these data sets. Our work may be helpful for deeply understanding the evolution properties of community members for social networks.

  16. Quantum Dynamics in Classical Time Evolution of Correlation Functions

    CERN Document Server

    Wetterich, C

    1997-01-01

    The time-dependence of correlation functions under the influence of cla= ssical equations of motion is described by an exact evolution equation. For conservative systems thermodynamic equilibrium is a fixed point of these equations. We show that this fixed point is not universally stable, since infinitely many conserved correlation functions obstruct the approach to equilibrium. Equilibrium can therefore be reached at most for suitably av= eraged quantities or for subsystems, similar to quantum statistics. The classica= l time evolution of correlation functions shows many dynamical features of quant= um mechanics.

  17. Rapid contemporary evolution and clonal food web dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Laura E; Becks, Lutz; Ellner, Stephen P; Hairston, Nelson G; Yoshida, Takehito; Fussmann, Gregor F

    2009-06-12

    Character evolution that affects ecological community interactions often occurs contemporaneously with temporal changes in population size, potentially altering the very nature of those dynamics. Such eco-evolutionary processes may be most readily explored in systems with short generations and simple genetics. Asexual and cyclically parthenogenetic organisms such as microalgae, cladocerans and rotifers, which frequently dominate freshwater plankton communities, meet these requirements. Multiple clonal lines can coexist within each species over extended periods, until either fixation occurs or a sexual phase reshuffles the genetic material. When clones differ in traits affecting interspecific interactions, within-species clonal dynamics can have major effects on the population dynamics. We first consider a simple predator-prey system with two prey genotypes, parametrized with data from a well-studied experimental system, and explore how the extent of differences in defence against predation within the prey population determine dynamic stability versus instability of the system. We then explore how increased potential for evolution affects the community dynamics in a more general community model with multiple predator and multiple prey genotypes. These examples illustrate how microevolutionary 'details' that enhance or limit the potential for heritable phenotypic change can have significant effects on contemporaneous community-level dynamics and the persistence and coexistence of species.

  18. Evolution and selection of river networks: statics, dynamics, and complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldo, Andrea; Rigon, Riccardo; Banavar, Jayanth R; Maritan, Amos; Rodriguez-Iturbe, Ignacio

    2014-02-18

    Moving from the exact result that drainage network configurations minimizing total energy dissipation are stationary solutions of the general equation describing landscape evolution, we review the static properties and the dynamic origins of the scale-invariant structure of optimal river patterns. Optimal channel networks (OCNs) are feasible optimal configurations of a spanning network mimicking landscape evolution and network selection through imperfect searches for dynamically accessible states. OCNs are spanning loopless configurations, however, only under precise physical requirements that arise under the constraints imposed by river dynamics--every spanning tree is exactly a local minimum of total energy dissipation. It is remarkable that dynamically accessible configurations, the local optima, stabilize into diverse metastable forms that are nevertheless characterized by universal statistical features. Such universal features explain very well the statistics of, and the linkages among, the scaling features measured for fluvial landforms across a broad range of scales regardless of geology, exposed lithology, vegetation, or climate, and differ significantly from those of the ground state, known exactly. Results are provided on the emergence of criticality through adaptative evolution and on the yet-unexplored range of applications of the OCN concept.

  19. Coupling Dynamical And Collisional Evolution Of Dust In Protoplanetary Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnoz, Sebastien

    2010-10-01

    Gaseous circumstellar disks are rich in dust and are thought to be both accretionaly and dynamically active. Unfortunately large bodies that could be embedded in these disks are still difficult to observe and their putative properties are indirectly inferred from the observable small dust content. It is why constraining the size distribution coupled with dust-dynamics is so critical. Unfortunately, coupling effects such as a realistic time-dependant dynamics, fragmentation and coagulation, has been recognized as numerically challenging and almost no attempt really succeeded with a generic approach. In these disks, the dust dynamics is driven by a variety of processes (gravity, gas drag, radiation pressure..) inducing a size-dependant dynamics, and, at the same time collisional evolution changes the local size distributions. These two effects are intimately coupled because the local dynamics and size-distribution determines the local collision rates, that, in-turn, determines the size-distribution and modifies the particle's dynamics. Here we report on a new algorithm that overcomes these difficulties by using a hybrid approach extending the work of Charnoz & Morbidelli (Icarus, 2004, 2007). We will briefly present the method and focus on gaseous protoplanetary disks either laminar or turbulent (the time dependant transport and dust evolution will be shown) . We will show how the taking into account of a 3D dynamics helps to determine disantengle the dust size-distribution in the disk's photosphere and in the midplane and thus may provide observational signatures of accretion. We will show how the coupling of turbulence with fragmentation may significantly affect the dust/ratio for the smallest bodies. Finally, we will show that an accurate description of the time dependant dynamics of larger dusts (those with Stokes numbers >= 1) may provide a possible path to the formation of bodies larger than the accretion barrier, through accretion in a transitory regime.

  20. Adaptive Network Dynamics and Evolution of Leadership in Collective Migration

    CERN Document Server

    Pais, Darren

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of leadership in migratory populations depends not only on costs and benefits of leadership investments but also on the opportunities for individuals to rely on cues from others through social interactions. We derive an analytically tractable adaptive dynamic network model of collective migration with fast timescale migration dynamics and slow timescale adaptive dynamics of individual leadership investment and social interaction. For large populations, our analysis of bifurcations with respect to investment cost explains the observed hysteretic effect associated with recovery of migration in fragmented environments. Further, we show a minimum connectivity threshold above which there is evolutionary branching into leader and follower populations. For small populations, we show how the topology of the underlying social interaction network influences the emergence and location of leaders in the adaptive system. Our model and analysis can describe other adaptive network dynamics involving collective...

  1. Dynamical transitions in the evolution of learning algorithms by selection

    CERN Document Server

    Neirotti, J P; Neirotti, Juan Pablo; Caticha, Nestor

    2002-01-01

    We study the evolution of artificial learning systems by means of selection. Genetic programming is used to generate a sequence of populations of algorithms which can be used by neural networks for supervised learning of a rule that generates examples. In opposition to concentrating on final results, which would be the natural aim while designing good learning algorithms, we study the evolution process and pay particular attention to the temporal order of appearance of functional structures responsible for the improvements in the learning process, as measured by the generalization capabilities of the resulting algorithms. The effect of such appearances can be described as dynamical phase transitions. The concepts of phenotypic and genotypic entropies, which serve to describe the distribution of fitness in the population and the distribution of symbols respectively, are used to monitor the dynamics. In different runs the phase transitions might be present or not, with the system finding out good solutions, or ...

  2. Dynamical Evolution of Young Embedded Clusters: A Parameter Space Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Proszkow, Eva-Marie

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates the dynamical evolution of embedded stellar clusters from the protocluster stage, through the embedded star-forming phase, and out to ages of 10 Myr -- after the gas has been removed from the cluster. The relevant dynamical properties of young stellar clusters are explored over a wide range of possible star formation environments using N-body simulations. Many realizations of equivalent initial conditions are used to produce robust statistical descriptions of cluster evolution including the cluster bound fraction, radial probability distributions, as well as the distributions of close encounter distances and velocities. These cluster properties are presented as a function of parameters describing the initial configuration of the cluster, including the initial cluster membership N, initial stellar velocities, cluster radii, star formation efficiency, embedding gas dispersal time, and the degree of primordial mass segregation. The results of this parameter space survey, which includes ab...

  3. Bioattractors: dynamical systems theory and the evolution of regulatory processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Johannes; Monk, Nick

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we illustrate how dynamical systems theory can provide a unifying conceptual framework for evolution of biological regulatory systems. Our argument is that the genotype-phenotype map can be characterized by the phase portrait of the underlying regulatory process. The features of this portrait--such as attractors with associated basins and their bifurcations--define the regulatory and evolutionary potential of a system. We show how the geometric analysis of phase space connects Waddington's epigenetic landscape to recent computational approaches for the study of robustness and evolvability in network evolution. We discuss how the geometry of phase space determines the probability of possible phenotypic transitions. Finally, we demonstrate how the active, self-organizing role of the environment in phenotypic evolution can be understood in terms of dynamical systems concepts. This approach yields mechanistic explanations that go beyond insights based on the simulation of evolving regulatory networks alone. Its predictions can now be tested by studying specific, experimentally tractable regulatory systems using the tools of modern systems biology. A systematic exploration of such systems will enable us to understand better the nature and origin of the phenotypic variability, which provides the substrate for evolution by natural selection.

  4. Habitable Planets: Interior Dynamics and Long-Term Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tackley, Paul J.; Ammann, Michael M.; Brodholt, John P.; Dobson, David P.; Valencia, Diana

    2014-04-01

    Here, the state of our knowledge regarding the interior dynamics and evolution of habitable terrestrial planets including Earth and super-Earths is reviewed, and illustrated using state-of-the-art numerical models. Convection of the rocky mantle is the key process that drives the evolution of the interior: it causes plate tectonics, controls heat loss from the metallic core (which generates the magnetic field) and drives long-term volatile cycling between the atmosphere/ocean and interior. Geoscientists have been studying the dynamics and evolution of Earth's interior since the discovery of plate tectonics in the late 1960s and on many topics our understanding is very good, yet many first-order questions remain. It is commonly thought that plate tectonics is necessary for planetary habitability because of its role in long-term volatile cycles that regulate the surface environment. Plate tectonics is the surface manifestation of convection in the 2900-km deep rocky mantle, yet exactly how plate tectonics arises is still quite uncertain; other terrestrial planets like Venus and Mars instead have a stagnant lithosphere- essentially a single plate covering the entire planet. Nevertheless, simple scalings as well as more complex models indicate that plate tectonics should be easier on larger planets (super-Earths), other things being equal. The dynamics of terrestrial planets, both their surface tectonics and deep mantle dynamics, change over billions of years as a planet cools. Partial melting is a key process influencing solid planet evolution. Due to the very high pressure inside super-Earths' mantles the viscosity would normally be expected to be very high, as is also indicated by our density function theory (DFT) calculations. Feedback between internal heating, temperature and viscosity leads to a superadiabatic temperature profile and self-regulation of the mantle viscosity such that sluggish convection still occurs.

  5. Evolution of geometrically necessary dislocation density from computational dislocation dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guruprasad, P. J.; Benzerga, A. A.

    2009-07-01

    This paper presents a method for calculating GND densities in dislocation dynamics simulations. Evolution of suitably defined averages of GND density as well as maps showing the spatial nonuniform distribution of GNDs are analyzed under uniaxial loading. Focus is laid on the resolution dependence of the very notion of GND density, its dependence upon physical dimensions of plastically deformed specimens and its sensitivity to initial conditions. Acknowledgments Support from the National Science Foundation (CMMI-0748187) is gratefully acknowledged.

  6. THE DYNAMICAL EVOLUTION OF STELLAR BLACK HOLES IN GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morscher, Meagan; Pattabiraman, Bharath; Rodriguez, Carl; Rasio, Frederic A.; Umbreit, Stefan, E-mail: m.morscher@u.northwestern.edu [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA), Northwestern University, Evanston, IL (United States)

    2015-02-10

    Our current understanding of the stellar initial mass function and massive star evolution suggests that young globular clusters (GCs) may have formed hundreds to thousands of stellar-mass black holes (BHs), the remnants of stars with initial masses from ∼20-100 M {sub ☉}. Birth kicks from supernova explosions may eject some BHs from their birth clusters, but most should be retained. Using a Monte Carlo method we investigate the long-term dynamical evolution of GCs containing large numbers of stellar BHs. We describe numerical results for 42 models, covering a broad range of realistic initial conditions, including up to 1.6 × 10{sup 6} stars. In almost all models we find that significant numbers of BHs (up to ∼10{sup 3}) are retained all the way to the present. This is in contrast to previous theoretical expectations that most BHs should be ejected dynamically within a few gigayears The main reason for this difference is that core collapse driven by BHs (through the Spitzer {sup m}ass segregation instability{sup )} is easily reverted through three-body processes, and involves only a small number of the most massive BHs, while lower-mass BHs remain well-mixed with ordinary stars far from the central cusp. Thus the rapid segregation of stellar BHs does not lead to a long-term physical separation of most BHs into a dynamically decoupled inner core, as often assumed previously. Combined with the recent detections of several BH X-ray binary candidates in Galactic GCs, our results suggest that stellar BHs could still be present in large numbers in many GCs today, and that they may play a significant role in shaping the long-term dynamical evolution and the present-day dynamical structure of many clusters.

  7. Cryptic population dynamics: rapid evolution masks trophic interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takehito Yoshida

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Trophic relationships, such as those between predator and prey or between pathogen and host, are key interactions linking species in ecological food webs. The structure of these links and their strengths have major consequences for the dynamics and stability of food webs. The existence and strength of particular trophic links has often been assessed using observational data on changes in species abundance through time. Here we show that very strong links can be completely missed by these kinds of analyses when changes in population abundance are accompanied by contemporaneous rapid evolution in the prey or host species. Experimental observations, in rotifer-alga and phage-bacteria chemostats, show that the predator or pathogen can exhibit large-amplitude cycles while the abundance of the prey or host remains essentially constant. We know that the species are tightly linked in these experimental microcosms, but without this knowledge, we would infer from observed patterns in abundance that the species are weakly or not at all linked. Mathematical modeling shows that this kind of cryptic dynamics occurs when there is rapid prey or host evolution for traits conferring defense against attack, and the cost of defense (in terms of tradeoffs with other fitness components is low. Several predictions of the theory that we developed to explain the rotifer-alga experiments are confirmed in the phage-bacteria experiments, where bacterial evolution could be tracked. Modeling suggests that rapid evolution may also confound experimental approaches to measuring interaction strength, but it identifies certain experimental designs as being more robust against potential confounding by rapid evolution.

  8. On the Nonlinear Evolution of Cosmic Web: Lagrangian Dynamics Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Xin

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the nonlinear evolution of cosmic morphologies of the large-scale structure by examining the Lagrangian dynamics of various tensors of a cosmic fluid element, including the velocity gradient tensor, the Hessian matrix of the gravitational potential as well as the deformation tensor. Instead of the eigenvalue representation, the first two tensors, which associate with the "kinematic" and "dynamical" cosmic web classification algorithm respectively, are studied in a more convenient parameter space. These parameters are defined as the rotational invariant coefficients of the characteristic equation of the tensor. In the nonlinear local model (NLM) where the magnetic part of Weyl tensor vanishes, these invariants are fully capable of characterizing the dynamics. Unlike the Zeldovich approximation (ZA), where various morphologies do not change before approaching a one-dimensional singularity, the sheets in NLM are unstable for both overdense and underdense perturbations. While it has long been known...

  9. Dynamics and evolution of galactic nuclei (princeton series in astrophysics)

    CERN Document Server

    Merritt, David

    2013-01-01

    Deep within galaxies like the Milky Way, astronomers have found a fascinating legacy of Einstein's general theory of relativity: supermassive black holes. Connected to the evolution of the galaxies that contain these black holes, galactic nuclei are the sites of uniquely energetic events, including quasars, stellar tidal disruptions, and the generation of gravitational waves. This textbook is the first comprehensive introduction to dynamical processes occurring in the vicinity of supermassive black holes in their galactic environment. Filling a critical gap, it is an authoritative resource for astrophysics and physics graduate students, and researchers focusing on galactic nuclei, the astrophysics of massive black holes, galactic dynamics, and gravitational wave detection. It is an ideal text for an advanced graduate-level course on galactic nuclei and as supplementary reading in graduate-level courses on high-energy astrophysics and galactic dynamics. David Merritt summarizes the theoretical work of the las...

  10. DYNAMICAL EVOLUTION OF VISCOUS DISKS AROUND Be STARS. I. PHOTOMETRY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haubois, X.; Carciofi, A. C. [Instituto de Astronomia, Geofisica e Ciencias Atmosfericas, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao 1226, Cidade Universitaria, Sao Paulo, SP 05508-900 (Brazil); Rivinius, Th. [European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Casilla 19001, Santiago 19 (Chile); Okazaki, A. T. [Faculty of Engineering, Hokkai-Gakuen University, Toyohira-ku, Sapporo 062-8605 (Japan); Bjorkman, J. E., E-mail: xhaubois@astro.iag.usp.br [Ritter Observatory, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States)

    2012-09-10

    Be stars possess gaseous circumstellar disks that modify in many ways the spectrum of the central B star. Furthermore, they exhibit variability at several timescales and for a large number of observables. Putting the pieces together of this dynamical behavior is not an easy task and requires a detailed understanding of the physical processes that control the temporal evolution of the observables. There is an increasing body of evidence that suggests that Be disks are well described by standard {alpha}-disk theory. This paper is the first of a series that aims at studying the possibility of inferring several disk and stellar parameters through the follow-up of various observables. Here we study the temporal evolution of the disk density for different dynamical scenarios, including the disk build-up as a result of a long and steady mass injection from the star, the disk dissipation that occurs after mass injection is turned off, as well as scenarios in which active periods are followed by periods of quiescence. For those scenarios, we investigate the temporal evolution of continuum photometric observables using a three-dimensional non-LTE radiative transfer code. We show that light curves for different wavelengths are specific of a mass loss history, inclination angle, and {alpha} viscosity parameter. The diagnostic potential of those light curves is also discussed.

  11. Structure, dynamics, assembly, and evolution of protein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Joseph A; Teichmann, Sarah A

    2015-01-01

    The assembly of individual proteins into functional complexes is fundamental to nearly all biological processes. In recent decades, many thousands of homomeric and heteromeric protein complex structures have been determined, greatly improving our understanding of the fundamental principles that control symmetric and asymmetric quaternary structure organization. Furthermore, our conception of protein complexes has moved beyond static representations to include dynamic aspects of quaternary structure, including conformational changes upon binding, multistep ordered assembly pathways, and structural fluctuations occurring within fully assembled complexes. Finally, major advances have been made in our understanding of protein complex evolution, both in reconstructing evolutionary histories of specific complexes and in elucidating general mechanisms that explain how quaternary structure tends to evolve. The evolution of quaternary structure occurs via changes in self-assembly state or through the gain or loss of protein subunits, and these processes can be driven by both adaptive and nonadaptive influences.

  12. Star clusters as laboratories for stellar and dynamical evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Kalirai, Jason S

    2009-01-01

    Open and globular star clusters have served as benchmarks for the study of stellar evolution due to their supposed nature as simple stellar populations of the same age and metallicity. After a brief review of some of the pioneering work that established the importance of imaging stars in these systems, we focus on several recent studies that have challenged our fundamental picture of star clusters. These new studies indicate that star clusters can very well harbour multiple stellar populations, possibly formed through self-enrichment processes from the first-generation stars that evolved through post-main-sequence evolutionary phases. Correctly interpreting stellar evolution in such systems is tied to our understanding of both chemical-enrichment mechanisms, including stellar mass loss along the giant branches, and the dynamical state of the cluster. We illustrate recent imaging, spectroscopic and theoretical studies that have begun to shed new light on the evolutionary processes that occur within star cluste...

  13. Analysis of planetary evolution with emphasis on differentiation and dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaula, William M.; Newman, William I.

    1987-01-01

    In order to address the early stages of nebula evolution, a three-dimensional collapse code which includes not only hydrodynamics and radiative transfer, but also the effects of ionization and, possibly, magnetic fields is being addressed. As part of the examination of solar system evolution, an N-body code was developed which describes the latter stages of planet formation from the accretion of planetesimals. To test the code for accuracy and run-time efficiency, and to develop a stronger theoretical foundation, problems were studied in orbital dynamics. A regional analysis of the correlation in the gravity and topography fields of Venus was performed in order to determine the small and intermediate scale subsurface structure.

  14. Virus Dynamics and Evolution: Bridging Scales and Disciplines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Poss

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Viruses have attracted the interest of researchers from multiple disciplines and have nucleated many productive and innovative collaborations. In part, this is because viruses so intimately associate with their hosts that decoupling host and virus biology is difficult, and virus-host interactions occur at multiple scales, from within cells to populations, each of which is intrinsically complex. As a consequence, ecologists, population biologists, evolutionary biologists, and researchers from quantitative fields, including mathematics, statistics, physics and computer science, make significant contributions to the field of virology. Our understanding of virus dynamics and evolution has substantially benefited from these multidisciplinary efforts. It is now common to see advanced phylogenetic reconstruction methods used to determine the origins of emergent viruses, to estimate the effect of natural selection on virus populations, and to assess virus population dynamics. Mathematical and statistical models that elucidate complex virus and host interactions in time and space at the molecular and population level are appearing more regularly in virology and biomedical journals. Massive quantities of data now available due to technological innovation in imaging, increased disease surveillance efforts, and novel approaches to determine social contact structure are changing approaches to study the dynamics and evolution of viral infections in heterogeneous environments. The next decade presents exciting new opportunities and challenges for the expanding field of researchers investigating dynamics of viral infections that will lead to innovation and new insight on virus interactions in both individual hosts and in populations. The compilation of articles in this Special Issue on “Virus Dynamics and Evolution” is comprised of reviews and primary research, summarized below, that provide new perspectives on virus interactions with host organisms through

  15. Origin and Dynamical Evolution of Neptune Trojans - II: Long Term Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Lykawka, Patryk Sofia; Jones, Barrie W; Mukai, Tadashi

    2010-01-01

    We present results examining the fate of the Trojan clouds produced in our previous work. We find that the stability of Neptunian Trojans seems to be strongly correlated to their initial post-migration orbital elements, with those objects that survive as Trojans for billions of years displaying negligible orbital evolution. The great majority of these survivors began the integrations with small eccentricities (e 20{\\deg}. Dynamical integrations of the currently observed Trojans show that five out of the seven are dynamically stable on 4 Gyr timescales, while 2001 QR322, exhibits significant dynamical instability. The seventh Trojan object, 2008 LC18, has such large orbital uncertainties that only future studies will be able to determine its stability.

  16. On learning dynamics underlying the evolution of learning rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dridi, Slimane; Lehmann, Laurent

    2014-02-01

    In order to understand the development of non-genetically encoded actions during an animal's lifespan, it is necessary to analyze the dynamics and evolution of learning rules producing behavior. Owing to the intrinsic stochastic and frequency-dependent nature of learning dynamics, these rules are often studied in evolutionary biology via agent-based computer simulations. In this paper, we show that stochastic approximation theory can help to qualitatively understand learning dynamics and formulate analytical models for the evolution of learning rules. We consider a population of individuals repeatedly interacting during their lifespan, and where the stage game faced by the individuals fluctuates according to an environmental stochastic process. Individuals adjust their behavioral actions according to learning rules belonging to the class of experience-weighted attraction learning mechanisms, which includes standard reinforcement and Bayesian learning as special cases. We use stochastic approximation theory in order to derive differential equations governing action play probabilities, which turn out to have qualitative features of mutator-selection equations. We then perform agent-based simulations to find the conditions where the deterministic approximation is closest to the original stochastic learning process for standard 2-action 2-player fluctuating games, where interaction between learning rules and preference reversal may occur. Finally, we analyze a simplified model for the evolution of learning in a producer-scrounger game, which shows that the exploration rate can interact in a non-intuitive way with other features of co-evolving learning rules. Overall, our analyses illustrate the usefulness of applying stochastic approximation theory in the study of animal learning.

  17. Massive Black Hole Binaries: Dynamical Evolution and Observational Signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dotti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of the dynamical evolution of massive black hole pairs in mergers is crucial in the context of a hierarchical galaxy formation scenario. The timescales for the formation and the coalescence of black hole binaries are still poorly constrained, resulting in large uncertainties in the expected rate of massive black hole binaries detectable in the electromagnetic and gravitational wave spectra. Here, we review the current theoretical understanding of the black hole pairing in galaxy mergers, with a particular attention to recent developments and open issues. We conclude with a review of the expected observational signatures of massive binaries and of the candidates discussed in literature to date.

  18. Massive Quantum Memories by Periodically Inverted Dynamic Evolutions

    CERN Document Server

    Giampaolo, S M; Lisi, A D; Mazzarella, G

    2005-01-01

    We introduce a general scheme to realize perfect quantum state reconstruction and storage in systems of interacting qubits. This novel approach is based on the idea of controlling the residual interactions by suitable external controls that, acting on the inter-qubit couplings, yield time-periodic inversions in the dynamical evolution, thus cancelling exactly the effects of quantum state diffusion. We illustrate the method for spin systems on closed rings with XY residual interactions, showing that it enables the massive storage of arbitrarily large numbers of local states, and we demonstrate its robustness against several realistic sources of noise and imperfections.

  19. Dynamical Phase Transition in a Model for Evolution with Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waclaw, Bartłomiej; Allen, Rosalind J.; Evans, Martin R.

    2010-12-01

    We study a simple quasispecies model for evolution in two different habitats, with different fitness landscapes, coupled through one-way migration. Our key finding is a dynamical phase transition at a critical value of the migration rate, at which the time to reach the steady state diverges. The genetic composition of the population is qualitatively different above and below the transition. Using results from localization theory, we show that the critical migration rate may be very small—demonstrating that evolutionary outcomes can be very sensitive to even a small amount of migration.

  20. Dynamical Models Explaining Social Balance and Evolution of Cooperation

    CERN Document Server

    Traag, V A; De Leenheer, P

    2013-01-01

    In social networks with positive and negative links the dominant theory of explaining its structure is that of social balance. The theory states that a network is balanced if its triads are balanced. Such a balanced network can be split into (at most) two opposing factions with positive links within a faction and negative links between them. Although inherently dynamical, the theory has long remained static, with a focus on finding such partitions. Recently however, a dynamical model was introduced which was shown to converge to a socially balanced state for certain symmetric initial conditions. Here we show this does not hold for general (non-symmetric) initial conditions. We propose an alternative model and show that it does converge to a socially balanced state generically. Moreover, in a basic model of evolution of cooperation of indirect reciprocity, the alternative model has an evolutionary advantage compared to the earlier model. The principal difference between the two models can be understood in term...

  1. On the dynamical evolution of the Orion Trapezium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Christine.; Costero, Rafael; Ruelas-Mayorga, Alex; Sánchez, L. J.

    2017-01-01

    We discuss recent observational data on the transverse and radial velocities, as well as on the masses of the main components of the Orion Trapezium. Based on the most reliable values of these quantities we study the dynamical evolution of ensembles of multiple systems mimicking the Orion Trapezium. To this end we conduct numerical N -body integrations using the observed masses, planar positions and velocities, radial velocities, and random line-of-sight (z) positions for all components. We include perturbations in these quantities compatible with the observational errors. We find the dynamical lifetimes of such systems to be quite short, of the order of 10 to 50 thousand years. The end result of the simulations is usually a tight binary, or sometimes a hierarchical triple. The properties of the evolved systems are studied at different values of the crossing times. The frequency distributions of the major semiaxes and eccentricities of the resulting binaries are discussed and compared with observations.

  2. Formation and evolution dynamics of bipolarons in conjugated polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, B; Meng, Y; Wang, Y D; Liu, X J; An, Z

    2011-02-10

    Combining the one-dimensional tight-binding Su-Schrieffer-Heeger (SSH) model and the extended Hubbard model (EHM), we analyze the scattering and combination in conjugated polymers of two polarons with the same charges and parallel or antiparallel spins using a nonadiabatic evolution method. Results show that collisions between the two same charge polarons with parallel spin are essentially elastic due to strong Pauli repulsion, whereas the two same charge polarons with antiparallel spins can combine into a singlet bipolaronic state. The dynamics of bipolarons on two coupled polymer chains and at the interface of a polymer/polymer heterojunction are discussed in detail. This knowledge will serve to understand the dynamics of the system when many polarons are created in the system, e.g., by electroluminescence.

  3. Evolution in Mind: Evolutionary Dynamics, Cognitive Processes, and Bayesian Inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchow, Jordan W; Bourgin, David D; Griffiths, Thomas L

    2017-07-01

    Evolutionary theory describes the dynamics of population change in settings affected by reproduction, selection, mutation, and drift. In the context of human cognition, evolutionary theory is most often invoked to explain the origins of capacities such as language, metacognition, and spatial reasoning, framing them as functional adaptations to an ancestral environment. However, evolutionary theory is useful for understanding the mind in a second way: as a mathematical framework for describing evolving populations of thoughts, ideas, and memories within a single mind. In fact, deep correspondences exist between the mathematics of evolution and of learning, with perhaps the deepest being an equivalence between certain evolutionary dynamics and Bayesian inference. This equivalence permits reinterpretation of evolutionary processes as algorithms for Bayesian inference and has relevance for understanding diverse cognitive capacities, including memory and creativity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A Fault Evolution Model Including the Rupture Dynamic Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y.; Chen, X.

    2011-12-01

    We perform a preliminary numerical simulation of seismicity and stress evolution along a strike-slip fault in a 3D elastic half space. Following work of Ben-Zion (1996), the fault geometry is devised as a vertical plane which is about 70 km long and 17 km wide, comparable to the size of San Andreas Fault around Parkfield. The loading mechanism is described by "backslip" method. The fault failure is governed by a static/kinetic friction law, and induced stress transfer is calculated with Okada's static solution. In order to track the rupture propagation in detail, we allow induced stress to propagate through the medium at the shear wave velocity by introducing a distance-dependent time delay to responses to stress changes. Current simulation indicates small to moderate earthquakes following the Gutenberg-Richter law and quasi-periodical characteristic large earthquakes, which are consistent with previous work by others. Next we will consider introducing a more realistic friction law, namely, the laboratory-derived rate- and state- dependent law, which can simulate more realistic and complicated sliding behavior such as the stable and unstable slip, the aseismic sliding and the slip nucleation process. In addition, the long duration of aftershocks is expected to be reproduced due to this time-dependent friction law, which is not available in current seismicity simulation. The other difference from previous work is that we are trying to include the dynamic ruptures in this study. Most previous study on seismicity simulation is based on the static solution when dealing with failure induced stress changes. However, studies of numerical simulation of rupture dynamics have revealed lots of important details which are missing in the quasi-static/quasi- dynamic simulation. For example, dynamic simulations indicate that the slip on the ground surface becomes larger if the dynamic rupture process reaches the free surface. The concentration of stress on the propagating crack

  5. Network evolution induced by the dynamical rules of two populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platini, Thierry; Zia, R. K. P.

    2010-10-01

    We study the dynamical properties of a finite dynamical network composed of two interacting populations, namely extrovert (a) and introvert (b). In our model, each group is characterized by its size (Na and Nb) and preferred degree (κa and \\kappa_b\\ll \\kappa_a ). The network dynamics is governed by the competing microscopic rules of each population that consist of the creation and destruction of links. Starting from an unconnected network, we give a detailed analysis of the mean field approach which is compared to Monte Carlo simulation data. The time evolution of the restricted degrees langkbbrang and langkabrang presents three time regimes and a non-monotonic behavior well captured by our theory. Surprisingly, when the population sizes are equal Na = Nb, the ratio of the restricted degree θ0 = langkabrang/langkbbrang appears to be an integer in the asymptotic limits of the three time regimes. For early times (defined by t introverts remains constant while the number of connections increases linearly in the extrovert population. Finally, due to the competing dynamics, the network presents a frustrated stationary state characterized by a ratio θ0 = 3.

  6. Radiation Recoil Effects on the Dynamical Evolution of Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotto-Figueroa, Desiree

    The Yarkovsky effect is a radiation recoil force that results in a semimajor axis drift in the orbit that can cause Main Belt asteroids to be delivered to powerful resonances from which they could be transported to Earth-crossing orbits. This force depends on the spin state of the object, which is modified by the YORP effect, a variation of the Yarkovsky effect that results in a torque that changes the spin rate and the obliquity. Extensive analyses of the basic behavior of the YORP effect have been previously conducted in the context of the classical spin state evolution of rigid bodies (YORP cycle). However, the YORP effect has an extreme sensitivity to the topography of the asteroids and a minor change in the shape of an aggregate asteroid can stochastically change the YORP torques. Here we present the results of the first simulations that self-consistently model the YORP effect on the spin states of dynamically evolving aggregates. For these simulations we have developed several algorithms and combined them with two codes, TACO and pkdgrav. TACO is a thermophysical asteroid code that models the surface of an asteroid using a triangular facet representation and which can compute the YORP torques. The code pkdgrav is a cosmological N-body tree code modified to simulate the dynamical evolution of asteroids represented as aggregates of spheres using gravity and collisions. The continuous changes in the shape of an aggregate result in a different evolution of the YORP torques and therefore aggregates do not evolve through the YORP cycle as a rigid body would. Instead of having a spin evolution ruled by long periods of rotational acceleration and deceleration as predicted by the classical YORP cycle, the YORP effect is self-limiting and stochastic on aggregate asteroids. We provide a statistical description of the spin state evolution which lays out the foundation for new simulations of a coupled Yarkovsky/YORP evolution. Both self-limiting YORP and to a lesser

  7. Dynamic reconstruction of heterogeneous materials and microstructure evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shaohua; Li, Hechao; Jiao, Yang

    2015-08-01

    Reconstructing heterogeneous materials from limited structural information has been a topic that attracts extensive research efforts and still poses many challenges. The Yeong-Torquato procedure is one of the most popular reconstruction techniques, in which the material reconstruction problem based on a set of spatial correlation functions is formulated as a constrained energy minimization (optimization) problem and solved using simulated annealing [Yeong and Torquato, Phys. Rev. E 57, 495 (1998)]. The standard two-point correlation function S2 has been widely used in reconstructions, but can also lead to large structural degeneracy for certain nearly percolating systems. To improve reconstruction accuracy and reduce structural degeneracy, one can successively incorporate additional morphological information (e.g., nonconventional or higher-order correlation functions), which amounts to reshaping the energy landscape to create a deep (local) energy minimum. In this paper, we present a dynamic reconstruction procedure that allows one to use a series of auxiliary S2 to achieve the same level of accuracy as those incorporating additional nonconventional correlation functions. In particular, instead of randomly sampling the microstructure space as in the simulated annealing scheme, our procedure utilizes a series of auxiliary microstructures that mimic a physical structural evolution process (e.g., grain growth). This amounts to constructing a series auxiliary energy landscapes that bias the convergence of the reconstruction to a favored (local) energy minimum. Moreover, our dynamic procedure can be naturally applied to reconstruct an actual microstructure evolution process. In contrast to commonly used evolution reconstruction approaches that separately generate individual static configurations, our procedure continuously evolves a single microstructure according to a time-dependent correlation function. The utility of our procedure is illustrated by successfully

  8. Dynamics of Quantum Adiabatic Evolution Algorithm for Number Partitioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smelyanskiy, Vadius; vonToussaint, Udo V.; Timucin, Dogan A.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a general technique to study the dynamics of the quantum adiabatic evolution algorithm applied to random combinatorial optimization problems in the asymptotic limit of large problem size n. We use as an example the NP-complete Number Partitioning problem and map the algorithm dynamics to that of an auxiliary quantum spin glass system with the slowly varying Hamiltonian. We use a Green function method to obtain the adiabatic eigenstates and the minimum exitation gap, gmin = O(n2(sup -n/2)), corresponding to the exponential complexity of the algorithm for Number Partitioning. The key element of the analysis is the conditional energy distribution computed for the set of all spin configurations generated from a given (ancestor) configuration by simultaneous flipping of a fixed number of spins. For the problem in question this distribution is shown to depend on the ancestor spin configuration only via a certain parameter related to the energy of the configuration. As the result, the algorithm dynamics can be described in terms of one-dimensional quantum diffusion in the energy space. This effect provides a general limitation of a quantum adiabatic computation in random optimization problems. Analytical results are in agreement with the numerical simulation of the algorithm.

  9. Network Evolution Induced by the Dynamical Rules of Two Populations

    CERN Document Server

    Platini, T

    2010-01-01

    We study the dynamical properties of a finite dynamical network composed of two interacting populations, namely; extrovert ($a$) and introvert ($b$). In our model, each group is characterized by its size ($N_a$ and $N_b$) and preferred degree ($\\kappa_a$ and $\\kappa_b\\ll\\kappa_a$). The network dynamics is governed by the competing microscopic rules of each population that consist of the creation and destruction of links. Starting from an unconnected network, we give a detailed analysis of the mean field approach which is compared to Monte Carlo simulation data. The time evolution of the restricted degrees $\\moyenne{k_{bb}}$ and $\\moyenne{k_{ab}}$ presents three time regimes and a non monotonic behavior well captured by our theory. Surprisingly, when the population size are equal $N_a=N_b$, the ratio of the restricted degree $\\theta_0=\\moyenne{k_{ab}}/\\moyenne{k_{bb}}$ appears to be an integer in the asymptotic limits of the three time regimes. For early times (defined by $t

  10. Player guild dynamics and evolution in massively multiplayer online games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Hsun; Sun, Chuen-Tsai; Hsieh, Jilung

    2008-06-01

    In the latest versions of massively multiplayer online games (MMOGs), developers have purposefully made guilds part of game environments. Guilds represent a powerful method for giving players a sense of online community, but there is little quantitative data on guild dynamics. To address this topic, we took advantage of a feature found in one of today's most popular MMOGs (World of Warcraft) to collect in-game data: user interfaces that players can modify and refine. In addition to collecting data on in-game player activities, we used this feature to observe and investigate how players join and leave guilds. Data were analyzed for the purpose of identifying factors that propel game-world guild dynamics and evolution. After collecting data for 641,805 avatars on 62 Taiwanese World of Warcraft game servers between February 10 and April 10, 2006, we created five guild type categories (small, large, elite, newbie, and unstable) that have different meanings in terms of in-game group dynamics. By viewing players as the most important resource affecting guild life cycles, it is possible to analyze game worlds as ecosystems consisting of evolving guilds and to study how guild life cycles reflect game world characteristics.

  11. Game dynamics with learning and evolution of universal grammar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchener, W Garrett

    2007-04-01

    We investigate a model of language evolution, based on population game dynamics with learning. First, we examine the case of two genetic variants of universal grammar (UG), the heart of the human language faculty, assuming each admits two possible grammars. The dynamics are driven by a communication game. We prove using dynamical systems techniques that if the payoff matrix obeys certain constraints, then the two UGs are stable against invasion by each other, that is, they are evolutionarily stable. Then, we prove a similar theorem for an arbitrary number of disjoint UGs. In both theorems, the constraints are independent of the learning process. Intuitively, if a mutation in UG results in grammars that are incompatible with the established languages, then the mutation will die out because mutants will be unable to communicate and therefore unable to realize any potential benefit of the mutation. An example for which these theorems do not apply shows that compatible mutations may or may not be able to invade, depending on the population's history and the learning process. These results suggest that the genetic history of language is constrained by the need for compatibility and that mutations in the language faculty may have died out or taken over due more to historical accident than to any straightforward notion of relative fitness.

  12. Evolution of Secondary Software Businesses: Understanding Industry Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyrväinen, Pasi; Warsta, Juhani; Seppänen, Veikko

    Primary software industry originates from IBM's decision to unbundle software-related computer system development activities to external partners. This kind of outsourcing from an enterprise internal software development activity is a common means to start a new software business serving a vertical software market. It combines knowledge of the vertical market process with competence in software development. In this research, we present and analyze the key figures of the Finnish secondary software industry, in order to quantify its interaction with the primary software industry during the period of 2000-2003. On the basis of the empirical data, we present a model for evolution of a secondary software business, which makes explicit the industry dynamics. It represents the shift from internal software developed for competitive advantage to development of products supporting standard business processes on top of standardized technologies. We also discuss the implications for software business strategies in each phase.

  13. Dynamic evolution of venom proteins in squamate reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casewell, Nicholas R; Huttley, Gavin A; Wüster, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Phylogenetic analyses of toxin gene families have revolutionised our understanding of the origin and evolution of reptile venoms, leading to the current hypothesis that venom evolved once in squamate reptiles. However, because of a lack of homologous squamate non-toxin sequences, these conclusions rely on the implicit assumption that recruitments of protein families into venom are both rare and irreversible. Here we use sequences of homologous non-toxin proteins from two snake species to test these assumptions. Phylogenetic and ancestral-state analyses revealed frequent nesting of 'physiological' proteins within venom toxin clades, suggesting early ancestral recruitment into venom followed by reverse recruitment of toxins back to physiological roles. These results provide evidence that protein recruitment into venoms from physiological functions is not a one-way process, but dynamic, with reversal of function and/or co-expression of toxins in different tissues. This requires a major reassessment of our previous understanding of how animal venoms evolve.

  14. Kinematical fingerprints of star cluster early dynamical evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Vesperini, Enrico; McMillan, Stephen L W; Zepf, Stephen E

    2014-01-01

    We study the effects of the external tidal field on the violent relaxation phase of star clusters dynamical evolution, with particular attention to the kinematical properties of the equilibrium configurations emerging at the end of this phase.We show that star clusters undergoing the process of violent relaxation in the tidal field of their host galaxy can acquire significant internal differential rotation and are characterized by a distinctive radial variation of the velocity anisotropy. These kinematical properties are the result of the symmetry breaking introduced by the external tidal field in the collapse phase and of the action of the Coriolis force on the orbit of the stars. The resulting equilibrium configurations are characterized by differential rotation, with a peak located between one and two half-mass radii. As for the anisotropy, similar to clusters evolving in isolation, the systems explored in this Letter are characterized by an inner isotropic core, followed by a region of increasing radial a...

  15. Cooperative Bacterial Growth Dynamics Predict the Evolution of Antibiotic Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemova, Tatiana; Gerardin, Ylaine; Hsin-Jung Li, Sophia; Gore, Jeff

    2011-03-01

    Since the discovery of penicillin, antibiotics have been our primary weapon against bacterial infections. Unfortunately, bacteria can gain resistance to penicillin by acquiring the gene that encodes beta-lactamase, which inactivates the antibiotic. However, mutations in this gene are necessary to degrade the modern antibiotic cefotaxime. Understanding the conditions that favor the spread of these mutations is a challenge. Here we show that bacterial growth in beta-lactam antibiotics is cooperative and that the nature of this growth determines the conditions in which resistance evolves. Quantitative analysis of the growth dynamics predicts a peak in selection at very low antibiotic concentrations; competition between strains confirms this prediction. We also find significant selection at higher antibiotic concentrations, close to the minimum inhibitory concentrations of the strains. Our results argue that an understanding of the evolutionary forces that lead to antibiotic resistance requires a quantitative understanding of the evolution of cooperation in bacteria.

  16. Star-planet interactions and dynamical evolution of exoplanetary systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damiani Cilia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamical evolution of planetary systems, after the evaporation of the accretion disk, is the result of the competition between tidal dissipation and the net angular momentum loss of the system. The description of the diversity of orbital configurations, and correlations between parameters of the observed system (e.g. in the case of hot jupiters, is still limited by our understanding of the transport of angular momentum within the stars, and its effective loss by magnetic braking. After discussing the challenges of modelling tidal evolution for exoplanets, I will review recent results showing the importance of tidal interactions to test models of planetary formation. This kind of studies rely on the determination of stellar radii, masses and ages. Major advances will thus be obtained with the results of the PLATO 2.0 mission, selected as the next M-class mission of ESA’s Cosmic Vision plan, that will allow the complete characterisation of host stars using asteroseismology.

  17. Phylogenomic Analysis and Dynamic Evolution of Chloroplast Genomes in Salicaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Huang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Chloroplast genomes of plants are highly conserved in both gene order and gene content. Analysis of the whole chloroplast genome is known to provide much more informative DNA sites and thus generates high resolution for plant phylogenies. Here, we report the complete chloroplast genomes of three Salix species in family Salicaceae. Phylogeny of Salicaceae inferred from complete chloroplast genomes is generally consistent with previous studies but resolved with higher statistical support. Incongruences of phylogeny, however, are observed in genus Populus, which most likely results from homoplasy. By comparing three Salix chloroplast genomes with the published chloroplast genomes of other Salicaceae species, we demonstrate that the synteny and length of chloroplast genomes in Salicaceae are highly conserved but experienced dynamic evolution among species. We identify seven positively selected chloroplast genes in Salicaceae, which might be related to the adaptive evolution of Salicaceae species. Comparative chloroplast genome analysis within the family also indicates that some chloroplast genes are lost or became pseudogenes, infer that the chloroplast genes horizontally transferred to the nucleus genome. Based on the complete nucleus genome sequences from two Salicaceae species, we remarkably identify that the entire chloroplast genome is indeed transferred and integrated to the nucleus genome in the individual of the reference genome of P. trichocarpa at least once. This observation, along with presence of the large nuclear plastid DNA (NUPTs and NUPTs-containing multiple chloroplast genes in their original order in the chloroplast genome, favors the DNA-mediated hypothesis of organelle to nucleus DNA transfer. Overall, the phylogenomic analysis using chloroplast complete genomes clearly elucidates the phylogeny of Salicaceae. The identification of positively selected chloroplast genes and dynamic chloroplast-to-nucleus gene transfers in

  18. Effects of grain size evolution on mantle dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Falko; Tosi, Nicola; Plesa, Ana-Catalina; Breuer, Doris

    2016-04-01

    The rheology of planetary mantle materials is strongly dependent on temperature, pressure, strain-rate, and grain size. In particular, the rheology of olivine, the most abundant mineral of the Earth's upper mantle, has been extensively studied in the laboratory (e.g., Karato and Wu, 1993; Hirth and Kohlstedt, 2003). Two main mechanisms control olivine's deformation: dislocation and diffusion creep. While the former implies a power-law dependence of the viscosity on the strain-rate that leads to a non-Newtonian behaviour, the latter is sensitively dependent on the grain size. The dynamics of planetary interiors is locally controlled by the deformation mechanism that delivers the lowest viscosity. Models of the dynamics and evolution of planetary mantles should thus be capable to self-consistently distinguish which of the two mechanisms dominates at given conditions of temperature, pressure, strain-rate and grain size. As the grain size can affect the viscosity associated with diffusion creep by several orders of magnitude, it can strongly influence the dominant deformation mechanism. The vast majority of numerical, global-scale models of mantle convection, however, are based on the use of a linear diffusion-creep rheology with constant grain-size. Nevertheless, in recent studies, a new equation has been proposed to properly model the time-dependent evolution of the grain size (Austin and Evens, 2007; Rozel et al., 2010). We implemented this equation in our mantle convection code Gaia (Hüttig et al., 2013). In the framework of simple models of stagnant lid convection, we compared simulations based on the fully time-dependent equation of grain-size evolution with simulations based on its steady-state version. In addition, we tested a number of different parameters in order to identify those that affects the grain size to the first order and, in turn, control the conditions at which mantle deformation is dominated by diffusion or dislocation creep. References Austin

  19. The initiation, temporal evolution and dynamics of deep mantle heterogeneities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull-Aller, Abigail; Torsvik, Trond; Domeier, Mathew; Doubrovine, Pavel

    2013-04-01

    Understanding the first-order dynamical structure and temporal evolution of Earth's mantle is a fundamental goal in solid-earth geophysics. Recent tomographic observations reveal a lower mantle characterised by higher-than-average shear-wave speeds beneath Asia and encircling the Pacific, consistent with cold slabs of descending lithosphere beneath regions of ancient subduction, and lower-than-average shear-wave speeds in broad regional areas beneath Africa and the Central Pacific (LLSVPs). The LLSVPs, although not as easily understood from a dynamical perspective, are inferred to be broad upwelling centres between Mesozoic and Cenozoic subduction zones. Heterogeneous mantle models place these anomalies into the context of thermochemical piles, characterised by an anomalously dense component, with their location and geometry being controlled by the movement of subducting slabs. The origin and temporal evolution of the LLSVPs remain enigmatic. Recent numerical studies propose that the LLSVP beneath Africa formed as a result of return flow in the mantle due to circum-Pacific subduction beneath the Pangean supercontinent. This suggests that prior to the formation of Pangea, the lower mantle was dominated by a degree-1 convection pattern, with a major upwelling centred close to the present-day Pacific LLSVP and subduction concentrated in the antipodal hemisphere. The African LLSVP would thus have developed within the time frame of the Pangean supercontinent (i.e., 300Ma-180Ma), in contrast to a much older Pacific LLSVP. It is further proposed that a cyclic alternation between a degree-1 pattern and a degree-2 pattern of mantle convection may accompany the supercontinent cycle and characterise the temporal convective evolution of Earth's mantle. In contrast, a more long-term persistence for both the African and Pacific LLSVPs, and thus for the planform of mantle convection within the Earth as a whole, is suggested by recent palaeomagnetic studies, which show that over

  20. SPH code for dynamical and chemical evolution of disk galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Berczik, P

    1998-01-01

    The problem of chemical and dynamical evolution of galaxies is one of the most attracting and complex problems of modern astrophysics. Within the framework of the given work the standard dynamic Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) code (Monaghan J.J. 1992, ARAA, 30, 543) is noticeably expanded. Our investigation concernes with the changes and incorporation of new ideas into the algorithmic inclusion of Star Formation (SF) and Super Novae (SN) explosions in SPH (Berczik P. & Kravchuk S.G., 1996, ApSpSci, 245, 27). The proposed energy criterion for definition of a place and efficiency of SF results in the successfully explain Star Formation History (SFH) in isolated galaxies of different types. On the base of original ideas we expand a code in a more realistic way of the description of effects of return of a hot, chemical enriched gas in Interstellar Matter (ISM). In addition to the account of SNII, we offer the self-agreed account of SNIa and PN. This allows to describe not only the ISM content of $ O^{1...

  1. Dynamical evolution of high velocity clouds in the intergalactic medium

    CERN Document Server

    Konz, C; Birk, G T

    2002-01-01

    HI observations of high-velocity clouds (HVCs) indicate, that they are interacting with their ambient medium. Even clouds located in the very outer Galactic halo or the intergalactic space seem to interact with their ambient medium. In this paper, we investigate the dynamical evolution of high velocity neutral gas clouds moving through a hot magnetized ambient plasma by means of two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic plasma-neutral gas simulations. This situation is representative for the fast moving dense neutral gas cloudlets in the Magellanic Stream as well as for high velocity clouds in general. The question on the dynamical and thermal stabilization of a cold dense neutral cloud in a hot thin ambient halo plasma is numerically investigated. The simulations show the formation of a comet-like head-tail structure combined with a magnetic barrier of increased field strength which exerts a stabilizing pressure on the cloud and hinders hot plasma from diffusing into the cloud. The simulations can explain both the...

  2. Phylogenomics and the dynamic genome evolution of the genus Streptococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Vincent P; Palmer, Sara R; Pavinski Bitar, Paulina D; Qin, Xiang; Weinstock, George M; Highlander, Sarah K; Town, Christopher D; Burne, Robert A; Stanhope, Michael J

    2014-04-01

    The genus Streptococcus comprises important pathogens that have a severe impact on human health and are responsible for substantial economic losses to agriculture. Here, we utilize 46 Streptococcus genome sequences (44 species), including eight species sequenced here, to provide the first genomic level insight into the evolutionary history and genetic basis underlying the functional diversity of all major groups of this genus. Gene gain/loss analysis revealed a dynamic pattern of genome evolution characterized by an initial period of gene gain followed by a period of loss, as the major groups within the genus diversified. This was followed by a period of genome expansion associated with the origins of the present extant species. The pattern is concordant with an emerging view that genomes evolve through a dynamic process of expansion and streamlining. A large proportion of the pan-genome has experienced lateral gene transfer (LGT) with causative factors, such as relatedness and shared environment, operating over different evolutionary scales. Multiple gene ontology terms were significantly enriched for each group, and mapping terms onto the phylogeny showed that those corresponding to genes born on branches leading to the major groups represented approximately one-fifth of those enriched. Furthermore, despite the extensive LGT, several biochemical characteristics have been retained since group formation, suggesting genomic cohesiveness through time, and that these characteristics may be fundamental to each group. For example, proteolysis: mitis group; urea metabolism: salivarius group; carbohydrate metabolism: pyogenic group; and transcription regulation: bovis group.

  3. Non-equilibrium evolution of a "Tsunami" Dynamical Symmetry Breaking

    CERN Document Server

    Boyanovsky, D; Holman, R; Kumar, S P; Pisarski, R D; Boyanovsky, Daniel; Vega, Hector J. de; Holman, Richard; Pisarski, Robert D.

    1998-01-01

    We propose to study the non-equilibrium features of heavy-ion collisions by following the evolution of an initial state with a large number of quanta with a distribution around a momentum |\\vec k_0| corresponding to a thin spherical shell in momentum space, a `tsunami'. An O(N); ({\\vec \\Phi}^2)^2 model field theory in the large N limit is used as a framework to study the non-perturbative aspects of the non-equilibrium dynamics including a resummation of the effects of the medium (the initial particle distribution). In a theory where the symmetry is spontaneously broken in the absence of the medium, when the initial number of particles per correlation volume is chosen to be larger than a critical value the medium effects can restore the symmetry of the initial state. We show that if one begins with such a symmetry-restored, non-thermal, initial state, non-perturbative effects automatically induce spinodal instabilities leading to a dynamical breaking of the symmetry. As a result there is explosive particle pro...

  4. Exploring the evolution of node neighborhoods in Dynamic Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orman, Günce Keziban; Labatut, Vincent; Naskali, Ahmet Teoman

    2017-09-01

    Dynamic Networks are a popular way of modeling and studying the behavior of evolving systems. However, their analysis constitutes a relatively recent subfield of Network Science, and the number of available tools is consequently much smaller than for static networks. In this work, we propose a method specifically designed to take advantage of the longitudinal nature of dynamic networks. It characterizes each individual node by studying the evolution of its direct neighborhood, based on the assumption that the way this neighborhood changes reflects the role and position of the node in the whole network. For this purpose, we define the concept of neighborhood event, which corresponds to the various transformations such groups of nodes can undergo, and describe an algorithm for detecting such events. We demonstrate the interest of our method on three real-world networks: DBLP, LastFM and Enron. We apply frequent pattern mining to extract meaningful information from temporal sequences of neighborhood events. This results in the identification of behavioral trends emerging in the whole network, as well as the individual characterization of specific nodes. We also perform a cluster analysis, which reveals that, in all three networks, one can distinguish two types of nodes exhibiting different behaviors: a very small group of active nodes, whose neighborhood undergo diverse and frequent events, and a very large group of stable nodes.

  5. Phylogenomics and the Dynamic Genome Evolution of the Genus Streptococcus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Vincent P.; Palmer, Sara R.; Pavinski Bitar, Paulina D.; Qin, Xiang; Weinstock, George M.; Highlander, Sarah K.; Town, Christopher D.; Burne, Robert A.; Stanhope, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The genus Streptococcus comprises important pathogens that have a severe impact on human health and are responsible for substantial economic losses to agriculture. Here, we utilize 46 Streptococcus genome sequences (44 species), including eight species sequenced here, to provide the first genomic level insight into the evolutionary history and genetic basis underlying the functional diversity of all major groups of this genus. Gene gain/loss analysis revealed a dynamic pattern of genome evolution characterized by an initial period of gene gain followed by a period of loss, as the major groups within the genus diversified. This was followed by a period of genome expansion associated with the origins of the present extant species. The pattern is concordant with an emerging view that genomes evolve through a dynamic process of expansion and streamlining. A large proportion of the pan-genome has experienced lateral gene transfer (LGT) with causative factors, such as relatedness and shared environment, operating over different evolutionary scales. Multiple gene ontology terms were significantly enriched for each group, and mapping terms onto the phylogeny showed that those corresponding to genes born on branches leading to the major groups represented approximately one-fifth of those enriched. Furthermore, despite the extensive LGT, several biochemical characteristics have been retained since group formation, suggesting genomic cohesiveness through time, and that these characteristics may be fundamental to each group. For example, proteolysis: mitis group; urea metabolism: salivarius group; carbohydrate metabolism: pyogenic group; and transcription regulation: bovis group. PMID:24625962

  6. Evolutionarily stable disequilibrium: endless dynamics of evolution in a stationary population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takeuchi, Nobuto; Kaneko, Kunihiko; Hogeweg, P

    2016-01-01

    Evolution is often conceived as changes in the properties of a population over generations. Does this notion exhaust the possible dynamics of evolution? Life is hierarchically organized, and evolution can operate at multiple levels with conflicting tendencies. Using a minimal model of such conflicti

  7. Studies on Dynamic Damage Evolution for Pp/pa Polymer Blends Under High Strain Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zi-Jian; Wang, Li-Li

    The dynamic damage evolution for PP/PA blends with different compatibilizers is studied in high strain rates from two different approaches, namely by determining the unloading elastic modulus of specimen experienced impact deformation and by combining the split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) experimental technique with the back-propagation (BP) neural network. The results obtained by both approaches consistently show that a threshold strain ɛth exists for dynamic damage evolution, and both the damage evolution and ɛth are dependent on strain and strain rate. For non-linear visco-elastic materials, the damage evolution determined by the unloading elastic modulus provides an underestimation of real damage evolution.

  8. Formal Definitions of Unbounded Evolution and Innovation Reveal Universal Mechanisms for Open-Ended Evolution in Dynamical Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Alyssa; Zenil, Hector; Davies, Paul C W; Walker, Sara Imari

    2017-04-20

    Open-ended evolution (OEE) is relevant to a variety of biological, artificial and technological systems, but has been challenging to reproduce in silico. Most theoretical efforts focus on key aspects of open-ended evolution as it appears in biology. We recast the problem as a more general one in dynamical systems theory, providing simple criteria for open-ended evolution based on two hallmark features: unbounded evolution and innovation. We define unbounded evolution as patterns that are non-repeating within the expected Poincare recurrence time of an isolated system, and innovation as trajectories not observed in isolated systems. As a case study, we implement novel variants of cellular automata (CA) where the update rules are allowed to vary with time in three alternative ways. Each is capable of generating conditions for open-ended evolution, but vary in their ability to do so. We find that state-dependent dynamics, regarded as a hallmark of life, statistically out-performs other candidate mechanisms, and is the only mechanism to produce open-ended evolution in a scalable manner, essential to the notion of ongoing evolution. This analysis suggests a new framework for unifying mechanisms for generating OEE with features distinctive to life and its artifacts, with broad applicability to biological and artificial systems.

