WorldWideScience

Sample records for dynamics final performance

  1. 4D Dynamic Required Navigation Performance Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelsztein, Daniel M.; Sturdy, James L.; Alaverdi, Omeed; Hochwarth, Joachim K.

    2011-01-01

    New advanced four dimensional trajectory (4DT) procedures under consideration for the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) require an aircraft to precisely navigate relative to a moving reference such as another aircraft. Examples are Self-Separation for enroute operations and Interval Management for in-trail and merging operations. The current construct of Required Navigation Performance (RNP), defined for fixed-reference-frame navigation, is not sufficiently specified to be applicable to defining performance levels of such air-to-air procedures. An extension of RNP to air-to-air navigation would enable these advanced procedures to be implemented with a specified level of performance. The objective of this research effort was to propose new 4D Dynamic RNP constructs that account for the dynamic spatial and temporal nature of Interval Management and Self-Separation, develop mathematical models of the Dynamic RNP constructs, "Required Self-Separation Performance" and "Required Interval Management Performance," and to analyze the performance characteristics of these air-to-air procedures using the newly developed models. This final report summarizes the activities led by Raytheon, in collaboration with GE Aviation and SAIC, and presents the results from this research effort to expand the RNP concept to a dynamic 4D frame of reference.

  2. Final Performance Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houldin, Joseph [Delaware Valley Industrial Resource Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Saboor, Veronica [Delaware Valley Industrial Resource Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2016-03-30

    about assessing a company’s technical assets, broadening our view of the business to go beyond what they make or what NAICS code they have…to better understand their capacity, capability, and expertise, and to learn more about THEIR customers. Knowing more about the markets they serve can often provide insight into their level of technical knowledge and sophistication. Finally, in the spirit of realizing the intent of the Accelerator we strove to align and integrate the work and activities supported by the five funding agencies to leverage each effort. To that end, we include in the Integrated Work Plan a graphic that illustrates that integration. What follows is our summary report of the project, aggregated from prior reports.

  3. Final Performance Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, S. T. [Tulane Univ., New Orleans, LA (United States)

    2013-08-31

    U.S./China Energy and Environmental Technology Center (EETC), Payson Center for International Development, Law School of Tulane University was officially established in 1997 with initial funds from private sector, US Environmental Protection Agency and the US Department of Energy (DOE.) Lately, DOE has provided EETC funds for operations with cost share from the Ministry of Science and Technology, China. EETC was created to facilitate the development of friendly, broad-based U.S./China relations. Tulane University signed the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the Chinese People’s Institute of Foreign Affairs (1995) to promote the formation of Chinese partners for EETC. EETC’s original goal is to enhance the competitiveness of US clean fossil energy technology in China so that, as her economy expands, local and global environment are well protected. Specifically, through the demonstration and broadly deployment of US developed clean coal technology for power generation, transmission, and emission reductions in China. EETC is also focused on US industry partnerships for local economic development. One of the main the objectives of the EETC is to promote the efficient, responsible production and utilization of energy with a focus on clean fossil energy, promote US clean energy and environmental technologies, and encourage environmental performance while improving the quality of life in China. Another objective is to assist China with environmental and energy policy development and provide supports for China’s development with expertise (best practices) from US industry.

  4. SLC Final Performance and Lessons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phinney, Nan

    2000-01-01

    The Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) was the first prototype of a new type of accelerator, the electron-positron linear collider. Many years of dedicated effort were required to understand the physics of this new technology and to develop the techniques for maximizing performance. Key issues were emittance dilution, stability, final beam optimization and background control. Precision, non-invasive diagnostics were required to measure and monitor the beams throughout the machine. Beam-based feedback systems were needed to stabilize energy, trajectory, intensity and the final beam size at the interaction point. variety of new tuning techniques were developed to correct for residual optical or alignment errors. The final focus system underwent a series of refinements in order to deliver sub-micron size beams. It also took many iterations to understand the sources of backgrounds and develop the methods to control them. The benefit from this accumulated experience was seen in the performance of the SLC during its final run in 1997-98. The luminosity increased by a factor of three to 3*10 30 and the 350,000 Z data sample delivered was nearly double that from all previous runs combined

  5. NONLINEAR DYNAMICAL SYSTEMS - Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philip Holmes

    2005-12-31

    This document is the final report on the work completed on DE-FG02-95ER25238 since the start of the second renewal period: Jan 1, 2001. It supplements the annual reports submitted in 2001 and 2002. In the renewal proposal I envisaged work in three main areas: Analytical and topological tools for studying flows and maps Low dimensional models of fluid flow Models of animal locomotion and I describe the progess made on each project.

  6. Dynamic Capabilities and Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilden, Ralf; Gudergan, Siegfried P.; Nielsen, Bo Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    are contingent on the competitive intensity faced by firms. Our findings demonstrate the performance effects of internal alignment between organizational structure and dynamic capabilities, as well as the external fit of dynamic capabilities with competitive intensity. We outline the advantages of PLS...

  7. Power performance assessment. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frandsen, S.

    1998-12-01

    In the increasingly commercialised wind power marketplace, the lack of precise assessment methods for the output of an investment is becoming a barrier for wider penetration of wind power. Thus, addressing this problem, the overall objectives of the project are to reduce the financial risk in investment in wind power projects by significantly improving the power performance assessment methods. Ultimately, if this objective is successfully met, the project may also result in improved tuning of the individual wind turbines and in optimisation methods for wind farm operation. The immediate, measurable objectives of the project are: To prepare a review of existing contractual aspects of power performance verification procedures of wind farms; to provide information on production sensitivity to specific terrain characteristics and wind turbine parameters by analyses of a larger number of wind farm power performance data available to the proposers; to improve the understanding of the physical parameters connected to power performance in complex environment by comparing real-life wind farm power performance data with 3D computational flow models and 3D-turbulence wind turbine models; to develop the statistical framework including uncertainty analysis for power performance assessment in complex environments; and to propose one or more procedures for power performance evaluation of wind power plants in complex environments to be applied in contractual agreements between purchasers and manufacturers on production warranties. Although the focus in this project is on power performance assessment the possible results will also be of benefit to energy yield forecasting, since the two tasks are strongly related. (au) JOULE III. 66 refs.; In Co-operation Renewable Energy System Ltd. (GB); Centre for Renewable Energy (GR); Aeronautic Research Centre (SE); National Engineering Lab. (GB); Public Power Cooperation (GR)

  8. High performance MEAs. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-15

    The aim of the present project is through modeling, material and process development to obtain significantly better MEA performance and to attain the technology necessary to fabricate stable catalyst materials thereby providing a viable alternative to current industry standard. This project primarily focused on the development and characterization of novel catalyst materials for the use in high temperature (HT) and low temperature (LT) proton-exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC). New catalysts are needed in order to improve fuel cell performance and reduce the cost of fuel cell systems. Additional tasks were the development of new, durable sealing materials to be used in PEMFC as well as the computational modeling of heat and mass transfer processes, predominantly in LT PEMFC, in order to improve fundamental understanding of the multi-phase flow issues and liquid water management in fuel cells. An improved fundamental understanding of these processes will lead to improved fuel cell performance and hence will also result in a reduced catalyst loading to achieve the same performance. The consortium have obtained significant research results and progress for new catalyst materials and substrates with promising enhanced performance and fabrication of the materials using novel methods. However, the new materials and synthesis methods explored are still in the early research and development phase. The project has contributed to improved MEA performance using less precious metal and has been demonstrated for both LT-PEM, DMFC and HT-PEM applications. New novel approach and progress of the modelling activities has been extremely satisfactory with numerous conference and journal publications along with two potential inventions concerning the catalyst layer. (LN)

  9. Dynamic Boiler Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kim

    Traditionally, boilers have been designed mainly focussing on the static operation of the plant. The dynamic capability has been given lower priority and the analysis has typically been limited to assuring that the plant was not over-stressed due to large temperature gradients. New possibilities...... developed. Analyzing boilers for dynamic operation gives rise to a number of opposing aims: shrinking and swelling, steam quality, stress levels, control system/philosophy, pressurization etc. Common for these opposing aims is that an optimum can be found for selected operation conditions. The framework has...... for buying and selling energy has increased the focus on the dynamic operation capability, efciency, emissions etc. For optimizing the design of boilers for dynamic operation a quantication of the dynamic capability is needed. A framework for optimizing design of boilers for dynamic operation has been...

  10. Parton dynamics in hadronic processes. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukhatme, U.P.

    1984-07-01

    We have elucidated several aspects of the dual parton fragmentation model for low transverse momentum multiparticle production in hadronic collisions previously developed by the author and collaborators at Orsay, France. In particular, we have verified that the dual parton model correctly reproduces recently obtained two particle inclusive distributions and particle ratios in the central region of pp and anti pp collisions. This work sheds light on the dynamics of partons in a hadronic collision since it strongly indicates that a valence quark from each initial hadron is held back with a small momentum fraction. Also, we have extended the dual parton approach to include diffraction dissocation and studied the consequences on inclusive pion production in pp interactions. We have investigated the virtues and limitations of logarithmic perturbation theory, which is often a much simpler alternative to standard Rayleigh-Schroedinger perturbation theory. Finally, we have developed and studied the shifted 1/N expansion for the enrgy eigenstates in non-relativistic quantum mechanics. Our results provide an accurate, rapidly convergent, powerful new way of handling any spherically symmetric potential. 18 references

  11. Final Report: Performance Engineering Research Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mellor-Crummey, John [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-10-27

    This document is a final report about the work performed for cooperative agreement DE-FC02-06ER25764, the Rice University effort of Performance Engineering Research Institute (PERI). PERI was an Enabling Technologies Institute of the Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC-2) program supported by the Department of Energy's Office of Science Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) program. The PERI effort at Rice University focused on (1) research and development of tools for measurement and analysis of application program performance, and (2) engagement with SciDAC-2 application teams.

  12. Final report for NIF chamber dynamics studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnham, A; Peterson, P F; Scott, J M

    1998-01-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), a 1.8 MJ, 192 laser beam facility, will have anticipated fusion yields of up to 20 MJ from D-T pellets encased in a gold hohlraum target. The energy emitted from the target in the form of x rays, neutrons, target debris kinetic energy, and target shrapnel will be contained in a 5 m. radius spherical target chamber. various diagnostics will be stationed around the target at varying distances from the target. During each shot, the target will emit x rays that will vaporize nearby target facing surfaces including those of the diagnostics, the target positioner, and other chamber structures. This ablated vapor will be transported throughout the chamber, and will eventually condense and deposit on surfaces in the chamber, including the final optics debris shields. The research at the University of California at Berkeley relates primarily to the NIF chamber dynamics. The key design issues are the ablation of the chamber structures, transport of the vapor through the chamber and the condensation or deposition processes of those vaporized materials. An understanding of these processes is essential in developing a concept for protecting the fina optics debris shields from an excessive coating (> 10 A) of target debris and ablated material, thereby prolonging their lifetime between change-outs. At Berkeley, we have studied the physical issues of the ablation process and the effects of varying materials, the condensation process of the vaporized material, and design schemes that can lower the threat posed to the debris shields by these processes. The work or portions of the work completed this year have been published in several papers and a dissertation [l-5

  13. dynamic performance of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abo elnor, A.G.M.

    2007-01-01

    this work studies the dynamic performance of material testing reactor (MTR), where the dynamic performance of any reactor reflects its safety behavior and it should enhance its intrinsic characteristics s ystem corrects itself internally without introducing external corrective action . the present work analyzes and studies the dynamic performance of mtr through the transfer function. the servo system parameters can be changed to fit the system demand. the servo system is an excellent approximation to some of the practical servo system currently use in reactor control system, and a quadratic form of this sort should closely approximate the behavior of almost any type of physical equipment which might be chosen to drive a control rod. proposed changes in servo system parameters could enhance the dynamic performance of the system , but the suitable parameters can be evaluated by using the automatic reactor power control system model

  14. Dynamics of final sectoral energy demand and aggregate energy intensity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lescaroux, Francois

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a regional and sectoral model of global final energy demand. For the main end-use sectors of consumption (industrial, commercial and public services, residential and road transportation), per-capita demand is expressed as an S-shaped function of per-capita income. Other variables intervene as well, like energy prices, temperatures and technological trends. This model is applied on a panel of 101 countries and 3 aggregates (covering the whole world) and it explains fairly well past variations in sectoral, final consumption since the beginning of the 2000s. Further, the model is used to analyze the dynamics of final energy demand, by sector and in total. The main conclusion concerns the pattern of change for aggregate energy intensity. The simulations performed show that there is no a priori reason for it to exhibit a bell-shape, as reported in the literature. Depending on initial conditions, the weight of basic needs in total consumption and the availability of modern commercial energy resources, various forms might emerge. - Research Highlights: → The residential sector accounts for most of final energy consumption at low income levels. → Its share drops at the benefit of the industrial, services and road transportation sectors in turn. → Sectoral shares' pattern is affected by changes in geographic, sociologic and economic factors. → Final energy intensity may show various shapes and does not exhibit necessarily a bell-shape.

  15. Photocathode Optimization for a Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, P; Flom, Z; Heinselman, K; Nguyen, T; Tung, S; Haskell, R; Reed, B W; LaGrange, T

    2011-08-04

    The Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope (DTEM) team at Harvey Mudd College has been sponsored by LLNL to design and build a test setup for optimizing the performance of the DTEM's electron source. Unlike a traditional TEM, the DTEM achieves much faster exposure times by using photoemission from a photocathode to produce electrons for imaging. The DTEM team's work is motivated by the need to improve the coherence and current density of the electron cloud produced by the electron gun in order to increase the image resolution and contrast achievable by DTEM. The photoemission test setup is nearly complete and the team will soon complete baseline tests of electron gun performance. The photoemission laser and high voltage power supply have been repaired; the optics path for relaying the laser to the photocathode has been finalized, assembled, and aligned; the internal setup of the vacuum chamber has been finalized and mostly implemented; and system control, synchronization, and data acquisition has been implemented in LabVIEW. Immediate future work includes determining a consistent alignment procedure to place the laser waist on the photocathode, and taking baseline performance measurements of the tantalum photocathode. Future research will examine the performance of the electron gun as a function of the photoemission laser profile, the photocathode material, and the geometry and voltages of the accelerating and focusing components in the electron gun. This report presents the team's progress and outlines the work that remains.

  16. DYNAMICS OF POLYMERS AT INTERFACES; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SMITH, G.S.; MAJEWSKI, J.

    1999-01-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This project addresses fundamental questions concerning the behavior of polymers at interfaces: (1) What processes control the formation of an adsorbed layer on a clean surface? (2) What processes control the displacement of preadsorbed polymers? (3) Can one accurately predict the structure of polymer layers? To answer these questions, using neutron reflectivity, we have studied adsorbed layers of the polymer poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) onto a quartz substrate. The polymer density profiles were derived from the neutron reflectivity data. We have shown that dry films exhibit behavior predicted by mean-field theory in that the equilibrated layer thickness scales with the molecular weight of the polymer. Also, we find that the profiles of the polymers in solution qualitatively agree with those predicted by reflected random walk (RRW) theories, yet the profiles are not in quantitative agreement

  17. Investigations on detonation shock dynamics and related topics. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, D.S. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics

    1993-11-01

    This document is a final report that summarizes the research findings and research activities supported by the subcontract DOE-LANL-9-XG8-3931P-1 between the University of Illinois (D. S. Stewart Principal Investigator) and the University of California (Los Alamos National Laboratory, M-Division). The main focus of the work has been on investigations of Detonation Shock Dynamics. A second emphasis has been on modeling compaction of energetic materials and deflagration to detonation in those materials. The work has led to a number of extensions of the theory of Detonation Shock Dynamics (DSD) and its application as an engineering design method for high explosive systems. The work also enhanced the hydrocode capabilities of researchers in M-Division by modifications to CAVEAT, an existing Los Alamos hydrocode. Linear stability studies of detonation flows were carried out for the purpose of code verification. This work also broadened the existing theory for detonation. The work in this contract has led to the development of one-phase models for dynamic compaction of porous energetic materials and laid the groundwork for subsequent studies. Some work that modeled the discrete heterogeneous behavior of propellant beds was also performed. The contract supported the efforts of D. S. Stewart and a Postdoctoral student H. I. Lee at the University of Illinois.

  18. 10 CFR 603.890 - Final performance report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... to Other Administrative Matters Financial and Programmatic Reporting § 603.890 Final performance report. A TIA must require a final performance report that addresses all major accomplishments under the... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Final performance report. 603.890 Section 603.890 Energy...

  19. Traffic Management Systems Performance Measurement: Final Report

    OpenAIRE

    Banks, James H.; Kelly, Gregory

    1997-01-01

    This report documents a study of performance measurement for Transportation Management Centers (TMCs). Performance measurement requirements were analyzed, data collection and management techniques were investigated, and case study traffic data system improvement plans were prepared for two Caltrans districts.

  20. Tunnel Boring Machine Performance Study. Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-06-01

    Full face tunnel boring machine "TBM" performance during the excavation of 6 tunnels in sedimentary rock is considered in terms of utilization, penetration rates and cutter wear. The construction records are analyzed and the results are used to inves...

  1. Performance life of HMA mixes : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    A number of hot mix asphalt (HMA) types, such as permeable friction course (PFC), stone mastic asphalts : (SMA), performance design mixes and conventional dense graded mixes are currently used to construct or overlay : roads. One of the important inp...

  2. Performance of Personal Workspace Controls Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila; Loffeld, John; Pettler,Pete; Snook, Joel

    2004-12-01

    One of the key deliverables for the DOE-funded controls research at LBNL for FY04 was the development of a prototype Personal Workspace Control system. The successful development of this system is a critical milestone for the LBNL Lighting Controls Research effort because this system demonstrates how IBECS can add value to today's Task Ambient lighting systems. LBNL has argued that by providing both the occupant and the facilities manager with the ability to precisely control the operation of overhead lighting and all task lighting in a coordinated manner, that task ambient lighting can optimize energy performance and occupant comfort simultaneously [Reference Task Ambient Foundation Document]. The Personal Workspace Control system is the application of IBECS to this important lighting problem. This report discusses the development of the Personal Workspace Control to date including descriptions of the different fixture types that have been converted to IBECS operation and a detailed description of the operation of PWC Scene Controller, which provides the end user with precise control of his task ambient lighting system. The objective, from the Annual Plan, is to demonstrate improvements in efficiency, lighting quality and occupant comfort realized using Personal Workspace Controls (PWC) designed to optimize the delivery of lighting to the individual's workstation regardless of which task-ambient lighting solution is chosen. The PWC will be capable of controlling floor-mounted, desk lamps, furniture-mounted and overhead lighting fixtures from a personal computer and handheld remote. The PWC will use an environmental sensor to automatically monitor illuminance, temperature and occupancy and to appropriately modulate ambient lighting according to daylight availability and to switch off task lighting according to local occupancy. [Adding occupancy control to the system would blunt the historical criticism of occupant-controlled lighting - the tendency of the

  3. Final report for NIF chamber dynamics studies. Final report (May 1997), Subcontract No. B291847

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, P.F.; Jin, H.; Scott, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), a 1.8 MJ, 192 laser beam facility, will have anticipated fusion yields of up to 20 MJ from D-T pellets encased in a gold hohlraum target. The energy emitted from the target in the form of x rays, neutrons, target debris kinetic energy, and target shrapnel will be contained in a 5 m. radius spherical target chamber. Various diagnostics will be stationed around the target at varying distances from the target. During each shot, the target will emit x rays that will vaporize nearby target facing surfaces including those of the diagnostics, the target positioner, and other chamber structures. This ablated vapor will be transported throughout the chamber, and will eventually condense and deposit on surfaces in the chamber, including the final optics debris shields. The research at the University of California at Berkeley relates primarily to the NIF chamber dynamics. The key design issues are the ablation of the chamber structures, transport of the vapor through the chamber and the condensation or deposition processes of those vaporized materials. An understanding of these processes is essential in developing a concept for protecting the final optics debris shields from an excessive coating (> 10 Angstrom) of target debris and ablated material, thereby prolonging their lifetime between change- outs. At Berkeley, we have studied the physical issues of the ablation process and the effects of varying materials, the condensation process of the vaporized material, and design schemes that can lower the threat posed to the debris shields by these processes. In addition to the work described briefly above, we performed extensive analysis of the target-chamber thermal response to in- chamber CO 2 Cleaning and of work performed to model the behavior of silica vapor. The work completed this year has been published in several papers and a dissertation -6 This report provides a summary of the work completed this year, as well as copies of

  4. Dynamism in Electronic Performance Support Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laffey, James

    1995-01-01

    Describes a model for dynamic electronic performance support systems based on NNAble, a system developed by the training group at Apple Computer. Principles for designing dynamic performance support are discussed, including a systems approach, performer-centered design, awareness of situated cognition, organizational memory, and technology use.…

  5. Factors Influencing Student Nurses' Performance in the Final ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Factors Influencing Student Nurses' Performance in the Final Practical Examination ... Staff development courses can be held to coordinate the work of the school ... to authentic individual nursing care of patients so that they use the individual ...

  6. Dynamic process model of a plutonium oxalate precipitator. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, C.L.; Hammelman, J.E.; Borgonovi, G.M.

    1977-11-01

    In support of LLL material safeguards program, a dynamic process model was developed which simulates the performance of a plutonium (IV) oxalate precipitator. The plutonium oxalate precipitator is a component in the plutonium oxalate process for making plutonium oxide powder from plutonium nitrate. The model is based on state-of-the-art crystallization descriptive equations, the parameters of which are quantified through the use of batch experimental data. The dynamic model predicts performance very similar to general Hanford oxalate process experience. The utilization of such a process model in an actual plant operation could promote both process control and material safeguards control by serving as a baseline predictor which could give early warning of process upsets or material diversion. The model has been incorporated into a FORTRAN computer program and is also compatible with the DYNSYS 2 computer code which is being used at LLL for process modeling efforts.

  7. Dynamic process model of a plutonium oxalate precipitator. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, C.L.; Hammelman, J.E.; Borgonovi, G.M.

    1977-11-01

    In support of LLL material safeguards program, a dynamic process model was developed which simulates the performance of a plutonium (IV) oxalate precipitator. The plutonium oxalate precipitator is a component in the plutonium oxalate process for making plutonium oxide powder from plutonium nitrate. The model is based on state-of-the-art crystallization descriptive equations, the parameters of which are quantified through the use of batch experimental data. The dynamic model predicts performance very similar to general Hanford oxalate process experience. The utilization of such a process model in an actual plant operation could promote both process control and material safeguards control by serving as a baseline predictor which could give early warning of process upsets or material diversion. The model has been incorporated into a FORTRAN computer program and is also compatible with the DYNSYS 2 computer code which is being used at LLL for process modeling efforts

  8. Dynamics of process at the final stage of nuclear fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koljari, I.G.; Mavlitov, N.D.

    2005-01-01

    Numerous experimental data show, that the final stage of nuclear fission near to a scission point plays an essential role at formation of characteristics of fission products. At the description of a final stage of fission there is a number of problems: Definition of the form of the nuclear near the scission point and definition forms of a fission fragments; The account of dynamic processes in compound nuclear directly before of fission. The condition of the quasistatic al adiabatic process - dS/dt=0 - is applied in a point of transition from the uniform compound nuclei to several forms for definition of generalized coordinates and speeds. Calculation of dependence of post neutrons from nuclear mass of fission fragments for reactions is α+ 83 Bi 209 → 85 At 213 (E lab = 45 MeV); α+ 92 U 242 → 94 Pu 242 (E lab = 45 MeV); 8 O 18 + 79 Au 197 → 97 Fr 215 (E lab = 159 MeV). System of equations, which describes behaviour of system in a point of nuclear fission-transition from the uniform form to system of a two (and, probably more) fission fragments is given. The system of the equations allows in a fission point to define the generalized coordinates, and the generalized speeds for each of the generalized coordinates of collective deformation variables

  9. Sleep and Final Exam Performance in Introductory Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coletta, Vincent; Wikholm, Colin; Pascoe, Daniel

    2018-03-01

    Most physics instructors believe that adequate sleep is important in order for students to perform well on problem solving, and many instructors advise students to get plenty of sleep the night before an exam. After years of giving such advice to students at Loyola Marymount University (LMU), one of us decided to find out how many hours students actually do sleep the night before an exam, and how that would relate to their performance. The effect of inadequate sleep on exam performance was explored in a second-semester introductory physics course. At the end of the final exam, students reported the number of hours they slept the night before. Sleep deprivation corresponded to lower final exam scores. The main purpose of this study is to provide evidence that instructors can provide to their students to convince them that their time is better spent sleeping rather than studying all night before an exam.

  10. Organizing Performance Requirements For Dynamical Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malchow, Harvey L.; Croopnick, Steven R.

    1990-01-01

    Paper describes methodology for establishing performance requirements for complicated dynamical systems. Uses top-down approach. In series of steps, makes connections between high-level mission requirements and lower-level functional performance requirements. Provides systematic delineation of elements accommodating design compromises.

  11. Optimized controllers for enhancing dynamic performance of PV interface system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud A. Attia

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic performance of PV interface system can be improved by optimizing the gains of the Proportional–Integral (PI controller. In this work, gravitational search algorithm and harmony search algorithm are utilized to optimal tuning of PI controller gains. Performance comparison between the PV system with optimized PI gains utilizing different techniques are carried out. Finally, the dynamic behavior of the system is studied under hypothetical sudden variations in irradiance. The examination of the proposed techniques for optimal tuning of PI gains is conducted using MATLAB/SIMULINK software package. The main contribution of this work is investigating the dynamic performance of PV interfacing system with application of gravitational search algorithm and harmony search algorithm for optimal PI parameters tuning. Keywords: Photovoltaic power systems, Gravitational search algorithm, Harmony search algorithm, Genetic algorithm, Artificial intelligence

  12. Dynamic Performance Tuning Supported by Program Specification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo César

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Performance analysis and tuning of parallel/distributed applications are very difficult tasks for non-expert programmers. It is necessary to provide tools that automatically carry out these tasks. These can be static tools that carry out the analysis on a post-mortem phase or can tune the application on the fly. Both kind of tools have their target applications. Static automatic analysis tools are suitable for stable application while dynamic tuning tools are more appropriate to applications with dynamic behaviour. In this paper, we describe KappaPi as an example of a static automatic performance analysis tool, and also a general environment based on parallel patterns for developing and dynamically tuning parallel/distributed applications.

  13. Study on dynamic performance of SOFC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Haiyang; Liang, Qianchao; Wen, Qiang; Zhu, Runkai

    2017-05-01

    In order to solve the problem of real-time matching of load and fuel cell power, it is urgent to study the dynamic response process of SOFC in the case of load mutation. The mathematical model of SOFC is constructed, and its performance is simulated. The model consider the influence factors such as polarization effect, ohmic loss. It also takes the diffusion effect, thermal effect, energy exchange, mass conservation, momentum conservation. One dimensional dynamic mathematical model of SOFC is constructed by using distributed lumped parameter method. The simulation results show that the I-V characteristic curves are in good agreement with the experimental data, and the accuracy of the model is verified. The voltage response curve, power response curve and the efficiency curve are obtained by this way. It lays a solid foundation for the research of dynamic performance and optimal control in power generation system of high power fuel cell stack.

  14. FINAL IMPLEMENTATION AND PERFORMANCE OF THE LHC COLLIMATOR CONTROL SYSTEM

    CERN Document Server

    Redaelli, S; Masi, A; Losito, R

    2009-01-01

    The 2008 collimation system of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) included 80 movable collimators for a total of 316 degrees of freedom. Before beam operation, the final controls implementation was deployed and commissioned. The control system enabled remote control and appropriate diagnostics of the relevant parameters. The collimator motion is driven with time-functions, synchronized with other accelerator systems, which allows controlling the collimator jaw positions with a micrometer accuracy during all machine phases. The machine protection functionality of the system, which also relies on function-based tolerance windows, was also fully validated. The collimator control challenges are reviewed and the final system architecture is presented. The results of the remote system commissioning and the overall performance are discussed.

  15. French Modular Impoundment: Final Cost and Performance Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drown, Peter [French Development Enterprises, LLC, North Billerica, MA (United States); French, Bill [French Development Enterprises, LLC, North Billerica, MA (United States)

    2017-05-17

    This report comprises the Final Cost and Performance Report for the Department of Energy Award # EE0007244, the French Modular Impoundment (aka the “French Dam”.) The French Dam is a system of applying precast modular construction to water control structures. The “French Dam” is a term used to cover the construction means/methods used to construct or rehabilitate dams, diversion structures, powerhouses, and other hydraulic structures which impound water and are covered under FDE’s existing IP (Patents # US8414223B2; US9103084B2.)

  16. Dynamic capabilities, Marketing Capability and Organizational Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Roseli Wünsch Takahashi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the study is to investigate the influence of dynamic capabilities on organizational performance and the role of marketing capabilities as a mediator in this relationship in the context of private HEIs in Brazil. As a research method we carried out a survey with 316 IES and data analysis was operationalized with the technique of structural equation modeling. The results indicate that the dynamic capabilities have influence on organizational performance only when mediated by marketing ability. The marketing capability has an important role in the survival, growth and renewal on educational services offerings for HEIs in private sector, and consequently in organizational performance. It is also demonstrated that mediated relationship is more intense for HEI with up to 3,000 students and other organizational profile variables such as amount of courses, the constitution, the type of institution and type of education do not significantly alter the results.

  17. Performance of dynamic safety barriers-Structuring, modelling and visualization

    OpenAIRE

    Wikdahl, Olga

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this master thesis is to discuss performance of dynamic safety barriers. A comprehensive literature review is performed in order to get understanding what dynamic safety barrier is. Three different concepts of dynamic safety barriers based on various meanings of dynamic were derived from the literature review: - dynamic safety barriers related to motion or physical force - dynamic safety barriers as updated barriers from dynamic risk analysis - dynamic safety ...

  18. Dynamic revetments for coastal erosion in Oregon : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-08-01

    Gravel beaches have long been recognized as one of the most efficient forms of "natural" coastal protection, and have been suggested as a form of shore protection. "Cobble berms," "dynamic revetments" or "rubble beaches" involve the construction of a...

  19. Development of High-Performance Cast Crankshafts. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Mark E [General Motors, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2017-03-31

    The objective of this project was to develop technologies that would enable the production of cast crankshafts that can replace high performance forged steel crankshafts. To achieve this, the Ultimate Tensile Strength (UTS) of the new material needs to be 850 MPa with a desired minimum Yield Strength (YS; 0.2% offset) of 615 MPa and at least 10% elongation. Perhaps more challenging, the cast material needs to be able to achieve sufficient local fatigue properties to satisfy the durability requirements in today’s high performance gasoline and diesel engine applications. The project team focused on the development of cast steel alloys for application in crankshafts to take advantage of the higher stiffness over other potential material choices. The material and process developed should be able to produce high-performance crankshafts at no more than 110% of the cost of current production cast units, perhaps the most difficult objective to achieve. To minimize costs, the primary alloy design strategy was to design compositions that can achieve the required properties with minimal alloying and post-casting heat treatments. An Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (ICME) based approach was utilized, rather than relying only on traditional trial-and-error methods, which has been proven to accelerate alloy development time. Prototype melt chemistries designed using ICME were cast as test specimens and characterized iteratively to develop an alloy design within a stage-gate process. Standard characterization and material testing was done to validate the alloy performance against design targets and provide feedback to material design and manufacturing process models. Finally, the project called for Caterpillar and General Motors (GM) to develop optimized crankshaft designs using the final material and manufacturing processing path developed. A multi-disciplinary effort was to integrate finite element analyses by engine designers and geometry-specific casting

  20. Dynamic Performance of an HVDC Link

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. ZIDI

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of a simulation study on a 12 pulse HVDC (High Voltage Direct Current using a system in Matlab/Simulink. The object of the study is to investigate the steady state and dynamic performance of the system. First we examine response of current regulator after change in current reference in order to see the behavior of the controllers in controlling the desired current. Next, we present the digital simulation of a test system and show the response to a DC fault in the line and the AC fault at inverter side. The results are evaluated to enhance the recovery of the system from the disturbances for a full range of typical disturbances. The presented approach benefits from Simulink’s advantages in modeling and simulating dynamical systems.

  1. High performance computations using dynamical nucleation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Windus, T L; Crosby, L D; Kathmann, S M

    2008-01-01

    Chemists continue to explore the use of very large computations to perform simulations that describe the molecular level physics of critical challenges in science. In this paper, we describe the Dynamical Nucleation Theory Monte Carlo (DNTMC) model - a model for determining molecular scale nucleation rate constants - and its parallel capabilities. The potential for bottlenecks and the challenges to running on future petascale or larger resources are delineated. A 'master-slave' solution is proposed to scale to the petascale and will be developed in the NWChem software. In addition, mathematical and data analysis challenges are described

  2. Annual Report 2000. Chemical Structure and Dynamics; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colson, Steve D; McDowell, Rod S

    2001-01-01

    This annual report describes the research and accomplishments of the Chemical Structure and Dynamics Program in the year 2000, one of six research programs at the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) - a multidisciplinary, national scientific user facility and research organization. The Chemical Structure and Dynamics (CS and D) program is meeting the need for a fundamental, molecular-level understanding by (1) extending the experimental characterization and theoretical description of chemical reactions to encompass the effects of condensed media and interfaces; (2) developing a multidisciplinary capability for describing interfacial chemical processes relevant to environmental chemistry; and (3) developing state-of-the-art research and analytical methods for characterizing complex materials of the types found in natural and contaminated systems

  3. Advanced Dynamic Anthropomorphic Manikin (ADAM) Final Design Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-03-01

    an ejection sequence, the human body is subjected to numerous dynamic loadings from the catapult and sustaining rocket, as well as from wind blast. In...ML12S33 CMF’I.B #1.33, (A6) Selection = 3? BNC.S MU2S34 No - check for 4 LEA.L F’ARMSG,A2 Else display Parity prompt MOVC..W PARCT,D2 BSFR DI.; PMSG CLR.W

  4. Beam dynamics in the SLC final focus system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bambade, P.S.

    1987-06-01

    The SLC luminosity is reached by colliding beams focused to about 2 μm transverse sizes. The Final Focus System (FFS) must enable, beyond its basic optical design, the detection and correction of errors accumulated in the system. In this paper, after summarizing the design, we review the sensitivity to such errors and the ability to correct them. The overall tuning strategy involves three phases: single beam spot minimization, steering the beams in collision and luminosity optimization with beam-beam effects

  5. The Dynamic Performance of Flexural Ultrasonic Transducers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Feeney

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Flexural ultrasonic transducers are principally used as proximity sensors and for industrial metrology. Their operation relies on a piezoelectric ceramic to generate a flexing of a metallic membrane, which delivers the ultrasound signal. The performance of flexural ultrasonic transducers has been largely limited to excitation through a short voltage burst signal at a designated mechanical resonance frequency. However, a steady-state amplitude response is not generated instantaneously in a flexural ultrasonic transducer from a drive excitation signal, and differences in the drive characteristics between transmitting and receiving transducers can affect the measured response. This research investigates the dynamic performance of flexural ultrasonic transducers using acoustic microphone measurements and laser Doppler vibrometry, supported by a detailed mechanical analog model, in a process which has not before been applied to the flexural ultrasonic transducer. These techniques are employed to gain insights into the physics of their vibration behaviour, vital for the optimisation of industrial ultrasound systems.

  6. Assessing the performance of dynamical trajectory estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bröcker, Jochen

    2014-06-01

    Estimating trajectories and parameters of dynamical systems from observations is a problem frequently encountered in various branches of science; geophysicists for example refer to this problem as data assimilation. Unlike as in estimation problems with exchangeable observations, in data assimilation the observations cannot easily be divided into separate sets for estimation and validation; this creates serious problems, since simply using the same observations for estimation and validation might result in overly optimistic performance assessments. To circumvent this problem, a result is presented which allows us to estimate this optimism, thus allowing for a more realistic performance assessment in data assimilation. The presented approach becomes particularly simple for data assimilation methods employing a linear error feedback (such as synchronization schemes, nudging, incremental 3DVAR and 4DVar, and various Kalman filter approaches). Numerical examples considering a high gain observer confirm the theory.

  7. Intelligent Facades for High Performance Green Buildings. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyson, Anna [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Intelligent Facades for High Performance Green Buildings: Previous research and development of intelligent facades systems has been limited in their contribution towards national goals for achieving on-site net zero buildings, because this R&D has failed to couple the many qualitative requirements of building envelopes such as the provision of daylighting, access to exterior views, satisfying aesthetic and cultural characteristics, with the quantitative metrics of energy harvesting, storage and redistribution. To achieve energy self-sufficiency from on-site solar resources, building envelopes can and must address this gamut of concerns simultaneously. With this project, we have undertaken a high-performance building- integrated combined-heat and power concentrating photovoltaic system with high temperature thermal capture, storage and transport towards multiple applications (BICPV/T). The critical contribution we are offering with the Integrated Concentrating Solar Façade (ICSF) is conceived to improve daylighting quality for improved health of occupants and mitigate solar heat gain while maximally capturing and transferring on- site solar energy. The ICSF accomplishes this multi-functionality by intercepting only the direct-normal component of solar energy (which is responsible for elevated cooling loads) thereby transforming a previously problematic source of energy into a high- quality resource that can be applied to building demands such as heating, cooling, dehumidification, domestic hot water, and possible further augmentation of electrical generation through organic Rankine cycles. With the ICSF technology, our team is addressing the global challenge in transitioning commercial and residential building stock towards on-site clean energy self-sufficiency, by fully integrating innovative environmental control systems strategies within an intelligent and responsively dynamic building envelope. The advantage of being able to use the entire solar spectrum for

  8. A Dynamic Alignment System for the Final Focus Test Beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruland, R.E.; Bressler, V.E.; Fischer, G.; Plouffe, D.; SLAC

    2005-01-01

    The Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) was conceived as a technological stepping stone on the way to the next linear collider. Nowhere is this more evident than with the alignment subsystems. Alignment tolerances for components prior to beam turn are almost an order of magnitude smaller than for previous projects at SLAC. Position monitoring systems which operate independent of the beam are employed to monitor motions of the components locally and globally with unprecedented precision. An overview of the FFTB alignment system is presented herein

  9. Particle and Blood Cell Dynamics in Oscillatory Flows Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Restrepo, Juan M.

    2008-01-01

    Our aim has been to uncover fundamental aspects of the suspension and dislodgement of particles in wall-bounded oscillatory flows, in flows characterized by Reynolds numbers encompassing the situation found in rivers and near shores (and perhaps in some industrial processes). Our research tools are computational and our coverage of parameter space fairly broad. Computational means circumvent many complications that make the measurement of the dynamics of particles in a laboratory setting an impractical task, especially on the broad range of parameter space we plan to report upon. The impact of this work on the geophysical problem of sedimentation is boosted considerably by the fact that the proposed calculations can be considered ab-initio, in the sense that little to no modeling is done in generating dynamics of the particles and of the moving fluid: we use a three-dimensional Navier Stokes solver along with straightforward boundary conditions. Hence, to the extent that Navier Stokes is a model for an ideal incompressible isotropic Newtonian fluid, the calculations yield benchmark values for such things as the drag, buoyancy, and lift of particles, in a highly controlled environment. Our approach will be to make measurements of the lift, drag, and buoyancy of particles, by considering progressively more complex physical configurations and physics.

  10. University of Maryland component of the Center for Multiscale Plasma Dynamics: Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorland, William [University of Maryland

    2014-11-18

    The Center for Multiscale Plasma Dynamics (CMPD) was a five-year Fusion Science Center. The University of Maryland (UMD) and UCLA were the host universities. This final technical report describes the physics results from the UMD CMPD.

  11. Computational Particle Dynamic Simulations on Multicore Processors (CPDMu) Final Report Phase I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmalz, Mark S

    2011-07-24

    Statement of Problem - Department of Energy has many legacy codes for simulation of computational particle dynamics and computational fluid dynamics applications that are designed to run on sequential processors and are not easily parallelized. Emerging high-performance computing architectures employ massively parallel multicore architectures (e.g., graphics processing units) to increase throughput. Parallelization of legacy simulation codes is a high priority, to achieve compatibility, efficiency, accuracy, and extensibility. General Statement of Solution - A legacy simulation application designed for implementation on mainly-sequential processors has been represented as a graph G. Mathematical transformations, applied to G, produce a graph representation {und G} for a high-performance architecture. Key computational and data movement kernels of the application were analyzed/optimized for parallel execution using the mapping G {yields} {und G}, which can be performed semi-automatically. This approach is widely applicable to many types of high-performance computing systems, such as graphics processing units or clusters comprised of nodes that contain one or more such units. Phase I Accomplishments - Phase I research decomposed/profiled computational particle dynamics simulation code for rocket fuel combustion into low and high computational cost regions (respectively, mainly sequential and mainly parallel kernels), with analysis of space and time complexity. Using the research team's expertise in algorithm-to-architecture mappings, the high-cost kernels were transformed, parallelized, and implemented on Nvidia Fermi GPUs. Measured speedups (GPU with respect to single-core CPU) were approximately 20-32X for realistic model parameters, without final optimization. Error analysis showed no loss of computational accuracy. Commercial Applications and Other Benefits - The proposed research will constitute a breakthrough in solution of problems related to efficient

  12. 76 FR 2336 - Dynamic Random Access Memory Semiconductors From the Republic of Korea: Final Results of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-13

    ... Semiconductors From the Republic of Korea: Final Results of Countervailing Duty Administrative Review AGENCY... administrative review of the countervailing duty order on dynamic random access memory semiconductors from the... to a change in the net subsidy rate. The final net subsidy rate for Hynix Semiconductor, Inc. is...

  13. A diagnostic for electron dynamics in tokamaks. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skiff, F.; Boyd, D.

    1997-12-01

    The diagnostic was installed on TdeV and brought into operation. It was optimized to the extent that time and money permitted. A considerable quantity of data was accumulated and analyzed. Experiments ended in August 1995. The apparatus has been removed from TdeV and returned to the University of Maryland. Each of these activities is detailed here. The diagnostic worked very well. Although the distribution functions behaved in ways that were not anticipated and the refractive losses were sometimes higher than projected, the authors were able to adapt to the unexpected. In the authors' estimation, all of the effects listed above are significant, and warrant further study. The diagnostic is ready for use as a tool to study the physics of current drive and current profile modification. A mechanism for steering the launched beams is desirable to cope with the strong variations in refraction which are seen. Phased array launchers seem attractive for this purpose. Tuning of the length of the waveguide run is important to avoid troublesome reflections (return losses). It may be best to build in this capability in a future system. The perpendicular dynamics of the current driven electrons are invisible to us with the present form of the diagnostic. Simultaneous measurements at fundamental and harmonic frequencies would make perpendicular distribution function measurements possible

  14. Technology verification phase. Dynamic isotope power system. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halsey, D.G.

    1982-01-01

    The Phase I requirements of the Kilowatt Isotope Power System (KIPS) program were to make a detailed Flight System Conceptual Design (FSCD) for an isotope fueled organic Rankine cycle power system and to build and test a Ground Demonstration System (GDS) which simulated as closely as possible the operational characteristics of the FSCD. The activities and results of Phase II, the Technology Verification Phase, of the program are reported. The objectives of this phase were to increase system efficiency to 18.1% by component development, to demonstrate system reliability by a 5000 h endurance test and to update the flight system design. During Phase II, system performance was improved from 15.1% to 16.6%, an endurance test of 2000 h was performed while the flight design analysis was limited to a study of the General Purpose Heat Source, a study of the regenerator manufacturing technique and analysis of the hardness of the system to a laser threat. It was concluded from these tests that the GDS is basically prototypic of a flight design; all components necessary for satisfactory operation were demonstrated successfully at the system level; over 11,000 total h of operation without any component failure attested to the inherent reliability of this type of system; and some further development is required, specifically in the area of performance

  15. Technology verification phase. Dynamic isotope power system. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halsey, D.G.

    1982-03-10

    The Phase I requirements of the Kilowatt Isotope Power System (KIPS) program were to make a detailed Flight System Conceptual Design (FSCD) for an isotope fueled organic Rankine cycle power system and to build and test a Ground Demonstration System (GDS) which simulated as closely as possible the operational characteristics of the FSCD. The activities and results of Phase II, the Technology Verification Phase, of the program are reported. The objectives of this phase were to increase system efficiency to 18.1% by component development, to demonstrate system reliability by a 5000 h endurance test and to update the flight system design. During Phase II, system performance was improved from 15.1% to 16.6%, an endurance test of 2000 h was performed while the flight design analysis was limited to a study of the General Purpose Heat Source, a study of the regenerator manufacturing technique and analysis of the hardness of the system to a laser threat. It was concluded from these tests that the GDS is basically prototypic of a flight design; all components necessary for satisfactory operation were demonstrated successfully at the system level; over 11,000 total h of operation without any component failure attested to the inherent reliability of this type of system; and some further development is required, specifically in the area of performance. (LCL)

  16. Fast Flux Test Facility performance monitoring management information: [Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newland, D.J.

    1987-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide management with performance data on key performance indicators for the month of July, 1987. This report contains the results for key performance indicators divided into two categories of ''overall'' and ''other''. The ''overall'' performance indicators, when considered in the aggregate, provide one means of monitoring overall plant performance

  17. Pecan Street Grid Demonstration Program. Final technology performance report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2015-02-10

    This document represents the final Regional Demonstration Project Technical Performance Report (TPR) for Pecan Street Inc.’s (Pecan Street) Smart Grid Demonstration Program, DE-OE-0000219. Pecan Street is a 501(c)(3) smart grid/clean energy research and development organization headquartered at The University of Texas at Austin (UT). Pecan Street worked in collaboration with Austin Energy, UT, Environmental Defense Fund (EDF), the City of Austin, the Austin Chamber of Commerce and selected consultants, contractors, and vendors to take a more detailed look at the energy load of residential and small commercial properties while the power industry is undergoing modernization. The Pecan Street Smart Grid Demonstration Program signed-up over 1,000 participants who are sharing their home or businesses’s electricity consumption data with the project via green button protocols, smart meters, and/or a home energy monitoring system (HEMS). Pecan Street completed the installation of HEMS in 750 homes and 25 commercial properties. The program provided incentives to increase the installed base of roof-top solar photovoltaic (PV) systems, plug-in electric vehicles with Level 2 charging, and smart appliances. Over 200 participants within a one square mile area took advantage of Austin Energy and Pecan Street’s joint PV incentive program and installed roof-top PV as part of this project. Of these homes, 69 purchased or leased an electric vehicle through Pecan Street’s PV rebate program and received a Level 2 charger from Pecan Street. Pecan Street studied the impacts of these technologies along with a variety of consumer behavior interventions, including pricing models, real-time feedback on energy use, incentive programs, and messaging, as well as the corresponding impacts on Austin Energy’s distribution assets.The primary demonstration site was the Mueller community in Austin, Texas. The Mueller development, located less than three miles from the Texas State Capitol

  18. Course Syllabi and Their Effects on Students' Final Grade Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafin, Ana Gil

    This study examined the relationship between the changes introduced in a course syllabus for a course titled "Instructional Strategies" and the final grades obtained by freshman and sophomore students in three successive academic periods. A sample of 150 subjects was randomly selected from students enrolled in the course at the…

  19. Dynamic Web Pages: Performance Impact on Web Servers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothari, Bhupesh; Claypool, Mark

    2001-01-01

    Discussion of Web servers and requests for dynamic pages focuses on experimentally measuring and analyzing the performance of the three dynamic Web page generation technologies: CGI, FastCGI, and Servlets. Develops a multivariate linear regression model and predicts Web server performance under some typical dynamic requests. (Author/LRW)

  20. Issues with performance measures for dynamic multi-objective optimisation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Helbig, M

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Symposium on Computational Intelligence in Dynamic and Uncertain Environments (CIDUE), Mexico, 20-23 June 2013 Issues with Performance Measures for Dynamic Multi-objective Optimisation Mard´e Helbig CSIR: Meraka Institute Brummeria, South Africa...

  1. Heat pumps for geothermal applications: availability and performance. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reistad, G.M.; Means, P.

    1980-05-01

    A study of the performance and availability of water-source heat pumps was carried out. The primary purposes were to obtain the necessary basic information required for proper evaluation of the role of water-source heat pumps in geothermal energy utilization and/or to identify the research needed to provide this information. The Search of Relevant Literature considers the historical background, applications, achieved and projected performance evaluations and performance improvement techniques. The commercial water-source heat pump industry is considered in regard to both the present and projected availability and performance of units. Performance evaluations are made for units that use standard components but are redesigned for use in geothermal heating.

  2. Final design and performance of in situ testing in Grimsel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuentes-Cantillana, J.L.; Garcia-SiNeriz, J.L.

    1998-01-01

    This report is focused on the design, engineering, and construction aspects of the in situ test carried out at the Grimsel underground laboratory in Switzerland. This reproduces the AGP-granite concept of ENRESA for HLW repositories in crystalline rock. Two heaters, similar in dimensions and weight to the canisters in the reference concept, have been placed in a horizontal drift with a 2.28-m diameter, a total test length of 17.4 m, and backfilled with a total of 115.7 † of highly-compacted bentonite blocks. The backfilled area has been closed with a concrete plug which is 2.7 m thick. More than 600 sensors have been installed in the test to monitor different parameters such as temperature, pressures, humidity, etc., within both the buffer material and the host rock. The installation was completed and commissioned in February 1997, and then the heating phase, which will last for at least 3 years, was started. During this period, the test will basically be operated in an automatic mode, controlled and monitored from Spain via modem. The report is the Final Report from AITEMIN for Phase 4 of the project and includes a description of the test configuration and layout; the design, engineering, and manufacturing aspects of the different test components and equipment; the emplacement operation; and the as built information regarding the final position of the main components and the sensors. (Author)

  3. Human performance in nondestructive inspections and functional tests: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, D.H.

    1988-10-01

    Human performance plays a vital role in the inspections and tests conducted to assure the physical integrity of nuclear power plants. Even when technically-sophisticated equipment is employed, the outcome is highly dependent on human control actions, calibrations, observations, analyses, and interpretations. The principal consequences of inadequate performance are missed or falsely-reported defects. However, the cost-avoidance that stems from addressing potential risks promptly, and the increasing costs likely with aging plants, emphasize that timeliness and efficiency are important inspection-performance considerations also. Human performance issues were studied in a sample of inspections and tests regularly conducted in nuclear power plants. These tasks, selected by an industry advisory panel, were: eddy-current inspection of steam-generator tubes; ultrasonic inspection of pipe welds; inservice testing of pumps and valves; and functional testing of shock suppressors. Information was obtained for the study from industry and plant procedural documents; training materials; research reports and related documents; interviews with training specialists, inspectors, supervisory personnel, and equipment designers; and first-hand observations of task performance. Eleven recommendations are developed for improving human performance on nondestructive inspections and functional tests. Two recommendations were for the more-effective application of existing knowledge; nine recommendations were for research projects that should be undertaken to assure continuing improvements in human performance on these tasks. 25 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  4. Final Report - Certifying the Performance of Small Wind Turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherwood, Larry [Small Wind Certification Council, Clifton Park, NY (United States)

    2015-08-28

    The Small Wind Certification Council (SWCC) created a successful accredited certification program for small and medium wind turbines using the funding from this grant. SWCC certifies small turbines (200 square meters of swept area or less) to the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA) Small Wind Turbine Performance and Safety Standard (AWEA Standard 9.1 – 2009). SWCC also certifies medium wind turbines to the International Electrical Commission (IEC) Power Performance Standard (IEC 61400-12-1) and Acoustic Performance Standard (IEC 61400-11).

  5. Performance Measures for Public Participation Methods : Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Public engagement is an important part of transportation project development, but measuring its effectiveness is typically piecemealed. Performance measurementdescribed by the Urban Institute as the measurement on a regular basis of the results (o...

  6. Safety performance evaluation of converging chevron pavement markings : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    The objectives of this study were (1) to perform a detailed safety analysis of converging chevron : pavement markings, quantifying the potential safety benefits and developing an understanding of the : incident types addressed by the treatment, and (...

  7. Geosynthetic wall performance : facing pressure and deformation : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    The objective of the study was to validate the performance of blocked-faced Geosynthetic Reinforced Soil (GRS) wall and to validate the Colorado Department of Transportations (CDOT) decision to waive the positive block connection for closely-space...

  8. Performance assessment of MSE abutment walls in Indiana : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    This report presents a numerical investigation of the behavior of steel strip-reinforced mechanically stabilized earth (MSE) direct bridge abutments under static loading. Finite element simulations were performed using an advanced two-surface boundin...

  9. Transportation asset management : organizational performance and risk review : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-15

    The 2012 Federal reauthorization of surface transportation programs, Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st : Century (MAP-21) formally introduced performance-based decision making for investments in surface : transportation programs. This report revi...

  10. Environmental-performance research priorities: Wood products. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-01-15

    This report describes a research plan to establish environmental, energy, and economic performance measures for renewable building materials, and to identify management and technology alternatives to improve environmental performance in a cost-effective manner. The research plan is designed to: (1) collect environmental and economic data on all life-cycle stages of the materials, (2) ensure that the data follows consistent definitions and collection procedures, and (3) develop analytical procedures for life-cycle analysis to address environmental performance questions. The research will be subdivided into a number of individual project modules. The five processing stages of wood used to organize the research plan are: (1) resource management and harvesting; (2) processing; (3) design and construction of structures; (4) use, maintenance, and disposal; and (5) waste recycling. Individual research module descriptions are provided in the report, as well as assessment techniques, research standards and protocol, and research management. 13 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Test of job performance aids for power plants. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shriver, E.L.; Zach, S.E.; Foley, J.P. Jr.

    1982-10-01

    The objective of EPRI Research Project 1396-1 was to evaluate the applicability and effectiveness of Job Performance Aids (JPAs) in nuclear power plant situations. For over twenty years, JPAs have been developed in military situations to meet the problems of confusing, incomplete, and inaccurate procedures on maintenance jobs. Kinton, Incorporated of Alexandria, Virginia applied the military experience with JPAs to nuclear power plant situations and identified potential benefits in terms of cost reductions and improved performance. Sample JPAs were developed for Control Room Operations, Maintenance, Plant Operations, Instrumentation and Control, Health Physics, and Quality Assurance tasks (procedures) in selected nuclear plants. JPAs were also developed for a prototype condenser tube leak detection system in the design stage, as well as for generic classes of circuit breaker equipment. Based on the results of the study, the use of JPAs is recommended for plant procedures of medium to high difficulty and for those tasks performed infrequently, even if fairly simple

  12. Sleep and Final Exam Performance in Introductory Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coletta, Vincent; Wikholm, Colin; Pascoe, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    Most physics instructors believe that adequate sleep is important in order for students to perform well on problem solving, and many instructors advise students to get plenty of sleep the night before an exam. After years of giving such advice to students at Loyola Marymount University (LMU), one of us decided to find out how many hours students…

  13. Camp Verde Adult Reading Program. Final Performance Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, David A.

    This document begins with a four-page performance report describing how the Camp Verde Adult Reading Program site was relocated to the Community Center Complex, and the Town Council contracted directly with the Friends of the Camp Verde Library to provide for the requirements of the program. The U.S. Department of Education grant allowed the…

  14. Mathematical Models of Elementary Mathematics Learning and Performance. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suppes, Patrick

    This project was concerned with the development of mathematical models of elementary mathematics learning and performance. Probabilistic finite automata and register machines with a finite number of registers were developed as models and extensively tested with data arising from the elementary-mathematics strand curriculum developed by the…

  15. Advanced Certification Program for Computer Graphic Specialists. Final Performance Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkland Coll., Champaign, IL.

    A pioneer program in computer graphics was implemented at Parkland College (Illinois) to meet the demand for specialized technicians to visualize data generated on high performance computers. In summer 1989, 23 students were accepted into the pilot program. Courses included C programming, calculus and analytic geometry, computer graphics, and…

  16. Performance indicators for nuclear medicine and industrial radiographers. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, T.D.

    1997-01-01

    HCA--Assessment Experts (HCA) was retained under contract to provide evidence that a behaviourally based approach to the development of performance indicators for radioisotope users could be successfully designed, implemented and rapidly delivered to a pilot sample. Moreover, HCA believed that it was uniquely qualified to not only achieve this success, but to show further that we could instill the motivation for self-improvement in the AECB inspection ratings of Licensees and Permit Holders. In the space of about ten weeks. HCA was able to deliver a comprehensive set of web-based tools for performance indicators. Not only did we deliver these tools, but we also included such supplemental information as relevant legislation, regulations. Inspectors' preferences and recommendations, among others, so as to foster a learning component of the performance indicators tools. The call for the continuation of this work is based on two sources. The response from participants to this project was very favourable - participants want these tools. Secondly, our research and experience have shown (and the larger body of empirical research also shows) that this is the type of performance feedback and communication that participants appreciate the most, and is the most predictive of successful compliance and improvement in the future. (author)

  17. Summary of research performed since June 1996 and final summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masopust, R.

    1999-01-01

    Significant influence of large relative displacement might be caused by faulting-induced movements, lateral spreading (not expected in Paks), liquefaction induced ground movements (not expected in Paks), landslides and slope failures (not expected in Paks), settlement and seismic-induced motions and deformations of the building structure into the which the buried pipe is attached (compensated by flexible connections in Paks). Dynamic amplification does not play an important role in the response of buried pipes. Only the static response of buried pipelines when subjected to propagate seismic waves is important when the large relative displacements of the ground along the pipeline cannot occur. This presentation covers seismic evaluation of buried pipes with emphasis on the main emergency water supply system and the seismic margin assessment applied to large vertical cylindrical flat bottom tanks installed inside the main building of NPP. Conclusions derived from the obtained results are as follows: no seismic upgrading necessary for vertical single and also multi cylindrical tanks located inside the main reactor building mostly on the elevation ± 0.00 m; sliding shear capacity of such tanks when they stand on special grids without any anchorage needs more detailed investigation

  18. Influence choreographic readiness to gymnasts final assessment of performance skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.A. Omelichyk-Ziurkalova

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : to provide a quantitative assessment and expert choreographic preparedness gymnasts. Material : the study involved eight gymnasts competition finalists in the floor exercise - female members of the Ukrainian national team in gymnastics. Results : the quantitative indicators of acrobatic and dance elements to determine the baseline assessment. Defined methods complications composition on the floor exercise by reducing the number of acrobatic lines and diagonals and increase the number of gymnastic elements. The theoretical performance of the composite sequence is improved structure and increases the difficulty of the exercise. Conclusions : in the process of composition complications need to pay more attention to the technique of performing gymnastic elements. In improving exercise choreography element replace (in some cases acrobatic element. Based on the results is planned future direction of research in order to improve the training process in gymnastics.

