WorldWideScience

Sample records for dynamic tomographic imaging

  1. A digital-signal-processor-based optical tomographic system for dynamic imaging of joint diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasker, Joseph M.

    Over the last decade, optical tomography (OT) has emerged as viable biomedical imaging modality. Various imaging systems have been developed that are employed in preclinical as well as clinical studies, mostly targeting breast imaging, brain imaging, and cancer related studies. Of particular interest are so-called dynamic imaging studies where one attempts to image changes in optical properties and/or physiological parameters as they occur during a system perturbation. To successfully perform dynamic imaging studies, great effort is put towards system development that offers increasingly enhanced signal-to-noise performance at ever shorter data acquisition times, thus capturing high fidelity tomographic data within narrower time periods. Towards this goal, I have developed in this thesis a dynamic optical tomography system that is, unlike currently available analog instrumentation, based on digital data acquisition and filtering techniques. At the core of this instrument is a digital signal processor (DSP) that collects, collates, and processes the digitized data set. Complementary protocols between the DSP and a complex programmable logic device synchronizes the sampling process and organizes data flow. Instrument control is implemented through a comprehensive graphical user interface which integrates automated calibration, data acquisition, and signal post-processing. Real-time data is generated at frame rates as high as 140 Hz. An extensive dynamic range (˜190 dB) accommodates a wide scope of measurement geometries and tissue types. Performance analysis demonstrates very low system noise (˜1 pW rms noise equivalent power), excellent signal precision (˜0.04%--0.2%) and long term system stability (˜1% over 40 min). Experiments on tissue phantoms validate spatial and temporal accuracy of the system. As a potential new application of dynamic optical imaging I present the first application of this method to use vascular hemodynamics as a means of characterizing

  2. Image derived input functions for dynamic High Resolution Research Tomograph PET brain studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourik, Jurgen E M; van Velden, Floris H P; Lubberink, Mark; Kloet, Reina W; van Berckel, Bart N M; Lammertsma, Adriaan A; Boellaard, Ronald

    2008-12-01

    The High Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT) is a dedicated human brain positron emission tomography (PET) scanner. The aim of the present study was to validate the use of image derived input functions (IDIF) as an alternative for arterial sampling for HRRT human brain studies. To this end, IDIFs were extracted from 3D ordinary Poisson ordered subsets expectation maximization (OP-OSEM) and reconstruction based partial volume corrected (PVC) OP-OSEM images. IDIFs, either derived directly from regions of interest or further calibrated using manual samples taken during scans, were evaluated for dynamic [(11)C]flumazenil data (n=6). Results obtained with IDIFs were compared with those obtained using blood sampler input functions (BSIF). These comparisons included areas under the curve (AUC) for peak (0-3.3 min) and tail (3.3-55.0 min). In addition, slope, intercept and Pearson's correlation coefficient of tracer kinetic analysis results based on IDIF and BSIF were calculated for each subject. Good peak AUC ratios (0.83+/-0.21) between IDIF and BSIF were found for calibrated IDIFs extracted from OP-OSEM images. This combination of IDIFs and images also provided good slope values (1.07+/-0.11). Improved resolution, as obtained with PVC OP-OSEM, changed AUC ratios to 1.14+/-0.35 and, for tracer kinetic analysis, slopes changed to 0.95+/-0.13. For all reconstructions, non-calibrated IDIFs gave poorer results (>61+/-34% higher slopes) compared with calibrated IDIFs. The results of this study indicate that the use of IDIFs, extracted from OP-OSEM or PVC OP-OSEM images, is feasible for dynamic HRRT data, thereby obviating the need for online arterial sampling.

  3. Tomographic Neutron Imaging using SIRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregor, Jens [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); FINNEY, Charles E A [ORNL; Toops, Todd J [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Neutron imaging is complementary to x-ray imaging in that materials such as water and plastic are highly attenuating while material such as metal is nearly transparent. We showcase tomographic imaging of a diesel particulate filter. Reconstruction is done using a modified version of SIRT called PSIRT. We expand on previous work and introduce Tikhonov regularization. We show that near-optimal relaxation can still be achieved. The algorithmic ideas apply to cone beam x-ray CT and other inverse problems.

  4. Tomographic imaging with polarized light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soloviev, Vadim Y; Zacharakis, Giannis; Spiliopoulos, George; Favicchio, Rosy; Correia, Teresa; Arridge, Simon R; Ripoll, Jorge

    2012-06-01

    We report three-dimensional tomographic reconstruction of optical parameters for the mesoscopic light scattering regime from experimentally obtained datasets by using polarized light. We present a numerically inexpensive approximation to the radiative transfer equation governing the polarized light transport. This approximation is employed in the reconstruction algorithm, which computes two optical parameters by using parallel and perpendicular polarizations of transmitted light. Datasets were obtained by imaging a scattering phantom embedding highly absorbing inclusions. Reconstruction results are presented and discussed.

  5. Caveats on tomographic images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foulger, Gillian R.; Panza, Giuliano F.; Artemieva, Irina

    2013-01-01

    Geological and geodynamic models of the mantle often rely on joint interpretations of published seismic tomography images and petrological/geochemical data. This approach tends to neglect the fundamental limitations of, and uncertainties in, seismic tomography results. These limitations and uncer......Geological and geodynamic models of the mantle often rely on joint interpretations of published seismic tomography images and petrological/geochemical data. This approach tends to neglect the fundamental limitations of, and uncertainties in, seismic tomography results. These limitations...

  6. Caveats on tomographic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulger, Gillian R.; Panza, Giuliano F.; Artemieva, Irina M.; Bastow, Ian D.; Cammarano, Fabio; Evans, John R.; Hamilton, Warren B.; Julian, Bruce R.; Lustrino, Michele; Thybo, Hans; ,

    2013-01-01

    Geological and geodynamic models of the mantle often rely on joint interpretations of published seismic tomography images and petrological/geochemical data. This approach tends to neglect the fundamental limitations of, and uncertainties in, seismic tomography results. These limitations and uncertainties involve theory, correcting for the crust, the lack of rays throughout much of the mantle, the difficulty in obtaining the true strength of anomalies, choice of what background model to subtract to reveal anomalies, and what cross-sections to select for publication. The aim of this review is to provide a relatively non-technical summary of the most important of these problems, collected together in a single paper, and presented in a form accessible to non-seismologists. Appreciation of these issues is essential if final geodynamic models are to be robust, and required by the scientific observations.

  7. Tomographic image reconstruction using training images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soltani, Sara; Andersen, Martin Skovgaard; Hansen, Per Christian

    2017-01-01

    the framework of sparse learning as a regularized non-negative matrix factorization. Incorporating the dictionary as a prior in a convex reconstruction problem, we then find an approximate solution with a sparse representation in the dictionary. The dictionary is applied to non-overlapping patches of the image......We describe and examine an algorithm for tomographic image reconstruction where prior knowledge about the solution is available in the form of training images. We first construct a non-negative dictionary based on prototype elements from the training images; this problem is formulated within...

  8. Tomographic image reconstruction from continuous projections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cant, J.; Palenstijn, W.J.; Behiels, G.; Sijbers, J.

    2014-01-01

    An important design aspect in tomographic image reconstruction is the choice between a step-and-shoot protocol versus continuous X-ray tube movement for image acquisition. A step-and-shoot protocol implies a perfectly still tube during X-ray exposure, and hence involves moving the tube to its next p

  9. Terahertz wave tomographic imaging with a Fresnel lens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S. Wang; X.-C. Zhang

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrate three-dimensional tomographic imaging using a Fresnel lens with broadband terahertz pulses. Objects at various locations along the beam propagation path are uniquely imaged on the same imaging plane using a Fresnel lens with different frequencies of the imaging beam. This procedure allows the reconstruction of an object's tomographic contrast image by assembling the frequency-dependent images.

  10. Total Variation and Tomographic Imaging from Projections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Per Christian; Jørgensen, Jakob Heide

    2011-01-01

    Total Variation (TV) regularization is a powerful technique for image reconstruction tasks such as denoising, in-painting, and deblurring, because of its ability to produce sharp edges in the images. In this talk we discuss the use of TV regularization for tomographic imaging, where we compute a 2D...... incorporates our prior information about the solution and thus compensates for the loss of accuracy in the data. A consequence is that smaller data acquisition times can be used, thus reducing a patients exposure to X-rays in medical scanning and speeding up non-destructive measurements in materials science....

  11. Tomographic image of the proton

    CERN Document Server

    Dupre, Raphael; Vanderhaeghen, Marc

    2016-01-01

    We determine, based on the latest experimental Deep Virtual Compton Scattering experimental data, the dependence of the spatial size of the proton on the quark's longitudinal momentum. This results in a three-dimensional momentum-space image and tomography of the proton.

  12. Industrial dynamic tomographic reconstruction; Reconstrucao tomografica dinamica industrial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Eric Ferreira de

    2016-07-01

    The state of the art methods applied to industrial processes is currently based on the principles of classical tomographic reconstructions developed for tomographic patterns of static distributions, or is limited to cases of low variability of the density distribution function of the tomographed object. Noise and motion artifacts are the main problems caused by a mismatch in the data from views acquired in different instants. All of these add to the known fact that using a limited amount of data can result in the presence of noise, artifacts and some inconsistencies with the distribution under study. One of the objectives of the present work is to discuss the difficulties that arise from implementing reconstruction algorithms in dynamic tomography that were originally developed for static distributions. Another objective is to propose solutions that aim at reducing a temporal type of information loss caused by employing regular acquisition systems to dynamic processes. With respect to dynamic image reconstruction it was conducted a comparison between different static reconstruction methods, like MART and FBP, when used for dynamic scenarios. This comparison was based on a MCNPx simulation as well as an analytical setup of an aluminum cylinder that moves along the section of a riser during the process of acquisition, and also based on cross section images from CFD techniques. As for the adaptation of current tomographic acquisition systems for dynamic processes, this work established a sequence of tomographic views in a just-in-time fashion for visualization purposes, a form of visually disposing density information as soon as it becomes amenable to image reconstruction. A third contribution was to take advantage of the triple color channel necessary to display colored images in most displays, so that, by appropriately scaling the acquired values of each view in the linear system of the reconstruction, it was possible to imprint a temporal trace into the regularly

  13. Low-dose computed tomographic imaging in orbital trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, A.; Whitehouse, R.W. (Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology)

    1993-08-01

    The authors review findings in 75 computed tomographic (CT) examinations of 66 patients with orbital trauma who were imaged using a low-radiation-dose CT technique. Imaging was performed using a dynamic scan mode and exposure factors of 120 kVp and 80 mAs resulting in a skin dose of 11 mGy with an effective dose-equivalent of 0.22 mSv. Image quality was diagnostic in all cases and excellent in 73 examinations. Soft-tissue abnormalities within the orbit including muscle adhesions were well demonstrated both on primary axial and reconstructed multiplanar images. The benefits of multiplanar reconstructions are stressed and the contribution of soft-tissue injuries to symptomatic diplopia examined. (author).

  14. Advances in Time-Resolved Tomographic Particle Image Velocimetry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lynch, K.P.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis details advanced developments in 3-D particle image velocimetry (PIV) based on the tomographic PIV technique, with an emphasis on time-resolved experiments. Tomographic PIV is a technique introduced in 2006 to measure the flow velocity in a three-dimensional volume. When measurements are

  15. Tomographic Particle Image Velocimetry Using Colored Shadow Imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Alarfaj, Meshal K.

    2016-02-01

    Tomographic Particle Image Velocimetry Using Colored Shadow Imaging by Meshal K Alarfaj, Master of Science King Abdullah University of Science & Technology, 2015 Tomographic Particle image velocimetry (PIV) is a recent PIV method capable of reconstructing the full 3D velocity field of complex flows, within a 3-D volume. For nearly the last decade, it has become the most powerful tool for study of turbulent velocity fields and promises great advancements in the study of fluid mechanics. Among the early published studies, a good number of researches have suggested enhancements and optimizations of different aspects of this technique to improve the effectiveness. One major aspect, which is the core of the present work, is related to reducing the cost of the Tomographic PIV setup. In this thesis, we attempt to reduce this cost by using an experimental setup exploiting 4 commercial digital still cameras in combination with low-cost Light emitting diodes (LEDs). We use two different colors to distinguish the two light pulses. By using colored shadows with red and green LEDs, we can identify the particle locations within the measurement volume, at the two different times, thereby allowing calculation of the velocities. The present work tests this technique on the flows patterns of a jet ejected from a tube in a water tank. Results from the images processing are presented and challenges discussed.

  16. From tomographic images to fault heterogeneities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Amato

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available Local Earthquake Tomography (LET is a useful tool for imaging lateral heterogeneities in the upper crust. The pattern of P- and S-wave velocity anomalies, in relation to the seismicity distribution along active fault zones. can shed light on the existence of discrete seismogenic patches. Recent tomographic studies in well monitored seismic areas have shown that the regions with large seismic moment release generally correspond to high velocity zones (HVZ's. In this paper, we discuss the relationship between the seismogenic behavior of faults and the velocity structure of fault zones as inferred from seismic tomography. First, we review some recent tomographic studies in active strike-slip faults. We show examples from different segments of the San Andreas fault system (Parkfield, Loma Prieta, where detailed studies have been carried out in recent years. We also show two applications of LET to thrust faults (Coalinga, Friuli. Then, we focus on the Irpinia normal fault zone (South-Central Italy, where a Ms = 6.9 earthquake occurred in 1980 and many thousands of attershock travel time data are available. We find that earthquake hypocenters concentrate in HVZ's, whereas low velocity zones (LVZ’ s appear to be relatively aseismic. The main HVZ's along which the mainshock rupture bas propagated may correspond to velocity weakening fault regions, whereas the LVZ's are probably related to weak materials undergoing stable slip (velocity strengthening. A correlation exists between this HVZ and the area with larger coseismic slip along the fault, according to both surface evidence (a fault scarp as high as 1 m and strong ground motion waveform modeling. Smaller wave-length, low-velocity anomalies detected along the fault may be the expression of velocity strengthening sections, where aseismic slip occurs. According to our results, the rupture at the nucleation depth (~ 10-12 km is continuous for the whole fault lenoth (~ 30 km, whereas at shallow depth

  17. Correction of ring artifacts in X-ray tomographic images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyckegaard, Allan; Johnson, G.; Tafforeau, P.

    2011-01-01

    Ring artifacts are systematic intensity distortions located on concentric circles in reconstructed tomographic X-ray images. When using X-ray tomography to study for instance low-contrast grain boundaries in metals it is crucial to correct for the ring artifacts in the images as they may have...... the same intensity level as the grain boundaries and thus make it impossible to perform grain segmentation. This paper describes an implementation of a method for correcting the ring artifacts in tomographic X-ray images of simple objects such as metal samples where the object and the background...... are separable. The method is implemented in Matlab, it works with very little user interaction and may run in parallel on a cluster if applied to a whole stack of images. The strength and robustness of the method implemented will be demonstrated on three tomographic X-ray data sets: a mono-phase β...

  18. Generalized Row-Action Methods for Tomographic Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Martin Skovgaard; Hansen, Per Christian

    2014-01-01

    initial convergence which is desirable in applications where a low-accuracy solution is acceptable. In this paper, we propose relaxed variants of a class of incremental proximal gradient methods, and these variants generalize many existing row-action methods for tomographic imaging. Moreover, they allow......Row-action methods play an important role in tomographic image reconstruction. Many such methods can be viewed as incremental gradient methods for minimizing a sum of a large number of convex functions, and despite their relatively poor global rate of convergence, these methods often exhibit fast...... us to derive new incremental algorithms for tomographic imaging that incorporate different types of prior information via regularization. We demonstrate the efficacy of the approach with some numerical examples....

  19. Computer Aided Interpretation Approach for Optical Tomographic Images

    CERN Document Server

    Klose, Christian D; Netz, Uwe; Beuthan, Juergen; Hielscher, Andreas H

    2010-01-01

    A computer-aided interpretation approach is proposed to detect rheumatic arthritis (RA) of human finger joints in optical tomographic images. The image interpretation method employs a multi-variate signal detection analysis aided by a machine learning classification algorithm, called Self-Organizing Mapping (SOM). Unlike in previous studies, this allows for combining multiple physical image parameters, such as minimum and maximum values of the absorption coefficient for identifying affected and not affected joints. Classification performances obtained by the proposed method were evaluated in terms of sensitivity, specificity, Youden index, and mutual information. Different methods (i.e., clinical diagnostics, ultrasound imaging, magnet resonance imaging and inspection of optical tomographic images), were used as "ground truth"-benchmarks to determine the performance of image interpretations. Using data from 100 finger joints, findings suggest that some parameter combinations lead to higher sensitivities while...

  20. Terahertz Imaging for Biomedical Applications Pattern Recognition and Tomographic Reconstruction

    CERN Document Server

    Yin, Xiaoxia; Abbott, Derek

    2012-01-01

    Terahertz Imaging for Biomedical Applications: Pattern Recognition and Tomographic Reconstruction presents the necessary algorithms needed to assist screening, diagnosis, and treatment, and these algorithms will play a critical role in the accurate detection of abnormalities present in biomedical imaging. Terahertz biomedical imaging has become an area of interest due to its ability to simultaneously acquire both image and spectral information. Terahertz imaging systems are being commercialized with an increasing number of trials performed in a biomedical setting. Terahertz tomographic imaging and detection technology contributes to the ability to identify opaque objects with clear boundaries,and would be useful to both in vivo and ex vivo environments. This book also: Introduces terahertz radiation techniques and provides a number of topical examples of signal and image processing, as well as machine learning Presents the most recent developments in an emerging field, terahertz radiation Utilizes new methods...

  1. Progress Update on Iterative Reconstruction of Neutron Tomographic Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hausladen, Paul [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gregor, Jens [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2016-09-15

    This report satisfies the fiscal year 2016 technical deliverable to report on progress in development of fast iterative reconstruction algorithms for project OR16-3DTomography-PD2Jb, "3D Tomography and Image Processing Using Fast Neutrons." This project has two overall goals. The first of these goals is to extend associated-particle fast neutron transmission and, particularly, induced-reaction tomographic imaging algorithms to three dimensions. The second of these goals is to automatically segment the resultant tomographic images into constituent parts, and then extract information about the parts, such as the class of shape and potentially shape parameters. This report addresses of the component of the project concerned with three-dimensional (3D) image reconstruction.

  2. Tomographic Image Reconstruction Using Training Images with Matrix and Tensor Formulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soltani, Sara

    the image resolution compared to a classical reconstruction method such as Filtered Back Projection (FBP). Some priors for the tomographic reconstruction take the form of cross-section images of similar objects, providing a set of the so-called training images, that hold the key to the structural...... information about the solution. The training images must be reliable and application-specific. This PhD project aims at providing a mathematical and computational framework for the use of training sets as non-parametric priors for the solution in tomographic image reconstruction. Through an unsupervised...... machine learning technique (here, the dictionary learning), prototype elements from the training images are extracted and then incorporated in the tomographic reconstruction problem both with matrix and tensor representations of the training images. First, an algorithm for the tomographic image...

  3. Computerized tomographic imaging for space plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuhong; Coplan, Michael A.; Moore, John H.; Berenstein, Carlos A.

    1990-01-01

    The measurement of plasma electron velocity distribution functions as a problem in imaging and image reconstruction is considered. A model instrument that measures the integral of the distribution function along lines in velocity space is presented. This allows the use of the powerful mathematical and numerical methods that have recently been so successful in other areas of imaging. It is found that this approach leads to classes of instruments that are qualitatively different from contemporary designs. An investigation of different methods of reconstruction of the distribution function from integral measurements reveals that the mathematical tools appropriate to one particular imaging problem may be very different from those required to deal with another.

  4. Tomographic imaging and scanning thermal microscopy: thermal impedance tomography

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    The application of tomographic imaging techniques developed for medical applications to the data provided by the scanning thermal microscope will give access to true three-dimensional information on the thermal properties of materials on a mm length scale. In principle, the technique involves calculating and inverting a sensitivity matrix for a uniform isotropic material, collecting ordered data at several modulation frequencies, and multiplying the inverse of the matrix with the data vector....

  5. Superiorization of incremental optimization algorithms for statistical tomographic image reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helou, E. S.; Zibetti, M. V. W.; Miqueles, E. X.

    2017-04-01

    We propose the superiorization of incremental algorithms for tomographic image reconstruction. The resulting methods follow a better path in its way to finding the optimal solution for the maximum likelihood problem in the sense that they are closer to the Pareto optimal curve than the non-superiorized techniques. A new scaled gradient iteration is proposed and three superiorization schemes are evaluated. Theoretical analysis of the methods as well as computational experiments with both synthetic and real data are provided.

  6. Three-dimensional illumination system for tomographic particle image velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fen; Song, Yang; Qu, Xiangju; Ji, Yunjing; Li, Zhenhua; He, Anzhi

    2016-10-01

    Tomographic particle image velocimetry (Tomo-PIV) is a new developed technique for three-component threedimensional (3C-3D) velocity measurement of the flow field based on the optical tomographic reconstruction method, and has been received extensive attention of the related industries. Three-dimensional light source illuminating the tracer particles of flow field is a critical application for tomographic particle image velocimetry. Three-dimensional light source not only determines the size of measurement volume and the range of the scope of application, but also has a great influence on the image quality. In this work, we propose a rectangular light amplification system using powell lens, prisms and two reflectors. The system can be optimized if given the system parameters based on the theoretical model. The rectangular light amplification system will be verified experimentally by measuring the cross section size of the illuminated light source. A 60mm×25mm cross section of rectangular three-dimensional light source can be obtained by using the rectangular light amplification system. The experiments demonstrate the the feasibility the proposed system.

  7. Computer-aided interpretation approach for optical tomographic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klose, Christian D.; Klose, Alexander D.; Netz, Uwe J.; Scheel, Alexander K.; Beuthan, Jürgen; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2010-11-01

    A computer-aided interpretation approach is proposed to detect rheumatic arthritis (RA) in human finger joints using optical tomographic images. The image interpretation method employs a classification algorithm that makes use of a so-called self-organizing mapping scheme to classify fingers as either affected or unaffected by RA. Unlike in previous studies, this allows for combining multiple image features, such as minimum and maximum values of the absorption coefficient for identifying affected and not affected joints. Classification performances obtained by the proposed method were evaluated in terms of sensitivity, specificity, Youden index, and mutual information. Different methods (i.e., clinical diagnostics, ultrasound imaging, magnet resonance imaging, and inspection of optical tomographic images), were used to produce ground truth benchmarks to determine the performance of image interpretations. Using data from 100 finger joints, findings suggest that some parameter combinations lead to higher sensitivities, while others to higher specificities when compared to single parameter classifications employed in previous studies. Maximum performances are reached when combining the minimum/maximum ratio of the absorption coefficient and image variance. In this case, sensitivities and specificities over 0.9 can be achieved. These values are much higher than values obtained when only single parameter classifications were used, where sensitivities and specificities remained well below 0.8.

  8. Evaluation of multislice computed tomographic perfusion imaging and computed tomographic angiography on traumatic cerebral infarction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Fang-hong; CHEN Wei-jian; YANG Yun-jun; DUAN Yu-xia; FU Feng-li

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the application value of multislice computed tomographic perfusion imaging (MSCTPI) and multislice computed tomographic angiography (MSCTA) on traumatic cerebral infarction. Methods: MSCTA was performed on 10 patients who were initiailly diagnosed as traumatic cerebral infarction by normal conventional computed tomography (NCCT), among whom, 3 patients were examined by MSCTPI simultaneously. Reconstructed images of the intracranial artery were made with techniques of maximum intensity projection (MIP) and volume rendering (VR) from MSCTA scanning data. Then the graph of function of four parameters, regional cerebral blood flow (Rcbf), regional cerebral blood volume (Rcbv), mean transit time (MTT), and time to peak (TTP), acquired by the perfusing analysis software was obtained. Results: Among the 10 patients with traumatic cerebral infarction, 6 showed complex type on NCCT, which depicted abnormality on MSCTA, and 4 showed simple type on NCCT, which had negative results on MSCTA. Among the 4 patients with abnormal great vessels, 2 suffered from steno sis or occlusion of the middle cerebral artery, 1 from spasm of the anterior cerebral artery, and 1 from spasm of the vertebral-basal artery. The image of MSCTPI of 1 patient with massive cerebral infarction on the right cerebral hemisphere confirmed by CT was smaller than those of the other patients, which showed occlusion of the ipsilateral middle cerebral artery on MSCTA. Among the 6 patients whose MSCTA showed no abnormality, 4 showed simple infarction and 2 showed complex infarction. The infarction focus of 5 patients occurred in the basal ganglia and 1 in the splenium of corpus callosum. Among the 2 cases of small cerebral infarction volume on NCCT, one was normal, the other showed hypoperfusion on MSCTPI and was normal on MSCTA. Conclusion: The combination of MSCTPI and MSCTA is very useful for evaluating the change of intracranial artery in ischemic regions and assessing the cerebral

  9. Entropy analysis to psychological evaluation of tomographic images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higashida, Y.; Matsumoto, M.; Yoshida, H.; Dodanuki, S.; Moribe, N. (Kumamoto Univ. (Japan))

    1981-11-01

    Entropy analysis to psychological evaluation for tomographic images is applied. An optic canal and an internal ear tomogram are taken by hypocycloidal, elliptical, spiral and circular blurring movements. Fifteen tomograms are taken for each tomographic blurring movement of the two different parts, so a total of 60 sheets of tomograms are taken. All optic canal tomograms are evaluated by two groups composed of five ophthalmologists and five radiologic technologists, and internal ear tomograms are evaluated by five otolaryngologists and five radiologic technologists. Each observer participated in this experiment twice, so the total number of tomograms are 120 sheets per observer. The subjects were directed to classify 120 tomograms by using a three-category rating scale. Characteristics of each observer and each group can be shown quantitatively by calculated information values.

  10. Segmentation Toolbox for Tomographic Image Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Einarsdottir, Hildur

    , techniques to automatically analyze such data becomes ever more important. Most segmentation methods for large datasets, such as CT images, deal with simple thresholding techniques, where intensity values cut offs are predetermined and hard coded. For data where the intensity difference is not sufficient...... to automatically determine parameters of the different classes present in the data, and edge weighted smoothing of the final segmentation based on Markov Random Fields (MRF). The toolbox is developed for Matlab users and requires only minimal background knowledge of Matlab....

  11. Reflective echo tomographic imaging using acoustic beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kisner, Roger; Santos-Villalobos, Hector J

    2014-11-25

    An inspection system includes a plurality of acoustic beamformers, where each of the plurality of acoustic beamformers including a plurality of acoustic transmitter elements. The system also includes at least one controller configured for causing each of the plurality of acoustic beamformers to generate an acoustic beam directed to a point in a volume of interest during a first time. Based on a reflected wave intensity detected at a plurality of acoustic receiver elements, an image of the volume of interest can be generated.

  12. Structured illumination for tomographic X-ray diffraction imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Joel A; Hassan, Mehadi; Krishnamurthy, Kalyani; Brady, David

    2014-02-21

    Tomographic imaging of the molecular structure of an object is important for a variety of applications, ranging from medical and industrial radiography to security screening. X-ray diffraction imaging is the preeminent technique for performing molecular analysis of large volumes. Here we propose and demonstrate a new measurement architecture to improve the source and detector efficiency for diffraction imaging. In comparison with previous techniques, our approach reduces the required overall scan time by 1-2 orders of magnitude, which makes possible real-time scanning of a broad range of materials over a large volume using a table-top setup. This method, which relies on structuring spatially the illumination incident on an object moving relative to the X-ray source, is compatible with existing systems and has the potential to significantly enhance performance in an array of areas, such as medical diagnostic imaging and explosives detection.

  13. Operators versus functions: from quantum dynamical semigroups to tomographic semigroups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aniello, Paolo

    2013-11-01

    Quantum mechanics can be formulated in terms of phase-space functions, according to Wigner's approach. A generalization of this approach consists in replacing the density operators of the standard formulation with suitable functions, the so-called generalized Wigner functions or (group-covariant) tomograms, obtained by means of group-theoretical methods. A typical problem arising in this context is to express the evolution of a quantum system in terms of tomograms. In the case of a (suitable) open quantum system, the dynamics can be described by means of a quantum dynamical semigroup 'in disguise', namely, by a semigroup of operators acting on tomograms rather than on density operators. We focus on a special class of quantum dynamical semigroups, the twirling semigroups, that have interesting applications, e.g., in quantum information science. The 'disguised counterparts' of the twirling semigroups, i.e., the corresponding semigroups acting on tomograms, form a class of semigroups of operators that we call tomographic semigroups. We show that the twirling semigroups and the tomographic semigroups can be encompassed in a unique theoretical framework, a class of semigroups of operators including also the probability semigroups of classical probability theory, so achieving a deeper insight into both the mathematical and the physical aspects of the problem.

  14. Discrimination of carnation pistils in neutron tomographic images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsushima, U. [University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Lehmann, E.H.; Vontobel, P. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Kawamitsu, Y.; Nishizawa, T. [Yamagata University, Tsuruoka (Japan)

    2005-07-01

    Discrimination of plant organs and tissues from neutron tomographic image of a carnation flower is important to compare before and after changes in water distribution in each organ. A discriminative image processing that based on geographical characteristics of flower organs was used to try to create an image of a pistil in a flower. The styles in the pistil were clearly. On the other hand, the discriminated isosurface of the ovary was rugged with several spikes because the coalesced petals were recognized as parts of the ovary. Therefore, to correct the rugged surface, open filtering and closed filtering were attempted. The filtering processes showed strong dilation and erosion effects respectively. Combined open and closed filtering were applied to complement each other. The process removed coalesced petals and had fewer side effects.

  15. Scanning tomographic particle image velocimetry applied to a turbulent jet

    KAUST Repository

    Casey, T. A.

    2013-02-21

    We introduce a modified tomographic PIV technique using four high-speed video cameras and a scanning pulsed laser-volume. By rapidly illuminating adjacent subvolumes onto separate video frames, we can resolve a larger total volume of velocity vectors, while retaining good spatial resolution. We demonstrate this technique by performing time-resolved measurements of the turbulent structure of a round jet, using up to 9 adjacent volume slices. In essence this technique resolves more velocity planes in the depth direction by maintaining optimal particle image density and limiting the number of ghost particles. The total measurement volumes contain between 1 ×106 and 3 ×106 velocity vectors calculated from up to 1500 reconstructed depthwise image planes, showing time-resolved evolution of the large-scale vortical structures for a turbulent jet of Re up to 10 000.

  16. The development of a compact positron tomograph for prostate imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, Jennifer S.; Qi, Jinyi; Derenzo, Stephen E.; Moses, William W.; Huesman, Ronald H.; Budinger, Thomas F.

    2002-12-17

    We give design details and expected image results of a compact positron tomograph designed for prostate imaging that centers a patient between a pair of external curved detector banks (ellipse: 45 cm minor, 70 cm major axis). The bottom bank is fixed below the patient bed, and the top bank moves upward for patient access and downward for maximum sensitivity. Each bank is composed of two rows (axially) of 20 CTI PET Systems HR+ block detectors, forming two arcs that can be tilted to minimize attenuation. Compared to a conventional PET system, our camera uses about one-quarter the number of detectors and has almost two times higher solid angle coverage for a central point source, because the detectors are close to the patient. The detectors are read out by modified CTI HRRT data acquisition electronics. The individual detectors are angled in the plane to point towards the prostate to minimize reso

  17. Tomographic imaging with ultra-wideband noise radar using time-domain data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hee Jung; Narayanan, Ram M.; Rangaswamy, Muralidhar

    2013-05-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility of using a noise waveform in an ultra-wideband (UWB) radar system for two-dimensional tomographic imaging of a stationary object with a multistatic tomographic geometry. Multiple UWB transmitters and receivers are positioned along each side of the imaging area. We perform several numerical simulations in time-domain, and the successful imaging of the target is achieved by visual inspection of the formed images.

  18. Swept-source digital holography to reconstruct tomographic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheoran, Gyanendra; Dubey, Satish; Anand, Arun; Mehta, Dalip Singh; Shakher, Chandra

    2009-06-15

    We present what we believe to be a new method of swept-source digital holography using a superluminescent diode (SLD) as a broadband light source and an acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) as a frequency tunable device. The swept source consists of an SLD as a broadband source in conjunction with the AOTF as the frequency tuning device in the wavelength range of 800-870 nm. Since the AOTF is an electronically controlled device, frequency tuning can be achieved without mechanical movement . The angular spectrum approach to the scalar diffraction theory is used to reconstruct the images for each wavelength. Applications of a broadband source ensure an increased axial resolution of reconstructed images. The proposed swept-source system provides a sufficiently broad range of tunability and can increase the axial range and the resolution of reconstructed tomographic images using digital holography. The system was tested using a semireflecting glass substrate; a character "B" is written on it with black ink. Experimental results are presented.

  19. Proposal of fault-tolerant tomographic image reconstruction

    CERN Document Server

    Kudo, Hiroyuki; Yamazaki, Fukashi; Nemoto, Takuya

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with tomographic image reconstruction under the situation where some of projection data bins are contaminated with abnormal data. Such situations occur in various instances of tomography. We propose a new reconstruction algorithm called the Fault-Tolerant reconstruction outlined as follows. The least-squares (L2-norm) error function ||Ax-b||_2^2 used in ordinary iterative reconstructions is sensitive to the existence of abnormal data. The proposed algorithm utilizes the L1-norm error function ||Ax-b||_1^1 instead of the L2-norm, and we develop a row-action-type iterative algorithm using the proximal splitting framework in convex optimization fields. We also propose an improved version of the L1-norm reconstruction called the L1-TV reconstruction, in which a weak Total Variation (TV) penalty is added to the cost function. Simulation results demonstrate that reconstructed images with the L2-norm were severely damaged by the effect of abnormal bins, whereas images with the L1-norm and L1-TV reco...

  20. Spiral computed tomographic imaging related to computerized ultrasonographic images of carotid plaque morphology and histology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønholdt, Marie-Louise; Wagner, A; Wiebe, B M;

    2001-01-01

    Echolucency of carotid atherosclerotic plaques, as evaluated by computerized B-mode ultrasonographic images, has been associated with an increased incidence of brain infarcts on cerebral computed tomographic scans. We tested the hypotheses that characterization of carotid plaques on spiral comput...

  1. Spiral computed tomographic imaging related to computerized ultrasonographic images of carotid plaque morphology and histology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønholdt, Marie-Louise; Wagner, A; Wiebe, B M

    2001-01-01

    Echolucency of carotid atherosclerotic plaques, as evaluated by computerized B-mode ultrasonographic images, has been associated with an increased incidence of brain infarcts on cerebral computed tomographic scans. We tested the hypotheses that characterization of carotid plaques on spiral comput...

  2. Visual servoing in medical robotics: a survey. Part II: tomographic imaging modalities--techniques and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizian, Mahdi; Najmaei, Nima; Khoshnam, Mahta; Patel, Rajni

    2015-03-01

    Intraoperative application of tomographic imaging techniques provides a means of visual servoing for objects beneath the surface of organs. The focus of this survey is on therapeutic and diagnostic medical applications where tomographic imaging is used in visual servoing. To this end, a comprehensive search of the electronic databases was completed for the period 2000-2013. Existing techniques and products are categorized and studied, based on the imaging modality and their medical applications. This part complements Part I of the survey, which covers visual servoing techniques using endoscopic imaging and direct vision. The main challenges in using visual servoing based on tomographic images have been identified. 'Supervised automation of medical robotics' is found to be a major trend in this field and ultrasound is the most commonly used tomographic modality for visual servoing. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Tomographic Particle Image Velocimetry using Smartphones and Colored Shadows

    KAUST Repository

    Aguirre-Pablo, Andres A.

    2017-06-12

    We demonstrate the viability of using four low-cost smartphone cameras to perform Tomographic PIV. We use colored shadows to imprint two or three different time-steps on the same image. The back-lighting is accomplished with three sets of differently-colored pulsed LEDs. Each set of Red, Green & Blue LEDs is shone on a diffuser screen facing each of the cameras. We thereby record the RGB-colored shadows of opaque suspended particles, rather than the conventionally used scattered light. We subsequently separate the RGB color channels, to represent the separate times, with preprocessing to minimize noise and cross-talk. We use commercially available Tomo-PIV software for the calibration, 3-D particle reconstruction and particle-field correlations, to obtain all three velocity components in a volume. Acceleration estimations can be done thanks to the triple pulse illumination. Our test flow is a vortex ring produced by forcing flow through a circular orifice, using a flexible membrane, which is driven by a pressurized air pulse. Our system is compared to a commercial stereoscopic PIV system for error estimations. We believe this proof of concept experiment will make this technique available for education, industry and scientists for a fraction of the hardware cost needed for traditional Tomo-PIV.

  4. Guided Wave Annular Array Sensor Design for Improved Tomographic Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koduru, Jaya Prakash; Rose, Joseph L.

    2009-03-01

    Guided wave tomography for structural health monitoring is fast emerging as a reliable tool for the detection and monitoring of hotspots in a structure, for any defects arising from corrosion, crack growth etc. To date guided wave tomography has been successfully tested on aircraft wings, pipes, pipe elbows, and weld joints. Structures practically deployed are subjected to harsh environments like exposure to rain, changes in temperature and humidity. A reliable tomography system should take into account these environmental factors to avoid false alarms. The lack of mode control with piezoceramic disk sensors makes it very sensitive to traces of water leading to false alarms. In this study we explore the design of annular array sensors to provide mode control for improved structural tomography, in particular, addressing the false alarm potential of water loading. Clearly defined actuation lines in the phase velocity dispersion curve space are calculated. A dominant in-plane displacement point is found to provide a solution to the water loading problem. The improvement in the tomographic images with the annular array sensors in the presence of water traces is clearly illustrated with a series of experiments. An annular array design philosophy for other problems in NDE/SHM is also discussed.

  5. Tomographic diffractive microscopy with agile illuminations for imaging targets in a noisy background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, T; Godavarthi, C; Chaumet, P C; Maire, G; Giovannini, H; Talneau, A; Prada, C; Sentenac, A; Belkebir, K

    2015-02-15

    Tomographic diffractive microscopy is a marker-free optical digital imaging technique in which three-dimensional samples are reconstructed from a set of holograms recorded under different angles of incidence. We show experimentally that, by processing the holograms with singular value decomposition, it is possible to image objects in a noisy background that are invisible with classical wide-field microscopy and conventional tomographic reconstruction procedure. The targets can be further characterized with a selective quantitative inversion.

  6. Linear adaptive noise-reduction filters for tomographic imaging: Optimizing for minimum mean square error

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Winston Y. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1993-04-01

    This thesis solves the problem of finding the optimal linear noise-reduction filter for linear tomographic image reconstruction. The optimization is data dependent and results in minimizing the mean-square error of the reconstructed image. The error is defined as the difference between the result and the best possible reconstruction. Applications for the optimal filter include reconstructions of positron emission tomographic (PET), X-ray computed tomographic, single-photon emission tomographic, and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. Using high resolution PET as an example, the optimal filter is derived and presented for the convolution backprojection, Moore-Penrose pseudoinverse, and the natural-pixel basis set reconstruction methods. Simulations and experimental results are presented for the convolution backprojection method.

  7. ECAT: A New Computerized Tomographic Imaging System for Position-Emitting Radiopharmaceuticals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, M. E.; Hoffman, E. J.; Huang, S. C.; Kuhl, D. E.

    1977-01-01

    The ECAT was designed and developed as a complete computerized positron radionuclide imaging system capable of providing high contrast, high resolution, quantitative images in 2 dimensional and tomographic formats. Flexibility, in its various image mode options, allows it to be used for a wide variety of imaging problems.

  8. Tomographic image of a seismically active volcano: Mammoth Mountain, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Phillip B.; Chouet, Bernard A.; Pitt, Andrew M.

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution tomographic P wave, S wave, and VP/VS velocity structure models are derived for Mammoth Mountain, California, using phase data from the Northern California Seismic Network and a temporary deployment of broadband seismometers. An anomalous volume (5.1 × 109 to 5.9 × 1010m3) of low P and low S wave velocities is imaged beneath Mammoth Mountain, extending from near the surface to a depth of ∼2 km below sea level. We infer that the reduction in seismic wave velocities is due to the presence of CO2 distributed in oblate spheroid pores with mean aspect ratio α = 1.6 × 10−3 to 7.9 × 10−3 (crack-like pores) and mean gas volume fraction ϕ = 8.1 × 10−4 to 3.4 × 10−3. The pore density parameter κ = 3ϕ/(4πα) = na3=0.11, where n is the number of pores per cubic meter and a is the mean pore equatorial radius. The total mass of CO2 is estimated to be 4.6 × 109 to 1.9 × 1011 kg. The local geological structure indicates that the CO2 contained in the pores is delivered to the surface through fractures controlled by faults and remnant foliation of the bedrock beneath Mammoth Mountain. The total volume of CO2 contained in the reservoir suggests that given an emission rate of 500 tons day−1, the reservoir could supply the emission of CO2 for ∼25–1040 years before depletion. Continued supply of CO2 from an underlying magmatic system would significantly prolong the existence of the reservoir.

  9. The angulation and the position change of the planned implant after tomographic imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Byung Cheol [Chonnam National Univ. Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-09-15

    To measure the differences of the splint pin angulation and the position of the planned implant site after conventional tomographic analysis. The angulation and the location of the metal splint pin retained in acrylic stent were compared with the corrected angulation and the location of the implant fixture on the 331 tomographic images. The stent pins were located buccal in 40%, lingual in 10% to the corrected implant site after analysis of the conventional tomographic image. The angle and the location of the maxillary splint pin were mainly directed buccal on incisor and canine regions. The angle and the location of the splint pins in premolar and molar regions needed less corrections in both maxilla and mandible. This study demonstrated that the use of tomographs was essential for successful dental implant planning.

  10. Estimating Single and Multiple Target Locations Using K-Means Clustering with Radio Tomographic Imaging in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-26

    ESTIMATING SINGLE AND MULTIPLE TARGET LOCATIONS USING K-MEANS CLUSTERING WITH RADIO TOMOGRAPHIC IMAGING IN WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORKS THESIS Jeffrey K...AND MULTIPLE TARGET LOCATIONS USING K-MEANS CLUSTERING WITH RADIO TOMOGRAPHIC IMAGING IN WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORKS THESIS Presented to the Faculty...SINGLE AND MULTIPLE TARGET LOCATIONS USING K-MEANS CLUSTERING WITH RADIO TOMOGRAPHIC IMAGING IN WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORKS Jeffrey K. Nishida, B.S.E.E

  11. Tensor-based dictionary learning for dynamic tomographic reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Shengqi; Zhang, Yanbo; Wang, Ge; Mou, Xuanqin; Cao, Guohua; Wu, Zhifang; Yu, Hengyong

    2015-04-01

    In dynamic computed tomography (CT) reconstruction, the data acquisition speed limits the spatio-temporal resolution. Recently, compressed sensing theory has been instrumental in improving CT reconstruction from far few-view projections. In this paper, we present an adaptive method to train a tensor-based spatio-temporal dictionary for sparse representation of an image sequence during the reconstruction process. The correlations among atoms and across phases are considered to capture the characteristics of an object. The reconstruction problem is solved by the alternating direction method of multipliers. To recover fine or sharp structures such as edges, the nonlocal total variation is incorporated into the algorithmic framework. Preclinical examples including a sheep lung perfusion study and a dynamic mouse cardiac imaging demonstrate that the proposed approach outperforms the vectorized dictionary-based CT reconstruction in the case of few-view reconstruction.

  12. Temporal bone anomalies in the branchio-oto-renal syndrome: detailed computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging findings.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ceruti, S.; Stinckens, C.I.C.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Casselman, J.W.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To inventory computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging findings in the branchio-oto-renal (BOR) syndrome. STUDY DESIGN: A prospective computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging study on a family with the BOR syndrome. SETTING: Department of medical imaging and magnetic

  13. Temporal bone anomalies in the branchio-oto-renal syndrome: detailed computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging findings.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ceruti, S.; Stinckens, C.I.C.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Casselman, J.W.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To inventory computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging findings in the branchio-oto-renal (BOR) syndrome. STUDY DESIGN: A prospective computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging study on a family with the BOR syndrome. SETTING: Department of medical imaging and magnetic

  14. Non-contact continuous-wave diffuse optical tomographic system to capture vascular dynamics in the foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoi, Jennifer W.; Kim, Hyun K.; Khalil, Michael A.; Fong, Christopher J.; Marone, Alessandro; Shrikhande, Gautam; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2015-03-01

    Dynamic optical tomographic imaging has shown promise in diagnosing and monitoring peripheral arterial disease (PAD), which affects 8 to 12 million in the United States. PAD is the narrowing of the arteries that supply blood to the lower extremities. Prolonged reduced blood flow to the foot leads to ulcers and gangrene, which makes placement of optical fibers for contact-based optical tomography systems difficult and cumbersome. Since many diabetic PAD patients have foot wounds, a non-contact interface is highly desirable. We present a novel non-contact dynamic continuous-wave optical tomographic imaging system that images the vasculature in the foot for evaluating PAD. The system images at up to 1Hz by delivering 2 wavelengths of light to the top of the foot at up to 20 source positions through collimated source fibers. Transmitted light is collected with an electron multiplying charge couple device (EMCCD) camera. We demonstrate that the system can resolve absorbers at various locations in a phantom study and show the system's first clinical 3D images of total hemoglobin changes in the foot during venous occlusion at the thigh. Our initial results indicate that this system is effective in capturing the vascular dynamics within the foot and can be used to diagnose and monitor treatment of PAD in diabetic patients.

  15. Spatially variant tomographic imaging: Estimation, identification, and optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, John Robert [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1991-11-01

    This thesis is an investigation of methods for processing multidimensional signals acquired using modern tomography systems that have an anisotropic or spatially variant response function. The main result of this research is the discovery of a new method to obtain better estimators of an unknown spatial intensity distribution by incorporating detailed knowledge about the tomograph system response function and statistical properties of the acquired signal into a mathematical model.

  16. Spatially variant tomographic imaging: Estimation, identification, and optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, J.R.

    1991-11-01

    This thesis is an investigation of methods for processing multidimensional signals acquired using modern tomography systems that have an anisotropic or spatially variant response function. The main result of this research is the discovery of a new method to obtain better estimators of an unknown spatial intensity distribution by incorporating detailed knowledge about the tomograph system response function and statistical properties of the acquired signal into a mathematical model.

  17. Multi-pass light amplification for tomographic particle image velocimetry applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghaemi, S.; Scarano, F.

    2010-01-01

    The light source budget is a critical issue for tomographic particle image velocimetry (Tomo-PIV) systems due to its requirement for large illuminated volume and imaging at small apertures. In this work, a light amplification system based on the multi-pass concept is investigated for Tomo-PIV applic

  18. Tomographic Imaging of Water Content and Mine-Induced Stress Distribution in North Aurora, Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meulemans, A. J.; Fratta, D.; Wang, H. F.

    2013-12-01

    Located in North Aurora, Illinois, the Lafarge-Conco plant is a room-and-pillar mine that is in active production of aggregates, taken from the Galena-Platteville formations. To better understand how stresses are distributed among the pillars over periods of mining production, tomographic images of the interior of the pillar using seismic data collected in November 2012 and March 2013 were created. Seismic tomographic images showed changes in seismic velocity between the two surveys, which is interpreted as change in stress. The southeast corner pillar showed a significant stress increase, and could indicate a possible area of very high stresses within the pillar. While the ground-penetrating radar (GPR) tomographic image was used to assess a very uniform water content and porosity distribution within the pillar. Understanding how stress and moisture distribution changes within pillars during excavation is valuable to mine design and to the maintenance of mine safety.

  19. 3D tomographic breast imaging in-vivo using a handheld optical imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Sarah J.; Martinez, Sergio; Gonzalez, Jean; Roman, Manuela; Nunez, Annie; Godavarty, Anuradha

    2011-02-01

    Hand-held optical imagers are currently developed toward clinical imaging of breast tissue. However, the hand-held optical devices developed to are not able to coregister the image to the tissue geometry for 3D tomography. We have developed a hand-held optical imager which has demonstrated automated coregistered imaging and 3D tomography in phantoms, and validated coregistered imaging in normal human subjects. Herein, automated coregistered imaging is performed in a normal human subject with a 0.45 cm3 spherical target filled with 1 μM indocyanine green (fluorescent contrast agent) placed superficially underneath the flap of the breast tissue. The coregistered image data is used in an approximate extended Kalman filter (AEKF) based reconstruction algorithm to recover the 3D location of the target within the breast tissue geometry. The results demonstrate the feasibility of performing 3D tomographic imaging and recovering a fluorescent target in breast tissue of a human subject for the first time using a hand-held based optical imager. The significance of this work is toward clinical imaging of breast tissue for cancer diagnostics and therapy monitoring.

