WorldWideScience

Sample records for dynamic vulnerability map

  1. Dynamic Flood Vulnerability Mapping with Google Earth Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellman, B.; Kuhn, C.; Max, S. A.; Sullivan, J.

    2015-12-01

    Satellites capture the rate and character of environmental change from local to global levels, yet integrating these changes into flood exposure models can be cost or time prohibitive. We explore an approach to global flood modeling by leveraging satellite data with computing power in Google Earth Engine to dynamically map flood hazards. Our research harnesses satellite imagery in two main ways: first to generate a globally consistent flood inundation layer and second to dynamically model flood vulnerability. Accurate and relevant hazard maps rely on high quality observation data. Advances in publicly available spatial, spectral, and radar data together with cloud computing allow us to improve existing efforts to develop a comprehensive flood extent database to support model training and calibration. This talk will demonstrate the classification results of algorithms developed in Earth Engine designed to detect flood events by combining observations from MODIS, Landsat 8, and Sentinel-1. Our method to derive flood footprints increases the number, resolution, and precision of spatial observations for flood events both in the US, recorded in the NCDC (National Climatic Data Center) storm events database, and globally, as recorded events from the Colorado Flood Observatory database. This improved dataset can then be used to train machine learning models that relate spatial temporal flood observations to satellite derived spatial temporal predictor variables such as precipitation, antecedent soil moisture, and impervious surface. This modeling approach allows us to rapidly update models with each new flood observation, providing near real time vulnerability maps. We will share the water detection algorithms used with each satellite and discuss flood detection results with examples from Bihar, India and the state of New York. We will also demonstrate how these flood observations are used to train machine learning models and estimate flood exposure. The final stage of

  2. A Dynamic Vulnerability Map to Assess the Risk of Road Network Traffic Utilization

    CERN Document Server

    Nabaa, Michel; Dutot, Antoine; Olivier, Damien; Mallet, Pascal

    2009-01-01

    Le Havre agglomeration (CODAH) includes 16 establishments classified Seveso with high threshold. In the literature, we construct vulnerability maps to help decision makers assess the risk. Such approaches remain static and do take into account the population displacement in the estimation of the vulnerability. We propose a decision making tool based on a dynamic vulnerability map to evaluate the difficulty of evacuation in the different sectors of CODAH. We use a Geographic Information system (GIS) to visualize the map which evolves with the road traffic state through a detection of communities in large graphs algorithm.

  3. CDC's Social Vulnerability Index (SVI) Mapping Dashboard

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The interactive maps are visual representations of the Social Vulnerability Index (SVI). Data were extracted from the US Census and the American Community Survey.

  4. Heat Wave Vulnerability Mapping for India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azhar, Gulrez; Saha, Shubhayu; Ganguly, Partha; Mavalankar, Dileep; Madrigano, Jaime

    2017-03-30

    Assessing geographic variability in heat wave vulnerability forms the basis for planning appropriate targeted adaptation strategies. Given several recent deadly heatwaves in India, heat is increasingly being recognized as a public health problem. However, to date there has not been a country-wide assessment of heat vulnerability in India. We evaluated demographic, socioeconomic, and environmental vulnerability factors and combined district level data from several sources including the most recent census, health reports, and satellite remote sensing data. We then applied principal component analysis (PCA) on 17 normalized variables for each of the 640 districts to create a composite Heat Vulnerability Index (HVI) for India. Of the total 640 districts, our analysis identified 10 and 97 districts in the very high and high risk categories (> 2SD and 2-1SD HVI) respectively. Mapping showed that the districts with higher heat vulnerability are located in the central parts of the country. On examination, these are less urbanized and have low rates of literacy, access to water and sanitation, and presence of household amenities. Therefore, we concluded that creating and mapping a heat vulnerability index is a useful first step in protecting the public from the health burden of heat. Future work should incorporate heat exposure and health outcome data to validate the index, as well as examine sub-district levels of vulnerability.

  5. Mapping of earthquakes vulnerability area in Papua

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad Fawzy Ismullah, M.; Massinai, Muh. Altin

    2016-05-01

    Geohazard is a geological occurrence which may lead to a huge loss for human. A mitigation of these natural disasters is one important thing to be done properly in order to reduce the risks. One of the natural disasters that frequently occurs in the Papua Province is the earthquake. This study applies the principle of Geospatial and its application for mapping the earthquake-prone area in the Papua region. It uses earthquake data, which is recorded for 36 years (1973-2009), fault location map, and ground acceleration map of the area. The earthquakes and fault map are rearranged into an earthquake density map, as well as an earthquake depth density map and fault density map. The overlaid data of these three maps onto ground acceleration map are then (compiled) to obtain an earthquake unit map. Some districts area, such as Sarmi, Nabire, and Dogiyai, are identified by a high vulnerability index. In the other hand, Waropen, Puncak, Merauke, Asmat, Mappi, and Bouven Digoel area shows lower index. Finally, the vulnerability index in other places is detected as moderate.

  6. Groundwater vulnerability mapping of Qatar aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baalousha, Husam Musa

    2016-12-01

    Qatar is one of the most arid countries in the world with limited water resources. With little rainfall and no surface water, groundwater is the only natural source of fresh water in the country. Whilst the country relies mainly on desalination of seawater to secure water supply, groundwater has extensively been used for irrigation over the last three decades, which caused adverse environmental impact. Vulnerability assessment is a widely used tool for groundwater protection and land-use management. Aquifers in Qatar are carbonate with lots of fractures, depressions and cavities. Karst aquifers are generally more vulnerable to contamination than other aquifers as any anthropogenic-sourced contaminant, especially above a highly fractured zone, can infiltrate quickly into the aquifer and spread over a wide area. The vulnerability assessment method presented in this study is based on two approaches: DRASTIC and EPIK, within the framework of Geographical Information System (GIS). Results of this study show that DRASTIC vulnerability method suits Qatar hydrogeological settings more than EPIK. The produced vulnerability map using DRASTIC shows coastal and karst areas have the highest vulnerability class. The southern part of the country is located in the low vulnerability class due to occurrence of shale formation within aquifer media, which averts downward movement of contaminants.

  7. Drought vulnerability assesssment and mapping in Morocco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imani, Yasmina; Lahlou, Ouiam; Bennasser Alaoui, Si; Naumann, Gustavo; Barbosa, Paulo; Vogt, Juergen

    2014-05-01

    Drought vulnerability assessment and mapping in Morocco Authors: Yasmina Imani 1, Ouiam Lahlou 1, Si Bennasser Alaoui 1 Paulo Barbosa 2, Jurgen Vogt 2, Gustavo Naumann 2 1: Institut Agronomique et Vétérinaire Hassan II (IAV Hassan II), Rabat Morocco. 2: European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Institute for Environment and Sustainability (IES), Ispra, Italy. In Morocco, nearly 50% of the population lives in rural areas. They are mostly small subsistent farmers whose production depends almost entirely on rainfall. They are therefore very sensitive to drought episodes that may dramatically affect their incomes. Although, as a consequence of the increasing frequency, length and severity of drought episodes in the late 90's, the Moroccan government decided, to move on from a crisis to a risk management approach, drought management remains in practice mainly reactive and often ineffective. The lack of effectiveness of public policy is in part a consequence of the poor understanding of drought vulnerability at the rural community level, which prevents the development of efficient mitigation actions and adaptation strategies, tailored to the needs and specificities of each rural community. Thus, the aim of this study is to assess and map drought vulnerability at the rural commune level in the Oum Er-Rbia basin which is a very heterogeneous basin, showing a big variability of climates, landscapes, cropping systems and social habits. Agricultural data collected from the provincial and local administrations of Agriculture and socio-economic data from the National Department of Statistics were used to compute a composite vulnerability index (DVI) integrating four different components: (i) the renewable natural capacity, (ii) the economic capacity, (iii) human and civic resources, and (iv) infrastructure and technology. The drought vulnerability maps that were derived from the computation of the DVI shows that except very specific areas, most of the Oum er Rbia

  8. Mapping Regional Drought Vulnerability: a Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamouz, M.; Zeynolabedin, A.; Olyaei, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Drought is among the natural disaster that causes damages and affects many people's life in many part of the world including in Iran. Recently, some factors such as climate variability and the impact of climate change have influenced drought frequency and intensity in many parts of the world. Drought can be divided into four categories of meteorological, hydrological, agricultural and social-economic. In meteorological the important feature is lack of rainfall. In hydrological drought river flows and dam storage are considered. Lack of soil moisture is the key factor in agricultural droughts while in social-economic type of drought the relation between supply and demand and social-economic damages due to water deficiency is studied. While the first three types relates to the lack of some hydrological characteristics, social-economic type of drought is actually the consequence of other types expressed in monetary values. Many indices are used in assessing drought; each has its own advantages and disadvantages and can be used for specific types of drought. Therefore knowing the types of drought can provide a better understanding of shortages and their characteristics. Drought vulnerability is a concept which shows the likelihood of damages from hazard in a particular place by focusing on the system status prior to the disaster. Drought vulnerability has been viewed as a potential for losses in the region due to water deficiency at the time of drought. In this study the application of vulnerability concept in drought management in East Azarbaijan province in Iran is investigated by providing vulnerability maps which demonstrates spatial characteristics of drought vulnerability. In the first step, certain governing parameters in drought analysis such as precipitation, temperature, land use, topography, solar radiation and ground water elevation have been investigated in the region. They are described in details and calculated in suitable time series. Vulnerabilities

  9. MAPPING REGIONAL DROUGHT VULNERABILITY: A CASE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Karamouz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Drought is among the natural disaster that causes damages and affects many people’s life in many part of the world including in Iran. Recently, some factors such as climate variability and the impact of climate change have influenced drought frequency and intensity in many parts of the world. Drought can be divided into four categories of meteorological, hydrological, agricultural and social-economic. In meteorological the important feature is lack of rainfall. In hydrological drought river flows and dam storage are considered. Lack of soil moisture is the key factor in agricultural droughts while in social-economic type of drought the relation between supply and demand and social-economic damages due to water deficiency is studied. While the first three types relates to the lack of some hydrological characteristics, social-economic type of drought is actually the consequence of other types expressed in monetary values. Many indices are used in assessing drought; each has its own advantages and disadvantages and can be used for specific types of drought. Therefore knowing the types of drought can provide a better understanding of shortages and their characteristics. Drought vulnerability is a concept which shows the likelihood of damages from hazard in a particular place by focusing on the system status prior to the disaster. Drought vulnerability has been viewed as a potential for losses in the region due to water deficiency at the time of drought. In this study the application of vulnerability concept in drought management in East Azarbaijan province in Iran is investigated by providing vulnerability maps which demonstrates spatial characteristics of drought vulnerability. In the first step, certain governing parameters in drought analysis such as precipitation, temperature, land use, topography, solar radiation and ground water elevation have been investigated in the region. They are described in details and calculated in suitable time

  10. Beyond 'vulnerable groups': contexts and dynamics of vulnerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarowsky, Christina; Haddad, Slim; Nguyen, Vinh-Kim

    2013-03-01

    This paper reviews approaches to vulnerability in public health, introducing a series of 10 papers addressing vulnerability in health in Africa. We understand vulnerability as simultaneously a condition and a process. Social inequalities are manifest in and exacerbate three key dimensions of vulnerability: the initial level of wellbeing, the degree of exposure to risk, and the capacity to manage risk effectively. We stress the dynamic interactions linking material and social deprivation, poverty, powerlessness and ill health: risks or shocks and their health impacts are intimately interconnected and reinforce each other in a cycle which in the absence of effective interventions, increases vulnerability. An inductive process which does not begin with an a priori definition or measurement of 'vulnerability' and which does not assume the existence of fixed 'vulnerable groups' allowed us both to re-affirm core aspects of existing conceptual frameworks, and to engage in new ways with literature specifically addressing vulnerability and resilience at the population level as well as with literature - for example in ecology, and on the concept of frailty in research on aging - with which researchers on health and poverty in Africa may not be familiar. We invite conceptual and empirical work on vulnerability in complex systems frameworks. These perspectives emphasize contexts and nonlinear causality thus supporting analyses of vulnerability and resilience as both markers and emergent properties of dynamic interactions. We accept a working definition of vulnerability, and recognize that some definable groups of people are more likely than others to suffer harm from exposure to health risks. But we suggest that the real work - at both intellectual and policy/political levels - lies in understanding and responding to the dynamics, meanings and power relations underlying actual instances and processes of vulnerability and harm.

  11. Groundwater vulnerability maps for pesticides for Flanders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dams, Jef; Joris, Ingeborg; Bronders, Jan; Van Looy, Stijn; Vanden Boer, Dirk; Heuvelmans, Griet; Seuntjens, Piet

    2017-04-01

    Pesticides are increasingly being detected in shallow groundwater and and are one of the main causes of the poor chemical status of phreatic groundwater bodies in Flanders. There is a need for groundwater vulnerability maps in order to design monitoring strategies and land-use strategies for sensitive areas such as drinking water capture zones. This research focuses on the development of generic vulnerability maps for pesticides for Flanders and a tool to calculate substance-specific vulnerability maps at the scale of Flanders and at the local scale. (1) The generic vulnerability maps are constructed using an index based method in which maps of the main contributing factors in soil and saturated zone to high concentrations of pesticides in groundwater are classified and overlain. Different weights are assigned to the contributing factors according to the type of pesticide (low/high mobility, low/high persistence). Factors that are taken into account are the organic matter content and texture of soil, depth of the unsaturated zone, organic carbon and redox potential of the phreatic groundwater and thickness and conductivity of the phreatic layer. (2) Secondly a tool is developed that calculates substance-specific vulnerability maps for Flanders using a hybrid approach where a process-based leaching model GeoPEARL is combined with vulnerability indices that account for dilution in the phreatic layer. The GeoPEARL model is parameterized for Flanders in 1434 unique combinations of soil properties, climate and groundwater depth. Leaching is calculated for a 20 year period for each 50 x 50 m gridcell in Flanders. (3) At the local scale finally, a fully process-based approach is applied combining GeoPEARL leaching calculations and flowline calculations of pesticide transport in the saturated zone to define critical zones in the capture zone of a receptor such as a drinking water well or a river segment. The three approaches are explained more in detail and illustrated

  12. Dynamics of immune system vulnerabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stromberg, Sean P.

    The adaptive immune system can be viewed as a complex system, which adapts, over time, to reflect the history of infections experienced by the organism. Understanding its operation requires viewing it in terms of tradeoffs under constraints and evolutionary history. It typically displays "robust, yet fragile" behavior, meaning common tasks are robust to small changes but novel threats or changes in environment can have dire consequences. In this dissertation we use mechanistic models to study several biological processes: the immune response, the homeostasis of cells in the lymphatic system, and the process that normally prevents autoreactive cells from entering the lymphatic system. Using these models we then study the effects of these processes interacting. We show that the mechanisms that regulate the numbers of cells in the immune system, in conjunction with the immune response, can act to suppress autoreactive cells from proliferating, thus showing quantitatively how pathogenic infections can suppress autoimmune disease. We also show that over long periods of time this same effect can thin the repertoire of cells that defend against novel threats, leading to an age correlated vulnerability. This vulnerability is shown to be a consequence of system dynamics, not due to degradation of immune system components with age. Finally, modeling a specific tolerance mechanism that normally prevents autoimmune disease, in conjunction with models of the immune response and homeostasis we look at the consequences of the immune system mistakenly incorporating pathogenic molecules into its tolerizing mechanisms. The signature of this dynamic matches closely that of the dengue virus system.

  13. Aquifer Vulnerability maps and climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducci, Daniela; Sellerino, Mariangela

    2017-04-01

    The aquifer vulnerability maps to contamination are used worldwide by environmental agencies and water-resource managers with the aim of preserving the water resources and of evaluating the most suitable areas where to locate new settlements. In the parametric methods, more used to assess the groundwater contamination vulnerability, e.g. the DRASTIC and the AVI methods, an important role is played by the protective capacity of cover layers to the introduction and transport of contaminants into the aquifer. Therefore, these methods point out the importance of the "Depth to water" parameter, which represents, where the aquifer is unconfined, the depth of the piezometric level and, where the aquifer is confined, the top of the aquifer. This parameter is rarely variable in confined aquifers and in deep unconfined aquifers, as karst aquifers, where the piezometric oscillations are low, compared with the depth of the water table. On the contrary, in shallow aquifers of flat areas, where in addition a large number of human activities are practiced and the contamination risk is high, the piezometric level varies suddenly with the rainfall, and it is very sensitive to drought periods and climatic changes. This affects noticeably the "Depth to water" parameter and consequently the vulnerability maps (e.g. 3 m of piezometric lowering can produce a change in the DRASTIC index from 10 to 7…). To validate this hypothesis, the DRASTC and AVI methods have been applied on a shallow aquifer located in a flat area in Campania (Italy,) considering data corresponding to an average rainfall period and to a drought period.

  14. Vulnerability Is Dynamic! Conceptualising a Dynamic Approach to Coastal Tourism Destinations’ Vulnerability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Student, J.R.; Amelung, B.; Lamers, M.A.J.

    2016-01-01

    Coastal regions and islands are among the most popular tourist destinations.
    They are also highly vulnerable to climate change. Much of the literature on
    vulnerability, including IPCC reports, states that vulnerability is dynamic. However,
    vulnerability conceptualisations in the tourism

  15. Groundwater vulnerability map for South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chiedza Musekiwa

    Coastal vulnerability is the degree to which a coastal system is susceptible to, ... methods, indicator-based approaches, GIS-based decision support systems and ..... E 2005, 'Coastal Vulnerability and Risk Parameters', European Water, vol.

  16. Groundwater vulnerability mapping in Guadalajara aquifers system (Western Mexico)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizo-Decelis, L. David; Marín, Ana I.; Andreo, Bartolomé

    2016-04-01

    Groundwater vulnerability mapping is a practical tool to implement strategies for land-use planning and sustainable socioeconomic development coherent with groundwater protection. The objective of vulnerability mapping is to identify the most vulnerable zones of catchment areas and to provide criteria for protecting the groundwater used for drinking water supply. The delineation of protection zones in fractured aquifers is a challenging task due to the heterogeneity and anisotropy of hydraulic conductivities, which makes difficult prediction of groundwater flow organization and flow velocities. Different methods of intrinsic groundwater vulnerability mapping were applied in the Atemajac-Toluquilla groundwater body, an aquifers system that covers around 1300 km2. The aquifer supplies the 30% of urban water resources of the metropolitan area of Guadalajara (Mexico), where over 4.6 million people reside. Study area is located in a complex neotectonic active volcanic region in the Santiago River Basin (Western Mexico), which influences the aquifer system underneath the city. Previous works have defined the flow dynamics and identified the origin of recharge. In addition, the mixture of fresh groundwater with hydrothermal and polluted waters have been estimated. Two main aquifers compose the multilayer system. The upper aquifer is unconfined and consists of sediments and pyroclastic materials. Recharge of this aquifer comes from rainwater and ascending vertical fluids from the lower aquifer. The lower aquifer consists of fractured basalts of Pliocene age. Formerly, the main water source has been the upper unit, which is a porous and unconsolidated unit, which acts as a semi-isotropic aquifer. Intense groundwater usage has resulted in lowering the water table in the upper aquifer. Therefore, the current groundwater extraction is carried out from the deeper aquifer and underlying bedrock units, where fracture flow predominates. Pollution indicators have been reported in

  17. Hunger mapping: food insecurity and vulnerability information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-12-01

    Save the Children Foundation (SCF), a nongovernmental organization (NGO), developed the "household food economy analysis" to assess the needs of an area or population facing acute food insecurity. This method considers all of the ways people secure access to food and illustrates the distribution of various food supplies in pie charts that allow comparison of the percentage contribution of each option during a normal year and a "bad" year. Data are gathered through the use of key informants, and the analysis permits identification of ways to support local initiatives and to target assistance. As a result of this work, SCF and another NGO, Helen Keller International, attended a March 1997 expert consultation organized by the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) to create a workplan for the Food Insecurity and Vulnerability Information and Mapping System (FIVIMS) called for in the World Food Summit Plan of Action. The consultation adopted use of the FAO's food and balance sheet approach, despite its limitations, and determined that indicators should be location- and time-specific as well as 1) simple and reliable, 2) readily available, 3) social and anthropometric, and 4) found at all levels. The consultation also recommended combination of the key informant and the indicator approach to data collection. Finally, the consultation identified appropriate actions that should be accomplished before the 1998 meeting of the FAO's Committee on World Food Security.

  18. Blind Spots on Achilles’ Heel: The Limitations of Vulnerability and Resilience Mapping in Research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heesen, Jessica; Lorenz, Daniel F.; Nagenborg, Michael; Wenzel, Bettina; Voss, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The mapping of vulnerability and resilience has become an important tool for vulnerability and resilience research. By definition, maps are selective representations. However, the predominant methods of mapping also have constraints. When addressing vulnerability and resilience, these limitations, b

  19. Mapping disaster vulnerability in India using analytical hierarchy process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anusheema Chakraborty

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Disasters are the coincidences between hazardous events, elements at risk, and conditions of vulnerability. Vulnerability integrates social and environmental systems to reduce the intensity and frequency of these risks. By categorizing regions according to their level of vulnerability, one can examine and assess the possible impacts of developmental and environmental degradation processes. This study is an attempt to map the sub-national areas (districts in India that are vulnerable to natural and climate-induced disasters. The assessment is considered under the framework of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change definition of vulnerability. Using analytical hierarchy process as a multi-criteria decision-mapping method, vulnerability is measured in terms of exposure, sensitivity, and adaptive capacity. Based on this mapping assessment, districts in the state of Arunachal Pradesh, Assam, Bihar, Himachal Pradesh, Jharkhand, Manipur, Meghalaya, Mizoram, Uttar Pradesh, Uttarakhand, and West Bengal are the most vulnerable regions; while districts in the state of Punjab, Haryana, Gujarat, Tamil Nadu, Maharashtra, Goa, Andhra Pradesh, Kerala, and Karnataka are among the least vulnerable regions. The results of this study can serve as the basis for targeting prioritization efforts, emergency response measures, and policy interventions at district level for mitigating disaster vulnerability in the country.

  20. Beyond 'vulnerable groups': contexts and dynamics of vulnerability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zarowsky, C.; Haddad, S.; Nguyen, V.K.

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews approaches to vulnerability in public health, introducing a series of 10 papers addressing vulnerability in health in Africa. We understand vulnerability as simultaneously a condition and a process. Social inequalities are manifest in and exacerbate three key dimensions of

  1. Beyond 'vulnerable groups': contexts and dynamics of vulnerability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zarowsky, C.; Haddad, S.; Nguyen, V.K.

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews approaches to vulnerability in public health, introducing a series of 10 papers addressing vulnerability in health in Africa. We understand vulnerability as simultaneously a condition and a process. Social inequalities are manifest in and exacerbate three key dimensions of vulnera

  2. Beyond 'vulnerable groups': contexts and dynamics of vulnerability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zarowsky, C.; Haddad, S.; Nguyen, V.K.

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews approaches to vulnerability in public health, introducing a series of 10 papers addressing vulnerability in health in Africa. We understand vulnerability as simultaneously a condition and a process. Social inequalities are manifest in and exacerbate three key dimensions of vulnera

  3. Groundwater vulnerability to pollution mapping of Ranchi district using GIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, R; Iqbal, J; Gorai, A K; Pathak, G; Tuluri, F; Tchounwou, P B

    2015-12-01

    Groundwater pollution due to anthropogenic activities is one of the major environmental problems in urban and industrial areas. The present study demonstrates the integrated approach with GIS and DRASTIC model to derive a groundwater vulnerability to pollution map. The model considers the seven hydrogeological factors [Depth to water table (D), net recharge (R), aquifer media (A), soil media (S), topography or slope (T), impact of vadose zone (I) and hydraulic Conductivity(C)] for generating the groundwater vulnerability to pollution map. The model was applied for assessing the groundwater vulnerability to pollution in Ranchi district, Jharkhand, India. The model was validated by comparing the model output (vulnerability indices) with the observed nitrate concentrations in groundwater in the study area. The reason behind the selection of nitrate is that the major sources of nitrate in groundwater are anthropogenic in nature. Groundwater samples were collected from 30 wells/tube wells distributed in the study area. The samples were analyzed in the laboratory for measuring the nitrate concentrations in groundwater. A sensitivity analysis of the integrated model was performed to evaluate the influence of single parameters on groundwater vulnerability index. New weights were computed for each input parameters to understand the influence of individual hydrogeological factors in vulnerability indices in the study area. Aquifer vulnerability maps generated in this study can be used for environmental planning and groundwater management.

  4. Application of Fuzzy Cognitive Mapping in Livelihood Vulnerability Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Eric M. A. Smaling; Andersson, Jens A.; Van Wijk, Mark T.; Chrispen Murungweni; Giller, Ken E.

    2011-01-01

    Feedback mechanisms are important in the analysis of vulnerability and resilience of social-ecological systems, as well as in the analysis of livelihoods, but how to evaluate systems with direct feedbacks has been a great challenge. We applied fuzzy cognitive mapping, a tool that allows analysis of both direct and indirect feedbacks and can be used to explore the vulnerabilities of livelihoods to identified hazards. We studied characteristics and drivers of rural livelihoods in the Great Limp...

  5. Application of Fuzzy Cognitive Mapping in Livelihood Vulnerability Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Murungweni, C.; Wijk, van M.T.; Andersson, J.A.; Smaling, E.M.A.; Giller, K.E.

    2011-01-01

    Feedback mechanisms are important in the analysis of vulnerability and resilience of social-ecological systems, as well as in the analysis of livelihoods, but how to evaluate systems with direct feedbacks has been a great challenge. We applied fuzzy cognitive mapping, a tool that allows analysis of

  6. Data Integration for Climate Vulnerability Mapping in West Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex de Sherbinin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Vulnerability mapping reveals areas that are likely to be at greater risk of climate-related disasters in the future. Through integration of climate, biophysical, and socioeconomic data in an overall vulnerability framework, so-called “hotspots” of vulnerability can be identified. These maps can be used as an aid to targeting adaptation and disaster risk management interventions. This paper reviews vulnerability mapping efforts in West Africa conducted under the USAID-funded African and Latin American Resilience to Climate Change (ARCC project. The focus is on the integration of remotely sensed and socioeconomic data. Data inputs included a range of sensor data (e.g., MODIS NDVI, Landsat, SRTM elevation, DMSP-OLS night-time lights as well as high-resolution poverty, conflict, and infrastructure data. Two basic methods were used, one in which each layer was transformed into standardized indicators in an additive approach, and another in which remote sensing data were used to contextualize the results of composite indicators. We assess the benefits and challenges of data integration, and the lessons learned from these mapping exercises.

  7. Application of Fuzzy Cognitive Mapping in Livelihood Vulnerability Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric M. A. Smaling

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Feedback mechanisms are important in the analysis of vulnerability and resilience of social-ecological systems, as well as in the analysis of livelihoods, but how to evaluate systems with direct feedbacks has been a great challenge. We applied fuzzy cognitive mapping, a tool that allows analysis of both direct and indirect feedbacks and can be used to explore the vulnerabilities of livelihoods to identified hazards. We studied characteristics and drivers of rural livelihoods in the Great Limpopo Transfrontier Conservation Area in southern Africa to assess the vulnerability of inhabitants to the different hazards they face. The process involved four steps: (1 surveys and interviews to identify the major livelihood types; (2 description of specific livelihood types in a system format using fuzzy cognitive maps (FCMs, a semi-quantitative tool that models systems based on people's knowledge; (3 linking variables and drivers in FCMs by attaching weights; and (4 defining and applying scenarios to visualize the effects of drought and changing park boundaries on cash and household food security. FCMs successfully gave information concerning the nature (increase or decrease and magnitude by which a livelihood system changed under different scenarios. However, they did not explain the recovery path in relation to time and pattern (e.g., how long it takes for cattle to return to desired numbers after a drought. Using FCMs revealed that issues of policy, such as changing situations at borders, can strongly aggravate effects of climate change such as drought. FCMs revealed hidden knowledge and gave insights that improved the understanding of the complexity of livelihood systems in a way that is better appreciated by stakeholders.

  8. Creating a high resolution social vulnerability map in support of national decision makers in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Le Roux, Alice

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The core objective of this study was to create a social vulnerability map based on generally accepted variables that are indicative of drivers of social vulnerability, capturing the unique attributes of South African communities. The paper explains...

  9. Visualizing Dynamic Data with Maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashima, Daisuke; Kobourov, Stephen G; Hu, Yifan

    2012-09-01

    Maps offer a familiar way to present geographic data (continents, countries), and additional information (topography, geology), can be displayed with the help of contours and heat-map overlays. In this paper, we consider visualizing large-scale dynamic relational data by taking advantage of the geographic map metaphor. We describe a map-based visualization system which uses animation to convey dynamics in large data sets, and which aims to preserve the viewer's mental map while also offering readable views at all times. Our system is fully functional and has been used to visualize user traffic on the Internet radio station last.fm, as well as TV-viewing patterns from an IPTV service. All map images in this paper are available in high-resolution at [1] as are several movies illustrating the dynamic visualization.

  10. Vulnerability mapping and protection zoning of karst springs. Validation by multitracer tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín, A I; Andreo, B; Mudarra, M

    2015-11-01

    Protection zoning of karst springs and wells used for water supply is a key aspect in many countries, calling for specific methodologies adapted to the particular characteristics of karst media. This work presents a new approach, in view of the present state of the art and based on experiences with contamination vulnerability mapping at the pilot site of the Villanueva del Rosario karst system (southern Spain). Source (intrinsic) vulnerability maps were prepared and compared using three European procedures for karst aquifers. The vulnerability maps were then tested using dye tracers. The COP+K method and Slovene Approach appear to provide reliable results in terms of intrinsic vulnerability mapping. Nevertheless, all the methods have a margin of error. The COP+K map is adopted as the baseline to delineate the protection zones, through the conversion from vulnerability classes to degrees of protection.

  11. MODELING OF THE VULNERABILITY RELATED TO THE DYNAMIC ROAD TRAFFIC

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    International audience; The utilization of the road network by vehicles with different behaviors can generate a danger under normal and especially under evacuation situations. In Le Havre agglomeration (CODAH), there are 33 establishments classified SEVESO with high threshold. The modeling and assessment of the danger is useful when it intersects with the exposed stakes. The most important factor is people. In the literature, vulnerability maps are constructed to help decision makers assess t...

  12. Index-based groundwater vulnerability mapping models using hydrogeological settings: A critical evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Prashant, E-mail: prashantkumar@csio.res.in [CSIR-Central Scientific Instruments Organisation, Chandigarh 160030 (India); Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research—CSIO, Chandigarh 160030 (India); Bansod, Baban K.S.; Debnath, Sanjit K. [CSIR-Central Scientific Instruments Organisation, Chandigarh 160030 (India); Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research—CSIO, Chandigarh 160030 (India); Thakur, Praveen Kumar [Indian Institute of Remote Sensing (ISRO), Dehradun 248001 (India); Ghanshyam, C. [CSIR-Central Scientific Instruments Organisation, Chandigarh 160030 (India); Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research—CSIO, Chandigarh 160030 (India)

    2015-02-15

    Groundwater vulnerability maps are useful for decision making in land use planning and water resource management. This paper reviews the various groundwater vulnerability assessment models developed across the world. Each model has been evaluated in terms of its pros and cons and the environmental conditions of its application. The paper further discusses the validation techniques used for the generated vulnerability maps by various models. Implicit challenges associated with the development of the groundwater vulnerability assessment models have also been identified with scientific considerations to the parameter relations and their selections. - Highlights: • Various index-based groundwater vulnerability assessment models have been discussed. • A comparative analysis of the models and its applicability in different hydrogeological settings has been discussed. • Research problems of underlying vulnerability assessment models are also reported in this review paper.

  13. Dynamical maps and density matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asorey, M [Departamento de Fisica Teorica. Facultad de Ciencias. Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Kossakowski, A [Institute of Physics, Nicolaus Copernicus University Torun 87-100 (Poland); Marmo, G [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita Federico II di Napoli and INFN, Sezione di Napoli Complesso University di Monte Sant' Angelo, Via Cintia, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Sudarshan, E C G [Department of Physics. University of Texas at Austin Austin, Texas 78712-1081 (United States)

    2009-11-01

    The relations between dynamical maps and quantum states of bipartite systems are analyzed from the perspective of quantum conditional probability. In particular, we explore new interesting relations between completely positive maps, which correspond to quantum channels, and states of bipartite systems which correspond to correlations between the initial and final states. The new connection emerges in a natural way from the generalisation of the classical concept of conditional probability. We develop applications of these relations which prove to be very useful in both directions, either for the classification of positive maps which are not completely positive, the classification of non-decomposable dynamical maps or for the classification of positive partial transpose and entangled states.

  14. analysis and mapping of climate change risk and vulnerability in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    regarding vulnerability to climate change at the local scale. This study was ... prime contributor to food security (CEEPA, 2006). Climate ... developing world, home to half of the world's currently ... change impacts on the landscape to more.

  15. USGS Map service: Coastal Vulnerability to Sea-Level Rise

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The coastal vulnerability index (CVI)provides a preliminary overview, at a National scale, of the relative susceptibility of the Nation's coast to sea-level rise....

  16. USGS Map service: Coastal Vulnerability to Sea-Level Rise

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The coastal vulnerability index (CVI)provides a preliminary overview, at a National scale, of the relative susceptibility of the Nation's coast to sea-level rise....

  17. Developing a vulnerability mapping methodology: applying the water-associated disease index to dengue in Malaysia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dickin, Sarah K; Schuster-Wallace, Corinne J; Elliott, Susan J

    2013-01-01

    The Water-associated Disease Index (WADI) was developed to identify and visualize vulnerability to different water-associated diseases by integrating a range of social and biophysical determinants in map format...

  18. Maine Environmental Vulnerability Index (EVI) Atlas, Maine - 2007, maps in portable document format (NODC Accession 0036827)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This four volume set of Environmental Vulnerability Index Maps depicts environmental resources along the coast of Maine most at risk from oil spilled into the marine...

  19. Discretization and implicit mapping dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, Albert C J

    2015-01-01

    This unique book presents the discretization of continuous systems and implicit mapping dynamics of periodic motions to chaos in continuous nonlinear systems. The stability and bifurcation theory of fixed points in discrete nonlinear dynamical systems is reviewed, and the explicit and implicit maps of continuous dynamical systems are developed through the single-step and multi-step discretizations. The implicit dynamics of period-m solutions in discrete nonlinear systems are discussed. The book also offers a generalized approach to finding analytical and numerical solutions of stable and unstable periodic flows to chaos in nonlinear systems with/without time-delay. The bifurcation trees of periodic motions to chaos in the Duffing oscillator are shown as a sample problem, while the discrete Fourier series of periodic motions and chaos are also presented. The book offers a valuable resource for university students, professors, researchers and engineers in the fields of applied mathematics, physics, mechanics,...

  20. Hazard-Specific Vulnerability Mapping for Water Security in a Shale Gas Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, D. M.; Holding, S.; McKoen, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Northeast British Columbia (NEBC) is estimated to hold large reserves of unconventional natural gas and has experienced rapid growth in shale gas development activities over recent decades. Shale gas development has the potential to impact the quality and quantity of surface and ground water. Robust policies and sound water management are required to protect water security in relation to the water-energy nexus surrounding shale gas development. In this study, hazard-specific vulnerability mapping was conducted across NEBC to identify areas most vulnerable to water quality and quantity deterioration due to shale gas development. Vulnerability represents the combination of a specific hazard threat and the susceptibility of the water system to that threat. Hazard threats (i.e. potential contamination sources and water abstraction) were mapped spatially across the region. The shallow aquifer susceptibility to contamination was characterised using the DRASTIC aquifer vulnerability approach, while the aquifer susceptibility to abstraction was mapped according to aquifer productivity. Surface water susceptibility to contamination was characterised on a watershed basis to describe the propensity for overland flow (i.e. contaminant transport), while watershed discharge estimates were used to assess surface water susceptibility to water abstractions. The spatial distribution of hazard threats and susceptibility were combined to form hazard-specific vulnerability maps for groundwater quality, groundwater quantity, surface water quality and surface water quantity. The vulnerability maps identify priority areas for further research, monitoring and policy development. Priority areas regarding water quality occur where hazard threat (contamination potential) coincide with high aquifer susceptibility or high overland flow potential. Priority areas regarding water quantity occur where demand is estimated to represent a significant proportion of estimated supply. The identification

  1. Mapping the groundwater vulnerability for pollution at the pan African scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouedraogo, Issoufou; Defourny, Pierre; Vanclooster, Marnik

    2016-02-15

    We estimated vulnerability and pollution risk of groundwater at the pan-African scale. We therefore compiled the most recent continental scale information on soil, land use, geology, hydrogeology and climate in a Geographical Information System (GIS) at a resolution of 15 km × 15 km and at the scale of 1:60,000,000. The groundwater vulnerability map was constructed by means of the DRASTIC method. The map reveals that groundwater is highly vulnerable in Central and West Africa, where the watertable is very low. In addition, very low vulnerability is found in the large sedimentary basins of the African deserts where groundwater is situated in very deep aquifers. The groundwater pollution risk map is obtained by overlaying the DRASTIC vulnerability map with land use. The northern, central and western part of the African continent is dominated by high pollution risk classes and this is very strongly related to shallow groundwater systems and the development of agricultural activities. Subsequently, we performed a sensitivity analysis to evaluate the relative importance of each parameter on groundwater vulnerability and pollution risk. The sensitivity analysis indicated that the removal of the impact of vadose zone, the depth of the groundwater, the hydraulic conductivity and the net recharge causes a large variation in the mapped vulnerability and pollution risk. The mapping model was validated using nitrate concentration data of groundwater as a proxy of pollution risk. Pan-African concentration data were inferred from a meta-analysis of literature data. Results shows a good match between nitrate concentration and the groundwater pollution risk classes. The pan African assessment of groundwater vulnerability and pollution risk is expected to be of particular value for water policy and for designing groundwater resources management programs. We expect, however, that this assessment can be strongly improved when better pan African monitoring data related to groundwater

  2. Mapping Social and Economic Vulnerability in Forest and Peatland Fire Disaster in Bengkalis Regency, Riau Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eko Ahmad Riyanto

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this research are (1 analyzing social and economic vulnerability of forest and peat land fire disaster in Bengkalis Regency; (2 Mapping social and economic vulnerability of forest and peat land fire disaster in Bengkalis Regency.  Research Variable is social and economic vulnerability. The data that used is primary and secondary data with survey method. Analysis method is scoring and weightings. After that classified based on the value of the score to determine the level of vulnerability. The analysis based on the head of National Agency for Disaster Management (Perka BNPB Number 02.2012 and literatures study. The results of research show that social vulnerability of forest and peat land fire in Bengkalis Regency is medium vulnerability because it has value of social vulnerability is 0.46663. While economic vulnerability in Bengkalis Regency is low vulnerability because economic vulnerability is 0.3333. In addition, required mitigation that is quick and appropriate by governments of Bengkalis Regency and the local community in management of forest and peat land fire disaster.

  3. Mapping fires and American Red Cross aid using demographic indicators of vulnerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lue, Evan; Wilson, John P

    2017-04-01

    Social vulnerability indicators can assist with informing disaster relief preparation. Certain demographic segments of a population may suffer disproportionately during disaster events, and a geographical understanding of them can help to determine where to place strategically logistical assets and to target disaster-awareness outreach endeavours. Records of house fire events and American Red Cross aid provision over a five-year period were mapped for the County of Los Angeles, California, United States, to examine the congruence between actual events and expectations of risk based on vulnerability theory. The geographical context provided by the data was compared with spatially-explicit indicators of vulnerability, such as age, race, and wealth. Fire events were found to occur more frequently in more vulnerable areas, and Red Cross aid was found to have an even stronger relationship to those places. The findings suggest that these indicators speak beyond vulnerability and relate to patterns of fire risk.

  4. Quantum dynamical maps and Markovianity

    CERN Document Server

    Devi, A R Usha; Sudha,

    2011-01-01

    It is known that the time evolution of a subsystem from an initial state to two later times, t1, t2 (t2 > t1), are both completely positive (CP) but it is shown here that in the intermediate times between t1 and t2, in general, it need not be CP. This reveals the key to the Markov (if CP) and nonMarkov (if NCP) avataras of the intermediate dynamics. This is brought out based on A and B dynamical maps - without resorting to Master equation approach. The choice of tensor product form for the global initial state points towards the system-environment interaction dynamics as the sole cause for Markovianity/non-Markovianity. A succinct summary of the results is given in the form of a table.

  5. Mapping the Drivers of Climate Change Vulnerability for Australia's Threatened Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jasmine R; Maggini, Ramona; Taylor, Martin F J; Fuller, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    Effective conservation management for climate adaptation rests on understanding the factors driving species' vulnerability in a spatially explicit manner so as to direct on-ground action. However, there have been only few attempts to map the spatial distribution of the factors driving vulnerability to climate change. Here we conduct a species-level assessment of climate change vulnerability for a sample of Australia's threatened species and map the distribution of species affected by each factor driving climate change vulnerability across the continent. Almost half of the threatened species assessed were considered vulnerable to the impacts of climate change: amphibians being the most vulnerable group, followed by plants, reptiles, mammals and birds. Species with more restricted distributions were more likely to show high climate change vulnerability than widespread species. The main factors driving climate change vulnerability were low genetic variation, dependence on a particular disturbance regime and reliance on a particular moisture regime or habitat. The geographic distribution of the species impacted by each driver varies markedly across the continent, for example species impacted by low genetic variation are prevalent across the human-dominated south-east of the country, while reliance on particular moisture regimes is prevalent across northern Australia. Our results show that actions to address climate adaptation will need to be spatially appropriate, and that in some regions a complex suite of factors driving climate change vulnerability will need to be addressed. Taxonomic and geographic variation in the factors driving climate change vulnerability highlights an urgent need for a spatial prioritisation of climate adaptation actions for threatened species.

  6. Mapping the Drivers of Climate Change Vulnerability for Australia’s Threatened Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jasmine R.; Maggini, Ramona; Taylor, Martin F. J.; Fuller, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Effective conservation management for climate adaptation rests on understanding the factors driving species’ vulnerability in a spatially explicit manner so as to direct on-ground action. However, there have been only few attempts to map the spatial distribution of the factors driving vulnerability to climate change. Here we conduct a species-level assessment of climate change vulnerability for a sample of Australia’s threatened species and map the distribution of species affected by each factor driving climate change vulnerability across the continent. Almost half of the threatened species assessed were considered vulnerable to the impacts of climate change: amphibians being the most vulnerable group, followed by plants, reptiles, mammals and birds. Species with more restricted distributions were more likely to show high climate change vulnerability than widespread species. The main factors driving climate change vulnerability were low genetic variation, dependence on a particular disturbance regime and reliance on a particular moisture regime or habitat. The geographic distribution of the species impacted by each driver varies markedly across the continent, for example species impacted by low genetic variation are prevalent across the human-dominated south-east of the country, while reliance on particular moisture regimes is prevalent across northern Australia. Our results show that actions to address climate adaptation will need to be spatially appropriate, and that in some regions a complex suite of factors driving climate change vulnerability will need to be addressed. Taxonomic and geographic variation in the factors driving climate change vulnerability highlights an urgent need for a spatial prioritisation of climate adaptation actions for threatened species. PMID:26017785

  7. Using Fuzzy Cognitive Maps (FCMs) to Evaluate the Vulnerabilities with ICT Assets Disposal Policies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yeboah-Boateng, Ezer Osei

    2012-01-01

    This paper evaluates the possible vulnerabilities of ICT assets disposal policies and the associated impact that can affect the SMEs. A poorly implemented policy or unenforced policy is “potentially the weakest link” in the cyber-security chain. Do SMEs have an idea of vulnerabilities or threats...... data left on the hard disk drives or storage media, which is a source of data confidentiality vulnerability. SMEs were surveyed in developing economies on their assets disposal policies. The perceived correlations were analyzed using fuzzy cognitive maps (FCMs) to ascertain if any cyber...

  8. Integrating Community Volcanic Hazard Mapping, Geographic Information Systems, and Modeling to Reduce Volcanic Hazard Vulnerability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajo Sanchez, Jorge V.

    This dissertation is composed of an introductory chapter and three papers about vulnerability and volcanic hazard maps with emphasis on lahars. The introductory chapter reviews definitions of the term vulnerability by the social and natural hazard community and it provides a new definition of hazard vulnerability that includes social and natural hazard factors. The first paper explains how the Community Volcanic Hazard Map (CVHM) is used for vulnerability analysis and explains in detail a new methodology to obtain valuable information about ethnophysiographic differences, hazards, and landscape knowledge of communities in the area of interest: the Canton Buenos Aires situated on the northern flank of the Santa Ana (Ilamatepec) Volcano, El Salvador. The second paper is about creating a lahar hazard map in data poor environments by generating a landslide inventory and obtaining potential volumes of dry material that can potentially be carried by lahars. The third paper introduces an innovative lahar hazard map integrating information generated by the previous two papers. It shows the differences in hazard maps created by the communities and experts both visually as well as quantitatively. This new, integrated hazard map was presented to the community with positive feedback and acceptance. The dissertation concludes with a summary chapter on the results and recommendations.

  9. Components of dynamic digital maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condit, Christopher D.

    1999-05-01

    The core of a dynamic digital map (DDM) is a program created to display a digital geologic map and its associated data set as a single integrated package. This DDM program core is authored using a high-level object oriented graphical programming environment, SuperCard, a Macintosh `xTalk' language. Some of the major philosophical underpinnings relevant to the job of creating DDMs in this programming environment include taking advantage of specific object's attributes, how to organize data structure effectively for this job and keeping applicable code as transportable (generalized) as possible between objects. The core components of DDMs are parts of a SuperCard `template' or map display `container' into which the various externally created digital pieces (e.g. CAD produced geologic maps, spread sheet data, digital images, text files, movies) can be inserted for integrated display and digital publication. Components of DDMs consist of windows, cards within these windows, card fields (text and data containers) and a menu structure. The paper discusses each of these major components and how they fit into a DDM and gives examples of each topic in programs whose components demonstrate the concept. These programs are available from Web (see Appendix A); readers can refer to them as they examine these examples.

  10. Mapping Vulnerability to Disasters in Latin America and the Caribbean, 1900-2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard-Ford, Miriam C.; Phillips, Emily C.; Chirico, Peter G.

    2008-01-01

    The vulnerability of a population and its infrastructure to disastrous events is a factor of both the probability of a hazardous event occurring and the community's ability to cope with the resulting impacts. Therefore, the ability to accurately identify vulnerable populations and places in order to prepare for future hazards is of critical importance for disaster mitigation programs. This project created maps of higher spatial resolution of vulnerability to disaster in Latin America and the Caribbean from 1900 to 2007 by mapping disaster data by first-level administrative boundaries with the objective of identifying geographic trends in regional occurrences of disasters and vulnerable populations. The method of mapping by administrative level is an improvement on displaying and analyzing disasters at the country level and shows the relative intensity of vulnerability within and between countries in the region. Disaster mapping at the country level produces only a basic view of which countries experience various types of natural disasters. Through disaggregation, the data show which geographic areas of these countries, including populated areas, are historically most susceptible to different hazard types.

  11. Mapping eco-environmental vulnerability patterns: An assessment framework based on remote sensing, GIS, and AHP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anh, N. K.; Liou, Y. A.; Li, M. H.

    2016-12-01

    The motivation for this study is assessment of the eco-environment vulnerability based on four independent determinants: hydro-meteorology, topography, land resources, and human activities. An assessment framework is proposed to assess the vulnerable eco-environment by using 16 variables with 6 of them constructed from Landsat 8 satellite images. The remaining variables were extracted from digital maps. Each variable was evaluated and spatially mapped with the aid of an analytical hierarchy process (AHP) and geographical information system (GIS). The Thua Thien - Hue Province that has been experiencing natural disasters and urbanization in the recent decades is selected as our study area. An eco-environmental vulnerability map is assorted into six vulnerable levels consisting of potential, slight, light, medium, heavy, and very heavy vulnerabilities, representing 14%, 27%, 17%, 26%, 13%, 3% of the study area, respectively. It is found that heavy and very heavy vulnerable areas appear mainly in the low and medium lands with high intensification of social-economic activities and often suffer from flooding. Tiny percentages of medium and heavy vulnerable levels occur in high land areas probably caused by agricultural practices in highlands, slash and burn cultivation and removal of natural forests with new plantation forests and these regions are usually influenced by landslides, flash flooding. Based on our results, three ecological zones requiring different development and protection solutions are proposed to restore local eco-environment toward sustainable development. Our findings support the idea that eco-environmental vulnerability is driven by anthropogenic processes and enhanced by natural disaster in the Thua Thien-Hue Province.

  12. GIS based Hydrogeological Vulnerability Mapping of Groundwater Resources in Jerash Area-Jordan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammouri, N [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Natural Resources and Environment, Hashemite University, Zarqa (Jordan); El-Naqa, A [Department of Water Management and Environment, Faculty of Natural Resources and Environment, Hashemite University, Zarqa (Jordan)

    2008-04-15

    This paper presents groundwater vulnerability mapping for Jerash area, north Jordan generated using EPIK and DRASTIC models. These models have been implemented using GIS to delineate groundwater protection zones and to suggest a protection plan to improve groundwater quality of the major springs and wells. Most of the groundwater resources in the study area are polluted and bacteria and nitrate levels are high. Different sources of groundwater pollution have been identified. Domestic wastewater is considered as a major source of pollution. Urban runoff, fertilizers from agricultural return flows and solid waste disposal appear to be secondary sources. The most relevant vulnerability class of EPIK map is very high which accounts for about 41 % of the total area. While in the DRASTIC vulnerability map, areas with high vulnerability were only about 23 % of the total area. There is a good correlation between vulnerability maps obtained from both models with microbiological and chemical pollution evidences. There is also a good agreement between the areas classified as highly vulnerable and those that have high levels of pollution. [Spanish] El estudio de vulnerabilidad de aguas subterraneas en la region de Yerash, Jordania fue obtenido mediante las metodologias de EPIK y DRASTIC. Se uso GIS para mapear las zonas protegidas y para sugerir un plan de proteccion para mejorar la calidad del agua subterranea en los principales manantiales y pozos. Los niveles de contaminacion bacteriana y de nitratos son elevados. El efluente domestico es la fuente mas importante de contaminacion; vienen en segundo lugar la precipitacion en zonas urbanas, los fertilizantes agricolas y los desechos solidos. En el mapa de EPIK, la vulnerabilidad extrema abarca hasta 41% del area total; en cambio, en el mapa de DRASTIC las areas de alta vulnerabilidad ocupan solo un 23% del area. La correlacion de los datos de contaminacion microbiana y quimica con ambos mapas der vulnerabilidad es buena

  13. Mapping Water Vulnerability of the Yangtze River Basin: 1994-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fengyun; Kuang, Wenhui; Xiang, Weining; Che, Yue

    2016-11-01

    A holistic understanding of the magnitude and long-term trend of water vulnerability is essential for making management decisions in a given river basin. Existing procedures to assess the spatiotemporal dynamic of water vulnerability in complex mega-scale river basins are inadequate; a new method named ensemble hydrologic assessment was proposed in this study, which allows collection of data and knowledge about many aspects of water resources to be synthesized in a useful way for vulnerability assessment. The objective of this study is to illustrate the practical utility of such an integrated approach in examining water vulnerability in the Yangtze River Basin. Overall, the results demonstrated that the ensemble hydrologic assessment model could largely explain the spatiotemporal evolution of water vulnerability. This paper improves understanding of the status and trends of water resources in the Yangtze River Basin.

  14. Mapping Extreme Heat Vulnerability and Health Outcomes to inform the District of Columbia's Climate Adaptation Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Declet-Barreto, J.; Wilhelmi, O.; Goggans, A.

    2016-12-01

    In this collaborative engagement, scientists are partnering with the District of Columbia (DC) to develop an extreme heat vulnerability assessment. To do so, we map socio-demographic and built environment indicators of extreme heat vulnerability in Census Tracts in DC neighborhoods. In order to provide information useful for DC public health and urban planning practitioners, we aggregate the indicators into an index of extreme heat vulnerability. We compare the index against heat-related call data from DC's 911 system to better understand the socio-spatial distribution of extreme heat-related health outcomes. Our assessment can help inform the District's Climate Adaptation Plan as well as increase public engagement in reducing vulnerability to extreme heat.

  15. Tropical Cyclone Vulnerability Mapping Using Geospatial Techniques: Application to a Coastal Upazila in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoque, M. A. A.; Phinn, S. R.; Roelfsema, C. M.; Childs, I.

    2015-12-01

    Cyclones are one of the most catastrophic natural disasters. Globally, many coastal regions are vulnerable to different categories cyclones. In Bangladesh, disasters from tropical cyclones are annual occurrences in coastal areas. The intensity and extent of damage due to tropical cyclones are very high. An appropriate mapping approach is essential for producing detail vulnerability assessments to deliver useful information for reducing the impacts of cyclones on people, property and environment. The present study developed and tested a vulnerability mapping approach for tropical cyclone impacts in Sarankhola upazila a 151 km2 local government area located in coastal Bangladesh. The study applied the approach by integrating remote sensing, field data and multi-criteria evaluation at regional scales covering Bangladesh to tropical cyclones.

  16. Groundwater vulnerability and risk mapping using GIS, modeling and a fuzzy logic tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobre, R C M; Rotunno Filho, O C; Mansur, W J; Nobre, M M M; Cosenza, C A N

    2007-12-07

    A groundwater vulnerability and risk mapping assessment, based on a source-pathway-receptor approach, is presented for an urban coastal aquifer in northeastern Brazil. A modified version of the DRASTIC methodology was used to map the intrinsic and specific groundwater vulnerability of a 292 km(2) study area. A fuzzy hierarchy methodology was adopted to evaluate the potential contaminant source index, including diffuse and point sources. Numerical modeling was performed for delineation of well capture zones, using MODFLOW and MODPATH. The integration of these elements provided the mechanism to assess groundwater pollution risks and identify areas that must be prioritized in terms of groundwater monitoring and restriction on use. A groundwater quality index based on nitrate and chloride concentrations was calculated, which had a positive correlation with the specific vulnerability index.

  17. Beyond the single species climate envelope: A multifaceted approach to mapping climate change vulnerability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher S. Balzotti; Stanley G. Kitchen; Clinton McCarthy

    2016-01-01

    Federal land management agencies and conservation organizations have begun incorporating climate change vulnerability assessments (CCVAs) as an important component in the management and conservation of landscapes. It is often a challenge to translate that knowledge into management plans and actions, even when research infers species risk. Predictive maps can...

  18. Incorporating occupational risk in heat stress vulnerability mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crider, Kyle G; Maples, Elizabeth H; Gohlke, Julia M

    2014-01-01

    Both obesity and strenuous outdoor work are known risk factors for heat-related illness (HRI). These risk factors may be compounded by more and longer periods of extreme heat in the southeastern U.S. To quantify occupational risk and investigate the possible predictive value of a GIS-based tool, a weighted occupation-based metabolic equivalent (MET) index was created. The correlation between current MET-weighted employment rates or obesity rates and 2012 HRI report rates in Alabama were then determined. With the current dataset, results indicate occupational and obesity rates may explain some of the geographical variation seen in HRI report rates, although results are not statistically significant with this limited dataset. Mapping occupational and physiological risk factors with HRI rates may be useful for environmental and occupational health professionals to identify "hotspots" that may require special attention.

  19. Tsunami vulnerability assessment mapping for the west coast of Peninsular Malaysia using a geographical information system (GIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najihah, R.; Effendi, D. M.; Hairunnisa, M. A.; Masiri, K.

    2014-02-01

    The catastrophic Indian Ocean tsunami of 26 December 2004 raised a number of questions for scientist and politicians on how to deal with the tsunami risk and assessment in coastal regions. This paper discusses the challenges in tsunami vulnerability assessment and presents the result of tsunami disaster mapping and vulnerability assessment study for West Coast of Peninsular Malaysia. The spatial analysis was carried out using Geographical Information System (GIS) technology to demarcate spatially the tsunami affected village's boundary and suitable disaster management program can be quickly and easily developed. In combination with other thematic maps such as road maps, rail maps, school maps, and topographic map sheets it was possible to plan the accessibility and shelter to the affected people. The tsunami vulnerability map was used to identify the vulnerability of villages/village population to tsunami. In the tsunami vulnerability map, the intensity of the tsunami was classified as hazard zones based on the inundation level in meter (contour). The approach produced a tsunami vulnerability assessment map consists of considering scenarios of plausible extreme, tsunami-generating events, computing the tsunami inundation levels caused by different events and scenarios and estimating the possible range of casualties for computing inundation levels. The study provides an interactive means to identify the tsunami affected areas after the disaster and mapping the tsunami vulnerable village before for planning purpose were the essential exercises for managing future disasters.

  20. Global Dynamics for Symmetric Planar Maps

    CERN Document Server

    Alarcon, B; Labouriau, I S

    2012-01-01

    We consider sufficient conditions to determine the global dynamics for equivariant maps of the plane with a unique fixed point which is also hyperbolic. When the map is equivariant under the action of a compact Lie group, it is possible to describe the local dynamics and - from this - also the global dynamics. In particular, if the group contains a reflection, there is a line invariant by the map. This allows us to use results based on the theory of free homeomorphisms to describe the global dynamical behaviour. In the absence of reflections, we use equivariant examples to show that global dynamics may not follow from local dynamics near the unique fixed point.

  1. Debris Flow Vulnerability Assessment in Urban Area Associated with Landslide Hazard Map : Application to Busan, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okjeong, Lee; Yoonkyung, Park; Mookwang, Sung; Sangdan, Kim

    2016-04-01

    In this presentation, an urban debris flow disaster vulnerability assessment methodology is suggested with major focus on urban social and economic aspect. The proposed methodology is developed based on the landslide hazard maps that Korean Forest Service has utilized to identify landslide source areas. Frist, debris flows are propagated to urban areas from such source areas by Flow-R model, and then urban vulnerability is evaluated by two categories; physical and socio-economic aspect. The physical vulnerability is associated to buildings that can be broken down by a landslide event directly. This study considers two popular building structure types, reinforced concrete frame and non-reinforced concretes frame, to evaluate the physically-based vulnerability. The socio-economic vulnerability is measured as a function of the resistant levels of the exposed people, the intensity and magnitude of indirect or intangible losses, and preparedness level of the local government. An indicator-based model is established to evaluate the life and indirect loss under urban debris flow disasters as well as the resilience ability against disasters. To illuminate the validity of the suggested methodology, physical and socio-economic vulnerability levels are investigated for Daejeon, Korea using the proposed approach. The results reveal that the higher population density areas under a weaker fiscal condition that are located at the downstream of mountainous areas are more vulnerable than the areas in opposite conditions. Key words: Debris flow disasters, Physical vulnerability, Socio-economic Vulnerability, Urban Acknowledgement This research was supported by a grant(13SCIPS04) from Smart Civil Infrastructure Research Program funded by Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport(MOLIT) of Korea government and Korea Agency for Infrastructure Technology Advancement(KAIA).

  2. Chaotic Maps Dynamics, Fractals, and Rapid Fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Goong

    2011-01-01

    This book consists of lecture notes for a semester-long introductory graduate course on dynamical systems and chaos taught by the authors at Texas A&M University and Zhongshan University, China. There are ten chapters in the main body of the book, covering an elementary theory of chaotic maps in finite-dimensional spaces. The topics include one-dimensional dynamical systems (interval maps), bifurcations, general topological, symbolic dynamical systems, fractals and a class of infinite-dimensional dynamical systems which are induced by interval maps, plus rapid fluctuations of chaotic maps as a

  3. MAPPING OF ECOLOGICALLY VULNERABLE ZONES AND REGIONS OF WATER AREAS AND SHORELINES WITH PRIORITY PROTECTION AGAINST SPILLS OF OIL AND OIL PRODUCTS IN RUSSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksey Knizhnikov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Map development for ecologically vulnerable zones and regions of water areas and shorelines with priority protection against spills of oil and oil products is important because of (1 the population’s concern about the growing technological load on nature, and (2 the need to comply with the existing state legislation. At present there is no general methodology for development of vulnerability maps in Russian Federation. The integral maps to be used in prevention and control of oil spills should represent data about ecological vulnerability to oil of both coastal and water ecosystems and information about legally protected objects, zones and regions. A set of maps showing absolute and relative integral vulnerability of particular water areas allows analyzing spatial-temporal dynamics of this indicator. The most vulnerable areas (regions of the water area could be selected, as well as the most dangerous seasons. Recommendations are elaborated in order to organize the most effective protection of the environment against any possible emergency spills of oil and oil products.

  4. An AHP-derived method for mapping the physical vulnerability of coastal areas at regional scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Le Cozannet

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Assessing coastal vulnerability to climate change at regional scales is now mandatory in France since the adoption of recent laws to support adaptation to climate change. However, there is presently no commonly recognised method to assess accurately how sea level rise will modify coastal processes in the coming decades. Therefore, many assessments of the physical component of coastal vulnerability are presently based on a combined use of data (e.g. digital elevation models, historical shoreline and coastal geomorphology datasets, simple models and expert opinion. In this study, we assess the applicability and usefulness of a multi-criteria decision-mapping method (the analytical hierarchy process, AHP to map physical coastal vulnerability to erosion and flooding in a structured way. We apply the method in two regions of France: the coastal zones of Languedoc-Roussillon (north-western Mediterranean, France and the island of La Réunion (south-western Indian Ocean, notably using the regional geological maps. As expected, the results show not only the greater vulnerability of sand spits, estuaries and low-lying areas near to coastal lagoons in both regions, but also that of a thin strip of erodible cliffs exposed to waves in La Réunion. Despite gaps in knowledge and data, the method is found to provide a flexible and transportable framework to represent and aggregate existing knowledge and to support long-term coastal zone planning through the integration of such studies into existing adaptation schemes.

  5. Mapping Social Vulnerability to Air Pollution: A Case Study of the Yangtze River Delta Region, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Ge

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Many frequent and severe air pollution incidents have emerged across the vast parts of China recently. The identification of factors and mapping social vulnerability has become extremely necessary for environmental management and sustainable development. However, studies associating social vulnerability with air pollution remain sparse. With reference to research achievements of social vulnerability, this study made a new trial regarding social vulnerability assessment to air pollution. With the projection pursuit cluster (PPC model, the top three factors contributing to social vulnerability index (SVI were discovered and SVI and SVI dimensions (susceptibility, exposure, and adaptability were evaluated. Results revealed that adaptability values are higher than susceptibility and exposure values. SVI is in a poor condition as, for the whole region, most values belong to the high-medium level. High SVI values mainly appear in the northern and the southern ends of study area. SVI in Shanghai is lower than in Jiangsu and Zhejiang provinces. On the scale of prefecture-level city, it can be found that the low-value centers of SVI always occurred in urban core areas. The spatial variation and inequality in social vulnerability provide policy-makers a scientific basis for air pollution prevention and sustainable management.

  6. A procedure for mapping vulnerability of sea-coastal zones to oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavykin, A. A.; Matishov, G. G.; Karnatov, A. N.

    2017-08-01

    An algorithm for mapping the vulnerability of sea-coastal zones is described. Normalization of the distribution densities of the biotic groups to the annual average abundance for presenting these data in identical measurement units is offered. Sensitivity of biota to oil should be normalized to the maximum permissible concentrations for the species inhabiting the water column and to the maximum permissible thickness of the film that has contacted with the water surface. All parameters should be estimated by the metric scale. The proposed algorithm makes it possible to calculate the vulnerability of a sea-coastal zone to oil pollution caused by oil spills.

