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Sample records for dynamical structure sds

  1. The structure and dynamics of Nano Particles encapsulated by the SDS monolayer collapse at the water/TCE interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wenxiong

    2016-11-01

    The super-saturated surfactant monolayer collapses with the nanoparticles (NPs) at the water/trichloroethylene (TCE) interface are investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The results show that sodium alkyl sulfate (SDS) monolayer collapse is initiated by buckling and followed primarily by budding and the bud encapsulating the NPs and oil molecules. The developed bud detaches from the monolayer into a water phase and forms the swollen micelle emulsion with NPs and oil molecules. We investigate the wavelength of the initial budding and the theoretical description of the budding process. The wavelength of the monolayer increases with bending modulus. The energy barrier of the budding can be easily overcome by thermal fluctuation energy, which indicates that budding process proceeds rapidly.

  2. Protecting role of cosolvents in protein denaturation by SDS: a structural study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wouters Johan

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, we reported a unique approach to preserve the activity of some proteins in the presence of the denaturing agent, Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate (SDS. This was made possible by addition of the amphipathic solvent 2,4-Methyl-2-PentaneDiol (MPD, used as protecting but also as refolding agent for these proteins. Although the persistence of the protein activity in the SDS/MPD mixture was clearly established, preservation of their structure was only speculative until now. Results In this paper, a detailed X-ray study addresses the pending question. Crystals of hen egg-white lysozyme were grown for the first time in the presence of MPD and denaturing concentrations of SDS. Depending on crystallization conditions, tetragonal crystals in complex with either SDS or MPD were collected. The conformation of both structures was very similar to the native lysozyme and the obtained complexes of SDS-lysozyme and MPD-lysozyme give some insights in the interplay of protein-SDS and protein-MPD interactions. Conclusion This study clearly established the preservation of the enzyme structure in a SDS/MPD mixture. It is hypothesized that high concentrations of MPD would change the properties of SDS and lower or avoid interactions between the denaturant and the protein. These structural data therefore support the hypothesis that MPD avoids disruption of the enzyme structure by SDS and can protect proteins from SDS denaturation.

  3. Structure of the SDS/1-dodecanol surfactant mixture on a graphite surface: a computer simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, Hector

    2010-05-15

    Molecular dynamics simulations of mixtures of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and 1-dodecanol molecules on a graphite surface were carried out at low and high concentration to investigate the formation of aggregates on the solid plate. The simulations showed that at low concentration the surfactants were well adsorbed on the surface by forming layers structures or a hemicylinder aggregate for a slightly higher surfactant concentration whereas at the highest concentration the surfactants formed monolayer-like structures localized away from the graphite surface with a water bin between the monolayer and the graphite plate. Therefore, we obtained different arrays of those observed in recent simulations of pure SDS adsorbed on graphite at the same concentration reported in the literature. The unexpected water layer between the 1-dodecanol and the graphite surface, at the highest concentration, was explained in terms of the Hamaker constants. The present results suggest that the formation of aggregates on solid surfaces is a combined effect not only of the surfactant-surfactant and the surfactant-wall interactions but also of the surfactant concentration.

  4. Effect of SDS on human hair: Study on the molecular structure and morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Bhawana; Umapathy, Siva

    2011-05-01

    This paper presents a model study to understand the effect of surfactants on the physicochemical properties of human hair. FT-IR ATR spectroscopy has been employed to understand the chemical changes induced by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) on human scalp hair. In particular, the SDS induced changes in the secondary structure of protein present in the outer protective layer of hair, i.e. cuticle, have been investigated. Conformational changes in the secondary structure of protein were studied by curve fitting of the amide I band after every phase of SDS treatment. It has been found that SDS brings rearrangements in the protein backbone conformations by transforming β -sheet structure to random coil and β -turn. Additionally, AFM and SEM studies were carried out to understand the morphological changes induced on the hair surface. SEM and AFM images demonstrated the rupture and partial erosion of cuticle sublayers. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Lack of Population Structure in Coriander Populations Based on SDS (Seed Storage Protein Page Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülsüm Yaldiz

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Genetic variation is prerequisite for plant breeding. Nothing information existed in the literature for available diversity of Coriander accession in Turkey. Plant breeding activities are negligible in Turkey. So in order to start effective plant breeding program in Turkey, information on the available genetic diversity is viable. Therefore we planned to study the genetic variation and population structure of 29 Coriander accessions by seed storage protein (SDS. SDS analysis elaborated the lack of population structure and genetic bottleneck in the Coriander accessions in Turkey. Based on the results of this study, it was clear that sampling strategy was not appropriate and plant introduction should be made from different sources and diverse genotypes should be used as parents to initialize the effective Turkish Coriander breeding program.

  6. SDS, a structural disruption score for assessment of missense variant deleteriousness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanawadee ePreeprem

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a novel structure-based evaluation for missense variants that explicitly models protein structure and amino acid properties to predict the likelihood that a variant disrupts protein function. A structural disruption score (SDS is introduced as a measure to depict the likelihood that a case variant is functional. The score is constructed using characteristics that distinguish between causal and neutral variants within a group of proteins. The SDS score is correlated with standard sequence-based deleteriousness, but shows promise for improving discrimination between neutral and causal variants at less conserved sites.The prediction was performed on 3-dimentional structures of 57 gene products whose homozygous SNPs were identified as case-exclusive variants in an exome sequencing study of epilepsy disorders. We contrasted the candidate epilepsy variants with scores for likely benign variants found in the EVS database, and for positive control variants in the same genes that are suspected to promote a range of diseases. To derive a characteristic profile of damaging SNPs, we transformed continuous scores into categorical variables based on the score distribution of each measurement, collected from all possible SNPs in this protein set, where extreme measures were assumed to be deleterious. A second epilepsy dataset was used to replicate the findings. Causal variants tend to receive higher sequence-based deleterious scores, induce larger physico-chemical changes between amino acid pairs, locate in protein domains, buried sites or on conserved protein surface clusters, and cause protein destabilization, relative to negative controls. These measures were agglomerated for each variant. A list of nine high-priority putative functional variants for epilepsy was generated. Our newly developed SDS protocol facilitates SNP prioritization for experimental validation.

  7. Molecular dynamics simulations of helical antimicrobial peptides in SDS micelles: what do point mutations achieve?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khandelia, Himanshu; Kaznessis, Yiannis N

    2005-01-01

    We report long time scale simulations of the 18-residue helical antimicrobial peptide ovispirin-1 and its analogs novispirin-G10 and novispirin-T7 in SDS micelles. The SDS micelle serves as an economical and effective model for a cellular membrane. Ovispirin, which is initially placed along a mic...

  8. The structure and amphipathy characteristics of modified γ-zeins by SDS or alkali in conjunction with heating treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Shi-Rong; Xu, Hong-Hua; Tan, Jun-Yan; Xie, Ming-Ming; Yu, Guo-Ping

    2017-10-15

    γ-Zein was modified by SDS or alkali combined with heating treatments in water and in 70% ethanol to change its amphipathic properties and explore the relationship between amphipathic characteristic and structure. γ-Zein water-dispersibility was dramatically increased via alkali or SDS combined with heating treatments, but their ethanol-dispersibilities were significantly different during ethanol evaporation. High both water-dispersibility and ethanol-dispersibility were found from alkali modified γ-zein while high water-dispersibility but low ethanol-dispersibility were obtained from SDS modified γ-zein, indicating that alkali modified γ-zein had better amphipathic characteristic compared with SDS modified γ-zein. Alkali modified γ-zein with higher amphipathic characteristic possessed higher structural inversion ability since it was easy to recover its native state as solvent changing from water to ethanol, contrary to SDS modified γ-zeins whose amphipathic characteristic was not improved. Moreover, the higher structural inversion ability of alkali modified γ-zein depended on the recovery capability of α-helix structure as solvent altering. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Thermodynamic and structural investigation of the specific SDS binding of humicola insolens cutinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kold, David; Dauter, Zbigniew; Laustsen, Anne K;

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of lipolytic enzymes with anionic surfactants is of great interest with respect to industrially produced detergents. Here, we report the interaction of cutinase from the thermophilic fungus Humicola insolens with the anionic surfactant SDS, and show the enzyme specifically binds a......, unexpectedly, esterification of the active site serine is accompanied by the ethylation of the active site histidine which flips out from its usual position in the triad....

  10. Structural Control of Mesoporous 1,4-Phenylene-silica Using the Mixture of CTAB/SDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhuang Wei; Bi Lifeng; Zhang Ming; Wang Sibing; Li Yi; Li Baozong; Yang Yonggang

    2011-01-01

    The morphology, pore architecture and crystallinity of the mesoporous 1,4-phenylene-silicas were controlled using the mixtures of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS). When the SDS/CTAB molar ratio increased from 0 to 1.0, the morphology of the mesoporous 1,4-phenylene-silicas changed in a sequence of sphere, hexagonal short rod, worm-like, bent flake and flower-like structure; the pore architecture of them changed from a hexagonal arranged tubular structure to a lamellar one; and the organization of the smallest repeat units within the wall changed from a random structure to a crystalline structure. At the SDS/CTAB molar ra-tios of 0.3 and 0.5, 1,4-phenylene-silica nanofibers with lamellar mesopores outside and tubular pore channels in-side were obtained. The lamellar mesopores should be formed by merging the rod-like miceUes during the reaction process.

  11. Structure of pure SDS and DTAB micelles in brine determined by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergström, M.; Pedersen, J.S.

    1999-01-01

    The geometrical structure of pure SDS and DTAB surfactant micelles in the absence of added salt as well as its dependence on the concentration of NaBr have been investigated at 40 degrees C using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). In contrast to previous SANS measurements on the same systems we...... have analysed the scattering data in the entire regime of scattering vectors that are relevant for determining the structure of the micelles. Our obtained results for pure surfactant micelles, as well as those of mixed catanionic micelles presented in a recent study, show somewhat unexpectedly...... that ordinary surfactant micelles are shaped as circular or elongated bilayers (tablets). Both SDS and DTAB micelles appeared to be disk-like in pure D2O and the corresponding data were best fitted with a model for (monodisperse) oblate ellipsoids of revolution with half axes a=12.0 Angstrom, b=20.3 Angstrom...

  12. Femtosecond Transient Absorption Spectra and Relaxation Dynamics of SWNT in SDS Micellar Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadtochenko, V. A.; Lobach, A. S.; Gostev, F. E.; Tcherbinin, D. O.; Sobennikov, A.; Sarkisov, O. M.

    2005-09-01

    Transient absorption spectra and relaxation dynamics of excited SWNT were studied by femtosecond absorption spectroscopy as a function of: the energy of excitation quanta (ℏω = 2 eV, 2.5 eV, 4 eV); the density of the excitation energy; polarizations of the pump and probe pulses. The transient absorption spectra were monitored by white supercontinuum light pulse in the spectral region of ˜ 1.2 ÷ 3.6 eV. The induced transient absorption spectra of SWNT are considered as filling of the size-quantized energy bands with nonequilibrium carriers; renormalization of the one-dimensional energy bands at high density of the induced plasma; quantum confined Stark effect and screening of excitons. The anisotropic relaxation rate is observed.

  13. Molecular dynamics study of the potential of mean force of SDS aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawada, Shinji; Fujimoto, Kazushi; Yoshii, Noriyuki; Okazaki, Susumu

    2017-08-01

    In our previous study, all-atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) calculations have been carried out for the aggregation of ionic sodium dodecyl sulfate in water [S. Kawada et al., Chem. Phys. Lett. 646, 36 (2016)]. Aggregates of 20-30 dodecyl sulfate ions were formed within a short MD run for 10 ns. However, further aggregation did not occur despite a long MD calculation for more than 100 ns. This suggests that strong electrostatic repulsive interactions between the aggregates prevent the fusion of the aggregates. In the present study, mean force and potential of mean force acting between two aggregates with aggregation number N = 30 were evaluated as a function of their separation by MD calculations. The repulsive force becomes strong with decreasing distance between the two aggregates before they merge into one. An origin of the repulsive force is an electric double layer formed by the sulfate group and counter sodium ions. Strength of the repulsive force is in good agreement with the theoretical value given by the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory. Once the aggregates establish contact, the force between them turns to be a large attractive force that can be explained by the interfacial tension. In order to form a single micelle from the two aggregates, it is necessary for them to climb over a free energy barrier of 23 kJ/mol. Once, the barrier is overcome, the micelle is stabilized by ˜200 kJ/mol. The time constant of aggregation evaluated from the calculated free energy barrier was about 28 μs at the concentration in our previous study.

  14. An SDS-PAGE Examination of Protein Quaternary Structure and Disulfide Bonding for a Biochemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Jennifer L.; Andrews, Carla S.; St. Antoine, Caroline C.; Jain, Swapan S.; Bevilacqua, Vicky L. H.

    2005-01-01

    Electrophoresis is a valuable tool for biochemists, yet this technique is often not included in biochemistry laboratory curricula owing to time constraints or lack of equipment. Protein structure is also a topic of interest in many disciplines, yet most undergraduate lab experiments focus only on primary structure. In this experiment, students use…

  15. Structural dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Strømmen, Einar N

    2014-01-01

    This book introduces to the theory of structural dynamics, with focus on civil engineering structures that may be described by line-like beam or beam-column type of systems, or by a system of rectangular plates. Throughout this book the mathematical presentation contains a classical analytical description as well as a description in a discrete finite element format, covering the mathematical development from basic assumptions to the final equations ready for practical dynamic response predictions. Solutions are presented in time domain as well as in frequency domain. Structural Dynamics starts off at a basic level and step by step brings the reader up to a level where the necessary safety considerations to wind or horizontal ground motion induced dynamic design problems can be performed. The special theory of the tuned mass damper has been given a comprehensive treatment, as this is a theory not fully covered elsewhere. For the same reason a chapter on the problem of moving loads on beams has been included.

  16. Distribution and Transfer of Gatifloxacin Between Two Microemulsion Phases with Different Structures in SDS/n-C5H11 OH/H2O System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yuan; GUO Rong

    2007-01-01

    At a weight ratio of n-C5H11OH/H2O=50/50,when the total content of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was less than 6.0%,the ternary mixture of SDS/n-C5H11OH/H2O coexisted in two immiscible microemulsions.The distribution and transfer of gatifloxacin (GTFX) between the two phases were studied using UV-Vis and electrochemistry AC impedance spectra.The results show that GTFX transferred from the upper phase (W/O) to the lower phase (O/W or bicontinuous microemulsion),but a small amount of SDS transferred from the lower phase to the upper phase correspondingly with the increase of the total SDS content at a total GTFX concentration of 1.0×10-5 mol/L.The addition of GTFX did not change the structures of the two different phases fundamentally,but resulted in the transfer and redistribution of GTFX and SDS,so the electric properties of the system were changed correspondingly.

  17. Phase Space Structures of k-threshold Sequential Dynamical Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Rani, Raffaele

    2011-01-01

    Sequential dynamical systems (SDS) are used to model a wide range of processes occurring on graphs or networks. The dynamics of such discrete dynamical systems is completely encoded by their phase space, a directed graph whose vertices and edges represent all possible system configurations and transitions between configurations respectively. Direct calculation of the phase space is in most cases a computationally demanding task. However, for some classes of SDS one can extract information on the connected component structure of phase space from the constituent elements of the SDS, such as its base graph and vertex functions. We present a number of novel results about the connected component structure of the phase space for k-threshold dynamical system with binary state spaces. We establish relations between the structure of the components, the threshold value, and the update sequence. Also fixed-point reachability from garden of eden configurations is investigated and upper bounds for the length of paths in t...

  18. Giant extracellular Glossoscolex paulistus Hemoglobin (HbGp) upon interaction with cethyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTAC) and sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) surfactants: Dissociation of oligomeric structure and autoxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Patricia S; Moreira, Leonardo M; de Almeida, Erika V; Tabak, Marcel

    2007-04-01

    The effects of two ionic surfactants on the oligomeric structure of the giant extracellular hemoglobin of Glossoscolex paulistus (HbGp) in the oxy - form have been studied through the use of several spectroscopic techniques such as electronic optical absorption, fluorescence emission, light scattering, and circular dichroism. The use of anionic sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) and cationic cethyltrimethyl ammonium chloride (CTAC) has allowed to differentiate the effects of opposite headgroup charges on the oligomeric structure dissociation and hemoglobin autoxidation. At pH 7.0, both surfactants induce the protein dissociation and a significant oxidation. Spectral changes occur at very low CTAC concentrations suggesting a significant electrostatic contribution to the protein-surfactant interaction. At low protein concentration, 0.08 mg/ml, some light scattering within a narrow CTAC concentration range occurs due to protein-surfactant precipitation. Light scattering experiments showed the dissociation of the oligomeric structure by SDS and CTAC, and the effect of precipitation induced by CTAC. At higher protein concentrations, 3.0 mg/ml, a precipitation was observed due to the intense charge neutralization upon formation of ion pair in the protein-surfactant precipitate. The spectral changes are spread over a much wider SDS concentration range, implying a smaller electrostatic contribution to the protein-surfactant interactions. The observed effects are consistent with the acid isoelectric point (pI) of this class of hemoglobins, which favors the intense interaction of HbGp with the cationic surfactant due to the existence of excess acid anionic residues at the protein surface. Protein secondary structure changes are significant for CTAC at low concentrations while they occur at significantly higher concentrations for SDS. In summary, the cationic surfactant seems to interact more strongly with the protein producing more dramatic spectral changes as compared to the

  19. Fundamentals of structural dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Craig, Roy R

    2006-01-01

    From theory and fundamentals to the latest advances in computational and experimental modal analysis, this is the definitive, updated reference on structural dynamics.This edition updates Professor Craig's classic introduction to structural dynamics, which has been an invaluable resource for practicing engineers and a textbook for undergraduate and graduate courses in vibrations and/or structural dynamics. Along with comprehensive coverage of structural dynamics fundamentals, finite-element-based computational methods, and dynamic testing methods, this Second Edition includes new and e

  20. Structural Dynamics Laboratory (SDL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Structural dynamic testing is performed to verify the survivability of a component or assembly when exposed to vibration stress screening, or a controlled simulation...

  1. Basic structural dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, James C

    2012-01-01

    A concise introduction to structural dynamics and earthquake engineering Basic Structural Dynamics serves as a fundamental introduction to the topic of structural dynamics. Covering single and multiple-degree-of-freedom systems while providing an introduction to earthquake engineering, the book keeps the coverage succinct and on topic at a level that is appropriate for undergraduate and graduate students. Through dozens of worked examples based on actual structures, it also introduces readers to MATLAB, a powerful software for solving both simple and complex structural d

  2. Nonlinear dynamics of structures

    CERN Document Server

    Oller, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    This book lays the foundation of knowledge that will allow a better understanding of nonlinear phenomena that occur in structural dynamics.   This work is intended for graduate engineering students who want to expand their knowledge on the dynamic behavior of structures, specifically in the nonlinear field, by presenting the basis of dynamic balance in non‐linear behavior structures due to the material and kinematics mechanical effects.   Particularly, this publication shows the solution of the equation of dynamic equilibrium for structure with nonlinear time‐independent materials (plasticity, damage and frequencies evolution), as well as those time dependent non‐linear behavior materials (viscoelasticity and viscoplasticity). The convergence conditions for the non‐linear dynamic structure solution  are studied, and the theoretical concepts and its programming algorithms are presented.  

  3. Mechanism design and dynamic analysis of a large-scale spatial deployable structure for space mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yanling; Lin, Qiuhong; Wang, Xingze; Li, Lin; Cong, Qiang; Pan, Bo

    2017-01-01

    The deployable structure is critical to the overall success of the space mission. This paper introduces a large-scale spatial deployable structure (SDS), which is developed to deploy and support the payload panels in a precise configuration once on the track. And segmental researching in the design, kinematics and dynamics analysis of SDS's prototyping system are presented. Geometric construction method and Bar-groups method are adopted to analysis the dimensions and coordinates of the SDS, which finally construct an well-determined mathematical model to raise the productivity and efficiency during optimization and analysis work. Be reasoned with the large-scale of the truss structures, flexible multibody dynamic simulations are developed, which present much more authentic stress transfer and kinematics behaviors. According to the deployment experiments of SDS's prototyping system, the correctness and validity of the flexible multibody simulation work are well proved.

  4. Dynamic term structure models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Martin Møller; Meldrum, Andrew

    This paper studies whether dynamic term structure models for US nominal bond yields should enforce the zero lower bound by a quadratic policy rate or a shadow rate specification. We address the question by estimating quadratic term structure models (QTSMs) and shadow rate models with at most four...

  5. Physisorption of SDS in a Hydrocarbon Nanoporous Polymer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Li; Wang, Yanwei; Vigild, Martin Etchells

    2010-01-01

    as diffusion-controlled dynamics. Both the specific equilibrium loading and the final SDS adsorption reached plateau values at concentrations above 6.8 m M. The infiltration of SDS into the nanoporous film was mainly followed by gravimetry and for a few samples confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy...

  6. Structure and dynamics of surfactant and hydrocarbon aggregates on graphite: a molecular dynamics simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammalkorpi, Maria; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z; Haataja, Mikko

    2008-03-13

    We have examined the structure and dynamics of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and dodecane (C12) molecular aggregates at varying surface coverages on the basal plane of graphite via classical molecular dynamics simulations. Our results suggest that graphite-hydrocarbon chain interactions favor specific molecular orientations at the single-molecule level via alignment of the tail along the crystallographic directions. This orientational bias is reduced greatly upon increasing the surface coverage for both molecules due to intermolecular interactions, leading to very weak bias at intermediate surface coverages. Interestingly, for complete monolayers, we find a re-emergent orientational bias. Furthermore, by comparing the SDS behavior with C12, we demonstrate that the charged head group plays a key role in the aggregate structures: SDS molecules display a tendency to form linear file-like aggregates while C12 forms tightly bound planar ones. The observed orientational bias for SDS molecules is in agreement with experimental observations of hemimicelle orientation and provides support for the belief that an initial oriented layer governs the orientation of hemimicellar aggregates.

  7. Dynamic Data Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsakalidis, Konstantinos

    We study dynamic data structures for different variants of orthogonal range reporting query problems. In particular, we consider (1) the planar orthogonal 3-sided range reporting problem: given a set of points in the plane, report the points that lie within a given 3-sided rectangle with one....... Dynamic problems like the above arise in various applications of network optimization, VLSI layout design, computer graphics and distributed computing. For the first problem, we present dynamic data structures for internal and external memory that support planar orthogonal 3-sided range reporting queries......, and insertions and deletions of points efficiently over an average case sequence of update operations. The external memory data structures find applications in constraint and temporal databases. In particular, we assume that the coordinates of the points are drawn from different probabilistic distributions...

  8. Interaction of insulin with SDS/CTAB catanionic Vesicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tah, Bidisha; Pal, Prabir; Talapatra, G.B., E-mail: spgbt@iacs.res.in

    2014-01-15

    In the present study, a novel method was used for entrapping the protein, insulin into the catanionic SDS/CTAB vesicle membrane. The anionic SDS and cationic CTAB formed catanionic vesicles at particular concentration (35:65 by volume). In this study, vesicle membrane can be considered as model membrane. The vesicle formation and entrapment efficiency depend on the pH of the aqueous solution. The insulin molecules have attached with the vesicular membrane at pH 7.0. However, at acidic pH, the vesicles were ruptured and the insulin did not entrap into the vesicle membrane, whereas at alkaline pH insulin became fibriller. The scanning electron microscope (SEM), Dynamic light scattering (DLS), and Zeta potential studies established the self-assembled structure formation of insulin and catanionic vesicles. To know the protein confirmations, Circular dichroism (CD) was also employed. The temperature dependent steady state and time resolved emission spectroscopy show that at room temperature (25 °C), apart from the 305 nm tyrosine fluorescence, a new emission peak at 450 nm was observed only in case of insulin-vesicle system, and was assigned as the tyrosine phosphorescence. This phosphorescence peak is the signature of the entrapment of insulin into the vesicle membrane. Highlights: • SDS-CTAB based catanionic vesicle has been fabricated. • Insulin has been successfully immobilized on these vesicles. • Immobilized insulin shows room temperature phosphorescence.

  9. Dynamics of structures

    CERN Document Server

    Paultre, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    This book covers structural dynamics from a theoretical and algorithmic approach. It covers systems with both single and multiple degrees-of-freedom. Numerous case studies are given to provide the reader with a deeper insight into the practicalities of the area, and the solutions to these case studies are given in terms of real-time and frequency in both geometric and modal spaces. Emphasis is also given to the subject of seismic loading. The text is based on many lectures on the subject of structural dynamics given at numerous institutions and thus will be an accessible and practical aid to

  10. Structural dynamics analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Housner, J. M.; Anderson, M.; Belvin, W.; Horner, G.

    1985-01-01

    Dynamic analysis of large space antenna systems must treat the deployment as well as vibration and control of the deployed antenna. Candidate computer programs for deployment dynamics, and issues and needs for future program developments are reviewed. Some results for mast and hoop deployment are also presented. Modeling of complex antenna geometry with conventional finite element methods and with repetitive exact elements is considered. Analytical comparisons with experimental results for a 15 meter hoop/column antenna revealed the importance of accurate structural properties including nonlinear joints. Slackening of cables in this antenna is also a consideration. The technology of designing actively damped structures through analytical optimization is discussed and results are presented.

  11. SDS-Induced Fibrillation of α-Synuclein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giehm, L.; Oliveira, Cristiano Luis Pinto De; Pedersen, J.S.;

    2010-01-01

    -stabilized micelles. Thus, fibrillation in this case occurs by a process of continuous accretion rather than by the rate-limiting accumulation of a distinct nucleus. The morphology of the SDS-induced fibrils does not exhibit the classical rod-like structures formed by αSN when aggregated by agitation in the absence......, and transmission electron microscopy to elucidate a fibrillation pathway that is remarkably different from the fibrillation pathway in the absence of SDS. Fibrillation occurs most extensively and most rapidly (starting within 45 min) under conditions where 12 SDS molecules are bound per αSN molecule, which is also...... of SDS. The SDS-induced fibrils have a flexible worm-like appearance, which can be converted into classical straight fibrils by continuous agitation. SDS-induced fibrillation represents an alternative and highly reproducible mechanism for fibrillation where protein association is driven by the formation...

  12. Dynamic Data Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsakalidis, Konstantinos

    We study dynamic data structures for different variants of orthogonal range reporting query problems. In particular, we consider (1) the planar orthogonal 3-sided range reporting problem: given a set of points in the plane, report the points that lie within a given 3-sided rectangle with one....... Dynamic problems like the above arise in various applications of network optimization, VLSI layout design, computer graphics and distributed computing. For the first problem, we present dynamic data structures for internal and external memory that support planar orthogonal 3-sided range reporting queries...... unbounded side, (2) the planar orthogonal range maxima reporting problem: given a set of points in the plane, report the points that lie within a given orthogonal range and are not dominated by any other point in the range, and (3) the problem of designing fully persistent B-trees for external memory...

  13. Dynamic Data Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kejlberg-Rasmussen, Casper

    to a given key? The updates we can do are: inserting a new key or deleting a given key. Our dictionary has the working set property, which means that the running time of a query depends on the query distribution. Specifically the time to search for a key depends on when we last searched for it. Our data...... statements about our data structure, which are based on the structure of the underlying problem, that we are trying to solve. We can rely on the properties of the invariants when performing queries, and in return we need to ensure that the invariants remain true after we perform updates. When designing data......In this thesis I will address three dynamic data structure problems using the concept of invariants. The first problem is maintaining a dynamically changing set of keys – a dictionary – where the queries we can ask are: does it contain a given key? and what is the preceding (or succeeding) key...

  14. Dynamic Data Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kejlberg-Rasmussen, Casper

    statements about our data structure, which are based on the structure of the underlying problem, that we are trying to solve. We can rely on the properties of the invariants when performing queries, and in return we need to ensure that the invariants remain true after we perform updates. When designing data......In this thesis I will address three dynamic data structure problems using the concept of invariants. The first problem is maintaining a dynamically changing set of keys – a dictionary – where the queries we can ask are: does it contain a given key? and what is the preceding (or succeeding) key...... to a given key? The updates we can do are: inserting a new key or deleting a given key. Our dictionary has the working set property, which means that the running time of a query depends on the query distribution. Specifically the time to search for a key depends on when we last searched for it. Our data...

  15. Analysis of the Crude Antigen of Hymenolepis nana from Mice by SDS-PAGE and the Determination of Specific Antigens in Protein Structure by Western Blotting

    OpenAIRE

    GÖNENÇ, Bahadır

    2002-01-01

    Protein bands of crude antigens of Hymenolepis nana were determined by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting. Thirty Swiss albino mice were allotted into two groups of 15 each as positive (infected with H. nana) and negative (non-infected with H. nana) groups. The natural infections of H. nana and other helminths were determined by centrifugal flotation of faeces. After bleeding, the mice were necropsied and their guts were examined for H. nana and other intestinal helminths. Sera from mice were test...

  16. Dynamical Structure of Baryons

    CERN Document Server

    Aleksejevs, A

    2013-01-01

    Compton scattering offers a unique opportunity to study the dynamical structure of hadrons over a wide kinematic range, with polarizabilities characterizing the hadron active internal degrees of freedom. We present calculations and detailed analysis of electric and magnetic and the spin-dependent dynamical polarizabilities for the lowest in mass SU(3) octet of baryons. These extensive calculations are made possible by the recent implementation of semi-automatized calculations in chiral perturbation theory which allows evaluating polarizabilities from Compton scattering up to next-to-the-leading order. The dependencies for the range of photon energies covering the majority of the meson photoproduction channels are analyzed.

  17. Dynamic Weighted Data Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-06-01

    and Bonnie Hampton, who taught me much more than how to play the cello . Finally, for hours of artistic satisfaction, I thank Johannes Brahms, Ludwig...van "j Beethoven, Igor Stravinsky, Glan-Carlo Menotti, and Johann Sebastian Bach . Dynamic Weighted Data Structures Samuel W. Bent This thesis discusses...34I find It a matter of some difficulty to arrange these cards In a manner suited to my needs.’ I glanced at the cards and noticed each was labelled

  18. Structural dynamic modification

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Sestieri

    2000-06-01

    Vibration and acoustic requirements are becoming increasingly important in the design of mechanical structures, but they are not usually of primary concern in the design process. So the need to vary the structural behaviour to solve noise and vibration problems often occurs at the prototype stage, giving rise to the so-called structural modification problem. In this paper, the direct problem of determing the new response of a system, after some modifications are introduced into the sestem, is analysed using two different databases: the modal database and the frequency response function database. The limitaions of the modal database are discussed. Structural modifications that can be accounted for are lumped masses, springs, dampers and dynamic absorbers.

  19. Joint IGCP 499/SDS Meeting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter K(o)nigshof; Eberhard Schindler; Volker Wildez; Jurga Lazauskiene; M. Namik Yal(c)in

    2006-01-01

    @@ A major event of IGCP 499 in 2005 took place in Southern Siberia. In the tradition of successful joint meetings and field trips of Devonian IGCP projects and the international Subcommission on Devonian Stratigraphy (SDS), a very successful meeting was held at the Institute of Petroleum Geology,United Institute of Geology and Mineralogy of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Siberian Branch in Novosibirsk.

  20. Electrolyte-induced reorganization of SDS self-assembly on graphene: a molecular simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuyan; Wu, Bin; Yang, Xiaoning

    2014-04-23

    A molecular dynamics simulation was conducted to study the structure and morphology of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) surfactants adsorbed on a nanoscale graphene nanostructure in the presence of an electrolyte. The self-assembly structure can be reorganized by the electrolyte-induced effect. An increase in the ionic strength of the added electrolyte can enhance the stretching of adsorbed surfactants toward the bulk aqueous phase and make headgroups assemble densely, leading to a more compact structure of the SDS/graphene composite. The change in the self-assembly structure is attributed to the accumulation/condensation of electrolyte cations near the surfactant aggregate, consequently screening the electrostatic repulsion between charged headgroups. The role of the electrolyte revealed here provides direct microscopic evidence or an explanation of the reported experiments in the electrolyte tuning of the interfacial structure of a surfactant aggregate on the surface of carbon nanoparticles. Additionally, the buoyant density of the SDS/graphene assembly has been computed. With an increase in the ionic strength of the electrolyte, the buoyant density of the SDS/graphene composite rises. The interfacial accumulation of electrolytes provides an important contribution to the density enhancement. The study will be valuable for the dispersion and application of graphene nanomaterials.

  1. Smart Data Selection (SDS) Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-21

    Developing the capability to notify operators when data demonstrate abnormal behavior 15. SUBJECT TERMS Spectrum, Aeronautical telemetry, algorithm...bandwidth, Integrated Networked Enhanced Telemetry (iNET), Smart Data Selection (SDS), Pulse Code modulation (PCM) 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF...Efficient Algorithm • PCM Compression Enhancement • Benefits to T&E Project Description (/) ~ ;;:,... ~ 0 8 ~ & ~əNott,C# iThe dominant inherent nature

  2. Structural dynamic modifications via models

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T K Kundra

    2000-06-01

    Structural dynamic modification techniques attempt to reduce dynamic design time and can be implemented beginning with spatial models of structures, dynamic test data or updated models. The models assumed in this discussion are mathematical models, namely mass, stiffness, and damping matrices of the equations of motion of a structure. These models are identified/extracted from dynamic test data viz. frequency response functions (FRFs). Alternatively these models could have been obtained by adjusting or updating the finite element model of the structure in the light of the test data. The methods of structural modification for getting desired dynamic characteristics by using modifiers namely mass, beams and tuned absorbers are discussed.

  3. Role of counterion condensation in the self-assembly of SDS surfactants at the water-graphite interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tummala, Naga Rajesh; Striolo, Alberto

    2008-02-21

    The aggregate structure of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) adsorbed at the graphite-water interface has been studied with the aid of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. As expected, our results show that adsorbed SDS yields hemi-cylindrical micelles. The hemi-cylindrical aggregates in our simulations closely resemble all structural and morphological details provided by previous solution atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments. More interestingly, our data indicate that SDS head groups do not provide a complete shield to the hydrophobic tails. Instead, we found regions in which the hydrophobic tails are exposed to the aqueous solution. By conducting a parametric study for SDS-like nonionic surfactants we show that electrostatic interactions between SDS head groups and counterions are responsible for the unexpected result. Our interpretation is corroborated by density profiles, analysis of the coordination states, and mean square displacement data for both the adsorbed SDS surfactants and the counterions in solution. Counterion condensation appears to be a physical phenomenon that could be exploited to direct the assembly of advanced nanostructured materials.

  4. Structural Dynamics of Maneuvering Aircraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-01

    AD-RI92 376 STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS OF MANEUVERING RIRCRAFT(U) CONRAD I TECHNOLOGIES INC KING OF PRUSSIA PR M M REDDI SEP 97 CTI-8601 NRDC-88014-69...REPORT NO. NADC-8014-60 STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS OF MANEUVERING AIRCRAFT M. Mahadeva Reddi .4 Conrad Technologies, Inc. 650 S. Henderson Rd. D T IQ King of...NO A0 CCESSION NO. R02303001 107601 11. TITLE (Include Security Classfication) (u) STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS OF MANEUVERING AIRCRAFT 12. PERSONAL AUTHORS) M

  5. Dynamic testing of cable structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caetano Elsa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the role of dynamic testing in the study of cable structures. In this context, the identification of cable force based on vibration measurements is discussed. Vibration and damping assessment are then introduced as the focus of dynamic monitoring systems, and particular aspects of the structural behaviour under environmental loads are analysed. Diverse application results are presented to support the discussion centred on cable-stayed bridges, roof structures, a guyed mast and a transmission line.

  6. SDS: A Framework for Scientific Data Services

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Bin; Byna, Surendra; Wu, Kesheng

    2013-10-31

    Large-scale scientific applications typically write their data to parallel file systems with organizations designed to achieve fast write speeds. Analysis tasks frequently read the data in a pattern that is different from the write pattern, and therefore experience poor I/O performance. In this paper, we introduce a prototype framework for bridging the performance gap between write and read stages of data access from parallel file systems. We call this framework Scientific Data Services, or SDS for short. This initial implementation of SDS focuses on reorganizing previously written files into data layouts that benefit read patterns, and transparently directs read calls to the reorganized data. SDS follows a client-server architecture. The SDS Server manages partial or full replicas of reorganized datasets and serves SDS Clients' requests for data. The current version of the SDS client library supports HDF5 programming interface for reading data. The client library intercepts HDF5 calls and transparently redirects them to the reorganized data. The SDS client library also provides a querying interface for reading part of the data based on user-specified selective criteria. We describe the design and implementation of the SDS client-server architecture, and evaluate the response time of the SDS Server and the performance benefits of SDS.

  7. Structural dynamics in rotating systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiraly, Louis J.

    1993-01-01

    Major issues and recent advances in the structural dynamics of rotating systems are summarized. The objectives and benefits of such systems are briefly discussed. Directions for future research are suggested.

  8. Hysteresis in structural dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanyi, A., E-mail: aivanyi@morpheus.pte.hu [Pollack Mihaly Faculty of Engineering, University of Pecs, Boszorkany u. 2, H-7624 Pecs (Hungary); Ivanyi, P., E-mail: peteri@morpheus.pte.hu [Pollack Mihaly Faculty of Engineering, University of Pecs, Boszorkany u. 2, H-7624 Pecs (Hungary); Ivanyi, M.M., E-mail: ivanyi@uvaterv.hu [Pollack Mihaly Faculty of Engineering, University of Pecs, Boszorkany u. 2, H-7624 Pecs (Hungary); UVATERV Ltd, Budapest, 1117, Dombovari ut 17, Budapest (Hungary); Ivanyi, M., E-mail: drivanyi@pmmk.pte.hu [Pollack Mihaly Faculty of Engineering, University of Pecs, Boszorkany u. 2, H-7624 Pecs (Hungary)

    2012-05-01

    In this paper the Preisach hysteresis model is applied to determine the dynamic behavior of a steel column with mass on the top and loaded by an impulse force. The column is considered as a rigid element, while the fixed end of the column is modeled with a rotational spring of hysterestic characteristic. In the solution of the non-linear dynamical equation of motion the fix-point technique is inserted to the time marching iteration. In the investigation the non-linearity of the rotation spring is modeled with the Preisach hysteresis model. The variation of amplitude and the action time interval of force are changing. The results are plotted in figures.

  9. Development of the Space Debris Sensor (SDS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, J.; Liou, J.-C.; Anz-Meador, P. D.; Corsaro, B.; Giovane, F.; Matney, M.; Christiansen, E.

    2017-01-01

    The Space Debris Sensor (SDS) is a NASA experiment scheduled to fly aboard the International Space Station (ISS) starting in 2018. The SDS is the first flight demonstration of the Debris Resistive/Acoustic Grid Orbital NASA-Navy Sensor (DRAGONS) developed and matured at NASA Johnson Space Center's Orbital Debris Program Office. The DRAGONS concept combines several technologies to characterize the size, speed, direction, and density of small impacting objects. With a minimum two-year operational lifetime, SDS is anticipated to collect statistically significant information on orbital debris ranging from 50 microns to 500 microns in size. This paper describes the features of SDS and how data from the ISS mission may be used to update debris environment models. Results of hypervelocity impact testing during the development of SDS and the potential for improvement on future sensors at higher altitudes will be reviewed.

  10. Lymphotactin structural dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Volkman, Brian F.; Liu, Tina Y.; Peterson, Francis C.

    2009-01-01

    Lymphotactin/XCL1, the defining member of the C class of chemokines, undergoes a conformational change that involves the complete restructuring of all stabilizing interactions. Other chemokines are restricted to a single conformation by a pair of conserved disulfide crosslinks, one of which is absent in lymphotactin. This structural interconversion is entirely reversible, and the two-state equilibrium is sensitive to changes in temperature and ionic strength. One species adopts the conserved ...

  11. Foams structure and dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Cantat, Isabelle; Graner, François; Pitois, Olivier; Höhler, Reinard; Elias, Florence; Saint-Jalmes, Arnaud; Rouyer, Florence

    2013-01-01

    This book is the first to provide a thorough description of all aspects of the physico-chemical properties of foams. It sets out what is known about their structure, their stability, and their rheology. Engineers, researchers and students will find descriptions of all the key concepts, illustrated by numerous applications, as well as experiments and exercises for the reader. A solutions manual for lecturers is available via the publisher's web site.

  12. Structural Mechanics and Dynamics Branch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefko, George

    2003-01-01

    The 2002 annual report of the Structural Mechanics and Dynamics Branch reflects the majority of the work performed by the branch staff during the 2002 calendar year. Its purpose is to give a brief review of the branch s technical accomplishments. The Structural Mechanics and Dynamics Branch develops innovative computational tools, benchmark experimental data, and solutions to long-term barrier problems in the areas of propulsion aeroelasticity, active and passive damping, engine vibration control, rotor dynamics, magnetic suspension, structural mechanics, probabilistics, smart structures, engine system dynamics, and engine containment. Furthermore, the branch is developing a compact, nonpolluting, bearingless electric machine with electric power supplied by fuel cells for future "more electric" aircraft. An ultra-high-power-density machine that can generate projected power densities of 50 hp/lb or more, in comparison to conventional electric machines, which generate usually 0.2 hp/lb, is under development for application to electric drives for propulsive fans or propellers. In the future, propulsion and power systems will need to be lighter, to operate at higher temperatures, and to be more reliable in order to achieve higher performance and economic viability. The Structural Mechanics and Dynamics Branch is working to achieve these complex, challenging goals.

  13. Molecular Orientation and Structural Characterization of Ultrathin Films of C12AzoNaph(1,4)C6N-SDS Studied by FT-IR and NIR-SERS Spectroscopies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The orientation and structural characterization of the ultrathin film of azobenzene-containing amphiphilic compound, C12AzoNaph(1,4)C6N+Br-, were studied in the present study. The compound can form a stable monolayer with sodium dextrin sulfate(SDS) by means of electrostatic interaction. Fourier-transform infrared(FT-IR) and near-infrared surface-enhanced Raman scattering(NIR-SERS) spectroscopies were used to study the orientation and characterize the structure of the Langmuir-Blodgett(LB) film and the dipping film. The FT-IR spectra indicate that the alkyl tail is nearly perpendicular to the substrate surface without any aggregation and adopts largely trans-zigzag conformation in the LB film. The NIR-SERS spectra demonstrate that the chromorphoric part in C12AzoNaph(1,4)C6N+Br is also nearly perpendicular to the surface of silver substrate both in the dipping film and the LB film. A new "sandwiched system" model was designed to investigate the orientation and structural characterization of the chromophoric part in the multi-monolayer LB films on the non-SERS active substrate. The SERS mechanism of the "sandwiched system" is discussed in the present paper.

  14. A molecular dynamics simulation study of dynamic process and mesoscopic structure in liquid mixture systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peng

    The focus of this dissertation is the Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation study of two different systems. In thefirst system, we study the dynamic process of graphene exfoliation, particularly graphene dispersion using ionic surfactants (Chapter 2). In the second system, we investigate the mesoscopic structure of binary solute/ionic liquid (IL) mixtures through the comparison between simulations and corresponding experiments (Chapter 3 and 4). In the graphene exfoliation study, we consider two separation mechanisms: changing the interlayer distance and sliding away the relative distance of two single-layer graphene sheets. By calculating the energy barrier as a function of separation (interlayer or sliding-away) distance and performing sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) structure analysis around graphene surface in SDS surfactant/water + bilayer graphene mixture systems, we find that the sliding-away mechanism is the dominant, feasible separation process. In this process, the SDS-graphene interaction gradually replaces the graphene-graphene Van der Waals (VdW) interaction, and decreases the energy barrier until almost zero at critical SDS concentration. In solute/IL study, we investigate nonpolar (CS2) and dipolar (CH 3CN) solute/IL mixture systems. MD simulation shows that at low concentrations, IL is nanosegregated into an ionic network and nonpolar domain. It is also found that CS2 molecules tend to be localized into the nonpolar domain, while CH3CN interacts with nonpolar domain as well as with the charged head groups in the ionic network because of its amphiphilicity. At high concentrations, CH3CN molecules eventually disrupt the nanostructural organization. This dissertation is organized in four chapters: (1) introduction to graphene, ionic liquids and the methodology of MD; (2) MD simulation of graphene exfoliation; (3) Nanostructural organization in acetonitrile/IL mixtures; (4) Nanostructural organization in carbon disulfide/IL mixtures; (5) Conclusions. Results

  15. Dynamic Soil-Structure-Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kellezi, Lindita

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to investigate and develop alternative methods of analyzing problems in dynamic soil-structure-interaction. The main focus is the major difficulty posed by such an analysis - the phenomenon of waves which radiate outward from the excited structures towards infinity...... transmitting boundary at the edges of the computational mesh. To start with, an investigation of the main effects of the interaction phenomena is carried out employing a widely used model, considering dynamic stiffness of the unbounded soil as frequency independent. Then a complete description...... represents an attempt to construct a local stiffness for the unbounded soil domain....

  16. Relating structure and dynamics in organisation models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonkers, C.M.; Treur, J.

    To understand how an organisational structure relates to dynamics is an interesting fundamental challenge in the area of social modelling. Specifications of organisational structure usually have a diagrammatic form that abstracts from more detailed dynamics. Dynamic properties of agent systems,

  17. Algebraic Structure of Dynamical Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-22

    Scholar project report; no. 461 (2017) ALGEBRAIC STRUCTURE OF DYNAMICAL SYSTEMS by MIDN 1/C James P. Talisse United States Naval Academy Annapolis, MD...based on the structure of algebraic objects associated with it. In this project we study two algebraic objects, centralizers and topological full groups...group completely defines the system up to time reversal. We apply numerical estimates to draw conclusions about the algebraic properties of this group

  18. Structural system identification: Structural dynamics model validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Red-Horse, J.R.

    1997-04-01

    Structural system identification is concerned with the development of systematic procedures and tools for developing predictive analytical models based on a physical structure`s dynamic response characteristics. It is a multidisciplinary process that involves the ability (1) to define high fidelity physics-based analysis models, (2) to acquire accurate test-derived information for physical specimens using diagnostic experiments, (3) to validate the numerical simulation model by reconciling differences that inevitably exist between the analysis model and the experimental data, and (4) to quantify uncertainties in the final system models and subsequent numerical simulations. The goal of this project was to develop structural system identification techniques and software suitable for both research and production applications in code and model validation.

  19. Distributed Dynamic Condition Response Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hildebrandt, Thomas; Mukkamala, Raghava Rao

    We present distributed dynamic condition response structures as a declarative process model inspired by the workflow language employed by our industrial partner and conservatively generalizing labelled event structures. The model adds to event structures the possibility to 1) finitely specify...... repeated, possibly infinite behavior, 2) finitely specify fine-grained acceptance conditions for (possibly infinite) runs based on the notion of responses and 3) distribute events via roles. We give a graphical notation inspired by related work by van der Aalst et al and formalize the execution semantics...

  20. On the Morphology of the SDS Film on the Surface of Borosilicate Glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zih-Yao Shen

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Surfactant films on solid surfaces have attracted much attention because of their scientific interest and applications, such as surface treatment agent, or for micro- or nano-scale templates for microfluidic devices. In this study, anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS solutions with various charged inorganic salts was spread on a glass substrate and dried to form an SDS thin film. Atomic force microscopy (AFM was employed to observe the micro-structure of the SDS thin film. The effects of inorganic salts on the morphology of the SDS film were observed and discussed. The results of experiments demonstrated that pure SDS film formed patterns of long, parallel, highly-ordered stripes. The existence of the inorganic salt disturbed the structure of the SDS film due to the interaction between the cationic ion and the anionic head groups of SDS. The divalent ion has greater electrostatic interaction with anionic head groups than that of the monovalent ion, and causes a gross change in the morphology of the SDS film. The height of the SDS bilayer measured was consistent with the theoretical value, and the addition of the large-sized monovalent ion would lead to lowering the height of the adsorbed structures.

  1. Structural Dynamics of the Ribosome

    OpenAIRE

    Korostelev, Andrei; Ermolenko, Dmitri N.; Noller, Harry F.

    2008-01-01

    Protein synthesis is inherently a dynamic process, requiring both small- and large-scale movements of tRNA and mRNA. It has long been suspected that these movements might be coupled to conformational changes in the ribosome, and in its RNA moieties in particular. Recently, the nature of ribosome structural dynamics has begun to emerge from a combination of approaches, most notably cryo-EM, X-ray crystallography and FRET. Ribosome movement occurs both on a grand scale, as in the intersubunit r...

  2. Primary structural dynamics in graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, Sascha; Liang Wenxi; Zewail, Ahmed H, E-mail: zewail@caltech.edu [Physical Biology Center for Ultrafast Science and Technology, Arthur Amos Noyes Laboratory of Chemical Physics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    The structural dynamics of graphite and graphene are unique, because of the selective coupling between electron and lattice motions and hence the limit on electric and electro-optic properties. Here, we report on the femtosecond probing of graphite films (1-3 nm) using ultrafast electron crystallography in the transmission mode. Two time scales are observed for the dynamics: a 700 fs initial decrease in diffraction intensity due to lattice phonons in optically dark regions of the Brillouin zone, followed by a 12 ps decrease due to phonon thermalization near the {Gamma} and K regions. These results indicate the non-equilibrium distortion of the unit cells at early time and the subsequent role of long-wavelength atomic motions in the thermalization process. Theory and experiment are now in agreement regarding the nature of nuclear motions, but the results suggest that potential change plays a role in the lateral dynamics of the lattice.

  3. Structurally Dynamic Spin Market Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, Denis; Kuscsik, Zoltán

    The agent-based model of stock price dynamics on a directed evolving complex network is suggested and studied by direct simulation. The stationary regime is maintained as a result of the balance between the extremal dynamics, adaptivity of strategic variables and reconnection rules. The inherent structure of node agent "brain" is modeled by a recursive neural network with local and global inputs and feedback connections. For specific parametric combination the complex network displays small-world phenomenon combined with scale-free behavior. The identification of a local leader (network hub, agent whose strategies are frequently adapted by its neighbors) is carried out by repeated random walk process through network. The simulations show empirically relevant dynamics of price returns and volatility clustering. The additional emerging aspects of stylized market statistics are Zipfian distributions of fitness.

  4. Dynamic molecular graphs: "hopping" structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Guzmán, Fernando; Rocha-Rinza, Tomas; Guevara-Vela, José Manuel; Cuevas, Gabriel; Gómez, Rosa María

    2014-05-05

    This work aims to contribute to the discussion about the suitability of bond paths and bond-critical points as indicators of chemical bonding defined within the theoretical framework of the quantum theory of atoms in molecules. For this purpose, we consider the temporal evolution of the molecular structure of [Fe{C(CH2 )3 }(CO)3 ] throughout Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (BOMD), which illustrates the changing behaviour of the molecular graph (MG) of an electronic system. Several MGs with significant lifespans are observed across the BOMD simulations. The bond paths between the trimethylenemethane and the metallic core are uninterruptedly formed and broken. This situation is reminiscent of a "hopping" ligand over the iron atom. The molecular graph wherein the bonding between trimethylenemethane and the iron atom takes place only by means of the tertiary carbon atom has the longest lifespan of all the considered structures, which is consistent with the MG found by X-ray diffraction experiments and quantum chemical calculations. In contrast, the η(4) complex predicted by molecular-orbital theory has an extremely brief lifetime. The lifespan of different molecular structures is related to bond descriptors on the basis of the topology of the electron density such as the ellipticities at the FeCH2 bond-critical points and electron delocalisation indices. This work also proposes the concept of a dynamic molecular graph composed of the different structures found throughout the BOMD trajectories in analogy to a resonance hybrid of Lewis structures. It is our hope that the notion of dynamic molecular graphs will prove useful in the discussion of electronic systems, in particular for those in which analysis on the basis of static structures leads to controversial conclusions. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Dynamic Range Majority Data Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Elmasry, Amr; HE, MENG; Munro, J. Ian; Nicholson, Patrick K.

    2011-01-01

    Given a set $P$ of coloured points on the real line, we study the problem of answering range $\\alpha$-majority (or "heavy hitter") queries on $P$. More specifically, for a query range $Q$, we want to return each colour that is assigned to more than an $\\alpha$-fraction of the points contained in $Q$. We present a new data structure for answering range $\\alpha$-majority queries on a dynamic set of points, where $\\alpha \\in (0,1)$. Our data structure uses O(n) space, supports queries in $O((\\lg...

  6. Solution structures of the cytoplasmic linkers between segments S4 and S5 (S4-S5) in domains III and IV of human brain sodium channels in SDS micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, K; Nakagawa, T; Kuroda, Y

    2001-09-01

    The two cytoplasmic linkers connecting segment S4 and segment S5 (S4-S5 linker) of both domain III (III/S4-S5) and IV (IV/S4-S5) of the sodium channel alpha-subunit are considered to work as a hydrophobic receptor for the inactivation particle because of the three hydrophobic amino acids of Ile-Phe-Met (IFM motif) in the III-IV linker of the sodium channel alpha-subunit. To date, the solution structures of the peptides related to III/S4-S5 (MP-D3: A1325-M1338) and IV/S4-S5 (MP-D4: T1648-L1666) of human brain sodium channels have been investigated using CD and (1)H NMR spectroscopies. SDS micelles were employed as a solvent. The micelles mimic either biological membranes or the interior of a protein and can be a relevant environment at the inactivated state of the channels. It was found that the secondary structures of both MP-D3 and MP-D4 assume alpha-helical conformations around the N-terminal half-side of the sequences, i.e. the residues between V1326 and L1331 in MP-D3 and between L1650 and S1656 in MP-D4. Residue A1329 in MP-D3, which is considered to interact with F1489 of the IFM motif, was found to be located within the alpha-helix. Residues F1651, M1654, M1655, L1657 and A1669 in MP-D4, which also play an important role in inactivation, formed a hydrophobic cluster on one side of the helix. This cluster was concluded to interact with the hydrophobic cluster due to the III-IV linker before the inactivation gate closes.

  7. Dynamic Range Majority Data Structures

    CERN Document Server

    He, Meng; Nicholson, Patrick K

    2011-01-01

    Given a set $P$ of coloured points on the real line, we study the problem of answering range $\\alpha$-majority (or "heavy hitter") queries on $P$. More specifically, for a query range $Q$, we want to return each colour that is assigned to more than an $\\alpha$-fraction of the points contained in $Q$. We present a new data structure for answering range $\\alpha$-majority queries on a dynamic set of points, where $\\alpha \\in (0,1)$. Our data structure uses O(n) space, supports queries in $O((\\lg n) / \\alpha)$ time, and updates in $O((\\lg n) / \\alpha)$ amortized time. If the coordinates of the points are integers, then the query time can be improved to $O(\\lg n / (\\alpha \\lg \\lg n) + (\\lg(1/\\alpha))/\\alpha))$. For constant values of $\\alpha$, this improved query time matches an existing lower bound, for any data structure with polylogarithmic update time. We also generalize our data structure to handle sets of points in d-dimensions, for $d \\ge 2$, as well as dynamic arrays, in which each entry is a colour.

  8. Simple detection of phosphoproteins in SDS-PAGE by quercetin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Wang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A novel fluorescence-based staining method was developed for phosphoprotein analysis in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE. Similar to the mechanism of immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC, the method employed quercetin–aluminum (III-appended complex as a fluoroprobe to selectively visualize phosphorylated proteins among total proteins. According to the results, as low as 16–32 ng of phosphoproteins (α-casein, β-casein and phosvitin could be selectively detected in 90 min with a wide linear dynamic range. In addition, the specificity of this novel stain for phosphoproteins was confirmed by 1-D and 2-D SDS-PAGE, dephosphorylation, western blot and liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry analysis (LC–MS/MS, respectively.

  9. Twelve lectures on structural dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Preumont, André

    2013-01-01

    This text addresses the modeling of vibrating systems with the perspective of finding the model of minimum complexity which accounts for the physics of the phenomena at play. The first half of the book (Ch.1-6) deals with the dynamics of discrete and continuous mechanical systems; the classical approach emphasizes the use of Lagrange's equations. The second half of the book (Ch.7-12) deals with more advanced topics, rarely encountered in the existing literature: seismic excitation, random vibration (including fatigue), rotor dynamics, vibration isolation and dynamic vibration absorbers; the final chapter is an introduction to active control of vibrations. The first part of this text may be used as a one semester course for 3rd year students in Mechanical, Aerospace or Civil Engineering. The second part of the text is intended for graduate classes. A set of problems is provided at the end of every chapter. The author has a 35 years experience in various aspects of Structural dynamics, both in industry (nuclea...