  20. Connections model for tomographic images reconstruction; Modelo conexionista para reconstrucao de imagens tomograficas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, R.G.S.; Pela, C.A.; Roque, S.F. A.C. [Departamento de Fisica e Matematica (FFCLRP) USP. Av. Bandeirantes, 3900- 14040- 901- Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    1998-12-31

    This paper shows an artificial neural network with an adequately topology for tomographic image reconstruction. The associated error function is derived and the learning algorithm is make. The simulated results are presented and demonstrate the existence of a generalized solution for nets with linear activation function. (Author)

  1. Tomographic particle image velocimetry and its application to turbulent boundary layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsinga, G.E.

    2008-01-01

    Tomographic Particle Image Velocimetry is a new experimental method developed to study three-dimensional motion in turbulent flows. The technique is an extension of standard PIV and makes use of several simultaneous views of illuminated tracer particles and their three-dimensional reconstruction as

  2. Tomographic Image Reconstruction Using an Interpolation Method for Tree Decay Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hailin Feng; Guanghui Li; Sheng Fu; Xiping Wang

    2014-01-01

    Stress wave velocity has been traditionally regarded as an indicator of the extent of damage inside wood. This paper aimed to detect internal decay of urban trees through reconstructing tomographic image of the cross section of a tree trunk. A grid model covering the cross section area of a tree trunk was defined with some assumptions. Stress wave data were processed...

  3. Connections model for tomographic images reconstruction; Modelo conexionista para reconstrucao de imagens tomograficas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, R.G.S.; Pela, C.A.; Roque SF, A.C. [Sao Paulo Univ., Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras. Dept. de Fisica e Matematica

    1998-07-01

    This paper shows an artificial neural network with a adequately topology for tomographic image reconstruction. The associated error function is derived and the learning algorithm is make. The simulated results are presented and demonstrate the existence of a generalized solution for nets with linear activation function. (author)

  4. First tomographic image of neutron capture rate in a BNCT facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minsky, D.M., E-mail: minsky@tandar.cnea.gov.ar [Gerencia de Investigacion y Aplicaciones, CAC, CNEA, Av. Gral. Paz 1499 (B1650KNA), San Martin, Prov. Bs. As. (Argentina)] [Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnologia, , UNSAM, M. de Irigoyen 3100 (1650), San Martin, Prov. Bs. As. (Argentina)] [Conicet, Av. Rivadavia 1917 (C1033AAJ), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Valda, A.A. [Gerencia de Investigacion y Aplicaciones, CAC, CNEA, Av. Gral. Paz 1499 (B1650KNA), San Martin, Prov. Bs. As. (Argentina)] [Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnologia, , UNSAM, M. de Irigoyen 3100 (1650), San Martin, Prov. Bs. As. (Argentina); Kreiner, A.J. [Gerencia de Investigacion y Aplicaciones, CAC, CNEA, Av. Gral. Paz 1499 (B1650KNA), San Martin, Prov. Bs. As. (Argentina)] [Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnologia, , UNSAM, M. de Irigoyen 3100 (1650), San Martin, Prov. Bs. As. (Argentina)] [Conicet, Av. Rivadavia 1917 (C1033AAJ), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Green, S.; Wojnecki, C. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, B15 2 TT (United Kingdom)] [Department of Medical Physics, University Hospital Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TH (United Kingdom); Ghani, Z. [Department of Medical Physics, University Hospital Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TH (United Kingdom)

    2011-12-15

    This work discusses the development of online dosimetry of the boron dose via Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) during a BNCT treatment irradiation. Such a system will allow the online computation of boron dose maps without the large current uncertainties in the assessment of the boron concentration in different tissues. The first tomographic boron dose image with a SPECT prototype is shown.

  5. Tomographic imaging of asymmetric molecular orbitals with a two-color multicycle laser field

    CERN Document Server

    Qin, Meiyan; Zhang, Qingbin; Lu, Peixiang

    2013-01-01

    We theoretically demonstrate a scheme for tomographic reconstruction of asymmetric molecular orbitals based on high-order harmonic generation with a two-color multicycle laser field. It is shown that by adjusting the relative phase of the two fields, the returning electrons can be forced to recollide from one direction for all the orientations of molecules. Thus the reconstruction of the asymmetric orbitals can be carried out with multicycle laser field. This releases the stringent requirement of a single-cycle pulse with a stabilized and controllable carrier-envelop phase for the tomographic imaging of asymmetric molecular orbitals.

  6. Lamb-Wave-Based Tomographic Imaging Techniques for Hole-Edge Corrosion Monitoring in Plate Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dengjiang Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a novel monitoring method for hole-edge corrosion damage in plate structures based on Lamb wave tomographic imaging techniques. An experimental procedure with a cross-hole layout using 16 piezoelectric transducers (PZTs was designed. The A0 mode of the Lamb wave was selected, which is sensitive to thickness-loss damage. The iterative algebraic reconstruction technique (ART method was used to locate and quantify the corrosion damage at the edge of the hole. Hydrofluoric acid with a concentration of 20% was used to corrode the specimen artificially. To estimate the effectiveness of the proposed method, the real corrosion damage was compared with the predicted corrosion damage based on the tomographic method. The results show that the Lamb-wave-based tomographic method can be used to monitor the hole-edge corrosion damage accurately.

  7. Imaging earth`s interior: Tomographic inversions for mantle P-wave velocity structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pulliam, R.J.

    1991-07-01

    A formalism is developed for the tomographic inversion of seismic travel time residuals. The travel time equations are solved both simultaneously, for velocity model terms and corrections to the source locations, and progressively, for each set of terms in succession. The methods differ primarily in their treatment of source mislocation terms. Additionally, the system of equations is solved directly, neglecting source terms. The efficacy of the algorithms is explored with synthetic data as we perform simulations of the general procedure used to produce tomographic images of Earth`s mantle from global earthquake data. The patterns of seismic heterogeneity in the mantle that would be returned reliably by a tomographic inversion are investigated. We construct synthetic data sets based on real ray sampling of the mantle by introducing spherical harmonic patterns of velocity heterogeneity and perform inversions of the synthetic data.

  8. Imaging earth's interior: Tomographic inversions for mantle P-wave velocity structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pulliam, R.J.

    1991-07-01

    A formalism is developed for the tomographic inversion of seismic travel time residuals. The travel time equations are solved both simultaneously, for velocity model terms and corrections to the source locations, and progressively, for each set of terms in succession. The methods differ primarily in their treatment of source mislocation terms. Additionally, the system of equations is solved directly, neglecting source terms. The efficacy of the algorithms is explored with synthetic data as we perform simulations of the general procedure used to produce tomographic images of Earth's mantle from global earthquake data. The patterns of seismic heterogeneity in the mantle that would be returned reliably by a tomographic inversion are investigated. We construct synthetic data sets based on real ray sampling of the mantle by introducing spherical harmonic patterns of velocity heterogeneity and perform inversions of the synthetic data.

  9. DEVELOPMENT OF A DUAL MODALITY TOMOGRAPHIC IMAGING SYSTEM FOR BIOLUMINESCENCE AND PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CHATZIIOANNOU, ARION

    2011-12-21

    The goal of this proposal was to develop a new hybrid imaging modality capable to simultaneously image optical bioluminescence signals, as well as radionuclide emissions from the annihilation of positrons originating from molecular imaging probes in preclinical mouse models. This new technology enables the simultaneous in-vivo measurements of both emissions that could be produced from a single or a combination of two different biomarkers. It also facilitates establishing the physical limitations of bioluminescence imaging, its tomographic and spectral image reconstruction potential and the quantification of bioluminescence signals.

  10. Parallel computing for simultaneous iterative tomographic imaging by graphics processing units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello-Maldonado, Pedro D.; López, Ricardo; Rogers, Colleen; Jin, Yuanwei; Lu, Enyue

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we address the problem of accelerating inversion algorithms for nonlinear acoustic tomographic imaging by parallel computing on graphics processing units (GPUs). Nonlinear inversion algorithms for tomographic imaging often rely on iterative algorithms for solving an inverse problem, thus computationally intensive. We study the simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique (SIRT) for the multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) tomography algorithm which enables parallel computations of the grid points as well as the parallel execution of multiple source excitation. Using graphics processing units (GPUs) and the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) programming model an overall improvement of 26.33x was achieved when combining both approaches compared with sequential algorithms. Furthermore we propose an adaptive iterative relaxation factor and the use of non-uniform weights to improve the overall convergence of the algorithm. Using these techniques, fast computations can be performed in parallel without the loss of image quality during the reconstruction process.

  11. A tomographic particle image velocimetry investigation of the flow development over dual step cylinders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morton, C., E-mail: chris.morton@ucalgary.ca [Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Calgary, 2500 University Dr NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada); Yarusevych, S. [Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave W, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Scarano, F. [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Delft University of Technology, 2628 Delft (Netherlands)

    2016-02-15

    This experimental study focuses on the near wake development of a dual step cylinder geometry consisting of a long base cylinder of diameter d to which a larger diameter (D) cylinder of length L is attached coaxially at mid-span. The experiments cover a range of Reynolds numbers, 2000 ≤ Re{sub D} ≤ 5000, diameter ratios, 1.33 ≤ D/d ≤ 2.0 and large cylinder aspect ratios, 0.5 ≤ L/D ≤ 5 using Tomographic particle image velocimetry. Distinct changes in wake topology are observed varying the above parameters. Supporting previous experimental studies on the same geometry involving flow visualization and planar measurements, four distinct flow regimes are identified to which a distinct three-dimensional wake topology can be associated. The vortex-dominated wake dynamical behaviour is investigated with Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) and conditional averaging of three-dimensional velocity fields is used to exemplify the different shedding regimes. The conditionally averaged flow fields are shown to quantitatively resolve flow features equivalent to those obtained from a reduced order model consisting of the first ten to twenty POD modes, identifying the dominant vortex shedding cells and their interactions.

  12. Computed tomographic imaging of the brain of normal neonatal foals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Cabrera

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to provide a more complete description of normal cross-sectional anatomy of the neonatal brain of the foal and associated structures by computed tomography (CT and gross anatomical sections. Using a fourth-generation CT scanner, 2-mm contiguous transverse images were acquired from two neonatal 5-days-old Quarter horse foals. After the study the animals were euthanised for reasons unrelated to head pathology. To assist in the accurate identification of brain and associated structures, transverse CT images were obtained and compared with the corresponding frozen cross-sections of the head. CT images matched well with their corresponding transverse gross sections and provided good differentiation between the bones and the soft tissues of the head. These CT images are intended to be a useful initial anatomic reference in the interpretation for clinical CT imaging studies of the brain and associated structures in live neonatal foals.

  13. String-averaging incremental subgradients for constrained convex optimization with applications to reconstruction of tomographic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massambone de Oliveira, Rafael; Salomão Helou, Elias; Fontoura Costa, Eduardo

    2016-11-01

    We present a method for non-smooth convex minimization which is based on subgradient directions and string-averaging techniques. In this approach, the set of available data is split into sequences (strings) and a given iterate is processed independently along each string, possibly in parallel, by an incremental subgradient method (ISM). The end-points of all strings are averaged to form the next iterate. The method is useful to solve sparse and large-scale non-smooth convex optimization problems, such as those arising in tomographic imaging. A convergence analysis is provided under realistic, standard conditions. Numerical tests are performed in a tomographic image reconstruction application, showing good performance for the convergence speed when measured as the decrease ratio of the objective function, in comparison to classical ISM.

  14. Noise Equivalent Counts Based Emission Image Reconstruction Algorithm of Tomographic Gamma Scanning

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Ke; Feng, Wei; Han, Dong

    2014-01-01

    Tomographic Gamma Scanning (TGS) is a technique used to assay the nuclide distribution and radioactivity in nuclear waste drums. Both transmission and emission scans are performed in TGS and the transmission image is used for the attenuation correction in emission reconstructions. The error of the transmission image, which is not considered by the existing reconstruction algorithms, negatively affects the final results. An emission reconstruction method based on Noise Equivalent Counts (NEC) is presented. Noises from the attenuation image are concentrated to the projection data to apply the NEC Maximum-Likelihood Expectation-Maximization algorithm. Experiments are performed to verify the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  15. Automating the segmentation of medical images for the production of voxel tomographic computational models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caon, M; Mohyla, J

    2001-12-01

    Radiation dosimetry for the diagnostic medical imaging procedures performed on humans requires anatomically accurate, computational models. These may be constructed from medical images as voxel-based tomographic models. However, they are time consuming to produce and as a consequence, there are few available. This paper discusses the emergence of semi-automatic segmentation techniques and describes an application (iRAD) written in Microsoft Visual Basic that allows the bitmap of a medical image to be segmented interactively and semi-automatically while displayed in Microsoft Excel. iRAD will decrease the time required to construct voxel models.

  16. Laparoscopic optical coherence tomographic imaging of human ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariri, Lida P.; Bonnema, Garret T.; Schmidt, Kathy; Korde, Vrushali; Winkler, Amy M.; Hatch, Kenneth; Brewer, Molly; Barton, Jennifer K.

    2009-02-01

    Ovarian cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death among women. If diagnosed at early stages, 5-year survival rate is 94%, but drops to 68% for regional disease and 29% for distant metastasis; only 19% of cases are diagnosed at early, localized stages. Optical coherence tomography is a recently emerging non-destructive imaging technology, achieving high axial resolutions (10-20 µm) at imaging depths up to 2 mm. Previously, we studied OCT in normal and diseased human ovary ex vivo. Changes in collagen were suggested with several images that correlated with changes in collagen seen in malignancy. Areas of necrosis and blood vessels were also visualized using OCT, indicative of an underlying tissue abnormality. We recently developed a custom side-firing laparoscopic OCT (LOCT) probe fabricated for in vivo imaging. The LOCT probe, consisting of a 38 mm diameter handpiece terminated in a 280 mm long, 4.6 mm diameter tip for insertion into the laparoscopic trocar, is capable of obtaining up to 9.5 mm image lengths at 10 µm axial resolution. In this pilot study, we utilize the LOCT probe to image one or both ovaries of 17 patients undergoing laparotomy or transabdominal endoscopy and oophorectomy to determine if OCT is capable of differentiating normal and neoplastic ovary. We have laparoscopically imaged the ovaries of seventeen patients with no known complications. Initial data evaluation reveals qualitative distinguishability between the features of undiseased post-menopausal ovary and the cystic, non-homogenous appearance of neoplastic ovary such as serous cystadenoma and endometroid adenocarcinoma.

  17. Dynamic enhanced computed tomographic findings of a perirenal capillary hemangioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jung Min; Kim, Sang Won; Kim, Hyun Cheol; Yang, Dal Mo; Ryu, Jung Kyu; Lim, Sung Jig [Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Hemangiomas are benign mesenchymal neoplasms that rarely occur in the kidney and perirenal space. Perirenal hemangiomas can mimic the appearance of exophytic renal cell carcinoma or various retroperitoneal tumors. We report a case of perirenal hemangioma detected by dynamic enhanced computed tomography in a 43-year-old female.

  18. Local and Non-local Regularization Techniques in Emission (PET/SPECT) Tomographic Image Reconstruction Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Munir; Shahzad, Tasawar; Masood, Khalid; Rashid, Khalid; Tanveer, Muhammad; Iqbal, Rabail; Hussain, Nasir; Shahid, Abubakar; Fazal-E-Aleem

    2016-06-01

    Emission tomographic image reconstruction is an ill-posed problem due to limited and noisy data and various image-degrading effects affecting the data and leads to noisy reconstructions. Explicit regularization, through iterative reconstruction methods, is considered better to compensate for reconstruction-based noise. Local smoothing and edge-preserving regularization methods can reduce reconstruction-based noise. However, these methods produce overly smoothed images or blocky artefacts in the final image because they can only exploit local image properties. Recently, non-local regularization techniques have been introduced, to overcome these problems, by incorporating geometrical global continuity and connectivity present in the objective image. These techniques can overcome drawbacks of local regularization methods; however, they also have certain limitations, such as choice of the regularization function, neighbourhood size or calibration of several empirical parameters involved. This work compares different local and non-local regularization techniques used in emission tomographic imaging in general and emission computed tomography in specific for improved quality of the resultant images.

  19. Initial results of a positron tomograph for prostate imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, J.S.; Choong, W.S.; Moses, W.W.; Qi, J.; Hu, J.; Wang,G.C.; Wilson, D.; Oh, S.; Huesman, R.H.; Derenzo, S.E.; Budinger, T.F.

    2004-11-29

    We present the status and initial images of a positrontomograph for prostate imaging that centers a patient between a pair ofexternal curved detector banks (ellipse: 45 cm minor, 70 cm major axis).The distance between detector banks adjusts to allow patient access andto position the detectors as closely as possible for maximum sensitivitywith patients of various sizes. Each bank is composed of two axial rowsof 20 CTI PET Systems HR+ block detectors for a total of 80 modules inthe camera. Compared to an ECAT HR PET system operating in 3D mode, ourcamera uses about one-quarter the number of detectors and hasapproximately the same sensitivity for a central point source, becauseour detectors are close to the patient. The individual detectors areangled in the plane to point towards the prostate to minimize resolutiondegradation in that region. The detectors are read out by modified CTIdata acquisition electronics. We have completed construction of thegantry and electronics, have developed detector calibration and dataacquisition software, and are taking coincidence data. We demonstratethat we can clearly visualize a "prostate" in a simple phantom.Reconstructed images of two phantoms are shown.

  20. Electrical impedance tomographic imaging of a single cell electroporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meir, Arie; Rubinsky, Boris

    2014-06-01

    A living cell placed in a high strength electric field, can undergo a process known as electroporation. It is believed that during electroporation nano-scale defects (pores) occur in the membrane of the cell, causing dramatic changes to the permeability of its membrane. Electroporation is an important technique in biotechnology and medicine and numerous methods are being developed to improve the understanding and use of the technology. We propose to extend the toolbox available for studying electroporation by generating impedance distribution images of the cell as it undergoes electroporation using Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT). To investigate the feasibility of this concept, we develop a mathematical model of the process of electroporation in a single cell and of EIT of the process and show simulation results of a computer-based finite element model (FEM). Our work is an attempt to develop a new imaging tool for visualizing electroporation in a single cell, offering a different temporal and spatial resolution compared to the state of the art, which includes bulk measurements of electrical properties during single cell electroporation, patch clamp and voltage clamp measurement in single cells and optical imaging with colorimetric dyes during single cell electroporation. This paper is a preliminary theoretic feasibility study.

  1. Image reconstruction for a Positron Emission Tomograph optimized for breast cancer imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virador, Patrick R.G.

    2000-04-01

    The author performs image reconstruction for a novel Positron Emission Tomography camera that is optimized for breast cancer imaging. This work addresses for the first time, the problem of fully-3D, tomographic reconstruction using a septa-less, stationary, (i.e. no rotation or linear motion), and rectangular camera whose Field of View (FOV) encompasses the entire volume enclosed by detector modules capable of measuring Depth of Interaction (DOI) information. The camera is rectangular in shape in order to accommodate breasts of varying sizes while allowing for soft compression of the breast during the scan. This non-standard geometry of the camera exacerbates two problems: (a) radial elongation due to crystal penetration and (b) reconstructing images from irregularly sampled data. Packing considerations also give rise to regions in projection space that are not sampled which lead to missing information. The author presents new Fourier Methods based image reconstruction algorithms that incorporate DOI information and accommodate the irregular sampling of the camera in a consistent manner by defining lines of responses (LORs) between the measured interaction points instead of rebinning the events into predefined crystal face LORs which is the only other method to handle DOI information proposed thus far. The new procedures maximize the use of the increased sampling provided by the DOI while minimizing interpolation in the data. The new algorithms use fixed-width evenly spaced radial bins in order to take advantage of the speed of the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), which necessitates the use of irregular angular sampling in order to minimize the number of unnormalizable Zero-Efficiency Bins (ZEBs). In order to address the persisting ZEBs and the issue of missing information originating from packing considerations, the algorithms (a) perform nearest neighbor smoothing in 2D in the radial bins (b) employ a semi-iterative procedure in order to estimate the unsampled data

  2. Image reconstruction for a Positron Emission Tomograph optimized for breast cancer imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virador, Patrick R.G. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-04-01

    The author performs image reconstruction for a novel Positron Emission Tomography camera that is optimized for breast cancer imaging. This work addresses for the first time, the problem of fully-3D, tomographic reconstruction using a septa-less, stationary, (i.e. no rotation or linear motion), and rectangular camera whose Field of View (FOV) encompasses the entire volume enclosed by detector modules capable of measuring Depth of Interaction (DOI) information. The camera is rectangular in shape in order to accommodate breasts of varying sizes while allowing for soft compression of the breast during the scan. This non-standard geometry of the camera exacerbates two problems: (a) radial elongation due to crystal penetration and (b) reconstructing images from irregularly sampled data. Packing considerations also give rise to regions in projection space that are not sampled which lead to missing information. The author presents new Fourier Methods based image reconstruction algorithms that incorporate DOI information and accommodate the irregular sampling of the camera in a consistent manner by defining lines of responses (LORs) between the measured interaction points instead of rebinning the events into predefined crystal face LORs which is the only other method to handle DOI information proposed thus far. The new procedures maximize the use of the increased sampling provided by the DOI while minimizing interpolation in the data. The new algorithms use fixed-width evenly spaced radial bins in order to take advantage of the speed of the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), which necessitates the use of irregular angular sampling in order to minimize the number of unnormalizable Zero-Efficiency Bins (ZEBs). In order to address the persisting ZEBs and the issue of missing information originating from packing considerations, the algorithms (a) perform nearest neighbor smoothing in 2D in the radial bins (b) employ a semi-iterative procedure in order to estimate the unsampled data

  3. ESTIMATING FIBRE DIRECTION DISTRIBUTIONS OF REINFORCED COMPOSITES FROM TOMOGRAPHIC IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Wirjadi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Fibre reinforced composites constitute a relevant class of materials used chiefly in lightweight constructions for example in fuselages or car bodies. The spatial arrangement of the fibres and in particular their direction distribution have huge impact on macroscopic properties and, thus, its determination is an important topic of material characterisation. The fibre direction distribution is defined on the unit sphere, and it is therefore preferable to work with fully three-dimensional images of the microstructure as obtained, e.g., by computed micro-tomography. A number of recent image analysis algorithms exploit local grey value variations to estimate a preferred direction in each fibre point. Averaging these local results leads estimates of the volume-weighted fibre direction distribution. We show how the thus derived fibre direction distribution is related to quantities commonly used in engineering applications. Furthermore, we discuss four algorithms for local orientation analysis, namely those based on the response of anisotropic Gaussian filters, moments and axes of inertia derived from directed distance transforms, the structure tensor, or the Hessian matrix. Finally, the feasibility of these algorithms is demonstrated for application examples and some advantages and disadvantages of the underlying methods are pointed out.

  4. Use of artificial neural networks in drug and explosive detection through tomographic images with thermal neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Francisco J.O.; Crispim, Verginia R.; Silva, Ademir X., E-mail: fferreira@ien.gov.b, E-mail: verginia@con.ufri.b, E-mail: ademir@con.ufri.b [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2009-07-01

    The artificial neural network technique was used to identify drugs and plastic explosives, from a tomography composed by a set of six neutrongraphic projections obtained in real time. Bidimensional tomographic images of samples of drugs, explosives and other materials, when digitally processed, yield the characteristic spectra of each type of material. The information contained in those spectra was then used for ANN training, the best images being obtained when the multilayer perceptron model, the back-propagation training algorithm and the Cross-validation interruption criterion were used. ANN showed to be useful in forecasting presence of drugs and explosives hitting a rate of success above 97 %. (author)

  5. Post-operative computed tomographic imaging of the shoulder joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helweg, G. [Abt. fuer Roentgendiagnostik und Computertomographie, Univ. Klinik fuer Innere Medizin, Innsbruck (Austria); Zur Nedden, D. [Abt. fuer Roentgendiagnostik und Computertomographie, Univ. Klinik fuer Innere Medizin, Innsbruck (Austria); Wicke, K. [Abt. fuer Roentgendiagnostik und Computertomographie, Univ. Klinik fuer Innere Medizin, Innsbruck (Austria); Knapp, R. [Abt. fuer Roentgendiagnostik und Computertomographie, Univ. Klinik fuer Innere Medizin, Innsbruck (Austria); Oberhauser, A. [Abt. fuer Roentgendiagnostik und Computertomographie, Univ. Klinik fuer Innere Medizin, Innsbruck (Austria); Resch, H. [Univ. Klinik fuer Unfallchirurgie, Innsbruck (Austria); Sperner, G. [Univ. Klinik fuer Unfallchirurgie, Innsbruck (Austria)

    1992-12-01

    Between 1984 and 1990 312 patients underwent surgery for habitual or recurrent shoulder dislocation. Out then, 65 had a post-operative CT examination. This retrospective study was launched to demonstrate the value of CT in post-operative shoulder imaging. In most cases, CT was done using standardised techniques without contrast medium. Except in 4 cases, an intra-articular double-contrast technique was used. Evaluation was focused on 41 cases after implantation of a wedged bone graft in cases of primary or secondary flat glenoid or widening of a small glenoid with cortical consoles and bone block. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of standardised CT technique in that all necessary information concerning stabilisation of the shoulder joint, sufficient implant of bone grafts and assessment of correct inclination after osteotomy were obtained. (orig.)

  6. Tomographic brain imaging with nucleolar detail and automatic cell counting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hieber, Simone E.; Bikis, Christos; Khimchenko, Anna; Schweighauser, Gabriel; Hench, Jürgen; Chicherova, Natalia; Schulz, Georg; Müller, Bert

    2016-09-01

    Brain tissue evaluation is essential for gaining in-depth insight into its diseases and disorders. Imaging the human brain in three dimensions has always been a challenge on the cell level. In vivo methods lack spatial resolution, and optical microscopy has a limited penetration depth. Herein, we show that hard X-ray phase tomography can visualise a volume of up to 43 mm3 of human post mortem or biopsy brain samples, by demonstrating the method on the cerebellum. We automatically identified 5,000 Purkinje cells with an error of less than 5% at their layer and determined the local surface density to 165 cells per mm2 on average. Moreover, we highlight that three-dimensional data allows for the segmentation of sub-cellular structures, including dendritic tree and Purkinje cell nucleoli, without dedicated staining. The method suggests that automatic cell feature quantification of human tissues is feasible in phase tomograms obtained with isotropic resolution in a label-free manner.

  7. An efficient simultaneous reconstruction technique for tomographic particle image velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Callum; Soria, Julio

    2009-10-01

    To date, Tomo-PIV has involved the use of the multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique (MART), where the intensity of each 3D voxel is iteratively corrected to satisfy one recorded projection, or pixel intensity, at a time. This results in reconstruction times of multiple hours for each velocity field and requires considerable computer memory in order to store the associated weighting coefficients and intensity values for each point in the volume. In this paper, a rapid and less memory intensive reconstruction algorithm is presented based on a multiplicative line-of-sight (MLOS) estimation that determines possible particle locations in the volume, followed by simultaneous iterative correction. Reconstructions of simulated images are presented for two simultaneous algorithms (SART and SMART) as well as the now standard MART algorithm, which indicate that the same accuracy as MART can be achieved 5.5 times faster or 77 times faster with 15 times less memory if the processing and storage of the weighting matrix is considered. Application of MLOS-SMART and MART to a turbulent boundary layer at Re θ = 2200 using a 4 camera Tomo-PIV system with a volume of 1,000 × 1,000 × 160 voxels is discussed. Results indicate improvements in reconstruction speed of 15 times that of MART with precalculated weighting matrix, or 65 times if calculation of the weighting matrix is considered. Furthermore the memory needed to store a large weighting matrix and volume intensity is reduced by almost 40 times in this case.

  8. Tomographic reconstruction of atmospheric volumes from infrared limb-imager measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ungermann, Joern

    2011-08-12

    State-of-the art nadir and limb-sounders, but also in situ measurements, do not offer the capability to highly resolve the atmosphere in all three dimensions. This leaves an observational gap with respect to small-scale structures that arise frequently in the atmosphere and that still lack a quantitative understanding. For instance, filaments and tropopause folds in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS) are crucial for its composition and variability. One way to achieve a highly resolved three-dimensional (3-D) picture of the atmosphere is the tomographic evaluation of limb-imager measurements. This thesis presents a methodology for the tomographic reconstruction of atmospheric constituents. To be able to deal with the large increase of observations and unknowns compared to conventional retrievals, great care is taken to reduce memory consumption and processing time. This method is used to evaluate the performance of two upcoming infrared limb-imager instruments and to prepare their missions. The first examined instrument is the infrared limb-imager on board of PREMIER (Process Exploration through Measurements of Infrared and millimetrewave Emitted Radiation), one of three remaining candidates for ESA's 7th Earth Explorer mission. Scientific goals of PREMIER are, among others, the examination of gravity waves and the quantification of processes controlling atmospheric composition in the UTLS, a region of particular importance for climate change. Simulations based on the performance requirements of this instrument deliver a vertical resolution that is slightly better than its vertical field-of-view (about 0.75 km) and a horizontal resolution of {approx}25km x 70 km. Non-linear end-to-end simulations for various gravity wave patterns demonstrate that the high 3-D resolution of PREMIER considerably extends the range of detectable gravity waves in terms of horizontal and vertical wavelength compared to previous observations. The second examined

  9. A 3-D tomographic trajectory retrieval for the air-borne limb-imager GLORIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ungermann

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Infrared limb sounding from aircraft can provide 2-D curtains of multiple trace gas species. However, conventional limb sounders view perpendicular to the aircraft axis and are unable to resolve the observed airmass along their line-of-sight. GLORIA (Gimballed Limb Observer for Radiance Imaging of the Atmosphere is a new remote sensing instrument able to adjust its horizontal view angle with respect to the aircraft flight direction from 45° to 135°. This will allow for tomographic measurements of mesoscale structures for a wide variety of atmospheric constituents.

    Many flights of the GLORIA instrument will not follow closed curves that allow measuring an airmass from all directions. Consequently, it is examined by means of simulations, what results can be expected from tomographic evaluation of measurements made during a straight flight. It is demonstrated that the achievable resolution and stability is enhanced compared to conventional retrievals. In a second step, it is shown that the incorporation of channels exhibiting different optical depth can greatly enhance the 3-D retrieval quality enabling the exploitation of previously unused spectral samples.

    A second problem for tomographic retrievals is that advection, which can be neglected for conventional retrievals, plays an important role for the time-scales involved in a tomographic measurement flight. This paper presents a method to diagnose the effect of a time-varying atmosphere on a 3-D retrieval and demonstrates an effective way to compensate for effects of advection by incorporating wind-fields from meteorological datasets as a priori information.

  10. Assessment of Acute Antivascular Effects of Vandetanib with High-Resolution Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Computed Tomographic Imaging in a Human Colon Tumor Xenograft Model in the Nude Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joo Ho Tai

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Tumor size is not a reliable marker for the assessment of early antivascular effects of antiangiogenics. In the present study, we used 200-µm in-plane high-resolution dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT to noninvasively assess the immediate antivascular effects of vandetanib in a subcutaneous human colon cancer (LoVo xenograft model in nude rats and to investigate correlation between changes in CT perfusion parameters and tumor volume or immunohistochemical end points. At 3 to 4 weeks after LoVo cell implantation, the animal was gavaged with either vandetanib (50 mg/kg or vehicle twice (22 hours apart and scanned with a preclinical DCE-CT scanner before (0 hour and after treatment (24 hours. Quantitative maps of blood flow (BF and volume (BV of the tumor were calculated from the acquired DCE-CT images. The rats were divided into nonhypovascular, hypovascular, and combined (regardless of vascularity groups. In the nonhypovascular group, significant decreases in both tumor BF and BV were observed in the vandetanib-treated rats compared with increases in the vehicle-treated rats. A significant decrease in BV was detected in the vandetanib-treated rats in the combined group as well. No differences in tumor growth, vascular endothelial growth factor expression, microvessel density, or apoptosis were observed between vandetanib- and vehicle-treated rats in all three groups. These results demonstrate that BF and BV imaging biomarkers from DCE-CT imaging can be used for rapid monitoring of immediate (24 hours after antimicrovascular effects of vandetanib on tumors, even in the absence of significant changes of tumor volume or clinically relevant immunohistochemical end points.

  11. Tomographic lifetime imaging using combined early- and late-arriving photons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Steven S; Rice, William L; Bacskai, Brian J; Kumar, Anand T N

    2014-03-01

    We present a novel, hybrid approach for time domain fluorescence tomography that efficiently combines lifetime multiplexing using late-arriving or asymptotic photons, with the high spatial resolution capability of early photon tomography. We also show that a decay amplitude-based asymptotic approach is superior to direct inversion of late-arriving photons for tomographic lifetime imaging within turbid media. The hybrid reconstruction approach is experimentally shown to recover fluorescent inclusions separated as close as 1.4 mm, with improved resolution and reduced cross talk compared to just using early photons or the asymptotic approach alone.

  12. The accuracy of tomographic particle image velocimetry for measurements of a turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Callum; Coudert, Sebastien; Foucaut, Jean-Marc; Stanislas, Michel; Soria, Julio

    2011-04-01

    To investigate the accuracy of tomographic particle image velocimetry (Tomo-PIV) for turbulent boundary layer measurements, a series of synthetic image-based simulations and practical experiments are performed on a high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer at Reθ = 7,800. Two different approaches to Tomo-PIV are examined using a full-volume slab measurement and a thin-volume "fat" light sheet approach. Tomographic reconstruction is performed using both the standard MART technique and the more efficient MLOS-SMART approach, showing a 10-time increase in processing speed. Random and bias errors are quantified under the influence of the near-wall velocity gradient, reconstruction method, ghost particles, seeding density and volume thickness, using synthetic images. Experimental Tomo-PIV results are compared with hot-wire measurements and errors are examined in terms of the measured mean and fluctuating profiles, probability density functions of the fluctuations, distributions of fluctuating divergence through the volume and velocity power spectra. Velocity gradients have a large effect on errors near the wall and also increase the errors associated with ghost particles, which convect at mean velocities through the volume thickness. Tomo-PIV provides accurate experimental measurements at low wave numbers; however, reconstruction introduces high noise levels that reduces the effective spatial resolution. A thinner volume is shown to provide a higher measurement accuracy at the expense of the measurement domain, albeit still at a lower effective spatial resolution than planar and Stereo-PIV.

  13. Accelerating frequency-domain diffuse optical tomographic image reconstruction using graphics processing units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Jaya; Chandrasekharan, Venkittarayan; Upendra, Vishwajith; Yalavarthy, Phaneendra K

    2010-01-01

    Diffuse optical tomographic image reconstruction uses advanced numerical models that are computationally costly to be implemented in the real time. The graphics processing units (GPUs) offer desktop massive parallelization that can accelerate these computations. An open-source GPU-accelerated linear algebra library package is used to compute the most intensive matrix-matrix calculations and matrix decompositions that are used in solving the system of linear equations. These open-source functions were integrated into the existing frequency-domain diffuse optical image reconstruction algorithms to evaluate the acceleration capability of the GPUs (NVIDIA Tesla C 1060) with increasing reconstruction problem sizes. These studies indicate that single precision computations are sufficient for diffuse optical tomographic image reconstruction. The acceleration per iteration can be up to 40, using GPUs compared to traditional CPUs in case of three-dimensional reconstruction, where the reconstruction problem is more underdetermined, making the GPUs more attractive in the clinical settings. The current limitation of these GPUs in the available onboard memory (4 GB) that restricts the reconstruction of a large set of optical parameters, more than 13,377.

  14. A tensor-based dictionary learning approach to tomographic image reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soltani, Sara; Kilmer, Misha E.; Hansen, Per Christian

    2016-01-01

    We consider tomographic reconstruction using priors in the form of a dictionary learned from training images. The reconstruction has two stages: first we construct a tensor dictionary prior from our training data, and then we pose the reconstruction problem in terms of recovering the expansion...... coefficients in that dictionary. Our approach differs from past approaches in that (a) we use a third-order tensor representation for our images and (b) we recast the reconstruction problem using the tensor formulation. The dictionary learning problem is presented as a non-negative tensor factorization problem...... with sparsity constraints. The reconstruction problem is formulated in a convex optimization framework by looking for a solution with a sparse representation in the tensor dictionary. Numerical results show that our tensor formulation leads to very sparse representations of both the training images...

  15. Re-evaluation of Magnetic Resonance and Computerised Tomographic Imaging in Neuro-Ophthalmic Patients in an Academic Centre

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koekoek, Clarence G. J.; Meiners, Linda C.; Pott, Jan Willem R.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study is to report the frequency of missed diagnoses on magnetic resonance and computerised tomographic imaging in neuro-ophthalmic patients who were referred to an academic ophthalmology department, with apparent normal imaging. The authors included all neuro-ophthalmic patients, ref

  16. Re-evaluation of Magnetic Resonance and Computerised Tomographic Imaging in Neuro-Ophthalmic Patients in an Academic Centre

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koekoek, Clarence G. J.; Meiners, Linda C.; Pott, Jan Willem R.

    The aim of the study is to report the frequency of missed diagnoses on magnetic resonance and computerised tomographic imaging in neuro-ophthalmic patients who were referred to an academic ophthalmology department, with apparent normal imaging. The authors included all neuro-ophthalmic patients,

  17. Tomographic Imaging of Jakarta Area from Cross-correlation of Seismic Ambient Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pranata, B.; Saygin, E.; Cummins, P. R.; Widiyantoro, S.; Nugraha, A. D.; Harjadi, P.; Suhardjono, S.

    2012-12-01

    Seismic imaging of sediment thickness of Jakarta is crucial where Jakarta city is currently being rapidly developed with major installations and high-rise structures being constructed at a fast pace. Therefore, information of surface geology and surface sediment thickness for Jakarta city is urgently required in order to mitigate the effects of earthquake hazards in the future. Because of this need, we deployed 36 broadband and shortperiod stations across Jakarta to record seismic ambient noise. We apply cross-correlation method to the simultaneously recorded data to retrieve interstation Green's functions. We measure group velocity dispersion of the retrieved Green's functions by applying narrowband filters. Dispersion measurements are then inverted with a nonlinear tomographic technique to image the shallow structure of Jakarta and its surrounding regions. Preliminary results from tomographic maps show low velocities dominantly located in central, west and north Jakarta. While the highest rate obtained is between stations in South Jakarta. This conforms with the known geological conditions in which the structure of sedimentary cover in northern Jakarta is thicker than the southern part.

  18. Tomographic imaging of flourescence resonance energy transfer in highly light scattering media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soloviev, Vadim Y.; McGinty, James; Tahir, Khadija B.; Laine, Romain; Stuckey, Daniel W.; Mohan, P. Surya; Hajnal, Joseph V.; Sardini, Alessandro; French, Paul M. W.; Arridge, Simon R.

    2010-02-01

    Three-dimensional localization of protein conformation changes in turbid media using Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) was investigated by tomographic fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). FRET occurs when a donor fluorophore, initially in its electronic excited state, transfers energy to an acceptor fluorophore in close proximity through non-radiative dipole-dipole coupling. An acceptor effectively behaves as a quencher of the donor's fluorescence. The quenching process is accompanied by a reduction in the quantum yield and lifetime of the donor fluorophore. Therefore, FRET can be localized by imaging changes in the quantum yield and the fluorescence lifetime of the donor fluorophore. Extending FRET to diffuse optical tomography has potentially important applications such as in vivo studies in small animal. We show that FRET can be localized by reconstructing the quantum yield and lifetime distribution from time-resolved non-invasive boundary measurements of fluorescence and transmitted excitation radiation. Image reconstruction was obtained by an inverse scattering algorithm. Thus we report, to the best of our knowledge, the first tomographic FLIM-FRET imaging in turbid media. The approach is demonstrated by imaging a highly scattering cylindrical phantom concealing two thin wells containing cytosol preparations of HEK293 cells expressing TN-L15, a cytosolic genetically-encoded calcium FRET sensor. A 10mM calcium chloride solution was added to one of the wells to induce a protein conformation change upon binding to TN-L15, resulting in FRET and a corresponding decrease in the donor fluorescence lifetime. The resulting fluorescence lifetime distribution, the quantum efficiency, absorption and scattering coefficients were reconstructed.

  19. In vivo tomographic imaging with fluorescence and MRI using tumor-targeted dual-labeled nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Y

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Yue Zhang,1 Bin Zhang,1 Fei Liu,1,2 Jianwen Luo,1,3 Jing Bai1 1Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, 2Tsinghua-Peking Center for Life Sciences, 3Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Tsinghua University, Beijing, People's Republic of China Abstract: Dual-modality imaging combines the complementary advantages of different modalities, and offers the prospect of improved preclinical research. The combination of fluorescence imaging and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI provides cross-validated information and direct comparison between these modalities. Here, we report on the application of a novel tumor-targeted, dual-labeled nanoparticle (NP, utilizing iron oxide as the MRI contrast agent and near infrared (NIR dye Cy5.5 as the fluorescent agent. Results of in vitro experiments verified the specificity of the NP to tumor cells. In vivo tumor targeting and uptake of the NPs in a mouse model were visualized by fluorescence and MR imaging collected at different time points. Quantitative analysis was carried out to evaluate the efficacy of MRI contrast enhancement. Furthermore, tomographic images were also acquired using both imaging modalities and cross-validated information of tumor location and size between these two modalities was revealed. The results demonstrate that the use of dual-labeled NPs can facilitate the dual-modal detection of tumors, information cross-validation, and direct comparison by combing fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT and MRI. Keywords: dual-modality, fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, nanoparticle

  20. Comparing seismic tomographic images from automatically- and manually-detected arrival times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spallarossa, Daniele; Scafidi, Davide; Turino, Chiara; Ferretti, Gabriele; Viganò, Alfio

    2013-04-01

    In this work we compare local earthquake tomographic images obtained using arrival times detected by an automatic picking procedure and by an expert seismologist. For this purpose we select a reference dataset composed of 476 earthquakes occurred in the Trentino region (north-eastern Italy) in the period 1994-2007. Local magnitudes are comprised between 0.8 and 5.3. Original recordings are mainly from the Provincia Autonoma di Trento (PAT), and from other networks operating in the surrounding areas (Istituto Nazionale di Oceanografia e di Geofisica Sperimentale - INOGS; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia - INGV; others available via the European Integrated Data Archive). The automatic picking of P and S phases is performed through a picker engine based on the Akaike information criterion (AIC). In particular, the proposed automatic phase picker includes: (i) envelope calculation, (ii) band-pass filtering, (iii) Akaike information criterion (AIC) detector for both P- and S-arrivals, (iv) checking for impulsive arrivals, (v) evaluation of expected S onset on the basis of a preliminary location derived from the P-arrival times, and (vi) quality assessment. Simultaneously, careful manual inspection by expert seismologists is applied to the same waveform dataset, to obtain manually-repicked phase readings. Both automatic and manual procedures generate a comparable amount of readings (about 6000 P- and 5000 S-phases). These data are used for the determination of two similar 3-D propagation models for the Trentino region, applying the SIMULPS code. In order to quantitatively estimate the difference of these two models we measure their discrepancies in terms of velocity at all grid points. The small differences observed among tomographic results allow us to demonstrate that the automatic picking engine adopted in this test can be used for reprocessing large amount of seismic recordings with the aim of perform a local tomographic study with an accuracy

  1. Comparison of fluorescence tomographic imaging in mice with early-arriving and quasi-continuous-wave photons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedre, Mark; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2010-02-01

    The highly diffuse nature of light propagation in biological tissue is a major challenge for obtaining high-fidelity fluorescence tomographic images. In this work we investigated the use of time-gated detection of early-arriving photons for reducing the effects of light scatter in mice relative to quasi-cw photons. When analyzing sinographic representations of the measured data, it was determined that early photons allowed a reduction in the measured FWHM of fluorescent targets by a factor of approximately 2-3, yielding a significant improvement in the tomographic image reconstruction quality.

  2. Microwave Tomographic Imaging of Cerebrovascular Accidents by Using High-Performance Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Tournier, P -H; Bonazzoli, M; de Buhan, M; Darbas, M; Dolean, V; Hecht, F; Jolivet, P; Kanfoud, I El; Migliaccio, C; Nataf, F; Pichot, C; Semenov, S

    2016-01-01

    The motivation of this work is the detection of cerebrovascular accidents by microwave tomographic imaging. This requires the solution of an inverse problem relying on a minimization algorithm (for example, gradient-based), where successive iterations consist in repeated solutions of a direct problem. The reconstruction algorithm is extremely computationally intensive and makes use of efficient parallel algorithms and high-performance computing. The feasibility of this type of imaging is conditioned on one hand by an accurate reconstruction of the material properties of the propagation medium and on the other hand by a considerable reduction in simulation time. Fulfilling these two requirements will enable a very rapid and accurate diagnosis. From the mathematical and numerical point of view, this means solving Maxwell's equations in time-harmonic regime by appropriate domain decomposition methods, which are naturally adapted to parallel architectures.

  3. Classification of wet aged related macular degeneration using optical coherence tomographic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haq, Anam; Mir, Fouwad Jamil; Yasin, Ubaid Ullah; Khan, Shoab A.

    2013-12-01

    Wet Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is a type of age related macular degeneration. In order to detect Wet AMD we look for Pigment Epithelium detachment (PED) and fluid filled region caused by choroidal neovascularization (CNV). This form of AMD can cause vision loss if not treated in time. In this article we have proposed an automated system for detection of Wet AMD in Optical coherence tomographic (OCT) images. The proposed system extracts PED and CNV from OCT images using segmentation and morphological operations and then detailed feature set are extracted. These features are then passed on to the classifier for classification. Finally performance measures like accuracy, sensitivity and specificity are calculated and the classifier delivering the maximum performance is selected as a comparison measure. Our system gives higher performance using SVM as compared to other methods.

  4. X-ray tomographic intervention guidance: Towards real-time 4D imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Bartling, Sönke

    2016-01-01

    Implementation of real-time, continuous, and three-dimensional imaging (4D intervention guidance) would be a quantum leap for minimally-invasive medicine. It allows guidance during interventions by assessing the spatial position of instruments continuously in respect to their surroundings. Recent research showed that it is feasible using X-ray and novel tomographic reconstruction approaches. Radiation dose stays within reasonable limits. This article provides abstractions and background information together with an outlook on these prospects. There are explanations of how situational awareness during interventions is generated today and how they will be in future. The differences between fluoroscopically and CT-guided interventions are eluted to within the context of these developments. The exploration of uncharted terrain between these current methods is worth pursuing. Necessary image quality of 4D intervention guidance varies relevantly from that of standard computed tomography. Means to analyze the risk-b...

  5. TECHNICAL DESIGN NOTE Multi-pass light amplification for tomographic particle image velocimetry applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaemi, Sina; Scarano, Fulvio

    2010-12-01

    The light source budget is a critical issue for tomographic particle image velocimetry (Tomo-PIV) systems due to its requirement for large illuminated volume and imaging at small apertures. In this work, a light amplification system based on the multi-pass concept is investigated for Tomo-PIV applications. The system design is performed on the basis of a theoretical model providing an estimation of the most important system parameters and above all the amplification gain. The multi-pass light amplification concept is verified experimentally by measuring the scattered light intensity across the illuminated volume. The results demonstrate a gain factor of 7 and 5 times in comparison with the single-pass and double-pass illumination approaches, respectively.