  7. Dynamic Assessment on Ecosystem Vulnerability in Dashanbao Wetland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    [Objective] The aim was to assess the ecosystem vulnerability of Dashanbao wetland.[Method] The evaluation index system of ecosystem vulnerability of Dashanbao wetland was constructed by using analytic hierarchy process(AHP),and the ecosystem vulnerability of Dashanbao wetland from 2002 to 2008 was assessed based on vulnerable degree of ecosystem.[Result] The vulnerable degree of ecosystem of Dashanbao wetland from 2002 to 2008 was 0.560 0,0.513 7,0.516 4,0.465 4,0.476 0,0.449 2 and 0.400 6 respectively,tha...

  8. Operational Characterization of Divisibility of Dynamical Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Joonwoo; Chruściński, Dariusz

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we show the operational characterization to the divisibility of dynamical maps in terms of the distinguishability of quantum channels. It is proven that the distinguishability of any pair of quantum channels does not increase under divisible maps, in which the full hierarchy of divisibility is isomorphic to the structure of entanglement between system and environment. This shows that (i) channel distinguishability is the operational quantity signifying (detecting) divisibility (indivisibility) of dynamical maps and (ii) the decision problem for the divisibility of maps is as hard as the separability problem in entanglement theory. We also provide the information-theoretic characterization to the divisibility of maps with conditional min-entropy.

  9. Generating natural hazard risk maps for Styria to highlight differences in the social vulnerability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heß, Vincent

    2016-04-01

    Costs of natural hazards are commonly classified as either damage costs or risk mitigation costs. These categories are not independent, as risk mitigation aims at reducing damage costs. However, the factors that influence the risk of damage costs are still not completely understood. Commonly, the risk is defined as a function of hazard, exposure and vulnerability and we want to produce risk maps that combine existing information about these factors under a common framework. Because of good data availability, the risk maps will be produced for Styria, Austria, where detailed hazard and land-use maps are available on a municipality level and the costs can be verified with private damage data from the Austrian disaster fond. A key issue is the generation of a social vulnerability map by the use of demographic and socio-economic data. We use a statistical model to analyze how much of the variance in the damage data are explainable by considering social characteristics across municipalities. The combination of the aforementioned maps results in a risk map, which can not only display areas of high risks, but also the underlying reasons. Knowledge about risk increasing factors consequently allow for better suited risk mitigation measures. Especially soft measures need to be clearly targeted towards local needs to increase the resilience and adaptive capacity of municipalities.

  10. Application of indicators derived by remote sensing for mapping of landslide hazard and vulnerability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eidsvig, Unni; Vidar Vangelsten, Bjørn; Geiss, Christian; Klotz, Martin; Ekseth, Kristine; Taubenböck, Hannes

    2014-05-01

    The choice and the development of methods for risk assessment of landslides depends on several factors. Important factors are the type of landslide and the elements at risk, the choice of spatial and temporal scale, the purpose of the analysis and the needs of the end-users. In addition, data availability is a major constraint, which greatly affects the type of methods and models that can be developed. Remote sensing is a promising tool for an economical and up-to-date data collection, which also could be applied to monitor the dynamic development of risk. The spatial and temporal distribution of the risk for landslides can be assessed by monitoring hazard indicators (e.g. slope height and slope angle), exposure indicators (e.g. number of houses and the total population) and vulnerability indicators (e.g. population density, settlement structures or indicators related to structural vulnerability). Several of the indicators applicable for landslide risk and vulnerability can be obtained by remote sensing techniques. However, for better results, indicators from remote sensing should be combined with other type of data. In this work, a review on the application of indicators for landslide risk assessment in explicit models as well as an assessment of end user needs was conducted in order to determine the most relevant indicators for landslide hazard and vulnerability. Lists of recommended indicators, mainly derivable from remote sensing, have been developed. These indicators are supposed to be used in risk assessment, e.g. by combining hazard, vulnerability and exposure indicators to produce risk indices. Moreover schemes for ranking, weighting and aggregation of the indicators into hazard- and vulnerability indices are provided. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme [FP7-SPACE-2012-1] under Grant agreement No 312972 Framework to integrate Space-based and in-situ sENSing for dynamic vUlnerability

  11. Delineating Groundwater Vulnerability and Protection Zone Mapping in Fractured Rock Masses: Focus on the DISCO Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Meerkhan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Hard-rock catchments are considered to be source of valuable water resources for water supply to inhabitants and ecosystems. The present work aims to develop a groundwater vulnerability approach in the Caldas da Cavaca hydromineral system (Aguiar da Beira, Central Portugal in order to improve the hydrogeological conceptual site model. Different types of information were overlaid, generating several thematic maps to achieve an integrated framework of key sectors in the study site. Thus, a multi-technical approach was used, encompassing field and laboratory techniques, whereby different types of data were collected from fields such as geology, hydrogeology, applied geomorphology and geophysics and hydrogeomechanics, with the fundamental aim of applying the so-called DISCO index method. All of these techniques were successfully performed and an intrinsic groundwater vulnerability to contamination assessment, based on the multicriteria methodology of GOD-S, DRASTIC-Fm, SINTACS, SI and DISCO indexes, was delineated. Geographic Information Systems (GIS provided the basis on which to organize and integrate the databases and to produce all the thematic maps. This multi-technical approach highlights the importance of groundwater vulnerability to contamination mapping as a tool to support hydrogeological conceptualization, contributing to improving the decision-making process regarding water resources management and sustainability.

  12. Robustness and Vulnerability of Networks with Dynamical Dependency Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Ya-Nan; Huang, Ning; Wang, Lei; Wu, Zhi-Xi

    2016-11-01

    The dependency property and self-recovery of failure nodes both have great effects on the robustness of networks during the cascading process. Existing investigations focused mainly on the failure mechanism of static dependency groups without considering the time-dependency of interdependent nodes and the recovery mechanism in reality. In this study, we present an evolving network model consisting of failure mechanisms and a recovery mechanism to explore network robustness, where the dependency relations among nodes vary over time. Based on generating function techniques, we provide an analytical framework for random networks with arbitrary degree distribution. In particular, we theoretically find that an abrupt percolation transition exists corresponding to the dynamical dependency groups for a wide range of topologies after initial random removal. Moreover, when the abrupt transition point is above the failure threshold of dependency groups, the evolving network with the larger dependency groups is more vulnerable; when below it, the larger dependency groups make the network more robust. Numerical simulations employing the Erdős-Rényi network and Barabási-Albert scale free network are performed to validate our theoretical results.

  13. Automating Flood Hazard Mapping Methods for Near Real-time Storm Surge Inundation and Vulnerability Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigel, A. M.; Griffin, R.; Gallagher, D.

    2015-12-01

    Storm surge has enough destructive power to damage buildings and infrastructure, erode beaches, and threaten human life across large geographic areas, hence posing the greatest threat of all the hurricane hazards. The United States Gulf of Mexico has proven vulnerable to hurricanes as it has been hit by some of the most destructive hurricanes on record. With projected rises in sea level and increases in hurricane activity, there is a need to better understand the associated risks for disaster mitigation, preparedness, and response. GIS has become a critical tool in enhancing disaster planning, risk assessment, and emergency response by communicating spatial information through a multi-layer approach. However, there is a need for a near real-time method of identifying areas with a high risk of being impacted by storm surge. Research was conducted alongside Baron, a private industry weather enterprise, to facilitate automated modeling and visualization of storm surge inundation and vulnerability on a near real-time basis. This research successfully automated current flood hazard mapping techniques using a GIS framework written in a Python programming environment, and displayed resulting data through an Application Program Interface (API). Data used for this methodology included high resolution topography, NOAA Probabilistic Surge model outputs parsed from Rich Site Summary (RSS) feeds, and the NOAA Census tract level Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI). The development process required extensive data processing and management to provide high resolution visualizations of potential flooding and population vulnerability in a timely manner. The accuracy of the developed methodology was assessed using Hurricane Isaac as a case study, which through a USGS and NOAA partnership, contained ample data for statistical analysis. This research successfully created a fully automated, near real-time method for mapping high resolution storm surge inundation and vulnerability for the

  14. SOME DYNAMICAL PROPERTIES OF QUADRATIC RATIONAL MAPS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YINYONGCHENG

    1994-01-01

    This paper studies the dynamics of the analytic family z+1/z+b and describes the topology of the parameter space, structural stability and J-stability. The mapping class group of almost all maps of the above family is determined.

  15. Elemental mapping inventory of the fish Liza aurata brain: a biomarker of metal pollution vulnerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godinho, Rita M; Pereira, Patricia; Raimundo, Joana; Pacheco, Mário; Pinheiro, Teresa

    2015-02-01

    The elemental distributions in optic tectum of brains of wild Liza aurata a teleost fish captured in polluted and reference coastal areas were assessed quantitatively by nuclear microscopy providing insights into brain vulnerability to metal pollution. Elemental maps enabled us to visualize optic tectum layers and identify cellular arrangements. Whereas Cl, K and Ca contents identify meninges, the Ca, Fe and Zn concentrations distinguish the underneath grey matter, white matter and inner cellular layers. Exposed animals showed significantly decreased P concentrations and increased contents of Cu, Zn and Ni in all brain structures. These changes highlight homeostasis modification, altered permeability of the blood-brain barrier and suggest risk for neurological toxicity. Our study initiated for the first time an inventory of physiological measures containing images and elemental compositions of brain regions of fish exposed to different environmental conditions. This will help defining total and local brain vulnerability to metals and pollution levels.

  16. Application of Geographically Weighted Regression for Vulnerable Area Mapping of Leptospirosis in Bantul District

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prima Widayani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Geographically Weighted Regression (GWR is regression model that developed for data modeling with continuous respond variable and considering the spatial or location aspect. Leptospirosis case happened in some regions in Indonesia, including in Bantul District, Special Region of Yogyakarta. The purpose of this study are to determine local and global variable in making vulnerable area model of Leptospirosis disease, determine the best type of weighting function and make vulnerable area map of Leptospirosis. Alos satelite imagery as primary data to get settlement and paddy fields area. The others variable are the percentage of population’s age, flood risk, and the number of health facility that obtained from secondary data. Determinant variables that affect locally are flood risk, health facility, percentage of age 25-50 years old and the percentage of settlement area. Meanwhile, independent variable that affects globally is the percentage of paddy fields area. Vulnerability map of Leptospirosis disease resulted from the best GWR model which used weighting function Fixed Bisquare. There are 3 vulnerable area of Leptospirosis disease, high vulnerability area located in the middle of Bantul District, meanwhile the medium and low vulnerability area showed clustered pattern in the side of Bantul District.   Abstrak Geographically Weighted Regression (GWR adalah model regresi yang dikembangkan untuk memodelkan data dengan variabel respon yang bersifat kontinu dan mempertimbangkan aspek spasial atau lokasi.  Kejadian Leptospirosis terjadi di beberapa wilayah di Indonesia termasuk di wilayah Kabupaten Bantul Daerah Istimewa Yogyakarta. Tujuan dari penelitian ini adalah menentukan variabel lokal dan global dalam membuat model  kerentanan Leptospirosis dan menentukan jenis fungsi pembobot yang terbaik serta membuat peta kerentanan wilayah Leptospirosis menggunakan aplikasi GWR. Citra Satelit Alos digunakan untuk mendapatkan data penggunaan

  17. Water resource management under deep uncertainty: The concept and application of vulnerability maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazemi, A.; Wheater, H. S.

    2013-12-01

    Assessments of potential impacts of climate change on water resources are generally based on the use of downscaled climate scenarios to force hydrological models and hence estimate the changes in natural water availability in comparison to baseline conditions. This framework, however, suffers from various sources of uncertainty. First, climate models have large uncertainty associated with key climate variables such as precipitation. Second, downscaling approaches are based on several assumptions, which degrade their prediction capability for future conditions. Third, hydrological models are associated with a set of limitations due to lack of process understanding and data support as well as structural and parametric identifiability. As a result, given a particular water resource system and a certain scenario of climate change, different combinations of climate/downscaling/hydrological models may result in very different estimates of future water availability. Moreover, using the 'cascade of models approach', limited insights into the water resource system response to potential hydrological changes in the flow regime are obtained. We argue that there is merit in an alternative approach in which the vulnerability in water resource system response to a feasible range of future inflows is evaluated. We develop a stochastic reconstruction framework that generates a large ensemble of perturbed flow series at the local scale to represent a range of potential flow responses to climate change. This approach is generic and can provide insight into critical thresholds beyond which changes in the natural streamflow regime can initiate stress in the system. It can also provide the basis for assessment of specific realizations of future scenarios, which can be located on a vulnerability map. The methodology is applied to the existing water resource system of the South Saskatchewan river in southern Alberta, Canada, to explore the system's vulnerability to potential changes in

  18. Spatial analysis and modeling to assess and map current vulnerability to extreme weather events in the Grijalva - Usumacinta watershed, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez L, D, E-mail: dlopez@centrogeo.org.m [Centro de Investigacion en GeografIa y Geomatica, Ing. Jorge L. Tamayo A.C., Contoy 137, col. Lomas de Padierna, del Tlalpan, Maxico D.F (Mexico)

    2009-11-01

    One of the major concerns over a potential change in climate is that it will cause an increase in extreme weather events. In Mexico, the exposure factors as well as the vulnerability to the extreme weather events have increased during the last three or four decades. In this study spatial analysis and modeling were used to assess and map settlement and crop systems vulnerability to extreme weather events in the Grijalva - Usumacinta watershed. Sensitivity and coping adaptive capacity maps were constructed using decision models; these maps were then combined to produce vulnerability maps. The most vulnerable area in terms of both settlement and crop systems is the highlands, where the sensitivity is high and the adaptive capacity is low. In lowlands, despite the very high sensitivity, the higher adaptive capacity produces only moderate vulnerability. I conclude that spatial analysis and modeling are powerful tools to assess and map vulnerability. These preliminary results can guide the formulation of adaptation policies to an increasing risk of extreme weather events.

  19. Chance of Vulnerability Reduction in Application-Specific NoC through Distance Aware Mapping Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janidarmian, Majid; Fekr, Atena Roshan; Bokharaei, Vahhab Samadi

    2011-08-01

    Mapping algorithm which means which core should be linked to which router is one of the key issues in the design flow of network-on-chip. To achieve an application-specific NoC design procedure that minimizes the communication cost and improves the fault tolerant property, first a heuristic mapping algorithm that produces a set of different mappings in a reasonable time is presented. This algorithm allows the designers to identify the set of most promising solutions in a large design space, which has low communication costs while yielding optimum communication costs in some cases. Another evaluated parameter, vulnerability index, is then considered as a principle of estimating the fault-tolerance property in all produced mappings. Finally, in order to yield a mapping which considers trade-offs between these two parameters, a linear function is defined and introduced. It is also observed that more flexibility to prioritize solutions within the design space is possible by adjusting a set of if-then rules in fuzzy logic.

  20. Vulnerability mapping of groundwater contamination based on 3D lithostratigraphical models of porous aquifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducci, Daniela; Sellerino, Mariangela

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to apply a methodology in order to reconstruct a lithostratigraphic 3D model of an aquifer so as to define some parameters involved in the evaluation of the aquifer vulnerability to contamination of porous aquifers. The DRASTIC, SINTACS and AVI methods have been applied to an alluvial coastal aquifer of southern Italy. The stratigraphic reconstruction has been obtained by interpolating stratigraphic data from more than one borehole per 2 km. The lithostratigraphic reconstruction of a 3D model has been applied and used for three-dimensional or two-dimensional representations. In the first two methods, the layers of the vadose zone and the aquifer media have been evaluated not only by the interpolation of the single boreholes and piezometers, but also by the 3D model, assigning the scores of the parameters of each layer of the 3D model. The comparison between the maps constructed from the weighted values in each borehole and the maps deriving from the attribution of the values of each layer of the 3D model, highlights that the second representation avoids or minimizes the "bullseye" effect linked to the presence of boreholes with higher or lower values. The study has demonstrated that it is possible to integrate a 3D lithostratigraphic model of an aquifer in the assessment of the parameters involved in the evaluation of the aquifer vulnerability to contamination by Point Count System methods.

  1. Geomatics Based Landslide Vulnerability Zonation Mapping - Parts Of Nilgiri District, Tamil Nadu, India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Subramani

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Landslide includes a wide range of ground movements, such as rock falls, deep failure of slope, and shallow debris flows. Although gravity acting on an over steepened slope is the primary reason for a landslide. The Nilgiri Hills (Mountains of Tamil Nadu, India are prone to landslides, which often result in considerable damage to private property, public infrastructure, and loss of life. The mapping of LVZ includes, the preparation of various thematic layers from different data sources, such as Survey of India topographic sheets, Satellite data, Geological Survey of India maps etc. These landslides are typically the result of the structural failure of thick laterite soils that have been saturated by heavy rains during the monsoon season. . GIS have proved to be useful tools for analyzing and managing landslide related data. GIS has been widely used in quantitative estimation landslide susceptibility. The methodology adopted for the identification of landslide vulnerable zones, and suggestion of remedial measures based on the vulnerability of landslides on different terrain parameters per unit area. Through this study, it is evinced again that the geomatics technology is a proven tool for landslide studies in order to properly understand, identify and suggest remedial measures.

  2. Vulnerable Households and Hazards: Can GIS Mapping Help Avoid Post-Disaster Chaos?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, R.

    2006-12-01

    In the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, most Americans were horrified as every level of government failed the affected populations along the gulf coast. Especially troubling were governments' failures to come to the aid of the most vulnerable households: the elderly, disabled, and the poor. Every region of the country faces its own particular natural disasters: floods, tornados, hurricanes, earthquakes, killer heat waves, and so on. Post-Katrina, every region of the country is thinking anew about how best to aid its citizens when the unthinkable happens, particularly those citizens who, in the best of times, have trouble fending for themselves. In California, the Welfare Policy Research Project (WPRP), a state legislatively mandated project that studies California's low-income populations, has proposed that GIS mapping be used to help emergency planners and first responders address the needs of vulnerable households when disaster strikes. As a start, WPRP proposes that state and/or county welfare agencies map the residences of their most vulnerable caseloads together with authoritative hazard scenarios and other pertinent information. In theory, such information can be regularly updated and shared with first responders in the immediate aftermath of a disaster. Just as important, this technology should enable emergency planners to better factor in the special needs of such households during the longer-term period of recovery. WPRP staff are currently working with both county and state officials to pilot test this technology. In this presentation, WPRP's director, Dr. Rikki Baum, will briefly describe WPRP's proposal, the policy implications, the privacy issues, and the reactions of California officials to date.

  3. A systematic review of dynamics in climate risk and vulnerability assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurgilevich, Alexandra; Räsänen, Aleksi; Groundstroem, Fanny; Juhola, Sirkku

    2017-01-01

    Understanding climate risk is crucial for effective adaptation action, and a number of assessment methodologies have emerged. We argue that the dynamics of the individual components in climate risk and vulnerability assessments has received little attention. In order to highlight this, we systematically reviewed 42 sub-national climate risk and vulnerability assessments. We analysed the assessments using an analytical framework with which we evaluated (1) the conceptual approaches to vulnerability and exposure used, (2) if current or future risks were assessed, and (3) if and how changes over time (i.e. dynamics) were considered. Of the reviewed assessments, over half addressed future risks or vulnerability; and of these future-oriented studies, less than 1/3 considered both vulnerability and exposure dynamics. While the number of studies that include dynamics is growing, and while all studies included socio-economic aspects, often only biophysical dynamics was taken into account. We discuss the challenges of assessing socio-economic and spatial dynamics, particularly the poor availability of data and methods. We suggest that future-oriented studies assessing risk dynamics would benefit from larger stakeholder involvement, discussion of the assessment purpose, the use of multiple methods, inclusion of uncertainty/sensitivity analyses and pathway approaches.

  4. Dynamic brain mapping methodology and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itil, T M; Mucci, A; Eralp, E

    1991-01-01

    Brain mapping has opened important perspectives for the neurophysiological evaluation of patients, for the discrimination of drug effects on the brain and for the study of the relationship between the brain and behavior. Our Dynamic Brain Mapping System is the result of many years of EEG quantification. It was designed as a software-oriented system to favor the largest clinical application and simultaneously stimulate new research objectives. Data collection and analysis procedures are critically important in brain mapping for a good understanding of the results. For clinical use, the maps should answer relevant EEG questions and be interpretable with the consolidated knowledge. Therefore, we have developed a new type of brain mapping technology which is called "Field blending interpolation" mapping offered together with the conventional technology with user-selectable interpolation algorithms. In addition to diagnosis, the use of computer-analyzed EEG and brain mapping can be instrumental in drug monitoring, drug selection and drug discriminations. Prospective studies are, however, required to validate the use of brain mapping in each of these new areas. Spatial analysis is the original goal of brain mapping. The development of a new data collection procedure and analysis will be instrumental in the determination of an adequate time and space resolution.

  5. Network topology, Transport dynamics, and Vulnerability Analysis in River Deltas: A Graph-Theoretic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejedor, A.; Foufoula-Georgiou, E.; Longjas, A.; Zaliapin, I. V.

    2014-12-01

    River deltas are intricate landscapes with complex channel networks that self-organize to deliver water, sediment, and nutrients from the apex to the delta top and eventually to the coastal zone. The natural balance of material and energy fluxes which maintains a stable hydrologic, geomorphologic, and ecological state of a river delta, is often disrupted by external factors causing topological and dynamical changes in the delta structure and function. A formal quantitative framework for studying river delta topology and transport dynamics and their response to change is lacking. Here we present such a framework based on spectral graph theory and demonstrate its value in quantifying the complexity of the delta network topology, computing its steady state fluxes, and identifying upstream (contributing) and downstream (nourishment) areas from any point in the network. We use this framework to construct vulnerability maps that quantify the relative change of sediment and water delivery to the shoreline outlets in response to possible perturbations in hundreds of upstream links. This enables us to evaluate which links (hotspots) and what management scenarios would most influence flux delivery to the outlets, paving the way of systematically examining how local or spatially distributed delta interventions can be studied within a systems approach for delta sustainability.

  6. A coupled groundwater-flow-modelling and vulnerability-mapping methodology for karstic terrain management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavouri, Konstantina P.; Karatzas, George P.; Plagnes, Valérie

    2017-02-01

    A coupled groundwater-flow-modelling and vulnerability-mapping methodology for the management of karst aquifers with spatial variability is developed. The methodology takes into consideration the duality of flow and recharge in karst and introduces a simple method to integrate the effect of temporal storage in the unsaturated zone. In order to investigate the applicability of the developed methodology, simulation results are validated against available field measurement data. The criteria maps from the PaPRIKa vulnerability-mapping method are used to document the groundwater flow model. The FEFLOW model is employed for the simulation of the saturated zone of Palaikastro-Chochlakies karst aquifer, in the island of Crete, Greece, for the hydrological years 2010-2012. The simulated water table reproduces typical karst characteristics, such as steep slopes and preferred drain axes, and is in good agreement with field observations. Selected calculated error indicators—Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE), root mean squared error (RMSE) and model efficiency (E')—are within acceptable value ranges. Results indicate that different storage processes take place in different parts of the aquifer. The north-central part seems to be more sensitive to diffuse recharge, while the southern part is affected primarily by precipitation events. Sensitivity analysis is performed on the parameters of hydraulic conductivity and specific yield. The methodology is used to estimate the feasibility of artificial aquifer recharge (AAR) at the study area. Based on the developed methodology, guidelines were provided for the selection of the appropriate AAR scenario that has positive impact on the water table.

  7. A coupled groundwater-flow-modelling and vulnerability-mapping methodology for karstic terrain management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavouri, Konstantina P.; Karatzas, George P.; Plagnes, Valérie

    2017-08-01

    A coupled groundwater-flow-modelling and vulnerability-mapping methodology for the management of karst aquifers with spatial variability is developed. The methodology takes into consideration the duality of flow and recharge in karst and introduces a simple method to integrate the effect of temporal storage in the unsaturated zone. In order to investigate the applicability of the developed methodology, simulation results are validated against available field measurement data. The criteria maps from the PaPRIKa vulnerability-mapping method are used to document the groundwater flow model. The FEFLOW model is employed for the simulation of the saturated zone of Palaikastro-Chochlakies karst aquifer, in the island of Crete, Greece, for the hydrological years 2010-2012. The simulated water table reproduces typical karst characteristics, such as steep slopes and preferred drain axes, and is in good agreement with field observations. Selected calculated error indicators—Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE), root mean squared error (RMSE) and model efficiency (E')—are within acceptable value ranges. Results indicate that different storage processes take place in different parts of the aquifer. The north-central part seems to be more sensitive to diffuse recharge, while the southern part is affected primarily by precipitation events. Sensitivity analysis is performed on the parameters of hydraulic conductivity and specific yield. The methodology is used to estimate the feasibility of artificial aquifer recharge (AAR) at the study area. Based on the developed methodology, guidelines were provided for the selection of the appropriate AAR scenario that has positive impact on the water table.

  8. Integrating population dynamics into mapping human exposure to seismic hazard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Freire

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Disaster risk is not fully characterized without taking into account vulnerability and population exposure. Assessment of earthquake risk in urban areas would benefit from considering the variation of population distribution at more detailed spatial and temporal scales, and from a more explicit integration of this improved demographic data with existing seismic hazard maps. In the present work, "intelligent" dasymetric mapping is used to model population dynamics at high spatial resolution in order to benefit the analysis of spatio-temporal exposure to earthquake hazard in a metropolitan area. These night- and daytime-specific population densities are then classified and combined with seismic intensity levels to derive new spatially-explicit four-class-composite maps of human exposure. The presented approach enables a more thorough assessment of population exposure to earthquake hazard. Results show that there are significantly more people potentially at risk in the daytime period, demonstrating the shifting nature of population exposure in the daily cycle and the need to move beyond conventional residence-based demographic data sources to improve risk analyses. The proposed fine-scale maps of human exposure to seismic intensity are mainly aimed at benefiting visualization and communication of earthquake risk, but can be valuable in all phases of the disaster management process where knowledge of population densities is relevant for decision-making.

  9. Poverty Dynamics and Vulnerability: Empirical Evidence from Smallholders in Northern Highlands of Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Tsehay, Abrham Seyoum; Bauer, Siegfried

    2012-01-01

    This study is primarily intended to examine the dynamics and determinants of rural household poverty and vulnerability in Northern Highlands of Ethiopia. The data for this research is mainly based on the Ethiopian Household Survey (ERHS). Results from disaggregation of the poor indicate that ultra poverty is predominant in the area. Similarly, using a three steps feasible generalized least squares (FGLS) we found that many of the households in the region are vulnerable to poverty. However, th...

  10. Drought Vulnerability Mapping with Geomorphological Approach in Yogyakarta Special Region (DIY) and Central Java

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudaryatno

    2016-11-01

    This study aims to determine the level of vulnerability of the geomorphologic drought that occurred in Central Java and Yogyakarta Special Region. This study examines geomorphologic drought. Parameters used were slope, drainage, Available Water Capacity (AWC), permeability, landform, and land use. Landsat 8 and SRTM data were used for the extraction of physical parameters, such as slope, drainage, landform, and land use. The method used in this study is scoring and weighting. Query results were used for data classification by overlaying drought geomorphologic parameters. The expected outcome of this research is to map the geomorphologic drought vulnerability on Central Java and Yogyakarta Special Region. Drought vulnerability was divided into wet, normal and dry classes. Distribution of the dry class is frequent. Some of the dry classes are distributed on the steep till extremely steep slope region and on the structural and karsts landform. This was related to AWC value where region with high AWC contributed to the poor drainage of the soil, such as at Kulonprogo, Purworejo, Kebumen, Blora, Wonogiri, Purbalingga, Pekalongan, Jepara and Kudus regency. Normal classes are distributed on the sloping till steep slope, have moderate till well-drained soil and low AWC, such as at Gunung Kidul, Pati, Temanggung regency, and Magelang city. Wet classes are distributed on the flat or almost flat and sloping region. Most of the wet classes are distributed on volcanic hills and coastal area. Those regions are well-drained and the land uses are mostly for settlement and farming, such as at Sleman, Yogyakarta city, Klaten, Bantul, and Wonosobo regency.

  11. Mapping vulnerability of multiple aquifers using multiple models and fuzzy logic to objectively derive model structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadiri, Ata Allah; Sedghi, Zahra; Khatibi, Rahman; Gharekhani, Maryam

    2017-09-01

    Driven by contamination risks, mapping Vulnerability Indices (VI) of multiple aquifers (both unconfined and confined) is investigated by integrating the basic DRASTIC framework with multiple models overarched by Artificial Neural Networks (ANN). The DRASTIC framework is a proactive tool to assess VI values using the data from the hydrosphere, lithosphere and anthroposphere. However, a research case arises for the application of multiple models on the ground of poor determination coefficients between the VI values and non-point anthropogenic contaminants. The paper formulates SCFL models, which are derived from the multiple model philosophy of Supervised Committee (SC) machines and Fuzzy Logic (FL) and hence SCFL as their integration. The Fuzzy Logic-based (FL) models include: Sugeno Fuzzy Logic (SFL), Mamdani Fuzzy Logic (MFL), Larsen Fuzzy Logic (LFL) models. The basic DRASTIC framework uses prescribed rating and weighting values based on expert judgment but the four FL-based models (SFL, MFL, LFL and SCFL) derive their values as per internal strategy within these models. The paper reports that FL and multiple models improve considerably on the correlation between the modeled vulnerability indices and observed nitrate-N values and as such it provides evidence that the SCFL multiple models can be an alternative to the basic framework even for multiple aquifers. The study area with multiple aquifers is in Varzeqan plain, East Azerbaijan, northwest Iran. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Knowledge Map: Mathematical Model and Dynamic Behaviors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai Zhuge; Xiang-Feng Luo

    2005-01-01

    Knowledge representation and reasoning is a key issue of the Knowledge Grid. This paper proposes a Knowledge Map (KM) model for representing and reasoning causal knowledge as an overlay in the Knowledge Grid. It extends Fuzzy Cognitive Maps (FCMs) to represent and reason not only simple cause-effect relations, but also time-delay causal relations, conditional probabilistic causal relations and sequential relations. The mathematical model and dynamic behaviors of KM are presented. Experiments show that, under certain conditions, the dynamic behaviors of KM can translate between different states. Knowing this condition, experts can control or modify the constructed KM while its dynamic behaviors do not accord with their expectation. Simulations and applications show that KM is more powerful and natural than FCM in emulating real world.

  13. Dynamical systems generated by linear maps

    CERN Document Server

    Dolićanin, Ćemal B

    2014-01-01

    The book deals with dynamical systems, generated by linear mappings of finite dimensional spaces and their applications. These systems have a relatively simple structure from the point of view of the modern dynamical systems theory. However, for the dynamical systems of this sort, it is possible to obtain explicit answers to specific questions being useful in applications. The considered problems are natural and look rather simple, but in reality in the course of investigation, they confront users with plenty of subtle questions, and their detailed analysis needs a substantial effort. The problems arising are related to linear algebra and dynamical systems theory, and therefore, the book can be considered as a natural amplification, refinement and supplement to linear algebra and dynamical systems theory textbooks.

  14. Urban Flood Vulnerability and Risk Mapping Using Integrated Multi-Parametric AHP and GIS: Methodological Overview and Case Study Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    This study aims at providing expertise for preparing public-based flood mapping and estimating flood risks in growing urban areas. To model and predict the magnitude of flood risk areas, an integrated Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) and Geographic Information System (GIS) analysis techniques are used for the case of Eldoret Municipality in Kenya. The flood risk vulnerability mapping follows a multi-parametric approach and integrates some of the flooding causative factors such as rainfall d...

  15. Mapping global vulnerability index in mining sectors: A case study Moulares-Redayef aquifer system, southwestern Tunisia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khelif, Nadia; Jmal, Ikram; Bouri, Salem

    2016-09-01

    Contrary to the DRASTIC model grouping together the saturated and unsaturated zones to compute a global intrinsic vulnerability index, the global vulnerability index method incorporates both hydrogeological and hydrochemical data for a comprehensive index mapping for the saturated zones. This concept depends on the behavior and the uses of the groundwater. The main aim of this study is to propose a scientific basis for sustainable land use planning and groundwater management of the Moulares-Reayef aquifer, located in Southwestern Tunisia. The overexploitation of this aquifer causes the threat of groundwater quality by various sources of pollution. The global vulnerability index was applied in the Moulares-Reayef aquifer. The results show that the most favorable zones to pollutant percolation are situated along the wadis (Tabaddit, Zallaz, Berka, …) which are drained by continuous discharges. The global vulnerability values were correlated with nitrates values for validation. It revealed a significant correlation showing that high values of nitrates occurred in highly vulnerable zones with a value of 0.69 for the Pearson coefficient. The global vulnerability evaluation shows that the aquifer is characterized by high vertical vulnerability and high susceptibility.

  16. Dynamics of linear maps of idempotent measures

    CERN Document Server

    Rozikov, U A

    2012-01-01

    We describe all linear operators which maps $n-1$-dimensional simplex of idempotent measures to itself. Such operators divided to two classes: the first class contains all $n\\times n$-matrices with non-negative entries which has at least one zero-row; the second class contains all $n\\times n$-matrices with non-negative entries which in each row and in each column has exactly one non-zero entry. These matrices play a role of the stochastic matrices in case of idempotent matrices. For both classes of linear maps we find fixed points. We also study the dynamical systems generated by the linear maps of the set of idempotent measures.

  17. Application of the GEM Inventory Data Capture Tools for Dynamic Vulnerability Assessment and Recovery Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrucci, Enrica; Bevington, John; Vicini, Alessandro

    2014-05-01

    A set of open-source tools to create building exposure datasets for seismic risk assessment was developed from 2010-13 by the Inventory Data Capture Tools (IDCT) Risk Global Component of the Global Earthquake Model (GEM). The tools were designed to integrate data derived from remotely-sensed imagery, statistically-sampled in-situ field data of buildings to generate per-building and regional exposure data. A number of software tools were created to aid the development of these data, including mobile data capture tools for in-field structural assessment, and the Spatial Inventory Data Developer (SIDD) for creating "mapping schemes" - statistically-inferred distributions of building stock applied to areas of homogeneous urban land use. These tools were made publically available in January 2014. Exemplar implementations in Europe and Central Asia during the IDCT project highlighted several potential application areas beyond the original scope of the project. These are investigated here. We describe and demonstrate how the GEM-IDCT suite can be used extensively within the framework proposed by the EC-FP7 project SENSUM (Framework to integrate Space-based and in-situ sENSing for dynamic vUlnerability and recovery Monitoring). Specifically, applications in the areas of 1) dynamic vulnerability assessment (pre-event), and 2) recovery monitoring and evaluation (post-event) are discussed. Strategies for using the IDC Tools for these purposes are discussed. The results demonstrate the benefits of using advanced technology tools for data capture, especially in a systematic fashion using the taxonomic standards set by GEM. Originally designed for seismic risk assessment, it is clear the IDCT tools have relevance for multi-hazard risk assessment. When combined with a suitable sampling framework and applied to multi-temporal recovery monitoring, data generated from the tools can reveal spatio-temporal patterns in the quality of recovery activities and resilience trends can be

  18. Dynamical maps, quantum detailed balance, and the Petz recovery map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhambra, Álvaro M.; Woods, Mischa P.

    2017-08-01

    Markovian master equations (formally known as quantum dynamical semigroups) can be used to describe the evolution of a quantum state ρ when in contact with a memoryless thermal bath. This approach has had much success in describing the dynamics of real-life open quantum systems in the laboratory. Such dynamics increase the entropy of the state ρ and the bath until both systems reach thermal equilibrium, at which point entropy production stops. Our main result is to show that the entropy production at time t is bounded by the relative entropy between the original state and the state at time 2 t . The bound puts strong constraints on how quickly a state can thermalize, and we prove that the factor of 2 is tight. The proof makes use of a key physically relevant property of these dynamical semigroups, detailed balance, showing that this property is intimately connected with the field of recovery maps from quantum information theory. We envisage that the connections made here between the two fields will have further applications. We also use this connection to show that a similar relation can be derived when the fixed point is not thermal.

  19. Symplectic map description of Halley's comet dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Haag, P; Lages, J

    2014-01-01

    The main features of 1P/Halley chaotic dynamics can be described by a two dimensional symplectic map. Using Mel'nikov integral we semi-analytically determine such a map for 1P/Halley taking into account gravitational interactions from the Sun and the eight planets. We determine the Solar system kick function ie the energy transfer to 1P/Halley along one passage through the Solar system. Our procedure allows to compute for each planet its contribution to the Solar system kick function which appears to be the sum of the Keplerian potential of the planet and of a rotating circular gravitational dipole potential due to the Sun movement around Solar system barycenter. We test the robustness of the symplectic Halley map by directly integrating Newton's equations over $\\sim 2.4\\cdot 10^4$ yr around Y2K and by reconstructing the Solar system kick function. Our results show that the Halley map with fixed parameters gives a reliable description of comet dynamics on time scales of $10^4$ yr while on a larger scales the ...

  20. The vulnerability of rules in complex work environments: dynamism and uncertainty pose problems for cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clewley, Richard; Stupple, Edward J N

    2015-01-01

    Many complex work environments rely heavily on cognitive operators using rules. Operators sometimes fail to implement rules, with catastrophic human, social and economic costs. Rule-based error is widely reported, yet the mechanisms of rule vulnerability have received less attention. This paper examines rule vulnerability in the complex setting of airline transport operations. We examined 'the stable approach criteria rule', which acts as a system defence during the approach to land. The study experimentally tested whether system state complexity influenced rule failure. The results showed increased uncertainty and dynamism led to increased likelihood of rule failure. There was also an interaction effect, indicating complexity from different sources can combine to further constrain rule-based response. We discuss the results in relation to recent aircraft accidents and suggest that 'rule-based error' could be progressed to embrace rule vulnerability, fragility and failure. This better reflects the influence that system behaviour and cognitive variety have on rule-based response. Practitioner Summary: In this study, we examined mechanisms of rule vulnerability in the complex setting of airline transport operations. The results suggest work scenarios featuring high uncertainty and dynamism constrain rule-based response, leading to rules becoming vulnerable, fragile or failing completely. This has significant implications for rule-intensive, safety critical work environments.

  1. Climate change impacts on lake thermal dynamics and ecosystem vulnerabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, G. B; Forrest, A. L; Schladow, S. G ;; Reuter, J. E; Coats, R.; Dettinger, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Using water column temperature records collected since 1968, we analyzed the impacts of climate change on thermal properties, stability intensity, length of stratification, and deep mixing dynamics of Lake Tahoe using a modified stability index (SI). This new SI is easier to produce and is a more informative measure of deep lake stability than commonly used stability indices. The annual average SI increased at 16.62 kg/m2/decade although the summer (May–October) average SI increased at a higher rate (25.42 kg/m2/decade) during the period 1968–2014. This resulted in the lengthening of the stratification season by approximately 24 d. We simulated the lake thermal structure over a future 100 yr period using a lake hydrodynamic model driven by statistically downscaled outputs of the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Model (GFDL) for two different green house gas emission scenarios (the A2 in which greenhouse-gas emissions increase rapidly throughout the 21st Century, and the B1 in which emissions slow and then level off by the late 21st Century). The results suggest a continuation and intensification of the already observed trends. The length of stratification duration and the annual average lake stability are projected to increase by 38 d and 12 d and 30.25 kg/m2/decade and 8.66 kg/m2/decade, respectively for GFDLA2 and GFDLB1, respectively during 2014–2098. The consequences of this change bear the hallmarks of climate change induced lake warming and possible exacerbation of existing water quality, quantity and ecosystem changes. The developed methodology could be extended and applied to other lakes as a tool to predict changes in stratification and mixing dynamics.

  2. Urban growth patterns in major Southeast Asian cities: Toward exposure mapping and vulnerability assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandapaka, Pradeep; Kamarajugedda, Shankar A.; Lo, Edmond Y. M.

    2017-04-01

    Southeast Asia (SEA) is undergoing rapid urbanization, with urban population percentage increasing from 32% in 1990 to 48% in 2015. It is projected that by the year 2040, urban regions in SEA account for 60% of its total population. The region is home to 600 million people, with many densely populated cities, including megacities such as Jakarta, Bangkok, and Manila. The region has more than 20,000 islands, and many cities lie on coastal low-lands and floodplains. These geographical characteristics together with the increasing population, infrastructure growth, and changing climate makes the region highly vulnerable to natural hazards. This study assessed urban growth dynamics in major (defined as population exceeding 1 million) SEA cities using remotely sensed night-time lights (NTL) data. A recently proposed brightness gradient approach was applied on 21 years (1992-2012) of NTL annual composites to derive core-urban (CU) and peri-urban (PU) regions within each city. The study also assessed the sensitivity of above extracted urban categories to different NTL thresholds. The temporal trends in CU and PU regions were quantified, and compared with trends in socio-economic indicators. The spatial expansion of CU and PU regions were found to depend on geographical constraints and socio-economic factors. Quantification of urban growth spatial-temporal patterns, as conducted here contributes towards the understanding of exposure and vulnerability of people and infrastructures to natural hazards, as well as the evolving trends for assessment under projected urbanization conditions. This will underpin better risk assessment efforts for present and future planning.

  3. Hazard, Vulnerability and Capacity Mapping for Landslides Risk Analysis using Geographic Information System (GIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, D. A. P.; Innaqa, S.; Safrilah

    2017-06-01

    This research analyzed the levels of disaster risk in the Citeureup sub-District, Bogor Regency, West Java, based on its potential hazard, vulnerability and capacity, using map to represent the results, then Miles and Huberman analytical techniques was used to analyze the qualitative interviews. The analysis conducted in this study is based on the concept of disaster risk by Wisner. The result shows that the Citeureup sub-District has medium-low risk of landslides. Of the 14 villages, three villages have a moderate risk level, namely Hambalang, Tajur, and Tangkil, or 49.58% of the total land area. Eleven villages have a low level of risk, namely Pasir Mukti, Sanja, Tarikolot, Gunung Sari, Puspasari, East Karang Asem, Citeureup, Leuwinutug, Sukahati, West Karang Asem West and Puspanegara, or 48.68% of the total land area, for high-risk areas only around 1.74%, which is part of Hambalang village. The analysis using Geographic Information System (GIS) prove that areas with a high risk potential does not necessarily have a high level of risk. The capacity of the community plays an important role to minimize the risk of a region. Disaster risk reduction strategy is done by creating a safe condition, which intensified the movement of disaster risk reduction.

  4. Computing dynamic classification images from correlation maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hongjing; Liu, Zili

    2006-05-22

    We used Pearson's correlation to compute dynamic classification images of biological motion in a point-light display. Observers discriminated whether a human figure that was embedded in dynamic white Gaussian noise was walking forward or backward. Their responses were correlated with the Gaussian noise fields frame by frame, across trials. The resultant correlation map gave rise to a sequence of dynamic classification images that were clearer than either the standard method of A. J. Ahumada and J. Lovell (1971) or the optimal weighting method of R. F. Murray, P. J. Bennett, and A. B. Sekuler (2002). Further, the correlation coefficients of all the point lights were similar to each other when overlapping pixels between forward and backward walkers were excluded. This pattern is consistent with the hypothesis that the point-light walker is represented in a global manner, as opposed to a fixed subset of point lights being more important than others. We conjecture that the superior performance of the correlation map may reflect inherent nonlinearities in processing biological motion, which are incompatible with the assumptions underlying the previous methods.

  5. Mechanical vulnerability of lower second premolar utilising visco-elastic dynamic stress analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khani, M M; Tafazzoli-Shadpour, M; Aghajani, F; Naderi, P

    2009-10-01

    Stress analysis determines vulnerability of dental tissues to external loads. Stress values depend on loading conditions, mechanical properties and constrains of structural components. The critical stress levels lead to tissue damage. The aim of this study is to analyse dynamic stress distribution of lower second premolar due to physiological cyclic loading, and dependency of pulsatile stress characteristics to visco-elastic property of dental components by finite element modelling. Results show that visco-elastic property markedly influences stress determinants in major anatomical sites including dentin, cementum-enamel and dentin-enamel junctions. Reduction of visco-elastic parameter leads to mechanical vulnerability through elevation of stress pulse amplitude, maximum stress value; and reduction of stress phase shift as a determinant of stress wave propagation. The results may be applied in situations in which visco-elasticity is reduced such as root canal therapy and post and core restoration in which teeth are more vulnerable to fracture.

  6. [Mapping environmental vulnerability from ETM + data in the Yellow River Mouth Area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui-Yan; Yu, Zhen-Wen; Xia, Yan-Ling; Wang, Xiang-Feng; Zhao, Geng-Xing; Jiang, Shu-Qian

    2013-10-01

    The environmental vulnerability retrieval is important to support continuing data. The spatial distribution of regional environmental vulnerability was got through remote sensing retrieval. In view of soil and vegetation, the environmental vulnerability evaluation index system was built, and the environmental vulnerability of sampling points was calculated by the AHP-fuzzy method, then the correlation between the sampling points environmental vulnerability and ETM + spectral reflectance ratio including some kinds of conversion data was analyzed to determine the sensitive spectral parameters. Based on that, models of correlation analysis, traditional regression, BP neural network and support vector regression were taken to explain the quantitative relationship between the spectral reflectance and the environmental vulnerability. With this model, the environmental vulnerability distribution was retrieved in the Yellow River Mouth Area. The results showed that the correlation between the environmental vulnerability and the spring NDVI, the September NDVI and the spring brightness was better than others, so they were selected as the sensitive spectral parameters. The model precision result showed that in addition to the support vector model, the other model reached the significant level. While all the multi-variable regression was better than all one-variable regression, and the model accuracy of BP neural network was the best. This study will serve as a reliable theoretical reference for the large spatial scale environmental vulnerability estimation based on remote sensing data.

  7. Social class variation in risk: a comparative analysis of the dynamics of economic vulnerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, Christopher T; Maître, Bertrand

    2008-12-01

    A joint concern with multidimensionality and dynamics is a defining feature of the pervasive use of the terminology of social exclusion in the European Union. The notion of social exclusion focuses attention on economic vulnerability in the sense of exposure to risk and uncertainty. Sociological concern with these issues has been associated with the thesis that risk and uncertainty have become more pervasive and extend substantially beyond the working class. This paper combines features of recent approaches to statistical modelling of poverty dynamics and multidimensional deprivation in order to develop our understanding of the dynamics of economic vulnerability. An analysis involving nine countries and covering the first five waves of the European Community Household Panel shows that, across nations and time, it is possible to identify an economically vulnerable class. This class is characterized by heightened risk of falling below a critical resource level, exposure to material deprivation and experience of subjective economic stress. Cross-national differentials in persistence of vulnerability are wider than in the case of income poverty and less affected by measurement error. Economic vulnerability profiles vary across welfare regimes in a manner broadly consistent with our expectations. Variation in the impact of social class within and across countries provides no support for the argument that its role in structuring such risk has become much less important. Our findings suggest that it is possible to accept the importance of the emergence of new forms of social risk and acknowledge the significance of efforts to develop welfare states policies involving a shift of opportunities and decision making on to individuals without accepting the 'death of social class' thesis.

  8. Adaptive typography for dynamic mapping environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardon, Didier

    1991-08-01

    When typography moves across a map, it passes over areas of different colors, densities, and textures. In such a dynamic environment, the aspect of typography must be constantly adapted to provide disernibility for every new background. Adaptive typography undergoes two adaptive operations: background control and contrast control. The background control prevents the features of the map (edges, lines, abrupt changes of densities) from destroying the integrity of the letterform. This is achieved by smoothing the features of the map in the area where a text label is displayed. The modified area is limited to the space covered by the characters of the label. Dispositions are taken to insure that the smoothing operation does not introduce any new visual noise. The contrast control assures that there are sufficient lightness differences between the typography and its ever-changing background. For every new situation, background color and foreground color are compared and the foreground color lightness is adjusted according to a chosen contrast value. Criteria and methods of choosing the appropriate contrast value are presented as well as the experiments that led to them.

  9. Genetic k-Means Clustering Approach for Mapping Human Vulnerability to Chemical Hazards in the Industrialized City: A Case Study of Shanghai, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weihua Zeng

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Reducing human vulnerability to chemical hazards in the industrialized city is a matter of great urgency. Vulnerability mapping is an alternative approach for providing vulnerability-reducing interventions in a region. This study presents a method for mapping human vulnerability to chemical hazards by using clustering analysis for effective vulnerability reduction. Taking the city of Shanghai as the study area, we measure human exposure to chemical hazards by using the proximity model with additionally considering the toxicity of hazardous substances, and capture the sensitivity and coping capacity with corresponding indicators. We perform an improved k-means clustering approach on the basis of genetic algorithm by using a 500 m × 500 m geographical grid as basic spatial unit. The sum of squared errors and silhouette coefficient are combined to measure the quality of clustering and to determine the optimal clustering number. Clustering result reveals a set of six typical human vulnerability patterns that show distinct vulnerability dimension combinations. The vulnerability mapping of the study area reflects cluster-specific vulnerability characteristics and their spatial distribution. Finally, we suggest specific points that can provide new insights in rationally allocating the limited funds for the vulnerability reduction of each cluster.

  10. DYNAMIC SPECTRAL MAPPING OF INTERSTELLAR PLASMA LENSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuntsov, Artem V.; Walker, Mark A. [Manly Astrophysics, 3/22 Cliff Street, Manly 2095 (Australia); Koopmans, Leon V. E. [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, University of Groningen, P.O. Box 800, NL-9700 AV Groningen (Netherlands); Bannister, Keith W.; Stevens, Jamie; Johnston, Simon [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping NSW 1710 (Australia); Reynolds, Cormac; Bignall, Hayley E., E-mail: Artem.Tuntsov@manlyastrophysics.org, E-mail: Mark.Walker@manlyastrophysics.org, E-mail: koopmans@astro.rug.nl [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research—Curtin University, Perth (Australia)

    2016-02-01

    Compact radio sources sometimes exhibit intervals of large, rapid changes in their flux density, due to lensing by interstellar plasma crossing the line of sight. A novel survey program has made it possible to discover these “Extreme Scattering Events” (ESEs) in real time, resulting in a high-quality dynamic spectrum of an ESE observed in PKS 1939–315. Here we present a method for determining the column-density profile of a plasma lens, given only the dynamic radio spectrum of the lensed source, under the assumption that the lens is either axisymmetric or totally anisotropic. Our technique relies on the known, strong frequency dependence of the plasma refractive index in order to determine how points in the dynamic spectrum map to positions on the lens. We apply our method to high-frequency (4.2–10.8 GHz) data from the Australia Telescope Compact Array of the PKS 1939–315 ESE. The derived electron column-density profiles are very similar for the two geometries we consider, and both yield a good visual match to the data. However, the fit residuals are substantially above the noise level, and deficiencies are evident when we compare the predictions of our model to lower-frequency (1.6–3.1 GHz) data on the same ESE, thus motivating future development of more sophisticated inversion techniques.

  11. Dynamic spectral mapping of interstellar plasma lenses

    CERN Document Server

    Tuntsov, Artem V; Koopmans, Leon V E; Bannister, Keith W; Stevens, Jamie; Johnston, Simon; Reynolds, Cormac; Bignall, Hayley E

    2015-01-01

    Compact radio sources sometimes exhibit intervals of large, rapid changes in their flux-density, due to lensing by interstellar plasma crossing the line-of-sight. A novel survey program has made it possible to discover these "Extreme Scattering Events" (ESEs) in real time, resulting in a high-quality dynamic spectrum of an ESE observed in PKS 1939-315. Here we present a method for determining the column-density profile of a plasma lens, given only the dynamic radio spectrum of the lensed source, under the assumption that the lens is either axisymmetric or totally anisotropic. Our technique relies on the known, strong frequency dependence of the plasma refractive index in order to determine how points in the dynamic spectrum map to positions on the lens. We apply our method to high-frequency (4.2-10.8 GHz) data from the Australia Telescope Compact Array of the PKS 1939-315 ESE. The derived electron column-density profiles are very similar for the two geometries we consider, and both yield a good visual match t...

  12. EVALUASI PEMBAGIAN RASKIN DI KABUPATEN BANTUL TAHUN 2007 DENGAN PENDEKATAN VULNERABILITY ANALYSIS AND MAPPING (VAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Karsinah

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The goal of raskin program is to give the protection to the poor and vulnerability families by given the subsidized rice although they meet the nutrition need and reduce the poor families expenditure. Targeting the poor families eligible often not efficient. Bad targeting give the impact to the raskin program, some of program benefit leaked to non needy families. The research attempted to determine the area or region in Bantul the could be categorized into food vulnerability using VAM methods so they would be the targer of raskin program. The data used in the research were secondary data consist of classification and leveling family data in all area in Bantul in the year 2006 and raskin allocation data in Bantul in the year 2007. The finding of this research indicated that 17 areas observed, only 3 areas could be categorized in highest vulnerability, 7 areas categorized in high vulnerability, 2 areas categorized in medium vulnerability, 1 areas categorized in low vulnerability, 4 areas categorized in lowest vulnerability.

  13. Characterization of flow dynamics and vulnerability in a coastal aquifer system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murgulet, Dorina; Tick, Geoffrey R

    2013-01-01

    Traditional aquifer vulnerability techniques primarily rely on spatial property data for a region and are limited by their ability to directly or indirectly assess flow and transport processes occurring from the surface to depth within an aquifer system. The main objective of this study was to investigate groundwater vulnerability in terms of aquifer interconnectivity and flow dynamics. A combination of stable isotopes, groundwater age-dating (radiocarbon), and geomorphic/geogenic spatial analyses was applied to a regional, highly developed coastal aquifer to explain the presence of nitrate at depth. The average δ(13) C value (-17.3 ± 2‰ VPDB, n = 27) is characteristic of groundwater originating from locally infiltrated precipitation through extensively cultivated soils. The average δ(18) O and δD values (-4.0 ± 0.1‰ VSMOW, n = 27; δD: -19.3 ± 1‰ VSMOW, n = 27, respectively) are similar to precipitation water derived from maritime sources feeding the region's surface water and groundwater. Stable and radioactive isotopes reveal significant mixing between shallow and deep aquifers due to high velocities, hydraulic connection, and input of local recharge water to depths. Groundwater overdevelopment enhances deeper and faster modern water downward flux, amplifying aquifer vulnerability. Therefore, aquifer vulnerability is a variable, dependent on the type and degree of stress conditions experienced by a groundwater system as well as the geospatial properties at the near surface.

  14. MAPPING TSUNAMI VULNERABILITY FOR MATARAM CITY IN LOMBOK ISLAND – INDONESIA: A PHYSICAL AND SOCIOECONOMIC ASSESSMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andhi Pratama Putra

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Letak kedekatan lokasi geografis dengan lempeng tektonik Eurasian dan Indo-Australian membawa konsekuensi logis terhadap tingginya resiko kebencanaan, terutama gempa dan tsunami, bagi Indonesia. Kota Mataram yang merupakan ibukota Provinsi Nusa Tenggara Barat merupakan salah satu wilayah yang perlu mendapatkan perhatian khusus terhadap resiko bencana tsunami. Sebagai langkah awal, identifikasi lokasi yang paling rentan terhadap resiko bencana tsunami perlu dilakukan dengan memadukan aspek-aspek fisik, sosial dan ekonomi. Penelitian ini bertujuan mengidentifikasikan lokasi paling rentan terhadap resiko bencana tsunami di Kota Mataram dengan menggunakan analisa sistem informasi geografis (GIS. Penilaian dilakukan dengan mengembangkan Indeks Gabungan (Composite Index berupa Total Vulnerability Index (TVI yang merupakan kombinasi Indeks Kerentanan Fisik/ Physical Vulnerability Index (PVI, Indeks Kerentanan Sosial/ Social Vulnerability Index (SVI dan Indeks Kerentanan Ekonomi/ Economic Vulnerability Index (EVI. Hasil analisis berhasil menemukenali bahwa Kota Tua Ampenan merupakan wilayah di Kota Mataram dengan nilai indeks gabungan tertinggi yang mencerminkan tingkat kerentanan yang paling tinggi.

  15. Mapping cumulative environmental effects, social vulnerability, and health in the San Joaquin Valley, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ganlin; London, Jonathan

    2012-05-01

    To understand the social distribution of environmental hazards, methods to assess cumulative effects and their health implications are needed. We developed a cumulative environmental hazard index integrating environmental data on pollution sites, air quality, and pesticide use; a social vulnerability index to measure residents' resources to prevent or mitigate health effects; and a health index. We found that communities in California's San Joaquin Valley with high social vulnerability face more environmental burdens and have worse health conditions.

  16. Measuring dynamics of household vulnerability in selected coastal megacities to inform transformative adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkmann, J.; Solecki, W. D.

    2016-12-01

    Understanding conditions and dynamics of household vulnerability and risk is key for building community resilience. Two different methodological approaches of vulnerability, risk and resilience assessment for selected global megacities are presented to address this research issue. First, an indicator-based approach was executed to compare susceptibility, coping and adaptive capacities for Lagos, Kolkata, Lagos, London, New York, and Tokyo on a neighborhood by neighborhood scale. Second, a household survey that has been conducted in Kolkata, Lagos, and New York to explore specific features of susceptibility, risk management capacities and transformations within at risk neighborhoods. The results of both methods underscore the dynamics of vulnerability. Lessons learned for disaster risk management and urban planning are derived, particularly in terms of defining priorities for a more inclusive and resilient urban development, and transformative adaptation. The findings also provide opportunity to critically review the potential outcomes of the New Urban Agenda (outcome of UN-Habitat III). The research has been undertaken within a larger international research team in the Belmont funded project Transformation of Urban Coasts.

  17. The construction of synthetic maps of groundwater vulnerability on the example of catchment area of Žilůvky stream

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristýna Kubová

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The term “vulnerability of groundwater to contamination” was introduced by French hydrogeologist J. Margat in the late 1960s. The idea of describing the degree of vulnerability of groundwater to contaminants as a function of hydrogeological conditions by means of maps was conceived to show that the protection provided by the natural environment varies at different locations. Groundwater vulnerability maps belong to category of special-purpose environmental maps and introduce one of the possible tool to solve groundwater protection. The synthetic map of relevant catchment area of Žilůvky stream was composed in the program ArcGIS as a intersection between 4 partial maps: the map of soil character according to infiltration capability, the map of geological structure according to permeability, the map of unsaturated zone potency and the map of karst phenomens, springs and boreholes localization. The final map was presented in 4 variants A – D according to meaning of layers which have the influence on groundwater vulnerability.

  18. Controlling chaos in dynamical systems described by maps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crispin, Y.; Marduel, C. [Embry-Riddle Aeronautical Univ., Daytona Beach, FL (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The problem of suppressing chaotic behavior in dynamical systems is treated using a feedback control method with limited control effort. The proposed method is validated on archetypal systems described by maps, i.e. discrete-time difference equations. The method is also applicable to dynamical systems described by flows, i.e. by systems of ordinary differential equations. Results are presented for the one-dimensional logistic map and for a two-dimensional Lotka-Volterra map describing predator-prey population dynamics. It is shown that chaos can be suppressed and the system stabilized about a period-1 fixed point of the maps.

  19. IMPACT OF TONE MAPPING IN HIGH DYNAMIC RANGE IMAGE COMPRESSION

    OpenAIRE

    Narwaria, Manish; Perreira Da Silva, Matthieu; Le Callet, Patrick; Pépion, Romuald

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Tone mapping or range reduction is often used in High Dynamic Range (HDR) visual signal compression to take advantage of the existing image/video coding architectures. Thus, it is important to study the impact of tone mapping on the visual quality of decompressed HDR visual signals. To our knowledge, most of the existing studies focus only on the quality loss in the resultant low dynamic range (LDR) signal (obtained via tone mapping) and typically employ LDR displays f...

  20. Real Time Mapping and Dynamic Navigation for Mobile Robots

    OpenAIRE

    Maki K. Habib

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses the importance, the complexity and the challenges of mapping mobile robot?s unknown and dynamic environment, besides the role of sensors and the problems inherited in map building. These issues remain largely an open research problems in developing dynamic navigation systems for mobile robots. The paper presenst the state of the art in map building and localization for mobile robots navigating within unknown environment, and then introduces a solution for the complex prob...

  1. Real Time Mapping and Dynamic Navigation for Mobile Robots

    OpenAIRE

    Maki K. Habib

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses the importance, the complexity and the challenges of mapping mobile robot?s unknown and dynamic environment, besides the role of sensors and the problems inherited in map building. These issues remain largely an open research problems in developing dynamic navigation systems for mobile robots. The paper presenst the state of the art in map building and localization for mobile robots navigating within unknown environment, and then introduces a solution for ...

  2. Spatial analysis and modeling to assess and map current vulnerability to extreme weather events in the Grijalva - Usumacinta watershed, México

    Science.gov (United States)

    López L, D.

    2009-11-01

    One of the major concerns over a potential change in climate is that it will cause an increase in extreme weather events. In Mexico, the exposure factors as well as the vulnerability to the extreme weather events have increased during the last three or four decades. In this study spatial analysis and modeling were used to assess and map settlement and crop systems vulnerability to extreme weather events in the Grijalva - Usumacinta watershed. Sensitivity and coping adaptive capacity maps were constructed using decision models; these maps were then combined to produce vulnerability maps. The most vulnerable area in terms of both settlement and crop systems is the highlands, where the sensitivity is high and the adaptive capacity is low. In lowlands, despite the very high sensitivity, the higher adaptive capacity produces only moderate vulnerability. I conclude that spatial analysis and modeling are powerful tools to assess and map vulnerability. These preliminary results can guide the formulation of adaptation policies to an increasing risk of extreme weather events.

  3. Visual explorations of dynamics: The standard map

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J D Meiss

    2008-06-01

    The Macintosh application StdMap allows easy exploration of many of the phenomena of area-preserving mappings. This tutorial explains some of these phenomena and presents a number of simple experiments centered on the use of this program.

  4. Time augmented bond percolation mapping of spreading dynamics on networks

    OpenAIRE

    Antulov-Fantulin, Nino; Tolic, Dijana

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a mapping of spreading dynamics to weighted networks, where weights represent interaction time delays on edges. With this mapping, we are able to estimate both the process evolution in time and the final outcome of a process. In a limit of process time, we establish the connection of our mapping with the bond percolation and thus we name it time augmented bond percolation mapping. We concentrate on the stochastic formulation of the generalized Susceptible Infected Re...