  19. High Performance Building Facade Solutions - PIER Final Project Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eleanor; Selkowitz, Stephen

    2009-12-31

    Building facades directly influence heating and cooling loads and indirectly influence lighting loads when daylighting is considered, and are therefore a major determinant of annual energy use and peak electric demand. Facades also significantly influence occupant comfort and satisfaction, making the design optimization challenge more complex than many other building systems.This work focused on addressing significant near-term opportunities to reduce energy use in California commercial building stock by a) targeting voluntary, design-based opportunities derived from the use of better design guidelines and tools, and b) developing and deploying more efficient glazings, shading systems, daylighting systems, facade systems and integrated controls. This two-year project, supported by the California Energy Commission PIER program and the US Department of Energy, initiated a collaborative effort between The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and major stakeholders in the facades industry to develop, evaluate, and accelerate market deployment of emerging, high-performance, integrated facade solutions. The LBNL Windows Testbed Facility acted as the primary catalyst and mediator on both sides of the building industry supply-user business transaction by a) aiding component suppliers to create and optimize cost effective, integrated systems that work, and b) demonstrating and verifying to the owner, designer, and specifier community that these integrated systems reliably deliver required energy performance. An industry consortium was initiated amongst approximately seventy disparate stakeholders, who unlike the HVAC or lighting industry, has no single representative, multi-disciplinary body or organized means of communicating and collaborating. The consortium provided guidance on the project and more importantly, began to mutually work out and agree on the goals, criteria, and pathways needed to attain the ambitious net zero energy goals defined by California and

  20. Coal-fired high performance power generating system. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-31

    As a result of the investigations carried out during Phase 1 of the Engineering Development of Coal-Fired High-Performance Power Generation Systems (Combustion 2000), the UTRC-led Combustion 2000 Team is recommending the development of an advanced high performance power generation system (HIPPS) whose high efficiency and minimal pollutant emissions will enable the US to use its abundant coal resources to satisfy current and future demand for electric power. The high efficiency of the power plant, which is the key to minimizing the environmental impact of coal, can only be achieved using a modern gas turbine system. Minimization of emissions can be achieved by combustor design, and advanced air pollution control devices. The commercial plant design described herein is a combined cycle using either a frame-type gas turbine or an intercooled aeroderivative with clean air as the working fluid. The air is heated by a coal-fired high temperature advanced furnace (HITAF). The best performance from the cycle is achieved by using a modern aeroderivative gas turbine, such as the intercooled FT4000. A simplified schematic is shown. In the UTRC HIPPS, the conversion efficiency for the heavy frame gas turbine version will be 47.4% (HHV) compared to the approximately 35% that is achieved in conventional coal-fired plants. This cycle is based on a gas turbine operating at turbine inlet temperatures approaching 2,500 F. Using an aeroderivative type gas turbine, efficiencies of over 49% could be realized in advanced cycle configuration (Humid Air Turbine, or HAT). Performance of these power plants is given in a table.

  1. Rumination and Performance in Dynamic, Team Sport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eRoy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available People high in rumination are good at tasks that require persistence whereas people low in rumination are good at tasks that require flexibility. Here we examine real world implications of these differences in dynamic, team sport. In two studies, we found that professional male football (soccer players from Germany and female field hockey players on the US national team were lower in rumination than were non-athletes. Further, low levels of rumination were associated with a longer career at a higher level in football players. Results indicate that athletes in dynamic, team sport might benefit from the flexibility associated with being low in rumination.

  2. EPRI fuel performance data base: user's manual. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, J.; Lee, S.; Rumble, E.

    1980-10-01

    This user's manual provides instructions for accessing the data in the EPRI fuel performance data base (FPDB) and manipulating that data to solve specific problems that the user wishes to specify. The user interacts with the FPDB through the Relational Information Management System (RIMS) computer program. The structure and format of the FPDB and the general syntax of the data base commands are described. Instructions follow for the use of each command. Appendixes provide more detailed information about the FPDB and its software. The FPDB currently resides on a PRIME-750 computer

  3. Sacramento State Solar Decathlon 2015: Research Performance Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Mikael [California State Univ., Sacramento, CA (United States). Dept. of Construction Management

    2017-03-14

    Our primary objective is to design and build a 600-1000sf home that produces more energy than it consumes and to showcase this home at the 2015 Solar Decathlon in Irvine, CA. Further objectives are to educate consumers and home builders, alike (including K-12 students – the industry’s future consumers), inspire a shift towards the adoption of net-zero energy solutions in residential building, and to be a leader in the transformation of the California residential marketplace to a net-zero standard. Our specific mission statement for this project is as follows: Solar NEST strives to discover the future of sustainable, energy-efficient housing and deliver these innovations to home buyers at an affordable price. To make substantial improvements to conventional building methods with regard to aesthetics, performance, and affordability. Through our efforts, we aspire to bridge the gap between ‘what is’ and ‘what is possible’ by providing unique, elegant simplicity.

  4. Dynamic Open Inquiry Performances of High-School Biology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zion, Michal; Sadeh, Irit

    2010-01-01

    In examining open inquiry projects among high-school biology students, we found dynamic inquiry performances expressed in two criteria: "changes occurring during inquiry" and "procedural understanding". Characterizing performances in a dynamic open inquiry project can shed light on both the procedural and epistemological…

  5. Charismatic leadership, environmental dynamism, and performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Hoogh, Annebel H.B.; den Hartog, Deanne N.; Koopman, Paul L.; Thierry, Henk; van den Berg, Peter T.; van der Weide, J.G.; Wilderom, Celeste P.M.

    2004-01-01

    Most studies relating charismatic leadership to performance have limitations concerning selection of criterion measures and investigation of moderators. Therefore, this study examines relationships between charismatic leadership and multiple performance outcomes under different levels of

  6. High Performance Interactive System Dynamics Visualization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bush, Brian W [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Brunhart-Lupo, Nicholas J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Gruchalla, Kenny M [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Duckworth, Jonathan C [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-09-14

    This brochure describes a system dynamics simulation (SD) framework that supports an end-to-end analysis workflow that is optimized for deployment on ESIF facilities(Peregrine and the Insight Center). It includes (I) parallel and distributed simulation of SD models, (ii) real-time 3D visualization of running simulations, and (iii) comprehensive database-oriented persistence of simulation metadata, inputs, and outputs.

  7. High Performance Interactive System Dynamics Visualization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bush, Brian W [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Brunhart-Lupo, Nicholas J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Gruchalla, Kenny M [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Duckworth, Jonathan C [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-09-14

    This presentation describes a system dynamics simulation (SD) framework that supports an end-to-end analysis workflow that is optimized for deployment on ESIF facilities(Peregrine and the Insight Center). It includes (I) parallel and distributed simulation of SD models, (ii) real-time 3D visualization of running simulations, and (iii) comprehensive database-oriented persistence of simulation metadata, inputs, and outputs.

  8. Final rubbery state characterization using a hollow cylinder dynamic shear sample on DMA7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilaiporn Luksameevanish

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic properties of raw natural rubber were examined using a hollow cylinder shaped samplesubjected to shear deformation on a laboratory Dynamic Mechanical Analyser. According to Cox-Merz’s study, dynamic complex viscosity obtained by this method showed a good agreement with shear flow viscosity measured by capillary rheometer. A master curve derived from the dynamic properties were then characterized. A crossing point of storage modulus (G’ and loss modulus (G’’ curves in the master curves was used to identify the final rubbery state, which indicated the transition of rubbery state and molten state. The position of this point depends on quantities and types of reinforcing or non-reinforcing fillers. The final rubbery state was shifted to higher frequency or lower temperature. It was found that the final rubbery state of CaCO3-filled rubber compounds was shifted to higher frequency or lower temperature by approximately 4 decades, while the translation of carbon black-filled rubber compounds was lower than unfilled rubber by about 1 decade. This phenomenon can be used to explain rubber elasticity, i.e. a decreasing of die swell of CaCO3 filled compounds at any high processing temperature. On the other hand, high magnitude of die swell for carbon black filled compound was still obtained.

  9. Dynamic resource allocation using performance forecasting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moura, Paulo; Kon, Fabio; Voulgaris, Spyros; Van Steen, Maarten

    2016-01-01

    To benefit from the performance gains and cost savings enabled by elasticity in cloud IaaS environments, effective automated mechanisms for scaling are essential. This automation requires monitoring system status and defining criteria to trigger allocation and deallocation of resources. While these

  10. Turbomachinery Flow Physics and Dynamic Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Schobeiri, Meinhard T

    2012-01-01

    With this second revised and extended edition, the readers have a solid source of information for designing state-of-the art turbomachinery components and systems at hand.   Based on fundamental principles of turbomachinery thermo-fluid mechanics, numerous CFD based calculation methods are being developed to simulate the complex 3-dimensional, highly unsteady turbulent flow within turbine or compressor stages. The objective of this book is to present the fundamental principles of turbomachinery fluid-thermodynamic design process of turbine and compressor components, power generation and aircraft gas turbines in a unified and compact manner. The book provides senior undergraduate students, graduate students and engineers in the turbomachinery industry with a solid background of turbomachinery flow physics and performance fundamentals that are essential for understanding turbomachinery performance and flow complexes.   While maintaining the unifying character of the book structure in this second revised and e...

  11. Model tests on dynamic performance of RC shear walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagashima, Toshio; Shibata, Akenori; Inoue, Norio; Muroi, Kazuo.

    1991-01-01

    For the inelastic dynamic response analysis of a reactor building subjected to earthquakes, it is essentially important to properly evaluate its restoring force characteristics under dynamic loading condition and its damping performance. Reinforced concrete shear walls are the main structural members of a reactor building, and dominate its seismic behavior. In order to obtain the basic information on the dynamic restoring force characteristics and damping performance of shear walls, the dynamic test using a large shaking table, static displacement control test and the pseudo-dynamic test on the models of a shear wall were conducted. In the dynamic test, four specimens were tested on a large shaking table. In the static test, four specimens were tested, and in the pseudo-dynamic test, three specimens were tested. These tests are outlined. The results of these tests were compared, placing emphasis on the restoring force characteristics and damping performance of the RC wall models. The strength was higher in the dynamic test models than in the static test models mainly due to the effect of loading rate. (K.I.)

  12. Group performance and group learning at dynamic system control tasks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drewes, Sylvana

    2013-01-01

    Proper management of dynamic systems (e.g. cooling systems of nuclear power plants or production and warehousing) is important to ensure public safety and economic success. So far, research has provided broad evidence for systematic shortcomings in individuals' control performance of dynamic systems. This research aims to investigate whether groups manifest synergy (Larson, 2010) and outperform individuals and if so, what processes lead to these performance advantages. In three experiments - including simulations of a nuclear power plant and a business setting - I compare the control performance of three-person-groups to the average individual performance and to nominal groups (N = 105 groups per experiment). The nominal group condition captures the statistical advantage of aggregated group judgements not due to social interaction. First, results show a superior performance of groups compared to individuals. Second, a meta-analysis across all three experiments shows interaction-based process gains in dynamic control tasks: Interacting groups outperform the average individual performance as well as the nominal group performance. Third, group interaction leads to stable individual improvements of group members that exceed practice effects. In sum, these results provide the first unequivocal evidence for interaction-based performance gains of groups in dynamic control tasks and imply that employers should rely on groups to provide opportunities for individual learning and to foster dynamic system control at its best.

  13. Operations-oriented performance measures for freeway management systems : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    This report describes the second and final year activities of the project titled Using Operations-Oriented Performance Measures to Support Freeway Management Systems. Work activities included developing a prototype system architecture for testi...

  14. Effect of Repeated/Spaced Formative Assessments on Medical School Final Exam Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward K. Chang

    2017-06-01

    Discussion: Performance on weekly formative assessments was predictive of final exam scores. Struggling medical students will benefit from extra cumulative practice exams while students who are excelling do not need extra practice.

  15. On the dynamical fluctuations in the multiparticle final states of e+e- collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Fuming; Liu Feng; Liu Lianshou

    1999-01-01

    The scaling property of factorial moments in the multiparticle final-states of e + e - collisions is studied in both the laboratory and the thrust-axis coordinate systems by using the Jetset generator. It turns out that in both of the two cases, the 3-dimensional lnF 2 -lnM are approximately straight lines when the phase space are divided isotropically in different directions, showing that the dynamical fluctuations in the multiparticle final-state of e + e - collisions are approximately isotropic. In the lab system, the three γ parameters obtained by fitting F 2 -M of p x , p y , p z to Ochs formula respectively are approximately equal. In the thrust system, the three γ values obtained by fitting F 2 (y)-M, F 2 (p t )-M and F 2 (φ)-M are also close to each other provided the starting point in fitting F 2 (φ)-M is chosen appropriately. All of these provide further evidence for the above assertion. The results show that the essential feature, i.e. anisotropy of approximate) isotropy, of the dynamical fluctuations in soft and hard processes can be revealed by studying the scaling property of factorial moments in the collisions. Therefore, further investigation of the scaling properties of factorial moments in various kinds of collisions processes is significant for the understanding of the essential characteristics of collision dynamics

  16. Dynamic performances analysis of a real vehicle driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, M. A.; Jamil, J. F.; Salim, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Vehicle dynamic is the effects of movement of a vehicle generated from the acceleration, braking, ride and handling activities. The dynamic behaviours are determined by the forces from tire, gravity and aerodynamic which acting on the vehicle. This paper emphasizes the analysis of vehicle dynamic performance of a real vehicle. Real driving experiment on the vehicle is conducted to determine the effect of vehicle based on roll, pitch, and yaw, longitudinal, lateral and vertical acceleration. The experiment is done using the accelerometer to record the reading of the vehicle dynamic performance when the vehicle is driven on the road. The experiment starts with weighing a car model to get the center of gravity (COG) to place the accelerometer sensor for data acquisition (DAQ). The COG of the vehicle is determined by using the weight of the vehicle. A rural route is set to launch the experiment and the road conditions are determined for the test. The dynamic performance of the vehicle are depends on the road conditions and driving maneuver. The stability of a vehicle can be controlled by the dynamic performance analysis.

  17. Maintenance performance improvement with System Dynamics : A Corrective Maintenance showcase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deenen, R.E.M.; Van Daalen, C.E.; Koene, E.G.C.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a case study of an analysis of a Corrective Maintenance process to realize performance improvement. The Corrective Maintenance process is supported by SAP, which has indicated the performance realisation problem. System Dynamics is used in a Group Model Building process to

  18. Computational Fluid Dynamics and Building Energy Performance Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.; Tryggvason, Tryggvi

    An interconnection between a building energy performance simulation program and a Computational Fluid Dynamics program (CFD) for room air distribution will be introduced for improvement of the predictions of both the energy consumption and the indoor environment. The building energy performance...

  19. Incentives and Their Dynamics in Public Sector Performance Management Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Carolyn J.; Marschke, Gerald

    2010-01-01

    We use the principal-agent model as a focal theoretical frame for synthesizing what we know, both theoretically and empirically, about the design and dynamics of the implementation of performance management systems in the public sector. In this context, we review the growing body of evidence about how performance measurement and incentive systems…

  20. Analysing the temporal dynamics of model performance for hydrological models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reusser, D.E.; Blume, T.; Schaefli, B.; Zehe, E.

    2009-01-01

    The temporal dynamics of hydrological model performance gives insights into errors that cannot be obtained from global performance measures assigning a single number to the fit of a simulated time series to an observed reference series. These errors can include errors in data, model parameters, or

  1. Dynamic Service Selection in Workflows Using Performance Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W. Walker

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available An approach to dynamic workflow management and optimisation using near-realtime performance data is presented. Strategies are discussed for choosing an optimal service (based on user-specified criteria from several semantically equivalent Web services. Such an approach may involve finding "similar" services, by first pruning the set of discovered services based on service metadata, and subsequently selecting an optimal service based on performance data. The current implementation of the prototype workflow framework is described, and demonstrated with a simple workflow. Performance results are presented that show the performance benefits of dynamic service selection. A statistical analysis based on the first order statistic is used to investigate the likely improvement in service response time arising from dynamic service selection.

  2. Dynamic Performance of the ITER Reactive Power Compensation System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheng Zhicai; Fu Peng; Xu Liuwei

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic performance of a reactive power compensation (RPC) system for the international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER) power supply is presented. Static var compensators (SVCs) are adopted to mitigate voltage fluctuation and reduce the reactive power down to a level acceptable for the French/European 400 kV grid. A voltage feedback and load power feedforward controller for SVC is proposed, with the feedforward loop intended to guarantee short response time and the feedback loop ensuring good dynamics and steady characteristics of SVC. A mean filter was chosen to measure the control signals to improve the dynamic response. The dynamic performance of the SVC is verified by simulations using PSCAD/EMTDC codes.

  3. Dynamic Performance Characteristic Tests of Real Scale Lead Rubber Bearing for the Evaluation of Performance Criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Min Kyu; Kim, Jung-Han; Choi, In-Kil

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic characteristic tests of full scale lead rubber bearing were performed for the evaluation of performance criteria of isolation system for nuclear power plants. For the dynamic test for a full scale rubber bearing, two 1500mm diameter lead rubber bearings were manufactured. The viewpoints of this dynamic test are determination of an ultimate shear strain level of lead rubber bearing, behavior of rubber bearing according to static and dynamic input motion, sinusoidal and random (earthquake) motion, and 1-dimentional and 2-dimensional input motion. In this study, seismic isolation device tests were performed for the evaluation of performance criteria of isolation system. Through this test, it can be recognized that in the case of considering a mechanical property test, dynamic and multi degree of loading conditions should be determined. But these differences should be examined how much affect to the global structural behavior

  4. VI-G, Sec. 661, P.L. 91-230. Final Performance Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976

    Presented is the final performance report of the CSDC model which is designed to provide services for learning disabled high school students. Sections cover the following program aspects: organizational structure, inservice sessions, identification of students, materials and equipment, evaluation of student performance, evaluation of the model,…

  5. Dynamic performance of maximum power point tracking circuits using sinusoidal extremum seeking control for photovoltaic generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyva, R.; Artillan, P.; Cabal, C.; Estibals, B.; Alonso, C.

    2011-04-01

    The article studies the dynamic performance of a family of maximum power point tracking circuits used for photovoltaic generation. It revisits the sinusoidal extremum seeking control (ESC) technique which can be considered as a particular subgroup of the Perturb and Observe algorithms. The sinusoidal ESC technique consists of adding a small sinusoidal disturbance to the input and processing the perturbed output to drive the operating point at its maximum. The output processing involves a synchronous multiplication and a filtering stage. The filter instance determines the dynamic performance of the MPPT based on sinusoidal ESC principle. The approach uses the well-known root-locus method to give insight about damping degree and settlement time of maximum-seeking waveforms. This article shows the transient waveforms in three different filter instances to illustrate the approach. Finally, an experimental prototype corroborates the dynamic analysis.

  6. Mastoidectomy performance assessment of virtual simulation training using final-product analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Steven A W; Cayé-Thomasen, Per; Sørensen, Mads S

    2015-01-01

    a modified Welling scale. The simulator gathered basic metrics on time, steps, and volumes in relation to the on-screen tutorial and collisions with vital structures. RESULTS: Substantial inter-rater reliability (kappa = 0.77) for virtual simulation and moderate inter-rater reliability (kappa = 0.......59) for dissection final-product assessment was found. The simulation and dissection performance scores had significant correlation (P = .014). None of the basic simulator metrics correlated significantly with the final-product score except for number of steps completed in the simulator. CONCLUSIONS: A modified...... version of a validated final-product performance assessment tool can be used to assess mastoidectomy on virtual temporal bones. Performance assessment of virtual mastoidectomy could potentially save the use of cadaveric temporal bones for more advanced training when a basic level of competency...

  7. Distributed dynamic simulations of networked control and building performance applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahiaoui, Azzedine

    2018-02-01

    The use of computer-based automation and control systems for smart sustainable buildings, often so-called Automated Buildings (ABs), has become an effective way to automatically control, optimize, and supervise a wide range of building performance applications over a network while achieving the minimum energy consumption possible, and in doing so generally refers to Building Automation and Control Systems (BACS) architecture. Instead of costly and time-consuming experiments, this paper focuses on using distributed dynamic simulations to analyze the real-time performance of network-based building control systems in ABs and improve the functions of the BACS technology. The paper also presents the development and design of a distributed dynamic simulation environment with the capability of representing the BACS architecture in simulation by run-time coupling two or more different software tools over a network. The application and capability of this new dynamic simulation environment are demonstrated by an experimental design in this paper.

  8. Peak and ceiling effects in final-product analysis of mastoidectomy performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    West, N; Konge, L; Cayé-Thomasen, P

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Virtual reality surgical simulation of mastoidectomy is a promising training tool for novices. Final-product analysis for assessing novice mastoidectomy performance could be limited by a peak or ceiling effect. These may be countered by simulator-integrated tutoring. METHODS: Twenty......-two participants completed a single session of self-directed practice of the mastoidectomy procedure in a virtual reality simulator. Participants were randomised for additional simulator-integrated tutoring. Performances were assessed at 10-minute intervals using final-product analysis. RESULTS: In all, 45.5 per...

  9. Final Project Report: Data Locality Enhancement of Dynamic Simulations for Exascale Computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Xipeng [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    2016-04-27

    The goal of this project is to develop a set of techniques and software tools to enhance the matching between memory accesses in dynamic simulations and the prominent features of modern and future manycore systems, alleviating the memory performance issues for exascale computing. In the first three years, the PI and his group have achieves some significant progress towards the goal, producing a set of novel techniques for improving the memory performance and data locality in manycore systems, yielding 18 conference and workshop papers and 4 journal papers and graduating 6 Ph.Ds. This report summarizes the research results of this project through that period.

  10. The experimental assessment of dynamic tire handling performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pauwelussen, J.P.

    1999-01-01

    Testing of steady state tire handling performance is nowadays common practice with slip angle sweeps and breaking being simulated in the laboratory with drum or flat belt, or on the road with a test trailer. In recent years, more emphasis is put on dynamic tire models, motivated by ride comfort

  11. Dynamic thread assignment in web server performance optimization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Weij, W.; Bhulai, S.; van der Mei, R.D.

    2009-01-01

    Popular web sites are expected to handle huge number of requests concurrently within a reasonable time frame. The performance of these web sites is largely dependent on effective thread management of their web servers. Although the implementation of static and dynamic thread policies is common

  12. Improving lean team performance: leadership and workfloor dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dun, Desirée Hermina

    2015-01-01

    This Ph.D. thesis reports four different studies that were undertaken to identify and examine the content of human dynamics that may account for sustainable lean team performance, at multiple organizational levels: higher-level leaders (including top- and middle managers), team leaders, and team

  13. Analysing the performance of dynamic multi-objective optimisation algorithms

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Helbig, M

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available and the goal of the algorithm is to track a set of tradeoff solutions over time. Analysing the performance of a dynamic multi-objective optimisation algorithm (DMOA) is not a trivial task. For each environment (before a change occurs) the DMOA has to find a set...

  14. Dynamic Incentive Effects of Relative Performance Pay: A Field Experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Delfgaauw (Josse); A.J. Dur (Robert); J.A. Non (Arjan); W.J.M.I. Verbeke (Willem)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractWe conduct a field experiment among 189 stores of a retail chain to study dynamic incentive effects of relative performance pay. Employees in the randomly selected treatment stores could win a bonus by outperforming three comparable stores from the control group over the course of four

  15. On the Dynamic Nature of Performance Management Regimes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Mads Bøge; Dahler-Larsen, Peter; Ghin, Eva Moll

    2018-01-01

    The ambition of this article is to gain a better understanding of the endogenous dynamics of performance management regimes. Based on a review of the literature, we develop a framework that enables us to grasp dimensions and mechanisms of escalation. Hereafter, we demonstrate the use of our frame...

  16. Short communication: final year students' deficits in physical examination skills performance in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krautter, Markus; Diefenbacher, Katja; Koehl-Hackert, Nadja; Buss, Beate; Nagelmann, Lars; Herzog, Wolfgang; Jünger, Jana; Nikendei, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    The physical examination of patients is an important diagnostic competence, but little is known about the examination skills of final-year medical students. To investigate physical examination skills of final-year medical students. In a cross-sectional study, 40 final-year students were asked to perform a detailed physical examination on standardized patients. Their performances were video-recorded and rated by independent video assessors. Video ratings showed a mean success rate of 40.1 % (SD 8.2). As regards accompanying doctor-patient communication, final-year students achieved a mean of no more than 36.7 % (SD 8.9) in the appropriate use of the corresponding communication items. Our study revealed severe deficits among final-year medical students in performing a detailed physical examination on a standardized patient. Thus, physical examination skills training should aim to improve these deficits while also paying attention to communicative aspects. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  17. A Multimedia Tutorial for Charged-Particle Beam Dynamics. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silbar, Richard R.

    1999-01-01

    In September 1995 WhistleSoft, Inc., began developing a computer-based multimedia tutorial for charged-particle beam dynamics under Phase II of a Small Business Innovative Research grant from the U.S. Department of Energy. In Phase I of this project (see its Final Report) we had developed several prototype multimedia modules using an authoring system on NeXTStep computers. Such a platform was never our intended target, and when we began Phase II we decided to make the change immediately to develop our tutorial modules for the Windows and Macintosh microcomputer market. This Report details our progress and accomplishments. It also gives a flavor of the look and feel of the presently available and upcoming modules

  18. A Multimedia Tutorial for Charged-Particle Beam Dynamics. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silbar, Richard R.

    1999-07-26

    In September 1995 WhistleSoft, Inc., began developing a computer-based multimedia tutorial for charged-particle beam dynamics under Phase II of a Small Business Innovative Research grant from the U.S. Department of Energy. In Phase I of this project (see its Final Report) we had developed several prototype multimedia modules using an authoring system on NeXTStep computers. Such a platform was never our intended target, and when we began Phase II we decided to make the change immediately to develop our tutorial modules for the Windows and Macintosh microcomputer market. This Report details our progress and accomplishments. It also gives a flavor of the look and feel of the presently available and upcoming modules.

  19. Microchannel electron multiplier: improvement in gain performances and detection dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audier, M.; Delmotte, J.C.; Boutot, J.P.

    1978-01-01

    The performances of an MCP are a function of its geometrical characteristics (diameter d and ratio 1/d of a channel, useful area) and of the applied voltage. Gain and mean output current are limited by saturation phenomena. By using a particular cascaded MCP's configuration, it is possible to simultaneously improve the gain, its associated fluctuations and the detection dynamics (detected level, counting rate). For gains 10 6 7 , the fluctuations, can be kept as low as 20% and an improvement by a factor > 10 can be obtained on the detection dynamics [fr

  20. Hospitality Industry Technology Training (HITT). Final Performance Report, April 1, 1989-December 31, 1990.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mount Hood Community Coll., Gresham, OR.

    This final performance report includes a third-party evaluation and a replication guide. The first section describes a project to develop and implement an articulated curriculum for grades 8-14 to prepare young people for entry into hospitality/tourism-related occupations. It discusses the refinement of existing models, pilot test, curriculum…

  1. Sewage Treatment Plants: Standards of Performance for New Stationary Sources 1977 Final Rule (42 FR 58520)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document includes a copy of the Federal Register publication of the November 10, 1977 Final Rule for the Standards of Performance of New Stationary Sources for 40 CFR 60 Subparts O. This document is provided curtesy of HeinOnline.

  2. LDRD final report : mesoscale modeling of dynamic loading of heterogeneous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robbins, Joshua [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dingreville, Remi Philippe Michel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Voth, Thomas Eugene [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Furnish, Michael David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Material response to dynamic loading is often dominated by microstructure (grain structure, porosity, inclusions, defects). An example critically important to Sandia's mission is dynamic strength of polycrystalline metals where heterogeneities lead to localization of deformation and loss of shear strength. Microstructural effects are of broad importance to the scientific community and several institutions within DoD and DOE; however, current models rely on inaccurate assumptions about mechanisms at the sub-continuum or mesoscale. Consequently, there is a critical need for accurate and robust methods for modeling heterogeneous material response at this lower length scale. This report summarizes work performed as part of an LDRD effort (FY11 to FY13; project number 151364) to meet these needs.

  3. Meson dynamics beyond the quark model: a study of final state interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Au, K.L.; Pennington, M.R.; Morgan, D.

    1986-09-01

    A scalar glueball is predicted in the 1 GeV mass region. The present analysis is concerned with experimental evidence for such a state. Recent high statistics results on central dimeson production at the ISR enable the authors to perform an extensive new coupled channel analysis of I = O S-wave ππ and KK-bar final states. This unambiguously reveals three resonances in the 1 GeV region - S 1 (991), S 2 (988) and epsilon(900) - where the naive quark model expects just two. These new features are discussed including how they may be confirmed experimentally and their present interpretation. The S 1 (991) is a plausible candidate for the scalar glueball. Other production reactions are examined (heavy flavour decays and γγ reactions) which lead to the same final states. (author)

  4. Poor academic performance: A perspective of final year diagnostic radiography students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gqweta, Ntokozo

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: A study was conducted on final year diagnostic radiography students at a University of Technology in Durban. The aim of the study was to investigate the final year diagnostic radiography students' opinions and views on academic performance in order to inform teaching and learning methods. The objectives were: •To explore the students' opinions regarding poor performance. •To identify strategies to improve academic performance. Method: A qualitative, interpretive approach was used to explain and understand the students' lived experiences of their academic performances. A short open ended questionnaire was administered to a cohort of final diagnostic radiography students following feedback on a written assessment. Questionnaire responses were then manually captured and analyzed. Results: Five (5) themes were identified that could possibly be associated with poor academic performance. These themes were, poor preparation, lack of independent study, difficulty in understanding learning content and misinterpretation of assessment questions, inefficient studying techniques as well as perceived improvement strategies. Conclusion: Students identified their inadequate preparation and the lack of dedicated independent studying as the main reasons for poor performance. Students preferred to be taught in an assessment oriented manner. However their identified improvement strategies were aligned with the learner centred approach.

  5. Analysis of Dynamic Performance of a Kalman Filter for Combining Multiple MEMS Gyroscopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Xue

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the dynamic performance of a Kalman filter (KF was analyzed, which is used to combine multiple measurements of a gyroscopes array to reduce the noise and improve the accuracy of the individual sensors. A principle for accuracy improvement by the KF was briefly presented to obtain an optimal estimate of input rate signal. In particular, the influences of some crucial factors on the KF dynamic performance were analyzed by simulations such as the factors input signal frequency, signal sampling, and KF filtering rate. Finally, a system that was comprised of a six-gyroscope array was designed and implemented to test the dynamic performance. Experimental results indicated that the 1σ error for the combined rate signal was reduced to about 0.2°/s in the constant rate test, which was a reduction by a factor of more than eight compared to the single gyroscope. The 1σ error was also reduced from 1.6°/s to 0.48°/s in the swing test. It showed that the estimated angular rate signal could well reflect the dynamic characteristic of the input signal in dynamic conditions.

  6. Dynamics and Morphology of Saturn’s North Polar Region During Cassini’s Final Year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blalock, John J.; Sayanagi, Kunio M.; Ingersoll, Andrew P.; Dyudina, Ulyana A.; Ewald, Shawn; McCabe, Ryan M.; Gunnarson, Jacob; Garland, Justin; Gallego, Angelina

    2017-10-01

    We present an analysis of Saturn’s north polar region utilizing Cassini ISS images captured in visible and near-infrared wavelengths during late 2016 and 2017, including images captured during Cassini’s Grand Finale orbits. To measure the wind field in the region, we utilize the two-dimensional correlation imaging velocimetry (CIV) technique. We also calculate the relative vorticity and divergence from the wind field. To detect changes in the dynamics, we compare measurements of the wind, relative vorticity, and divergence in 2012 and 2013 with those from 2016/2017. We also compare cloud reflectivity between 2012/2013 and 2016/2017 in images that show the north pole under similar illumination conditions. To detect changes in cloud reflectivity, we utilize a Minnaert correction to calculate the zonal mean reflectivity as a function of latitude. Furthermore, we compare the winds and cloud reflectivity at several wavelengths in order to look for changes occurring at different altitudes. Our results indicate that while the dynamics of the north polar region have remained relatively stable, there have been significant morphology changes that have resulted in dramatic color changes. We hypothesize that these changes are a result of the seasonal cycle and linked to the increased production of photochemical hazes in the atmosphere. Our work has been supported by NASA PATM NNX14AK07G, NSF AAG 1212216, and NASA NESSF NNX15AQ70H.

  7. On the dynamical fluctuations in the multiparticle final states of $e^{+}e^{-}$ collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, F; Liu, L

    1999-01-01

    The scaling property of factorial moments in the multiparticle final- states of e/sup +/e/sup -/ collisions is studied in both the laboratory and the thrust-axis coordinate systems by using the Jetset generator. It turns out that in both of the two cases, the 3- dimensional lnF/sub 2/~lnM are approximately straight lines when the phase space are divided isotropically in different directions, showing that the dynamical fluctuations in the multiparticle final- state of e/sup +/e/sup $/collisions are approximately isotropic. In the lab system, the three gamma parameters obtained by fitting F/sub 2/~M of p/sub x/, p/sub y/, p/sub z/ to Ochs formula respectively are approximately equal. In the thrust system, the three gamma values obtained by fitting F/sub 2/(y)~M, F/sub 2/(p/sub t/)~M and F/sub 2/( phi )~M are also close to each other provided the starting point in fitting F/sub 2/( phi )~M is chosen appropriately. All of these provide further evidence for the above assertion. Our results show that the essential ...

  8. Analysis of the dynamics of movement of the landing vehicle with an inflatable braking device on the final trajectory under the influence of wind load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koryanov, V.; Kazakovtsev, V.; Harri, A.-M.; Heilimo, J.; Haukka, H.; Aleksashkin, S.

    2015-10-01

    This research work is devoted to analysis of angular motion of the landing vehicle (LV) with an inflatable braking device (IBD), taking into account the influence of the wind load on the final stage of the movement. Using methods to perform a calculation of parameters of angular motion of the landing vehicle with an inflatable braking device based on the availability of small asymmetries, which are capable of complex dynamic phenomena, analyzes motion of the landing vehicle at the final stage of motion in the atmosphere.

  9. Instability predictions for circumferentially cracked Type-304 stainless-steel pipes under dynamic loading. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahoor, A.; Wilkowski, G.; Abou-Sayed, I.; Marschall, C.; Broek, D.; Sampath, S.; Rhee, H.; Ahmad, J.

    1982-04-01

    This report provides methods to predict margins of safety for circumferentially cracked Type 304 stainless steel pipes subjected to applied bending loads. An integrated combination of experimentation and analysis research was pursued. Two types of experiments were performed: (1) laboratory-scale tests on center-cracked panels and bend specimens to establish the basic mechanical and fracture properties of Type 304 stainless steel, and (2) full-scale pipe fracture tests under quasi-static and dynamic loadings to assess the analysis procedures. Analyses were based upon the simple plastic collapse criterion, a J-estimation procedure, and elastic-plastic large-deformation finite element models

  10. Optimal dynamic performance for high-precision actuators/stages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preissner, C.; Lee, S.-H.; Royston, T. J.; Shu, D.

    2002-01-01

    System dynamic performance of actuator/stage groups, such as those found in optical instrument positioning systems and other high-precision applications, is dependent upon both individual component behavior and the system configuration. Experimental modal analysis techniques were implemented to determine the six degree of freedom stiffnesses and damping for individual actuator components. These experimental data were then used in a multibody dynamic computer model to investigate the effect of stage group configuration. Running the computer model through the possible stage configurations and observing the predicted vibratory response determined the optimal stage group configuration. Configuration optimization can be performed for any group of stages, provided there is stiffness and damping data available for the constituent pieces

  11. Dynamic Performance of the Standalone Wind Power Driven Heat Pump

    OpenAIRE

    H. Li; P.E. Campana; S. Berretta; Y. Tan; J. Yan

    2016-01-01

    Reducing energy consumption and increasing use of renewable energyin the building sector arecrucial to the mitigation of climate change. Wind power driven heat pumps have been considered as a sustainable measure to supply heat for detached houses, especially those that even don’t have access to the grid. This work is to investigate the dynamic performance of a heat pump system directly driven by a wind turbine. The heat demand of a detached single family house was simulated in details. Accord...

  12. Total System Performance Assessment Sensitivity Analyses for Final Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bechtel SAIC Company

    2001-01-01

    This Letter Report presents the results of supplemental evaluations and analyses designed to assess long-term performance of the potential repository at Yucca Mountain. The evaluations were developed in the context of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) final public regulation, or rule, 10 CFR Part 63 (66 FR 55732 [DIRS 156671]), which was issued on November 2, 2001. This Letter Report addresses the issues identified in the Department of Energy (DOE) technical direction letter dated October 2, 2001 (Adams 2001 [DIRS 156708]). The main objective of this Letter Report is to evaluate performance of the potential Yucca Mountain repository using assumptions consistent with performance-assessment-related provisions of 10 CFR Part 63. The incorporation of the final Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standard, 40 CFR Part 197 (66 FR 32074 [DIRS 155216]), and the analysis of the effect of the 40 CFR Part 197 EPA final rule on long-term repository performance are presented in the Total System Performance Assessment--Analyses for Disposal of Commercial and DOE Waste Inventories at Yucca Mountain--Input to Final Environmental Impact Statement and Site Suitability Evaluation (BSC 2001 [DIRS 156460]), referred to hereafter as the FEIS/SSE Letter Report. The Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) analyses conducted and documented prior to promulgation of the NRC final rule 10 CFR Part 63 (66 FR 55732 [DIRS 156671]), were based on the NRC proposed rule (64 FR 8640 [DIRS 101680]). Slight differences exist between the NRC's proposed and final rules which were not within the scope of the FEIS/SSE Letter Report (BSC 2001 [DIRS 156460]), the Preliminary Site Suitability Evaluation (PSSE) (DOE 2001 [DIRS 155743]), and supporting documents for these reports. These differences include (1) the possible treatment of ''unlikely'' features, events and processes (FEPs) in evaluation of both the groundwater protection standard and the human-intrusion scenario of the individual

  13. High-Performance Java Codes for Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Christopher; Chatterjee, Siddhartha; Biswas, Rupak; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The computational science community is reluctant to write large-scale computationally -intensive applications in Java due to concerns over Java's poor performance, despite the claimed software engineering advantages of its object-oriented features. Naive Java implementations of numerical algorithms can perform poorly compared to corresponding Fortran or C implementations. To achieve high performance, Java applications must be designed with good performance as a primary goal. This paper presents the object-oriented design and implementation of two real-world applications from the field of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD): a finite-volume fluid flow solver (LAURA, from NASA Langley Research Center), and an unstructured mesh adaptation algorithm (2D_TAG, from NASA Ames Research Center). This work builds on our previous experience with the design of high-performance numerical libraries in Java. We examine the performance of the applications using the currently available Java infrastructure and show that the Java version of the flow solver LAURA performs almost within a factor of 2 of the original procedural version. Our Java version of the mesh adaptation algorithm 2D_TAG performs within a factor of 1.5 of its original procedural version on certain platforms. Our results demonstrate that object-oriented software design principles are not necessarily inimical to high performance.

  14. Expert performance in sport and the dynamics of talent development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Elissa; Davids, Keith; Renshaw, Ian; Portus, Marc

    2010-04-01

    Research on expertise, talent identification and development has tended to be mono-disciplinary, typically adopting genocentric or environmentalist positions, with an overriding focus on operational issues. In this paper, the validity of dualist positions on sport expertise is evaluated. It is argued that, to advance understanding of expertise and talent development, a shift towards a multidisciplinary and integrative science focus is necessary, along with the development of a comprehensive multidisciplinary theoretical rationale. Here we elucidate dynamical systems theory as a multidisciplinary theoretical rationale for capturing how multiple interacting constraints can shape the development of expert performers. This approach suggests that talent development programmes should eschew the notion of common optimal performance models, emphasize the individual nature of pathways to expertise, and identify the range of interacting constraints that impinge on performance potential of individual athletes, rather than evaluating current performance on physical tests referenced to group norms.

  15. Dynamic Impact of Online Word-of-Mouth and Advertising on Supply Chain Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jian

    2018-01-01

    Cooperative (co-op) advertising investments benefit brand goodwill and further improve supply chain performance. Meanwhile, online word-of-mouth (OWOM) can also play an important role in supply chain performance. On the basis of co-op advertising, this paper considers a single supply chain structure led by a manufacturer and examines a fundamental issue concerning the impact of OWOM on supply chain performance. Firstly, by the method of differential game, this paper analyzes the dynamic impact of OWOM and advertising on supply chain performance (i.e., brand goodwill, sales, and profits) under three different supply chain decisions (i.e., only advertising, and manufacturers with and without sharing cost of OWOM with retailers). We compare and analyze the optimal strategies of advertising and OWOM under the above different supply chain decisions. Secondly, the system dynamics model is established to reflect the dynamic impact of OWOM and advertising on supply chain performance. Finally, three supply chain decisions under two scenarios, strong brand and weak brand, are analyzed through the system dynamics simulation. The results show that the input of OWOM can enhance brand goodwill and improve earnings. It further promotes the OWOM reputation and improves the supply chain performance if manufacturers share the cost of OWOM with retailers. Then, in order to eliminate the retailers from word-of-mouth fraud and establish a fair competition mechanism, the third parties (i.e., regulators or e-commerce platforms) should take appropriate punitive measures against retailers. Furthermore, the effect of OWOM on supply chain performance under a strong brand differed from those under a weak brand. Last but not least, if OWOM is improved, there would be more remarkable performance for the weak brand than that for the strong brand in the supply chain. PMID:29300361

  16. Dynamic Impact of Online Word-of-Mouth and Advertising on Supply Chain Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jian; Liu, Bin

    2018-01-04

    Cooperative (co-op) advertising investments benefit brand goodwill and further improve supply chain performance. Meanwhile, online word-of-mouth (OWOM) can also play an important role in supply chain performance. On the basis of co-op advertising, this paper considers a single supply chain structure led by a manufacturer and examines a fundamental issue concerning the impact of OWOM on supply chain performance. Firstly, by the method of differential game, this paper analyzes the dynamic impact of OWOM and advertising on supply chain performance (i.e., brand goodwill, sales, and profits) under three different supply chain decisions (i.e., only advertising, and manufacturers with and without sharing cost of OWOM with retailers). We compare and analyze the optimal strategies of advertising and OWOM under the above different supply chain decisions. Secondly, the system dynamics model is established to reflect the dynamic impact of OWOM and advertising on supply chain performance. Finally, three supply chain decisions under two scenarios, strong brand and weak brand, are analyzed through the system dynamics simulation. The results show that the input of OWOM can enhance brand goodwill and improve earnings. It further promotes the OWOM reputation and improves the supply chain performance if manufacturers share the cost of OWOM with retailers. Then, in order to eliminate the retailers from word-of-mouth fraud and establish a fair competition mechanism, the third parties (i.e., regulators or e-commerce platforms) should take appropriate punitive measures against retailers. Furthermore, the effect of OWOM on supply chain performance under a strong brand differed from those under a weak brand. Last but not least, if OWOM is improved, there would be more remarkable performance for the weak brand than that for the strong brand in the supply chain.

  17. The Institute for Sustained Performance, Energy, and Resilience, University of North Carolina, Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, Robert [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    2018-01-20

    This is the final report for the UNC component of the SciDAD Institute for Sustained Performance, Energy, and Resilience. In this report, we describe activities on the SUPER project at RENCI at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. While we focus particularly on UNC, we touch on project-wide activities as well as, on interactions with, and impacts on, other projects.

  18. Frequency of chest pain in primary care, diagnostic tests performed and final diagnoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoorweg, Beatrijs Bn; Willemsen, Robert Ta; Cleef, Lotte E; Boogaerts, Tom; Buntinx, Frank; Glatz, Jan Fc; Dinant, Geert Jan

    2017-11-01

    Observational study of patients with chest pain in primary care: determination of incidence, referral rate, diagnostic tests and (agreement between) working and final diagnoses. 118 general practitioners (GPs) in the Netherlands and Belgium recorded all patient contacts during  2weeks. Furthermore, patients presenting with chest pain were registered extensively. A follow-up form was filled in after 30 days. 22 294 patient contacts were registered. In 281 (1.26%), chest pain was a reason for consulting the GP (mean age for men 54.4/women 53 years). In this cohort of 281 patients, in 38.1% of patients, acute coronary syndrome (ACS) was suspected at least temporarily during consultation, 40.2% of patients were referred to secondary care and 512 diagnostic tests were performed by GPs and consulted specialists. Musculoskeletal pain was the most frequent working (26.1%) and final diagnoses (33.1%). Potentially life-threatening diseases as final diagnosis (such as myocardial infarction) accounted for 8.4% of all chest pain cases. In 23.1% of cases, a major difference between working and final diagnoses was found, in 0.7% a severe disease was initially missed by the GP. Chest pain was present in 281 patients (1.26% of all consultations). Final diagnoses were mostly non-life-threatening. Nevertheless, in 8.4% of patients with chest pain, life-threatening underlying causes were identified. This seems reflected in the magnitude and wide variety of diagnostic tests performed in these patients by GPs and specialists, in the (safe) overestimation of life-threatening diseases by GPs at initial assessment and in the high referral rate we found. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  19. Software life cycle dynamic simulation model: The organizational performance submodel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tausworthe, Robert C.

    1985-01-01

    The submodel structure of a software life cycle dynamic simulation model is described. The software process is divided into seven phases, each with product, staff, and funding flows. The model is subdivided into an organizational response submodel, a management submodel, a management influence interface, and a model analyst interface. The concentration here is on the organizational response model, which simulates the performance characteristics of a software development subject to external and internal influences. These influences emanate from two sources: the model analyst interface, which configures the model to simulate the response of an implementing organization subject to its own internal influences, and the management submodel that exerts external dynamic control over the production process. A complete characterization is given of the organizational response submodel in the form of parameterized differential equations governing product, staffing, and funding levels. The parameter values and functions are allocated to the two interfaces.

  20. Clinical observed performance evaluation: a prospective study in final year students of surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Markey, G C

    2010-06-24

    We report a prospective study of clinical observed performance evaluation (COPE) for 197 medical students in the pre-qualification year of clinical education. Psychometric quality was the main endpoint. Students were assessed in groups of 5 in 40-min patient encounters, with each student the focus of evaluation for 8 min. Each student had a series of assessments in a 25-week teaching programme. Over time, several clinicians from a pool of 16 surgical consultants and registrars evaluated each student by direct observation. A structured rating form was used for assessment data. Variance component analysis (VCA), internal consistency and inter-rater agreement were used to estimate reliability. The predictive and convergent validity of COPE in relation to summative OSCE, long case, and overall final examination was estimated. Median number of COPE assessments per student was 7. Generalisability of a mean score over 7 COPE assessments was 0.66, equal to that of an 8 x 7.5 min station final OSCE. Internal consistency was 0.88-0.97 and inter-rater agreement 0.82. Significant correlations were observed with OSCE performance (R = 0.55 disattenuated) and long case (R = 0.47 disattenuated). Convergent validity was 0.81 by VCA. Overall final examination performance was linearly related to mean COPE score with standard error 3.7%. COPE permitted efficient serial assessment of a large cohort of final year students in a real world setting. Its psychometric quality compared well with conventional assessments and with other direct observation instruments as reported in the literature. Effect on learning, and translation to clinical care, are directions for future research.

  1. Quantitative adaptation analytics for assessing dynamic systems of systems: LDRD Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauthier, John H. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). System Readiness & Sustainment Technologies (6133, M/S 1188); Miner, Nadine E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Military & Energy Systems Analysis (6114, M/S 1188); Wilson, Michael L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Resilience and Regulatory Effects (6921, M/S 1138); Le, Hai D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). System Readiness & Sustainment Technologies (6133, M/S 1188); Kao, Gio K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Networked System Survivability & Assurance (5629, M/S 0671); Melander, Darryl J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Software Systems R& D (9525, M/S 1188); Longsine, Dennis Earl [Sandia National Laboratories, Unknown, Unknown; Vander Meer, Jr., Robert C. [SAIC, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Our society is increasingly reliant on systems and interoperating collections of systems, known as systems of systems (SoS). These SoS are often subject to changing missions (e.g., nation- building, arms-control treaties), threats (e.g., asymmetric warfare, terrorism), natural environments (e.g., climate, weather, natural disasters) and budgets. How well can SoS adapt to these types of dynamic conditions? This report details the results of a three year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project aimed at developing metrics and methodologies for quantifying the adaptability of systems and SoS. Work products include: derivation of a set of adaptability metrics, a method for combining the metrics into a system of systems adaptability index (SoSAI) used to compare adaptability of SoS designs, development of a prototype dynamic SoS (proto-dSoS) simulation environment which provides the ability to investigate the validity of the adaptability metric set, and two test cases that evaluate the usefulness of a subset of the adaptability metrics and SoSAI for distinguishing good from poor adaptability in a SoS. Intellectual property results include three patents pending: A Method For Quantifying Relative System Adaptability, Method for Evaluating System Performance, and A Method for Determining Systems Re-Tasking.

  2. Studies of dynamic contact of ceramics and alloys for advanced heat engines. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaydos, P.A.; Dufrane, K.F. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

    1993-06-01

    Advanced materials and coatings for low heat rejection engines have been investigated for almost a decade. Much of the work has concentrated on the critical wear interface between the piston ring and cylinder liner. Simplified bench tests have identified families of coatings with high temperature wear performance that could meet or exceed that of conventional engine materials at today`s operating temperatures. More recently, engine manufacturers have begun to optimize material combinations and manufacturing processes so that the materials not only have promising friction and wear performance but are practical replacements for current materials from a materials and manufacturing cost standpoint. In this study, the advanced materials supplied by major diesel engine manufacturers were evaluated in an experimental apparatus that simulates many of the in-cylinder conditions of a low heat rejection diesel engine. Results include ring wear factors and average dynamic friction coefficients measured at intervals during the test. These results are compared with other advanced materials tested in the past as well as the baseline wear of current engines. Both fabricated specimens and sections of actual ring and cylinder liners were used in the testing. Observations and relative friction and wear performance of the individual materials are provided.

  3. Physics and dynamics coupling across scales in the next generation CESM: Meeting the challenge of high resolution. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, Vincent E.

    2015-02-21

    This is a final report for a SciDAC grant supported by BER. The project implemented a novel technique for coupling small-scale dynamics and microphysics into a community climate model. The technique uses subcolumns that are sampled in Monte Carlo fashion from a distribution of subgrid variability. The resulting global simulations show several improvements over the status quo.

  4. Dynamic performance of concrete undercut anchors for Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahrenholtz, Christoph, E-mail: christoph@mahrenholtz.net; Eligehausen, Rolf

    2013-12-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Behavior of undercut anchors under dynamic actions simulating earthquakes. • First high frequency load and crack cycling tests on installed concrete anchors ever. • Comprehensive review of anchor qualification for Nuclear Power Plants. - Abstract: Post-installed anchors are widely used for structural and nonstructural connections to concrete. In many countries, concrete anchors used for Nuclear Power Plants have to be qualified to ensure reliable behavior even under extreme conditions. The tests required for qualification of concrete anchors are carried out at quasi-static loading rates well below the rates to be expected for dynamic actions deriving from earthquakes, airplane impacts or explosions. To investigate potentially beneficial effects of high loading rates and cycling frequencies, performance tests on installed undercut anchors were conducted. After introductory notes on anchor technology and a comprehensive literature review, this paper discusses the qualification of anchors for Nuclear Power Plants and the testing carried out to quantify experimentally the effects of dynamic actions on the load–displacement behavior of undercut anchors.

  5. Computational Fluid Dynamics and Building Energy Performance Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm; Tryggvason, T.

    1998-01-01

    An interconnection between a building energy performance simulation program and a Computational Fluid Dynamics program (CFD) for room air distribution will be introduced for improvement of the predictions of both the energy consumption and the indoor environment. The building energy performance...... simulation program requires a detailed description of the energy flow in the air movement which can be obtained by a CFD program. The paper describes an energy consumption calculation in a large building, where the building energy simulation program is modified by CFD predictions of the flow between three...... zones connected by open areas with pressure and buoyancy driven air flow. The two programs are interconnected in an iterative procedure. The paper shows also an evaluation of the air quality in the main area of the buildings based on CFD predictions. It is shown that an interconnection between a CFD...

  6. Relationships between Isometric Force-Time Characteristics and Dynamic Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Dos’Santos

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships between isometric mid-thigh pull (IMTP force-time characteristics (peak force and time-specific force vales (100–250 ms and dynamic performance and compare dynamic performance between stronger and weaker athletes. Forty-three athletes from different sports (rowing, soccer, bicycle motocross, and hockey performed three trials of the squat jump (SJ, countermovement jump (CMJ, and IMTP, and performed a one repetition maximum power clean (PC. Reactive strength index modified (RSImod was also calculated from the CMJ. Statistically significant large correlations between IMTP force-time characteristics and PC (ρ = 0.569–0.674, p < 0.001, and moderate correlations between IMTP force-time characteristics (excluding force at 100 ms and RSImod (ρ = 0.389–0.449, p = 0.013–0.050 were observed. Only force at 250 ms demonstrated a statistically significant moderate correlation with CMJ height (ρ = 0.346, p = 0.016 and no statistically significant associations were observed between IMTP force-time characteristics and SJ height. Stronger athletes (top 10 demonstrated statistically significantly greater CMJ heights, RSImods, and PCs (p ≤ 0.004, g = 1.32–1.89 compared to weaker (bottom 10 athletes, but no differences in SJ height were observed (p = 0.871, g = 0.06. These findings highlight that the ability to apply rapidly high levels of force in short time intervals is integral for PC, CMJ height, and reactive strength.

  7. Optimization of Mechanical, Dynamical and Thermal Properties of a High Performance Tread Compound for Radial Tires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mir Hamid Reza Ghoreishy

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A high performance passenger tire tread compound was optimized for its mechanical, dynamical and thermal properties. A reference compound was based on a blend of SBR and BR, sulfur and other ingredients without accelerator, carbon black and aromatic oil. The effects of CBS/TMTD and TBBS/TMTD as accelerator systems were studied with different quantities and the best accelerator system was chosen. Then, the blends of N330 and N550 carbon blacks were added in different quantities and the properties of these samples were studied to determine the best carbon black blend. Finally, the effect of different quantities of aromatic oil was investigated and the optimized quantity of aromatic oil and the final properties of tire tread compound were defined. The mechanical and dynamical tests were carried out on appropriate samples to determine tensile strength, elongation-at-break, fatigue-to-failure, abrasion resistance, hardness, resilience, dynamical-mechanical properties and temperature rise due to the heat build-up. The results showed that the compound containing 0.8 phr CBS, 0.7 phr TMTD, 40 phr N330,20 phr N550 and 15 phr aromatic oils demonstrated the best properties.

  8. Framing of task performance strategies: effects on performance in a multiattribute dynamic decision making environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nygren, T E

    1997-09-01

    It is well documented that the way a static choice task is "framed" can dramatically alter choice behavior, often leading to observable preference reversals. This framing effect appears to result from perceived changes in the nature or location of a person's initial reference point, but it is not clear how framing effects might generalize to performance on dynamic decision making tasks that are characterized by high workload, time constraints, risk, or stress. A study was conducted to examine the hypothesis that framing can introduce affective components to the decision making process and can influence, either favorably (positive frame) or adversely (negative frame), the implementation and use of decision making strategies in dynamic high-workload environments. Results indicated that negative frame participants were significantly impaired in developing and employing a simple optimal decision strategy relative to a positive frame group. Discussion focuses on implications of these results for models of dynamic decision making.

  9. Behind the Final Grade in Hybrid v. Traditional Courses: Comparing Student Performance by Assessment Type, Core Competency, and Course Objective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Lisa Z.

    2012-01-01

    There are many different delivery methods used by institutions of higher education. These include traditional, hybrid, and online course offerings. The comparisons of these typically use final grade as the measure of student performance. This research study looks behind the final grade and compares student performance by assessment type, core…

  10. Use of isotope techniques in lake dynamics investigations. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-03-01

    The Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on the Use of Isotope Techniques in Lake Dynamics Investigations was launched with the aim of assessing the potential of environmental isotope techniques in studying the dynamics of surface water bodies and related problems such as: dynamics of solutes; sediment focusing; establishment of water balance components; vulnerability to pollution. The CRP enabled a number of isotope and geochemical studies to be carried out on small and large water bodies, with the general aim of understanding of the dynamics of these systems under the growing anthropogenic influence. This publication is a compilation of the papers presented at the final Research Co-ordination Meeting (RCM) held in Rehovot, Israel, from 10 to 13 March 1997. Individual contributions have been indexed separately

  11. Human factors affecting the performance of inspection personnel in nuclear power plants: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karimi, S.S.

    1988-12-01

    This study investigates the problem of poor performance among nuclear power plant inspection personnel both in training and in the field. First, a systems perspective is employed to explore the psychological processes and relevant human factors that may be associated with workers' inadequate performance. Second, two separate yet related approaches are used to clarify the definition of competence: (1) a theory-based (or ''top-down'') approach, in which effective performance is construed as a product of a skillful, motivated person interacting with a responsive environment; and (2) an empirical (or ''bottom-up'') approach, in which key persons and context characteristics are generated based on the opinions of experts in the industry. Using a series of semi-structured interviews, two empirical studies were conducted in the latter approach. Overall, the results of both studies converged with the theoretical analysis emphasizing (1) the reciprocal and dynamic interplay of contextual and motivational factors influencing performance, and (2) the salient role of supervisory practices in terms of support, cooperation, and efficiency in contributing to the outcome of performance. 53 refs., 14 figs., 7 tabs

  12. Relationship between push phase and final race time in skeleton performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanoletti, Costanza; La Torre, Antonio; Merati, Giampiero; Rampinini, Ermanno; Impellizzeri, Franco M

    2006-08-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between push-time and final race time in skeleton participants during a series of major international competitions to determine the importance of the push phase in skeleton performance. Correlations were computed from the first and second heat split data measured during 24 men and 24 women skeleton competitions. Body mass, height, age, and years of experience of the first 30 men and women athletes of the skeleton, bobsleigh and luge 2003-2004 World Cup ranking were used for the comparison between sliding sports. Moderate but significant correlations (p push-time and final race time in men (r(mean) = 0.48) and women (r(mean) = 0.63). No correlations were found between changes in the individual push-time between the first and second heat with the corresponding changes in final race time. The bobsleigh sliders are heavier than the athletes of the other sliding disciplines. Luge athletes have more experience and are younger than bobsleigh and skeleton sliders. The results of this study suggest that a fast push phase is a prerequisite to success in competition and confirms that the selection of skeleton athletes based on the ability to accelerate to a maximum speed quickly could be valid. However, a good or improved push-time does not ensure a placement in the top finishing positions. On the basis of these results, we suggest that strength and power training is necessary to maintain a short push-time but additional physical training aimed to enhance the push phase might not reflect performance improvements. The recruitment of younger athletes and an increase of youthful competitive activity may be another effective way to reach international competitive results.

  13. Final results of the fifth three-dimensional dynamic Atomic Energy Research benchmark problem calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadek, J.