  6. Hybrid Photoacoustic/Ultrasound Tomograph for Real-Time Finger Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeri, Milan; Bost, Wolfgang; Sénégond, Nicolas; Tretbar, Steffen; Fournelle, Marc

    2017-10-01

    We report a target-enclosing, hybrid tomograph with a total of 768 elements based on capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducer technology and providing fast, high-resolution 2-D/3-D photoacoustic and ultrasound tomography tailored to finger imaging. A freely programmable ultrasound beamforming platform sampling data at 80 MHz was developed to realize plane wave transmission under multiple angles. A multiplexing unit enables the connection and control of a large number of elements. Fast image reconstruction is provided by GPU processing. The tomograph is composed of four independent and fully automated movable arc-shaped transducers, allowing imaging of all three finger joints. The system benefits from photoacoustics, yielding high optical contrast and enabling visualization of finger vascularization, and ultrasound provides morphologic information on joints and surrounding tissue. A diode-pumped, Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and an optical parametric oscillator are used to broaden the spectrum of emitted wavelengths to provide multispectral imaging. Custom-made optical fiber bundles enable illumination of the region of interest in the plane of acoustic detection. Precision in positioning of the probe in motion is ensured by use of a motor-driven guide slide. The current position of the probe is encoded by the stage and used to relate ultrasound and photoacoustic signals to the corresponding region of interest of the suspicious finger joint. The system is characterized in phantoms and a healthy human finger in vivo. The results obtained promise to provide new opportunities in finger diagnostics and establish photoacoustic/ultrasound-tomography in medical routine. Copyright © 2017 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The homogeneous and dual-medium cell's refractive index decoupling method and entropy tomographic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Z. D.; Xu, Y. Y.; Ji, Y.; Jin, W. F.; Zheng, H. R.; Zhang, L.; Wang, Y. W.

    2016-10-01

    In the paper, a decoupling method for homogeneous and dual-medium cells' refractive index, and the entropy tomographic phase imaging method are proposed. Based on the decoupling method, the 3D morphology of sample can be obtained by the imaging method, which only needs two phase images of the cell. Thus the information about 3D refractive index distribution is given, and the 3D structure image of the model is reconstructed as well based on the relationship between the refractive index and thickness. In order to verify these methods, we set up the typical models after analysing the characteristic of blood cells, and the related orthogonal phase images are obtained by simulation experiment. Thus the 3D reconstructed structure images of the models are presented in this paper. Finally, the feasibility of this method is verified by simulating on a red blood cell and a monocyte model. The results show that subsurface imaging of samples can be achieved based on this method with a good accuracy.

  8. Towards a 3-D tomographic retrieval for the air-borne limb-imager GLORIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ungermann

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available GLORIA (Gimballed Limb Observer for Radiance Imaging of the Atmosphere is a new remote sensing instrument essentially combining a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer with a two-dimensional (2-D detector array in combination with a highly flexible gimbal mount. It will be housed in the belly pod of the German research aircraft HALO (High Altitude and Long Range Research Aircraft. It is unique in its combination of high spatial and state-of-the art spectral resolution. Furthermore, the horizontal view angle with respect to the aircraft flight direction can be varied from 45° to 135°. This allows for tomographic measurements of mesoscale events for a wide variety of atmospheric constituents.

    In this paper, a tomographic retrieval scheme is presented, which is able to fully exploit the manifold radiance observations of the GLORIA limb sounder. The algorithm is optimized for massive 3-D retrievals of several hundred thousands of measurements and atmospheric constituents on common hardware. The new scheme is used to explore the capabilities of GLORIA to sound the atmosphere in full 3-D with respect to the choice of the flightpath and to different measurement modes of the instrument using ozone as a test species. It is demonstrated that the achievable resolution should approach 200 m vertically and 20 km–30 km horizontally. Finally, a comparison of the 3-D inversion with conventional 1-D inversions using the assumption of a horizontally homogeneous atmosphere is performed.

  9. Tomographic image of the crust and uppermost mantle of the Ionian and Aegean regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. N. Stavrakakis

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a tomographic view of the crust and uppermost mantle beneath the Central Mediterranean area obtained from P-wave arrival times of regional earthquakes selected from the ISC bulletin. The P-wave velocity anomalies are obtained using Thurber's algorithm that jointly relocates earthquakes and computes velocity adjustments with respect to a starting model. A specific algorithm has been applied to achieve a distribution of epicentres as even as possible. A data set of 1009 events and 49072 Pg and Pn phases was selected. We find a low velocity belt in the crust, evident in the map view at 25 km of depth, beneath the Hellenic arc. A low velocity anomaly extends at 40 km of depth under the Aegean back arc basin. High velocities are present at Moho depth beneath the Ionian sea close to the Calabrian and Aegean arcs. The tomographic images suggest a close relationship between P-wave velocity pattern and the subduction systems of the studied area.

  10. Measurement of facial soft tissues thickness using 3D computed tomographic images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Ho Gul; Kim, Kee Deog; Shin, Dong Won; Hu, Kyung Seok; Lee, Jae Bum; Park, Hyok; Park, Chang Seo [Yonsei Univ. Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Seung Ho [Catholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-03-15

    To evaluate accuracy and reliability of program to measure facial soft tissue thickness using 3D computed tomographic images by comparing with direct measurement. One cadaver was scanned with a Helical CT with 3 mm slice thickness and 3 mm/sec table speed. The acquired data was reconstructed with 1.5 mm reconstruction interval and the images were transferred to a personal computer. The facial soft tissue thickness were measured using a program developed newly in 3D image. For direct measurement, the cadaver was cut with a bone cutter and then a ruler was placed above the cut side. The procedure was followed by taking pictures of the facial soft tissues with a high-resolution digital camera. Then the measurements were done in the photographic images and repeated for ten times. A repeated measure analysis of variance was adopted to compare and analyze the measurements resulting from the two different methods. Comparison according to the areas was analyzed by Mann-Whitney test. There were no statistically significant differences between the direct measurements and those using the 3D images(p>0.05). There were statistical differences in the measurements on 17 points but all the points except 2 points showed a mean difference of 0.5 mm or less. The developed software program to measure the facial soft tissue thickness using 3D images was so accurate that it allows to measure facial soft tissue thickness more easily in forensic science and anthropology.

  11. 3-D Tomographic Imaging of the Chicxulub Impact Crater: Preliminary Results From EW#0501

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surendra, A. T.; Barton, P. J.; Vermeesch, P. M.; Morgan, J. V.; Warner, M. R.; Gulick, S. P.; Christeson, G. L.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.; Rebolledo-Vieyra, M.; Melosh, H. J.; McDonald, M. A.; Goldin, T.; Mendoza, K.

    2005-05-01

    The Chicxulub impact structure provides a unique opportunity to investigate the sub-surface morphology of large craters on Earth and other planets. The structure of the crater interior is still poorly known and there is much uncertainty over the sequence of events by which these large craters form and the magnitude of the subsequent catastrophic environmental effects. In early 2005, a reflection-refraction survey aboard the R/V Maurice Ewing imaged the deep structure of the Chicxulub impact. We present wide-angle data collected by a 3-D grid of 50 ocean bottom seismometers (OBSs), 86 three-component land stations and a 6 km long hydrophone streamer. The OBS grid, designed to image the peak ring and underlying structure of the northwestern quadrant of the crater, recorded shots from several seismic profiles in various orientations. Many of these profiles extended past the crater rim imaging to the base of the crust. Travel-time picks from this dataset, combined with existing 1996 data, will be inverted using the JIVE3-D tomographic inversion program to create a fully 3-D velocity model of the crater interior. The interpretation of the velocity model will focus on the morphology of the peak ring and the central uplift, and the distribution of breccia and suevite (an impact related breccia/melt) in the centre of the crater. We will calculate the Poisson's ratio for different areas of the crater using both the P-wave velocity model and S-wave arrivals, including those from the 1996 land station data. Comparisons of these values with measurements on the Yaxcopoil-1 core taken from within the crater provide ground-truth for our tomographic model. The contrast in Poisson's ratio between areas of suevite and the surrounding rock further constrain the distribution of breccia and suevite.

  12. The accuracy of tomographic particle image velocimetry for measurements of a turbulent boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atkinson, Callum [Monash University, Laboratory for Turbulence Research in Aerospace and Combustion, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Victoria (Australia); Ecole Centrale de Lille, Bd Paul Langevin, Laboratoire de Mecanique de Lille (UMR CNRS 8107), Villeneuve d' Ascq cedex (France); Coudert, Sebastien; Foucaut, Jean-Marc; Stanislas, Michel [Ecole Centrale de Lille, Bd Paul Langevin, Laboratoire de Mecanique de Lille (UMR CNRS 8107), Villeneuve d' Ascq cedex (France); Soria, Julio [Monash University, Laboratory for Turbulence Research in Aerospace and Combustion, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Victoria (Australia)

    2011-04-15

    To investigate the accuracy of tomographic particle image velocimetry (Tomo-PIV) for turbulent boundary layer measurements, a series of synthetic image-based simulations and practical experiments are performed on a high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer at Re{sub {theta}} = 7,800. Two different approaches to Tomo-PIV are examined using a full-volume slab measurement and a thin-volume ''fat'' light sheet approach. Tomographic reconstruction is performed using both the standard MART technique and the more efficient MLOS-SMART approach, showing a 10-time increase in processing speed. Random and bias errors are quantified under the influence of the near-wall velocity gradient, reconstruction method, ghost particles, seeding density and volume thickness, using synthetic images. Experimental Tomo-PIV results are compared with hot-wire measurements and errors are examined in terms of the measured mean and fluctuating profiles, probability density functions of the fluctuations, distributions of fluctuating divergence through the volume and velocity power spectra. Velocity gradients have a large effect on errors near the wall and also increase the errors associated with ghost particles, which convect at mean velocities through the volume thickness. Tomo-PIV provides accurate experimental measurements at low wave numbers; however, reconstruction introduces high noise levels that reduces the effective spatial resolution. A thinner volume is shown to provide a higher measurement accuracy at the expense of the measurement domain, albeit still at a lower effective spatial resolution than planar and Stereo-PIV. (orig.)

  13. [OsiriX, a useful tool for processing tomographic images in patients with facial fracture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra-Martínez, Eduardo; Cienfuegos-Monroy, Ricardo; Fernández-Sobrino, Gerardo

    2009-01-01

    OsiriX, a Mac OS X-based open source program, is presented as a useful tool to process tomographic images for diagnosis and preoperative planning in patients with facial fractures. CT scans were performed on 124 patients with facial fractures treated at the Department of Maxillofacial and Reconstructive Surgery of the Hospital de Traumatología y Ortopedia "Lomas Verdes" in Mexico City. Information obtained was recorded in DICOM format in CDs and processed in a Macintosh laptop with OsiriX software, doing multiplanar and 3D reconstructions. Surgical findings were compared to the images obtained by the software. Of the surgical findings, 96.5% matched with the OsiriX images. Only 3.5% of the OsiriX images were not consistent because of distortion or artifacts in the CT due to firearm projectiles and Erich arch bars near the involved area. Based on the results obtained, the authors consider that the OsiriX software is a useful tool for diagnosis and preoperative planning in patients with facial fractures. Furthermore, it prevents the loss of information due to the process of image selection by the radiology staff.

  14. Anatomical Variations of Carotid Artery and Optic Nerve in Sphenoid Sinus Using Computerized Tomographic Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikakhlagh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Sphenoid sinus is surrounded by many vital vascular and nervous structures. In more than 20% of patients with chronic sinusitis, involvement of sphenoid sinus has been observed. Besides, sphenoid sinus is an appropriate route to access anterior and middle cranial fossa in surgery. Therefore, it is important to have an adequate knowledge about the contents of sphenoid sinus and its proximity for nasal endoscopy, sinus surgeries and neurosurgeries. Objectives The aim of this study was to study sphenoid sinus proximity with carotid artery and the optic nerve using computerized tomographic imaging. Materials and Methods In this prospective study, computerized tomographic images of sphenoid sinus of patients referred to Imam Khomeini and Apadana hospitals were studied. The images were studied regarding any bulging, as well as not having a bone covering in sphenoid sinus regarding internal carotid artery and optic nerve. Furthermore, unilateralness or bilateralness of their relationships was studied. Results Among 468 coronal and axial CT scan images of sphenoid sinus, 365 (78% showed post-sellar pneumatization and 103 (22% pre-sellar pneumatization. Regarding existence of internal septa, 346 (74% cases showed multiple septation, and the remaining images were reported to have a single septum. According to the reports of CT scan images, the existence of bulging as a result of internal carotid artery and uncovered artery were 4.22% and 5.8% in the right sinus, 4.9% and 5.4% in the left sinus, and 4.34% and 4.6% in both sinuses, respectively. According to the reports of CT scan images, existence of bulging as a result of optic nerve and uncovered nerve were 5.7% and 4.3% in the right sinus, 6% and 5.4% in the left sinus, and 12% and 3.2% in both sinuses, respectively. Conclusions Due to variability of sphenoid sinus pneumatization and the separator blade of the two sinus cavities, careful attention is required during sinus surgery to avoid

  15. Recovery and Visualization of 3D Structure of Chromosomes from Tomographic Reconstruction Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsap Leonid V

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this work include automatic recovery and visualization of a 3D chromosome structure from a sequence of 2D tomographic reconstruction images taken through the nucleus of a cell. Structure is very important for biologists as it affects chromosome functions, behavior of the cell, and its state. Analysis of chromosome structure is significant in the detection of diseases, identification of chromosomal abnormalities, study of DNA structural conformation, in-depth study of chromosomal surface morphology, observation of in vivo behavior of the chromosomes over time, and in monitoring environmental gene mutations. The methodology incorporates thresholding based on a histogram analysis with a polyline splitting algorithm, contour extraction via active contours, and detection of the 3D chromosome structure by establishing corresponding regions throughout the slices. Visualization using point cloud meshing generates a 3D surface. The 3D triangular mesh of the chromosomes provides surface detail and allows a user to interactively analyze chromosomes using visualization software.

  16. Comparison between resistography readings and tomographic images for internal assessment in trees trunks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Martins de Almeida Rollo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Risk assessment of tree falls is essential for urban management and demands reliable methods and criteria capable of providing accurate information on assessed individuals. Among the tools currently used, resistograph stands out since it enables the detection of biomechanical problems through readings of needle penetration resistance. Recently, impulse tomography has been used as advanced technology to detect inner rottenness based on measurements of energy propagation velocity in inner tissues, generating a tomographic image that highlights higher and lower density areas related to lesions and rot processes. We compared these two risk assessment methods of trees to evaluate data reliability generated from impulse tomography, contrasting its results with data from resistograph. We obtained a model with high determination coefficient (R² of 0.9977, showing that data provided by impulse tomography are high quality and reliable.

  17. Tomographic particle image velocimetry over a triangular prism in unidirectional flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sou, In Mei; Calantoni, Joseph

    2011-11-01

    Using tomographic particle image velocimetry (Tomo-PIV), the full three-dimensional-three-component (3D-3C) flow structure and turbulence characteristics over a triangular prism in a recirculating water tunnel were investigated. Here we present preliminary results from a new Tomo-PIV system for subcritical Froude number flows. Large-scale vortex shedding from the tip of the triangular prism is observed. Results of coherent structure organization analyzed by 3D vorticity calculation will be presented. Using the full 3D-3C instantaneous velocity field, turbulent kinetic energy is directly evaluated without any of the assumptions often needed for 2D PIV measurements. Details of the experimental setup including a unique device designed to perform our Tomo-PIV volume calibration will be discussed. We perform an in-depth turbulent kinetic energy budget and explore the feasibility of extending the measurement technique to other complex flows.

  18. Recovery and Visualization of 3D Structure of Chromosomes from Tomographic Reconstruction Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babu, S; Liao, P; Shin, M C; Tsap, L V

    2004-04-28

    The objectives of this work include automatic recovery and visualization of a 3D chromosome structure from a sequence of 2D tomographic reconstruction images taken through the nucleus of a cell. Structure is very important for biologists as it affects chromosome functions, behavior of the cell and its state. Chromosome analysis is significant in the detection of deceases and in monitoring environmental gene mutations. The algorithm incorporates thresholding based on a histogram analysis with a polyline splitting algorithm, contour extraction via active contours, and detection of the 3D chromosome structure by establishing corresponding regions throughout the slices. Visualization using point cloud meshing generates a 3D surface. The 3D triangular mesh of the chromosomes provides surface detail and allows a user to interactively analyze chromosomes using visualization software.

  19. Post-processing methods of rendering and visualizing 3-D reconstructed tomographic images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, S.T.C. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1997-02-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to discuss the computer processing techniques of tomographic images, after they have been generated by imaging scanners, for volume visualization. Volume visualization is concerned with the representation, manipulation, and rendering of volumetric data. Since the first digital images were produced from computed tomography (CT) scanners in the mid 1970s, applications of visualization in medicine have expanded dramatically. Today, three-dimensional (3D) medical visualization has expanded from using CT data, the first inherently digital source of 3D medical data, to using data from various medical imaging modalities, including magnetic resonance scanners, positron emission scanners, digital ultrasound, electronic and confocal microscopy, and other medical imaging modalities. We have advanced from rendering anatomy to aid diagnosis and visualize complex anatomic structures to planning and assisting surgery and radiation treatment. New, more accurate and cost-effective procedures for clinical services and biomedical research have become possible by integrating computer graphics technology with medical images. This trend is particularly noticeable in current market-driven health care environment. For example, interventional imaging, image-guided surgery, and stereotactic and visualization techniques are now stemming into surgical practice. In this presentation, we discuss only computer-display-based approaches of volumetric medical visualization. That is, we assume that the display device available is two-dimensional (2D) in nature and all analysis of multidimensional image data is to be carried out via the 2D screen of the device. There are technologies such as holography and virtual reality that do provide a {open_quotes}true 3D screen{close_quotes}. To confine the scope, this presentation will not discuss such approaches.

  20. Removal of ring artifacts in computed tomographic imaging using iterative center weighted median filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadi, Fazle; Lee, Soo Yeol; Hasan, Md Kamrul

    2010-01-01

    A new iterative center weighted median filter (ICWMF) for ring artifact reduction from the micro-computed tomographic (micro-CT) image is proposed in this paper. The center weight of the median filter is computed based on the characteristic of the ring artifact in the mean curve of the projection data. The filter operates on the deviation of the mean curve to smooth the ring generating peaks and troughs iteratively while preserving the details due to image. A convergence criterion for the iterative algorithm is determined from the distribution of the local deviation computed from the mean curve deviation. The estimate of the mean curve obtained using the ICWMF is used to correct the ring corrupted projection data from which reconstruction gives the ring artifact suppressed micro-CT image. Test results on both the synthetic and real images demonstrate that the ring artifacts can be more effectively suppressed using our method as compared to other ring removal techniques reported in the literature. 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Full-field AO-assisted OCT for high-resolution tomographic imaging of the retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glanc, M.; Lafaille, D.; Puget, P.; Lacombe, F.; Vabre, L.; Levecq, X.; Chateau, N.

    2006-02-01

    Since the advent of Adaptive Optics in ophthalmic instrumentation, several attempts for improving the performances of the existing observing techniques, either in imaging or tomography, have been made. For long, Adaptive Optics have proven its ability to restore high lateral resolution with the SLO or flood imaging, or more recently to enhance the interferometric contrast and hence, the sensitivity, of OCT. Nevertheless, the direct acquisition of en face tomographic images equivalent to horizontal optical sections of the retinal tissue is still the objective of intensive developments. We report here a new instrumental approach where a time domain full field OCT setup has been coupled with a double pass adaptive optics system, providing 300 x 300 x 4 m instantaneous optical sections of biological tissues. We will describe how the interferometric contrast is derived without any modulation of the optical path, thus giving access to targets as critical, because unstable, as the retinal tissue during in vivo ophthalmic examinations. The advantages of this new design, which benefits from the implementation of very recent deformable mirrors, featuring simultaneously a higher actuators density and a much larger stroke, will be discussed, and the ability of the system to accommodate for variable pupil sizes, thanks to wavefront sensing techniques optimized for ophthalmology, are commented. The performances of the system, in terms of X,Y,Z resolution, sensitivity, registration capability and / or image stabilisation are discussed and illustrated with results obtained in the laboratory and in clinical environment.

  2. Fractal analysis of en face tomographic images obtained with full field optical coherence tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Wanrong; Zhu, Yue [Department of Optical Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Jiangsu (China)

    2017-03-15

    The quantitative modeling of the imaging signal of pathological areas and healthy areas is necessary to improve the specificity of diagnosis with tomographic en face images obtained with full field optical coherence tomography (FFOCT). In this work, we propose to use the depth-resolved change in the fractal parameter as a quantitative specific biomarker of the stages of disease. The idea is based on the fact that tissue is a random medium and only statistical parameters that characterize tissue structure are appropriate. We successfully relate the imaging signal in FFOCT to the tissue structure in terms of the scattering function and the coherent transfer function of the system. The formula is then used to analyze the ratio of the Fourier transforms of the cancerous tissue to the normal tissue. We found that when the tissue changes from the normal to cancerous the ratio of the spectrum of the index inhomogeneities takes the form of an inverse power law and the changes in the fractal parameter can be determined by estimating slopes of the spectra of the ratio plotted on a log-log scale. The fresh normal and cancer liver tissues were imaged to demonstrate the potential diagnostic value of the method at early stages when there are no significant changes in tissue microstructures. (copyright 2016 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. Advances in tomographic PIV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Novara, M.

    2013-01-01

    This research deals with advanced developments in 3D particle image velocimetry based on the tomographic PIV technique (Tomo-PIV). The latter is a relatively recent measurement technique introduced by Elsinga et al. in 2005, which is based on the tomographic reconstruction of particle tracers in thr

  4. Dynamical energy loss as a novel Quark-Gluon Plasma tomographic tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djordjevic, Magdalena

    2016-12-01

    High momentum suppression of light and heavy flavor observables is considered to be an excellent probe of jet-medium interactions in QCD matter created at RHIC and LHC. Utilizing this tool requires accurate suppression predictions for different experiments, probes and experimental conditions, and their unbiased comparison with experimental data. With this goal, we developed the dynamical energy loss formalism towards generating predictions for non-central collisions; the formalism takes into account both radiative and collisional energy loss computed within the same theoretical framework, dynamical (as opposed to static) scattering centers, finite magnetic mass, running coupling and uses no free parameters in comparison with experimental data. Within this formalism, we provided predictions, and a systematic comparison with experimental data, for a diverse set of suppression data: all available light and heavy flavor probes, lower and high momentum ranges, various centrality ranges and various collision energies at RHIC and LHC. We here also provide clear qualitative and quantitative predictions for soon to become available LHC experimental data. Comprehensive agreement between our predictions and experimental results provides a good deal of confidence that our dynamical energy loss formalism can well explain the jet-medium interactions in QGP, which will be further tested by the obtained predictions for the upcoming data. Application of this model, as a novel high-precision tomographic tool of QGP medium, are also discussed.

  5. A distribution-based parametrization for improved tomographic imaging of solute plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pidlisecky, A.; Singha, K.; Day-Lewis, F. D.

    2011-01-01

    Difference geophysical tomography (e.g. radar, resistivity and seismic) is used increasingly for imaging fluid flow and mass transport associated with natural and engineered hydrologic phenomena, including tracer experiments, in situ remediation and aquifer storage and recovery. Tomographic data are collected over time, inverted and differenced against a background image to produce 'snapshots' revealing changes to the system; these snapshots readily provide qualitative information on the location and morphology of plumes of injected tracer, remedial amendment or stored water. In principle, geometric moments (i.e. total mass, centres of mass, spread, etc.) calculated from difference tomograms can provide further quantitative insight into the rates of advection, dispersion and mass transfer; however, recent work has shown that moments calculated from tomograms are commonly biased, as they are strongly affected by the subjective choice of regularization criteria. Conventional approaches to regularization (Tikhonov) and parametrization (image pixels) result in tomograms which are subject to artefacts such as smearing or pixel estimates taking on the sign opposite to that expected for the plume under study. Here, we demonstrate a novel parametrization for imaging plumes associated with hydrologic phenomena. Capitalizing on the mathematical analogy between moment-based descriptors of plumes and the moment-based parameters of probability distributions, we design an inverse problem that (1) is overdetermined and computationally efficient because the image is described by only a few parameters, (2) produces tomograms consistent with expected plume behaviour (e.g. changes of one sign relative to the background image), (3) yields parameter estimates that are readily interpreted for plume morphology and offer direct insight into hydrologic processes and (4) requires comparatively few data to achieve reasonable model estimates. We demonstrate the approach in a series of

  6. Tomographic imaging of an ultrasonic field in a plane by use of a linear array: theory and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Kendall R; Johnston, Patrick H

    2005-11-01

    Quantitative ultrasonic characterization of in-homogeneous and anisotropic materials is often difficult due to undesired phenomena such as beam steering and phase aberration of the insonifying field. We introduce a method based on tomographic reconstruction techniques for the visualization of an ultrasonic field using a linear array rotated in a plane. Tomographic reconstruction of the ultrasonic field is made possible through the phase-sensitive nature of the tall, narrow piezoelectric elements of a linear array that act as parallel line integrators of the pressure field. We validate the proposed imaging method through numerical simulations of propagated ultrasonic fields based upon the angular spectrum decomposition technique. We then demonstrate the technique with experimental measurements of two textile composites and a reference water path. We reconstruct images of the real and imaginary parts of a transmitted 2 MHz ultrasonic field that are then combined to reconstruct images of the power and unwrapped phase. We also construct images of the attenuation and phase shift for several regions of the composites. Our results demonstrate that tomographic imaging of an ultrasonic field in a plane using a rotated linear array can potentially improve ultrasonic characterization of complex materials.

  7. Modeling the RV jitter of early M dwarfs using tomographic imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Hébrard, É M; Delfosse, X; Morin, J; Moutou, C; Boisse, I

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we show how tomographic imaging (Zeeman Doppler Imaging, ZDI) can be used to characterize stellar activity and magnetic field topologies, ultimately allowing to filter out the radial velocity (RV) activity jitter of M-dwarf moderate rotators. This work is based on spectropolarimetric observations of a sample of five weakly-active early M-dwarfs (GJ 205, GJ 358, GJ 410, GJ479, GJ 846) with HARPS-Pol and NARVAL. These stars have v sin i and RV jitters in the range 1-2 km/s and 2.7-10.0 m/s rms respectively. Using a modified version of ZDI applied to sets of phase-resolved Least-Squares- Decon- volved (LSD) profiles of unpolarized spectral lines, we are able to characterize the distribution of active regions at the stellar surfaces. We find that darks spots cover less than 2% of the total surface of the stars of our sample. Our technique is e cient at modeling the rotationally mod- ulated component of the activity jitter, and succeeds at decreasing the amplitude of this com- ponent by typical facto...

  8. Estimation of the thermal conductivity of hemp based insulation material from 3D tomographic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sawalhi, R.; Lux, J.; Salagnac, P.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we are interested in the structural and thermal characterization of natural fiber insulation materials. The thermal performance of these materials depends on the arrangement of fibers, which is the consequence of the manufacturing process. In order to optimize these materials, thermal conductivity models can be used to correlate some relevant structural parameters with the effective thermal conductivity. However, only a few models are able to take into account the anisotropy of such material related to the fibers orientation, and these models still need realistic input data (fiber orientation distribution, porosity, etc.). The structural characteristics are here directly measured on a 3D tomographic image using advanced image analysis techniques. Critical structural parameters like porosity, pore and fiber size distribution as well as local fiber orientation distribution are measured. The results of the tested conductivity models are then compared with the conductivity tensor obtained by numerical simulation on the discretized 3D microstructure, as well as available experimental measurements. We show that 1D analytical models are generally not suitable for assessing the thermal conductivity of such anisotropic media. Yet, a few anisotropic models can still be of interest to relate some structural parameters, like the fiber orientation distribution, to the thermal properties. Finally, our results emphasize that numerical simulations on 3D realistic microstructure is a very interesting alternative to experimental measurements.

  9. [¹³N]Ammonia positron emission tomographic/computed tomographic imaging targeting glutamine synthetase expression in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xinchong; Zhang, Xiangsong; Yi, Chang; Liu, Yubo; He, Qiao

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression of glutamine synthetase (GS) in prostate cancer (PCa) and the utility of [¹³N]ammonia positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in the imaging of PCa. The uptake ratio of [¹³N]ammonia and the expression of GS in PC3 and DU145 cells was measured. Thirty-four patients with suspected PCa underwent [¹³N]ammonia PET/CT imaging, and immunohistochemistry staining of GS was performed. The uptake of [¹³N]ammonia in PC3 and DU145 cells elevated along with the decrease in glutamine in medium. The expression of GS messenger ribonucleic acid and protein also increased when glutamine was deprived. In biopsy samples, the GS expression scores were significantly higher in PCa tissue than in benign tissues (p glutamine. GS is the main reason for the uptake of [¹³N]ammonia, and [¹³N]ammonia is a useful tracer for PCa imaging.

  10. Clinical usefulness of facial soft tissues thickness measurement using 3D computed tomographic images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Ho Gul; Kim, Kee Deog; Hu, Kyung Seok; Lee, Jae Bum; Park, Hyok [Maxtron Inc., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Seung Ho [Catholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Seong Ho; Kim, Chong Kwan; Park, Chang Seo [Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-06-15

    To evaluate clinical usefulness of facial soft tissue thickness measurement using 3D computed tomographic images. One cadaver that had sound facial soft tissues was chosen for the study. The cadaver was scanned with a Helical CT under following scanning protocols about slice thickness and table speed: 3 mm and 3 mm/sec, 5 mm and 5 mm/sec, 7 mm and 7 mm/sec. The acquired data were reconstructed 1.5, 2.5, 3.5 mm reconstruction interval respectively and the images were transferred to a personal computer. Using a program developed to measure facial soft tissue thickness in 3D image, the facial soft tissue thickness was measured. After the ten-time repeation of the measurement for ten times, repeated measure analysis of variance (ANOVA) was adopted to compare and analyze the measurements using the three scanning protocols. Comparison according to the areas was analysed by Mann-Whitney test. There were no statistically significant intraobserver differences in the measurements of the facial soft tissue thickness using the three scanning protocols (p>0.05). There were no statistically significant differences between measurements in the 3 mm slice thickness and those in the 5 mm, 7 mm slice thickness (p>0.05). There were statistical differences in the 14 of the total 30 measured points in the 5 mm slice thickness and 22 in the 7 mm slice thickness. The facial soft tissue thickness measurement using 3D images of 7 mm slice thickness is acceptable clinically, but those of 5 mm slice thickness is recommended for the more accurate measurement.

  11. P and S-wave tomographic images for the PASSCAL experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, H.; Dueker, K.

    2001-12-01

    We present teleseismic P and S-wave tomographic images down to 400 Km for the PASSCAL CD-ROM teleseismic experiment. Our aim is to investigate the structural variations across the Archean-Proterozoic Cheyenne Belt (the North line) and across the Proterozoic-Proterozoic Jemez volcanic lineament (the South line). A full year of teleseismic P and S-wave data was collected from 48 PASSCAL broadband 3-component instruments. S phases were rotated to the direction of maximum linear polarization. A multi-channel cross correlation technique was used to measure the arrival times. We picked 1400 travel-time residuals for the teleseismic S, ScS and SKS phases and 2000 for P. An iterative LSQR matrix solver with Laplacian regulation was applied to invert the data for P and S wave images. Our preliminary results show large peak-to-peak teleseismic residuals, i.e., 2 sec P-time variations and 5 sec S-wave variations. The peak-to-peak S velocity difference reaches 12%. In the CD-ROM North line a fast anomaly appears north of CB, which is consistent with the cold, stable Archean craton. To the south this feature vanishes across the Cheyenne Belt (N 41.25 deg). The south line shows a large low velocity zone extending to 200 km beneath the Jemez volcanic lineament. The P-wave and S-wave images are highly correlated with a dnVp/dlnVs ratio of about 2. Images from two different PASSCAL experiments, the Lodore and Laramie array, share the complexities of the seismic velocity variation beneath the CD-ROM transects. A joint inversion of the P and S and a delta t-star data are proposed to further constrain the thermal state and composition state of the active upper mantle beneath the Wyoming, Colorado and New Mexico regions.

  12. Radiation dose to patients and image quality evaluation from coronary 256-slice computed tomographic angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Liang-Kuang [Department of Radiology, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China); College of Medicine, Fu Jen Catholic University, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiological Technology, Yuan Pei University, Taiwan (China); Wu, Tung-Hsin [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang Ming University, 155 Li-Nong St., Section 2, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Yang, Ching-Ching [Department of Radiological Technology, Tzu Chi College of Technology, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Chia-Jung [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang Ming University, 155 Li-Nong St., Section 2, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Lee, Jason J.S., E-mail: jslee@ym.edu.t [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang Ming University, 155 Li-Nong St., Section 2, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China)

    2010-07-21

    The aim of this study is to assess radiation dose and the corresponding image quality from suggested CT protocols which depends on different mean heart rate and high heart rate variability by using 256-slice CT. Fifty consecutive patients referred for a cardiac CT examination were included in this study. All coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) examinations were performed on a 256-slice CT scanner with one of five different protocols: retrospective ECG-gating (RGH) with full dose exposure in all R-R intervals (protocol A), RGH of 30-80% pulsing window with tube current modulation (B), RGH of 78{+-}5% pulsing window with tube current modulation (C), prospective ECG-triggering (PGT) of 78% R-R interval with 5% padding window (D) and PGT of 78% R-R interval without padding window (E). Radiation dose parameters and image quality scoring were determined and compared. In this study, no significant differences were found in comparison on image quality of the five different protocols. Protocol A obtained the highest radiation dose comparing with those of protocols B, C, D and E by a factor of 1.6, 2.4, 2.5 and 4.3, respectively (p<0.001), which were ranged between 2.7 and 11.8 mSv. The PGT could significantly reduce radiation dose delivered to patients, as compared to the RGH. However, the use of PGT has limitations and is only good in assessing cases with lower mean heart rate and stable heart rate variability. With higher mean heart rate and high heart rate variability circumstances, the RGH within 30-80% of R-R interval pulsing window is suggested as a feasible technique for assessing diagnostic performance.

  13. EEG source imaging with spatio-temporal tomographic nonnegative independent component analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés-Sosa, Pedro A; Vega-Hernández, Mayrim; Sánchez-Bornot, José Miguel; Martínez-Montes, Eduardo; Bobes, María Antonieta

    2009-06-01

    This article describes a spatio-temporal EEG/MEG source imaging (ESI) that extracts a parsimonious set of "atoms" or components, each the outer product of both a spatial and a temporal signature. The sources estimated are localized as smooth, minimally overlapping patches of cortical activation that are obtained by constraining spatial signatures to be nonnegative (NN), orthogonal, sparse, and smooth-in effect integrating ESI with NN-ICA. This constitutes a generalization of work by this group on the use of multiple penalties for ESI. A multiplicative update algorithm is derived being stable, fast and converging within seconds near the optimal solution. This procedure, spatio-temporal tomographic NN ICA (STTONNICA), is equally able to recover superficial or deep sources without additional weighting constraints as tested with simulations. STTONNICA analysis of ERPs to familiar and unfamiliar faces yields an occipital-fusiform atom activated by all faces and a more frontal atom that only is active with familiar faces. The temporal signatures are at present unconstrained but can be required to be smooth, complex, or following a multivariate autoregressive model.

  14. Two methods of Haustral fold detection from computed tomographic virtual colonoscopy images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Ananda S.; Tan, Sovira; Yao, Jianhua; Linguraru, Marius G.; Summers, Ronald M.

    2009-02-01

    Virtual colonoscopy (VC) has gained popularity as a new colon diagnostic method over the last decade. VC is a new, less invasive alternative to the usually practiced optical colonoscopy for colorectal polyp and cancer screening, the second major cause of cancer related deaths in industrial nations. Haustral (colonic) folds serve as important landmarks for virtual endoscopic navigation in the existing computer-aided-diagnosis (CAD) system. In this paper, we propose and compare two different methods of haustral fold detection from volumetric computed tomographic virtual colonoscopy images. The colon lumen is segmented from the input using modified region growing and fuzzy connectedness. The first method for fold detection uses a level set that evolves on a mesh representation of the colon surface. The colon surface is obtained from the segmented colon lumen using the Marching Cubes algorithm. The second method for fold detection, based on a combination of heat diffusion and fuzzy c-means algorithm, is employed on the segmented colon volume. Folds obtained on the colon volume using this method are then transferred to the corresponding colon surface. After experimentation with different datasets, results are found to be promising. The results also demonstrate that the first method has a tendency of slight under-segmentation while the second method tends to slightly over-segment the folds.

  15. Voronoi analysis of bubbly flows via ultrafast X-ray tomographic imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lau, Yuk Man; Mueller, Karolin; Azizi, Salar; Schubert, Markus [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Institute of Fluid Dynamics, Dresden (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    Although clustering of bubbles plays a significant role in bubble column reactors regarding the heat and mass transfer due to bubble-bubble and flow field interactions, it has yet to be fully understood. Contrary to flows in bubble columns, most literature studies on clustering report numerical and experimental results on dilute or micro-bubbly flows. In this paper, clustering of bubbles in a cylindrical bubble column of 100 mm diameter is experimentally investigated. Ultrafast X-ray tomographic imaging is used to obtain the bubble positions within a hybrid Eulerian framework. By means of Voronoi analysis, the clustering behavior of bubbles is investigated. Experiments are performed with different superficial gas velocities, where Voronoi diagrams are constructed at several column heights. From the PDFs of the Voronoi diagrams, it is shown that the bubble structuring in terms of Voronoi cell volumes develops slower than the bubble size distribution. The latter reaches a steady state earlier with increasing column height. The measured PDFs are compared with the PDF of randomly distributed points, which showed that the amount of bubbles as part of clusters (Voronoi cells < V/ anti V{sub cluster}) as well as bubbles as part of voids (Voronoi cells > V/ anti V{sub void}) increases with the superficial gas velocity. It is found that all experiments have an approximate cluster limit V/ anti V{sub cluster} of 0.63, while the void limit V/ anti V{sub void} varies between 1.5 and 3.0. (orig.)

  16. Tomographically-imaged subducted slabs and magmatic history of Caribbean and Pacific subduction beneath Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal-Olaya, R.; Mann, P.; Vargas, C. A.; Koulakov, I.

    2013-12-01

    We define the length and geometry of eastward and southeastward-subducting slabs beneath northwestern South America in Colombia using ~100,000 earthquake events recorded by the Colombian National Seismic Network from 1993 to 2012. Methods include: hypocenter relocation, compilation of focal mechanisms, and P and S wave tomographic calculations performed using LOTOS and Seisan. The margins of Colombia include four distinct subduction zones based on slab dip: 1) in northern Colombia, 12-16-km-thick oceanic crust subducts at a modern GPS rate of 20 mm/yr in a direction of 110 degrees at a shallow angle of 8 degrees; as a result of its low dip, Pliocene-Pleistocene volcanic rocks are present 400 km from the frontal thrust; magmatic arc migration to the east records 800 km of subduction since 58 Ma ago (Paleocene) with shallow subduction of the Caribbean oceanic plateau starting ~24-33 Ma (Miocene); at depths of 90-150 km, the slab exhibits a negative velocity anomaly we associate with pervasive fracturing; 2) in the central Colombia-Panama area, we define an area of 30-km-thick crust of the Panama arc colliding/subducting at a modern 30/mm in a direction of 95 degrees; the length of this slab shows subduction/collision initiated after 20 Ma (Middle Miocene); we call this feature the Panama indenter since it has produced a V-shaped indentation of the Colombian margin and responsible for widespread crustal deformation and topographic uplift in Colombia; an incipient subduction area is forming near the Panama border with intermediate earthquakes at an eastward dip of 70 degrees to depths of ~150 km; this zone is not visible on tomographic images; 3) a 250-km-wide zone of Miocene oceanic crust of the Nazca plate flanking the Panama indenter subducts at a rate of 25 mm/yr in a direction of 55 degrees and at a normal dip of 40 degrees; the length of this slab suggests subduction began at ~5 Ma; 4) the Caldas tear defines a major dip change to the south where a 35 degrees

  17. A 3-D tomographic retrieval approach with advection compensation for the air-borne limb-imager GLORIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ungermann

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Infrared limb sounding from aircraft can provide 2-D curtains of multiple trace gas species. However, conventional limb sounders view perpendicular to the aircraft axis and are unable to resolve the observed airmass along their line-of-sight. GLORIA (Gimballed Limb Observer for Radiance Imaging of the Atmosphere is a new remote sensing instrument that is able to adjust its horizontal view angle with respect to the aircraft flight direction from 45° to 135°. This will allow for tomographic measurements of mesoscale structures for a wide variety of atmospheric constituents.

    Many flights of the GLORIA instrument will not follow closed curves that allow measuring an airmass from all directions. Consequently, it is examined by means of simulations, what spatial resolution can be expected under ideal conditions from tomographic evaluation of measurements made during a straight flight. It is demonstrated that the achievable horizontal resolution in the line-of-sight direction could be reduced from over 200 km to around 70 km compared to conventional retrievals and that the tomographic retrieval is also more robust against horizontal gradients in retrieved quantities in this direction. In a second step, it is shown that the incorporation of channels exhibiting different optical depth can further enhance the spatial resolution of 3-D retrievals enabling the exploitation of spectral samples usually not used for limb sounding due to their opacity.

    A second problem for tomographic retrievals is that advection, which can be neglected for conventional retrievals, plays an important role for the time-scales involved in a tomographic measurement flight. This paper presents a method to diagnose the effect of a time-varying atmosphere on a 3-D retrieval and demonstrates an effective way to compensate for effects of advection by incorporating wind-fields from meteorological datasets as a priori information.

  18. Modelling the RV jitter of early-M dwarfs using tomographic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hébrard, É. M.; Donati, J.-F.; Delfosse, X.; Morin, J.; Moutou, C.; Boisse, I.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we show how tomographic imaging (Zeeman-Doppler imaging, ZDI) can be used to characterize stellar activity and magnetic field topologies, ultimately allowing us to filter out the radial velocity (RV) activity jitter of M dwarf moderate rotators. This work is based on spectropolarimetric observations of a sample of five weakly active early-M dwarfs (GJ 205, GJ 358, GJ 410, GJ 479, GJ 846) with HARPS-Pol and NARVAL. These stars have v sin i and RV jitters in the range 1-2 km s-1 and 2.7-10.0 m s-1 rms, respectively. Using a modified version of ZDI applied to sets of phase-resolved least-squares deconvolved profiles of unpolarized spectral lines, we are able to characterize the distribution of active regions at the stellar surfaces. We find that dark spots cover less than 2 per cent of the total surface of the stars of our sample. Our technique is efficient at modelling the rotationally modulated component of the activity jitter, and succeeds at decreasing the amplitude of this component by typical factors of 2-3 and up to 6 in optimal cases. From the rotationally modulated time series of circularly polarized spectra and with ZDI, we also reconstruct the large-scale magnetic field topology. These fields suggest that bistability of dynamo processes observed in active M dwarfs may also be at work for moderately active M dwarfs. Comparing spot distributions with field topologies suggest that dark spots causing activity jitter concentrate at the magnetic pole and/or equator, to be confirmed with future data on a larger sample.

  19. Ray tracing based path-length calculations for polarized light tomographic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjappa, Rakesh; Kanhirodan, Rajan

    2015-09-01

    A ray tracing based path length calculation is investigated for polarized light transport in a pixel space. Tomographic imaging using polarized light transport is promising for applications in optical projection tomography of small animal imaging and turbid media with low scattering. Polarized light transport through a medium can have complex effects due to interactions such as optical rotation of linearly polarized light, birefringence, di-attenuation and interior refraction. Here we investigate the effects of refraction of polarized light in a non-scattering medium. This step is used to obtain the initial absorption estimate. This estimate can be used as prior in Monte Carlo (MC) program that simulates the transport of polarized light through a scattering medium to assist in faster convergence of the final estimate. The reflectance for p-polarized (parallel) and s-polarized (perpendicular) are different and hence there is a difference in the intensities that reach the detector end. The algorithm computes the length of the ray in each pixel along the refracted path and this is used to build the weight matrix. This weight matrix with corrected ray path length and the resultant intensity reaching the detector for each ray is used in the algebraic reconstruction (ART) method. The proposed method is tested with numerical phantoms for various noise levels. The refraction errors due to regions of different refractive index are discussed, the difference in intensities with polarization is considered. The improvements in reconstruction using the correction so applied is presented. This is achieved by tracking the path of the ray as well as the intensity of the ray as it traverses through the medium.

  20. Computer-aided teniae coli detection using height maps from computed tomographic colonography images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zhuoshi; Yao, Jianhua; Wang, Shijun; Summers, Ronald M.

    2011-03-01

    Computed tomographic colonography (CTC) is a minimally invasive technique for colonic polyps and cancer screening. Teniae coli are three bands of longitudinal smooth muscle on the colon surface. They are parallel, equally distributed on the colon wall, and form a triple helix structure from the appendix to the sigmoid colon. Because of their characteristics, teniae coli are important anatomical meaningful landmarks on human colon. This paper proposes a novel method for teniae coli detection on CT colonography. We first unfold the three-dimensional (3D) colon using a reversible projection technique and compute the two-dimensional (2D) height map of the unfolded colon. The height map records the elevation of colon surface relative to the unfolding plane, where haustral folds corresponding to high elevation points and teniae to low elevation points. The teniae coli are detected on the height map and then projected back to the 3D colon. Since teniae are located where the haustral folds meet, we break down the problem by first detecting haustral folds. We apply 2D Gabor filter banks to extract fold features. The maximum response of the filter banks is then selected as the feature image. The fold centers are then identified based on piecewise thresholding on the feature image. Connecting the fold centers yields a path of the folds. Teniae coli are finally extracted as lines running between the fold paths. Experiments were carried out on 7 cases. The proposed method yielded a promising result with an average normalized RMSE of 5.66% and standard deviation of 4.79% of the circumference of the colon.

  1. Imaging of anal fistulas: comparison of computed tomographic fistulography and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Changhu; Lu, Yongchao; Zhao, Bin; Du, Yinglin; Wang, Cuiyan; Jiang, Wanli

    2014-01-01

    The primary importance of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in evaluating anal fistulas lies in its ability to demonstrate hidden areas of sepsis and secondary extensions in patients with fistula in ano. MR imaging is relatively expensive, so there are many healthcare systems worldwide where access to MR imaging remains restricted. Until recently, computed tomography (CT) has played a limited role in imaging fistula in ano, largely owing to its poor resolution of soft tissue. In this article, the different imaging features of the CT and MRI are compared to demonstrate the relative accuracy of CT fistulography for the preoperative assessment of fistula in ano. CT fistulography and MR imaging have their own advantages for preoperative evaluation of perianal fistula, and can be applied to complement one another when necessary.

  2. Imaging of Anal Fistulas: Comparison of Computed Tomographic Fistulography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Changhu [Shandong Medical Imaging Research Institute, Shandong University, Jinan 250021 (China); Lu, Yongchao [Traditional Chinese Medicine Department, Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan 250021 (China); Zhao, Bin [Shandong Medical Imaging Research Institute, Shandong University, Jinan 250021 (China); Du, Yinglin [Shandong Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Public Health Institute, Jinan 250014 (China); Wang, Cuiyan [Shandong Medical Imaging Research Institute, Shandong University, Jinan 250021 (China); Jiang, Wanli [Department of Radiology, Taishan Medical University, Taian 271000 (China)

    2014-07-01

    The primary importance of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in evaluating anal fistulas lies in its ability to demonstrate hidden areas of sepsis and secondary extensions in patients with fistula in ano. MR imaging is relatively expensive, so there are many healthcare systems worldwide where access to MR imaging remains restricted. Until recently, computed tomography (CT) has played a limited role in imaging fistula in ano, largely owing to its poor resolution of soft tissue. In this article, the different imaging features of the CT and MRI are compared to demonstrate the relative accuracy of CT fistulography for the preoperative assessment of fistula in ano. CT fistulography and MR imaging have their own advantages for preoperative evaluation of perianal fistula, and can be applied to complement one another when necessary.

  3. Dual-source computed tomographic coronary angiography: image quality and stenosis diagnosis in patients with high heart rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Minwen; Li, Jiayi; Xu, Jian; Chen, Kang; Zhao, Hongliang; Huan, Yi

    2009-01-01

    We sought to evaluate prospectively the effects of heart rate and heart-rate variability on dual-source computed tomographic coronary image quality in patients whose heart rates were high, and to determine retrospectively the accuracy of dual-source computed tomographic diagnosis of coronary artery stenosis in the same patients.We compared image quality and diagnostic accuracy in 40 patients whose heart rates exceeded 70 beats/min with the same data in 40 patients whose heart rates were 70 beats/min or slower. In both groups, we analyzed 1,133 coronary arterial segments. Five hundred forty-five segments (97.7%) in low-heart-rate patients and 539 segments (93.7%) in high-heart-rate patients were of diagnostic image quality. We considered P coronary artery, nor were any significant differences found between the groups in the accurate diagnosis of angiographically significant stenosis.Calcification was the chief factor that affected diagnostic accuracy. In high-heart-rate patients, heart-rate variability was significantly related to the diagnostic image quality of all segments (P = 0.001) and of the left circumflex coronary artery (P = 0.016). Heart-rate variability of more than 5 beats/min most strongly contributed to an inability to evaluate segments in both groups. When heart rates rose, the optimal reconstruction window shifted from diastole to systole.The image quality of dual-source computed tomographic coronary angiography at high heart rates enables sufficient diagnosis of stenosis, although variability of heart rates significantly deteriorates image quality.

