WorldWideScience

Sample records for dynamics lessons learnt

  1. Important lessons to be learnt from 'Daimler'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werlauff, Erik

    2014-01-01

    , and concluded that the German version was out of step with the mainstream of linguistic versions. Fifth, after Daimler it has become even more important to remember the exception: Quoted companies must as soon as possible disclose inside information; that is the main rule, and after Daimler it is stronger than......In this editorial, professor Erik Werlauff argues that some impoprtant lessons can be learnt from the ECJ’s judgment in Daimler, C-19/11. First, it may be an item of good news for investors in a quoted company that its CEO resigns, or considers to resign. When, after having contemplated...... to be able to sue the quoted company itself on grounds of misleading or delayed stock announcements. Other countries, including Denmark, are gradually coming to a similar state of law, however without statutory law to guide investors. The lesson for the EU should be that common rules are needed in this field...

  2. Lessons learnt from fission materials R&D programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Colin; Buckthorpe, Derek

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the lessons learnt on the use of advanced materials on the design and operation of components in fission reactors and to consider how these lessons can be employed to benefit the use of advanced structural and, to a certain extent, coolant channel materials in the design and qualification of the in-vessel and containment vessel components for the DEMO fusion reactor. The focus is on lessons learnt on methodologies that need to be applied, and a number of specific recommendations are made.

  3. Lessons Learnt of Thai Women Environmental Leaders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sittipong Dilokwanich

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available During the past few decades, Thai women have learned how to extent their roles from a care taker of children and a household to natural resources and environmental protection and management in local and inter-regional communities. Due to the application of National Economic and Social Development Plans, rapid resource exploitation has brought in natural resource and environmental degradation all over the country threatening communal security. For this reason, there have been a number of emerging environmental leaders who want to correct directions of national development, especially Thai woman environmental leaders who are taking a successful role of environmental guardian in their communities. This research attempts to explore why they took leadership role in environment, how they work so successful as an environmental guardian, and what their next move is. During early 2013 till mid-2014, there are 28 Thai woman leaders who received the award of Thai Environmental Conservation Mother from the Faculty of Environment and Resource Studies, Mahidol University between 2004 and 2012. They were in-depth interviewed and collected data were preceded by content analysis. Their lessons learnt show that most leaders saved their communities' environment and natural resources from the intervention of new development activities. Most of them had their parents as a good role model in environmental management who provide knowledge of morals and environmental ethics as a good basic of leadership while some shared their husband's responsibility in the same matter. Significantly, teamwork is their working style with the assistance of public participation to hold teamwork and collaboration of the community. Almost all leaders had systematic working with talents of patience, gentleness and sensitivity. The working network also broadens their new information and knowledge between practitioners. In the same time, more than half of the leaders can prepare their

  4. Lessons learnt from the Climate Dialogue initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crok, Marcel; Strengers, Bart; Vasileiadou, Eleftheria

    2015-04-01

    The weblog Climate Dialogue (climatedialogue.org) has been an experimental climate change communication project. It was the result of a motion in the Dutch parliament, which asked the Dutch government "to also involve climate sceptics in future studies on climate change". Climate Dialogue was set up by the Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI), the Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency (PBL), and Dutch science journalist Marcel Crok. It operated for slightly more than two years (From November 2012 till December 2014). Around 20 climate scientists from all over the world, many of them leading in their respective fields, participated in six dialogues. Climate Dialogue was a moderated blog on controversial climate science topics introducing a combination of several novel elements: a) bringing together scientists with widely separated viewpoints b) strict moderation of the discussion and c) compilation of executive and extended summaries of the discussions that were approved by the invited scientists. In our talk, we will discuss the operation and results of the Climate Dialogue project, focusing more explicitly on the lessons learnt with respect to online climate change communication addressing the question: "To what extent can online climate change communication bring together climate scientists with widely separated viewpoints, and what would be the advantage of such communication practice?" We identify how Climate Dialogue was received and perceived by the participating scientists, but also by different scientific and online communities. Finally, we present our ideas on how Climate Dialogue could evolve in a novel way of contributing to (climate) science and what steps would be necessary and/or beneficial for such a platform to survive and succeed.

  5. The Tamiflu fiasco and lessons learnt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogendra Kumar Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oseltamivir (Tamiflu, a neuraminidase inhibitor, was approved for seasonal flu by US Food and Drug Administration in 1999. A number of randomized controlled trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analysis emphasized a favorable efficacy and safety profile. Majority of them were funded by Roche, which also first marketed and promoted this drug. In 2005 and 2009, the looming fear of pandemic flu led to recommendation by prominent regulatory bodies such as World Health Organization (WHO, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, European Medicines Agency and others for its use in treatment and prophylaxis of influenza, and it′s stockpiling as a measure to tide over the crisis. Serious Adverse Events, especially neuropsychiatric events associated with Tamiflu started getting reported leading to a cascade of questions on clinical utility of this drug. A recent Cochrane review and related articles have questioned the risk-benefit ratio of the drug, besides raising doubts about the regulatory decision of approving it. The recommendations for stockpiling the said drug as given by various international organizations viz WHO have also been put to scrutiny. Although many reviewers have labeled the Tamiflu saga as a "costly mistake," the episode leaves us with some important lessons. This article takes a comprehensive relook on the subject, and we proceed to suggest some ways and means to avoid a similar situation in the future.

  6. Developing an evaluation framework for clinical redesign programs: lessons learnt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaranayake, Premaratne; Dadich, Ann; Fitzgerald, Anneke; Zeitz, Kathryn

    2016-09-19

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to present lessons learnt through the development of an evaluation framework for a clinical redesign programme - the aim of which was to improve the patient journey through improved discharge practices within an Australian public hospital. Design/methodology/approach The development of the evaluation framework involved three stages - namely, the analysis of secondary data relating to the discharge planning pathway; the analysis of primary data including field-notes and interview transcripts on hospital processes; and the triangulation of these data sets to devise the framework. The evaluation framework ensured that resource use, process management, patient satisfaction, and staff well-being and productivity were each connected with measures, targets, and the aim of clinical redesign programme. Findings The application of business process management and a balanced scorecard enabled a different way of framing the evaluation, ensuring measurable outcomes were connected to inputs and outputs. Lessons learnt include: first, the importance of mixed-methods research to devise the framework and evaluate the redesigned processes; second, the need for appropriate tools and resources to adequately capture change across the different domains of the redesign programme; and third, the value of developing and applying an evaluative framework progressively. Research limitations/implications The evaluation framework is limited by its retrospective application to a clinical process redesign programme. Originality/value This research supports benchmarking with national and international practices in relation to best practice healthcare redesign processes. Additionally, it provides a theoretical contribution on evaluating health services improvement and redesign initiatives.

  7. Lessons learnt from the first EMEP intensive measurement periods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Aas

    2012-02-01

    will probably improve if the EMEP model is coupled to a dynamic, mechanistic ammonia emission module. The largest underestimations of aerosol mass are seen in Italy during winter, which to a large extent may be explained by an underestimation of residential wood burning source. It should be noted that both primary and secondary OC has been included in the calculations for the first time, showing promising results. Mineral dust is important, especially in southern Europe, and the model seems to capture the dust episodes well. The lack of measurements of mineral dust hampers the possibility for model evaluation for this highly uncertain PM component.

    There are also lessons learnt regarding improved measurements for future intensive periods. There is a need for increased comparability between the measurements at different sites. For the nitrogen compounds it is clear that more measurements using artefact free methods based on continuous measurement methods and/or denuders are needed. For EC/OC, a reference methodology (both in field and laboratory was lacking during these periods giving problems with comparability, though presently measurement protocols have been established and these should be followed by the Parties to the EMEP Protocol. For measurements with no defined protocols, it might be a good solution to use centralised laboratories to ensure comparability across the network. To cope with the introduction of these new measurements new reporting guidelines have been developed to ensure that all proper information about the methodologies and data quality is given.

  8. Engaging the public via competitions - lessons learnt from Rosetta

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Flaherty, Karen S.; Baldwin, Emily; Mignone, Claudia; Homfeld, Anne-Mareike; Bauer, Markus; McCaughrean, Mark J.

    2015-04-01

    2014 was an historic and challenging year for the European Space Agency's Rosetta mission as it awoke from a 957-day slumber, arrived at Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, and deployed a lander on the comet's surface. One of the biggest challenges facing the mission's science communicators was to awaken interest in the mission and generate a sustained engagement in the broadest possible audience in a relatively short time. New and innovative means were adopted alongside traditional approaches to achieve this goal. In this paper, we describe one of these outreach projects: engaging the public with open competitions. We describe three different competitions that were run for three important mission milestones: 'Wake Up Rosetta' - a video competition to celebrate the end of hibernation; 'Rosetta, are we there yet?' - a photo competition to coincide with Rosetta's rendevous with 67P, and 'Name Site J' - to name the landing site chosen for the Philae lander. We discuss our experiences of these competitions: the channels we used to promote them, the audience we reached, the different levels of engagement, the issues that we encountered, and the outcomes, including lessons learnt.

  9. Ectopic Cushing syndrome secondary to recurrent pancreatoblastoma in a child: Lessons learnt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajid S Qureshi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although rare, pancreatoblastoma is the most common pancreatic tumor in children. Cushing syndrome secondary to ectopic secretion of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH from a pancreatoblastoma is very rare with only two previously reported cases. We present the management and the lesson learnt in a 3-year-old child with recurrent pancreatoblastoma with Cushing syndrome.

  10. Ectopic Cushing syndrome secondary to recurrent pancreatoblastoma in a child: Lessons learnt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Sajid S; Bhagat, Monica; Kurkure, Purna A; Kembhavi, Seema A

    2015-01-01

    Although rare, pancreatoblastoma is the most common pancreatic tumor in children. Cushing syndrome secondary to ectopic secretion of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) from a pancreatoblastoma is very rare with only two previously reported cases. We present the management and the lesson learnt in a 3-year-old child with recurrent pancreatoblastoma with Cushing syndrome.

  11. Lessons learnt from the first Australian 'pop-up' HIV testing site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Marianne; Holden, Jo; Kitchener, Samara; Knight, Vickie; McNulty, Anna; Price, Karen; Leeman, Craig; Cunningham, Philip; Hayen, Andrew; MacInytre, C Raina

    2014-12-01

    Lessons learnt from the first 'pop-up' HIV testing site in Australia suggest that highly visible testing activity was acceptable in the context of inner Sydney and that pop-up sites may be a useful adjunct to clinic-based models. Further evaluation of alternative testing models is needed to inform the scale up of HIV testing in Australia.

  12. Lessons learnt from the first EMEP intensive measurement periods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Aas

    2012-09-01

    explained by an underestimation of residential wood burning sources. It should be noted that both primary and secondary OC has been included in the calculations for the first time, showing promising results. Mineral dust is important, especially in southern Europe, and the model seems to capture the dust episodes well. The lack of measurements of mineral dust hampers the possibility for model evaluation for this highly uncertain PM component.

    There are also lessons learnt regarding improved measurements for future intensive periods. There is a need for increased comparability between the measurements at different sites. For the nitrogen compounds it is clear that more measurements using artefact free methods based on continuous measurement methods and/or denuders are needed. For EC/OC, a reference methodology (both in field and laboratory was lacking during these periods giving problems with comparability, though measurement protocols have recently been established and these should be followed by the Parties to the EMEP Protocol. For measurements with no defined protocols, it might be a good solution to use centralised laboratories to ensure comparability across the network. To cope with the introduction of these new measurements, new reporting guidelines have been developed to ensure that all proper information about the methodologies and data quality is given.

  13. How environment drives galaxy evolution: lessons learnt from satellite galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Pasquali, A

    2015-01-01

    It is by now well established that galaxy evolution is driven by intrinsic and environmental processes, both contributing to shape the observed properties of galaxies. A number of early studies, both observational and theoretical, have shown that the star formation activity of galaxies depends on their environmental local density and also on galaxy hierarchy, i.e. centrals vs. satellites. In fact, contrary to their central (most massive) galaxy of a group/cluster, satellite galaxies are stripped of their gas and stars, and have their star formation quenched by their environment. Large galaxy surveys like SDSS now permit us to investigate in detail environment-driven transformation processes by comparing centrals and satellites. In this paper I summarize what we have so far learnt about environmental effects by analysing the observed properties of local central and satellite galaxies in SDSS, as a function of their stellar mass and the dark matter mass of their host group/cluster.

  14. Benchmarking neuromorphic vision: lessons learnt from computer vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Cheston; Lallee, Stephane; Orchard, Garrick

    2015-01-01

    Neuromorphic Vision sensors have improved greatly since the first silicon retina was presented almost three decades ago. They have recently matured to the point where they are commercially available and can be operated by laymen. However, despite improved availability of sensors, there remains a lack of good datasets, while algorithms for processing spike-based visual data are still in their infancy. On the other hand, frame-based computer vision algorithms are far more mature, thanks in part to widely accepted datasets which allow direct comparison between algorithms and encourage competition. We are presented with a unique opportunity to shape the development of Neuromorphic Vision benchmarks and challenges by leveraging what has been learnt from the use of datasets in frame-based computer vision. Taking advantage of this opportunity, in this paper we review the role that benchmarks and challenges have played in the advancement of frame-based computer vision, and suggest guidelines for the creation of Neuromorphic Vision benchmarks and challenges. We also discuss the unique challenges faced when benchmarking Neuromorphic Vision algorithms, particularly when attempting to provide direct comparison with frame-based computer vision.

  15. Urban environmental history: what lessons are there to be learnt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schott, D. [Darmstadt Univ. of Technology, History Dept., Damrmstadt (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    The paper traces the emergence of urban environmental history first in the United States and since the 1990s increasingly also in Europe. It identifies the development of large technical networks which provide cities with water and energy and which serve to take problematic substances and waste out of urban areas as a central theme of this new subfield where scholars from urban history, environmental history and history of technology converge. The concepts of 'path dependence' and 'urban metabolism' are introduced as useful heuristic devices to assess long-term effects of these infrastructures in a holistic manner. The paper shows that the implementation of networks and related household technologies was accompanied by comprehensive processes of social and cultural adaptation which fundamentally altered the attitudes and behavioural patterns towards resource use. Lessons of urban environmental history are seen in providing long-term horizons to current debates over urban technologies and their environmental consequences. (orig.)

  16. Online User Feedback in Early Phases of the Design Process: Lessons Learnt from Four Design Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asbjørn Følstad

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Online user feedback, collected by means of internet survey tools, is a promising approach to obtain early user feedback on concepts and early prototypes. In this study, the collection and utilization of online user feedback was investigated in four design cases: all master student projects for industry clients involving seven student designers. A total of 272 user participants provided quantitative feedback. Half of these also provided qualitative feedback. One third of the qualitative feedback was perceived as useful by the student designers. The main usefulness of the feedback was related to strategic concept decisions rather than the interaction design of the early prototype. Lessons learnt are provided.

  17. Lessons learnt on recruitment and fieldwork from a pilot European human biomonitoring survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiddicke, Ulrike; Becker, Kerstin; Schwedler, Gerda;

    2015-01-01

    Within the European Environment and Health Action Plan an initiative to establish a coherent human biomonitoring approach in Europe was started. The project COPHES (COnsortium to Perform Human biomonitoring on a European Scale ) developed recommendations for a harmonized conduct of a human......, in autumn/winter 2011/2012. Based on the countries' experiences of conducting the pilot study, following lessons learnt were compiled: the harmonized fieldwork instruments (basic questionnaire, urine and hair sampling) turned out to be very valuable for future HBM surveys on the European scale. A school...

  18. Renal services disaster planning: lessons learnt from the 2011 Queensland floods and North Queensland cyclone experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, David W; Hayes, Bronwyn; Gray, Nicholas A; Hawley, Carmel; Hole, Janet; Mantha, Murty

    2013-01-01

    In 2011, Queensland dialysis services experienced two unprecedented natural disasters within weeks of each other. Floods in south-east Queensland and Tropical Cyclone Yasi in North Queensland caused widespread flooding, property damage and affected the provision of dialysis services, leading to Australia's largest evacuation of dialysis patients. This paper details the responses to the disasters and examines what worked and what lessons were learnt. Recommendations are made for dialysis units in relation to disaster preparedness, response and recovery. © 2012 The Authors. Nephrology © 2012 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  19. A GUIDED SWAT MODEL APPLICATION ON SEDIMENT YIELD MODELING IN PANGANI RIVER BASIN: LESSONS LEARNT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preksedis Marco Ndomba

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The overall objective of this paper is to report on the lessons learnt from applying Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT in a well guided sediment yield modelling study. The study area is the upstream of Pangani River Basin (PRB, the Nyumba Ya Mungu (NYM reservoir catchment, located in the North Eastern part of Tanzania. It should be noted that, previous modeling exercises in the region applied SWAT with preassumption that inter-rill or sheet erosion was the dominant erosion type. In contrast, in this study SWAT model application was guided by results of analysis of high temporal resolution of sediment flow data and hydro-meteorological data. The runoff component of the SWAT model was calibrated from six-years (i.e. 1977–1982 of historical daily streamflow data. The sediment component of the model was calibrated using one-year (1977–1988 daily sediment loads estimated from one hydrological year sampling programme (between March and November, 2005 rating curve. A long-term period over 37 years (i.e. 1969–2005 simulation results of the SWAT model was validated to downstream NYM reservoir sediment accumulation information. The SWAT model captured 56 percent of the variance (CE and underestimated the observed daily sediment loads by 0.9 percent according to Total Mass Control (TMC performance indices during a normal wet hydrological year, i.e., between November 1, 1977 and October 31, 1978, as the calibration period. SWAT model predicted satisfactorily the long-term sediment catchment yield with a relative error of 2.6 percent. Also, the model has identified erosion sources spatially and has replicated some erosion processes as determined in other studies and field observations in the PRB. This result suggests that for catchments where sheet erosion is dominant SWAT model may substitute the sediment-rating curve. However, the SWAT model could not capture the dynamics of sediment load delivery in some seasons to the catchment outlet.

  20. A GUIDED SWAT MODEL APPLICATION ON SEDIMENT YIELD MODELING IN PANGANI RIVER BASIN: LESSONS LEARNT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preksedis M. Ndomba

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The overall objective of this paper is to report on the lessons learnt from applying Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT in a well guided sediment yield modelling study. The study area is the upstream of Pangani River Basin (PRB, the Nyumba Ya Mungu (NYM reservoir catchment, located in the North Eastern part of Tanzania. It should be noted that, previous modeling exercises in the region applied SWAT with preassumption that inter-rill or sheet erosion was the dominant erosion type. In contrast, in this study SWAT model application was guided by results of analysis of high temporal resolution of sediment flow data and hydro-meteorological data. The runoff component of the SWAT model was calibrated from six-years (i.e. 1977¿1982 of historical daily streamflow data. The sediment component of the model was calibrated using one-year (1977-1988 daily sediment loads estimated from one hydrological year sampling programme (between March and November, 2005 rating curve. A long-term period over 37 years (i.e. 1969-2005 simulation results of the SWAT model was validated to downstream NYM reservoir sediment accumulation information. The SWAT model captured 56 percent of the variance (CE and underestimated the observed daily sediment loads by 0.9 percent according to Total Mass Control (TMC performance indices during a normal wet hydrological year, i.e., between November 1, 1977 and October 31, 1978, as the calibration period. SWAT model predicted satisfactorily the long-term sediment catchment yield with a relative error of 2.6 percent. Also, the model has identified erosion sources spatially and has replicated some erosion processes as determined in other studies and field observations in the PRB. This result suggests that for catchments where sheet erosion is dominant SWAT model may substitute the sediment-rating curve. However, the SWAT model could not capture the dynamics of sediment load delivery in some seasons to the catchment outlet.

  1. Consistency across missions of long time series of global biophysical variables: challenges and lessons learnt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacaze, Roselyne; Smets, Bruno; Calvet, Jean-Christophe; Camacho, Fernando; Swinnen, Else; Verger, Aleixandre

    2017-04-01

    The Global component of the Copernicus Land Monitoring Service (CGLS) provides continuously a set of bio-geophysical variables describing the dynamics of vegetation, the energy budget at the continental surface, the water cycle and the cryosphere. Products are generated on a reliable and automatic basis from Earth Observation satellite data, at a frequency ranging from one hour to 10 days. They are accessible free of charge through the GCLS website (http://land.copernicus.eu/global/), associated with documentation describing the physical methodologies, the technical properties of products, and the quality of variables based on the results of validation exercises. The portfolio of the CGLS contains some Essential Climate Variables (ECV) like the Leaf Area Index (LAI), the Fraction of PAR absorbed by the vegetation (FAPAR), the surface albedo, and additional vegetation indices. These products were derived from SPOT/VEGETATION sensor data till December 2013, are currently derived from PROBA-V sensor data, and will be derived in the future from Sentinel-3 data. This talk will show how challenging is the transition between sensors to ensure the sustainability of the production while keeping the consistency of the time series. We will discuss the various sources of differences from input data, the impact of these differences on the biophysical variables and, in turn, on some final users' applications as such those based upon anomalies or assimilation of time series. We will present the mitigation measures taken to reduce as much as possible this impact. We will conclude with the lessons learnt and how this experience will be exploited to manage the transition towards Sentinel-3.

  2. Differential alkylation-based redox proteomics - Lessons learnt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wojdyla, Katarzyna; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina

    2015-01-01

    is a critical evaluation of differential alkylation-based strategies for the analysis of S-nitrosylation and S-sulfenylation. The aim is to assess the current status and to provide insights for future directions in the dynamically evolving field of redox proteomics. To achieve that we collected 35 original......, including the amount of starting material required for analysis. The results of this meta-analysis are the core of this review, complemented by issues related to biological models and sample preparation in redox proteomics, including conditions for free thiol blocking and labelling of target cysteine...

  3. A Grounded Theory Approach in a Branding Context: Challenges and lessons learnt during the research process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Rindell, PhD.

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to discuss challenges and lessons learnt when conducting a classic grounded theory study in a marketing context. The paper focuses on two specific challenges that were met during a specific research process. The first challenge related to positioning the study, namely, specifying“what the study is a study of”. The second challenge concerned the choice between formal or substantive theory. Both challenges were accentuated as the emerged core category concerned a phenomenon that has caught less attention in marketing, that is, the temporal dimension in corporate images. By the temporal dimension in corporate images we mean that corporate images often have roots in earlier times through consumer memories. In other words, consumers are not tabula rasa, that is, blank sheets of paper on which communication messages can be printed. Rather, consumers have a pre-understanding of the company that works as an interpretation framework for company actions in the present. The lessons learnt from this research process can be summarized as “stay faithful to the data”, “write memos on issues you reflect upon although they might be in another substantial field” as they might become useful later, and, “look into thinking in other disciplines” as disciplines do not develop equally.

  4. Kidney stones in primary hyperoxaluria: new lessons learnt.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorrit E Jacob

    Full Text Available To investigate potential differences in stone composition with regard to the type of Primary Hyperoxaluria (PH, and in relation to the patient's medical therapy (treatment naïve patients versus those on preventive medication we examined twelve kidney stones from ten PH I and six stones from four PH III patients. Unfortunately, no PH II stones were available for analysis. The study on this set of stones indicates a more diverse composition of PH stones than previously reported and a potential dynamic response of morphology and composition of calculi to treatment with crystallization inhibitors (citrate, magnesium in PH I. Stones formed by PH I patients under treatment are more compact and consist predominantly of calcium-oxalate monohydrate (COM, whewellite, while calcium-oxalate dihydrate (COD, weddellite is only rarely present. In contrast, the single stone available from a treatment naïve PH I patient as well as stones from PH III patients prior to and under treatment with alkali citrate contained a wide size range of aggregated COD crystals. No significant effects of the treatment were noted in PH III stones. In disagreement with findings from previous studies, stones from patients with primary hyperoxaluria did not exclusively consist of COM. Progressive replacement of COD by small COM crystals could be caused by prolonged stone growth and residence times in the urinary tract, eventually resulting in complete replacement of calcium-oxalate dihydrate by the monohydrate form. The noted difference to the naïve PH I stone may reflect a reduced growth rate in response to treatment. This pilot study highlights the importance of detailed stone diagnostics and could be of therapeutic relevance in calcium-oxalates urolithiasis, provided that the effects of treatment can be reproduced in subsequent larger studies.

  5. A Marathon Not a Sprint: Lessons Learnt from the First Decade of Digitisation at the National Library of Wales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R. Arwel

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to provide an overview of developments in digitisation policy and practice at the National Library of Wales (NLW) from 1995 to 2007 and drawing out the lessons learnt. Design/methodology/approach: A chronological overview of developments focusing on the pilot phase, policy statements of 2001 and 2005 and on specific…

  6. Practical experiences of, and lessons learnt from, Internet technologies in higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Polovina

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper addresses how the Internet as computer-mediated communication is affecting teaching and learning in higher education institutions, particularly as these institutions face increasing competition due to the emergence of Web-based collaboration and assessment technologies. London’s South Bank University (SBU, a typical modern-day higher education institution is thereby in the process of integrating Internet technologies into its conventional and distance learning programmes. From its practical experiences so far SBU has learnt a variety of valuable lessons. In particular the technical and social aspects that determine the choice and use of the most appropriate software tools were identified, as well as a new approach towards online (Internet / Web subject reference sources was outlined. From SBU’s anecdotal experiences, useful recommendations are made for the effective use of Internet technologies that applies to many higher educational institutions.

  7. Participation in ICZM initiatives: critical aspects and lessons learnt from the Mediterranean and Black Sea experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriani, Stefano; Buono, Fabrizia; Tonino, Marco; Camuffo, Monica

    2015-03-15

    Public participation is recognized as a necessary tool to ensure a successful implementation of Integrated Coastal Zone Management (ICZM) strategies and plans. This paper, based on the experiences carried out in the Mediterranean and in the Black Sea within the EU FP7 project PEGASO, presents some critical aspects and lessons learnt regarding participation in ICZM projects. The research shows that data availability, the complexity of data interpretation, an inadequate legal and cultural framework and the difficulties in promoting integration of all the components of coastal management within short term projects are all elements that if not properly considered since the beginning of the participatory process may hinder public participation effectiveness. Moreover the definition of the spatial scale of coastal phenomenon as well as the discrepancy between the local scale of coastal governance and the complex multi-scale nature of coastal systems remain highly critical aspects to be addressed.

  8. Lessons Learnt from the Improvement of Customer Support Processes: A Case Study on Incident Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäntti, Marko

    IT Infrastructure Library (ITIL) is the most widely used IT service management framework that provides guidelines how to create, manage and support IT services. Service support processes, such as incident management and problem management, are among the first ITIL processes that organizations start to implement. However, several challenges may exist in the process implementation. The research question of this study is: which issues are important in establishing an ITIL-based incident management process? The main contribution of this paper is to present lessons learnt from an ITIL-based process improvement project that focused on establishing an incident management process in an IS department of a university hospital. Our results show that key issues in implementing incident management are to 1) define the basic concepts of incident management with concrete examples and 2) define process interfaces between incident management and other support processes.

  9. The Development of Computational Biology in South Africa: Successes Achieved and Lessons Learnt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Nicola J.; Christoffels, Alan; de Oliveira, Tulio; Gamieldien, Junaid; Hazelhurst, Scott; Joubert, Fourie; Kumuthini, Judit; Pillay, Ché S.; Snoep, Jacky L.; Tastan Bishop, Özlem; Tiffin, Nicki

    2016-01-01

    Bioinformatics is now a critical skill in many research and commercial environments as biological data are increasing in both size and complexity. South African researchers recognized this need in the mid-1990s and responded by working with the government as well as international bodies to develop initiatives to build bioinformatics capacity in the country. Significant injections of support from these bodies provided a springboard for the establishment of computational biology units at multiple universities throughout the country, which took on teaching, basic research and support roles. Several challenges were encountered, for example with unreliability of funding, lack of skills, and lack of infrastructure. However, the bioinformatics community worked together to overcome these, and South Africa is now arguably the leading country in bioinformatics on the African continent. Here we discuss how the discipline developed in the country, highlighting the challenges, successes, and lessons learnt. PMID:26845152

  10. Assembly and Quality Control of the LHC Cryostats at CERN Motivations, Means, Results and Lessons Learnt

    CERN Document Server

    Poncet, A; Parma, V; Strubin, P; Tock, JP; Tommasini, D

    2007-01-01

    In 2001, the project management decided to perform at CERN the final assembly of the LHC superconducting magnets with cryostat parts and cold masses produced by European Industry in large series. This industrial-like production has required a very significant investment in tooling, production facilities, engineering and quality control efforts, in contractual partnership with a consortium of firms. This unusual endeavour of a limited lifetime represented more than 850,000 working hours spanning over five years, the work being done on a result-oriented basis by the contractor. This paper presents the reasons for having conducted this project at CERN, summarizes the work breakdown structure, the production means and methods, the infrastructure specially developed, the tooling, logistics and quality control aspects of the work performed and the results achieved, in analytical form. Finally, the lessons learnt are outlined.

  11. Flipped Learning, MOOCs and Learning Analytics: Lessons learnt from a Web Map Design course redesign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treves, R.

    2013-12-01

    Five weeks content of a 12 week course in web map design were converted to 'flipped learning': Lecture sessions were replaced by online short video lectures and multiple choice questions to be completed outside class. Class time was taken up with activities and exercises linked to the online learning. Students use of the online content was carefully tracked and detailed student feedback gathered. The response from students was good, 90% of them completed all the out of class activities and their feedback was very positive. The format has the advantage of being easily repurposed as a MOOC or scaled up in other ways. Lessons learnt from the implementation of the materials and the analysis of the VLE logs will be discussed as will ongoing efforts to reuse the materials in a MOOC.

  12. Investing in the future: lessons learnt from communicating the results of HSV/ HIV intervention trials in South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Mayaud Philippe; Stadler Jonathan; Delany-Moretlwe Sinead; Rees Helen

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Communicating the results of randomised controlled trials may present challenges for researchers who have to work with communities and policy-makers to anticipate positive outcomes, while being aware that results may show no effect or harm. Methods We present a case study from the perspective of researchers in South Africa about the lessons learnt from communicating the results of four trials evaluating treatment for herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) as a new strategy fo...

  13. Importance of rodents for hydrology: lessons learnt from various field experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schaik, Loes; Zangerlé, Anne; Schneider, Anne-Kathrin; Schröder, Boris; Eccard, Jana

    2017-04-01

    organisms are known to create soil macropores of different sizes and with varying extent and orientation: most commonly earthworms, rodents, moles and roots. Preferential flow through macropore networks is dynamic and typically occurs when short individual macropores become connected at the hillslope scale as the nodes between the macropores become wet. Large lateral macropores may contribute to rapid subsurface stormflow of water and solutes at hillslope scale and supply a significant part of the catchment scale discharge during high intensity rainfall events even under relatively dry catchment state. Outflow from soil pipes, especially in the valley bottom or along the banking near to streams, is frequently observed, however, it remains a challenge to measure the spatial distribution, extent and connectivity of macropores at hill slope scales. We hypothesize that local information on organism abundances may be used as an indicator for spatial variability in infiltration, water storage and fluxes at the small scale and that knowledge on the landscape scale spatial distribution of organisms can provide information on connectivity of macropores at hillslope scale. Here we summarize the lessons learnt during three years of measurements aimed at determining the influence of rodent burrows on soil hydrology in a meso-scale catchment. Within the Attert Catchment (297 km2) in Luxembourg we performed sprinkling experiments with a brilliant blue tracer on twelve plots, of which six directly above rodent burrow openings and six on a surface without a rodent burrow opening, in order to examine the influence of the burrow openings on the infiltration pattern. Then we tested the extent of flow through mice burrows in different forest types, with varying geology and slope, by supplying 5 Liters of water with brilliant blue tracer directly to 24 burrow openings at soil surface. We excavated the burrows to measure how far the water was transported laterally in the burrow. Though

  14. Recruiting Dementia Caregivers Into Clinical Trials: Lessons Learnt From the Australian TRANSCENDENT Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Matthew J; Ziaian, Tahereh; Francis, Andrew; Agnew, Tamara

    2016-01-01

    The burden on those caring for a person with dementia is substantial. Although quality research assists in addressing the needs of these caregivers, recruiting caregivers into clinical studies is often problematic. This investigation explores the difficulties and successes in recruiting dementia caregivers into community-based clinical research by reporting the findings of a mixed-method substudy of a multicenter randomized controlled trial involving 40 community-dwelling dementia caregivers living in Adelaide, South Australia. Data for the substudy were derived from standardized trial monitoring documentation and structured telephone interviews. From a total of 16 distinct methods used across a 12-month recruitment campaign, the most cost-effective strategy was the distribution of flyers through a single study site. This approach generated the greatest number of enrollments of all methods used, achieving a 67% recruitment yield. The least cost-effective strategy, with a 0% recruitment yield, was the publication of a newspaper advertisement. Themes that emerged from the interviews pointed toward 5 key facilitators and 3 barriers to future trial recruitment. This study has generated new insights into the effective recruitment of dementia caregivers into clinical trials. We anticipate that these lessons learnt will assist in shaping the recruitment strategies of future studies of dementia caregivers.

  15. The early identification of psychosis: can lessons be learnt from cardiac stress testing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Swapnil; Ranganathan, Mohini; D'Souza, Deepak Cyril

    2016-01-01

    Psychotic disorders including schizophrenia are amongst the most debilitating psychiatric disorders. There is an urgent need to develop methods to identify individuals at risk with greater precision and as early as possible. At present, a prerequisite for a diagnosis of schizophrenia is the occurrence of a psychotic episode. Therefore, attempting to detect schizophrenia on the basis of psychosis is analogous to diagnosing coronary artery disease (CAD) after the occurrence of a myocardial infarction (MI). The introduction of cardiac stress testing (CST) has revolutionized the detection of CAD and the prevention and management of angina and MI. In this paper, we attempt to apply lessons learnt from CST to the early detection of psychosis by proposing the development of an analogous psychosis stress test. We discuss in detail the various parameters of a proposed psychosis stress test including the choice of a suitable psychological or psychopharmacological "stressor," target population, outcome measures, safety of the approach, and the necessary evolution of test to become clinically informative. The history of evolution of CST may guide the development of a similar approach for the detection and management of psychotic disorders. The initial development of a test to unmask latent risk for schizophrenia will require the selection of a suitable and safe stimulus and the development of outcome measures as a prelude to testing in populations with a range of risk to determine predictive value. The use of CST in CAD offers the intriguing possibility that a similar approach may be applied to the detection and management of schizophrenia.

  16. Changing Dimensions in IR- Need for New Strategy: Lessons to Be Learnt From Maruti Violence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pardeep Jain

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Labour unrest in the country is steadily leadingto violence. The protests of the workers against theiremployers are not confined to the peaceful carrying out ofprocessions. Strikes have become the bane of society. Thegap between the workers and the management is growingwith each passing day and thus leading to violentincidents. Poor living conditions of contract workers inindustrial clusters could be blamed for the recent troublesat Manesar, which saw a major violence at Maruti's plant.So lesson learnt is that there is a need to introspect thereasons behind such violent acts and to reformulate andproperly execute HR policies so that such terrific acts canbe avoided. The need of the hour is personal touchbetween the management and workers and timely redressof grievances. Labour reforms is a long-pending issue andyet another symptom of policy paralysis that has engulfedthe wider polity. Unless our political and corporate classshows greater resolve and will to carry forward reformsagenda in the labour market, there is every possibility thatwhatever progress India has made in past two decadeswould be lost. Organizations must create a workplaceenvironment based on transparent conversation so thatemployees do not have to seek help from unions.

  17. Evolved glyphosate-resistant weeds around the world: lessons to be learnt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powles, Stephen B

    2008-04-01

    Glyphosate is the world's most important herbicide, with many uses that deliver effective and sustained control of a wide spectrum of unwanted (weedy) plant species. Until recently there were relatively few reports of weedy plant species evolving resistance to glyphosate. Since 1996, the advent and subsequent high adoption of transgenic glyphosate-resistant crops in the Americas has meant unprecedented and often exclusive use of glyphosate for weed control over very large areas. Consequently, in regions of the USA where transgenic glyphosate-resistant crops dominate, there are now evolved glyphosate-resistant populations of the economically damaging weed species Ambrosia artemissifolia L., Ambrosia trifida L., Amaranthus palmeri S Watson, Amaranthus rudis JD Sauer, Amaranthus tuberculatus (Moq) JD Sauer and various Conyza and Lolium spp. Likewise, in areas of transgenic glyphosate-resistant crops in Argentina and Brazil, there are now evolved glyphosate-resistant populations of Sorghum halepense (L.) Pers and Euphorbia heterophylla L. respectively. As transgenic glyphosate-resistant crops will remain very popular with producers, it is anticipated that glyphosate-resistant biotypes of other prominent weed species will evolve over the next few years. Therefore, evolved glyphosate-resistant weeds are a major risk for the continued success of glyphosate and transgenic glyphosate-resistant crops. However, glyphosate-resistant weeds are not yet a problem in many parts of the world, and lessons can be learnt and actions taken to achieve glyphosate sustainability. A major lesson is that maintenance of diversity in weed management systems is crucial for glyphosate to be sustainable. Glyphosate is essential for present and future world food production, and action to secure its sustainability for future generations is a global imperative.

  18. Developing children's palliative care in Africa through beacon centres: lessons learnt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, Julia D; Marston, Joan; Selwyn, Casey; Ross-Gakava, Laura

    2013-02-18

    Much progress has been made in the provision of palliative care across sub-Saharan Africa, however much still remains to be done, particularly in the area of children's palliative care (CPC). The Beacon Centres programme was set up in 2009, aimed at improving access to CPC in South Africa, Uganda and Tanzania through more and better-trained health professionals and CPC clinical services of a high standard. Having identified sites in each country to develop into CPC Beacon Centres, Navigators were identified who would be the 'champions' for CPC in those sites and lead a programme of training, mentorship and support. Five navigators (2 in Uganda and Tanzania and 1 in South Africa) were trained between September and December 2009. Following this they undertook CPC needs assessments at the 3 centres and set up and delivered a six-month CPC training programme, providing mentorship and support to students to enable them to integrate CPC into their workplaces. To date, 188 participants have commenced the six-month course, with 80 having completed it. CPC has been integrated into the activities of the centres and a CPC virtual resource centre set up in South Africa. The achievements from the Beacon project have been great and the work of the navigators immense, but as in all projects it has not been without its challenges. Lessons learnt include issues around: the focus of the project; the length and nature of the training; assessment; accreditation; the choice of navigators; mentoring; administrative support; co-ordination; the choice of project sites; and the integration of CPC into services. The need for CPC is not going to go away and it is therefore important that models of scaling-up are found that are not only practical, feasible, affordable and sustainable, but that focus on the outcome of improved CPC for all those who need it. It is hoped that the lessons shared from the Beacon Project will help in developing and implementing such models.

  19. Research and innovation in sustainable forestry: lessons learnt to inform the policy making community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gérard Buttoud

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available From an already rich experience of cooperation between scientists and policy makers in the framework of international research institutions such as the International union of forest research organizations (IUFRO, the Center for international forest research (CIFOR and the European Forest Institute (EFI, as well as through the promotion and development of EU research projects and programs, some lessons can be drawn considering the possible role of scientists at the science-policy interface. Today, on the example of the global change - and especially the climatic changes that policy makers are demanding about-, most of the researches to be carried out have to answer social questions the solutions of which require the support of science. This is especially the case in the forestry field, which is characterized by the particularly long term of cycles and the great number of stakeholders interested in. Whilst decision making processes are complex systems, science is not the only source of knowledge useful for taking decisions, so that in a democratic context, research results have to be confronted to other lessons learnt (for instance from technical expertise, or from traditional knowledge in order to get accountability in terms of instrumentation. In scientific terms, it should certainly lead to multi-disciplinary approaches of the multifunctionality of forest and related techniques to be implemented. But this does not mean that research activities have to be assessed only against their instrumentality. However, research and public decision-making are very contrasting spheres, where the principles and professional types of behavior are basically different. This situation calls for a need for a clear separation of the respective roles. In addition, all scientific developments should not be driven from practical needs of decision-makers, since theoretical questions may indirectly build up the future reality. 

  20. The RAFT Telemedicine Network in Low and Middle Income Countries: Educational and Clinical Services, Lessons Learnt and Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georges eBediang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The objectives of this paper are to: i provide an overview of the educational and clinical experiences of the RAFT network, ii analyse key challenges and lessons learnt throughout a decade of activity and, iii draw a vision and perspectives of its sustainability.Methods: The study was carried out following three main stages: i a literature review, ii the analysis of key documents and iii discussions with key collaborators of the RAFT.Results: RAFT has been offering an important quantity of educational, clinical and public health activities during the last decade. The educational activities include: the weekly delivery of video-lectures for continuing and postgraduate medical education, the use of virtual patients for training in clinical decision making, research training activities using ICTs and other e-learning activities. The clinical and public health activities include: tele-expertise to support health professionals in the management of difficult clinical cases, the implementation of clinical information systems in African hospitals, the deployment of mHealth projects, etc. Since 2010, the RAFT has been extended to the Altiplano in Bolivia and Nepal (in progress. Lessons learnt and perspectives: Important lessons have been learnt from the accumulated experiences throughout these years. These lessons concern: social and organization, human resources, technologies and data security, policy and legislation, and economy and financing. Also, given the increase of the activities and the integration of eHealth and telemedicine in the health system of most of the countries, the RAFT network faces many other challenges and perspectives such as: learning throughout life, recognition and valorisation of teaching or learning activities, the impact evaluation of interventions, and the scaling up and transferability out of Africa of RAFT activities. Based on the RAFT experience, effective integration and optimum use of eHealth and

  1. Lessons learnt from the first controlled human malaria infection study conducted in Nairobi, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, Susanne H; Juma, Elizabeth; Salim, Amina; Magiri, Charles; Njenga, Daniel; Molyneux, Sassy; Njuguna, Patricia; Awuondo, Ken; Lowe, Brett; Billingsley, Peter F; Cole, Andrew O; Ogwang, Caroline; Osier, Faith; Chilengi, Roma; Hoffman, Stephen L; Draper, Simon J; Ogutu, Bernhards; Marsh, Kevin

    2015-04-28

    Controlled human malaria infection (CHMI) studies, in which healthy volunteers are infected with Plasmodium falciparum to assess the efficacy of novel malaria vaccines and drugs, have become a vital tool to accelerate vaccine and drug development. CHMI studies provide a cost-effective and expeditious way to circumvent the use of large-scale field efficacy studies to deselect intervention candidates. However, to date few modern CHMI studies have been performed in malaria-endemic countries. An open-label, randomized pilot CHMI study was conducted using aseptic, purified, cryopreserved, infectious P. falciparum sporozoites (SPZ) (Sanaria® PfSPZ Challenge) administered intramuscularly (IM) to healthy Kenyan adults (n = 28) with varying degrees of prior exposure to P. falciparum. The purpose of the study was to establish the PfSPZ Challenge CHMI model in a Kenyan setting with the aim of increasing the international capacity for efficacy testing of malaria vaccines and drugs, and allowing earlier assessment of efficacy in a population for which interventions are being developed. This was part of the EDCTP-funded capacity development of the CHMI platform in Africa. This paper discusses in detail lessons learnt from conducting the first CHMI study in Kenya. Issues pertinent to the African setting, including community sensitization, consent and recruitment are considered. Detailed reasoning regarding the study design (for example, dose and route of administration of PfSPZ Challenge, criteria for grouping volunteers according to prior exposure to malaria and duration of follow-up post CHMI) are given and changes other centres may want to consider for future studies are suggested. Performing CHMI studies in an African setting presents unique but surmountable challenges and offers great opportunity for acceleration of malaria vaccine and drug development. The reflections in this paper aim to aid other centres and partners intending to use the CHMI model in Africa.

  2. Asthma programmes in diverse regions of the world: challenges, successes and lessons learnt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalloo, U G; Walters, R D; Adachi, M; de Guia, T; Emelyanov, A; Fritscher, C C; Hong, J; Jimenez, C; King, G G; Lin, J; Loaiza, A; Nadeau, G; Neffen, H; Sekerel, B E; Yorgancioğlu, A; Zar, H J

    2011-12-01

    International surveys have demonstrated that asthma is still underdiagnosed and undertreated in many parts of the world. Despite improvements in the standard of asthma care delivered in many areas, as evidenced by improved global asthma mortality data, much information on projects and programmes undertaken in resource-limited regions of the world is not in the public domain. The aim of this report is to review projects and programmes in diverse regions around the world so that health care providers, planners and consumers may draw on the successes, failures and lessons learnt. Such real world experiences may contribute to achieving Global Initiative for Asthma goals of asthma control. Asthma projects and programmes in Argentina, Australia, Brazil, China, Japan, Mexico, Philippines, Russia, South Africa and Turkey were discussed by a group of experts in asthma care, the Advancing Asthma Care Network, from their respective countries, over a course of three satellite meetings in 2010. Collective analyses consistently identified low rates of dissemination and implementation of national and international treatment guidelines, low levels of continuing medical education and training of primary health care professionals and access and distribution of inhaled corticosteroids to be major barriers that are critical to the overall success of a national asthma management programme. In the less developed asthma programmes, under-recognition and undertreatment further limited the success of the programmes. Evidence from well-established national asthma management programmes suggests that establishment of a successful programme entails a logical progression through specific developmental stages, starting with political/stakeholder endorsement and commitment, followed by epidemiological evaluation, evaluation of disease burden, evaluation of access to care and best therapy, and finally optimisation and maintenance therapy for individual patients.

  3. Developing children’s palliative care in Africa through beacon centres: lessons learnt

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Much progress has been made in the provision of palliative care across sub-Saharan Africa, however much still remains to be done, particularly in the area of children’s palliative care (CPC). The Beacon Centres programme was set up in 2009, aimed at improving access to CPC in South Africa, Uganda and Tanzania through more and better-trained health professionals and CPC clinical services of a high standard. Having identified sites in each country to develop into CPC Beacon Centres, Navigators were identified who would be the ‘champions’ for CPC in those sites and lead a programme of training, mentorship and support. Five navigators (2 in Uganda and Tanzania and 1 in South Africa) were trained between September and December 2009. Following this they undertook CPC needs assessments at the 3 centres and set up and delivered a six-month CPC training programme, providing mentorship and support to students to enable them to integrate CPC into their workplaces. To date, 188 participants have commenced the six-month course, with 80 having completed it. CPC has been integrated into the activities of the centres and a CPC virtual resource centre set up in South Africa. The achievements from the Beacon project have been great and the work of the navigators immense, but as in all projects it has not been without its challenges. Lessons learnt include issues around: the focus of the project; the length and nature of the training; assessment; accreditation; the choice of navigators; mentoring; administrative support; co-ordination; the choice of project sites; and the integration of CPC into services. The need for CPC is not going to go away and it is therefore important that models of scaling-up are found that are not only practical, feasible, affordable and sustainable, but that focus on the outcome of improved CPC for all those who need it. It is hoped that the lessons shared from the Beacon Project will help in developing and implementing such models. PMID:23419095

  4. Lessons learnt from 20 years surveillance of malaria drug resistance prior to the policy change in Burkina Faso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinto, Halidou; Valea, Innocent; Ouédraogo, Jean-Bosco; Guiguemdé, Tinga Robert

    2016-01-01

    The history of drug resistance to the previous antimalarial drugs, and the potential for resistance to evolve to Artemisinin-based combination therapies, demonstrates the necessity to set-up a good surveillance system in order to provide early warning of the development of resistance. Here we report a review summarizing the history of the surveillance of drug resistance that led to the policy change in Burkina Faso. The first Plasmodium falciparum Chloroquine-Resistance strain identified in Burkina Faso was detected by an in vitro test carried out in Koudougou in 1983. Nevertheless, no further cases were reported until 1987, suggesting that resistant strains had been circulating at a low prevalence before the beginning of the systematic surveillance system from 1984. We observed a marked increase of Chloroquine-Resistance in 2002-2003 probably due to the length of follow-up as the follow-up duration was 7 or 14 days before 2002 and 28 days from 2002 onwards. Therefore, pre-2002 studies have probably under-estimated the real prevalence of Chloroquine-Resistance by not detecting the late recrudescence. With a rate of 8.2% treatment failure reported in 2003, Sulfadoxine-Pyrimethamine was still efficacious for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria in Burkina Faso but this rate might rapidly increase as the result of its spreading from neighboring countries and due to its current use for both the Intermittent Preventive Treatment in pregnant women and Seasonal Malaria Chemoprophylaxis. The current strategy for the surveillance of the Artemisinin-based combination treatments resistance should build on lessons learnt under the previous period of 20 years surveillance of Chloroquine and Sulfadoxine-Pyrimethamine resistance (1994-2004). The most important aspect being to extend the number of sentinel sites so that data would be less patchy and could help understanding the dynamic of the resistance.

  5. Investing in the future: lessons learnt from communicating the results of HSV/ HIV intervention trials in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayaud Philippe

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Communicating the results of randomised controlled trials may present challenges for researchers who have to work with communities and policy-makers to anticipate positive outcomes, while being aware that results may show no effect or harm. Methods We present a case study from the perspective of researchers in South Africa about the lessons learnt from communicating the results of four trials evaluating treatment for herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2 as a new strategy for HIV prevention. Results We show that contextual factors such as misunderstandings and mistrust played an important role in defining the communications response. Use of different approaches in combination was found to be most effective in building understanding, credibility and trust in the research process. During the communication process, researchers acted beyond their traditional role of neutral observers and became agents of social change. This change in role is in keeping with a global trend towards increased communication of research results and presents both opportunities and challenges for the conduct of future research. Conclusions Despite disappointing trial results which showed no benefit of HSV-2 treatment for HIV prevention, important lessons were learnt about the value of the communication process in building trust between researchers, community members and policy-makers, and creating an enabling environment for future research partnerships.

  6. Internet of Things Platform for Smart Farming: Experiences and Lessons Learnt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaraman, Prem Prakash; Yavari, Ali; Georgakopoulos, Dimitrios; Morshed, Ahsan; Zaslavsky, Arkady

    2016-01-01

    crop recommendations for any particular farm. SmartFarmNet can integrate virtually any IoT device, including commercially available sensors, cameras, weather stations, etc., and store their data in the cloud for performance analysis and recommendations. An evaluation of the SmartFarmNet platform and our experiences and lessons learnt in developing this system concludes the paper. SmartFarmNet is the first and currently largest system in the world (in terms of the number of sensors attached, crops assessed, and users it supports) that provides crop performance analysis and recommendations. PMID:27834862

  7. Internet of Things Platform for Smart Farming: Experiences and Lessons Learnt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaraman, Prem Prakash; Yavari, Ali; Georgakopoulos, Dimitrios; Morshed, Ahsan; Zaslavsky, Arkady

    2016-11-09

    crop recommendations for any particular farm. SmartFarmNet can integrate virtually any IoT device, including commercially available sensors, cameras, weather stations, etc., and store their data in the cloud for performance analysis and recommendations. An evaluation of the SmartFarmNet platform and our experiences and lessons learnt in developing this system concludes the paper. SmartFarmNet is the first and currently largest system in the world (in terms of the number of sensors attached, crops assessed, and users it supports) that provides crop performance analysis and recommendations.

  8. Internet of Things Platform for Smart Farming: Experiences and Lessons Learnt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prem Prakash Jayaraman

    2016-11-01

    and personalised crop recommendations for any particular farm. SmartFarmNet can integrate virtually any IoT device, including commercially available sensors, cameras, weather stations, etc., and store their data in the cloud for performance analysis and recommendations. An evaluation of the SmartFarmNet platform and our experiences and lessons learnt in developing this system concludes the paper. SmartFarmNet is the first and currently largest system in the world (in terms of the number of sensors attached, crops assessed, and users it supports that provides crop performance analysis and recommendations.

  9. Lessons learnt from past Flash Floods and Debris Flow events to propose future strategies on risk management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabello, Angels; Velasco, Marc; Escaler, Isabel

    2010-05-01

    Floods, including flash floods and debris flow events, are one of the most important hazards in Europe regarding both economic and life loss. Moreover, changes in precipitation patterns and intensity are very likely to increase due to the observed and predicted global warming, rising the risk in areas that are already vulnerable to floods. Therefore, it is very important to carry out new strategies to improve flood protection, but it is also crucial to take into account historical data to identify high risk areas. The main objective of this paper is to show a comparative analysis of the flood risk management information compiled in four test-bed basins (Llobregat, Guadalhorce, Gardon d'Anduze and Linth basins) from three different European countries (Spain, France and Switzerland) and to identify which are the lessons learnt from their past experiences in order to propose future strategies on risk management. This work is part of the EU 7th FP project IMPRINTS which aims at reducing loss of life and economic damage through the improvement of the preparedness and the operational risk management of flash flood and debris flow (FF & DF) events. The methodology followed includes the following steps: o Specific survey on the effectivity of the implemented emergency plans and risk management procedures sent to the test-bed basin authorities that participate in the project o Analysis of the answers from the questionnaire and further research on their methodologies for risk evaluation o Compilation of available follow-up studies carried out after major flood events in the four test-bed basins analyzed o Collection of the lessons learnt through a comparative analysis of the previous information o Recommendations for future strategies on risk management based on lessons learnt and management gaps detected through the process As the Floods Directive (FD) already states, the flood risks associated to FF & DF events should be assessed through the elaboration of Flood Risk

  10. Teachers' Social Capital as a Resource for Curriculum Development: Lessons Learnt in the Implementation of a Child-Friendly Schools Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modipane, Mpho; Themane, Mahlapahlapana

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on lessons learnt in the use of teachers' social capital as a resource for curriculum development, in the implementation of the Child-Friendly Schools (CFS) programme in South Africa. The researchers in this study were amongst the trainers. The study followed a qualitative research approach, where a descriptive research design…

  11. Influenza A (H1N1-2009) pandemic in Singapore--public health control measures implemented and lessons learnt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Joanne; Ng, Yeuk Fan; Cutter, Jeffery L; James, Lyn

    2010-04-01

    We describe the public health control measures implemented in Singapore to limit the spread of influenza A (H1N1-2009) and mitigate its social effects. We also discuss the key learning points from this experience. Singapore's public health control measures were broadly divided into 2 phases: containment and mitigation. Containment strategies included the triage of febrile patients at frontline healthcare settings, admission and isolation of confirmed cases, mandatory Quarantine Orders (QO) for close contacts, and temperature screening at border entry points. After sustained community transmission became established, containment shifted to mitigation. Hospitals only admitted H1N1-2009 cases based on clinical indications, not for isolation. Mild cases were managed in the community. Contact tracing and QOs tapered off, and border temperature screening ended. The 5 key lessons learnt were: (1) Be prepared, but retain flexibility in implementing control measures; (2) Surveillance, good scientific information and operational research can increase a system's ability to manage risk during a public health crisis; (3) Integrated systems-level responses are essential for a coherent public health response; (4) Effective handling of manpower surges requires creative strategies; and (5) Communication must be strategic, timely, concise and clear. Singapore's effective response to the H1N1-2009 pandemic, founded on experience in managing the 2003 SARS epidemic, was a whole-of-government approach towards pandemic preparedness planning. Documenting the measures taken and lessons learnt provides a learning opportunity for both doctors and policy makers, and can help fortify Singapore's ability to respond to future major disease outbreaks.

  12. Lessons learnt for Public Policy Maker from Relocation of Tsunami Affected Villagers in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamthonkiat, Daroonwan; Thuy Vu, Tuong

    2013-04-01

    facilities such as water, electricity and dumping area were not enough supported in some donated areas. 3)A lot of fishermen had turned to wage-earners or unfamiliar jobs to earn for their living. Some were jobless more than a year after relocation because of less skill for other jobs, high competition for less vacancies and no capital to start their small business. 4)After a few years of relocation and adaptation in the donated houses, we found that old and young generation became a major residence while much of the working generation fishermen went back to their villages for their fishing career. Some of them leaved the right of living in the donated houses by renting out to non-tsunami impact people or leaving their houses abandoned. As a lesson learnt from the relocation of the tsunami impact villagers in Thailand during 2005 - 2010, we could summarize some critical concerns for government policy makers as listed; 1)The government may support the certificate of the ownership or title deed with some conditions to the villagers who occupied on their lands before the conservative zones were announced. They should have the right to stay further and do eco-friendly activities for earning their lives. The villagers have no right to transfer the title deed or certificate to the third parties. Only eco-friendly equipments are permitted for fishing in this area. 2)After relocation to the higher ground, basic facilities (such as water, electricity and dumping area) should be sufficiently furnished. 3)Not only skill practicing for career options should be supported, finding job vacancy should run in parallel to ensure that the tsunami impact villagers can afford their living. 4)For reducing the right transfer or leaving the donated houses abandoned, annual or continuous survey to these residences should be conducted by government sectors until 80% of them had settled on their careers and adaptations. Location analysis should be conducted before construction of houses for disaster

  13. Coping with Natural Disasters: Lessons Learnt by a Head of Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, Beverley

    2011-01-01

    Since the first of the 29 significant earthquakes and thousands of aftershocks that the University of Canterbury (New Zealand) community has endured in the last year, Beverly Lord has learned a few lessons as a departmental head in a university during a time of natural disaster. Herein, she organizes and describes these lessons under five…

  14. Predicting the evolution of large cholera outbreaks: lessons learnt from the Haiti case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertuzzo, Enrico; Mari, Lorenzo; Righetto, Lorenzo; Knox, Allyn; Finger, Flavio; Casagrandi, Renato; Gatto, Marino; Rodriguez-Iturbe, Ignacio; Rinaldo, Andrea

    2013-04-01

    Mathematical models can provide key insights into the course of an ongoing epidemic, potentially aiding real-time emergency management in allocating health care resources and possibly anticipating the impact of alternative interventions. Spatially explicit models of waterborne disease are made routinely possible by widespread data mapping of hydrology, road network, population distribution, and sanitation. Here, we study the ex-post reliability of predictions of the ongoing Haiti cholera outbreak. Our model consists of a set of dynamical equations (SIR-like, i.e. subdivided into the compartments of Susceptible, Infected and Recovered individuals) describing a connected network of human communities where the infection results from the exposure to excess concentrations of pathogens in the water, which are, in turn, driven by hydrologic transport through waterways and by mobility of susceptible and infected individuals. Following the evidence of a clear correlation between rainfall events and cholera resurgence, we test a new mechanism explicitly accounting for rainfall as a driver of enhanced disease transmission by washout of open-air defecation sites or cesspool overflows. A general model for Haitian epidemic cholera and the related uncertainty is thus proposed and applied to the dataset of reported cases now available. The model allows us to draw predictions on longer-term epidemic cholera in Haiti from multi-season Monte Carlo runs, carried out up to January 2014 by using a multivariate Poisson rainfall generator, with parameters varying in space and time. Lessons learned and open issues are discussed and placed in perspective. We conclude that, despite differences in methods that can be tested through model-guided field validation, mathematical modeling of large-scale outbreaks emerges as an essential component of future cholera epidemic control.