  10. RESEARCH ON NONLINEAR PROBLEMS IN STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research on nonlinear problems structural dynamics is briefly summarized. Panel flutter was investigated to make a critical comparison between theory...panel flutter in aerospace vehicles, plausible simplifying assumptions are examined in the light of experimental results. Structural dynamics research

  11. One-dimensional SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (1D SDS-PAGE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunelle, Julie L; Green, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    This protocol describes a denaturing polyacrylamide gel system utilizing sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) to separate protein molecules based on size as first described by Laemmli (1970). SDS-PAGE can be used to monitor protein purifications, check the purity of samples, and to estimate molecular weights for unknown proteins. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Structural dynamic modification using additive damping

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B C Nakra

    2000-06-01

    In order to control dynamic response in structures and machines, modofications using additive viscoelastic damping materials are highlighted. The techniques described for analysis include analytical methods for structural elements, FEM and perturbation methods for reanalysis or structural dynamic modifications for complex structures. Optimisation techniques are used for damping effectiveness include multi-parameter optimisatoin techniques and a technique using dynamic sensitivity analysis and structural dynamic modification. These have been applied for optimum dynamic design of structures incorporating viscoelastic damping. Some current trends for vibraton control are also discussed.

  13. Structure and dynamics of solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Ohtaki, H

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in the study of structural and dynamic properties of solutions have provided a molecular picture of solute-solvent interactions. Although the study of thermodynamic as well as electronic properties of solutions have played a role in the development of research on the rate and mechanism of chemical reactions, such macroscopic and microscopic properties are insufficient for a deeper understanding of fast chemical and biological reactions. In order to fill the gap between the two extremes, it is necessary to know how molecules are arranged in solution and how they change their pos

  14. Automated sample preparation for CE-SDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, M Eleanor; Vizel, Alona; Hutterer, Katariina M

    2013-05-01

    Traditionally, CE with SDS (CE-SDS) places many restrictions on sample composition. Requirements include low salt content, known initial sample concentration, and a narrow window of final sample concentration. As these restrictions require buffer exchange for many sample types, sample preparation is often tedious and yields poor sample recoveries. To improve capacity and streamline sample preparation, an automated robotic platform was developed using the PhyNexus Micro-Extractor Automated Instrument (MEA) for both the reduced and nonreduced CE-SDS assays. This automated sample preparation normalizes sample concentration, removes salts and other contaminants, and adds the required CE-SDS reagents, essentially eliminating manual steps during sample preparation. Fc-fusion proteins and monoclonal antibodies were used in this work to demonstrate benefits of this approach when compared to the manual method. With optimized conditions, this application has demonstrated decreased analyst "hands on" time and reduced total assay time. Sample recovery greater than 90% can be achieved, regardless of initial composition and concentration of analyte.

  15. Dynamic range majority data structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elmasry, Amr Ahmed Abd Elmoneim; He, Meng; Munro, J. Ian

    2011-01-01

    Given a set P of n coloured points on the real line, we study the problem of answering range α-majority (or "heavy hitter") queries on P. More specifically, for a query range Q, we want to return each colour that is assigned to more than an α-fraction of the points contained in Q. We present a new...... data structure for answering range α-majority queries on a dynamic set of points, where α ε (0,1). Our data structure uses O(n) space, supports queries in O((lg n)/α) time, and updates in O((lg n)/α) amortized time. If the coordinates of the points are integers, then the query time can be improved to O...

  16. Sierra Structural Dynamics Theory Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reese, Garth M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-10-19

    Sierra/SD provides a massively parallel implementation of structural dynamics finite element analysis, required for high fidelity, validated models used in modal, vibration, static and shock analysis of structural systems. This manual describes the theory behind many of the constructs in Sierra/SD. For a more detailed description of how to use Sierra/SD , we refer the reader to Sierra/SD, User's Notes . Many of the constructs in Sierra/SD are pulled directly from published material. Where possible, these materials are referenced herein. However, certain functions in Sierra/SD are specific to our implementation. We try to be far more complete in those areas. The theory manual was developed from several sources including general notes, a programmer notes manual, the user's notes and of course the material in the open literature. This page intentionally left blank.

  17. Structural Dynamics of Electronic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhir, E.

    2013-03-01

    The published work on analytical ("mathematical") and computer-aided, primarily finite-element-analysis (FEA) based, predictive modeling of the dynamic response of electronic systems to shocks and vibrations is reviewed. While understanding the physics of and the ability to predict the response of an electronic structure to dynamic loading has been always of significant importance in military, avionic, aeronautic, automotive and maritime electronics, during the last decade this problem has become especially important also in commercial, and, particularly, in portable electronics in connection with accelerated testing of various surface mount technology (SMT) systems on the board level. The emphasis of the review is on the nonlinear shock-excited vibrations of flexible printed circuit boards (PCBs) experiencing shock loading applied to their support contours during drop tests. At the end of the review we provide, as a suitable and useful illustration, the exact solution to a highly nonlinear problem of the dynamic response of a "flexible-and-heavy" PCB to an impact load applied to its support contour during drop testing.

  18. Relating structure and dynamics in organisation models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonkers, C.M.; Treur, J.

    2008-01-01

    To understand how an organisational structure relates to dynamics is an interesting fundamental challenge in the area of social modelling. Specifications of organisational structure usually have a diagrammatic form that abstracts from more detailed dynamics. Dynamic properties of agent systems, on t

  19. Resolution of structural heterogeneity in dynamic crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhong; Chan, Peter W Y; Moffat, Keith; Pai, Emil F; Royer, William E; Šrajer, Vukica; Yang, Xiaojing

    2013-06-01

    Dynamic behavior of proteins is critical to their function. X-ray crystallography, a powerful yet mostly static technique, faces inherent challenges in acquiring dynamic information despite decades of effort. Dynamic `structural changes' are often indirectly inferred from `structural differences' by comparing related static structures. In contrast, the direct observation of dynamic structural changes requires the initiation of a biochemical reaction or process in a crystal. Both the direct and the indirect approaches share a common challenge in analysis: how to interpret the structural heterogeneity intrinsic to all dynamic processes. This paper presents a real-space approach to this challenge, in which a suite of analytical methods and tools to identify and refine the mixed structural species present in multiple crystallographic data sets have been developed. These methods have been applied to representative scenarios in dynamic crystallography, and reveal structural information that is otherwise difficult to interpret or inaccessible using conventional methods.

  20. Dynamic analysis and design of offshore structures

    CERN Document Server

    Chandrasekaran, Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    This book  attempts to provide readers with an overall idea of various types of offshore platform geometries. It covers the various environmental loads encountered by these structures, a detailed description of the fundamentals of structural dynamics in a class-room style, estimate of damping in offshore structures and their applications in the preliminary analysis and design. Basic concepts of structural dynamics are emphasized through simple illustrative examples and exercises. Design methodologies and guidelines, which are FORM based concepts are explained through a few applied example structures. Each chapter also has tutorials and exercises for self-learning. A dedicated chapter on stochastic dynamics will help the students to extend the basic concepts of structural dynamics to this advanced domain of research. Hydrodynamic response of offshore structures with perforated members is one of the recent research applications, which is found to be one of the effective manner of retrofitting offshore structur...

  1. Transforming Static Data Structures to Dynamic Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-09-03

    2C*(N))) f?, (Ps(N)) n (N). The last two Inequalities both follow from the fact that PS grows at least linearly. QED. Maurer and Ottmann [1979...Maurer, H. A. and T. Ottmann C1979]. "Dynamic solutions of decomposable searching problems," Report 33, Institut fur Informationsverabeltung

  2. Predicting protein dynamics from structural ensembles

    CERN Document Server

    Copperman, J

    2015-01-01

    The biological properties of proteins are uniquely determined by their structure and dynamics. A protein in solution populates a structural ensemble of metastable configurations around the global fold. From overall rotation to local fluctuations, the dynamics of proteins can cover several orders of magnitude in time scales. We propose a simulation-free coarse-grained approach which utilizes knowledge of the important metastable folded states of the protein to predict the protein dynamics. This approach is based upon the Langevin Equation for Protein Dynamics (LE4PD), a Langevin formalism in the coordinates of the protein backbone. The linear modes of this Langevin formalism organize the fluctuations of the protein, so that more extended dynamical cooperativity relates to increasing energy barriers to mode diffusion. The accuracy of the LE4PD is verified by analyzing the predicted dynamics across a set of seven different proteins for which both relaxation data and NMR solution structures are available. Using e...

  3. Development of the Space Debris Sensor (SDS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Joe; Liou, J. -C.; Anz-Meador, P.; Matney, M.; Christiansen, E.

    2017-01-01

    Debris Resistive/Acoustic Grid Orbital Navy-NASA Sensor (DRAGONS) is an impact sensor designed to detect and characterize collisions with small orbital debris: from 50 microns to greater than 1millimeter debris size detection; Characterizes debris size, speed, direction, and density. The Space Debris Sensor (SDS) is a flight demonstration of DRAGONS on the International Space Station: Approximately 1 square meter of detection area facing the ISS velocity vector; Minimum two year mission on Columbus External Payloads Facility (EPF); Minimal obstruction from ISS hardware; Development is nearing final checkout and integration with the ISS; Current launch schedule is SpaceX13, about September 2017, or SpaceX14, about Jan 2018.

  4. Structural Dynamics Model of a Cartesian Robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-10-01

    34 D FILE COPY AD-A198 053 *.CC Technical Report 1009 Structural Dynamics Model of a Cartesian Robot "DTIC SELEC T E 0 Alfonso Garcia Reynoso MIT...COVERED Structural Dynamics Model of a Cartesian Robot technical report G. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUM9ER 7. AUTHO0R(@) S. CONTRACT On GRANT NUMSER...8217 %S S Structural Dynamics Model of a Cartesian Robot by Alfonso Garcia Reynoso BSME Instituto Tecnol6gico de Veracruz (1967) MSME Instituto Tecnol6gico

  5. Structurally dynamic spin market networks

    CERN Document Server

    Horváth, D

    2007-01-01

    The agent-based model of price dynamics on a directed evolving complex network is suggested and studied by direct simulation. The resulting stationary regime is maintained as a result of the balance between the extremal dynamics, adaptivity of strategic variables and reconnection rules. For some properly selected parametric combination the network displays small-world phenomenon with high mean clustering coefficient and power-law node degree distribution. The mechanism of repeated random walk through network combined with a fitness recognition is proposed and tested to generate modular multi-leader market. The simulations suggest that dynamics of fitness is the slowest process that manifests itself in the volatility clustering of the log-price returns.

  6. Sexual dimorphism in stature (SDS), jealousy and mate retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Gayle; Riley, Charlene

    2010-10-02

    Previous research has investigated the manner in which absolute height impacts on jealousy and mate retention. Although relative height is also important, little information exists about the potential influence of sexual dimorphism in stature (SDS) within established relationships. The current study investigated the relationship between SDS and the satisfaction, jealousy and mate retention behaviors reported by men and women. Heterosexual men (n = 98) and women (n = 102) completed a questionnaire. Men in high SDS relationships reported the lowest levels of cognitive and behavioral jealousy, although the impact of SDS on relationship satisfaction was less clear. SDS was not associated with the overall use of mate retention strategies; SDS did however affect the use of three specific strategies (vigilance, monopolization of time, love and care). SDS did not affect women's relationship satisfaction, jealousy (cognitive, behavioral, or emotional) or the use of mate retention strategies (with the exception of resource display).

  7. Visualizing structural dynamics of thylakoid membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwai, Masakazu; Yokono, Makio; Nakano, Akihiko

    2014-01-01

    To optimize photosynthesis, light-harvesting antenna proteins regulate light energy dissipation and redistribution in chloroplast thylakoid membranes, which involve dynamic protein reorganization of photosystems I and II. However, direct evidence for such protein reorganization has not been visualized in live cells. Here we demonstrate structural dynamics of thylakoid membranes by live cell imaging in combination with deconvolution. We observed chlorophyll fluorescence in the antibiotics-induced macrochloroplast in the moss Physcomitrella patens. The three-dimensional reconstruction uncovered the fine thylakoid membrane structure in live cells. The time-lapse imaging shows that the entire thylakoid membrane network is structurally stable, but the individual thylakoid membrane structure is flexible in vivo. Our observation indicates that grana serve as a framework to maintain structural integrity of the entire thylakoid membrane network. Both the structural stability and flexibility of thylakoid membranes would be essential for dynamic protein reorganization under fluctuating light environments. PMID:24442007

  8. Cationic spin probe reporting on thermal denaturation and complexation-decomplexation of BSA with SDS. Potential applications in protein purification processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matei, Iulia; Ariciu, Ana Maria; Neacsu, Maria Victoria; Collauto, Alberto; Salifoglou, Athanasios; Ionita, Gabriela

    2014-09-25

    In this work, we present evidence on the suitability of spin probes to report on the thermal treatment of bovine serum albumin (BSA), in the temperature range 293-343 K, and indirectly monitor the release of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) from its complex with BSA using a covalent gel with β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) in the network. The spin probes used, 5- and 7-doxyl-stearic acids (5-DSA, 7-DSA) or 4-(N,N'-dimethyl-N-hexadecyl)ammonium-2,2',6,6'-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl iodide (CAT16), present similar, fatty acid-like structural features. Their continuous wave electron paramagnetic resonance (CW-EPR) spectra, however, reflect different dynamics when complexed with BSA: a restricted motion for 5-DSA, almost nonsensitive to the heating/cooling cycle, and a faster temperature-dependent dynamic motion for CAT16. Molecular docking allows us to rationalize these results by revealing the different binding modes of 5-DSA and CAT16. The EPR data on the temperature effect on BSA are supported by circular dichroism results projecting recovery, upon cooling, of the initial binding ability of BSA for samples heated to 323 K. The interactions occurring in BSA/SDS/β-CD systems are investigated by CW-EPR and FT-ESEEM spectroscopies. It is found that the covalent gel containing β-CD can efficiently remove SDS from the BSA/SDS complex. The gel is not permeable to BSA but it can encapsulate SDS, thus yielding the free protein in solution and allowing recovery of the native protein conformation. Collectively, the accrued knowledge supports potential applications in protein purification biotechnological processes.

  9. Simultaneous determination of protein structure and dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Best, Robert B.; DePristo, M. A.

    2005-01-01

    We present a protocol for the experimental determination of ensembles of protein conformations that represent simultaneously the native structure and its associated dynamics. The procedure combines the strengths of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy-for obtaining experimental information at ...

  10. Understanding Microbial Communities: Function, Structure and Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-11

    microbial communities: Function, structure and dynamics’, at the Isaac Newton Institute, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom, from August to...dynamics’, at the Isaac Newton Institute, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom, from August to December 2014. The programme involved over 150...Communities: Function, Structure and Dynamics’, at the Isaac Newton Institute, Cambridge University, UK, from 19th August 2014 – 19th December 2014

  11. Structural Dynamic Behavior of Wind Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thresher, Robert W.; Mirandy, Louis P.; Carne, Thomas G.; Lobitz, Donald W.; James, George H. III

    2009-01-01

    The structural dynamicist s areas of responsibility require interaction with most other members of the wind turbine project team. These responsibilities are to predict structural loads and deflections that will occur over the lifetime of the machine, ensure favorable dynamic responses through appropriate design and operational procedures, evaluate potential design improvements for their impact on dynamic loads and stability, and correlate load and control test data with design predictions. Load prediction has been a major concern in wind turbine designs to date, and it is perhaps the single most important task faced by the structural dynamics engineer. However, even if we were able to predict all loads perfectly, this in itself would not lead to an economic system. Reduction of dynamic loads, not merely a "design to loads" policy, is required to achieve a cost-effective design. The two processes of load prediction and structural design are highly interactive: loads and deflections must be known before designers and stress analysts can perform structural sizing, which in turn influences the loads through changes in stiffness and mass. Structural design identifies "hot spots" (local areas of high stress) that would benefit most from dynamic load alleviation. Convergence of this cycle leads to a turbine structure that is neither under-designed (which may result in structural failure), nor over-designed (which will lead to excessive weight and cost).

  12. Dynamic Response of Embedded Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-07-15

    1 (202) 767-6963 AFOSR/Nh 00 FORM 1473, 83 APR EDITION OF I JAN 73 IS OBSOLETE. Uwc A ____________ SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE...4. Baker W. E., Westine P. S., Dodge F. T., "Similarity Methods in Engineering Dynamics", Hayden Book Company, Inc., New Jerset, 1978. 5. Bazant , Z...P., "Size Effect in Blunt Fracture: Concrete, Rock, Metal", ASCE, Journal of Engineering Mechanics, Vol. 110, No. 4, April 1984. 6. Bazant , Z. P

  13. Effects of dodecanol on the adsorption kinetics of SDS at the water-hexane interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadi, A; Mucic, N; Vollhardt, D; Fainerman, V B; Miller, R

    2010-11-15

    Even though sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) is the most frequently studied surfactant, its properties at liquid interfaces are not easily accessible. This is mainly caused by the fact that in aqueous solution SDS is subject to hydrolysis, by which the homologous dodecanol (C12OH) is formed. Due to its enormously high surface activity it competes with SDS at the interface. We demonstrate here that this "natural" impurity C12OH does not remarkably affect the adsorption dynamics of SDS at the water/hexane interface, due to its high solubility in hexane. Therefore, the dynamic adsorption properties can be determined independent of disturbing dodecanol effects. The surfactant adsorbs diffusion controlled and the interfacial tension isotherm at the water/hexane interface is well described by a Frumkin model. However complementary experiments via direct admixture of dodecanol in hexane indicate a significant decrease in interfacial tension of the water-hexane interface at concentrations higher than 10(-3) mol/l in hexane. This condition may happen when the oil phase is distributed as small droplets in a high concentrated solution of SDS. The distribution coefficient of C12OH between water and hexane is estimated from adsorption experiments to be K(p)=c(o)/c(w)=6.7×10(3).

  14. 31st IMAC Conference on Structural Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, Douglas; Carrella, Alex; Mayes, Randy; Rixen, Daniel; Allen, Matt; Cunha, Alvaro; Catbas, Fikret; Pakzad, Shamim; Racic, Vitomir; Pavic, Aleksandar; Reynolds, Paul; Simmermacher, Todd; Cogan, Scott; Moaveni, Babak; Papadimitriou, Costas; Allemang, Randall; Clerck, James; Niezrecki, Christopher; Wicks, Alfred

    2013-01-01

    Topics in Nonlinear Dynamics, Volume 1: Proceedings of the 31st IMAC, A Conference and Exposition on Structural Dynamics, 2013, the first volume of seven from the Conference, brings together contributions to this important area of research and engineering. The collection presents early findings and case studies on fundamental and applied aspects of Structural Dynamics, including papers on:   Nonlinear Oscillations Nonlinearities In Practice Nonlinear System Identification: Methods Nonlinear System Identification: Friction & Contact Nonlinear Modal Analysis Nonlinear Modeling & Simulation Nonlinear Vibration Absorbers Constructive Utilization of Nonlinearity.

  15. [Burnout syndrome of human services professionals--doctors, nurses, caregivers, teachers and clerks (1). Maslach Burnout Inventory: factor structures for samples of human services professionals, and its relation with Zung's Self-rating Depression Scale (SDS)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuko, E; Yamagishi, M; Kishi, R; Miyake, H

    1989-07-01

    During the past decade, burnout syndrome has been widely discussed not only in the USA but also in Japan. To evaluate the state of "burnout," two major scales are available: the first is the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) developed by C. Maslach and the other is the burnout scale by A. Pines. MBI is suggested to be independent of and incompatible with Pines' burnout scale, but, Pines' burnout scale is predominantly used in Japan, while both are used in the USA. Since hardly any studies of burnout using MBI have been made in Japan, we measured and analyzed MBI to evaluate the burnout state of doctors, nurses, caregivers, teachers and clerks who are engaged in "human services professions." The available data were subjected to factor analysis, reliability analysis and multiple regression analysis using Zung's Self-rating Depression Scale (SDS). The following results were obtained. 1) The factor analysis showed that the factor loading pattern was similar to that of Maslach's, but two different factors were emerged in addition to the standard factors in the intensity subscale. 2) In the relationship with the state of depression, burnout is closely related to depression but simultaneously has its own factors. This suggest that burnout is not a subtype of the depressive state.

  16. SDS -PAGE and Western Blotting Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blancher, C; Jones, A

    2001-01-01

    The goal of Western blotting, or more correctly, immunoblotting, is to identify with a specific antibody a particular antigen within a complex mixture of proteins that has been fractionated in a polyacrylamide gel and immobilized onto a membrane. Immunoblotting can be used to determine a number of important characteristics of protein antigens-the presence and quantity of an antigen, the relative molecular weight of the polypeptide chain, and the efficiency of extraction of the antigen.Immunoblotting occurs in six stages: (1) extraction and quantification of protein samples; (2) resolution of the protein sample in sodium dodecyl sulfatepolyacrylamide denaturing gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE); (3) transfer of the separated polypeptides to a membrane support; (4) blocking nonspecific binding sites on the membrane; (5) addition of antibodies; and (6) detection.Sample preparation is important for obtaining accurate separation of the proteins on the basis of molecular weight. Depending on whether an antigen is primarily extracellular, cytoplasmic, or membrane-associated different procedures might be required to prepare the sample initially. Although there are exceptions, many soluble nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins can be solubilized by lysis buffers that contain the nonionic detergent Nonidet P-40 (NP-40) and either no salt at all or relatively high concentrations of salt (e.g., 0.5 M NaCl). However, the efficiency of extraction is often greatly affected by pH of the buffer and the presence or absence of chelating agents such EDTA.

  17. Dynamic Analysis of Structures Using Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Ahmadi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In the recent years, neural networks are considered as the best candidate for fast approximation with arbitrary accuracy in the time consuming problems. Dynamic analysis of structures against earthquake has the time consuming process. We employed two kinds of neural networks: Generalized Regression neural network (GR and Back-Propagation Wavenet neural network (BPW, for approximating of dynamic time history response of frame structures. GR is a traditional radial basis function neural network while BPW categorized as a wavelet neural network. In BPW, sigmoid activation functions of hidden layer neurons are substituted with wavelets and weights training are achieved using Scaled Conjugate Gradient (SCG algorithm. Comparison the results of BPW with those of GR in the dynamic analysis of eight story steel frame indicates that accuracy of the properly trained BPW was better than that of GR and therefore, BPW can be efficiently used for approximate dynamic analysis of structures.

  18. Midfrequency band dynamics of large space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppolino, Robert N.; Adams, Douglas S.; Levine, Marie B.

    2004-09-01

    High and low intensity dynamic environments experienced by a spacecraft during launch and on-orbit operations, respectively, induce structural loads and motions, which are difficult to reliably predict. Structural dynamics in low- and mid-frequency bands are sensitive to component interface uncertainty and non-linearity as evidenced in laboratory testing and flight operations. Analytical tools for prediction of linear system response are not necessarily adequate for reliable prediction of mid-frequency band dynamics and analysis of measured laboratory and flight data. A new MATLAB toolbox, designed to address the key challenges of mid-frequency band dynamics, is introduced in this paper. Finite-element models of major subassemblies are defined following rational frequency-wavelength guidelines. For computational efficiency, these subassemblies are described as linear, component mode models. The complete structural system model is composed of component mode subassemblies and linear or non-linear joint descriptions. Computation and display of structural dynamic responses are accomplished employing well-established, stable numerical methods, modern signal processing procedures and descriptive graphical tools. Parametric sensitivity and Monte-Carlo based system identification tools are used to reconcile models with experimental data and investigate the effects of uncertainties. Models and dynamic responses are exported for employment in applications, such as detailed structural integrity and mechanical-optical-control performance analyses.

  19. Damping mechanisms and models in structural dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, Steen

    2002-01-01

    Several aspects of damping models for dynamic analysis of structures are investigated. First the causality condition for structural response is used to identify rules for the use of complex-valued frequency dependent material models, illustrated by the shortcomings of the elastic hysteretic model...

  20. The Structure and Dynamics of GRB Jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granot, Jonathan; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2006-10-25

    There are several lines of evidence which suggest that the relativistic outflows in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are collimated into narrow jets. The jet structure has important implications for the true energy release and the event rate of GRBs, and can constrain the mechanism responsible for the acceleration and collimation of the jet. Nevertheless, the jet structure and its dynamics as it sweeps up the external medium and decelerates, are not well understood. In this review I discuss our current understanding of GRB jets, stressing their structure and dynamics.

  1. Isolation and characterization of an SDS-degrading Klebsiella oxytoca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukor, M Y; Husin, W S W; Rahman, M F A; Shamaan, N A; Syed, M A

    2009-01-01

    Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) is one of the main components in the detergent and cosmetic industries. Its bioremediation by suitable microorganism has begun to receive greater attention as the amount of SDS usage increases to a point where treatment plants would not be able to cope with the increasing amount of SDS in wastewater. The purpose of this work was to isolate local SDS-degrading bacteria. Screening was carried out by the conventional enrichment-culture technique. Six SDS-degrading bacteria were isolated. Of these isolates, isolate S14 showed the highest degradation of SDS with 90% degradation after three days of incubation. Isolate S14 was tentatively identified as Klebsiella oxytoca strain DRY14 based on carbon utilization profiles using Biolog GN plates and partial 16S rDNA molecular phylogeny. SDS degradation by the bacterium was optimum at 37 degrees 0. Ammonium sulphate; at 2.0 g l(-1), was found to be the best nitrogen source for the growth of strain DRY14. Maximum growth on SDS was observed at pH 7.25. The strain exhibited optimum growth at SDS concentration of 2.0 g l(-1) and was completely inhibited at 10 g l(-1) SDS. At the tolerable initial concentration of 2.0 g l(-1), almost 80% of 2.0 g l(-1) SDS was degraded after 4 days of incubation concomitant with increase in cellular growth. The K(m(app) and V(max(app)) values calculated for the alkylsulfatase from this bacterium were 0.1 mM SDS and 1.07 micromol min(-1) mg(-1) protein, respectively.

  2. Interactions of PAMAM dendrimers with SDS at the solid-liquid interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arteta, Marianna Yanez; Eltes, Felix; Campbell, Richard A; Nylander, Tommy

    2013-05-14

    This work addresses structural and nonequilibrium effects of the interactions between well-defined cationic poly(amidoamine) PAMAM dendrimers of generations 4 and 8 and the anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) at the hydrophilic silica-water interface. Neutron reflectometry and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring were used to reveal the adsorption from premixed dendrimer/surfactant solutions as well as sequential addition of the surfactant to preadsorbed layers of dendrimers. PAMAM dendrimers of both generations adsorb to hydrophilic silica as a compact monolayer, and the adsorption is irreversible upon rinsing with salt solution. SDS adsorbs on the dendrimer layer and at low bulk concentrations causes the expansion of the dendrimer layers on the surface. When the bulk concentration of SDS is increased, the surfactant layer consists of aggregates or bilayer-like structures. The adsorption of surfactant is reversible upon rinsing, but slight changes of the structure of the preadsorbed PAMAM monolayer were observed. The adsorption from premixed solutions close to charge neutrality results in thick multilayers, but the surface excess is lower when the bulk complexes have a net negative charge. A critical examination of the pathway of adsorption for the interactions of SDS with preadsorbed PAMAM monolayers and premixed PAMAM/SDS solutions with hydrophilic silica revealed that nonequilibrium effects are important only in the latter case, and the application of a thermodynamic model to such experimental data would be inappropriate.

  3. Structural dynamics of liganded myoglobin.

    OpenAIRE

    Frauenfelder, H; Petsko, G A

    1980-01-01

    X-ray crystallography can reveal the magnitudes and principal directions of the mean-square displacements of every atom in a protein. This structural information is complementary to the temporal information obtainable by spectroscopic techniques such as nuclear magnetic resonance. Determination of the temperature dependence of the mean-square displacements makes it possible to separate large conformational motions from simple thermal vibrations. The contribution of crystal lattice disorder to...

  4. On Dynamics of Spinning Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, K. K.; Ibrahim, A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides details of developments pertaining to vibration analysis of gyroscopic systems, that involves a finite element structural discretization followed by the solution of the resulting matrix eigenvalue problem by a progressive, accelerated simultaneous iteration technique. Thus Coriolis, centrifugal and geometrical stiffness matrices are derived for shell and line elements, followed by the eigensolution details as well as solution of representative problems that demonstrates the efficacy of the currently developed numerical procedures and tools.

  5. Spreading of aqueous SDS solutions over nitrocellulose membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdanov, S A; Starov, V M; Sobolev, V D; Velarde, M G

    2003-08-15

    Experimental investigations were carried out on the spreading of small drops of aqueous SDS solutions over dry thin porous substrates (nitrocellulose membranes) in the case of partial wetting. The time evolution was monitored of the radii of both the drop base and the wetted area inside the porous substrate. The total duration of the spreading process was subdivided into three stages: the first stage: the drop base expands until the maximum value of the drop base is reached, the contact angle rapidly decreases during this stage; the second stage: the radius of the drop base remains constant and the contact angle decreases linearly with time; the third stage: the drop base shrinks and the contact angle remains constant. The wetted area inside the porous substrate expends during the whole spreading process. Appropriate scales were used with a plot of the dimensionless radii of the drop base, of the wetted area inside the porous substrate and the dynamic contact angle on the dimensionless time. Our experimental data show: the overall time of the spreading of drops of SDS solution over dry thin porous substrates decreases with the increase of surfactant concentration; the difference between advancing and hydrodynamic receding contact angles decreases with the surfactant concentration increase; the constancy of the contact angle during the third stage of spreading has nothing to do with the hysteresis of contact angle, but determined by the hydrodynamic reasons. It is shown using independent spreading experiments of the same drops on nonporous nitrocellulose substrate that the static receding contact angle is equal to zero, which supports our conclusion on the hydrodynamic nature of the hydrodynamic receding contact angle on porous substrates.

  6. Dynamic Study of Bicycle Frame Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sani, M. S. M.; Nazri, N. A.; Zahari, S. N.; Abdullah, N. A. Z.; Priyandoko, G.

    2016-11-01

    Bicycle frames have to bear variety of loads and it is needed to ensure the frame can withstand dynamic loads to move. This paper focusing on dynamic study for bicycle frame structure with a purpose to avoid the problem regarding loads on the structure and to ensure the structure is safe when multiple loads are applied on it. The main objectives of dynamic study are to find the modal properties using two method; finite element analysis (FEA) and experimental modal analysis (EMA). The correlation between two studies will be obtained using percentage error. Firstly, 3D model of mountain bike frame structure has been draw using computer-aided design (CAD) software and normal mode analysis using MSC Nastran Patran was executed for numerical method meanwhile modal testing using impact hammer was performed for experimental counterpart. From the correlation result, it show that percentage error between FEA and EMA were below 10% due to noise, imperfect experiment setup during perform EMA and imperfect modeling of mountain bike frame structure in CAD software. Small percentage error differences makes both of the method can be applied to obtain the dynamic characteristic of structure. It is essential to determine whether the structure is safe or not. In conclusion, model updating method is required to reduce more percentage error between two results.

  7. Structural Equation Modeling of Travel Choice Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Golob, Thomas F.

    1988-01-01

    This research has two objectives. The first objective is to explore the use of the modeling tool called "latent structural equations" (structural equations with latent variables) in the general field of travel behavior analysis and the more specific field of dynamic analysis of travel behavior. The second objective is to apply a latent structural equation model in order to determine the causal relationships between income, car ownership, and mobility. Many transportation researchers ...

  8. [Oligoglycine surface structures: molecular dynamics simulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gus'kova, O A; Khalatur, P G; Khokhlov, A R; Chinarev, A A; Tsygankova, S V; Bovin, N V

    2010-01-01

    The full-atomic molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of adsorption mode for diantennary oligoglycines [H-Gly4-NH(CH2)5]2 onto graphite and mica surface is described. The resulting structure of adsorption layers is analyzed. The peptide second structure motives have been studied by both STRIDE (structural identification) and DSSP (dictionary of secondary structure of proteins) methods. The obtained results confirm the possibility of polyglycine II (PGII) structure formation in diantennary oligoglycine (DAOG) monolayers deposited onto graphite surface, which was earlier estimated based on atomic-force microscopy measurements.

  9. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis-SDS as a tool to study myofibrillar proteins. A review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perez-Chabela, M. Lourdes

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Miofibrillar proteins are part of land and sea animals’ muscle. Nonetheless, even when muscle proteins are the same type of proteins, their structure, rigor mortis time, and biochemical process associated to muscle to meat conversion, are different among animal species. This review has the aim to describe the advantages of SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE in the study of myofibrillar proteins structure, besides the influence of many parameters on this technique to obtain an electrophoretic profile. Applications of this technique as a diagnostic tool in the food science, ecology and health are described as well.

  10. Dynamics of localized structures in vector waves

    CERN Document Server

    Hernández-García, E; Colet, P; San Miguel, M; Hernandez-Garcia, Emilio; Hoyuelos, Miguel; Colet, Pere; Miguel, Maxi San

    1999-01-01

    Dynamical properties of topological defects in a twodimensional complex vector field are considered. These objects naturally arise in the study of polarized transverse light waves. Dynamics is modeled by a Vector Complex Ginzburg-Landau Equation with parameter values appropriate for linearly polarized laser emission. Creation and annihilation processes, and selforganization of defects in lattice structures, are described. We find "glassy" configurations dominated by vectorial defects and a melting process associated to topological-charge unbinding.

  11. Spin Dynamics in Confined Magnetic Structures III

    CERN Document Server

    Hillebrands, Burkard

    2006-01-01

    This third volume of Spin Dynamics in Confined Magnetic Structures addresses central aspects of spin-dynamic phenomena, including recent new developments, on a tutorial level. Researchers will find a comprehensive compilation of the current work in the field. Introductory chapters help newcomers to understand the basic concepts. The more advanced chapters give the current state of the art of spin dynamic issues ranging from the femtosecond to the microsecond regime. This volume concentrates on new experimental techniques such as ferromagnetic-resonance-force microscopy and two-photon photoemission, as well as on aspects of precessional switching, spin-wave excitation, vortex dynamics, spin relaxation, domain-wall dynamics in nanowires and their applications to magnetic logic devices. An important chapter is devoted to the presently very hot subject of the spin-transfer torque, combining the physics of electronic transport and micromagnetics. The comprehensive presentation of these developments makes this volu...

  12. Strength of concrete structures under dynamic loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumpyak, O. G., E-mail: ogkumpyak@yandex.ru; Galyautdinov, Z. R., E-mail: gazr@yandex.ru; Kokorin, D. N., E-mail: kokorindenn@yandex.ru [Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2, Solyanaya Sq., 634003, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    The use of elastic supports is one the efficient methods of decreasing the dynamic loading. The paper describes the influence of elastic supports on the stress-strain state of steel concrete structures exposed to one-time dynamic loading resulting in failure. Oblique bending beams on elastic supports and their elastic, elastoplastic, and elastoplastic consolidation behavior are considered in this paper. For numerical calculations the developed computer program is used based on the finite element method. Research findings prove high efficiency of elastic supports under dynamic loading conditions. The most effective behavior of elastic supports is demonstrated at the elastoplastic stage. A good agreement is observed between the theoretical and experimental results.

  13. Nonlinear Dynamics of Structures with Material Degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, P.; Wagg, D. J.; Pinna, C.; Whear, R.; Briody, C.

    2016-09-01

    Structures usually experience deterioration during their working life. Oxidation, corrosion, UV exposure, and thermo-mechanical fatigue are some of the most well-known mechanisms that cause degradation. The phenomenon gradually changes structural properties and dynamic behaviour over their lifetime, and can be more problematic and challenging in the presence of nonlinearity. In this paper, we study how the dynamic behaviour of a nonlinear system changes as the thermal environment causes certain parameters to vary. To this end, a nonlinear lumped mass modal model is considered and defined under harmonic external force. Temperature dependent material functions, formulated from empirical test data, are added into the model. Using these functions, bifurcation parameters are defined and the corresponding nonlinear responses are observed by numerical continuation. A comparison between the results gives a preliminary insight into how temperature induced properties affects the dynamic response and highlights changes in stability conditions of the structure.

  14. A Dynamic Model for Energy Structure Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Energy structure is a complicated system concerning economic development, natural resources, technological innovation, ecological balance, social progress and many other elements. It is not easy to explain clearly the developmental mechanism of an energy system and the mutual relations between the energy system and its related environments by the traditional methods. It is necessary to develop a suitable dynamic model, which can reflect the dynamic characteristics and the mutual relations of the energy system and its related environments. In this paper, the historical development of China's energy structure was analyzed. A new quantitative analysis model was developed based on system dynamics principles through analysis of energy resources, and the production and consumption of energy in China and comparison with the world. Finally, this model was used to predict China's future energy structures under different conditions.

  15. Simultaneous determination of protein structure and dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Best, Robert B.; DePristo, M. A.

    2005-01-01

    We present a protocol for the experimental determination of ensembles of protein conformations that represent simultaneously the native structure and its associated dynamics. The procedure combines the strengths of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy-for obtaining experimental information...... at the atomic level about the structural and dynamical features of proteins-with the ability of molecular dynamics simulations to explore a wide range of protein conformations. We illustrate the method for human ubiquitin in solution and find that there is considerable conformational heterogeneity throughout...... the protein structure. The interior atoms of the protein are tightly packed in each individual conformation that contributes to the ensemble but their overall behaviour can be described as having a significant degree of liquid-like character. The protocol is completely general and should lead to significant...

  16. Unifying dynamical and structural stability of equilibria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnoldi, Jean-François; Haegeman, Bart

    2016-09-01

    We exhibit a fundamental relationship between measures of dynamical and structural stability of linear dynamical systems-e.g. linearized models in the vicinity of equilibria. We show that dynamical stability, quantified via the response to external perturbations (i.e. perturbation of dynamical variables), coincides with the minimal internal perturbation (i.e. perturbations of interactions between variables) able to render the system unstable. First, by reformulating a result of control theory, we explain that harmonic external perturbations reflect the spectral sensitivity of the Jacobian matrix at the equilibrium, with respect to constant changes of its coefficients. However, for this equivalence to hold, imaginary changes of the Jacobian's coefficients have to be allowed. The connection with dynamical stability is thus lost for real dynamical systems. We show that this issue can be avoided, thus recovering the fundamental link between dynamical and structural stability, by considering stochastic noise as external and internal perturbations. More precisely, we demonstrate that a linear system's response to white-noise perturbations directly reflects the intensity of internal white-noise disturbance that it can accommodate before becoming stochastically unstable.

  17. Structural dynamics of electronic and photonic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Suhir, Ephraim; Steinberg, David S

    2011-01-01

    The proposed book will offer comprehensive and versatile methodologies and recommendations on how to determine dynamic characteristics of typical micro- and opto-electronic structural elements (printed circuit boards, solder joints, heavy devices, etc.) and how to design a viable and reliable structure that would be able to withstand high-level dynamic loading. Particular attention will be given to portable devices and systems designed for operation in harsh environments (such as automotive, aerospace, military, etc.)  In-depth discussion from a mechanical engineer's viewpoint will be conducte

  18. Chemical structure and dynamics: Annual report 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colson, S.D.

    1994-07-01

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics program responds to the need for a fundamental, molecular-level understanding of chemistry at the wide variety of environmentally-important interfaces. The research program is built around the established relationship between structure, thermodynamics, and kinetics. This research effort continues to evolve into a program of rigorous studies of fundamental molecular processes in model systems (e.g., well-characterized surfaces, single-component solutions, clusters, and biological molecules), and studies of complex systems found in the environment. Experimental studies of molecular and supramolecular structures and thermodynamics are key to understanding the nature of matter, and lead to direct comparison with computational results. Kinetic and mechanistic measurements, combined with real-time dynamics measurements of atomic and molecular motions during chemical reactions, provide for a molecular-level description of chemical reactions. The anticipated results of this work are the achievement of a quantitative understanding of chemical processes at complex interfaces, the development of new techniques for the detection and measurement of species at such interfaces, and the interpretation and extrapolation of the observations in terms of models of interfacial chemistry. The Chemical Structure and Dynamics research program includes five areas described in detail in this report: Reaction mechanisms at solid interfaces; Solution and solution interfaces; Structure and dynamics of biological systems; Analytical methods development; and atmospheric chemistry. Extended abstracts are presented for 23 studies.

  19. Multiscale structure in eco-evolutionary dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, Blake C.

    In a complex system, the individual components are neither so tightly coupled or correlated that they can all be treated as a single unit, nor so uncorrelated that they can be approximated as independent entities. Instead, patterns of interdependency lead to structure at multiple scales of organization. Evolution excels at producing such complex structures. In turn, the existence of these complex interrelationships within a biological system affects the evolutionary dynamics of that system. I present a mathematical formalism for multiscale structure, grounded in information theory, which makes these intuitions quantitative, and I show how dynamics defined in terms of population genetics or evolutionary game theory can lead to multiscale organization. For complex systems, "more is different," and I address this from several perspectives. Spatial host--consumer models demonstrate the importance of the structures which can arise due to dynamical pattern formation. Evolutionary game theory reveals the novel effects which can result from multiplayer games, nonlinear payoffs and ecological stochasticity. Replicator dynamics in an environment with mesoscale structure relates to generalized conditionalization rules in probability theory. The idea of natural selection "acting at multiple levels" has been mathematized in a variety of ways, not all of which are equivalent. We will face down the confusion, using the experience developed over the course of this thesis to clarify the situation.

  20. Dynamic behaviors of pretensioned cable AERORail structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李方元; 吴培峰

    2015-01-01

    The AERORail, a new aerial transport platform, was chosen as the object of this work. Following a review of the literature on static behaviors, model tests on the basic dynamic mechanical characteristics were conducted. A series of 90 tests were completed with different factors, including tension force, vehicle load and vehicle speed. With regard to the proper tension and vehicle load, at a certain speed range, the tension increments of the rail’s cable were proved relatively small. It can be assumed that the change of tension is small and can be reasonably ignored when the tension of an entire span is under a dynamic load. When the tension reaches a certain range, the calculation of the cable track structure using classical cable theory is acceptable. The tests prove that the average maximum dynamic amplification factor of the deflection is small, generally no more than 1.2. However, when the vehicle speed reaches a certain value, the amplified factor will reach 2.0. If the moving loads increase, the dynamic amplification factor of dynamic deflection will also increase. The tension will change the rigidity of the structure and the vibration frequency; furthermore, the resonance speed will change at a certain tension. The vibration is noticeable when vehicles pass through at the resonance speed, and this negative impact on driving comfort requires the right velocity to avoid the resonance. The results demonstrate that more design details are required for the AERORail structure.

  1. Structural Dynamics of Tropical Moist Forest Gaps

    OpenAIRE

    Hunter, Maria O.; Michael Keller; Douglas Morton; Bruce Cook; Michael Lefsky; Mark Ducey; Scott Saleska; Raimundo Cosme de Oliveira; Juliana Schietti

    2015-01-01

    Gap phase dynamics are the dominant mode of forest turnover in tropical forests. However, gap processes are infrequently studied at the landscape scale. Airborne lidar data offer detailed information on three-dimensional forest structure, providing a means to characterize fine-scale (1 m) processes in tropical forests over large areas. Lidar-based estimates of forest structure (top down) differ from traditional field measurements (bottom up), and necessitate clear-cut definitions unencumbered...

  2. Protein Secondary Structure Prediction Using Dynamic Programming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing ZHAO; Pei-Ming SONG; Qing FANG; Jian-Hua LUO

    2005-01-01

    In the present paper, we describe how a directed graph was constructed and then searched for the optimum path using a dynamic programming approach, based on the secondary structure propensity of the protein short sequence derived from a training data set. The protein secondary structure was thus predicted in this way. The average three-state accuracy of the algorithm used was 76.70%.

  3. Identifying Community Structures in Dynamic Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Alvari, Hamidreza; Sukthankar, Gita; Lakkaraju, Kiran

    2016-01-01

    Most real-world social networks are inherently dynamic, composed of communities that are constantly changing in membership. To track these evolving communities, we need dynamic community detection techniques. This article evaluates the performance of a set of game theoretic approaches for identifying communities in dynamic networks. Our method, D-GT (Dynamic Game Theoretic community detection), models each network node as a rational agent who periodically plays a community membership game with its neighbors. During game play, nodes seek to maximize their local utility by joining or leaving the communities of network neighbors. The community structure emerges after the game reaches a Nash equilibrium. Compared to the benchmark community detection methods, D-GT more accurately predicts the number of communities and finds community assignments with a higher normalized mutual information, while retaining a good modularity.

  4. Ultrafast structural dynamics of perovskite superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woerner, M.; Korff Schmising, C. von; Zhavoronkov, N.; Elsaesser, T. [Max-Born-Institut fuer Nichtlineare Optik und Kurzzeitspektroskopie, Berlin (Germany); Bargheer, M. [Universitaet Potsdam, Institut fuer Physik und Astronomie, Potsdam (Germany); Vrejoiu, I.; Hesse, D.; Alexe, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Mikrostrukturphysik, Halle (Germany)

    2009-07-15

    Femtosecond X-ray diffraction provides direct insight into the ultrafast reversible lattice dynamics of materials with a perovskite structure. Superlattice (SL) structures consisting of a sequence of nanometer-thick layer pairs allow for optically inducing a tailored stress profile that drives the lattice motions and for limiting the influence of strain propagation on the observed dynamics. We demonstrate this concept in a series of diffraction experiments with femtosecond time resolution, giving detailed information on the ultrafast lattice dynamics of ferroelectric and ferromagnetic superlattices. Anharmonically coupled lattice motions in a SrRuO{sub 3}/PbZr{sub 0.2}Ti{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (SRO/PZT) SL lead to a switch-off of the electric polarizations on a time scale of the order of 1 ps. Ultrafast magnetostriction of photoexcited SRO layers is demonstrated in a SRO/SrTiO{sub 3} (STO) SL. (orig.)

  5. Cation-pi interactions stabilize the structure of the antimicrobial peptide indolicidin near membranes: molecular dynamics simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khandelia, Himanshu; Kaznessis, Yiannis N

    2007-01-01

    We implemented molecular dynamics simulations of the 13-residue antimicrobial peptide indolicidin (ILPWKWPWWPWRR-NH2) in dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelles. In DPC, a persistent cation-pi interaction between TRP11 and ARG13 defined the structure of the peptide...... near the interface. A transient cation-pi interaction was also observed between TRP4 and the choline group on DPC lipids. We also implemented simulation of a mutant of indolicidin in the DPC micelle where TRP11 was replaced by ALA11. As a result of the mutation, the boat-shaped conformation is lost...

  6. Preparative SDS PAGE as an Alternative to His-Tag Purification of Recombinant Amelogenin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire M. Gabe

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant protein technology provides an invaluable source of proteins for use in structure-function studies, as immunogens, and in the development of therapeutics. Recombinant proteins are typically engineered with “tags” that allow the protein to be purified from crude host cell extracts using affinity based chromatography techniques. Amelogenin is the principal component of the developing enamel matrix and a frequent focus for biomineralization researchers. Several groups have reported the successful production of recombinant amelogenins but the production of recombinant amelogenin free of any tags, and at single band purity on silver stained SDS PAGE is technically challenging. This is important, as rigorous structure-function research frequently demands a high degree of protein purity and fidelity of protein sequence. Our aim was to generate His-tagged recombinant amelogenin at single band purity on silver stained SDS PAGE for use in functionality studies after His-tag cleavage. An acetic acid extraction technique (previously reported to produce recombinant amelogenin at 95% purity directly from E. coli followed by repeated rounds of nickel column affinity chromatography, failed to generate recombinant amelogenin at single band purity. This was because following an initial round of nickel column affinity chromatography, subsequent cleavage of the His-tag was not 100% efficient. A second round of nickel column affinity chromatography, used in attempts to separate the cleaved His-tag free recombinant from uncleaved His-tagged contaminants, was still unsatisfactory as cleaved recombinant amelogenin exhibited significant affinity for the nickel column. To solve this problem, we used preparative SDS PAGE to successfully purify cleaved recombinant amelogenins to single band purity on silver stained SDS PAGE. The resolving power of preparative SDS PAGE was such that His-tag based purification of recombinant amelogenin becomes redundant. We

  7. Structure and dynamics of the solar chromosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krijger, Johannes Mattheus

    2002-01-01

    The thesis "Structure and dynamics of the solar chromosphere" of J.M. Krijger is a study on the behavior of the solar chromosphere, the thin layer just above the solar surface (photosphere) visible in purple red light during a total solar eclipse. The most important result of this thesis is that the

  8. Structure and dynamics of the solar chromosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krijger, Johannes Mattheus

    2003-01-01

    The thesis "Structure and dynamics of the solar chromosphere" of J.M. Krijger is a study on the behavior of the solar chromosphere, the thin layer just above the solar surface (photosphere) visible in purple red light during a total solar eclipse. The most important result of this thesis is that the

  9. Proteins with Novel Structure, Function and Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Recently, a small enzyme that ligates two RNA fragments with the rate of 10(exp 6) above background was evolved in vitro (Seelig and Szostak, Nature 448:828-831, 2007). This enzyme does not resemble any contemporary protein (Chao et al., Nature Chem. Biol. 9:81-83, 2013). It consists of a dynamic, catalytic loop, a small, rigid core containing two zinc ions coordinated by neighboring amino acids, and two highly flexible tails that might be unimportant for protein function. In contrast to other proteins, this enzyme does not contain ordered secondary structure elements, such as alpha-helix or beta-sheet. The loop is kept together by just two interactions of a charged residue and a histidine with a zinc ion, which they coordinate on the opposite side of the loop. Such structure appears to be very fragile. Surprisingly, computer simulations indicate otherwise. As the coordinating, charged residue is mutated to alanine, another, nearby charged residue takes its place, thus keeping the structure nearly intact. If this residue is also substituted by alanine a salt bridge involving two other, charged residues on the opposite sides of the loop keeps the loop in place. These adjustments are facilitated by high flexibility of the protein. Computational predictions have been confirmed experimentally, as both mutants retain full activity and overall structure. These results challenge our notions about what is required for protein activity and about the relationship between protein dynamics, stability and robustness. We hypothesize that small, highly dynamic proteins could be both active and fault tolerant in ways that many other proteins are not, i.e. they can adjust to retain their structure and activity even if subjected to mutations in structurally critical regions. This opens the doors for designing proteins with novel functions, structures and dynamics that have not been yet considered.

  10. Electrochemical Oxidation of L-Cystenine in SDS/BA/H2O Microemulsion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhong-chun; LIU Tian-qing; GUO Rong

    2005-01-01

    The electrochemical oxidation of L-cysteine in an SDS/BA/H2O microemulsion system was studied with the methods of ultramicroelectrode cyclic voltammetry and AC impedance. The catalytic efficiency of the microemulsion on the electrochemical oxidation increases with the increase of BA or SDS content, but decreases with the increase of the water content because of the effects of BA, SDS and water on the solubilization of L-cysteine in the microemulsion. Furthermore, the catalytic efficiency of the bicontinuous structure is greater than that of an O/W microemulsion system. The results derived from both the rate constant k0 and Gibbs free energy ΔG≠ accord with those from the catalytic efficiency.

  11. Dynamic object management for distributed data structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totty, Brian K.; Reed, Daniel A.

    1992-01-01

    In distributed-memory multiprocessors, remote memory accesses incur larger delays than local accesses. Hence, insightful allocation and access of distributed data can yield substantial performance gains. The authors argue for the use of dynamic data management policies encapsulated within individual distributed data structures. Distributed data structures offer performance, flexibility, abstraction, and system independence. This approach is supported by data from a trace-driven simulation study of parallel scientific benchmarks. Experimental data on memory locality, message count, message volume, and communication delay suggest that data-structure-specific data management is superior to a single, system-imposed policy.

  12. Exploiting Dynamically Propositional Logic Structures in SAT

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Jingchao

    2011-01-01

    The 32-bit hwb (hwb-n32 for short) problem is from equivalence checking that arises in combining two circuits computing the hidden weighted bit function. Since 2002, it remains still unsolvable in every SAT competition. This paper focuses on solving problems such as hwb-n32. Generally speaking, modern solvers can detect only XOR, AND, OR and ITE gates. Other non-clausal formulas (propositional logic structures) cannot be detected. To solve the hwb-n32 problem, we extract dynamically some special propositional logic structures, and then use a variant of DPLL-based solvers to solve the subproblem simplified by the extracted structure information. Using the dynamic extraction technique, we solved efficiently the hwb-n32 problem, even some of which were solved within 3000 seconds.

  13. Correlation Measure Equivalence in Dynamic Causal Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Gyongyosi, Laszlo

    2016-01-01

    We prove an equivalence transformation between the correlation measure functions of the causally-unbiased quantum gravity space and the causally-biased standard space. The theory of quantum gravity fuses the dynamic (nonfixed) causal structure of general relativity and the quantum uncertainty of quantum mechanics. In a quantum gravity space, the events are causally nonseparable and all time bias vanishes, which makes it no possible to use the standard causally-biased entropy and the correlation measure functions. Since a corrected causally-unbiased entropy function leads to an undefined, obscure mathematical structure, in our approach the correction is made in the data representation of the causally-unbiased space. We prove that the standard causally-biased entropy function with a data correction can be used to identify correlations in dynamic causal structures. As a corollary, all mathematical properties of the causally-biased correlation measure functions are preserved in the causally-unbiased space. The eq...

  14. The fundamental structures of dynamic social networks

    CERN Document Server

    Sekara, Vedran; Lehmann, Sune

    2015-01-01

    Networks provide a powerful mathematical framework for analyzing the structure and dynamics of complex systems (1-3). The study of group behavior has deep roots in the social science literature (4,5) and community detection is a central part of modern network science. Network communities have been found to be highly overlapping and organized in a hierarchical structure (6-9). Recent technological advances have provided a toolset for measuring the detailed social dynamics at scale (10,11). In spite of great progress, a quantitative description of the complex temporal behavior of social groups-with dynamics spanning from minute-by-minute changes to patterns expressed on the timescale of years-is still absent. Here we uncover a class of fundamental structures embedded within highly dynamic social networks. On the shortest time-scale, we find that social gatherings are fluid, with members coming and going, but organized via a stable core of individuals. We show that cores represent social contexts (9), with recur...

  15. Soliton structure dynamics in inhomogeneous media

    CERN Document Server

    Guerrero, L E; González, J A

    1998-01-01

    We show that soliton interaction with finite-width inhomogeneities can activate a great number of soliton internal modes. We obtain the exact stationary soliton solution in the presence of inhomogeneities and solve exactly the stability problem. We present a Karhunen-Loeve analysis of the soliton structure dynamics as a time-dependent force pumps energy into the traslational mode of the kink. We show the importance of the internal modes of the soliton as they can generate shape chaos for the soliton as well as cases in which the first shape mode leads the dynamics.

  16. Purification of RNA by SDS solubilization and phenol extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rio, Donald C; Ares, Manuel; Hannon, Gregory J; Nilsen, Timothy W

    2010-06-01

    This protocol describes a method for RNA purification by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) solubilization and phenol extraction. It is of wide utility and is used routinely to deproteinize RNAs in biological material that has been solubilized in SDS, an ionic detergent that dissolves membranes, disrupts protein-nucleic acid interactions, and inactivates ribonucleases. Once solubilized, addition of phenol or phenol:chloroform:isoamyl alcohol (PCA) completely denatures the protein, and it becomes insoluble in aqueous solution. PCA extraction is the method of choice for preparing cytoplasmic RNA from tissue culture cells or in any other situation (e.g., enzyme reactions) where solubilization in SDS is easily achievable.

  17. Dynamics and structure of stretched flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Law, C.K. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This program aims to gain fundamental understanding on the structure, geometry, and dynamics of laminar premixed flames, and relate these understanding to the practical issues of flame extinction and stabilization. The underlying fundamental interest here is the recent recognition that the response of premixed flames can be profoundly affected by flame stretch, as manifested by flow nonuniformity, flame curvature, and flame/flow unsteadiness. As such, many of the existing understanding on the behavior of premixed flames need to be qualitatively revised. The research program consists of three major thrusts: (1) detailed experimental and computational mapping of the structure of aerodynamically-strained planar flames, with emphasis on the effects of heat loss, nonequidiffusion, and finite residence time on the flame thickness, extent of incomplete reaction, and the state of extinction. (2) Analytical study of the geometry and dynamics of stretch-affected wrinkled flame sheets in simple configurations, as exemplified by the Bunsen flame and the spatially-periodic flame, with emphasis on the effects of nonlinear stretch, the phenomena of flame cusping, smoothing, and tip opening, and their implications on the structure and burning rate of turbulent flames. (3) Stabilization and blowoff of two-dimensional inverted premixed and stabilization and determining the criteria governing flame blowoff. The research is synergistically conducted through the use of laser-based diagnostics, computational simulation of the flame structure with detailed chemistry and transport, and mathematical analysis of the flame dynamics.