  9. Molecular Dynamic Simulation of Thin Film Growth Stress Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Haifeng

    2011-12-01

    With the increasing demand for thin films across a wide range of technology, especially in electronic and magnetic applications, controlling the stresses in deposited thin films has become one of the more important challenges in modern engineering. It is well known that large intrinsic stress---in the magnitude of several gigapascals---can result during the thin film preparation. The magnitude of stress depends on the deposition technique, film thickness, types and structures of materials used as films and substrates, as well as other factors. Such large intrinsic stress may lead to film cracking and peeling in case of tensile stress, and delamination and blistering in case of compression. However it may also have beneficial effects on optoelectronics and its applications. For example, intrinsic stresses can be used to change the electronic band gap of semiconducting materials. The far-reaching fields of microelectronics and optoelectronics depend critically on the properties, behavior, and reliable performance of deposited thin films. Thus, understanding and controlling the origins and behavior of such intrinsic stresses in deposited thin films is a highly active field of research. In this study, on-going tensile stress evolution during Volmer-Weber growth mode was analyzed through numerical methods. A realistic model with semi-cylinder shape free surfaces was used and molecular dynamics simulations were conducted. Simulations were at room temperature (300 K), and 10 nanometer diameter of islands were used. A deposition rate that every 3 picoseconds deposit one atom was chosen for simulations. The deposition energy was and lattice orientation is [0 0 1]. Five different random seeds were used to ensure average behaviors. In the first part of this study, initial coalescence stress was first calculated by comparing two similar models, which only differed in the distance between two neighboring islands. Three different substrate thickness systems were analyzed to

  10. Evolution of the Granular Dynamics and Energy Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesis, A.; Hammer, R.; Schleicher, H.

    2003-05-01

    Based on series of excellent spectrograms taken at the German Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT) at the Observatorio del Teide (Tenerife), we study the temporal evolution of the granular dynamics and the energy transport in the photospheric layers. We consider the ensemble of the granules cut by the spectrograph slit as a complex system. We describe this ensemble by the rms of the fluctuations of the granular observables along the slit: continuum intensity I, Doppler velocity v, and line width w. The history of the rms of the observables v and w reflects the dynamical change of the system over the 20 minutes observation time. We find for both observables a quasi-periodical change. However, the history of the cross-correlation between I and v remains virtually constant, with the exception of two gaps. We measure the rms of v in the deep photospheric layers for six lines of different strength included in the spectrograms. Using a model velocity variation based on our previous publications, we assign photospheric heights to the velocity measurements. These heights agree with those calculated by other means. On the basis of this v variation we calculate the kinetic energy flux as a function of the height in the photosphere for different times during the observation. The form of the variation with height turns out to be constant in time. The convective energy flux, finally, is calculated from the measured velocity and the temperature variations of our earlier models. Again we find practically the same variation form over the time of the observation. Taken together, these results quantify the different roles that the lower and higher photospheric layers play for the energetics of the convective overshoot at the upper boundary of the superadiabatic region of the Sun. A.N. acknowledges travel support from the German science foundation DFG.

  11. Evol and ProDy for bridging protein sequence evolution and structural dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Bakan, Ahmet; Dutta, Anindita; Mao, Wenzhi; Liu, Ying; Chennubhotla, Chakra; Lezon, Timothy R.; Bahar, Ivet

    2014-01-01

    Correlations between sequence evolution and structural dynamics are of utmost importance in understanding the molecular mechanisms of function and their evolution. We have integrated Evol, a new package for fast and efficient comparative analysis of evolutionary patterns and conformational dynamics, into ProDy, a computational toolbox designed for inferring protein dynamics from experimental and theoretical data. Using information-theoretic approaches, Evol coanalyzes conservation and coevolu...

  12. Dynamical Evolution of the Earth-Moon Progenitors - Whence Theia?

    CERN Document Server

    Quarles, Billy

    2014-01-01

    We present integrations of a model Solar System with five terrestrial planets (beginning ~30-50 Myr after the formation of primitive Solar System bodies) in order to determine the preferred regions of parameter space leading to a giant impact that resulted in the formation of the Moon. Our results indicate which choices of semimajor axes and eccentricities for Theia (the proto-Moon) at this epoch can produce a late Giant Impact, assuming that Mercury, Venus, and Mars are near the current orbits. We find that the likely semimajor axis of Theia, at the epoch when our simulations begin, depends on the assumed mass ratio of Earth-Moon progenitors (8/1, 4/1, or 1/1). The low eccentricities of the terrestrial planets are most commonly produced when the progenitors have similar semimajor axes at the epoch when our integrations commence. Additionally, we show that mean motion resonances among the terrestrial planets and perturbations from the giant planets can affect the dynamical evolution of the system leading to a...

  13. Dynamical evolution of supernova remnants breaking through molecular clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Cho, Wankee; Koo, Bon-Chul

    2015-01-01

    We carry out three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of the supernova remnants (SNRs) produced inside molecular clouds (MCs) near their surface using the HLL code (Harten et al. 1983). We explore the dynamical evolution and the X-ray morphology of SNRs after breaking through the MC surface for ranges of the explosion depths below the surface and the density ratios of the clouds to the intercloud media (ICM). We find that if an SNR breaks out through an MC surface in its Sedov stage, the outermost dense shell of the remnant is divided into several layers. The divided layers are subject to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability and fragmented. On the other hand, if an SNR breaks through an MC after the remnant enters the snowplow phase, the radiative shell is not divided to layers. We also compare the predictions of previous analytic solutions for the expansion of SNRs in stratified media with our onedimensional simulations. Moreover, we produce synthetic X-ray surface brightness in order to research the center-bri...

  14. Microstructure evolution of polycrystalline silicon by molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao; Ding, Jianning; Jiang, Cunhua; Liu, Zunfeng; Yuan, Ningyi

    2017-06-01

    Polycrystalline silicon is the dominant material in solar cells and plays an important role in photovoltaic industry. It is important for not only the conventional production of silicon ingots but also the direct growth of silicon wafers to control crystallization for obtaining the desired polycrystalline silicon. To the best of our knowledge, few studies have systematically reported about the effects of crystalline planes on the solidification behavior of liquid silicon and the analysis of the microstructural features of the polysilicon structure. In this study, molecular dynamics simulations were employed to investigate the solidification and microstructure evolution of polysilicon, with focus on the effects of the seed distribution and cooling rate on the growth of polycrystalline silicon. The (110), (111), and (112) planes were extruded by the (100) plane and formed the inclusion shape. The crystallization of silicon consisted of diamond-type structures is relatively high at a low cooling rate. The simulations provide substantial information regarding microstructures and serve as guidance for the growth of polycrystalline silicon.

  15. Microstructure evolution of polycrystalline silicon by molecular dynamics simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Chen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Polycrystalline silicon is the dominant material in solar cells and plays an important role in photovoltaic industry. It is important for not only the conventional production of silicon ingots but also the direct growth of silicon wafers to control crystallization for obtaining the desired polycrystalline silicon. To the best of our knowledge, few studies have systematically reported about the effects of crystalline planes on the solidification behavior of liquid silicon and the analysis of the microstructural features of the polysilicon structure. In this study, molecular dynamics simulations were employed to investigate the solidification and microstructure evolution of polysilicon, with focus on the effects of the seed distribution and cooling rate on the growth of polycrystalline silicon. The (110, (111, and (112 planes were extruded by the (100 plane and formed the inclusion shape. The crystallization of silicon consisted of diamond-type structures is relatively high at a low cooling rate. The simulations provide substantial information regarding microstructures and serve as guidance for the growth of polycrystalline silicon.

  16. Dynamical evolution of star forming regions - II. Basic kinematics

    CERN Document Server

    Parker, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    We follow the dynamical evolution of young star-forming regions with a wide range of initial conditions and examine how the radial velocity dispersion, $\\sigma$, evolves over time. We compare this velocity dispersion to the theoretically expected value for the velocity dispersion if a region were in virial equilibrium, $\\sigma_{\\rm vir}$ and thus assess the virial state ($\\sigma / \\sigma_{\\rm vir}$) of these systems. We find that in regions that are initially subvirial, or in global virial equilibrium but subvirial on local scales, the system relaxes to virial equilibrium within several million years, or roughly 25 - 50 crossing times, according to the measured virial ratio. However, the measured velocity dispersion, $\\sigma$, appears to be a bad diagnostic of the current virial state of these systems as it suggests that they become supervirial when compared to the velocity dispersion estimated from the virial mass, $\\sigma_{\\rm vir}$. We suggest that this discrepancy is caused by the fact that the regions ar...

  17. Dynamic evolution process of turbulent channel flow after opposition control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Mingwei; Tian, De; Yongqian, Liu

    2017-02-01

    Dynamic evolution of turbulent channel flow after application of opposition control (OC), together with the mechanism of drag reduction, is studied through direct numerical simulation (DNS). In the simulation, the pressure gradient is kept constant, and the flow rate increases due to drag reduction. In the transport of mean kinetic energy (MKE), one part of the energy from the external pressure is dissipated by the mean shear, and the other part is transported to the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) through a TKE production term (TKP). It is found that the increase of MKE is mainly induced by the reduction of TKP that is directly affected by OC. Further analysis shows that the suppression of the redistribution term of TKE in the wall normal direction plays a key role in drag reduction, which represses the wall normal velocity fluctuation and then reduces TKP through the attenuation of its main production term. When OC is suddenly applied, an acute imbalance of energy in space is induced by the wall blowing and suction. Both the skin-friction and TKP terms exhibit a transient growth in the initial phase of OC, which can be attributed to the local effect of and in the viscous sublayer. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11402088 and Grant No. 51376062) , State Key Laboratory of Alternate Electrical Power System with Renewable Energy Sources (Grant No. LAPS15005), and ‘the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities’ (Grant No.2014MS33).

  18. The orbit and dynamical evolution of the Chelyabinsk object

    CERN Document Server

    Emel'yanenko, Vacheslav V; Jenniskens, Peter; Popova, Olga P

    2014-01-01

    The orbit of the Chelyabinsk object is calculated, applying the least-squares method directly to astrometric positions. The dynamical evolution of this object in the past is studied by integrating equations of motion for particles with orbits from the confidence region. It is found that the majority of the Chelyabinsk clones reach the near-Sun state. 67 percent of these objects have collisions with the Sun for 15 Myr in our numerical simulations. The distribution of minimum solar distances shows that the most probable time for the encounters of the Chelyabinsk object with the Sun lies in the interval from -0.8 Myr to -2 Myr. This is consistent with the estimate of a cosmic ray exposure age of 1.2 Myr (Popova et al 2013). A parent body of the Chelyabinsk object should experience strong tidal and thermal effects at this time. The possible association of the Chelyabinsk object with 86039 (1999 NC43) and 2008 DJ is discussed.

  19. Venom Down Under: Dynamic Evolution of Australian Elapid Snake Toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy N. W. Jackson

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite the unparalleled diversity of venomous snakes in Australia, research has concentrated on a handful of medically significant species and even of these very few toxins have been fully sequenced. In this study, venom gland transcriptomes were sequenced from eleven species of small Australian elapid snakes, from eleven genera, spanning a broad phylogenetic range. The particularly large number of sequences obtained for three-finger toxin (3FTx peptides allowed for robust reconstructions of their dynamic molecular evolutionary histories. We demonstrated that each species preferentially favoured different types of α-neurotoxic 3FTx, probably as a result of differing feeding ecologies. The three forms of α-neurotoxin [Type I (also known as (aka: short-chain, Type II (aka: long-chain and Type III] not only adopted differential rates of evolution, but have also conserved a diversity of residues, presumably to potentiate prey-specific toxicity. Despite these differences, the different α-neurotoxin types were shown to accumulate mutations in similar regions of the protein, largely in the loops and structurally unimportant regions, highlighting the significant role of focal mutagenesis. We theorize that this phenomenon not only affects toxin potency or specificity, but also generates necessary variation for preventing/delaying prey animals from acquiring venom-resistance. This study also recovered the first full-length sequences for multimeric phospholipase A2 (PLA2 ‘taipoxin/paradoxin’ subunits from non-Oxyuranus species, confirming the early recruitment of this extremely potent neurotoxin complex to the venom arsenal of Australian elapid snakes. We also recovered the first natriuretic peptides from an elapid that lack the derived C-terminal tail and resemble the plesiotypic form (ancestral character state found in viper venoms. This provides supporting evidence for a single early recruitment of natriuretic peptides into snake venoms. Novel

  20. Formation and Dynamical Evolution of the Asteroid Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottke, William F.

    2015-08-01

    Asteroids are critical to our desire to unravel the origin of the Solar System because they supply unique, relatively pristine snapshots of the environment in which the Earth formed and evolved. This is due to the fact that, although the asteroids and Earth have followed very different evolutionary pathways, they all formed from the same set of physical processes and share a common ancestry. The asteroid belt presents a particular challenge to understanding terrestrial planet formation because of its small mass. Models of the protoplanetary disk suggest the region between 2-3 AU should contain roughly 3 Earth masses, while less than 0.001 of an Earth mass is actually found there.A long-standing explanation for the asteroid belt's small mass is that it is due to the gravitational influence of Jupiter and Saturn. Some have suggested protoplanets grew there before they were dynamically removed from the asteroid belt by resonances with the gas giants. This left the asteroid belt dynamically excited (which is observed) and heavily depleted in mass. More recently, however, detailed models have shown that this process produces an asteroid belt that is inconsistent with observations.Two recent models propose new ways to match asteroid belt constraints. The first, the so-called ‘Grand Tack’ scenario, uses the results of hydrodynamic simulations to show that Jupiter (and Saturn) migrated both inward and outward across the asteroid belt while interacting with the protoplanetary gas disk. The Grand Tack not only reproduces the mass and mixture of spectral types in the asteroid belt, but it also truncates the planetesimal disk from which the terrestrial planets form, potentially explaining why Mars is less massive than Earth. In a second scenario, planetesimals that form directly from cm- to meter-sized objects, known as “pebbles”, are rapidly converted to 100 to 1000 km asteroid-like object that subsequently grow by accreting even more pebbles. Pebble accretion models

  1. Disentangling the Dynamical Mechanisms for Cluster Galaxy Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-02-01

    explanation of the nature of the color-magnitude relation as effectively an age -mass relation resolves the dilemma faced by the conventional explanation, that...in-fallers from the field region. The existence of the morphology-density relation over several orders-of-magnitude variation of local sur- face ...color evolution of the BO galaxies in their sample is much faster than the morphologial evolution. In the secular evolution scenario, these two

  2. Dynamics of hydrofracturing and permeability evolution in layered reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghani, Irfan; Koehn, Daniel; Toussaint, Renaud; Passchier, Cees

    2015-09-01

    A coupled hydro-mechanical model is presented to model fluid driven fracturing in layered porous rocks. In the model the solid elastic continuum is described by a discrete element approach coupled with a fluid continuum grid that is used to solve Darcy based pressure diffusion. The model assumes poro-elasto-plastic effects and yields real time dynamic aspects of the fracturing and effective stress evolution under the influence of excess fluid pressure gradients. We show that the formation and propagation of hydrofractures are sensitive to mechanical and tectonic conditions of the system. In cases where elevated fluid pressure is the sole driving agent in a stable tectonic system, sealing layers induce permutations between the principal directions of the local stress tensor, which regulate the growth of vertical fractures and may result in irregular pattern formation or sub-horizontal failure below the seal. Stiffer layers tend to concentrate differential stresses and lead to vertical fracture growth, whereas the layer-contact tends to fracture if the strength of the neighboring rock is comparably high. If the system has remained under extension for a longer time period, the developed hydrofractures propagate by linking up confined tensile fractures in competent layers. This leads to the growth of large-scale normal faults in the layered systems, so that subsequently the effective permeability is highly variable over time and the faults drain the system. The simulation results are shown to be consistent with some of the field observations carried out in the Oman Mountains, where abnormal fluid pressure is reported to be a significant factor in the development of several generations of local and regional fracture and fault sets.

  3. Information Mining of Spatio-Temporal Evolution of Lakes Based on Multiple Dynamic Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, W.; Chen, J.

    2017-09-01

    Lakes are important water resources and integral parts of the natural ecosystem, and it is of great significance to study the evolution of lakes. The area of each lake increased and decreased at the same time in natural condition, only but the net change of lakes' area is the result of the bidirectional evolution of lakes. In this paper, considering the effects of net fragmentation, net attenuation, swap change and spatial invariant part in lake evolution, a comprehensive evaluation indexes of lake dynamic evolution were defined,. Such degree contains three levels of measurement: 1) the swap dynamic degree (SDD) reflects the space activity of lakes in the study period. 2) the attenuation dynamic degree (ADD) reflects the net attenuation of lakes into non-lake areas. 3) the fragmentation dynamic degree (FDD) reflects the trend of lakes to be divided and broken into smaller lakes. Three levels of dynamic measurement constitute the three-dimensional "Swap - attenuation - fragmentation" dynamic evolution measurement system of lakes. To show its effectiveness, the dynamic measurement was applied to lakes in Jianghan Plain, the middle Yangtze region of China for a more detailed analysis of lakes from 1984 to 2014. In combination with spatial-temporal location characteristics of lakes, the hidden information in lake evolution in the past 30 years can be revealed.

  4. Industry evolution, submarket dynamics and strategic behavior among firms in offshore wind energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Poul Houman; Drejer, Ina; Gjerding, Allan Næs

    2017-01-01

    integration, overlap and disintegration across submarkets. This balance depends on how strategic intent and behaviour influence submarket dynamics, leading to the conclusion that effects of agency and managerial intent should play a more prominent role in studies of industry evolution....

  5. A Descriptive Model of Robot Team and the Dynamic Evolution of Robot Team Cooperation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhen-min Tang; Xian-yi Cheng; Lan Shuai; Shu-qin Li; Jing-yu Yang

    2008-01-01

    At present, the research on robot team cooperation is still in qualitative analysis phase and lacks the description model that can quantitatively describe the dynamical evolution of team cooperative...

  6. A Descriptive Model of Robot Team and the Dynamic Evolution of Robot Team Cooperation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, Shu-qin; Shuai, Lan; Cheng, Xian-yi; Tang, Zhen-min; Yang, Jing-yu

    2005-01-01

    At present, the research on robot team cooperation is still in qualitative analysis phase and lacks the description model that can quantitatively describe the dynamical evolution of team cooperative...

  7. Evol and ProDy for bridging protein sequence evolution and structural dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Wenzhi; Liu, Ying; Chennubhotla, Chakra; Lezon, Timothy R.; Bahar, Ivet

    2014-01-01

    Correlations between sequence evolution and structural dynamics are of utmost importance in understanding the molecular mechanisms of function and their evolution. We have integrated Evol, a new package for fast and efficient comparative analysis of evolutionary patterns and conformational dynamics, into ProDy, a computational toolbox designed for inferring protein dynamics from experimental and theoretical data. Using information-theoretic approaches, Evol coanalyzes conservation and coevolution profiles extracted from multiple sequence alignments of protein families with their inferred dynamics. Availability and implementation: ProDy and Evol are open-source and freely available under MIT License from http://prody.csb.pitt.edu/. Contact: bahar@pitt.edu PMID:24849577

  8. Parallel dynamics and evolution: Protein conformational fluctuations and assembly reflect evolutionary changes in sequence and structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Joseph A; Teichmann, Sarah A

    2014-02-01

    Protein structure is dynamic: the intrinsic flexibility of polypeptides facilitates a range of conformational fluctuations, and individual protein chains can assemble into complexes. Proteins are also dynamic in evolution: significant variations in secondary, tertiary and quaternary structure can be observed among divergent members of a protein family. Recent work has highlighted intriguing similarities between these structural and evolutionary dynamics occurring at various levels. Here we review evidence showing how evolutionary changes in protein sequence and structure are often closely related to local protein flexibility and disorder, large-scale motions and quaternary structure assembly. We suggest that these correspondences can be largely explained by neutral evolution, while deviations between structural and evolutionary dynamics can provide valuable functional insights. Finally, we address future prospects for the field and practical applications that arise from a deeper understanding of the intimate relationship between protein structure, dynamics, function and evolution.

  9. An approach of community evolution based on gravitational relationship refactoring in dynamic networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Guisheng; Chi, Kuo, E-mail: chik89769@hrbeu.edu.cn; Dong, Yuxin; Dong, Hongbin

    2017-04-25

    In this paper, an approach of community evolution based on gravitational relationship refactoring between the nodes in a dynamic network is proposed, and it can be used to simulate the process of community evolution. A static community detection algorithm and a dynamic community evolution algorithm are included in the approach. At first, communities are initialized by constructing the core nodes chains, the nodes can be iteratively searched and divided into corresponding communities via the static community detection algorithm. For a dynamic network, an evolutionary process is divided into three phases, and behaviors of community evolution can be judged according to the changing situation of the core nodes chain in each community. Experiments show that the proposed approach can achieve accuracy and availability in the synthetic and real world networks. - Highlights: • The proposed approach considers both the static community detection and dynamic community evolution. • The approach of community evolution can identify the whole 6 common evolution events. • The proposed approach can judge the evolutionary events according to the variations of the core nodes chains.

  10. A predator-2 prey fast-slow dynamical system for rapid predator evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piltz, Sofia Helena; Veerman, Frits; Maini, Philip K.

    2017-01-01

    We consider adaptive change of diet of a predator population that switches its feeding between two prey populations. We develop a novel 1 fast-3 slow dynamical system to describe the dynamics of the three populations amidst continuous but rapid evolution of the predator's diet choice. The two ext...

  11. Game equilibrium models I evolution and game dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    1991-01-01

    There are two main approaches towards the phenotypic analysis of frequency dependent natural selection. First, there is the approach of evolutionary game theory, which was introduced in 1973 by John Maynard Smith and George R. Price. In this theory, the dynamical process of natural selection is not modeled explicitly. Instead, the selective forces acting within a population are represented by a fitness function, which is then analysed according to the concept of an evolutionarily stable strategy or ESS. Later on, the static approach of evolutionary game theory has been complemented by a dynamic stability analysis of the replicator equations. Introduced by Peter D. Taylor and Leo B. Jonker in 1978, these equations specify a class of dynamical systems, which provide a simple dynamic description of a selection process. Usually, the investigation of the replicator dynamics centers around a stability analysis of their stationary solutions. Although evolutionary stability and dynamic stability both intend to charac...

  12. Towards investigation of evolution of dynamical systems with independence of time accuracy: more classes of systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurzadyan, V.G. [SIA, Sapienza University of Rome (Italy); Alikhanian National Laboratory and Yerevan State University, Center for Cosmology and Astrophysics, Yerevan (Armenia); Kocharyan, A.A. [Alikhanian National Laboratory and Yerevan State University, Center for Cosmology and Astrophysics, Yerevan (Armenia); Monash University, School of Mathematical Sciences, Clayton (Australia)

    2015-07-15

    The recently developed method (Paper 1) enabling one to investigate the evolution of dynamical systems with an accuracy not dependent on time is developed further. The classes of dynamical systems which can be studied by that method are much extended, now including systems that are: (1) non-Hamiltonian, conservative; (2) Hamiltonian with time-dependent perturbation; (3) non-conservative (with dissipation). These systems cover various types of N-body gravitating systems of astrophysical and cosmological interest, such as the orbital evolution of planets, minor planets, artificial satellites due to tidal, non-tidal perturbations and thermal thrust, evolving close binary stellar systems, and the dynamics of accretion disks. (orig.)

  13. Earth Evolution and Dynamics (Arthur Holmes Medal Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torsvik, Trond H.

    2016-04-01

    While physicists are fantasizing about a unified theory that can explain just about everything from subatomic particles (quantum mechanics) to the origin of the Universe (general relativity), Darwin already in 1858 elegantly unified the biological sciences with one grand vision. In the Earth Sciences, the description of the movement and deformation of the Earth's outer layer has evolved from Continental Drift (1912) into Sea-Floor Spreading (1962) and then to the paradigm of Plate Tectonics in the mid-to-late 1960s. Plate Tectonics has been extremely successful in providing a framework for understanding deformation and volcanism at plate boundaries, allowed us to understand how continent motions through time are a natural result of heat escaping from Earth's deep interior, and has granted us the means to conduct earthquake and volcanic hazard assessments and hydrocarbon exploration, which have proven indispensable for modern society. Plate Tectonics is as fundamentally unifying to the Earth Sciences as Darwin's Theory of Evolution is to the Life Sciences, but it is an incomplete theory that lacks a clear explanation of how plate tectonics, mantle convection and mantle plumes interact. Over the past decade, however, we have provided compelling evidence that plumes rise from explicit plume generation zones at the margins of two equatorial and antipodal large low shear-wave velocity provinces (Tuzo and Jason). These thermochemical provinces on the core-mantle boundary have been stable for at least the last 300 million years, possibly the last 540 million years, and their edges are the dominant sources of the plumes that generate large igneous provinces, hotspots and kimberlites. Linking surface and lithospheric processes to the mantle is extremely challenging and is only now becoming feasible due to breakthroughs in the estimation of ancient longitudes before the Cretaceous, greatly improved seismic tomography, recent advances in mineral physics, and new developments

  14. Dynamic Evolution of Financial Network and its Relation to Economic Crises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ya-Chun; Wei, Zong-Wen; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2013-02-01

    The static topology properties of financial networks have been widely investigated since the work done by Mantegna, yet their dynamic evolution with time is little considered. In this paper, we comprehensively study the dynamic evolution of financial network by a sliding window technique. The vertices and edges of financial network are represented by the stocks from S&P500 components and correlations between pairs of daily returns of price fluctuation, respectively. Furthermore, the duration of stock price fluctuation, spanning from January 4, 1985 to September 14, 2009, makes us to carefully observe the relation between the dynamic topological properties and big financial crashes. The empirical results suggest that the financial network has the robust small-world property when the time evolves, and the topological structure drastically changes when the big financial crashes occur. This correspondence between the dynamic evolution of financial network and big financial crashes may provide a novel view to understand the origin of economic crisis.

  15. Revisiting Hele-Shaw dynamics to better understand beach evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bokhove, Onno; van der Horn, Avraham/Bram; van der Horn, A.J.; van der Meer, Roger M.; Gagarina, Elena; Zweers, W.; Thornton, Anthony Richard

    2013-01-01

    Wave action, particularly during storms, drives the evo lution of beaches. Beach evolution by non-linear break ing waves is poorly understood due to its three-dimensional character, the range of scales involved, and our limited understanding of particle-wave interactions. We show how a novel, three-

  16. Evolution dynamics modeling and simulation of logistics enterprise's core competence based on service innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo; Tong, Yuting

    2017-04-01

    With the rapid development of economy, the development of logistics enterprises in China is also facing a huge challenge, especially the logistics enterprises generally lack of core competitiveness, and service innovation awareness is not strong. Scholars in the process of studying the core competitiveness of logistics enterprises are mainly from the perspective of static stability, not from the perspective of dynamic evolution to explore. So the author analyzes the influencing factors and the evolution process of the core competence of logistics enterprises, using the method of system dynamics to study the cause and effect of the evolution of the core competence of logistics enterprises, construct a system dynamics model of evolution of core competence logistics enterprises, which can be simulated by vensim PLE. The analysis for the effectiveness and sensitivity of simulation model indicates the model can be used as the fitting of the evolution process of the core competence of logistics enterprises and reveal the process and mechanism of the evolution of the core competence of logistics enterprises, and provide management strategies for improving the core competence of logistics enterprises. The construction and operation of computer simulation model offers a kind of effective method for studying the evolution of logistics enterprise core competence.

  17. Dynamical evolution and molecular abundances of interstellar clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Sheo S.; Heere, Karen R.; Tarafdar, Shankar P.

    1991-01-01

    Dynamical models are presented that start with interstellar gas in an initial diffuse state and consider their gravitational collapse and the formation of dense cores. Frozen-in tangled magnetic fields are included to mimic forces that might oppose gravitational contraction and whose effectiveness may increase with increasing core densities. Results suggest the possibility that dense cloud cores may be dynamically evolving ephemeral objects, such that their lifespan at a given core density decreases as that density increases.

  18. Statistical behavior of time dynamics evolution of HIV infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Ramón E. R.; Santos, Iury A. X.; Nunes, Marcos G. P.; de Oliveira, Viviane M.; Barbosa, Anderson L. R.

    2017-09-01

    We use the tools of the random matrix theory (RMT) to investigate the statistical behavior of the evolution of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. By means of the nearest-neighbor spacing distribution we have identified four distinct regimes of the evolution of HIV infection. We verified that at the beginning of the so-called clinical latency phase the concentration of infected cells grows slowly and evolves in a correlated way. This regime is followed by another one in which the correlation is lost and that in turn leads the system to a regime in which the increase of infected cells is faster and correlated. In the final phase, the one in which acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is stablished, the system presents maximum correlation as demonstrated by GOE distribution.

  19. Dynamic evolution of bitter taste receptor genes in vertebrates

    OpenAIRE

    Jones Gareth; Dong Dong; Zhang Shuyi

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Sensing bitter tastes is crucial for many animals because it can prevent them from ingesting harmful foods. This process is mainly mediated by the bitter taste receptors (T2R), which are largely expressed in the taste buds. Previous studies have identified some T2R gene repertoires, and marked variation in repertoire size has been noted among species. However, the mechanisms underlying the evolution of vertebrate T2R genes remain poorly understood. Results To better unders...

  20. Dynamic evolution of bitter taste receptor genes in vertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones Gareth

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sensing bitter tastes is crucial for many animals because it can prevent them from ingesting harmful foods. This process is mainly mediated by the bitter taste receptors (T2R, which are largely expressed in the taste buds. Previous studies have identified some T2R gene repertoires, and marked variation in repertoire size has been noted among species. However, the mechanisms underlying the evolution of vertebrate T2R genes remain poorly understood. Results To better understand the evolutionary pattern of these genes, we identified 16 T2R gene repertoires based on the high coverage genome sequences of vertebrates and studied the evolutionary changes in the number of T2R genes during birth-and-death evolution using the reconciled-tree method. We found that the number of T2R genes and the fraction of pseudogenes vary extensively among species. Based on the results of phylogenetic analysis, we showed that T2R gene families in teleost fishes are more diverse than those in tetrapods. In addition to the independent gene expansions in teleost fishes, frogs and mammals, lineage-specific gene duplications were also detected in lizards. Furthermore, extensive gains and losses of T2R genes were detected in each lineage during their evolution, resulting in widely differing T2R gene repertoires. Conclusion These results further support the hypotheses that T2R gene repertoires are closely related to the dietary habits of different species and that birth-and-death evolution is associated with adaptations to dietary changes.

  1. Network Generation Model Based on Evolution Dynamics To Generate Benchmark Graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Pasta, Muhammad Qasim

    2016-01-01

    Network generation models provide an understanding of the dynamics behind the formation and evolution of different networks including social networks, technological networks and biological networks. Two important applications of these models are to study the evolution dynamics of network formation and to generate benchmark networks with known community structures. Research has been conducted in both these directions relatively independent of the other application area. This creates a disjunct between real world networks and the networks generated to study community detection algorithms. In this paper, we propose to study both these application areas together i.e.\\ introduce a network generation model based on evolution dynamics of real world networks and generate networks with community structures that can be used as benchmark graphs to study community detection algorithms. The generated networks possess tunable modular structures which can be used to generate networks with known community structures. We stud...

  2. 2D pattern evolution constrained by complex network dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Rocha, L E C; Costa, Luciano da Fontoura; Rocha, Luis Enrique Correa da

    2006-01-01

    Complex networks have established themselves along the last years as being particularly suitable and flexible for representing and modeling several complex natural and human-made systems. At the same time in which the structural intricacies of such networks are being revealed and understood, efforts have also been directed at investigating how such connectivity properties define and constrain the dynamics of systems unfolding on such structures. However, lesser attention has been focused on hybrid systems, \\textit{i.e.} involving more than one type of network and/or dynamics. Because several real systems present such an organization (\\textit{e.g.} the dynamics of a disease coexisting with the dynamics of the immune system), it becomes important to address such hybrid systems. The current paper investigates a specific system involving a diffusive (linear and non-linear) dynamics taking place in a regular network while interacting with a complex network of defensive agents following Erd\\"os-R\\'enyi and Barab\\'a...

  3. Dynamical evolution of viscous disks around be stars. II. Polarimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haubois, X. [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS UMR 8109, UPMC, Université Paris Diderot, 5 place Jules Janssen, F-92195 Meudon (France); Mota, B. C.; Carciofi, A. C.; Bednarski, D. [Instituto de Astronomia, Geofísica e Ciências Atmosféricas, Universidade de São Paulo, Rua do Matão 1226, Cidade Universitária, São Paulo, SP 05508-090 (Brazil); Draper, Z. H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, 3800 Finnerty Road, Victoria, BC V8P 5C2 (Canada); Wisniewski, J. P. [H. L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, 440 West Brooks St Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Rivinius, Th., E-mail: xavier.haubois@obspm.fr [European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Casilla 19001, Santiago 19 (Chile)

    2014-04-10

    Be stars exhibit variability for a great number of observables. Putting the pieces of the disk dynamics together is not an easy task and requires arduous modeling before achieving a good fit to the observational data. In order to guide the modeling process and make it more efficient, it is very instructive to investigate reference dynamical cases. This paper focuses on continuum polarimetric quantities and is the second of a series that aims to demonstrate the capacity of deriving the dynamical history and fundamental parameters of a classical Be star through follow-up of various observables. After a detailed study of the different opacities at play in the formation of polarized spectra, we investigate predictions of polarimetric observables in the continuum for different dynamical scenarios. Our models are based on a coupling of a hydrodynamic viscous decretion simulations in a disk and a three-dimensional non-LTE radiative transfer code. Through introduction of the polarization color diagram (PCD), we show that certain combinations of polarimetric observables exhibit features that are characteristic of a mass-loss history. This diagram also enables estimates of fundamental parameters such as the inclination angle, disk density scale, and the α viscous diffusion parameter. We present the PCD as a powerful diagnosis tool to track the dynamical phases of a Be star, such as disk build-up, dissipation, periodic, and episodic outbursts. Finally, we confront our models with observations of four Be stars that exhibited long-term polarimetric activity.

  4. Evolution and Dynamics of a Solar Active Prominence

    CERN Document Server

    Magara, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    The life of a solar active prominence, one of the most remarkable objects on the Sun, is full of dynamics; after first appearing on the Sun the prominence continuously evolves with various internal motions and eventually produces a global eruption toward the interplane- tary space. Here we report that the whole life of an active prominence is successfully re- produced by performing as long-term a magnetohydrodynamic simulation of a magnetized prominence plasma as was ever done. The simulation reveals underlying dynamic processes that give rise to observed properties of an active prominence: invisible subsurface flows self- consistently produce the cancellation of magnetic flux observed at the photosphere, while observed and somewhat counterintuitive strong upflows are driven against gravity by en- hanced gas pressure gradient force along a magnetic field line locally standing vertical. The most highlighted dynamic event, transition into an eruptive phase, occurs as a natural con- sequence of the self-consiste...

  5. Dynamic evolution of cross-correlations in the Chinese stock market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Fei; Zhou, Wei-Xing

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of cross-correlations is extensively applied for the understanding of interconnections in stock markets and the portfolio risk estimation. Current studies of correlations in Chinese market mainly focus on the static correlations between return series, and this calls for an urgent need to investigate their dynamic correlations. Our study aims to reveal the dynamic evolution of cross-correlations in the Chinese stock market, and offer an exact interpretation for the evolution behavior. The correlation matrices constructed from the return series of 367 A-share stocks traded on the Shanghai Stock Exchange from January 4, 1999 to December 30, 2011 are calculated over a moving window with a size of 400 days. The evolutions of the statistical properties of the correlation coefficients, eigenvalues, and eigenvectors of the correlation matrices are carefully analyzed. We find that the stock correlations are significantly increased in the periods of two market crashes in 2001 and 2008, during which only five eigenvalues significantly deviate from the random correlation matrix, and the systemic risk is higher in these volatile periods than calm periods. By investigating the significant contributors of the deviating eigenvectors in different time periods, we observe a dynamic evolution behavior in business sectors such as IT, electronics, and real estate, which lead the rise (drop) before (after) the crashes. Our results provide new perspectives for the understanding of the dynamic evolution of cross-correlations in the Chines stock markets, and the result of risk estimation is valuable for the application of risk management.

  6. Chemical spots and their dynamical evolution on HgMn stars

    CERN Document Server

    Korhonen, Heidi; Briquet, Maryline; Gonzalez, Federico; Savanov, Igor

    2010-01-01

    Our recent studies of late B-type stars with HgMn peculiarity revealed for the first time the presence of fast dynamical evolution of chemical spots on their surfaces. These observations suggest a hitherto unknown physical process operating in the stars with radiative outer envelopes. Furthermore, we have also discovered existence of magnetic fields on these stars that have up to now been thought to be non-magnetic. Here we will discuss the dynamical spot evolution on HD 11753 and our new results on magnetic fields on AR Aur.

  7. Stochastic evolutions of dynamic traffic flow modeling and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Xiqun (Michael); Shi, Qixin

    2015-01-01

    This book reveals the underlying mechanisms of complexity and stochastic evolutions of traffic flows. Using Eulerian and Lagrangian measurements, the authors propose lognormal headway/spacing/velocity distributions and subsequently develop a Markov car-following model to describe drivers’ random choices concerning headways/spacings, putting forward a stochastic fundamental diagram model for wide scattering flow-density points. In the context of highway onramp bottlenecks, the authors present a traffic flow breakdown probability model and spatial-temporal queuing model to improve the stability and reliability of road traffic flows. This book is intended for researchers and graduate students in the fields of transportation engineering and civil engineering.

  8. Do group dynamics play a role in the evolution of member galaxies?

    CERN Document Server

    Hou, Annie; Balogh, Michael L; McGee, Sean L; Wilman, David J; Connelly, Jennifer L; Harris, William E; Mok, Angus; Mulchaey, John S; Bower, Richard G; Finoguenov, Alexis

    2013-01-01

    We examine galaxy groups from the present epoch to z = 1 to explore the impact of group dynamics on galaxy evolution. We use group catalagues from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), the Group Environment and Evolution Collaboration (GEEC) and the high redshift GEEC2 sample to study how the observed member properties depend on galaxy stellar mass, group dynamical mass and dynamical state of the host group. We find a strong correlation between the fraction of non-star-forming (quiescent) galaxies and galaxy stellar mass, but do not detect a significant difference in the quiescent fraction with group dynamical mass, within our sample halo mass range of 10^13-10^14.5 M_sun, or with dynamical sate. However, at a redshift of approximately 0.4 we do see some evidence that the quiescent fraction in low mass galaxies (log(M_star/M_sun) 10.5), evolution is most strongly correlated to the stellar mass of a galaxy with little or no additional effect related to either the group dynamical mass or dynamical state. For lo...

  9. Long-term dynamical evolution of dusty ejecta from Deimos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makuch, Martin; Krivov, Alexander V.; Spahn, Frank

    2005-04-01

    We re-assess expected properties of the presumed dust belt of Mars formed by impact ejecta from Deimos. Previous studies have shown that dynamics of Deimos particles are dominated by two perturbing forces: radiation pressure (RP) and Mars' oblateness (J2). At the same time, they have demonstrated that lifetimes of particles, especially of grains about ten of micrometers in size, may reach more than 104 years. On such timescales, the Poynting-Robertson drag (PR) becomes important. Here we provide a study of the dynamics under the combined action of all three perturbing forces. We show that a PR decay of the semimajor axes leads to an adiabatic decrease of amplitudes and periods of oscillations in orbital inclinations predicted in the framework of the underlying RP+J2 problem. Furthermore, we show that smallest of the long-lived Deimos grains (radius≈5- 10μm) may reach a chaotic regime, resulting in unpredictable and abrupt changes of their dynamics. The particles just above that size ( ≈10- 15μm) should be the most abundant in the Deimos torus. Our dynamical analysis, combined with a more accurate study of the particle lifetimes, provides corrections to earlier predictions about the dimensions and geometry of the Deimos torus. In addition to a population, appreciably inclined and shifted towards the Sun, the torus should contain a more contracted, less asymmetric, and less tilted component between the orbits of Phobos and Deimos.

  10. Dynamic evolution of Rht-1 homologous regions in grass genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bread wheat contains A, B, and D subgenomes with its well characterized ancestral genomes that exist at the diploid and tetraploid levels. Therefore, the wheat genome system acts as a model specie for studying genome evolutionary dynamics. Here, we performed intra- and inter-species comparative ana...

  11. Sensitivity of train stochastic dynamics to long-term evolution of track irregularities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lestoille, N.; Soize, C.; Funfschilling, C.

    2016-05-01

    The influence of the track geometry on the dynamic response of the train is of great concern for the railway companies, because they have to guarantee the safety of the train passengers in ensuring the stability of the train. In this paper, the long-term evolution of the dynamic response of the train on a stretch of the railway track is studied with respect to the long-term evolution of the track geometry. The characterisation of the long-term evolution of the train response allows the railway companies to start off maintenance operations of the track at the best moment. The study is performed using measurements of the track geometry, which are carried out very regularly by a measuring train. A stochastic model of the studied stretch of track is created in order to take into account the measurement uncertainties in the track geometry. The dynamic response of the train is simulated with a multibody software. A noise is added in output of the simulation to consider the uncertainties in the computational model of the train dynamics. Indicators on the dynamic response of the train are defined, allowing to visualize the long-term evolution of the stability and the comfort of the train, when the track geometry deteriorates.

  12. Dynamical and chemical evolution of the thin disc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Just, A.; Rybizki, J.

    2016-09-01

    Our detailed analytic local disc model (JJ-model) quantifies the interrelation between kinematic properties (e.g. velocity dispersions and asymmetric drift), spatial parameters (scale-lengths and vertical density profiles), and properties of stellar sub-populations (age and abundance distributions). Any consistent radial extension of the disc evolution model should predict specific features in the different distribution functions and in their correlations. Large spectroscopic surveys (SEGUE, RAVE, APOGEE, Gaia-ESO) allow significant constraints on the long-term evolution of the thin disc. We discuss the qualitative difference of correlations (like the α-enhancement as function of metallicity) and distribution functions (e.g. in [Mg/H] or [Fe/H]) for the construction of a disc model. In the framework of the JJ-model we build a local chemical enrichment model and show that significant vertical gradients for main sequence and red clump stars are expected in the thin disc. A Jeans analysis of the asymmetric drift provides a link to the radial structure of the disc. The derived metallicity-dependent radial scale-lengths can be combined in the future with the abundance distributions at different Galactocentric distances to construct full disc models. We expect to be able to constrain possible scenarios of inside-out growth of the thin disc and to characterise those populations, which require significant radial migration.

  13. Dynamics of genome size evolution in birds and mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feschotte, Cédric

    2017-01-01

    Genome size in mammals and birds shows remarkably little interspecific variation compared with other taxa. However, genome sequencing has revealed that many mammal and bird lineages have experienced differential rates of transposable element (TE) accumulation, which would be predicted to cause substantial variation in genome size between species. Thus, we hypothesize that there has been covariation between the amount of DNA gained by transposition and lost by deletion during mammal and avian evolution, resulting in genome size equilibrium. To test this model, we develop computational methods to quantify the amount of DNA gained by TE expansion and lost by deletion over the last 100 My in the lineages of 10 species of eutherian mammals and 24 species of birds. The results reveal extensive variation in the amount of DNA gained via lineage-specific transposition, but that DNA loss counteracted this expansion to various extents across lineages. Our analysis of the rate and size spectrum of deletion events implies that DNA removal in both mammals and birds has proceeded mostly through large segmental deletions (>10 kb). These findings support a unified “accordion” model of genome size evolution in eukaryotes whereby DNA loss counteracting TE expansion is a major determinant of genome size. Furthermore, we propose that extensive DNA loss, and not necessarily a dearth of TE activity, has been the primary force maintaining the greater genomic compaction of flying birds and bats relative to their flightless relatives. PMID:28179571

  14. Dynamical and chemical evolution of the thin disc

    CERN Document Server

    Just, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Our detailed analytic local disc model (JJ-model) quantifies the interrelation between kinematic properties (e.g. velocity dispersions and asymmetric drift), spatial parameters (scale-lengths and vertical density profiles), and properties of stellar sub-populations (age and abundance distributions). Any consistent radial extension of the disc evolution model should predict specific features in the different distribution functions and in their correlations. Large spectroscopic surveys (SEGUE, RAVE, APOGEE, Gaia-ESO) allow significant constraints on the long-term evolution of the thin disc. We discuss the qualitative difference of correlations (like the alpha-enhancement as function of metallicity) and distribution functions (e.g. in [Mg/H] or [Fe/H]) for the construction of a disc model. In the framework of the JJ-model we build a local chemical enrichment model and show that significant vertical gradients for main sequence and red clump stars are expected in the thin disc. A Jeans analysis of the asymmetric d...

  15. Dynamic evolution of coherent vortex dipole in atmospheric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinhong; Zeng, Jun

    2017-01-01

    The analytical expression for the cross-spectral density function of Gaussian Schell-model (GSM) beams with coherent vortex dipole (CVD) propagating through atmospheric turbulence is derived, which enables us to study the evolution process of CVD propagating through atmospheric turbulence, where the influences of the beams parameters and atmospheric turbulence parameters on the ratio of critical off-axis distance to the waist width are stressed. It shows that the evolution process of the CVD depends on the off-axis distance. The larger the off-axis distance is, the more the number of CVD is. When the off-axis distance is zero, the position of coherent vortices with positive and negative topological charge of CVD propagating through atmospheric turbulence is always symmetry. When the off-axis distance is big enough, compared with the situation at source plane, the orientation of the positive coherent vortex of inherent CVD and negative coherent vortex of that rotates 180° in the far field. The larger the structure constant and the waist width are, as well as the smaller the spatial correlation length and the inner scale are, the smaller the ratio ac/w0 is. Besides, the ratio ac/w0 will no longer change when the spatial correlation length or the inner scale increases to a certain value, whereas the outer scale has no effect on the ratio.

  16. Glycomics: revealing the dynamic ecology and evolution of sugar molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Stevan A; Gagneux, Pascal

    2016-03-01

    Sugars are the most functionally and structurally diverse molecules in the biological world. Glycan structures range from tiny single monosaccharide units to giant chains thousands of units long. Some glycans are branched, their monosaccharides linked together in many different combinations and orientations. Some exist as solitary molecules; others are conjugated to proteins and lipids and alter their collective functional properties. In addition to structural and storage roles, glycan molecules participate in and actively regulate physiological and developmental processes. Glycans also mediate cellular interactions within and between individuals. Their roles in ecology and evolution are pivotal, but not well studied because glycan biochemistry requires different methods than standard molecular biology practice. The properties of glycans are in some ways convenient, and in others challenging. Glycans vary on organismal timescales, and in direct response to physiological and ecological conditions. Their mature structures are physical records of both genetic and environmental influences during maturation. We describe the scope of natural glycan variation and discuss how studying glycans will allow researchers to further integrate the fields of ecology and evolution.

  17. The mathematical law of evolutionary information dynamics and an observer's evolution regularities

    CERN Document Server

    Lerner, Vladimir S

    2011-01-01

    An interactive stochastics, evaluated by an entropy functional (EF) of a random field and informational process' path functional (IPF), allows us modeling the evolutionary information processes and revealing regularities of evolution dynamics. Conventional Shannon's information measure evaluates a sequence of the process' static events for each information state and do not reveal hidden dynamic connections between these events. The paper formulates the mathematical forms of the information regularities, based on a minimax variation principle (VP) for IPF, applied to the evolution's both random microprocesses and dynamic macroprocesses. The paper shows that the VP single form of the mathematical law leads to the following evolutionary regularities: -creation of the order from stochastics through the evolutionary macrodynamics, described by a gradient of dynamic potential, evolutionary speed and the evolutionary conditions of a fitness and diversity; -the evolutionary hierarchy with growing information values a...

  18. Eventful Evolution of Giant Molecular Clouds in Dynamically Evolving Spiral Arms

    CERN Document Server

    Baba, Junichi; Saitoh, Takayuki R

    2016-01-01

    The formation and evolution of giant molecular clouds (GMCs) in spiral galaxies have been investigated in the traditional framework of the combined quasi-stationary density wave and galactic shock model. However, our understanding of the dynamics of spiral arms is changing from the traditional spiral model to a dynamically evolving spiral model. In this study, we investigate the structure and evolution of GMCs in a dynamically evolving spiral arm using a three-dimensional N-body/hydrodynamic simulation of a barred spiral galaxy at parsec-scale resolution. This simulation incorporated self-gravity, molecular hydrogen formation, radiative cooling, heating due to interstellar far-ultraviolet radiation, and stellar feedback by both HII regions and Type-II supernovae. In contrast to a simple expectation based on the traditional spiral model, the GMCs exhibited no systematic evolutionary sequence across the spiral arm. Our simulation showed that the GMCs behaved as highly dynamic objects with eventful lives involvi...

  19. The Evolution of Open Magnetic Flux Driven by Photospheric Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linker, Jon A.; Lionello, Roberto; Mikic, Zoran; Titov, Viacheslav S.; Antiochos, Spiro K.

    2010-01-01

    The coronal magnetic field is of paramount importance in solar and heliospheric physics. Two profoundly different views of the coronal magnetic field have emerged. In quasi-steady models, the predominant source of open magnetic field is in coronal holes. In contrast, in the interchange model, the open magnetic flux is conserved, and the coronal magnetic field can only respond to the photospheric evolution via interchange reconnection. In this view the open magnetic flux diffuses through the closed, streamer belt fields, and substantial open flux is present in the streamer belt during solar minimum. However, Antiochos and co-workers, in the form of a conjecture, argued that truly isolated open flux cannot exist in a configuration with one heliospheric current sheet (HCS) - it will connect via narrow corridors to the polar coronal hole of the same polarity. This contradicts the requirements of the interchange model. We have performed an MHD simulation of the solar corona up to 20R solar to test both the interchange model and the Antiochos conjecture. We use a synoptic map for Carrington Rotation 1913 as the boundary condition for the model, with two small bipoles introduced into the region where a positive polarity extended coronal hole forms. We introduce flows at the photospheric boundary surface to see if open flux associated with the bipoles can be moved into the closed-field region. Interchange reconnection does occur in response to these motions. However, we find that the open magnetic flux cannot be simply injected into closed-field regions - the flux eventually closes down and disconnected flux is created. Flux either opens or closes, as required, to maintain topologically distinct open and closed field regions, with no indiscriminate mixing of the two. The early evolution conforms to the Antiochos conjecture in that a narrow corridor of open flux connects the portion of the coronal hole that is nearly detached by one of the bipoles. In the later evolution, a

  20. A Descriptive Model of Robot Team and the Dynamic Evolution of Robot Team Cooperation

    OpenAIRE

    Shu-qin Li; Lan Shuai; Xian-yi Cheng; Zhen-min Tang; Jing-yu Yang

    2005-01-01

    At present, the research on robot team cooperation is still in qualitative analysis phase and lacks the description model that can quantitatively describe the dynamical evolution of team cooperative relationships with constantly changeable task demand in Multi-robot field. First this paper whole and static describes organization model HWROM of robot team, then uses Markov course and Bayesian theorem for reference, dynamical describes the team cooperative relationships building. Finally from c...

  1. Evolution and Dynamics of a Matter creation model

    CERN Document Server

    Pan, Supriya; Paliathanasis, Andronikos; Slagter, Reinoud Jan

    2016-01-01

    In the flat Friedmann-Lema\\^{\\i}tre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) geometry, we consider the expansion of the universe powered by the gravitationally induced `adiabatic' matter creation. To demonstrate how matter creation works well with the expanding universe, we have considered a general creation rate and analyzed this rate in the framework of dynamical analysis. The dynamical analysis hints the presence of a non-singular universe (without the big bang singularity) with two successive accelerated phases, one at the very early phase of the universe (i.e., inflation), and the other one describes the current accelerating universe, where this early, late accelerated phases are associated with an unstable fixed point (i.e., repeller) and a stable fixed (attractor) points, respectively. We have described this phenomena by analytic solutions of the Hubble function and the scale factor of the FLRW universe. Using Jacobi Last multiplier method, we have found a Lagrangian for this matter creation rate describing this scenar...

  2. Evolution and extinction dynamics in rugged fitness landscapes

    CERN Document Server

    Brandt, P S M; Brandt, Paolo Sibani Michael; Alstroem, Preben

    1997-01-01

    Macroevolution is considered as a problem of stochastic dynamics in a system with many competing agents. Evolutionary events (speciations and extinctions) are triggered by fitness records found by random exploration of the agents' fitness landscapes. As a consequence, the average fitness in the system increases logarithmically with time, while the rate of extinction steadily decreases. This dynamics is studied by numerical simulations and, in a simpler mean field version, analytically. We also study the effect of externally added `mass' extinctions. The predictions for various quantities of paleontological interest (life-time distributions, distribution of event sizes and behavior of the rate of extinction) are robust and in good agreement with available data. Brief version of parts of this work have been published as Letters. (PRL 75, 2055, (1995) and PRL, 79, 1413, (1997))

  3. Dynamics and collisional evolution of closely packed planetary systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jason A.; Steffen, Jason H.; Lombardi, J. C., Jr.; Rasio, Frederic A.

    2017-10-01

    High-multiplicity Kepler systems (referred to as Kepler multis) are often tightly packed and may be on the verge of instability. Many systems of this type could have experienced past instabilities, where the compact orbits and often low densities make physical collisions likely outcomes. We use numerical simulations to study the dynamical instabilities and planet-planet interactions in a synthetically generated sample of closely packed, high-multiplicity systems. We focus specifically on systems resembling Kepler-11, a Kepler multi with six planets, and run a suite of dynamical integrations, sampling the initial orbital parameters around the nominal values reported in Lissauer et al. (2011a), finding that most of the realizations are unstable, resulting in orbit crossings and, eventually, collisions and mergers. We study in detail the dependence of stability on the orbital parameters of the planets and planet-pair characteristics to identify possible precursors to instability, compare the systems that emerge from dynamical instabilities to the observed Kepler sample (after applying observational corrections), and propose possible observable signatures of these instabilities. We examine the characteristics of each planet-planet collision, categorizing collisions by the degree of contact and collision energy, and find that grazing collisions are more common than direct impacts. Since the structure of many planets found in Kepler multis is such that the mass is dominated by a rocky core, but the volume is dominated by a low-density gaseous envelope, the sticky-sphere approximation may not be valid, and we present hydrodynamic calculations of planet-planet collisions clearly deviating from this approximation. Finally, we rerun a subset of our dynamical calculations using instead a modified prescription to handle collisions, finding, in general, higher multiplicity remnant systems.

  4. Markovian evolution of quantum coherence under symmetric dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lostaglio, Matteo; Korzekwa, Kamil; Milne, Antony

    2017-09-01

    Both conservation laws and practical restrictions impose symmetry constraints on the dynamics of open quantum systems. In the case of time-translation symmetry, which arises naturally in many physically relevant scenarios, the quantum coherence between energy eigenstates becomes a valuable resource for quantum information processing. In this work, we identify the minimum amount of decoherence compatible with this symmetry for a given population dynamics. This yields a generalization to higher-dimensional systems of the relation T2≤2 T1 for qubit decoherence and relaxation times. It also enables us to witness and assess the role of non-Markovianity as a resource for coherence preservation and transfer. Moreover, we discuss the relationship between ergodicity and the ability of Markovian dynamics to indefinitely sustain a superposition of different energy states. Finally, we establish a formal connection between the resource-theoretic and the master equation approaches to thermodynamics, with the former being a non-Markovian generalization of the latter. Our work thus brings the abstract study of quantum coherence as a resource towards the realm of actual physical applications.

  5. Schumpeterian economic dynamics as a quantifiable model of evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurner, Stefan; Klimek, Peter; Hanel, Rudolf

    2010-07-01

    We propose a simple quantitative model of Schumpeterian economic dynamics. New goods and services are endogenously produced through combinations of existing goods. As soon as new goods enter the market, they may compete against already existing goods. In other words, new products can have destructive effects on existing goods. As a result of this competition mechanism, existing goods may be driven out from the market—often causing cascades of secondary defects (Schumpeterian gales of destruction). The model leads to generic dynamics characterized by phases of relative economic stability followed by phases of massive restructuring of markets—which could be interpreted as Schumpeterian business 'cycles'. Model time series of product diversity and productivity reproduce several stylized facts of economics time series on long timescales, such as GDP or business failures, including non-Gaussian fat tailed distributions and volatility clustering. The model is phrased in an open, non-equilibrium setup which can be understood as a self-organized critical system. Its diversity dynamics can be understood by the time-varying topology of the active production networks.