  15. Lessons learnt from implementing an empirically informed recruitment approach for FEM-PrEP, a large HIV prevention clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parker C

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Caleb Parker,1 Amy Corneli,1 Kawango Agot,2 Jacob Odhiambo,2 Jesse Asewe,2 Khatija Ahmed,3 Joseph Skhosana,3 Malebo Ratlhagana,3 Michele Lanham,1 Christina Wong,1 Jennifer Deese,1 Rachel Manongi,4 Lut Van Damme,1On behalf of the FEM-PrEP recruitment group 1FHI 360, Global Health, Population and Nutrition, Durham, NC, USA; 2Impact Research and Development Organization, Kisumu, Kenya; 3Setshaba Research Centre, Soshanguve, Pretoria, South Africa; 4Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Centre, Moshi, Tanzania Abstract: We implemented an empirically informed, geographically based recruitment approach for FEM-PrEP, a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV prevention clinical trial of daily oral emtricitabine (FTC and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF for HIV prevention. During the formative research phase, we conducted a modification of the Priorities for Local AIDS Control Efforts (PLACE method and used those data and staff experiences to identify and prioritize for recruitment geographic areas where HIV incidence might be high. During the clinical trial, we implemented a routinely monitored and flexible recruitment plan in the geographical areas identified in the formative research. We describe three lessons learnt from implementing this approach: 1 the PLACE data were critical in identifying places presumed to be high risk; 2 staff experiences, in combination with PLACE data, were needed to inform a practical recruitment strategy; and 3 recruiting in establishments in priority areas identified by the PLACE data led to screening many HIV-positive women at the Bondo site (Kenya, placing additional burden on clinic staff. These lessons learnt highlight the critical importance of having a flexible and monitored recruitment strategy. Although we successfully recruited a study population at higher risk for HIV, FEM-PrEP was unable to determine the effectiveness of FTC/TDF for HIV prevention, due to low adherence to the study product among participants. We must

  16. Assessing costs and benefits of measures to achieve Good Environmental Status in European regional seas: Challenges, opportunities and lessons learnt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Börger

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The EU Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD requires Member States to assess the costs and benefits of Programmes of Measures (PoMs put in place to ensure that European marine waters achieve Good Environmental Status by 2020. An interdisciplinary approach is needed to carry out such an assessment whereby economic analysis is used to evaluate the outputs from ecological analysis that determines the expected effects of such management measures. This paper applies and tests an existing six-step approach to assess costs and benefits of management measures with potential to support the overall goal of the MSFD and discusses a range of ecological and economic analytical tools applicable to this task. Environmental cost-benefit analyses are considered for selected PoMs in three European case studies: Baltic Sea (Finland, East Coast Marine Plan area (UK and the Bay of Biscay (Spain. These contrasting case studies are used to investigate the application of environmental cost-benefit analysis including the challenges, opportunities and lessons learnt from using this approach. This paper demonstrates that there are opportunities in applying the six-step environmental cost-benefit analysis framework presented to assess the impact of PoMs. However, given demonstrated limitations of knowledge and data availability, application of other economic techniques should also be considered (although not applied here to complement the more formal environmental cost-benefit analysis approach.

  17. Nosocomial Cholera Outbreak in a Mental Hospital: Challenges and Lessons Learnt from Butabika National Referral Mental Hospital, Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bwire, Godfrey; Malimbo, Mugagga; Kagirita, Atek; Makumbi, Issa; Mintz, Eric; Mengel, Martin A; Orach, Christopher Garimoi

    2015-09-01

    During the last four decades, Uganda has experienced repeated cholera outbreaks in communities; no cholera outbreaks have been reported in Ugandan health facilities. In October 2008, a unique cholera outbreak was confirmed in Butabika National Mental Referral Hospital (BNMRH), Uganda. This article describes actions taken to control the outbreak, challenges, and lessons learnt. We reviewed patient and hospital reports for clinical symptoms and signs, treatment and outcome, patient mental diagnosis, and challenges noted during management of patients and contacts. Out of 114 BNMRH patients on two affected wards, 18 cholera cases and five deaths were documented for an attack rate of 15.8% and a case fatality rate of 28%. Wards and surroundings were intensively disinfected and 96 contacts (psychiatric patients) in the affected wards received chemoprophylaxis with oral ciprofloxacin 500 mg twice daily until November 5, 2008. We documented a nosocomial cholera outbreak in BNMRH with a high case fatality of 28% compared with the national average of 2.4% for cholera outbreaks in communities. To avoid cholera outbreaks and potentially high mortality among patients in mental institutions, procedures for prompt diagnosis, treatment, disinfection, and prophylaxis are needed and preemptive use of oral cholera vaccines should be considered. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  18. Nosocomial Cholera Outbreak in a Mental Hospital: Challenges and Lessons Learnt from Butabika National Referral Mental Hospital, Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bwire, Godfrey; Malimbo, Mugagga; Kagirita, Atek; Makumbi, Issa; Mintz, Eric; Mengel, Martin A.; Orach, Christopher Garimoi

    2015-01-01

    During the last four decades, Uganda has experienced repeated cholera outbreaks in communities; no cholera outbreaks have been reported in Ugandan health facilities. In October 2008, a unique cholera outbreak was confirmed in Butabika National Mental Referral Hospital (BNMRH), Uganda. This article describes actions taken to control the outbreak, challenges, and lessons learnt. We reviewed patient and hospital reports for clinical symptoms and signs, treatment and outcome, patient mental diagnosis, and challenges noted during management of patients and contacts. Out of 114 BNMRH patients on two affected wards, 18 cholera cases and five deaths were documented for an attack rate of 15.8% and a case fatality rate of 28%. Wards and surroundings were intensively disinfected and 96 contacts (psychiatric patients) in the affected wards received chemoprophylaxis with oral ciprofloxacin 500 mg twice daily until November 5, 2008. We documented a nosocomial cholera outbreak in BNMRH with a high case fatality of 28% compared with the national average of 2.4% for cholera outbreaks in communities. To avoid cholera outbreaks and potentially high mortality among patients in mental institutions, procedures for prompt diagnosis, treatment, disinfection, and prophylaxis are needed and preemptive use of oral cholera vaccines should be considered. PMID:26195468

  19. Lessons learnt and results from the first survey of transiting exoplanet atmospheres using a multi-object spectrograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desert, Jean-Michel

    2015-12-01

    We present results from the first comprehensive survey program dedicated to probing transiting exoplanet atmospheres using transmission spectroscopy with a multi-object spectrograph (MOS). Our three-year survey focused on nine close-in giant planets for which the wavelength dependent transit depths in the visible were measured with Gemini/GMOS. In total, about 40 transits (200 hours) have been secured, with each exoplanet observed on average during four transits. This approach allows for a high spectrophotometric precision (200-500 ppm / 10 nm) and for a unique and reliable estimate of systematic uncertainties. We present the main results from this survey, the challenges faced by such an experiment, and the lessons learnt for future MOS observations and instrument designs. We show that the precision achieved by this survey permits us to distinguish hazy atmospheres from cloud-free scenarios. We lay out the challenges that are in front of us whilst preparing future atmospheric reconnaissance of habitable worlds with multi-object spectrographs.

  20. Integrating Multiple Spatial Datasets to Assess Protected Areas: Lessons Learnt from the Digital Observatory for Protected Area (DOPA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grégoire Dubois

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The Digital Observatory for Protected Areas (DOPA has been developed to support the European Union’s efforts in strengthening our capacity to mobilize and use biodiversity data so that they are readily accessible to policymakers, managers, researchers and other users. Assessing protected areas for biodiversity conservation at national, regional and international scales implies that methods and tools are in place to evaluate characteristics such as the protected areas’ connectivity, their species assemblages (including the presence of threatened species, the uniqueness of their ecosystems, and the threats these areas are exposed to. Typical requirements for such analyses are data on protected areas, information on species distributions and threat status, and information on ecosystem distributions. By integrating all these global data consistently in metrics and indicators, the DOPA provides the means to allow end-users to evaluate protected areas individually but also to compare protected areas at the country and ecoregion level to, for example, identify potential priorities for further conservation research, action and funding. Since the metrics and indicators are available through web services, the DOPA further allows end-users to develop their own applications without requiring management of large databases and processing capacities. In addition to examples illustrating how the DOPA can be used as an aid to decision making, we discuss the lessons learnt in the development of this global biodiversity information system, and outline planned future developments for further supporting conservation strategies.

  1. Lessons learnt on biases and uncertainties in personal exposure measurement surveys of radiofrequency electromagnetic fields with exposimeters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolte, John F B

    2016-09-01

    Personal exposure measurements of radio frequency electromagnetic fields are important for epidemiological studies and developing prediction models. Minimizing biases and uncertainties and handling spatial and temporal variability are important aspects of these measurements. This paper reviews the lessons learnt from testing the different types of exposimeters and from personal exposure measurement surveys performed between 2005 and 2015. Applying them will improve the comparability and ranking of exposure levels for different microenvironments, activities or (groups of) people, such that epidemiological studies are better capable of finding potential weak correlations with health effects. Over 20 papers have been published on how to prevent biases and minimize uncertainties due to: mechanical errors; design of hardware and software filters; anisotropy; and influence of the body. A number of biases can be corrected for by determining multiplicative correction factors. In addition a good protocol on how to wear the exposimeter, a sufficiently small sampling interval and sufficiently long measurement duration will minimize biases. Corrections to biases are possible for: non-detects through detection limit, erroneous manufacturer calibration and temporal drift. Corrections not deemed necessary, because no significant biases have been observed, are: linearity in response and resolution. Corrections difficult to perform after measurements are for: modulation/duty cycle sensitivity; out of band response aka cross talk; temperature and humidity sensitivity. Corrections not possible to perform after measurements are for: multiple signals detection in one band; flatness of response within a frequency band; anisotropy to waves of different elevation angle. An analysis of 20 microenvironmental surveys showed that early studies using exposimeters with logarithmic detectors, overestimated exposure to signals with bursts, such as in uplink signals from mobile phones and Wi

  2. Which lesson can be learnt from a historical contamination analysis of the most polluted river in Europe?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lofrano, Giusy, E-mail: glofrano@unisa.it [Department of Chemistry and Biology, University of Salerno, via Giovanni Paolo II, 132-84084 Fisciano, Salerno (Italy); Institute of Methodologies for Environmental Analysis, National Research Council (CNR IMA), C. da S. Loja Z.I. Tito Scalo, I-85050 Potenza (Italy); Department of Environmental and Civil Engineering, University of Naples “Federico II”, Via Claudio, 21, 80127 Naples (Italy); Libralato, Giovanni [Department of Environmental Sciences, Informatics and Statistics, University Cà Foscari Venice, Campo della Celestia, 2737/B-30122 Venice (Italy); Institute of Marine Sciences, National Research Council (CNR ISMAR), Arsenale Tesa 104, Castello 2737/F-30122, Venice (Italy); Acanfora, Floriana Giuseppina [Department of Chemistry and Biology, University of Salerno, via Giovanni Paolo II, 132-84084 Fisciano, Salerno (Italy); Pucci, Luca [Legambiente Campania, Piazza Cavour, 168-80137 Naples (Italy); Carotenuto, Maurizio [Department of Chemistry and Biology, University of Salerno, via Giovanni Paolo II, 132-84084 Fisciano, Salerno (Italy)

    2015-08-15

    The Sarno River trend analysis during the last 60 years was traced focusing on the socio-economic and environmental issues. The river, originally worshiped as a god by Romans, is affected by an extreme level of environmental degradation, being sadly reputed as the most polluted river in Europe. This is the “not to be followed” example of the worst way a European river can be managed. Data about water, sediment, soil, biota and air contamination were collected from scientific papers, monitoring surveys, and technical reports depicting a sick river. Originally, the river was reputed as a source of livelihood, now it is considered a direct threat for human health. Wastewater can still flow through the river partially or completely untreated, waste production associated with the manufacture of metal products and leather tanning continues to suffer from the historical inadequacy of regional wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), associated with the partial or no reuse of effluents. All efforts should be devoted to solving the lack of wastewater and waste management, the gap in land planning, improving the capacity of existing WWTPs also via the construction of new sewer sections, restoring Sarno River minimum vital-flow, keeping to a minimum uncontrolled discharges as well as supporting river contracts. The 2015 goal stated by the Water Framework Directive (2000/60/EC) is still far to be reached. The lesson has not been learnt yet. - Highlights: • Sarno River is far from reaching the 2015 goal of Water Framework Directive. • A full knowledge of the health status of Sarno River was provided. • Poor wastewater management and agricultural pressures as main weaknesses • Restoration of vital flow and river contracts as immediate and low cost solutions.

  3. Medical lessons learnt from the US and Canadian experience of treating combat casualties from Afghanistan and Iraq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharm-Datta, Shreshth; McLenaghan, J

    2013-06-01

    The Winston Churchill Memorial Trust, established in 1965, funds Travelling Fellowships and both authors visited hospitals in Germany, Canada and the USA regarded as centres of excellence with expertise in the early care, reconstruction and rehabilitation of the combat casualties of our NATO Allies, as recipients of these Fellowships. This article presents some of the lessons learnt in the field of musculoskeletal trauma and rehabilitation from the Canadian and US military medical systems. In trauma, there were significant differences in wound debridement policy, use of external fixators for fractures, primary use of circular frames for open tibial fractures and a far more liberal use of bone morphogenetic protein in fracture treatment. Differences in soft tissue reconstruction policy regarding flaps for soft tissue cover over exposed bone, near-universal usage of topical negative pressure dressings and use of Allgöwer-Donati suture pattern to close all wounds were noted. Ertl amputation osteoplasty, a modified form of transtibial amputation, had also been reintroduced. In rehabilitation, the management of heterotopic ossification, in particular with imaging techniques and excision surgery, was identified. For the upper limb, we observed the patient training required to use a myoelectric hand and the future possibility of targeted muscle re-innervation to make controlling these myoelectric prostheses more natural using innate motor patterns. For the lower limb, we found we used identical above knee prostheses. For patients who have had limb reconstruction and have poor function, an energy-storing orthosis was demonstrated to compensate for the loss of range of motion and muscle power.

  4. Inquiries into Malaysia's socio-technical disasters: recommendations and lessons learnt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Said, Aini Mat; Ahmadun, Fakhru'l-Razi; Abdul Kadir, Razali; Daud, Mohamed

    2009-04-01

    Most democratic countries hold inquiries into disasters. One of their key functions is to establish the cause of an event and to learn lessons in order to prevent a recurrence. In addition, they offer an opportunity for communal catharsis, permitting the public to vent anger, distress and frustration and to exert pressure for policy changes. Malaysia has experienced six landmark socio-technical disasters since 1968, which resulted in the proposal or amendment of various safety/emergency acts and regulations. The authors used a grounded theory approach utilising a constant comparative method to analyse the recommendations made by the inquiries into these events. Data indicate that social and technical recommendations comprise 85 and 15 per cent, respectively, of the total recommendations made by the inquiry committees. This paper offers suggestions for improving the management of inquiry tribunals, as they will remain a valuable source of information for society and corporations to learn from past incidents.

  5. Antepartum uterine rupture in previous caesarean sections presenting as advanced extrauterine pregnancies: lessons learnt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramphal, Surandhra R; Moodley, Jagidesa

    2009-03-01

    In present day obstetric practice, rupture of a previously scarred uterus should be uncommon. It occurs in uterine pregnancy is made. We present a series of 7 cases, all of whom had one or more previous caesarean sections, were haemodynamically stable and were being managed expectantly, to illustrate the fact that ruptured uterus should be strongly considered in the differential diagnosis, even when the clinical signs and sonography are suggestive of an advanced extra-uterine pregnancy. The lessons in these cases fall into the following categories: 1. Ruptured uteri can occur in non-labouring women with previous lower segment caesarean sections. 2. Absence of signs of peritonism is possibly due to the fact that the pregnancy is extruded through the uterine rupture with the amniotic sac being intact and there is little or no bleeding into the abdominal cavity or vaginally. 3. Imaging techniques should focus on the size of the uterus, as an enlarged uterus in the background of an advanced extra-uterine pregnancy in a previously scarred uterus is highly suggestive of uterine rupture. Clinicians must strongly consider ruptured uteri in non labouring women with previous caesarean sections even when imaging modalities suggest an advanced extrauterine pregnancy. This will lead to earlier surgical treatment and appropriate information being provided to patients.

  6. Lessons learnt from the first efficacy trial of a new infant tuberculosis vaccine since BCG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tameris, Michele; McShane, Helen; McClain, J Bruce; Landry, Bernard; Lockhart, Stephen; Luabeya, Angelique K K; Geldenhuys, Hennie; Shea, Jacqui; Hussey, Gregory; van der Merwe, Linda; de Kock, Marwou; Scriba, Thomas; Walker, Robert; Hanekom, Willem; Hatherill, Mark; Mahomed, Hassan

    2013-03-01

    New tuberculosis (TB) vaccines are being developed to combat the global epidemic. A phase IIb trial of a candidate vaccine, MVA85A, was conducted in a high burden setting in South Africa to evaluate proof-of-concept efficacy for prevention of TB in infants. To describe the study design and implementation lessons from an infant TB vaccine efficacy trial. This was a randomised, controlled, double-blind clinical trial comparing the safety and efficacy of MVA85A to Candin control administered to 4-6-month-old, BCG-vaccinated, HIV-negative infants at a rural site in South Africa. Infants were followed up for 15-39 months for incident TB disease based on pre-specified endpoints. 2797 infants were enrolled over 22 months. Factors adversely affecting recruitment and the solutions that were implemented are discussed. Slow case accrual led to six months extension of trial follow up. The clinical, regulatory and research environment for modern efficacy trials of new TB vaccines are substantially different to that when BCG vaccine was first evaluated in infants. Future infant TB vaccine trials will need to allocate sufficient resources and optimise operational efficiency. A stringent TB case definition is necessary to maximize specificity, and TB case accrual must be monitored closely. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Lessons to be Learnt from Natural Control of HIV – Future Directions, Therapeutic and Preventive Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eShasha

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating data generated from persons who naturally control HIV without the need for antiretroviral treatment has led to significant insights into the mechanisms of durable control of AIDS virus infection. At the center of this control is the HIV-specific CD8 T cell response, and the basis for this CD8-mediated control is gradually being revealed. Genome wide association studies coupled with HLA sequence data implicate the nature of the HLA-viral peptide interaction as the major genetic factor modulating durable control of HIV, but that host genetic factors account for only around 20% of the variability in control. Other factors including specific functional characteristics of the TCR clonotypes generated in vivo, targeting of vulnerable regions of the virus that lead to fitness impairing mutations, immune exhaustion and host restriction factors that limit HIV replication all have been shown to additionally contribute to control. Moreover, emerging data indicate that the CD8 T cell response may be critical for attempts to purge virus infected cells following activation of the latent reservoir, and thus lessons learned from elite controllers are likely to impact the eradication agenda. Ongoing efforts are also needed to understand and address the role of immune activation in disease progression, as it becomes increasingly clear that durable immune control in elite controllers comes at a cost. Taken together, the research achievements in the attempt to unlock the mechanisms behind natural control of HIV will continue to be an important source of insights and ideas in the continuous search after an effective HIV vaccine, and for the attempts to achieve a sterilizing or functional cure in HIV positive patients with progressive infection.

  8. The dimensions of land use change in rural landscapes: lessons learnt from the GB Countryside Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Sandrine

    2009-07-01

    Rural landscapes are highly dynamic and their change impacts on a number of ecological processes such as the dynamics of biodiversity. Although a substantial amount of research has focused on quantifying these changes and their impact on biodiversity, most studies have focused on single dimensions of land use change. This lack of integration in land use change studies can be explained by the fact that data on the spatial, temporal, and ecological dimensions of land use are seldom available for the same geographical location. In this paper, the benefits of taking into account these three dimensions are illustrated with results derived from the Great Britain Countryside Surveys (CS), a large-scale monitoring programme designed to assess change in the extent and ecological condition of British habitats. The overview of CS results presented in this paper shows that (1) changes in land use composition will translate into a variety of spatial patterns; (2) the temporal stability of land use is often lower than can be expected; and (3) there can be large-scale shifts in the ecological condition of the land use types that form our rural landscapes. The benefits of integrated rural landscape studies are discussed in the context of other national monitoring programmes.

  9. Communication in a Human biomonitoring study: Focus group work, public engagement and lessons learnt in 17 European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exley, Karen; Cano, Noemi; Aerts, Dominique; Biot, Pierre; Casteleyn, Ludwine; Kolossa-Gehring, Marike; Schwedler, Gerda; Castaño, Argelia; Angerer, Jürgen; Koch, Holger M; Esteban, Marta; Schoeters, Greet; Den Hond, Elly; Horvat, Milena; Bloemen, Louis; Knudsen, Lisbeth E; Joas, Reinhard; Joas, Anke; Dewolf, Marie-Christine; Van de Mieroop, Els; Katsonouri, Andromachi; Hadjipanayis, Adamos; Cerna, Milena; Krskova, Andrea; Becker, Kerstin; Fiddicke, Ulrike; Seiwert, Margarete; Mørck, Thit A; Rudnai, Peter; Kozepesy, Szilvia; Cullen, Elizabeth; Kellegher, Anne; Gutleb, Arno C; Fischer, Marc E; Ligocka, Danuta; Kamińska, Joanna; Namorado, Sónia; Reis, M Fátima; Lupsa, Ioana-Rodica; Gurzau, Anca E; Halzlova, Katarina; Jajcaj, Michal; Mazej, Darja; Tratnik, Janja Snoj; Huetos, Olga; López, Ana; Berglund, Marika; Larsson, Kristin; Sepai, Ovnair

    2015-08-01

    A communication strategy was developed by The Consortium to Perform Human Biomonitoring on a European Scale (COPHES), as part of its objectives to develop a framework and protocols to enable the collection of comparable human biomonitoring data throughout Europe. The framework and protocols were tested in the pilot study DEMOCOPHES (Demonstration of a study to Coordinate and Perform Human biomonitoring on a European Scale). The aims of the communication strategy were to raise awareness of human biomonitoring, encourage participation in the study and to communicate the study results and their public health significance. It identified the audiences and key messages, documented the procedure for dissemination of results and was updated as the project progressed. A communication plan listed the tools and materials such as press releases, flyers, recruitment letters and information leaflets required for each audience with a time frame for releasing them. Public insight research was used to evaluate the recruitment material, and the feedback was used to improve the documents. Dissemination of results was coordinated in a step by step approach by the participating countries within DEMOCOPHES, taking into account specific national messages according to the needs of each country. Participants received individual results, unless they refused to be informed, along with guidance on what the results meant. The aggregate results and policy recommendations were then communicated to the general public and stakeholders, followed by dissemination at European level. Several lessons were learnt that may assist other future human biomonitoring studies. Recruitment took longer than anticipated and so social scientists, to help with community engagement, should be part of the research team from the start. As a European study, involving multiple countries, additional considerations were needed for the numerous organisations, different languages, cultures, policies and priorities

  10. Swarm slide - debris flow disaster induced by extreme rainfall in Hiroshima, August 2014 and lessons learnt in urban designing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuoka, H.; Wang, C.

    2015-12-01

    Hiroshima city was hit by swarm debris flows along a narrow, and linear-shaped rain band of 2 km x 10 km which appeared in the early morning of August 20, 2014. Most of the flows were induced by shallow slide in the upstream. This disaster claimed 74 death, although this city experienced very similar disaster in 1999, claiming more than 30 residents lives. In the most severely affected debris flow torrent, more than 50 residents were killed. Most of the casualties arose in the wooden, vulnerable houses constructed in front of the exit of torrents. Points and lessons learnt from the disaster are as follows:1. Authors collected two types of sands from the source scar of the initial debris slides which induced debris flows. Tested by the ring shear apparatus under pore-pressure control condition, clear "Sliding surface liquefaction" was confirmed for both samples even under small normal stress, representing the small thickness of the slides. These results shows even instant excess pore pressure could initiate the slides and trigger slide-induced debris flow byundrained loading onto the torrent deposits.2. Apparently long-term land-use change since 1945 affected and raised the vulnerability of the community. Residential area had expanded into hill-slope (mountainous / semi-mountainous area) especially along the torrents. Those communities were developed on the past debris flow fan.3. As the devastated area is very close to downtown of Hiroshima city, it gave large societal impact to the Japanese citizens. After 1999 Hiroshima debris flow disaster, the Landslide disaster reduction law which intends to promote designation of landslide potential risk zones, was adopted in 2000. Immediately after 2014 disaster, national diet approved revision of the bill to promote rapid completion of the designation over the national territory. MLIT (Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Tranportation and Tourism) decided to install X-band rain radars at more sites to cover whole city zones

  11. Stolen Manuscript: Lessons Learnt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Sanson

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available In 2000, the 13th-century Hebrew Bible, known as Hebrew 52, was discovered missing at the National Library of France. Investigations led to the arrest of the National Library of France's chief curator of Hebrew Collection Michel Garel in 2004. In response to this event the National Library of France has implemented a security plan which includes four main fields: spaces and access controls, preservation and control of collections, measures applied to library staff and readers, and national and international cooperation.

  12. Delusional parasitosis: lessons learnt.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ahmad, Kashif

    2012-01-31

    Delusional parasitosis manifests in the patient\\'s firm belief that they have skin symptoms due to an infestation with insects. Patients often refuse to seek psychiatric care. This study reassessed patients with delusional parasitosis in order to review and learn from them, which is important due to the significant morbidity of this condition and the therapeutic difficulties it presents to the dermatologist. Between 1995 and 2008, 13 patients with delusional parasitosis (6 men, 7 women; mean age 46 years) were included in this retrospective study. Mean duration of follow-up was 50.1 months. Nine patients were treated with pimozide, but only two had complete remission. Four were treated with sulpiride with two reported partial remissions. Risperidone was given to four patients, resulting in one partial remission. Eight patients were seen in the last 6 months and five were lost to follow-up. These findings highlight the difficulties encountered in diagnosing delusional parasitosis, the lack of response to neuroleptic medication, compliance problems and the dermatologist\\'s dilemma of managing a psychiatric condition in a dermatological setting.

  13. Real World Data and Service Integration: Demonstrations and Lessons Learnt from the GEOSS Architecture Implementation Pilot Phase Four

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonis, I.; Alameh, N.; Percivall, G.

    2012-04-01

    that can be achieved using currently available standards and corresponding products and implementations. The AIP-4 integration testing process proved that the integration of heterogeneous data resources available via interoperability arrangements such as WMS, WFS, WCS and WPS indeed works. However, the integration often required various levels of customizations on the client side to accommodate for variations in the service implementations. Those variations seem to be based on both malfunctioning service implementations as well as varying interpretations of or inconsistencies in existing standards. Other interoperability issues identified revolve around missing metadata or using unrecognized identifiers in the description of GEOSS resources. Once such issues are resolved, continuous compliance testing is necessary to ensure minimizing variability of implementations. Once data providers can choose from a set of enhanced implementations for offering their data using consistent interoperability arrangements, the barrier to client and decision support implementation developers will be lowered, leading to true leveraging of earth observation data through GEOSS. AIP-4 results, lessons learnt from previous AIPs 1-3 and close coordination with the Infrastructure Implementation Board (IIB), the successor of the Architecture and Data Committee (ADC), form the basis in the current preparation phase for the next Architecture Implementation Pilot, AIP-5. The Call For Participation will be launched in February and the pilot will be conducted from May to November 2012. The current planning foresees a scenario- oriented approach, with possible scenarios coming from the domains of disaster management, health (including air quality and waterborne diseases), water resource observations, energy, biodiversity and climate change, and agriculture.

  14. Process, practice and priorities — key lessons learnt undertaking sensitive social reconnaissance research as part of an (UNESCO-IOC) International Tsunami Survey Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zijll de Jong, Shona L.; Dominey-Howes, Dale; Roman, Carolina E.; Calgaro, Emma; Gero, Anna; Veland, Siri; Bird, Deanne K.; Muliaina, Tolu; Tuiloma-Sua, Dawn; Afioga, Taulagi Latu

    2011-07-01

    The 29 September 2009 South Pacific tsunami has had a lasting impact upon local coastal villages and global collaborative research efforts. Locally, the impact of the tsunami is one of the most severe disasters Samoa has experienced in the last several decades. Within one week of the event, 143 people died. Approximately 6000 traumatized men, women and children - terrified of the sea - refused to return to live or work in their rural, coastal villages, which in turn has had broad consequences for humanitarian emergency relief distribution networks and early recovery planning efforts. Researchers came from all over the world to participate in the UNESCO International Oceanographic Commission (IOC) Samoa International Tsunami Survey Team (ITST). Focusing on the need for interdisciplinary research, for the first time, a social impact assessment team (SIT) was expressly invited to participate. Within days of the tsunami, a group of Australian, New Zealand, American, Fijian, and Japanese disaster researchers began to discuss how they might develop a social science reconnaissance research plan using innovative approaches and best practice. This paper presents an overview of challenges faced by the social impact assessment team with a focus on lessons to be learnt from this experience. We discuss the need to clarify project boundaries, develop a core research agenda and project milestones, and develop day-to-day fieldwork work plans and at the same time be sensitive to the emotional needs of the interviewees as well as the researchers. We also make several practical suggestions for future social reconnaissance research with a set of recommendations to support disaster researchers as they plan their own research projects. The inclusion of a social impacts assessment group within a UNESCO-IOC ITST was a valuable response to the increasing need for responsible social research in sensitive topics of post-disaster analysis. Social scientists are aware that disaster social

  15. Very Large System Dynamics Models - Lessons Learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob J. Jacobson; Leonard Malczynski

    2008-10-01

    This paper provides lessons learned from developing several large system dynamics (SD) models. System dynamics modeling practice emphasize the need to keep models small so that they are manageable and understandable. This practice is generally reasonable and prudent; however, there are times that large SD models are necessary. This paper outlines two large SD projects that were done at two Department of Energy National Laboratories, the Idaho National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories. This paper summarizes the models and then discusses some of the valuable lessons learned during these two modeling efforts.

  16. Patience, persistence and pragmatism: experiences and lessons learnt from the implementation of clinically integrated teaching and learning of evidence-based health care - a qualitative study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taryn Young

    Full Text Available Clinically integrated teaching and learning are regarded as the best options for improving evidence-based healthcare (EBHC knowledge, skills and attitudes. To inform implementation of such strategies, we assessed experiences and opinions on lessons learnt of those involved in such programmes.We conducted semi-structured interviews with 24 EBHC programme coordinators from around the world, selected through purposive sampling. Following data transcription, a multidisciplinary group of investigators carried out analysis and data interpretation, using thematic content analysis. Successful implementation of clinically integrated teaching and learning of EBHC takes much time. Student learning needs to start in pre-clinical years with consolidation, application and assessment following in clinical years. Learning is supported through partnerships between various types of staff including the core EBHC team, clinical lecturers and clinicians working in the clinical setting. While full integration of EBHC learning into all clinical rotations is considered necessary, this was not always achieved. Critical success factors were pragmatism and readiness to use opportunities for engagement and including EBHC learning in the curriculum; patience; and a critical mass of the right teachers who have EBHC knowledge and skills and are confident in facilitating learning. Role modelling of EBHC within the clinical setting emerged as an important facilitator. The institutional context exerts an important influence; with faculty buy-in, endorsement by institutional leaders, and an EBHC-friendly culture, together with a supportive community of practice, all acting as key enablers. The most common challenges identified were lack of teaching time within the clinical curriculum, misconceptions about EBHC, resistance of staff, lack of confidence of tutors, lack of time, and negative role modelling.Implementing clinically integrated EBHC curricula requires institutional

  17. Forums for consultation and follow-up of the peace agreements in Guatemala: lessons learnt for territorial peace in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile Mouly

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This article considers the experience of the forums for consultation and the follow-up of the peace agreements in Guatemala and draws lessons for territorial peace in Colombia. Based on data from observation, interviews, and documents, it analyses how the consultation forums evolved into an infrastructure for peace, and the role they played in the decentralization of peace implementation. From this experience, It emphasizes the importance of the departmental level as a bridge between the grassroots and decision makers at the central level, and of the participation of traditionally marginalized groups for territorial peace. Additionally, the successful local peacebuilding initiatives that emerged during the war must be considered. It also discusses the role of multisectoral spaces in the peaceful transformation of local conflicts, and the need to maintain a balance between institutionalization and flexibility.

  18. Lessons learnt from metal-on-metal hip arthroplasties will lead to safer innovation for all medical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Alister J; Sabah, Shiraz A; Henckel, Johann; Lloyd, Gwynneth; Skinner, John A

    2015-01-01

    Metal-on-metal bearings were re-popularised in the late 1990s with the introduction of modern hip resurfacing. Large diameter (LD) metal-on-metal (MoM) hips became more prevalent and have been the least successful group of hip implants ever used. They were rapidly adopted from 2004 until the British Hip Society stopped their use in 2012. Well functioning MoM hip results (including the BHR and Metasul) are hidden in the mire of poor results from the group of all MoM bearings.We have reviewed what happened and we make 3 observations. Firstly, collaboration between surgeons and then between surgeons and other disciplines, first identified and then solved the clinical management problems. Secondly, the problems with MoM hips occurred because hip simulation was inadequate at predicting performance in patients. They gave no indications of the biological effects of wear in the human environment. Lastly, retrieval of failed implants was essential to understanding why failure occurred.These lessons must never be forgotten and must form the basis by which new or altered implants are introduced and how they should be monitored. This will enable safer innovation for patients, surgeons and manufacturers. The problems with MoM hips will not have been in vain.

  19. Lessons learnt from a series of hemodynamic and interventional complications during pulmonary valvotomy and device closure of ventricular septal defect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Kumar Singhi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In an adolescent girl with coexistent valvar pulmonary stenosis (PS and muscular ventricular septal defect (VSD causing right to left shunt and severe cyanosis, a series of complications were encountered during transcatheter intervention. After balloon pulmonary valvotomy (BPV and device closure of the VSD, dynamic infundibular hypercontractility elevated the right ventricular (RV systolic pressures leading to embolization of the device into the left ventricle. During retrieval of the device from the left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT, there was injury to the atrioventricular nodal tissue resulting in transient complete heart block. Even though the device was successfully retrieved out from the right femoral arterial access, there was a retroperitoneal hematoma causing severe anemia. A combination of dynamic infundibular obstruction, intravascular volume depletion caused by hemorrhage, low oxygen carrying capacity due to anemia, and inotropes resulted in a life-threatening hypercyanotic spell. Once this combination of suicidal hypercontractile right ventricle, anemia, and dehydration was recognized; management of the pathophysiology resulted in recovery of the patient. On a subsequent day, device closure of the VSD was complicated by unstable device position, but was finally achieved by an innovative device stabilization technique. We propose to explain the basis of hemodynamic and procedural complications, their recognition, and management. During preparatory stage before interventions in patients with multiple defects, which are linked by strong hemodynamic interdependence, meticulous planning should be done and multiple untoward events should be foreseen. While a few complications were completely unanticipated, some others could have been predicted.

  20. Modelling of marine radionuclide dispersion in IAEA MODARIA program: Lessons learnt from the Baltic Sea and Fukushima scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periáñez, R; Bezhenar, R; Brovchenko, I; Duffa, C; Iosjpe, M; Jung, K T; Kobayashi, T; Lamego, F; Maderich, V; Min, B I; Nies, H; Osvath, I; Outola, I; Psaltaki, M; Suh, K S; de With, G

    2016-11-01

    State-of-the art dispersion models were applied to simulate (137)Cs dispersion from Chernobyl nuclear power plant disaster fallout in the Baltic Sea and from Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant releases in the Pacific Ocean after the 2011 tsunami. Models were of different nature, from box to full three-dimensional models, and included water/sediment interactions. Agreement between models was very good in the Baltic. In the case of Fukushima, results from models could be considered to be in acceptable agreement only after a model harmonization process consisting of using exactly the same forcing (water circulation and parameters) in all models. It was found that the dynamics of the considered system (magnitude and variability of currents) was essential in obtaining a good agreement between models. The difficulties in developing operative models for decision-making support in these dynamic environments were highlighted. Three stages which should be considered after an emergency, each of them requiring specific modelling approaches, have been defined. They are the emergency, the post-emergency and the long-term phases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Blending Pan-European and local hydrological models for water resource assessment in Mediterranean areas: lessons learnt from a mountainous catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    José Polo, María; José Pérez-Palazón, María; Saénz de Rodrigáñez, Marta; Pimentel, Rafael; Arheimer, Berit

    2017-04-01

    Global hydrological models provide scientists and technicians with distributed data over medium to large areas from which assessment of water resource planning and use can be easily performed. However, scale conflicts between global models' spatial resolution and the local significant spatial scales in heterogeneous areas usually pose a constraint for the direct use and application of these models' results. The SWICCA (Service for Water Indicators in Climate Change Adaptation) Platform developed under the Copernicus Climate Change Service (C3S) offers a wide range of both climate and hydrological indicators obtained on a global scale with different time and spatial resolutions. Among the different study cases supporting the SWICCA demonstration of local impact assessment, the Sierra Nevada study case (South Spain) is a representative example of mountainous coastal catchments in the Mediterranean region. This work shows the lessons learnt during the study case development to derive local impact indicator tailored to suit the local end-users of water resource in this snow-dominated area. Different approaches were followed to select the most accurate method to downscale the global data and variables to the local level in a highly abrupt topography, in a sequential step approach. 1) SWICCA global climate variable downscaling followed by river flow simulation from a local hydrological model in selected control points in the catchment, together with 2) SWICCA global river flow values downscaling to the control points followed by corrections with local transfer functions were both tested against the available local river flow series of observations during the reference period. This test was performed for the different models and the available spatial resolutions included in the SWICCA platform. From the results, the second option, that is, the use of SWICCA river flow variables, performed the best approximations, once the local transfer functions were applied to the

  2. Integrated community case management of malaria, pneumonia and diarrhoea across three African countries: A qualitative study exploring lessons learnt and implications for further scale up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare Strachan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies highlight the effectiveness of an integrated approach for the management of malaria, pneumonia and diarrhoea at the community level. There has however been little study on lessons learnt from implementation in practice and stakeholder experiences which could inform future programmatic planning and evaluation frameworks. A participatory, qualitative evaluation was conducted in the three varied settings of South Sudan, Uganda and Zambia, which have seen the scale up of integrated community case management (iCCM over the last five years. All key in–country stakeholders were consulted on study design, with a particular focus on scope and methodology. Data collection methods included stakeholder consultations (key informant interviews, focus group discussions, and a review of project and Ministry of Health documentation. Data analysis followed the Framework Approach. Results suggest that iCCM implementation generally followed national pre–agreed guidelines. Overarching key programmatic recommendations included: collaboration with implementing partners in planning stages to positively impact on community acceptance and ownership; adoption of participatory training methods adapted to low literacy populations; development of alternative support supervision methods such as peer support groups; full integration of community level data into the health management information system and emphasizing data analysis, use and feedback at all levels; strengthened supply chains through improved quantification and procurement of commodities in conjunction with the national distribution network; community engagement to establish a support system for community health workers to increase their motivation; enhanced sensitisation and behaviour change communication to raise awareness and usage of appropriate health services; and advocacy at the national level for funding and logistical support for the continuation and integration of iCCM. This

  3. Integrated community case management of malaria, pneumonia and diarrhoea across three African countries: A qualitative study exploring lessons learnt and implications for further scale up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strachan, Clare; Wharton-Smith, Alexandra; Sinyangwe, Chomba; Mubiru, Denis; Ssekitooleko, James; Meier, Joslyn; Gbanya, Miatta; Tibenderana, James K; Counihan, Helen

    2014-12-01

    Numerous studies highlight the effectiveness of an integrated approach for the management of malaria, pneumonia and diarrhoea at the community level. There has however been little study on lessons learnt from implementation in practice and stakeholder experiences which could inform future programmatic planning and evaluation frameworks. A participatory, qualitative evaluation was conducted in the three varied settings of South Sudan, Uganda and Zambia, which have seen the scale up of integrated community case management (iCCM) over the last five years. All key in-country stakeholders were consulted on study design, with a particular focus on scope and methodology. Data collection methods included stakeholder consultations (key informant interviews, focus group discussions), and a review of project and Ministry of Health documentation. Data analysis followed the Framework Approach. Results suggest that iCCM implementation generally followed national pre-agreed guidelines. Overarching key programmatic recommendations included: collaboration with implementing partners in planning stages to positively impact on community acceptance and ownership; adoption of participatory training methods adapted to low literacy populations; development of alternative support supervision methods such as peer support groups; full integration of community level data into the health management information system and emphasizing data analysis, use and feedback at all levels; strengthened supply chains through improved quantification and procurement of commodities in conjunction with the national distribution network; community engagement to establish a support system for community health workers to increase their motivation; enhanced sensitisation and behaviour change communication to raise awareness and usage of appropriate health services; and advocacy at the national level for funding and logistical support for the continuation and integration of iCCM. This qualitative study is a

  4. Increased uptake of intermittent preventive treatment for malaria in pregnant women in Zambia(2006–2012):Potential determinants and highlight of lessons learnt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Freddie Masaninga; Mary Katepa Bwalya; Sarai Malumo; Busiku Hamainza; Peter Songolo; Mulakwa Kamuliwo; Martin Meremikwu; Lawrence Kazembe; Jacob Mufunda; Olusegun Ayorinde Babaniyi

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To assess potential determinants of uptake and highlight lessons learnt from the implementation of intermittent preventive treatment(IPTp), given to pregnant women as early as possible during the second trimester in Zambia.Methods: Data from four national malaria surveys(2006, 2008, 2010, 2012) were reviewed, and proportions of pregnant women attending antenatal clinics(ANCs) who received two or more doses of sulfadoxine–pyrimethamine(IPTp2) were compared by place of residence, education level, and wealth status. Malaria cases and deaths in pregnant women, from Health Information Management System 2011–2013, were analyzed to determine malaria burden in pregnancy in Zambia. A multiple logistic regression model was applied to identify potential determinants of IPTp uptake.Results: The proportion of pregnant women who took IPTp at ANCs increased from near zero at inception in 2001 to 61.9% in 2006; and to 72% by 2012(P < 0.001), and overall the uptake was 1.41 times higher in 2012 compared to 2006. From 2006 to 2012,IPTp2 uptake among women with no formal education increased from 51% to 68%(P < 0.1). Likewise, uptake among pregnant women with the lowest wealth index increased from 58.2% to 61.2%. By 2012, IPTp uptake among pregnant women within the lowest wealth index increased to a similar level as the women with high wealth index(P = 0.05). Incidence of malaria cases, hospital admissions and mortality during pregnancy decreased between 2011 and 2013. Overall, increased IPTp uptake was associated with being in urban areas(OR = 1.56, 95% CI: 1.39–1.74), having college(OR = 1.83,95% CI: 1.25–2.75) or secondary education(OR = 1.68, 95% CI: 1.44–1.96) or of being of higher wealth status(OR = 1.86, 95% CI: 1.60–2.17).Conclusions: Zambia has increased IPTp uptake through ANC for all women. The malaria control program has contributed to increasing access to health services and reducing demographic and socioeconomic disparities.

  5. Increased uptake of intermittent preventive treatment for malaria in pregnant women in Zambia (2006-2012):Potential determinants and highlight of lessons learnt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Freddie Masaninga; Olusegun Ayorinde Babaniyi; Mary Katepa Bwalya; Sarai Malumo; Busiku Hamainza; Peter Songolo; Mulakwa Kamuliwo; Martin Meremikwu; Lawrence Kazembe; Jacob Mufunda

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess potential determinants of uptake and highlight lessons learnt from the implementation of intermittent preventive treatment (IPTp), given to pregnant women as early as possible during the second trimester in Zambia. Methods: Data from four national malaria surveys (2006, 2008, 2010, 2012) were reviewed, and proportions of pregnant women attending antenatal clinics (ANCs) who received two or more doses of sulfadoxine–pyrimethamine (IPTp2) were compared by place of residence, education level, and wealth status. Malaria cases and deaths in pregnant women, from Health Information Management System 2011–2013, were analyzed to determine malaria burden in pregnancy in Zambia. A multiple logistic regression model was applied to identify potential determinants of IPTp uptake. Results: The proportion of pregnant women who took IPTp at ANCs increased from near zero at inception in 2001 to 61.9%in 2006;and to 72%by 2012 (P<0.001), and overall the uptake was 1.41 times higher in 2012 compared to 2006. From 2006 to 2012, IPTp2 uptake among women with no formal education increased from 51% to 68%(P < 0.1). Likewise, uptake among pregnant women with the lowest wealth index increased from 58.2%to 61.2%. By 2012, IPTp uptake among pregnant women within the lowest wealth index increased to a similar level as the women with high wealth index (P = 0.05). Incidence of malaria cases, hospital admissions and mortality during preg-nancy decreased between 2011 and 2013. Overall, increased IPTp uptake was associated with being in urban areas (OR=1.56, 95%CI:1.39–1.74), having college (OR=1.83, 95%CI:1.25–2.75) or secondary education (OR=1.68, 95%CI:1.44–1.96) or of being of higher wealth status (OR=1.86, 95%CI:1.60–2.17). Conclusions: Zambia has increased IPTp uptake through ANC for all women. The malaria control program has contributed to increasing access to health services and reducing demographic and socioeconomic disparities.

  6. Locally optimal control under unknown dynamics with learnt cost function: application to industrial robot positioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guérin, Joris; Gibaru, Olivier; Thiery, Stéphane; Nyiri, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Recent methods of Reinforcement Learning have enabled to solve difficult, high dimensional, robotic tasks under unknown dynamics using iterative Linear Quadratic Gaussian control theory. These algorithms are based on building a local time-varying linear model of the dynamics from data gathered through interaction with the environment. In such tasks, the cost function is often expressed directly in terms of the state and control variables so that it can be locally quadratized to run the algorithm. If the cost is expressed in terms of other variables, a model is required to compute the cost function from the variables manipulated. We propose a method to learn the cost function directly from the data, in the same way as for the dynamics. This way, the cost function can be defined in terms of any measurable quantity and thus can be chosen more appropriately for the task to be carried out. With our method, any sensor information can be used to design the cost function. We demonstrate the efficiency of this method through simulating, with the V-REP software, the learning of a Cartesian positioning task on several industrial robots with different characteristics. The robots are controlled in joint space and no model is provided a priori. Our results are compared with another model free technique, consisting in writing the cost function as a state variable.

  7. Mapping infectious disease hospital surge threats to lessons learnt in Singapore: a systems analysis and development of a framework to inform how to DECIDE on planning and response strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shweta R; Coker, Richard; Vrijhoef, Hubertus J-M; Leo, Yee Sin; Chow, Angela; Lim, Poh Lian; Tan, Qinghui; Chen, Mark I-Cheng; Hildon, Zoe Jane-Lara

    2017-09-04

    Hospital usage and service demand during an Infectious Disease (ID) outbreak can tax the health system in different ways. Herein we conceptualize hospital surge elements, and lessons learnt from such events, to help build appropriately matched responses to future ID surge threats. We used the Interpretive Descriptive qualitative approach. Interviews (n = 35) were conducted with governance and public health specialists; hospital based staff; and General Practitioners. Key policy literature in tandem with the interview data were used to iteratively generate a Hospital ID Surge framework. We anchored our narrative account within this framework, which is used to structure our analysis. A spectrum of surge threats from combinations of capacity (for crowding) and capability (for treatment complexity) demands were identified. Starting with the Pyramid scenario, or an influx of high screening rates flooding Emergency Departments, alongside fewer and manageable admissions; the Reverse-Pyramid occurs when few cases are screened and admitted but those that are, are complex; during a 'Black' scenario, the system is overburdened by both crowding and complexity. The Singapore hospital system is highly adapted to crowding, functioning remarkably well at constant near-full capacity in Peacetime and resilient to Endemic surges. We catalogue 26 strategies from lessons learnt relating to staffing, space, supplies and systems, crystalizing institutional memory. The DECIDE model advocates linking these strategies to types of surge threats and offers a step-by-step guide for coordinating outbreak planning and response. Lack of a shared definition and decision making of surge threats had rendered the procedures somewhat duplicative. This burden was paradoxically exacerbated by a health system that highly prizes planning and forward thinking, but worked largely in silo until an ID crisis hit. Many such lessons can be put into play to further strengthen our current hospital governance

  8. Lessons learnt from INTEGRAL AGN

    CERN Document Server

    Beckmann, V; Soldi, S; Alfonso-Garzon, J; Courvoisier, T J -L; Domingo, A; Gehrels, N; Lubinski, P; Mas-Hesse, J M; Zdziarski, A A

    2010-01-01

    The INTEGRAL mission provides a large data set for studying the hard X-ray properties of AGN and allows to test the unified scheme for AGN. We present results based on the analysis of 199 AGN. A difference between the Seyfert types is detected in slightly flatter spectra with higher cut-off energies and lower luminosities for the more absorbed/type 2 AGN. When applying a Compton reflection model, the underlying continua (photon index 1.95) appear the same in Seyfert 1 and 2, and the reflection strength is R=1 in both cases, with differences in the inclination angle only. A difference is seen in the sense that Seyfert 1 are on average twice as luminous in hard X-rays than the Seyfert 2 galaxies. The unified model for Seyfert galaxies seems to hold, showing in hard X-rays that the central engine is the same in Seyfert 1 and 2 galaxies, seen under different inclination angle and absorption. Based on our knowledge of AGN from INTEGRAL data, we briefly outline open questions and investigations to answer them. In t...

  9. Cluster Active Archive: lessons learnt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laakso, H. E.; Perry, C. H.; Taylor, M. G.; Escoubet, C. P.; Masson, A.

    2010-12-01

    The ESA Cluster Active Archive (CAA) was opened to public in February 2006 after an initial three-year development phase. It provides access (both web GUI and command-line tool are available) to the calibrated full-resolution datasets of the four-satellite Cluster mission. The data archive is publicly accessible and suitable for science use and publication by the world-wide scientific community. There are more than 350 datasets from each spacecraft, including high-resolution magnetic and electric DC and AC fields as well as full 3-dimensional electron and ion distribution functions and moments from a few eV to hundreds of keV. The Cluster mission has been in operation since February 2001, and currently although the CAA can provide access to some recent observations, the ingestion of some other datasets can be delayed by a few years due to large and difficult calibration routines of aging detectors. The quality of the datasets is the central matter to the CAA. Having the same instrument on four spacecraft allows the cross-instrument comparisons and provide confidence on some of the instrumental calibration parameters. Furthermore it is highly important that many physical parameters are measured by more than one instrument which allow to perform extensive and continuous cross-calibration analyses. In addition some of the instruments can be regarded as absolute or reference measurements for other instruments. The CAA attempts to avoid as much as possible mission-specific acronyms and concepts and tends to use more generic terms in describing the datasets and their contents in order to ease the usage of the CAA data by “non-Cluster” scientists. Currently the CAA has more 1000 users and every month more than 150 different users log in the CAA for plotting and/or downloading observations. The users download about 1 TeraByte of data every month. The CAA has separated the graphical tool from the download tool because full-resolution datasets can be visualized in many ways and so there is no one-to-one correspondence between graphical products and full-resolution datasets. The CAA encourages users to contact the CAA team for all kind of issues whether it concerns the user interface, the content of the datasets, the quality of the observations or provision of new type of services. The CAA runs regular annual reviews on the data products and the user services in order to improve the quality and usability of the CAA system to the world-wide user community. The CAA is continuously being upgraded in terms of datasets and services.

  10. Lessons Learnt From Hurricane Katrina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akundi, Murty

    2008-03-01

    Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans and its suburbs on Monday August 29^th, 2005. The previous Friday morning, August 26, the National Hurricane Center indicated that Katrina was a Category One Hurricane, which was expected to hit Florida. By Friday afternoon, it had changed its course, and neither the city nor Xavier University was prepared for this unexpected turn in the hurricane's path. The university had 6 to 7 ft of water in every building and Xavier was closed for four months. Students and university personnel that were unable to evacuate were trapped on campus and transportation out of the city became a logistical nightmare. Email and all electronic systems were unavailable for at least a month, and all cell phones with a 504 area code stopped working. For the Department, the most immediate problem was locating faculty and students. Xavier created a list of faculty and their new email addresses and began coordinating with faculty. Xavier created a web page with advice for students, and the chair of the department created a separate blog with contact information for students. The early lack of a clear method of communication made worse the confusion and dismay among the faculty on such issues as when the university would reopen, whether the faculty would be retained, whether they should seek temporary (or permanent) employment elsewhere, etc. With the vision and determination of President Dr. Francis, Xavier was able to reopen the university in January and ran a full academic year from January through August. Since Katrina, the university has asked every department and unit to prepare emergency preparedness plans. Each department has been asked to collect e-mail addresses (non-Xavier), cell phone numbers and out of town contact information. The University also established an emergency website to communicate. All faculty have been asked to prepare to teach classes electronically via Black board or the web. Questions remain about the longer term issues of the size and stability of the faculty.

  11. [Fifty years of research on tuberculosis. Lessons I have learnt during 50 years and topics to be investigated in the future].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimao, T

    2000-07-01

    I have engaged in the research on tuberculosis for 50 years, and lessons I have learnt during this period could be summarized in the following ten topics. First is great research achievements by our predecessors on the establishment of so-called primary infection theory on the pathogenesis of TB, planning of TB control principles based on the theory and development of new technologies used for TB control, such as mass miniature X-ray examination and BCG vaccination in 1920s and 1930s. TB control law was enforced in 1951, and the modern TB programme was initiated. Second, the field is a treasure house of interesting data. Several interesting data on TB soon after the World War II in Tokyo and a rural area were collected and analyzed from the mass health examination. Third, looking at the increase of tuberculin positivity with age, it was found that the tuberculin negativity decreased as the exponential function of age, and the current concept of the annual risk of TB infection was already developed in late 1940s. It was 18.1% in male and 11.6% in female in Tokyo in late 1940s. Based on this concept, age specific TB mortality was analyzed by the type of TB, and the rates of miliary TB and TB meningitis were similar to the rate of newly infected to the total population, while the rate of all forms could be divided into early and late death as shown in Fig. 1. Fourth, I suffered from TB by myself from 1951 to 1953, receiving first thoracoplasty in two stages under local anaesthesia, then right upper lobectomy and segmentectomy of superior segment of right lower lobe. From this experience, I learnt a lot about the psychology and suffering of TB patients. Fifth, the importance of recognition of real magnitude of the problem in such a disease as TB in which many TB cases did not aware of their disease. The answer to this was the first TB prevalence survey in 1953 using stratified random sampling method, and based on the results of the survey, the mass health examination

  12. 'Lessons learnt from America'--Reflections from a fellowship examining the prevention, recognition and treatment of operational stress injuries in U.S. Army serving personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesson, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    These are my personal views and reflections from a hugely rewarding experience. They are not opinions or recommendations of the MOD or any other institution I am associated with. I realise that there may be various logistical reasons why my recommendations cannot be carried out; however I do hope that some will be able to be put into place. If nothing else I gained a massive amount from my travelling fellowship and it has already had a positive impact on my own clinical work. I hope to continue to pass on what I have learnt from the fellowship for many years to come. A special thank you goes to the Winston Churchill Memorial Trust for providing me with this fantastic opportunity and everyone who helped me before and during my visit.

  13. Cooperation mechanisms of the EU renewable energy directive and flexible mechanisms of the Kyoto Protocol: comparison and lessons learnt. Working paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frieden, Dorian; Tuerk, Andreas; Steiner, Daniel

    2013-07-15

    This working paper discusses similarities and differences between the cooperation mechanisms of the EU renewable energy directive (RES directive) and the flexible mechanisms of the Kyoto Protocol. The cooperation mechanisms allow the (virtual) trade of renewable energy and were introduced with the RES directive to provide Member States (MS) with greater flexibility to achieve their national targets for renewable energy sources (RES). A similar kind of flexibility is known from the flexible mechanisms of the Kyoto Protocol which aim at the cost efficient achievement of emission reduction targets. Lessons learned from the Kyoto mechanisms may allow conclusions to be drawn on the design and implementation of the renewable energy cooperation mechanisms. This paper first gives an overview of the cooperation mechanisms regarding their potential, advantages and disadvantages, barriers and preconditions. This is followed by a brief explanation of and a systematic comparison with the flexible mechanisms of the Kyoto Protocol – Joint Implementation (JI); Clean Development Mechanism (CDM); and International Emissions Trading (IET). A gamut of factors influenced the success of the Kyoto mechanisms in general and in specific national contexts. Therefore, it is not possible to directly transfer past experiences with the Kyoto mechanisms to the capability of specific nations to make use of the renewable energy cooperation mechanisms. A comparison of specific features, such as the mechanism type (transfer, project-based, support scheme), price building and specific barriers can, however, help anticipate the possible dynamics and challenges of the cooperation mechanisms. Experiences with the Kyoto mechanisms show that predictions based on supply-demand analysis were valid only to a limited extent and that specific factors such as institutional capacity constraints or legal uncertainties delayed or prevented the use of the mechanisms in some cases. Similarly, for the cooperation

  14. Radioguided localisation of impalpable breast lesions using 99m-Technetium macroaggregated albumin: Lessons learnt during introduction of a new technique to guide preoperative localisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landman, Joanne [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); Kulawansa, Sagarika [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); McCarthy, Michael; Troedson, Russell [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); Phillips, Michael [Western Australian Institute for Medical Research, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); Tinning, Jill [The Multidisciplinary Breast Service, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); Taylor, Donna, E-mail: Donna.Taylor@health.wa.gov.au [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); School of Surgery, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Western Australia (Australia)

    2015-03-15

    Preoperative wire-guided localisation (WGL) of impalpable breast lesions is widely used but can be technically difficult. Risks include wire migration, inaccurate placement, and inadequate surgical margins. Research shows that radioguided occult lesion localisation (ROLL) is quicker, easier, and can improve surgical and cosmetic outcomes. An audited introduction of ROLL was conducted to validate the technique as a feasible alternative to WGL. Fifty patients with single impalpable lesions and biopsy proven malignancy or indeterminate histology underwent WGL followed by intralesional radiopharmaceutical injection of 99m-Technetium macroaggregated albumin. Postprocedural mammography was performed to demonstrate wire position, and scintigraphy to evaluate radiopharmaceutical migration. Lymphoscintigraphy and intraoperative sentinel node biopsy were performed if indicated, followed by lesion localisation and excision using a gamma probe. Specimen imaging was performed, with immediate reexcision for visibly inadequate margins. Accurate localisation was achieved in 86% of patients with ROLL compared to 72% with WGL. All lesions were successfully removed, with clear margins in 71.8% of malignant lesions. Reexcision and intraoperative sentinel node localisation rates were equivalent to preaudit figures for WGL. ROLL was easy to perform and problems were infrequent. Inaccurate radiopharmaceutical placement necessitating WGL occurred in four patients. Minor radiopharmaceutical migration was common, but precluded using ROLL in only two cases. ROLL is effective, simple, inexpensive, and easily learnt; however, preoperative confirmation of correct radiopharmaceutical placement using mammography and the gamma probe is important to help ensure successful lesion removal. Insertion of a backup hookwire is recommended during the initial introduction of ROLL.