  18. Sds22, a PP1 phosphatase regulatory subunit, regulates epithelial cell polarity and shape [Sds22 in epithelial morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Hsin-Ho

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background How epithelial cells adopt their particular polarised forms is poorly understood. In a screen for genes regulating epithelial morphology in Drosophila, we identified sds22, a conserved gene previously characterised in yeast. Results In the columnar epithelia of imaginal discs or follicle cells, mutation of sds22 causes contraction of cells along their apical-basal axis, resulting in a more cuboidal morphology. In addition, the mutant cells can also display altered cell polarity, forming multiple layers in follicle cells and leaving the epithelium in imaginal discs. In yeast, sds22 encodes a PP1 phosphatase regulatory subunit. Consistent with this, we show that Drosophila Sds22 binds to all four Drosophila PP1s and shares an overlapping phenotype with PP1beta9c. We also show that two previously postulated PP1 targets, Spaghetti Squash and Moesin are hyper-phosphorylated in sds22 mutants. This function is shared by the human homologue of Sds22, PPP1R7. Conclusion Sds22 is a conserved PP1 phosphatase regulatory subunit that controls cell shape and polarity.

  19. Time Collocation Method for Structural Dynamic Problems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Chen; LUO Tao; YAN Haiqing; GU Xiaohui

    2005-01-01

    In order to achieve highly accurate and efficient numerical calculations of structural dynamics, time collocation method is presented. For a given time interval, the numerical solution of the method is approximated by a polynomial. The polynomial coefficients are evaluated by solving algebraic equation. Once the polynomial coefficients are evaluated, the numerical solutions at any time in the interval can be easily calculated. New formulae are derived for the polynomial coefficients,which are more practical and succinct than those previously given. Two structural dynamic equations are calculated by the proposed method. The numerical solutions are compared with the traditional fourth-order Runge-Kutta method. The results show that the method proposed is highly accurate and computationally efficient. In addition, an important advantage of the method is the simplicity in software programming.

  20. Chemical structure and dynamics. Annual report 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colson, S.D.; McDowell, R.S.

    1996-05-01

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics program is a major component of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory`s Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), providing a state-of-the-art collaborative facility for studies of chemical structure and dynamics. We respond to the need for a fundamental, molecular-level understanding of chemistry at a wide variety of environmentally important interfaces by (1) extending the experimental characterization and theoretical description of chemical reactions to encompass the effects of condensed media and interfaces; (2) developing a multidisciplinary capability for describing interfacial chemical processes within which the new knowledge generated can be brought to bear on complex phenomena in environmental chemistry and in nuclear waste processing and storage; and (3) developing state-of-the-art analytical methods for the characterization of waste tanks and pollutant distributions, and for detection and monitoring of trace atmospheric species.

  1. Chemical structure and dynamics: Annual report 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colson, S.D.; McDowell, R.S.

    1997-03-01

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics (CS&D) program is a major component of the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to provide a state-of-the-art collaborative facility for studies of chemical structure and dynamics. We respond to the need for a fundamental, molecular-level understanding of chemistry at a wide variety of environmentally important interfaces by (1) extending the experimental characterization and theoretical description of chemical reactions to encompass the effects of condensed media and interfaces; (2) developing a multidisciplinary capability for describing interfacial chemical processes within which the new knowledge generated can be brought to bear on complex phenomena in environmental chemistry and in nuclear waste processing and storage; and (3) developing state-of-the-art analytical methods for characterizing waste tanks and pollutant distributions, and for detecting and monitoring trace atmospheric species.

  2. Annual Report 2000. Chemical Structure and Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colson, Steven D.; McDowell, Robin S.

    2001-04-15

    This annual report describes the research and accomplishments of the Chemical Structure and Dynamics Program in the year 2000, one of six research programs at the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) - a multidisciplinary, national scientific user facility and research organization. The Chemical Structure and Dynamics (CS&D) program is meeting the need for a fundamental, molecular-level understanding by 1) extending the experimental characterization and theoretical description of chemical reactions to encompass the effects of condensed media and interfaces; 2) developing a multidisciplinary capability for describing interfacial chemical processes relevant to environmental chemistry; and 3) developing state-of-the-art research and analytical methods for characterizing complex materials of the types found in natural and contaminated systems.

  3. Dynamic active earth pressure on retaining structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Deepankar Choudhury; Santiram Chatterjee

    2006-12-01

    Earth-retaining structures constitute an important topic of research in civil engineering, more so under earthquake conditions. For the analysis and design of retaining walls in earthquake-prone zones, accurate estimation of dynamic earth pressures is very important. Conventional methods either use pseudo-static approaches of analysis even for dynamic cases or a simple single-degree of freedom model for the retaining wall–soil system. In this paper, a simplified two-degree of freedom mass–spring–dashpot (2-DOF) dynamic model has been proposed to estimate the active earth pressure at the back of the retaining walls for translation modes of wall movement under seismic conditions. The horizontal zone of influence on dynamic earth force on the wall is estimated. Results in terms of displacement, velocity and acceleration-time history are presented for some typical cases, which show the final movement of the wall in terms of wall height, which is required for the design. The non-dimensional design chart proposed in the present study can be used to compute the total dynamic earth force on the wall under different input ground motion and backfill conditions. Finally, the results obtained have been compared with those of the available Scott model and the merits of the present results have been discussed.

  4. On R factors for dynamic structure crystallography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coppens, Philip; Kaminski, Radoslaw; Schmøkel, Mette Stokkebro

    2010-01-01

    In studies of dynamic changes in crystals in which induced metastable species may have lifetimes of microseconds or less, refinements are most sensitive if based on the changes induced in the measured intensities. Agreement factors appropriate for such refinements, based on the ratios of the inte...... of the intensities before and after the external perturbation is applied, are discussed and compared with R factors commonly applied in static structure crystallography....

  5. Dynamical Structure of Nuclear Excitation in Continuum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Chun-Lei; ZHANG Huan-Qiao; ZHANG Xi-Zhen

    2005-01-01

    @@ Dynamical structures of collective excitation in continuum are studied by calculating the isoscalar and isovector strength as well as transition density of nuclei near the drip-line such as 28O and 34Ca. It is found that for some excited states in continuum the proton and neutron transition density calculated from isoscalar and isovector excitation at some given energies may be different, which will affect the calculation of the polarization for nuclei with N ≠ Z.

  6. Nonlinear Dynamics and Control of Flexible Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-03-01

    Freedom," Ph.D. Thesis, Department of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, Cornell University, in preparation. 5I I URI Reorts Islam , Saiful and Mircea...Theoretical and Applied Mechanics I S. Islam Civil and Environmental Engineering I 2! I 3 URI Accomplishments 3 -Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos in Flexible...Structures with Symmetry," 31 (1991) 265-285. Islam , S. and M. Grigoriu, "Nonlinear Random Vibration of Pin-Jointed Trusses with Imperfections," in

  7. Flexible joints in structural and multibody dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    O. A. Bauchau; Han, S.

    2013-01-01

    Flexible joints, sometimes called bushing elements or force elements, are found in all structural and multibody dynamics codes. In their simplest form, flexible joints simply consist of sets of three linear and three torsional springs placed between two nodes of the model. For infinitesimal deformations, the selection of the lumped spring constants is an easy task, which can be based on a numerical simulation of the joint or on experimental measurements. If the joint undergoes finite deformat...

  8. Feature Extraction for Structural Dynamics Model Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrar, Charles [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nishio, Mayuko [Yokohama University; Hemez, Francois [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stull, Chris [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Gyuhae [Chonnam Univesity; Cornwell, Phil [Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology; Figueiredo, Eloi [Universidade Lusófona; Luscher, D. J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Worden, Keith [University of Sheffield

    2016-01-13

    As structural dynamics becomes increasingly non-modal, stochastic and nonlinear, finite element model-updating technology must adopt the broader notions of model validation and uncertainty quantification. For example, particular re-sampling procedures must be implemented to propagate uncertainty through a forward calculation, and non-modal features must be defined to analyze nonlinear data sets. The latter topic is the focus of this report, but first, some more general comments regarding the concept of model validation will be discussed.

  9. Modal interactions in dynamical and structural systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nayfeh, A.H.; Balachandran, B. (Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State Univ., Blacksburg (USA))

    1989-11-01

    The authors review theoretical and experimental studies of the influence of modal interactions on the nonlinear response of harmonically excited structural and dynamical systems. In particular, they discuss the response of pendulums, ships, rings, shells, arches, beam structures, surface waves, and the similarities in the qualitative behavior of these systems. The systems are characterized by quadratic nonlinearities which may lead to two-to-one and combination autoparametric resonances. These resonances give rise to a coupling between the modes involved in the resonance leading to nonlinear periodic, quasi-periodic, and chaotic motions.

  10. Some Modern Problems in Structural Engineering Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Elishakoff

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This review paper deals with two problems in structural engineering dynamics; one is deterministic, the other is of stochastic nature. One problem is linear, the other is nonlinear. Authors have a biased preferential view on these problems because of their active involvement in the discussed research topics. Still, these two problems reflect, at least in a small manner, some developments in this vast and fascinating field. The first part deals with deterministic linear vibrations of double-walled carbon nanotubes either in classical or refined setting; the second part is devoted to the nonlinear random vibrations of structures.

  11. Dynamic ice loads on conical structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Two series of model tests were performed to observe the dynamic ice loads on conical structures.The variable testing parameters include the water line diameter of the model cone and ice parameters.During small water line diameter tests,two-time breaking is found to be the typical failure of ice on steep conical structure,and also be controlled by other factors,such as ice speed and the cone angle.During big water line diameter tests,the ice sheet failed nonsimultaneously around the cone.Several independe...

  12. Feature extraction for structural dynamics model validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemez, Francois [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farrar, Charles [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Gyuhae [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nishio, Mayuko [UNIV OF TOKYO; Worden, Keith [UNIV OF SHEFFIELD; Takeda, Nobuo [UNIV OF TOKYO

    2010-11-08

    This study focuses on defining and comparing response features that can be used for structural dynamics model validation studies. Features extracted from dynamic responses obtained analytically or experimentally, such as basic signal statistics, frequency spectra, and estimated time-series models, can be used to compare characteristics of structural system dynamics. By comparing those response features extracted from experimental data and numerical outputs, validation and uncertainty quantification of numerical model containing uncertain parameters can be realized. In this study, the applicability of some response features to model validation is first discussed using measured data from a simple test-bed structure and the associated numerical simulations of these experiments. issues that must be considered were sensitivity, dimensionality, type of response, and presence or absence of measurement noise in the response. Furthermore, we illustrate a comparison method of multivariate feature vectors for statistical model validation. Results show that the outlier detection technique using the Mahalanobis distance metric can be used as an effective and quantifiable technique for selecting appropriate model parameters. However, in this process, one must not only consider the sensitivity of the features being used, but also correlation of the parameters being compared.

  13. Structural dynamic analysis of composite beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, J. K.; Venkatesan, C.; Ramamurti, V.

    1990-12-01

    In the treatment of the structural dynamic problem of composite materials, two alternate types of formulations, based on the elastic modulus and compliance quantities, exist in the literature. The definitions of the various rigidities are observed to differ in these two approaches. Following these two types of formulation, the structural dynamic characteristics of a composite beam are analyzed. The results of the analysis are compared with those available in the literature. Based on the comparison, the influence of the warping function in defining the coupling terms in the modulus approach and also on the natural frequencies of the beam has been identified. It is found from the analysis that, in certain cases, the difference between the results of the two approaches is appreciable. These differences may be attributed to the constraints imposed on the deformation and flexibility of the beam by the choice of the description of the warping behaviour. Finally, the influence of material properties on the structural dynamic characteristics of the beam is studied for different composites for various angles of orthotropy.

  14. Handbook on dynamics of jointed structures.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ames, Nicoli M.; Lauffer, James P.; Jew, Michael D.; Segalman, Daniel Joseph; Gregory, Danny Lynn; Starr, Michael James; Resor, Brian Ray

    2009-07-01

    The problem of understanding and modeling the complicated physics underlying the action and response of the interfaces in typical structures under dynamic loading conditions has occupied researchers for many decades. This handbook presents an integrated approach to the goal of dynamic modeling of typical jointed structures, beginning with a mathematical assessment of experimental or simulation data, development of constitutive models to account for load histories to deformation, establishment of kinematic models coupling to the continuum models, and application of finite element analysis leading to dynamic structural simulation. In addition, formulations are discussed to mitigate the very short simulation time steps that appear to be required in numerical simulation for problems such as this. This handbook satisfies the commitment to DOE that Sandia will develop the technical content and write a Joints Handbook. The content will include: (1) Methods for characterizing the nonlinear stiffness and energy dissipation for typical joints used in mechanical systems and components. (2) The methodology will include practical guidance on experiments, and reduced order models that can be used to characterize joint behavior. (3) Examples for typical bolted and screw joints will be provided.

  15. Controlling Proton Delivery through Catalyst Structural Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardenas, Allan Jay P. [Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, K2-57 Richland WA 99352 USA; 221 Science Center, State University of New York at Fredonia, Fredonia NY 14063 USA; Ginovska, Bojana [Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, K2-57 Richland WA 99352 USA; Kumar, Neeraj [Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, K2-57 Richland WA 99352 USA; Hou, Jianbo [Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, K2-57 Richland WA 99352 USA; Raugei, Simone [Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, K2-57 Richland WA 99352 USA; Helm, Monte L. [Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, K2-57 Richland WA 99352 USA; Appel, Aaron M. [Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, K2-57 Richland WA 99352 USA; Bullock, R. Morris [Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, K2-57 Richland WA 99352 USA; O' Hagan, Molly [Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, K2-57 Richland WA 99352 USA

    2016-09-27

    The fastest synthetic molecular catalysts for production and oxidation of H2 emulate components of the active site of natural hydrogenases. The role of controlled structural dynamics is recognized as a critical component in the catalytic performance of many enzymes, including hydrogenases, but is largely neglected in the design of synthetic molecular cata-lysts. In this work, the impact of controlling structural dynamics on the rate of production of H2 was studied for a series of [Ni(PPh2NC6H4-R2)2]2+ catalysts including R = n-hexyl, n-decyl, n-tetradecyl, n-octadecyl, phenyl, or cyclohexyl. A strong correlation was observed between the ligand structural dynamics and the rates of electrocatalytic hydrogen production in acetonitrile, acetonitrile-water, and protic ionic liquid-water mixtures. Specifically, the turnover frequencies correlate inversely with the rates of ring inversion of the amine-containing ligand, as this dynamic process dictates the positioning of the proton relay in the second coordination sphere and therefore governs protonation at either catalytically productive or non-productive sites. This study demonstrates that the dynamic processes involved in proton delivery can be controlled through modifications of the outer coordination sphere of the catalyst, similar to the role of the protein architecture in many enzymes. The present work provides new mechanistic insight into the large rate enhancements observed in aqueous protic ionic liquid media for the [Ni(PPh2NR2)]2+ family of catalysts. The incorporation of controlled structural dynamics as a design parameter to modulate proton delivery in molecular catalysts has enabled H2 production rates that are up to three orders of magnitude faster than the [Ni(PPh2NPh2)]2+complex. The observed turnover frequencies are up to 106 s-1 in acetonitrile-water, and over 107 s-1 in protic ionic liquid-water mixtures, with a minimal increase in overpotential. This material is based upon work supported as part of

  16. DYNAMIC CINEMATIC TO A STRUCTURE 2R

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Ion Tiberiu Petrescu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Flat structures 2R can solve all the problems posed by all the robotic anthropomorphic structures. The study of the anthropomorphic robots by the use of a flat structure 2R is a much easier method than classical used spatial methods. The paper outlines a method for the determination of dynamic to a robotic structure 2R balanced. 2R plane structures are used in practice only in the form balanced, for which in this paper will be made, initial, the total balance, and then the study cinematico-dynamic will only develop on the model already balanced. Dynamic relations presented then briefly without deduction will be explained and discussed with regard to their application. On the basis of the model presented and following calculations performed can be chosen correctly the two electric motors in the actuator. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  17. 30th IMAC, A Conference on Structural Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Catbas, FN; Mayes, R; Rixen, D; Griffith, DT; Allemang, R; Clerck, J; Klerk, D; Simmermacher, T; Cogan, S; Chauhan, S; Cunha, A; Racic, V; Reynolds, P; Salyards, K; Adams, D; Kerschen, G; Carrella, A; Voormeeren, SN; Allen, MS; Horta, LG; Barthorpe, R; Niezrecki, C; Blough, JR; Vol.1 Topics on the Dynamics of Civil Structures; Vol.2 Topics in Experimental Dynamics Substructuring and Wind Turbine Dynamics; Vol.3 Topics in Nonlinear Dynamics; Vol.4 Topics in Model Validation and Uncertainty Quantification; Vol.5 Topics in Modal Analysis I; Vol.6 Topics in Modal Analysis II

    2012-01-01

    Topics on the Dynamics of Civil Structures, Volume 1, Proceedings of the 30th IMAC, A Conference and Exposition on Structural Dynamics, 2012, the first volume of six from the Conference, brings together 45 contributions to this important area of research and engineering. The collection presents early findings and case studies on fundamental and applied aspects of Structural Dynamics, including papers on: Human Induced Vibrations Bridge Dynamics Operational Modal Analysis Experimental Techniques and Modeling for Civil Structures System Identification for Civil Structures Method and Technologies for Bridge Monitoring Damage Detection for Civil Structures Structural Modeling Vibration Control Method and Approaches for Civil Structures Modal Testing of Civil Structures.

  18. Dynamic Failure of Composite and Sandwich Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Abrate, Serge; Rajapakse, Yapa D S

    2013-01-01

    This book presents a broad view of the current state of the art regarding the dynamic response of composite and sandwich structures subjected to impacts and explosions. Each chapter combines a thorough assessment of the literature with original contributions made by the authors.  The first section deals with fluid-structure interactions in marine structures.  The first chapter focuses on hull slamming and particularly cases in which the deformation of the structure affects the motion of the fluid during the water entry of flexible hulls. Chapter 2 presents an extensive series of tests underwater and in the air to determine the effects of explosions on composite and sandwich structures.  Full-scale structures were subjected to significant explosive charges, and such results are extremely rare in the open literature.  Chapter 3 describes a simple geometrical theory of diffraction for describing the interaction of an underwater blast wave with submerged structures. The second section addresses the problem of...

  19. SDS bubbles functionalized with Gold nanoparticles and SERS applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Badilla, A.; Hurtado, R. Britto; Cortez-Valadez, M.; Perez-Rodriguez, A.; Flores-Acosta, M.; Maldonado-Arce, A.

    2017-03-01

    We present a method of incorporation of gold nanoparticles in SDS (sodium dodecyl sulfate) bubbles with a low polydispersity index (monodispersed nanoparticles). Both the bubbles and nanoparticles maintained their structural and morphologic properties after functionalization. The bubbles present a radio of 0.38 mm with a standard deviation of±0.018 mm. The gold nanoparticles were obtained with sucrose as the catalytic agent and ascorbic acid as the reducing agent. The nanoparticles display several geometric morphologies as well as sizes inferior to 50 nm, as observed in the images obtained with Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). The optical properties were studied by optical absorption spectroscopy. The absorption band linked to the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is located at 550 nm before and after the functionalization of the bubbles. Moreover, microscopic bubbles with a diameter smaller than 1 μm with the ability to stabilize nanoparticles in their surface were found in isolated regions of the sample. Additionally, the Surface Enhancement Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) properties of the colloid were analyzed with common drugs.

  20. Structural optimization for nonlinear dynamic response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dou, Suguang; Strachan, B. Scott; Shaw, Steven W.

    2015-01-01

    condition, thereby providing a means for tailoring its nonlinear response. The method is applied to the fundamental nonlinear resonance of a clamped–clamped beam and to the coupled mode response of a frame structure, and the results show that one can modify essential normal form coefficients by an order...... resonant behaviour is being used for a variety of applications in sensing and signal conditioning. In this work, we describe a computational method that provides a systematic means for manipulating and optimizing features of nonlinear resonant responses of mechanical structures that are described...... by a single vibrating mode, or by a pair of internally resonant modes. The approach combines techniques from nonlinear dynamics, computational mechanics and optimization, and it allows one to relate the geometric and material properties of structural elements to terms in the normal form for a given resonance...

  1. Dynamics of Correlation Structure in Stock Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maman Abdurachman Djauhari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a correction factor for Jennrich’s statistic is introduced in order to be able not only to test the stability of correlation structure, but also to identify the time windows where the instability occurs. If Jennrich’s statistic is only to test the stability of correlation structure along predetermined non-overlapping time windows, the corrected statistic provides us with the history of correlation structure dynamics from time window to time window. A graphical representation will be provided to visualize that history. This information is necessary to make further analysis about, for example, the change of topological properties of minimal spanning tree. An example using NYSE data will illustrate its advantages.

  2. The structural dynamics of social class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Michael W; Park, Jun Won

    2017-08-01

    Individual agency accounts of social class persist in society and even in psychological science despite clear evidence for the role of social structures. This article argues that social class is defined by the structural dynamics of society. Specifically, access to powerful networks, groups, and institutions, and inequalities in wealth and other economic resources shape proximal social environments that influence how individuals express their internal states and motivations. An account of social class that highlights the means by which structures shape and are shaped by individuals guides our understanding of how people move up or down in the social class hierarchy, and provides a framework for interpreting neuroscience studies, experimental paradigms, and approaches that attempt to intervene on social class disparities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Dynamic sign structures in visual art and music

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeller, Jörg

    2006-01-01

    Seemingly static meaning carriers in visual art are considered as aspects of holistic dynamical sign structures.......Seemingly static meaning carriers in visual art are considered as aspects of holistic dynamical sign structures....

  4. Dynamic sign structures in visual art and music

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeller, Jörg

    2006-01-01

    Seemingly static meaning carriers in visual art are considered as aspects of holistic dynamical sign structures.......Seemingly static meaning carriers in visual art are considered as aspects of holistic dynamical sign structures....

  5. Simulation model for jet flow in liquid injection system of CANDU-6 SDS 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Che, K. M.; Yoo, S. Y. [Chungnam National Univ., Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, B. W.; Choi, H. B. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-10-01

    For the performance analysis of the secondary shutdown system (SDS-2), a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model for the poison jet flow is being developed to analyze the flow and poison concentration fields formed inside the moderator tank. As the ratio between Calandria shell and the nozzle hole diameter of the injection system is so big as 1055, it is impractical to develop a full size model encompassing the whole Calandria tank. To reduce the model to a manageable size, a quarter of the five-lattice-pitch length segment of the tank was modeled by using the symmetric nature of the jet and the injected jet was treated as source term to remove the limit caused by the small diameter of the injection nozzle hole, when the grid of the calculation domain was generated. A half model calculation was performed to show the symmetricity of the quarter model. For the validation of the source treatment of the inlet flow condition, the simulation result was compared with the experimental data of the gas jet. The symmetricity was confirmed by the results of simulation the half model calculation on the symmetric line and the result of simulation for the source treatment well agreed with the experiment when a fine mesh grid structure was used near the inlet.

  6. Dynamic structure of dense krypton gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egelstaff, P. A.; Salacuse, J. J.; Schommers, W.; Ram, J.

    1984-07-01

    We have made molecular-dynamics computer simulations of dense krypton gas (10.6×1027 atoms/m3 and 296 K) using reasonably realistic pair potentials. Comparisons are made with the recent experimental data[P. A. Egelstaff et al., Phys. Rev. A 27, 1106 (1983)] for the dynamic structure factor S(q,ω) over the range 0.4

  7. Fundamental structures of dynamic social networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekara, Vedran; Stopczynski, Arkadiusz; Lehmann, Sune

    2016-09-06

    Social systems are in a constant state of flux, with dynamics spanning from minute-by-minute changes to patterns present on the timescale of years. Accurate models of social dynamics are important for understanding the spreading of influence or diseases, formation of friendships, and the productivity of teams. Although there has been much progress on understanding complex networks over the past decade, little is known about the regularities governing the microdynamics of social networks. Here, we explore the dynamic social network of a densely-connected population of ∼1,000 individuals and their interactions in the network of real-world person-to-person proximity measured via Bluetooth, as well as their telecommunication networks, online social media contacts, geolocation, and demographic data. These high-resolution data allow us to observe social groups directly, rendering community detection unnecessary. Starting from 5-min time slices, we uncover dynamic social structures expressed on multiple timescales. On the hourly timescale, we find that gatherings are fluid, with members coming and going, but organized via a stable core of individuals. Each core represents a social context. Cores exhibit a pattern of recurring meetings across weeks and months, each with varying degrees of regularity. Taken together, these findings provide a powerful simplification of the social network, where cores represent fundamental structures expressed with strong temporal and spatial regularity. Using this framework, we explore the complex interplay between social and geospatial behavior, documenting how the formation of cores is preceded by coordination behavior in the communication networks and demonstrating that social behavior can be predicted with high precision.

  8. The Hierarchical Structure and Dynamics of Voids

    CERN Document Server

    Aragon-Calvo, M A

    2012-01-01

    Contrary to the common view voids have very complex internal structure and dynamics. Here we show how the hierarchy of structures in the density field inside voids is reflected by a similar hierarchy of structures in the velocity field. Voids defined by dense filaments and clusters can de described as simple expanding domains with coherent flows everywhere except at their boundaries. At scales smaller that the void radius the velocity field breaks into expanding sub-domains corresponding to sub- voids. These sub-domains break into even smaller sub-sub domains at smaller scales resulting in a nesting hierarchy of locally expanding domains. The ratio between the magnitude of the velocity field responsible for the expansion of the void and the velocity field defining the sub voids is approximately one order of magnitude. The small-scale components of the velocity field play a minor role in the shaping of the voids but they define the local dynamics directly affecting the processes of galaxy formation and evoluti...

  9. Structural Dynamics of Tropical Moist Forest Gaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Maria O.; Keller, Michael; Morton, Douglas; Cook, Bruce; Lefsky, Michael; Ducey, Mark; Saleska, Scott; de Oliveira, Raimundo Cosme; Schietti, Juliana

    2015-01-01

    Gap phase dynamics are the dominant mode of forest turnover in tropical forests. However, gap processes are infrequently studied at the landscape scale. Airborne lidar data offer detailed information on three-dimensional forest structure, providing a means to characterize fine-scale (1 m) processes in tropical forests over large areas. Lidar-based estimates of forest structure (top down) differ from traditional field measurements (bottom up), and necessitate clear-cut definitions unencumbered by the wisdom of a field observer. We offer a new definition of a forest gap that is driven by forest dynamics and consistent with precise ranging measurements from airborne lidar data and tall, multi-layered tropical forest structure. We used 1000 ha of multi-temporal lidar data (2008, 2012) at two sites, the Tapajos National Forest and Ducke Reserve, to study gap dynamics in the Brazilian Amazon. Here, we identified dynamic gaps as contiguous areas of significant growth, that correspond to areas > 10 m2, with height <10 m. Applying the dynamic definition at both sites, we found over twice as much area in gap at Tapajos National Forest (4.8 %) as compared to Ducke Reserve (2.0 %). On average, gaps were smaller at Ducke Reserve and closed slightly more rapidly, with estimated height gains of 1.2 m y-1 versus 1.1 m y-1 at Tapajos. At the Tapajos site, height growth in gap centers was greater than the average height gain in gaps (1.3 m y-1 versus 1.1 m y-1). Rates of height growth between lidar acquisitions reflect the interplay between gap edge mortality, horizontal ingrowth and gap size at the two sites. We estimated that approximately 10 % of gap area closed via horizontal ingrowth at Ducke Reserve as opposed to 6 % at Tapajos National Forest. Height loss (interpreted as repeat damage and/or mortality) and horizontal ingrowth accounted for similar proportions of gap area at Ducke Reserve (13 % and 10 %, respectively). At Tapajos, height loss had a much stronger signal (23

  10. Structural Dynamics of Tropical Moist Forest Gaps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria O Hunter

    Full Text Available Gap phase dynamics are the dominant mode of forest turnover in tropical forests. However, gap processes are infrequently studied at the landscape scale. Airborne lidar data offer detailed information on three-dimensional forest structure, providing a means to characterize fine-scale (1 m processes in tropical forests over large areas. Lidar-based estimates of forest structure (top down differ from traditional field measurements (bottom up, and necessitate clear-cut definitions unencumbered by the wisdom of a field observer. We offer a new definition of a forest gap that is driven by forest dynamics and consistent with precise ranging measurements from airborne lidar data and tall, multi-layered tropical forest structure. We used 1000 ha of multi-temporal lidar data (2008, 2012 at two sites, the Tapajos National Forest and Ducke Reserve, to study gap dynamics in the Brazilian Amazon. Here, we identified dynamic gaps as contiguous areas of significant growth, that correspond to areas > 10 m2, with height <10 m. Applying the dynamic definition at both sites, we found over twice as much area in gap at Tapajos National Forest (4.8% as compared to Ducke Reserve (2.0%. On average, gaps were smaller at Ducke Reserve and closed slightly more rapidly, with estimated height gains of 1.2 m y-1 versus 1.1 m y-1 at Tapajos. At the Tapajos site, height growth in gap centers was greater than the average height gain in gaps (1.3 m y-1 versus 1.1 m y-1. Rates of height growth between lidar acquisitions reflect the interplay between gap edge mortality, horizontal ingrowth and gap size at the two sites. We estimated that approximately 10% of gap area closed via horizontal ingrowth at Ducke Reserve as opposed to 6% at Tapajos National Forest. Height loss (interpreted as repeat damage and/or mortality and horizontal ingrowth accounted for similar proportions of gap area at Ducke Reserve (13% and 10%, respectively. At Tapajos, height loss had a much stronger signal

  11. Structural Dynamics of Tropical Moist Forest Gaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Maria O; Keller, Michael; Morton, Douglas; Cook, Bruce; Lefsky, Michael; Ducey, Mark; Saleska, Scott; de Oliveira, Raimundo Cosme; Schietti, Juliana

    2015-01-01

    Gap phase dynamics are the dominant mode of forest turnover in tropical forests. However, gap processes are infrequently studied at the landscape scale. Airborne lidar data offer detailed information on three-dimensional forest structure, providing a means to characterize fine-scale (1 m) processes in tropical forests over large areas. Lidar-based estimates of forest structure (top down) differ from traditional field measurements (bottom up), and necessitate clear-cut definitions unencumbered by the wisdom of a field observer. We offer a new definition of a forest gap that is driven by forest dynamics and consistent with precise ranging measurements from airborne lidar data and tall, multi-layered tropical forest structure. We used 1000 ha of multi-temporal lidar data (2008, 2012) at two sites, the Tapajos National Forest and Ducke Reserve, to study gap dynamics in the Brazilian Amazon. Here, we identified dynamic gaps as contiguous areas of significant growth, that correspond to areas > 10 m2, with height <10 m. Applying the dynamic definition at both sites, we found over twice as much area in gap at Tapajos National Forest (4.8%) as compared to Ducke Reserve (2.0%). On average, gaps were smaller at Ducke Reserve and closed slightly more rapidly, with estimated height gains of 1.2 m y-1 versus 1.1 m y-1 at Tapajos. At the Tapajos site, height growth in gap centers was greater than the average height gain in gaps (1.3 m y-1 versus 1.1 m y-1). Rates of height growth between lidar acquisitions reflect the interplay between gap edge mortality, horizontal ingrowth and gap size at the two sites. We estimated that approximately 10% of gap area closed via horizontal ingrowth at Ducke Reserve as opposed to 6% at Tapajos National Forest. Height loss (interpreted as repeat damage and/or mortality) and horizontal ingrowth accounted for similar proportions of gap area at Ducke Reserve (13% and 10%, respectively). At Tapajos, height loss had a much stronger signal (23% versus 6

  12. Thermal fatigue and creep evaluation for the bed in tritium SDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Woo-seok, E-mail: wschoi@kaeri.re.kr [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Yuseong, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Chang-gyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Yuseong, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ju, Yong-sun [KOASIS, Yuseong, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Hyun-goo; Jang, Min-ho; Yun, Sei-hun [National Fusion Research Institute, Yuseong, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • To evaluate the integrity of the ITER tritium SDS bed, three kinds of assessments were conducted. • The structural analysis showed that the stress induced from the thermal load and the internal pressure is within the design stress intensity. • The combined fatigue and creep assessment was also performed according to the procedure of ASME code Subsection NH. • A new operation procedure to obtain more integrity margin was recommended. • The other operation procedure could be considered which makes the rapid operation possible giving up the marginal integrity. - Abstract: The primary vessel of ITER tritium SDS bed is made of stainless steel. It is heated beyond 500 °C to desorb tritium. During this process the primary vessel is subject to thermal stress. And it is also subject to thermal fatigue by the iterative process of absorption and desorption. In addition, its operation temperature range is in the thermal creep temperature region. Therefore, the tritium SDS bed should have sufficient design stress intensity under the high temperature operating conditions. It should also be free of damage due to fatigue during the design life. Thermal analysis and structural analysis was performed using a finite element method to calculate the temperature and the stress distribution of the ITER tritium SDS bed due to the internal pressure and thermal loads. The thermal fatigue and creep effects were also evaluated since the tritium SDS bed was heated to hot temperature region where creep occurs. Based on the distribution of the primary stress and secondary stress results, two evaluation cross-sections were selected. The evaluation showed that the calculated value on the cross-sections satisfied all of the limits of the design code requirements.

  13. SDS interferes with SaeS signaling of Staphylococcus aureus independently of SaePQ.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phuti E Makgotlho

    Full Text Available The Staphylococcus aureus regulatory saePQRS system controls the expression of numerous virulence factors, including extracellular adherence protein (Eap, which amongst others facilitates invasion of host cells. The saePQRS operon codes for 4 proteins: the histidine kinase SaeS, the response regulator SaeR, the lipoprotein SaeP and the transmembrane protein SaeQ. S. aureus strain Newman has a single amino acid substitution in the transmembrane domain of SaeS (L18P which results in constitutive kinase activity. SDS was shown to be one of the signals interfering with SaeS activity leading to inhibition of the sae target gene eap in strains with SaeS(L but causing activation in strains containing SaeS(P. Here, we analyzed the possible involvement of the SaeP protein and saePQ region in SDS-mediated sae/eap expression. We found that SaePQ is not needed for SDS-mediated SaeS signaling. Furthermore, we could show that SaeS activity is closely linked to the expression of Eap and the capacity to invade host cells in a number of clinical isolates. This suggests that SaeS activity might be directly modulated by structurally non-complex environmental signals, as SDS, which possibly altering its kinase/phosphatase activity.

  14. Structural dynamics of turbo-machines

    CERN Document Server

    Rangwala, AS

    2009-01-01

    The book presents a detailed and comprehensive treatment of structural vibration evaluation of turbo-machines. Starting with the fundamentals of the theory of vibration as related to various aspects of rotating machines, the dynamic analysis procedures of a broad spectrum of turbo-machines is covered. An in-depth procedure for analyzing the torsional and flexural oscillations of the components and of the rotor-bearing system is presented. The latest trends in design and analysis are presented, chief among them: Blade and coupled disk-blade mod

  15. The chemical bond structure and dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Zewail, Ahmed

    1992-01-01

    This inspired book by some of the most influential scientists of our time--including six Nobel laureates--chronicles our emerging understanding of the chemical bond through the last nine decades and into the future. From Pauling's early structural work using x-ray and electron diffraction to Zewail's femtosecond lasers that probe molecular dynamics in real time; from Crick's molecular biology to Rich's molecular recognition, this book explores a rich tradition of scientific heritage and accomplishment. The perspectives given by Pauling, Perutz, Rich, Crick, Porter, Polanyi, Herschbach, Zewail,

  16. Inverse Eigenvalue Problem in Structural Dynamics Design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huiqing Xie; Hua Dai

    2006-01-01

    A kind of inverse eigenvalue problem in structural dynamics design is considered. The problem is formulated as an optimization problem. The properties of this problem are analyzed, and the existence of the optimum solution is proved. The directional derivative of the objective function is obtained and a necessary condition for a point to be a local minimum point is given. Then a numerical algorithm for solving the problem is presented and a plane-truss problem is discussed to show the applications of the theories and the algorithm.

  17. Molten uranium dioxide structure and dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, L B; Benmore, C J; Weber, J K R; Williamson, M A; Tamalonis, A; Hebden, A; Wiencek, T; Alderman, O L G; Guthrie, M; Leibowitz, L; Parise, J B

    2014-11-21

    Uranium dioxide (UO2) is the major nuclear fuel component of fission power reactors. A key concern during severe accidents is the melting and leakage of radioactive UO2 as it corrodes through its zirconium cladding and steel containment. Yet, the very high temperatures (>3140 kelvin) and chemical reactivity of molten UO2 have prevented structural studies. In this work, we combine laser heating, sample levitation, and synchrotron x-rays to obtain pair distribution function measurements of hot solid and molten UO2. The hot solid shows a substantial increase in oxygen disorder around the lambda transition (2670 K) but negligible U-O coordination change. On melting, the average U-O coordination drops from 8 to 6.7 ± 0.5. Molecular dynamics models refined to this structure predict higher U-U mobility than 8-coordinated melts.

  18. Molecular structures and intramolecular dynamics of pentahalides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ischenko, A. A.

    2017-03-01

    This paper reviews advances of modern gas electron diffraction (GED) method combined with high-resolution spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations in studies of the impact of intramolecular dynamics in free molecules of pentahalides. Some recently developed approaches to the electron diffraction data interpretation, based on direct incorporation of the adiabatic potential energy surface parameters to the diffraction intensity are described. In this way, complementary data of different experimental and computational methods can be directly combined for solving problems of the molecular structure and its dynamics. The possibility to evaluate some important parameters of the adiabatic potential energy surface - barriers to pseudorotation and saddle point of intermediate configuration from diffraction intensities in solving the inverse GED problem is demonstrated on several examples. With increasing accuracy of the electron diffraction intensities and the development of the theoretical background of electron scattering and data interpretation, it has become possible to investigate complex nuclear dynamics in fluxional systems by the GED method. Results of other research groups are also included in the discussion.

  19. Chemical Structure and Dynamics annual report 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colson, S.D.; McDowell, R.S.

    1998-03-01

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics (CS and D) program is a major component of the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to provide a state-of-the-art collaborative facility for studies of chemical structure and dynamics. The authors respond to the need for a fundamental, molecular level understanding of chemistry at a wide variety of environmentally important interfaces by: (1) extending the experimental characterization and theoretical description of chemical reactions to encompass the effects of condensed media and interfaces; (2) developing a multidisciplinary capability for describing interfacial chemical processes within which the new knowledge generated can be brought to bear on complex phenomena in environmental chemistry and in nuclear waste processing and storage; and (3) developing state-of-the-art analytical methods for characterizing complex materials of the types found in stored wastes and contaminated soils, and for detecting and monitoring trace atmospheric species. The focus of the research is defined primarily by DOE`s environmental problems: fate and transport of contaminants in the subsurface environment, processing and storage of waste materials, cellular effects of chemical and radiological insult, and atmospheric chemistry as it relates to air quality and global change. Twenty-seven projects are described under the following topical sections: Reaction mechanisms at interfaces; High-energy processes at environmental interfaces; Cluster models of the condensed phase; and Miscellaneous.

  20. Best kept secrets ... Source Data Systems, Inc. (SDS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, W F

    1991-03-01

    The SDS/MEDNET system is a cost-effective option for small- to medium-size hospitals (up to 400 beds). The parameter-driven system lets users control operations with only occasional SDS assistance. A full application set, available for modular selection to reduce upfront costs while facilitating steady growth and protecting client investment, is adaptable to multi-facility environments. The industry-standard, Intel-based multi-user processors, network communications and protocols assure high efficiency, low-cost solutions independent of any one hardware vendor. Sustained growth in both client base and product offerings point to a high level of responsiveness and healthcare industry commitment. Corporate emphasis on user involvement and open systems integration assures clients of leading-edge capabilities. SDS/MEDNET will be a strong contender in selected marketing environments.

  1. Structural optimization for nonlinear dynamic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Suguang; Strachan, B Scott; Shaw, Steven W; Jensen, Jakob S

    2015-09-28

    Much is known about the nonlinear resonant response of mechanical systems, but methods for the systematic design of structures that optimize aspects of these responses have received little attention. Progress in this area is particularly important in the area of micro-systems, where nonlinear resonant behaviour is being used for a variety of applications in sensing and signal conditioning. In this work, we describe a computational method that provides a systematic means for manipulating and optimizing features of nonlinear resonant responses of mechanical structures that are described by a single vibrating mode, or by a pair of internally resonant modes. The approach combines techniques from nonlinear dynamics, computational mechanics and optimization, and it allows one to relate the geometric and material properties of structural elements to terms in the normal form for a given resonance condition, thereby providing a means for tailoring its nonlinear response. The method is applied to the fundamental nonlinear resonance of a clamped-clamped beam and to the coupled mode response of a frame structure, and the results show that one can modify essential normal form coefficients by an order of magnitude by relatively simple changes in the shape of these elements. We expect the proposed approach, and its extensions, to be useful for the design of systems used for fundamental studies of nonlinear behaviour as well as for the development of commercial devices that exploit nonlinear behaviour.

  2. Structural and dynamical properties of complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoshal, Gourab

    Recent years have witnessed a substantial amount of interest within the physics community in the properties of networks. Techniques from statistical physics coupled with the widespread availability of computing resources have facilitated studies ranging from large scale empirical analysis of the worldwide web, social networks, biological systems, to the development of theoretical models and tools to explore the various properties of these systems. Following these developments, in this dissertation, we present and solve for a diverse set of new problems, investigating the structural and dynamical properties of both model and real world networks. We start by defining a new metric to measure the stability of network structure to disruptions, and then using a combination of theory and simulation study its properties in detail on artificially generated networks; we then compare our results to a selection of networks from the real world and find good agreement in most cases. In the following chapter, we propose a mathematical model that mimics the structure of popular file-sharing websites such as Flickr and CiteULike and demonstrate that many of its properties can solved exactly in the limit of large network size. The remaining part of the dissertation primarily focuses on the dynamical properties of networks. We first formulate a model of a network that evolves under the addition and deletion of vertices and edges, and solve for the equilibrium degree distribution for a variety of cases of interest. We then consider networks whose structure can be manipulated by adjusting the rules by which vertices enter and leave the network. We focus in particular on degree distributions and show that, with some mild constraints, it is possible by a suitable choice of rules to arrange for the network to have any degree distribution we desire. In addition we define a simple local algorithm by which appropriate rules can be implemented in practice. Finally, we conclude our

  3. Finite Element Vibration and Dynamic Response Analysis of Engineering Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Mackerle

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available This bibliography lists references to papers, conference proceedings, and theses/dissertations dealing with finite element vibration and dynamic response analysis of engineering structures that were published from 1994 to 1998. It contains 539 citations. The following types of structures are included: basic structural systems; ground structures; ocean and coastal structures; mobile structures; and containment structures.

  4. Native SDS-PAGE: High Resolution Electrophoretic Separation of Proteins With Retention of Native Properties Including Bound Metal Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowakowski, Andrew B.; Wobig, William J.; Petering, David H.

    2014-01-01

    Sodium dodecyl-sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) is commonly used to obtain high resolution separation of complex mixtures of proteins. The method initially denatures the proteins that will undergo electrophoresis. Although covalent structural features of resolved proteins can be determined with SDS-PAGE, functional properties are destroyed, including the presence of non-covalently bound metal ions. To address this shortcoming, blue-native (BN)-PAGE has been introduced. This method retains functional properties but at the cost of protein resolving power. To address the need for a high resolution PAGE method that results in the separation of native proteins, experiments tested the impact of changing the conditions of SDS-PAGE on the quality of protein separation and retention of functional properties. Removal of SDS and EDTA from the sample buffer together with omission of a heating step had no effect on the results of PAGE. Reduction of SDS in the running buffer from 0.1% to 0.0375% together with deletion of EDTA also made little impact on the quality of the electrophoretograms of fractions of pig kidney (LLC-PK1) cell proteome in comparison with that achieved with the SDS-PAGE method. The modified conditions were called native (N)SDS-PAGE. Retention of Zn2+ bound in proteomic samples increased from 26 to 98% upon shifting from standard to modified conditions. Moreover, seven of nine model enzymes, including four Zn2+ proteins that were subjected to NSDS-PAGE retained activity. All nine were active in BN-PAGE, whereas all underwent denaturation during SDS-PAGE. Metal retention after electrophoresis was additionally confirmed using laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and in-gel Zn-protein staining using the fluorophore TSQ. PMID:24686569

  5. Nonparametric inference of network structure and dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peixoto, Tiago P.

    The network structure of complex systems determine their function and serve as evidence for the evolutionary mechanisms that lie behind them. Despite considerable effort in recent years, it remains an open challenge to formulate general descriptions of the large-scale structure of network systems, and how to reliably extract such information from data. Although many approaches have been proposed, few methods attempt to gauge the statistical significance of the uncovered structures, and hence the majority cannot reliably separate actual structure from stochastic fluctuations. Due to the sheer size and high-dimensionality of many networks, this represents a major limitation that prevents meaningful interpretations of the results obtained with such nonstatistical methods. In this talk, I will show how these issues can be tackled in a principled and efficient fashion by formulating appropriate generative models of network structure that can have their parameters inferred from data. By employing a Bayesian description of such models, the inference can be performed in a nonparametric fashion, that does not require any a priori knowledge or ad hoc assumptions about the data. I will show how this approach can be used to perform model comparison, and how hierarchical models yield the most appropriate trade-off between model complexity and quality of fit based on the statistical evidence present in the data. I will also show how this general approach can be elegantly extended to networks with edge attributes, that are embedded in latent spaces, and that change in time. The latter is obtained via a fully dynamic generative network model, based on arbitrary-order Markov chains, that can also be inferred in a nonparametric fashion. Throughout the talk I will illustrate the application of the methods with many empirical networks such as the internet at the autonomous systems level, the global airport network, the network of actors and films, social networks, citations among

  6. SDS-assisted hydrothermal synthesis of porous CdIn2S4 microspheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, X. F.; Li, J. S.; Wu, W.

    2017-02-01

    The porous CdIn2S4 microspheres were synthesized via a sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-assisted hydrothermal technology. The as-prepared CdIn2S4 products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy and UV-Vis diffusive reflectance spectroscopy. The results showed that hydrothermal time and the surfactant addition had great effect on the structure, morphology and optical property of CdIn2S4 products.

  7. From Dynamic Condition Response Structures to Büchi Automata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mukkamala, Raghava Rao; Hildebrandt, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Recently we have presented distributed dynamic condition response structures (DCR structures) as a declarative process model conservatively generalizing labelled event structures to allow for finite specifications of repeated, possibly infinite behavior. The key ideas are to split the causality r...

  8. Distinguish crocodile blood by SDS- PAGE%鳄鱼血SDS - PAGE鉴别方法的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张敏; 王春梅; 李耀武; 吴先敏; 赵增荣; 张露

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To establish the SDS - PAGE identification method for crocodile blood. Methods: Electro-phoresis buffer was used to prepare six animals' whole blood sample solution. The animals were: crocodile, sheep, guinea pig, chicken, rabbit, and deer. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis ( SDS - PAGE ) method was used to identify six animals' whole blood. Results:The best SDS -PAGE conditions to get good resolution were 60 μg protein sample loaded to each well and using the 7. 5% - 11% gradient separating gel plate ( 16 cm × 20 cm) to run the samples. The obviously different electrophoresis bands of six animals' whole blood were obtained by the method and crocodile blood has the characteristic bands. Conclusion: This method is sensitive and could be used easily to distinguish the crocodile blood from other five kinds bleed.%目的:建立鳄鱼血SDS - PAGE鉴别方法.方法:利用电泳缓冲液制备鳄鱼血、绵羊血、豚鼠血、鸡血、兔血、鹿血等6种动物全血样品液,采用十二烷基磺酸钠-聚丙烯酰胺凝胶电泳(SDS- PAGE)法,对6种动物全血进行鉴别研究.结果:以7.5% ~11%的梯度分离胶、60μg蛋白量上样,大板(16 cm×20 cm)进行SDS- PAGE鉴别,6种动物全血的电泳谱带有明显差异,鳄鱼血存在特征条带.结论:本方法灵敏度高、专属性强,可作为鳄鱼血与其他动物血的鉴别依据.

  9. Lagrangian coherent structures and inertial particle dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Sudharsan, M; Riley, James J

    2015-01-01

    In this work we investigate the dynamics of inertial particles using finite-time Lyapunov exponents (FTLE). In particular, we characterize the attractor and repeller structures underlying preferential concentration of inertial particles in terms of FTLE fields of the underlying carrier fluid. Inertial particles that are heavier than the ambient fluid (aerosols) attract onto ridges of the negative-time fluid FTLE. This negative-time FTLE ridge becomes a repeller for particles that are lighter than the carrier fluid (bubbles). We also examine the inertial FTLE (iFTLE) determined by the trajectories of inertial particles evolved using the Maxey-Riley equations with non-zero Stokes number and density ratio. Finally, we explore the low-pass filtering effect of Stokes number. These ideas are demonstrated on two-dimensional numerical simulations of the unsteady double gyre flow.

  10. Dynamic structural correlation via nonlinear programming techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, T.; Ojalvo, I. U.

    1988-01-01

    A solution to the correlation between structural dynamic test results and finite element analyses of the same components is presented in this paper. Basically, the method can be categorized as a Levenberg-Marquardt type Gauss-Newton method which requires only the differences between FE modal analyses and test results and their first derivatives with respect to preassigned design variables. With proper variable normalization and equation scaling, the method has been made numerically better-conditioned and the inclusion of the Levenberg-Marquardt technique overcomes any remaining difficulty encountered in inverting singular or near-singular matrices. An important feature is that each iteration requires only one function evaluation along with the associated design sensitivity analysis and so the procedure is computationally efficient.

  11. Wheat yield dynamics: a structural econometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Afsin; Akdi, Yilmaz; Arslan, Fahrettin

    2007-10-15

    In this study we initially have tried to explore the wheat situation in Turkey, which has a small-open economy and in the member countries of European Union (EU). We have observed that increasing the wheat yield is fundamental to obtain comparative advantage among countries by depressing domestic prices. Also the changing structure of supporting schemes in Turkey makes it necessary to increase its wheat yield level. For this purpose, we have used available data to determine the dynamics of wheat yield by Ordinary Least Square Regression methods. In order to find out whether there is a linear relationship among these series we have checked each series whether they are integrated at the same order or not. Consequently, we have pointed out that fertilizer usage and precipitation level are substantial inputs for producing high wheat yield. Furthermore, in respect for our model, fertilizer usage affects wheat yield more than precipitation level.

  12. Dynamic structure of active nematic shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Zhou, Ye; Rahimi, Mohammad; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2016-11-01

    When a thin film of active, nematic microtubules and kinesin motor clusters is confined on the surface of a vesicle, four +1/2 topological defects oscillate in a periodic manner between tetrahedral and planar arrangements. Here a theoretical description of nematics, coupled to the relevant hydrodynamic equations, is presented here to explain the dynamics of active nematic shells. In extensile microtubule systems, the defects repel each other due to elasticity, and their collective motion leads to closed trajectories along the edges of a cube. That motion is accompanied by oscillations of their velocities, and the emergence and annihilation of vortices. When the activity increases, the system enters a chaotic regime. In contrast, for contractile systems, which are representative of some bacterial suspensions, a hitherto unknown static structure is predicted, where pairs of defects attract each other and flows arise spontaneously.

  13. Structure and dynamics of interphase chromosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Rosa

    Full Text Available During interphase chromosomes decondense, but fluorescent in situ hybridization experiments reveal the existence of distinct territories occupied by individual chromosomes inside the nuclei of most eukaryotic cells. We use computer simulations to show that the existence and stability of territories is a kinetic effect that can be explained without invoking an underlying nuclear scaffold or protein-mediated interactions between DNA sequences. In particular, we show that the experimentally observed territory shapes and spatial distances between marked chromosome sites for human, Drosophila, and budding yeast chromosomes can be reproduced by a parameter-free minimal model of decondensing chromosomes. Our results suggest that the observed interphase structure and dynamics are due to generic polymer effects: confined Brownian motion conserving the local topological state of long chain molecules and segregation of mutually unentangled chains due to topological constraints.

  14. Molecular dynamics study of ice structural evolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Yan; Dong Shun-Le

    2008-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation is employed to study the structural evolution of low density amorphous ice during its compression from one atmosphere to 2.5 GPa. Calculated results show that high density amorphous ice is formed at an intermediate pressure of~1.0GPa; the O-O-O bond angle ranges from 83° to 113°, and the O-H...O bond is bent from 112° to 160°. Very high density amorphous ice is obtained by quenching to 80K and decompressing the ice to ambient pressure from 160 K/1.3 GPa or 160 K/1.7 GPa; and the next-nearest O-O length is found to be 0.310 nm, just 0.035 nm beyond the nearest O-O distance of 0.275 nm.

  15. Anaerobic degradation of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) by denitrifying bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paulo, A.; Plugge, C.M.; Garcia Encina, P.A.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Two denitrifying bacteria were isolated using sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) as substrate. Strains SN1 and SN2 were isolated from an activated sludge reactor of a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) with Anaerobic–Anoxic–Oxic (A2/O) steps. Based on 16S rRNA gene analysis strain SN1 is 99% similar to Pse

  16. Walking the Talk of Racial Equity. SDS Report. Program Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint Paul Foundation, St. Paul, MN.

    This newsletter describes the 6-year Supporting Diversity in Schools (SDS) project that seeks to create school environments free of racial prejudice and privilege. It briefly describes the program's working themes: (1) giving a voice to people who have traditionally been silent in the shaping of classroom practices; (2) developing pride in…

  17. Anaerobic degradation of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) by denitrifying bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paulo, A.; Plugge, C.M.; Garcia Encina, P.A.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Two denitrifying bacteria were isolated using sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) as substrate. Strains SN1 and SN2 were isolated from an activated sludge reactor of a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) with Anaerobic–Anoxic–Oxic (A2/O) steps. Based on 16S rRNA gene analysis strain SN1 is 99% similar to

  18. Chemical structure and dynamics. Annual report 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colson, S.D.

    1995-07-01

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics program was organized as a major component of Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s Environmental and Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a state-of-the-art collaborative facility for studies of chemical structure and dynamics. Our program responds to the need for a fundamental, molecular-level understanding of chemistry at the wide variety of environmentally important interfaces by (1) extending the experimental characterization and theoretical description of chemical reactions to encompass the effects of condensed media and interfaces, and (2) developing a multidisciplinary capability for describing interfacial chemical processes within which the new knowledge generated can be brought to bear on complex phenomena in environmental chemistry and in nuclear waste processing and storage. This research effort was initiated in 1989 and will continue to evolve over the next few years into a program of rigorous studies of fundamental molecular processes in model systems, such as well-characterized surfaces, single-component solutions, clusters, and biological molecules; and studies of complex systems found in the environment (multispecies, multiphase solutions; solid/liquid, liquid/liquid, and gas/surface interfaces; colloidal dispersions; ultrafine aerosols; and functioning biological systems). The success of this program will result in the achievement of a quantitative understanding of chemical reactions at interfaces, and more generally in condensed media, that is comparable to that currently available for gas-phase reactions. This understanding will form the basis for the development of a priori theories for predictions of macroscopic chemical behavior in condensed and heterogeneous media, adding significantly to the value of field-scale environmental models, the prediction of short- and long-term nuclear waste storage stabilities, and other problems related to the primary missions of the DOE.

  19. Annual Report 1998: Chemical Structure and Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SD Colson; RS McDowell

    1999-05-10

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics (CS&D) program is a major component of the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Labo- ratory (EMSL), developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to provide a state-of- the-art collaborative facility for studies of chemical structure and dynamics. We respond to the need for a fundamental, molecular-level understanding of chemistry at a wide variety of environmentally important interfaces by (1) extending the experimental characterization and theoretical description of chemical reactions to encompass the effects of condensed media and interfaces; (2) developing a multidisciplinary capability for describing interracial chemical processes within which the new knowledge generated can be brought to bear on complex phenomena in envi- ronmental chemistry and in nuclear waste proc- essing and storage; and (3) developing state-of- the-art analytical methods for characterizing com- plex materials of the types found in stored wastes and contaminated soils, and for detecting and monitoring trace atmospheric species. Our program aims at achieving a quantitative understanding of chemical reactions at interfaces and, more generally, in condensed media, compa- rable to that currently available for gas-phase reactions. This understanding will form the basis for the development of a priori theories for pre- dicting macroscopic chemical behavior in con- densed and heterogeneous media, which will add significantly to the value of field-scale envi- ronmental models, predictions of short- and long- term nuclear waste storage stabilities, and other areas related to the primary missions of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).

  20. Multiscale Dynamics of Solar Magnetic Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uritsky, Vadim M.; Davila, Joseph M.