  5. Assessment of intrinsic vulnerability of an alluvial aquifer under anthropogenic pressure: cross comparison of 4 index-based groundwater vulnerability mapping models within the Biguglia lagoon watershed (Corsica, France).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaunat, Jessy; Huneau, Frédéric; Garel, Emilie; Devos, Alain; Lejeune, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    KEYWORDS: Alluvial aquifer, Vulnerability mapping, Index-based methods, DRASTIC, SINTACS, SI, GOD The geographical position of the Biguglia lagoon watershed south of the Bastia city (80 000 inhabitants), lead to a highly vulnerable hydrosystem setting. This littoral plain is the unique territory available for the urbanisation and for the agriculture activities (cattle breeding). All the activities developed are likely to have a qualitative impact on water infiltration and therefore on groundwater, which is in hydraulic connection with the lagoon system. Beyond this ecological issue, groundwater of this watershed is intensively used as drinking water supply. It appears essential to control the long-term groundwater quality of the Biguglia plain which is the major economic zone of Corsica. Achievement of this issue requires the identification of the areas where the alluvial aquifer is mostly vulnerable to anthropogenic activities. The results given by 4 of the most popular index-based vulnerability mapping methods (DRASTIC, SI, SINTACS and GOD) are compared. The water table, net recharge, aquifer and soils properties, topography, vadose zone and land uses have been precisely mapped and numerically translated in GIS with a 25m precision. 4 final maps were finally compiled according to the weighting factors of each methods. Hydrochemical investigations were also carried out on 30 sampling points (major ions and anthropogenic tracers) to evaluate the effect of anthropogenic activities on groundwater quality and also to validate the results of the vulnerability mapping. A comparison between the parametric models shows a significant agreement between the DRASTIC, SINTACS and SI results (2% to 5% of the total area in very low vulnerability class, 10% to 13% in low vulnerability, 16% to 23% in medium vulnerability, 31% to 53% in high vulnerability and 14% to 23% in very high vulnerability). The two first methods are quite similar, which explains the proximity of the

  6. Mapping the vulnerability hotspots over Hindu-Kush Himalaya region to flooding disasters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shada Elalem

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A disproportionate share of the global economic and human losses caused by environmental shocks is borne by people in the developing nations. The mountain region of Hindu-Kush Himalaya (HKH in South Asia is threatened by numerous flooding events annually. An efficient disaster risk reduction often needs to rest upon location-based synoptic view of vulnerability. Resolving this deficit improves the ability to take risk reduction measures in a cost-effective way, and in doing so, strengthens the resilience of societies to flooding disasters. The central aim of this research is to identify the vulnerable locations across HKH boundary from the perspective of reported history of economic and human impacts due to occurrence of flooding disasters. A detailed analysis indicates a very high spatial heterogeneity in flooding disaster occurrence in the past 6 decades. The most recent decade reported highest number of disasters and greater spatial coverage as compared to the earlier decades. The data indicates that, in general, economic impacts of flooding disasters were notably higher in Pakistan, Afghanistan and Nepal. On the other hand, vulnerability scenarios with respect to human impacts were diverse for different countries. In terms of morbidity and mortality, Bangladesh, Pakistan, Bhutan and India were detected to be most susceptible to human impacts. Although Bhutan had seen lesser number of flooding disasters, higher population living within disaster prone region make them vulnerable. In summary, complex interactions between natural and socio-economic conditions play a dominant role to define and characterize the type and magnitude of vulnerability of HKH countries to disaster occurrence and their economic and human impacts.

  7. Anticipating Vulnerability to Climate Change in Dryland Pastoral Systems: Using Dynamic Systems Models for the Kalahari

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. Dougill

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available It is vitally important to identify agroecosystems that may cease functioning because of changing climate or land degradation. However, identifying such systems is confounded on both conceptual and methodological grounds, especially in systems that are moving toward thresholds, a common trait of dryland environments. This study explores these challenges by analyzing how a range of external pressures affect the vulnerability of dryland pastoral systems in the Kalahari. This is achieved by employing dynamic systems modeling approaches to understand the pathways by which communities became vulnerable to drought. Specifically, we evaluate how external pressures have changed: (1 different agroecosystems' abilities to tolerate drought, i.e., ecosystem resilience; (2 rural communities' abilities to adapt to drought, mediated via their access to assets; and (3 the ability of institutions and policy interventions to play a role in mediating drought-related crises, i.e., socio-political governance. This is done by reanalyzing ecological and participatory research findings along with farm-scale livestock offtake data from across the Kalahari in Botswana. An iterative process was followed to establish narratives exploring how external drivers led to changes in agroecosystem resilience, access to assets, and the institutional capacity to buffer the system. We use "causal loop diagrams" and statistical dynamic system models to express key quantitative relationships and establish future scenarios to help define where uncertainties lie by showing where the system is most sensitive to change. We highlight how that greater sharing of land management knowledge and practices between private and communal land managers can provide 'win-win-win' benefits of reducing system vulnerability, increasing economic income, and building social capital. We use future scenario analyses to identify key areas for future studies of climate change adaptation across the Kalahari.

  8. Mapping vulnerability to climate change and its repercussions on human health in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Sadia Mariam; Awan, Haroon; Khan, Niazullah

    2012-09-03

    Pakistan is highly vulnerable to climate change due to its geographic location, high dependence on agriculture and water resources, low adaptive capacity of its people, and weak system of emergency preparedness. This paper is the first ever attempt to rank the agro-ecological zones in Pakistan according to their vulnerability to climate change and to identify the potential health repercussions of each manifestation of climate change in the context of Pakistan. A climate change vulnerability index is constructed as an un-weighted average of three sub-indices measuring (a) the ecological exposure of each region to climate change, (b) sensitivity of the population to climate change and (c) the adaptive capacity of the population inhabiting a particular region. The regions are ranked according to the value of this index and its components. Since health is one of the most important dimensions of human wellbeing, this paper also identifies the potential health repercussions of each manifestations of climate change and links it with the key manifestations of climate change in the context of Pakistan. The results indicate that Balochistan is the most vulnerable region with high sensitivity and low adaptive capacity followed by low-intensity Punjab (mostly consisting of South Punjab) and Cotton/Wheat Sindh. The health risks that each of these regions face depend upon the type of threat that they face from climate change. Greater incidence of flooding, which may occur due to climate variability, poses the risk of diarrhoea and gastroenteritis; skin and eye Infections; acute respiratory infections; and malaria. Exposure to drought poses the potential health risks in the form of food insecurity and malnutrition; anaemia; night blindness; and scurvy. Increases in temperature pose health risks of heat stroke; malaria; dengue; respiratory diseases; and cardiovascular diseases. The study concludes that geographical zones that are more exposed to climate change in ecological and

  9. Mapping vulnerability to climate change and its repercussions on human health in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malik Sadia

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pakistan is highly vulnerable to climate change due to its geographic location, high dependence on agriculture and water resources, low adaptive capacity of its people, and weak system of emergency preparedness. This paper is the first ever attempt to rank the agro-ecological zones in Pakistan according to their vulnerability to climate change and to identify the potential health repercussions of each manifestation of climate change in the context of Pakistan. Methods A climate change vulnerability index is constructed as an un-weighted average of three sub-indices measuring (a the ecological exposure of each region to climate change, (b sensitivity of the population to climate change and (c the adaptive capacity of the population inhabiting a particular region. The regions are ranked according to the value of this index and its components. Since health is one of the most important dimensions of human wellbeing, this paper also identifies the potential health repercussions of each manifestations of climate change and links it with the key manifestations of climate change in the context of Pakistan. Results The results indicate that Balochistan is the most vulnerable region with high sensitivity and low adaptive capacity followed by low-intensity Punjab (mostly consisting of South Punjab and Cotton/Wheat Sindh. The health risks that each of these regions face depend upon the type of threat that they face from climate change. Greater incidence of flooding, which may occur due to climate variability, poses the risk of diarrhoea and gastroenteritis; skin and eye Infections; acute respiratory infections; and malaria. Exposure to drought poses the potential health risks in the form of food insecurity and malnutrition; anaemia; night blindness; and scurvy. Increases in temperature pose health risks of heat stroke; malaria; dengue; respiratory diseases; and cardiovascular diseases. Conclusion The study concludes that geographical

  10. Hypercrosslinked polystyrene networks: An atomistic molecular dynamics simulation combined with a mapping/reverse mapping procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazutin, A. A.; Glagolev, M. K.; Vasilevskaya, V. V.; Khokhlov, A. R. [A. N. Nesmeyanov Institute of Organoelement Compounds RAS, Vavilova Str. 28, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-04-07

    An algorithm involving classical molecular dynamics simulations with mapping and reverse mapping procedure is here suggested to simulate the crosslinking of the polystyrene dissolved in dichloroethane by monochlorodimethyl ether. The algorithm comprises consecutive stages: molecular dynamics atomistic simulation of a polystyrene solution, the mapping of atomistic structure onto coarse-grained model, the crosslink formation, the reverse mapping, and finally relaxation of the structure dissolved in dichloroethane and in dry state. The calculated values of the specific volume and the elastic modulus are in reasonable quantitative correspondence with experimental data.

  11. A negative genetic interaction map in isogenic cancer cell lines reveals cancer cell vulnerabilities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vizeacoumar, Franco J; Arnold, Roland; Vizeacoumar, Frederick S; Chandrashekhar, Megha; Buzina, Alla; Young, Jordan T F; Kwan, Julian H M; Sayad, Azin; Mero, Patricia; Lawo, Steffen; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Brown, Kevin R; Baryshnikova, Anastasia; Mak, Anthony B; Fedyshyn, Yaroslav; Wang, Yadong; Brito, Glauber C; Kasimer, Dahlia; Makhnevych, Taras; Ketela, Troy; Datti, Alessandro; Babu, Mohan; Emili, Andrew; Pelletier, Laurence; Wrana, Jeff; Wainberg, Zev; Kim, Philip M; Rottapel, Robert; O‧Brien, Catherine A; Andrews, Brenda; Boone, Charles; Moffat, Jason

    ...‐scale sequencing efforts. Using genome‐scale pooled shRNA screening technology, we mapped negative genetic interactions across a set of isogenic cancer cell lines and confirmed hundreds of these interactions in orthogonal co...

  12. Modeling vulnerability to thermokarst disturbance and its consequences on regional land cover dynamic in boreal Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genet, H.; Lara, M. J.; Bolton, W. R.; McGuire, A. D.

    2016-12-01

    Estimation of the magnitude and consequences of permafrost degradation in high latitude is one of the most urgent research challenges related to contemporary and future climate change. In addition to widespread vertical degradation, ice-rich permafrost can thaw laterally, often triggering abrupt subsidence of the ground surface called thermokart. In this depression, permafrost plateau vegetation will transition to wetlands or lakes, while surface water of the surrounding landscape may drain towards it. These abrupt changes in land cover and hydrology can have dramatic consequences from wildlife habitat and biogeochemical cycles. Although recent studies have documented an acceleration of the rates of thermokarst formation in boreal and arctic peatlands, the importance of thermokarst at the regional level is still poorly understood. To better understand the vulnerability of the landscape to thermokarst disturbance in Alaska, we developed the Alaska Thermokarst Model (ATM), a state-and-transition model designed to simulate land cover change associated with thermokarst disturbance. In boreal regions, the model simulates transitions from permafrost plateau forest to thermokarst lake, bog or fen, as a function of climate and fire dynamics, permafrost characteristics and physiographic information. This model is designed and parameterized based on existing literature and a new repeated imagery analysis we conducted in a major wetland complex in boreal Alaska. We will present simulation and validation of thermokarst dynamic and associated land cover change in two wetland complexes in boreal Alaska, from 2000 to 2100 for six climate scenarios associating three AR5 emission scenarios and two global circulation model simulations. By 2100, ATM is predicting decrease between 3.5 and 9.1 % in the extent of permafrost plateau forest, mostly to the benefit of thermokarst fen, and lake. This analysis allowed us to assess the importance of thermokarst dynamics and landscape evolution

  13. Vulnerability of dynamic genetic conservation units of forest trees in Europe to climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schueler, Silvio; Falk, Wolfgang; Koskela, Jarkko; Lefèvre, François; Bozzano, Michele; Hubert, Jason; Kraigher, Hojka; Longauer, Roman; Olrik, Ditte C

    2014-05-01

    A transnational network of genetic conservation units for forest trees was recently documented in Europe aiming at the conservation of evolutionary processes and the adaptive potential of natural or man-made tree populations. In this study, we quantified the vulnerability of individual conservation units and the whole network to climate change using climate favourability models and the estimated velocity of climate change. Compared to the overall climate niche of the analysed target species populations at the warm and dry end of the species niche are underrepresented in the network. However, by 2100, target species in 33-65 % of conservation units, mostly located in southern Europe, will be at the limit or outside the species' current climatic niche as demonstrated by favourabilities below required model sensitivities of 95%. The highest average decrease in favourabilities throughout the network can be expected for coniferous trees although they are mainly occurring within units in mountainous landscapes for which we estimated lower velocities of change. Generally, the species-specific estimates of favourabilities showed only low correlations to the velocity of climate change in individual units, indicating that both vulnerability measures should be considered for climate risk analysis. The variation in favourabilities among target species within the same conservation units is expected to increase with climate change and will likely require a prioritization among co-occurring species. The present results suggest that there is a strong need to intensify monitoring efforts and to develop additional conservation measures for populations in the most vulnerable units. Also, our results call for continued transnational actions for genetic conservation of European forest trees, including the establishment of dynamic conservation populations outside the current species distribution ranges within European assisted migration schemes. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Assessing frost damages using dynamic models in walnut trees: exposure rather than vulnerability controls frost risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charrier, Guillaume; Chuine, Isabelle; Bonhomme, Marc; Améglio, Thierry

    2017-02-09

    Frost damages develop when exposure overtakes frost vulnerability. Frost risk assessment therefore needs dynamic simulation of frost hardiness using temperature and photoperiod in interaction with developmental stage. Two models, including or not the effect of photoperiod were calibrated using five years of frost hardiness monitoring (2007-2012), in two locations (low and high elevation) for three walnut genotypes with contrasted phenology and maximum hardiness (Juglans regia cv Franquette, Juglans regia x nigra 'Early' and 'Late'). The Photothermal model predicted more accurate values for all genotypes (Efficiency = 0.879; RMSEP = 2.55 °C) than the Thermal model (Efficiency = 0.801; RMSEP = 3.24 °C). Predicted frost damages were strongly correlated to minimum temperature of the freezing events (ρ = -0.983) rather than actual frost hardiness (ρ = -0.515), or ratio of phenological stage completion (ρ = 0.336). Higher frost risks are consequently predicted during winter, at high elevation, whereas spring is only risky at low elevation in early genotypes exhibiting faster dehardening rate. However, early frost damages, although of lower value, may negatively affect fruit production the subsequent year (R(2)  = 0.381, P = 0.057). These results highlight the interacting pattern between frost exposure and vulnerability at different scales and the necessity of intra-organ studies to understand the time course of frost vulnerability in flower buds along the winter.

  15. Efficient mapping of ligand migration channel networks in dynamic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tu-Liang; Song, Guang

    2011-08-01

    For many proteins such as myoglobin, the binding site lies in the interior, and there is no obvious route from the exterior to the binding site in the average structure. Although computer simulations for a limited number of proteins have found some transiently open channels, it is not clear if there exist more channels elsewhere or how the channels are regulated. A systematic approach that can map out the whole ligand migration channel network is lacking. Ligand migration in a dynamic protein resembles closely a well-studied problem in robotics, namely, the navigation of a mobile robot in a dynamic environment. In this work, we present a novel robotic motion planning inspired approach that can map the ligand migration channel network in a dynamic protein. The method combines an efficient spatial mapping of protein inner space with a temporal exploration of protein structural heterogeneity, which is represented by a structure ensemble. The spatial mapping of each conformation in the ensemble produces a partial map of protein inner cavities and their inter-connectivity. These maps are then merged to form a super map that contains all the channels that open dynamically. Results on the pathways in myoglobin for gaseous ligands demonstrate the efficiency of our approach in mapping the ligand migration channel networks. The results, obtained in a significantly less amount of time than trajectory-based approaches, are in agreement with previous simulation results. Additionally, the method clearly illustrates how and what conformational changes open or close a channel.

  16. High resolution, large dynamic range field map estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagher, Joseph; Reese, Timothy; Bilgin, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We present a theory and a corresponding method to compute high resolution field maps over a large dynamic range. Theory and Methods We derive a closed-form expression for the error in the field map value when computed from two echoes. We formulate an optimization problem to choose three echo times which result in a pair of maximally distinct error distributions. We use standard field mapping sequences at the prescribed echo times. We then design a corresponding estimation algorithm which takes advantage of the optimized echo times to disambiguate the field offset value. Results We validate our method using high resolution images of a phantom at 7T. The resulting field maps demonstrate robust mapping over both a large dynamic range, and in low SNR regions. We also present high resolution offset maps in vivo using both, GRE and MEGE sequences. Even though the proposed echo time spacings are larger than the well known phase aliasing cutoff, the resulting field maps exhibit a large dynamic range without the use of phase unwrapping or spatial regularization techniques. Conclusion We demonstrate a novel 3-echo field map estimation method which overcomes the traditional noise-dynamic range trade-off. PMID:23401245

  17. Genetic Vulnerability and the Relationship of Commercial Germplasms of Maize in Brazil with the Nested Association Mapping Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Luciano Rogério Braatz de; Fritsche Neto, Roberto; Granato, Ítalo Stefanine Correia; Sant'Ana, Gustavo César; Morais, Pedro Patric Pinho; Borém, Aluízio

    2016-01-01

    A few breeding companies dominate the maize (Zea mays L.) hybrid market in Brazil: Monsanto® (35%), DuPont Pioneer® (30%), Dow Agrosciences® (15%), Syngenta® (10%) and Helix Sementes (4%). Therefore, it is important to monitor the genetic diversity in commercial germplasms as breeding practices, registration and marketing of new cultivars can lead to a significant reduction of the genetic diversity. Reduced genetic variation may lead to crop vulnerabilities, food insecurity and limited genetic gains following selection. The aim of this study was to evaluate the genetic vulnerability risk by examining the relationship between the commercial Brazilian maize germplasms and the Nested Association Mapping (NAM) Parents. For this purpose, we used the commercial hybrids with the largest market share in Brazil and the NAM parents. The hybrids were genotyped for 768 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), using the Illumina Goldengate® platform. The NAM parent genomic data, comprising 1,536 SNPs for each line, were obtained from the Panzea data bank. The population structure, genetic diversity and the correlation between allele frequencies were analyzed. Based on the estimated effective population size and genetic variability, it was found that there is a low risk of genetic vulnerability in the commercial Brazilian maize germplasms. However, the genetic diversity is lower than those found in the NAM parents. Furthermore, the Brazilian germplasms presented no close relations with most NAM parents, except B73. This indicates that B73, or its heterotic group (Iowa Stiff Stalk Synthetic), contributed to the development of the commercial Brazilian germplasms.

  18. Compositing climate change vulnerability of a Mediterranean region using spatiotemporally dynamic proxies for ecological and socioeconomic impacts and stabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirkesen, Ali Can; Evrendilek, Fatih

    2017-01-01

    The study presents a new methodology to quantify spatiotemporal dynamics of climate change vulnerability at a regional scale adopting a new conceptual model of vulnerability as a function of climate change impacts, ecological stability, and socioeconomic stability. Spatiotemporal trends of equally weighted proxy variables for the three vulnerability components were generated to develop a composite climate change vulnerability index (CCVI) for a Mediterranean region of Turkey combining Landsat time series data, digital elevation model (DEM)-derived data, ordinary kriging, and geographical information system. Climate change impact was based on spatiotemporal trends of August land surface temperature (LST) between 1987 and 2016. Ecological stability was based on DEM, slope, aspect, and spatiotemporal trends of normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), while socioeconomic stability was quantified as a function of spatiotemporal trends of land cover, population density, per capita gross domestic product, and illiteracy. The zones ranked on the five classes of no-to-extreme vulnerability were identified where highly and moderately vulnerable lands covered 0.02% (12 km(2)) and 11.8% (6374 km(2)) of the study region, respectively, mostly occurring in the interior central part. The adoption of this composite CCVI approach is expected to lead to spatiotemporally dynamic policy recommendations towards sustainability and tailor preventive and mitigative measures to locally specific characteristics of coupled ecological-socioeconomic systems.

  19. RISKS, THREATS AND VULNERABILITIES IN THE COMPLEX DYNAMIC OF THE SYRIAN CONFLICT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raluca-Irina IONIȚĂ

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The regional conflict that takes place now in the middle east from Afghanistan, Iraq to Syria has proven to be incrementally complex and difficult to manage from a geo-political point of view. It is becoming harder to know who are the violent non-state actors and who is backing them, turning what was at first a civil war into a proxy war between the western countries on one side and Russia, pro al-assad forces and Iran. Also, Turkey who at once was considered to be an important ally to the US has now grown closer to Russian interests, bombing kurdish troops backed by the US. In this regard it is becoming obvious that there are a number of threats, risks, and vulnerabilities that arise in an unpredictable manner. In conclusion, this paper analyzes the main solutions that can be adopted in order to control and manage the complex dynamic that are unfolding in Syria.

  20. Population dynamics of Hawaiian seabird colonies vulnerable to sea-level rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatfield, Jeff S.; Reynolds, Michelle H.; Seavy, Nathaniel E.; Krause, Crystal M.

    2012-01-01

    Globally, seabirds are vulnerable to anthropogenic threats both at sea and on land. Seabirds typically nest colonially and show strong fidelity to natal colonies, and such colonies on low-lying islands may be threatened by sea-level rise. We used French Frigate Shoals, the largest atoll in the Hawaiian Archipelago, as a case study to explore the population dynamics of seabird colonies and the potential effects sea-level rise may have on these rookeries. We compiled historic observations, a 30-year time series of seabird population abundance, lidar-derived elevations, and aerial imagery of all the islands of French Frigate Shoals. To estimate the population dynamics of 8 species of breeding seabirds on Tern Island from 1980 to 2009, we used a Gompertz model with a Bayesian approach to infer population growth rates, density dependence, process variation, and observation error. All species increased in abundance, in a pattern that provided evidence of density dependence. Great Frigatebirds (Fregata minor), Masked Boobies (Sula dactylatra), Red-tailed Tropicbirds (Phaethon rubricauda), Spectacled Terns (Onychoprion lunatus), and White Terns (Gygis alba) are likely at carrying capacity. Density dependence may exacerbate the effects of sea-level rise on seabirds because populations near carrying capacity on an island will be more negatively affected than populations with room for growth. We projected 12% of French Frigate Shoals will be inundated if sea level rises 1 m and 28% if sea level rises 2 m. Spectacled Terns and shrub-nesting species are especially vulnerable to sea-level rise, but seawalls and habitat restoration may mitigate the effects of sea-level rise. Losses of seabird nesting habitat may be substantial in the Hawaiian Islands by 2100 if sea levels rise 2 m. Restoration of higher-elevation seabird colonies represent a more enduring conservation solution for Pacific seabirds.

  1. Composite interval mapping of QTL for dynamic traits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Huijiang; YANG Runqing

    2006-01-01

    Many economically important quantitative traits in animals and plants are measured repeatedly over time. These traits are called dynamic traits. Mapping QTL controlling the phenotypic profiles of dynamic traits has become an interesting topic for animal and plant breeders. However, statistical methods of QTL mapping for dynamic traits have not been well developed. We develop a composite interval mapping approach to detecting QTL for dynamic traits. We fit the profile of each QTL effect with Legendre polynomials. Parameter estimation and statistical test are performed on the regression coefficients of the polynomials under the maximum likelihood framework. Maximum likelihood estimates of QTL parameters are obtained via the EM algorithm. Results of simulation study showed that composite interval mapping can improve both the statistcial power of QTL detecting and the accuracy of parameter estimation relative to the simply interval mapping procedure where only one QTL is fit to each model. The method is developed in the context of an F2 mapping population, but extension to other types of mapping populations is straightforward.

  2. Map Your Hazards! - an Interdisciplinary, Place-Based Educational Approach to Assessing Natural Hazards, Social Vulnerability, Risk and Risk Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, B. D.; McMullin-Messier, P. A.; Schlegel, M. E.

    2014-12-01

    'Map your Hazards' is an educational module developed within the NSF Interdisciplinary Teaching about Earth for a Sustainable Future program (InTeGrate). The module engages students in place-based explorations of natural hazards, social vulnerability, and the perception of natural hazards and risk. Students integrate geoscience and social science methodologies to (1) identify and assess hazards, vulnerability and risk within their communities; (2) distribute, collect and evaluate survey data (designed by authors) on the knowledge, risk perception and preparedness within their social networks; and (3) deliver a PPT presentation to local stakeholders detailing their findings and recommendations for development of a prepared, resilient community. 'Map your Hazards' underwent four rigorous assessments by a team of geoscience educators and external review before being piloted in our classrooms. The module was piloted in a 300-level 'Volcanoes and Society' course at Boise State University, a 300-level 'Environmental Sociology' course at Central Washington University, and a 100-level 'Natural Disasters and Environmental Geology' course at the College of Western Idaho. In all courses students reported a fascination with learning about the hazards around them and identifying the high risk areas in their communities. They were also surprised at the low level of knowledge, inaccurate risk perception and lack of preparedness of their social networks. This successful approach to engaging students in an interdisciplinary, place-based learning environment also has the broad implications of raising awareness of natural hazards (survey participants are provided links to local hazard and preparedness information). The data and preparedness suggestions can be shared with local emergency managers, who are encouraged to attend the student's final presentations. All module materials are published at serc.carleton.edu/integrate/ and are appropriate to a wide range of classrooms.

  3. Mapping urban malaria and diarrhea mortality in Accra, Ghana: evidence of vulnerabilities and implications for urban health policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fobil, Julius N; Levers, Christian; Lakes, Tobia; Loag, Wibke; Kraemer, Alexander; May, Juergen

    2012-12-01

    Historic increase in urban population numbers in the face of shrinking urban economies and declining social services has meant that a large proportion of the urban population lives in precarious urban conditions, which provide the grounds for high urban health risks in low income countries. This study aims to identify, investigate, and contrast the spatial patterns of vulnerability and risk of two major causes of mortality, viz malaria and diarrhea mortalities, in order to optimize resource allocation for effective urban environmental management and improvement in urban health. A spatial cluster analysis of the observed urban malaria and diarrhea mortalities for the whole city of Accra was conducted. We obtained routinely reported mortality data for the period 1998-2002 from the Ghana Vital Registration System (VRS), computed the fraction of deaths due to malaria and diarrhea at the census cluster level, and analyzed and visualized the data with Geographic Information System (GIS, ArcMap 9.3.1). Regions of identified hotspots, cold spots, and excess mortalities were observed to be associated with some socioeconomic and neighborhood urban environmental conditions, suggesting uneven distribution of risk factors for both urban malaria and diarrhea in areas of rapid urban transformation. Case-control and/or longitudinal studies seeking to understand the individual level factors which mediate socioenvironmental conditions in explaining the observed excess urban mortalities and to establish the full range of risk factors might benefit from initial vulnerability mapping and excess risk analysis using geostatistical approaches. This is key to evidence-based urban health policy reforms in rapidly urbanizing areas in low income economies.

  4. Focus on CSIR research in water resources: improved methods for aquifer vulnerability assessments and protocols (AVAP) for producing vulnerability maps, taking into account information on soils

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Colvin, C

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater resources are increasingly threatened by pollution. The AVAP project was initiated to develop improved methods for vulnerability assessments in urban catchments, with particular emphasis on the integration of available soils information...

  5. Visualising interactive flood risk maps in a dynamic Geobrowser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaw Manful, Desmond; He, Yi; Cloke, Hannah; Pappenberger, Florian; Li, Zhijia; Wetterhall, Fredrik; Huang, Yingchun; Hu, Yuzhong

    2010-05-01

    Communicating flood forecast products effectively to end-users is the final step in the flood event simulation process. A prototype of the Novel Flood Early Warning System (NEWS) based on the TIGGE (THORPEX Interactive Grand Global Ensemble) database explores new avenues to visualise flood forecast products in a dynamic and interactive manner. One of the possibilities NEWS is currently assessing is Google Maps. Google Maps is a basic web mapping service application and technology provided by Google, free (for non-commercial use). It powers many map-based services including maps embedded on third-party websites via the Google Maps API. Creating a customized map interface requires adding the Google JavaScript code to a page, and then using Javascript functions to add points to the map. Flood maps allow end-users to visualise and navigate a world that is too large and complex to be seen directly. The NEWS software will attempt to deal with the following issues: • Uncertainty visualization in hazards maps • Visualizing uncertainty for sector specific risk managers • Uncertainty representation of point and linear data The objective is improve the information content of flood risk maps making them more useful to specific end-users.

  6. Real Time Mapping and Dynamic Navigation for Mobile Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maki K. Habib

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the importance, the complexity and the challenges of mapping mobile robot?s unknown and dynamic environment, besides the role of sensors and the problems inherited in map building. These issues remain largely an open research problems in developing dynamic navigation systems for mobile robots. The paper presenst the state of the art in map building and localization for mobile robots navigating within unknown environment, and then introduces a solution for the complex problem of autonomous map building and maintenance method with focus on developing an incremental grid based mapping technique that is suitable for real-time obstacle detection and avoidance. In this case, the navigation of mobile robots can be treated as a problem of tracking geometric features that occur naturally in the environment of the robot. The robot maps its environment incrementally using the concept of occupancy grids and the fusion of multiple ultrasonic sensory information while wandering in it and stay away from all obstacles. To ensure real-time operation with limited resources, as well as to promote extensibility, the mapping and obstacle avoidance modules are deployed in parallel and distributed framework. Simulation based experiments has been conducted and illustrated to show the validity of the developed mapping and obstacle avoidance approach.

  7. Automatic generalization of metro maps based on dynamic segmentation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A metro map is usually optimized for the readability of connections and transportation networks structure.In order to assure good readability and meet aesthetic considerations,a set of principles for good metro map layout are proposed.According to these principles,a new methodology based on dynamic segmentation is presented to produce the metro maps automatically.Firstly,routes are constructed according to the line attribute similarity and geometry continuity.Then a set of cartographic generalization methods about the shape,angle,length,and topology are presented for these routes.This method is validated by Beijing metro plan map.From the experiment results,it can be concluded that this new method is more effective than the static segmentation method to produce metro maps with better readability for route plans.

  8. Controllability of open quantum systems with Kraus-map dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Rong; Pechen, Alexander; Brif, Constantin; Rabitz, Herschel [Department of Chemistry, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2007-05-25

    This paper presents a constructive proof of complete kinematic state controllability of finite-dimensional open quantum systems whose dynamics are represented by Kraus maps. For any pair of states (pure or mixed) on the Hilbert space of the system, we explicitly show how to construct a Kraus map that transforms one state into another. Moreover, we prove by construction the existence of a Kraus map that transforms all initial states into a predefined target state (such a process may be used, for example, in quantum information dilution). Thus, in sharp contrast to unitary control, Kraus-map dynamics allows for the design of controls which are robust to variations in the initial state of the system. The capabilities of non-unitary control for population transfer between pure states illustrated for an example of a two-level system by constructing a family of non-unitary Kraus maps to transform one pure state into another. The problem of dynamic state controllability of open quantum systems (i.e., controllability of state-to-state transformations, given a set of available dynamical resources such as coherent controls, incoherent interactions with the environment, and measurements) is also discussed.

  9. Landslides in Nicaragua - Mapping, Inventory, Hazard Assessment, Vulnerability Reduction, and Forecasting Attempts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dévoli, G.; Strauch, W.; Álvarez, A.; Muñoz, A.; Kjekstad, O.

    2009-04-01

    access, manage, update and distribute in a short time to all sectors and users; and finally, the need of a comprehensive understanding of landslide processes. Many efforts have been made in the last 10 years to gain a more comprehensive and predictive understanding of landslide processes in Nicaragua. Since 1998, landslide inventory GIS based maps have been produced in different areas of the country, as part of international and multidisciplinary development projects. Landslide susceptibility and hazard maps are available now at INETEŔs Website for all municipalities of the country. The insights on landslide hazard have been transmitted to governmental agencies, local authorities, NGÓs, international agencies to be used in measures for risk reduction. A massive application example was the integration of hazard assessment studies in a large house building program in Nicaragua. Hazards of landslides, and other dangerous phenomena, were evaluated in more than 90 house building projects, each with 50 - 200 houses to be build, sited mainly in rural areas of the country. For more than 7000 families, this program could finally assure that their new houses were build in safe areas. Attempts have been made to develop a strategy for early warning of landslides in Nicaragua. First approaches relied on precipitation gauges with satellite based telemetry which were installed in some Nicaraguan volcanoes where lahars occur frequently. The occurrence of lahars in certain gullies could be detected by seismic stations. A software system gave acoustic alarm at INETEŔs Monitoring Centre when certain trigger levels of the accumulated precipitation were reached. The monitoring and early warning for all areas under risk would have required many rain gauges. A new concept is tested which uses near real time precipitation estimates from NOAA meteorological satellite data. A software system sends out alarm messages if strong or long lasting rains are observed over certain landslide "hot spots

  10. A Bayesian Algorithm for Functional Mapping of Dynamic Complex Traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongling Wu

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Functional mapping of dynamic traits measured in a longitudinal study was originally derived within the maximum likelihood (ML context and implemented with the EM algorithm. Although ML-based functional mapping possesses many favorable statistical properties in parameter estimation, it may be computationally intractable for analyzing longitudinal data with high dimensions and high measurement errors. In this article, we derive a general functional mapping framework for quantitative trait locus mapping of dynamic traits within the Bayesian paradigm. Markov chain Monte Carlo techniques were implemented for functional mapping to estimate biologically and statistically sensible parameters that model the structures of time-dependent genetic effects and covariance matrix. The Bayesian approach is useful to handle difficulties in constructing confidence intervals as well as the identifiability problem, enhancing the statistical inference of functional mapping. We have undertaken simulation studies to investigate the statistical behavior of Bayesian-based functional mapping and used a real example with F2 mice to validate the utilization and usefulness of the model.

  11. Chaos and Maps in Relativistic Dynamical Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Horwitz, L P

    1999-01-01

    The basic work of Zaslavskii et al showed that the classical non-relativistic electromagnetically kicked oscillator can be cast into the form of an iterative map on the phase space; the resulting evolution contains a stochastic flow to unbounded energy. Subsequent studies have formulated the problem in terms of a relativistic charged particle in interaction with the electromagnetic field. We review the structure of the covariant Lorentz force used to study this problem. We show that the Lorentz force equation can be derived as well from the manifestly covariant mechanics of Stueckelberg in the presence of a standard Maxwell field, establishing a connection between these equations and mass shell constraints. We argue that these relativistic generalizations of the problem are intrinsically inaccurate due to an inconsistency in the structure of the relativistic Lorentz force, and show that a reformulation of the relativistic problem, permitting variations (classically) in both the particle mass and the effective...

  12. Prevention of Cross-Site Scripting Vulnerabilities using Dynamic Hash Generation Technique on the Server Side

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashank Gupta

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Cookies are a means to provide statefulcommunication over the HTTP. In the World WideWeb (WWW, once the user using web browser hasbeen successfully authenticated by the web server ofthe web application, then the web server willgenerate and transfer the cookie to the web browser.Now each time, if the user again wants to send arequest to the web server as a part of the activeconnection, the user has to include thecorresponding cookie in its request, so that the webserver associates the cookie to the correspondinguser. Cookies are the mechanisms that maintain anauthentication state between the user and webapplication. Therefore cookies are the possibletargets for the attackers. Cross Site Scripting (XSSattack is one of such attacks against the webapplications in which a user has to compromise itsbrowser’s resources (e.g. cookies etc.. In this paper,a novel technique called Dynamic Hash GenerationTechnique is introduced whose aim is to makecookies worthless for the attackers. This techniqueis implemented on the server side whose main taskis to generate a hash of the value of name attributein the cookie and send this hash value to the webbrowser. With this technique, the hash value ofname attribute in the cookie which is stored on thebrowser’s database is not valid for the attackers toexploit the vulnerabilities of XSS attacks.

  13. Assessment of Coastal Communities' Vulnerability to Hurricane Surge under Climate Change via Probabilistic Map - A Case Study of the Southwest Coast of Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, X.; Shen, S.

    2014-12-01

    The US coastline, over the past few years, has been overwhelmed by major storms including Hurricane Katrina (2005), Ike (2008), Irene (2011), and Sandy (2012). Supported by a growing and extensive body of evidence, a majority of research agrees hurricane activities have been enhanced due to climate change. However, the precise prediction of hurricane induced inundation remains a challenge. This study proposed a probabilistic inundation map based on a Statistically Modeled Storm Database (SMSD) to assess the probabilistic coastal inundation risk of Southwest Florida for near-future (20 years) scenario considering climate change. This map was processed through a Joint Probability Method with Optimal-Sampling (JPM-OS), developed by Condon and Sheng in 2012, and accompanied by a high resolution storm surge modeling system CH3D-SSMS. The probabilistic inundation map shows a 25.5-31.2% increase in spatially averaged inundation height compared to an inundation map of present-day scenario. To estimate climate change impacts on coastal communities, socioeconomic analyses were conducted using both the SMSD based probabilistic inundation map and the present-day inundation map. Combined with 2010 census data and 2012 parcel data from Florida Geographic Data Library, the differences of economic loss between the near-future and present day scenarios were used to generate an economic exposure map at census block group level to reflect coastal communities' exposure to climate change. The results show that climate change induced inundation increase has significant economic impacts. Moreover, the impacts are not equally distributed among different social groups considering their social vulnerability to hazards. Social vulnerability index at census block group level were obtained from Hazards and Vulnerability Research Institute. The demographic and economic variables in the index represent a community's adaptability to hazards. Local Moran's I was calculated to identify the clusters

  14. X-ray Mapping of Dynamic Suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholami, Mohammad; Lenoir, Nicolas; Ovarlez, Guillaume; Hormozi, Sarah

    2016-11-01

    Dense non-colloidal suspensions are materials with broad application both in industrial processes and natural phenomena. In most of these applications, the suspensions are either far from equilibrium or strongly non-Newtonian (i.e., non-colloidal particles are suspended in non-Newtonian fluid) meaning that the flow kinetics are not only strain-dependent but also strain-rate dependent. Therefore, experimental techniques must be developed to analyze the flows of these complex suspensions over a wide range of steady and transient shear rates. Techniques such as Nuclear Magnetic Resonance/Imaging (NMR/I) are inapplicable due to low sampling frequency and low image resolution (typically 10 minutes per averaged NMR image of 1x1cm). We introduce a new technique using an X-ray/CT-scan system to study dynamic suspensions. We show our recent results on the application of this technique for the study of shear induced migration of particles in a yield stress matrix fluid in a wide-gap cylindrical Couette cell. This work opens new avenues to study dynamic non-colloidal suspensions and the suspensions with other types of nonlinear suspending fluids such as viscoelastic and shear thickening fluids. NFS(CBET-1554044-CAREER).

  15. Dynamic Quantitative T1 Mapping in Orthotopic Brain Tumor Xenografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelsey Herrmann

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Human brain tumors such as glioblastomas are typically detected using conventional, nonquantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI techniques, such as T2-weighted and contrast enhanced T1-weighted MRI. In this manuscript, we tested whether dynamic quantitative T1 mapping by MRI can localize orthotopic glioma tumors in an objective manner. Quantitative T1 mapping was performed by MRI over multiple time points using the conventional contrast agent Optimark. We compared signal differences to determine the gadolinium concentration in tissues over time. The T1 parametric maps made it easy to identify the regions of contrast enhancement and thus tumor location. Doubling the typical human dose of contrast agent resulted in a clearer demarcation of these tumors. Therefore, T1 mapping of brain tumors is gadolinium dose dependent and improves detection of tumors by MRI. The use of T1 maps provides a quantitative means to evaluate tumor detection by gadolinium-based contrast agents over time. This dynamic quantitative T1 mapping technique will also enable future quantitative evaluation of various targeted MRI contrast agents.

  16. Map updates in a dynamic Voronoi data structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mioc, Darka; Antón Castro, Francesc/François; Gold, C. M.;

    2006-01-01

    the complex operations. This resulted in a new formal model for map updates, similar to "cellular encoding", where each update is uniquely characterized by the numbers of newly created and inactivated Voronoi regions. This research shows that the result of the formalization of the operations on the dynamic...

  17. Quantum dynamical semigroups and non-decomposable positive maps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benatti, Fabio; Floreanini, Roberto; Piani, Marco

    2004-06-07

    We study dynamical semigroups of positive, but not completely positive maps on finite-dimensional bipartite systems and analyze properties of their generators in relation to non-decomposability and bound-entanglement. An example of non-decomposable semigroup leading to a (4x4)-dimensional bound-entangled density matrix is explicitly obtained.

  18. Joyfully Map Social Dynamics When Designing Web-Based Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahamer, Gilbert

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides a concept and a notation for optimizing the design of social processes in gaming and learning for individuals, groups of individuals and society as a whole. Traditional approaches to the mapping and designing of the emerging social dynamics in a joyful, social education setting have fallen short of producing desirable results…

  19. Mapping and tracking of moving objects in dynamic environments

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Pancham, A

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In order for mobile robots to operate in dynamic or real world environments they must be able to localise themselves while building a map of the environment, and detect and track moving objects. This work involves the research and implementation...

  20. Multi-Volume High Resolution RGB-D Mapping with Dynamic Volume Placement

    OpenAIRE

    Salvato, Michael; Finman, Ross; Leonard, John

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel RGB-D mapping system for generating 3D maps over spatially extended regions with higher resolution than current methods using multiple, dynamically placed mapping volumes. Our method takes in RGB-D frames and dynamically assigns multiple mapping volumes to the environment, exchanging mapping volumes between the CPU and GPU. Mapping volumes are added or removed as needed to allow for spatially extended, high resolution mapping. Our system is designed to maximize the resoluti...

  1. Dynamic-mismatch mapping for digitally-assisted DACs

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Yongjian; van Roermund, Arthur

    2013-01-01

    This book describes a novel digital calibration technique called dynamic-mismatch mapping (DMM) to improve the performance of digital to analog converters (DACs).  Compared to other techniques, the DMM technique has the advantage of calibrating all mismatch errors without any noise penalty, which is particularly useful in order to meet the demand for high performance DACs in rapidly developing applications, such as multimedia and communication systems.   ·         Discusses fundamental performance limitations of digital to analog converters and summarizes existing design/calibration techniques; ·         Introduces a novel digital calibration technique, called dynamic-mismatch mapping (DMM) to improve both static and dynamic performance of DACs; ·         Includes two state-of-the-art DAC design examples with in-depth discussion.

  2. Robust dynamical effects in traffic and chaotic maps on trees

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bosiljka Tadić; Zoran Levnajić

    2008-06-01

    In the dynamic processes on networks collective effects emerge due to the couplings between nodes, where the network structure may play an important role. Interaction along many network links in the nonlinear dynamics may lead to a kind of chaotic collective behavior. Here we study two types of well-defined diffusive dynamics on scale-free trees: traffic of packets as navigated random walks, and chaotic standard maps coupled along the network links. We show that in both cases robust collective dynamic effects appear, which can be measured statistically and related to non-ergodicity of the dynamics on the network. Specifically, we find universal features in the fluctuations of time series and appropriately defined return-time statistics.

  3. Entropy Rate Maps of Complex Excitable Dynamics in Cardiac Monolayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Schlemmer

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The characterization of spatiotemporal complexity remains a challenging task. This holds in particular for the analysis of data from fluorescence imaging (optical mapping, which allows for the measurement of membrane potential and intracellular calcium at high spatial and temporal resolutions and, therefore, allows for an investigation of cardiac dynamics. Dominant frequency maps and the analysis of phase singularities are frequently used for this type of excitable media. These methods address some important aspects of cardiac dynamics; however, they only consider very specific properties of excitable media. To extend the scope of the analysis, we present a measure based on entropy rates for determining spatiotemporal complexity patterns of excitable media. Simulated data generated by the Aliev–Panfilov model and the cubic Barkley model are used to validate this method. Then, we apply it to optical mapping data from monolayers of cardiac cells from chicken embryos and compare our findings with dominant frequency maps and the analysis of phase singularities. The studies indicate that entropy rate maps provide additional information about local complexity, the origins of wave breakup and the development of patterns governing unstable wave propagation.

  4. Dynamics of Seabird Colonies Vulnerable to Sea-Level Rise at French Frigate Shoals, Hawaii

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Globally, seabirds are vulnerable to anthropogenic threats both at sea and on land. Seabirds typically nest colonially and show strong site fidelity; therefore,...

  5. Global dynamics of triaxial galactic models through frequency map analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaphilippou, Y.; Laskar, J.

    1998-01-01

    In a previous article (Papaphilippou & Laskar 1996), we used the frequency map analysis for studying the dynamics of the axisymmetric softened version of the logarithmic potential. The method is now applied to its 3-dimensional generalisation in order to deepen our knowledge regarding the dynamics of triaxial power-law galactic models. The principal dynamical features of the system are reviewed within the appropriate Hamiltonian frame of reference. The quasi-periodic approximations furnished by the method permit to clarify the dynamics of the principal types of orbits and their connection with perturbations of integrable cases of the general Hamiltonian. All the fine details of the dynamics associated with the addition of the third degree of freedom are displayed in the complete frequency map, a direct representation of the system's Arnol'd web. The influence of resonant lines and the extent of the chaotic zones are directly visualized in the physical space of the system. This approach reveals many unknown dynamical features of triaxial galactic potentials and gives strong indications that chaos should be an innate characteristic of triaxial configurations. The impact of these results in the construction of self-consistent galactic models are finally discussed.

  6. Global Dynamic Exposure and the OpenBuildingMap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schorlemmer, D.; Beutin, T.; Hirata, N.; Hao, K. X.; Wyss, M.; Cotton, F.; Prehn, K.

    2015-12-01

    Detailed understanding of local risk factors regarding natural catastrophes requires in-depth characterization of the local exposure. Current exposure capture techniques have to find the balance between resolution and coverage. We aim at bridging this gap by employing a crowd-sourced approach to exposure capturing focusing on risk related to earthquake hazard. OpenStreetMap (OSM), the rich and constantly growing geographical database, is an ideal foundation for us. More than 2.5 billion geographical nodes, more than 150 million building footprints (growing by ~100'000 per day), and a plethora of information about school, hospital, and other critical facility locations allow us to exploit this dataset for risk-related computations. We will harvest this dataset by collecting exposure and vulnerability indicators from explicitly provided data (e.g. hospital locations), implicitly provided data (e.g. building shapes and positions), and semantically derived data, i.e. interpretation applying expert knowledge. With this approach, we can increase the resolution of existing exposure models from fragility classes distribution via block-by-block specifications to building-by-building vulnerability. To increase coverage, we will provide a framework for collecting building data by any person or community. We will implement a double crowd-sourced approach to bring together the interest and enthusiasm of communities with the knowledge of earthquake and engineering experts. The first crowd-sourced approach aims at collecting building properties in a community by local people and activists. This will be supported by tailored building capture tools for mobile devices for simple and fast building property capturing. The second crowd-sourced approach involves local experts in estimating building vulnerability that will provide building classification rules that translate building properties into vulnerability and exposure indicators as defined in the Building Taxonomy 2.0 developed

  7. Concepts and theoretical specifications of a Coastal Vulnerability Dynamic Simulator (COVUDS): A multi-agent system for simulating coastal vulnerability towards management of coastal ecosystem services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orencio, P. M.; Endo, A.; Taniguchi, M.

    2014-12-01

    Disaster-causing natural hazards such as floods, erosions, earthquakes or slope failures were particularly observed to be concentrated in certain geographical regions. In the Asia-pacific region, coastal ecosystems were suffering because of perennial threats driven by chronic fluctuations in climate variability (e.g., typhoons, ENSO), or by dynamically occurring events (e.g., earthquakes, tsunamis). Among the many people that were found prone to such a risky condition were the ones inhabiting near the coastal areas. Characteristically, aside from being located at the forefront of these events, the coastal communities have impacted the resource by the kind of behavioral patterns they exhibited, such as overdependence and overexploitation to achieve their wellbeing. In this paper, we introduce the development of an approach to an assessment of the coupled human- environment using a multi- agent simulation (MAS) model known as Coastal Vulnerability Dynamic Simulator (COVUDS). The COVUDS comprised a human- environmental platform consisting multi- agents with corresponding spatial- based dynamic and static variables. These variables were used to present multiple hypothetical future situations that contribute to the purpose of supporting a more rational management of the coastal ecosystem and their environmental equities. Initially, we present the theoretical and conceptual components that would lead to the development of the COVUDS. These consisted of the human population engaged in behavioral patterns affecting the conditions of coastal ecosystem services; the system of the biophysical environment and changes in patches brought by global environment and local behavioral variations; the policy factors that were important for choosing area- specific interventions; and the decision- making mechanism that integrates the first three components. To guide a future scenario-based application that will be undertaken in a coastal area in the Philippines, the components of the

  8. Kinetic distance and kinetic maps from molecular dynamics simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Noe, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Characterizing macromolecular kinetics from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations requires a distance metric that can distinguish slowly-interconverting states. Here we build upon diffusion map theory and define a kinetic distance for irreducible Markov processes that quantifies how slowly molecular conformations interconvert. The kinetic distance can be computed given a model that approximates the eigenvalues and eigenvectors (reaction coordinates) of the MD Markov operator. Here we employ the time-lagged independent component analysis (TICA). The TICA components can be scaled to provide a kinetic map in which the Euclidean distance corresponds to the kinetic distance. As a result, the question of how many TICA dimensions should be kept in a dimensionality reduction approach becomes obsolete, and one parameter less needs to be specified in the kinetic model construction. We demonstrate the approach using TICA and Markov state model (MSM) analyses for illustrative models, protein conformation dynamics in bovine...

  9. Gross-Pitaevski map as a chaotic dynamical system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarneri, Italo

    2017-03-01

    The Gross-Pitaevski map is a discrete time, split-operator version of the Gross-Pitaevski dynamics in the circle, for which exponential instability has been recently reported. Here it is studied as a classical dynamical system in its own right. A systematic analysis of Lyapunov exponents exposes strongly chaotic behavior. Exponential growth of energy is then shown to be a direct consequence of rotational invariance and for stationary solutions the full spectrum of Lyapunov exponents is analytically computed. The present analysis includes the "resonant" case, when the free rotation period is commensurate to 2 π , and the map has countably many constants of the motion. Except for lowest-order resonances, this case exhibits an integrable-chaotic transition.

  10. Can Organic Farming Reduce Vulnerabilities and Enhance the Resilience of the European Food System? A Critical Assessment Using System Dynamics Structural Thinking Tools

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brzezina, Natalia; Kopainsky, Birgit; Mathijs, Erik

    2016-01-01

    ...? In this paper, we use system dynamics structural thinking tools to identify the vulnerabilities of the conventional food system that result from both its internal structure as well as its exposure...

  11. GIS-Mapping and Statistical Analyses to Identify Climate-Vulnerable Communities and Populations Exposed to Superfund Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Climate change-related cumulative health risks are expected to be disproportionately greater for overburdened communities, due to differential proximity and exposures to chemical sources and flood zones. Communities and populations vulnerable to climate change-associated impacts ...

  12. GIS-Mapping and Statistical Analyses to Identify Climate-Vulnerable Communities and Populations Exposed to Superfund Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Climate change-related cumulative health risks are expected to be disproportionately greater for overburdened communities, due to differential proximity and exposures to chemical sources and flood zones. Communities and populations vulnerable to climate change-associated impacts ...

  13. Exploring the Dynamics of Globalization: Supply Chain Vulnerability to Natural Disasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalafsky, Ronald V.; Conner, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Global supply chains play an increasingly important role in the economy and should therefore be addressed within geography coursework, especially given concerns that geographers have not fully explored various angles of globalization. This article explores the use of an online case study on supply chains and their vulnerability to natural…

  14. The eco-innovation of K-Chabazite zeolite application in high nitrate vulnerable soils: a mapping assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasi, Emanuele; Passeri, Nicolò; Martella, Angelo; Coltorti, Massimo; Faccini, Barbara; Di Giuseppe, Dario; Ferretti, Giacomo

    2015-04-01

    Farmers' cultivation choices, mainly related to the use of agricultural inputs, affect the natural ecosystem and has an impact on larger scale. In particular the on-land application of swine manure by pigs livestock affects the water quality of waterways and in certain area can compromise the long term sustainability of the agro-ecosystems. The Volano-Burana basin (Ferrara Province, Italy) is a high vulnerable area (under the Directive Nitrate 91/676/CEE) characterized by waterways surrounding terrains with high concentration of croplands that year by year are managed by farmers with slurry and fertilizers application on the soil. A 6 ha agricultural field within this basin has been involved as a case study for the implementation of ZeoLIFE project experimental activities, which consist in the introduction of volcanic rocks called zeolitite, by an innovative integrated cycle, that combines zeolitite with pig slurry, and put it into soil. The zeolitite used for the project, K-Chabazite zeolitite, holds a high cation exchange capacity (up to 2.2 meq/g) and reversible hydration. The granulated waste quarries zeolitite, enriched in ammonium by a treatment with pig slurry and added to agricultural land, have a high fertilization capacity and a slow-realise of nutrients (K, NH4) and water, allowing the solubilisation of tricalcium phosphate, making the P available for plants. Added to agricultural soil it has allowed an increase in yield up to 20% and simultaneously reduce of the amount of fertilizer and irrigation water up to 50%, with a resulting decrease in the nitrate concentration in pore-waters and superficial waters issued from the field in the water system. Starting from project's results, an agro-ecological model of charged zeolite application has been provided taking into account the economic and normative constraints and the main characteristics of the Burana-Volano Basin to identify and promote the best pathways to spread this eco-innovation process and

  15. Improved generalized cell mapping for global analysis of dynamical systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Three main parts of generalized cell mapping are improved for global analysis. A simple method, which is not based on the theory of digraphs, is presented to locate complete self-cycling sets that corre- spond to attractors and unstable invariant sets involving saddle, unstable periodic orbit and chaotic saddle. Refinement for complete self-cycling sets is developed to locate attractors and unstable in- variant sets with high degree of accuracy, which can start with a coarse cell structure. A nonuniformly interior-and-boundary sampling technique is used to make the refinement robust. For homeomorphic dissipative dynamical systems, a controlled boundary sampling technique is presented to make gen- eralized cell mapping method with refinement extremely accurate to obtain invariant sets. Recursive laws of group absorption probability and expected absorption time are introduced into generalized cell mapping, and then an optimal order for quantitative analysis of transient cells is established, which leads to the minimal computational work. The improved method is applied to four examples to show its effectiveness in global analysis of dynamical systems.

  16. Improved generalized cell mapping for global analysis of dynamical systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU HaiLin; XU JianXue

    2009-01-01

    Three main parts of generalized cell mapping are improved for global analysis. A simple method, whichis not based on the theory of digraphs, is presented to locate complete self-cycling sets that corre-spond to attractors and unstable invariant sets involving saddle, unstable periodic orbit and chaotic saddle. Refinement for complete self-cycling sets is developed to locate attractors and unstable in-variant sets with high degree of accuracy, which can start with a coarse cell structure. A nonuniformly interior-and-boundary sampling technique is used to make the refinement robust. For homeomorphic dissipative dynamical systems, a controlled boundary sampling technique is presented to make gen-eralized cell mapping method with refinement extremely accurate to obtain invariant sets. Recursive laws of group absorption probability and expected absorption time are introduced into generalized cell mapping, and then an optimal order for quantitative analysis of transient cells is established, which leads to the minimal computational work. The improved method is applied to four examples to show its effectiveness in global analysis of dynamical systems.

  17. Foreword: The dynamics of change in Alaska’s boreal forests: Resilience and vulnerability in response to climate warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Anthony; Chapin, F. Stuart; Ruess, Roger W.

    2016-01-01

    Long-term research by the Bonanza Creek (BNZ) Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) program has documented natural patterns of interannual and successional variability of the boreal forest in interior Alaska against which we can detect changes in system behavior. Between 2004 and 2010 the BNZ LTER program focused on understanding the dynamics of change through studying the resilience and vulnerability of Alaska's boreal forest in response to climate warming. The overarching question in this endeavor has been “How are boreal ecosystems responding, both gradually and abruptly, to climate warming, and what new landscape patterns are emerging?”

  18. Space charges can significantly affect the dynamics of accelerator maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bountis, Tassos; Skokos, Charalampos

    2006-10-01

    Space charge effects can be very important for the dynamics of intense particle beams, as they repeatedly pass through nonlinear focusing elements, aiming to maximize the beam's luminosity properties in the storage rings of a high energy accelerator. In the case of hadron beams, whose charge distribution can be considered as “frozen” within a cylindrical core of small radius compared to the beam's dynamical aperture, analytical formulas have been recently derived [C. Benedetti, G. Turchetti, Phys. Lett. A 340 (2005) 461] for the contribution of space charges within first order Hamiltonian perturbation theory. These formulas involve distribution functions which, in general, do not lead to expressions that can be evaluated in closed form. In this Letter, we apply this theory to an example of a charge distribution, whose effect on the dynamics can be derived explicitly and in closed form, both in the case of 2-dimensional as well as 4-dimensional mapping models of hadron beams. We find that, even for very small values of the “perveance” (strength of the space charge effect) the long term stability of the dynamics changes considerably. In the flat beam case, the outer invariant “tori” surrounding the origin disappear, decreasing the size of the beam's dynamical aperture, while beyond a certain threshold the beam is almost entirely lost. Analogous results in mapping models of beams with 2-dimensional cross section demonstrate that in that case also, even for weak tune depressions, orbital diffusion is enhanced and many particles whose motion was bounded now escape to infinity, indicating that space charges can impose significant limitations on the beam's luminosity.

  19. Space charges can significantly affect the dynamics of accelerator maps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bountis, Tassos [Department of Mathematics, University of Patras, GR-26500 Patras (Greece) and Center for Research and Applications of Nonlinear Systems (CRANS), University of Patras, GR-26500 Patras (Greece)]. E-mail: tassos50@otenet.gr; Skokos, Charalampos [Center for Research and Applications of Nonlinear Systems (CRANS), University of Patras, GR-26500 Patras (Greece)

    2006-10-09

    Space charge effects can be very important for the dynamics of intense particle beams, as they repeatedly pass through nonlinear focusing elements, aiming to maximize the beam's luminosity properties in the storage rings of a high energy accelerator. In the case of hadron beams, whose charge distribution can be considered as 'frozen' within a cylindrical core of small radius compared to the beam's dynamical aperture, analytical formulas have been recently derived [C. Benedetti, G. Turchetti, Phys. Lett. A 340 (2005) 461] for the contribution of space charges within first order Hamiltonian perturbation theory. These formulas involve distribution functions which, in general, do not lead to expressions that can be evaluated in closed form. In this Letter, we apply this theory to an example of a charge distribution, whose effect on the dynamics can be derived explicitly and in closed form, both in the case of 2-dimensional as well as 4-dimensional mapping models of hadron beams. We find that, even for very small values of the 'perveance' (strength of the space charge effect) the long term stability of the dynamics changes considerably. In the flat beam case, the outer invariant 'tori' surrounding the origin disappear, decreasing the size of the beam's dynamical aperture, while beyond a certain threshold the beam is almost entirely lost. Analogous results in mapping models of beams with 2-dimensional cross section demonstrate that in that case also, even for weak tune depressions, orbital diffusion is enhanced and many particles whose motion was bounded now escape to infinity, indicating that space charges can impose significant limitations on the beam's luminosity.

  20. Anticipating Vulnerability to Climate Change in Dryland Pastoral Systems: Using Dynamic Systems Models for the Kalahari

    OpenAIRE

    Dougill, AJ; Fraser, EDG; Reed, MS

    2010-01-01

    It is vitally important to identify agroecosystems that may cease functioning because of changing climate or land degradation. However, identifying such systems is confounded on both conceptual and methodological grounds, especially in systems that are moving toward thresholds, a common trait of dryland environments. This study explores these challenges by analyzing how a range of external pressures affect the vulnerability of dryland pastoral systems in the Kalahari. This is achieved by empl...

  1. Dynamic Digital Maps as Vehicles for Distributing Digital Geologic Maps and Embedded Analytical Data and Multimedia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condit, C. D.; Mninch, M.

    2012-12-01

    The Dynamic Digital Map (DDM) is an ideal vehicle for the professional geologist to use to describe the geologic setting of key sites to the public in a format that integrates and presents maps and associated analytical data and multimedia without the need for an ArcGIS interface. Maps with field trip guide stops that include photographs, movies and figures and animations, showing, for example, how the features seen in the field formed, or how data might be best visualized in "time-frame" sequences are ideally included in DDMs. DDMs distribute geologic maps, images, movies, analytical data, and text such as field guides, in an integrated cross-platform, web enabled format that are intuitive to use, easily and quickly searchable, and require no additional proprietary software to operate. Maps, photos, movies and animations are stored outside the program, which acts as an organizational framework and index to present these data. Once created, the DDM can be downloaded from the web site hosting it in the flavor matching the user's operating system (e.g. Linux, Windows and Macintosh) as zip, dmg or tar files (and soon as iOS and Android tablet apps). When decompressed, the DDM can then access its associated data directly from that site with no browser needed. Alternatively, the entire package can be distributed and used from CD, DVD, or flash-memory storage. The intent of this presentation is to introduce the variety of geology that can be accessed from the over 25 DDMs created to date, concentrating on the DDM of the Springerville Volcanic Field. We will highlight selected features of some of them, introduce a simplified interface to the original DDM (that we renamed DDMC for Classic) and give a brief look at a the recently (2010-2011) completed geologic maps of the Springerville Volcanic field to see examples of each of the features discussed above, and a display of the integrated analytical data set. We will also highlight the differences between the classic or

  2. Past landscape dynamics in mountain territories: historical trajectory of vulnerability in the Vars catchment (French Alps)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puissant, Anne; Cioloboc, Florin; Schlosser, Arnaud; Gazo, Aurelien; Martin, Brice; Malet, Jean-Philippe

    2016-04-01

    Over the last decades and centuries, mountain landscapes have experiment natural and man-made landcover/use changes with mainly the development of tourism activities and the reduction of agro-pastoral activities. These transformations have directly influenced the spatial organization of mountain landscapes. To better anticipate the future exposure of the territory to natural hazards, decision-makers need retrospective analyses of the past changes. In the frame of the SAMCO project, whose objective is to propose mountain risk assessment methodologies in the context of global changes, this research presents a retrospective analysis of land cover/use changes (from 1948 to 2013) in the Vars catchment (French South Alps) submitted to several natural hazards (rockfall, landslide, and flood). Database of elements at risk has been built for five dates and evolution of vulnerability is performed through a versatile GIS-based analysis tool developed for the estimation of vulnerability indicators (physical, economical, social) at a fine scale (1:5000). Results allow identifying several areas with different trajectories of vulnerability which can be use as input data for risk analysis and define future trends.