    1999-01-01

    The paper gives a brief survey of the fifth three-dimensional dynamic Atomic Energy Research benchmark calculation results received with the code DYN3D/ATHLET at NRI Rez. This benchmark was defined at the seventh Atomic Energy Research Symposium (Hoernitz near Zittau, 1997). Its initiating event is a symmetrical break of the main steam header at the end of the first fuel cycle and hot shutdown conditions with one stuck out control rod group. The calculations were performed with the externally coupled codes ATHLET Mod.1.1 Cycle C and DYN3DH1.1/M3. The standard WWER-440/213 input deck of ATHLET code was adopted for benchmark purposes and for coupling with the code DYN3D. The first part of paper contains a brief characteristics of NPP input deck and reactor core model. The second part shows the time dependencies of important global and local parameters. In comparison with the results published at the eighth Atomic Energy Research Symposium (Bystrice nad Pernstejnem, 1998), the results published in this paper are based on improved ATHLET descriptions of control and safety systems. (Author)

  14. Adaptation and learning: characteristic time scales of performance dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, Karl M; Mayer-Kress, Gottfried; Hong, S Lee; Liu, Yeou-Teh

    2009-12-01

    A multiple time scales landscape model is presented that reveals structures of performance dynamics that were not resolved in the traditional power law analysis of motor learning. It shows the co-existence of separate processes during and between practice sessions that evolve in two independent dimensions characterized by time scales that differ by about an order of magnitude. Performance along the slow persistent dimension of learning improves often as much and sometimes more during rest (memory consolidation and/or insight generation processes) than during a practice session itself. In contrast, the process characterized by the fast, transient dimension of adaptation reverses direction between practice sessions, thereby significantly degrading performance at the beginning of the next practice session (warm-up decrement). The theoretical model fits qualitatively and quantitatively the data from Snoddy's [Snoddy, G. S. (1926). Learning and stability. Journal of Applied Psychology, 10, 1-36] classic learning study of mirror tracing and other averaged and individual data sets, and provides a new account of the processes of change in adaptation and learning. 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Performative family: homosexuality, marriage and intergenerational dynamics in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Susanne Yp; Luo, Ming

    2016-06-01

    Using in-depth interview data on nominal marriages - legal marriages between a gay man and a lesbian to give the appearance of heterosexuality - this paper develops the concept of performative family to explain the processes through which parents and their adult children negotiate and resolve disagreements in relation to marriage decisions in post-socialist China. We identify three mechanisms - network pressure, a revised discourse of filial piety and resource leverage - through which parents influence their gay offspring's decision to turn to nominal marriage. We also delineate six strategies, namely minimizing network participation, changing expectations, making partial concessions, drawing the line, delaying decisions and ending the marriage, by which gay people in nominal marriages attempt to meet parental expectations while simultaneously retaining a degree of autonomy. Through these interactions, we argue that Chinese parents and their gay adult children implicitly and explicitly collaborate to perform family, emphasizing the importance of formally meeting society's expectations about marriage rather than substantively yielding to its demands. We also argue that the performative family is a pragmatic response to the tension between the persistent centrality of family and marriage and the rising tide of individualism in post-socialist China. We believe that our findings highlight the specific predicament of homosexual people. They also shed light on the more general dynamics of intergenerational negotiation because there is evidence that the mechanisms used by parents to exert influence may well be similar between gay and non-gay people. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2016.

  16. Performance and impact of dynamic data placement in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Maier, Thomas; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    For high-throughput computing the efficient use of distributed computing resources relies on an evenly distributed workload, which in turn requires wide availability of input data that is used in physics analysis. In ATLAS, the dynamic data placement agent C3PO was implemented in the ATLAS distributed data management system Rucio which identifies popular data and creates additional, transient replicas to make data more widely and more reliably available. This contribution presents studies on the performance of C3PO and the impact it has on throughput rates of distributed computing in ATLAS. This includes analysis of the placement algorithm selection behaviour regarding the data considered for replication and destination storage elements, usage after the placement decision of the chosen datasets in general and the newly created copies in particular, and the impact on metrics like job waiting times, task completion times and failure rates of tasks.

  17. Team performance modeling for HRA in dynamic situations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu Yufei; Furuta, Kazuo; Kondo, Shunsuke

    2002-01-01

    This paper proposes a team behavior network model that can simulate and analyze response of an operator team to an incident in a dynamic and context-sensitive situation. The model is composed of four sub-models, which describe the context of team performance. They are task model, event model, team model and human-machine interface model. Each operator demonstrates aspects of his/her specific cognitive behavior and interacts with other operators and the environment in order to deal with an incident. Individual human factors, which determine the basis of communication and interaction between individuals, and cognitive process of an operator, such as information acquisition, state-recognition, decision-making and action execution during development of an event scenario are modeled. A case of feed and bleed operation in pressurized water reactor under an emergency situation was studied and the result was compared with an experiment to check the validity of the proposed model

  18. Implementing Molecular Dynamics for Hybrid High Performance Computers - 1. Short Range Forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, W. Michael; Wang, Peng; Plimpton, Steven J.; Tharrington, Arnold N.

    2011-01-01

    The use of accelerators such as general-purpose graphics processing units (GPGPUs) have become popular in scientific computing applications due to their low cost, impressive floating-point capabilities, high memory bandwidth, and low electrical power requirements. Hybrid high performance computers, machines with more than one type of floating-point processor, are now becoming more prevalent due to these advantages. In this work, we discuss several important issues in porting a large molecular dynamics code for use on parallel hybrid machines - (1) choosing a hybrid parallel decomposition that works on central processing units (CPUs) with distributed memory and accelerator cores with shared memory, (2) minimizing the amount of code that must be ported for efficient acceleration, (3) utilizing the available processing power from both many-core CPUs and accelerators, and (4) choosing a programming model for acceleration. We present our solution to each of these issues for short-range force calculation in the molecular dynamics package LAMMPS. We describe algorithms for efficient short range force calculation on hybrid high performance machines. We describe a new approach for dynamic load balancing of work between CPU and accelerator cores. We describe the Geryon library that allows a single code to compile with both CUDA and OpenCL for use on a variety of accelerators. Finally, we present results on a parallel test cluster containing 32 Fermi GPGPUs and 180 CPU cores.

  19. Final waste forms project: Performance criteria for phase I treatability studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilliam, T.M.; Hutchins, D.A.; Chodak, P. III

    1994-06-01

    This document defines the product performance criteria to be used in Phase I of the Final Waste Forms Project. In Phase I, treatability studies will be performed to provide open-quotes proof-of-principleclose quotes data to establish the viability of stabilization/solidification (S/S) technologies. This information is required by March 1995. In Phase II, further treatability studies, some at the pilot scale, will be performed to provide sufficient data to allow treatment alternatives identified in Phase I to be more fully developed and evaluated, as well as to reduce performance uncertainties for those methods chosen to treat a specific waste. Three main factors influence the development and selection of an optimum waste form formulation and hence affect selection of performance criteria. These factors are regulatory, process-specific, and site-specific waste form standards or requirements. Clearly, the optimum waste form formulation will require consideration of performance criteria constraints from each of the three categories. Phase I will focus only on the regulatory criteria. These criteria may be considered the minimum criteria for an acceptable waste form. In other words, a S/S technology is considered viable only if it meet applicable regulatory criteria. The criteria to be utilized in the Phase I treatability studies were primarily taken from Environmental Protection Agency regulations addressed in 40 CFR 260 through 265 and 268; and Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations addressed in 10 CFR 61. Thus the majority of the identified criteria are independent of waste form matrix composition (i.e., applicable to cement, glass, organic binders etc.)

  20. Final waste forms project: Performance criteria for phase I treatability studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilliam, T.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Hutchins, D.A. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Chodak, P. III [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)

    1994-06-01

    This document defines the product performance criteria to be used in Phase I of the Final Waste Forms Project. In Phase I, treatability studies will be performed to provide {open_quotes}proof-of-principle{close_quotes} data to establish the viability of stabilization/solidification (S/S) technologies. This information is required by March 1995. In Phase II, further treatability studies, some at the pilot scale, will be performed to provide sufficient data to allow treatment alternatives identified in Phase I to be more fully developed and evaluated, as well as to reduce performance uncertainties for those methods chosen to treat a specific waste. Three main factors influence the development and selection of an optimum waste form formulation and hence affect selection of performance criteria. These factors are regulatory, process-specific, and site-specific waste form standards or requirements. Clearly, the optimum waste form formulation will require consideration of performance criteria constraints from each of the three categories. Phase I will focus only on the regulatory criteria. These criteria may be considered the minimum criteria for an acceptable waste form. In other words, a S/S technology is considered viable only if it meet applicable regulatory criteria. The criteria to be utilized in the Phase I treatability studies were primarily taken from Environmental Protection Agency regulations addressed in 40 CFR 260 through 265 and 268; and Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations addressed in 10 CFR 61. Thus the majority of the identified criteria are independent of waste form matrix composition (i.e., applicable to cement, glass, organic binders etc.).

  1. 7X performance results - final report : ASCI Red vs Red Storm.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinge, Dennis C. (Cray Inc., Albuquerque, NM); Davis, Michael E. (Cray Inc., Albuquerque, NM); Haskell, Karen H.; Ballance, Robert A.; Gardiner, Thomas Anthony; Stevenson, Joel O.; Noe, John P.

    2011-04-01

    The goal of the 7X performance testing was to assure Sandia National Laboratories, Cray Inc., and the Department of Energy that Red Storm would achieve its performance requirements which were defined as a comparison between ASCI Red and Red Storm. Our approach was to identify one or more problems for each application in the 7X suite, run those problems at multiple processor sizes in the capability computing range, and compare the results between ASCI Red and Red Storm. The first part of this report describes the two computer systems, the applications in the 7X suite, the test problems, and the results of the performance tests on ASCI Red and Red Storm. During the course of the testing on Red Storm, we had the opportunity to run the test problems in both single-core mode and dual-core mode and the second part of this report describes those results. Finally, we reflect on lessons learned in undertaking a major head-to-head benchmark comparison.

  2. Planning for risk-informed/performance-based fire protection at nuclear power plants. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najafi, B.; Parkinson, W.J.; Lee, J.A.

    1997-12-01

    This document presents a framework for discussing issues and building consensus towards use of fire modeling and risk technology in nuclear power plant fire protection program implementation. The plan describes a three-phase approach: development of core technologies, implementation of methods, and finally, case studies and pilot applications to verify viability of such methods. The core technologies are defined as fire modeling, fire and system tests, use of operational data, and system and risk techniques. The implementation phase addresses the programmatic issues involved in implementing a risk-informed/performance-based approach in an integrated approach with risk/performance measures. The programmatic elements include: (1) a relationship with fire codes and standards development as defined by the ongoing effort of NFPA for development of performance-based standards; (2) the ability for NRC to undertake inspection and enforcement; and (3) the benefit to utilities in terms of cost versus safety. The case studies are intended to demonstrate applicability of single issue resolution while pilot applications are intended to check the applicability of the integrated program as a whole

  3. IMPER: Characterization of the wind field over a large wind turbine rotor - final report; Improved performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt Paulsen, U.; Wagner, R.

    2012-01-15

    A modern wind turbine rotor with a contemporary rotor size would easily with the tips penetrate the air between 116 m and 30 m and herby experience effects of different wind. With current rules on power performance measurements such as IEC 61400-121 the reference wind speed is measured at hub height, an oversimplification of the wind energy power over the rotor disk area is carried out. The project comprised a number of innovative and coordinated measurements on a full scale turbine with remote sensing technology and simulations on a 500 kW wind turbine for the effects of wind field characterization. The objective with the present report is to give a short overview of the different experiments carried out and results obtained within the final phase of this project. (Author)

  4. Final report of the project performance assessment and economic evaluation of nuclear waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasilainen, K.; Anttila, M.; Hautojaervi, A.

    1993-05-01

    The publication is the final report of project Performance Assessment and Economic Evaluation of Nuclear Waste Management (TOKA) at the Nuclear Engineering Laboratory of VTT (Technical Research Centre of Finland), forming part of the Publicly Financed Nuclear Waste Management Research Programme (JYT). The project covers safety and cost aspects of all phases of nuclear waste management. The main emphasis has been on developing an integrated system of models for performance assessment of nuclear waste repositories. During the four years the project has so far been in progress, the total amount of work has been around 14 person-years. Computer codes are the main tools in the project, they are either developed by the project team or acquired from abroad. In-house model development has been especially active in groundwater flow, near-field and migration modelling. The quantitative interpretation of Finnish tracer experiments in the laboratory and natural analogue studies at Palmottu support performance assessments via increased confidence in the migration concepts used. The performance assessment philosophy adopted by the team consists of deterministic modelling and pragmatic scenario analysis. This is supported by the long-term experience in practical performance assessment of the team, and in theoretical probabilistic modelling exercises. The radiological risks of spent fuel transportation from the Loviisa nuclear power plant to Russia have been analysed using a probabilistic computer code and Finnish traffic accident statistics. The project assists the authorities in the annual assessment of utility estimates of funding needs for future nuclear waste management operations. The models and methods used within the project are tested in international verification/validation projects

  5. Performance of HEPA filters under hot dynamic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frankum, D.P.; Costigan, G.

    1995-01-01

    Accidents in nuclear facilities involving fires may have implications upon the ventilation systems where high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters are used to minimise the airborne release of radioactive or toxic particles. The Filter Development Section at Harwell Laboratory has been investigating the effect of temperature on the performance of HEPA filters under hot dynamic conditions[ 1 ] for a number of years. The test rig is capable of delivering air flows of 10001/s (at ambient conditions) at temperatures up to 500 degrees C, where measurements of the penetration and pressure drop across the filter are obtained. This paper reports the experiments on different constructions of HEPA filters; rectangular and circular. The filters were tested at an air temperature of 200 degrees C for up to 48 hours at the rated airflow to assess their performance. The penetration measurements for rectangular filters were observed to be below 0.021% after prolonged operation. In a number of cases, holes appeared along the pleat creases of circular filters although the penetration remained below 1%. The sealing gasket for these filters was noted to deform with temperature, permitting a leakage path. A prototype high strength circular filter was evaluated at temperatures of up to 400 degrees C with a penetration less than 0.65%

  6. Performance of HEPA filters under hot dynamic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frankum, D.P.; Costigan, G. [AEA Technology, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom)

    1995-02-01

    Accidents in nuclear facilities involving fires may have implications upon the ventilation systems where high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters are used to minimise the airborne release of radioactive or toxic particles. The Filter Development Section at Harwell Laboratory has been investigating the effect of temperature on the performance of HEPA filters under hot dynamic conditions[{sub 1}] for a number of years. The test rig is capable of delivering air flows of 10001/s (at ambient conditions) at temperatures up to 500{degrees}C, where measurements of the penetration and pressure drop across the filter are obtained. This paper reports the experiments on different constructions of HEPA filters; rectangular and circular. The filters were tested at an air temperature of 200{degrees}C for up to 48 hours at the rated airflow to assess their performance. The penetration measurements for rectangular filters were observed to be below 0.021% after prolonged operation. In a number of cases, holes appeared along the pleat creases of circular filters although the penetration remained below 1%. The sealing gasket for these filters was noted to deform with temperature, permitting a leakage path. A prototype high strength circular filter was evaluated at temperatures of up to 400{degrees}C with a penetration less than 0.65%.

  7. Predicting performance in competitive apnea diving, part II: dynamic apnoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schagatay, Erika

    2010-03-01

    Part I of this series of articles identified the main physiological factors defining the limits of static apnea, while this paper reviews the factors involved when physical work is added in the dynamic distance disciplines, performed in shallow water in a swimming pool. Little scientific work has been done concerning the prerequisites and limitations of swimming with or without fins whilst breath holding to extreme limits. Apneic duration influences all competitive apnea disciplines, and can be prolonged by any means that increase gas storage or tolerance to asphyxia, or reduce metabolic rate, as reviewed in the first article. For horizontal underwater distance swimming, the main challenge is to restrict metabolism despite the work, and to direct blood flow only to areas where demand is greatest, to allow sustained function. Here, work economy, local tissue energy and oxygen stores and the anaerobic capacity of the muscles are key components. Improvements in swimming techniques and, especially in swimming with fins, equipment have already contributed to enhanced performance and may do so further. High lactate levels observed after competition swims suggest a high anaerobic component, and muscle hypoxia could ultimately limit muscle work and swimming distance. However, the frequency of syncope, especially in swimming without fins, suggests that cerebral oxygenation may often be compromised before this occurs. In these pool disciplines, safety is high and the dive can be interrupted by the competitor or safety diver within seconds. The safety routines in place during pool competitions are described.

  8. Dynamic performance analysis of two regional Nuclear Hybrid Energy Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Humberto E.; Chen, Jun; Kim, Jong S.; Vilim, Richard B.; Binder, William R.; Bragg Sitton, Shannon M.; Boardman, Richard D.; McKellar, Michael G.; Paredis, Christiaan J.J.

    2016-01-01

    In support of more efficient utilization of clean energy generation sources, including renewable and nuclear options, HES (hybrid energy systems) can be designed and operated as FER (flexible energy resources) to meet both electrical and thermal energy needs in the electric grid and industrial sectors. These conceptual systems could effectively and economically be utilized, for example, to manage the increasing levels of dynamic variability and uncertainty introduced by VER (variable energy resources) such as renewable sources (e.g., wind, solar), distributed energy resources, demand response schemes, and modern energy demands (e.g., electric vehicles) with their ever changing usage patterns. HES typically integrate multiple energy inputs (e.g., nuclear and renewable generation) and multiple energy outputs (e.g., electricity, gasoline, fresh water) using complementary energy conversion processes. This paper reports a dynamic analysis of two realistic HES including a nuclear reactor as the main baseload heat generator and to assess the local (e.g., HES owners) and system (e.g., the electric grid) benefits attainable by their application in scenarios with multiple commodity production and high renewable penetration. It is performed for regional cases – not generic examples – based on available resources, existing infrastructure, and markets within the selected regions. This study also briefly addresses the computational capabilities developed to conduct such analyses. - Highlights: • Hybrids including renewables can operate as dispatchable flexible energy resources. • Nuclear energy can address high variability and uncertainty in energy systems. • Nuclear hybrids can reliably provide grid services over various time horizons. • Nuclear energy can provide operating reserves and grid inertia under high renewables. • Nuclear hybrids can greatly reduce GHG emissions and support grid and industry needs.

  9. A domain specific language for performance portable molecular dynamics algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, William Robert; Grant, James; Müller, Eike Hermann

    2018-03-01

    Developers of Molecular Dynamics (MD) codes face significant challenges when adapting existing simulation packages to new hardware. In a continuously diversifying hardware landscape it becomes increasingly difficult for scientists to be experts both in their own domain (physics/chemistry/biology) and specialists in the low level parallelisation and optimisation of their codes. To address this challenge, we describe a "Separation of Concerns" approach for the development of parallel and optimised MD codes: the science specialist writes code at a high abstraction level in a domain specific language (DSL), which is then translated into efficient computer code by a scientific programmer. In a related context, an abstraction for the solution of partial differential equations with grid based methods has recently been implemented in the (Py)OP2 library. Inspired by this approach, we develop a Python code generation system for molecular dynamics simulations on different parallel architectures, including massively parallel distributed memory systems and GPUs. We demonstrate the efficiency of the auto-generated code by studying its performance and scalability on different hardware and compare it to other state-of-the-art simulation packages. With growing data volumes the extraction of physically meaningful information from the simulation becomes increasingly challenging and requires equally efficient implementations. A particular advantage of our approach is the easy expression of such analysis algorithms. We consider two popular methods for deducing the crystalline structure of a material from the local environment of each atom, show how they can be expressed in our abstraction and implement them in the code generation framework.

  10. The response of pile-guided floats subjected to dynamic loading : volume I final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Pile : - : Guided floats can be a desirable alternative to stationary berthing structures. Both floats and guide piles are subjected to dynamic : forces such as wind generated waves and impacts from vessels. This project developed a rational basis fo...

  11. Exploring travelers' behavior in response to dynamic message signs (DMS) using a driving simulator : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    This research studies the effectiveness of a dynamic message sign (DMS) using a driving : simulator. Over 100 subjects from different socio-economic and age groups were recruited to : drive the simulator under different traffic and driving conditions...

  12. Design and Implementation of High-Performance GIS Dynamic Objects Rendering Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Y.; Wang, S.; Li, R.; Yun, W.; Song, G.

    2017-12-01

    Spatio-temporal dynamic visualization is more vivid than static visualization. It important to use dynamic visualization techniques to reveal the variation process and trend vividly and comprehensively for the geographical phenomenon. To deal with challenges caused by dynamic visualization of both 2D and 3D spatial dynamic targets, especially for different spatial data types require high-performance GIS dynamic objects rendering engine. The main approach for improving the rendering engine with vast dynamic targets relies on key technologies of high-performance GIS, including memory computing, parallel computing, GPU computing and high-performance algorisms. In this study, high-performance GIS dynamic objects rendering engine is designed and implemented for solving the problem based on hybrid accelerative techniques. The high-performance GIS rendering engine contains GPU computing, OpenGL technology, and high-performance algorism with the advantage of 64-bit memory computing. It processes 2D, 3D dynamic target data efficiently and runs smoothly with vast dynamic target data. The prototype system of high-performance GIS dynamic objects rendering engine is developed based SuperMap GIS iObjects. The experiments are designed for large-scale spatial data visualization, the results showed that the high-performance GIS dynamic objects rendering engine have the advantage of high performance. Rendering two-dimensional and three-dimensional dynamic objects achieve 20 times faster on GPU than on CPU.

  13. A forecasting performance comparison of dynamic factor models based on static and dynamic methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marra Fabio Della

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a comparison of the forecasting performances of three Dynamic Factor Models on a large monthly data panel of macroeconomic and financial time series for the UE economy. The first model relies on static principal-component and was introduced by Stock and Watson (2002a, b. The second is based on generalized principal components and it was introduced by Forni, Hallin, Lippi and Reichlin (2000, 2005. The last model has been recently proposed by Forni, Hallin, Lippi and Zaffaroni (2015, 2016. The data panel is split into two parts: the calibration sample, from February 1986 to December 2000, is used to select the most performing specification for each class of models in a in- sample environment, and the proper sample, from January 2001 to November 2015, is used to compare the performances of the selected models in an out-of-sample environment. The metholodogical approach is analogous to Forni, Giovannelli, Lippi and Soccorsi (2016, but also the size of the rolling window is empirically estimated in the calibration process to achieve more robustness. We find that, on the proper sample, the last model is the most performing for the Inflation. However, mixed evidencies appear over the proper sample for the Industrial Production.

  14. Feed-pump hydraulic performance and design improvement, Phase I: research program design. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, W.H.; Gopalakrishnan, S.; Fehlau, R.; Thompson, W.E.; Wilson, D.G.

    1982-03-01

    As a result of prior EPRI-sponsored studies, it was concluded that a research program should be designed and implemented to provide an improved basis for the design, procurement, testing, and operation of large feed pumps with increased reliability and stability over the full range of operating conditions. This two-volume report contains a research plan which is based on a review of the present state of the art and which defines the necessary R and D program and estimates the benefits and costs of the program. The recommended research program consists of 30 interrelated tasks. It is designed to perform the needed research; to verify the results; to develop improved components; and to publish computer-aided design methods, pump specification guidelines, and a troubleshooting manual. Most of the technology proposed in the research plan is applicable to nuclear power plants as well as to fossil-fired plants. This volume discusses the design, performance and failures of feed pumps, and recommendations for research on pump dynamics, design, and specifications.

  15. Towards the final MRPC design. Performance test with heavy ion beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deppner, Ingo; Herrmann, Norbert [Physikalisches Institut Uni. Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter spectrometer (CBM) is a future heavy ion experiment located at the Facility for Anti-proton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt, Germany. The key element in CBM providing hadron identification at incident energies between 2 and 35 AGeV will be a 120 m{sup 2} large Time-of-Flight (ToF) wall composed of Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chambers (MRPC) with a system time resolution better than 80 ps. Aiming for an interaction rate of 10 MHz for Au+Au collisions the MRPCs have to cope with an incident particle flux between 0.1 kHz/cm{sup 2} and 25 kHz/cm{sup 2} depending on their location. Characterized by granularity and rate capability the actual conceptual design of the ToF-wall foresees 4 different counter types called MRPC1 - MRPC4. In order to elaborate the final MRPC design of these counters a heavy ion test beam time was performed at GSI. In this contribution we present performance test results of 2 different MRPC3 full size prototypes developed at Heidelberg University and Tsinghua University, Beijing.

  16. Low-level waste disposal site performance assessment with the RQ/PQ methodology. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, V.C.; Grant, M.W.; Sutherland, A.A.

    1982-12-01

    A methodology called RQ/PQ (retention quotient/performance quotient) has been developed for relating the potential hazard of radioactive waste to the natural and man-made barriers provided by a disposal facility. The methodology utilizes a systems approach to quantify the safety of low-level waste disposed in a near-surface facility. The main advantages of the RQ/PQ methodology are its simplicity of analysis and clarity of presentation while still allowing a comprehensive set of nuclides and pathways to be treated. Site performance and facility designs for low-level waste disposal can be easily investigated with relatively few parameters needed to define the problem. Application of the methodology has revealed that the key factor affecting the safety of low-level waste disposal in near surface facilities is the potential for intrusion events. Food, inhalation and well water pathways dominate in the analysis of such events. While the food and inhalation pathways are not strongly site-dependent, the well water pathway is. Finally, burial at depths of 5 m or more was shown to reduce the impacts from intrusion events

  17. Verbal Final Exam in Introductory Biology Yields Gains in Student Content Knowledge and Longitudinal Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckie, Douglas B.; Rivkin, Aaron M.; Aubry, Jacob R.; Marengo, Benjamin J.; Creech, Leah R.; Sweeder, Ryan D.

    2013-01-01

    We studied gains in student learning over eight semesters in which an introductory biology course curriculum was changed to include optional verbal final exams (VFs). Students could opt to demonstrate their mastery of course material via structured oral exams with the professor. In a quantitative assessment of cell biology content knowledge, students who passed the VF outscored their peers on the medical assessment test (MAT), an exam built with 40 Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT) questions (66.4% [n = 160] and 62% [n = 285], respectively; p students performed better on MCAT questions in all topic categories tested; the greatest gain occurred on the topic of cellular respiration. Because the VF focused on a conceptually parallel topic, photosynthesis, there may have been authentic knowledge transfer. In longitudinal tracking studies, passing the VF also correlated with higher performance in a range of upper-level science courses, with greatest significance in physiology, biochemistry, and organic chemistry. Participation had a wide range but not equal representation in academic standing, gender, and ethnicity. Yet students nearly unanimously (92%) valued the option. Our findings suggest oral exams at the introductory level may allow instructors to assess and aid students striving to achieve higher-level learning. PMID:24006399

  18. Dynamic Channel Slot Allocation Scheme and Performance Analysis of Cyclic Quorum Multichannel MAC Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Hu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In high diversity node situation, multichannel MAC protocol can improve the frequency efficiency, owing to fewer collisions compared with single-channel MAC protocol. And the performance of cyclic quorum-based multichannel (CQM MAC protocol is outstanding. Based on cyclic quorum system and channel slot allocation, it can avoid the bottleneck that others suffered from and can be easily realized with only one transceiver. To obtain the accurate performance of CQM MAC protocol, a Markov chain model, which combines the channel-hopping strategy of CQM protocol and IEEE 802.11 distributed coordination function (DCF, is proposed. The results of numerical analysis show that the optimal performance of CQM protocol can be obtained in saturation bound situation. And then we obtain the saturation bound of CQM system by bird swarm algorithm. In addition, to improve the performance of CQM protocol in unsaturation situation, a dynamic channel slot allocation of CQM (DCQM protocol is proposed, based on wavelet neural network. Finally, the performance of CQM protocol and DCQM protocol is simulated by Qualnet platform. And the simulation results show that the analytic and simulation results match very well; the DCQM performs better in unsaturation situation.

  19. Performance Evaluation of Advanced Retrofit Roof Technologies Using Field-Test Data Phase Three Final Report, Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biswas, Kaushik [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Childs, Phillip W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Atchley, Jerald Allen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-01-01

    This article presents some miscellaneous data from two low-slope and two steep-slope experimental roofs. The low-slope roofs were designed to compare the performance of various roof coatings exposed to natural weatherization. The steep-slope roofs contained different combinations of phase change material, rigid insulation, low emittance surface and above-sheathing ventilation, with standing-seam metal panels on top. The steep-slope roofs were constructed on a series of adjacent attics separated at the gables using thick foam insulation. This article describes phase three (3) of a study that began in 2009 to evaluate the energy benefits of a sustainable re-roofing technology utilizing standing-seam metal roofing panels combined with energy efficient features like above-sheathing-ventilation (ASV), phase change material (PCM) and rigid insulation board. The data from phases 1 and 2 have been previously published and reported [Kosny et al., 2011; Biswas et al., 2011; Biswas and Childs, 2012; Kosny et al., 2012]. Based on previous data analyses and discussions within the research group, additional test roofs were installed in May 2012, to test new configurations and further investigate different components of the dynamic insulation systems. Some experimental data from phase 3 testing from May 2012 to December 2013 and some EnergyPlus modeling results have been reported in volumes 1 and 3, respectively, of the final report [Biswas et al., 2014; Biswas and Bhandari, 2014].

  20. Physics and Dynamics Coupling Across Scales in the Next Generation CESM. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacmeister, Julio T. [University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR), Boulder, CO (United States)

    2015-06-12

    This project examines physics/dynamics coupling, that is, exchange of meteorological profiles and tendencies between an atmospheric model’s dynamical core and its various physics parameterizations. Most model physics parameterizations seek to represent processes that occur on scales smaller than the smallest scale resolved by the dynamical core. As a consequence a key conceptual aspect of parameterizations is an assumption about the subgrid variability of quantities such as temperature, humidity or vertical wind. Most existing parameterizations of processes such as turbulence, convection, cloud, and gravity wave drag make relatively ad hoc assumptions about this variability and are forced to introduce empirical parameters, i.e., “tuning knobs” to obtain realistic simulations. These knobs make systematic dependences on model grid size difficult to quantify.

  1. High performance computer code for molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levay, I.; Toekesi, K.

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation is a widely used technique for modeling complicated physical phenomena. Since 2005 we are developing a MD simulations code for PC computers. The computer code is written in C++ object oriented programming language. The aim of our work is twofold: a) to develop a fast computer code for the study of random walk of guest atoms in Be crystal, b) 3 dimensional (3D) visualization of the particles motion. In this case we mimic the motion of the guest atoms in the crystal (diffusion-type motion), and the motion of atoms in the crystallattice (crystal deformation). Nowadays, it is common to use Graphics Devices in intensive computational problems. There are several ways to use this extreme processing performance, but never before was so easy to programming these devices as now. The CUDA (Compute Unified Device) Architecture introduced by nVidia Corporation in 2007 is a very useful for every processor hungry application. A Unified-architecture GPU include 96-128, or more stream processors, so the raw calculation performance is 576(!) GFLOPS. It is ten times faster, than the fastest dual Core CPU [Fig.1]. Our improved MD simulation software uses this new technology, which speed up our software and the code run 10 times faster in the critical calculation code segment. Although the GPU is a very powerful tool, it has a strongly paralleled structure. It means, that we have to create an algorithm, which works on several processors without deadlock. Our code currently uses 256 threads, shared and constant on-chip memory, instead of global memory, which is 100 times slower than others. It is possible to implement the total algorithm on GPU, therefore we do not need to download and upload the data in every iteration. On behalf of maximal throughput, every thread run with the same instructions

  2. Aphysiologic performance on dynamic posturography in work-related patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrosa, F; Durà, M J; Menacho, J; González-Sabaté, L; Cordón, A; Hernández, A; García-Ibáñez, L

    2013-01-01

    It has been suggested that malingering should be suspected in patients suffering from dizziness or imbalance and who had a potential gain associated with insurance and worker's compensation claims. This study aimed to assess and compare the prevalence of aphysiologic performance on computerized dynamic posturography (CDP) in patients with the potential for secondary gain using a retrospective review of two groups of patients: work-related patients referred for dizziness and/or imbalance (Group 1) were compared against a group of patients with complaints of dizziness or imbalance, who had no history of work-related injury, or litigation procedures (Group 2). CDP and videonystagmography (VNG) were carried out in all patients. The Sensory Organization Test summaries were scored as normal, aphysiologic, or vestibular using the scoring method published by Cevette et al. in Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 112:676-688 (1995). 24 out of 88 (27%) patients had aphysiologic CDP in Group 1 and 9 out of 51 (18%) in Group 2 but these differences were not significant (p > 0.05). Definite signs of vestibular dysfunction were found in 12 out of 24 (50%) of patients with aphysiologic performance in Group 1 although the presence of VNG abnormalities was significantly higher (p = 0.005) in Group 2. The hypothesis that the occupational group could show a significantly higher rate of aphysiologic results than a control group is not confirmed. Furthermore, VNG abnormalities were found in 50% of the work-related cases with non organic sway patterns. These results suggest that patient's complaints should be considered genuine in work-related cases and due caution exercised when evaluating aphysiologic CDP patterns.

  3. Understanding the dynamic performance of microchannel plates in pulsed mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray Thomas; Ming Wu; Nathan Joseph; Craig Kruschwitz; Gregroy A. Rochau

    2007-01-01

    The dynamic performance of a microchannel plate (MCP) is highly dependent on the high-voltage waveforms that are applied to it. Impedance mismatches in MCP detectors can significantly vary the waveforms on the MCP compared to the input pulses. High-voltage pulse waveforms launched onto surface coatings on the MCPs have historically been difficult and expensive to measure. Over the past few years, we have developed and tested techniques utilizing probes to measure the voltage propagation on the surface of MCPs. Square and Gaussian pulses with widths ranging from 200 ps to 2 ns have been applied. We have investigated the effects of coating thickness, microstrip width, and openended versus terminated strips. These data provide a wealth of knowledge that is enabling a better understanding of images recorded with these devices. This presentation discusses a method for measuring voltage profiles on the surface of the MCP and presents Monte Carlo simulations of the optical gate profiles based on the measured waveforms. Excellent agreement in the optical gate profiles have been achieved between the simulations and the experimental measurements using a short-pulse ultraviolet laser

  4. Psychological biases affecting human cognitive performance in dynamic operational environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takano, Kenichi; Reason, J.

    1999-01-01

    In order to identify cognitive error mechanisms observed in the dynamic operational environment, the following materials were analyzed giving special attention to psychological biases, together with possible cognitive tasks and these location, and internal and external performance shaping factors: (a) 13 human factors analyses of US nuclear power plant accidents, (b) 14 cases of Japanese nuclear power plant incidents, and (c) 23 cases collected in simulator experiments. In the resulting analysis, the most frequently identified cognitive process associated with error productions was situation assessment, and following varieties were KB processes and response planning, all of that were the higher cognitive activities. Over 70% of human error cases, psychological bias was affecting to cognitive errors, especially those to higher cognitive activities. In addition, several error occurrence patterns, including relations between cognitive process, biases, and PSFs were identified by the multivariate analysis. According to the identified error patterns, functions that an operator support system have to equip were discussed and specified for design base considerations. (author)

  5. Chemical and mechanical performance properties for various final waste forms -- PSPI scoping study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farnsworth, R.K.; Larsen, E.D.; Sears, J.W.; Eddy, T.L.; Anderson, G.L.

    1996-09-01

    The US DOE is obtaining data on the performance properties of the various final waste forms that may be chosen as primary treatment products for the alpha-contaminated low-level and transuranic waste at the INEL's Transuranic Storage Area. This report collects and compares selected properties that are key indicators of mechanical and chemical durability for Portland cement concrete, concrete formed under elevated temperature and pressure, sulfur polymer cement, borosilicate glass, and various forms of alumino-silicate glass, including in situ vitrification glass and various compositions of iron-enriched basalt (IEB) and iron-enriched basalt IV (IEB4). Compressive strength and impact resistance properties were used as performance indicators in comparative evaluation of the mechanical durability of each waste form, while various leachability data were used in comparative evaluation of each waste form's chemical durability. The vitrified waste forms were generally more durable than the non-vitrified waste forms, with the iron-enriched alumino-silicate glasses and glass/ceramics exhibiting the most favorable chemical and mechanical durabilities. It appears that the addition of zirconia and titania to IEB (forming IEB4) increases the leach resistance of the lanthanides. The large compositional ranges for IEB and IEB4 more easily accommodate the compositions of the waste stored at the INEL than does the composition of borosilicate glass. It appears, however, that the large potential variation in IEB and IEB4 compositions resulting from differing waste feed compositions can impact waste form durability. Further work is needed to determine the range of waste stream feed compositions and rates of waste form cooling that will result in acceptable and optimized IEB or IEB4 waste form performance. 43 refs

  6. Test methods for the dynamic mechanical properties of polymeric materials. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, G.K.

    1980-06-01

    Various test geometries and procedures for the dynamic mechanical analysis of polymers employing a mechanical spectrometer have been evaluated. The methods and materials included in this work are forced torsional pendulum testing of Kevlar/epoxy laminates and rigid urethane foams, oscillatory parallel plate testing to determine the kinetics of the cure of VCE with Hylene MP, oscillatory compressive testing of B-3223 cellular silicone, and oscillatory tensile testing of Silastic E and single Kevlar filaments. Fundamental dynamic mechanical properties, including the storage and loss moduli and loss tangent of the materials tested, were determined as a function of temperature and sometimes of frequency.

  7. Dynamics of WIC Program Participation by Infants and Children, 2001 to 2003. Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castner, Laura; Mabli, James; Sykes, Julie

    2009-01-01

    The Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) provides nutritious foods that promote the health of low-income pregnant women, new mothers, infants, and preschool children. This study examines WIC participation dynamics of infants and children from 2001 to 2003 using the Survey of Income and Program Participation…

  8. Investigation of modern methods of probalistic sensitivity analysis of final repository performance assessment models (MOSEL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiessl, Sabine; Becker, Dirk-Alexander

    2017-06-01

    Sensitivity analysis is a mathematical means for analysing the sensitivities of a computational model to variations of its input parameters. Thus, it is a tool for managing parameter uncertainties. It is often performed probabilistically as global sensitivity analysis, running the model a large number of times with different parameter value combinations. Going along with the increase of computer capabilities, global sensitivity analysis has been a field of mathematical research for some decades. In the field of final repository modelling, probabilistic analysis is regarded a key element of a modern safety case. An appropriate uncertainty and sensitivity analysis can help identify parameters that need further dedicated research to reduce the overall uncertainty, generally leads to better system understanding and can thus contribute to building confidence in the models. The purpose of the project described here was to systematically investigate different numerical and graphical techniques of sensitivity analysis with typical repository models, which produce a distinctly right-skewed and tailed output distribution and can exhibit a highly nonlinear, non-monotonic or even non-continuous behaviour. For the investigations presented here, three test models were defined that describe generic, but typical repository systems. A number of numerical and graphical sensitivity analysis methods were selected for investigation and, in part, modified or adapted. Different sampling methods were applied to produce various parameter samples of different sizes and many individual runs with the test models were performed. The results were evaluated with the different methods of sensitivity analysis. On this basis the methods were compared and assessed. This report gives an overview of the background and the applied methods. The results obtained for three typical test models are presented and explained; conclusions in view of practical applications are drawn. At the end, a recommendation

  9. Technologies and tools for high-performance distributed computing. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karonis, Nicholas T.

    2000-05-01

    In this project we studied the practical use of the MPI message-passing interface in advanced distributed computing environments. We built on the existing software infrastructure provided by the Globus Toolkit{trademark}, the MPICH portable implementation of MPI, and the MPICH-G integration of MPICH with Globus. As a result of this project we have replaced MPICH-G with its successor MPICH-G2, which is also an integration of MPICH with Globus. MPICH-G2 delivers significant improvements in message passing performance when compared to its predecessor MPICH-G and was based on superior software design principles resulting in a software base that was much easier to make the functional extensions and improvements we did. Using Globus services we replaced the default implementation of MPI's collective operations in MPICH-G2 with more efficient multilevel topology-aware collective operations which, in turn, led to the development of a new timing methodology for broadcasts [8]. MPICH-G2 was extended to include client/server functionality from the MPI-2 standard [23] to facilitate remote visualization applications and, through the use of MPI idioms, MPICH-G2 provided application-level control of quality-of-service parameters as well as application-level discovery of underlying Grid-topology information. Finally, MPICH-G2 was successfully used in a number of applications including an award-winning record-setting computation in numerical relativity. In the sections that follow we describe in detail the accomplishments of this project, we present experimental results quantifying the performance improvements, and conclude with a discussion of our applications experiences. This project resulted in a significant increase in the utility of MPICH-G2.

  10. Investigation of modern methods of probalistic sensitivity analysis of final repository performance assessment models (MOSEL)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spiessl, Sabine; Becker, Dirk-Alexander

    2017-06-15

    Sensitivity analysis is a mathematical means for analysing the sensitivities of a computational model to variations of its input parameters. Thus, it is a tool for managing parameter uncertainties. It is often performed probabilistically as global sensitivity analysis, running the model a large number of times with different parameter value combinations. Going along with the increase of computer capabilities, global sensitivity analysis has been a field of mathematical research for some decades. In the field of final repository modelling, probabilistic analysis is regarded a key element of a modern safety case. An appropriate uncertainty and sensitivity analysis can help identify parameters that need further dedicated research to reduce the overall uncertainty, generally leads to better system understanding and can thus contribute to building confidence in the models. The purpose of the project described here was to systematically investigate different numerical and graphical techniques of sensitivity analysis with typical repository models, which produce a distinctly right-skewed and tailed output distribution and can exhibit a highly nonlinear, non-monotonic or even non-continuous behaviour. For the investigations presented here, three test models were defined that describe generic, but typical repository systems. A number of numerical and graphical sensitivity analysis methods were selected for investigation and, in part, modified or adapted. Different sampling methods were applied to produce various parameter samples of different sizes and many individual runs with the test models were performed. The results were evaluated with the different methods of sensitivity analysis. On this basis the methods were compared and assessed. This report gives an overview of the background and the applied methods. The results obtained for three typical test models are presented and explained; conclusions in view of practical applications are drawn. At the end, a recommendation

  11. 'Peripheric' pancreatic cysts: performance of CT scan, MRI and endoscopy according to final pathological examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duconseil, P; Turrini, O; Ewald, J; Soussan, J; Sarran, A; Gasmi, M; Moutardier, V; Delpero, J R

    2015-06-01

    To assess the accuracy of pre-operative staging in patients with peripheral pancreatic cystic neoplasms (pPCNs). From 2005 to 2011, 148 patients underwent a pancreatectomy for pPCNs. The pre-operative examination methods of computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) were compared for their ability to predict the suggested diagnosis accurately, and the definitive diagnosis was affirmed by pathological examination. A mural nodule was detected in 34 patients (23%): only 1 patient (3%) had an invasive pPCN at the final histological examination. A biopsy was performed in 79 patients (53%) during EUS: in 55 patients (70%), the biopsy could not conclude a diagnosis; the biopsy provided the correct and wrong diagnosis in 19 patients (24%) and 5 patients (6%), respectively. A correct diagnosis was affirmed by CT, EUS and pancreatic MRI in 60 (41%), 103 (74%) and 80 (86%) patients (when comparing EUS and MRI; P = 0.03), respectively. The positive predictive values (PPVs) of CT, EUS and MRI were 70%, 75% and 87%, respectively. Pancreatic MRI appears to be the most appropriate examination to diagnose pPCNs accurately. EUS alone had a poor PPV. Mural nodules in a PCN should not be considered an indisputable sign of pPCN invasiveness. © 2015 International Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association.

  12. Calculation method for the seasonal performance of heat pump compact units and validation. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wemhoener, C.; Dott, R.; Afjei, Th. [University of Applied Sciences Northwestern Switzerland, Institute of Energy in Buildings, Muttenz (Switzerland); Huber, H.; Helfenfinger, D.; Keller, P.; Furter, R. [University of Applied Sciences Lucerne (HTA), Test center HLKS, Horw (Switzerland)

    2007-02-15

    This comprehensive final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) takes a look at compact heat pump units that have been developed for the heating of low energy consumption houses built to MINERGIE or MINERGIE-P standards. These units, which combine the functions of space heating, domestic hot water preparation and ventilation in one unit are described. A testing procedure developed at the University of Applied Science in Lucerne, Switzerland, using a test rig for the measurement of the seasonal performance factor (SPF) is described. A calculation method based on temperature classes for the calculation of the SPF of combined heat pump systems for space heating and domestic hot water preparation that was developed by the Institute of Energy in Buildings at the University of Applied Sciences Northwestern Switzerland is examined. Two pilot plants allowing detailed field monitoring of two compact units are described. One pilot plant installed in a single-family house built to MINERGIE standard in Gelterkinden, Switzerland, provided data on a compact unit. These results of measurements made on this and a further installation in a MINERGIE-P ultra-low energy consumption house in Zeiningen, Switzerland, are presented and discussed. Calculation methods, including exergy considerations are reviewed and their validation is discussed.

  13. Complex dynamics in the distribution of players’ scoring performance in Rugby Union world cups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seuront, Laurent

    2013-09-01

    The evolution of the scoring performance of Rugby Union players is investigated over the seven rugby world cups (RWC) that took place from 1987 to 2011, and a specific attention is given to how they may have been impacted by the switch from amateurism to professionalism that occurred in 1995. The distribution of the points scored by individual players, Ps, ranked in order of performance were well described by the simplified canonical law Ps∝(, where r is the rank, and ϕ and α are the parameters of the distribution. The parameter α did not significantly change from 1987 to 2007 (α=0.92±0.03), indicating a negligible effect of professionalism on players’ scoring performance. In contrast, the parameter ϕ significantly increased from ϕ=1.32 for 1987 RWC, ϕ=2.30 for 1999 to 2003 RWC and ϕ=5.60 for 2007 RWC, suggesting a progressive decrease in the relative performance of the best players. Finally, the sharp decreases observed in both α(α=0.38) and ϕ(ϕ=0.70) in the 2011 RWC indicate a more even distribution of the performance of individuals among scorers, compared to the more heterogeneous distributions observed from 1987 to 2007, and suggest a sharp increase in the level of competition leading to an increase in the average quality of players and a decrease in the relative skills of the top players. Note that neither α nor ϕ significantly correlate with traditional performance indicators such as the number of points scored by the best players, the number of games played by the best players, the number of points scored by the team of the best players or the total number of points scored over each RWC. This indicates that the dynamics of the scoring performance of Rugby Union players is influenced by hidden processes hitherto inaccessible through standard performance metrics; this suggests that players’ scoring performance is connected to ubiquitous phenomena such as anomalous diffusion.

  14. Knowledge Base for Strainer Clogging - Modifications performed in different countries since 1992 - Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    performed mock-up studies. Full-scale tests were also performed in the condensation pool of some units. The experiment results were utilised for the optimisation in most BWRs of new strainer designs, and for the choice of new thermal insulation materials. The results obtained confirmed, mostly, the appropriate design of existing PWR strainers. PWR and Candu reactors related s studies and experiments are, however, still on-going in a few countries. The modifications of the ECCS and/or CSS suction strainers have been performed after the aforementioned exhaustive studies and experiments. The modifications have resulted in new strainer designs with significantly enlarged filtering area. Most of the new strainers have good self-cleaning properties. Relatively many of them have been provided with instrumentation for differential pressure measurement, with indications and alarms in the unit main control room, and at some units in the emergency control room. In some BWRs, the design encompasses the possibility to back-flush the strainers. Replacements of large fractions of the thermal insulation materials utilised on piping and other components inside the containment have taken place. The newly installed insulation materials vary both within and between countries. They are primarily RMI (Reflecting Metallic Insulation), nuclear grade fiberglass, mineral wool and calcium silicate. The same insulation material - for example mineral wool - can be installed differently in different countries, i.e. jacketed or encapsulated in cassettes. The results of the experiments have significantly contributed to the materials selected or installation methods. The administrative measures taken by plant owners include, e.g. a periodic cleanup of the suppression pool and the containment sumps, with the aim to minimise the presence of foreign materials, and the control and eventual betterment of the containment coating. Finally, several plants have revised their Emergency Operating Procedures (EOPs

  15. Linear and nonlinear dynamic analysis by boundary element method. Ph.D. Thesis, 1986 Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Shahid

    1991-01-01

    An advanced implementation of the direct boundary element method (BEM) applicable to free-vibration, periodic (steady-state) vibration and linear and nonlinear transient dynamic problems involving two and three-dimensional isotropic solids of arbitrary shape is presented. Interior, exterior, and half-space problems can all be solved by the present formulation. For the free-vibration analysis, a new real variable BEM formulation is presented which solves the free-vibration problem in the form of algebraic equations (formed from the static kernels) and needs only surface discretization. In the area of time-domain transient analysis, the BEM is well suited because it gives an implicit formulation. Although the integral formulations are elegant, because of the complexity of the formulation it has never been implemented in exact form. In the present work, linear and nonlinear time domain transient analysis for three-dimensional solids has been implemented in a general and complete manner. The formulation and implementation of the nonlinear, transient, dynamic analysis presented here is the first ever in the field of boundary element analysis. Almost all the existing formulation of BEM in dynamics use the constant variation of the variables in space and time which is very unrealistic for engineering problems and, in some cases, it leads to unacceptably inaccurate results. In the present work, linear and quadratic isoparametric boundary elements are used for discretization of geometry and functional variations in space. In addition, higher order variations in time are used. These methods of analysis are applicable to piecewise-homogeneous materials, such that not only problems of the layered media and the soil-structure interaction can be analyzed but also a large problem can be solved by the usual sub-structuring technique. The analyses have been incorporated in a versatile, general-purpose computer program. Some numerical problems are solved and, through comparisons

  16. Dynamics of Coupled Contaminant and Microbial Transport in Heterogeneous Porous Media: Purdue Component. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cushman, J.H.

    2000-01-01

    Dynamic microbial attachment/detachment occurs in subsurface systems in response to changing environmental conditions caused by contaminant movement and degradation. Understanding the environmental conditions and mechanisms by which anaerobic bacteria partition between aqueous and solid phases is a critical requirement for designing and evaluating in situ bioremediation efforts. This interdisciplinary research project, of which we report only the Purdue contribution, provides fundamental information on the attachment/detachment dynamics of bacteria in heterogeneous porous media. Fundamental results from the Purdue collaboration are: (a) development of a matched-index method for obtaining 3-D Lagrangian trajectories of microbial sized particles transporting within porous media or microflow cells, (b) application of advanced numerical methods to optimally design a microflow cell for studying anaerobic bacterial attachment/detachment phenomena, (c) development of two types of models for simulating bacterial movement and attachment/detachment in microflow cells and natural porous media, (d) application of stochastic analysis to upscale pore scale microbial attachment/detachment models to natural heterogeneous porous media, and (e) evaluation of the role nonlocality plays in microbial dynamics in heterogeneous porous media

  17. Final Report. The 2015 Conference on the Dynamics of Molecular Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suits, Arthur G. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States)

    2015-08-31

    The 25th The Conference on the Dynamics of Molecular Collisions (DMC) was held from July 12-17, 2015. The Conference provides a unique platform and focal point for the gathering of experimentalists and theoreticians in the field of chemical dynamics. Since its inauguration in 1965, it has played an irreplaceable role in the development of this field and of many distinguished careers. This 25th meeting was highly successful. We held ten oral sessions and four poster sessions. Nobel Laureate Yuan T. Lee presented the keynote lecture. At this meeting, celebrating 50 years of chemical reaction dynamics, one hundred thirty-seven attendees participated, forty-two talks were presented as well as fifty-nine posters.Many attendees remarked that it was the “best meeting of the year.” Results from the meeting and other contributions were collected in a special issue of the Journal of Physical Chemistry A, published December 17, 2015. With this proposal we sought support for students, post-doctoral researchers and junior scientists who needed financial support. The Department of Energy has a large program in gas phase chemistry and many of the speakers and session chairs at the meeting are presently supported by DOE, including Professor Millard Alexander and Carl Lineberger, the recipents of the 2015 Herschbach Prizes that were awarded at the meeting. Funds were used to supplement registration fees for students and post-docs and to cover registration fees for the six selected “hot topic” presentations.

  18. X-ray Studies of Materials Dynamics at MHATT-CAT Sector 7 , Advanced Photon Source. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy Clarke

    2006-01-01

    This Final Report describes the scientific accomplishments that have been achieved with support from grant DE-FG02-03ER46023 during the period 12/01/02-11/30/05. The funding supported a vigorous scientific program allowing the PI to achieve leadership in a number of important areas. In particular, research carried out during this period has opened way to ultrafast dynamics studies of materials by combining the capabilities of synchrotron radiation with those of ultrafast lasers. This enables the initiation of laser-induced excitations and studies of their subsequent dynamics using laser-pump/x-ray probe techniques. Examples of such excitations include phonons, shock waves, excitons, spin-waves, and polaritons. The breadth of phenomena that can now be studied in the time-domain is very broad, revealing new phenomena and mechanisms that are critical to many applications of materials

  19. Beyond Identity: the Dynamic Self at the Intersection of Performance Philosophy and the Philosophy of Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibila Petlevski

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this article we advocate the methodological feedback loop in the study of the dynamical self at the crossroads of performance philosophy, (artistic performance, and the philosophy of science. We point to the importance of the dynamics of methodology transfer between arts and sciences and the “interactive continuum” proposed by Newman & Benz in 1998. In the first part of this paper we give a comparative review of the research context relevant for our field of study, and we explain our research hubs in approaching the concept of “performance”. We suggest the possibility to define our filed of research in three equally legitimate ways: as philosophy-of-performance, philosophy-as-performance and performance-as-philosophy. In our recent work we are primarily interested in artistic performances that incorporate elements of artistic practice in the methodology of research output (Frayling 1993, as well as in the potentials of performative aspects of scientific praxis and methodology. However, the conceptual background relevant for this paper is in the field of process philosophy and its relation to science (Birkhard’s “interactivist model” 2009; Campbell’s “process-based model for an interactive ontology” 2009. We attribute particular importance to the notion of “autopoietic feedback” (Maturana and Varela 1974; Luhmann 1990. The second part addresses the issue of transcending identity in the representations of the self and the other; the relationship between Theory-Theory (TT and Simulation Theory (ST, as well as some recent attempts at combining different theories of mind (e.g. Barlassina 2013. We also deal with the notion of “embodied praxis” (Gallagher and Meltzoff 1996; we mention some neuroscientific insights into the similar phenomena, and – commenting on the importance of the dialogue between neuroscientists and philosophers (Changeux and Ricour – we give an example of an enactive approach to understanding

  20. Final Report 02-ERD-033: Rapid Resolidification of Metals using Dynamic Compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streitz, F H; Nguyen, J H; Orlikowski, D; Minich, R; Moriarty, J A; Holmes, N C

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to develop a greater understanding of the kinetics involved during a liquid-solid phase transition occurring at high pressure and temperature. Kinetic limitations are known to play a large role in the dynamics of solidification at low temperatures, determining, e.g., whether a material crystallizes upon freezing or becomes an amorphous solid. The role of kinetics is not at all understood in transitions at high temperature when extreme pressures are involved. In order to investigate time scales during a dynamic compression experiment we needed to create an ability to alter the length of time spent by the sample in the transition region. Traditionally, the extreme high-pressure phase diagram is studied through a few static and dynamic techniques: static compression involving diamond anvil cells (DAC) [1], shock compression [2, 3], and quasi-isentropic compression [4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]. Static DAC experiments explore equilibrium material properties along an isotherm or an isobar [1]. Dynamic material properties can be explored with shock compression [2, 3], probing single states on the Hugoniot, or with quasi-isentropic compression [4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]. In the case of shocks, pressures variation typically occurs on a sub-nanosecond time scale or faster [11]. Previous quasi-isentropic techniques have yielded pressure ramps on the 10-100 nanosecond time-scale for samples that are several hundred microns thick [4, 5, 6, 7]. In order to understand kinetic effects at high temperatures and high pressures, we need to span a large dynamic range (strain rates, relaxation times, etc.) as well as control the thermodynamic path that the material experiences. Compression rates, for instance, need to bridge those of static experiments (seconds to hours) and those of the Z-accelerator (10 6 s -1 ) [4] or even laser ablation techniques (10 6 s -1 to 10 8 s -1 ) [7]. Here, we present a new technique that both extends the compression time to several

  1. Dynamic performance enhancement of microgrids by advanced sliding mode controller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sofla, Mohammadhassan Abdollahi [Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Dept., University of Toledo, Ohio (United States); Gharehpetian, Gevorg B. [Electrical Engineering Dept., Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-01-15

    Dynamics are the most important problems in the microgrid operation. In the islanded microgrid, the mismatch of parallel operations of inverters during dynamics can result in the instability. This paper considers severe dynamics which can occur in the microgrid. Microgrid can have different configurations with different load and generation dynamics which are facing voltage disturbances. As a result, microgrid has many uncertainties and is placed in the distribution network where is full of voltage disturbances. Moreover, characteristics of the distribution network and distributed energy resources in the islanded mode make microgrid vulnerable and easily lead to instability. The main aim of this paper is to discuss the suitable mathematical modeling based on microgrid characteristics and to design properly inner controllers to enhance the dynamics of microgrid with uncertain and changing parameters. This paper provides a method for inner controllers of inverter-based distributed energy resources to have a suitable response for different dynamics. Parallel inverters in distribution networks were considered to be controlled by nonlinear robust voltage and current controllers. Theoretical prove beyond simulation results, reveal evidently the effectiveness of the proposed controller. (author)

  2. Causal Dynamic Relationships between Political–Economic Factors and Export Performance in the Renewable Energy Technologies Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bongsuk Sung

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This study explores how political–economic forces could affect export performance in the renewable energy technologies market. We conduct panel framework analyses to verify the characteristics of panel data for 19 countries before establishing the panel estimator meant to test the effects of political–economic forces on export specialization. We consider the results of the panel framework analyses and develop an empirical model to test casual dynamic relationships between political–economic forces and export performance. The results from the least squares dummy variable-corrected estimation indicate that the major factors promoting the export specialization of renewable energy technologies are, in order of decreasing importance, public pressure, market size, and government demand-pull policy. However, the traditional energy industry has no significant effect on export performance. Finally, this study finds that dynamic effects exist in all estimations.

  3. FY2014 FES (Fusion Energy Sciences) Theory & Simulation Performance Target, Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Guoyong [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Budny, Robert [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Gorelenkov, Nikolai [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Poli, Francesca [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Chen, Yang [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); McClenaghan, Joseph [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Lin, Zhihong [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Spong, Don [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bass, Eric [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Waltz, Ron [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2014-10-14

    We report here the work done for the FY14 OFES Theory Performance Target as given below: "Understanding alpha particle confinement in ITER, the world's first burning plasma experiment, is a key priority for the fusion program. In FY 2014, determine linear instability trends and thresholds of energetic particle-driven shear Alfven eigenmodes in ITER for a range of parameters and profiles using a set of complementary simulation models (gyrokinetic, hybrid, and gyrofluid). Carry out initial nonlinear simulations to assess the effects of the unstable modes on energetic particle transport". In the past year (FY14), a systematic study of the alpha-driven Alfven modes in ITER has been carried out jointly by researchers from six institutions involving seven codes including the transport simulation code TRANSP (R. Budny and F. Poli, PPPL), three gyrokinetic codes: GEM (Y. Chen, Univ. of Colorado), GTC (J. McClenaghan, Z. Lin, UCI), and GYRO (E. Bass, R. Waltz, UCSD/GA), the hybrid code M3D-K (G.Y. Fu, PPPL), the gyro-fluid code TAEFL (D. Spong, ORNL), and the linear kinetic stability code NOVA-K (N. Gorelenkov, PPPL). A range of ITER parameters and profiles are specified by TRANSP simulation of a hybrid scenario case and a steady-state scenario case. Based on the specified ITER equilibria linear stability calculations are done to determine the stability boundary of alpha-driven high-n TAEs using the five initial value codes (GEM, GTC, GYRO, M3D-K, and TAEFL) and the kinetic stability code (NOVA-K). Both the effects of alpha particles and beam ions have been considered. Finally, the effects of the unstable modes on energetic particle transport have been explored using GEM and M3D-K.