  15. Lessons learnt: Observation of Grade 4 reading comprehension teaching in South African schools across the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS 2006 achievement spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Zimmerman

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The evidence of the huge challenges of literacy development faced by South African learners is primarily gleaned from the results of learners’ external assessments. There is little research which explores, in-depth, the strategies used by teachers to teach reading literacy and reading comprehension specifically. Questions remain about what is going wrong and, most importantly,what can be changed to rectify the poor outcomes of learners. To gain insight into the poor achievement of Grade 4 learners, in South Africa in the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS 2006, six case studies were undertaken. Each school case had a different class average achievement profile ranging from low to high on the PIRLS achievement scale.This article presents findings from the observation of Grade 4 reading comprehension lessons in six schools. The comparison of observations of teaching practices aligned to higher achieving schools, against those of lower performing schools, indicates the discrepancies in the quality of teaching reading comprehension across the schools, and reveals potential foci for teacher development. The value of comparative lesson observation for these purposes is highlighted.

  16. Prospective Teachers' Experiences in Developing Lessons with Dynamic Mathematics Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haciomeroglu, Erhan Selcuk; Bu, Lingguo; Schoen, Robert C.; Hohenwarter, Markus

    2011-01-01

    This study sought to examine the development of prospective secondary mathematics teachers' Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge as they worked individually and in small groups to develop and present lessons with dynamic mathematics software. In a three-semester long study, data were collected from 68 prospective secondary mathematics…

  17. Fallout radionuclide-based techniques for assessing the impact of soil conservation measures on erosion control and soil quality: an overview of the main lessons learnt under an FAO/IAEA Coordinated Research Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dercon, G; Mabit, L; Hancock, G; Nguyen, M L; Dornhofer, P; Bacchi, O O S; Benmansour, M; Bernard, C; Froehlich, W; Golosov, V N; Haciyakupoglu, S; Hai, P S; Klik, A; Li, Y; Lobb, D A; Onda, Y; Popa, N; Rafiq, M; Ritchie, J C; Schuller, P; Shakhashiro, A; Wallbrink, P; Walling, D E; Zapata, F; Zhang, X

    2012-05-01

    This paper summarizes key findings and identifies the main lessons learnt from a 5-year (2002-2008) coordinated research project (CRP) on "Assessing the effectiveness of soil conservation measures for sustainable watershed management and crop production using fallout radionuclides" (D1.50.08), organized and funded by the International Atomic Energy Agency through the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture. The project brought together nineteen participants, from Australia, Austria, Brazil, Canada, Chile, China, Japan, Morocco, Pakistan, Poland, Romania, Russian Federation, Turkey, United Kingdom, United States of America and Vietnam, involved in the use of nuclear techniques and, more particularly, fallout radionuclides (FRN) to assess the relative impacts of different soil conservation measures on soil erosion and land productivity. The overall objective of the CRP was to develop improved land use and management strategies for sustainable watershed management through effective soil erosion control practices, by the use of ¹³⁷Cs (half-life of 30.2 years), ²¹⁰Pb(ex) (half-life of 22.3 years) and ⁷Be (half-life of 53.4 days) for measuring soil erosion over several spatial and temporal scales. The environmental conditions under which the different research teams applied the tools based on the use of fallout radionuclides varied considerably--a variety of climates, soils, topographies and land uses. Nevertheless, the achievements of the CRP, as reflected in this overview paper, demonstrate that fallout radionuclide-based techniques are powerful tools to assess soil erosion/deposition at several spatial and temporal scales in a wide range of environments, and offer potential to monitor soil quality. The success of the CRP has stimulated an interest in many IAEA Member States in the use of these methodologies to identify factors and practices that can enhance sustainable agriculture and minimize land degradation.

  18. Time to Act: Lessons learnt from the first pilot school-based intervention study from Lebanon to prevent and reduce childhood Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla eHabib-Mourad

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Today, childhood overweight and obesity are serious public health problems facing the world. Obese children suffer from both short-term and long-term health consequences, and poorer adult health. Despite the rising prevalence of childhood obesity in the Eastern Mediterranean Region (EMR, including Lebanon, no intervention research studies have been undertaken. This paper summarizes the main challenges and lessons learned emanating from the first evidence-based multicomponent school intervention aimed at promoting Healthy Eating and Physical Activity in Lebanese School children (Health-E-PALS. Health-E-PALS, which includes three components (class curriculum, family involvement and food service and relies on interactive fun learning activities, achieved an increase in students’ nutritional knowledge and self-efficacy, and a decrease in their purchase and consumption of high energy dense snacks and beverages. Recommendations for future school-based programs are also highlighted.

  19. Lessons learnt from the development of the Patient Safety Incidents Reporting an Learning System for the Spanish National Health System: SiNASP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejo-Gutiérrez, Paula; Bañeres-Amella, Joaquim; Sierra, Eduardo; Casal, Jesús; Agra, Yolanda

    2014-01-01

    To describe the development process and characteristics of a patient safety incidents reporting system to be implemented in the Spanish National Health System, based on the context and the needs of the different stakeholders. Literature review and analysis of most relevant reporting systems, identification of more than 100 stakeholder's (patients, professionals, regional governments representatives) expectations and requirements, analysis of the legal context, consensus of taxonomy, development of the software and pilot test. Patient Safety Events Reporting and Learning system (Sistema de Notificación y Aprendizajepara la Seguridad del Paciente, SiNASP) is a generic reporting system for all types of incidents related to patient safety, voluntary, confidential, non punitive, anonymous or nominative with anonimization, system oriented, with local analysis of cases and based on the WHO International Classification for Patient Safety. The electronic program has an on-line form for reporting, a software to manage the incidents and improvement plans, and a scoreboard with process indicators to monitor the system. The reporting system has been designed to respond to the needs and expectations identified by the stakeholders, taking into account the lessons learned from the previous notification systems, the characteristics of the National Health System and the existing legal context. The development process presented and the characteristics of the system provide a comprehensive framework that can be used for future deployments of similar patient safety systems. Copyright © 2013 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. Development, roll-out and impact of Xpert MTB/RIF for tuberculosis: what lessons have we learnt and how can we do better?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Heidi; Nathavitharana, Ruvandhi R; Isaacs, Chris; Pai, Madhukar; Denkinger, Claudia M; Boehme, Catharina C

    2016-08-01

    The global roll-out of Xpert MTB/RIF (Cepheid Inc., Sunnyvale, CA, USA) has changed the diagnostic landscape of tuberculosis (TB). More than 16 million tests have been performed in 122 countries since 2011, and detection of multidrug-resistant TB has increased three- to eight-fold compared to conventional testing. The roll-out has galvanised stakeholders, from donors to civil society, and paved the way for universal drug susceptibility testing. It has attracted new product developers to TB, resulting in a robust molecular diagnostics pipeline. However, the roll-out has also highlighted gaps that have constrained scale-up and limited impact on patient outcomes. The roll-out has been hampered by high costs for under-funded programmes, unavailability of a complete solution package (notably comprehensive training, quality assurance, implementation plans, inadequate service and maintenance support) and lack of impact assessment. Insufficient focus has been afforded to effective linkage to care of diagnosed patients, and clinical impact has been blunted by weak health systems. In many countries the private sector plays a dominant role in TB control, yet this sector has limited access to subsidised pricing. In light of these lessons, we advocate for a comprehensive diagnostics implementation approach, including increased engagement of in-country stakeholders for product launch and roll-out, broader systems strengthening in preparation for new technologies, as well as quality impact data from programmatic settings.

  1. FOREIGN POLICY SOVIET CONSTRUCT. LESSONS LEARNT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin MEGHEŞAN

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Soviet foreign policy is a field where theories abund. Most of these theories contend that one or more factors are extremely important determinant factors for Soviet behaviour in all or most situations. Soviet foreign policy has usually been analysed in terms of the leader’s objectives, their perceptions and iniatives in the outer environment of the world politics, and their response to development abroad. The main purpose of this article is to briefly examine the internal and external factors that shape Soviet foreign policy and behavior, and to analyse the forces that shape Soviet international behaviour, focusing on the national interest issue. Why Soviet foreign policy? Because we consider that even a brief look into the Soviet foreign policy may represent the key to understanding Russias current behaviour on the world stage. The first step in constructing viable security strategies is to understand the surrounding political world, as well as what Russia was, is and could be.

  2. Lessons learnt from post-infectious IBS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushil eSarna

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The development of IBS symptoms– altered bowel function and abdominal cramping in a subset of adult subjects exposed to severe enteric infections opened up an unprecedented opportunity to understand the etiology of this poorly understood disorder. Perhaps, for the reasons that these symptoms follow a severe enteric infection, and mucosal biopsy tissues are readily available, the focus of most studies thus far has been to show that mild/low-grade mucosal inflammation persisting after the initial infection has subsided causes the IBS symptoms. Parallel studies in non-infectious IBS patients, who did not have prior enteritis, showed similar mild mucosal inflammation. Together, these studies examined the mucosal infiltration of specific immune cells, increase of select inflammatory mediators, mast cell and enterochromafin cell hyperplasia and epithelial permeability. In spite of the fact that the data on these topics were not consistent among different studies and clinical trials with prednisone, fluoxetine and kitotifen failed to provide relief of IBS symptoms, the predominant conclusions were that mild mucosal inflammation is the cause of IBS symptoms. However, the circular smooth muscle cells, and myenteric neurons are the primary regulators of gut motility function, while primary afferent neurons and CNS play essential roles in induction of visceral hypersensitivity - no explanation was provided as to how mild mucosal inflammation causes dysfunction in cells far removed. Accumulating evidence shows that mild mucosal inflammation in IBS patients is in physiological range. It has little deleterious effects on cells within its own environment and therefore it is unlikely to affect cells in the muscularis externa. This review discusses the disconnect between the focus on mild/low-grade mucosal inflammation and the potential mechanisms and molecular dysfunctions in smooth muscle cells, myenteric neurons and primary afferent neurons that may underlie IBS symptoms.

  3. Direct access : Lessons learnt from the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Northcott, A.; Brocklehurst, P.; Jerkovic-Cosic, K.; Reinders, J. J.; McDermott, I.; Tickle, M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To use a qualitative approach to examine the perceptions of policy makers, general dental practitioners, dental hygienists, dental students and dental hygiene students in the Netherlands following the introduction of a direct access policy in 2006. Methods Semi-structured interviews and fo

  4. Accident investigation: case study and lessons learnt

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kirsten, T

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available . The proceedings of the TC were strictly confi dential and therefore this report only provides generic information and insights. User briefi ng The fi rst activity of the TC on the 25 October 2007 was the briefi ng by the SANDF offi cer who had been responsible...

  5. Lessons learnt from tropical cyclone losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honegger, Caspar; Wüest, Marc; Zimmerli, Peter; Schoeck, Konrad

    2016-04-01

    Swiss Re has a long history in developing natural catastrophe loss models. The tropical cyclone USA and China model are examples for event-based models in their second generation. Both are based on basin-wide probabilistic track sets and calculate explicitly the losses from the sub-perils wind and storm surge in an insurance portfolio. Based on these models, we present two cases studies. China: a view on recent typhoon loss history Over the last 20 years only very few major tropical cyclones have caused severe insurance losses in the Pearl River Delta region and Shanghai, the two main exposure clusters along China's southeast coast. Several storms have made landfall in China every year but most struck areas with relatively low insured values. With this study, we make the point that typhoon landfalls in China have a strong hit-or-miss character and available insured loss experience is too short to form a representative view of risk. Historical storm tracks and a simple loss model applied to a market portfolio - all from publicly available data - are sufficient to illustrate this. An event-based probabilistic model is necessary for a reliable judgement of the typhoon risk in China. New York: current and future tropical cyclone risk In the aftermath of hurricane Sandy 2012, Swiss Re supported the City of New York in identifying ways to significantly improve the resilience to severe weather and climate change. Swiss Re provided a quantitative assessment of potential climate related risks facing the city as well as measures that could reduce those impacts.

  6. IS-ENES project management - lessons learnt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parinet, Marie; Guglielmo, Francesca; Joussaume, Sylvie

    2017-04-01

    IS-ENES is the distributed e-infrastructure of models, model data and metadata of the European Network for Earth System Modelling (ENES). It has benefitted from two EC FP7 grants and aims towards further European and national funding to achieve sustainability. We highlight here several challenges related to project management that have risen in the course of these two project-phases spanning 8 years. Some challenges are related to the heterogeneity of the activities within IS-ENES, with different groups working on very diverse activities, not necessarily strictly interdependent. An immediate consequence is the need of implementing and setting up in early phases of the project efficient collection and circulation of information to preserve and reinforce the systemic view of the infrastructure as a whole and the pursuit of common goals, including coordinated provision of services. Toward and beyond such common goals, managing IS-ENES, covering both scientific and more strictly management-related aspects, implies a double-paced approach: besides setting up efficient project workflow, there is the need of setting up longer term objectives. This implies, within the project lifetime, to elaborate and implement a coherent organizational (consistent with scientific goals, funding schemes, research and technology landscape) strategy to pursue these goals beyond the project itself. Furthermore, a series of more generic project management challenges will also be listed and can be gathered around 3 main objectives: ease the internal processes in order to optimize the work, anticipate delays and budget issues, and motivate the project teams by ensuring an efficient internal and external communication.

  7. Intravenous drug delivery in neonates: lessons learnt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwin, Catherine M T; Medlicott, Natalie J; Reith, David M; Broadbent, Roland S

    2014-06-01

    Intravenous drug administration presents a series of challenges that relate to the pathophysiology of the neonate and intravenous infusion systems in neonates. These challenges arise from slow intravenous flow rates, small drug volume, dead space volume and limitations on the flush volume in neonates. While there is a reasonable understanding of newborn pharmacokinetics, an appreciation of the substantial delay and variability in the rate of drug delivery from the intravenous line is often lacking. This can lead to difficulties in accurately determining the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic relationship of drugs in the smallest patients. The physical variables that affect the passage of drugs through neonatal lines need to be further explored in order to improve our understanding of their impact on the delivery of drugs by this route in neonates. Through careful investigation, the underlying causes of delayed drug delivery may be identified and administration protocols can then be modified to ensure predictable, appropriate drug input kinetics.

  8. Young-minds.net/ lessons learnt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simovska, V.; Jensen, Bjarne Bruun

    I bogen præsenteres de vigtigste forskningsresultater fra projektet "Young Minds - exploring links between youth, cultura and alcohol consumption". Bogen rummer desuden en præsentation af selve udviklingsprojektet (herunder de vigtigste grundbegreber i en handlings-orienteret og participatorisk...

  9. Masihambisane, lessons learnt using participatory indigenous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    knowledge research approaches in a school-based collaborative ... In this paper we make explicit our learning, and the manner in which we carried ... As both participants and researchers on the project, we engaged in reflexive enquiry, using.

  10. Young-minds.net/ lessons learnt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simovska, V.; Jensen, Bjarne Bruun

    I bogen præsenteres de vigtigste forskningsresultater fra projektet "Young Minds - exploring links between youth, cultura and alcohol consumption". Bogen rummer desuden en præsentation af selve udviklingsprojektet (herunder de vigtigste grundbegreber i en handlings-orienteret og participatorisk...

  11. Post-accidental riverine dispersion of sediments contaminated by radionuclides: confrontation of lessons learnt from Chernobyl and Fukushima case studies in catchments from Russia (1986-2009) and Japan (2011-2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evrard, Olivier; Belyaev, Vladimir; Onda, Yuichi; Chartin, Caroline; Patin, Jeremy; Lefèvre, Irène; Ayrault, Sophie; Ivanova, Nadezda; Bonté, Philippe; Golosov, Valentin

    2013-04-01

    Chernobyl (1986) and Fukushima (2011) nuclear power plant accidents led to the release of important quantities of radionuclides (e.g., Cs-134; Cs-137) into the environment, and to the formation of severe contamination plumes (with initial Cs-137 activities exceeding typically 400 kBq m-2) on soils of the regions exposed to the radioactive fallout. This leads to important consequences for agriculture in strongly contaminated areas where the most affected fields should not be cultivated anymore during long periods of time, depending on the half life of the emitted radionuclides. Furthermore, sediment transfer in rivers can lead to the dispersion of radioactive contamination into larger areas over time. In this paper, we propose a methodology to trace and model radioactive contamination in river catchments over the short (2 yrs) and the longer term (25 yr) after major nuclear power plant accidents. This methodology is established and confronted to two case studies. The most recent study was conducted in the coastal catchments of the Rivers Nitta, Mano and Ota (ca. 600 km²) draining the main part of the radioactive pollution plume that deposited across Fukushima Prefecture. Three field campaigns were conducted to sample riverbed sediment along those rivers after the summer typhoons and the spring snowmelt (i.e., in Nov 2011, April 2012 and Nov 2012). Based on their analysis in gamma spectrometry, we show the rapid dispersion of the inland contamination and its progressive export by coastal rivers to the Pacific Ocean. This is confirmed by measurements of the Ag-110m: Cs-137 ratio. Analysis of sediment sequences that accumulated in reservoirs of the region provides additional information on the magnitude on sediment transfers in those areas. This rapid dispersion of radioactive contamination in Japan is confronted to lessons learnt from a case study conducted in the Plava River catchment (ca. 2000 km²) located in the so-called "Plavsk contamination hotspot", in

  12. The added value of participatory modelling in fisheries management – what has been learnt?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Röckmann, C.; Ulrich, Clara; Dreyer, M.

    2012-01-01

    , and the lessons learnt. It is concluded that participatory modelling has the potential to facilitate and structure discussions between scientists and stakeholders about uncertainties and the quality of the knowledge base. It can also contribute to collective learning, increase legitimacy, and advance scientific...

  13. Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome: lessons learnt and lessons remaining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, D Woodrow; Cohen, Mitchell I

    2017-01-01

    The Wolff-Parkinson-White pattern refers to the electrocardiographic appearance in sinus rhythm, wherein an accessory atrioventricular pathway abbreviates the P-R interval and causes a slurring of the QRS upslope - the "delta wave". It may be asymptomatic or it may be associated with orthodromic reciprocating tachycardia; however, rarely, even in children, it is associated with sudden death due to ventricular fibrillation resulting from a rapid response by the accessory pathway to atrial fibrillation, which itself seems to result from orthodromic reciprocating tachycardia. Historically, patients at risk for sudden death were characterised by the presence of symptoms and a shortest pre- excited R-R interval during induced atrial fibrillation Parkinson-White pattern and availability of catheter ablation, there has been a need to identify risk among asymptomatic patients. Recent guidelines recommend invasive evaluation for such patients where pre-excitation clearly does not disappear during exercise testing. This strategy has a high negative predictive value only. The accuracy of this approach is under continued investigation, especially in light of other considerations: Patients having intermittent pre-excitation, once thought to be at minimal risk may not be, and the role of isoproterenol in risk assessment.

  14. Dynamic Lesson Planning in EFL Reading Classes through a New e-Learning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Takeshi; Sakamoto, Yasunobu

    2015-01-01

    This paper illustrates how lesson plans, teaching styles and assessment can be dynamically adapted on a real-time basis during an English as a Foreign Language (EFL) reading classroom session by using a new e-learning system named iBELLEs (interactive Blended English Language Learning Enhancement system). iBELLEs plays a crucial role in filling…

  15. Wage, Price and Unemployment Dynamics in the Spanish Transition to EMU Membership

    OpenAIRE

    Jusélius, Katarina; Ordóñez, Javier

    2008-01-01

    This paper provides an empirical investigation of the wage, price and unemployment dynamics that have taken place in Spain during the last two decades. The aim of this paper is to shed light on the impact of the European economic integration process on Spanish labour market and the convergence to a European level of prosperity. We find some important lessons to be learnt from the Spanish experience that should be relevant for the new member states. First, high competitiveness in the tradable ...

  16. Care or Cry: Three years from Cyclone Gonu.What have we learnt?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultan Al-Shaqsi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT:Objectives: This article examines and evaluates the history of natural disasters in Oman and presents the health care response to cyclone Gonu, and highlights the health care lessons learnt from the Cyclone as narrated by frontline personnel and it puts forward some practical recommendations for health care policy makers in order to strengthen the health care disaster preparations to combat future natural and man-made disasters.Methods: The lessons presented in this article are based on the reflections of frontline health care personnel who witnessed Cyclone Gonu. The reflections of experience collected as a part of a qualitative 17 semi-structured interviews conducted in Oman between December 2009 and January 2010.Results: The study found that the lessons from passes events went by un-noticed and exposed some serious fragmentation in the coordination of different governmental sectors involved in emergency management and that there was no well-plannedmechanism of alert and warning dissemination to people and communities.Conclusion:Overall, the major lessons that learnt from Cyclone Gonu would have been very useful if they had been taken into consideration and implemented during the health care response to cyclone Phet.

  17. Interplay of Dynamic Transcription and Chromatin Remodeling: Lessons from Yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Klopf

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Regulation of transcription involves dynamic rearrangements of chromatin structure. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has a variety of highly conserved factors necessary for these reconstructions. Chromatin remodelers, histone modifiers and histone chaperones directly associate to promoters and open reading frames of exposed genes and facilitate activation and repression of transcription. We compare two distinct patterns of induced transcription: Sustained transcribed genes switch to an activated state where they remain as long as the induction signal is present. In contrast, single pulsed transcribed genes show a quick and strong induction pulse resulting in high transcript levels followed by adaptation and repression to basal levels. We discuss intensively studied promoters and coding regions from both groups for their co-factor requirements during transcription. Interplay between chromatin restructuring factors and dynamic transcription is highly variable and locus dependent.

  18. Lessons Learned from Quantitative Dynamical Modeling in Systems Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Julie; Matteson, Andrew; Schelke, Max; Kaschek, Daniel; Hug, Sabine; Kreutz, Clemens; Harms, Brian D.; Theis, Fabian J.; Klingmüller, Ursula; Timmer, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Due to the high complexity of biological data it is difficult to disentangle cellular processes relying only on intuitive interpretation of measurements. A Systems Biology approach that combines quantitative experimental data with dynamic mathematical modeling promises to yield deeper insights into these processes. Nevertheless, with growing complexity and increasing amount of quantitative experimental data, building realistic and reliable mathematical models can become a challenging task: the quality of experimental data has to be assessed objectively, unknown model parameters need to be estimated from the experimental data, and numerical calculations need to be precise and efficient. Here, we discuss, compare and characterize the performance of computational methods throughout the process of quantitative dynamic modeling using two previously established examples, for which quantitative, dose- and time-resolved experimental data are available. In particular, we present an approach that allows to determine the quality of experimental data in an efficient, objective and automated manner. Using this approach data generated by different measurement techniques and even in single replicates can be reliably used for mathematical modeling. For the estimation of unknown model parameters, the performance of different optimization algorithms was compared systematically. Our results show that deterministic derivative-based optimization employing the sensitivity equations in combination with a multi-start strategy based on latin hypercube sampling outperforms the other methods by orders of magnitude in accuracy and speed. Finally, we investigated transformations that yield a more efficient parameterization of the model and therefore lead to a further enhancement in optimization performance. We provide a freely available open source software package that implements the algorithms and examples compared here. PMID:24098642

  19. Lessons learned from quantitative dynamical modeling in systems biology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Raue

    Full Text Available Due to the high complexity of biological data it is difficult to disentangle cellular processes relying only on intuitive interpretation of measurements. A Systems Biology approach that combines quantitative experimental data with dynamic mathematical modeling promises to yield deeper insights into these processes. Nevertheless, with growing complexity and increasing amount of quantitative experimental data, building realistic and reliable mathematical models can become a challenging task: the quality of experimental data has to be assessed objectively, unknown model parameters need to be estimated from the experimental data, and numerical calculations need to be precise and efficient. Here, we discuss, compare and characterize the performance of computational methods throughout the process of quantitative dynamic modeling using two previously established examples, for which quantitative, dose- and time-resolved experimental data are available. In particular, we present an approach that allows to determine the quality of experimental data in an efficient, objective and automated manner. Using this approach data generated by different measurement techniques and even in single replicates can be reliably used for mathematical modeling. For the estimation of unknown model parameters, the performance of different optimization algorithms was compared systematically. Our results show that deterministic derivative-based optimization employing the sensitivity equations in combination with a multi-start strategy based on latin hypercube sampling outperforms the other methods by orders of magnitude in accuracy and speed. Finally, we investigated transformations that yield a more efficient parameterization of the model and therefore lead to a further enhancement in optimization performance. We provide a freely available open source software package that implements the algorithms and examples compared here.

  20. Experiences and lessons learned from 30 years of dynamic collector testing, modelling and simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perers, Bengt; Kovacs, Peter; Pettersson, Ulrik

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic testing and modeling (in contrast to Steady State line of action) of solar collectors is to prefer in most climates, except for the most extreme locations with clear skies every day. A very important part of dynamic testing and modeling is not only the thermal capacitance correction......, but also the split of the solar radiation absorption modeling, into beam and diffuse and the modeling of the collectors’ incidence angle dependency for both beam and diffuse radiation. These optical features are in most situations more important than the accuracy of the dynamic and thermal loss part...... concerning solar radiation measurements for beam and diffuse including alignment of sensors and test object, that are often not considered, which will be discussed and lessons learned will be given. A misalignment of just a few degrees of the collector test stand or the solar sensors will immediately show up...

  1. Malaria vaccines:looking back and lessons learnt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Veronique; Lorenz; Panagiotis; Karanis

    2011-01-01

    The current status of malaria vaccine approaches has the background of a long and arduous path of malaria disease control and vaccine development.Here,we critically review with regard to unilateral interventional approaches and highlight the impact of socioeconomic elements of malaria endemicity. The necessity of re-energizing basic research of malaria life-cycle and Plasmodium developmental biology to provide the basis for promising and cost-effective vaccine approaches and to reach eradication goals is more urgent than previously believed.We closely analyse the flaws of various vaccine approaches,outline future directions and challenges that still face us and conclude that the focus of the field must be shifted to the basic research efforts including findings on the skin stage of infection.We also reflect on economic factors of vaccine development and the impact of public perception when it comes to vaccine uptake.

  2. Lessons learnt from the Solar neighbourhood and the Kepler field

    CERN Document Server

    Casagrande, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Setting the timeline of the events which shaped the Milky Way disc through its 13 billion year old history is one of the major challenges in the theory of galaxy formation. Achieving this goal is possible using late-type stars, which in virtue of their long lifetimes can be regarded as fossil remnants from various epochs of the formation of the Galaxy. There are two main paths to reliably age-date late-type stars: astrometric distances for stars in the turn-off and subgiant region, or oscillation frequencies along the red giant branch. So far, these methods have been applied to large samples of stars in the solar neighbourhood, and in the Kepler field. I review these studies, emphasize how they complement each other, and highlight some of the constraints they provide for Galactic modelling. I conclude with the prospects and synergies that astrometric (Gaia) and asteroseismic space-borne missions reserve to the field of Galactic Archaeology, and advocate that survey selection functions should be kept as simple...

  3. Assessment Schemes for Sustainability Design through BIM: Lessons Learnt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamaruzzaman Syahrul Nizam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing demand on sustainability-led design to reduce negative impacts brought by construction development. The capability of Building Information Modeling (BIM to achieve sustainability is widely acknowledged. Various sustainability analysis and calculation can be performed at early stages to help the designers in decision making. However, the level of implementation is still not popular in the construction industry. Many of the industry players are still rely on traditional 2D method for designing and analysis. Hence, this study aims to demonstrate a proof concept of using BIM for sustainability design. The first phase of this study conducted a critical review of existing assessment schemes: BREEAM, LEED, SBTool, CASBEE, BEAM Plus, Green Star, Green Mark and GBI, to develop a set of main criteria to be considered for sustainability design. The findings revealed that fourteen criteria are considered, which are management, sustainable site, transport, indoor environmental quality, energy, waste, water, material, pollution, innovation, economics, social, culture and quality of services. It was found that most of the existing schemes emphasized on environmental aspect as compared to economics, social and culture except SBTool. The next phase of this study will conduct a case study to demonstrate sustainability design through BIM by using the criteria developed from the first phase.

  4. Recruiting a young adolescent rural cohort: Costs and lessons learnt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krestina L. Amon

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adolescent recruitment into longitudinal health studies is challenging. The aim of this paper is to report the detailed process and costs of recruiting young adolescents and their families into an intensive longitudinal study of the effects of puberty hormones on health, behaviour and wellbeing in early adolescence, based in regional/rural Australia. Methods: Participants were recruited using a saturation strategy of targeted methods (including school visits and community events and non-targeted recruitment approaches (including print and electronic media advertising, and social media. Direct (face-to-face contact with the public and indirect (behind-the-scenes preparatory activities researcher hours were calculated for each of the recruitment strategies. Results: The study recruited 342 adolescent participants and a parent/guardian over two years. School and community-based recruitment required 6.2 and 6.0 researcher hours per activity, respectively. Direct researcher hours were primarily spent on delivering presentations and connecting with community members at community events. The majority of indirect hours were spent preparing and assembling information packs for distribution to students and parents during school visits. Non-targeted recruitment strategies using media advertising were the most frequently used methods. Researchers were estimated to have spent less than one hour for each media activity. In 27 months, an estimated $250,000 was spent on recruitment activities and resources. A combination of methods was used to recruit young adolescents and their families into a longitudinal health study. Conclusions: The financial costs and researcher time committed to this study highlight the labour-intensive nature of recruitment. The data presented are useful for researchers planning longitudinal studies in adolescents.

  5. Saga of Wilms′ tumor: Lessons learnt from the past

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Devendra

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Wilms′ tumor (WT represents 6% of childhood cancers. Recent advances in molecular biology have significant implications for the clinical management. A dramatic improvement in overall cure has resulted from the adoption of multimodality treatment during the past few decades. National Wilms′ Tumor Study (NWTS, and the Sociιtι Internationale d′Oncologie Pιdiatrique (SIOP have laid down the guidelines for standardized treatment of WT, though differing in the diagnostic and therapeutic approach. Both these groups currently aim at intensifying treatment for patients with poor prognosticators while appropriating the therapy to reduce long-term complications for those with favorable prognostic features. Challenges faced in developing nations include poverty, malnutrition, ignorance, and presentation in advanced stages coupled with limited facilities that are necessary for total management of these cases. In this article, we have discussed our approach to deal with patients with nephroblastoma, reviewed the literature on the current management strategies and the long-term outcome. Most countries have adopted the NWTS protocols, while others especially in Europe, South America and some Asian countries follow the SIOP regimen. Both have their advantages and weaknesses and maynot necessarily be suitable to the setup in developing countries. We have discussed the controversial issues in the management of WT including the timing of biopsy, type of biopsy, investigative approach, role of chemotherapy / radiotherapy, management of bilateral Wilms′ tumor and parenchymal sparing renal surgery. Despite deviating from NWTS at various points, the overall results have remained satisfactory. Thus, developing countries might adopt their own protocols depending on the prevalent situations and facilities available to them to treat such patients.

  6. Lessons learnt from the solar neighbourhood and the Kepler field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casagrande, L.

    2016-09-01

    Setting the timeline of the events which shaped the Milky Way disc through its 13 billion year old history is one of the major challenges in the theory of galaxy formation. Achieving this goal is possible using late-type stars, which in virtue of their long lifetimes can be regarded as fossil remnants from various epochs of the formation of the Galaxy. There are two main paths to reliably age-date late-type stars: astrometric distances for stars in the turn-off and subgiant region, or oscillation frequencies along the red giant branch. So far, these methods have been applied to large samples of stars in the solar neighbourhood, and in the Kepler field. I review these studies, emphasize how they complement each other, and highlight some of the constraints they provide for Galactic modelling. I conclude with the prospects and synergies that astrometric ({Gaia}) and asteroseismic space-borne missions reserve to the field of Galactic archaeology, and advocate that survey selection functions should be kept as simple as possible, relying on basic observables such as colours and magnitudes only.

  7. Army Basic Skills Provision: Whole Organisation Approach/Lessons Learnt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basic Skills Agency, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The Army began working in partnership with the Basic Skills Agency in 2000. This was formalised with the establishment of the Basic Skills Agency's National Support Project for the Army (2001) that contributes to the raising of basic skills standards in the Army by advising on, and assisting with, the development of the Army's basic skills policy…

  8. Lessons learnt from a primary care asthma improvement project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenney, Warren; Clayton, Sadie; Gilchrist, Francis J; Price, David; Small, Iain; Smith, Judy; Sutton, Emma J

    2016-01-07

    Asthma is a very common disease that can occur at any age. In the UK and in many other countries it is mainly managed in primary care. The published evidence suggests that the key to improving diagnosis and management lies in better training and education rather than in the discovery of new medications. An asthma improvement project managed through the British Lung Foundation is attempting to do this. The project has three pilot sites: two in England supported by the Department of Health and one in Scotland supported by the Scottish Government. If the project is successful it will be rolled out to other health areas within the UK. The results of this project are not yet available. This article highlights the challenges encountered in setting up the project and may well be applicable to other areas in the UK and to other countries where similar healthcare systems exist. The encountered challenges reflect the complex nature of healthcare systems and electronic data capture in primary care. We discuss the differences between general practices in their ability and willingness to support the project, the training and education of their staff on asthma management, governance issues in relation to information technology systems, and the quality of data capture. Virtually all the challenges have now been overcome, but discussing them should ensure that others become aware of them at an early stage should they wish to undertake similar projects in the future.

  9. Preparedness of Response to Deadly Outbreaks: Lessons Learnt ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    contributions made by WHO Zambia human resources staff that were deployed ... International Health Regulation (IHR) 2005. WHO has the mandate ... office compound were requested to have their body temperature taken. WHO encouraged ...

  10. Engineered nanomaterial risk. Lessons learnt from completed nanotoxicology studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnston, Helinor; Pojana, Giulio; Zuin, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    PARTICLE_RISK was one of the first multidisciplinary projects funded by the European Commission's Framework Programme that was responsible for evaluating the implications of nanomaterial (NM) exposure on human health. This project was the basis for this review which identifies the challenges...

  11. Cholera in Ecuador: Current relevance of past lessons learnt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S S Malavade

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This report analyses the trends in the cholera epidemic that hit Ecuador in 1991. The study is based on personal experiences and analysis of epidemiological databases from the Ministry of Public Health of Ecuador. The number of cases and initial attack rates in an immunologically naive population are described by province. An analysis of the Andean and coastal cholera patterns of transmission are described along with its associated risk factors. The logistical, environmental, and socio-cultural risk factors prevalent during the epidemic and the control measures implemented are also reviewed. Also, the role of the epidemic in the development of the public health and healthcare resources in Ecuador is discussed here. Current data indicate favorable conditions for another outbreak of cholera in Ecuador. In view of the existing risk factors, new strategies are proposed to prevent such an epidemic in the future.

  12. Conducting a meta-ethnography of qualitative literature: Lessons learnt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewin Simon

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Qualitative synthesis has become more commonplace in recent years. Meta-ethnography is one of several methods for synthesising qualitative research and is being used increasingly within health care research. However, many aspects of the steps in the process remain ill-defined. Discussion We utilized the seven stages of the synthesis process to synthesise qualitative research on adherence to tuberculosis treatment. In this paper we discuss the methodological and practical challenges faced; of particular note are the methods used in our synthesis, the additional steps that we found useful in clarifying the process, and the key methodological challenges encountered in implementing the meta-ethnographic approach. The challenges included shaping an appropriate question for the synthesis; identifying relevant studies; assessing the quality of the studies; and synthesising findings across a very large number of primary studies from different contexts and research traditions. We offer suggestions that may assist in undertaking meta-ethnographies in the future. Summary Meta-ethnography is a useful method for synthesising qualitative research and for developing models that interpret findings across multiple studies. Despite its growing use in health research, further research is needed to address the wide range of methodological and epistemological questions raised by the approach.

  13. Biosimilars in rheumatology: current perspectives and lessons learnt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dörner, Thomas; Kay, Jonathan

    2015-12-01

    Biosimilars, based on biopharmaceuticals approved by regulatory agencies that are no longer under patent protection, have efficacy and safety comparable to their reference products, and are a new therapeutic option to treat inflammatory diseases. Biosimilars must be distinguished from 'biomimics' or 'biocopies', which are marketed in some countries but have not been evaluated according to the stringent regulatory pathway used for biosimilars. CT-P13, based on infliximab, was the first biosimilar approved for the treatment of inflammatory diseases; however, some countries did not allow extrapolation of indications to all eight diseases for which the reference drug infliximab is approved. Antidrug antibodies can reduce drug levels and affect clinical efficacy, but although available data suggest that biosimilars and their reference products have comparable immunogenicity, this important property might differ between individual biopharmaceuticals. This Review discusses biosimilars already approved within the past 3 years to treat rheumatic diseases, as well as others that are currently under development. The main challenges posed by biosimilars are also addressed, such as the extrapolation of indications to diseases only studied for the reference drug, and the definition of strategies for adequate pharmacovigilance to monitor biosimilars after marketing approval.

  14. Integrated agricultural research for development: lessons learnt and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mo

    expand South-South-North partnerships involving educational as well as research and development ... programmes as the SSA-Challenge Programme are discussed. ..... made learning experiences at the regional (Latin America) or national ...

  15. Combining AIET with chemotherapy - lessons learnt from our experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chidambaram R

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common invasive cancer in women and as per the data in 2008, this deadly cancer was responsible for 458,503 deaths worldwide in 2008 [1]. Several researches are on-going for identifying therapeutic strategies for breast cancer. Breast cancer biology is complex and breast cancer stem cells that are often resistant to conventional therapies like chemotherapy [2] increases the complexity as it has been reported that at even early stages of the disease, a portion of the breast cancer cells may have eloped to the bone marrow facilitated by the mesenchymal stem cells [3] and remain dormant becoming active later thereby causing recurrence or advancement of the disease. Natural Killer (NK cell based Autologous Immune Enhancement Therapy (AIET which has been administered for different types of cancers [4,5] represents a potential option, as NK cells being a part of innate immunity help in tackling circulating cancer cells [6] and cancer stem cells [7] thereby helping to prevent metastasis. Herein we report our experience of NK cell based AIET in a patient of stage III A breast cancer (inflammatory type diagnosed three months post-partum. A 29 year old female with history of pain and tenderness in the left breast post-partum was investigated in October 2012 and the investigations revealed the presence of infiltrating ductal carcinoma (pT3 N2a Mx- Stage III A (T4bN2M0 and the cancer was ER positive, PR negative, Her2neu negative, Ki67 positive (86% of the tumour cells and EGFR, Cytokeratin 5 negative. The patient underwent three cycles of pre-operative chemotherapy (from October 2012 to December 2012 using Doxorubicin, Docetaxel and Cyclophosphamide followed by left modified radical mastectomy (December 2012 and then three cycles of post-operative chemotherapy (from January to February 2013. The patient simultaneously underwent 12 transfusions of NK cell based AIET from November 2012 to February 2013 planned in accordance with the chemotherapy cycles. Approximately 200-220 ml of peripheral blood (PB was withdrawn for the first three cycles (three transfusions in one cycle – nine transfusions in total and then for the 10th transfusion, only 40 ml of PB was withdrawn as the patient's general health condition was low. 185 ml of PB was withdrawn for the 11th and 12th transfusions. For each AIET transfusion, the NK cells isolated from peripheral blood monononuclear cells (PBMNCSs were culture-expanded in vitro based on earlier described protocols [8, 9] for 10-12 days before being infused to the patient. Chemotherapy has earlier been reported to cause a decline in NK cell number and function [10]. It was observed in the present case that, with progressively increasing number of chemotherapy cycles, there was a gradual decline in the in vitro growth expansion of the NK cells, though the number of NK cells isolated from the peripheral blood remained fairly constant. After AIET and chemotherapy, the patient underwent radiotherapy with 5400cGy in 27 fractions. The patient is under follow-up. The decrease in NK cell expansion potential with progressive chemotherapy implies a weakened immune system after chemotherapy. This experience could be an eye opener to understand the potential weakness of the immune system with the present therapies enable us undertake researches to come out with more targeted therapies which shall not compromise the immune system thereby plugging the loopholes to prevent metastases and to yield a better prognosis.

  16. IT lessons learnt from real time dike monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonder, M.R.; Waaij, B.D. van der

    2013-01-01

    The Dutch lowlands are protected by many kilometres of dikes. Currently these dikes are visually inspected on a regular basis. During heavy weather this frequency is raised, up to 24/7 in very extreme situations. After a dike failure at the Dutch town Wilnis in 2003, the question was raised whether

  17. Culture & Development: Lessons learnt from the Post-Election ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A community will have a certain perception of the world (culture) and how it would like to .... Kenyans were disappointed that he could not deal with corruption. In fact, he .... and subsequent hurried swearing-in ceremony was all but credible.

  18. Lessons learnt from and sustainability assessment of Indonesian urban kampong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surjono, Antariksa; Ridhoni, M.

    2017-06-01

    The search of good (sustainable) model of development has been evolved from the era of City Beautiful to current era of uncertainty. Many urban planner and designers practice western modern concept and design, which are not entirely suitable for developing countries. It has been identified that local forms and characteristics in the urban context have wisdom and content that sustainable for local condition. This paper supports the argument that local characteristics have the qualities of sustainable development by evaluating sustainable development indicators and promoting method in generating aggregate indicator of sustainable development qualities of urban kampong in Indonesia. Fuzzy logic approach, which is widely used in system control design, is promoted in formulating the aggregate indicator of sustainable kampong in Indonesia. The result show that Indonesian kampongs are good in compactness, density, and access. Other indicators will also show sustainable development quality if the lacks are improved.

  19. Lessons learnt from mining meter data of residential consumers

    OpenAIRE

    Blazakis, K; Davarzani, S; G. Stavrakakis; Pisica, I

    2016-01-01

    Tracking end-users' usage patterns can enable more accurate demand forecasting and the automation of demand response execution. Accordingly, more advanced applications, such as electricity market design, integration of distributed generation and theft detection can be developed. By employing data mining techniques on smart meter recordings, the suppliers can efficiently investigate the load patterns of consumers. This paper presents applications where data mining of energy usage can derive us...

  20. Differential alkylation-based redox proteomics - Lessons learnt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wojdyla, Katarzyna; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine is one of the most reactive amino acids. This is due to the electronegativity of sulphur atom in the side chain of thiolate group. It results in cysteine being present in several distinct redox forms inside the cell. Amongst these, reversible oxidations, S-nitrosylation and S-sulfenylati......Cysteine is one of the most reactive amino acids. This is due to the electronegativity of sulphur atom in the side chain of thiolate group. It results in cysteine being present in several distinct redox forms inside the cell. Amongst these, reversible oxidations, S-nitrosylation and S...

  1. Malaria vaccines:looking back and lessons learnt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Veronique Lorenz; Panagiotis Karanis

    2011-01-01

    The current status of malaria vaccine approaches has the background of a long and arduous path of malaria disease control and vaccine development. Here, we critically review with regard to unilateral interventional approaches and highlight the impact of socioeconomic elements of malaria endemicity. The necessity of re-energizing basic research of malaria life-cycle and Plasmodium developmental biology to provide the basis for promising and cost-effective vaccine approaches and to reach eradication goals is more urgent than previously believed. We closely analyse the flaws of various vaccine approaches, outline future directions and challenges that still face us and conclude that the focus of the field must be shifted to the basic research efforts including findings on the skin stage of infection. We also reflect on economic factors of vaccine development and the impact of public perception when it comes to vaccine uptake.

  2. From inventivity in Limerick to creativity in Aveiro: lessons learnt

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wong, W

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available around four key questions: nature vs. nurture: can creative invention be taught; what tools and methods are there to help students learn to develop creative solutions; how to train educators in creative invention; and what are the stumbling blocks...

  3. Building rural wireless networks: lessons learnt and future directions

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Johnson, D

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available -cost wireless rural networks in South Africa and Zambia that are showing very encouraging results in which houses, schools and clinics are connected on shoestring budgets. Some key areas for future development are also discussed such the use of IPv6, power...

  4. Back to the Classroom: Lessons Learnt by a Teacher Educator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiteri, Doreen

    2010-01-01

    This self-study focuses on the suitability of implementing the Communicative Language Teaching approach to teach English in contexts where the conditions for learning might be different to those implied by the original tenets of the approach. As a university-based teacher educator, the researcher promotes this approach in her methodology classes.…

  5. Academic publishing: Lessons learnt from the Southern African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Writing and publishing scientific articles is an important activity of academic life. .... these journals appear on the ISI Citation Indexes (9.0%) and the International ..... Some changes occurred in the authorship structure of manuscripts during this.

  6. Lessons learnt from FARO/TERMOS corium melt quenching experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magallon, D.; Huhtiniemi, I.; Hohmann, H. [Commission of the European Communities, Ispra (Italy). Joint Research Center

    1998-01-01

    The influence of melt quantity, melt composition, water depth and initial pressure on quenching is assessed on the basis of seven tests performed in various conditions in the TERMOS vessel of the FARO facility at JRC-Ispra. Tests involved UO{sub 2}-based melt quantities in the range 18-176 kg at a temperature of approximately 3000 K poured into saturated water. The results suggest that erosion of the melt jet column is an efficient contributor to the amount of break-up, and thus quenching, for large pours of corium melt. The presence of Zr metal in the melt induced a much more efficient quenching than in a similar test with no Zr metal, attributed to the oxidation of the Zr. Significant amounts of H{sub 2} were produced also in tests with pure oxidic melts (e.g. about 300 g for 157 kg melt). In the tests at 5.0 and 2.0 MPa good mixing with significant melt break-up and quenching was obtained during the penetration in the water. At 0.5 MPa, good penetration of the melt into the water could still be achieved, but a jump in the vessel pressurisation occurred when the melt contacted the bottom and part (5 kg) of the debris was re-ejected from the water. (author)

  7. Wrestling with IWMP implementation: case study challenges and lessons learnt

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Muswema, Aubrey P

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available / A / . * + , - . / D 4 + 5 8 ' 4 2 ' E / ' F G H I J F K I L M N O P Q R N O S T R U N O V R M R P O W O M N X Y R M M Z M P [ L T V X \\ ] R U Q O ^ _ P M Z U O S R U R U ` _ Q N a N O Q W U N Q R N O P b Z M Z N Z R N Z c O d _ Q N ` O e f g Y Z... ^ R M S e Q Z c R N O U O ^ N _ Q Z M N ` O h R N Z _ M R Y T R U N O V R M R P O W O M N H N Q R N O P b R U d R Q g R ^ i R U j k k k [ l m F I n j k k k \\ o I O M b O R Q U Y R N O Q n N ` Q _ f P ` N ` O T R U N O F ^ N _ M j p f Y b q r r k n N...

  8. Flight Dynamics Operations: Methods and Lessons Learned from Space Shuttle Orbit Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutri-Kohart, Rebecca M.

    2011-01-01

    The Flight Dynamics Officer is responsible for trajectory maintenance of the Space Shuttle. This paper will cover high level operational considerations, methodology, procedures, and lessons learned involved in performing the functions of orbit and rendezvous Flight Dynamics Officer and leading the team of flight dynamics specialists during different phases of flight. The primary functions that will be address are: onboard state vector maintenance, ground ephemeris maintenance, calculation of ground and spacecraft acquisitions, collision avoidance, burn targeting for the primary mission, rendezvous, deorbit and contingencies, separation sequences, emergency deorbit preparation, mass properties coordination, payload deployment planning, coordination with the International Space Station, and coordination with worldwide trajectory customers. Each of these tasks require the Flight Dynamics Officer to have cognizance of the current trajectory state as well as the impact of future events on the trajectory plan in order to properly analyze and react to real-time changes. Additionally, considerations are made to prepare flexible alternative trajectory plans in the case timeline changes or a systems failure impact the primary plan. The evolution of the methodology, procedures, and techniques used by the Flight Dynamics Officer to perform these tasks will be discussed. Particular attention will be given to how specific Space Shuttle mission and training simulation experiences, particularly off-nominal or unexpected events such as shortened mission durations, tank failures, contingency deorbit, navigation errors, conjunctions, and unexpected payload deployments, have influenced the operational procedures and training for performing Space Shuttle flight dynamics operations over the history of the program. These lessons learned can then be extended to future vehicle trajectory operations.

  9. Addressing gender dynamics and engaging men in HIV programs: lessons learned from Horizons research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulerwitz, Julie; Michaelis, Annie; Verma, Ravi; Weiss, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    In the field of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention, there has been increasing interest in the role that gender plays in HIV and violence risk, and in successfully engaging men in the response. This article highlights findings from more than 10 studies in Asia, Africa, and Latin America--conducted from 1997 through 2007 as part of the Horizons program--that have contributed to understanding the relationship between gender and men's behaviors, developing useful measurement tools for gender norms, and designing and evaluating the impact of gender-focused program strategies. Studies showed significant associations between support for inequitable norms and risk, such as more partner violence and less condom use. Programmatic lessons learned ranged from insights into appropriate media messages, to strategies to engage men in critically reflecting upon gender inequality, to the qualities of successful program facilitators. The portfolio of work reveals the potential and importance of directly addressing gender dynamics in HIV- and violence-prevention programs for both men and women.

  10. Affordance, Learning Opportunities, and the Lesson Plan Pro Forma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jason

    2015-01-01

    This article argues that the most commonly used lesson plan pro formas in language teacher education are inappropriately premised on an outcomes-based approach to teaching, one that is in conflict with what we know about how languages are learnt and how experienced teachers teach. It proposes an alternative, affordance-based approach to lesson…

  11. Affordance, Learning Opportunities, and the Lesson Plan Pro Forma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jason

    2015-01-01

    This article argues that the most commonly used lesson plan pro formas in language teacher education are inappropriately premised on an outcomes-based approach to teaching, one that is in conflict with what we know about how languages are learnt and how experienced teachers teach. It proposes an alternative, affordance-based approach to lesson…

  12. Wage, Price and Unemployment Dynamics in the Spanish Transition to EMU Membership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juselius, Katarina; Ordóñez, Javier

    2008-01-01

    This paper provides an empirical investigation of the wage, price and unemployment dynamics that have taken place in Spain during the last two decades. The aim of this paper is to shed light on the impact of the European economic integration process on Spanish labour market and the convergence...... to a European level of prosperity. We find some important lessons to be learnt from the Spanish experience that should be relevant for the new member states. Second, before fixing the real exchange rate it seems crucial that it is on its sustainable (competitive) purchasing power parity level. First, high...

  13. Language use in real-time interactions during early elementary science lessons : The bidirectional dynamics of the language complexity of teachers and pupils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Menninga, Astrid; van Dijk, Marijn; Steenbeek, Henderien; van Geert, Paul

    2016-01-01

    This study explored bidirectional sequential relations between the real-time language use of teachers and pupils in naturalistic science lessons from a dynamic approach. It also compared experienced teachers (N = 22) with relative starters (student teachers, N = 8) when it comes to such relations. V

  14. DMPD: Infectious non-self recognition in invertebrates: lessons from Drosophila andother insect models. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 15476918 Infectious non-self recognition in invertebrates: lessons from Drosophila ...fectious non-self recognition in invertebrates: lessons from Drosophila andother insect models. PubmedID 154...76918 Title Infectious non-self recognition in invertebrates: lessons from Drosop

  15. Planning Lessons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Linda Jensen

    2007-01-01

    @@ Jensen's "Lesson Planning"article serves aS a guide fOr novice teachers who need to create formalized lesson plans.The article covers why,when,and how teachers plan lessons,as well aS basic lesson plan principles and a lesson plan template.

  16. What have we learnt from ISAAC phase III in the Asia-Pacific rim?.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fok, Annie O L; Wong, Gary W K

    2009-04-01

    International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) phase III had provided a worldwide map of epidemiology of asthma and allergic diseases, as well as the changes in prevalence rate of these diseases when compared to data obtained in phase I. The wide variations of environmental factors and ethnic background in Asia provide excellent opportunities for research into the environmental and genetic determinants of asthma and allergies. This review summarizes important lessons learnt from ISAAC phase III results from Asia on asthma and allergy. ISAAC phase III provided epidemiological evidence of the wide variation and increasing prevalence of asthma and allergy in many Asian countries. When compared to other regions of the world, Asia has a relatively lower prevalence of asthma and allergic diseases. Comparative studies of populations of the same ethnic group living in different environments reveal striking disparity in prevalence of asthma and allergic diseases. The established risk factors could not explain the secular trend and variations of asthma prevalence in different Asian countries. Further research is needed in this rapidly changing region of Asia in order to identify the protective or risk factors associated with the development of asthma. ISAAC phase III provides standardized data on the prevalence and burden of asthma and allergy in the Asia-Pacific region. Further research is needed to reveal the underlying factors responsible for the wide variations in disease manifestations in the region.

  17. Quantifying the Use of Dynamics in Western Keyboard Music: Lessons and Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorottya Fabian

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ladinig and Huron’s (2010 investigation of the relationship between mode (major-minor and dynamics in Classical and Romantic piano music indicated higher levels of dynamics for compositions from the Classical period but only in major-mode pieces. This was contrary to the expectation that minor mode pieces from the Romantic era would be louder because romantic composers may have intended to convey seriousness, passion or even aggression, rather than sadness. Although the methodology was carefully crafted to enable necessary control for a quantitative study, it also contributed to the questionable relevance of the results. It is arguable whether the chosen repertoire is typical, whether initial markings in the score have a true bearing on the dynamic characteristics of a piece and whether notated dynamics are reliable data due to historical notation conventions and later editorial practices.

  18. Randomized Impact Evaluation of Education Interventions: Experiences and Lessons from a Reading to Learn Intervention in East Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngware, Moses Waithanji; Abuya, Benta; Oketch, Moses; Admassu, Kassahun; Mutisya, Maurice; Musyoka, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the experiences and lessons learnt during the design and implementation of the randomized impact evaluation (IE) of a reading to learn (RtL) intervention in early primary grades. The study was to assess the impact of RtL on literacy and numeracy among pupils in low-performing districts in East Africa. The intervention was…

  19. From Exact to Partial Dynamical Symmetries: Lessons From the Interacting Boson Model

    CERN Document Server

    Leviatan, A

    2012-01-01

    We exploit the rich algebraic structure of the interacting boson model to explain the notion of partial dynamical symmetry (PDS), and present a procedure for constructing Hamiltonians with this property. We demonstrate the relevance of PDS to various topics in nuclear spectroscopy, including K-band splitting, odd-even staggering in the gamma-band and anharmonicity of excited vibrational bands. Special emphasis in this construction is paid to the role of higher-order terms.

  20. Diversification versus specialization -- lessons from a noise driven linear dynamical system

    CERN Document Server

    Mate, Gabriell

    2014-01-01

    Specialization and diversification are two major strategies that complex systems might exploit. Given a fixed amount of resources, the question is whether to invest this in elements that respond in a correlated manner to external perturbations, or to build a diversified system with groups of elements that respond in a not necessarily correlated manner. This general dilemma is investigated here using a high dimensional discrete dynamical system subject to an external noise, analyzing the statistical properties of an order parameter that quantifies growth. Our analytical solution suggests that diversification is a good strategy once the system has a fair amount of resources. For systems with small or extremely large supplies, we argue that specialization might be a more successful strategy. We discuss the results also from the perspective of economic and biologic systems.

  1. The dynamic nature of the nuclear envelope: lessons from closed mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnone, James T; Walters, Alison D; Cohen-Fix, Orna

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotes, chromosomes are encased by a dynamic nuclear envelope. In contrast to metazoans, where the nuclear envelope disassembles during mitosis, many fungi including budding yeast undergo "closed mitosis," where the nuclear envelope remains intact throughout the cell cycle. Consequently, during closed mitosis the nuclear envelope must expand to accommodate chromosome segregation to the two daughter cells. A recent study by Witkin et al. in budding yeast showed that if progression through mitosis is delayed, for example due to checkpoint activation, the nuclear envelope continues to expand despite the block to chromosome segregation. Moreover, this expansion occurs at a specific region of the nuclear envelope- adjacent to the nucleolus- forming an extension referred to as a "flare." These observations raise questions regarding the regulation of nuclear envelope expansion both in budding yeast and in higher eukaryotes, the mechanisms confining mitotic nuclear envelope expansion to a particular region and the possible consequences of failing to regulate nuclear envelope expansion during the cell cycle.

  2. Dynamic strategy and sustainable business development: lessons learned from the crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarmila Šebestová

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Each adaptation in business is an impulse to change and may cause unexpected behaviour inside or outside the company. This article aims to present an innovative thinking bond and investment success in overcoming the crisis, based on the results of the research carried out. From knowledge of current methods of management and business management services in general it can be inferred that the enterprise can develop an open system that is capable of rapidly adapting to positive and negative external influences. Which interactions support the dynamics and adaptability of the strategy in a positive way? As a contribution to the literature, the paper will highlight which elements have the biggest influence on the flexibility of business and which items are the most important for sustainable behaviour in an uncertain and turbulent environment. In this survey (twice observed groups, the main aim is to identify the effect of investment on innovation, strategy preparation and the relationship between financial ratios and company performance. The survey of this study was conducted with owners and managers of small and medium size businesses in the Czech Republic (under 250 employees operating between the years 2007–2012. The main goal of this paper is, based on the literature review, to provide a practical model of adaptation. Research methodology, analyses results and research models will take place in the second section. The results of the analyses will be discussed and recommendations will be provided in the last section. The QRBITS analysis is presented as a special tool for analyzing the business environment and resources. Finally, a model of dynamic entrepreneurship is presented as a combination of factors which generate the final effectiveness of strategy implementation.