  3. Assessing vulnerability mapping and protection zones of karst spring waters and validating by the joint use of natural and artificial tracers. The case of Auta Spring (Southern Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín, Ana Isabel; Mudarra, Matías; Andreo, Bartolomé

    2016-04-01

    Delineation of protection zones for water supply and implementation of proper land-use practices in surrounding areas are crucial aspects for a sustainable use of valuable drinking water resources. This is even more important in karst aquifers, which are particularly sensitive to contamination, having a very low self-cleaning capacity due to their structure and hydrological behavior. Consequently, specific methodologies adapted to the particular characteristics of karst media are necessary. In this work, an approach for protection zoning of the pilot site of Auta karst spring (southern Spain) is proposed, based on the application of COP+K method for contamination vulnerability and validation of results by natural (organic) tracers of infiltration (NO3-, TOC, intrinsic fluorescence) and by a dye tracer test conducted on June, 2011 (injecting 500 mg uranine). The aquifer drained by Auta spring (8.5 km2) presents a complex geological structure, formed by Jurassic dolostones and limestones highly folded and fractured. Recharge takes place by the infiltration of rainfall through karst landforms and also by losses in an adjacent river when it flows over the carbonate outcrops (dye injection point). Drainage is mainly through several springs located at the southwest, including Auta spring and 5 overflow springs. The source vulnerability map obtained by applying COP+K method can be adopted as the baseline to delineate the protection zones, through the conversion from vulnerability classes to degrees of protection. Dye tracer test and natural tracers of infiltration corroborate that aquifer sectors influenced by the river can be extremely vulnerable to pollution, but also well-developed exokarst features. In fact, slight evidences of pollution have been detected during the study period, with relatively-high NO3- contents and high fluorescence linked to bacteriological activity in Auta spring water. The jointly use of natural and artificial tracers constitute a reliable and

  4. Spatial Variability of Geriatric Depression Risk in a High-Density City: A Data-Driven Socio-Environmental Vulnerability Mapping Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung Chak Ho

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies found a relationship between geriatric depression and social deprivation. However, most studies did not include environmental factors in the statistical models, introducing a bias to estimate geriatric depression risk because the urban environment was found to have significant associations with mental health. We developed a cross-sectional study with a binomial logistic regression to examine the geriatric depression risk of a high-density city based on five social vulnerability factors and four environmental measures. We constructed a socio-environmental vulnerability index by including the significant variables to map the geriatric depression risk in Hong Kong, a high-density city characterized by compact urban environment and high-rise buildings. Crude and adjusted odds ratios (ORs of the variables were significantly different, indicating that both social and environmental variables should be included as confounding factors. For the comprehensive model controlled by all confounding factors, older adults who were of lower education had the highest geriatric depression risks (OR: 1.60 (1.21, 2.12. Higher percentage of residential area and greater variation in building height within the neighborhood also contributed to geriatric depression risk in Hong Kong, while average building height had negative association with geriatric depression risk. In addition, the socio-environmental vulnerability index showed that higher scores were associated with higher geriatric depression risk at neighborhood scale. The results of mapping and cross-section model suggested that geriatric depression risk was associated with a compact living environment with low socio-economic conditions in historical urban areas in Hong Kong. In conclusion, our study found a significant difference in geriatric depression risk between unadjusted and adjusted models, suggesting the importance of including environmental factors in estimating geriatric depression risk

  5. Mood-Reactive Self-Esteem and Depression Vulnerability: Person-Specific Symptom Dynamics via Smart Phone Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clasen, Peter C; Fisher, Aaron J; Beevers, Christopher G

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive theories of depression suggest that mood-reactive self-esteem, a pattern of cognitive reactivity where low self-esteem is temporally dependent on levels of sadness, represents vulnerability for depression. Few studies have directly tested this hypothesis, particularly using intensive data collection methods (i.e., experience sampling) required to capture the temporal dynamics of sadness and self-esteem as they unfold naturally, over time. In this study we used participants' smartphones to collect multiple daily ratings of sadness and self-esteem over three weeks, in the real world. We then applied dynamic factor modeling to explore theoretically driven hypotheses about the temporal dependency of self-esteem on sadness (i.e., mood-reactive self-esteem) and its relationship to indices of depression vulnerability both contemporaneously (e.g., rumination, sad mood persistence) and prospectively (e.g., future symptomatology). In sum, individuals who demonstrated mood-reactive self-esteem reported higher levels of rumination at baseline, more persistent sad mood over three weeks, and increased depression symptoms at the end of three weeks above and beyond a trait-like index of self-esteem. The integration of smartphone assessment and person-specific analytics employed in this study offers an exiting new avenue to advance the study and treatment of depression.

  6. Mood-Reactive Self-Esteem and Depression Vulnerability: Person-Specific Symptom Dynamics via Smart Phone Assessment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter C Clasen

    Full Text Available Cognitive theories of depression suggest that mood-reactive self-esteem, a pattern of cognitive reactivity where low self-esteem is temporally dependent on levels of sadness, represents vulnerability for depression. Few studies have directly tested this hypothesis, particularly using intensive data collection methods (i.e., experience sampling required to capture the temporal dynamics of sadness and self-esteem as they unfold naturally, over time. In this study we used participants' smartphones to collect multiple daily ratings of sadness and self-esteem over three weeks, in the real world. We then applied dynamic factor modeling to explore theoretically driven hypotheses about the temporal dependency of self-esteem on sadness (i.e., mood-reactive self-esteem and its relationship to indices of depression vulnerability both contemporaneously (e.g., rumination, sad mood persistence and prospectively (e.g., future symptomatology. In sum, individuals who demonstrated mood-reactive self-esteem reported higher levels of rumination at baseline, more persistent sad mood over three weeks, and increased depression symptoms at the end of three weeks above and beyond a trait-like index of self-esteem. The integration of smartphone assessment and person-specific analytics employed in this study offers an exiting new avenue to advance the study and treatment of depression.

  7. Mood-Reactive Self-Esteem and Depression Vulnerability: Person-Specific Symptom Dynamics via Smart Phone Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clasen, Peter C.; Fisher, Aaron J.; Beevers, Christopher G.

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive theories of depression suggest that mood-reactive self-esteem, a pattern of cognitive reactivity where low self-esteem is temporally dependent on levels of sadness, represents vulnerability for depression. Few studies have directly tested this hypothesis, particularly using intensive data collection methods (i.e., experience sampling) required to capture the temporal dynamics of sadness and self-esteem as they unfold naturally, over time. In this study we used participants’ smartphones to collect multiple daily ratings of sadness and self-esteem over three weeks, in the real world. We then applied dynamic factor modeling to explore theoretically driven hypotheses about the temporal dependency of self-esteem on sadness (i.e., mood-reactive self-esteem) and its relationship to indices of depression vulnerability both contemporaneously (e.g., rumination, sad mood persistence) and prospectively (e.g., future symptomatology). In sum, individuals who demonstrated mood-reactive self-esteem reported higher levels of rumination at baseline, more persistent sad mood over three weeks, and increased depression symptoms at the end of three weeks above and beyond a trait-like index of self-esteem. The integration of smartphone assessment and person-specific analytics employed in this study offers an exiting new avenue to advance the study and treatment of depression. PMID:26131724

  8. Border Malaria Associated with Multidrug Resistance on Thailand-Myanmar and Thailand-Cambodia Borders: Transmission Dynamic, Vulnerability, and Surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adisak Bhumiratana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This systematic review elaborates the concepts and impacts of border malaria, particularly on the emergence and spread of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax multidrug resistance (MDR malaria on Thailand-Myanmar and Thailand-Cambodia borders. Border malaria encompasses any complex epidemiological settings of forest-related and forest fringe-related malaria, both regularly occurring in certain transmission areas and manifesting a trend of increased incidence in transmission prone areas along these borders, as the result of interconnections of human settlements and movement activities, cross-border population migrations, ecological changes, vector population dynamics, and multidrug resistance. For regional and global perspectives, this review analyzes and synthesizes the rationales pertaining to transmission dynamics and the vulnerabilities of border malaria that constrain surveillance and control of the world’s most MDR falciparum and vivax malaria on these chaotic borders.

  9. Mapping cold-water coral habitats at different scales within the Northern Ionian Sea (Central Mediterranean): an assessment of coral coverage and associated vulnerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savini, Alessandra; Vertino, Agostina; Marchese, Fabio; Beuck, Lydia; Freiwald, André

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we mapped the distribution of Cold-Water Coral (CWC) habitats on the northern Ionian Margin (Mediterranean Sea), with an emphasis on assessing coral coverage at various spatial scales over an area of 2,000 km(2) between 120 and 1,400 m of water depth. Our work made use of a set of data obtained from ship-based research surveys. Multi-scale seafloor mapping data, video inspections, and previous results from sediment samples were integrated and analyzed using Geographic Information System (GIS)-based tools. Results obtained from the application of spatial and textural analytical techniques to acoustic meso-scale maps (i.e. a Digital Terrain Model (DTM) of the seafloor at a 40 m grid cell size and associated terrain parameters) and large-scale maps (i.e. Side-Scan Sonar (SSS) mosaics of 1 m in resolution ground-truthed using underwater video observations) were integrated and revealed that, at the meso-scale level, the main morphological pattern (i.e. the aggregation of mound-like features) associated with CWC habitat occurrences was widespread over a total area of 600 km(2). Single coral mounds were isolated from the DTM and represented the geomorphic proxies used to model coral distributions within the investigated area. Coral mounds spanned a total area of 68 km(2) where different coral facies (characterized using video analyses and mapped on SSS mosaics) represent the dominant macro-habitat. We also mapped and classified anthropogenic threats that were identifiable within the examined videos, and, here, discuss their relationship to the mapped distribution of coral habitats and mounds. The combined results (from multi-scale habitat mapping and observations of the distribution of anthropogenic threats) provide the first quantitative assessment of CWC coverage for a Mediterranean province and document the relevant role of seafloor geomorphology in influencing habitat vulnerability to different types of human pressures.

  10. A Novel Dynamic Physical Storage Model for Vehicle Navigation Maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaohua Wang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The physical storage model is one of the key technologies for vehicle navigation maps used in a navigation system. However, the performance of most traditional storage models is limited in dynamic navigation due to the static storage format they use. In this paper, we proposed a new physical storage model, China Navigation Data Format (CNDF, which helped access and update the navigation data. The CNDF model used the reach-based hierarchy method to build a road hierarchal network, which enhanced the efficiency of data compression. It also adopted the Linear Link Coding method, in which the start position was combined with the end position as the identification code for multi-level links, and each link traced up-level links consistently without recording the array of identifications. The navigation map of East China (including Beijing, Tianjin, Shandong, Hebei, and Jiangsu at 1:10,000, generated using the CNDF model, and the real time traffic information in Beijing were combined to test the performance of a navigation system using an embedded navigation device. Results showed that it cost less than 1 second each time to refresh the navigation map, and the accuracy of the hierarchal shortest-path algorithm was 99.9%. Our work implied that the CNDF model is efficient in vehicle navigation applications.

  11. Developmental dynamics of radial vulnerability in the cerebral compartments in preterm infants and neonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivica eKostović

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The developmental vulnerability of different classes of axonal pathways in preterm white matter is not known. We propose that laminar compartments of the developing cerebral wall serve as spatial framework for axonal growth and evaluate potential of anatomical landmarks for understanding reorganization of the cerebral wall after perinatal lesions. The 3T MRI (in vivo and histological analysis were performed in a series of cases ranging from 22 PCW to 3 years. For the follow-up scans, three groups of children (control, normotypic and preterms with lesions were examined at the term equivalent age and after the first year of life. MRI and histological abnormalities were analyzed in the following compartments: (a periventricular, with periventricular fibre system; (b intermediate, with periventricular crossroads, sagittal strata and centrum semiovale; (c superficial, composed of gyral white matter, subplate and cortical plate. Vulnerability of thalamo-cortical pathways within the crossroads and sagittal strata seems to be characteristic for early preterms, while vulnerability of long association pathways in the centrum semiovale seems to be predominant feature of late preterms. The structural indicator of the lesion of the long association pathways is the loss of delineation between centrum semiovale and subplate remnant, which is possible substrate of the diffuse periventricular leukomalacia. The enhanced difference in MR signal intensity of centrum semiovale and subplate remnant, observed in damaged children after first year, we interpret as structural plasticity of intact short cortico-cortical fibres, which grow postnatally through U-zones and enter the cortex through the subplate remnant. Our findings indicate that radial distribution of MRI signal abnormalities in the cerebral compartments may be related to lesion of different classes of axonal pathways and have prognostic value for predicting the likely outcome of prenatal and perinatal

  12. Developmental dynamics of radial vulnerability in the cerebral compartments in preterm infants and neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostović, Ivica; Kostović-Srzentić, Mirna; Benjak, Vesna; Jovanov-Milošević, Nataša; Radoš, Milan

    2014-01-01

    The developmental vulnerability of different classes of axonal pathways in preterm white matter is not known. We propose that laminar compartments of the developing cerebral wall serve as spatial framework for axonal growth and evaluate potential of anatomical landmarks for understanding reorganization of the cerebral wall after perinatal lesions. The 3-T MRI (in vivo) and histological analysis were performed in a series of cases ranging from 22 postconceptional weeks to 3 years. For the follow-up scans, three groups of children (control, normotypic, and preterms with lesions) were examined at the term equivalent age and after the first year of life. MRI and histological abnormalities were analyzed in the following compartments: (a) periventricular, with periventricular fiber system; (b) intermediate, with periventricular crossroads, sagittal strata, and centrum semiovale; (c) superficial, composed of gyral white matter, subplate, and cortical plate. Vulnerability of thalamocortical pathways within the crossroads and sagittal strata seems to be characteristic for early preterms, while vulnerability of long association pathways in the centrum semiovale seems to be predominant feature of late preterms. The structural indicator of the lesion of the long association pathways is the loss of delineation between centrum semiovale and subplate remnant, which is possible substrate of the diffuse periventricular leukomalacia. The enhanced difference in MR signal intensity of centrum semiovale and subplate remnant, observed in damaged children after first year, we interpret as structural plasticity of intact short cortico-cortical fibers, which grow postnatally through U-zones and enter the cortex through the subplate remnant. Our findings indicate that radial distribution of MRI signal abnormalities in the cerebral compartments may be related to lesion of different classes of axonal pathways and have prognostic value for predicting the likely outcome of prenatal and

  13. Kinetic distance and kinetic maps from molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noé, Frank; Clementi, Cecilia

    2015-10-13

    Characterizing macromolecular kinetics from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations requires a distance metric that can distinguish slowly interconverting states. Here, we build upon diffusion map theory and define a kinetic distance metric for irreducible Markov processes that quantifies how slowly molecular conformations interconvert. The kinetic distance can be computed given a model that approximates the eigenvalues and eigenvectors (reaction coordinates) of the MD Markov operator. Here, we employ the time-lagged independent component analysis (TICA). The TICA components can be scaled to provide a kinetic map in which the Euclidean distance corresponds to the kinetic distance. As a result, the question of how many TICA dimensions should be kept in a dimensionality reduction approach becomes obsolete, and one parameter less needs to be specified in the kinetic model construction. We demonstrate the approach using TICA and Markov state model (MSM) analyses for illustrative models, protein conformation dynamics in bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor and protein-inhibitor association in trypsin and benzamidine. We find that the total kinetic variance (TKV) is an excellent indicator of model quality and can be used to rank different input feature sets.

  14. Dynamical zeta functions for piecewise monotone maps of the interval

    CERN Document Server

    Ruelle, David

    2004-01-01

    Consider a space M, a map f:M\\to M, and a function g:M \\to {\\mathbb C}. The formal power series \\zeta (z) = \\exp \\sum ^\\infty _{m=1} \\frac {z^m}{m} \\sum _{x \\in \\mathrm {Fix}\\,f^m} \\prod ^{m-1}_{k=0} g (f^kx) yields an example of a dynamical zeta function. Such functions have unexpected analytic properties and interesting relations to the theory of dynamical systems, statistical mechanics, and the spectral theory of certain operators (transfer operators). The first part of this monograph presents a general introduction to this subject. The second part is a detailed study of the zeta functions associated with piecewise monotone maps of the interval [0,1]. In particular, Ruelle gives a proof of a generalized form of the Baladi-Keller theorem relating the poles of \\zeta (z) and the eigenvalues of the transfer operator. He also proves a theorem expressing the largest eigenvalue of the transfer operator in terms of the ergodic properties of (M,f,g).

  15. Dynamic-BM: multispecies Dynamic BodyMap database from temporal RNA-seq data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Ya; Chen, Xiaowei; Niu, Yiwei; Wang, Dongpeng; Luo, Huaxia; Fan, Zhen; Wang, Dan; Wu, Wei; Teng, Xueyi; He, Shunmin; Luo, Jianjun; Chen, Runsheng

    2017-06-01

    Biological processes, especially developmental processes, are often dynamic. Previous BodyMap projects for human and mouse have provided researchers with portals to tissue-specific gene expression, but these efforts have not included dynamic gene expression patterns. Over the past few years, substantial progress in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of protein-coding and long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) genes in development processes has been achieved through numerous time series RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) studies. However, none of the existing databases focuses on these time series data, thus rendering the exploration of dynamic gene expression patterns inconvenient. Here, we present Dynamic BodyMap (Dynamic-BM), a database for temporal gene expression profiles, obtained from 2203 time series of RNA-seq samples, covering >25 tissues from five species. Dynamic-BM has a user-friendly Web interface designed for browsing and searching the dynamic expression pattern of genes from different sources. It is an open resource for efficient data exploration, providing dynamic expression profiles of both protein-coding genes and lncRNAs to facilitate the generation of new hypotheses in developmental biology research. Additionally, Dynamic-BM includes a literature-based knowledgebase for lncRNAs associated with tissue development and a list of manually selected lncRNA candidates that may be involved in tissue development. Dynamic-BM is available at http://bioinfo.ibp.ac.cn/Dynamic-BM. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Benthic Assemblages of the Anton Dohrn Seamount (NE Atlantic: Defining Deep-Sea Biotopes to Support Habitat Mapping and Management Efforts with a Focus on Vulnerable Marine Ecosystems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime S Davies

    Full Text Available In 2009 the NW and SE flanks of Anton Dohrn Seamount were surveyed using multibeam echosounder and video ground-truthing to characterise megabenthic biological assemblages (biotopes and assess those which clearly adhere to the definition of Vulnerable Marine Ecosystems, for use in habitat mapping. A combination of multivariate analysis of still imagery and video ground-truthing defined 13 comprehensive descriptions of biotopes that function as mapping units in an applied context. The data reveals that the NW and SE sides of Anton Dohrn Seamount (ADS are topographically complex and harbour diverse biological assemblages, some of which agree with current definitions of 'listed' habitats of conservation concern. Ten of these biotopes could easily be considered Vulnerable Marine Ecosystems; three coral gardens, four cold-water coral reefs, two xenophyophore communities and one sponge dominated community, with remaining biotopes requiring more detailed assessment. Coral gardens were only found on positive geomorphic features, namely parasitic cones and radial ridges, found both sides of the seamount over a depth of 1311-1740 m. Two cold-water coral reefs (equivalent to summit reef were mapped on the NW side of the seamount; Lophelia pertusa reef associated with the cliff top mounds at a depth of 747-791 m and Solenosmilia variabilis reef on a radial ridge at a depth of 1318-1351 m. Xenophyophore communities were mapped from both sides of the seamount at a depth of 1099-1770 m and were either associated with geomorphic features or were in close proximity (< 100 m to them. The sponge dominated community was found on the steep escarpment either side of the seamount over at a depth of 854-1345 m. Multivariate diversity revealed the xenophyophore biotopes to be the least diverse, and a hard substratum biotope characterised by serpulids and the sessile holothurian, Psolus squamatus, as the most diverse.

  17. Benthic Assemblages of the Anton Dohrn Seamount (NE Atlantic): Defining Deep-Sea Biotopes to Support Habitat Mapping and Management Efforts with a Focus on Vulnerable Marine Ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Jaime S; Stewart, Heather A; Narayanaswamy, Bhavani E; Jacobs, Colin; Spicer, John; Golding, Neil; Howell, Kerry L

    2015-01-01

    In 2009 the NW and SE flanks of Anton Dohrn Seamount were surveyed using multibeam echosounder and video ground-truthing to characterise megabenthic biological assemblages (biotopes) and assess those which clearly adhere to the definition of Vulnerable Marine Ecosystems, for use in habitat mapping. A combination of multivariate analysis of still imagery and video ground-truthing defined 13 comprehensive descriptions of biotopes that function as mapping units in an applied context. The data reveals that the NW and SE sides of Anton Dohrn Seamount (ADS) are topographically complex and harbour diverse biological assemblages, some of which agree with current definitions of 'listed' habitats of conservation concern. Ten of these biotopes could easily be considered Vulnerable Marine Ecosystems; three coral gardens, four cold-water coral reefs, two xenophyophore communities and one sponge dominated community, with remaining biotopes requiring more detailed assessment. Coral gardens were only found on positive geomorphic features, namely parasitic cones and radial ridges, found both sides of the seamount over a depth of 1311-1740 m. Two cold-water coral reefs (equivalent to summit reef) were mapped on the NW side of the seamount; Lophelia pertusa reef associated with the cliff top mounds at a depth of 747-791 m and Solenosmilia variabilis reef on a radial ridge at a depth of 1318-1351 m. Xenophyophore communities were mapped from both sides of the seamount at a depth of 1099-1770 m and were either associated with geomorphic features or were in close proximity (< 100 m) to them. The sponge dominated community was found on the steep escarpment either side of the seamount over at a depth of 854-1345 m. Multivariate diversity revealed the xenophyophore biotopes to be the least diverse, and a hard substratum biotope characterised by serpulids and the sessile holothurian, Psolus squamatus, as the most diverse.

  18. Making Dynamic Digital Maps Cross-Platform and WWW Capable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condit, C. D.

    2001-05-01

    High-quality color geologic maps are an invaluable information resource for educators, students and researchers. However, maps with large datasets that include images, or various types of movies, in addition to site locations where analytical data has been collected, are difficult to publish in a format that facilitates their easy access, distribution and use. The development of capable desktop computers and object oriented graphical programming environments has facilitated publication of such data sets in an encapsulated form. The original Dynamic Digital Map (DDM) programs, developed using the Macintosh based SuperCard programming environment, exemplified this approach, in which all data are included in a single package designed so that display and access to the data did not depend on proprietary programs. These DDMs were aimed for ease of use, and allowed data to be displayed by several methods, including point-and-click at icons pin-pointing sample (or image) locations on maps, and from clicklists of sample or site numbers. Each of these DDMs included an overview and automated tour explaining the content organization and program use. This SuperCard development culminated in a "DDM Template", which is a SuperCard shell into which SuperCard users could insert their own content and thus create their own DDMs, following instructions in an accompanying "DDM Cookbook" (URL http://www.geo.umass.edu/faculty/condit/condit2.html). These original SuperCard-based DDMs suffered two critical limitations: a single user platform (Macintosh) and, although they can be downloaded from the web, their use lacked an integration into the WWW. Over the last eight months I have been porting the DDM technology to MetaCard, which is aggressively cross-platform (11 UNIX dialects, WIN32 and Macintosh). The new MetaCard DDM is redesigned to make the maps and images accessible either from CD or the web, using the "LoadNGo" concept. LoadNGo allows the user to download the stand-alone DDM

  19. Rift Valley fever in a zone potentially occupied by Aedes vexans in Senegal: dynamics and risk mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile Vignolles

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analysis of the interaction between the various variables associated with Rift Valley fever (RVF such as the mosquito vector, available hosts and rainfall distribution. To that end, the varying zones potentially occupied by mosquitoes (ZPOM, rainfall events and pond dynamics, and the associated exposure of hosts to the RVF virus by Aedes vexans, were analyzed in the Barkedji area of the Ferlo, Senegal, during the 2003 rainy season. Ponds were identified by remote sensing using a high-resolution SPOT-5 satellite image. Additional data on ponds and rainfall events from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission were combined with in-situ entomological and limnimetric measurements, and the localization of vulnerable ruminant hosts (data derived from QuickBird satellite. Since “Ae. vexans productive events” are dependent on the timing of rainfall for their embryogenesis (six days without rain are necessary to trigger hatching, the dynamic spatio-temporal distribution of Ae. vexans density was based on the total rainfall amount and pond dynamics. Detailed ZPOM mapping was obtained on a daily basis and combined with aggressiveness temporal profiles. Risks zones, i.e. zones where hazards and vulnerability are combined, are expressed by the percentages of parks where animals are potentially exposed to mosquito bites. This new approach, simply relying upon rainfall distribution evaluated from space, is meant to contribute to the implementation of a new, operational early warning system for RVF based on environmental risks linked to climatic and environmental conditions.

  20. Taluka level environmental sensitivity index (ESI) and vulnerability mapping for oil spills: A pilot study from Goa state, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    ManiMurali, R.; Kumar, R.; Vethamony, P.

    is an understanding of the relationships among physical processes, substrate type and associated biota that produce predictable patterns in oil behavior persistence and biological impact. Shoreline Classification–ranked according to a scale relating...,; (shore line species are vulnerable to oil spill so classification of species is necessary in order to present a ESI atlas.  Identification of major oil sensitive organism: (there are some species inhabiting the shoreline which are particularly...

  1. Mapping real-world to online vulnerability in young people with developmental disorders : illustrations from autism and Williams syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Lough, E.; Flynn, E.; Riby, D.M.

    2014-01-01

    The Internet poses a new kind of threat, especially for those individuals already vulnerable in society. The current paper draws on the social phenotypes associated with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and Williams syndrome (WS) to propose that individuals with some developmental disorders face an elevated level of risk whilst online. Many individuals with ASD struggle to maintain social relations and are frequent users of screen-based technology, using the Internet to seek out social connecti...

  2. Mapping of beef, sheep and goat food systems in Nairobi - A framework for policy making and the identification of structural vulnerabilities and deficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarcon, Pablo; Fèvre, Eric M; Murungi, Maurice K; Muinde, Patrick; Akoko, James; Dominguez-Salas, Paula; Kiambi, Stella; Ahmed, Sohel; Häsler, Barbara; Rushton, Jonathan

    2017-03-01

    Nairobi is a large rapidly-growing city whose demand for beef, mutton and goat products is expected to double by 2030. The study aimed to map the Nairobi beef, sheep and goat systems structure and flows to identify deficiencies and vulnerabilities to shocks. Cross-sectional data were collected through focus group discussions and interviews with people operating in Nairobi ruminant livestock and meat markets and in the large processing companies. Qualitative and quantitative data were obtained about the type of people, animals, products and value adding activities in the chains, and their structural, spatial and temporal interactions. Mapping analysis was done in three different dimensions: people and product profiling (interactions of people and products), geographical (routes of animals and products) and temporal mapping (seasonal fluctuations). The results obtained were used to identify structural deficiencies and vulnerability factors in the system. Results for the beef food system showed that 44-55% of the city's beef supply flows through the 'local terminal markets', but that 54-64% of total supply is controlled by one 'meat market'. Numerous informal chains were identified, with independent livestock and meat traders playing a pivotal role in the functionality of these systems, and where most activities are conducted with inefficient quality control and under scarce and inadequate infrastructure and organisation, generating wastage and potential food safety risks in low quality meat products. Geographical and temporal analysis showed the critical areas influencing the different markets, with larger markets increasing their market share in the low season. Large processing companies, partly integrated, operate with high quality infrastructures, but with up to 60% of their beef supply depending on similar routes as the informal markets. Only these companies were involved in value addition activities, reaching high-end markets, but also dominating the

  3. Dynamic mapping of EDDL device descriptions to OPC UA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atta Nsiah, Kofi; Schappacher, Manuel; Sikora, Axel

    2017-07-01

    OPC UA (Open Platform Communications Unified Architecture) is already a well-known concept used widely in the automation industry. In the area of factory automation, OPC UA models the underlying field devices such as sensors and actuators in an OPC UA server to allow connecting OPC UA clients to access device-specific information via a standardized information model. One of the requirements of the OPC UA server to represent field device data using its information model is to have advanced knowledge about the properties of the field devices in the form of device descriptions. The international standard IEC 61804 specifies EDDL (Electronic Device Description Language) as a generic language for describing the properties of field devices. In this paper, the authors describe a possibility to dynamically map and integrate field device descriptions based on EDDL into OPCUA.

  4. Quantum cat map dynamics on AdS$_2$

    CERN Document Server

    Axenides, Minos; Nicolis, Stam

    2016-01-01

    We present a toy model for the chaotic unitary scattering of single particle wave packets on the radial AdS$_2$ geometry of extremal BH horizons. Based on our recent work for the discretization of the AdS$_2$ space-time, which describes a finite and random geometry, by modular arithmetic, we investigate the validity of the eigenstate thermalization hypothesis (ETH), as well as that of the fast scrambling time bound conjecture (STB), for an observer with time evolution operator the quantum Arnol'd cat map (QACM). We find that the QACM, while possessing a linear spectrum, has eigenstates, which can be expressed in closed form, are found to be random and to satisfy the assumptions of the ETH.The implications are that the dynamics is described by a chaotic, unitary, single particle S-matrix, which completely delocalizes and randomizes initial gaussian wave packets . Applying results obtained by Dyson and Falk for the periods of the Arnol'd Cat Map(ACM),which are related to its mixing time, we also find that the t...

  5. DEMOGRAPHIC VULNERABILITIES IN TECUCI PLAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iulian Adrian ŞORCARU

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The study focuses on analyzing and mapping 8 indicators considered to best reflect the demographic vulnerability in Tecuci Plain in the year 2010 and proposes a model of aggregation which finally allows us to distinguish three major types of demographic vulnerability (low, medium and high. Mapping the final values also shows significant disparities in the territorial administrative units that broadly overlap the plain, the most vulnerable being Tecuci city and the peripheral communes, towards Vrancea and Vaslui Counties.

  6. Recovery and archiving key Arctic Alaska vegetation map and plot data for the Arctic-Boreal Vulnerability Field Experiment (ABoVE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, D. A.; Breen, A. L.; Broderson, D.; Epstein, H. E.; Fisher, W.; Grunblatt, J.; Heinrichs, T.; Raynolds, M. K.; Walker, M. D.; Wirth, L.

    2013-12-01

    Abundant ground-based information will be needed to inform remote-sensing and modeling studies of NASA's Arctic-Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE). A large body of plot and map data collected by the Alaska Geobotany Center (AGC) and collaborators from the Arctic regions of Alaska and the circumpolar Arctic over the past several decades is being archived and made accessible to scientists and the public via the Geographic Information Network of Alaska's (GINA's) 'Catalog' display and portal system. We are building two main types of data archives: Vegetation Plot Archive: For the plot information we use a Turboveg database to construct the Alaska portion of the international Arctic Vegetation Archive (AVA) http://www.geobotany.uaf.edu/ava/. High quality plot data and non-digital legacy datasets in danger of being lost have highest priority for entry into the archive. A key aspect of the database is the PanArctic Species List (PASL-1), developed specifically for the AVA to provide a standard of species nomenclature for the entire Arctic biome. A wide variety of reports, documents, and ancillary data are linked to each plot's geographic location. Geoecological Map Archive: This database includes maps and remote sensing products and links to other relevant data associated with the maps, mainly those produced by the Alaska Geobotany Center. Map data include GIS shape files of vegetation, land-cover, soils, landforms and other categorical variables and digital raster data of elevation, multispectral satellite-derived data, and data products and metadata associated with these. The map archive will contain all the information that is currently in the hierarchical Toolik-Arctic Geobotanical Atlas (T-AGA) in Alaska http://www.arcticatlas.org, plus several additions that are in the process of development and will be combined with GINA's already substantial holdings of spatial data from northern Alaska. The Geoecological Atlas Portal uses GINA's Catalog tool to develop a

  7. Unraveling protein dynamics through fast spectral density mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ropars, Virginie; Bouguet-Bonnet, Sabine; Auguin, Daniel; Barthe, Philippe; Canet, Daniel; Roumestand, Christian

    2007-03-01

    Spectral density mapping at multiple NMR field strengths is probably the best method to describe the dynamical behavior of a protein in solution through the analysis of 15N heteronuclear relaxation parameters. Nevertheless, such analyses are scarcely reported in the literature, probably because this method is excessively demanding in spectrometer measuring time. Indeed, when using n different magnetic fields and assuming the validity of the high frequency approximation, the discrete sampling of the spectral density function with 2n + 1 points needs the measurement of 3n 15N heteronuclear relaxation measurements (n R1, n R2, and n15N{1H}NOEs). Based on further approximations, we proposed a new strategy that allows us to describe the spectral density with n + 2 points, with the measurement of a total of n + 2 heteronuclear relaxation parameters. Applied to the dynamics analysis of the protein p13( MTCP1) at three different NMR fields, this approach allowed us to divide by nearly a factor of two the total measuring time, without altering further results obtained by the "model free" analysis of the resulting spectral densities. Furthermore, simulations have shown that this strategy remains applicable to any low isotropically tumbling protein (tauc>3 ns), and is valid for the types of motion generally envisaged for proteins.

  8. Quantitative Map of Proteome Dynamics during Neuronal Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian K. Frese

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal differentiation is a multistep process that shapes and re-shapes neurons by progressing through several typical stages, including axon outgrowth, dendritogenesis, and synapse formation. To systematically profile proteome dynamics throughout neuronal differentiation, we took cultured rat hippocampal neurons at different developmental stages and monitored changes in protein abundance using a combination of stable isotope labeling and high-resolution liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS. Almost one third of all 4,500 proteins quantified underwent a more than 2-fold expression change during neuronal differentiation, indicating extensive remodeling of the neuron proteome. To highlight the strength of our resource, we studied the neural-cell-adhesion molecule 1 (NCAM1 and found that it stimulates dendritic arbor development by promoting actin filament growth at the dendritic growth cone. We anticipate that our quantitative map of neuronal proteome dynamics is a rich resource for further analyses of the many identified proteins in various neurodevelopmental processes.

  9. Mapping socio-environmentally vulnerable populations access and exposure to ecosystem services at the U.S.-Mexico borderlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Laura M.; Villarreal, Miguel L.; Lara-Valencia, Francisco; Yuan, Yongping; Nie, Wenming; Wilson, Sylvia; Amaya, Gladys; Sleeter, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    Socio-environmental vulnerable populations are often unrepresented in land-use planning yet have great potential for loss when exposed to changes in ecosystem services. Administrative boundaries, cultural differences, and language barriers increase the disassociation between land-use management and marginalized populations living in the U.S.–Mexico borderlands. This paper describes the development of a Modified Socio-Environmental Vulnerability Index (M-SEVI), using determinants from binational census and neighborhood data that describe levels of education, access to resources, migratory status, housing, and number of dependents, to provide a simplified snapshot of the region's populace that can be used in binational planning efforts. We apply this index at the SCW, located on the border between Arizona, USA and Sonora, Mexico. For comparison, the Soil and Water Assessment Tool is concurrently applied to assess the provision of erosion- and flood control services over a 9-year period. We describe how this coupling of data can form the base for an ecosystem services assessment across political boundaries that can be used by land-use planners. Results reveal potential disparities in environmental risks and burdens throughout the binational watershed in residential districts surrounding and between urban centers. The M-SEVI can be used as an important first step in addressing environmental justice for binational decision-making.

  10. Environmental Groundwater Vulnerability Assessment in Urban Water Mines (Porto, NW Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria José Afonso

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A multidisciplinary approach was developed to estimate urban groundwater vulnerability to contamination combining hydrogeology, hydrogeochemistry, subterranean hydrogeotechnics, groundwater ecotoxicology and isotope tracers. Paranhos and Salgueiros spring waters in Porto City were used as a case study. Historical and current vulnerability scenarios were compared using hydrogeological GIS-based modelling. Potential contamination sources were mapped around the spring galleries. Most of these were point sources and their potential contamination load was moderate. The ecotoxicological assessment indicated a low acute toxicity potential. Groundwater radionuclides appeared to be mainly controlled by geological factors and biomineralisation. Vulnerability maps suggest that most of the area has a moderate to low vulnerability to contamination. However, some surface sources such as sewage systems cause contamination and contribute to increased vulnerability. This integrated approach was demonstrated to be adequate for a better knowledge of urban hydrogeological processes and their dynamics, and highlighted the importance of a vulnerability assessment in urban areas.

  11. Mapping the structural and dynamical features of kinesin motor domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Scarabelli

    Full Text Available Kinesin motor proteins drive intracellular transport by coupling ATP hydrolysis to conformational changes that mediate directed movement along microtubules. Characterizing these distinct conformations and their interconversion mechanism is essential to determining an atomic-level model of kinesin action. Here we report a comprehensive principal component analysis of 114 experimental structures along with the results of conventional and accelerated molecular dynamics simulations that together map the structural dynamics of the kinesin motor domain. All experimental structures were found to reside in one of three distinct conformational clusters (ATP-like, ADP-like and Eg5 inhibitor-bound. These groups differ in the orientation of key functional elements, most notably the microtubule binding α4-α5, loop8 subdomain and α2b-β4-β6-β7 motor domain tip. Group membership was found not to correlate with the nature of the bound nucleotide in a given structure. However, groupings were coincident with distinct neck-linker orientations. Accelerated molecular dynamics simulations of ATP, ADP and nucleotide free Eg5 indicate that all three nucleotide states could sample the major crystallographically observed conformations. Differences in the dynamic coupling of distal sites were also evident. In multiple ATP bound simulations, the neck-linker, loop8 and the α4-α5 subdomain display correlated motions that are absent in ADP bound simulations. Further dissection of these couplings provides evidence for a network of dynamic communication between the active site, microtubule-binding interface and neck-linker via loop7 and loop13. Additional simulations indicate that the mutations G325A and G326A in loop13 reduce the flexibility of these regions and disrupt their couplings. Our combined results indicate that the reported ATP and ADP-like conformations of kinesin are intrinsically accessible regardless of nucleotide state and support a model where neck

  12. Dynamics of change in Alaska's boreal forests: resilience and vulnerability in response to climate warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. David McGuire; F.S. Chapin; R.W. Ruess

    2010-01-01

    Long-term research by the Bonanza Creek (BNZ) Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) program has documented natural patterns of interannual and successional variability of the boreal forest in interior Alaska against which we can detect changes in system behavior. Between 2004 and 2010 the BNZ LTER program focused on understanding the dynamics of change through studying...

  13. Urban heritage value and seismic vulnerability mapping: challenges for engineering and architectural assessments. Case study of a protected area in Bucharest, Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emil-Sever GEORGESCU

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper evaluates the urban heritage situation at almost four decades after the Bucharest, March 4, 1977 earthquake disaster, followed by a razing of the present Civic Center area and a large-scale remodeling project. The first results of the URBASRISK Project (2012 are presented as a contribution to a new multi-hazard paradigm to cope with European urban scale threats, especially in heritage areas, with a case study of a historic zone now designated as protected area. The cultural and utility value was identified and graded on specific scales for further analysis and mapping. For this phase of study some data of 1977 were adjusted to express the vulnerability by the Mean Damage Degree, GA, with a possibility to make corrections after visual inspection. The URBASRISKdb geodatabase was created for storing the attributes of the buildings. The basic source, i.e. the ESRI World Street Map layer, was verified against satellite, aerial and street views freely available online from various providers. The final version of the map was obtained by also considering information obtained by field visits.

  14. A spatial analysis of population dynamics and climate change in Africa: potential vulnerability hot spots emerge where precipitation declines and demographic pressures coincide

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Carr, David; Pricope, Narcisa G.; Aukema, Juliann E.; Jankowska, Marta M.; Funk, Christopher C.; Husak, Gregory J.; Michaelsen, Joel C.

    2014-01-01

    We present an integrative measure of exposure and sensitivity components of vulnerability to climatic and demographic change for the African continent in order to identify “hot spots” of high potential population vulnerability. Getis-Ord Gi* spatial clustering analyses reveal statistically significant locations of spatio-temporal precipitation decline coinciding with high population density and increase. Statistically significant areas are evident, particularly across central, southern, and eastern Africa. The highly populated Lake Victoria basin emerges as a particularly salient hot spot. People located in the regions highlighted in this analysis suffer exceptionally high exposure to negative climate change impacts (as populations increase on lands with decreasing rainfall). Results may help inform further hot spot mapping and related research on demographic vulnerabilities to climate change. Results may also inform more suitable geographical targeting of policy interventions across the continent.

  15. Mapping the dynamics of adverse drug reactions in subsequent time periods using INDSCAL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rikken, F.; Kiers, H.A.L.; Vos, R.

    1995-01-01

    In this study we have focused on the problem of mapping the dynamics of co-word-matrices from subsequent time periods. Methods for mapping dynamics are important for following trends in research. We have explored the possibilities of a three way multidimensional scaling method, INDSCAL. We are espec

  16. Mathematical Approaches to WMD Defense and Vulnerability Assessments of Dynamic Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    analysis depending on the context. In the first example we aim to identify a set of land mines that are planted on a field . To find the location of the...and effective dose] 1 × 10–2 joule per kilogram (J kg–1) [sievert (Sv)] * Specific details regarding the implementation of SI units may be viewed at...telecommunications, transportation, and electricity grids. More importantly, we analyze network dynamics that include cascading failures due to

  17. Hardware Implementation of an Automatic Rendering Tone Mapping Algorithm for a Wide Dynamic Range Display

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Tone mapping algorithms are used to adapt captured wide dynamic range (WDR) scenes to the limited dynamic range of available display devices. Although there are several tone mapping algorithms available, most of them require manual tuning of their rendering parameters. In addition, the high complexities of some of these algorithms make it difficult to implement efficient real-time hardware systems. In this work, a real-time hardware implementation of an exponent-based tone mapping algorithm i...

  18. Mathematical Approaches to WMD Defense and Vulnerability Assessments of Dynamic Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Structure in Dynamic Social Networks,” Proceedings of the IEEE Communications Society (INFOCOM), 2011. Nguyen, N.P. and Thai, M.T., “Finding...cubic foot (ft 3 ) 2.831 685 × 10 –2 cubic meter (m 3 ) Mass /Density pound (lb) 4.535 924 × 10 –1 kilogram (kg) unified atomic mass unit (amu...1.660 539 × 10 –27 kilogram (kg) pound- mass per cubic foot (lb ft –3 ) 1.601 846 × 10 1 kilogram per cubic meter (kg m –3 ) pound-force (lbf

  19. Spatiotemporal mapping of diffusion dynamics and organization in plasma membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bag, Nirmalya; Ng, Xue Wen; Sankaran, Jagadish; Wohland, Thorsten

    2016-09-01

    Imaging fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and the related FCS diffusion law have been applied in recent years to investigate the diffusion modes of lipids and proteins in membranes. These efforts have provided new insights into the membrane structure below the optical diffraction limit, new information on the existence of lipid domains, and on the influence of the cytoskeleton on membrane dynamics. However, there has been no systematic study to evaluate how domain size, domain density, and the probe partition coefficient affect the resulting imaging FCS diffusion law parameters. Here, we characterize the effects of these factors on the FCS diffusion law through simulations and experiments on lipid bilayers and live cells. By segmenting images into smaller 7  ×  7 pixel areas, we can evaluate the FCS diffusion law on areas smaller than 2 µm and thus provide detailed maps of information on the membrane structure and heterogeneity at this length scale. We support and extend this analysis by deriving a mathematical expression to calculate the mean squared displacement (MSDACF) from the autocorrelation function of imaging FCS, and demonstrate that the MSDACF plots depend on the existence of nanoscopic domains. Based on the results, we derive limits for the detection of domains depending on their size, density, and relative viscosity in comparison to the surroundings. Finally, we apply these measurements to bilayers and live cells using imaging total internal reflection FCS and single plane illumination microscopy FCS.

  20. Analysis of dynamic recrystallization of ice from EBSD orientation mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagnat, Maurine; Chauve, Thomas; Barou, Fabrice; Tommasi, Andrea; Beausir, Benoît; Fressengeas, Claude

    2015-12-01

    We present high resolution observations of microstructure and texture evolution during dynamic recrystallization (DRX) of ice polycrystals deformed in the laboratory at high temperature (≈0.98Tm). Ice possesses a significant viscoplastic anisotropy that induces strong strain heterogeneities, which result in an early occurrence of DRX mechanisms. It is therefore a model material to explore these mechanisms. High resolution c-axis measurements at sample scale by optical techniques and full crystallographic orientation measurements by cryo- Electron Back Scattering Diffraction (EBSD) provide a solid database for analyzing the relative impact of the macroscopic imposed stress versus the local and internal stress field on DRX mechanisms. Analysis of misorientation gradients in the EBSD data highlights a heterogeneous dislocation distribution, which is quantified by the Nye tensor estimation. Joint analyses of the dislocation density maps and microstructural observations highlight spatial correlation between high dislocation density sites and the onset of nucleation taking place by grain-boundary bulging, subgrain rotation or by the formation of kink-bands.

  1. Vulnerability to forest loss through altered postfire recovery dynamics in a warming climate in the Klamath Mountains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepley, Alan J; Thompson, Jonathan R; Epstein, Howard E; Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J

    2017-04-27

    In the context of ongoing climatic warming, certain landscapes could be near a tipping point where relatively small changes to their fire regimes or their postfire forest recovery dynamics could bring about extensive forest loss, with associated effects on biodiversity and carbon-cycle feedbacks to climate change. Such concerns are particularly valid in the Klamath Region of northern California and southwestern Oregon, where severe fire initially converts montane conifer forests to systems dominated by broadleaf trees and shrubs. Conifers eventually overtop the competing vegetation, but until they do, these systems could be perpetuated by a cycle of reburning. To assess the vulnerability of conifer forests to increased fire activity and altered forest recovery dynamics in a warmer, drier climate, we characterized vegetation dynamics following severe fire in nine fire years over the last three decades across the climatic aridity gradient of montane conifer forests. Postfire conifer recruitment was limited to a narrow window, with 89% of recruitment in the first 4 years, and height growth tended to decrease as the lag between the fire year and the recruitment year increased. Growth reductions at longer lags were more pronounced at drier sites, where conifers comprised a smaller portion of live woody biomass. An interaction between seed-source availability and climatic aridity drove substantial variation in the density of regenerating conifers. With increasing climatic water deficit, higher propagule pressure (i.e., smaller patch sizes for high-severity fire) was needed to support a given conifer seedling density, which implies that projected future increases in aridity could limit postfire regeneration across a growing portion of the landscape. Under a more severe prospective warming scenario, by the end of the century more than half of the area currently capable of supporting montane conifer forest could become subject to minimal conifer regeneration in even

  2. Analysis on the Vulnerability to Poverty Dynamics in Chinese Rual Households%中国农村贫困脆弱性动态演化分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    聂荣; 张志国

    2014-01-01

    Based on the household panel of CHNS in 1993~2009 ,we calculate vulnerability to poverty of Chi-nese rural households and analyze dynamics of poverty in China rural using statistic analysis and transition matrix . We conclude that:there is a downward trend for vulnerable degree of Chinese rural households;The vulnerable state of Chinese rural households is temporary and Out of poverty vulnerability is accompany with entering of pov-erty vulnerability ;Chinese rural Households w hich is out of poverty vulnerability show a state-dependence ,ente-ring of poverty Vulnerability too ,which are more easily into and out of poverty near the vulnerable line;After dif-ferent vulnerability to poverty class is out of poverty vulnerability ,Most families which enter class of poverty vul-nerability groups is different .After different non-vulnerability to poverty class enter poverty vulnerability ,Most households enter lower class of poverty vulnerable groups .Meanwhile ,we analysis mechanism of vulnerability to poverty dynamic from China's rural households .%利用1993~2009年CHNS的6轮农村家庭收入调查数据,计算中国农村家庭的贫困脆弱性,并采用统计分析和转移矩阵的方法,分析中国农村家庭贫困脆弱的整体变动趋势及其动态演化特征。研究发现:中国农村家庭整体脆弱程度呈不断下降趋势;贫困脆弱状态是一种暂时性贫困脆弱状态,并且脱离贫困脆弱与进入贫困脆弱现象并存;脱离贫困脆弱和进入贫困脆弱均呈现状态依赖性,在脆弱线附近群体更容易进入和脱离贫困脆弱;贫困脆弱群体的不同阶层脱离贫困脆弱后,大部分家庭进入非贫困脆弱群体的阶层有所差别,非贫困脆群体的不同阶层进入贫困脆弱后,大部分家庭均进入贫困脆弱群体的较低阶层;同时,分析了中国农村家庭贫困脆弱性动态演化作用机制。

  3. Identification of urban flood vulnerability in eastern Slovakia by mapping the potential natural sources of flooding - implications for territorial planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka Gaňová

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the presented study was to assess the distribution of flood-risk potential (FRP at the regional scale. A progressive approach integrating geographical information system (GIS with two different methods of multicriteria analysis (MCA – analytic hierarchy process (AHP and ranking method (RM was applied in the process. In the analyses, the most causative factors for flooding were taken into account, urban spatial planning, such as soil type, daily precipitation, land use, size of the catchment and average basin slope. A case study of flood vulnerability identification in the Hornád and Bodrog catchments’ areas in eastern Slovakia has been employed to illustrate two different approaches. Spatial estimation of FRP should be one of the basic steps for complex geoecological evaluation and delimitation of landscape considering water resources management, groundwater pollution, prediction of soil erosion and sediment transport and some other important landscape-ecological factors. The obtained results indicate that RM method shows better results as related to the existing floods in the recent years in Bodrog and Hornád catchment than AHP method.

  4. Thallium dynamics in contrasting light sandy soils--soil vulnerability assessment to anthropogenic contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanek, Ales; Chrastný, Vladislav; Komárek, Michael; Galusková, Ivana; Drahota, Petr; Grygar, Tomás; Tejnecký, Václav; Drábek, Ondrej

    2010-01-15

    The influence of different soil conditions and the presence of LMWOA (Low Molecular Weight Organic Acids) on anthropogenic Tl dynamics were discussed in this study. A shift from the "labile" to the residual fraction during the ageing was identified, indicating Tl incorporation into stable phases (e.g., illite and/or amorphous silicates). The increased water-soluble Tl concentration (1.8-fold, in maximum) after the split application of LMWOA (simulating root exudation) was observed in all soils; partial dissolution of relatively "insoluble" Tl-bearing phases (silicates and eventually oxides) in the presence of LMWOA is suggested. Thermodynamic modeling showed that Tl mobilization in the presence of citric and oxalic acids was indirect and could be attributed to complexation of major elements (Ca, Mg, Al) originating from the dissolution of various soil phases. On the contrary, H(+)-promoted dissolution by acetic acid was assumed as the predominant mechanism of Tl mobilization. Manganese(III,IV) oxides, illite and probably amorphous silicates were evaluated as the dominant phases responsible for Tl retention in the soils. In carbonate-rich soils, Tl coprecipitation with the newly formed carbonates seems to be an important factor influencing Tl release. Therefore, we suggest data on CEC, pH(ZPC) and soil mineralogy to be critical for assessment of Tl behavior in soil systems.

  5. Dynamically Allocated Hub in Task-Evoked Network Predicts the Vulnerable Prefrontal Locus for Contextual Memory Retrieval in Macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Osada

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Neuroimaging and neurophysiology have revealed that multiple areas in the prefrontal cortex (PFC are activated in a specific memory task, but severity of impairment after PFC lesions is largely different depending on which activated area is damaged. The critical relationship between lesion sites and impairments has not yet been given a clear mechanistic explanation. Although recent works proposed that a whole-brain network contains hubs that play integrative roles in cortical information processing, this framework relying on an anatomy-based structural network cannot account for the vulnerable locus for a specific task, lesioning of which would bring impairment. Here, we hypothesized that (i activated PFC areas dynamically form an ordered network centered at a task-specific "functional hub" and (ii the lesion-effective site corresponds to the "functional hub," but not to a task-invariant "structural hub." To test these hypotheses, we conducted functional magnetic resonance imaging experiments in macaques performing a temporal contextual memory task. We found that the activated areas formed a hierarchical hub-centric network based on task-evoked directed connectivity, differently from the anatomical network reflecting axonal projection patterns. Using a novel simulated-lesion method based on support vector machine, we estimated severity of impairment after lesioning of each area, which accorded well with a known dissociation in contextual memory impairment in macaques (impairment after lesioning in area 9/46d, but not in area 8Ad. The predicted severity of impairment was proportional to the network "hubness" of the virtually lesioned area in the task-evoked directed connectivity network, rather than in the anatomical network known from tracer studies. Our results suggest that PFC areas dynamically and cooperatively shape a functional hub-centric network to reallocate the lesion-effective site depending on the cognitive processes, apart from

  6. Dynamically Allocated Hub in Task-Evoked Network Predicts the Vulnerable Prefrontal Locus for Contextual Memory Retrieval in Macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osada, Takahiro; Adachi, Yusuke; Miyamoto, Kentaro; Jimura, Koji; Setsuie, Rieko; Miyashita, Yasushi

    2015-06-01

    Neuroimaging and neurophysiology have revealed that multiple areas in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) are activated in a specific memory task, but severity of impairment after PFC lesions is largely different depending on which activated area is damaged. The critical relationship between lesion sites and impairments has not yet been given a clear mechanistic explanation. Although recent works proposed that a whole-brain network contains hubs that play integrative roles in cortical information processing, this framework relying on an anatomy-based structural network cannot account for the vulnerable locus for a specific task, lesioning of which would bring impairment. Here, we hypothesized that (i) activated PFC areas dynamically form an ordered network centered at a task-specific "functional hub" and (ii) the lesion-effective site corresponds to the "functional hub," but not to a task-invariant "structural hub." To test these hypotheses, we conducted functional magnetic resonance imaging experiments in macaques performing a temporal contextual memory task. We found that the activated areas formed a hierarchical hub-centric network based on task-evoked directed connectivity, differently from the anatomical network reflecting axonal projection patterns. Using a novel simulated-lesion method based on support vector machine, we estimated severity of impairment after lesioning of each area, which accorded well with a known dissociation in contextual memory impairment in macaques (impairment after lesioning in area 9/46d, but not in area 8Ad). The predicted severity of impairment was proportional to the network "hubness" of the virtually lesioned area in the task-evoked directed connectivity network, rather than in the anatomical network known from tracer studies. Our results suggest that PFC areas dynamically and cooperatively shape a functional hub-centric network to reallocate the lesion-effective site depending on the cognitive processes, apart from static anatomical

  7. Recovering map static nonlinearities from chaotic data using dynamical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Luis Antonio

    1997-02-01

    This paper is concerned with the estimation from chaotic data of maps with static nonlinearities. A number of issues concerning model construction such as structure selection, over-parametrization and model validation are discussed in the light of the shape of the static non-linearities reproduced by the estimated maps. A new interpretation of term clusters and cluster coefficients of polynomial models is provided based on this approach. The paper discusses model limitations and some useful principles to select the structure of nonlinear maps. Some of the ideas have been tested using several nonlinear systems including a boost voltage regulator map and a set of real data from a chaotic circuit.

  8. Open system quantum dynamics with correlated initial states, not completely positive maps and non-Markovianity

    CERN Document Server

    Devi, A R Usha; Sudha,

    2010-01-01

    Dynamical A and B maps have been employed extensively by Sudarshan and co-workers to investigate open system evolution of quantum systems. A canonical structure of the A-map is introduced here. It is shown that this canonical A-map enables us to investigate if the dynamics is completely positive (CP) or non-completely positive (NCP) in an elegant way and hence, it subsumes the basic results on open system dynamics. Identifying memory effects in open system evolution is gaining increasing importance recently and here, a criterion of non-Markovianity, based on the relative entropy of the dynamical state is proposed. The relative entropy difference of the dynamical system serves as a complementary characterization - though not related directly - to the fidelity difference criterion proposed recently. Three typical examples of open system evolution of a qubit, prepared initially in a correlated state with another qubit (environment), and evolving jointly under a specific unitary dynamics - which corresponds to a ...

  9. DYNAMIC STRAIN MAPPING AND REAL-TIME DAMAGE STATE ESTIMATION UNDER BIAXIAL RANDOM FATIGUE LOADING

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — DYNAMIC STRAIN MAPPING AND REAL-TIME DAMAGE STATE ESTIMATION UNDER BIAXIAL RANDOM FATIGUE LOADING SUBHASISH MOHANTY*, ADITI CHATTOPADHYAY, JOHN N. RAJADAS, AND CLYDE...

  10. Fixed point theorems for compatible mappings of type (P and applications to dynamic programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. K. Pathak

    1995-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we prove some common fixed point theorems for compatible mappings of type (P. As applications, the existence and uniqueness of common solutions for a class of the functional equations in dynamic programming are discussed.

  11. VT - Vermont Heat Vulnerability Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This map shows: The overall vulnerability of each town to heat related illness. This index is a composite of the following themes: Population Theme, Socioeconomic...

  12. Chaotic dynamics in the Volterra predator-prey model via linked twist maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Pireddu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We prove the existence of infinitely many periodic solutions and complicated dynamics, due to the presence of a topological horseshoe, for the classical Volterra predator-prey model with a periodic harvesting. The proof relies on some recent results about chaotic planar maps combined with the study of geometric features which are typical of linked twist maps.

  13. Vulnerability Analysis for Complex Networks Using Aggressive Abstraction

    CERN Document Server

    Colbaugh, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Large, complex networks are ubiquitous in nature and society, and there is great interest in developing rigorous, scalable methods for identifying and characterizing their vulnerabilities. This paper presents an approach for analyzing the dynamics of complex networks in which the network of interest is first abstracted to a much simpler, but mathematically equivalent, representation, the required analysis is performed on the abstraction, and analytic conclusions are then mapped back to the original network and interpreted there. We begin by identifying a broad and important class of complex networks which admit vulnerability-preserving, finite state abstractions, and develop efficient algorithms for computing these abstractions. We then propose a vulnerability analysis methodology which combines these finite state abstractions with formal analytics from theoretical computer science to yield a comprehensive vulnerability analysis process for networks of realworld scale and complexity. The potential of the prop...

  14. Combinatorics on Words in Symbolic Dynamics: The Quadratic Map

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wan Ji DAI; Kebo L(U); Jun WANG

    2008-01-01

    This paper is contributed to the combinatorial properties of the MSS sequences, which are the periodic kneading words of quadratic maps denned on a interval. An explicit expression of adjacency relations on MSS sequences of given lengths is established.

  15. Mood-Reactive Self-Esteem and Depression Vulnerability: Person-Specific Symptom Dynamics via Smart Phone Assessment: e0129774

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Peter C Clasen; Aaron J Fisher; Christopher G Beevers

    2015-01-01

      Cognitive theories of depression suggest that mood-reactive self-esteem, a pattern of cognitive reactivity where low self-esteem is temporally dependent on levels of sadness, represents vulnerability for depression...

  16. Mood-Reactive Self-Esteem and Depression Vulnerability: Person-Specific Symptom Dynamics via Smart Phone Assessment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Clasen, Peter C; Fisher, Aaron J; Beevers, Christopher G

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive theories of depression suggest that mood-reactive self-esteem, a pattern of cognitive reactivity where low self-esteem is temporally dependent on levels of sadness, represents vulnerability for depression...

  17. Coupled Vulnerability and Resilience: the Dynamics of Cross-Scale Interactions in Post-Katrina New Orleans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin F. Gotham

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the impact of trauma on cross-scale interactions in order to identify the major social-ecological factors affecting the pace and trajectory of post-Katrina rebuilding in New Orleans, Louisiana, USA. Disaster and traumatic events create and activate networks and linkages at different spatial and institutional levels to provide information and resources related to post-trauma recovery and rebuilding. The extension, intensification, and acceleration of cross-scale linkages and interactions in response to trauma alter organizational couplings, which then contribute to the vulnerability and resilience of social-ecological systems. Rather than viewing urban ecosystems as either resilient or vulnerable, we conceptualize them as embodying both resilient and vulnerable components. This integrated approach directs analytical attention to the impact of socio-legal regulations, government policies, and institutional actions on resilience and vulnerability, which are also systemic properties of urban ecosystems.

  18. Global Dynamic Exposure and the OpenBuildingMap - Communicating Risk and Involving Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schorlemmer, Danijel; Beutin, Thomas; Hirata, Naoshi; Hao, Ken; Wyss, Max; Cotton, Fabrice; Prehn, Karsten

    2017-04-01

    Detailed understanding of local risk factors regarding natural catastrophes requires in-depth characterization of the local exposure. Current exposure capture techniques have to find the balance between resolution and coverage. We aim at bridging this gap by employing a crowd-sourced approach to exposure capturing, focusing on risk related to earthquake hazard. OpenStreetMap (OSM), the rich and constantly growing geographical database, is an ideal foundation for this task. More than 3.5 billion geographical nodes, more than 200 million building footprints (growing by 100'000 per day), and a plethora of information about school, hospital, and other critical facilities allows us to exploit this dataset for risk-related computations. We are combining the strengths of crowd-sourced data collection with the knowledge of experts in extracting the most information from these data. Besides relying on the very active OpenStreetMap community and the Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team, which are collecting building information at high pace, we are providing a tailored building capture tool for mobile devices. This tool is facilitating simple and fast building property capturing for OpenStreetMap by any person or interested community. With our OpenBuildingMap system, we are harvesting this dataset by processing every building in near-realtime. We are collecting exposure and vulnerability indicators from explicitly provided data (e.g. hospital locations), implicitly provided data (e.g. building shapes and positions), and semantically derived data, i.e. interpretation applying expert knowledge. The expert knowledge is needed to translate the simple building properties as captured by OpenStreetMap users into vulnerability and exposure indicators and subsequently into building classifications as defined in the Building Taxonomy 2.0 developed by the Global Earthquake Model (GEM) and the European Macroseismic Scale (EMS98). With this approach, we increase the resolution of existing

  19. Transient poverty, poverty dynamics, and vulnerability to poverty: An empirical analysis using a balanced panel from rural China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Patrick S

    2016-02-01

    China's economic reforms starting in the late 1970s have resulted in rapid economic growth, with annual growth in gross domestic product averaging greater than 10 percent per year for more than thirty years. Accompanying this rapid growth in national accounts have been rapid and widespread reductions in poverty. With these reductions in poverty, however, there has often been observed an increase in income inequality, both between as well as within rural and urban sectors. This rising income gap challenges the notion that economic reforms in China have been as successful as the poverty statistics would suggest. In this paper, we suggest that an alternative view would be to consider the effects of these reforms on changing the chronic nature of poverty and reducing household vulnerability to poverty. Using a balanced panel from rural China from 1991 through 2006, we find that most poverty among our sample has shifted from being chronic in nature to being transient, with households either shifting into a state of being non-poor moving in and out of poverty. Among our sample, vulnerability to poverty has been declining over time, but the declines are not uniform over time or space. We decompose household vulnerability status into two proximate causes: low expected income and high income variability, finding vulnerability increasingly due to income variability. Additionally, we demonstrate that vulnerable households have very different characteristics than non-vulnerable households.

  20. Transient poverty, poverty dynamics, and vulnerability to poverty: An empirical analysis using a balanced panel from rural China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Patrick S.

    2015-01-01

    China’s economic reforms starting in the late 1970s have resulted in rapid economic growth, with annual growth in gross domestic product averaging greater than 10 percent per year for more than thirty years. Accompanying this rapid growth in national accounts have been rapid and widespread reductions in poverty. With these reductions in poverty, however, there has often been observed an increase in income inequality, both between as well as within rural and urban sectors. This rising income gap challenges the notion that economic reforms in China have been as successful as the poverty statistics would suggest. In this paper, we suggest that an alternative view would be to consider the effects of these reforms on changing the chronic nature of poverty and reducing household vulnerability to poverty. Using a balanced panel from rural China from 1991 through 2006, we find that most poverty among our sample has shifted from being chronic in nature to being transient, with households either shifting into a state of being non-poor moving in and out of poverty. Among our sample, vulnerability to poverty has been declining over time, but the declines are not uniform over time or space. We decompose household vulnerability status into two proximate causes: low expected income and high income variability, finding vulnerability increasingly due to income variability. Additionally, we demonstrate that vulnerable households have very different characteristics than non-vulnerable households. PMID:26855470

  1. Dynamics of impurities in a three-dimensional volume-preserving map.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Swetamber; Gupte, Neelima

    2014-07-01

    We study the dynamics of inertial particles in three-dimensional incompressible maps, as representations of volume-preserving flows. The impurity dynamics has been modeled, in the Lagrangian framework, by a six-dimensional dissipative bailout embedding map. The fluid-parcel dynamics of the base map is embedded in the particle dynamics governed by the map. The base map considered for the present study is the Arnold-Beltrami-Childress (ABC) map. We consider the behavior of the system both in the aerosol regime, where the density of the particle is larger than that of the base flow, as well as the bubble regime, where the particle density is less than that of the base flow. The phase spaces in both the regimes show rich and complex dynamics with three types of dynamical behaviors--chaotic structures, regular orbits, and hyperchaotic regions. In the one-action case, the aerosol regime is found to have periodic attractors for certain values of the dissipation and inertia parameters. For the aerosol regime of the two-action ABC map, an attractor merging and widening crisis is identified using the bifurcation diagram and the spectrum of Lyapunov exponents. After the crisis an attractor with two parts is seen, and trajectories hop between these parts with period 2. The bubble regime of the embedded map shows strong hyperchaotic regions as well as crisis induced intermittency with characteristic times between bursts that scale as a power law behavior as a function of the dissipation parameter. Furthermore, we observe a riddled basin of attraction and unstable dimension variability in the phase space in the bubble regime. The bubble regime in the one-action case shows similar behavior. This study of a simple model of impurity dynamics may shed light upon the transport properties of passive scalars in three-dimensional flows. We also compare our results with those seen earlier in two-dimensional flows.