  4. Predicting Expressive Dynamics in Piano Performances using Neural Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Herwaarden, Sam; Grachten, Maarten; de Haas, W. Bas

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a model for predicting expressive accentuation in piano performances with neural networks. Using Restricted Boltzmann Machines (RBMs), features are learned from performance data, after which these features are used to predict performed loudness. During feature learning, data

  5. Final report LDRD project 105816 : model reduction of large dynamic systems with localized nonlinearities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehoucq, Richard B.; Segalman, Daniel Joseph; Hetmaniuk, Ulrich L. (University of Washington, Seattle, WA); Dohrmann, Clark R.

    2009-10-01

    Advanced computing hardware and software written to exploit massively parallel architectures greatly facilitate the computation of extremely large problems. On the other hand, these tools, though enabling higher fidelity models, have often resulted in much longer run-times and turn-around-times in providing answers to engineering problems. The impediments include smaller elements and consequently smaller time steps, much larger systems of equations to solve, and the inclusion of nonlinearities that had been ignored in days when lower fidelity models were the norm. The research effort reported focuses on the accelerating the analysis process for structural dynamics though combinations of model reduction and mitigation of some factors that lead to over-meshing.

  6. Stochastic final-state dynamics of widening entanglement-a possible description of quantum measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksson, Karl-Erik

    2009-01-01

    The measurement process of quantum mechanics is analysed in the scattering theory of quantum field theory. A matrix of bilinear forms of the scattering amplitudes (the R-matrix) is used as the basic descriptive tool. The measurement process is viewed as a final-state interaction described through a series of linear stochastic mappings of the R-matrix, not changing the observable to be measured. The unknown details of the measurement apparatus enter through the stochasticity of the mappings. Although linear in terms of the R-matrix, the mappings are nonlinear in the density matrix, which is obtainable from the R-matrix through normalization. The eigenstates of the observable are the attractors of the mapping process. This result, known from previous generalizations of quantum mechanics, is obtained here within linear quantum mechanics. The conclusion is that the measurement process can be understood within relativistic quantum field theory itself without any generalization or metatheory.

  7. Beam dynamics in the final focus section of the future linear collider

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)739431; TOMAS, Rogelio

    The exploration of new physics in the ``Tera electron-Volt''~(TeV) scale with precision measurements requires lepton colliders providing high luminosities to obtain enough statistics for the particle interaction analysis. In order to achieve design luminosity values, linear colliders feature nanometer beam spot sizes at the Interaction~Point~(IP).\\par In addition to several effects affecting the luminosity, three main issues to achieve the beam size demagnification in the Final Focus Section (FFS) of the accelerator are the chromaticity correction, the synchrotron radiation effects and the correction of the lattice errors.\\par This thesis considers two important aspects for linear colliders: push the limits of linear colliders design, in particular the chromaticity correction and the radiation effects at 3~TeV, and the instrumentation and experimental work on beam stabilization in a test facility.\\par The current linear collider projects, CLIC~\\cite{CLICdes} and ILC~\\cite{ILCdes}, have lattices designed using...

  8. The simulation research for the dynamic performance of integrated PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Jiandong; Xia Guoqing; Fu Mingyu

    2005-01-01

    The mathematical model of the reactor core of integrated PWR has been studied and simplified properly. With the lumped parameter method, authors have established the mathematical model of the reactor core, including the neutron dynamic equation, the feedback reactivities model and the thermo-hydraulic model of the reactor. Based on the above equations and models, the incremental transfer functions of the reactor core model have been built. By simulation experimentation, authors have compared the dynamic characteristics of the integrated PWR with the traditional dispersed PWR. The simulation results show that the mathematical models and equations are correct. (authors)

  9. Performance of classification confidence measures in dynamic classifier systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štefka, D.; Holeňa, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 4 (2013), s. 299-319 ISSN 1210-0552 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-17187S Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : classifier combining * dynamic classifier systems * classification confidence Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science Impact factor: 0.412, year: 2013

  10. Scientific Final Report: COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: CONTINUOUS DYNAMIC GRID ADAPTATION IN A GLOBAL ATMOSPHERIC MODEL: APPLICATION AND REFINEMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William J. Gutowski; Joseph M. Prusa, Piotr K. Smolarkiewicz

    2012-04-09

    This project had goals of advancing the performance capabilities of the numerical general circulation model EULAG and using it to produce a fully operational atmospheric global climate model (AGCM) that can employ either static or dynamic grid stretching for targeted phenomena. The resulting AGCM combined EULAG's advanced dynamics core with the 'physics' of the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model (CAM). Effort discussed below shows how we improved model performance and tested both EULAG and the coupled CAM-EULAG in several ways to demonstrate the grid stretching and ability to simulate very well a wide range of scales, that is, multi-scale capability. We leveraged our effort through interaction with an international EULAG community that has collectively developed new features and applications of EULAG, which we exploited for our own work summarized here. Overall, the work contributed to over 40 peer-reviewed publications and over 70 conference/workshop/seminar presentations, many of them invited.

  11. Self-management support by final year nursing students: A correlational study of performance and person-related associated factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duprez, Veerle; Beeckman, Dimitri; Verhaeghe, Sofie; Van Hecke, Ann

    2017-09-01

    Chronic conditions put a heavy burden on healthcare in every country. Supporting persons with a chronic illness to take an active role in the management of their condition is a core component in the Chronic Care Model. It implies confidence and good skills from professionals. To date, there is no evidence on final year nursing students' performance in supporting patients' self-management, nor on factors associated with this performance. To explore self-reported performance of supporting patients' self-management by final year nursing students, and person-related factors associated with this performance. A correlational multi-centre study of final year nursing students (N=256) from eight nursing schools. Students were recruited from a convenience sample of eight nursing schools. All final year students were invited to participate. Data were collected between January 2015 and May 2016 using self-administered validated questionnaires. Theoretical behavioural frameworks were used to select hypothesized associated factors for self-management support: self-efficacy to perform self-management support and socio-structural factors (Social Cognitive Theory); needs for autonomy, competence and relatedness, and patient-invested contingent self-esteem (Self-Determination Theory); and attitudes towards supporting patients' self-management (Theory of Planned Behaviour). Final year nursing students (N=256) reported an overall low level of performance in delivering self-management support during internship. Students lacked mainly competencies in collaborative goal setting and shared decision making. Students reported a significant gap between their confidence and their actual performance in self-management support (pLearning opportunities can be introduced in classroom activities and on internship. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. H-coal fluid dynamics. Final report, August 1, 1977-December 31, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-04-16

    This report presents the results of work aimed at understanding the hydrodynamic behavior of the H-Coal reactor. A summary of the literature search related to the fluid dynamic behavior of gas/liquid/solid systems has been presented. Design details of a cold flow unit were discussed. The process design of this cold flow model followed practices established by HRI in their process development unit. The cold fow unit has been used to conduct experiments with nitrogen, kerosene, or kerosene/coal char slurries, and HDS catalyst, which at room temperature have properties similar to those existing in the H-Coal reactor. Mineral oil, a high-viscosity liquid, was also used. The volume fractions occupied by gas/liquid slurries and catalyst particles were determined by several experimental techniques. The use of a mini-computer for data collection and calculation has greatly accelerated the analysis and reporting of data. Data on nitrogen/kerosene/HDS catalyst and coal char fines are presented in this paper. Correlations identified in the literature search were utilized to analyze the data. From this analysis it became evident that the Richardson-Zaki correlation describes the effect of slurry flow rate on catalyst expansion. Three-phase fluidization data were analyzed with two models.

  13. Final summary report of fuel-dynamics tests H2 and E4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerner, R.C.; Rothman, A.B.; De Volpi, A.; Dickerman, C.E.; Deitrich, L.W; Stahl, D.; Murphy, W.F.

    1976-02-01

    Results of two failure experiments using LMFBR-type fuel during simulated unprotected transient overpower accidents are reported and analyzed. In both experiments, a single fresh fuel pin in a Mark-IIA loop was subjected to a temperature-limited, step-reactivity irradiation in the TREAT reactor. Total energy was 490 MJ in Test H2 and 690 MJ in Test E4. Except for their timing, the sequence of events in the failure scenario was the same for both tests. Local coolant boiling began 25-50 msec before failure. Significant upward fuel flow in the center of the pin started as early as 100 msec before cladding failure. Cladding failure was due to melting after contact with molten fuel and occurred at the top of the fuel column. Formation of an outlet flow-channel blockage began about 10 msec after failure and was complete by 50 msec. Inlet blockage began later and was less extensive. No significant amount of fuel sweepout was observed. Fuel remains separated into a small group of 50-1000-μm fragments and a macroscopic group of chunks and clinkers. The final distribution of fuel remains may have resulted from a delayed fuel/steel interaction in the inlet region

  14. Lunar electric power systems utilizing the SP-100 reactor coupled to dynamic conversion systems. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harty, R.B.; Durand, R.E.

    1993-03-01

    An integration study was performed by Rocketdyne under contract to NASA-LeRC. The study was concerned with coupling an SP-0100 reactor to either a Brayton or Stirling power conversion system. The application was for a surface power system to supply power requirements to a lunar base. A power level of 550 kWe was selected based on the NASA Space Exploration Initiative 90-day study. Reliability studies were initially performed to determine optimum power conversion redundancy. This study resulted in selecting three operating engines and one stand-by unit. Integration design studies indicated that either the Brayton or Stirling power conversion systems could be integrated with the PS-100 reactor. The Stirling system had an integration advantage because of smaller piping size and fewer components. The Stirling engine, however, is more complex and heavier than the Brayton rotating unit, which tends to off-set the Stirling integration advantage. From a performance consideration, the Brayton had a 9 percent mass advantage, and the Stirling had a 50 percent radiator advantage

  15. JGOFS IV. Subproject: natural radionuclides as tracers for particle dynamics in the water column. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholten, J.C.; Fietzke, J.; Mangini, A.; Stoffers, P.

    2000-01-01

    As part of the German JOINT GLOBAL OCEAN FLUX STUDY (JGOFS) the aim of the project was to investigate the particle dynamics in the water column, especially to estimate the trapping efficiencies of sediment traps deployed in the eastern North Atlantic (L1: 33 N 21 W; L2: 47 N 19.5 W; L3: 54,4 N 21,1 W; ESTOC: 29,07 N 15,25 W; OMEX: 49 N 12,5 W). This investigation was based on measurements of the distribution of natural radionuclides in the water column and in sediment traps. In the upper water column (≤1000 m) the 230 Th concentrations are similar at all locations investigated and a reversible scavenging model was able to describe the 230 Th distribution. In the deep water-column at L2 and L3 the 230 Th concentrations were significantly lower than predicted from the reversible scavenging model. The 230 Th concentrations here could be described by a scavenging-mixing model which assumes an advection of 230 Th depleted water masses and a rapid ventilation between 3 and 25 years. Based on two models, a mass balance for 230 Th and 231 Pa and a constant removal model, sediment trap efficiencies were calculated to be between 9% and 143%. The lowest efficiencies (9%-36%) were determined in the 500 m and 1000 m traps and no direct relation between water currents velocities and trapping biases were observed. The correction for trapping biases were found to be important for the understanding of the regional differences in the particle flux in the eastern north Atlantic. (orig.) [de

  16. Decision criterion dynamics in animals performing an auditory detection task.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W Mill

    Full Text Available Classical signal detection theory attributes bias in perceptual decisions to a threshold criterion, against which sensory excitation is compared. The optimal criterion setting depends on the signal level, which may vary over time, and about which the subject is naïve. Consequently, the subject must optimise its threshold by responding appropriately to feedback. Here a series of experiments was conducted, and a computational model applied, to determine how the decision bias of the ferret in an auditory signal detection task tracks changes in the stimulus level. The time scales of criterion dynamics were investigated by means of a yes-no signal-in-noise detection task, in which trials were grouped into blocks that alternately contained easy- and hard-to-detect signals. The responses of the ferrets implied both long- and short-term criterion dynamics. The animals exhibited a bias in favour of responding "yes" during blocks of harder trials, and vice versa. Moreover, the outcome of each single trial had a strong influence on the decision at the next trial. We demonstrate that the single-trial and block-level changes in bias are a manifestation of the same criterion update policy by fitting a model, in which the criterion is shifted by fixed amounts according to the outcome of the previous trial and decays strongly towards a resting value. The apparent block-level stabilisation of bias arises as the probabilities of outcomes and shifts on single trials mutually interact to establish equilibrium. To gain an intuition into how stable criterion distributions arise from specific parameter sets we develop a Markov model which accounts for the dynamic effects of criterion shifts. Our approach provides a framework for investigating the dynamics of decisions at different timescales in other species (e.g., humans and in other psychological domains (e.g., vision, memory.

  17. Influence of year-on-year performance on final degree classification in a chiropractic master's degree program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewhurst, Philip; Rix, Jacqueline; Newell, David

    2016-03-01

    We explored if any predictors of success could be identified from end-of-year grades in a chiropractic master's program and whether these grades could predict final-year grade performance and year-on-year performance. End-of-year average grades and module grades for a single cohort of students covering all academic results for years 1-4 of the 2013 graduating class were used for this analysis. Analysis consisted of within-year correlations of module grades with end-of-year average grades, linear regression models for continuous data, and logistic regression models for predicting final degree classifications. In year 1, 140 students were enrolled; 85.7% of students completed the program 4 years later. End-of-year average grades for years 1-3 were correlated (Pearson r values ranging from .75 to .87), but the end-of-year grades for years 1-3 were poorly correlated with clinic internship performance. In linear regression, several modules were predictive of end-of-year average grades for each year. For year 1, logistic regression showed that the modules Physiology and Pharmacology and Investigative Imaging were predictive of year 1 performance (odds ratio [OR] = 1.15 and 0.9, respectively). In year 3, the modules Anatomy and Histopathology 3 and Problem Solving were predictors of the difference between a pass/merit or distinction final degree classification (OR = 1.06 and 1.12, respectively). Early academic performance is weakly correlated with final-year clinic internship performance. The modules of Anatomy and Histopathology year 3 and Problem Solving year 3 emerged more consistently than other modules as being associated with final-year classifications.

  18. Emotional intelligence and academic performance in first and final year medical students: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Boon How; Zain, Azhar Md; Hassan, Faezah

    2013-03-27

    Research on emotional intelligence (EI) suggests that it is associated with more pro-social behavior, better academic performance and improved empathy towards patients. In medical education and clinical practice, EI has been related to higher academic achievement and improved doctor-patient relationships. This study examined the effect of EI on academic performance in first- and final-year medical students in Malaysia. This was a cross-sectional study using an objectively-scored measure of EI, the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT). Academic performance of medical school students was measured using continuous assessment (CA) and final examination (FE) results. The first- and final-year students were invited to participate during their second semester. Students answered a paper-based demographic questionnaire and completed the online MSCEIT on their own. Relationships between the total MSCEIT score to academic performance were examined using multivariate analyses. A total of 163 (84 year one and 79 year five) medical students participated (response rate of 66.0%). The gender and ethnic distribution were representative of the student population. The total EI score was a predictor of good overall CA (OR 1.01), a negative predictor of poor result in overall CA (OR 0.97), a predictor of the good overall FE result (OR 1.07) and was significantly related to the final-year FE marks (adjusted R(2) = 0.43). Medical students who were more emotionally intelligent performed better in both the continuous assessments and the final professional examination. Therefore, it is possible that emotional skill development may enhance medical students' academic performance.

  19. A comparative study on dynamic mechanical performance of concrete and rock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Zhengbing

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available of underground cavities and field-leveling excavation. Dynamic mechanical performance of rocks has been gradually attached importance both in China and abroad. Concrete and rock are two kinds of the most frequently used engineering materials and also frequently used as experimental objects currently. To compare dynamic mechanical performance of these two materials, this study performed dynamic compression test with five different strain rates on concrete and rock using Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB to obtain basic dynamic mechanical parameters of them and then summarized the relationship of dynamic compressive strength, peak strain and strain rate of two materials. Moreover, specific energy absorption is introduced to confirm dynamic damage mechanisms of concrete and rock materials. This work can not only help to improve working efficiency to the largest extent but also ensure the smooth development of engineering, providing rich theoretical guidance for development of related engineering in the future

  20. Do Work Placements Improve Final Year Academic Performance or Do High-Calibre Students Choose to Do Work Placements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, C. M.; Green, J. P.; Higson, H. E.

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates whether the completion of an optional sandwich work placement enhances student performance in final year examinations. Using Propensity Score Matching, our analysis departs from the literature by controlling for self-selection. Previous studies may have overestimated the impact of sandwich work placements on performance…

  1. Libraries of Middlesex, Final Performance Report for Library Services and Construction Act (LSCA) Title VI, Library Literacy Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Director, Elissa

    This final performance report for the Libraries of Middlesex literacy project begins with a section that compares actual accomplishments to the following objectives for 1992-93: (1) recruit and enroll at least 150 new volunteers in Basic Reading of English as a Second Language (ESL) tutor training; (2) have at least 125 volunteers successfully…

  2. Stability of cracked pipe under seismic/dynamic displacement-controlled stresses. Subtask 1.2 final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, G.; Veith, P.; Marschall, C.

    1997-06-01

    Results of displacement-controlled pipe fracture experiments, analyses, and material characterization efforts performed within the International Piping Integrity Research Group, IPIRG, Program Subtask 1.2 are discussed. Effects of dynamic versus quasi-static and monotonic versus cyclic loading were evaluated for ductile tearing of two materials, A106 Grade B ferritic steel and TP304 austenitic steel. Twelve through-wall-cracked pipe experiments were conducted on 6-inch diameter Schedule 120 pipe at 288 C (550 F). The results indicated dynamic loading at seismic strain rates marginally increased the load-carrying capacity of austenitic steel. The ferritic steel tested was sensitive to dynamic strain-aging, and consequently, its load-carrying capacity decreased at dynamic strain rates. Two parameters were found to affect the apparent ductile crack growth resistance during cyclic loading, load ratio (R) and incremental plastic displacement that occurs in a cycle. Cyclic (R = 0) loading had minimal effect on ductile tearing for both materials. However, fully reversed loading decreased the load-carrying capacity and toughness for both materials. The incremental plastic displacement can be as important as the load ratio; however, it is harder to quantify from design stress reports. Large plastic displacements will minimize the effect of negative load ratios

  3. Real-Time Dynamic Brake Assessment Proof of Concept Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lascurain, Mary Beth [ORNL; Franzese, Oscar [ORNL; Capps, Gary J [ORNL

    2011-11-01

    This proof-of-concept research was performed to explore the feasibility of using real-world braking data from commercial motor vehicles to make a diagnosis of brake condition similar to that of the performance-based brake tester (PBBT). This was done by determining the relationship between pressure and brake force (P-BF), compensating for the gross vehicle weight (GVW). The nature of this P-BF relationship (e.g., low braking force for a given brake application pressure) may indicate brake system problems. In order to determine the relationship between brake force and brake application pressure, a few key parameters of duty cycle information were collected. Because braking events are often brief, spanning only a few seconds, a sample rate of 10 Hz was needed. The algorithm under development required brake application pressure and speed (from which deceleration was calculated). Accurate weight estimation was also needed to properly derive the braking force from the deceleration. In order to ensure that braking force was the predominant factor in deceleration for the segments of data used in analysis, the data was screened for grade as well. Also, the analysis needed to be based on pressures above the crack pressure. The crack pressure is the pressure below which the individual brakes are not applied due the nature of the mechanical system. This value, which may vary somewhat from one wheel end to another, is approximately 10 psi. Therefore, only pressures 15 psi and above were used in the analysis. The Department of Energy s Medium Truck Duty Cycle research has indicated that under the real-world circumstances of the test vehicle brake pressures of up to approximately 30 psi can be expected. Several different types of data were collected during the testing task of this project. Constant-pressure stopping tests were conducted at several combinations of brake application pressure (15, 20, 25, and 30 psi), load conditions (moderately and fully laden), and speeds (20 and

  4. A Computational Procedure for Assessing the Dynamic Performance of Diffusion-Controlled Transdermal Delivery Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Simon

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The dynamic performances of two different controlled-release systems were analyzed. In a reservoir-type drug-delivery patch, the transdermal flux is influenced by the properties of the membrane. A constant thermodynamic drug activity is preserved in the donor compartment. Monolithic matrices are among the most inexpensive systems used to direct drug delivery. In these structures, the active pharmaceutical ingredients are encapsulated within a polymeric material. Despite the popularity of these two devices, to tailor the properties of the polymer and additives to specific transient behaviors can be challenging and time-consuming. The heuristic approaches often considered to select the vehicle formulation provide limited insight into key permeation mechanisms making it difficult to predict the device performance. In this contribution, a method to calculate the flux response time in a system consisting of a reservoir and a polymeric membrane was proposed and confirmed. Nearly 8.60 h passed before the metoprolol delivery rate reached ninety-eight percent of its final value. An expression was derived for the time it took to transport the active pharmaceutical ingredient out of the polymer. Ninety-eight percent of alpha-tocopherol acetate was released in 461.4 h following application to the skin. The effective time constant can be computed to help develop optimum design strategies.

  5. Orchestra Festival Evaluations: Interjudge Agreement and Relationships between Performance Categories and Final Ratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garman, Barry R.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Band, orchestra, and choir festival evaluations are a regular part of many secondary school music programs, and most such festivals engage adjudicators who rate each group's performance. Because music ensemble performance is complex and multi-dimensional, it does not lend itself readily to precise measurement; generally, musical performances are…

  6. The spring 2011 final stratospheric warming above Eureka: anomalous dynamics and chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Adams

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In spring 2011, the Arctic polar vortex was stronger than in any other year on record. As the polar vortex started to break up in April, ozone and NO2 columns were measured with UV-visible spectrometers above the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL in Eureka, Canada (80.05° N, 86.42° W using the differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS technique. These ground-based column measurements were complemented by Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI and Optical Spectrograph and Infra-Red Imager System (OSIRIS satellite measurements, Global Modeling Initiative (GMI simulations, and meteorological quantities. On 8 April 2011, NO2 columns above PEARL from the DOAS, OMI, and GMI datasets were approximately twice as large as in previous years. On this day, temperatures and ozone volume mixing ratios above Eureka were high, suggesting enhanced chemical production of NO2 from NO. Additionally, GMI NOx (NO + NO2 and N2O fields suggest that downward transport along the vortex edge and horizontal transport from lower latitudes also contributed to the enhanced NO2. The anticyclone that transported lower-latitude NOx above PEARL became frozen-in and persisted in dynamical and GMI N2O fields until the end of the measurement period on 31 May 2011. Ozone isolated within this frozen-in anticyclone (FrIAC in the middle stratosphere was lost due to reactions with the enhanced NOx. Below the FrIAC (from the tropopause to 700 K, NOx driven ozone loss above Eureka was larger than in previous years, according to GMI monthly average ozone loss rates. Using the passive tracer technique, with passive ozone profiles from the Lagrangian Chemistry and Transport Model, ATLAS, ozone losses since 1 December 2010 were calculated at 600 K. In the air mass that was above Eureka on 20 May 2011, ozone losses reached 4.2 parts per million by

  7. Dynamic Performance of a Residential Air-to-Air Heat Pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, George E.; Bean, John

    This publication is a study of the dynamic performance of a 5-ton air-to-air heat pump in a residence in Washington, D.C. The effect of part-load operation on the heat pump's cooling and heating coefficients of performance was determined. Discrepancies between measured performance and manufacturer-supplied performance data were found when the unit…

  8. How dynamic capabilities drive performance in the Indian IT industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holzweber, Markus; Mattsson, Jan; Chadee, Doren

    2012-01-01

    This study examines key issues and effects of capability management on a fast-growing area of knowledge-intensive global business services – IT outsourcing and offshoring. An exploratory study of Indian companies providing complex process-oriented offshore IT services to their global customers...... is undertaken. The analysis of the data related to the service provider side shows that developing dynamic capabilities is strongly driven by management and top-clients and results in the development of business processes and in establishing a strategic partnership with the client organization. Key findings...

  9. Experimental investigation and modeling of dynamic performance of wave springs

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, N.; Rongong, J.; Lord, C.; Sims, N.

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates vibration suppression potentials for a novel frictional system - a wave spring.\\ud Two different types of wave springs, crest-to-crest and nested ones, were used in this work. Compared with\\ud nested wave springs, crest-to-crest wave springs have lower damping and a larger range for the linear stiffness\\ud due to a reduced level of contact. Dynamic compressive tests, subject to different static compression levels,\\ud are carried out to investigate the force-displacemen...

  10. Dynamic performance analysis of diaphragm coupling base on ABAQUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You Wen

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Base on the diaphragm coupling of driving system of a rotation testing machine,FEA software ABAQUS is used to simulate the force which the coupling gets when it is working,to obtain the stress and stain during the coupling with axial misalignment and degree misalignment and to find where the maximal stress is as well as its distribution.Then the nature frequency of the coupling is calculated by use of finite element software and rotor dynamics and compared with the date of misalignment and maximum speed from the manufacture,which verifies the correctness of the model and the reliability of the calculation method.

  11. Addressing Thermal and Performance Variability Issues in Dynamic Processors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshii, Kazutomo [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Llopis, Pablo [Univ. Carlos III de Madrid (Spain); Zhang, Kaicheng [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Luo, Yingyi [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Ogrenci-Memik, Seda [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Memik, Gokhan [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Sankaran, Rajesh [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Beckman, Pete [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-03-01

    As CMOS scaling nears its end, parameter variations (process, temperature and voltage) are becoming a major concern. To overcome parameter variations and provide stability, modern processors are becoming dynamic, opportunistically adjusting voltage and frequency based on thermal and energy constraints, which negatively impacts traditional bulk-synchronous parallelism-minded hardware and software designs. As node-level architecture is growing in complexity, implementing variation control mechanisms only with hardware can be a challenging task. In this paper we investigate a software strategy to manage hardwareinduced variations, leveraging low-level monitoring/controlling mechanisms.

  12. Market-Based Adult Lifelong Learning Performance Measures for Public Libraries Serving Lower Income and Majority-Minority Markets. Final Performance Report. September 1, 1996-August 31, 1999.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, Christine; Jue, Dean K.; Lance, Keith Curry

    This document is the final performance report for a Field Initiated Studies (FIS) project that addressed the need for a better assessment of public library services for adult lifelong learning in majority-minority and lower income library market areas. After stating the major educational problem addressed by the FIS project, the report lists the…

  13. Final Report - Dynamic Path Scheduling through Extensions to Generalized Multiprotocol Label Switching (GMPLS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Principal Investigator: Dr. Abdella Battou

    2009-05-22

    The major accomplishments of the project are the successful software implementation of the Phase I scheduling algorithms for GMPLS Label Switched Paths (LSPs) and the extension of the IETF Path Computation Element (PCE) Protocol to support scheduling extensions. In performing this work, we have demonstrated the theoretical work of Phase I, analyzed key issues, and made relevant extensions. Regarding the software implementation, we developed a proof of concept prototype as part of our Algorithm Evaluation System (AES). This implementation uses the Linux operating system to provide software portability and will be the foundation for our commercial software. To demonstrate proof of concept, we have implemented LSP scheduling algorithms to support two of the key GMPLS switching technologies (Lambda and Packet) and support both Fixed Path (FP) and Switched Path (SP) routing. We chose Lambda and Packet because we felt it was essential to include both circuit and packet switching technologies as well as to address all-optical switching in the study. As conceptualized in Phase I, the FP algorithms use a traditional approach where the LSP uses the same physical path for the entire service duration while the innovative SP algorithms allow the physical path to vary during the service duration. As part of this study, we have used the AES to conduct a performance analysis using metro size networks (up to 32 nodes) that showed that these algorithms are suitable for commercial implementation. Our results showed that the CPU time required to compute an LSP schedule was small compared to expected inter-arrival time between LSP requests. Also, when the network size increased from 7 to 15 to 32 nodes with 10, 26, and 56 TE links, the CPU processing time showed excellent scaling properties. When Fixed Path and Switched Path routing were compared, SP provided only modestly better performance with respect to LSP completion rate, service duration, path length, and start time deviation

  14. TGLF Recalibration for ITER Standard Case Parameters FY2015: Theory and Simulation Performance Target Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Candy, J.

    2015-01-01

    flows that fit the GYRO simulations, the parameters of the model had to be tuned to each case. A physics basis for the zonal flow model was lacking. Electron energy transport at short wavelength: A secondary issue - the high-k electron energy flux - was initially assumed to be independent of the zonal flow effect. However, detailed studies of the fluctuation spectra from recent multiscale (electron and ion scale) GYRO simulations provided a critical new insight into the role of zonal flows. The multiscale simulations suggested that advection by the zonal flows strongly suppressed electron-scale turbulence. Radial shear of the zonal ExB fluctuation could not compete with the large electron-scale linear growth rate, but the k x -mixing rate of the ExB advection could. This insight led to a preliminary new model for the way zonal flows saturate both electron- and ion-scale turbulence. It was also discovered that the strength of the zonal ExB velocity could be computed from the linear growth rate spectrum. The new saturation model (SAT1), which replaces the original model (SAT0), was fit to the multiscale GYRO simulations as well as the ion-scale GYRO simulations used to calibrate the original SAT0 model. Thus, SAT1 captures the physics of both multiscale electron transport and zonal-flow stabilization. In future work, the SAT1 model will require significant further testing and (expensive) calibration with nonlinear multiscale gyrokinetic simulations over a wider variety of plasma conditions - certainly more than the small set of scans about a single C-Mod L-mode discharge. We believe the SAT1 model holds great promise as a physics-based model of the multiscale turbulent transport in fusion devices. Correction to ITER performance predictions: Finally, the impact of the SAT1model on the ITER hybrid case is mixed. Without the electron-scale contribution to the fluxes, the Dimits shift makes a significant improvement in the predicted fusion power as originally posited. Alas

  15. TGLF Recalibration for ITER Standard Case Parameters FY2015: Theory and Simulation Performance Target Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candy, J. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    flows that fit the GYRO simulations, the parameters of the model had to be tuned to each case. A physics basis for the zonal flow model was lacking. Electron energy transport at short wavelength: A secondary issue – the high-k electron energy flux – was initially assumed to be independent of the zonal flow effect. However, detailed studies of the fluctuation spectra from recent multiscale (electron and ion scale) GYRO simulations provided a critical new insight into the role of zonal flows. The multiscale simulations suggested that advection by the zonal flows strongly suppressed electron-scale turbulence. Radial shear of the zonal E×B fluctuation could not compete with the large electron-scale linear growth rate, but the kx-mixing rate of the E×B advection could. This insight led to a preliminary new model for the way zonal flows saturate both electron- and ion-scale turbulence. It was also discovered that the strength of the zonal E×B velocity could be computed from the linear growth rate spectrum. The new saturation model (SAT1), which replaces the original model (SAT0), was fit to the multiscale GYRO simulations as well as the ion-scale GYRO simulations used to calibrate the original SAT0 model. Thus, SAT1 captures the physics of both multiscale electron transport and zonal-flow stabilization. In future work, the SAT1 model will require significant further testing and (expensive) calibration with nonlinear multiscale gyrokinetic simulations over a wider variety of plasma conditions – certainly more than the small set of scans about a single C-Mod L-mode discharge. We believe the SAT1 model holds great promise as a physics-based model of the multiscale turbulent transport in fusion devices. Correction to ITER performance predictions: Finally, the impact of the SAT1model on the ITER hybrid case is mixed. Without the electron-scale contribution to the fluxes, the Dimits shift makes a significant improvement in the predicted fusion power as

  16. Final Report - Effects of Impurities on Fuel Cell Performance and Durability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trent Molter

    2012-08-18

    This program is focused on the experimental determination of the effects of key hydrogen side impurities on the performance of PEM fuel cells. Experimental data has been leveraged to create mathematical models that predict the performance of PEM fuel cells that are exposed to specific impurity streams. These models are validated through laboratory experimentation and utilized to develop novel technologies for mitigating the effects of contamination on fuel cell performance. Results are publicly disseminated through papers, conference presentations, and other means.

  17. High-performance dynamic quantum clustering on graphics processors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittek, Peter, E-mail: peterwittek@acm.org [Swedish School of Library and Information Science, University of Boras, Boras (Sweden)

    2013-01-15

    Clustering methods in machine learning may benefit from borrowing metaphors from physics. Dynamic quantum clustering associates a Gaussian wave packet with the multidimensional data points and regards them as eigenfunctions of the Schroedinger equation. The clustering structure emerges by letting the system evolve and the visual nature of the algorithm has been shown to be useful in a range of applications. Furthermore, the method only uses matrix operations, which readily lend themselves to parallelization. In this paper, we develop an implementation on graphics hardware and investigate how this approach can accelerate the computations. We achieve a speedup of up to two magnitudes over a multicore CPU implementation, which proves that quantum-like methods and acceleration by graphics processing units have a great relevance to machine learning.

  18. High-performance dynamic quantum clustering on graphics processors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wittek, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Clustering methods in machine learning may benefit from borrowing metaphors from physics. Dynamic quantum clustering associates a Gaussian wave packet with the multidimensional data points and regards them as eigenfunctions of the Schrödinger equation. The clustering structure emerges by letting the system evolve and the visual nature of the algorithm has been shown to be useful in a range of applications. Furthermore, the method only uses matrix operations, which readily lend themselves to parallelization. In this paper, we develop an implementation on graphics hardware and investigate how this approach can accelerate the computations. We achieve a speedup of up to two magnitudes over a multicore CPU implementation, which proves that quantum-like methods and acceleration by graphics processing units have a great relevance to machine learning.

  19. Nonlinear Dynamic Inversion Baseline Control Law: Architecture and Performance Predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Christopher J.

    2011-01-01

    A model reference dynamic inversion control law has been developed to provide a baseline control law for research into adaptive elements and other advanced flight control law components. This controller has been implemented and tested in a hardware-in-the-loop simulation; the simulation results show excellent handling qualities throughout the limited flight envelope. A simple angular momentum formulation was chosen because it can be included in the stability proofs for many basic adaptive theories, such as model reference adaptive control. Many design choices and implementation details reflect the requirements placed on the system by the nonlinear flight environment and the desire to keep the system as basic as possible to simplify the addition of the adaptive elements. Those design choices are explained, along with their predicted impact on the handling qualities.

  20. Tri-State Current Source Inverter With Improved Dynamic Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Frede; Loh, Poh Chiang; Wong, Chow Pang

    2008-01-01

    Traditional dc-ac current source inverter (CSI) has a right-half-plane (RHP) zero in its control-to-output transfer function. This RHP zero causes the inverter output to fall before rising when a step increase in command reference is required (commonly known as non-minimum-phase effect). To achieve...... a better dynamic response, this paper proposes the design of a tri-state CSI using only an additional semiconductor switch for introducing unique freewheeling states to the traditional six active and three null states of a CSI. With the freewheeling states inserted appropriately within the inverter state...... sequence, the inductive boosting and discharging intervals can be decoupled, allowing the RHP zero to be eliminated with only minor circuit modifications (high level control schemes like predictive and multiloop voltage/current control remain unchanged). The designed inverter can be controlled using...

  1. Comment Response on the Final Report: Peer Review of the Total System Performance Assessment-Viability Assessment (TSPA-VA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pendleton, M. W.

    1999-01-01

    The Management and Operating Contractor established a Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel (hereinafter ''the Panel'') at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Office. The objectives of the peer review were to provide: (1) A formal, independent evaluation and critique of Viability Assessment of a Repository at Yucca Mountain: Total System Performance Assessment, Volume 3 (DOE 1998a; hereinafter ''Total System Performance Assessment-Viability Assessment'') that was conducted in support of the Viability Assessment of a Repository at Yucca Mountain (DOE 1998b). (2) Suggestions for improvements as the U.S. Department of Energy prepares to develop the documentation for a Total System Performance Assessment to support a potential License Application. The Panel conducted a phased review over a two-year period to observe the development and, ultimately, to review the Total System Performance Assessment-Viability Assessment (DOE 1998a). During the development of the Total System Performance Assessment-Viability Assessment (DOE 1998a), the Panel submitted three Interim Reports (Whipple et al., 1997a, 1997b, and 1998) to the Management and Operating Contractor with recommendations and comments on the process models, model abstractions, and draft documentation for the Total System Performance Assessment-Viability Assessment (DOE 1998a). The Panel's Final Report Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel (Whipple et al. 1999; hereinafter ''Final Report'') on the Total System Performance Assessment-Viability Assessment (DOE 1998a) is based primarily on the completed Total System Performance Assessment-Viability Assessment (DOE 1998a), the Total System Performance Assessment-Viability Assessment (TSPA-VA) Analyses Technical Basis Document (CRWMS M and O 1998), and the cited references. The Final Report (Whipple et al. 1999) includes the major points from the three Interim Reports (Whipple et al. 1997a, 1997b, and 1998

  2. Sixty-five-year old final clarifier performance rivals that of modern designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, James L; Kunetz, Thomas E; Sobanski, Joseph P

    2008-01-01

    The Stickney plant of the Metropolitan Wastewater Reclamation District of Greater Chicago (MWRDGC), one of the largest wastewater treatment plants in the world, treats an average dry weather flow of 22 m3/s and a sustained wet weather flow of 52 m3/s that can peak to 63 m3/s. Most of the inner city of Chicago has combined sewers, and in order to reduce pollution through combined sewer overflows (CSO), the 175 km Tunnel and Reservoir Plan (TARP) tunnels, up to 9.1 m in diameter, were constructed to receive and convey CSO to a reservoir from where it will be pumped to the Stickney treatment plant. Pumping back storm flows will result in sustained wet weather flows over periods of weeks. Much of the success of the plant will depend on the ability of 96 circular final clarifiers to produce an effluent of acceptable quality. The nitrifying activated sludge plant is arranged in a plug-flow configuration, and some denitrification takes place as a result of the high oxygen demand in the first pass of the four-pass aeration basins that have a length to width ratio of 18:1. The SVI of the mixed liquor varies between 60 and 80 ml/g. The final clarifiers, which were designed by the District's design office in 1938, have functioned for more than 65 years without major changes and are still producing very high-quality effluent. This paper will discuss the design and operation of these final clarifiers and compare the design with more modern design practices. (c) IWA Publishing 2008.

  3. UCSD Performance in the Edge Plasma Simulation (EPSI) Project. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tynan, George Robert [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States). Center for Energy Research

    2017-12-12

    This report contains a final report on the activities of UC San Diego PI G.R. Tynan and his collaborators as part of the EPSI Project, that was led by Dr. C.S. Chang, from PPPL. As a part of our work, we carried out several experiments on the ALCATOR C-­MOD tokamak device, aimed at unraveling the “trigger” or cause of the spontaneous transition from low-­mode confinement (L-­mode) to high confinement (H-­mode) that is universally observed in tokamak devices, and is planned for use in ITER.

  4. An innovative fuel design concept for improved light water reactor performance and safety. Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tulenko, J.S.; Connell, R.G.

    1995-07-01

    Light water reactor (LWR) fuel performance is limited by thermal and mechanical constraints associated with the design, fabrication, and operation of fuel in a nuclear reactor. The purpose of this research was to explore a technique for extending fuel performance by thermally bonding LWR fuel with a non-alkaline liquid metal alloy. Current LWR fuel rod designs consist of enriched uranium oxide (UO 2 ) fuel pellets enclosed in a zirconium alloy cylindrical clad. The space between the pellets and the clad is filled by an inert gas. Due to the thermal conductivity of the gas, the gas space thermally insulates the fuel pellets from the reactor coolant outside the fuel rod, elevating the fuel temperatures. Filling the gap between the fuel and clad with a high conductivity liquid metal thermally bonds the fuel to the cladding, and eliminates the large temperature change across the gap, while preserving the expansion and pellet loading capabilities. The resultant lower fuel temperature directly impacts fuel performance limit margins and also core transient performance. The application of liquid bonding techniques to LWR fuel was explored for the purposes of increasing LWR fuel performance and safety. A modified version of the ESCORE fuel performance code (ESBOND) has been developed under the program to analyze the in-reactor performance of the liquid metal bonded fuel. An assessment of the technical feasibility of this concept for LWR fuel is presented, including the results of research into materials compatibility testing and the predicted lifetime performance of Liquid Metal Bonded LWR fuel

  5. Performance Engineering Research Institute SciDAC-2 Enabling Technologies Institute Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Mary [University of Utah

    2014-09-19

    Enhancing the performance of SciDAC applications on petascale systems has high priority within DOE SC. As we look to the future, achieving expected levels of performance on high-end com-puting (HEC) systems is growing ever more challenging due to enormous scale, increasing archi-tectural complexity, and increasing application complexity. To address these challenges, PERI has implemented a unified, tripartite research plan encompassing: (1) performance modeling and prediction; (2) automatic performance tuning; and (3) performance engineering of high profile applications. The PERI performance modeling and prediction activity is developing and refining performance models, significantly reducing the cost of collecting the data upon which the models are based, and increasing model fidelity, speed and generality. Our primary research activity is automatic tuning (autotuning) of scientific software. This activity is spurred by the strong user preference for automatic tools and is based on previous successful activities such as ATLAS, which has automatically tuned components of the LAPACK linear algebra library, and other re-cent work on autotuning domain-specific libraries. Our third major component is application en-gagement, to which we are devoting approximately 30% of our effort to work directly with Sci-DAC-2 applications. This last activity not only helps DOE scientists meet their near-term per-formance goals, but also helps keep PERI research focused on the real challenges facing DOE computational scientists as they enter the Petascale Era.

  6. Designing Scholarships to Improve College Success: Final Report on the Performance-Based Scholarship Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Alexander K.; Patel, Reshma; Rudd, Timothy; Ratledge, Alyssa

    2015-01-01

    Performance-based scholarships have two main goals: (1) to give students more money for college; and (2) to provide incentives for academic progress. MDRC launched the Performance-Based Scholarship (PBS) Demonstration in 2008 to evaluate the effectiveness of these scholarships in a diverse set of states, institutions, and low-income student…

  7. The Effects of Nonperforming Loans on Dynamic Network Bank Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Day-Yang Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is to explore the relationship between banks’ performance and their nonperforming loans (NPLs. The banks’ performance through a network production process structure with NPLs is developed. With increasing NPLs in recent years, the quality of lending assets is a key significant and influencing factor for banks’ operational risk. The research methodology is to integrate the radial and nonradial measures of efficiency into the network production process framework with NPLs; this study utilizes network epsilon-based measure model to evaluate the banking industry performance. In addition, the key characteristics of the bank industry including those of financial holding companies and privatized government banks are needed to be figured out and to provide insight into what causes imperfectly competitive conditions for some banks. The results demonstrate that the banking sector grew consistently in three aspects of operation: operating performance, profitability performance, and risk management in the last five years of the subject period. These results showed that the overall banking sector was capable of pursuing growth in both operations and profits while accounting for risk management. The potential applications and strengths of network data envelopment analysis in assessing financial organizations are also highlighted.

  8. Instability predictions for circumferentially cracked Type-304 stainless steel pipes under dynamic loading. Volume 2. Appendixes. Final report. [BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahoor, A.; Wilkowski, G.; Abou-Sayed, I.; Marschall, C.; Broek, D.; Sampath, S.; Rhee, H.; Ahmad, J.

    1982-04-01

    This report provides methods to predict margins of safety for circumferentially cracked Type 304 stainless steel pipes subjected to applied bending loads. An integrated combination of experimentation and analysis research was pursued. Two types of experiments were performed: (1) laboratory-scale tests on center-cracked panels and bend specimens to establish the basic mechanical and fracture properties of Type 304 stainless steel, and (2) full-scale pipe fracture tests under quasi-static and dynamic loadings to assess the analysis procedures. Analyses were based upon the simple plastic collapse criterion, a J-estimation procedure, and elastic-plastic large-deformation finite element models.

  9. Instability predictions for circumferentially cracked Type-304 stainless steel pipes under dynamic loading. Volume 2. Appendixes. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahoor, A.; Wilkowski, G.; Abou-Sayed, I.; Marschall, C.; Broek, D.; Sampath, S.; Rhee, H.; Ahmad, J.

    1982-04-01

    This report provides methods to predict margins of safety for circumferentially cracked Type 304 stainless steel pipes subjected to applied bending loads. An integrated combination of experimentation and analysis research was pursued. Two types of experiments were performed: (1) laboratory-scale tests on center-cracked panels and bend specimens to establish the basic mechanical and fracture properties of Type 304 stainless steel, and (2) full-scale pipe fracture tests under quasi-static and dynamic loadings to assess the analysis procedures. Analyses were based upon the simple plastic collapse criterion, a J-estimation procedure, and elastic-plastic large-deformation finite element models

  10. Instability predictions for circumferentially cracked Type-304 stainless-steel pipes under dynamic loading. Final report. [BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahoor, A.; Wilkowski, G.; Abou-Sayed, I.; Marschall, C.; Broek, D.; Sampath, S.; Rhee, H.; Ahmad, J.

    1982-04-01

    This report provides methods to predict margins of safety for circumferentially cracked Type 304 stainless steel pipes subjected to applied bending loads. An integrated combination of experimentation and analysis research was pursued. Two types of experiments were performed: (1) laboratory-scale tests on center-cracked panels and bend specimens to establish the basic mechanical and fracture properties of Type 304 stainless steel, and (2) full-scale pipe fracture tests under quasi-static and dynamic loadings to assess the analysis procedures. Analyses were based upon the simple plastic collapse criterion, a J-estimation procedure, and elastic-plastic large-deformation finite element models.

  11. Swimming performance changes during the final 3 weeks of training leading to the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujika, I; Padilla, S; Pyne, D

    2002-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the magnitude of the swimming performance change during the final 3 weeks of training (F3T) leading to the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games. Olympic swimmers who took part in the same event or events at the Telstra 2000 Grand Prix Series in Melbourne, Australia, (26 - 27 August 2000), and 21 - 28 d later at the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games (16 - 23 September 2000) were included in this analysis. A total of 99 performances (50 male, 49 female) were analysed. The overall performance improvement between pre- and post-F3T conditions for all swimmers was 2.18 +/- 1.50 % (p pre-Olympic F3T elicited a significant performance improvement of 2.57 % for male and 1.78 % for female swimmers at the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games. The magnitude was similar for all competition events, and was achieved by swimmers from different countries and performance levels. These data provide a quantitative framework for coaches and swimmers to set realistic performance goals based on individual performance levels before the final training phase leading to important competitions.

  12. High performance low cost interconnections for flip chip attachment with electrically conductive adhesive. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    This final report is a compilation of final reports from each of the groups participating in the program. The main three groups involved in this effort are the Thomas J. Watson Research Center of IBM Corporation in Yorktown Heights, New York, Assembly Process Design of IBM Corporation in Endicott, New York, and SMT Laboratory of Universal Instruments Corporation in Binghamton, New York. The group at the research center focused on the conductive adhesive materials development and characterization. The group in process development focused on processing of the Polymer-Metal-Solvent Paste (PMSP) to form conductive adhesive bumps, formation of the Polymer-Metal Composite (PMC) on semiconductor devices and study of the bonding process to circuitized organic carriers, and the long term durability and reliability of joints formed using the process. The group at Universal Instruments focused on development of an equipment set and bonding parameters for the equipment to produce bond assembly tooling. Reports of each of these individual groups are presented here reviewing their technical efforts and achievements.

  13. Effects of hazardous environments on animal performance. Final report, Mar 88-Mar 91

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, M.R.

    1992-03-01

    Using a variety of experimental methods and procedures, animal models are used to measure the effects on performance of combat threats and countermeasures for such threats. The ultimate usefulness of such measurements in animal models will depend on extrapolations from performance changes in animals to performance changes in humans performing tasks of military relevance. This report describes several tasks in use for performance assessments in animals, and the results of experiments using these tasks to estimate performance threats from chemical warfare agents and from chemical countermeasures to these agents, as well as the efficacy of such countermeasures in reducing deleterious effects of threat agents. The use of rodents to characterize changes in neural structure and function concomitant with near-lethal exposures to chemical threat agents is also illustrated. Efforts to make rodents more closely resemble primates in their sensitivity to anticholinesterases through the use of carboxylesterase inhibitors are reported. Development of a primate model for thermal stress effects in chemical warfare defense is also described. The application of primate performance assessment techniques to the medical question of hyperbaric oxygen treatment effects on carbon monoxide toxicity is also presented.

  14. Utility and performance relative to consumer product energy efficiency standards. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coggins, J.L.

    1979-12-14

    An investigation of the relative utility and performance of nine major household consumer products covered by the Energy Policy and Conservation Act is summarized. The objective was to define the terms utility and performance, to recommend methods for quantifying these two concepts, and to recommend an approach for dealing with utility and performance issues in the energy efficiency standards program. The definitions developed are: performance of a consumer product is the objective measure of how well, with the expected level of consumer input (following the manufacturer's instructions for installation and operation), the product does its intended job; and utility of a consumer product is a subjective measure, based on the consumer's perception, of the capability of the product to satisfy human needs. Quantification is based on test procedures and consumer survey methods which are largely already in use by industry. Utility and performance issues are important in product classification for prescribing energy efficiency standards. The recommended approach to utility and performance issues and classification is: prior to setting standards, evaluate utility and performance issues in the most quantitative way allowed by resources and schedules in order to develop classification guidelines. This approach requires no changes in existing Department of Energy test procedures.

  15. Lifespan Differences in Nonlinear Dynamics during Rest and Auditory Oddball Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Viktor; Lindenberger, Ulman

    2012-01-01

    Electroencephalographic recordings (EEG) were used to assess age-associated differences in nonlinear brain dynamics during both rest and auditory oddball performance in children aged 9.0-12.8 years, younger adults, and older adults. We computed nonlinear coupling dynamics and dimensional complexity, and also determined spectral alpha power as an…

  16. The effect of dynamic workstations on the performance of various computer and office-based tasks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burford, E.M.; Botter, J.; Commissaris, D.; Könemann, R.; Hiemstra-Van Mastrigt, S.; Ellegast, R.P.

    2013-01-01

    The effect of different workstations, conventional and dynamic, on different types of performance measures for several different office and computer based task was investigated in this research paper. The two dynamic workstations assessed were the Lifespan Treadmill Desk and the RightAngle

  17. Dynamic Social Networks in High Performance Football Coaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Occhino, Joseph; Mallett, Cliff; Rynne, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Background: Sports coaching is largely a social activity where engagement with athletes and support staff can enhance the experiences for all involved. This paper examines how high performance football coaches develop knowledge through their interactions with others within a social learning theory framework. Purpose: The key purpose of this study…

  18. Distributed dynamic simulations of networked control and building performance applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yahiaoui, Azzedine

    2018-01-01

    The use of computer-based automation and control systems for smart sustainable buildings, often so-called Automated Buildings (ABs), has become an effective way to automatically control, optimize, and supervise a wide range of building performance applications over a network while achieving the

  19. High Fidelity, “Faster than Real-Time” Simulator for Predicting Power System Dynamic Behavior - Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flueck, Alex [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2017-07-14

    The “High Fidelity, Faster than Real­Time Simulator for Predicting Power System Dynamic Behavior” was designed and developed by Illinois Institute of Technology with critical contributions from Electrocon International, Argonne National Laboratory, Alstom Grid and McCoy Energy. Also essential to the project were our two utility partners: Commonwealth Edison and AltaLink. The project was a success due to several major breakthroughs in the area of large­scale power system dynamics simulation, including (1) a validated faster than real­ time simulation of both stable and unstable transient dynamics in a large­scale positive sequence transmission grid model, (2) a three­phase unbalanced simulation platform for modeling new grid devices, such as independently controlled single­phase static var compensators (SVCs), (3) the world’s first high fidelity three­phase unbalanced dynamics and protection simulator based on Electrocon’s CAPE program, and (4) a first­of­its­ kind implementation of a single­phase induction motor model with stall capability. The simulator results will aid power grid operators in their true time of need, when there is a significant risk of cascading outages. The simulator will accelerate performance and enhance accuracy of dynamics simulations, enabling operators to maintain reliability and steer clear of blackouts. In the long­term, the simulator will form the backbone of the newly conceived hybrid real­time protection and control architecture that will coordinate local controls, wide­area measurements, wide­area controls and advanced real­time prediction capabilities. The nation’s citizens will benefit in several ways, including (1) less down time from power outages due to the faster­than­real­time simulator’s predictive capability, (2) higher levels of reliability due to the detailed dynamics plus protection simulation capability, and (3) more resiliency due to the three­ phase unbalanced simulator’s ability to

  20. A-jacks and Aquawrap installations in Utah : scour revetment performance evaluation, final report, December 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    This is a performance evaluation report for A-Jacks, an articulated concrete block designed to protect bridge elements exposed to the river scouring forces, and for Aquawrap, a glass fiber reinforced polymer designed to protect and strengthen bridge ...

  1. Historical performance evaluation of Iowa pavement treatments using data analytics : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    The pavement network in Iowa has reached a mature state making maintenance and rehabilitation activities more important than new construction. As such, a need exists to evaluate the performance of the pavement treatments and estimate their performanc...

  2. National Aeronautics and Space Administration FY 02 Revised Final Annual Performance Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    The Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA) was passed by Congress and signed by the President in 1993. GPRA was enacted to improve the efficiency of all Federal agencies, with the following specific goals: (1) Improve Federal program management, effectiveness, and public accountability; (2) Improve Congressional decision making on where to commit the Nation's financial and human resources; and (3) Improve citizen confidence in government performance. GPRA directs Executive Branch agencies to develop a customer-focused strategic plan that aligns activities with concrete missions and goals. The Act directs agencies to manage and measure results to justify Congressional appropriations and authorizations. The Report Consolidation Act of 2000 directs agencies to provide a report on the degree of success in achieving the goals and performance measures defined in the strategic and performance plans one hundred and fifty days after the completion of the fiscal year.

  3. Performance measures to characterize directional corridor travel time delay based on probe vehicle data : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Anonymous probe vehicle data are currently being collected on roadways throughout the United States. These data are being incorporated into local and statewide mobility reports to measure the performance of freeways and arterial systems. Predefined s...

  4. Quality Assurance Strategy for Existing Homes: Final Quality Management Primer for High Performing Homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Bianco, M.; Taggart, J.; Sikora, J.; Wood, A.

    2012-12-01

    This guide is designed to help Building America (BA) Teams understand quality management and its role in transitioning from conventional to high performance home building and remodeling. It explains what quality means, the value of quality management systems, the unique need for QMS when building high performing homes, and the first steps to a implementing a comprehensive QMS. This document provides a framework and context for BA teams when they encounter builders and remodelers.

  5. Quality Assurance Strategy for Existing Homes. Final Quality Management Primer for High Performing Homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Bianco, M. [NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States); Taggart, J. [NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States); Sikora, J. [NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States); Wood, A. [NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States)

    2012-12-01

    This guide is designed to help Building America (BA) teams understand quality management and its role in transitioning from conventional to high performance home building and remodeling. It explains what quality means, the value of quality management systems, the unique need for QMS when building high performing homes, and the first steps to a implementing a comprehensive QMS. This document provides a framework and context for BA teams when they encounter builders and remodelers.

  6. Telemetered sensors for dynamic activity and structural performance monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Christopher P.; Hamel, Michael J.; Arms, Steven W.

    2001-08-01

    The development of improved structures requires knowledge of their dynamic behavior. Minimally intrusive wireless systems, capable of monitoring vibration and impact, are needed in order to provide this knowledge. Our objective was to design, build, and test a high speed data collection and wireless data communications system, including microsensors, and capable of being embedded or externally worn. Our previous transmitter designs were small and could be used to transmit multichannel digital data, but they were not capable of fast data transmission rates. The addition of a remotely triggered datalogger allowed us to overcome the limitations of our earlier designs. A bi-directional RF communications link was used to trigger a sample to be logged (from 30 meters), as well as to request data to be transmitted to the host PC for data acquisition/analysis. Sweep rates of 2000 Hz were successfully demonstrated from a triad of MEMs accelerometers. The remote datalogger and transceiver and accelerometer package measured 12 mm by 24 mm by 6 mm thick; these were mounted to the feet of thoroughbred horses to study their impact levels. These small, fast, wireless data recording systems can be used to monitor rotating/ vibrating machinery and civil/automotive/aerospace structures.

  7. Dynamic pressure as a measure of gas turbine engine (GTE) performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinaldi, G; Stiharu, I; Packirisamy, M; Nerguizian, V; Landry, R Jr; Raskin, J-P

    2010-01-01

    Utilizing in situ dynamic pressure measurement is a promising novel approach with applications for both control and condition monitoring of gas turbine-based propulsion systems. The dynamic pressure created by rotating components within the engine presents a unique opportunity for controlling the operation of the engine and for evaluating the condition of a specific component through interpretation of the dynamic pressure signal. Preliminary bench-top experiments are conducted with dc axial fans for measuring fan RPM, blade condition, surge and dynamic temperature variation. Also, a method, based on standing wave physics, is presented for measuring the dynamic temperature simultaneously with the dynamic pressure. These tests are implemented in order to demonstrate the versatility of dynamic pressure-based diagnostics for monitoring several different parameters, and two physical quantities, dynamic pressure and dynamic temperature, with a single sensor. In this work, the development of a dynamic pressure sensor based on micro-electro-mechanical system technology for in situ gas turbine engine condition monitoring is presented. The dynamic pressure sensor performance is evaluated on two different gas turbine engines, one having a fan and the other without

  8. Drop-on-Demand Inkjet Printhead Performance Enhancement by Dynamic Lumped Element Modeling for Printable Electronics Fabrication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maowei He

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The major challenge in printable electronics fabrication is the print resolution and accuracy. In this paper, the dynamic lumped element model (DLEM is proposed to directly simulate an inkjet-printed nanosilver droplet formation process and used for predictively controlling jetting characteristics. The static lumped element model (LEM previously developed by the authors is extended to dynamic model with time-varying equivalent circuits to characterize nonlinear behaviors of piezoelectric printhead. The model is then used to investigate how performance of the piezoelectric ceramic actuator influences jetting characteristics of nanosilver ink. Finally, the proposed DLEM is applied to predict the printing quality using nanosilver ink. Experimental results show that, compared to other analytic models, the proposed DLEM has a simpler structure with the sufficient simulation and prediction accuracy.

  9. Evaluation of the Field Performance of Residential Fuel Cells: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torrero, E.; McClelland, R.

    2004-05-01

    Distributed generation has attracted significant interest from rural electric cooperatives and their customers. Cooperatives have a particular nexus because of inherently low customer density, growth patterns at the end of long lines, and an influx of customers and high-tech industries seeking to diversify out of urban environments. Fuel cells are considered a particularly interesting DG candidate for these cooperatives because of their power quality, efficiency, and environmental benefits. The National Rural Electric Cooperative Association Cooperative Research Network residential fuel cell program demonstrated RFC power plants and assessed related technical and application issues. This final subcontract report is an assessment of the program's results. This 3-year program leveraged Department of Energy (DOE) and National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) funding.

  10. The Dynamics of the Impact of Past Performance on Mutual Fund Flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goriaev, A.P.; Nijman, T.E.; Werker, B.J.M.