  4. Computed tomographic evaluation of dynamic alteration of the canine lumbosacral intervertebral neurovascular foramina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worth, Andrew J; Hartman, Angela; Bridges, Janis P; Jones, Boyd R; Mayhew, Joe I G

    2017-02-01

    To develop a computed tomographic (CT) method to measure the volume of the lumbosacral intervertebral neurovascular foramina (IVF) in dogs, and determine the effect of the range of motion of the lumbosacral (LS) junction on this measurement in German shepherd dogs (GSDs) with degenerative lumbosacral stenosis (DLSS) compared to unaffected controls. In vivo analysis and retrospective case series. Twenty-four working Police GSDs, 12 diagnosed with DLSS and 12 unaffected by DLSS were compared to 10 Greyhounds without DLSS. Three-dimensional renderings of CT data were used to measure the lumbosacral foraminal volume of dogs positioned in dorsal recumbency with the LS junction alternately positioned in extension, neutral position, and flexion. Volumetric analysis of the IVF was found repeatable for the extended and neutral positions (interclass correlation coefficient of 0.89 and 0.8, respectively). The mean lumbosacral IVF volume was decreased by 74% between LS flexion and extension in Greyhounds, compared to 79 and 85% reductions in GSDs unaffected and affected by DLSS, respectively. The lumbosacral IVF volume was decreased by 23% when comparing extended to neutral LS positions in Greyhounds, 29% in unaffected GSDs, and 31% in affected GSDs. IVF volumes were smaller in affected GSDs compared to unaffected GSDs (P < .05) and Greyhounds (P < .01). Positioning the LS junction in full extension decreases the volume of the lumbosacral IVF. This dynamic narrowing was more pronounced in GSDs with signs of DLSS than in GSDs not overtly affected by DLSS. © 2017 The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  5. An efficient reconstruction algorithm for differential phase-contrast tomographic images from a limited number of views

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunaguchi, Naoki [Faculty of Science and Technology, Gunma University, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); Yuasa, Tetsuya [Graduate School of Engineering and Science, Yamagata University, Yonezawa, Yamagata 992-8510 (Japan); Gupta, Rajiv [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Ando, Masami [Research Institute for Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, Noda, Chiba 278-8510 (Japan)

    2015-12-21

    The main focus of this paper is reconstruction of tomographic phase-contrast image from a set of projections. We propose an efficient reconstruction algorithm for differential phase-contrast computed tomography that can considerably reduce the number of projections required for reconstruction. The key result underlying this research is a projection theorem that states that the second derivative of the projection set is linearly related to the Laplacian of the tomographic image. The proposed algorithm first reconstructs the Laplacian image of the phase-shift distribution from the second-derivative of the projections using total variation regularization. The second step is to obtain the phase-shift distribution by solving a Poisson equation whose source is the Laplacian image previously reconstructed under the Dirichlet condition. We demonstrate the efficacy of this algorithm using both synthetically generated simulation data and projection data acquired experimentally at a synchrotron. The experimental phase data were acquired from a human coronary artery specimen using dark-field-imaging optics pioneered by our group. Our results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can reduce the number of projections to approximately 33% as compared with the conventional filtered backprojection method, without any detrimental effect on the image quality.

  6. Tomographic image reconstruction from limited projections using iterative revisions in image and transform spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, T; Norton, S J; Linzer, M; Ikeda, O; Hirama, M

    1981-02-01

    An iterative technique is proposed for improving the quality of reconstructions from projections when the number of projections is small or the angular range of projections is limited. The technique consists of transforming repeatedly between image and transform spaces and applying a priori object information at each iteration. The approach is a generalization of the Gerchberg-Papoulis algorithm, a technique for extrapolating in the Fourier domain by imposing a space-limiting constraint on the object in the spatial domain. A priori object data that may be applied, in addition to truncating the image beyond the known boundaries of the object, include limiting the maximum range of variation of the physical parameter being imaged. The results of computer simulations show clearly how the process of forcing the image to conform to a priori object data reduces artifacts arising from limited data available in the Fourier domain.

  7. Linear information retrieval method in X-ray grating-based phase contrast imaging and its interchangeability with tomographic reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Z.; Gao, K.; Wang, Z. L.; Shao, Q. G.; Hu, R. F.; Wei, C. X.; Zan, G. B.; Wali, F.; Luo, R. H.; Zhu, P. P.; Tian, Y. C.

    2017-06-01

    In X-ray grating-based phase contrast imaging, information retrieval is necessary for quantitative research, especially for phase tomography. However, numerous and repetitive processes have to be performed for tomographic reconstruction. In this paper, we report a novel information retrieval method, which enables retrieving phase and absorption information by means of a linear combination of two mutually conjugate images. Thanks to the distributive law of the multiplication as well as the commutative law and associative law of the addition, the information retrieval can be performed after tomographic reconstruction, thus simplifying the information retrieval procedure dramatically. The theoretical model of this method is established in both parallel beam geometry for Talbot interferometer and fan beam geometry for Talbot-Lau interferometer. Numerical experiments are also performed to confirm the feasibility and validity of the proposed method. In addition, we discuss its possibility in cone beam geometry and its advantages compared with other methods. Moreover, this method can also be employed in other differential phase contrast imaging methods, such as diffraction enhanced imaging, non-interferometric imaging, and edge illumination.

  8. 3D "spectracoustic" system: a modular, tomographic, spectroscopic mapping imaging, non-invasive, diagnostic system for detection of small starting developing tumors like melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagiannis, Georgios

    2017-03-01

    This work led to a new method named 3D spectracoustic tomographic mapping imaging. The current and the future work is related to the fabrication of a combined acoustic microscopy transducer and infrared illumination probe permitting the simultaneous acquisition of the spectroscopic and the tomographic information. This probe provides with the capability of high fidelity and precision registered information from the combined modalities named spectracoustic information.

  9. Dynamic 3D computed tomography scanner for vascular imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mark K.; Holdsworth, David W.; Fenster, Aaron

    2000-04-01

    A 3D dynamic computed-tomography (CT) scanner was developed for imaging objects undergoing periodic motion. The scanner system has high spatial and sufficient temporal resolution to produce quantitative tomographic/volume images of objects such as excised arterial samples perfused under physiological pressure conditions and enables the measurements of the local dynamic elastic modulus (Edyn) of the arteries in the axial and longitudinal directions. The system was comprised of a high resolution modified x-ray image intensifier (XRII) based computed tomographic system and a computer-controlled cardiac flow simulator. A standard NTSC CCD camera with a macro lens was coupled to the electro-optically zoomed XRII to acquire dynamic volumetric images. Through prospective cardiac gating and computer synchronized control, a time-resolved sequence of 20 mm thick high resolution volume images of porcine aortic specimens during one simulated cardiac cycle were obtained. Performance evaluation of the scanners illustrated that tomographic images can be obtained with resolution as high as 3.2 mm-1 with only a 9% decrease in the resolution for objects moving at velocities of 1 cm/s in 2D mode and static spatial resolution of 3.55 mm-1 with only a 14% decrease in the resolution in 3D mode for objects moving at a velocity of 10 cm/s. Application of the system for imaging of intact excised arterial specimens under simulated physiological flow/pressure conditions enabled measurements of the Edyn of the arteries with a precision of +/- kPa for the 3D scanner. Evaluation of the Edyn in the axial and longitudinal direction produced values of 428 +/- 35 kPa and 728 +/- 71 kPa, demonstrating the isotropic and homogeneous viscoelastic nature of the vascular specimens. These values obtained from the Dynamic CT systems were not statistically different (p less than 0.05) from the values obtained by standard uniaxial tensile testing and volumetric measurements.

  10. 3D flow visualization and tomographic particle image velocimetry for vortex breakdown over a non-slender delta wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, ChengYue; Gao, Qi; Wei, RunJie; Li, Tian; Wang, JinJun

    2016-06-01

    Volumetric measurement for the leading-edge vortex (LEV) breakdown of a delta wing has been conducted by three-dimensional (3D) flow visualization and tomographic particle image velocimetry (TPIV). The 3D flow visualization is employed to show the vortex structures, which was recorded by four cameras with high resolution. 3D dye streaklines of the visualization are reconstructed using a similar way of particle reconstruction in TPIV. Tomographic PIV is carried out at the same time using same cameras with the dye visualization. Q criterion is employed to identify the LEV. Results of tomographic PIV agree well with the reconstructed 3D dye streaklines, which proves the validity of the measurements. The time-averaged flow field based on TPIV is shown and described by sections of velocity and streamwise vorticity. Combining the two measurement methods sheds light on the complex structures of both bubble type and spiral type of breakdown. The breakdown position is recognized by investigating both the streaklines and TPIV velocity fields. Proper orthogonal decomposition is applied to extract a pair of conjugated helical instability modes from TPIV data. Therefore, the dominant frequency of the instability modes is obtained from the corresponding POD coefficients of the modes based on wavelet transform analysis.

  11. Analysis of discrete-to-discrete imaging models for iterative tomographic image reconstruction and compressive sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Jørgensen, Jakob H; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2011-01-01

    Discrete-to-discrete imaging models for computed tomography (CT) are becoming increasingly ubiquitous as the interest in iterative image reconstruction algorithms has heightened. Despite this trend, all the intuition for algorithm and system design derives from analysis of continuous-to-continuous models such as the X-ray and Radon transform. While the similarity between these models justifies some crossover, questions such as what are sufficient sampling conditions can be quite different for the two models. This sampling issue is addressed extensively in the first half of the article using singular value decomposition analysis for determining sufficient number of views and detector bins. The question of full sampling for CT is particularly relevant to current attempts to adapt compressive sensing (CS) motivated methods to application in CT image reconstruction. The second half goes in depth on this subject and discusses the link between object sparsity and sufficient sampling for accurate reconstruction. Par...

  12. Optical tomographic imaging of vascular and metabolic reactivity in rheumatoid joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasker, Joseph M.; Dwyer, Edward; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2005-04-01

    Our group has recently established that joints affected by Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) can be distinguished from healthy joints through measurements of the scattering coefficient. We showed that a high scattering coefficient in the center of the joint is indicative of a joint with RA. While these results were encouraging, data to date still suffers from low sensitivity and specificity. Possibly higher specificities and sensitivities can be achieved if dynamic measurements of hemodynamic and metabolic processes in the synovium are considered. Using our dual-wavelength imaging system together with previously implemented model-based iterative image reconstruction schemes, we have performed initial dynamic imaging studies involving healthy human volunteers and patients affected by RA. These case studies seem to confirm our hypothesis that differences in the vascular reactivity exist between affected and unaffected joints.

  13. Fluorescence tomographic imaging of sentinel lymph node using near-infrared emitting bioreducible dextran nanogels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li J

    2014-12-01

    nanoprobes for safe and noninvasive SLN mapping. Keywords: nanogel, disulfide, dextran, lymph node, tomographic imaging

  14. Coupled third-order simplified spherical harmonics and diffusion equation-based fluorescence tomographic imaging of liver cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xueli; Sun, Fangfang; Yang, Defu; Liang, Jimin

    2015-09-01

    For fluorescence tomographic imaging of small animals, the liver is usually regarded as a low-scattering tissue and is surrounded by adipose, kidneys, and heart, all of which have a high scattering property. This leads to a breakdown of the diffusion equation (DE)-based reconstruction method as well as a heavy computational burden for the simplified spherical harmonics equation (SPN). Coupling the SPN and DE provides a perfect balance between the imaging accuracy and computational burden. The coupled third-order SPN and DE (CSDE)-based reconstruction method is developed for fluorescence tomographic imaging. This is achieved by doubly using the CSDE for the excitation and emission processes of the fluorescence propagation. At the same time, the finite-element method and hybrid multilevel regularization strategy are incorporated in inverse reconstruction. The CSDE-based reconstruction method is first demonstrated with a digital mouse-based liver cancer simulation, which reveals superior performance compared with the SPN and DE-based methods. It is more accurate than the DE-based method and has lesser computational burden than the SPN-based method. The feasibility of the proposed approach in applications of in vivo studies is also illustrated with a liver cancer mouse-based in situ experiment, revealing its potential application in whole-body imaging of small animals.

  15. Mantle structure beneath Indonesia inferred from high-resolution tomographic imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Widiyantoro, Sri; Hilst, R.D. van der

    1997-01-01

    We investigated mantle structure beneath the Indonesian region by means of tomographic inversions of traveltime residuals of direct P and the surface-reflected depth phases pP and pwP. The hypocentres and phase data used in the inversions were derived from the reprocessing of data reported to intern

  16. Development and application of a tomographic model from CT images for calculating internal dose to a pregnant woman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chengyu

    Assessment of radiation dose and possible risk to a pregnant woman and her fetus is an important task in radiation protection. Although stylized models for male and female patients of different ages have been developed, tomographic models for pregnant women have not been developed to date. This dissertation presents an effort to construct a partial-body model of a pregnant woman from a set of CT images. The patient was 30-weeks pregnant, and the CT scan covered the portion of the body between the lower breast and the upper thigh in 70 slices, each 7 mm thick. The image resolution was 512 x 512 pixels in a 48 cm x 48 cm field. The images were carefully segmented to identify 34 organs and tissues, It has been found that the masses are different from the Reference Woman. The characteristics of the resulting model is discussed and compared with one existing stylized mathematical model for pregnant women. Based on this tomographic model, a Monte Carlo code, EGS4-VLSI, was used to derive Specific Absorbed Fractions. Monoenergetic and isotropic photon and electron emitters distributed in different source organs were assumed and the energies ranged from 10 keV to 4 MeV for photons and from 100 keV to 4 MeV for electrons. The results for high energy (>50 keV) photons showed general agreement with previous studies, however, the results for lower energy (women are satisfactory for a very large size patient for most of the photon energies (between 50 keV and 4 MeV). However, a tomographic model has to be used to obtain acceptable dose assessments for electrons. The newly calculated SAF data set can provide the nuclear medicine dosimetry field a new perspective involving internal electrons.

  17. The impact of reorienting cone-beam computed tomographic images in varied head positions on the coordinates of anatomical landmarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Hun; Jeong, Ho Gul; Hwang, Jae Joon; Lee, Jung Hee; Han, Sang Sun [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Yonsei University, College of Dentistry, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    The aim of this study was to compare the coordinates of anatomical landmarks on cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) images in varied head positions before and after reorientation using image analysis software. CBCT images were taken in a normal position and four varied head positions using a dry skull marked with 3 points where gutta percha was fixed. In each of the five radiographic images, reference points were set, 20 anatomical landmarks were identified, and each set of coordinates was calculated. Coordinates in the images from the normally positioned head were compared with those in the images obtained from varied head positions using statistical methods. Post-reorientation coordinates calculated using a three-dimensional image analysis program were also compared to the reference coordinates. In the original images, statistically significant differences were found between coordinates in the normal-position and varied-position images. However, post-reorientation, no statistically significant differences were found between coordinates in the normal-position and varied-position images. The changes in head position impacted the coordinates of the anatomical landmarks in three-dimensional images. However, reorientation using image analysis software allowed accurate superimposition onto the reference positions.

  18. The impact of reorienting cone-beam computed tomographic images in varied head positions on the coordinates of anatomical landmarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Hun; Hwang, Jae Joon; Lee, Jung-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to compare the coordinates of anatomical landmarks on cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) images in varied head positions before and after reorientation using image analysis software. Materials and Methods CBCT images were taken in a normal position and four varied head positions using a dry skull marked with 3 points where gutta percha was fixed. In each of the five radiographic images, reference points were set, 20 anatomical landmarks were identified, and each set of coordinates was calculated. Coordinates in the images from the normally positioned head were compared with those in the images obtained from varied head positions using statistical methods. Post-reorientation coordinates calculated using a three-dimensional image analysis program were also compared to the reference coordinates. Results In the original images, statistically significant differences were found between coordinates in the normal-position and varied-position images. However, post-reorientation, no statistically significant differences were found between coordinates in the normal-position and varied-position images. Conclusion The changes in head position impacted the coordinates of the anatomical landmarks in three-dimensional images. However, reorientation using image analysis software allowed accurate superimposition onto the reference positions. PMID:27358821

  19. Dental computed tomographic imaging as age estimation: morphological analysis of the third molar of a group of Turkish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantekin, Kenan; Sekerci, Ahmet Ercan; Buyuk, Suleyman Kutalmis

    2013-12-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is capable of providing accurate and measurable 3-dimensional images of the third molar. The aims of this study were to analyze the development of the mandibular third molar and its relation to chronological age and to create new reference data for a group of Turkish participants aged 9 to 25 years on the basis of cone-beam CT images. All data were obtained from the patients' records including medical, social, and dental anamnesis and cone-beam CT images of 752 patients. Linear regression analysis was performed to obtain regression formulas for dental age calculation with chronological age and to determine the coefficient of determination (r) for each sex. Statistical analysis showed a strong correlation between age and third-molar development for the males (r2 = 0.80) and the females (r2 = 0.78). Computed tomographic images are clinically useful for accurate and reliable estimation of dental ages of children and youth.

  20. Four-dimensional computed tomographic imaging in the wrist: proof of feasibility in a cadaveric model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tay, Shian-Chao; Berger, Richard A. [Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Orthopedics Biomechanics Laboratory, Rochester, MN (United States); Primak, Andrew N.; Amrami, Kimberly K. [Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States); Fletcher, Joel G.; McCollough, Cynthia H. [Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States); Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, CT Innovation Center, Rochester, MN (United States); Schmidt, Bernhard [Siemens Medical Solutions, Forchheim (Germany)

    2007-12-15

    High-resolution real-time three-dimensional (3D) imaging of the moving wrist may provide novel insights into the pathophysiology of joint instability. The purpose of this work was to assess the feasibility of using retrospectively gated spiral computed tomography (CT) to perform four-dimensional (4D) imaging of the moving wrist joint. A cadaver forearm from below the elbow was mounted on a motion simulator which performed radioulnar deviation of the wrist at 30 cycles per minute. An electronic trigger from the simulator provided the ''electrocardiogram'' (ECG) signal required for gated reconstructions. Four-dimensional and 3D images were compared by a blinded observer for image quality and presence of artifacts. Image quality of 4D images was found to be excellent at the extremes of radial and ulnar deviation (end-motion phases). Some artifacts were seen in mid-motion phases. 4D CT musculoskeletal imaging is feasible. Four-dimensional CT may allow clinicians to assess functional (dynamic) instabilities of the wrist joint. (orig.)

  1. Quantitative Perfusion and Permeability Biomarkers in Brain Cancer from Tomographic CT and MR Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilaghi, Armin; Yeung, Timothy; d'Esterre, Christopher; Bauman, Glenn; Yartsev, Slav; Easaw, Jay; Fainardi, Enrico; Lee, Ting-Yim; Frayne, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced perfusion and permeability imaging, using computed tomography and magnetic resonance systems, are important techniques for assessing the vascular supply and hemodynamics of healthy brain parenchyma and tumors. These techniques can measure blood flow, blood volume, and blood-brain barrier permeability surface area product and, thus, may provide information complementary to clinical and pathological assessments. These have been used as biomarkers to enhance the treatment planning process, to optimize treatment decision-making, and to enable monitoring of the treatment noninvasively. In this review, the principles of magnetic resonance and computed tomography dynamic contrast-enhanced perfusion and permeability imaging are described (with an emphasis on their commonalities), and the potential values of these techniques for differentiating high-grade gliomas from other brain lesions, distinguishing true progression from posttreatment effects, and predicting survival after radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and antiangiogenic treatments are presented.

  2. Quantitative Perfusion and Permeability Biomarkers in Brain Cancer from Tomographic CT and MR Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilaghi, Armin; Yeung, Timothy; d’Esterre, Christopher; Bauman, Glenn; Yartsev, Slav; Easaw, Jay; Fainardi, Enrico; Lee, Ting-Yim; Frayne, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced perfusion and permeability imaging, using computed tomography and magnetic resonance systems, are important techniques for assessing the vascular supply and hemodynamics of healthy brain parenchyma and tumors. These techniques can measure blood flow, blood volume, and blood–brain barrier permeability surface area product and, thus, may provide information complementary to clinical and pathological assessments. These have been used as biomarkers to enhance the treatment planning process, to optimize treatment decision-making, and to enable monitoring of the treatment noninvasively. In this review, the principles of magnetic resonance and computed tomography dynamic contrast-enhanced perfusion and permeability imaging are described (with an emphasis on their commonalities), and the potential values of these techniques for differentiating high-grade gliomas from other brain lesions, distinguishing true progression from posttreatment effects, and predicting survival after radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and antiangiogenic treatments are presented. PMID:27398030

  3. Secure High Dynamic Range Images

    OpenAIRE

    Med Amine Touil; Noureddine Ellouze

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a tone mapping algorithm is proposed to produce LDR (Limited Dynamic Range) images from HDR (High Dynamic Range) images. In the approach, non-linear functions are applied to compress the dynamic range of HDR images. Security tools will be then applied to the resulting LDR images and their effectiveness will be tested on the reconstructed HDR images. Three specific examples of security tools are described in more details: integrity verification using hash function to compute loc...

  4. Tomographic imaging of transparent biological samples using the pyramid phase microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias, Ignacio

    2016-08-01

    We show how a pyramid phase microscope can be used to obtain tomographic information of the spatial variation of refractive index in biological samples using the Radon transform. A method that uses the information provided by the phase microscope for axial and lateral repositioning of the sample when it rotates is also described. Its application to the reconstruction of mouse embryos in the blastocyst stage is demonstrated.

  5. High Speed Optical Tomography System for Imaging Dynamic Transparent Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMackin, Lenore; Hugo, Ronald J.; Pierson, R. E.; Truman, C. R.

    1997-11-01

    We describe the design and operation of a high speed optical tomography system for measuring two-dimensional images of a dynamic phase object at a rate of 5 kHz. Data from a set of eight Hartmann wavefront sensors is back-projected to produce phase images showing the details of the inner structure of a heated air flow. The tomographic reconstructions have a spatial resolution of approximately 2.0 mm and can measure temperature variations across the flow with an accuracy of about 0.7 C. Series of animated reconstructions at different downstream locations illustrate the development of flow structure and the effect of acoustic flow forcing.

  6. Uniaxial Compression of Cellular Materials at a 10-1 s-1 Strain Rate Simultaneously with Synchrotron X-ray Computed Tomographic Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patterson, Brian M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The topic is presented as a series of slides. Motivation for the work included the following: X-ray tomography is a fantastic technique for characterizing a material’s starting structure as well as for non-destructive, in situ experiments to investigate material response; 3D X-ray tomography is needed to fully characterize the morphology of cellular materials; and synchrotron micro-CT can capture 3D images without pausing experiment. Among the conclusions reached are these: High-rate radiographic and tomographic imaging (0.25 s 3D frame rate) using synchrotron CT can capture full 3D images of hyper-elastic materials at a 10-2 strain rate; dynamic true in situ uniaxial loading can be accurately captured; the three stages of compression can be imaged: bending, buckling, and breaking; implementation of linear modeling is completed; meshes have been imported into LANL modeling codes--testing and validation is underway and direct comparison and validation between in situ data and modeled mechanical response is possible.

  7. Tomographic incoherent phase imaging, a diffraction tomography alternative for any white-light microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bon, Pierre; Aknoun, Shérazade; Savatier, Julien; Wattellier, Benoit; Monneret, Serge

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, we discuss the possibility of making tomographic reconstruction of the refractive index of a microscopic sample using a quadriwave lateral shearing interferometer, under incoherent illumination. A Z-stack is performed and the acquired incoherent elecromagnetic fields are deconvoluted before to retrieve in a quantitative manner the refractive index. The results are presented on polystyrene beads and can easily be expanded to biological samples. This technique is suitable to any white-light microscope equipped with nanometric Z-stack module.

  8. Quantitative whole body biodistribution of fluorescent-labeled agents by non-invasive tomographic imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristine O Vasquez

    Full Text Available When small molecules or proteins are injected into live animals, their physical and chemical properties will significantly affect pharmacokinetics, tissue penetration, and the ultimate routes of metabolism and clearance. Fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT offers the ability to non-invasively image and quantify temporal changes in fluorescence throughout the major organ systems of living animals, in a manner analogous to traditional approaches with radiolabeled agents. This approach is best used with biotherapeutics (therapeutic antibodies, or other large proteins or large-scaffold drug-delivery vectors, that are minimally affected by low-level fluorophore conjugation. Application to small molecule drugs should take into account the significant impact of fluorophore labeling on size and physicochemical properties, however, the presents studies show that this technique is readily applied to small molecule agents developed for far-red (FR or near infrared (NIR imaging. Quantification by non-invasive FMT correlated well with both fluorescence from tissue homogenates as well as with planar (2D fluorescence reflectance imaging of excised intact organs (r²  =  0.996 and 0.969, respectively. Dynamic FMT imaging (multiple times from 0 to 24 h performed in live mice after the injection of four different FR/NIR-labeled agents, including immunoglobulin, 20-50 nm nanoparticles, a large vascular imaging agent, and a small molecule integrin antagonist, showed clear differences in the percentage of injected dose per gram of tissue (%ID/g in liver, kidney, and bladder signal. Nanoparticles and IgG1 favored liver over kidney signal, the small molecule integrin-binding agent favored rapid kidney and bladder clearance, and the vascular agent, showed both liver and kidney clearance. Further assessment of the volume of distribution of these agents by fluorescent volume added information regarding their biodistribution and highlighted the relatively poor

  9. Petrophysical characterization of porous media starting from micro-tomographic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadmoradi, Peyman; Kantzas, Apostolos

    2016-08-01

    A quasi-static scheme based on pore space spatial statistics is presented to simulate pore-scale two-phase capillary-dominant displacement processes. The algorithm is coupled with computational fluid dynamics in order to evaluate saturation functions. Wettability heterogeneity in partial and fractional/mixed-wet media is implemented using a contact angle map. The simulation process is pixel-wised and performed directly on binary images. Bypassing and snap-off are tackled as non-wetting phase trapping mechanisms. Post-processing results include residual saturations, effective permeability and capillary pressure curves for drainage and imbibition scenarios. The primary advantages of the proposed workflow are eliminating pore space skeletisation/ discretization, superior time efficiency and minimal numerical drawbacks when compared to other direct or network-based simulation techniques.

  10. Software development for ACR-approved phantom-based nuclear medicine tomographic image quality control with cross-platform compatibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jungsu S.; Choi, Jae Min; Nam, Ki Pyo; Chae, Sun Young; Ryu, Jin-Sook; Moon, Dae Hyuk; Kim, Jae Seung

    2015-07-01

    Quality control and quality assurance (QC/QA) have been two of the most important issues in modern nuclear medicine (NM) imaging for both clinical practices and academic research. Whereas quantitative QC analysis software is common to modern positron emission tomography (PET) scanners, the QC of gamma cameras and/or single-photon-emission computed tomography (SPECT) scanners has not been sufficiently addressed. Although a thorough standard operating process (SOP) for mechanical and software maintenance may help the QC/QA of a gamma camera and SPECT-computed tomography (CT), no previous study has addressed a unified platform or process to decipher or analyze SPECT phantom images acquired from various scanners thus far. In addition, a few approaches have established cross-platform software to enable the technologists and physicists to assess the variety of SPECT scanners from different manufacturers. To resolve these issues, we have developed Interactive Data Language (IDL)-based in-house software for crossplatform (in terms of not only operating systems (OS) but also manufacturers) analyses of the QC data on an ACR SPECT phantom, which is essential for assessing and assuring the tomographical image quality of SPECT. We applied our devised software to our routine quarterly QC of ACR SPECT phantom images acquired from a number of platforms (OS/manufacturers). Based on our experience, we suggest that our devised software can offer a unified platform that allows images acquired from various types of scanners to be analyzed with great precision and accuracy.

  11. Use of a Diagnostic Score to Prioritize Computed Tomographic (CT) Imaging for Patients Suspected of Ischemic Stroke Who May Benefit from Thrombolytic Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hwong, Wen Yea; Bots, Michiel L; Selvarajah, Sharmini; Kappelle, L Jaap; Abdul Aziz, Zariah; Sidek, Norsima Nazifah; Vaartjes, Ilonca

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A shortage of computed tomographic (CT) machines in low and middle income countries often results in delayed CT imaging for patients suspected of a stroke. Yet, time constraint is one of the most important aspects for patients with an ischemic stroke to benefit from thrombolytic therapy.

  12. Estimating the surface relaxivity as a function of pore size from NMR T2 distributions and micro-tomographic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavides, Francisco; Leiderman, Ricardo; Souza, Andre; Carneiro, Giovanna; Bagueira, Rodrigo

    2017-09-01

    In the present work, we formulate and solve an inverse problem to recover the surface relaxivity as a function of pore size. The input data for our technique are the T2 distribution measurement and the micro-tomographic image of the rock sample under investigation. We simulate the NMR relaxation signal for a given surface relaxivity function using the random walk method and rank different surface relaxivity functions according to the correlation of the resulting simulated T2 distributions with the measured T2 distribution. The optimization is performed using genetic algorithms and determines the surface relaxivity function whose corresponding simulated T2 distribution best matches the measured T2 distribution. In the proposed methodology, pore size is associated with a number of collisions in the random walk simulations. We illustrate the application of the proposed method by performing inversions from synthetic and laboratory input data and compare the obtained results with those obtained using the uniform relaxivity assumption.

  13. Combined application of virtual imaging techniques and three-dimensional computed tomographic angiography in diagnosing intracranial aneurysms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Background The diagnostic value of virtual imaging combined with three-dimensional computed tomographic angiography (3D-CTA) for intracranial aneurysms has not been fully elucidated yet. This study aimed to evaluate the value of combined application of virtual imaging techniques and 3D-CTA in diagnosing patients with aneurismal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) at the acute stage. Methods Eighty patients with non-traumatic SAH received 3D-CTA examinations. The raw CT data of these patients were reconstructed and transferred into the 3D mode through the surgical plan system based on virtual reality (VR) image, and the 3D virtual images of skulls and brain blood vessels were acquired. The location, size and shape of aneurysms and their anatomic relationship with adjacent tissues were measured from many points of view. Results Seventy-three aneurysms were detected in 68 of the 80 patients, but 2 aneurysms were detected in 2 of the 5 patients who had been found free of aneurysms previously and had received 3D-CTA examinations for a second time one month later. The 3D virtual images produced by the virtual imaging system were clear and vivid, and they could reveal the location and size of the aneurysm and its relations to the parent artery and skull directly. Conclusions The imaging of 3D-CTA is convenient, reliable and fast in diagnosing intracranial aneurysms and can be regarded as the first choice for the diagnosis and treatment of ruptured intracranial aneurysms. Combined with the surgical plan system based on the VR image, 3D-CTA may obtain more imaging information about aneurysms.

  14. Microstructural degradation of silicon electrodes during lithiation observed via operando X-ray tomographic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taiwo, Oluwadamilola O.; Paz-García, Juan M.; Hall, Stephen A.; Heenan, Thomas M. M.; Finegan, Donal P.; Mokso, Rajmund; Villanueva-Pérez, Pablo; Patera, Alessandra; Brett, Daniel J. L.; Shearing, Paul R.

    2017-02-01

    Due to their high theoretical capacity compared to that of state-of-the-art graphite-based electrodes, silicon electrodes have gained much research focus for use in the development of next generation lithium-ion batteries. However, a major drawback of silicon as an electrode material is that it suffers from particle fracturing due to huge volume expansion during electrochemical cycling, thus limiting commercialization of such electrodes. Understanding the role of material microstructure in electrode degradation will be instrumental in the design of stable silicon electrodes. Here, we demonstrate the application of synchrotron-based X-ray tomographic microscopy to capture and track microstructural evolution, phase transformation and fracturing within a silicon-based electrode during electrochemical lithiation.

  15. Secure High Dynamic Range Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Med Amine Touil

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a tone mapping algorithm is proposed to produce LDR (Limited Dynamic Range images from HDR (High Dynamic Range images. In the approach, non-linear functions are applied to compress the dynamic range of HDR images. Security tools will be then applied to the resulting LDR images and their effectiveness will be tested on the reconstructed HDR images. Three specific examples of security tools are described in more details: integrity verification using hash function to compute local digital signatures, encryption for confidentiality, and scrambling technique.

  16. Tomographic particle image velocimetry of desert locust wakes: instantaneous volumes combine to reveal hidden vortex elements and rapid wake deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomphrey, Richard J.; Henningsson, Per; Michaelis, Dirk; Hollis, David

    2012-01-01

    Aerodynamic structures generated by animals in flight are unstable and complex. Recent progress in quantitative flow visualization has advanced our understanding of animal aerodynamics, but measurements have hitherto been limited to flow velocities at a plane through the wake. We applied an emergent, high-speed, volumetric fluid imaging technique (tomographic particle image velocimetry) to examine segments of the wake of desert locusts, capturing fully three-dimensional instantaneous flow fields. We used those flow fields to characterize the aerodynamic footprint in unprecedented detail and revealed previously unseen wake elements that would have gone undetected by two-dimensional or stereo-imaging technology. Vortex iso-surface topographies show the spatio-temporal signature of aerodynamic force generation manifest in the wake of locusts, and expose the extent to which animal wakes can deform, potentially leading to unreliable calculations of lift and thrust when using conventional diagnostic methods. We discuss implications for experimental design and analysis as volumetric flow imaging becomes more widespread. PMID:22977102

  17. Tomographic particle image velocimetry of desert locust wakes: instantaneous volumes combine to reveal hidden vortex elements and rapid wake deformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomphrey, Richard J; Henningsson, Per; Michaelis, Dirk; Hollis, David

    2012-12-07

    Aerodynamic structures generated by animals in flight are unstable and complex. Recent progress in quantitative flow visualization has advanced our understanding of animal aerodynamics, but measurements have hitherto been limited to flow velocities at a plane through the wake. We applied an emergent, high-speed, volumetric fluid imaging technique (tomographic particle image velocimetry) to examine segments of the wake of desert locusts, capturing fully three-dimensional instantaneous flow fields. We used those flow fields to characterize the aerodynamic footprint in unprecedented detail and revealed previously unseen wake elements that would have gone undetected by two-dimensional or stereo-imaging technology. Vortex iso-surface topographies show the spatio-temporal signature of aerodynamic force generation manifest in the wake of locusts, and expose the extent to which animal wakes can deform, potentially leading to unreliable calculations of lift and thrust when using conventional diagnostic methods. We discuss implications for experimental design and analysis as volumetric flow imaging becomes more widespread.

  18. Tomographic particle image velocimetry investigation of the flow in a modeled human carotid artery bifurcation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchmann, N. A.; Atkinson, C.; Jeremy, M. C.; Soria, J.

    2011-04-01

    Hemodynamic forces within the human carotid artery are well known to play a key role in the initiation and progression of vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis. The degree and extent of the disease largely depends on the prevailing three-dimensional flow structure and wall shear stress (WSS) distribution. This work presents tomographic PIV (Tomo-PIV) measurements of the flow structure and WSS in a physiologically accurate model of the human carotid artery bifurcation. The vascular geometry is reconstructed from patient-specific data and reproduced in a transparent flow phantom to demonstrate the feasibility of Tomo-PIV in a complex three-dimensional geometry. Tomographic reconstruction is performed with the multiplicative line-of-sight (MLOS) estimation and simultaneous multiplicative algebraic reconstruction (SMART) technique. The implemented methodology is validated by comparing the results with Stereo-PIV measurements in the same facility. Using a steady flow assumption, the measurement error and RMS uncertainty are directly inferred from the measured velocity field. It is shown that the measurement uncertainty increases for increasing light sheet thickness and increasing velocity gradients, which are largest near the vessel walls. For a typical volume depth of 6 mm (or 256 pixel), the analysis indicates that the velocity derived from 3D cross-correlation can be measured within ±2% of the maximum velocity (or ±0.2 pixel) near the center of the vessel and within ±5% (±0.6 pixel) near the vessel wall. The technique is then applied to acquire 3D-3C velocity field data at multiple axial locations within the carotid artery model, which are combined to yield the flow field and WSS in a volume of approximately 26 mm × 27 mm × 60 mm. Shear stress is computed from the velocity gradient tensor and a method for inferring the WSS distribution on the vessel wall is presented. The results indicate the presence of a complex and three-dimensional flow structure, with

  19. In vivo tomographic imaging of lung colonization of tumour in mouse with simultaneous fluorescence and X-ray CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bin; Gao, Fuping; Wang, Mengjiao; Cao, Xu; Liu, Fei; Wang, Xin; Luo, Jianwen; Wang, Guangzhi; Bai, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Non-invasive in vivo imaging of diffuse and wide-spread colonization within the lungs, rather than distinct solid primary tumors, is still a challenging work. In this work, a lung colonization mouse model bearing A549 human lung tumor was simultaneously scanned by a dual-modality fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) and X-ray computed tomography (CT) system in vivo. A two steps method which incorporates CT structural information into the FMT reconstruction procedure is employed to provide concurrent anatomical and functional information. By using the target-specific fluorescence agent, the fluorescence tomographic results show elevated fluorescence intensity deep within the lungs which is colonized with diffuse and wide-spread tumors. The results were confirmed with ex vivo fluorescence reflectance imaging and histological examination of the lung tissues. With FMT reconstruction combined with the CT information, the dual-modality FMT/micro-CT system is expected to offer sensitive and noninvasive imaging of diffuse tumor colonization within the lungs in vivo. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. 256-Slice coronary computed tomographic angiography in patients with atrial fibrillation: optimal reconstruction phase and image quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oda, Seitaro; Yuki, Hideaki; Kidoh, Masafumi; Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Nakaura, Takeshi; Namimoto, Tomohiro; Yamashita, Yasuyuki [Kumamoto University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Life Sciences, Chuou-ku, Kumamoto (Japan); Honda, Keiichi; Yoshimura, Akira; Katahira, Kazuhiro [Kumamoto Chuo Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Minami-ku, Kumamoto (Japan); Noda, Katsuo; Oshima, Shuichi [Kumamoto Chuo Hospital, Department of Cardiology, Minami-ku, Kumamoto (Japan)

    2016-01-15

    To assess the optimal reconstruction phase and the image quality of coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). We performed CCTA in 60 patients with AF and 60 controls with sinus rhythm. The images were reconstructed in multiple phases in all parts of the cardiac cycle, and the optimal reconstruction phase with the fewest motion artefacts was identified. The coronary artery segments were visually evaluated to investigate their assessability. In 46 (76.7 %) patients, the optimal reconstruction phase was end-diastole, whereas in 6 (10.0 %) patients it was end-systole or mid-diastole, and in 2 (3.3 %) patients it was another cardiac phase. In 53 (88.3 %) of the controls, the optimal reconstruction phase was mid-diastole, whereas it was end-systole in 4 (6.7 %), and in 3 (5.0 %) it was another cardiac phase. There was a significant difference between patients with AF and the controls in the optimal phase (p < 0.01) but not in the visual image quality score (p = 0.06). The optimal reconstruction phase in most patients with AF was the end-diastolic phase. The end-systolic phase tended to be optimal in AF patients with higher average heart rates. (orig.)

  1. On the tomographic description of classical fields

    CERN Document Server

    Ibort, A; Man'ko, V I; Marmo, G; Simoni, A; Sudarshan, E C G; Ventriglia, F

    2012-01-01

    After a general description of the tomographic picture for classical systems, a tomographic description of free classical scalar fields is proposed both in a finite cavity and the continuum. The tomographic description is constructed in analogy with the classical tomographic picture of an ensemble of harmonic oscillators. The tomograms of a number of relevant states such as the canonical distribution, the classical counterpart of quantum coherent states and a new family of so called Gauss--Laguerre states, are discussed. Finally the Liouville equation for field states is described in the tomographic picture offering an alternative description of the dynamics of the system that can be extended naturally to other fields.

  2. Tomographic imaging beneath Alboran sea and surrounding areas (southern Iberian Peninsula and northern Morocco)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, I.; Morales, J.

    2009-04-01

    The main aim of this study is to provide a detailed analysis of the structure of the crust and upper mantle below the Iberian Peninsula, Morocco and surrounding regions using the results of global seismic tomography. We have developed a detailed three-dimensional velocity structure of this region to 700-km depth using P-wave arrival times from more than 15,000 local and regional earthquakes and 145 teleseismic events. For teleseismic events we handpicked P-wave arrival times from high-quality original seismograms from 2000 to 2005 belonging to the Andalusian Seismic Network. We also handpicked data from seismic stations belonging to the GSN (Global Seismic Network) and monitored by IRIS. All events are located between 30° and 90° from the seismic networks. This new data set is superior, in terms of both station density and arrival time accuracy, to that used in previous studies because of the higher sensitivity of the seismographs monitored by the new broad band network of the Andalusian Institute of Geophysics. In this study we modified the original tomographic method of Zhao et al. (1992) to combine teleseismic residuals with local and regional earthquake arrival times in tomographic inversions. Several bodies of high P-wave seismic velocity are located between 5 and 15 km depth and the magnetic and gravimetric data indicate superposition of bodies at different depths in this zone with a complex geological structure. Pronounced low-velocity anomalies characterize the upper crust near the Strait of Gibraltar, both in Spain and Morocco, which could be interpreted as a sedimentary basin or crustal deformation in the flysch regions. Two high-velocity anomalies were obtained in the Alboran Sea, the first, located in the middle of the basin could be related to the existence of high density lithologies, while the second, situated in the eastern Rif and trending NE-SW, could be related to the NE-SW trending magnetic anomaly in the eastern Rif. One of the most robust

  3. Imaging of 3-D seismic velocity structure of Southern Sumatra region using double difference tomographic method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lestari, Titik, E-mail: t2klestari@gmail.com [Meteorological Climatological and Geophysical Agency (MCGA), Jalan Angkasa I No.2 Kemayoran, Jakarta Pusat, 10720 (Indonesia); Faculty of Earth Science and Technology, Bandung Institute of Technology, Jalan Ganesa No.10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Nugraha, Andri Dian, E-mail: nugraha@gf.itb.ac.id [Global Geophysical Research Group, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Bandung Institute of Technology, Jalan Ganesa 10 Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

    2015-04-24

    Southern Sumatra region has a high level of seismicity due to the influence of the subduction system, Sumatra fault, Mentawai fault and stretching zone activities. The seismic activities of Southern Sumatra region are recorded by Meteorological Climatological and Geophysical Agency (MCGA’s) Seismograph network. In this study, we used earthquake data catalog compiled by MCGA for 3013 events from 10 seismic stations around Southern Sumatra region for time periods of April 2009 – April 2014 in order to invert for the 3-D seismic velocities structure (Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs ratio). We applied double-difference seismic tomography method (tomoDD) to determine Vp, Vs and Vp/Vs ratio with hypocenter adjustment. For the inversion procedure, we started from the initial 1-D seismic velocity model of AK135 and constant Vp/Vs of 1.73. The synthetic travel time from source to receiver was calculated using ray pseudo-bending technique, while the main tomographic inversion was applied using LSQR method. The resolution model was evaluated using checkerboard test and Derivative Weigh Sum (DWS). Our preliminary results show low Vp and Vs anomalies region along Bukit Barisan which is may be associated with weak zone of Sumatran fault and migration of partial melted material. Low velocity anomalies at 30-50 km depth in the fore arc region may indicated the hydrous material circulation because the slab dehydration. We detected low seismic seismicity in the fore arc region that may be indicated as seismic gap. It is coincides contact zone of high and low velocity anomalies. And two large earthquakes (Jambi and Mentawai) also occurred at the contact of contrast velocity.

  4. Imaging of 3-D seismic velocity structure of Southern Sumatra region using double difference tomographic method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lestari, Titik; Nugraha, Andri Dian

    2015-04-01

    Southern Sumatra region has a high level of seismicity due to the influence of the subduction system, Sumatra fault, Mentawai fault and stretching zone activities. The seismic activities of Southern Sumatra region are recorded by Meteorological Climatological and Geophysical Agency (MCGA's) Seismograph network. In this study, we used earthquake data catalog compiled by MCGA for 3013 events from 10 seismic stations around Southern Sumatra region for time periods of April 2009 - April 2014 in order to invert for the 3-D seismic velocities structure (Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs ratio). We applied double-difference seismic tomography method (tomoDD) to determine Vp, Vs and Vp/Vs ratio with hypocenter adjustment. For the inversion procedure, we started from the initial 1-D seismic velocity model of AK135 and constant Vp/Vs of 1.73. The synthetic travel time from source to receiver was calculated using ray pseudo-bending technique, while the main tomographic inversion was applied using LSQR method. The resolution model was evaluated using checkerboard test and Derivative Weigh Sum (DWS). Our preliminary results show low Vp and Vs anomalies region along Bukit Barisan which is may be associated with weak zone of Sumatran fault and migration of partial melted material. Low velocity anomalies at 30-50 km depth in the fore arc region may indicated the hydrous material circulation because the slab dehydration. We detected low seismic seismicity in the fore arc region that may be indicated as seismic gap. It is coincides contact zone of high and low velocity anomalies. And two large earthquakes (Jambi and Mentawai) also occurred at the contact of contrast velocity.

  5. Effective segmentation of fresh post-mortem murine lung parenchyma in phase contrast X-ray tomographic microscopy images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogiatzis Oikonomidis, Ioannis; Cremona, Tiziana P.; Lovric, Goran; Arcadu, Filippo; Stampanoni, Marco; Schittny, Johannes C.

    2017-06-01

    The acinus represents the functional unit of the mammalian lung. It is defined as the small tree of gas-exchanging airways, which is fed by the most distal purely conducting airway. Different hypotheses exist on how the fine structure of the acinus changes during ventilation and development. Since in classical 2-dimensional (2D) sections of the lung the borders of the acini are not detectable, every study of acini requires 3-dimensional (3D) datasets. As a basis for further studies of pulmonary acini we imaged rodent lungs as close to life as possible using phase contrast synchrotron radiation-based X-ray tomographic microscopy (SRXTM), and developed a protocol for the segmentation of the alveolar septa. The method is based on a combined multilevel filtering approach. Seeds are automatically defined for separate regions of tissue and airspace during each 2D filtering level and then given as input to a 3D random walk segmentation. Thus, the different types of artifacts present in the images are treated separately, taking into account the sample’s structural complexity. The proposed procedure yields high-quality 3D segmentations of acinar microstructure that can be used for a reliable morphological analysis.

  6. Effect of beta blockade on single photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) thallium-201 images in patients with coronary disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narahara, K.A.; Thompson, C.J.; Hazen, J.F.; Brizendine, M.; Mena, I.

    1989-05-01

    We evaluated the effect of beta blockers on thallium-201 (Tl-201) single photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) imaging in 12 patients with coronary disease using an automated computer algorithm. Maximal exercise heart rate and blood pressure were reduced and exercise time was increased with beta blockers. Estimated stress defect size decreased from 47 +/- 36.3 gm during placebo treatment to 32 +/- 27.1 gm during beta blocker therapy (-32%; p less than 0.01). The placebo treatment redistribution defect was estimated to be 28 +/- 29.8 gm. It fell to 15 +/- 23.3 gm with beta blockade (-46%; p less than 0.005). All patients had a stress Tl-201 defect during placebo treatment and eight had redistribution defects consistent with residual scar. During beta blocker therapy, 2 of 12 patients had normal stress-redistribution studies and only five patients had redistribution defects. Beta blockade can reduce exercise and redistribution Tl-201 SPECT defect size significantly while simultaneously increasing exercise time and reducing angina. Beta blockers may unmask or may eliminate evidence of redistribution. Tl-201 SPECT imaging may be useful in defining the reduction in ischemia produced by cardiac drugs.

  7. X-ray Luminescence Efficiency of GAGG:Ce Single Crystal Scintillators for use in Tomographic Medical Imaging Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, S. L.; Valais, I. G.; Michail, C. M.; Kandarakis, I. S.