    2012-01-01

    Multiscale topological complexity of the solar magnetic field is among the primary factors controlling energy release in the corona, including associated processes in the photospheric and chromospheric boundaries.We present a new approach for analyzing multiscale behavior of the photospheric magnetic flux underlying these dynamics as depicted by a sequence of high-resolution solar magnetograms. The approach involves two basic processing steps: (1) identification of timing and location of magnetic flux origin and demise events (as defined by DeForest et al.) by tracking spatiotemporal evolution of unipolar and bipolar photospheric regions, and (2) analysis of collective behavior of the detected magnetic events using a generalized version of the Grassberger-Procaccia correlation integral algorithm. The scale-free nature of the developed algorithms makes it possible to characterize the dynamics of the photospheric network across a wide range of distances and relaxation times. Three types of photospheric conditions are considered to test the method: a quiet photosphere, a solar active region (NOAA 10365) in a quiescent non-flaring state, and the same active region during a period of M-class flares. The results obtained show (1) the presence of a topologically complex asymmetrically fragmented magnetic network in the quiet photosphere driven by meso- and supergranulation, (2) the formation of non-potential magnetic structures with complex polarity separation lines inside the active region, and (3) statistical signatures of canceling bipolar magnetic structures coinciding with flaring activity in the active region. Each of these effects can represent an unstable magnetic configuration acting as an energy source for coronal dissipation and heating.

  1. Dynamics of Subauroral Polarization Stream (SAPS) Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazykin, S. Y.; Coster, A. J.; Huba, J.; Ridley, A. J.; Erickson, P. J.; Foster, J. C.; Baker, J. B. H.; Wolf, R.

    2015-12-01

    The Subauroral Polarization Stream (SAPS) flow structures are narrow ionospheric channels of fast (in excess of 100 m/s) westward drift just outside the equatorward edge of the diffuse aurora in the dusk-to-midnight local time sector. Other terms for this phenomenon include subauroral Ion Drift (SAID) events and Polarization Jets. SAPS structures represent a striking departure from the commonly-used two-cell convection pattern. They are thought to arise from the displacement of the downward region-2 Birkeland currents on the dusk side equatorward of the low-latitude boundary of the auroral oval during times of changing high-latitude convection. In this paper, we will use several event simulations with the SAMI3-RCM numerical model (a self-consistent ionosphere-inner magnetosphere model) and RCM-GITM (a self-consistent model of the ionosphere-thermosphere-inner magnetosphere) to analyze the relative roles of changes in the IMF Bz component, ionospheric electron density depletions, and thermospheric modifications in controlling the dynamics of SAPS. Simulation results will be compared to multi-instrument ionospheric observations.

  2. Electronic structure and dynamics of nitrosyl porphyrins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheidt, W Robert; Barabanschikov, Alexander; Pavlik, Jeffrey W; Silvernail, Nathan J; Sage, J Timothy

    2010-07-19

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a signaling molecule employed to regulate essential physiological processes. Thus, there is great interest in understanding the interaction of NO with heme, which is found at the active site of many proteins that recognize NO, as well as those involved in its creation and elimination. We summarize what we have learned from investigations of the structure, vibrational properties, and conformational dynamics of NO complexes with ferrous porphyrins, as well as computational investigations in support of these experimental studies. Multitemperature crystallographic data reveal variations in the orientational disorder of the nitrosyl ligand. In some cases, equilibria among NO orientations can be analyzed using the van't Hoff relationship and the free energy and enthalpy of the solid-state transitions evaluated experimentally. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations predict that intrinsic barriers to torsional rotation are smaller than thermal energies at physiological temperatures, and the coincidence of observed NO orientations with minima in molecular mechanics potentials indicates that nonbonded interactions with other chemical groups control the conformational freedom of the bound NO. In favorable cases, reduced disorder at low temperatures exposes subtle structural features including off-axis tilting of the Fe-NO bond and anisotropy of the equatorial Fe-N bonds. We also present the results of nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy measurements on oriented single crystals of [Fe(TPP)(NO)] and [Fe(TPP)(1-MeIm)(NO)]. These describe the anisotropic vibrational motion of iron in five- and six-coordinate heme-NO complexes and reveal vibrations of all Fe-ligand bonds as well as low-frequency molecular distortions associated with the doming of the heme upon ligand binding. A quantitative comparison with predicted frequencies, amplitudes, and directions facilitates identification of the vibrational modes but also suggests that commonly used DFT

  3. Recombination Dynamics in Quantum Well Semiconductor Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouquet, Julie Elizabeth

    Time-resolved and time-integrated photoluminescence as a function of excitation energy density have been observed in order to study recombination dynamics in GaAs/Al(,x)Ga(,1 -x)As quantum well structures. The study of room temperature photoluminescence from the molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) -grown multiple quantum well structure and photoluminescence peak energy as a function of tem- perature shows that room temperature recombination at excitation densities above the low 10('16) cm('-3) level is due to free carriers, not excitons. This is the first study of time-resolved photoluminescence of impurities in quantum wells; data taken at different emission wave- lengths at low temperatures shows that the impurity-related states at photon energies lower than the free exciton peaks luminesce much more slowly than the free exciton states. Results from a similar structure grown by metal -organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) are explained by saturation of traps. An unusual increase in decay rate observed tens of nanoseconds after excitation is probably due to carriers falling out of the trap states. Since this is the first study of time-resolved photoluminescence of MOCVD-grown quantum well structures, this unusual behavior may be realted to the MOCVD growth process. Further investigations indi- cate that the traps are not active at low temperatures; they become active at approximately 150 K. The traps are probably associated with the (hetero)interfaces rather than the bulk Al(,x)Ga(,1-x)As material. The 34 K photoluminescence spectrum of this sample revealed a peak shifted down by approximately 36 meV from the main peak. Time-resolved and time-integrated photoluminescence results here show that this peak is not a stimulated phonon emission sideband, but rather is an due to an acceptor impurity, probably carbon. Photo- luminescence for excitation above and below the barrier bandgap shows that carriers are efficiently collected in the wells in both single and multiple

  4. Structure-preserving integrators in nonlinear structural dynamics and flexible multibody dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book focuses on structure-preserving numerical methods for flexible multibody dynamics, including nonlinear elastodynamics and geometrically exact models for beams and shells. It also deals with the newly emerging class of variational integrators as well as Lie-group integrators. It discusses two alternative approaches to the discretization in space of nonlinear beams and shells. Firstly, geometrically exact formulations, which are typically used in the finite element community and, secondly, the absolute nodal coordinate formulation, which is popular in the multibody dynamics community. Concerning the discretization in time, the energy-momentum method and its energy-decaying variants are discussed. It also addresses a number of issues that have arisen in the wake of the structure-preserving discretization in space. Among them are the parameterization of finite rotations, the incorporation of algebraic constraints and the computer implementation of the various numerical methods. The practical application...

  5. A Formal Framework for P Systems with Dynamic Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Freund, Rudolf; Pérez Hurtado de Mendoza, Ignacio; Riscos Núñez, Agustín; Verlan, Sergey

    2012-01-01

    This article introduces a formalism/framework able to describe different variants of P systems having a dynamic structure. This framework can be useful for the definition of new variants of P systems with dynamic structure, for the comparison of existing definitions as well as for their extension. We give a precise definition of the formalism and show how existing variants of P systems with dynamic structure can be translated to it.

  6. A Light-Responsive Self-Assembly Formed by a Cationic Azobenzene Derivative and SDS as a Drug Delivery System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Shengyong; Wang, Yuzhu; Wang, Liping; Kouyama, Tsutomu; Gotoh, Toshiaki; Wada, Satoshi; Wang, Jin-Ye

    2017-01-01

    The structure of a self-assembly formed from a cationic azobenzene derivative, 4-cholesterocarbonyl-4′-(N,N,N-triethylamine butyloxyl bromide) azobenzene (CAB) and surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in aqueous solution was studied by cryo-TEM and synchrotron radiation small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Both unilamellar and multilamellar vesicles could be observed. CAB in vesicles were capable to undergo reversible trans-to-cis isomerization upon UV or visible light irradiation. The structural change upon UV light irradiation could be catched by SAXS, which demonstrated that the interlamellar spacing of the cis-multilamellar vesicles increased by 0.2–0.3 nm. Based on this microstructural change, the release of rhodamine B (RhB) and doxorubicin (DOX) could be triggered by UV irradiation. When incubated NIH 3T3 cells and Bel 7402 cells with DOX-loaded CAB/SDS vesicles, UV irradiation induced DOX release decreased the viability of both cell lines significantly compared with the non-irradiated cells. The in vitro experiment indicated that CAB/SDS vesicles had high efficiency to deliver loaded molecules into cells. The in vivo experiment showed that CAB/SDS vesicles not only have high drug delivery efficiency into rat retinas, but also could maintain high drug concentration for a longer time. CAB/SDS catanionic vesicles may find potential applications as a smart drug delivery system for controlled release by light. PMID:28051069

  7. A Light-Responsive Self-Assembly Formed by a Cationic Azobenzene Derivative and SDS as a Drug Delivery System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Shengyong; Wang, Yuzhu; Wang, Liping; Kouyama, Tsutomu; Gotoh, Toshiaki; Wada, Satoshi; Wang, Jin-Ye

    2017-01-01

    The structure of a self-assembly formed from a cationic azobenzene derivative, 4-cholesterocarbonyl-4‧-(N,N,N-triethylamine butyloxyl bromide) azobenzene (CAB) and surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in aqueous solution was studied by cryo-TEM and synchrotron radiation small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Both unilamellar and multilamellar vesicles could be observed. CAB in vesicles were capable to undergo reversible trans-to-cis isomerization upon UV or visible light irradiation. The structural change upon UV light irradiation could be catched by SAXS, which demonstrated that the interlamellar spacing of the cis-multilamellar vesicles increased by 0.2-0.3 nm. Based on this microstructural change, the release of rhodamine B (RhB) and doxorubicin (DOX) could be triggered by UV irradiation. When incubated NIH 3T3 cells and Bel 7402 cells with DOX-loaded CAB/SDS vesicles, UV irradiation induced DOX release decreased the viability of both cell lines significantly compared with the non-irradiated cells. The in vitro experiment indicated that CAB/SDS vesicles had high efficiency to deliver loaded molecules into cells. The in vivo experiment showed that CAB/SDS vesicles not only have high drug delivery efficiency into rat retinas, but also could maintain high drug concentration for a longer time. CAB/SDS catanionic vesicles may find potential applications as a smart drug delivery system for controlled release by light.

  8. Universal structural estimator and dynamics approximator for complex networks

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Yu-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Revealing the structure and dynamics of complex networked systems from observed data is of fundamental importance to science, engineering, and society. Is it possible to develop a universal, completely data driven framework to decipher the network structure and different types of dynamical processes on complex networks, regardless of their details? We develop a Markov network based model, sparse dynamical Boltzmann machine (SDBM), as a universal network structural estimator and dynamics approximator. The SDBM attains its topology according to that of the original system and is capable of simulating the original dynamical process. We develop a fully automated method based on compressive sensing and machine learning to find the SDBM. We demonstrate, for a large variety of representative dynamical processes on model and real world complex networks, that the equivalent SDBM can recover the network structure of the original system and predicts its dynamical behavior with high precision.

  9. Developing Best Practices for Scientific Data Stewardship? (SDS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kihn, E.; Redmon, R.

    2008-12-01

    Science Data Stewardship (SDS) is the art of 'maintaining the science integrity and long term utility of scientific records' and ' the actions which maximize the return on investment for archived scientific data'. This paper will present a series of best practices developed under the Electronic Geophysical Year (eGY) for SDS. These practices include areas such as: Storage and Preservation, Ease of Use, Interoperability, Quality Information and Metadata, Data Availability, User Presentation, Attribution and Accountability, and Electronic Data Preservation These practice are of use for anyone concerned with the long term stewardship and preservation of electronic records. This set of practices is currently being extended by the CODATA working group on the eGY. http://www.sciencedatastewardship.org

  10. Phenomenology, Structure, and Dynamic of Psychedelic States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preller, Katrin H; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2016-12-27

    Classic serotonergic hallucinogens or psychedelics produce an altered states of consciousness (ASC) that is characterized by profound alterations in sensory perception, mood, thought including the perception of reality, and the sense of self. Over the past years, there has been considerable progress in the search for invariant and common features of psychedelic states. In the first part of this review, we outline contemporary approaches to characterize the structure of ASCs by means of three primary etiology-independent dimensions including oceanic boundlessness, anxious ego-dissolution, and visionary restructuralization as well as by 11 lower-order factors, all of which can be reliably measured by the altered state of consciousness questionnaire (APZ-OAV). The second part sheds light on the dynamic nature of psychedelic experiences. Frequently, psychedelic subjects progress through different stages over time and levels of changes along a perception-hallucination continuum of increasing arousal and ego-dissolution. We then review in detail the acute effects of psychedelics on sensory perception, emotion, cognition, creativity, and time perception along with possible neural mechanisms underlying them. The next part of this review outlines the influence of non-pharmacological factors (predictors) on the acute psychedelic experience, such as demographics, genetics, personality, mood, and setting, and also discusses some long-term effects succeeding the acute experience. The last part presents some recent concepts and models attempting to understand different facets of psychedelic states of consciousness from a neuroscientific perspective.

  11. Structured Counseling for Auditory Dynamic Range Expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Susan L; Formby, Craig

    2017-02-01

    A structured counseling protocol is described that, when combined with low-level broadband sound therapy from bilateral sound generators, offers audiologists a new tool for facilitating the expansion of the auditory dynamic range (DR) for loudness. The protocol and its content are specifically designed to address and treat problems that impact hearing-impaired persons who, due to their reduced DRs, may be limited in the use and benefit of amplified sound from hearing aids. The reduced DRs may result from elevated audiometric thresholds and/or reduced sound tolerance as documented by lower-than-normal loudness discomfort levels (LDLs). Accordingly, the counseling protocol is appropriate for challenging and difficult-to-fit persons with sensorineural hearing losses who experience loudness recruitment or hyperacusis. Positive treatment outcomes for individuals with the former and latter conditions are highlighted in this issue by incremental shifts (improvements) in LDL and/or categorical loudness judgments, associated reduced complaints of sound intolerance, and functional improvements in daily communication, speech understanding, and quality of life leading to improved hearing aid benefit, satisfaction, and aided sound quality, posttreatment.

  12. Optimizing Dynamical Network Structure for Pinning Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orouskhani, Yasin; Jalili, Mahdi; Yu, Xinghuo

    2016-04-01

    Controlling dynamics of a network from any initial state to a final desired state has many applications in different disciplines from engineering to biology and social sciences. In this work, we optimize the network structure for pinning control. The problem is formulated as four optimization tasks: i) optimizing the locations of driver nodes, ii) optimizing the feedback gains, iii) optimizing simultaneously the locations of driver nodes and feedback gains, and iv) optimizing the connection weights. A newly developed population-based optimization technique (cat swarm optimization) is used as the optimization method. In order to verify the methods, we use both real-world networks, and model scale-free and small-world networks. Extensive simulation results show that the optimal placement of driver nodes significantly outperforms heuristic methods including placing drivers based on various centrality measures (degree, betweenness, closeness and clustering coefficient). The pinning controllability is further improved by optimizing the feedback gains. We also show that one can significantly improve the controllability by optimizing the connection weights.

  13. The stability and dynamic behaviour of fluid-loaded structures

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Suliman, Ridhwaan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available ECCOMAS Young Investigators Conference 6th GACM Colloquium, July 20–23, 2015, Aachen, Germany The stability and dynamic behaviour of fluid-loaded structures R. Suliman, N. Peake Abstract. The deformation of slender elastic structures due...

  14. STRUCTURE AND DYNAMICS OF ALKALI BORATE GLASSES - A MOLECULAR-DYNAMICS STUDY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VERHOEF, AH; DENHARTOG, HW

    1995-01-01

    Structural and dynamical properties of lithium, cesium and mixed alkali (i.e., lithium and cesium) borate glasses have been studied by the molecular dynamics method. The calculations yield glass structures consisting of planar BO3 triangles and BO4 tetrahedrons with no sixfold ring structures at all

  15. Knottin cyclization: impact on structure and dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gracy Jérôme

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Present in various species, the knottins (also referred to as inhibitor cystine knots constitute a group of extremely stable miniproteins with a plethora of biological activities. Owing to their small size and their high stability, knottins are considered as excellent leads or scaffolds in drug design. Two knottin families contain macrocyclic compounds, namely the cyclotides and the squash inhibitors. The cyclotide family nearly exclusively contains head-to-tail cyclized members. On the other hand, the squash family predominantly contains linear members. Head-to-tail cyclization is intuitively expected to improve bioactivities by increasing stability and lowering flexibility as well as sensitivity to proteolytic attack. Results In this paper, we report data on solution structure, thermal stability, and flexibility as inferred from NMR experiments and molecular dynamics simulations of a linear squash inhibitor EETI-II, a circular squash inhibitor MCoTI-II, and a linear analog lin-MCoTI. Strikingly, the head-to-tail linker in cyclic MCoTI-II is by far the most flexible region of all three compounds. Moreover, we show that cyclic and linear squash inhibitors do not display large differences in structure or flexibility in standard conditions, raising the question as to why few squash inhibitors have evolved into cyclic compounds. The simulations revealed however that the cyclization increases resistance to high temperatures by limiting structure unfolding. Conclusion In this work, we show that, in contrast to what could have been intuitively expected, cyclization of squash inhibitors does not provide clear stability or flexibility modification. Overall, our results suggest that, for squash inhibitors in standard conditions, the circularization impact might come from incorporation of an additional loop sequence, that can contribute to the miniprotein specificity and affinity, rather than from an increase in conformational rigidity

  16. Study of the structure and dynamics of complex biological networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samal, Areejit

    2008-12-01

    In this thesis, we have studied the large scale structure and system level dynamics of certain biological networks using tools from graph theory, computational biology and dynamical systems. We study the structure and dynamics of large scale metabolic networks inside three organisms, Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Staphylococcus aureus. We also study the dynamics of the large scale genetic network controlling E. coli metabolism. We have tried to explain the observed system level dynamical properties of these networks in terms of their underlying structure. Our studies of the system level dynamics of these large scale biological networks provide a different perspective on their functioning compared to that obtained from purely structural studies. Our study also leads to some new insights on features such as robustness, fragility and modularity of these large scale biological networks. We also shed light on how different networks inside the cell such as metabolic networks and genetic networks are interrelated to each other.

  17. DYNAMIC DESIGN OF INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE BLOCK STRUCTURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    Several main steps of internal combustion engine block structure dynamic design,such as model set-up,structure dynamic response analysis,optimizing design and vibration and noise control,are discussed for the type of EQ6100 gasoline engine block.

  18. Structural dynamics branch research and accomplishments for fiscal year 1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    This publication contains a collection of fiscal year 1987 research highlights from the Structural Dynamics Branch at NASA Lewis Research Center. Highlights from the branch's four major work areas, Aeroelasticity, Vibration Control, Dynamic Systems, and Computational Structural Methods, are included in the report as well as a complete listing of the FY87 branch publications.

  19. Structural dynamics branch research and accomplishments to FY 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Charles

    1992-12-01

    This publication contains a collection of fiscal year 1992 research highlights from the Structural Dynamics Branch at NASA LeRC. Highlights from the branch's major work areas--Aeroelasticity, Vibration Control, Dynamic Systems, and Computational Structural Methods are included in the report as well as a listing of the fiscal year 1992 branch publications.

  20. Gradient-based optimization in nonlinear structural dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dou, Suguang

    The intrinsic nonlinearity of mechanical structures can give rise to rich nonlinear dynamics. Recently, nonlinear dynamics of micro-mechanical structures have contributed to developing new Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS), for example, atomic force microscope, passive frequency divider, fr...

  1. Visualizing Structure and Dynamics of Disaccharide Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, J. F.; Beckham, G. T.; Himmel, M. E.; Crowley, M. F.

    2012-01-01

    We examine the effect of several solvent models on the conformational properties and dynamics of disaccharides such as cellobiose and lactose. Significant variation in timescale for large scale conformational transformations are observed. Molecular dynamics simulation provides enough detail to enable insight through visualization of multidimensional data sets. We present a new way to visualize conformational space for disaccharides with Ramachandran plots.

  2. Molecular dynamics investigation of the influence of anionic and zwitterionic interfaces on antimicrobial peptides' structure: implications for peptide toxicity and activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khandelia, Himanshu; Kaznessis, Yiannis N

    2006-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of three related helical antimicrobial peptides have been carried out in zwitterionic diphosphocholine (DPC) micelles and anionic sodiumdodecylsulfate (SDS) micelles. These systems can be considered as model mammalian and bacterial membrane interfaces, respectively...

  3. Structural dynamics for new launch vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neighbors, Joyce; Ryan, Robert S.

    1992-01-01

    An overview is presented of current studies that will permit more robust designs and reduce the safety hazards of maximum dynamic pressure during launches. Key considerations in the assessment of future operable launch capabilities are the dynamics problems that arise during the initial minutes of transition from the static configuration on the launch pad to the attainment of orbital velocity. Attention is given to a typical attempt to achieve robustness that involves creating a design in which the first bending mode will have a high enough frequency to allow decoupling between the autopilot design and the flexible body dynamics.

  4. Ergodic Theory, Open Dynamics, and Coherent Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Bose, Christopher; Froyland, Gary

    2014-01-01

    This book is comprised of selected research articles developed from a workshop on Ergodic Theory, Probabilistic Methods and Applications, held in April 2012 at the Banff International Research Station. It contains contributions from world leading experts in ergodic theory, dynamical systems, numerical analysis, fluid dynamics, and networks. The volume will serve as a valuable reference for mathematicians, physicists, engineers, physical oceanographers, atmospheric scientists, biologists, and climate scientists, who currently use, or wish to learn how to use, probabilistic techniques to cope with dynamical models that display open, coherent, or non-equilibrium behavior.

  5. The effects of bolted joints on dynamic response of structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, I.; Khalid, A.; Manshoor, B.; Araby, S.; Ghazali, M. I.

    2013-12-01

    Joint is an universal fastening technology for structural members; in particular bolted joints are extensively used in mechanical structures due to their simple maintenance and low cost. However, the components of bolted joints are imperative because failure could be catastrophic and endanger lives. Hence, in this study, the effects of bolted joints on vibrating structures are investigated by determining the structural dynamic properties, such as mode shapes, damping ratios and natural frequencies, and these are compared with the monolithic structures (welding). Two approaches of experimental rigs are developed: a beam and a frame where both are subjected to dynamic loading. The analysis reveals the importance of bolted joints in increasing the damping properties and minimizing the vibration magnitude of structures, this indicates the significant influence of bolted joints on the dynamic behaviour of assembled structures. The outcome of this study provides a good model for predicting the experimental variable response in different types of structural joints.

  6. CISM course on exploiting nonlinear behaviour in structural dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Virgin, Lawrence; Exploiting Nonlinear Behavior in Structural Dynamics

    2012-01-01

    The articles in this volume give an overview and introduction to nonlinear phenomena in structural dynamics. Topics treated are approximate methods for analyzing nonlinear systems (where the level of nonlinearity is assumed to be relatively small), vibration isolation, the mitigation of undesirable torsional vibration in rotating systems utilizing specifically nonlinear features in the dynamics, the vibration of nonlinear structures in which the motion is sufficiently large amplitude and structural systems with control.

  7. Laser fields in dynamically ionized plasma structures for coherent acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Luu-Thanh, Ph.; Pukhov, A.; Kostyukov, I.

    2015-01-01

    With the emergence of the CAN (Coherent Amplification Network) laser technology, a new scheme for direct particle acceleration in periodic plasma structures has been proposed. By using our full electromagnetic relativistic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation code equipped with ionisation module, we simulate the laser fields dynamics in the periodic structures of different materials. We study how the dynamic ionization influences the field structure.

  8. Fire analysis for compartment of ITER tritium SDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Woo Seok; Bang, Kyoung Sik [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Seung Yon; Yun, Sei Hun [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    The objective of the fire accident analysis for the compartment where the ITER tritium storage and delivery system (hereafter SDS) glove boxes are installed is to estimate the integrity of the glove box. Fires in grouped electrical cable trays pose distinct fire hazards within the compartment where the SDS glove boxes are installed. The nuclear industry has defined two general types of electrical cables, referred to as IEEE 383 qualified and unqualified. According to NUREG/CR 4679 and DOT TSC UMAT 83 4 1, a damage threshold temperature of 370 .deg. C and a critical heat flux of 10 kW/m2 have been selected for IEEE 383 qualified cable. A damage threshold temperature of 218 .deg. C and a critical heat flux of 5 kW/m2 have been selected for IEEE 383 unqualified cable. Cable tray fires can occur from various sources. The scenarios of concern include a fire within a cable tray and as exposure fire. However, fire within the compartment where the SDS glove boxes are installed could be happened due to over currents. Therefore, it is common practice to consider only self ignited cable fires to occur in power cable trays since they carry enough electrical energy for ignition. In general, electrical cables typically do not carry enough electrical energy for self ignition. According to NUREG/CR 5384, it was concluded that electrical cables which passed the IEEE 383 74 flame test were less likely to propagate electrically initiated fires. However, the scenario in this fire accident analysis assumed that the IEEE 383 qualified cable is burned completely.

  9. Isolation of a strain of Pseudomonas putida capable of metabolizing anionic detergent sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Kumar

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate (SDS is one of the most widely used anionic detergents. The present study deals with isolation and identification of SDS-degrading bacteria from a detergent contaminated pond situated in Varanasi city, India."nMaterials and Methods: Employing enrichment technique in minimal medium (PBM, SDS-degrading bacteria were isolated from pond water sample. Rate of degradation of SDS was studied in liquid PBM and also degradation of different concentrations of SDS was also studied to find out maximum concentration of SDS degraded by the potent isolates. Alkyl sulfatase activity (key enzyme in SDS degradation was estimated in crude cell extracts and multiplicity of alkyl sulfatase was studied by Native PAGE Zymography. The potent isolate was identified by 16S rRNA sequence analysis."nResults: Using enrichment technique in minimal medium containing SDS as a sole carbon source, initially three SDS degrading isolates were recovered. However, only one isolate, SP3, was found to be an efficient degrader of SDS. It was observed that this strain could completely metabolize 0.1% SDS in 16 h, 0.2% SDS in 20 h and 0.3% SDS in 24 h of incubation. Specific activity of alkyl sulfatase was 0.087±0.004 μmol SDS/mg protein/min and Native PAGE Zymography showed presence of alkyl sulfatase of Rf value of 0.21. This isolate was identified as Pseudomonas putida strain SP3."nConclusion: This is the report of isolation of SDS-degrading strain of P. putida, which shows high rate of SDS degradation and can degrade up to 0.3% SDS. It appears that this isolate can be exploited for bioremediation of this detergent from water systems.

  10. Unascertained Factor Method of Dynamic Characteristic Analysis for Antenna Structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Zeng-qing; LIANG Zhen-tao; CHEN Jian-jun

    2008-01-01

    The dynamic characteristic analysis model of antenna structures is built, in which the structural physical parameters and geometrical dimensions are all considered as unascertained variables, And a structure dynamic characteristic analysis method based on the unascertained factor method is given. The computational expression of structural characteristic is developed by the mathematics expression of unascertained factor and the principles of unascertained rational numbers arithmetic. An example is given, in which the possible values and confidence degrees of the unascertained structure characteristics are obtained. The calculated results show that the method is feasible and effective.

  11. Recent Progress in Heliogyro Solar Sail Structural Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkie, W.; Warren, J.; Horta, L.; Juang, J.; Gibbs, S.; Dowell, E.; Guerrant, D.; Lawrence, D.

    2014-06-01

    Results from recent National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) research on the structural dynamics and control characteristics of heliogyro solar sails are summarized. Specific areas under investigation include coupled nonlinear finite element analysis of heliogyro membrane blade with solar radiation pressure effects, system identification of spinning membrane structures, solarelastic stability analysis of heliogyro solar sails, including stability during blade deployment, and results from small-scale in vacuo dynamics experiments with spinning high-aspect ratio membranes. A low-cost, rideshare payload heliogyro technology demonstration mission concept, used as a mission context for these heliogyro structural dynamics and solarelasticity investigations, is also described.

  12. Recent Progress in Heliogyro Solar Sail Structural Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkie, William K.; Warren, Jerry E.; Horta, Lucas G.; Juang, Jer-Nan; Gibbs, Samuel C.; Dowell, E.; Guerrant, Daniel; Lawrence Dale

    2014-01-01

    Results from recent National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) research on the structural dynamics and control characteristics of heliogyro solar sails are summarized. Specific areas under investigation include coupled nonlinear finite element analysis of heliogyro membrane blade with solar radiation pressure effects, system identification of spinning membrane structures, solarelastic stability analysis of heliogyro solar sails, including stability during blade deployment, and results from small-scale in vacuo dynamics experiments with spinning high-aspect ratio membranes. A low-cost, rideshare payload heliogyro technology demonstration mission concept, used as a mission context for these heliogyro structural dynamics and solarelasticity investigations, is also described.

  13. The Sun's interior structure and dynamics, and the solar cycle

    CERN Document Server

    Broomhall, A -M; Howe, R; Norton, A A; Thompson, M J

    2014-01-01

    The Sun's internal structure and dynamics can be studied with helioseismology, which uses the Sun's natural acoustic oscillations to build up a profile of the solar interior. We discuss how solar acoustic oscillations are affected by the Sun's magnetic field. Careful observations of these effects can be inverted to determine the variations in the structure and dynamics of the Sun's interior as the solar cycle progresses. Observed variations in the structure and dynamics can then be used to inform models of the solar dynamo, which are crucial to our understanding of how the Sun's magnetic field is generated and maintained.

  14. THE DYNAMICS OF THE MATRICS STRUCTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumitru CONSTANTINESCU

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationships organization-suppliers-customers have recently known major changes in the structure of services and have made the organization develop its managerial and professional competencies in order to do projects. The qualified organization is the most trust-worthy in the process of doing a project. The participation of an organization in doing projects depends on a multitude of factors. Out of these factors, the structural organization comes forth, as it represents the variable with the most important impact on a project’s quality, costs and lead time. From the organizational point of view, the matrix structure is frequently chosen for projects. The matrix structure generally coexists with the line structure. The two structures are contrastive. The line structure is based on the unity of command principle and is not open to cooperation and dialogue. The matrix structure encourages cooperation and communication, favours conflict, which is considered here a healthy and essential process. The matrix structure and the line structure claim their right to initiative. Conflict and the multidimensional integration of multiple hierarchies can be negotiated through the concept charisma – mediation, sustained by the matrix structure.

  15. Testing protein permeability of dialysis membranes using SDS-PAGE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, H; Melzer, H; Al-Bashir, A; Xu, X Q; Stiller, S

    2002-05-01

    Permeability of dialysis membranes for high molecular weight compounds should be similar to that of the glomerular membrane in order to remove uremic toxins like the human kidney does. In order to evaluate permeability of high-flux dialysis membranes SDS-PAGE is applied for examination of filtrate of dialysers during routine dialysis with different membranes. SDS-PAGE analysis is performed with silver staining method according to the modification of Melzer (5) and consecutive laser densitometry. The protein pattern of filtrate from dialysis membranes is similar to that of the glomerular membrane containing IgG, transferrin, albumin, alpha-1-microglobulin, retinol binding protein and beta-2-microglobulin. Comparing different membranes there are considerable differences depending on cut-off, charge and adsorption capacity of the particular membrane. In all membranes tested permeability of proteins decreases during one treatment session. Protein permeability of high-flux dialysis membranes is similar to the gloemerular membrane but modified according to pore-size, surface charge, adsorption and time on dialysis. In contrast to the glomerular membrane in each of the investigated membranes protein permeability decreases during function.

  16. Sensitive dependence of network dynamics on network structure

    CERN Document Server

    Nishikawa, Takashi; Motter, Adilson E

    2016-01-01

    The relation between network structure and dynamics is determinant for the behavior of complex systems in numerous domains. An important longstanding problem concerns the properties of the networks that optimize the dynamics with respect to a given performance measure. Here we show that such optimization can lead to sensitive dependence of the dynamics on the structure of the network. Specifically, we demonstrate that the stability of the dynamical state, as determined by the maximum Lyapunov exponent, can exhibit a cusp-like dependence on the number of nodes and links as well as on the size of perturbations applied to the network structure. As mechanisms underlying this sensitivity, we identify discontinuous transitions occurring in the complement of optimal networks and the prevalence of eigenvector degeneracy in these networks. These findings establish a unified characterization of networks optimized for dynamical stability in diffusively coupled systems, which we illustrate using Turing instability in act...

  17. Segmenting Dynamic Human Action via Statistical Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Dare; Andersson, Annika; Saffran, Jenny; Meyer, Meredith

    2008-01-01

    Human social, cognitive, and linguistic functioning depends on skills for rapidly processing action. Identifying distinct acts within the dynamic motion flow is one basic component of action processing; for example, skill at segmenting action is foundational to action categorization, verb learning, and comprehension of novel action sequences. Yet…

  18. Electronic-structural dynamics in graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella Gierz

    2016-09-01

    meV, a transient enhancement of the electron-phonon coupling constant is observed, providing interesting perspective for experiments that report light-enhanced superconductivity in doped fullerites in which a similar lattice mode was excited. All the studies reviewed here have important implications for applications of graphene in optoelectronic devices and for the dynamical engineering of electronic properties with light.

  19. Dynamic network structure of interhemispheric coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doron, Karl W; Bassett, Danielle S; Gazzaniga, Michael S

    2012-11-13

    Fifty years ago Gazzaniga and coworkers published a seminal article that discussed the separate roles of the cerebral hemispheres in humans. Today, the study of interhemispheric communication is facilitated by a battery of novel data analysis techniques drawn from across disciplinary boundaries, including dynamic systems theory and network theory. These techniques enable the characterization of dynamic changes in the brain's functional connectivity, thereby providing an unprecedented means of decoding interhemispheric communication. Here, we illustrate the use of these techniques to examine interhemispheric coordination in healthy human participants performing a split visual field experiment in which they process lexical stimuli. We find that interhemispheric coordination is greater when lexical information is introduced to the right hemisphere and must subsequently be transferred to the left hemisphere for language processing than when it is directly introduced to the language-dominant (left) hemisphere. Further, we find that putative functional modules defined by coherent interhemispheric coordination come online in a transient manner, highlighting the underlying dynamic nature of brain communication. Our work illustrates that recently developed dynamic, network-based analysis techniques can provide novel and previously unapproachable insights into the role of interhemispheric coordination in cognition.

  20. Molecular dynamics modeling of structural battery components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verners, O.; Van Duin, A.C.T.; Wagemaker, M.; Simone, A.

    2015-01-01

    A crosslinked polymer based solid electrolyte prototype material –poly(propylene glycol) diacrylate– is studied using the reactive molecular dynamics force field ReaxFF. The focus of the study is the evaluation of the effects of equilibration and added plasticizer (ethylene carbonate) or anion compo

  1. Simulation of dynamic behavior of surfactants on a hydrophobic surface using periodic-shell boundary molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Daiki; Horikoshi, Satoshi; Sakai, Kenichi; Sakai, Hideki; Abe, Masahiko

    2011-01-01

    The adsorption and aggregation behaviors of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) on a hydrophobic graphite surface were examined using a novel molecular dynamics (MD) simulation with the periodic-shell boundary condition (PSBC). Differences in the adsorption behavior of SDS and CTAB molecules were clearly shown on the hydrophobic surface. Unexpectedly, the SDS molecules approached the graphite surface with their hydrophilic head groups. This unexpected approach mode was thought to be due to the aqueous layer on the graphite surface. The hydrophobic moiety of SDS molecules repeatedly adsorbed and desorbed on the graphite surface. In addition, SDS molecules kept moving on the graphite surface; thus, they did not form a stable adsorption layer. In contrast to SDS, the hydrophobic moiety of CTAB molecules approached the graphite surface at the primary step of adsorption. The hydrophobic moieties of CTAB molecules came close to each other, whereas the hydrophilic groups separated from one another. This result suggests that the CTAB molecules form molecular assemblies with a curved structure. The simulation results were consistent with the experimental observations. A clear difference between the adsorption behavior of SDS and CTAB molecules was revealed by MD simulations with PSBC.

  2. Site-directed spectroscopic probes of actomyosin structural dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, David D; Kast, David; Korman, Vicci L

    2009-01-01

    Spectroscopy of myosin and actin has entered a golden age. High-resolution crystal structures of isolated actin and myosin have been used to construct detailed models for the dynamic actomyosin interactions that move muscle. Improved protein mutagenesis and expression technologies have facilitated site-directed labeling with fluorescent and spin probes. Spectroscopic instrumentation has achieved impressive advances in sensitivity and resolution. Here we highlight the contributions of site-directed spectroscopic probes to understanding the structural dynamics of myosin II and its actin complexes in solution and muscle fibers. We emphasize studies that probe directly the movements of structural elements within the myosin catalytic and light-chain domains, and changes in the dynamics of both actin and myosin due to their alternating strong and weak interactions in the ATPase cycle. A moving picture emerges in which single biochemical states produce multiple structural states, and transitions between states of order and dynamic disorder power the actomyosin engine.

  3. Structural Dynamics Within and Between Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fombrun, Charles J.

    1986-01-01

    The concept of structure is recast as an instantaneous correspondence between an infrastructure, a sociostructure, and a superstructure--manifestations of collective life juxtaposed through technological solutions, political exchanges, and social interpretations involving organizations. Ultimately, structuring is a dialectical unfolding of…

  4. Dynamic characteristics of large repetitive framelike structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayfeh, A. H.; Hartle, M. S.

    1984-01-01

    Using a building block approach and starting with a single element, expressions for the energy of various two-dimensional frametype gridwork configurations are derived. These are then used to develop energy equivalent continua for the gridworks. Equations of motion and associated boundary conditions are obtained for the continua. Some dynamic characteristics of these continua are investigated and compared with corresponding results obtained from finite element codes and also with some available theoretical predictions.

  5. Jellyfish modulate bacterial dynamic and community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinta, Tinkara; Kogovšek, Tjaša; Malej, Alenka; Turk, Valentina

    2012-01-01

    Jellyfish blooms have increased in coastal areas around the world and the outbreaks have become longer and more frequent over the past few decades. The Mediterranean Sea is among the heavily affected regions and the common bloom-forming taxa are scyphozoans Aurelia aurita s.l., Pelagia noctiluca, and Rhizostoma pulmo. Jellyfish have few natural predators, therefore their carcasses at the termination of a bloom represent an organic-rich substrate that supports rapid bacterial growth, and may have a large impact on the surrounding environment. The focus of this study was to explore whether jellyfish substrate have an impact on bacterial community phylotype selection. We conducted in situ jellyfish-enrichment experiment with three different jellyfish species. Bacterial dynamic together with nutrients were monitored to assess decaying jellyfish-bacteria dynamics. Our results show that jellyfish biomass is characterized by protein rich organic matter, which is highly bioavailable to 'jellyfish-associated' and 'free-living' bacteria, and triggers rapid shifts in bacterial population dynamics and composition. Based on 16S rRNA clone libraries and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis, we observed a rapid shift in community composition from unculturable Alphaproteobacteria to culturable species of Gammaproteobacteria and Flavobacteria. The results of sequence analyses of bacterial isolates and of total bacterial community determined by culture independent genetic analysis showed the dominance of the Pseudoalteromonadaceae and the Vibrionaceae families. Elevated levels of dissolved proteins, dissolved organic and inorganic nutrient release, bacterial abundance and carbon production as well as ammonium concentrations characterized the degradation process. The biochemical composition of jellyfish species may influence changes in the amount of accumulated dissolved organic and inorganic nutrients. Our results can contribute insights into possible changes in

  6. Jellyfish modulate bacterial dynamic and community structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tinkara Tinta

    Full Text Available Jellyfish blooms have increased in coastal areas around the world and the outbreaks have become longer and more frequent over the past few decades. The Mediterranean Sea is among the heavily affected regions and the common bloom-forming taxa are scyphozoans Aurelia aurita s.l., Pelagia noctiluca, and Rhizostoma pulmo. Jellyfish have few natural predators, therefore their carcasses at the termination of a bloom represent an organic-rich substrate that supports rapid bacterial growth, and may have a large impact on the surrounding environment. The focus of this study was to explore whether jellyfish substrate have an impact on bacterial community phylotype selection. We conducted in situ jellyfish-enrichment experiment with three different jellyfish species. Bacterial dynamic together with nutrients were monitored to assess decaying jellyfish-bacteria dynamics. Our results show that jellyfish biomass is characterized by protein rich organic matter, which is highly bioavailable to 'jellyfish-associated' and 'free-living' bacteria, and triggers rapid shifts in bacterial population dynamics and composition. Based on 16S rRNA clone libraries and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE analysis, we observed a rapid shift in community composition from unculturable Alphaproteobacteria to culturable species of Gammaproteobacteria and Flavobacteria. The results of sequence analyses of bacterial isolates and of total bacterial community determined by culture independent genetic analysis showed the dominance of the Pseudoalteromonadaceae and the Vibrionaceae families. Elevated levels of dissolved proteins, dissolved organic and inorganic nutrient release, bacterial abundance and carbon production as well as ammonium concentrations characterized the degradation process. The biochemical composition of jellyfish species may influence changes in the amount of accumulated dissolved organic and inorganic nutrients. Our results can contribute insights into

  7. Protein dynamics derived from clusters of crystal structures.

    OpenAIRE

    van Aalten, D M; Conn, D A; de Groot, B L; Berendsen, H J; Findlay, J B; Amadei, A

    1997-01-01

    A method is presented to mathematically extract concerted structural transitions in proteins from collections of crystal structures. The "essential dynamics" procedure is used to filter out small-amplitude fluctuations from such a set of structures; the remaining large conformational changes describe motions such as those important for the uptake/release of substrate/ligand and in catalytic reactions. The method is applied to sets of x-ray structures for a number of proteins, and the results ...

  8. Broadband Structural Dynamics: Understanding the Impulse-Response of Structures Across Multiple Length and Time Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-18

    annual progress in this effort in four research areas: (1) structural health monitoring, (2) experimental structural dynamics , (3) spectral modeling of wave propagation, and (4) wavelet analysis for damage detection.

  9. The structural and dynamical variables of pentane isomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Tarika K.; Vaghela, M. V.; Gajjar, P. N.

    2016-05-01

    We derived structural and dynamical properties of pentane isomers: normal pentane, iso-pentane and neo pentane for liquid and gaseous state. We use molecular dynamics simulation to calculate the dynamical properties of pentane isomers for number of particles 729 using the intermolecular potential and force due to Lenard Jones potential. The computations also include mean square displacement and self diffusion co-efficient using Einstein relation. In structural properties, structure factor and phonon frequency are obtaining from P Y Method and Hubbard and Beeby Approach respectively. The Intermolecular potential and self diffusion co-efficient depend on the branching in the structure. The pair correlation function and phonon dispersion curves revels the complex structure of neo-pentane with respect to iso-pentane and n-pentane.

  10. Structure-based control of complex networks with nonlinear dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Zañudo, Jorge G T; Albert, Réka

    2016-01-01

    Given the network of interactions underlying a complex system, what can we learn about controlling such a system solely from its structure? Over a century of research in control theory has given us tools to answer this question, which were widely applied in science and engineering. Yet the current tools do not always consider the inherently nonlinear dynamics of real systems and the naturally occurring system states in their definition of "control", a term whose interpretation varies across disciplines. Here we use a new mathematical framework for structure-based control of networks governed by a broad class of nonlinear dynamics that includes the major dynamic models of biological, technological, and social processes. This framework provides realizable node overrides that steer a system towards any of its natural long term dynamic behaviors and which are guaranteed to be effective regardless of the dynamic details and parameters of the underlying system. We use this framework on several real networks, compar...

  11. Dynamic Analysis of Composite Structural System for Looms Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jigar K. Sevalia

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available All the structures subjected to any kind of loads or displacement tends to behave dynamically. Thus the structures are always under continuous loading. The industrial buildings have to support the machineries in motion which are under high degree of vibrations. And so the design of base and the foundations of such structures under vibrations are very important and need to be stable. Problems of dynamics of bases and foundations are to be studied carefully, so as to understand the response characteristics of the power loom industry structure. This is very important from the economic point of view as well as to secure the stability and safety of the structure; dynamic analysis was carried out for Ground + One storey industry load bearing structure using STAAD.Pro software. In this paper, an attempt has been made to study the dynamic analysis of the structure under vibrations caused by reciprocating type machines. This paper makes attempt to study the effects of various structural parameters like Beam Size, Column Size and Storey Height and Wall Thickness variation on Frequency and Displacement of the industrial building which in future will serve as guidelines to the structural engineers and the industry people.

  12. Opinion dynamics on a group structured adaptive network

    CERN Document Server

    Gargiulo, F

    2009-01-01

    Many models have been proposed to analyze the evolution of opinion structure due to the interaction of individuals in their social environment. Such models analyze the spreading of ideas both in completely interacting backgrounds and on social networks, where each person has a finite set of interlocutors.Moreover also the investigation on the topological structure of social networks has been object of several analysis, both from the theoretical and the empirical point of view. In this framework a particularly important area of study regards the community structure inside social networks.In this paper we analyze the reciprocal feedback between the opinions of the individuals and the structure of the interpersonal relationships at the level of community structures. For this purpose we define a group based random network and we study how this structure co-evolve with opinion dynamics processes. We observe that the adaptive network structure affects the opinion dynamics process helping the consensus formation. Th...

  13. Cluster structure and dynamics in gels and glasses

    CERN Document Server

    Pastore, Raffaele; Fierro, Anallisa; Ciamarra, Massimo Pica; Coniglio, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The dynamical arrest of gels is the consequence of a well defined structural phase transition, leading to the formation of a spanning cluster of bonded particles. The dynamical glass transition, instead, is not accompanied by any clear structural signature. Nevertheless, both transitions are characterized by the emergence of dynamical heterogeneities. Reviewing recent results from numerical simulations, we discuss the behavior of dynamical heterogeneities in different systems and show that a clear connection with the structure exists in the case of gels. The emerging picture may be also relevant for the more elusive case of glasses. We show, as an example, that the relaxation process of a simple glass-forming model can be related to a reverse percolation transition and discuss further perspective in this direction.

  14. The semi-dynamical reflection equation: solutions and structure matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avan, J; Zambon, C [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique et Modelisation, Universite de Cergy-Pontoise (CNRS UMR 8089), Saint-Martin 2 avenue Adolphe Chauvin, 95302 Cergy-Pontoise Cedex (France)], E-mail: avan@u-cergy.fr, E-mail: cristina.zambon@u-cergy.fr

    2008-05-16

    Explicit solutions of the non-constant semi-dynamical reflection equation are constructed, together with suitable parametrizations of their structure matrices. Considering the semi-dynamical reflection equation with rational non-constant Arutyunov-Chekhov-Frolov structure matrices, and a specific meromorphic ansatz, it is found that only two sets of the previously found constant solutions are extendible to the non-constant case. In order to simplify future constructions of spin-chain Hamiltonians, a parametrization procedure is applied explicitly to all elements of the semi-dynamical reflection equation available. Interesting expressions for 'twists' and R-matrices entering the parametrization procedure are found. In particular, some expressions for the R-matrices seem to appear here for the first time. In addition, a new set of consistent structure matrices for the semi-dynamical reflection equation is obtained.

  15. Impact of SDS surfactant on the interactions of Cu(2+) ions with the amyloidogenic region of human prion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecel, Aleksandra; Migliorini, Caterina; Valensin, Daniela; Luczkowski, Marek; Kozlowski, Henryk

    2015-08-01

    Prion diseases, known as Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies (TSEs), are a group of fatal neuronal, and to some extent infectious disorders, associated with a pathogenic protein agent called prion protein (PrP). The human prion protein (hPrP) fragment encompassing the 91-127 region, also known as the amyloidogenic domain, comprises two copper-binding sites corresponding to His-96 and His-111 residues that act as anchors for Cu(2+) binding. In this work, we investigated Cu(2+) interaction with hPrP91-127 in the presence of the anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), which induces a partial α-helix folding of the peptide. Our data indicate that the Cu(2+) coordination ability of the amyloidogenic fragment in the presence of SDS micelles is significantly different to that observed in aqueous solution. This is mainly due to the fact that SDS micelles strongly stabilize the formation of the α-helical structure of the peptide backbone, which is well conserved also upon Cu(2+) binding, contrary to the random coil conformation mainly assumed by hPrP91-127 in aqueous solutions. Potentiometric and spectroscopic studies clearly indicate that in the case of SDS containing solutions, Cu(2+) ions coordinate simultaneously to both imidazoles, while in the case of water solutions, metal ion coordination involves only a single His side chain, which individually acts as an independent Cu(2+) anchoring site.

  16. NEW TYPE OF VIBRATION STRUCTURE OF VERTICAL DYNAMIC BALANCING MACHINE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Dinggen; Cao Jiguang; Chen Chuanyao; Wang Junwen

    2004-01-01

    A new type of vibration structure of vertical dynamic balancing machine is designed, which is based on the analysis for swing frame of a traditional vertical dynamic balancing machine. The static unbalance and couple unbalance can be separated effectively by using the new machine with the new swing frame. By building the dynamics model, the advantages of the new structure are discussed in detail. The modal and harmonic response are analyzed by using the ANSYS7.0. By comparing the finite element modal analysis with the experimental modal analysis, the natural frequencies and vibration modes are found out. There are many spring boards in the new swing frame. Their stiffness is different and assort with each other. Furthermore, there are three sensors on the measurement points. Therefore, the new dynamic balancing machine can measure the static unbalance and couple unbalance directly, and the influence between them is faint. The new structure has the function of belt-strain compensation to improve the measurement precision. The practical result indicates that the new vertical dynamic balancing machine is suitable for inertial measurement of flying objects, and can overcome the shortcomings of traditional double-plane vertical dynamic balancing machines. The vertical dynamic balancing machine with the new vibration structure can be widely used in the future applications. The modeling and analysis of the new vibration structure provide theoretic instruction and practical experience for designing new type of vertical dynamic balancing machines. Based on the design principles such as stiffness-matching, frequency-adjacence and strain-compensation and so on, various new type of vibration structures can be designed.

  17. Introducing Students to Structural Dynamics and Earthquake Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthoine, Armelle; Marazzi, Francesco; Tirelli, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    The European Laboratory for Structural Assessment (ELSA) is one of the world's main laboratories for seismic studies. Besides its research activities, it also aims to bring applied science closer to the public. This article describes teaching activities based on a demonstration shaking table which is used to introduce the structural dynamics of…

  18. Structure and Dynamics of the VAULT COMPLEX

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. van Zon (Arend)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractVaults are the largest ribonucleoprotein particles found in eukaryotic cells. The maincomponent of these 13 MDa structures is the Mr 100,000 major vault protein (MVP).In mammalian cells, about 96 copies of this protein are necessary to form one vaultparticle. Two additional proteins are

  19. Emergence of structured communities through evolutionary dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtilerman, Elad; Kessler, David A; Shnerb, Nadav M

    2015-10-21

    Species-rich communities, in which many competing species coexist in a single trophic level, are quite frequent in nature, but pose a formidable theoretical challenge. In particular, it is known that complex competitive systems become unstable and unfeasible when the number of species is large. Recently, many studies have attributed the stability of natural communities to the structure of the interspecific interaction network, yet the nature of such structures and the underlying mechanisms responsible for them remain open questions. Here we introduce an evolutionary model, based on the generic Lotka-Volterra competitive framework, from which a stable, structured, diverse community emerges spontaneously. The modular structure of the competition matrix reflects the phylogeny of the community, in agreement with the hierarchial taxonomic classification. Closely related species tend to have stronger niche overlap and weaker fitness differences, as opposed to pairs of species from different modules. The competitive-relatedness hypothesis and the idea of emergent neutrality are discussed in the context of this evolutionary model. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Oxide Interfaces: emergent structure and dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarke, Roy [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2016-08-16

    This Final Report describes the scientific accomplishments that have been achieved with support from grant DE-FG02-06ER46273 during the period 6/1/2012– 5/31/2016. The overall goals of this program were focused on the behavior of epitaxial oxide heterostructures at atomic length scales (Ångstroms), and correspondingly short time-scales (fs -ns). The results contributed fundamentally to one of the currently most active frontiers in condensed matter physics research, namely to better understand the intricate relationship between charge, lattice, orbital and spin degrees of freedom that are exhibited by complex oxide heterostructures. The findings also contributed towards an important technological goal which was to achieve a better basic understanding of structural and electronic correlations so that the unusual properties of complex oxides can be exploited for energy-critical applications. Specific research directions included: probing the microscopic behavior of epitaxial interfaces and buried layers; novel materials structures that emerge from ionic and electronic reconfiguration at epitaxial interfaces; ultrahigh-resolution mapping of the atomic structure of heterointerfaces using synchrotron-based x-ray surface scattering, including direct methods of phase retrieval; using ultrafast lasers to study the effects of transient strain on coherent manipulation of multi-ferroic order parameters; and investigating structural ordering and relaxation processes in real-time.

  1. DYNAMIC OPTIMIZATION FOR UNCERTAIN STRUCTURES USING INTERVAL METHOD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ChertSub-A-; WuJie; LiuChun

    2003-01-01

    An interval optimization method for the dynamic response of structures with interval parameters is presented. The matrices of structures with interval parameters are given. Combining the interval extension with the perturbation, the method for interval dynamic response analysis is derived. The interval optimization problem is transformed into a corresponding deterministic one. Because the mean values and the uncertainties of the interval parameters can be elected design variables, more information of the optimization results can be obtained by the present method than that obtained by the deterministic one. The present method is implemented for a truss structure. The numerical results show that the method is effective.

  2. International Conference on Structural Nonlinear Dynamics and Diagnosis

    CERN Document Server

    CSNDD 2012; CSNDD 2014

    2015-01-01

    This book, which presents the peer-reviewed post-proceedings of CSNDD 2012 and CSNDD 2014, addresses the important role that relevant concepts and tools from nonlinear and complex dynamics could play in present and future engineering applications. It includes 22 chapters contributed by outstanding researchers and covering various aspects of applications, including: structural health monitoring, diagnosis and damage detection, experimental methodologies, active vibration control and smart structures, passive control of structures using nonlinear energy sinks, vibro-impact dynamic MEMS/NEMS/AFM, energy-harvesting materials and structures, and time-delayed feedback control, as well as aspects of deterministic versus stochastic dynamics and control of nonlinear phenomena in physics.  Researchers and engineers interested in the challenges posed and opportunities offered by nonlinearities in the development of passive and active control strategies, energy harvesting, novel design criteria, modeling and characteriz...

  3. Dynamics and control of diseases in networks with community structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Salathé

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of infectious diseases spread via direct person-to-person transmission (such as influenza, smallpox, HIV/AIDS, etc. depends on the underlying host contact network. Human contact networks exhibit strong community structure. Understanding how such community structure affects epidemics may provide insights for preventing the spread of disease between communities by changing the structure of the contact network through pharmaceutical or non-pharmaceutical interventions. We use empirical and simulated networks to investigate the spread of disease in networks with community structure. We find that community structure has a major impact on disease dynamics, and we show that in networks with strong community structure, immunization interventions targeted at individuals bridging communities are more effective than those simply targeting highly connected individuals. Because the structure of relevant contact networks is generally not known, and vaccine supply is often limited, there is great need for efficient vaccination algorithms that do not require full knowledge of the network. We developed an algorithm that acts only on locally available network information and is able to quickly identify targets for successful immunization intervention. The algorithm generally outperforms existing algorithms when vaccine supply is limited, particularly in networks with strong community structure. Understanding the spread of infectious diseases and designing optimal control strategies is a major goal of public health. Social networks show marked patterns of community structure, and our results, based on empirical and simulated data, demonstrate that community structure strongly affects disease dynamics. These results have implications for the design of control strategies.