  6. Evolution and dynamics of a matter creation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, S.; Haro, J. de; Paliathanasis, A.; Slagter, R. J.

    2016-08-01

    In a flat Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) geometry, we consider the expansion of the universe powered by the gravitationally induced `adiabatic' matter creation. To demonstrate how matter creation works well with the expanding universe, we have considered a general creation rate and analysed this rate in the framework of dynamical analysis. The dynamical analysis hints the presence of a non-singular universe (without the big bang singularity) with two successive accelerated phases, one at the very early phase of the universe (i.e. inflation), and the other one describes the current accelerating universe, where this early, late accelerated phases are associated with an unstable fixed point (i.e. repeller) and a stable fixed point (attractor), respectively. We have described this phenomena by analytic solutions of the Hubble function and the scale factor of the FLRW universe. Using Jacobi last multiplier method, we have found a Lagrangian for this matter creation rate describing this scenario of the universe. To match with our early physics results, we introduce an equivalent dynamics driven by a single scalar field, discuss the associated observable parameters and compare them with the latest Planck data sets. Finally, introducing the teleparallel modified gravity, we have established an equivalent gravitational theory in the framework of matter creation.

  7. Dynamical Evolution of Elliptical Galaxies with Central Singularities

    CERN Document Server

    Merritt, D; Merritt, David; Quinlan, Gerald

    1997-01-01

    We study the effect of a massive central singularity on the structure of a triaxial galaxy using N-body simulations. Starting from a single initial model, we grow black holes with various final masses Mh and at various rates, ranging from impulsive to adiabatic. In all cases, the galaxy achieves a final shape that is nearly spherical at the center and close to axisymmetric throughout. However, the rate of change of the galaxy's shape depends strongly on the ratio Mh/Mg of black hole mass to galaxy mass. When Mh/Mg 2%, the galaxy becomes axisymmetric in little more than a crossing time. We propose that the rapid evolution toward axisymmetric shapes that occurs when Mh/Mg > 2% provides a negative feedback mechanism which limits the mass of central black holes by cutting off their supply of fuel.

  8. Dynamically Encircling Exceptional Points: Exact Evolution and Polarization State Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Absar U.; Zhen, Bo; Soljačić, Marin; Khajavikhan, Mercedeh; Christodoulides, Demetrios N.

    2017-03-01

    We show that a two-level non-Hermitian Hamiltonian with constant off-diagonal exchange elements can be analyzed exactly when the underlying exceptional point is perfectly encircled in the complex plane. The state evolution of this system is explicitly obtained in terms of an ensuing transfer matrix, even for large encirclements, regardless of adiabatic conditions. Our results clearly explain the direction-dependent nature of this process and why in the adiabatic limit its outcome is dominated by a specific eigenstate—irrespective of initial conditions. Moreover, numerical simulations suggest that this mechanism can still persist in the presence of nonlinear effects. We further show that this robust process can be harnessed to realize an optical omnipolarizer: a configuration that generates a desired polarization output regardless of the input polarization state, while from the opposite direction it always produces the counterpart eigenstate.

  9. Supernova Feedback in Molecular Clouds: Global Evolution and Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Körtgen, Bastian; Banerjee, Robi; Vázquez-Semadeni, Enrique; Zamora-Avilés, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    We use magnetohydrodynamical simulations of converging warm neutral medium flows to analyse the formation and global evolution of magnetised and turbulent molecular clouds subject to supernova feedback from massive stars. We show that supernova feedback alone fails to disrupt entire, gravitationally bound, molecular clouds, but is able to disperse small--sized (~10 pc) regions on timescales of less than 1 Myr. Efficient radiative cooling of the supernova remnant as well as strong compression of the surrounding gas result in non-persistent energy and momentum input from the supernovae. However, if the time between subsequent supernovae is short and they are clustered, large hot bubbles form that disperse larger regions of the parental cloud. On longer timescales, supernova feedback increases the amount of gas with moderate temperatures (T~300-3000 K). Despite its inability to disrupt molecular clouds, supernova feedback leaves a strong imprint on the star formation process. We find an overall reduction of the ...

  10. Dynamical evolution of the community structure of complex earthquake network

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, Sumiyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Earthquake network is known to be complex in the sense that it is scale-free, small-world, hierarchically organized and assortatively mixed. Here, the time evolution of earthquake networks is analyzed around main shocks in the context of the community structure. It is found that the maximum of the modularity measure quantifying existence of communities exhibits a peculiar behavior: its maximum value stays at a large value before a main shock, suddenly drops to a small values at the main shock, and then increases to relax to a large value again relatively slowly. In this way, a main shock is characterized in the language of theory of complex networks. The result is also interpreted in terms of the clustering structure of the earthquake network.

  11. Dynamic Convergent Evolution Drives the Passage Adaptation across 48 Years' History of H3N2 Influenza Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui; Deng, Qiang; Ng, Sock Hoon; Lee, Raphael Tze Chuen; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Zhai, Weiwei

    2016-12-01

    Influenza viruses are often propagated in a diverse set of culturing media and additional substitutions known as passage adaptation can cause extra evolution in the target strain, leading to ineffective vaccines. Using 25,482 H3N2 HA1 sequences curated from Global Initiative on Sharing All Influenza Data and National Center for Biotechnology Information databases, we found that passage adaptation is a very dynamic process that changes over time and evolves in a seesaw like pattern. After crossing the species boundary from bird to human in 1968, the influenza H3N2 virus evolves to be better adapted to the human environment and passaging them in embryonated eggs (i.e., an avian environment) leads to increasingly stronger positive selection. On the contrary, passage adaptation to the mammalian cell lines changes from positive selection to negative selection. Using two statistical tests, we identified 19 codon positions around the receptor binding domain strongly contributing to passage adaptation in the embryonated egg. These sites show strong convergent evolution and overlap extensively with positively selected sites identified in humans, suggesting that passage adaptation can confound many of the earlier studies on influenza evolution. Interestingly, passage adaptation in recent years seems to target a few codon positions in antigenic surface epitopes, which makes it difficult to produce antigenically unaltered vaccines using embryonic eggs. Our study outlines another interesting scenario whereby both convergent and adaptive evolution are working in synchrony driving viral adaptation. Future studies from sequence analysis to vaccine production need to take careful consideration of passage adaptation. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Comparison of the Internal Dynamics of Metalloproteases Provides New Insights on Their Function and Evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique F Carvalho

    Full Text Available Metalloproteases have evolved in a vast number of biological systems, being one of the most diverse types of proteases and presenting a wide range of folds and catalytic metal ions. Given the increasing understanding of protein internal dynamics and its role in enzyme function, we are interested in assessing how the structural heterogeneity of metalloproteases translates into their dynamics. Therefore, the dynamical profile of the clan MA type protein thermolysin, derived from an Elastic Network Model of protein structure, was evaluated against those obtained from a set of experimental structures and molecular dynamics simulation trajectories. A close correspondence was obtained between modes derived from the coarse-grained model and the subspace of functionally-relevant motions observed experimentally, the later being shown to be encoded in the internal dynamics of the protein. This prompted the use of dynamics-based comparison methods that employ such coarse-grained models in a representative set of clan members, allowing for its quantitative description in terms of structural and dynamical variability. Although members show structural similarity, they nonetheless present distinct dynamical profiles, with no apparent correlation between structural and dynamical relatedness. However, previously unnoticed dynamical similarity was found between the relevant members Carboxypeptidase Pfu, Leishmanolysin, and Botulinum Neurotoxin Type A, despite sharing no structural similarity. Inspection of the respective alignments shows that dynamical similarity has a functional basis, namely the need for maintaining proper intermolecular interactions with the respective substrates. These results suggest that distinct selective pressure mechanisms act on metalloproteases at structural and dynamical levels through the course of their evolution. This work shows how new insights on metalloprotease function and evolution can be assessed with comparison schemes that

  13. Laboratory and computational investigation of dynamics and permeability evolution in clay-smear type fault zones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heege, J.H. ter; Wassing, B.B.T.; Orlic, B.; Colenell, M.B.; Giger, S.B.; Ciftici, N.B.; Ricchetti, M.; Clark, P.; Harbers, C.

    2012-01-01

    Practical application of fault seal analysis for reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and CO2 storage, and for predicting the dynamics of reservoirs under stress, requires that both small and large scale processes within and around fault zones are understood and that structural evolution is rela

  14. Evolution and biogeography of Haemonchus contortus, linking faunal dynamics in space and time

    Science.gov (United States)

    History is the foundation that informs about the nuances of faunal assembly that are essential in understanding the dynamic nature of the host-parasite interface. All of our knowledge begins and ends with evolution, ecology and biogeography as these interacting facets determine the history of biodi...

  15. Combined effects of surface conditions, boundary layer dynamics and chemistry on diurnal SOA evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, R.H.H.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Ganzeveld, L.N.; Kabat, P.; Jimenez, J.L.; Farmer, D.K.; Heerwaarden, van C.C.; Mammarella, I.

    2012-01-01

    We study the combined effects of land surface conditions, atmospheric boundary layer dynamics and chemistry on the diurnal evolution of biogenic secondary organic aerosol in the atmospheric boundary layer, using a model that contains the essentials of all these components. First, we evaluate the mod

  16. TREATMENT OF NONADIABATIC TRANSITIONS BY DENSITY-MATRIX EVOLUTION AND MOLECULAR-DYNAMICS SIMULATIONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MAVRI, J; BERENDSEN, HJC

    1994-01-01

    A density matrix evolution (DME) method (H.J.C. Berendsen and J. Mavri, J. Phys. Chem., 97 (1993) 13469) to simulate the dynamics of quantum systems embedded in a classical environment is presented. The DME method allows treatment of nonadiabatic transitions. As numerical examples the collinear coll

  17. From Static Content to Dynamic Communities: The Evolution of Networked Educational Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Neil; Huxley, Lesly

    2002-01-01

    Discusses Web-based educational resources in the United Kingdom, focusing on current challenges of linking content with community and static information with dynamic news. Describes the evolution of three social sciences resources and examines sustainability, the need for collaboration, and data protection and privacy concerns. (Author/LRW)

  18. Evolution of the dynamic Rayleigh-Plateau instability on liquid jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denner, Fabian; Evrard, Fabien; van Wachem, Berend; Castrejon-Pita, Alfonso Arturo; Castrejon-Pita, Jose Rafael

    2016-11-01

    The Rayleigh-Plateau instability (RPI) is the dominating mechanism leading to the breakup of surface-tension-dominated liquid jets. Although linear stability analysis has proven to be a powerful tool to study the evolution of the RPI for (quasi-)static liquid jets and filaments, in typical practical applications (e.g. inkjet printing) the inertia of liquid jets is significant, giving rise to nonlinear effects that influence the spatiotemporal evolution of the RPI and which are not captured by linear stability analysis. Using direct numerical simulation and laboratory experiments, we study the evolution of the dynamic RPI on liquid jets with different Weber and Ohnesorge numbers as well as different velocity profiles, perturbation amplitudes and wavenumbers. Our results show how inertia as well as the amplitude/wavenumber of the perturbation change the velocity and pressure fields of the liquid jet, which changes the spatiotemporal growth of the dynamic RPI and, consequently, the breakup length of the jet, with a local reversal of the RPI under certain conditions. We identify the key mechanisms that govern the complex evolution of the dynamic RPI and highlight the main differences between static and dynamic RPI. Financial support from the EPSRC (Grant EP/M021556/1), from Petrobras, from the John Fell Oxford University Press Research Fund and from the Royal Society is gratefully acknowledged.

  19. Dynamic evolution of clonal epialleles revealed by methclone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sheng; Garrett-Bakelman, Francine; Perl, Alexander E; Luger, Selina M; Zhang, Chao; To, Bik L; Lewis, Ian D; Brown, Anna L; D'Andrea, Richard J; Ross, M Elizabeth; Levine, Ross; Carroll, Martin; Melnick, Ari; Mason, Christopher E

    2014-09-27

    We describe methclone, a novel method to identify epigenetic loci that harbor large changes in the clonality of their epialleles (epigenetic alleles). Methclone efficiently analyzes genome-wide DNA methylation sequencing data. We quantify the changes using a composition entropy difference calculation and also introduce a new measure of global clonality shift, loci with epiallele shift per million loci covered, which enables comparisons between different samples to gauge overall epiallelic dynamics. Finally, we demonstrate the utility of methclone in capturing functional epiallele shifts in leukemia patients from diagnosis to relapse. Methclone is open-source and freely available at https://code.google.com/p/methclone.

  20. Chemical process dynamic optimization based on the differential evolution algorithm with an adaptive scheduling mutation strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jun; Yan, Xuefeng; Zhao, Weixiang

    2013-10-01

    To solve chemical process dynamic optimization problems, a differential evolution algorithm integrated with adaptive scheduling mutation strategy (ASDE) is proposed. According to the evolution feedback information, ASDE, with adaptive control parameters, adopts the round-robin scheduling algorithm to adaptively schedule different mutation strategies. By employing an adaptive mutation strategy and control parameters, the real-time optimal control parameters and mutation strategy are obtained to improve the optimization performance. The performance of ASDE is evaluated using a suite of 14 benchmark functions. The results demonstrate that ASDE performs better than four conventional differential evolution (DE) algorithm variants with different mutation strategies, and that the whole performance of ASDE is equivalent to a self-adaptive DE algorithm variant and better than five conventional DE algorithm variants. Furthermore, ASDE was applied to solve a typical dynamic optimization problem of a chemical process. The obtained results indicate that ASDE is a feasible and competitive optimizer for this kind of problem.

  1. Dynamics of Pre-3 Ga Crust-Mantle Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patchett, P. J.; Chase, C. G.; Vervoort, J. D.

    2004-05-01

    During 3.0 to 2.7 Ga, the Earth's crust underwent a non-uniformitarian change from a pre-3.0 Ga environment where long-term preservation of cratons was rare and difficult, to post-2.7 Ga conditions where cratons were established and new continental crust generation took place largely at craton margins. Many models view the Earth's surface during pre-3 Ga time as broadly equivalent to the post 2.7 Ga regime. Any such uniformitarian or gradual evolution cannot explain the conundrum that only a tiny amount of pre-3 Ga crust is preserved today coupled with the fact that very little pre-3 Ga crust was incorporated into the large amount of new craton that came into existence during 3.0-2.7 Ga. If large volumes of pre-3 Ga continental crust existed, it disappeared either just prior to 3 Ga, or during 3.0-2.7 Ga. To explain sudden appearance of surviving but dominantly juvenile continental crust in a model where continents were large prior to 3 Ga, it would be necessary either that pre-3 Ga continent was recycled into the mantle at sites systematically different from those where new 3.0-2.7 Ga crust was made, or that widespread continent destruction preceded the 3.0-2.7 Ga crustal genesis. From expected mantle overturn in response to the heat budget, it is likely that most pre-3 Ga crust was both more mafic and shorter-lived than after 3 Ga. Although Nd and Hf ratios for pre-3 Ga rocks are uncertain due to polymetamorphism, it appears that depleted upper mantle was widespread by 2.7 Ga, even pre-3 Ga. Depletion may have been largely achieved by formation, subduction and storage of mafic crust for periods of 200-500 m.y. The rapid change to large surviving continents during 3.0-2.7 Ga was due to declining mantle overturn, and particularly to development of the ability to maintain subduction in one zone of the earth's surface for the time needed to allow evolution to felsic igneous rock compositions. In as much as storage of subducted slabs is probably occurring today, and

  2. The dynamics of a coupled soilscape-landscape evolution model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welivitiya, Dimuth; Willgoose, Garry; Hancock, Greg

    2016-04-01

    In this study we present results obtained from a landform evolution model coupled with SSSPAM5D soilscape evolution model. This presentation will show a number of computer animations with this coupled model using a range of widely accepted soil profile weathering models, and erosion/armouring models. The animations clearly show that subtle changes in process can result in dramatic changes in long-term equilibrium hillslope and soilscape form. We will discuss the reasons for these differences, arguing from the various mathematical and physical assumptions modelled, and infer how observed hillslope form may provide identifiable (and perhaps quantifiable) landform and soilscape signatures of landscape and soilscape process, and in particular the coupling between the landscape and the soilscape. Specifically we have simulated soilscapes using 3 depth dependent weathering functions: 1) Exponential, 2) Humped and 3) Reversed exponential. The Exponential weathering function simulates physical weathering due to thermal effects, and the weathering rate exponentially decreases with depth. The Humped function simulates chemical and/or physical weathering with moisture feedbacks, where the highest weathering rate is at a finite depth below the surface and exponentially declines with depth. The Reversed exponential function simulates chemical weathering, and the highest weathering rate is at the soil-saprolite interface and exponentially decreases both above and below the interface. Both the Humped and Reversed exponential functions can be used as approximations to chemical weathering as they can be derived analytically by solving widely accepted geochemical weathering equations. The Humped function can arise where the weathering fluid is introduced at the top of the soil profile (e.g. rainfall equilibrated with carbon dioxide in the atmosphere), while the Reversed exponential can be derived when carbon dioxide is generated within the profile (e.g. by biodegradation of soil

  3. Influence of opinion dynamics on the evolution of games.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Floriana Gargiulo

    Full Text Available Under certain circumstances such as lack of information or bounded rationality, human players can take decisions on which strategy to choose in a game on the basis of simple opinions. These opinions can be modified after each round by observing own or others payoff results but can be also modified after interchanging impressions with other players. In this way, the update of the strategies can become a question that goes beyond simple evolutionary rules based on fitness and become a social issue. In this work, we explore this scenario by coupling a game with an opinion dynamics model. The opinion is represented by a continuous variable that corresponds to the certainty of the agents respect to which strategy is best. The opinions transform into actions by making the selection of an strategy a stochastic event with a probability regulated by the opinion. A certain regard for the previous round payoff is included but the main update rules of the opinion are given by a model inspired in social interchanges. We find that the fixed points of the dynamics of the coupled model are different from those of the evolutionary game or the opinion models alone. Furthermore, new features emerge such as the independence of the fraction of cooperators with respect to the topology of the social interaction network or the presence of a small fraction of extremist players.

  4. Influence of Opinion Dynamics on the Evolution of Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargiulo, Floriana; Ramasco, José J.

    2012-01-01

    Under certain circumstances such as lack of information or bounded rationality, human players can take decisions on which strategy to choose in a game on the basis of simple opinions. These opinions can be modified after each round by observing own or others payoff results but can be also modified after interchanging impressions with other players. In this way, the update of the strategies can become a question that goes beyond simple evolutionary rules based on fitness and become a social issue. In this work, we explore this scenario by coupling a game with an opinion dynamics model. The opinion is represented by a continuous variable that corresponds to the certainty of the agents respect to which strategy is best. The opinions transform into actions by making the selection of an strategy a stochastic event with a probability regulated by the opinion. A certain regard for the previous round payoff is included but the main update rules of the opinion are given by a model inspired in social interchanges. We find that the fixed points of the dynamics of the coupled model are different from those of the evolutionary game or the opinion models alone. Furthermore, new features emerge such as the independence of the fraction of cooperators with respect to the topology of the social interaction network or the presence of a small fraction of extremist players. PMID:23166600

  5. Dynamic correlation between intrahost HIV-1 quasispecies evolution and disease progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ha Youn Lee

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Quantifying the dynamics of intrahost HIV-1 sequence evolution is one means of uncovering information about the interaction between HIV-1 and the host immune system. In the chronic phase of infection, common dynamics of sequence divergence and diversity have been reported. We developed an HIV-1 sequence evolution model that simulated the effects of mutation and fitness of sequence variants. The amount of evolution was described by the distance from the founder strain, and fitness was described by the number of offspring a parent sequence produces. Analysis of the model suggested that the previously observed saturation of divergence and decrease of diversity in later stages of infection can be explained by a decrease in the proportion of offspring that are mutants as the distance from the founder strain increases rather than due to an increase of viral fitness. The prediction of the model was examined by performing phylogenetic analysis to estimate the change in the rate of evolution during infection. In agreement with our modeling, in 13 out of 15 patients (followed for 3-12 years we found that the rate of intrahost HIV-1 evolution was not constant but rather slowed down at a rate correlated with the rate of CD4+ T-cell decline. The correlation between the dynamics of the evolutionary rate and the rate of CD4+ T-cell decline, coupled with our HIV-1 sequence evolution model, explains previously conflicting observations of the relationships between the rate of HIV-1 quasispecies evolution and disease progression.

  6. Evolution of the protolunar disk: dynamics, cooling timescale and implantation of volatiles onto the Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Charnoz, Charnoz

    2015-01-01

    It is thought that the Moon accreted from the protolunar disk that was assembled after the last giant impact on Earth. Due to its high temperature, the protolunar disk may act as a thermochemical reactor in which the material is processed before being incorporated into the Moon. Outstanding issues like devolatilisation and istotopic evolution are tied to the disk evolution, however its lifetime, dynamics and thermodynamics are unknown. Here, we numerically explore the long term viscous evolution of the protolunar disk using a one dimensional model where the different phases (vapor and condensed) are vertically stratified. Viscous heating, radiative cooling, phase transitions and gravitational instability are accounted for whereas Moon s accretion is not considered for the moment. The viscosity of the gas, liquid and solid phases dictates the disk evolution. We find that (1) the vapor condenses into liquid in about 10 years, (2) a large fraction of the disk mass flows inward forming a hot and compact liquid di...

  7. The origin, dynamics, and molecular evolution of transmissible cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones EA

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Elizabeth A Jones, Yuanyuan Cheng, Katherine BelovFaculty of Veterinary Science, University of Sydney, NSW, AustraliaAbstract: Three transmissible cancers are known to have emerged naturally in the wild: canine transmissible venereal tumor (CTVT; Tasmanian devil facial tumor disease (DFTD; and a recently discovered leukemia-like cancer in soft-shell clams (Mya arenaria. These cancers have all acquired the ability to pass between individuals. DFTD emerged approximately 20 years ago and has decimated the Tasmanian devil population. CTVT arose over 10,000 years ago in an ancient breed of dog. The clam cancer is believed to have evolved at least 40 years ago. In this manuscript, we review CTVT and DFTD, the two transmissible mammalian cancers, and provide an overview of the leukemia-like cancer of clams. We showcase how genetics and genomics have enhanced our understanding of the unique biology, origins, and evolutionary histories of these rare cancers.Keywords: transmissible cancer, devil facial tumor disease, DFTD, canine transmissible venereal tumor, origin, evolution

  8. A neural network dynamics that resembles protein evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrán, Edgardo A.; Ferrara, Pascual

    1992-06-01

    We use neutral networks to classify proteins according to their sequence similarities. A network composed by 7 × 7 neurons, was trained with the Kohonen unsupervised learning algorithm using, as inputs, matrix patterns derived from the bipeptide composition of cytochrome c proteins belonging to 76 different species. As a result of the training, the network self-organized the activation of its neurons into topologically ordered maps, wherein phylogenetically related sequences were positioned close to each other. The evolution of the topological map during learning, in a representative computational experiment, roughly resembles the way in which one species evolves into several others. For instance, sequences corresponding to vertebrates, initially grouped together into one neuron, were placed in a contiguous zone of the final neural map, with sequences of fishes, amphibia, reptiles, birds and mammals associated to different neurons. Some apparent wrong classifications are due to the fact that some proteins have a greater degree of sequence identity than the one expected by phylogenetics. In the final neural map, each synaptic vector may be considered as the pattern corresponding to the ancestor of all the proteins that are attached to that neuron. Although it may be also tempting to link real time with learning epochs and to use this relationship to calibrate the molecular evolutionary clock, this is not correct because the evolutionary time schedule obtained with the neural network depends highly on the discrete way in which the winner neighborhood is decreased during learning.

  9. The Dynamical and Chemical Evolution of Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Revaz, Y; Sawala, T; Hill, V; Letarte, B; Irwin, M; Battaglia, G; Helmi, A; Shetrone, M D; Tolstoy, E; Venn, K A

    2009-01-01

    We present a large sample of fully self-consistent hydrodynamical Nbody/Tree-SPH simulations of isolated dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs). It has enabled us to identify the key physical parameters and mechanisms at the origin of the observed variety in the Local Group dSph properties. The initial total mass (gas + dark matter) of these galaxies is the main driver of their evolution. Star formation (SF) occurs in series of short bursts. In massive systems, the very short intervals between the SF peaks mimic a continuous star formation rate, while less massive systems exhibit well separated SF bursts, as identified observationally. The delay between the SF events is controlled by the gas cooling time dependence on galaxy mass. The observed global scaling relations, luminosity-mass and luminosity-metallicity, are reproduced with low scatter. We take advantage of the unprecedentedly large sample size and data homogeneity of the ESO Large Programme DART, and add to it a few independent studies, to constrain the s...

  10. Proposal of a relationship between dynamic aperture adn intensity evolution in a storage ring

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannozzi, M

    2010-01-01

    A scaling law for the time-dependence of the dynamic aperture, i.e., the region of phase space where stable motion occurs, was proposed in previous papers, about ten years ago. The use of fundamental theorems of the theory of dynamical systems allowed showing that the dynamic aperture has a logarithmic dependence on time. In this paper this result, proved by mean of numerical simulations, is used as a basis for deriving a scaling law for the intensity evolution in a storage ring. The proposed scaling law is also tested against experimental data showing a remarkable agreement.

  11. Dynamical evolution of a bulge in an N-body model of the Milky Way

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard O.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The detailed dynamical structure of the bulge in the Milky Way is currently under debate. Although kinematics of the bulge stars can be well reproduced by a boxy-bulge, the possible existence of a small embedded classical bulge can not be ruled out. We study the dynamical evolution of a small classical bulge in a model of the Milky Way using a self-consistent high resolution N-body simulation. Detailed kinematics and dynamical properties of such a bulge are presented.

  12. Modeling of microstructural evolution during dynamic recrystallization in coarse Nb microalloyed austenite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling Zhang; Wangyue Yang; Zuqing Sun

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate the microstructural evolution during dynamic recrystallization in coarse Nb microalloyed austenite in thin slab direct rolling (TSDR) processing. A model was developed to predict the change of the austenite grain size during the dynamic recrystallization, by using the law of mixtures. The equations initially developed for partial static recrystallization were used for partial dynamic recrystallization, by adjusting the value of the constant. The results show that the change of the austenite grain size can be reasonably described by using the equations developed according to the law of mixtures.

  13. Research progress of the NSFC Major Research Plan “Dynamic Disaster Evolution of Major Engineering Structures”

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The NSFC Major Research Plan aims to conduct researches at the international research frontiers on modeling of strong earthquake ground motions and strong wind or typhoon fields, and investigating the damage and failure evolution process of the major engineering structures under dynamic actions, focusing on the following two key scientific problems: (1) characteristics and laws of strong earthquake ground motions and strong wind or typhoon fields, and (2) process and mechanism of dynamic disaster evolution of the major engineering structures. For these goals, the research work is targeted at (1) modeling and predicting of strong earthquake ground motion and strong wind or typhoon fields, (2) identifying critical parameters influencing the dynamic disaster evolution of the major engineering structures, (3) analyzing the whole dynamic disaster evolution process of the major engineering structures, and (4) integration and verification of simulation systems for dynamic disaster evolution of the major engineering structures.

  14. World-trade web: Topological properties, dynamics, and evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagiolo, Giorgio; Reyes, Javier; Schiavo, Stefano

    2009-03-01

    This paper studies the statistical properties of the web of import-export relationships among world countries using a weighted-network approach. We analyze how the distributions of the most important network statistics measuring connectivity, assortativity, clustering, and centrality have coevolved over time. We show that all node-statistic distributions and their correlation structure have remained surprisingly stable in the last 20years —and are likely to do so in the future. Conversely, the distribution of (positive) link weights is slowly moving from a log-normal density towards a power law. We also characterize the autoregressive properties of network-statistics dynamics. We find that network-statistics growth rates are well-proxied by fat-tailed densities like the Laplace or the asymmetric exponential power. Finally, we find that all our results are reasonably robust to a few alternative, economically meaningful, weighting schemes.

  15. On the dynamical evolution and end states of binary centaurs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunini, A.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we perform a numerical integration of 666 fictitious binary Centaurs coming from the trans Neptunian space. Our population is restricted to tight binaries whose components have sizes between 30 and 100 km. We included the dynamical perturbations from the giant planets, Kozai Cycles induced by the Sun and tidal friction on the orbits of the binaries. We found that most binaries are disrupted during one of the close planetary encounters, making the mean lifetime of binary Centaurs much shorter than the one of single Centaurs. Nearly 10 per cent of the binaries reach a very tight circular orbit, arguing in favour of the existence of a non-negligible population of contact Centaurs. Another 10 per cent survive as a binary during their lifetime as Centaur. Our simulations favour the existence of a small population of very tight binary Centaurs.

  16. Dynamical Evolution of Sodium Anysotropies in the Exosphere of Mercury

    CERN Document Server

    Mangano, V; Milillo, A; Mura, A; Orsini, S; Leblanc, F

    2012-01-01

    The exosphere, the tenuous collisionless cloud of gas surrounding Mercury is still a poorly known object because it is the result of many various interactions between the surface, the interplanetary medium (Solar wind, photons and meteoroids), the planetary and the interplanetary magnetic fields. Many ground-based observations have allowed the detection of intense and variable sodium emissions at global and local spatial scales, the latter being mostly concentrated in the polarmid latitude regions. These regions are indeed the preferred location of solar wind precipitation on the surface of the planet. In the present paper, by using high resolution Na observations obtained at the Canary Islands with the THEMIS solar telescope, we analyze the variability of the sodium exosphere on time-scale of 1 hour and investigate the possible mechanisms that could explain the exospheric sodium emission distribution and its dynamics. Our interpretation relates the observed sodium asymmetries to the combined effects of plasm...

  17. In Situ Formation and Dynamical Evolution of Hot Jupiter Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batygin, Konstantin; Bodenheimer, Peter H.; Laughlin, Gregory P.

    2016-10-01

    Hot Jupiters, giant extrasolar planets with orbital periods shorter than ˜10 days, have long been thought to form at large radial distances, only to subsequently experience long-range inward migration. Here, we offer the contrasting view that a substantial fraction of the hot Jupiter population formed in situ via the core-accretion process. We show that under conditions appropriate to the inner regions of protoplanetary disks, rapid gas accretion can be initiated by super-Earth-type planets, comprising 10-20 Earth masses of refractory material. An in situ formation scenario leads to testable consequences, including the expectation that hot Jupiters should frequently be accompanied by additional low-mass planets with periods shorter than ˜100 days. Our calculations further demonstrate that dynamical interactions during the early stages of planetary systems’ lifetimes should increase the inclinations of such companions, rendering transits rare. High-precision radial velocity monitoring provides the best prospect for their detection.

  18. In Situ Formation and Dynamical Evolution of Hot Jupiter Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Batygin, Konstantin; Laughlin, Gregory P

    2015-01-01

    Hot Jupiters, giant extrasolar planets with orbital periods shorter than ~10 days, have long been thought to form at large radial distances, only to subsequently experience long-range inward migration. Here, we propose that in contrast with this picture, a substantial fraction of the hot Jupiter population formed in situ via the core accretion process. We show that under conditions appropriate to the inner regions of protoplanetary disks, rapid gas accretion can be initiated by Super-Earth type planets, comprising 10-20 Earth masses of refractory composition material. An in situ formation scenario leads to testable consequences, including the expectation that hot Jupiters should frequently be accompanied by additional low-mass planets with periods shorter than ~100 days. Our calculations further demonstrate that dynamical interactions during the early stages of planetary systems' lifetimes should increase the inclinations of such companions, rendering transits rare. High-precision radial velocity monitoring p...

  19. Cognitive algorithms: dynamic logic, working of the mind, evolution of consciousness and cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlovsky, Leonid I.

    2007-04-01

    The paper discusses evolution of consciousness driven by the knowledge instinct, a fundamental mechanism of the mind which determines its higher cognitive functions. Dynamic logic mathematically describes the knowledge instinct. It overcomes past mathematical difficulties encountered in modeling intelligence and relates it to mechanisms of concepts, emotions, instincts, consciousness and unconscious. The two main aspects of the knowledge instinct are differentiation and synthesis. Differentiation is driven by dynamic logic and proceeds from vague and unconscious states to more crisp and conscious states, from less knowledge to more knowledge at each hierarchical level of the mind. Synthesis is driven by dynamic logic operating in a hierarchical organization of the mind; it strives to achieve unity and meaning of knowledge: every concept finds its deeper and more general meaning at a higher level. These mechanisms are in complex relationship of symbiosis and opposition, which leads to complex dynamics of evolution of consciousness and cultures. Modeling this dynamics in a population leads to predictions for the evolution of consciousness, and cultures. Cultural predictive models can be compared to experimental data and used for improvement of human conditions. We discuss existing evidence and future research directions.

  20. Signalling and the evolution of cooperative foraging in dynamic environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin J Torney

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Understanding cooperation in animal social groups remains a significant challenge for evolutionary theory. Observed behaviours that benefit others but incur some cost appear incompatible with classical notions of natural selection; however, these behaviours may be explained by concepts such as inclusive fitness, reciprocity, intra-specific mutualism or manipulation. In this work, we examine a seemingly altruistic behaviour, the active recruitment of conspecifics to a food resource through signalling. Here collective, cooperative behaviour may provide highly nonlinear benefits to individuals, since group functionality has the potential to be far greater than the sum of the component parts, for example by enabling the effective tracking of a dynamic resource. We show that due to this effect, signalling to others is an evolutionarily stable strategy under certain environmental conditions, even when there is a cost associated to this behaviour. While exploitation is possible, in the limiting case of a sparse, ephemeral but locally abundant nutrient source, a given environmental profile will support a fixed number of signalling individuals. Through a quantitative analysis, this effective carrying capacity for cooperation is related to the characteristic length and time scales of the resource field.

  1. Fast Dynamical Evolution of Hadron Resonance Gas via Hagedorn States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beitel, M.; Gallmeister, K.; Greiner, C.

    2017-01-01

    Hagedorn states (HS) are a tool to model the hadronization process which occurs in the phase transition region between the quark gluon plasma (QGP) and the hadron resonance gas (HRG). These states are believed to appear near the Hagedorn temperature TH which in our understanding equals the critical temperature Tc . A covariantly formulated bootstrap equation is solved to generate the zoo of these particles characterized baryon number B, strangeness S and electric charge Q. These hadron-like resonances are characterized by being very massive and by not being limited to quantum numbers of known hadrons. All hadronic properties like masses, spectral functions etc. are taken from the hadronic transport model Ultra Relativistic Quantum Molecular Dynamics (UrQMD). Decay chains of single Hagedorn states provide a well description of experimentally observed multiplicity ratios of strange and multi-strange particles as the Ξ0- and the Ω‑-baryon. In addition, the final energy spectra of resulting hadrons show a thermal-like distribution with the characteristic Hagedorn temperature TH . Box calculations including these Hagedorn states are performed. Indeed, the time scales leading to equilibration of the system are drastically reduced down to 2. . . 5 fm/c.

  2. Signalling and the evolution of cooperative foraging in dynamic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torney, Colin J; Berdahl, Andrew; Couzin, Iain D

    2011-09-01

    Understanding cooperation in animal social groups remains a significant challenge for evolutionary theory. Observed behaviours that benefit others but incur some cost appear incompatible with classical notions of natural selection; however, these behaviours may be explained by concepts such as inclusive fitness, reciprocity, intra-specific mutualism or manipulation. In this work, we examine a seemingly altruistic behaviour, the active recruitment of conspecifics to a food resource through signalling. Here collective, cooperative behaviour may provide highly nonlinear benefits to individuals, since group functionality has the potential to be far greater than the sum of the component parts, for example by enabling the effective tracking of a dynamic resource. We show that due to this effect, signalling to others is an evolutionarily stable strategy under certain environmental conditions, even when there is a cost associated to this behaviour. While exploitation is possible, in the limiting case of a sparse, ephemeral but locally abundant nutrient source, a given environmental profile will support a fixed number of signalling individuals. Through a quantitative analysis, this effective carrying capacity for cooperation is related to the characteristic length and time scales of the resource field.

  3. Dynamical evolution and chronology of the Hygiea asteroid family

    CERN Document Server

    Carruba, V; Huaman, M E; Santos, C R dos; Souami, D

    2013-01-01

    The asteroid (10) Hygiea is the fourth largest asteroid of the Main Belt, by volume and mass, and it is the largest member of its own family. Previous works investigated the long-term effects of close encounters with (10) Hygiea of asteroids in the orbital region of the family, and analyzed the taxonomical and dynamical properties of members of this family. In this paper we apply the high-quality SDSS-MOC4 taxonomic scheme of DeMeo and Carry (2013) to members of the Hygiea family core and halo, we obtain an estimate of the minimum time and number of encounter necessary to obtain a $3\\sigma$ (or 99.7%) compatible frequency distribution function of changes in proper $a$ caused by close encounters with (10) Hygiea, we study the behavior of asteroids near secular resonance configurations, in the presence and absence of the Yarkovsky force, and obtain a first estimate of the age of the family based on orbital diffusion by the Yarkovsky and YORP effects with two methods. The Hygiea family is at least 2 Byr old, wit...

  4. Entropy Evolution and Uncertainty Estimation with Dynamical Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. San Liang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comprehensive introduction and systematic derivation of the evolutionary equations for absolute entropy H and relative entropy D, some of which exist sporadically in the literature in different forms under different subjects, within the framework of dynamical systems. In general, both H and D are dissipated, and the dissipation bears a form reminiscent of the Fisher information; in the absence of stochasticity, dH/dt is connected to the rate of phase space expansion, and D stays invariant, i.e., the separation of two probability density functions is always conserved. These formulas are validated with linear systems, and put to application with the Lorenz system and a large-dimensional stochastic quasi-geostrophic flow problem. In the Lorenz case, H falls at a constant rate with time, implying that H will eventually become negative, a situation beyond the capability of the commonly used computational technique like coarse-graining and bin counting. For the stochastic flow problem, it is first reduced to a computationally tractable low-dimensional system, using a reduced model approach, and then handled through ensemble prediction. Both the Lorenz system and the stochastic flow system are examples of self-organization in the light of uncertainty reduction. The latter particularly shows that, sometimes stochasticity may actually enhance the self-organization process.

  5. Dynamical evolution of primordial dark matter haloes through mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogiya, Go; Nagai, Daisuke; Ishiyama, Tomoaki

    2016-09-01

    Primordial dark matter (DM) haloes are the smallest gravitationally bound DM structures from which the first stars, black holes and galaxies form and grow in the early universe. However, their structures are sensitive to the free streaming scale of DM, which in turn depends on the nature of DM particles. In this work, we test the hypothesis that the slope of the central cusps in primordial DM haloes near the free streaming scale depends on the nature of merging process. By combining and analysing data from a cosmological simulation with the cutoff in the small-scale matter power spectrum as well as a suite of controlled, high-resolution simulations of binary mergers, we find that (1) the primordial DM haloes form preferentially through major mergers in radial orbits; (2) their central DM density profile is more susceptible to a merging process compared to that of galaxy- and cluster-sized DM haloes; (3) consecutive major mergers drive the central density slope to approach the universal form characterized by the Navarro-Frenk-White profile, which is shown to be robust to the impacts of mergers and serves an attractor solution for the density structure of DM haloes. Our work highlights the importance of dynamical processes on the structure formation during the Dark Ages.

  6. Influence of opinion dynamics on the evolution of games

    CERN Document Server

    Gargiulo, Floriana

    2012-01-01

    Under certain circumstances such as lack of information or bounded rationality, human players can take decisions on which strategy to choose in a game on the basis of simple opinions. These opinions can be modified after each round by observing own or others payoff results but can be also modified after interchanging impressions with other players. In this way, the update of the strategies can become a question that goes beyond simple evolutionary rules based on fitness and become a social issue. In this work, we explore this scenario by coupling a game with an opinion dynamics model. The opinion is represented by a continuous variable that corresponds to the certainty of the agents respect to which strategy is best. The opinions transform into actions by making the selection of an strategy a stochastic event with a probability regulated by the opinion. A certain regard for the previous round payoff is included but the main update rules of the opinion are given by a model inspired in social interchanges. We f...

  7. Dynamical evolution of active detached binaries on log Jo - log M diagram and contact binary formation

    CERN Document Server

    Eker, Z; Bilir, S; Karatas, Y

    2006-01-01

    Orbital angular momentum (Jo), systemic mass (M) and orbital period (P) distributions of chromospherically active binaries (CAB) and W Ursae Majoris (W UMa) systems were investigated. The diagrams of log Jo - log P, log M - log P and log Jo-log M were formed from 119 CAB and 102 W UMa stars. The log Jo-log M diagram is found to be most meaningful in demonstrating dynamical evolution of binary star orbits. A slightly curved borderline (contact border) separating the detached and the contact systems was discovered on the log Jo - log M diagram. Since orbital size (a) and period (P) of binaries are determined by their current Jo, M and mass ratio q, the rates of orbital angular momentum loss (dlog Jo/dt) and mass loss (dlog M/dt) are primary parameters to determine the direction and the speed of the dynamical evolution. A detached system becomes a contact system if its own dynamical evolution enables it to pass the contact border on the log Jo - log M diagram. Evolution of q for a mass loosing detached system is...

  8. Dynamic and Quantitative Method of Analyzing Service Consistency Evolution Based on Extended Hierarchical Finite State Automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linjun Fan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the dynamic evolution analysis and quantitative measurement of primary factors that cause service inconsistency in service-oriented distributed simulation applications (SODSA. Traditional methods are mostly qualitative and empirical, and they do not consider the dynamic disturbances among factors in service’s evolution behaviors such as producing, publishing, calling, and maintenance. Moreover, SODSA are rapidly evolving in terms of large-scale, reusable, compositional, pervasive, and flexible features, which presents difficulties in the usage of traditional analysis methods. To resolve these problems, a novel dynamic evolution model extended hierarchical service-finite state automata (EHS-FSA is constructed based on finite state automata (FSA, which formally depict overall changing processes of service consistency states. And also the service consistency evolution algorithms (SCEAs based on EHS-FSA are developed to quantitatively assess these impact factors. Experimental results show that the bad reusability (17.93% on average is the biggest influential factor, the noncomposition of atomic services (13.12% is the second biggest one, and the service version’s confusion (1.2% is the smallest one. Compared with previous qualitative analysis, SCEAs present good effectiveness and feasibility. This research can guide the engineers of service consistency technologies toward obtaining a higher level of consistency in SODSA.

  9. Dynamic evolution of cross-correlations in the Chinese stock market.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Ren

    Full Text Available The analysis of cross-correlations is extensively applied for the understanding of interconnections in stock markets and the portfolio risk estimation. Current studies of correlations in Chinese market mainly focus on the static correlations between return series, and this calls for an urgent need to investigate their dynamic correlations. Our study aims to reveal the dynamic evolution of cross-correlations in the Chinese stock market, and offer an exact interpretation for the evolution behavior. The correlation matrices constructed from the return series of 367 A-share stocks traded on the Shanghai Stock Exchange from January 4, 1999 to December 30, 2011 are calculated over a moving window with a size of 400 days. The evolutions of the statistical properties of the correlation coefficients, eigenvalues, and eigenvectors of the correlation matrices are carefully analyzed. We find that the stock correlations are significantly increased in the periods of two market crashes in 2001 and 2008, during which only five eigenvalues significantly deviate from the random correlation matrix, and the systemic risk is higher in these volatile periods than calm periods. By investigating the significant contributors of the deviating eigenvectors in different time periods, we observe a dynamic evolution behavior in business sectors such as IT, electronics, and real estate, which lead the rise (drop before (after the crashes. Our results provide new perspectives for the understanding of the dynamic evolution of cross-correlations in the Chines stock markets, and the result of risk estimation is valuable for the application of risk management.

  10. Dynamic aggregation evolution of competitive societies of cooperative and noncooperative agents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Zhen-Quan; Ye Gao-Xiang

    2013-01-01

    We propose an evolution model of cooperative agent and noncooperative agent aggregates to investigate the dynamic evolution behaviors of the system and the effects of the competing microscopic reactions on the dynamic evolution.In this model,each cooperative agent and noncooperative agent are endowed with integer values of cooperative spirits and noncooperative spirits,respectively.The cooperative spirits of a cooperative agent aggregate and the noncooperative spirits of a noncooperative agent aggregate change via four competing microscopic reaction schemes:the win-win reaction between two cooperative agents,the lose-lose reaction between two noncooperative agents,the win-lose reaction between a cooperative agent and a noncooperative agent (equivalent to the migration of spirits from cooperative agents to noncooperative agents),and the cooperative agent catalyzed decline of noncooperative spirits.Based on the generalized Smoluchowski's rate equation approach,we investigate the dynamic evolution behaviors such as the total cooperative spirits of all cooperative agents and the total noncooperative spirits of all noncooperative agents.The effects of the three main groups of competition on the dynamic evolution are revealed.These include:(i) the competition between the lose-lose reaction and the win-lose reaction,which gives rise to respectively the decrease and increase in the noncooperative agent spirits; (ii) the competition between the win-win reaction and the win-lose reaction,which gives rise to respectively the increase and decrease in the cooperative agent spirits; (iii) the competition between the win-lose reaction and the catalyzed-decline reaction,which gives rise to respectively the increase and decrease in the noncooperative agent spirits.

  11. Aerosol processing of materials: Aerosol dynamics and microstructure evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurav, Abhijit Shankar

    Spray pyrolysis is an aerosol process commonly used to synthesize a wide variety of materials in powder or film forms including metals, metal oxides and non-oxide ceramics. It is capable of producing high purity, unagglomerated, and micrometer to submicron-size powders, and scale-up has been demonstrated. This dissertation deals with the study of aerosol dynamics during spray pyrolysis of multicomponent systems involving volatile phases/components, and aspects involved with using fuel additives during spray processes to break apart droplets and particles in order to produce powders with smaller sizes. The gas-phase aerosol dynamics and composition size distributions were measured during spray pyrolysis of (Bi, Pb)-Sr-Ca-Cu-O, and Sr-Ru-O and Bi-Ru-O at different temperatures. A differential mobility analyzer (DMA) was used in conjunction with a condensation particle counter (CPC) to monitor the gas-phase particle size distributions, and a Berner-type low-pressure impactor was used to obtain mass size distributions and size-classified samples for chemical analysis. (Bi, Pb)-Sr-Ca-Cu-O powders made at temperatures up to 700sp°C maintained their initial stoichiometry over the whole range of particle sizes monitored, however, those made at 800sp°C and above were heavily depleted in lead in the size range 0.5-5.0 mum. When the reactor temperature was raised from 700 and 800sp°C to 900sp°C, a large number ({˜}10sp7\\ #/cmsp3) of new ultrafine particles were formed from PbO vapor released from the particles and the reactor walls at the beginning of high temperature runs (at 900sp°C). The metal ruthenate systems showed generation of ultrafine particles (measurements were also used to monitor the gas-phase particle size distributions during the generation of fullerene (Csb{60}) nano-particles (30 to 50 nm size) via vapor condensation at 400-650sp°C using Nsb2 carrier gas. In general, during laboratory-scale aerosol processing of materials containing a volatile

  12. Experimental analysis of microscale rain cells and their dynamic evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enjamio, C.; Vilar, E.; RedañO, A.; FontáN, F. P.; Ndzi, D.

    2005-06-01

    This paper presents a detailed space-time analysis of rainfall rate using two dense networks of rain gauges covering two microscale areas of some 100 km2 each and located in two distinct climatic areas in the United Kingdom and Spain. The study has been carried out with the main objective of addressing dynamic fade mitigation techniques and scatter interference problems in terrestrial and satellite communication systems. The two databases, using a total of 49 and 23 rain gauges, respectively, are described, and the continuous interpolated field used for the subsequent analyses is explained in detail. The suitability of the networks in terms of density, correlation distance, and fractal dimension are briefly addressed. A to-scale comparison grid of the networks is also given. It has been found that when the maximum intensity reached during a rain event surpasses a certain threshold, different for each of the two areas, rainfall rates exhibit a spatial structure in the form of closed contours of thresholds referred to as cells. In statistical terms, the most probable diameter found is about 3.5 km, and distributions are presented. They are similar for the two sites but not so for the maxima reached inside the cells. Using cross-correlation techniques, displacement and velocities are analyzed in detail. Cells "zigzag" around a dominant trend because of the global cloud movements (driven by winds at heights of about 700 hPa). Local topography strongly affects local behavior. Analytical approximations to the experimental statistical distributions and selected histograms of the results are presented.

  13. The Effects of Stellar Dynamics on the Evolution of Young, Dense Stellar Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkus, H.; van Bever, J.; Vanbeveren, D.

    In this paper, we report on first results of a project in Brussels in which we study the effects of stellar dynamics on the evolution of young dense stellar systems using 3 decades of expertise in massive-star evolution and our population (number and spectral) synthesis code. We highlight an unconventionally formed object scenario (UFO-scenario) for Wolf Rayet binaries and study the effects of a luminous blue variable-type instability wind mass-loss formalism on the formation of intermediate-mass black holes.

  14. Structural dynamics flexibility informs function and evolution at a proteome scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevin Gerek, Zeynep; Kumar, Sudhir; Banu Ozkan, Sefika

    2013-01-01

    Protein structures are dynamic entities with a myriad of atomic fluctuations, side-chain rotations, and collective domain movements. Although the importance of these dynamics to proper functioning of proteins is emerging in the studies of many protein families, there is a lack of broad evidence for the critical role of protein dynamics in shaping the biological functions of a substantial fraction of residues for a large number of proteins in the human proteome. Here, we propose a novel dynamic flexibility index (dfi) to quantify the dynamic properties of individual residues in any protein and use it to assess the importance of protein dynamics in 100 human proteins. Our analyses involving functionally critical positions, disease-associated and putatively neutral population variations, and the rate of interspecific substitutions per residue produce concordant patterns at a proteome scale. They establish that the preservation of dynamic properties of residues in a protein structure is critical for maintaining the protein/biological function. Therefore, structural dynamics needs to become a major component of the analysis of protein function and evolution. Such analyses will be facilitated by the dfi, which will also enable the integrative use of structural dynamics with evolutionary conservation in genomic medicine as well as functional genomics investigations. PMID:23745135

  15. Eventful evolution of giant molecular clouds in dynamically evolving spiral arms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Junichi; Morokuma-Matsui, Kana; Saitoh, Takayuki R.

    2017-01-01

    The formation and evolution of giant molecular clouds (GMCs) in spiral galaxies have been investigated in the traditional framework of the combined quasi-stationary density wave and galactic shock model. In this study, we investigate the structure and evolution of GMCs in a dynamically evolving spiral arm using a three-dimensional N-body/hydrodynamic simulation of a barred spiral galaxy at parsec-scale resolution. This simulation incorporated self-gravity, molecular hydrogen formation, radiative cooling, heating due to interstellar far-ultraviolet radiation, and stellar feedback by both H II regions and Type II supernovae. In contrast to a simple expectation based on the traditional spiral model, the GMCs exhibited no systematic evolutionary sequence across the spiral arm. Our simulation showed that the GMCs behaved as highly dynamic objects with eventful lives involving collisional build-up, collision-induced star formation, and destruction via stellar feedback. The GMC lifetimes were predicted to be short, only a few tens of millions years. We also found that at least at the resolutions and with the feedback models used in this study, most of the GMCs without H II regions were collapsing, but half of the GMCs with H II regions were expanding owing to the H II-region feedback from stars within them. Our results support the dynamic and feedback-regulated GMC evolution scenario. Although the simulated GMCs were converging rather than virial equilibrium, they followed the observed scaling relationship well. We also analysed the effects of galactic tides and external pressure on GMC evolution and suggested that GMCs cannot be regarded as isolated systems since their evolution in disc galaxies is complicated because of these environmental effects.

  16. Eventful Evolution of Giant Molecular Clouds in Dynamically Evolving Spiral Arms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Junichi; Morokuma-Matsui, Kana; Saitoh, Takayuki R.

    2016-09-01

    The formation and evolution of giant molecular clouds (GMCs) in spiral galaxies have been investigated in the traditional framework of the combined quasi-stationary density wave and galactic shock model. In this study, we investigate the structure and evolution of GMCs in a dynamically evolving spiral arm using a three-dimensional N-body/hydrodynamic simulation of a barred spiral galaxy at parsec-scale resolution. This simulation incorporated self-gravity, molecular hydrogen formation, radiative cooling, heating due to interstellar far-ultraviolet radiation, and stellar feedback by both HII regions and Type-II supernovae. In contrast to a simple expectation based on the traditional spiral model, the GMCs exhibited no systematic evolutionary sequence across the spiral arm. Our simulation showed that the GMCs behaved as highly dynamic objects with eventful lives involving collisional build-up, collision-induced star formation, and destruction via stellar feedback. The GMC lifetimes were predicted to be short, only a few tens of millions years. We also found that, at least at the resolutions and with the feedback models used in this study, most of the GMCs without HII regions were collapsing, but half of the GMCs with HII regions were expanding owing to the HII-region feedback from stars within them. Our results support the dynamic and feedback-regulated GMC evolution scenario. Although the simulated GMCs were converging rather than virial equilibrium, they followed the observed scaling relationship well. We also analysed the effects of galactic tides and external pressure on GMC evolution and suggested that GMCs cannot be regarded as isolated systems since their evolution in disc galaxies is complicated because of these environmental effects.

  17. The efficiency of plate tectonics and nonequilibrium dynamical evolution of planetary mantles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, W. B.; Lenardic, A.

    2015-11-01

    Consideration of the structure of dynamical equilibria in terrestrial planets using simplified descriptions of the relevant heat transport processes (rigid-lid convection, plate tectonics, and heat pipe volcanism) reveals that if the efficiency of plate tectonic heat transport decreases at higher mantle temperature, then it cannot govern quasi-equilibrium dynamical evolution, and the system is always evolving away from the plate tectonic regime. A planet on which plate tectonics is less efficient at higher temperature stays in heat pipe mode longer, spends less time undergoing plate tectonics, and has a low and ever-decreasing Urey number during this phase. These conclusions are based solely on the structure of the equilibria in a system with less efficient plate tectonics in the past and are independent of the mechanisms leading to this behavior. Commonly used quasi-equilibrium approaches to planetary thermal evolution are likely not valid for planets in which heat transport becomes less efficient at higher temperature.

  18. Dynamic in situ visualization of voltage-driven magnetic domain evolution in multiferroic heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ya; Hu, Jia-Mian; Wu, Liang; Nan, C. W.

    2015-12-01

    Voltage control of magnetism in multiferroic heterostructures provides a promising solution to the excessive heating in spintronic devices. Direct observation of voltage-modulated magnetic domain evolution dynamics is desirable for studying the mechanism of the voltage control of magnetism at mesoscale, but has remained challenging. Here we explored a characterization method for the dynamic in situ evolution of pure voltage modulated magnetic domains in the heterostructures by employing the scanning Kerr microscopy function in the magneto optic Kerr effect system. The local magnetization reorientation of a Ni/PMN-PT heterostructure were characterized under sweeping applied voltage on the PMN-PT single crystal, and the results show that the magnetization rotation angle in the local regions is much greater than that obtained from macroscopic magnetization hysteresis loops.

  19. Collaboration strategy for software dynamic evolution of multi-agent system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李青山; 褚华; 张曼; 李敏; 刁亮

    2015-01-01

    As the ability of a single agent is limited while information and resources in multi-agent systems are distributed, cooperation is necessary for agents to accomplish a complex task. In the open and changeable environment on the Internet, it is of great significance to research a system flexible and capable in dynamic evolution that can find a collaboration method for agents which can be used in dynamic evolution process. With such a method, agents accomplish tasks for an overall target and at the same time, the collaborative relationship of agents can be adjusted with the change of environment. A method of task decomposition and collaboration of agents by improved contract net protocol is introduced. Finally, analysis on the result of the experiments is performed to verify the improved contract net protocol can greatly increase the efficiency of communication and collaboration in multi-agent system.

  20. An Improved Differential Evolution Based Dynamic Economic Dispatch with Nonsmooth Fuel Cost Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Balamurugan

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic economic dispatch (DED is one of the major operational decisions in electric power systems. DED problem is an optimization problem with an objective to determine the optimal combination of power outputs for all generating units over a certain period of time in order to minimize the total fuel cost while satisfying dynamic operational constraints and load demand in each interval. This paper presents an improved differential evolution (IDE method to solve the DED problem of generating units considering valve-point effects. Heuristic crossover technique and gene swap operator are introduced in the proposed approach to improve the convergence characteristic of the differential evolution (DE algorithm. To illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach, two test systems consisting of five and ten generating units have been considered. The results obtained through the proposed method are compared with those reported in the literature.

  1. Dynamical evolution of globular-cluster systems in clusters of galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muzzio, J.C.

    1987-04-01

    The dynamical processes that affect globular-cluster systems in clusters of galaxies are analyzed. Two-body and impulsive approximations are utilized to study dynamical friction, drag force, tidal stripping, tidal radii, globular-cluster swapping, tidal accretion, and galactic cannibalism. The evolution of galaxies and the collision of galaxies are simulated numerically; the steps involved in the simulation are described. The simulated data are compared with observations. Consideration is given to the number of galaxies, halo extension, location of the galaxies, distribution of the missing mass, nonequilibrium initial conditions, mass dependence, massive central galaxies, globular-cluster distribution, and lost globular clusters. 116 references.