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate different scintillator crystal samples, with a cross section of 3×3mm2 and various thicknesses ranging from 4mm up to 20mm, of the new mixed Gd3Al2Ga3O12:Ce (GAGG:Ce) scintillator material under X-ray irradiation, for potential applications in Tomographic Medical Imaging systems. Evaluation was performed by determining the X-ray luminescence efficiency (XLE) (emitted light energy flux over incident X-ray energy flux) in energies employed in general X-ray imaging. For the luminescence efficiency measurements, the scintillator samples were exposed to X-rays using a BMI General Medical Merate tube, with rotating Tungsten anode and inherent filtration equivalent to 2 mm Al. X-ray tube voltages between 50 to 130 kV were selected. An additional 20 mm filtration was introduced to the beam to simulate beam quality alternation equivalent to a human body. The emitted light energy flux measurements were performed using an experimental set up comprising a light integration sphere coupled to an EMI 9798B photomultiplier tube which was connected to a Cary 401 vibrating reed electrometer. The GAGG:Ce sample with dimensions 3×3×10 mm3 exhibited higher XLE values, in the whole X- ray energy range examined. XLE value equal to 0.013 was recorded for this crystal at 130 kVp - a setting frequently used in Computed Tomography applications.

  8. X-Ray Tomographic Reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnie Schmittberger

    2010-08-25

    Tomographic scans have revolutionized imaging techniques used in medical and biological research by resolving individual sample slices instead of several superimposed images that are obtained from regular x-ray scans. X-Ray fluorescence computed tomography, a more specific tomography technique, bombards the sample with synchrotron x-rays and detects the fluorescent photons emitted from the sample. However, since x-rays are attenuated as they pass through the sample, tomographic scans often produce images with erroneous low densities in areas where the x-rays have already passed through most of the sample. To correct for this and correctly reconstruct the data in order to obtain the most accurate images, a program employing iterative methods based on the inverse Radon transform was written. Applying this reconstruction method to a tomographic image recovered some of the lost densities, providing a more accurate image from which element concentrations and internal structure can be determined.

  9. The use of transport and diffusion equations in the three-dimensional reconstruction of computerized tomographic images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pires, Sandrerley Ramos, E-mail: sandrerley@eee.ufg.br [Escola de Engenharia Eletrica e de Computacao - EEEC, Universidade Federal de Goias - UFG, Goiania, GO (Brazil); Flores, Edna Lucia; Pires, Dulcineia Goncalves F.; Carrijo, Gilberto Arantes; Veiga, Antonio Claudio Paschoarelli [Faculdade de Engenharia Eletrica - FEELT, Universidade Federal de Uberlandia - UFU, Uberlandia, MG (Brazil); Barcelos, Celia Aparecida Z. [Faculdade de Matematica, Universidade Federal de Uberlandia - UFU, Uberlandia, MG (Brazil)

    2012-09-15

    The visualization of a computerized tomographic (TC) exam in 3D increases the quality of the medical diagnosis and, consequently, the success probability in the treatment. To obtain a high quality image it is necessary to obtain slices which are close to one another. Motivated towards the goal of reaching an improved balance between quantity of slices and visualization quality, this research work presents a digital inpainting technique of 3D interpolation for CT slices used in the visualization of human body structures. The inpainting is carried out via non-linear partial differential equations (PDE). The PDE's have been used, in the image-processing context to fill in the damaged regions in a digital 2D image. Inspired by this idea, this article proposes an interpolation method for the filling in of the empty regions between the CT slices. To do it, considering the high similarity between two consecutive real slice, the first step of the proposed method is to create the virtual slices. The virtual slices contain all similarity between the intercalated slices and, when there are not similarities between real slices, the virtual slices will contain indefinite portions. In the second step of the proposed method, the created virtual slices will be used together with the real slices images, in the reconstruction of the structure in three dimensions, mapped onto the exam. The proposed method is capable of reconstructing the curvatures of the patient's internal structures without using slices that are close to one another. The experiments carried out show the proposed method's efficiency. (author)

  10. Relationship between cerebrospinal fluid flow through the ventriculo-peritoneal shunt and computed tomographic images of hydrocephalic patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, Kiyonobu; Itoh, Haruhide; Someya, Shigeru; Yamamoto, Shinjiro

    1988-04-01

    Quantitative measurements of cerebrospinal fluid flow through the ventriculo-peritoneal shunt using radioisotope were carried out on 34 hydrocepalic patients (18 children and 16 adults) and the relationship between the flow rates and the computed tomographic (CT) images was studied. 1) The flow rates in the prone position was 0.04 - 0.20(mean +- SD, 0.10 +- 0.05) ml/min in 13 patients whose shunt systems were functioning adequately. There was a good correlation between the flow rates and closing pressures of the shunt valves. 2) The 21 patients with malfunctioning shunt systems were devided into two groups as follows; the obstruction or lower flow group in which the shunt flow was in 0 approx. 0.05 ml/min and the over-flow groups with rates over 0.20 ml/min. In the former group, there were 3 cases in which the shunt flow in a sitting position was very low and the cause of the malfunction was thought to be placement of an inadequate system with a higher pressure valve. 3) In 4 cases of 5 children in which the ventricles were of normal size during shunt malfunction, their ventricular sizes on CT images changed to small or slit-like ventricles after shunt revision. 4) A few cases of hydrocephalic adults, in which the shunt-catheters were thought to be obstructed with no shunt flow in the prone and sitting positions showing no progressive dilatation of the ventricles on CT images, were diagnosed with the added findings of RI cisternography as shunt-dependent arrested hydrocephalus. In the diagnosis of shunt malfunction and selection of the most adequate system in shunt revision, it is necessary to analyze together the data on CT images, quantitative measurement of shunt flow rates and RI cisternography as well as the clinical manifestations.

  11. Tomographic imaging of the cervical spine of horses; Aspectos tomograficos da coluna cervical de equinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, L.P.; Machado, V.M.V.; Santos, R.V.; Evangelista, F.C.; Vulcano, L.C. [Universidade Estadual Paulista, Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina Veterinaria e Zootecnia

    2012-09-15

    The anatomy of the cervical spine of mature horses based on images obtained with a helical computed tomography examination performed on anatomic specimens was studied. Computed tomography was the diagnostic imaging method of choice and allowed three-dimensional reconstructions of images and other anatomical planes, such as coronal and sagittal. All images were acquired and evaluated in the filter and window to bone tissue. It was possible to demonstrate the anatomical differences and peculiarities of the normal vertebrae, particularly the occipito-atlantoaxial region, which has a higher incidence of changes to assist in the visualization of any change of the bone pattern on CT studies. (author)

  12. Comparison of radiographic and computed tomographic images of the lungs in healthy neonatal foals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schliewert, Eva-Christina; Lascola, Kara M; O'Brien, Robert T; Clark-Price, Stuart C; Wilkins, Pamela A; Foreman, Jonathan H; Mitchell, Mark A; Hartman, Susan K; Kline, Kevin H

    2015-01-01

    To compare CT and radiographic images of the lungs in sedated healthy foals positioned in sternal recumbency and to investigate whether a relationship exists between CT-derived measurements of lung attenuation and Paco2 and Pao2. 6 healthy Standardbred foals < 14 days of age. Thoracic CT images were acquired followed by radiographic views with each foal sedated and positioned in sternal recumbency. For each foal, both CT and radiographic images were evaluated for severity and extent of changes by lung regions on the basis of a subjective scoring system by 3 investigators. Quantitative analysis of CT images was also performed. Assessments of Pao2 and Paco2 were performed before sedation, following sedation prior to CT, and after CT prior to radiography. Interobserver agreement for CT and radiographic image scoring was strong (0.73) and fair (0.65), respectively; intraobserver agreement was near perfect for CT (0.97) and radiographic (0.94) image scoring. Increased CT attenuation and radiographic changes were identified for all foals and were preferentially distributed in the caudoventral portion of the lungs. Radiographic scores were significantly lower than CT image scores. A positive correlation (r = 0.872) between lung attenuation and CT image score was identified. A significant increase in Paco2 was not considered clinically relevant. Significant changes in Pao2 were not observed. Results suggested that interpretation of CT images may be less subjective, compared with interpretation of radiographic images. These findings may aid in the evaluation of CT and radiographic images of neonatal foals with respiratory tract disease.

  13. Region-Based 4D Tomographic Image Reconstruction: Application to Cardiac X-ray CT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eyndhoven, G. Van; Batenburg, K.J.; Sijbers, J.

    2015-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) is a powerful tool for noninvasive cardiac imaging. However, radiation dose is a major issue. In this paper, we propose an iterative reconstruction method that reduces the radiation dose without compromising image quality. This is achieved by exploiting prior knowledge

  14. P-wave tomographic images beneath southeastern Tibet:Investigating the mechanism of the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    We used 71670 P-wave arrival times from 3594 earthquakes recorded by the Sichuan and Yunnan seismic networks to determine the three-dimensional P-wave velocity structure in the crust and uppermost mantle beneath the southeastern Tibetan Plateau. Our results show that prominent low P-wave velocity (low-Vp) anomalies exist in the midto lower crust of the Song- pan-Ganze and Sichuan-Yunnan blocks. In contrast, a high P-wave velocity (high-Vp) anomaly is resolved in the middle and lower crust beneath the Sichuan Basin. Our tomographic results provide seismic evidence for a dynamic model of lower crustal flow. Ongoing lower crustal flow beneath the central and eastern Tibetan Plateau abuts against the mechanically strong Si- chuan Basin resulting in accumulated strain in the Longmen Shan region. When a critical accumulation of strain energy was reached, its sudden release led to the occurrence of 2008 Wenchuan earthquake. Pronounced low-Vp anomalies are observed in the uppermost mantle in the region south of ~26°N. Combining these results with shear-wave splitting investigations, we suggest that the flow of asthenospheric material has impacted the velocity structure of the uppermost mantle and caused the thinning of the southwestern Yangtze Craton.

  15. Tomographic image of crust and upper mantle off the Boso Peninsula using data from an ocean-bottom seismograph array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Aki; Yamamoto, Yojiro; Hino, Ryota; Suetsugu, Daisuke; Sugioka, Hiroko; Nakano, Masaru; Obana, Koichiro; Nakahigashi, Kazuo; Shinohara, Masanao

    2017-08-01

    We determined the three-dimensional structure of the crust and upper mantle off the Boso Peninsula, Japan, by analyzing seismograms recorded by ocean-bottom seismometers and land stations between 2011 and 2013. We employed seismic tomography to determine the P- and S-wave velocity structures and earthquake locations simultaneously. The tomographic image shows that the mantle parts of the Pacific and the Philippine Sea plates have high-velocity anomalies. The upper boundary of the Philippine Sea plate is delineated as approximately 2-6 km shallower than that previously estimated from land-based data for the area 140.5°E-141.5°E and 35°N-35.5°N. A pronounced low-velocity anomaly in P- and S-waves with low- V p/ V s ratio (1.5-1.6) was observed at depths shallower than 20 km in the overriding North American plate. This anomaly may be caused by the presence of rocks with a low- V p/ V s ratio, such as quartzite, and the water expelled from the subducted Pacific and Philippine Sea plates.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  16. A Markov random field approach for topology-preserving registration: application to object-based tomographic image interpolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero-Grande, Lucilio; Vegas-Sánchez-Ferrero, Gonzalo; Casaseca-de-la-Higuera, Pablo; Alberola-López, Carlos

    2012-04-01

    This paper proposes a topology-preserving multiresolution elastic registration method based on a discrete Markov random field of deformations and a block-matching procedure. The method is applied to the object-based interpolation of tomographic slices. For that purpose, the fidelity of a given deformation to the data is established by a block-matching strategy based on intensity- and gradient-related features, the smoothness of the transformation is favored by an appropriate prior on the field, and the deformation is guaranteed to maintain the topology by imposing some hard constraints on the local configurations of the field. The resulting deformation is defined as the maximum a posteriori configuration. Additionally, the relative influence of the fidelity and smoothness terms is weighted by the unsupervised estimation of the field parameters. In order to obtain an unbiased interpolation result, the registration is performed both in the forward and backward directions, and the resulting transformations are combined by using the local information content of the deformation. The method is applied to magnetic resonance and computed tomography acquisitions of the brain and the torso. Quantitative comparisons offer an overall improvement in performance with respect to related works in the literature. Additionally, the application of the interpolation method to cardiac magnetic resonance images has shown that the removal of any of the main components of the algorithm results in a decrease in performance which has proven to be statistically significant.

  17. Application of the FDK algorithm for multi-slice tomographic image reconstruction; Aplicacao do algoritmo FDK para a reconstrucao de imagens tomograficas multicortes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Paulo Roberto, E-mail: pcosta@if.usp.b [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IFUSP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica. Dept. de Fisica Nuclear; Araujo, Ericky Caldas de Almeida [Fine Image Technology, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2010-08-15

    This work consisted on the study and application of the FDK (Feldkamp- Davis-Kress) algorithm for tomographic image reconstruction using cone-beam geometry, resulting on the implementation of an adapted multi-slice computed tomography system. For the acquisition of the projections, a rotating platform coupled to a goniometer, an X-ray equipment and a digital image detector charge-coupled device type were used. The FDK algorithm was implemented on a computer with a Pentium{sup R} XEON{sup TM} 3.0 processor, which was used for the reconstruction process. Initially, the original FDK algorithm was applied considering only the ideal physical conditions in the measurement process. Then some artifacts corrections related to the projections measurement process were incorporated. The implemented MSCT system was calibrated. A specially designed and manufactured object with a known linear attenuation coefficient distribution ({mu}(r)) was used for this purpose. Finally, the implemented MSCT system was used for multi-slice tomographic reconstruction of an inhomogeneous object, whose distribution {mu}(r) was unknown. Some aspects of the reconstructed images were analyzed to assess the robustness and reproducibility of the system. During the system calibration, a linear relationship between CT number and linear attenuation coefficients of materials was verified, which validate the application of the implemented multi-slice tomographic system for the characterization of linear attenuation coefficients of distinct several objects. (author)

  18. Modeling clustered activity increase in amyloid-beta positron emission tomographic images with statistical descriptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shokouhi S

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Sepideh Shokouhi,1 Baxter P Rogers,1 Hakmook Kang,2 Zhaohua Ding,1 Daniel O Claassen,3 John W Mckay,1 William R Riddle1On behalf of the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative1Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science, 2Department of Biostatistics, 3Department of Neurology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USABackground: Amyloid-beta (Aβ imaging with positron emission tomography (PET holds promise for detecting the presence of Aβ plaques in the cortical gray matter. Many image analyses focus on regional average measurements of tracer activity distribution; however, considerable additional information is available in the images. Metrics that describe the statistical properties of images, such as the two-point correlation function (S2, have found wide applications in astronomy and materials science. S2 provides a detailed characterization of spatial patterns in images typically referred to as clustering or flocculence. The objective of this study was to translate the two-point correlation method into Aβ-PET of the human brain using 11C-Pittsburgh compound B (11C-PiB to characterize longitudinal changes in the tracer distribution that may reflect changes in Aβ plaque accumulation.Methods: We modified the conventional S2 metric, which is primarily used for binary images and formulated a weighted two-point correlation function (wS2 to describe nonbinary, real-valued PET images with a single statistical function. Using serial 11C-PiB scans, we calculated wS2 functions from two-dimensional PET images of different cortical regions as well as three-dimensional data from the whole brain. The area under the wS2 functions was calculated and compared with the mean/median of the standardized uptake value ratio (SUVR. For three-dimensional data, we compared the area under the wS2 curves with the subjects’ cerebrospinal fluid measures.Results: Overall, the longitudinal changes in wS2

  19. A new tomographic image on the Philippine Sea Slab beneath Tokyo - Implication to seismic hazard in the Tokyo metropolitan region -

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, N.; Sakai, S.; Nakagawa, S.; Ishikawa, M.; Sato, H.; Kasahara, K.; Kimura, H.; Honda, R.

    2012-12-01

    region. Based on elastic wave velocities of rocks and minerals, we interpreted the tomographic images as petrologic images. Tomographic images revealed the presence of two stepwise velocity increase of the top layer of the subducting PSP slab. Rock velocity data reveals that subducting PSP crust transforms from blueschists to amphibolites at depth of 30km and amphibolites to eclogites at depth of 50km, which suggest that dehydration reactions occurs in subducting crust of basaltic compositions during prograde metamorphism and water is released from the subducting PSP crust. Tomograms show evidence for a low-velocity zone (LVZ) beneath the area just north of Tokyo bay. We interpret the LVZ as a serpentinized region in the forearc mantle of Honshu arc, resulting from hydration by water derived from subducting PSP crust. The P- and S-wave velocities within the serpentinized zone represent a degree of serpentinization as high as 10-40% for the LVZ with 20-km-long in noth-south and 90-km-long in east-west just above PSP, which is approximately eastern half or less of the previously estimated serpentinized area (Kamiya and Kobayashi, 2000). Because strength of the serpentinized preidotite is not large enough for brittle fracture, if the area is smaller than previously estimated, a possible area of the large thrusting fault on the upper surface of PSP can be larger than previously thought.

  20. Tomographic image reconstruction from incomplete view data by convex projections and direct fourier inversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezan, M; Stark, H

    1984-01-01

    We consider the problem of reconstructing CAT imagery by the direct Fourier method (DFM) when not all view data are available. To restore the missing information we use the method of projections onto convex sets (POCS). POCS is a recursive image restoration technique that finds a solution consistent with the measured data and a priori known constraints in both the space and Fourier domain. Because DFM reconstruction is a frequency-domain technique it is ideally matched to POCS restoration when, for one reason or another, we are forced to generate an image from a less than complete set of view data. We design and apply an algorithm (PRDF) which interpolates/extrapolates the missing Fourier domain information by POCS and reconstructs an image by DFM. A simulated human thorax cross section is restored and reconstructed. The restorations using POCS are compared with the Gerchberg-Papoulis extrapolation method and shown to be superior. Applications of PRDF to other types of medical imaging modalities are discussed.

  1. Three-dimensional segmentation of the tumor in computed tomographic images of neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deglint, Hanford J; Rangayyan, Rangaraj M; Ayres, Fábio J; Boag, Graham S; Zuffo, Marcelo K

    2007-09-01

    Segmentation of the tumor in neuroblastoma is complicated by the fact that the mass is almost always heterogeneous in nature; furthermore, viable tumor, necrosis, and normal tissue are often intermixed. Tumor definition and diagnosis require the analysis of the spatial distribution and Hounsfield unit (HU) values of voxels in computed tomography (CT) images, coupled with a knowledge of normal anatomy. Segmentation and analysis of the tissue composition of the tumor can assist in quantitative assessment of the response to therapy and in the planning of the delayed surgery for resection of the tumor. We propose methods to achieve 3-dimensional segmentation of the neuroblastic tumor. In our scheme, some of the normal structures expected in abdominal CT images are delineated and removed from further consideration; the remaining parts of the image volume are then examined for tumor mass. Mathematical morphology, fuzzy connectivity, and other image processing tools are deployed for this purpose. Expert knowledge provided by a radiologist in the form of the expected structures and their shapes, HU values, and radiological characteristics are incorporated into the segmentation algorithm. In this preliminary study, the methods were tested with 10 CT exams of four cases from the Alberta Children's Hospital. False-negative error rates of less than 12% were obtained in eight of 10 exams; however, seven of the exams had false-positive error rates of more than 20% with respect to manual segmentation of the tumor by a radiologist.

  2. Tectonic implications of tomographic images of subducted lithosphere beneath northwestern South America

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilst, R.D. van der; Mann, P.

    1994-01-01

    We used seismic tomography to investigate the complex structure of the upper mantle below northwestern South America. Images of slab structure not delineated by previous seismicity studies help us to refine existing tectonic models of subducted Caribbean-Pacific lithosphere beneath the study area. B

  3. Investigation of alterations in multifractality in optical coherence tomographic images of in vivo human retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Nandan Kumar; Mukhopadhyay, Sabyasachi; Ghosh, Nirmalya; Chhablani, Jay; Richhariya, Ashutosh; Divakar Rao, Kompalli; Sahoo, Naba Kishore

    2016-09-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) enables us to monitor alterations in the thickness of the retinal layer as disease progresses in the human retina. However, subtle morphological changes in the retinal layers due to early disease progression often may not lead to detectable alterations in the thickness. OCT images encode depth-dependent backscattered intensity distribution arising due to the depth distributions of the refractive index from tissue microstructures. Here, such depth-resolved refractive index variations of different retinal layers were analyzed using multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis, a special class of multiresolution analysis tools. The analysis extracted and quantified microstructural multifractal information encoded in normal as well as diseased human retinal OCT images acquired in vivo. Interestingly, different layers of the retina exhibited different degrees of multifractality in a particular retina, and the individual layers displayed consistent multifractal trends in healthy retinas of different human subjects. In the retinal layers of diabetic macular edema (DME) subjects, the change in multifractality manifested prominently near the boundary of the DME as compared to the normal retinal layers. The demonstrated ability to quantify depth-resolved information on multifractality encoded in OCT images appears promising for the early diagnosis of diseases of the human eye, which may also prove useful for detecting other types of tissue abnormalities from OCT images.

  4. HF Radar Signal Processing Based on Tomographic Imaging and CS Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the application of a spotlight-mode synthetic aperture radar (SAR imaging technique to the problem of high probablity target detection in high frequency (HF radar system, attempting to improve its spatial resolution. The effects of finite aperture on resolution, sampling constraints and reconstruction over a complete angular range of 360 degrees are discussed. A Convolution Back Projection (CBP algorithm has been applied to image reconstruction. In order to solve the range limitation of aspect angle with one radar-carrying platform, we collect data over a larger azimuthal range by making multi-aspect observations. Each straight line is a sub aperture over which we can perform the CBP algorithm. When we demand higher resolution for stationary target, it will cause blur with longer data acquisition time. Thus the application of the traditional imaging algorithm is limited. Compressed Sensing (CS has recently attracted much interest as it can reduce the number of samples without compromising the imaging quality. Within this motivation, we discuss the applicability of CS and present the application constraint for HF radar system.

  5. A Method for Identifying Contours in Processing Digital Images from Computer Tomograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roşu, Şerban; Pater, Flavius; Costea, Dan; Munteanu, Mihnea; Roşu, Doina; Fratila, Mihaela

    2011-09-01

    The first step in digital processing of two-dimensional computed tomography images is to identify the contour of component elements. This paper deals with the collective work of specialists in medicine and applied mathematics in computer science on elaborating new algorithms and methods in medical 2D and 3D imagery.

  6. Urinary Metabolomic Analysis to Detect Changes After Intravenous, Non-ionic, Low Osmolar Iodinated Radiocontrast for Computerized Tomographic Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah B Diercks

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Contrast-induced nephropathy is a result of injury to the proximal tubules caused by oxidative stress and ischemia. Metabolomics is a novel technique that has been used to identify renal damage from drug toxicities. The objective of this study is to analyze the metabolic changes in the urine after dosing with intravenous (IV contrast for computed tomograph (CT of the chest Methods: A convenience sample of patients undergoing a chest CT with IV contrast who had at least one of the following: age ≥50 years, diabetes, heart failure, chronic kidney disease, coronary artery disease, or diastolic blood pressure >90 mmHg -- were eligible for enrollment. Urine samples were collected prior to imaging and 4-6 hours post imaging. Samples underwent gas chromography/mass spectrometry profiling. We measured peak metabolite values and log transformed data. Paired T tests were calculated. We used significance analysis of microarrays (SAM to determine the most significant metabolites. Results: The cohort comprised 14 patients with matched samples; 9 /14 (64.3 were males, and the median age was 61 years (IQR 50-68. A total of 158 metabolites were identified. Using SAM we identified 9 metabolites that were identified as significant using a delta of 1.6. Conclusion: Changes in urinary metabolites are present soon after contrast administration. This change in urinary metabolites may be potential early identifiers of contrast-induced nephropathy and could identify patients at high-risk for developing this condition. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(2:152–157.

  7. Diffusion in Altered Tonalite Sample Using Time Domain Diffusion Simulations in Tomographic Images Combined with Lab-scale Diffusion Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voutilainen, M.; Sardini, P.; Togneri, L.; Siitari-Kauppi, M.; Timonen, J.

    2010-12-01

    In this work an effect of rock heterogeneity on diffusion was investigated. Time domain diffusion simulations were used to compare behavior of diffusion in homogeneous and heterogeneous 3D media. Tomographic images were used as heterogeneous rock media. One altered tonalite sample from Sievi, Finland, was chosen as test case for introduced analysis procedure. Effective diffusion coefficient of tonalite sample was determined with lab-scale experiments and the same coefficient was used also for homogeneous media. Somewhat technically complicated mathematical solution for analysis of through diffusion experiment is shortly described. Computed tomography (CT) is already quite widely used in many geological, petrological, and paleontological applications when the three-dimensional (3D) structure of the material is of interest, and is an excellent method for gaining information especially about its heterogeneity, grain size, or porosity. In addition to offering means for quantitative characterization, CT provides a lot of qualitative information [1]. A through -diffusion laboratory experiment using radioactive tracer was fitted using the Time Domain Diffusion (TDD) method. This rapid particle tracking method allows simulation of the heterogeneous diffusion based on pore-scale images and local values of diffusivities [2]. As a result we found out that heterogeneity has only a small effect to diffusion coefficient and in-diffusion profile for used geometry. Also direction dependency was tested and was found to be negligible. Whereas significant difference between generally accepted value and value obtained from simulations for constant m in Archie’s law was found. [1] Voutilainen, M., Siitari-Kauppi, M., Sardini, P., and Timonen, J., (2010). On pore-space characterization of an altered tonalite by X-ray µCT and the 14C-PMMA method (in progress). [2] Sardini, P., Robinet, J., Siitari-Kauppi, M., Delay, F., and Hellmuth, K-H, (2007). On direct simulation of heterogeneous

  8. Evaluation of Periapical Lesions and Their Association with Maxillary Sinus Abnormalities on Cone-beam Computed Tomographic Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Carla A B C M; Guedes, Orlando Aguirre; Alencar, Ana Helena G; Peters, Ove A; Estrela, Cyntia R A; Estrela, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Periapical inflammation is often responsible for distinct maxillary sinus (MS) changes. This retrospective, cross-sectional study evaluated the association between the clinical characteristics of periapical lesions (presence, size, and distance) in maxillary posterior teeth and the presence of sinus abnormalities by evaluating cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) images obtained from an archived collection. Apart from sex, no other patient information was available. The study sample was composed of CBCT images of 143 MSs of patients with at least 1 maxillary posterior tooth with a periapical lesion and 178 MSs of patients without periapical radiolucent lesions. Sinus abnormalities were classified as mucosal thickening, sinus polyp, antral pseudocyst, nonspecific opacification, periostitis, and antral calcification; periapical radiolucent areas were classified using the CBCT periapical index, and the distance between the periapical lesion edge and the MS floor was measured. Data were analyzed using chi-square tests at a level of significance set at α = 0.05. Most sinus abnormalities were associated with at least 1 maxillary posterior tooth with a periapical lesion (P > .05). The most frequent sinus abnormality in the presence of a periapical lesion was mucosal thickening. All teeth with a CBCT periapical index score of 5 were associated with sinus abnormalities. The highest frequency of abnormalities was found when the radiolucent area was subjacent to the sinus floor. Maxillary posterior teeth with periapical radiolucent lesions had the highest frequency of sinus abnormalities. The size of a periapical lesion was not associated with the frequency of sinus abnormalities. A close spatial relationship between periapical lesions and sinuses resulted most frequently in sinus abnormalities. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Automatic segmentation of the ribs, the vertebral column, and the spinal canal in pediatric computed tomographic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banik, Shantanu; Rangayyan, Rangaraj M; Boag, Graham S

    2010-06-01

    We propose methods to perform automatic identification of the rib structure, the vertebral column, and the spinal canal in computed tomographic (CT) images of pediatric patients. The segmentation processes for the rib structure and the vertebral column are initiated using multilevel thresholding and the results are refined using morphological image processing techniques with features based on radiological and anatomical prior knowledge. The Hough transform for the detection of circles is applied to a cropped edge map that includes the thoracic vertebral structure. The centers of the detected circles are used to derive the information required for the opening-by-reconstruction algorithm used to segment the spinal canal. The methods were tested on 39 CT exams of 13 patients; the results of segmentation of the vertebral column and the spinal canal were assessed quantitatively and qualitatively by comparing with segmentation performed independently by a radiologist. Using 13 CT exams of six patients, including a total of 458 slices with the vertebra from different sections of the vertebral column, the average Hausdorff distance was determined to be 3.2 mm with a standard deviation (SD) of 2.4 mm; the average mean distance to the closest point (MDCP) was 0.7 mm with SD = 0.6 mm. Quantitative analysis was also performed for the segmented spinal canal with three CT exams of three patients, including 21 slices with the spinal canal from different sections of the vertebral column; the average Hausdorff distance was 1.6 mm with SD = 0.5 mm, and the average MDCP was 0.6 mm with SD = 0.1 mm.

  10. Advertising, patient decision making, and self-referral for computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illes, Judy; Kann, Dylan; Karetsky, Kim; Letourneau, Phillip; Raffin, Thomas A; Schraedley-Desmond, Pamela; Koenig, Barbara A; Atlas, Scott W

    Self-referred imaging is one of the latest health care services to be marketed directly to consumers. Most aspects of these services are unregulated, and little is known about the messages in advertising used to attract potential consumers. We conducted a detailed analysis of print advertisements and informational brochures for self-referred imaging with respect to themes, content, accuracy, and emotional valence. Forty print advertisements from US newspapers around the country and 20 informational brochures were analyzed by 2 independent raters according to 7 major themes: health care technology; emotion, empowerment, and assurance; incentives; limited supporting evidence; popular appeal; statistics; and images. The Fisher exact test was used to identify significant differences in information content. Both the advertisements and the brochures emphasized health care and technology information and provided assurances of good health and incentives to self-refer. These materials also encouraged consumers to seek further information from company resources; virtually none referred to noncomplying sources of information or to the risks of having a scan. Images of people commonly portrayed European Americans. We found statistical differences between newspaper advertisements and mailed brochures for references to "prevalence of disease" (P<.001), "death" (P<.003), and "radiation" (P<.001). Statements lacking clear scientific evidence were identified in 38% of the advertisements (n = 15) and 25% of the brochures (n = 5). Direct-to-consumer marketing of self-referred imaging services, in both print advertisements and informational brochures, fails to provide prospective consumers with comprehensive balanced information vital to informed autonomous decision making. Professional guidelines and oversight for advertising and promotion of these services are needed.

  11. Quantitative computed tomographic imaging-based clustering differentiates asthmatic subgroups with distinctive clinical phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sanghun; Hoffman, Eric A; Wenzel, Sally E; Castro, Mario; Fain, Sean; Jarjour, Nizar; Schiebler, Mark L; Chen, Kun; Lin, Ching-Long

    2017-09-01

    Imaging variables, including airway diameter, wall thickness, and air trapping, have been found to be important metrics when differentiating patients with severe asthma from those with nonsevere asthma and healthy subjects. The objective of this study was to identify imaging-based clusters and to explore the association of the clusters with existing clinical metrics. We performed an imaging-based cluster analysis using quantitative computed tomography-based structural and functional variables extracted from the respective inspiration and expiration scans of 248 asthmatic patients. The imaging-based metrics included a broader set of multiscale variables, such as inspiratory airway dimension, expiratory air trapping, and registration-based lung deformation (inspiration vs expiration). Asthma subgroups derived from a clustering method were associated with subject demographics, questionnaire results, medication history, and biomarker variables. Cluster 1 was composed of younger patients with early-onset nonsevere asthma and reversible airflow obstruction and normal airway structure. Cluster 2 was composed of patients with a mix of patients with nonsevere and severe asthma with marginal inflammation who exhibited airway luminal narrowing without wall thickening. Clusters 3 and 4 were dominated by patients with severe asthma. Cluster 3 patients were obese female patients with reversible airflow obstruction who exhibited airway wall thickening without airway narrowing. Cluster 4 patients were late-onset older male subjects with persistent airflow obstruction who exhibited significant air trapping and reduced regional deformation. Cluster 3 and 4 patients also showed decreased lymphocyte and increased neutrophil counts, respectively. Four image-based clusters were identified and shown to be correlated with clinical characteristics. Such clustering serves to differentiate asthma subgroups that can be used as a basis for the development of new therapies. Copyright © 2017

  12. Induced apnea enhances image quality and visualization of cardiopulmonary anatomic during contrastenhanced cardiac computerized tomographic angiography in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murali Chakravarthy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of our study was to determine the effect of induced apnea on quality of cardiopulmonary structures during computerized tomographic (CT angiography images in children with congenital heart diseases. Methods: Pediatric patients with congenital heart defects undergoing cardiac CT angiography at our facility in the past 3 years participated in this study. The earlier patients underwent cardiac CT angiography without induced apnea and while, later, apnea was induced in patients, which was followed by electrocardiogram gated cardiac CT angiography. General anesthesia was induced using sleep dose of intravenous propofol. After the initial check CT, on request by the radiologist, apnea was induced by the anesthesiologist by administering 1 mg/kg of intravenous suxamethonium. Soon after apnea ensued, the contrast was injected, and CT angiogram carried out. CT images in the "apnea group" were compared with those in "nonapnea group." After the completion of the procedure, the patients were mask ventilated with 100% oxygen till the spontaneous ventilation was restored. Results: We studied 46 patients, of whom 36 with apnea and yet another 10 without. The quality of the image, visualization of structures such as cardiac wall, outflow tracts, lung field, aortopulmonary shunts, and coronary arteries were analyzed and subjected to statistical analysis (Mann-Whitney U, Fischer′s exact test and Pearson′s Chi-square test. In the induced apnea group, overall image quality was considered excellent in 89% (n = 33 of the studies, while in the "no apnea group," only 30% of studies were excellent. Absent or minimal motion artifacts were seen in a majority of the studies in apnea group (94%. In the nonapnea group, the respiratory and body motion artifacts were severe in 50%, moderate in 30%, and minimal in 20%, but they were significantly lesser in the apnea group. All the studied parameters were statistically significant in the apnea group in

  13. Tomographic imaging of the Nazca slab and surrounding mantle in the mantle transition zone beneath the Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scire, A. C.; Biryol, C. B.; Zandt, G.; Beck, S. L.; Wagner, L. S.; Long, M. D.; Minaya, E.; Tavera, H.

    2013-12-01

    The central Andes in South America is an ideal location to investigate the interaction between a subducting slab and the surrounding mantle to the base of the mantle transition zone (MTZ). We used finite-frequency teleseismic P-wave tomography to image velocity anomalies in the mantle from 100 - 700 km between 10° and 28°S in the central Andes by combining data from twelve separate networks deployed in the region between 1994 and 2013. P- and PKIKP- (diffracted PKP) arrivals were picked in multiple frequency bands for earthquakes at distances between 30° and 90° and between 155° to 180° from the array, respectively. The tomographic algorithm used calculates approximate finite frequency kernels for each ray, providing additional sampling for each model layer to potentially increase the resolution of our images. The trench-parallel, fast anomaly which appears to correspond with the subducting Nazca slab is the most prominent anomaly in our tomograms. Variations in the width of the slab anomaly in the deeper parts of the model show evidence for deformation of the slab between 300 and 660 km. Our results show localized thickening of the Nazca slab in the MTZ north of 14°S, between 16° and 18°S, and south of 25°S, in agreement with the idea that the Nazca slab stagnates at least temporarily in the transition zone before resuming subduction into the lower mantle. Our images of the deeply subducted Nazca slab also show evidence of varying degrees of thinning in the mantle transition zone, particularly at 20° and 24°S, possibly indicating that the stress state changes along strike as the slab deforms in the MTZ before resuming subduction into the lower mantle. We also image along-strike variations in the sub-slab mantle in the MTZ including a strong low velocity anomaly between 22° and 28°S which is similar to those seen in other subduction zones, and is interpreted as either a local thermal anomaly or a region of hydrated material in the MTZ. A similar

  14. Computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging of ameloblastoma: 2 case reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oder, P.; Royster, A. [Boston Medical Center, Dept. of Radiology, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Gibbons, D. [Boston Medical Center, Dept. of Pathology, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Mulligan, N.; Kavanagh, P.; Eustace, S. [Boston Medical Center, Dept. of Radiology, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    1999-12-01

    Cysts of the mandible are uncommon. Most arise from epithelium lining the alveolus or root of the tooth (tooth derivatives), and the rest arise from the cortical and cancellous osseous matrix of the mandible. Of cysts arising from the alveolus (odontogenic epithelium), radicular cysts are the most common, accounting for almost 90% of cases. They are almost always found either in association with a dental cavity or at the base of a devitalized, amalgam-filled tooth. Of the remaining 10% of cases, most are dentigerous cysts, arising from the outer epithelial lining of the developing tooth, which is displaced to the base of the cyst as the lesion grows. Ameloblastoma, which also arises from odontogenic epithelium, accounts for less than 1% of cases. In this case report, we review the imaging appearance, histology and management of this uncommon tumour. In doing so, we highlight signal characteristics on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that may allow noninvasive characterization of ameloblastoma before surgical resection. (author)

  15. Evaluation of Positron Emission Tomographic Tracers for Imaging of Papillomavirus-Induced Tumors in Rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Probst

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, simultaneous positron emission tomography (PET/magnetic resonance (MR imaging was employed to evaluate the feasibility of the PET tracers 2-deoxy-2-18F-fluoro-D-glucose (18F-FDG, 11C-choline, and 18F-fluorothymidine (18F-FLT to detect papillomavirus-induced tumors in an established rabbit model system. The combined PET/MR allowed the analysis of tracer uptake of the tumors using the morphologic information acquired by MR. New Zealand White rabbits were infected with cottontail rabbit papillomavirus genomes and were imaged for up to 10 months with a simultaneous PET/MR system during the course of infection. The uptake characteristics of the PET tracers 11C-choline and 18F-FLT of tumors and reference tissues were examined relative to the clinical standard, 18F-FDG. Tracer biodistribution of various organs was measured by gamma-counting after the last PET scan and compared to the in vivo PET/MR 18F-FDG uptake. Increased tracer uptake was found 2 months postinfection in primary tumors with 18F-FDG and 11C-choline, whereas 18F-FLT failed to detect the tumors at all measured time points. Our data show that the PET tracer 18F-FDG is superior for imaging papillomavirus-induced tumors in rabbits compared to 11C-choline and 18F-FLT. However, 11C-choline imaging, which has previously been applied to detect various tumor entities in patients, appears to be an alternative to 18F-FDG.

  16. Frequency and Relevance of Acute Peritraumatic Pulmonary Thrombus Diagnosed by Computed Tomographic Imaging in Combat Casualties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    determine the prevalence of and risk factors for the diagnosis of APPT in casualties admitted to Bastion Hospital, Afghanistan. APPT imaging characteristics...were collected, and demographics, injury severity and mechanism, and risk factors were included in the analysis. Logistic regression was used to...segmental, and 15% (n = 10) were subsegmental. Forty-seven percent (n = 31) had bilateral APPT. Logistic regression found presence of deep venous thrombosis

  17. Tomographic reconstruction of storm time RC ion distribution from ENA images on board multiple spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shu-Ying; Yan, Wei-Nan; Xu, Liang

    2015-11-01

    A quantitative retrieval of 3-D distribution of energetic ions as energetic neutral atoms (ENA) sources is a challenging task. In this paper the voxel computerized tomography (CT) method is initially applied to reconstruct the 3-D distribution of energetic ions in the magnetospheric ring current (RC) region from ENA emission images on board multiple spacecraft. To weaken the influence of low-altitude emission (LAE) on the reconstruction, the LAE-associated ENA intensities are corrected by invoking the thick-target approximation. To overcome the divergence in iteration due to discordant instrument biases, a differential ENA voxel CT method is developed. The method is proved reliable and advantageous by numerical simulation for the case of constant bias independent of viewing angle. Then this method is implemented with ENA data measured by the Two Wide-angle Imaging Neutral-atom Spectrometers mission which performs stereoscopic ENA imaging. The 3-D spatial distributions and energy spectra of RC ion flux intensity are reconstructed for energies of 4-50 keV during the main phase of a major magnetic storm. The retrieved ion flux distributions seem to correspond to an asymmetric partial RC, located mainly around midnight favoring the postmidnight with L = 3.5-7.0 in the equatorial plane. The RC ion distributions with magnetic local time depend on energy, with major equatorial flux peak for lower energy located east of that for higher energy. In comparison with the ion energy spectra measured by Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms-D satellite flying in the RC region, the retrieved spectrum from remotely sensed ENA images are well matched with the in situ measurements.

  18. Biomaterial porosity determined by fractal dimensions, succolarity and lacunarity on microcomputed tomographic images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N' Diaye, Mambaye [LUNAM Université, GEROM Groupe Etudes Remodelage Osseux et bioMatériaux-LHEA, IRIS-IBS Institut de Biologie en Santé, CHU d' Angers, 49933 ANGERS Cedex (France); Degeratu, Cristinel [LUNAM Université, GEROM Groupe Etudes Remodelage Osseux et bioMatériaux-LHEA, IRIS-IBS Institut de Biologie en Santé, CHU d' Angers, 49933 ANGERS Cedex (France); University Politehnica of Bucharest, Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, Department of Bioresources and Polymer Science, Calea Victoriei 149, 010072, Sector 1, Bucharest (Romania); Bouler, Jean-Michel [Inserm UMR 791, LIOAD, University of Nantes, 44000 Nantes (France); Chappard, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.chappard@univ-angers.fr [LUNAM Université, GEROM Groupe Etudes Remodelage Osseux et bioMatériaux-LHEA, IRIS-IBS Institut de Biologie en Santé, CHU d' Angers, 49933 ANGERS Cedex (France)

    2013-05-01

    Porous structures are becoming more and more important in biology and material science because they help in reducing the density of the grafted material. For biomaterials, porosity also increases the accessibility of cells and vessels inside the grafted area. However, descriptors of porosity are scanty. We have used a series of biomaterials with different types of porosity (created by various porogens: fibers, beads …). Blocks were studied by microcomputed tomography for the measurement of 3D porosity. 2D sections were re-sliced to analyze the microarchitecture of the pores and were transferred to image analysis programs: star volumes, interconnectivity index, Minkowski–Bouligand and Kolmogorov fractal dimensions were determined. Lacunarity and succolarity, two recently described fractal dimensions, were also computed. These parameters provided a precise description of porosity and pores' characteristics. Non-linear relationships were found between several descriptors e.g. succolarity and star volume of the material. A linear correlation was found between lacunarity and succolarity. These techniques appear suitable in the study of biomaterials usable as bone substitutes. Highlights: ► Interconnected porosity is important in the development of bone substitutes. ► Porosity was evaluated by 2D and 3D morphometry on microCT images. ► Euclidean and fractal descriptors measure interconnectivity on 2D microCT images. ► Lacunarity and succolarity were evaluated on a series of porous biomaterials.

  19. Variational-based segmentation of bio-pores in tomographic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Benjamin; Cai, Xiaohao; Peth, Stephan; Schladitz, Katja; Steidl, Gabriele

    2017-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) combined with a quantitative analysis of the resulting volume images is a fruitful technique in soil science. However, the variations in X-ray attenuation due to different soil components keep the segmentation of single components within these highly heterogeneous samples a challenging problem. Particularly demanding are bio-pores due to their elongated shape and the low gray value difference to the surrounding soil structure. Recently, variational models in connection with algorithms from convex optimization were successfully applied for image segmentation. In this paper we apply these methods for the first time for the segmentation of bio-pores in CT images of soil samples. We introduce a novel convex model which enforces smooth boundaries of bio-pores and takes the varying attenuation values in the depth into account. Segmentation results are reported for different real-world 3D data sets as well as for simulated data. These results are compared with two gray value thresholding methods, namely indicator kriging and a global thresholding procedure, and with a morphological approach. Pros and cons of the methods are assessed by considering geometric features of the segmented bio-pore systems. The variational approach features well-connected smooth pores while not detecting smaller or shallower pores. This is an advantage in cases where the main bio-pores network is of interest and where infillings, e.g., excrements of earthworms, would result in losing pore connections as observed for the other thresholding methods.

  20. Quantitative analysis of the cochlea using three-dimensional reconstruction based on microcomputed tomographic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Kang-Jae; Lee, Ju-Young; Kim, Jeong-Nam; Yoo, Ja-Young; Shin, Chuog; Song, Wu-Chul; Koh, Ki-Seok

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to provide data on various dimensions of the normal cochlea using three-dimensional reconstruction based on high-resolution micro-CT images. The petrous parts of 39 temporal bones were scanned by micro-computed tomography (CT) with a slice thickness of 35 μm. The micro-CT images were used in reconstructing three-dimensional volumes of the bony labyrinth using computer software. The volumes were used to measure 12 dimensions of the cochlea, and statistical analysis was carried out. The dimensions of cochleae varied widely between different specimens. The mean height and length of the cochlea were 3.8 and 9.7 mm, respectively. The angle between the basal and middle turns was slightly larger in males than in females, while none of the other 11 dimensions differed significantly between males and females. The cochlear accessory canals were observed in about half of the cases (51.3%). Correlation analysis among measured items revealed positive correlations among several of the measured dimensions. The present study could investigate the detailed anatomy of the normal cochlea using high-resolution imaging technologies. The results of the present study could be helpful for the precise diagnosis of congenital cochlear malformations and for producing optimized cochlear implants.

  1. Tomographic imaging of reacting flows in 3D by laser absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, J.; Martin, P. A.

    2017-05-01

    This paper describes the development of an infrared laser absorption tomography system for the 3D volumetric imaging of chemical species and temperature in reacting flows. The system is based on high-resolution near-infrared tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) for the measurement of water vapour above twin, mixed fuel gas burners arranged with an asymmetrical output. Four parallel laser beams pass through the sample region and are rotated rapidly in a plane to produce a wide range of projection angles. A rotation of 180° with 0.5° sampling was achieved in 3.6 s. The effects of changes to the burner fuel flow were monitored in real time for the 2D distributions. The monitoring plane was then moved vertically relative to the burners enabling a stack of 2D images to be produced which were then interpolated to form a 3D volumetric image of the temperature and water concentrations above the burners. The optical transmission of each beam was rapidly scanned around 1392 nm and the spectrum was fitted to find the integrated absorbance of the water transitions and although several are probed in each scan, two of these transitions possess opposite temperature dependencies. The projections of the integrated absorbances at each angle form the sinogram from which the 2D image of integrated absorbance of each line can be reconstructed by the direct Fourier reconstruction based on the Fourier slice theorem. The ratio of the integrated absorbances of the two lines can then be related to temperature alone in a method termed, two-line thermometry. The 2D temperature distribution obtained was validated for pattern and accuracy by thermocouple measurements. With the reconstructed temperature distribution, the temperature-dependent line strengths could be determined and subsequently the concentration distribution of water across the 2D plane whilst variations in burner condition were carried out. These results show that the measurement system based on TDLAS can be

  2. Tomographic study of helical modes in bifurcating Taylor-Couette-Poiseuille flow using magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, K W; Raguin, L G; Georgiadis, J G

    2001-07-01

    The quantitative visualization of flow in a wide-gap annulus (radius ratio 0.5) between concentric cylinders with the inner cylinder rotating and a superimposed axial flow reveals a novel mixed-mode state at relatively high flow rates. A fast magnetic resonance imaging sequence allows the cinematographic dissection and three-dimensional reconstruction of supercritical nonaxisymmetric modes in a regime where stationary helical and propagating toroidal vortices coexist. The findings shed light on symmetry-breaking instabilities, flow pattern selection, and their consequences for hydrodynamic mixing in a complex laminar flow that constitutes a celebrated prototype of many mixing or fractionation processes.

  3. Choroidal Structure in Children with Anisohypermetropic Amblyopia Determined by Binarization of Optical Coherence Tomographic Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, Tomo; Ueda, Tetsuo; Mizusawa, Yuutaro; Shinomiya, Kayo; Semba, Kentaro; Mitamura, Yoshinori; Sonoda, Shozo; Uchino, Eisuke; Sakamoto, Taiji; Ogata, Nahoko

    2016-01-01

    To compare the choroidal structure of the subfoveal area in the eyes of children with anisohypermetropic amblyopia to that of the fellow eyes and to age-matched controls using a binarization method of the images obtained by enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography (EDI-OCT). This study was performed at Nara Medical University Hospital, Tokushima University Hospital, and Kagoshima University Hospital, Japan. Forty amblyopic eyes with anisohypermetropic amblyopia and their fellow eyes (5.9 ± 2.1 years, mean ± standard deviation), and 103 age-matched controls (6.7 ± 2.4 years) were studied. The control eyes were divided into myopic, emmetropic, and hyperopic eyes. The total choroidal area, luminal area and stromal area of the subfoveal choroid were measured by the binarization method. The luminal/stromal ratio and the axial length of the amblyopic eyes were compared to that of the control eyes. The total choroidal area in the amblyopic eyes was significantly larger than that of the fellow eyes (P = 0.005). The luminal/stromal ratio was significantly larger in the amblyopic eyes than that of the fellow eyes (Pcontrol hyperopic eyes (Pcontrol eyes (r = -0.30, P = 0.001), but no significant correlation was found in the amblyopic eyes. The choroidal structure of the amblyopic eyes was different from that of the fellow and the control hyperopic eyes. The choroidal changes are related to amblyopia.