    2002-01-01

    This study reconsiders the determinants of flows into US growth funds, focusing in particular on the dynamics of the impact of past performance on flows.We model the flow-performance relationship at the monthly frequency, allowing for dependence of the sensitivity of flows to past performance on

  11. Simulation training improves team dynamics and performance in a low-resource cardiac intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivaram Subaya Emani

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: This study demonstrates the feasibility and effectiveness of simulationbased training in improving team dynamics and performance in lowresource pediatric CICU environments, indicating its potential role in eliminating communication barriers in these settings.

  12. Individual Differences in Cognitive and Noncognitive Abilities and Team Performance in Dynamic Task Environments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Doane, Stephanie

    2004-01-01

    The specific goal of this research was to examine the role of individual differences in cognitive and non-cognitive abilities on individual and team performance in a real-time dynamic team-task environment...

  13. Dynamic assessment of bridge deck performance considering realistic bridge-traffic interaction : research brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    This study is to develop simulation methodology to conduct the dynamic assessment of bridge deck performance subjected to traffic. Concrete bridge decks are exposed to daily traffic loads and may experience some surface cracking caused by excessive s...

  14. Some effects of sleep deprivation on tracking performance in static and dynamic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    The influence of approximately 34 and 55 h of sleep deprivation on performance scores derived from manually tracking the localizer needle on an aircraft instrument was assessed under both static (no motion) and dynamic (whole-body angular acceleratio...

  15. Performance of a Sequential and Parallel Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) Solver on a Missile Body Configuration

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hisley, Dixie

    1999-01-01

    .... The goals of this report are: (1) to investigate the performance of message passing and loop level parallelization techniques, as they were implemented in the computational fluid dynamics (CFD...

  16. High-Performance Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration by Coupling Reservoir Simulation and Molecular Dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Bao, Kai; Yan, Mi; Allen, Rebecca; Salama, Amgad; Lu, Ligang; Jordan, Kirk E.; Sun, Shuyu; Keyes, David E.

    2015-01-01

    The present work describes a parallel computational framework for carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration simulation by coupling reservoir simulation and molecular dynamics (MD) on massively parallel high-performance-computing (HPC) systems

  17. Mild Traumatic Brain Injury and Dynamic Simulated Shooting Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    differences between tasks. All pairwise comparisons were adjusted with a Sidak correction for multiple comparisons. TLX scores 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35...research at multiple sites. Specific to the question of MTBI-related balance, we recommend that future studies seek, when feasible, to quantify body sway...higher ratings of perceived workload. In addition, the alternate analyses yielded some preliminary evidence of shooting performance decrements

  18. Startle Auditory Stimuli Enhance the Performance of Fast Dynamic Contractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Del-Olmo, Miguel; Río-Rodríguez, Dan; Iglesias-Soler, Eliseo; Acero, Rafael M.

    2014-01-01

    Fast reaction times and the ability to develop a high rate of force development (RFD) are crucial for sports performance. However, little is known regarding the relationship between these parameters. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of auditory stimuli of different intensities on the performance of a concentric bench-press exercise. Concentric bench-presses were performed by thirteen trained subjects in response to three different conditions: a visual stimulus (VS); a visual stimulus accompanied by a non-startle auditory stimulus (AS); and a visual stimulus accompanied by a startle auditory stimulus (SS). Peak RFD, peak velocity, onset movement, movement duration and electromyography from pectoralis and tricep muscles were recorded. The SS condition induced an increase in the RFD and peak velocity and a reduction in the movement onset and duration, in comparison with the VS and AS condition. The onset activation of the pectoralis and tricep muscles was shorter for the SS than for the VS and AS conditions. These findings point out to specific enhancement effects of loud auditory stimulation on the rate of force development. This is of relevance since startle stimuli could be used to explore neural adaptations to resistance training. PMID:24489967

  19. Startle auditory stimuli enhance the performance of fast dynamic contractions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Fernandez-Del-Olmo

    Full Text Available Fast reaction times and the ability to develop a high rate of force development (RFD are crucial for sports performance. However, little is known regarding the relationship between these parameters. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of auditory stimuli of different intensities on the performance of a concentric bench-press exercise. Concentric bench-presses were performed by thirteen trained subjects in response to three different conditions: a visual stimulus (VS; a visual stimulus accompanied by a non-startle auditory stimulus (AS; and a visual stimulus accompanied by a startle auditory stimulus (SS. Peak RFD, peak velocity, onset movement, movement duration and electromyography from pectoralis and tricep muscles were recorded. The SS condition induced an increase in the RFD and peak velocity and a reduction in the movement onset and duration, in comparison with the VS and AS condition. The onset activation of the pectoralis and tricep muscles was shorter for the SS than for the VS and AS conditions. These findings point out to specific enhancement effects of loud auditory stimulation on the rate of force development. This is of relevance since startle stimuli could be used to explore neural adaptations to resistance training.

  20. Self-perceived versus objectively measured competence in performing clinical practical procedures by final year medical students

    OpenAIRE

    Katowa-Mukwato, Patricia; Banda, Sekelani

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine and compare the self-perceived and objectively measured competence in performing 14 core-clinical practical procedures by Final Year Medical Students of the University of Zambia. Methods The study included 56 out of 60 graduating University of Zambia Medical Students of the 2012/2013 academic year. Self-perceived competence: students rated their competence on 14 core- clinical practical procedures using a self-administered questionnaire on a 5-point Likert scale. Objec...

  1. Lithium/Manganese Dioxide (Li/MnO(2)) Battery Performance Evaluation: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingersoll, D.; Clark, N.H.

    1999-04-01

    In February 1997, under the auspices of the Product Realization Program, an initiative to develop performance models for lithium/manganese dioxide-based batteries began. As a part of this initiative, the performance characteristics of the cells under a variety of conditions were determined, both for model development and for model validation. As a direct result of this work, it became apparent that possible Defense Program (DP) uses for batteries based on this cell chemistry existed. A larger effort aimed at mapping the performance envelope of this chemistry was initiated in order to assess the practicality of this cell chemistry, not only for DP applications, but also for other uses. The work performed included an evaluation of the cell performance as a function of a number of variables, including cell size, manufacturer, current, pulse loads, constant current loads, safety, etc. In addition, the development of new evaluation techniques that would apply to any battery system, such as those related to reliability assessments began. This report describes the results of these evaluations.

  2. Gravity-gradient dynamics experiments performed in orbit utilizing the Radio Astronomy Explorer (RAE-1) spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walden, H.

    1973-01-01

    Six dynamic experiments were performed in earth orbit utilizing the RAE spacecraft in order to test the accuracy of the mathematical model of RAE dynamics. The spacecraft consisted of four flexible antenna booms, mounted on a rigid cylindrical spacecraft hub at center, for measuring radio emissions from extraterrestrial sources. Attitude control of the gravity stabilized spacecraft was tested by using damper clamping, single lower leading boom operations, and double lower boom operations. Results and conclusions of the in-orbit dynamic experiments proved the accuracy of the analytic techniques used to model RAE dynamical behavior.

  3. Using a Feedback Environment to Improve Creative Performance: A Dynamic Affect Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Gong, Zhenxing; Zhang, Na

    2017-01-01

    Prior research on feedback and creative performance has neglected the dynamic nature of affect and has focused only on the influence of positive affect. We argue that creative performance is the result of a dynamic process in which a person experiences a phase of negative affect and subsequently enters a state of high positive affect that is influenced by the feedback environment. Hierarchical regression was used to analyze a sample of 264 employees from seven industry firms. The results indi...

  4. How milk-fed dairy calves perform in stable versus dynamic groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rikke Engelbrecht; Sørensen, Jan Tind; Skjøth, F

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the present field trial was to compare calf performance among pre-weaned calves in two different group housing systems, stable groups ("all in-all out") and dynamic groups (continuous introduction). Performance data was collected from 484 calves randomly assigned to the two syste....../days). The prevalence of both diarrhoea and respiratory disease were more than twice as high among calves in dynamic groups compared to calves in stable groups....

  5. [Electronic and structural properties of individual nanometer-size supported metallic clusters]. Final performance report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reifenberger, R.

    1993-09-01

    This report summarizes the work performed under contract DOE-FCO2-84ER45162. During the past ten years, our study of electron emission from laser-illuminated field emission tips has taken on a broader scope by addressing problems of direct interest to those concerned with the unique physical and chemical properties of nanometer-size clusters. The work performed has demonstrated that much needed data can be obtained on individual nanometer-size clusters supported on a wide-variety of different substrates. The work was performed in collaboration with R.P. Andres in the School of Chemical Engineering at Purdue University. The Multiple Expansion Cluster Source developed by Andres and his students was essential for producing the nanometer-size clusters studied. The following report features a discussion of these results. This report provides a motivation for studying the properties of nanometer-size clusters and summarizes the results obtained.

  6. Effects of coal-derived trace species on performance of molten carbonate fuel cells. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-05-01

    The Carbonate Fuel Cell is a very promising option for highly efficient generation of electricity from many fuels. If coal-gas is to be used, the interactions of coal-derived impurities on various fuel cell components need to be understood. Thus the effects on Carbonate Fuel Cell performance due to ten different coal-derived contaminants viz., NH{sub 3}, H{sub 2}S, HC{ell}, H{sub 2}Se, AsH{sub 3}, Zn, Pb, Cd, Sn, and Hg, have been studied at Energy Research Corporation. Both experimental and theoretical evaluations were performed, which have led to mechanistic insights and initial estimation of qualitative tolerance levels for each species individually and in combination with other species. The focus of this study was to investigate possible coal-gas contaminant effects on the anode side of the Carbonate Fuel Cell, using both out-of-cell thermogravimetric analysis by isothermal TGA, and fuel cell testing in bench-scale cells. Separate experiments detailing performance decay in these cells with high levels of ammonia contamination (1 vol %) and with trace levels of Cd, Hg, and Sn, have indicated that, on the whole, these elements do not affect carbonate fuel cell performance. However, some performance decay may result when a number of the other six species are present, singly or simultaneously, as contaminants in fuel gas. In all cases, tolerance levels have been estimated for each of the 10 species and preliminary models have been developed for six of them. At this stage the models are limited to isothermal, benchscale (300 cm{sup 2} size) single cells. The information obtained is expected to assist in the development of coal-gas cleanup systems, while the contaminant performance effects data will provide useful basic information for modeling fuel cell endurance in conjunction with integrated gasifier/fuel-cell systems (IGFC).

  7. Performance Evaluation of Multivariate Analysis Methods on the $Z \\gamma$ Final State

    CERN Document Server

    Amos, Kieran Robert

    2017-01-01

    The performance of various machine learning algorithms are evaluated for their separation power of the $Z\\gamma$ Electroweak process (with $Z\\rightarrow\\ell\\ell$ and $\\ell=e,\\mu$) against the various backgrounds that populate the selection.\\\\ The Boosted Decision Tree method is found to deliver the best performance and is compared to that of neural net analysis and previously used methods using $36.1\\, \\text{fb}^{-1}$ of data obtained at $\\sqrt{s}=13\\, \\text{TeV}$ from the ATLAS detector in 2015 and 2016.

  8. Research on Dynamic Models and Performances of Shield Tunnel Boring Machine Cutterhead Driving System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianhong Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A general nonlinear time-varying (NLTV dynamic model and linear time-varying (LTV dynamic model are presented for shield tunnel boring machine (TBM cutterhead driving system, respectively. Different gear backlashes and mesh damped and transmission errors are considered in the NLTV dynamic model. The corresponding multiple-input and multiple-output (MIMO state space models are also presented. Through analyzing the linear dynamic model, the optimal reducer ratio (ORR and optimal transmission ratio (OTR are obtained for the shield TBM cutterhead driving system, respectively. The NLTV and LTV dynamic models are numerically simulated, and the effects of physical parameters under various conditions of NLTV dynamic model are analyzed. Physical parameters such as the load torque, gear backlash and transmission error, gear mesh stiffness and damped, pinions inertia and damped, large gear inertia and damped, and motor rotor inertia and damped are investigated in detail to analyze their effects on dynamic response and performances of the shield TBM cutterhead driving system. Some preliminary approaches are proposed to improve dynamic performances of the cutterhead driving system, and dynamic models will provide a foundation for shield TBM cutterhead driving system's cutterhead fault diagnosis, motion control, and torque synchronous control.

  9. The performance model of dynamic virtual organization (VO) formations within grid computing context

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Liangxiu

    2009-01-01

    Grid computing aims to enable 'resource sharing and coordinated problem solving in dynamic, multi-institutional virtual organizations (VOs)'. Within the grid computing context, successful dynamic VO formations mean a number of individuals and institutions associated with certain resources join together and form new VOs in order to effectively execute tasks within given time steps. To date, while the concept of VOs has been accepted, few research has been done on the impact of effective dynamic virtual organization formations. In this paper, we develop a performance model of dynamic VOs formation and analyze the effect of different complex organizational structures and their various statistic parameter properties on dynamic VO formations from three aspects: (1) the probability of a successful VO formation under different organizational structures and statistic parameters change, e.g. average degree; (2) the effect of task complexity on dynamic VO formations; (3) the impact of network scales on dynamic VO formations. The experimental results show that the proposed model can be used to understand the dynamic VO formation performance of the simulated organizations. The work provides a good path to understand how to effectively schedule and utilize resources based on the complex grid network and therefore improve the overall performance within grid environment.

  10. Target acquisition: Human observer performance studies and TARGAC model validation (Final Report)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valeton, J.M.; Bijl, P.; Gillespie, P.

    1995-01-01

    Human target acquisition performance was studied using the thermal imagery that was collected during Battlefield Emissives Sources Trials under the European Theater Weather and Obscurants, (BEST TWO), organized by NATO AC243/Panel4/RSG.l5 in 1990. Recognition and identification probabilities were

  11. Articulated, Performance-Based Instruction Objectives Guide for Automotive Mechanics. Final Document. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, William Edward, Jr.

    Developed during a project designed to provide continuous, performance-based vocational training at the secondary and postsecondary levels, this instructional guide is intended to help teachers implement a laterally and vertically articulated secondary level automotive mechanics program. Introductory materials include descriptions of Automotive…

  12. Complex Multi-Chamber Airbag Performance Simulation Final Report CRADA No. TSB-961-94

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kay, Gregory [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kithil, Philip [Advanced Safety Concepts, Inc. (ASCI), Santa Fe, NM (United States)

    2018-01-22

    The purpose of this small business CRADA was to evaluate the performance of new airbag concepts which were developed by the Advanced Safety Concepts, Inc. (ASCI). These new airbag concepts, if successful, could have major potential savings to society in terms of fewer injuries, lost time and lives.

  13. Final report of DOE project "Detection, Localization and Diagnosis of Performance Problems Using PerfSONAR"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dovrolis, Konstantinos [Georgia Tech

    2014-04-15

    We present the development of a middleware service, called Pythia, that is able to detect, localize, and diagnose performance problems in the network paths that interconnect research sites that are of interest to DOE. The proposed service can analyze perfSONAR data collected from all participating sites.

  14. Benchmark dynamics in the environmental performance of ports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puig, Martí; Michail, Antonis; Wooldridge, Chris; Darbra, Rosa Mari

    2017-08-15

    This paper analyses the 2016 environmental benchmark performance of the port sector, based on a wide representation of EcoPorts members. This is the fifth time that this study has been conducted as an initiative of the European Sea Ports Organisation (ESPO). The data and results are derived from the Self-Diagnosis Method (SDM), a concise checklist against which port managers can self-assess the environmental management of their port in relation to the performance of the EcoPorts membership. The SDM tool was developed in the framework of the ECOPORTS project (2002-2005) and it is managed by ESPO. A total number of 91 ports from 20 different European Maritime States contributed to this evaluation. The main results are that air quality remains as the top environmental priority of the respondent ports, followed by energy consumption and noise. In terms of environmental management, the study confirms that key components are commonly implemented in the majority of European ports. 94% of contributing ports have a designated environmental manager, 92% own an environmental policy and 82% implement an environmental monitoring program. Waste is identified as the most monitored issue in ports (80%), followed by energy consumption (73%) and water quality (70%). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. IT-enabled dynamic capability on performance: An empirical study of BSC model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adilson Carlos Yoshikuni

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available ew studies have investigated the influence of “information capital,” through IT-enabled dynamic capability, on corporate performance, particularly in economic turbulence. Our study investigates the causal relationship between performance perspectives of the balanced scorecard using partial least squares path modeling. Using data on 845 Brazilian companies, we conduct a quantitative empirical study of firms during an economic crisis and observe the following interesting results. Operational and analytical IT-enabled dynamic capability had positive effects on business process improvement and corporate performance. Results pertaining to mediation (endogenous variables and moderation (control variables clarify IT’s role in and benefits for corporate performance.

  16. Electronic and magnetic interactions in high temperature superconducting and high coercivity materials. Final performance report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, B.R.

    1997-01-01

    The issue addressed in the research was how to understand what controls the competition between two types of phase transition (ordering) which may be present in a hybridizing correlated-electron system containing two transition-shell atomic species; and how the variation of behavior observed can be used to understand the mechanisms giving the observed ordered state. This is significant for understanding mechanisms of high-temperature superconductivity and other states of highly correlated electron systems. Thus the research pertains to magnetic effects as related to interactions giving high temperature superconductivity; where the working hypothesis is that the essential feature governing the magnetic and superconducting behavior of copper-oxide-type systems is a cooperative valence fluctuation mechanism involving the copper ions, as mediated through hybridization effects dominated by the oxygen p electrons. (Substitution of praseodymium at the rare earth sites in the 1·2·3 material provides an interesting illustration of this mechanism since experimentally such substitution strongly suppresses and destroys the superconductivity; and, at 100% Pr, gives Pr f-electron magnetic ordering at a temperature above 16K). The research was theoretical and computational and involved use of techniques aimed at correlated-electron systems that can be described within the confines of model hamiltonians such as the Anderson lattice hamiltonian. Specific techniques used included slave boson methodology used to treat modification of electronic structure and the Mori projection operator (memory function) method used to treat magnetic response (dynamic susceptibility)

  17. Dynamic thermal performance of alveolar brick construction system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gracia, A. de; Castell, A.; Medrano, M.; Cabeza, L.F.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Even though U-value does not measure thermal inertia, it is the commonly used parameter. → The thermal performance analysis of buildings must include the evaluation of transient parameters. → Transient parameters of alveolar brick constructive system show good agreement with its low energy consumption. -- Abstract: Alveolar bricks are being introduced in building sector due to the simplicity of their construction system and to the elimination of the insulation material. Nevertheless, it is not clear if this new system is energetically efficient and which is its thermal behaviour. This paper presents an experimental and theoretical study to evaluate the thermal behaviour of the alveolar brick construction system, compared with a traditional Mediterranean brick system with insulation. The experimental study consists of measuring the thermal performance of four real house-like cubicles. The thermal transmittance in steady-state, also known as U-value, is calculated theoretically and experimentally for each cubicle, presenting the insulated cubicles as the best construction system, with differences around 45% in comparison to the alveolar one. On the other hand, experimental results show significantly smaller differences on the energy consumption between the alveolar and insulated construction systems during summer period (around 13% higher for the alveolar cubicle). These values demonstrate the high thermal efficiency of the alveolar system. In addition, the lack of agreement between the measured energy consumption and the calculated U-values, guides the authors to analyze the thermal inertia of the different building components. Therefore, several transient parameters, extracted from the heat transfer matrix and from experimental data, are also evaluated. It can be concluded that the alveolar brick construction system presents higher thermal inertia than the insulated one, justifying the low measured energy consumption.

  18. A Final Review of the Performance of the CDF Run II Data Acquisition System

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    The CDF Collider Detector at Fermilab ceased data collection on September 30, 2011 after over twenty five years of operation. We review the performance of the CDF Run II data acquisition systems over the last ten of these years while recording nearly 10 fb-1 of proton-antiproton collisions with a high degree of efficiency. Technology choices in the online control and configuration systems and front-end embedded processing have impacted the efficiency and quality of the data accumulated by CDF, and have had to perform over a large range of instantaneous luminosity values and trigger rates. We identify significant sources of problems and successes. In particular, we present our experience computing and acquiring data in a radiation environment, and attempt to correlate system technical faults with radiation dose rate and technology choices.

  19. A Final Review of the Performance of the CDF Run II Data Acquisition System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badgett, W

    2012-01-01

    The CDF Collider Detector at Fermilab ceased data collection on September 30, 2011 after over twenty-five years of operation. We review the performance of the CDF Run II data acquisition systems over the last ten of these years while recording nearly 10 inverse femtobarns of proton-antiproton collisions with a high degree of efficiency - exceeding 83%. Technology choices in the online control and configuration systems and front-end embedded processing have impacted the efficiency and quality of the data accumulated by CDF, and have had to perform over a large range of instantaneous luminosity values and trigger rates. We identify significant sources of problems and successes. In particular, we present our experience computing and acquiring data in a radiation environment, and attempt to correlate system technical faults with radiation dose rate and technology choices.

  20. Neutronic calculations for JET. Performed with the FURNACE2 program. (Final report JET contract JEO/9004)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verschuur, K.A.

    1996-10-01

    Neutron-transport calculations with the FURNACE(2) program system, in support of the Neutron Diagnostic Group at JET, have been performed since 1980, i.e. since the construction phase of JET. FURNACE(2) is a ray-tracing/multiple-reflection transport program system for toroidal geometries, that orginally was developed for blanket neutronics studies and which then was improved and extended for application to the neutron-diagnostics at JET. (orig./WL)

  1. Final Technical Report - Recovery Act: Organic Coatings as Encapsulants for Low Cost, High Performance PV Modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuart Hellring; Jiping Shao; James Poole

    2011-12-05

    The objective of this project was to evaluate the feasibility of utilizing PPG's commercial organic coatings systems as efficient, modernized encapsulants for low cost, high performance, thin film photovoltaic modules. Our hypothesis was that the combination of an anticorrosive coating with a more traditional barrier topcoat would mitigate many electrochemical processes that are now responsible for the significant portion of photovoltaic (PV) failures, thereby nullifying the extremely high moisture barrier requirements of currently used encapsulation technology. Nine commercially available metal primer coatings and six commercially available top coatings were selected for screening. Twenty-one different primer/top coat combinations were evaluated. The primer coatings were shown to be the major contributor to corrosion inhibition, adhesion, and barrier properties. Two primer coatings and one top coating were downselected for testing on specially-fabricated test modules. The coated test modules passed initial current leakage and insulation testing. Damp Heat testing of control modules showed visible corrosion to the bus bar metal, whereas the coated modules showed none. One of the primer/top coat combinations retained solar power performance after Damp Heat testing despite showing some delamination at the EVA/solar cell interface. Thermal Cycling and Humidity Freeze testing resulted in only one test module retaining its power performance. Failure modes depended on the particular primer/top coating combination used. Overall, this study demonstrated that a relatively thin primer/top coating has the potential to replace the potting film and backsheet in crystalline silicon-based photovoltaic modules. Positive signals were received from commercially available coatings developed for applications having performance requirements different from those required for photovoltaic modules. It is likely that future work to redesign and customize these coatings would result in

  2. High Density, Insensitive Oxidizer With RDX Performance Final Report CRADA No. TC02178.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagoria, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Preda, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-08-25

    This was a collaborative effort between Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC as manager and operator of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Physical Sciences, Inc. (PSI), to develop a synthesis and evaluate a novel high density, insensitive oxidizer with RDX performance. This CRADA resulted from the award of a Phase I STTR ("STTR") from DOD. In recent years, the synthesis of new energetic heterocyclic compounds to replace the energetic materials currently in the stockpile has received a great amount of attention. The Office of the Secretary of Defense has identified that there is a need to incorporate new energetic materials in current and future weapon systems in an effort to increase performance and decrease sensitivity. For many of the future weapon systems, incorporation of energetic compounds currently in the stockpile will not provide the desired performance and sensitivity goals. The success of this CRADA may lead to a Phase I option STTR from DOD and to a Phase II STTR from DOD. The goal of this CRADA was to produce and test a novel oxidizer, 2,5,8-trinitroheptazine (TNH).

  3. Performance measurement of the gas tax and public transit funds : final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    Federal funding for the gas tax fund and public transit fund are provided through Infrastructure Canada for municipal infrastructure across Canada in a broad range of municipal service projects. In order to identify appropriate outcomes that would meet reporting requirements for the gas tax fund and public transit fund, this report outlined a performance measurement approach that would allow for the reporting of projects under both funds and provide a structured methodology for multiple year analysis of benefits. The report discussed the performance measures process review and outcomes approach logic model. It also provided an outline of information sourcing strategies including an overview of the project types and expenditures; information sourcing strategy; typical municipal information sources by project type; performance measurement framework assumptions and limitations; and modeling of outcomes from outputs. Conclusions and recommendations were also offered. It was concluded that based on a comprehensive review of ancillary benefits and outcomes of various historic funding programs, there are 3 foundational outcomes that should be considered to assess all initial program outcomes. These include cleaner air, cleaner water and reduced greenhouse gas emissions. tabs., figs

  4. Study on dynamic team performance evaluation methodology based on team situation awareness model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Suk Chul

    2005-02-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to provide a theoretical framework and its evaluation methodology of team dynamic task performance of operating team at nuclear power plant under the dynamic and tactical environment such as radiological accident. This thesis suggested a team dynamic task performance evaluation model so called team crystallization model stemmed from Endsely's situation awareness model being comprised of four elements: state, information, organization, and orientation and its quantification methods using system dynamics approach and a communication process model based on a receding horizon control approach. The team crystallization model is a holistic approach for evaluating the team dynamic task performance in conjunction with team situation awareness considering physical system dynamics and team behavioral dynamics for a tactical and dynamic task at nuclear power plant. This model provides a systematic measure to evaluate time-dependent team effectiveness or performance affected by multi-agents such as plant states, communication quality in terms of transferring situation-specific information and strategies for achieving the team task goal at given time, and organizational factors. To demonstrate the applicability of the proposed model and its quantification method, the case study was carried out using the data obtained from a full-scope power plant simulator for 1,000MWe pressurized water reactors with four on-the-job operating groups and one expert group who knows accident sequences. Simulated results team dynamic task performance with reference key plant parameters behavior and team-specific organizational center of gravity and cue-and-response matrix illustrated good symmetry with observed value. The team crystallization model will be useful and effective tool for evaluating team effectiveness in terms of recruiting new operating team for new plant as cost-benefit manner. Also, this model can be utilized as a systematic analysis tool for

  5. Study on dynamic team performance evaluation methodology based on team situation awareness model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Suk Chul

    2005-02-15

    The purpose of this thesis is to provide a theoretical framework and its evaluation methodology of team dynamic task performance of operating team at nuclear power plant under the dynamic and tactical environment such as radiological accident. This thesis suggested a team dynamic task performance evaluation model so called team crystallization model stemmed from Endsely's situation awareness model being comprised of four elements: state, information, organization, and orientation and its quantification methods using system dynamics approach and a communication process model based on a receding horizon control approach. The team crystallization model is a holistic approach for evaluating the team dynamic task performance in conjunction with team situation awareness considering physical system dynamics and team behavioral dynamics for a tactical and dynamic task at nuclear power plant. This model provides a systematic measure to evaluate time-dependent team effectiveness or performance affected by multi-agents such as plant states, communication quality in terms of transferring situation-specific information and strategies for achieving the team task goal at given time, and organizational factors. To demonstrate the applicability of the proposed model and its quantification method, the case study was carried out using the data obtained from a full-scope power plant simulator for 1,000MWe pressurized water reactors with four on-the-job operating groups and one expert group who knows accident sequences. Simulated results team dynamic task performance with reference key plant parameters behavior and team-specific organizational center of gravity and cue-and-response matrix illustrated good symmetry with observed value. The team crystallization model will be useful and effective tool for evaluating team effectiveness in terms of recruiting new operating team for new plant as cost-benefit manner. Also, this model can be utilized as a systematic analysis tool for

  6. Static versus dynamic stretching: Chronic and acute effects on Agility performance in male athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iman Taleb-Beydokhti

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the acute and chronic effects of static & dynamic stretching protocols on agility performance in amateur handball players. Twelve male amateur handball players (age: 19.66 ± 4.02 years old, weight: 67.12 ± 8.73 kg, height: 178.29 ± 7.81 cm participated in this study. The athletes were randomly allocated into two groups: static stretching or dynamic stretching. All of them underwent an initial evaluation and were submitted to the first intervention. They were evaluated once again and at the end of 12 training sessions. The results analyzed using ANOVA showed that there was a significant decrease in agility time after dynamic stretching against no stretching in the acute phase; but, there were no significant differences between dynamic stretching and no stretching in the chronic phase. In addition, there was no a significant difference between no stretching and static stretching in the acute phase; while, There was a significant decrease in agility time after no stretching against static stretching in the chronic phase. It was concluded that acute dynamic stretching as part of a warm-up may decrease agility time performance, whereas static stretching seems to increase agility time performance. Consequently, the acute and chronic static stretching should not be performed prior to an explosive athletic performance. Keywords: Handball, Agility, Dynamic stretching, Static stretching

  7. Advanced Insulation for High Performance Cost-Effective Wall, Roof, and Foundation Systems Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costeux, Stephane [Dow Chemical Company, Midland, MI (United States); Bunker, Shanon [Dow Chemical Company, Midland, MI (United States)

    2013-12-20

    The objective of this project was to explore and potentially develop high performing insulation with increased R/inch and low impact on climate change that would help design highly insulating building envelope systems with more durable performance and lower overall system cost than envelopes with equivalent performance made with materials available today. The proposed technical approach relied on insulation foams with nanoscale pores (about 100 nm in size) in which heat transfer will be decreased. Through the development of new foaming methods, of new polymer formulations and new analytical techniques, and by advancing the understanding of how cells nucleate, expand and stabilize at the nanoscale, Dow successfully invented and developed methods to produce foams with 100 nm cells and 80% porosity by batch foaming at the laboratory scale. Measurements of the gas conductivity on small nanofoam specimen confirmed quantitatively the benefit of nanoscale cells (Knudsen effect) to increase insulation value, which was the key technical hypotheses of the program. In order to bring this technology closer to a viable semi-continuous/continuous process, the project team modified an existing continuous extrusion foaming process as well as designed and built a custom system to produce 6" x 6" foam panels. Dow demonstrated for the first time that nanofoams can be produced in a both processes. However, due to technical delays, foam characteristics achieved so far fall short of the 100 nm target set for optimal insulation foams. In parallel with the technology development, effort was directed to the determination of most promising applications for nanocellular insulation foam. Voice of Customer (VOC) exercise confirmed that demand for high-R value product will rise due to building code increased requirements in the near future, but that acceptance for novel products by building industry may be slow. Partnerships with green builders, initial launches in smaller markets (e.g. EIFS

  8. Final Technical Report, Oct 2004 - Nov. 2006, High Performance Flexible Reversible Solid Oxide Fuel Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guan, Jie; Minh, Nguyen

    2007-02-21

    This report summarizes the work performed for the program entitled “High Performance Flexible Reversible Solid Oxide Fuel Cell” under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC36-04GO14351 for the U. S. Department of Energy. The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate a single modular stack that generates electricity from a variety of fuels (hydrogen and other fuels such as biomass, distributed natural gas, etc.) and when operated in the reverse mode, produces hydrogen from steam. This project has evaluated and selected baseline cell materials, developed a set of materials for oxygen and hydrogen electrodes, and optimized electrode microstructures for reversible solid oxide fuel cells (RSOFCs); and demonstrated the feasibility and operation of a RSOFC multi-cell stack. A 10-cell reversible SOFC stack was operated over 1000 hours alternating between fuel cell (with hydrogen and methane as fuel) and steam electrolysis modes. The stack ran very successfully with high power density of 480 mW/cm2 at 0.7V and 80% fuel utilization in fuel cell mode and >6 SLPM hydrogen production in steam electrolysis mode using about 1.1 kW electrical power. The hydrogen generation is equivalent to a specific capability of 2.59 Nm3/m2 with electrical energy demand of 3 kWh/Nm3. The performance stability in electrolysis mode was improved vastly during the program with a degradation rate reduction from 8000 to 200 mohm-cm2/1000 hrs. This was accomplished by increasing the activity and improving microstructure of the oxygen electrode. Both cost estimate and technology assessment were conducted. Besides the flexibility running under both fuel cell mode and electrolysis mode, the reversible SOFC system has the potentials for low cost and high efficient hydrogen production through steam electrolysis. The cost for hydrogen production at large scale was estimated at ~$2.7/kg H2, comparing favorably with other electrolysis techology.

  9. (House Municipal School wind energy system: equipment performance). Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-05-14

    The performance of a Skyhawk horizontal axis wind system with a 3-blade, 15-ft upwind rotor is evaluated. The wind system was placed at the House Municipal School. The school is located between Tucumcari and Clovis, New Mexico and has an annual wind regime of 12 mi/h at a height of 33 ft. It was operated for 26 months and during that time has been out of service, due to breakdowns, 13 months. When the Skyhawk was operational, it generated between 100 and 700 kilowatt-hrs per month.

  10. Design and performance of the Georgia Tech Aquatic Center photovoltaic system. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohatgi, A.; Begovic, M.; Long, R.; Ropp, M.; Pregelj, A.

    1996-12-31

    A building-integrated DC PV array has been constructed on the Georgia Tech campus. The array is mounted on the roof of the Georgia Tech Aquatic Center (GTAC), site of the aquatic events during the 1996 Paralympic and Olympic Games in Atlanta. At the time of its construction, it was the world`s largest roof-mounted photovoltaic array, comprised of 2,856 modules and rates at 342 kW. This section describes the electrical and physical layout of the PV system, and the associated data acquisition system (DAS) which monitors the performance of the system and collects measurements of several important meteorological parameters.

  11. Final Report - High Performance, Durable, Low Cost Membrane Electrode Assemblies for Transportation Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinbach, Andrew [3M Company, Maplewood, MN (United States)

    2017-05-31

    The primary project objective was development of improved polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) which address the key DOE barriers of performance, durability and cost. Additional project objectives were to address commercialization barriers specific to MEAs comprising 3M nanostructured thin film (NSTF) electrodes, including a larger-than-acceptable sensitivity to operating conditions, an unexplained loss of rated power capability with operating time, and slow break-in conditioning. Significant progress was made against each of these barriers, and most DOE 2020 targets were met or substantially approached.

  12. High Performance Fuel Laboratory, Hanford Reservation, Richland, Washington. Final environmental impact statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-09-01

    The High Performance Fuel Laboratory (HPFL) will provide pilot scale tests of manufacturing processes, equipment, and handling systems and of accountability and safeguards, methods, and equipment while keeping radiological and chemical exposures of the workers, public, and environment at the lowest practicable levels. The experience gained from designing, constructing and operating the HPFL can be used in future commitments to commercial fuel fabrication plants in the late 1980s and beyond for processing of nuclear fuel. The HPFL site is located in the 400 Area of the 559-square mile, federally owned Hanford Reservation. This environmental impact statement considers effects of the HPFL under normal conditions and in the event of an accident

  13. High performance ground penetrating radar survey of TA-49/Area 2. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeberling, R.F.; Rangel, M.J. III

    1994-09-01

    The results of high performance ground penetrating radar study of Area 2 at Technical Area 49 are presented. The survey was commissioned as part of Los Alamos Laboratory's continuing Environmental Remediation program and was completed and analyzed before borehole studies in Area 2 were started. Based upon the ground penetrating radar results, the location of one of the planned boreholes was moved to assure the drilling area was as safe as possible. While earlier attempts to use commercial radar devices at this facility had not been successful, the radar and digital processing system developed at Los Alamos were able to significantly improve the buried physical detail of the site

  14. Final Report from The University of Texas at Austin for DEGAS: Dynamic Global Address Space programming environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erez, Mattan

    2018-02-21

    The Dynamic, Exascale Global Address Space programming environment (DEGAS) project will develop the next generation of programming models and runtime systems to meet the challenges of Exascale computing. Our approach is to provide an efficient and scalable programming model that can be adapted to application needs through the use of dynamic runtime features and domain-specific languages for computational kernels. We address the following technical challenges: Programmability: Rich set of programming constructs based on a Hierarchical Partitioned Global Address Space (HPGAS) model, demonstrated in UPC++. Scalability: Hierarchical locality control, lightweight communication (extended GASNet), and ef- ficient synchronization mechanisms (Phasers). Performance Portability: Just-in-time specialization (SEJITS) for generating hardware-specific code and scheduling libraries for domain-specific adaptive runtimes (Habanero). Energy Efficiency: Communication-optimal code generation to optimize energy efficiency by re- ducing data movement. Resilience: Containment Domains for flexible, domain-specific resilience, using state capture mechanisms and lightweight, asynchronous recovery mechanisms. Interoperability: Runtime and language interoperability with MPI and OpenMP to encourage broad adoption.

  15. Final Technical Report - Period of Performance: 09/01/97 to 05/14/15

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Long, Lance Eric

    2016-01-01

    Prior to 1997, the PI had studied the unusual upper critical magnetic field phase boundaries of several novel or exotic types of superconductors, including charge density wave materials such as NbSe_2, organic superconductors such as K-(ET)_2Cu[N(CN)_2]Br, high-temperature oxide superconductors such as (Ba,K)BiO_3 and the cuprates, heavy fermion superconductors such as U_6Fe, UBe_1_3, URu_2Si_2 and UPt_3, and re-entrant Kondo alloys such as (La,Ce)Al_2 and ferromagnetic superconductors such as ErRh_4B_4. Most of these materials exhibited marked positive or negative curvature of H_C_2(T) which could not be explained by traditional pair-breaking models. It became clear that many of these materials had very short coherence lengths that made quantized vortices highly mobile (depinned) near the phase boundary, and the fundamental, equilibrium H_C_2(T) difficult to measure using finite field or current drives. These problems made the underlying physics obscure, and led to erroneous interpretations of experimental data in terms of models of exotic superconducting pairing mechanisms. Around 1995, these issues led the PI to take advantage of modern electron beam lithography techniques for patterning superconducting and ferromagnetic thin films on the nanoscale. Primarily due to strong magnetic shape anisotropy effects, EBL patterning has led to enhanced control of the spatial distribution and dynamics of topological defects such as domain walls and magnetic vortices, which can create serious energy dissipation and other limitations for modern devices. Moreover, finite size and interface effects also strongly alter phase transition temperatures and phase boundaries of superconducting and magnetic films, as well as introduce barriers to equilibration, enhanced fluctuations and alter magnetic relaxation. Geometrical frustration and spin ice behavior can also be systematically controlled in patterned film media. Film patterning thus provides an excellent tool for conducting

  16. Investigation of properties and performance of ceramic composite components: Final report on Phases 3 and 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtin, W.A.; Halverson, H.; Carter, R.H.; Miraj, N.; Reifsnider, K.L. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    1998-01-15

    The objective of the Fossil Energy Advanced Research and Technology Development (AR and TD) Materials Program is to conduct research and development on materials for longer-term fossil energy applications as well as for generic needs of various fossil fuel technologies. The research program of the Materials Response Group at Virginia Tech addresses the need for reliable and durable structural ceramic composites to perform in high temperature environments. The research effort provides an experimental and analytical basis for the transition from properties of materials to performance of actual component structures. Phases 1 and 2 of the present program focused on the development of test capabilities, initial studies of component mechanical response under various conditions and the development of a life prediction methodology. These efforts have been described in previous reports. This report summarizes the major tasks completed under Phases 3 and 4 of the project. Overall, the authors have made significant progress in a broad spectrum of tasks in this program. Their efforts have encompassed component evaluation, assessment of new SiC-based composites with improved high-temperature potential, development of oxide coating materials for SiC, and the extension and development of new models for predicting the durability of composite components under specific operating conditions for various CMC applications. Each of these areas of work is an important area for achieving the ultimate goal of usable SiC-based composites in high-temperature corrosive environments typical of fossil energy applications.

  17. Final Design and Experimental Validation of the Thermal Performance of the LHC Lattice Cryostats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourcey, N.; Capatina, O.; Parma, V.; Poncet, A.; Rohmig, P.; Serio, L.; Skoczen, B.; Tock, J.-P.; Williams, L. R.

    2004-01-01

    The recent commissioning and operation of the LHC String 2 have given a first experimental validation of the global thermal performance of the LHC lattice cryostat at nominal cryogenic conditions. The cryostat designed to minimize the heat inleak from ambient temperature, houses under vacuum and thermally protects the cold mass, which contains the LHC twin-aperture superconducting magnets operating at 1.9 K in superfluid helium. Mechanical components linking the cold mass to the vacuum vessel, such as support posts and insulation vacuum barriers are designed with efficient thermalisations for heat interception to minimise heat conduction. Heat inleak by radiation is reduced by employing multilayer insulation (MLI) wrapped around the cold mass and around an aluminium thermal shield cooled to about 60 K.Measurements of the total helium vaporization rate in String 2 gives, after substraction of supplementary heat loads and end effects, an estimate of the total thermal load to a standard LHC cell (107 m) including two Short Straight Sections and six dipole cryomagnets. Temperature sensors installed at critical locations provide a temperature mapping which allows validation of the calculated and estimated thermal performance of the cryostat components, including efficiency of the heat interceptions

  18. Final Design and Experimental Validation of the Thermal Performance of the LHC Lattice Cryostats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourcey, N.; Capatina, O.; Parma, V.; Poncet, A.; Rohmig, P.; Serio, L.; Skoczen, B.; Tock, J.-P.; Williams, L. R.

    2004-06-01

    The recent commissioning and operation of the LHC String 2 have given a first experimental validation of the global thermal performance of the LHC lattice cryostat at nominal cryogenic conditions. The cryostat designed to minimize the heat inleak from ambient temperature, houses under vacuum and thermally protects the cold mass, which contains the LHC twin-aperture superconducting magnets operating at 1.9 K in superfluid helium. Mechanical components linking the cold mass to the vacuum vessel, such as support posts and insulation vacuum barriers are designed with efficient thermalisations for heat interception to minimise heat conduction. Heat inleak by radiation is reduced by employing multilayer insulation (MLI) wrapped around the cold mass and around an aluminium thermal shield cooled to about 60 K. Measurements of the total helium vaporization rate in String 2 gives, after substraction of supplementary heat loads and end effects, an estimate of the total thermal load to a standard LHC cell (107 m) including two Short Straight Sections and six dipole cryomagnets. Temperature sensors installed at critical locations provide a temperature mapping which allows validation of the calculated and estimated thermal performance of the cryostat components, including efficiency of the heat interceptions.

  19. A portable and independent edge fluctuation diagnostic. Final performance report, March 1992--March 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsui, H.; Wootton, A.

    1994-01-01

    A compact self contained portable probe system has been designed and developed to diagnose the edge plasma of devices of different sizes and configurations. The system measures both the mean and the fluctuation quantities of density, temperature and potential from a standardized Langmuir probe array using a fast reciprocating probe drive. It can also be used for other fluctuation diagnostics, such as magnetic probes. The data acquisition and analysis is performed on a Macintosh IIfx which provides a user-friendly environment. The results obtained by the signal processing routines are stored in a tabloid format to allow comparative studies. The resulting database is a core part of the protable signal analysis system. To date measurements have been performed on the stellarator ATF, the reversed field pinch ZT40(m), and the tokamaks TEXT, Versator, Phaedrus-T and TFTR. The data are presently being analyzed and the results collected into the database for the purpose of edge turbulence and transport studies. Existing published data are also being included. The edge database, an output of this project, will provide readily available information for other experimental groups to compare their results with, and for theoretical groups to validate (or otherwise) the predictions of their models

  20. LIFAC sorbent injection desulfurization demonstration project. Final report, volume II: Project performance and economics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    This publication discusses the demonstration of the LIFAC sorbent injection technology at Richmond Power and Light`s Whitewater Valley Unit No. 2, performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Program. LIFAC is a sorbent injection technology capable of removing 75 to 85 percent of a power plant`s SO{sub 2} emissions using limestone at calcium to sulfur molar ratios of between 2 and 2.5 to 1. The site of the demonstration is a coal-fired electric utility power plant located in Richmond, Indiana. The project is being conducted by LIFAC North America (LIFAC NA), a joint venture partnership of Tampella Power Corporation and ICF Kaiser Engineers, in cooperation with DOE, RP&L, and Research Institute (EPRI), the State of Indiana, and Black Beauty Coal Company. The purpose of Public Design Report Volume 2: Project Performance and Economics is to consolidate, for public use, the technical efficiency and economy of the LIFAC Process. The report has been prepared pursuant to the Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC22-90PC90548 between LIFAC NA and the U.S. Department of Energy.

  1. Evaluation of the dynamic and kinematic performance of the THOR dummy: neck performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoofman, M.; Ratingen, M.R. van; Wismans, J.S.H.M.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the frontal head-neck performance of the THOR neck with respect to the human frontal head-neck performance and the Hybrid-III frontal head-neck performance. For this purpose, tests were carried out with an isolated THOR and Hybrid-III-neck system on a HyGe

  2. Evaluation of the dynamic and kinematic performance of the THOR dummy : neck performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoofman, M.; van Ratingen, M.R.; Wismans, J.S.H.M.; Cesari, D.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the frontal head-neck performance of the THOR neck with respect to the human frontal head-neck performance and the Hybrid-III frontal head-neck performance. For this purpose, tests were carried out with an isolated THOR and Hybrid-III head-neck system on a

  3. Final Technical Report - SciDAC Cooperative Agreement: Center for Extended Magnetohydrodynamic Modeling/ Transport and Dynamics in Torodial Fusion System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schanck, Dalton D.

    2010-01-01

    Final technical report for research performed by Professor Dalton D. Schnack on SciDAC Cooperative Agreement: Center for Extended MHD Modeling, DE-FC02-06ER54870, for the period 7/1/06 to 2/15/08. Principal results for this period are: 1. Development of a model for computational modeling for the primitive form of the extended MMD equations. This was reported as Phys. Plasmas 13, 058103 (2006). 2. Comparison between the NIMROD and M3D codes for simulation of the nonlinear sawtooth crash in the CDXU tokamak. This was reported in Phys. Plasmas 14, 056105 (2006). 3. Demonstration of 2-fluid and gyroviscous stabilization of interchange modes using computational extended MHD models. This was reported in Phys. Rev. Letters 101, 085005 (2008). Each of these publications is attached as an Appendix of this report. They should be consulted for technical details.

  4. Spent Fuel Performance Assessment and Research. Final Report of a Coordinated Research Project (SPAR-II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-01

    As storage of spent fuel has become a key technology in spent fuel management, wet and dry storage have become mature technologies and continue to demonstrate good performance. Increased spent fuel storage capacity in combination with longer storage durations will be needed over the foreseeable future as many countries have delayed their decision on spent fuel disposal or reprocessing. Extended spent fuel storage is, and will remain, an important activity for all countries with nuclear power programmes. A number of countries are planning or have already initiated research programmes on spent fuel storage performance, and there is a continuing benefit in exchanging spent fuel storage experience of the Member States in order to build a comprehensive technology knowledge base. Potential degradation mechanisms that may affect cladding integrity during wet storage are uniform corrosion, pitting, galvanic, and microbiologically-influenced corrosion. Potential degradation mechanisms that may affect cladding integrity during dry storage and subsequent handling and transportation operations are air oxidation, thermal creep, stress corrosion cracking (SCC), delayed hydride cracking (DHC), hydride re-orientation, hydrogen migration and re-distribution. Investigations carried out so far indicate that from the degradation mechanisms that may affect the integrity of spent fuel assembly/bundle structure during interim storage, hydride re-orientation has the potential to impair the ability of the cladding to effectively withstand potentially adverse mechanical challenges resulting from handling or transportation accidents. Fuel integrity issues are related to the definition and criteria of fuel integrity, failure classification, packaging and retrieval of damaged fuel and transport of damaged fuel assemblies. Various monitoring technologies have been developed and used to confirm the continued spent fuel integrity during storage or to provide an early indication of developing

  5. Spent Fuel Performance Assessment and Research. Final Report of a Coordinated Research Project (SPAR-II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    As storage of spent fuel has become a key technology in spent fuel management, wet and dry storage have become mature technologies and continue to demonstrate good performance. Increased spent fuel storage capacity in combination with longer storage durations will be needed over the foreseeable future as many countries have delayed their decision on spent fuel disposal or reprocessing. Extended spent fuel storage is, and will remain, an important activity for all countries with nuclear power programmes. A number of countries are planning or have already initiated research programmes on spent fuel storage performance, and there is a continuing benefit in exchanging spent fuel storage experience of the Member States in order to build a comprehensive technology knowledge base. Potential degradation mechanisms that may affect cladding integrity during wet storage are uniform corrosion, pitting, galvanic, and microbiologically-influenced corrosion. Potential degradation mechanisms that may affect cladding integrity during dry storage and subsequent handling and transportation operations are air oxidation, thermal creep, stress corrosion cracking (SCC), delayed hydride cracking (DHC), hydride re-orientation, hydrogen migration and re-distribution. Investigations carried out so far indicate that from the degradation mechanisms that may affect the integrity of spent fuel assembly/bundle structure during interim storage, hydride re-orientation has the potential to impair the ability of the cladding to effectively withstand potentially adverse mechanical challenges resulting from handling or transportation accidents. Fuel integrity issues are related to the definition and criteria of fuel integrity, failure classification, packaging and retrieval of damaged fuel and transport of damaged fuel assemblies. Various monitoring technologies have been developed and used to confirm the continued spent fuel integrity during storage or to provide an early indication of developing

  6. Evaluation of performance of select fusion experiments and projected reactors. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miley, G.H.

    1978-10-01

    The performance of NASA Lewis fusion experiments (SUMMA and Bumpy Torus) is compared with other experiments and that necessary for a power reactor. Key parameters cited are gain (fusion power/input power) and the time average fusion power, both of which may be more significant for real fusion reactors than the commonly used Lawson parameter. The NASA devices are over 10 orders of magnitude below the required powerplant values in both gain and time average power. The best experiments elsewhere are also as much as 4 to 5 orders of magnitude low. However, the NASA experiments compare favorably with other alternate approaches that have received less funding than the mainline experiments. The steady-state character and efficiency of plasma heating are strong advantages of the NASA approach. The problem, though, is to move ahead to experiments of sufficient size to advance in gain and average power parameters

  7. Cone penetrometer testing at the Hanford Site: Final performance evaluation report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richterich, L.R.; Cassem, B.R.

    1994-08-01

    The Volatile Organic Compounds-Arid Integrated Demonstration (VOC-Arid ID) is one of several US Department of Energy (DOE) integrated demonstrations designed to support the testing of emerging environmental characterization and remediation technologies in support of the Environmental Restoration (ER) and Waste Management (WM) Programs. The primary objective of the VOC Arid ID at the Hanford Site is to characterize, remediate, and monitor arid and semi-arid sites containing volatile organic compounds with or without associated contamination. The main objective of the Arid Drilling Technology Technical Task Plan is to demonstrate promising subsurface access technologies; this includes using the cone penetrometer (CPT) system for source detection, characterization, monitoring, and remediation in support of environmental activities. The utility of the CPT for performing site characterization work has been the subject of much discussion and speculation at the Hanford Site and other arid sites because of the preponderance of thick units of coarse cobbles and gravel in the subsurface

  8. Yuma Border Patrol Lighting Retrofit: Final LED System Performance Assessment of Trial and Full Installation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrea Wilkerson, Gregory P Sullivan, Robert G Davis, Sarah Safranek

    2018-04-30

    Along the Yuma Sector Border Patrol Area in Yuma, Arizona, the GATEWAY program conducted a trial evaluation in which the incumbent quartz metal halide area lighting was replaced with LED at three pole locations, and illuminance measurements were recorded initially and at 2500 hours, 5000 hours, 7000, and 11,000 hours of operation. Additionally, four second-generation LED luminaires installed as part of the full installation were evaluated initially and again after 4,000 hours of operation. While the initial energy, lighting quality, and maintenance benefits relative to the incumbent high-pressure sodium system were very satisfactory, the study raises important questions regarding the long-term performance of LED lighting systems in high-temperature environments.

  9. Performance improvement of silicon nitride ball bearings by ion implantation. CRADA final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.M.; Miner, J.

    1998-01-01

    The present report summarizes technical results of CRADA No. ORNL 92-128 with the Pratt and Whitney Division of United Technologies Corporation. The stated purpose of the program was to assess the 3effect of ion implantation on the rolling contact performance of engineering silicon nitride bearings, to determine by post-test analyses of the bearings the reasons for improved or reduced performance and the mechanisms of failure, if applicable, and to relate the overall results to basic property changes including but not limited to swelling, hardness, modulus, micromechanical properties, and surface morphology. Forty-two control samples were tested to an intended runout period of 60 h. It was possible to supply only six balls for ion implantation, but an extended test period goal of 150 h was used. The balls were implanted with C-ions at 150 keV to a fluence of 1.1 x 10 17 /cm 2 . The collection of samples had pre-existing defects called C-cracks in the surfaces. As a result, seven of the control samples had severe spalls before reaching the goal of 60 h for an unacceptable failure rate of 0.003/sample-h. None of the ion-implanted samples experienced engineering failure in 150 h of testing. Analytical techniques have been used to characterize ion implantation results, to characterize wear tracks, and to characterize microstructure and impurity content. In possible relation to C-cracks. It is encouraging that ion implantation can mitigate the C-crack failure mode. However, the practical implications are compromised by the fact that bearings with C-cracks would, in no case, be acceptable in engineering practice, as this type of defect was not anticipated when the program was designed. The most important reason for the use of ceramic bearings is energy efficiency

  10. Coordinated Fault-Tolerance for High-Performance Computing Final Project Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panda, Dhabaleswar Kumar [The Ohio State University; Beckman, Pete

    2011-07-28

    existing publish-subscribe tools. We enhanced the intrinsic fault tolerance capabilities representative implementations of a variety of key HPC software subsystems and integrated them with the FTB. Targeting software subsystems included: MPI communication libraries, checkpoint/restart libraries, resource managers and job schedulers, and system monitoring tools. Leveraging the aforementioned infrastructure, as well as developing and utilizing additional tools, we have examined issues associated with expanded, end-to-end fault response from both system and application viewpoints. From the standpoint of system operations, we have investigated log and root cause analysis, anomaly detection and fault prediction, and generalized notification mechanisms. Our applications work has included libraries for fault-tolerance linear algebra, application frameworks for coupled multiphysics applications, and external frameworks to support the monitoring and response for general applications. Our final goal was to engage the high-end computing community to increase awareness of tools and issues around coordinated end-to-end fault management.

  11. More than just the mean: moving to a dynamic view of performance-based compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Christopher M; Reb, Jochen; Ang, Dionysius

    2012-05-01

    Compensation decisions have important consequences for employees and organizations and affect factors such as retention, motivation, and recruitment. Past research has primarily focused on mean performance as a predictor of compensation, promoting the implicit assumption that alternative aspects of dynamic performance are not relevant. To address this gap in the literature, we examined the influence of dynamic performance characteristics on compensation decisions in the National Basketball Association (NBA). We predicted that, in addition to performance mean, performance trend and variability would also affect compensation decisions. Results revealed that performance mean and trend, but not variability, were significantly and positively related to changes in compensation levels of NBA players. Moreover, trend (but not mean or variability) predicted compensation when controlling for future performance, suggesting that organizations overweighted trend in their compensation decisions. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. An integrated methodology for the dynamic performance and reliability evaluation of fault-tolerant systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominguez-Garcia, Alejandro D.; Kassakian, John G.; Schindall, Joel E.; Zinchuk, Jeffrey J.

    2008-01-01

    We propose an integrated methodology for the reliability and dynamic performance analysis of fault-tolerant systems. This methodology uses a behavioral model of the system dynamics, similar to the ones used by control engineers to design the control system, but also incorporates artifacts to model the failure behavior of each component. These artifacts include component failure modes (and associated failure rates) and how those failure modes affect the dynamic behavior of the component. The methodology bases the system evaluation on the analysis of the dynamics of the different configurations the system can reach after component failures occur. For each of the possible system configurations, a performance evaluation of its dynamic behavior is carried out to check whether its properties, e.g., accuracy, overshoot, or settling time, which are called performance metrics, meet system requirements. Markov chains are used to model the stochastic process associated with the different configurations that a system can adopt when failures occur. This methodology not only enables an integrated framework for evaluating dynamic performance and reliability of fault-tolerant systems, but also enables a method for guiding the system design process, and further optimization. To illustrate the methodology, we present a case-study of a lateral-directional flight control system for a fighter aircraft

  13. Research on dynamic performance design of mobile phone application based on context awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, Zhang

    2018-05-01

    It aims to explore the dynamic performance of different mobile phone applications and the user's cognitive differences, reduce the cognitive burden, and enhance the sense of experience. By analyzing the dynamic design performance in four different interactive contexts, and constructing the framework of information service process in the interactive context perception and the two perception principles of the cognitive consensus between designer and user, and the two kinds of knowledge in accordance with the perception principles. The analysis of the context will help users sense the dynamic performance more intuitively, so that the details of interaction will be performed more vividly and smoothly, thus enhance user's experience in the interactive process. The common perception experience enables designers and users to produce emotional resonance in different interactive contexts, and help them achieve rapid understanding of interactive content and perceive the logic and hierarchy of the content and the structure, therefore the effectiveness of mobile applications will be improved.

  14. System structure and cognitive ability as predictors of performance in dynamic system control tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Hundertmark

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In dynamic system control, cognitive mechanisms and abilities underlying performance may vary depending on the nature of the task. We therefore investigated the effects of system structure and its interaction with cognitive abilities on system control performance. A sample of 127 university students completed a series of different system control tasks that were manipulated in terms of system size and recurrent feedback, either with or without a cognitive load manipulation. Cognitive abilities assessed included reasoning ability, working memory capacity, and cognitive reflection. System size and recurrent feedback affected overall performance as expected. Overall, the results support that cognitive ability is a good predictor of performance in dynamic system control tasks but predictiveness is reduced when the system structure contains recurrent feedback. We discuss this finding from a cognitive processing perspective as well as its implications for individual differences research in dynamic systems.