  2. Remote Sensing observations of Cecropia communities along Amazonian rivers: Mapping and monitoring habitat dynamics with time series datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinteros Casaverde, N. L.; McDonald, K.

    2016-12-01

    Riverine habitats host more than 14% of non-aquatic birds in the Amazon basin, some of them considered vulnerable by the UICN due to habitat destruction. Plant species of the genus Cecropia are known for being a late pioneer species in these riverine habitats creating monospecific stands along the Amazonian rivers. Cecropia biomes are thought to have significant impacts on the avifauna communities and their diversity. Nowadays, these habitats are threatened by the on-going development in the Amazonian countries. There are plans to build hydroelectric facilities, damming important tributaries of the Amazon river. Such large scale land cover change threatens Cecropia communities and the habitats they support and associated biodiversity. Thus, it is imperative to understand the fragility of these ecosystems, their extent and spatial distribution, and seasonal influences to their environments. We employ multiple sources of remote sensing data to assess the ability to use high resolution imagery to map Cecropia communities and multi-temporal observations to assess their seasonal dynamics. This research aims to facilitate the understanding of these communities through time series analyses using remote sensing products such as high resolution images from Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and Landsat to identify the Cecropia stands along the rivers and lower resolution products such as satellite-borne radiometers and scatterometers to assess seasonality. Our goal is to employ combined remote sensing data sources at map and monitor these important habitats.

  3. Combinatorics on Words in Symbolic Dynamics: the Antisymmetric Cubic Map

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wan Ji DAI; Kebo L(U); Jun WANG

    2008-01-01

    This paper is contributed to the combinatorial properties of the periodic kneading words of antisymmetric cubic maps defined on a interval.The least words of given lengths,the adjacency relations on the words of given lengths and the parity-alternative property in some sets of such words are established.

  4. Chaotic dynamics for two-dimensional tent maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumariño, Antonio; Ángel Rodríguez, José; Carles Tatjer, Joan; Vigil, Enrique

    2015-02-01

    For a two-dimensional extension of the classical one-dimensional family of tent maps, we prove the existence of an open set of parameters for which the respective transformation presents a strange attractor with two positive Lyapounov exponents. Moreover, periodic orbits are dense on this attractor and the attractor supports a unique ergodic invariant probability measure.

  5. Genus-zero Whitham hierarchies in conformal-map dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Alonso, Luis [Departamento de Fisica Teorica II, Universidad Complutense, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: luism@fis.ucm.es; Medina, Elena [Departamento de Matematicas, Universidad de Cadiz, E-11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain)

    2006-10-26

    A scheme for solving quasiclassical string equations is developed to prove that genus-zero Whitham hierarchies describe the deformations of planar domains determined by rational conformal maps. This property is applied in normal matrix models to show that deformations of simply-connected supports of eigenvalues under changes of coupling constants are governed by genus-zero Whitham hierarchies.

  6. Dynamic maps: a visual-analytic methodology for exploring spatio-temporal disease patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chui Kenneth KH

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epidemiologic studies are often confounded by the human and environmental interactions that are complex and dynamic spatio-temporal processes. Hence, it is difficult to discover nuances in the data and generate pertinent hypotheses. Dynamic mapping, a method to simultaneously visualize temporal and spatial information, was introduced to elucidate such complexities. A conceptual framework for dynamic mapping regarding principles and implementation methods was proposed. Methods The spatio-temporal dynamics of Salmonella infections for 2002 in the U.S. elderly were depicted via dynamic mapping. Hospitalization records were obtained from the Centers of Medicare and Medicaid Services. To visualize the spatial relationship, hospitalization rates were computed and superimposed onto maps of environmental exposure factors including livestock densities and ambient temperatures. To visualize the temporal relationship, the resultant maps were composed into a movie. Results The dynamic maps revealed that the Salmonella infections peaked at specific spatio-temporal loci: more clusters were observed in the summer months and higher density of such clusters in the South. The peaks were reached when the average temperatures were greater than 83.4°F (28.6°C. Although the relationship of salmonellosis rates and occurrence of temperature anomalies was non-uniform, a strong synchronization was found between high broiler chicken sales and dense clusters of cases in the summer. Conclusions Dynamic mapping is a practical visual-analytic technique for public health practitioners and has an outstanding potential in providing insights into spatio-temporal processes such as revealing outbreak origins, percolation and travelling waves of the diseases, peak timing of seasonal outbreaks, and persistence of disease clusters.

  7. The Concept of Collision-Free Motion Planning Using a Dynamic Collision Map

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keum-Bae Cho

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we address a new method for the collision-free motion planning of a mobile robot in dynamic environments. The motion planner is based on the concept of a conventional collision map (CCM, represented on the L(travel length-T(time plane. We extend the CCM with dynamic information about obstacles, such as linear acceleration and angular velocity, providing useful information for estimating variation in the collision map. We first analyse the effect of the dynamic motion of an obstacle in the collision region. We then define the measure of collision dispersion (MOCD. The dynamic collision map (DCM is generated by drawing the MOCD on the CCM. To evaluate a collision-free motion planner using the DCM, we extend the DCM with MOCD, then draw the unreachable region and deadlocked regions. Finally, we construct a collision-free motion planner using the information from the extended DCM.

  8. Studies of phase return map and symbolic dynamics in a periodically driven Hodgkin—Huxley neuron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jiong; Zhang, Hong; Tong, Qin-Ye; Chen, Zhuo

    2014-02-01

    How neuronal spike trains encode external information is a hot topic in neurodynamics studies. In this paper, we investigate the dynamical states of the Hodgkin—Huxley neuron under periodic forcing. Depending on the parameters of the stimulus, the neuron exhibits periodic, quasiperiodic and chaotic spike trains. In order to analyze these spike trains quantitatively, we use the phase return map to describe the dynamical behavior on a one-dimensional (1D) map. According to the monotonicity or discontinuous point of the 1D map, the spike trains are transformed into symbolic sequences by implementing a coarse-grained algorithm — symbolic dynamics. Based on the ordering rules of symbolic dynamics, the parameters of the external stimulus can be measured in high resolution with finite length symbolic sequences. A reasonable explanation for why the nervous system can discriminate or cognize the small change of the external signals in a short time is also presented.

  9. Quantitative Map of Proteome Dynamics during Neuronal Differentiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frese, Christian K; Mikhaylova, Marina; Stucchi, Riccardo; Gautier, Violette; Liu, Qingyang; Mohammed, Shabaz; Heck, Albert J R; Altelaar, A F Maarten; Hoogenraad, Casper C

    2017-01-01

    Neuronal differentiation is a multistep process that shapes and re-shapes neurons by progressing through several typical stages, including axon outgrowth, dendritogenesis, and synapse formation. To systematically profile proteome dynamics throughout neuronal differentiation, we took cultured rat hip

  10. Coastal dynamics studies for evaluation of hazard and vulnerability for coastal erosion. case study the town La Bocana, Buenaventura, colombian pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coca-Domínguez, Oswaldo; Ricaurte-Villota, Constanza

    2015-04-01

    The analysis of the hazard and vulnerability in coastal areas caused for erosion is based on studies of coastal dynamics since that allows having a better information detail that is useful for decision-making in aspects like prevention, mitigation, disaster reduction and integrated risk management. The Town of La Bocana, located in Buenaventura (Colombian Pacific) was selected to carry out the threat assessment for coastal erosion based on three components: i) magnitude, ii) occurrence and iii) susceptibility. Vulnerability meanwhile, is also composed of three main components for its evaluation: i) exposure ii) fragility and iii) resilience, which in turn are evaluated in 6 dimensions of vulnerability: physical, social, economic, ecological, institutional and cultural. The hazard analysis performed used a semi-quantitative approach, and an index of variables such as type of geomorphological unit, type of beach, exposure of the surfing coast, occurrence, among others. Quantitative data of coastal retreat was measured through the use of DSAS (Digital Shoreline Analysis System) an application of ArcGIS, as well as the development of digital elevation models from the beach and 6 beach profiles strategically located on the coast obtained with GNSS technology. Sediment samples collected from these beaches, medium height and wave direction were used as complementary data. The information was integrated across the coast line into segments of 250 x 250 meters. 4 sectors are part of the coastal area of La Bocana: Pianguita, Vistahermosa, Donwtown and Shangay. 6 vulnerability dimensions units were taken from these population, as well as its density for exposure, wich was analyzed through a multi-array method that include variables such as, land use, population, type of structure, education, basic services, among others, to measure frailty, and their respective indicator of resilience. The hazard analysis results indicate that Vistahermosa is in very high threat, while

  11. Mapping how local perturbations influence systems-level brain dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Gollo, Leonardo L.; James A. Roberts; Cocchi, Luca

    2016-01-01

    The human brain exhibits a relatively stable spatiotemporal organization that supports brain function and can be manipulated via local brain stimulation. Such perturbations to local cortical dynamics are globally integrated by distinct neural systems. However, it remains unclear how and why local changes in neural activity affect large-scale system dynamics. Here, we briefly review empirical and computational studies addressing how localized perturbations affect brain activity. We then system...

  12. Dynamic Vulnerability of Karst Systems: a Concept to understand qualitative and quantitative Aspects of Karst springs due to Changes in Groundwater Recharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggenberger, P.; Butscher, C.; Epting, J.; Auckenthaler, A.

    2015-12-01

    Karst groundwater resources represent valuable water resources, which may be affected by different types of pollution and changes of groundwater recharge by climate change. In many parts of Europe, it has been predicted that record-breaking heat waves, such as the one experienced in 2003 and 2015, will become more frequent. At the same time, even as summers become drier, the incidence of severe precipitation events could increase. What is the influence such changes to the quantitative and qualitative aspects of Karst groundwater systems? A factor to be considered in conjunction with groundwater quality is the vulnerability of the resource, which is defined as the sensitivity of a groundwater system to pollution. Intrinsic vulnerability refers to the sensitivity to pollution when considering only natural, geogenic conditions without the effects of human activities such as contaminant release. Intrinsic vulnerability depends on the recharge conditions, which are dependent on the surface and subsurface structure and on precipitation and evaporation patterns. The latter are highly time dependent. Therefore, our groundwater vulnerability concept also includes dynamic aspects of the system, the variations of spatial and temporal components. We present results of combined monitoring and modelling experiments of several types of Karst systems in the Tabular and the Folded Jura of NW Switzerland. The recharge, conduit flow, diffuse flow(RCD) rainfall-discharge model "RCD-seasonal" was used to simulate the discharge and substance concentration of several spring. This lumped parameter model include: the recharge system (soil and epikarst system), the conduit flow system, and the diffuse flow system. The numerically derived Dynamic Vulnerability Index (DVI) can indicate qualitative changes of spring water with sufficient accuracy to be used for drinking water management. In addition, the results obtained from the test sites indicate a decrease in short-lived contaminants in

  13. Dynamics of a map with a power-law tail

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botella-Soler, V; Ros, J [Departament de Fisica Teorica and Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Universitat de Valencia, 46100-Burjassot, Valencia (Spain); Oteo, J A [Departament de Fisica Teorica, Universitat de Valencia, 46100-Burjassot, Valencia (Spain)], E-mail: vicente.botella@uv.es, E-mail: oteo@uv.es, E-mail: rosj@uv.es

    2009-09-25

    We analyze a one-dimensional piecewise continuous discrete model proposed originally in studies on population ecology. The map is composed of a linear part and a power-law decreasing piece, and has three parameters. The system presents both regular and chaotic behavior. We study numerically and, in part, analytically different bifurcation structures. Particularly interesting is the description of the abrupt order-to-chaos transition mediated by an attractor made of an infinite number of limit cycles with only a finite number of different periods. It is shown that the power-law piece in the map is at the origin of this type of bifurcation. The system exhibits interior crises and crisis-induced intermittency.

  14. Multicongenic fate mapping quantification of dynamics of thymus colonization

    OpenAIRE

    Ziętara, Natalia; Łyszkiewicz, Marcin; Puchałka, Jacek; Witzlau, Katrin; Reinhardt, Annika; Förster, Reinhold; Pabst, Oliver; Prinz, Immo; Krueger, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Postnatal T cell development depends on continuous colonization of the thymus by BM-derived T lineage progenitors. Both quantitative parameters and the mechanisms of thymus seeding remain poorly understood. Here, we determined the number of dedicated thymus-seeding progenitor niches (TSPNs) capable of supporting productive T cell development, turnover rates of niche occupancy, and feedback mechanisms. To this end, we established multicongenic fate mapping combined with mathematical modeling t...

  15. Blogviz: mapping the dynamics of information diffusion in blogspace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Manuel S.

    2006-01-01

    Blogviz is a visualization model for mapping the transmission and internal structure of top links across the blogosphere. It explores the idea of meme propagation by assuming a parallel with the spreading of most cited URLs in daily weblog entries. The main goal of Blogviz is to unravel hidden patterns in the topics diffusion process. What's the life cycle of a topic? How does it start and how does it evolve through time? Are topics constrained to a specific community of users? Who are the most influential and innovative blogs in any topic? Are there any relationships amongst topic proliferators?

  16. Nonlinear systems dynamics in cardiovascular physiology: The heart rate delay map and lower body negative pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooker, John C.

    1990-01-01

    A preliminary study of the applicability of nonlinear dynamic systems analysis techniques to low body negative pressure (LBNP) studies. In particular, the applicability of the heart rate delay map is investigated. It is suggested that the heart rate delay map has potential as a supplemental tool in the assessment of subject performance in LBNP tests and possibly in the determination of susceptibility to cardiovascular deconditioning with spaceflight.

  17. Review of single particle dynamics for third generation light sources through frequency map analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Nadolski

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Frequency map analysis [J. Laskar, Icarus 88, 266 (1990] is used here to analyze the transverse dynamics of four third generation synchrotron light sources: the ALS, the ESRF, the SOLEIL project, and Super-ACO. Time variations of the betatron tunes give additional information for the global dynamics of the beam. The main resonances are revealed; a one-to-one correspondence between the configuration space and the frequency space can be performed. We stress that the frequency maps, and therefore the dynamics optimization, are highly sensitive to sextupolar strengths and vary in a large amount from one machine to another. The frequency maps can thus be used to characterize the different machines.

  18. Dynamic CRM occupancy reflects a temporal map of developmental progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilczyński, Bartek; Furlong, Eileen E M

    2010-06-22

    Development is driven by tightly coordinated spatio-temporal patterns of gene expression, which are initiated through the action of transcription factors (TFs) binding to cis-regulatory modules (CRMs). Although many studies have investigated how spatial patterns arise, precise temporal control of gene expression is less well understood. Here, we show that dynamic changes in the timing of CRM occupancy is a prevalent feature common to all TFs examined in a developmental ChIP time course to date. CRMs exhibit complex binding patterns that cannot be explained by the sequence motifs or expression of the TFs themselves. The temporal changes in TF binding are highly correlated with dynamic patterns of target gene expression, which in turn reflect transitions in cellular function during different stages of development. Thus, it is not only the timing of a TF's expression, but also its temporal occupancy in refined time windows, which determines temporal gene expression. Systematic measurement of dynamic CRM occupancy may therefore serve as a powerful method to decode dynamic changes in gene expression driving developmental progression.

  19. Dynamical properties of a dissipative discontinuous map: A scaling investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar-Sánchez, R. [Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, Puebla 72570 (Mexico); Leonel, Edson D. [Departamento de Física, UNESP – Univ. Estadual Paulista, Av. 24A, 1515, Bela Vista, 13506-900 Rio Claro, SP (Brazil); Méndez-Bermúdez, J.A. [Instituto de Física, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, Apartado Postal J-48, Puebla 72570 (Mexico)

    2013-12-13

    The effects of dissipation on the scaling properties of nonlinear discontinuous maps are investigated by analyzing the behavior of the average squared action 〈I{sup 2}〉 as a function of the n-th iteration of the map as well as the parameters K and γ, controlling nonlinearity and dissipation, respectively. We concentrate our efforts to study the case where the nonlinearity is large; i.e., K≫1. In this regime and for large initial action I{sub 0}≫K, we prove that dissipation produces an exponential decay for the average action 〈I〉. Also, for I{sub 0}≅0, we describe the behavior of 〈I{sup 2}〉 using a scaling function and analytically obtain critical exponents which are used to overlap different curves of 〈I{sup 2}〉 onto a universal plot. We complete our study with the analysis of the scaling properties of the deviation around the average action ω.

  20. Can Organic Farming Reduce Vulnerabilities and Enhance the Resilience of the European Food System? A Critical Assessment Using System Dynamics Structural Thinking Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Brzezina

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In a world of growing complexity and uncertainty, food systems must be resilient, i.e., able to deliver sustainable and equitable food and nutrition security in the face of multiple shocks and stresses. The resilience of the European food system that relies mostly on conventional agriculture is a matter of genuine concern and a new approach is called for. Does then organic farming have the potential to reduce vulnerabilities and improve the resilience of the European food system to shocks and stresses? In this paper, we use system dynamics structural thinking tools to identify the vulnerabilities of the conventional food system that result from both its internal structure as well as its exposure to external disturbances. Further, we evaluate whether organic farming can reduce the vulnerabilities. We argue here that organic farming has some potential to bring resilience to the European food system, but it has to be carefully designed and implemented to overcome the contradictions between the dominant socio-economic organization of food production and the ability to enact all organic farming’s principles—health, ecology, fairness and care—on a broader scale.

  1. Redistributing vulnerabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seeberg, Jens; Padmawati, Retna Siwi

    2015-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the social distribution of vulnerability in a given society may turn hazardous events into disasters. This distributional approach draws attention to continuities that explain catastrophes by virtue of the workings of society prior to the event. In this paper, we draw...... Central Java earthquake, and we explore relations between citizens and the state during post-disaster house reconstruction. We argue that disastrous outcomes of catastrophic events do not follow pre-existing fault lines of vulnerability in a simple or predictable manner, and that the social process...

  2. Dynamic viscosity mapping of the oxidation of squalene aerosol particles.

    OpenAIRE

    Athanasiadis, Athanasios; Fitzgerald, Clare; Davidson, Nicholas M; Giorio, Chiara; Botchway, Stanley W; Ward, Andrew D.; Kalberer, Markus; Pope, Francis D.; Kuimova, Marina K.

    2016-01-01

    Organic aerosols (OAs) play important roles in multiple atmospheric processes, including climate change, and can impact human health. The physico-chemical properties of OAs are important for all these processes and can evolve through reactions with various atmospheric components, including oxidants. The dynamic nature of these reactions makes it challenging to obtain a true representation of their composition and surface chemistry. Here we investigate the microscopic viscosity of the model OA...

  3. Mapping knowledge to boolean dynamic systems in Bateson's epistemology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malloy, Thomas E; Jensen, Gary C; Song, Timothy

    2005-01-01

    Gregory Bateson (1972, 1979) established an epistemology that integrates mind and nature as a necessary unity, a unity in which learning and evolution share fundamental principles and in which criteria for mental process are explicitly specified. E42 is a suite of freely available Java applets that constitute an online research lab for creating and interacting with simulations of the Boolean systems developed by Kauffman (1993) in his study of evolution where he proposed that self-organization and natural selection are co-principles "weaving the tapestry of life." This paper maps Boolean systems, developed in the study of evolution, onto Bateson's epistemology in general and onto his criteria of mental process in particular.

  4. Assessing vulnerability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellmuth, M.; Kabat, P.

    2003-01-01

    It is in the shantytowns and rural villages of the Third World that floods and droughts strike hardest and deepest. Vulnerability to the vagaries of climate depends not only on location, but, crucially, on the capacity of the victims to cope with the impacts of extreme weather. So, where are the

  5. Redistributing vulnerabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seeberg, Jens; Padmawati, Retna Siwi

    2015-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the social distribution of vulnerability in a given society may turn hazardous events into disasters. This distributional approach draws attention to continuities that explain catastrophes by virtue of the workings of society prior to the event. In this paper, we draw a...

  6. Assessing vulnerability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellmuth, M.; Kabat, P.

    2003-01-01

    It is in the shantytowns and rural villages of the Third World that floods and droughts strike hardest and deepest. Vulnerability to the vagaries of climate depends not only on location, but, crucially, on the capacity of the victims to cope with the impacts of extreme weather. So, where are the peo

  7. Displaying R spatial statistics on Google dynamic maps with web applications created by Rwui

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The R project includes a large variety of packages designed for spatial statistics. Google dynamic maps provide web based access to global maps and satellite imagery. We describe a method for displaying directly the spatial output from an R script on to a Google dynamic map. Methods This is achieved by creating a Java based web application which runs the R script and then displays the results on the dynamic map. In order to make this method easy to implement by those unfamiliar with programming Java based web applications, we have added the method to the options available in the R Web User Interface (Rwui) application. Rwui is an established web application for creating web applications for running R scripts. A feature of Rwui is that all the code for the web application being created is generated automatically so that someone with no knowledge of web programming can make a fully functional web application for running an R script in a matter of minutes. Results Rwui can now be used to create web applications that will display the results from an R script on a Google dynamic map. Results may be displayed as discrete markers and/or as continuous overlays. In addition, users of the web application may select regions of interest on the dynamic map with mouse clicks and the coordinates of the region of interest will automatically be made available for use by the R script. Conclusions This method of displaying R output on dynamic maps is designed to be of use in a number of areas. Firstly it allows statisticians, working in R and developing methods in spatial statistics, to easily visualise the results of applying their methods to real world data. Secondly, it allows researchers who are using R to study health geographics data, to display their results directly onto dynamic maps. Thirdly, by creating a web application for running an R script, a statistician can enable users entirely unfamiliar with R to run R coded statistical analyses of health geographics

  8. Displaying R spatial statistics on Google dynamic maps with web applications created by Rwui

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Newton Richard

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The R project includes a large variety of packages designed for spatial statistics. Google dynamic maps provide web based access to global maps and satellite imagery. We describe a method for displaying directly the spatial output from an R script on to a Google dynamic map. Methods This is achieved by creating a Java based web application which runs the R script and then displays the results on the dynamic map. In order to make this method easy to implement by those unfamiliar with programming Java based web applications, we have added the method to the options available in the R Web User Interface (Rwui application. Rwui is an established web application for creating web applications for running R scripts. A feature of Rwui is that all the code for the web application being created is generated automatically so that someone with no knowledge of web programming can make a fully functional web application for running an R script in a matter of minutes. Results Rwui can now be used to create web applications that will display the results from an R script on a Google dynamic map. Results may be displayed as discrete markers and/or as continuous overlays. In addition, users of the web application may select regions of interest on the dynamic map with mouse clicks and the coordinates of the region of interest will automatically be made available for use by the R script. Conclusions This method of displaying R output on dynamic maps is designed to be of use in a number of areas. Firstly it allows statisticians, working in R and developing methods in spatial statistics, to easily visualise the results of applying their methods to real world data. Secondly, it allows researchers who are using R to study health geographics data, to display their results directly onto dynamic maps. Thirdly, by creating a web application for running an R script, a statistician can enable users entirely unfamiliar with R to run R coded statistical

  9. Displaying R spatial statistics on Google dynamic maps with web applications created by Rwui.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Richard; Deonarine, Andrew; Wernisch, Lorenz

    2012-09-24

    The R project includes a large variety of packages designed for spatial statistics. Google dynamic maps provide web based access to global maps and satellite imagery. We describe a method for displaying directly the spatial output from an R script on to a Google dynamic map. This is achieved by creating a Java based web application which runs the R script and then displays the results on the dynamic map. In order to make this method easy to implement by those unfamiliar with programming Java based web applications, we have added the method to the options available in the R Web User Interface (Rwui) application. Rwui is an established web application for creating web applications for running R scripts. A feature of Rwui is that all the code for the web application being created is generated automatically so that someone with no knowledge of web programming can make a fully functional web application for running an R script in a matter of minutes. Rwui can now be used to create web applications that will display the results from an R script on a Google dynamic map. Results may be displayed as discrete markers and/or as continuous overlays. In addition, users of the web application may select regions of interest on the dynamic map with mouse clicks and the coordinates of the region of interest will automatically be made available for use by the R script. This method of displaying R output on dynamic maps is designed to be of use in a number of areas. Firstly it allows statisticians, working in R and developing methods in spatial statistics, to easily visualise the results of applying their methods to real world data. Secondly, it allows researchers who are using R to study health geographics data, to display their results directly onto dynamic maps. Thirdly, by creating a web application for running an R script, a statistician can enable users entirely unfamiliar with R to run R coded statistical analyses of health geographics data. Fourthly, we envisage an

  10. Fuzzy cognitive maps outmatch loop analysis in dynamic modeling of ecological systems

    OpenAIRE

    Alessandro Ferrarini

    2011-01-01

    Modeling natural systems is challenging due to their complexity in terms of variables, interactions, and dynamics. Much of this complexity is rooted in the existence of multiple ways through which acting variables affect each other. Besides the simple direct effects, numerous indirect effects emerge in ecological systems. Through an illustrative example, I exemplify here several advantages of fuzzy cognitive maps (FCM) over loop analysis (LA) in dynamic modeling of ecological systems. In addi...

  11. Chronic imaging of cortical sensory map dynamics using a genetically encoded calcium indicator

    OpenAIRE

    Minderer, M; Liu, W.; Sumanovski, L. T.; Kügler, S; Helmchen, F; Margolis, D. J.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract  In vivo optical imaging can reveal the dynamics of large-scale cortical activity, but methods for chronic recording are limited. Here we present a technique for long-term investigation of cortical map dynamics using wide-field ratiometric fluorescence imaging of the genetically encoded calcium indicator (GECI) Yellow Cameleon 3.60. We find that wide-field GECI signals report sensory-evoked activity in anaesthetized mouse somatosensory cortex with high sensitivity and spatiotemporal ...

  12. Analysis of dynamic recrystallization of ice from EBSD orientation mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurine eMontagnat

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We present high resolution observations of microstructure and texture evolution during dynamicrecrystallization (DRX of ice polycrystals deformed in the laboratory at high temperature(≈0.98Tm. Ice possesses a significant viscoplastic anisotropy that induces strong strainheterogeneities, which result in an early occurrence of DRX mechanisms. It is thereforea model material to explore these mechanisms. High resolution c-axis measurements atsample scale by optical techniques and full crystallographic orientation measurements by cryo-Electron Back Scattering Diffraction (EBSD provide a solid database for analyzing the relativeimpact of the macroscopic imposed stress versus the local and internal stress field on DRXmechanisms. Analysis of misorientation gradients in the EBSD data highlights a heterogeneousdislocation distribution, which is quantified by the Nye tensor estimation. Joint analyses of thedislocation density maps and microstructural observations highlight spatial correlation betweenhigh dislocation density sites and the onset of nucleation taking place by grain-boundary bulging,subgrain rotation or by the formation of kink-bands.

  13. Hardware Implementation of an Automatic Rendering Tone Mapping Algorithm for a Wide Dynamic Range Display

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orly Yadid-Pecht

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Tone mapping algorithms are used to adapt captured wide dynamic range (WDR scenes to the limited dynamic range of available display devices. Although there are several tone mapping algorithms available, most of them require manual tuning of their rendering parameters. In addition, the high complexities of some of these algorithms make it difficult to implement efficient real-time hardware systems. In this work, a real-time hardware implementation of an exponent-based tone mapping algorithm is presented. The algorithm performs a mixture of both global and local compression on colored WDR images. An automatic parameter selector has been proposed for the tone mapping algorithm in order to achieve good tone-mapped images without manual reconfiguration of the algorithm for each WDR image. Both algorithms are described in Verilog and synthesized for a field programmable gate array (FPGA. The hardware architecture employs a combination of parallelism and system pipelining, so as to achieve a high performance in power consumption, hardware resources usage and processing speed. Results show that the hardware architecture produces images of good visual quality that can be compared to software-based tone mapping algorithms. High peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR and structural similarity (SSIM scores were obtained when the results were compared with output images obtained from software simulations using MATLAB.

  14. High resolution dynamical mapping of social interactions with active RFID

    CERN Document Server

    Barrat, Alain; Colizza, Vittoria; Pinton, Jean-Francois; Broeck, Wouter Van den; Vespignani, Alessandro

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we present an experimental framework to gather data on face-to-face social interactions between individuals, with a high spatial and temporal resolution. We use active Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) devices that assess contacts with one another by exchanging low-power radio packets. When individuals wear the beacons as a badge, a persistent radio contact between the RFID devices can be used as a proxy for a social interaction between individuals. We present the results of a pilot study %recently performed during a conference, and a subsequent preliminary data analysis, that provides an assessment of our method and highlights its versatility and applicability in many areas concerned with human dynamics.

  15. Mapping flow distortion on oceanographic platforms using computational fluid dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. O'Sullivan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Wind speed measurements over the ocean on ships or buoys are affected by flow distortion from the platform and by the anemometer itself. This can lead to errors in direct measurements and the derived parametrisations. Here we computational fluid dynamics (CFD to simulate the errors in wind speed measurements caused by flow distortion on the RV Celtic Explorer. Numerical measurements were obtained from the finite-volume CFD code OpenFOAM, which was used to simulate the velocity fields. This was done over a range of orientations in the test domain from −60 to +60° in increments of 10°. The simulation was also set up for a range of velocities, ranging from 5 to 25 m s−1 in increments of 0.5 m s−1. The numerical analysis showed close agreement to experimental measurements.

  16. Dynamic Assessment of EFL Learners' Listening Comprehension via Computerized Concept Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebadi, Saman; Latif, Shokoufeh Vakili

    2015-01-01

    In Vygotsky's theory, learner's Zone of Proximal Development (ZPD) and autonomous performance could be further developed through social interaction with an expert. Computerized concept mapping enjoys the advantage of meeting learners' differences and therefore can be applied as a scaffold to support learning process.Taking a dynamic assessment…

  17. Monitoring Scientific Developments from a Dynamic Perspective: Self-Organized Structuring To Map Neural Network Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyons, E. C. M.; van Raan, A. F. J.

    1998-01-01

    Using bibliometric mapping techniques, authors developed a methodology of self-organized structuring of scientific fields which was applied to neural network research. Explores the evolution of a data generated field structure by monitoring the interrelationships between subfields, the internal structure of subfields, and the dynamic features of…

  18. Dynamic relationships between age, amyloid-β deposition, and glucose metabolism link to the regional vulnerability to Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hwamee; Madison, Cindee; Baker, Suzanne; Rabinovici, Gil; Jagust, William

    2016-08-01

    SEE HANSSON AND GOURAS DOI101093/AWW146 FOR A SCIENTIFIC COMMENTARY ON THIS ARTICLE: Although some brain regions such as precuneus and lateral temporo-parietal cortex have been shown to be more vulnerable to Alzheimer's disease than other areas, a mechanism underlying the differential regional vulnerability to Alzheimer's disease remains to be elucidated. Using fluorodeoxyglucose and Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography imaging glucose metabolism and amyloid-β deposition, we tested whether and how life-long changes in glucose metabolism relate to amyloid-β deposition and Alzheimer's disease-related hypometabolism. Nine healthy young adults (age range: 20-30), 96 cognitively normal older adults (age range: 61-96), and 20 patients with Alzheimer's disease (age range: 50-90) were scanned using fluorodeoxyglucose and Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography. Among cognitively normal older subjects, 32 were further classified as amyloid-positive, with 64 as amyloid-negative. To assess the contribution of glucose metabolism to the regional vulnerability to amyloid-β deposition, we defined the highest and lowest metabolic regions in young adults and examined differences in amyloid deposition between these regions across groups. Two-way analyses of variance were conducted to assess regional differences in age and amyloid-β-related changes in glucose metabolism. Multiple regressions were applied to examine the association between amyloid-β deposition and regional glucose metabolism. Both region of interest and whole-brain voxelwise analyses were conducted to complement and confirm the results derived from the other approach. Regional differences in glucose metabolism between the highest and lowest metabolism regions defined in young adults (T = 12.85, P Alzheimer's disease-related hypometabolism was observed in brain regions that showed both age-invariance and amyloid-β-related increases in glucose metabolism. Our results indicate that although

  19. Dynamic Programming for Re-Mapping Noisy Fixations in Translation Tasks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carl, Michael

    2013-01-01

    drifted center of the observed fixation onto the symbol directly below it. In this paper I extend this naïve fixation-to-symbol mapping by introducing background knowledge about the translation task. In a first step, the sequence of fixation-to- symbol mappings is extended into a lattice of several...... possible fixated symbols, including those on the line above and below the naïve fixation mapping. In a second step a dynamic programming algorithm applies a number of heuristics to find the best path through the lattice, based on the probable distance in characters, in words and in pixels between...... successive fixations and the symbol locations, so as to smooth the gazing path according to the background gazing model. A qualitative and quantitative evaluation shows that the algorithm increases the accuracy of the re-mapped symbol sequence....

  20. Bells Galore: Oscillations and circle-map dynamics from space-filling fractal functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puente, C.E.; Cortis, A.; Sivakumar, B.

    2008-10-15

    The construction of a host of interesting patterns over one and two dimensions, as transformations of multifractal measures via fractal interpolating functions related to simple affine mappings, is reviewed. It is illustrated that, while space-filling fractal functions most commonly yield limiting Gaussian distribution measures (bells), there are also situations (depending on the affine mappings parameters) in which there is no limit. Specifically, the one-dimensional case may result in oscillations between two bells, whereas the two-dimensional case may give rise to unexpected circle map dynamics of an arbitrary number of two-dimensional circular bells. It is also shown that, despite the multitude of bells over two dimensions, whose means dance making regular polygons or stars inscribed on a circle, the iteration of affine maps yields exotic kaleidoscopes that decompose such an oscillatory pattern in a way that is similar to the many cases that converge to a single bell.

  1. Phase diagrams and dynamics of a computationally efficient map-based neuron model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonsalves, Jheniffer J.; Tragtenberg, Marcelo H. R.

    2017-01-01

    We introduce a new map-based neuron model derived from the dynamical perceptron family that has the best compromise between computational efficiency, analytical tractability, reduced parameter space and many dynamical behaviors. We calculate bifurcation and phase diagrams analytically and computationally that underpins a rich repertoire of autonomous and excitable dynamical behaviors. We report the existence of a new regime of cardiac spikes corresponding to nonchaotic aperiodic behavior. We compare the features of our model to standard neuron models currently available in the literature. PMID:28358843

  2. IMAGING THE BRAIN AS SCHIZOPHRENIA DEVELOPS: DYNAMIC & GENETIC BRAIN MAPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Paul; Rapoport, Judith L; Cannon, Tyrone D; Toga, Arthur W

    2002-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a chronic, debilitating psychiatric disorder that affects 0.2-2% of the population worldwide. Often striking without warning in the late teens or early twenties, its symptoms include auditory and visual hallucinations, psychotic outbreaks, bizarre or disordered thinking, depression and social withdrawal. To combat the disease, new antipsychotic drugs are emerging; these atypical neuroleptics target dopamine and serotonin pathways in the brain, offering increased therapeutic efficacy with fewer side effects. Despite their moderate success in controlling some patients' symptoms, little is known about the causes of schizophrenia, and what triggers the disease. Its peculiar age of onset raises key questions: What physical changes occur in the brain as a patient develops schizophrenia? Do these deficits spread in the brain, and can they be opposed? How do they relate to psychotic symptoms? As risk for the disease is genetically transmitted, do a patient's relatives exhibit similar brain changes? Recent advances in brain imaging and genetics provide exciting insight on these questions. Neuroimaging can now chart the emergence and progression of deficits in the brain, providing an exceptionally sharp scalpel to dissect the effects of genetic risk, environmental triggers, and susceptibility genes. Visualizing the dynamics of the disease, these techniques also offer new strategies to evaluate drugs that combat the unrelenting symptoms of schizophrenia.

  3. POD- Mapping and analysis of hydroturbine exit flow dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjeldsen, Morten; Finstad, Pal Henrik

    2012-11-01

    Pairwise radial dynamic measurements of the swirling draft tube flow have been made at the 25 MW Svorka power plant in Surnadal operating at 48% load at 6 radial and 7 angular positions. The data is analyzed with traditional methods as well as with POD. The measurements were made in the turbine draft tube/exit flow in an axial measurement plane about 1200mm downstream the turbine runner. The draft tube diameter in the measurement plane is about 1300mm. The flow rate during measurements was close to 5.8m3/s. Two probes were used; both of length Le=700 mm and made of stainless steel with an outer diameter of Do=20 mm and inner diameter Di=4mm. At the end of each probe a full bridge cylindrical KULITE xcl152, 0-3.5, was mounted. 90 seconds samples at 10 kS/s were taken. The POD analysis largely follows that of Tutkun et al. (see e.g. AIAA J., 45,5,2008). The analysis shows that 26% of the pressure pulsation energy can be addressed to azimuthal mode 1. The work has been supported by Energy Norway.

  4. Disparity map generation from illumination variant stereo images using efficient hierarchical dynamic programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisagar, Viral H; Zaveri, Mukesh A

    2014-01-01

    A novel hierarchical stereo matching algorithm is presented which gives disparity map as output from illumination variant stereo pair. Illumination difference between two stereo images can lead to undesirable output. Stereo image pair often experience illumination variations due to many factors like real and practical situation, spatially and temporally separated camera positions, environmental illumination fluctuation, and the change in the strength or position of the light sources. Window matching and dynamic programming techniques are employed for disparity map estimation. Good quality disparity map is obtained with the optimized path. Homomorphic filtering is used as a preprocessing step to lessen illumination variation between the stereo images. Anisotropic diffusion is used to refine disparity map to give high quality disparity map as a final output. The robust performance of the proposed approach is suitable for real life circumstances where there will be always illumination variation between the images. The matching is carried out in a sequence of images representing the same scene, however in different resolutions. The hierarchical approach adopted decreases the computation time of the stereo matching problem. This algorithm can be helpful in applications like robot navigation, extraction of information from aerial surveys, 3D scene reconstruction, and military and security applications. Similarity measure SAD is often sensitive to illumination variation. It produces unacceptable disparity map results for illumination variant left and right images. Experimental results show that our proposed algorithm produces quality disparity maps for both wide range of illumination variant and invariant stereo image pair.

  5. Disparity Map Generation from Illumination Variant Stereo Images Using Efficient Hierarchical Dynamic Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viral H. Borisagar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel hierarchical stereo matching algorithm is presented which gives disparity map as output from illumination variant stereo pair. Illumination difference between two stereo images can lead to undesirable output. Stereo image pair often experience illumination variations due to many factors like real and practical situation, spatially and temporally separated camera positions, environmental illumination fluctuation, and the change in the strength or position of the light sources. Window matching and dynamic programming techniques are employed for disparity map estimation. Good quality disparity map is obtained with the optimized path. Homomorphic filtering is used as a preprocessing step to lessen illumination variation between the stereo images. Anisotropic diffusion is used to refine disparity map to give high quality disparity map as a final output. The robust performance of the proposed approach is suitable for real life circumstances where there will be always illumination variation between the images. The matching is carried out in a sequence of images representing the same scene, however in different resolutions. The hierarchical approach adopted decreases the computation time of the stereo matching problem. This algorithm can be helpful in applications like robot navigation, extraction of information from aerial surveys, 3D scene reconstruction, and military and security applications. Similarity measure SAD is often sensitive to illumination variation. It produces unacceptable disparity map results for illumination variant left and right images. Experimental results show that our proposed algorithm produces quality disparity maps for both wide range of illumination variant and invariant stereo image pair.

  6. Vulnerable Hunter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md.Asha Begum

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This project "VULNERABLE HUNTER" application main aim is to detect risk in our mobile applications. This application contains modules like Fetch Application, Generate Score, Uninstall and Display Graph. Through this application it detects risk so that this application is very useful to smart phone users Now-a-days so many people are using smart phones and people are crazy about new apps. But by installing all the applications into our mobile may reduce its performance. Some apps contain more risk. But user may not know the effects that are caused by the app which is installed until the performance of mobile is reduced. With the prosperity of the Android app economy, many apps have been published and sold in various markets. However, short development applications and insufficient security development apps have led to many vulnerable apps. So to reduce these type of problems Vulnerable Hunter is proposed. Through the proposed application user can see which application is risky and then the user may uninstall that application. The main advantage of designing this app is without internet also the users will use this application. Users also feel more convenient to work with mobile apps.

  7. Orbital-specific mapping of chemical dynamics with ultrafast x-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernet, Philippe

    Charge and spin density changes at the metal sites of transition-metal complexes and in metalloproteins determine reactivity and selectivity. To understand their function and to optimize complexes for photocatalytic applications the changes of charge and spin densities need to be mapped and ultimately controlled. I will discuss how time-resolved soft x-ray spectroscopy enables a fundamental understanding of local atomic and intermolecular interactions and their dynamics on atomic length and time scales of Ångströms and femtoseconds. The approach consists in using time-resolved, atom- and orbital-specific x-ray spectroscopy and quantum chemical theory to map the frontier-orbital interactions and their evolution in real time of ultrafast chemical transformations. We recently used femtosecond resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS, the x-ray analog of resonant Raman scattering) at the x-ray free-electron laser LINAC Coherent Light Source (LCLS, Stanford, USA) to probe the reaction dynamics of a transition-metal complex in solution on the femtosecond time scale. Spin crossover and ligation are found to define the excited-state dynamics. It is demonstrated how correlating orbital symmetry and orbital interactions with spin multiplicity allows for determining the reactivity of short-lived reaction intermediates. I will discuss how this complements approaches that probe structural dynamics and how it can be extended to map the local chemical interactions and their dynamical evolution in metalloproteins.

  8. Note: Dynamic strain field mapping with synchrotron X-ray digital image correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, L. [CAS Key Laboratory of Mechanical Behavior and Design of Materials, Department of Modern Mechanics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230027 (China); The Peac Institute of Multiscale Sciences, Chengdu, Sichuan 610207 (China); Fan, D.; Luo, S. N., E-mail: sluo@pims.ac.cn [The Peac Institute of Multiscale Sciences, Chengdu, Sichuan 610207 (China); Bie, B. X. [The Peac Institute of Multiscale Sciences, Chengdu, Sichuan 610207 (China); School of Science, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430070 (China); Ran, X. X.; Qi, M. L., E-mail: qiml@whut.edu.cn [School of Science, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430070 (China); Parab, N.; Sun, J. Z.; Liao, H. J.; Hudspeth, M. C.; Claus, B. [School of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Fezzaa, K.; Sun, T. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Chen, W. [School of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); School of Material Science Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Gong, X. L., E-mail: gongxl@ustc.edu.cn [CAS Key Laboratory of Mechanical Behavior and Design of Materials, Department of Modern Mechanics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230027 (China)

    2014-07-15

    We present a dynamic strain field mapping method based on synchrotron X-ray digital image correlation (XDIC). Synchrotron X-ray sources are advantageous for imaging with exceptional spatial and temporal resolutions, and X-ray speckles can be produced either from surface roughness or internal inhomogeneities. Combining speckled X-ray imaging with DIC allows one to map strain fields with high resolutions. Based on experiments on void growth in Al and deformation of a granular material during Kolsky bar/gas gun loading at the Advanced Photon Source beamline 32ID, we demonstrate the feasibility of dynamic XDIC. XDIC is particularly useful for dynamic, in-volume, measurements on opaque materials under high strain-rate, large, deformation.

  9. Mapping Carrier Dynamics on Material Surfaces in Space and Time using Scanning Ultrafast Electron Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Jingya

    2016-02-25

    Selectively capturing the ultrafast dynamics of charge carriers on materials surfaces and at interfaces is crucial to the design of solar cells and optoelectronic devices. Despite extensive research efforts over the past few decades, information and understanding about surface-dynamical processes, including carrier trapping and recombination remains extremely limited. A key challenge is to selectively map such dynamic processes, a capability that is hitherto impractical by time-resolved laser techniques, which are limited by the laser’s relatively large penetration depth and consequently they record mainly bulk information. Such surface dynamics can only be mapped in real space and time by applying four-dimensional (4D) scanning ultrafast electron microscopy (S-UEM), which records snapshots of materials surfaces with nanometer spatial and sub-picosecond temporal resolutions. In this method, the secondary electron (SE) signal emitted from the sample’s surface is extremely sensitive to the surface dynamics and is detected in real time. In several unique applications, we spatially and temporally visualize the SE energy gain and loss, the charge carrier dynamics on the surface of InGaN nanowires and CdSe single crystals and its powder film. We also provide the mechanisms for the observed dynamics, which will be the foundation for future potential applications of S-UEM to a wide range of studies on material surfaces and device interfaces.

  10. Windthrow Dynamics in Boreal Ontario: A Simulation of the Vulnerability of Several Stand Types across a Range of Wind Speeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth A. Anyomi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In Boreal North America, management approaches inspired by the variability in natural disturbances are expected to produce more resilient forests. Wind storms are recurrent within Boreal Ontario. The objective of this study was to simulate wind damage for common Boreal forest types for regular as well as extreme wind speeds. The ForestGALES_BC windthrow prediction model was used for these simulations. Input tree-level data were derived from permanent sample plot (PSP data provided by the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources. PSPs were assigned to one of nine stand types: Balsam fir-, Jack pine-, Black spruce-, and hardwood-dominated stands, and, Jack pine-, spruce-, conifer-, hardwood-, and Red and White pine-mixed species stands. Morphological and biomechanical parameters for the major tree species were obtained from the literature. At 5 m/s, predicted windthrow ranged from 0 to 20%, with damage increasing to 2 to 90% for winds of 20 m/s and to 10 to 100% for winds of 40 m/s. Windthrow varied by forest stand type, with lower vulnerability within hardwoods. This is the first study to provide such broad simulations of windthrow vulnerability data for Boreal North America, and we believe this will benefit policy decisions regarding risk management and forest planning.

  11. Localization microscopy: mapping cellular dynamics with single molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, A J; Hess, S T

    2014-04-01

    has helped to illuminate many dynamic biological processes, such as the trajectories of molecules within living cells. This review discusses the concept and process of SRFLM imaging and investigates recent advances in SRFLM functionality. Since its announcement in 2006, SRFLM has been quickly adopted and modified by many researchers to help investigate questions whose answers lie below the diffraction limit. The versatility of the SRFLM technique has great promise for improving our understanding of cell biology at the molecular level.

  12. A method of recovering the initial vectors of globally coupled map lattices based on symbolic dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Li-Sha; Kang Xiao-Yun; Zhang Qiong; Lin Lan-Xin

    2011-01-01

    Based on symbolic dynamics,a novel computationally efficient algorithm is proposed to estimate the unknown initial vectors of globally coupled map lattices (CMLs).It is proved that not all inverse chaotic mapping functions are satisfied for contraction mapping.It is found that the values in phase space do not always converge on their initial values with respect to sufficient backward iteration of the symbolic vectors in terms of global convergence or divergence (CD).Both CD property and the coupling strength are directly related to the mapping function of the existing CML.Furthermore,the CD properties of Logistic,Bernoulli,and Tent chaotic mapping functions are investigated and compared.Various simulation results and the performances of the initial vector estimation with different signal-tonoise ratios (SNRs) are also provided to confirm the proposed algorithm.Finally,based on the spatiotemporal chaotic characteristics of the CML,the conditions of estimating the initial vectors using symbolic dynamics are discussed.The presented method provides both theoretical and experimental results for better understanding and characterizing the behaviours of spatiotemporal chaotic systems.

  13. Laser-Based Slam with Efficient Occupancy Likelihood Map Learning for Dynamic Indoor Scenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Yao, Jian; Xie, Renping; Tu, Jinge; Feng, Chen

    2016-06-01

    Location-Based Services (LBS) have attracted growing attention in recent years, especially in indoor environments. The fundamental technique of LBS is the map building for unknown environments, this technique also named as simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) in robotic society. In this paper, we propose a novel approach for SLAMin dynamic indoor scenes based on a 2D laser scanner mounted on a mobile Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV) with the help of the grid-based occupancy likelihood map. Instead of applying scan matching in two adjacent scans, we propose to match current scan with the occupancy likelihood map learned from all previous scans in multiple scales to avoid the accumulation of matching errors. Due to that the acquisition of the points in a scan is sequential but not simultaneous, there unavoidably exists the scan distortion at different extents. To compensate the scan distortion caused by the motion of the UGV, we propose to integrate a velocity of a laser range finder (LRF) into the scan matching optimization framework. Besides, to reduce the effect of dynamic objects such as walking pedestrians often existed in indoor scenes as much as possible, we propose a new occupancy likelihood map learning strategy by increasing or decreasing the probability of each occupancy grid after each scan matching. Experimental results in several challenged indoor scenes demonstrate that our proposed approach is capable of providing high-precision SLAM results.

  14. Analytical description of critical dynamics for two-dimensional dissipative nonlinear maps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Méndez-Bermúdez, J.A. [Instituto de Física, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, Apartado Postal J-48, Puebla 72570 (Mexico); Oliveira, Juliano A. de [UNESP – Univ. Estadual Paulista, Câmpus de São João da Boa Vista, Av. Professora Isette Corrêa Fontão, 505, Jardim Santa Rita das Areias, 13876-750 São João da Boa Vista, SP (Brazil); Leonel, Edson D. [Departamento de Física, UNESP – Univ. Estadual Paulista, Av. 24A, 1515, Bela Vista, 13506-900 Rio Claro, SP (Brazil); Abdus Salam International Center for Theoretical Physics, Strada Costiera 11, 34151 Trieste (Italy)

    2016-05-20

    The critical dynamics near the transition from unlimited to limited action diffusion for two families of well known dissipative nonlinear maps, namely the dissipative standard and dissipative discontinuous maps, is characterized by the use of an analytical approach. The approach is applied to explicitly obtain the average squared action as a function of the (discrete) time and the parameters controlling nonlinearity and dissipation. This allows to obtain a set of critical exponents so far obtained numerically in the literature. The theoretical predictions are verified by extensive numerical simulations. We conclude that all possible dynamical cases, independently on the map parameter values and initial conditions, collapse into the universal exponential decay of the properly normalized average squared action as a function of a normalized time. The formalism developed here can be extended to many other different types of mappings therefore making the methodology generic and robust. - Highlights: • We analytically approach scaling properties of a family of two-dimensional dissipative nonlinear maps. • We derive universal scaling functions that were obtained before only approximately. • We predict the unexpected condition where diffusion and dissipation compensate each other exactly. • We find a new universal scaling function that embraces all possible dissipative behaviors.

  15. Dynamic approximate entropy electroanatomic maps detect rotors in a simulated atrial fibrillation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugarte, Juan P; Orozco-Duque, Andrés; Tobón, Catalina; Kremen, Vaclav; Novak, Daniel; Saiz, Javier; Oesterlein, Tobias; Schmitt, Clauss; Luik, Armin; Bustamante, John

    2014-01-01

    There is evidence that rotors could be drivers that maintain atrial fibrillation. Complex fractionated atrial electrograms have been located in rotor tip areas. However, the concept of electrogram fractionation, defined using time intervals, is still controversial as a tool for locating target sites for ablation. We hypothesize that the fractionation phenomenon is better described using non-linear dynamic measures, such as approximate entropy, and that this tool could be used for locating the rotor tip. The aim of this work has been to determine the relationship between approximate entropy and fractionated electrograms, and to develop a new tool for rotor mapping based on fractionation levels. Two episodes of chronic atrial fibrillation were simulated in a 3D human atrial model, in which rotors were observed. Dynamic approximate entropy maps were calculated using unipolar electrogram signals generated over the whole surface of the 3D atrial model. In addition, we optimized the approximate entropy calculation using two real multi-center databases of fractionated electrogram signals, labeled in 4 levels of fractionation. We found that the values of approximate entropy and the levels of fractionation are positively correlated. This allows the dynamic approximate entropy maps to localize the tips from stable and meandering rotors. Furthermore, we assessed the optimized approximate entropy using bipolar electrograms generated over a vicinity enclosing a rotor, achieving rotor detection. Our results suggest that high approximate entropy values are able to detect a high level of fractionation and to locate rotor tips in simulated atrial fibrillation episodes. We suggest that dynamic approximate entropy maps could become a tool for atrial fibrillation rotor mapping.

  16. Vulnerable Waters

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This web service contains the following map layers: FlowLines, Watersheds, and Wetlands. Data used to create this web service are available as separate download at...

  17. Synchronizing the information content of a chaotic map and flow via symbolic dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corron, Ned J; Pethel, Shawn D; Myneni, Krishna

    2002-09-01

    In this paper we report an extension to the concept of generalized synchronization for coupling different types of chaotic systems, including maps and flows. This broader viewpoint takes disparate systems to be synchronized if their information content is equivalent. We use symbolic dynamics to quantize the information produced by each system and compare the symbol sequences to establish synchronization. A general architecture is presented for drive-response coupling that detects symbols produced by a chaotic drive oscillator and encodes them in a response system using the methods of chaos control. We include experimental results demonstrating synchronization of information content in an electronic oscillator circuit driven by a logistic map.

  18. Simulating Excited State Dynamics in Systems with Multiple Avoided Crossings Using Mapping Variable Ring Polymer Molecular Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Jessica R; Ananth, Nandini

    2015-11-05

    Mapping variable ring polymer molecular dynamics (MV-RPMD) is an approximate quantum dynamics method based on imaginary-time path integrals for simulating electronically nonadiabatic photochemical processes. By employing a mapping protocol to transform from a discrete electronic state basis to continuous Cartesian phase-space variables, the method captures electronic state transitions coupled to nuclear motion using only classical MD trajectories. In this work, we extend the applicability of MV-RPMD to simulations of photoinduced excited electronic state dynamics in nonadiabatic systems with multiple avoided crossings. We achieve this by deriving a new electronic state population estimator in the phase space of electronic variables that is exact at equilibrium and numerically accurate in real time. Further, we introduce an efficient constraint protocol to initialize an MV-RPMD simulation to a particular electronic state. We numerically demonstrate the accuracy of this estimator and constraint technique in describing electronic state dynamics from an initial nonequilibrium state in six model systems, three of which describe photodissociation.

  19. A new device for dynamic luminance mapping and glare risk assessment in buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisuit, Apiparn; Münch, Mirjam; Deschamps, Laurent; Kämpf, Jérôme; Scartezzini, Jean-Louis

    2012-10-01

    High dynamic range imaging has been shown to be a reliable tool to assess luminance maps and glare risk probability in buildings. However, there are some limitations of image capturing time, especially when dealing with highly dynamic and contrasted daylight situations. We used a newly developed prototype of a digital camera which contains a high dynamic range pixel array chip, with a logarithmic scale for encoding. This type of camera allows to effectively assessing luminance, contrast and contrast directions, by taking only a single image or by performing real time recordings. The device was equipped with a fisheye lens and V-lambda filters to adapt the camera's spectral sensitivity to the human eye. After spectral as well as photometric calibration and vignetting correction, the device was tested to perform luminance mapping of real scenes. The results showed that luminance maps of a room can be efficiently assessed under dynamic daylight and mixed day- and electric lighting conditions in a very short time (i.e. 100 ms), when compared to classical HDR imaging techniques. This allows us to calculate glare indexes of a scene simultaneously. The camera opens a variety of new applications as a useful tool for architects, building designers and lighting experts. The device can be used to easily monitor daylight availability and glare indexes in existing buildings and further developments for advanced (day-) lighting control can be envisaged.

  20. A Dynamic Detection Technique to Format String Vulnerability%一种格式化字符串脆弱性动态检测技术

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    匡春光; 王春雷; 何蓉晖

    2012-01-01

    In order to improve the security of computer software,the principle and the feature of format string vulnerability in C programs are analyzed.Based on the analysis,a dynamic detection technique is advanced.By taking use of the technique,a detection tool is produced.The tool can efficiently detect format string vulnerabilities in C binary programs.The analysis result can be a reference to make more secure C programs,and the detection technique is practical.%为了提高计算机软件的安全性,对C程序中的格式化字符串脆弱性的原理、特征进行了分析,在分析的基础上提出了一种动态检测技术.利用此检测技术实现的一种格式化字符串脆弱性检测工具能较准确地检测到C目标程序中的格式化字符串脆弱性.分析结果对编写更安全的C程序具有参考价值,检测技术具有实用价值.

  1. Occupancy Grid Mapping Based on DSmT for Dynamic Environment Perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjing Zhou

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Occupancy grid mapping is an important approach for intelligent vehicle environment perception. In this paper, an occupancy grid mapping approach in Dezert-Smarandache theory (DSmT framework for the purpose of dynamic environment perception is proposed. To avoid the transformation of the local map from polar to Catersian coordinate, a different inverse sensor model in Cartesian coordinate for laser scanner was proposed. Two different combination rules in DSmT framework, Dempster’s rule of combination and PCR2, are implemented independently for global map update and mobile object detection. The performance of the two combination rules were compared by ways of simulation and experiment. According to the comparisons we find that both of the combination rules are capable of detecting mobile objects. And the former effectively filtered out the noise and make the detection robust, but the latter didn’t, suggesting that the former is more suitable for occupancy grid mapping. Static and mobile objects are extracted from the occupancy grid map using digital image processing technology.

  2. This Dynamic Planet: World map of volcanoes, earthquakes, impact craters and plate tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simkin, Tom; Tilling, Robert I.; Vogt, Peter R.; Kirby, Stephen H.; Kimberly, Paul; Stewart, David B.

    2006-01-01

    Our Earth is a dynamic planet, as clearly illustrated on the main map by its topography, over 1500 volcanoes, 44,000 earthquakes, and 170 impact craters. These features largely reflect the movements of Earth's major tectonic plates and many smaller plates or fragments of plates (including microplates). Volcanic eruptions and earthquakes are awe-inspiring displays of the powerful forces of nature and can be extraordinarily destructive. On average, about 60 of Earth's 550 historically active volcanoes are in eruption each year. In 2004 alone, over 160 earthquakes were magnitude 6.0 or above, some of which caused casualties and substantial damage. This map shows many of the features that have shaped--and continue to change--our dynamic planet. Most new crust forms at ocean ridge crests, is carried slowly away by plate movement, and is ultimately recycled deep into the earth--causing earthquakes and volcanism along the boundaries between moving tectonic plates. Oceans are continually opening (e.g., Red Sea, Atlantic) or closing (e.g., Mediterranean). Because continental crust is thicker and less dense than thinner, younger oceanic crust, most does not sink deep enough to be recycled, and remains largely preserved on land. Consequently, most continental bedrock is far older than the oldest oceanic bedrock. (see back of map) The earthquakes and volcanoes that mark plate boundaries are clearly shown on this map, as are craters made by impacts of extraterrestrial objects that punctuate Earth's history, some causing catastrophic ecological changes. Over geologic time, continuing plate movements, together with relentless erosion and redeposition of material, mask or obliterate traces of earlier plate-tectonic or impact processes, making the older chapters of Earth's 4,500-million-year history increasingly difficult to read. The recent activity shown on this map provides only a present-day snapshot of Earth's long history, helping to illustrate how its present surface came to

  3. Echo-acoustic flow dynamically modifies the cortical map of target range in bats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartenstein, Sophia K.; Gerstenberg, Nadine; Vanderelst, Dieter; Peremans, Herbert; Firzlaff, Uwe

    2014-08-01

    Echolocating bats use the delay between their sonar emissions and the reflected echoes to measure target range, a crucial parameter for avoiding collisions or capturing prey. In many bat species, target range is represented as an orderly organized map of echo delay in the auditory cortex. Here we show that the map of target range in bats is dynamically modified by the continuously changing flow of acoustic information perceived during flight (‘echo-acoustic flow’). Combining dynamic acoustic stimulation in virtual space with extracellular recordings, we found that neurons in the auditory cortex of the bat Phyllostomus discolor encode echo-acoustic flow information on the geometric relation between targets and the bat’s flight trajectory, rather than echo delay per se. Specifically, the cortical representation of close-range targets is enlarged when the lateral passing distance of the target decreases. This flow-dependent enlargement of target representation may trigger adaptive behaviours such as vocal control or flight manoeuvres.

  4. Fixed points and chaotic dynamics for expansive-contractive maps in Euclidean spaces, with some applications

    CERN Document Server

    Pireddu, Marina

    2009-01-01

    In this work we introduce a topological method for the search of fixed points and periodic points for continuous maps defined on generalized rectangles in finite dimensional Euclidean spaces. We name our technique "Stretching Along the Paths" method, since we deal with maps that expand the arcs along one direction. Our technique is also significant from a dynamical point of view, as it allows to detect complex dynamics. In particular, we are able to prove semi-conjugacy to the Bernoulli shift and thus positivity of the topological entropy, the presence of topological transitivity and sensitivity with respect to initial conditions, density of periodic points. Moreover, our approach, although mathematically rigorous, avoids the use of sophisticated topological theories and it is relatively easy to apply to specific models arising in the applications. For example we have here employed the Stretching along the paths method to study discrete and continuous-time models arising from economics and biology.

  5. Analysis of convergence for initial condition estimation of coupled map lattices based on symbolic dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Li-Sha; Kang Xiao-Yun; Lin Lan-Xin

    2010-01-01

    A novel approach to the inverse problem of diffusively coupled map lattices is systematically investigated by utilizing the symbolic vector dynamics. The relationship between the performance of initial condition estimation and the structural feature of dynamical system is proved theoretically. It is found that any point in a spatiotemporal coupled system is not necessary to converge to its initial value with respect to sufficient backward iteration, which is directly relevant to the coupling strength and local mapping function. When the convergence is met, the error bound in estimating the initial condition is proposed in a noiseless environment, which is determined by the dimension of attractors and metric entropy of the system. Simulation results further confirm the theoretic analysis, and prove that the presented method provides the important theory and experimental results for better analysing and characterizing the spatiotemporal complex behaviours in an actual system.

  6. A Simple Dynamic Mind-map Framework To Discover Associative Relationships in Transactional Data Streams

    CERN Document Server

    Schommer, Christoph

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we informally introduce dynamic mind-maps that represent a new approach on the basis of a dynamic construction of connectionist structures during the processing of a data stream. This allows the representation and processing of recursively defined structures and avoids the problem of a more traditional, fixed-size architecture with the processing of input structures of unknown size. For a data stream analysis with association discovery, the incremental analysis of data leads to results on demand. Here, we describe a framework that uses symbolic cells to calculate associations based on transactional data streams as it exists in e.g. bibliographic databases. We follow a natural paradigm of applying simple operations on cells yielding on a mind-map structure that adapts over time.

  7. Chronic imaging of cortical sensory map dynamics using a genetically encoded calcium indicator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minderer, Matthias; Liu, Wenrui; Sumanovski, Lazar T; Kügler, Sebastian; Helmchen, Fritjof; Margolis, David J

    2012-01-01

    In vivo optical imaging can reveal the dynamics of large-scale cortical activity, but methods for chronic recording are limited. Here we present a technique for long-term investigation of cortical map dynamics using wide-field ratiometric fluorescence imaging of the genetically encoded calcium indicator (GECI) Yellow Cameleon 3.60. We find that wide-field GECI signals report sensory-evoked activity in anaesthetized mouse somatosensory cortex with high sensitivity and spatiotemporal precision, and furthermore, can be measured repeatedly in separate imaging sessions over multiple weeks. This method opens new possibilities for the longitudinal study of stability and plasticity of cortical sensory representations.

  8. Global Dynamics of the Advanced Light Source Revealed through Experimental Frequency Map Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, D.; Steier, C.; Laskar, J.; Nadolski, L.

    2000-07-01

    Frequency map analysis was first used for the dynamical study of numerical simulations of physical systems (solar system, galaxies, particle accelerators). Here it is applied directly to the experimental results obtained at the Advanced Light Source. For the first time, the network of coupling resonances is clearly visible in an experiment, in a similar way as in the numerical simulation. Excellent agreement between numerical and experimental results leads us to propose this technique as a tool for improving numerical models and actual behavior of particle accelerators. Moreover, it provides a model-independent diagnostic for the evaluation of the dynamical properties of the beam.