  4. Presence of foveal bulge in optical coherence tomographic images in eyes with macular edema associated with branch retinal vein occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Taiji; Ueda, Tetsuo; Okamoto, Masahiro; Ogata, Nahoko

    2014-02-01

    To determine whether a significant correlation exists between the presence of a bulge in the photoreceptor inner segment/outer segment (IS/OS) line and the best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) in eyes with resolved macular edema associated with branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO). Retrospective, observational case series. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients who had a complete resolution of macular edema and had an intact IS/OS line in the central fovea in the spectral-domain optical coherence tomographic (SDOCT) images. Thirty-one eyes with macular edema associated with BRVO (BRVO group) and 31 unaffected fellow eyes (control group) of 31 patients were evaluated. In normal eyes, the intact IS/OS line determined by SDOCT has a bulge at the central fovea, called the foveal bulge. The eyes in the BRVO group were classified by the presence or absence of foveal bulge, and the characteristics of the 2 groups were compared. A foveal bulge was present in 7 of 31 eyes in the BRVO group. The incidence of a foveal bulge was significantly lower in the BRVO group (22.6%) than in the control group (100%; P < .0001). All 7 eyes with foveal bulge had a decimal BCVA of ≥1.0 at the final visit. The incidence of a foveal bulge was significantly higher in eyes with BCVA of ≥1.0 (77.8%) than in the eyes with BCVA of <1.0 (0%; P < .0001). The foveal bulge is a good marker of the functional properties of the fovea in eyes with resolved macular edema associated with BRVO. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Moving image analysis to the cloud: A case study with a genome-scale tomographic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mader, Kevin; Stampanoni, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, the time required to measure a terabyte of microscopic imaging data has gone from years to minutes. This shift has moved many of the challenges away from experimental design and measurement to scalable storage, organization, and analysis. As many scientists and scientific institutions lack training and competencies in these areas, major bottlenecks have arisen and led to substantial delays and gaps between measurement, understanding, and dissemination. We present in this paper a framework for analyzing large 3D datasets using cloud-based computational and storage resources. We demonstrate its applicability by showing the setup and costs associated with the analysis of a genome-scale study of bone microstructure. We then evaluate the relative advantages and disadvantages associated with local versus cloud infrastructures.

  6. Tomographic airborne ground penetrating radar imaging: Achievable spatial resolution and on-field assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catapano, Ilaria; Crocco, Lorenzo; Krellmann, Yvonne; Triltzsch, Gunnar; Soldovieri, Francesco

    2014-06-01

    Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) airborne systems are gaining an increasing attention as effective monitoring tools capable of underground investigation of wide areas. With respect to this frame, the paper deals with a reconstruction approach specifically designed to image buried targets from airborne gathered scattered field data. The role of the measurement configuration is investigated in order to address the practical problem of how multi-monostatic and multi-frequency data should be gathered, in terms of synthetic aperture length and frequency range, and how the available data affect the achievable reconstruction capabilities. Such an analysis allows us to evaluate the performance of the reconstruction approach in terms of transversal and depth resolution limits. Finally, an experimental validation of the approach is performed by processing real data.

  7. Correlation between computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging findings of parenchymal lung diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreto, Miriam Menna; Rafful, Patricia Piazza [Department of Radiology, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Rodrigues, Rosana Souza [Department of Radiology, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); D’Or Institute for Research and Education, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Zanetti, Gláucia [Department of Radiology, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Hochhegger, Bruno [Complexo Hospitalar Santa Casa de Misericórdia de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Souza, Arthur Soares [Department of Radiology, Medical School of Rio Preto (FAMERP) and Ultra X, São José do Rio Preto, SP (Brazil); Guimarães, Marcos Duarte [Department of Imaging, Hospital AC Camargo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Marchiori, Edson, E-mail: edmarchiori@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2013-09-15

    Computed tomography (CT) is considered to be the gold standard method for the assessment of morphological changes in the pulmonary parenchyma. Although its spatial resolution is lower than that of CT, MRI offers the advantage of characterizing different aspects of tissue based on the degree of contrast on T1-weighted image (WI) and T2-WI. In this article, we describe and correlate the MRI and CT features of several common patterns of parenchymal lung disease (air trapping, atelectasis, bronchiectasis, cavitation, consolidation, emphysema, ground-glass opacities, halo sign, interlobular septal thickening, masses, mycetoma, nodules, progressive massive fibrosis, reverse halo sign and tree-in-bud pattern). MRI may be an alternative modality for the collection of morphological and functional information useful for the management of parenchymal lung disease, which would help reduce the number of chest CT scans and radiation exposure required in patients with a variety of conditions.

  8. A study on laser-based ultrasonic technique by the use of guided wave tomographic imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Junpil, E-mail: jpp@pusan.ac.kr; Lim, Juyoung, E-mail: jpp@pusan.ac.kr [Graduate school, School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Younho [School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University (Korea, Republic of); Krishnaswamy, Sridhar [Center for Quality Engineering and Failure Prevention, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL (United States)

    2015-03-31

    Guided wave tests are impractical for investigating specimens with limited accessibility and coarse surfaces or geometrically complicated features. A non-contact setup with a laser ultrasonic transmitter and receiver is the classic attractive for guided wave inspection. The present work was done to develop a non-contact guided-wave tomography technique by laser ultrasonic technique in a plate-like structure. A method for Lam wave generation and detection in an aluminum plate with a pulse laser ultrasonic transmitter and a Michelson interferometer receiver has been developed. In the images obtained by laser scanning, the defect shape and area showed good agreement with the actual defect. The proposed approach can be used as a non-contact-based online inspection and monitoring technique.

  9. The complex aerodynamic footprint of desert locusts revealed by large-volume tomographic particle image velocimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henningsson, Per; Michaelis, Dirk; Nakata, Toshiyuki; Schanz, Daniel; Geisler, Reinhard; Schröder, Andreas; Bomphrey, Richard J

    2015-07-01

    Particle image velocimetry has been the preferred experimental technique with which to study the aerodynamics of animal flight for over a decade. In that time, hardware has become more accessible and the software has progressed from the acquisition of planes through the flow field to the reconstruction of small volumetric measurements. Until now, it has not been possible to capture large volumes that incorporate the full wavelength of the aerodynamic track left behind during a complete wingbeat cycle. Here, we use a unique apparatus to acquire the first instantaneous wake volume of a flying animal's entire wingbeat. We confirm the presence of wake deformation behind desert locusts and quantify the effect of that deformation on estimates of aerodynamic force and the efficiency of lift generation. We present previously undescribed vortex wake phenomena, including entrainment around the wing-tip vortices of a set of secondary vortices borne of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in the shear layer behind the flapping wings.

  10. Measurement of cochlea to facial nerve canal with thin-section computed tomographic image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ying; Liu, Xiangliang; Yao, Jihang; Tian, Yong; Xia, Changli; Li, Youqiong; Fu, Yan; Luo, Qi

    2013-03-01

    Facial nerve (FN) paralysis is a rare but devastating complication of cochlear implant surgery. This study aimed to measure the cupula of the cochlea to the tympanic segment of the FN canal, cupula of the cochlea to the mastoid segment of the FN canal, and the geniculate ganglion to provide a more secure and accurate orientation of the FN canal and to facilitate operation on the cochlea by avoiding potential damage to FN. Using computed tomography, we scanned skulls of 120 volunteers who suffer no cases of skull base lesions. Multiplane reconstruction images were prepared with high-resolution computed tomography. Preoperative evaluation of the FN anatomy within the temporal bone by high-resolution computed tomography helps in minimizing surgical trauma to the nerve, and these results can help guide clinical surgery on the cochlea.

  11. Three-dimensional microscopic tomographic imagings of the cataract in a human lens in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, B

    1998-10-26

    The problem of three-dimensional visualization of a human lens in vivo has been solved by a technique of volume rendering a transformed series of 60 rotated Scheimpflug (a dual slit reflected light microscope) digital images. The data set was obtained by rotating the Scheimpflug camera about the optic axis of the lens in 3 degree increments. The transformed set of optical sections were first aligned to correct for small eye movements, and then rendered into a volume reconstruction with volume rendering computer graphics techniques. To help visualize the distribution of lens opacities (cataracts) in the living, human lens the intensity of light scattering was pseudocolor coded and the cataract opacities were displayed as a movie.

  12. Moving image analysis to the cloud: A case study with a genome-scale tomographic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mader, Kevin [4Quant Ltd., Switzerland & Institute for Biomedical Engineering at University and ETH Zurich (Switzerland); Stampanoni, Marco [Institute for Biomedical Engineering at University and ETH Zurich, Switzerland & Swiss Light Source at Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland)

    2016-01-28

    Over the last decade, the time required to measure a terabyte of microscopic imaging data has gone from years to minutes. This shift has moved many of the challenges away from experimental design and measurement to scalable storage, organization, and analysis. As many scientists and scientific institutions lack training and competencies in these areas, major bottlenecks have arisen and led to substantial delays and gaps between measurement, understanding, and dissemination. We present in this paper a framework for analyzing large 3D datasets using cloud-based computational and storage resources. We demonstrate its applicability by showing the setup and costs associated with the analysis of a genome-scale study of bone microstructure. We then evaluate the relative advantages and disadvantages associated with local versus cloud infrastructures.

  13. Dynamic Pattern Based Image Steganography

    OpenAIRE

    Thiyagarajan, P.; G. Aghila; Venkatesan, V. Prasanna

    2012-01-01

    Steganography is the art of hiding secret information in media such as image, audio and video. The purpose of steganography is to conceal the existence of the secret information in any given medium. This work aims at strengthening the security in steganography algorithm by generating dynamic pattern in selection of indicator sequence. In addition to this dynamicity is also encompassed in number of bits embedded in data channel. This technique has been implemented and the results have been com...

  14. Clinical outcomes following spinal fusion using an intraoperative computed tomographic 3D imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Roy; Miller, Jacob A; Sabharwal, Navin C; Lubelski, Daniel; Alentado, Vincent J; Healy, Andrew T; Mroz, Thomas E; Benzel, Edward C

    2017-03-03

    OBJECTIVE Improvements in imaging technology have steadily advanced surgical approaches. Within the field of spine surgery, assistance from the O-arm Multidimensional Surgical Imaging System has been established to yield superior accuracy of pedicle screw insertion compared with freehand and fluoroscopic approaches. Despite this evidence, no studies have investigated the clinical relevance associated with increased accuracy. Accordingly, the objective of this study was to investigate the clinical outcomes following thoracolumbar spinal fusion associated with O-arm-assisted navigation. The authors hypothesized that increased accuracy achieved with O-arm-assisted navigation decreases the rate of reoperation secondary to reduced hardware failure and screw misplacement. METHODS A consecutive retrospective review of all patients who underwent open thoracolumbar spinal fusion at a single tertiary-care institution between December 2012 and December 2014 was conducted. Outcomes assessed included operative time, length of hospital stay, and rates of readmission and reoperation. Mixed-effects Cox proportional hazards modeling, with surgeon as a random effect, was used to investigate the association between O-arm-assisted navigation and postoperative outcomes. RESULTS Among 1208 procedures, 614 were performed with O-arm-assisted navigation, 356 using freehand techniques, and 238 using fluoroscopic guidance. The most common indication for surgery was spondylolisthesis (56.2%), and most patients underwent a posterolateral fusion only (59.4%). Although O-arm procedures involved more vertebral levels compared with the combined freehand/fluoroscopy cohort (4.79 vs 4.26 vertebral levels; p fusion only (HR 0.39; p fusion (HR 0.22; p = 0.03), but not posterior/transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion. CONCLUSIONS To the authors' knowledge, the present study is the first to investigate clinical outcomes associated with O-arm-assisted navigation following thoracolumbar spinal fusion. O

  15. Biomaterial porosity determined by fractal dimensions, succolarity and lacunarity on microcomputed tomographic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    N'Diaye, Mambaye; Degeratu, Cristinel; Bouler, Jean-Michel; Chappard, Daniel

    2013-05-01

    Porous structures are becoming more and more important in biology and material science because they help in reducing the density of the grafted material. For biomaterials, porosity also increases the accessibility of cells and vessels inside the grafted area. However, descriptors of porosity are scanty. We have used a series of biomaterials with different types of porosity (created by various porogens: fibers, beads …). Blocks were studied by microcomputed tomography for the measurement of 3D porosity. 2D sections were re-sliced to analyze the microarchitecture of the pores and were transferred to image analysis programs: star volumes, interconnectivity index, Minkowski-Bouligand and Kolmogorov fractal dimensions were determined. Lacunarity and succolarity, two recently described fractal dimensions, were also computed. These parameters provided a precise description of porosity and pores' characteristics. Non-linear relationships were found between several descriptors e.g. succolarity and star volume of the material. A linear correlation was found between lacunarity and succolarity. These techniques appear suitable in the study of biomaterials usable as bone substitutes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Radio-Tomographic Images of Post-midnight Equatorial Plasma Depletions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hei, M. A.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Siefring, C. L.; Wilkens, M.; Huba, J. D.; Krall, J.; Valladares, C. E.; Heelis, R. A.; Hairston, M. R.; Coley, W. R.; Chau, J. L.

    2013-12-01

    For the first time, post-midnight equatorial plasma depletions (EPDs) have been imaged in the longitude-altitude plane using radio-tomography. High-resolution (~10 km × 10 km) electron-density reconstructions were created from total electron content (TEC) data using an array of receivers sited in Peru and the Multiplicative Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (MART) inversion algorithm. TEC data were obtained from the 150 and 400 MHz signals transmitted by the CERTO beacon on the C/NOFS satellite. In-situ electron density data from the C/NOFS CINDI instrument and electron density profiles from the UML Jicamarca ionosonde were used to generate an initial guess for the MART inversion, and also to constrain the inversion process. Observed EPDs had widths of 100-1000 km, spacings of 300-900 km, and often appeared 'pinched off' at the bottom. Well-developed EPDs appeared on an evening with a very small (4 m/s) Pre-Reversal-Enhancement (PRE), suggesting that postmidnight enhancements of the vertical plasma drift and/or seeding-induced uplifts (e.g. gravity waves) were responsible for driving the Rayleigh-Taylor Instability into the nonlinear regime on this night. On another night the Jicamarca ISR recorded postmidnight (~0230 LT) Eastward electric fields nearly twice as strong as the PRE fields seven hours earlier. These electric fields lifted the whole ionosphere, including embedded EPDs, over a longitude range ~14° wide. CINDI detected a dawn depletion in exactly the area where the reconstruction showed an uplifted EPD. Strong Equatorial Spread-F observed by the Jicamarca ionosonde during receiver observation times confirmed the presence of ionospheric irregularities.

  17. From mantle to crust: Tomographic image of a mid-ocean ridge volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Florian; Koulakov, Ivan; Schlindwein, Vera

    2016-04-01

    Volcanoes are an integral part of mid-ocean ridges. At ultraslow spreading ridges, volcanic centres receive more melt than is produced locally and hence are centres of very efficient magmatism. The cause of melt focussing and the structure of the underlying magma plumbing systems at these volcanic centres are still enigmatic. We present microearthquake data and local earthquake tomography results, based on a one-year deployment of ocean bottom seismometers from 2012 to 2013 on a volcanic centre at the ultraslow Southwest Indian Ridge. In the period 1996-2001, several tectono-magmatic earthquake swarms including unusually strong teleseismically recorded events indicated recent magmatic activity at the experiment site. The distribution of recorded microearthquakes reveals a prominent gap in seismicity of approx. 20 km diameter immediately beneath the volcano indicating elevated temperatures. Tomography results show distinct velocity anomalies in the area of the seismicity gap. An eminent circular low Vs anomaly was found at 4-6 km depth beneath the volcano, imaging a potential crustal magma chamber. Another anomaly of high Vp/Vs-ratios is located at the eastern rim of the seismicity gap, capped by a cluster of microearthquakes and underlain by another low Vs anomaly in the upper mantle. We propose anomalies of reduced seismic velocity to result from recent magmatic activity that is further manifested in elevated temperatures beneath the volcano. Clustering microearthquake foci might be associated with steep temperature gradients and thermal fracturing, where hot upwelling material is confronted with a cold, rigid crust. Our results provide the first direct observation of a melt lens beneath the ultraslow type of mid-ocean ridge and give unprecedented insights to potential magma pathways from the upper mantle to the crust.

  18. The Salton Seismic Imaging Project: Tomographic characterization of a sediment-filled rift valley and adjacent ranges, southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, K.; Hole, J. A.; Stock, J. M.; Fuis, G. S.; Carrick, E.; Tikoff, B.

    2011-12-01

    The Salton Trough in Southern California represents the northernmost rift of the Gulf of California extensional system. Relative motion between the Pacific and North American plates is accommodated by continental rifting in step-over zones between the San Andreas, Imperial, and Cerro Prieto transform faults. Rapid sedimentation from the Colorado River has isolated the trough from the southern portion of the Gulf of California, progressively filling the subsiding rift basin. Based on data from previous seismic surveys, the pre-existing continent has ruptured completely, and a new ~22 km thick crust has been created entirely by sedimentation overlying rift-related magmatism. The MARGINS, EarthScope, and USGS-funded Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP) was designed to investigate the nature of this new crust, the ongoing process of continental rifting, and associated earthquake hazards. SSIP, acquired in March 2011, comprises 7 lines of onshore seismic refraction / wide-angle reflection data, 2 lines of refraction / reflection data in the Salton Sea, and a line of broadband stations. This presentation focuses on the refraction / wide-angle reflection line across the Imperial Valley, extending ~220 km across California from Otay Mesa, near Tijuana, to the Colorado River. The data from this line includes seventeen 100-160 kg explosive shots and receivers at 100 m spacing across the Imperial Valley to constrain the structure of the Salton Trough rift basin, including the Imperial Fault. Eight larger shots (600-920 kg) at 20-35 km spacing and receivers at 200-500 m spacing extend the line across the Peninsular Ranges and the Chocolate Mountains. These data will contrast the structure of the rift to that of the surrounding crust and provide constraints on whole-crust and uppermost mantle structure. Preliminary work has included tomographic inversion of first-arrival travel times across the Valley, emphasizing a minimum-structure approach to create a velocity model of the

  19. Estimation of water saturated permeability of soils, using 3D soil tomographic images and pore-level transport phenomena modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamorski, Krzysztof; Sławiński, Cezary; Barna, Gyöngyi

    2014-05-01

    There are some important macroscopic properties of the soil porous media such as: saturated permeability and water retention characteristics. These soil characteristics are very important as they determine soil transport processes and are commonly used as a parameters of general models of soil transport processes used extensively for scientific developments and engineering practise. These characteristics are usually measured or estimated using some statistical or phenomenological modelling, i.e. pedotransfer functions. On the physical basis, saturated soil permeability arises from physical transport processes occurring at the pore level. Current progress in modelling techniques, computational methods and X-ray micro-tomographic technology gives opportunity to use direct methods of physical modelling for pore level transport processes. Physically valid description of transport processes at micro-scale based on Navier-Stokes type modelling approach gives chance to recover macroscopic porous medium characteristics from micro-flow modelling. Water microflow transport processes occurring at the pore level are dependent on the microstructure of porous body and interactions between the fluid and the medium. In case of soils, i.e. the medium there exist relatively big pores in which water can move easily but also finer pores are present in which water transport processes are dominated by strong interactions between the medium and the fluid - full physical description of these phenomena is a challenge. Ten samples of different soils were scanned using X-ray computational microtomograph. The diameter of samples was 5 mm. The voxel resolution of CT scan was 2.5 µm. Resulting 3D soil samples images were used for reconstruction of the pore space for further modelling. 3D image threshholding was made to determine the soil grain surface. This surface was triangulated and used for computational mesh construction for the pore space. Numerical modelling of water flow through the

  20. Temporal Unmixing of Dynamic Fluorescent Images by Blind Source Separation Method with a Convex Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duofang Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available By recording a time series of tomographic images, dynamic fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT allows exploring perfusion, biodistribution, and pharmacokinetics of labeled substances in vivo. Usually, dynamic tomographic images are first reconstructed frame by frame, and then unmixing based on principle component analysis (PCA or independent component analysis (ICA is performed to detect and visualize functional structures with different kinetic patterns. PCA and ICA assume sources are statistically uncorrelated or independent and don’t perform well when correlated sources are present. In this paper, we deduce the relationship between the measured imaging data and the kinetic patterns and present a temporal unmixing approach, which is based on nonnegative blind source separation (BSS method with a convex analysis framework to separate the measured data. The presented method requires no assumption on source independence or zero correlations. Several numerical simulations and phantom experiments are conducted to investigate the performance of the proposed temporal unmixing method. The results indicate that it is feasible to unmix the measured data before the tomographic reconstruction and the BSS based method provides better unmixing quality compared with PCA and ICA.

  1. Experimental computer tomograph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heinemann D.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The computed tomography is one of the most important medical instruments, allowing the non-invasive visualization of cross sections which are free from superpositions. Since 2000 an experimental computer tomo-graph of the third generation for the purpose of education and research was set up and further developed. Besides the mechanical construction design reconstruction algorithms, including certain corrections of the measured data were developed and implemented. In 2013 iterative reconstruction methods were investigated and implemented for advanced reconstructions and dose reduction using various ray tracing algorithms. The new reconstruction technique leads to improvements in image quality and low dose reconstructions.

  2. A tomographic technique for the simultaneous imaging of temperature, chemical species, and pressure in reactive flows using absorption spectroscopy with frequency-agile lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Weiwei; Kaminski, Clemens F., E-mail: cfk23@cam.ac.uk [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3RA (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-20

    This paper proposes a technique that can simultaneously retrieve distributions of temperature, concentration of chemical species, and pressure based on broad bandwidth, frequency-agile tomographic absorption spectroscopy. The technique holds particular promise for the study of dynamic combusting flows. A proof-of-concept numerical demonstration is presented, using representative phantoms to model conditions typically prevailing in near-atmospheric or high pressure flames. The simulations reveal both the feasibility of the proposed technique and its robustness. Our calculations indicate precisions of ∼70 K at flame temperatures and ∼0.05 bars at high pressure from reconstructions featuring as much as 5% Gaussian noise in the projections.

  3. Quantitative strain analysis in analogue modelling experiments: insights from X-ray computed tomography and tomographic image correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, J.; Klinkmueller, M.; Schreurs, G.; Wieneke, B.

    2009-04-01

    deformation. We have adapted our analogue modelling setups for optimal analysis of complex deformation processes using leading-edge volumetric strain monitoring techniques (3D volume DIC, Tomographic DIC). In this study, we apply DIC on X-ray CT images of analogue models. Our first results indicate that DIC can successfully be applied to quantify the 2D and 3D spatial and temporal patterns of strain accumulation. REFERENCES Adam, J., Urai, J.L, Wieneke, B., Oncken, O., Pfeiffer, K., Kukowski, N., Lohrmann, J., Hoth, S. van der Zee, W., and Schmatz, J.; 2005: Shear localisation and strain distribution during tectonic faulting - new insights from granular-flow experiments and high-resolution optical image correlation techniques. Journal of Structural Geology, 27, 283-301. Lohrmann, J., Kukowski, N., Adam, J. & Oncken, O.; 2003: The control of sand wedges by material properties: sensitivity analyses and application to convergent margin mechanics. - Journal of Structural Geology, 25, 1691-1711 Panien, M., Schreurs, G., and Pfiffner, A.; 2006. Mechanical behaviour of granular materials used in analogue modelling: insights from grain characterisation, ring-shear tests and analogue experiments. Journal of Structural Geology, 28, 1710-1724. Schreurs, G., Hänni, R, and Vock, P.; 2002: Analogue modelling of transfer zones in fold and thrust belts: a 4-D analysis. In: Schellart, W.P. and Passchier, C. (eds). Analogue modelling of large-scale tectonic processes. Journal of the Virtual Explorer, 7, 67-73. Schreurs, G., Hänni, R, Panien, M. and Vock, P.; 2003: Analysis of analogue models by helical X-ray computed tomography. In: Mees, F., Swennen, R., Van Geet, M. and Jacobs, P. (eds). Applications of X-ray Computed Tomogaphy in Earth Sciences. Geological Society, London, Special Publications, 215, 213-223.

  4. Caveats on tomographic images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foulger, Gillian R.; Panza, Giuliano F.; Artemieva, Irina

    2014-01-01

    .r.foulger@durham.ac.uk, +44 191 334 2301), (2) Dept.Mathematics and Geosciences, University of Trieste, Italy and the Abdus Salam ICTP - SAND Group, Trieste, Italy, (3) Inst.Geophysics, China Earthquake Administration, Beijing, China, (4) Dept. Geography and Geology, University of Copenhagen,Denmark, (5) Dept. Earth Science...... and Engineering, Imperial College, London, SW7 2AZ, UK, (6) U.S. Geological Survey,Menlo Park, CA 94025, U.S.A., (7) Dept. of Geophysics, Colorado School of Mines, Golden CO 80401, U.S.A., (8)Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Università degli Studi di Roma La Sapienza, P.le A. Moro, 5, 00185, Rome, Italy, (9......)CNR – Istituto di Geologia Ambientale e Geoingegneria (IGAG) c/o Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Università degliStudi di Roma La Sapienza, Rome, Italy, (10) Dept. Physics of the Earth, Sankt-Petersburg State University, Sankt-Petersburg,RussiaGeological models of the mantle and its geodynamic...

  5. Caveats on tomographic images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foulger, Gillian R.; Panza, Giuliano F.; Artemieva, Irina

    2014-01-01

    .r.foulger@durham.ac.uk, +44 191 334 2301), (2) Dept.Mathematics and Geosciences, University of Trieste, Italy and the Abdus Salam ICTP - SAND Group, Trieste, Italy, (3) Inst.Geophysics, China Earthquake Administration, Beijing, China, (4) Dept. Geography and Geology, University of Copenhagen,Denmark, (5) Dept. Earth Science......)CNR – Istituto di Geologia Ambientale e Geoingegneria (IGAG) c/o Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Università degliStudi di Roma La Sapienza, Rome, Italy, (10) Dept. Physics of the Earth, Sankt-Petersburg State University, Sankt-Petersburg,RussiaGeological models of the mantle and its geodynamic...

  6. Dynamic CT perfusion imaging of the myocardium: a technical note on improvement of image quality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Muenzel

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To improve image and diagnostic quality in dynamic CT myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI by using motion compensation and a spatio-temporal filter. METHODS: Dynamic CT MPI was performed using a 256-slice multidetector computed tomography scanner (MDCT. Data from two different patients-with and without myocardial perfusion defects-were evaluated to illustrate potential improvements for MPI (institutional review board approved. Three datasets for each patient were generated: (i original data (ii motion compensated data and (iii motion compensated data with spatio-temporal filtering performed. In addition to the visual assessment of the tomographic slices, noise and contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR were measured for all data. Perfusion analysis was performed using time-density curves with regions-of-interest (ROI placed in normal and hypoperfused myocardium. Precision in definition of normal and hypoperfused areas was determined in corresponding coloured perfusion maps. RESULTS: The use of motion compensation followed by spatio-temporal filtering resulted in better alignment of the cardiac volumes over time leading to a more consistent perfusion quantification and improved detection of the extend of perfusion defects. Additionally image noise was reduced by 78.5%, with CNR improvements by a factor of 4.7. The average effective radiation dose estimate was 7.1±1.1 mSv. CONCLUSION: The use of motion compensation and spatio-temporal smoothing will result in improved quantification of dynamic CT MPI using a latest generation CT scanner.

  7. Neural network analysis of crosshole tomographic images: The seismic signature of gas hydrate bearing sediments in the Mackenzie Delta (NW Canada)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, K.; Pratt, R. G.; Haberland, C.; Weber, M.

    2008-10-01

    Crosshole seismic experiments were conducted to study the in-situ properties of gas hydrate bearing sediments (GHBS) in the Mackenzie Delta (NW Canada). Seismic tomography provided images of P velocity, anisotropy, and attenuation. Self-organizing maps (SOM) are powerful neural network techniques to classify and interpret multi-attribute data sets. The coincident tomographic images are translated to a set of data vectors in order to train a Kohonen layer. The total gradient of the model vectors is determined for the trained SOM and a watershed segmentation algorithm is used to visualize and map the lithological clusters with well-defined seismic signatures. Application to the Mallik data reveals four major litho-types: (1) GHBS, (2) sands, (3) shale/coal interlayering, and (4) silt. The signature of seismic P wave characteristics distinguished for the GHBS (high velocities, strong anisotropy and attenuation) is new and can be used for new exploration strategies to map and quantify gas hydrates.

  8. Validation of pore network simulations of ex-situ water distributions in a gas diffusion layer of proton exchange membrane fuel cells with X-ray tomographic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agaesse, Tristan; Lamibrac, Adrien; Büchi, Felix N.; Pauchet, Joel; Prat, Marc

    2016-11-01

    Understanding and modeling two-phase flows in the gas diffusion layer (GDL) of proton exchange membrane fuel cells are important in order to improve fuel cells performance. They are scientifically challenging because of the peculiarities of GDLs microstructures. In the present work, simulations on a pore network model are compared to X-ray tomographic images of water distributions during an ex-situ water invasion experiment. A method based on watershed segmentation was developed to extract a pore network from the 3D segmented image of the dry GDL. Pore network modeling and a full morphology model were then used to perform two-phase simulations and compared to the experimental data. The results show good agreement between experimental and simulated microscopic water distributions. Pore network extraction parameters were also benchmarked using the experimental data and results from full morphology simulations.

  9. Dynamic CT myocardial perfusion imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Damiano; Eid, Marwen; Schoepf, U Joseph; Jin, Kwang Nam; Varga-Szemes, Akos; Tesche, Christian; Mangold, Stefanie; Spandorfer, Adam; Laghi, Andrea; De Cecco, Carlo N

    2016-10-01

    Non-invasive cardiac imaging has rapidly evolved during the last decade due to advancements in CT based technologies. Coronary CT angiography has been shown to reliably assess coronary anatomy and detect high risk coronary artery disease. However, this technique is limited to anatomical assessment, thus non-invasive techniques for functional assessment of the heart are necessary. CT myocardial perfusion is a new CT based technique that provides functional assessment of the myocardium and allows for a comprehensive assessment of coronary artery disease with a single modality when combined with CTA. This review aims to discuss dynamic CT myocardial perfusion as a new technique in the assessment of CAD.

  10. Tomographic bremsstrahlung imaging with yttrium-90 in the context of radioembolisation of liver tumors; Tomografische Bildgebung mit Yttrium-90-Bremsstrahlung im Rahmen der Radioembolisation von Lebertumoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosser, Oliver Stephan

    2013-04-12

    Establish tomographic Bremsstrahlung SPECT imaging (BSPECT) for the clinical validation of Selective Internal Radiotherapy (SIRT) with Yttrium-90 ({sup 90}Y) labelled microspheres. Various energy ranges (75 ± 3.8 keV; 135 ± 6.8 keV; 167 ± 8.4 keV) and the summation window were studied to see if they were suitable for BSPECT. To this end, clinically available reconstruction techniques were analysed for their suitability for BSPECT. The tomographic examinations were performed on a cylindrical phantom filled with spheres of different diameters d = [28; 35; 40; 50; 60] mm in a non-active waterfilled background. The spheres were filled with identical {sup 90}Y activity concentration (AC). Measurements were conducted at AC = [14.58; 5.20; 1.98; 0.66] MBq/cm{sup 3}. The BSPECT were reconstructed with filtered back-projection (FBP), a 2D Ordered-Subset Expectation Maximisation Algorithm (2D-OSEM) and a 3D Geometric Mean Algorithm (3D-GMA). Evaluation was made visually and on the basis of objective performance parameters such as contrast, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and image noise. While the 75 keV ± 3.8 keV window was identified as suitable for the BSPECT, limitations were revealed as to use of different implementations of the Point Spread Function (PSF). It was found for all reconstruction techniques that, at a given sphere diameter, there existed a linear relationship between the AC in the spheres and the reconstructed pulse rate per volume element. The recovery effect was verified for small spheres. The iterative techniques were found to be suitable for the BSPECT at all AC. At low AC, the 3D-GMA exhibited the least noise and the highest SNR. The FBP turned out to be entirely inappropriate for the BSPECT. The narrow energy window in which the bremsstrahlung interferes with the characteristic X-radiation of lead can be used for BSPECT. In this approach, the tomographic data reconstructed with different algorithms exhibited a varying image quality, with the iterative

  11. Estimation of the Above Ground Biomass of Tropical Forests using Polarimetric and Tomographic SAR Data Acquired at P Band and 3-D Imaging Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro-Famil, L.; El Hajj Chehade, B.; Ho Tong Minh, D.; Tebaldini, S.; LE Toan, T.

    2016-12-01

    Developing and improving methods to monitor forest biomass in space and time is a timely challenge, especially for tropical forests, for which SAR imaging at larger wavelength presents an interesting potential. Nevertheless, directly estimating tropical forest biomass from classical 2-D SAR images may reveal a very complex and ill-conditioned problem, since a SAR echo is composed of numerous contributions, whose features and importance depend on many geophysical parameters, such has ground humidity, roughness, topography… that are not related to biomass. Recent studies showed that SAR modes of diversity, i.e. polarimetric intensity ratios or interferometric phase centers, do not fully resolve this under-determined problem, whereas Pol-InSAR tree height estimates may be related to biomass through allometric relationships, with, in general over tropical forests, significant levels of uncertainty and lack of robustness. In this context, 3-D imaging using SAR tomography represents an appealing solution at larger wavelengths, for which wave penetration properties ensures a high quality mapping of a tropical forest reflectivity in the vertical direction. This paper presents a series of studies led, in the frame of the preparation of the next ESA mission BIOMASS, on the estimation of biomass over a tropical forest in French Guiana, using Polarimetric SAR Tomographic (Pol-TomSAR) data acquired at P band by ONERA. It is then shown that Pol-TomoSAR significantly improves the retrieval of forest above ground biomass (AGB) in a high biomass forest (200 up to 500 t/ha), with an error of only 10% at 1.5-ha resolution using a reflectivity estimates sampled at a predetermined elevation. The robustness of this technique is tested by applying the same approach over another site, and results show a similar relationship between AGB and tomographic reflectivity over both sites. The excellent ability of Pol-TomSAR to retrieve both canopy top heights and ground topography with an error

  12. SU-E-I-39: Combining Conventional Tomographic Imaging Strategy and Interior Tomography for Low Dose Dual-Energy CT (DECT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Q [School of Electronic and Information Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710049 (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Xing, L [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Xiong, G; Elmore, K; Min, J [Dalio Institute of Cardiovascular Imaging, New York- Presbyterian Hospital and Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Dual-energy CT (DECT) affords quantitative information of tissue density and provides a new dimension for disease diagnosis and treatment planning. The technique, however, increases the imaging dose because of the doubled scans, and thus hinders its widespread clinical applications. The purpose of this work is to develop a novel hybrid DECT image acquisition and reconstruction strategy, in which one of the energies is dealt by interior tomography while the other one is obtained using conventional tomography approach. Methods: In the proposed hybrid imaging strategy, the projection data of one of the energies (e.g., high-energy) were acquired and processed in an interior scanning model, whereas the other energy in the conventional tomographic approach. It known that, if the ROI is piecewise constant or polynomial, the interior ROI can be reconstructed with TV or HOT minimization. Here we extend the TV based interior reconstruction method into dual-energy situation. The ROI images so obtained were overlaid in the context of conventional CT of the companion energy. A material based composition in ROI was used in the proposed reconstruction framework. Results: In the simulation experiment with a diagnostic DECT geometry and energies, we were able to derive the densities of soft-tissues and bones in the ROI with high fidelity. In the experimental CBCT study, both kV and MV data were collected using the on-board kV and MV imaging system. The MV data were truncated only across the ROI. Using the interior tomography reconstruction above, we were able to obtain the ROI images as that obtained using un-truncated MV data with known tissue densities. Conclusion: The proposed DECT imaging strategy provides an effective way to extract tissue density information in the ROI and in the context of anatomical images of CT imaging, with much reduced imaging dose.

  13. Optimization of [(11)C]raclopride positron emission tomographic rat studies: comparison of methods for image quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrent, Elia; Farré, Magí; Abasolo, Ibane; Millan, Olga; Llop, Jordi; Gispert, Juan Domingo; Ruiz, Alba; Pareto, Deborah

    2013-06-01

    The goal of this study was to compare different quantification approaches and reconstruction methods to estimate the binding potential in [11C]raclopride studies in rats. The final aim was to determine if the results obtained with short-acquisition scanning were comparable to the results obtained with long-acquistion (conventional) scanning. We analyzed two rat data sets: a baseline versus a pretreatment study (with cold raclopride) and a young versus an old animal group comparison. The study results support the contention that optimization of [11C]raclopride positron emission tomographic studies in rats by shortening the acquisition time is feasible. In addition, filtered backprojection is recommended as a reconstruction algorithm, although iterative methods may be more sensitive to detect within-group differences.

  14. Tomographic imaging of the spleen: the role of morphological and metabolic features in differentiating benign from malignant diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainenti, Pier Paolo; Iodice, Delfina; Cozzolino, Immacolata; Segreto, Sabrina; Capece, Sergio; Sica, Giacomo; Magliulo, Mario; Ciancia, Giuseppe; Pace, Leonardo; Salvatore, Marco

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the tomographic features in differentiating benign from malignant splenic diseases, 54 patients with a cytohistological examination and a contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomography (ce-MDCT) and/or positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) were retrospectively selected. Significant associations were observed between ce-MDCT Pattern 3 (focal hyperdense lesion) and Pattern 4 (infarcts/cysts) as well as PET/CT Pattern 3 (focal photopenia/diffuse uptake

  15. Guest editorial : high dynamic range imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Luís Paulo; Debattista, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    High Dynamic Range (HDR) imagery is a step-change in imaging technology that is not limited to the 8-bits per pixel for each color channel that traditional or low-dynamic range digital images have been constrained to. These restrictions have meant that the current and relatively novel imaging technologies including stereoscopic, HD and ultraHD imaging do not provide an accurate representation of the lighting available in a real world environment. HDR technology has enabled the capture, sto...

  16. Tomographic imaging of Central Java, Indonesia: Preliminary result of joint inversion of the MERAMEX and MCGA earthquake data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohadi, Supriyanto [Study Program of Earth Sciences, Faculty of Earth Sciences and Technology, Institute of Technology Bandung, Jl. Ganesha No.10, Bandung 40132, Indonesia and Meteorological, Climatological, and Geophysical Agency, Jl. Angkasa 1 No.2, Kemayoran, Jakarta (Indonesia); Widiyantoro, Sri; Nugraha, Andri Dian [Global Geophysics Research Group, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institute of Technology Bandung, Jl. Ganesha No.10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Masturyono [Meteorological, Climatological, and Geophysical Agency, Jl. Angkasa 1 No.2, Kemayoran, Jakarta Pusat (Indonesia)

    2013-09-09

    The realization of local earthquake tomography is usually conducted by removing distant events outside the study region, because these events may increase errors. In this study, tomographic inversion has been conducted using the travel time data of local and regional events in order to improve the structural resolution, especially for deep structures. We used the local MERapi Amphibious EXperiments (MERAMEX) data catalog that consists of 292 events from May to October 2004. The additional new data of regional events in the Java region were taken from the Meteorological, Climatological, and Geophysical Agency (MCGA) of Indonesia, which consist of 882 events, having at least 10 recording phases at each seismographic station from April 2009 to February 2011. We have conducted joint inversions of the combined data sets using double-difference tomography to invert for velocity structures and to conduct hypocenter relocation simultaneously. The checkerboard test results of Vp and Vs structures demonstrate a significantly improved spatial resolution from the shallow crust down to a depth of 165 km. Our tomographic inversions reveal a low velocity anomaly beneath the Lawu - Merapi zone, which is consistent with the results from previous studies. A strong velocity anomaly zone with low Vp, low Vs and low Vp/Vs is also identified between Cilacap and Banyumas. We interpret this anomaly as a fluid content material with large aspect ratio or sediment layer. This anomaly zone is in a good agreement with the existence of a large dome containing sediment in this area as proposed by previous geological studies. A low velocity anomaly zone is also detected in Kebumen, where it may be related to the extensional oceanic basin toward the land.

  17. Tomographic imaging of Central Java, Indonesia: Preliminary result of joint inversion of the MERAMEX and MCGA earthquake data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohadi, Supriyanto; Widiyantoro, Sri; Nugraha, Andri Dian; Masturyono

    2013-09-01

    The realization of local earthquake tomography is usually conducted by removing distant events outside the study region, because these events may increase errors. In this study, tomographic inversion has been conducted using the travel time data of local and regional events in order to improve the structural resolution, especially for deep structures. We used the local MERapi Amphibious EXperiments (MERAMEX) data catalog that consists of 292 events from May to October 2004. The additional new data of regional events in the Java region were taken from the Meteorological, Climatological, and Geophysical Agency (MCGA) of Indonesia, which consist of 882 events, having at least 10 recording phases at each seismographic station from April 2009 to February 2011. We have conducted joint inversions of the combined data sets using double-difference tomography to invert for velocity structures and to conduct hypocenter relocation simultaneously. The checkerboard test results of Vp and Vs structures demonstrate a significantly improved spatial resolution from the shallow crust down to a depth of 165 km. Our tomographic inversions reveal a low velocity anomaly beneath the Lawu - Merapi zone, which is consistent with the results from previous studies. A strong velocity anomaly zone with low Vp, low Vs and low Vp/Vs is also identified between Cilacap and Banyumas. We interpret this anomaly as a fluid content material with large aspect ratio or sediment layer. This anomaly zone is in a good agreement with the existence of a large dome containing sediment in this area as proposed by previous geological studies. A low velocity anomaly zone is also detected in Kebumen, where it may be related to the extensional oceanic basin toward the land.

  18. Use of a Diagnostic Score to Prioritize Computed Tomographic (CT) Imaging for Patients Suspected of Ischemic Stroke Who May Benefit from Thrombolytic Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bots, Michiel L.; Selvarajah, Sharmini; Kappelle, L. Jaap; Abdul Aziz, Zariah; Sidek, Norsima Nazifah; Vaartjes, Ilonca

    2016-01-01

    Background A shortage of computed tomographic (CT) machines in low and middle income countries often results in delayed CT imaging for patients suspected of a stroke. Yet, time constraint is one of the most important aspects for patients with an ischemic stroke to benefit from thrombolytic therapy. We set out to assess whether application of the Siriraj Stroke Score is able to assist physicians in prioritizing patients with a high probability of having an ischemic stroke for urgent CT imaging. Methods From the Malaysian National Neurology Registry, we selected patients aged 18 years and over with clinical features suggesting of a stroke, who arrived in the hospital 4.5 hours or less from ictus. The prioritization of receiving CT imaging was left to the discretion of the treating physician. We applied the Siriraj Stroke Score to all patients, refitted the score and defined a cut-off value to best distinguish an ischemic stroke from a hemorrhagic stroke. Results Of the 2176 patients included, 73% had an ischemic stroke. Only 33% of the ischemic stroke patients had CT imaging within 4.5 hours. The median door-to-scan time for these patients was 4 hours (IQR: 1;16). With the recalibrated score, it would have been possible to prioritize 95% (95% CI: 94%–96%) of patients with an ischemic stroke for urgent CT imaging. Conclusions In settings where CT imaging capacity is limited, we propose the use of the Siriraj Stroke Score to prioritize patients with a probable ischemic stroke for urgent CT imaging. PMID:27768752

  19. Imaging of hemodynamic effects in arthritic joints with dynamic optical tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hielscher, Andreas H.; Lasker, Joseph M.; Fong, Christopher J.; Dwyer, Edward

    2007-07-01

    Optical probing of hemodynamics is often employed in areas such as brain, muscular, and breast-cancer imaging. In these studies an external stimulus is applied and changes in relevant physiological parameters, e.g. oxy or deoxyhemoglobin concentrations, are determined. In this work we present the first application of this method for characterizing joint diseases, especially effects of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in the proximal-interphalangeal (PIP) finger joints. Using a dual-wavelength tomographic imaging system together with previously implemented model-based iterative image reconstruction schemes, we have performed dynamic imaging case studies on a limited number of healthy volunteers and patients diagnosed with RA. Inflating a sphygmomanometer cuff placed around the forearm we elicited a controlled vascular response. We observed pronounced differences between the hemodynamic effect occurring in healthy volunteers and patients affected by RA.

  20. Voxel-based model construction from colored tomographic images; Construcao de simuladores baseados em elementos de volume a partir de imagens tomograficas coloridas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loureiro, Eduardo Cesar de Miranda

    2002-07-01

    This work presents a new approach in the construction of voxel-based phantoms that was implemented to simplify the segmentation process of organs and tissues reducing the time used in this procedure. The segmentation process is performed by painting tomographic images and attributing a different color for each organ or tissue. A voxel-based head and neck phantom was built using this new approach. The way as the data are stored allows an increasing in the performance of the radiation transport code. The program that calculates the radiation transport also works with image files. This capability allows image reconstruction showing isodose areas, under several points of view, increasing the information to the user. Virtual X-ray photographs can also be obtained allowing that studies could be accomplished looking for the radiographic techniques optimization assessing, at the same time, the doses in organs and tissues. The accuracy of the program here presented, called MCvoxEL, that implements this new approach, was tested by comparison to results from two modern and well-supported Monte Carlo codes. Dose conversion factors for parallel X-ray exposure were also calculated. (author)

  1. Comprehensive Detection, Grading, and Growth Behavior Evaluation of Subthreshold and Low Intensity Photocoagulation Lesions by Optical Coherence Tomographic and Infrared Image Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Koinzer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To correlate the long-term clinical effect of photocoagulation lesions after 6 months, as measured by their retinal damage size, to exposure parameters. We used optical coherence tomographic (OCT-based lesion classes in order to detect and assess clinically invisible and mild lesions. Methods. In this prospective study, 488 photocoagulation lesions were imaged in 20 patients. We varied irradiation diameters (100/300 µm, exposure-times (20–200 ms, and power. Intensities were classified in OCT images after one hour, and we evaluated OCT and infrared (IR images over six months after exposure. Results. For six consecutive OCT-based lesion classes, the following parameters increased with the class: ophthalmoscopic, OCT and IR visibility rate, fundus and OCT diameter, and IR area, but not irradiation power. OCT diameters correlated with exposure-time, irradiation diameter, and OCT class. OCT classes discriminated the largest bandwidth of OCT diameters. Conclusion. OCT classes represent objective and valid endpoints of photocoagulation intensity even for “subthreshold” intensities. They are suitable to calculate the treated retinal area. As the area is critical for treatment efficacy, OCT classes are useful to define treatment intensity, calculate necessary lesion numbers, and universally categorize lesions in clinical studies.

  2. Positron Emission Tomographic Imaging of Copper 64– and Gallium 68–Labeled Chelator Conjugates of the Somatostatin Agonist Tyr3-Octreotate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessie R. Nedrow

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The bifunctional chelator and radiometal have been shown to have a direct effect on the pharmacokinetics of somatostatin receptor (SSTR-targeted imaging agents. We evaluated three Y3-TATE analogues conjugated to NOTA-based chelators for radiolabeling with 64Cu and 68Ga for small-animal positron emission tomographic/computed tomograhic (PET/CT imaging. Two commercially available NOTA analogues, p-SCN-Bn-NOTA and NODAGA, were evaluated. The p-SCN-Bn-NOTA analogues were conjugated to Y3- TATE through β-Ala and PEG8 linkages. The NODAGA chelator was directly conjugated to Y3-TATE. The analogues labeled with 64Cu or 68Ga were analyzed in vitro for binding affinity and internalization and in vivo by PET/CT imaging, biodistribution, and Cerenkov imaging (68Ga analogues. We evaluated the effects of the radiometals, chelators, and linkers on the performance of the SSTR subtype 2–targeted imaging agents and also compared them to a previously reported agent, 64Cu-CB-TE2A-Y3-TATE. We found that the method of conjugation, particularly the length of the linkage between the chelator and the peptide, significantly impacted tumor and nontarget tissue uptake and clearance. Among the 64Cu- and 68Ga-labeled NOTA analogues, NODAGA-Y3-TATE had the most optimal in vivo behavior and was comparable to 64Cu-CB-TE2A-Y3-TATE. An advantage of NODAGA-Y3-TATE is that it allows labeling with 64Cu and 68Ga, providing a versatile PET probe for imaging SSTr subtype 2-positive tumors.