  15. Final Technical Report: Affordable, High-Performance, Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackburn, Bryan M. [Redox Power Systems, LLC, College Park, MD (United States); Bishop, Sean [Redox Power Systems, LLC, College Park, MD (United States); Gore, Colin [Redox Power Systems, LLC, College Park, MD (United States); Wang, Lei [Redox Power Systems, LLC, College Park, MD (United States); Correa, Luis [Redox Power Systems, LLC, College Park, MD (United States); Langdo, Thomas [Redox Power Systems, LLC, College Park, MD (United States); Deaconu, Stelu [Redox Power Systems, LLC, College Park, MD (United States); Pan, Keji [Redox Power Systems, LLC, College Park, MD (United States)

    2018-02-15

    In this project, we improved the power output and voltage efficiency of our intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells (IT-SOFCs) with a focus on ~600 °C operation. At these temperatures and with the increased power density (i.e., fewer cells for same power output), the stack cost should be greatly reduced while extending durability. Most SOFC stacks operate at temperatures greater than 800 °C. This can greatly increase the cost of the system (stacks and BOP) as well as maintenance costs since the most common degradation mechanisms are thermally driven. Our approach uses no platinum group metal (PGM) materials and the lower operating temperature allows use of simple stainless steel interconnects and commercial off-the-shelf gaskets in the stack. Furthermore, for combined heating and power (CHP) applications the stack exhaust still provides “high quality” waste heat that can be recovered and used in a chiller or boiler. The anticipated performance, durability, and resulting cost improvements (< $700/kWe) will also move us closer to reaching the full potential of this technology for distributed generation (DG) and residential/commercial CHP. This includes eventual extension to cleaner, more efficient portable generators, auxiliary power units (APUs), and range extenders for transportation. The research added to the understanding of the area investigated by exploring various methods for increasing power density (Watts/square centimeter of active area in each cell) and increasing cell efficiency (increasing the open circuit voltage, or cell voltage with zero external electrical current). The results from this work demonstrated an optimized cell that had greater than 1 W/cm2 at 600 °C and greater than 1.6 W/cm2 at 650 °C. This was demonstrated in large format sizes using both 5 cm by 5 cm and 10 cm by 10 cm cells. Furthermore, this work demonstrated that high stability (no degradation over > 500 hours) can be achieved together with high performance in large

  16. Sewage Sludge Incinerators: Final Standards of Performance for New Stationary Sources and Emission Guidelines for Existing Sources Final Rule Fact Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page contains a February 2011 fact sheet with information regarding the final NSPS and Emission Guidelines for Existing Sources for Sewage Sludge Incinerators (SSI). This document provides a summary of the information for these regulations.

  17. Phase 1 Final Technical Report - MgB2 Synthesis: Pushing to High Field Performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatia, Mohit; McIntyre, Peter

    2009-01-01

    attempted. It may require an extended period of R and D for both the torch itself and the gas dynamics in the reaction region. Second, this simpler single-component process will yield a product powder that is important today for the many groups undertaking powder-metallurgy routes to MgB2. The above success and learning curve has brought us to a significant shift of strategy from what was originally set out in the Phase 1 plan. But this shift has brought us to within sight of a powder product that will itself be an enabling boost for the community of MgB2 developers.

  18. Dynamic performance of a suspended reinforced concrete footbridge under pedestrian movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drygala, I.; Dulinska, J.; Kondrat, K.

    2018-02-01

    In the paper the dynamic analysis of a suspended reinforced concrete footbridge over a national road located in South Poland was carried out. Firstly, modes and values of natural frequencies of vibration of the structure were calculated. The results of the numerical modal investigation shown that the natural frequencies of the structure coincided with the frequency of human beings during motion steps (walking fast or running). Hence, to consider the comfort standards, the dynamic response of the footbridge to a runner dynamic motion should be calculated. Secondly, the dynamic response of the footbridge was calculated taking into consideration two models of dynamic forces produced by a single running pedestrian: a ‘sine’ and ‘half-sine’ model. It occurred that the values of accelerations and displacements obtained for the ‘half-sine’ model of dynamic forces were greater than those obtained for the ‘sine’ model up 20%. The ‘sine’ model is appropriate only for walking users of the walkways, because the nature of their motion has continues characteristic. In the case of running users of walkways this theory is unfitting, since the forces produced by a running pedestrian has a discontinuous nature. In this scenario of calculations, a ‘half-sine’ model seemed to be more effective. Finally, the comfort conditions for the footbridge were evaluated. The analysis proved that the vertical comfort criteria were not exceeded for a single user of footbridge running or walking fast.

  19. Final Phase Flight Performance and Touchdown Time Assessment of TDV in RLV-TD HEX-01 Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Sandeep; Jayakumar, M.; Nizin, Aziya; Kesavabrahmaji, K.; Shyam Mohan, N.

    2017-12-01

    RLV-TD HEX-01 mission was configured as a precursor flight to actual two stages to orbit vehicle. In this mission RLV-TD was designed as a two stage vehicle for demonstrating the hypersonic flight of a winged body vehicle at Mach No. 5. One of the main objectives of this mission was to generate data for better understanding of new technologies required to design the future vehicle. In this mission, the RLV-TD vehicle was heavily instrumented to get data related to performance of different subsystems. As per the mission design, RLV-TD will land in sea after flight duration of 700 s and travelling a distance of nearly 500 km in Bay of Bengal from the launch site for a nominal trajectory. The visibility studies for telemetry data of vehicle for the nominal and off nominal trajectories were carried out. Based on that, three ground stations were proposed for the telemetry data reception (including one in sea). Even with this scheme it was seen that during the final phase of the flight there will not be any ground station visible to the flight due to low elevation. To have the mission critical data during final phase of the flight, telemetry through INSAT scheme was introduced. During the end of the mission RLV-TD will be landing in the sea on a hypothetical runway. To know the exact time of touchdown for the flight in sea, there was no direct measurement available. Simultaneously there were all chances of losing ground station visibility just before touchdown, making it difficult to assess flight performance during that phase. In this work, telemetry and instrumentation scheme of RLV-TD HEX-01 mission is discussed with an objective to determine the flight performance during the final phase. Further, using various flight sensor data the touchdown time of TDV is assessed for this mission.

  20. Performance Prediction for Large-Scale Nuclear Waste Repositories: Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glassley, W E; Nitao, J J; Grant, W; Boulos, T N; Gokoffski, M O; Johnson, J W; Kercher, J R; Levatin, J A; Steefel, C I

    2001-01-01

    The goal of this project was development of a software package capable of utilizing terascale computational platforms for solving subsurface flow and transport problems important for disposal of high level nuclear waste materials, as well as for DOE-complex clean-up and stewardship efforts. We sought to develop a tool that would diminish reliance on abstracted models, and realistically represent the coupling between subsurface fluid flow, thermal effects and chemical reactions that both modify the physical framework of the rock materials and which change the rock mineralogy and chemistry of the migrating fluid. Providing such a capability would enhance realism in models and increase confidence in long-term predictions of performance. Achieving this goal also allows more cost-effective design and execution of monitoring programs needed to evaluate model results. This goal was successfully accomplished through the development of a new simulation tool (NUFT-C). This capability allows high resolution modeling of complex coupled thermal-hydrological-geochemical processes in the saturated and unsaturated zones of the Earth's crust. The code allows consideration of virtually an unlimited number of chemical species and minerals in a multi-phase, non-isothermal environment. Because the code is constructed to utilize the computational power of the tera-scale IBM ASCI computers, simulations that encompass large rock volumes and complex chemical systems can now be done without sacrificing spatial or temporal resolution. The code is capable of doing one-, two-, and three-dimensional simulations, allowing unprecedented evaluation of the evolution of rock properties and mineralogical and chemical change as a function of time. The code has been validated by comparing results of simulations to laboratory-scale experiments, other benchmark codes, field scale experiments, and observations in natural systems. The results of these exercises demonstrate that the physics and chemistry

  1. Performance assessment and adoption processes of an information monitoring and diagnostic system prototype; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piette, Mary Ann

    1999-01-01

    This report addresses the problem that buildings do not perform as well as anticipated during design. We partnered with an innovative building operator to evaluate a prototype Information Monitoring and Diagnostic System (IMDS). The IMDS consists of high-quality measurements archived each minute, a data visualization tool, and a web-based capability. The operators recommend similar technology be adopted in other buildings. The IMDS has been used to identify and correct a series of control problems. It has also allowed the operators to make more effective use of the building control system, freeing up time to take care of other tenant needs. They believe they have significantly improved building comfort, potentially improving tenant health, and productivity. The reduction in hours to operate the building are worth about$20,000 per year, which could pay for the IMDS in about five years. A control system retrofit based on findings from the IMDS is expected to reduce energy use by 20 percent over the next year, worth over$30,000 per year. The main conclusion of the model-based chiller fault detection work is that steady-state models can be used as reference models to monitor chiller operation and detect faults. The ability of the IMDS to measure cooling load and chiller power to one-percent accuracy with a one-minute sampling interval permits detection of additional faults. Evolutionary programming techniques were also evaluated, showing promise in the detection of patterns in building data. We also evaluated two technology adoption processes, radical and routine. In routine adoption, managers enhance features of existing products that are already well understood. In radical adoption, innovative building managers introduce novel technology into their organizations without using the rigorous payback criteria used in routine innovations

  2. Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization (AFGD) demonstration project: Volume 2, Project performance and economics. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-30

    The project objective is to demonstrate removal of 90--95% or more of the SO{sub 2} at approximately one-half the cost of conventional scrubbing technology; and to demonstrate significant reduction of space requirements. In this project, Pure Air has built a single SO{sub 2} absorber for a 528-MWe power plant. The absorber performs three functions in a single vessel: prequencher, absorber, and oxidation of sludge to gypsum. Additionally, the absorber is of a co- current design, in which the flue gas and scrubbing slurry move in the same direction and at a relatively high velocity compared to conventional scrubbers. These features all combine to yield a state- of-the-art SO{sub 2} absorber that is more compact and less expensive than conventional scrubbers. The project incorporated a number of technical features including the injection of pulverized limestone directly into the absorber, a device called an air rotary sparger located within the base of the absorber, and a novel wastewater evaporation system. The air rotary sparger combines the functions of agitation and air distribution into one piece of equipment to facilitate the oxidation of calcium sulfite to gypsum. Additionally, wastewater treatment is being demonstrated to minimize water disposal problems inherent in many high-chloride coals. Bituminous coals primarily from the Indiana, Illinois coal basin containing 2--4.5% sulfur were tested during the demonstration. The Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization (AFGD) process has demonstrated removal of 95% or more of the SO{sub 2} while providing a commercial gypsum by-product in lieu of solid waste. A portion of the commercial gypsum is being agglomerated into a product known as PowerChip{reg_sign} gypsum which exhibits improved physical properties, easier flowability and more user friendly handling characteristics to enhance its transportation and marketability to gypsum end-users.

  3. High density turbulent plasma processes from a shock tube. Final performance report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.A. III.

    1997-01-01

    A broad-based set of measurements has begun on high density turbulent plasma processes. This includes determinations of new plasma physics and the initiation of work on new diagnostics for collisional plasmas as follows: (1) A transient increase is observed in both the spectral energy decay rate and the degree of chaotic complexity at the interface of a shock wave and a turbulent ionized gas. Even though the gas is apparently brought to rest by the shock wave, no evidence is found either of prompt relaminarization or of any systematic influence of end-wall material thermal conductivities on the turbulence parameters. (2) Point fluorescence emissions and averaged spectral line evolutions in turbulent plasmas produced in both the primary and the reflected shock wave flows exhibit ergodicity in the standard turbulence parameters. The data show first evidence of a reverse energy cascade in the collisional turbulent plasma. This suggests that the fully turbulent environment can be described using a stationary state formulation. In these same data, the author finds compelling evidence for a turbulent Stark effect on neutral emission lines in these data which is associated with evidence of large coherent structures and dominant modes in the Fourier analyses of the fluctuations in the optical spectra. (3) A neutral beam generator has been assembled by coupling a Colutron Ion Gun to a charge exchange chamber. Beam-target collisions where the target species is neutral and the beam is either singly charged or neutral have been performed using argon as the working gas. Spectral analysis of the emission shows specific radiative transitions characteristic of both Ar I and Ar II, indicating that some ionization of the target gas results. Gas and plasma parameters such as density, pressure, temperature and flow velocity and their fluctuations can now be followed in real time by spectroscopic analysis of carefully chosen radiative emissions

  4. Assessment of dynamic and long-term performance of an innovative multi-story timber building via structural monitoring and dynamic testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omenzetter, Piotr; Morris, Hugh; Worth, Margaret; Gaul, Andrew; Jager, Simon; Desgeorges, Yohann

    2012-04-01

    An innovative three-story timber building, using self-centering, post-tensioned timber shear walls as the main horizontal load resisting system and lightweight non-composite timber-concrete floors, has recently been completed in Nelson, New Zealand. It is expected to be the trailblazer for similar but taller structures to be more widely adopted. Performance based standards require an advanced understanding of building responses and in order to meet the need for in-situ performance data the building has been subjected to forced vibration testing and instrumented for continuous monitoring using a total of approximately 90 data channels to capture its dynamic and long-term responses. The first part of the paper presents a brief discussion of the existing research on the seismic performance of timber frame buildings and footfall induced floor vibrations. An outline of the building structural system, focusing on the novel design solutions, is then discussed. This is followed by the description of the monitoring system. The analysis of monitoring results starts with a discussion of the monitoring of long-term deformations. Next, the assessment of the floor vibration serviceability performance is outlined. Then, the forced vibration tests conducted on the whole building at different construction stages are reviewed. The system identification results from seismic shaking records are also discussed. Finally, updating of a finite element model of the building is conducted.

  5. Novel Contact Materials for Improved Performance CdTe Solar Cells Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rockett, Angus [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Marsillac, Sylvain [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Collins, Robert [Univesity of Toledo

    2018-04-15

    Te devices. We demonstrated the conduction mechanism by which CdTe polycrystals improve the performance of the devices relative to single crystal devices. The mechanism shows that grain boundaries are conduction pathways for photogenerated electrons and that the corresponding holes are confined to the grains and therefore do not contribute to recombination.

  6. The developmental dynamics of task-avoidant behavior and math performance in kindergarten and elementary school

    OpenAIRE

    Hirvonen, Riikka; Tolvanen, Asko; Aunola, Kaisa; Nurmi, Jari-Erik

    2012-01-01

    Besides cognitive factors, children's learning at school may be influenced by more dynamic phenomena, such as motivation and achievement-related task-avoidant behavior. The present study examined the developmental dynamics of task-avoidant behavior and math performance from kindergarten to Grade 4. A total of 225 children were tested for their arithmetic skills in kindergarten and in Grades 1, 2, and 4 of elementary school. Children's task-avoidant behavior in learning situations was rated by...

  7. Performance metric optimization advocates CPFR in supply chains: A system dynamics model based study

    OpenAIRE

    Balaji Janamanchi; James R. Burns

    2016-01-01

    Background: Supply Chain partners often find themselves in rather helpless positions, unable to improve their firm’s performance and profitability because their partners although willing to share production information do not fully collaborate in tackling customer order variations as they don’t seem to appreciate the benefits of such collaboration. Methods: We use a two-player (supplier-manufacturer) System Dynamics model to study the dynamics to assess the impact and usefulness of supply cha...

  8. Enhanced Emission Performance and Fuel Efficiency for HD Methane Engines. Literature Study. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broman, R.; Staalhammar, P.; Erlandsson, L.

    2010-05-15

    A literature survey has been conducted in order to define state-of-the-art for methane fuelled engines to be used in heavy duty vehicles. Use of methane can be favourable to increase security of supply and mitigate CO2 emissions, especially when the methane origins from biomass. Furthermore, methane used as a fuel in heavy duty engines has a potential to reduce toxic exhaust emissions. Historically, use of methane in heavy duty engines has often been hampered by poor efficiency, i.e. high fuel consumption when using the Otto-cycle. However, current generation technology engines might be within 5-10 % of the efficiency of Diesel engine technology. In this context it is worth mentioning that compliance-driven changes for meeting future emission regulations for Diesel engines may have a negative impact on fuel efficiency, thereby narrowing the gap. This may present an opportunity for heavy methane fuelled engines. The reliability and durability of the exhaust aftertreatment devices for methane fuelled engines has also given rise to some concerns. Some concepts are performing acceptable while others do not meet expectations. This is partly due to difficulties in handling methane in the aftertreatment device and partly to issues in the design of the ignition system. Methane is a fuel used worldwide and has a potential to be an important complement to Diesel oil. There are two categories of HD methane engines available to end-users: Retrofitted engines, which often include computer controlled retrofit systems developed as 'bolt-on' technologies that can be removed if necessary, to resell the vehicle with a normal diesel engine, and those developed specifically for and in conjunction with engine manufacturers and delivered to customers as factory-built engines or vehicles (OEM). Additionally, both these categories can include engines that use the Otto- or Diesel combustion cycles. When adapting a HD Diesel engine to run on methane there are two options, either

  9. FLOAT - development of new flexible UHPC. Final report. [Ultra High Performance Fibre Reinforced Concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-11-01

    The current project is a preliminary study intended to clarify the background and give a better basis for an evaluation of the risks and possible rewards of funding a full project with the overall purpose of developing and testing a new concept for wave energy floaters, made of Ultra High Performance Fibre Reinforced Concrete (UHPC), as an enabling technology for the establishment of competitive wave energy production (FLOAT). As an initial step for this preliminary study of FLOAT an investigation has been undertaken in relation to preliminary design of 2 types of floaters, essential properties of UHPFRC - and identification of necessary developments, compilation of existing data from off shore applications and analysis of effect on Cost Of Energy. Preliminary float design and economical considerations - is a theoretical and numerical study including preliminary float designs and cost estimates. It aims at making a first comparison between the different materials options for DEXA and Wave Star floats and giving a first judgement about the suitability of CRC concrete. This is done through a qualitative assessment of pros and cons of different materials for both types of floats and a design study of the Dexa Wave float. It is concluded that the requirements for the Dexa Wave float are so that CRC is not able to compete with conventional concrete for the best and most cost effective solution. The good durability (leading to low maintenance costs), the mechanical properties and the ductility of CRC are not important enough to offset the increased cost for this float. For Wave Star on the other hand, there are significant advantages in using CRC as the only other option in this case is fibre glass, which is a much more expensive product. An investigation was made of methods of optimizing the properties of CRC - customizing them for particular applications in WEC's. The method of optimization has been to change the types of fibres in the mix, and it is demonstrated

  10. Dynamic Reconfiguration in Real-Time Systems Energy, Performance, and Thermal Perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Weixun; Ranka, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    Given the widespread use of real-time multitasking systems, there are tremendous optimization opportunities if reconfigurable computing can be effectively incorporated while maintaining performance and other design constraints of typical applications. The focus of this book is to describe the dynamic reconfiguration techniques that can be safely used in real-time systems. This book provides comprehensive approaches by considering synergistic effects of computation, communication as well as storage together to significantly improve overall performance, power, energy and temperature.  Provides a comprehensive introduction to optimization and dynamic reconfiguration techniques in real-time embedded systems; Covers state-of-the-art techniques and ongoing research in reconfigurable architectures; Focuses on algorithms tuned for dynamic reconfiguration techniques in real-time systems;  Provides reference for anyone designing low-power systems, energy-/temperature-constrained devices, and power-performance efficie...

  11. Static, dynamic balance and functional performance in subjects with and without plantar fasciitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geiseane Aguiar Gonçalves

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Plantar fasciitis (PF is characterized by non-inflammatory degeneration and pain under the heel, and is one of the most common foot complaints. The compensations and adjustments made to decrease the discomfort caused by the disease are clinical findings and can be a factor that contributes to impaired balance and decreased functional performance. Objective: To compare functional performance as well as static and dynamic balance among subjects with and without PF. Methods: The sample consisted of 124 subjects of both sexes aged 20-60 years. Participants were divided into two groups: a bilateral PF group (PFG; n = 62 and a control group (CG, n = 62. The following outcomes were analyzed: static and dynamic balance (using functional tests and functional performance (using a questionnaire. We used Student’s t test for independent samples to compare variables between the groups. The alpha error was set at 0.05. Results: Subjects with PF showed greater impairment in their overall dynamic balance performance (p < 0.001 than the control group, except for left posteromedial movement (p = 0.19. The CG showed showed better functional performance (p < 0.001 than the PF group. There was no difference between groups for the variable static balance on stable (p = 0.160 and unstable surfaces (p = 0.085. Conclusion: Subjects with PF displayed smaller reach distances in the overall Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT, demonstrating a deficit in dynamic balance and functional performance when compared with healthy subjects.

  12. Dynamic performance of a C/C composite finger seal in a tilting mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hailin ZHAO

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The complex operating state of aeroengines has an impact on the performance of finger seals. However, little work has been focused on the issue and the dynamic performance of finger seals is also rarely studied. Therefore, a distributed mass equivalent model considering working conditions is proposed in this paper for solving the existing problems. The effects of the fiber bundle density and the preparation direction of the fiber bundle of a C/C composite on the dynamic performance of a finger seal are investigated in rotor tilt based on the proposed model. The difference between the C/C composite finger seal performances under the rotor precession and nutation tilt cases is also investigated. The results show that the fiber bundle density and the preparation direction of the fiber bundle have an influence on the dynamic performance of the finger seal as rotor tilt is considered, and the dynamic performance of the finger seal is different in the two kinds of tilting modes. In addition, a novel method for design of finger seals is presented based on the contact pressure between finger boots and the rotor. Finger seals with good leakage rates and low wear can be acquired in this method.

  13. Relations between Air-Fuel Ratio and Dynamic Performance of Small Race Cars

    OpenAIRE

    位田, 晴良; Ida, Haruyoshi; 漁, 佑一郎; Sunadori, Yuichiro; 牧田, 俊太郎; Makita, Syuntaro; 宮﨑, 真央; Miyazaki, Manaka; 磯松, 弥司; Isomatsu, Yatsuka

    2017-01-01

    'It goes without saying that engine output power characteristics greatly affect the dynamic performance of the race car. One of the methods of changing the output power of the engine is to adjust the set amount of fuel supply. This method changes the air-fuel ratio of the air fuel mixture supplied to the engine. In this study, a slalom test run of a small race car was used to examine dynamic performance with attention to the air-fuel ratio changed by adjusting the set amount of fuel supply. T...

  14. Diminished Dynamic Physical Performance Is Associated With Orthostatic Hypotension in Geriatric Outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruïne, Eline S; Reijnierse, Esmee M; Trappenburg, Marijke C; Pasma, Jantsje H; de Vries, Oscar J; Meskers, Carel G M; Maier, Andrea B

    2018-03-23

    Orthostatic hypotension (OH), a blood pressure drop after postural change, is a highly prevalent and disabling syndrome in older adults. Yet, the association between physical performance and OH is not clearly established. The aim of this study was to determine whether different types of physical performance are associated with OH in a clinically relevant population of geriatric outpatients. This cross-sectional study included 280 geriatric outpatients (mean age: 82.2 years, standard deviation: 7.1). Orthostatic hypotension was determined using intermittently measured blood pressure and continuously measured blood pressure in a random subgroup of 58 patients. Physical performance was classified into a dynamic type (4-m Walk Test, Chair Stand Test, and Timed Up and Go test) and a static type (standing balance tests, handgrip strength). Associations were analyzed using logistic regression models with adjustments for age, sex, weight, and height. Diminished physical performance on the Chair Stand Test was associated with OH measured intermittently. Diminished physical performance on all dynamic physical domains (4-m Walk Test, Chair Stand Test, and Timed Up and Go test) was associated with OH measured continuously. Static physical performance was not significantly associated with OH. Dynamic physical performance tests with a substantial postural change and center of mass displacement were significantly associated with OH. The influence of physical performance on OH in daily routine activities should be further explored to establish counteracting interventions.

  15. Performance enhanced design of chaos controller for the mechanical centrifugal flywheel governor system via adaptive dynamic surface control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaohua Luo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses chaos suppression of the mechanical centrifugal flywheel governor system with output constraint and fully unknown parameters via adaptive dynamic surface control. To have a certain understanding of chaotic nature of the mechanical centrifugal flywheel governor system and subsequently design its controller, the useful tools like the phase diagrams and corresponding time histories are employed. By using tangent barrier Lyapunov function, a dynamic surface control scheme with neural network and tracking differentiator is developed to transform chaos oscillation into regular motion and the output constraint rule is not broken in whole process. Plugging second-order tracking differentiator into chaos controller tackles the “explosion of complexity” of backstepping and improves the accuracy in contrast with the first-order filter. Meanwhile, Chebyshev neural network with adaptive law whose input only depends on a subset of Chebyshev polynomials is derived to learn the behavior of unknown dynamics. The boundedness of all signals of the closed-loop system is verified in stability analysis. Finally, the results of numerical simulations illustrate effectiveness and exhibit the superior performance of the proposed scheme by comparing with the existing ADSC method.

  16. Enhanced Microgrid Dynamic Performance Using a Modulated Power Filter Based on Enhanced Bacterial Foraging Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M. Othman

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a design of microgrid (MG with enhanced dynamic performance. Distributed energy resources (DER are widely used in MGs to match the various load types and profiles. DERs include solar PV cells, wind energy sources, fuel cells, batteries, micro gas-engines and storage elements. MG will include AC/DC circuits, developed power electronics devices, inverters and power electronic controllers. A novel modulated power filters (MPF device will be applied in MG design. Enhanced bacterial foraging optimization (EBFO will be proposed to optimize and set the MPF parameters to enhance and tune the MG dynamic response. Recent dynamic control is applied to minimize the harmonic reference content. EBFO will adapt the gains of MPF dynamic control. The present research achieves an enhancement of MG dynamic performance, in addition to ensuring improvements in the power factor, bus voltage profile and power quality. MG operation will be evaluated by the dynamic response to be fine-tuned by MPF based on EBFO. Digital simulations have validated the results to show the effectiveness and efficient improvement by the proposed strategy.

  17. Dynamic tracking performance of indoor global positioning system: An experimental and theoretical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Zhao

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The automation level has been improved rapidly with the introduction of large-scale measurement technologies, such as indoor global positioning system, into the production process among the fields of car, ship, and aerospace due to their excellent measurement characteristics. In fact, the objects are usually in motion during the real measurement process; however, the dynamic measurement characteristics of indoor global positioning system are much limited and still in exploration. In this research, we focused on the dynamic tracking performance of indoor global positioning system and then successfully built a mathematical model based on its measurement principles. We first built single and double station system models with the consideration of measurement objects’ movement. Using MATLAB simulation, we realized the dynamic measurement characteristics of indoor global positioning system. In the real measurement process, the experimental results also support the mathematical model that we built, which proves a great success in dynamic measurement characteristics. We envision that this dynamic tracking performance of indoor global positioning system would shed light on the dynamic measurement of a motion object and therefore make contribution to the automation production.

  18. Dynamics of safety performance and culture: a group model building approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Yang Miang; Love, Peter E D; Stagbouer, Greg; Annesley, Chris

    2012-09-01

    The management of occupational health and safety (OHS) including safety culture interventions is comprised of complex problems that are often hard to scope and define. Due to the dynamic nature and complexity of OHS management, the concept of system dynamics (SD) is used to analyze accident prevention. In this paper, a system dynamics group model building (GMB) approach is used to create a causal loop diagram of the underlying factors influencing the OHS performance of a major drilling and mining contractor in Australia. While the organization has invested considerable resources into OHS their disabling injury frequency rate (DIFR) has not been decreasing. With this in mind, rich individualistic knowledge about the dynamics influencing the DIFR was acquired from experienced employees with operations, health and safety and training background using a GMB workshop. Findings derived from the workshop were used to develop a series of causal loop diagrams that includes a wide range of dynamics that can assist in better understanding the causal influences OHS performance. The causal loop diagram provides a tool for organizations to hypothesize the dynamics influencing effectiveness of OHS management, particularly the impact on DIFR. In addition the paper demonstrates that the SD GMB approach has significant potential in understanding and improving OHS management. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Winners in the urban champions league – A performance assessment of Japanese cities by means of dynamic and super-efficient DEA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soushi Suzuki

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to provide an advanced dynamic efficiency assessment methodology for city performance strategies in Japan, based on an extended and super-efficient Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA. The use of this novel efficiency-improving approach originates from earlier research based on the so-called Distance Friction Minimisation (DFM method. In the present study we develop a new multi-period model from a blend of a Target-Oriented (TO DFM model including a dynamic approach. This new model is able to present a more realistic efficiency improvement projection comprising a dynamic system of target-settings to achieve a target improvement level so as to programme more realistic policy actions. The above-mentioned Dynamic TO-DFM model will be applied to and tested for a multi-dimensional efficiency assessment of several large Japanese cities. In this study, we consider due to comparative data limitations, two inputs (population and city budget and two outputs (GDP and tax revenues. Based on these items, this study assesses the relative economic performance of 16 Japanese big cities by means of the above described, extended super-efficient DEA model. Finally, we present an efficiency improvement programme based on the Dynamic TO-DFM model for enhancing the position of inefficient cites. Keywords: Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA, Distance Friction Minimization (DFM, super-efficiency, Target-oriented (TO model, Dynamic DEA model, performance assessment, Japanese cities

  20. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of two-phase flow in a BWR fuel assembly. Final CRADA Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tentner, A.

    2009-01-01

    A direct numerical simulation capability for two-phase flows with heat transfer in complex geometries can considerably reduce the hardware development cycle, facilitate the optimization and reduce the costs of testing of various industrial facilities, such as nuclear power plants, steam generators, steam condensers, liquid cooling systems, heat exchangers, distillers, and boilers. Specifically, the phenomena occurring in a two-phase coolant flow in a BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) fuel assembly include coolant phase changes and multiple flow regimes which directly influence the coolant interaction with fuel assembly and, ultimately, the reactor performance. Traditionally, the best analysis tools for this purpose of two-phase flow phenomena inside the BWR fuel assembly have been the sub-channel codes. However, the resolution of these codes is too coarse for analyzing the detailed intra-assembly flow patterns, such as flow around a spacer element. Advanced CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) codes provide a potential for detailed 3D simulations of coolant flow inside a fuel assembly, including flow around a spacer element using more fundamental physical models of flow regimes and phase interactions than sub-channel codes. Such models can extend the code applicability to a wider range of situations, which is highly important for increasing the efficiency and to prevent accidents.

  1. Regarding the rejection performance of a polymeric reverse osmosis membrane for the final purification of two-phase olive mill effluents previously treated by an advanced oxidation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochando-Pulido, J.M.; Martínez-Férez, A.

    2017-01-01

    In previous works on olive mill wastewater (OMW), secondary advanced oxidation treatment solved the problem related to the presence of phenolic compounds and considerable chemical oxygen demand. However, the effluent presented a significant salinity after this treatment. In this work, an adequate operation of a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane is addressed to ensure constant performance over a long period of time. In this paper, the effect of the operating parameters on the dynamic membrane rejection performance towards the target species was examined and discussed. Rejection efficiencies of all species were observed to follow a similar pattern, which consisted of slight initial improvement that further decreased over time. Rejection of both divalent ions remained constant at over 99% regardless of the operating conditions. Rejections were noticed to follow the order SO42−> Cl−> NO3− and Ca2+> Mg2+> K+> Na+, as a rule. Divalent species were moderately more highly rejected than monovalent ones, in accordance with their higher charge and molecular size, and sulfate anions were consistently rejected by over 99%. Finally, the RO membrane exiting treated effluent was depleted of the high electro conductivity initially present (above 97% rejection), permitting its re-use as good quality irrigation water (below 1 mS/cm). [es

  2. Dynamic modeling and performance evaluation of axial flux PMSG based wind turbine system with MPPT control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Behjat

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This research work develops dynamic model of a gearless small scale wind power generation system based on a direct driven single sided outer rotor AFPMSG with coreless armature winding. Dynamic modeling of the AFPMSG based wind turbine requires machine parameters. To this end, a 3D FEM model of the generator is developed and from magnetostatic and transient analysis of the FEM model, machine parameters are calculated and utilized in dynamic modeling of the system. A maximum power point tracking (MPPT-based FOC control approach is used to obtain maximum power from the variable wind speed. The simulation results show the proper performance of the developed dynamic model of the AFPMSG, control approach and power generation system.

  3. Investigation on dynamic performance of concrete column crumb rubber steel and fiber concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siti Nurul Nureda, M. Z.; Mariyana, A. K.; Khiyon, M. Iqbal; Rahman, M. S. Abdul; Nurizaty, Z.

    2017-11-01

    In general the Normal Concrete (NC) are by quasi-brittle failure, where, the nearly complete loss of loading capacity, once failure is initiated especially under dynamic loadings. The significance of this study is to improve the damping properties of concrete structure by utilization of the recycled materials from waste tires to be used in concrete as structural materials that improve seismic performance. In this study, the concrete containing 10% of fine crumb rubber and 1 % volume fraction of steel fiber from waste tires is use to investigate the dynamic performance (natural frequency and damping ratio).A small scale column were fabricated from Treated Crumb Rubber and Steel Fiber Concrete (TCRSFC) and NC were cast and cured for 28 days to investigate the dynamic performance. Based on analysis, dynamic modulus, damping ratio and natural frequency of TCRSFC has improved considerably by 5.18%, 109% and 10.94% when compared with NC. The TCRSFC producing concrete with the desired properties as well as to introduce the huge potential as dynamic resistance structure from severe damage especially prevention on catastrophic failure.

  4. Dynamic Performance Analysis for an Absorption Chiller under Different Working Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Wang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Due to the merits of energy saving and environmental protection, the absorption chiller (AC has attracted a lot of attention, and previous studies only concentrated on the dynamic response of the AC under a single working condition. However, the working conditions are usually variable, and the dynamic performance under different working conditions is beneficial for the adjustment of AC and the control of the whole system, of which the stabilization can be affected by the AC transient process. Therefore, the steady and dynamic models of a single-effect H2O-LiBr absorption chiller are built up, the thermal inertia and fluid storage are also taken into consideration. And the dynamic performance analyses of the AC are completed under different external parameters. Furthermore, a whole system using AC in a process plant is analyzed. As a conclusion, the time required to reach a new steady-state (relaxation time increases when the step change of the generator inlet temperature becomes large, the cooling water inlet temperature rises, or the evaporator inlet temperature decreases. In addition, the control strategy considering the AC dynamic performance is favorable to the operation of the whole system.

  5. Comparison of two methods to determine fan performance curves using computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onma, Patinya; Chantrasmi, Tonkid

    2018-01-01

    This work investigates a systematic numerical approach that employs Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to obtain performance curves of a backward-curved centrifugal fan. Generating the performance curves requires a number of three-dimensional simulations with varying system loads at a fixed rotational speed. Two methods were used and their results compared to experimental data. The first method incrementally changes the mass flow late through the inlet boundary condition while the second method utilizes a series of meshes representing the physical damper blade at various angles. The generated performance curves from both methods are compared with an experiment setup in accordance with the AMCA fan performance testing standard.

  6. The impact of interface bonding efficiency on high-burnup spent nuclear fuel dynamic performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Hao, E-mail: jiangh@ornl.gov; Wang, Jy-An John; Wang, Hong

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • To investigate the impact of interfacial bonding efficiency at pellet-pellet and pellet-clad interfaces of high-burnup (HBU) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) on its dynamic performance. • Flexural rigidity, EI = M/κ, estimated from FEA results were benchmarked with SNF dynamic experimental results, and used to evaluate interface bonding efficiency. • Interface bonding efficiency can significantly dictate the SNF system rigidity and the associated dynamic performance. • With consideration of interface bonding efficiency and fuel cracking, HBU SNF fuel property was estimated with SNF static and dynamic experimental data. - Abstract: Finite element analysis (FEA) was used to investigate the impact of interfacial bonding efficiency at pellet-pellet and pellet-clad interfaces of high-burnup (HBU) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) on system dynamic performance. Bending moments M were applied to FEA model to evaluate the system responses. From bending curvature, κ, flexural rigidity EI can be estimated as EI = M/κ. The FEA simulation results were benchmarked with experimental results from cyclic integrated reversal bending fatigue test (CIRFT) of HBR fuel rods. The consequence of interface debonding between fuel pellets and cladding is a redistribution of the loads carried by the fuel pellets to the clad, which results in a reduction in composite rod system flexural rigidity. Therefore, the interface bonding efficiency at the pellet-pellet and pellet-clad interfaces can significantly dictate the SNF system dynamic performance. With the consideration of interface bonding efficiency, the HBU SNF fuel property was estimated with CIRFT test data.

  7. Target acquisition performance : Effects of target aspect angle, dynamic imaging and signal processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beintema, J.A.; Bijl, P.; Hogervorst, M.A.; Dijk, J.

    2008-01-01

    In an extensive Target Acquisition (TA) performance study, we recorded static and dynamic imagery of a set of military and civilian two-handheld objects at a range of distances and aspect angles with an under-sampled uncooled thermal imager. Next, we applied signal processing techniques including

  8. A dynamic approach to real-time performance measurement in design projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skec, Stanko; Cash, Philip; Storga, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Recent developments in engineering design management point to the need for more dynamic, fine-grain measurement approaches able to deal with multi-dimensional, cross-level process performance in product design. Thus, this paper proposes a new approach to the measurement and management of individu...

  9. School Expenditure and School Performance: Evidence from New South Wales Schools Using a Dynamic Panel Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, G.; Mangan, J.; Blackburn, V.; Radicic, D.

    2015-01-01

    This article estimates the effects of school expenditure on school performance in government secondary schools in New South Wales, Australia over the period 2006-2010. It uses dynamic panel analysis to exploit time series data on individual schools that only recently has become available. We find a significant but small effect of expenditure on…

  10. Design methodology for flexible energy conversion systems accounting for dynamic performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pierobon, Leonardo; Casati, Emiliano; Casella, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a methodology to help in the definition of the optimal design of power generation systems. The innovative element is the integration of requirements on dynamic performance into the system design procedure. Operational flexibility is an increasingly important specification...

  11. Physiological performance of plaice Pleuronectes platessa (L.): from Static to Dynamic Energy Budgets.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    v.d. Veer, H.; Cardoso, J.F.M.F.; Peck, M.A.; Kooijman, S.A.L.M.

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, various body size scaling relationships describing the physiological performance of plaice Pleuronectes platessa (L.) were derived using a dynamic energy budget (DEB) model and compared with allometric relationships derived from a static energy budget (SEB) model. Results

  12. Public Auditing and Data Dynamics in Cloud with Performance Assessment on Third Party Auditor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    P. Sawant, Snehal; Deshmukh, Aaradhana A.; Mihovska, Albena Dimitrova

    2016-01-01

    presented in this paper uses the concept of an external Third Party Auditor (TPA). TPA is an external party who is going to perform integrity verification of the user’s data on behalf of the user. The proposed scheme assures integrity verification with a dynamic data support, to ensure that changes made...

  13. Comparative analyses on dynamic performances of photovoltaic–thermal solar collectors integrated with phase change materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Di; Jia, Yuting; Alva, Guruprasad; Liu, Lingkun; Fang, Guiyin

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The dynamic model of photovoltaic–thermal collector with phase change material was developed. • The performances of photovoltaic–thermal collector are performed comparative analyses. • The performances of photovoltaic–thermal collector with phase change material were evaluated. • Upper phase change material mode can improve performances of photovoltaic–thermal collector. - Abstract: The operating conditions (especially temperature) of photovoltaic–thermal solar collectors have significant influence on dynamic performance of the hybrid photovoltaic–thermal solar collectors. Only a small percentage of incoming solar radiation can be converted into electricity, and the rest is converted into heat. This heat leads to a decrease in efficiency of the photovoltaic module. In order to improve the performance of the hybrid photovoltaic–thermal solar collector, we performed comparative analyses on a hybrid photovoltaic–thermal solar collector integrated with phase change material. Electrical and thermal parameters like solar cell temperature, outlet temperature of air, electrical power, thermal power, electrical efficiency, thermal efficiency and overall efficiency are simulated and analyzed to evaluate the dynamic performance of the hybrid photovoltaic–thermal collector. It is found that the position of phase change material layer in the photovoltaic–thermal collector has a significant effect on the performance of the photovoltaic–thermal collector. The results indicate that upper phase change material mode in the photovoltaic–thermal collector can significantly improve the thermal and electrical performance of photovoltaic–thermal collector. It is found that overall efficiency of photovoltaic–thermal collector in ‘upper phase change material’ mode is 10.7% higher than that in ‘no phase change material’ mode. Further, for a photovoltaic–thermal collector with upper phase change material, it is verified that 3 cm

  14. Fatigue performance improvement in AISI 4140 steel by dynamic strain aging and dynamic precipitation during warm laser shock peening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye Chang [School of Industrial Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47906 (United States); Suslov, Sergey; Kim, Bong Joong; Stach, Eric A. [School of Materials Engineering and Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Cheng, Gary J., E-mail: gjcheng@purdue.edu [School of Industrial Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47906 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    Warm laser shock peening (WLSP) is a thermomechanical treatment technique combining the advantages of laser shock peening and dynamic strain aging (DSA). Through DSA, WLSP of steel increases the dislocation density and stabilizes the dislocation structure by pinning of mobile dislocations by carbon atoms. In addition, WLSP generates nanoscale carbide precipitates through strain-induced precipitation. The carbide precipitates stabilize the microstructure by dislocation pinning. This results in higher stability of the dislocation structure and thus improves the stability of the compressive residual stress. In this study the mechanism of fatigue performance improvement in AISI 4140 steel by WLSP is investigated. It is found that microstructures formed after WLSP lead to a higher stability of dislocation structures and residual stress, which are beneficial for fatigue performance.

  15. Fatigue performance improvement in AISI 4140 steel by dynamic strain aging and dynamic precipitation during warm laser shock peening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Chang; Suslov, Sergey; Kim, Bong Joong; Stach, Eric A.; Cheng, Gary J.

    2011-01-01

    Warm laser shock peening (WLSP) is a thermomechanical treatment technique combining the advantages of laser shock peening and dynamic strain aging (DSA). Through DSA, WLSP of steel increases the dislocation density and stabilizes the dislocation structure by pinning of mobile dislocations by carbon atoms. In addition, WLSP generates nanoscale carbide precipitates through strain-induced precipitation. The carbide precipitates stabilize the microstructure by dislocation pinning. This results in higher stability of the dislocation structure and thus improves the stability of the compressive residual stress. In this study the mechanism of fatigue performance improvement in AISI 4140 steel by WLSP is investigated. It is found that microstructures formed after WLSP lead to a higher stability of dislocation structures and residual stress, which are beneficial for fatigue performance.

  16. Is performance in pre-clinical assessment a good predictor of the final Doctor of Medicine grade?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Wardy, Nadia M; Rizvi, Syed G; Bayoumi, Riad A

    2009-12-01

    To investigate if any correlation exists between students' grades on their final doctor of Medicine (MD) assessment and their overall preclinical grade point average (GPA) and its component parts. Student data available from the Deanship of Admissions and Registration were analyzed. Pearson correlation coefficient was obtained to assess the degree of linear relationship between performance in the preclinical and the MD assessment of 529 students who graduated from the College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Sultan Qaboos University, Al-Khoud, Oman from June 1998 to June 2005. Simple and multiple regression analyses were performed to evaluate individual and combined impact of the preclinical courses' grades on MD grades. Preclinical GPA correlated highly with MD GPA (r=0.641). The science component taught early in the preclinical phase correlated more strongly (r=0.457) than student electives (r=0.246). This correlation was better in the good English group. Students' performance, however, was best in electives, but worst in English. Most students who had low MD GPA (2.5, and limiting the credit hour requirement of electives by the College seems to be justified.

  17. Dynamic balance performance and noncontact lower extremity injury in college football players: an initial study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Robert J; Lehr, Michael E; Fink, Michael L; Kiesel, Kyle B; Plisky, Phillip J

    2013-09-01

    Field expedient screening tools that can identify individuals at an elevated risk for injury are needed to minimize time loss in American football players. Previous research has suggested that poor dynamic balance may be associated with an elevated risk for injury in athletes; however, this has yet to be examined in college football players. To determine if dynamic balance deficits are associated with an elevated risk of injury in collegiate football players. It was hypothesized that football players with lower performance and increased asymmetry in dynamic balance would be at an elevated risk for sustaining a noncontact lower extremity injury. Prospective cohort study. Fifty-nine collegiate American football players volunteered for this study. Demographic information, injury history, and dynamic balance testing performance were collected, and noncontact lower extremity injuries were recorded over the course of the season. Receiver operator characteristic curves were calculated based on performance on the Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT), including composite score and asymmetry, to determine the population-specific risk cut-off point. Relative risk was then calculated based on these variables, as well as previous injury. A cut-off point of 89.6% composite score on the SEBT optimized the sensitivity (100%) and specificity (71.7%). A college football player who scored below 89.6% was 3.5 times more likely to get injured. Poor performance on the SEBT may be related to an increased risk for sustaining a noncontact lower extremity injury over the course of a competitive American football season. College football players should be screened preseason using the SEBT to identify those at an elevated risk for injury based upon dynamic balance performance to implement injury mitigation strategies to this specific subgroup of athletes.

  18. The role of model dynamics in ensemble Kalman filter performance for chaotic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, G.-H.C.; McLaughlin, D.; Entekhabi, D.; Ahanin, A.

    2011-01-01

    The ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) is susceptible to losing track of observations, or 'diverging', when applied to large chaotic systems such as atmospheric and ocean models. Past studies have demonstrated the adverse impact of sampling error during the filter's update step. We examine how system dynamics affect EnKF performance, and whether the absence of certain dynamic features in the ensemble may lead to divergence. The EnKF is applied to a simple chaotic model, and ensembles are checked against singular vectors of the tangent linear model, corresponding to short-term growth and Lyapunov vectors, corresponding to long-term growth. Results show that the ensemble strongly aligns itself with the subspace spanned by unstable Lyapunov vectors. Furthermore, the filter avoids divergence only if the full linearized long-term unstable subspace is spanned. However, short-term dynamics also become important as non-linearity in the system increases. Non-linear movement prevents errors in the long-term stable subspace from decaying indefinitely. If these errors then undergo linear intermittent growth, a small ensemble may fail to properly represent all important modes, causing filter divergence. A combination of long and short-term growth dynamics are thus critical to EnKF performance. These findings can help in developing practical robust filters based on model dynamics. ?? 2011 The Authors Tellus A ?? 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  19. Self-perceived versus objectively measured competence in performing clinical practical procedures by final year medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katowa-Mukwato, Patricia; Banda, Sekelani

    2016-04-30

    To determine and compare the self-perceived and objectively measured competence in performing 14 core-clinical practical procedures by Final Year Medical Students of the University of Zambia. The study included 56 out of 60 graduating University of Zambia Medical Students of the 2012/2013 academic year. Self-perceived competence: students rated their competence on 14 core- clinical practical procedures using a self-administered questionnaire on a 5-point Likert scale. Objective competence: it was measured by Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) by faculty using predetermined rating scales. Rank order correlation test was performed for self-perceived and objectively measured competence. Two thirds 36 (66.7%) of the participants perceived themselves as moderately competent, 15 (27.8%) rated themselves as highly competent while 3 (5.6%) had low self-perception. With objective competence, the majority 52 (92.8%) were barely competent while 4 (7.2%) were absolutely competent. When overall self-perception was compared to objectively measured competence, there was a discordance which was demonstrated by a negative correlation (Spearman rho -.123). Significant numbers of students reported low self-competence in performing procedures such as endotracheal intubation, gastric lavage and cardiopulmonary resuscitation which most never performed during the clinical years of medical education. In addition, the negative correlation between self-perceived and objectively measured competence demonstrated the inability of students to assess and rate themselves objectively due to fear that others may know their weaknesses and realize that they are not as competent as expected at a specific level of training.

  20. Dynamic lighting system for the learning environment: performance of elementary students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyungah; Suk, Hyeon-Jeong

    2016-05-16

    This study aims to investigate the effects of lighting color temperatures on elementary students' performance, and thereby propose a dynamic lighting system for a smart learning environment. Three empirical studies were conducted: First, physiological responses were measured as a potential mediator of performance. Second, cognitive and behavioral responses were observed during academic and recess activities. Lastly, the experiment was carried out in a real-life setting with prolonged exposure. With a comprehensive analysis of the three studies, three lighting presets-3500 K, 5000 K, and 6500 K-are suggested for easy, standard, and intensive activity, respectively. The study is expected to act as a good stepping stone for developing dynamic lighting systems to support students' performance in learning environments.

  1. Achievable ADC Performance by Postcorrection Utilizing Dynamic Modeling of the Integral Nonlinearity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Händel

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available There is a need for a universal dynamic model of analog-to-digital converters (ADC’s aimed for postcorrection. However, it is complicated to fully describe the properties of an ADC by a single model. An alternative is to split up the ADC model in different components, where each component has unique properties. In this paper, a model based on three components is used, and a performance analysis for each component is presented. Each component can be postcorrected individually and by the method that best suits the application. The purpose of postcorrection of an ADC is to improve the performance. Hence, for each component, expressions for the potential improvement have been developed. The measures of performance are total harmonic distortion (THD and signal to noise and distortion (SINAD, and to some extent spurious-free dynamic range (SFDR.

  2. Dynamics and mechanisms of catalytic processes and hot chemistry. Final report, March 1, 1972-October 31, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spicer, L.D.

    1984-10-01

    General areas of research addressed are recoil chemistry of halogens, tritium, and sulfur, radiotracer methods for studies of chemical dynamics, thermal and photochemistry of sulfur dioxide, and photochemistry and photoassistance in catalytic systems

  3. Experimental Testing and Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation of Maple Seeds and Performance Analysis as a Wind Turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Jacob R.

    Descending maple seeds generate lift to slow their fall and remain aloft in a blowing wind; have the wings of these seeds evolved to descend as slowly as possible? A unique energy balance equation, experimental data, and computational fluid dynamics simulations have all been developed to explore this question from a turbomachinery perspective. The computational fluid dynamics in this work is the first to be performed in the relative reference frame. Maple seed performance has been analyzed for the first time based on principles of wind turbine analysis. Application of the Betz Limit and one-dimensional momentum theory allowed for empirical and computational power and thrust coefficients to be computed for maple seeds. It has been determined that the investigated species of maple seeds perform near the Betz limit for power conversion and thrust coefficient. The power coefficient for a maple seed is found to be in the range of 48-54% and the thrust coefficient in the range of 66-84%. From Betz theory, the stream tube area expansion of the maple seed is necessary for power extraction. Further investigation of computational solutions and mechanical analysis find three key reasons for high maple seed performance. First, the area expansion is driven by maple seed lift generation changing the fluid momentum and requiring area to increase. Second, radial flow along the seed surface is promoted by a sustained leading edge vortex that centrifuges low momentum fluid outward. Finally, the area expansion is also driven by the spanwise area variation of the maple seed imparting a radial force on the flow. These mechanisms result in a highly effective device for the purpose of seed dispersal. However, the maple seed also provides insight into fundamental questions about how turbines can most effectively change the momentum of moving fluids in order to extract useful power or dissipate kinetic energy.

  4. Influence of operating conditions upon the dynamic steady-state performance of a switched reluctance motor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faiz, J.; Shafagh, E.

    1999-01-01

    In order to obtain more accurate predicted dynamic steady-state performance with shorter computation time, an available mathematical model is modified and presented. Using this modified model, performance of a typical switched reluctance motor under a wide range of variations of operating conditions is obtained and discussed. These include variations of speed, voltage, load and switching angle. The static test characteristics of the motor are carefully measured and measured flux-linkage data are then used to predict the steady-state performance

  5. Aging analysis of high performance FinFET flip-flop under Dynamic NBTI simulation configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zainudin, M. F.; Hussin, H.; Halim, A. K.; Karim, J.

    2018-03-01

    A mechanism known as Negative-bias Temperature Instability (NBTI) degrades a main electrical parameters of a circuit especially in terms of performance. So far, the circuit design available at present are only focussed on high performance circuit without considering the circuit reliability and robustness. In this paper, the main circuit performances of high performance FinFET flip-flop such as delay time, and power were studied with the presence of the NBTI degradation. The aging analysis was verified using a 16nm High Performance Predictive Technology Model (PTM) based on different commands available at Synopsys HSPICE. The results shown that the circuit under the longer dynamic NBTI simulation produces the highest impact in the increasing of gate delay and decrease in the average power reduction from a fresh simulation until the aged stress time under a nominal condition. In addition, the circuit performance under a varied stress condition such as temperature and negative stress gate bias were also studied.

  6. Static and Dynamic Performance Simulation of Direct-Acting Force Motor Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xinghai; Ding, Jianjun; Zheng, Gang; Jiang, Kunpeng; Chen, Dongdong

    2017-07-01

    This work focuses on static and dynamic characteristics of direct-acting force motor valve. First, we analyzed the structure features and operating principle of the Mitsubishi-Hitachi force motor valve (FMV) and the operating principle of its internal permanent-magnet moving-coil force motor magnetic circuit, determined the transfer function of the FMV force motor system, and established a mathematical model for the system. Secondly, we established a static performance analysis model using the AMESIM software and utilized the model in combination with experimental results to analyze the effects of electro-hydraulic servo valve structural parameters on static characteristics. Lastly, we deduced the trajectory equation of the system, established the relationship between dynamic characteristic indexes and structural parameters, and analyzed the effects of different parameter values on the dynamic characteristics of the system. This research can provide a theoretical guidance for designing and manufacturing the FMV body.

  7. Dynamic Model of Centrifugal Compressor for Prediction of Surge Evolution and Performance Variations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Mooncheong; Han, Jaeyoung; Yu, Sangseok

    2016-01-01

    When a control algorithm is developed to protect automotive compressor surges, the simulation model typically selects an empirically determined look-up table. However, it is difficult for a control oriented empirical model to show surge characteristics of the super charger. In this study, a dynamic supercharger model is developed to predict the performance of a centrifugal compressor under dynamic load follow-up. The model is developed using Simulink® environment, and is composed of a compressor, throttle body, valves, and chamber. Greitzer’s compressor model is used, and the geometric parameters are achieved by the actual supercharger. The simulation model is validated with experimental data. It is shown that compressor surge is effectively predicted by this dynamic compressor model under various operating conditions.

  8. Dynamic Model of Centrifugal Compressor for Prediction of Surge Evolution and Performance Variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Mooncheong; Han, Jaeyoung; Yu, Sangseok [Chungnam National Univ., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    When a control algorithm is developed to protect automotive compressor surges, the simulation model typically selects an empirically determined look-up table. However, it is difficult for a control oriented empirical model to show surge characteristics of the super charger. In this study, a dynamic supercharger model is developed to predict the performance of a centrifugal compressor under dynamic load follow-up. The model is developed using Simulink® environment, and is composed of a compressor, throttle body, valves, and chamber. Greitzer’s compressor model is used, and the geometric parameters are achieved by the actual supercharger. The simulation model is validated with experimental data. It is shown that compressor surge is effectively predicted by this dynamic compressor model under various operating conditions.

  9. Prediction of Cognitive Performance and Subjective Sleepiness Using a Model of Arousal Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postnova, Svetlana; Lockley, Steven W; Robinson, Peter A

    2018-04-01

    A model of arousal dynamics is applied to predict objective performance and subjective sleepiness measures, including lapses and reaction time on a visual Performance Vigilance Test (vPVT), performance on a mathematical addition task (ADD), and the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KSS). The arousal dynamics model is comprised of a physiologically based flip-flop switch between the wake- and sleep-active neuronal populations and a dynamic circadian oscillator, thus allowing prediction of sleep propensity. Published group-level experimental constant routine (CR) and forced desynchrony (FD) data are used to calibrate the model to predict performance and sleepiness. Only the studies using dim light (performance measures during CR and FD protocols, with sleep-wake cycles ranging from 20 to 42.85 h and a 2:1 wake-to-sleep ratio. New metrics relating model outputs to performance and sleepiness data are developed and tested against group average outcomes from 7 (vPVT lapses), 5 (ADD), and 8 (KSS) experimental protocols, showing good quantitative and qualitative agreement with the data (root mean squared error of 0.38, 0.19, and 0.35, respectively). The weights of the homeostatic and circadian effects are found to be different between the measures, with KSS having stronger homeostatic influence compared with the objective measures of performance. Using FD data in addition to CR data allows us to challenge the model in conditions of both acute sleep deprivation and structured circadian misalignment, ensuring that the role of the circadian and homeostatic drives in performance is properly captured.

  10. Using a Feedback Environment to Improve Creative Performance: A Dynamic Affect Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zhenxing; Zhang, Na

    2017-01-01

    Prior research on feedback and creative performance has neglected the dynamic nature of affect and has focused only on the influence of positive affect. We argue that creative performance is the result of a dynamic process in which a person experiences a phase of negative affect and subsequently enters a state of high positive affect that is influenced by the feedback environment. Hierarchical regression was used to analyze a sample of 264 employees from seven industry firms. The results indicate that employees' perceptions of a supportive supervisor feedback environment indirectly influence their level of creative performance through positive affect (t2); the negative affect (t1) moderates the relationship between positive affect (t2) and creative performance (t2), rendering the relationship more positive if negative affect (t1) is high. The change in positive affect mediates the relationship between the supervisor feedback environment and creative performance; a decrease in negative affect moderates the relationship between increased positive affect and creative performance, rendering the relationship more positive if the decrease in negative affect is large. The implications for improving the creative performances of employees are further discussed.

  11. Using a Feedback Environment to Improve Creative Performance: A Dynamic Affect Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenxing Gong

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Prior research on feedback and creative performance has neglected the dynamic nature of affect and has focused only on the influence of positive affect. We argue that creative performance is the result of a dynamic process in which a person experiences a phase of negative affect and subsequently enters a state of high positive affect that is influenced by the feedback environment. Hierarchical regression was used to analyze a sample of 264 employees from seven industry firms. The results indicate that employees’ perceptions of a supportive supervisor feedback environment indirectly influence their level of creative performance through positive affect (t2; the negative affect (t1 moderates the relationship between positive affect (t2 and creative performance (t2, rendering the relationship more positive if negative affect (t1 is high. The change in positive affect mediates the relationship between the supervisor feedback environment and creative performance; a decrease in negative affect moderates the relationship between increased positive affect and creative performance, rendering the relationship more positive if the decrease in negative affect is large. The implications for improving the creative performances of employees are further discussed.

  12. Clean Coal Technology III: 10 MW Demonstration of Gas Suspension Absorption final project performance and economics report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, F.E.

    1995-08-01

    The 10 MW Demonstration of the Gas Suspension Absorption (GSA) program is a government and industry co-funded technology development. The objective of the project is to demonstrate the performance of the GSA system in treating a 10 MW slipstream of flue gas resulting from the combustion of a high sulfur coal. This project involves design, fabrication, construction and testing of the GSA system. The Project Performance and Economics Report provides the nonproprietary information for the ``10 MW Demonstration of the Gas Suspension Absorption (GSA) Project`` installed at Tennessee Valley Authority`s (TVA) Shawnee Power Station, Center for Emissions Research (CER) at Paducah, Kentucky. The program demonstrated that the GSA flue-gas-desulfurization (FGD) technology is capable of achieving high SO{sub 2} removal efficiencies (greater than 90%), while maintaining particulate emissions below the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS), without any negative environmental impact (section 6). A 28-day test demonstrated the reliability and operability of the GSA system during continuous operation. The test results and detailed discussions of the test data can be obtained from TVA`s Final Report (Appendix A). The Air Toxics Report (Appendix B), prepared by Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EERC) characterizes air toxic emissions of selected hazardous air pollutants (HAP) from the GSA process. The results of this testing show that the GSA system can substantially reduce the emission of these HAP. With its lower capital costs and maintenance costs (section 7), as compared to conventional semi-dry scrubbers, the GSA technology commands a high potential for further commercialization in the United States. For detailed information refer to The Economic Evaluation Report (Appendix C) prepared by Raytheon Engineers and Constructors.