  2. Evolution of perturbed dynamical systems: analytical computation with time independent accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurzadyan, A. V.; Kocharyan, A. A.

    2016-12-01

    An analytical method for investigation of the evolution of dynamical systems with independent on time accuracy is developed for perturbed Hamiltonian systems. The error-free estimation using of computer algebra enables the application of the method to complex multi-dimensional Hamiltonian and dissipative systems. It also opens principal opportunities for the qualitative study of chaotic trajectories. The performance of the method is demonstrated on perturbed two-oscillator systems. It can be applied to various non-linear physical and astrophysical systems, e.g. to long-term planetary dynamics.

  3. Radio galaxies radiation transfer, dynamics, stability and evolution of a synchrotron plasmon

    CERN Document Server

    Pacholczyk, A G

    1977-01-01

    Radio Galaxies: Radiation Transfer, Dynamics, Stability and Evolution of a Synchrotron Plasmon deals with the physics of a region in space containing magnetic field and thermal and relativistic particles (a plasmon). The synchrotron emission and absorption of this region are discussed, along with the properties of its spectrum; its linear and circular polarization; transfer of radiation through such a region; its dynamics and expansion; and interaction with external medium.Comprised of eight chapters, this volume explores the stability, turbulence, and acceleration of particles in a synchrotro

  4. Evolution of perturbed dynamical systems: analytical computation with time independent accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurzadyan, A.V. [Russian-Armenian (Slavonic) University, Department of Mathematics and Mathematical Modelling, Yerevan (Armenia); Kocharyan, A.A. [Monash University, School of Physics and Astronomy, Clayton (Australia)

    2016-12-15

    An analytical method for investigation of the evolution of dynamical systems with independent on time accuracy is developed for perturbed Hamiltonian systems. The error-free estimation using of computer algebra enables the application of the method to complex multi-dimensional Hamiltonian and dissipative systems. It also opens principal opportunities for the qualitative study of chaotic trajectories. The performance of the method is demonstrated on perturbed two-oscillator systems. It can be applied to various non-linear physical and astrophysical systems, e.g. to long-term planetary dynamics. (orig.)

  5. Evolution of perturbed dynamical systems: analytical computation with time independent accuracy

    CERN Document Server

    Gurzadyan, A V

    2016-01-01

    An analytical method for investigation of the evolution of dynamical systems {\\it with independent on time accuracy} is developed for perturbed Hamiltonian systems. The error-free estimation using of computer algebra enables the application of the method to complex multi-dimensional Hamiltonian and dissipative systems. It also opens principal opportunities for the qualitative study of chaotic trajectories. The performance of the method is demonstrated on perturbed two-oscillator systems. It can be applied to various non-linear physical and astrophysical systems, e.g. to the long-term planetary dynamics.

  6. Evolution, Interaction, and Intrinsic Properties of Dislocations in Intermetallics: Anisotropic 3D Dislocation Dynamics Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Qian [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The generation, motion, and interaction of dislocations play key roles during the plastic deformation process of crystalline solids. 3D Dislocation Dynamics has been employed as a mesoscale simulation algorithm to investigate the collective and cooperative behavior of dislocations. Most current research on 3D Dislocation Dynamics is based on the solutions available in the framework of classical isotropic elasticity. However, due to some degree of elastic anisotropy in almost all crystalline solids, it is very necessary to extend 3D Dislocation Dynamics into anisotropic elasticity. In this study, first, the details of efficient and accurate incorporation of the fully anisotropic elasticity into 3D discrete Dislocation Dynamics by numerically evaluating the derivatives of Green's functions are described. Then the intrinsic properties of perfect dislocations, including their stability, their core properties and disassociation characteristics, in newly discovered rare earth-based intermetallics and in conventional intermetallics are investigated, within the framework of fully anisotropic elasticity supplemented with the atomistic information obtained from the ab initio calculations. Moreover, the evolution and interaction of dislocations in these intermetallics as well as the role of solute segregation are presented by utilizing fully anisotropic 3D dislocation dynamics. The results from this work clearly indicate the role and the importance of elastic anisotropy on the evolution of dislocation microstructures, the overall ductility and the hardening behavior in these systems.

  7. DYNAMIC SIMULATION OF MICROSTRUCTURE EVOLUTION DURING HOT FORGING FOR ENGINE STIGMATA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Incorporated with constitutive relationship established by artificial neural networks (ANN), a coupled theroviscoplastic finite element procedure is developed for predicting the microstructure evolution in the hot forging process, considering the factors such as dynamic recrystallization, static recrystallization and grain growth etc. This software system is applied to predict the distributions of the grain size over the crosssection of stigmata, which is found to be in good agreement with the experimental results. The software can provide a fundament for optimizing technological parameters.

  8. Models of disk chemical evolution focusing the pure dynamical radial mixing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Re Fiorentin P.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We performed N-body simulations to study the dynamical evolution of a stellar disk inside a Dark Matter (DM halo. Our results evidence how a standard -radially decreasing- metallicity gradient produces a negative vϕ vs. [Fe/H] correlation, similar to that shown by the thin disk stars, while an inverse radial gradient generates a positive rotation-metallicity correlation, as that observed in the old thick population.

  9. Key Technologies for Decentralized Control Platform with Dynamic Evolution for Railway Transportation System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tan Yongdong; GuiXun; Qian Qingquan

    2006-01-01

    Key technologies as well as their principles were discussed for a decentralized control platform capable of dynamic evolution.The primary content includes the automatic decision-making mechanism and the algorithm of the control center migration, the principle and technology of system self-monitoring, the principle and technology of the switch-mode of remote control station, the information transmission technology, and the data consistency technology. These key technologies have shown a series of advanced characteristics for decentralized control platform.

  10. Evidences on Secular Dynamical Evolution of Detached Active Binary Orbits and Contact Binary Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Eker, Z; Bilir, S; Karatas, Y

    2006-01-01

    Evidence of secular dynamical evolution for detached active binary orbits are presented. First order decreasing rates of orbital angular momentum (OAM), systemic mass ($M=M_{1}+M_{2}$) and orbital period of detached active binaries have been determined as $\\dot J/J = 3.48 \\times 10^{-10}$yr$^{-1}$, $\\dot M/M = 1.30 \\times 10^{-10}$yr$^{-1}$ and $\\dot P/P = 3.96\\times 10^{-10}$yr$^{-1}$ from the kinematical ages of 62 field detached systems. The ratio of $d \\log J/ d \\log M = 2.68$ implies that either there are mechanisms which amplify AM loss $\\delta=2.68$ times with respect to isotropic AM loss of hypothetical isotropic winds or there exist external causes contributing AM loss in order to produce this mean rate of decrease for orbital periods. Various decreasing rates of OAM ($d \\log J / dt$) and systemic mass ($d \\log M/ dt$) determine various speeds of dynamical evolutions towards a contact configuration. According to average dynamical evolution with $\\delta = 2.68$, the fraction of 10, 22 and 39 per cent ...

  11. Adaptive evolution of cooperation through Darwinian dynamics in Public Goods games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Kuiying; Chu, Tianguang

    2011-01-01

    The linear or threshold Public Goods game (PGG) is extensively accepted as a paradigmatic model to approach the evolution of cooperation in social dilemmas. Here we explore the significant effect of nonlinearity of the structures of public goods on the evolution of cooperation within the well-mixed population by adopting Darwinian dynamics, which simultaneously consider the evolution of populations and strategies on a continuous adaptive landscape, and extend the concept of evolutionarily stable strategy (ESS) as a coalition of strategies that is both convergent-stable and resistant to invasion. Results show (i) that in the linear PGG contributing nothing is an ESS, which contradicts experimental data, (ii) that in the threshold PGG contributing the threshold value is a fragile ESS, which cannot resist the invasion of contributing nothing, and (iii) that there exists a robust ESS of contributing more than half in the sigmoid PGG if the return rate is relatively high. This work reveals the significant effect of the nonlinearity of the structures of public goods on the evolution of cooperation, and suggests that, compared with the linear or threshold PGG, the sigmoid PGG might be a more proper model for the evolution of cooperation within the well-mixed population.

  12. Horizontal gene transfer dynamics and distribution of fitness effects during microbial in silico evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mozhayskiy Vadim

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Horizontal gene transfer (HGT is a process that facilitates the transfer of genetic material between organisms that are not directly related, and thus can affect both the rate of evolution and emergence of traits. Recent phylogenetic studies reveal HGT events are likely ubiquitous in the Tree of Life. However, our knowledge of HGT's role in evolution and biological organization is very limited, mainly due to the lack of ancestral evolutionary signatures and the difficulty to observe complex evolutionary dynamics in a laboratory setting. Here, we utilize a multi-scale microbial evolution model to comprehensively study the effect of HGT on the evolution of complex traits and organization of gene regulatory networks. Results Large-scale simulations reveal a distinct signature of the Distribution of Fitness Effect (DFE for HGT events: during evolution, while mutation fitness effects become more negative and neutral, HGT events result in a balanced effect distribution. In either case, lethal events are significantly decreased during evolution (33.0% to 3.2%, a clear indication of mutational robustness. Interestingly, evolution was accelerated when populations were exposed to correlated environments of increasing complexity, especially in the presence of HGT, a phenomenon that warrants further investigation. High HGT rates were found to be disruptive, while the average transferred fragment size was linked to functional module size in the underlying biological network. Network analysis reveals that HGT results in larger regulatory networks, but with the same sparsity level as those evolved in its absence. Observed phenotypic variability and co-existing solutions were traced to individual gain/loss of function events, while subsequent re-wiring after fragment integration was necessary for complex traits to emerge.

  13. Dynamical friction and the evolution of Supermassive Black hole Binaries: the final hundred-parsec problem

    CERN Document Server

    Dosopoulou, Fani

    2016-01-01

    The massive black holes originally in the nuclei of two merging galaxies will form a binary in the core of the merger remnant. The early evolution of the massive binary is driven by dynamical friction before the binary becomes "hard" and eventually reaches coalescence through the emission of gravitational wave radiation. We use analytical models and $N$-body integrations to study the evolution of supermassive black hole binaries due to dynamical friction. In our treatment we include the frictional force from stars moving faster than the massive body which is neglected in the standard Chandrasekhar's treatment. We show that the eccentricity of a massive binary increases due to dynamical friction if the density profile of the surrounding stellar cusp rises less steeply than $\\rho\\propto r^{-2}$. For cusps shallower than $\\rho\\propto r^{-1}$ the dynamical fiction timescale can become very long due to the deficit of stars moving slower than the secondary hole. Although adding the contribution of the fast stars in...

  14. Dynamical evolution and spectral characteristics of the stellar group Mamajek 2

    CERN Document Server

    Jilinski, E; De la Reza, R; Drake, N A; Bazzanella, B

    2008-01-01

    The dynamical evolution of the recently detected stellar group Mamajek 2 is studied by means of its past 3D orbit. The past orbits of the open clusters NGC 2516 and $\\alpha$ Persei, belonging to the so-called "Local Association", were also computed in order to check for a possible common past dynamical evolution of these systems. To complete the data of the Mamajek 2 small group, we have obtained high resolution FEROS spectra to measure the radial and also the projected rotational velocities of its members; an estimate of its metallicity was obtained as well. Two exceptionally low rotating A-type stars turned out to be a strong magnetic Ap star in one case, and a normal A0 star with near-solar metallicity in the other. The dynamical results showed that NGC 2516 and Mamajek 2 may have had a common origin at the age of 135 $\\pm$ 5 Myr. This dynamical age confirms the individual ages of 140 Myr for NGC 2516 and 120 $\\pm$ 25 Myr for Mamajek 2 obtained independently by photometric methods. Both these groups appear...

  15. Application of Gas Dynamical Friction for Planetesimals. II. Evolution of Binary Planetesimals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grishin, Evgeni; Perets, Hagai B.

    2016-04-01

    One of the first stages of planet formation is the growth of small planetesimals and their accumulation into large planetesimals and planetary embryos. This early stage occurs long before the dispersal of most of the gas from the protoplanetary disk. At this stage gas-planetesimal interactions play a key role in the dynamical evolution of single intermediate-mass planetesimals (mp ˜ 1021-1025 g) through gas dynamical friction (GDF). A significant fraction of all solar system planetesimals (asteroids and Kuiper-belt objects) are known to be binary planetesimals (BPs). Here, we explore the effects of GDF on the evolution of BPs embedded in a gaseous disk using an N-body code with a fiducial external force accounting for GDF. We find that GDF can induce binary mergers on timescales shorter than the disk lifetime for masses above mp ≳ 1022 g at 1 au, independent of the binary initial separation and eccentricity. Such mergers can affect the structure of merger-formed planetesimals, and the GDF-induced binary inspiral can play a role in the evolution of the planetesimal disk. In addition, binaries on eccentric orbits around the star may evolve in the supersonic regime, where the torque reverses and the binary expands, which would enhance the cross section for planetesimal encounters with the binary. Highly inclined binaries with small mass ratios, evolve due to the combined effects of Kozai-Lidov (KL) cycles with GDF which lead to chaotic evolution. Prograde binaries go through semi-regular KL evolution, while retrograde binaries frequently flip their inclination and ˜50% of them are destroyed.

  16. APPLICATION OF GAS DYNAMICAL FRICTION FOR PLANETESIMALS. II. EVOLUTION OF BINARY PLANETESIMALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grishin, Evgeni; Perets, Hagai B. [Physics Department, Technion—Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, 3200003 (Israel)

    2016-04-01

    One of the first stages of planet formation is the growth of small planetesimals and their accumulation into large planetesimals and planetary embryos. This early stage occurs long before the dispersal of most of the gas from the protoplanetary disk. At this stage gas–planetesimal interactions play a key role in the dynamical evolution of single intermediate-mass planetesimals (m{sub p} ∼ 10{sup 21}–10{sup 25} g) through gas dynamical friction (GDF). A significant fraction of all solar system planetesimals (asteroids and Kuiper-belt objects) are known to be binary planetesimals (BPs). Here, we explore the effects of GDF on the evolution of BPs embedded in a gaseous disk using an N-body code with a fiducial external force accounting for GDF. We find that GDF can induce binary mergers on timescales shorter than the disk lifetime for masses above m{sub p} ≳ 10{sup 22} g at 1 au, independent of the binary initial separation and eccentricity. Such mergers can affect the structure of merger-formed planetesimals, and the GDF-induced binary inspiral can play a role in the evolution of the planetesimal disk. In addition, binaries on eccentric orbits around the star may evolve in the supersonic regime, where the torque reverses and the binary expands, which would enhance the cross section for planetesimal encounters with the binary. Highly inclined binaries with small mass ratios, evolve due to the combined effects of Kozai–Lidov (KL) cycles with GDF which lead to chaotic evolution. Prograde binaries go through semi-regular KL evolution, while retrograde binaries frequently flip their inclination and ∼50% of them are destroyed.

  17. The Dynamical Evolution of Stellar-Mass Black Holes in Dense Star Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morscher, Maggie

    Globular clusters are gravitationally bound systems containing up to millions of stars, and are found ubiquitously in massive galaxies, including the Milky Way. With densities as high as a million stars per cubic parsec, they are one of the few places in the Universe where stars interact with one another. They therefore provide us with a unique laboratory for studying how gravitational interactions can facilitate the formation of exotic systems, such as X-ray binaries containing black holes, and merging double black hole binaries, which are produced much less efficiently in isolation. While telescopes can provide us with a snapshot of what these dense clusters look like at present, we must rely on detailed numerical simulations to learn about their evolution. These simulations are quite challenging, however, since dense star clusters are described by a complicated set of physical processes occurring on many different length and time scales, including stellar and binary evolution, weak gravitational scattering encounters, strong resonant binary interactions, and tidal stripping by the host galaxy. Until very recently, it was not possible to model the evolution of systems with millions of stars, the actual number contained in the largest clusters, including all the relevant physics required describe these systems accurately. The Northwestern Group's Henon Monte Carlo code, CMC, which has been in development for over a decade, is a powerful tool that can be used to construct detailed evolutionary models of large star clusters. With its recent parallelization, CMC is now capable of addressing a particularly interesting unsolved problem in astrophysics: the dynamical evolution of stellar black holes in dense star clusters. Our current understanding of the stellar initial mass function and massive star evolution suggests that young globular clusters may have formed hundreds to thousands of stellar-mass black holes, the remnants of stars with initial masses from 20 - 100

  18. Time evolution of photon propagation in scattering and absorbing media: the Dynamic Radiative Transfer System

    CERN Document Server

    Georgakopoulos, A; Georgiou, E

    2016-01-01

    A new dynamic system approach to the problem of radiative transfer inside scattering and absorbing media is presented, directly based on firsthand physical principles. This method, the Dynamic Radiative Transfer System (DRTS), calculates accurately the time evolution of photon propagation in media of complex structure and shape. DRTS employs a dynamical system formality using a global sparse matrix which characterizes the physical, optical and geometrical properties of the material volume of interest. The new system state vector is generated by the above time-independent matrix, using simple matrix vector multiplication addition for each subsequent time step. DRTS simulation results are presented for 3D light propagation in different optical media, demonstrating greatly reduced computational cost and resource requirements compared to other methods. Flexibility of the method allows the integration of time-dependent sources, boundary conditions, different media and several optical phenomena like reflection and ...

  19. Grammatical Immune System Evolution for reverse engineering nonlinear dynamic Bayesian models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, B A; Tian, D

    2008-01-01

    An artificial immune system algorithm is introduced in which nonlinear dynamic models are evolved to fit time series of interacting biomolecules. This grammar-based machine learning method learns the structure and parameters of the underlying dynamic model. In silico immunogenetic mechanisms for the generation of model-structure diversity are implemented with the aid of a grammar, which also enforces semantic constraints of the evolved models. The grammar acts as a DNA repair polymerase that can identify recombination and hypermutation signals in the antibody (model) genome. These signals contain information interpretable by the grammar to maintain model context. Grammatical Immune System Evolution (GISE) is applied to a nonlinear system identification problem in which a generalized (nonlinear) dynamic Bayesian model is evolved to fit biologically motivated artificial time-series data. From experimental data, we use GISE to infer an improved kinetic model for the oxidative metabolism of 17beta-estradiol (E(2)), the parent hormone of the estrogen metabolism pathway.

  20. Magnetic bright point dynamics and evolutions observed by Sunrise/IMaX and other instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utz, D.; del Toro Iniesta, J. C.; Bellot Rubio, L.; Thonhofer, S.; Jurčák, J.

    2015-05-01

    In this proceeding we will have a closer look on recent observations and results regarding the dynamics and evolution of so-called magnetic bright points (MBPs). MBPs are manifestations of kG magnetic field strong flux concentrations seen in the solar photosphere. They belong to the class of small-scale solar magnetic features with diameters starting from low values around the current observational resolution limit - about 100 km - up to a few hundred km. They might play an important role in several key research questions like the total solar irradiance variation (TSI variation) as well as the solar atmospheric heating problem. Especially their dynamic behaviour is of interest for the heating problem as they might trigger all kinds of MHD waves which travel up to the higher solar atmospheric layers, where they can get damped leading to a heating of the plasma. Furthermore they might engage in magnetic field reconnection processes leading consequently also to a heating. Due to these reasons, and also for the sake of a better understanding of the physical processes involved on small-scales, detailed investigations on the dynamical behaviour and evolution of such magnetic field proxies like MBPs is in order. In this conference proceeding we wish to give in a first part an overview about the obtained knowledge so far. In a second part we highlight recent results regarding the dynamical evolution of plasma parameters of MBPs such as magnetic field strength, temperature, and line of sight velocity. This proceeding is completed by an outlook on what can and should be done in the near future with available data from recent telescopes.

  1. Evolution of the DeNOC-based dynamic modelling for multibody systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Saha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic modelling of a multibody system plays very essential role in its analyses. As a result, several methods for dynamic modelling have evolved over the years that allow one to analyse multibody systems in a very efficient manner. One such method of dynamic modelling is based on the concept of the Decoupled Natural Orthogonal Complement (DeNOC matrices. The DeNOC-based methodology for dynamics modelling, since its introduction in 1995, has been applied to a variety of multibody systems such as serial, parallel, general closed-loop, flexible, legged, cam-follower, and space robots. The methodology has also proven useful for modelling of proteins and hyper-degree-of-freedom systems like ropes, chains, etc. This paper captures the evolution of the DeNOC-based dynamic modelling applied to different type of systems, and its benefits over other existing methodologies. It is shown that the DeNOC-based modelling provides deeper understanding of the dynamics of a multibody system. The power of the DeNOC-based modelling has been illustrated using several numerical examples.

  2. Dynamical evolution of V-type photometric candidates in the outer Main-belt

    CERN Document Server

    Huaman, Mariela E; Domingos, Rita Cassia

    2014-01-01

    V-type asteroids, characterized by two absorption bands at 1.0 and 2.0 $\\mu m$, are usually thought to be portions of the crust of differentiated or partially differentiated bodies. Most V-type asteroids are found in the inner main belt and are thought to be current or past members of the Vesta dynamical family. Recently, several V-type photometric candidates have been identified in the central and outer main belt. While the dynamical evolution of V-type photometric candidates in the central main belt has been recently investigated, less attention has been given to the orbital evolution of basaltic material in the outer main belt as a whole. Here we identify known and new V-type photometric candidates in this region, and study their orbital evolution under the effect of gravitational and non-gravitational forces. A scenario in which a minimum of three local sources, possibly associated with the parent bodies of (349) Dembowska, (221) Eos, and (1459) Magnya, could in principle explain the current orbital distr...

  3. Automatic tracking of dynamical evolutions of oceanic mesoscale eddies with satellite observation data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Liang; Li, Qiu-Yang

    2017-04-01

    The oceanic mesoscale eddies play a major role in ocean climate system. To analyse spatiotemporal dynamics of oceanic mesoscale eddies, the Genealogical Evolution Model (GEM) based on satellite data is developed, which is an efficient logical model used to track dynamic evolution of mesoscale eddies in the ocean. It can distinguish different dynamic processes (e.g., merging and splitting) within a dynamic evolution pattern, which is difficult to accomplish using other tracking methods. To this end, a mononuclear eddy detection method was firstly developed with simple segmentation strategies, e.g. watershed algorithm. The algorithm is very fast by searching the steepest descent path. Second, the GEM uses a two-dimensional similarity vector (i.e. a pair of ratios of overlap area between two eddies to the area of each eddy) rather than a scalar to measure the similarity between eddies, which effectively solves the ''missing eddy" problem (temporarily lost eddy in tracking). Third, for tracking when an eddy splits, GEM uses both "parent" (the original eddy) and "child" (eddy split from parent) and the dynamic processes are described as birth and death of different generations. Additionally, a new look-ahead approach with selection rules effectively simplifies computation and recording. All of the computational steps are linear and do not include iteration. Given the pixel number of the target region L, the maximum number of eddies M, the number N of look-ahead time steps, and the total number of time steps T, the total computer time is O (LM(N+1)T). The tracking of each eddy is very smooth because we require that the snapshots of each eddy on adjacent days overlap one another. Although eddy splitting or merging is ubiquitous in the ocean, they have different geographic distribution in the Northern Pacific Ocean. Both the merging and splitting rates of the eddies are high, especially at the western boundary, in currents and in "eddy deserts". GEM is useful not only for

  4. Investigating the Relationship between Topology and Evolution in a Dynamic Nematode Odor Genetic Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Fitzpatrick

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between biological network architectures and evolution is unclear. Within the phylum nematoda olfaction represents a critical survival tool. For nematodes, olfaction contributes to multiple processes including the finding of food, hosts, and reproductive partners, making developmental decisions, and evading predators. Here we examine a dynamic nematode odor genetic network to investigate how divergence, diversity, and contribution are shaped by network topology. Our findings describe connectivity frameworks and characteristics that correlate with molecular evolution and contribution across the olfactory network. Our data helps guide the development of a robust evolutionary description of the nematode odor network that may eventually aid in the prediction of interactive and functional qualities of novel nodes.

  5. Biophysical connection between evolutionary dynamics and thermodynamics in in vitro evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aita, Takuyo; Husimi, Yuzuru

    2012-02-07

    We analyzed a mathematical model of in vitro evolution conducted by repetition of mutagenesis and selection processes. The selection process consists of the selective enrichment and subsequent sampling as follows: each mutant with fitness W is amplified by the Boltzmann factor exp(rW/k(B)T(the)), where the fitness W is defined as the negative Gibbs free energy (-ΔG) in a reaction of the phenotypic molecules and r is the round number of the selective enrichment; then, an arbitrary mutant is randomly chosen from the resulting mutant population and it becomes a new parent in the next generation. As a result, we found that the evolutionary dynamics is described in a mathematical framework similar to thermodynamics: the "evolution constant" k(E) and "evolutionary temperature" T(evo) play key roles similar to the Boltzmann constant k(B) and thermodynamic temperature T(the), respectively. In the stationary state of the evolutionary dynamics, the attractor of the fitness is in inverse proportion to k(E)T(evo). Furthermore, beyond the mathematical analogy, we obtained a biophysical connection between evolutionary dynamics and thermodynamics. Particularly, we found that T(evo) and T(the) are connected by k(E)T(evo)≈k(B)T(the)/2r. These results suggest that we can predict the fitness value in the stationary state by the thermodynamic temperature T(the) in the experimental setup.

  6. Evolution dynamics of a model for gene duplication under adaptive conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancliff, Mark; Park, Jeong-Man

    2014-06-01

    We present and solve the dynamics of a model for gene duplication showing escape from adaptive conflict. We use a Crow-Kimura quasispecies model of evolution where the fitness landscape is a function of Hamming distances from two reference sequences, which are assumed to optimize two different gene functions, to describe the dynamics of a mixed population of individuals with single and double copies of a pleiotropic gene. The evolution equations are solved through a spin coherent state path integral, and we find two phases: one is an escape from an adaptive conflict phase, where each copy of a duplicated gene evolves toward subfunctionalization, and the other is a duplication loss of function phase, where one copy maintains its pleiotropic form and the other copy undergoes neutral mutation. The phase is determined by a competition between the fitness benefits of subfunctionalization and the greater mutational load associated with maintaining two gene copies. In the escape phase, we find a dynamics of an initial population of single gene sequences only which escape adaptive conflict through gene duplication and find that there are two time regimes: until a time t* single gene sequences dominate, and after t* double gene sequences outgrow single gene sequences. The time t* is identified as the time necessary for subfunctionalization to evolve and spread throughout the double gene sequences, and we show that there is an optimum mutation rate which minimizes this time scale.

  7. Nucleation and evolution of dynamic damage at Cu/Pb interfaces using molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fensin, S. J.; Valone, S. M.; Cerreta, E. K.; Gray, G. T.; Shao, S.

    2017-01-01

    For ductile metals, the process of dynamic fracture occurs through nucleation, growth and coalescence of voids. For high purity single-phase metals, it has been observed by numerous investigators that voids tend to heterogeneously nucleate at grain boundaries and all grain boundaries are not equally susceptible to void nucleation. However, for materials of engineering significance, especially those with second phase particles, it is less clear if the type of bi-metal interface between the two phases will affect void nucleation and growth. To approach this problem in a systematic manner two bi-metal interfaces between Cu and Pb have been investigated: {111} and {100}. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of the collected data from molecular dynamics shock and spall simulations suggests that Pb becomes disordered during shock compression and is the preferred location for void nucleation under tension. Despite the interfaces being aligned with the spall plane (by design), they are not the preferred location for void nucleation irrespective of interface type.

  8. Molecular dynamics simulations of the structure evolutions of Cu-Zr metallic glasses under irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Lin; Tian, Zean; Xiao, Shifang; Deng, Huiqiu; Ao, Bingyun; Chen, Piheng; Hu, Wangyu

    2017-02-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to investigate the structural evolution of Cu64.5Zr35.5 metallic glasses under irradiation. The largest standard cluster analysis (LSCA) method was used to quantify the microstructure within the collision cascade regions. It is found that the majority of clusters within the collision cascade regions are full and defective icosahedrons. Not only the smaller structures (common neighbor subcluster) but also primary clusters greatly changed during the collision cascades; while most of these radiation damages self-recover quickly in the following quench states. These findings indicate the Cu-Zr metallic glasses have excellent irradiation-resistance properties.

  9. The Dynamics of the Creation, Evolution, and Disappearance of Terrorist Internet Forums

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Ricardo Torres-Soriano

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available An examination of the organizational nature of the threat posed by jihadi terrorism, supplying quantitative and qualitative data on the dynamics behind the creation, evolution, and disappearance of the main jihadi Internet forums during the period 2008–2012. An analysis of the origins and functions of the forums, their links with terrorist organizations, their internal structures, and the processes accounting for their stability in cyberspace shows that far from representinga horizontal structure where the main actors are a network of followers, the terrorist presence on the Internet is in fact a hierarchical organization in which intervention by formal terrorist organizations plays a crucial role.

  10. CONSIDERATIONS ON COMMERCIAL GLOBALIZATION (I – THE DYNAMICS OF THE COMMERCIAL FLOWS: EVOLUTIONS AND STRUCTURAL MODIFICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badulescu Daniel

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Following the WW II, the global economic evolution is more and more marked by the relevant dynamic of the commercial trades that had become the core of the economic development both for the developed countries and for the emerging economies. The average annual growth rhythm of the international goods trade was practically double in comparison with that of the production (real GDP, both for the developed and for the developing countries. Thus, between 1960 and 2005, the rate of the commercial trades in the global GDP increased from 24% to 46%, practically doubling in the 45 years.

  11. A Multi-Phase Chemo-Dynamical SPH Code for Galaxy Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Berczik, P.; Hensler, G.; Theis, Ch.; Spurzem, R.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we present some test results of our newly developed Multi-Phase Chemo-Dynamical Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (MP- CD-SPH) code for galaxy evolution. At first, we present a test of the ``pure'' hydro SPH part of the code. Then we describe and test the multi-phase description of the gaseous components of the interstellar matter. In this second part we also compare our condensation and evaporation description with the results of a previous 2d multi-phase hydrodynamic mesh code.

  12. On the Debate Concerning the Proper Characterisation of Quantum Dynamical Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Cuffaro, Michael E

    2014-01-01

    There has been a long-standing and sometimes passionate debate between physicists over whether a dynamical framework for quantum systems should incorporate not completely positive (NCP) maps in addition to completely positive (CP) maps. Despite the reasonableness of the arguments for complete positivity, we argue that NCP maps should be allowed, with a qualification: these should be understood, not as reflecting 'not completely positive' evolution, but as linear extensions, to a system's entire state space, of CP maps that are only partially defined. Beyond the domain of definition of a partial-CP map, we argue, much may be permitted.

  13. Gas Evolution Dynamics in Godunov-Type Schemes and Analysis of Numerical Shock Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kun

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we are going to study the gas evolution dynamics of the exact and approximate Riemann solvers, e.g., the Flux Vector Splitting (FVS) and the Flux Difference Splitting (FDS) schemes. Since the FVS scheme and the Kinetic Flux Vector Splitting (KFVS) scheme have the same physical mechanism and similar flux function, based on the analysis of the discretized KFVS scheme the weakness and advantage of the FVS scheme are closely observed. The subtle dissipative mechanism of the Godunov method in the 2D case is also analyzed, and the physical reason for shock instability, i.e., carbuncle phenomena and odd-even decoupling, is presented.

  14. Evolution of shear banding flows in metallic glasses characterized by molecular dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Li, E-mail: yltiger@sjtu.edu.cn [Shanghai Institute of Space Power-Sources, 2965 Dongchuan Rd., Shanghai 200245 (China); Luan, Yingwei [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Rd., Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2016-06-21

    To reveal the evolution of shear banding flows, one-dimensional nanostructure metallic glass composites have been studied with molecular dynamics. The inherent size determines the initial thickness of shear bands, and the subsequent broadening can be restricted to some extent. The vortex-like flows evoke the atomic motion perpendicular to the shear plane, which accelerates the interatomic diffusion. The reduction of local strain rate causes the flow softening for monolithic Cu-Zr glass, but the participation of Cu-atoms in the shear banding flow gradually leads to the shear hardening for the composites.

  15. Monte Carlo simulation of the dynamic evolution of binary lamellar eutectic in directional solidification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Wei-Min; Niu Yu-Chao; Chen Jun-Hua; Bian Xiu-Fang; Liu Jun-Ming

    2004-01-01

    The dynamic evolution of the lamellar eutectic of binary alloys in directional solidification is studied in detail using the Monte Carlo technique. The simulated results can be summarized into two aspects: (1) the lamellar spacing λ is found to be inversely proportional to the chemical potential difference △μ, predicting a linear relationship between the kinetic supercooling △Tk and total supercooling at the solid/liquid (S/L) interface; (2) as the solidifying velocity R is low, the dynamic product λ2R shows a considerable dependence on temperature gradient GT in the liquid in front of the S/L interface, although this dependence becomes much weaker at a high R.

  16. Response and reliability analysis of nonlinear uncertain dynamical structures by the probability density evolution method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren R. K.; Peng, Yongbo; Sichani, Mahdi Teimouri

    2016-01-01

    The paper deals with the response and reliability analysis of hysteretic or geometric nonlinear uncertain dynamical systems of arbitrary dimensionality driven by stochastic processes. The approach is based on the probability density evolution method proposed by Li and Chen (Stochastic dynamics...... of structures, 1st edn. Wiley, London, 2009; Probab Eng Mech 20(1):33–44, 2005), which circumvents the dimensional curse of traditional methods for the determination of non-stationary probability densities based on Markov process assumptions and the numerical solution of the related Fokker–Planck and Kolmogorov......–Feller equations. The main obstacle of the method is that a multi-dimensional convolution integral needs to be carried out over the sample space of a set of basic random variables, for which reason the number of these need to be relatively low. In order to handle this problem an approach is suggested, which...

  17. Dynamic Mechanisms for Evolution of Mountain Rural Settlements and Soil Conservation in Upper Yangtze River Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qing; CHEN Yong

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the logic relationship between rural settlement reconstruction and soil conservation in the Upper Yangtze River. Firstly, by introducing the concepts of "flow" and "intercepted flow", we probe into the dynamic mechanism on interaction between ecological and environmental system, and then point out that the "intercepting sites" are physical conditions for establishment of human settlements in mountains. Secondly, by using ecological theories, "flow", "source", and "sink", material cycle and energy flow in mountains have been discussed. Thirdly, according to dissipative structure theory and thermodynamic laws, a hypothesis has been proposed that "entropy flow" is a dynamic force for settlement evolution. Finally, it is argued that a project for soil conservation is set to control and utilize flows so rural settlements can be supported and farmers' life improved.

  18. Investigating the Dynamics and Density Evolution of Returning Plasma Blobs from the 2011 June 7 Eruption

    CERN Document Server

    Carlyle, Jack; van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia; Innes, Davina; Hillier, Andrew; Matthews, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    This work examines infalling matter following an enormous Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) on 2011 June 7. The material formed discrete concentrations, or blobs, in the corona and fell back to the surface, appearing as dark clouds against the bright corona. In this work we examined the density and dynamic evolution of these blobs in order to formally assess the intriguing morphology displayed throughout their descent. The blobs were studied in five wavelengths (94, 131, 171, 193 and 211 \\AA) using the Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (SDO/AIA), comparing background emission to attenuated emission as a function of wavelength to calculate column densities across the descent of four separate blobs. We found the material to have a column density of hydrogen of approximately 2 $\\times$ 10$^{19}$ cm$^{-2}$, which is comparable with typical pre-eruption filament column densities. Repeated splitting of the returning material is seen in a manner consistent with the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Furthe...

  19. Selection on Network Dynamics Drives Differential Rates of Protein Domain Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannakee, Brian K; Gutenkunst, Ryan N

    2016-07-01

    The long-held principle that functionally important proteins evolve slowly has recently been challenged by studies in mice and yeast showing that the severity of a protein knockout only weakly predicts that protein's rate of evolution. However, the relevance of these studies to evolutionary changes within proteins is unknown, because amino acid substitutions, unlike knockouts, often only slightly perturb protein activity. To quantify the phenotypic effect of small biochemical perturbations, we developed an approach to use computational systems biology models to measure the influence of individual reaction rate constants on network dynamics. We show that this dynamical influence is predictive of protein domain evolutionary rate within networks in vertebrates and yeast, even after controlling for expression level and breadth, network topology, and knockout effect. Thus, our results not only demonstrate the importance of protein domain function in determining evolutionary rate, but also the power of systems biology modeling to uncover unanticipated evolutionary forces.

  20. Selection on Network Dynamics Drives Differential Rates of Protein Domain Evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian K Mannakee

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The long-held principle that functionally important proteins evolve slowly has recently been challenged by studies in mice and yeast showing that the severity of a protein knockout only weakly predicts that protein's rate of evolution. However, the relevance of these studies to evolutionary changes within proteins is unknown, because amino acid substitutions, unlike knockouts, often only slightly perturb protein activity. To quantify the phenotypic effect of small biochemical perturbations, we developed an approach to use computational systems biology models to measure the influence of individual reaction rate constants on network dynamics. We show that this dynamical influence is predictive of protein domain evolutionary rate within networks in vertebrates and yeast, even after controlling for expression level and breadth, network topology, and knockout effect. Thus, our results not only demonstrate the importance of protein domain function in determining evolutionary rate, but also the power of systems biology modeling to uncover unanticipated evolutionary forces.

  1. Collective dynamics of belief evolution under cognitive coherence and social conformity

    CERN Document Server

    Rodriguez, Nathaniel; Ahn, Yong-Yeol

    2015-01-01

    Human history has been marked by social instability and conflict, often driven by the irreconcilability of opposing sets of beliefs, ideologies, and religious dogmas. The dynamics of belief systems has been studied mainly from two distinct perspectives, namely how cognitive biases lead to individual belief rigidity and how social influence leads to social conformity. Here we propose a unifying framework that connects cognitive and social forces together in order to study the dynamics of societal belief evolution. Each individual is endowed with a network of interacting beliefs that evolves through interaction with other individuals in a social network. The adoption of beliefs is affected by both internal coherence and social conformity. Our framework explains how social instabilities can arise in otherwise homogeneous populations, how small numbers of zealots with highly coherent beliefs can overturn societal consensus, and how belief rigidity protects fringe groups and cults against invasion from mainstream ...

  2. Aggregate size and structure determination of nanomaterials in physiological media: importance of dynamic evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afrooz, A. R. M. Nabiul; Hussain, Saber M.; Saleh, Navid B.

    2014-12-01

    Most in vitro nanotoxicological assays are performed after 24 h exposure. However, in determining size and shape effect of nanoparticles in toxicity assays, initial characterization data are generally used to describe experimental outcome. The dynamic size and structure of aggregates are typically ignored in these studies. This brief communication reports dynamic evolution of aggregation characteristics of gold nanoparticles. The study finds that gradual increase in aggregate size of gold nanospheres (AuNS) occurs up to 6 h duration; beyond this time period, the aggregation process deviates from gradual to a more abrupt behavior as large networks are formed. Results of the study also show that aggregated clusters possess unique structural conformation depending on nominal diameter of the nanoparticles. The differences in fractal dimensions of the AuNS samples likely occurred due to geometric differences, causing larger packing propensities for smaller sized particles. Both such observations can have profound influence on dosimetry for in vitro nanotoxicity analyses.

  3. Dynamical Decomposition of Multifractal Time Series as Fractal Evolution and Long-Term Cycles: Applications to Foreign Currency Exchange Market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turiel, A.; Perez-Vicente, C.

    The application of the multifractal formalism to the study of some time series with scale invariant evolution has given rise to a rich framework of models and processing tools for the analysis of these signals. The formalism has been successfully exploited in different ways and with different goals: to obtain the effective variables governing the evolution of the series, to predict its future evolution, to estimate in which regime the series are, etc. In this paper, we discuss on the capabilities of a new, powerful processing tool, namely the computation of dynamical sources. With the aid of the source field, we will separate the fast, chaotic dynamics defined by the multifractal structure from a new, so-far unknown slow dynamics which concerns long cycles in the series. We discuss the results on the perspective of detection of sharp dynamic changes and forecasting.

  4. Bedrock Channel and Cave Evolution Models Based on Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perne, M.; Covington, M. D.; Cooper, M.

    2014-12-01

    Models of bedrock channel cross-section evolution typically rely on simple approximations of boundary shear stress to calculate erosion rates across the channel. While such models provide a useful tool for gaining general insight into channel dynamics, they also exhibit a narrower range of behaviors than seen in nature and scale experiments. Recent computational advances enable use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to relax many of the assumptions used in these simple models by simulating the full 3D flow field and resulting erosion. We have developed a model of bedrock channel evolution at the reach scale, using CFD, that alternates flow simulation steps with channel evolution steps and evolves the channel in time according to shear stresses calculated from the CFD runs. Caves provide an ideal field setting for studying bedrock channel dynamics, because long records of incision are often preserved in the form of channel widths, meander patterns, and sculpted forms, such as scallops, that indicate flow velocity and direction. However, most existing numerical models of cave formation investigate processes on larger scales, treat conduits as simple shapes, such as cylinders, and deal with the early stages of speleogenesis when sediment transport and erosion mechanisms other than dissolution do not have to be taken into account. Therefore, initial applications of the CFD model focus on the dynamics of cave channels, and particularly on the controls of channel width. While discharge, base level, sediment supply, and the ratio of dissolution to mechanical erosion, are likely to play important roles in determining channel width, we lack a quantitative understanding for the importance of these various factors. Notches in passage walls are thought to result from lateral erosion during periods of increased sediment load when the bed is armored. Modeling is used to check the plausibility of this explanation, and examine whether other mechanisms may also produce notches

  5. EFFECTS OF DYNAMICAL EVOLUTION OF GIANT PLANETS ON SURVIVAL OF TERRESTRIAL PLANETS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumura, Soko [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20741 (United States); Ida, Shigeru; Nagasawa, Makiko [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan)

    2013-04-20

    The orbital distributions of currently observed extrasolar giant planets allow marginally stable orbits for hypothetical, terrestrial planets. In this paper, we propose that many of these systems may not have additional planets on these ''stable'' orbits, since past dynamical instability among giant planets could have removed them. We numerically investigate the effects of early evolution of multiple giant planets on the orbital stability of the inner, sub-Neptune-like planets which are modeled as test particles, and determine their dynamically unstable region. Previous studies have shown that the majority of such test particles are ejected out of the system as a result of close encounters with giant planets. Here, we show that secular perturbations from giant planets can remove test particles at least down to 10 times smaller than their minimum pericenter distance. Our results indicate that, unless the dynamical instability among giant planets is either absent or quiet like planet-planet collisions, most test particles down to {approx}0.1 AU within the orbits of giant planets at a few AU may be gone. In fact, out of {approx}30% of survived test particles, about three quarters belong to the planet-planet collision cases. We find a good agreement between our numerical results and the secular theory, and present a semi-analytical formula which estimates the dynamically unstable region of the test particles just from the evolution of giant planets. Finally, our numerical results agree well with the observations, and also predict the existence of hot rocky planets in eccentric giant planet systems.

  6. Evolution of cooperation in spatial iterated Prisoner's Dilemma games under localized extremal dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen; Yu, Chao; Cui, Guang-Hai; Li, Ya-Peng; Li, Ming-Chu

    2016-02-01

    The spatial Iterated Prisoner's Dilemma game has been widely studied in order to explain the evolution of cooperation. Considering the large strategy space size and infinite interaction times, it is unrealistic to adopt the common imitate-best updating rule, which assumes that the human players have much stronger abilities to recognize their neighbors' strategies than they do in the one-shot game. In this paper, a novel localized extremal dynamic system is proposed, in which each player only needs to recognize the payoff of his neighbors and changes his strategy randomly when he receives the lowest payoff in his neighborhood. The evolution of cooperation is here explored under this updating rule for neighborhoods of different sizes, which are characterized by their corresponding radiuses r. The results show that when r = 1, the system is trapped in a checkerboard-like state, where half of the players consistently use AllD-like strategies and the other half constantly change their strategies. When r = 2, the system first enters an AllD-like state, from which it escapes, and finally evolves to a TFT-like state. When r is larger, the system locks in a situation with similar low average fitness as r = 1. The number of active players and the ability to form clusters jointly distinguish the evolutionary processes for different values of r from each other. The current findings further provide some insight into the evolution of cooperation and collective behavior in biological and social systems.

  7. Dynamics of DNA methylation in recent human and great ape evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Hernando-Herraez

    Full Text Available DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification involved in regulatory processes such as cell differentiation during development, X-chromosome inactivation, genomic imprinting and susceptibility to complex disease. However, the dynamics of DNA methylation changes between humans and their closest relatives are still poorly understood. We performed a comparative analysis of CpG methylation patterns between 9 humans and 23 primate samples including all species of great apes (chimpanzee, bonobo, gorilla and orangutan using Illumina Methylation450 bead arrays. Our analysis identified ∼800 genes with significantly altered methylation patterns among the great apes, including ∼170 genes with a methylation pattern unique to human. Some of these are known to be involved in developmental and neurological features, suggesting that epigenetic changes have been frequent during recent human and primate evolution. We identified a significant positive relationship between the rate of coding variation and alterations of methylation at the promoter level, indicative of co-occurrence between evolution of protein sequence and gene regulation. In contrast, and supporting the idea that many phenotypic differences between humans and great apes are not due to amino acid differences, our analysis also identified 184 genes that are perfectly conserved at protein level between human and chimpanzee, yet show significant epigenetic differences between these two species. We conclude that epigenetic alterations are an important force during primate evolution and have been under-explored in evolutionary comparative genomics.

  8. An Empirical Model for Halo Evolution and Global Gas Dynamics of the Fornax Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Yuan, Zhen; Jing, Y P

    2015-01-01

    We present an empirical model for the halo evolution and global gas dynamics of Fornax, the brightest Milky Way (MW) dwarf spheroidal galaxy (dSph). Assuming a global star formation rate psi(t)=lambda_*[M_g(t)/M_sun]^alpha consistent with observations of star formation in nearby galaxies and using the data on Fornax's psi(t), we derive the evolution of the total mass M_g(t) for cold gas in Fornax's star-forming disk and the rate Delta F(t) of net gas flow to or from the disk. We identify the onset of the transition in Delta F(t) from a net inflow to a net outflow as the time t_sat at which the Fornax halo became an MW satellite and estimate the evolution of its total mass M_h(t) at t

  9. Evolution of a new chlorophyll metabolic pathway driven by the dynamic changes in enzyme promiscuous activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Hisashi; Tanaka, Ayumi

    2014-03-01

    Organisms generate an enormous number of metabolites; however, the mechanisms by which a new metabolic pathway is acquired are unknown. To elucidate the importance of promiscuous enzyme activity for pathway evolution, the catalytic and substrate specificities of Chl biosynthetic enzymes were examined. In green plants, Chl a and Chl b are interconverted by the Chl cycle: Chl a is hydroxylated to 7-hydroxymethyl chlorophyll a followed by the conversion to Chl b, and both reactions are catalyzed by chlorophyllide a oxygenase. Chl b is reduced to 7-hydroxymethyl chlorophyll a by Chl b reductase and then converted to Chl a by 7-hydroxymethyl chlorophyll a reductase (HCAR). A phylogenetic analysis indicated that HCAR evolved from cyanobacterial 3,8-divinyl chlorophyllide reductase (DVR), which is responsible for the reduction of an 8-vinyl group in the Chl biosynthetic pathway. In addition to vinyl reductase activity, cyanobacterial DVR also has Chl b reductase and HCAR activities; consequently, three of the four reactions of the Chl cycle already existed in cyanobacteria, the progenitor of the chloroplast. During the evolution of cyanobacterial DVR to HCAR, the HCAR activity, a promiscuous reaction of cyanobacterial DVR, became the primary reaction. Moreover, the primary reaction (vinyl reductase activity) and some disadvantageous reactions were lost, but the neutral promiscuous reaction (NADH dehydrogenase) was retained in both DVR and HCAR. We also show that a portion of the Chl c biosynthetic pathway already existed in cyanobacteria. We discuss the importance of dynamic changes in promiscuous activity and of the latent pathways for metabolic evolution.

  10. Microsatellite landscape evolutionary dynamics across 450 million years of vertebrate genome evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Richard H; Blackmon, Heath; Reyes-Velasco, Jacobo; Schield, Drew R; Card, Daren C; Andrew, Audra L; Waynewood, Nyimah; Castoe, Todd A

    2016-05-01

    The evolutionary dynamics of simple sequence repeats (SSRs or microsatellites) across the vertebrate tree of life remain largely undocumented and poorly understood. In this study, we analyzed patterns of genomic microsatellite abundance and evolution across 71 vertebrate genomes. The highest abundances of microsatellites exist in the genomes of ray-finned fishes, squamate reptiles, and mammals, while crocodilian, turtle, and avian genomes exhibit reduced microsatellite landscapes. We used comparative methods to infer evolutionary rates of change in microsatellite abundance across vertebrates and to highlight particular lineages that have experienced unusually high or low rates of change in genomic microsatellite abundance. Overall, most variation in microsatellite content, abundance, and evolutionary rate is observed among major lineages of reptiles, yet we found that several deeply divergent clades (i.e., squamate reptiles and mammals) contained relatively similar genomic microsatellite compositions. Archosauromorph reptiles (turtles, crocodilians, and birds) exhibit reduced genomic microsatellite content and the slowest rates of microsatellite evolution, in contrast to squamate reptile genomes that have among the highest rates of microsatellite evolution. Substantial branch-specific shifts in SSR content in primates, monotremes, rodents, snakes, and fish are also evident. Collectively, our results support multiple major shifts in microsatellite genomic landscapes among vertebrates.

  11. Cell state switching factors and dynamical patterning modules: complementary mediators of plasticity in development and evolution

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Stuart A Newman; Ramray Bhat; Nadejda V Mezentseva

    2009-10-01

    Ancient metazoan organisms arose from unicellular eukaryotes that had billions of years of genetic evolution behind them. The transcription factor networks present in single-celled ancestors at the origin of the Metazoa (multicellular animals) were already capable of mediating the switching of the unicellular phenotype among alternative states of gene activity in response to environmental conditions. Cell differentiation, therefore, had its roots in phenotypic plasticity, with the ancient regulatory proteins acquiring new targets over time and evolving into the ``developmental transcription factors” (DTFs) of the ``developmental-genetic toolkit.” In contrast, the emergence of pattern formation and morphogenesis in the Metazoa had a different trajectory. Aggregation of unicellular metazoan ancestors changed the organisms’ spatial scale, leading to the first ``dynamical patterning module” (DPM): cell-cell adhesion. Following this, other DPMs (defined as physical forces and processes pertinent to the scale of the aggregates mobilized by a set of toolkit gene products distinct from the DTFs), transformed simple cell aggregates into hollow, multilayered, segmented, differentiated and additional complex structures, with minimal evolution of constituent genes. Like cell differentiation, therefore, metazoan morphologies also originated from plastic responses of cells and tissues. Here we describe examples of DTFs and most of the important DPMs, discussing their complementary roles in the evolution of developmental mechanisms. We also provide recently characterized examples of DTFs in cell type switching and DPMs in morphogenesis of avian limb bud mesenchyme, an embryo-derived tissue that retains a high degree of developmental plasticity.

  12. Dynamics of green Sahara periods and their role in hominin evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrasoaña, Juan C; Roberts, Andrew P; Rohling, Eelco J

    2013-01-01

    Astronomically forced insolation changes have driven monsoon dynamics and recurrent humid episodes in North Africa, resulting in green Sahara Periods (GSPs) with savannah expansion throughout most of the desert. Despite their potential for expanding the area of prime hominin habitats and favouring out-of-Africa dispersals, GSPs have not been incorporated into the narrative of hominin evolution due to poor knowledge of their timing, dynamics and landscape composition at evolutionary timescales. We present a compilation of continental and marine paleoenvironmental records from within and around North Africa, which enables identification of over 230 GSPs within the last 8 million years. By combining the main climatological determinants of woody cover in tropical Africa with paleoenvironmental and paleoclimatic data for representative (Holocene and Eemian) GSPs, we estimate precipitation regimes and habitat distributions during GSPs. Their chronology is consistent with the ages of Saharan archeological and fossil hominin sites. Each GSP took 2-3 kyr to develop, peaked over 4-8 kyr, biogeographically connected the African tropics to African and Eurasian mid latitudes, and ended within 2-3 kyr, which resulted in rapid habitat fragmentation. We argue that the well-dated succession of GSPs presented here may have played an important role in migration and evolution of hominins.

  13. Investigating the dynamics and density evolution of returning plasma blobs from the 2011 June 7 eruption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlyle, Jack; Williams, David R.; Van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia; Matthews, Sarah [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury St Mary, Surrey, RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Innes, Davina [Max-Planck Institut für Sonnensystemforschung, D-37191 Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany); Hillier, Andrew, E-mail: j.carlyle@ucl.ac.uk [Kwasan and Hida Observatories, Kyoto University, Kyoto 607-8471 (Japan)

    2014-02-20

    This work examines in-falling matter following an enormous coronal mass ejection on 2011 June 7. The material formed discrete concentrations, or blobs, in the corona and fell back to the surface, appearing as dark clouds against the bright corona. In this work we examined the density and dynamic evolution of these blobs in order to formally assess the intriguing morphology displayed throughout their descent. The blobs were studied in five wavelengths (94, 131, 171, 193, and 211 Å) using the Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly, comparing background emission to attenuated emission as a function of wavelength to calculate column densities across the descent of four separate blobs. We found the material to have a column density of hydrogen of approximately 2 × 10{sup 19} cm{sup –2}, which is comparable with typical pre-eruption filament column densities. Repeated splitting of the returning material is seen in a manner consistent with the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Furthermore, the observed distribution of density and its evolution is also a signature of this instability. By approximating the three-dimensional geometry (with data from STEREO-A), volumetric densities were found to be approximately 2 × 10{sup –14} g cm{sup –3}, and this, along with observed dominant length scales of the instability, was used to infer a magnetic field of the order 1 G associated with the descending blobs.

  14. Dynamical evolution of the chiral magnetic effect: applications to the quark-gluon plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Manuel, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    We study the dynamical evolution of the so-called chiral magnetic effect in an electromagnetic conductor. To this end, we consider the coupled set of corresponding Maxwell and chiral anomaly equations, and we prove that these can be derived from chiral kinetic theory. After integrating the chiral anomaly equation over space in a closed volume, it leads to a quantum conservation law of the total helicity of the system. A change in the magnetic helicity density comes together with a modification of the chiral fermion density. We study in Fourier space the coupled set of anomalous equations and we obtain the dynamical evolution of the magnetic fields, magnetic helicity density, and chiral fermion imbalance. Depending on the initial conditions we observe how the helicity might be transferred from the fermions to the magnetic fields, or vice versa, and find that the rate of this transfer also depends on the scale of wavelengths of the gauge fields in consideration. We then focus our attention on the quark-gluon pl...

  15. Application of Gas Dynamical Friction for Planetesimals: II. Evolution of Binary Planetesimals

    CERN Document Server

    Grishin, Evgeni

    2015-01-01

    One of first the stages of planet formation is the growth of small planetesimals and their accumulation into large planetesimals and planetary embryos. This early stage occurs much before the dispersal of most of the gas from the protoplanetary disk. At this stage gas-planetesimal interactions play a key role in the dynamical evolution of \\emph{single} intermediate-mass planetesimals ($m_{p}\\sim10^{21}-10^{25}g$) \\emph{through gas dynamical friction} (GDF). A significant fraction of all Solar system planetesimals (asteroids and Kuiper-belt objects) are known to be binary planetesimals (BPs). Here, we explore the effects of GDF on the evolution of \\emph{binary} planetesimals embedded in a gaseous disk using an N-body code with a fiducial external force accounting for GDF. We find that GDF can induce binary mergers on timescales shorter than the disk lifetime for masses above $m_{p}\\gtrsim10^{22}g$ at 1AU, independent of the binary initial separation and eccentricity. Such mergers can affect the structure of me...

  16. Experimental evolution reveals habitat-specific fitness dynamics among Wolbachia clades in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versace, Elisabetta; Nolte, Viola; Pandey, Ram Vinay; Tobler, Ray; Schlötterer, Christian

    2014-02-01

    The diversity and infection dynamics of the endosymbiont Wolbachia can be influenced by many factors, such as transmission rate, cytoplasmic incompatibility, environment, selection and genetic drift. The interplay of these factors in natural populations can result in heterogeneous infection patterns with substantial differences between populations and strains. The causes of these heterogeneities are not yet understood, partly due to the complexity of natural environments. We present experimental evolution as a new approach to study Wolbachia infection dynamics in replicate populations exposed to a controlled environment. A natural Drosophila melanogaster population infected with strains of Wolbachia belonging to different clades evolved in two laboratory environments (hot and cold) for 1.5 years. In both treatments, the rate of Wolbachia infection increased until fixation. In the hot environment, the relative frequency of different Wolbachia clades remained stable over 37 generations. In the cold environment, however, we observed marked changes in the composition of the Wolbachia population: within 15 generations, one Wolbachia clade increased more than 50% in frequency, whereas the other two clades decreased in frequency, resulting in the loss of one clade. The frequency change was highly reproducible not only among replicates, but also when flies that evolved for 42 generations in the hot environment were transferred to the cold environment. These results document how environmental factors can affect the composition of Wolbachia in D. melanogaster. The high reproducibility of the pattern suggests that experimental evolution studies can efficiently determine the functional basis of habitat-specific fitness among Wolbachia strains.