  9. Beam rate influence on dose distribution and fluence map in IMRT dynamic technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slosarek, Krzysztof; Grządziel, Aleksandra; Osewski, Wojciech; Dolla, Lukasz; Bekman, Barbara; Petrovic, Borislava

    2012-01-01

    To examine the impact of beam rate on dose distribution in IMRT plans and then to evaluate agreement of calculated and measured dose distributions for various beam rate values. Accelerators used in radiotherapy utilize some beam rate modes which can shorten irradiation time and thus reduce ability of patient movement during a treatment session. This aspect should be considered in high conformal dynamic techniques. Dose calculation was done for two different beam rates (100 MU/min and 600 MU/min) in an IMRT plan. For both, a comparison of Radiation Planning Index (RPI) and MU was conducted. Secondly, the comparison of optimal fluence maps and corresponding actual fluence maps was done. Next, actual fluence maps were measured and compared with the calculated ones. Gamma index was used for that assessment. Additionally, positions of each leaf of the MLC were controlled by home made software. Dose distribution obtained for lower beam rates was slightly better than for higher beam rates in terms of target coverage and risk structure protection. Lower numbers of MUs were achieved in 100 MU/min plans than in 600 MU/min plans. Actual fluence maps converted from optimal ones demonstrated more similarity in 100 MU/min plans. Better conformity of the measured maps to the calculated ones was obtained when a lower beam rate was applied. However, these differences were small. No correlation was found between quality of fluence map conversion and leaf motion accuracy. Execution of dynamic techniques is dependent on beam rate. However, these differences are minor. Analysis shows a slight superiority of a lower beam rate. It does not significantly affect treatment accuracy.

  10. Dynamic Feedforward Control of a Diesel Engine Based on Optimal Transient Compensation Maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Mancini

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available To satisfy the increasingly stringent emission regulations and a demand for an ever lower fuel consumption, diesel engines have become complex systems with many interacting actuators. As a consequence, these requirements are pushing control and calibration to their limits. The calibration procedure nowadays is still based mainly on engineering experience, which results in a highly iterative process to derive a complete engine calibration. Moreover, automatic tools are available only for stationary operation, to obtain control maps that are optimal with respect to some predefined objective function. Therefore, the exploitation of any leftover potential during transient operation is crucial. This paper proposes an approach to derive a transient feedforward (FF control system in an automated way. It relies on optimal control theory to solve a dynamic optimization problem for fast transients. A partially physics-based model is thereby used to replace the engine. From the optimal solutions, the relevant information is extracted and stored in maps spanned by the engine speed and the torque gradient. These maps complement the static control maps by accounting for the dynamic behavior of the engine. The procedure is implemented on a real engine and experimental results are presented along with the development of the methodology.

  11. Hydrological exchanges and Organic Matter dynamics in highly vulnerable tidal wetland ecosystems at the land-ocean interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzortziou, M.; Neale, P.; Megonigal, P.; Loughner, C.

    2014-12-01

    Occupying a critical interface between the land and the sea, tidal wetlands are amongst the most ecologically valuable and economically important ecosystems on Earth, but also especially vulnerable to human pressures and climate change. These rich in biodiversity and highly productive ecosystems are hot spots of biogeochemical transformations, consistently exchanging Organic Matter with adjacent estuarine waters through tidal flushing. Here we discuss new results on the amount and directions of biogeochemical exchanges at the tidal wetland-estuary interface. Detailed microbial and photochemical degradation experiments and high resolution bio-optical observations in tidal freshwater and salt marsh systems of the Eastern US coast provide insights on the quality and fate of the organic compounds exported from tidal marshes and their influence on near-shore biological processes, biogeochemical cycles and optical variability. Impacts of anthropogenic activities and resulting air-pollution are also discussed. High resolution model runs were performed using the Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) model, to examine atmospheric composition along the shoreline where processes such as sea and bay breeze circulations often favor the accumulation and air-deposition of atmospheric pollutants, impacting biogeochemical processes in sensitive tidal wetland ecosystems.

  12. A New Image Encryption Scheme Based on Dynamic S-Boxes and Chaotic Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Atique Ur; Khan, Jan Sher; Ahmad, Jawad; Hwang, Soeng Oun

    2016-03-01

    Substitution box is a unique and nonlinear core component of block ciphers. A better designing technique of substitution box can boost up the quality of ciphertexts. In this paper, a new encryption method based on dynamic substitution boxes is proposed via using two chaotic maps. To break the correlation in an original image, pixels values of the original plaintext image are permuted row- and column-wise through random sequences. The aforementioned random sequences are generated by 2-D Burgers chaotic map. For the generation of dynamic substitution boxes, Logistic chaotic map is employed. In the process of diffusion, the permuted image is divided into blocks and each block is substituted via different dynamic substitution boxes. In contrast to conventional encryption schemes, the proposed scheme does not undergo the fixed block cipher and hence the security level can be enhanced. Extensive security analysis including histogram test is applied on the proposed image encryption technique. All experimental results reveal that the proposed scheme has a high level of security and robustness for transmission of digital images on insecure communication channels.

  13. Dynamic semiparametric Bayesian models for genetic mapping of complex trait with irregular longitudinal data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Kiranmoy; Li, Jiahan; Fu, Guifang; Wang, Zhong; Li, Runze; Wu, Rongling

    2013-02-10

    Many phenomena of fundamental importance to biology and biomedicine arise as a dynamic curve, such as organ growth and HIV dynamics. The genetic mapping of these traits is challenged by longitudinal variables measured at irregular and possibly subject-specific time points, in which case nonnegative definiteness of the estimated covariance matrix needs to be guaranteed. We present a semiparametric approach for genetic mapping within the mixture-model setting by jointly modeling mean and covariance structures for irregular longitudinal data. Penalized spline is used to model the mean functions of individual quantitative trait locus (QTL) genotypes as latent variables, whereas an extended generalized linear model is used to approximate the covariance matrix. The parameters for modeling the mean-covariances are estimated by MCMC, using the Gibbs sampler and the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm. We derive the full conditional distributions for the mean and covariance parameters and compute Bayes factors to test the hypothesis about the existence of significant QTLs. We used the model to screen the existence of specific QTLs for age-specific change of body mass index with a sparse longitudinal data set. The new model provides powerful means for broadening the application of genetic mapping to reveal the genetic control of dynamic traits.

  14. Magnetic resonance velocity mapping of 3D cerebrospinal fluid flow dynamics in hydrocephalus: preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stadlbauer, Andreas [Landesklinikum St. Poelten, MR Physics Group, Department of Radiology, St. Poelten (Austria); University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Neurosurgery, Erlangen (Germany); Salomonowitz, Erich [Landesklinikum St. Poelten, MR Physics Group, Department of Radiology, St. Poelten (Austria); Brenneis, Christian [Landesklinikum St. Poelten, Department of Neurology, St. Poelten (Austria); Ungersboeck, Karl [Landesklinikum St. Poelten, Department of Neurosurgery, St. Poelten (Austria); Riet, Wilma van der [European MRI Consultancy (EMRIC), Strasbourg (France); Buchfelder, Michael; Ganslandt, Oliver [University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Neurosurgery, Erlangen (Germany)

    2012-01-15

    To investigate the detectability of CSF flow alterations in the ventricular system of patients with hydrocephalus using time-resolved 3D MR velocity mapping. MR velocity mapping was performed in 21 consecutive hydrocephalus patients and 21 age-matched volunteers using a 3D phase-contrast (PC) sequence. Velocity vectors and particle path lines were calculated for visualisation of flow dynamics. CSF flow was classified as ''hypomotile flow'' if it showed attenuated dynamics and as ''hypermotile flow'' if it showed increased dynamics compared with volunteers. Diagnostic efficacy was compared with routine 2D cine PC-MRI. Seven patients showed hypomotile CSF flow: six had non-communicating hydrocephalus due to aqueductal stenosis. One showed oscillating flow between the lateral ventricles after craniotomy for intracranial haemorrhage. Seven patients showed normal flow: six had hydrocephalus ex vacuo due to brain atrophy. One patient who underwent ventriculostomy 10 years ago showed a flow path through the opening. Seven patients showed hypermotile flow: three had normal pressure hydrocephalus, three had dementia, and in one the diagnosis remained unclear. The diagnostic efficacy of velocity mapping was significantly higher except for that of aqueductal stenosis. Our approach may be useful for diagnosis, therapy planning, and follow-up of different kinds of hydrocephalus. (orig.)

  15. The implementation of a modernized Dynamic Digital Map on Gale Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBeck, J.; Condit, C. D.

    2012-12-01

    Currently, geology instructors present information to students via PowerPoint, Word, Excel and other programs that are not designed to parse or present geologic data. More tech-savvy, and perhaps better-funded, instructors use Google Earth or ArcGIS to display geologic maps and other visual information. However, Google Earth lacks the ability to present large portions of text, and ArcGIS restricts such functionality to labels and annotations. The original Dynamic Digital Map, which we have renamed Dynamic Digital Map Classic (DDMC), allows instructors to represent both visual and large portions of textual information to students. This summer we generalized the underlying architecture of DDMC, redesigned the user interface, modernized the analytical functionality, renamed the older version and labeled this new creature Dynamic Digital Map Extended (DDME). With the new DDME instructors can showcase maps, images, articles and movies, and create digital field trips. They can set the scale, coordinate system and caption of maps and images, add symbol links to maps and images that can transport the user to any specified destination—either internally (to data contained within the DDME) or externally (to a website address). Instructors and students can also calculate non-linear distances and irregular areas of maps and images, and create digital field trips with any number of stops—complete with notes and driving directions. DDMEs are perhaps best described as a sort of computerized, self-authored, interactive textbook. To display the vast capabilities of DDME, we created a DDME of Gale Crater (DDME-GC), which is the landing site of the most sophisticated NASA Mars Rover—Curiosity. DDME-GC hosts six thematic maps: a detailed geologic map provided by Brad Thompson of the Boston University Center for Remote Sensing (Thompson, et al., 2010), and five maps maintained in ASU's JMARS system, including global mosaics from Mars Global Surveyor's Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter

  16. QIN: Practical Considerations in T1 Mapping of Prostate for Dynamic Contrast Enhancement Pharmacokinetic Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennessy, Fiona M; Fedorov, Andriy; Gupta, Sandeep N; Schmidt, Ehud J; Tempany, Clare M; Mulkern, Robert V

    2012-01-01

    There are many challenges in developing robust imaging biomarkers that can be reliably applied in a clinical trial setting. In the case of Dynamic Contrast Enhanced (DCE) MRI, one such challenge is to obtain accurate pre-contrast T1 maps for subsequent use in two-compartment pharmacokinetic models commonly used to fit the MR enhancement time courses. In the prostate, a convenient and common approach for this task has been to use the same 3D SPGR sequence used to collect the DCE data, but with variable flip angles (VFA’s) to collect data suitable for T1 mapping prior to contrast injection. However, inhomogeneous radiofrequency conditions within the prostate have been found to adversely affect the accuracy of this technique. Herein we demonstrate the sensitivity of DCE pharmacokinetic parameters to pre-contrast T1 values and examine methods to improve the accuracy of T1 mapping with flip angle corrected VFA SPGR methods, comparing T1 maps from such methods with reference T1 maps generated with saturation recovery experiments performed with fast spin echo (FSE) sequences. PMID:22898681

  17. Estimating vegetation vulnerability to detect areas prone to land degradation in the Mediterranean basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbrenda, Vito; Coluzzi, Rosa; D'Emilio, Mariagrazia; Lanfredi, Maria; Simoniello, Tiziana

    2013-04-01

    Vegetation is one of the key components to study land degradation vulnerability because of the complex interactions and feedbacks that link it to soil. In the Mediterranean region, degradation phenomena are due to a mix of predisposing factors (thin soil horizons, low soil organic matter, increasing aridity, etc.) and bad management practices (overgrazing, deforestation, intensification of agriculture, tourism development). In particular, in areas threatened by degradation processes but still covered by vegetation, large scale soil condition evaluation is a hard task and the detection of stressed vegetation can be useful to identify on-going soil degradation phenomena and to reduce their impacts through interventions for recovery/rehabilitation. In this context the use of satellite time series can increase the efficacy and completeness of the land degradation assessment, providing precious information to understand vegetation dynamics. In order to estimate vulnerability levels in Basilicata (a Mediterranean region of Southern Italy) in the framework of PRO-LAND project (PO-FESR Basilicata 2007-2013), we crossed information on potential vegetation vulnerability with information on photosynthetic activity dynamics. Potential vegetation vulnerability represents the vulnerability related to the type of present cover in terms of fire risk, erosion protection, drought resistance and plant cover distribution. It was derived from an updated land cover map by separately analyzing each factor, and then by combining them to obtain concise information on the possible degradation exposure. The analysis of photosynthetic activity dynamics provides information on the status of vegetation, that is fundamental to discriminate the different vulnerability levels within the same land cover, i.e. the same potential vulnerability. For such a purpose, we analyzed a time series (2000-2010) of a satellite vegetation index (MODIS NDVI) with 250m resolution, available as 16-day composite

  18. Spatiotemporal mapping of three dimensional rotational dynamics of single ultrasmall gold nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Kamalesh; Pradeep, Thalappil

    2014-08-01

    Spatiotemporal mapping of the position and orientation of nano-machinery inside complex and dynamic cellular environments is essential for the detailed understanding of many bio-physical processes. For the genuine observation of such biomolecular dynamics with high signal to noise ratio and reduced disturbance from the labeling probes, reduction in the size of nano-bio labels and simplification of techniques for their observation are important. Here we achieve this using polarized dark field scattering micro-spectroscopy (PDFSMS), in its simplest form so that it is deployable in several experiments. We not only locate tiny gold nanorods (GNRs) of size 30 (length) × 10 nm (diameter) inside HEK293 cells but also demonstrate mapping of their in-situ polarization patterns using a novel method. Real time observations of rotating GNR with DFSMS and PDFSMS are used to resolve in-plane and out-of-plane rotational modes of GNR. We have shown that PDFSMS itself can provide complete information about the state of GNR. A step ahead, we demonstrate the application of PDFSMS to track three dimensional rotational dynamics of transferrin-conjugated GNRs inside live HEK293 cells. These first-time observations of the three dimensional intracellular rotational dynamics of tiny GNRs using PDFSMS present a new landmark in single particle scattering spectroscopy.

  19. A novel energy-aware multi-task dynamic mapping heuristic of NoC-based MPSoCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xibin; Gu, Ming

    2013-05-01

    Task mapping is an important issue in network-on-chip (NoC)-based multiprocessor systems-on-chips (MPSoCs) design. The dynamic characteristic of application execution enforces the use of dynamic task mapping. In this article, a hybrid energy-aware dynamic mapping strategy is proposed. The strategy consists of an off-line part and an on-line part. In the off-line part, optimisation tools are used to extract information that helps to reduce the energy consumption in the on-line mapping, while the on-line mapping heuristic makes use of the information. Experimental result shows that the energy consumption is reduced by 21%, on average, compared to the best neighbour heuristic.

  20. Evaluating sustainable adaptation strategies for vulnerable mega-deltas using system dynamics modelling: Rice agriculture in the Mekong Delta's An Giang Province, Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Alexander; Darby, Stephen

    2016-07-15

    Challenging dynamics are unfolding in social-ecological systems around the globe as society attempts to mitigate and adapt to climate change while sustaining rapid local development. The IPCC's 5th assessment suggests these changing systems are susceptible to unforeseen and dangerous 'emergent risks'. An archetypal example is the Vietnamese Mekong Delta (VMD) where the river dyke network has been heightened and extended over the last decade with the dual objectives of (1) adapting the delta's 18 million inhabitants and their livelihoods to increasingly intense river-flooding, and (2) developing rice production through a shift from double to triple-cropping. Negative impacts have been associated with this shift, particularly in relation to its exclusion of fluvial sediment deposition from the floodplain. A deficit in our understanding of the dynamics of the rice-sediment system, which involve unintuitive delays, feedbacks, and tipping points, is addressed here, using a system dynamics (SD) approach to inform sustainable adaptation strategies. Specifically, we develop and test a new SD model which simulates the dynamics between the farmers' economic system and their rice agriculture operations, and uniquely, integrates the role of fluvial sediment deposition within their dyke compartment. We use the model to explore a range of alternative rice cultivation strategies. Our results suggest that the current dominant strategy (triple-cropping) is only optimal for wealthier groups within society and over the short-term (ca. 10years post-implementation). The model suggests that the policy of opening sluice gates and leaving paddies fallow during high-flood years, in order to encourage natural sediment deposition and the nutrient replenishment it supplies, is both a more equitable and a more sustainable policy. But, even with this approach, diminished supplies of sediment-bound nutrients and the consequent need to compensate with artificial fertilisers will mean that smaller

  1. Fusion of Saliency Maps for Visual Attention Selection in Dynamic Scenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiawei Xu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Human vision system can optionally process the visual information and adjust the contradiction between the limited resources and the huge visual information. Building attention models similar to human visual attention system should be very beneficial to computer vision and machine intelligence; meanwhile, it has been a challenging task due to the complexity of human brain and limited understanding of the mechanisms underlying the human attention system. Previous studies emphasized on static attention, however the motion features, which are playing key roles in human attention system intuitively, have not been well integrated into the previous models. Motion features such as motion direction are assumed to be processed within the dorsal visual and the dorsal auditory pathways and there is no systematic approach to extract the motion cues well so far. In this paper, we proposed a generic Global Attention Model (GAM system based on visual attention analysis. The computational saliency map is superimposed by a set of saliency maps via different predefined approaches. We added three saliencies maps up together to reflect dominant motion features into the attention model, i.e., the fused saliency map at each frame is adjusted by the top-down, static and motion saliency maps. By doing this, the proposed attention model accommodating motion feature into the system so that it can responds to real visual events in a manner similar to the human visual attention system in a realistic circumstance. The visual challenges used in our experiments are selected from the benchmark video sequences. We tested the GAM on several dynamic scenes, such as traffic artery, parachuter landing and surfing, with high speed and cluttered background. The experiment results showed the GAM system demonstrated high robustness and real-time ability under complex dynamic scenes. Extensive evaluations based on comparisons with other approaches of the attention model results have

  2. Mapping Fuel Load and Its Dynamics in Shrubland and Grassland Using eMODIS Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, H.; Vogelmann, J. E.; Zhang, X.; Hawbaker, T. J.; Reeves, M. C.; Li, Z.

    2014-12-01

    A challenge for mapping live fuels and their dynamics in rangeland ecosystems is separating fuel conditions and changes from background variation. Rangelands are characterized by seasonal and inter-annual spectral variation associated with phenology and other factors. Remote sensing systems for assessing these ecosystems, such as the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), enable characterization of intra- and inter-annual spectral conditions across all seasons. Fuel conditions in rangelands are influenced by major disturbances such as fires, and phenological changes are strongly influenced by weather and climate. Fuel load data are key components to simulating areas that are more likely to burn and burn severity, and to provide regional estimates biomass burning emissions. We developed an approach for mapping live fuel load, biomass density, dynamics using enhanced MODIS (eMODIS) data at a spatial resolution of 250m. Generalized allometric models were developed to estimate branch biomass and aboveground biomass based on independent variables of maximum foliage biomass. Temporal leaf area index (LAI) data were converted from weekly eMODIS Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index (SAVI) data for various vegetation types and fitted to a vegetation growing model to reduce uncertainty. Results from the study area (Owyhee and Twin Falls) will be examined and validated by using high-resolution aerial photography (WorldView) and field data. Additionally, we analyzed and summarized the correlations among fire occurrence (frequency), burn severity, live fuel load, and climatic conditions. Our results demonstrate that mapping fuel load and its dynamics in shrubland and grassland with remotely sensed time series data can capture spatiotemporal heterogeneity in nonforest live fuel types relevant to fire disturbances and climate/weather variation. This work provides a useful and powerful mapping approach that can improve and augment existing LANDFIRE fuels data in

  3. Age-related changes in the ``complexity'' of cardiovascular dynamics: A potential marker of vulnerability to disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, D. A. Lipsitz M.

    1995-03-01

    Healthy physiologic control of cardiovascular function is a result of complex interactions between multiple regulatory processes that operate over different time scales. These include the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems which regulate beat-to-beat heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP), as well as extravascular volume, body temperature, and sleep which influence HR and BP over the longer term. Interactions between these control systems generate highly variable fluctuations in continuous HR and BP signals. Techniques derived from nonlinear dynamics and chaos theory are now being adapted to quantify the dynamic behavior of physiologic time series and study their changes with age or disease. We have shown significant age-related changes in the 1/fx relationship between the log amplitude and log frequency of the heart rate power spectrum, as well as declines in approximate dimension and approximate entropy of both heart rate and blood pressure time series. These changes in the ``complexity'' of cardiovascular dynamics reflect the breakdown and decoupling of integrated physiologic regulatory systems with aging, and may signal an impairment in cardiovascular ability to adapt to external and internal perturbations. Studies are currently underway to determine whether the complexity of HR or BP time series can distinguish patients with fainting spells due to benign vasovagal reactions from those due to life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias. Thus, measures of the complexity of physiologic variability may provide novel methods to monitor cardiovascular aging and test the efficacy of specific interventions to improve adaptive capacity in old age.

  4. Towards high resolution mapping of 3-D mesoscale dynamics from observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Buongiorno Nardelli

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The MyOcean R&D project MESCLA (MEsoSCaLe dynamical Analysis through combined model, satellite and in situ data was devoted to the high resolution 3-D retrieval of tracer and velocity fields in the oceans, based on the combination of in situ and satellite observations and quasi-geostrophic dynamical models. The retrieval techniques were also tested and compared with the output of a primitive equation model, with particular attention to the accuracy of the vertical velocity field as estimated through the Q vector formulation of the omega equation. The project focused on a test case, covering the region where the Gulf Stream separates from the US East Coast. This work demonstrated that innovative methods for the high resolution mapping of 3-D mesoscale dynamics from observations can be used to build the next generations of operational observation-based products.

  5. Mapping variable ring polymer molecular dynamics: A path-integral based method for nonadiabatic processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananth, Nandini

    2013-09-01

    We introduce mapping-variable ring polymer molecular dynamics (MV-RPMD), a model dynamics for the direct simulation of multi-electron processes. An extension of the RPMD idea, this method is based on an exact, imaginary time path-integral representation of the quantum Boltzmann operator using continuous Cartesian variables for both electronic states and nuclear degrees of freedom. We demonstrate the accuracy of the MV-RPMD approach in calculations of real-time, thermal correlation functions for a range of two-state single-mode model systems with different coupling strengths and asymmetries. Further, we show that the ensemble of classical trajectories employed in these simulations preserves the Boltzmann distribution and provides a direct probe into real-time coupling between electronic state transitions and nuclear dynamics.

  6. Mapping the structural and dynamical features of multiple p53 DNA binding domains: insights into loop 1 intrinsic dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suryani Lukman

    Full Text Available The transcription factor p53 regulates cellular integrity in response to stress. p53 is mutated in more than half of cancerous cells, with a majority of the mutations localized to the DNA binding domain (DBD. In order to map the structural and dynamical features of the DBD, we carried out multiple copy molecular dynamics simulations (totaling 0.8 μs. Simulations show the loop 1 to be the most dynamic element among the DNA-contacting loops (loops 1-3. Loop 1 occupies two major conformational states: extended and recessed; the former but not the latter displays correlations in atomic fluctuations with those of loop 2 (~24 Å apart. Since loop 1 binds to the major groove whereas loop 2 binds to the minor groove of DNA, our results begin to provide some insight into the possible mechanism underpinning the cooperative nature of DBD binding to DNA. We propose (1 a novel mechanism underlying the dynamics of loop 1 and the possible tread-milling of p53 on DNA and (2 possible mutations on loop 1 residues to restore the transcriptional activity of an oncogenic mutation at a distant site.

  7. The Dynamics of The Potts-Bethe Mapping over ℚ p : The Case p ≡ 2 (mod 3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saburov, Mansoor; Khameini Ahmad, Mohd Ali

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we study the dynamics of the Potts-Bethe mapping associated with the p-adic q-state Potts model over the Cayley tree of order three. Namely, we establish the regularity of the Potts-Bethe mapping for the case p ≡ 2 (mod 3) with p ≥ 5.

  8. Molecular dynamics-based refinement and validation for sub-5 Å cryo-electron microscopy maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singharoy, Abhishek; Teo, Ivan; McGreevy, Ryan; Stone, John E; Zhao, Jianhua; Schulten, Klaus

    2016-07-07

    Two structure determination methods, based on the molecular dynamics flexible fitting (MDFF) paradigm, are presented that resolve sub-5 Å cryo-electron microscopy (EM) maps with either single structures or ensembles of such structures. The methods, denoted cascade MDFF and resolution exchange MDFF, sequentially re-refine a search model against a series of maps of progressively higher resolutions, which ends with the original experimental resolution. Application of sequential re-refinement enables MDFF to achieve a radius of convergence of ~25 Å demonstrated with the accurate modeling of β-galactosidase and TRPV1 proteins at 3.2 Å and 3.4 Å resolution, respectively. The MDFF refinements uniquely offer map-model validation and B-factor determination criteria based on the inherent dynamics of the macromolecules studied, captured by means of local root mean square fluctuations. The MDFF tools described are available to researchers through an easy-to-use and cost-effective cloud computing resource on Amazon Web Services.

  9. Analytical stability analysis of periodic systems by Poincaré mappings with application to rotorcraft dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henryk Flashner

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available A point mapping analysis is employed to investigate the stability of periodic systems. The method is applied to simplified rotorcraft models. The proposed approach is based on a procedure to obtain an analytical expression for the period-to-period mapping description of system's dynamics, and its dependence on system's parameters. Analytical stability and bifurcation conditions are then determined and expressed as functional relations between important system parameters. The method is applied to investigate the parametric stability of flapping motion of a rotor and the ground resonance problem encountered in rotorcraft dynamics. It is shown that the proposed approach provides very accurate results when compared with direct numerical results which are assumed to be an “exact solution” for the purpose of this study. It is also demonstrated that the point mapping method yields more accurate results than the widely used classical perturbation analysis. The ability to perform analytical stability studies of systems with multiple degrees-of-freedom is an important feature of the proposed approach since most existing analysis methods are applicable to single degree-of-freedom systems. Stability analysis of higher dimensional systems, such as the ground resonance problems, by perturbation methods is not straightforward, and is usually very cumbersome.

  10. Coastal dynamic and shoreline mapping: multi-sources spatial data analysis in Semarang Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marfai, Muh Aris; Almohammad, Hussein; Dey, Sudip; Susanto, Budi; King, Lorenz

    2008-07-01

    Semarang coastal area has geomorphologically complex processes, such as erosion-sedimentation, land subsidence, and tidal inundation hazard. Multi-years shoreline mapping is considered a valuable task for coastal monitoring and assessment. This paper presents maps illustrating the shoreline dynamic in a coastal area of Semarang-Indonesia using multi-sources spatial data. The segment data has been obtained by visual delineation of the topographic maps Year 1908, 1937, 1992 and Ikonos image Year 2003 as well as digital number (DN) value analysis and masking operation of Landsat MSS Year 1972 and Landsat ETM Year 2001. For the long period of almost 100 year, the shoreline dynamic in Semarang coastal area is dominated by sedimentation process. Shoreline extended to the sea as a result of man-made infrastructure and natural processes. The research's result was satisfactory and the method has proven to be effective considering lack of homogeneous data-series. However, some further improvement regarding geo-processing can be made and the accuracy can be tested in future version.

  11. Molecular dynamics-based refinement and validation for sub-5 Å cryo-electron microscopy maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singharoy, Abhishek; Teo, Ivan; McGreevy, Ryan; Stone, John E; Zhao, Jianhua; Schulten, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Two structure determination methods, based on the molecular dynamics flexible fitting (MDFF) paradigm, are presented that resolve sub-5 Å cryo-electron microscopy (EM) maps with either single structures or ensembles of such structures. The methods, denoted cascade MDFF and resolution exchange MDFF, sequentially re-refine a search model against a series of maps of progressively higher resolutions, which ends with the original experimental resolution. Application of sequential re-refinement enables MDFF to achieve a radius of convergence of ~25 Å demonstrated with the accurate modeling of β-galactosidase and TRPV1 proteins at 3.2 Å and 3.4 Å resolution, respectively. The MDFF refinements uniquely offer map-model validation and B-factor determination criteria based on the inherent dynamics of the macromolecules studied, captured by means of local root mean square fluctuations. The MDFF tools described are available to researchers through an easy-to-use and cost-effective cloud computing resource on Amazon Web Services. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16105.001 PMID:27383269

  12. Non-Markovianity Measure Based on Brukner–Zeilinger Invariant Information for Unital Quantum Dynamical Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhi; Zhu, Lie-Qiang; Li, Li

    2017-03-01

    A non-Markovianity measure based on Brukner–Zeilinger invariant information to characterize non-Markovian effect of open systems undergoing unital dynamical maps is proposed. The method takes advantage of non-increasing property of the Brukner–Zeilinger invariant information under completely positive and trace-preserving unital maps. The simplicity of computing the Brukner–Zeilinger invariant information is the advantage of the proposed measure because of mainly depending on the purity of quantum state. The measure effectively captures the characteristics of non-Markovianity of unital dynamical maps. As some concrete application, we consider two typical non-Markovian noise channels, i.e., the phase damping channel and the random unitary channel to show the sensitivity of the proposed measure. By investigation, we find that the conditions of detecting the non-Markovianity for the phase damping channel are consistent with the results of existing measures for non-Markovianity, i.e., information flow, divisibility and quantum mutual information. However, for the random unitary channel non-Markovian conditions are same to that of the information flow, but is different from that of the divisibility and quantum mutual information. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 61505053, the Natural Science Foundation of Hunan Province under Grant No. 2015JJ3092, the Research Foundation of Education Bureau of Hunan Province, China under Grant No. 16B177, the School Foundation from the Hunan University of Arts and Science under Grant No. 14ZD01

  13. Dynamic edge warping - An experimental system for recovering disparity maps in weakly constrained systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, K. L.; Wuescher, D. M.; Sarkar, S.

    1991-01-01

    Dynamic edge warping (DEW), a technique for recovering reasonably accurate disparity maps from uncalibrated stereo image pairs, is presented. No precise knowledge of the epipolar camera geometry is assumed. The technique is embedded in a system including structural stereopsis on the front end and robust estimation in digital photogrammetry on the other for the purpose of self-calibrating stereo image pairs. Once the relative camera orientation is known, the epipolar geometry is computed and the system can use this information to refine its representation of the object space. Such a system will find application in the autonomous extraction of terrain maps from stereo aerial photographs, for which camera position and orientation are unknown a priori, and for online autonomous calibration maintenance for robotic vision applications, in which the cameras are subject to vibration and other physical disturbances after calibration. This work thus forms a component of an intelligent system that begins with a pair of images and, having only vague knowledge of the conditions under which they were acquired, produces an accurate, dense, relative depth map. The resulting disparity map can also be used directly in some high-level applications involving qualitative scene analysis, spatial reasoning, and perceptual organization of the object space. The system as a whole substitutes high-level information and constraints for precise geometric knowledge in driving and constraining the early correspondence process.

  14. Assessing vulnerability of urban African communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson Nyed, Patrik; Jean-Baptiste, Nathalie; Herslund, Lise Byskov

    2014-01-01

    East African cities are in the process of assessing their vulnerabilities to climate change, but face difficulties in capturing the complexity of the various facets of vulnerability. This holistic approach, captures four different dimensions of vulnerability to flooding - Assets, Institutions......, Attitudes and the Physical environment, with Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, as a case city. The methodology is actively involving the expertise of the stakeholders, and uses GIS to analyze and compile the data. The final output is presented as a comprehensible map, delineating the varying vulnerability...

  15. Dynamical Degrees, Arithmetic Degrees, and Canonical Heights for Dominant Rational Self-Maps of Projective Space

    CERN Document Server

    Silverman, Joseph H

    2011-01-01

    Let F : P^N --> P^N be a dominant rational map. The dynamical degree of F is the quantity d_F = lim (deg F^n)^(1/n). When F is defined over a number field, we define the arithmetic degree of an algebraic point P to be a_F(P) = limsup h(F^n(P))^(1/n) and the canonical height of P to be h_F(P) = limsup h(F^n(P))/n^k d_F^n for an appropriately chosen integer k = k_F. In this article we prove some elementary relations and make some deep conjectures relating d_F, a_F(P), and h_F(P). We prove our conjectures for semisimple monomial maps.

  16. Stem-cell dynamics and lineage topology from in vivo fate mapping in the hematopoietic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höfer, Thomas; Barile, Melania; Flossdorf, Michael

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, sophisticated fate-mapping tools have been developed to study the behavior of stem cells in the intact organism. These experimental approaches are beginning to yield a quantitative picture of how cell numbers are regulated during steady state and in response to challenges. Focusing on hematopoiesis and immune responses, we discuss how novel mathematical approaches driven by these fate-mapping data have provided insights into the dynamics and topology of cellular differentiation pathways in vivo. The combination of experiment and theory has allowed to quantify the degree of self-renewal in stem and progenitor cells, shown how native hematopoiesis differs fundamentally from post-transplantation hematopoiesis, and uncovered that the diversification of T lymphocytes during immune responses resembles tissue renewal driven by stem cells.

  17. Superconducting linac beam dynamics with high-order maps for RF resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Geraci, A A; Pardo, R C; 10.1016/j.nima.2003.11.177

    2004-01-01

    The arbitrary-order map beam optics code COSY Infinity has recently been adapted to calculate accurate high-order ion-optical maps for electrostatic and radio-frequency accelerating structures. The beam dynamics of the superconducting low-velocity positive-ion injector linac for the ATLAS accelerator at Argonne National Lab is used to demonstrate some advantages of the new simulation capability. The injector linac involves four different types of superconducting accelerating structures and has a total of 18 resonators. The detailed geometry for each of the accelerating cavities is included, allowing an accurate representation of the on- and off-axis electric fields. The fields are obtained within the code from a Poisson-solver for cylindrically symmetric electrodes of arbitrary geometry. The transverse focusing is done with superconducting solenoids. A detailed comparison of the transverse and longitudinal phase space is made with the conventional ray-tracing code LINRAY. The two codes are evaluated for ease ...

  18. Model-driven mapping of transcriptional networks reveals the circuitry and dynamics of virulence regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Ezekiel J; Haynes, Brian C; Gish, Stacey R; Wang, Zhuo A; Skowyra, Michael L; Marulli, Alyssa L; Doering, Tamara L; Brent, Michael R

    2015-05-01

    Key steps in understanding a biological process include identifying genes that are involved and determining how they are regulated. We developed a novel method for identifying transcription factors (TFs) involved in a specific process and used it to map regulation of the key virulence factor of a deadly fungus-its capsule. The map, built from expression profiles of 41 TF mutants, includes 20 TFs not previously known to regulate virulence attributes. It also reveals a hierarchy comprising executive, midlevel, and "foreman" TFs. When grouped by temporal expression pattern, these TFs explain much of the transcriptional dynamics of capsule induction. Phenotypic analysis of TF deletion mutants revealed complex relationships among virulence factors and virulence in mice. These resources and analyses provide the first integrated, systems-level view of capsule regulation and biosynthesis. Our methods dramatically improve the efficiency with which transcriptional networks can be analyzed, making genomic approaches accessible to laboratories focused on specific physiological processes.

  19. Dynamical prediction and pattern mapping in short-term load forecasting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguirre, Luis Antonio; Rodrigues, Daniela D.; Lima, Silvio T. [Departamento de Engenharia Eletronica, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Av. Antonio Carlos, 6627, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Martinez, Carlos Barreira [Departamento de Engenharia Hidraulica e Recursos Hidricos, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Av. Antonio Carlos, 6627, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2008-01-15

    This work will not put forward yet another scheme for short-term load forecasting but rather will provide evidences that may improve our understanding about fundamental issues which underlay load forecasting problems. In particular, load forecasting will be decomposed into two main problems, namely dynamical prediction and pattern mapping. It is argued that whereas the latter is essentially static and becomes nonlinear when weekly features in the data are taken into account, the former might not be deterministic at all. In such cases there is no determinism (serial correlations) in the data apart from the average cycle and the best a model can do is to perform pattern mapping. Moreover, when there is determinism in addition to the average cycle, the underlying dynamics are sometimes linear, in which case there is no need to resort to nonlinear models to perform dynamical prediction. Such conclusions were confirmed using real load data and surrogate data analysis. In a sense, the paper details and organizes some general beliefs found in the literature on load forecasting. This sheds some light on real model-building and forecasting problems and helps understand some apparently conflicting results reported in the literature. (author)

  20. Equivalent Dynamic Stiffness Mapping technique for identifying nonlinear structural elements from frequency response functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.; Zheng, G. T.

    2016-02-01

    A simple and general Equivalent Dynamic Stiffness Mapping technique is proposed for identifying the parameters or the mathematical model of a nonlinear structural element with steady-state primary harmonic frequency response functions (FRFs). The Equivalent Dynamic Stiffness is defined as the complex ratio between the internal force and the displacement response of unknown element. Obtained with the test data of responses' frequencies and amplitudes, the real and imaginary part of Equivalent Dynamic Stiffness are plotted as discrete points in a three dimensional space over the displacement amplitude and the frequency, which are called the real and the imaginary Equivalent Dynamic Stiffness map, respectively. These points will form a repeatable surface as the Equivalent Dynamic stiffness is only a function of the corresponding data as derived in the paper. The mathematical model of the unknown element can then be obtained by surface-fitting these points with special functions selected by priori knowledge of the nonlinear type or with ordinary polynomials if the type of nonlinearity is not pre-known. An important merit of this technique is its capability of dealing with strong nonlinearities owning complicated frequency response behaviors such as jumps and breaks in resonance curves. In addition, this technique could also greatly simplify the test procedure. Besides there is no need to pre-identify the underlying linear parameters, the method uses the measured data of excitation forces and responses without requiring a strict control of the excitation force during the test. The proposed technique is demonstrated and validated with four classical single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) numerical examples and one experimental example. An application of this technique for identification of nonlinearity from multiple-degree-of-freedom (MDOF) systems is also illustrated.

  1. Assessment of dynamic probabilistic methods for mapping snow cover in Québec Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Seve, D.; Perreault, L.; Vachon, F.; Guay, F.; choquette, Y.

    2012-04-01

    Hydro-Quebec is the leader in electricity production in North America and uses hydraulic resources to generate 97% of its overall production where snow represents 30% of its annual energy reserve. Information on snow cover extent (SC) and snow water equivalent (SWE) is crucial for hydrological forecasting, particularly in Nordic regions where a majority of total precipitations falls as snow. Accurate estimation of the spatial distribution of snow cover variables is required to measure the extent of this resource but snow surveys are expensive due to inaccessibility factors and to the large extent nature of the Quebec geography. Consequently, the follow-up of snowmelt is particularly challenging for operational forecasting resulting in the need to develop a new approach to assist forecasters. For improved understanding of the dynamics of snow melting over watersheds and to generate optimized power production, Hydro-Québec's Research Institute (IREQ) has developed expertise in in-situ, remote sensing monitoring and statistical treatment of such data. The main goal of this Hydro-Quebec project is to develop an automatic and dynamic snow mapping system providing a daily snow map by merging remote sensing (AVHRR and SSMI) and in situ data. This paper focuses on the work accomplished on passive microwave SSM/I data to follow up snow cover. In our problematic, it is highly useful to classify snow, more specifically during the snowmelt period. The challenge is to be able to discriminate ground from wet snow as it will react as a black body, therefore, adding noise to global brightness temperature. Two dynamic snow classifiers were developed and tested. For this purpose, channels at 19 and 37 GHz in vertical polarization have been used to feed each model. SWE values from gamma ray in situ stations (GMON) and data snow depth from ultrasonic sensor (SR50) were used to validate the output models. The first algorithm is based on a standard K-mean clustering approach, combined

  2. Can we predict subject-specific dynamic cortical thickness maps during infancy from birth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Yu; Li, Gang; Rekik, Islem; Zhang, Han; Gao, Yaozong; Lin, Weili; Shen, Dinggang

    2017-06-01

    Understanding the early dynamic development of the human cerebral cortex remains a challenging problem. Cortical thickness, as one of the most important morphological attributes of the cerebral cortex, is a sensitive indicator for both normal neurodevelopment and neuropsychiatric disorders, but its early postnatal development remains largely unexplored. In this study, we investigate a key question in neurodevelopmental science: can we predict the future dynamic development of cortical thickness map in an individual infant based on its available MRI data at birth? If this is possible, we might be able to better model and understand the early brain development and also early detect abnormal brain development during infancy. To this end, we develop a novel learning-based method, called Dynamically-Assembled Regression Forest (DARF), to predict the development of the cortical thickness map during the first postnatal year, based on neonatal MRI features. We applied our method to 15 healthy infants and predicted their cortical thickness maps at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months of age, with respectively mean absolute errors of 0.209 mm, 0.332 mm, 0.340 mm, and 0.321 mm. Moreover, we found that the prediction precision is region-specific, with high precision in the unimodal cortex and relatively low precision in the high-order association cortex, which may be associated with their differential developmental patterns. Additional experiments also suggest that using more early time points for prediction can further significantly improve the prediction accuracy. Hum Brain Mapp 38:2865-2874, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Local Dynamic Map als modulares Software Framework für Fahrerassistenzsysteme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisdorf, P.; Auerswald, A.; Wanielik, G.

    2015-11-01

    Moderne Fahrerassistenzsysteme basieren auf der Verarbeitung von Informationen, welche durch die Umfeldwahrnehmung mit unterschiedlicher Sensorik erfolgt. Neben den Informationen aus dem eigenen Fahrzeug ergeben sich durch unterschiedliche Kommunikationsmöglichkeiten (Car2Car, Car2X,...) erweiterte Umfeldwahrnehmungen (siehe Abb. 1). Diese Daten gilt es aufbereitet und zielorientiert einer Anwendung zur Verfügung zu stellen, was mit Hilfe einer Local Dynamic Map (LDM) erfüllt werden kann. Die vorliegende Veröffentlichung beschreibt den Aufbau, Verwendungszweck und Eigenschaften einer entwickelten LDM und geht auf einige Applikationen ein, die mit Hilfe dieser realisiert wurden.

  4. A Novel Bit-level Image Encryption Method Based on Chaotic Map and Dynamic Grouping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张国基; 沈彦

    2012-01-01

    In this paper,a novel bit-level image encryption method based on dynamic grouping is proposed.In the proposed method,the plain-image is divided into several groups randomly,then permutation-diffusion process on bit level is carried out.The keystream generated by logistic map is related to the plain-image,which confuses the relationship between the plain-image and the cipher-image.The computer simulation results of statistical analysis,information entropy analysis and sensitivity analysis show that the proposed encryption method is secure and reliable enough to be used for communication application.

  5. Evaluation of High Dynamic Range Photography as a Luminance Mapping Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inanici, Mehlika; Galvin, Jim

    2004-12-30

    The potential, limitations, and applicability of the High Dynamic Range (HDR) photography technique is evaluated as a luminance mapping tool. Multiple exposure photographs of static scenes are taken with a Nikon 5400 digital camera to capture the wide luminance variation within the scenes. The camera response function is computationally derived using the Photosphere software, and is used to fuse the multiple photographs into HDR images. The vignetting effect and point spread function of the camera and lens system is determined. Laboratory and field studies have shown that the pixel values in the HDR photographs can correspond to the physical quantity of luminance with reasonable precision and repeatability.

  6. The dynamics of a symmetric coupling of three modified quadratic maps

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paulo C.Rech

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the dynamical behavior of a symmetric linear coupling of three quadratic maps with exponential terms,and identify various interesting features as a function of two control parameters.In particular,we investigate the emergence of quasiperiodic states arising from Naimark-Sacker bifurcations of stable period-1,period-2,and period-3 orbits.We also investigate the multistability in the same coupling.Lyapunov exponents,parameter planes,phase space portraits,and bifurcation diagrams are used to investigate transitions from periodic to quasiperiodic states,from quasiperiodic to mode-locked states and to chaotic states,and from chaotic to hyperchaotic states.

  7. Nonlinear Maps for Design of Discrete Time Models of Neuronal Network Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-29

    and K+ pumps responsible for generation of action potential (spike). This map is of the form Xn+l = fa(Xn, y), where Xn is a dynamical variable and...function fa(. . ) is a piecewise nonlinear function containing three segments . In the original form the function is { a 1 + y, Xn ~ 0, fa(Xn,y...a~~~ 0 < Xn <a+ y and Xn-1 ~ 0, -1, Xn 2:: a+ y or Xn- 1 > 0, where variable Xn_ 1 is used to define a condition that prevents system to remain at

  8. Secure Web Development Based on Vulnerabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ms. Daljit Kaur Dr. Parminder Kaur

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper is an effort to develop secure web applications based on known vulnerabilities. It has been seen that in the rapid race of developing web applications in minimum time and budget, security is given least importance as consequence of which web applications are developed and hosted with number of vulnerabilities in them. And in this race, one thing is constant that attackers take advantage of weaknesses existing in technology for financial gain and theft of intellectual property. In this proposed method of secure web development, most common vulnerabilities and their occurrence in development process is discussed. Mapping vulnerabilities to the actions needed to take during development process may help developers to understand vulnerability and avoid vulnerabilities in application.

  9. Mean-field dynamics of a population of stochastic map neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franović, Igor; Maslennikov, Oleg V.; Bačić, Iva; Nekorkin, Vladimir I.

    2017-07-01

    We analyze the emergent regimes and the stimulus-response relationship of a population of noisy map neurons by means of a mean-field model, derived within the framework of cumulant approach complemented by the Gaussian closure hypothesis. It is demonstrated that the mean-field model can qualitatively account for stability and bifurcations of the exact system, capturing all the generic forms of collective behavior, including macroscopic excitability, subthreshold oscillations, periodic or chaotic spiking, and chaotic bursting dynamics. Apart from qualitative analogies, we find a substantial quantitative agreement between the exact and the approximate system, as reflected in matching of the parameter domains admitting the different dynamical regimes, as well as the characteristic properties of the associated time series. The effective model is further shown to reproduce with sufficient accuracy the phase response curves of the exact system and the assembly's response to external stimulation of finite amplitude and duration.

  10. Cooling Dynamics Trough Transition Temperature of Niobium SRF Cavities Captured by Temperature Mapping

    CERN Document Server

    Martinello, M; Checchin, M; Grassellino, A; Crawford, A C; Melnychuk, A; Sergatskov, D A

    2015-01-01

    Cool-down dynamics of superconducting accelerating cavities became particularly important for obtaining very high quality factors in SRF cavities. Previous studies proved that when cavity is cooled fast, the quality factor is higher than when cavity is cooled slowly. This has been discovered to derive from the fact that a fast cool-down allows better magnetic field expulsion during the superconducting transition. In this paper we describe the first experiment where the temperature all around the cavity was mapped during the cavity cool-down through transition temperature, proving the existence of two different transition dynamics: a sharp superconducting-normal conducting transition during fast cool-down which favors flux expulsion and nucleation phase transition during slow cool-down, which leads to full flux trapping.

  11. A MultiBaker Map for Thermodynamic Cross-Effects in Dynamical Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Matyas, L; Vollmer, J; Matyas, Laszlo; Tel, Tamas; Vollmer, Jurgen

    1999-01-01

    A consistent description of simultaneous heat and particle transport, including cross effects, and the associated entropy balance is given in the framework of a deterministic dynamical system. This is achieved by a multibaker map where, besides the phase-space density of the multibaker, a second field with appropriate source terms is included in order to mimic a spatial temperature distribution and its time evolution. Conditions are given to ensure consistency in an appropriately defined continuum limit with the thermodynamic entropy balance. They leave as the only free parameter of the model the entropy flux let directly into a surroundings. If it vanishes in the bulk, the transport properties of the model are described by the thermodynamic transport equations. Another choice leads to a uniform temperature distribution. It represents transport problems treated by means of a thermostatting algorithm, similar to the one considered in non-equilibrium molecular dynamics.

  12. Fuzzy cognitive maps outmatch loop analysis in dynamic modeling of ecological systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Ferrarini

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Modeling natural systems is challenging due to their complexity in terms of variables, interactions, and dynamics. Much of this complexity is rooted in the existence of multiple ways through which acting variables affect each other. Besides the simple direct effects, numerous indirect effects emerge in ecological systems. Through an illustrative example, I exemplify here several advantages of fuzzy cognitive maps (FCM over loop analysis (LA in dynamic modeling of ecological systems. In addition to being able to incorporate information about the magnitude of variables interactions, FCM can make predictions about multiple simultaneous perturbations. Furthermore, FCM allow for the simulation of different magnitude of initial perturbations to the system. Last, FCM estimate the amount of variable increase/decrease, not just the likely direction of change. Hence, even if LA is still much more used than FCM in the scientific literature, FCM can be considered fitter than LA in modeling ecological systems.

  13. Conformational and functional analysis of molecular dynamics trajectories by Self-Organising Maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella Fabio

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular dynamics (MD simulations are powerful tools to investigate the conformational dynamics of proteins that is often a critical element of their function. Identification of functionally relevant conformations is generally done clustering the large ensemble of structures that are generated. Recently, Self-Organising Maps (SOMs were reported performing more accurately and providing more consistent results than traditional clustering algorithms in various data mining problems. We present a novel strategy to analyse and compare conformational ensembles of protein domains using a two-level approach that combines SOMs and hierarchical clustering. Results The conformational dynamics of the α-spectrin SH3 protein domain and six single mutants were analysed by MD simulations. The Cα's Cartesian coordinates of conformations sampled in the essential space were used as input data vectors for SOM training, then complete linkage clustering was performed on the SOM prototype vectors. A specific protocol to optimize a SOM for structural ensembles was proposed: the optimal SOM was selected by means of a Taguchi experimental design plan applied to different data sets, and the optimal sampling rate of the MD trajectory was selected. The proposed two-level approach was applied to single trajectories of the SH3 domain independently as well as to groups of them at the same time. The results demonstrated the potential of this approach in the analysis of large ensembles of molecular structures: the possibility of producing a topological mapping of the conformational space in a simple 2D visualisation, as well as of effectively highlighting differences in the conformational dynamics directly related to biological functions. Conclusions The use of a two-level approach combining SOMs and hierarchical clustering for conformational analysis of structural ensembles of proteins was proposed. It can easily be extended to other study cases and to

  14. Compressive mapping of number to space reflects dynamic encoding mechanisms, not static logarithmic transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicchini, Guido Marco; Anobile, Giovanni; Burr, David C

    2014-05-27

    The mapping of number onto space is fundamental to measurement and mathematics. However, the mapping of young children, unschooled adults, and adults under attentional load shows strong compressive nonlinearities, thought to reflect intrinsic logarithmic encoding mechanisms, which are later "linearized" by education. Here we advance and test an alternative explanation: that the nonlinearity results from adaptive mechanisms incorporating the statistics of recent stimuli. This theory predicts that the response to the current trial should depend on the magnitude of the previous trial, whereas a static logarithmic nonlinearity predicts trialwise independence. We found a strong and highly significant relationship between numberline mapping of the current trial and the magnitude of the previous trial, in both adults and school children, with the current response influenced by up to 15% of the previous trial value. The dependency is sufficient to account for the shape of the numberline, without requiring logarithmic transform. We show that this dynamic strategy results in a reduction of reproduction error, and hence improvement in accuracy.

  15. Dynamic recrystallization behavior and processing map of the Cu-Cr-Zr-Nd alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Sun, Huili; Volinsky, Alex A; Tian, Baohong; Song, Kexing; Chai, Zhe; Liu, Ping; Liu, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Hot deformation behavior of the Cu-Cr-Zr-Nd alloy was studied by hot compressive tests in the temperature range of 650-950 °C and the strain rate range of 0.001-10 s(-1) using Gleeble-1500D thermo-mechanical simulator. The results showed that the flow stress is strongly dependent on the deformation temperature and the strain rate. With the increase of temperature or the decrease of strain rate, the flow stress significantly decreases. Hot activation energy of the alloy is about 404.84 kJ/mol and the constitutive equation of the alloy based on the hyperbolic-sine equation was established. Based on the dynamic material model, the processing map was established to optimize the deformation parameters. The optimal processing parameters for the Cu-Cr-Zr-Nd alloy hot working are in the temperature range of 900-950 °C and strain rate range of 0.1-1 s(-1). A full dynamic recrystallization structure with fine and homogeneous grain size can be obtained at optimal processing conditions. The microstructure of specimens deformed at different conditions was analyzed and connected with the processing map. The surface fracture was observed to identify instability conditions.

  16. An Adaptive Scheme for Robot Localization and Mapping with Dynamically Configurable Inter-Beacon Range Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo Torres-González

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This work is motivated by robot-sensor network cooperation techniques where sensor nodes (beacons are used as landmarks for range-only (RO simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM. This paper presents a RO-SLAM scheme that actuates over the measurement gathering process using mechanisms that dynamically modify the rate and variety of measurements that are integrated in the SLAM filter. It includes a measurement gathering module that can be configured to collect direct robot-beacon and inter-beacon measurements with different inter-beacon depth levels and at different rates. It also includes a supervision module that monitors the SLAM performance and dynamically selects the measurement gathering configuration balancing SLAM accuracy and resource consumption. The proposed scheme has been applied to an extended Kalman filter SLAM with auxiliary particle filters for beacon initialization (PF-EKF SLAM and validated with experiments performed in the CONET Integrated Testbed. It achieved lower map and robot errors (34% and 14%, respectively than traditional methods with a lower computational burden (16% and similar beacon energy consumption.

  17. An adaptive scheme for robot localization and mapping with dynamically configurable inter-beacon range measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-González, Arturo; Martinez-de Dios, Jose Ramiro; Ollero, Anibal

    2014-04-25

    This work is motivated by robot-sensor network cooperation techniques where sensor nodes (beacons) are used as landmarks for range-only (RO) simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM). This paper presents a RO-SLAM scheme that actuates over the measurement gathering process using mechanisms that dynamically modify the rate and variety of measurements that are integrated in the SLAM filter. It includes a measurement gathering module that can be configured to collect direct robot-beacon and inter-beacon measurements with different inter-beacon depth levels and at different rates. It also includes a supervision module that monitors the SLAM performance and dynamically selects the measurement gathering configuration balancing SLAM accuracy and resource consumption. The proposed scheme has been applied to an extended Kalman filter SLAM with auxiliary particle filters for beacon initialization (PF-EKF SLAM) and validated with experiments performed in the CONET Integrated Testbed. It achieved lower map and robot errors (34% and 14%, respectively) than traditional methods with a lower computational burden (16%) and similar beacon energy consumption.

  18. Mapping and Dynamics of Regulatory DNA and Transcription Factor Networks in A. thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra M. Sullivan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Our understanding of gene regulation in plants is constrained by our limited knowledge of plant cis-regulatory DNA and its dynamics. We mapped DNase I hypersensitive sites (DHSs in A. thaliana seedlings and used genomic footprinting to delineate ∼700,000 sites of in vivo transcription factor (TF occupancy at nucleotide resolution. We show that variation associated with 72 diverse quantitative phenotypes localizes within DHSs. TF footprints encode an extensive cis-regulatory lexicon subject to recent evolutionary pressures, and widespread TF binding within exons may have shaped codon usage patterns. The architecture of A. thaliana TF regulatory networks is strikingly similar to that of animals in spite of diverged regulatory repertoires. We analyzed regulatory landscape dynamics during heat shock and photomorphogenesis, disclosing thousands of environmentally sensitive elements and enabling mapping of key TF regulatory circuits underlying these fundamental responses. Our results provide an extensive resource for the study of A. thaliana gene regulation and functional biology.

  19. Prune-able fuzzy ART neural architecture for robot map learning and navigation in dynamic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Rui

    2006-09-01

    Mobile robots must be able to build their own maps to navigate in unknown worlds. Expanding a previously proposed method based on the fuzzy ART neural architecture (FARTNA), this paper introduces a new online method for learning maps of unknown dynamic worlds. For this purpose the new Prune-able fuzzy adaptive resonance theory neural architecture (PAFARTNA) is introduced. It extends the FARTNA self-organizing neural network with novel mechanisms that provide important dynamic adaptation capabilities. Relevant PAFARTNA properties are formulated and demonstrated. A method is proposed for the perception of object removals, and then integrated with PAFARTNA. The proposed methods are integrated into a navigation architecture. With the new navigation architecture the mobile robot is able to navigate in changing worlds, and a degree of optimality is maintained, associated to a shortest path planning approach implemented in real-time over the underlying global world model. Experimental results obtained with a Nomad 200 robot are presented demonstrating the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  20. The brain decade in debate: VI. Sensory and motor maps: dynamics and plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Das

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available This article is an edited transcription of a virtual symposium promoted by the Brazilian Society of Neuroscience and Behavior (SBNeC. Although the dynamics of sensory and motor representations have been one of the most studied features of the central nervous system, the actual mechanisms of brain plasticity that underlie the dynamic nature of sensory and motor maps are not entirely unraveled. Our discussion began with the notion that the processing of sensory information depends on many different cortical areas. Some of them are arranged topographically and others have non-topographic (analytical properties. Besides a sensory component, every cortical area has an efferent output that can be mapped and can influence motor behavior. Although new behaviors might be related to modifications of the sensory or motor representations in a given cortical area, they can also be the result of the acquired ability to make new associations between specific sensory cues and certain movements, a type of learning known as conditioning motor learning. Many types of learning are directly related to the emotional or cognitive context in which a new behavior is acquired. This has been demonstrated by paradigms in which the receptive field properties of cortical neurons are modified when an animal is engaged in a given discrimination task or when a triggering feature is paired with an aversive stimulus. The role of the cholinergic input from the nucleus basalis to the neocortex was also highlighted as one important component of the circuits responsible for the context-dependent changes that can be induced in cortical maps.

  1. Identifying hazard parameter to develop quantitative and dynamic hazard map of an active volcano in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suminar, Wulan; Saepuloh, Asep; Meilano, Irwan

    2016-05-01

    Analysis of hazard assessment to active volcanoes is crucial for risk management. The hazard map of volcano provides information to decision makers and communities before, during, and after volcanic crisis. The rapid and accurate hazard assessment, especially to an active volcano is necessary to be developed for better mitigation on the time of volcanic crises in Indonesia. In this paper, we identified the hazard parameters to develop quantitative and dynamic hazard map of an active volcano. The Guntur volcano in Garut Region, West Java, Indonesia was selected as study area due population are resided adjacent to active volcanoes. The development of infrastructures, especially related to tourism at the eastern flank from the Summit, are growing rapidly. The remote sensing and field investigation approaches were used to obtain hazard parameters spatially. We developed a quantitative and dynamic algorithm to map spatially hazard potential of volcano based on index overlay technique. There were identified five volcano hazard parameters based on Landsat 8 and ASTER imageries: volcanic products including pyroclastic fallout, pyroclastic flows, lava and lahar, slope topography, surface brightness temperature, and vegetation density. Following this proposed technique, the hazard parameters were extracted, indexed, and calculated to produce spatial hazard values at and around Guntur Volcano. Based on this method, the hazard potential of low vegetation density is higher than high vegetation density. Furthermore, the slope topography, surface brightness temperature, and fragmental volcanic product such as pyroclastics influenced to the spatial hazard value significantly. Further study to this proposed approach will be aimed for effective and efficient analyses of volcano risk assessment.

  2. The Karakum and Kyzylkum sand seas dynamics; mapping and palaeoclimatic interpretations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maman, Shimrit; Blumberg, Dan G.; Tsoar, Haim; Porat, Naomi

    2015-04-01

    Sand seas are large basins in deserts that are mantled by wind-swept sand and that exhibit varying degrees of vegetation cover. Wilson (1973) was the first to globally map and classify sand seas. Beyond Wilson's maps, however, little research has been published regarding the Karakum and Kyzylkum sand seas of Central Asia. Wilson's maps delineate active ergs from inactive ergs based solely on precipitation. His assumption of annual average rainfall as a factor determining mobility vs. stability of sand seas is too simplistic and does not take into consideration other factors such as biogenic soil crusts and wind power, both of which are known to have major effects on the dynamics of sand dunes. Literature related to mapping and classifying the Central Asian ergs by remote sensing or sand sea classification state (stable/active) is lacking. Moreover, the palaeoclimatic significance of dunes in Central Asia is difficult to assess, as there has been few studies of dune stratigraphy and numerical ages are lacking. Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) is a firm optical dating method that is used to determine the elapsed time since quartz grains were last exposed to sunlight, thus, their burial. Yet, absolute ages indicating mobilization and stabilization of these sands, are still inadequately known and are here under discussion. The broad concern of this research was to determine the dynamics of the Central Asian sand seas and study the palaeoclimatic changes that brought to their stabilization. As there are no reliable maps or aeolian discussion of these sands, establishment of a digital data base was initially conducted, focusing on identifying and mapping these sand seas. The vast area and inaccessibility make traditional mapping methods virtually impossible. A variety of space-borne imagery both optical and radar, with varying spectral and spatial resolutions was used. These images provided the basis for mapping sand distribution, dune forms, and vegetation cover

  3. Dynamic link between ECG and clinical data by a CORBA-based query engine and temporal mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C; Ohe, K; Kaihara, S

    1997-01-01

    It is important to create a dynamic link method to link distributed patient data across multiple hospitals on an "as needed" basis because the pre-defined links (an item of data has a character or group of characters that indicates the storage of another item of data) are difficult to be managed, or can only be established in part, or are not necessary to be pre-defined in many cases, especially in linking the descriptive data such as history data with the corresponding examination data across multiple hospitals. A method of linking electrocardiogram (ECG) with clinical data dynamically in a Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA) environment has been achieved and verified in a real computing environment to approach to this goal. By this method, distributed patient data can be linked dynamically by a CORBA-based query engine and temporal mapping no matter where they are located on the Internet. The necessary temporal information is provided by either computing or human being. Since multiple time-axes for different databases are involved in, some temporal reasoning methods (such as mapping occurrences across temporal contexts and determining bounds for absolute occurrences, etc.) are applied to this study, and a series of temporal mappings including the first mapping, the secondary mapping, the contextual mapping, the extended mapping, the previous mapping and the next mapping are created. In comparison with the pre-defined link, the major strengths of this method are the dynamic link on an "as needed" basis, no limitation of institutional boundaries, easy creation, simplifying the data storage, and the high flexibility, etc.

  4. Brain dynamics during natural viewing conditions--a new guide for mapping connectivity in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Andreas; Zeki, Semir

    2005-01-15

    We describe here a new way of obtaining maps of connectivity in the human brain based on interregional correlations of blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal during natural viewing conditions. We propose that anatomical connections are reflected in BOLD signal correlations during natural brain dynamics. This may provide a powerful approach to chart connectivity, more so than that based on the 'resting state' of the human brain, and it may complement diffusion tensor imaging. Our approach relies on natural brain dynamics and is therefore experimentally unbiased and independent of hypothesis-driven, specialized stimuli. It has the advantage that natural viewing leads to considerably stronger cortical activity than rest, thus facilitating detection of weaker connections. To validate our technique, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to record BOLD signal while volunteers freely viewed a movie that was interrupted by resting periods. We used independent component analysis (ICA) to segregate cortical areas before characterizing the dynamics of their BOLD signal during free viewing and rest. Natural viewing and rest each revealed highly specific correlation maps, which reflected known anatomical connections. Examples are homologous regions in visual and auditory cortices in the two hemispheres and the language network consisting of Wernicke's area, Broca's area, and a premotor region. Correlations between regions known to be directly connected were always substantially higher than between nonconnected regions. Furthermore, compared to rest, natural viewing specifically increased correlations between anatomically connected regions while it decreased correlations between nonconnected regions. Our findings therefore demonstrate that natural viewing conditions lead to particularly specific interregional correlations and thus provide a powerful environment to reveal anatomical connectivity in vivo.