  13. Final Report for Award DE-SC0005403. Improved Electrochemical Performance of Strained Lattice Electrolytes via Modulated Doping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertz, Joshua L. [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States); Prasad, Ajay K. [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States)

    2015-09-06

    The enclosed document provides a final report to document the research performed at the University of Delaware under Grant DE-SC0005403: Improved Electrochemical Performance of Strained Lattice Electrolytes via Modulated Doping. The ultimate goal of this project was to learn how to systematically strain the inter-atomic distance in thin ceramic films and how to use this newfound control to improve the ease by which oxygen ions can conduct through the films. Increasing the ionic conductivity of ceramics holds the promise of drastic improvements in the performance of solid oxide fuel cells, chemical sensors, gas permeation membranes, and related devices. Before this work, the experimental evidence advocating for strain-based techniques was often controversial and poorly characterized. Enabling much of this work was a new method to quickly create a very wide range of ceramic nanostructures that was established during the first phase of the project. Following this initial phase, we created a variety of promising nanostructured epitaxial films and multilayers with systematic variations in lattice mismatch and dopant content. Over the course of the work, a positive effect of tensile atomic strain on the oxygen conductivity was conclusively found using a few different forms of samples and experimental techniques. The samples were built by sputtering, an industrially scalable technique, and thus the technological implementation of these results may be economically feasible. Still, two other results consistently achieved over multiple efforts in this work give pause. The first of these results was that very specific, pristine surfaces upon which to build the nanostructures were strictly required in order to achieve measurable results. The second of these results was that compressively strained films with concomitant reductions in oxygen conductivity are much easier to obtain relative to tensile-strained films with increased conductivity.

  14. A computational procedure for the dynamics of flexible beams within multibody systems. Ph.D. Thesis Final Technical Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downer, Janice Diane

    1990-01-01

    The dynamic analysis of three dimensional elastic beams which experience large rotational and large deformational motions are examined. The beam motion is modeled using an inertial reference for the translational displacements and a body-fixed reference for the rotational quantities. Finite strain rod theories are then defined in conjunction with the beam kinematic description which accounts for the effects of stretching, bending, torsion, and transverse shear deformations. A convected coordinate representation of the Cauchy stress tensor and a conjugate strain definition is introduced to model the beam deformation. To treat the beam dynamics, a two-stage modification of the central difference algorithm is presented to integrate the translational coordinates and the angular velocity vector. The angular orientation is then obtained from the application of an implicit integration algorithm to the Euler parameter/angular velocity kinematical relation. The combined developments of the objective internal force computation with the dynamic solution procedures result in the computational preservation of total energy for undamped systems. The present methodology is also extended to model the dynamics of deployment/retrieval of the flexible members. A moving spatial grid corresponding to the configuration of a deployed rigid beam is employed as a reference for the dynamic variables. A transient integration scheme which accurately accounts for the deforming spatial grid is derived from a space-time finite element discretization of a Hamiltonian variational statement. The computational results of this general deforming finite element beam formulation are compared to reported results for a planar inverse-spaghetti problem.

  15. Comparative Study of the Tuning Performances of the Nominal and Long L* CLIC Final Focus System at √s = 380 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Plassard, F; Marin, E; Tomás, R

    2017-01-01

    Mitigation of static imperfections for emittance preservation is one of the most important and challenging tasks faced by the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) beam delivery system. A simulation campaign has been performed to recover the nominal luminosity by means of different alignment procedures. The state of the art of the tuning studies is drawn up. Comparative studies of the tuning performances and a tuning-based final focus system design optimization for two L options are presented. The effectiveness of the tuning techniques applied to these different lattices will be decisive for the final layout of the CLIC final focus system at √s = 380 GeV.

  16. GNSS Signal Tracking Performance Improvement for Highly Dynamic Receivers by Gyroscopic Mounting Crystal Oscillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedi, Maryam; Jin, Tian; Sun, Kewen

    2015-08-31

    In this paper, the efficiency of the gyroscopic mounting method is studied for a highly dynamic GNSS receiver's reference oscillator for reducing signal loss. Analyses are performed separately in two phases, atmospheric and upper atmospheric flights. Results show that the proposed mounting reduces signal loss, especially in parts of the trajectory where its probability is the highest. This reduction effect appears especially for crystal oscillators with a low elevation angle g-sensitivity vector. The gyroscopic mounting influences frequency deviation or jitter caused by dynamic loads on replica carrier and affects the frequency locked loop (FLL) as the dominant tracking loop in highly dynamic GNSS receivers. In terms of steady-state load, the proposed mounting mostly reduces the frequency deviation below the one-sigma threshold of FLL (1σ(FLL)). The mounting method can also reduce the frequency jitter caused by sinusoidal vibrations and reduces the probability of signal loss in parts of the trajectory where the other error sources accompany this vibration load. In the case of random vibration, which is the main disturbance source of FLL, gyroscopic mounting is even able to suppress the disturbances greater than the three-sigma threshold of FLL (3σ(FLL)). In this way, signal tracking performance can be improved by the gyroscopic mounting method for highly dynamic GNSS receivers.

  17. An Evaluation of Molecular Dynamics Performance on the Hybrid Cray XK6 Supercomputer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, W. Michael; Nguyen, Trung D.; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel A.; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Rack, Philip D.; Berger, Mark

    2012-01-01

    For many years, the drive towards computational physics studies that match the size and time-scales of experiment has been fueled by increases in processor and interconnect performance that could be exploited with relatively little modification to existing codes. Engineering and electrical power constraints have disrupted this trend, requiring more drastic changes to both hardware and software solutions. Here, we present details of the Cray XK6 architecture that achieves increased performance with the use of GPU accelerators. We review software development efforts in the LAMMPS molecular dynamics package that have been implemented in order to utilize hybrid high performance computers. We present benchmark results for solid-state, biological, and mesoscopic systems and discuss some challenges for utilizing hybrid systems. We present some early work in improving application performance on the XK6 and performance results for the simulation of liquid copper nanostructures with the embedded atom method.

  18. Evaluation of cyclone geometry and its influence on performance parameters by computational fluid dynamics (CFD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. P. Martignoni

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Cyclone models have been used without relevant modifications for more than a century. Most of the attention has been focused on finding new methods to improve performance parameters. Recently, some studies were conducted to improve equipment performance by evaluating geometric effects on projects. In this work, the effect of cyclone geometry was studied through the creation of a symmetrical inlet and a volute scroll outlet section in an experimental cyclone and comparison to an ordinary single tangential inlet. The study was performed for gas-solid flow, based on an experimental study available in the literature, where a conventional cyclone model was used. Numerical experiments were performed by using CFX 5.7.1. The axial and tangential velocity components were evaluated using RSM and LES turbulence models. Results showed that these new designs can improve the cyclone performance parameters significantly and very interesting details were found on cyclone fluid dynamics properties using RSM and LES.

  19. Performance evaluation of the zero-multipole summation method in modern molecular dynamics software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuraba, Shun; Fukuda, Ikuo

    2018-05-04

    The zero-multiple summation method (ZMM) is a cutoff-based method for calculating electrostatic interactions in molecular dynamics simulations, utilizing an electrostatic neutralization principle as a physical basis. Since the accuracies of the ZMM have been revealed to be sufficient in previous studies, it is highly desirable to clarify its practical performance. In this paper, the performance of the ZMM is compared with that of the smooth particle mesh Ewald method (SPME), where the both methods are implemented in molecular dynamics software package GROMACS. Extensive performance comparisons against a highly optimized, parameter-tuned SPME implementation are performed for various-sized water systems and two protein-water systems. We analyze in detail the dependence of the performance on the potential parameters and the number of CPU cores. Even though the ZMM uses a larger cutoff distance than the SPME does, the performance of the ZMM is comparable to or better than that of the SPME. This is because the ZMM does not require a time-consuming electrostatic convolution and because the ZMM gains short neighbor-list distances due to the smooth damping feature of the pairwise potential function near the cutoff length. We found, in particular, that the ZMM with quadrupole or octupole cancellation and no damping factor is an excellent candidate for the fast calculation of electrostatic interactions. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. The influence of climatic and physiological performance on population dynamics of Mytilus edulis in West Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyrring, Jakob; Blicher, Martin; Sejr, Mikael Kristian

    2014-01-01

    data on current distribution and physiological performance of blue mussels in the Arctic is lacking, and knowledge of how “climate” in a broad sense specifically influence population dynamics of this species is unknown. Here, we present data on abundance, age and mortality of blue mussels in West...... Greenland. We supplement our data with physiological measurements on freezing tolerance and aerobic metabolic performance of intertidal specimens. We hereby attempt to identify links between temperature and physiology and how this might translate into population dynamics in this region of the Arctic....... Results show an overall decline in blue mussel abundance along the coast from south to north Greenland. Physiological adaptation and plasticity of blue mussels was found across latitudes spanning from the temperate to the High Arctic region. Combined our results indicate that low ocean temperature per se...

  1. A dynamic network model to explain the development of excellent human performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruud J.R. Den Hartigh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Across different domains, from sports to science, some individuals accomplish excellent levels of performance. For over 150 years, researchers have debated the roles of specific nature and nurture components to develop excellence. In this article, we argue that the key to excellence does not reside in specific underlying components, but rather in the ongoing interactions among the components. We propose that excellence emerges out of dynamic networks consisting of idiosyncratic mixtures of interacting components such as genetic endowment, motivation, practice, and coaching. Using computer simulations we demonstrate that the dynamic network model accurately predicts typical properties of excellence reported in the literature, such as the idiosyncratic developmental trajectories leading to excellence and the highly skewed distributions of productivity present in virtually any achievement domain. Based on this novel theoretical perspective on excellent human performance, this article concludes by suggesting policy implications and directions for future research.

  2. Labour Market Performance Differentials and Dynamics in EU-15 Countries and Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano Perugini

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to contribute to empirical analysis of the differentials, dynamics and determinants of labour market performance in EU-15. One innovation of the paper reflects our decision not to use a single indicator of labour market performance, but to adopt three variables: employment rate, unemployment rate, and long-term unemployment rate. In addition to national data (1997-2006, the use of data at regional NUTS-2 level (1999-2005 is a key characteristic of this study. Empirical analyses are carried out by means of various comparative statistics and econometric approaches. In the latter, a large set of explicative variables is applied to examine the potential determinants of regional (unemployment levels and dynamics.

  3. Design and evaluation of dynamic replication strategies for a high-performance data grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranganathan, K.; Foster, I.

    2001-01-01

    Physics experiments that generate large amounts of data need to be able to share it with researchers around the world. High performance grids facilitate the distribution of such data to geographically remote places. Dynamic replication can be used as a technique to reduce bandwidth consumption and access latency in accessing these huge amounts of data. The authors describe a simulation framework that we have developed to model a grid scenario, which enables comparative studies of alternative dynamic replication strategies. The authors present preliminary results obtained with this simulator, in which we evaluate the performance of six different replication strategies for three different kinds of access patterns. The simulation results show that the best strategy has significant savings in latency and bandwidth consumption if the access patterns contain a moderate amount of geographical locality

  4. A Dynamic Simulation Model of Organizational Culture and Business Strategy Effects on Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivellas, Panagiotis; Reklitis, Panagiotis; Konstantopoulos, Nikolaos

    2007-12-01

    In the past two decades, organizational culture literature has gained tremendous interest for both academic and practitioners. This is based not only on the suggestion that culture is related to performance, but also on the view that it is subject of direct managerial control and manipulation to the desired direction. In the present paper, we adopt Competing Values Framework (CVF) to operationalise organizational culture and Porter's typology to conceptualize business strategy (cost leadership, innovative and marketing differentiation, and focus). Although simulation of social events is a quite difficult task, since there are so many considerations (not all well understood) involved, in the present study we developed a dynamic model to simulate the organizational culture and strategy effects on financial performance. Data obtained from a six-year survey in the banking sector of a European developing economy was used for the proposed dynamic model development.

  5. Effects of dynamic workstation Oxidesk on acceptance, physical activity, mental fitness and work performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groenesteijn, L; Commissaris, D A C M; Van den Berg-Zwetsloot, M; Hiemstra-Van Mastrigt, S

    2016-07-19

    Working in an office environment is characterised by physical inactivity and sedentary behaviour. This behaviour contributes to several health risks in the long run. Dynamic workstations which allow people to combine desk activities with physical activity, may contribute to prevention of these health risks. A dynamic workstation, called Oxidesk, was evaluated to determine the possible contribution to healthy behaviour and the impact on perceived work performance. A field test was conducted with 22 office workers, employed at a health insurance company in the Netherlands. The Oxidesk was well accepted, positively perceived for fitness and the participants maintained their work performance. Physical activity was lower than the activity level required in the Dutch guidelines for sufficient physical activity. Although there was a slight increase in physical activity, the Oxidesk may be helpful in the reducing health risks involved and seems applicable for introduction to office environments.

  6. Dynamic Increase Factors for High Performance Concrete in Compression using Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisgaard, Benjamin; Ngo, Tuan; Mendis, Priyan

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides dynamic increase factors (DIF) in compression for two different High Performance Concretes (HPC), 100 MPa and 160 MPa, respectively. In the experimental investigation 2 different Split Hopkinson Pressure Bars are used in order to test over a wide range of strain rates, 100 sec1...... to 700 sec-1. The results are compared with the CEB Model Code and the Spilt Hopkinson Pressure Bar technique is briefly de-scribed....

  7. Dynamic neural networks based on-line identification and control of high performance motor drives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubaai, Ahmed; Kotaru, Raj

    1995-01-01

    In the automated and high-tech industries of the future, there wil be a need for high performance motor drives both in the low-power range and in the high-power range. To meet very straight demands of tracking and regulation in the two quadrants of operation, advanced control technologies are of a considerable interest and need to be developed. In response a dynamics learning control architecture is developed with simultaneous on-line identification and control. the feature of the proposed approach, to efficiently combine the dual task of system identification (learning) and adaptive control of nonlinear motor drives into a single operation is presented. This approach, therefore, not only adapts to uncertainties of the dynamic parameters of the motor drives but also learns about their inherent nonlinearities. In fact, most of the neural networks based adaptive control approaches in use have an identification phase entirely separate from the control phase. Because these approaches separate the identification and control modes, it is not possible to cope with dynamic changes in a controlled process. Extensive simulation studies have been conducted and good performance was observed. The robustness characteristics of neuro-controllers to perform efficiently in a noisy environment is also demonstrated. With this initial success, the principal investigator believes that the proposed approach with the suggested neural structure can be used successfully for the control of high performance motor drives. Two identification and control topologies based on the model reference adaptive control technique are used in this present analysis. No prior knowledge of load dynamics is assumed in either topology while the second topology also assumes no knowledge of the motor parameters.

  8. Oregon State University Softball: Dynamic Visual Acuity Training for Improving Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Madsen, Bruce; Blair, Kyle

    2017-01-01

    Sports vision training involves eye focusing and movement workouts that center on the visual tracking of objects. The purpose of sports vision training is to improve performance in various sports by improving visual responses and processing, such as by lowering reaction times. In 2015, the Athletic Eye Institute started a sports vision-training program study with the Oregon State University Softball Team in the hopes of increasing the dynamic visual skills of their players. There were two aim...

  9. Catalytic performances of chemically immobilized urease under static and dynamic conditions: A comparative study

    OpenAIRE

    Yürekli, Yılmaz; Alsoy Altınkaya, Sacide

    2011-01-01

    Immobilized urease has been used for direct removal of urea from aqueous solution and as biological sensing material in the preparation of urea biosensors. The former application is carried out under dynamic condition using ultrafiltration membrane either in tubular form or in flat sheet, while the latter is used in static condition. In this study, the performance of chemically immobilized urease on poly(acrylonitrile-co-sodium methallyl sulfonate) ultrafiltration membrane was determined unde...

  10. Modelling quality dynamics on business value and firm performance in big data analytics environment

    OpenAIRE

    Ji-fan Ren, S; Fosso Wamba, S; Akter, S; Dubey, R; Childe, SJ

    2017-01-01

    Big data analytics have become an increasingly important component for firms across advanced economies. This paper examines the quality dynamics in big data environment that are linked with enhancing business value and firm performance. The study identifies that system quality (i.e., system reliability, accessibility, adaptability, integration, response time and privacy) and information quality (i.e., completeness, accuracy, format and currency) are key to enhance business value and firm perf...

  11. Foam Rolling for Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness and Recovery of Dynamic Performance Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearcey, Gregory E. P.; Bradbury-Squires, David J.; Kawamoto, Jon-Erik; Drinkwater, Eric J.; Behm, David G.; Button, Duane C.

    2015-01-01

    Context: After an intense bout of exercise, foam rolling is thought to alleviate muscle fatigue and soreness (ie, delayed-onset muscle soreness [DOMS]) and improve muscular performance. Potentially, foam rolling may be an effective therapeutic modality to reduce DOMS while enhancing the recovery of muscular performance. Objective: To examine the effects of foam rolling as a recovery tool after an intense exercise protocol through assessment of pressure-pain threshold, sprint time, change-of-direction speed, power, and dynamic strength-endurance. Design: Controlled laboratory study. Setting: University laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 8 healthy, physically active males (age = 22.1 ± 2.5 years, height = 177.0 ± 7.5 cm, mass = 88.4 ± 11.4 kg) participated. Intervention(s): Participants performed 2 conditions, separated by 4 weeks, involving 10 sets of 10 repetitions of back squats at 60% of their 1-repetition maximum, followed by either no foam rolling or 20 minutes of foam rolling immediately, 24, and 48 hours postexercise. Main Outcome Measure(s): Pressure-pain threshold, sprint speed (30-m sprint time), power (broad-jump distance), change-of-direction speed (T-test), and dynamic strength-endurance. Results: Foam rolling substantially improved quadriceps muscle tenderness by a moderate to large amount in the days after fatigue (Cohen d range, 0.59 to 0.84). Substantial effects ranged from small to large in sprint time (Cohen d range, 0.68 to 0.77), power (Cohen d range, 0.48 to 0.87), and dynamic strength-endurance (Cohen d = 0.54). Conclusions: Foam rolling effectively reduced DOMS and associated decrements in most dynamic performance measures. PMID:25415413

  12. C-Band Airport Surface Communications System Standards Development. Phase II Final Report. Volume 2: Test Bed Performance Evaluation and Final AeroMACS Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Edward; Magner, James

    2011-01-01

    This report is provided as part of ITT s NASA Glenn Research Center Aerospace Communication Systems Technical Support (ACSTS) contract NNC05CA85C, Task 7: New ATM Requirements-Future Communications, C-Band and L-Band Communications Standard Development and was based on direction provided by FAA project-level agreements for New ATM Requirements-Future Communications. Task 7 included two subtasks. Subtask 7-1 addressed C-band (5091- to 5150-MHz) airport surface data communications standards development, systems engineering, test bed and prototype development, and tests and demonstrations to establish operational capability for the Aeronautical Mobile Airport Communications System (AeroMACS). Subtask 7-2 focused on systems engineering and development support of the L-band digital aeronautical communications system (L-DACS). Subtask 7-1 consisted of two phases. Phase I included development of AeroMACS concepts of use, requirements, architecture, and initial high-level safety risk assessment. Phase II builds on Phase I results and is presented in two volumes. Volume I is devoted to concepts of use, system requirements, and architecture, including AeroMACS design considerations. Volume II (this document) describes an AeroMACS prototype evaluation and presents final AeroMACS recommendations. This report also describes airport categorization and channelization methodologies. The purposes of the airport categorization task were (1) to facilitate initial AeroMACS architecture designs and enable budgetary projections by creating a set of airport categories based on common airport characteristics and design objectives, and (2) to offer high-level guidance to potential AeroMACS technology and policy development sponsors and service providers. A channelization plan methodology was developed because a common global methodology is needed to assure seamless interoperability among diverse AeroMACS services potentially supplied by multiple service providers.

  13. The Dynamics of the Economic-Financial Performance of the Corporate System of National Economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riabokin Taras V.

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The article is aimed at analyzing the dynamics of the economic-financial performance of the national corporate system, identifying trends in its development. An allocation of the corporate system as a structured object and its research will contribute to understanding of the dynamic properties of the corporate system itself, its actors, and the economy as a whole. An analysis of the dynamics of the economic-financial performance of the corporate system of national economy has been carried out. The national accounts of Ukraine for 2008-2015, in particular, in the sectors of both non-financial and financial corporations as the major subsystems of the corporate system, have been analyzed. Trends as to releasing goods and services, intermediate consumption, gross value added, and net value added, incomes, savings, net lending (+, and net borrowing (-, have been highlighted. Future researches should address a deeper analysis of the performance indicators of individual corporations, the corporate structures, constituting a part of the core corporate system, including the financial core, as well as efficiency of the State administration of national economy

  14. Two-Scale Modelling of Effects of Microstructure and Thermomechanical Properties on Dynamic Performance of an Aluminium Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Influences of microstructure and properties of an aluminium alloy on resistance to dynamic perforation are predicted using a decoupled multiscale ... simulated performance. Library parameters typical for aluminium alloys (Kohn, 1969) are used for the macroscopic equation of state of Al 2139, details of...Two-Scale Modelling of Effects of Microstructure and Thermomechanical Properties on Dynamic Performance of an Aluminium Alloy by J. D

  15. Performance-Driven Robust Identification and Control of Uncertain Dynamical Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basar, Tamer

    2001-10-29

    The grant DEFG02-97ER13939 from the Department of Energy has supported our research program on robust identification and control of uncertain dynamical systems, initially for the three-year period June 15, 1997-June 14, 2000, which was then extended on a no-cost basis for another year until June 14, 2001. This final report provides an overview of our research conducted during this period, along with a complete list of publications supported by the Grant. Within the scope of this project, we have studied fundamental issues that arise in modeling, identification, filtering, control, stabilization, control-based model reduction, decomposition and aggregation, and optimization of uncertain systems. The mathematical framework we have worked in has allowed the system dynamics to be only partially known (with the uncertainties being of both parametric or structural nature), and further the dynamics to be perturbed by unknown dynamic disturbances. Our research over these four years has generated a substantial body of new knowledge, and has led to new major developments in theory, applications, and computational algorithms. These have all been documented in various journal articles and book chapters, and have been presented at leading conferences, as to be described. A brief description of the results we have obtained within the scope of this project can be found in Section 3. To set the stage for the material of that section, we first provide in the next section (Section 2) a brief description of the issues that arise in the control of uncertain systems, and introduce several criteria under which optimality will lead to robustness and stability. Section 4 contains a list of references cited in these two sections. A list of our publications supported by the DOE Grant (covering the period June 15, 1997-June 14, 2001) comprises Section 5 of the report.

  16. Focusing performance of a multilayer Laue lens with layer placement error described by dynamical diffraction theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lingfei; Chang, Guangcai; Liu, Peng; Zhou, Liang

    2015-07-01

    The multilayer Laue lens (MLL) is essentially a linear zone plate with large aspect ratio, which can theoretically focus hard X-rays to well below 1 nm with high efficiency when ideal structures are used. However, the focusing performance of a MLL depends heavily on the quality of the layers, especially the layer placement error which always exists in real MLLs. Here, a dynamical modeling approach, based on the coupled wave theory, is proposed to study the focusing performance of a MLL with layer placement error. The result of simulation shows that this method can be applied to various forms of layer placement error.

  17. Real-Time Projection-Based Augmented Reality System for Dynamic Objects in the Performing Arts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaewoon Lee

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the case study of applying projection-based augmented reality, especially for dynamic objects in live performing shows, such as plays, dancing, or musicals. Our study aims to project imagery correctly inside the silhouettes of flexible objects, in other words, live actors or the surface of actor’s costumes; the silhouette transforms its own shape frequently. To realize this work, we implemented a special projection system based on the real-time masking technique, that is to say real-time projection-based augmented reality system for dynamic objects in performing arts. We installed the sets on a stage for live performance, and rehearsed particular scenes of a musical. In live performance, using projection-based augmented reality technology enhances technical and theatrical aspects which were not possible with existing video projection techniques. The projected images on the surfaces of actor’s costume could not only express the particular scene of a performance more effectively, but also lead the audience to an extraordinary visual experience.

  18. What Does Eye-Blink Rate Variability Dynamics Tell Us About Cognitive Performance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafal Paprocki

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive performance is defined as the ability to utilize knowledge, attention, memory, and working memory. In this study, we briefly discuss various markers that have been proposed to predict cognitive performance. Next, we develop a novel approach to characterize cognitive performance by analyzing eye-blink rate variability dynamics. Our findings are based on a sample of 24 subjects. The subjects were given a 5-min resting period prior to a 10-min IQ test. During both stages, eye blinks were recorded from Fp1 and Fp2 electrodes. We found that scale exponents estimated for blink rate variability during rest were correlated with subjects' performance on the subsequent IQ test. This surprising phenomenon could be explained by the person to person variation in concentrations of dopamine in PFC and accumulation of GABA in the visual cortex, as both neurotransmitters play a key role in cognitive processes and affect blinking. This study demonstrates the possibility that blink rate variability dynamics at rest carry information about cognitive performance and can be employed in the assessment of cognitive abilities without taking a test.

  19. Experiential knowledge of expert coaches can help identify informational constraints on performance of dynamic interceptive actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Daniel; Davids, Keith; Renshaw, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Coordination of dynamic interceptive movements is predicated on cyclical relations between an individual's actions and information sources from the performance environment. To identify dynamic informational constraints, which are interwoven with individual and task constraints, coaches' experiential knowledge provides a complementary source to support empirical understanding of performance in sport. In this study, 15 expert coaches from 3 sports (track and field, gymnastics and cricket) participated in a semi-structured interview process to identify potential informational constraints which they perceived to regulate action during run-up performance. Expert coaches' experiential knowledge revealed multiple information sources which may constrain performance adaptations in such locomotor pointing tasks. In addition to the locomotor pointing target, coaches' knowledge highlighted two other key informational constraints: vertical reference points located near the locomotor pointing target and a check mark located prior to the locomotor pointing target. This study highlights opportunities for broadening the understanding of perception and action coupling processes, and the identified information sources warrant further empirical investigation as potential constraints on athletic performance. Integration of experiential knowledge of expert coaches with theoretically driven empirical knowledge represents a promising avenue to drive future applied science research and pedagogical practice.

  20. Effect of progressive resistance exercise with neuromuscular joint facilitation on the dynamic balance performance of junior soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongzhao; Huo, Ming; Guan, Peipei; Onoda, Ko; Chen, Di; Huang, Qiuchen; Maruyama, Hitoshi

    2015-11-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate the change in dynamic balance performance of junior soccer players after progressive resistance treatment with neuromuscular joint facilitation (NJF). [Subjects] The subjects were 14 healthy males who were divided into two groups, namely the NJF and control groups. The NJF group consisted of 8 subjects, and the control group consisted of 6 subjects. [Methods] The participants in the NJF group received NJF progressive resistance treatment. Dynamic balance performance was measured before and after 3 weeks of exercise. [Results] Significant improvement in dynamic balance performance was observed both in the NJF and control groups. In the NJF group, dynamic balance performance was significantly increased compared with that in the control group. [Conclusion] The NJF intervention shortened movement time, which implies that NJF is effective for dynamic balance performance.

  1. Performance analysis and dynamic modeling of a single-spool turbojet engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrei, Irina-Carmen; Toader, Adrian; Stroe, Gabriela; Frunzulica, Florin

    2017-01-01

    The purposes of modeling and simulation of a turbojet engine are the steady state analysis and transient analysis. From the steady state analysis, which consists in the investigation of the operating, equilibrium regimes and it is based on appropriate modeling describing the operation of a turbojet engine at design and off-design regimes, results the performance analysis, concluded by the engine's operational maps (i.e. the altitude map, velocity map and speed map) and the engine's universal map. The mathematical model that allows the calculation of the design and off-design performances, in case of a single spool turbojet is detailed. An in house code was developed, its calibration was done for the J85 turbojet engine as the test case. The dynamic modeling of the turbojet engine is obtained from the energy balance equations for compressor, combustor and turbine, as the engine's main parts. The transient analysis, which is based on appropriate modeling of engine and its main parts, expresses the dynamic behavior of the turbojet engine, and further, provides details regarding the engine's control. The aim of the dynamic analysis is to determine a control program for the turbojet, based on the results provided by performance analysis. In case of the single-spool turbojet engine, with fixed nozzle geometry, the thrust is controlled by one parameter, which is the fuel flow rate. The design and management of the aircraft engine controls are based on the results of the transient analysis. The construction of the design model is complex, since it is based on both steady-state and transient analysis, further allowing the flight path cycle analysis and optimizations. This paper presents numerical simulations for a single-spool turbojet engine (J85 as test case), with appropriate modeling for steady-state and dynamic analysis.

  2. Final accepted paper. Effects of turbulence near a free surface on the dynamics of two-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uzawa, Ken; Watanabe, Tadashi

    2011-01-01

    The effect of turbulence on the dynamics of three-dimensional dam break flow is numerically investigated based on the incompressible Reynolds-averaged Navier- Stokes (RANS) equations with the Volume Of Fluid (VOF) function. It is found that the tip velocity over the ground and the impact pressure against the vertical wall in the Launder- Gibson (LG) model are in good agreement with experimental results. The dynamics of the dam break flow is subject to the viscous dissipation during the collapse of the flow, which is underestimated in the laminar model and overestimated in the realizable k - ε (RKE) model. The turbulent viscous dissipation near the free surface is comparable to that inside the water in the LG model. (author)

  3. Dynamic of N fertilizers: urea (15 N) and aqua ammonia (15 N) incorporated to the sugar cane soil. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trivelin, P.C.O.

    1988-05-01

    The dynamic of N fertilizers, urea and aqua ammonia, in the soil of sugar cane crops are studied with an emphasis on the horizontal and vertical moving. The nitrogen routing from urea and aqua ammonia sources, by isotopic technique with 15 N in relation to the leaching, volatilization and extraction by the cultivation and residue of N immobilized manure in the soil with sugar cane plantation is also analysed. (C.G.C.)

  4. Testing of components on the shaking table facilities of AEP and contribution to full scale dynamic testing of Kozloduy NPP. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambriashvili, Y.

    1996-01-01

    This final report summarizes the results of components testing on the shaking table facilities of 'Atomenergoproject' which are considered as a contribution to the full scale dynamic testing of the Kozloduy nuclear power plant Units 5 and 6. It was designed on 1.0 g according to the calculations that were based on accelerograms which included artificial and already known recordings of real earthquakes. Maximum acceleration of the designed spectrum and new spectrum which are recommended are now within the range of frequencies 2.5-20 Hz. Active reactor and the primary loop are seismic stable as well as the tested equipment tested by 'Atomenergoproject'

  5. Evaporation dynamics of a sessile droplet on glass surfaces with fluoropolymer coatings: focusing on the final stage of thin droplet evaporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatapova, Elizaveta Ya; Shonina, Anna M; Safonov, Alexey I; Sulyaeva, Veronica S; Kabov, Oleg A

    2018-03-07

    The evaporation dynamics of a water droplet with an initial volume of 2 μl from glass surfaces with fluoropolymer coatings are investigated using the shadow technique and an optical microscope. The droplet profile for a contact angle of less than 5° is constructed using an image-analyzing interference technique, and evaporation dynamics are investigated at the final stage. We coated the glass slides with a thin film of a fluoropolymer by the hot-wire chemical vapor deposition method at different deposition modes depending on the deposition pressure and the temperature of the activating wire. The resulting surfaces have different structures affecting the wetting properties. Droplet evaporation from a constant contact radius mode in the early stage of evaporation was found followed by the mode where both contact angle and contact radius simultaneously vary in time (final stage) regardless of wettability of the coated surfaces. We found that depinning occurs at small contact angles of 2.2-4.7° for all samples, which are smaller than the measured receding contact angles. This is explained by imbibition of the liquid into the developed surface of the "soft" coating that leads to formation of thin droplets completely wetting the surface. The final stage, which is little discussed in the literature, is also recorded. We have singled out a substage where the contact line velocity is abruptly increasing for all coated and uncoated surfaces. The critical droplet height corresponding to the transition to this substage is about 2 μm with R/h = 107. The duration of this substage is the same for all coated and uncoated surfaces. Droplets observed at this substage for all the tested surfaces are axisymmetric. The specific evaporation rate clearly demonstrates an abrupt increase at the final substage of the droplet evaporation. The classical R 2 law is justified for the complete wetting situation where the droplet is disappearing in an axisymmetric manner.

  6. A novel adaptive control scheme for dynamic performance improvement of DFIG-Based wind turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Zhanfeng; Shi, Tingna; Xia, Changliang; Chen, Wei

    2012-01-01

    A novel adaptive current controller for DFIG-based wind turbines is introduced in this paper. The attractiveness of the proposed strategy results from its ability to actively estimate and actively compensate for the plant dynamics and external disturbances in real time. Thus, the control strategy can successfully drive the rotor current to track the reference value, ensuring that the performance degradation caused by grid disturbances, cross-coupling terms and parameter uncertainties can be successfully suppressed. Besides, the two-parameter tuning feature makes the control strategy practical and easy to implement in commercial wind turbines. To quantify the controller performances, the transfer function description of the controller is derived. General disturbance rejection, robustness against parameter uncertainties, bandwidth and stability are also addressed. Simulation results, together with the time-domain responses, proved the stability and the strong robustness of the control system against parameter uncertainties and grid disturbances. Significant tracking and disturbance rejection performances are achieved. -- Highlights: ► The controller can compensate for plant dynamics and external disturbances. ► Performance degradation caused by disturbance can be successfully suppressed. ► General disturbance rejection of the proposed strategy is addressed. ► The stability and the strong robustness of the control system are proved.

  7. Dynamic performance of self-operated three-way valve used in a hybrid air conditioner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Penglei; Zhou, Dehai; Shi, Wenxing; Li, Xianting; Wang, Baolong

    2014-01-01

    A hybrid air conditioner combining a thermosyphon cycle with a vapor compression refrigeration cycle has a large energy saving potential compared with a common air conditioner for spaces requiring year-round cooling. The performance of the switch between the vapor compression mode and the thermosyphon mode largely impacts the safety and reliability of hybrid air conditioners. Therefore, a self-operated three-way valve is proposed. A thermodynamic model and a kinetic model are developed in this paper to evaluate the dynamic performance of the switch valve. The effects of the spring force constant, compressor discharging volume, fit clearance and piston length on the dynamic performance of the switch valve are analyzed. In conclusion, the proposed self-operated three-way valve can realize the switch operation accurately. - Highlights: •A self-operated three-way valve is proposed for hybrid air conditioners. •The thermodynamic model and kinetic model of the self-operated three-way valve are developed. •The validity of models is verified by experiments. •Effects of four main design parameters on the operating performance of the valve are researched

  8. Analysis to Inform CA Grid Integration Rules for PV: Final Report on Inverter Settings for Transmission and Distribution System Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Jeff [Electric Power Research Inst. (EPRI), Palo Alto, CA (United States); Rylander, Matthew [Electric Power Research Inst. (EPRI), Palo Alto, CA (United States); Boemer, Jens [Electric Power Research Inst. (EPRI), Palo Alto, CA (United States); Broderick, Robert Joseph [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Reno, Matthew J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mather, Barry [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-09-01

    The fourth solicitation of the California Solar Initiative (CSI) Research, Development, Demonstration and Deployment (RD&D) Program established by the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) supported the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) with data provided from Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E), Southern California Edison (SCE), and San Diego Gas and Electric (SDG&E) conducted research to determine optimal default settings for distributed energy resource advanced inverter controls. The inverter functions studied are aligned with those developed by the California Smart Inverter Working Group (SIWG) and those being considered by the IEEE 1547 Working Group. The advanced inverter controls examined to improve the distribution system response included power factor, volt-var, and volt-watt. The advanced inverter controls examined to improve the transmission system response included frequency and voltage ride-through as well as Dynamic Voltage Support. This CSI RD&D project accomplished the task of developing methods to derive distribution focused advanced inverter control settings, selecting a diverse set of feeders to evaluate the methods through detailed analysis, and evaluating the effectiveness of each method developed. Inverter settings focused on the transmission system performance were also evaluated and verified. Based on the findings of this work, the suggested advanced inverter settings and methods to determine settings can be used to improve the accommodation of distributed energy resources (PV specifically). The voltage impact from PV can be mitigated using power factor, volt-var, or volt-watt control, while the bulk system impact can be improved with frequency/voltage ride-through.

  9. A Performance Prediction Method for Pumps as Turbines (PAT Using a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD Modeling Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Frosina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Small and micro hydropower systems represent an attractive solution for generating electricity at low cost and with low environmental impact. The pump-as-turbine (PAT approach has promise in this application due to its low purchase and maintenance costs. In this paper, a new method to predict the inverse characteristic of industrial centrifugal pumps is presented. This method is based on results of simulations performed with commercial three-dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD software. Model results have been first validated in pumping mode using data supplied by pump manufacturers. Then, the results have been compared to experimental data for a pump running in reverse. Experimentation has been performed on a dedicated test bench installed in the Department of Civil Construction and Environmental Engineering of the University of Naples Federico II. Three different pumps, with different specific speeds, have been analyzed. Using the model results, the inverse characteristic and the best efficiency point have been evaluated. Finally, results have been compared to prediction methods available in the literature.

  10. RF dynamic and noise performance of Metallic Source/Drain SOI n-MOSFETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Maria J.; Pascual, Elena; Rengel, Raúl

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents a detailed study of the RF and noise performance of n-type Schottky barrier (SB) MOSFETs with a particular focus on the influence of the Schottky barrier height (SBH) on the main dynamic and noise figures of merit. With this aim, a 2D Monte Carlo simulator including tunnelling transport across Schottky interfaces has been developed, with special care to consider quantum transmission coefficients and the influence of image charge effects at the Schottky junctions. Particular attention is paid to the microscopic transport features, including carrier mean free paths or number of scattering events along the channel for investigating the optimization of the device topology and the strategic concepts related to the noise performance of this new architecture. A more effective control of the gate electrode over drain current for low SBH (discussed in terms of internal physical quantities) is translated into an enhanced transconductance gm, cut-off frequency fT, and non-quasistatic dynamic parameters. The drain and gate intrinsic noise sources show a noteworthy degradation with the SBH reduction due to the increased current, influence of hot carriers and reduced number of phonon scatterings. However, the results evidence that this effect is counterbalanced by the extremely improved dynamic performance in terms of gm and fT. Therefore, the deterioration of the intrinsic noise performance of the SB-MOSFET has no significant impact on high-frequency noise FoMs as NFmin, Rn and Gass for low SBH and large gate overdrive conditions. The role of the SBH on Γopt, optimum noise reactance and susceptance has been also analyzed.

  11. Modelling and simulation of the dynamic performance of a natural-gas turbine flowmeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Gonzalez, L.M. [Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieria Industrial, Universidad de La Rioja, C/Luis de Ulloa, 20, E-26004 Logrono (La Rioja) (Spain); Sala, J.M.; Gonzalez-Bustamante, J.A. [Escuela Superior de Ingenieros Industriales de Bilbao, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Alameda de Urquijo, s/n 48013 Bilbao (Bizkaia) (Spain); Miguez, J.L. [Universidad de Vigo, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros Industriales, C/Lagoas-Marcosende, s/n 36200 Vigo (Pontevedra) (Spain)

    2006-11-15

    Installations involving fluids often present problems in terms of the dynamic performances of their different parts. These problems can be analysed and dealt with at the design stage. This means that both the technologists who design the thermohydraulic process and those who carry out the regulation and control must be involved in the process from the early stages of the design. In this study, a dynamic model of the behaviour of a gas flowmeter has been developed, based on the laws of conservation of mass, linear momentum, energy and angular momentum. The model has been computerised via a software module. As there is no information available with which to compare the model's behaviour, a continuous rating validation has been carried out, using a comparison with the actual calibration curve of the flowmeter. The results obtained are satisfactory. (author)

  12. Features static-and-dynamic performance in athletes of winter sports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotenko K.V.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: analysis of static-dynamic performance of the musculoskeletal system of athletes of winter sports. Materials and Methods. The evaluation of static-dynamic characteristics of the musculoskeletal system. Results. The highest percentage of load-balancing the body while maintaining a static position was observed in the group of athletes of speed and power of the sport and made up, the lowest — in athletes clearing difficult sport. Significant shift in the distribution of body load were detected in athletes clearing difficult sport in the speed and power sport, none of the athletes of the deviations were found. Conclusion. The survey revealed the features of the coordination ability and load balancing body in athletes of different sports: cycling, hard-house and speed-power.

  13. Dynamic aperture and performance of the SSC low energy booster lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilat, F.; Bourianoff, G.; Cole, B.; Talman, R.; York, R.

    1991-05-01

    A systematic study of lattice designs proposed for the SSC Low Energy Booster has been performed, where the dynamic behavior of high transition gamma lattices is compared with that of a simpler FODO- like machine. After optimization of the transverse tunes, the dynamic aperture is determined by tracking the chromaticity corrected, ''ideal'' lattices, where the only sources on nonlinearity are the chromaticity sextupoles. The robustness of the lattices against misalignment, systematic and random errors is then evaluated and error compensation schemes worked out. The computational speed of the TEAPOT code has been greatly enhanced by porting and running its tracking core on the Intel iPSC/860 parallel computer. 7 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  14. Dynamic performance of power generation systems for off-shore oil and gas platforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pierobon, Leonardo; Breuhaus, Peter; Haglind, Fredrik

    2014-01-01

    %) arises on the prediction of the rotational speed of the high pressure shaft, while the largest deviation (average relative error ~20%) occurs in the evaluation of the pressure at the outlet of the low pressure turbine. As waste heat recovery units (e.g. organic Rankine cycles) are likely...... to be implemented in future off-shore platforms, the proposed model may serve in the design phase for a preliminary assessment of the dynamic response of the power generation system and to evaluate if requirements such as minimum and maximum frequency during transient operation and the recovery time are satisfied......On off-shore oil and gas platforms two or more gas turbines typically support the electrical demand on site by operating as a stand-alone (island) power system. As reliability and availability are major concerns during operation, the dynamic performance of the power generation system becomes...

  15. A review on sustainable construction management strategies for monitoring, diagnosing, and retrofitting the building’s dynamic energy performance: Focused on the operation and maintenance phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Taehoon; Koo, Choongwan; Kim, Jimin; Lee, Minhyun; Jeong, Kwangbok

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • This study reviews the state-of-the-art in “energy” as well as “building”. • Building’s dynamic energy performance should be managed in the built environments. • This study summarizes recent progress in the building’s dynamic energy performance. • The major phases can be categorized into monitoring, diagnosing, and retrofitting. • This study proposes the specific future development directions and challenges by phase. - Abstract: According to a press release, the building sector accounts for about 40% of the global primary energy consumption. Energy savings can be achieved in the building sector by improving the building’s dynamic energy performance in terms of sustainable construction management in the urban-based built environments (referred to as an “Urban Organism”). This study implements the concept of “dynamic approach” to reflect the unexpected changes in the climate and energy environments as well as in the energy policies and technologies. Research in this area is very significant for the future of the building, energy, and environmental industries around the world. However, there is a lack of studies from the perspective of the dynamic approach and the system integration, and thus, this study is designed to fill the research gap. This study highlights the state-of-the-art in the major phases for a building’s dynamic energy performance (i.e., monitoring, diagnosing, and retrofitting phases), focusing on the operation and maintenance phase. This study covers a wide range of research works and provides various illustrative examples of the monitoring, diagnosing, and retrofitting of a building’s dynamic energy performance. Finally, this study proposes the specific future developments and challenges by phase and suggests the future direction of system integration for the development of a carbon-integrated management system as a large complex system. It is expected that researchers and practitioners can

  16. The Configuration Of Supply Chain Agritourism To Improve The Performance With Dynamic Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahnaz Ubud

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The purposes of this research is to implementation about  the configuration of Supply Chain Agritourism in Mekarsari Tours Garden and result a decision making  which must be done by top level management about their supply chain configuration. Because now Mekarsari, the biggest fruit garden in the world, have a lot of type of fruit which must be supply for the customer depend on the season with on time. So Mekarsari must know about their configuration from supplier to customer to improve their performance. The Respondents  for this research is selected based on the results of supply chain maping from the worker in the garden, the top level management until the end customer. Supply chian network is formed consisting of farm workers to the end customers, especially those located in the tourist are of green land zone.  The type of data is displayed in a supply chain modeling approach is to use the dynamic system. It’s consists of numeric data, the written data and mental models.  That data is collected and processed into a design model. The design model is using system dynamics methodology. In compiling the system dynamics model has been used software Vensim Professional Academic Ventana 5.7. The result of this research is a configuration of Supply Chain Agritourism which is developed from the supplier until the end customer in Mekarsari tours Garden. From the Dynamic Programming, the result is a decision making which must be done by the top level management to improve the supply chain performance, especially in the green land zone.

  17. Comparison of Controller and Flight Deck Algorithm Performance During Interval Management with Dynamic Arrival Trees (STARS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battiste, Vernol; Lawton, George; Lachter, Joel; Brandt, Summer; Koteskey, Robert; Dao, Arik-Quang; Kraut, Josh; Ligda, Sarah; Johnson, Walter W.

    2012-01-01

    Managing the interval between arrival aircraft is a major part of the en route and TRACON controller s job. In an effort to reduce controller workload and low altitude vectoring, algorithms have been developed to allow pilots to take responsibility for, achieve and maintain proper spacing. Additionally, algorithms have been developed to create dynamic weather-free arrival routes in the presence of convective weather. In a recent study we examined an algorithm to handle dynamic re-routing in the presence of convective weather and two distinct spacing algorithms. The spacing algorithms originated from different core algorithms; both were enhanced with trajectory intent data for the study. These two algorithms were used simultaneously in a human-in-the-loop (HITL) simulation where pilots performed weather-impacted arrival operations into Louisville International Airport while also performing interval management (IM) on some trials. The controllers retained responsibility for separation and for managing the en route airspace and some trials managing IM. The goal was a stress test of dynamic arrival algorithms with ground and airborne spacing concepts. The flight deck spacing algorithms or controller managed spacing not only had to be robust to the dynamic nature of aircraft re-routing around weather but also had to be compatible with two alternative algorithms for achieving the spacing goal. Flight deck interval management spacing in this simulation provided a clear reduction in controller workload relative to when controllers were responsible for spacing the aircraft. At the same time, spacing was much less variable with the flight deck automated spacing. Even though the approaches taken by the two spacing algorithms to achieve the interval management goals were slightly different they seem to be simpatico in achieving the interval management goal of 130 sec by the TRACON boundary.

  18. Final Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per; Brohus, Henrik; Nielsen, Peter V.

    This final report for the Hybrid Ventilation Centre at Aalborg University describes the activities and research achievement in the project period from August 2001 to August 2006. The report summarises the work performed and the results achieved with reference to articles and reports published...

  19. Electron-Ion Dynamics with Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory: Towards Predictive Solar Cell Modeling: Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maitra, Neepa [Hunter College City University of New York, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-07-14

    This project investigates the accuracy of currently-used functionals in time-dependent density functional theory, which is today routinely used to predict and design materials and computationally model processes in solar energy conversion. The rigorously-based electron-ion dynamics method developed here sheds light on traditional methods and overcomes challenges those methods have. The fundamental research undertaken here is important for building reliable and practical methods for materials discovery. The ultimate goal is to use these tools for the computational design of new materials for solar cell devices of high efficiency.

  20. A semi-active suspension control algorithm for vehicle comprehensive vertical dynamics performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Shida; Zhuang, Ye; Liu, Weiping; Chen, Fan

    2017-08-01

    Comprehensive performance of the vehicle, including ride qualities and road-holding, is essentially of great value in practice. Many up-to-date semi-active control algorithms improve vehicle dynamics performance effectively. However, it is hard to improve comprehensive performance for the conflict between ride qualities and road-holding around the second-order resonance. Hence, a new control algorithm is proposed to achieve a good trade-off between ride qualities and road-holding. In this paper, the properties of the invariant points are analysed, which gives an insight into the performance conflicting around the second-order resonance. Based on it, a new control algorithm is proposed. The algorithm employs a novel frequency selector to balance suspension ride and handling performance by adopting a medium damping around the second-order resonance. The results of this study show that the proposed control algorithm could improve the performance of ride qualities and suspension working space up to 18.3% and 8.2%, respectively, with little loss of road-holding compared to the passive suspension. Consequently, the comprehensive performance can be improved by 6.6%. Hence, the proposed algorithm is of great potential to be implemented in practice.

  1. Develop feedback system for intelligent dynamic resource allocation to improve application performance.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentile, Ann C.; Brandt, James M.; Tucker, Thomas (Open Grid Computing, Inc., Austin, TX); Thompson, David

    2011-09-01

    This report provides documentation for the completion of the Sandia Level II milestone 'Develop feedback system for intelligent dynamic resource allocation to improve application performance'. This milestone demonstrates the use of a scalable data collection analysis and feedback system that enables insight into how an application is utilizing the hardware resources of a high performance computing (HPC) platform in a lightweight fashion. Further we demonstrate utilizing the same mechanisms used for transporting data for remote analysis and visualization to provide low latency run-time feedback to applications. The ultimate goal of this body of work is performance optimization in the face of the ever increasing size and complexity of HPC systems.

  2. Numerical simulation of unsteady free surface flow and dynamic performance for a Pelton turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, Y X; Wang, Z W; Yan, Z G; Cui, T

    2012-01-01

    Different from the reaction turbines, the hydraulic performance of the Pelton turbine is dynamic due to the unsteady free surface flow in the rotating buckets in time and space. This paper aims to present the results of investigations conducted on the free surface flow in a Pelton turbine rotating buckets. The unsteady numerical simulations were performed with the CFX code by using the Realizable k-ε turbulence model coupling the two-phase flow volume of fluid method. The unsteady free surface flow patterns and torque varying with the bucket rotating were analysed. The predicted relative performance at five operating conditions was compared with the field test results. The study was also conducted the interactions between the bucket rear and the water jet.

  3. Numerical simulation of unsteady free surface flow and dynamic performance for a Pelton turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Y. X.; Cui, T.; Wang, Z. W.; Yan, Z. G.

    2012-11-01

    Different from the reaction turbines, the hydraulic performance of the Pelton turbine is dynamic due to the unsteady free surface flow in the rotating buckets in time and space. This paper aims to present the results of investigations conducted on the free surface flow in a Pelton turbine rotating buckets. The unsteady numerical simulations were performed with the CFX code by using the Realizable k-ε turbulence model coupling the two-phase flow volume of fluid method. The unsteady free surface flow patterns and torque varying with the bucket rotating were analysed. The predicted relative performance at five operating conditions was compared with the field test results. The study was also conducted the interactions between the bucket rear and the water jet.

  4. Recurrent fuzzy neural network backstepping control for the prescribed output tracking performance of nonlinear dynamic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Seong-Ik; Lee, Jang-Myung

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a backstepping control system that uses a tracking error constraint and recurrent fuzzy neural networks (RFNNs) to achieve a prescribed tracking performance for a strict-feedback nonlinear dynamic system. A new constraint variable was defined to generate the virtual control that forces the tracking error to fall within prescribed boundaries. An adaptive RFNN was also used to obtain the required improvement on the approximation performances in order to avoid calculating the explosive number of terms generated by the recursive steps of traditional backstepping control. The boundedness and convergence of the closed-loop system was confirmed based on the Lyapunov stability theory. The prescribed performance of the proposed control scheme was validated by using it to control the prescribed error of a nonlinear system and a robot manipulator. © 2013 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The dynamics of lake, bog, and bay - Consequences of exposure to man related to final storage of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agnedal, P.O.; Andersson, K.; Evans, S.; Sundblad, B.; Tham, G.; Wilkens, A.B.

    1984-12-01

    The natural aging of the environment, much shorter than a possible continuous release from a repository, results in uncertainties as regards to consequences of exposure to man related to final storage of spent fuel. The Phase I project summarizes the identification of such factors and parameters of predominant importance for an assessment of possible radiological consequences in a normally revolving biosphere. Three major areas are described: geomorphology and residence time such as phenomena associated with the formation of lakes in Sweden formed by the latest inland ice, lake development in terms of uptake of different elements and radionuclides as a function of the chemical composition of the water in a recipient and some aspects of sedimentation in lakes and coastal waters. The chemical environment is also studied in the evolution of a lake or a Baltic bay into farming land or peat land. The most important parameters to the behaviour of trace metal ions seem to be pH, Eh, ionic strength and content of complex formers. Finally, the human impact during the evolution of a lake or a bay is discussed. The study also includes recommendation for a reference field test area and for laboratory studies of the chemical properties of radionuclides in sediments in a Phase 2 project. (Author)

  6. A predictive model of nuclear power plant crew decision-making and performance in a dynamic simulation environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, Kevin Anthony

    branching events and provide a better representation of the IDAC cognitive model. An operator decision-making engine capable of responding to dynamic changes in situational context was implemented. The IDAC human performance model was fully integrated with a detailed nuclear plant model in order to realistically simulate plant accident scenarios. Finally, the improved ADS-IDAC model was calibrated, validated, and updated using actual nuclear plant crew performance data. This research led to the following general conclusions: (1) A relatively small number of branching rules are capable of efficiently capturing a wide spectrum of crew-to-crew variabilities. (2) Compared to traditional static risk assessment methods, ADS-IDAC can provide a more realistic and integrated assessment of human error events by directly determining the effect of operator behaviors on plant thermal hydraulic parameters. (3) The ADS-IDAC approach provides an efficient framework for capturing actual operator performance data such as timing of operator actions, mental models, and decision-making activities.

  7. Measurement-based performance profiles and dynamics of UDT over dedicated connections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster, Ian [University of Chicago; Kettimuthu, R. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Wu, Qishi [University of Memphis; Yun, Daqing [Harrisburg University; Rao, Nageswara S. [ORNL; Liu, Qiang [ORNL

    2016-11-01

    Wide-area data transfers in high-performance computing and big data scenarios are increasingly being carried over dedicated network connections that provide high capacities at low loss rates. UDP-based transport protocols are expected to be particularly well-suited for such transfers but their performance is relatively unexplored over a wide range of connection lengths, compared to TCP over shared connections. We present extensive throughput measurements of UDP-based Data Transfer (UDT) over a suite of physical and emulated 10 Gbps connections. In sharp contrast to current UDT analytical models, these measurements indicate much more complex throughput dynamics that are sensitive to the connection modality, protocol parameters, and round-trip times. Lyapunov exponents estimated from the Poincare maps of UDT traces clearly indicate regions of instability and complex dynamics. We propose a simple model based on the ramp-up and sustainment regimes of a generic transport protocol, which qualitatively illustrates the dominant monotonicity and concavity properties of throughput profiles and relates them to Lyapunov exponents. These measurements and analytical results together enable us to comprehensively evaluate UDT performance and select parameters to achieve high throughput, and they also provide guidelines for designing effective transport protocols for dedicated connections.

  8. Operation and Performance of a Biphase Turbine Power Plant at the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field (Final Report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hays, Lance G. [Douglas Energy Company, Placentia, CA (United States)

    2000-09-01

    A full scale, wellhead Biphase turbine was manufactured and installed with the balance of plant at Well 103 of the Cerro Prieto geothermal resource in Baja, California. The Biphase turbine was first synchronized with the electrical grid of Comision Federal de Electricidad on August 20, 1997. The Biphase power plant was operated from that time until May 23, 2000, a period of 2 years and 9 months. A total of 77,549 kWh were delivered to the grid. The power plant was subsequently placed in a standby condition pending replacement of the rotor with a newly designed, higher power rotor and replacement of the bearings and seals. The maximum measured power output of the Biphase turbine, 808 kWe at 640 psig wellhead pressure, agreed closely with the predicted output, 840 kWe. When combined with the backpressure steam turbine the total output power from that flow would be increased by 40% above the power derived only from the flow by the present flash steam plant. The design relations used to predict performance and design the turbine were verified by these tests. The performance and durability of the Biphase turbine support the conclusion of the Economics and Application Report previously published, (Appendix A). The newly designed rotor (the Dual Pressure Rotor) was analyzed for the above power condition. The Dual Pressure Rotor would increase the power output to 2064 kWe by incorporating two pressure letdown stages in the Biphase rotor, eliminating the requirement for a backpressure steam turbine. The power plant availability was low due to deposition of solids from the well on the Biphase rotor and balance of plant problems. A great deal of plant down time resulted from the requirement to develop methods to handle the solids and from testing the apparatus in the Biphase turbine. Finally an online, washing method using the high pressure two-phase flow was developed which completely eliminated the solids problem. The availability of the Biphase turbine itself was 100

  9. Different performances in static and dynamic imagery and real locomotion. An exploratory trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augusto eFusco

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Motor imagery is a mental representation of an action without its physical execution. Recently, the simultaneous movement of the body has been added to the mental simulation. This refers to dynamic motor imagery (dMI. This study was aimed at analyzing the temporal features for static and dMI in different locomotor conditions (natural walking, NW, light running, LR, lateral walking, LW, backward walking, BW, and whether these performances were more related to all the given conditions or present only in walking. We have been also evaluated the steps performed in the dMI in comparison with the ones performed by real locomotion. Twenty healthy participants (29.3 ± 5.1 y. old were asked to move towards a visualized target located at 10mt. In dMI, no significant temporal differences respect the actual locomotion were found for all the given tasks (NW: p=0.058, LR: p=0.636, BW: p=0.096; LW: p=0,487. Significant temporal differences between static imagery and actual movements were found for LR (p<0.001 and LW (p<0.001, due to an underestimation of time needed to achieve the target in imagined locomotion. Significant differences in terms of number of steps among tasks were found for LW (p<0.001 and BW (p=0.036, whereas neither in NW (p=0.124 nor LR (p=0.391 between dMI and real locomotion.Our results confirmed that motor imagery is a task-dependent process, with walking being temporally closer than other locomotor conditions. Moreover, the time records of dynamic motor imagery are nearer to the ones of actual locomotion respect than the ones of static motor imagery. Keywords: Walking, dynamic motor imagery, human locomotion, chronometry.

  10. Dynamic Performance of High Bypass Ratio Turbine Engines With Water Ingestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, S. N. B.

    1996-01-01

    The research on dynamic performance of high bypass turbofan engines includes studies on inlets, turbomachinery and the total engine system operating with air-water mixture; the water may be in vapor, droplet, or film form, and their combinations. Prediction codes (WISGS, WINCOF, WINCOF-1, WINCLR, and Transient Engine Performance Code) for performance changes, as well as changes in blade-casing clearance, have been established and demonstrated in application to actual, generic engines. In view of the continuous changes in water distribution in turbomachinery, the performance of both components and the total engine system must be determined in a time-dependent mode; hence, the determination of clearance changes also requires a time-dependent approach. In general, the performance and clearances changes cannot be scaled either with respect to operating or ingestion conditions. Removal of water prior to phase change is the most effective means of avoiding ingestion effects. Sufficient background has been established to perform definitive, full scale tests on a set of components and a complete engine to establish engine control and operability with various air-water vapor-water mixtures.

  11. Robot Comedy Lab: Experimenting with the Social Dynamics of Live Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kleomenis eKatevas

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The success of live comedy depends on a performer's ability to 'work' an audience. Ethnographic studies suggest that this involves the co-ordinated use of subtle social signals such as body orientation, gesture, gaze by both performers and audience members. Robots provide a unique opportunity to test the effects of these signals experimentally. Using a life-size humanoid robot, programmed to perform a stand-up comedy routine, we manipulated the robot's patterns of gesture and gaze and examined their effects on the real-time responses of a live audience. The strength and type of responses were captured using SHOREtm computer vision analytics. The results highlight the complex, reciprocal social dynamics of performer and audience behavior. People respond more positively when the robot looks at them, negatively when it looks away and that different performative gestures elicit systematically different patterns of audience response. This demonstrates that the responses of individual audience members depend on the specific interaction they're having with the performer. This work provides insights into how to design more effective, more socially engaging, forms of robot interaction that can be used in a variety of service contexts.