  17. The dynamical evolution and the force model for asteroid (196256) 2003 EH1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galushina, T. Yu.; Sambarov, G. E.

    2017-08-01

    This paper is devoted to the dynamics of asteroid (196256) 2003 EH1 which belongs to the Amor group. It is known that asteroid 2003 EH1 is associated with one of the main annual meteor showers - the Quadrantids. In this work we analyze the influence of various perturbing factors on the asteroid motion. The perturbations' estimation was done by five different methods based on the nominal orbit evolution and the size of the initial confidence region. The most significant influences on the dynamical evolution of 2003 EH1 are gravitational forces from the Sun, major planets and the Moon, and the relativistic effects (RE) of the Sun. The Earth, the Sun and Jupiter oblateness; gravitational perturbations from Pallas, Ceres, Vesta and Pluto; and the RE of planets, the Moon, and Pluto are of less importance. The researches of chaoticity and evolution of asteroid 2003 EH1 were examined by integrating its motion equations along with 500 clones. The time interval (1000-4000 years) has been determined by integration precision estimation. We estimated the mean exponential growth factor of nearby orbits (MEGNO) and found that MEGNO < 2 only in the interval from 1700 year to 2300 year. After 2300 year the MEGNO parameter increases that indicates motion instability. It shows that the orbit may be considered as regular on the time interval of ±300 years from now, and as chaotic outside this interval. We suppose that the reasons are the frequent close approaches of the asteroid with Jupiter and the overlap of apsidal-nodal resonances.

  18. Long-term dynamics of adaptive evolution in a globally important phytoplankton species to ocean acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlüter, Lothar; Lohbeck, Kai T.; Gröger, Joachim P.; Riebesell, Ulf; Reusch, Thorsten B. H.

    2016-01-01

    Marine phytoplankton may adapt to ocean change, such as acidification or warming, because of their large population sizes and short generation times. Long-term adaptation to novel environments is a dynamic process, and phenotypic change can take place thousands of generations after exposure to novel conditions. We conducted a long-term evolution experiment (4 years = 2100 generations), starting with a single clone of the abundant and widespread coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi exposed to three different CO2 levels simulating ocean acidification (OA). Growth rates as a proxy for Darwinian fitness increased only moderately under both levels of OA [+3.4% and +4.8%, respectively, at 1100 and 2200 μatm partial pressure of CO2 (Pco2)] relative to control treatments (ambient CO2, 400 μatm). Long-term adaptation to OA was complex, and initial phenotypic responses of ecologically important traits were later reverted. The biogeochemically important trait of calcification, in particular, that had initially been restored within the first year of evolution was later reduced to levels lower than the performance of nonadapted populations under OA. Calcification was not constitutively lost but returned to control treatment levels when high CO2–adapted isolates were transferred back to present-day control CO2 conditions. Selection under elevated CO2 exacerbated a general decrease of cell sizes under long-term laboratory evolution. Our results show that phytoplankton may evolve complex phenotypic plasticity that can affect biogeochemically important traits, such as calcification. Adaptive evolution may play out over longer time scales (>1 year) in an unforeseen way under future ocean conditions that cannot be predicted from initial adaptation responses. PMID:27419227

  19. Combined effects of surface conditions, boundary layer dynamics and chemistry on diurnal SOA evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. H. H. Janssen

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We study the combined effects of land surface conditions, atmospheric boundary layer dynamics and chemistry on the diurnal evolution of biogenic secondary organic aerosol in the atmospheric boundary layer, using a model that contains the essentials of all these components. First, we evaluate the model for a case study in Hyytiälä, Finland, and find that it is able to satisfactorily reproduce the observed dynamics and gas-phase chemistry. We show that the exchange of organic aerosol between the free troposphere and the boundary layer (entrainment must be taken into account in order to explain the observed diurnal cycle in organic aerosol (OA concentration. An examination of the budgets of organic aerosol and terpene concentrations show that the former is dominated by entrainment, while the latter is mainly driven by emission and chemical transformation. We systematically investigate the role of the land surface, which governs both the surface energy balance partitioning and terpene emissions, and the large-scale atmospheric process of vertical subsidence. Entrainment is especially important for the dilution of organic aerosol concentrations under conditions of dry soils and low terpene emissions. Subsidence suppresses boundary layer growth while enhancing entrainment. Therefore, it influences the relationship between organic aerosol and terpene concentrations. Our findings indicate that the diurnal evolution of secondary organic aerosols (SOA in the boundary layer is the result of coupled effects of the land surface, dynamics of the atmospheric boundary layer, chemistry, and free troposphere conditions. This has potentially some consequences for the design of both field campaigns and large-scale modeling studies.

  20. Evolution in functional complexity of heart rate dynamics: a measure of cardiac allograft adaptability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kresh, J Y; Izrailtyan, I

    1998-09-01

    The capacity of self-organized systems to adapt is embodied in the functional organization of intrinsic control mechanisms. Evolution in functional complexity of heart rate variability (HRV) was used as measure of the capacity of the transplanted heart to express newly emergent regulatory order. In a cross-sectional study of 100 patients after (0-10 yr) heart transplantation (HTX), heart rate dynamics were assessed using pointwise correlation dimension (PD2) analysis. A new observation is that, commencing with the acute event of allograft transplantation, the dynamics of rhythm formation proceed through complex phase transitions. At implantation, the donor heart manifested metronome-like chronotropic behavior (PD2 approximately 1.0). At 11-100 days, dimensional complexity of HRV reached a peak (PD2 approximately 2.0) associated with resurgence in the high-frequency component (0.15-0.5 Hz) of the power spectral density. Subsequent dimensional loss to PD2 approximately 1.0 at 20-30 mo after HTX was followed by a progressive near-linear gain in system complexity, reaching PD2 approximately 3.0 7-10 yr after HTX. The "dynamic reorganization" in the allograft rhythm-generating system, seen in the first 100 days, is a manifestation of the adaptive capacity of intrinsic control mechanisms. The loss of HRV 2 yr after HTX implies a withdrawal of intrinsic autonomic control and/or development of an entrained dynamic pattern characteristic of extrinsic sympathetic input. The subsequent long-term progressive rise in dimensional complexity of HRV can be attributed to the restoration of a functional order patterning parasympathetic control. The recognition that the decentralized heart can restitute the multidimensional state space of HR generator dynamics independent of external autonomic signaling may provide a new perspective on principles that constitute homeodynamic regulation.

  1. Nonlinear Dynamical Behavior in BS Evolution Model Based on Small-World Network Added with Mechanism of Preferential Connection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a modified small-world network added with new links with preferential connection instead of adding randomly, then we apply Bak-Sneppen (BS) evolution model on this network. Several dynamical character of the model such as the evolution graph, fo avalanche, the critical exponent D and τ, and the distribution of mutation times of all the nodes, show particular behaviors different from those of the model based on the regular network and the small-world network.

  2. Evolution-development congruence in pattern formation dynamics: Bifurcations in gene expression and regulation of networks structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohsokabe, Takahiro; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2016-01-01

    Search for possible relationships between phylogeny and ontogeny is important in evolutionary-developmental biology. Here we uncover such relationships by numerical evolution and unveil their origin in terms of dynamical systems theory. By representing developmental dynamics of spatially located cells with gene expression dynamics with cell-to-cell interaction under external morphogen gradient, gene regulation networks are evolved under mutation and selection with the fitness to approach a prescribed spatial pattern of expressed genes. For most numerical evolution experiments, evolution of pattern over generations and development of pattern by an evolved network exhibit remarkable congruence. Both in the evolution and development pattern changes consist of several epochs where stripes are formed in a short time, while for other temporal regimes, pattern hardly changes. In evolution, these quasi-stationary regimes are generations needed to hit relevant mutations, while in development, they are due to some gene expression that varies slowly and controls the pattern change. The morphogenesis is regulated by combinations of feedback or feedforward regulations, where the upstream feedforward network reads the external morphogen gradient, and generates a pattern used as a boundary condition for the later patterns. The ordering from up to downstream is common in evolution and development, while the successive epochal changes in development and evolution are represented as common bifurcations in dynamical-systems theory, which lead to the evolution-development congruence. Mechanism of exceptional violation of the congruence is also unveiled. Our results provide a new look on developmental stages, punctuated equilibrium, developmental bottlenecks, and evolutionary acquisition of novelty in morphogenesis.

  3. Energy Change due to Off-Fault Damage Evolution associated with Dynamic Fault Tip Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, T.

    2010-12-01

    We theoretically study off-fault damage evolution effects on dynamic earthquake rupture, especially from a standpoint of energy change in a whole system. The importance of off-fault inelastic energy loss due to damage on dynamic earthquake rupture has attracted interests of many researchers in terms of, for example, rupture velocity reduction and crack tip growth cessation. The damage effect is found to be important on dynamic earthquake slip behavior in terms of porosity increase also in a series of our previous studies, Suzuki and Yamashita (2007; 2008; 2009; 2010). The mathematical formulation of Murakami and Kamiya (1997) is assumed in the present study; the damage tensor D is used to describe damage state in a medium. Damage, which consists of microcracks in a medium, has direction (defined as normal to the crack surface) and the magnitude (crack size), so that a scalar damage variable is insufficient to describe the damage state. We first analytically derive the equation system including the damage tensor and describing energy change in a whole system due to any dynamic elastic and inelastic deformation processes such as macroscopic crack extension and damage evolution. The change in the summation of strain and kinetic energies and damage energy is found to be equal to the summation of energy flowing out of the medium through the boundary and energy turning to heat and irreversibly lost based on the analytical expression; the damage energy is associated with surface energy released by damage evolution. The damage energy is confirmed to be equal to the summation of the loss in strain energy due to change in the elastic moduli and irreversibly lost energy. A mode III crack embedded in a medium causing damage is then assumed to study the off-fault damage effects on dynamic earthquake rupture. Spontaneous crack tip growth with the Coulomb fracture criterion is assumed and in such a case the rupture velocity can be sufficiently smaller than the terminal velocity

  4. Grammatical Immune System Evolution for Reverse Engineering Nonlinear Dynamic Bayesian Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.A. McKinney

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available An artificial immune system algorithm is introduced in which nonlinear dynamic models are evolved to fi t time series of interacting biomolecules. This grammar-based machine learning method learns the structure and parameters of the underlying dynamic model. In silico immunogenetic mechanisms for the generation of model-structure diversity are implemented with the aid of a grammar, which also enforces semantic constraints of the evolved models. The grammar acts as a DNA repair polymerase that can identify recombination and hypermutation signals in the antibody (model genome. These signals contain information interpretable by the grammar to maintain model context. Grammatical Immune System Evolution (GISE is applied to a nonlinear system identification problem in which a generalized (nonlinear dynamic Bayesian model is evolved to fi t biologically motivated artificial time-series data. From experimental data, we use GISE to infer an improved kinetic model for the oxidative metabolism of 17β-estradiol (E2, the parent hormone of the estrogen metabolism pathway.

  5. Dynamical systems for modeling the evolution of the magnetic field of stars and Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova, H.

    2016-02-01

    The cycles of solar magnetic activity are connected with a solar dynamo that operates in the convective zone. Solar dynamo mechanism is based on the combined action of the differential rotation and the alpha-effect. Application of these concepts allows us to get an oscillating solution as a wave of the toroidal field propagating from middle latitudes to the equator. We investigated the dynamo model with the meridional circulation by the low-mode approach. This approach is based on an assumption that the solar magnetic field can be described by non-linear dynamical systems with a relatively small number of parameters. Such non-linear dynamical systems are based on the equations of dynamo models. With this method dynamical systems have been built for media which contains the meridional flow and thickness of the convection zone of the star. It was shown the possibility of coexistence of quiasi-biennial and 22-year cycle. We obtained the different regimes (oscillations, vacillations, dynamo-bursts) depending on the value of the dynamo-number, the meridional circulation, and thickness of the convection zone. We discuss the features of these regimes and compare them with the observed features of evolution of the solar and geo magnetic fields. We built theoretical paleomagnetic time scale and butterfly-diagrams for the helicity and toroidal magnetic field for different regimes.

  6. Dynamical response of dark matter to galaxy evolution affects direct-detection experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Michael S.; Katz, Neal; Weinberg, Martin D.

    2016-12-01

    Over a handful of rotation periods, dynamical processes in barred galaxies induce nonaxisymmetric structure in dark matter halos. Using n -body simulations of a Milky Way-like barred galaxy, we identify both a trapped dark matter component, a shadow bar, and a strong response wake in the dark matter distribution that affects the predicted dark matter detection rates for current experiments. The presence of a baryonic disk, together with well-known dynamical processes (e.g. spiral structure and bar instabilities), increases the dark matter density in the disk plane. We find that the magnitude of the combined stellar and shadow bar evolution, when isolated from the effect of the axisymmetric gravitational potential of the disk, accounts for >30 % of this overall increase in disk-plane density. This is significantly larger than that of previously claimed deviations from the standard halo model. The dark matter density and kinematic wakes driven by the Milky Way bar increase the detectability of dark matter overall, especially for the experiments with higher vmin . These astrophysical features increase the detection rate by more than a factor of 2 when compared to the standard halo model and by a factor of 10 for experiments with high minimum recoil energy thresholds. These same features increase (decrease) the annual modulation for low (high) minimum recoil energy experiments. We present physical arguments for why these dynamics are generic for barred galaxies such as the Milky Way rather than contingent on a specific galaxy model.

  7. Collective Dynamics of Belief Evolution under Cognitive Coherence and Social Conformity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Nathaniel; Bollen, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Human history has been marked by social instability and conflict, often driven by the irreconcilability of opposing sets of beliefs, ideologies, and religious dogmas. The dynamics of belief systems has been studied mainly from two distinct perspectives, namely how cognitive biases lead to individual belief rigidity and how social influence leads to social conformity. Here we propose a unifying framework that connects cognitive and social forces together in order to study the dynamics of societal belief evolution. Each individual is endowed with a network of interacting beliefs that evolves through interaction with other individuals in a social network. The adoption of beliefs is affected by both internal coherence and social conformity. Our framework may offer explanations for how social transitions can arise in otherwise homogeneous populations, how small numbers of zealots with highly coherent beliefs can overturn societal consensus, and how belief rigidity protects fringe groups and cults against invasion from mainstream beliefs, allowing them to persist and even thrive in larger societies. Our results suggest that strong consensus may be insufficient to guarantee social stability, that the cognitive coherence of belief-systems is vital in determining their ability to spread, and that coherent belief-systems may pose a serious problem for resolving social polarization, due to their ability to prevent consensus even under high levels of social exposure. We argue that the inclusion of cognitive factors into a social model could provide a more complete picture of collective human dynamics. PMID:27812210

  8. Efficient search and responsiveness trade-offs in a Markov chain model of evolution in dynamic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Amor A; Kabamba, Pierre T

    2016-06-01

    Motivated by the desire to study evolutionary responsiveness in fluctuating environments, and by the current interest in analyses of evolution that merge notions of fitness maximization with dynamical systems concepts such as Lyapunov functions, this paper models natural evolution with a simple stochastic dynamical system that can be represented as a Markov chain. The process maximizes fitness globally via search and has links to information and entropy. These links suggest that a possible rationale for evolution with the exponential fitness functions observed in nature is that of optimally-efficient search in a dynamic environment, which represents the quickest trade-off of prior information about the genotype search space for search effort savings after an environment perturbation. A Lyapunov function is also provided that relates the stochastic dynamical system model with search information, and the model shows that evolution is not gradient-based but dwells longer on more fit outcomes. The model further indicates that tuning the amount of selection trades off environment responsiveness with the time to reach fit outcomes, and that excessive selection causes a loss of responsiveness, a result that is validated by the literature and impacts efforts in directed evolution.

  9. River dynamics and landscape evolution in La Réunion Island: insights from luminescence dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farvacque, Manon; Valla, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    Tropical volcanic islands are natural laboratories to investigate the competition between volcanic construction (lava eruptions) and erosional destruction (extreme climatic events) in long-term landscape evolution. In La Réunion Island (Indian Ocean), the present day topography of the Piton des Neiges results from these competing processes. It presents three large-scale excavations called "cirques" that have been significantly eroded since the latest eruptive events but whose origin and formation time are still unclear. Indeed, the morphologic evolution of the Piton des Neiges is mostly known from K-Ar dating of lava flows and associated reconstructions of post-eruption eroded volumes. However, involved erosion processes and their rates through time remain poorly constrained, making it difficult to understand the geomorphic response to volcanic activity in this setting. Here, we focus on the "Bras de Cilaos" river that drains the "Cilaos cirque" (southern part of the Piton des Neiges). The Cilaos cirque has been first excavated between 140-180 ka [1], and it has been filled again during a late-stage eruptive event at ~145 ka [2] that also entirely filled the Bras de Cilaos valley. Alternatively, some studies have proposed that the Cilaos cirque and the Bras de Cilaos have been more recently filled by an eruption event at ~70 ka [3]. The Bras de Cilaos river is characterized by high relief (400-650 m) with no remaining evidence for these late eruptive events, showing significant incision and efficient fluvial erosion/transport processes after lava emplacement. In its downstream part, it presents thick alluvial deposits preserved along its riverbanks. The presence of such deposits may provide important constraints on the river dynamics and especially its response to the latest eruption events. However this requires establishing a tight temporal framework for these sediment archives. We thus sampled five different sedimentary sequences along the river to date their

  10. Differential Evolution Based Receding Horizon Control for UAV Motion Planning in Dynamic Environments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xing; BAI YongQiang; XIN Bin; CHEN Jie

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents online motion planning for UAV (unmanned aerial vehicle) in complex threat field,including both static threats and moving threats,which can be formulated as a dynamic constrained optimal control problem.Receding horizon control (RHC) based on differential evolution (DE) algorithm is adopted.A location-predicting model of moving threats is established to assess the value of threat that UAV faces in flight.Then flyable paths can be generated by the control inputs which are optimized by DE under the guidance of the objective function.Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed method not only generates smooth and flyable paths,but also enables UAV to avoid threats efficiently and arrive at destination safely.

  11. Eco-innovation Dynamics - Creative Destruction ad Creative accumulation in green Economic Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Maj Munch

    2010-01-01

    evolutionary economic theorizing on the dynamics of the “greening” of the economy, a theme which has been little analyzed so far. The paper suggests that the greening of the economic process should be seen as one of the most innovative changes in recent economic evolution entailing a major structural change...... economics. The paper concludes that we may see the emerging ‘ green economy’ as a specific historic era reflecting important changes in competitive conditions characterizing the modern knowledge economy. The paper contributes mainly to a micro-theoretical discussion forwarding a strong paradigmatic...... to a fundamental ‘green trajectory’ at the very general R&D level. The impact and pervasiveness of eco-innovation is at this very basic level influencing on the entire economy. The techno-economic paradigm change should be seen as a function of partly changes in the underlying trajectory and partly changes...

  12. Hydrogen partitioning in pure cast aluminum as determined by dynamic evolution rate measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Outlaw, R. A.; Peterson, D. T.; Schmidt, F. A.

    1981-01-01

    Hydrogen in pure aluminum can be found in two different states. One is related to a presence in gas-filled pores, while the other state involves the formation of a solid solution between hydrogen and aluminum. The considered investigation is concerned with the distribution of the hydrogen between various states. A dynamic technique is employed to measure the evolution of hydrogen from commercially available samples of polycrystalline pure aluminum under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. The obtained data are compared with the results of a statistical analysis concerning the porosity in the cast aluminum. It was found that more than 99 pct of the hydrogen in the aluminum is located in large pores. Less than 1 pct of the hydrogen is partitioned between the solid solution and the small pores.

  13. Dynamic evolution of outer radiation belt electrons driven by superluminous R-X mode waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    We present initial results on the temporal evolution of the phase space density (PSD) of the outer radiation belt energetic electrons driven by the superluminous R-X mode waves. We calculate diffusion rates in pitch angle and momentum assuming the standard Gaussian distributions in both wave frequency and wave normal angle at the location L=6.5. We solve a 2D momentum-pitch-angle Fokker-Planck equation using those diffusion rates as inputs. Numerical results show that R-X mode can produce significant acceleration of relativistic electrons around geostationary orbit,supporting previous findings that superluminous waves potentially contribute to dramatic variation in the outer radiation belt electron dynamics.

  14. Co-Evolution of Opinion and Strategy in Persuasion Dynamics:. AN Evolutionary Game Theoretical Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Fei; Liu, Yun; Li, Yong

    In this paper, a new model of opinion formation within the framework of evolutionary game theory is presented. The model simulates strategic situations when people are in opinion discussion. Heterogeneous agents adjust their behaviors to the environment during discussions, and their interacting strategies evolve together with opinions. In the proposed game, we take into account payoff discount to join a discussion, and the situation that people might drop out of an unpromising game. Analytical and emulational results show that evolution of opinion and strategy always tend to converge, with utility threshold, memory length, and decision uncertainty parameters influencing the convergence time. The model displays different dynamical regimes when we set differently the rule when people are at a loss in strategy.

  15. Structure, dynamics and evolution of disk galaxies in a hierarchical formation scenario

    CERN Document Server

    Firmani, C

    1999-01-01

    Using galaxy evolutionary models in a hierarchical formation scenario, we predict the structure, dynamics and evolution of disk galaxies in a LCDM universe. Our models include star formation and hydrodynamics of the ISM. We find that the Tully-Fisher relation (TFR) in the I and H bands is an imprint of the mass-velocity relation of the cosmological dark halos. The scatter of the TFR originates mainly from the scatter in the dark halo structure and, to a minor extension, from the dispersion of the primordial spin parameter lambda. Our models allow us to explain why low and high surface brightness galaxies have the same TFR. The disk gas fractions predicted agree with the observations. The disks formed within the growing halos have nearly exponential surface brightness and flat rotation curves. Towards high redshifts, the zero-point of the TFR in the H band increases while in the B-band it slightly decreases.

  16. From discrete to continuous evolution models: a unifying approach to drift-diffusion and replicator dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Chalub, Fabio A C C

    2008-01-01

    We study the large population limit of the Moran process, assuming weak-selection, and for different scalings. Depending on the particular choice of scalings, we obtain a continuous model that may highlight the genetic-drift (neutral evolution) or natural selection; for one precise scaling, both effects are present. For the scalings that take the genetic-drift into account, the continuous model is given by a singular diffusion equation, together with two conservation laws that are already present at the discrete level. For scalings that take into account only natural selection, we obtain a hyperbolic singular equation that embeds the Replicator Dynamics and satisfies only one conservation law. The derivation is made in two steps: a formal one, where the candidate limit model is obtained, and a rigorous one, where convergence of the probability density is proved. Additional results on the fixation probabilities are also presented.

  17. Dynamics of magnetic flux tubes in close binary stars II. Nonlinear evolution and surface distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Holzwarth, V R

    2003-01-01

    Observations of magnetically active close binaries with orbital periods of a few days reveal the existence of starspots at preferred longitudes (with respect to the direction of the companion star). We numerically investigate the non-linear dynamics and evolution of magnetic flux tubes in the convection zoneof a fast-rotating component of a close binary system and explore whether the tidal effects are able to generate non-uniformities in the surface distribution of erupting flux tubes. Assuming a synchronised system with a rotation period of two days and consisting of two solar-type components, both the tidal force and the deviation of the stellar structure from spherical shape are considered in lowest-order perturbation theory. The magnetic field is initially stored in the form of toroidal magnetic flux rings within the stably stratified overshoot region beneath the convection zone. Once the field has grown sufficiently strong, instabilities initiate the formation of rising flux loops, which rise through the...

  18. Dynamic Behavior and Unstable State Evolution of Ocean-Atmosphere Oscillator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Wenjie; FENG Guolin

    2005-01-01

    It is mathematically and thoroughly proved in this paper that the nonlinear stochastic ocean-atmosphere oscillator model possesses a stable limit cycle; then the model equations are transformed into the FokkerPlanck equation (FPE), and the evolution of El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) from unstable state to stable state is studied from the point of view of nonequilibrium system dynamics. The study results reveal that although the complex nonlinear ocean-atmosphere oscillator model possesses multiequilibrium states,the real climatic system possesses only a quasi-normal state and a strong ENSO cycle stable state. The first passage time between states is also given in this paper, and the theoretical computational results agree with observational data.

  19. Evolution of Wheat streak mosaic virus: dynamics of population growth within plants may explain limited variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Roy; Stenger, Drake C

    2003-01-01

    Like many other plant RNA viruses, Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) sequence diversity within and among infected plants is low given the large number of virions produced. This may be explained by considering aspects of plant virus life history. Intracellular replication of RNA viruses is predominately linear, not exponential, which means that the rate at which mutations accumulate also is linear. Bottlenecks during systemic movement further limit diversity. Analysis of mixed infections with two WSMV isolates suggests that about four viral genomes participate in systemic invasion of each tiller. Low effective population size increases the role of stochastic processes on dynamics of plant virus population genetics and evolution. Despite low pair-wise diversity among isolates, the number of polymorphic sites within the U.S. population is about the same as between divergent strains or a sister species. Characteristics of polymorphism in the WSMV coat protein gene suggest that most variation appears neutral.

  20. A straightforward characterization of non-modal effects from the evolution of linear dynamical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arratia, Cristobal

    2014-11-01

    A simple construction will be shown, which reveals a general property satisfied by the evolution in time of a state vector composed by a superposition of orthogonal eigenmodes of a linear dynamical system. This property results from the conservation of the inner product between such state vectors evolving forward and backwards in time, and it can be simply evaluated from the state vector and its first and second time derivatives. This provides an efficient way to characterize, instantaneously along any specific phase-space trajectory of the linear system, the relevance of the non-normality of the linearized Navier-Stokes operator on the energy (or any other norm) gain or decay of small perturbations. Examples of this characterization applied to stationary or time dependent base flows will be shown. CONICYT, Concurso de Apoyo al Retorno de Investigadores del Extranjero, folio 821320055.

  1. Dynamic Evolution of the Evaporating Liquid-Vapor Interface in Micropillar Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antao, Dion S; Adera, Solomon; Zhu, Yangying; Farias, Edgardo; Raj, Rishi; Wang, Evelyn N

    2016-01-19

    Capillary assisted passively pumped thermal management devices have gained importance due to their simple design and reduction in energy consumption. The performance of these devices is strongly dependent on the shape of the curved interface between the liquid and vapor phases. We developed a transient laser interferometry technique to investigate the evolution of the shape of the liquid-vapor interface in micropillar arrays during evaporation heat transfer. Controlled cylindrical micropillar arrays were fabricated on the front side of a silicon wafer, while thin-film heaters were deposited on the reverse side to emulate a heat source. The shape of the meniscus was determined using the fringe patterns resulting from interference of a monochromatic beam incident on the thin liquid layer. We studied the evolution of the shape of the meniscus on these surfaces under various operating conditions including varying the micropillar geometry and the applied heating power. By monitoring the transient behavior of the evaporating liquid-vapor interface, we accurately measured the absolute location and shape of the meniscus and calculated the contact angle and the maximum capillary pressure. We demonstrated that the receding contact angle which determines the capillary pumping limit is independent of the microstructure geometry and the rate of evaporation (i.e., the applied heating power). The results of this study provide fundamental insights into the dynamic behavior of the liquid-vapor interface in wick structures during phase-change heat transfer.

  2. The long-term dynamical evolution of disc-fragmented multiple systems in the Solar Neighborhood

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Yun; Stamatellos, D; Goodwin, S P

    2016-01-01

    The origin of very low-mass hydrogen-burning stars, brown dwarfs, and planetary-mass objects at the low-mass end of the initial mass function is not yet fully understood. Gravitational fragmentation of circumstellar discs provides a possible mechanism for the formation of such low-mass objects. The kinematic and binary properties of very low-mass objects formed through disc fragmentation at early times (< 10 Myr) were discussed in Li et al. (2015). In this paper we extend the analysis by following the long-term evolution of disc-fragmented systems, up to an age of 10 Gyr, covering the ages of the stellar and substellar population in the Galactic field. We find that the systems continue to decay, although the rates at which companions escape or collide with each other are substantially lower than during the first 10 Myr, and that dynamical evolution is limited beyond 1 Gyr. By t = 10 Gyr, about one third of the host stars is single, and more than half have only one companion left. Most of the other systems ...

  3. Comparative genomic paleontology across plant kingdom reveals the dynamics of TE-driven genome evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Baidouri, Moaine; Panaud, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Long terminal repeat-retrotransposons (LTR-RTs) are the most abundant class of transposable elements (TEs) in plants. They strongly impact the structure, function, and evolution of their host genome, and, in particular, their role in genome size variation has been clearly established. However, the dynamics of the process through which LTR-RTs have differentially shaped plant genomes is still poorly understood because of a lack of comparative studies. Using a new robust and automated family classification procedure, we exhaustively characterized the LTR-RTs in eight plant genomes for which a high-quality sequence is available (i.e., Arabidopsis thaliana, A. lyrata, grapevine, soybean, rice, Brachypodium dystachion, sorghum, and maize). This allowed us to perform a comparative genome-wide study of the retrotranspositional landscape in these eight plant lineages from both monocots and dicots. We show that retrotransposition has recurrently occurred in all plant genomes investigated, regardless their size, and through bursts, rather than a continuous process. Moreover, in each genome, only one or few LTR-RT families have been active in the recent past, and the difference in genome size among the species studied could thus mostly be accounted for by the extent of the latest transpositional burst(s). Following these bursts, LTR-RTs are efficiently eliminated from their host genomes through recombination and deletion, but we show that the removal rate is not lineage specific. These new findings lead us to propose a new model of TE-driven genome evolution in plants.

  4. Dynamic Evolution of Outer Radiation Belt Electrons due to Whistler-Mode Chorus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU Zhen-Peng; ZHENG Hui-Nan; XIONG Ming

    2009-01-01

    Following our preceding work,we perform a further study on dynamic evolution of energetic electrons in the outer radiation belt L = 4.5 due to a band of whistler-mode chorus frequency distributed over a standard Gaussian spectrum.We solve the 2D bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck equation by allowing incorporation of cross diffusion rates.Numerical results show that whistler-mode chorus can be effective in acceleration of electrons at large pitch angles,and enhance the phase space density for energies of about 1MeV by a factor of 102 or above in about one day,consistent with observation of significant enhancement in flux of energetic electrons during the recovery phase of a geomagnetic storm.Moreover,neglecting cross diffusion often leads to overestimates of the phase space density evolution at large pitch angle by a factor of 5-10 after one day,with larger errors at smaller pitch angle,suggesting that cross diffusion also plays an important role in wave-particle interaction.

  5. Public good dynamics drive evolution of iron acquisition strategies in natural bacterioplankton populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero, Otto X; Ventouras, Laure-Anne; DeLong, Edward F; Polz, Martin F

    2012-12-01

    A common strategy among microbes living in iron-limited environments is the secretion of siderophores, which can bind poorly soluble iron and make it available to cells via active transport mechanisms. Such siderophore-iron complexes can be thought of as public goods that can be exploited by local communities and drive diversification, for example by the evolution of "cheating." However, it is unclear whether bacterial populations in the environment form stable enough communities such that social interactions significantly impact evolutionary dynamics. Here we show that public good games drive the evolution of iron acquisition strategies in wild populations of marine bacteria. We found that within nonclonal but ecologically cohesive genotypic clusters of closely related Vibrionaceae, only an intermediate percentage of genotypes are able to produce siderophores. Nonproducers within these clusters exhibited selective loss of siderophore biosynthetic pathways, whereas siderophore transport mechanisms were retained, suggesting that these nonproducers can act as cheaters that benefit from siderophore producers in their local environment. In support of this hypothesis, these nonproducers in iron-limited media suffer a significant decrease in growth, which can be alleviated by siderophores, presumably owing to the retention of transport mechanisms. Moreover, using ecological data of resource partitioning, we found that cheating coevolves with the ecological specialization toward association with larger particles in the water column, suggesting that these can harbor stable enough communities for dependencies among organisms to evolve.

  6. Computational issues in chemo-dynamical modelling of the formation and evolution of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Revaz, Yves; Nichols, Matthew; Bonvin, Vivien; Jablonka, Pascale

    2016-01-01

    Chemo-dynamical N-body simulations are an essential tool for understanding the formation and evolution of galaxies. As the number of observationally determined stellar abundances continues to climb, these simulations are able to provide new constraints on the early star formaton history and chemical evolution inside both the Milky Way and Local Group dwarf galaxies. Here, we aim to reproduce the low $\\alpha$-element scatter observed in metal-poor stars. We first demonstrate that as stellar particles inside simulations drop below a mass threshold, increases in the resolution produce an unacceptably large scatter as one particle is no longer a good approximation of an entire stellar population. This threshold occurs at around $10^3\\,\\rm{M_\\odot}$, a mass limit easily reached in current (and future) simulations. By simulating the Sextans and Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxies we show that this increase in scatter at high resolutions arises from stochastic supernovae explosions. In order to reduce this scatter down...

  7. Chemo-Dynamical Evolution of Disk Galaxies, Smoothed Particles Hydrodynamics Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berczik, P.

    In this paper I present, the new Chemo-Dynamical code, incorporated to the standard Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (CD-SPH). This code used to modelling the complex evolution of disk galaxy systems. The more detailed description of SPH code and the Star Formation (SF) and Super Novae (SN) algorithms you can find in our earlier work Berczik P. & Kravchuk S.G., 1996, ApSpSci, 245, 27. The galaxy presented via tree component system. The Dark Matter Halo described as an external gravitational potential with distribution of Dark Matter density (Burkert A. 1995, ApJ, 447, L25): ρDM (r) = frac ρ0 (1 + r / r0) cdot (1 + r / r0)2. The total mass of Dark Matter Halo is 1012 Modot. The second component is a hot coronal gas, with Thot ~106 K. This component presented as a uniformly distributed SPH gas with initial solid body rotation and with additisional random velocity component Δ V ~100 km/sec. The total mass of this component is 5 cdot 1010 Modot. The last component is a cold gas (Tcold ~104 K). This component presented also as a uniformly distributed SPH gas with initial solid body rotation and with additional random velocity component Δ V ~10 km/sec. The total mass of this component also is 5 cdot 1010 Modot. In the paper presented a more complex and may be more realistic incorporation of SF & SN in the SPH code. The presented calculation is clearly show, what the some interestiong and important properties of isolated disk galaxies we can explain using this simple, tree component "collapsing" model. In the frame of this approach we are able to reproduce the presently observed kinematics of star and gaseous components as well as their distributions and heavy element abundances. The developed model provide the realystic description of dynamics and chemical evolution of typical disk galaxies over the Hubble timescale.

  8. The dynamic loss and gain of introns during the evolution of the Brassicaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milia, Giampiera; Camiolo, Salvatore; Avesani, Linda; Porceddu, Andrea

    2015-06-01

    Sequence comparison allows the detailed analysis of evolution at the nucleotide and amino acid levels, but much less information is known about the structural evolution of genes, i.e. how the number, length and distribution of introns change over time. We constructed a parsimonious model for the evolutionary rate of intron loss (IL) and intron gain (IG) within the Brassicaceae and found that IL/IG has been highly dynamic, with substantial differences between and even within lineages. The divergence of the Brassicaceae lineages I and II marked a dramatic change in the IL rate, with the common ancestor of lineage I losing introns three times more rapidly than the common ancestor of lineage II. Our data also indicate a subsequent declining trend in the rate of IL, although in Arabidopsis thaliana introns continue to be lost at approximately the ancestral rate. Variations in the rate of IL/IG within lineage II have been even more remarkable. Brassica rapa appears to have lost introns approximately 15 times more rapidly than the common ancestor of B. rapa and Schenkiella parvula, and approximately 25 times more rapidly than its sister species Eutrema salsugineum. Microhomology was detected at the splice sites of several dynamic introns suggesting that the non-homologous end-joining and double-strand break repair is a common pathway underlying IL/IG in these species. We also detected molecular signatures typical of mRNA-mediated IL, but only in B. rapa. © 2015 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Asteroid 4 Vesta: Dynamical and collisional evolution during the Late Heavy Bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirani, S.; Turrini, D.

    2016-06-01

    Asteroid 4 Vesta is the only currently identified asteroid for which we possess samples in the form of meteorites. These meteorites revealed us that Vesta is a differentiated body and that its differentiation produced a relatively thin basaltic crust that survived intact over its entire collisional history. The survival of the vestan basaltic crust has long been identified as a pivotal constraint in the study of the evolution of the asteroid belt and the Solar System but, while we possess a reasonably good picture of the effects of the last 4 Ga on such a crust, little is known about the effects of earlier events like the Late Heavy Bombardment. In this work we address this gap in our knowledge by simulating the Late Heavy Bombardment on Vesta in the different dynamical scenarios proposed for the migration of the giant planets in the broad framework of the Nice Model. The results of the simulations allowed us to assess the collisional history of the asteroid during the Late Heavy Bombardment in terms of produced crater population, surface saturation, mass loss and mass gain of Vesta and number of energetic or catastrophic impacts. Our results reveal that planet-planet scattering is a dynamically favorable migration mechanism for the survival of Vesta and its crust. The number of impacts of asteroids larger than about 1 km in diameter estimated as due to the LHB is 31 ± 5, i.e. about 5 times larger than the number of impacts that would have occurred in an unperturbed main belt in the same time interval. The contribution of a possible extended belt to the collisional evolution of Vesta during the LHB is quite limited and can be quantified in 2 ± 1 impacts of asteroids with diameter greater than or equal to 1 km. The chance of energetic and catastrophic impacts is less than 10% and is compatible with the absence of giant craters dated back to 4 Ga ago and with the survival of the asteroid during the Late Heavy Bombardment. The mass loss caused by the bombardment

  10. The evolution of gene expression levels in mammalian organs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brawand, David; Soumillon, Magali; Necsulea, Anamaria

    2011-01-01

    and chromosomes, owing to differences in selective pressures: transcriptome change was slow in nervous tissues and rapid in testes, slower in rodents than in apes and monotremes, and rapid for the X chromosome right after its formation. Although gene expression evolution in mammals was strongly shaped......Changes in gene expression are thought to underlie many of the phenotypic differences between species. However, large-scale analyses of gene expression evolution were until recently prevented by technological limitations. Here we report the sequencing of polyadenylated RNA from six organs across...... ten species that represent all major mammalian lineages (placentals, marsupials and monotremes) and birds (the evolutionary outgroup), with the goal of understanding the dynamics of mammalian transcriptome evolution. We show that the rate of gene expression evolution varies among organs, lineages...

  11. Chemo -- dynamical, multi -- fragmented SPH code for evolution of star forming disk galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berczik, P.

    The problem of chemical and dynamical evolution of galaxies is one of the most attracting and complex problems of modern astrophysics. Within the framework of the given paper the standard dynamic Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) code (Monaghan J.J. 1992, ARAA, 30, 543) is noticeably expanded. Our work concernes with the changes and incorporation of new ideas into the algorithmic inclusion of Star Formation (SF) and Super Novae (SN) explosions in SPH (Berczik P. & Kravchuk S.G., 1996, ApSpSci, 245, 27). The proposed energy criterion for definition of a place and efficiency of SF results in the successfully explain Star Formation History (SFH) in isolated galaxies of different types. On the base of original ideas we expand a code in a more realistic way of the description of effects of return of a hot, chemical enriched gas in Interstellar Matter (ISM). In addition to the account of SNII, we offer the self-agreed account of SNIa and PN. This allows to describe not only the ISM content of O^16 but also the content of Fe^56 . This model will allow to investigate adequately also a well known G - dwarf problem.

  12. Language evolution and population dynamics in a system of two interacting species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmidis, Kosmas; Halley, John M.; Argyrakis, Panos

    2005-08-01

    We use Monte Carlo simulations and assumptions from evolutionary game theory in order to study the evolution of words and the population dynamics of a system made of two interacting species which initially speak two different languages. The species are characterized by their identity, vocabulary, and have different initial fitness, i.e. reproduction capability. We investigate how different initial fitness affects the vocabulary of the species or the population dynamics by leading to a permanent populational advantage. We further find that the spatial distributions of the species may cause the system to exhibit pattern formation or segregation. We show that an initial fitness advantage, even though very quickly balanced, leads to better spatial arrangement and enhances survival probabilities of the species. In most cases the system will arrive at a final state where both languages coexist. However, in cases where one species greatly outnumbers the other in population and fitness, then only one species survives with its “final” language having a slightly richer vocabulary than its initial language. Thus, our results offer an explanation for the existence and origin of synonyms in spoken languages.

  13. The Dynamical Response of Dark Matter to Galaxy Evolution Affects Direct-Detection Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Petersen, Michael S; Weinberg, Martin D

    2016-01-01

    Over a handful of rotation periods, dynamical processes in barred galaxies induce non-axisymmetric structure in dark matter halos. Using n-body simulations of a Milky Way-like barred galaxy, we identify both a trapped dark-matter component, a shadow bar, and a strong response wake in the dark-matter distribution that affects the predicted dark-matter detection rates for current experiments. The presence of a baryonic disk together with well-known dynamical processes (e.g. spiral structure and bar instabilities) increase the dark matter density in the disk plane. We find that the magnitude of the combined stellar and shadow bar evolution, when isolated from the effect of the axisymmetric gravitational potential of the disk, accounts for >30% of this overall increase in disk-plane density. This is significantly larger that of previously claimed deviations from the standard halo model. The dark-matter density and kinematic wakes driven by the Milky Way bar increase the detectability of dark matter overall, espec...

  14. The effects of supernovae on the dynamical evolution of binary stars and star clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Parker, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter I review the effects of supernovae explosions on the dynamical evolution of (1) binary stars and (2) star clusters. (1) Supernovae in binaries can drastically alter the orbit of the system, sometimes disrupting it entirely, and are thought to be partially responsible for `runaway' massive stars - stars in the Galaxy with large peculiar velocities. The ejection of the lower-mass secondary component of a binary occurs often in the event of the more massive primary star exploding as a supernova. The orbital properties of binaries that contain massive stars mean that the observed velocities of runaway stars (10s - 100s km s$^{-1}$) are consistent with this scenario. (2) Star formation is an inherently inefficient process, and much of the potential in young star clusters remains in the form of gas. Supernovae can in principle expel this gas, which would drastically alter the dynamics of the cluster by unbinding the stars from the potential. However, recent numerical simulations, and observational e...

  15. Asteroid 4 Vesta: dynamical and collisional evolution during the Late Heavy Bombardment

    CERN Document Server

    Pirani, S

    2016-01-01

    Vesta is the only currently identified asteroid for which we possess samples, which revealed us that the asteroid is differentiated and possesses a relatively thin basaltic crust that survived to the evolution of the asteroid belt and the Solar System. However, little is know about the effects of past events like the Late Heavy Bombardment on this crust. We address this gap in our knowledge by simulating the LHB in the different dynamical scenarios proposed for the migration of the giant planets in the broad framework of the Nice Model. The results of simulations generate information about produced crater population, surface saturation, mass loss and mass gain of Vesta and number of energetic or catastrophic impacts during LHB. Our results reveal that planet-planet scattering is a dynamically favourable migration mechanism for the survival of Vesta and its crust. The number of impacts on Vesta estimated as due to the LHB is $31\\pm5$, i.e. about 5 times larger than the number of impacts that would have occurre...

  16. Stochastic dynamics of complex systems: from glasses to evolution (series on complexity science)

    CERN Document Server

    Sibani, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Dynamical evolution over long time scales is a prominent feature of all the systems we intuitively think of as complex - for example, ecosystems, the brain or the economy. In physics, the term ageing is used for this type of slow change, occurring over time scales much longer than the patience, or indeed the lifetime, of the observer. The main focus of this book is on the stochastic processes which cause ageing, and the surprising fact that the ageing dynamics of systems which are very different at the microscopic level can be treated in similar ways. The first part of this book provides the necessary mathematical and computational tools and the second part describes the intuition needed to deal with these systems. Some of the first few chapters have been covered in several other books, but the emphasis and selection of the topics reflect both the authors' interests and the overall theme of the book. The second part contains an introduction to the scientific literature and deals in some detail with the desc...

  17. Dynamical evolution of V-type asteroids in the central main belt

    CERN Document Server

    Carruba, V; Domingos, R C; Santos, C R Dos; Souami, D

    2014-01-01

    V-type asteroids are associated with basaltic composition, and are supposed to be fragments of crust of differentiated objects. Most V-type asteroids in the main belt are found in the inner main belt, and are either current members of the Vesta dynamical family (Vestoids), or past members that drifted away. However, several V-type photometric candidates have been recently identified in the central and outer main belt. The origin of this large population of V-type objects is not well understood. Since it seems unlikely that Vestoids crossing the 3J:-1A mean-motion resonance with Jupiter could account for the whole population of V-type asteroids in the central and outer main belt, origin from local sources, such as the parent bodies of the Eunomia, and of the Merxia and Agnia asteroid families, has been proposed as an alternative mechanism. In this work we investigated the dynamical evolution of the V-type photometric candidates in the central main belt, under the effect of gravitational and non-gravitational f...

  18. EVIDENCE FOR TWO DISTINCT STELLAR INITIAL MASS FUNCTIONS: REVISITING THE EFFECTS OF CLUSTER DYNAMICAL EVOLUTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaritsky, Dennis [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Colucci, Janet E.; Bernstein, Rebecca A. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 1156 High Street, UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Pessev, Peter M. [Gemini South Observatory, c/o AURA Inc., Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); Chandar, Rupali, E-mail: dzaritsky@as.arizona.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Toledo, 2801 West Bancroft Street, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States)

    2013-06-20

    We measure the velocity dispersions of six galactic globular clusters using spatially integrated spectra, to test for the effects of internal dynamical evolution in the stellar mass-to-light ratios, Y{sub *}, of star clusters. In particular, we revisit whether the low values of Y{sub *} that we found in our previous study, from which we concluded that there are at least two population of stellar clusters with distinct stellar initial mass functions, are artificially depressed by relaxation driven mass loss. The combination of our previous sample of five old clusters and these six now provide an order of magnitude range in cluster mass with which to explore this issue. We find no relationship between cluster mass, or relaxation time, and Y{sub *}. Because relaxation is mass dependent, we conclude that the values of Y{sub *} for these clusters are not strongly affected by dynamical effects, and so confirm the presence of the population of clusters with low Y{sub *}.

  19. DYNAMICAL SIMULATION OF A QUANTUM HARMONIC-OSCILLATOR IN A NOBLE-GAS BATH BY DENSITY-MATRIX EVOLUTION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MAVRI, J; BERENDSEN, HJC

    1994-01-01

    A density-matrix evolution method [Berendsen and Mavri, J. Phys. Chem. 97, 13464 (1993)] coupled to a classical molecular dynamics simulation was applied to study a quantum harmonic oscillator immersed in a bath of Lennard-Jones particles. Eigenfunctions of the three, lowest levels of the unperturbe

  20. DYNAMICAL SIMULATION OF A QUANTUM HARMONIC-OSCILLATOR IN A NOBLE-GAS BATH BY DENSITY-MATRIX EVOLUTION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MAVRI, J; BERENDSEN, HJC

    1994-01-01

    A density-matrix evolution method [Berendsen and Mavri, J. Phys. Chem. 97, 13464 (1993)] coupled to a classical molecular dynamics simulation was applied to study a quantum harmonic oscillator immersed in a bath of Lennard-Jones particles. Eigenfunctions of the three, lowest levels of the unperturbe

  1. Modelling sediment dynamics due to hillslope-river interactions : incorporating fluvial behaviour in landscape evolution model LAPSUS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baartman, Jantiene E. M.; van Gorp, Wouter; Temme, Arnaud J. A. M.; Schoorl, Jeroen M.

    2012-01-01

    Landscape evolution models (LEMs) simulate the three-dimensional development of landscapes over time. Different LEMs have different foci, e.g. erosional behaviour, river dynamics, the fluvial domain, hillslopes or a combination. LEM LAPSUS is a relatively simple cellular model operating on timescale

  2. The organization and evolution of the Responder satellite in species of the Drosophila melanogaster group: dynamic evolution of a target of meiotic drive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larracuente, Amanda M

    2014-11-25

    Satellite DNA can make up a substantial fraction of eukaryotic genomes and has roles in genome structure and chromosome segregation. The rapid evolution of satellite DNA can contribute to genomic instability and genetic incompatibilities between species. Despite its ubiquity and its contribution to genome evolution, we currently know little about the dynamics of satellite DNA evolution. The Responder (Rsp) satellite DNA family is found in the pericentric heterochromatin of chromosome 2 of Drosophila melanogaster. Rsp is well-known for being the target of Segregation Distorter (SD)- an autosomal meiotic drive system in D. melanogaster. I present an evolutionary genetic analysis of the Rsp family of repeats in D. melanogaster and its closely-related species in the melanogaster group (D. simulans, D. sechellia, D. mauritiana, D. erecta, and D. yakuba) using a combination of available BAC sequences, whole genome shotgun Sanger reads, Illumina short read deep sequencing, and fluorescence in situ hybridization. I show that Rsp repeats have euchromatic locations throughout the D. melanogaster genome, that Rsp arrays show evidence for concerted evolution, and that Rsp repeats exist outside of D. melanogaster, in the melanogaster group. The repeats in these species are considerably diverged at the sequence level compared to D. melanogaster, and have a strikingly different genomic distribution, even between closely-related sister taxa. The genomic organization of the Rsp repeat in the D. melanogaster genome is complex-it exists of large blocks of tandem repeats in the heterochromatin and small blocks of tandem repeats in the euchromatin. My discovery of heterochromatic Rsp-like sequences outside of D. melanogaster suggests that SD evolved after its target satellite and that the evolution of the Rsp satellite family is highly dynamic over a short evolutionary time scale (<240,000 years).

  3. Evolution of continental-scale drainage in response to mantle dynamics and surface processes: An example from the Ethiopian Highlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sembroni, Andrea; Molin, Paola; Pazzaglia, Frank J.; Faccenna, Claudio; Abebe, Bekele

    2016-05-01

    Ethiopia offers an excellent opportunity to study the effects and linkage between mantle dynamics and surface processes on landscape evolution. The Ethiopian Highlands (NW Ethiopia), characterized by a huge basaltic plateau, is part of the African Superswell, a wide region of dynamically-supported anomalously high topography related to the rising of the Afar plume. The initiation and steadiness of dynamic support beneath Ethiopia has been explored in several studies. However the presence, role, and timing of dynamic support beneath Ethiopia and its relationship with continental flood basalts volcanism and surface processes are poorly defined. Here, we present a geomorphological analysis of the Ethiopian Highlands supplying new constraints on the evolution of river network. We investigated the general topographic features (filtered topography, swath profiles, local relief) and the river network (river longitudinal profiles) of the study area. We also apply a knickpoint celerity model in order to provide a chronological framework to the evolution of the river network. The results trace the long-term progressive capture of the Ethiopian Highlands drainage system and confirm the long-term dynamic support of the area, documenting its impact on the contrasting development of the Blue Nile and Tekeze basins.

  4. Conference on Hamiltonian Systems and Celestial Mechanics 2014 & Workshop on Virus Dynamics and Evolution : Extended Abstracts Spring 2014

    CERN Document Server

    Cors, Josep; Llibre, Jaume; Korobeinikov, Andrei

    2015-01-01

    The two parts of the present volume contain extended conference abstracts corresponding to selected talks given by participants at the "Conference on Hamiltonian Systems and Celestial Mechanics 2014" (HAMSYS2014) (15 abstracts) and at the "Workshop on Virus Dynamics and Evolution" (12 abstracts), both held at the Centre de Recerca Matemàtica (CRM) in Barcelona from June 2nd to 6th, 2014, and from June 23th to 27th, 2014, respectively. Most of them are brief articles, containing preliminary presentations of new results not yet published in regular research journals. The articles are the result of a direct collaboration between active researchers in the area after working in a dynamic and productive atmosphere. The first part is about Central Configurations, Periodic Orbits and Hamiltonian Systems with applications to Celestial Mechanics – a very modern and active field of research. The second part is dedicated to mathematical methods applied to viral dynamics and evolution. Mathematical modelling of biologi...

  5. Examining the Dynamics and Evolution of Scientist-Teacher Partnerships Using Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, B. A.; Hall, M. K.

    2004-12-01

    Partnerships between scientists and teachers bring individuals from different work cultures together to share information, make mutual decisions, achieve common goals, and contribute resources and skills (Gomez et al., 1990.) Because of differences between the cultures of science and teaching, building productive, durable partnerships is a challenge. CATTS (Collaboration to Advance Teaching Technology and Science) is an NSF GK-12 fellowship program that establishes partnerships between graduate and undergraduate CATTS fellows and K-12 teachers. Ideally, these sustainable relationships will increase each partner's knowledge and skill in inquiry-based teaching, the quality and quantity of math and science taught, and the likelihood of initiating future partnerships. We used a case study approach to investigate the dynamics of partnership development in the context of CATTS and why some partnerships evolve successfully and others do not. Data were obtained using classroom observations, journals, surveys, and interviews with fellows and teachers. We found commonalities among case studies that allowed us to identify patterns in partnership evolution, attributes of successful and unsuccessful partnerships, and barriers to their formation. Specific shared goals and expectations were essential, but flexibility was also important as the goals and expectations evolved over time. Role definition was an iterative process that required frequent communication and feedback between partners. Establishing hierarchical roles resulted in intimidation and breakdown of communication. The best partnerships involved a division of labor in the classroom and in planning and collaboration in which each partner's strengths were utilized to supply scientific and pedagogical resources. Investment in the partnership varied as the partnership progressed but was strongest when both partners felt as though their individual contributions were welcomed and appreciated. Successful partnership

  6. Dynamic Landscapes and Sea Level Change in Human Evolution and Dispersal

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, G. C.; Devès, M. H.; Bailey, G.; Inglis, R.; Williams, M.

    2012-12-01

    Archaeological studies of human settlement in its wider landscape setting usually focus on climate change as the principal environmental driver of change in the physical features of the landscape, even on the long time scales of early human evolution. We emphasize that landscapes evolve dynamically due to an interplay of processes occurring over different timescales. Tectonic deformation, volcanism, sea level changes, by acting on the topography, the lithology and on the patterns of erosion-deposition in a given area, can moderate or amplify the influence of climate at the regional and local scale. These processes impose or alleviate physical barriers to movement, and modify the distribution and accessibility of plant and animal resources in ways critical to human ecological and evolutionary success (King and Bailey, JHE 2006; Bailey and King, Antiquity 2011). The DISPERSE project, an ERC-funded collaboration between the University of York and the Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris,are developing systematic methods for reconstructing landscapes associated with active tectonics, volcanism and sea level change at a variety of scales in order to study their potential impact on patterns of human evolution and dispersal. These approaches use remote sensing techniques combined with archaeological and tectonic field surveys on land and underwater. Examples are shown from Europe, the Middle East and Africa to illustrate the ways in which changes of significance to human settlement can occur at a range of geographical scales and on time scales that range from lifetimes to tens of millennia, creating and sustaining attractive conditions for human settlement and exercising powerful selective pressures on human development.

  7. Early evolution and dynamics of Earth from a molten initial stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louro Lourenço, Diogo; Tackley, Paul J.

    2016-04-01

    It is now well established that most of the terrestrial planets underwent a magma ocean stage during their accretion. On Earth, it is probable that at the end of accretion, giant impacts like the hypothesised Moon-forming impact, together with other sources of heat, melted a substantial part of the mantle. The thermal and chemical evolution of the resulting magma ocean most certainly had dramatic consequences on the history of the planet. Considerable research has been done on magma oceans using simple 1-D models (e.g.: Abe, PEPI 1997; Solomatov, Treat. Geophys. 2007; Elkins-Tanton EPSL 2008). However, some aspects of the dynamics may not be adequately addressed in 1-D and require the use of 2-D or 3-D models. Moreover, new developments in mineral physics that indicate that melt can be denser than solid at high pressures (e.g.: de Koker et al., EPSL 2013) can have very important impacts on the classical views of the solidification of magma oceans (Labrosse et al., Nature 2007). The goal of our study is to understand and characterize the influence of melting on the long-term thermo-chemical evolution of rocky planet interiors, starting from an initial molten state (magma ocean). Our approach is to model viscous creep of the solid mantle, while parameterizing processes that involve melt as previously done in 1-D models, including melt-solid separation at all melt fractions, the use of an effective diffusivity to parameterize turbulent mixing, coupling to a parameterized core heat balance and a radiative surface boundary condition. These enhancements have been made to the numerical code StagYY (Tackley, PEPI 2008). We present results for the evolution of an Earth-like planet from a molten initial state to present day, while testing the effect of uncertainties in parameters such as melt-solid density differences, surface heat loss and efficiency of turbulent mixing. Our results show rapid cooling and crystallization until the rheological transition then much slower

  8. Effects of landscape evolution on soil organic carbon dynamics in intensively managed agricultural landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Q.; Kumar, P.