  3. Reproductive Dynamics of Sterna hirundinacea Lesson, 1831 in Ilha dos Cardos, Santa Catarina, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélio Augusto Alves Fracasso

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we intend to describe the reproductive dynamics of Sterna hirundinacea in an island from South Brazil. We studied the reproductive biology of this species in its natural environment and provide data on their growth, survival, and reproductive success in Ilha dos Cardos, Santa Catarina, South Brazil. Samplings were carried out daily on the island throughout the reproductive seasons of 2003, 2005, and 2006 and the different stages of development of the chicks were characterized according to age, length of the beak, and plumage characteristics. We provide a basic equation Lm=167.91 (1-e-0.062t--0.23 to determine the approximate age of individuals using their body mass. The main cause of chick mortality on the island was natural (63.17% in 2003, 81.41% in 2005, and 79.96% in 2006, whereas predation contributed to mortality in a proportion of 38.83% in 2003, 18.59% in 2005, and 20.04% in 2006. The absence in the area of the chicks’ main predator, Kelp gull (Larus dominicanus, the large number of chicks that reached the final stages of development, and their reproductive success demonstrate that Ilha dos Cardos is an important breeding site for the species in southern Brazil.

  4. Water security, risk and economic growth: lessons from a dynamical systems model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadson, Simon; Hall, Jim; Garrick, Dustin; Sadoff, Claudia; Grey, David; Whittington, Dale

    2016-04-01

    Investments in the physical infrastructure, human capital, and institutions needed for water resources management have been a noteworthy feature in the development of most civilisations. These investments affect the economy in two distinct ways: (i) by improving the factor productivity of water in multiple sectors of the economy, especially those that are water intensive such as agriculture and energy; and (ii) by reducing the acute and chronic harmful effects of water-related hazards like floods, droughts, and water-related diseases. The need for capital investment to mitigate these risks in order to promote economic growth is widely acknowledged, but prior work to conceptualise the relationship between water-related risks and economic growth has focused on the productive and harmful roles of water in the economy independently. Here the two influences are combined using a simple, dynamical model of water-related investment, risk, and growth at the national level. The model suggests the existence of a context-specific threshold above which growth proceeds along an 'S'-curve. In many cases there is a requirement for initial investment in water-related assets to enable growth. Below the threshold it is possible for a poverty trap to arise. The presence and location of the poverty trap is context-specific and depends on the relative exposure of productive water-related assets to risk, compared with risks faced by assets in the wider economy. Exogenous changes in the level of water-related risk (through, for example, climate and land cover change) can potentially push an economy away from a growth path towards a poverty trap. These results illustrate the value of accounting for environmental risk in models of economic growth and may offer guidance in the design of robust policies for investment in water-related productive assets to manage risk, particularly in the face of global and regional environmental change.

  5. The 2010 outbreak of poliomyelitis in Tajikistan: epidemiology and lessons learnt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakovenko, M L; Gmyl, A P; Ivanova, O E; Eremeeva, T P; Ivanov, A P; Prostova, M A; Baykova, O Y; Isaeva, O V; Lipskaya, G Y; Shakaryan, A K; Kew, O M; Deshpande, J M; Agol, V I

    2014-02-20

    A large outbreak of poliomyelitis, with 463 laboratory-confirmed and 47 polio-compatible cases, took place in 2010 in Tajikistan. Phylogenetic analysis of the viral VP1 gene suggested a single importation of wild poliovirus type 1 from India in late 2009, its further circulation in Tajikistan and expansion into neighbouring countries, namely Kazakhstan, Russia, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan. Whole-genome sequencing of 14 isolates revealed recombination events with enterovirus C with cross-overs within the P2 region. Viruses with one class of recombinant genomes co-circulated with the parental virus, and representatives of both caused paralytic poliomyelitis. Serological analysis of 327 sera from acute flaccid paralysis cases as well as from patients with other diagnoses and from healthy people demonstrated inadequate immunity against polio in the years preceding the outbreak. Evidence was obtained suggesting that vaccination against poliomyelitis, in rare cases, may not prevent the disease. Factors contributing to the peculiarities of this outbreak are discussed. The outbreak emphasises the necessity of continued vaccination against polio and the need, at least in risk areas, of quality control of this vaccination through well planned serological surveillance.

  6. Brucellosis in a refugee who migrated from Syria to Germany and lessons learnt, 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunow, Roland; Jacob, Daniela; Klee, Silke; Schlembach, Dietmar; Jackowski-Dohrmann, Sabine; Loenning-Baucke, Vera; Eberspächer, Bettina; Swidsinski, Sonja

    2016-01-01

    A teenage woman migrating from Syria arrived in May 2015 in Germany. She gave birth to a healthy child in early 2016, but became febrile shortly after delivery. Blood cultures revealed Brucella melitensis. In retrospect, she reported contact with sheep in Syria and recurrent pain in the hip joints over about five months before diagnosis of brucellosis. We discuss consequences for adequate treatment of mother and child as well as for clinical and laboratory management. PMID:27525454

  7. Large vestibular schwannomas and hydrocephalus: Lessons learnt from a single centre experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash Nair

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the following study is to analyze the outcome following surgery in 169 patients with large vestibular schwannoma (VS and to evaluate hydrocephalus as a prognostic factor in patients of the VSs. Subjects and Methods: Retrospective analysis of all cases of VSs admitted to our tertiary neurosurgical center from January 2005 to December 2010 was performed. Comparison of patients who underwent pre-operative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF diversion and those who underwent primary surgery was carried out for post-operative complications and delayed hydrocephalus. Results: A total of 169 patients of VS were seen. The mean age at presentation was 39.03 years (12-72 years. The most common symptom was hearing loss seen in 161 (95.2% cases. Giant VS was seen in 130 (75.5% and hydrocephalus was present in 110 (63.9%. Pre-operative CSF diversion was done in 23 (13.1% patients; 8 (4.6% patients developed gradually symptomatic hydrocephalus following surgery and underwent ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Total surgical excision was done in 92.9% patients and subtotal excision was done in 7% patients. Conclusions: Hydrocephalus occurs in longstanding untreated cases of VS. Hydrocephalus causes no statistically significant increase in post-operative complications like CSF leak and post-operative hematoma. Patients with hydrocephalus presenting with acute symptoms of raised intracranial pressure benefit from CSF diversion. In most patients, tumor resection will restore patency of the CSF pathway and CSF diversion can be avoided.

  8. Lessons learnt from ITER safety & licensing for DEMO and future nuclear fusion facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, Neill

    2013-01-01

    One of the strong motivations for pursuing the development of fusion energy is its potentially low environmental impact and very good safety performance. But this safety and environmental potential can only be fully realized by careful design choices. For DEMO and other fusion facilities that will require nuclear licensing, S&E objectives and criteria should be set at an early stage and taken into account when choosing basic design options and throughout the design process. Studies in recent decades of the safety of fusion power plant concepts give a useful basis on which to build the S&E approach and to assess the impact of design choices. The experience of licensing ITER is of particular value, even though there are some important differences between ITER and DEMO. The ITER project has developed a safety case, produced a preliminary safety report and had it examined by the French nuclear safety authorities, leading to the licence to construct the facility. The key technical issues that arose during ...

  9. Brucellosis in a refugee who migrated from Syria to Germany and lessons learnt, 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunow, Roland; Jacob, Daniela; Klee, Silke; Schlembach, Dietmar; Jackowski-Dohrmann, Sabine; Loenning-Baucke, Vera; Eberspächer, Bettina; Swidsinski, Sonja

    2016-08-04

    A teenage woman migrating from Syria arrived in May 2015 in Germany. She gave birth to a healthy child in early 2016, but became febrile shortly after delivery. Blood cultures revealed Brucella melitensis. In retrospect, she reported contact with sheep in Syria and recurrent pain in the hip joints over about five months before diagnosis of brucellosis. We discuss consequences for adequate treatment of mother and child as well as for clinical and laboratory management.

  10. A Holistic Approach to Knowledge Management and Social Learning: lessons learnt from military headquarters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leoni Warne

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on research conducted by the Enterprise Social Learning Architecture (ESLA team of the Defence Science and Technology Organisation. The ESLA team is investigating collaborative social learning within the Australian Defence Organisation (ADO. Social learning is tightly coupled to knowledge management. Three studies in three different settings have been conducted to date. The studies have provided multi-layered findings about social learning, and validated the use of ethnography for this purpose. Preliminary findings are discussed in this paper in terms of identified enablers and motivators for effective social learning and knowledge management. Although the paper deals with the defence environment, the findings can be generalised to other organisational settings, as the study deals with understanding the issues inherent in building sustainable and adaptive learning organisations.

  11. How Well Are We Respecting Patient Privacy in Medical Imaging? Lessons Learnt From a Departmental Audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilauro, Marc; Thornhill, Rebecca; Fasih, Najla

    2016-11-01

    Preservation of patient privacy and dignity are basic requirements for all patients visiting a hospital. The purpose of this study was to perform an audit of patients' satisfaction with privacy whilst in the Department of Medical Imaging (MI) at the Civic Campus of the Ottawa Hospital. Outpatients who underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), ultrasonography (US), and plain film (XR) examinations were provided with a survey on patient privacy. The survey asked participants to rank (on a 6-point scale ranging from 6 = excellent to 1 = no privacy) whether their privacy was respected in 5 key locations within the Department of MI. The survey was conducted over a consecutive 5-day period. A total of 502 surveys were completed. The survey response rate for each imaging modality was: 55% MRI, 42% CT, 45% US, and 47% XR. For each imaging modality, the total percentage of privacy scores greater than or equal to 5 were: 98% MRI, 96% CT, 94% US, and 92% XR. Privacy ratings for the MRI reception and waiting room areas were significantly higher in comparison to the other imaging modalities (P = .0025 and P = .0227, respectively). Overall, patient privacy was well respected within the Department of MI. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Association of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Observations of the role of science in the United States medical cannabis state policies: Lessons learnt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grbic, Jelica; Goddard, Perilou; Ryder, David

    2017-04-01

    Clinical trials have shown cannabis to be effective in the treatment of some medical conditions and there is mounting public and political pressure to enact laws enabling the use of cannabis for medicinal purposes. To date, 28 United States (U.S.) states and the District of Columbia have enacted medical cannabis laws. This study sought to identify the main issues pertaining to the development of medical cannabis laws in the U.S, including the role of scientific evidence. Data were collected from three groups of participants: government officials, lobbyists and medical professionals involved in the medical cannabis debate in five selected states in the U.S.; researchers from the same five states conducting funded research in the alcohol and other drugs field; and members of the International Society for the Study of Drug Policy. The data were analysed using thematic analysis. Six major themes emerged in relation to the factors influencing policy: scientific evidence plays a limited role in the development of policy; the available research is limited and mixed; there is a need for clearer communication and active dissemination of evidence to policy makers; researchers need to consider what research is likely to impact on policy; scientific evidence is not a major factor in policy development; and there is a need to consider evidence within a political context. Researchers need to be aware of the political context in which medical cannabis laws are or are not enacted and consider ways in which research findings can achieve a higher profile within this context. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Trends and correlates of HIV testing amongst women: lessons learnt from Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas N.O. Achia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A majority of women in Kenya do not know their HIV status and are therefore unable to take preventive measures or medication in order to prolong their lives.Objectives: This study investigates the key determinants of HIV testing in Kenya and documents how these changed over the 1998–2008 period.Method: This study uses data from the 1998, 2003 and 2008 Kenya Demographic and Health surveys. Principal components analysis was used to compute indices of HIV knowledge, HIV-related stigma, media exposure and decision making. Survey logistic regression analysis was used to determine factors that had a statistically-significant association with ever having been tested for HIV.Results: Testing was significantly higher in 2008 compared with the previous surveys. In 1998, 14.7% of the women had tested for HIV. The rate increased to 15.0% in 2003 and then to 59.2% in 2008. In the 1998 and 2003 Kenya Demographic and Health surveys, respondents’ age, region of residence, education, knowledge of someone who had died from HIV-related illness and media exposure were the main determinants of testing. In the 2008 study, HIV-related stigma, occupation and the partner’s level of education were found to be associated with HIV testing.Conclusion: Despite efforts to scale up voluntary counselling and testing in Kenya over the 1998–2008 period, HIV testing amongst women is still quite low. Prevention and control programmes in Kenya need to focus on reducing HIV-related stigma, increasing access to testing in rural areas and increasing access amongst women with little or no education.

  14. Kawasaki Disease in India, Lessons Learnt Over the Last 20 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Surjit; Kawasaki, Tomisaku

    2016-02-01

    Over the last 20 years, Kawasaki disease is being increasingly recognized in India and it may soon replace acute rheumatic fever to become the commonest cause of acquired heart disease amongst children. However, the vast majority of children with Kawasaki disease in India are still not being diagnosed. Diagnosis of Kawasaki disease is based on a constellation of clinical findings which have a typical temporal sequence. All pediatricians must we familiar with the nuances involved in arriving at a diagnosis of Kawasaki disease. With early diagnosis and prompt treatment, the risk of coronary artery abnormalities can be significantly reduced.

  15. Developing government policies for distance education: Lessons learnt from two Sri Lankan case studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liyanagunawardena, Tharindu Rekha; Adams, Andrew A.; Rassool, Naz; Williams, Shirley A.

    2014-12-01

    Education, especially higher education, is considered vital for maintaining national and individual competitiveness in the global knowledge economy. Following the introduction of its "Free Education Policy" as early as 1947, Sri Lanka is now the best performer in basic education in the South Asian region, with a remarkable record in terms of high literacy rates and the achievement of universal primary education. However, access to tertiary education is a bottleneck, due to an acute shortage of university places. In an attempt to address this problem, the government of Sri Lanka has invested heavily in information and communications technologies (ICTs) for distance education. Although this has resulted in some improvement, the authors of this article identify several barriers which are still impeding successful participation for the majority of Sri Lankans wanting to study at tertiary level. These impediments include the lack of infrastructure/resources, low English language proficiency, weak digital literacy, poor quality of materials and insufficient provision of student support. In the hope that future implementations of ICT-enabled education programmes can avoid repeating the mistakes identified by their research in this Sri Lankan case, the authors conclude their paper with a list of suggested policy options.

  16. THE THREAT OF CROSS-CULTURAL CLASH: LESSONS LEARNT FROM INTERNATIONAL PROJECTS

    OpenAIRE

    Carmen-Laura ZARZU; Scarlat, Cezar; Sorin STROE

    2014-01-01

    The article is based on both literature review and authors’ experience related to about forty international projects – over more than a decade. Besides their creative potential based on the opportunity to exchange cross-cultural knowledge, the international projects have their negative side as well: if not timely identified, and properly managed, the cross-cultural clash might be a threat for the successful completion of the project. The authors investigate engineering, development and techni...

  17. Primary airway epithelial cell culture and asthma in children-lessons learnt and yet to come.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLellan, Kirsty; Shields, Mike; Power, Ultan; Turner, Steve

    2015-12-01

    Until recently the airway epithelial cell (AEC) was considered a simple barrier that prevented entry of inhaled matter into the lung parenchyma. The AEC is now recognized as having an important role in the inflammatory response of the respiratory system to inhaled exposures, and abnormalities of these responses are thought to be important to asthma pathogenesis. This review first explores how the challenges of studying nasal and bronchial AECs in children have been addressed and then summarizes the results of studies of primary AEC function in children with and without asthma. There is good evidence that nasal AECs may be a suitable surrogate for the study of certain aspects of bronchial AEC function, although bronchial AECs remain the gold standard for asthma research. There are consistent differences between children with and without asthma for nasal and bronchial AEC mediator release following exposure to a range of pro-inflammatory stimulants including interleukins (IL)-1β, IL-4, and IL-13. However, there are inconsistencies between studies, e.g., release of IL-6, an important pro-inflammatory cytokine, is not increased in children with asthma relative to controls in all studies. Future work should expand current understanding of the "upstream" signalling pathways in AEC, study AEC from children before the onset of asthma symptoms and in vitro models should be developed that replicate the in vivo status more completely, e.g., co-culture with dendritic cells. AECs are difficult to obtain from children and collaboration between centers is expected to yield meaningful advances in asthma understanding and ultimately help deliver novel therapies.

  18. Lessons learnt? The importance of metacognition and its implications for Cognitive Remediation in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo eCella

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The cognitive problems experienced by people with schizophrenia not only impede recovery but also interfere with treatments designed to improve overall functioning. Hence there has been a proliferation of new therapies to treat cognitive problems with the hope that improvements will benefit future intervention and recovery outcomes. Cognitive remediation therapy (CR that relies on intensive task practice can support basic cognitive functioning but there is little evidence on how these therapies lead to transfer to real life skills. However, there is increasing evidence that CR including elements of transfer training (e.g. strategy use and problem solving schemas produce higher functional outcomes. It is hypothesised that these therapies achieve higher transfer by improving metacognition. People with schizophrenia have metacognitive problems; these include poor self-awareness and difficulties in planning for complex tasks. This paper reviews this evidence as well as research on why metacognition needs to be explicitly taught as part of cognitive treatments. The evidence is based on research on learning spanning neuroscience to the field of education. Learning programmes, and CRT, may be able to achieve better outcomes if they explicitly teach metacognition including metacognitive knowledge (i.e. awareness of the cognitive requirements and approaches to tasks and metacognitive regulation (i.e. cognitive control over the different task relevant cognitive requirements. These types of metacognition are essential for successful task performance, in particular, for controlling effort, accuracy and efficient strategy use. We consider metacognition vital for the transfer of therapeutic gains to everyday life tasks making it a therapy target that may yield greater gains compared to cognition alone for recovery interventions.

  19. Exploitation of the vulnerable in research: Responses to lessons learnt in history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amaboo Dhai

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The Nuremberg Trials raised insightful issues on how and why doctors who were trained in the Hippocratic tradition were able to commit such egregious and heinous medical crimes. The vulnerable were considered to be subhuman, of decreased intelligence, of no moral status and lacking human dignity. The reputation of the medical profession had been undermined, professionalism questioned and the doctor-patient relationship damaged as a result of the Nazi medical experiments. The World Medical Association’s Declaration of Helsinki has been hailed as one of the most successful efforts in rescuing medical research from the darkness of the scandals and tragedies in health research. The first Research Ethics Committee in South Africa was established in 1966 at the University of the Witwatersrand. From the mid-1970s other institutions followed suit. The promulgation of the National Health Act No. 61 of 2003, in 2004, resulted in strong protectionism for research participants in the country.

  20. Mast cells in renal inflammation and fibrosis: lessons learnt from animal studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madjene, Lydia Celia; Pons, Maguelonne; Danelli, Luca; Claver, Julien; Ali, Liza; Madera-Salcedo, Iris K; Kassas, Asma; Pellefigues, Christophe; Marquet, Florian; Dadah, Albert; Attout, Tarik; El-Ghoneimi, Alaa; Gautier, Gregory; Benhamou, Marc; Charles, Nicolas; Daugas, Eric; Launay, Pierre; Blank, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are hematopoietic cells involved in inflammation and immunity and have been recognized also as important effector cells in kidney inflammation. In humans, only a few mast cells reside in kidneys constitutively but in progressive renal diseases their numbers increase substantially representing an essential part of the interstitial infiltrate of inflammatory cells. Recent data obtained in experimental animal models have emphasized a complex role of these cells and the mediators they release as they have been shown both to promote, but also to protect from disease and fibrosis development. Sometimes conflicting results have been reported in similar models suggesting a very narrow window between these activities depending on the pathophysiological context. Interestingly in mice, mast cell or mast cell mediator specific actions became also apparent in the absence of significant mast cell kidney infiltration supporting systemic or regional actions via draining lymph nodes or kidney capsules. Many of their activities rely on the capacity of mast cells to release, in a timely controlled manner, a wide range of inflammatory mediators, which can promote anti-inflammatory actions and repair activities that contribute to healing, but in some circumstances or in case of inappropriate regulation may also promote kidney disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. End-of-life issues for a modern India - Lessons learnt in the West

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puri Vinod

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Consideration of end-of-life issues is a relatively new phenomenon in the Indian context. It is difficult to assess the magnitude of the problem except the certainty that these issues will affect more patients and their families in the future. The approaches used in the West to prepare patients and public in general such as living will and durable power of attorney have not always been useful. The religious and social attitudes have an effect on facing end-of-life issues and yet these attitudes are in transition. The lack of education in bioethics and paucity of case law is reviewed. New approaches to the end-of-life issues in the light of experience gained in the West are suggested.

  2. Experience and Lessons learnt from running high availability databases on Network Attached Storage

    CERN Document Server

    Guijarro, Juan Manuel; Segura Chinchilla, Nilo

    2008-01-01

    The Database and Engineering Services Group of CERN's Information Technology Department provides the Oracle based Central Data Base services used in many activities at CERN. In order to provide High Availability and ease management for those services, a NAS (Network Attached Storage) based infrastructure has been set up. It runs several instances of the Oracle RAC (Real Application Cluster) using NFS as share disk space for RAC purposes and Data hosting. It is composed of two private LAN's to provide access to the NAS file servers and Oracle RAC interconnect, both using network bonding. NAS nodes are configured in partnership to prevent having single points of failure and to provide automatic NAS fail-over. This presentation describes that infrastructure and gives some advice on how to automate its management and setup using a Fabric Management framework such as Quattor. It also covers aspects related with NAS Performance and Monitoring as well Data Backup and Archive of such facility using already existing i...

  3. Experience and Lessons learnt from running High Availability Databases on Network Attached Storage

    CERN Document Server

    Guijarro, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    The Database and Engineering Services Group of CERN's Information Technology Department supplies the Oracle Central Database services used in many activities at CERN. In order to provide High Availability and ease management for those services, a NAS (Network Attached Storage) based infrastructure has been setup. It runs several instances of the Oracle RAC (Real Application Cluster) using NFS (Network File System) as shared disk space for RAC purposes and Data hosting. It is composed of two private LANs (Local Area Network), one to provide access to the NAS filers and a second to implement the Oracle RAC private interconnect, both using Network Bonding. NAS filers are configured in partnership to prevent having single points of failure and to provide automatic NAS filer fail-over.

  4. Bioresorbable polymeric scaffolds for coronary revascularization: Lessons learnt from ABSORB III, ABSORB China, and ABSORB Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogas, Bill D; King, Spencer B; Samady, Habib

    2015-01-01

    Bioresorbable polymers and biocorrodible metals are the latest developments in biodegradable materials used in interventional cardiology for the mechanical treatment of coronary atherosclerosis. Poly-L-lactic acid is the most frequently used bioresorbable polymer and initial evidence of feasibility, efficacy and clinical safety following deployment of polymer-based platforms was gained after completion of the first-in-man longitudinal ABSORB registries, Cohorts A and B and ABSORB Extend. In these studies, the biologic interaction of the first-generation Absorb Bioresorbable Vascular Scaffold (BVS) (Abbott Vascular, SC, Calif., US) with the underlying vascular tissue was evaluated in vivo with multiple imaging modalities such as intravascular ultrasound (IVUS), virtual histology-IVUS, IVUS-palpography, optical coherence tomography as well as ex vivo with coronary computed tomography. Efficacy measures following this in vivo multi-imaging assessment as well as clinical safety were comparable with current generation drug-eluting stents (DES) (Abbott Vascular, SC, Calif., US) in non-complex lesions over a 3-year follow-up. Furthermore, novel properties of functional and anatomic restoration of the vessel wall during the late phases of resorption and vascular healing were observed transforming the field of mechanical treatment of atherosclerosis from delivering only acute revascularization to additionally enable late repair and subsequent restoration of a more physiologic underlying vascular tissue. Despite the sufficient evidence and the subsequent Conformité Européenne mark approval of the first fully biodegradable scaffold (Absorb BVS) in 2012 for revascularizing non-complex lesions, the paucity of randomized comparisons of fully bioresorbable scaffolds (BRS) with metallic DES in a "real-world" clinical setting raised controversies among the interventional community for the merit of these technologies. Only recently, results from international large-scale randomized trials from the United States (U.S.), China and Japan were revealed. Herein we provide a comprehensive overview of the ABSORB III, ABSORB China and ABSORB Japan studies demonstrating the consistent non-inferiority in clinical safety and efficacy measures of the Absorb BVS vs. current generation DES.

  5. Lessons learnt? The importance of metacognition and its implications for Cognitive Remediation in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cella, Matteo; Reeder, Clare; Wykes, Til

    2015-01-01

    The cognitive problems experienced by people with schizophrenia not only impede recovery but also interfere with treatments designed to improve overall functioning. Hence there has been a proliferation of new therapies to treat cognitive problems with the hope that improvements will benefit future intervention and recovery outcomes. Cognitive remediation therapy (CR) that relies on intensive task practice can support basic cognitive functioning but there is little evidence on how these therapies lead to transfer to real life skills. However, there is increasing evidence that CR including elements of transfer training (e.g., strategy use and problem solving schemas) produce higher functional outcomes. It is hypothesized that these therapies achieve higher transfer by improving metacognition. People with schizophrenia have metacognitive problems; these include poor self-awareness and difficulties in planning for complex tasks. This paper reviews this evidence as well as research on why metacognition needs to be explicitly taught as part of cognitive treatments. The evidence is based on research on learning spanning from neuroscience to the field of education. Learning programmes, and CRT, may be able to achieve better outcomes if they explicitly teach metacognition including metacognitive knowledge (i.e., awareness of the cognitive requirements and approaches to tasks) and metacognitive regulation (i.e., cognitive control over the different task relevant cognitive requirements). These types of metacognition are essential for successful task performance, in particular, for controlling effort, accuracy and efficient strategy use. We consider metacognition vital for the transfer of therapeutic gains to everyday life tasks making it a therapy target that may yield greater gains compared to cognition alone for recovery interventions.

  6. State of the Offshore Wind Industry in Northern Europe. Lessons Learnt in the First Decade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiersma, F.; Grassin, J.; Crockford, A.; Winkel, T.; Ritzen, A.; Folkerts, L.

    2011-03-15

    The offshore wind industry has experienced rapid development over the past ten years and a supply chain is gradually developing towards maturity. Some regions and businesses have successfully taken advantage of this opportunity and have grown into centres for manufacturing, construction and servicing for the offshore wind energy industry. This has generated regional economic growth and jobs. The continued growth of offshore wind is set to provide a major contribution to reaching the EU 2020 CO2 reduction targets of North Sea countries. This is also a valuable opportunity for the development of a major industry that will contribute added economic value and increase potential for exports of leading technology to other regions. There are however, significant challenges to overcome. These relate to the rate at which projects must be realised, the corresponding growth rate in the supply chain and the scale of the investments required. Effective stakeholder management will be necessary to ensure an efficient acquisition of permits and approvals for projects. Clarity on a long-term policy outlook is also a precondition for the investments required in both supply chain and offshore wind projects. National and regional governments can play a key role in providing a solution to this, by being pro-active and enabling. This looks set to enable a progressive spiral of cost reduction and efficiency, allowing further growth of the offshore wind market.

  7. Best practice lessons learnt through the exit interview and the Oral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... the Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA) signed in 2005 was adhered to and ... we could address potential risks that operating in the Sudan context presented. ... Social networking and file sharing sites have become de facto systems for ...

  8. The AAU-cubesat Student Satellite Project: Architectual Overview and Lessons Learnt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Kasper Zinck; Alminde, Lars; Bisgaard, Morten

    2004-01-01

    In September 2001 Aalborg university started the AAU-cubesat project that reached its climax when the student built satellite was launched into space on the 30th of June 2003 on top of a former Russian ICBM. AAU-cubesat was among the first five satellites to be launched that are built within the ...

  9. The AAU-cubesat Student Satellite Project: Architectual Overview and Lessons Learnt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Kasper Zinck; Alminde, Lars; Bisgaard, Morten

    In September 2001 Aalborg university started the AAU-cubesat project that reached its climax when the student built satellite was launched into space on the 30th of June 2003 on top of a former Russian ICBM. AAU-cubesat was among the first five satellites to be launched that are built within the ...

  10. Extension services and multifunctional agriculture. Lessons learnt from the French and Dutch contexts and approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labarthe, Pierre

    2009-05-01

    Today's acknowledgement of the multifunctionality of agriculture (MFA) implies the production of new knowledge to integrate different functions at farm level (primary production, environmental protection, food safety, etc.). At the same time, agricultural sectors of European countries have recently faced changes in the organisation of their R&D activities, including a trend of commercialisation and privatisation of advisory services for farmers. To assess the consequences of these changes on support for innovations related to MFA, this paper explores the potential of combining two analytical frameworks: an institutional economic approach (IEA) and a sociological network approach (SNA). This potential is illustrated by a historical analysis of advisory services in France and The Netherlands from 1945 until now. This analysis stresses the importance of collective procedures for the accumulation of technical knowledge in agriculture. It also shows that these procedures could not be analysed from a strictly technical perspective. They are the expression of institutional arrangements involving social groups of farmers and the state, and are grounded in national contexts. A historical perspective also enables us to understand better why the privatisation of extension services cannot meet the requirements of support for farm innovations in the MFA context.

  11. Evaluating the effect of fishery closures: lessons learnt from the Plaice Box

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beare, Doug; Rijnsdorp, Adriaan D.; Blæsbjerg, Mette

    2013-01-01

    in the environment unrelated to the PB. Juvenile growth rate of plaice decreased and juveniles moved to deeper waters outside the PB. Demersal fish biomass decreased, whereas the abundance of epibenthic predators (Asterias rubens and Cancer pagurus) increased in the PB. Endobenthos, in particular the main food items...... and an appropriate evaluation framework including both ecological and socio-economic indicators when implementing closed areas. Key words: Marine Protected Area, MPA, spatial management, fisheries management, discards, climate change, trawling impact, North Sea, benthos, ecosystem change, stakeholder perception...

  12. Sustainable oceans and coasts: Lessons learnt from Eastern and Western Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diop, S.; Scheren, P. A.

    2016-12-01

    Marine and coastal ecosystems in Africa provide valuable cultural (recreational, spiritual), provisioning (such as food, timber and firewood) and regulatory (such as flood protection and climate regulation) services that are not only at the core of coastal ecosystem functioning, but are also an important basis for the economic livelihoods of over 120 million inhabitants living along the continent's coastal zone. However, these valuable ecosystems are being subjected to a range of human pressures, including overfishing and destructive fishing practices, pollution, including excess nutrients (causing eutrophication), loss and degradation of habitats, physical shoreline changes and disturbance of the hydrological regimes of rivers and estuarine systems, aggravated further by the effects of climate change. The effects of these pressures, often acting in cumulative and synergistic manners, readily affect the overall stability of the coastal ecosystems, threatening their resilience over the short- and long-term. This chapter highlights the challenges faced by the coastal states of Eastern and Western Africa in managing their coastal and marine resources for the sustainable benefits of their populations. Current mechanisms for the governance and management of the coastal and marine environment at national to regional scales are reviewed, and their effectiveness appraised, and recommendations for improved management and scientific support are made.

  13. Observations and lessons learnt from non health professionals evaluating a health search engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pletneva, Natalia; Uresova, Zdenka; Altman, Jean-Jacques; Postel Vinay, Nicolas; Degoulet, Patrice; Hajic, Jan; Boyer, Celia

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the results of one of the stages of the user-centered evaluation conducted in a framework of the EU project Khresmoi. In a controlled environment, users were asked to perform health-related tasks using a search engine specifically developed for trustworthy online health information. Twenty seven participants from largely the Czech Republic and France took part in the evaluation. All reported overall a positive experience, while some features caused some criticism. Learning points are summed up regarding running such types of evaluations with the general public and specifically with patients.

  14. Developing Sustainable Modeling Software and Necessary Data Repository for Volcanic Hazard Analysis -- Some Lessons Learnt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, A. K.; Connor, C.; Webley, P.; Jones, M.; Charbonnier, S. J.; Connor, L.; Gallo, S.; Bursik, M. I.; Valentine, G.; Hughes, C. G.; Aghakhani, H.; Renschler, C. S.; Kosar, T.

    2014-12-01

    We report here on an effort to improve the sustainability, robustness and usability of the core modeling and simulation tools housed in the collaboratory VHub.org and used in the study of complex volcanic behavior. In particular, we focus on tools that support large scale mass flows (TITAN2D), ash deposition/transport and dispersal (Tephra2 and PUFF), and lava flows (Lava2). These tools have become very popular in the community especially due to the availability of an online usage modality. The redevelopment of the tools ot take advantage of new hardware and software advances was a primary thrust for the effort. However, as we start work we have reoriented the effort to also take advantage of significant new opportunities for supporting the complex workflows and use of distributed data resources that will enable effective and efficient hazard analysis.

  15. Lessons learnt from the use of relationship-based procurement methods in Australia: clients’ perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farshid Rahmani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to review the use of various construction procurement systems and present the development of Relationship-Based Procurement (RBP Methods currently in use within the Australian construction industry. Therefore, this paper provides the historical development of procurement briefly and then focuses on the adoption of Relationship-Based Procurement (RBP approaches in the Australian construction industry to investigate the future direction of the collaborative project procurement arrangements. Semi-structured interviews with high-level managers in the Australian state government organizations have been conducted to answer the research question. A discussion has been presented about the potential future tendency of the industry in adopting a RBP. The findings suggest that even though relationship based procurement systems offer significant benefits; they are not popular among the public sector decision makers because of inability to demonstrate Value for Money (VfM propositions for public projects. Other reasons which may cause a move away from using RBPs in the future include the need for managers to fully engage throughout the project, and the lack of collaborative environment within the construction industry in general.

  16. Thirty years after the Chernobyl accident: What lessons have we learnt?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beresford, N A; Fesenko, S; Konoplev, A; Skuterud, L; Smith, J T; Voigt, G

    2016-06-01

    April 2016 sees the 30(th) anniversary of the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant. As a consequence of the accident populations were relocated in Belarus, Russia and Ukraine and remedial measures were put in place to reduce the entry of contaminants (primarily (134+137)Cs) into the human food chain in a number of countries throughout Europe. Remedial measures are still today in place in a number of countries, and areas of the former Soviet Union remain abandoned. The Chernobyl accident led to a large resurgence in radioecological studies both to aid remediation and to be able to make future predictions on the post-accident situation, but, also in recognition that more knowledge was required to cope with future accidents. In this paper we discuss, what in the authors' opinions, were the advances made in radioecology as a consequence of the Chernobyl accident. The areas we identified as being significantly advanced following Chernobyl were: the importance of semi-natural ecosystems in human dose formation; the characterisation and environmental behaviour of 'hot particles'; the development and application of countermeasures; the "fixation" and long term bioavailability of radiocaesium and; the effects of radiation on plants and animals. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Rapid response seismic networks in Europe: lessons learnt from the L'Aquila earthquake emergency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Strollo

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available

    The largest dataset ever recorded during a normal fault seismic sequence was acquired during the 2009 seismic emergency triggered by the damaging earthquake in L'Aquila (Italy. This was possible through the coordination of different rapid-response seismic networks in Italy, France and Germany. A seismic network of more than 60 stations recorded up to 70,000 earthquakes. Here, we describe the different open-data archives where it is possible to find this unique set of data for studies related to hazard, seismotectonics and earthquake physics. Moreover, we briefly describe some immediate and direct applications of emergency seismic networks. At the same time, we note the absence of communication platforms between the different European networks. Rapid-response networks need to agree on common strategies for network operations. Hopefully, over the next few years, the European Rapid-Response Seismic Network will became a reality.

  18. Maastricht : Lessons not learnt and mistakes that shouldn't have been made

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquim Muns

    1993-03-01

    Full Text Available From a standpoint of support for the deepening of European integration, the current article offers a critica1 insight into the way in which the respective governments of the Community have presented the Maastricht Treaty before public opinion, a manner described in the text as an attempt to sellthe Treaty. In the author's opinion, looking back at the historical background of European union reveals on the one hand, that countries have always stopped short of those compromises reached in its political aspect and, on the other, that the process that has resulted in Maastricht is not the fruition of a permanent dialogue between politicians and the people on this subject. In addition, great opportunities in the process of political cooperation have coincided at economically unfavourable moments the result of which has been that the countriesinvolved have had to fall back on themselves. The same attempt to sellMaastricht has led to a series of errors analysed in detail here. From the author's point of view, what is important is to understand that the Maastricht Treaty offers to change not only certain economic facts of life (and to a lesser extent, political and social as well but, above all, the way of doing things in our respective societies, the consequence of which involves a tremendous cultural transformation, that is to say, a great change in our way of thinking. The main conclusion of this work therefore is that for the welfare of European integration it would be very counterproductive to accelerate a process so complex and with such profound implications as that of Maastricht.

  19. Lessons learnt from the market for air freight ground handling at Amsterdam Airport Schiphol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burghouwt, G.; Poort, J.; Ritsema, H.

    2014-01-01

    On 16 April 2013, the European Parliament adopted a new, amended airport ground handling Regulation, which will replace the old Directive 96/67 EC on ground handling services. The new Regulation will further open up European airports for competition on the ground handling market. Even long before

  20. Method and application of ocean environmental awareness measurement: Lessons learnt from university students of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umuhire, Marie Louise; Fang, Qinhua

    2016-01-30

    Different studies have proved that enhancing public Ocean Environmental Awareness (OEA) will lead to increased public support for ocean environmental protection. Our study develops a questionnaire to investigate current levels of students' OEA from three aspects including ocean environmental concerns, ocean environment knowledge and willingness to participate in ocean related activities. This questionnaire was applied to students from Xiamen University to understand the OEA of university students in China, of which there are few studies. Using data gathered from a random purposive sample, the OEA level of students in Xiamen University was investigated and then the influencing factors (education, geographical situation, age and gender etc.) were further analyzed. Findings suggest that most students are concerned about the ocean environment but their knowledge is not enough that makes the willingness to participate in ocean related actions limited as well. The results show there is an urgent need to improve students' OEA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Assessment of diagnostic skills in specialist examinations should include lessons learnt from misdiagnosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehud Zamir

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Poor authenticity in high stake clinical exams adversely effects validity. We propose including known misleading diagnostic factors and contextual biases in the assessment of diagnostic skills amongst advanced specialty trainees. We hypothesise that this strategy offers a more realistic and critical assessment of diagnostic skill than strategies in which candidates are presented with directive, bias free information, allowing for assumptions which cannot be made in real life. METHODS: Eleven patient based practice clinical exam stations were presented to nine advanced ophthalmology trainees. Four patients had a history of misdiagnosis or near misdiagnosis of key ophthalmic findings, presumed to result from identifiable biases and misleading information. In those four stations, candidates were presented with authentic, file based information and were asked authentic questions, similar to those with which the patients presented. If the candidates were unsuccessful in identifying key findings, the questions were converted into directive questions about the same key findings (i.e. "examine the patient's eyelids, what is your diagnosis?", and the candidates re-assessed the patient and re-answered. RESULTS: Ninety-eight doctor-patient encounters took place. Of those, 35 encounters were analysed for the purpose of this study. In 63% of those encounters, key findings were missed when the question included authentic biases or misleading background information, but rephrasing the question to a directive exam format led to their correct identification (Fail converted to pass. Key findings were detected despite contextual biases or misleading background information in only 23% of encounters. In 14% the findings were missed with either question phrasing. CONCLUSIONS: Presentation authentic questions provide a more realistic and less forgiving measure of diagnostic skills than directive exam questions. Given the prevalence of diagnostic errors and their importance to patient outcomes, known mechanisms contributing to diagnostic errors should be used as one of the assessment tools of advanced speciality trainees.

  2. Lessons Learnt from the Development of a Municipal Solid Waste NAMA in Peru

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Morten; Jantzen, Jan; de la Torre, Luis

    Forberedelsen af ​​en "National Apppropriate Mitigation Measures" mhp at reducere udledningen drivhusgasser i Perus kommunale sektor fast affald har ført til en forbedring af emissionsdata. En tilbundsgående beregning af de samlede affaldsemissioner beholdning solid, der anvender IPCC 2006 retnin...

  3. Isolated Bilateral Renal Mucormycosis Masquerading as Renal Abscess in an Immunocompetent Individual: A Lesson Learnt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somorendro Paonam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Isolated renal mucormycosis is a rare entity in immunocompetent subjects. It is usually a rapidly progressive disease with poor prognosis but it can mimic renal abscess with a protracted course.

  4. The ABCC6 transporter: what lessons can be learnt from other ATP-binding cassette transporters?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier M. Vanakker

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available ABC transporters represent a large family of ATP-driven transmembrane transporters involved in uni- or bidirectional transfer of a variety of substrates. Divided in 7 families, they represent 48 transporter proteins, several of which are associated with human disease. Among the latter is ABCC6, a unidirectional exporter protein primarily expressed in liver and kidney. ABCC6 deficiency causes pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE, characterised by calcification and fragmentation of elastic fibres, resulting in oculocutaneous and cardiovascular symptoms. Unique among connective tissue disorders, the relation between the ABCC6 transporter and ectopic mineralization in PXE remains enigmatic, not in the least because of lack of knowledge on the substrate(s of ABCC6 and its unusual expression pattern. Because many features, including structure and transport mechanism, are shared by ABC transporters, it is worthwhile to evaluate if and to what extent the knowledge on the (pathophysiology of other transporters may provide useful clues towards understanding the (pathophysiological role of ABCC6. In this paper, we summarize relevant knowledge and methods for analysis on ABC transporters which may be useful for the further study of ABCC6.

  5. Lessons learnt on implementing an interdisciplinary doctoral programme in water sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Gemma; Loucks, Daniel Pete; Blaschke, Alfred Paul; Bucher, Christian; Farnleitner, Andreas; Fürnkranz-Prskawetz, Alexia; Parajka, Juraj; Pfeifer, Norbert; Rechberger, Helmut; Wagner, Wolfgang; Zessner, Matthias; Blöschl, Günter

    2015-04-01

    Using the Vienna Doctoral Programme on Water Resource Systems as a case study, this work describes how the characteristics of the programme can be evaluated to identify which process features are important for developing interdisciplinary research at the doctoral level. The Programme has been running since 2009, and to date has engaged 35 research students, three post-docs and ten faculty members from ten research fields (aquatic microbiology, hydrology, hydro-climatology, hydro-geology, mathematical economics, photogrammetry, remote sensing, resource management, structural mechanics, and water quality). Collaborative, multi-disciplinary research is encouraged and supported through various mechanisms - shared offices, study programme, research cluster groups that hold regular meetings, joint study sites, annual and six-month symposia that bring all members of the programme together, seminar series, joint supervision, and social events. Interviews were conducted with 12 students and recent graduates to explore individual experiences of doing interdisciplinary research within the Programme, and to identify which mechanisms are perceived to be of the greatest benefit for collaborative work. Analysis revealed four important process features. Firstly, students noted that joint supervision and supervisors who are motivated to collaborate are essential for multi-disciplinary collaborative work. Secondly, interviewees described that they work with the people they sit close to or see most regularly. Physical places for collaboration between different discipline researchers such as shared offices and shared study sites are therefore important. Thirdly, the costs and benefits to doing interdisciplinary work were highlighted. Students make a trade-off when deciding if their time investment to develop their understanding of a new research field will support them in addressing their research question. The personal characteristics of the researcher seem to be particularly relevant to this decision making process and need to be considered during student selection. Finally, communication skills are critical. Students noted that they need to be able to understand what each other are doing in order to work together and the symposia and research cluster meetings are good places for developing these skills.

  6. Adolescence spinal epidural abscess with neurological symptoms: case report, a lesson to be re-learnt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales, Jafar Ganjpour; Tabrizi, Ali; Elmi, Asghar; Soleimanpour, Jafar; Gavidel, Ehsan

    2013-02-01

    Epidural abscess of the spinal column is a rare condition that can be fatal if left untreated. It promptly progresses and can cause neurologic paralysis, urinary retention or cauda equina syndrome. Compromised immune system that occurs in patients with diabetes mellitus, AIDS, chronic renal failure, alcoholism, or cancer is a predisposing factor. It mostly occurs in adults. Here we would like to report a case of spontaneous pyogenic lumbar epidural abscess with neurological deficit diagnosed in a 15 year old boy. We treated this case successfully with surgical microscopic decompression and drainage.

  7. Building Healthcare - Patient Relationship with CRM 2.0: Lesson Learnt from Prita Mulyasari's Case

    CERN Document Server

    Anshari, Muhammad

    2012-01-01

    Healthcare is implementing CRM as a strategy for managing interactions and communication with patients which involves using Information and Communication Technology (ICT) to organize, automate, and coordinate business processes. CRM with the Web technology provides healthcare the ability to broaden service beyond its usual practices, and thus provides a particular advantageous environment for them that want to use ICT to achieve complex healthcare goal. This paper we will discuss and demonstrate how a new approach in CRM will help the healthcare increasing their customer support, and promoting better health to patient. The patients benefited from the customized personal service so that they have full information access to perform self managed their own health and the healthcare provider will have a loyal and retains the right customer. A conceptual framework of approach will be highlighted. Customer centric paradigm in social network's era and value creation of healthcare's business process will be taken into...

  8. How lessons learnt informed the development of an implementation framework in an ICT4D initiative

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Botha, Adèle

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available period of three years through five phases. Each phase represented a specific point in time and the objective was to create a platform to enable widespread participation and collaboration between multiple stakeholders in a rural school district that has...

  9. Supporting Knowledge exchange isn't Easy: Lessons Learnt from a Case Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pumareja, D.T.; Bondarouk, Tatiana; Sikkel, Nicolaas; Kosrow-Pour, M.

    A knowledge management system is introduced in a large insurance company. It is meant to become a virtual knowledge network for a group of insurance professionals. Despite the fact that the introduction was met with enthusiasm and user participation in the design was ensured, the system did not live

  10. An outbreak of suspected cutaneous leishmaniasis in Ghana: lessons learnt and preparation for future outbreaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kweku, Margaret A; Odoom, Shirley; Puplampu, Naiki; Desewu, Kwame; Nuako, Godwin Kwakye; Gyan, Ben; Raczniak, Greg; Kronmann, Karl C; Koram, Kwadwo; Botero, Silvia; Boakye, Daniel; Akuffo, Hannah

    2011-01-01

    Human cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) has previously been reported in West Africa, but more recently, sporadic reports of CL have increased. Leishmania major has been identified from Mauritania, Senegal, Mali, and Burkina Faso. Three zymodemes (MON-26, MON-117, and MON-74, the most frequent) have been found. The geographic range of leishmaniasis is limited by the sand fly vector, its feeding preferences, and its capacity to support internal development of specific species of Leishmania. The risk of acquiring CL has been reported to increase considerably with human activity and epidemics of CL have been associated with deforestation, road construction, wars, or other activities where humans intrude the habitat of the vector. In the Ho Municipality in the Volta Region of Ghana, a localised outbreak of skin ulcers, possibly CL, was noted in 2003 without any such documented activity. This outbreak was consistent with CL as evidenced using various methods including parasite identification, albeit, in a small number of patients with ulcers. This paper reports the outbreak in Ghana. The report does not address a single planned study but rather a compilation of data from a number of ad-hoc investigations in response to the outbreak plus observations and findings made by the authors. It acknowledges that a number of the observations need to be further clarified. What is the detailed epidemiology of the disease? What sparked the epidemic? Can it happen again? What was the causative agent of the disease, L. major or some other Leishmania spp.? What were the main vectors and animal reservoirs? What are the consequences for surveillance of the disease and the prevention of its reoccurrence when the communities see a self-healing disease and may not think it is important?

  11. An outbreak of suspected cutaneous leishmaniasis in Ghana: lessons learnt and preparation for future outbreaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Boakye

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Human cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL has previously been reported in West Africa, but more recently, sporadic reports of CL have increased. Leishmania major has been identified from Mauritania, Senegal, Mali, and Burkina Faso. Three zymodemes (MON-26, MON-117, and MON-74, the most frequent have been found. The geographic range of leishmaniasis is limited by the sand fly vector, its feeding preferences, and its capacity to support internal development of specific species of Leishmania. The risk of acquiring CL has been reported to increase considerably with human activity and epidemics of CL have been associated with deforestation, road construction, wars, or other activities where humans intrude the habitat of the vector. In the Ho Municipality in the Volta Region of Ghana, a localised outbreak of skin ulcers, possibly CL, was noted in 2003 without any such documented activity. This outbreak was consistent with CL as evidenced using various methods including parasite identification, albeit, in a small number of patients with ulcers.This paper reports the outbreak in Ghana. The report does not address a single planned study but rather a compilation of data from a number of ad-hoc investigations in response to the outbreak plus observations and findings made by the authors. It acknowledges that a number of the observations need to be further clarified. What is the detailed epidemiology of the disease? What sparked the epidemic? Can it happen again? What was the causative agent of the disease, L. major or some other Leishmania spp.? What were the main vectors and animal reservoirs? What are the consequences for surveillance of the disease and the prevention of its reoccurrence when the communities see a self-healing disease and may not think it is important?

  12. [Lessons learnt from the German smallpox outbreaks after World War II].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasse, Julia; Gelderblom, Hans R

    2015-07-01

    Even though smallpox was declared eradicated by WHO in 1980, it cannot be ruled out that the etiological variola virus could be used as a biological weapon. Undestroyed viruses from biowarfare programmes, virus strains left undetected in a freezer or dangerous recombinant poxvirus constructs could cause dangerous outbreaks in a relatively unprotected population. Despite an abundance of studies performed during the eradication of smallpox, epidemiological data for preparedness planning and outbreak control in modern, industrialized countries are scarce. Full-text hand search for the period from 1945 to 1975 in the main German public health journals. After World War II 12 smallpox outbreaks occurred in Germany. They were studied with the focus on the period of contagiousness, the protective effect of vaccination, booster-effect of revaccination and the place of infection. A total of 95 individuals contracted smallpox, including 10 fatalities. Despite having been previously vaccinated, 81 vaccinated persons came down with smallpox, yet 91% of them developed only mild symptoms. These patients presented a high risk for spreading the infection to contact persons due to misinterpretation of symptoms and the continuing social contacts. Basically, the risk of transmission in the first 2 to 3 days after onset of symptoms was low, thus facilitating antiepidemic measures. The importance of hospital preparedness is emphasized by the fact that most infections occurred in hospitals. The data analyzed provide valuable information for today's outbreak response planning and counter bioterrorism preparedness.

  13. Expanding Bicycle-Sharing Systems: Lessons Learnt from an Analysis of Usage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Thomas, Tom; Brussel, M J G; van Maarseveen, M F A M

    2016-01-01

    Bike-sharing programs, with initiatives to increase bike use and improve accessibility of urban transit, have received increasing attention in growing number of cities across the world. The latest generation of bike-sharing systems has employed smart card technology that produces station-based data or trip-level data. This facilitates the studies of the practical use of these systems. However, few studies have paid attention to the changes in users and system usage over the years, as well as the impact of system expansion on its usage. Monitoring the changes of system usage over years enables the identification of system performance and can serve as an input for improving the location-allocation of stations. The objective of this study is to explore the impact of the expansion of a bicycle-sharing system on the usage of the system. This was conducted for a bicycle-sharing system in Zhongshan (China), using operational usage data of different years following system expansion. To this end, we performed statistical and spatial analyses to examine the changes in both users and system usage between before and after the system expansion. The findings show that there is a big variation in users and aggregate usage following the system expansion. However, the trend in spatial distribution of demand shows no substantial difference over the years, i.e. the same high-demand and low-demand areas appear. There are decreases in demand for some old stations over the years, which can be attributed to either the negative performance of the system or the competition of nearby new stations. Expanding the system not only extends the original users' ability to reach new areas but also attracts new users to use bike-sharing systems. In the conclusions, we present and discuss the findings, and offer recommendations for the further expansion of system.

  14. Skin resurfacing in a circumferential full thickness burn to the penis: lessons learnt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabir, Shehab; Frew, Quentin; Thompson, Richard; Dziewulski, Peter

    2013-08-13

    A circumferential full-thickness burn to the penis is a rarely encountered injury. However, when it does occur, it proves a management challenge to the plastic and burns surgeon in terms of reconstruction. This is due to the need of not only regaining adequate function of the organ, but also because of the need for a pleasing aesthetic outcome. Split-skin grafts have been utilised successfully to resurface full thickness burns of the penis and have given good results. Yet the success of split-skin grafts, especially those applied to an anatomically challenging region of the body such as the penis, depends on a number of carefully thought-out steps. We discuss the case of a circumferential full-thickness burn to the penis which was treated with split-skin grafting and highlight important pitfalls that the plastic and burns surgeon need to be aware of to ensure a successful outcome.

  15. Laparoscopic vs open donor nephrectomy: Lessons learnt from single academic center experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoulfas, Georgios; Agorastou, Polyxeni; Ko, Dicken S C; Hertl, Martin; Elias, Nahel; Cosimi, AB; Kawai, Tatsuo

    2017-01-01

    AIM To compare laparoscopic and open living donor nephrectomy, based on the results from a single center during a decade. METHODS This is a retrospective review of all living donor nephrectomies performed at the Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, between 1/1998 - 12/2009. Overall there were 490 living donors, with 279 undergoing laparoscopic living donor nephrectomy (LLDN) and 211 undergoing open donor nephrectomy (OLDN). Demographic data, operating room time, the effect of the learning curve, the number of conversions from laparoscopic to open surgery, donor preoperative glomerular filtration rate and creatinine (Cr), donor and recipient postoperative Cr, delayed graft function and donor complications were analyzed. Statistical analysis was performed. RESULTS Overall there was no statistically significant difference between the LLDN and the OLDN groups regarding operating time, donor preoperative renal function, donor and recipient postoperative kidney function, delayed graft function or the incidence of major complications. When the last 100 laparoscopic cases were analyzed, there was a statistically significant difference regarding operating time in favor of the LLDN, pointing out the importance of the learning curve. Furthermore, another significant difference between the two groups was the decreased length of stay for the LLDN (2.87 d for LLDN vs 3.6 d for OLDN). CONCLUSION Recognizing the importance of the learning curve, this paper provides evidence that LLDN has a safety profile comparable to OLDN and decreased length of stay for the donor. PMID:28101451

  16. Type 1 Innate Lymphoid Cell Biology: Lessons Learnt from Natural Killer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Yuhao; Huntington, Nicholas D; Belz, Gabrielle T; Seillet, Cyril

    2016-01-01

    Group 1 innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) comprise the natural killer (NK) cells and ILC1s that reside within peripheral tissues. Several different ILC1 subsets have recently been characterized; however, no unique markers have been identified that uniquely define these subsets. Whether ILC1s and NK cells are in fact distinct lineages, or alternately exhibit transitional molecular programs that allow them to adapt to different tissue niches remains an open question. NK cells are the prototypic member of the Group 1 ILCs and have been historically assigned the functions of what now appears to be a multi-subset family that are distributed throughout the body. This raises the question of whether each of these populations mediate distinct functions during infection and tumor immunosurveillance. Here, we review the diversity of the Group 1 ILC subsets in their transcriptional regulation, localization, mobility, and receptor expression, and highlight the challenges in unraveling the individual functions of these different populations of cells.

  17. Epidemiological research drives a paradigm shift in complementary feeding - the celiac disease story and lessons learnt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordyke, Katrina; Olsson, Cecilia; Hernell, Olle; Ivarsson, Anneli

    2010-01-01

    Breast milk is the initial natural food for infants, but already during the second half year complementary feeding is essential. Epidemiological research, first on celiac disease and later on atopic diseases, has driven a paradigm shift with respect to most favorable age to introduce complementary feeding. Simplified, this implies a shift from later to earlier introduction, which is now taken into account in recommendations on infant feeding. Complementary feeding, including all foods, should not be initiated for any infant before 4 months of age, and not later than around 6 months, including infants with elevated disease risk (e.g. for celiac disease or atopic diseases). Motivating reasons could be that ongoing breastfeeding provides an 'immunological umbrella' and/ or a different age interval gives a 'window of opportunity' for developing oral tolerance towards gluten and other food antigens. This will for some infants be in conflict with recent WHO recommendations on exclusive breastfeeding for 6 months. Epidemiology has evolved over time and could, if increasingly used, contribute even more to innovations in pediatric nutrition and other phenomena related to population health.

  18. Restoration of a boulder reef in temperate waters: Strategy, methodology and lessons learnt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Støttrup, Josianne Gatt; Dahl, Karsten; Niemann, Sanne

    2017-01-01

    Anthropogenic impacts on marine habitats are a global problem, particularly in coastal areas. While boulder reefs in temperate waters hold high biomass and biodiversity, and may be unable to recover from anthropogenic stressors without restoration efforts, little is known about how to restore and...

  19. Laparoscopic bilateral transperitoneal adrenalectomy for Cushing syndrome: surgical challenges and lessons learnt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Sandeep; Yadav, Kunal; Sharma, Aditya P; Sethi, Vrishketan

    2013-06-01

    Laparoscopic adrenalectomy is well established for treatment of adrenal lesions. However, bilateral adrenalectomy for Cushing syndrome is a challenging and time-consuming operation. We report our experience of laparoscopic bilateral adrenalectomy for this disease in 19 patients. From September 2009 to August 2012, we have operated 19 patients with Cushing syndrome and performed bilateral laparoscopic adrenalectomy using the transperitoneal approach; synchronous in 15 patients and staged in 4 patients. In 15 patients, the surgery was carried out sequentially on both the sides in lateral position with intraoperative change in position. Complete adrenalectomy including periadrenal fat was carried out on both the sides. Nineteen patients were referred from Department of Endocrinology for bilateral adrenalectomy for adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH)-dependent and ACTH-independent Cushing syndrome. The indications for surgery were Cushing disease in 15 patients, occult/ectopic source of ACTH in 2 patients, and primary adrenal hyperplasia in 2 patients. Fifteen patients underwent bilateral adrenalectomy during the same operation. Four patients underwent staged procedures. All procedures were completed laparoscopically with no conversions. The mean operating time for simultaneous bilateral adrenalectomy was 210 minutes (range, 150 to 240 min). This included the repositioning and reprepping time. There were no major intraoperative complications. The average blood loss was 100 mL (range, 50 to 200 mL). None of the patients required blood transfusions in the postoperative period. The postoperative complications included minor port-site infection in 2 patients. One severely debilitated patient died on the 14th postoperative day because of hospital-acquired pneumonia. The remaining 18 patients have done well in terms of impact on the disease. Laparoscopic bilateral adrenalectomy for Cushing syndrome is feasible and safe. It confers all the advantages of minimally invasive approach such as less postoperative pain, shorter hospitalization, lesser wound complications, and faster recovery. The advantages of the laparoscopic approach have led to an earlier referral for bilateral adrenalectomy by endocrinologist in patients with failed pituitary surgery.

  20. FLAMINKO: Usability evaluation of work-domain specific applications. Experiences and lessons learnt.

    OpenAIRE

    Følstad, Asbjørn

    2009-01-01

    Work-domain specific software solutions represent important challenges for usability evaluation methods; particularly related to the lack of context knowledge resources available to the usability experts involved in the evaluation. In order to meet this challenge we have investigated two methods where work-domain experts (end users with thorough experience of the context of use) are engaged as analysts in usability evaluations.• Group-based expert evaluation is an analytical evaluation method...