  4. Dynamic energy absorption characteristics of hollow microlattice structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, YL; Schaedler, TA; Chen, X

    2014-10-01

    Hollow microlattice structures are promising candidates for advanced energy absorption and their characteristics under dynamic crushing are explored. The energy absorption can be significantly enhanced by inertial stabilization, shock wave effect and strain rate hardening effect. In this paper we combine theoretical analysis and comprehensive finite element method simulation to decouple the three effects, and then obtain a simple model to predict the overall dynamic effects of hollow microlattice structures. Inertial stabilization originates from the suppression of sudden crushing of the microlattice and its contribution scales with the crushing speed, v. Shock wave effect comes from the discontinuity across the plastic shock wave front during dynamic loading and its contribution scales with e. The strain rate effect increases the effective yield strength upon dynamic deformation and increases the energy absorption density. A mechanism map is established that illustrates the dominance of these three dynamic effects at a range of crushing speeds. Compared with quasi-static loading, the energy absorption capacity a dynamic loading of 250 m/s can be enhanced by an order of magnitude. The study may shed useful insight on designing and optimizing the energy absorption performance of hollow microlattice structures under various dynamic loads. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. SDS表面活性剂在纳米尺度多层石墨烯的吸附自组装分子模拟%Molecular simulations of adsorption self-assembly of SDS surfactants on nano-sized multilayer graphenes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘淑延; 陈琦; 吴彬; 杨晓宁

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out to study the structure and morphology of SDS adsorbed on nano-sized graphene surfaces in pure water and electrolyte solution. The effects of the layer numbers of the graphene on the adsorption self-assembly structure and the buoyant density of the SDS/graphene assemblies were explored. The simulation results show that the aggregate morphology was highly dependent on the layer number of the graphene in both solutions. The stretching of surfactants to solution was enhanced with increasing layer number, leading to expansion of the self-assembly structure. In the presence of electrolyte in the solution, the surfactant micelles of SDS were transformed from the rough multi-layer to hemi-cylinder structure. In the meantime, the buoyant densities of the SDS/graphene assemblies were found to increase linearly with increasing layer number of the graphene. This behavior provided a direct theoretical basis for graphene dispersion with controlled thickness using the density gradient ultracentrifugation in the surfactant aqueous solution.%采用分子动力学模拟分别研究了纯水和电解质溶液中 SDS 表面活性剂在纳米尺度石墨烯表面的自组装结构,考察了不同石墨烯层数对自组装吸附形态和SDS/石墨烯复合物悬浮密度的影响。模拟结果揭示了上述两种溶剂介质中,SDS的表面自组装结构形态与石墨烯的结构层数有关,增加石墨烯的层数能够加大吸附表面活性剂向溶液中的伸展程度,使表面活性剂自组装结构膨胀。此外电解质存在能够导致SDS表面活性剂在石墨烯表面吸附形态由多层结构向半圆胶束转化。模拟计算进一步发现SDS/石墨烯超分子复合物的悬浮密度随石墨烯层数的增加呈近似线性增加。

  6. The Hyades distance, structure, dynamics, and age

    CERN Document Server

    Perryman, M A C; Lebreton, Y; Gómez, A; Turon, C; De Strobel, G C; Mermilliod, J C; Robichon, N; Kovalevsky, J; Crifo, F

    1997-01-01

    We use absolute trigonometric parallaxes from the Hipparcos Catalogue to determine individual distances to members of the Hyades cluster, from which the 3-dimensional structure of the cluster can be derived. Inertially-referenced proper motions are used to rediscuss distance determinations based on convergent-point analyses. A combination of parallaxes and proper motions from Hipparcos, and radial velocities from ground-based observations, are used to determine the position and velocity components of candidate members with respect to the cluster centre, providing new information on cluster membership: 13 new candidate members within 20 pc of the cluster centre have been identified. Farther from the cluster centre there is a gradual merging between certain cluster members and field stars, both spatially and kinematically. Within the cluster, the kinematical structure is fully consistent with parallel space motion of the component stars with an internal velocity dispersion of about 0.3 km/s. The spatial structu...

  7. Cosmic Voids: structure, dynamics and galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    van de Weygaert, Rien

    2009-01-01

    In this review we discuss several aspects of Cosmic Voids. Voids are a major component of the large scale distribution of matter and galaxies in the Universe. They are of instrumental importance for understanding the emergence of the Cosmic Web. Their relatively simple shape and structure makes them into useful tools for extracting the value of a variety cosmic parameters, possibly including even that of the influence of dark energy. Perhaps most promising and challenging is the issue of the galaxies found within their realm. Not only does the pristine environment of voids provide a promising testing ground for assessing the role of environment on the formation and evolution of galaxies, the dearth of dwarf galaxies may even represent a serious challenge to the standard view of cosmic structure formation.

  8. Spatial Dynamic Structures and Mobility in Computation

    CERN Document Server

    Aman, Bogdan

    2011-01-01

    Membrane computing is a well-established and successful research field which belongs to the more general area of molecular computing. Membrane computing aims at defining parallel and non-deterministic computing models, called membrane systems or P Systems, which abstract from the functioning and structure of the cell. A membrane system consists of a spatial structure, a hierarchy of membranes which do not intersect, with a distinguishable membrane called skin surrounding all of them. A membrane without any other membranes inside is elementary, while a non-elementary membrane is a composite membrane. The membranes define demarcations between regions; for each membrane there is a unique associated region. Since we have a one-to-one correspondence, we sometimes use membrane instead of region, and vice-versa. The space outside the skin membrane is called the environment. In this thesis we define and investigate variants of systems of mobile membranes as models for molecular computing and as modelling paradigms fo...

  9. Dynamic kirigami structures for integrated solar tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamoureux, Aaron; Lee, Kyusang; Shlian, Matthew; Forrest, Stephen R; Shtein, Max

    2015-09-08

    Optical tracking is often combined with conventional flat panel solar cells to maximize electrical power generation over the course of a day. However, conventional trackers are complex and often require costly and cumbersome structural components to support system weight. Here we use kirigami (the art of paper cutting) to realize novel solar cells where tracking is integral to the structure at the substrate level. Specifically, an elegant cut pattern is made in thin-film gallium arsenide solar cells, which are then stretched to produce an array of tilted surface elements which can be controlled to within ±1°. We analyze the combined optical and mechanical properties of the tracking system, and demonstrate a mechanically robust system with optical tracking efficiencies matching conventional trackers. This design suggests a pathway towards enabling new applications for solar tracking, as well as inspiring a broader range of optoelectronic and mechanical devices.

  10. Information diversity in structure and dynamics of simulated neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäki-Marttunen, Tuomo; Aćimović, Jugoslava; Nykter, Matti; Kesseli, Juha; Ruohonen, Keijo; Yli-Harja, Olli; Linne, Marja-Leena

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal networks exhibit a wide diversity of structures, which contributes to the diversity of the dynamics therein. The presented work applies an information theoretic framework to simultaneously analyze structure and dynamics in neuronal networks. Information diversity within the structure and dynamics of a neuronal network is studied using the normalized compression distance. To describe the structure, a scheme for generating distance-dependent networks with identical in-degree distribution but variable strength of dependence on distance is presented. The resulting network structure classes possess differing path length and clustering coefficient distributions. In parallel, comparable realistic neuronal networks are generated with NETMORPH simulator and similar analysis is done on them. To describe the dynamics, network spike trains are simulated using different network structures and their bursting behaviors are analyzed. For the simulation of the network activity the Izhikevich model of spiking neurons is used together with the Tsodyks model of dynamical synapses. We show that the structure of the simulated neuronal networks affects the spontaneous bursting activity when measured with bursting frequency and a set of intraburst measures: the more locally connected networks produce more and longer bursts than the more random networks. The information diversity of the structure of a network is greatest in the most locally connected networks, smallest in random networks, and somewhere in between in the networks between order and disorder. As for the dynamics, the most locally connected networks and some of the in-between networks produce the most complex intraburst spike trains. The same result also holds for sparser of the two considered network densities in the case of full spike trains.

  11. Dynamics-based Nondestructive Structural Monitoring Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-21

    in the practice of non- destructive evaluation ( NDE ) and structural health monitoring (SHM). Guided wave techniques have several advantages over...conventional bulk wave ultrasonic NDE /SHM techniques. Some of these advantages are outlined in Table I. However, in addition to the advantages of...PVDF transducers for SHM applications with controlled guided wave modes and frequencies [7]. Wilcox used EMATs with circular coils in a guided wave

  12. Dynamics-based Nondestructive Structural Monitoring Teclrniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-21

    destructive evaluation ( NDE ) and structural health monitoring (SHM). Guided wave techniques have several advantages over conventional bulk wave...ultrasonic NDE /SHM techniques. Some of these advantages are outlined in Table I. However, in addition to the advantages of guided waves comes an...PVDF transducers for SHM applications with controlled guided wave modes and frequencies [7]. Wilcox used EMATs with circular coils in a guided wave

  13. Structural Optimization of Machine Gun Based on Dynamic Stability Concept

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yong-jian; WANG Rui-lin; ZHANG Ben-jun

    2008-01-01

    Improving the firing accuracy is a final goal of structural optimization of machine guns. The main factors which affect the dispersion accuracy of machine gun are analyzed. Based on the concept of dynamic stability, a structural optimization model is built up, and the sensitivity of dispersion accuracy to design variables is analyzed. The optimization results of a type of machine gun show that the method is valid, feasible, and can be used as a guide to the structural optimization of other automatic weapons.

  14. Nonlocalized cluster dynamics and nuclear molecular structure

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Bo; Horiuchi, Hisashi; Ren, Zhongzhou; Röpke, Gerd; Schuck, Peter; Tohsaki, Akihiro; Xu, Chang; Yamada, Taiichi

    2013-01-01

    A container picture is proposed for understanding cluster dynamics where the clusters make nonlocalized motion occupying the lowest orbit of the cluster mean-field potential characterized by the size parameter $``B"$ in the THSR (Tohsaki-Horiuchi-Schuck-R\\"{o}pke) wave function. The nonlocalized cluster aspects of the inversion-doublet bands in $^{20}$Ne which have been considered as a typical manifestation of localized clustering are discussed. So far unexplained puzzling features of the THSR wave function, namely that after angular-momentum projection for two cluster systems the prolate THSR wave function is almost 100$\\%$ equivalent to an oblate THSR wave function is clarified. It is shown that the true intrinsic two-cluster THSR configuration is nonetheless prolate. The proposal of the container picture is based on the fact that typical cluster systems, 2$\\alpha$, 3$\\alpha$, and $\\alpha$+$^{16}$O, are all well described by a single THSR wave function. It will be shown for the case of linear-chain states w...

  15. Dynamics in Sequence Space for RNA Secondary Structure Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthies, Marco C; Bienert, Stefan; Torda, Andrew E

    2012-10-01

    We have implemented a method for the design of RNA sequences that should fold to arbitrary secondary structures. A popular energy model allows one to take the derivative with respect to composition, which can then be interpreted as a force and used for Newtonian dynamics in sequence space. Combined with a negative design term, one can rapidly sample sequences which are compatible with a desired secondary structure via simulated annealing. Results for 360 structures were compared with those from another nucleic acid design program using measures such as the probability of the target structure and an ensemble-weighted distance to the target structure.

  16. Structure and Dynamics of the Interstellar Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo; Moles, Mariano; Melnick, Jorge

    Here for the first time is a book that treats practically all aspects of modern research in interstellar matter astrophysics. 20 review articles and 40 carefully selected and refereed papers give a thorough overview of the field and convey the flavor of enthusiastic colloquium discussions to the reader. The book includes sections on: - Molecular clouds, star formation and HII regions - Mechanical energy sources - Discs, outflows, jets and HH objects - The Orion Nebula - The extragalactic interstellar medium - Interstellar matter at high galactic latitudes - The structure of the interstellar medium

  17. Structure and dynamics of magnetic nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, K.N.; Bødker, F.; Hansen, M.F.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we present X-ray and neutron diffraction data illustrating aspects of crystal and magnetic structures of ferromagnetic alpha-Fe and antiferromagnetic NiO nanoparticles, as well as inelastic neutron scattering studies of the magnetic fluctuations in NiO and in canted antiferromagneti...... alpha-Fe2O3. In the inelastic case we make use of the fact that we can study both the superparamagnetic relaxation and collective magnetic excitations of the whole particle moment at the antiferromagnetic Bragg positions. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved....

  18. Structure and Dynamics of Dinucleosomes Assessed by Atomic Force Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina A. Filenko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamics of nucleosomes and their interactions are important for understanding the mechanism of chromatin assembly. Internucleosomal interaction is required for the formation of higher-order chromatin structures. Although H1 histone is critically involved in the process of chromatin assembly, direct internucleosomal interactions contribute to this process as well. To characterize the interactions of nucleosomes within the nucleosome array, we designed a dinucleosome and performed direct AFM imaging. The analysis of the AFM data showed dinucleosomes are very dynamic systems, enabling the nucleosomes to move in a broad range along the DNA template. Di-nucleosomes in close proximity were observed, but their population was low. The use of the zwitterionic detergent, CHAPS, increased the dynamic range of the di-nucleosome, facilitating the formation of tight di-nucleosomes. The role of CHAPS and similar natural products in chromatin structure and dynamics is also discussed.

  19. Intrinsically disordered proteins: structural and functional dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wallin S

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Stefan Wallin Department of Physics and Physical Oceanography, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s, NL, Canada Abstract: The classical view holds that proteins fold into essentially unique three-dimensional structures before becoming biologically active. However, studies over the last several years have provided broad and convincing evidence that some proteins do not adopt a single structure and yet are fully functional. These intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs have been found to be highly prevalent in many genomes, including human, and play key roles in central cellular processes, such as regulation of transcription and translation, cell cycle, and cell signaling. Moreover, IDPs are overrepresented among proteins implicated in disease, including various cancers and neurodegenerative disorders. Intense efforts, by using both experimental and computational approaches, are consequently under way to uncover the molecular mechanisms that underpin the roles of IDPs in biology and disease. This review provides an introduction to the general biophysical properties of IDPs and discusses some of the recent emerging areas in IDP research, including the roles of IDPs in allosteric regulation, regulatory unfolding, and formation of intracellular membrane-less organelles. In addition, recent attempts at therapeutic targeting of IDPs by small molecules, noting in particular that IDPs represent a potentially important source of new drug targets in light of their central role in protein–protein interaction networks, are also reviewed. Keywords: natively unfolded proteins, unstructured proteins, protein folding, protein–protein interaction, cell regulation, signaling, drug development, inhibitors

  20. Ab initio theory for ultrafast magnetization dynamics with a dynamic band structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, B. Y.; Haag, M.; Fähnle, M.

    2016-09-01

    Laser-induced modifications of magnetic materials on very small spatial dimensions and ultrashort timescales are a promising field for novel storage and spintronic devices. Therefore, the contribution of electron-electron spin-flip scattering to the ultrafast demagnetization of ferromagnets after an ultrashort laser excitation is investigated. In this work, the dynamical change of the band structure resulting from the change of the magnetization in time is taken into account on an ab initio level. We find a large influence of the dynamical band structure on the magnetization dynamics and we illustrate the thermalization and relaxation process after laser irradiation. Treating the dynamical band structure yields a demagnetization comparable to the experimental one.

  1. Structure and conformational dynamics of scaffolded DNA origami nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Keyao; Bricker, William P; Ratanalert, Sakul; Bathe, Mark

    2017-06-20

    Synthetic DNA is a highly programmable nanoscale material that can be designed to self-assemble into 3D structures that are fully determined by underlying Watson-Crick base pairing. The double crossover (DX) design motif has demonstrated versatility in synthesizing arbitrary DNA nanoparticles on the 5-100 nm scale for diverse applications in biotechnology. Prior computational investigations of these assemblies include all-atom and coarse-grained modeling, but modeling their conformational dynamics remains challenging due to their long relaxation times and associated computational cost. We apply all-atom molecular dynamics and coarse-grained finite element modeling to DX-based nanoparticles to elucidate their fine-scale and global conformational structure and dynamics. We use our coarse-grained model with a set of secondary structural motifs to predict the equilibrium solution structures of 45 DX-based DNA origami nanoparticles including a tetrahedron, octahedron, icosahedron, cuboctahedron and reinforced cube. Coarse-grained models are compared with 3D cryo-electron microscopy density maps for these five DNA nanoparticles and with all-atom molecular dynamics simulations for the tetrahedron and octahedron. Our results elucidate non-intuitive atomic-level structural details of DX-based DNA nanoparticles, and offer a general framework for efficient computational prediction of global and local structural and mechanical properties of DX-based assemblies that are inaccessible to all-atom based models alone. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  2. Ab initio lattice dynamics of complex structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voss, Johannes

    2008-01-01

    systems in particular. A more detailed analysis of the phonon spectrum has been performed for the compound Mg(BH4)2, where several crystal symmetries have been proposed theoretically and experimentally. By means of an analysis of the instabilities of these structures, a new, stable phase has been......In this thesis, density functional theory is applied in a study of thermodynamic properties of so-called complex metal hydrides, which are promising materials for hydrogen storage applications. Since the unit cells of these crystals can be relatively large with many symmetrically inequivalent...... determined. Aiming at finding scaling relationships between alloy stabilities and computationally inexpensive properties, the stabilities of cation-alloyed metal aluminum hexahydrides have been studied. The analysis shows that charge density symmetries are correlated to the stability. In addition...

  3. Fundamental structures of dynamic social networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sekara, Vedran; Stopczynski, Arkadiusz; Jørgensen, Sune Lehmann

    2016-01-01

    and their interactions in the network of real-world person-to-person proximity measured via Bluetooth, as well as their telecommunication networks, online social media contacts, geolocation, and demographic data. These high-resolution data allow us to observe social groups directly, rendering community detection...... a pattern of recurring meetings across weeks and months, each with varying degrees of regularity. Taken together, these findings provide a powerful simplification of the social network, where cores represent fundamental structures expressed with strong temporal and spatial regularity. Using this framework......, we explore the complex interplay between social and geospatial behavior, documenting how the formation of cores is preceded by coordination behavior in the communication networks and demonstrating that social behavior can be predicted with high precision....

  4. Modeling structural dynamic behavior of SSME components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefling, Larry A.; Saxon, J. B.; Prickett, T. L.

    1991-01-01

    FEM studies are presented of the nozzle and the low-pressure fuel-pump inducer designs for the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) to analyze the effects of structural vibrations. FEM preprocessing software based on a CAD system is employed to develop a model of the component's sophisticated geometry. The nozzle geometry is also defined by means of the preprocessing technique and subsequently analyzed with respect to time-transient loading. The analysis is conducted with a Cray supercomputer using the SPAR/EAL FEM program. The investigation of the nozzle demonstrates the advantageous use of symmetry in the determination of nozzle response to SSME start-up transients. Plots of time vs strain are developed for gages on the nozzle wall and steerhorn tubing. The results of the inducer modeling are found to be adequate for investigating the component's principle modes, and the nozzle results indicate the suitability of the FEM techniques for optimizing the design of engine components.

  5. In situ structure and dynamics of DNA origami determined through molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jejoong; Aksimentiev, Aleksei

    2013-12-10

    The DNA origami method permits folding of long single-stranded DNA into complex 3D structures with subnanometer precision. Transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and recently cryo-EM tomography have been used to characterize the properties of such DNA origami objects, however their microscopic structures and dynamics have remained unknown. Here, we report the results of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations that characterized the structural and mechanical properties of DNA origami objects in unprecedented microscopic detail. When simulated in an aqueous environment, the structures of DNA origami objects depart from their idealized targets as a result of steric, electrostatic, and solvent-mediated forces. Whereas the global structural features of such relaxed conformations conform to the target designs, local deformations are abundant and vary in magnitude along the structures. In contrast to their free-solution conformation, the Holliday junctions in the DNA origami structures adopt a left-handed antiparallel conformation. We find the DNA origami structures undergo considerable temporal fluctuations on both local and global scales. Analysis of such structural fluctuations reveals the local mechanical properties of the DNA origami objects. The lattice type of the structures considerably affects global mechanical properties such as bending rigidity. Our study demonstrates the potential of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to play a considerable role in future development of the DNA origami field by providing accurate, quantitative assessment of local and global structural and mechanical properties of DNA origami objects.

  6. Multiscale simulation of microbe structure and dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Harshad; Singharoy, Abhishek; Sereda, Yuriy V; Cheluvaraja, Srinath C; Ortoleva, Peter J

    2011-10-01

    A multiscale mathematical and computational approach is developed that captures the hierarchical organization of a microbe. It is found that a natural perspective for understanding a microbe is in terms of a hierarchy of variables at various levels of resolution. This hierarchy starts with the N -atom description and terminates with order parameters characterizing a whole microbe. This conceptual framework is used to guide the analysis of the Liouville equation for the probability density of the positions and momenta of the N atoms constituting the microbe and its environment. Using multiscale mathematical techniques, we derive equations for the co-evolution of the order parameters and the probability density of the N-atom state. This approach yields a rigorous way to transfer information between variables on different space-time scales. It elucidates the interplay between equilibrium and far-from-equilibrium processes underlying microbial behavior. It also provides framework for using coarse-grained nanocharacterization data to guide microbial simulation. It enables a methodical search for free-energy minimizing structures, many of which are typically supported by the set of macromolecules and membranes constituting a given microbe. This suite of capabilities provides a natural framework for arriving at a fundamental understanding of microbial behavior, the analysis of nanocharacterization data, and the computer-aided design of nanostructures for biotechnical and medical purposes. Selected features of the methodology are demonstrated using our multiscale bionanosystem simulator DeductiveMultiscaleSimulator. Systems used to demonstrate the approach are structural transitions in the cowpea chlorotic mosaic virus, RNA of satellite tobacco mosaic virus, virus-like particles related to human papillomavirus, and iron-binding protein lactoferrin.

  7. Structure and dynamics of core-periphery networks

    CERN Document Server

    Csermely, Peter; Wu, Ling-Yun; Uzzi, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies uncovered important core/periphery network structures characterizing complex sets of cooperative and competitive interactions between network nodes, be they proteins, cells, species or humans. Better characterization of the structure, dynamics and function of core/periphery networks is a key step of our understanding cellular functions, species adaptation, social and market changes. Here we summarize the current knowledge of the structure and dynamics of "traditional" core/periphery networks, rich-clubs, nested, bow-tie and onion networks. Comparing core/periphery structures with network modules, we discriminate between global and local cores. The core/periphery network organization lies in the middle of several extreme properties, such as random/condensed structures, clique/star configurations, network symmetry/asymmetry, network assortativity/disassortativity, as well as network hierarchy/anti-hierarchy. These properties of high complexity together with the large degeneracy of core pathways e...

  8. Dynamics of a bistable Miura-origami structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Hongbin; Li, Suyi; Ji, Huimin; Wang, K. W.

    2017-05-01

    Origami-inspired structures and materials have shown extraordinary properties and performances originating from the intricate geometries of folding. However, current state of the art studies have mostly focused on static and quasistatic characteristics. This research performs a comprehensive experimental and analytical study on the dynamics of origami folding through investigating a stacked Miura-Ori (SMO) structure with intrinsic bistability. We fabricate and experimentally investigated a bistable SMO prototype with rigid facets and flexible crease lines. Under harmonic base excitation, the SMO exhibits both intrawell and interwell oscillations. Spectrum analyses reveal that the dominant nonlinearities of SMO are quadratic and cubic, which generate rich dynamics including subharmonic and chaotic oscillations. The identified nonlinearities indicate that a third-order polynomial can be employed to approximate the measured force-displacement relationship. Such an approximation is validated via numerical study by qualitatively reproducing the phenomena observed in the experiments. The dynamic characteristics of the bistable SMO resemble those of a Helmholtz-Duffing oscillator (HDO); this suggests the possibility of applying the established tools and insights of HDO to predict origami dynamics. We also show that the bistability of SMO can be programmed within a large design space via tailoring the crease stiffness and initial stress-free configurations. The results of this research offer a wealth of fundamental insights into the dynamics of origami folding, and provide a solid foundation for developing foldable and deployable structures and materials with embedded dynamic functionalities.

  9. Stabilization of structure-preserving power networks with market dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Stegink, Tjerk W; van der Schaft, Arjan J

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies the problem of maximizing the social welfare while stabilizing both the physical power network as well as the market dynamics. For the physical power grid a third-order structure-preserving model is considered involving both frequency and voltage dynamics. By applying the primal-dual gradient method to the social welfare problem, a distributed dynamic pricing algorithm in port-Hamiltonian form is obtained. After interconnection with the physical system a closed-loop port-Hamiltonian system of differential-algebraic equations is obtained, whose properties are exploited to prove local asymptotic stability of the optimal points.

  10. Accelerating Dynamic Cardiac MR Imaging Using Structured Sparse Representation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nian Cai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Compressed sensing (CS has produced promising results on dynamic cardiac MR imaging by exploiting the sparsity in image series. In this paper, we propose a new method to improve the CS reconstruction for dynamic cardiac MRI based on the theory of structured sparse representation. The proposed method user the PCA subdictionaries for adaptive sparse representation and suppresses the sparse coding noise to obtain good reconstructions. An accelerated iterative shrinkage algorithm is used to solve the optimization problem and achieve a fast convergence rate. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method improves the reconstruction quality of dynamic cardiac cine MRI over the state-of-the-art CS method.

  11. Cluster structure and dynamics in gels and glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastore, R.; de Candia, A.; Fierro, A.; Pica Ciamarra, M.; Coniglio, A.

    2016-07-01

    The dynamical arrest of gels is the consequence of a well defined structural phase transition, leading to the formation of a spanning cluster of bonded particles. The glass transition, instead, is not accompanied by any clear structural signature. Nevertheless, both transitions are characterized by the emergence of dynamical heterogeneities. Reviewing recent results from numerical simulations, we discuss the behavior of dynamical heterogeneities in different systems and show that a clear connection with the structure exists in the case of gels. The emerging picture may also be relevant for the more elusive case of glasses. We show, as an example, that the relaxation process of a simple glass-forming model can be related to a reverse percolation transition and discuss further perspective in this direction.

  12. An Aspect of Dynamic Human-structure Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lars

    2008-01-01

    . Focus is on how modal characteristics of the structure, i.e. its frequency and damping, are influenced by the presence of stationary humans. Vertical vibrations are considered, and particular focus is given the influence of human posture on modal characteristics of the supporting structure. Insight......It is known that humans and structures interact. Humans can cause structures to vibrate, and excessive vibrations may occur if the motion frequency of humans coincides with a resonant frequency of the structural system. It is also known that stationary humans (such as humans sitting or standing...... on the structure) influence the dynamic behaviour and modal characteristics of the structure carrying them, whether being a grandstand, an office floor or similar. However, the interaction between the stationary humans and the structure is generally not well understood, and the paper addresses this interaction...

  13. On the dynamics of floating structures

    CERN Document Server

    Lannes, David

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses the floating body problem which consists in studying the interaction of surface water waves with a floating body. We propose a new formulation of the water waves problem that can easily be generalized in order to take into account the presence of a floating body. The resulting equations have a compressible-incompressible structure in which the interior pressure exerted by the fluid on the floating body is a Lagrange multiplier that can be determined through the resolution of a $d$-dimensional elliptic equation, where $d$ is the horizontal dimension. In the case where the object is freely floating, we decompose the hydrodynamic force and torque exerted by the fluid on the solid in order to exhibit an added mass effect; in the one dimensional case $d=1$, the computations can be carried out explicitly. We also show that this approach in which the interior pressure appears as a Lagrange multiplier can be implemented on reduced asymptotic models such as the nonlinear shallow water equations an...

  14. Organoactinide chemistry: synthesis, structure, and solution dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brennan, J.G.

    1985-12-01

    This thesis considers three aspects of organoactinide chemistry. In chapter one, a bidentate phosphine ligand was used to kinetically stabilize complexes of the type Cp/sub 2/MX/sub 2/. Ligand redistribution processes are present throughout the synthetic work, as has often been observed in uranium cyclopentadienyl chemistry. The effects of covalent M-L bonding on the solution and solid state properties of U(III) coordination complexes are considered. In particular, the nature of the more subtle interaction between the metal and the neutral ligand are examined. Using relative basicity data obtained in solution, and solid state structural data (and supplemented by gas phase photoelectron measurements), it is demonstrated that the more electron rich U(III) centers engage in significant U ..-->.. L ..pi..-donation. Trivalent uranium is shown to be capable of acting either as a one- or two-electron reducing agent toward a wide variety of unsaturated organic and inorganic molecules, generating molecular classes unobtainable via traditional synthetic approaches, as well as offering an alternative synthetic approach to molecules accessible via metathesis reactions. Ligand redistribution processes are again observed, but given the information concerning ligand lability, this reactivity pattern is applied to the synthesis of pure materials inaccessible from redox chemistry. 214 refs., 33 figs., 10 tabs.

  15. On Natural Genetic Engineering: Structural Dynamism in Random Boolean Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Bull, Larry

    2012-01-01

    This short paper presents an abstract, tunable model of genomic structural change within the cell lifecycle and explores its use with simulated evolution. A well-known Boolean model of genetic regulatory networks is extended to include changes in node connectivity based upon the current cell state, e.g., via transposable elements. The underlying behaviour of the resulting dynamical networks is investigated before their evolvability is explored using a version of the NK model of fitness landscapes. Structural dynamism is found to be selected for in non-stationary environments and subsequently shown capable of providing a mechanism for evolutionary innovation when such reorganizations are inherited.

  16. A Structural Dynamics Approach to the Simulation of Spacecraft Control/Structure Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    A relatively simple approach to the analysis of linear spacecraft control/structure interaction problems is presented. The approach uses a commercially available structural system dynamic analysis package for both controller and plant dynamics, thus obviating the need to transfer data between separate programs. The unilateral coupling between components in the control system block diagram is simulated using sparse matrix stiffness and damping elements available in the structural dynamic code. The approach is illustrated with a series of simple tutorial examples of a rigid spacecraft core with flexible appendages.

  17. Detection of Molecular Weight of PMCA Isoform with 20 cm SDS PAGE Electrophoresis:Compared with 8 cm SDS PAGE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Yang; Junwen Zeng

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the effect of 20 cm SDS-PAGE electrophoresis, which is most widely used in proteomic research, in identifying human lens epithelium B3 (HLE B3) cells plasma membrane calcium ATPase (PMCA) isoform's apparent molecular weight (MW), with that of 8 cm SDS-PAGE electrophoresis.Method: HLE B-3 cells were cultured and membrane protein sample was collected. Part of the sample is electrophoresised with 20 cm gel, 16 mA/gel for 1.5 hrs and then 24 mA/gel for 4~5 hrs. The same sample is electrophoresised with 8cm mini gel, 200V for 2 hrs. Protein marker of known MW was run with the sample in the same gel. The resulting separated proteins were transferred to polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) membrane and Western blot were used to identify the PMCA isoform with specific antibody against PMCA 1, 2, 4. The apparent MW was calculated in reference to the known protein marker that was electrophoresised in the same gel.Result: In 8 cm gel the distance between 208 kDa and 126 kDa band was about 6.1 mm,while that of 20 cm gel was 32.8 mm. The distance between 126 kDa and 97 kDa was about 5.2 mm, while that of 20 cm gel was 20.2 mm. The migration distance differences of protein bands were significantly much longer in 20 cm gel than in 8 cm gel (P < 0.005).But the bands were generally more condensed in 8 cm gel. The apparent MW of PMCA1,2, 4 were 153.8, 153.5 and 152.9 kDa respectively. In the 20 cm gel, the apparent MW for PMCA1, 2, 4 was 153.1, 125.5 and 147.4 kDa respectively.Conclusion: Both the 20 cm gel and 8 cm gel successful identified PMCA 1,2, 4 in HLE B-3 cells. The apparent MW for PMCA1, 2, 4 was 153.8, 153.5 and 152.9 kDa respectively in 8 cm gel,and 153.1,125.5 and 147.4 kDa respectively in 20 cm gel.PMCA2 probably had some kinds of degradation during the long electrophoresis time in 20 cm gel.

  18. Nonlinear dynamic analysis of quasi-symmetric anisotropic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Peters, Jeanne M.

    1987-01-01

    An efficient computational method for the nonlinear dynamic analysis of quasi-symmetric anisotropic structures is proposed. The application of mixed models simplifies the analytical development and improves the accuracy of the response predictions, and operator splitting allows the reduction of the analysis model of the quasi-symmetric structure to that of the corresponding symmetric structure. The preconditoned conjugate gradient provides a stable and effective technique for generating the unsymmetric response of the structure as the sum of a symmetrized response plus correction modes. The effectiveness of the strategy is demonstrated with the example of a laminated anisotropic shallow shell of quadrilateral planform subjected to uniform normal loading.

  19. Structure and dynamics of stock market in times of crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Longfeng; Li, Wei; Cai, Xu

    2016-02-01

    Daily correlations among 322 S&P 500 constituent stocks are investigated by means of correlation-based (CB) network. By using the heterogeneous time scales, we identify global expansion and local clustering market behaviors during crises, which are mainly caused by community splits and inter-sector edge number decreases. The CB networks display distinctive community and sector structures. Graph edit distance is applied to capturing the dynamics of CB networks in which drastic structure reconfigurations can be observed during crisis periods. Edge statistics reveal the power-law nature of edges' duration time distribution. Despite the networks' strong structural changes during crises, we still find some long-duration edges that serve as the backbone of the stock market. Finally the dynamical change of network structure has shown its capability in predicting the implied volatility index (VIX).

  20. A compact data structure for representing a dynamic multiset

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katajainen, Jyrki; Rao, S. Srinivasa

    2010-01-01

    We develop a data structure for maintaining a dynamic multiset that uses O(nlglgn/lgn) bits and O(1) words, in addition to the space required by the n elements stored, supports searches in O(lgn) worst-case time and updates in O(lgn) amortized time. Compared to earlier data structures, we improve...... the space requirements from O(n) bits to O(nlglgn/lgn) bits, but the running time of updates is amortized, not worst-case. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.......We develop a data structure for maintaining a dynamic multiset that uses O(nlglgn/lgn) bits and O(1) words, in addition to the space required by the n elements stored, supports searches in O(lgn) worst-case time and updates in O(lgn) amortized time. Compared to earlier data structures, we improve...

  1. Synchronization in dynamical networks with unconstrained structure switching

    CERN Document Server

    del Genio, Charo I; Criado, Regino; Boccaletti, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    We provide a rigorous solution to the problem of constructing a structural evolution for a network of coupled identical dynamical units that switches between specified topologies without constraints on their structure. The evolution of the structure is determined indirectly, from a carefully built transformation of the eigenvector matrices of the coupling Laplacians, which are guaranteed to change smoothly in time. In turn, this allows to extend the Master Stability Function formalism, which can be used to assess the stability of a synchronized state. This approach is independent from the particular topologies that the network visits, and is not restricted to commuting structures. Also, it does not depend on the time scale of the evolution, which can be faster than, comparable to, or even secular with respect to the the dynamics of the units.

  2. Connectivity, dynamics, and structure in a tetrahedral network liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldán-Vargas, Sándalo; Rovigatti, Lorenzo; Sciortino, Francesco

    2017-01-04

    We report a detailed computational study by Brownian dynamics simulations of the structure and dynamics of a liquid of patchy particles which forms an amorphous tetrahedral network upon decreasing the temperature. The highly directional particle interactions allow us to investigate the system connectivity by discriminating the total set of particles into different populations according to a penta-modal distribution of bonds per particle. With this methodology we show how the particle bonding process is not randomly independent but it manifests clear bond correlations at low temperatures. We further explore the dynamics of the system in real space and establish a clear relation between particle mobility and particle connectivity. In particular, we provide evidence of anomalous diffusion at low temperatures and reveal how the dynamics is affected by the short-time hopping motion of the weakly bounded particles. Finally we widely investigate the dynamics and structure of the system in Fourier space and identify two quantitatively similar length scales, one dynamic and the other static, which increase upon cooling the system and reach distances of the order of few particle diameters. We summarize our findings in a qualitative picture where the low temperature regime of the viscoelastic liquid is understood in terms of an evolving network of long time metastable cooperative domains of particles.

  3. Dynamic stiffness for thin-walled structures by power series

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Bin; LEUNG A.Y.T.

    2006-01-01

    The dynamic stiffness method is introduced to analyze thin-walled structures including thin-walled straight beams and spatial twisted helix beam. A dynamic stiffness matrix is formed by using frequency dependent shape functions which are exact solutions of the governing differential equations. With the obtained thin-walled beam dynamic stiffness matrices, the thin-walled frame dynamic stiffness matrix can also be formulated by satisfying the required displacements compatibility and forces equilibrium, a method which is similar to the finite element method (FEM). Then the thin-walled structure natural frequencies can be found by equating the determinant of the system dynamic stiffness matrix to zero. By this way, just one element and several elements can exactly predict many modes of a thin-walled beam and a spatial thin-walled frame, respectively. Several cases are studied and the results are compared with the existing solutions of other methods. The natural frequencies and buckling loads of these thin-walled structures are computed.

  4. Modeling community structure and topics in dynamic text networks

    CERN Document Server

    Henry, Teague; Chai, Christine; Owens-Oas, Derek

    2016-01-01

    The last decade has seen great progress in both dynamic network modeling and topic modeling. This paper draws upon both areas to create a Bayesian method that allows topic discovery to inform the latent network model and the network structure to facilitate topic identification. We apply this method to the 467 top political blogs of 2012. Our results find complex community structure within this set of blogs, where community membership depends strongly upon the set of topics in which the blogger is interested.

  5. Dynamics and management of stage-structured fish stocks

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    With increasing fishing pressures having brought several stocks to the brink of collapse, there is a need for developing efficient harvesting methods that account for factors beyond merely yield or profit. We consider the dynamics and management of a stage-structured fish stock. Our work is based on a consumer-resource model which De Roos et al. (2008) have derived as an approximation of a physiologically-structured counterpart. First, we rigorously prove the existence of steady states in bot...

  6. 32nd IMAC Conference and Exposition on Structural Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Mayes, Randy; Rixen, Daniel; Catbas, Fikret; Atamturktur, H; Moaveni, Babak; Papadimitriou, Costas; Schoenherr, Tyler; Foss, Gary; Niezrecki, Christopher; Allemang, Randall; Kerschen, Gaetan

    2014-01-01

    This critical collection examines a range of topics in modal analysis, from experimental techniques to acoustics to biodynamics,  as presented in early findings and case studies from the Proceedings of the 32nd IMAC, A Conference and Exposition on Structural Dynamics, 2014. The collection includes papers in the following general technical research areas: Experimental Techniques, Processing Modal Data, Rotating Machinery, Acoustics, Adaptive Structures, Biodynamics, Damping

  7. Structural dynamic and aeroelastic considerations for hypersonic vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazier, F. W., Jr.; Doggett, Robert V., Jr.; Ricketts, Rodney H.

    1991-01-01

    The specific geometrical, structural, and operational environment characteristics of hypersonic vehicles are discussed with particular reference to aerospace plane type configurations. A discussion of the structural dynamic and aeroelastic phenomena that must be addressed for this class of vehicles is presented. These phenomena are in the aeroservothermoelasticity technical area. Some illustrative examples of recent experimental and analytical work are given. Some examples of current research are pointed out.

  8. Capital Structure, Environmental Dynamism, Innovation Strategy, and Strategic Risk Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul Andersen, Torben

    2005-01-01

    Previous research found that capital structure affects performance when it is adapted to the level of environmental dynamism and pursuit of an innovation strategy. The current study reproduces some of these relationships in a more recent dataset but also identifies significant nuances across...... industrial environments. Analyses of a large cross sectional sample and various industry sub-samples suggest that other factors have influenced capital structure effects in recent years including flexibilities in multinational organization and effective strategic risk management capabilities....

  9. Dynamic design of automotive systems: Engine mounts and structural joints

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Singh

    2000-06-01

    Dynamic design and vibro-acoustic modelling issues for automotive structures are illustrated via two case studies. The first case examines the role performance of passive and adaptive hydraulic engine mounts. In the second, the importance of welded joints and adhesives in vehicle bodies and chassis structures is highlighted via generic 'T' and 'L' beams assemblies. In each case, analytical and experimental results are presented. Unresolved research issues are briefly discussed.

  10. Gas Price Formation, Structure and Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davoust, R.

    2008-07-01

    Our study, focused on gas prices in importing economies, describes wholesale prices and retail prices, their evolution for the last one or two decades, the economic mechanisms of price formation. While an international market for oil has developed thanks to moderate storage and transportation charges, these costs are much higher in the case of natural gas, which involves that this energy is still traded inside continental markets. There are three regional gas markets around the world: North America (the United States, importing mainly from Canada and Mexico), Europe (importing mainly from Russia, Algeria and Norway) and Asia (Japan, Korea, Taiwan, China and India, importing mainly from Indonesia, Malaysia and Australia). A market for gas has also developed in South America, but it will not be covered by our paper. In Europe and the US, due to large domestic resources and strong grids, natural gas is purchased mostly through pipelines. In Northeast Asia, there is a lack of such infrastructures, so imported gas takes mainly the form of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG), shipped on maritime tankers. Currently, the LNG market is divided into two zones: the Atlantic Basin (Europe and US) and the Pacific Basin (Asia and the Western Coast of America). For the past few years, the Middle East and Africa have tended to be crucial suppliers for both LNG zones. Gas price formation varies deeply between regional markets, depending on several structural factors (regulation, contracting practises, existence of a spot market, liquidity, share of imports). Empirically, the degree of market opening (which corresponds to the seniority in the liberalization process) seems to be the primary determinant of pricing patterns. North America has the most liberalized and well-performing natural gas industry in the world. Gas pricing is highly competitive and is based on supply/demand balances. Spot and futures markets are developed. The British gas sector is also deregulated and thus follows a

  11. Development of structural health monitoring techniques using dynamics testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, G.H. III [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Experimental Structural Dynamics Dept.

    1996-03-01

    Today`s society depends upon many structures (such as aircraft, bridges, wind turbines, offshore platforms, buildings, and nuclear weapons) which are nearing the end of their design lifetime. Since these structures cannot be economically replaced, techniques for structural health monitoring must be developed and implemented. Modal and structural dynamics measurements hold promise for the global non-destructive inspection of a variety of structures since surface measurements of a vibrating structure can provide information about the health of the internal members without costly (or impossible) dismantling of the structure. In order to develop structural health monitoring for application to operational structures, developments in four areas have been undertaken within this project: operational evaluation, diagnostic measurements, information condensation, and damage identification. The developments in each of these four aspects of structural health monitoring have been exercised on a broad range of experimental data. This experimental data has been extracted from structures from several application areas which include aging aircraft, wind energy, aging bridges, offshore structures, structural supports, and mechanical parts. As a result of these advances, Sandia National Laboratories is in a position to perform further advanced development, operational implementation, and technical consulting for a broad class of the nation`s aging infrastructure problems.

  12. Dynamic Analysis of Wind Turbines Including Soil-Structure Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harte, M.; Basu, B.; Nielsen, Søren R.K.

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the along-wind forced vibration response of an onshore wind turbine. The study includes the dynamic interaction effects between the foundation and the underlying soil, as softer soils can influence the dynamic response of wind turbines. A Multi-Degree-of-Freedom (MDOF...... rotational speed (3P effects). The effect of dynamic soil-structure interaction on the rotation of the foundation has also been investigated.......) horizontal axes onshore wind turbine model is developed for dynamic analysis using an Euler–Lagrangian approach. The model is comprised of a rotor blade system, a nacelle and a flexible tower connected to a foundation system using a substructuring approach. The rotor blade system consists of three rotating...

  13. CD and 31P NMR studies of tachykinin and MSH neuropeptides in SDS and DPC micelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Sydney C.; Brown, Taylor C.; Gonzalez, Javier D.; Levonyak, Nicholas S.; Rush, Lydia A.; Cremeens, Matthew E.

    2016-02-01

    Secondary structural characteristics of substance P (SP), neurokinin A (NKA), neurokinin B (NKB), α-melanocyte stimulating hormone peptide (α-MSH), γ1-MSH, γ2-MSH, and melittin were evaluated with circular dichroism in phosphite buffer, DPC micelles, and SDS micelles. CD spectral properties of γ1-MSH and γ2-MSH as well as 31P NMR of DPC micelles with all the peptides are reported for the first time. Although, a trend in the neuropeptide/micelle CD data appears to show increased α-helix content for the tachykinin peptides (SP, NKA, NKB) and increased β-sheet content for the MSH peptides (α-MSH, γ1-MSH, γ2-MSH) with increasing peptide charge, the lack of perturbed 31P NMR signals for all neuropeptides could suggest that the reported antimicrobial activity of SP and α-MSH might not be related to a membrane disruption mode of action.

  14. The Role of Structure in the Protein Dynamical Transition

    CERN Document Server

    He, Yunfen

    2008-01-01

    The protein dynamical transition is investigated as a function of protein structure using terahertz time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS). Measurements performed for native state and denatured hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) show that protein structure is not necessary for the dynamical transition. We find the temperature dependence follows activated behavior and there is no evidence of a fragile to strong transition. Measurements of short chain poly alanine show a dynamical transition down to penta-alanine, however no transition is observed for di-alanine or tri-alanine. These measurements demonstrate that the temperature dependence arises strictly from the interaction of the side chains with the solvent. The lack of a transition for shorter chain polypeptides may indicate the temperature dependence arises from a net ordering of the adjacent water which scales with the length of the polypeptide chain.

  15. A structural perspective on the dynamics of kinesin motors

    CERN Document Server

    Hyeon, Changbong

    2011-01-01

    Despite significant fluctuation under thermal noise, biological machines in cells perform their tasks with exquisite precision. Using molecular simulation of a coarse-grained model and theoretical arguments we envisaged how kinesin, a prototype of biological machines, generates force and regulates its dynamics to sustain persistent motor action. A structure based model, which can be versatile in adapting its structure to external stresses while maintaining its native fold, was employed to account for several features of kinesin dynamics along the biochemical cycle. This analysis complements our current understandings of kinesin dynamics and connections to experiments. We propose a thermodynamic cycle for kinesin that emphasizes the mechanical and regulatory role of the neck-linker and clarify issues related the motor directionality, and the difference between the external stalling force and the internal tension responsible for the head-head coordination. The comparison between the thermodynamic cycle of kines...

  16. Dynamically Multivalued Self-Organisation and Probabilistic Structure Formation Processes

    CERN Document Server

    Kirilyuk, A P

    2004-01-01

    The unreduced, universally nonperturbative analysis of arbitrary many-body interaction process reveals the irreducible, purely dynamic source of randomness. It leads to the universal definition of real system complexity (physics/9806002), where the internally chaotic self-organisation emerges as a limiting case of complex interaction dynamics (physics/0211071). It extends also the concept of "self-organised criticality" and corresponds to formation of distinct enough (but always internally chaotic) structures occurring if the system is far from characteristic frequency resonances. Transition to the opposite limiting regime of multivalued interaction dynamics, that of uniform (global) chaos, takes place around the main frequency resonance(s), which provides the absolutely universal criterion of global chaos onset, applicable to any kind of system, as well as the new, extended interpretation of the phenomenon of resonance itself. As a result, one obtains the causally complete description of world structure emer...

  17. Static and dynamic buckling of thin-walled plate structures

    CERN Document Server

    Kubiak, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    This monograph deals with buckling and postbuckling behavior of thin plates and thin-walled structures with flat wall subjected to static and dynamic load. The investigations are carried out in elastic range. The basic assumption here is the  thin plate theory. This method is used to determination the buckling load and postbuckling analysis of thin-walled structures subjected to static and dynamic load. The book introduces two methods for static and dynamic buckling investigation which allow for a wider understanding of the phenomenon. Two different methods also can allow uncoupling of the phenomena occurring at the same time and attempt to estimate their impact on the final result. A general mathematical model, adopted in proposed analytical-numerical method, enables the consideration of all types of stability loss i.e.local, global and interactive forms of buckling. The applied numerical-numerical method includes adjacent of walls, shear-lag phenomenon and a deplanation of cross-sections.

  18. Money-center structures in dynamic banking systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shouwei; Zhang, Minghui

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we propose a dynamic model for banking systems based on the description of balance sheets. It generates some features identified through empirical analysis. Through simulation analysis of the model, we find that banking systems have the feature of money-center structures, that bank asset distributions are power-law distributions, and that contract size distributions are log-normal distributions.

  19. In situ characterization of structural dynamics in swelling hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman-Sepulveda, J R; Deng, J; Fang, J Y; Dogariu, A

    2016-07-06

    Characterizing the structural morphology and the local viscoelastic properties of soft complex systems raises significant challenges. Here we introduce a dynamic light scattering method capable of in situ, continuous monitoring of structural changes in evolving systems such as swelling gels. We show that the inherently non-stationary dynamics of embedded probes can be followed using partially coherent radiation, which effectively isolates only single scattering contributions even during the dramatic changes in the scattering regime. Using a simple and robust experimental setup, we demonstrate the ability to continuously monitor the structural dynamics of chitosan hydrogels formed by the Ag(+) ion-triggered gelation during their long-term swelling process. We demonstrate that both the local viscoelastic properties of the suspending medium and an effective cage size experienced by diffusing probe particles loaded into the hydrogel can be recovered and used to describe the structural dynamics of hydrogels with different levels of cross-linking. This characterization capability is critical for defining and controlling the hydrogel performance in different biomedical applications.

  20. Simultaneous dynamic electrical and structural measurements of functional materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vecchini, C.; Stewart, M.; Muñiz-Piniella, A.; Wooldridge, J. [National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Thompson, P.; McMitchell, S. R. C.; Bouchenoire, L.; Brown, S.; Wermeille, D.; Lucas, C. A. [XMaS, The UK-CRG, ESRF-The European Synchrotron, CS40220, F-38043, Grenoble Cedex 09 (France); Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3BX (United Kingdom); Lepadatu, S. [National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Jeremiah Horrocks Institute, University of Central Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); Bikondoa, O.; Hase, T. P. A. [XMaS, The UK-CRG, ESRF-The European Synchrotron, CS40220, F-38043, Grenoble Cedex 09 (France); Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Lesourd, M. [ESRF-The European Synchrotron, CS40220, F-38043, Grenoble Cedex 09 (France); Dontsov, D. [SIOS Meßtechnik GmbH, Am Vogelherd 46, 98693 Ilmenau (Germany); Cain, M. G. [National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Electrosciences Ltd., Farnham, Surrey GU9 9QT (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    A new materials characterization system developed at the XMaS beamline, located at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in France, is presented. We show that this new capability allows to measure the atomic structural evolution (crystallography) of piezoelectric materials whilst simultaneously measuring the overall strain characteristics and electrical response to dynamically (ac) applied external stimuli.

  1. Dynamic Capital Structure with Callable Debt and Debt Renegotiations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Peter Ove; Flor, Christian Riis; Lando, David

    2014-01-01

    We consider a dynamic trade-off model of a firm’s capital structure with debt renegotiation. Debt holders only accept restructuring offers from equity holders backed by threats which are in the equity holders’ own interest to execute. Our model shows that in a complete information model in which...

  2. From dynamics to structure and function of model biomolecular systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fontaine-Vive-Curtaz, F.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to extend recent works on structure and dynamics of hydrogen bonded crystals to model biomolecular systems and biological processes. The tools that we have used are neutron scattering (NS) and density functional theory (DFT) and force field (FF) based simulation method

  3. Structure and dynamics of confined alcohol-water mixtures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bampoulis, Pantelis; Witteveen, J.P.; Kooij, Ernst S.; Lohse, Detlef; Poelsema, Bene; Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of confinement between mica and graphene on the structure and dynamics of alcohol–water mixtures has been studied in situ and in real time at the molecular level by atomic force microscopy (AFM) at room temperature. AFM images reveal that the adsorbed molecules are segregated into faceted

  4. Structural preablation dynamics of graphite observed by ultrafast electron crystallography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carbone, Fabrizio; Baum, Peter; Rudolf, Petra; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2008-01-01

    By means of time-resolved electron crystallography, we report direct observation of the structural dynamics of graphite, providing new insights into the processes involving coherent lattice motions and ultrafast graphene ablation. When graphite is excited by an ultrashort laser pulse, the excited

  5. Label-free characterization of biomembranes: from structure to dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mashaghi, A.; Mashaghi, S.; Reviakine, I.; Heeren, R.M.A.; Sandoghdarf, V.; Bonn, M.

    2013-01-01

    We review recent progress in the study of the structure and dynamics of phospholipid membranes and associated proteins, using novel label-free analytical tools. We describe these techniques and illustrate them with examples highlighting current capabilities and limitations. Recent advances in applyi

  6. The Fine Structure of Equity-Index Option Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Torben G.; Bondarenko, Oleg; Todorov, Viktor;

    We analyze the high-frequency dynamics of S&P 500 equity-index option prices by constructing an assortment of implied volatility measures. This allows us to infer the underlying fine structure behind the innovations in the latent state variables driving the movements of the volatility surface. In...

  7. A new dynamic null model for phylogenetic community structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pigot, Alex L; Etienne, Rampal S

    2015-01-01

    Phylogenies are increasingly applied to identify the mechanisms structuring ecological communities but progress has been hindered by a reliance on statistical null models that ignore the historical process of community assembly. Here, we address this, and develop a dynamic null model of assembly by

  8. Molecular dynamics simulation of the structure and dynamics of 5-HT3 serotonin receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonov, M. Yu.; Popinako, A. V.; Prokopiev, G. A.

    2016-10-01

    In this work, we investigated structure, dynamics and ion transportation in transmembrane domain of the 5-HT3 serotonin receptor. High-resolution (0.35 nm) structure of the 5-HT3 receptor in complex with stabilizing nanobodies was determined by protein crystallography in 2014 (Protein data bank (PDB) code 4PIR). Transmembrane domain of the structure was prepared in complex with explicit membrane environment (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (POPC)) and solvent (TIP3P water model). Molecular dynamics protocols for simulation and stabilization of the transmembrane domain of the 5-HT3 receptor model were developed and 60 ns simulation of the structure was conducted in order to explore structural parameters of the system. We estimated the mean force profile for Na+ ions using umbrella sampling method.

  9. Dynamic Structural Modeling and Its Applications: An Analysis of Anxiety Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keita Kinjo

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at investigating and analyzing the changes of consciousness structure. The method is already known and is referred to as structural modeling; to investigate and analyze the change of consciousness structure. However, there have been only a few studies conducted to analyze the change of consciousness structure. We have therefore proposed the dynamic structural modeling as an outline to investigate and analyze the change of consciousness structure. As an example, we have applied the principle to the data about the structural change of human anxiety at the 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku Earthquake and the result gives us useful information.

  10. Uncertainty Quantification in Experimental Structural Dynamics Identification of Composite Material Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luczak, Marcin; Peeters, Bart; Kahsin, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    Aerospace and wind energy structures are extensively using components made of composite materials. Since these structures are subjected to dynamic environments with time-varying loading conditions, it is important to model their dynamic behavior and validate these models by means of vibration...... for uncertainty evaluation in experimentally estimated models. Investigated structures are plates, fuselage panels and helicopter main rotor blades as they represent different complexity levels ranging from coupon, through sub-component up to fully assembled structures made of composite materials. To evaluate...

  11. Neighborhood structure effects on the Dynamic response of soil-structure interaction by harmonic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Dan-guang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available For realizing the variation of structural dynamic characteristics due to neighbor structure in buildings group, the surface structure is idealized as an equivalent single degree of freedom system with rigid base whose site consists of a single homogeneous layer. Based on the model, a equivalent method on the equivalent seismic excitation is proposed. Then, the differences of seismic response and equivalent seismic input between soil - structure interaction (SSI system and structure -soil-structure interaction (SSSI system are investigated by harmonic analysis. The numerical results show that dynamic responses would be underestimated in SSSI system when the forcing frequencies are close to the Natural frequency if the effects of neighborhood structure were ignored. Neighborhood structure would make the translational displacement increase and rocking vibration decrease. When establishing an effective seismic input, it is necessary to consider the impact of inertia interaction.

  12. Structure and dynamics in network-forming materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Mark

    2016-12-01

    The study of the structure and dynamics of network-forming materials is reviewed. Experimental techniques used to extract key structural information are briefly considered. Strategies for building simulation models, based on both targeting key (experimentally-accessible) materials and on systematically controlling key model parameters, are discussed. As an example of the first class of materials, a key target system, SiO2, is used to highlight how the changing structure with applied pressure can be effectively modelled (in three dimensions) and used to link to both experimental results and simple structural models. As an example of the second class the topology of networks of tetrahedra in the MX2 stoichiometry are controlled using a single model parameter linked to the M-X-M bond angles. The evolution of ordering on multiple length-scales is observed as are the links between the static structure and key dynamical properties. The isomorphous relationship between the structures of amorphous Si and SiO2 is discussed as are the similarities and differences in the phase diagrams, the latter linked to potential polyamorphic and ‘anomalous’ (e.g. density maxima) behaviour. Links to both two-dimensional structures for C, Si and Ge and near-two-dimensional bilayers of SiO2 are discussed. Emerging low-dimensional structures in low temperature molten carbonates are also uncovered.

  13. Structure, dynamics, assembly, and evolution of protein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Joseph A; Teichmann, Sarah A

    2015-01-01

    The assembly of individual proteins into functional complexes is fundamental to nearly all biological processes. In recent decades, many thousands of homomeric and heteromeric protein complex structures have been determined, greatly improving our understanding of the fundamental principles that control symmetric and asymmetric quaternary structure organization. Furthermore, our conception of protein complexes has moved beyond static representations to include dynamic aspects of quaternary structure, including conformational changes upon binding, multistep ordered assembly pathways, and structural fluctuations occurring within fully assembled complexes. Finally, major advances have been made in our understanding of protein complex evolution, both in reconstructing evolutionary histories of specific complexes and in elucidating general mechanisms that explain how quaternary structure tends to evolve. The evolution of quaternary structure occurs via changes in self-assembly state or through the gain or loss of protein subunits, and these processes can be driven by both adaptive and nonadaptive influences.