  5. Karst morphology and groundwater vulnerability of high alpine karst plateaus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plan, Lukas; Decker, Kurt; Faber, Robert; Wagreich, Michael; Grasemann, Bernhard

    2009-07-01

    High alpine karst plateaus are recharge areas for major drinking water resources in the Alps and many other regions. Well-established methods for the vulnerability mapping of groundwater to contamination have not been applied to such areas yet. The paper characterises this karst type and shows that two common vulnerability assessment methods (COP and PI) classify most of the areas with high vulnerability classes. In the test site on the Hochschwab plateau (Northern Calcareous Alps, Austria), overlying layers are mostly absent, not protective or even enhance point recharge, where they have aquiclude character. The COP method classifies 82% of the area as highly or extremely vulnerable. The resulting maps are reasonable, but do not differentiate vulnerabilities to the extent that the results can be used for protective measures. An extension for the upper end of the vulnerability scale is presented that allows identifying ultra vulnerable areas. The proposed enhancement of the conventional approach points out that infiltration conditions are of key importance for vulnerability. The method accounts for karst genetical and hydrologic processes using qualitative and quantitative properties of karst depressions and sinking streams including parameters calculated from digital elevations models. The method is tested on the Hochschwab plateau where 1.7% of the area is delineated as ultra vulnerable. This differentiation could not be reached by the COP and PI methods. The resulting vulnerability map highlights spots of maximum vulnerability and the combination with a hazard map enables protective measures for a manageable area and number of sites.

  6. Spatiotemporal dynamics of a digital phase-locked loop based coupled map lattice system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Tanmoy; Paul, Bishwajit; Sarkar, B. C.

    2014-03-01

    We explore the spatiotemporal dynamics of a coupled map lattice (CML) system, which is realized with a one dimensional array of locally coupled digital phase-locked loops (DPLLs). DPLL is a nonlinear feedback-controlled system widely used as an important building block of electronic communication systems. We derive the phase-error equation of the spatially extended system of coupled DPLLs, which resembles a form of the equation of a CML system. We carry out stability analysis for the synchronized homogeneous solutions using the circulant matrix formalism. It is shown through extensive numerical simulations that with the variation of nonlinearity parameter and coupling strength the system shows transitions among several generic features of spatiotemporal dynamics, viz., synchronized fixed point solution, frozen random pattern, pattern selection, spatiotemporal intermittency, and fully developed spatiotemporal chaos. We quantify the spatiotemporal dynamics using quantitative measures like average quadratic deviation and spatial correlation function. We emphasize that instead of using an idealized model of CML, which is usually employed to observe the spatiotemporal behaviors, we consider a real world physical system and establish the existence of spatiotemporal chaos and other patterns in this system. We also discuss the importance of the present study in engineering application like removal of clock-skew in parallel processors.

  7. Vulnerability and Resilience of Temperate Forest Landscapes to Broad-Scale Deforestation in Response to Changing Fire Regimes and Altered Post-Fire Vegetation Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepley, A. J.; Veblen, T. T.; Perry, G.; Anderson-Teixeira, K. J.

    2015-12-01

    In the face of on-going climatic warming and land-use change, there is growing concern that temperate forest landscapes could be near a tipping point where relatively small changes to the fire regime or altered post-fire vegetation dynamics could lead to extensive conversion to shrublands or savannas. To evaluate vulnerability and resilience to such conversion, we develop a simple model based on three factors we hypothesize to be key in predicting temperate forest responses to changing fire regimes: (1) the hazard rate (i.e., the probability of burning in the next year given the time since the last fire) in closed-canopy forests, (2) the hazard rate for recently-burned, open-canopy vegetation, and (3) the time to redevelop canopy closure following fire. We generate a response surface representing the proportions of the landscape potentially supporting closed-canopy forest and non-forest vegetation under nearly all combinations of these three factors. We then place real landscapes on this response surface to assess the type and magnitude of changes to the fire regime that would drive extensive forest loss. We show that the deforestation of much of New Zealand that followed initial human colonization and the introduction of a new ignition source ca. 750 years ago was essentially inevitable due to the slow rate of forest recovery after fire and the high flammability of post-fire vegetation. In North America's Pacific Northwest, by contrast, a predominantly forested landscape persisted despite two periods of widespread burning in the recent past due in large part to faster post-fire forest recovery and less pronounced differences in flammability between forests and the post-fire vegetation. We also assess the factors that could drive extensive deforestation in other regions to identify where management could reduce this potential and to guide field and modeling work to better understand the responses and ecological feedbacks to changing fire regimes.

  8. Dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound parametric maps to evaluate intratumoral vascularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitre-Champagnat, Stephanie; Leguerney, Ingrid; Bosq, Jacques; Peronneau, Pierre; Kiessling, Fabian; Calmels, Lucie; Coulot, Jeremy; Lassau, Nathalie

    2015-04-01

    The purposes of this study were to assess the reliability of parametric maps from dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (DCE-US) to reflect the heterogeneous distribution of intratumoral vascularization and to predict the tissue features linked to vasculature. This study was designed to compare DCE-US parametric maps with histologic vascularity measurements. Dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound was performed on 17 melanoma-bearing nude mice after a 0.1-mL bolus injection of SonoVue (Bracco SPA, Milan, Italy). The parametric maps were developed from raw linear data to extract pixelwise 2 semiquantitative parameters related to perfusion and blood volume, namely, area under the curve (AUC) and peak intensity (PI). The mathematical method to fit the time-intensity curve for each pixel was a polynomial model used in clinical routine and patented by the team. Regions of interest (ROIs) were drawn on DCE-US parametric maps for whole tumors and for several local areas of 15 mm within each tumor (iROI), the latter reflecting the heterogeneity of intratumoral blood volume. As the criterion standard correlation, microvessel densities (MVDs) were determined for both ROI categories. In detail, for all iROI of 15 mm, MVD and maturity were divided separately for vessels of 0 to 10 μm, 10 to 40 μm, and greater than 40 μm in diameter, and the results were correlated with the ultrasound findings. Among the 17 studied mice, a total of 64 iROIs were analyzed. For the whole-tumor ROI set, AUC and PI values significantly correlated with MVD (rAUC = 0.52 [P = 0.0408] and rPI = 0.70 [P = 0.0026]). In the case of multiple iROI, a strong linear correlation was observed between the DCE-US parameters and the density of vessels ranging in their diameter from 0 to 10 μm (rAUC = 0.68 [P rAUC = 0.98 [P = 0.0003]; rPI = 0.98 [P = 0.0004]), and greater than 40 μm (rAUC = 0.86 [P = 0.0120]; rPI = 0.92 [P = 0.0034]), respectively. However, the DCE-US parameter values of perfusion and blood volume

  9. Effects of Scale-Free Topological Properties on Dynamical Synchronization and Control in Coupled Map Lattices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Wei; FANG Jin-Qing; KANG Ge-Wen

    2007-01-01

    In the paper,we study effects of scale-free (SF) topology on dynamical synchronization and control in coupled map lattices (CML).Our strategy is to apply three feedback control methods,including constant feedback and two types of time-delayed feedback,to a small fraction of network nodes to reach desired synchronous state.Two controlled bifurcation diagrams verses feedback strength are obtained respectively.It is found that the value of critical feedback strength γc for the first time-delayed feedback control is increased linearly as ε is increased linearly.The CML with SF loses synchronization and intermittency occurs if γ,>γc.Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate all results.

  10. Mapping Out Narrative Structures and Dynamics Using Networks and Textual Information

    CERN Document Server

    Min, Semi

    2016-01-01

    Human communication is often executed in the form of a narrative, an account of connected events composed of characters, actions, and settings. A coherent narrative structure is therefore a requisite for a well-formulated narrative -- be it fictional or nonfictional -- for informative and effective communication, opening up the possibility of a deeper understanding of a narrative by studying its structural properties. In this paper we present a network-based framework for modeling and analyzing the structure of a narrative, which is further expanded by incorporating methods from computational linguistics to utilize the narrative text. Modeling a narrative as a dynamically unfolding system, we characterize its progression via the growth patterns of the character network, and use sentiment analysis and topic modeling to represent the actual content of the narrative in the form of interaction maps between characters with associated sentiment values and keywords. This is a network framework advanced beyond the si...

  11. Mapping the spatiotemporal dynamics of calcium signaling in cellular neural networks using optical flow

    CERN Document Server

    Buibas, Marius; Nizar, Krystal; Silva, Gabriel A

    2009-01-01

    An optical flow gradient algorithm was applied to spontaneously forming networks of neurons and glia in culture imaged by fluorescence optical microscopy in order to map functional calcium signaling with single pixel resolution. Optical flow estimates the direction and speed of motion of objects in an image between subsequent frames in a recorded digital sequence of images (i.e. a movie). Computed vector field outputs by the algorithm were able to track the spatiotemporal dynamics of calcium signaling patterns. We begin by briefly reviewing the mathematics of the optical flow algorithm, describe how to solve for the displacement vectors, and how to measure their reliability. We then compare computed flow vectors with manually estimated vectors for the progression of a calcium signal recorded from representative astrocyte cultures. Finally, we applied the algorithm to preparations of primary astrocytes and hippocampal neurons and to the rMC-1 Muller glial cell line in order to illustrate the capability of the ...

  12. Mapping dynamics of deforestation and forest degradation in tropical forests using radar satellite data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joshi, Neha; Mitchard, Edward TA; Woo, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    Mapping anthropogenic forest disturbances has largely been focused on distinct delineations of events of deforestation using optical satellite images. In the tropics, frequent cloud cover and the challenge of quantifying forest degradation remain problematic. In this study, we detect processes...... of deforestation, forest degradation and successional dynamics, using long-wavelength radar (L-band from ALOS PALSAR) backscatter. We present a detection algorithm that allows for repeated disturbances on the same land, and identifies areas with slow- and fast-recovering changes in backscatter in close spatial...... along the tri-national Interoceanic Highway, as well as in mining areas and areas under no land use allocation. A continuous spatial gradient of disturbance was observed, highlighting artefacts arising from imposing discrete boundaries on deforestation events. The magnitude of initial radar backscatter...

  13. Mapping dynamics of deforestation and forest degradation in tropical forests using radar satellite data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joshi, Neha; Mitchard, Edward TA; Woo, Natalia;

    2015-01-01

    Mapping anthropogenic forest disturbances has largely been focused on distinct delineations of events of deforestation using optical satellite images. In the tropics, frequent cloud cover and the challenge of quantifying forest degradation remain problematic. In this study, we detect processes...... of deforestation, forest degradation and successional dynamics, using long-wavelength radar (L-band from ALOS PALSAR) backscatter. We present a detection algorithm that allows for repeated disturbances on the same land, and identifies areas with slow- and fast-recovering changes in backscatter in close spatial...... along the tri-national Interoceanic Highway, as well as in mining areas and areas under no land use allocation. A continuous spatial gradient of disturbance was observed, highlighting artefacts arising from imposing discrete boundaries on deforestation events. The magnitude of initial radar backscatter...

  14. Urbanization susceptibility maps: a dynamic spatial decision support system for sustainable land use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cerreta

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in land consumption assessment identify the need to implement integrated evaluative approaches, with particular attention to the identification of multidimensional tools for guiding and managing sustainable land use. Policy decisions defining land use are mostly implemented through spatial planning and related zoning, and this involves trade-offs between many sectoral interests and conflicting challenges aimed at win-win solutions. In order to identify a decision-making process for land use allocation, the paper proposes a methodological approach for a Dynamic Spatial Decision Support System (DSDSS, named Integrated Spatial Assessment (ISA, supported by Geographical Information Systems (GIS combined with Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP. Through the empirical investigation in an operative case study, an integrated evaluative approach implemented in a DSDSS helps to elaborate "urbanization susceptibility maps", where spatial analysis combined with a multi-criteria method proved to be useful for facing the main issues related to land consumption and minimizing environmental impacts of spatial planning.

  15. Mapping multidimensional electronic structure and ultrafast dynamics with single-element detection and compressive sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Austin P; Spokoyny, Boris; Ray, Supratim; Sarvari, Fahad; Harel, Elad

    2016-01-25

    Compressive sensing allows signals to be efficiently captured by exploiting their inherent sparsity. Here we implement sparse sampling to capture the electronic structure and ultrafast dynamics of molecular systems using phase-resolved 2D coherent spectroscopy. Until now, 2D spectroscopy has been hampered by its reliance on array detectors that operate in limited spectral regions. Combining spatial encoding of the nonlinear optical response and rapid signal modulation allows retrieval of state-resolved correlation maps in a photosynthetic protein and carbocyanine dye. We report complete Hadamard reconstruction of the signals and compression factors as high as 10, in good agreement with array-detected spectra. Single-point array reconstruction by spatial encoding (SPARSE) Spectroscopy reduces acquisition times by about an order of magnitude, with further speed improvements enabled by fast scanning of a digital micromirror device. We envision unprecedented applications for coherent spectroscopy using frequency combs and super-continua in diverse spectral regions.

  16. Mapping replication dynamics in Trypanosoma brucei reveals a link with telomere transcription and antigenic variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devlin, Rebecca; Marques, Catarina A; Paape, Daniel; Prorocic, Marko; Zurita-Leal, Andrea C; Campbell, Samantha J; Lapsley, Craig; Dickens, Nicholas; McCulloch, Richard

    2016-05-26

    Survival of Trypanosoma brucei depends upon switches in its protective Variant Surface Glycoprotein (VSG) coat by antigenic variation. VSG switching occurs by frequent homologous recombination, which is thought to require locus-specific initiation. Here, we show that a RecQ helicase, RECQ2, acts to repair DNA breaks, including in the telomeric site of VSG expression. Despite this, RECQ2 loss does not impair antigenic variation, but causes increased VSG switching by recombination, arguing against models for VSG switch initiation through direct generation of a DNA double strand break (DSB). Indeed, we show DSBs inefficiently direct recombination in the VSG expression site. By mapping genome replication dynamics, we reveal that the transcribed VSG expression site is the only telomeric site that is early replicating - a differential timing only seen in mammal-infective parasites. Specific association between VSG transcription and replication timing reveals a model for antigenic variation based on replication-derived DNA fragility.

  17. Bio-inspired Methods for Dynamic Network Analysis in Science Mapping

    CERN Document Server

    Soos, Sandor

    2011-01-01

    We apply bio-inspired methods for the analysis of different dynamic bibliometric networks (linking papers by citation, authors, and keywords, respectively). Biological species are clusters of individuals defined by widely different criteria and in the biological perspective it is natural to (1) use different categorizations on the same entities (2) to compare the different categorizations and to analyze the dissimilarities, especially as they change over time. We employ the same methodology to comparisons of bibliometric classifications. We constructed them as analogs of three species concepts: cladistic or lineage based, similarity based, and "biological species" (based on co-reproductive ability). We use the Rand and Jaccard indexes to compare classifications in different time intervals. The experiment is aimed to address the classic problem of science mapping, as to what extent the various techniques based on different bibliometric indicators, such as citations, keywords or authors are able to detect conve...

  18. Evolutionary origins and dynamics of octoploid strawberry subgenomes revealed by dense targeted capture linkage maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennessen, Jacob A; Govindarajulu, Rajanikanth; Ashman, Tia-Lynn; Liston, Aaron

    2014-12-04

    Whole-genome duplications are radical evolutionary events that have driven speciation and adaptation in many taxa. Higher-order polyploids have complex histories often including interspecific hybridization and dynamic genomic changes. This chromosomal reshuffling is poorly understood for most polyploid species, despite their evolutionary and agricultural importance, due to the challenge of distinguishing homologous sequences from each other. Here, we use dense linkage maps generated with targeted sequence capture to improve the diploid strawberry (Fragaria vesca) reference genome and to disentangle the subgenomes of the wild octoploid progenitors of cultivated strawberry, Fragaria virginiana and Fragaria chiloensis. Our novel approach, POLiMAPS (Phylogenetics Of Linkage-Map-Anchored Polyploid Subgenomes), leverages sequence reads to associate informative interhomeolog phylogenetic markers with linkage groups and reference genome positions. In contrast to a widely accepted model, we find that one of the four subgenomes originates with the diploid cytoplasm donor F. vesca, one with the diploid Fragaria iinumae, and two with an unknown ancestor close to F. iinumae. Extensive unidirectional introgression has converted F. iinumae-like subgenomes to be more F. vesca-like, but never the reverse, due either to homoploid hybridization in the F. iinumae-like diploid ancestors or else strong selection spreading F. vesca-like sequence among subgenomes through homeologous exchange. In addition, divergence between homeologous chromosomes has been substantially augmented by interchromosomal rearrangements. Our phylogenetic approach reveals novel aspects of the complicated web of genetic exchanges that occur during polyploid evolution and suggests a path forward for unraveling other agriculturally and ecologically important polyploid genomes.

  19. StreamMap: Smooth Dynamic Visualization of High-Density Streaming Points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chenhui; Baciu, George; Yu, Han

    2017-02-13

    Interactive visualization of streaming points for real-time scatterplots and linear blending of correlation patterns is increasingly becoming the dominant mode of visual analytics for both big data and streaming data from active sensors and broadcasting media. To better visualize and interact with inter-stream patterns, it is generally necessary to smooth out gaps or distortions in the streaming data. Previous approaches either animate the points directly or present a sampled static heatmap. We propose a new approach, called StreamMap, to smoothly blend high-density streaming points and create a visual flow that emphasizes the density pattern distributions. In essence, we present three new contributions for the visualization of high-density streaming points. The first contribution is a density-based method called super kernel density estimation that aggregates streaming points using an adaptive kernel to solve the overlapping problem. The second contribution is a robust density morphing algorithm that generates several smooth intermediate frames for a given pair of frames. The third contribution is a trend representation design that can help convey the flow directions of the streaming points. The experimental results on three datasets demonstrate the effectiveness of StreamMap when dynamic visualization and visual analysis of trend patterns on streaming points are required.

  20. Animation, Small Multiples, and the Effect of Mental Map Preservation in Dynamic Graphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archambault, D; Purchase, H; Pinaud, B

    2011-04-01

    In this paper, we present the results of a human-computer interaction experiment that compared the performance of the animation of dynamic graphs to the presentation of small multiples and the effect that mental map preservation had on the two conditions. Questions used in the experiment were selected to test both local and global properties of graph evolution over time. The data sets used in this experiment were derived from standard benchmark data sets of the information visualization community. We found that small multiples gave significantly faster performance than animation overall and for each of our five graph comprehension tasks. In addition, small multiples had significantly more errors than animation for the tasks of determining sets of nodes or edges added to the graph during the same timeslice, although a positive time-error correlation coefficient suggests that, in this case, faster responses did not lead to more errors. This result suggests that, for these two tasks, animation is preferable if accuracy is more important than speed. Preserving the mental map under either the animation or the small multiples condition had little influence in terms of error rate and response time.

  1. MAMA: An Algebraic Map for the Secular Dynamics of Planetesimals in Tight Binary Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Leiva, A M; Beaugé, C

    2013-01-01

    We present an algebraic map (MAMA) for the dynamical and collisional evolution of a planetesimal swarm orbiting the main star of a tight binary system (TBS). The orbital evolution of each planetesimal is dictated by the secular perturbations of the secondary star and gas drag due to interactions with a protoplanetary disk. The gas disk is assumed eccentric with a constant precession rate. Gravitational interactions between the planetesimals are ignored. All bodies are assumed coplanar. A comparison with full N-body simulations shows that the map is of the order of 100 times faster, while preserving all the main characteristics of the full system. In a second part of the work, we apply MAMA to the \\gamma-Cephei, searching for friendly scenarios that may explain the formation of the giant planet detected in this system. For low-mass protoplanetary disks, we find that a low-eccentricity static disk aligned with the binary yields impact velocities between planetesimals below the disruption threshold. All other sc...

  2. Rapid exploration of configuration space with diffusion-map-directed molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wenwei; Rohrdanz, Mary A; Clementi, Cecilia

    2013-10-24

    The gap between the time scale of interesting behavior in macromolecular systems and that which our computational resources can afford often limits molecular dynamics (MD) from understanding experimental results and predicting what is inaccessible in experiments. In this paper, we introduce a new sampling scheme, named diffusion-map-directed MD (DM-d-MD), to rapidly explore molecular configuration space. The method uses a diffusion map to guide MD on the fly. DM-d-MD can be combined with other methods to reconstruct the equilibrium free energy, and here, we used umbrella sampling as an example. We present results from two systems: alanine dipeptide and alanine-12. In both systems, we gain tremendous speedup with respect to standard MD both in exploring the configuration space and reconstructing the equilibrium distribution. In particular, we obtain 3 orders of magnitude of speedup over standard MD in the exploration of the configurational space of alanine-12 at 300 K with DM-d-MD. The method is reaction coordinate free and minimally dependent on a priori knowledge of the system. We expect wide applications of DM-d-MD to other macromolecular systems in which equilibrium sampling is not affordable by standard MD.

  3. Representation and coding of large-scale 3D dynamic maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Robert A.; Tian, Dong; Krivokuća, Maja; Sugimoto, Kazuo; Vetro, Anthony; Wakimoto, Koji; Sekiguchi, Shunichi

    2016-09-01

    combined with depth and color measurements of the surrounding environment. Localization could be achieved with GPS, inertial measurement units (IMU), cameras, or combinations of these and other devices, while the depth measurements could be achieved with time-of-flight, radar or laser scanning systems. The resulting 3D maps, which are composed of 3D point clouds with various attributes, could be used for a variety of applications, including finding your way around indoor spaces, navigating vehicles around a city, space planning, topographical surveying or public surveying of infrastructure and roads, augmented reality, immersive online experiences, and much more. This paper discusses application requirements related to the representation and coding of large-scale 3D dynamic maps. In particular, we address requirements related to different types of acquisition environments, scalability in terms of progressive transmission and efficiently rendering different levels of details, as well as key attributes to be included in the representation. Additionally, an overview of recently developed coding techniques is presented, including an assessment of current performance. Finally, technical challenges and needs for future standardization are discussed.

  4. Modeling reverberation mapping data II: dynamical modeling of the Lick AGN Monitoring Project 2008 dataset

    CERN Document Server

    Pancoast, Anna; Treu, Tommaso; Park, Daeseong; Barth, Aaron J; Bentz, Misty C; Woo, Jong-Hak

    2013-01-01

    We present dynamical modeling of the broad line region (BLR) for a sample of five Seyfert 1 galaxies using reverberation mapping data taken by the Lick AGN Monitoring Project (LAMP) in 2008. The sample includes Arp 151, Mrk 1310, NGC 5548, NGC 6814, and SBS 1116+583A. By modeling the continuum light curve and H$\\beta$ line profiles directly we are able to constrain the geometry and kinematics of the BLR. Modeling the kinematics also allows us to make a measurement of the black hole mass that does not depend upon the virial coefficient or normalizing factor needed in traditional reverberation mapping analysis. We find that the geometry of the BLR is generally a thick disk viewed close to face-on, but a more spherical geometry is not ruled out for two of the five AGNs. While the H$\\beta$ is found to come preferentially from the far side of the BLR, the mean size of the BLR is consistent with the lags measured with cross-correlation analysis. The BLR kinematics are generally found to be consistent with either in...

  5. Modelling reverberation mapping data - II. Dynamical modelling of the Lick AGN Monitoring Project 2008 data set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancoast, Anna; Brewer, Brendon J.; Treu, Tommaso; Park, Daeseong; Barth, Aaron J.; Bentz, Misty C.; Woo, Jong-Hak

    2014-12-01

    We present dynamical modelling of the broad-line region (BLR) for a sample of five Seyfert 1 galaxies using reverberation mapping data taken by the Lick AGN Monitoring Project in 2008. By modelling the AGN continuum light curve and Hβ line profiles directly, we are able to constrain the geometry and kinematics of the BLR and make a measurement of the black hole mass that does not depend upon the virial factor, f, needed in traditional reverberation mapping analysis. We find that the geometry of the BLR is generally a thick disc viewed close to face-on. While the Hβ emission is found to come preferentially from the far side of the BLR, the mean size of the BLR is consistent with the lags measured with cross-correlation analysis. The BLR kinematics are found to be consistent with either inflowing motions or elliptical orbits, often with some combination of the two. We measure black hole masses of log _{10}(M_ BH/M_{odot })=6.62^{+0.10}_{-0.13} for Arp 151, 7.42^{+0.26}_{-0.27} for Mrk 1310, 7.59^{+0.24}_{-0.21} for NGC 5548, 6.37^{+0.21}_{-0.16} for NGC 6814, and 6.99^{+0.32}_{-0.25} for SBS 1116+583A. The f factors measured individually for each AGN are found to correlate with inclination angle, although not with M BH, L5100, or FWHM/σ of the emission line profile.

  6. A rigorous formalism of information transfer between dynamical system components. I. Discrete mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, X. San; Kleeman, Richard

    2007-07-01

    We put the concept of information transfer on a rigorous footing and establish for it a formalism within the framework of discrete maps. The resulting transfer measure possesses a property of directionality or transfer asymmetry as emphasized by Schreiber [T. Schreiber, Measuring information transfer, Phys. Rev. Lett. 85 (2) (2000) 461]; it also verifies the transfer measure for two-dimensional systems, which was obtained by Liang and Kleeman [X.S. Liang, R. Kleeman, Information transfer between dynamical system components, Phys. Rev. Lett. 95 (24) (2005) 244101] through a different avenue. Connections to classical formalisms are explored and applications presented. We find that, in the context of the baker transformation, there is always information flowing from the stretching direction to the folding direction, while no transfer occurs in the opposite direction; we also find that, within the Hénon map system, the transfer from the quadratic component to the linear component is of a simple form as expected on physical grounds. This latter result is unique to our formalism.

  7. Mapping the conformational dynamics and pathways of spontaneous steric zipper Peptide oligomerization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Matthes

    Full Text Available The process of protein misfolding and self-assembly into various, polymorphic aggregates is associated with a number of important neurodegenerative diseases. Only recently, crystal structures of several short peptides have provided detailed structural insights into -sheet rich aggregates, known as amyloid fibrils. Knowledge about early events of the formation and interconversion of small oligomeric states, an inevitable step in the cascade of peptide self-assembly, however, remains still limited. We employ molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent to study the spontaneous aggregation process of steric zipper peptide segments from the tau protein and insulin in atomistic detail. Starting from separated chains with random conformations, we find a rapid formation of structurally heterogeneous, -sheet rich oligomers, emerging from multiple bimolecular association steps and diverse assembly pathways. Furthermore, our study provides evidence that aggregate intermediates as small as dimers can be kinetically trapped and thus affect the structural evolution of larger oligomers. Alternative aggregate structures are found for both peptide sequences in the different independent simulations, some of which feature characteristics of the known steric zipper conformation (e.g., -sheet bilayers with a dry interface. The final aggregates interconvert with topologically distinct oligomeric states exclusively via internal rearrangements. The peptide oligomerization was analyzed through the perspective of a minimal oligomer, i.e., the dimer. Thereby all observed multimeric aggregates can be consistently mapped onto a space of reduced dimensionality. This novel method of conformational mapping reveals heterogeneous association and reorganization dynamics that are governed by the characteristics of peptide sequence and oligomer size.

  8. Software Vulnerability Taxonomy Consolidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polepeddi, Sriram S. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2004-12-07

    In today's environment, computers and networks are increasing exposed to a number of software vulnerabilities. Information about these vulnerabilities is collected and disseminated via various large publicly available databases such as BugTraq, OSVDB and ICAT. Each of these databases, individually, do not cover all aspects of a vulnerability and lack a standard format among them, making it difficult for end-users to easily compare various vulnerabilities. A central database of vulnerabilities has not been available until today for a number of reasons, such as the non-uniform methods by which current vulnerability database providers receive information, disagreement over which features of a particular vulnerability are important and how best to present them, and the non-utility of the information presented in many databases. The goal of this software vulnerability taxonomy consolidation project is to address the need for a universally accepted vulnerability taxonomy that classifies vulnerabilities in an unambiguous manner. A consolidated vulnerability database (CVDB) was implemented that coalesces and organizes vulnerability data from disparate data sources. Based on the work done in this paper, there is strong evidence that a consolidated taxonomy encompassing and organizing all relevant data can be achieved. However, three primary obstacles remain: lack of referencing a common ''primary key'', un-structured and free-form descriptions of necessary vulnerability data, and lack of data on all aspects of a vulnerability. This work has only considered data that can be unambiguously extracted from various data sources by straightforward parsers. It is felt that even with the use of more advanced, information mining tools, which can wade through the sea of unstructured vulnerability data, this current integration methodology would still provide repeatable, unambiguous, and exhaustive results. Though the goal of coalescing all available data

  9. DiffAni: visualizing dynamic graphs with a hybrid of difference maps and animation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rufiange, Sébastien; McGuffin, Michael J

    2013-12-01

    Visualization of dynamically changing networks (graphs) is a significant challenge for researchers. Previous work has experimentally compared animation, small multiples, and other techniques, and found trade-offs between these. One potential way to avoid such trade-offs is to combine previous techniques in a hybrid visualization. We present two taxonomies of visualizations of dynamic graphs: one of non-hybrid techniques, and one of hybrid techniques. We also describe a prototype, called DiffAni, that allows a graph to be visualized as a sequence of three kinds of tiles: diff tiles that show difference maps over some time interval, animation tiles that show the evolution of the graph over some time interval, and small multiple tiles that show the graph state at an individual time slice. This sequence of tiles is ordered by time and covers all time slices in the data. An experimental evaluation of DiffAni shows that our hybrid approach has advantages over non-hybrid techniques in certain cases.

  10. Spin tune mapping as a novel tool to probe the spin dynamics in storage rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleev, A.; Nikolaev, N. N.; Rathmann, F.; Augustyniak, W.; Bagdasarian, Z.; Bai, M.; Barion, L.; Berz, M.; Chekmenev, S.; Ciullo, G.; Dymov, S.; Eversmann, D.; Gaisser, M.; Gebel, R.; Grigoryev, K.; Grzonka, D.; Guidoboni, G.; Heberling, D.; Hejny, V.; Hempelmann, N.; Hetzel, J.; Hinder, F.; Kacharava, A.; Kamerdzhiev, V.; Keshelashvili, I.; Koop, I.; Kulikov, A.; Lehrach, A.; Lenisa, P.; Lomidze, N.; Lorentz, B.; Maanen, P.; Macharashvili, G.; Magiera, A.; Mchedlishvili, D.; Mey, S.; Müller, F.; Nass, A.; Pesce, A.; Prasuhn, D.; Pretz, J.; Rosenthal, M.; Schmidt, V.; Semertzidis, Y.; Senichev, Y.; Shmakova, V.; Silenko, A.; Slim, J.; Soltner, H.; Stahl, A.; Stassen, R.; Stephenson, E.; Stockhorst, H.; Ströher, H.; Tabidze, M.; Tagliente, G.; Talman, R.; Engblom, P. Thörngren; Trinkel, F.; Uzikov, Yu.; Valdau, Yu.; Valetov, E.; Vassiliev, A.; Weidemann, C.; Wrońska, A.; Wüstner, P.; Zuprański, P.; Zurek, M.; JEDI Collaboration

    2017-07-01

    Precision experiments, such as the search for electric dipole moments of charged particles using storage rings, demand for an understanding of the spin dynamics with unprecedented accuracy. The ultimate aim is to measure the electric dipole moments with a sensitivity up to 15 orders in magnitude better than the magnetic dipole moment of the stored particles. This formidable task requires an understanding of the background to the signal of the electric dipole from rotations of the spins in the spurious magnetic fields of a storage ring. One of the observables, especially sensitive to the imperfection magnetic fields in the ring is the angular orientation of stable spin axis. Up to now, the stable spin axis has never been determined experimentally, and in addition, the JEDI collaboration for the first time succeeded to quantify the background signals that stem from false rotations of the magnetic dipole moments in the horizontal and longitudinal imperfection magnetic fields of the storage ring. To this end, we developed a new method based on the spin tune response of a machine to artificially applied longitudinal magnetic fields. This novel technique, called spin tune mapping, emerges as a very powerful tool to probe the spin dynamics in storage rings. The technique was experimentally tested in 2014 using polarized deuterons stored in the cooler synchrotron COSY, and for the first time, the angular orientation of the stable spin axis at two different locations in the ring has been determined to an unprecedented accuracy of better than 2.8 μ rad .

  11. Integrated assessment of urban vulnerability and resilience. Case study: Targu Ocna town, Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grozavu, Adrian; Bănică, Alexandru

    2015-04-01

    Vulnerability assessment frequently emphasizes the internal fragility of a system in relation to a given hazard, when compared to similar systems or to a reference standard. This internal fragility, either biophysical or structural, may affect the ability to predict, to prepare for and cope with or to recover from the manifestation of a risk phenomenon. Thus, the vulnerability is highly related to resilience and adaptability. There is no single methodology for vulnerability and resilience analysis, their assessment can only be made by identifying and integrating indicators which are compatible with the analysis level and the geographic, economic and social features of a certain area. An integrated model of evaluating vulnerability and resilience capacity is being proposed in this paper for Targu Ocna, a small mining settlement in the Eastern Carpathians of Romania, that became in the last years a tourist town and acts within the surrounding territory as a dynamic local pole. Methodologically, the following steps and operations were considered: identifying potential hazards, identifying elements at risk, identifying proper indicators and integrating them in order to evaluate the general vulnerability and resilience. The inventory of elements at risk (the number of people potentially affected, residential or other functionalities buildings, roads and other infrastructure elements etc.) was made based on General Urban Plan, topographic maps (scale 1:5000), ortophotos from 2003 and 2008 and field mapping and researches. Further on, several vulnerability indicators were identified and included within the analytical approach: dependency ratio, income, quality of the habitat and technical urban facilities, environment quality showing differentiated sensitivity. Issues such as preparedness and preventive measures (priority areas within the risk prevention plans), coping ability (networks' geometry and connectivity, emergency utilities and services accessibility) and the

  12. Selection and quality assessment of Landsat data for the North American forest dynamics forest history maps of the US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karen Schleeweis; Samuel N. Goward; Chengquan Huang; John L. Dwyer; Jennifer L. Dungan; Mary A. Lindsey; Andrew Michaelis; Khaldoun Rishmawi; Jeffery G. Masek

    2016-01-01

    Using the NASA Earth Exchange platform, the North American Forest Dynamics (NAFD) project mapped forest history wall-to-wall, annually for the contiguous US (1986-2010) using the Vegetation Change Tracker algorithm. As with any effort to identify real changes in remotely sensed time-series, data gaps, shifts in seasonality, misregistration, inconsistent radiometry and...

  13. Vulnerability of Coastal Communities from Storm Surge and Flood Disasters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathi, Jejal Reddy; Das, Himangshu S

    2016-02-19

    Disasters in the form of coastal storms and hurricanes can be very destructive. Preparing for anticipated effects of such disasters can help reduce the public health and economic burden. Identifying vulnerable population groups can help prioritize resources for the most needed communities. This paper presents a quantitative framework for vulnerability measurement that incorporates both socioeconomic and flood inundation vulnerability. The approach is demonstrated for three coastal communities in Mississippi with census tracts being the study unit. The vulnerability results are illustrated as thematic maps for easy usage by planners and emergency responders to assist in prioritizing their actions to vulnerable populations during storm surge and flood disasters.

  14. Dynamic QTL analysis and candidate gene mapping for waterlogging tolerance at maize seedling stage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid A Osman

    Full Text Available Soil waterlogging is one of the major abiotic stresses adversely affecting maize growth and yield. To identify dynamic expression of genes or quantitative trait loci (QTL, QTL associated with plant height, root length, root dry weight, shoot dry weight and total dry weight were identified via conditional analysis in a mixed linear model and inclusive composite interval mapping method at three respective periods under waterlogging and control conditions. A total of 13, 19 and 23 QTL were detected at stages 3D|0D (the period during 0-3 d of waterlogging, 6D|3D and 9D|6D, respectively. The effects of each QTL were moderate and distributed over nine chromosomes, singly explaining 4.14-18.88% of the phenotypic variation. Six QTL (ph6-1, rl1-2, sdw4-1, sdw7-1, tdw4-1 and tdw7-1 were identified at two consistent stages of seedling development, which could reflect a continuous expression of genes; the remaining QTL were detected at only one stage. Thus, expression of most QTL was influenced by the developmental status. In order to provide additional evidence regarding the role of corresponding genes in waterlogging tolerance, mapping of Expressed Sequence Tags markers and microRNAs were conducted. Seven candidate genes were observed to co-localize with the identified QTL on chromosomes 1, 4, 6, 7 and 9, and may be important candidate genes for waterlogging tolerance. These results are a good starting point for understanding the genetic basis for selectively expressing of QTL in different stress periods and the common genetic control mechanism of the co-localized traits.

  15. Mapping and Visualization of Storm-Surge Dynamics for Hurricane Katrina and Hurricane Rita

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesch, Dean B.

    2009-01-01

    The damages caused by the storm surges from Hurricane Katrina and Hurricane Rita were significant and occurred over broad areas. Storm-surge maps are among the most useful geospatial datasets for hurricane recovery, impact assessments, and mitigation planning for future storms. Surveyed high-water marks were used to generate a maximum storm-surge surface for Hurricane Katrina extending from eastern Louisiana to Mobile Bay, Alabama. The interpolated surface was intersected with high-resolution lidar elevation data covering the study area to produce a highly detailed digital storm-surge inundation map. The storm-surge dataset and related data are available for display and query in a Web-based viewer application. A unique water-level dataset from a network of portable pressure sensors deployed in the days just prior to Hurricane Rita's landfall captured the hurricane's storm surge. The recorded sensor data provided water-level measurements with a very high temporal resolution at surveyed point locations. The resulting dataset was used to generate a time series of storm-surge surfaces that documents the surge dynamics in a new, spatially explicit way. The temporal information contained in the multiple storm-surge surfaces can be visualized in a number of ways to portray how the surge interacted with and was affected by land surface features. Spatially explicit storm-surge products can be useful for a variety of hurricane impact assessments, especially studies of wetland and land changes where knowledge of the extent and magnitude of storm-surge flooding is critical.

  16. Stochastic sensitivity analysis of periodic attractors in non-autonomous nonlinear dynamical systems based on stroboscopic map

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Kong-Ming, E-mail: kmguo@xidian.edu.cn [School of Electromechanical Engineering, Xidian University, P.O. Box 187, Xi' an 710071 (China); Jiang, Jun, E-mail: jun.jiang@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Strength and Vibration, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2014-07-04

    To apply stochastic sensitivity function method, which can estimate the probabilistic distribution of stochastic attractors, to non-autonomous dynamical systems, a 1/N-period stroboscopic map for a periodic motion is constructed in order to discretize the continuous cycle into a discrete one. In this way, the sensitivity analysis of a cycle for discrete map can be utilized and a numerical algorithm for the stochastic sensitivity analysis of periodic solutions of non-autonomous nonlinear dynamical systems under stochastic disturbances is devised. An external excited Duffing oscillator and a parametric excited laser system are studied as examples to show the validity of the proposed method. - Highlights: • A method to analyze sensitivity of stochastic periodic attractors in non-autonomous dynamical systems is proposed. • Probabilistic distribution around periodic attractors in an external excited Φ{sup 6} Duffing system is obtained. • Probabilistic distribution around a periodic attractor in a parametric excited laser system is determined.

  17. Declining vulnerability to river floods and the global benefits of adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongman, Brenden; Winsemius, Hessel; Aerts, Jeroen; Coughlan de Perez, Erin; Van Aalst, Maarten; Kron, Wolfgang; Ward, Philip

    2016-04-01

    The global impacts of river floods are substantial and rising. Effective adaptation to the increasing risks requires an in-depth understanding of the physical and socioeconomic drivers of risk. Whilst the modeling of flood hazard and exposure has improved greatly, compelling evidence on spatiotemporal patterns in vulnerability of societies around the world is lacking. Hence, the effects of vulnerability on global flood risk are not fully understood, and future projections of fatalities and losses available today are based on simplistic assumptions or do not include vulnerability. In this study, we show that trends and fluctuations in vulnerability to river floods around the world can be estimated by dynamic high-resolution modeling of flood hazard and exposure. We show that fatalities and losses as a share of exposed population and gross domestic product are decreasing with rising income. We also show that there is a tendency of convergence in vulnerability levels between low- and high-income countries. Based on these findings, we simulate future flood impacts per country using traditional assumptions of static vulnerability through time, but also using future assumptions on reduced vulnerability in the future. We show that future risk increases can be largely contained using effective disaster risk reduction strategies, including a reduction of vulnerability. The study was carried out using the global flood risk model, GLOFRIS, combined with high-resolution time-series maps of hazard and exposure at the global scale. Based on: Jongman et al., 2015. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, doi:10.1073/pnas.1414439112.

  18. Common Control System Vulnerability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trent Nelson

    2005-12-01

    The Control Systems Security Program and other programs within the Idaho National Laboratory have discovered a vulnerability common to control systems in all sectors that allows an attacker to penetrate most control systems, spoof the operator, and gain full control of targeted system elements. This vulnerability has been identified on several systems that have been evaluated at INL, and in each case a 100% success rate of completing the attack paths that lead to full system compromise was observed. Since these systems are employed in multiple critical infrastructure sectors, this vulnerability is deemed common to control systems in all sectors. Modern control systems architectures can be considered analogous to today's information networks, and as such are usually approached by attackers using a common attack methodology to penetrate deeper and deeper into the network. This approach often is composed of several phases, including gaining access to the control network, reconnaissance, profiling of vulnerabilities, launching attacks, escalating privilege, maintaining access, and obscuring or removing information that indicates that an intruder was on the system. With irrefutable proof that an external attack can lead to a compromise of a computing resource on the organization's business local area network (LAN), access to the control network is usually considered the first phase in the attack plan. Once the attacker gains access to the control network through direct connections and/or the business LAN, the second phase of reconnaissance begins with traffic analysis within the control domain. Thus, the communications between the workstations and the field device controllers can be monitored and evaluated, allowing an attacker to capture, analyze, and evaluate the commands sent among the control equipment. Through manipulation of the communication protocols of control systems (a process generally referred to as ''reverse engineering''), an

  19. Spin tune mapping as a novel tool to probe the spin dynamics in storage rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Precision experiments, such as the search for electric dipole moments of charged particles using storage rings, demand for an understanding of the spin dynamics with unprecedented accuracy. The ultimate aim is to measure the electric dipole moments with a sensitivity up to 15 orders in magnitude better than the magnetic dipole moment of the stored particles. This formidable task requires an understanding of the background to the signal of the electric dipole from rotations of the spins in the spurious magnetic fields of a storage ring. One of the observables, especially sensitive to the imperfection magnetic fields in the ring is the angular orientation of stable spin axis. Up to now, the stable spin axis has never been determined experimentally, and in addition, the JEDI collaboration for the first time succeeded to quantify the background signals that stem from false rotations of the magnetic dipole moments in the horizontal and longitudinal imperfection magnetic fields of the storage ring. To this end, we developed a new method based on the spin tune response of a machine to artificially applied longitudinal magnetic fields. This novel technique, called spin tune mapping, emerges as a very powerful tool to probe the spin dynamics in storage rings. The technique was experimentally tested in 2014 using polarized deuterons stored in the cooler synchrotron COSY, and for the first time, the angular orientation of the stable spin axis at two different locations in the ring has been determined to an unprecedented accuracy of better than 2.8  μ  rad.

  20. Fast recovery of free energy landscapes via diffusion-map-directed molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preto, Jordane; Clementi, Cecilia

    2014-09-28

    The reaction pathways characterizing macromolecular systems of biological interest are associated with high free energy barriers. Resorting to the standard all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) to explore such critical regions may be inappropriate as the time needed to observe the relevant transitions can be remarkably long. In this paper, we present a new method called Extended Diffusion-Map-directed Molecular Dynamics (extended DM-d-MD) used to enhance the sampling of MD trajectories in such a way as to rapidly cover all important regions of the free energy landscape including deep metastable states and critical transition paths. Moreover, extended DM-d-MD was combined with a reweighting scheme enabling to save on-the-fly information about the Boltzmann distribution. Our algorithm was successfully applied to two systems, alanine dipeptide and alanine-12. Due to the enhanced sampling, the Boltzmann distribution is recovered much faster than in plain MD simulations. For alanine dipeptide, we report a speedup of one order of magnitude with respect to plain MD simulations. For alanine-12, our algorithm allows us to highlight all important unfolded basins in several days of computation when one single misfolded event is barely observable within the same amount of computational time by plain MD simulations. Our method is reaction coordinate free, shows little dependence on the a priori knowledge of the system, and can be implemented in such a way that the biased steps are not computationally expensive with respect to MD simulations thus making our approach well adapted for larger complex systems from which little information is known.

  1. Crop Type Mapping from a Sequence of Terrasar-X Images with Dynamic Conditional Random Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenduiywo, B. K.; Bargiel, D.; Soergel, U.

    2016-06-01

    Crop phenology is dynamic as it changes with times of the year. Such biophysical processes also look spectrally different to remote sensing satellites. Some crops may depict similar spectral properties if their phenology coincide, but differ later when their phenology diverge. Thus, conventional approaches that select only images from phenological stages where crops are distinguishable for classification, have low discrimination. In contrast, stacking images within a cropping season limits discrimination to a single feature space that can suffer from overlapping classes. Since crop backscatter varies with time, it can aid discrimination. Therefore, our main objective is to develop a crop sequence classification method using multitemporal TerraSAR-X images. We adopt first order markov assumption in undirected temporal graph sequence. This property is exploited to implement Dynamic Conditional Random Fields (DCRFs). Our DCRFs model has a repeated structure of temporally connected Conditional Random Fields (CRFs). Each node in the sequence is connected to its predecessor via conditional probability matrix. The matrix is computed using posterior class probabilities from association potential. This way, there is a mutual temporal exchange of phenological information observed in TerraSAR-X images. When compared to independent epoch classification, the designed DCRF model improved crop discrimination at each epoch in the sequence. However, government, insurers, agricultural market traders and other stakeholders are interested in the quantity of a certain crop in a season. Therefore, we further develop a DCRF ensemble classifier. The ensemble produces an optimal crop map by maximizing over posterior class probabilities selected from the sequence based on maximum F1-score and weighted by correctness. Our ensemble technique is compared to standard approach of stacking all images as bands for classification using Maximum Likelihood Classifier (MLC) and standard CRFs. It

  2. Coastal Vulnerability Index (CVI) for Kaloko-Honokohau National Historical Park (kaho_shore)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A coastal vulnerability index (CVI) was used to map the relative vulnerability of the coast to future sea-level rise within Kaloko-Honokohau National Historical...

  3. Coastal Vulnerability (CVI) dataset for Virgin Islands National Park (viis_shore)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A coastal vulnerability index (CVI) was used to map the relative vulnerability of the coast to future sea-level rise within Virgin Island National Park in St. John....

  4. Coastal Vulnerability Index (CVI) for Fire Island National Seashore (fiis_shore)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A coastal vulnerability index (CVI) was used to map the relative vulnerability of the coast to future sea-level rise within Fire Island National Seashore in New...

  5. Coastal Vulnerability Index (CVI) for Kaloko-Honokohau National Historical Park (kaho_shore)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A coastal vulnerability index (CVI) was used to map the relative vulnerability of the coast to future sea-level rise within Kaloko-Honokohau National Historical Park...

  6. Coastal Vulnerability Index (CVI) dataset for Padre Island National Seashore (pais_shore)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A coastal vulnerability index (CVI) was used to map the relative vulnerability of the coast to future sea-level rise within Padre Island National Seashore in Texas....

  7. Coastal Vulnerability Index (CVI) Assessment for the National Park of American Samoa (npsa_shore)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A coastal vulnerability index (CVI) was used to map the relative vulnerability of the coast to future sea-level rise within The National Park of American Samoa ....

  8. Coastal Vulnerability Index (CVI) dataset for Olympic National Park (olym_shore)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A coastal vulnerability index (CVI) was used to map the relative vulnerability of the coast to future sea-level rise within Olympic National Park in Washington. The...

  9. Coastal Vulnerability Index (CVI) dataset for Golden Gate National Recreation (GGNRA - ggnra_shore)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A coastal vulnerability index (CVI) was used to map the relative vulnerability of the coast to future sea-level rise within Golden Gate National Recreation Area in...

  10. Coastal Vulnerability Index (CVI) dataset for Padre Island National Seashore (pais_shore)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A coastal vulnerability index (CVI) was used to map the relative vulnerability of the coast to future sea-level rise within Padre Island National Seashore in Texas....

  11. Coastal Vulnerability Index (CVI) Assessment for the National Park of American Samoa (npsa_shore)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A coastal vulnerability index (CVI) was used to map the relative vulnerability of the coast to future sea-level rise within The National Park of American Samoa . The...

  12. Coastal Vulnerability Index (CVI) for Cape Cod National Seashore (caco_shore)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A coastal vulnerability index (CVI) was used to map the relative vulnerability of the coast to future sea-level rise within Cape Cod National Seashore in...

  13. Coastal Vulnerability Index (CVI) dataset for Cape Hatteras National Seashore (caha_shore)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A coastal vulnerability index (CVI) was used to map the relative vulnerability of the coast to future sea-level rise within Cape Hatteras National Seashore in North...

  14. Coastal Vulnerability Index (CVI) for Cape Cod National Seashore (caco_shore)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A coastal vulnerability index (CVI) was used to map the relative vulnerability of the coast to future sea-level rise within Cape Cod National Seashore in...

  15. Coastal Vulnerability Index (CVI) of Dry Tortugas National Park (drto_shore)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A coastal vulnerability index (CVI) was used to map the relative vulnerability of the coast to future sea-level rise within Dry Tortugas National Park, located 70...

  16. Coastal Vulnerability Index (CVI) dataset for Cumberland Island National Seashore (cuis_shore)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A coastal vulnerability index (CVI) was used to map the relative vulnerability of the coast to future sea-level rise within Cumberland Island National Seashore in...

  17. Coastal Vulnerability Index (CVI) for Gateway National Recreation Area (gate_shore)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A coastal vulnerability index (CVI) was used to map the relative vulnerability of the coast to future sea-level rise within Gateway National Recreation Area in New...

  18. Coastal Vulnerability Index (CVI) dataset for War in the Pacific National Historical Park (wapa_shore)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A coastal vulnerability index (CVI) was used to map the relative vulnerability of the coast to future sea-level rise within War in the Pacific National Historical...

  19. Coastal Vulnerability Index (CVI) for Gulf Islands National Seashore (guis_shore)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A coastal vulnerability index (CVI) was used to map the relative vulnerability of the coast to future sea-level rise within Gulf Islands National Seashore in...

  20. Coastal Vulnerability Index (CVI) dataset for Cape Hatteras National Seashore (caha_shore)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A coastal vulnerability index (CVI) was used to map the relative vulnerability of the coast to future sea-level rise within Cape Hatteras National Seashore in North...

  1. Coastal Vulnerability Index (CVI) dataset for Channel Islands National Park (chis_shore)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A coastal vulnerability index (CVI) was used to map the relative vulnerability of the coast to future sea-level rise within Channel Islands National Park in...

  2. Coastal Vulnerability Index (CVI) dataset for Point Reyes National Seashore (pore_shore)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A coastal vulnerability index (CVI) was used to map the relative vulnerability of the coast to future sea-level rise within Point Reyes National Seashore in...

  3. Coastal Vulnerability (CVI) dataset for Virgin Islands National Park (viis_shore)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A coastal vulnerability index (CVI) was used to map the relative vulnerability of the coast to future sea-level rise within Virgin Island National Park in St. John....

  4. Coastal Vulnerability Index (CVI) dataset for Olympic National Park (olym_shore)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A coastal vulnerability index (CVI) was used to map the relative vulnerability of the coast to future sea-level rise within Olympic National Park in Washington. The...

  5. Coastal Vulnerability Index (CVI) for Gateway National Recreation Area (gate_shore)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A coastal vulnerability index (CVI) was used to map the relative vulnerability of the coast to future sea-level rise within Gateway National Recreation Area in New...

  6. Coastal Vulnerability Index (CVI) for Fire Island National Seashore (fiis_shore)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A coastal vulnerability index (CVI) was used to map the relative vulnerability of the coast to future sea-level rise within Fire Island National Seashore in New...

  7. Coastal Vulnerability Index (CVI) for Gulf Islands National Seashore (guis_shore)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A coastal vulnerability index (CVI) was used to map the relative vulnerability of the coast to future sea-level rise within Gulf Islands National Seashore in...

  8. Coastal Vulnerability Index (CVI) dataset for Golden Gate National Recreation (GGNRA - ggnra_shore)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A coastal vulnerability index (CVI) was used to map the relative vulnerability of the coast to future sea-level rise within Golden Gate National Recreation Area in...

  9. Coastal Vulnerability Index (CVI) dataset for Point Reyes National Seashore (pore_shore)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A coastal vulnerability index (CVI) was used to map the relative vulnerability of the coast to future sea-level rise within Point Reyes National Seashore in...

  10. Tumor microcirculation during a course of combined chemoradiation in patients with primary rectal carcinoma measured with dynamic T1 mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremser, Christian; Judmaier, Werner; De Vries, Alexander

    2003-05-01

    A recently introduced dynamic T1 mapping technique was used to investigate changes of tumor microcirculatory parameters in 16 patients with clinically staged T3) primary rectal carcinoma during a course of preoperative combined chemoradiation. For dynamic T1 mapping an ultra-fast snapshot FLASH T1 mapping sequence was implemented on a 1.5T whole body MR scanner. Acquiring a series of T1 maps contrast media (CM) uptake and washout over an examination time of 40 min was monitored. From the obtained series of T1-maps perfusion-indices (PI) were calculated as the ratio of maximum slope of the tumor CM curve and the maximum of the arterial CM curve. Using pathologic classification of the resected tumors after therapy the patient group could be divided into patients with and without response to therapy. It was found that mean pre-therapy PI values of tumors showing therapy-response were significantly lower than for tumors without no therapy-response. In addition a different behavior of PI distributions within tumors for both groups was observed. The presented study indicates that PI values and their distributions within a tumor seem to be of predictive value for therapy outcome of preoperative therapy in patients with primary rectal carcinoma.

  11. Computational Aspects of a Modified Bernoulli Map(Oscillation, Chaos and Network Dynamics in Nonlinear Science)

    OpenAIRE

    Asaki, SAITO; Future University-Hakodate

    2006-01-01

    We introduce a modified Bernoulli map, which presents f^ spectrum. This map is equivalent to a certain symbolic operation of continued fraction representation. From this fact, we can derive various properties of the map, e.g., concerning residence times, from the theory of continued fractions. Furthermore, we can generate true chaotic orbits with intermittent behavior long enough to investigate their statistical properties.

  12. Mapping dynamic social networks in real life using participants' own smartphones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tjeerd W. Boonstra

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Interpersonal relationships are vital for our daily functioning and wellbeing. Social networks may form the primary means by which environmental influences determine individual traits. Several studies have shown the influence of social networks on decision-making, behaviors and wellbeing. Smartphones have great potential for measuring social networks in a real world setting. Here we tested the feasibility of using people's own smartphones as a data collection platform for face-to-face interactions. We developed an application for iOS and Android to collect Bluetooth data and acquired one week of data from 14 participants in our organization. The Bluetooth scanning statistics were used to quantify the time-resolved connection strength between participants and define the weights of a dynamic social network. We used network metrics to quantify changes in network topology over time and non-negative matrix factorization to identify cliques or subgroups that reoccurred during the week. The scanning rate varied considerably between smartphones running Android and iOS and egocentric networks metrics were correlated with the scanning rate. The time courses of two identified subgroups matched with two meetings that took place that week. These findings demonstrate the feasibility of using participants' own smartphones to map social network, whilst identifying current limitations of using generic smartphones. The bias introduced by variations in scanning rate and missing data is an important limitation that needs to be addressed in future studies.

  13. Dynamics of the auroral electrojets and their mapping to the magnetosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldstein, Y.I.; Gromova, L.I.; Grafe, A.; Meng, C.-I.; Kalegaev, V.V.; Alexeev, I.I.; Sumaruk, Yu.P

    1999-10-01

    Data of the EISCAT and IMAGE magnetic observatories chains in combination with data of three Russian observatories (St. Petersburg, Borok and Moscow) were used to determine the eastward and westward electrojet dynamics in the course of magnetic storms. During the storm main phase and maximum substorm intensity the eastward electrojet is located at latitudes lower than usual. During intervals between substorms the westward electrojet centre shifts equatorwards as Dst increases. At a substorm maximum the westward electrojet widens polewards. The spectrograms of precipitating electrons and ions of auroral energies obtained onboard the DMSP F8, F10 and F11 satellites allow to connect the regions of the electrojet location with characteristic plasma structures at ionospheric altitudes. The eastward electrojet in the evening sector is located in the region of diffuse electron precipitations. The electrojet centre coincides with the latitude of an energy flux maximum of auroral protons. In the course of substorms the westward electrojet at the nightside is located at latitudes of both diffuse and discrete electron precipitations. The electrojets and plasma region boundaries are mapped to the magnetosphere. The paraboloid model of the magnetosphere is used here. The influence of paraboloid model input parameters on the dayside cusp latitude, on the ionospheric boundaries between open and closed as well as dipole-like and tail-like field lines is considered. It is shown that tail currents influence magnetic field line configuration in the nightside magnetosphere stronger than the ring current.

  14. Development of a dynamic network monitoring tool – Interactive map based on LLDP and SNMP

    CERN Document Server

    Haen, Christophe; Mesnard, E

    2010-01-01

    The European Organization for Nuclear Research (French: Organisation Européenne pour la Recherche Nucléaire), known as CERN is the world’s largest particle physics laboratory, established in 1954 near Geneva. CERN’s main function is to provide the particle accelerators and other infrastructure needed for high-energy physics research. The LHCb (standing for “Large Hadron Collider beauty”) experiment is one of six particle physics detector experiments built on the Large Hadron Collider, the world’s largest and highest-energy particle accelerator. This experiment produces a large amount of data which needs to be treated. This task is processed by some 2000 computing servers and 400 control servers. The LHCb Online team is responsible of the data, from their creation in the detector, till the storage. The purpose of my internship was to develop a software from scratch able to dynamically discover the network, draw a map of it, gather information of the network equipments, and implement basic monitorin...

  15. Dynamic Mapping of Rice Growth Parameters Using HJ-1 CCD Time Series Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The high temporal resolution (4-day charge-coupled device (CCD cameras onboard small environment and disaster monitoring and forecasting satellites (HJ-1A/B with 30 m spatial resolution and large swath (700 km have substantially increased the availability of regional clear sky optical remote sensing data. For the application of dynamic mapping of rice growth parameters, leaf area index (LAI and aboveground biomass (AGB were considered as plant growth indicators. The HJ-1 CCD-derived vegetation indices (VIs showed robust relationships with rice growth parameters. Cumulative VIs showed strong performance for the estimation of total dry AGB. The cross-validation coefficient of determination ( R C V 2 was increased by using two machine learning methods, i.e., a back propagation neural network (BPNN and a support vector machine (SVM compared with traditional regression equations of LAI retrieval. The LAI inversion accuracy was further improved by dividing the rice growth period into before and after heading stages. This study demonstrated that continuous rice growth monitoring over time and space at field level can be implemented effectively with HJ-1 CCD 10-day composite data using a combination of proper VIs and regression models.

  16. Mapping dynamic social networks in real life using participants' own smartphones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonstra, Tjeerd W; E Larsen, Mark; Christensen, Helen

    2015-11-01

    Interpersonal relationships are vital for our daily functioning and wellbeing. Social networks may form the primary means by which environmental influences determine individual traits. Several studies have shown the influence of social networks on decision-making, behaviors and wellbeing. Smartphones have great potential for measuring social networks in a real world setting. Here we tested the feasibility of using people's own smartphones as a data collection platform for face-to-face interactions. We developed an application for iOS and Android to collect Bluetooth data and acquired one week of data from 14 participants in our organization. The Bluetooth scanning statistics were used to quantify the time-resolved connection strength between participants and define the weights of a dynamic social network. We used network metrics to quantify changes in network topology over time and non-negative matrix factorization to identify cliques or subgroups that reoccurred during the week. The scanning rate varied considerably between smartphones running Android and iOS and egocentric networks metrics were correlated with the scanning rate. The time courses of two identified subgroups matched with two meetings that took place that week. These findings demonstrate the feasibility of using participants' own smartphones to map social network, whilst identifying current limitations of using generic smartphones. The bias introduced by variations in scanning rate and missing data is an important limitation that needs to be addressed in future studies.

  17. Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping and Dynamic Contrast Enhanced Quantitative Perfusion in Cerebral Cavernous Angiomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikati, Abdul Ghani; Tan, Huan; Shenkar, Robert; Li, Luying; Zhang, Lingjiao; Guo, Xiaodong; Shi, Changbin; Liu, Tian; Wang, Yi; Shah, Akash; Edelman, Robert; Christoforidis, Gregory; Awad, Issam

    2015-01-01

    Background Hyperpermeability and iron deposition are two central pathophysiological phenomena in human cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM) disease. Here we used two novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques to establish a relationship between these phenomena. Methods Subjects with CCM disease (4 sporadic and 18 familial) underwent MRI imaging using the Dynamic Contrast Enhanced Quantitative Perfusion (DCEQP) and Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping (QSM) techniques that measure hemodynamic factors of vessel leak and iron deposition respectively, previously demonstrated in CCM disease. Regions of interest encompassing the CCM lesions were analyzed using these techniques Results Susceptibility measured by QSM was positively correlated with permeability of lesions measured using DCEQP (r=0.49, p=<0.0001). The correlation was not affected by factors including familial predisposition, lesion volume, the contrast agent and the use of statin medication. Susceptibility was correlated with lesional blood volume (r=0.4, p=0.0001), but not with lesional blood flow. Conclusion The correlation between QSM and DCEQP suggests that the phenomena of permeability and iron deposition are related in CCM; hence “more leaky lesions” also manifest a more cumulative iron burden. These techniques might be used as biomarkers to monitor the course of this disease and the effect of therapy. PMID:24302484

  18. The dynamics of ant mosaics in tropical rainforests characterized using the Self-Organizing Map algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dejean, Alain; Azémar, Frédéric; Céréghino, Régis; Leponce, Maurice; Corbara, Bruno; Orivel, Jérôme; Compin, Arthur

    2016-08-01

    Ants, the most abundant taxa among canopy-dwelling animals in tropical rainforests, are mostly represented by territorially dominant arboreal ants (TDAs) whose territories are distributed in a mosaic pattern (arboreal ant mosaics). Large TDA colonies regulate insect herbivores, with implications for forestry and agronomy. What generates these mosaics in vegetal formations, which are dynamic, still needs to be better understood. So, from empirical research based on 3 Cameroonian tree species (Lophira alata, Ochnaceae; Anthocleista vogelii, Gentianaceae; and Barteria fistulosa, Passifloraceae), we used the Self-Organizing Map (SOM, neural network) to illustrate the succession of TDAs as their host trees grow and age. The SOM separated the trees by species and by size for L. alata, which can reach 60 m in height and live several centuries. An ontogenic succession of TDAs from sapling to mature trees is shown, and some ecological traits are highlighted for certain TDAs. Also, because the SOM permits the analysis of data with many zeroes with no effect of outliers on the overall scatterplot distributions, we obtained ecological information on rare species. Finally, the SOM permitted us to show that functional groups cannot be selected at the genus level as congeneric species can have very different ecological niches, something particularly true for Crematogaster spp., which include a species specifically associated with B. fistulosa, nondominant species and TDAs. Therefore, the SOM permitted the complex relationships between TDAs and their growing host trees to be analyzed, while also providing new information on the ecological traits of the ant species involved.