  1. Lessons learnt from a birthday party: a Bacillus cereus outbreak, Bari, Italy, January 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Martinelli

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Bacillus cereus, a ubiquitous bacterium, can be isolated in various starchy food items, causing both emetic and diarrhoeal disease. The real burden of B. cereus outbreaks is actually poorly known in Italy. We report a B. cereus foodborne outbreak that occurred in a pub in Bari (Italy on January 22nd 2012 during a birthday party, promptly reported by the pub owner. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Between January 22nd and 24th 2012, we performed a retrospective cohort study among the guests of the party to identify risk factors associated with illness. Leftovers of different meals were available for microbiological analysis. Faecal specimens were collected from cases. RESULTS: A total of 12 cases among the 13 customers (attack rate: 92% were reported. All cases had consumed basmati rice and sweet and sour vegetables (aetiological fraction: 100%. B. cereus was isolated from both basmati rice served during the party and faecal specimens. DISCUSSION: The close collaboration between the pub owner and the public health officers and the possibility to test food leftovers and stool samples contributed to prevent further cases.

  2. S-nitrosothiol (SNO signals in the enteric nervous system: lessons learnt from big brother.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tor eSavidge

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is a functionally important neurotransmitter signaling molecule generated by mammalian and bacterial nitric oxide synthases (NOS, and by chemical conversion of dietary nitrite in the gastrointestinal (GI tract. Neuronal nNOS is the most abundant isoenzyme in the enteric nervous system, and targeted deletion in transgenic mice has clearly demonstrated its importance in normal gut function. Enteric neuropathy is also often associated with abnormal NO production, for example in achalasia and diabetic gastroparesis. Not surprisingly therefore, aberrant nNOS activity is widely implicated in enteric disease, and represents a potential molecular target for therapeutic intervention. One physiological signalling mechanism of NO bioactivity is through chemical reaction with the heme centre of guanylyl cyclase, resulting in the conversion of cGMP from GTP. This second messenger nucleotide signal activates cGMP-dependent protein kinases, phosphodiesterases and ion channels, and is implicated in the neuronal control of GI function. However, few studies in the GI tract have fully related NO bioactivity with specific molecular targets of NO-derived signals. In the central nervous system (CNS, it is now increasingly appreciated that NO bioactivity is often actively transduced via S-nitrosothiol (SNO signals rather than via activation of guanylyl cyclase. Moreover, aberrant S-nitrosylation of specific molecular targets is implicated in CNS pathology. S-nitrosylation refers to the posttranslational modification of a protein cysteine thiol by NO, forming an endogenous SNO. Because cysteine residues are often key regulators of protein function, S-nitrosylation represents a physiologically important signaling mechanism analogous to other posttranslational modifications, such as O-phosphorylation. This article provides an overview of how neurotransmitter NO is produced by nNOS as this represents the most prominent and well defined source of SNO production

  3. Lessons Learnt from and Sustainability of Adopting a Personal Learning Environment & Network (Ple&N)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Eric; Sabetzadeh, Farzad

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the feedback from the configuration and deployment of a Personal Learning Environment & Network (PLE&N) tool to support peer-based social learning for university students and graduates. An extension of an earlier project in which a generic and PLE&N was deployed for all learners, the current PLE&N is a…

  4. Environmental sustainability of electricity supply in the world between 1980 and 2011: Lessons learnt and perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurent, Alexis; Espinosa Martinez, Nieves

    2014-01-01

    for energy planning? To address these questions, we collected annual data on electricity generation for 199 countries and territories for the period 1980-2011, differentiated per types of energy sources. These data were combined with region-specific life cycle inventories of pollutant emissions and resource...... consumptions to assess ten environmental impact categories, e.g. climate change, water use or chemical pollution. The results show that, for several regions, the majority of these impacts have increased between 1980 and 2011. Asia and the Middle East – and to a lesser degree, Africa and Latin America – thus...... show steep increase, up to more than one order of magnitude, in nearly all indicators when compared to their 1980- baseline values. To estimate the “environmental cleanness” of the grid mixes over time, the impact scores were normalized by the electricity generated yearly within each country...

  5. Lessons learnt in Japan from adverse reactions to the HPV vaccine: a medical ethics perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beppu, Hirokuni; Minaguchi, Masumi; Uchide, Kiyoshi; Kumamoto, Kunihiko; Sekiguchi, Masato; Yaju, Yukari

    2017-01-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine has been linked to a number of serious adverse reactions. The range of symptoms is diverse and they develop in a multi-layered manner over an extended period of time. The argument for the safety and effectiveness of the HPV vaccine overlooks the following flaws: (i) no consideration is given to the genetic basis of autoimmune diseases, and arguments that do not take this into account cannot assure the safety of the vaccine; (ii) the immune evasion mechanisms of HPV, which require the HPV vaccine to maintain an extraordinarily high antibody level for a long period of time for it to be effective, are disregarded; and (iii) the limitations of effectiveness of the vaccine. We also discuss various issues that came up in the course of developing, promoting and distributing the vaccine, as well as the pitfalls encountered in monitoring adverse events and epidemiological verification.

  6. Building Cyberinfrastructures for Earth and Space Sciences so that they will come: lessons learnt from Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyborn, L. A.; Woodcock, R.

    2013-12-01

    One of the greatest drivers for change in the way scientific research is undertaken in Australia was the development of the Australian eResearch Infrastructure which was coordinated by the then Australian Government Department of Innovation, Industry, Science and Research. There were two main tranches of funding: the 2007-2013 National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy (NCRIS) and the 2009 Education and Investment Framework (EIF) Super Science Initiative. Investments were in two areas: the Australian e-Research Infrastructure and domain specific capabilities: combined investment in both is 1,452M with at least 456M being invested in eResearch infrastructure. NCRIS was specifically designed as a community-guided process to provide researchers, both academic and government, with major research facilities, supporting infrastructures and networks necessary for world-class research. Extensive community engagement was sought to inform decisions on where Australia could best make strategic infrastructure investments to further develop its research capacity and improve research outcomes over the next 5 to 10years. The current (2007-2014) Australian e-Research Infrastructure has 2 components: 1. The National eResearch physical infrastructure which includes two petascale HPC facilities (one in Canberra and one in Perth), a 10 Gbps national network (National Research Network), a national data storage infrastructure comprising 8 multi petabyte data stores and shared access methods (Australian Access Federation). 2. A second component is focused on research integration infrastructures and includes the Australian National Data Service, which is concerned with better management, description and access to distributed research data in Australia and the National eResearch Collaboration Tools and Resources (NeCTAR) project. NeCTAR is centred on developing problem oriented digital laboratories which provide better and coordinated access to research tools, data environments and workflows. The eResearch Infrastructure Stack is designed to support 12 individual domain-specific capabilities. Four are relevant to the Earth and Space Sciences: (1) AuScope (a national Earth Science Infrastructure Program), (2) the Integrated Marine Observing System (IMOS), (3) the Terrestrial Ecosystems Research Network (TERN) and (4) the Australian Urban Research Infrastructure Network (AURIN). The two main research integration infrastructures, ANDS and NeCTAR, are seen as pivotal to the success of the Australian eResearch Infrastructure. Without them, there was a risk that that the investments in new computers and data storage would provide physical infrastructure, but few would come to use it as the skills barriers to entry were too high. ANDS focused on transforming Australia's research data environment. Its flagship is Research Data Australia, an Internet-based discovery service designed to provide rich connections between data, projects, researchers and institutions, and promote visibility of Australian research data collections in search engines. NeCTAR focused on building eResearch infrastructure in four areas: virtual laboratories, tools, a federated research cloud and a hosting service. Combined, ANDS and NeCTAR are ensuring that people ARE coming and ARE using the physical infrastructures that were built.

  7. Educational Value and Lessons Learnt from the AAU-Cubesat Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alminde, Lars; Bisgaard, Morten; Vinther, D.

    In September 2001 Aalborg university started the AAU-cubesat project that reached it climax when the student built satellite was launched into space on the 30th of June 2003 on top of a former Russian ICBM. AAU-cubesat was among the first five satellites to be launched that are built within...... together to built a student satellite like the AAU-cubesat. Results from the operation phase will be stated, and recommendations on further work on pico-satellite designs will be given. In addition as the project has been carried through by students then the educational value of the project...

  8. Educational Value and Lessons Learnt from the AAU-cubesat Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alminde, Lars; Bisgaard, Morten; Vinther, D.

    2003-01-01

    In September 2001 Aalborg university started the AAU-cubesat project that reached it climax when the student built satellite was launched into space on the 30th of June 2003 on top of a former Russian ICBM. AAU-cubesat was among the first five satellites to be launched that are built within...... together to built a student satellite like the AAU-cubesat. Results from the operation phase will be stated, and recommendations on further work on pico-satellite designs will be given. In addition as the project has been carried through by students then the educational value of the project...

  9. A problem-oriented approach to understanding adaptation: lessons learnt from Alpine Shire, Victoria Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Carolina

    2010-05-01

    Climate change is gaining attention as a significant strategic issue for localities that rely on their business sectors for economic viability. For businesses in the tourism sector, considerable research effort has sought to characterise the vulnerability to the likely impacts of future climate change through scenarios or ‘end-point' approaches (Kelly & Adger, 2000). Whilst useful, there are few demonstrable case studies that complement such work with a ‘start-point' approach that seeks to explore contextual vulnerability (O'Brien et al., 2007). This broader approach is inclusive of climate change as a process operating within a biophysical system and allows recognition of the complex interactions that occur in the coupled human-environmental system. A problem-oriented and interdisciplinary approach was employed at Alpine Shire, in northeast Victoria Australia, to explore the concept of contextual vulnerability and adaptability to stressors that include, but are not limited to climatic change. Using a policy sciences approach, the objective was to identify factors that influence existing vulnerabilities and that might consequently act as barriers to effective adaptation for the Shire's business community involved in the tourism sector. Analyses of results suggest that many threats, including the effects climate change, compete for the resources, strategy and direction of local tourism management bodies. Further analysis of conditioning factors revealed that many complex and interacting factors define the vulnerability and adaptive capacity of the Shire's tourism sector to the challenges of global change, which collectively have more immediate implications for policy and planning than long-term future climate change scenarios. An approximation of the common interest, i.e. enhancing capacity in business acumen amongst tourism operators, would facilitate adaptability and sustainability through the enhancement of social capital in this business community. Kelly, P. M., & Adger, W. N. (2000). Theory and practice in assessing vulnerability to climatic change and facilitating adaptation. Climatic Change, 47, 325-352. O'Brien, K., Eriksen, S., Nygaard, L. P., & Schjolden, A. (2007). Why different interpretations of vulnerability matter in climate change discourses. Climate Policy, 7, 73-88.

  10. Internet of Things Platform for Smart Farming: Experiences and Lessons Learnt

    OpenAIRE

    Prem Prakash Jayaraman; Ali Yavari; Dimitrios Georgakopoulos; Ahsan Morshed; Arkady Zaslavsky

    2016-01-01

    Improving farm productivity is essential for increasing farm profitability and meeting the rapidly growing demand for food that is fuelled by rapid population growth across the world. Farm productivity can be increased by understanding and forecasting crop performance in a variety of environmental conditions. Crop recommendation is currently based on data collected in field-based agricultural studies that capture crop performance under a variety of conditions (e.g., soil quality and environme...

  11. Establishing a deceased donor program in north Indian region: lessons learnt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vivek; Chandra, Abhijit; Rahul; Singh, Manmeet; Shrivastava, Peeyush Kumar; Singhai, Atin; Ojha, Bal Krishna; Chandra, Girish; Khan, Mohammed Parvez; Pandey, Sant; Kant, Ravi

    2016-05-01

    Living-related donors are the source of almost all organ transplants in India. However, these donations fall far short of current needs, and there remains a huge disparity between demand and supply of organs. In the last five yr, a consistent increase in deceased donor transplant activity has been observed in some southern Indian states. This report describes our experience of establishing a new deceased donor program in the state of Uttar Pradesh in north India. We describe our experience on counseling families of all brain-dead patients admitted to our center from October 2013 to September 2014 and data on retrieving and transplanting organs. A total of 99 brain-dead patients were identified, of which 67 were medically eligible as donors. Fourteen patients developed cardiac arrest before the counseling could begin. Only eight families agreed for multi-organ donation. Lack of consensus among the family members, mistrust of the medical system, fear of mutilation of the body, and delay in the funeral were identified as the main reasons behind negative consent. Conversely, mass media campaign, proper ICU care of brain-dead patients, rapport with the family and streamlining all medico legal processes were associated with positive consent. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Biofuel support policies in Europe. Lessons learnt for the long way ahead

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiesenthal, Tobias; Leduc, Guillaume; Christidis, Panayotis; Schade, Burkhard [European Commission, DG JRC, Institute for Prospective Technological Studies (IPTS), Edificio Expo, C/Inca Garcilaso, s/n, E-41092 Sevilla (Spain); Pelkmans, Luc; Govaerts, Leen [Flemish Institute for Technological Research VITO, Boeretang 200, BE-2400 Mol (Belgium); Georgopoulos, Panagiotis [CERTH/HIT Centre for Research and Technology Hellas/Hellenic Institute of Transport, 6th Km Charilaou, Thermi Road, 57001 Thermi, Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2009-05-15

    Biofuel consumption in the EU is growing rapidly but major efforts will need to be undertaken if the EU's objectives for 2010 and beyond are to be achieved. This article analyses the strengths and weaknesses of different biofuel support policies based on the experiences gained in pioneering countries and explores scenarios for their possible impacts in the long-term. It comes to the conclusion that important pre-conditions such as fuel standards and compatibility with engines are in place or being introduced on an EU-wide basis. Current and future policy support therefore focuses on creating favourable economic or legal frameworks to accelerate the market penetration of biofuels. The ambitious targets endorsed in terms of biofuel market shares require the implementation of efficient policy instruments. At the same time, large consumption volumes and the advent of innovative production technologies make it possible for Member States to promote specific types of biofuels, depending on their main objectives and natural potentials. This will require complementary instruments such as subsidies for production facilities, user incentives or feedstock subsidies. (author)

  13. Educational Value and Lessons Learnt from the AAU-cubesat Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alminde, Lars; Bisgaard, Morten; Vinther, D.

    2003-01-01

    the cubesat concept that prescribes a satellite with dimensions 10x10x10cm and mass one kilogram. These constraints clearly limits the possibilities for the satellite in terms of possible scientific missions, but on the other hand: by building satellites of this size a technology push is created...

  14. The measles outbreak in Bulgaria, 2009-2011: An epidemiological assessment and lessons learnt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscat, Mark; Marinova, Lili; Mankertz, Annette; Gatcheva, Nina; Mihneva, Zafira; Santibanez, Sabine; Kunchev, Angel; Filipova, Radosveta; Kojouharova, Mira

    2016-01-01

    Measles re-emerged in a nationwide outbreak in Bulgaria from 2009 to 2011 despite reported high vaccination coverage at national level. This followed an eight-year period since the last indigenous cases of measles were detected. The Bulgarian National Centre of Infectious and Parasitic Diseases collated measles surveillance data for 2009-2011. We analysed data for age group, sex, ethnicity, diagnosis confirmation, vaccination, hospitalisation, disease complications, and death and describe the outbreak control measures taken. The outbreak started in April 2009 following an importation of measles virus and affected 24,364 persons, predominantly Roma. Most cases (73%) were among children measles-containing vaccine. Twenty-four measles-related deaths were reported. The Roma ethnic group was particularly susceptible to measles. The magnitude of the outbreak resulted primarily from the accumulation of susceptible children over time. This outbreak serves as a reminder that both high vaccination coverage and closing of immunity gaps across all sections of the population are crucial to reach the goal of measles elimination.

  15. Remote intracranial hemorrhage following surgery for giant orbitofrontal growing skull fracture: A lesson learnt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachin Baldawa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Growing skull fracture is an extremely rare complication of pediatric head injury, especially in infants. Repair of the dural tear early in the course of development of growing skull fracture has been suggested for a better outcome. Surgical repair of large, tense growing skull fractures, especially those in the communication of the ventricles can lead to potentially life-threatening complications. The author reports a rare case of remote intracranial hemorrhage following surgery for large, tense growing skull fracture in a 12-year-old girl and discusses the likely pathogenesis and possible ways to avoid this life-threatening complication.

  16. Scientific collaborations on Living Labs: some lessons learnt from South Africa and Tanzania

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Herselman, M

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available .S. De Vos (Ed.), Research at grassroots for social and human service professions. Pretoria: Van Schaik. Geerts, G. (2011). A design science research methodology and its application to accounting information systems research. International Journal...: geo-collaborative crisis management: Designing technologies to meet real-world needs. International Conference on Digital Government Research, San Diego, California, pp. 71- 72, ACM Press. Mulder, I., Fahy, C., Hribernik, K., Velthausz, D., Feurstein...

  17. Lessons learnt from TB screening in closed immigration centres in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crepet, Anna; Repetto, Ernestina; Al Rousan, Ahmad; Sané Schepisi, Monica; Girardi, Enrico; Prestileo, Tullio; Codecasa, Luigi; Garelli, Silvia; Corrao, Salvatore; Ippolito, Giuseppe; Decroo, Tom; Maccagno, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Background Between June 2012 and December 2013 Médecins Sans Frontières launched a pilot project with the aim of testing a strategy for improving timely diagnosis of active pulmonary TB among migrants hosted in four centres of identification and expulsion (CIE) in Italy. Methods This is a descriptive study. For active TB case finding we used an active symptom screening approach among migrants at admission in four CIE's. Here we describe the feasibility and the yield of this programme. Results Overall, 3588 migrants were screened, among whom 87 (2.4%) had a positive questionnaire. Out of 30 migrants referred for further investigations, three were diagnosed as having TB, or 0.1% out of 3588 individuals that underwent screening. Twenty-five (29%, 25/87) migrants with positive questionnaires were not referred for further investigation, following the doctors' decision; however, for 32 (37%, 32/87) migrants the diagnostic work-out was not completed. In multivariate analyses, being over 35 years (OR 1.7; 95% CI 1.1–2.6) and being transgender (OR 4.9; 95% CI 2.1–11.7), was associated with a positive questionnaire. Conclusions TB screening with symptom screening questionnaires of migrants at admission in closed centres is feasible. However, to improve the yield, follow-up of patients with symptoms or signs suggestive for TB needs to be improved. PMID:27208040

  18. Daily precipitation in a changing climate: lessons learnt from Swiss national climate change scenario initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Andreas; Liniger, Mark; Zubler, Elias; Keller, Denise; Rajczak, Jan; Schär, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    Precipitation is a key variable in the climate system that affects many aspects of the hydrological cycle such as river runoff, snow amount, or droughts. Climate change projections of precipitation and related impacts are therefore of fundamental concern for multiple sectors in many regions. Within the Swiss national climate change initiatives CH2011 and CH2014, several precipitation-dependent impacts were quantitatively assessed. This included consideration of projections of the mean annual cycle, as well as changes in extremes, wet-day frequency, and spell lengths. To better understand the needs of the primary and intermediary users of climate model data in Switzerland, a dialogue between the climate modeling and impact communities was established over recent years. In this presentation, we like to report about our experience with these needs, and on the steps we undertook to approach the emerging challenges regarding changes in precipitation. In our work beyond CH2011, the multi-faceted characteristics of precipitation change over Switzerland are investigated based on the joint analysis of several regional climate model (RCM) simulations from ENSEMBLES at the A1B emission scenario. In some seasons, changes in precipitation frequency and intensity compensate each other, in other seasons just one of these two components changes. Yet, extreme daily precipitation events are projected to intensify in most seasons. In summer, a reduction of frequency yields an augmented risk of more multi-day dry spells and meteorological summer droughts. It is also in summer, when the model simulations exhibit an elevation-dependent shift in precipitation type toward more convective precipitation. To accommodate the common need of many end-users in obtaining quantitative future projection data at multiple stations, we use a stochastic multi-site precipitation generator as main downscaling technique. In the presentation, we will present first results thereof and discuss, how end-users can handle changes in daily precipitation statistics for climate change scenarios.

  19. Reconceptualised life skills in secondary education in the African context: Lessons learnt from reforms in Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyeampong, Kwame

    2014-04-01

    Early notions of life skills in Africa did not take into account the importance of a flexible and portable set of skills that would enable youth to adapt to changes in the world of work and lay the foundations for productive well-being and behaviour. Rather, life skills education in many secondary education curricula in Africa started with an emphasis on developing specific technical vocational skills considered essential for employability or self-employment. Using Ghana as an example, this paper shows how secondary education curriculum reformers recommended shifts that embraced a new interpretation of life skills focused on 21st-century skills. This gradual move also reflected the difficulty that secondary education in general has had in networking with the world of work to provide work experience that would lead to the development of work-related skills and enhance employability. The author's main argument is that although the reconceptualisation of life skills in secondary education to reflect 21st-century skills is a welcome shift in the African context, this needs to be accompanied by reforms in teacher education. Classroom teaching and learning need to be adapted in a fundamental way in order to ensure that youth fully benefit from the inclusion of 21st-century life skills in secondary education curricula. Such reforms must include pedagogical practices which nurture communication, collaboration, creativity and critical thinking skills.

  20. Lessons learnt from recent citizen science initiatives to document floods in France, Argentina and New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Coz Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available New communication and digital image technologies have enabled the public to produce and share large quantities of flood observations. Valuable hydraulic data such as water levels, flow rates, inundated areas, etc., can be extracted from photos and movies taken by citizens and help improve the analysis and modelling of flood hazard. We introduce recent citizen science initiatives which have been launched independently by research organisations to document floods in some catchments and urban areas of France, Argentina and New Zealand. Key drivers for success appear to be: a clear and simple procedure, suitable tools for data collecting and processing, an efficient communication plan, the support of local stakeholders, and the public awareness of natural hazards.

  1. Lessons Learnt from a Secondary School Sex Education Program in Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Ana Paula; Soares, Isabel; Vilar, Duarte

    2007-01-01

    Based on a developmental framework, a study was conducted in Portugal in two groups of youth in terms of relevant aspects related to adolescent psychosexual development: one group participated in an Experimental Project of Sex Education and Health Promotion during high school, whereas the other did not receive any formal sex education in school.…

  2. Lessons learnt from a MOOC about social media for digital health literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atique, Suleman; Hosueh, Mowafa; Fernandez-Luque, Luis; Gabarron, Elia; Wan, Marian; Singh, Onkar; Traver Salcedo, Vicente; Li, Yu-Chuan Jack; Shabbir, Syed-Abdul

    2016-08-01

    Nowadays, the Internet and social media represent prime channels for health information seeking and peer support. However, benefits of health social media can be reduced by low digital health literacy. We designed a massive open online course (MOOC) course about health social media to increase the students' digital health literacy. In this course, we wanted to explore the difficulties confronted by the MOOC users in relation to accessing quality online health information and to propose methods to overcome the issues. An online survey was carried out to assess the students' digital health literacy. This survey was one of the activities for the enrolled learners in an online course entitled "Social Media in Health Care" on "FutureLearn", one of the popular MOOC platforms. The course was hosted by Taipei Medical University, Taiwan. Data from a total of 300 respondents were collected through the online survey from 14 December 2015 to 10 January 2016. Most participants (61%) considered finding online health information is easy or very easy, while 39% were unsure or found it difficult to retrieve online health information. Most (63%) were not sure about judging whether available information can be used for making health decisions. This study indicates a demand for more training to increase skills to improve the capability of health consumers to identify trustworthy, useful health information. More research to understand the health information seeking process will be crucial in identifying the skillsets that need to be further developed. MOOCs about digital health can be a great source of knowledge when it comes to studying patients' needs.

  3. Lessons learnt from a measles outbreak in Madang Province, Papua New Guinea, June 2014 - March 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamac, Karoi; Paterson, Beverley; Flint, James

    2017-01-01

    This study examined measles vaccine wastage during an outbreak response in Madang Province of Papua New Guinea from June 2014 to March 2015. Vaccine wastage was defined as the number of doses received by a health centre minus the total number of doses administered during and returned following the outbreak vaccination campaign. Vaccine data were collected from the Provincial Health Information Office, the Provincial Vaccine Store register and clinic and health centre immunization registers for calculating the vaccine wastage. Interviews were conducted with all 48 health centres involved in the outbreak response using a structured questionnaire to explore the reasons for vaccine wastage. Of the 154 110 doses issued by Madang Province during the outbreak, a total of 85 236 (55%) doses were wasted. The wastage varied by district from 31% to 90%. The total cost of the vaccine wastage was estimated to be 589 810 Kina (US$ 196 604). None of the health centres maintained vaccine stock registers. Most health centres indicated multiple failures in cold chain logistics. Almost 40% of health centres reported incorrectly diluting vaccines. The same percentage of health centres reported using incorrect injection techniques. Regular audits of cold chain logistics, staff training and improved processes for recording vaccine administration and wastage will decrease vaccine wastage during vaccine-preventable disease outbreaks and also benefit routine immunization activities.

  4. Recurrent Volvulus of an Ileal Pouch Requiring Repeat Pouchopexy: A Lesson Learnt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pär Myrelid

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Restorative surgery for ulcerative colitis with ileal pouch anal anastomosis (IPAA is frequently accompanied by complications. Volvulus of the ileal pouch is one of the most rarely reported late complications and to our knowledge no report exists on reoperative surgery for this condition. Case Report. A 58-year-old woman who previously had undergone restorative proctocolectomy due to ulcerative colitis with an IPAA presented with volvulus of the pouch. She was operated with a single row pouchopexy to the presacral fascia. Two months later she returned with a recurrent volvulus. At reoperation, the pouch was found to have become completely detached from the fascia. A new pexy was made by firmly anchoring the pouch with two rows of sutures to the presacral fascia as well as with sutures to the lateral pelvic walls. At follow-up after five months she was free of symptoms. Conclusion. This first report ever on reoperative surgery for volvulus of a pelvic pouch indicates that a single row pouchopexy might be insufficient for preventing retwisting. Several rows seem to be needed.

  5. Reconceptualised Life Skills in Secondary Education in the African Context: Lessons Learnt from Reforms in Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyeampong, Kwame

    2014-01-01

    Early notions of life skills in Africa did not take into account the importance of a flexible and portable set of skills that would enable youth to adapt to changes in the world of work and lay the foundations for productive well-being and behaviour. Rather, life skills education in many secondary education curricula in Africa started with an…

  6. Was Kiobel Detrimental to Corporate Social Responsibility? Applying Lessons Learnt From American Exceptionalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Thompson

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The recent decision in the US Supreme Court Kiobel case applied the presumption against extraterritoriality towards the Alien Tort Statute, decreasing the potential scope of tort actions that can be made against corporations for severe human rights violations. In light of the growing influence of multinational corporations and the lack of any international law regime to regulate corporate wrongdoing, this decision might be seen as a blow against one of the few potential avenues for justice for those victims of corporate human rights violations. The Alien Tort Statute is not a jurisdictional statute that allows for claims under international law but is rather a uniquely American cause of action unconnected to international law. The question remains whether an extension of American law to provide remedies for severe corporate human rights abuses can be justified in the absence of any such remedies existent in international law. This article will attempt to answer this question applying criteria developed by leading scholars in response to American exceptionalism. It will argue that the Kiobel decision, rather than being detrimental to holding corporations accountable, actually addresses many of the negative aspects of extraterritorial litigation whilst preserving some possibility of remedy for victims of severe human rights violations by corporations.

  7. When an interim analysis of randomized trial changes the practice in oncology: the lesson of adjuvant Trastuzumab and the HERA trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rossi, Costanza; Brunello, Antonella; Jirillo, Giuseppe; Jirillo, Antonio

    2009-03-01

    About 30% of the randomized clinical trials are stopped early because of appearance of clear clinical benefit. Though interim analyses protect patients in case of significant imbalance between two treatment arms, conclusions drawn from truncated studies can be premature and should be viewed with caution. We report the lesson learnt from the Herceptin adjuvant (HERA) trial.

  8. LESSONS FROM THE BOER WAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. De Jong

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Review of: Jay Stone and Erwin A. Schmidl, The Boer War and Military reforms, Volume 28 of the series "War and Society of East Central Europe", University Press of America, Lanham: New York - London, 1988, 345 pp. Numerous studies exist of the lessons to be learnt from the Anglo-Boer War 1899-1902 by students of 20th Century Warfare. These studies date back from the days of that war up to the present. In many cases these studies are titled "Lessons from the Boer War". In the book under review Jay Stone examines the War's impact on Britain and Erwin Schmidl its effect in Austria-Hungary. I shall confine this review to Stone's findings. According to him Britain entered the war full of self-confidence in the hope of terminating the conflict within a few weeks, but was totally unprepared. The reason was that the last war she waged against a European power was as long ago as 1855-56. That was the Crimean War against Russia. Thereafter she had fought only local, colonial wars against badly drilled, little disciplined and primitively armed non-European armies. Some of these used to attack in large hordes and were shot or ridden down en masse. This had happened recently at Omdurman in 1898 where Kitchener defeated the Sudanese. The British ultimately were victorious in all the colonial wars.

  9. What is there to be learnt from the 1950s and 1960s for contemporary trainee teachers in Further Education?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parfitt, Anne

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, some stories of staff who became Further Education (FE lecturers during the 1950s and 1960s are reported upon. What emerges is that this period when FE was being established was heavily reliant on the imagination of the actors in their community settings. Moreover, these pioneers in the sector, often from strong occupational backgrounds but with limited formal qualifications, were employed because it was considered that they would be able to use their creative wisdom to forge the necessary links with local industry and other relevant stakeholders, so as to give the FE brand a high profile in its respective local communities. It is contended that in the current, most likely prolonged, period of austerity there is much to be drawn from these experiences of yesteryear, in that what is revealed in the following is very much a perspective that funding was not necessarily the be-all and end-all when these practitioners were endeavouring to deliver excellence. In particular, it is argued that lessons can be learnt from former times and thus, by recalling these and other such narratives and including them in FE lecturers’ Initial Teacher Training(ITT and ongoing Continuing Professional Development (CPD programmes, we may stimulate our imaginations in relation to how FE can be further integrated into the local setting, despite the aforementioned contemporary financial constraints.

  10. Traditional Herbal Management of Sickle Cell Anemia: Lessons from Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Sunday J. Ameh; Florence D. Tarfa; Benjamin U. Ebeshi

    2012-01-01

    Background. Patients in West Africa where sickle cell anemia (SCA) is endemic have for ages been treated with natural products, especially herbs, as, is still the case in rural communities. Objective. In this paper we look closely at some of these herbs to see if there are any lessons to be learnt or clues to be found for optimizing the treatments based on them, as had been done in the case of NIPRISAN, which was developed from herbs in Nigeria based on Yoruba Medicine. Methods. Select public...

  11. Developing and managing transdisciplinary and transformative research on the coastal dynamics of sea level rise: Experiences and lessons learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLorme, Denise E.; Kidwell, David; Hagen, Scott C.; Stephens, Sonia H.

    2016-05-01

    There is increasing emphasis from funding agencies on transdisciplinary approaches to integrate science and end-users. However, transdisciplinary research can be laborious and costly and knowledge of effective collaborative processes in these endeavors is incomplete. More guidance grounded in actual project experiences is needed. Thus, this article describes and examines the collaborative process of the Ecological Effects of Sea Level Rise in the Northern Gulf of Mexico transdisciplinary research project, including its development, implementation, and evaluation. Reflections, considerations, and lessons learned from firsthand experience are shared, supported with examples, and connected to relevant scholarly literature.

  12. Designing Conservation Corridors in Production Landscapes: Assessment Methods, Implementation Issues, and Lessons Learned

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda T. Lombard

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Designing broad-scale conservation corridors has become increasingly common as a way of conducting an assessment for achieving targets for the representation and persistence of nature. However, since many of these corridors must traverse agricultural and other production landscapes, planning and implementation are not trivial tasks. Most approaches to conservation assessments in the dynamic world of production landscapes are data-intensive and analytically complex. However, in the real world, donor and other external requirements impose time and budget constraints, and dictate strong stakeholder involvement in the entire planning process. In order to accommodate this, assessments must be rapid, cheap, and the approach and products must be comprehensible and acceptable to stakeholders. Here we describe such an assessment aimed at identifying and implementing a network of conservation corridors in the Gouritz Initiative project domain of South Africa's Cape Floristic Region hotspot. We used empirical data and expert knowledge to identify a corridor network hypothesized to sustain key ecological and evolutionary processes. We also consulted experts to provide a spatially explicit assessment of the opportunity costs of conservation associated with agriculture, the predominant land use in the region. We used these products to identify categories of land requiring different actions and instruments to achieve conservation goals, thereby moving from the "where" to the "how" of conservation. This information was then fed into the collaborative strategy development process for the Gouritz Initiative. Our discussion emphasizes the lessons that we learnt from undertaking this assessment, particularly lessons regarding the implementation of the planning products. We conclude that at the outset of any planning project, a consensus on the vision must be achieved, a detailed social assessment of appropriate institutions must be undertaken, and a learning

  13. Novice High School Science Teachers: Lesson Plan Adaptations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharon, Aracelis Janelle

    2013-01-01

    The Next Generation Science Standards (NRC, 2013) positions teachers as responsible for necessary decision making about how their intended science lesson plan content supports continuous student science learning. Teachers interact with their instructional lesson plans in dynamic and constructive ways. Adapting lesson plans is complex. This process…

  14. Epidemic and intervention modelling – a scientific rationale for policy decisions? Lessons from the 2009 influenza pandemic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Neil M

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Problem Outbreak analysis and mathematical modelling are crucial for planning public health responses to infectious disease outbreaks, epidemics and pandemics. This paper describes the data analysis and mathematical modelling undertaken during and following the 2009 influenza pandemic, especially to inform public health planning and decision-making. Approach Soon after A(H1N1)pdm09 emerged in North America in 2009, the World Health Organization convened an informal mathematical modelling network of public health and academic experts and modelling groups. This network and other modelling groups worked with policy-makers to characterize the dynamics and impact of the pandemic and assess the effectiveness of interventions in different settings. Setting The 2009 A(H1N1) influenza pandemic. Relevant changes Modellers provided a quantitative framework for analysing surveillance data and for understanding the dynamics of the epidemic and the impact of interventions. However, what most often informed policy decisions on a day-to-day basis was arguably not sophisticated simulation modelling, but rather, real-time statistical analyses based on mechanistic transmission models relying on available epidemiologic and virologic data. Lessons learnt A key lesson was that modelling cannot substitute for data; it can only make use of available data and highlight what additional data might best inform policy. Data gaps in 2009, especially from low-resource countries, made it difficult to evaluate severity, the effects of seasonal variation on transmission and the effectiveness of non-pharmaceutical interventions. Better communication between modellers and public health practitioners is needed to manage expectations, facilitate data sharing and interpretation and reduce inconsistency in results. PMID:22511828

  15. Refinement of horizontal resolution in dynamical downscaling of climate information using WRF: Costs, benefits, and lessons learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dynamical downscaling techniques have previously been developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) using a nested WRF at 108- and 36-km. Subsequent work extended one-way nesting down to 12-km resolution. Recently, the EPA Office of Research and Development used com...

  16. Response selection difficulty modulates the behavioral impact of rapidly learnt action effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uta eWolfensteller

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that we can pick up action effect associations when acting in a free-choice intentional mode. However, it is less clear whether and when action effect associations are learnt and actually affect behavior if we are acting in a forced-choice mode, applying a specific stimulus-response (S-R rule. In the present study, we investigated whether response selection difficulty imposed by S-R rules influences the initial rapid learning and the behavioral expression of previously learnt but weakly practiced action effect associations when those are re-activated by effect exposure. Experiment 1 showed that the rapid acquisition of action effect associations is not directly influenced by response selection difficulty. By contrast, the behavioral expression of re-activated action effect associations is prevented when actions are directly activated by highly over-learnt response cues and thus response selection difficulty is low. However, all three experiments showed that if response selection difficulty is sufficiently high during re-activation, the same action effect associations do influence behavior. Experiment 2 and 3 revealed that the effect of response selection difficulty cannot be fully reduced to giving action effects more time to prime an action, but seems to reflect competition during response selection. Finally, the present data suggest that when multiple novel rules are rapidly learnt in succession, which requires a lot of flexibility, action effect associations continue to influence behavior only if response selection difficulty is sufficiently high. Thus, response selection difficulty might modulate the impact of experiencing multiple learning episodes on action effect expression and learning, possibly via inducing different strategies.

  17. The impact of early bilingualism on controlling a lately learnt language: An ERP study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara D Martin

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This study asks whether early bilingual speakers who have already developed a language control mechanism to handle two languages control a dominant and a lately learnt language in the same way as late bilingual speakers. We therefore compared event-related potentials in a language switching task in two groups of participants switching between a dominant (L1 and a weak lately learnt language (L3. Early bilingual late learners of an L3 showed a different ERP pattern (larger N2 mean amplitude as late bilingual late learners of an L3. Even though the relative strength of languages was similar in both groups (a dominant and a weak lately learnt language, they controlled their language output in a different manner. Moreover, the N2 was similar in two groups of early bilinguals tested in languages of different strength. We conclude that early and late bilinguals differ in language control. This difference might explain some of the advantages early bilinguals have when learning new languages.

  18. Deeply learnt hashing forests for content based image retrieval in prostate MR images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Amit; Conjeti, Sailesh; Navab, Nassir; Katouzian, Amin

    2016-03-01

    Deluge in the size and heterogeneity of medical image databases necessitates the need for content based retrieval systems for their efficient organization. In this paper, we propose such a system to retrieve prostate MR images which share similarities in appearance and content with a query image. We introduce deeply learnt hashing forests (DL-HF) for this image retrieval task. DL-HF effectively leverages the semantic descriptiveness of deep learnt Convolutional Neural Networks. This is used in conjunction with hashing forests which are unsupervised random forests. DL-HF hierarchically parses the deep-learnt feature space to encode subspaces with compact binary code words. We propose a similarity preserving feature descriptor called Parts Histogram which is derived from DL-HF. Correlation defined on this descriptor is used as a similarity metric for retrieval from the database. Validations on publicly available multi-center prostate MR image database established the validity of the proposed approach. The proposed method is fully-automated without any user-interaction and is not dependent on any external image standardization like image normalization and registration. This image retrieval method is generalizable and is well-suited for retrieval in heterogeneous databases other imaging modalities and anatomies.

  19. Lesson Learning at JPL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberhettinger, David

    2011-01-01

    A lessons learned system is a hallmark of a mature engineering organization A formal lessons learned process can help assure that valuable lessons get written and published, that they are well-written, and that the essential information is "infused" into institutional practice. Requires high-level institutional commitment, and everyone's participation in gathering, disseminating, and using the lessons

  20. Lesson Learning at JPL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberhettinger, David

    2011-01-01

    A lessons learned system is a hallmark of a mature engineering organization A formal lessons learned process can help assure that valuable lessons get written and published, that they are well-written, and that the essential information is "infused" into institutional practice. Requires high-level institutional commitment, and everyone's participation in gathering, disseminating, and using the lessons

  1. River flow is critical for vegetation dynamics: Lessons from multi-scale analysis in a hyper-arid endorheic basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Qin; Gao, Guangyao; Lü, Yihe; Wang, Shuai; Jiang, Xiaohui; Fu, Bojie

    2017-12-15

    Knowledge of the spatio-temporal responses of vegetation dynamics to hydro-climatic factors is important to assess ecological restoration efforts in arid and semiarid areas. In this study, the vegetation dynamics during 2000-2015 were investigated in the downstream area of the Heihe River Basin (HRB) in Northwest China where an ecological water diversion project (EWDP) commenced in 2000. The spatio-temporal relationships between vegetation cover and climatic factors (precipitation and temperature) and available water resources (river flow and groundwater) were determined. The results indicated that the mean growing season NDVI increased significantly during the period of 2000-2015, and the area of East Juyan Lake (EJL) enlarged to 36.4km(2) in 2010. The scale effect of the relationships between NDVI and hydro-climatic factors was obvious. At the catchment scale, changes of NDVI were not significantly correlated with climatic factors, but significantly related with the antecedent 1-year river flow. River flow played an important role in vegetation growth within approximately 2000m distance from the river bank. At the pixel scale, the changes of NDVI were significantly positive with temperature and river flow in 17.40% and 7.14% of the study area, respectively, whereas significant relationship between NDVI and precipitation occurred in only 0.65% of study area. The suitable water table depth for vegetation growth was between 1.8 and 3.5m. The increased river flow and recovered groundwater due to the EWDP were critical for the improvement of vegetation cover, whereas the riparian vegetation degraded along some parts of the river bank. It is important to improve integrated watershed management with consideration of spatio-temporal lagged hydro-ecological connections in the study area. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Scroll-wave dynamics in human cardiac tissue: lessons from a mathematical model with inhomogeneities and fiber architecture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupamanjari Majumder

    Full Text Available Cardiac arrhythmias, such as ventricular tachycardia (VT and ventricular fibrillation (VF, are among the leading causes of death in the industrialized world. These are associated with the formation of spiral and scroll waves of electrical activation in cardiac tissue; single spiral and scroll waves are believed to be associated with VT whereas their turbulent analogs are associated with VF. Thus, the study of these waves is an important biophysical problem. We present a systematic study of the combined effects of muscle-fiber rotation and inhomogeneities on scroll-wave dynamics in the TNNP (ten Tusscher Noble Noble Panfilov model for human cardiac tissue. In particular, we use the three-dimensional TNNP model with fiber rotation and consider both conduction and ionic inhomogeneities. We find that, in addition to displaying a sensitive dependence on the positions, sizes, and types of inhomogeneities, scroll-wave dynamics also depends delicately upon the degree of fiber rotation. We find that the tendency of scroll waves to anchor to cylindrical conduction inhomogeneities increases with the radius of the inhomogeneity. Furthermore, the filament of the scroll wave can exhibit drift or meandering, transmural bending, twisting, and break-up. If the scroll-wave filament exhibits weak meandering, then there is a fine balance between the anchoring of this wave at the inhomogeneity and a disruption of wave-pinning by fiber rotation. If this filament displays strong meandering, then again the anchoring is suppressed by fiber rotation; also, the scroll wave can be eliminated from most of the layers only to be regenerated by a seed wave. Ionic inhomogeneities can also lead to an anchoring of the scroll wave; scroll waves can now enter the region inside an ionic inhomogeneity and can display a coexistence of spatiotemporal chaos and quasi-periodic behavior in different parts of the simulation domain. We discuss the experimental implications of our study.

  3. Twenty years' application of agricultural countermeasures following the Chernobyl accident: lessons learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fesenko, S V [International Atomic Energy Agency, 1400 Vienna (Austria); Alexakhin, R M [Russian Institute of Agricultural Radiology and Agroecology, 249020 Obninsk (Russian Federation); Balonov, M I [International Atomic Energy Agency, 1400 Vienna (Austria); Bogdevich, I M [Research Institute for Soil Science and Agrochemistry, Minsk (Belarus); Howard, B J [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Centre, Library Avenue, Bailrigg, Lancaster LAI 4AP (United Kingdom); Kashparov, V A [Ukrainian Institute of Agricultural Radiology (UIAR), Mashinostroiteley Street 7, Chabany, Kiev Region 08162 (Ukraine); Sanzharova, N I [Russian Institute of Agricultural Radiology and Agroecology, 249020 Obninsk (Russian Federation); Panov, A V [Russian Institute of Agricultural Radiology and Agroecology, 249020 Obninsk (Russian Federation); Voigt, G [International Atomic Energy Agency, 1400 Vienna (Austria); Zhuchenka, Yu M [Research Institute of Radiology, 246000 Gomel (Belarus)

    2006-12-15

    The accident at the Chernobyl NPP (nuclear power plant) was the most serious ever to have occurred in the history of nuclear energy. The consumption of contaminated foodstuffs in affected areas was a significant source of irradiation for the population. A wide range of different countermeasures have been used to reduce exposure of people and to mitigate the consequences of the Chernobyl accident for agriculture in affected regions in Belarus, Russia and Ukraine. This paper for the first time summarises key data on countermeasure application over twenty years for all three countries and describes key lessons learnt from this experience. (review)

  4. Early interventions and lessons from Harvard Business Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Siow-Ann

    2007-11-01

    To describe the establishment and development of an Early Psychosis Intervention Programme in Singapore that is based on a business model and with concepts drawn from the corporate world. The author who directed this programme describes the circumstances that led to this initiative, the ideas borrowed and adapted from the corporate world, and the lessons learnt in setting up this intervention programme. The modus operandi of the programme is based on the Balanced Scorecard - a model which stresses four equally important components: customers, internal processes, financial health and learning and innovation. Other complementary actions like creating a sense of urgency, forging a vision with a core ideology, empowerment of team members, creating short-term wins, anchoring the changes and finding meaning in the work are vital for the programme to thrive. This model also emphasizes the importance of accountability through the measurability of indicators. These indicators included a significant reduction in the duration of untreated psychosis, a positive change in the referral patterns with better engagement of the primary health-care sector and an improvement in the quality of care for the patients. Much can be learnt from the business world in building and maintaining a public mental health programme. Effective change also requires effective leadership, and the successful implementation of certain strategic steps.

  5. What lessons to be learnt from reflective learning journals written by students to improve learning and intercultural awareness?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Peter

    2009-01-01

    and given special help to develop team and project work skills. When Danish and foreign students are grouped in mixed teams on the 2nd semester, the Danish students still are experts in project work and they are not familiar with taking in less skilled newcomers. A new course was established for Danish 1st...

  6. The Political Ecology of Chinese Large Dams in Cambodia: Implications, Challenges and Lessons Learnt from the Kamchay Dam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Siciliano

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Given the opportunities offered by foreign investment in energy infrastructure mostly by Chinese firms, the Government of Cambodia is giving high priority to developing hydropower resources for reducing energy poverty and powering economic growth. Using a “Political ecology of the Asian drivers” framework, this paper assesses China’s involvement in the development of large dams’ in Cambodia and its impacts on the access of natural resources such as water and energy by dam builders, local communities and the government. This analysis is based on 61 interviews and 10 focus group discussions with affected communities, institutional actors, Chinese dam builders and financiers in relation to the first large Chinese dam built in Cambodia: the Kamchay dam. Based on the results of the analysis this paper makes recommendations on how to improve the planning, implementation and governance of future large dams in Cambodia.

  7. How can we establish more successful knowledge networks in developing countries? Lessons learnt from knowledge networks in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdizadeh, Bahareh; Majdzadeh, Reza; Alami, Ali; Amrolalaei, Sima

    2014-10-29

    Formal knowledge networks are considered among the solutions for strengthening knowledge translation and one of the elements of innovative systems in developing and developed countries. In the year 2000, knowledge networks were established in Iran's health system to organize, lead, empower, and coordinate efforts made by health-related research centers in the country. Since the assessment of a knowledge network is one of the main requirements for its success, the current study was designed in two qualitative and quantitative sections to identify the strengths and weaknesses of the established knowledge networks and to assess their efficiency. In the qualitative section, semi-structured, in-depth interviews were held with network directors and secretaries. The interviews were analyzed through the framework approach. To analyze effectiveness, social network analysis approach was used. That is, by considering the networks' research council members as 'nodes', and the numbers of their joint articles--before and after the network establishments--as 'relations or ties', indices of density, clique, and centrality were calculated for each network. In the qualitative section, non-transparency of management, lack of goals, administrative problems were among the most prevalent issues observed. Currently, the most important challenges are the policies related to them and their management. In the quantitative section, we observed that density and clique indices had risen for some networks; however, the centrality index for the same networks was not as high. Consequently the attribution of density and clique indices to these networks was not possible. Therefore, consolidating and revising policies relevant to the networks and preparing a guide for establishing managing networks could prove helpful. To develop knowledge and technology in a country, networks need to solve the problems they face in management and governance. That is, the first step towards the realization of true knowledge networks in health system.

  8. Integrated weed management systems with herbicide-tolerant crops in the European Union: lessons learnt from home and abroad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamichhane, Jay Ram; Devos, Yann; Beckie, Hugh J; Owen, Micheal D K; Tillie, Pascal; Messéan, Antoine; Kudsk, Per

    2017-06-01

    Conventionally bred (CHT) and genetically modified herbicide-tolerant (GMHT) crops have changed weed management practices and made an important contribution to the global production of some commodity crops. However, a concern is that farm management practices associated with the cultivation of herbicide-tolerant (HT) crops further deplete farmland biodiversity and accelerate the evolution of herbicide-resistant (HR) weeds. Diversification in crop systems and weed management practices can enhance farmland biodiversity, and reduce the risk of weeds evolving herbicide resistance. Therefore, HT crops are most effective and sustainable as a component of an integrated weed management (IWM) system. IWM advocates the use of multiple effective strategies or tactics to manage weed populations in a manner that is economically and environmentally sound. In practice, however, the potential benefits of IWM with HT crops are seldom realized because a wide range of technical and socio-economic factors hamper the transition to IWM. Here, we discuss the major factors that limit the integration of HT crops and their associated farm management practices in IWM systems. Based on the experience gained in countries where CHT or GMHT crops are widely grown and the increased familiarity with their management, we propose five actions to facilitate the integration of HT crops in IWM systems within the European Union.

  9. Molecular diagnostics for lassa fever at Irrua specialist teaching hospital, Nigeria: lessons learnt from two years of laboratory operation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny A Asogun

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lassa fever is a viral hemorrhagic fever endemic in West Africa. However, none of the hospitals in the endemic areas of Nigeria has the capacity to perform Lassa virus diagnostics. Case identification and management solely relies on non-specific clinical criteria. The Irrua Specialist Teaching Hospital (ISTH in the central senatorial district of Edo State struggled with this challenge for many years. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A laboratory for molecular diagnosis of Lassa fever, complying with basic standards of diagnostic PCR facilities, was established at ISTH in 2008. During 2009 through 2010, samples of 1,650 suspected cases were processed, of which 198 (12% tested positive by Lassa virus RT-PCR. No remarkable demographic differences were observed between PCR-positive and negative patients. The case fatality rate for Lassa fever was 31%. Nearly two thirds of confirmed cases attended the emergency departments of ISTH. The time window for therapeutic intervention was extremely short, as 50% of the fatal cases died within 2 days of hospitalization--often before ribavirin treatment could be commenced. Fatal Lassa fever cases were older (p = 0.005, had lower body temperature (p<0.0001, and had higher creatinine (p<0.0001 and blood urea levels (p<0.0001 than survivors. Lassa fever incidence in the hospital followed a seasonal pattern with a peak between November and March. Lassa virus sequences obtained from the patients originating from Edo State formed--within lineage II--a separate clade that could be further subdivided into three clusters. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Lassa fever case management was improved at a tertiary health institution in Nigeria through establishment of a laboratory for routine diagnostics of Lassa virus. Data collected in two years of operation demonstrate that Lassa fever is a serious public health problem in Edo State and reveal new insights into the disease in hospitalized patients.

  10. One decade of research into the fate and transport of carbon-based nanomaterials - Lessons learnt and future perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüffer, Thorsten; Hofmann, Thilo

    2016-04-01

    Carbon-based nanomaterials (CNM) exhibit unique physico-chemical properties (e.g., large surface area to volume ratios, electron delocalization), which make them promising for a great number of applications. The production, use, and disposal of CNM and CNM-containing products will inevitably result in the release of these materials into the environment. The fate and transport of CNM greatly depends on their physico-chemical properties and surrounding environmental conditions. This field of research has constantly increased over recent years. Yet little is known on how transformation processes such as changes in surface properties or aggregation influence their interaction with other environmental species (i.e., solid surfaces or contaminants). For example, changes in redox chemistry in combination with irradiation have shown to significantly alter the surface chemistry of C60 fullerenes and consequently decreased their sorption affinity towards non-polar organic contaminants [1]. The presence of natural organic matter (NOM) seems to play a major role on the aggregation of CNM; however, the results are not consistent whether this leads to an increase or decrease in interactions with solid surfaces or contaminants. Either increased interactions resulting from a higher dispersion of CNM or decreased interactions of CNM, which was assigned to an offset of "creating" new sorption sites due to increased dispersion by a reduced accessibility of polar moieties. For the latter effect, NOM was proposed to either directly compete for sorption sites on CNM surface or a blocking of CNM pores by large NOM molecules [2]. The potential consequences of these changes in surface properties of CNM on their toxic effects on microorganisms have only been partially examined. For an environmental risk assessment, data on the occurrence of CNM is obligatory but to date the environmental concentrations of CNM are still difficult to assess due to still unsolved analytical issues in matrix separation and the discrimination of CNM from naturally present particles with similar dimensions and properties (e.g., soot or colloids). Recently, progress has been made to characterize the aggregation and to determine the occurrence of (functionalized) fullerenes using asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation coupled to a LC-HR-MS [3]. In this contribution, the major results during the last decade of environmental research into CNM will be reviewed with the focus on their analyses and characterization, and interactions with solid surfaces. References: [1] Hüffer, T., Kah, M., Hofmann, T., Schmidt, T.C. (2013) How Redox Conditions and Irradiation Affect Sorption of PAHs by Dispersed Fullerenes (nC60). Environmental Science & Technology, 47(13), 6935-6942. [2] Hüffer, T., Schroth, S., Schmidt, T.C. (2015) Influence of humic acids on sorption of alkanes by carbon nanotubes - Implications for the dominant sorption mode. Chemosphere, 119, 1169-1175. [3] Kolkman, A., Emke, E., Bauerlein, P.S., Carboni, A., Tran, D.T., terLaak, T.L., vanWezel, A.P., deVoogt, P. (2013) Analysis of (Functionalized) Fullerenes in Water Samples by Liquid Chromatography Coupled to High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry. Analytical Chemistry, 85(12), 5867-5874.

  11. Spreading Of Avian Flu On Duck And Its Impact On Social Economy: Lesson Learnt From Avian Flu Cases On Chicken

    OpenAIRE

    Nyak Ilham

    2013-01-01

    Bird flu disease that attacks duck dismissed the notion of duck immune to bird flu disease. Learning from the experience of bird flu disease that attacks poultry in the year of 2004-2005, necessary to measure the spread of disease prevention bird flu in ducks. This paper aims to describe the business and trade patterns of duck associated with the spread of avian influenza and predict the socio-economic impact of bird flu on duck farms in Indonesia. Duck rearing patterns mostly are in the e...

  12. Urban morphology, urban transformations and conservation in Maputo, Mozambique. Lessons learnt and transfer of knowledge to other regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskemose Andersen, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    was developed in order to record the spaces within which the majority of African urban residents dwell - dwelling being both a material place, an identity, an investment and a process. The unit of analysis was the land, the plot on which people reside regardless whether being planned or unplanned, formal......This paper draws on the research programme Home Space in the African City (www.homespace.dk) and aims at providing insights to the development of African cities with an emphasis on planning and housing, based on in-depth empirical data from Maputo, the capital of Mozambique. The Home Space concept...... involves feelings of security (physical and legal), concepts of family and social networks, relation to neighbourhood and how objects and spaces are invested with symbolic meanings. The study argues that the Maputo peri-urban inhabitants are acting as the de facto city makers with limited, if any...

  13. Rescue and emergency management of a man-made disaster: lesson learnt from a collapse factory building, Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Animesh; Rahman, Aminur; Mashreky, Saidur Rahman; Humaira, Tasnuva; Dalal, Koustuv

    2015-01-01

    A tragic disaster occurred on April 24, 2013, in Bangladesh, when a nine storied building in a suburban area collapsed and killed 1115 people and injured many more. The study describes the process of rescue operation and emergency management services provided in the event. Data were collected using qualitative methods including in-depth interviews and a focus group discussion with the involved medical students, doctors, volunteers, and local people. Immediately after the disaster, rescue teams came to the place from Bangladesh Armed Forces, Bangladesh Navy, Bangladesh Air Force, and Dhaka Metropolitan and local Police and doctors, medical students, and nurses from nearby medical college hospitals and private hospitals and students from colleges and universities including local civil people. Doctors and medical students provided 24-hour services at the disaster place and in hospitals. Minor injured patients were treated at health camps and major injured patients were immediately carried to nearby hospital. Despite the limitations of a low resource setting, Bangladesh faced a tremendous challenge to manage the man-made disaster and experienced enormous support from different sectors of society to manage the disaster carefully and saved thousands of lives. This effort could help to develop a standard emergency management system applicable to Bangladesh and other counties with similar settings.

  14. Best-Worst scaling…reflections on presentation, analysis, and lessons learnt from case 3 BWS experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adamsen, Jannie Mia; Rundle-Thiele, Sharyn; Whitty, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Surveys based on Likert scales and similar ratings-based scales continue to dominate market research practice despite their many and well-documented limitations. Key issues of concern for Likert scales include over- or under-reporting depending on the context, and variation in responses based...... on cultural background. Alternatives exist to overcome the inherent weaknesses of these scales. This paper reflects on the Best Worst (BW) Scaling method that we have recently used in eight online studies. In these studies, we employed a novel pictorial approach to capture product preferences for over 3...

  15. Characterization of post-disaster environmental management for Hazardous Materials Incidents: Lessons learnt from the Tianjin warehouse explosion, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Duan, Huabo; Zuo, Jian; Song, MingWei; Zhang, Yukui; Yang, Bo; Niu, Yongning

    2017-09-01

    Hazardous Materials Incidents (HMIs) have attracted a growing public concern worldwide. The health risks and environmental implications associated with HMIs are almost invariably severe, and underscore the urgency for sound management. Hazardous Materials Explosion incidents (HMEIs) belong to a category of extremely serious HMIs. Existing studies placed focuses predominately on the promptness and efficiency of emergency responses to HMIs and HMEIs. By contrast, post-disaster environmental management has been largely overlooked. Very few studies attempted to examine the post-disaster environmental management plan particularly its effectiveness and sufficiency. In the event of the Tianjin warehouse explosion (TWE), apart from the immediate emergency response, the post-disaster environmental management systems (P-EMSs) have been reported to be effective and sufficient in dealing with the environmental concerns. Therefore, this study aims to critically investigate the P-EMSs for the TWE, and consequently to propose a framework and procedures for P-EMSs in general for HMIs, particularly for HMEIs. These findings provide a useful reference to develop P-EMSs for HMIs in the future, not only in China but also other countries. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Monitoring and Surveillance in the Workplace: Lessons Learnt? – Investigating the International Legal Position

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verine Etsebeth

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available When considering the legal implications of monitoring and surveillance in the workplace, the question may be asked why companies deploy computer surveillance and monitoring in the first place. Several reasons may be put forward to justify why more than 80% of all major American firms monitor employee e-mails and Internet usage. However, what most companies forget is the fact that the absence or presence of monitoring and surveillance activities in a company holds serious legal consequences for companies. From the discussion in this paper it will become apparent that there is a vast difference in how most countries approach this subject matter. On the one hand America does not afford any employee a reasonable expectation of privacy when it comes to the use of corporate computer resources and systems, while in contrast to this position the United Kingdom goes out of its way to protect each employee’s reasonable expectation of privacy. This paper will not only investigate the different approaches followed by some of the world-leader, but will also investigate the legal consequences embedded in each approach. This paper will ultimately enable the reader to judge for himself/herself which approach his/her country should follow while being fully informed of the legal consequences attached to the chosen approach.