  14. Metastable structures and size effects in small group dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauro Grotto, Rosapia; Guazzini, Andrea; Bagnoli, Franco

    2014-01-01

    In his seminal works on group dynamics Bion defined a specific therapeutic setting allowing psychoanalytic observations on group phenomena. In describing the setting he proposed that the group was where his voice arrived. This physical limit was later made operative by assuming that the natural dimension of a therapeutic group is around 12 people. Bion introduced a theory of the group aspects of the mind in which proto-mental individual states spontaneously evolve into shared psychological states that are characterized by a series of features: (1) they emerge as a consequence of the natural tendency of (both conscious and unconscious) emotions to combine into structured group patterns; (2) they have a certain degree of stability in time; (3) they tend to alternate so that the dissolution of one is rapidly followed by the emergence of another; (4) they can be described in qualitative terms according to the nature of the emotional mix that dominates the state, in structural terms by a kind of typical "leadership" pattern, and in "cognitive" terms by a set of implicit expectations that are helpful in explaining the group behavior (i.e., the group behaves "as if" it was assuming that). Here we adopt a formal approach derived from Socio-physics in order to explore some of the structural and dynamic properties of this small group dynamics. We will described data from an analytic DS model simulating small group interactions of agents endowed with a very simplified emotional and cognitive dynamic in order to assess the following main points: (1) are metastable collective states allowed to emerge in the model and if so, under which conditions in the parameter space? (2) can these states be differentiated in structural terms? (3) to what extent are the emergent dynamic features of the systems dependent of the system size? We will finally discuss possible future applications of the quantitative descriptions of the interaction structure in the small group clinical setting.

  15. Metastable structures and size effects in small group dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosapia eLauro Grotto

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In his seminal works on group dynamics Bion defined a specific therapeutic setting allowing psychoanalytic observations on group phenomena. In describing the setting he proposed that the group was where his voice arrived. This physical limit was later made operative by assuming that the natural dimension of a therapeutic group is around 12 people. Bion introduced a theory of the group aspects of the mind in which proto-mental individual states spontaneously evolve into shared psychological states that are characterized by a series of features: 1 they emerge as a consequence of the natural tendency of (both conscious and unconscious emotions to combine into structured group patterns; 2 they have a certain degree of stability in time; 3 they tend to alternate so that the dissolution of one is rapidly followed by the emergence of another; 4 they can be described in qualitative terms according to the nature of the emotional mix that dominates the state, in structural terms by a kind of typical 'leadership’ pattern, and in 'cognitive’ terms by a set of implicit expectations that are helpful in explaining the group behavior (i.e. the group behaves 'as if’ it was assuming that…. Here we adopt a formal approach derived from Socio-physics in order to explore some of the structural and dynamic properties of this small group dynamics. We will described data from an analytic DS model simulating small group interactions of agents endowed with a very simplified emotional and cognitive dynamic in order to assess the following main points: 1 are metastable collective states allowed to emerge in the model and if so, under which conditions in the parameter space? 3 can these states be differentiated in structural terms? 3 to what extent are the emergent dynamic features of the systems dependent of the system size? We will finally discuss possible future applications of the quantitative descriptions of the interaction structure in the small group clinical

  16. Structure and Dynamics of Glycosphingolipids in Lipid Bilayers: Insights from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronak Y. Patel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycolipids are important constituents of biological membranes, and understanding their structure and dynamics in lipid bilayers provides insights into their physiological and pathological roles. Experimental techniques have provided details into their behavior at model and biological membranes; however, computer simulations are needed to gain atomic level insights. This paper summarizes the insights obtained from MD simulations into the conformational and orientational dynamics of glycosphingolipids and their exposure, hydration, and hydrogen-bonding interactions in membrane environment. The organization of glycosphingolipids in raft-like membranes and their modulation of lipid membrane structure are also reviewed.

  17. Hyaluronan binding motifs of USP17 and SDS3 exhibit anti-tumor activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Ramakrishna

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We previously reported that the USP17 deubiquitinating enzyme having hyaluronan binding motifs (HABMs interacts with human SDS3 (suppressor of defective silencing 3 and specifically deubiquitinates Lys-63 branched polyubiquitination of SDS3 resulting in negative regulation of histone deacetylase (HDAC activity in cancer cells. Furthermore, USP17 and SDS3 mutually interact with each other to block cell proliferation in HeLa cells but the mechanism for this inhibition in cell proliferation is not known. We wished to investigate whether the HABMs of USP17 were responsible for tumor suppression activity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Similarly to USP17, we have identified that SDS3 also has three consecutive HABMs and shows direct binding with hyaluronan (HA using cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC assay. Additionally, HA oligosaccharides (6-18 sugar units competitively block binding of endogenous HA polymer to HA binding proteins. Thus, administration of HA oligosaccharides antagonizes the interaction between HA and USP17 or SDS3. Interestingly, HABMs deleted USP17 showed lesser interaction with SDS3 but retain its deubiquitinating activity towards SDS3. The deletion of HABMs of USP17 could not alter its functional regulation on SDS3-associated HDAC activity. Furthermore, to explore whether HABMs in USP17 and SDS3 are responsible for the inhibition of cell proliferation, we investigated the effect of USP17 and SDS3-lacking HABMs on cell proliferation by soft agar, apoptosis, cell migration and cell proliferation assays. CONCLUSIONS: Our results have demonstrated that these HABMs in USP17 and its substrate SDS3 are mainly involved in the inhibition of anchorage-independent tumor growth.

  18. Removal of Pb and MDF from contaminated soils by EDTA- and SDS-enhanced washing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weihua; Tsang, Daniel C W; Lo, Irene M C

    2007-02-01

    Heavy metal- and organic-contaminated sites are ubiquitous, but few studies have been conducted to address such an issue. EDTA- and SDS-enhanced washing was studied for remediation of Pb- and/or marine diesel fuel (MDF)-contaminated soils. The feasibility of recovery and reuse of EDTA and SDS, as well as the physicochemical interactions among the chemical agents, contaminants and soils were extensively investigated using batch experiments. The optimal washing sequence was then determined. The experimental results showed that EDTA could be recovered and reused for four cycles without significant loss of its chelating capacity, while the extraction capability of SDS was noticeably reduced after each reuse cycle. The free phase of marine diesel fuel (MDF) in soils physically isolated the sorbed Pb on soils and thus reducing its extraction by EDTA. The presence of SDS alone or together with low concentration of EDTA was found to enhance Pb removal probably via electrostatic interaction and dissolution of soil organic matter. However, it hindered Pb extraction by high concentration of EDTA, because of the potential formation of complexes between some strongly-bound Pb and SDS, that are more resistant to desorption. Therefore, EDTA washing followed by SDS achieved the highest Pb removal efficiency. On the other hand, MDF removal by SDS was significantly hindered by coexisting Pb in soils, probably because the formation of Pb-dodecyl sulfate (DS) complex would decrease the effective amount of SDS available for forming micelles in solution and enhance MDF sorption. EDTA alone or together with SDS could enhance MDF removal, but the residual MDF after EDTA-washing became more resistant to SDS removal. Consequently, SDS washing followed by EDTA is considered as the optimal washing sequence for MDF removal.

  19. Model Reduction in Dynamic Finite Element Analysis of Lightweight Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flodén, Ola; Persson, Kent; Sjöström, Anders

    2012-01-01

    The application of wood as a construction material when building multi-storey buildings has many advantages, e.g., light weight, sustainability and low energy consumption during the construction and lifecycle of the building. However, compared to heavy structures, it is a greater challenge to build...... lightweight structures without noise and disturbing vibrations between storeys and rooms. The dynamic response of floor and wall structures may be investigated using finite element models with three-dimensional solid elements [1]. In order to analyse the global response of complete buildings, finite element...

  20. Membrane proteins structure and dynamics by nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltsev, Sergey; Lorigan, Gary A

    2011-10-01

    Membrane proteins represent a challenging class of biological systems to study. They are extremely difficult to crystallize and in most cases they retain their structure and functions only in membrane environments. Therefore, commonly used diffraction methods fail to give detailed molecular structure and other approaches have to be utilized to obtain biologically relevant information. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, however, can provide powerful structural and dynamical constraints on these complicated systems. Solution- and solid-state NMR are powerful methods for investigating membrane proteins studies. In this work, we briefly review both solution and solid-state NMR techniques for membrane protein studies and illustrate the applications of these methods to elucidate proteins structure, conformation, topology, dynamics, and function. Recent advances in electronics, biological sample preparation, and spectral processing provided opportunities for complex biological systems, such as membrane proteins inside lipid vesicles, to be studied faster and with outstanding quality. New analysis methods therefore have emerged, that benefit from the combination of sample preparation and corresponding specific high-end NMR techniques, which give access to more structural and dynamic information.

  1. Watching coherent molecular structural dynamics during photoreaction: beyond kinetic description

    CERN Document Server

    Lemke, Henrik T; Hartsock, Robert; van Driel, Tim Brandt; Chollet, Matthieu; Glownia, J M; Song, Sanghoon; Zhu, Diling; Pace, Elisabetta; Nielsen, Martin M; Benfatto, Maurizio; Gaffney, Kelly J; Collet, Eric; Cammarata, Marco

    2015-01-01

    A deep understanding of molecular photo-transformations occurring is challenging because of the complex interaction between electronic and nuclear structure. The initially excited electronic energy dissipates into electronic and structural reconfigurations often in less than a billionth of a second. Molecular dynamics induced by photoexcitation have been very successfully studied with femtosecond optical spectroscopies, but electronic and nuclear dynamics are often very difficult to disentangle. X-ray based spectroscopies can reduce the ambiguity between theoretical models and experimental data, but it is only with the recent development of bright ultrafast X-ray sources, that key information during transient molecular processes can be obtained on their intrinsic timescale. We use Free Electron Laser (FEL) based time-resolved X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) measurements around the Iron K-edge of a spin crossover prototypical compound. We reveal its transformation from the ligand-located electroni...

  2. Dynamic soil-structure interaction of monopod and polypod foundations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Vabbersgaard

    2016-01-01

    The paper concerns the importance of through–soil coupling for structures having foundations with more footings. First, a model for dynamic analysis of polypod footings is established in the frequency domain, employing Green’s function for wave propagation in a layered half-space. To allow analysis...... manner. As a computational example, the dynamic response of a plane frame structure with two footings is compared for two cases: one with and one without the cross coupling. Homogeneous as well as layered soil is considered....... within the time domain, frequency-independent lumped-parameter models are developed. The paper proposes a decision criterion for determination of which components must be included within a lumped-parameter model in order to account for the structure–soil–structure interaction in an adequate and efficient...

  3. Isomorph invariance of the structure and dynamics of classical crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrechtsen, Dan; Olsen, Andreas Elmerdahl; Pedersen, Ulf Rørbæk

    2014-01-01

    of a defective fcc crystal is also shown to be isomorph invariant. In contrast, a NaCl crystal model does not exhibit isomorph invariances. Other systems simulated, though in less detail, are the Wahnström binary Lennard-Jones crystal with the MgZn2 Laves crystal structure, monatomic fcc crystals of particles......This paper shows by computer simulations that some crystalline systems have curves in their thermodynamic phase diagrams, so-called isomorphs, along which structure and dynamics in reduced units are invariant to a good approximation. The crystals are studied in a classical-mechanical framework......, which is generally a good description except significantly below melting. The existence of isomorphs for crystals is validated by simulations of particles interacting via the Lennard-Jones pair potential arranged into a face-centered cubic (fcc) crystalline structure; the slow vacancy-jump dynamics...

  4. Real-time probing of structural dynamics in perovskite materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsaesser, Thomas [Max-Born-Institut fuer Nichtlineare Optik und Kurzzeitspektroskopie, D-12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Femtosecond x-ray diffraction probes structural dynamics of solids in real-time and gives insight into reversible geometry changes on atomic length and time scales. After a brief introduction into this field, recent results on the lattice dynamics of ferroelectric SrRuO{sub 3}/PbZr{sub 0.2}Ti{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} superlattice structures and their interplay with the electric polarization of the material are presented. Ultrafast optical generation of mechanical stress allows for switching-off the polarization on a time scale of a few picoseconds. As a second example, magnetostriction in a ferromagnetic SrRuO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3} superlattice structure is analyzed in real time.

  5. Dynamic behavior of reinforced concrete frame structure during construction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Ming-ge; YI Wei-jian

    2008-01-01

    The effects of concrete's time-variant elastic modulus, casting structural components, assembling temporary shoring framework system, and shock by operating construction equipment on dynamic behavior of the reinforced concrete frame structure during construction were investigated. The dynamic tests of an eight-storey reinforced concrete frame structure during full-scaled stages of the sixth storey construction cycle were carried out by ambient vibration. Natural frequencies, corresponding mode shapes and damping ratio were determined by power spectrum processing the tested signal data in frequency domain. The changes of frequencies, mode shapes and damping ratios at different construction stages were given. The results show that natural frequencies and modal damping ratios reach the maximum at stage of casting fresh concrete, especially for higher modes. Modal damping ratios at each construction stage are less than 5% of those during usage.

  6. AGENT based structural static and dynamic collaborative optimization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A static and dynamic collaborative optimization mode for complex machine system and itsontology project relationship are put forward, on which an agent-based structural static and dynamiccollaborative optimization system is constructed as two agent colonies: optimization agent colony andfinite element analysis colony. And a two-level solving strategy as well as the necessity and possibilityfor handing with finite element analysis model in multi-level mode is discussed. Furthermore, the coop-eration of all FEA agents for optimal design of complicated structural is studied in detail. Structural stat-ic and dynamic collaborative optimization of hydraulic excavator working equimpent is taken as an ex-ample to show that the system is reliable.

  7. A new dynamic null model for phylogenetic community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigot, Alex L; Etienne, Rampal S

    2015-02-01

    Phylogenies are increasingly applied to identify the mechanisms structuring ecological communities but progress has been hindered by a reliance on statistical null models that ignore the historical process of community assembly. Here, we address this, and develop a dynamic null model of assembly by allopatric speciation, colonisation and local extinction. Incorporating these processes fundamentally alters the structure of communities expected due to chance, with speciation leading to phylogenetic overdispersion compared to a classical statistical null model assuming equal probabilities of community membership. Applying this method to bird and primate communities in South America we show that patterns of phylogenetic overdispersion - often attributed to negative biotic interactions - are instead consistent with a species neutral model of allopatric speciation, colonisation and local extinction. Our findings provide a new null expectation for phylogenetic community patterns and highlight the importance of explicitly accounting for the dynamic history of assembly when testing the mechanisms governing community structure.

  8. Photogrammetry and optical methods in structural dynamics - A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baqersad, Javad; Poozesh, Peyman; Niezrecki, Christopher; Avitabile, Peter

    2017-03-01

    In the last few decades, there has been a surge of research in the area of non-contact measurement techniques. Photogrammetry has received considerable attention due to its ability to achieve full-field measurement and its robustness to work in testing environments and on testing articles in which using other measurement techniques may not be practical. More recently, researchers have used this technique to study transient phenomena and to perform measurements on vibrating structures. The current paper reviews the most current trends in the photogrammetry technique (point tracking, digital image correlation, and target-less approaches) and compares the applications of photogrammetry to other measurement techniques used in structural dynamics (e.g. laser Doppler vibrometry and interferometry techniques). The paper does not present the theoretical background of the optical techniques, but instead presents the general principles of each approach and highlights the novel structural dynamic measurement concepts and applications that are enhanced by utilizing optical techniques.

  9. Dynamic soil-structure interaction of monopod and polypod foundations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Vabbersgaard

    2016-01-01

    within the time domain, frequency-independent lumped-parameter models are developed. The paper proposes a decision criterion for determination of which components must be included within a lumped-parameter model in order to account for the structure–soil–structure interaction in an adequate and efficient......The paper concerns the importance of through–soil coupling for structures having foundations with more footings. First, a model for dynamic analysis of polypod footings is established in the frequency domain, employing Green’s function for wave propagation in a layered half-space. To allow analysis...... manner. As a computational example, the dynamic response of a plane frame structure with two footings is compared for two cases: one with and one without the cross coupling. Homogeneous as well as layered soil is considered....

  10. Dynamic Analysis of Partially Embedded Structures Considering Soil-Structure Interaction in Time Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanaz Mahmoudpour

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis and design of structures subjected to arbitrary dynamic loadings especially earthquakes have been studied during past decades. In practice, the effects of soil-structure interaction on the dynamic response of structures are usually neglected. In this study, the effect of soil-structure interaction on the dynamic response of structures has been examined. The substructure method using dynamic stiffness of soil is used to analyze soil-structure system. A coupled model based on finite element method and scaled boundary finite element method is applied. Finite element method is used to analyze the structure, and scaled boundary finite element method is applied in the analysis of unbounded soil region. Due to analytical solution in the radial direction, the radiation condition is satisfied exactly. The material behavior of soil and structure is assumed to be linear. The soil region is considered as a homogeneous half-space. The analysis is performed in time domain. A computer program is prepared to analyze the soil-structure system. Comparing the results with those in literature shows the exactness and competency of the proposed method.

  11. Dynamic characterization of thin-film inflatable structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, Kara Nicole

    Inflatable structures constructed from thin polyimide films form a key part of several technology development programs for solar thermal propulsion for satellites, as well as for other applications both in space and on earth. This project investigates the mechanical properties of several of these structures, focusing primarily on their dynamic behavior. The primary focus is the Shooting Star Experiment prototype developed by NASA, but a simpler cylindrical structure is also considered in order to provide an analytically tractable situation for the evaluation of testing and modeling techniques. The cylindrical strut is tested statically to determine its load-deflection characteristics both in linear and nonlinear regimes. The phenomenon of wrinkling is observed under large deflection conditions, particularly at lower pressure. Then, modal testing is used to determine the dynamic properties of the strut for comparison to numerical models. Modal testing is also conducted on Pathfinder 3, a prototype inflatable solar concentrator for the Shooting Star Experiment, both in vacuum and ambient atmospheric conditions. The orbital terminator crossing test is used to determine the dynamic susceptibility of the Pathfinder 3 structure to thermal shock, and it is found to undergo only quasistatic deformations. Finite element models of the cylinder and the Pathfinder 3 concentrator are then constructed using MSC NASTRAN. The inflatable cylinder may be modeled as a beam if only global bending is considered. This restriction leads to the development of a frequency-dependent modulus of elasticity in bending for the structure, developed from engineering beam theory. Both frequency-dependent beam models and shell models are constructed and evaluated for their efficacy. The results from the modeling of the strut are then applied to the inflatable concentrator, where it is found that the shell model captures more of the dynamic subtleties of the system than the beam model, but that both

  12. Structure, dynamics, and ion conductance of the phospholamban pentamer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffeo, Christopher; Aksimentiev, Aleksei

    2009-06-17

    A 52-residue membrane protein, phospholamban (PLN) is an inhibitor of an adenosine-5'-triphosphate-driven calcium pump, the Ca2+-ATPase. Although the inhibition of Ca2+-ATPase involves PLN monomers, in a lipid bilayer membrane, PLN monomers form stable pentamers of unknown biological function. The recent NMR structure of a PLN pentamer depicts cytoplasmic helices extending normal to the bilayer in what is known as the bellflower conformation. The structure shows transmembrane helices forming a hydrophobic pore 4 A in diameter, which is reminiscent of earlier reports of possible ion conductance through PLN pentamers. However, recent FRET measurements suggested an alternative structure for the PLN pentamer, known as the pinwheel model, which features a narrower transmembrane pore and cytoplasmic helices that lie against the bilayer. Here, we report on structural dynamics and conductance properties of the PLN pentamers from all-atom (AA) and coarse-grained (CG) molecular dynamics simulations. Our AA simulations of the bellflower model demonstrate that in a lipid bilayer membrane or a detergent micelle, the cytoplasmic helices undergo large structural fluctuations, whereas the transmembrane pore shrinks and becomes asymmetric. Similar asymmetry of the transmembrane region was observed in the AA simulations of the pinwheel model; the cytoplasmic helices remained in contact with the bilayer. Using the CG approach, structural dynamics of both models were investigated on a microsecond timescale. The cytoplasmic helices of the CG bellflower model were observed to fall against the bilayer, whereas in the CG pinwheel model the conformation of the cytoplasmic helices remained stable. Using steered molecular dynamics simulations, we investigated the feasibility of ion conductance through the pore of the bellflower model. The resulting approximate potentials of mean force indicate that the PLN pentamer is unlikely to function as an ion channel.

  13. Synchronization of networks of chaotic oscillators: Structural and dynamical datasets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Sevilla-Escoboza

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We provide the topological structure of a series of N=28 Rössler chaotic oscillators diffusively coupled through one of its variables. The dynamics of the y variable describing the evolution of the individual nodes of the network are given for a wide range of coupling strengths. Datasets capture the transition from the unsynchronized behavior to the synchronized one, as a function of the coupling strength between oscillators. The fact that both the underlying topology of the system and the dynamics of the nodes are given together makes this dataset a suitable candidate to evaluate the interplay between functional and structural networks and serve as a benchmark to quantify the ability of a given algorithm to extract the structural network of connections from the observation of the dynamics of the nodes. At the same time, it is possible to use the dataset to analyze the different dynamical properties (randomness, complexity, reproducibility, etc. of an ensemble of oscillators as a function of the coupling strength.

  14. Structure and Dynamics of Water at Carbon-Based Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Martí

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Water structure and dynamics are affected by the presence of a nearby interface. Here, first we review recent results by molecular dynamics simulations about the effect of different carbon-based materials, including armchair carbon nanotubes and a variety of graphene sheets—flat and with corrugation—on water structure and dynamics. We discuss the calculations of binding energies, hydrogen bond distributions, water’s diffusion coefficients and their relation with surface’s geometries at different thermodynamical conditions. Next, we present new results of the crystallization and dynamics of water in a rigid graphene sieve. In particular, we show that the diffusion of water confined between parallel walls depends on the plate distance in a non-monotonic way and is related to the water structuring, crystallization, re-melting and evaporation for decreasing inter-plate distance. Our results could be relevant in those applications where water is in contact with nanostructured carbon materials at ambient or cryogenic temperatures, as in man-made superhydrophobic materials or filtration membranes, or in techniques that take advantage of hydrated graphene interfaces, as in aqueous electron cryomicroscopy for the analysis of proteins adsorbed on graphene.

  15. An age-structured population balance model for microbial dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duarte M.V.E.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents an age-structured population balance model (ASPBM for a bioprocess in a continuous stirred-tank fermentor. It relates the macroscopic properties and dynamic behavior of biomass to the operational parameters and microscopic properties of cells. Population dynamics is governed by two time- and age-dependent density functions for living and dead cells, accounting for the influence of substrate and dissolved oxygen concentrations on cell division, aging and death processes. The ASPBM described biomass and substrate oscillations in aerobic continuous cultures as experimentally observed. It is noteworthy that a small data set consisting of nonsegregated measurements was sufficient to adjust a complex segregated mathematical model.

  16. Dynamic Force Identification for Beamlike Structures Using an Improved Dynamic Stiffness Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.L. Chen

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study a procedure of dynamic force identification for beamlike structures is developed based on an improved dynamic stiffness method. In this procedure, the entire structure is first divided into substructures according to the excitation locations and the measured response sites. Each substructure is then represented by an equivalent element. The resulting model only retains the degree of freedom (DOF associated with the excitations and the measured responses and the DOF corresponding to the boundaries of the structures. Because the technique partly bypasses the processes of modal parameter extraction, global matrix inversion, and model reduction, it can eliminate many of the approximations and errors that may be introduced during these processes. The principle of the method is described in detail and its efficiency is demonstrated via numerical simulations of three different structures. The sensitivity of the estimated force to random noise is discussed and the limitation of the technique is pointed out.

  17. Determination of the Subunit Molecular Mass and Composition of Alcohol Dehydrogenase by SDS-PAGE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Barbara T.

    2007-01-01

    SDS-PAGE is a simple, rapid technique that has many uses in biochemistry and is readily adaptable to the undergraduate laboratory. It is, however, a technique prone to several types of procedural pitfalls. This article describes the use of SDS-PAGE to determine the subunit molecular mass and composition of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase employing…

  18. Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate (SDS)-Loaded Nanoporous Polymer as Anti-Biofilm Surface Coating Material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Li; Molin, Søren; Yang, Liang

    2013-01-01

    -b-polydimethylsiloxane (1,2-PB-b-PDMS) block copolymer via chemical cross-linking of the 1,2-PB block followed by quantitative removal of the PDMS block. Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was loaded into the nanoporous 1,2-PB from aqueous solution. The SDS-loaded nanoporous polymer films were shown to block bacterial attachment...

  19. A Comparison of Satisfied and Dissatisfied Users of Holland's Self Directed Search (SDS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Anne M.; Sedlacek, William E.

    The Self-Directed Search for Educational and Vocational Planning (SDS) is a self-scoring, self-administering instrument designed by John L. Holland, author of the Vocational Reference Inventory. Preliminary use of the SDS led to the speculation that some people were very dissatisfied with their results and others were quite pleased. Of the 4,631…

  20. Structural Dynamics of the Cereblon Ligand Binding Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Marcus D.; Boichenko, Iuliia; Coles, Murray; Lupas, Andrei N.; Hernandez Alvarez, Birte

    2015-01-01

    Cereblon, a primary target of thalidomide and its derivatives, has been characterized structurally from both bacteria and animals. Especially well studied is the thalidomide binding domain, CULT, which shows an invariable structure across different organisms and in complex with different ligands. Here, based on a series of crystal structures of a bacterial representative, we reveal the conformational flexibility and structural dynamics of this domain. In particular, we follow the unfolding of large fractions of the domain upon release of thalidomide in the crystalline state. Our results imply that a third of the domain, including the thalidomide binding pocket, only folds upon ligand binding. We further characterize the structural effect of the C-terminal truncation resulting from the mental-retardation linked R419X nonsense mutation in vitro and offer a mechanistic hypothesis for its irresponsiveness to thalidomide. At 1.2Å resolution, our data provide a view of thalidomide binding at atomic resolution. PMID:26024445

  1. Structural dynamics of the cereblon ligand binding domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus D Hartmann

    Full Text Available Cereblon, a primary target of thalidomide and its derivatives, has been characterized structurally from both bacteria and animals. Especially well studied is the thalidomide binding domain, CULT, which shows an invariable structure across different organisms and in complex with different ligands. Here, based on a series of crystal structures of a bacterial representative, we reveal the conformational flexibility and structural dynamics of this domain. In particular, we follow the unfolding of large fractions of the domain upon release of thalidomide in the crystalline state. Our results imply that a third of the domain, including the thalidomide binding pocket, only folds upon ligand binding. We further characterize the structural effect of the C-terminal truncation resulting from the mental-retardation linked R419X nonsense mutation in vitro and offer a mechanistic hypothesis for its irresponsiveness to thalidomide. At 1.2Å resolution, our data provide a view of thalidomide binding at atomic resolution.

  2. Application of dynamic programming to structural repairing strategies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈朝晖; LIU; Xila; 等

    2002-01-01

    A model of dynamic programming for repairing strategies of concrete structures during a projected service period is proposed,which takes into account the degradation in strength of components and the probability of accidental load.This model takes the safety grade of a structural system as the state variable of repairing strategies,and incorporates economic factors including expected repair cost,property loss due to structure failure,goods and material loss due to structure failure,loss of production interrupt due to structure failure,and inspection cost in decision making.It is found that the optimal repairing strategies are sensitive to the probability of accidental loads as well as the failure costs.The practicality of the model is demonstrated by an example.

  3. Enhancing phosphate adsorption capacity of SDS-based magnetite by surface modification of citric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhigang; Zhang, Chang; Zheng, Zuhong; Hu, Liang; Li, Xuemei; Yang, Zhongzhu; Ma, Chi; Zeng, Guangming

    2017-05-01

    In this study, citric acid (CA) was employed as a low-molecule organic acid to influence the adsorption performance of phosphorus by as-obtained magnetite. The factors including initial phosphate concentrations, dosage of citric acid, pH value, ion strength, contact time and temperature were examined in detail. Results indicated that the dissolution of anion sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) covering on surface of magnetite, a slight decrease of Fe level and a superior structure of magnetite after CA modification occurred. The pH-dependence of phosphate adsorption was impeded and the surface potential of magnetite positively increased at pH > 5.0 when CA was added. Non-linear regression Langmuir-Freundlich model was fitted well in thermodynamics, and the opposite adsorption process as a function of temperatures with or without CA addition was due to the decrease of active energy and active mobility of phosphate ion. Finally, the declining adsorption efficiency with increasing cycles was observed while phosphate removal was approximately finished and had small change with 0.05 and 0.1 M of CA addition. Those improvements of removal efficiency of phosphorus by modified iron oxide were because of the removal of anionic SDS that increased the surface positive charge, and especially the dissolution of element Fe into solution to form precipitate with phosphorus ions. The enhanced stability of magnetite by CA also promoted the high removal efficiency of phosphorus. These implications of CA on phosphate removal can be extended to the field where phosphate pollution is notorious but urgent.

  4. Experiment and Formulations for the Dynamic Characteristics of Jointed Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongqiang Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Clearance joints significantly affect the dynamic properties of deployable structures (DSs. This paper presents a spring-mass model with clearance for the study of the axial stiffness of a jointed structure. The nonlinear stiffness can be predicted by calculating the model's natural frequency which is the reciprocal of the motion period of the model. The results of the theoretical model show that the dynamic stiffness of the clearance joint increases with increases in the displacement amplitude; this finding is consistent with the experimental results. With the inclusion of sliding factors, contact friction, and impact, the established model of energy dissipation is useful for estimating the effects of joint damping on DSs. The energy dissipation model reveals the effects of joint features and excitation conditions on the dissipation of the jointed structure, that is, the excitation frequency and amplitude. Dynamic experiments were performed on jointed structures to characterize the dissipation variations. An exponentially fitting equation was developed based on the energy dissipation model and was verified through the experimental data. This formulation is more efficient than numerical integration for the calculation of the energy dissipation.

  5. Dynamic structure evolution of time-dependent network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Beibei; Zhou, Yadong; Xu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Dai; Guan, Xiaohong

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we research the long-voided problem of formulating the time-dependent network structure evolution scheme, it focus not only on finding new emerging vertices in evolving communities and new emerging communities over the specified time range but also formulating the complex network structure evolution schematic. Previous approaches basically applied to community detection on time static networks and thus failed to consider the potentially crucial and useful information latently embedded in the dynamic structure evolution process of time-dependent network. To address these problems and to tackle the network non-scalability dilemma, we propose the dynamic hierarchical method for detecting and revealing structure evolution schematic of the time-dependent network. In practice and specificity, we propose an explicit hierarchical network evolution uncovering algorithm framework originated from and widely expanded from time-dependent and dynamic spectral optimization theory. Our method yields preferable results compared with previous approaches on a vast variety of test network data, including both real on-line networks and computer generated complex networks.

  6. Loads and Structural Dynamics Requirements for Spaceflight Hardware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Kenneth P.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to establish requirements relating to the loads and structural dynamics technical discipline for NASA and commercial spaceflight launch vehicle and spacecraft hardware. Requirements are defined for the development of structural design loads and recommendations regarding methodologies and practices for the conduct of load analyses are provided. As such, this document represents an implementation of NASA STD-5002. Requirements are also defined for structural mathematical model development and verification to ensure sufficient accuracy of predicted responses. Finally, requirements for model/data delivery and exchange are specified to facilitate interactions between Launch Vehicle Providers (LVPs), Spacecraft Providers (SCPs), and the NASA Technical Authority (TA) providing insight/oversight and serving in the Independent Verification and Validation role. In addition to the analysis-related requirements described above, a set of requirements are established concerning coupling phenomena or other interaction between structural dynamics and aerodynamic environments or control or propulsion system elements. Such requirements may reasonably be considered structure or control system design criteria, since good engineering practice dictates consideration of and/or elimination of the identified conditions in the development of those subsystems. The requirements are included here, however, to ensure that such considerations are captured in the design space for launch vehicles (LV), spacecraft (SC) and the Launch Abort Vehicle (LAV). The requirements in this document are focused on analyses to be performed to develop data needed to support structural verification. As described in JSC 65828, Structural Design Requirements and Factors of Safety for Spaceflight Hardware, implementation of the structural verification requirements is expected to be described in a Structural Verification Plan (SVP), which should describe the verification of each

  7. SDS-PAGE and IR spectroscopy to evaluate modifications in the viral protein profile induced by a cationic porphyrinic photosensitizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Liliana; Esteves, Ana Cristina; Correia, António; Moreirinha, Catarina; Delgadillo, Ivonne; Cunha, Ângela; Neves, Maria G P S; Faustino, Maria A F; Almeida, Adelaide

    2014-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species can be responsible for microbial photodynamic inactivation due to its toxic effects, which include severe damage to proteins, lipids and nucleic acids. In this study, the photo-oxidative modifications of the proteins of a non-enveloped T4-like bacteriophage, induced by the cationic porphyrin 5,10,15-tris(1-methylpyridinium-4-yl)-20-(pentafluorophenyl)porphyrin tri-iodide were evaluated. Two methods were used: sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and infrared spectroscopy. SDS-PAGE analysis showed that the phage protein profile was considerably altered after photodynamic treatment. Seven protein bands putatively corresponding to capsid and tail tube proteins were attenuated and two other were enhanced. Infrared spectroscopy confirmed the time-dependent alteration on the phage protein profile detected by SDS-PAGE, indicative of a response to oxidative damage. Infrared analysis showed to be a promising and rapid screening approach for the analysis of the modifications induced on viral proteins by photosensitization. In fact, one single infrared spectrum can highlight the changes induced to all viral molecular structures, overcoming the delays and complex protocols of the conventional methods, in a much simple and cost effective way.

  8. Structural and Symmetry Analysis of Discrete Dynamical Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kornyak, Vladimir V

    2010-01-01

    To study discrete dynamical systems of different types --- deterministic, statistical and quantum --- we develope various approaches. We introduce the concept of a system of discrete relations on an abstract simplicial complex and develope algorithms for analysis of compatibility and construction of canonical decompositions of such systems. To illustrate these techniques we describe their application to some cellular automata. Much attention is paid to study symmetries of the systems. In the case of deterministic systems we reveale some important relations between symmetries and dynamics. We demonstrate that moving soliton-like structures arise inevitably in deterministic dynamical system whose symmetry group splits the set of states into finite number of group orbits. We develope algorithms and programs exploiting discrete symmetries to study microcanonical ensembles and search phase transitions in mesoscopic lattice models. We propose an approach to quantization of discrete systems based on introduction of ...

  9. Evolutionary dynamics of group interactions on structured populations: A review

    CERN Document Server

    Perc, Matjaz; Szolnoki, Attila; Floría, Luis M; Moreno, Yamir; 10.1098/rsif.2012.0997

    2013-01-01

    Interactions among living organisms, from bacteria colonies to human societies, are inherently more complex than interactions among particles and nonliving matter. Group interactions are a particularly important and widespread class, representative of which is the public goods game. In addition, methods of statistical physics have proven valuable for studying pattern formation, equilibrium selection, and self-organisation in evolutionary games. Here we review recent advances in the study of evolutionary dynamics of group interactions on structured populations, including lattices, complex networks and coevolutionary models. We also compare these results with those obtained on well-mixed populations. The review particularly highlights that the study of the dynamics of group interactions, like several other important equilibrium and non-equilibrium dynamical processes in biological, economical and social sciences, benefits from the synergy between statistical physics, network science and evolutionary game theory...

  10. Geometrical Models of the Phase Space Structures Governing Reaction Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Waalkens, Holger

    2009-01-01

    Hamiltonian dynamical systems possessing equilibria of ${saddle} \\times {centre} \\times...\\times {centre}$ stability type display \\emph{reaction-type dynamics} for energies close to the energy of such equilibria; entrance and exit from certain regions of the phase space is only possible via narrow \\emph{bottlenecks} created by the influence of the equilibrium points. In this paper we provide a thorough pedagogical description of the phase space structures that are responsible for controlling transport in these problems. Of central importance is the existence of a \\emph{Normally Hyperbolic Invariant Manifold (NHIM)}, whose \\emph{stable and unstable manifolds} have sufficient dimensionality to act as separatrices, partitioning energy surfaces into regions of qualitatively distinct behavior. This NHIM forms the natural (dynamical) equator of a (spherical) \\emph{dividing surface} which locally divides an energy surface into two components (`reactants' and `products'), one on either side of the bottleneck. This di...

  11. Global Structure of Exact Scalar Hairy Dynamical Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Zhong-Ying; Lu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    We study the global structure of some exact scalar hairy dynamical black holes which were constructed in Einstein gravity either minimally or non-minimally coupled to a scalar field. We find that both the apparent horizon and the local event horizon (measured in luminosity coordinate) monotonically increase with the advanced time as well as the Vaidya mass. At late advanced times, the apparent horizon approaches the event horizon and gradually becomes future outer. Correspondingly, the space-time arrives at stationary black hole states with the relaxation time inversely proportional to the $1/(n-1)$ power of the final black hole mass. These results strongly support the solutions describing the formation of black holes with scalar hair. We also obtain new charged dynamical solutions in the non-minimal theory by introducing an Maxwell field which is non-minimally coupled to the scalar. The presence of the electric charge strongly modifies the dynamical evolution of the space-time.

  12. IUTAM Symposium on Hamiltonian Dynamics, Vortex Structures, Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Borisov, Alexey V; Mamaev, Ivan S; Sokolovskiy, Mikhail A; IUTAM BOOKSERIES : Volume 6

    2008-01-01

    This work brings together previously unpublished notes contributed by participants of the IUTAM Symposium on Hamiltonian Dynamics, Vortex Structures, Turbulence (Moscow, 25-30 August 2006). The study of vortex motion is of great interest to fluid and gas dynamics: since all real flows are vortical in nature, applications of the vortex theory are extremely diverse, many of them (e.g. aircraft dynamics, atmospheric and ocean phenomena) being especially important. The last few decades have shown that serious possibilities for progress in the research of real turbulent vortex motions are essentially related to the combined use of mathematical methods, computer simulation and laboratory experiments. These approaches have led to a series of interesting results which allow us to study these processes from new perspectives. Based on this principle, the papers collected in this proceedings volume present new results on theoretical and applied aspects of the processes of formation and evolution of various flows, wave a...

  13. Ultrafast Structural Dynamics in Combustion Relevant Model Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Peter M. [Brown University

    2014-03-31

    The research project explored the time resolved structural dynamics of important model reaction system using an array of novel methods that were developed specifically for this purpose. They include time resolved electron diffraction, time resolved relativistic electron diffraction, and time resolved Rydberg fingerprint spectroscopy. Toward the end of the funding period, we also developed time-resolved x-ray diffraction, which uses ultrafast x-ray pulses at LCLS. Those experiments are just now blossoming, as the funding period expired. In the following, the time resolved Rydberg Fingerprint Spectroscopy is discussed in some detail, as it has been a very productive method. The binding energy of an electron in a Rydberg state, that is, the energy difference between the Rydberg level and the ground state of the molecular ion, has been found to be a uniquely powerful tool to characterize the molecular structure. To rationalize the structure sensitivity we invoke a picture from electron diffraction: when it passes the molecular ion core, the Rydberg electron experiences a phase shift compared to an electron in a hydrogen atom. This phase shift requires an adjustment of the binding energy of the electron, which is measurable. As in electron diffraction, the phase shift depends on the molecular, geometrical structure, so that a measurement of the electron binding energy can be interpreted as a measurement of the molecule’s structure. Building on this insight, we have developed a structurally sensitive spectroscopy: the molecule is first elevated to the Rydberg state, and the binding energy is then measured using photoelectron spectroscopy. The molecule’s structure is read out as the binding energy spectrum. Since the photoionization can be done with ultrafast laser pulses, the technique is inherently capable of a time resolution in the femtosecond regime. For the purpose of identifying the structures of molecules during chemical reactions, and for the analysis of

  14. Polarizability effects on the structure and dynamics of ionic liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavalcante, Ary de Oliveira, E-mail: arycavalcante@ufam.edu.br [Institute of Chemistry, University of Campinas – UNICAMP, Cx. P. 6154, Campinas, SP 13084-862 (Brazil); Departamento de Química, Universidade Federal do Amazonas, Av. Rodrigo Octávio, 6200, Coroado, Manaus, AM (Brazil); Ribeiro, Mauro C. C. [Laboratório de Espectroscopia Molecular, Instituto de Química, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP C.P. 26077, 05513 970 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Skaf, Munir S. [Institute of Chemistry, University of Campinas – UNICAMP, Cx. P. 6154, Campinas, SP 13084-862 (Brazil)

    2014-04-14

    Polarization effects on the structure and dynamics of ionic liquids are investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. Four different ionic liquids were simulated, formed by the anions Cl{sup −} and PF{sub 6}{sup −}, treated as single fixed charge sites, and the 1-n-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium cations (1-ethyl and 1-butyl-), which are polarizable. The partial charge fluctuation of the cations is provided by the electronegativity equalization model (EEM) and a complete parameter set for the cations electronegativity (χ) and hardness (J) is presented. Results obtained from a non-polarizable model for the cations are also reported for comparison. Relative to the fixed charged model, the equilibrium structure of the first solvation shell around the imidazolium cations shows that inclusion of EEM polarization forces brings cations closer to each other and that anions are preferentially distributed above and below the plane of the imidazolium ring. The polarizable model yields faster translational and reorientational dynamics than the fixed charges model in the rotational-diffusion regime. In this sense, the polarizable model dynamics is in better agreement with the experimental data.

  15. Solving Optimal Control Problems by Exploiting Inherent Dynamical Systems Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaßkamp, Kathrin; Ober-Blöbaum, Sina; Kobilarov, Marin

    2012-08-01

    Computing globally efficient solutions is a major challenge in optimal control of nonlinear dynamical systems. This work proposes a method combining local optimization and motion planning techniques based on exploiting inherent dynamical systems structures, such as symmetries and invariant manifolds. Prior to the optimal control, the dynamical system is analyzed for structural properties that can be used to compute pieces of trajectories that are stored in a motion planning library. In the context of mechanical systems, these motion planning candidates, termed primitives, are given by relative equilibria induced by symmetries and motions on stable or unstable manifolds of e.g. fixed points in the natural dynamics. The existence of controlled relative equilibria is studied through Lagrangian mechanics and symmetry reduction techniques. The proposed framework can be used to solve boundary value problems by performing a search in the space of sequences of motion primitives connected using optimized maneuvers. The optimal sequence can be used as an admissible initial guess for a post-optimization. The approach is illustrated by two numerical examples, the single and the double spherical pendula, which demonstrates its benefit compared to standard local optimization techniques.

  16. Dynamic stiffness and damping of foundations for jacket structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Latini, Chiara; Zania, Varvara; Johannesson, Björn

    2015-01-01

    Foundation for offshore jacket structures may comprise of long floating piles. The dynamic response of floating piles to horizontal load is herein investigated. The analytical solution of horizontally vibrating end bearing piles by Novak & Nogami (1977) has been modified. At first the soil resist...... study clarifies the role of the parameters involved i.e. the depth of the soil layer, the pile diameter and the soil layer shear wave velocity. Results are presented in terms of dimensionless graphs which highlight the frequency dependency of the dynamic stiffness and damping.......Foundation for offshore jacket structures may comprise of long floating piles. The dynamic response of floating piles to horizontal load is herein investigated. The analytical solution of horizontally vibrating end bearing piles by Novak & Nogami (1977) has been modified. At first the soil...... resistance as defined by Nogami & Novak (1977) is determined, considering 3D wave propagation within linear soil layer with hysteretic damping. Thereafter, the dynamic response of the pile is estimated assuming soil pressure equal to the soil resistance and imposing displacement compatibility. A parametric...

  17. Picosecond to Millisecond Structural Dynamics in Human Ubiquitin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Maragakis, Paul; Piana, Stefano; Shaw, David E

    2016-08-25

    Human ubiquitin has been extensively characterized using a variety of experimental and computational methods and has become an important model for studying protein dynamics. Nevertheless, it has proven difficult to characterize the microsecond time scale dynamics of this protein with atomistic resolution. Here we use an unbiased computer simulation to describe the structural dynamics of ubiquitin on the picosecond to millisecond time scale. In the simulation, ubiquitin interconverts between a small number of distinct states on the microsecond to millisecond time scale. We find that the conformations visited by free ubiquitin in solution are very similar to those found various crystal structures of ubiquitin in complex with other proteins, a finding in line with previous experimental studies. We also observe weak but statistically significant correlated motions throughout the protein, including long-range concerted movement across the entire β sheet, consistent with recent experimental observations. We expect that the detailed atomistic description of ubiquitin dynamics provided by this unbiased simulation may be useful in interpreting current and future experiments on this protein.

  18. A new computational structure for real-time dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izaguirre, A. (New Jersey Inst. of Tech., Newark (United States)); Hashimoto, Minoru (Univ. of Electrocommunications, Tokyo (Japan))

    1992-08-01

    The authors present an efficient structure for the computation of robot dynamics in real time. The fundamental characteristic of this structure is the division of the computation into a high-priority synchronous task and low-priority background tasks, possibly sharing the resources of a conventional computing unit based on commercial microprocessors. The background tasks compute the inertial and gravitational coefficients as well as the forces due to the velocities of the joints. In each control sample period, the high-priority synchronous task computes the product of the inertial coefficients by the accelerations of the joints and performs the summation of the torques due to the velocities and gravitational forces. Kircanski et al. (1986) have shown that the bandwidth of the variation of joint angles and of their velocities is an order of magnitude less than the variation of joint accelerations. This result agrees with the experiments the authors have carried out using a PUMA 260 robot. Two main strategies contribute to reduce the computational burden associated with the evaluation of the dynamic equations. The first involves the use of efficient algorithms for the evaluation of the equations. The second is aimed at reducing the number of dynamic parameters by identifying beforehand the linear dependencies among these parameters, as well as carrying out a significance analysis of the parameters' contribution to the final joint torques. The actual code used to evaluate this dynamic model is entirely computer generated from experimental data, requiring no other manual intervention than performing a campaign of measurements.

  19. Estimating spatio-temporal dynamics of size-structured populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kasper; Thygesen, Uffe Høgsbro; Andersen, Ken Haste

    2014-01-01

    Spatial distributions of structured populations are usually estimated by fitting abundance surfaces for each stage and at each point of time separately, ignoring correlations that emerge from growth of individuals. Here, we present a statistical model that combines spatio-temporal correlations...... with simple stock dynamics, to estimate simultaneously how size distributions and spatial distributions develop in time. We demonstrate the method for a cod population sampled by trawl surveys. Particular attention is paid to correlation between size classes within each trawl haul due to clustering...... of individuals with similar size. The model estimates growth, mortality and reproduction, after which any aspect of size-structure, spatio-temporal population dynamics, as well as the sampling process can be probed. This is illustrated by two applications: 1) tracking the spatial movements of a single cohort...

  20. Letting Structure Emerge: Connectionist and Dynamical Systems Approaches to Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, James L.; Botvinick, Matthew M.; Noelle, David C.; Plaut, David C.; Rogers, Timothy T.; Seidenberg, Mark S.; Smith, Linda B.

    2011-01-01

    Connectionist and dynamical systems approaches explain human thought, language and behavior in terms of the emergent consequences of a large number of simple non-cognitive processes. We view the entities that serve as the basis for structured probabilistic approaches as sometimes useful but often misleading abstractions that have no real basis in the actual processes that give rise to linguistic and cognitive abilities or the development of these abilities. While structured probabilistic approaches can be useful in determining what would be optimal under certain assumptions, we suggest that approaches such as the connectionist and dynamical systems approaches, which focus on explaining the mechanisms giving rise to cognition, will be essential in achieving a full understanding of cognition and development. PMID:20598626

  1. Dynamic time warping for temperature compensation in structural health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglass, Alexander; Harley, Joel B.

    2017-02-01

    Guided wave structural health monitoring uses ultrasonic waves to identify changes in structures. To identify these changes, most guided wave methods require a pristine baseline measurement with which other measurements are compared. Damage signatures arise when there is a deviation between the baseline and the recorded measurement. However, temperature significantly complicates this analysis by creating misalignment between the baseline and measurements. This leads to false alarms of damage and significantly reduces the reliability of these systems. Several methods have been created to account for these temperature perturbations. Yet, most of these compensation methods fail in harsh, highly variable temperature conditions or require a prohibitive amount of prior data. In this paper, we use an algorithm known as dynamic time warping to compensate for temperature in these harsh conditions. We demonstrate that dynamic time warping is able to account for temperature variations whereas the more traditional baseline signal stretch method is unable to resolve damage under high temperature fluctuations.

  2. Differentiable dynamical systems an introduction to structural stability and hyperbolicity

    CERN Document Server

    Wen, Lan

    2016-01-01

    This is a graduate text in differentiable dynamical systems. It focuses on structural stability and hyperbolicity, a topic that is central to the field. Starting with the basic concepts of dynamical systems, analyzing the historic systems of the Smale horseshoe, Anosov toral automorphisms, and the solenoid attractor, the book develops the hyperbolic theory first for hyperbolic fixed points and then for general hyperbolic sets. The problems of stable manifolds, structural stability, and shadowing property are investigated, which lead to a highlight of the book, the \\Omega-stability theorem of Smale. While the content is rather standard, a key objective of the book is to present a thorough treatment for some tough material that has remained an obstacle to teaching and learning the subject matter. The treatment is straightforward and hence could be particularly suitable for self-study. Selected solutions are available electronically for instructors only. Please send email to textbooks@ams.org for more informatio...

  3. Kinematics, Dynamics, and the Structure of Physical Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Curiel, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Every physical theory has (at least) two different forms of mathematical equations to represent its target systems: the dynamical (equations of motion) and the kinematical (kinematical constraints). Kinematical constraints are differentiated from equations of motion by the fact that their particular form is fixed once and for all, irrespective of the interactions the system enters into. By contrast, the particular form of a system's equations of motion depends essentially on the particular interaction the system enters into. All contemporary accounts of the structure and semantics of physical theory treat dynamics, i.e., the equations of motion, as the most important feature of a theory for the purposes of its philosophical analysis. I argue to the contrary that it is the kinematical constraints that determine the structure and empirical content of a physical theory in the most important ways: they function as necessary preconditions for the appropriate application of the theory; they differentiate types of p...

  4. Doublet vs. FODO structure: beam dynamics and layout

    CERN Document Server

    Eshraqi, M; CERN. Geneva. BE Department

    2010-01-01

    A FoDo (singlet) structure is designed for the CERN Superconducting Proton LINAC. This architecture is compared to the baseline (doublet) architecture of SPL on the basis of its beam dynamics performance and the required investment. The sensitivity of both layouts to quadrupole gradient errors and misalignment is checked and a correction scheme for beam steering is proposed. Finally a single quad beam dilution scheme is studied and designed for the pilot beam dump.

  5. Yaw control for active damping of structural dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekelund, T. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Control Engineering Lab.

    1996-12-01

    Yaw torque control for reduction of structural dynamic loads in a two-bladed wind turbine is investigated. The models are obtained using rigid-body mechanics. Linear quadratic control theory is utilized for design and analysis. The analysis of two simple examples, where the teeter angle and the tower lateral bending motion are regarded, shows that a time-varying controller has some advantages compared with a time-invariant controller. 6 refs, 9 figs

  6. Development of paradigms for the dynamics of structured populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-10-01

    This is a technical progress report on the dynamics of predator-prey systems in a patchy environment. A new phenomenon that might contribute to outbreaks in systems of discrete patches has been determined using a discrete time model with both spatial and age structure. A model for a single species in a patchy environment with migration, local population growth and disasters with in patches has been formulated and a brief description is included.

  7. Sierra Structural Dynamics User's Notes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reese, Garth M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-10-19

    Sierra/SD provides a massively parallel implementation of structural dynamics finite element analysis, required for high fidelity, validated models used in modal, vibration, static and shock analysis of weapons systems. This document provides a users guide to the input for Sierra/SD. Details of input specifications for the different solution types, output options, element types and parameters are included. The appendices contain detailed examples, and instructions for running the software on parallel platforms.

  8. SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS BASED ON LANCZOS ALGORITHM IN STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李书; 王波; 胡继忠

    2003-01-01

    The sensitivity calculating formulas in structural dynamics was developed byutilizing the mathematical theorem and new definitions of sensitivities. So the singularityproblem of sensitivity with repeated eigenvalues is solved completely. To improve thecomputational efficiency, the reduction system is obtained based on Lanczos vectors. Afterincorporating the mathematical theory with the Lanczos algorithm, the approximatesensitivity solution can be obtained. A numerical example is presented to illustrate theperformance of the method.

  9. Nucleon structure from 2+1-flavor dynamical DWF ensembles

    CERN Document Server

    Abramczyk, Michael; Lytle, Andrew; Ohta, Shigemi

    2016-01-01

    Nucleon isovector vector- and axialvector-current form factors, the renormalized isovector transversity and scalar charge, and the bare quark momentum and helicity moments of isovector structure functions are reported with improved statistics from two recent RBC+UKQCD 2+1-flavor dynamical domain-wall fermions ensembles: Iwasaki\\(\\times\\)DSDR gauge \\(32^3\\times64\\) at inverse lattice spacing of 1.38 GeV and pion mass of 249 and 172 MeV.

  10. NMR contributions to structural dynamics studies of intrinsically disordered proteins☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konrat, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are characterized by substantial conformational plasticity. Given their inherent structural flexibility X-ray crystallography is not applicable to study these proteins. In contrast, NMR spectroscopy offers unique opportunities for structural and dynamic studies of IDPs. The past two decades have witnessed significant development of NMR spectroscopy that couples advances in spin physics and chemistry with a broad range of applications. This article will summarize key advances in basic physical-chemistry and NMR methodology, outline their limitations and envision future R&D directions. PMID:24656082

  11. Time resolved structural dynamics of butadiyne-linked porphyrin dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Franco V A; Hall, Christopher R; Anderson, Harry L; Meech, Stephen R; Heisler, Ismael A

    2016-03-01

    In this work, the timescales and mechanisms associated with the structural dynamics of butadiyne-linked porphyrin dimers are investigated through time resolved narrowband pump/broadband probe transient absorption spectroscopy. Our results confirm previous findings that the broadening is partly due to a distribution of structures with different (dihedral) angular conformations. Comparison of measurements with excitations on the red and blue sides of the Q-band unravel the ground and excited state conformational re-equilibration timescales. Further comparison to a planarized dimer, through the addition of a ligand, provides conclusive evidence for the twisting motion performed by the porphyrin dimer in solution.

  12. Time resolved structural dynamics of butadiyne-linked porphyrin dimers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco V. A. Camargo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the timescales and mechanisms associated with the structural dynamics of butadiyne-linked porphyrin dimers are investigated through time resolved narrowband pump/broadband probe transient absorption spectroscopy. Our results confirm previous findings that the broadening is partly due to a distribution of structures with different (dihedral angular conformations. Comparison of measurements with excitations on the red and blue sides of the Q-band unravel the ground and excited state conformational re-equilibration timescales. Further comparison to a planarized dimer, through the addition of a ligand, provides conclusive evidence for the twisting motion performed by the porphyrin dimer in solution.

  13. Structure-Preserving Algorithms for a Class of Dynamical Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling-shu Wang; Guang-hui Feng

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we study structure-preserving algorithms for dynamical systems defined by ordinary differential equations in Rn. The equations are assumed to be of the form y = A(y) + D(y) + R(y), where A(y)of damping and expanding; R(y) reflects strange phenomenon of the system. It is shown that the numerical approximations to the exact ones, and these methods can describe the structural properties of the quadratic energy for these systems. Some numerical experiments and backward error analysis also show that these methods are better than other methods including the general algebraically stable Runge-Kutta(RK)methods.

  14. Structural Modeling and Molecular Dynamics Simulation of the Actin Filament

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Splettstoesser, Thomas [University of Heidelberg; Holmes, Kenneth [Max Planck Institute, Heidelberg, Germany; Noe, Frank [DFG Research Center Matheon, FU Berlin, Germany; Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Actin is a major structural protein of the eukaryotic cytoskeleton and enables cell motility. Here, we present a model of the actin filament (F-actin) that not only incorporates the global structure of the recently published model by Oda et al. but also conserves internal stereochemistry. A comparison is made using molecular dynamics simulation of the model with other recent F-actin models. A number of structural determents such as the protomer propeller angle, the number of hydrogen bonds, and the structural variation among the protomers are analyzed. The MD comparison is found to reflect the evolution in quality of actin models over the last 6 years. In addition, simulations of the model are carried out in states with both ADP or ATP bound and local hydrogen-bonding differences characterized.