  3. Complimentary Imaging Modalities for Investigating Obscure Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Capsule Endoscopy, Double-Balloon Enteroscopy, and Computed Tomographic Enterography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Chu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The complimentary value of computed tomographic enterography (CTE and double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE combined with capsule endoscopy (CE was evaluated in the diagnosis of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB. Methods. Patients who received CE examinations at Ruijin Hospital between July 2007 and July 2014 with the indication of OGIB were identified, and those who also underwent DBE and/or CTE were included. Their clinical information was retrieved, and results from each test were compared with findings from the other two examinations. Results. The overall diagnostic yield of CE was comparable with DBE (73.9% versus 60.9% but was significantly higher than the yield of CTE (87% versus 25%, p<0.001. The diagnostic yield of angiodysplasia at CE was significantly higher than CTE (73% versus 8%, p<0.001 and DBE (39.1% versus 17.4%, p=0.013, while no significant difference was found between the three approaches for small bowel tumors. DBE and CTE identified small bowel diseases undetected or undetermined by CE. Conversely, CE improved diagnosis in the cases with negative CTE and DBE, and findings at initial CE directed further diagnosis made by DBE. Conclusions. Combination of the three diagnostic platforms provides complementary value in the diagnosis of OGIB.

  4. Shadow Attenuation With High Dynamic Range Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadow often interferes with accurate image analysis. To mitigate shadow effects in near-earth imagery (2 m above ground level), we created high dynamic range (HDR) nadir images and used them to measure grassland ground cover. HDR composites were created by merging three differentially-exposed image...

  5. Dynamical influences on the moment of inertia tensor from lateral viscosity variations inferred from seismic tomographic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuxia; Yuen, David A.

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated the influences of lateral variations of viscosity on the moment of inertia tensor from viscous flows due to the density anomalies in the mantle inferred from seismic tomographic models. The scaling relations between the density and the seismic anomalies is taken as either a constant or a function increasing with depth in accord with the recent high-pressure experimental studies. The viscosity is taken as an exponential function of the 3D density anomaly. In models with an isoviscous background, the effects on the perturbed moment of inertia tensor from the lateral viscosity variations are smaller than those due to variations in the radial viscosity profiles. In mantle models with a background viscosity increasing with depth, the influences of the lateral viscosity variations are significant. The most striking feature in the latter case is that the two off-diagonal elements delta I(sub xz) and delta I(sub yz) in the inertia tensor exhibit greatest sensitivity to lateral variations of the viscosity. While the other elements of the inertia change by only about a few tens of percent in the range of lateral viscosity contrast considered (less than 300), delta I(sub xz) and delta I(sub yz) can vary up to 40 times even with a change in sign, depending on the radial viscosity stratification and the location of the strongest lateral variations. The increase in the velocity-density scaling relation with depth can reduce the influences of the lateral viscosity variations, but it does not change the overall sensitive nature of delta I(sub xz) and delta I(sub yz). This study demonstrates clearly that the lateral viscosity variations, especially in the upper mantle, must be considered in the determination of long-term polar wander, since the variations in the delta I(sub xz) and delta I(sub yz) terms are directly responsible for exciting rotational movements.

  6. MULTIDETECTOR COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC AND LOW-FIELD MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING ANATOMY OF THE QUADRIGEMINAL CISTERN AND CHARACTERIZATION OF SUPRACOLLICULAR FLUID ACCUMULATIONS IN DOGS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolini, G; Ricciardi, M; Caldin, M

    2016-05-01

    Focal fluid accumulations in the supracollicular region are commonly termed quadrigeminal cysts and may be either subclinical or associated with neurologic deficits in dogs. Little published information is available on normal imaging anatomy and anatomic relationships for the canine quadrigeminal cistern. Objectives of this observational, cross-sectional study were to describe normal quadrigeminal cistern anatomy and determine the prevalence and characteristics of supracollicular fluid accumulations in dogs. Normal descriptions were accomplished using computed tomographic (CT) cisternography in one canine cadaver, and CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of the brain in four prospectively recruited dogs with no evidence of intracranial disease. Prevalence and characteristics descriptions were accomplished using a retrospective review of brain CT or MRI studies performed during the period of 2005-2015. The normal quadrigeminal cistern consistently exhibited a complex H shape and was separated from the third ventricle by a thin membrane. Prevalence of supracollicular fluid accumulations (SFAs) was 2.19% among CT studies (n = 4427) and 2.2% among MRI studies (n = 626). Dogs with SFA were significantly younger than control dogs (P dogs were predisposed (P dogs with SFAs, the following three patterns were defined: (1) third ventricle (49.54%), (2) quadrigeminal cistern (13.51%), and (3) both third ventricle and quadrigeminal cistern (36.93%). Authors recommend that the term supracollicular fluid accumulation (SFA) should be used rather than the term quadrigeminal cyst to describe these focal fluid accumulations in dogs.

  7. Improved High Dynamic Range Image Reproduction Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    András Rövid

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available High dynamic range (HDR of illumination may cause serious distortions andother problems in viewing and further processing of digital images. This paper describes anew algorithm for HDR image creation based on merging images taken with differentexposure time. There are many fields, in which HDR images can be used advantageously,with the help of them the accuracy, reliability and many other features of the certain imageprocessing methods can be improved.

  8. Time-resolved diffuse optical tomographic imaging for the provision of both anatomical and functional information about biological tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Huijuan; Gao, Feng; Tanikawa, Yukari; Homma, Kazuhiro; Yamada, Yukio

    2005-04-01

    We present in vivo images of near-infrared (NIR) diffuse optical tomography (DOT) of human lower legs and forearm to validate the dual functions of a time-resolved (TR) NIR DOT in clinical diagnosis, i.e., to provide anatomical and functional information simultaneously. The NIR DOT system is composed of time-correlated single-photon-counting channels, and the image reconstruction algorithm is based on the modified generalized pulsed spectral technique, which effectively incorporates the TR data with reasonable computation time. The reconstructed scattering images of both the lower legs and the forearm revealed their anatomies, in which the bones were clearly distinguished from the muscles. In the absorption images, some of the blood vessels were observable. In the functional imaging, a subject was requested to do handgripping exercise to stimulate physiological changes in the forearm tissue. The images of oxyhemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin, and total hemoglobin concentration changes in the forearm were obtained from the differential images of the absorption at three wavelengths between the exercise and the rest states, which were reconstructed with a differential imaging scheme. These images showed increases in both blood volume and oxyhemoglobin concentration in the arteries and simultaneously showed hypoxia in the corresponding muscles. All the results have demonstrated the capability of TR NIR DOT by reconstruction of the absolute images of the scattering and the absorption with a high spatial resolution that finally provided both the anatomical and functional information inside bulky biological tissues.

  9. Comparison of two cone beam computed tomographic systems versus panoramic imaging for localization of impacted maxillary canines and detection of root resorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqerban, Ali; Jacobs, Reinhilde; Fieuws, Steffen; Willems, Guy

    2011-02-01

    The diagnostic accuracy for the localization of impacted canines and the detection of canine-induced root resorption of maxillary incisors were compared between conventional radiographic procedures using one two-dimensional (2D) panoramic radiograph with that of two three-dimensional (3D) cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans. The clinical records of 60 consecutive patients who had impacted or ectopically erupting maxillary canines were identified from those seeking orthodontic treatment. For each case, two sets of radiographic information were obtained. The study sample was divided into two groups: group A (n = 30) included those for whom a dental pantomograph (DPT) and CBCT obtained with a 3D Accuitomo-XYZ Slice View Tomograph were available and group B (n = 30) who had a DPT and CBCT obtained with a Scanora. The DPT and CBCT images were subsequently analysed by 11 examiners. Statistical analysis included an evaluation of the agreement between observers based on the standard error of the measurement, kappa statistics and coefficient of concordance, as well as an assessment of the differences between 2D and 3D imaging employing Wilcoxon signed rank and McNemar tests. There was a highly significant difference between the 2D and 3D images in the width of the canine crown (P resorption of the lateral incisor was also significantly different in both groups (P = 0.0201 and P incisor root resorption was significantly different between the Accuitomo and DPT images (P = 0.045). There was also a significant difference in the severity of lateral incisor root resorption between the DPT and CBCT in both groups (P = 0.02). The results of this study suggest that CBCT is more sensitive than conventional radiography for both canine localization and identification of root resorption of adjacent teeth.

  10. Analysis of the priority of anatomic structures according to the diagnostic task in cone-beam computed tomographic images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jin Woo [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Dankook University College of Dentistry, Chunan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    This study was designed to evaluate differences in the required visibility of anatomic structures according to the diagnostic tasks of implant planning and periapical diagnosis. Images of a real skull phantom were acquired under 24 combinations of different exposure conditions in a cone-beam computed tomography scanner (60, 70, 80, 90, 100, and 110 kV and 4, 6, 8, and 10 mA). Five radiologists evaluated the visibility of anatomic structures and the image quality for diagnostic tasks using a 6-point scale. The visibility of the periodontal ligament space showed the closest association with the ability to use an image for periapical diagnosis in both jaws. The visibility of the sinus floor and canal wall showed the closest association with the ability to use an image for implant planning. Variations in tube voltage were associated with significant differences in image quality for all diagnostic tasks. However, tube current did not show significant associations with the ability to use an image for implant planning. The required visibility of anatomic structures varied depending on the diagnostic task. Tube voltage was a more important exposure parameter for image quality than tube current. Different settings should be used for optimization and image quality evaluation depending on the diagnostic task.

  11. High-density speckle contrast optical tomography (SCOT) for three dimensional tomographic imaging of the small animal brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragojević, Tanja; Varma, Hari M; Hollmann, Joseph L; Valdes, Claudia P; Culver, Joseph P; Justicia, Carles; Durduran, Turgut

    2017-06-01

    High-density speckle contrast optical tomography (SCOT) utilizing tens of thousands of source-detector pairs, was developed for in vivo imaging of blood flow in small animals. The reduction in cerebral blood flow (CBF) due to local ischemic stroke in a mouse brain was transcanially imaged and reconstructed in three dimensions. The reconstructed volume was then compared with corresponding magnetic resonance images demonstrating that the volume of reduced CBF agrees with the infarct zone at twenty-four hours. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparison of computed tomographic urography, magnetic resonance urography and the combination of diffusion weighted imaging in diagnosis of upper urinary tract cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guang-Yu; Lu, Qing; Wu, Lian-Ming; Zhang, Jin; Chen, Xiao-Xi; Xu, Jian-Rong

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate the performance of computed tomographic urography (CTU), static-fluid magnetic resonance urography (static-fluid MRU) and combinations of CTU, static-fluid MRU and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) in the diagnosis of upper urinary tract cancer. Between January 2010 and June 2011, patients with suspected UUT cancer underwent CTU, static-fluid MRU and DWI (b=1000s/mm(2)) within a 1-week period. The diagnostic performances of CTU, static-fluid MRU and combinations of CTU, static-fluid MRU and DWI for upper urinary tract cancer were prospectively evaluated. The ureteroscopic and histopathologic findings were compared with the imaging findings. Compared to static-fluid MRU alone (sensitivity: 76/75%, reader 1/reader 2), combining DWI with MRI can increase the sensitivity (sensitivity: 84/84%, p=0.031/p=0.016) of upper urinary tract cancer diagnosis. CTU had greater sensitivity (95/94%) and accuracy (92/91%) than both static-fluid MRU (sensitivity: pMRU with DWI (sensitivity: p=0.023/p=0.039 and accuracy: 87/85%, p=0.042/p=0.049) for the diagnosis of upper urinary tract cancers. Compared with CTU alone, CTU with DWI did not significantly increase sensitivity, specificity or accuracy. However, the diagnostic confidence was improved when the combined technique was used (p=0.031/p=0.024). Moreover, there was no significant change in sensitivity, specificity, accuracy or diagnostic confidence when static-fluid MRU was used in combination with CTU and DWI. Although there is a potential role for static-fluid MRU and static-fluid MRU with DWI in urinary tract imaging, CTU is still the better choice for the diagnosis of upper urinary tract cancer. Combining DWI with CTU can help improve confidence in upper urinary tract cancer diagnoses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A Pilot Evaluation of a 4-Dimensional Cone-Beam Computed Tomographic Scheme Based on Simultaneous Motion Estimation and Image Reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dang, Jun; Gu, Xuejun [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Pan, Tinsu [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wang, Jing, E-mail: jing.wang@utsouthwestern.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the performance of a 4-dimensional (4-D) cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) reconstruction scheme based on simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR) through patient studies. Methods and Materials: The SMEIR algorithm contains 2 alternating steps: (1) motion-compensated CBCT reconstruction using projections from all phases to reconstruct a reference phase 4D-CBCT by explicitly considering the motion models between each different phase and (2) estimation of motion models directly from projections by matching the measured projections to the forward projection of the deformed reference phase 4D-CBCT. Four lung cancer patients were scanned for 4 to 6 minutes to obtain approximately 2000 projections for each patient. To evaluate the performance of the SMEIR algorithm on a conventional 1-minute CBCT scan, the number of projections at each phase was reduced by a factor of 5, 8, or 10 for each patient. Then, 4D-CBCTs were reconstructed from the down-sampled projections using Feldkamp-Davis-Kress, total variation (TV) minimization, prior image constrained compressive sensing (PICCS), and SMEIR. Using the 4D-CBCT reconstructed from the fully sampled projections as a reference, the relative error (RE) of reconstructed images, root mean square error (RMSE), and maximum error (MaxE) of estimated tumor positions were analyzed to quantify the performance of the SMEIR algorithm. Results: The SMEIR algorithm can achieve results consistent with the reference 4D-CBCT reconstructed with many more projections per phase. With an average of 30 to 40 projections per phase, the MaxE in tumor position detection is less than 1 mm in SMEIR for all 4 patients. Conclusion: The results from a limited number of patients show that SMEIR is a promising tool for high-quality 4D-CBCT reconstruction and tumor motion modeling.

  14. Mandibular canal branches supplying the mandibular third molar observed on cone beam computed tomographic images: Reports of four cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Seo; Yoon, Suk Ja; Kang, Byung Cheol [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, Dental Science Research Institute, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-15

    Bifid mandibular canal can be an anatomic variation. This condition can lead to complication when performing mandibular anesthesia or during extraction of lower third molar, placement of implants and surgery in the mandible. Four patients underwent preoperative imaging for extraction of third molars using CBCT (CB Mercuray, Hitachi, Japan). The axial images were processed with CBworks program 2.1 (CyberMed Inc., Seoul, Korea). The branches for supplying the lower third molar were identified mainly on cross-sectional and panoramic images of CBCT. Since the location and configuration of mandibular canal variations are important in any mandibular surgical procedures, we report 4 cases of bifid mandibular canal with panoramic and the CBCT images.

  15. Comprehensive coronary risk determination in primary prevention: an imaging and clinical based definition combining computed tomographic coronary artery calcium score and national cholesterol education program risk score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir, Khurram; Vasamreddy, Chandra; Blumenthal, Roger S; Rumberger, John A

    2006-06-16

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of mortality and a major cause of morbidity. Coronary heart disease (CHD) accounts for nearly half of all CVD deaths. Currently estimation of risk in primary prevention is based on the Framingham risk equations, which inputs traditional risk factors and is helpful in predicting the development of CHD in asymptomatic individuals. However many individuals suffer events in the absence of established risk factors for atherosclerosis and broad based population risk estimations may have little precision when applied to a given individual. To meet the challenge of CHD risk assessment, several tools have been developed to identify atherosclerotic disease in its preclinical stages. This paper aims to incorporate information from coronary artery calcification (CAC) scoring from a computed tomographic "heartscan" (using Electron Beam Tomography (EBT) as the validated prototype) along with current Framingham risk profiling in order to refine risk on an absolute scale by combining imaging and clinical data to affect a more comprehensive calculation of absolute risk in a given individual. For CAC scores above the 75th percentile but or =55 years, women> or =65 years) a CAC = 0 will result in an age point score corresponding to the age-group whose median CAC score is zero i.e., 40-44 years for men and 55-59 years for women. The utilization of CAC scores allows the inclusion of sub-clinical disease definition into the context of modifiable risk factors as well as identifies high-risk individuals requiring aggressive treatment.

  16. Biodistribution and radiation dosimetry of a positron emission tomographic ligand, {sup 18}F-SP203, to image metabotropic glutamate subtype 5 receptors in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, Yasuyuki; Simeon, Fabrice G.; Pike, Victor W.; Innis, Robert B.; Fujita, Masahiro [National Institute of Mental Health, Molecular Imaging Branch, Bethesda, MD (United States); Hatazawa, Jun [Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Tracer Kinetics, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Mozley, P.D. [Merck Research Laboratories, West Point, PA (United States)

    2010-10-15

    A new PET ligand, 3-fluoro-5-(2-(2-{sup 18}F-(fluoromethyl)-thiazol-4-yl)ethynyl)benzonitrile ({sup 18}F-SP203), is a positron emission tomographic radioligand selective for metabotropic glutamate subtype 5 receptors. The purposes of this study were to estimate the radiation-absorbed doses of {sup 18}F-SP203 in humans and to determine from the distribution of radioactivity in bone structures with various proportions of bone and red marrow whether {sup 18}F-SP203 undergoes defluorination. Whole-body images were acquired for 5 h after injecting {sup 18}F-SP203 in seven healthy humans. Urine was collected at various time points. Radiation-absorbed doses were estimated by the Medical Internal Radiation Dose scheme. After injecting {sup 18}F-SP203, the two organs with highest radiation exposure were urinary bladder wall and gallbladder wall, consistent with both urinary and fecal excretion. In the skeleton, most of the radioactivity was in bone structures that contain red marrow and not in those without red marrow. Although the dose to red marrow (30.9 {mu}Sv/MBq) was unusually high, the effective dose (17.8 {mu}Sv/MBq) of {sup 18}F-SP203 was typical of that of other {sup 18}F radiotracers. {sup 18}F-SP203 causes an effective dose in humans typical of several other {sup 18}F radioligands and undergoes little defluorination. (orig.)

  17. Imaging of Archaeological Remains at Barcombe Roman Villa using Microwave Tomographic Depictions of Ground Penetrating Radar Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldovieri, F.; Utsi, E.; Alani, A.; Persico, R.

    2012-04-01

    to 600MHz (the frequency range of the antennas used). The 2-dimensional plots were formed into a 3-dimensional cube and time slices extracted, on the basis of maximum signal return, at 16ns, 25ns and 29ns. In this work, we show the reprocessing of the GPR data via a microwave tomographic approach based on a linear approximation of the inverse scattering problem [4]. In particular, the effectiveness of this approach ensures a reliable and high resolution representation/visualization of the scene very large in terms of probing wavelength. This has been made possible thanks to the adoption of the approach presented in [5] where the 3D representation was achieved by performing 2D reconstruction and after obtaining the 3D Cube from these 2D reconstructed profiles. In particular, the re-examination of GPR data using microwave tomography has allowed to improve definition of the villa outline and to detect earlier prehistoric remains. [1] Rudling, D., & Butler, C. "Roundhouse to Villa" in Sussex Past & Present 95, pp 6 - 7, 2001. [2] Utsi, E., Wortley Villa paper currently in preparation of EAGE special issue. [3] Utsi, E., & Alani, A. "Barcombe Roman Villa: An Exercise in GPR Time Slicingand Comparative Geophysics", in Koppenjan, S., & Hua, L. (eds) Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Ground Penetrating Radar, 2002. [4] F. Soldovieri, R. Persico, E. Utsi, V. Utsi, "The application of inverse scattering techniques with ground penetrating radar to the problem of rebar location in concrete", NDT & E International, Vol. 39, Issue 7, October 2006, Pages 602-607. [5] R. Persico, F. Soldovieri, E. Utsi, "Microwave tomography for processing of GPR data at Ballachulish", Journal of Geophysics and Engineering, vol.7, no. 2, pp. 164-173, June 2010

  18. Tomographic x-ray guided three-dimensional diffuse optical imaging of osteoarthritis in the finger joints: a clinical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zhen; Jiang, Huizhu; Zhang, Qizhi; Sobel, Eric S.; Jiang, Huabei

    2009-02-01

    To investigate the typical optical findings that can be used to characterize osteoarthritis, the distal interphalangeal finger joints from 40 subjects including 22 patients and 18 healthy controllers were examined clinically and scanned by a novel hybrid imaging system. The hybrid imaging platform integrated a C-arm based x-ray tomosynthetic system with a multi-channel optic-fiber based diffuse optical imaging system. Optical images were recovered qualitatively and quantitatively based on a regularization-based reconstruction algorithm that can incorporate the fine structural maps obtained from x-ray as a priori spatial information into diffuse optical tomography reconstruction procedures. Our findings suggest statistically significant differences between healthy and osteoarthritis finger joints. X-ray guided diffuse optical imaging may not only detect radiologic features supporting the development of an inflammatory disorder but may also help discriminate specific optical features that differ between osteoarthritic and healthy joints. These quantitative optical features are also potentially important for a better understanding of inflammatory arthritis in humans.

  19. Tomographic PIV: principles and practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarano, F.

    2013-01-01

    A survey is given of the major developments in three-dimensional velocity field measurements using the tomographic particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique. The appearance of tomo-PIV dates back seven years from the present review (Elsinga et al 2005a 6th Int. Symp. PIV (Pasadena, CA)) and this approach has rapidly spread as a versatile, robust and accurate technique to investigate three-dimensional flows (Arroyo and Hinsch 2008 Topics in Applied Physics vol 112 ed A Schröder and C E Willert (Berlin: Springer) pp 127-54) and turbulence physics in particular. A considerable number of applications have been achieved over a wide range of flow problems, which requires the current status and capabilities of tomographic PIV to be reviewed. The fundamental aspects of the technique are discussed beginning from hardware considerations for volume illumination, imaging systems, their configurations and system calibration. The data processing aspects are of uppermost importance: image pre-processing, 3D object reconstruction and particle motion analysis are presented with their fundamental aspects along with the most advanced approaches. Reconstruction and cross-correlation algorithms, attaining higher measurement precision, spatial resolution or higher computational efficiency, are also discussed. The exploitation of 3D and time-resolved (4D) tomographic PIV data includes the evaluation of flow field pressure on the basis of the flow governing equation. The discussion also covers a-posteriori error analysis techniques. The most relevant applications of tomo-PIV in fluid mechanics are surveyed, covering experiments in air and water flows. In measurements in flow regimes from low-speed to supersonic, most emphasis is given to the complex 3D organization of turbulent coherent structures.

  20. Motion compensation in a tomographic ultrasound imaging system: Toward volumetric scans of a limb for prosthetic socket design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranger, Bryan J; Feigin, Micha; Pestrov, Nikita; Zhang, Xiang; Lempitsky, Victor; Herr, Hugh M; Anthony, Brian W

    2015-08-01

    Current methods of prosthetic socket fabrication remain subjective and ineffective at creating an interface to the human body that is both comfortable and functional. Though there has been recent success using methods like magnetic resonance imaging and biomechanical modeling, a low-cost, streamlined, and repeatable process has not been fully demonstrated. Medical ultrasonography, which has significant potential to expand its clinical applications, is being pursued to acquire data that may quantify and improve the design process and fabrication of prosthetic sockets. This paper presents a new multi-modal imaging approach for acquiring volumetric images of a human limb, specifically focusing on how motion of the limb is compensated for using optical imagery.

  1. Joint Tomographic Imaging of 3-­-D Density Structure Using Cosmic Ray Muons and High-­-Precision Gravity Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, C. A.; Guardincerri, E.; Roy, M.; Dichter, M.

    2015-12-01

    As part of the CO2 reservoir muon imaging project headed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboraory (PNNL) under the U.S. Department of Energy Subsurface Technology and Engineering Research, Development, and Demonstration (SubTER) iniative, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and the University of New Mexico (UNM) plan to leverage the recently decommissioned and easily accessible Tunnel Vault on LANL property to test the complementary modeling strengths of muon radiography and high-precision gravity surveys. This tunnel extends roughly 300 feet into the hillside, with a maximum depth below the surface of approximately 300 feet. We will deploy LANL's Mini Muon Tracker (MMT), a detector consisting of 576 drift tubes arranged in alternating parallel planes of orthogonally oriented tubes. This detector is capable of precise determination of trajectories for incoming muons with angular resolution of a few milliradians. We will deploy the MMT at several locations within the tunnel, to obtain numerous crossing muon trajectories and permit a 3D tomographic image of the overburden to be built. In the same project, UNM will use a Scintrex digital gravimeter to collect high-precision gravity data from a dense grid on the hill slope above the tunnel as well as within the tunnel itself. This will provide both direct and differential gravity readings for density modeling of the overburden. By leveraging detailed geologic knowledge of the canyon and the lithology overlying the tunnel, as well as the structural elements, elevations and blueprints of the tunnel itself, we will evaluate the muon and gravity data both independently and in a simultaneous, joint inversion to build a combined 3D density model of the overburden.

  2. Simultaneous determination of sample thickness, tilt, and electron mean free path using tomographic tilt images based on Beer-Lambert law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Rui; Edwards, Thomas J.; Pankratz, Logan M.; Kuhn, Richard J.; Lanman, Jason K.; Liu, Jun; Jiang, Wen

    2015-01-01

    Cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) is an emerging technique that can elucidate the architecture of macromolecular complexes and cellular ultrastructure in a near-native state. Some important sample parameters, such as thickness and tilt, are needed for 3-D reconstruction. However, these parameters can currently only be determined using trial 3-D reconstructions. Accurate electron mean free path plays a significant role in modeling image formation process essential for simulation of electron microscopy images and model-based iterative 3-D reconstruction methods; however, their values are voltage and sample dependent and have only been experimentally measured for a limited number of sample conditions. Here, we report a computational method, tomoThickness, based on the Beer-Lambert law, to simultaneously determine the sample thickness, tilt and electron inelastic mean free path by solving an overdetermined nonlinear least square optimization problem utilizing the strong constraints of tilt relationships. The method has been extensively tested with both stained and cryo datasets. The fitted electron mean free paths are consistent with reported experimental measurements. The accurate thickness estimation eliminates the need for a generous assignment of Z-dimension size of the tomogram. Interestingly, we have also found that nearly all samples are a few degrees tilted relative to the electron beam. Compensation of the intrinsic sample tilt can result in horizontal structure and reduced Z-dimension of tomograms. Our fast, pre-reconstruction method can thus provide important sample parameters that can help improve performance of tomographic reconstruction of a wide range of samples. PMID:26433027

  3. Understanding Synthesis Imaging Dynamic Range

    CERN Document Server

    Braun, Robert

    2012-01-01

    We develop a general framework for quantifying the many different contributions to the noise budget of an image made with an array of dishes or aperture array stations. Each noise contribution is associated with a relevant correlation timescale and frequency bandwidth so that the net impact in a complete observation can be assessed. All quantities are parameterised as function of observing frequency and the visibility baseline length. We apply the resulting noise budget analysis to a wide range of existing and planned telescope systems that will operate between about 100 MHz and 5 GHz to ascertain their imaging performance and limitations. We conclude that imaging performance is adversely impacted in several respects by small dimensions of the dishes or aperture array stations. It will be more challenging to achieve thermal noise limited performance using 15m class dishes rather than the 25m dishes of current arrays. Some of the performance risks are mitigated by the deployment of phased array feeds and more ...

  4. Ultrasound-Guided Optical Tomographic Imaging of Malignant and Benign Breast Lesions: Initial Clinical Results of 19 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quing Zhu

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of solid benign and malignant tumors presents a unique challenge to all noninvasive imaging modalities. Ultrasound is used in conjunction with mammography to differentiate simple cysts from solid lesions. However, the overlapping appearances of benign and malignant lesions make ultrasound less useful in differentiating solid lesions, resulting in a large number of benign biopsies. Optical tomography using near-infrared diffused light has great potential for imaging functional parameters of 1 tumor hemoglobin concentration, 2 oxygen saturation, 3 metabolism, as well as other tumor distinguishing characteristics. These parameters can differentiate benign from malignant lesions. However, optical tomography, when used alone, suffers from low spatial resolution and target localization uncertainty due to intensive light scattering. Our aim is to combine diffused light imaging with ultrasound in a novel way for the detection and diagnosis of solid lesions. Initial findings of two earlystage invasive carcinomas, one combined fibroadenoma and fibrocystic change with scattered foci of lobular neoplasia/lobular carcinoma in situ, 16 benign lesions are reported in this paper. The invasive cancer cases reveal about two-fold greater total hemoglobin concentration (mean 119 μmol than benign cases (mean 67 μmol, suggest that the discrimination of benign and malignant breast lesions might be enhanced by this type of achievable optical quantification with ultrasound localization. Furthermore, the small invasive cancers are well localized and have wavelength-dependent appearance in optical absorption maps, whereas the benign lesions appear diffused and relatively wavelength-independent.

  5. On the Feasibility of Multi-kHz Acquisition Rate Tomographic-PIV in Turbulent Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2013-0044 On the Feasibility of multi-kHz Acquisition Rate Tomographic- PIV in Turbulent Flames Isaac Boxx...Tomographic- PIV in Turbulent Flames 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8655-12-1-2092 5b. GRANT NUMBER Grant 12-2092 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 61102F 6...distribution is unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Tomographic particle image velocimetry (tomographic- PIV ) is a recently

  6. High dynamic range images for enhancing low dynamic range content

    OpenAIRE

    Banterle, Francesco; Dellepiane, Matteo; Scopigno, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    This poster presents a practical system for enhancing the quality of Low Dynamic Range (LDR) videos using High Dynamic Range (HDR) background images. Our technique relies on the assumption that the HDR information is static in the video footage. This assumption can be valid in many scenarios where moving subjects are the main focus of the footage and do not have to interact with moving light sources or highly reflective objects. Another valid scenario is teleconferencing via webcams, where th...

  7. Tomographic particle image velocimetry of a water-jet for low volume harvesting of fat tissue for regenerative medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drobek Christoph

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV measurements of a water-jet for water-assisted liposuction (WAL are carried out to investigate the distribution of velocity and therefore momentum and acting force on the human sub-cutaneous fat tissue. These results shall validate CFD simulations and force sensor measurements of the water-jet and support the development of a new WAL device that is able to harvest low volumes of fat tissue for regenerative medicine even gentler than regular WAL devices.

  8. Comparison between X-rays spectra and their effective energies in small animal CT tomographic imaging and dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdi, Mahdjoub; Mimi, Malika; Bentourkia, M'hamed

    2016-12-22

    Small animal CT imaging and dosimetry usually rely on X-ray radiation produced by X-ray tubes. These X-rays typically cover a large energy range. In this study, we compared poly-energetic X-ray spectra against estimated equivalent (effective) mono-energetic beams with the same number of simulated photons for small animal CT imaging and dosimetry applications. Two poly-energetic X-ray spectra were generated from a tungsten anode at 50 and 120 kVp. The corresponding effective mono-energetic beams were established as 36 keV for the 50 kVp spectrum and 49.5 keV for the 120 kVp spectrum. To assess imaging applications, we investigated the spatial resolution by a tungsten wire, and the contrast-to-noise ratio in a reference phantom and in a realistic mouse phantom. For dosimetry investigation, we calculated the absorbed dose in a segmented digital mouse atlas in the skin, fat, heart and bone tissues. Differences of 2.1 and 2.6% in spatial resolution were respectively obtained between the 50 and 120 kVp poly-energetic spectra and their respective 36 and 49.5 keV mono-energetic beams. The differences in contrast-to-noise ratio between the poly-energetic 50 kVp spectrum and its corresponding mono-energetic 36 keV beam for air, fat, brain and bone were respectively -2.9, -0.2, 11.2 and -4.8%, and similarly between the 120 kVp and its effective energy 49.5 keV: -11.3, -20.2, -4.2 and -13.5%. Concerning the absorbed dose, for the lower X-ray beam energies, 50 kVp against 36 keV, the poly-energetic radiation doses were higher than the mono-energetic doses. Instead, for the higher X-ray beam energies, 120 kVp and 49.5 keV, the absorbed dose to the bones and lungs were higher for the mono-energetic 49.5 keV. The intensity and energy of the X-ray beam spectrum have an impact on both imaging and dosimetry in small animal studies. Simulations with mono-energetic beams should take into account these differences in order to study biological effects or to be compared to

  9. The extent of the Cratonic keel underneath the Southern African region: A 3D image using Finite-Frequency Tomograph

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soliman, Mohammad Youssof Ahmad; Bezada, Max; Thybo, Hans;

    2010-01-01

    We have re-examined the P body wave data from the South Africa Seismic Experiment (Carlson et al, EOS 77, 1996) across the Kaapvaal and Zimbabwe cratons and the Bushveld complex. Using finite-frequency kernels, we inverted the P-wave delay times to obtain 3-D images of compressional velocity...... between the Archean and modified regions such as the Bushveld complex, and the mobile belts surrounding the cratons. The high velocity (+1.0%) cratonic roots extend to 220-250 km depth beneath the Kaapvaal and Zimbabwe cratons. Lower P-velocities are found under the Bushveld complex and the mobile belts...

  10. Understanding synthesis imaging dynamic range

    OpenAIRE

    Braun, Robert

    2012-01-01

    We develop a general framework for quantifying the many different contributions to the noise budget of an image made with an array of dishes or aperture array stations. Each noise contribution to the visibility data is associated with a relevant correlation timescale and frequency bandwidth so that the net impact on a complete observation can be assessed. All quantities are parameterised as function of observing frequency and the visibility baseline length. We apply the resulting noise budget...

  11. Decomposition of time-resolved tomographic PIV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmid, P.J.; Violato, D.; Scarano, F.

    2012-01-01

    An experimental study has been conducted on a transitional water jet at a Reynolds number of Re = 5,000. Flow fields have been obtained by means of time-resolved tomographic particle image velocimetry capturing all relevant spatial and temporal scales. The measured threedimensional flow fields have

  12. Quantum dynamic imaging theoretical and numerical methods

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanov, Misha

    2011-01-01

    Studying and using light or "photons" to image and then to control and transmit molecular information is among the most challenging and significant research fields to emerge in recent years. One of the fastest growing areas involves research in the temporal imaging of quantum phenomena, ranging from molecular dynamics in the femto (10-15s) time regime for atomic motion to the atto (10-18s) time scale of electron motion. In fact, the attosecond "revolution" is now recognized as one of the most important recent breakthroughs and innovations in the science of the 21st century. A major participant in the development of ultrafast femto and attosecond temporal imaging of molecular quantum phenomena has been theory and numerical simulation of the nonlinear, non-perturbative response of atoms and molecules to ultrashort laser pulses. Therefore, imaging quantum dynamics is a new frontier of science requiring advanced mathematical approaches for analyzing and solving spatial and temporal multidimensional partial differ...

  13. Quantification of normative ranges and baseline predictors of aortoventricular interface dimensions using multi-detector computed tomographic imaging in patients without aortic valve disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gooley, Robert P., E-mail: robert.gooley@monashhealth.org [MonashHeart, Monash Health, Melbourne 3168 (Australia); Monash Cardiovascular Research Centre, Department of Medicine (MMC), Monash University, Melbourne 3168 (Australia); Cameron, James D., E-mail: james.cameron@monash.edu [MonashHeart, Monash Health, Melbourne 3168 (Australia); Monash Cardiovascular Research Centre, Department of Medicine (MMC), Monash University, Melbourne 3168 (Australia); Soon, Jennifer, E-mail: jenn.sa@gmail.com [MonashHeart, Monash Health, Melbourne 3168 (Australia); Monash Cardiovascular Research Centre, Department of Medicine (MMC), Monash University, Melbourne 3168 (Australia); Loi, Duncan, E-mail: dloi2@student.monash.edu [Monash Cardiovascular Research Centre, Department of Medicine (MMC), Monash University, Melbourne 3168 (Australia); Chitale, Gauri, E-mail: gchi21@student.monash.edu [Monash Cardiovascular Research Centre, Department of Medicine (MMC), Monash University, Melbourne 3168 (Australia); Syeda, Rifath, E-mail: rssye1@student.monash.edu [Monash Cardiovascular Research Centre, Department of Medicine (MMC), Monash University, Melbourne 3168 (Australia); Meredith, Ian T., E-mail: ian.meredith@myheart.id.au [MonashHeart, Monash Health, Melbourne 3168 (Australia); Monash Cardiovascular Research Centre, Department of Medicine (MMC), Monash University, Melbourne 3168 (Australia)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • MDCT imaging of the aortoventricular interface is increasingly common. • We present normative ranges for aortoventricular interface dimensions. • Such techniques and ranges should be used to standardise reporting and research. - Abstract: Background: Multidetector computed tomographic (MDCT) assessment of the aortoventricular interface has gained increased importance with the advent of minimally invasive treatment modalities for aortic and mitral valve disease. This has included a standardised technique of identifying a plane through the nadir of each coronary cusp, the basal plane, and taking further measurements in relation to this plane. Despite this there is no published data defining normal ranges for these aortoventricular metrics in a healthy cohort. This study seeks to quantify normative ranges for MDCT derived aortoventricular dimensions and evaluate baseline demographic and anthropomorphic associates of these measurements in a normal cohort. Methods: 250 consecutive patients undergoing MDCT coronary angiography were included. Aortoventricular dimensions at multiple levels of the aortoventricular interface were assessed and normative ranges quantified. Multivariate linear regression was performed to identify baseline predictors of each metric. Results: The mean age was 59 ± 12 years. The basal plane was eccentric (EI = 0.22 ± 0.06) while the left ventricular outflow tract was more eccentric (EI = 0.32 ±0.06), with no correlation to gender, age or hypertension. Male gender, height and body mass index were consistent independent predictors of larger aortoventricular dimensions at all anatomical levels, while age was predictive of supra-annular measurements. Conclusions: Male gender, height and BMI are independent predictors of all aortoventricular dimensions while age predicts only supra-annular dimensions. Use of defined metrics such as the basal plane and formation of normative ranges for these metrics allows reference for clinical

  14. X-ray tomographic imaging of Al/SiC{sub p} functionally graded composites fabricated by centrifugal casting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velhinho, A. E-mail: ajv@fct.unl.ptajv@engmateriais.eng.uminho.pt; Sequeira, P.D.; Martins, Rui; Vignoles, G.; Braz Fernandes, F.; Botas, J.D.; Rocha, L.A

    2003-01-01

    The present work refers to an X-ray microtomography experiment aiming at the elucidation of some aspects regarding particle distribution in SiC-particle-reinforced functionally graded aluminium composites. Precursor composites were produced by rheocasting. These were then molten and centrifugally cast to obtain the functionally graded composites. From these, cylindrical samples, around 1 mm in diameter, were extracted, which were then irradiated with a X-ray beam produced at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The 3-D images were obtained in edge-detection mode. A segmentation procedure has been adapted in order to separate the pores and SiC particles from the Al matrix. Preliminary results on the particle and pore distributions are presented.

  15. X-ray tomographic imaging of Al/SiC p functionally graded composites fabricated by centrifugal casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velhinho, A.; Sequeira, P. D.; Martins, Rui; Vignoles, G.; Braz Fernandes, F.; Botas, J. D.; Rocha, L. A.

    2003-01-01

    The present work refers to an X-ray microtomography experiment aiming at the elucidation of some aspects regarding particle distribution in SiC-particle-reinforced functionally graded aluminium composites. Precursor composites were produced by rheocasting. These were then molten and centrifugally cast to obtain the functionally graded composites. From these, cylindrical samples, around 1 mm in diameter, were extracted, which were then irradiated with a X-ray beam produced at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The 3-D images were obtained in edge-detection mode. A segmentation procedure has been adapted in order to separate the pores and SiC particles from the Al matrix. Preliminary results on the particle and pore distributions are presented.

  16. Enhanced dynamic range x-ray imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haidekker, Mark A; Morrison, Logan Dain-Kelley; Sharma, Ajay; Burke, Emily

    2017-03-01

    X-ray images can suffer from excess contrast. Often, image exposure is chosen to visually optimize the region of interest, but at the expense of over- and underexposed regions elsewhere in the image. When image values are interpreted quantitatively as projected absorption, both over- and underexposure leads to the loss of quantitative information. We propose to combine multiple exposures into a composite that uses only pixels from those exposures in which they are neither under- nor overexposed. The composite image is created in analogy to visible-light high dynamic range photography. We present the mathematical framework for the recovery of absorbance from such composite images and demonstrate the method with biological and non-biological samples. We also show with an aluminum step-wedge that accurate recovery of step thickness from the absorbance values is possible, thereby highlighting the quantitative nature of the presented method. Due to the higher amount of detail encoded in an enhanced dynamic range x-ray image, we expect that the number of retaken images can be reduced, and patient exposure overall reduced. We also envision that the method can improve dual energy absorptiometry and even computed tomography by reducing the number of low-exposure ("photon-starved") projections.

  17. Comparison of computed tomographic urography, magnetic resonance urography and the combination of diffusion weighted imaging in diagnosis of upper urinary tract cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Guang-yu; Lu, Qing; Wu, Lian-ming [Department of Radiology, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, No. 1630, Dongfang Road, Pudong, Shanghai 200120 (China); Zhang, Jin [Department of Urinary Surgery, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, No. 1630, Dongfang Road, Pudong, Shanghai 200120 (China); Chen, Xiao-xi [Department of Radiology, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, No. 1630, Dongfang Road, Pudong, Shanghai 200120 (China); Xu, Jian-rong, E-mail: renjixujr@163.com [Department of Radiology, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, No. 1630, Dongfang Road, Pudong, Shanghai 200120 (China)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the performance of computed tomographic urography (CTU), static-fluid magnetic resonance urography (static-fluid MRU) and combinations of CTU, static-fluid MRU and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) in the diagnosis of upper urinary tract cancer. Material and Methods: Between January 2010 and June 2011, patients with suspected UUT cancer underwent CTU, static-fluid MRU and DWI (b = 1000 s/mm{sup 2}) within a 1-week period. The diagnostic performances of CTU, static-fluid MRU and combinations of CTU, static-fluid MRU and DWI for upper urinary tract cancer were prospectively evaluated. The ureteroscopic and histopathologic findings were compared with the imaging findings. Results: Compared to static-fluid MRU alone (sensitivity: 76/75%, reader 1/reader 2), combining DWI with MRI can increase the sensitivity (sensitivity: 84/84%, p = 0.031/p = 0.016) of upper urinary tract cancer diagnosis. CTU had greater sensitivity (95/94%) and accuracy (92/91%) than both static-fluid MRU (sensitivity: p < 0.001/p < 0.001 and accuracy: 83/81%, p = 0.001/p < 0.001) and static-fluid MRU with DWI (sensitivity: p = 0.023/p = 0.039 and accuracy: 87/85%, p = 0.042/p = 0.049) for the diagnosis of upper urinary tract cancers. Compared with CTU alone, CTU with DWI did not significantly increase sensitivity, specificity or accuracy. However, the diagnostic confidence was improved when the combined technique was used (p = 0.031/p = 0.024). Moreover, there was no significant change in sensitivity, specificity, accuracy or diagnostic confidence when static-fluid MRU was used in combination with CTU and DWI. Conclusion: Although there is a potential role for static-fluid MRU and static-fluid MRU with DWI in urinary tract imaging, CTU is still the better choice for the diagnosis of upper urinary tract cancer. Combining DWI with CTU can help improve confidence in upper urinary tract cancer diagnoses.

  18. Dynamic metamaterial aperture for microwave imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sleasman, Timothy; Imani, Mohammadreza F.; Gollub, Jonah N.; Smith, David R. [Center for Metamaterials and Integrated Plasmonics, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, 27708 (United States)

    2015-11-16

    We present a dynamic metamaterial aperture for use in computational imaging schemes at microwave frequencies. The aperture consists of an array of complementary, resonant metamaterial elements patterned into the upper conductor of a microstrip line. Each metamaterial element contains two diodes connected to an external control circuit such that the resonance of the metamaterial element can be damped by application of a bias voltage. Through applying different voltages to the control circuit, select subsets of the elements can be switched on to create unique radiation patterns that illuminate the scene. Spatial information of an imaging domain can thus be encoded onto this set of radiation patterns, or measurements, which can be processed to reconstruct the targets in the scene using compressive sensing algorithms. We discuss the design and operation of a metamaterial imaging system and demonstrate reconstructed images with a 10:1 compression ratio. Dynamic metamaterial apertures can potentially be of benefit in microwave or millimeter wave systems such as those used in security screening and through-wall imaging. In addition, feature-specific or adaptive imaging can be facilitated through the use of the dynamic aperture.

  19. Midbrain dopamine function in schizophrenia and depression: a post-mortem and positron emission tomographic imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howes, Oliver D; Williams, Matthew; Ibrahim, Kemal; Leung, Garret; Egerton, Alice; McGuire, Philip K; Turkheimer, Federico

    2013-11-01

    Elevated in vivo markers of presynaptic striatal dopamine activity have been a consistent finding in schizophrenia, and include a large effect size elevation in dopamine synthesis capacity. However, it is not known if the dopaminergic dysfunction is limited to the striatal terminals of dopamine neurons, or is also evident in the dopamine neuron cell bodies, which mostly originate in the substantia nigra. The aim of our studies was therefore to determine whether dopamine synthesis capacity is altered in the substantia nigra of people with schizophrenia, and how this relates to symptoms. In a post-mortem study, a semi-quantitative analysis of tyrosine hydroxylase staining was conducted in nigral dopaminergic cells from post-mortem tissue from patients with schizophrenia (n = 12), major depressive disorder (n = 13) and matched control subjects (n = 13). In an in vivo imaging study, nigral and striatal dopaminergic function was measured in patients with schizophrenia (n = 29) and matched healthy control subjects (n = 29) using (18)F-dihydroxyphenyl-L-alanine ((18)F-DOPA) positron emission tomography. In the post-mortem study we found that tyrosine hydroxylase staining was significantly increased in nigral dopaminergic neurons in schizophrenia compared with both control subjects (P dopamine synthesis capacity is seen in the nigral origin of dopamine neurons as well as their striatal terminals in schizophrenia, and is linked to symptom severity in patients.

  20. Quantitative evaluation of myocardial single-photon emission tomographic imaging: application to the measurement of perfusion defect size and severity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benoit, T. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, C.H.U. Sart Tilman, Liege (Belgium); Vivegnis, D. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, C.H.U. Sart Tilman, Liege (Belgium); Foulon, J. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, C.H.U. Sart Tilman, Liege (Belgium); Rigo, P. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, C.H.U. Sart Tilman, Liege (Belgium)

    1996-12-01

    A new method is described for precise quantitative analysis of the relative three-dimensional distribution of myocardial tracers. The system uses a 360 elliptical sampling of radial slices to create activity profiles. These are then positioned onto a common centre at the same angular coordinates as the corresponding radial slice reconstruction planes to generate a two-dimensional polar summary display. Abnormal distribution is then identified by automatic comparison of the patient polar map with the threshold of a normal database defined on a pixel by pixel basis as the normal mean -2.5 SD. Our stress and rest databases currently comprise 34 and 24 studies for sestamibi and tetrofosmin respectively. The present method differs from currently available software in two major respects. Calculation of defect extent takes into account the surface distortion resulting from planar projection by using pixel by pixel weighted factors but it is otherwise overestimated as a result of the limited resolution of the imaging system. Integrating defect severity and extent, our hypoperfusion index appeared to accurately estimate the true defect size in our phantom model (r=0.993). The reproducibility of analysis was 6.24% in phantom studies and 3.10% in patient studies including repeated acquisitions. Applied to a well-documented population of 80 patients, this method resulted in an 86% sensitivity and a 78% specificity for overall coronary artery disease detection with reference to the angiographic data. (orig.). With 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Dynamic NMR cardiac imaging in a piglet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doyle, M.; Rzedzian, R.; Mansfield, P. (Nottingham Univ. (UK). Dept. of Physics); Coupland, R.E. (Nottingham Univ. (UK). Queen' s Medical Centre)

    1983-12-01

    NMR echo-planar imaging (EPI) has been used in a real-time mode to visualise the thorax of a live piglet. Moving pictures are available on an immediate image display system which demonstrates dynamic cardiac function. Frame rates vary from one per cardiac cycle in a prospective stroboscopic mode with immediate visual output to a maximum of 10 frames per second yielding up to six looks in one piglet heart cycle, but using a visual playback mode. A completely new system has been used to obtain these images, features of which include a probe assembly with 22 cm access and an AP400 array processor for real-time data processing.