  12. On the dynamical vs. thermodynamical performance of a β-type Stirling engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reséndiz-Antonio, Margarita; Santillán, Moisés

    2014-09-01

    In this work we present a simple mathematical model for a β-type Stirling engine. Despite its simplicity, the model considers all the engine’s relevant thermodynamic and mechanical aspects. The dynamic behavior of the model equation of motion is analyzed in order to obtain the sufficient conditions for engine cycling and to study the stability of the stationary regime. The performance of the engine’s thermodynamic part is also investigated. As a matter of fact, we found that it corresponds to a Carnot engine.

  13. Experimental demonstration of H∞ filter performance for dynamic compensation of rhodium neutron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Moon-Ghu; Choi, Yu-Sun; Lee, Kwang-Dae

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the experimental demonstration of the theoretical result of the previous work on LMI (linear matrix inequality) based H ∞ filter for time-delay compensation of self-powered neutron detectors. The filter gains are optimized in the sense of noise attenuation level of H ∞ setting. By introducing bounded real lemma, the conventional algebraic Riccati inequalities are converted into linear matrix inequalities (LMIs). Finally, the filter design problem is solved via the convex optimization framework using LMIs. The experimental measurements of rhodium detector signal from a research reactor show that the predicted theoretical filter performance is verified by showing successful reconstruction of the reference power signal

  14. PATHWAY: a dynamic foodchain model to predict radionuclide ingestion after fallout deposition. Final report, September 17, 1979-December 31, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whicker, F.W.; Kirchner, T.B.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes the structure and basis for parameter values of a computerized foodchain transport model for radionuclides. The model, called ''PATHWAY,'' estimates the time-integrated intake by humans of twenty radionuclides after a single deposition of radioactive material from the atmosphere to the landscape. The model solves a set of differential equations to estimate the inventories and concentrations of radionuclides in three soil layers and numerous types of vegetation, animal tissues and animal products as a function of time following a deposition event. Dynamic processes considered in the model include foliar interception, weathering and absorption; plant growth, uptake, harvest and senescence; soil resuspension, percolation, leaching and tillage; radioactive decay; livestock ingestion, absorption, excretion; and etc. An age- and sex-specific human diet is embodied in the model to permit calculation of time-dependent radionuclide ingestion rates, which are then numerically integrated. 3 figs., 10 tabs

  15. Investigation of transitions from order to chaos in dynamical systems. Final technical report, period ending May 31, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, G.

    1996-01-01

    It has been recently conjectured that chaotic flows in conductive fluids can generate fast dynamos, where the magnetic field increases exponentially in time such processes could be responsible for the generation of solar and terrestrial magnetic fields. The author studied realistic flows, like those arising from the Rayleigh Benard instability. First the flow was studied computationally as well as analytically, to give a clear description of its properties, relevant ranges of parameter and regions of chaotic flow. Once this task was accomplished computational studies were carried out to see if such flows are capable of fast dynamo action. In addition, the author carried out preliminary investigations on other applications of chaotic dynamics, like emittance growth in electron beams, and the relationship between stochastic webs and percolation theory

  16. Dynamic energy performance analysis: Case study for energy efficiency retrofits of hospital buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buonomano, Annamaria; Calise, Francesco; Ferruzzi, Gabriele; Palombo, Adolfo

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates several actions for the energy refurbishment of some buildings of the University Hospital Federico II of Naples. The analysis focuses on a specific lot of 4 buildings, representative of the whole district hospital. For those structures, sustainable energy savings actions are investigated. They regard the installation of: i) roofs thermal insulation; ii) a substation climatic 3-way valve; iii) radiators thermostatic valves; iv) AHU (air handling unit) time-programmable regulation. This paper aims at presenting an investigation methodology, useful for designers and other stakeholders involved in hospital energy refurbishments, based on an integrated approach which combines dynamic energy performance simulations and experimental campaigns. In order to measure all the simulations' missing input parameters, a suitable experimental analysis, including measurements of temperature, humidity, flow rate and density of construction materials, is performed. A thermographic investigation is also performed for investigating the building envelope performance. This analysis showed that significant savings can be achieved especially by adopting radiators thermostatic valves and AHU regulations. Coherently, the installation of a 3-way valve in the substation does not determine significant additional savings when radiators thermostatic valves are already installed. For high-rise buildings, roofs insulation returns only marginal reductions of space heating and cooling demands. - Highlights: • Energy saving measures applied to the largest hospital of South Italy are analyzed. • A new approach combining dynamic simulations and measurements is implemented. • Thermography, temperature and flow measurements are performed. • High savings are achieved by adopting thermostatic valves and AHU control systems. • The simplest energy saving actions resulted to be the most profitable ones

  17. How do task characteristics affect learning and performance? The roles of variably mapped and dynamic tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macnamara, Brooke N; Frank, David J

    2018-05-01

    For well over a century, scientists have investigated individual differences in performance. The majority of studies have focused on either differences in practice, or differences in cognitive resources. However, the predictive ability of either practice or cognitive resources varies considerably across tasks. We are the first to examine task characteristics' impact on learning and performance in a complex task while controlling for other task characteristics. In 2 experiments we test key theoretical task characteristic thought to moderate the relationship between practice, cognitive resources, and performance. We devised a task where each of several key task characteristics can be manipulated independently. Participants played 5 rounds of a game similar to the popular tower defense videogame Plants vs. Zombies where both cognitive load and game characteristics were manipulated. In Experiment 1, participants either played a consistently mapped version-the stimuli and the associated meaning of their properties were constant across the 5 rounds-or played a variably mapped version-the stimuli and the associated meaning of their properties changed every few minutes. In Experiment 2, participants either played a static version-that is, turn taking with no time pressure-or played a dynamic version-that is, the stimuli moved regardless of participants' response rates. In Experiment 1, participants' accuracy and efficiency were substantially hindered in the variably mapped conditions. In Experiment 2, learning and performance accuracy were hindered in the dynamic conditions, especially when under cognitive load. Our results suggest that task characteristics impact the relative importance of cognitive resources and practice on predicting learning and performance. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Dynamic Performance of Maximum Power Point Trackers in TEG Systems Under Rapidly Changing Temperature Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, E. A.; Sera, D.; Mathe, L.; Schaltz, E.; Rosendahl, L.

    2016-03-01

    Characterization of thermoelectric generators (TEG) is widely discussed and equipment has been built that can perform such analysis. One method is often used to perform such characterization: constant temperature with variable thermal power input. Maximum power point tracking (MPPT) methods for TEG systems are mostly tested under steady-state conditions for different constant input temperatures. However, for most TEG applications, the input temperature gradient changes, exposing the MPPT to variable tracking conditions. An example is the exhaust pipe on hybrid vehicles, for which, because of the intermittent operation of the internal combustion engine, the TEG and its MPPT controller are exposed to a cyclic temperature profile. Furthermore, there are no guidelines on how fast the MPPT must be under such dynamic conditions. In the work discussed in this paper, temperature gradients for TEG integrated in several applications were evaluated; the results showed temperature variation up to 5°C/s for TEG systems. Electrical characterization of a calcium-manganese oxide TEG was performed at steady-state for different input temperatures and a maximum temperature of 401°C. By using electrical data from characterization of the oxide module, a solar array simulator was emulated to perform as a TEG. A trapezoidal temperature profile with different gradients was used on the TEG simulator to evaluate the dynamic MPPT efficiency. It is known that the perturb and observe (P&O) algorithm may have difficulty accurately tracking under rapidly changing conditions. To solve this problem, a compromise must be found between the magnitude of the increment and the sampling frequency of the control algorithm. The standard P&O performance was evaluated experimentally by using different temperature gradients for different MPPT sampling frequencies, and efficiency values are provided for all cases. The results showed that a tracking speed of 2.5 Hz can be successfully implemented on a TEG

  19. Optimization of the dynamic and thermal performance of a resonant micro heat engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardaweel, H K; Richards, R F; Richards, C D; Anderson, M J

    2008-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of a flexing membrane micro heat engine is presented. The micro heat engine consists of a cavity filled with a saturated, two-phase working fluid bounded on the top by a flexible expander membrane and on the bottom by a stiff evaporator membrane. A lumped parameter model is developed to simulate the dynamic behavior of the micro heat engine. First, the model is validated against experimental data. Then, the model is used to investigate the effect of the duration of the heat addition process, the mass of the expander membrane and the thermal storage or thermal inertia associated with the engine cavity on the dynamic behavior of the micro engine. The results show the optimal duration for the heat addition process to be less than 10% of the engine cycle period. Increasing the mass of the flexible expander membrane is shown to reduce the resonant frequency of the engine to 130 Hz. Operating the engine at resonance leads to increased power output. The thermal storage or thermal inertia associated with the engine cavity is shown to have a strong effect on engine performance

  20. Dynamic performance of a novel solar photovoltaic/loop-heat-pipe heat pump system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xingxing; Zhao, Xudong; Shen, Jingchun; Xu, Jihuan; Yu, Xiaotong

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A transient model was developed to predict dynamic performance of new PV/LHP system. • The model accuracy was validated by experiment giving less than 9% in error. • The new system had basic and advanced performance coefficients of 5.51 and 8.71. • The new system had a COP 1.5–4 times that for conventional heat pump systems. • The new system had higher exergetic efficiency than PV and solar collector systems. - Abstract: Objective of the paper is to present an investigation into the dynamic performance of a novel solar photovoltaic/loop-heat-pipe (PV/LHP) heat pump system for potential use in space heating or hot water generation. The methods used include theoretical computer simulation, experimental verification, analysis and comparison. The fundamental equations governing the transient processes of solar transmission, heat transfer, fluid flow and photovoltaic (PV) power generation were appropriately integrated to address the energy balances occurring in different parts of the system, e.g., glazing cover, PV cells, fin sheet, loop heat pipe, heat pump cycle and water tank. A dedicated computer model was developed to resolve the above grouping equations and consequently predict the system’s dynamic performance. An experimental rig was constructed and operated under the real weather conditions for over one week in Shanghai to evaluate the system living performance, which was undertaken by measurement of various operational parameters, e.g., solar radiation, photovoltaic power generation, temperatures and heat pump compressor consumption. On the basis of the first- (energetic) and second- (exergetic) thermodynamic laws, an overall evaluation approach was proposed and applied to conduct both quantitative and qualitative analysis of the PV/LHP module’s efficiency, which involved use of the basic thermal performance coefficient (COP th ) and the advanced performance coefficient (COP PV/T ) of such a system. Moreover, a simple comparison

  1. Structure and Topology Dynamics of Hyper-Frequency Networks during Rest and Auditory Oddball Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Viktor; Perdikis, Dionysios; von Oertzen, Timo; Sleimen-Malkoun, Rita; Jirsa, Viktor; Lindenberger, Ulman

    2016-01-01

    Resting-state and task-related recordings are characterized by oscillatory brain activity and widely distributed networks of synchronized oscillatory circuits. Electroencephalographic recordings (EEG) were used to assess network structure and network dynamics during resting state with eyes open and closed, and auditory oddball performance through phase synchronization between EEG channels. For this assessment, we constructed a hyper-frequency network (HFN) based on within- and cross-frequency coupling (WFC and CFC, respectively) at 10 oscillation frequencies ranging between 2 and 20 Hz. We found that CFC generally differentiates between task conditions better than WFC. CFC was the highest during resting state with eyes open. Using a graph-theoretical approach (GTA), we found that HFNs possess small-world network (SWN) topology with a slight tendency to random network characteristics. Moreover, analysis of the temporal fluctuations of HFNs revealed specific network topology dynamics (NTD), i.e., temporal changes of different graph-theoretical measures such as strength, clustering coefficient, characteristic path length (CPL), local, and global efficiency determined for HFNs at different time windows. The different topology metrics showed significant differences between conditions in the mean and standard deviation of these metrics both across time and nodes. In addition, using an artificial neural network approach, we found stimulus-related dynamics that varied across the different network topology metrics. We conclude that functional connectivity dynamics (FCD), or NTD, which was found using the HFN approach during rest and stimulus processing, reflects temporal and topological changes in the functional organization and reorganization of neuronal cell assemblies.

  2. ACUTE EFFECTS OF A RESISTED DYNAMIC WARM-UP PROTOCOL ON JUMPING PERFORMANCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilli, M; Yildiz, S; Saglam, T; Camur, MH

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the kinematic and kinetic changes when resistance is applied in horizontal and vertical directions, produced by using different percentages of body weight, caused by jumping movements during a dynamic warm-up. The group of subjects consisted of 35 voluntary male athletes (19 basketball and 16 volleyball players; age: 23.4 ± 1.4 years, training experience: 9.6 ± 2.7 years; height: 177.2 ± 5.7 cm, body weight: 69.9 ± 6.9 kg) studying Physical Education, who had a jump training background and who were training for 2 hours, on 4 days in a week. A dynamic warm-up protocol containing seven specific resistance movements with specific resistance corresponding to different percentages of body weight (2%, 4%, 6%, 8%, 10%) was applied randomly on non consecutive days. Effects of different warm-up protocols were assessed by pre-/post- exercise changes in jump height in the countermovement jump (CMJ) and the squat jump (SJ) measured using a force platform and changes in hip and knee joint angles at the end of the eccentric phase measured using a video camera. A significant increase in jump height was observed in the dynamic resistance warm-up conducted with different percentages of body weight (p 0.05). In jump movements before and after the warm-up, while no significant difference between the vertical ground reaction forces applied by athletes was observed (p > 0.05), in some cases of resistance, a significant reduction was observed in hip and knee joint angles (p jumping movements, as well as an increase in jump height values. As a result, dynamic warm-up exercises could be applicable in cases of resistance corresponding to 6-10% of body weight applied in horizontal and vertical directions in order to increase the jump performance acutely. PMID:25435670

  3. Improving the road network performance with dynamic route guidance by considering the indifference band of road users

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vreeswijk, J.D.; Landman, R.L.; Van Berkum, E.C.; Hegyi, A.; Hoogendoorn, S.P.; Van Arem, B.

    2012-01-01

    When applying dynamic route guidance to improve the network performance, it is important to balance the interests of the road authorities and the road users. In this paper we will illustrate how bounded rationality and indifference bands can be taken into account in dynamic route guidance to improve

  4. Horizontal Air-Ground Heat Exchanger Performance and Humidity Simulation by Computational Fluid Dynamic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Maria Congedo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Improving energy efficiency in buildings and promoting renewables are key objectives of European energy policies. Several technological measures are being developed to enhance the energy performance of buildings. Among these, geothermal systems present a huge potential to reduce energy consumption for mechanical ventilation and cooling, but their behavior depending on varying parameters, boundary and climatic conditions is not fully established. In this paper a horizontal air-ground heat exchanger (HAGHE system is studied by the development of a computational fluid dynamics (CFD model. Summer and winter conditions representative of the Mediterranean climate are analyzed to evaluate operation and thermal performance differences. A particular focus is given to humidity variations as this parameter has a major impact on indoor air quality and comfort. Results show the benefits that HAGHE systems can provide in reducing energy consumption in all seasons, in summer when free-cooling can be implemented avoiding post air treatment using heat pumps.

  5. Performance Improvement of Inertial Navigation System by Using Magnetometer with Vehicle Dynamic Constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daehee Won

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A navigation algorithm is proposed to increase the inertial navigation performance of a ground vehicle using magnetic measurements and dynamic constraints. The navigation solutions are estimated based on inertial measurements such as acceleration and angular velocity measurements. To improve the inertial navigation performance, a three-axis magnetometer is used to provide the heading angle, and nonholonomic constraints (NHCs are introduced to increase the correlation between the velocity and the attitude equation. The NHCs provide a velocity feedback to the attitude, which makes the navigation solution more robust. Additionally, an acceleration-based roll and pitch estimation is applied to decrease the drift when the acceleration is within certain boundaries. The magnetometer and NHCs are combined with an extended Kalman filter. An experimental test was conducted to verify the proposed method, and a comprehensive analysis of the performance in terms of the position, velocity, and attitude showed that the navigation performance could be improved by using the magnetometer and NHCs. Moreover, the proposed method could improve the estimation performance for the position, velocity, and attitude without any additional hardware except an inertial sensor and magnetometer. Therefore, this method would be effective for ground vehicles, indoor navigation, mobile robots, vehicle navigation in urban canyons, or navigation in any global navigation satellite system-denied environment.

  6. Assessment of the effect of rainfall dynamics on the storm overflow performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szeląg Bartosz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of the effect of rainfall dynamics on the storm overfl ow performance. This research study analyzes the effect of the rainfall characteristics (total and maximum 10-, 15- and 30-minute rainfall depth, its duration, the dry weather period on the performance of the emergency overflow weir located at the inflow to an existing treatment plant. The analyses used the numerical calculation results of the inflow hydrographs performed in the SWMM (Storm Water Management Model program on the basis of six-year-long rainfall measurement sequence. The obtained simulation results for the analysed catchment allowed for the performance of statistical analyses, which demonstrated that the volume of stormwater discharge, the maximum instantaneous flow and the share of stormwater volume discharged through the emergency overflow weir in relation to the total volume of the inflow hydrograph from the catchment are affected by the maximum 30-minute rainfall depth, whereas the discharge duration is affected by the depth of the catchment rainfall layer. Taking into account the results of statistical and hydraulic calculations it can be concluded that in the case of the analysed catchment the performance of the emergency overflow weir is affected to the greatest extent by the rainfall intensity distribution.

  7. Dynamic Effects of Performance-Avoidance Goal Orientation on Student Achievement in Language and Mathematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamovlasis, Dimitrios; Gonida, Sofia-Eleftheria N

    2018-07-01

    The present study used achievement goal theory (AGT) as a theoretical framework and examined the role of mastery and performance goals, both performance-approach and performance-avoidance, on school achieve-ment within the nonlinear dynamical systems (NDS) perspective. A series of cusp catastrophe models were applied on students' achievement in a number of school subjects, such as mathematics and language for elementary school and algebra, geometry, ancient and modern Greek language for high school, using achievement goal orientations as control variables. The participants (N=224) were students attending fifth and eighth grade (aged 11 and 14, respectively) in public schools located in northern Greece. Cusp analysis based on the probability density function was carried out by two procedures, the maximum likelihood and the least squares. The results showed that performance-approach goals had no linear effect on achievement, while the cusp models implementing mastery goals as the asymmetry factor and performance-avoidance as the bifurcation, proved superior to their linear alternatives. The results of the study based on NDS support the multiple goal perspective within AGT. Theoretical issues, educational implications and future directions are discussed.

  8. Evaluation of static and dynamic balance in elderly women performing aquatic exercise and gymnastics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Almeida

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated static and dynamic balance and related motor valences in elderly women who had been undergone gymnastics or aquatic exercise training for at least 6 months, three times a week. Thirty-one women performed water gymnastics (mean age: 69.32 ± 6.57 years and 28 gymnastics (65.57 ± 7.67 years. Height (cm, weight (kg and waist, hip and abdominal circumference (cm were measured and the body mass index (BMI and waist-hip ratio (WHR were calculated. Physical fitness was measured using the “sit and get up in 30 seconds” test (leg endurance and “8-foot up-and-go” test (dynamic balance, both proposed by Rikli and Jones (1999, and the “sit and reach” (flexibility and static balance tests described by Caromano (1998. Statistical analysis was performed using the Student t-test and Pearson’s correlation, with a level of significance of 0.05. No significant difference in the anthropometric measures (BMI and WHR was observed between groups. In the physical fitness tests, significant differences were only found in the “8-foot up-and-go” and “sit and get up” tests, with the gymnastics group presenting better results. No correlations within or between groups were observed regarding static and dynamic balance or motor valences. In conclusion, neither type of exercise was superior but the gymnastics group tended to show better results in terms of parameters such as agility, balance and flexibility.

  9. Causality analysis in business performance measurement system using system dynamics methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusof, Zainuridah; Yusoff, Wan Fadzilah Wan; Maarof, Faridah

    2014-07-01

    One of the main components of the Balanced Scorecard (BSC) that differentiates it from any other performance measurement system (PMS) is the Strategy Map with its unidirectional causality feature. Despite its apparent popularity, criticisms on the causality have been rigorously discussed by earlier researchers. In seeking empirical evidence of causality, propositions based on the service profit chain theory were developed and tested using the econometrics analysis, Granger causality test on the 45 data points. However, the insufficiency of well-established causality models was found as only 40% of the causal linkages were supported by the data. Expert knowledge was suggested to be used in the situations of insufficiency of historical data. The Delphi method was selected and conducted in obtaining the consensus of the causality existence among the 15 selected expert persons by utilizing 3 rounds of questionnaires. Study revealed that only 20% of the propositions were not supported. The existences of bidirectional causality which demonstrate significant dynamic environmental complexity through interaction among measures were obtained from both methods. With that, a computer modeling and simulation using System Dynamics (SD) methodology was develop as an experimental platform to identify how policies impacting the business performance in such environments. The reproduction, sensitivity and extreme condition tests were conducted onto developed SD model to ensure their capability in mimic the reality, robustness and validity for causality analysis platform. This study applied a theoretical service management model within the BSC domain to a practical situation using SD methodology where very limited work has been done.

  10. Recursive formulae and performance comparisons for first mode dynamics of periodic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobeck, Jared D.; Inman, Daniel J.

    2017-05-01

    Periodic structures are growing in popularity especially in the energy harvesting and metastructures communities. Common types of these unique structures are referred to in the literature as zigzag, orthogonal spiral, fan-folded, and longitudinal zigzag structures. Many of these studies on periodic structures have two competing goals in common: (a) minimizing natural frequency, and (b) minimizing mass or volume. These goals suggest that no single design is best for all applications; therefore, there is a need for design optimization and comparison tools which first require efficient easy-to-implement models. All available structural dynamics models for these types of structures do provide exact analytical solutions; however, they are complex requiring tedious implementation and providing more information than necessary for practical applications making them computationally inefficient. This paper presents experimentally validated recursive models that are able to very accurately and efficiently predict the dynamics of the four most common types of periodic structures. The proposed modeling technique employs a combination of static deflection formulae and Rayleigh’s Quotient to estimate the first mode shape and natural frequency of periodic structures having any number of beams. Also included in this paper are the results of an extensive experimental validation study which show excellent agreement between model prediction and measurement. Lastly, the proposed models are used to evaluate the performance of each type of structure. Results of this performance evaluation reveal key advantages and disadvantages associated with each type of structure.

  11. Dynamic Simulation of the Green Roofs Impact on Building Energy Performance, Case Study of Antananarivo, Madagascar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hery Tiana Rakotondramiarana

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Green roofs improve building energy performance and constitute an alternative to sustainable buildings. A green roof model is dynamically coupled with a building thermal model to assess its energy performance that takes into account the indoor air temperature dynamic changes. Under the climate conditions in Antananarivo, we compared green and conventional roofs. The present study shows that green roofs protect the roof structure under extreme temperature and large temperature fluctuations. For the case of Antananarivo, the amplitude of the temperature fluctuations at the top face of the support is reduced by 28 °C when using green roof. The impact of the green roof on indoor air temperature and energy demand is investigated. The vegetation decreases the maximum indoor air temperature and improves the building thermal comfort during summer days. It has no effect on the minimum indoor air temperature, but additional soil thickness can increase it. In addition, a global sensitivity analysis, which is carried out on the proposed model without considering any specific weather data, allows us to identify the most influential parameters on the energy demand. It has been found that green roofs have almost insignificant thermal impact in insulated buildings; however, their potential prevails over the building envelope and weather characteristics in the case of non-insulated building.

  12. Network Signaling Channel for Improving ZigBee Performance in Dynamic Cluster-Tree Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Hämäläinen

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available ZigBee is one of the most potential standardized technologies for wireless sensor networks (WSNs. Yet, sufficient energy-efficiency for the lowest power WSNs is achieved only in rather static networks. This severely limits the applicability of ZigBee in outdoor and mobile applications, where operation environment is harsh and link failures are common. This paper proposes a network channel beaconing (NCB algorithm for improving ZigBee performance in dynamic cluster-tree networks. NCB reduces the energy consumption of passive scans by dedicating one frequency channel for network beacon transmissions and by energy optimizing their transmission rate. According to an energy analysis, the power consumption of network maintenance operations reduces by 70%–76% in dynamic networks. In static networks, energy overhead is negligible. Moreover, the service time for data routing increases up to 37%. The performance of NCB is validated by ns-2 simulations. NCB can be implemented as an extension on MAC and NWK layers and it is fully compatible with ZigBee.

  13. Effect of Dynamic Pressure on the Performance of Thermoacoustic Refrigerator with Aluminium (Al) Resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arya, Bheemsha; Nayak, B. Ramesh; Shivakumara, N. V.

    2018-04-01

    In practice the refrigerants are being used in the conventional refrigeration system to get the required cooling effect. These refrigerants produce Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and Hydro chlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) which are highly harmful to the environment, particularly depleting of ozone layers resulting in green house emissions. In order to overcome these effects, the research needs to be focused on the development of an ecofriendly refrigeration system. The thermoacoustic refrigeration system is one among such system where the sound waves are used to compress and expand the gas particles. This study focuses on the effect of dynamic pressure on the thermoacoustic refrigerator made of aluminium with overall length of 748.82 mm, and the entire inner surface of the resonator tube was coated with 2mm thickness of polyurethane to minimize the heat losses to the atmosphere. Experiments were conducted with different stack geometries i.e. parallel plates having 0.119 mm thick with spacing between the plates maintained at 0.358 mm, 1mm diameter pipes, 2mm diameter pipes and 4 mm diameter pipes. Experiments were also conducted with different drive ratios of 0.6%, 1% and 1.6% for a constant dynamic pressure of 2 bar and 10 bar for helium and air as working medium. The results were plotted with the help of graphs, the variation of coefficient of performance (COP) and the relative coefficient of performance (COPR) for the above said conditions were calculated.

  14. Conceptual Design Optimization of an Augmented Stability Aircraft Incorporating Dynamic Response Performance Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welstead, Jason

    2014-01-01

    This research focused on incorporating stability and control into a multidisciplinary de- sign optimization on a Boeing 737-class advanced concept called the D8.2b. A new method of evaluating the aircraft handling performance using quantitative evaluation of the sys- tem to disturbances, including perturbations, continuous turbulence, and discrete gusts, is presented. A multidisciplinary design optimization was performed using the D8.2b transport air- craft concept. The con guration was optimized for minimum fuel burn using a design range of 3,000 nautical miles. Optimization cases were run using xed tail volume coecients, static trim constraints, and static trim and dynamic response constraints. A Cessna 182T model was used to test the various dynamic analysis components, ensuring the analysis was behaving as expected. Results of the optimizations show that including stability and con- trol in the design process drastically alters the optimal design, indicating that stability and control should be included in conceptual design to avoid system level penalties later in the design process.

  15. An evaluation of the performance of two binaural beamformers in complex and dynamic multitalker environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Virginia; Mejia, Jorge; Freeston, Katrina; van Hoesel, Richard J; Dillon, Harvey

    2015-01-01

    Binaural beamformers are super-directional hearing aids created by combining microphone outputs from each side of the head. While they offer substantial improvements in SNR over conventional directional hearing aids, the benefits (and possible limitations) of these devices in realistic, complex listening situations have not yet been fully explored. In this study we evaluated the performance of two experimental binaural beamformers. Testing was carried out using a horizontal loudspeaker array. Background noise was created using recorded conversations. Performance measures included speech intelligibility, localization in noise, acceptable noise level, subjective ratings, and a novel dynamic speech intelligibility measure. Participants were 27 listeners with bilateral hearing loss, fitted with BTE prototypes that could be switched between conventional directional or binaural beamformer microphone modes. Relative to the conventional directional microphones, both binaural beamformer modes were generally superior for tasks involving fixed frontal targets, but not always for situations involving dynamic target locations. Binaural beamformers show promise for enhancing listening in complex situations when the location of the source of interest is predictable.

  16. Performance evaluation of a mouse-sized camera for dynamic studies in small animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loudos, George; Majewski, Stan; Wojcik, Randy; Weisenberger, Andrew; Sakellios, Nicolas; Nikita, Konstantina; Uzunoglu, Nikolaos; Bouziotis, Penelope; Varvarigou, Alexandra

    2007-01-01

    A mouse sized camera has been built in terms of collaboration between the presenting institutions. The system is used for the performance of dynamic studies in small animals, in order to evaluate novel radiopharmaceuticals. The active area of the detector is approximately 48x96 mm allowing depiction of the entire mouse in a single view. The system is based on two flat-panel Hamamatsu H8500 position sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PSPMT), a pixellated NaI(Tl) scintillator and a copper-beryllium (CuBe) parallel-hole collimator. In this work, the evaluation results of the system are presented, using phantoms and small animals injected with conventional radiophrmaceuticals. Average resolution was ∼1.6 mm on the collimator surface and increased to ∼4.1 mm in 12 cm distance from the detector. The average energy resolution was measured and found to be ∼15.6% for Tc 99m . Results from imaging thin capillaries demonstrated system's high resolution and sensitivity in activity variations was shown. Initial dynamic studies have been carried out in small animals injected with Tc 99m -DTPA and Tc 99m -MDP. The results show system's ability to perform kinetic imaging in small animals

  17. Addition of Passive Dynamics to a Flapping Airfoil to Improve Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asselin, Daniel; Young, Jay; Williamson, C. H. K.

    2017-11-01

    Animals which fly or swim typically employ flapping motions of their wings and fins in order to produce thrust and to maneuver. Small, unmanned vehicles might also exploit such motions and are of considerable interest for the purposes of surveillance, environmental monitoring, and search and rescue. Flapping refers to a combination of pitch and heave and has been shown to provide good thrust and efficiency (Read, et al. 2003) when both axes are independently controlled (an Active-Active system). In this study, we examine the performance of an airfoil actuated only in the heave direction but allowed to pitch passively under the control of a torsion spring (an Active-Passive system). The presence of the spring is simulated in software using a force-feedback control system called Cyber-Physical Fluid Dynamics, or CPFD (Mackowski & Williamson 2011, 2015, 2016). Adding passive pitch to active heave provides significantly improved thrust and efficiency compared with heaving alone, especially when the torsion spring stiffness is selected so that the system operates near resonance (in an Active-Passive system). In many cases, values of thrust and efficiency are comparable to or better than those obtained with two actively controlled degrees of freedom. By using carefully-designed passive dynamics in the pitch direction, we can eliminate one of the two actuators, saving cost, complexity, and weight, while maintaining performance. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research Grant No. FA9550-15-1-0243, monitored by Dr. Douglas Smith.

  18. Synchronisation effects on the behavioural performance and information dynamics of a simulated minimally cognitive robotic agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moioli, Renan C; Vargas, Patricia A; Husbands, Phil

    2012-09-01

    Oscillatory activity is ubiquitous in nervous systems, with solid evidence that synchronisation mechanisms underpin cognitive processes. Nevertheless, its informational content and relationship with behaviour are still to be fully understood. In addition, cognitive systems cannot be properly appreciated without taking into account brain-body- environment interactions. In this paper, we developed a model based on the Kuramoto Model of coupled phase oscillators to explore the role of neural synchronisation in the performance of a simulated robotic agent in two different minimally cognitive tasks. We show that there is a statistically significant difference in performance and evolvability depending on the synchronisation regime of the network. In both tasks, a combination of information flow and dynamical analyses show that networks with a definite, but not too strong, propensity for synchronisation are more able to reconfigure, to organise themselves functionally and to adapt to different behavioural conditions. The results highlight the asymmetry of information flow and its behavioural correspondence. Importantly, it also shows that neural synchronisation dynamics, when suitably flexible and reconfigurable, can generate minimally cognitive embodied behaviour.

  19. Static and dynamic analyses on the MFTF [Mirror Fusion Test Facility]-B Axicell Vacuum Vessel System: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, D.S.

    1986-09-01

    The Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is a large-scale, tandem-mirror-fusion experiment. MFTF-B comprises many highly interconnected systems, including a magnet array and a vacuum vessel. The vessel, which houses the magnet array, is supported by reinforced concrete piers and steel frames resting on an array of foundations and surrounded by a 7-ft-thick concrete shielding vault. The Pittsburgh-Des Moines (PDM) Corporation, which was awarded the contract to design and construct the vessel, carried out fixed-base static and dynamic analyses of a finite-element model of the axicell vessel and magnet systems, including the simulation of various loading conditions and three postulated earthquake excitations. Meanwhile, LLNL monitored PDM's analyses with modeling studies of its own, and independently evaluated the structural responses of the vessel in order to define design criteria for the interface members and other project equipment. The assumptions underlying the finite-element model and the behavior of the axicell vessel are described in detail in this report, with particular emphasis placed on comparing the LLNL and PDM studies and on analyzing the fixed-base behavior with the soil-structure interaction, which occurs between the vessel and the massive concrete vault wall during a postulated seismic event. The structural members that proved sensitive to the soil effect are also reevaluated

  20. Influence of guideway flexibility on maglev vehicle/guideway dynamic forces. Final report, July 1991-July 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniels, L E; Ahlbeck, D R; Stekly, Z J; Gregorek, G M

    1992-07-01

    The report presents the results of a study investigating the dynamic interaction between aerial structures and maglev vehicles. The study includes three dimensional responses for attractive (EMS) maglev vehicle and repulsive (EDS) maglev vehicles and six different guideway structures. The analysis is conducted using original time domain computer models which incorporate up to 52 degrees of freedom for EMS systems and 44 degrees of freedom for the EDS systems, including multiple span guideways, multiple-vehicle trains, aerodynamic inputs with the special relations and structural properties associated with each major system component, and with appropriate maglev suspension characteristics interconnecting vehicle to guideway. The various guideway structure and vehicle combinations are analyzed separately for two representative guideway lengths of 21m and 39m. Results are presented for vehicle accelerations in terms of ride comfort accelerations and for guideway accelerations and bending moments. Comparisons from the analysis include EMS vs. EDS system responses, effects of span length, effects of position in car, effects of multiple-vehicle trains, effects of multiple simple span guideways vs. continuous span guideways, effects of wind gusts, and effects of beam bearing pad stiffness. Costs of each guideway is estimated in 1992 dollars.

  1. Patterns of fish assemblage structure and dynamics in waters of the Savannah River Plant. Comprehensive Cooling Water Study final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aho, J.M.; Anderson, C.S.; Floyd, K.B.; Negus, M.T.; Meador, M.R.

    1986-06-01

    Research conducted as part of the Comprehensive Cooling Water Study (CCWS) has elucidated many factors that are important to fish population and community dynamics in a variety of habitats on the Savannah River Plant (SRP). Information gained from these studies is useful in predicting fish responses to SRP operations. The overall objective of the CCWS was (1) to determine the environmental effects of SRP cooling water withdrawals and discharges and (2) to determine the significance of the cooling water impacts on the environment. The purpose of this study was to: (1) examine the effects of thermal plumes on anadromous and resident fishes, including overwintering effects, in the SRP swamp and associated tributary streams; (2) assess fish spawning and locate nursery grounds on the SRP; (3) examine the level of use of the SRP by spawning fish from the Savannah River, this objective was shared with the Savannah River Laboratory, E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Company; and (4) determine impacts of cooling-water discharges on fish population and community attributes. Five studies were designed to address the above topics. The specific objectives and a summary of the findings of each study are presented.

  2. Final Report Product Imaging of Molecular Dynamics Relevant to Combustion Grant No. DE-FG02-88ER13934

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houston, Paul L.

    2005-01-01

    Product imaging has been used to investigate several processes important to a fundamental understanding of combustion. The imaging technique produces a ''snapshot'' of the three-dimensional velocity distribution of a state-selected reaction product. Research in three main areas is planned or underway. First, product imaging has been used to investigate the reactive scattering of radicals or atoms with species important in combustion. These experiments, while more difficult than studies of inelastic scattering or photodissociation, are now becoming feasible. They provide both product distributions of important processes as well as angular information important to the interpretation of reaction mechanisms. Second, the imaging technique has been used to measure rotationally inelastic energy transfer on collision of closed-shell species with important combustion radicals. Such measurements improve our knowledge of intramolecular potentials and provide important tests of ab initio calculations. Finally, experiments using product imaging have explored the vacuum ultraviolet photodissociation of O2, N2O, SO2, CO2 and other important species. Little is known about the highly excited electronic states of these molecules and, in particular, how they dissociate. These studies provide product vibrational energy distributions as well as angular information that can aid in understanding the symmetry and crossings among the excited electronic states

  3. 'Hooligans' abroad? Inter-group dynamics, social identity and participation in collective 'disorder' at the 1998 World Cup Finals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stott, C; Hutchison, P; Drury, J

    2001-09-01

    During the 1998 Football World Cup Finals in France, English supporters were, once again, involved in major incidents of collective 'disorder'. Explanations for these incidents concentrated on the conflictual norms held by 'hooligans'. In contrast, Scottish supporters attending the tournament displayed norms of non-violence, explained by the popular press in terms of the absence of 'hooligans'. This study challenges this tendency to explain the presence or absence of 'disorder' in the context of football solely in terms of the presence or absence of 'hooligan' fans. Using data obtained from an ethnographic study of both Scottish and English supporters attending the tournament (N = 121), we examine the processes through which ordinarily 'peaceful' supporters would or would not become involved in collective conflict. In line with the Elaborated Social Identity Model (ESIM) of crowd behaviour, the analysis highlights the role of the intergroup context. Where out-group activity was understood as illegitimate in in-group terms, in-group members redefined their identity such that violent action toward out-group members came to be understood as legitimate. By contrast, where there was no out-group hostility, in-group members defined themselves through an explicit contrast with the 'hooligan' supporters of rival teams. This analysis represents an advance on previous studies of crowd behaviour by demonstrating how the ESIM can account for not only the presence, but also the absence, of collective 'disorder'.

  4. To develop a dynamic model of a collector loop for purpose of improved control of solar heating and cooling. Final technical report. [TRNSYS code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herczfeld, P R; Fischl, R

    1980-01-01

    The program objectives were to (1) assess the feasibility of using the TRNSYS computer code for solar heating and cooling control studies and modify it wherever possible, and (2) develop a new dynamic model of the solar collector which reflects the performance of the collector under transient conditions. Also, the sensitivity of the performance of this model to the various system parameters such as collector time constants, flow rates, turn-on and turn-off temperature set points, solar insolation, etc., was studied. Results are presented and discussed. (WHK)

  5. Mainstream upflow nitritation-anammox system with hybrid anaerobic pretreatment: Long-term performance and microbial community dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaojin; Sun, Shan; Yuan, Heyang; Badgley, Brian D; He, Zhen

    2017-11-15

    Mainstream nitritation-anammox is of strong interest to energy- and resource-efficient domestic wastewater treatment. However, there lack in-depth studies of pretreatment, tests of actual wastewater, and examination of long-term performance. Herein, an upflow nitritation-anammox granular reactor has been investigated to treat primary effluent with a hybrid anaerobic reactor (HAR) as pretreatment for more than 300 days. This system achieved 92% of COD removal, 75% of which was accomplished by the HAR, and had an average final effluent COD concentration of 22 mg L -1 . More than 90% of ammonium was removed in the nitritation-anammox reactor, achieving a nitrogen removal rate of 81.0 g N m -3  d -1 in the last stage. The accumulation of sulfate-reducing bacteria in the HAR evidenced the effect of sulfate on COD removal and subsequent nitrogen removal. Anammox bacteria (predominantly Ca. Jettenia asiatica) accounted for up to 40.2% of total granular communities, but their abundance decreased over time in the suspended communities. The dynamics of major metabolisms and functional genes involved in nitrogen conversion were predicted by PICRUSt based on the taxonomic data, providing more insights into the functions of the microbial communities. These results have demonstrated the effectiveness and importance of anaerobic pretreatment to successful mainstream nitritation-anammox. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Experimental study on the dynamic performance of a novel system combining natural ventilation with diffuse ceiling inlet and TABS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Tao; Heiselberg, Per Kvols; Lei, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Highlights • Dynamic experiments are performed to study energy performance of a new HVAC system. • Designed control strategies show good utilization of natural ventilation cooling. • TABS work well with the diffuse ceiling in the dynamic measurements. • No local thermal comfort problem is found...... even in the extreme winter case. • Designed control strategies can be used in the future application of this system....

  7. Theory and use of modern microscopical methods with applications to studies of wetlands microbial community dynamics. Final performance reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    Funds were granted to the University of Southwestern Louisiana to coordinate and offer a summer enhancement institute for science teachers. Following are highlights from that institute: (1) 20 teachers from Louisiana attended the institute as students; (2) institute faculty included staff members from USL`s Departments of Biology, Mathematics, and Education and 3 principal scientists plus technicians from the Southern Science Center; (3) the institute began June 5, 1995 and ended June 30, 1995, and it featured daily lectures, laboratory exercises, examinations, and field trips--assignments for students included journal keeping, lesson plan development, and presentations, the student`s journal entries proved valuable for evaluating institute activities, students received copies of lesson plans developed at the institute, videos entitled ``Pond Life Diversity`` and ``Chesapeake: The Twilight Estuary,`` a guide to ``Free-lining Freshwater Protozoa,`` a graphing calculator, 2 x 2 slide set of pond life, software or hardware (selected by the teacher to meet specific needs), a field manual for water quality monitoring laboratory exercises (Project Green), and a book on Benchmarks for Science Literacy; (4) follow-up measures included the following--a newsletter disseminated by USL but written with teacher input; making equipment (such as a trinocular compound microscope and video monitor) and materials and supplies available to the teachers and their students in the classroom; and mentoring between USL and SSC staff and the teachers during the school year. Attached to this report are copies of the institute agenda and lesson plans developed in the institute.

  8. Development of a dynamic model to evaluate economic recovery following a nuclear attack. Volume 1. Description and simulations. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, D.W.; Silverman, W.S.; Weil, H.B.; Willard, S.

    1980-11-01

    A highly-robust, dynamic simulation model of the US economy has been constructed to evaluate the likely economic response after various nuclear attacks or other severe disruptions, under various policies and assumptions. The model consists of a large system of nonlinear, recursive, time-difference equations. The solution-interval of the model is adjustable, with a maximum value of three weeks. The model represents the economy in thirteen sectors. Each sector contains a detailed representation of production, distribution, supply constraints, finance, employment, pricing, and wages. Also included are a full input-output representation of the interconnections among the sectors, and the psychological responses of corporate planners, consumers, and the labor force. The model's equations are formulated to remain consistent and realistic for all values of the variables, including the most extreme conditions. Therefore, the model can realistically simulate any degree or time sequence of nuclear attacks, pre-attack surges, mobilization, or policy shifts. Simulation experiments with the model suggest that the economy is highly vulnerable to nuclear attack, and that recovery requires extensive preparation, including psychological readiness, technology maintenance, special financial policies, and (if possible) maintenance of foreign trade. Civil defense policies must be adaptive (contingent on the nature of the damage) and must strive for balance among sectors, rather than maximum survival. This volume includes two appendices. Appendix A defines the aggregation of the model. Appendix B outlines the range of attack scenarios, pre-attack civil defense policies, and post-attack civil defense policies that can be evaluated with the model, including the model variables applicable to implementing those policies

  9. Do Dental Students' Personality Types and Group Dynamics Affect Their Performance in Problem-Based Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihm, Jung-Joon; An, So-Youn; Seo, Deog-Gyu

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the personality types of dental students and their group dynamics were linked to their problem-based learning (PBL) performance. The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) instrument was used with 263 dental students enrolled in Seoul National University School of Dentistry from 2011 to 2013; the students had participated in PBL in their first year. A four-session PBL setting was designed to analyze how individual personality types and the diversity of their small groups were associated with PBL performance. Overall, the results showed that the personality type of PBL performance that was the most prominent was Judging. As a group became more diverse with its different constituent personality characteristics, there was a tendency for the group to be higher ranked in terms of PBL performance. In particular, the overperforming group was clustered around three major profiles: Extraverted Intuitive Thinking Judging (ENTJ), Introverted Sensing Thinking Judging (ISTJ), and Extraverted Sensing Thinking Judging (ESTJ). Personality analysis would be beneficial for dental faculty members in order for them to understand the extent to which cooperative learning would work smoothly, especially when considering group personalities.

  10. Dynamic rod worth measurements (''Rod Insertion''). Final report for the period 01 December 1994 - 30 November 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogdan, G.

    1996-12-01

    Reload startup physics tests are performed for pressurized water reactors (PWR power plant) following a refuelling or other significant core alteration for which nuclear design calculations are required. Part of the reload startup physics tests are control rod group worths measurements. for this purpose a new so-called method ''Rod-Insertion'' was developed. It can also be used as an additional measuring instrument on the research reactor for education purposes. The principle of the rod-insertion method is to start from a critical reactor operating at low power and to measure the time-dependent reactivity change while a control rod is inserted into the core. Unlike in the rod-drop method, the measured control rod is inserted with the drive mechanism at normal speed. By analyzing the flux trace using point-kinetics, not only the total rod worth but also the differential and the integral rod worth curves are obtained. A high-quality electrometer is required for monitoring the neutron flux. The analysis is performed by transferring the data to an IBM PC compatible with some additional standard electronic board and the associated software. The new reactivity meter has been validated on the TRIGA Mark II reactors in Ljubljana and Vienna and at the Krsko Nuclear Power Plant during physics startup tests after reload. The results proved the high performance of the reactivity meter in the standard applications according to the existing procedures, as well as in the new rod-insertion technique of measuring the control rod group worths. This method drastically differs from others such as absence of any chemical control of reactivity (like boron exchange method), and minimizing a testing time and waste coolant production

  11. Personal and Network Dynamics in Performance of Knowledge Workers: A Study of Australian Breast Radiologists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyedamir Tavakoli Taba

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a theoretical model based upon previous studies about personal and social network dynamics of job performance. We provide empirical support for this model using real-world data within the context of the Australian radiology profession. An examination of radiologists' professional network topology through structural-positional and relational dimensions and radiologists' personal characteristics in terms of knowledge, experience and self-esteem is provided. Thirty one breast imaging radiologists completed a purpose designed questionnaire regarding their network characteristics and personal attributes. These radiologists also independently read a test set of 60 mammographic cases: 20 cases with cancer and 40 normal cases. A Jackknife free response operating characteristic (JAFROC method was used to measure the performance of the radiologists' in detecting breast cancers.Correlational analyses showed that reader performance was positively correlated with the social network variables of degree centrality and effective size, but negatively correlated with constraint and hierarchy. For personal characteristics, the number of mammograms read per year and self-esteem (self-evaluation positively correlated with reader performance. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis indicated that the combination of number of mammograms read per year and network's effective size, hierarchy and tie strength was the best fitting model, explaining 63.4% of the variance in reader performance. The results from this study indicate the positive relationship between reading high volumes of cases by radiologists and expertise development, but also strongly emphasise the association between effective social/professional interactions and informal knowledge sharing with high performance.

  12. Developmental dynamics between mathematical performance, task motivation, and teachers' goals during the transition to primary school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aunola, Kaisa; Leskinen, Esko; Nurmi, Jari-Erik

    2006-03-01

    It has been suggested that children's learning motivation and interest in a particular subject play an important role in their school performance, particularly in mathematics. However, few cross-lagged longitudinal studies have been carried out to investigate the prospective relationships between academic achievement and task motivation. Moreover, the role that the classroom context plays in this development is largely unknown. The aim of the study was to investigate the developmental dynamics of maths-related motivation and mathematical performance during children's transition to primary school. The role of teachers' pedagogical goals and classroom characteristics on this development was also investigated. A total of 196 Finnish children were examined four times: (0) in October during their preschool year; (1) in October and (2) April during their first grade of primary school; and (3) in October during their second grade. Children's mathematical performance was tested at each measurement point. Task motivation was examined at measurement points 2, 3, and 4 using the Task-value scale for children. First-grade teachers were interviewed in November about their pedagogical goals and classroom characteristics. The results showed that children's mathematical performance and related task motivation formed a cumulative developmental cycle: a high level of maths performance at the beginning of the first grade increased subsequent task motivation towards mathematics, which further predicted a high level of maths performance at the beginning of the second grade. The level of maths-related task motivation increased in those classrooms where the teachers emphasized motivation or self-concept development as their most important pedagogical goal.

  13. The organizational dynamics enabling patient portal impacts upon organizational performance and patient health: a qualitative study of Kaiser Permanente.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otte-Trojel, Terese; Rundall, Thomas G; de Bont, Antoinette; van de Klundert, Joris; Reed, Mary E

    2015-12-16

    Patient portals may lead to enhanced disease management, health plan retention, changes in channel utilization, and lower environmental waste. However, despite growing research on patient portals and their effects, our understanding of the organizational dynamics that explain how effects come about is limited. This paper uses qualitative methods to advance our understanding of the organizational dynamics that influence the impact of a patient portal on organizational performance and patient health. The study setting is Kaiser Permanente, the world's largest not-for-profit integrated delivery system, which has been using a portal for over ten years. We interviewed eighteen physician leaders and executives particularly knowledgeable about the portal to learn about how they believe the patient portal works and what organizational factors affect its workings. Our analytical framework centered on two research questions. (1) How does the patient portal impact care delivery to produce the documented effects?; and (2) What are the important organizational factors that influence the patient portal's development? We identify five ways in which the patient portal may impact care delivery to produce reported effects. First, the portal's ability to ease access to services improves some patients' satisfaction as well as changes the way patients seek care. Second, the transparency and activation of information enable some patients to better manage their care. Third, care management may also be improved through augmented patient-physician interaction. This augmented interaction may also increase the 'stickiness' of some patients to their providers. Forth, a similar effect may be triggered by a closer connection between Kaiser Permanente and patients, which may reduce the likelihood that patients will switch health plans. Finally, the portal may induce efficiencies in physician workflow and administrative tasks, stimulating certain operational savings and deeper involvement of

  14. High-performance modeling of CO2 sequestration by coupling reservoir simulation and molecular dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Bao, Kai

    2013-01-01

    The present work describes a parallel computational framework for CO2 sequestration simulation by coupling reservoir simulation and molecular dynamics (MD) on massively parallel HPC systems. In this framework, a parallel reservoir simulator, Reservoir Simulation Toolbox (RST), solves the flow and transport equations that describe the subsurface flow behavior, while the molecular dynamics simulations are performed to provide the required physical parameters. Numerous technologies from different fields are employed to make this novel coupled system work efficiently. One of the major applications of the framework is the modeling of large scale CO2 sequestration for long-term storage in the subsurface geological formations, such as depleted reservoirs and deep saline aquifers, which has been proposed as one of the most attractive and practical solutions to reduce the CO2 emission problem to address the global-warming threat. To effectively solve such problems, fine grids and accurate prediction of the properties of fluid mixtures are essential for accuracy. In this work, the CO2 sequestration is presented as our first example to couple the reservoir simulation and molecular dynamics, while the framework can be extended naturally to the full multiphase multicomponent compositional flow simulation to handle more complicated physical process in the future. Accuracy and scalability analysis are performed on an IBM BlueGene/P and on an IBM BlueGene/Q, the latest IBM supercomputer. Results show good accuracy of our MD simulations compared with published data, and good scalability are observed with the massively parallel HPC systems. The performance and capacity of the proposed framework are well demonstrated with several experiments with hundreds of millions to a billion cells. To our best knowledge, the work represents the first attempt to couple the reservoir simulation and molecular simulation for large scale modeling. Due to the complexity of the subsurface systems

  15. FINAL REPORT DE-FG02-04ER41317 Advanced Computation and Chaotic Dynamics for Beams and Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cary, John R [U. Colorado

    2014-09-08

    During the year ending in August 2013, we continued to investigate the potential of photonic crystal (PhC) materials for acceleration purposes. We worked to characterize acceleration ability of simple PhC accelerator structures, as well as to characterize PhC materials to determine whether current fabrication techniques can meet the needs of future accelerating structures. We have also continued to design and optimize PhC accelerator structures, with the ultimate goal of finding a new kind of accelerator structure that could offer significant advantages over current RF acceleration technology. This design and optimization of these requires high performance computation, and we continue to work on methods to make such computation faster and more efficient.

  16. Dynamic range in BOLD modulation: lifespan aging trajectories and association with performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Kristen M; Boylan, Maria A; Rieck, Jenny R; Foster, Chris M; Rodrigue, Karen M

    2017-12-01

    Alteration of dynamic range of modulation to cognitive difficulty has been proposed as a salient predictor of cognitive aging. Here, we examine in 171 adults (aged 20-94 years) the effects of age on dynamic modulation of blood oxygenation-level dependent activation to difficulty in parametrically increasing working memory (WM) load (0-, 2-, 3-, and 4-back conditions). First, we examined parametric increases and decreases in activation to increasing WM load (positive modulation effect and negative modulation effect). Second, we examined the effect of age on modulation to difficulty (WM load) to identify regions that differed with age as difficulty increased (age-related positive and negative modulation effects). Weakened modulation to difficulty with age was found in both the positive modulation (middle frontal, superior/inferior parietal) and negative modulation effect (deactivated) regions (insula, cingulate, medial superior frontal, fusiform, and parahippocampal gyri, hippocampus, and lateral occipital cortex). Age-related alterations to positive modulation emerged later in the lifespan than negative modulation. Furthermore, these effects were significantly coupled in that greater upmodulation was associated with lesser downmodulation. Importantly, greater fronto-parietal upmodulation to difficulty and greater downmodulation of deactivated regions were associated with better task accuracy and upmodulation with better WM span measured outside the scanner. These findings suggest that greater dynamic range of modulation of activation to cognitive challenge is in service of current task performance, as well as generalizing to cognitive ability beyond the scanner task, lending support to its utility as a marker of successful cognitive aging. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. High-Performance First-Principles Molecular Dynamics for Predictive Theory and Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gygi, Francois [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Computer Science; Galli, Giulia [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Schwegler, Eric [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-12-03

    This project focused on developing high-performance software tools for First-Principles Molecular Dynamics (FPMD) simulations, and applying them in investigations of materials relevant to energy conversion processes. FPMD is an atomistic simulation method that combines a quantum-mechanical description of electronic structure with the statistical description provided by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. This reliance on fundamental principles allows FPMD simulations to provide a consistent description of structural, dynamical and electronic properties of a material. This is particularly useful in systems for which reliable empirical models are lacking. FPMD simulations are increasingly used as a predictive tool for applications such as batteries, solar energy conversion, light-emitting devices, electro-chemical energy conversion devices and other materials. During the course of the project, several new features were developed and added to the open-source Qbox FPMD code. The code was further optimized for scalable operation of large-scale, Leadership-Class DOE computers. When combined with Many-Body Perturbation Theory (MBPT) calculations, this infrastructure was used to investigate structural and electronic properties of liquid water, ice, aqueous solutions, nanoparticles and solid-liquid interfaces. Computing both ionic trajectories and electronic structure in a consistent manner enabled the simulation of several spectroscopic properties, such as Raman spectra, infrared spectra, and sum-frequency generation spectra. The accuracy of the approximations used allowed for direct comparisons of results with experimental data such as optical spectra, X-ray and neutron diffraction spectra. The software infrastructure developed in this project, as applied to various investigations of solids, liquids and interfaces, demonstrates that FPMD simulations can provide a detailed, atomic-scale picture of structural, vibrational and electronic properties of complex systems

  18. ASSESSMENT OF DYNAMIC PRA TECHNIQUES WITH INDUSTRY AVERAGE COMPONENT PERFORMANCE DATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadav, Vaibhav; Agarwal, Vivek; Gribok, Andrei V.; Smith, Curtis L.

    2017-06-01

    In the nuclear industry, risk monitors are intended to provide a point-in-time estimate of the system risk given the current plant configuration. Current risk monitors are limited in that they do not properly take into account the deteriorating states of plant equipment, which are unit-specific. Current approaches to computing risk monitors use probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) techniques, but the assessment is typically a snapshot in time. Living PRA models attempt to address limitations of traditional PRA models in a limited sense by including temporary changes in plant and system configurations. However, information on plant component health are not considered. This often leaves risk monitors using living PRA models incapable of conducting evaluations with dynamic degradation scenarios evolving over time. There is a need to develop enabling approaches to solidify risk monitors to provide time and condition-dependent risk by integrating traditional PRA models with condition monitoring and prognostic techniques. This paper presents estimation of system risk evolution over time by integrating plant risk monitoring data with dynamic PRA methods incorporating aging and degradation. Several online, non-destructive approaches have been developed for diagnosing plant component conditions in nuclear industry, i.e., condition indication index, using vibration analysis, current signatures, and operational history [1]. In this work the component performance measures at U.S. commercial nuclear power plants (NPP) [2] are incorporated within the various dynamic PRA methodologies [3] to provide better estimates of probability of failures. Aging and degradation is modeled within the Level-1 PRA framework and is applied to several failure modes of pumps and can be extended to a range of components, viz. valves, generators, batteries, and pipes.

  19. Integrated Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A). Performance Verification Report: Final Comprehensive Performance Test Report, P/N 1331720-2TST, S/N 105/A1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, R.

    1999-01-01

    This is the Performance Verification Report, Final Comprehensive Performance Test (CPT) Report, for the Integrated Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A). This specification establishes the requirements for the CPT and Limited Performance Test (LPT) of the AMSU-1A, referred to here in as the unit. The sequence in which the several phases of this test procedure shall take place is shown.

  20. Effect of industrial pollution on the distribution dynamics of radionuclides in boreal understorey ecosystems (EPORA). Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suomela, M.; Rahola, T.; Bergman, R.; Bunzl, K.; Jaakkola, T.

    1999-08-01

    The project EPORA 'Effects of Industrial Pollution on Distribution Dynamics of Radionuclides in Boreal Understorey Ecosystems' is a part of the Nuclear Fission Safety Research programme of the European Union. A suitable environment for the study was found in the surroundings of the Cu-Ni smelter in Monchegorsk, in NW Russia where the huge atmospheric emissions from the smelter have polluted the environment since the 1930's. Samples of soil, litter, plants and runoff water were taken. Total concentrations of the main pollutants, Ni and Cu, in the organic soil increased from about 10 mg kg -1 at the reference site in Finland to about 5000 mg kg -1 at the most polluted site in Russia. Similar trends were observed for exchangeable fractions and plant concentrations of the same elements. Concentrations of exchangeable K, Ca, and Mg in the organic soil decreased strongly with increased input of chemical pollutants. The radionuclides studied were 137 Cs, 90 Sr and 239+240 Pu, mainly originating from the atmospheric nuclear weapons tests. The contribution of the Chernobyl derived 137 Cs deposition was about 10% but insignificant for the other nuclides. The activity distribution of all three radionuclides in the soil, their corresponding residence half-times as well as their aggregated trencher factors for various plants depended on the degree of pollution: Activity distribution: in the litter layer, the activity of all three radionuclides increased continually from the reference site to the most polluted site. This effect was most pronounced for 239+240 Pu and least for 90 Sr and could, at least partly, be explained by the increase of the thickness of this layer. In the root zone, the opposite effect was observed: the largest fraction of all radionuclides was found at the reference site. In the organic layer, the exchangeable fractions of 137 Cs, 90 Sr and 239+240 Pu decreased with increasing pollution. Residence half-times: in the root zone, the residence half-times of 90