  15. Dynamic Changes in Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Structure in Ventricular Myocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda L. Vega

    2011-01-01

    sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR and the sarcolemma where Ca2+ release is activated. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the SR is a structurally inert organelle in ventricular myocytes. Our data suggest that rather than being static, the SR undergoes frequent dynamic structural changes. SR boutons expressing functional ryanodine receptors moved throughout the cell, approaching or moving away from the sarcolemma of ventricular myocytes. These changes in SR structure occurred in the absence of changes in [Ca2+] during EC coupling. Microtubules and the molecular motors dynein and kinesin 1(Kif5b were important regulators of SR motility. These findings support a model in which the SR is a motile organelle capable of molecular motor protein-driven structural changes.

  16. An Optimal Dynamic Data Structure for Stabbing-Semigroup Queries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agarwal, Pankaj K.; Arge, Lars; Kaplan, Haim;

    2012-01-01

    {R}$, the stabbing-semigroup query asks for computing $\\sum_{s \\in S(q)} \\omega(s)$. We propose a linear-size dynamic data structure, under the pointer-machine model, that answers queries in worst-case $O(\\log n)$ time and supports both insertions and deletions of intervals in amortized $O(\\log n)$ time....... It is the first data structure that attains the optimal $O(\\log n)$ bound for all three operations. Furthermore, our structure can easily be adapted to external memory, where we obtain a linear-size structure that answers queries and supports updates in $O(\\log_B n)$ I/Os, where B is the disk block size...

  17. Structural prediction of dynamic Bayesian network with partial prior information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiti, Aniruddha; Reddy, Ramakanth; Mukherjee, Anirban

    2015-01-01

    The prediction of the structure of a hidden dynamic Bayesian network (DBN) from a noisy dataset is an important and challenging task. This work presents a generalized framework to infer the DBN network structure with partial prior information. In the proposed framework, the partial information about the network structure is provided in the form of prior. The proposed method makes use of the prior information regarding the presence and as well as absence of some of the edges. Using the noisy dataset and partial prior information, this method is able to infer nearly accurate structure of the network. The proposed method is validated using simulated datasets. In addition, two real biological datasets are used to infer hidden biological interaction networks.

  18. Higher-order structure and epidemic dynamics in clustered networks

    CERN Document Server

    Ritchie, Martin; House, Thomas; Kiss, Istvan Z

    2013-01-01

    Clustering is typically measured by the ratio of triangles to all triples, open or closed. Generating clustered networks, and how clustering affects dynamics on networks, is reasonably well understood for certain classes of networks \\cite{vmclust, karrerclust2010}, e.g., networks composed of lines and non-overlapping triangles. In this paper we show that it is possible to generate networks which, despite having the same degree distribution and equal clustering, exhibit different higher-order structure, specifically, overlapping triangles and other order-four (a closed network motif composed of four nodes) structures. To distinguish and quantify these additional structural features, we develop a new network metric capable of measuring order-four structure which, when used alongside traditional network metrics, allows us to more accurately describe a network's topology. Three network generation algorithms are considered: a modified configuration model and two rewiring algorithms. By generating homogeneous netwo...

  19. Nesting of thermodynamic, structural, and dynamic anomalies in liquid silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasisht, Vishwas V.; Mathew, John; Sengupta, Shiladitya; Sastry, Srikanth

    2014-09-01

    Anomalous behaviour in density, diffusivity, and structural order is investigated for silicon modeled by the Stillinger-Weber potential by performing molecular dynamics simulations. As previously reported in the case of water [J. R. Errington and P. G. Debenedetti, Nature (London) 409, 318 (2001)] and silica [M. S. Shell, P. G. Debenedetti, and A. Z. Panagiotopoulos, Phys. Rev. E 66, 011202 (2002)], a cascading of thermodynamic, dynamic, and structural anomalous regions is also observed in liquid silicon. The region of structural anomaly includes the region of diffusivity anomaly, which in turn encompasses the region of density anomaly (which is unlike water but similar to silica). In the region of structural anomaly, a tight correlation between the translational and tetrahedrality order parameter is found, but the correlation is weaker when a local orientational order parameter (q3) is used as a measure of tetrahedrality. The total excess entropy and the pair correlation entropy are computed across the phase diagram and the correlation between the excess entropy and the regions of anomalies in the phase diagram of liquid silicon is examined. Scaling relations associating the excess entropy with the diffusion coefficient show considerable deviation from the quasi-universal behaviour observed in hard-sphere and Lennard-Jones liquids and some liquid metals. Excess entropy based criteria for diffusivity and structural anomalies fail to capture the observed regions of anomaly.

  20. Wind turbine control systems: Dynamic model development using system identification and the fast structural dynamics code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuart, J.G.; Wright, A.D.; Butterfield, C.P.

    1996-10-01

    Mitigating the effects of damaging wind turbine loads and responses extends the lifetime of the turbine and, consequently, reduces the associated Cost of Energy (COE). Active control of aerodynamic devices is one option for achieving wind turbine load mitigation. Generally speaking, control system design and analysis requires a reasonable dynamic model of {open_quotes}plant,{close_quotes} (i.e., the system being controlled). This paper extends the wind turbine aileron control research, previously conducted at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC), by presenting a more detailed development of the wind turbine dynamic model. In prior research, active aileron control designs were implemented in an existing wind turbine structural dynamics code, FAST (Fatigue, Aerodynamics, Structures, and Turbulence). In this paper, the FAST code is used, in conjunction with system identification, to generate a wind turbine dynamic model for use in active aileron control system design. The FAST code is described and an overview of the system identification technique is presented. An aileron control case study is used to demonstrate this modeling technique. The results of the case study are then used to propose ideas for generalizing this technique for creating dynamic models for other wind turbine control applications.

  1. Stress, strain, and structural dynamics an interactive handbook of formulas, solutions, and Matlab toolboxes

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Bingen

    2005-01-01

    Stress, Strain, and Structural Dynamics is a comprehensive and definitive reference to statics and dynamics of solids and structures, including mechanics of materials, structural mechanics, elasticity, rigid-body dynamics, vibrations, structural dynamics, and structural controls. This text integrates the development of fundamental theories, formulas and mathematical models with user-friendly interactive computer programs, written in the powerful and popular MATLAB. This unique merger of technical referencing and interactive computing allows instant solution of a variety of engineering problems

  2. Impact of constrained rewiring on network structure and node dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattana, P; Berthouze, L; Kiss, I Z

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we study an adaptive spatial network. We consider a susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) epidemic on the network, with a link or contact rewiring process constrained by spatial proximity. In particular, we assume that susceptible nodes break links with infected nodes independently of distance and reconnect at random to susceptible nodes available within a given radius. By systematically manipulating this radius we investigate the impact of rewiring on the structure of the network and characteristics of the epidemic. We adopt a step-by-step approach whereby we first study the impact of rewiring on the network structure in the absence of an epidemic, then with nodes assigned a disease status but without disease dynamics, and finally running network and epidemic dynamics simultaneously. In the case of no labeling and no epidemic dynamics, we provide both analytic and semianalytic formulas for the value of clustering achieved in the network. Our results also show that the rewiring radius and the network's initial structure have a pronounced effect on the endemic equilibrium, with increasingly large rewiring radiuses yielding smaller disease prevalence.

  3. Structural dynamics and thermostabilization of neurotensin receptor 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangbae; Bhattacharya, Supriyo; Tate, Christopher G; Grisshammer, Reinhard; Vaidehi, Nagarajan

    2015-04-16

    The neurotensin receptor NTSR1 binds the peptide agonist neurotensin (NTS) and signals preferentially via the Gq protein. Recently, Grisshammer and co-workers reported the crystal structure of a thermostable mutant NTSR1-GW5 with NTS bound. Understanding how the mutations thermostabilize the structure would allow efficient design of thermostable mutant GPCRs for protein purification, and subsequent biophysical studies. Using microsecond scale molecular dynamics simulations (4 μs) of the thermostable mutant NTSR1-GW5 and wild type NTSR1, we have elucidated the structural and energetic factors that affect the thermostability and dynamics of NTSR1. The thermostable mutant NTSR1-GW5 is found to be less flexible and less dynamic than the wild type NTSR1. The point mutations confer thermostability by improving the interhelical hydrogen bonds, hydrophobic packing, and receptor interactions with the lipid bilayer, especially in the intracellular regions. During MD, NTSR1-GW5 becomes more hydrated compared to wild type NTSR1, with tight hydrogen bonded water clusters within the transmembrane core of the receptor, thus providing evidence that water plays an important role in improving helical packing in the thermostable mutant. Our studies provide valuable insights into the stability and functioning of NTSR1 that will be useful in future design of thermostable mutants of other peptide GPCRs.

  4. Crystal structures and dynamical properties of dense CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Xue; Liu, Hanyu; Wu, Min; Yao, Yansun; Tse, John S; Dias, Ranga; Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2016-10-04

    Structural polymorphism in dense carbon dioxide (CO2) has attracted significant attention in high-pressure physics and chemistry for the past two decades. Here, we have performed high-pressure experiments and first-principles theoretical calculations to investigate the stability, structure, and dynamical properties of dense CO2 We found evidence that CO2-V with the 4-coordinated extended structure can be quenched to ambient pressure below 200 K-the melting temperature of CO2-I. CO2-V is a fully coordinated structure formed from a molecular solid at high pressure and recovered at ambient pressure. Apart from confirming the metastability of CO2-V (I-42d) at ambient pressure at low temperature, results of ab initio molecular dynamics and metadynamics (MD) simulations provided insights into the transformation processes and structural relationship from the molecular to the extended phases. In addition, the simulation also predicted a phase V'(Pna21) in the stability region of CO2-V with a diffraction pattern similar to that previously assigned to the CO2-V (P212121) structure. Both CO2-V and -V' are predicted to be recoverable and hard with a Vicker hardness of ∼20 GPa. Significantly, MD simulations found that the CO2 in phase IV exhibits large-amplitude bending motions at finite temperatures and high pressures. This finding helps to explain the discrepancy between earlier predicted static structures and experiments. MD simulations clearly indicate temperature effects are critical to understanding the high-pressure behaviors of dense CO2 structures-highlighting the significance of chemical kinetics associated with the transformations.

  5. The interplay between dynamic heterogeneities and structure of bulk liquid water: A molecular dynamics simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demontis, Pierfranco; Gulín-González, Jorge; Masia, Marco; Sant, Marco; Suffritti, Giuseppe B

    2015-06-28

    In order to study the interplay between dynamical heterogeneities and structural properties of bulk liquid water in the temperature range 130-350 K, thus including the supercooled regime, we use the explicit trend of the distribution functions of some molecular properties, namely, the rotational relaxation constants, the atomic mean-square displacements, the relaxation of the cross correlation functions between the linear and squared displacements of H and O atoms of each molecule, the tetrahedral order parameter q and, finally, the number of nearest neighbors (NNs) and of hydrogen bonds (HBs) per molecule. Two different potentials are considered: TIP4P-Ew and a model developed in this laboratory for the study of nanoconfined water. The results are similar for the dynamical properties, but are markedly different for the structural characteristics. In particular, for temperatures higher than that of the dynamic crossover between "fragile" (at higher temperatures) and "strong" (at lower temperatures) liquid behaviors detected around 207 K, the rotational relaxation of supercooled water appears to be remarkably homogeneous. However, the structural parameters (number of NNs and of HBs, as well as q) do not show homogeneous distributions, and these distributions are different for the two water models. Another dynamic crossover between "fragile" (at lower temperatures) and "strong" (at higher temperatures) liquid behaviors, corresponding to the one found experimentally at T(∗) ∼ 315 ± 5 K, was spotted at T(∗) ∼ 283 K and T(∗) ∼ 276 K for the TIP4P-Ew and the model developed in this laboratory, respectively. It was detected from the trend of Arrhenius plots of dynamic quantities and from the onset of a further heterogeneity in the rotational relaxation. To our best knowledge, it is the first time that this dynamical crossover is detected in computer simulations of bulk water. On the basis of the simulation results, the possible mechanisms of the two

  6. Structural Dynamics of the MecA-ClpC Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Mei, Ziqing; Li, Ningning; Qi, Yutao; Xu, Yanji; Shi, Yigong; Wang, Feng; Lei, Jianlin; Gao, Ning

    2013-01-01

    The MecA-ClpC complex is a bacterial type II AAA+ molecular machine responsible for regulated unfolding of substrates, such as transcription factors ComK and ComS, and targeting them to ClpP for degradation. The six subunits of the MecA-ClpC complex form a closed barrel-like structure, featured with three stacked rings and a hollow passage, where substrates are threaded and translocated through successive pores. Although the general concepts of how polypeptides are unfolded and translocated by internal pore loops of AAA+ proteins have long been conceived, the detailed mechanistic model remains elusive. With cryoelectron microscopy, we captured four different structures of the MecA-ClpC complexes. These complexes differ in the nucleotide binding states of the two AAA+ rings and therefore might presumably reflect distinctive, representative snapshots from a dynamic unfolding cycle of this hexameric complex. Structural analysis reveals that nucleotide binding and hydrolysis modulate the hexameric complex in a number of ways, including the opening of the N-terminal ring, the axial and radial positions of pore loops, the compactness of the C-terminal ring, as well as the relative rotation between the two nucleotide-binding domain rings. More importantly, our structural and biochemical data indicate there is an active allosteric communication between the two AAA+ rings and suggest that concerted actions of the two AAA+ rings are required for the efficiency of the substrate unfolding and translocation. These findings provide important mechanistic insights into the dynamic cycle of the MecA-ClpC unfoldase and especially lay a foundation toward the complete understanding of the structural dynamics of the general type II AAA+ hexamers. PMID:23595989

  7. Effects of Tx-100-SDS on crystal growth of calcium carbonate in reverse microemulsion solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Yu; DU BiYing; LI LinGang; YANG Jun; ZHANG YuanMing

    2007-01-01

    Syntheses of CaCO3 crystals in reverse microemulsion solutions containing 1-(1,1,3,3-tetramethylbutyl)-4-hydroxypolyethoxybenzene (Tx-100), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and their equimolar mixture were carried out at room temperature respectively. The crystal phase of CaCO3 is changed from calcite at low concentrations to vaterite at high concentrations of SDS and Tx-100. From rods at low concentration to olivary spheres at high concentration, SDS can influence the morphology of CaCO3 significantly, while almost no such effect for Tx-100. Hollow spheres, olivary spheres and even two fused olivary spheres of CaCO3 were produced at different concentrations of Tx-100-SDS, and the variation of crystal phase is opposite to that in the presence of SDS or Tx-100 alone. The effects of interaction of SDS with Tx-100 on morphology and crystal phase of CaCO3 were discussed. It was estimated to put forward that the formation of hollow CaCO3 crystals was caused by the collaborating actions of SDS template and TX-100 inhibition.

  8. Functional conservation of the meiotic genes SDS and RCK in male meiosis in the monocot rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling Chang; Hong Ma; Hong-Wei Xue

    2009-01-01

    The Arabidopsis SDS (SOLO DANCERS) and RCK (ROCK-N-ROLLERS) genes are important for male meiosis, but it is still unknown whether they represent conserved functions in plants. We have performed phylogenetic analy-ses of SDS and RCK and their respective homologs, and identified their putative orthologs in poplar and rice. Quan-titative real-time RT-PCR analysis indicated that rice SDS and RCK are expressed preferentially in young flowers, and transgenic RNAi rice lines with reduced expression of these genes exhibited normal vegetative development, but showed significantly reduced fertility with partially sterile flowers and defective pollens. SDS deficiency also caused a decrease in pollen amounts. Further cytological examination of male meiocytes revealed that the SDS deficiency led to defects in homolog interaction and bivalent formation in meiotic prophase I, and RCK deficiency resulted in defec-tive meiotic crossover formation. These results indicate that rice SDS and RCK genes have similar functions to their Arabidopsis orthologs. Because rice and Arabidopsis, respectively, are members of monocots and eudicots, two largest groups of flowering plants, our results suggest that the functions of SDS and RCK are likely conserved in flowering plants.

  9. A Molecular Dynamics Study of the Structural and Dynamical Properties of Putative Arsenic Substituted Lipid Bilayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratna Juwita

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Cell membranes are composed mainly of phospholipids which are in turn, composed of five major chemical elements: carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, and phosphorus. Recent studies have suggested the possibility of sustaining life if the phosphorus is substituted by arsenic. Although this issue is still controversial, it is of interest to investigate the properties of arsenated-lipid bilayers to evaluate this possibility. In this study, we simulated arsenated-lipid, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-arsenocholine (POAC, lipid bilayers using all-atom molecular dynamics to understand basic structural and dynamical properties, in particular, the differences from analogous 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, (POPC lipid bilayers. Our simulations showed that POAC lipid bilayers have distinct structural and dynamical properties from those of native POPC lipid bilayers. Relative to POPC lipid bilayers, POAC lipid bilayers have a more compact structure with smaller lateral areas and greater order. The compact structure of POAC lipid bilayers is due to the fact that more inter-lipid salt bridges are formed with arsenate-choline compared to the phosphate-choline of POPC lipid bilayers. These inter-lipid salt bridges bind POAC lipids together and also slow down the head group rotation and lateral diffusion of POAC lipids. Thus, it would be anticipated that POAC and POPC lipid bilayers would have different biological implications.

  10. Essential functions of Sds22p in chromosome stability and nuclear localization of PP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peggie, Mark W; MacKelvie, Sarah H; Bloecher, Andrew; Knatko, Elena V; Tatchell, Kelly; Stark, Michael J R

    2002-01-01

    Sds22p is a conserved, leucine-rich repeat protein that interacts with the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1(C)) and which has been proposed to regulate one or more functions of PP1(C) during mitosis. Here we show that Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sds22p is a largely nuclear protein, most of which is present as a sTable 1:1 complex with yeast PP1(C) (Glc7p). Temperature-sensitive (Ts(-)) S. cerevisiae sds22 mutants show profound chromosome instability at elevated growth temperatures but do not confer a cell cycle stage-specific arrest. In the sds22-6 Ts(-) mutant, nuclear Glc7p is both reduced in level and aberrantly localized at 37 degrees C and the interaction between Glc7p and Sds22p in vitro is reduced at higher temperatures, consistent with the in vivo Ts(-) growth defect. Like some glc7 mutations, sds22-6 can suppress the Ts(-) growth defect associated with ipl1-2, a loss of function mutation in a protein kinase that is known to work in opposition to PP1 on at least two nuclear substrates. This, together with reciprocal genetic interactions between GLC7 and SDS22, suggests that Sds22p functions positively with Glc7p to promote dephosphorylation of nuclear substrates required for faithful transmission of chromosomes during mitosis, and this role is at least partly mediated by effects of Sds22p on the nuclear distribution of Glc7p

  11. Dynamic Approach of Capital Structure of European Shipping Companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stavros H. Arvanitis

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The issue of capital structure of companies is one of the most debated problems of financialmanagement. According to economic theory, capital structure determines the stock market valueof firms and therefore their viability, while one of the most negative result of the crash of 2008 andthe persisting crisis (excess supply in markets of labor and money is their ongoing steep declineof lending by credit institutions and other sources. In this paper, considering the importanceof the issue and motivated by the conflicting results of previous empirical studies, we attemptthe analysis of capital structure of the European Maritime Enterprises (oceanic shipping.We focus on shipping companies, because of the large volume of funding that demands theirmain operation, due to the intensity of the assets held. The objectives of this research are firstlythe identification of factors that affect the capital structure of European oceanic shipping andsecondly to search for the existence of an ideal - target capital structure ratio. The determinantsof capital structure are examined through static (fixed effect method and FGLS and dynamic(GMM Methods econometric models, using data from the financial statements of 32 listedEuropean shipping companies for the period 2005-2010. The results suggest the prevalence ofpecking order theory in our case, while a positive relationship arises between tangible assets andtax benefits (arising from sources other than borrowing against leverage. Moreover, we observea negative relationship between size or profitability and debt. Our findings contribute to a deeperunderstanding of the decisions taken by European shipping on their capital structure.

  12. Structure and dynamics of metalloproteins in live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Jeremy D; Penner-Hahn, James E; Stemmler, Timothy L

    2008-01-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has emerged as one of the premier tools for investigating the structure and dynamic properties of metals in cells and in metal containing biomolecules. Utilizing the high flux and broad energy range of X-rays supplied by synchrotron light sources, one can selectively excite core electronic transitions in each metal. Spectroscopic signals from these electronic transitions can be used to dissect the chemical architecture of metals in cells, in cellular components, and in biomolecules at varying degrees of structural resolution. With the development of ever-brighter X-ray sources, X-ray methods have grown into applications that can be utilized to provide both a cellular image of the relative distribution of metals throughout the cell as well as a high-resolution picture of the structure of the metal. As these techniques continue to grow in their capabilities and ease of use, so too does the demand for their application by chemists and biochemists interested in studying the structure and dynamics of metals in cells, in cellular organelles, and in metalloproteins.

  13. Effects of Dragonfly Wing Structure on the Dynamic Performances

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huaihui Ren; Xishu Wang; Xudong Li; Yinglong Chen

    2013-01-01

    The configurations of dragonfly wings,including the corrugations of the chordwise cross-section,the microstructure of the longitudinal veins and membrane,were comprehensively investigated using the Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy (ESEM).Based on the experimental results reported previously,the multi-scale and multi-dimensional models with different structural features of dragonfly wing were created,and the biological dynamic behaviors of wing models were discussed through the Finite Element Method (FEM).The results demonstrate that the effects of different structural features on dynamic behaviors of dragonfly wing such as natural frequency/modal,bending/torsional deformation,reaction force/torque are very significant.The corrugations of dragonfly wing along the chordwise can observably improve the flapping frequency because of the greater structural stiffness of wings.In updated model,the novel sandwich microstructure of the longitudinal veins remarkably improves the torsional deformation of dragonfly wing while it has a little effect on the flapping frequency and bending deformation.These integrated structural features can adjust the deformation of wing oneself,therefore the flow field around the wings can be controlled adaptively.The fact is that the flights of dragonfly wing with sandwich microstructure of longitudinal veins are more efficient and intelligent.

  14. Accuracy Enhanced Stability and Structure Preserving Model Reduction Technique for Dynamical Systems with Second Order Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tahavori, Maryamsadat; Shaker, Hamid Reza

    A method for model reduction of dynamical systems with the second order structure is proposed in this paper. The proposed technique preserves the second order structure of the system, and also preserves the stability of the original systems. The method uses the controllability and observability...... gramians within the time interval to build the appropriate Petrov-Galerkin projection for dynamical systems within the time interval of interest. The bound on approximation error is also derived. The numerical results are compared with the counterparts from other techniques. The results confirm...

  15. 35th IMAC, A Conference and Exposition on Structural Dynamics 2017

    CERN Document Server

    Niezrecki, Christopher; Maio, Dario; Castellini, Paolo; Mains, Michael; Blough, JR

    2017-01-01

    Special Topics in Structural Dynamics, Volume 6: Proceedings of the 35th IMAC, A Conference and Exposition on Structural Dynamics, 2017, the sixth volume of ten from the Conference brings together contributions to this important area of research and engineering. The collection presents early findings and case studies on fundamental and applied aspects of Structural Dynamics, including papers on: Experimental Methods Analytical Methods General Dynamics & Modal Analysis General Dynamics & System Identification Damage Detection .

  16. EFFECT OF SURFACTANT SDS ON DETERMINATION OF NUCLEIC ACID WITH TERBIUM (III)FLUO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WuHui; WanYu

    2002-01-01

    The effect of an anionic surfactant(sodium dodecylsulfate.SDS)on the fluorescence properties of nucleic acid with terbium(III)is studied.Results show that ri-bonucleir acid (RNA)presents fluorescence reaction with Tb(III)directly.but deoxyribonucleic acid(DNA)pre-sents similar fluorescence reaction only after its denatura-tion.In the presence of SDS ,the fluorescence intensity is 4.0 times and 3.5 times greater than that of DNA and RNA without SDS.

  17. Mapping the structural and dynamical features of kinesin motor domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Scarabelli

    Full Text Available Kinesin motor proteins drive intracellular transport by coupling ATP hydrolysis to conformational changes that mediate directed movement along microtubules. Characterizing these distinct conformations and their interconversion mechanism is essential to determining an atomic-level model of kinesin action. Here we report a comprehensive principal component analysis of 114 experimental structures along with the results of conventional and accelerated molecular dynamics simulations that together map the structural dynamics of the kinesin motor domain. All experimental structures were found to reside in one of three distinct conformational clusters (ATP-like, ADP-like and Eg5 inhibitor-bound. These groups differ in the orientation of key functional elements, most notably the microtubule binding α4-α5, loop8 subdomain and α2b-β4-β6-β7 motor domain tip. Group membership was found not to correlate with the nature of the bound nucleotide in a given structure. However, groupings were coincident with distinct neck-linker orientations. Accelerated molecular dynamics simulations of ATP, ADP and nucleotide free Eg5 indicate that all three nucleotide states could sample the major crystallographically observed conformations. Differences in the dynamic coupling of distal sites were also evident. In multiple ATP bound simulations, the neck-linker, loop8 and the α4-α5 subdomain display correlated motions that are absent in ADP bound simulations. Further dissection of these couplings provides evidence for a network of dynamic communication between the active site, microtubule-binding interface and neck-linker via loop7 and loop13. Additional simulations indicate that the mutations G325A and G326A in loop13 reduce the flexibility of these regions and disrupt their couplings. Our combined results indicate that the reported ATP and ADP-like conformations of kinesin are intrinsically accessible regardless of nucleotide state and support a model where neck

  18. Dynamic structure of joint-action stimulus-response activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, MaryLauren; Castillo, Ramon D; Kloos, Heidi; Holden, John G; Richardson, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    The mere presence of a co-actor can influence an individual's response behavior. For instance, a social Simon effect has been observed when two individuals perform a Go/No-Go response to one of two stimuli in the presence of each other, but not when they perform the same task alone. Such effects are argued to provide evidence that individuals co-represent the task goals and the to-be-performed actions of a co-actor. Motivated by the complex-systems approach, the present study was designed to investigate an alternative hypothesis--that such joint-action effects are due to a dynamical (time-evolving) interpersonal coupling that operates to perturb the behavior of socially situated actors. To investigate this possibility, participants performed a standard Go/No-Go Simon task in joint and individual conditions. The dynamic structure of recorded reaction times was examined using fractal statistics and instantaneous cross-correlation. Consistent with our hypothesis that participants responding in a shared space would become behaviorally coupled, the analyses revealed that reaction times in the joint condition displayed decreased fractal structure (indicative of interpersonal perturbation processes modulating ongoing participant behavior) compared to the individual condition, and were more correlated across a range of time-scales compared to the reaction times of pseudo-pair controls. Collectively, the findings imply that dynamic processes might underlie social stimulus-response compatibility effects and shape joint cognitive processes in general.

  19. Dynamic structure of joint-action stimulus-response activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MaryLauren Malone

    Full Text Available The mere presence of a co-actor can influence an individual's response behavior. For instance, a social Simon effect has been observed when two individuals perform a Go/No-Go response to one of two stimuli in the presence of each other, but not when they perform the same task alone. Such effects are argued to provide evidence that individuals co-represent the task goals and the to-be-performed actions of a co-actor. Motivated by the complex-systems approach, the present study was designed to investigate an alternative hypothesis--that such joint-action effects are due to a dynamical (time-evolving interpersonal coupling that operates to perturb the behavior of socially situated actors. To investigate this possibility, participants performed a standard Go/No-Go Simon task in joint and individual conditions. The dynamic structure of recorded reaction times was examined using fractal statistics and instantaneous cross-correlation. Consistent with our hypothesis that participants responding in a shared space would become behaviorally coupled, the analyses revealed that reaction times in the joint condition displayed decreased fractal structure (indicative of interpersonal perturbation processes modulating ongoing participant behavior compared to the individual condition, and were more correlated across a range of time-scales compared to the reaction times of pseudo-pair controls. Collectively, the findings imply that dynamic processes might underlie social stimulus-response compatibility effects and shape joint cognitive processes in general.

  20. Structure and dynamics of a constitutively active neurotensin receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krumm, Brian E. [National Inst. of Health (NIH), Rockville, MD (United States). National Inst. of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Dept. of Health and Human Services; Lee, Sangbae [Beckman Research Inst. of the City of Hope, Duarte, CA (United States). Dept. of Molecular Immunology; Bhattacharya, Supriyo [Beckman Research Inst. of the City of Hope, Duarte, CA (United States). Dept. of Molecular Immunology; Botos, Istvan [National Inst. of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD (United States). National Inst. of Diabetes and; White, Courtney F. [National Inst. of Health (NIH), Rockville, MD (United States). National Inst. of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Dept. of Health and Human Services; Du, Haijuan [National Inst. of Health (NIH), Rockville, MD (United States). National Inst. of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Dept. of Health and Human Services; Vaidehi, Nagarajan [Beckman Research Inst. of the City of Hope, Duarte, CA (United States). Dept. of Molecular Immunology; Grisshammer, Reinhard [National Inst. of Health (NIH), Rockville, MD (United States). National Inst. of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Dept. of Health and Human Services

    2016-12-07

    Many G protein-coupled receptors show constitutive activity, resulting in the production of a second messenger in the absence of an agonist; and naturally occurring constitutively active mutations in receptors have been implicated in diseases. To gain insight into mechanistic aspects of constitutive activity, we report here the 3.3 Å crystal structure of a constitutively active, agonist-bound neurotensin receptor (NTSR1) and molecular dynamics simulations of agonist-occupied and ligand-free receptor. Comparison with the structure of a NTSR1 variant that has little constitutive activity reveals uncoupling of the ligand-binding domain from conserved connector residues, that effect conformational changes during GPCR activation. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulations show strong contacts between connector residue side chains and increased flexibility at the intracellular receptor face as features that coincide with robust signalling in cells. The loss of correlation between the binding pocket and conserved connector residues, combined with altered receptor dynamics, possibly explains the reduced neurotensin efficacy in the constitutively active NTSR1 and a facilitated initial engagement with G protein in the absence of agonist.

  1. Dynamics of driven flow with exclusion in graphenelike structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinchcombe, R. B.; de Queiroz, S. L. A.

    2015-05-01

    We present a mean-field theory for the dynamics of driven flow with exclusion in graphenelike structures, and numerically check its predictions. We treat first a specific combination of bond transmissivity rates, where mean field predicts, and numerics to a large extent confirms, that the sublattice structure characteristic of honeycomb networks becomes irrelevant. Dynamics, in the various regions of the phase diagram set by open boundary injection and ejection rates, is then in general identical to that of one-dimensional systems, although some discrepancies remain between mean-field theory and numerical results, in similar ways for both geometries. However, at the critical point for which the characteristic exponent is z =3 /2 in one dimension, the mean-field value z =2 is approached for very large systems with constant (finite) aspect ratio. We also treat a second combination of bond (and boundary) rates where, more typically, sublattice distinction persists. For the two rate combinations, in continuum or late-time limits, respectively, the coupled sets of mean-field dynamical equations become tractable with various techniques and give a two-band spectrum, gapless in the critical phase. While for the second rate combination quantitative discrepancies between mean-field theory and simulations increase for most properties and boundary rates investigated, theory still is qualitatively correct in general, and gives a fairly good quantitative account of features such as the late-time evolution of density profile differences from their steady-state values.

  2. Beyond Membrane Protein Structure: Drug Discovery, Dynamics and Difficulties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggin, Philip C; Aldeghi, Matteo; Bodkin, Michael J; Heifetz, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Most of the previous content of this book has focused on obtaining the structures of membrane proteins. In this chapter we explore how those structures can be further used in two key ways. The first is their use in structure based drug design (SBDD) and the second is how they can be used to extend our understanding of their functional activity via the use of molecular dynamics. Both aspects now heavily rely on computations. This area is vast, and alas, too large to consider in depth in a single book chapter. Thus where appropriate we have referred the reader to recent reviews for deeper assessment of the field. We discuss progress via the use of examples from two main drug target areas; G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) and ion channels. We end with a discussion of some of the main challenges in the area.

  3. A neighbor pixel communication filtering structure for Dynamic Vision Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yuan; Liu, Shiqi; Lu, Hehui; Zhang, Zilong

    2017-02-01

    For Dynamic Vision Sensors (DVS), thermal noise and junction leakage current induced Background Activity (BA) is the major cause of the deterioration of images quality. Inspired by the smoothing filtering principle of horizontal cells in vertebrate retina, A DVS pixel with Neighbor Pixel Communication (NPC) filtering structure is proposed to solve this issue. The NPC structure is designed to judge the validity of pixel's activity through the communication between its 4 adjacent pixels. The pixel's outputs will be suppressed if its activities are determined not real. The proposed pixel's area is 23.76×24.71μm2 and only 3ns output latency is introduced. In order to validate the effectiveness of the structure, a 5×5 pixel array has been implemented in SMIC 0.13μm CIS process. 3 test cases of array's behavioral model show that the NPC-DVS have an ability of filtering the BA.

  4. Model Reduction in Dynamic Finite Element Analysis of Lightweight Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flodén, Ola; Persson, Kent; Sjöström, Anders

    2012-01-01

    . The objective of the analyses presented in this paper is to evaluate methods for model reduction of detailed finite element models of floor and wall structures and to investigate the influence of reducing the number of degrees of freedom and computational cost on the dynamic response of the models in terms....... The drawback of component mode synthesis compared to modelling with structural elements is the increased computational cost, although the number of degrees of freedom is small in comparison, as a result of the large bandwidth of the system matrices.......The application of wood as a construction material when building multi-storey buildings has many advantages, e.g., light weight, sustainability and low energy consumption during the construction and lifecycle of the building. However, compared to heavy structures, it is a greater challenge to build...

  5. Complex Dynamic Flows in Solar Flare Sheet Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, David E.; Reeves, Katharine K.; Savage, Sabrina

    2012-01-01

    Observations of high-energy emission from solar flares often reveal the presence of large sheet-like structures, sometimes extending over a space comparable to the Sun's radius. Given that these structures are found between a departing coronal mass ejection and the post-eruption flare arcade, it is natural to associate the structure with a current sheet; though the relationship is unclear. Moreover, recent high-resolution observations have begun to reveal that the motions in this region are highly complex, including reconnection outflows, oscillations, and apparent wakes and eddies. We present a detailed first look at the complicated dynamics within this supra-arcade plasma, and consider implications for the interrelationship between the plasma and its embedded magnetic field.

  6. Computational and theoretical aspects of biomolecular structure and dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, A.E.; Berendzen, J.; Catasti, P., Chen, X. [and others

    1996-09-01

    This is the final report for a project that sought to evaluate and develop theoretical, and computational bases for designing, performing, and analyzing experimental studies in structural biology. Simulations of large biomolecular systems in solution, hydrophobic interactions, and quantum chemical calculations for large systems have been performed. We have developed a code that implements the Fast Multipole Algorithm (FMA) that scales linearly in the number of particles simulated in a large system. New methods have been developed for the analysis of multidimensional NMR data in order to obtain high resolution atomic structures. These methods have been applied to the study of DNA sequences in the human centromere, sequences linked to genetic diseases, and the dynamics and structure of myoglobin.

  7. Perspective: Structure and ultrafast dynamics of biomolecular hydration shells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien Laage

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The structure and function of biomolecules can be strongly influenced by their hydration shells. A key challenge is thus to determine the extent to which these shells differ from bulk water, since the structural fluctuations and molecular excitations of hydrating water molecules within these shells can cover a broad range in both space and time. Recent progress in theory, molecular dynamics simulations, and ultrafast vibrational spectroscopy has led to new and detailed insight into the fluctuations of water structure, elementary water motions, and electric fields at hydrated biointerfaces. Here, we discuss some central aspects of these advances, focusing on elementary molecular mechanisms and processes of hydration on a femto- to picosecond time scale, with some special attention given to several issues subject to debate.

  8. Optical Fibres Contactless Sensor for Dynamic Testing of Lightweight Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Bregant

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available With dynamic testing, engineers describe activities focused on the identification of some properties of vibrating structures. This step requires for the measurements of excitations and responses signals, applying appropriate sensors directly on the test article. These instruments modify the system's mass and stiffness distributions and eventually the eigen-properties of the structure. These errors become unacceptable especially when testing lightweight structures. This paper shows the results of some tests performed on a small compressor with the purpose of identifying the blades’ natural frequencies and modes. It compares the acquisitions performed with standard accelerometers and two different contact-less systems using as exciters either a micro-hammer or a micro inertial shaker. The paper shows how the contact-less sensors provide good quality data and consistent results in the mode identification phase.

  9. Gradient-based adaptation of continuous dynamic model structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Cava, William G.; Danai, Kourosh

    2016-01-01

    A gradient-based method of symbolic adaptation is introduced for a class of continuous dynamic models. The proposed model structure adaptation method starts with the first-principles model of the system and adapts its structure after adjusting its individual components in symbolic form. A key contribution of this work is its introduction of the model's parameter sensitivity as the measure of symbolic changes to the model. This measure, which is essential to defining the structural sensitivity of the model, not only accommodates algebraic evaluation of candidate models in lieu of more computationally expensive simulation-based evaluation, but also makes possible the implementation of gradient-based optimisation in symbolic adaptation. The proposed method is applied to models of several virtual and real-world systems that demonstrate its potential utility.

  10. Application of the Probabilistic Dynamic Synthesis Method to Realistic Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Andrew M.; Ferri, Aldo A.

    1998-01-01

    The Probabilistic Dynamic Synthesis method is a technique for obtaining the statistics of a desired response engineering quantity for a structure with non-deterministic parameters. The method uses measured data from modal testing of the structure as the input random variables, rather than more "primitive" quantities like geometry or material variation. This modal information is much more comprehensive and easily measured than the "primitive" information. The probabilistic analysis is carried out using either response surface reliability methods or Monte Carlo simulation. In previous work, the feasibility of the PDS method applied to a simple seven degree-of-freedom spring-mass system was verified. In this paper, extensive issues involved with applying the method to a realistic three-substructure system are examined, and free and forced response analyses are performed. The results from using the method are promising, especially when the lack of alternatives for obtaining quantitative output for probabilistic structures is considered.

  11. Structure and properties of forsterite-MgSiO3 liquid interface: molecular dynamics study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Noritake, Fumiya; Kawamura, Katsuyuki

    2014-01-01

    .... We performed molecular dynamics simulations in terms of structures and diffusivities in forsterite-MgSiO3 liquid interfaces to obtain the nanoscale dynamic properties and structure of the interface...

  12. Application of Incremental Dynamic Analysis (IDA Method for Studying the Dynamic Behavior of Structures During Earthquakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Javanpour

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Prediction of existing buildings’ vulnerability by future earthquakes is one of the most essential topics in structural engineering. Modeling steel structures is a giant step in determining the damage caused by the earthquake, as such structures are increasingly being used in constructions. Hence, two same-order steel structures with two types of structural systems were selected (coaxial moment frames and moment frame. In most cases, a specific structure needs to satisfy several functional levels. For this purpose, a method is required to determine the input request to the structures under possible earthquakes. Therefore, the Incremental Dynamic Analysis (IDA was preferred to the Push-Over non-linear static method for the analysis and design of the considered steel structures, due its accuracy and effect of higher modes at the same time intervals. OpenSees software was used to perform accurate nonlinear analysis of the steel structure. Two parameters (spectral acceleration and maximum ground acceleration were introduced to the modeled frames to compare the numerical correlations of seismic vulnerability obtained by two statistical methods based on the "log-normal distribution" and "logistics distribution", and finally, the parameters of displacement and drift were assessed after analysis.

  13. WMO Sand and Dust Storm Warning Advisory and Assessment System (SDS-WAS): Research Implementation Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickovic, Slobodan; Barrie, Leonard

    2010-05-01

    Strong winds cause lifting of large amounts of sand and dust from bare, dry soils into the atmosphere. For countries in and downwind of arid regions, airborne sand and dust presents serious risks to the environment, property and human health. Impacts on health include respiratory and cardio-vascular problems, eye infections and in some regions, diseases such as meningitis and valley fever. Dust can efficiently carry irritating spores, bacteria, viruses and persistent organic pollutants. It can also efficiently transport nutrients to parts of the world oceans and affect marine biomass production. Other impacts include negative effects on the ground transport, aviation, agriculture and visibility. The Inter-governmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) recognizes dust as a major component of the atmospheric aerosol that is an essential climate variable. Dust aerosol has important effects on weather through feedback on atmospheric dynamics, clouds and precipitation formation. Approximately 15 centres around the world provide sand and dust research operational forecasts. Many are operated by national meteorological services of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO). Sand and dust storm models can substantially reduce risk by providing dust concentration predictions for several days in advance. Numerical weather prediction systems that drive these models use complex parameterizations and assimilation of satellite, and surface-based observations to predict winds, clouds, precipitation and dust mobilization, transport, and removal from the atmosphere. Sand and dust forecast products contribute to the mitigation and reduction of risk through research based advances in understanding and forecasting products. Observations of sand and dust are made by many agencies and some of them are being coordinated globally through the WMO Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) programme. In 2006, WMO and partners initiated the implementation of the Sand and Dust Storm Warning Advisory and

  14. Structural and Dynamical Properties of Polyethylene/Graphene Nanocomposites through Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastassia N. Rissanou

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Detailed atomistic (united atoms molecular dynamics simulations of several graphene based polymer (polyethylene, PE nanocomposite systems have been performed. Systems with graphene sheets of different sizes have been simulated at the same graphene concentration (~3%. In addition, a periodic graphene layer (“infinite sheet” has been studied. Results concerning structural and dynamical properties of PE chains are presented for the various systems and compared to data from a corresponding bulk system. The final properties of the material are the result of a complex effect of the graphene’s sheet size, mobility and fluctuations. A detailed investigation of density, structure and dynamics of the hybrid systems has been conducted. Particular emphasis has been given in spatial heterogeneities due to the PE/graphene interfaces, which were studied through a detailed analysis based on radial distances form the graphene’s center-of-mass. Chain segmental dynamics is found to be slower, compared to the bulk one, at the PE/graphene interface by a factor of 5 to 10. Furthermore, an analysis on the graphene sheets characteristics is presented in terms of conformational properties (i.e., wrinkling and mobility.

  15. Structural Dynamics Experimental Activities in Ultra-Lightweight and Inflatable Space Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappa, Richard S.; Lassiter, John O.; Ross, Brian P.

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports recently completed structural dynamics experimental activities with new ultralightweight and inflatable space structures (a.k.a., "Gossamer" spacecraft) at NASA Langley Research Center, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Nine aspects of this work are covered, as follows: 1) inflated, rigidized tubes, 2) active control experiments, 3) photogrammetry, 4) laser vibrometry, 5) modal tests of inflatable structures, 6) in-vacuum modal tests, 7) tensioned membranes, 8) deployment tests, and 9) flight experiment support. Structural dynamics will play a major role in the design and eventual in-space deployment and performance of Gossamer spacecraft, and experimental R&D work such as this is required now to validate new analytical prediction methods. The activities discussed in the paper are pathfinder accomplishments, conducted on unique components and prototypes of future spacecraft systems.

  16. Dynamics of a vertical cavity quantum cascade phonon laser structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maryam, W.; Akimov, A. V.; Campion, R. P.; Kent, A. J.

    2013-07-01

    Driven primarily by scientific curiosity, but also by the potential applications of intense sources of coherent sound, researchers have targeted the phonon laser (saser) since the invention of the optical laser over 50 years ago. Here we fabricate a vertical cavity structure designed to operate as a saser oscillator device at a frequency of 325 GHz. It is based on a semiconductor superlattice gain medium, inside a multimode cavity between two acoustic Bragg reflectors. We measure the acoustic output of the device as a function of time after applying electrical pumping. The emission builds in intensity reaching a steady state on a timescale of order 0.1 μs. We show that the results are consistent with a model of the dynamics of a saser cavity exactly analogous to the models used for describing laser dynamics. We also obtain estimates for the gain coefficient, steady-state acoustic power output and efficiency of the device.

  17. Structural Influence on Excited State Dynamics in Simple Amines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, Liv Bærenholdt

    is femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron velocity map imaging (VMI), which is a newtechnique in the Copenhagen lab. The design, building and implementation of the VMI spectrometer has been a very substantial part of the thesis work. This techniques oers enhanced information content in the form of ecient......Simple amines are basic model system of nitrogen-containing chromophores that appear widely in nature. They are also ideal systems for detailed investigation of nonadiabatic dynamical processes and ultrafast temporal evolution of electronic states of the Rydberg type. This investigation, combining...... experiments with calculations, provides new insight into the nature of the internal conversion processes that mediate the dynamical evolution between Rydberg states, and how structural variations in simple amine system have a large impact on the non-adiabatic processes. The experimental method of choice...

  18. Dynamical Structures of High-Frequency Financial Data

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, K; Kim, S Y; Kim, Y; Yoon, S M; Chang, Ki-Ho; Kim, Kyungsik; Kim, Soo Yong; Kim, Yup; Yoon, Seong-Min

    2005-01-01

    We study the dynamical behavior of high-frequency data from the Korean Stock Price Index (KOSPI) using the movement of returns in Korean financial markets. The dynamical behavior for a binarized series of our models is not completely random. The conditional probability is numerically estimated from a return series of KOSPI tick data. Non-trivial probability structures can be constituted from binary time series of autoregressive (AR), logit, and probit models, for which the Akaike Information Criterion shows a minimum value at the 15th order. From our results, we find that the value of the correct match ratio for the AR model is slightly larger than the findings of other models.

  19. Stage-Structured Population Dynamics of AEDES AEGYPTI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusoff, Nuraini; Budin, Harun; Ismail, Salemah

    Aedes aegypti is the main vector in the transmission of dengue fever, a vector-borne disease affecting world population living in tropical and sub-tropical countries. Better understanding of the dynamics of its population growth will help in the efforts of controlling the spread of this disease. In looking at the population dynamics of Aedes aegypti, this paper explored the stage-structured modeling of the population growth of the mosquito using the matrix population model. The life cycle of the mosquito was divided into five stages: eggs, larvae, pupae, adult1 and adult2. Developmental rates were obtained for the average Malaysian temperature and these were used in constructing the transition matrix for the matrix model. The model, which was based only on temperature, projected that the population of Aedes aegypti will blow up with time, which is not realistic. For further work, other factors need to be taken into account to obtain a more realistic result.

  20. Ultrafast Structural Dynamics in Combustion Relevant Model Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Peter M. [Brown University

    2014-03-31

    The research project explored the time resolved structural dynamics of important model reaction system using an array of novel methods that were developed specifically for this purpose. They include time resolved electron diffraction, time resolved relativistic electron diffraction, and time resolved Rydberg fingerprint spectroscopy. Toward the end of the funding period, we also developed time-resolved x-ray diffraction, which uses ultrafast x-ray pulses at LCLS. Those experiments are just now blossoming, as the funding period expired. In the following, the time resolved Rydberg Fingerprint Spectroscopy is discussed in some detail, as it has been a very productive method. The binding energy of an electron in a Rydberg state, that is, the energy difference between the Rydberg level and the ground state of the molecular ion, has been found to be a uniquely powerful tool to characterize the molecular structure. To rationalize the structure sensitivity we invoke a picture from electron diffraction: when it passes the molecular ion core, the Rydberg electron experiences a phase shift compared to an electron in a hydrogen atom. This phase shift requires an adjustment of the binding energy of the electron, which is measurable. As in electron diffraction, the phase shift depends on the molecular, geometrical structure, so that a measurement of the electron binding energy can be interpreted as a measurement of the molecule’s structure. Building on this insight, we have developed a structurally sensitive spectroscopy: the molecule is first elevated to the Rydberg state, and the binding energy is then measured using photoelectron spectroscopy. The molecule’s structure is read out as the binding energy spectrum. Since the photoionization can be done with ultrafast laser pulses, the technique is inherently capable of a time resolution in the femtosecond regime. For the purpose of identifying the structures of molecules during chemical reactions, and for the analysis of

  1. Enzymes: An integrated view of structure, dynamics and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agarwal Pratul K

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Microbes utilize enzymes to perform a variety of functions. Enzymes are biocatalysts working as highly efficient machines at the molecular level. In the past, enzymes have been viewed as static entities and their function has been explained on the basis of direct structural interactions between the enzyme and the substrate. A variety of experimental and computational techniques, however, continue to reveal that proteins are dynamically active machines, with various parts exhibiting internal motions at a wide range of time-scales. Increasing evidence also indicates that these internal protein motions play a role in promoting protein function such as enzyme catalysis. Moreover, the thermodynamical fluctuations of the solvent, surrounding the protein, have an impact on internal protein motions and, therefore, on enzyme function. In this review, we describe recent biochemical and theoretical investigations of internal protein dynamics linked to enzyme catalysis. In the enzyme cyclophilin A, investigations have lead to the discovery of a network of protein vibrations promoting catalysis. Cyclophilin A catalyzes peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerization in a variety of peptide and protein substrates. Recent studies of cyclophilin A are discussed in detail and other enzymes (dihydrofolate reductase and liver alcohol dehydrogenase where similar discoveries have been reported are also briefly discussed. The detailed characterization of the discovered networks indicates that protein dynamics plays a role in rate-enhancement achieved by enzymes. An integrated view of enzyme structure, dynamics and function have wide implications in understanding allosteric and co-operative effects, as well as protein engineering of more efficient enzymes and novel drug design.

  2. A Comparative Study on Optimal Structural Dynamics Using Wavelet Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Hossein Mahdavi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Wavelet solution techniques have become the focus of interest among researchers in different disciplines of science and technology. In this paper, implementation of two different wavelet basis functions has been comparatively considered for dynamic analysis of structures. For this aim, computational technique is developed by using free scale of simple Haar wavelet, initially. Later, complex and continuous Chebyshev wavelet basis functions are presented to improve the time history analysis of structures. Free-scaled Chebyshev coefficient matrix and operation of integration are derived to directly approximate displacements of the corresponding system. In addition, stability of responses has been investigated for the proposed algorithm of discrete Haar wavelet compared against continuous Chebyshev wavelet. To demonstrate the validity of the wavelet-based algorithms, aforesaid schemes have been extended to the linear and nonlinear structural dynamics. The effectiveness of free-scaled Chebyshev wavelet has been compared with simple Haar wavelet and two common integration methods. It is deduced that either indirect method proposed for discrete Haar wavelet or direct approach for continuous Chebyshev wavelet is unconditionally stable. Finally, it is concluded that numerical solution is highly benefited by the least computation time involved and high accuracy of response, particularly using low scale of complex Chebyshev wavelet.

  3. Modeling structured population dynamics using data from unmarked individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Evan H. Campbell; Zipkin, Elise; Thorson, James T.; See, Kevin; Lynch, Heather J.; Kanno, Yoichiro; Chandler, Richard; Letcher, Benjamin H.; Royle, J. Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The study of population dynamics requires unbiased, precise estimates of abundance and vital rates that account for the demographic structure inherent in all wildlife and plant populations. Traditionally, these estimates have only been available through approaches that rely on intensive mark–recapture data. We extended recently developed N-mixture models to demonstrate how demographic parameters and abundance can be estimated for structured populations using only stage-structured count data. Our modeling framework can be used to make reliable inferences on abundance as well as recruitment, immigration, stage-specific survival, and detection rates during sampling. We present a range of simulations to illustrate the data requirements, including the number of years and locations necessary for accurate and precise parameter estimates. We apply our modeling framework to a population of northern dusky salamanders (Desmognathus fuscus) in the mid-Atlantic region (USA) and find that the population is unexpectedly declining. Our approach represents a valuable advance in the estimation of population dynamics using multistate data from unmarked individuals and should additionally be useful in the development of integrated models that combine data from intensive (e.g., mark–recapture) and extensive (e.g., counts) data sources.

  4. Flow dynamics of bank-attached instream structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Seokkoo

    2016-04-01

    Numerical simulations and experiments for flow past a bank-attached vane, a widely-used instream structure for stream restoration, are carried out to study the turbulent flow dynamics occurring around the structure. In the numerical simulation, the details of the natural rocks that constitute the vane are directly resolved by employing the recently developed computational fluid dynamics model of Kang et al. (2011). The time-averaged flowfield is shown to be in good agreement with the results of laboratory measurements. Analysis of the simulated flow shows that there exist two counter-rotating secondary flows cells downstream of the vane, one of which is located near the center of the channel and the other is located near the corner between the channel bed and the sidewall to which the vane is attached. The formation of the two counter-rotating secondary flow cells is shown to be linked to the plunging of the mean three-dimensional streamlines originating upstream of the vane onto a point downstream of the vane positioned on the lower part of the sidewall. The laboratory experiment also reveals the existence of such flow structures.

  5. Invasion dynamics of competing species with stage-structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bewick, Sharon; Wang, Guoqing; Younes, Hannah; Li, Bingtuan; Fagan, William F

    2017-08-03

    The spread of an invasive species often results in a decline and subsequent disappearance of native competitors. Several models, primarily based on spatially explicit Lotka-Volterra competition dynamics, have been developed to understand this phenomenon. In general, the goal of these models is to relate fundamental life history traits, for example dispersal ability and competition strength, to the rate of spread of the invasive species, which is also the rate at which the invasive species displaces its native competitor. Stage-structure is often an important determinant of population dynamics, but it has received little attention within the context of Lotka-Volterra invasion models. For many species, behaviors like dispersal and competition depend on life-stage. To describe the processes of invasion in these species, it is important to understand how behaviors that vary as a function of life-stage can impact spread rate. In this paper, we develop a spatially explicit, stage-structured Lotka-Volterra competition model. By comparing spread speed predictions from this model to spread speed predictions from an analogous single-stage model, we are able to determine when stage-structure is important and how stage-dependent behavior can alter the characteristics of an invasion. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. [Schedule for evaluation of the deficit syndrome in schizophrenia: Schedule for Deficit Syndrome (SDS) (Kirkpatrick et al.). Importance pertinence of the SDS. Introduction of the French version].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeyre, J M; Dollfus, S; Lesieur, P; Ménard, J F; Petit, M

    1994-01-01

    The negative symptoms of schizophrenia have generated a great interest leading some authors (Crow, Andreasen, Kay) to delineate schizophrenic subtypes based on their presence or absence. Carpenter et al. have recently proposed another subtype, the deficit syndrome, based on Kraepelin's clinical description. This differs from other proposed negative subtypes and refers to the presence or absence of prominent, enduring and primary negative symptoms. Primary negative symptoms have to be due to psychophrenia itself, in other words, independent of factors such as depression, anxiety, akinesia... Kirkpatrick et al. have proposed the Schedule for the Deficit Syndrome (SDS) to reliably identify this deficit syndrome. Some studies using this instrument have supported the validity of the deficit syndrome concept. Particularly, deficit patients have clinical, neuropsychological, neurological, eye-tracking and brain imaging impairments compared to nondeficit patients. We realized a french translation of SDS and used it to study a biological index (plasma homovanillic acid, pHVA) among deficit and nondeficit schizophrenic patients. Our data suggest a specific biochemical basis for the deficit syndrome, ie, significant lower mean pHVA levels with a lack of diurnal variation for deficit patients. The french version of SDS was validated by Kirkpatrick after english back translation. We present here our psychometric data regarding reliability (assessed by weighted and unweighted kappa coefficients) and cohesiveness of the construct (assessed by rank-order correlations of each negative symptoms with the other five, using Spearman's rho). These data are quite significant and in agreement with the SDS authors.

  7. Improving the Dynamic Characteristics of Body-in-White Structure Using Structural Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aizzat S. Yahaya Rashid

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic behavior of a body-in-white (BIW structure has significant influence on the noise, vibration, and harshness (NVH and crashworthiness of a car. Therefore, by improving the dynamic characteristics of BIW, problems and failures associated with resonance and fatigue can be prevented. The design objectives attempt to improve the existing torsion and bending modes by using structural optimization subjected to dynamic load without compromising other factors such as mass and stiffness of the structure. The natural frequency of the design was modified by identifying and reinforcing the structure at critical locations. These crucial points are first identified by topology optimization using mass and natural frequencies as the design variables. The individual components obtained from the analysis go through a size optimization step to find their target thickness of the structure. The thickness of affected regions of the components will be modified according to the analysis. The results of both optimization steps suggest several design modifications to achieve the target vibration specifications without compromising the stiffness of the structure. A method of combining both optimization approaches is proposed to improve the design modification process.

  8. Logically Sensing Aggregate Process and Discriminating SDS from Other Surfactants with the Assistance of BSA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱俊红; 徐玉芳; 钱旭红

    2012-01-01

    An amphiphilic fluorescent probe, 3-dodecylamino dihydrogen imidazo[2,l-a]benz[de]isoquinolin-7-one (compound 3), was used to sense the aggregate formation process of bovine serum albumine (BSA), sodium dode- cyl sulfate (SDS) and their mixed system. The fluorescence intensity of 3 was significantly affected by the adding order of SDS and BSA, and SDS can be distinguished from other surfactants with the aid of BSA, but only when 3 is allowed to interact with BSA first. The results revealed that compound 3 is preferentially sited in the hydrophobic region of BSA, and thermodynamically in SDS-BSA mixed aggregate. Sodium phosphate buffer solution (PBS) and BSA played important but distinct roles in distinguishing SDS micelle from the others.