  19. A two-dimensional protein map of Pleurotus ostreatus microsomes-proteome dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petráčková, Denisa; Halada, Petr; Bezoušková, Silvia; Křesinová, Zdena; Svobodová, Kateřina

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies documented that several processes in filamentous fungi are connected with microsomal enzyme activities. In this work, microsomal subproteomes of Pleurotus ostreatus were analyzed by two-dimensional (2-D) polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry analysis. To assess proteome dynamics, microsomal proteins were isolated from fungal cultures after 7 and 12 days of cultivation. Additionally, 10 mg/L of 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) was treated with the cultures during 2 days. Despite the EE2 degradation by the fungus reached 97 and 76.3 % in 7- and 12-day-old cultures, respectively, only a minor effect on the composition of microsomal proteins was observed. The changes in protein maps related to ageing prevailed over those induced by EE2. Epoxide hydrolase, known to metabolize EE2, was detected in 12-day-old cultures only which suggests differences in EE2 degradation pathways utilized by fungal cultures of different age. The majority (32 %) of identified microsomal proteins were parts of mitochondrial energy metabolism.

  20. Temporal vulnerability in hazardscapes: flood memory-networks and referentiality along the North Carolina Neuse River (USA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, D.H.

    2011-01-01

    Social models of population vulnerability to disasters increasingly include the notion that vulnerability has a strong temporal component. While this temporality is typically conceptualized as objective (making vulnerability "dynamic," "multiscalar," and/or "historical"), it consistently fails to ac

  1. Construction of Rational Maps on the Projective Line with Given Dynamical Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-11

    1)2 = (x+ 1) (x− 1) we see that g(x) is in fact a linear map. Consider another map: h(x) = x2 + 1 x2 − 2x+ 1. Res(h) = ∣∣∣∣∣∣∣∣∣∣∣∣ 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1...a1 = b1 + b0 12 Also note that if a2 = 0 or b0 = 0 the map will become linear . Therefore if a quadratic rational map φ has fixed points 0,1...quadratic map using algebra to show the fixed points and two-cycle hold for the map, then using the resultant to show that the map is quadratic and does not

  2. Groundwater vulnerability assessment and validation on the example of Gömör-Torna Karst, Hungary and Slovakia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iván, Veronika; Mádl-Szőnyi, Judit

    2017-04-01

    A comprehensive resource and source groundwater vulnerability assessment was carried out on a transboundary test site of the Gömör-Torna Karst (Hungary and Slovakia). The main goal of the investigation was to understand and map vulnerability in a more general hydrogeological context, taking into consideration the special characteristics of gravity-driven groundwater flow systems, i.e. the flow dynamics in the area. In order to assess vulnerability, parametric, semi-quantitative approaches were adapted, applied, compared and validated on the test area. Focusing on the usual "weak points" of the assessment (as crucial but nonetheless mainly just roughly estimated parameters), complementary investigations were carried out with diverse techniques. The characteristic clayey sediment cover may have major impact on the infiltration. Its spatial extension and role in the infiltration process were investigated by means of geophysical techniques and grain-size measurements. In order to understand the flow dynamics in the saturated zone better, results of tracer tests were analyzed. Besides that, spring hydrograph and recession curve analysis were carried out based on long-term daily spring discharge data series. The study provides an approach in order to improve the reliability of vulnerability maps. The well-studied and intensively karstified area of the Gömör-Torna Karst serves also as an appropriate example for further similar studies to find the best possible investigation and mapping strategies and thus to create comprehensive, reliable, process-based vulnerability maps. The authors gratefully acknowledge the Geogold Kárpátia Environmental Consulting Ltd and the Aggtelek National Park Directorate for involvement in the project and sharing geophysical and tracer test data.

  3. Regional adaptation of a dynamic global vegetation model using a remote sensing data derived land cover map of Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khvostikov, S.; Venevsky, S.; Bartalev, S.

    2015-12-01

    The dynamic global vegetation model (DGVM) SEVER has been regionally adapted using a remote sensing data-derived land cover map in order to improve the reconstruction conformity of the distribution of vegetation functional types over Russia. The SEVER model was modified to address noticeable divergences between modelling results and the land cover map. The model modification included a light competition method elaboration and the introduction of a tundra class into the model. The rigorous optimisation of key model parameters was performed using a two-step procedure. First, an approximate global optimum was found using the efficient global optimisation (EGO) algorithm, and afterwards a local search in the vicinity of the approximate optimum was performed using the quasi-Newton algorithm BFGS. The regionally adapted model shows a significant improvement of the vegetation distribution reconstruction over Russia with better matching with the satellite-derived land cover map, which was confirmed by both a visual comparison and a formal conformity criterion.

  4. 3D mapping of buried underworld infrastructure using dynamic Bayesian network based multi-sensory image data fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Ritaban; Cohn, Anthony G.; Muggleton, Jen M.

    2013-05-01

    The successful operation of buried infrastructure within urban environments is fundamental to the conservation of modern living standards. In this paper a novel multi-sensor image fusion framework has been proposed and investigated using dynamic Bayesian network for automatic detection of buried underworld infrastructure. Experimental multi-sensors images were acquired for a known buried plastic water pipe using Vibro-acoustic sensor based location methods and Ground Penetrating Radar imaging system. Computationally intelligent conventional image processing techniques were used to process three types of sensory images. Independently extracted depth and location information from different images regarding the target pipe were fused together using dynamic Bayesian network to predict the maximum probable location and depth of the pipe. The outcome from this study was very encouraging as it was able to detect the target pipe with high accuracy compared with the currently existing pipe survey map. The approach was also applied successfully to produce a best probable 3D buried asset map.

  5. Scenario-based Storm Surge Vulnerability Assessment of Catanduanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, J. K. B.

    2015-12-01

    After the devastating storm surge effect of Typhoon Haiyan, the public recognized an improved communication about risks, vulnerabilities and what is threatened by storm surge. This can be provided by vulnerability maps which allow better visual presentations and understanding of the risks and vulnerabilities. Local implementers can direct the resources needed for protection of these areas. Moreover, vulnerability and hazard maps are relevant in all phases of disaster management designed by the National Disaster Risk Reduction Council (NDRRMC) - disaster preparedness, prevention and mitigation and response and recovery and rehabilitation. This paper aims to analyze the vulnerability of Catanduanes, a coastal province in the Philippines, to storm surges in terms of four parameters: population, built environment, natural environment and agricultural production. The vulnerability study relies on the storm surge inundation maps based on the Department of Science and Technology Nationwide Operational Assessment of Hazards' (DOST-Project NOAH) proposed four Storm Surge Advisory (SSA) scenarios (1-2, 3, 4, and 5 meters) for predicting storm surge heights. To determine total percent affected for each parameter elements, an overlay analysis was performed in ArcGIS Desktop. Moreover, vulnerability and hazard maps are generated as a final output and a tool for visualizing the impacts of storm surge event at different surge heights. The result of this study would help the selected province to know their present condition and adapt strategies to strengthen areas where they are found to be most vulnerable in order to prepare better for the future.

  6. Dynamics of a Skew Tent Map in the Nonlinear Frobenius-Perron Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuragi, Daisuke

    Return maps of the mean field in globally coupled map lattices (GCML) with a large system size were compared with those at the limit in a large system size. We adopted a nonlinear Frobenius-Perron equation (NFPE) for the limit in the large system size, and used a skew tent map as a chaotic map to simplify calculations in the NFPE. The return maps of the mean field for direct numerical calculations in the GCML usually fluctuate from those for numerical calculations in the NFPE. However, at some coupling strengths, there are totally different return maps between the GCML and the NFPE. We show that this strongly depends on the initial conditions at some coupling strengths.

  7. Mapping of flood dynamics and spatial distribution of vegetation in the Amazon floodplain using multitemporal SAR data

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez, Jean-Michel; Le Toan, T.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the use of time series of SAR images to map the flood temporal dynamics and the spatial distribution of vegetation over a large Amazonian floodplain. The region under study (3500 km(2)) presents a diversity of landscape units with open lakes, bogs, large meadows, savannahs, alluvial forests and terra firma forest, covered by 21 images acquired by J-ERS between 1993 and 1997. Ground data include in situ observations of vegetation structure and flood extent as well as water ...

  8. Free and Open Source Software for land degradation vulnerability assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbrenda, Vito; Calamita, Giuseppe; Coluzzi, Rosa; D'Emilio, Mariagrazia; Lanfredi, Maria Teresa; Perrone, Angela; Ragosta, Maria; Simoniello, Tiziana

    2013-04-01

    Nowadays the role of FOSS software in scientific research is becoming increasingly important. Besides the important issues of reduced costs for licences, legality and security there are many other reasons that make FOSS software attractive. Firstly, making the code opened is a warranty of quality permitting to thousands of developers around the world to check the code and fix bugs rather than rely on vendors claims. FOSS communities are usually enthusiastic about helping other users for solving problems and expand or customize software (flexibility). Most important for this study, the interoperability allows to combine the user-friendly QGIS with the powerful GRASS-GIS and the richness of statistical methods of R in order to process remote sensing data and to perform geo-statistical analysis in one only environment. This study is focused on the land degradation (i.e. the reduction in the capacity of the land to provide ecosystem goods and services and assure its functions) and in particular on the estimation of the vulnerability levels in order to suggest appropriate policy actions to reduce/halt land degradation impacts, using the above mentioned software. The area investigated is the Basilicata Region (Southern Italy) where large natural areas are mixed with anthropized areas. To identify different levels of vulnerability we adopted the Environmentally Sensitive Areas (ESAs) model, based on the combination of indicators related to soil, climate, vegetation and anthropic stress. Such indicators were estimated by using the following data-sources: - Basilicata Region Geoportal to assess soil vulnerability; - DESERTNET2 project to evaluate potential vegetation vulnerability and climate vulnerability; - NDVI-MODIS satellite time series (2000-2010) with 250m resolution, available as 16-day composite from the NASA LP DAAC to characterize the dynamic component of vegetation; - Agricultural Census data 2010, Corine Land Cover 2006 and morphological information to assess

  9. Effect of environmental sound familiarity on dynamic neural activation/inhibition patterns: an ERD mapping study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebrun, N; Clochon, P; Etévenon, P; Baron, J C; Eustache, F

    1998-07-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the timing and topography of brain activity in relation to the cognitive processing of different types of auditory information. We specifically investigated the effects of familiarity on environmental sound identification, an issue which has been little studied with respect to cognitive processes, neural substrates, and time course of brain activity. To address this issue, we implemented and applied an electroencephalographic mapping method named event-related desynchronization, which allows one to assess the dynamics of neuronal activity with high temporal resolution (here, 125 ms); we used 19 recording electrodes with standard positioning. We designed an activation paradigm in which healthy subjects were asked to discriminate binaurally heard sounds belonging to one of two distinct categories, "familiar" (i.e., natural environmental sounds) or "unfamiliar" (i.e., altered environmental sounds). The sounds were selected according to strict preexperimental tests so that the former should engage greater semantic, and the latter greater structural, analysis, which we predicted to preferentially implicate left posterior and right brain regions, respectively. During the stimulations, significant desynchronizations (thought to reflect neuronal activations) were recorded over left hemisphere regions for familiar sounds and right temporofrontal regions for unfamiliar sounds, but with only few significant differences between the two sound categories and a common bilateral activation in the frontal regions. However, strongly significant differences between familiar and unfamiliar sounds occurred near the end of and following the stimulations, due to synchronizations (though to reflect deactivations) which appeared over the left posterior regions, as well as the vertex and bilateral frontal cortex, only after unfamiliar sounds. These unexpected synchronizations after the unfamiliar stimuli may reflect an awareness of the unfamiliarity of

  10. Dynamic Programming for Re-Mapping Noisy Fixations in Translation Tasks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carl, Michael

    2013-01-01

    problems and noise that we observe when using eyetrackers to record and analyse gazing behavior of translators. I describe the mapping algorithm and show how it rectifies and re-aligns the noisy gaze data to provide a more intelligible gaze path. I show examples of re-mapped fixations which better explain...

  11. Transitions from phase-locked dynamics to chaos in a piecewise-linear map

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhusubaliyev, Z.T.; Mosekilde, Erik; De, S.

    2008-01-01

    place via border-collision fold bifurcations. We examine the transition to chaos through torus destruction in such maps. Considering a piecewise-linear normal-form map we show that this transition, by virtue of the interplay of border-collision bifurcations with period-doubling and homoclinic...

  12. Dynamic T{sub 2}-mapping during magnetic resonance guided high intensity focused ultrasound ablation of bone marrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waspe, Adam C.; Looi, Thomas; Mougenot, Charles; Amaral, Joao; Temple, Michael; Sivaloganathan, Siv; Drake, James M. [Centre for Image Guided Innovation and Therapeutic Intervention, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, M5G 1X8 (Canada); Philips Healthcare Canada, Markham, ON, L6C 2S3 (Canada); Centre for Image Guided Innovation and Therapeutic Intervention, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, M5G 1X8 (Canada); Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Centre for Image Guided Innovation and Therapeutic Intervention, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, M5G 1X8 (Canada)

    2012-11-28

    Focal bone tumor treatments include amputation, limb-sparing surgical excision with bone reconstruction, and high-dose external-beam radiation therapy. Magnetic resonance guided high intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) is an effective non-invasive thermotherapy for palliative management of bone metastases pain. MR thermometry (MRT) measures the proton resonance frequency shift (PRFS) of water molecules and produces accurate (<1 Degree-Sign C) and dynamic (<5s) thermal maps in soft tissues. PRFS-MRT is ineffective in fatty tissues such as yellow bone marrow and, since accurate temperature measurements are required in the bone to ensure adequate thermal dose, MR-HIFU is not indicated for primary bone tumor treatments. Magnetic relaxation times are sensitive to lipid temperature and we hypothesize that bone marrow temperature can be determined accurately by measuring changes in T{sub 2}, since T{sub 2} increases linearly in fat during heating. T{sub 2}-mapping using dual echo times during a dynamic turbo spin-echo pulse sequence enabled rapid measurement of T{sub 2}. Calibration of T{sub 2}-based thermal maps involved heating the marrow in a bovine femur and simultaneously measuring T{sub 2} and temperature with a thermocouple. A positive T{sub 2} temperature dependence in bone marrow of 20 ms/ Degree-Sign C was observed. Dynamic T{sub 2}-mapping should enable accurate temperature monitoring during MR-HIFU treatment of bone marrow and shows promise for improving the safety and reducing the invasiveness of pediatric bone tumor treatments.

  13. Development of AHPDST Vulnerability Indexing Model for Groundwater Vulnerability Assessment Using Hydrogeophysical Derived Parameters and GIS Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogaji, K. A.

    2017-04-01

    Producing a bias-free vulnerability assessment map model is significantly needed for planning a scheme of groundwater quality protection. This study developed a GIS-based AHPDST vulnerability index model for producing groundwater vulnerability model map in the hard rock terrain, Nigeria by exploiting the potentials of analytic hierarchy process (AHP) and Dempster-Shafer theory (DST) data mining models. The acquired borehole and geophysical data in the study area were processed to derive five groundwater vulnerability conditioning factors (GVCFs), namely recharge rate, aquifer transmissivity, hydraulic conductivity, transverse resistance and longitudinal conductance. The produced GVCFs' thematic maps were multi-criterially analyzed by employing the mechanisms of AHP and DST models to determine the normalized weight ( W) parameter for the GVCFs and mass function factors (MFFs) parameter for the GVCFs' thematic maps' class boundaries, respectively. Based on the application of the weighted linear average technique, the determined W and MFFs parameters were synthesized to develop groundwater vulnerability potential index (GVPI)-based AHPDST model algorithm. The developed model was applied to establish four GVPI mass/belief function indices. The estimates based on the applied GVPI belief function indices were processed in GIS environment to create prospective groundwater vulnerability potential index maps. The most representative of the resulting vulnerability maps (the GVPIBel map) was considered for producing the groundwater vulnerability potential zones (GVPZ) map for the area. The produced GVPZ map established 48 and 52% of the areal extent to be covered by the lows/moderate and highs vulnerable zones, respectively. The success and the prediction rates of the produced GVPZ map were determined using the relative operating characteristics technique to give 82.3 and 77.7%, respectively. The analyzed results reveal that the developed GVPI-based AHPDST model algorithm is

  14. Development of AHPDST Vulnerability Indexing Model for Groundwater Vulnerability Assessment Using Hydrogeophysical Derived Parameters and GIS Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogaji, K. A.

    2017-02-01

    Producing a bias-free vulnerability assessment map model is significantly needed for planning a scheme of groundwater quality protection. This study developed a GIS-based AHPDST vulnerability index model for producing groundwater vulnerability model map in the hard rock terrain, Nigeria by exploiting the potentials of analytic hierarchy process (AHP) and Dempster-Shafer theory (DST) data mining models. The acquired borehole and geophysical data in the study area were processed to derive five groundwater vulnerability conditioning factors (GVCFs), namely recharge rate, aquifer transmissivity, hydraulic conductivity, transverse resistance and longitudinal conductance. The produced GVCFs' thematic maps were multi-criterially analyzed by employing the mechanisms of AHP and DST models to determine the normalized weight (W) parameter for the GVCFs and mass function factors (MFFs) parameter for the GVCFs' thematic maps' class boundaries, respectively. Based on the application of the weighted linear average technique, the determined W and MFFs parameters were synthesized to develop groundwater vulnerability potential index (GVPI)-based AHPDST model algorithm. The developed model was applied to establish four GVPI mass/belief function indices. The estimates based on the applied GVPI belief function indices were processed in GIS environment to create prospective groundwater vulnerability potential index maps. The most representative of the resulting vulnerability maps (the GVPIBel map) was considered for producing the groundwater vulnerability potential zones (GVPZ) map for the area. The produced GVPZ map established 48 and 52% of the areal extent to be covered by the lows/moderate and highs vulnerable zones, respectively. The success and the prediction rates of the produced GVPZ map were determined using the relative operating characteristics technique to give 82.3 and 77.7%, respectively. The analyzed results reveal that the developed GVPI-based AHPDST model algorithm is

  15. Dynamic Programming for Re-Mapping Noisy Fixations in Translation Tasks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carl, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Eyetrackers which allow for free head movements are in many cases imprecise to the extent that reading patterns become heavily distorted. The poor usability and interpretability of these gaze patterns is corroborated by a "naïve" fixation-to-symbol mapping, which often wrongly maps the possibly d...... successive fixations and the symbol locations, so as to smooth the gazing path according to the background gazing model. A qualitative and quantitative evaluation shows that the algorithm increases the accuracy of the re-mapped symbol sequence....

  16. AutoMap & AutoLink: Tools for Communicating Complex & DynamicData-Structures using MPI

    OpenAIRE

    Goujon, Delphine; Michel, Martial; Peeters, Jasper; Devaney, Judith Ellen

    1998-01-01

    Colloque avec actes et comité de lecture.; This article describes two software tools, AutoMap and AutoLink, that facilitate the use of data-structures in MPI. AutoMap is a program that parses a file of user-defined data-structures and generates new MPI types out of basic and previously defined MPI data-types. Our software tool automatically handles specialized error checking related to memory mapping. AutoLink is an MPI library that allows the transfert of complex, dynimacally linked, and pos...

  17. Anticipating Future Extreme Climate Events for Alaska Using Dynamical Downscaling and Quantile Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lader, R.; Walsh, J. E.

    2016-12-01

    Alaska is projected to experience major changes in extreme climate during the 21st century, due to greenhouse warming and exacerbated by polar amplification, wherein the Arctic is warming at twice the rate compared to the Northern Hemisphere. Given its complex topography, Alaska displays extreme gradients of temperature and precipitation. However, global climate models (GCMs), which typically have a spatial resolution on the order of 100km, struggle to replicate these extremes. To help resolve this issue, this study employs dynamically downscaled regional climate simulations and quantile-mapping methodologies to provide a full suite of daily model variables at 20 km spatial resolution for Alaska, from 1970 to 2100. These data include downscaled products of the: ERA-Interim reanalysis from 1979 to 2015, GFDL-CM3 historical from 1970 to 2005, and GFDL-CM3 RCP 8.5 from 2006 to 2100. Due to the limited nature of long-term observations and high-resolution modeling in Alaska, these data enable a broad expansion of extremes analysis. This study uses these data to highlight a subset of the 27 climate extremes indices, previously defined by the Expert Team on Climate Change Detection and Indices, as they pertain to climate change in Alaska. These indices are based on the statistical distributions of daily surface temperature and precipitation and focus on threshold exceedance, and percentiles. For example, the annual number of days with a daily maximum temperature greater than 25°C is anticipated to triple in many locations in Alaska by the end of the century. Climate extremes can also refer to long duration events, such as the record-setting warmth that defined the 2015-16 cold season in Alaska. The downscaled climate model simulations indicate that this past winter will be considered normal by as early as the mid-2040s, if we continue to warm according to the business-as-usual RCP 8.5 emissions scenario. This represents an accelerated warming as compared to projections

  18. Development of a dynamic web mapping service for vegetation productivity using earth observation and in situ sensors in a sensor web based approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooistra, L.; Bergsma, A.R.; Chuma, B.; Bruin, de S.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a sensor web based approach which combines earth observation and in situ sensor data to derive typical information offered by a dynamic web mapping service (WMS). A prototype has been developed which provides daily maps of vegetation productivity for the Nethe

  19. Dynamics and Evolution of SO2 Gas Condensation Around Prometheus-like Volcanic Plumes on Io as Seen by the Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doute, S.; Lopes-Gautier, R.; Smythe, W. D.; Kamp, L. W.; Carlson, R.

    2001-01-01

    Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer data acquired during the I24, 25, and 27 Io's Fly-bys by Galileo are analyzed to map the SO2 frost abundance and granularity. This allows a better understanding of the dynamics and evolution of gas condensation around volcanic plumes. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  20. Global 30m 2000-2014 Surface Water Dynamics Map Derived from All Landsat 5, 7, and 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, A.; Hansen, M.

    2015-12-01

    Water is critical for human life, agriculture, and ecosystems. A better understanding of where it is and how it is changing will enable better management of this valuable resource and guide protection of sensitive ecological areas. Global water maps have typically been representations of surface water at one given time. However, there is both seasonal and interannual variability: rivers meander, lakes disappear, floods arise. To address this ephemeral nature of water, in this study University of Maryland has developed a method that analyzes every Landsat 5, 7, and 8 scene from 1999-2015 to produce global seasonal maps (Winter, Spring, Summer, Fall) of surface water dynamics from 2000-2014. Each Landsat scene is automatically classified into land, water, cloud, haze, shadow, and snow via a decision tree algorithm. The land and water observations are aggregated per pixel into percent occurrence of water in a 3 year moving window for each meteorological season. These annual water percentages form a curve for each season that is discretized into a continuous 3 band RGB map. Frequency of water observation and type of surface water change (loss, gain, peak, or dip) is clearly seen through brightness and hue respectively. Additional data layers include: the year the change began, peak year, minimum year, and the year the change process ended. Currently these maps have been created for 18 1°x1° test tiles scattered around the world, and a portion of the September-November map over Bangladesh is shown below. The entire Landsat archive from 1999-2015 will be processed through a partnership with Google Earth Engine to complete the global product in the coming months. In areas where there is sufficient satellite data density (e.g. the United States), this project could be expanded to 1984-2015. This study provides both scientific researchers and the public an understandable, temporally rich, and globally consistent map showing surface water changes over time.

  1. Dynamic load balancing scheduling strategy against vulnerability in P2P sub-domain network%P2P分域网络动态负载均衡调度的抗脆弱性策略

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王建勇; 李玉玲; 景秀; 刘峰

    2011-01-01

    The hubs in P2P network increase the network vulnerability.To reduce this kind of vulnerability, a dynamically scheduling strategy for network load balancing is proposed, in which, a P2P network is devided into several domains according to the physical location of P2P nodes, and then it designs a function which can quantify the load of nodes equitably and dynamically.When a consumer node sends a downloading request, the node with the smallest dynamic factor is selected as a server node, which can balance the load of P2P network effectively.Simulations show that this strategy can avoid the forming of hubs,enhance the robustness of network,and make P2P networks develop sustainably and healthily.%P2P网络中集散节点的存在加重了网络的脆弱性.提出一种动态负载均衡调度的抗脆弱性策略,该策略依据节点物理位置的邻近性对网络进行了分域,并设计出更为公平的函数对节点的负载进行动态的量化,当消费节点发出下载请求后,选择负载动态变化因子最小的节点作为服务节点,避免了单个节点负载猛增的情况,均衡了节点的负载.仿真证明该策略能有效抑制网络中集散节点的形成,增强网络的健壮性,从而达到保障P2P网络可持续健康发展的目的.

  2. A new GIS approach for reconstructing and mapping dynamic late Holocene coastal plain palaeogeography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierik, H. J.; Cohen, K. M.; Stouthamer, E.

    2016-10-01

    The geomorphological development of Holocene coastal plains around the world has been studied since the beginning of the twentieth century from various disciplines, resulting in large amounts of data. However, the overwhelming quantities and heterogeneous nature of this data have caused the divided knowledge to remain inconsistent and fragmented. To keep improving the understanding of coastal plain geomorphology and geology, cataloguing of data and integration of knowledge are essential. In this paper we present a GIS that incorporates the accumulated data of the Netherlands' coastal plain and functions as a storage and integration tool for coastal plain mapped data. The GIS stores redigitised architectural elements (beach barriers, tidal channels, intertidal flats, supratidal flats, and coastal fresh water peat) from earlier mappings in separate map layers. A coupled catalogue-style database stores the dating information of these elements, besides references to source studies and annotations regarding changed insights. Using scripts, the system automatically establishes palaeogeographical maps for any chosen moment, combining the above mapping and dating information. In our approach, we strip the information to architectural element level, and we separate mapping from dating information, serving the automatic generation of time slice maps. It enables a workflow in which the maker can iteratively regenerate maps, which speeds up fine-tuning and thus the quality of palaeogeographical reconstruction. The GIS currently covers the late Holocene coastal plain development of the Netherlands. This period witnessed widespread renewed flooding along the southern North Sea coast, coinciding with large-scale reclamation and human occupation. Our GIS method is generic and can be expanded and adapted to allow faster integrated processing of growing amounts of data for many coastal areas and other large urbanising lowlands around the world. It allows maintaining actual data

  3. Selective vulnerability in brain hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cervos-Navarro, J.; Diemer, Nils Henrik

    1991-01-01

    Neuropathology, selective vulnerability, brain hypoxia, vascular factors, excitotoxicity, ion homeostasis......Neuropathology, selective vulnerability, brain hypoxia, vascular factors, excitotoxicity, ion homeostasis...

  4. Arizona - Social Vulnerability Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Social Vulnerability Index is derived from the 2000 US Census data. The fields included are percent minority, median household income, age (under 18 and over...

  5. County Population Vulnerability

    Data.gov (United States)

    City and County of Durham, North Carolina — This layer summarizes the social vulnerability index for populations within each county in the United States at scales 1:3m and below. It answers the question...

  6. spatially identifying vulnerable areas

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    System (SMDSS) to identify factors that make forest and game reserves vulnerable .... involve the creation of a Digital Elevation Model (DEM), Slope Settlement and ... Feature). Spatial. Analyst Tool. (Slope). Buffer Tool. Buffer Tool. Buffer Tool.

  7. Sources to the landscape - detailed spatiotemporal analysis of 200 years Danish landscape dynamics using unexploited historical maps and aerial photos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenningsen, Stig Roar; Christensen, Andreas Aagaard; Dupont, Henrik

    Historical cartographic material in the form of maps and aerial imagery remains one of the main data sources available to landscape scientists studying changes in land use and land cover. The use and analysis of such sources is widespread, and most contemporary scholars in the landscape sciences...... use historical maps and imagery to relate their findings to landscape history. Especially the recent transition from a landscape dominated by feudal societal structures to today’s urbanized landscapes with intensive agriculture, has been intensively studied. This approach in some cases suffers from...... or to the commercial photo series from the last 20 years. This poster outlines a new research project focusing on the potential of unexploited cartographic sources for detailed analysis of the dynamic of the Danish landscape between 1800 – 2000. The project draws on cartographic sources available in Danish archives...

  8. Coarse-graining the dynamics of a driven interface in the presence of mobile impurities: effective description via diffusion maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonday, Benjamin E; Haataja, Mikko; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G

    2009-09-01

    Developing effective descriptions of the microscopic dynamics of many physical phenomena can both dramatically enhance their computational exploration and lead to a more fundamental understanding of the underlying physics. Previously, an effective description of a driven interface in the presence of mobile impurities, based on an Ising variant model and a single empirical coarse variable, was partially successful [M. Haataja, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 160603 (2004)]; yet it underlined the necessity of selecting additional coarse variables in certain parameter regimes. In this paper we use a data mining approach to help identify the coarse variables required. We discuss the implementation of this diffusion map approach, the selection of a similarity measure between system snapshots required in the approach, and the correspondence between empirically selected and automatically detected coarse variables. We conclude by illustrating the use of the diffusion map variables in assisting the atomistic simulations and we discuss the translation of information between fine and coarse descriptions using lifting and restriction operators.

  9. Sources to the landscape - detailed spatiotemporal analysis of 200 years Danish landscape dynamics using unexploited historical maps and aerial photos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenningsen, Stig Roar; Christensen, Andreas Aagaard; Dupont, Henrik

    Historical cartographic material in the form of maps and aerial imagery remains one of the main data sources available to landscape scientists studying changes in land use and land cover. The use and analysis of such sources is widespread, and most contemporary scholars in the landscape sciences...... use historical maps and imagery to relate their findings to landscape history. Especially the recent transition from a landscape dominated by feudal societal structures to today’s urbanized landscapes with intensive agriculture, has been intensively studied. This approach in some cases suffers from...... or to the commercial photo series from the last 20 years. This poster outlines a new research project focusing on the potential of unexploited cartographic sources for detailed analysis of the dynamic of the Danish landscape between 1800 – 2000. The project draws on cartographic sources available in Danish archives...

  10. Coastal Vulnerability to Sea Level Rise and Erosion in Northwest Alaska (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorokhovich, Y.; Leiserowitz, A.

    2009-12-01

    Northwest Alaska is experiencing significant climate change and human impacts. The study area includes the coastal zone of Kotzebue Sound and the Chukchi Sea and provides the local population (predominantly Inupiaq Eskimo) with critical subsistence resources of meat, fish, berries, herbs, and wood. The geomorphology of the coast includes barrier islands, inlets, estuaries, deltas, cliffs, bluffs, and beaches that host modern settlements and infrastructure. Coastal dynamics and sea-level rise are contributing to erosion, intermittent erosion/accretion patterns, landslides, slumps and coastal retreat. These factors are causing the sedimentation of deltas and lagoons, and changing local bathymetry, morphological parameters of beaches and underwater slopes, rates of coastal dynamics, and turbidity and nutrient cycling in coastal waters. This study is constructing vulnerability maps to help local people and federal officials understand the potential consequences of sea-level rise and coastal erosion on local infrastructure, subsistence resources, and culturally important sites. A lack of complete and uniform data (in terms of methods of collection, geographic scale and spatial resolution) creates an additional level of uncertainty that complicates geographic analysis. These difficulties were overcome by spatial modeling with selected spatial resolution using extrapolation methods. Data include subsistence resource maps obtained using Participatory GIS with local hunters and elders, geological and geographic data on coastal dynamics from satellite imagery, aerial photos, bathymetry and topographic maps, and digital elevation models. These data were classified and ranked according to the level of coastal vulnerability (Figure 1). The resulting qualitative multicriteria model helps to identify the coastal areas with the greatest vulnerability to coastal erosion and of the potential loss of subsistence resources. Acknowldgements: Dr. Ron Abileah (private consultant, j

  11. Coastal vulnerability assessment of Puducherry coast, India, using the analytical hierarchical process

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    ManiMurali, R.; Ankita, M.; Amrita, S.; Vethamony, P.

    of tourist areas) are considered to measure the physical vulnerability index (PVI) as well as the socio-economic vulnerability index (SVI) of the Puducherry coast. Based on the weights and scores derived using AHP, vulnerability maps are prepared to demarcate...

  12. Mapping of two-polarization-mode dynamics in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with optical injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatare, I; Sciamanna, M; Nizette, M; Thienpont, H; Panajotov, K

    2009-08-01

    We report theoretically on the interplay between polarization switching and bifurcations to nonlinear dynamics in a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) subject to orthogonal optical injection. Qualitatively different bifurcation scenarios leading to polarization switching are found and mapped out in the plane of the injection parameters, i.e., the frequency detuning vs injection strength plane. A Hopf bifurcation mechanism on the two-polarization-mode solution determines the injection-locking boundaries and influences polarization switching induced by optical injection. We furthermore report on a torus bifurcation emerging from a two-linearly polarized (LP) mode time-periodic dynamics before polarization switching and injection locking appear. It corresponds to an interesting combination of relaxation oscillation dynamics in the x -LP mode together with wave mixing dynamics in the injected y -LP mode. In agreement with recent experiments, we unveil a period-doubling route to chaos that involves both VCSEL orthogonal LP modes. The corresponding region of chaotic dynamics coincides with abrupt changes in the polarization switching boundaries in the plane of the injection parameters.

  13. Mapping between finite temperature classical and zero temperature quantum systems: Quantum critical jamming and quantum dynamical heterogeneities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nussinov, Zohar; Johnson, Patrick; Graf, Matthias J.; Balatsky, Alexander V.

    2013-05-01

    Many electronic systems (e.g., the cuprate superconductors and heavy fermions) exhibit striking features in their dynamical response over a prominent range of experimental parameters. While there are some empirical suggestions of particular increasing length scales that accompany such transitions in some cases, this identification is not universal and in numerous instances no large correlation length is evident. To better understand, as a matter of principle, such behavior in quantum systems, we extend a known mapping (earlier studied in stochastic or supersymmetric quantum mechanics) between finite temperature classical Fokker-Planck systems and related quantum systems at zero temperature to include general nonequilibrium dynamics. Unlike Feynman mappings or stochastic quantization methods in field theories (as well as more recent holographic type dualities), the classical systems that we consider and their quantum duals reside in the same number of space-time dimensions. The upshot of our very broad and rigorous result is that a Wick rotation exactly relates (i) the dynamics in general finite temperature classical dissipative systems to (ii) zero temperature dynamics in the corresponding dual many-body quantum systems. Using this correspondence, we illustrate that, even in the absence of imposed disorder, many continuum quantum fluid systems (and possible lattice counterparts) may exhibit a zero-point “quantum dynamical heterogeneity” wherein the dynamics, at a given instant, is spatially nonuniform. While the static length scales accompanying this phenomenon do not seem to exhibit a clear divergence in standard correlation functions, the length scale of the dynamical heterogeneities can increase dramatically. We further study “quantum jamming” and illustrate how a hard-core bosonic system can undergo a zero temperature quantum critical metal-to-insulator-type transition with an extremely large effective dynamical exponent z>4 that is consistent with

  14. An Integrated Approach for Urban Earthquake Vulnerability Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Düzgün, H. S.; Yücemen, M. S.; Kalaycioglu, H. S.

    2009-04-01

    -economical, structural, coastal, ground condition, organizational vulnerabilities, as well as accessibility to critical services within the framework. The proposed framework has the following eight components: Seismic hazard analysis, soil response analysis, tsunami inundation analysis, structural vulnerability analysis, socio-economic vulnerability analysis, accessibility to critical services, GIS-based integrated vulnerability assessment, and visualization of vulnerabilities in 3D virtual city model The integrated model for various vulnerabilities obtained for the urban area is developed in GIS environment by using individual vulnerability assessments for considered elements at risk and serve for establishing the backbone of the spatial decision support system. The stages followed in the model are: Determination of a common mapping unit for each aspect of urban earthquake vulnerability, formation of a geo-database for the vulnerabilities, evaluation of urban vulnerability based on multi attribute utility theory with various weighting algorithms, mapping of the evaluated integrated earthquake risk in geographic information systems (GIS) in the neighborhood scale. The framework is also applicable to larger geographical mapping scales, for example, the building scale. When illustrating the results in building scale, 3-D visualizations with remote sensing data is used so that decision-makers can easily interpret the outputs. The proposed vulnerability assessment framework is flexible and can easily be applied to urban environments at various geographical scales with different mapping units. The obtained total vulnerability maps for the urban area provide a baseline for the development of risk reduction strategies for the decision makers. Moreover, as several aspects of elements at risk for an urban area is considered through vulnerability analyses, effect on changes in vulnerability conditions on the total can easily be determined. The developed approach also enables decision makers to

  15. Mapping Urbanization Dynamics in Major Cities of Colombia, Ecuador, Perú, and Bolivia Using Night-Time Satellite Imagery

    OpenAIRE

    Parés-Ramos, Isabel K.; Nora L. Álvarez-Berríos; T. Mitchell. Aide

    2013-01-01

    By 2050, 90% of the population in Latin America will live in cities, but there is a lack of up-to-date spatial information about the urban extent and patterns of urbanization in cities of this region. In this study, we analyzed population growth, urban density and urbanization dynamics between 1992 and 2009 in the major cities of Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador and Perú using Google Earth and DMSP/OLS night-time lights imagery. We used Google Earth to map the urban extent, and time series of night...

  16. The use of error-category mapping in pharmacokinetic model analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Andrew B; Anandappa, Gayathri; Patterson, Andrew J; Priest, Andrew N; Graves, Martin J; Janowitz, Tobias; Jodrell, Duncan I; Eisen, Tim; Lomas, David J

    2015-02-01

    This study introduces the use of 'error-category mapping' in the interpretation of pharmacokinetic (PK) model parameter results derived from dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE-) MRI data. Eleven patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma were enrolled in a multiparametric study of the treatment effects of bevacizumab. For the purposes of the present analysis, DCE-MRI data from two identical pre-treatment examinations were analysed by application of the extended Tofts model (eTM), using in turn a model arterial input function (AIF), an individually-measured AIF and a sample-average AIF. PK model parameter maps were calculated. Errors in the signal-to-gadolinium concentration ([Gd]) conversion process and the model-fitting process itself were assigned to category codes on a voxel-by-voxel basis, thereby forming a colour-coded 'error-category map' for each imaged slice. These maps were found to be repeatable between patient visits and showed that the eTM converged adequately in the majority of voxels in all the tumours studied. However, the maps also clearly indicated sub-regions of low Gd uptake and of non-convergence of the model in nearly all tumours. The non-physical condition ve ≥ 1 was the most frequently indicated error category and appeared sensitive to the form of AIF used. This simple method for visualisation of errors in DCE-MRI could be used as a routine quality-control technique and also has the potential to reveal otherwise hidden patterns of failure in PK model applications.

  17. Concept Mapping: A Dynamic, Individualized and Qualitative Method for Eliciting Meaning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jessie; Mandich, Angie; Magalhães, Lilian

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this theoretical article is to explore the use of concept mapping as a qualitative research method that is represented as a form of multimodal communication. This framework strives to move mapping beyond quantitative analysis by inserting art and humanness into the process. This proposed framework provides a means to highlight the ways in which people learn, understand, and interpret the world around them. Three categories for understanding have been identified by the authors to help individuals create, interpret, and understand qualitative concept maps. These categories include the following: Voice: Tri-directional Voice and Mutual Absorption; Detail in the Parts & Recognition of the Whole: Uniqueness, Aesthetic Distance and Emplacement; and Sensory Experience: Intellectual + Emotional Investment and Humanness. Each of these categories is interconnected, and informs each other in a dialectical way, therefore creating a piece of visual data with which the participant, researcher and audience can interact.

  18. Urbanising Thailand: Implications for climate vulnerability assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Friend; C. Choosuk; K. Hutanuwatr; Y. Inmuong; J. Kittitornkool; B. Lambregts; B. Promphakping; T. Roachanakanan; P. Thiengburanathum; S. Siriwattanaphaiboon

    2016-01-01

    This report summarises a series of studies carried out by a multi-disciplinary team of Thai scholars. It focuses on the dynamics of urbanisation and climate change risks, and on the linkages between urbanisation, climate change and emerging patterns of urban poverty and vulnerability. It provides ne

  19. Structural vulnerability assessment of electric power grids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koç, Y.; Warnier, M.; Kooij, R.E.; Brazier, F.

    2014-01-01

    Cascading failures are the typical reasons of blackouts in power grids. The grid topology plays an important role in determining the dynamics of cascading failures in power grids. Measures for vulnerability analysis are crucial to assure a higher level of robustness of power grids. Metrics from Comp

  20. Urbanising Thailand: Implications for climate vulnerability assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friend, R.; Choosuk, C.; Hutanuwatr, K.; Inmuong, Y.; Kittitornkool, J.; Lambregts, B.; Promphakping, B.; Roachanakanan, T.; Thiengburanathum, P.; Siriwattanaphaiboon, S.

    2016-01-01

    This report summarises a series of studies carried out by a multi-disciplinary team of Thai scholars. It focuses on the dynamics of urbanisation and climate change risks, and on the linkages between urbanisation, climate change and emerging patterns of urban poverty and vulnerability. It provides

  1. In-Situ Chemical Dynamics and Phase Mapping Under Steep Thermal Gradients Using Time-Resolved and Spatially Resolved X-Ray Diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, J.; Larson, E.M.; Holt, J.B.; Ressler, T.; Elmer, J.W.

    1999-09-17

    Time-resolved and spatially-resolved diffraction techniques have been developed recently to perform materials dynamics study in-situ extending into the time and spatial domain in high temperature processes. The applications of these methods to investigate the chemical dynamics of solid combustion reactions and to map phases and their transformation in fusion welds are exemplified in this paper.

  2. Vulnerability of Forests in India: A National Scale Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Jagmohan; Upgupta, Sujata; Jayaraman, Mathangi; Chaturvedi, Rajiv Kumar; Bala, Govindswamy; Ravindranath, N. H.

    2017-09-01

    Forests are subjected to stress from climatic and non-climatic sources. In this study, we have reported the results of inherent, as well as climate change driven vulnerability assessments for Indian forests. To assess inherent vulnerability of forests under current climate, we have used four indicators, namely biological richness, disturbance index, canopy cover, and slope. The assessment is presented as spatial profile of inherent vulnerability in low, medium, high and very high vulnerability classes. Fourty percent forest grid points in India show high or very high inherent vulnerability. Plantation forests show higher inherent vulnerability than natural forests. We assess the climate change driven vulnerability by combining the results of inherent vulnerability assessment with the climate change impact projections simulated by the Integrated Biosphere Simulator dynamic global vegetation model. While 46% forest grid points show high, very high, or extremely high vulnerability under future climate in the short term (2030s) under both representative concentration pathways 4.5 and 8.5, such grid points are 49 and 54%, respectively, in the long term (2080s). Generally, forests in the higher rainfall zones show lower vulnerability as compared to drier forests under future climate. Minimizing anthropogenic disturbance and conserving biodiversity can potentially reduce forest vulnerability under climate change. For disturbed forests and plantations, adaptive management aimed at forest restoration is necessary to build long-term resilience.

  3. Facility Environmental Vulnerability Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Hoesen, S.D.

    2001-07-09

    From mid-April through the end of June 2001, a Facility Environmental Vulnerability Assessment (FEVA) was performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The primary goal of this FEVA was to establish an environmental vulnerability baseline at ORNL that could be used to support the Laboratory planning process and place environmental vulnerabilities in perspective. The information developed during the FEVA was intended to provide the basis for management to initiate immediate, near-term, and long-term actions to respond to the identified vulnerabilities. It was expected that further evaluation of the vulnerabilities identified during the FEVA could be carried out to support a more quantitative characterization of the sources, evaluation of contaminant pathways, and definition of risks. The FEVA was modeled after the Battelle-supported response to the problems identified at the High Flux Beam Reactor at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This FEVA report satisfies Corrective Action 3A1 contained in the Corrective Action Plan in Response to Independent Review of the High Flux Isotope Reactor Tritium Leak at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, submitted to the Department of Energy (DOE) ORNL Site Office Manager on April 16, 2001. This assessment successfully achieved its primary goal as defined by Laboratory management. The assessment team was able to develop information about sources and pathway analyses although the following factors impacted the team's ability to provide additional quantitative information: the complexity and scope of the facilities, infrastructure, and programs; the significantly degraded physical condition of the facilities and infrastructure; the large number of known environmental vulnerabilities; the scope of legacy contamination issues [not currently addressed in the Environmental Management (EM) Program]; the lack of facility process and environmental pathway analysis performed by the accountable line management or facility owner; and

  4. Dynamics of delayed-coupled chaotic logistic maps: Influence of network topology, connectivity and delay times

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arturo C Martí; Marcelo Ponce; Cristina Masoller

    2008-06-01

    We review our recent work on the synchronization of a network of delay-coupled maps, focusing on the interplay of the network topology and the delay times that take into account the finite velocity of propagation of interactions. We assume that the elements of the network are identical ( logistic maps in the regime where the individual maps, without coupling, evolve in a chaotic orbit) and that the coupling strengths are uniform throughout the network. We show that if the delay times are su±ciently heterogeneous, for adequate coupling strength the network synchronizes in a spatially homogeneous steady state, which is unstable for the individual maps without coupling. This synchronization behavior is referred to as `suppression of chaos by random delays' and is in contrast with the synchronization when all the interaction delay times are homogeneous, because with homogeneous delays the network synchronizes in a state where the elements display in-phase time-periodic or chaotic oscillations. We analyze the influence of the network topology considering four different types of networks: two regular (a ring-type and a ring-type with a central node) and two random (free-scale Barabasi-Albert and small-world Newman-Watts). We find that when the delay times are sufficiently heterogeneous the synchronization behavior is largely independent of the network topology but depends on the network's connectivity, i.e., on the average number of neighbors per node.

  5. The Path Planning of AUV Based on D-S Information Fusion Map Building and Bio-inspired Neural Network in Unknown Dynamic Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daqi Zhu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a biologically inspired neural dynamics and map planning based approach are simultaneously proposed for AUV (Autonomous Underwater Vehicle path planning and obstacle avoidance in an unknown dynamic environment. Firstly the readings of an ultrasonic sensor are fused into the map using the D-S (Dempster-Shafer inference rule and a two-dimensional occupancy grid map is built. Secondly the dynamics of each neuron in the topologically organized neural network is characterized by a shunting equation. The AUV path is autonomously generated from the dynamic activity landscape of the neural network and previous AUV location. Finally, simulation results show high quality path optimization and obstacle avoidance behaviour for the AUV.

  6. The Path Planning of AUV Based on D-S Information Fusion Map Building and Bio-Inspired Neural Network in Unknown Dynamic Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daqi Zhu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a biologically inspired neural dynamics and map planning based approach are simultaneously proposed for AUV (Autonomous Underwater Vehicle path planning and obstacle avoidance in an unknown dynamic environment. Firstly the readings of an ultrasonic sensor are fused into the map using the D-S (Dempster-Shafer inference rule and a two-dimensional occupancy grid map is built. Secondly the dynamics of each neuron in the topologically organized neural network is characterized by a shunting equation. The AUV path is autonomously generated from the dynamic activity landscape of the neural network and previous AUV location. Finally, simulation results show high quality path optimization and obstacle avoidance behaviour for the AUV.

  7. Mapping the dynamics of brain perfusion using functional ultrasound in a rat model of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Clément; Isabel, Clothilde; Martin, Abraham; Dussaux, Clara; Savoye, Anne; Emmrich, Julius; Montaldo, Gabriel; Mas, Jean-Louis; Baron, Jean-Claude; Urban, Alan

    2017-01-01

    Following middle cerebral artery occlusion, tissue outcome ranges from normal to infarcted depending on depth and duration of hypoperfusion as well as occurrence and efficiency of reperfusion. However, the precise time course of these changes in relation to tissue and behavioral outcome remains unsettled. To address these issues, a three-dimensional wide field-of-view and real-time quantitative functional imaging technique able to map perfusion in the rodent brain would be desirable. Here, we applied functional ultrasound imaging, a novel approach to map relative cerebral blood volume without contrast agent, in a rat model of brief proximal transient middle cerebral artery occlusion to assess perfusion in penetrating arterioles and venules acutely and over six days thanks to a thinned-skull preparation. Functional ultrasound imaging efficiently mapped the acute changes in relative cerebral blood volume during occlusion and following reperfusion with high spatial resolution (100 µm), notably documenting marked focal decreases during occlusion, and was able to chart the fine dynamics of tissue reperfusion (rate: one frame/5 s) in the individual rat. No behavioral and only mild post-mortem immunofluorescence changes were observed. Our study suggests functional ultrasound is a particularly well-adapted imaging technique to study cerebral perfusion in acute experimental stroke longitudinally from the hyper-acute up to the chronic stage in the same subject.

  8. Selection and quality assessment of Landsat data for the North American forest dynamics forest history maps of the US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleeweis, Karen; Goward, Samuel N.; Huang, Chengquan; Dwyer, John L.; Dungan, Jennifer L.; Lindsey, Mary A.; Michaelis, Andrew; Rishmawi, Khaldoun; Masek, Jeffery G.

    2016-01-01

    Using the NASA Earth Exchange platform, the North American Forest Dynamics (NAFD) project mapped forest history wall-to-wall, annually for the contiguous US (1986–2010) using the Vegetation Change Tracker algorithm. As with any effort to identify real changes in remotely sensed time-series, data gaps, shifts in seasonality, misregistration, inconsistent radiometry and cloud contamination can be sources of error. We discuss the NAFD image selection and processing stream (NISPS) that was designed to minimize these sources of error. The NISPS image quality assessments highlighted issues with the Landsat archive and metadata including inadequate georegistration, unreliability of the pre-2009 L5 cloud cover assessments algorithm, missing growing-season imagery and paucity of clear views. Assessment maps of Landsat 5–7 image quantities and qualities are presented that offer novel perspectives on the growing-season archive considered for this study. Over 150,000+ Landsat images were considered for the NAFD project. Optimally, one high quality cloud-free image in each year or a total of 12,152 images would be used. However, to accommodate data gaps and cloud/shadow contamination 23,338 images were needed. In 220 specific path-row image years no acceptable images were found resulting in data gaps in the annual national map products.

  9. Texture analysis on parametric maps derived from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in head and neck cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jacobus FA Jansen; Yonggang Lu; Gaorav Gupta; Nancy Y Lee; Hilda E Stambuk; Yousef Mazaheri; Joseph O Deasy; Amita Shukla-Dave

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the merits of texture analysis on parametric maps derived from pharmacokinetic modeling with dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging(DCE-MRI) as imaging biomarkers for the prediction of treatment response in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma(HNSCC). METHODS: In this retrospective study,19 HNSCC patients underwent pre- and intra-treatment DCEMRI scans at a 1.5T MRI scanner. All patients had chemo-radiation treatment. Pharmacokinetic modeling was performed on the acquired DCE-MRI images,generating maps of volume transfer rate(Ktrans) and volume fraction of the extravascular extracellular space(ve). Image texture analysis was then employed on maps of Ktrans and ve,generating two texture measures: Energy(E) and homogeneity.RESULTS: No significant changes were found for the mean and standard deviation for Ktrans and ve between pre- and intra-treatment(P > 0.09). Texture analysis revealed that the imaging biomarker E of ve was significantly higher in intra-treatment scans,relative to pretreatment scans(P < 0.04). CONCLUSION: Chemo-radiation treatment in HNSCC significantly reduces the heterogeneity of tumors.

  10. MDcons: Intermolecular contact maps as a tool to analyze the interface of protein complexes from molecular dynamics trajectories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Azeim, Safwat; Chermak, Edrisse; Vangone, Anna; Oliva, Romina; Cavallo, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations of protein complexes suffer from the lack of specific tools in the analysis step. Analyses of MD trajectories of protein complexes indeed generally rely on classical measures, such as the RMSD, RMSF and gyration radius, conceived and developed for single macromolecules. As a matter of fact, instead, researchers engaged in simulating the dynamics of a protein complex are mainly interested in characterizing the conservation/variation of its biological interface. On these bases, herein we propose a novel approach to the analysis of MD trajectories or other conformational ensembles of protein complexes, MDcons, which uses the conservation of inter-residue contacts at the interface as a measure of the similarity between different snapshots. A "consensus contact map" is also provided, where the conservation of the different contacts is drawn in a grey scale. Finally, the interface area of the complex is monitored during the simulations. To show its utility, we used this novel approach to study two protein-protein complexes with interfaces of comparable size and both dominated by hydrophilic interactions, but having binding affinities at the extremes of the experimental range. MDcons is demonstrated to be extremely useful to analyse the MD trajectories of the investigated complexes, adding important insight into the dynamic behavior of their biological interface. MDcons specifically allows the user to highlight and characterize the dynamics of the interface in protein complexes and can thus be used as a complementary tool for the analysis of MD simulations of both experimental and predicted structures of protein complexes.

  11. Landslide vulnerability criteria: a case study from Umbria, central Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, Mirco; Guzzetti, Fausto

    2007-10-01

    Little is known about the vulnerability to landslides, despite landslides causing frequent and widespread damage to the population and the built-up environment in many areas of the world. Lack of information about vulnerability to landslides limits our ability to determine landslide risk. This paper provides information on the vulnerability of buildings and roads to landslides in Umbria, central Italy. Information on 103 landslides of the slide and slide-earth flow types that have resulted in damage to buildings and roads at 90 sites in Umbria is used to establish dependencies between the area of the landslide and the vulnerability to landslides. The dependencies obtained are applied in the hills surrounding the town of Collazzone, in central Umbria, an area for which a detailed landslide inventory map is available. By exploiting the landslide inventory and the established vulnerability curves, the geographical distribution of the vulnerability to landslides is mapped and statistics of the expected damage are calculated. Reliability and limits of the vulnerability thresholds and of the obtained vulnerability assessment are discussed.

  12. Investigation on Vulnerability of Tabriz-plain Unconfined Aquifer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Tabarmayeh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available It is more expensive to remove pollution from groundwater than to prevent it. Delineation areas that arevulnerable to surface pollutants is one of methods to prevent pollution of groundwater resources. Focusing on this issue, DRASTIC model was used for evaluation of vulnerability of Tabriz-plain aquifer to pollution and the aquifer vulnerability map was prepared. The study shows that main zone of the aquifer’s groundwater is low to modrate vulnerability to pollution (DRASTIC Index of 120-40 that consist of about 55.84% and areas with low, moderate to high, and high risk zones comprise 21.81,22.08.% and 0.26% of the studied area, respectively Two tests of sensitivity analyses were carried out: the map removal and the single-parameter sensitivity analyses. Based on the characteristics of the studied area, the results from both map removal and single-parameter sensitivity analyses showed that the depth to water table has the most significant impact on the vulnerability risk zone. By overlaying of the vulnerability and landuse maps the areas where are subjected to potential release of pollutants from the agricultural activities were determined .Nitrate ion concentration and SINTACS model confirms the results of the vulnerability assessment.

  13. A molecular dynamics approach to receptor mapping: application to the 5HT3 and beta 2-adrenergic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouldson, P R; Winn, P J; Reynolds, C A

    1995-09-29

    A molecular dynamics-based approach to receptor mapping is proposed, based on the method of Rizzi (Rizzi, J. P.; et al. J. Med. Chem. 1990, 33, 2721). In Rizzi's method, the interaction energy between a series of drug molecules and probe atoms (which mimic functional groups on the receptor, such as hydrogen bond donors) was calculated. These interactions were calculated on a three-dimensional grid within a molecular mechanics parameters, were placed at these minima. The distances between the dummy atom sites were monitored during molecular dynamics simulations and plotted as distance distribution functions. Important distances within the receptor became apparent, as drugs with a common mode of binding share similar peaks in the distance distribution functions. In the case of specific 5HT3 ligands, the important donor--acceptor distance within the receptor has a range of ca. 7.9--8.9 A. In the case of specific beta 2-adrenergic ligands, the important donor--acceptor distances within the receptor lie between ca. 7--9 A and between 8 and 10 A. These distances distribution functions were used to assess three different models of the beta 2-adrenergic G-protein-coupled receptor. The comparison of the distance distribution functions for the simulation with the actual donor--acceptor distances in the receptor models suggested that two of the three receptor models were much more consistent with the receptor-mapping studies. These receptor-mapping studies gave support for the use of rhodopsin, rather than the bacteriorhodopsin template, for modeling G-protein-coupled receptors but also sounded a warning that agreement with binding data from site-directed mutagenesis experiments does not necessarily validate a receptor model.

  14. Energy vulnerability relationships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, B.R.; Boesen, J.L.

    1998-02-01

    The US consumption of crude oil resources has been a steadily growing indicator of the vitality and strength of the US economy. At the same time import diversity has also been a rapidly developing dimension of the import picture. In the early 1970`s, embargoes of crude oil from Organization of Producing and Exporting Countries (OPEC) created economic and political havoc due to a significant lack of diversity and a unique set of economic, political and domestic regulatory circumstances. The continued rise of imports has again led to concerns over the security of our crude oil resource but threats to this system must be considered in light of the diversity and current setting of imported oil. This report develops several important issues concerning vulnerability to the disruption of oil imports: (1) The Middle East is not the major supplier of oil to the United States, (2) The US is not vulnerable to having its entire import stream disrupted, (3) Even in stable countries, there exist vulnerabilities to disruption of the export stream of oil, (4) Vulnerability reduction requires a focus on international solutions, and (5) DOE program and policy development must reflect the requirements of the diverse supply. Does this increasing proportion of imported oil create a {open_quotes}dependence{close_quotes}? Does this increasing proportion of imported oil present a vulnerability to {open_quotes}price shocks{close_quotes} and the tremendous dislocations experienced during the 1970`s? Finally, what is the vulnerability of supply disruptions from the current sources of imported oil? If oil is considered to be a finite, rapidly depleting resource, then the answers to these questions must be {open_quotes}yes.{close_quotes} However, if the supply of oil is expanding, and not limited, then dependence is relative to regional supply sources.

  15. Plutonium Vulnerability Management Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-03-01

    This Plutonium Vulnerability Management Plan describes the Department of Energy`s response to the vulnerabilities identified in the Plutonium Working Group Report which are a result of the cessation of nuclear weapons production. The responses contained in this document are only part of an overall, coordinated approach designed to enable the Department to accelerate conversion of all nuclear materials, including plutonium, to forms suitable for safe, interim storage. The overall actions being taken are discussed in detail in the Department`s Implementation Plan in response to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 94-1. This is included as Attachment B.

  16. Nonlinear Maps for Design of Discrete-Time Models of Neuronal Network Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-31

    responsive tiring patterns . We propose to use modern DSP ideas to develop new efficient approaches to the design of such discrete-time models for...2016 Performance/Technic~ 03-01-2016- 03-31-2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Sa. CONTRACT NUMBER Nonlinear Maps for Design of Discrete-Time Models of...simulations is to design a neuronal model in the form of difference equations that generates neuronal states in discrete moments of time. In this

  17. Doppler Spectrometry for Ultrafast Temporal Mapping of Density Dynamics in Laser-Induced Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, S.; Lad, Amit D.; Ahmed, Saima; Narayanan, V.; Pasley, J.; Rajeev, P. P.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Kumar, G. Ravindra

    2010-09-01

    We present high resolution measurements of the ultrafast temporal dynamics of the critical surface in moderately overdense, hot plasma by using two-color, pump-probe Doppler spectrometry. Our measurements clearly capture the initial inward motion of the plasma inside the critical surface of the pump laser which is followed by outward expansion. The measured instantaneous velocity and acceleration profiles are very well reproduced by a hybrid simulation that uses a 1D electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulation for the initial evolution and a hydrodynamics simulation for the later times. The combination of high temporal resolution and dynamic range in our measurements clearly provides quantitative unraveling of the dynamics in this important region, enabling this as a powerful technique to obtain ultrafast snapshots of plasma density and temperature profiles for providing benchmarks for simulations.

  18. Participatory Maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salovaara-Moring, Inka

    2016-01-01

    practice. In particular, mapping environmental damage, endangered species, and human-made disasters has become one focal point for environmental knowledge production. This type of digital map has been highlighted as a processual turn in critical cartography, whereas in related computational journalism...... of a geo-visualization within information mapping that enhances embodiment in the experience of the information. InfoAmazonia is defined as a digitally created map-space within which journalistic practice can be seen as dynamic, performative interactions between journalists, ecosystems, space, and species...

  19. Functional lung MRI in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: comparison of T1 mapping, oxygen-enhanced T1 mapping and dynamic contrast enhanced perfusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertram J Jobst

    Full Text Available Monitoring of regional lung function in interventional COPD trials requires alternative endpoints beyond global parameters such as FEV1. T1 relaxation times of the lung might allow to draw conclusions on tissue composition, blood volume and oxygen fraction. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential value of lung Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI with native and oxygen-enhanced T1 mapping for the assessment of COPD patients in comparison with contrast enhanced perfusion MRI.20 COPD patients (GOLD I-IV underwent a coronal 2-dimensional inversion recovery snapshot flash sequence (8 slices/lung at room air and during inhalation of pure oxygen, as well as dynamic contrast-enhanced first-pass perfusion imaging. Regional distribution of T1 at room air (T1, oxygen-induced T1 shortening (ΔT1 and peak enhancement were rated by 2 chest radiologists in consensus using a semi-quantitative 3-point scale in a zone-based approach.Abnormal T1 and ΔT1 were highly prevalent in the patient cohort. T1 and ΔT1 correlated positively with perfusion abnormalities (r = 0.81 and r = 0.80; p&0.001, and with each other (r = 0.80; p<0.001. In GOLD stages I and II ΔT1 was normal in 16/29 lung zones with mildly abnormal perfusion (15/16 with abnormal T1. The extent of T1 (r = 0.45; p<0.05, ΔT1 (r = 0.52; p<0.05 and perfusion abnormalities (r = 0.52; p<0.05 showed a moderate correlation with GOLD stage.Native and oxygen-enhanced T1 mapping correlated with lung perfusion deficits and severity of COPD. Under the assumption that T1 at room air correlates with the regional pulmonary blood pool and that oxygen-enhanced T1 reflects lung ventilation, both techniques in combination are principally suitable to characterize ventilation-perfusion imbalance. This appears valuable for the assessment of regional lung characteristics in COPD trials without administration of i.v. contrast.

  20. A Secure Dynamic Identity and Chaotic Maps Based User Authentication and Key Agreement Scheme for e-Healthcare Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chun-Ta; Lee, Cheng-Chi; Weng, Chi-Yao; Chen, Song-Jhih

    2016-11-01

    Secure user authentication schemes in many e-Healthcare applications try to prevent unauthorized users from intruding the e-Healthcare systems and a remote user and a medical server can establish session keys for securing the subsequent communications. However, many schemes does not mask the users' identity information while constructing a login session between two or more parties, even though personal privacy of users is a significant topic for e-Healthcare systems. In order to preserve personal privacy of users, dynamic identity based authentication schemes are hiding user's real identity during the process of network communications and only the medical server knows login user's identity. In addition, most of the existing dynamic identity based authentication schemes ignore the inputs verification during login condition and this flaw may subject to inefficiency in the case of incorrect inputs in the login phase. Regarding the use of secure authentication mechanisms for e-Healthcare systems, this paper presents a new dynamic identity and chaotic maps based authentication scheme and a secure data protection approach is employed in every session to prevent illegal intrusions. The proposed scheme can not only quickly detect incorrect inputs during the phases of login and password change but also can invalidate the future use of a lost/stolen smart card. Compared the functionality and efficiency with other authentication schemes recently, the proposed scheme satisfies desirable security attributes and maintains acceptable efficiency in terms of the computational overheads for e-Healthcare systems.