    2016-12-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) plays a critical role in nutrient dynamics and carbon sequestration. Significant research has been done to predict changes of organic carbon and nitrogen in the soil by studying the interaction between soil, climate, and vegetation. However, an important factor in this system, the landscape evolution (LE), which interacts extensively with the soil, climate, and vegetation over a longer time scale, is usually not represented in such studies. Natural and anthropogenic drivers change the surface topography. Agricultural practices, such as fertilizer application and tillage episodically disturb the system. Here we simulate this system by coupling chemically based C-N model with physically based hydro-geomorphologic model at hillslope scale to understand 1) how LE impacts C-N dynamics; 2) how SOM affects LE; 3) how farming activities modify the interaction between LE and SOM dynamics. Our results show that LE plays a dominant role in SOC both above- and below-ground. Contrary to an assumption used in many models that a vertical profile of SOC concentration decreases exponentially, we find that in many situations SOC concentration below-ground could be higher than the one at the surface in both deposition and erosion sites. Tillage mixes the SOC in top 5cm-30cm of the soil. On one hand, tillage enhances the SOC storage by increasing below ground SOC concentration; On the other hand, tillage could accelerate soil erosion, which increase SOC loss. In general, tillage causes the soil vertical profile to become more uniform. Our model also shows that tillage can change the C-N oscillation cycle and then increase the time to reach a dynamic equilibrium. The SOC measured in the field site of Intensively Managed Landscapes Critical Zone Observatory (IMLCZO) is consistent with our model results. This study not only helps us understand the natural carbon-nitrogen cycle, but also serve as an instrument to develop practical means for reducing soil erosion

  9. Linking partial and quasi dynamical symmetries in rotational nuclei and shell evolution in {sup 96}Zr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kremer, Christoph

    2016-01-27

    The first part of this thesis revolves around symmetries in the sd-IBA-1. A region of approximate O(6) symmetry for the ground-state band, a partial dynamical symmetry (PDS) of type III, in the parameter space of the extended consistent-Q formalism is identified through quantum number fluctuations. The simultaneous occurrence of a SU(3) quasi dynamical symmetry for nuclei in the region of O(6) PDS is explained via the β=1, γ=0 intrinsic state underlying the ground-state band. The previously unrelated concepts of PDS and QDS are connected for the first time and many nuclei in the rare earth region that approximately satisfy both symmetry requirements are identified. Ground-state to ground-state (p, t) transfer reactions are presented as an experimental signature to identify pairs of nuclei that both exhibit O(6) PDS. In the second part of this thesis inelastic electron scattering off {sup 96}Zr is studied. The experiment was performed at the high resolution Lintott spectrometer at the S-DALINAC and covered a momentum-transfer range of 0.28 - 0.59 fm{sup -1}. Through a relative analysis using Plane Wave Born Approximation (PWBA) the B(E2;2{sup +}{sub 2}→0{sup +}{sub 1}) value is extracted without incurring the additional model dependence of a Distorted Wave Born Approximation (DWBA). By combining this result with known multipole mixing ratios and branching ratios all decay strengths of the 2{sup +}{sub 2} state are determined. A mixing calculation establishes very weak mixing (V{sub mix}=76 keV) between states of the ground-state band and those of the band build on top of the 0{sup +}{sub 2} state which includes the 2{sup +}{sub 2} state. The occurrence of these two isolated bands is interpreted within the shell model in terms of type II shell evolution.

  10. Dynamical patterning modules: a "pattern language" for development and evolution of multicellular form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Stuart A; Bhat, Ramray

    2009-01-01

    This article considers the role played by a core set of "dynamical patterning modules" (DPMs) in the origination, development and evolution of complex organisms. These consist of the products of a subset of the genes of what has come to be known as the "developmental-genetic toolkit" in association with physical processes they mobilize. The physical processes are those characteristic of chemically and mechanically excitable mesoscopic systems like cell aggregates: cohesion, viscoelasticity, diffusion, spatiotemporal heterogeneity based on activator-inhibitor interaction, and multistable and oscillatory dynamics. We focus on the emergence of the Metazoa, and show how toolkit gene products and pathways that pre-existed the metazoans acquired novel morphogenetic functions simply by virtue of the change in scale and context inherent to multicellularity. We propose that DPMs, acting singly and in combination with each other, constitute a "pattern language" capable of generating all metazoan body plans and organ forms. This concept implies that the multicellular organisms of the late Precambrian-early Cambrian were phenotypically plastic, fluently exploring morphospace in a fashion decoupled from both function-based selection and genotypic change. The relatively stable developmental trajectories and morphological phenotypes of modern organisms, then, are considered to be products of stabilizing selection. This perspective solves the apparent "molecular homology-analogy paradox," whereby widely divergent modern animal types utilize the same molecular toolkit during development, but it does so by inverting the neo-Darwinian principle that phenotypic disparity was generated over long periods of time in concert with, and in proportion to genotypic change.

  11. New orbit recalculations of comet C/1890 F1 Brooks and its dynamical evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Królikowska, Małgorzata; Dybczyński, Piotr A.

    2016-08-01

    C/1890 F1 Brooks belongs to a group of 19 comets used by Jan Oort to support his famous hypothesis on the existence of a spherical cloud containing hundreds of billions of comets with orbits of semi-major axes between 50 000 and 150 000 au. Comet Brooks stands out from this group because of a long series of astrometric observations as well as a nearly 2-yr-long observational arc. Rich observational material makes this comet an ideal target for testing the rationality of an effort to recalculate astrometric positions on the basis of original (comet-star) measurements using modern star catalogues. This paper presents the results of such a new analysis based on two different methods: (i) automatic re-reduction based on cometary positions and the (comet-star) measurements and (ii) partially automatic re-reduction based on the contemporary data for the reference stars originally used. We show that both methods offer a significant reduction in the uncertainty of orbital elements. Based on the most preferred orbital solution, the dynamical evolution of comet Brooks during three consecutive perihelion passages is discussed. We conclude that C/1890 F1 is a dynamically old comet that passed the Sun at a distance below 5 au during its previous perihelion passage. Furthermore, its next perihelion passage will be a little closer than during the 1890-1892 apparition. C/1890 F1 is interesting also because it suffered extremely small planetary perturbations when it travelled through the planetary zone. Therefore, in the next passage through perihelion, it will once again be a comet from the Oort spike.

  12. Natural selection on genes that underlie human disease susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blekhman, Ran; Man, Orna; Herrmann, Leslie; Boyko, Adam R.; Indap, Amit; Kosiol, Carolin; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Teshima, Kosuke M.; Przeworski, Molly

    2008-01-01

    What evolutionary forces shape genes that contribute to the risk of human disease? Do similar selective pressures act on alleles that underlie simple vs. complex disorders? [1-3]. Answers to these questions will shed light on the origin of human disorders (e.g., [4]), and help to predict the population frequencies of alleles that contribute to disease risk, with important implications for the efficient design of mapping studies [5-7]. As a first step towards addressing them, we created a hand-curated version of the Mendelian Inheritance in Man database (OMIM). We then examined selective pressures on Mendelian disease genes, genes that contribute to complex disease risk and genes known to be essential in mouse, by analyzing patterns of human polymorphism and of divergence between human and rhesus macaque. We find that Mendelian disease genes appear to be under widespread purifying selection, especially when the disease mutations are dominant (rather than recessive). In contrast, the class of genes that influence complex disease risk shows little signs of evolutionary conservation, possibly because this category includes both targets of purifying and positive selection. PMID:18571414

  13. Structural evolution of nanoscale metallic glasses during high-pressure torsion: A molecular dynamics analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, S. D.; Jiao, W.; Jing, Q.; Qi, L.; Pan, S. P.; Li, G.; Ma, M. Z.; Wang, W. H.; Liu, R. P.

    2016-11-01

    Structural evolution in nanoscale Cu50Zr50 metallic glasses during high-pressure torsion is investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. Results show that the strong cooperation of shear transformations can be realized by high-pressure torsion in nanoscale Cu50Zr50 metallic glasses at room temperature. It is further shown that high-pressure torsion could prompt atoms to possess lower five-fold symmetries and higher potential energies, making them more likely to participate in shear transformations. Meanwhile, a higher torsion period leads to a greater degree of forced cooperative flow. And the pronounced forced cooperative flow at room temperature under high-pressure torsion permits the study of the shear transformation, its activation and characteristics, and its relationship to the deformations behaviors. This research not only provides an important platform for probing the atomic-level understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of high-pressure torsion in metallic glasses, but also leads to higher stresses and homogeneous flow near lower temperatures which is impossible previously.

  14. Structural evolution of Ti50Cu50 on rapid cooling by molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, J. J.; Tan, M. J.; Liew, K. M.

    2012-03-01

    The structural evolution and atomic structure of the Ti50Cu50 compound have been investigated by means of molecular dynamics simulation using the generalized embedded-atom model (GEAM) potential. Gibbs free energy calculation manifests the large driving force of undercooled Ti50Cu50 for crystallization and thus the poor glass-forming ability. Radial distribution functions (RDFs) within the temperature range from 2000 K to 300 K are analyzed and reveal the increasing degree of short-range order and reducing periodic length between peaks on cooling. Atomic arrangement is characterized by the Voronoi tessellation method, showing that the frequency of icosahedral configurations is most sensitive to temperature and grows upon quenching while that of the others remains relatively stable. The thermal behavior of the structure factors follows the Debye model up to the supercooled liquid temperature. The structural investigation of amorphous Ti50Cu50 demonstrates that there exist a variety of polyhedral configurations in Ti50Cu50 amorphous alloy, where icosahedral and bcc clusters are the major types. Due to the existence of bcc clusters and the other distorted polyhedra other than full icosahedra, the structural analysis reconfirms the inference from the Gibbs free energy calculation.

  15. Spatio-temporal dynamics induced by competing instabilities in two asymmetrically coupled nonlinear evolution equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schüler, D.; Alonso, S.; Bär, M. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Abbestrasse 2-12, 10587 Berlin (Germany); Torcini, A. [CNR-Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi - Via Madonna del Piano 10, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); INFN Sez. Firenze, via Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)

    2014-12-15

    Pattern formation often occurs in spatially extended physical, biological, and chemical systems due to an instability of the homogeneous steady state. The type of the instability usually prescribes the resulting spatio-temporal patterns and their characteristic length scales. However, patterns resulting from the simultaneous occurrence of instabilities cannot be expected to be simple superposition of the patterns associated with the considered instabilities. To address this issue, we design two simple models composed by two asymmetrically coupled equations of non-conserved (Swift-Hohenberg equations) or conserved (Cahn-Hilliard equations) order parameters with different characteristic wave lengths. The patterns arising in these systems range from coexisting static patterns of different wavelengths to traveling waves. A linear stability analysis allows to derive a two parameter phase diagram for the studied models, in particular, revealing for the Swift-Hohenberg equations, a co-dimension two bifurcation point of Turing and wave instability and a region of coexistence of stationary and traveling patterns. The nonlinear dynamics of the coupled evolution equations is investigated by performing accurate numerical simulations. These reveal more complex patterns, ranging from traveling waves with embedded Turing patterns domains to spatio-temporal chaos, and a wide hysteretic region, where waves or Turing patterns coexist. For the coupled Cahn-Hilliard equations the presence of a weak coupling is sufficient to arrest the coarsening process and to lead to the emergence of purely periodic patterns. The final states are characterized by domains with a characteristic length, which diverges logarithmically with the coupling amplitude.

  16. Spatial Temporal Dynamics and Molecular Evolution of Re-Emerging Rabies Virus in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Cheng Lin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Taiwan has been recognized by the World Organization for Animal Health as rabies-free since 1961. Surprisingly, rabies virus (RABV was identified in a dead Formosan ferret badger in July 2013. Later, more infected ferret badgers were reported from different geographic regions of Taiwan. In order to know its evolutionary history and spatial temporal dynamics of this virus, phylogeny was reconstructed by maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods based on the full-length of glycoprotein (G, matrix protein (M, and nucleoprotein (N genes. The evolutionary rates and phylogeographic were determined using Beast and SPREAD software. Phylogenetic trees showed a monophyletic group containing all of RABV isolates from Taiwan and it further separated into three sub-groups. The estimated nucleotide substitution rates of G, M, and N genes were between 2.49 × 10−4–4.75 × 10−4 substitutions/site/year, and the mean ratio of dN/dS was significantly low. The time of the most recent common ancestor was estimated around 75, 89, and 170 years, respectively. Phylogeographic analysis suggested the origin of the epidemic could be in Eastern Taiwan, then the Formosan ferret badger moved across the Central Range of Taiwan to western regions and separated into two branches. In this study, we illustrated the evolution history and phylogeographic of RABV in Formosan ferret badgers.

  17. Dynamic Recrystallization Kinetics and Microstructural Evolution for LZ50 Steel During Hot Deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Shiwen; Chen, Shuangmei; Song, Jianjun

    2016-09-01

    The dynamic recrystallization (DRX) behavior of LZ50 steel was investigated using hot compression tests at a deformation temperature of 870-1170 °C and a strain rate of 0.05-3 s-1. The effects of deformation temperature, strain, strain rate, and initial austenite grain size on the microstructural evolution during DRX were studied in detail. The austenite grain size of DRX was refined with increasing strain rate and decreasing temperature, whereas the initial grain size had no influence on DRX grain size. A model based on the Avrami equation was proposed to estimate the kinetics of the DRX under different deformation conditions. A DRX map, which was derived from the DRX kinetics, the recrystallized microstructure, and the flow stress analysis, can be used to identify optimal deformation conditions. The initiation of DRX was lower than Z c (critical Zener-Hollomon parameter) and higher than ɛc (critical strain). The relationship between the DRX microstructure and the Z parameter was analyzed. Fine DRX grain sizes can be achieved with a moderate Z value, which can be used to identify suitable deformation parameters.

  18. Dynamic evolution of the LPS-detoxifying enzyme intestinal alkaline phosphatase in zebrafish and other vertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye eYang

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Alkaline phosphatases (Alps are well-studied enzymes that remove phosphates from a variety of substrates. Alps function in diverse biological processes, including modulating host-bacterial interactions by dephosphorylating the Gram-negative bacterial cell wall component lipopolysaccharide (LPS. In animals, Alps are encoded by multiple genes characterized by either ubiquitous expression (named Alpls, for their liver expression, or their tissue-specific expression, for example in the intestine (Alpi. We previously characterized a zebrafish alpi gene (renamed here alpi.1 that is regulated by Myd88-dependent innate immune signaling and that is required to prevent a host’s excessive inflammatory reactions to its resident microbiota. Here we report the characterization of two new alp genes in zebrafish, alpi.2 and alp3. To understand their origins, we investigated the phylogenetic history of Alp genes in animals. We find that vertebrate Alp genes are organized in three clades with one of these clades missing from the mammals. We present evidence that these three clades originated during the two vertebrate genome duplications. We show that in zebrafish alpl is ubiquitously expressed, as it is in mammals, whereas the other three alps are specific to the intestine. Our phylogenetic analysis reveals that in contrast to Alpl, which has been stably maintained as a single gene throughout the vertebrates, the Alpis have been lost and duplicated multiple times independently in vertebrate lineages, likely reflecting the rapid and dynamic evolution of vertebrate gut morphologies, driven by changes in bacterial associations and diet.

  19. Green evolution and dynamic adaptations revealed by genomes of the marine picoeukaryotes Micromonas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worden, Alexandra Z.; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Mock, Thomas; Rouze, Pierre; Simmons, Melinda P.; Aerts, Andrea L.; Allen, Andrew E.; Cuvelier, Marie L.; Derelle, Evelyne; Everett, Meredieht V.; Foulon, Elodie; Grimwood, Jane; Gundlach, Heidrun; Henrissat, Bernard; Napoli, Carolyn; McDonald, Sarah M.; Parker, Micaela S.; Rombauts, Stephane; Salamov, Asaf; von Dassow, Peter; Badger, Jonathan G,; Coutinho, Pedro M.; Demir, Elif; Dubchak, Inna; Gentemann, Chelle; Eikrem, Wenche; Gready, Jill E.; John, Uwe; Lanier, William; Lindquist, Erika A.; Lucas, Susan; Mayer, Kluas F. X.; Moreau, Herve; Not, Fabrice; Otillar, Robert; Panaud, Olivier; Pangilinan, Jasmyn; Paulsen, Ian; Piegu, Benoit; Poliakov, Aaron; Robbens, Steven; Schmutz, Jeremy; Roulza, Eve; Wyss, Tania; Zelensky, Alexander; Zhou, Kemin; Armbrust, E. Virginia; Bhattacharya, Debashish; Goodenough, Ursula W.; Van de Peer, Yves; Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2009-10-14

    Picoeukaryotes are a taxonomically diverse group of organisms less than 2 micrometers in diameter. Photosynthetic marine picoeukaryotes in the genus Micromonas thrive in ecosystems ranging from tropical to polar and could serve as sentinel organisms for biogeochemical fluxes of modern oceans during climate change. These broadly distributed primary producers belong to an anciently diverged sister clade to land plants. Although Micromonas isolates have high 18S ribosomal RNA gene identity, we found that genomes from two isolates shared only 90percent of their predicted genes. Their independent evolutionary paths were emphasized by distinct riboswitch arrangements as well as the discovery of intronic repeat elements in one isolate, and in metagenomic data, but not in other genomes. Divergence appears to have been facilitated by selection and acquisition processes that actively shape the repertoire of genes that are mutually exclusive between the two isolates differently than the core genes. Analyses of the Micromonas genomes offer valuable insights into ecological differentiation and the dynamic nature of early plant evolution.

  20. Solving chemical dynamic optimization problems with ranking-based differential evolution algorithms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Chen; Wenli Du; Feng Qian

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic optimization problems (DOPs) described by differential equations are often encountered in chemical engineering. Deterministic techniques based on mathematic programming become invalid when the models are non-differentiable or explicit mathematical descriptions do not exist. Recently, evolutionary algorithms are gaining popularity for DOPs as they can be used as robust alternatives when the deterministic techniques are in-valid. In this article, a technology named ranking-based mutation operator (RMO) is presented to enhance the previous differential evolution (DE) algorithms to solve DOPs using control vector parameterization. In the RMO, better individuals have higher probabilities to produce offspring, which is helpful for the performance enhancement of DE algorithms. Three DE-RMO algorithms are designed by incorporating the RMO. The three DE-RMO algorithms and their three original DE algorithms are applied to solve four constrained DOPs from the literature. Our simulation results indicate that DE-RMO algorithms exhibit better performance than previous non-ranking DE algorithms and other four evolutionary algorithms.

  1. Genotypic variation in foundation species generates network structure that may drive community dynamics and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Matthew K; Keith, Arthur R; Borrett, Stuart R; Shuster, Stephen M; Whitham, Thomas G

    2016-03-01

    Although genetics in a single species is known to impact whole communities, little is known about how genetic variation influences species interaction networks in complex ecosystems. Here, we examine the interactions in a community of arthropod species on replicated genotypes (clones) of a foundation tree species, Populus angustifolia James (narrowleaf cottonwood), in a long-term, common garden experiment using a bipartite "genotype-species" network perspective. We combine this empirical work with a simulation experiment designed to further investigate how variation among individual tree genotypes can impact network structure. Three findings emerged: (1) the empirical "genotype-species network" exhibited significant network structure with modularity being greater than the highly conservative null model; (2) as would be expected given a modular network structure, the empirical network displayed significant positive arthropod co-occurrence patterns; and (3) furthermore, the simulations of "genotype-species" networks displayed variation in network structure, with modularity in particular clearly increasing, as genotypic variation increased. These results support the conclusion that genetic variation in a single species contributes to the structure of ecological interaction networks, which could influence eco-ogical dynamics (e.g., assembly and stability) and evolution in a community context.

  2. Spatial Temporal Dynamics and Molecular Evolution of Re-Emerging Rabies Virus in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yung-Cheng; Chu, Pei-Yu; Chang, Mei-Yin; Hsiao, Kuang-Liang; Lin, Jih-Hui; Liu, Hsin-Fu

    2016-03-17

    Taiwan has been recognized by the World Organization for Animal Health as rabies-free since 1961. Surprisingly, rabies virus (RABV) was identified in a dead Formosan ferret badger in July 2013. Later, more infected ferret badgers were reported from different geographic regions of Taiwan. In order to know its evolutionary history and spatial temporal dynamics of this virus, phylogeny was reconstructed by maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods based on the full-length of glycoprotein (G), matrix protein (M), and nucleoprotein (N) genes. The evolutionary rates and phylogeographic were determined using Beast and SPREAD software. Phylogenetic trees showed a monophyletic group containing all of RABV isolates from Taiwan and it further separated into three sub-groups. The estimated nucleotide substitution rates of G, M, and N genes were between 2.49 × 10(-4)-4.75 × 10(-4) substitutions/site/year, and the mean ratio of dN/dS was significantly low. The time of the most recent common ancestor was estimated around 75, 89, and 170 years, respectively. Phylogeographic analysis suggested the origin of the epidemic could be in Eastern Taiwan, then the Formosan ferret badger moved across the Central Range of Taiwan to western regions and separated into two branches. In this study, we illustrated the evolution history and phylogeographic of RABV in Formosan ferret badgers.

  3. The evolution of simulation techniques for dynamic bone tissue engineering in bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetsch, Jolanda Rita; Müller, Ralph; Hofmann, Sandra

    2015-08-01

    Bone tissue engineering aims to overcome the drawbacks of current bone regeneration techniques in orthopaedics. Bioreactors are widely used in the field of bone tissue engineering, as they help support efficient nutrition of cultured cells with the possible combination of applying mechanical stimuli. Beneficial influencing parameters of in vitro cultures are difficult to find and are mostly determined by trial and error, which is associated with significant time and money spent. Mathematical simulations can support the finding of optimal parameters. Simulations have evolved over the last 20 years from simple analytical models to complex and detailed computational models. They allow researchers to simulate the mechanical as well as the biological environment experienced by cells seeded on scaffolds in a bioreactor. Based on the simulation results, it is possible to give recommendations about specific parameters for bone bioreactor cultures, such as scaffold geometries, scaffold mechanical properties, the level of applied mechanical loading or nutrient concentrations. This article reviews the evolution in simulating various aspects of dynamic bone culture in bioreactors and reveals future research directions.

  4. Dust dynamics and evolution in expanding HII regions. I. Radiative drift of neutral and charged grains

    CERN Document Server

    Akimkin, V V; Pavlyuchenkov, Ya N; Wiebe, D S

    2015-01-01

    We consider dust drift under the influence of stellar radiation pressure during the pressure-driven expansion of an HII region using the chemo-dynamical model MARION. Dust size distribution is represented by four dust types: conventional polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), very small grains (VSGs), big grains (BGs) and also intermediate-sized grains (ISGs), which are larger than VSGs and smaller than BGs. The dust is assumed to move at terminal velocity determined locally from the balance between the radiation pressure and gas drag. As Coulomb drag is an important contribution to the overall gas drag, we evaluate a grain charge evolution within the HII region for each dust type. BGs are effectively swept out of the HII region. The spatial distribution of ISGs within the HII region has a double peak structure, with a smaller inner peak and a higher outer peak. PAHs and VSGs are mostly coupled to the gas. The mean charge of PAHs is close to zero, so they can become neutral from time to time because of char...

  5. Influence of vortex dynamics and atmospheric turbulence on the early evolution of a contrail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Paugam

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This study describes three-dimensional numerical simulations of the evolution of an aircraft contrail during the first 30 min following the emission of exhausts. The wake is modeled as a vortex pair descending in a stratified atmosphere where turbulent fluctuations are sustained in the late dissipation regime. The focus of the study is laid on the interactions between vortex dynamics, atmospheric turbulence and contrail microphysics, and their role in determining the growth and the distribution of ice crystals. The atmospheric turbulence is synthesized using a methodology developed to force anisotropic turbulent fluctuations. The results show the feasibility of three-dimensional simulations of the early development of a contrail in supersaturated conditions before its transition into a contrail-cirrus. %(when radiative heating and sedimentation are no more negligible. It is shown that in case of strongly supersaturated and shear-free atmosphere the optical depth is maintained as the contrail spreads by turbulent diffusion in the late dissipation regime.

  6. Dynamic evolution of interacting carbon nanotubes suspended in a fluid using a dielectrophoretic framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva-Avilés, A. I.; Zozulya, V. V.; Gamboa, F.; Avilés, F.

    2016-09-01

    A theoretical investigation of the dynamic response of interacting carbon nanotubes (CNTs) dispersed in a liquid medium under alternating current electric fields is presented. The proposed modeling strategy is based on the dielectrophoretic theory and classical electrodynamics of rigid bodies, and considers the coupled rotation-translation motion of interacting CNTs represented as electrical dipoles. Based on experimental evidence, the parameters which are expected to cause a major contribution to the CNTs' motion are investigated for different initial configurations of CNTs. It is predicted that high electric field frequencies, long CNTs, high values of electrical permittivity and conductivity of the CNTs immersed in solvents of high polarity promote faster equilibrium conditions, achieved by CNT tip-to-tip contact and alignment along the electric field direction. For the majority of the scenarios, CNT alignment along the field direction is predicted as the first event, followed by the translation of aligned CNTs until the tip-to-tip contact condition is reached. For systems with interacting CNTs with different lengths, equilibrium of the shorter CNT is achieved faster. Predictions also show that the initial rotation angles and initial location of CNTs have a paramount influence on the evolution of the system towards the equilibrium configuration.

  7. Homogeneous nucleation and microstructure evolution in million-atom molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibuta, Yasushi; Oguchi, Kanae; Takaki, Tomohiro; Ohno, Munekazu

    2015-08-27

    Homogeneous nucleation from an undercooled iron melt is investigated by the statistical sampling of million-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations performed on a graphics processing unit (GPU). Fifty independent instances of isothermal MD calculations with one million atoms in a quasi-two-dimensional cell over a nanosecond reveal that the nucleation rate and the incubation time of nucleation as functions of temperature have characteristic shapes with a nose at the critical temperature. This indicates that thermally activated homogeneous nucleation occurs spontaneously in MD simulations without any inducing factor, whereas most previous studies have employed factors such as pressure, surface effect, and continuous cooling to induce nucleation. Moreover, further calculations over ten nanoseconds capture the microstructure evolution on the order of tens of nanometers from the atomistic viewpoint and the grain growth exponent is directly estimated. Our novel approach based on the concept of "melting pots in a supercomputer" is opening a new phase in computational metallurgy with the aid of rapid advances in computational environments.

  8. Evolution in action: climate change, biodiversity dynamics and emerging infectious disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoberg, Eric P; Brooks, Daniel R

    2015-04-01

    Climatological variation and ecological perturbation have been pervasive drivers of faunal assembly, structure and diversification for parasites and pathogens through recurrent events of geographical and host colonization at varying spatial and temporal scales of Earth history. Episodic shifts in climate and environmental settings, in conjunction with ecological mechanisms and host switching, are often critical determinants of parasite diversification, a view counter to more than a century of coevolutionary thinking about the nature of complex host-parasite assemblages. Parasites are resource specialists with restricted host ranges, yet shifts onto relatively unrelated hosts are common during phylogenetic diversification of parasite lineages and directly observable in real time. The emerging Stockholm Paradigm resolves this paradox: Ecological Fitting (EF)--phenotypic flexibility and phylogenetic conservatism in traits related to resource use, most notably host preference--provides many opportunities for rapid host switching in changing environments, without the evolution of novel host-utilization capabilities. Host shifts via EF fuel the expansion phase of the Oscillation Hypothesis of host range and speciation and, more generally, the generation of novel combinations of interacting species within the Geographic Mosaic Theory of Coevolution. In synergy, an environmental dynamic of Taxon Pulses establishes an episodic context for host and geographical colonization.

  9. The Dynamical and Chemical Evolution of Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies with GEAR

    CERN Document Server

    Revaz, Yves

    2011-01-01

    We present a fully parallel chemo-dynamical Tree/SPH code, GEAR, which allows to perform high resolution simulations with detailed chemical diagnostics. Starting from the public version of Gadget-2, we included the complex treatment of the baryon physics: gas cooling, star formation law, chemical evolution and supernovae feedback. We qualified the performances of GEAR with the case of dSph galaxies. GEAR conserves the total energy budget of the systems to better than 5% over 14Gyr and proved excellent convergence of the results with numerical resolution. We showed that models of dSphs in a static Euclidean space, where the expansion of the universe is neglected are valid. In addition, we tackled some of the existing open questions in the field, like the stellar mass fraction of dSphs and its link with the predicted dark matter halo mass function, the effect of the supernova feedback, the spatial distribution of the stellar populations, and the origin of the diversity in star formation histories and chemical a...

  10. DYNAMIC DUCTILE EVOLUTION AND TENSILE FRACTURE: NEW EXPERIMENTAL INSIGHTS FOR MODELS EVALUATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. ZUREK

    2000-08-01

    Under dynamic loading conditions, the rapid nature of the fracture process may simultaneously activate a considerable number of nucleation sites for void formation at the region of the tensile stress field. The growth and coalescence of these voids forms the deformation plane and eventually the fracture surface. Attempts to quantify damage evolution during fracture using microstructural observations, specifically for spallation, were pioneered by Seaman and his coworkers. They performed incipient spallation experiments in which they imposed a peak stress below the spall strength of the material, thereby developing an incipient spallation zone rather than complete separation. When this experimental methodology is applied, recovery techniques are utilized to recover the deformed samples without introducing any additional damage. Seaman and his coworkers, and later Lacomme, et al., developed damage quantification techniques based on area measurements of incipient fracture. However, measuring the area of a fracture opening with a certain degree of precision from a two dimensional image can be extremely inaccurate due to the irregular shape of the image. In recent years several techniques have been developed, or improved, that may allow a better and more accurate quantification of image features observed in metallographic analyses in incipient damage of fracture surfaces. Many of these measured quantities are essential towards developing a solid, robust understanding necessary for a good constitutive model.

  11. Studies on Three-Dimensional Dynamic Evolution of Filaments and Coronal EUV Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, T.

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, it becomes a popular topic to explore various solar eruptive activities in three-dimensional space. The main reason is that three-dimensional evolution of eruptive activities reflects their true physical processes, which is of great importance to understand the occurrence and evolution of various activities. Filament eruption and coronal mass ejection (CME) are two important solar activities. Coronal EUV wave is a phenomenon associated with CME, and the study of coronal EUV wave provides important clues for understanding CME entirely. Since previous observations are from one single viewpoint, the studies of filament eruption and coronal EUV wave are two-dimensional, and suffer from the projection effect. Recently, the multi-viewpoint and high-quality observations from the STEREO and SDO provide us a good opportunity to investigate the three-dimensional evolution of filament eruption and coronal EUV wave. We make full use of the advantages of current observations from STEREO and SDO, and study in detail the three-dimensional shape and evolution of filament eruption, the interaction of coronal EUV waves with coronal structures, and so on. The novel results of our study are listed as below. Using the two-viewpoint observations from the STEREO, we reconstruct two eruptive filaments, locate their positions in three-dimensional space, investigate their true dynamic evolution, and display the evolution of reconstructed filaments seen from different viewpoints with a new visualization method. For the first time, we analyze the true kinematic characteristics of different parts of the filament, and find that the highest part corresponds to the largest velocity during the early phase, which is implied to be the initially perturbed location; afterwards, other parts of the filament move the fastest, which should be accelerated by some mechanisms. With the increasing separation angle between the two STEREO satellites, the reconstruction becomes more difficult

  12. Kinematic and morphological evolution and dynamics of coronal mass ejections in interplanetary space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poomvises, Watanachak

    2010-12-01

    observations, and find consistency between theory and observation. The evolution of CMEs can be explained by different forces that act on them: Lorentz force, thermal pressure force, gravity force, aero-dynamic drag force, and magnetic drag force. Based on a set of four events, I find that the drag coefficient from CME to CME is between 2.5 to 3.0, which is much smaller than the factor of twelve suggested by earlier studies. Therefore, we have been able to narrow down the range of drag coefficient, which helps improve the prediction of CME arrival time at the Earth. In the early stage of my Ph.D. study, working with a team, we have identified solar and interplanetary sources of all 88 major geomagnetic storms from 1996 to 2005. We classify the Solar-IP sources into three broad types: (1) S-type, in which the storm is associated with a single ICME and a single CME at the Sun; (2) M-type, in which the storm is associated with a complex solar wind flow produced by multiple interacting ICMEs arising from multiple halo CMEs launched from the Sun in a short period; (3) C-type, in which the storm is associated with a Corotating Interaction Region (CIR) formed at the leading edge of a high-speed stream originating from a solar coronal hole (CH). For the 88 major storms, the S-type, M-type, and C-type events number 53 (60%), 24 (27%), and 11 (13%), respectively. For the 85 events for which the surface source regions could be investigated, 54 (63%) of the storms originated in solar active regions, 11 (13%) in quiet Sun regions associated with quiescent filaments or filament channels, and 11 (13%) were associated with coronal holes. This study improves our understanding of geo-effective CMEs. In conclusion, the dissertation work has improved our understanding about the kinematic and morphologic evolution of CMEs in interplanetary space. In the future, a larger number of events need to be measured and modeled to further constrain CME evolution models, in particular, the drag coefficient

  13. The Evolution of a Creative Industry : The industrial dynamics and spatial evolution of the global fashion design industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wenting, R.

    2008-01-01

    The recent growth of creative industries has raised the interest of both policy makers and academic scholars. However, we know very little about the forces that drive the development and geography of these industries. This dissertation provides an in-depth study of the industrial dynamics and

  14. The Evolution of a Creative Industry : The industrial dynamics and spatial evolution of the global fashion design industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wenting, R.

    2008-01-01

    The recent growth of creative industries has raised the interest of both policy makers and academic scholars. However, we know very little about the forces that drive the development and geography of these industries. This dissertation provides an in-depth study of the industrial dynamics and spatia

  15. Evolutional dynamics of 45S and 5S ribosomal DNA in ancient allohexaploid Atropa belladonna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, Roman A; Panchuk, Irina I; Borisjuk, Nikolai V; Hosiawa-Baranska, Marta; Maluszynska, Jolanta; Hemleben, Vera

    2017-01-23

    Polyploid hybrids represent a rich natural resource to study molecular evolution of plant genes and genomes. Here, we applied a combination of karyological and molecular methods to investigate chromosomal structure, molecular organization and evolution of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) in nightshade, Atropa belladonna (fam. Solanaceae), one of the oldest known allohexaploids among flowering plants. Because of their abundance and specific molecular organization (evolutionarily conserved coding regions linked to variable intergenic spacers, IGS), 45S and 5S rDNA are widely used in plant taxonomic and evolutionary studies. Molecular cloning and nucleotide sequencing of A. belladonna 45S rDNA repeats revealed a general structure characteristic of other Solanaceae species, and a very high sequence similarity of two length variants, with the only difference in number of short IGS subrepeats. These results combined with the detection of three pairs of 45S rDNA loci on separate chromosomes, presumably inherited from both tetraploid and diploid ancestor species, example intensive sequence homogenization that led to substitution/elimination of rDNA repeats of one parent. Chromosome silver-staining revealed that only four out of six 45S rDNA sites are frequently transcriptionally active, demonstrating nucleolar dominance. For 5S rDNA, three size variants of repeats were detected, with the major class represented by repeats containing all functional IGS elements required for transcription, the intermediate size repeats containing partially deleted IGS sequences, and the short 5S repeats containing severe defects both in the IGS and coding sequences. While shorter variants demonstrate increased rate of based substitution, probably in their transition into pseudogenes, the functional 5S rDNA variants are nearly identical at the sequence level, pointing to their origin from a single parental species. Localization of the 5S rDNA genes on two chromosome pairs further supports uniparental

  16. Dynamical evolution of space debris on high-elliptical orbits near high-order resonance zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, Eduard; Zakharova, Polina

    Orbital evolution of objects on Molniya-type orbits is considered near high-order resonance zones. Initial conditions correspond to high-elliptical orbits with the critical inclination 63.4 degrees. High-order resonances are analyzed. Resonance orders are more than 5 and less than 50. Frequencies of perturbations caused by the effect of sectorial and tesseral harmonics of the Earth's gravitational potential are linear combinations of the mean motion of a satellite, angular velocities of motion of the pericenter and node of its orbit, and the angular velocity of the Earth. Frequencies of perturbations were calculated by taking into account secular perturbations from the Earth oblateness, the Moon, the Sun, and a solar radiation pressure. Resonance splitting effect leads to three sub-resonances. The study of dynamical evolution on long time intervals was performed on the basis of the results of numerical simulation. We used "A Numerical Model of the Motion of Artificial Earth's Satellites", developed by the Research Institute of Applied Mathematics and Mechanics of the Tomsk State University. The model of disturbing forces taken into account the main perturbing factors: the gravitational field of the Earth, the attraction of the Moon and the Sun, the tides in the Earth’s body, the solar radiation pressure, taking into account the shadow of the Earth, the Poynting-Robertson effect, and the atmospheric drag. Area-to-mass ratio varied from small values corresponding to satellites to big ones corresponding to space debris. The locations and sizes of resonance zones were refined from numerical simulation. The Poynting-Robertson effect results in a secular decrease in the semi-major axis of a spherically symmetrical satellite. In resonance regions the effect weakens slightly. Reliable estimates of secular perturbations of the semi-major axis were obtained from the numerical simulation. Under the Poynting-Robertson effect objects pass through the regions of high

  17. Dynamic Sliding Mode Evolution PWM Controller for a Novel High-Gain Interleaved DC-DC Converter in PV System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taizhou Bei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering the disadvantages of the traditional high-gain DC-DC converter such as big size, high voltage stress of switches, and large input current ripple, a novel high-gain interleaved boost converter with coupled-inductor and switched-capacitor was proposed correspondingly and the operation principle together with the steady-state analysis of this converter was also described. Besides, a new control approach-dynamic sliding mode evolution PWM controller (DSME PWM for the novel topological converter based on both dynamic evolution and sliding mode control was also presented. From the simulation results and experimental validation the proposed converter can fulfill high-gain boost, low ripple of both the input current and the output voltage. Furthermore, MPPT technique can be also achieved in a short time by simulation. The efficiency and stability of the converter proposed in this paper can be improved.

  18. Dynamic mixtures and combinatorial libraries: imines as probes for molecular evolution at the interface between chemistry and biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Andreas

    2009-08-21

    In analogy to evolution in biological processes, "molecular evolution", based on the reversible formation of imines, has successfully been explored for drug discovery, receptor design and as a controlled-release vehicle. Multicomponent systems composed of amines and carbonyl compounds generate structural diversity by reversible reaction of the different components to form equilibrated dynamic mixtures or combinatorial libraries (DCLs). Under thermodynamic control and in the presence of an external factor which influences the equilibrium, these systems evolve by selective adaptation to the changing external conditions. This concept allows the casting of biologically or catalytically active substrates and the molding of receptors from DCLs which are composed of smaller non-active amine and carbonyl moieties. Similarly, if the amine or carbonyl compounds are the biologically active compounds of interest, the corresponding dynamic mixtures are found to be efficient delivery systems, allowing their controlled release over time.

  19. Chemo-dynamical evolution model: Enrichment of r-process elements in the Local Group dwarf galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Yutaka; Ishimaru, Yuhri; Saitoh, Takayuki R.; Fujii, Michiko S.; Hidaka, Jun; Kajino, Toshitaka

    2016-08-01

    Neutron star mergers are one of the candidate astrophysical site(s) of r-process. Several chemical evolution studies however pointed out that the observed abundance of r-process is difficult to reproduce by neutron star mergers. In this study, we aim to clarify the enrichment of r-process elements in the Local Group dwarf galaxies. We carry out numerical simulations of galactic chemo-dynamical evolution using an N-body/smoothed particle hydrodynamics code, ASURA. We construct a chemo-dynamical evolution model for dwarf galaxies assuming that neutron star mergers are the major source of r-process elements. Our models reproduce the observed dispersion in [Eu/Fe] as a function of [Fe/H] with neutron star mergers with a merger time of 100 Myr. We find that star formation efficiency and metal mixing processes during the first <~ 300 Myr of galaxy evolution are important to reproduce the observations. This study supports that neutron star mergers are a major site of r-process.

  20. Terrestrial slopes in northern high latitudes: A paradigm shift regarding sediment origin, composition, and dynamic evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lønne, Ida

    2017-01-01

    High-Arctic terrestrial slopes have received limited systematic research interest, but increased vulnerability related to regional warming has driven the call for better knowledge of the dynamics of these systems. Studies of sediment transport from a plateau area in Adventdalen, Svalbard, and associated slopes extending to sea level demonstrate that glacial processes play a more prominent role than earlier anticipated, - especially the impact of glacial meltwater. Traces of drainage at the plateau and the dissection of the plateau edge and upper slope were clearly initiated during various stages of Late Glacial runoff. Further, there is a close association between the sediment distribution and composition at the plateau and the evolution of various types of slopes. The reconstructed sedimentation history shows that the landscape will undergo four stages with contrasting modes of sediment transport: 1) subglacial processes related to active ice, 2) processes related to the margin of active ice, 3) processes related to the melting of inactive ice, and 4) nonglacial processes. These stages form four successions, referred to as supply regimes A-D, which control the supply of water and sediments to a given slope segment. In this landscape, traces of glacial meltwater occur at most altitudes, in "odd" positions and in slope segments "without" catchments. The associated depocenters (isolated, composite or coalescing into aprons), are often outsized compared to the apparent slope catchment. Reworked glacial sediments form a significant part of the slope-debris but are covered partly or entirely by products of physical weathering. Colluvium, senso stricto, thus masks a distinct system shift related to the local termination of glacial meltwater. Consequently, the weathering part of the slope sediment budget in this region is considerably overestimated.

  1. Landscape evolution in tidal embayments: Modeling the interplay of erosion, sedimentation, and vegetation dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alpaos, Andrea; Lanzoni, Stefano; Marani, Marco; Rinaldo, Andrea

    2007-03-01

    We propose an ecomorphodynamic model which conceptualizes the chief land-forming processes operating on the intertwined, long-term evolution of marsh platforms and embedded tidal networks. The rapid network incision (previously addressed by the authors) is decoupled from the geomorphological dynamics of intertidal areas, governed by sediment erosion and deposition and crucially affected by the presence of vegetation. This allows us to investigate the response of tidal morphologies to different scenarios of sediment supply, colonization by halophytes, and changing sea level. Different morphological evolutionary regimes are shown to depend on marsh ecology. Marsh accretion rates, enhanced by vegetation growth, and the related platform elevations tend to decrease with distance from the creek, measured along suitably defined flow paths. The negative feedback between surface elevation and its inorganic accretion rate is reinforced by the relation between plant productivity and soil elevation in Spartina-dominated marshes and counteracted by positive feedbacks in multispecies-vegetated marshes. When evolving under constant sea level, unvegetated and Spartina-dominated marshes asymptotically tend to mean high water level (MHWL), different from multiple vegetation species marshes, which can make the evolutionary transition to upland. Equilibrium configurations below MHWL can be reached under constant rates of sea level rise, depending on sediment supply and vegetation productivity. Our analyses on marine regressions and transgressions show that when the system is in a supply-limited regime, network retreat and expansion (associated with regressions and transgressions, respectively) tend to be cyclic. Conversely, in a transport-limited regime, network reexpansion following a regression tends to take on a new configuration, showing a hysteretic behavior.

  2. The DYMECS project: The Dynamical and Microphysical Evolution of Convective Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Thorwald; Hogan, Robin; Hanley, Kirsty; Nicol, John; Plant, Robert; Lean, Humphrey; Clark, Peter; Halliwell, Carol

    2014-05-01

    A new frontier in weather forecasting is emerging by operational forecast models now being run at convection-permitting resolutions at many national weather services. However, this is not a panacea; significant systematic errors remain in the character of convective clouds and rainfall distributions. The DYMECS project (Dynamical and Microphysical Evolution of Convective Storms) is taking a fundamentally new approach to evaluate and improve such models: rather than relying on a limited number of cases, which may not be representative, we have gathered a large database of 3D storm structures on 40 convective days using an automated storm-tracking and scan-scheduling algorithm for the high resolution Chilbolton radar in southern England. These structures have been related to storm life-cycles derived by tracking features in the rainfall from the UK radar network, and compared statistically to simulated reflectivity fields from multiple versions of the Met Office model, varying horizontal grid length between 1.5 km and 100 m, and changing the sub-grid mixing and microphysics schemes. We also evaluated the scale and intensity of convective updrafts using a new radar technique. We find that the horizontal size of simulated convective clouds and the updrafts within them decreases with decreasing grid lengths down to 200 m, below which no further decrease is found. Comparison with observations reveals that at these resolutions, updrafts are about the right size (around 2 km across), but the clouds are typically too narrow and rain too intense (in both cases by around a factor of two), while progressing through their lifecycle too slowly. The scale error may be remedied by artificially increasing mixing length, but the microphysics scheme has little effect on either scale or intensity.

  3. Learning to read and write in evolution: from static pseudoenzymes and pseudosignalers to dynamic gear shifters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abudukelimu, Abulikemu; Mondeel, Thierry D G A; Barberis, Matteo; Westerhoff, Hans V

    2017-06-15

    We present a systems biology view on pseudoenzymes that acknowledges that genes are not selfish: the genome is. With network function as the selectable unit, there has been an evolutionary bonus for recombination of functions of and within proteins. Many proteins house a functionality by which they 'read' the cell's state, and one by which they 'write' and thereby change that state. Should the writer domain lose its cognate function, a 'pseudoenzyme' or 'pseudosignaler' arises. GlnK involved in Escherichia coli ammonia assimilation may well be a pseudosignaler, associating 'reading' the nitrogen state of the cell to 'writing' the ammonium uptake activity. We identify functional pseudosignalers in the cyclin-dependent kinase complexes regulating cell-cycle progression. For the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, we illustrate how a 'dead' pseudosignaler could produce potentially selectable functionalities. Four billion years ago, bioenergetics may have shuffled 'electron-writers', producing various networks that all served the same function of anaerobic ATP synthesis and carbon assimilation from hydrogen and carbon dioxide, but at different ATP/acetate ratios. This would have enabled organisms to deal with variable challenges of energy need and substrate supply. The same principle might enable 'gear-shifting' in real time, by dynamically generating different pseudo-redox enzymes, reshuffling their coenzymes, and rerouting network fluxes. Non-stationary pH gradients in thermal vents together with similar such shuffling mechanisms may have produced a first selectable proton-motivated pyrophosphate synthase and subsequent ATP synthase. A combination of functionalities into enzymes, signalers, and the pseudo-versions thereof may offer fitness in terms of plasticity, both in real time and in evolution. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  4. Dynamic evolution of bz orthologous regions in the Andropogoneae and other grasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qinghua; Dooner, Hugo K

    2012-10-01

    Genome structure exhibits remarkable plasticity within Zea mays. To examine how haplotype structure has evolved within the Andropogoneae tribe, we have analyzed the bz gene-rich region of maize (Zea mays), the Zea teosintes mays ssp. mexicana, luxurians and diploperennis, Tripsacum dactyloides, Coix lacryma-jobi and Sorghum propinquum. We sequenced and annotated BAC clones from these species and re-annotated the orthologous Sorghum bicolor region. Gene colinearity in the region is well conserved within the genus Zea. However, the orthologous regions of Coix and Sorghum exhibited several micro-rearrangements relative to Zea, including addition, truncation and deletion of genes. The stc1 gene, involved in the production of a terpenoid insect defense signal, is evolving particularly fast, and its progressive disappearance from some species is occurring by microhomology-mediated recombination. LTR retrotransposons are the main contributors to the dynamic evolution of the bz region. Common transposon insertion sites occur among haplotypes from different Zea mays sub-species, but not outside the species. As in Zea, different patterns of interspersion between genes and retrotransposons are observed in Sorghum. We estimate that the mean divergence times between maize and Tripsacum, Coix and Sorghum are 8.5, 12.1 and 12.4 million years ago, respectively, and that between Coix and Sorghum is 9.3 million years ago. A comparison of the bz orthologous regions of Zea, Sorghum and Coix with those of Brachypodium, Setaria and Oryza allows us to infer how the region has evolved by addition and deletion of genes in the approximately 50 million years since these genera diverged from a common progenitor.

  5. Evolution of foredune texture following dynamic restoration, Doughboy Bay, Stewart Island, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konlechner, T. M.; Ryu, W.; Hilton, M. J.; Sherman, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Growing concern regarding the geomorphic and associated biotic effects of dune management practises has led to an increase in the number of dune restoration projects globally. Most recent projects aim to enhance the efficiency of aeolian sediment dynamics and increase dune mobility by decreasing vegetation cover, but we lack objective measures to evaluate such projects. Here we demonstrate the use of landscape metrics to quantify the evolution of foredune texture following the removal of vegetation. A long-term program of marram grass (Ammophila arenaria) eradication in southern New Zealand (Doughboy Bay, Stewart Island) is examined. Four metrics: bare sand area, patch adjacency, complexity, and the range of proximity, are used to classify a series of foredune textures beginning with the pre-restoration state through the phases of marram removal, to the current state. Foredune texture at Doughboy Bay has evolved from a semi-stable to an active state as the consequence of restoration. Two metrics, bare sand and adjacency, appear to be particularly good measures of change following marram removal. Patterns and rates of change for these metrics are consistent with ground observations of increased 'naturalness' (native plant communities, sand mobility) over the same period. The set of landscape metrics derived for Doughboy Bay were compared to similar sets measured for a nearby foredune system where marram invasion has not occurred, and where conditions presumably represent equilibrium foredune texture. Since the removal of marram at Doughboy Bay and the consequent remobilization of the sand surface, the foredune texture has increased in similarity to that of the reference site, indicating a favourable shift in plant cover as a result of the restoration program. We conclude that landscape metrics can be used to track changes in foredune morphology following restoration. Second, the planning, management, and monitoring of coastal dune restoration programs will benefit

  6. Dynamic karyotype evolution and unique sex determination systems in Leptidea wood white butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šíchová, Jindra; Voleníková, Anna; Dincă, Vlad; Nguyen, Petr; Vila, Roger; Sahara, Ken; Marec, František

    2015-05-19

    Chromosomal rearrangements have the potential to limit the rate and pattern of gene flow within and between species and thus play a direct role in promoting and maintaining speciation. Wood white butterflies of the genus Leptidea are excellent models to study the role of chromosome rearrangements in speciation because they show karyotype variability not only among but also within species. In this work, we investigated genome architecture of three cryptic Leptidea species (L. juvernica, L. sinapis and L. reali) by standard and molecular cytogenetic techniques in order to reveal causes of the karyotype variability. Chromosome numbers ranged from 2n = 85 to 91 in L. juvernica and 2n = 69 to 73 in L. sinapis (both from Czech populations) to 2n = 51 to 55 in L. reali (Spanish population). We observed significant differences in chromosome numbers and localization of cytogenetic markers (rDNA and H3 histone genes) within the offspring of individual females. Using FISH with the (TTAGG) n telomeric probe we also documented the presence of multiple chromosome fusions and/or fissions and other complex rearrangements. Thus, the intraspecific karyotype variability is likely due to irregular chromosome segregation of multivalent meiotic configurations. The analysis of female meiotic chromosomes by GISH and CGH revealed multiple sex chromosomes: W1W2W3Z1Z2Z3Z4 in L. juvernica, W1W2W3Z1Z2Z3 in L. sinapis and W1W2W3W4Z1Z2Z3Z4 in L. reali. Our results suggest a dynamic karyotype evolution and point to the role of chromosomal rearrangements in the speciation of Leptidea butterflies. Moreover, our study revealed a curious sex determination system with 3-4 W and 3-4 Z chromosomes, which is unique in the Lepidoptera and which could also have played a role in the speciation process of the three Leptidea species.

  7. Reconstructing the dynamics of HIV evolution within hosts from serial deep sequence data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Art F Y Poon

    Full Text Available At the early stage of infection, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 predominantly uses the CCR5 coreceptor for host cell entry. The subsequent emergence of HIV variants that use the CXCR4 coreceptor in roughly half of all infections is associated with an accelerated decline of CD4+ T-cells and rate of progression to AIDS. The presence of a 'fitness valley' separating CCR5- and CXCR4-using genotypes is postulated to be a biological determinant of whether the HIV coreceptor switch occurs. Using phylogenetic methods to reconstruct the evolutionary dynamics of HIV within hosts enables us to discriminate between competing models of this process. We have developed a phylogenetic pipeline for the molecular clock analysis, ancestral reconstruction, and visualization of deep sequence data. These data were generated by next-generation sequencing of HIV RNA extracted from longitudinal serum samples (median 7 time points from 8 untreated subjects with chronic HIV infections (Amsterdam Cohort Studies on HIV-1 infection and AIDS. We used the known dates of sampling to directly estimate rates of evolution and to map ancestral mutations to a reconstructed timeline in units of days. HIV coreceptor usage was predicted from reconstructed ancestral sequences using the geno2pheno algorithm. We determined that the first mutations contributing to CXCR4 use emerged about 16 (per subject range 4 to 30 months before the earliest predicted CXCR4-using ancestor, which preceded the first positive cell-based assay of CXCR4 usage by 10 (range 5 to 25 months. CXCR4 usage arose in multiple lineages within 5 of 8 subjects, and ancestral lineages following alternate mutational pathways before going extinct were common. We observed highly patient-specific distributions and time-scales of mutation accumulation, implying that the role of a fitness valley is contingent on the genotype of the transmitted variant.

  8. Reconstructing the dynamics of HIV evolution within hosts from serial deep sequence data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Art F Y; Swenson, Luke C; Bunnik, Evelien M; Edo-Matas, Diana; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; van 't Wout, Angélique B; Harrigan, P Richard

    2012-01-01

    At the early stage of infection, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 predominantly uses the CCR5 coreceptor for host cell entry. The subsequent emergence of HIV variants that use the CXCR4 coreceptor in roughly half of all infections is associated with an accelerated decline of CD4+ T-cells and rate of progression to AIDS. The presence of a 'fitness valley' separating CCR5- and CXCR4-using genotypes is postulated to be a biological determinant of whether the HIV coreceptor switch occurs. Using phylogenetic methods to reconstruct the evolutionary dynamics of HIV within hosts enables us to discriminate between competing models of this process. We have developed a phylogenetic pipeline for the molecular clock analysis, ancestral reconstruction, and visualization of deep sequence data. These data were generated by next-generation sequencing of HIV RNA extracted from longitudinal serum samples (median 7 time points) from 8 untreated subjects with chronic HIV infections (Amsterdam Cohort Studies on HIV-1 infection and AIDS). We used the known dates of sampling to directly estimate rates of evolution and to map ancestral mutations to a reconstructed timeline in units of days. HIV coreceptor usage was predicted from reconstructed ancestral sequences using the geno2pheno algorithm. We determined that the first mutations contributing to CXCR4 use emerged about 16 (per subject range 4 to 30) months before the earliest predicted CXCR4-using ancestor, which preceded the first positive cell-based assay of CXCR4 usage by 10 (range 5 to 25) months. CXCR4 usage arose in multiple lineages within 5 of 8 subjects, and ancestral lineages following alternate mutational pathways before going extinct were common. We observed highly patient-specific distributions and time-scales of mutation accumulation, implying that the role of a fitness valley is contingent on the genotype of the transmitted variant.

  9. Quantifying the dynamics of coupled networks of switches and oscillators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew R Francis

    Full Text Available Complex network dynamics have been analyzed with models of systems of coupled switches or systems of coupled oscillators. However, many complex systems are composed of components with diverse dynamics whose interactions drive the system's evolution. We, therefore, introduce a new modeling framework that describes the dynamics of networks composed of both oscillators and switches. Both oscillator synchronization and switch stability are preserved in these heterogeneous, coupled networks. Furthermore, this model recapitulates the qualitative dynamics for the yeast cell cycle consistent with the hypothesized dynamics resulting from decomposition of the regulatory network into dynamic motifs. Introducing feedback into the cell-cycle network induces qualitative dynamics analogous to limitless replicative potential that is a hallmark of cancer. As a result, the proposed model of switch and oscillator coupling provides the ability to incorporate mechanisms that underlie the synchronized stimulus response ubiquitous in biochemical systems.

  10. A microRNA allele that emerged prior to apple domestication may underlie fruit size evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jia-Long; Xu, Juan; Cornille, Amandine; Tomes, Sumathi; Karunairetnam, Sakuntala; Luo, Zhiwei; Bassett, Heather; Whitworth, Claire; Rees-George, Jonathan; Ranatunga, Chandra; Snirc, Alodie; Crowhurst, Ross; de Silva, Nihal; Warren, Ben; Deng, Cecilia; Kumar, Satish; Chagné, David; Bus, Vincent G M; Volz, Richard K; Rikkerink, Erik H A; Gardiner, Susan E; Giraud, Tatiana; MacDiarmid, Robin; Gleave, Andrew P

    2015-10-01

    The molecular genetic mechanisms underlying fruit size remain poorly understood in perennial crops, despite size being an important agronomic trait. Here we show that the expression level of a microRNA gene (miRNA172) influences fruit size in apple. A transposon insertional allele of miRNA172 showing reduced expression associates with large fruit in an apple breeding population, whereas over-expression of miRNA172 in transgenic apple significantly reduces fruit size. The transposon insertional allele was found to be co-located with a major fruit size quantitative trait locus, fixed in cultivated apples and their wild progenitor species with relatively large fruit. This finding supports the view that the selection for large size in apple fruit was initiated prior to apple domestication, likely by large mammals, before being subsequently strengthened by humans, and also helps to explain why signatures of genetic bottlenecks and selective sweeps are normally weaker in perennial crops than in annual crops.