  17. Lessons learnt from pilot field test of a comprehensive advocacy program to support health promoting schools’ project in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babazadeh, Towhid; Fathi, Behrouz; Shaghaghi, Abdolreza; Allahverdipour, Hamid

    2017-01-01

    Background: Health promoting schools (HPS) project is currently being used in Iran but many challenges still lie ahead. The present study aimed, to test feasibility of implementing a comprehensive advocacy program (CAP) to overcome the obstacles and problems associated with the consummation of school health programs based on the HPS framework. Methods: This quasi-experimental study was performed through recruiting all schools that were enrolled in the national HPS program and located in Jolfa as the intervention group and all of the schools situated in the East Azerbaijan province as control. In order to collect data, Iranian Ministry of Health’s checklists and external audit guidelines for HPS were utilized. In addition, to plan a CAP required data for coordinating fund raising activities including current rules and regulations regarding implementation of local health promotion interventions were collected. Results: Findings of the study revealed that the implemented CAP had improved all HPS dimensions’ mean score in the intervention group. The observed change in the pre- and post-test score in the intervention group was significant (P < 0.05). The intervention was also successful in encouraging signing of an agreement among the participated organizations to be committed to pursue the adopted policies in facilitation of progress towards full implementation of the local HPS project. Conclusion: Commencing changes in the recruited schools’ structure through coordinated multi-level activities is feasible and this must be considered as a priority where contextual determinants exist to motivate progress towards providing healthier educational settings for school aged children in Iran. PMID:28058237

  18. An unusual case of acute kidney injury due to vancomycin lessons learnt from reliance on eGFR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barraclough, Katherine; Harris, Marianne; Montessori, Val; Levin, Adeera

    2007-08-01

    We present a case of renal impairment in an emaciated HIV-infected male that initially went unrecognized because of reliance on serum creatinine and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Inaccurate vancomycin dosing led to toxic drug levels (66 mg/l), associated with acute and severe worsening of kidney function. This occurred in the context of escalating doses of vancomycin given in the presence of changing kidney function, albeit kidney function that always remained well within the normal range (serum creatinine 29 - 42 mumol/l). In the absence of other plausible explanations, a presumptive diagnosis of vancomycin nephrotoxicity was made. Given the rarity of this diagnosis in the current era, we discuss the pathophysiology of vancomycin nephrotoxicity. We also explore the potential reasons for inaccuracy of GFR prediction equations in the HIV population, and discuss the potential pitfalls associated with application of eGFR or even serum creatinine without appropriate understanding of their limitations. We believe our case highlights a number of important teaching points: Vancomycin nephrotoxitiy is rare but can occur in the setting of kidney dysfunction. Current assessment of kidney function using creatinine and eGFR requires awareness of the clinical caveats in which these measures may be misleading. Acute changes in kidney function, irrespective of the test used, should be contextualized to the individual situation. Persons with HIV and low muscle mass constitute a specific subgroup in whom assessment of kidney function may be problematic using creatinine. We support ongoing efforts to develop or refine equations for specific unique and easily identifiable populations.

  19. Bilateral sequential knee dislocation in a patient with connective tissue disorder: Report of an unusual case and lessons learnt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Azzani, Waheeb; Wronka, Konrad; Lewis, James; Ghandour, Adel; Robertson, Angus

    2016-01-01

    Tibiofemoral knee dislocation is a rare but serious limb-threatening injury. Without prompt recognition and management, amputation or long-term functional impairment may result. The authors present a case of bilateral sequential knee dislocation, secondary to low-energy trauma, in a patient with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and antiphospholipid syndrome. Adequate stability was achieved on both occasions by reconstruction of the postero-lateral corner and MCL. During the first reconstruction, ipsi-lateral autograft, as well as hamstring tendons from the contra-lateral side, were used to strengthen the graft. For the second reconstruction, allografts were used. This case highlights that, a patient with soft-tissue disorder presenting with low-energy knee dislocation may be at risk of further dislocations. Treating surgeons should anticipate these issues and consider the role of allograft in ligamentous repair.

  20. Sediment transfer in coastal catchments exposed to typhoons: lessons learnt from catchments contaminated with Fukushima radioactive fallout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evrard, Olivier; Laceby, J. Patrick; Onda, Yuichi; Lefèvre, Irène

    2016-04-01

    Several coastal catchments located in Northeastern Japan received significant radioactive fallout following the Fukushima nuclear accident in March 2011, with initial 137Cs activities exceeding 100 kBq m-2. Although radiocesium poses a considerable health risk for local populations, it also provides a relatively straightforward tracer to investigate sediment transfers in catchments exposed to spring floods and heavy typhoons in late summer and early fall. This study focused on two catchments (the Niida and Mano Rivers) covering a surface area of 450 km² that drain the main radioactive plume. A database of radiocesium activities measured in potential source samples (n=260) was used to model radiocesium dilution in 342 sediment deposit samples collected at 38 locations during 9 different sampling campaigns conducted every 6 months from Nov. 2011 to Nov. 2015. The dilution of the initial radiocesium contamination in sediment was individually calculated for each of the 342 samples using a distribution model. Results show that the proportion of heavily contaminated sediment increased from 27% to 39% after the occurrence of typhoons in 2013 (with rainfall amount exceeding 100 mm in 48 hours) and from 29% to 45% after the 2015 spring floods, illustrating the occurrence of soil erosion and resuspension of contaminated material stored in the river channel. In contrast, the occurrence of a very strong typhoon in September 2015 (up to 450 mm in 48h) led to the dilution and the flush of the contamination to the Pacific Ocean, with the proportion of heavily contaminated material decreasing from 45 to 21%. This case study in catchments impacted by the Fukushima accident illustrates their high reactivity to both human activities and rainfall. These results will improve our understanding of sediment transfers in similar coastal mountainous environments frequently exposed to heavy rainfall.

  1. Debate: Lessons Learnt from 10 Years and USD 50 million of Grant Making to End Human Trafficking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randy Newcomb

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available On 26 September 2013, Humanity United, with our partners Legatum Foundation and Walk Free, announced the creation of the USD 100 million Freedom Fund to combat human trafficking around the world. This fund is the first of its kind, organised by three private foundations and borne in part from Humanity United’s experience as a donor over the past decade, during which time we provided more than USD 50 million to fund anti-trafficking efforts globally. During this time, we also worked closely with the donor community as well as organisations and activists working on the frontlines of the struggle to end human trafficking.  Over this period, four themes have emerged that help us better understand how to more effectively work and provide grants to combat human trafficking.

  2. Internal Branding in Universities and the Lessons Learnt from the Past: The Significance of Employee Brand Support and Transformational Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sujchaphong, Narissara; Nguyen, Bang; Melewar, T. C.

    2015-01-01

    The paper reviews the literature on the concept of internal branding and its effects in the service sector in general, as well as in UK universities. In addition, the concept of employee brand support is reviewed, discussing the influence of leadership characteristics on internal branding in universities. Employee brand support is a crucial…

  3. Design of a testing strategy using non-animal based test methods: lessons learnt from the ACuteTox project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Prieto, Pilar; Kinsner-Ovaskainen, Agnieszka; Stanzel, Sven

    2013-06-01

    In the framework of toxicology, a testing strategy can be viewed as a series of steps which are taken to come to a final prediction about a characteristic of a compound under study. The testing strategy is performed as a single-step procedure, usually called a test battery, using simultaneously all information collected on different endpoints, or as tiered approach in which a decision tree is followed. Design of a testing strategy involves statistical considerations, such as the development of a statistical prediction model. During the EU FP6 ACuteTox project, several prediction models were proposed on the basis of statistical classification algorithms which we illustrate here. The final choice of testing strategies was not based on statistical considerations alone. However, without thorough statistical evaluations a testing strategy cannot be identified. We present here a number of observations made from the statistical viewpoint which relate to the development of testing strategies. The points we make were derived from problems we had to deal with during the evaluation of this large research project. A central issue during the development of a prediction model is the danger of overfitting. Procedures are presented to deal with this challenge. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Multi-centre, multi-database studies with common protocols: Lessons learnt from the IMI PROTECT project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klungel, Olaf H.; Kurz, Xavier; de Groot, Mark C. H.; Schlienger, Raymond G.; Tcherny-Lessenot, Stephanie; Grimaldi, Lamiae; Ibáñez, Luisa; Groenwold, Rolf H. H.; Reynolds, Robert F.; Alvarez, Y.; Candore, G.; Durand, J.; Slattery, J.; Hasford, J.; Rottenkolber, M.; Schmiedl, S.; de Abajo Iglesias, F.; Gil, M.; Gonzalez, R.; Huerta Alvarez, C.; Martin, E.; Oliva, B.; Requena, G.; Amelio, J.; Brauer, R.; Downey, G.; Feudjo-Tepie, M.; Schoonen, M.; Johansson, S.; Robinson, J.; Schuerch, M.; Tatt, I.; Petri, H.; Garcia, L.A.; Ruigomez, A.; Campbell, J.; Gallagher, A.; Ng, E.; van Staa, T.P.; Demol, O.; Boudiaf, N.; Davis, K.; Logie, J.; Pimenta, J.; Beau-Lejdstrom, R.; Grimaldi-Bensouda, L.; Abenhaim, L.; Grimaldi-Bensouda, L.; Rossignol, M.; Hesse, U.; Rønn, P.F.; Miret, M.; Fortuny, J.; Primatesta, P.; Rivero, E.; Schlienger, R.; Bate, A.; Gatto, N.; Ballarin, E.; Ferrer, P.; Ibañez, L.; Laporte, J.R.; Sabaté, M.; Abbing-Karahagopian, V.; Ali, S.; de Bakker, D.; Belitser, S.; de Boer, Anthonius; De Bruin, M.L.; Egberts, A.C.G.; van Dijk, L.; Gardarsdottir, H.; Hoes, A.W.; Leufkens, H.G.M.; Pestman, W.; Roes, K.C.B.; Souverein, P.; Rutten, F.; Uddin, J.; van den Ham, H.A.; Voogd, E.; de Vries, Frank; De Bruin, M.L.; Udo, R.; Auclert, L.; Juhaeri, J.; Mazuranok, L.; Wise, L.; Irvine, D.; Dolin, P.; Gasse, C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of a variety of methodological parameters on the association between six drug classes and five key adverse events in multiple databases. Methods: The selection of Drug-Adverse Event pairs was based on public health impact, regulatory relevance, and the possibility to st

  5. Scale-Up and Commercialisation of Improved Cookstoves in Sri Lanka: Lessons Learnt from the Anagi Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nissanka, Ramani [Practical Action Consulting in Eastern Africa, Nairobi (Kenya)

    2009-12-15

    Interest in cook stove improvement in Sri Lanka started in the early 1950s. These activities were initiated among the migrant South Indian community that worked in tea plantations concentrated in the central part of the country who had been influenced by the interest generated in the South India. However, these were not replicated in other parts of the country, possibly due to the abudance of the fuel-wood in those areas and also due to a lack of wider interest and awareness of the significance if Improved Cook Stoves (ICS).

  6. Self-directed e-learning at a tertiary hospital in Malawi – A qualitative Evaluation and Lessons learnt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barteit, Sandra

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Malawi faces a severe lack of health workers. Despite initiatives to address this problem, a critical shortage of health care staff remains. This lack challenges the education and training of junior medical staff, especially medical interns in their final and crucial training year before they independently work as medical doctors.Project description: We have introduced an e-learning platform in the medical department of the Kamuzu Central Hospital (KCH in Malawi. With the support of computer-assisted instruction, we aimed to improve the quality of medical training and education, as well as access to current medical materials, in particular for interns.Method: From March to April 2012, we conducted a qualitative evaluation to assess relevance and appropriateness of the e-learning platform. Data was collected via face-to-face interviews, a guided group discussion and a checklist based observation log. Evaluation data was recorded and coded using content analysis, interviewees were chosen via purposive sampling.Results: E-learning proved to be technically feasible in this setting. Users considered the e-learning platform to be relevant and appropriate. Concerns were raised about sustainability, accessibility and technical infrastructure, as well as limited involvement and responsibilities of Malawian partners. Interest in e-learning was high, yet, awareness of and knowledge about the e-learning platform among potential users was low. Evaluation results indicated that further adaptions to local needs are necessary to increase usage and accessibility.Conclusions: Interview results and our project experiences showed that, in the given setting, e-learning requires commitment from local stakeholders, adequate technical infrastructure, identification and assignation of responsibilities, as well as specific adaption to local needs.

  7. Taking innovative vector control interventions in urban Latin America to scale: lessons learnt from multi-country implementation research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero, Juliana; García-Betancourt, Tatiana; Caprara, Andrea; Basso, Cesar; Garcia da Rosa, Elsa; Manrique-Saide, Pablo; Coelho, Giovanini; Sánchez-Tejeda, Gustavo; Dzul-Manzanilla, Felipe; García, Diego Alejandro; Carrasquilla, Gabriel; Alfonso-Sierra, Eduardo; Monteiro Vasconcelos Motta, Cyntia; Sommerfeld, Johannes; Kroeger, Axel

    2017-08-22

    Prior to the current public health emergency following the emergence of chikungunya and Zika Virus Disease in the Americas during 2014 and 2015, multi-country research investigated between 2011 and 2013 the efficacy of novel Aedes aegypti intervention packages through cluster randomised controlled trials in four Latin-American cities: Fortaleza (Brazil); Girardot (Colombia), Acapulco (Mexico) and Salto (Uruguay). Results from the trials led to a scaling up effort of the interventions at city levels. Scaling up refers to deliberate efforts to increase the impact of successfully tested health interventions to benefit more people and foster policy and program development in a sustainable way. The different scenarios represent examples for  a 'vertical approach' and a 'horizontal approach'. This paper presents the analysis of a preliminary process evaluation of the scaling up efforts in the mentioned cites, with a focus on challenges and enabling factors encountered by the research teams, analysing the main social, political, administrative, financial and acceptance factors.

  8. Lessons learnt from Volcanoes' Night I-II-III - a Marie Curie Researchers' Night project series dedicated to geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cseko, Adrienn; Bodo, Balazs; Ortega Rodriguez, Ariadna

    2017-04-01

    European Researchers' Nights (ERNs) are a pan-European series of events funded by the European Commission, organised on the last Friday of every September since 2005. ERNs mobilise scientific, academic and research organisations with the aim of giving the public the opportunity to meet researchers in an informal setting. The overall objective of ERNs is to achieve better awareness among the general public concerning the importance of science in everyday life and to combat stereotypes about researchers. The longer-term strategic objective of ERNs is to encourage young people to embark on a scientific career. Volcanoes' Night I-II-III has been an ERN project series funded by the EC FP7 and H2020 programmes between 2012-2015 (EC contract No. 316558, 610050, 633310, www.nochedevolcanes.es). The concept of Volcanoes' Night was created by researchers from the Canary Islands, Spain, where both the researchers and the public live in the close vicinity of volcanoes. The objective of the project was to use volcanoes as a background against which the role of geoscientists could be explained to the public. The scope of Volcanoes' Night was exclusively dedicated to geoscience, and in this respect it stands out among all other ERN projects, which are always more general in scope. During its four years of EC funding, the geographical coverage of Volcanoes' Night expanded substantially from a single location in 2012 (Fuencaliente de La Palma, Spain) to a dozen locations in 2015, mobilising multiple scientific organisations, researchers, and public authorities for engagement with the public. The last EC-funded project, Volcanoes' Night III, which was organised in 2014 and 2015, engaged approximately 21,000 visitors through its outreach activities, which included experiments, science cafés, volcano movies, My Day presentations, excursions, science workshops and more. The impact of the project was carefully assessed via surveys and social studies during its lifetime, and an Impact Assessment Report was submitted to the EC after the conclusion of each of the three projects. According to an on-site survey undertaken in 2015, 78.5% of responders reported that their initial understanding of the work of geoscientists improved as a result of the activities organised during the event. The conclusions from the Impact Assessment studies can be used to synthesise methodological recommendations for other organisations that may consider the organisation of similar public outreach actions for geosciences in the future. Scientific experiments are most efficient to raise interest if they are designed for direct engagement with the public so participants can participate in the experiments themselves as opposed to being simple observers. Scientific talks should always include a good level of interaction with the public, for example integrated experiments, quizzes, and real-time surveys. Edutainment options should be finalised in agreement with the audience so that the most interesting ones are selected - this is especially important to create meaningful engagement with young people. The definition of the scope of activities in a way that allows for the inclusion of interdisciplinary subjects (e.g. the intersection of geoscience and robotics) can raise the interest of an even greater public community.

  9. Using prior risk-related knowledge to support risk management decisions: lessons learnt from a tunneling project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chivatá Cárdenas, I.C.; Al-Jibouri, Saad S.H.; Halman, J.I.M.; Linde, van de W.; Kaalberg, F.

    2014-01-01

    The authors of this article have developed six probabilistic causal models for critical risks in tunnel works. The details of the models' development and evaluation were reported in two earlier publications of this journal. Accordingly, as a remaining step, this article is focused on the investigati

  10. Executive Information Systems and the Top-Officers' Roles: an exploratory study of user-behaviour model and lessons learnt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Ikart

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available In recent years a number of organisations have implemented executive information systems (EIS in order to improve the performance of their executives’ jobs. Although the use of EIS is important in executives’ work, the majority of executives are unwilling to use EIS applications because of their design flaws. By using social factors, habits and facilitation condition variables from Triandis’ framework, this paper extends the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM to derive useful variables to address the problem of the low usage of EIS by executives. This paper reports on research in progress in Australia on the adoption and usage of EIS by executives. The preliminary results suggest that executives’ experiences in EIS positively relates to their experiences in computer-based information systems. The results also suggest there is a high degree of perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use as well as positive attitudes towards using EIS. Further, the results suggest that executives consider social factors in using EIS in their work. Moreover, the results suggest that facilitating conditions such as EIS development process, EIS management process and organisational environment are strongly related to the adoption and usage of EIS by executives. Finally, the results suggest a higher degree of EIS usage by middle managers than top-level managers, which an EIS was meant to support.

  11. Lessons learnt from an international intercomparison of national network systems used to provide early warning of a nuclear accident

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saez-Vergara, J.C.; Thompson, I.M.G.; Funck, E.

    2003-01-01

    and at the Underground Laboratory for Dosimetry and Spectrometry (UDO) of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Germany. The network systems are used continuously to monitor radiation levels throughout a country in order to give early warning of nuclear accidents having transboundary implications...

  12. Lessons learnt from an international intercomparison of national network systems used to provide early warning of a nuclear accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saez-Vergara, J.C.; Thompson, I.M.G.; Funck, E.; Andersen, C.E.; Neumaier, S.; Botter-Jensen, L

    2003-07-01

    As part of the European Research Council's Fourth Framework Programme, the EURADOS Action Group on Monitoring of External Exposures held an intercomparison of national network systems. This took place during May/June 1999 at the Riso Natural Environmental Radiation Measurement Station in Denmark and at the Underground Laboratory for Dosimetry and Spectrometry of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt in Germany. The network systems are used continuously to monitor radiation levels throughout a country in order to give early warning of nuclear accidents having transboundary implications. The radiation levels measured are used to estimate the radiation risks to people arising from the accident. Seven European countries participated in the intercomparison with detector systems used in their national network systems as well as with detectors being developed for future use. Since different radiation quantities were measured by the systems (namely exposure, air kerma and ambient dose equivalent), the initial analysis of the intercomparison results was made in terms of the quantity air kerma rate. This report completes the analysis of the results and these are given in terms of air kerma rate in order to be consistent with the preliminary report. In addition, in some cases the results are also given in terms of the quantity measured by each national network system. The experience gained from this intercomparison is used to help organise a follow-up intercomparison to be held at the PTB Braunschweig in September 2002 and in which a further seven or eight countries from Europe will participate. (author)

  13. The barriers to nurturing and empowering long-term care experiments - lessons learnt to advance future healthcare projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cramer, Hendrik; Dewulf, Geert; Voordijk, Hans

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study is to explore the barriers to nurturing and empowering subsidized long-term care experiments that try to deal with today's long-term care challenges such as an aging population and increasing healthcare costs. Nurturing is the process of planning, implementing, and learni

  14. Pesticide leaching through sandy and loamy fields e Long-term lessons learnt from the Danish Pesticide Leaching Assessment Programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbom, Annette Elisabeth; Olsen, Preben; Plauborg, Finn

    2015-01-01

    The European Union authorization procedure for pesticides includes assessment of the leaching risk posed by pesticides and their degradation products aimed at avoiding any unacceptable influence on the environment, in particular contamination of water, including drinking water and groundwater...

  15. Critical elements and lessons learnt from the implementation of an RFID-enabled healthcare management system in a medical organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, S L; Kwok, S K; Tsang, Albert H C; Lee, W B

    2011-08-01

    Healthcare services are complex and life-critical. One mistake in any procedure may lead to irremediable consequences; numerous researchers, thus, introduce information and communication technology to improve quality of services and enhance patient safety by reducing the medical errors. Radio frequency identification (RFID) is considered as one of the emerging tool assist in meeting the challenges of the present situation. In recent years, RFID has been applied in medical organizations for the purpose of managing and tracking medical equipment, monitoring and identifying patients, ensuring that the right medication is given to the right patient, and preventing the use of counterfeit medicine. However, most of the existing literature focuses on demonstrating how RFID can benefit the healthcare industry, whereas little attention has been given to the management issues involved in constructing an RFID project in medical organizations. In this paper, an exploratory case study is conducted in a medical organization to illustrate the development framework and critical issues that should be taken into consideration in the preparation, implementation and maintenance stage of constructing such a project. All the experiences and results discussed in this paper offer valuable and useful insights to steer those who would like to start their journey using RFID in medical organizations.

  16. Practical lessons learnt from the application of X-ray computed tomography to evaluate the internal structure of asphalt mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allex Eduardo Alvarez-Lugo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available La Tomografía Computarizada de rayos-X (TC-rX ha permitido una eficiente caracterización no destructiva de mezclas asfálticas (MA de pavimentación y ha generado múltiples lecciones prácticas apren didas a partir del análisis de MA producidas en campo y laborat orio. El presente artículo tiene como objetivo resumir las lecciones prácticas ap rendidas, con el fin de facilitar su aplicación futura y desarr ollos posteriores, en términos de: ( i fabricación de especímenes de laboratorio, ( ii comparación de mezclas compactadas en campo y laboratorio, ( iii comparación entre mezclas asfálticas en caliente y mezclas tibias, ( iv efectos de aditivos, temperatura y compactación, ( v contacto agregado-agregado, ( vi relación entre la estructura interna y el desempeño, y ( vii aplicaciones de modelación. Estas lecciones prácticas se reco pilaron principalmente a partir del análisis de la distribución de vacíos en MA producid as en campo y laboratorio, evaluadas a través de TC-rX, el cual generó información relevante para evaluar la respuesta y el desempeño de MA. La TC-rX hizo expedito el cálculo de la estructura inter na de MA con múltiples aplicaciones prácticas y posibilidades futuras para m ejorar la microestructura de MA y, consecuentemente, optimizar su desempeño.

  17. Integrated weed management systems with herbicide-tolerant crops in the European Union: lessons learnt from home and abroad

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamichhane, Jay Ram; Devos, Yann; Beckie, Hugh J.

    2017-01-01

    Conventionally bred (CHT) and genetically modified herbicide-tolerant (GMHT) crops have changed weed management practices and made an important contribution to the global production of some commodity crops. However, a concern is that farm management practices associated with the cultivation...... of herbicide-tolerant (HT) crops further deplete farmland biodiversity and accelerate the evolution of herbicide-resistant (HR) weeds. Diversification in crop systems and weed management practices can enhance farmland biodiversity, and reduce the risk of weeds evolving herbicide resistance. Therefore, HT crops...... are most effective and sustainable as a component of an integrated weed management (IWM) system. IWM advocates the use of multiple effective strategies or tactics to manage weed populations in a manner that is economically and environmentally sound. In practice, however, the potential benefits of IWM...

  18. Brain Computer Interfaces on Track to Home: Results of the Evaluation at Disabled End-Users's Homes and Lessons Learnt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felip eMiralles

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The BackHome system is a multi-functional BCI system, the final outcome of a User Centred Design approach, whose ambition is to move BCI systems from laboratories into the home of people in need for their independent home use. The paper presents the results of testing and evaluation of the BackHome system with end-users at their own homes. Results show moderate to good acceptance from end-users, caregivers and therapists; which reported promising usability levels, good user satisfaction and levels of control in the use of services and home support based on remote monitoring tools.

  19. Risk-informed local action planning against flooding: lessons learnt and way forward for a case study in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castillo-Rodríguez J.T.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available After 29 years of the largest flood event in modern times (with the highest recorded rainfall rate at the Iberian Peninsula with 817 mm in 24 hours, the municipality of Oliva faces the challenge of mitigating flood risk through the development and implementation of a local action plan, in line with other existent and ongoing structural measures for flood risk reduction. Located 65 km from Valencia, on the South-Eastern coast of Spain, Oliva is affected by pluvial, river and coastal flooding and it is characterized by a complex and wide-ranging geography and high seasonal variation in population. A quantitative flood risk analysis has been performed to support the definition of flood risk management strategies. This paper shows how hazard, exposure and vulnerability analyses provide valuable information for the development of a local action plan against flooding, for example by identifying areas with highest societal and economic risk levels. It is concluded that flood risk management actions, such as flood warning and monitoring or evacuation, should not be applied homogenously at local scale, but instead actions should be adapted based on spatial clustering. Implications about the impact of education and training on flood risk reduction are also addressed and discusse

  20. Lessons learnt from the Indian Ocean Tsunami 2004: the role of surface and subsurface topography in deep water tsunami propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattiaratchi, C. B.

    2014-12-01

    The Indian Ocean experienced its most devastating natural disaster through the action of a Tsunami, resulting from of an earthquake off the coast of Sumatra on 26th of December 2004. This resulted in widespread damage both to property and human lives with over 250,000 deaths in the region and many millions homeless. Our understanding of tsunami generation and propagation has increased significantly over the past decade. In this presentation, results obtained from detailed analysis of sea level data from Western Australia and Sri Lanka together with numerical modelling are presented to highlight the effects of topography both at the surface and subsurface. The major effects are due to wave reflection and refraction. Examples of wave reflection include: impacts on Malaysia/Thailand, Sri Lanka and Western Australia due to wave reflection from Sri Lanka, Maldives and Mascarene Ridge, respectively. In the case of Sri Lanka, the maximum wave height recorded along the west coast during the 2004 tsunami was due to the reflected wave from Maldives impacting 3 hours after the arrival of the initial waves. Similarly, along the West coast of Australia highest waves occurred 15 hours after the arrival of the first wave. Here, based on travel times, we postulate that the waves were reflected from the Mascarene Ridge and/or the island of Madagascar (Figure 1b). The conclusions based on observations were verified using numerical model simulations using the MOST and ComMIT models. Numerical modelling using the MOST model indicated the role of offshore susurface topography on tsunami propagation through wave wave refraction. Examples of wave refraction included the effects of deep water seamounts (Venin Meinesz) and plateaus (Wallaby, Cuvier and Exmouth) on tsunami propagation along the West Australian coast. The tsunami waves are first scattered by the Venin Meinesz seamounts and were then refracted by the Wallaby and Cuvier plateaus resulting in waves being deflected onto the coast.

  1. Direct methods in photoelectron diffraction; experiences and lessons learnt based on the use of the projection method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodruff, D.P. [Physics Department, University of Warwick, Coventry (United Kingdom); Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Berlin (Germany); Baumgaertel, P.; Hoeft, J.T.; Kittel, M.; Polcik, M. [Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Berlin (Germany)

    2001-11-26

    As part of a programme of full quantitative adsorbate structure determinations on surfaces using scanned-energy-mode photoelectron diffraction (PhD) combined with multiple-scattering simulations, direct data-inversion methods based on Fourier transforms and the so-called projection method have been tested on experimental data from more than 30 adsorbate/substrate systems. The results highlight both strengths and weaknesses, many of which are likely to be generic in the use of direct methods. The most obvious feature is the reduced value of the methods for systems involving low emitter site symmetry or multiple-site occupation, but some specific problems attributed to the elastic scattering cross-section 'signatures' of different elemental species and cases in which multiple scattering proves to be especially important are also discussed. A combination of these problems in a particular system can lead to complete failure, although even in these cases the results are unlikely to be actively misleading as regards the correct structure. (author)

  2. Joint Investigation Teams: principles, practice, and problems Lessons learnt from the first efforts to establish a JIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conny Rijken

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Joint Investigation Teams (JITs are a new instrument in the fight against serious transnational crime. The European legal framework and the national implementation of this instrument give rise to several (legal questions. An analysis of the (European legal framework on JITs uncovers the particularities regarding the dual legal basis for establishing a JIT and the consequences of deficient and unclear national implementing laws. The implications of the Pupino case with regard to the Framework Decision on JITs cannot be denied, as was confirmed by the Dutch courts in the first JIT case ever brought before them. However, practice shows that a legal framework is not enough to ensure the successful application of the JIT instrument. Based on two case studies, insight is provided into the obstacles to establishing a JIT and into available remedies.

  3. Competence-Based Quality Assurance of University Education Lessons Learnt from the OECD-AHELO Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukahori, Satoko

    2014-01-01

    The discourse that an educated workforce is essential for a prosperous and sustainable economy in a knowledge-based society has invited heightened policy interest in higher education. In effect, many industrialized countries are approaching, or have already reached universal access, with the majority of their age cohorts enrolling in higher…

  4. Self-directed e-learning at a tertiary hospital in Malawi--a qualitative evaluation and lessons learnt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barteit, Sandra; Hoepffner, Philip; Huwendiek, Sören; Karamagi, Angela; Munthali, Charles; Theurer, Antje; Neuhann, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Malawi faces a severe lack of health workers. Despite initiatives to address this problem, a critical shortage of health care staff remains. This lack challenges the education and training of junior medical staff, especially medical interns in their final and crucial training year before they independently work as medical doctors. We have introduced an e-learning platform in the medical department of the Kamuzu Central Hospital (KCH) in Malawi. With the support of computer-assisted instruction, we aimed to improve the quality of medical training and education, as well as access to current medical materials, in particular for interns. From March to April 2012, we conducted a qualitative evaluation to assess relevance and appropriateness of the e-learning platform. Data was collected via face-to-face interviews, a guided group discussion and a checklist based observation log. Evaluation data was recorded and coded using content analysis, interviewees were chosen via purposive sampling. E-learning proved to be technically feasible in this setting. Users considered the e-learning platform to be relevant and appropriate. Concerns were raised about sustainability, accessibility and technical infrastructure, as well as limited involvement and responsibilities of Malawian partners. Interest in e-learning was high, yet, awareness of and knowledge about the e-learning platform among potential users was low. Evaluation results indicated that further adaptions to local needs are necessary to increase usage and accessibility. Interview results and our project experiences showed that, in the given setting, e-learning requires commitment from local stakeholders, adequate technical infrastructure, identification and assignation of responsibilities, as well as specific adaption to local needs.

  5. Phases of school health promotion implementation through the lens of complexity theory: lessons learnt from an Austrian case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremser, W

    2011-06-01

    The implementation of health promotion concepts in (school) settings is a complex undertaking on which little scientific knowledge exists. The purpose of this study was to better understand organizational influences on the implementation of school health promotion. An extended case study design that incorporated important insights from complexity science was used. This design influenced the focus of analysis and led to the use of multiple methods of data collection and analysis. A primary school in Vienna served as a case for observing and analysing the first year of implementing the health-promoting school concept. The study provided detailed insights into the implementation process. Results showed four chronologically overlapping implementation phases (starting health promotion, deciding what to do, planning health promotion projects, doing health promotion) on different system levels. In each phase, the original health-promoting school concept was adapted to the necessities and characteristics of each level and, therefore, changed considerably. Implications for possible adaptations of the health-promoting school concept to better fit the situation in schools are discussed.

  6. Multi-centre, multi-database studies with common protocols : lessons learnt from the IMI PROTECT project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klungel, Olaf H; Kurz, Xavier; de Groot, Mark C H; Schlienger, Raymond G; Tcherny-Lessenot, Stephanie; Grimaldi, Lamiae; Ibáñez, Luisa; Groenwold, Rolf H H; Reynolds, Robert F

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess the impact of a variety of methodological parameters on the association between six drug classes and five key adverse events in multiple databases. METHODS: The selection of Drug-Adverse Event pairs was based on public health impact, regulatory relevance, and the possibility to st

  7. Practical lessons learnt from the application of X-ray computed tomography to evaluate the internal structure of asphalt mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Allex Eduardo Alvarez-Lugo; Juan Sebastián Carvajal-Muñoz

    2014-01-01

    La Tomografía Computarizada de rayos-X (TC-rX) ha permitido una eficiente caracterización no destructiva de mezclas asfálticas (MA) de pavimentación y ha generado múltiples lecciones prácticas apren didas a partir del análisis de MA producidas en campo y laborat orio. El presente artículo tiene como objetivo resumir las lecciones prácticas ap rendidas, con el fin de facilitar su aplicación futura y desarr ollos posteriores, en términos de: ( i ) fabricación de especímenes de laboratorio, ( ii...

  8. The new opt-out Dutch National Breast Implant Registry - Lessons learnt from the road to implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakhorst, Hinne A; Mureau, Marc A M; Cooter, Rodney D; McNeil, John; van Hooff, Miranda; van der Hulst, René; Hommes, Juliette; Hoornweg, Marije; Moojen-Zaal, Laura; Liem, Patricia; Mathijssen, Irene M J

    2017-10-01

    An estimated 1-3% of all women in the Netherlands carry breast implants. Since the introduction five decades ago, problems with a variety of breast implants have emerged with direct consequences for the patients' health. Plastic surgeons worldwide reacted through campaigning for auditing on long-term implant quality, surgeon performance, and institutional outcomes in implant registries. Especially, the PIP implant scandal of 2010 demonstrated the paucity of epidemiological data and uncovered a weakness in our ability to even 'track and trace' patients. In addition, a recent report of the Dutch Institute of National Health showed a lack of compliance of 100% of breast implant producers to CE requirements. These arguments stress the need for an independent implant registry. Insufficient capture rates or dependence from the implant producers made the variety of national and international patient registries unreliable. The Dutch Breast Implant Registry (DBIR) is unique because it is an opt-out registry without the need for informed consent and thus a high capture rate. Furthermore, an estimated 95% of breast implants are implanted by board-certified plastic surgeons. Funding was received from a non-governmental organisation to increase the quality of health care in the Netherlands, and maintenance is gathered by 25 euros per implant inserted. This article describes the way the Dutch have set up their system, with special attention to the well-known hurdles of starting a patient registry. Examples include: funding, medical ethical issues, opt out system, benchmarking, quality assurance as well as governance and collaboration. The Dutch consider their experience and data shareware for others to be used globally to the benefit of patient safety and quality improvement. Copyright © 2017 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. What lessons to be learnt from reflective learning journals written by students to improve learning and intercultural awareness?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Peter

    2009-01-01

    and given special help to develop team and project work skills. When Danish and foreign students are grouped in mixed teams on the 2nd semester, the Danish students still are experts in project work and they are not familiar with taking in less skilled newcomers. A new course was established for Danish 1st...... semester Master students in 2007, with a double purpose of both developing team work and intercultural skills further and restart the students reflection and talking about how they actually work together, to prepare them to take in foreign students on the 2nd semester. To secure the latter part...... and the learning goal the students have to write an individual learning journal. The setup of the course and the learning journals was presented at last years SEFI conference. This paper will investigate the learning portfolios further, now having two years experiences in app. 100 portfolios. The focus...

  10. Lessons learnt from an international intercomparison of national network systems used to provide early warning of a nuclear accident

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saez-Vergara, J.C.; Thompson, I.M.G.; Funck, E.;

    2003-01-01

    and at the Underground Laboratory for Dosimetry and Spectrometry (UDO) of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Germany. The network systems are used continuously to monitor radiation levels throughout a country in order to give early warning of nuclear accidents having transboundary implications......As part of the European Research Council's Fourth Framework Programme, the EURADOS Action Group on Monitoring of External Exposures held an intercomparison of national network systems. This took place during May/June 1999 at the Riso Natural Environmental Radiation Measurement Station in Denmark....... The radiation levels measured are used to estimate the radiation risks to people arising from the accident. Seven European countries participated in the intercomparison with detector systems used in their national network systems as well as with detectors being developed for future use. Since different...

  11. An evaluation of the performance and acceptability of three LED fluorescent microscopes in Zambia: lessons learnt for scale-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, Eleanor R; Kaunda, Kaunda; Harris, Jennifer B; Kapata, Nathan; Muvwimi, Mweemba W; Kruuner, Annika; Henostroza, German; Reid, Stewart E

    2011-01-01

    The World Health Organization recommends the roll-out of light-emitting diode (LED) fluorescent microscopes (FM) as an alternative to light microscopes in resource-limited settings. We evaluated the acceptability and performance of three LED FMs after a short orientation among laboratory technicians from government health centers in Zambia. Sixteen technicians with varied light microscopy experience were oriented to FMs and divided into groups; each group read a different set of 40 slides on each LED FM (Primo Star iLED™, Lumin™, FluoLED™) and on a reference mercury-vapor FM (Olympus BX41TF). Slide reading times were recorded. An experienced FM technician examined each slide on the Olympus BX41TF. Sensitivity and specificity compared to TB culture were calculated. Misclassification compared to the experienced technician and inter-rater reliability between trainees was assessed. Trainees rated microscopes on technical aspects. Primo Star iLED™, FluoLED™ and Olympus BX41TF had comparable sensitivities (67%, 65% and 65% respectively), with the Lumin™ significantly worse (56%; p<0.05). Specificity was low for trainees on all microscopes (75.9%) compared to the experienced technician on Olympus BX41TF (100%). Primo Star iLED™ had significantly less misclassification (21.1% p<0.05) than FluoLED™ (26.5%) and Lumin™ (26.8%) and significantly higher inter-rater reliability (0.611; p<0.05), compared to FluoLED™ (0.523) and Lumin™ (0.492). Slide reading times for LED FMs were slower than the reference, but not significantly different from each other. Primo Star iLED™ rated highest in acceptability measures, followed by FluoLED™ then Lumin™. Primo Star iLED™ was consistently better than FluoLED™ and Lumin™, and performed comparably to the Olympus BX41TF in all analyses, except reading times. The Lumin™ compared least favorably and was thought unacceptable for use. Specificity and inter-rater reliability were low for all microscopes suggesting that a brief orientation was insufficient in this setting. These results provide important data for resource-limited settings to consider as they scale-up LED FMs.

  12. An evaluation of the performance and acceptability of three LED fluorescent microscopes in Zambia: lessons learnt for scale-up.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleanor R Turnbull

    Full Text Available The World Health Organization recommends the roll-out of light-emitting diode (LED fluorescent microscopes (FM as an alternative to light microscopes in resource-limited settings. We evaluated the acceptability and performance of three LED FMs after a short orientation among laboratory technicians from government health centers in Zambia. Sixteen technicians with varied light microscopy experience were oriented to FMs and divided into groups; each group read a different set of 40 slides on each LED FM (Primo Star iLED™, Lumin™, FluoLED™ and on a reference mercury-vapor FM (Olympus BX41TF. Slide reading times were recorded. An experienced FM technician examined each slide on the Olympus BX41TF. Sensitivity and specificity compared to TB culture were calculated. Misclassification compared to the experienced technician and inter-rater reliability between trainees was assessed. Trainees rated microscopes on technical aspects. Primo Star iLED™, FluoLED™ and Olympus BX41TF had comparable sensitivities (67%, 65% and 65% respectively, with the Lumin™ significantly worse (56%; p<0.05. Specificity was low for trainees on all microscopes (75.9% compared to the experienced technician on Olympus BX41TF (100%. Primo Star iLED™ had significantly less misclassification (21.1% p<0.05 than FluoLED™ (26.5% and Lumin™ (26.8% and significantly higher inter-rater reliability (0.611; p<0.05, compared to FluoLED™ (0.523 and Lumin™ (0.492. Slide reading times for LED FMs were slower than the reference, but not significantly different from each other. Primo Star iLED™ rated highest in acceptability measures, followed by FluoLED™ then Lumin™. Primo Star iLED™ was consistently better than FluoLED™ and Lumin™, and performed comparably to the Olympus BX41TF in all analyses, except reading times. The Lumin™ compared least favorably and was thought unacceptable for use. Specificity and inter-rater reliability were low for all microscopes suggesting that a brief orientation was insufficient in this setting. These results provide important data for resource-limited settings to consider as they scale-up LED FMs.

  13. Internal Branding in Universities and the Lessons Learnt from the Past: The Significance of Employee Brand Support and Transformational Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sujchaphong, Narissara; Nguyen, Bang; Melewar, T. C.

    2015-01-01

    The paper reviews the literature on the concept of internal branding and its effects in the service sector in general, as well as in UK universities. In addition, the concept of employee brand support is reviewed, discussing the influence of leadership characteristics on internal branding in universities. Employee brand support is a crucial…

  14. Accuracy assessment of global land cover maps: lessons learnt from the GlobCover and GlobCorine experiences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Defourny, P.; Bontemps, S.; Obsomer, V.; Schouten, L.; Bartalev, S.; Herold, M.; Bicheron, P.; Bogaert, van E.; Leroy, M.; Arino, O.

    2010-01-01

    The validation of global land cover products becomes a critical and challenging issue as more global products are made available more regularly to the international community. The GlobCover 2005 product delivered in 2008 was the first global land cover product at 300 m resolution. Later on, the

  15. Spreading Of Avian Flu On Duck And Its Impact On Social Economy: Lesson Learnt From Avian Flu Cases On Chicken

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyak Ilham

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Bird flu disease that attacks duck dismissed the notion of duck immune to bird flu disease. Learning from the experience of bird flu disease that attacks poultry in the year of 2004-2005, necessary to measure the spread of disease prevention bird flu in ducks. This paper aims to describe the business and trade patterns of duck associated with the spread of avian influenza and predict the socio-economic impact of bird flu on duck farms in Indonesia. Duck rearing patterns mostly are in the extensive and semi-intensive system, that have large potential disease transmission occured between duck and wild. Illegal trade in the crossborder region and imports from countries that re-export it, ias alo become potential as well as the entry point to the bird flu virus in Indonesia. Ducks trade between regions by land transportation is difficult to control as well becomes the potential media to spread of the virus to a wider area. The economic impact of bird flu on duck business occured due to the death of ducks, decline in production and loss of job opportunities, while that on demand reduction was not significant. Small scale farmers that were bankrupt as a result of bird flu outbreaks may require technical assistance and access to capital for recovery. In the future, development of ducks business should be directed at duck farms into a semi-intensive and intensive system to facilitate the control of epidemic diseases

  16. Lessons learnt from a measles outbreak in Madang Province, Papua New Guinea, June 2014 – March 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karoi Kamac

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study examined measles vaccine wastage during an outbreak response in Madang Province of Papua New Guinea from June 2014 to March 2015. Methods: Vaccine wastage was defined as the number of doses received by a health centre minus the total number of doses administered during and returned following the outbreak vaccination campaign. Vaccine data were collected from the Provincial Health Information Office, the Provincial Vaccine Store register and clinic and health centre immunization registers for calculating the vaccine wastage. Interviews were conducted with all 48 health centres involved in the outbreak response using a structured questionnaire to explore the reasons for vaccine wastage. Results: Of the 154 110 doses issued by Madang Province during the outbreak, a total of 85 236 (55% doses were wasted. The wastage varied by district from 31% to 90%. The total cost of the vaccine wastage was estimated to be 589 810 Kina (US$ 196 604. None of the health centres maintained vaccine stock registers. Most health centres indicated multiple failures in cold chain logistics. Almost 40% of health centres reported incorrectly diluting vaccines. The same percentage of health centres reported using incorrect injection techniques. Discussion: Regular audits of cold chain logistics, staff training and improved processes for recording vaccine administration and wastage will decrease vaccine wastage during vaccine-preventable disease outbreaks and also benefit routine immunization activities.

  17. Lessons learnt from the diagnosis and antimicrobial management of necrotising (malignant) otitis externa: our experience in a tertiary referral centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, S P; Curnow, T L; Almeyda, R

    2014-01-01

    Necrotising otitis externa is an uncommon and aggressive infection of the external auditory canal with a tendency to present in the elderly and immunocompromised patient. We report a series of twenty-five patients admitted to our institution over a four-year period with this diagnosis. We review the diagnosis and antimicrobial management of these cases, and propose a treatment algorithm based on our experience.

  18. EMPOWERING FARMERS’ ECONOMIC WALFARE THROUGH DEVELOPMENT OF OIL PALM INDUSTRY IN THE REGIONAL AUTONOMY ERA: LESSONS LEARNT FROM SIAK DISTRICT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arief Daryanto

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;} Pada tulisanini diajukan alternative kemitraan dalam bentuk contract farming untukmemadukan berbagai potensi yang dimiliki oleh pemerintah daerah, swasta, danakademisi untuk meningkatkan kesejahteraan masyarakat. Model yang dikenaldengan ABG (Academician, Business, and Government ini belajar dari kelemahanprogram kemitraan-kemitraan sebelumnya yang cenderung gagal atau tidaksustainable. Model alternatif ini dimungkinkan dengan meningkatkan kemampuankeuangan dan otoritas pemerintah daerah di era otonomi dan tersedianya lahandan perusahaan swasta serta akademisi yang memiliki kompetensi untukmemanfaatkan potensi tersebut.

  19. Financing energy efficiency: lessons from experiences in India and China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Painuly, J.P.

    2009-01-01

    . Design/methodology/approach – The paper follows the post-completion review approach of a project and presents the activities undertaken and results obtained from the project. Findings – The project seeks to remove the financial barrier through the development of a commercial banking window for energy...... in China and India. This paper aims to report the experience of a three-country United Nations Environment Programme/World Bank Energy Efficiency Project (involving China, India and Brazil) that is set up to address the financial barrier and identifies the lessons that can be learnt from the project...... efficiency, energy service company development and support, exploring the need for setting up guarantee facilities and need for facilitating equity financing to the sector. The project succeeds in creating awareness and better understanding among the financial institutions in both India and China...

  20. Outsourced design services lessons learned from LHC civil engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Watson, T

    2003-01-01

    In April 1996 CERN awarded three contracts for the provision of civil engineering design and site supervision services associated with the LHC Project. These three contracts with an average value at signature of 12MCHF were placed using the “two envelope” award system. Eight firms from six member states were integrated into three Joint Ventures. For Projects prior to the LHC, CERN would have carried out the design and supervision using in-house staff. The change to out-sourced services represented a major step for CERN. After seven years, the contracts are now coming to their conclusion. This paper aims to discuss the reasons why these contracts were originally implemented, the lessons than have been learnt over the last seven years and conclusions on how CERN could approach the need for civil engineering design services in the future.

  1. The Australian Treatment Outcome Study (ATOS): what have we learnt about treatment for heroin dependence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darke, Shane; Ross, Joanne; Teesson, Maree

    2007-01-01

    Opioids make the single largest contribution to illicit drug-related mortality and morbidity worldwide In this paper we reflect upon what has been learnt regarding treatment outcome and the natural history of heroin use from the Australian Treatment Outcome Study (ATOS). We focus on what we knew prior to ATOS, what ATOS revealed that is novel, and the implications for research, practice and policy. ATOS provided strong evidence for sustained improvement attributable to treatment across the three years of the study. It is argued that treatment for heroin dependence is money well spent, and leads to clear and sustained benefits to both heroin users and society.

  2. Lessons in Ponapean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peace Corps, Washington, DC.

    This volume contains 35 beginning Ponapean lessons for native English speakers. Each lesson consists of a dialogue structured around an aspect of Ponapean grammar and substitution exercises designed for drill. Vocabulary is introduced in the substitution exercises. (CLK)

  3. Which basic communication skills in medicine are learnt spontaneously and which need to be taught and trained?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspegren, Knut; Lønberg-Madsen, Peter

    2005-09-01

    Students in the last semester of medical school and experienced junior doctors with no or little training in communication skills were observed while interviewing or informing simulated patients. There was a remarkable similarity in behaviour between the two categories. Communication skills characteristic of common social conversation were learnt spontaneously, while important professional basic communication skills were not learnt despite 10 or more years of clinical work. These discrepancies and subsequent gaps should be the focus of future training courses at both pre- and postgraduate level.

  4. A participatory modelling approach to developing a numerical sediment dynamics model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Nicholas; McEwen, Lindsey; Parker, Chris; Staddon, Chad

    2016-04-01

    Fluvial geomorphology is recognised as an important consideration in policy and legislation in the management of river catchments. Despite this recognition, limited knowledge exchange occurs between scientific researchers and river management practitioners. An example of this can be found within the limited uptake of numerical models of sediment dynamics by river management practitioners in the United Kingdom. The uptake of these models amongst the applied community is important as they have the potential to articulate how, at the catchment-scale, the impacts of management strategies of land-use change affect sediment dynamics and resulting channel quality. This paper describes and evaluates a new approach which involves river management stakeholders in an iterative and reflexive participatory modelling process. The aim of this approach was to create an environment for knowledge exchange between the stakeholders and the research team in the process of co-constructing a model. This process adopted a multiple case study approach, involving four groups of river catchment stakeholders in the United Kingdom. These stakeholder groups were involved in several stages of the participatory modelling process including: requirements analysis, model design, model development, and model evaluation. Stakeholders have provided input into a number of aspects of the modelling process, such as: data requirements, user interface, modelled processes, model assumptions, model applications, and model outputs. This paper will reflect on this process, in particular: the innovative methods used, data generated, and lessons learnt.

  5. [Results and lessons after 10 years of universal neonatal hearing screening in the Champagne-Ardenne region of France].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chays, André; Labrousse, Marc; Makeieff, Marc

    2014-01-01

    In France, universal newborn hearing screening has been mandatory since April23rd, 2012, but it began in the Champagne-Ardenne region on January 15th 2004. More than 99 % of 160 196 newborns have since been systematically screened in this region. Bilateral hearing impairment was thus identified in 116 infants when they were around 3.5 months old. Earlier diagnosis improves the outcome of deafness, which is only diagnosed around age 20 months without screening. The authors report their experience and the lessons learnt.

  6. What Have We Learnt about BCG Vaccination in the Last 20 Years?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dockrell, Hazel M.; Smith, Steven G.

    2017-01-01

    A number of new tuberculosis (TB) vaccines have been or are entering clinical trials, which include genetically modified mycobacteria, mycobacterial antigens delivered by viral vectors, or mycobacterial antigens in adjuvant. Some of these vaccines aim to replace the existing BCG vaccine but others will be given as a boosting vaccine following BCG vaccination given soon after birth. It is clear that the existing BCG vaccines provide incomplete and variable protection against pulmonary TB. This review will discuss what we have learnt over the last 20 years about how the BCG vaccine induces specific and non-specific immunity, what factors influence the immune responses induced by BCG, and progress toward identifying correlates of immunity against TB from BCG vaccination studies. There is still a lot to learn about the BCG vaccine and the insights gained can help the development of more protective vaccines. PMID:28955344

  7. NASA Engineering Network Lessons Learned

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NASA Lessons Learned system provides access to official, reviewed lessons learned from NASA programs and projects. These lessons have been made available to the...

  8. Managing Physical Education Lessons: An Interactional Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Dean; Annerstedt, Claes

    2016-01-01

    Physical education (PE) lessons involve complex and dynamic interactive sequences between students, equipment and teacher. The potential for unexpected and/or unintended events is relatively large, a point reflected in an increasing amount of scholarship dealing with classroom management (CM). This scholarship further suggests that unexpected and…

  9. Ben Franklin. [Lesson Plan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Discovery Communications, Inc., Bethesda, MD.

    Based on Benjamin Franklin's "Poor Richard's Almanac," this lesson plan presents activities designed to help students understand that Ben Franklin is known, among other things, for his wit and wisdom; that Franklin published an almanac for 25 years; and he scattered aphorisms throughout the almanac. The main activity in the lesson is for students…

  10. "Walden". [Lesson Plan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surber, Gretchen C.

    Based on Henry David Thoreau's book "Walden," this lesson plan presents activities designed to help students understand that acquisitiveness and simplicity can be opposing life philosophies; and that both philosophies have had notable adherents. The main activity of the lesson involves students researching historical characters (including Thoreau)…

  11. "Frankenstein." [Lesson Plan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Melanie

    Based on Mary Shelley's novel "Frankenstein," this lesson plan presents activities designed to help students understand that active readers interpret a novel (its characters, plot, setting, and theme) in different ways; and the great literature can be and has been adapted in many ways over time. The main activity of the lesson involves students…

  12. Soybean Production Lesson Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Keith R.

    These lesson plans for teaching soybean production in a secondary or postsecondary vocational agriculture class are organized in nine units and cover the following topics: raising soybeans, optimum tillage, fertilizer and lime, seed selection, pest management, planting, troubleshooting, double cropping, and harvesting. Each lesson plan contains…

  13. Great Expectations. [Lesson Plan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devine, Kelley

    Based on Charles Dickens' novel "Great Expectations," this lesson plan presents activities designed to help students understand the differences between totalitarianism and democracy; and a that a writer of a story considers theme, plot, characters, setting, and point of view. The main activity of the lesson involves students working in groups to…

  14. Don Quixote. [Lesson Plan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooks, Kristen

    Based on Miguel de Cervantes' novel "Don Quixote," this lesson plan presents activities designed to help students understand that Quixote's misperceptions are understandable; writers often describe one object to sound as if it were something else; and metaphors help readers see with new eyes. The main activity of the lesson involves students…

  15. Gulliver's Travels. [Lesson Plan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooks, Kirsten; McLean, Mary

    Based on Jonathan Swift's novel "Gulliver's Travels," this lesson plan presents activities designed to help students understand that Swift comments on undesirable outcomes of advances in science; and other authors have also warned against abuse of science. The main activity of the lesson involves students developing a poster illustrating views of…

  16. Automatic Dance Lesson Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Leung, H.; Yue, Lihua; Deng, LiQun

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, an automatic lesson generation system is presented which is suitable in a learning-by-mimicking scenario where the learning objects can be represented as multiattribute time series data. The dance is used as an example in this paper to illustrate the idea. Given a dance motion sequence as the input, the proposed lesson generation…

  17. Mini Lessons from FDA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Food and Drug Administration (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    Eight self-contained lessons present information about topics of current interest in the Food and Drug Administration. Multidisciplinary in nature, the lessons can be integrated into ongoing activities in elementary or secondary level reading, math, language arts, social studies, science, art, health, consumer education, and home economics. The…

  18. A Lesson in Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnt, Marlene

    2004-01-01

    This article describes one classroom's experience integrating a three-part lesson that focused on tolerance. In the lesson, students examined works by American folk-art painter Edward Hicks, researched quotes about tolerance in society, and applied calligraphy skills to an original composition.

  19. Fish Facts. Lesson Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Mike

    This lesson plan is designed for a 50-minute class to teach extension home economists and homemakers about buying, storing, and using fish. The lesson plan contains references, a list of equipment needed, objectives, and the presentation. The presentation consists of an outline of instruction coordinated with methods of instruction and aids and…

  20. How Does a Lesson Plan?

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Div. of Curriculum and Instruction.

    This manual for secondary school teachers offers sample lesson plans that may be used to guide and stimulate experimentation and development of creative instructional units. Lesson plan components are defined, and various types of lessons and their significant characteristics are identified. These characteristic types of lessons are illustrated,…

  1. Investigating Social Cognition: Lessons from the Perception of Dynamic Nonverbal Cues in Cross-Cultural Psychology and High-Functioning Autism

    OpenAIRE

    Krämer, Katharina

    2014-01-01

    Our ability to perceive and accurately interpret dynamic nonverbal cues is essential for successful social interactions with others. Interestingly, a variety of factors influences the perception of dynamic nonverbal cues. During the perception of dynamic facial expressions, for example, the cultural background as well as the gaze direction of the person who displays the emotion are relevant. Furthermore, deficits in social cognition, characteristic of neurodevelopmental disorders like high-fu...

  2. Economic theory and forecasting: Lessons from the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Giacomini, Raffaella

    2014-01-01

    Does economic theory help in forecasting key macroeconomic variables? This article aims to provide some insight into the question by drawing lessons from the literature. The definition of "economic theory" includes a broad range of examples, such as accounting identities, disaggregation and spatial restrictions when forecasting aggregate variables, cointegration and forecasting with Dynamic Stochastic General Equilibrium (DSGE) models. We group the lessons into three themes. The first discuss...

  3. Lessons of Educational Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Repetto

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Reception of the book "Lessons of Educational Technology." The book contains materials work in certain aspects relevant to the formation of a teacher who is able to meet the challenges of society 'knowledge.

  4. The role of harvest, predators, and socio-political environment in the dynamics of the Taimyr wild reindeer herd with some lessons for North America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonid Kolpasсhikov

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Taimyr wild reindeer herd, i.e., caribou (Rangifer tarandus, is one of the most important wildlife resources in the Russian Far North and may constitute the largest migratory Rangifer herd in the world. Over the last 60 years the herd has undergone a recovery from low numbers in the 1940s, reaching high densities by 1970 that concerned wildlife managers and domestic husbandry herds, with an 11.7% annual growth rate. At that time an aggressive commercial harvest of the herd was implemented, and organized wolf control was initiated with the goal of stabilizing herd numbers and injecting needed economic activity into the region. These actions dampened the rate of increase throughout the 1970s and 1980s to a 3.0% annual growth rate. From 1991, after the collapse of the Soviet Union and the loss of financial capability to sustain the commercial harvest and continue wolf control, the population again increased at a 5.6% annual growth rate, until peaking in 2000 at just more than 1 million animals. Since 2000 the herd has been in decline; harvesting, primarily unregulated, has increased; the wolf population has increased; and range conditions have deteriorated. Understanding what has occurred in the Taimyr range can provide North American managers with valuable lessons in understanding the large migratory herds on this continent, especially given that the social and political situation in Russia enabled intensive management, i.e., harvest and wolf control, that may not be able to be duplicated in North America.