  9. Kinetic and structural fragility—a correlation between structures and dynamics in metallic liquids and glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelton, K. F.

    2017-01-01

    The liquid phase remains poorly understood. In many cases, the densities of liquids and their crystallized solid phases are similar, but since they are amorphous they lack the spatial order of the solid. Their dynamical properties change remarkably over a very small temperature range. At high temperatures, near their melting temperature, liquids flow easily under shear. However, only a few hundred degrees lower flow effectively ceases, as the liquid transforms into a solid-like glass. This temperature-dependent dynamical behavior is frequently characterized by the concept of kinetic fragility (or, generally, simply fragility). Fragility is believed to be an important quantity in glass formation, making it of significant practical interest. The microscopic origin of fragility remains unclear, however, making it also of fundamental interest. It is widely (although not uniformly) believed that the dynamical behavior is linked to the atomic structure of the liquid, yet experimental studies show that although the viscosity changes by orders of magnitude with temperature, the structural change is barely perceptible. In this article the concept of fragility is discussed, building to a discussion of recent results in metallic glass-forming liquids that demonstrate the presumed connection between structural and dynamical changes. In particular, it becomes possible to define a structural fragility parameter that can be linked with the kinetic fragility.

  10. Structure and Dynamics Vol.1 No.2: Editorial Commentary

    OpenAIRE

    White, Douglas R Institute of Mathematical Behavioral Science and Department of Anthropology; Manlove, Robert F.

    2005-01-01

    The Structure and Dynamics eJournal offers a conduit for refereed electronic publication, debate, and editorial communication in the domain of anthropology and human sciences. We invite you—as an open access reader at no cost, an author at no cost, or a volunteer, to submit book reviews or commentary—to contribute and to participate in raising the aspirations of the human sciences today. To submit an article, follow the link to “Submission guidelines.” To submit a review simply click Submit a...

  11. Dynamical Structure of the Fields in the Light Cone Coordinates

    CERN Document Server

    Kargar, Kianoosh

    2016-01-01

    It is well-known that additional constraints emerge in light cone coordinates. We enumerate the number of physical modes in light cone coordinates and compare it with conventional coordinates. We show that the number of Schrodinger modes is divided by two in light cone coordinates. We study the effect of this reduction in the number ladder operators acting on physical states of a system. We analyse the scaler, spinor and vector field theories carefully to see the effect of changes in the dynamical structure of these theories from the view point of the reduction of Schrodinger modes in light-cone coordinates.

  12. Chaotic dynamics and fractal structures in experiments with cold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daza, Alvar; Georgeot, Bertrand; Guéry-Odelin, David; Wagemakers, Alexandre; Sanjuán, Miguel A. F.

    2017-01-01

    We use tools from nonlinear dynamics for the detailed analysis of cold-atom experiments. A powerful example is provided by the recent concept of basin entropy, which allows us to quantify the final-state unpredictability that results from the complexity of the phase-space geometry. We show here that this enables one to reliably infer the presence of fractal structures in phase space from direct measurements. We illustrate the method with numerical simulations in an experimental configuration made of two crossing laser guides that can be used as a matter-wave splitter.

  13. Derivation of the fine structure constant using fractional dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Goldfain, E

    2003-01-01

    Both classical and quantum electrodynamics assume that random fluctuations are absent from the steady-state evolution of the underlying physical system. Our work goes beyond this approximation and accounts for the continuous exposure to stochastic fluctuations. It is known that the asymptotic limit of quantum field dynamics, dominated by large and persistent perturbations, may be described as an anomalous diffusion process. We use fractional calculus as an appropriate tool to handle this highly non-trivial regime. It is shown that the fine structure constant can be recovered from the fractional evolution equation of the density matrix under standard normalization conditions.

  14. Bayesian analysis of the dynamic structure in China's economic growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyo, Koki; Noda, Hideo

    2008-11-01

    To analyze the dynamic structure in China's economic growth during the period 1952-1998, we introduce a model of the aggregate production function for the Chinese economy that considers total factor productivity (TFP) and output elasticities as time-varying parameters. Specifically, this paper is concerned with the relationship between the rate of economic growth in China and the trend in TFP. Here, we consider the time-varying parameters as random variables and introduce smoothness priors to construct a set of Bayesian linear models for parameter estimation. The results of the estimation are in agreement with the movements in China's social economy, thus illustrating the validity of the proposed methods.

  15. Dynamical Structure Factors of quasi-one-dimensional antiferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagemans, Rob; Caux, Jean-Sébastien; Maillet, Jean Michel

    2007-03-01

    For a long time it has been impossible to accurately calculate the dynamical structure factors (spin-spin correlators as a function of momentum and energy) of quasi-one-dimensional antiferromagnets. For integrable Heisenberg chains, the recently developed ABACUS method (a first-principles computational approach based on the Bethe Ansatz) now yields highly accurate (over 99% of the sum rule) results for the DSF for finite chains, allowing for a very precise description of neutron-scattering data over the full momentum and energy range. We show remarkable agreement between results obtained with ABACUS and experiment.

  16. Dynamics of carrier recombination in a semiconductor laser structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzhioev, R. I., E-mail: dzhioev@orient.ioffe.ru; Kavokin, K. V.; Kusrayev, Yu. G.; Poletaev, N. K. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical–Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-15

    Carrier-recombination dynamics is studied by the method of optical orientation at room temperature in the active layer of a laser diode structure. The dependence of the degree of electron-spin orientation on the excitation density is attributed to saturation of the nonradiative-recombination channel. The time of electron capture at recombination centers is determined to be τ{sub e} = 5 × 10{sup –9} s. The temperature of nonequilibrium electrons heated by a He–Ne laser is estimated.

  17. An Introduction to the Problem of Dynamic Structural Damping,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    INTRODUCTION TO THE P ROBLEM OF DYNAMIC STRUCTURAL DAMPING by PSa n t ini , A.Castellan i and A.Nappi (stituto di Tecnologia Aerospaziale deIl’Unive rsità di...io Castellani Alfonso Nappi ist ituto di Tecnologia Aerospazialc dell’Università di RomM Via Eudossisna. 16 - 00184 Roma - Italy SUMMARY In the...A.Nappi January 1978 10. Au thor ’s Address Istituto di Tecnologia l1 .Pages Aerospaziale delI’(Jniversità di Roma 24 Via Eudossian a 16, 00 184 Roma

  18. Dynamics and structure of the Alpine Fold Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahle, H. G.

    1985-01-01

    The structure and present-day dynamics of the Alps interms of geodesy and gravimetry are discusssed. A strong correlation of precise leveling and isostatic gravity along the central Alpine chain, especially in Canton Graubunden, East Switzerland are shown. It is assumed that the uplift is partly controlled by isostatic rebound effects. Field observations indicate that these phenomena are still active in the Alps. The study of the uplift processes by applying a number of geodetic and gravimetric measuring techniques, such as the determination of nonperiodic secular variations of gravity, of the deflections of the vertical and tilt changes monitored by hydrostatic leveling is proposed.

  19. DYNAMICS OF THE ZONAL ASYMMETRIC STRUCTURE OF ARCTIC OSCILLATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiu-hong; YU Wei-dong; LUO Ti-qian

    2004-01-01

    The Arctic Oscillation(AO),though basically is a zonal symmetric phenomenon,also shows zonal asymmetric variation.The dynamics of this zonal variation is considered here from the point of view of the planetary propagation on the earth sphere.Based on the linear barotropic vorticity equation,the planetary wave ray path is calculated in the winter January.It shows that NAO(North Atlantic Oscillation),AO and North Pacific could be linked through the planetary wave propagation,which acts as the atmospheric bridge.The zonal symmetric and asymmetric structures both have association with these Rossby wave activities.

  20. Nano-Biotechnology: Structure and Dynamics of Nanoscale Biosystems

    CERN Document Server

    Manjasetty, Babu A; Ramaswamy, Y S

    2010-01-01

    Nanoscale biosystems are widely used in numerous medical applications. The approaches for structure and function of the nanomachines that are available in the cell (natural nanomachines) are discussed. Molecular simulation studies have been extensively used to study the dynamics of many nanomachines including ribosome. Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) serve as prototypes for biological channels such as Aquaporins (AQPs). Recently, extensive investigations have been performed on the transport of biological nanosystems through CNTs. The results are utilized as a guide in building a nanomachinary such as nanosyringe for a needle free drug delivery.

  1. The dynamics and control of large flexible space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainum, P. M.; Krishna, R.; Kumar, V. K.; Reddy, A. S. S. R.

    1981-01-01

    The dynamics and attitude and shape control of very large, inherently flexible spacecraft systems were investigated. Increasingly more complex examples were examined, beginning with a uniform free-free beam, next a free-free uniform plate/platform and finally by considering a thin shallow spherical shell structure in orbit. The effects devices were modeled. For given sets of assumed actuator locations, the controllability of these systems was first established. Control laws for each of the actuators were developed based on decoupling techniques (including distributed modal control) pole placement algorithms and a application of the linear regulator problem for optical control theory.

  2. Analysis of Asteroid (216) Kleopatra Using Dynamical and Structural Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirabayashi, Masatoshi; Scheeres, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper evaluates a dynamically and structurally stable size for Asteroid (216) Kleopatra. In particular, we investigate two different failure modes: material shedding from the surface and structural failure of the internal body. We construct zero-velocity curves in the vicinity of this asteroid to determine surface shedding, while we utilize a limit analysis to calculate the lower and upper bounds of structural failure under the zero-cohesion assumption. Surface shedding does not occur at the current spin period (5.385 hr) and cannot directly initiate the formation of the satellites. On the other hand, this body may be close to structural failure; in particular, the neck may be situated near a plastic state. In addition, the neck's sensitivity to structural failure changes as the body size varies. We conclude that plastic deformation has probably occurred around the neck part in the past. If the true size of this body is established through additional measurements, this method will provide strong constraints on the current friction angle for the body.

  3. Analysis of Asteroid (216) Kleopatra using dynamical and structural constraints

    CERN Document Server

    Hirabayashi, Masatoshi

    2013-01-01

    Given the spin state by Magnusson (1990), the shape model by Ostro et al. (2000), and the mass by Descamps et al. (2011), this paper evaluates a dynamically and structurally stable size of Asteroid (216) Kleopatra. In particular, we investigate two different failure modes: material shedding from the surface and structural failure of the internal body. We construct zero-velocity curves in the vicinity of this asteroid to determine surface shedding, while we utilize a limit analysis to calculate the lower and upper bounds of structural failure under the zero-cohesion assumption. Surface shedding does not occur at the current spin period (5.385 hr) and cannot directly initiate the formation of the satellites. On the other hand, this body may be close to structural failure; in particular, the neck may be situated near a plastic state. In addition, the neck's sensitivity to structural failure changes as the body size varies. We conclude that plastic deformation has probably occurred around the neck part in the pas...

  4. Structural Dynamics of Insulin Receptor and Transmembrane Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatulian, Suren A

    2015-09-15

    The insulin receptor (IR) is a (αβ)2-type transmembrane tyrosine kinase that plays a central role in cell metabolism. Each αβ heterodimer consists of an extracellular ligand-binding α-subunit and a membrane-spanning β-subunit that comprises the cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase (TK) domain and the phosphorylation sites. The α- and β-subunits are linked via a single disulfide bridge, and the (αβ)2 tetramer is formed by disulfide bonds between the α-chains. Insulin binding induces conformational changes in IR that reach the intracellular β-subunit followed by a protein phosphorylation and activation cascade. Defects in this signaling process, including IR dysfunction caused by mutations, result in type 2 diabetes. Rational drug design aimed at treatment of diabetes relies on knowledge of the detailed structure of IR and the dynamic structural transformations during transmembrane signaling. Recent X-ray crystallographic studies have provided important clues about the mode of binding of insulin to IR, the resulting structural changes and their transmission to the TK domain, but a complete understanding of the structural basis underlying insulin signaling has not been achieved. This review presents a critical analysis of the current status of the structure-function relationship of IR, with a comparative assessment of the other IR family receptors, and discusses potential advancements that may provide insight into the molecular mechanism of insulin signaling.

  5. Structure and dynamics of the HIV-1 frameshift element RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Justin T; Garcia-Miranda, Pablo; Mouzakis, Kathryn D; Gorelick, Robert J; Butcher, Samuel E; Weeks, Kevin M

    2014-07-08

    The HIV-1 ribosomal frameshift element is highly structured, regulates translation of all virally encoded enzymes, and is a promising therapeutic target. The prior model for this motif contains two helices separated by a three-nucleotide bulge. Modifications to this model were suggested by SHAPE chemical probing of an entire HIV-1 RNA genome. Novel features of the SHAPE-directed model include alternate helical conformations and a larger, more complex structure. These structural elements also support the presence of a secondary frameshift site within the frameshift domain. Here, we use oligonucleotide-directed structure perturbation, probing in the presence of formamide, and in-virion experiments to examine these models. Our data support a model in which the frameshift domain is anchored by a stable helix outside the conventional domain. Less stable helices within the domain can switch from the SHAPE-predicted to the two-helix conformation. Translational frameshifting assays with frameshift domain mutants support a functional role for the interactions predicted by and specific to the SHAPE-directed model. These results reveal that the HIV-1 frameshift domain is a complex, dynamic structure and underscore the importance of analyzing folding in the context of full-length RNAs.

  6. Virtual sensing of structural vibrations using dynamic substructuring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullaa, Jyrki

    2016-10-01

    Virtual sensing techniques use information available from a limited set of physical sensors together with the finite element model to calculate an estimate of the quantity of interest. In structural dynamics applications, analytical mode shapes from the finite element model are typically used as a basis to estimate the response at unmeasured locations by an expansion algorithm. An alternative is to model only the interesting part of the structure using substructuring techniques, in which the natural modes are replaced by component modes consisting of a selected number of fixed interface modes plus the interface constraint modes. They are mutually independent and compose a valid subspace for estimating the unmeasured response. If the number of interface degrees of freedom is large, interface reduction is applied. The main advantage of the proposed approach is that the modelling effort can be substantially decreased, because only part of the structure is modelled and the modelling uncertainties, non-linearities, or changes in the omitted structure can be ignored. The method is validated by numerical simulations of three different structures under unknown excitation. Different types and locations of virtual sensors are studied. Also, the effects of noise and model errors are investigated. The most accurate estimation is obtained if the virtual sensor is located away from the interface and close to a physical sensor.

  7. Low concentration structural dynamics of lanreotide and somatostatin-14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Belén; Coïc, Yves-Marie; Baron, Bruno; Kruglik, Sergei G; Pflüger, Fernando; Cohen, Régis; Carelli, Claude; Ghomi, Mahmoud

    2014-10-01

    Lanreotide, a synthetic cyclic octapeptide, analogue of the peptide hormone somatostatin-14 (SST-14), is routinely used as a long-acting medication in the management of neuroendocrine tumors. Despite its therapeutic importance, low concentration structural data is still lacking for lanreotide. In fact, the major part of the previous structural investigations were focused on the remarkable aggregation properties of this peptide, appearing at high concentrations (>5 mM). Here, we have applied three optical spectroscopic techniques, i.e. fluorescence, circular dichroism and Raman scattering, for analyzing the structural dynamics at the concentrations below 5 mM, where lanreotide exists either in a monomer state or at the first stages of aggregation. The obtained data from lanreotide were discussed through their comparison with those collected from SST-14, leading us to the following conclusions: (i) The central D-Trp residue, forming with its adjacent Lys the main receptor interacting part of lanreotide, keeps a constant high rotational freedom whatever the environment (water, water/methanol, methanol). (ii) A solvent-dependent tight β-turn, belonging to the type-II' family, is revealed in lanreotide. (iii) Raman data analyzed by band decomposition in the amide (I and III) regions allowed estimation of different secondary structural elements within the millimolar range. Interestingly, the applied protocol shows a perfect agreement between the structural features provided by the amide I and amide III Raman markers. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Effect of SDS concentration on colloidal suspensions of Ag and Au nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadha, Ridhima; Sharma, Rajeshwar; Maiti, Nandita; Ballal, Anand; Kapoor, Sudhir

    2015-11-05

    We present a kinetic study of the effects of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) concentration on reduction and aggregation of Ag(+) and Au(3+) ions in aqueous solutions. There are distinct differences between the surface plasmon absorption bands of Ag nanoparticles at different concentrations of SDS. The results reveal the existence of two competing SDS-induced processes: stabilization of the Ag nanoparticles due to adsorption and aggregation of the Ag nanoparticles due to increase in ionic strength. However, SDS induced aggregation of Au nanoparticles is negligible because of less surface passivity as evident from eaq(-) reaction with AuCl4(-). Nevertheless, the average size of the Ag and Au nanoparticles remains almost similar at all SDS concentrations. UV-Vis spectrophotometry and transmission electron microscopy are used to characterize the nanoparticles. Moreover, it is shown that these SDS-capped Ag, Au and Au/Ag bimetallic nanoparticles could function as catalysts for the reduction of o-nitro aniline in the presence of NaBH4.

  9. Dynamics of Localized Structures in Systems with Broken Parity Symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Javaloyes, J; Marconi, M; Giudici, M

    2016-01-01

    A great variety of nonlinear dissipative systems are known to host structures having a correlation range much shorter than the size of the system. The dynamics of these Localized Structures (LSs) have been investigated so far in situations featuring parity symmetry. In this letter we extend this analysis to systems lacking of this property. We show that the LS drifting speed in a parameter varying landscape is not simply proportional to the parameter gradient, as found in parity preserving situations. The symmetry breaking implies a new contribution to the velocity field which is a function of the parameter value, thus leading to a new paradigm for LSs manipulation. We illustrate this general concept by studying the trajectories of the LSs found in a passively mode-locked laser operated in the localization regime. Moreover, the lack of parity affects significantly LSs interactions which are governed by asymmetrical repulsive forces.

  10. A Modal Model to Simulate Typical Structural Dynamic Nonlinearity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacini, Benjamin Robert [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mayes, Randall L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Roettgen, Daniel R [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Some initial investigations have been published which simulate nonlinear response with almost traditional modal models: instead of connecting the modal mass to ground through the traditional spring and damper, a nonlinear Iwan element was added. This assumes that the mode shapes do not change with amplitude and there are no interactions between modal degrees of freedom. This work expands on these previous studies. An impact experiment is performed on a structure which exhibits typical structural dynamic nonlinear response, i.e. weak frequency dependence and strong damping dependence on the amplitude of vibration. Use of low level modal test results in combination with high level impacts are processed using various combinations of modal filtering, the Hilbert Transform and band-pass filtering to develop response data that are then fit with various nonlinear elements to create a nonlinear pseudo-modal model. Simulations of forced response are compared with high level experimental data for various nonlinear element assumptions.

  11. A local algorithm for detecting community structures in dynamic networks

    CERN Document Server

    Massaro, Emanuele; Guazzini, Andrea; Passarella, Andrea; Bagnoli, Franco

    2013-01-01

    The emergence and the global adaptation of mobile devices has influenced human interactions at the individual, community, and social levels leading to the so called Cyber-Physical World (CPW) convergence scenario [1]. One of the most important features of CPW is the possibility of exploiting information about the structure of social communities of users, that manifest through joint movement patterns and frequency of physical co-location: mobile devices of users that belong to the same social community are likely to "see" each other (and thus be able to communicate through ad hoc networking techniques) more frequently and regularly than devices outside of the community. In mobile opportunistic networks, this fact can be exploited, for example, to optimize networking operations such as forwarding and dissemination of messages. In this paper we present a novel local cognitive-inspired algorithm for revealing the structure of these dynamic social networks by exploiting information about physical encounters, logge...

  12. The interplay between dynamic heterogeneities and structure of bulk liquid water: A molecular dynamics simulation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demontis, Pierfranco; Suffritti, Giuseppe B. [Dipartimento di Chimica e Farmacia, Università degli studi di Sassari, Sassari (Italy); Consorzio Interuniversitario Nazionale per la Scienza e Tecnologia dei Materiali (INSTM), Unità di ricerca di Sassari, Via Vienna, 2, I-07100 Sassari (Italy); Gulín-González, Jorge [Grupo de Matemática y Física Computacionales, Universidad de las Ciencias Informáticas (UCI), Carretera a San Antonio de los Baños, Km 21/2, La Lisa, La Habana (Cuba); Masia, Marco [Dipartimento di Chimica e Farmacia, Università degli studi di Sassari, Sassari (Italy); Consorzio Interuniversitario Nazionale per la Scienza e Tecnologia dei Materiali (INSTM), Unità di ricerca di Sassari, Via Vienna, 2, I-07100 Sassari (Italy); Istituto Officina dei Materiali del CNR, UOS SLACS, Via Vienna 2, 07100 Sassari (Italy); Sant, Marco [Dipartimento di Chimica e Farmacia, Università degli studi di Sassari, Sassari (Italy)

    2015-06-28

    In order to study the interplay between dynamical heterogeneities and structural properties of bulk liquid water in the temperature range 130–350 K, thus including the supercooled regime, we use the explicit trend of the distribution functions of some molecular properties, namely, the rotational relaxation constants, the atomic mean-square displacements, the relaxation of the cross correlation functions between the linear and squared displacements of H and O atoms of each molecule, the tetrahedral order parameter q and, finally, the number of nearest neighbors (NNs) and of hydrogen bonds (HBs) per molecule. Two different potentials are considered: TIP4P-Ew and a model developed in this laboratory for the study of nanoconfined water. The results are similar for the dynamical properties, but are markedly different for the structural characteristics. In particular, for temperatures higher than that of the dynamic crossover between “fragile” (at higher temperatures) and “strong” (at lower temperatures) liquid behaviors detected around 207 K, the rotational relaxation of supercooled water appears to be remarkably homogeneous. However, the structural parameters (number of NNs and of HBs, as well as q) do not show homogeneous distributions, and these distributions are different for the two water models. Another dynamic crossover between “fragile” (at lower temperatures) and “strong” (at higher temperatures) liquid behaviors, corresponding to the one found experimentally at T{sup ∗} ∼ 315 ± 5 K, was spotted at T{sup ∗} ∼ 283 K and T{sup ∗} ∼ 276 K for the TIP4P-Ew and the model developed in this laboratory, respectively. It was detected from the trend of Arrhenius plots of dynamic quantities and from the onset of a further heterogeneity in the rotational relaxation. To our best knowledge, it is the first time that this dynamical crossover is detected in computer simulations of bulk water. On the basis of the simulation results, the possible

  13. Analysis of Nonlinear Structural Dynamics and Resonance in Trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Doumiri Ganji

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Wind and gravity both impact trees in storms, but wind loads greatly exceed gravity loads in most situations. Complex behavior of trees in windstorms is gradually turning into a controversial concern among ecological engineers. To better understand the effects of nonlinear behavior of trees, the dynamic forces on tree structures during periods of high winds have been examined as a mass-spring system. In fact, the simulated dynamic forces created by strong winds are studied in order to determine the responses of the trees to such dynamic loads. Many of such nonlinear differential equations are complicated to solve. Therefore, this paper focuses on an accurate and simple solution, Differential Transformation Method (DTM, to solve the derived equation. In this regard, the concept of differential transformation is briefly introduced. The approximate solution to this equation is calculated in the form of a series with easily computable terms. Then, the method has been employed to achieve an acceptable solution to the presented nonlinear differential equation. To verify the accuracy of the proposed method, the obtained results from DTM are compared with those from the numerical solution. The results reveal that this method gives successive approximations of high accuracy solution.

  14. Automatic anatomical structures location based on dynamic shape measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkowski, Marcin; Rapp, Walter; Sitnik, Robert; Kujawinska, Malgorzata; Vander Sloten, Jos; Haex, Bart; Bogaert, Nico; Heitmann, Kjell

    2005-09-01

    New image processing methods and active photonics apparatus have made possible the development of relatively inexpensive optical systems for complex shape and object measurements. We present dynamic 360° scanning method for analysis of human lower body biomechanics, with an emphasis on the analysis of the knee joint. The anatomical structure (of high medical interest) that is possible to scan and analyze, is patella. Tracking of patella position and orientation under dynamic conditions may lead to detect pathological patella movements and help in knee joint disease diagnosis. The processed data is obtained from a dynamic laser triangulation surface measurement system, able to capture slow to normal movements with a scan frequency between 15 and 30 Hz. These frequency rates are enough to capture controlled movements used e.g. for medical examination purposes. The purpose of the work presented is to develop surface analysis methods that may be used as support of diagnosis of motoric abilities of lower limbs. The paper presents algorithms used to process acquired lower limbs surface data in order to find the position and orientation of patella. The algorithms implemented include input data preparation, curvature description methods, knee region discrimination and patella assumed position/orientation calculation. Additionally, a method of 4D (3D + time) medical data visualization is proposed. Also some exemplary results are presented.

  15. Global structure of exact scalar hairy dynamical black holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Zhong-Ying [Center for High Energy Physics, Peking University,No. 5 Yiheyuan Rd, Beijing, 100871 P.R. (China); Chen, Bin [Center for High Energy Physics, Peking University,No. 5 Yiheyuan Rd, Beijing, 100871 P.R. (China); Department of Physics and State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology,Peking University, No. 5 Yiheyuan Rd, Beijing, 100871 P.R. (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter,No. 5 Yiheyuan Rd, Beijing, 100871 P.R. (China); Lü, H. [Center for Advanced Quantum Studies, Department of Physics, Beijing Normal University,Beijing, 100875 P.R. (China)

    2016-05-30

    We study the global structure of some exact scalar hairy dynamical black holes which were constructed in Einstein gravity either minimally or non-minimally coupled to a scalar field. We find that both the apparent horizon and the local event horizon (measured in luminosity coordinate) monotonically increase with the advanced time as well as the Vaidya mass. At late advanced times, the apparent horizon approaches the event horizon and gradually becomes future outer. Correspondingly, the space-time arrives at stationary black hole states with the relaxation time inversely proportional to the 1/(n−1) power of the final black hole mass, where n is the space-time dimension. These results strongly support the solutions describing the formation of black holes with scalar hair. We also obtain new charged dynamical solutions in the non-minimal theory by introducing an Maxwell field which is non-minimally coupled to the scalar. The presence of the electric charge strongly modifies the dynamical evolution of the space-time.

  16. Tangled nature model of evolutionary dynamics reconsidered: Structural and dynamical effects of trait inheritance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Christian Walther; Sibani, Paolo

    2016-05-01

    Based on the stochastic dynamics of interacting agents which reproduce, mutate, and die, the tangled nature model (TNM) describes key emergent features of biological and cultural ecosystems' evolution. While trait inheritance is not included in many applications, i.e., the interactions of an agent and those of its mutated offspring are taken to be uncorrelated, in the family of TNMs introduced in this work correlations of varying strength are parametrized by a positive integer K . We first show that the interactions generated by our rule are nearly independent of K . Consequently, the structural and dynamical effects of trait inheritance can be studied independently of effects related to the form of the interactions. We then show that changing K strengthens the core structure of the ecology, leads to population abundance distributions better approximated by log-normal probability densities, and increases the probability that a species extant at time tw also survives at t >tw . Finally, survival probabilities of species are shown to decay as powers of the ratio t /tw , a so-called pure aging behavior usually seen in glassy systems of physical origin. We find a quantitative dynamical effect of trait inheritance, namely, that increasing the value of K numerically decreases the decay exponent of the species survival probability.

  17. Structure and dynamics of cationic van-der-Waals clusters. II. Dynamics of protonated argon clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritschel, T.; Zuhrt, Ch.; Zülicke, L.; Kuntz, P. J.

    2007-01-01

    A diatomics-in-molecules (DIM) model with ab-initio input data, which in part I successfully described the structure and bonding properties of protonated argon clusters ArnH+, is used here to investigate some aspects of the dynamics of such aggregates for n up to 30. The simple triatomic ionic fragment, Ar2H+, is studied in some detail with respect to normal vibrations, characteristics of classical intramolecular dynamics as reflected in the Fourier spectra of dynamical variables, and accurate quantum states of the vibrational motion. For larger clusters ArnH+ (n ≤30), the normal vibrational frequencies (and displacement eigenvectors) are calculated and related to the cluster structure. In addition, the Fourier spectra are analyzed with respect to their variation with changing internal energy and cluster size. As expected, the clusters show some floppy character. Even a little vibrational excitation can lead to internal rearrangement and to Ar-atom evaporation from the clusters; this is studied in more detail for one small complex (n = 3). Electronic excitation to one of the low-lying excited states, which are all globally repulsive, leads to complete fragmentation (atomization) of the clusters. A variety of conceivable elementary collision processes involving protonated argon clusters are discussed. Some of these may play a role in the gas-phase formation of medium-sized ArnH+ aggregates.

  18. Triplet repeat DNA structures and human genetic disease: dynamic mutations from dynamic DNA

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Richard R Sinden; Vladimir N Potaman; Elena A Oussatcheva; Christopher E Pearson; Yuri L Lyubchenko; Luda S Shlyakhtenko

    2002-02-01

    Fourteen genetic neurodegenerative diseases and three fragile sites have been associated with the expansion of (CTG)n•(CAG)n, (CGG)n•(CCG)n, or (GAA)n•(TTC)n repeat tracts. Different models have been proposed for the expansion of triplet repeats, most of which presume the formation of alternative DNA structures in repeat tracts. One of the most likely structures, slipped strand DNA, may stably and reproducibly form within triplet repeat sequences. The propensity to form slipped strand DNA is proportional to the length and homogeneity of the repeat tract. The remarkable stability of slipped strand DNA may, in part, be due to loop-loop interactions facilitated by the sequence complementarity of the loops and the dynamic structure of three-way junctions formed at the loop-outs.

  19. Nonlinear dynamic behaviors of a floating structure in focused waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Fei-feng; Zhao, Xi-zeng

    2015-12-01

    Floating structures are commonly seen in coastal and offshore engineering. They are often subjected to extreme waves and, therefore, their nonlinear dynamic behaviors are of great concern. In this paper, an in-house CFD code is developed to investigate the accurate prediction of nonlinear dynamic behaviors of a two-dimensional (2-D) box-shaped floating structure in focused waves. Computations are performed by an enhanced Constrained Interpolation Profile (CIP)-based Cartesian grid model, in which a more accurate VOF (Volume of Fluid) method, the THINC/SW scheme (THINC: tangent of hyperbola for interface capturing; SW: Slope Weighting), is used for interface capturing. A focusing wave theory is used for the focused wave generation. The wave component of constant steepness is chosen. Comparisons between predictions and physical measurements show good agreement including body motions and free surface profiles. Although the overall agreement is good, some discrepancies are observed for impact pressure on the superstructure due to water on deck. The effect of grid resolution on the results is checked. With a fine grid, no obvious improvement is seen in the global body motions and impact pressures due to water on deck. It is concluded that highly nonlinear phenomena, such as distorted free surface, large-amplitude body motions, and violent impact flow, have been predicted successfully.

  20. The web of connections between tourism companies: Structure and dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Fontoura Costa, Luciano; Baggio, Rodolfo

    2009-10-01

    Tourism destination networks are amongst the most complex dynamical systems, involving a myriad of human-made and natural resources. In this work we report a complex network-based systematic analysis of the Elba (Italy) tourism destination network, including the characterization of its structure in terms of several traditional measurements, the investigation of its modularity, as well as its comprehensive study in terms of the recently reported superedges approach. In particular, structural (the number of paths of distinct lengths between pairs of nodes, as well as the number of reachable companies) and dynamical features (transition probabilities and the inward/outward activations and accessibilities) are measured and analyzed, leading to a series of important findings related to the interactions between tourism companies. Among the several reported results, it is shown that the type and size of the companies influence strongly their respective activations and accessibilities, while their geographical position does not seem to matter. It is also shown that the Elba tourism network is largely fragmented and heterogeneous, so that it could benefit from increased integration.

  1. Ultrafast structural dynamics and isomerization in Rydberg-exited Quadricyclane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudakov, Fedor M [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    The quadricyclane - norbornadiene system is an important model for the isomerization dynamics between highly strained molecules. In a breakthrough observation for a polyatomic molecular system of that complexity, we follow the photoionization from Rydberg states in the time-domain to derive a measure for the time-dependent structural dynamics and the time-evolving structural dispersion even while the molecule is crossing electronic surfaces. The photoexcitation to the 3s and 3p Rydberg states deposits significant amounts of energy into vibrational motions. We observe the formation and evolution of the vibrational wavepacket on the Rydberg surface and the internal conversion from the 3p Rydberg states to the 3s state. In that state, quadricyclane isomerizes to norbornadiene with a time constant of {tau}{sub 2} = 136(45) fs. The lifetime of the 3p Rydberg state in quadricyclane is {tau}{sub 1} = 320(31) and the lifetime of the 3s Rydberg state in norbornadiene is {tau}{sub 3} = 394(32).

  2. Dynamic Analysis of Structural Columns Subjected to Impulsive Loading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GONG Shunfeng; LU Yong; GAO Feng; JIN Weiliang

    2006-01-01

    For a building structure subjected to impulsive loading,particularly shock and impact loading,the response of the critical columns is crucial to the behaviour of the entire system during and after the blast loading phase.Therefore,an appropriate evaluation of the column response and damage under short-duration impulsive loading is important in a comprehensive assessment of the performance of a building system.This paper reports a dynamic analysis approach for the response of RC columns subjected to impulsive loading.Considering that the dynamic response of a column in a frame structure can also be affected by the floor movement which relates to the global vibration of the frame system,a generic column-mass model is used,in which a concentrated mass is attached to the column top to simulate the effect of a global vibration.To take into account the high shear effect under impulsive load,the model is formulated using Timoshenko beam theory,and three main nonlinear mechanisms are considered.Two typical scenarios,one under a direct air blast loading,and another under a blast-induced ground excitation,are analyzed and the primary response features are highlighted.

  3. Evolutionary principles underlying structure and response dynamics of cellular networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinacher, Arno; Soyer, Orkun S

    2012-01-01

    The network view in systems biology, in conjunction with the continuing development of experimental technologies, is providing us with the key structural and dynamical features of both cell-wide and pathway-level regulatory, signaling and metabolic systems. These include for example modularity and presence of hub proteins at the structural level and ultrasensitivity and feedback control at the level of dynamics. The uncovering of such features, and the seeming commonality of some of them, makes many systems biologists believe that these could represent design principles that underpin cellular systems across organisms. Here, we argue that such claims on any observed feature requires an understanding of how it has emerged in evolution and how it can shape subsequent evolution. We review recent and past studies that aim to achieve such evolutionary understanding for observed features of cellular networks. We argue that this evolutionary framework could lead to deciphering evolutionary origin and relevance of proposed design principles, thereby allowing to predict their presence or absence in an organism based on its environment and biochemistry and their effect on its future evolution.

  4. Dynamical Structure of a Traditional Amazonian Social Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul L. Hooper

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Reciprocity is a vital feature of social networks, but relatively little is known about its temporal structure or the mechanisms underlying its persistence in real world behavior. In pursuit of these two questions, we study the stationary and dynamical signals of reciprocity in a network of manioc beer (Spanish: chicha; Tsimane’: shocdye’ drinking events in a Tsimane’ village in lowland Bolivia. At the stationary level, our analysis reveals that social exchange within the community is heterogeneously patterned according to kinship and spatial proximity. A positive relationship between the frequencies at which two families host each other, controlling for kinship and proximity, provides evidence for stationary reciprocity. Our analysis of the dynamical structure of this network presents a novel method for the study of conditional, or non-stationary, reciprocity effects. We find evidence that short-timescale reciprocity (within three days is present among non- and distant-kin pairs; conversely, we find that levels of cooperation among close kin can be accounted for on the stationary hypothesis alone.

  5. Dynamics of generalized Gaussian polymeric structures in random layered flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katyal, Divya; Kant, Rama

    2015-04-01

    We develop a formalism for the dynamics of a flexible branched polymer with arbitrary topology in the presence of random flows. This is achieved by employing the generalized Gaussian structure (GGS) approach and the Matheron-de Marsily model for the random layered flow. The expression for the average square displacement (ASD) of the center of mass of the GGS is obtained in such flow. The averaging is done over both the thermal noise and the external random flow. Although the formalism is valid for branched polymers with various complex topologies, we mainly focus here on the dynamics of the flexible star and dendrimer. We analyze the effect of the topology (the number and length of branches for stars and the number of generations for dendrimers) on the dynamics under the influence of external flow, which is characterized by their root-mean-square velocity, persistence flow length, and flow exponent α . Our analysis shows two anomalous power-law regimes, viz., subdiffusive (intermediate-time polymer stretching and flow-induced diffusion) and superdiffusive (long-time flow-induced diffusion). The influence of the topology of the GGS is unraveled in the intermediate-time regime, while the long-time regime is only weakly dependent on the topology of the polymer. With the decrease in the value of α , the magnitude of the ASD decreases, while the temporal exponent of the ASD increases in both the time regimes. Also there is an increase in both the magnitude of the ASD and the crossover time (from the subdiffusive to the superdiffusive regime) with an increase in the total mass of the polymeric structure.

  6. Structure and Dynamics of the Milky Way: The Evolving Picture

    CERN Document Server

    Foster, Tyler

    2010-01-01

    From the inception of radio astronomy, the study of the Interstellar Medium has been both aided and frustrated by one fact: we are right within it! Our embedded perspective is favourable to observing kinematic and structural details that are likely to remain inaccessible in external galaxies for some time, but not so to gaining a birdseye view of our Galaxy's strucutre and motions on the largest scales. The CGPS is the original survey with the ability to image both details and the "big picture". We will broadly review what we know of the Milky Way (MW), and focus on large-scale ISM structure and dynamics that the IGPS family of surveys depicts particularly well (e.g. spiral structure, the rotation curve, density waves, rolling motions, the warp & scalloping). We also highlight areas where puzzles still exist (e.g. outer spiral structure, the question of shocks and rolling motions in the MW), and offer some new insights (e.g. multiple shocks in the 2nd quadrant; a radially varying spiral pattern speed in t...

  7. Analytical methods for proteome data obtained from SDS-PAGE multi-dimensional separation and mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gun Wook Park

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available For proteome analysis, various experimental protocols using mass spectrometry have been developed over thelast decade. The different protocols have differing performances and degrees of accuracy. Furthermore, the “best”protocol for a proteomic analysis of a sample depends on the purpose of the analysis, especially in connection withdisease proteomics, including biomarker discovery and therapeutics analyses of human serum or plasma. Theprotein complexity and the wide dynamic range of blood samples require high-dimensional separation technology.In this article, we review proteome analysis protocols in which both Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate-Polyacryl Amide GelElectrophoresis(SDS-PAGE and liquid chromatography are used for peptide and protein separations. Multidimensionalseparation technology supplies a high-quality dataset of tandem mass spectra and reveals signals fromlow-abundance proteins, although it can be time-consuming and laborious work. We survey shotgun proteomicsprotocols using SDS-PAGE and liquid chromatography and introduce bioinformatics tools for the analysis ofproteomics data. We also review efforts toward the biological interpretation of the proteome.

  8. Determination of buprenorphine by differential pulse voltammetry on carbon paste electrode using SDS as an enhancement factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behpour, Mohsen; Valipour, Akram; Keshavarz, Mahin

    2014-09-01

    In the present study, a facile electrochemical approach is proposed for the determination of buprenorphine (BPR) in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). SDS was applied for amplification of oxidation signal. Carbon paste electrode (CPE) used as working electrode and cyclic voltammetry (CV), differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were carried out in phosphate buffer solution (pH3.0). Under optimal experimental conditions, the oxidation current increased with the addition of BPR in the sample and two dynamic ranges obtained from 4.00 nM to 0.126 μM and from 0.126 to 0.317 μM by DPV and exhibited a low detection limit (LOD) of 1.33 nM (S/N=3). This offered method has been used for the determination of BPR in the real samples and has validated with the recovery test for BPR spiked urine samples. The result demonstrated that this method is a simple, sensitive, rapid, low-cost, and stable method for BPR detection.

  9. Structure and Dynamics of [PF$_6$][P$_{1,2,2,4}$] from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Carignano, Marcelo A

    2013-01-01

    Diethyl(methyl)(isobutyl)phosphonium hexafluorophosphate, [PF$_6$][P$_{1,2,2,4}$], is an organic ionic plastic crystal with potential uses as a solid electrolyte in storage and light harvesting devices. In this work we present a molecular dynamics simulation study for this material covering an extended temperature range, from 175 K to 500 K. The simulations predicts a transition from the crystalline to a {\\em semi} plastic phase at 197 K, the onset of cation jump-like rotations at 280 K, a third transition at 340 K to a {\\em full} plastic phase and melting to 450 K. Overall, the simulations show a good agreement with the experimental findings providing a wealth of detail in the structural and dynamic properties of the system.

  10. Solvation structures and dynamics of alkaline earth metal halides in supercritical water: A molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshri, Sonanki; Mandal, Ratnamala; Tembe, B. L.

    2016-09-01

    Constrained molecular dynamics simulations of alkaline earth metal halides have been carried out to investigate their structural and dynamical properties in supercritical water. Potentials of mean force (PMFs) for all the alkaline earth metal halides in supercritical water have been computed. Contact ion pairs (CIPs) are found to be more stable than all other configurations of the ion pairs except for MgI2 where solvent shared ion pair (SShIP) is more stable than the CIP. There is hardly any difference in the PMFs between the M2+ (M = Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba) and the X- (X = F, Cl, Br, I) ions whether the second X- ion is present in the first coordination shell of the M2+ ion or not. The solvent molecules in the solvation shells diffuse at a much slower rate compared to the bulk. Orientational distribution functions of solvent molecules are sharper for smaller ions.

  11. Basal Dynamics and Internal Structure of Ice Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolovick, Michael J.

    The internal structure of ice sheets reflects the history of flow and deformation experienced by the ice mass. Flow and deformation are controlled by processes occurring within the ice mass and at its boundaries, including surface accumulation or ablation, ice rheology, basal topography, basal sliding, and basal melting or freezing. The internal structure and basal environment of ice sheets is studied with ice-penetrating radar. Recently, radar observations in Greenland and Antarctica have imaged large englacial structures rising from near the bed that deform the overlying stratigraphy into anticlines, synclines, and overturned folds. The mechanisms that may produce these structures include basal freeze-on, travelling slippery patches at the ice base, and rheological contrasts within the ice column. In this thesis, I explore the setting and mechanisms that produce large basal stratigraphic structures inside ice sheets. First, I use radar data to map subglacial hydrologic networks that deliver meltwater uphill towards freeze-on structures in East Antarctica. Next, I use a thermomechanical flowline model to demonstrate that trains of alternating slippery and sticky patches can form underneath ice sheets and travel downstream over time. The disturbances to the ice flow field produced by these travelling patches produce stratigraphic folds resembling the observations. I then examine the overturned folds produced by a single travelling sticky patch using a kinematic flowline model. This model is used to interpret stratigraphic measurements in terms of the dynamic properties of basal slip. Finally, I use a simple local one-dimensional model to estimate the thickness of basal freeze-on that can be produced based on the supply of available meltwater, the thermal boundary conditions, ice sheet geometry, and the ice flow regime.

  12. Structure and dynamics of the M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruse, Andrew C.; Hu, Jianxin; Pan, Albert C.; Arlow, Daniel H.; Rosenbaum, Daniel M.; Rosemond, Erica; Green, Hillary F.; Liu, Tong; Chae, Pil Seok; Dror, Ron O.; Shaw, David E.; Weis, William I.; Wess, Jürgen; Kobilka, Brian K. (Stanford); (NIH); (D.E. Shaw); (Hanyang); (UTSMC)

    2012-03-01

    Acetylcholine, the first neurotransmitter to be identified, exerts many of its physiological actions via activation of a family of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) known as muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs). Although the five mAChR subtypes (M1-M5) share a high degree of sequence homology, they show pronounced differences in G-protein coupling preference and the physiological responses they mediate. Unfortunately, despite decades of effort, no therapeutic agents endowed with clear mAChR subtype selectivity have been developed to exploit these differences. We describe here the structure of the G{sub q/11}-coupled M3 mAChR ('M3 receptor', from rat) bound to the bronchodilator drug tiotropium and identify the binding mode for this clinically important drug. This structure, together with that of the G{sub i/o}-coupled M2 receptor, offers possibilities for the design of mAChR subtype-selective ligands. Importantly, the M3 receptor structure allows a structural comparison between two members of a mammalian GPCR subfamily displaying different G-protein coupling selectivities. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulations suggest that tiotropium binds transiently to an allosteric site en route to the binding pocket of both receptors. These simulations offer a structural view of an allosteric binding mode for an orthosteric GPCR ligand and provide additional opportunities for the design of ligands with different affinities or binding kinetics for different mAChR subtypes. Our findings not only offer insights into the structure and function of one of the most important GPCR families, but may also facilitate the design of improved therapeutics targeting these critical receptors.

  13. Structural Dynamics of Human Telomeric G-Quadruplex Loops Studied by Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hong; Xiao, Shiyan; Liang, Haojun

    2013-01-01

    Loops which are linkers connecting G-strands and supporting the G-tetrad core in G-quadruplex are important for biological roles of G-quadruplexes. TTA loop is a common sequence which mainly resides in human telomeric DNA (hTel) G-quadruplex. A series of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were carried out to investigate the structural dynamics of TTA loops. We found that (1) the TA base pair formed in TTA loops are very stable, the occupied of all hydrogen bonds are more than 0.95. (2) The TA base pair makes the adjacent G-quartet more stable than others. (3) For the edgewise loop and the diagonal loop, most loop bases are stacking with others, only few bases have considerable freedom. (4) The stabilities of these stacking structures are distinct. Part of the loops, especially TA base pairs, and bases stacking with the G-quartet, maintain certain stable conformations in the simulation, but other parts, like TT and TA stacking structures, are not stable enough. For the first time, spontaneous conformational switches of TTA edgewise loops were observed in our long time MD simulations. (5) For double chain reversal loop, it is really hard to maintain a stable conformation in the long time simulation under present force fields (parm99 and parmbsc0), as it has multiple conformations with similar free energies. PMID:23951152

  14. Structural dynamics of human telomeric G-quadruplex loops studied by molecular dynamics simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Zhu

    Full Text Available Loops which are linkers connecting G-strands and supporting the G-tetrad core in G-quadruplex are important for biological roles of G-quadruplexes. TTA loop is a common sequence which mainly resides in human telomeric DNA (hTel G-quadruplex. A series of molecular dynamics (MD simulations were carried out to investigate the structural dynamics of TTA loops. We found that (1 the TA base pair formed in TTA loops are very stable, the occupied of all hydrogen bonds are more than 0.95. (2 The TA base pair makes the adjacent G-quartet more stable than others. (3 For the edgewise loop and the diagonal loop, most loop bases are stacking with others, only few bases have considerable freedom. (4 The stabilities of these stacking structures are distinct. Part of the loops, especially TA base pairs, and bases stacking with the G-quartet, maintain certain stable conformations in the simulation, but other parts, like TT and TA stacking structures, are not stable enough. For the first time, spontaneous conformational switches of TTA edgewise loops were observed in our long time MD simulations. (5 For double chain reversal loop, it is really hard to maintain a stable conformation in the long time simulation under present force fields (parm99 and parmbsc0, as it has multiple conformations with similar free energies.

  15. PCI-SS: MISO dynamic nonlinear protein secondary structure prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aboul-Magd Mohammed O

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since the function of a protein is largely dictated by its three dimensional configuration, determining a protein's structure is of fundamental importance to biology. Here we report on a novel approach to determining the one dimensional secondary structure of proteins (distinguishing α-helices, β-strands, and non-regular structures from primary sequence data which makes use of Parallel Cascade Identification (PCI, a powerful technique from the field of nonlinear system identification. Results Using PSI-BLAST divergent evolutionary profiles as input data, dynamic nonlinear systems are built through a black-box approach to model the process of protein folding. Genetic algorithms (GAs are applied in order to optimize the architectural parameters of the PCI models. The three-state prediction problem is broken down into a combination of three binary sub-problems and protein structure classifiers are built using 2 layers of PCI classifiers. Careful construction of the optimization, training, and test datasets ensures that no homology exists between any training and testing data. A detailed comparison between PCI and 9 contemporary methods is provided over a set of 125 new protein chains guaranteed to be dissimilar to all training data. Unlike other secondary structure prediction methods, here a web service is developed to provide both human- and machine-readable interfaces to PCI-based protein secondary structure prediction. This server, called PCI-SS, is available at http://bioinf.sce.carleton.ca/PCISS. In addition to a dynamic PHP-generated web interface for humans, a Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP interface is added to permit invocation of the PCI-SS service remotely. This machine-readable interface facilitates incorporation of PCI-SS into multi-faceted systems biology analysis pipelines requiring protein secondary structure information, and greatly simplifies high-throughput analyses. XML is used to represent the input

  16. Specific glutamic acid residues in targeted proteins induce exaggerated retardations in Phos-tag SDS-PAGE migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Eiji; Kinoshita-Kikuta, Emiko; Karata, Kiyonobu; Kawano, Toshiki; Nishiyama, Atsuhiro; Yamato, Morihisa; Koike, Tohru

    2017-04-01

    We describe two unique proteins, Escherichia coli ClpX and human histone H2A, that show extremely retarded migrations relative to their molecular weights in Phos-tag SDS-PAGE, despite being nonphosphorylated. Although ClpX separated into multiple migration bands in Phos-tag gels, the separation was not due to phosphorylation. The N-terminal 47-61 region of ClpX was responsible for producing multiple phosphorylation-independent structural variants, even under denaturing conditions, and some of these variants were detected as highly up-shifted bands. By systematic Ala-scanning mutation analysis in the N-47-61 region, we concluded that the Glu-51 or Glu-54 residue was responsible for the appearance of exaggerated mobility-shifting bands. Histone H2A showed a much slower migration in Phos-tag gels in comparison with other major histones having similar molecular weights, and we found that the Glu-62 or Glu-65 residue caused the retarded migration. In addition, Phos-tag SDS-PAGE permitted us to detect a shift in the mobility of the phosphorylated form of histone H2A from that of the nonphosphorylated one. This is the first report showing that exaggerated retardation in the migration of a certain protein in Phos-tag SDS-PAGE is induced by interactions between the Phos-tag molecule and the carboxylate group of a specific Glu residue on the target. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Tyrosine aminotransferase: biochemical and structural properties and molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehere, Prajwalini; Han, Qian; Lemkul, Justin A; Vavricka, Christopher J; Robinson, Howard; Bevan, David R; Li, Jianyong

    2010-11-01

    Tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) catalyzes the transamination of tyrosine and other aromatic amino acids. The enzyme is thought to play a role in tyrosinemia type II, hepatitis and hepatic carcinoma recovery. The objective of this study is to investigate its biochemical and structural characteristics and substrate specificity in order to provide insight regarding its involvement in these diseases. Mouse TAT (mTAT) was cloned from a mouse cDNA library, and its recombinant protein was produced using Escherichia coli cells and purified using various chromatographic techniques. The recombinant mTAT is able to catalyze the transamination of tyrosine using α-ketoglutaric acid as an amino group acceptor at neutral pH. The enzyme also can use glutamate and phenylalanine as amino group donors and p-hydroxy-phenylpyruvate, phenylpyruvate and alpha-ketocaproic acid as amino group acceptors. Through macromolecular crystallography we have determined the mTAT crystal structure at 2.9 Å resolution. The crystal structure revealed the interaction between the pyridoxal-5'-phosphate cofactor and the enzyme, as well as the formation of a disulphide bond. The detection of disulphide bond provides some rational explanation regarding previously observed TAT inactivation under oxidative conditions and reactivation of the inactive TAT in the presence of a reducing agent. Molecular dynamics simulations using the crystal structures of Trypanosoma cruzi TAT and human TAT provided further insight regarding the substrate-enzyme interactions and substrate specificity. The biochemical and structural properties of TAT and the binding of its cofactor and the substrate may help in elucidation of the mechanism of TAT inhibition and activation.

  18. Tyrosine Aminotransferase: Biochemical and Structural Properties and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P Mehere; Q Han; J Lemkul; C Vavricka; H Robinson; D Bevan; J Li

    2011-12-31

    Tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) catalyzes the transamination of tyrosine and other aromatic amino acids. The enzyme is thought to play a role in tyrosinemia type II, hepatitis and hepatic carcinoma recovery. The objective of this study is to investigate its biochemical and structural characteristics and substrate specificity in order to provide insight regarding its involvement in these diseases. Mouse TAT (mTAT) was cloned from a mouse cDNA library, and its recombinant protein was produced using Escherichia coli cells and purified using various chromatographic techniques. The recombinant mTAT is able to catalyze the transamination of tyrosine using {alpha}-ketoglutaric acid as an amino group acceptor at neutral pH. The enzyme also can use glutamate and phenylalanine as amino group donors and p-hydroxy-phenylpyruvate, phenylpyruvate and alpha-ketocaproic acid as amino group acceptors. Through macromolecular crystallography we have determined the mTAT crystal structure at 2.9 {angstrom} resolution. The crystal structure revealed the interaction between the pyridoxal-5'-phosphate cofactor and the enzyme, as well as the formation of a disulphide bond. The detection of disulphide bond provides some rational explanation regarding previously observed TAT inactivation under oxidative conditions and reactivation of the inactive TAT in the presence of a reducing agent. Molecular dynamics simulations using the crystal structures of Trypanosoma cruzi TAT and human TAT provided further insight regarding the substrate-enzyme interactions and substrate specificity. The biochemical and structural properties of TAT and the binding of its cofactor and the substrate may help in elucidation of the mechanism of TAT inhibition and activation.

  19. Tyrosine aminotransferase: biochemical and structural properties and molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehere, P.; Robinson, H.; Han, Q.; Lemkul, J. A.; Vavricka, C. J.; Bevan, D. R.; Li, J.

    2010-11-01

    Tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) catalyzes the transamination of tyrosine and other aromatic amino acids. The enzyme is thought to play a role in tyrosinemia type II, hepatitis and hepatic carcinoma recovery. The objective of this study is to investigate its biochemical and structural characteristics and substrate specificity in order to provide insight regarding its involvement in these diseases. Mouse TAT (mTAT) was cloned from a mouse cDNA library, and its recombinant protein was produced using Escherichia coli cells and purified using various chromatographic techniques. The recombinant mTAT is able to catalyze the transamination of tyrosine using {alpha}-ketoglutaric acid as an amino group acceptor at neutral pH. The enzyme also can use glutamate and phenylalanine as amino group donors and p-hydroxy-phenylpyruvate, phenylpyruvate and alpha-ketocaproic acid as amino group acceptors. Through macromolecular crystallography we have determined the mTAT crystal structure at 2.9 {angstrom} resolution. The crystal structure revealed the interaction between the pyridoxal-5'-phosphate cofactor and the enzyme, as well as the formation of a disulphide bond. The detection of disulphide bond provides some rational explanation regarding previously observed TAT inactivation under oxidative conditions and reactivation of the inactive TAT in the presence of a reducing agent. Molecular dynamics simulations using the crystal structures of Trypanosoma cruzi TAT and human TAT provided further insight regarding the substrate-enzyme interactions and substrate specificity. The biochemical and structural properties of TAT and the binding of its cofactor and the substrate may help in elucidation of the mechanism of TAT inhibition and activation.

  20. Structural dynamics of protein backbone {phi} angles: extended molecular dynamics simulations versus experimental {sup 3}J scalar couplings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markwick, Phineus R. L. [CNRS/CEA/UJF, Protein Dynamics and Flexibility, Institut de Biologie Structurale Jean-Pierre Ebel UMR 5075 (France); Showalter, Scott A. [Florida State University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, NHMFL (United States); Bouvignies, Guillaume [CNRS/CEA/UJF, Protein Dynamics and Flexibility, Institut de Biologie Structurale Jean-Pierre Ebel UMR 5075 (France); Brueschweiler, Rafael [Florida State University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, NHMFL (United States)], E-mail: bruschweiler@magnet.fsu.edu; Blackledge, Martin [CNRS/CEA/UJF, Protein Dynamics and Flexibility, Institut de Biologie Structurale Jean-Pierre Ebel UMR 5075 (France)], E-mail: martin.blackledge@ibs.fr

    2009-09-15

    {sup 3}J scalar couplings report on the conformational averaging of backbone {phi} angles in peptides and proteins, and therefore represent a potentially powerful tool for studying the details of both structure and dynamics in solution. We have compared an extensive experimental dataset with J-couplings predicted from unrestrained molecular dynamics simulation using enhanced sampling available from accelerated molecular dynamics or using long timescale trajectories (200 ns). The dynamic fluctuations predicted to be present along the backbone, in agreement with residual dipolar coupling analysis, are compatible with the experimental {sup 3}J scalar couplings providing a slightly better reproduction of these experimental parameters than a high-resolution static structure.