  11. Bar dynamics and bifurcation evolution in a modelled braided sand-bed river

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuurman, Filip|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/328235830; Kleinhans, Maarten G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/217675123

    2015-01-01

    Morphodynamics in sand-bed braided rivers are associated with simultaneous evolution of mid-channel bars and channels on the braidplain. Bifurcations around mid-channel bars are key elements that divide discharge and sediment. This, in turn, may control the evolution of connected branches, with

  12. Non-Markovian dynamical effects and time evolution of entanglement entropy of a dissipative two-state system

    CERN Document Server

    Lü, Zhiguo

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the dynamical information exchange between a two-state system and its environment which is measured by von Neumann entropy. It is found that in the underdamping regime, the entropy dynamics exhibits an extremely non-Markovian oscillation-hump feature, in which oscillations manifest quantum coherence and a hump of envelop demonstrates temporal memory of bath. It indicates that the process of entropy exchange is bidirectional. When the coupling strength increases a certain threshold, the hump along with ripple disappears, which is indicative of the coherent-incoherent dynamical crossover. The long-time limit of entropy evolution reaches the ground state value which agrees with that of numerical renormalization group.

  13. Coupling dynamical and collisional evolution of small bodies II Forming the Kuiper Belt, the Scattered Disk and the Oort Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Morbidelli, S C A

    2006-01-01

    The Oort Cloud, the Kuiper Belt and the Scattered Disk are dynamically distinct populations of small bodies evolving in the outer regions of the Solar System. Whereas their collisional activity is now quiet, gravitational interactions with giant planets may have shaped these populations both dynamically and collisionally during their formation. Using a hybrid approach (Charnoz & Morbidelli 2003), the present paper tries to couple the primordial collisional and dynamical evolution of these three populations in a self-consistent way. A critical parameter is the primordial size-distribution. We show that the initial planetesimal size distribution that allows an effective mass depletion of the Kuiper belt by collisional grinding, would decimate also the population of comet-size bodies that end in the Oort Cloud and, in particular, in the Scattered Disk. As a consequence, the Scattered Disk and the Oort Cloud would be too anemic, by a factor 20 to 100, relative to the estimates achieved from the observation of...

  14. Microstructural Evolution and Dynamic Softening Mechanisms of Al-Zn-Mg-Cu Alloy during Hot Compressive Deformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cangji Shi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The hot deformation behavior and microstructural evolution of an Al-Zn-Mg-Cu (7150 alloy was studied during hot compression at various temperatures (300 to 450 °C and strain rates (0.001 to 10 s−1. A decline ratio map of flow stresses was proposed and divided into five deformation domains, in which the flow stress behavior was correlated with different microstructures and dynamic softening mechanisms. The results reveal that the dynamic recovery is the sole softening mechanism at temperatures of 300 to 400 °C with various strain rates and at temperatures of 400 to 450 °C with strain rates between 1 and 10 s−1. The level of dynamic recovery increases with increasing temperature and with decreasing strain rate. At the high deformation temperature of 450 °C with strain rates of 0.001 to 0.1 s−1, a partially recrystallized microstructure was observed, and the dynamic recrystallization (DRX provided an alternative softening mechanism. Two kinds of DRX might operate at the high temperature, in which discontinuous dynamic recrystallization was involved at higher strain rates and continuous dynamic recrystallization was implied at lower strain rates.

  15. Exponential decay of matrix Φ -entropies on Markov semigroups with applications to dynamical evolutions of quantum ensembles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hao-Chung; Hsieh, Min-Hsiu; Tomamichel, Marco

    2017-09-01

    In this work, we extend the theory of quantum Markov processes on a single quantum state to a broader theory that covers Markovian evolution of an ensemble of quantum states, which generalizes Lindblad's formulation of quantum dynamical semigroups. Our results establish the equivalence between an exponential decrease of the matrix Φ -entropies and the Φ -Sobolev inequalities, which allows us to characterize the dynamical evolution of a quantum ensemble to its equilibrium. In particular, we study the convergence rates of two special semigroups, namely, the depolarizing channel and the phase-damping channel. In the former, since there exists a unique equilibrium state, we show that the matrix Φ -entropy of the resulting quantum ensemble decays exponentially as time goes on. Consequently, we obtain a stronger notion of monotonicity of the Holevo quantity—the Holevo quantity of the quantum ensemble decays exponentially in time and the convergence rate is determined by the modified log-Sobolev inequalities. However, in the latter, the matrix Φ -entropy of the quantum ensemble that undergoes the phase-damping Markovian evolution generally will not decay exponentially. There is no classical analogy for these different equilibrium situations. Finally, we also study a statistical mixing of Markov semigroups on matrix-valued functions. We can explicitly calculate the convergence rate of a Markovian jump process defined on Boolean hypercubes and provide upper bounds to the mixing time.

  16. Dynamical evolution of angular momentum in damped nuclear reactions (I). Accumulation of angular momentum by nucleon transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Døssing, Thomas; Randrup, Jørgen

    1985-02-01

    The dynamical accumulation of angular momentum in the course of a damped nuclear reaction is studied within the framework of the nucleon exchange transport model. The dinuclear spin distribution is described by the mean values and the covariances of the two prefragment spins and their orbital angular momentum overlineL. Using an intrinsic coordinate system aligned with the fluctuating direction of overlineL, the equations of motion for the spin distribution are derived and discussed. The ultimate transformation to an externally defined reference frame is also discussed. The evolution of other observables and their coupling to the spin variables are included and, by integrating conditional distributions over all impact parameters, results are obtained for differential cross sections corresponding to a specified loss of relative kinetic energy. The characteristic features of the evolution of the spin distribution is discussed in detail. First the stationary solution of the equations of motion is considered and its different appearance in the various relevant coordinate systems is exhibited. The dynamical evolution is discussed in terms of the time-dependent relaxation times associated with the six different intrinsic modes of rotation in the disphere. Due to the relative smallness of the window size the positive modes will dominate (for not too long times), resulting in a predominantly positive correlation between the fragment spin fluctuations. Illustrative applications to cases of experimental interest are made and a critical discussion is given of other models addressing angular momentum in damped nuclear reactions.

  17. Dynamic evolution of the GnRH receptor gene family in vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Barry L; Akazome, Yasuhisa; Oka, Yoshitaka; Eisthen, Heather L

    2014-10-25

    Elucidating the mechanisms underlying coevolution of ligands and receptors is an important challenge in molecular evolutionary biology. Peptide hormones and their receptors are excellent models for such efforts, given the relative ease of examining evolutionary changes in genes encoding for both molecules. Most vertebrates possess multiple genes for both the decapeptide gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) and for the GnRH receptor. The evolutionary history of the receptor family, including ancestral copy number and timing of duplications and deletions, has been the subject of controversy. We report here for the first time sequences of three distinct GnRH receptor genes in salamanders (axolotls, Ambystoma mexicanum), which are orthologous to three GnRH receptors from ranid frogs. To understand the origin of these genes within the larger evolutionary context of the gene family, we performed phylogenetic analyses and probabilistic protein homology searches of GnRH receptor genes in vertebrates and their near relatives. Our analyses revealed four points that alter previous views about the evolution of the GnRH receptor gene family. First, the "mammalian" pituitary type GnRH receptor, which is the sole GnRH receptor in humans and previously presumed to be highly derived because it lacks the cytoplasmic C-terminal domain typical of most G-protein coupled receptors, is actually an ancient gene that originated in the common ancestor of jawed vertebrates (Gnathostomata). Second, unlike previous studies, we classify vertebrate GnRH receptors into five subfamilies. Third, the order of subfamily origins is the inverse of previous proposed models. Fourth, the number of GnRH receptor genes has been dynamic in vertebrates and their ancestors, with multiple duplications and losses. Our results provide a novel evolutionary framework for generating hypotheses concerning the functional importance of structural characteristics of vertebrate GnRH receptors. We show that five

  18. An Improved Differential Evolution Method Based on the Dynamic Search Strategy to Solve Dynamic Economic Dispatch Problem with Valve-Point Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangyu Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An improved differential evolution (DE method based on the dynamic search strategy (IDEBDSS is proposed to solve dynamic economic dispatch problem with valve-point effects in this paper. The proposed method combines the DE algorithm with the dynamic search strategy, which improves the performance of the algorithm. DE is the main optimizer in the method proposed. While chaotic sequences are applied to obtain the dynamic parameter settings in DE, dynamic search strategy which consists of two steps, global search strategy and local search strategy, is used to improve algorithm efficiency. To accelerate convergence, a new infeasible solution handing method is adopted in the local search strategy; meanwhile, an orthogonal crossover (OX operator is added to the global search strategy to enhance the optimization search ability. Finally, the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed methods are demonstrated by three test systems, and the simulation results reveal that the IDEBDSS method can obtain better solutions with higher efficiency than the standard DE and other methods reported in the recent literature.

  19. Dynamical evolution of topology of large-scale structure. [in distribution of galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Changbom; Gott, J. R., III

    1991-01-01

    The nonlinear effects of statistical biasing and gravitational evolution on the genus are studied. The biased galaxy subset is picked for the first time by actually identifying galaxy-sized peaks above a fixed threshold in the initial conditions, and their subsequent evolution is followed. It is found that in the standard cold dark matter (CDM) model the statistical biasing in the locations of galaxies produces asymmetry in the genus curve and coupling with gravitational evolution gives rise to a shift in the genus curve to the left in moderately nonlinear regimes. Gravitational evolution alone reduces the amplitude of the genus curve due to strong phase correlations in the density field and also produces asymmetry in the curve. Results on the genus of the mass density field for both CDM and hot dark matter models are consistent with previous work by Melott, Weinberg, and Gott (1987).

  20. Why time matters: codon evolution and the temporal dynamics of dN/dS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mugal, Carina F; Wolf, Jochen B W; Kaj, Ingemar

    2014-01-01

    The ratio of divergence at nonsynonymous and synonymous sites, dN/dS, is a widely used measure in evolutionary genetic studies to investigate the extent to which selection modulates gene sequence evolution...

  1. Soliton solutions to a few fractional nonlinear evolution equations in shallow water wave dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzazadeh, Mohammad; Ekici, Mehmet; Sonmezoglu, Abdullah; Ortakaya, Sami; Eslami, Mostafa; Biswas, Anjan

    2016-05-01

    This paper studies a few nonlinear evolution equations that appear with fractional temporal evolution and fractional spatial derivatives. These are Benjamin-Bona-Mahoney equation, dispersive long wave equation and Nizhnik-Novikov-Veselov equation. The extended Jacobi's elliptic function expansion method is implemented to obtain soliton and other periodic singular solutions to these equations. In the limiting case, when the modulus of ellipticity approaches zero or unity, these doubly periodic functions approach solitary waves or shock waves or periodic singular solutions emerge.

  2. [Dynamics of chromosome number evolution in the Agrodiaetus phyllis species complex (Insecta: Lepidoptera)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vershinina, A O; Lukhtanov, V A

    2013-01-01

    We employed phylogenetic comparative method to study karyotype evolution in the Agrodiaetus phyllis species complex in which haploid chromosome numbers vary greatly ranging from 10 to 134. We have found that different phylogenetic lineages of the group have different rates of chromosome number changes. Chromosome numbers in the complex posses phylogenetic signal, and their evolutionary transformation is difficult to explain in terms of punctual and gradual evolution.

  3. A principal possibility for computer investigation of evolution of dynamical systems independent on time accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurzadyan, V.G. [Sapienza University of Rome, SIA, Rome (Italy); Alikhanian National Laboratory and Yerevan State University, Center for Cosmology and Astrophysics, Yerevan (Armenia); Harutyunyan, V.V. [Alikhanian National Laboratory and Yerevan State University, Center for Cosmology and Astrophysics, Yerevan (Armenia); Kocharyan, A.A. [Alikhanian National Laboratory and Yerevan State University, Center for Cosmology and Astrophysics, Yerevan (Armenia); Monash University, School of Mathematical Sciences, Clayton (Australia)

    2015-06-15

    Extensive N-body simulations are among the key means for the study of numerous astrophysical and cosmological phenomena, so various schemes are developed for possibly higher accuracy computations. We demonstrate the principal possibility for revealing the evolution of a perturbed Hamiltonian system with an accuracy independent on time. The method is based on the Laplace transform and the derivation and analytical solution of an evolution equation in the phase space for the resolvent and using computer algebra. (orig.)

  4. The Dynamical Evolution of Black Hole-Neutron Star Binaries in General Relativity: Simulations of Tidal Disruption

    CERN Document Server

    Faber, J A; Shapiro, S L; Taniguchi, K; Rasio, F A; Faber, Joshua A.; Baumgarte, Thomas W.; Shapiro, Stuart L.; Taniguchi, Keisuke; Rasio, Frederic A.

    2006-01-01

    We calculate the first dynamical evolutions of merging black hole-neutron star binaries that construct the combined black hole-neutron star spacetime in a general relativistic framework. We treat the metric in the conformal flatness approximation, and assume that the black hole mass is sufficiently large compared to that of the neutron star so that the black hole remains fixed in space. Using a spheroidal spectral methods solver, we solve the resulting field equations for a neutron star orbiting a Schwarzschild black hole. The matter is evolved using a relativistic, Lagrangian, smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) treatment. We take as our initial data recent quasiequilibrium models for synchronized neutron star polytropes generated as solutions of the conformal thin-sandwich (CTS) decomposition of the Einstein field equations. We are able to construct from these models relaxed SPH configurations whose profiles show good agreement with CTS solutions. Our adiabatic evolution calculations for neutron stars wit...

  5. The Dominance of Dynamic Barlike Instabilities in the Evolution of a Massive Stellar Core Collapse That ``Fizzles''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, James N.; Durisen, Richard H.

    2001-03-01

    Core collapse in a massive rotating star may halt at subnuclear density if the core contains angular momentum J>~1049 g cm2 s-1. An aborted collapse can lead to the formation of a rapidly rotating equilibrium object, which, because of its high electron fraction, Ye>0.4, and high entropy per baryon, Sb/k~1-2, is secularly and dynamically stable. The further evolution of such a ``fizzler'' is driven by deleptonization and cooling of the hot, dense material. These processes cause the fizzler both to contract toward neutron star densities and to spin up, driving it toward instability points of the barlike modes. Using linear stability analyses to study the latter case, we find that the stability properties of fizzlers are similar to those of Maclaurin spheroids and polytropes despite the nonpolytropic nature and extreme compressibility of the fizzler equation of state. For fizzlers with the specific angular momentum distribution of the Maclaurin spheroids, secular and dynamic barlike instabilities set in at T/|W|~0.14 and 0.27, respectively, where T is the rotational kinetic energy and W is the gravitational energy of the fizzler, the same limits as found for Maclaurin spheroids. For fizzlers in which angular momentum is more concentrated toward the equator, the secular stability limits drop dramatically. For the most extreme angular momentum distribution we consider, the secular stability limit for the barlike modes falls to T/|W|~0.038, compared with T/|W|~0.09-0.10 for the most extreme polytropic cases known previously (Imamura et al.). For fixed equation-of-state parameters, the secular and dynamic stability limits occur at roughly constant mass over the range of typical fizzler central densities. Deleptonization and cooling decrease the limiting masses on timescales shorter than the growth time for secular instability. Consequently, unless an evolving fizzler reaches neutron star densities first, it will always encounter dynamic barlike instabilities before

  6. Stem Cells Expand Insights into Human Brain Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, Michael A

    2016-04-07

    Substantial expansion in the number of cerebral cortex neurons is thought to underlie cognitive differences between humans and other primates, although the mechanisms underlying this expansion are unclear. Otani et al. (2016) utilize PSC-derived brain organoids to study how species-specific differences in cortical progenitor proliferation may underlie cortical evolution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Temporal condensation and dynamic λ-transition within the complex network: an application to real-life market evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiliński, Mateusz; Szewczak, Bartłomiej; Gubiec, Tomasz; Kutner, Ryszard; Struzik, Zbigniew R.

    2015-02-01

    We fill a void in merging empirical and phenomenological characterisation of the dynamical phase transitions in complex networks by identifying and thoroughly characterising a triple sequence of such transitions on a real-life financial market. We extract and interpret the empirical, numerical, and analytical evidences for the existence of these dynamical phase transitions, by considering the medium size Frankfurt stock exchange (FSE), as a typical example of a financial market. By using the canonical object for the graph theory, i.e. the minimal spanning tree (MST) network, we observe: (i) the (initial) dynamical phase transition from equilibrium to non-equilibrium nucleation phase of the MST network, occurring at some critical time. Coalescence of edges on the FSE's transient leader (defined by its largest degree) is observed within the nucleation phase; (ii) subsequent acceleration of the process of nucleation and the emergence of the condensation phase (the second dynamical phase transition), forming a logarithmically diverging temporal λ-peak of the leader's degree at the second critical time; (iii) the third dynamical fragmentation phase transition (after passing the second critical time), where the λ-peak logarithmically relaxes over three quarters of the year, resulting in a few loosely connected sub-graphs. This λ-peak (comparable to that of the specific heat vs. temperature forming during the equilibrium continuous phase transition from the normal fluid I 4He to the superfluid II 4He) is considered as a prominent result of a non-equilibrium superstar-like superhub or a dragon-king's abrupt evolution over about two and a half year of market evolution. We capture and meticulously characterise a remarkable phenomenon in which a peripheral company becomes progressively promoted to become the dragon-king strongly dominating the complex network over an exceptionally long period of time containing the crash. Detailed analysis of the complete trio of the

  8. Solutions to Buoyancy-Drag Equation for Dynamical Evolution of Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov Mixing Zone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y.G. Cao; W.K. Chow; N.K. Fong

    2011-01-01

    With a self-similar parameter b(At) = Hi/λi, where At is the Atwood number, Hi and λi are the a.mplluae and wavelength of bubble (i = 1) and spike (i = 2) respectively, we derive analytically the solutions to the buoyancy-drag equation recently proposed for dynamical evolution of Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov mixing zone. Numerical solutions are obtained with a simple form ofb(At)--- 1/(1 + At) and comparisons with recent LEM (linear electric motor) experiments are made, and an agreement is found with properly chosen initial conditions.

  9. Nonlinear Dynamical Behavior in BS Evolution Model Based on Small-World Network Added with Nonlinear Preference

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ying-Yue; YANG Qiu-Ying; CHEN Tian-Lun

    2007-01-01

    We introduce a modified small-world network adding new links with nonlinearly preferential connection instead of adding randomly, then we apply Bak-Sneppen (BS) evolution model on this network. We study several important structural properties of our network such as the distribution of link-degree, the maximum link-degree, and the length of the shortest path. We further argue several dynamical characteristics of the model such as the important critical value fc, the f0 avalanche, and the mutating condition, and find that those characteristics show particular behaviors.

  10. Investigation of Vortex Structures in Gas-Discharge Nonneutral Electron Plasma: II. Vortex Formation, Evolution and Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Kervalishvili, N A

    2015-01-01

    The results of experimental investigations of inhomogeneities of gas-discharge nonneutral electron plasma obtained by using the nonperturbing experimental methods [N.A. Kervalishvili, arXiv:1502.02516 [physics.plasm-ph] (2015)] have been presented. Inhomogeneities are the dense solitary vortex structures stretched along the magnetic field, the lifetime of which is much greater than the time of electron-neutral collisions. The processes of formation, evolution and dynamics of vortex structures were studied. The periodic sequence of these processes is described for different geometries of discharge device.

  11. Dynamic mechanism and present situation of rural settlement evolution in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Guohua; HE Yanhua; TANG Chengli; YU Tao; XIAO Guozhen; ZHONG Ting

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides a detailed analysis of the factors influencing the evolution of rural settlements,including natural environmental constraints,infrastructure,regional cultural inheritance and integration,urbanization and rural industrial transformation,land use reformation and innovation,rural household behavior conversion,macro-control policy factors,and so on.Based on differences between the ways and degree of effect on rural settlement evolution,these factors are classified into basic factors,new-type factors and mutation factors.The drive of basic factors mainly focuses on the traditional inheritance of rural settlements,the new-type factors mainly affect rural settlement transition,and the mutation factors may bring about sudden changes.All these factors constitute a "three-wheel" driving mechanism for the evolution of rural settlements,and shape three typical driver paths:slow smooth path under the basic factors,new path to rapid development under the new-type factors,and the sudden change path under the mutation factors.The paper also investigates the overall situation of rural settlement evolution in the aspects of settlement system,settlement scale,settlement morphology,settlement function,settlement culture,settlement environment,etc.The general process of rural settlement evolution is divided into four stages:initial,transitional,developmental,and mature stages.

  12. Evolution of the global internal dynamics of a living cell nucleus during interphase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suissa, M; Place, C; Goillot, E; Freyssingeas, E

    2009-07-22

    Progress in cellular biology based on fluorescent microscopy techniques, shows that the spatial organization of the nucleus is dynamic. This dynamic is very complex and involves a multitude of phenomena that occur on very different time and size scales. Using an original light scattering experimental device, we investigated the global internal dynamics of the nucleus of a living cell according to the phases of the cell cycle. This dynamic presents two different and independent kinds of relaxation that are well separated in time and specific to the phase of the cell cycle.

  13. Urban DNA for cities evolutions. Cities as physical expression of dynamic equilibriums between competitive and cooperative forces

    CERN Document Server

    D'Acci, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Cities are physical manifestations of our competitive and cooperative behaviours. The tension between these two forces generates dynamic equilibriums whose material expressions are cities and their evolutions. In a Darwinian cooperative view, as Darwinism does not involve only competition, the public benefit obtained by cooperation, return in terms of private benefit too. An urban genetic code is proposed, according to which cities emerge connecting nature and urbanity, and as sum of multiuse, independent micro-areas, each one with its centrality, job locations, parks and daily shops-services and amenities. This mechanism, called Isobenefit Urbanism, is not static and pre-designed, but allows infinitely dynamic changes and expansions. Rather than describing The ideal city, which doesn't exist outside our own minds, Isobenefit Urbanism describes what a city should avoid to be in order to not become an unideal city. Its six principles are the urban DNA which does not give predetermined forms but indications to ...

  14. Evolution and Biogeography of Haemonchus contortus: Linking Faunal Dynamics in Space and Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoberg, E P; Zarlenga, D S

    2016-01-01

    History is the foundation that informs about the nuances of faunal assembly that are essential in understanding the dynamic nature of the host-parasite interface. All of our knowledge begins and ends with evolution, ecology and biogeography, as these interacting facets determine the history of biodiverse systems. These components, relating to Haemonchus, can inform about the complex history of geographical distribution, host association and the intricacies of host-parasite associations that are played out in physiological and behavioural processes that influence the potential for disease and our capacity for effective control in a rapidly changing world. Origins and evolutionary diversification among species of the genus Haemonchus and Haemonchus contortus occurred in a complex crucible defined by shifts in environmental structure emerging from cycles of climate change and ecological perturbation during the late Tertiary and through the Quaternary. A history of sequential host colonization associated with waves of dispersal bringing assemblages of ungulates from Eurasia into Africa and processes emerging from ecosystems in collision and faunal turnover defined the arena for radiation among 12 recognized species of Haemonchus. Among congeners, the host range for H. contortus is exceptionally broad, including species among artiodactyls of 40 genera representing 5 families (and within 12 tribes of Bovidae). Broad host range is dramatically reflected in the degree to which translocation, introduction and invasion with host switching, has characterized an expanding distribution over time in North America, South America, southern Eurasia, Australia and New Zealand, coincidental with agriculture, husbandry and global colonization by human populations driven particularly by European exploration after the 1500s. African origins in xeric to mesic habitats of the African savannah suggest that historical constraints linked to ecological adaptations (tolerances and

  15. Spatiotemporal Dynamic Simulation of Acute Perfusion/Diffusion Ischemic Stroke Lesions Evolution: A Pilot Study Derived from Longitudinal MR Patient Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Islem Rekik

    2013-01-01

    widely used but may underestimate the true lesion spatio-temporal dynamics. Currently there is no spatio-temporal 4D dynamic model that simulates the continuous evolution of ischemic stroke from MR images. We determined whether a 4D current-based diffeomorphic model, developed in the field of statistical modeling for measuring the variability of anatomical surfaces, could estimate patient-specific spatio-temporal continuous evolution for MR PWI (measured as mean transit time, (MTT and DWI lesions. In our representative pilot sample, the model fitted the data well. Our dynamic analysis of lesion evolution showed different patterns; for example, some DWI/PWI dynamic changes corresponded with DWI lesion expansion into PWI lesions, but other patterns were much more complex and diverse. There was wide variation in the time when the final tissue damage was reached after stroke for DWI and MTT.

  16. Evolution of Word-updating Dynamical Systems (WDS) on Directed Graphs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Jie

    2009-01-01

    This paper continues the research on theoretical foundations for computer simulation. We introduce the concept of word-updating dynamical systems (WDS) on directed graphs, which is a kind of generalization of sequential dynamical systems (SDS) on graphs. Some properties on WDS, especially some results on NOR -WDS,which are different from that on NOR -SDS, are obtained.

  17. Towards understanding the dynamical evolution of asteroid 25143 Itokawa: constraints from sample analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Connolly Jr, Harold C; Lauretta, Dante S; Walsh, Kevin J; Tachibana, Shogo; Bottke Jr, William F

    2015-01-01

    ..., and the dynamical history of the asteroid from the main belt to near-Earth space. We synthesize existing data to pose hypotheses to be tested by dynamical modeling and the analyses of future samples returned by Hayabusa 2 and OSIRIS-REx...

  18. Control quantum evolution speed of a single dephasing qubit for arbitrary initial states via periodic dynamical decoupling pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ya-Ju; Tan, Qing-Shou; Kuang, Le-Man

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the possibility to control quantum evolution speed of a single dephasing qubit for arbitrary initial states by the use of periodic dynamical decoupling (PDD) pulses. It is indicated that the quantum speed limit time (QSLT) is determined by initial and final quantum coherence of the qubit, as well as the non-Markovianity of the system under consideration during the evolution when the qubit is subjected to a zero-temperature Ohmic-like dephasing reservoir. It is shown that final quantum coherence of the qubit and the non-Markovianity of the system can be modulated by PDD pulses. Our results show that for arbitrary initial states of the dephasing qubit with non-vanishing quantum coherence, PDD pulses can be used to induce potential acceleration of the quantum evolution in the short-time regime, while PDD pulses can lead to potential speedup and slow down in the long-time regime. We demonstrate that the effect of PDD on the QSLT for the Ohmic or sub-Ohmic spectrum (Markovian reservoir) is much different from that for the super-Ohmic spectrum (non-Markovian reservoir). PMID:28272546

  19. Control quantum evolution speed of a single dephasing qubit for arbitrary initial states via periodic dynamical decoupling pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ya-Ju; Tan, Qing-Shou; Kuang, Le-Man

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the possibility to control quantum evolution speed of a single dephasing qubit for arbitrary initial states by the use of periodic dynamical decoupling (PDD) pulses. It is indicated that the quantum speed limit time (QSLT) is determined by initial and final quantum coherence of the qubit, as well as the non-Markovianity of the system under consideration during the evolution when the qubit is subjected to a zero-temperature Ohmic-like dephasing reservoir. It is shown that final quantum coherence of the qubit and the non-Markovianity of the system can be modulated by PDD pulses. Our results show that for arbitrary initial states of the dephasing qubit with non-vanishing quantum coherence, PDD pulses can be used to induce potential acceleration of the quantum evolution in the short-time regime, while PDD pulses can lead to potential speedup and slow down in the long-time regime. We demonstrate that the effect of PDD on the QSLT for the Ohmic or sub-Ohmic spectrum (Markovian reservoir) is much different from that for the super-Ohmic spectrum (non-Markovian reservoir).

  20. Orbital Dynamics, Environmental Heterogeneity, and the Evolution of the Human Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, Matt

    2012-01-01

    Many explanations have been proposed for the evolution of our anomalously large brains, including social, ecological, and epiphenomenal hypotheses. Recently, an additional hypothesis has emerged, suggesting that advanced cognition and, by inference, increases in brain size, have been driven over evolutionary time by the need to deal with…

  1. Orbital Dynamics, Environmental Heterogeneity, and the Evolution of the Human Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, Matt

    2012-01-01

    Many explanations have been proposed for the evolution of our anomalously large brains, including social, ecological, and epiphenomenal hypotheses. Recently, an additional hypothesis has emerged, suggesting that advanced cognition and, by inference, increases in brain size, have been driven over evolutionary time by the need to deal with…

  2. Promoting the Sustainable Building Market: an Evolution Analysis and System Dynamics Simulation on Behaviors of Real Estate Developers and Government

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuli Xie

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The Chinese government takes measures to promote the development of green building (GB. But until 2013, there are only few green buildings in China. The real estate developers are skeptical in entering GB market, which requires theories to explain developers and government’s behaviors.Design/methodology/approach: In this study, we attempt Evolutionary game theory and System dynamics (SD into the analysis. A system dynamics model is built for studying evolutionary games between the government and developers in greening building decision making.Findings and Originality/value: The results of mixed-strategy stability analysis and SD simulation show that evolutionary equilibrium does not exist with a static government incentive. Therefore, a dynamical incentive is suggested in the SD model for promoting the green building market. The symmetric game and asymmetric game between two developers show, if the primary proportion who choose GB strategy is lower, all the group in game may finally evolve to GB strategy. In this case and in this time, the government should take measures to encourage developers to enter into the GB market. If the proportion who choose GB strategy is high enough, the government should gradually cancel or reduce those incentive measure.Research limitations/implications: an Evolution Analysis and System Dynamics Simulation on Behaviors of Real Estate Developers and Government could give some advice for the government to promote the green building market.

  3. Supporting the analysis of ontology evolution processes through the combination of static and dynamic scaling functions in OQuaRE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duque-Ramos, Astrid; Quesada-Martínez, Manuel; Iniesta-Moreno, Miguela; Fernández-Breis, Jesualdo Tomás; Stevens, Robert

    2016-10-17

    The biomedical community has now developed a significant number of ontologies. The curation of biomedical ontologies is a complex task and biomedical ontologies evolve rapidly, so new versions are regularly and frequently published in ontology repositories. This has the implication of there being a high number of ontology versions over a short time span. Given this level of activity, ontology designers need to be supported in the effective management of the evolution of biomedical ontologies as the different changes may affect the engineering and quality of the ontology. This is why there is a need for methods that contribute to the analysis of the effects of changes and evolution of ontologies. In this paper we approach this issue from the ontology quality perspective. In previous work we have developed an ontology evaluation framework based on quantitative metrics, called OQuaRE. Here, OQuaRE is used as a core component in a method that enables the analysis of the different versions of biomedical ontologies using the quality dimensions included in OQuaRE. Moreover, we describe and use two scales for evaluating the changes between the versions of a given ontology. The first one is the static scale used in OQuaRE and the second one is a new, dynamic scale, based on the observed values of the quality metrics of a corpus defined by all the versions of a given ontology (life-cycle). In this work we explain how OQuaRE can be adapted for understanding the evolution of ontologies. Its use has been illustrated with the ontology of bioinformatics operations, types of data, formats, and topics (EDAM). The two scales included in OQuaRE provide complementary information about the evolution of the ontologies. The application of the static scale, which is the original OQuaRE scale, to the versions of the EDAM ontology reveals a design based on good ontological engineering principles. The application of the dynamic scale has enabled a more detailed analysis of the evolution of

  4. Using Dynamic Multi-Task Non-Negative Matrix Factorization to Detect the Evolution of User Preferences in Collaborative Filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Bin; Qian, Yuntao; Ye, Minchao; Ni, Rong; Zhu, Chenxi

    2015-01-01

    Predicting what items will be selected by a target user in the future is an important function for recommendation systems. Matrix factorization techniques have been shown to achieve good performance on temporal rating-type data, but little is known about temporal item selection data. In this paper, we developed a unified model that combines Multi-task Non-negative Matrix Factorization and Linear Dynamical Systems to capture the evolution of user preferences. Specifically, user and item features are projected into latent factor space by factoring co-occurrence matrices into a common basis item-factor matrix and multiple factor-user matrices. Moreover, we represented both within and between relationships of multiple factor-user matrices using a state transition matrix to capture the changes in user preferences over time. The experiments show that our proposed algorithm outperforms the other algorithms on two real datasets, which were extracted from Netflix movies and Last.fm music. Furthermore, our model provides a novel dynamic topic model for tracking the evolution of the behavior of a user over time.

  5. Timeline: A Dynamic Hierarchical Dirichlet Process Model for Recovering Birth/Death and Evolution of Topics in Text Stream

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmed, Amr

    2012-01-01

    Topic models have proven to be a useful tool for discovering latent structures in document collections. However, most document collec- tions often come as temporal streams and thus several aspects of the latent structure such as the number of topics, the topics' dis- tribution and popularity are time-evolving. Several models exist that model the evolu- tion of some but not all of the above as- pects. In this paper we introduce infinite dynamic topic models, iDTM, that can ac- commodate the evolution of all the aforemen- tioned aspects. Our model assumes that doc- uments are organized into epochs, where the documents within each epoch are exchange- able but the order between the documents is maintained across epochs. iDTM allows for unbounded number of topics: topics can die or be born at any epoch, and the repre- sentation of each topic can evolve according to a Markovian dynamics. We use iDTM to analyze the birth and evolution of topics in the NIPS community and evaluated the effi- cacy of our model on both ...

  6. Using Dynamic Multi-Task Non-Negative Matrix Factorization to Detect the Evolution of User Preferences in Collaborative Filtering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Ju

    Full Text Available Predicting what items will be selected by a target user in the future is an important function for recommendation systems. Matrix factorization techniques have been shown to achieve good performance on temporal rating-type data, but little is known about temporal item selection data. In this paper, we developed a unified model that combines Multi-task Non-negative Matrix Factorization and Linear Dynamical Systems to capture the evolution of user preferences. Specifically, user and item features are projected into latent factor space by factoring co-occurrence matrices into a common basis item-factor matrix and multiple factor-user matrices. Moreover, we represented both within and between relationships of multiple factor-user matrices using a state transition matrix to capture the changes in user preferences over time. The experiments show that our proposed algorithm outperforms the other algorithms on two real datasets, which were extracted from Netflix movies and Last.fm music. Furthermore, our model provides a novel dynamic topic model for tracking the evolution of the behavior of a user over time.

  7. Evolutionary dynamics of triosephosphate isomerase gene intron location pattern in Metazoa: A new perspective on intron evolution in animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bing; Shao, Jingru; Zhuang, Huifu; Wen, Jianfan

    2017-02-20

    Intron evolution, including its dynamics in the evolutionary transitions and diversification of eukaryotes, remains elusive. Inadequate taxon sampling due to data shortage, unclear phylogenetic framework, and inappropriate outgroup application might be among the causes. Besides, the integrity of all the introns within a gene was often neglected previously. Taking advantage of the ancient conserved triosephosphate isomerase gene (tim), the relatively robust phylogeny of Metazoa, and choanoflagellates as outgroup, the evolutionary dynamics of tim intron location pattern (ILP) in Metazoa was investigated. From 133 representative species of ten phyla, 30 types of ILPs were identified. A most common one, which harbors the maximum six intron positions, is deduced to be the common ancestral tim ILP of Metazoa, which almost had formed in their protozoan ancestor and was surprisingly retained and passed down till to each ancestors of metazoan phyla. In the subsequent animal diversification, it underwent different evolutionary trajectories: within Deuterostomia, it was almost completely retained only with changes in a few species with relatively recently fast-evolving histories, while within the rapidly radiating Protostomia, besides few but remarkable retention, it usually displayed extensive intron losses and a few gains. Therefore, a common ancestral exon-intron arrangement pattern of an animal gene is definitely discovered; besides the 'intron-rich view' of early animal genes being confirmed, the novel insight that high exon-intron re-arrangements of genes seem to be associated with the relatively recently rapid evolution of lineages/species/genomes but have no correlation with the ancient major evolutionary transitions in animal evolution, is revealed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The genome of the obligate intracellular parasite Trachipleistophora hominis: new insights into microsporidian genome dynamics and reductive evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, Eva; Williams, Tom A; Nakjang, Sirintra; Noël, Christophe J; Swan, Daniel C; Goldberg, Alina V; Harris, Simon R; Weinmaier, Thomas; Markert, Stephanie; Becher, Dörte; Bernhardt, Jörg; Dagan, Tal; Hacker, Christian; Lucocq, John M; Schweder, Thomas; Rattei, Thomas; Hall, Neil; Hirt, Robert P; Embley, T Martin

    2012-01-01

    The dynamics of reductive genome evolution for eukaryotes living inside other eukaryotic cells are poorly understood compared to well-studied model systems involving obligate intracellular bacteria. Here we present 8.5 Mb of sequence from the genome of the microsporidian Trachipleistophora hominis, isolated from an HIV/AIDS patient, which is an outgroup to the smaller compacted-genome species that primarily inform ideas of evolutionary mode for these enormously successful obligate intracellular parasites. Our data provide detailed information on the gene content, genome architecture and intergenic regions of a larger microsporidian genome, while comparative analyses allowed us to infer genomic features and metabolism of the common ancestor of the species investigated. Gene length reduction and massive loss of metabolic capacity in the common ancestor was accompanied by the evolution of novel microsporidian-specific protein families, whose conservation among microsporidians, against a background of reductive evolution, suggests they may have important functions in their parasitic lifestyle. The ancestor had already lost many metabolic pathways but retained glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway to provide cytosolic ATP and reduced coenzymes, and it had a minimal mitochondrion (mitosome) making Fe-S clusters but not ATP. It possessed bacterial-like nucleotide transport proteins as a key innovation for stealing host-generated ATP, the machinery for RNAi, key elements of the early secretory pathway, canonical eukaryotic as well as microsporidian-specific regulatory elements, a diversity of repetitive and transposable elements, and relatively low average gene density. Microsporidian genome evolution thus appears to have proceeded in at least two major steps: an ancestral remodelling of the proteome upon transition to intracellular parasitism that involved reduction but also selective expansion, followed by a secondary compaction of genome architecture in some, but

  9. Compensatory mechanisms underlie intact task-switching performance in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamadar, S; Michie, P; Karayanidis, F

    2010-04-01

    Individuals with schizophrenia tend to perform poorly on many measures of cognitive control. However, recent task-switching studies suggest that they show intact task-switching performance, despite the fact that the regions involved in task-switching are known to be structurally and functionally impaired in the disorder. Behavioral, event-related potential (ERP) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) measures were used to compare the temporal and spatial dynamics of task-switching performance in individuals with schizophrenia and controls. Consistent with previous studies, reaction time (RT) switch cost and its reduction with anticipatory preparation did not differ between groups. There were also no group differences on cue-locked ERP components associated with anticipatory preparation processes. However, both stimulus- and response-locked ERPs were significantly disrupted in schizophrenia, suggesting difficulty with task-set implementation. fMRI analyses indicated that individuals with schizophrenia showed hyperactivity in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and posterior parietal cortex. RT-fMRI and ERP-fMRI associations suggested that individuals with schizophrenia employ compensatory mechanisms to overcome difficulties in task-set implementation and thereby achieve the same behavioral outcomes as controls.

  10. Approach to nonadiabatic transitions by density matrix evolution and molecular dynamics simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berendsen, H.J.C.; Mavri, J.

    1996-01-01

    Many biological processes are characterized by an essentially quantum dynamical event, such as electron or proton transfer, in a complex classical environment. To treat such processes properly by computer simulation, allowing nonadiabatic transitions involving excited states, we recently developed a

  11. Global dynamic evolution of the cold plasma inferred with neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhelavskaya, Irina; Shprits, Yuri; Spasojevic, Maria

    2017-04-01

    The electron number density is a fundamental parameter of plasmas and is critical for the wave-particle interactions. Despite its global importance, the distribution of cold plasma and its dynamic dependence on solar wind conditions remains poorly quantified. Existing empirical models present statistical averages based on static geomagnetic parameters, but cannot reflect the dynamics of the highly structured and quickly varying plasmasphere environment, especially during times of high geomagnetic activity. Global imaging provides insights on the dynamics but quantitative inversion to electron number density has been lacking. We propose an empirical model for reconstruction of global dynamics of the cold plasma density distribution based only on solar wind data and geomagnetic indices. We develop a neural network that is capable of globally reconstructing the dynamics of the cold plasma density distribution for L shells from 2 to 6 and all local times. We utilize the density database obtained using the NURD algorithm [Zhelavskaya et al., 2016] in conjunction with solar wind data and geomagnetic indices to train the neural network. This study demonstrates how the global dynamics can be reconstructed from local in-situ observations by using machine learning tools. We describe aspects of the validation process in detail and discuss the selected inputs to the model and their physical implication.

  12. Molecular anions in circumstellar envelopes, interstellar clouds and planetary atmospheres: quantum dynamics of formation and evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Carelli, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    For decades astronomers and astrophysicists believed that only positively charged ions were worthy of relevance in drawing the networks for possible chemical reactions in the interstellar medium, as well as in modeling the physical conditions in most of astrophysical environments. Thus, molecular negative ions received minor attention until their possible existence was observationally confirmed (discovery of the first interstellar anion, C6H-), about thirty years after the first physically reasonable proposal on their actual detection was theoretically surmised by E.Herbst. In an astrophysical context, their role should be then found in their involvement in the charge balance as well as in the chemical evolution of the considered environment: depending on their amount and on the global gas density, in fact, the possible evolutive scenario could be susceptible of marked variations on the estimated time needed for reaching the steady state, their presence having thus also important repercussions on the final ch...

  13. Texture evolution in thin-sheets on AISI 301 metastable stainless steel under dynamic loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, K.Y. [Posco Steels, Pohan, South Korea (Korea, Republic of); Kozaczek, K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kulkarni, S.M. [TRW Vehicle Safety Systems, Mesa, AZ (United States); Bastias, P.C.; Hahn, G.T. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States)

    1995-05-08

    The evolution of texture in thin sheets of metastable austenitic stainless steel AISI 301 is affected by external conditions such as loading rate and temperature, by inhomogeneous deformation phenomena such as twinning and shear band formation, and by the concurent strain induced phase transformation of the retained austenitc ({gamma}) into martensite ({alpha}). The present paper describes texture measurements on different gauges of AISI 301 prior and after uniaxial stretching under different conditions.

  14. The Structure, Evolution, and Dynamics of Coastally Trapped Phenomena of Western North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    mesoscale model, version 5 (MM5).. Two papers are now near completion. 5. The PI and students have examined several gap flow situations in the Strait of...mountains during COAST IOP5 and the structural and evolution of gap flows in coastal terrain. To illustrate, the figure below shows a series of horizontal...cuts at increasing altitude across the Strait of Juan de Fuca during an easterly jet event. The shallow nature of the gap flow is apparent, as is its

  15. Nonlinear dynamic evolution and control in CCFN with mixed attachment mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianrong; Wang, Jianping; Han, Dun

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, wireless communication plays an important role in our lives. Cooperative communication, is used by a mobile station with single antenna to share with each other forming a virtual MIMO antenna system, will become a development with a diversity gain for wireless communication in tendency future. In this paper, a fitness model of evolution network based on complex networks with mixed attachment mechanisms is devised in order to study an actual network-CCFN (cooperative communication fitness network). Firstly, the evolution of CCFN is given by four cases with different probabilities, and the rate equations of nodes degree are presented to analyze the evolution of CCFN. Secondly, the degree distribution is analyzed by calculating the rate equation and numerical simulation with the examples of four fitness distributions such as power law, uniform fitness distribution, exponential fitness distribution and Rayleigh fitness distribution. Finally, the robustness of CCFN is studied by numerical simulation with four fitness distributions under random attack and intentional attack to analyze the effects of degree distribution, average path length and average degree. The results of this paper offers insights for building CCFN systems in order to program communication resources.

  16. The role of binaries in the dynamical evolution of the core of a globular cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Hut, P

    1996-01-01

    The size of the core is one of the main diagnostics of the evolutionary state of a globular cluster. Much has been learned over the last few years about the behavior of the core radius during and after core collapse, under a variety of different conditions related to the presence or absence of large numbers of binaries. An overview is presented of the basic physical principles that can be used to estimate the core radius. Four different situations are discussed, and expressions are presented for the ratio r_c/r_h of core radius to half mass radius. The regimes are: deep collapse in the absence of primordial binaries; steady post-collapse evolution after primordial binaries have been burned up; chaotic post-collapse evolution under the same conditions; and post-collapse evolution in the presence of primordial binaries. In addition, modifications to all of these cases are indicated for the more realistic situation where effects of the galactic tidal field are taken into account.

  17. Common evolutionary trends underlie the four-bar linkage systems of sunfish and mantis shrimp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yinan; Nelson-Maney, Nathan; Anderson, Philip S L

    2017-05-01

    Comparative biomechanics offers an opportunity to explore the evolution of disparate biological systems that share common underlying mechanics. Four-bar linkage modeling has been applied to various biological systems such as fish jaws and crustacean appendages to explore the relationship between biomechanics and evolutionary diversification. Mechanical sensitivity states that the functional output of a mechanical system will show differential sensitivity to changes in specific morphological components. We document similar patterns of mechanical sensitivity in two disparate four-bar systems from different phyla: the opercular four-bar system in centrarchid fishes and the raptorial appendage of stomatopods. We built dynamic linkage models of 19 centrarchid and 36 stomatopod species and used phylogenetic generalized least squares regression (PGLS) to compare evolutionary shifts in linkage morphology and mechanical outputs derived from the models. In both systems, the kinematics of the four-bar mechanism show significant evolutionary correlation with the output link, while travel distance of the output arm is correlated with the coupler link. This common evolutionary pattern seen in both fish and crustacean taxa is a potential consequence of the mechanical principles underlying four-bar systems. Our results illustrate the potential influence of physical principles on morphological evolution across biological systems with different structures, behaviors, and ecologies. © 2017 The Author(s). Evolution © 2017 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  18. A membrane computing simulator of trans-hierarchical antibiotic resistance evolution dynamics in nested ecological compartments (ARES).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Marcelino; Llorens, Carlos; Sempere, José M; Futami, Ricardo; Rodriguez, Irene; Carrasco, Purificación; Capilla, Rafael; Latorre, Amparo; Coque, Teresa M; Moya, Andres; Baquero, Fernando

    2015-08-05

    Antibiotic resistance is a major biomedical problem upon which public health systems demand solutions to construe the dynamics and epidemiological risk of resistant bacteria in anthropogenically-altered environments. The implementation of computable models with reciprocity within and between levels of biological organization (i.e. essential nesting) is central for studying antibiotic resistances. Antibiotic resistance is not just the result of antibiotic-driven selection but more properly the consequence of a complex hierarchy of processes shaping the ecology and evolution of the distinct subcellular, cellular and supra-cellular vehicles involved in the dissemination of resistance genes. Such a complex background motivated us to explore the P-system standards of membrane computing an innovative natural computing formalism that abstracts the notion of movement across membranes to simulate antibiotic resistance evolution processes across nested levels of micro- and macro-environmental organization in a given ecosystem. In this article, we introduce ARES (Antibiotic Resistance Evolution Simulator) a software device that simulates P-system model scenarios with five types of nested computing membranes oriented to emulate a hierarchy of eco-biological compartments, i.e. a) peripheral ecosystem; b) local environment; c) reservoir of supplies; d) animal host; and e) host's associated bacterial organisms (microbiome). Computational objects emulating molecular entities such as plasmids, antibiotic resistance genes, antimicrobials, and/or other substances can be introduced into this framework and may interact and evolve together with the membranes, according to a set of pre-established rules and specifications. ARES has been implemented as an online server and offers additional tools for storage and model editing and downstream analysis. The stochastic nature of the P-system model implemented in ARES explicitly links within and between host dynamics into a simulation, with

  19. A nonlinear control scheme based on dynamic evolution path theory for improved dynamic performance of boost PFC converter working on nonlinear features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Pratap Ranjan; Panda, Anup Kumar

    2016-11-01

    This paper is concerned to performance improvement of boost PFC converter under large random load fluctuation, ensuring unity power factor (UPF) at source end and regulated voltage at load side. To obtain such performance, a nonlinear controller based on dynamic evolution path theory is designed and its robustness is examined under both heavy and light loading condition. In this paper, %THD and zero-cross-over dead-zone of input current is significantly reduced. Also, very less response time of input current and output voltage to that of load and reference variation is remarked. A simulation model of proposed system is designed and it is realized using dSPACE 1104 signal processor for a 390VDC, 500W prototype. The relevant experimental and simulation waveforms are presented.

  20. Principles of Virus-Microbe Dynamics: From Ecology to Evolution and Back Again

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitz, Joshua

    Viruses are ubiquitous in the environment and can function like microbial predators, regulating the density and diversity of microbes present in a community. However, efforts to understand the dynamics of complex virus-microbe communities remain in their infancy. In this talk, I present examples of the interplay between evolutionary and ecological dynamics arising due to virus-microbe interactions. I begin by introducing canonical models of virus-microbe population dynamics in the context of observed oscillations of E. coli and associated phage. I then present a series of examples in which novel features observed in time series data arising from phage interactions with E. coli and V. cholerae can be understood when considering both population and evolutionary dynamics together. I conclude by presenting our recent efforts to extend the results of laboratory experiments to an environmental context, with significantly higher diversity of both viruses and microbes. Despite this increase in diversity, I show how network theoretic methods can reveal common principles underlying the dynamic coexistence of complex virus and host communities. Building on these findings, I describe new efforts to infer who infects whom directly from time series of multi-strain communities.

  1. Proposed scaling law for intensity evolution in hadron storage rings based on dynamic aperture variation with time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Giovannozzi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A scaling law for the time dependence of the dynamic aperture, i.e., the region of phase space where stable motion occurs, has been proposed in previous papers [M. Giovannozzi, W. Scandale, E. Todescoand , Part. Accel. 56, 195 (1996PLACBD0031-2460; M. Giovannozzi, W. Scandale, and E. Todesco, in Proceedings of the 1997 Particle Accelerator Conference, edited by M. Comyn, M. K. Craddock, M. Reiser, and J. Thomson (IEEE Service Center, Piscataway, NJ, 1997, p. 1445; M. Giovannozzi, W. Scandale, and E. Todesco, Phys. Rev. E 57, 3432 (1998PLEEE81063-651X10.1103/PhysRevE.57.3432]. This law, based on the analysis of numerical simulations data, is not entirely phenomenological, but motivated by some fundamental theorems of the theory of dynamical systems and indicates that the dynamic aperture has a logarithmic dependence on time. This result is used in turn as a basis for deriving a scaling law for the intensity evolution in hadron storage rings. This relationship is presented and discussed in detail in this paper. Furthermore, experimental data were compared to the predictions of this law and showed a remarkable agreement.

  2. Dynamical evolution and spin-orbit resonances of potentially habitable exoplanets. The case of GJ 667C

    CERN Document Server

    Makarov, Valeri V

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the dynamical evolution of the potentially habitable super-earth GJ 667Cc in the multiple system of at least two exoplanets orbiting a nearby M dwarf, paying special attention to its spin-orbital state. The published radial velocities for this star are re-analyzed and evidence is found for additional periodic signals, which could be taken for two additional planets on eccentric orbits. Such systems are not dynamically viable and break up quickly in numerical integrations. Limiting the scope to the two originally detected planets, we assess the dynamical stability of the system and find no evidence for bounded chaos in the orbital motion. The orbital eccentricity of the planets b and c is found to change cyclicly in the range 0.06 - 0.28 and 0.05 - 0.25, respectively, with a period of approximately 0.46 yr. Taking the eccentricity variation into account, numerical integrations are performed of the differential equations modeling the spin-orbit interaction of the planet GJ 667Cc with its host sta...

  3. Dynamic Model of Centrifugal Compressor for Prediction of Surge Evolution and Performance Variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Mooncheong; Han, Jaeyoung; Yu, Sangseok [Chungnam National Univ., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    When a control algorithm is developed to protect automotive compressor surges, the simulation model typically selects an empirically determined look-up table. However, it is difficult for a control oriented empirical model to show surge characteristics of the super charger. In this study, a dynamic supercharger model is developed to predict the performance of a centrifugal compressor under dynamic load follow-up. The model is developed using Simulink® environment, and is composed of a compressor, throttle body, valves, and chamber. Greitzer’s compressor model is used, and the geometric parameters are achieved by the actual supercharger. The simulation model is validated with experimental data. It is shown that compressor surge is effectively predicted by this dynamic compressor model under various operating conditions.

  4. Research on microstructural evolution and dynamic recrystallization behavior of JB800 bainitic steel by FEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qingjun Chen; Yonglin Kang; Hao Yu; Chunmei Wang; Chengxiang Li

    2008-01-01

    Single pass compression tests were conducted on Gleeble1500 thermal simulator. The effect of different deformation parameters on the grain size of dynamically recrystallized austenite was analyzed. A mathematical model of dynamic recrystallization and a material database of JB800 steel, whose tensile strength is above 800 Mpa, were set up. A subprogram was compiled using Fortran language and called by Marc finite element software. A thermal coupled elastoplastic finite element model was established to simulate the compression process. The grain size of recrystallized austenite obtained by different recrystailization models was simulated. The results show that the optimized dynamic recrystallization model of JBS00 bainitic steel has a higher precision and yields good agreement with metallographic observations.

  5. The role of gas dynamical friction in the evolution of embedded stellar clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Indulekha, K

    2013-01-01

    Two puzzles associated with open clusters have attracted a lot of attention -- their formation, with densities and velocity dispersions that are not too different from those of the star forming regions in the Galaxy, given that the observed Star Formation Efficiencies (SFE) are low and, the mass segregation observed / inferred in some of them, at ages significantly less than the dynamical relaxation times in them. Gas dynamical friction has been considered before as a mechanism for contracting embedded stellar clusters, by dissipating their energy. This would locally raise the SFE which might then allow bound clusters to form. Noticing that dynamical friction is inherently capable of producing mass segregation, since here, the dissipation rate is proportional to the mass of the body experiencing the force, we explore further, some of the details and implications of such a scenario, vis-a-vis observations. Making analytical approximations, we obtain a boundary value for the density of a star forming clump of g...

  6. a Statistical Dynamic Approach to Structural Evolution of Complex Capital Market Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Xiao; Chai, Li H.

    As an important part of modern financial systems, capital market has played a crucial role on diverse social resource allocations and economical exchanges. Beyond traditional models and/or theories based on neoclassical economics, considering capital markets as typical complex open systems, this paper attempts to develop a new approach to overcome some shortcomings of the available researches. By defining the generalized entropy of capital market systems, a theoretical model and nonlinear dynamic equation on the operations of capital market are proposed from statistical dynamic perspectives. The US security market from 1995 to 2001 is then simulated and analyzed as a typical case. Some instructive results are discussed and summarized.

  7. Dynamical evolution processes of traffic flow and travel cost in urban transportation networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Ren-Yong; Huang Hai-Jun

    2008-01-01

    Considering such a fact that travellers dynamically adjust their routes and the resultant link traffic flows in a network evolve over time,this paper proposes a dynamical evolutionary model of the traffic assignment problem with endogenous origin-destination (OD) demands.The model's stability is analysed and the resultant user equilibrium (UE) state is shown to be stable under certain conditions.Numerical results in a grid network indicate that the model can generate convergent flow patterns and finally terminates at the UE state.Impacts by the parameters associated with OD demand function and link cost function are also investigated.

  8. Evolution of robustness to noise and mutation in gene expression dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunihiko Kaneko

    Full Text Available Phenotype of biological systems needs to be robust against mutation in order to sustain themselves between generations. On the other hand, phenotype of an individual also needs to be robust against fluctuations of both internal and external origins that are encountered during growth and development. Is there a relationship between these two types of robustness, one during a single generation and the other during evolution? Could stochasticity in gene expression have any relevance to the evolution of these types of robustness? Robustness can be defined by the sharpness of the distribution of phenotype; the variance of phenotype distribution due to genetic variation gives a measure of 'genetic robustness', while that of isogenic individuals gives a measure of 'developmental robustness'. Through simulations of a simple stochastic gene expression network that undergoes mutation and selection, we show that in order for the network to acquire both types of robustness, the phenotypic variance induced by mutations must be smaller than that observed in an isogenic population. As the latter originates from noise in gene expression, this signifies that the genetic robustness evolves only when the noise strength in gene expression is larger than some threshold. In such a case, the two variances decrease throughout the evolutionary time course, indicating increase in robustness. The results reveal how noise that cells encounter during growth and development shapes networks' robustness to stochasticity in gene expression, which in turn shapes networks' robustness to mutation. The necessary condition for evolution of robustness, as well as the relationship between genetic and developmental robustness, is derived quantitatively through the variance of phenotypic fluctuations, which are directly measurable experimentally.

  9. Evolution of robustness to noise and mutation in gene expression dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2007-05-09

    Phenotype of biological systems needs to be robust against mutation in order to sustain themselves between generations. On the other hand, phenotype of an individual also needs to be robust against fluctuations of both internal and external origins that are encountered during growth and development. Is there a relationship between these two types of robustness, one during a single generation and the other during evolution? Could stochasticity in gene expression have any relevance to the evolution of these types of robustness? Robustness can be defined by the sharpness of the distribution of phenotype; the variance of phenotype distribution due to genetic variation gives a measure of 'genetic robustness', while that of isogenic individuals gives a measure of 'developmental robustness'. Through simulations of a simple stochastic gene expression network that undergoes mutation and selection, we show that in order for the network to acquire both types of robustness, the phenotypic variance induced by mutations must be smaller than that observed in an isogenic population. As the latter originates from noise in gene expression, this signifies that the genetic robustness evolves only when the noise strength in gene expression is larger than some threshold. In such a case, the two variances decrease throughout the evolutionary time course, indicating increase in robustness. The results reveal how noise that cells encounter during growth and development shapes networks' robustness to stochasticity in gene expression, which in turn shapes networks' robustness to mutation. The necessary condition for evolution of robustness, as well as the relationship between genetic and developmental robustness, is derived quantitatively through the variance of phenotypic fluctuations, which are directly measurable experimentally.