  5. Injuries following a serious hydrofluoric acid leak: First aid and lessons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuanhai; Wang, Xingang; Sharma, Komal; Mao, Xinxing; Qiu, Xuguang; Ni, Liangfang; Han, Chunmao

    2015-11-01

    Hydrofluoric acid is a dangerous inorganic acid that can cause local corrosion and systemic effects by ongoing absorption via the skin, mucosae, respiratory tract and digestive system. Recently, a serious toxic leak of low-concentration hydrofluoric acid solution occurred in the Pujiang area of Zhejiang Province, China. This accident resulted in 253 cases of chemical injury due to hydrofluoric acid exposure. Despite an immediate response by the local and provincial health-care system, as well as the local government, three people died due to acute poisoning and related complications. This article describes the events that took place leading to casualties as well as presenting the first-aid experience and the lessons learnt from this kind of mass injury.

  6. Swine flu: lessons we need to learn from our global experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Collignon

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available There are important lessons to be learnt from the recent ‘Swine Flu’ pandemic. Before we call it a pandemic, we need to have appropriate trigger points that involve not only the spread of the virus but also its level of virulence. This was not done for H1N1 (swine flu. We need to ensure that we improve the techniques used in trying to decrease the spread of infection—both in the community and within our hospitals. This means improved infection control and hygiene, and the use of masks, alcohol hand rubs and so on. We also need to have a different approach to vaccines. Effective vaccines were produced only after the epidemic had passed and therefore had relatively little impact in preventing many infections. Mass population strategies involving vaccines and antivirals also misused large amounts of scarce medical resources.

  7. Ebola viral hemorrhagic disease outbreak in West Africa- lessons from Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbonye, Anthony K; Wamala, Joseph F; Nanyunja, Miriam; Opio, Alex; Makumbi, Issa; Aceng, Jane Ruth

    2014-09-01

    There has been a rapid spread of Ebola Viral Hemorrhagic disease in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone since March 2014. Since this is the first time of a major Ebola outbreak in West Africa; it is possible there is lack of understanding of the epidemic in the communities, lack of experience among the health workers to manage the cases and limited capacities for rapid response. The main objective of this article is to share Uganda's experience in controlling similar Ebola outbreaks and to suggest some lessons that could inform the control of the Ebola outbreak in West Africa. The article is based on published papers, reports of previous Ebola outbreaks, response plans and experiences of individuals who have participated in the control of Ebola epidemics in Uganda. Lessons learnt: The success in the control of Ebola epidemics in Uganda has been due to high political support, effective coordination through national and district task forces. In addition there has been active surveillance, strong community mobilization using village health teams and other community resources persons, an efficient laboratory system that has capacity to provide timely results. These have coupled with effective case management and infection control and the involvement of development partners who commit resources with shared responsibility. Several factors have contributed to the successful quick containment of Ebola outbreaks in Uganda. West African countries experiencing Ebola outbreaks could draw some lessons from the Uganda experience and adapt them to contain the Ebola epidemic.

  8. Breathing Life into Engineering: A Lesson Study Life Science Lesson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Maria; Yang, Li-Ling; Briggs, May; Hession, Alicia; Koussa, Anita; Wagoner, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    A fifth grade life science lesson was implemented through a lesson study approach in two fifth grade classrooms. The research lesson was designed by a team of four elementary school teachers with the goal of emphasizing engineering practices consistent with the "Next Generation Science Standards" (NGSS) (Achieve Inc. 2013). The fifth…

  9. Breathing Life into Engineering: A Lesson Study Life Science Lesson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Maria; Yang, Li-Ling; Briggs, May; Hession, Alicia; Koussa, Anita; Wagoner, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    A fifth grade life science lesson was implemented through a lesson study approach in two fifth grade classrooms. The research lesson was designed by a team of four elementary school teachers with the goal of emphasizing engineering practices consistent with the "Next Generation Science Standards" (NGSS) (Achieve Inc. 2013). The fifth…

  10. Creating A Guided- discovery Lesson

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田枫

    2005-01-01

    In a guided - discovery lesson, students sequentially uncover layers of mathematical information one step at a time and learn new mathematics. We have identified eight critical steps necessary in developing a successful guided- discovery lesson.

  11. The most important things I have learnt in my career as a psychiatrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leff, Julian

    2017-02-01

    This paper is something of a patchwork, incorporating many issues that have intrigued me during 34 years of research. I have included the importance of maintaining a solid base in clinical work, alongside research activities, and being alert to the possibility of a somatic condition contributing to psychiatric symptoms. I stress the value of careful observation of patients, their response to treatments and reasons for dropping out. In addition, I have included 14 more lessons, learned from my experience of research, which I hope will be of use to those readers who aspire to become researchers.

  12. Lesson Planning the Kodaly Way.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boshkoff, Ruth

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the contribution of Zoltan Kodaly to music lesson planning. Emphasizes preparation, presentation, and practice as the three important strategies in teaching concepts and skills to be included in a lesson plan. Includes a sample lesson plan covering a semester and advice on choosing song material. (DK)

  13. Static and dynamic novelty detection methods for jet engine health monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayton, Paul; Utete, Simukai; King, Dennis; King, Steve; Anuzis, Paul; Tarassenko, Lionel

    2007-02-15

    Novelty detection requires models of normality to be learnt from training data known to be normal. The first model considered in this paper is a static model trained to detect novel events associated with changes in the vibration spectra recorded from a jet engine. We describe how the distribution of energy across the harmonics of a rotating shaft can be learnt by a support vector machine model of normality. The second model is a dynamic model partially learnt from data using an expectation-maximization-based method. This model uses a Kalman filter to fuse performance data in order to characterize normal engine behaviour. Deviations from normal operation are detected using the normalized innovations squared from the Kalman filter.

  14. Traditional Herbal Management of Sickle Cell Anemia: Lessons from Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunday J. Ameh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Patients in West Africa where sickle cell anemia (SCA is endemic have for ages been treated with natural products, especially herbs, as, is still the case in rural communities. Objective. In this paper we look closely at some of these herbs to see if there are any lessons to be learnt or clues to be found for optimizing the treatments based on them, as had been done in the case of NIPRISAN, which was developed from herbs in Nigeria based on Yoruba Medicine. Methods. Select publications on SCA, its molecular biology and pathology, and actual and experimental cases of herbal treatment were perused in search of molecular clues that can be linked to chemical constituents of the herbs involved. Results. The study revealed that during the last 2-3 decades, much progress was made in several aspects of SCA pharmacology, especially the approval of hydroxyurea. As for SCA herbalism, this paper revealed that antisickling herbs abound in West Africa and that the most promising may yet be found. Three new antisickling herbs (Entandrophragma utile, Chenopodium ambrosioides, and Petiveria alliacea were reported in May 2011. At NIPRD, where NIPRISAN was developed, three other recipes are currently awaiting development. Conclusion. The study raised the hope that the search in the Tropics for more effective herbal recipes for managing sickle cell anaemia will be more fruitful with time and effort.

  15. Traditional herbal management of sickle cell anemia: lessons from Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameh, Sunday J; Tarfa, Florence D; Ebeshi, Benjamin U

    2012-01-01

    Background. Patients in West Africa where sickle cell anemia (SCA) is endemic have for ages been treated with natural products, especially herbs, as, is still the case in rural communities. Objective. In this paper we look closely at some of these herbs to see if there are any lessons to be learnt or clues to be found for optimizing the treatments based on them, as had been done in the case of NIPRISAN, which was developed from herbs in Nigeria based on Yoruba Medicine. Methods. Select publications on SCA, its molecular biology and pathology, and actual and experimental cases of herbal treatment were perused in search of molecular clues that can be linked to chemical constituents of the herbs involved. Results. The study revealed that during the last 2-3 decades, much progress was made in several aspects of SCA pharmacology, especially the approval of hydroxyurea. As for SCA herbalism, this paper revealed that antisickling herbs abound in West Africa and that the most promising may yet be found. Three new antisickling herbs (Entandrophragma utile, Chenopodium ambrosioides, and Petiveria alliacea) were reported in May 2011. At NIPRD, where NIPRISAN was developed, three other recipes are currently awaiting development. Conclusion. The study raised the hope that the search in the Tropics for more effective herbal recipes for managing sickle cell anaemia will be more fruitful with time and effort.

  16. War Literature. [Lesson Plan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderquist, Alisa

    Based on Stephen Crane's poems about war and his novel "The Red Badge of Courage," this lesson plan presents activities designed to help students understand that Crane examined war-related themes in prose and poetry; that close study of a poem for oral presentation helps readers see meaning or techniques not noted earlier; and that not all readers…

  17. A Makeup Lesson.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagles, Cheryl

    1991-01-01

    Presents a hands-on lesson that can integrate the use of makeup with studies of the history of Halloween; the history and practices of the theater; Native American or African tribes and their use of paint, makeup, and masks; and the history, skills, and makeup of clowns. (MDH)

  18. DSCOVR Contamination Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziani, Larissa

    2015-01-01

    The Triana observatory was built at NASA GSFC in the late 1990's, then placed into storage. After approximately ten years it was removed from storage and repurposed as the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR). This presentation outlines the contamination control program lessons learned during the integration, test and launch of DSCOVR.

  19. A Lesson from Mangroves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Stephen

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the importance of interpretive programs in the Northern Territory of Australia. Describes the typical interpretive approach of local school science curricula, which serve 20,000 Aboriginal children. Addresses the curriculum framework, learning strategies, and process skill development, illustrating them through a lesson on mangroves. (TW)

  20. From a writing lesson

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Mafra Ney Reinhardt

    Full Text Available Beginning with Jacques Derrida's interpolation of the celebrated chapter A Writing Lesson by Claude Lévi-Strauss's, and James Clifford critique of the ethnographic text, the authors of this essay reflect on the written dimension of the ethnographic métier.

  1. Cooperative Science Lesson Plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooperative Learning, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Offers several elementary level cooperative science lesson plans. The article includes a recipe for cooperative class learning, instructions for making a compost pile, directions for finding evidence of energy, experiments in math and science using oranges to test density, and discussions of buoyancy using eggs. (SM)

  2. Brothers Grimm. [Lesson Plan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Discovery Communications, Inc., Bethesda, MD.

    Based on Grimm's fairy tales, this lesson plan presents activities designed to help students understand that fairy tales connect them to earlier generations, help them think about present situations, that magic figures prominently in fairy tales, and that fairy tales can inspire readers to create original works of art. The main activity in the…

  3. Rethinking lessons learned processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buttler, T.; Lukosch, S.G.; Kolfschoten, G.L.; Verbraeck, A.

    2012-01-01

    Lessons learned are one way to retain experience and knowledge in project-based organizations, helping them to prevent reinventin,g the wheel or to repeat past mistakes. However, there are several challenges that make these lessonts learned processes a challenging endeavor. These include capturing

  4. Dracula. [Lesson Plan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Discovery Communications, Inc., Bethesda, MD.

    Based on Bram Stoker's novel "Dracula," this lesson plan presents activities designed to help students understand that some fictional literary characters become so famous that they enter popular culture in other forms (movies, games, toys); and that working on a product such as a game often demands collaborative effort. The main activity of the…

  5. Transition state theory can be used in studies of enzyme catalysis: lessons from simulations of tunnelling and dynamical effects in lipoxygenase and other systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Mats H M; Mavri, Janez; Warshel, Arieh

    2006-08-29

    The idea that enzyme catalysis involves special factors such as coherent fluctuations, quantum mechanical tunnelling and non-equilibrium solvation (NES) effects has gained popularity in recent years. It has also been suggested that transition state theory (TST) cannot be used in studies of enzyme catalysis. The present work uses reliable state of the art simulation approaches to examine the above ideas. We start by demonstrating that we are able to simulate any of the present catalytic proposals using the empirical valence bond (EVB) potential energy surfaces, the dispersed polaron model and the quantized classical path (QCP) approach, as well as the approximate vibronic method. These approaches do not treat the catalytic effects by phenomenological treatments and thus can be considered as first principles approaches (at least their ability to compare enzymatic reaction to the corresponding solution reactions). This work will consider the lipoxygenase reaction, and to lesser extent other enzymes, for specific demonstration. It will be pointed out that our study of the lipoxygenase reaction reproduces the very large observed isotope effect and the observed rate constant while obtaining no catalytic contribution from nuclear quantum mechanical (NQM) effects. Furthermore, it will be clarified that our studies established that the NQM effect decreases rather than increases when the donor-acceptor distance is compressed. The consequences of these findings in terms of the temperature dependence of the kinetic isotope effect and in terms of different catalytic proposals will be discussed. This paper will also consider briefly the dynamical effects and conclude that such effects do not contribute in a significant way to enzyme catalysis. Furthermore, it will be pointed out that, in contrast to recent suggestions, NES effects are not dynamical effects and should therefore be part of the activation free energy rather than the transmission factor. In view of findings of the

  6. Insights Into the Dynamics of Planetary Interiors Obtained Through the Study of Global Distribution of Volcanoes: Lessons From Earth and Venus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canon-Tapia, E.

    2014-12-01

    The distribution of volcanic features is ultimately controlled by processes taking place beneath the surface of a planet. For this reason, characterization of volcano distribution at a global scale can be used to obtain insights concerning dynamic aspects of planetary interiors. In this work, description of the distribution of volcanic features observed on Earth and Venus is completed using density contours obtained with the Fisher kernel. Attention is focused on similar features observed in both planets. In particular two features are examined with more detail: First, a pattern of groups of clusters defining the boundaries of elliptical regions that tentatively can be associated to large mantle plumes. Second, the existence of a uniform distribution of background volcanism. The former pattern is considered to constitute the first order convective pattern of the mantle in Venus, and although it is present on Earth, it is not as prominent. In contrast, the persistent occurrence of volcanic clusters at a lower significance level, suggests the occurrence of a different scale of mantle convection that controls a more uniformly distributed volcanism. Both, the first order related to large mantle-plumes and the background volcanism are superimposed on Earth to the volcanism controlled by plate tectonics. Consequently, the global distribution of volcanism in both planets reveals that at least three types of mantle convection can take place in the terrestrial planets, and that such types of mantle convection can coexist simultaneously in one given planet, although in each case, a dominant mode is different.

  7. LESSONS LEARNED FROM LESSONS GIVEN AND ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN METHODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel de Carvalho Moreira

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents several teaching experiences of disciplines in the undergraduate and graduate courses of the School of Civil Engineering, Architecture and Urban Design (FEC of the State University of Campinas (Unicamp. The teaching examples discuss some of the issues of the contemporary design process in architecture. The design process is seen as a cycle of activities that include design, documentation, construction and use of built spaces. Emphasis is given to the architectural programming phase of this process and possible dynamics and activities for this analytical phase of this process. Dynamics are considered important, enabling designers to leave their comfort zone to experiment new points of view. In education, they may astonish students and faculty, stimulating as well new types of academic research. The research-teaching relationship is discussed at the higher education level. Examples Experiences of distinct undergraduate and graduate disciplines are presented. The teaching experience of a mini course provided further lessons learned. The purpose of this paper is to present the teaching experiences, regardless of the original situation in which they were applied, and discuss the contributions and results obtained from these examples, especially in the light of appropriate pedagogies for courses on design methods in architecture.

  8. Jacques Ranciere's Lesson on the Lesson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Samuel A.

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the significance of Jacques Ranciere's work on pedagogy, and argues that to make sense of Ranciere's "lesson on the lesson" one must do more but also less than merely explicate Ranciere's texts. It steadfastly refuses to draw out the lessons of Ranciere's writings in the manner of a series of…

  9. Quantification of human impact on past erosion and sediment dynamics - lessons learned from a case study in the Dijle catchment, Belgium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broothaerts, Nils; Notebaert, Bastiaan; Verstraeten, Gert

    2016-04-01

    Humans have changed the intensities and processes of soil erosion, sediment transport and sediment deposition since the introduction of agriculture. Although the general framework of these changes are well established, we still lack a detailed model of the impact-response relationship to fully grasp how, when and to what extent humans have changed the sediment transfers at the catchment scale. In this study we provide an holistic approach that combines detailed and well-dated data on erosion intensities and floodplain sedimentation with detailed data on human impact in the landscape, for the Dijle catchment (758 km²), Belgium. The field data shows increasing erosion and sedimentation rates throughout the Holocene resulting in important changes in floodplain morphology. These changes, however, are not occurring synchronous: large variability in the timing of the system response has been observed both at the scale of individual floodplain transects as well as at the catchment scale. Moreover, a detailed time-differentiated sediment budget, together with pollen-based quantitative measures of human impact , reveals important differences in time-lags, threshold levels and in the impact-response model at the catchment scale. We attribute this to the spatial and temporal variability in hillslope-floodplain connectivity and to differences in the timing and intensity of human activities between subcatchments. Overall, our data shows that the relationship between the intensity of anthropogenic disturbances and the changes in sediment dynamics is non-linear, both in space and time, and indicates that traditional extrapolation techniques and assumptions in erosion-sedimentation studies can be questioned. In particular, the use of point-specific volumetric sedimentation rates is problematic for obtaining a correct understanding of the human impact on sediment transfers. It also means that regional or global sediment databases needs to be sufficient large to correctly interpret

  10. Structural and thermal control of seismic activity and megathrust rupture dynamics in subduction zones: Lessons from the Mw 9.0, 2011 Tohoku earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satriano, Claudio; Dionicio, Viviana; Miyake, Hiroe; Uchida, Naoki; Vilotte, Jean-Pierre; Bernard, Pascal

    2014-10-01

    mantle wedge limit, released the accumulated stress in this region and succeeded to overcome the plate bending, driving the upper plate boundary interface to slip co-seismically, regardless its frictional property, thanks to a combination of dynamic effects associated with bi-material rupture directivity and stress changes induced by reflection from the surface of waves released by the unstable slip. This conceptual framework provides elements for reappraisal of long-term seismic activity and occurrence of rare and extreme tsunamigenic megathrust in other subduction zones, like those of North-Central Lesser Antilles, Central and Northern Chile.

  11. Essentials for emergency care: Lessons from an inventory assessment of an emergency centre in Sub-Saharan Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kofi Marfo Osei

    2014-12-01

    Conclusion: Beyond pointing out specific material resource deficiencies at the Surgical Medical Emergency (SME centre, our inventory assessment indicated a need to develop better implementation strategies for infection control policies, to collaborate with other departments on coordination of patient care, and to set a research agenda to develop emergency and acute care protocols that are both effective and sustainable in our setting. Equipment and supplies are essential elements of emergency preparedness that must be both available and ‘ready-to-hand’. Consequently, key factors in determining readiness to provide quality emergency care include supply-chain, healthcare financing, functionality of systems, and a coordinated institutional vision. Lessons learnt may be useful for others facing similar challenges to emergency medicine development.

  12. Adapting Free, Prior, and Informed Consent (FPIC to Local Contexts in REDD+: Lessons from Three Experiments in Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thuy Thu Pham

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Free, prior, and informed consent (FPIC is a means of ensuring that people’s rights are respected when reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation, and enhancing forest carbon stocks (REDD+ projects are established in developing countries. This paper examines how FPIC has been applied in three projects in Vietnam and highlights two key lessons learnt. First, as human rights and democracy are seen as politically sensitive issues in Vietnam, FPIC is likely to be more accepted by the government if it is built upon the national legal framework on citizen rights. Applying FPIC in this context can ensure that both government and citizen’s interests are achieved within the permitted political space. Second, FPIC activities should be seen as a learning process and designed based on local needs and preferences, with accountability of facilitators, two-way and multiple communication strategies, flexibility, and collective action in mind.

  13. Technological innovation, human capital and social change for sustainability. Lessons learnt from the industrial technologies theme of the EU's Research Framework Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabadie, Jesús Alquézar

    2014-05-15

    Europe is facing a twofold challenge. It must maintain or even increase its competitiveness, a basic requirement in a globalised economy and under the current demographic threat. It needs also to tackle the so-called "grand challenges", especially environmental issues, through a sustainable model of production and consumption. Such challenges should lead to new business and industrial models, based on more sustainable production and consumption chains, from design to end of life. This implies a need for new industrial materials and processes, new skills and, indeed, new values and life-styles. Sustainability and innovation are key elements of EU's Research and Innovation Framework Programmes, particularly in the field of industrial technologies (nanotechnologies, materials and industrial technologies), which objective is to "improve the competitiveness of the European industry and generate knowledge to ensure its transformation from a resource intensive to a knowledge intensive industry". Sustainability and innovation are interrelated challenges for R&D. Research can develop technical solutions to tackle environmental or societal challenges, but such technologies need to be successfully commercialised to have a real environmental impact. Several socio-economic studies carried-out by the European Commission show not only the emerging technological and industrial trends, but they also emphasise the need for linking sustainable technologies with social change. Human capital and new social behaviours are critical factors to combine economic competitiveness and sustainability: technology alone is no longer able to solve global challenges. But what kind of human capital (skills, behaviours, and values) are we referring to? How to encourage the shift towards a greener society through human capital? Which reforms are needed in education systems to move towards a sustainable economy? Are there examples of social innovation to be extrapolated and/or generalised? © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Lessons learnt to keep Europe polio-free: a review of outbreaks in the European Union, European Economic Area, and candidate countries, 1973 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derrough, Tarik; Salekeen, Alexandra

    2016-04-21

    Between 1973 and 2013, 12 outbreaks of paralytic poliomyelitis with a cumulative total of 660 cases were reported in the European Union, European Economic Area and candidate countries. Outbreaks lasted seven to 90 weeks (median: 24 weeks) and were identified through the diagnosis of cases of acute flaccid paralysis, for which infection with wild poliovirus was subsequently identified. In two countries, environmental surveillance was in place before the outbreaks, but did not detect any wild strain before the occurrence of clinical cases. This surveillance nonetheless provided useful information to monitor the outbreaks and their geographical spread. Outbreaks were predominantly caused by poliovirus type 1 and typically involved unvaccinated or inadequately vaccinated groups within highly immunised communities. Oral polio vaccine was primarily used to respond to the outbreaks with catch-up campaigns implemented either nationwide or in restricted geographical areas or age groups. The introduction of supplementary immunisation contained the outbreaks. In 2002, the European region of the World Health Organization was declared polio-free and it has maintained this status since. However, as long as there are non-vaccinated or under-vaccinated groups in European countries and poliomyelitis is not eradicated, countries remain continuously at risk of reintroduction and establishment of the virus. Continued efforts to reach these groups are needed in order to ensure a uniform and high vaccination coverage.

  15. Non-attendance at counselling therapy in cocaine-using methadone-maintained patients: lessons learnt from an abandoned randomised controlled trial.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Darker, C

    2012-12-01

    Recently, the authors commenced a randomised controlled trial to study the effectiveness of cognitive behavioural coping skills (CBCS) to reduce cocaine usage in methadone-maintained patients\\' in a clinical setting by assessing attendance at treatment sessions and outcomes in terms of cocaine use. However, recruitment into the study stopped when it became apparent that attendance at counselling sessions was poor.

  16. Key considerations for the experimental training and evaluation of cancer odour detection dogs: lessons learnt from a double-blind, controlled trial of prostate cancer detection

    OpenAIRE

    Elliker, Kevin R; Sommerville, Barbara A; Donald M. Broom; Neal, David E.; Armstrong, Sarah; Williams, Hywel C

    2014-01-01

    Background Cancer detection using sniffer dogs is a potential technology for clinical use and research. Our study sought to determine whether dogs could be trained to discriminate the odour of urine from men with prostate cancer from controls, using rigorous testing procedures and well-defined samples from a major research hospital. Methods We attempted to train ten dogs by initially rewarding them for finding and indicating individual prostate cancer urine samples (Stage 1). If dogs were suc...

  17. Lessons learnt from comprehensive evaluation of community-based education in Uganda: a proposal for an ideal model community-based education for health professional training institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atuyambe Lynn

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Community-based education (CBE can provide contextual learning that addresses manpower scarcity by enabling trainees acquire requisite experiences, competence, confidence and values. In Uganda, many health professional training institutions conduct some form of community-based education (CBE. However, there is scanty information on the nature of the training: whether a curriculum exists (objectives, intended outcomes, content, implementation strategy, administration and constraints faced. The objective was to make a comprehensive assessment of CBE as implemented by Ugandan health professional training institutions to document the nature of CBE conducted and propose an ideal model with minimum requirements for health professional training institutions in Uganda. Methods We employed several methods: documentary review of curricula of 22 institutions, so as to assess the nature, purpose, outcomes, and methods of instruction and assessment; site visits to these institutions and their CBE sites, to assess the learning environment (infrastructure and resources; in-depth interviews with key people involved in running CBE at the institutions and community, to evaluate CBE implementation, challenges experienced and perceived solutions. Results CBE was perceived differently ranging from a subject, a course, a program or a project. Despite having similar curricula, institutions differ in the administration, implementation and assessment of CBE. Objectives of CBE, the curricula content and implementation strategies differ in similar institutions. On collaborative and social learning, most trainees do not reside in the community, though they work on group projects and write group reports. Lectures and skills demonstrations were the main instruction methods. Assessment involved mainly continuous assessment, oral or written reports and summative examination. Conclusion This assessment identified deficiencies in the design and implementation of CBE at several health professional training institutions, with major flaws identified in curriculum content, supervision of trainees, inappropriate assessment, trainee welfare, and underutilization of opportunities for contextual and collaborative learning. Since CBE showed potential to benefit the trainees, community and institutions, we propose a model that delivers a minimum package of CBE and overcomes the wide variation in the concept, conduct and implementation of CBE.

  18. Bridging the gap: Lessons we have learnt from the merging of psychology and psychiatry for the optimisation of treatments for emotional disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Bronwyn M; Callaghan, Bridget L; Richardson, Rick

    2014-11-01

    In recent years the gap between psychological and psychiatric research and practice has lessened. In turn, greater attention has been paid toward how psychological and pharmacological treatments interact. Unfortunately, the majority of research has indicated no additive effect of anxiolytics and antidepressants when combined with psychological treatments, and in many cases pharmacological treatments attenuate the effectiveness of psychological treatments. However, as psychology and psychiatry have come closer together, research has started to investigate the neural and molecular mechanisms underlying psychological treatments. Such research has utilised preclinical models of psychological treatments, such as fear extinction, in both rodents and humans to determine multiple neural and molecular changes that may be responsible for the long-term cognitive and behavioural changes that psychological treatments induce. Currently, researchers are attempting to identify pharmacological agents that directly augment these neural/molecular changes, and which may be more effective adjuncts to psychological treatments than traditional anxiolytics and antidepressants. In this review we describe the research that has led to this new wave of thinking about combined psychological/pharmacological treatments. We also argue that an increased emphasis on identifying individual difference factors that predict the effectiveness of pharmacological adjuncts is critical in facilitating the translation of this preclinical research into clinical practice.

  19. Implementing the WHO integrated tool to assess quality of care for mothers, newborns and children: results and lessons learnt from five districts in Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Helen; Asfaw, Atnafu Getachew; Aung, Kyaw Myint; Chikoti, Lastone; Mgawadere, Florence; d'Aquino, Luigi; van den Broek, Nynke

    2017-08-25

    In 2014 the World Health Organization (WHO) developed a new tool to be used to assess the quality of care for mothers, newborns and children provided at healthcare facility level. This paper reports on the feasibility of using the tool, its limitations and strengths. Across 5 districts in Malawi, 35 healthcare facilities were assessed. The WHO tool includes checklists, interviews and observation of case management by which care is assessed against agreed standards using a Likert scale (1 lowest: not meeting standard, 5 highest: compliant with standard). Descriptive statistics were used to provide summary scores for each standard. A 'dashboard' system was developed to display the results. For maternal care three areas met standards; 1) supportive care for admitted patients (71% of healthcare facilities scored 4 or 5); 2) prevention and management of infections during pregnancy (71% scored 4 or 5); and 3) management of unsatisfactory progress of labour (84% scored 4 or 5). Availability of essential equipment and supplies was noted to be a critical barrier to achieving satisfactory standards of paediatric care (mean score; standard deviation: 2.9; SD 0.95) and child care (2.7; SD 1.1). Infection control is inadequate across all districts for maternal, newborn and paediatric care. Quality of care varies across districts with a mean (SD) score for all standards combined of 3 (SD 0.19) for the worst performing district and 4 (SD 0.27) for the best. The best performing district has an average score of 4 (SD 0.27). Hospitals had good scores for overall infrastructure, essential drugs, organisation of care and management of preterm labour. However, health centres were better at case management of HIV/AIDS patients and follow-up of sick children. There is a need to develop an expanded framework of standards which is inclusive of all areas of care. In addition, it is important to ensure structure, process and outcomes of health care are reflected.

  20. Twenty-Five Years After--Rebuilding the Lifelong Learning System in the Czech and Slovak Republic: Progress, Challenges and Lessons Learnt from a Narrative Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprlak, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    The lifelong learning system in the Czech Republic and Slovakia share some common traits: traditional model with the dominant role of the initial education, low participation rates, lack of incentives and fragmentation. The results of the narrative research on 15 low-skilled persons demonstrated that negative attitudes towards education are often…

  1. Improving the quality of obstetric care for women with obstructed labour in the national referral hospital in Uganda: lessons learnt from criteria based audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayiga, Herbert; Ajeani, Judith; Kiondo, Paul; Kaye, Dan K

    2016-07-11

    Obstructed labour remains a major cause of maternal morbidity and mortality whose complications can be reduced with improved quality of obstetric care. The objective was to assess whether criteria-based audit improves quality of obstetric care provided to women with obstructed labour in Mulago hospital, Uganda. Using criteria-based audit, management of obstructed labour was analyzed prospectively in two audits. Six standards of care were compared. An initial audit of 180 patients was conducted in September/October 2013. The Audit results were shared with key stakeholders. Gaps in patient management were identified and recommendations for improving obstetric care initiated. Six standards of care (intravenous fluids, intravenous antibiotics, monitoring of maternal vital signs, bladder catheterization, delivery within two hours, and blood grouping and cross matching) were implemented. A re-audit of 180 patients with obstructed labour was conducted four months later to evaluate the impact of these recommendations. The results of the two audits were compared. In-depth interviews and focus group discussions were conducted among healthcare providers to identify factors that could have influenced the audit results. There was improvement in two standards of care (intravenous fluids and intravenous antibiotic administration) 58.9 % vs. 86.1 %; p motivation), facility factors (poor supervision, stock-outs of essential supplies, absence of protocols) and patient factors (high patient load, poor compliance to instructions) contributed to poor quality of care. Introduction of criteria based audit in the management of obstructed labour led to measurable improvements in only two out of six standards of care. The extent to which criteria based audit may improve quality of obstetric care depends on having basic effective healthcare systems in place.

  2. Lessons learnt from a cluster-randomised trial evaluating the effectiveness of Self-Management Support (SMS) delivered by practice nurses in routine diabetes care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk-de Vries, Anneke; van Bokhoven, Marloes A; Winkens, Bjorn; Terluin, Berend; Knottnerus, J André; van der Weijden, Trudy; van Eijk, Jacques Th M

    2015-06-25

    To evaluate the effectiveness of biopsychosocial Self-Management Support (SMS) delivered by practice nurses in routine diabetes care. A pragmatic cluster-randomised controlled trial within a hybrid effectiveness-implementation study design. Practice nurses were cluster-randomised. A regional care group in the Netherlands consisting of 77 family practices. The study involved practice nurses (n=40) providing care to approximately 4000 patients with diabetes. Patients with type 2 diabetes (n=264) selected by a self-administered questionnaire aimed at measuring emotional distress and diabetes-related reduced daily functioning. Practice nurses in the intervention arm (n=19) were trained to integrate SMS into their routine consultations. SMS included detection of patients with emotional distress and reduced daily functioning, and supporting them when needed through problem solving and reattribution techniques. Practice nurses in the control arm (n=21) provided usual care. The primary outcome measure was a dichotomised score on a Visual Analogue Scale that measured the perceived effect of diabetes on daily functioning. Secondary measures included patients' diabetes-related distress, quality of life, autonomy and participation, self-efficacy, self-management and glycaemic control. Outcomes were measured at baseline and at 4-month and 12-month follow-ups. Only 16 of the 117 patients in the intervention arm (14%) who were found eligible by the posted research-driven screening questionnaire were detected by their practice nurses. Extra consultations for the self-management support were delivered to only 11 study participants. In the control arm, 147 patients received usual care. Multilevel analyses showed no significant differences in outcomes between the intervention and control arms. SMS in its present form was not effective. The research-driven screening to select trial participants appeared to be inconsistent with nurse-led detection in routine practice. Adequate follow-up moments need to be built in to overcome barriers resulting from tension between the implementation and effectiveness parts of hybrid studies. Current Controlled Trials NTR2764. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  3. A pivotal registration phase III, multicenter, randomized tuberculosis controlled trial: design issues and lessons learnt from the Gatifloxacin for TB (OFLOTUB project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merle Corinne SC

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There have been no major advances in tuberculosis (TB drug development since the first East African/British Medical Research Council short course chemotherapy trial 35 years ago. Since then, the landscape for conducting TB clinical trials has profoundly changed with the emergence of HIV infection, the spread of resistant TB bacilli strains, recent advances in mycobacteriological capacity, and drug discovery. As a consequence questions have arisen on the most appropriate approach to design and conduct current TB trials. To highlight key issues discussed: Is a superiority, equivalence, or non-inferiority design most appropriate? What should be the primary efficacy outcome? How to consider re-infections in the definition of the outcome? What is the optimal length of patient follow-up? Is blinding appropriate when treatment duration in test arm is shorter? What are the appropriate assumptions for sample size calculation? Methods Various drugs are currently in the development pipeline. We are presenting in this paper the design of the most recently completed phase III TB trial, the OFLOTUB project, which is the pivotal trial of a registration portfolio for a gatifloxacin-containing TB regimen. It is a randomized, open-label, multicenter, controlled trial aiming to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a gatifloxacin-containing 4-month regimen (trial registration: ClinicalTrial.gov database: NCT00216385. Results In the light of the recent scientific and regulatory discussions, we discuss some of the design issues in TB clinical trials and more specifically the reasons that guided our choices, in order to best answer the trial objectives, while at the same time satisfying regulatory authority requirements. Conclusion When shortening TB treatment, we are advocating for a non-inferiority, non-blinded design, with a composite unfavorable endpoint assessed 12 months post treatment completion, and added trial procedures specifically aiming to: (1 minimize endpoint unavailability; and (2 distinguish between relapse and re-infection.

  4. High resolution radar rainfall for urban pluvial flood managementmanagement: Lessons learnt from 10 pilots in North-West Europe within the RainGain project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ten Veldhuis, J.A.E.; Ochoa-Rodriguez, S.; Bruni, G.; Gires, A.; Van Assel, J.; Ichaba, A.; Kroll, S.; Wang, L.P.; Tchiguirinskaia, I.; Giangola Murzyn, A.; Richard, J.; Schertzer, D.; Willems, P.

    2014-01-01

    Precipitation and catchment information needs to be available at high resolution to reliably predict hydrological response and potential flooding in urban catchments. While recent advances have been made in weather radar technology and availability of DTM for urban flood modelling, the question is w

  5. Over-stimulation of insulin/IGF-1 signaling by western diet may promote diseases of civilization: lessons learnt from laron syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnik, Bodo C; John, Swen Malte; Schmitz, Gerd

    2011-06-24

    The insulin/insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) pathway drives an evolutionarily conserved network that regulates lifespan and longevity. Individuals with Laron syndrome who carry mutations in the growth hormone receptor (GHR) gene that lead to severe congenital IGF-1 deficiency with decreased insulin/IGF-1 signaling (IIS) exhibit reduced prevalence rates of acne, diabetes and cancer. Western diet with high intake of hyperglycemic carbohydrates and insulinotropic dairy over-stimulates IIS. The reduction of IIS in Laron subjects unmasks the potential role of persistent hyperactive IIS mediated by Western diet in the development of diseases of civilization and offers a rational perspective for dietary adjustments with less insulinotropic diets like the Paleolithic diet.

  6. Over-stimulation of insulin/IGF-1 signaling by western diet may promote diseases of civilization: lessons learnt from laron syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Schmitz Gerd; John Swen; Melnik Bodo C

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The insulin/insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) pathway drives an evolutionarily conserved network that regulates lifespan and longevity. Individuals with Laron syndrome who carry mutations in the growth hormone receptor (GHR) gene that lead to severe congenital IGF-1 deficiency with decreased insulin/IGF-1 signaling (IIS) exhibit reduced prevalence rates of acne, diabetes and cancer. Western diet with high intake of hyperglycemic carbohydrates and insulinotropic dairy over-stimulat...

  7. Over-stimulation of insulin/IGF-1 signaling by western diet may promote diseases of civilization: lessons learnt from laron syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmitz Gerd

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The insulin/insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1 pathway drives an evolutionarily conserved network that regulates lifespan and longevity. Individuals with Laron syndrome who carry mutations in the growth hormone receptor (GHR gene that lead to severe congenital IGF-1 deficiency with decreased insulin/IGF-1 signaling (IIS exhibit reduced prevalence rates of acne, diabetes and cancer. Western diet with high intake of hyperglycemic carbohydrates and insulinotropic dairy over-stimulates IIS. The reduction of IIS in Laron subjects unmasks the potential role of persistent hyperactive IIS mediated by Western diet in the development of diseases of civilization and offers a rational perspective for dietary adjustments with less insulinotropic diets like the Paleolithic diet.

  8. Multidisciplinary approach to evaluating immunogenicity of biosimilars: lessons learnt and open questions based on 10 years' experience of the European Union regulatory pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chamberlain PD

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Paul D Chamberlain NDA Advisory Board, NDA Advisory Services Ltd, Surrey, UK Abstract: Clinical evaluation of comparative immunogenicity represents an important component of the European Union regulatory review process for candidate biosimilar products. The clinical evaluation is part of a multidisciplinary review that cross-refers to product quality attributes as well as preclinical and ongoing risk management considerations. Results from the monitoring of anti-drug antibody formation in relevant populations treated for an adequate period of time are interpreted in relation to clinically relevant endpoints, including pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, efficacy, and safety parameters. The European Union regulatory standard for designation of biosimilarity requires a suitable weight of evidence, determined on a product-specific basis, to demonstrate that the immunogenicity associated with the biosimilar product does not lead to a higher negative impact on clinically relevant outcomes compared with the reference product. The experience gained during the 10-year period following the implementation of the European Union biosimilars pathway indicates that a suitably cautious approach was applied, insofar as no immunogenicity-related issues have emerged for the approved applications of the different biosimilar products. In some cases, product quality-related issues were identified in the preauthorization setting as being potentially relevant for heightened risk of immunogenicity and were duly taken into account for the biosimilarity decision. Some unresolved issues remain, most notably concerning the limitation of noninterventional post-marketing surveillance measures to monitor the potential for changes in immunogenicity over the longer term, eg, following introduction of changes in manufacture, formulation, or primary product container. Lack of standardization of bioanalytical methods precludes comparison of anti-drug antibody formation for different products that are evaluated in noncomparative clinical studies, and correlation with relevant clinical parameters is also lacking. Keywords: immunogenicity, biosimilar, regulatory, clinical, preclinical, bioanalytical

  9. Experiences and Lessons Learnt with Collaborative e-Research Infrastructure and the application of Identity Management and Access Control for the Centre for Environmental Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kershaw, P.

    2016-12-01

    CEDA, the Centre for Environmental Data Analysis, hosts a range of services on behalf of NERC (Natural Environment Research Council) for the UK environmental sciences community and its work with international partners. It is host to four data centres covering atmospheric science, earth observation, climate and space data domain areas. It holds this data on behalf of a number of different providers each with their own data policies which has thus required the development of a comprehensive system to manage access. With the advent of CMIP5, CEDA committed to be one of a number of centres to host the climate model outputs and make them available through the Earth System Grid Federation, a globally distributed software infrastructure developed for this purpose. From the outset, a means for restricting access to datasets was required, necessitating the development a federated system for authentication and authorisation so that access to data could be managed across multiple providers around the world. From 2012, CEDA has seen a further evolution with the development of JASMIN, a multi-petabyte data analysis facility. Hosted alongside the CEDA archive, it provides a range of services for users including a batch compute cluster, group workspaces and a community cloud. This has required significant changes and enhancements to the access control system. In common with many other examples in the research community, the experiences of the above underline the difficulties of developing collaborative e-Research infrastructures. Drawing from these there are some recurring themes: Clear requirements need to be established at the outset recognising that implementing strict access policies can incur additional development and administrative overhead. An appropriate balance is needed between ease of access desired by end users and metrics and monitoring required by resource providers. The major technical challenge is not with security technologies themselves but their effective integration with services and resources which they must protect. Effective policy and governance structures are needed for ongoing operations Federated identity infrastructures often exist only at the national level making it difficult for international research collaborations to exploit them.

  10. District health planning at a time of transition: a critical review and lessons learnt from the implementation of regional planning in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtale, Filippo; Musila, Timothy; Opigo, Jimmy; Nantamu, Dyogo; Ezati, Isaac Alidria

    2016-05-01

    A quarter of a century after the Harare Declaration on Strengthening District Health Systems Based on Primary Health Care (1987) was conceived, district health teams (DHTs) are facing a markedly changed situation. Rapid population growth, urbanization, a rapidly developing private sector, and the increasing role of vertical programs and global initiatives have marginalized the planning process and weakened the entire district health system (DHS). The Ugandan Ministry of Health (MoH) responded to these challenges by beginning a review of district planning: a key action point of the Harare Declaration. The first step was a critical review of relevant literature, then central and district health staff were engaged with to provide their input in developing the new strategy. Through a field experiment started in 2012-13, and still underway, the MoH is developing an innovative regional approach to health planning, which aims to encompass the complexity of the new context of health care provision and coordinate all new actors (private health providers, projects and local government staff from other sectors) operating in the health sector. A strategic revision of the planning process represents an opportunity to develop an appropriate 'Theory of Change', intended as a broader approach of thinking about the entire DHS and the relative role and functions of the DHT. Leadership and stewardship capacities of MoH staff, at central and peripheral level, must be strengthened and supported to achieve the expected changes and results.

  11. Lessons Learnt from the Westgate Shopping Mall Terrorist Attack in Nairobi, Kenya: Involving the Meetings, Incentives, Conferences and Exhibitions Sector in Crisis Communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley Schroeder

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The terrorist attacks in Nairobi Kenya have been widely disseminated by the world media, thus, affecting the long-term interests of stakeholders. The tourism industry is made up of a vast number of these stakeholders, with the operating sector alone including the accommodation, tourism services, transportation, entertainment, food services, adventure and outdoor recreation, attractions, meetings, incentive, conventions, and exhibitions (MICE, and travel trade sectors. Within each operating sector, there is also a variety of different stakeholders in various segments and organisations. The purpose of this manuscript is to examine tourism crisis communications surrounding the Westgate Shopping Mall attacks in Kenya. The main research question which guided this study was: did tourism communications surrounding the Westgate Shopping Mall attacks follow best practices for tourism crisis communications? Accordingly, this paper used participant observation to highlight communications surrounding the attacks from the perspective of a conference planner and a conference attendee.

  12. Creating and developing a non-profit community-outreach healthcare clinic in the developing world: lessons learnt in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favara, D M

    2014-05-01

    Chesed Children's Clinic is a non-profit, non-governmental, volunteer-run primary care paediatric-outreach clinic servicing the severely under-resourced informal settlement of Mzamomhle within South Africa's impoverished Eastern Cape Province. Founded in May 2011 by a group of junior medical professionals and volunteers, the clinic has been successfully operating a weekend clinic on alternate Sundays since September 2011. This paper discusses 10 points of essential consideration for individuals and organisations intent on pursuing similar projects.

  13. 从可口可乐谈企业奥运营销淘金攻略%Olympic Marketing Strategies: Lessons Learnt from Coca-Cola

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘杰克

    2006-01-01

    2008,对所有中国人来说,是一个绝对值得骄傲和纪念的年头,但更多的人,从这一个数字的背后看到了两个字——商机。2001年7月13日,中国北京申奥成功。据专家分析,从2002年到2008年,中国的经济增长速度每年将额外增加0.3%,而仅仅北京,就将创造200万个就业机会。

  14. Activation of endogenous antioxidants as a common therapeutic strategy against cancer, neurodegeneration and cardiovascular diseases: A lesson learnt from DJ-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Julie Y H; Chan, Samuel H H

    2015-12-01

    This review aims at presenting a new concept pertaining to the development of antioxidants, namely, to evolve from disease-oriented therapy to mechanism-oriented therapy. Using as our illustrative example is DJ-1, a homodimeric protein that is ubiquitously expressed in a variety of mammalian tissues, including the brain, and is found in the matrix and the intermembrane space of the mitochondria. DJ-1 is known to be an endogenous antioxidant against cancer, neurodegeneration and cardiovascular diseases, of which oxidative stress plays a causal role. Interestingly, the mechanistic targets of DJ-1 as an antioxidant, including Daxx, Nrf2, thioredoxin, glutathione, α-synuclein, PTEN/PI3K/Akt, and Pink/Parkin are also associated with those oxidative stress-related diseases. Furthermore, activators of DJ-1 are available in the form of mortalin, phenylbutyrate and quinone oxidoreductase 1. It follows that activation of DJ-1 as a common endogenous antioxidant provides a new strategy against cancer, neurodegeneration and cardiovascular diseases. Since clinical trials on exogenous application of the known antioxidants have basically failed, an alternative approach would logically be to activate the endogenous antioxidants that are already present in the appropriate cellular locale where elevated oxidative stress is the culprit for the disease. At the same time, since oxidative stress is a common denominator among cancer, neurodegeneration and cardiovascular diseases, development of antioxidant therapy should target the reduction in reactive oxygen species. Instead of focusing on disease-oriented therapy, pharmaceutical companies should concentrate on developing agents and dosing schemes for effective activation of the endogenous antioxidants that are associated with a multitude of oxidative stress-related diseases (mechanism-oriented therapy). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Training traditional birth attendants on the use of misoprostol and a blood measurement tool to prevent postpartum haemorrhage: lessons learnt from Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Suzanne; Passano, Paige; Bohl, Daniel D; Islam, Arshadul; Prata, Ndola

    2014-03-01

    A consensus emerged in the late 1990s among leaders in global maternal health that traditional birth attendants (TBAs) should no longer be trained in delivery skills and should instead be trained as promoters of facility-based care. Many TBAs continue to be trained in places where home deliveries are the norm and the potential impacts of this training are important to understand. The primary objective of this study was to gain a more nuanced understanding of the full impact of training TBAs to use misoprostol and a blood measurement tool (mat) for the prevention of postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) at home deliveries through the perspective of those involved in the project. This qualitative study, conducted between July 2009 and July 2010 in Bangladesh, was nested within larger operations research, testing the feasibility and acceptability of scaling up community-based provision of misoprostol and a blood measurement tool for prevention of PPH. A total of 87 in-depth interviews (IDIs) were conducted with TBAs, community health workers (CHWs), managers, and government-employed family welfare visitors (FWVs) at three time points during the study. Computer-assisted thematic data analysis was conducted using ATLAS.ti (version 5.2). Four primary themes emerged during the data analysis, which all highlight changes that occurred following the training. The first theme describes the perceived direct changes linked to the two new interventions. The following three themes describe the indirect changes that interviewees perceived: strengthened linkages between TBAs and the formal healthcare system; strengthened linkages between TBAs and the communities they serve; and improved quality of services/service utilization. The data indicate that training TBAs and CHW supervisors resulted in perceived broader and more nuanced changes than simply improvements in TBAs' knowledge, attitudes, and practices. Acknowledgeing TBAs' important role in the community and in home deliveries and integrating them into the formal healthcare system has the potential to result in changes similar to those seen in this study.

  16. Improving primary health care services for young people experiencing psychological distress and mental health problems: a personal reflection on lessons learnt from Australia and England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Jane H

    2012-10-01

    Australia and England show high rates of psychological distress and mental health problems in young people. Both are high-income countries and have stated their intention to improve the delivery of health care to young people in primary care settings. Australia has an international reputation for improving care through innovative services and educational initiatives. England has taken a different direction and has concentrated more on developing policy and making recommendations to improve access for young people. To describe a Churchill Fellowship visit to Australia to observe initiatives in primary care based youth-friendly mental health care and to reflect upon the observations, comparing and contrasting with the English model. The observations and reflections presented draw on field notes from site visits and meeting with key players, accessing web resources and referring to the literature, both grey and published. Australia offers plurality in health care delivery and innovative responses to addressing youth mental health. There are two key approaches. The first is the development of services specializing in youth mental health. The second approach is to build capacity of existing primary care services to recognize the particular bio-psychosocial needs of adolescents (and their families). In contrast, England has tended to focus primarily on policy development and improving youth access. The paper draws attention to a number of political, clinical and educational developments in both Australia and England. Both countries demonstrate different strategies in response to the high levels of psychological distress in young people. Learning from colleagues in other settings can inform our own practice. Ultimately responding to young people's mental health needs is best served by youth-friendly policy which prepares clinicians for effective practice, informed by applied research and supported by adequate resources. Investment in young people's health must be a priority for us all.

  17. Using a Contradictory Approach to Treat a Wound Induced by Hematoma in a Patient With Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome Using Negative Pressure Wound Therapy: Lessons Learnt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Min Young; Hong, Joon Pio; Bordianu, Anca; Suh, Hyun Suk

    2015-09-01

    A 48-year-old woman with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) had multiple skin necrosis caused by massive bleeding and hematoma collection at the right lower leg, left thigh, and abdomen. During the first month, we did surgical debridement every 2 to 3 days with meticulous coagulation and applied negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). Then as the base showed initial granulation, we changed the NPWT every 4 days. NPWT was used with lower pressure and cyclic mode (-40 to -75 mm Hg) to minimize trauma and to reduce the possibility of bleeding from the wounds. After 2 months of NPWT treatment, all the wounds eventually healed with secondary intension despite the patient's condition with diabetes, hemodialysis, anticoagulant use, and corticosteroid therapy. This report supports the idea that if accompanied by conservative debridement with meticulous bleeding control, application of NPWT in low pressures and close monitoring of the patient, NPWT is possible to use even in wounds of patients with risk for bleeding.

  18. Focus groups for allied health professionals and professions allied to technical services in the NHS--marketing opportunities, lessons learnt and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, David; Brook, Richard

    2011-09-01

    Worcestershire Health Libraries provides services to all NHS and social care staff in Worcestershire. Despite intensive marketing, statistics showed low usage of the library service for professions allied to technical services and allied health professionals. To discover why there was low usage of the library services using qualitative techniques and to use focus groups as a marketing opportunity. This article also aims to outline the processes involved in delivering focus groups, the results gained, and the actions taken in response to the results. Focus groups were conducted in two departments, Pathology and Occupational Therapy. The Biochemistry department (part of Pathology) had two focus groups. An additional focus group was conducted for all the Pathology education leads. Occupational Therapy had two meetings, one for hospital based staff, and the other for community staff. Issues centred on registration, inductions, time, library ambience, multi-disciplinary service and resources. The findings raised marketing opportunities and the process identified potential candidates for the role of team knowledge officer, to act as library champions within departments. It also identified areas in which the library service was not meeting user needs and expectations, and helped focus service development. Focus groups allowed an opportunity to speak to non-users face to face and to discover, and where appropriate challenge both their, and library staff's pre-conceived ideas about the service. The information revealed gave an opportunity to market services based on user needs. © 2011 The authors. Health Information and Libraries Journal © 2011 Health Libraries Group.

  19. Applying the foundations of enterprise systems engineering in complex real-world environments: lessons learnt from real-world project examples

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kotzé, Paula

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Enterprise systems engineering (ESE) is a multidisciplinary approach that combines traditional systems engineering (TSE) and strategic management to address methods and approaches for aligning system architectures, system development and system...

  20. Challenges in groundwater resource management in coastal aquifers of East Africa: Investigations and lessons learnt in the Comoros Islands, Kenya and Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Christophe Comte

    2016-03-01

    New hydrological insights: Results confirm the fundamental importance of coastal groundwater resources for the development of the region and the urgent need to match groundwater development with demographic and economic growth. Hydrogeological knowledge is fragmented, groundwater lacks a long-term monitoring infrastructure and information transfer from stakeholders to users is limited. Current trends in demography, climate, sea-level and land-use are further threatening freshwater availability. Despite possessing high-productivity aquifers, water quality from wells and boreholes is generally impacted by saltwater intrusion. Shallow large-diameter wells, following the traditional model of these areas, consistently prove to be less saline and more durable than deeper small-diameter boreholes. However, promoting the use of large numbers of shallow wells poses a significant challenge for governance, requiring coherent management of the resource at local and national scales and the engagement of local communities.

  1. EFSA Panel on Biological Hazards (BIOHAZ); Scientific Opinion on Reflecting on the experiences and lessons learnt from modelling on biological hazards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Tine

    , preferably before accepting the mandate, a scoping exercise is recommended. The scoping exercise could include an assessment of the mandate, possible interpretations of the terms of reference, deadlines, the modelling approaches possible and the data requirements. To support this process, a model catalogue...

  2. Eradicating the grey squirrel Sciurus carolinensis from urban areas: an innovative decision-making approach based on lessons learnt in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Morgia, Valentina; Paoloni, Daniele; Genovesi, Piero

    2017-02-01

    Eradication of invasive alien species supports the recovery of native biodiversity. A new European Union Regulation introduces obligations to eradicate the most harmful invasive species. However, eradications of charismatic mammals may encounter strong opposition. Considering the case study of the eastern grey squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis Gmelin, 1788) in central Italy, we developed a structured decision-making technique based on a Bayesian decision network model and explicitly considering the plurality of environmental values of invasive species management to reduce potential social conflicts. The model identified priority areas for management activities. These areas corresponded to the core of the grey squirrel range, but they also included peripheral zones, where rapid eradication is fundamental to prevent the spread of squirrels. However, when the model was expanded to integrate the attitude of citizens towards the project, the intervention strategy slightly changed. In some areas, the citizens' support was limited, and this resulted in a reduced overall utility of intervention. The suggested approach extends the scientific basis for management decisions, evaluated in terms of technical efficiency, feasibility and social impact. Here, the Bayesian decision network model analysed the potential technical and social consequences of management actions, and it responded to the need for transparency in the decision-making process, but it can easily be extended to consider further issues that are common in many mammal eradication programmes. Owing to its flexibility and comprehensiveness, it provides an innovative example of how to plan rapid eradication or control activities, as required by the new EU Regulation. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Increased uptake of intermittent preventive treatment for malaria in pregnant women in Zambia (2006–2012: Potential determinants and highlight of lessons learnt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freddie Masaninga

    2016-07-01

    Conclusions: Zambia has increased IPTp uptake through ANC for all women. The malaria control program has contributed to increasing access to health services and reducing demographic and socioeconomic disparities.

  4. Lesson plans in surgical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, S E; Robson, A K R

    2007-06-01

    Lesson plans in surgery enable trainers and trainees to agree on goals that balance training needs with service commitments. Lesson plans are individualised to the trainee and encourage ownership of learning. They are based on SMART criteria and therefore have a sound educational footing. Most of the work in creating a lesson plan falls to the trainee. The total time for creation of each plan is approximately 20 min. Our use of lesson plans for surgical training has been met with favourable response from both trainer and trainees.

  5. RUSSIAN LESSONS FOR 1999

    CERN Multimedia

    1999-01-01

    This autumn, Russian courses will be continued at CERN for beginners and advanced.The first lesson for advanced students will take place on 6th September at 12.00 noon as scheduled.A general briefing for beginners is planned for Thursday30th September at 17.00 in 54-1-002.For further details, please contact the teacher, Mrs Macha Mikhailova by e-mail at: Vladimir.Mikhailov@cern.ch

  6. Somalia Operations: Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    are the only other • .o" ’" "- THE OPERATIONAL COwnTEX FI(GUM1, EI Smoall Gulf of Aden DJIEBO U.S. and SomaMa Flelol Sin 12 SOMALIA OPERATIONS: LESSONS...demeanor that sawess q-d let diplomacy and reasuing wMii achiev- more than arogance. anger, disdain. coon. or sarcasm . PmmmeI mut be able to cope pq

  7. Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Goodman, Lawrence E

    2001-01-01

    Beginning text presents complete theoretical treatment of mechanical model systems and deals with technological applications. Topics include introduction to calculus of vectors, particle motion, dynamics of particle systems and plane rigid bodies, technical applications in plane motions, theory of mechanical vibrations, and more. Exercises and answers appear in each chapter.

  8. Best Practice Lesson Plans: A Lesson Plan in Cognitive Restructuring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayre, Gary W.

    2006-01-01

    This particular lesson was developed for Cognitive Skills I, a central course in cognitive restructuring at the Mt. Olive Correctional Center. In this lesson the author developed a series of classroom activities to allow students to examine and assess current beliefs they possess, and to understand how these beliefs--whether judged rational or…

  9. Design for Life. Abortion. A Student's Lesson Plan [and] A Teacher's Lesson Plan [and] A Lawyer's Lesson Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Estelle; And Others

    One of a series of secondary level teaching units presenting case studies with pro and con analyses of particular legal problems, the document consists of a student's lesson plan, a teacher's lesson plan, and a lawyer's lesson plan for a unit on abortion. The lessons are designed to expose students to the Supreme Court's decision concerning…

  10. Keiko, Killer Whale. [Lesson Plan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Discovery Communications, Inc., Bethesda, MD.

    This lesson plan presents activities designed to help students understand that Keiko, the killer whale, lived for a long time in an aquarium and had to be taught to live independently; and that computer users can get updates on how Keiko is doing. The main activity of the lesson involves middle school students working in small groups to produce a…

  11. Geometrical Analogies in Mathematics Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eid, Wolfram

    2007-01-01

    A typical form of thinking to approach problem solutions humanly is thinking in analogous structures. Therefore school, especially mathematical lessons should help to form and to develop corresponding heuristic abilities of the pupils. In the contribution, a summary of possibilities of mathematics lessons regarding this shall particularly be…

  12. Masterwork Art Lesson: Kandinsky Watercolors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LiPira, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Presents an art lesson used with sixth-grade students which also can be used with other grade levels. Explains that the artwork of Wassily Kandinsky served as inspiration for this lesson. Explains that the students learned about abstract art and used watercolors to create their own paintings in the style of Kandinsky. (CMK)

  13. Can You Haiku? [Lesson Plan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Endowment for the Humanities (NFAH), Washington, DC.

    In this lesson plan, students learn the rules and conventions of haiku, study examples by Japanese masters, and create haiku of their own. Its 4 lessons seek to help students be able to: (1) describe the traditional rules and conventions of haiku; (2) interpret examples of haiku; (3) characterize the image-evoking power of haiku; (4) develop a…

  14. Heart of Darkness. [Lesson Plan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Discovery Communications, Inc., Bethesda, MD.

    Based on Joseph Conrad's novel "Heart of Darkness," this lesson plan presents activities designed to help students understand that critics have debated some of Conrad's choices in the novel; and that the novel reflects the world as Conrad saw it. The main activity of the lesson involves students rewriting the ending of the novel so that Marlow…

  15. The history of a lesson

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Mikkel Vedby

    2003-01-01

    and emphasises the need to study the history of lessons rather than the lessons of history. This approach shows that Munich is the end point of a constitutive history that begins in the failure of the Versailles treaty to create a durable European order following the First World War. The Munich lesson is thus...... one element of the lesson of Versailles, which is a praxeology that defines how the West is to make peace, and against whom peace must be defended. The lesson of Versailles has been, at least in part, constitutive of the outbreak of the Cold War, and it continues to define the Western conception...... of what defines peace and security even in the 'war against terrorism'....

  16. Estimating the size of key populations at higher risk of HIV infection: a summary of experiences and lessons presented during a technical meeting on size estimation among key populations in Asian countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calleja, Jesus Maria Garcia; Zhao, Jinkou; Reddy, Amala; Seguy, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    Problem Size estimates of key populations at higher risk of HIV exposure are recognized as critical for understanding the trajectory of the HIV epidemic and planning and monitoring an effective response, especially for countries with concentrated and low epidemics such as those in Asia. Context To help countries estimate population sizes of key populations, global guidelines were updated in 2011 to reflect new technical developments and recent field experiences in applying these methods. Action In September 2013, a meeting of programme managers and experts experienced with population size estimates (PSE) for key populations was held for 13 Asian countries. This article summarizes the key results presented, shares practical lessons learnt and reviews the methodological approaches from implementing PSE in 13 countries. Lessons learnt It is important to build capacity to collect, analyse and use PSE data; establish a technical review group; and implement a transparent, well documented process. Countries should adapt global PSE guidelines and maintain operational definitions that are more relevant and useable for country programmes. Development of methods for non-venue-based key populations requires more investment and collaborative efforts between countries and among partners. PMID:25320676

  17. Estimating the size of key populations at higher risk of HIV infection: a summary of experiences and lessons presented during a technical meeting on size estimation among key populations in Asian countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongbao Yu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Problem: Size estimates of key populations at higher risk of HIV exposure are recognized as critical for understanding the trajectory of the HIV epidemic and planning and monitoring an effective response, especially for countries with concentrated and low epidemics such as those in Asia. Context: To help countries estimate population sizes of key populations, global guidelines were updated in 2011 to reflect new technical developments and recent field experiences in applying these methods. Action: In September 2013, a meeting of programme managers and experts experienced with population size estimates (PSE for key populations was held for 13 Asian countries. This article summarizes the key results presented, shares practical lessons learnt and reviews the methodological approaches from implementing PSE in 13 countries. Lessons learnt: It is important to build capacity to collect, analyse and use PSE data; establish a technical review group; and implement a transparent, well-documented process. Countries should adapt global PSE guidelines and maintain operational definitions that are more relevant and useable for country programmes. Development of methods for non-venue-based key populations requires more investment and collaborative efforts between countries and among partners.

  18. How Creative Are Your Art Lessons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asch, Rosalie

    1976-01-01

    How a teacher achieves a balance between structure and freedom in his art lessons requires a critical awareness of the methods he chooses. Discusses the problems in teaching art lessons, the basic characteristics of creative art lessons, and provides a checklist for analyzing the effectiveness of an art lesson. (Author/RK)

  19. Classroom Management and Lesson Planning(4)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ Lesson Planning Task 1 As teachers,we all need to plan our lessons before we teach.Make a list of things that you think need to be included in a lesson plan.Then compare and discuss your list with another teacher.Also think about reasons why we need to plan our lessons.

  20. Classroom Management and Lesson Planning(4)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Lesson PlanningTask 1As teachers,we all need to plan our lessons before we teach.Make a list of things that you think need tobe included in a lesson plan.Then compare and discuss your list with another teacher.Also think about reasonswhy we need to plan our lessons.

  1. Geographic Alliance of Iowa. Lesson Plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, Kay E.; Howe-Ford, Nancy

    This collection of five lesson plans in geography can be adapted for use with K-12 students. Each lesson plan explains the lesson and provides basic instructions. The lesson plans are titled: "Teaching Geography Using Literature in K-University Classrooms" (Kay Weller); "Geography and a Mystery Novel" (Kay Weller);…

  2. Shuttle Lesson Learned - Toxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, John T.

    2010-01-01

    This is a script for a video about toxicology and the space shuttle. The first segment is deals with dust in the space vehicle. The next segment will be about archival samples. Then we'll look at real time on-board analyzers that give us a lot of capability in terms of monitoring for combustion products and the ability to monitor volatile organics on the station. Finally we will look at other issues that are about setting limits and dealing with ground based lessons that pertain to toxicology.

  3. Lessons from Mayan Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Loeb, Abraham

    2016-01-01

    The Mayan culture collected exquisite astronomical data for over a millennium. However, it failed to come up with the breakthrough ideas of modern astronomy because the data was analyzed within a mythological culture of astrology that rested upon false but mathematically sophisticated theories about the Universe. Have we learned the necessary lessons to prevent our current scientific culture from resembling Mayan Astronomy? Clearly, data collection by itself is not a guarantee for good science as commonly assumed by funding agencies. A vibrant scientific culture should cultivate multiple approaches to analyzing existing data and to collecting new data.

  4. French Lessons A Memoir

    CERN Document Server

    Kaplan, Alice

    2009-01-01

    Brilliantly uniting the personal and the critical, French Lessons is a powerful autobiographical experiment. It tells the story of an American woman escaping into the French language and of a scholar and teacher coming to grips with her history of learning. Kaplan begins with a distinctly American quest for an imaginary France of the intelligence. But soon her infatuation with all things French comes up against the dark, unimagined recesses of French political and cultural life.The daughter of a Jewish lawyer who prosecuted Nazi war criminals at Nuremburg, Kaplan grew up in the 1960s in the Mi

  5. Financial Lessons Learned

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    @@ As the Wall Street chaos of 2008 swept the globe,China-with little exposure to subprime mortgages-was one of the only calm ports in the growing financial storm.Ifone lesson can be learned from the crisis,it is this: maintain a constant state of financial vigilance against risks even in boom times.China now faces the task of ensuring its financial health as it further opens to the world amid a global financial landscape reshaped by deep recessions.Economists and finance professors discussed these challenges at the Asia-Pacific Economic and Financial Forum recently held in Beijing.Edited excerpts follow:

  6. Financial Lessons Learned

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    As the Wall Street chaos of 2008 swept the globe,China-with little exposure to subprime mortgages-was one of the only calm ports in the growing financial storm.If one lesson can be learned from the crisis,it is this: maintain a constant state of financial vigilance against risks even in boom times.China now faces the task of ensuring its financial health as it further opens to the world amid a global financial landscape reshaped by deep recessions.Economists and finance professors discussed these challenges at the Asia-Pacific Economic and Financial Forum recently held in Beijing.Edited excerpts follow

  7. Lessons from the First Generation of Marine Ecological Forecast Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark R. Payne

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent years have seen a rapid expansion in the ability of earth system models to describe and predict the physical state of the ocean. Skilful forecasts ranging from seasonal (3 months to decadal (5–10 years time scales are now a reality. With the advance of these forecasts of ocean physics, the first generation of marine ecological forecasts has started to emerge. Such forecasts are potentially of great value in the management of living marine resources and for all of those who are dependent on the ocean for both nutrition and their livelihood; however, this is still a field in its infancy. We review the state of the art in this emerging field and identify the lessons that can be learnt and carried forward from these pioneering efforts. The majority of this first wave of products are forecasts of spatial distributions, possibly reflecting the inherent suitability of this response variable to the task of forecasting. Promising developments are also seen in forecasting fish-stock recruitment where, despite well-recognized challenges in understanding and predicting this response, new process knowledge and model approaches that could form a basis for forecasting are becoming available. Forecasts of phenology and coral-bleaching events are also being applied to monitoring and industry decisions. Moving marine ecological forecasting forward will require striking a balance between what is feasible and what is useful. We propose here a set of criteria to quickly identify “low-hanging fruit” that can potentially be predicted; however, ensuring the usefulness of forecast products also requires close collaboration with actively engaged end-users. Realizing the full potential of marine ecological forecasting will require bridging the gaps between marine ecology and climatology on the one-hand, and between science and end-users on the other. Nevertheless, the successes seen thus far and the potential to develop further products suggest that the field

  8. Microbiology: lessons from a first attempt at Lake Ellsworth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, D A; Magiopoulos, I; Mowlem, M; Tranter, M; Holt, G; Woodward, J; Siegert, M J

    2016-01-28

    During the attempt to directly access, measure and sample Subglacial Lake Ellsworth in 2012-2013, we conducted microbiological analyses of the drilling equipment, scientific instrumentation, field camp and natural surroundings. From these studies, a number of lessons can be learned about the cleanliness of deep Antarctic subglacial lake access leading to, in particular, knowledge of the limitations of some of the most basic relevant microbiological principles. Here, we focus on five of the core challenges faced and describe how cleanliness and sterilization were implemented in the field. In the light of our field experiences, we consider how effective these actions were, and what can be learnt for future subglacial exploration missions. The five areas covered are: (i) field camp environment and activities, (ii) the engineering processes surrounding the hot water drilling, (iii) sample handling, including recovery, stability and preservation, (iv) clean access methodologies and removal of sample material, and (v) the biodiversity and distribution of bacteria around the Antarctic. Comparisons are made between the microbiology of the Lake Ellsworth field site and other Antarctic systems, including the lakes on Signy Island, and on the Antarctic Peninsula at Lake Hodgson. Ongoing research to better define and characterize the behaviour of natural and introduced microbial populations in response to deep-ice drilling is also discussed. We recommend that future access programmes: (i) assess each specific local environment in enhanced detail due to the potential for local contamination, (ii) consider the sterility of the access in more detail, specifically focusing on single cell colonization and the introduction of new species through contamination of pre-existing microbial communities, (iii) consider experimental bias in methodological approaches, (iv) undertake in situ biodiversity detection to mitigate risk of non-sample return and post-sample contamination, and (v

  9. Light charged particle emission in heavy-ion reactions – What have we learnt?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Kailas

    2001-07-01

    Light charged particles emitted in heavy-ion induced reactions, their spectra and angular distributions measured over a range of energies, carry the signature of the underlying reaction mechanisms. Analysis of data of light charged particles, both inclusive and exclusive measured in coincidence with gamma rays, fission products, evaporation residues have yielded interesting results which bring out the influence of nuclear structure, nuclear mean field and dynamics on the emission of these particles.

  10. St. Louis FUSRAP Lessons Learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eberlin, J.; Williams, D.; Mueller, D.

    2003-02-26

    The purpose of this paper is to present lessons learned from fours years' experience conducting Remedial Investigation and Remedial Action activities at the St. Louis Downtown Site (SLDS) under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). Many FUSRAP sites are experiencing challenges conducting Remedial Actions within forecasted volume and budget estimates. The St. Louis FUSRAP lessons learned provide insight to options for cost effective remediation at FUSRAP sites. The lessons learned are focused on project planning (budget and schedule), investigation, design, and construction.

  11. Class-specific discriminant time-frequency analysis using novel jointly learnt non-negative matrix factorization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoraani, Behnaz

    2016-12-01

    Time-frequency (TF) representation has found wide use in many challenging signal processing tasks including classification, interference rejection, and retrieval. Advances in TF analysis methods have led to the development of powerful techniques, which use non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) to adaptively decompose the TF data into TF basis components and coefficients. In this paper, standard NMF is modified for TF data, such that the improved TF bases can be used for signal classification applications with overlapping classes and data retrieval. The new method, called jointly learnt NMF (JLNMF) method, identifies both distinct and shared TF bases and is able to use the decomposed bases to successfully retrieve and separate the class-specific information from data. The paper provides the framework of the proposed JLNMF cost function and proposes a projected gradient framework to solve for limit point stationarity solutions. The developed algorithm has been applied to a synthetic data retrieval experiment and epileptic spikes in EEG signals of infantile spasms and discrimination of pathological voice disorder. The experimental results verified that JLNMF successfully identified the class-specific information, thus enhancing data separation performance.

  12. Make That Shock Lesson Shocking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskowitz, Gertrude

    1975-01-01

    Notes a tendency among foreign language teachers to attempt to cover too much material too quickly with beginning students. A lesson used with prospective foreign language teachers is described which recalls the difficulties of beginning language students. (RM)

  13. Teacher Training: The Demonstration Lesson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Alan C.

    1977-01-01

    A teacher training technique is discussed involving a demonstration class given by a local teacher and observed by prospective teachers. After the class a discussion is held analyzing lesson content and teaching techniques. (CHK)

  14. [Lessons from Field Studies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Takesumi

    2015-01-01

    During my academic career for more than 40 years, I was involved in 18 epidemiological field studies, partially or fully. Among these field studies, four (1. Medical services in remote rural areas in Okinawa, 2. Yusho episode, 3. JICA Onchocerciasis Control Project in Guatemala, and 4. Miyako cohort study in Fukuoka) are introduced in this paper, including the latest situation after the presentation. Through these field works experienced by the author, the following lessons were gained. 1. Strong human reliance between researchers and the targeted population is essential in carrying out epidemiological surveys successfully in the field. 2. Data obtained from the survey should be carefully examined and analyzed so that those data may reflect the real situation.

  15. Lessons learned from accidents investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuniga-Bello, P. [Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnologia (CONACYT), Mexico City (Mexico); Croft, J. [National Radiological Protection Board (United Kingdom); Glenn, J

    1997-12-31

    Accidents from three main practices: medical applications, industrial radiography and industrial irradiators are used to illustrate some common causes of accidents and the main lessons to be learned. A brief description of some of these accidents is given. Lessons learned from the described accidents are approached by subjects covering: safety culture, quality assurance, human factors, good engineering practice, defence in depth, security of sources, safety assessment and monitoring and verification compliance. (author)

  16. Lesson "Balance in Nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapanova, V.

    2012-04-01

    Lesson "Balance in Nature" This simulation game-lesson (Balance in Nature) gives an opportunity for the students to show creativity, work independently, and to create models and ideas. It creates future-oriented thought connected to their experience, allowing them to propose solutions for global problems and personal responsibility for their activities. The class is divided in two teams. Each team chooses questions. 1. Question: Pollution in the environment. 2. Question: Care for nature and climate. The teams work on the chosen tasks. They make drafts, notes and formulate their solutions on small pieces of paper, explaining the impact on nature and society. They express their points of view using many different opinions. This generates alternative thoughts and results in creative solutions. With the new knowledge and positive behaviour defined, everybody realizes that they can do something positive towards nature and climate problems and the importance of individuals for solving global problems is evident. Our main goal is to recover the ecological balance, and everybody explains his or her own well-grounded opinions. In this work process the students obtain knowledge, skills and more responsible behaviour. This process, based on his or her own experience, dialogue and teamwork, helps the participant's self-development. Making the model "human↔ nature" expresses how human activities impact the natural Earth and how these impacts in turn affect society. Taking personal responsibility, we can reduce global warming and help the Earth. By helping nature we help ourselves. Teacher: Veselina Boycheva-Chapanova " Saint Patriarch Evtimii" Scholl Str. "Ivan Vazov"-19 Plovdiv Bulgaria

  17. Lessons Learned from FUSRAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo, Darina [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Legacy Management; Carpenter, Cliff [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Legacy Management; Miller, Michele [Navarro Research and Engineering

    2016-03-06

    The US DOE Office of Legacy Management (LM) is the long-term steward for 90 sites remediated under numerous regulatory regimes including the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) sites. In addition, LM holds considerable historical information, gathered in the 1970s, to determine site eligibility for remediation under FUSRAP. To date, 29 FUSRAP sites are in LM’s inventory of sites for long-term surveillance and maintenance (LTS&M), and 25 are with the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) for remediation or in the process of being transitioned to LM. It is forecasted that 13 FUSRAP sites will transfer from the USACE to LM over the next 10 years; however, the timing of the transfers is strongly dependent upon federal funding of the ongoing remedial actions. Historically, FUSRAP sites were generally cleaned up for “unrestricted” industrial use or remediated to the “cleanup standards” at that time, and their use remained unchanged. Today, these sites as well as the adjacent properties are now changing or envisioned to have changes in land use, typically from industrial to commercial or residential uses. The implication of land-use change affects DOE’s LTS&M responsibility for the sites under LM stewardship as well as the planning for the additional sites scheduled to transition in time. Coinciding with land-use changes at or near FUSRAP sites is an increased community awareness of these sites. As property development increases near FUSRAP sites, the general public and interested stakeholders regularly inquire about the sufficiency of cleanups that impact their neighborhoods and communities. LM has used this experience to address a series of lessons learned to improve our program management in light of the changing conditions of our sites. We describe these lessons learned as (1) improved stakeholder relations, (2) enhanced LTS&M requirements for the sites, and (3) greater involvement in the transition process.

  18. Sustainable energy lessons from domestic architecture of rock villages of cold dry regions of Iran (case studies: Benakohul, Samarkhazan and Hilehvar villages)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehmani, Roghaiyeh [Department of Architecture, Bostanabad Branch, Islamic Azad University (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], email: R_sana20@yahoo.com; A' zami, Ahadollah [Department of Architecture, Jolfa International Branch, Islamic Azad University (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], email: Azami@iauj.ac.ir; Sadeghi, Alireza [Department of Architecture, Azarshahr Branch, Islamic Azad University (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], email: irsesta@yahoo.com

    2011-07-01

    As the years pass, the importance of energy sustainability has been increasingly felt and emphasised. This paper presents a study of the construction methods used in Iran to build kohuls (a sort of underground barn) and the lessons to be learnt from them. The study was done in the villages of Benakohul, Hilehvar and Samarkhazan in East Azerbaijan province of northwest Iran. Kohuls are usually constructed in places surrounded by mountains. During winter they act as a shelter for animals, whose body heat and respiration keep them warm. In summer, the animals are away and the atmosphere in the kohul, insulated by the mountain, cools off and stays cold, making it an ideal place to store meat. The heat produced by the cattle inside the kohul also functions as a strong adhesive, reinforcing the walls and ceilings and increasing the sustainability and durability of the kohul. If they are unused for a long period, they decay naturally and eventually collapse.

  19. Metas de inflação: lições da era Greenspan Inflation targets: lessons from the Greenspan era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Silva de Deos

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper approaches the experience of monetary policy in the Greenspan period and suggests what lessons could be learnt. The adoption of inflation targeting would denote a step backward in the policymaking process in the USA, for, since the 1980s, a distinctive feature is flexibility of response to adjust to unexpected events and changing environments. The Fed was able to exercise an informed judgement in critical situations and this opens the case for the importance of not restraining policymakers' actions through the adoption of tight rules. Furthermore, that the various experiences with inflation targeting are indisputably huge successes, and that this framework represents the state of the art (therefore nothing else can alternatively be done, remains to be seen.

  20. Lessons of the Indo-Pakistani example for nuclear deterrence. Summary; Lecons de l'exemple Indo-Pakistanais pour la dissuasion nucleaire. synthese

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tertrais, B

    2003-10-15

    Southern Asia has similar characteristics as those of central Europe during the cold war. The arguments suggesting that the nuclear dissuasion cannot work between India and Pakistan are not convincing. A deep analysis of the Indo-Pakistan 'nuclear crises' is necessary to learn lessons from the south-Asian example. This analysis suggests that both parties have learnt the dissuasion rules in an empirical way since 1990 and now have more certitudes about their options and the related risks in a bilateral nuclear environment. In particular, it appears that the line of control (LoC) is now well identified, both by Islamabad and New Delhi, as one of those 'red lines' the crossing of which would lead the conflict towards a new dimension. (J.S.)

  1. The re-emergence of tuberculosis: what have we learnt from molecular epidemiology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgdorff, M W; van Soolingen, D

    2013-10-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) has re-emerged over the past two decades: in industrialized countries in association with immigration, and in Africa owing to the human immunodeficiency virus epidemic. Drug-resistant TB is a major threat worldwide. The variable and uncertain impact of TB control necessitates not only better tools (diagnostics, drugs, and vaccines), but also better insights into the natural history and epidemiology of TB. Molecular epidemiological studies over the last two decades have contributed to such insights by answering long-standing questions, such as the proportion of cases attributable to recent transmission, risk factors for recent transmission, the occurrence of multiple Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, and the proportion of recurrent TB cases attributable to re-infection. M. tuberculosis lineages have been identified and shown to be associated with geographical origin. The Beijing genotype is strongly associated with multidrug resistance, and may have escaped from bacille Calmette-Guérin-induced immunity. DNA fingerprinting has quantified the importance of institutional transmission and laboratory cross-contamination, and has helped to focus contact investigations. Questions to be answered in the near future with whole genome sequencing include identification of chains of transmission within clusters of patients, more precise quantification of mixed infection, and transmission probabilities and rates of progression from infection to disease of various M. tuberculosis lineages, as well as possible variations in vaccine efficacy by lineage. Perhaps most importantly, dynamics in the population structure of M. tuberculosis in response to control measures in high-prevalence areas should be better understood.

  2. Designing and Adapting Tasks in Lesson Planning: A Critical Process of Lesson Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Toshiakira

    2016-01-01

    There is no doubt that a lesson plan is a necessary product of Lesson Study. However, the collaborative work among teachers that goes into creating that lesson plan is largely under-appreciated by non-Japanese adopters of Lesson Study, possibly because the effort involved is invisible to outsiders, with our attention going to its most visible…

  3. Designing and Adapting Tasks in Lesson Planning: A Critical Process of Lesson Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Toshiakira

    2016-01-01

    There is no doubt that a lesson plan is a necessary product of Lesson Study. However, the collaborative work among teachers that goes into creating that lesson plan is largely under-appreciated by non-Japanese adopters of Lesson Study, possibly because the effort involved is invisible to outsiders, with our attention going to its most visible…

  4. IMPACT OF MANAGERIAL SKILLS LEARNT THROUGH MA EDUCATIONAL PLANNING MANAGEMENT PROGRAMME OF AIOU ON THE PERFORMANCE OF INSTITUTIONAL HEADS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Asif CHUADHRY

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Management provides formal coordination in an organization for achieving pre-determined goals. The educational manager particulary performs his duties by using different planning and management techniques. These techniques are equally important for the manager of other sectors. The present study was focused on the impact of managerial skills learnt through MA EPM programme on the performance of the heads. Following were the objectives of the study .to assess the contribution of the programme towards the learning of the heads of educational institutions. Ø To identify the managerial skills and competencies of Educational Managers and heads trained through EPPSL Department of the Allama Iqbal Open University. Ø (ii To evaluate the effectiveness of the programme and its impact on the skills of the MA EPM graduates. Ø (iii To analyze the performance of EPM graduates working as heads in their respective institutions.A questionnaire for graduates was developed for those working as institutional heads in Rawalpindi and Islamabad. There were 58 educational institutionl heads who have their master degree in EPM .The data obtained was organized, tabulated, and analyzed by using descriptive statistics means of percentage method in numbers of tables in order to find out the impact of the skills of the MA EPM programme. The finding and conclusions of the data indicated that the impact of the skills on their performance. Majority of the heads were agreed that the programme was beneficial for them. It was recommended on the basis of the conclusions that the selection of the resource person should be on merit; quality of books might be improved; and there should be a separate course for educational budgeting. It was also recommended that this programme should be compulsory for the institutional heads. There might be upgradation of the course.

  5. Rural Entrepreneurship in Nigeria: Lessons From Scientific ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rural Entrepreneurship in Nigeria: Lessons From Scientific Management. ... Lwati: A Journal of Contemporary Research. Journal Home ... This article focussed on the lessons that can be garnered from the tenets of Scientific Management.

  6. Crack - seal veins - what we learnt since the seminal work of John Ramsay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urai, Janos L.; Bons, Paul D.

    2017-04-01

    In the nineteen-eighties, John Ramsay and co-workers have laid the basis for much of our current understanding of tectonic veins, by proposing that tectonic veins accrete in many small increments of cracking and sealing, making the link to cyclic stress and fluid pressure cycles and the earthquake cycle, and by proposing that fibrous veins track the opening trajectory, which has created a toolbox to analyse progressive deformation in rocks. They recognised syntaxial and antitaxial veins, which grow depending on the composition of the wall rock and the vein. Following on these seminal contributions, advances in analysing the microstructure and chemical signature in crack-seal veins made a lot of progress, facilitated by the rapid increase in micro analytical tools like cathodeluminescence and EBSD. Initial modelling of crystal growth in crack- seal veins provided an explanation of how crystals become fibrous without being deformed and explained how fibres sometimes do and sometimes don't follow the opening trajectory. This was followed by numerical models of crystal growth to study the development of crystal facets after larger crack increments, and experimental study of the sealing dynamics of syntaxial veins. These models were initially kinematic, using the ELLE microdynamic simulation package, and more recently incorporating the physics of the growing interface using the Phase Field method, which now allows 3D simulation of both syntaxial and antitaxial veins and can simultaneously compute the evolving permeability of the crack using Lattice Boltzmann techniques. Parallel to these developments we developed an understanding of the strength of the vein cement, and, using Discrete Element Techniques, explored the effects of differences of the strength of the vein and its adhesion to the wall rock on fracture patterns in crack-seal systems in changing stress fields. This presentation will review these developments, showing how the ideas of John Ramsay inspired follow

  7. A Neural Network for Generating Adaptive Lessons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassina Seridi-Bouchelaghem

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional sequencing technology developed in the field of intelligent tutoring systems have not find an immediate place in large-scale Web-based education. This study investigates the use of computational intelligence for adaptive lesson generation in a distance learning environment over the Web. An approach for adaptive pedagogical hypermedia document generation is proposed and implemented in a prototype called KnowledgeClass. This approach is based on a specialized artificial neural network model. The system allows automatic generation of individualised courses according to the learner’s goal and previous knowledge and can dynamically adapt the course according to the learner’s success in acquiring knowledge. Several experiments showed the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  8. Rapid Spacecraft Development: Results and Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, William A.

    2002-01-01

    The Rapid Spacecraft Development Office (RSDO) at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center is responsible for the management and direction of a dynamic and versatile program for the definition, competition, and acquisition of multiple indefinite delivery and indefinite quantity contracts - resulting in a catalog of spacecraft buses. Five spacecraft delivery orders have been placed by the RSDO and one spacecraft has been launched. Numerous concept and design studies have been performed, most with the intent of leading to a future spacecraft acquisition. A collection of results and lessons learned is recorded to highlight management techniques, methods and processes employed in the conduct of spacecraft acquisition. Topics include working relationships under fixed price delivery orders, price and value, risk management, contingency reserves, and information restrictions.

  9. Lessons on collisionless reconnection from quantum fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhito eNarita

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic reconnection in space plasmas remains a challenge in physics in that the phenomenon is associated with the breakdown of frozen-in magnetic field in a collisionless medium. Such a topology change can also be found in superfluidity, known as the quantum vortex reconnection. We give a plasma physicists' view of superfluidity to obtain insights on essential processes in collisionless reconnection, including discussion of the kinetic and fluid pictures, wave dynamics, and time reversal asymmetry. The most important lesson from the quantum fluid is the scenario that reconnection is controlled by the physics of topological defects on the microscopic scale, and by the physics of turbulence on the macroscopic scale. Quantum vortex reconnection is accompanied by wave emission in the form of Kelvin waves and sound waves, which imprints the time reversal asymmetry.

  10. Lesson Plan Design for Facilitating Differentiated Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Pamela Hudson; Fleming, Louise Conn

    2005-01-01

    This study examines the role of lesson plan design in helping teacher candidates to meet diverse learning needs. The authors studied student teachers who had been taught to use a differential lesson plan to see if they were differentiating in their planning, assessment, and instruction. They concluded that, indeed, lesson plan design does…

  11. Lessons from 30 Years of Flight Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    McComas, David C.

    2015-01-01

    This presentation takes a brief historical look at flight software over the past 30 years, extracts lessons learned and shows how many of the lessons learned are embodied in the Flight Software product line called the core Flight System (cFS). It also captures the lessons learned from developing and applying the cFS.

  12. Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility Lessons Learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caulfield, R.

    2012-07-12

    The purpose of lessons learned is to identify insight gained during a project – successes or failures – that can be applied on future projects. Lessons learned can contribute to the overall success of a project by building on approaches that have worked well and avoiding previous mistakes. Below are examples of lessons learned during ERDF’s ARRA-funded expansion project.

  13. More than Tolerance for Engineering Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Andrea; Herfat, Safa; Truesdell, Pam; Miller, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Described herein is a science, mathematics, engineering, and technology (STEM) secondary lesson created by graduate engineering student Safa Herfat, with modifications by her co-authors. The lessons learned from this case study are explored through an explanation of tolerance, a description of the lesson, the results obtained, and participant…

  14. Lessons from the Sun

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In this brief note, the implications of a condensed Sun will be examined. A celestial body composed of liquid metallic hydrogen brings great promise to astronomy, relative to understanding thermal emission and solar structure. At the same time, as an incom- pressible liquid, a condensed Sun calls into question virtually everything which is cur- rently believed with respect to the evolution and nature of the stars. Should the Sun be condensed, then neutron stars and white dwarfs will fail to reach the enormous densities they are currently believed to possess. Much of cosmology also falls into question, as the incompressibility of matter curtails any thought that a primordial atom once existed. Aging stars can no longer collapse and black holes will know no formative mechanism. A condensed Sun also hints that great strides must still be made in understanding the nature of liquids. The Sun has revealed that liquids possess a much greater potential for lattice order than previously believed. In addition, lessons may be gained with regards to the synthesis of liquid metallic hydrogen and the use of condensed matter as the basis for initiating fusion on Earth.

  15. Femtosecond photography lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanchenko, S. D.

    1999-06-01

    Antic scientists, sailors, warriors, physician, etc. were perceiving the space by means of their eye vision system. Nowadays the same people use eyeglasses, telescopes, microscopes, image converters. All these devices fit the necessary magnification, intensification gain and image spectrum to the eyes. The human brain is processing the image data offered to him in a format pertaining to eyes. Hence, the cognition of images can be regarded as a direct measurement. As to the time scale converters, they turned out to be harder done as compared with the spatial scale converters. Hence, the development of the high-speed photography (HSP) continues for more than a hundred and fifty years. The recent pico- femtosecond HSP branch sprang up in 1949 at the Kurchatov Institute -- its cradle. All about the HSP had been advertised. Instead of reprinting what is already well known, it makes sense to emphasize some instructive lessons drawn from past experience. Also it is tempting to look a bit into the high-speed photography future.

  16. Lessons from Rotor 37

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.D.Denton

    1997-01-01

    NASA rotor 37 was used as a blind test case for turbomachinery CFD by the Turbomachinery Committee of the IGTI.The rotor is a transonic compressor with a tip speed of 454 m/s(1500ft/s)and a relatively high pressure ratio of 2.1.It was tested in isolation with a circumferentially uniform inlet flow so that the flow through it should be steady apart from and effects of passage to passage geometry variation and mechanical vibration.As such it represents the simplest possible type of test for three-dimensional turbomachinery flow solvers.Howerver,the rotor still presents a real challenge to 3D viscous flow solvers because the shock wave-boudary layer interaction is strong and the effects of viscosity are dominant in determining the flow deviation and hence the pressure ration.Eleven blind solutions were submittewd and in addition a non-blind solution was used to prepare for the exercies.This paper reviews the flow in the test case and the comparisons of the CFD solutions with the test data.Lessons for both the Flow physics in transonic fans and for the application of CFD to such machines are pointed out.

  17. Lessons from high-throughput protein crystallization screening: 10 years of practical experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    JR, Luft; EH, Snell; GT, DeTitta

    2011-01-01

    Introduction X-ray crystallography provides the majority of our structural biological knowledge at a molecular level and in terms of pharmaceutical design is a valuable tool to accelerate discovery. It is the premier technique in the field, but its usefulness is significantly limited by the need to grow well-diffracting crystals. It is for this reason that high-throughput crystallization has become a key technology that has matured over the past 10 years through the field of structural genomics. Areas covered The authors describe their experiences in high-throughput crystallization screening in the context of structural genomics and the general biomedical community. They focus on the lessons learnt from the operation of a high-throughput crystallization screening laboratory, which to date has screened over 12,500 biological macromolecules. They also describe the approaches taken to maximize the success while minimizing the effort. Through this, the authors hope that the reader will gain an insight into the efficient design of a laboratory and protocols to accomplish high-throughput crystallization on a single-, multiuser-laboratory or industrial scale. Expert Opinion High-throughput crystallization screening is readily available but, despite the power of the crystallographic technique, getting crystals is still not a solved problem. High-throughput approaches can help when used skillfully; however, they still require human input in the detailed analysis and interpretation of results to be more successful. PMID:22646073

  18. Emergency medical rescue efforts after a major earthquake: lessons from the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lulu; Liu, Xu; Li, Youping; Liu, Yuan; Liu, Zhipeng; Lin, Juncong; Shen, Ji; Tang, Xuefeng; Zhang, Yi; Liang, Wannian

    2012-03-01

    Major earthquakes often result in incalculable environmental damage, loss of life, and threats to health. Tremendous progress has been made in response to many medical challenges resulting from earthquakes. However, emergency medical rescue is complicated, and great emphasis should be placed on its organisation to achieve the best results. The 2008 Wenchuan earthquake was one of the most devastating disasters in the past 10 years and caused more than 370,000 casualties. The lessons learnt from the medical disaster relief effort and the subsequent knowledge gained about the regulation and capabilities of medical and military back-up teams should be widely disseminated. In this Review we summarise and analyse the emergency medical rescue efforts after the Wenchuan earthquake. Establishment of a national disaster medical response system, an active and effective commanding system, successful coordination between rescue forces and government agencies, effective treatment, a moderate, timely and correct public health response, and long-term psychological support are all crucial to reduce mortality and morbidity and promote overall effectiveness of rescue efforts after a major earthquake.

  19. Taxing soft drinks in the Pacific: implementation lessons for improving health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thow, Anne Marie; Quested, Christine; Juventin, Lisa; Kun, Russ; Khan, A Nisha; Swinburn, Boyd

    2011-03-01

    A tax on soft drinks is often proposed as a health promotion strategy for reducing their consumption and improving health outcomes. However, little is known about the processes and politics of implementing such taxes. We analysed four different soft drink taxes in Pacific countries and documented the lessons learnt regarding the process of policy agenda-setting and implementation. While local social and political context is critically important in determining policy uptake, these case studies suggest strategies for health promotion practitioners that can help to improve policy uptake and implementation. The case studies reveal interaction between the Ministries of Health, Finance and Revenue at every stage of the policy making process. In regard to agenda-setting, relevance to government fiscal priorities was important in gaining support for soft drink taxes. The active involvement of health policy makers was also important in initiating the policies, and the use of existing taxation mechanisms enabled successful policy implementation. While the earmarking of taxes for health has been widely recommended, the revenue may be redirected as government priorities change. Health promotion practitioners must strategically plan for agenda-setting, development and implementation of intersectoral health-promoting policies by engaging with stakeholders in finance at an early stage to identify priorities and synergies, developing cross-sectoral advocacy coalitions, and basing proposals on existing legislative mechanisms where possible.

  20. Implementing maternal death surveillance and response: a review of lessons from country case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Helen; Ameh, Charles; Roos, Natalie; Mathai, Matthews; Broek, Nynke van den

    2017-07-17

    Maternal Death Surveillance and Response (MDSR) implementation is monitored globally, but not much is known about what works well, where and why in scaling up. We reviewed a series of country case studies in order to determine whether and to what extent these countries have implemented the four essential components of MDSR and identify lessons for improving implementation. A secondary analysis of ten case studies from countries at different stages of MDSR implementation, using a policy analysis framework to draw out lessons learnt and opportunities for improvement. We identify the consistent drivers of success in countries with well-established systems for MDSR, and common barriers in countries were Maternal Death Review (MDR) systems have been less successful. MDR is accepted and ongoing at subnational level in many countries, but it is not adequately institutionalised and the shift from facility based MDR to continuous MDSR that informs the wider health system still needs to be made. Our secondary analysis of country experiences highlights the need for a) social and team processes at facility level, for example the existence of a 'no shame, no blame' culture, and the ability to reflect on practice and manage change as a team for recommendations to be acted upon, b) health system inputs including adequate funding and reliable health information systems to enable identification and analysis of cases c) national level coordination of dissemination, and monitoring implementation of recommendations at all levels and d) mandatory notification of maternal deaths (and enforcement of this) and a professional requirement to participate in MDRs. Case studies from countries with established MDSR systems can provide valuable guidance on ways to set up the processes and overcome some of the barriers; but the challenge, as with many health system interventions, is to find a way to provide catalytic assistance and strengthen capacity for MDSR such that this becomes embedded in

  1. Challenging Ties between State and Tobacco Industry: Advocacy Lessons from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upendra Bhojani

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Globally, tobacco use is a major public health concern given its huge morbidity and mortality burden that is inequitably high in low- and middle-income countries. The World Health Or¬ganization has suggested banning the advertisement, promotion and sponsorship of to¬bacco. However, governments in some countries, including India, are ei¬ther directly engaged in tobacco industry oper-ations or have a mandate to promote tobacco industry development. This paper analyses a short-term advocacy campaign that chal¬lenged the state-tobacco industry ties to draw lessons for effective public health advocacy.Method: This paper uses a case study method to analyze advocacy efforts in India to thwart the state-tobacco industry partnership: the Indian gov¬ernment’s sponsorship and support to a global tobacco industry event. The paper explores multiple strategies employed in the five-month advo¬cacy campaign (May to October 2010 to chal¬lenge this state-industry tie. In doing so, we describe the challenges faced and the lessons learnt for effective advocacy.Results: Government withdrew participation and financial sponsor¬ship from the tobacco industry event. Use of multiple strategies in¬cluding en¬gaging all concerned government agencies from the be¬ginning, strategic use of media, presence and mobilization of civil society, and use of legal tools to gain information and judicial action, were complementary in bringing desired outcomes.Conclusion: Use of multiple and complementary advocacy strate¬gies could lead to positive outcomes in a short-time campaign. The Framework Convention on Tobacco Control could form an impor¬tant advocacy tool, especially in countries that have ratified it, to advocate for im¬provements in national tobacco control regulations.

  2. Challenging Ties between State and Tobacco Industry: Advocacy Lessons from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhojani, Upendra; Venkataraman, Vidya; Manganawar, Bheemaray

    2013-01-01

    Globally, tobacco use is a major public health concern given its huge morbidity and mortality burden that is inequitably high in low- and middle-income countries. The World Health Organization has suggested banning the advertisement, promotion and sponsorship of tobacco. However, governments in some countries, including India, are either directly engaged in tobacco industry operations or have a mandate to promote tobacco industry development. This paper analyses a short-term advocacy campaign that challenged the state-tobacco industry ties to draw lessons for effective public health advocacy. This paper uses a case study method to analyze advocacy efforts in India to thwart the state-tobacco industry partnership: the Indian government's sponsorship and support to a global tobacco industry event. The paper explores multiple strategies employed in the five-month advocacy campaign (May to October 2010) to challenge this state-industry tie. In doing so, we describe the challenges faced and the lessons learnt for effective advocacy. Government withdrew participation and financial sponsorship from the tobacco industry event. Use of multiple strategies including engaging all concerned government agencies from the beginning, strategic use of media, presence and mobilization of civil society, and use of legal tools to gain information and judicial action, were complementary in bringing desired outcomes. Use of multiple and complementary advocacy strategies could lead to positive outcomes in a short-time campaign. The Framework Convention on Tobacco Control could form an important advocacy tool, especially in countries that have ratified it, to advocate for improvements in national tobacco control regulations.

  3. Writing Lessons with Gavin Curtis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Danling; Lamme, Linda

    2002-01-01

    Discusses a literature-inspired model of teaching writing and two scenarios of reading and writing connections in the classroom. Presents several reading and writing lessons drawn from the children's book "The Bat Boy and His Violin" by Gavin Curtis. Discusses Curtis' craft and demonstrates how to use this book to teach writing. Includes brief…

  4. Salem Witch Trials. [Lesson Plan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maupin, Lara

    Based on Arthur Miller' play "The Crucible," this lesson plan presents activities designed to help students understand that in 17th-century New England, people were persecuted for allegedly practicing witchcraft; students of this period have looked into the allegations and offer alternatives to witchcraft to explain the people's behavior; and…

  5. For Sale: Your Lesson Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Kim

    2016-01-01

    The last several years has seen an increasingly popular trend of teachers buying and selling their lesson plans and other self-created classroom materials in online marketplaces. The leader in this space is a website called Teachers Pay Teachers, which boasts 3.8 million active users. In this article, the author examines why these sites became…

  6. Student-Negotiated Lesson Style

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of action research conducted in an EFL university context, in which data was collected about students' past English learning experiences and hopes for college speaking classes. This data was then used to guide the lesson style for the semester. The study used three cycles of action research over one 15-week…

  7. Analysing student teachers’ lesson plans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Louise Meier

    2015-01-01

    I investigate 17 mathematics student teachers’ productions, in view of examining the synergy and interaction between their mathematical and didactical knowledge. The concrete data material consists in lesson plans elaborated for the final exam of a unit on “numbers, arithmetic and algebra...

  8. NASA Materials Related Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Danny; Gill, Paul S.; Vaughan, William W.

    2003-01-01

    Lessons Learned have been the basis for our accomplishments throughout the ages. They have been passed down from father to son, mother to daughter, teacher to pupil, and older to younger worker. Lessons Learned have also been the basis for the nation s accomplishments for more than 200 years. Both government and industry have long recognized the need to systematically document and utilize the knowledge gained from past experiences in order to avoid the repetition of failures and mishaps. Through the knowledge captured and recorded in Lessons Learned from more than 80 years of flight in the Earth s atmosphere, NASA s materials researchers are constantly working to develop stronger, lighter, and more durable materials that can withstand the challenges of space. The Agency s talented materials engineers and scientists continue to build on that rich tradition by using the knowledge and wisdom gained from past experiences to create futuristic materials and technologies that will be used in the next generation of advanced spacecraft and satellites that may one day enable mankind to land men on another planet or explore our nearest star. These same materials may also have application here on Earth to make commercial aircraft more economical to build and fly. With the explosion in technical accomplishments over the last decade, the ability to capture knowledge and have the capability to rapidly communicate this knowledge at lightning speed throughout an organization like NASA has become critical. Use of Lessons Learned is a principal component of an organizational culture committed to continuous improvement.

  9. A Lesson in Number Pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Rodney

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a guided investigation into the spacial relationships between the centres of the squares in a Fibonacci tiling. It is essentially a lesson in number pattern, but includes work with surds, coordinate geometry, and some elementary use of complex numbers. The investigation could be presented to students in a number of ways…

  10. The Great Gatsby. [Lesson Plan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelasko, Ken

    Based on F. Scott Fitzgerald's novel "The Great Gatsby," this lesson plan presents activities designed to help students understand that adapting part of a novel into a dramatic reading makes students more intimate with the author's intentions and craft; and that a part of a novel may lend itself to various oral interpretations. The main activity…

  11. "Pride and Prejudice". [Lesson Plan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderquist, Alisa

    Based on Jane Austen's novel "Pride and Prejudice," this lesson plan presents activities designed to help students understand that classics are those pieces of literature that continue to be popular long after they were written; classics tend to have universal themes; and Austen's writing has been updated and dramatized and, most likely, will…

  12. Children of War. [Lesson Plan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Discovery Communications, Inc., Bethesda, MD.

    This lesson plan presents activities in which students read, analyze, and discuss excerpts from children's war diaries; and create a storyboard for a public service announcement on children's rights in wartime. It includes objectives, materials, procedures, extension activities, excerpts of children's war diaries, suggested readings, and web…

  13. Plant ID. Agricultural Lesson Plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale. Dept. of Agricultural Education and Mechanization.

    This lesson plan is intended for use in conducting classes on plant identification. Presented first are a series of questions and answers designed to convey general information about the scientific classification of plants. The following topics are among those discussed: main types of plants; categories of vascular plants; gymnosperms and…

  14. Dr. King's Dream. [Lesson Plan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Endowment for the Humanities (NFAH), Washington, DC.

    This lesson plan teaches students about the life and work of Martin Luther King, Jr. Students listen to a brief biography, view photographs of the March on Washington, hear a portion of King's "I Have a Dream" speech, and discuss what King's words mean to them. Finally, they will create picture books about their own dreams of freedom for…

  15. In Old Pompeii. [Lesson Plan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001

    In this Web-based interdisciplinary lesson (involving social studies, geography, history, and language arts) students take a virtual field trip to the ruins of Pompeii to learn about everyday life in Roman times, then create a travelogue to attract visitors to the site and write an account of their field trip modeled on a description of Pompeii…

  16. Charismatic Leaders: A Lesson Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, Robert W.

    1983-01-01

    Focusing upon Franklin D. Roosevelt and Adolf Hitler, these lessons for high school students in U.S. or world history courses deal with what charismatic leadership is, what circumstances and personality factors generate charismatic movements, and the role, results, and dangers of charismatic leadership. (RM)

  17. Lessons Learned from Exemplary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrum, Lynne; Levin, Barbara B.

    2013-01-01

    This article presents lessons learned about successful professional development for promoting technology integration from eight exemplary schools. Through a qualitative investigation into school leaders' and teachers' intentional goals of improving student engagement and achievement, formal, informal, and individual opportunities are described…

  18. "The Scarlet Letter". [Lesson Plan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Discovery Communications, Inc., Bethesda, MD.

    Based on Nathaniel Hawthorne's novel "The Scarlet Letter," this lesson plan presents activities designed to help students understand that the ending of a novel does not resolve all of the questions that may occur to readers; and that readers may imagine characters living out their lives beyond the ending the author gave to a novel. The main…

  19. Moby-Dick. [Lesson Plan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderquist, Alisa

    Based on Herman Melville's novel "Moby-Dick," this lesson plan presents activities designed to help students understand that the novel is grounded in facts that Melville acquired in his own experiences at sea; New England was the center of a prospering whaling industry in the 19th century; and journal keeping was not uncommon among 19th-century…

  20. Multimedia Principle in Teaching Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kari Jabbour, Khayrazad

    2012-01-01

    Multimedia learning principle occurs when we create mental representations from combining text and relevant graphics into lessons. This article discusses the learning advantages that result from adding multimedia learning principle into instructions; and how to select graphics that support learning. There is a balance that instructional designers…

  1. Knowledge Learnt from Biaoyoufu()

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Fang-zhong

    2004-01-01

    @@ Biaoyoufu (), written by acupuncturist DOU Han-qing of Jin Dynasty, with extremely profound theory constructively revealed the relationship between needling and yin-yang, five elements, zang-fu organs, meridians,qi, blood, needling techniques, methods in selecting points, points for attention and contraindications,introduced author's clinical experience and realization,elaborated the essence of Neijing (), and it is highly praised by all doctors through ages and it also has guiding function in clinic. Some acquisitions from Biaoyoufu ()is now reported as follow.

  2. The Design of Lessons Using Mathematics Analysis Software to Support Multiple Representations in Secondary School Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Robyn; Stacey, Kaye; Wander, Roger; Ball, Lynda

    2011-01-01

    Current technologies incorporating sophisticated mathematical analysis software (calculation, graphing, dynamic geometry, tables, and more) provide easy access to multiple representations of mathematical problems. Realising the affordances of such technology for students' learning requires carefully designed lessons. This paper reports on design…

  3. Rainstorm Activities for Early Childhood Music Lessons Inspired by Teachable Moments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Harrison Grant

    2016-01-01

    Activities that focus on already familiar concepts are good starting points when designing early childhood music lessons. The author uses teachable moments, a spider in the classroom and a rainstorm, to design interdisciplinary preschool group activities that teach music, math, and science concepts. Dynamics and tempo are the music concepts that…

  4. The Design of Lessons Using Mathematics Analysis Software to Support Multiple Representations in Secondary School Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Robyn; Stacey, Kaye; Wander, Roger; Ball, Lynda

    2011-01-01

    Current technologies incorporating sophisticated mathematical analysis software (calculation, graphing, dynamic geometry, tables, and more) provide easy access to multiple representations of mathematical problems. Realising the affordances of such technology for students' learning requires carefully designed lessons. This paper reports on design…

  5. Rainstorm Activities for Early Childhood Music Lessons Inspired by Teachable Moments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Harrison Grant

    2016-01-01

    Activities that focus on already familiar concepts are good starting points when designing early childhood music lessons. The author uses teachable moments, a spider in the classroom and a rainstorm, to design interdisciplinary preschool group activities that teach music, math, and science concepts. Dynamics and tempo are the music concepts that…

  6. Utilization of Lesson Analysis as Teacher Self Reflection to Improve the Lesson Design on Chemical Equation Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edyani, E. A.; Supriatna, A.; Kurnia; Komalasari, L.

    2017-02-01

    The research is aimed to investigate how lesson analysis as teacher’s self-reflection changes the teacher’s lesson design on chemical equation topic. Lesson Analysis has been used as part of teacher training programs to improve teacher’s ability in analyzing their own lesson. The method used in this research is a qualitative method. The research starts from build lesson design, implementation lesson design to senior high school student, utilize lesson analysis to get information about the lesson, and revise lesson design. The revised lesson design from the first implementation applied to the second implementation, resulting in better design. This research use lesson analysis Hendayana&Hidayat framework. Video tapped and transcript are employed on each lesson. After first implementation, lesson analysis result shows that teacher-centered still dominating the learning because students are less active in discussion, so the part of lesson design must be revised. After second implementation, lesson analysis result shows that the learning already student-centered. Students are very active in discussion. But some part of learning design still must be revised. In general, lesson analysis was effective for teacher to reflect the lessons. Teacher can utilize lesson analysis any time to improve the next lesson design.

  7. The opening of electricity and gas markets to professional clients. Main lessons - December 2007; L'ouverture des marches du gaz naturel et de l'electricite pour les clients professionnels. Principaux enseignements - decembre 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    Since 2004, electricity and gas markets are opened to all professional clients who can freely chose their energy supplier. A quantitative inquiry has been carried out by BVA on behalf of the French Energy Regulatory Commission (CRE) on a sample of 1503 companies representative of both the private and public sectors. The aim of this inquiry is to gain information on the following points: what are the professionals' motivations or brakes concerning the change of energy supplier? What is their general opinion about markets opening? What are the false questions or ideas? what is their level of knowledge about the July 2004 opening of energy markets? What has it changed for them? Do they know the new suppliers? What are the new terms and conditions? What is their intention (faithfulness or changing). The lessons learnt from this inquiry are summarized in this document. (J.S.)

  8. Qualitative Data Collection and Interpretation: A Turkish Social Studies Lesson

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilman Grammes

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The classroom with its teaching-learning dynamics creates a kind of “embryonic society” in which the micro-policies of collective social knowledge construction and meaning can be re-constructed; therefore, it can be considered as a kind of “mirror” of political culture. Thus, comparative lesson research, which requires indepth classroom observation, has been getting much attention among educational community. On the other hand, there have not been done many studies that represent social studies and civics in particular, in this research tradition. Naturally, this research tradition is based on qualitative research paradigm. Likewise, qualitative research tradition has been getting increasing attention among educational community. Thus, the first purpose of this article is to explain all documentation and pre-interpretation process of this lesson so that it can provide an example for qualitative researchers. The second purpose of this article is to provide an example lesson of political education from Turkey so that educators worldwide can compare one example of social studies education practice in Turkey and with their countries.

  9. System safety management lessons learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piatt, J.A.

    1989-05-01

    The Assistant Secretary of the Army for Research, Development and Acquisition directed the Army Safety Center to provide an audit of the causes of accidents and safety of use restrictions on recently fielded systems by tracking residual hazards back through the acquisition process. The objective was to develop ''lessons learned'' that could be applied to the acquisition process to minimize mishaps in fielded systems. System safety management lessons learned are defined as Army practices or policies, derived from past successes and failures, that are expected to be effective in eliminating or reducing specific systemic causes of residual hazards. They are broadly applicable and supportive of the Army structure and acquisition objectives. 29 refs., 7 figs.

  10. USING LITERATURE IN GEOGRAPHY LESSONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROXANA HOBAI

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Including in a novel information about relief, climate, vegetation, fauna and various aspects of socio-economic life can make literature a real source of geographical information. Using realistic literary works in Geography lessons has multiple benefits, which are not limited only to geographical knowledge. In this paper there are some fragments from literature, suggestions of activities about how to integrate the fragments during Geography lessons and the results of these activities. The activities are from fifth to twelfth grade, passing through a first example of water pollution resulting from a Hercules labour, through the lyricism of the aurora borealis description, through the dramatic life of a refugee from Darfur, through the Dobrudgea winter landscape, through the grey urban landscape of Bucharest in the 90s and so on. Students were put into learning situations that stimulated their creativity, developed communication competencies and enriched their general knowledge.

  11. Applications of parallel supercomputers: Scientific results and computer science lessons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, G.C.

    1989-07-12

    Parallel Computing has come of age with several commercial and inhouse systems that deliver supercomputer performance. We illustrate this with several major computations completed or underway at Caltech on hypercubes, transputer arrays and the SIMD Connection Machine CM-2 and AMT DAP. Applications covered are lattice gauge theory, computational fluid dynamics, subatomic string dynamics, statistical and condensed matter physics,theoretical and experimental astronomy, quantum chemistry, plasma physics, grain dynamics, computer chess, graphics ray tracing, and Kalman filters. We use these applications to compare the performance of several advanced architecture computers including the conventional CRAY and ETA-10 supercomputers. We describe which problems are suitable for which computers in the terms of a matching between problem and computer architecture. This is part of a set of lessons we draw for hardware, software, and performance. We speculate on the emergence of new academic disciplines motivated by the growing importance of computers. 138 refs., 23 figs., 10 tabs.

  12. Brentwood Lessons Learned Project Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivkin, Carl H [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Caton, Melanie C [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ainscough, Christopher D [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-09-26

    The purpose of this report is to document lessons learned in the installation of the hydrogen fueling station at the National Park Service Brentwood site in Washington, D.C., to help further the deployment of hydrogen infrastructure required to support hydrogen and other fuel cell technologies. Hydrogen fueling is the most difficult infrastructure component to build and permit. Hydrogen fueling can include augmenting hydrogen fueling capability to existing conventional fuel fueling stations as well as building brand new hydrogen fueling stations. This report was produced as part of the Brentwood Lessons Learned project. The project consisted of transplanting an existing modular hydrogen fueling station from Connecticut to the National Park Service Brentwood site. This relocation required design and construction at the Brentwood site to accommodate the existing station design as well as installation and validation of the updated station. One of the most important lessons learned was that simply moving an existing modular station to an operating site was not necessarily straight-forward - performing the relocation required significant effort and cost. The station has to function at the selected operating site and this functionality requires a power supply, building supports connecting to an existing alarm system, electrical grounding and lighting, providing nitrogen for purging, and providing deionized water if an electrolyzer is part of the station package. Most importantly, the station has to fit into the existing site both spatially and operationally and not disrupt existing operations at the site. All of this coordination and integration requires logistical planning and project management. The idea that a hydrogen fueling station can be simply dropped onto a site and made immediately operational is generally not realistic. Other important lessons learned include that delineating the boundaries of the multiple jurisdictions that have authority over a project for

  13. Orbiter Water Dump Nozzles Redesign Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotter, Hank

    2017-01-01

    Hank Rotter, NASA Technical Fellow for Environmental Control and Life Support System, will provide the causes and lessons learned for the two Space Shuttle Orbiter water dump icicles that formed on the side of the Orbiter. He will present the root causes and the criticality of these icicles, along with the redesign of the water dump nozzles and lessons learned during the redesign phase.

  14. Lesson Planning with the Common Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, Linda A.; McDuffie, Amy Roth; Tate, Cathie

    2014-01-01

    Planning a lesson can be similar to planning a road trip--a metaphor the authors use to describe how they applied research and theory to their lesson planning process. A map and mode of transportation, the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM) and textbooks as resources, can lead to desired destinations, such as students engaging in…

  15. Planning Physical Education Lessons as Teaching "Episodes"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatoupis, Constantine

    2016-01-01

    An "episode" is a unit of time within which teachers and students are working on the same objective and are engaged in the same teaching/learning style. The duration of each episode, as well as the number of them in a single lesson, may vary. Additionally, the multiple episodes of a lesson may have similar objectives, offer similar…

  16. Developing Noticing of Reasoning through Demonstration Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragg, Leicha A.; Vale, Colleen

    2014-01-01

    Observation of fellow educators conducting demonstration lessons is one avenue for teachers to develop sensitivity to noticing students' reasoning. We examined teachers' noticing of children's learning behaviours in one demonstration lesson of the "Mathematical Reasoning Professional Learning Research Program" (MRPLRP). The observations…

  17. How Does Lesson Study Improve Mathematics Instruction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a theoretical model of lesson study's impact on instruction, through intervening impact on teachers' knowledge, beliefs and dispositions, teachers' learning community, and curriculum. It also describes four different types of lesson study in Japan, pointing out their synergies in producing a system where local teachers…

  18. Lesson Planning with the Common Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, Linda A.; McDuffie, Amy Roth; Tate, Cathie

    2014-01-01

    Planning a lesson can be similar to planning a road trip--a metaphor the authors use to describe how they applied research and theory to their lesson planning process. A map and mode of transportation, the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM) and textbooks as resources, can lead to desired destinations, such as students engaging in…

  19. On the Oregon Trail. [Lesson Plan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    In this lesson, students work with primary documents and latter-day photographs to recapture the experience of traveling on the Oregon Trail. The learning objectives of the lesson are: (1) to learn about the pioneer experience on the Oregon Trail; (2) to evaluate a historical re-enactment in light of documentary evidence; and (3) to synthesize…

  20. Pacemaker Primary Curriculum; Lesson Book Level A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Dorothea M.; Ross, Sheila A.

    This lesson book, which is the first in a four-level program for young children with learning difficulties, describes the purpose of and equipment and procedures for teaching lessons in the following subject areas on the kindergarten level: arithmetic concepts, number concepts, reading readiness, vocabulary, language, listening, social behavior,…