  10. Boltzmann, Lotka and Volterra and spatial structural evolution: an integrated methodology for some dynamical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Alan

    2008-08-01

    It is shown that Boltzmann's methods from statistical physics can be applied to a much wider range of systems, and in a variety of disciplines, than has been commonly recognized. A similar argument can be applied to the ecological models of Lotka and Volterra. Furthermore, it is shown that the two methodologies can be applied in combination to generate the Boltzmann, Lotka and Volterra (BLV) models. These techniques enable both spatial interaction and spatial structural evolution to be modelled, and it is argued that they potentially provide a much richer modelling methodology than that currently used in the analysis of 'scale-free' networks.

  11. Exact many-body dynamics with stochastic one-body density matrix evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacroix, D

    2004-05-01

    In this article, we discuss some properties of the exact treatment of the many-body problem with stochastic Schroedinger equation (SSE). Starting from the SSE theory, an equivalent reformulation is proposed in terms of quantum jumps in the density matrix space. The technical details of the derivation a stochastic version of the Liouville von Neumann equation are given. It is shown that the exact Many-Body problem could be replaced by an ensemble of one-body density evolution, where each density matrix evolves according to its own mean-field augmented by a one-body noise. (author)

  12. Existence and uniqueness of dynamic evolutions for a peeling test in dimension one

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Maso, Gianni; Lazzaroni, Giuliano; Nardini, Lorenzo

    2016-11-01

    In this paper we present a one-dimensional model of a dynamic peeling test for a thin film, where the wave equation is coupled with a Griffith criterion for the propagation of the debonding front. Our main results provide existence and uniqueness for the solution to this coupled problem under different assumptions on the data.

  13. Evolution and dynamics of shear-layer structures in near-wall turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Arne V.; Alfredsson, P. H.; Kim, John

    1991-01-01

    Near-wall flow structures in turbulent shear flows are analyzed, with particular emphasis on the study of their space-time evolution and connection to turbulence production. The results are obtained from investigation of a database generated from direct numerical simulation of turbulent channel flow at a Reynolds number of 180 based on half-channel width and friction velocity. New light is shed on problems associated with conditional sampling techniques, together with methods to improve these techniques, for use both in physical and numerical experiments. The results clearly indicate that earlier conceptual models of the processes associated with near-wall turbulence production, based on flow visualization and probe measurements need to be modified. For instance, the development of asymmetry in the spanwise direction seems to be an important element in the evolution of near-wall structures in general, and for shear layers in particular. The inhibition of spanwise motion of the near-wall streaky pattern may be the primary reason for the ability of small longitudinal riblets to reduce turbulent skin friction below the value for a flat surface.

  14. Enrichment of r-process elements in dwarf spheroidal galaxies in chemo-dynamical evolution model

    CERN Document Server

    Hirai, Yutaka; Saitoh, Takayuki R; Fujii, Michiko S; Hidaka, Jun; Kajino, Toshitaka

    2015-01-01

    The rapid neutron-capture process (r-process) is a major process to synthesize elements heavier than iron, but the astrophysical site(s) of r-process is not identified yet. Neutron star mergers (NSMs) are suggested to be a major r-process site from nucleosynthesis studies. Previous chemical evolution studies however require unlikely short merger time of NSMs to reproduce the observed large star-to-star scatters in the abundance ratios of r-process elements relative to iron, [Eu/Fe], of extremely metal-poor stars in the Milky Way (MW) halo. This problem can be solved by considering chemical evolution in dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) which would be building blocks of the MW and have lower star formation efficiencies than the MW halo. We demonstrate that enrichment of r-process elements in dSphs by NSMs using an N-body/smoothed particle hydrodynamics code. Our high-resolution model reproduces the observed [Eu/Fe] by NSMs with a merger time of 100 Myr when the effect of metal mixing is taken into account. Thi...

  15. Eco-Evolutionary Trophic Dynamics: Loss of Top Predators Drives Trophic Evolution and Ecology of Prey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palkovacs, Eric P.; Wasserman, Ben A.; Kinnison, Michael T.

    2011-01-01

    Ecosystems are being altered on a global scale by the extirpation of top predators. The ecological effects of predator removal have been investigated widely; however, predator removal can also change natural selection acting on prey, resulting in contemporary evolution. Here we tested the role of predator removal on the contemporary evolution of trophic traits in prey. We utilized a historical introduction experiment where Trinidadian guppies (Poecilia reticulata) were relocated from a site with predatory fishes to a site lacking predators. To assess the trophic consequences of predator release, we linked individual morphology (cranial, jaw, and body) to foraging performance. Our results show that predator release caused an increase in guppy density and a “sharpening” of guppy trophic traits, which enhanced food consumption rates. Predator release appears to have shifted natural selection away from predator escape ability and towards resource acquisition ability. Related diet and mesocosm studies suggest that this shift enhances the impact of guppies on lower trophic levels in a fashion nuanced by the omnivorous feeding ecology of the species. We conclude that extirpation of top predators may commonly select for enhanced feeding performance in prey, with important cascading consequences for communities and ecosystems. PMID:21526156

  16. Critical dynamics in the evolution of stochastic strategies for the iterated prisoner's dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliopoulos, Dimitris; Hintze, Arend; Adami, Christoph

    2010-10-07

    The observed cooperation on the level of genes, cells, tissues, and individuals has been the object of intense study by evolutionary biologists, mainly because cooperation often flourishes in biological systems in apparent contradiction to the selfish goal of survival inherent in Darwinian evolution. In order to resolve this paradox, evolutionary game theory has focused on the Prisoner's Dilemma (PD), which incorporates the essence of this conflict. Here, we encode strategies for the iterated Prisoner's Dilemma (IPD) in terms of conditional probabilities that represent the response of decision pathways given previous plays. We find that if these stochastic strategies are encoded as genes that undergo Darwinian evolution, the environmental conditions that the strategies are adapting to determine the fixed point of the evolutionary trajectory, which could be either cooperation or defection. A transition between cooperative and defective attractors occurs as a function of different parameters such as mutation rate, replacement rate, and memory, all of which affect a player's ability to predict an opponent's behavior. These results imply that in populations of players that can use previous decisions to plan future ones, cooperation depends critically on whether the players can rely on facing the same strategies that they have adapted to. Defection, on the other hand, is the optimal adaptive response in environments that change so quickly that the information gathered from previous plays cannot usefully be integrated for a response.

  17. Dynamics and early post-tsunami evolution of floating marine debris near Fukushima Daiichi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, John Philip; Ostrovsky, Lev; Yoshikawa, Yutaka; Komori, Satoru; Tamura, Hitoshi

    2017-08-01

    The devastating tsunami triggered by the Tōhoku-Oki earthquake of 11 March 2011 caused a crisis at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station where it overtopped the seawall defences. On retreating, the tsunami carried loose debris and wreckage seaward and marshalled buoyant material into extensive plumes. Widespread concern over the fate of these and numerous other Tōhoku tsunami depositions prompted attempts to simulate debris dispersion throughout the wider Pacific. However, the effects of locally perturbed wind and wave fields, active Langmuir circulation and current-induced attrition determine a complex and poorly understood morphology for large floating agglomerations. Here we show that the early post-tsunami evolution of marine-debris plumes near Fukushima Daiichi was also shaped by near-surface wind modifications that took place above relatively calm (lower surface roughness) waters covered by surface films derived from oil and other contaminants. High-spatial-resolution satellite tracking reveals faster-than-expected floating-debris motions and invigorated plume evolution within these regions, while numerical modelling of turbulent air flow over the low-drag, film-covered surface predicts typically metre-per-second wind strengthening at centimetric heights, sufficient to explain the observed debris-speed increases. Wind restructuring probably stimulates the dispersion of flotsam from both biological and anthropogenic sources throughout a global ocean of highly variable surface roughness.

  18. Self-Organization: Complex Dynamical Systems in the Evolution of Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudeyer, Pierre-Yves

    Human vocalization systems are characterized by complex structural properties. They are combinatorial, based on the systematic reuse of phonemes, and the set of repertoires in human languages is characterized by both strong statistical regularities—universals—and a great diversity. Besides, they are conventional codes culturally shared in each community of speakers. What are the origins of the forms of speech? What are the mechanisms that permitted their evolution in the course of phylogenesis and cultural evolution? How can a shared speech code be formed in a community of individuals? This chapter focuses on the way the concept of self-organization, and its interaction with natural selection, can throw light on these three questions. In particular, a computational model is presented which shows that a basic neural equipment for adaptive holistic vocal imitation, coupling directly motor and perceptual representations in the brain, can generate spontaneously shared combinatorial systems of vocalizations in a society of babbling individuals. Furthermore, we show how morphological and physiological innate constraints can interact with these self-organized mechanisms to account for both the formation of statistical regularities and diversity in vocalization systems.

  19. Critical dynamics in the evolution of stochastic strategies for the iterated prisoner's dilemma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitris Iliopoulos

    Full Text Available The observed cooperation on the level of genes, cells, tissues, and individuals has been the object of intense study by evolutionary biologists, mainly because cooperation often flourishes in biological systems in apparent contradiction to the selfish goal of survival inherent in Darwinian evolution. In order to resolve this paradox, evolutionary game theory has focused on the Prisoner's Dilemma (PD, which incorporates the essence of this conflict. Here, we encode strategies for the iterated Prisoner's Dilemma (IPD in terms of conditional probabilities that represent the response of decision pathways given previous plays. We find that if these stochastic strategies are encoded as genes that undergo Darwinian evolution, the environmental conditions that the strategies are adapting to determine the fixed point of the evolutionary trajectory, which could be either cooperation or defection. A transition between cooperative and defective attractors occurs as a function of different parameters such as mutation rate, replacement rate, and memory, all of which affect a player's ability to predict an opponent's behavior. These results imply that in populations of players that can use previous decisions to plan future ones, cooperation depends critically on whether the players can rely on facing the same strategies that they have adapted to. Defection, on the other hand, is the optimal adaptive response in environments that change so quickly that the information gathered from previous plays cannot usefully be integrated for a response.

  20. Evolution of desertification in a two-dimensional energy balance model coupled with thermodynamics and dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between desert evolution and change in albedo has been investigated quasi-analytically using a zonal mean two-dimensional energy balance model which considers the radiation transmission process due to thermodynamics and bound- ary layer movement caused by kinetics. A climate state including temperature, zonal wind, meridional wind and vertical wind can be simulated according to the current zonal distribution of albedo. Given desert distribution, characterized by the value and distribution of albedo, the response of climate on albedo has been studied to analyze the evolution of desert climate. One significant result is that the simple model can reproduce mean meridional circulation. Another result indicates that climate corresponds to two equilibria. This happens when the junction temperature between vegetation and desert is higher than a certain critical value. As for the first equilibrium, the desert belt is predicted to move southward in the northern hemisphere with the increasing values of albedo, which corresponds to the current trend of climate change. For the second equilibrium, vegetation will expand northward with increasing values of albedo, which would indicate a narrowing of the desert belt. In order to determine if the two equilibria exist, new physical models are needed.

  1. Dynamical Excision Boundaries in Spectral Evolutions of Binary Black Hole Spacetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Hemberger, Daniel A; Kidder, Lawrence E; Szilágyi, Béla; Teukolsky, Saul A

    2012-01-01

    Simulations of binary black holes systems using the Spectral Einstein Code (SpEC) are done on a computational domain that excises the regions surrounding the black holes. It is imperative that the excision boundaries are outflow boundaries with respect to the hyperbolic evolution equations used in the simulation. We employ a time-dependent mapping between the fixed computational frame and the inertial frame through which the black holes move. The time-dependent parameters of the mapping are adjusted throughout the simulation by a feedback control system in order to follow the motion of the black holes, to adjust the shape and size of the excision surfaces so that they remain outflow boundaries, and to prevent large distortions of the grid. We describe in detail the mappings and control systems that we use. We show how these techniques have been essential in the evolution of binary black hole systems with extreme configurations, such as large spin magnitudes and high mass ratios, especially during the merger, ...

  2. Eco-evolutionary trophic dynamics: loss of top predators drives trophic evolution and ecology of prey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric P Palkovacs

    Full Text Available Ecosystems are being altered on a global scale by the extirpation of top predators. The ecological effects of predator removal have been investigated widely; however, predator removal can also change natural selection acting on prey, resulting in contemporary evolution. Here we tested the role of predator removal on the contemporary evolution of trophic traits in prey. We utilized a historical introduction experiment where Trinidadian guppies (Poecilia reticulata were relocated from a site with predatory fishes to a site lacking predators. To assess the trophic consequences of predator release, we linked individual morphology (cranial, jaw, and body to foraging performance. Our results show that predator release caused an increase in guppy density and a "sharpening" of guppy trophic traits, which enhanced food consumption rates. Predator release appears to have shifted natural selection away from predator escape ability and towards resource acquisition ability. Related diet and mesocosm studies suggest that this shift enhances the impact of guppies on lower trophic levels in a fashion nuanced by the omnivorous feeding ecology of the species. We conclude that extirpation of top predators may commonly select for enhanced feeding performance in prey, with important cascading consequences for communities and ecosystems.

  3. Role of strongly modulated coherence in transient evolution dynamics of probe absorption in a three-level atomic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchadhyayee, Pradipta

    2013-11-01

    We investigate the dynamical behaviour of atomic response in a closed three-level V-type atomic system with the variation of different relevant parameters to exhibit transient evolution of absorption, gain and transparency in the probe response. The oscillations in probe absorption and gain can be efficiently modulated by changing the values of the Rabi frequency, detuning and the collective phase involved in the system. The interesting outcome of the work is the generation of coherence controlled loop-structure with varying amplitudes in the oscillatory probe response of the probe field at various parameter conditions. The prominence of these structures is observed when the coherence induced in a one-photon excitation path is strongly modified by two-step excitations driven by the coherent fields operating in closed interaction contour. In contrast to purely resonant case, the time interval between two successive loops gets significantly reduced with the application of non-zero detuning in the coherent fields.

  4. Equivalent construction of the infinitesimal time translation operator in algebraic dynamics algorithm for partial differential evolution equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    We give an equivalent construction of the infinitesimal time translation operator for partial differential evolution equation in the algebraic dynamics algorithm proposed by Shun-Jin Wang and his students. Our construction involves only simple partial differentials and avoids the derivative terms of δ function which appear in the course of computation by means of Wang-Zhang operator. We prove Wang’s equivalent theorem which says that our construction and Wang-Zhang’s are equivalent. We use our construction to deal with several typical equations such as nonlinear advection equation, Burgers equation, nonlinear Schrodinger equation, KdV equation and sine-Gordon equation, and obtain at least second order approximate solutions to them. These equations include the cases of real and complex field variables and the cases of the first and the second order time derivatives.

  5. THE DYNAMIC EVOLUTION OF ORAL HEALTH STATUS OF SCHOOLCHILDREN IN IASI UNDER THE IMPACT OF THE NATIONAL PREVENTION PROGRAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia BOBU

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In most of the developing countries, dental caries continues to represent a major issue of public health. In Romania, the National Program for Oral and Dental Diseases Prevention was implemented between 1999-2010, addressed to children attending primary school and consisting of weekly mouth rinses with 0.2% NaF solution. In the present study, the dynamic evolution of oral health status of schoolchildren aged 6-12 years in Iasi, under the impact of this Program, was analyzed. The results showed a decreasing trend in the prevalence and incidence of dental caries, a constant decrease of caries experience indices DMFT and DMFS and, within them, the increasing trend of fillings indicator FS and the decrease of deep lesions weight. The conclusion is that tooth decay has declined in schoolchildren in Iasi during the development of the National Prevention Program.

  6. Novel Control Vector Parameterization Method with Differential Evolution Algorithm and Its Application in Dynamic Optimization of Chemical Processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Fan; ZHONG Weimin; CHENG Hui; QIAN Feng

    2013-01-01

    Two general approaches are adopted in solving dynamic optimization problems in chemical processes,namely,the analytical and numerical methods.The numerical method,which is based on heuristic algorithms,has been widely used.An approach that combines differential evolution (DE) algorithm and control vector parameterization (CVP) is proposed in this paper.In the proposed CVP,control variables are approximated with polynomials based on state variables and time in the entire time interval.Region reduction strategy is used in DE to reduce the width of the search region,which improves the computing efficiency.The results of the case studies demonstrate the feasibility and efficiency of the proposed methods.

  7. Effects of Dynamical Evolution of Giant Planets on the Delivery of Atmophile Elements During Terrestrial Planet Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Matsumura, Soko; Ida, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    Recent observations started revealing the compositions of protostellar discs and planets beyond the Solar System. In this paper, we explore how the compositions of terrestrial planets are affected by dynamical evolution of giant planets. We estimate the initial compositions of building blocks of these rocky planets by using a simple condensation model, and numerically study the compositions of planets formed in a few different formation models of the Solar System. We find that the abundances of refractory and moderately volatile elements are nearly independent of formation models, and that all the models could reproduce the abundances of these elements of the Earth. The abundances of atmophile elements, on the other hand, depend on the scattering rate of icy planetesimals into the inner disc as well as the mixing rate of the inner planetesimal disc. For the classical formation model, neither of these mechanisms are efficient and the accretion of atmophile elements during the final assembly of terrestrial plan...

  8. Analytical investigation on the minimum traffic delay at a two-phase intersection considering the dynamical evolution process of queues

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Hong-Ze; Hu, Mao-Bin; Jia, Bin

    2016-01-01

    This paper has studied the minimum traffic delay at a two-phase intersection, taking into account the dynamical evolution process of queues. The feature of delay function has been studied, which indicates that the minimum traffic delay must be achieved when equality holds in at least one of the two constraints. We have derived the minimum delay as well as the corresponding traffic signal period, which shows that two situations are classified. Under certain circumstance, extra green time is needed for one phase while otherwise no extra green time should be assigned in both phases. Our work indicates that although the clearing policies were shown in many experiments to be optimal at isolated intersections, it is sometimes not the case.

  9. Equivalent construction of the infinitesimal time translation operator in algebraic dynamics algorithm for partial differential evolution equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chengshi

    2010-08-01

    We give an equivalent construction of the infinitesimal time translation operator for partial differential evolution equation in the algebraic dynamics algorithm proposed by Shun-Jin Wang and his students. Our construction involves only simple partial differentials and avoids the derivative terms of δ function which appear in the course of computation by means of Wang-Zhang operator. We prove Wang’s equivalent theorem which says that our construction and Wang-Zhang’s are equivalent. We use our construction to deal with several typical equations such as nonlinear advection equation, Burgers equation, nonlinear Schrodinger equation, KdV equation and sine-Gordon equation, and obtain at least second order approximate solutions to them. These equations include the cases of real and complex field variables and the cases of the first and the second order time derivatives.

  10. Adaptive grid based multi-objective Cauchy differential evolution for stochastic dynamic economic emission dispatch with wind power uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huifeng; Lei, Xiaohui; Wang, Chao; Yue, Dong; Xie, Xiangpeng

    2017-01-01

    Since wind power is integrated into the thermal power operation system, dynamic economic emission dispatch (DEED) has become a new challenge due to its uncertain characteristics. This paper proposes an adaptive grid based multi-objective Cauchy differential evolution (AGB-MOCDE) for solving stochastic DEED with wind power uncertainty. To properly deal with wind power uncertainty, some scenarios are generated to simulate those possible situations by dividing the uncertainty domain into different intervals, the probability of each interval can be calculated using the cumulative distribution function, and a stochastic DEED model can be formulated under different scenarios. For enhancing the optimization efficiency, Cauchy mutation operation is utilized to improve differential evolution by adjusting the population diversity during the population evolution process, and an adaptive grid is constructed for retaining diversity distribution of Pareto front. With consideration of large number of generated scenarios, the reduction mechanism is carried out to decrease the scenarios number with covariance relationships, which can greatly decrease the computational complexity. Moreover, the constraint-handling technique is also utilized to deal with the system load balance while considering transmission loss among thermal units and wind farms, all the constraint limits can be satisfied under the permitted accuracy. After the proposed method is simulated on three test systems, the obtained results reveal that in comparison with other alternatives, the proposed AGB-MOCDE can optimize the DEED problem while handling all constraint limits, and the optimal scheme of stochastic DEED can decrease the conservation of interval optimization, which can provide a more valuable optimal scheme for real-world applications.

  11. The dynamical evolution of dwarf planet (136108) Haumea's collisional family: General properties and implications for the trans-Neptunian belt

    CERN Document Server

    Lykawka, Patryk Sofia; Mukai, Tadashi; Nakamura, Akiko M

    2011-01-01

    Recently, the first collisional family was identified in the trans-Neptunian belt. The family consists of Haumea and at least ten other ~100km-sized trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs) located in the region a = 42 - 44.5 AU. In this work, we model the long-term orbital evolution of an ensemble of fragments representing hypothetical post-collision distributions at the time of the family's birth. We consider three distinct scenarios, in which the kinetic energy of dispersed particles were varied such that their mean ejection velocities (veje) were of order 200 m/s, 300 m/s and 400 m/s, respectively. Each simulation considered resulted in collisional families that reproduced that currently observed. The results suggest that 60-75% of the fragments created in the collision will remain in the trans-Neptunian belt, even after 4 Gyr of dynamical evolution. The surviving particles were typically concentrated in wide regions of orbital element space centred on the initial impact location, with their orbits spread across a ...

  12. Higher frequency of social learning in China than in the West shows cultural variation in the dynamics of cultural evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesoudi, Alex; Chang, Lei; Murray, Keelin; Lu, Hui Jing

    2015-01-07

    Cultural evolutionary models have identified a range of conditions under which social learning (copying others) is predicted to be adaptive relative to asocial learning (learning on one's own), particularly in humans where socially learned information can accumulate over successive generations. However, cultural evolution and behavioural economics experiments have consistently shown apparently maladaptive under-utilization of social information in Western populations. Here we provide experimental evidence of cultural variation in people's use of social learning, potentially explaining this mismatch. People in mainland China showed significantly more social learning than British people in an artefact-design task designed to assess the adaptiveness of social information use. People in Hong Kong, and Chinese immigrants in the UK, resembled British people in their social information use, suggesting a recent shift in these groups from social to asocial learning due to exposure to Western culture. Finally, Chinese mainland participants responded less than other participants to increased environmental change within the task. Our results suggest that learning strategies in humans are culturally variable and not genetically fixed, necessitating the study of the 'social learning of social learning strategies' whereby the dynamics of cultural evolution are responsive to social processes, such as migration, education and globalization.

  13. Impact of dam construction on river banks evolution and sediment dynamics. A case study from the Po River (Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maselli, V.; Pellegrini, C.; Crose, L.; Del Bianco, F.; Mercorella, A.

    2014-12-01

    Rivers draining densely populated landscapes are extremely impacted by modern human engineering: armored beds, artificial levees and dams modified natural fluvial dynamics, and consequently, the evolution of alluvial plains, deltas and coastal environments. Dams, in particular, segmented the longitudinal continuity of the river and reduced (or even interrupted) the export of sediment toward the sea. Here we investigate the impact of the Isola Serafini dam on the upstream portion of the Po River (Italy) influenced by backwater, by using an integrated approach of aerial and satellite images, longitudinal cross-sections, grain size analysis, backscatter data and multibeam bathymetry. The analysis of aerial photographs, acquired every 10 yr since the dam construction in 1960, and of longitudinal cross-sections, allows understanding how the river adjusts its profile in response to the backwater and quantifying areas of net river banks erosion and deposition in meanders. The drowning of the reaches influenced by backwater reduced the progradation of point bars and promoted the deposition of fine grained sediments, as highlighted by grain size analysis on surficial sediment sampled across and along the river course. Calibrated back-scatter data with grain-size distributions of two selected meanders, under the backwater effect and beyond, show how sands are progressively replaced by fine-grained sediments in the meander belt and in the river axis, mainly reflecting the reduction of flow velocity, inferred also by river bed roughness. The understanding of river and sediment dynamics under the influence of backwater due to dam construction is useful when studying pristine systems in which natural backwater affects their evolution, as in the case of the formation of standing water bodies during the drowning of an incised valley.

  14. Research on Dynamical Evolution Process of EEG Signal%EEG信号动态演化过程的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜慧; 周霆

    2013-01-01

    The research of Electroencephalogram(EEG) signals is an important means of diagnosis of brain disease. Taking EEG signals of epilepsy for example, for the complexity of the seizures, the evolution process is studied. It uses of the method of the Proper Orthogonal Decomposition(POD) to decompose and compress the EEG signals, chooses multiple variables to reflect electrical pathological characteristic of EEG brain, and uses the improved method of Fisher discrimination to classify the signal, determines the key points of the dynamic evolvement process of EEG signals. Experimental results show that combined with POD decomposition and Fisher discriminant method, it can not only reduce the workload of data analysis, and can effectively distinguish the EEG signal dynamic evolution process.%脑电图(EEG)信号的研究是诊断脑疾患的重要手段。以癫痫脑电为例,针对癫痫发作过程的复杂性,对其演化过程进行研究。利用本征正交分解(POD)对EEG信号实行特征压缩,选取能够反映EEG脑电病理特征的多个变量,通过改进的Fisher判别方法判别分解后的信号数据,以最终确定EEG信号动态演化过程的关键点。实验结果表明,将POD分解与Fisher判别方法相结合,不仅能减少数据分析的工作量,而且能够有效判别分析EEG信号动态演化过程。

  15. Kinetic adsorption profile and conformation evolution at the DNA-gold nanoparticle interface probed by dynamic light scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenjie; Ding, XiaoFan; He, Miao; Wang, Jing; Lou, Xinhui

    2014-10-21

    The kinetic adsorption profile at the DNA-gold nanoparticle (AuNP) interface is probed by following the binding and organization of thiolated linear DNA and aptamers of varying chain lengths (15, 30, 44, and 51 mer) to the surface of AuNPs (13.0 ± 1.0 nm diameter). A systematic investigation utilizing dynamic light scattering has been performed to directly measure the changes in particle size during the course of a typical aging-salting thiolated DNA/AuNP preparation procedure. We discuss the effect of DNA chain length, composition, salt concentration, and secondary structure on the kinetics and conformation at the DNA-AuNP interface. The adsorption kinetics are chain-length dependent, composition independent, and not diffusion rate limited for the conditions we report here. The kinetic data support a mechanism of stepwise adsorption of thiols to the surface of AuNPs and reorganization of the thiols at the interface. Very interestingly, the kinetic increases of the particle sizes are modeled accurately by the pseudo-second-order rate model, suggesting that DNA could possess the statistically well-defined conformational evolution. Together with other experimental evidence, we propose a dynamic inner-layer and outer-tail (DILOT) model to describe the evolution of the DNA conformation after the initial adsorption of a single oligonucleotide layer. According to this model, the length of the tails that extend from the surface of AuNPs, capable for hybridization or molecular recognition, can be conveniently calculated. Considering the wide applications of DNA/AuNPs, the results should have important implications in sensing and DNA-directed nanoparticle assembly.

  16. The dynamic proliferation of CanSINEs mirrors the complex evolution of Feliforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Repetitive short interspersed elements (SINEs) are retrotransposons ubiquitous in mammalian genomes and are highly informative markers to identify species and phylogenetic associations. Of these, SINEs unique to the order Carnivora (CanSINEs) yield novel insights on genome evolution in domestic dogs and cats, but less is known about their role in related carnivores. In particular, genome-wide assessment of CanSINE evolution has yet to be completed across the Feliformia (cat-like) suborder of Carnivora. Within Feliformia, the cat family Felidae is composed of 37 species and numerous subspecies organized into eight monophyletic lineages that likely arose 10 million years ago. Using the Felidae family as a reference phylogeny, along with representative taxa from other families of Feliformia, the origin, proliferation and evolution of CanSINEs within the suborder were assessed. Results We identified 93 novel intergenic CanSINE loci in Feliformia. Sequence analyses separated Feliform CanSINEs into two subfamilies, each characterized by distinct RNA polymerase binding motifs and phylogenetic associations. Subfamily I CanSINEs arose early within Feliformia but are no longer under active proliferation. Subfamily II loci are more recent, exclusive to Felidae and show evidence for adaptation to extant RNA polymerase activity. Further, presence/absence distributions of CanSINE loci are largely congruent with taxonomic expectations within Feliformia and the less resolved nodes in the Felidae reference phylogeny present equally ambiguous CanSINE data. SINEs are thought to be nearly impervious to excision from the genome. However, we observed a nearly complete excision of a CanSINEs locus in puma (Puma concolor). In addition, we found that CanSINE proliferation in Felidae frequently targeted existing CanSINE loci for insertion sites, resulting in tandem arrays. Conclusions We demonstrate the existence of at least two SINE families within the Feliformia suborder, one

  17. The hills are alive: Earth surface dynamics in the University of Arizona Landscape Evolution Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLong, S.; Troch, P. A.; Barron-Gafford, G. A.; Huxman, T. E.; Pelletier, J. D.; Dontsova, K.; Niu, G.; Chorover, J.; Zeng, X.

    2012-12-01

    To meet the challenge of predicting landscape-scale changes in Earth system behavior, the University of Arizona has designed and constructed a new large-scale and community-oriented scientific facility - the Landscape Evolution Observatory (LEO). The primary scientific objectives are to quantify interactions among hydrologic partitioning, geochemical weathering, ecology, microbiology, atmospheric processes, and geomorphic change associated with incipient hillslope development. LEO consists of three identical, sloping, 333 m2 convergent landscapes inside a 5,000 m2 environmentally controlled facility. These engineered landscapes contain 1 meter of basaltic tephra ground to homogenous loamy sand and contains a spatially dense sensor and sampler network capable of resolving meter-scale lateral heterogeneity and sub-meter scale vertical heterogeneity in moisture, energy and carbon states and fluxes. Each ~1000 metric ton landscape has load cells embedded into the structure to measure changes in total system mass with 0.05% full-scale repeatability (equivalent to less than 1 cm of precipitation), to facilitate better quantification of evapotraspiration. Each landscape has an engineered rain system that allows application of precipitation at rates between3 and 45 mm/hr. These landscapes are being studied in replicate as "bare soil" for an initial period of several years. After this initial phase, heat- and drought-tolerant vascular plant communities will be introduced. Introduction of vascular plants is expected to change how water, carbon, and energy cycle through the landscapes, with potentially dramatic effects on co-evolution of the physical and biological systems. LEO also provides a physical comparison to computer models that are designed to predict interactions among hydrological, geochemical, atmospheric, ecological and geomorphic processes in changing climates. These computer models will be improved by comparing their predictions to physical measurements made in

  18. Limb dominance changes in walking evolution explored by asymmetric correlations in gait dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverria, Juan C.; Rodriguez, Eduardo; Velasco, Alejandra; Alvarez-Ramirez, Jose

    2010-04-01

    Fluctuations in the stride interval time series of unconstrained walking are not random but seem to exhibit long-range correlations that decay as a power law (Hausdorff et al. (1995) [35]). Here, we examine whether asymmetries are present in the long-range correlations of different gait parameters (stride, swing and stance intervals) for the left and right limbs. Gait dynamics corresponding to 16 healthy subjects were obtained from the Physionet database, which contains stride, stance and swing intervals for both left and right limbs. Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA) revealed the presence of asymmetric long-range correlations in all gait cycle variables investigated. A rich variety of scaling exponent dynamics was found, with the presence of synchronicity, decreased correlations and dominant correlations. The results are discussed in terms of the hypothesis that reduced strength of long-range correlations reflect both enhanced stability and adaptability.

  19. Dynamic Entanglement Evolution of Two-qubit XYZ Spin Chain in Markovian Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Yi-Chong, Ren

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new approach called Ket-Bra Entangled State (KBES) Method for converting master equation into Schr\\"{o}dinger-like equation. With this method, we investigate decoherence process and entanglement dynamics induced by a $2$-qubit spin chain that each qubit coupled with reservoir. The spin chain is an anisotropy $XYZ$ Heisenberg model in the external magnetic field $B$, the corresponding master equation is solved concisely by KBES method; Furthermore, the effects of anisotropy, temperature, external field and initial state on concurrence dynamics is analyzed in detail for the case that initial state is Extended Wenger-Like(EWL) state. Finally we research the coherence and concurrence of the final state (namely the density operator for time tend to infinite)

  20. Dynamic 3D cell rearrangements guided by a fibronectin matrix underlie somitogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel G Martins

    Full Text Available Somites are transient segments formed in a rostro-caudal progression during vertebrate development. In chick embryos, segmentation of a new pair of somites occurs every 90 minutes and involves a mesenchyme-to-epithelium transition of cells from the presomitic mesoderm. Little is known about the cellular rearrangements involved, and, although it is known that the fibronectin extracellular matrix is required, its actual role remains elusive. Using 3D and 4D imaging of somite formation we discovered that somitogenesis consists of a complex choreography of individual cell movements. Epithelialization starts medially with the formation of a transient epithelium of cuboidal cells, followed by cell elongation and reorganization into a pseudostratified epithelium of spindle-shaped epitheloid cells. Mesenchymal cells are then recruited to this medial epithelium through accretion, a phenomenon that spreads to all sides, except the lateral side of the forming somite, which epithelializes by cell elongation and intercalation. Surprisingly, an important contribution to the somite epithelium also comes from the continuous egression of mesenchymal cells from the core into the epithelium via its apical side. Inhibition of fibronectin matrix assembly first slows down the rate, and then halts somite formation, without affecting pseudopodial activity or cell body movements. Rather, cell elongation, centripetal alignment, N-cadherin polarization and egression are impaired, showing that the fibronectin matrix plays a role in polarizing and guiding the exploratory behavior of somitic cells. To our knowledge, this is the first 4D in vivo recording of a full mesenchyme-to-epithelium transition. This approach brought new insights into this event and highlighted the importance of the extracellular matrix as a guiding cue during morphogenesis.

  1. Asymmetric excitatory synaptic dynamics underlie interaural time difference processing in the auditory system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo E Jercog

    Full Text Available Low-frequency sound localization depends on the neural computation of interaural time differences (ITD and relies on neurons in the auditory brain stem that integrate synaptic inputs delivered by the ipsi- and contralateral auditory pathways that start at the two ears. The first auditory neurons that respond selectively to ITD are found in the medial superior olivary nucleus (MSO. We identified a new mechanism for ITD coding using a brain slice preparation that preserves the binaural inputs to the MSO. There was an internal latency difference for the two excitatory pathways that would, if left uncompensated, position the ITD response function too far outside the physiological range to be useful for estimating ITD. We demonstrate, and support using a biophysically based computational model, that a bilateral asymmetry in excitatory post-synaptic potential (EPSP slopes provides a robust compensatory delay mechanism due to differential activation of low threshold potassium conductance on these inputs and permits MSO neurons to encode physiological ITDs. We suggest, more generally, that the dependence of spike probability on rate of depolarization, as in these auditory neurons, provides a mechanism for temporal order discrimination between EPSPs.

  2. Epidemiological Aspects Regarding Dynamic Evolution of The Horses Infectious Anemia Outbreaks, During 2005-2010

    OpenAIRE

    Octavian Negrea; Vioara Mireşan; Camelia Răducu; Flore Chirilă; Zamfir Marchis; Daniel Cocan; Octavia Negrea; Iulia Festila

    2013-01-01

    Research conducted in dynamic, in 2005-2010 period, regarding the incidence of outbreaks of equine infectious anemia in  Mures County, on a cumulative total of 925 actual horses from households in the commune and the 2 villages belonging and serologically tested (Coggins test) showed a significant decline in positive serologically diagnosed cases, 20 positive cases in 2005 (10.9%) to 3 positive cases in 2010 (0.25%). Cumulative distribution of outbreaks of equine infectious anemia in the comm...

  3. Evolution of Flexible Multibody Dynamics for Simulation Applications Supporting Human Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, An; Brain, Thomas A.; MacLean, John R.; Quiocho, Leslie J.

    2016-01-01

    During the course of transition from the Space Shuttle and International Space Station programs to the Orion and Journey to Mars exploration programs, a generic flexible multibody dynamics formulation and associated software implementation has evolved to meet an ever changing set of requirements at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC). Challenging problems related to large transitional topologies and robotic free-flyer vehicle capture/ release, contact dynamics, and exploration missions concept evaluation through simulation (e.g., asteroid surface operations) have driven this continued development. Coupled with this need is the requirement to oftentimes support human spaceflight operations in real-time. Moreover, it has been desirable to allow even more rapid prototyping of on-orbit manipulator and spacecraft systems, to support less complex infrastructure software for massively integrated simulations, to yield further computational efficiencies, and to take advantage of recent advances and availability of multi-core computing platforms. Since engineering analysis, procedures development, and crew familiarity/training for human spaceflight is fundamental to JSC's charter, there is also a strong desire to share and reuse models in both the non-realtime and real-time domains, with the goal of retaining as much multibody dynamics fidelity as possible. Three specific enhancements are reviewed here: (1) linked list organization to address large transitional topologies, (2) body level model order reduction, and (3) parallel formulation/implementation. This paper provides a detailed overview of these primary updates to JSC's flexible multibody dynamics algorithms as well as a comparison of numerical results to previous formulations and associated software.

  4. Role of Gas Dynamical Friction in the Evolution of Embedded Stellar Clusters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K. Indulekha

    2013-09-01

    Two puzzles associated with open clusters have attracted a lot of attention – their formation, with densities and velocity dispersions that are not too different from those of the star forming regions in the galaxy, given that the observed Star Formation Efficiencies (SFE) are low and, the mass segregation observed/inferred in some of them, at ages significantly less than the dynamical relaxation times in them. Gas dynamical friction has been considered before as a mechanism for contracting embedded stellar clusters, by dissipating their energy. This would locally raise the SFE which might then allow bound clusters to form. Noticing that dynamical friction is inherently capable of producing mass segregation, since here, the dissipation rate is proportional to the mass of the body experiencing the force, we explore further, some of the details and implications of such a scenario, vis-à-vis observations. Making analytical approximations, we obtain a boundary value for the density of a star forming clump of a given mass, such that, stellar clusters born in clumps which have densities higher than this, could emerge bound after gas loss. For a clump of given mass and density, we find a critical mass such that, sub-condensations with larger masses than this could suffer significant segregation within the clump.

  5. Formation and Dynamical Evolution of the Neptune Trojans - the Influence of the Initial Solar System Architecture

    CERN Document Server

    Lykawka, P S; Jones, B W; Mukai, T

    2010-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the dynamical stability of pre-formed Neptune Trojans under the gravitational influence of the four giant planets in compact planetary architectures, over 10 Myr. In our modelling, the initial orbital locations of Uranus and Neptune (aN) were varied to produce systems in which those planets moved on non-resonant orbits, or in which they lay in their mutual 1:2, 2:3 and 3:4 mean-motion resonances (MMRs). In total, 420 simulations were carried out, examining 42 different architectures, with a total of 840000 particles across all runs. In the non-resonant cases, the Trojans suffered only moderate levels of dynamical erosion, with the most compact systems (those with aN less than or equal 18 AU) losing around 50% of their Trojans by the end of the integrations. In the 2:3 and 3:4 MMR scenarios, however, dynamical erosion was much higher with depletion rates typically greater than 66% and total depletion in the most compact systems. The 1:2 resonant scenarios featured disruption on lev...

  6. Dynamical systems for modeling evolution of the magnetic field of the Sun, stars and planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova, E.

    2016-12-01

    The magnetic activity of the Sun, stars and planets are connected with a dynamo process based on the combined action of the differential rotation and the alpha-effect. Application of this concept allows us to get different types of solutions which can describe the magnetic activity of celestial bodies. We investigated the dynamo model with the meridional circulation by the low-mode approach. This approach is based on an assumption that the magnetic field can be described by non-linear dynamical systems with a relatively small number of parameters. Such non-linear dynamical systems are based on the equations of dynamo models. With this method dynamical systems have been built for media which contains the meridional flow and thickness of the spherical shell where dynamo process operates. It was shown the possibility of coexistence of quiasi-biennial oscillations, 22-year cycle, and grand minima of magnetic activity which is consistent with the observational data for the solar activity. We obtained different regimes (oscillations, vacillations, dynamo-bursts) depending on a value of the dynamo-number, the meridional circulation, and thickness of the spherical shell. We discuss features of these regimes and compare them with the observed features of the magnetic fields of the Sun, stars and Earth. We built theoretical paleomagnetic time scale and butterfly-diagrams for the helicity and toroidal magnetic field for different regimes.

  7. Structure and Evolution of Galaxy Clusters Internal Dynamics of ABCG 209 at z~0.21

    CERN Document Server

    Mercurio, A; Boschin, W; Merluzzi, P; Busarello, G

    2003-01-01

    We study the internal dynamics of the rich galaxy cluster ABGC 209 on the basis of new spectroscopic and photometric data. The distribution in redshift shows that ABCG 209 is a well isolated peak of 112 detected member galaxies at z=0.209, characterised by a high value of the line-of-sight velocity dispersion, sigma_v=1250-1400 Km/s, on the whole observed area (1 Mpc/h from the cluster center), that leads to a virial mass of M=1.6-2.2x10^15 M_sun within the virial radius, assuming the dynamical equilibrium. The presence of a velocity gradient in the velocity field, the elongation in the spatial distribution of the colour-selected likely cluster members, the elongation of the X-ray contour levels in the Chandra image, and the elongation of cD galaxy show that ABCG 209 is characterised by a preferential NW-SE direction. We also find a significant deviation of the velocity distribution from a Gaussian, and relevant evidence of substructure and dynamical segregation. All these facts show that ABCG 209 is a strong...

  8. Shear Induced Morphology Evolution and Dynamic Viscoelastic Behavior of Binary and Ternary Elastomer Blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xia; Liu, Xianggui; Liu, Wei; Han, Charles C.; Wang, Dujin

    2015-03-01

    The morphology evolution and rheological response of a near-critical composition polybutadiene /polyisoprene blend and solution-polymerized styrene-butadiene rubber/polyisoprene/silica ternary composites after various shear flow were in situ studied with the rheological and rheo-optical techniques. The relationship between the morphology of the blend during the relaxation after the cessation of steady shear with different shear rates and their corresponding rheological properties was successfully established. It was found that the different shear-induced morphologies under steady shear would relax to the equilibrium states via varied mechanisms after the shear cessation. The storage modulus G' increased significantly in the breakup process of the string-like phase. In long time scale, silica slowed down the succeeding breakup of the string-phase domains and simultaneous coalescence of broken droplets, and then effectively reduced the droplets size and stabilized the morphology. The authors thank the financial support from National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51173195).

  9. AMAZE and LSD: Metallicity and Dynamical Evolution of Galaxies in the Early Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiolino, R.; Mannucci, F.; Cresci, G.; Gnerucci, A.; Troncoso, P.; Marconi, A.; Calura, F.; Cimatti, A.; Cocchia, F.; Fontana, A.; Granato, G.; Grazian, A.; Matteucci, F.; Nagao, T.; Pentericci, L.; Pipino, A.; Pozzetti, L.; Risaliti, G.; Silva, L.

    2010-12-01

    The metal content in galaxies provides important information on the physical processes responsible for galaxy formation, but little was known for galaxies at z > 3, when the Universe was less than 15% of its current age. We report on our metallicity survey of galaxies at z > 3 using SINFONI at the VLT. We find that at z > 3, low-mass galaxies obey the same fundamental relation between metallicity, mass and star formation rate as at 0 3 massive galaxies deviate from this relation, being more metal-poor. In some of these massive galaxies we can even map the gas metallicity. We find that galaxies at z > 3.3 have regular rotation, though highly turbulent, and inverted abundance gradients relative to local galaxies, with lower abundances near the centre, close to the most active regions of star formation. Overall the results suggest that prominent inflow of pristine gas is responsible for the strong chemical evolution observed in galaxies at z > 3.

  10. Agent-Based Model to Study and Quantify the Evolution Dynamics of Android Malware Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Alegre-Sanahuja

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last years the number of malware Apps that the users download to their devices has risen. In this paper, we propose an agent-based model to quantify the Android malware infection evolution, modeling the behavior of the users and the different markets where the users may download Apps. The model predicts the number of infected smartphones depending on the type of malware. Additionally, we will estimate the cost that the users should afford when the malware is in their devices. We will be able to analyze which part is more critical: the users, giving indiscriminate permissions to the Apps or not protecting their devices with antivirus software, or the Android platform, due to the vulnerabilities of the Android devices that permit their rooted. We focus on the community of Valencia, Spain, although the obtained results can be extrapolated to other places where the number of Android smartphones remains fairly stable.

  11. Dynamic evolution of hepatitis C virus resistance-associated substitutions in the absence of antiviral treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltahla, Auda A.; Leung, Preston; Pirozyan, Mehdi R.; Rodrigo, Chaturaka; Grebely, Jason; Applegate, Tanya; Maher, Lisa; Luciani, Fabio; Lloyd, Andrew R.; Bull, Rowena A.

    2017-01-01

    Resistance against new hepatitis C virus (HCV) antivirals is an area of increasing interest. Resistance-associated substitutions (RASs) have been identified in treatment-naïve individuals, but pressures driving treatment-independent RAS emergence are poorly understood. We analysed the longitudinal evolution of RASs in twelve participants with early acute HCV infections. Full-genome deep sequences were analysed for changes in RAS frequency within NS3, NS5A and NS5B-coding regions over the course of the infection. Emergence of RASs relevant only to the polymerase non-nucleoside inhibitors (NNI) was detected, and these lay within CD8+ T-cell epitopes. Conversely, the loss of NNI RASs over time appeared likely to be driven by viral fitness constraints. These results highlight the importance of monitoring CD8+ T cell epitope-associated RASs in populations with dominant HLA types. PMID:28139734

  12. THE AVALANCHE DYNAMICS IN RANDOM NEAREST NEIGHBOR MODELS OF EVOLUTION WITH INTERACTION STRENGTH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A generalized Bak-Sneppen model (BS model) of biological evolution with interaction strength θ is introduced in d-dimensional space, where the "nearest neighbors"are chosen among the 2d neighbors of the extremal site, with the probabilities related to the sizes of the fitnesses. Simulations of one- and two-dimensional models are given.For given θ> 0, the model can self-organize to a critical state, and the critical threshold fc(θ) decreases as θ increases. The exact gap equation depending on θ is presented, which reduces to the gap equation of BS model as θ tends to infinity. An exact equation for the critical exponent γ(θ) is also obtained. Scaling relations are established among the six critical exponents of the avalanches of the model.

  13. Dynamic Strain Evolution around a Crack Tip under Steady- and Overloaded-Fatigue Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo Yeol Lee

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the evolution of the strain fields around a fatigued crack tip between the steady- and overloaded-fatigue conditions using a nondestructive neutron diffraction technique. The two fatigued compact-tension specimens, with a different fatigue history but an identical applied stress intensity factor range, were used for the direct comparison of the crack tip stress/strain distributions during in situ loading. While strains behind the crack tip in the steady-fatigued specimen are irrelevant to increasing applied load, the strains behind the crack tip in the overloaded-fatigued specimen evolve significantly under loading, leading to a lower driving force of fatigue crack growth. The results reveal the overload retardation mechanism and the correlation between crack tip stress distribution and fatigue crack growth rate.

  14. Structure, dynamics and function of Leishmania genome: resolving the puzzle of infection, genetics and evolution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dujardin, Jean-Claude

    2009-03-01

    We review and discuss here the specificity and contribution of genome (re-)arrangement studies for the exploration of genetic diversity among Leishmania. We show how the early molecular karyotyping studies generated an original perception of the genetics and evolution of these Protozoa, while providing some possible explanations on the parasite diverse phenotypes (drug resistance, pathogenicity...). We compare the results with the enormous amount of data provided by the recent genome sequencing projects, so far focused on one strain per genus/species. We highlight the relevance of parallel sequencing of different strains of a same species, now made possible by the new sequencing technologies. We recommend paying a particular attention to variation in gene copy number, a feature showed by the karyotyping studies to be extremely informative.

  15. Report on the Dynamical Evolution of an Axially Symmetric Quasar Model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N. J. Papadopoulos; N. D. Caranicolas

    2006-12-01

    The role of the angular momentum in the regular or chaotic character of motion in an axially symmetric quasar model is examined. It is found that, for a given value of the critical angular momentum , there are two values of the mass of the nucleus for which transition from regular to chaotic motion occurs. The [-] relationship shows a linear dependence for the time independent model and an exponential dependence for the evolving model. Both cases are explained using theoretical arguments together with some numerical evidence. The evolution of the orbits is studied, as mass is transported from the disk to the nucleus. The results are compared with the outcomes derived for galactic models with massive nuclei.

  16. ENRICHMENT OF r-PROCESS ELEMENTS IN DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXIES IN CHEMO-DYNAMICAL EVOLUTION MODEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirai, Yutaka; Kajino, Toshitaka [Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, the University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Ishimaru, Yuhri [Department of Material Science,International Christian University, 3-10-2 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8585 (Japan); Saitoh, Takayuki R. [Earth-Life Science Institute, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Fujii, Michiko S.; Hidaka, Jun, E-mail: yutaka.hirai@nao.ac.jp [Division of Theoretical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2015-11-20

    The rapid neutron-capture process (r-process) is a major process for the synthesis of elements heavier than iron-peak elements, but the astrophysical site(s) of the r-process has not yet been identified. Neutron star mergers (NSMs) are suggested to be a major r-process site according to nucleosynthesis studies. Previous chemical evolution studies, however, required unlikely short merger times of NSMs to reproduce the observed large star-to-star scatters in the abundance ratios of r-process elements to iron: the [Eu/Fe] of extremely metal-poor stars in the Milky Way (MW) halo. This problem can be solved by considering chemical evolution in dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs), which would be building blocks of the MW and have lower star formation efficiencies than the MW halo. We demonstrate the enrichment of r-process elements in dSphs by NSMs using an N-body/smoothed particle hydrodynamics code. Our high-resolution model reproduces the observed [Eu/Fe] due to NSMs with a merger time of 100 Myr when the effect of metal mixing is taken into account. This is because metallicity is not correlated with time ∼300 Myr from the start of the simulation due to the low star formation efficiency in dSphs. We also confirm that this model is consistent with observed properties of dSphs such as radial profiles and metallicity distribution. The merger time and the Galactic rate of NSMs are suggested to be ≲300 Myr and ∼10{sup −4} year{sup −1}, respectively, which are consistent with the values suggested by population synthesis and nucleosynthesis studies. This study supports the argument that NSMs are the major astrophysical site of the r-process.

  17. Evolution along the mutation gradient in the dynamic mitochondrial genome of salamanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Rebecca A; Mueller, Rachel Lockridge

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria are intracellular organelles where oxidative phosphorylation is carried out to complete ATP synthesis. Mitochondria have their own genome; in metazoans, this is a small, circular molecule encoding 13 electron transport proteins, 22 tRNAs, and 2 rRNAs. In invertebrates, mitochondrial gene rearrangement is common, and it is correlated with increased substitution rates. In vertebrates, mitochondrial gene rearrangement is rare, and its relationship to substitution rate remains unexplored. Mitochondrial genes can also show spatial variation in substitution rates around the genome due to the mechanism of mtDNA replication, which produces a mutation gradient. To date, however, the strength of the mutation gradient and whether movement along the gradient in rearranged (or otherwise modified) genomes impacts genic substitution rates remain unexplored in the majority of vertebrates. Salamanders include both normal mitochondrial genomes and independently derived rearrangements and expansions, providing a rare opportunity to test the effects of large-scale changes to genome architecture on vertebrate mitochondrial gene sequence evolution. We show that: 1) rearranged/expanded genomes have higher substitution rates; 2) most genes in rearranged/expanded genomes maintain their position along the mutation gradient, substitution rates of the genes that do move are unaffected by their new position, and the gradient in salamanders is weak; and 3) genomic rearrangements/expansions occur independent of levels of selective constraint on genes. Together, our results demonstrate that large-scale changes to genome architecture impact mitochondrial gene evolution in predictable ways; however, despite these impacts, the same functional constraints act on mitochondrial protein-coding genes in both modified and normal genomes.

  18. The effect of vaccination on the evolution and population dynamics of avian paramyxovirus-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yee Ling Chong

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV is a pathogenic strain of avian paramyxovirus (aPMV-1 that is among the most serious of disease threats to the poultry industry worldwide. Viral diversity is high in aPMV-1; eight genotypes are recognized based on phylogenetic reconstruction of gene sequences. Modified live vaccines have been developed to decrease the economic losses caused by this virus. Vaccines derived from avirulent genotype II strains were developed in the 1950s and are in use globally, whereas Australian strains belonging to genotype I were developed as vaccines in the 1970s and are used mainly in Asia. In this study, we evaluated the consequences of attenuated live virus vaccination on the evolution of aPMV-1 genotypes. There was phylogenetic incongruence among trees based on individual genes and complete coding region of 54 full length aPMV-1 genomes, suggesting that recombinant sequences were present in the data set. Subsequently, five recombinant genomes were identified, four of which contained sequences from either genotype I or II. The population history of vaccine-related genotype II strains was distinct from other aPMV-1 genotypes; genotype II emerged in the late 19(th century and is evolving more slowly than other genotypes, which emerged in the 1960s. Despite vaccination efforts, genotype II viruses have experienced constant population growth to the present. In contrast, other contemporary genotypes showed population declines in the late 1990s. Additionally, genotype I and II viruses, which are circulating in the presence of homotypic vaccine pressure, have unique selection profiles compared to nonvaccine-related strains. Collectively, these data show that vaccination with live attenuated viruses has changed the evolution of aPMV-1 by maintaining a large effective population size of a vaccine-related genotype, allowing for coinfection and recombination of vaccine and wild type strains, and by applying unique selective pressures on

  19. Accretion Disks around Black Holes: Dynamical Evolution, Meridional Circulations, and Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, William H.; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2002-10-01

    We study the hydrodynamic evolution of massive accretion disks around black holes, formed when a neutron star is disrupted by a black hole in a binary system. The initial conditions are taken from three-dimensional calculations of coalescing binaries. By assuming azimuthal symmetry we are able to follow the time dependence of the disk structure for 0.2 s in cylindrical coordinates (r,z). We use an ideal gas equation of state and assume that all the dissipated energy is radiated away. The disks evolve because of viscous stresses, modeled with an α law. We study the disk structure and, in particular, the strong meridional circulations that are established and persist throughout our calculations. These consist of strong outflows along the equatorial plane that reverse direction close to the surface of the disk and converge on the accretor. In the context of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), we estimate the energy released from the system in neutrinos and through magnetic-dominated mechanisms and find it can be as high as Eν~1052 ergs and EBZ~1051 ergs, respectively, during an estimated accretion timescale of 0.1-0.2 s. The νν annihilation is likely to produce bursts from only a short, impulsive energy input Lνν~t-5/2 and so would be unable to account for a large fraction of bursts that show complicated light curves. On the other hand, a gas mass ~0.1-0.25 Msolar survives in the orbiting debris, which enables strong magnetic fields ~1016 G to be anchored in the dense matter long enough to power short duration GRBs. We highlight the effects that the initial disk and black holes masses, viscosity, and binary mass ratio have on the evolution of the disk structure. Finally, we investigate the continuous energy injection that arises as the black hole slowly swallows the rest of the disk and discuss its consequences on the GRB afterglow emission.

  20. Study on dynamics of tectonic evolution in the Fushun Basin, Northeast China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴冲龙; 汪新庆; 刘刚; 李绍虎; 毛小平; 李星

    2002-01-01

    The updated study shows that the taphrogenesis of basement of the Fushun Basin is not a kind of instantaneous process. It intensified gradually and went to extreme in the sedimentary stage of the Guchengzi formation, and then, it weakened rapidly and stopped soon afterwards; the depression did not take place after the taphrogenesis. On the contrary, it almost happened simultaneously with the taphrogenesis. The depression went at a high speed from the beginning of the sedimentary period of the Xilutian formation, and then weakened gradually in the sedimentary period of the Gengjiajie formation. The evolution course of the synsedimentary structure of the Fushun Basin can be summarized as the following six stages: slow taphrogenesis and high speed depression to accelerated taphrogenesis and high speed depression to high speed taphrogenesis and high speed depression to retarded taphrogenesis and high speed depression to gradual halt of taphrogenesis and reduced depression to slow depression and gradual halt of depression. The tectonic evolution resulted in the formation of the "lower taphrogenesis and upper depression" structure. The formation of the binary structure might be due to the suspension of taphrogenesis and the change of the regional structure stress field, but the depression kept going. The result of calculation combining the analysis of the synsedimentary structural frame, the back-stripping method of the subsidence history of the basin basement and the simulation of thermo-settlement history indicates that the great sedimentary space required by the "upper depression part" consists of two parts, namely, 40% from compaction of sediments and 60% from slow depression of the basin basement during a long period of time. Gradual halt of the depression in the Fushun Basin may be attributed to the reversal of the lithosphere hot-recession and gravity isostasy adjustment which may be the result of new hot-events in the depths and accompanied invasion of extremely