  2. Clinical, computed tomographic, magnetic resonance imaging, and histologic findings associated with myxomatous neoplasia of the temporomandibular joint in two dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parslow, Arana; Taylor, David P; Simpson, David J

    2016-12-01

    CASE DESCRIPTION A 15-year-old neutered female mixed-breed dog (dog 1) and an 11-year-old neutered female Labrador Retriever (dog 2) were examined because of unilateral exophthalmus, third eyelid protrusion, and periorbital swelling that failed to respond to antimicrobial treatment. CLINICAL FINDINGS Both dogs underwent ultrasonographic, CT, and MRI examination of the head. In both dogs, advanced imaging revealed a poorly defined, peripherally contrast-enhancing, mucous-filled cystic mass that radiated from the temporomandibular joint and infiltrated the periorbital tissues and retrobulbar space. Both dogs underwent surgical biopsy of the periorbital mass. A viscous, straw-colored fluid was aspirated from the retrobulbar region in both dogs. The initial histologic diagnosis for dog 1 was zygomatic sialadenitis and sialocele. However, the clinical signs recurred, and histologic examination of specimens obtained during a second surgical biopsy resulted in a diagnosis of myxoma. The histologic diagnosis was myxosarcoma for dog 2. TREATMENT AND OUTCOME In both dogs, clinical signs recurred within 2 weeks after surgery and persisted for the duration of their lives. Dog 1 received no further treatment after the second surgery and was euthanized 34 months after initial examination because of multicentric lymphoma. Dog 2 was treated with various chemotherapy agents and was euthanized 11 months after initial examination because of a dramatic increase in periocular swelling and respiratory stertor. CLINICAL RELEVANCE Temporomandibular myxomatous neoplasia can be confused with zygomatic sialocele on the basis of clinical signs but has characteristic MRI features. Representative biopsy specimens should be obtained from areas close to the temporomandibular joint to avoid misdiagnosis.

  3. Positron emission tomography/computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging in a murine model of progressive atherosclerosis using (64)Cu-labeled glycoprotein VI-Fc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigalke, Boris; Phinikaridou, Alkystis; Andia, Marcelo E; Cooper, Margaret S; Schuster, Andreas; Schönberger, Tanja; Griessinger, Christoph M; Wurster, Thomas; Onthank, David; Ungerer, Martin; Gawaz, Meinrad; Nagel, Eike; Botnar, Rene M

    2013-11-01

    (-1); P=0.028). (64)Cu-GPVI-Fc positron emission tomographic imaging allows identification of exposed subendothelial collagen in injured WT and high-fat diet-fed ApoE(-/-) mice.

  4. Quantitative evaluation of myocardial single-photon emission tomographic imaging: application to the measurement of perfusion defect size and severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, T; Vivegnis, D; Foulon, J; Rigo, P

    1996-12-01

    A new method is described for precise quantitative analysis of the relative three-dimensional distribution of myocardial tracers. The system uses a 360 degrees elliptical sampling of radial slices to create activity profiles. These are then positioned onto a common centre at the same angular coordinates as the corresponding radial slice reconstruction planes to generate a two-dimensional polar summary display. Abnormal distribution is then identified by automatic comparison of the patient polar map with the threshold of a normal database defined on a pixel by pixel basis as the normal mean -2.5 SD. Our stress and rest databases currently comprise 34 and 24 studies for sestamibi and tetrofosmin respectively. The present method differs from currently available software in two major respects. First, radial slices are used rather than short-axis slices to minimize operator intervention and to allow quantitative evaluation of the left ventricle volume independent of the heart size and without truncation, in particular near the apex and at the base. This sampling scheme also results in a more homogeneous and sampling-independent partial volume effect. Secondly, quantitative analysis is improved by calculating perfusion defect severity, extent and size in a precise manner. Severity is evaluated relative to a standardized background measurement and to the mean normal value rather than to the threshold value. This parameter was underestimated up to a defect extent of 32 cm2 in our phantom studies. Calculation of defect extent takes into account the surface distortion resulting from planar projection by using pixel by pixel weighted factors but it is otherwise overestimated as a result of the limited resolution of the imaging system. Integrating defect severity and extent, our hypoperfusion index appeared to accurately estimate the true defect size in our phantom model (r=0.993). The reproducibility of analysis was 6.24% in phantom studies and 3.10% in patient studies

  5. Tomographic images of subducted oceans matched to the accretionary records of orogens - Case study of North America and relevance to Central Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigloch, Karin; Mihalynuk, Mitchell G.; Hosseini, Kasra

    2016-04-01

    Accretionary orogens are the surface record of subduction on the 100-million-year timescale; they aggregate buoyant crustal welts that resisted subduction. The other record of subduction is found in the deep subsurface: oceanic lithosphere preserved in the mantle that records ocean basin closure between successive generations of arcs. Seismic tomography maps out these crumpled paleo-oceans down to the core-mantle boundary, where slab accumulates. One such accumulation of enormous scale is under Eastern Asia, recording the assembly of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB). Deep CAOB slab has hardly been explored because tomographic image resolution in the lowermost mantle is limited, but this is rapidly improving. We present new images of the CAOB slabs from our P-wave tomography that includes core-diffracted waves as a technical novelty. The previous slab blur sharpens into the type of elongated geometries expected to trace paleo-trench lines. Since the North American Cordillera is younger than the CAOB (mostly 10,000 km long. North America converged on the two microcontinents by westward subduction of two intervening basins (which we name Mezcalera and Angayucham oceans), culminating in diachronous suturing between ~150 Ma and ~50 Ma. Hence geophysical subsurface evidence negates the widely accepted "Andean-style" model of Farallon-beneath-continent subduction since at least 180 Ma, and supports a Jura-Cretaceous paleogeography closer to today's Southwestern Pacific, or to the Paleozoic CAOB. Though advocated since the 1970's by a minority of geologists, this scenario had not gained wide acceptance due to a record obscured by overprinting, margin-parallel translation, and oroclinal bending. The new subsurface evidence provides specific indications where to seek the decisive Mezcalera-Angayucham suture. The suture is evident in a trail of collapsed Jura-Cretaceous basin relics that run the length of the Cordillera. Reference: Sigloch, K., & Mihalynuk, M. G. (2013

  6. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-08-01

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefited greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational.

  7. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefited greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational.

  8. Overcoming Dynamic Disturbances in Imaging Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Eric W.; Dente, Gregory C.; Lyon, Richard G.; Chesters, Dennis; Gong, Qian

    2000-01-01

    We develop and discuss a methodology with the potential to yield a significant reduction in complexity, cost, and risk of space-borne optical systems in the presence of dynamic disturbances. More robust systems almost certainly will be a result as well. Many future space-based and ground-based optical systems will employ optical control systems to enhance imaging performance. The goal of the optical control subsystem is to determine the wavefront aberrations and remove them. Ideally reducing an aberrated image of the object under investigation to a sufficiently clear (usually diffraction-limited) image. Control will likely be distributed over several elements. These elements may include telescope primary segments, telescope secondary, telescope tertiary, deformable mirror(s), fine steering mirror(s), etc. The last two elements, in particular, may have to provide dynamic control. These control subsystems may become elaborate indeed. But robust system performance will require evaluation of the image quality over a substantial range and in a dynamic environment. Candidate systems for improvement in the Earth Sciences Enterprise could include next generation Landsat systems or atmospheric sensors for dynamic imaging of individual, severe storms. The technology developed here could have a substantial impact on the development of new systems in the Space Science Enterprise; such as the Next Generation Space Telescope(NGST) and its follow-on the Next NGST. Large Interferometric Systems of non-zero field, such as Planet Finder and Submillimeter Probe of the Evolution of Cosmic Structure, could benefit. These systems most likely will contain large, flexible optormechanical structures subject to dynamic disturbance. Furthermore, large systems for high resolution imaging of planets or the sun from space may also benefit. Tactical and Strategic Defense systems will need to image very small targets as well and could benefit from the technology developed here. We discuss a novel

  9. Dynamic Image Stitching for Panoramic Video

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen-Yu Shieh

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The design of this paper is based on the Dynamic image titching for panoramic video. By utilizing OpenCV visual function data library and SIFT algorithm as the basis for presentation, this article brings forward Gaussian second differenced MoG which is processed basing on DoG Gaussian Difference Map to reduce order in synthesizing dynamic images and simplify the algorithm of the Gaussian pyramid structure. MSIFT matches with overlapping segmentation method to simplify the scope of feature extraction in order to enhance speed. And through this method traditional image synthesis can be improved without having to take lots of time in calculation and being limited by space and angle. This research uses four normal Webcams and two IPCAM coupled with several-wide angle lenses. By using wide-angle lenses to monitor over a wide range of an area and then by using image stitching panoramic effect is achieved. In terms of overall image application and control interface, Microsoft Visual Studio C# is adopted to a construct software interface. On a personal computer with 2.4-GHz CPU and 2-GB RAM and with the cameras fixed to it, the execution speed is three images per second, which reduces calculation time of the traditional algorithm.

  10. Doppler coherence imaging of ion dynamics in VINETA.II and ASDEX-upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gradic, Dorothea; Ford, Oliver; Wolf, Robert [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Greifswald (Germany); Lunt, Tilmann [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    In magnetically confining plasma experiments, diagnosis of ion flows is of great importance to measure the plasma response to the magnetic field or the exhaust particle flows in the divertor areas. Doppler coherence imaging spectroscopy (CIS) is a relatively new technique for the observation of plasma bulk ion dynamics. It is a passive optical diagnostic enabling line-integrated measurements to obtain 2D images of the ion flow and ion temperature. The general principle is similar to traditional Doppler spectroscopy, however CIS uses an imaging interferometer to perform narrow-bandwidth Fourier spectroscopy. A major advantage of the coherence imaging technique is the large amount of spatial information recovered. This allows tomographic inversion of the line-integrated measurements. With existing CIS setups, scrape-off-layer and high field side edge impurity flows could be observed in the MAST, core and edge poloidal He II flows in the WEGA stellarator and divertor impurity flows in DIII-D. The main objective of this study is the research of ion dynamics in the small linear plasma experiment VINETA.II and ASDEX-Upgrade. First Doppler CIS measurements from Ar-II plasma discharges in VINETA.II and He-II, C-III divertor flows in ASDEX-Upgrade and their preliminary interpretation will be presented.

  11. Global ENA Imaging of Earth's Dynamic Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Pontus

    2015-04-01

    The interaction between singly charged ions of Earth's magnetosphere and its neutral exosphere and upper atmosphere gives rise to Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENAs). This has enabled several missions to remotely image the global injection dynamics of the ring current and plasma sheet, the outflow of ions from Earth's polar regions, and the location of the sub-solar magnetopause. In this presentation we review ENA observations by the Astrid, IMAGE, TWINS and IBEX missions. We focus on results from the IMAGE/HENA Camera including observations of proton and oxygen ion injections in to the ring current and their impact on the force-balance and ionospheric coupling in the inner magnetosphere. We report also on the status of inversion techniques for retrieving the ion spatial and pitch-angle distributions from ENA images. The presentation concludes with a discussion of future next steps in ENA instrumentation and analysis capabilities required to deliver the science as recommended by the Heliophysics Decadal Survey.

  12. Image fusion for dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leach Martin O

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multivariate imaging techniques such as dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI have been shown to provide valuable information for medical diagnosis. Even though these techniques provide new information, integrating and evaluating the much wider range of information is a challenging task for the human observer. This task may be assisted with the use of image fusion algorithms. Methods In this paper, image fusion based on Kernel Principal Component Analysis (KPCA is proposed for the first time. It is demonstrated that a priori knowledge about the data domain can be easily incorporated into the parametrisation of the KPCA, leading to task-oriented visualisations of the multivariate data. The results of the fusion process are compared with those of the well-known and established standard linear Principal Component Analysis (PCA by means of temporal sequences of 3D MRI volumes from six patients who took part in a breast cancer screening study. Results The PCA and KPCA algorithms are able to integrate information from a sequence of MRI volumes into informative gray value or colour images. By incorporating a priori knowledge, the fusion process can be automated and optimised in order to visualise suspicious lesions with high contrast to normal tissue. Conclusion Our machine learning based image fusion approach maps the full signal space of a temporal DCE-MRI sequence to a single meaningful visualisation with good tissue/lesion contrast and thus supports the radiologist during manual image evaluation.

  13. Image Classifying Registration and Dynamic Region Merging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himadri Nath Moulick

    2013-07-01

    account spatial variations of intensity dependencies while keeping a good registration accuracy. And the addresses the automatic image segmentation problem in a region merging style. With an initially over-segmented image, in which the many regions (or super-pixels with homogeneous color aredetected, image segmentation is performed by iteratively merging the regions according to a statistical test. There are two essential issues in a region merging algorithm: order of merging and the stopping criterion. In the proposed algorithm, these two issues are solved by a novel predicate, which is defined by the sequential probability ratio test (SPRT and the minimal cost criterion. Starting from an over-segmented image, neighboring regions are progressively merged if there is an evidence for merging according to this predicate. We show that the merging order follows the principle of dynamic programming. This formulates image segmentation as an inference problem, where the final segmentation is established based on the observed image. We also prove that the produced segmentation satisfies certain global properties. In addition, a faster algorithm is developed to accelerate the region merging process, which maintains a nearest neighbor graph (NNG in each iteration. Experiments on real natural images are conducted to demonstrate the performance of the proposed dynamic region merging algorithm.

  14. High dynamic range imaging sensors and architectures

    CERN Document Server

    Darmont, Arnaud

    2013-01-01

    Illumination is a crucial element in many applications, matching the luminance of the scene with the operational range of a camera. When luminance cannot be adequately controlled, a high dynamic range (HDR) imaging system may be necessary. These systems are being increasingly used in automotive on-board systems, road traffic monitoring, and other industrial, security, and military applications. This book provides readers with an intermediate discussion of HDR image sensors and techniques for industrial and non-industrial applications. It describes various sensor and pixel architectures capable

  15. Computer-based image analysis in radiological diagnostics and image-guided therapy 3D-Reconstruction, contrast medium dynamics, surface analysis, radiation therapy and multi-modal image fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Beier, J

    2001-01-01

    This book deals with substantial subjects of postprocessing and analysis of radiological image data, a particular emphasis was put on pulmonary themes. For a multitude of purposes the developed methods and procedures can directly be transferred to other non-pulmonary applications. The work presented here is structured in 14 chapters, each describing a selected complex of research. The chapter order reflects the sequence of the processing steps starting from artefact reduction, segmentation, visualization, analysis, therapy planning and image fusion up to multimedia archiving. In particular, this includes virtual endoscopy with three different scene viewers (Chap. 6), visualizations of the lung disease bronchiectasis (Chap. 7), surface structure analysis of pulmonary tumors (Chap. 8), quantification of contrast medium dynamics from temporal 2D and 3D image sequences (Chap. 9) as well as multimodality image fusion of arbitrary tomographical data using several visualization techniques (Chap. 12). Thus, the softw...

  16. 3.5D dynamic PET image reconstruction incorporating kinetics-based clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lijun; Karakatsanis, Nicolas A; Tang, Jing; Chen, Wufan; Rahmim, Arman

    2012-08-07

    Standard 3D dynamic positron emission tomographic (PET) imaging consists of independent image reconstructions of individual frames followed by application of appropriate kinetic model to the time activity curves at the voxel or region-of-interest (ROI). The emerging field of 4D PET reconstruction, by contrast, seeks to move beyond this scheme and incorporate information from multiple frames within the image reconstruction task. Here we propose a novel reconstruction framework aiming to enhance quantitative accuracy of parametric images via introduction of priors based on voxel kinetics, as generated via clustering of preliminary reconstructed dynamic images to define clustered neighborhoods of voxels with similar kinetics. This is then followed by straightforward maximum a posteriori (MAP) 3D PET reconstruction as applied to individual frames; and as such the method is labeled '3.5D' image reconstruction. The use of cluster-based priors has the advantage of further enhancing quantitative performance in dynamic PET imaging, because: (a) there are typically more voxels in clusters than in conventional local neighborhoods, and (b) neighboring voxels with distinct kinetics are less likely to be clustered together. Using realistic simulated (11)C-raclopride dynamic PET data, the quantitative performance of the proposed method was investigated. Parametric distribution-volume (DV) and DV ratio (DVR) images were estimated from dynamic image reconstructions using (a) maximum-likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM), and MAP reconstructions using (b) the quadratic prior (QP-MAP), (c) the Green prior (GP-MAP) and (d, e) two proposed cluster-based priors (CP-U-MAP and CP-W-MAP), followed by graphical modeling, and were qualitatively and quantitatively compared for 11 ROIs. Overall, the proposed dynamic PET reconstruction methodology resulted in substantial visual as well as quantitative accuracy improvements (in terms of noise versus bias performance) for parametric DV and

  17. Achievement report on research and development of medical and welfare equipment technology. Optical tomographic imaging method; Iryo fukushi kiki gijutsu kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho. Hikari danso imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-11-01

    The aim is to develop a method of processing oxygen concentration distribution in human organs into an image by computed tomography using near infrared rays capable of transmitting through living tissues. Since the photoabsorption spectra of hemoglobin etc. in blood vary according to the degree of their oxidation, an oxygen concentration level is determined by measuring the magnitude of the variation. In the imaging method named in the title, the object is irradiated with picosecond-level near infrared pulses from all directions successively, the pulses after transmission through the object are measured at all directions at a picosecond-level time resolution, and the distribution of pulse scattering and absorption characteristics are subjected to algorithmic calculation, the outcome is converted into oxygen concentration levels, and an image is obtained. A 64-channel time resolution measurement system is constructed, and is applied to living tissue models (phantoms) and animals, and an image is obtained and evaluated. On the basis of the result, a patient is examined for clinical evaluation, and an image reflecting the distribution of variations in hemoglobin oxygen concentration is obtained for the head of the adult patient. A spatial resolution of 1cm is achieved in case of a phantom 10cm in diameter. In the case of 64 channels, measurement takes approximately 20 minutes and mapping image data measurement takes approximately 7 minutes. (NEDO)

  18. Dynamic real-time 4D cardiac MDCT image display using GPU-accelerated volume rendering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Eagleson, Roy; Peters, Terry M

    2009-09-01

    Intraoperative cardiac monitoring, accurate preoperative diagnosis, and surgical planning are important components of minimally-invasive cardiac therapy. Retrospective, electrocardiographically (ECG) gated, multidetector computed tomographical (MDCT), four-dimensional (3D + time), real-time, cardiac image visualization is an important tool for the surgeon in such procedure, particularly if the dynamic volumetric image can be registered to, and fused with the actual patient anatomy. The addition of stereoscopic imaging provides a more intuitive environment by adding binocular vision and depth cues to structures within the beating heart. In this paper, we describe the design and implementation of a comprehensive stereoscopic 4D cardiac image visualization and manipulation platform, based on the opacity density radiation model, which exploits the power of modern graphics processing units (GPUs) in the rendering pipeline. In addition, we present a new algorithm to synchronize the phases of the dynamic heart to clinical ECG signals, and to calculate and compensate for latencies in the visualization pipeline. A dynamic multiresolution display is implemented to enable the interactive selection and emphasis of volume of interest (VOI) within the entire contextual cardiac volume and to enhance performance, and a novel color and opacity adjustment algorithm is designed to increase the uniformity of the rendered multiresolution image of heart. Our system provides a visualization environment superior to noninteractive software-based implementations, but with a rendering speed that is comparable to traditional, but inferior quality, volume rendering approaches based on texture mapping. This retrospective ECG-gated dynamic cardiac display system can provide real-time feedback regarding the suspected pathology, function, and structural defects, as well as anatomical information such as chamber volume and morphology.

  19. Ring artifacts correction in compressed sensing tomographic reconstruction

    CERN Document Server

    Paleo, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel approach to handle ring artifacts correction in compressed sensing tomographic reconstruction. The correction is part of the reconstruction process, which differs from classical sinogram pre-processing and image post-processing techniques. The principle of compressed sensing tomographic reconstruction is presented. Then, we show that the ring artifacts correction can be integrated in the reconstruction problem formalism. We provide numerical results for both simulated and real data. This technique is included in the PyHST2 code which is used at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility for tomographic reconstruction.

  20. Computed Tomographic Perfusion Improves Diagnostic Power of Coronary Computed Tomographic Angiography in Women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penagaluri, Ashritha; Higgins, Angela Y; Vavere, Andrea L

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Coronary computed tomographic angiography (CTA) and myocardial perfusion imaging (CTP) is a validated approach for detection and exclusion of flow-limiting coronary artery disease (CAD), but little data are available on gender-specific performance of these modalities. In this study, w...... REGISTRATION: URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00934037....

  1. Digital Image Correlation with Dynamic Subset Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Ghulam Mubashar; MacNish, Cara; Dyskin, Arcady; Shufrin, Igor

    2016-09-01

    The quality of the surface pattern and selection of subset size play a critical role in achieving high accuracy in Digital Image Correlation (DIC). The subset size in DIC is normally selected by testing different subset sizes across the entire image, which is a laborious procedure. This also leads to the problem that the worst region of the surface pattern influences the performance of DIC across the entire image. In order to avoid these limitations, a Dynamic Subset Selection (DSS) algorithm is proposed in this paper to optimize the subset size for each point in an image before optimizing the correlation parameters. The proposed DSS algorithm uses the local pattern around the point of interest to calculate a parameter called the Intensity Variation Ratio (Λ), which is used to optimize the subset size. The performance of the DSS algorithm is analyzed using numerically generated images and is compared with the results of traditional DIC. Images obtained from laboratory experiments are also used to demonstrate the utility of the DSS algorithm. Results illustrate that the DSS algorithm provides a better alternative to subset size "guessing" and finds an appropriate subset size for each point of interest according to the local pattern.

  2. Motility Contrast Imaging and Tissue Dynamics Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolte, David D.; An, Ran; Turek, John

    Motion is the defining physiological characteristic of living matter. If we are interested in how things function, then the way they move is most informative. Motion provides an endogenous and functional suite of biomarkers that are sensitive to subtle changes that occur under applied pharmacological doses or cellular stresses. This chapter reviews the application of biodynamic imaging to measure cellular dynamics in three-dimensional tissue culture for drug screening applications. Nanoscale and microscale motions are detected through statistical fluctuations in dynamic speckle across an ensemble of cells within each resolution voxel. Tissue dynamics spectroscopy generates drug-response spectrograms that serve as phenotypic fingerprints of drug action and can differentiate responses from heterogeneous regions of tumor tissue.

  3. A system dedicated to the viewing and handling of tomographic images obtained by magnetic resonance; Um sistema dedicado a visualizacao e manipulacao de imagens tomograficas obtidas por ressonancia magnetica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slaets, Joan F.W.; Almeida, Lirio O.B. [Sao Paulo Univ., Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica e Quimica; Traina, Agma J.M. [Sao Paulo Univ., Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Matematicas

    1992-12-31

    The present work describes the development of a dedicated system to be used in visualization and manipulation of a MR images. The graphics environment as well as the tool kit were developed for the dedicated TMS34010 based hardware. The developed software offers a compact kernel with primitives to support the creation and manipulation windows and menus directly in `C` language. This work is fundamental for the implementation of a user friendly interface build to operate and visualize tomographic images. This tools are essential for the selection an archiving of images planes as used in clinical applications. (author) 9 refs., 2 figs., 1 photo; e-mail: jan, agma and lirio at uspfsc.ifqsc..usp.ansp.br

  4. Neutron Imaging Reveals Internal Plant Hydraulic Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Jeffrey [ORNL; Bilheux, Hassina Z [ORNL; Kang, Misun [ORNL; Voisin, Sophie [ORNL; Cheng, Chu-Lin [ORNL; Horita, Jusuke [ORNL; Perfect, Edmund [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Many terrestrial ecosystem processes are constrained by water availability and transport within the soil. Knowledge of plant water fluxes is thus critical for assessing mechanistic processes linked to biogeochemical cycles, yet resolution of root structure and xylem water transport dynamics has been a particularly daunting task for the ecologist. Through neutron imaging, we demonstrate the ability to non-invasively monitor individual root functionality and water fluxes within Zea mays L. (maize) and Panicum virgatum L. (switchgrass) seedlings growing in a sandy medium. Root structure and growth were readily imaged by neutron radiography and neutron computed tomography. Seedlings were irrigated with water or deuterium oxide and imaged through time as a growth lamp was cycled on to alter leaf demand for water. Sub-millimeter scale resolution reveals timing and magnitudes of root water uptake, redistribution within the roots, and root-shoot hydraulic linkages, relationships not well characterized by other techniques.

  5. High-dynamic-range microscope imaging based on exposure bracketing in full-field optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong-Hoi, Audrey; Montgomery, Paul C; Serio, Bruno; Twardowski, Patrice; Uhring, Wilfried

    2016-04-01

    By applying the proposed high-dynamic-range (HDR) technique based on exposure bracketing, we demonstrate a meaningful reduction in the spatial noise in image frames acquired with a CCD camera so as to improve the fringe contrast in full-field optical coherence tomography (FF-OCT). This new signal processing method thus allows improved probing within transparent or semitransparent samples. The proposed method is demonstrated on 3 μm thick transparent polymer films of Mylar, which, due to their transparency, produce low contrast fringe patterns in white-light interference microscopy. High-resolution tomographic analysis is performed using the technique. After performing appropriate signal processing, resulting XZ sections are observed. Submicrometer-sized defects can be lost in the noise that is present in the CCD images. With the proposed method, we show that by increasing the signal-to-noise ratio of the images, submicrometer-sized defect structures can thus be detected.

  6. Tomographic PIV: particles versus blobs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champagnat, Frédéric; Cornic, Philippe; Cheminet, Adam; Leclaire, Benjamin; Le Besnerais, Guy; Plyer, Aurélien

    2014-08-01

    We present an alternative approach to tomographic particle image velocimetry (tomo-PIV) that seeks to recover nearly single voxel particles rather than blobs of extended size. The baseline of our approach is a particle-based representation of image data. An appropriate discretization of this representation yields an original linear forward model with a weight matrix built with specific samples of the system’s point spread function (PSF). Such an approach requires only a few voxels to explain the image appearance, therefore it favors much more sparsely reconstructed volumes than classic tomo-PIV. The proposed forward model is general and flexible and can be embedded in a classical multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique (MART) or a simultaneous multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique (SMART) inversion procedure. We show, using synthetic PIV images and by way of a large exploration of the generating conditions and a variety of performance metrics, that the model leads to better results than the classical tomo-PIV approach, in particular in the case of seeding densities greater than 0.06 particles per pixel and of PSFs characterized by a standard deviation larger than 0.8 pixels.

  7. Computed tomographic colonography:Hope or hype?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Otto; Schiueh-Tzang; Lin

    2010-01-01

    Computed tomographic colonography (CTC) is a promising emerging technology for imaging of the colon. This concise review discusses the currently available data on CTC technique,test characteristics,acceptance,safety,cost-effectiveness,follow-up strategy,and extracolonic findings. In summary,CTC technique is still evolving,and further research is needed to clarify the role of automated colonic insufflation,smooth-muscle relaxants,intravenous and oral contrast,soft-ware rendering,and patient positioning. Curr...

  8. Computing dynamic classification images from correlation maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hongjing; Liu, Zili

    2006-05-22

    We used Pearson's correlation to compute dynamic classification images of biological motion in a point-light display. Observers discriminated whether a human figure that was embedded in dynamic white Gaussian noise was walking forward or backward. Their responses were correlated with the Gaussian noise fields frame by frame, across trials. The resultant correlation map gave rise to a sequence of dynamic classification images that were clearer than either the standard method of A. J. Ahumada and J. Lovell (1971) or the optimal weighting method of R. F. Murray, P. J. Bennett, and A. B. Sekuler (2002). Further, the correlation coefficients of all the point lights were similar to each other when overlapping pixels between forward and backward walkers were excluded. This pattern is consistent with the hypothesis that the point-light walker is represented in a global manner, as opposed to a fixed subset of point lights being more important than others. We conjecture that the superior performance of the correlation map may reflect inherent nonlinearities in processing biological motion, which are incompatible with the assumptions underlying the previous methods.

  9. Imaging electric field dynamics with graphene optoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horng, Jason; Balch, Halleh B.; McGuire, Allister F.; Tsai, Hsin-Zon; Forrester, Patrick R.; Crommie, Michael F.; Cui, Bianxiao; Wang, Feng

    2016-12-01

    The use of electric fields for signalling and control in liquids is widespread, spanning bioelectric activity in cells to electrical manipulation of microstructures in lab-on-a-chip devices. However, an appropriate tool to resolve the spatio-temporal distribution of electric fields over a large dynamic range has yet to be developed. Here we present a label-free method to image local electric fields in real time and under ambient conditions. Our technique combines the unique gate-variable optical transitions of graphene with a critically coupled planar waveguide platform that enables highly sensitive detection of local electric fields with a voltage sensitivity of a few microvolts, a spatial resolution of tens of micrometres and a frequency response over tens of kilohertz. Our imaging platform enables parallel detection of electric fields over a large field of view and can be tailored to broad applications spanning lab-on-a-chip device engineering to analysis of bioelectric phenomena.

  10. Electromagnetic imaging of dynamic brain activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosher, J.; Leahy, R. [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering; Lewis, P.; Lewine, J.; George, J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Singh, M. [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    1991-12-31

    Neural activity in the brain produces weak dynamic electromagnetic fields that can be measured by an array of sensors. Using a spatio-temporal modeling framework, we have developed a new approach to localization of multiple neural sources. This approach is based on the MUSIC algorithm originally developed for estimating the direction of arrival of signals impinging on a sensor array. We present applications of this technique to magnetic field measurements of a phantom and of a human evoked somatosensory response. The results of the somatosensory localization are mapped onto the brain anatomy obtained from magnetic resonance images.

  11. Dynamic force microscopy imaging of native membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kienberger, Ferry; Stroh, Cordula; Kada, Gerald; Moser, Rosita; Baumgartner, Werner; Pastushenko, Vassili; Rankl, Christian; Schmidt, Ute; Mueller, Harald; Orlova, Elena; LeGrimellec, Christian; Drenckhahn, Detlev; Blaas, Dieter; Hinterdorfer, Peter

    2003-10-15

    We employed magnetic ACmode atomic force microscopy (MACmode AFM) as a novel dynamic force microscopy method to image surfaces of biological membranes in their native environments. The lateral resolution achieved under optimized imaging conditions was in the nanometer range, even when the sample was only weakly attached to the support. Purple membranes (PM) from Halobacterium salinarum were used as a test standard for topographical imaging. The hexagonal arrangement of the bacteriorhodopsin trimers on the cytoplasmic side of PM was resolved with 1.5 nm lateral accuracy, a resolution similar to images obtained in contact and tapping-mode AFM. Human rhinovirus 2 (HRV2) particles were attached to mica surfaces via nonspecific interactions. The capsid structure and 2 nm sized protein loops of HRV2 were routinely obtained without any displacement of the virus. Globular and filamentous structures on living and fixed endothelial cells were observed with a resolution of 5-20 nm. These examples show that MACmode AFM is a favorable method in studying the topography of soft and weakly attached biological samples with high resolution under physiological conditions.

  12. Tomographic particle-image velocimetry and thermography in Rayleigh-Bénard convection using suspended thermochromic liquid crystals and digital image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciofalo, M.; Signorino, M.; Simiano, M.

    2003-02-01

    Steady-state flow and temperature fields in shallow rectangular enclosures heated from below were visualized and quantitatively characterized by using glycerol as the working fluid and suspended thermochromic liquid crystals as tracers. Couples of photographs taken on 120 transparency film for two orthogonal sets of vertical plane sections were digitized by a 1,200-dpi flatbed scanner and split into HSL (hue-saturation-lightness) components by using commercial general-purpose image processing software. Two-dimensional velocity fields were obtained from the lightness component by a two-frame cross-correlation technique using a commercial particle-image velocimetry (PIV) package. Temperature fields were obtained from the hue component on the basis of an in situ calibration procedure, conducted under conditions of stable thermal stratification. Finally, 2D flow and temperature distributions were interpolated by a purpose-written Fortran program to give 3D flow and thermal fields in the enclosure. Results are presented here for the case of a 1:2:4 aspect ratio cavity at a Rayleigh number of ˜ 14,500, for which a complex 3D flow and temperature distribution was observed.

  13. 3D Reconstruction Technique for Tomographic PIV

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜楠; 包全; 杨绍琼

    2015-01-01

    Tomographic particle image velocimetry(Tomo-PIV) is a state-of-the-art experimental technique based on a method of optical tomography to achieve the three-dimensional(3D) reconstruction for three-dimensional three-component(3D-3C) flow velocity measurements. 3D reconstruction for Tomo-PIV is carried out herein. Meanwhile, a 3D simplified tomographic reconstruction model reduced from a 3D volume light inten-sity field with 2D projection images into a 2D Tomo-slice plane with 1D projecting lines, i.e., simplifying this 3D reconstruction into a problem of 2D Tomo-slice plane reconstruction, is applied thereafter. Two kinds of the most well-known algebraic reconstruction techniques, algebraic reconstruction technique(ART) and multiple algebraic reconstruction technique(MART), are compared as well. The principles of the two reconstruction algorithms are discussed in detail, which has been performed by a series of simulation images, yielding the corresponding recon-struction images that show different features between the ART and MART algorithm, and then their advantages and disadvantages are discussed. Further discussions are made for the standard particle image reconstruction when the background noise of the pre-initial particle image has been removed. Results show that the particle image recon-struction has been greatly improved. The MART algorithm is much better than the ART. Furthermore, the computa-tional analyses of two parameters(the particle density and the number of cameras), are performed to study their effects on the reconstruction. Lastly, the 3D volume particle field is reconstructed by using the improved algorithm based on the simplified 3D tomographic reconstruction model, which proves that the algorithm simplification is feasible and it can be applied to the reconstruction of 3D volume particle field in a Tomo-PIV system.

  14. Computer simulations of a low energy proton beam tomograph

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milhoretto, E.; Schelin, H.R.; Setti, J.A.P.; Denyak, V.; Paschuk, S.A.; Basilio, A.C.; Rocha, R.; Ribeiro Junior, S. [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Curso de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Eletrica e Informatica Industrial (CPGEI)]. E-mails: sergei@utfpr.edu.br; edneymilhoretto@yahoo.com; schelin@cpgei.cefetpr.br; Evseev, I.; Yevseyeva, O. [Universidade Estadual do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Nova Friburgo, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: evseev@iprj.uerj.br; Lopes, R.T. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graducao em Engenharia (COPPE). Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear]. E-mail: ricardo@lin.ufrj.br; Vinagre Filho, U.M. [Instituto de Energia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2007-07-01

    This work presents the recent development of a low energy proton beam tomograph. The proton tomograph prototype (involving UTFPR, UERJ, UFRJ and IEN/CNEN) has been installed and tested at the cyclotron CV-28 of IEN/CNEN. New computer simulations were performed in order to optimize the performance of the scattered proton beam and its aluminum collimator energy losses. The computer code simulates the tomographic measurements with two aluminum collimators (variable aperture from 0.2 mm to 0.4 mm in diameter and variable thickness from 4 mm to 8 mm), a water phantom and a Si(Li) detector. The analysis of the exit beam energy spectra in comparison with a perfectly collimated proton beam made it possible to achieve the best quality of reconstructed tomographic images of water phantom. (author)

  15. Shape recovery using high dynamic range images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Zuoyong; Ma Lizhuang; Li Zhong

    2008-01-01

    An effective method for object shape recovery using HDRIs (high dynamic range images) is proposed. The radiance values of each point on the reference sphere and target object are firstly calculated, thus the set of candidate normals of each target point are found by comparing its radiance to that of each reference sphere point. In single-image shape recovery, a smoothness operation is applied to the target normals to obtain a stable and reasonable result; while in photometric stereo, radiance vectors of reference and target objects formed due to illuminations under different light source directions are directly compared to get the most suitable target normals. Finally, the height values can be recovered from the resulting normal field. Because diffuse and specular reflection are handled in an unified framework with radiance, our approach eliminates the limitation presented in most recovery strategies, i.e., only Lambertian model can be used. The experiment results from the real and synthesized images show the performance of our approach.

  16. Imaging Collective Dynamics in the Neocortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahar, Sonya

    2005-03-01

    Central to understanding collective neural dynamics is the problem of obtaining spatiotemporal data which reveals the collective behavior of neural ensembles; this can be done either through multi-contact recordings or through various imaging modalities. As an example of both the power and limitations of imaging techniques, we consider the onset, spread, and termination of focal seizures, imaged using the intrinsic optical signal (IOS). The IOS is a change in light reflectance from neural tissue that correlates with the underlying electrophysiological activity. With incident light in the green range, the IOS reflects changes in blood volume (CBV signal); for incident light in the orange range, the IOS shows a change in the oxygenation state of hemoglobin (Hbr signal), and can be correlated with the BOLD (blood oxygen level dependent) fMRI signal; for incident red light, the IOS reflects changes in cell volume and/or light scattering (LS signal). Using the IOS to image the spread of focal neocortical seizures induced by 4-aminopyridine in the rat, we found that the CBV, Hbr and LS signals were equally useful in localizing the ictal onset. We found a focal, profound dip in hemoglobin oxygenation (Hbr signal) during the entire seizure duration, implying that brain perfusion is inadequate to meet the metabolic demands of an epileptic focus. We observed significant variability in the spatial distribution of the active region during seizure termination. However, the IOS was unable to resolve electrophysiologically distinct patterns of seizure onset and the signal, at all incident wavelengths, persisted long after seizure termination.

  17. Differentiation of Glioblastomas from Metastatic Brain Tumors by Tryptophan Uptake and Kinetic Analysis: A Positron Emission Tomographic Study with Magnetic Resonance Imaging Comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David O. Kamson

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Differentiating high-grade gliomas from solitary brain metastases is often difficult by conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; molecular imaging may facilitate such discrimination. We tested the accuracy of α[11C]methyl-L-tryptophan (AMT–positron emission tomography (PET to differentiate newly diagnosed glioblastomas from brain metastases. AMT-PET was performed in 36 adults with suspected brain malignancy. Tumoral AMT accumulation was measured by standardized uptake values (SUVs. Tracer kinetic analysis was also performed to separate tumoral net tryptophan transport (by AMT volume of distribution [VD] from unidirectional uptake rates using dynamic PET and blood input function. Differentiating the accuracy of these PET variables was evaluated and compared to conventional MRI. For glioblastoma/metastasis differentiation, tumoral AMT SUV showed the highest accuracy (74% and the tumor/cortex VD ratio had the highest positive predictive value (82%. The combined accuracy of MRI (size of contrast-enhancing lesion and AMT-PET reached up to 93%. For ring-enhancing lesions, tumor/cortex SUV ratios were higher in glioblastomas than in metastatic tumors and could differentiate these two tumor types with > 90% accuracy. These results demonstrate that evaluation of tryptophan accumulation by PET can enhance pretreatment differentiation of glioblastomas and metastatic brain tumors. This approach may be particularly useful in patients with a newly diagnosed solitary ring-enhancing mass.

  18. Imaging via complete cantilever dynamic detection: general dynamic mode imaging and spectroscopy in scanning probe microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somnath, Suhas; Collins, Liam; Matheson, Michael A.; Sukumar, Sreenivas R.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen

    2016-10-01

    We develop and implement a multifrequency spectroscopy and spectroscopic imaging mode, referred to as general dynamic mode (GDM), that captures the complete spatially- and stimulus dependent information on nonlinear cantilever dynamics in scanning probe microscopy (SPM). GDM acquires the cantilever response including harmonics and mode mixing products across the entire broadband cantilever spectrum as a function of excitation frequency. GDM spectra substitute the classical measurements in SPM, e.g. amplitude and phase in lock-in detection. Here, GDM is used to investigate the response of a purely capacitively driven cantilever. We use information theory techniques to mine the data and verify the findings with governing equations and classical lock-in based approaches. We explore the dependence of the cantilever dynamics on the tip–sample distance, AC and DC driving bias. This approach can be applied to investigate the dynamic behavior of other systems within and beyond dynamic SPM. GDM is expected to be useful for separating the contribution of different physical phenomena in the cantilever response and understanding the role of cantilever dynamics in dynamic AFM techniques.

  19. 产前三维超声TUI技术对胎儿胼胝体发育不全的诊断价值%Value of Tomographic Ultrasound Imaging in Prenatal Diagnosis of Fetal Agenesis of the Corpus Callosum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林琪; 范海波; 甘晗靖; 孙枫; 吴瑛

    2013-01-01

    Objective To analyze the graphic features of fetal agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACC) detected by tomographic ultrasound imaging(TUI) and assess the value of TUI in the ACC. Methods 3D volume data of 35 cases of fetus with ACC were analyzed with TUI,the sagittal plane median view of the brain was obtained and the outcome was compared with that of two-dimensional (2D) ultrasound. Results There was difference in the revealing rate of ACC between TUI and 2D ultrasound(P<0. 05). Conclusions TUI is a useful tool in the prenatal diagnosis of ACC.%目的 分析三维断层超声显像技术(tomographic ultrasound imaging,TUI)在胎儿胼胝体发育不全(agenesis of the corpus callosum,ACC)中的图像特征,评价TUI诊断胎儿胼胝体发育不全的价值.方法 应用TUI对34例二维可疑ACC的三维容积数据进行后处理分析,获得显示胼胝体最好的胎头正中矢状切面,并将结果与二维超声结果进行比较.结果 TUI技术对ACC的显示率为97.0% (33/34);二维超声对ACC的显示率为52.9% (18/34),二者的显示率差别有统计意义(P<0.05).结论 三维超声TUI技术在胎儿ACC的产前诊断上具有较高的应用价值.

  20. Improvement in dynamic magnetic resonance imaging thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jun-Yu

    This dissertation is focused on improving MRI Thermometry (MRIT) techniques. The application of the spin-lattice relaxation constant is investigated in which T1 is used as indicator to measure the temperature of flowing fluid such as blood. Problems associated with this technique are evaluated, and a new method to improve the consistency and repeatability of T1 measurements is presented. The new method combines curve fitting with a measure of the curve null point to acquire more accurate and consistent T1 values. A novel method called K-space Inherited Parallel Acquisition (KIPA) is developed to achieve faster dynamic temperature measurements. Localized reconstruction coefficients are used to achieve higher reduction factors, and lower noise and artifact levels compared to that of GeneRalized Autocalibrating Partially Parallel Acquisition (GRAPPA) reconstruction. Artifacts in KIPA images are significantly reduced, and SNR is largely improved in comparison with that in GRAPPA images. The Root-Mean-Square (RMS) error of temperature for GRAPPA is 2 to 5 times larger than that for KIPA. Finally, the accuracy and comparison of the effects of motion on three parallel imaging methods: SENSE (SENSitivity Encoding), VSENSE (Variable-density SENSE) and KIPA are estimated. According to the investigation, KIPA is the most accurate and robust method among all three methods for studies with or without motion. The ratio of the normalized RMS (NRMS) error for SENSE to that for KIPA is within the range from 1 to 3.7. The ratio of the NRMS error for VSENSE to that for KIPA is about 1 to 2. These factors change with the reduction factor, motion and subject. In summary, the new strategy and method for the fast noninvasive measurement of T1 of flowing blood are proposed to improve stability and precision. The novel parallel reconstruction algorithm, KIPA, is developed to improve the temporal and spatial resolution for the PRF method. The motion effects on the KIPA method are also

  1. Tomographic extreme-ultraviolet spectrographs: TESS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, D M; Stephan, A; Cook, T; Vickers, J; Taylor, V; Chakrabarti, S

    2000-08-01

    We describe the system of Tomographic Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) SpectrographS (TESS) that are the primary instruments for the Tomographic Experiment using Radiative Recombinative Ionospheric EUV and Radio Sources (TERRIERS) satellite. The spectrographs were designed to make high-sensitivity {80 counts/s)/Rayleigh [one Rayleigh is equivalent to 10(6) photons/(4pi str cm(2)s)}, line-of-sight measurements of the oi 135.6- and 91.1-nm emissions suitable for tomographic inversion. The system consists of five spectrographs, four identical nightglow instruments (for redundancy and added sensitivity), and one instrument with a smaller aperture to reduce sensitivity and increase spectral resolution for daytime operation. Each instrument has a bandpass of 80-140 nm with approximately 2- and 1-nm resolution for the night and day instruments, respectively. They utilize microchannel-plate-based two-dimensional imaging detectors with wedge-and-strip anode readouts. The instruments were designed, fabricated, and calibrated at Boston University, and the TERRIERS satellite was launched on 18 May 1999 from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California.

  2. Dynamic imaging through turbid media based on digital holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shiping; Zhong, Jingang

    2014-03-01

    Imaging through turbid media using visible or IR light instead of harmful x ray is still a challenging problem, especially in dynamic imaging. A method of dynamic imaging through turbid media using digital holography is presented. In order to match the coherence length between the dynamic object wave and the reference wave, a cw laser is used. To solve the problem of difficult focusing in imaging through turbid media, an autofocus technology is applied. To further enhance the image contrast, a spatial filtering technique is used. A description of digital holography and experiments of imaging the objects hidden in turbid media are presented. The experimental result shows that dynamic images of the objects can be achieved by the use of digital holography.

  3. Dynamic imaging of disorders at craniovertebral junction using fast gradient echo imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nambu, Toshikazu; Miyasaka, Kazuo [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). School of Medicine; Yamamoto, Isao; Itoh, Hajime

    1995-01-01

    We have investigated the usefulness of Turbo-FLASH MR imaging in the dynamic evaluations of the disorders at craniovertebral junction. Using this fast scan program, serial fifteen dynamic images of the midline cervical plane could be obtained in 53 seconds, while the patient had very slow autonomous flexion-extension movement. Twelve cases including atlanto-axial dislocation, os odontoideum and Chiari malformation were investigated. The dynamic images could demonstrate findings of upper spinal cord compression which correlated well to the static functional SE images. We conclude that ultrafast MR imaging shows promise as a convenient dynamic evaluation of craniovertebral junctional disorders. (author).

  4. Rationale and design of the Progression of AtheRosclerotic PlAque DetermIned by Computed TomoGraphic Angiography IMaging (PARADIGM) registry: A comprehensive exploration of plaque progression and its impact on clinical outcomes from a multicenter serial coronary computed tomographic angiography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Eun; Chang, Hyuk-Jae; Rizvi, Asim; Hadamitzky, Martin; Kim, Yong-Jin; Conte, Edoardo; Andreini, Daniele; Pontone, Gianluca; Volpato, Valentina; Budoff, Matthew J; Gottlieb, Ilan; Lee, Byoung Kwon; Chun, Eun Ju; Cademartiri, Filippo; Maffei, Erica; Marques, Hugo; Leipsic, Jonathon A; Shin, Sanghoon; Choi, Jung Hyun; Chung, Namsik; Min, James K

    2016-12-01

    The natural history of coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients with low-to-intermediate risk is not well characterized. Although earlier invasive serial studies have documented the progression of atherosclerotic burden, most were focused on high-risk patients only. The PARADIGM registry is a large, prospective, multinational dynamic observational registry of patients undergoing serial coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA). The primary aim of PARADIGM is to characterize the natural history of CAD in relation to clinical and laboratory data. The PARADIGM registry (ClinicalTrials.govNCT02803411) comprises ≥2,000 consecutive patients across 9 cluster sites in 7 countries. PARADIGM sites were chosen on the basis of adequate CCTA volume, site CCTA proficiency, local demographic characteristics, and medical facilities to ensure a broad-based sample of patients. Patients referred for clinically indicated CCTA will be followed up and enrolled if they had a second CCTA scan. Patients will also be followed up beyond serial CCTA performance to identify adverse CAD events that include cardiac and noncardiac death, myocardial infarction, unstable angina, target vessel revascularization, and CAD-related hospitalization. The results derived from the PARADIGM registry are anticipated to add incremental insight into the changes in CCTA findings in accordance with the progression or regression of CAD that confer prognostic value beyond demographic and clinical characteristics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. PRE-IMAGE ENTROPY OF NONAUTONOMOUS DYNAMICAL SYSTEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xianjiu HUANG; Xi WEN; Fanping ZENG

    2008-01-01

    The authors define and study topological pre-image entropy for the non-autonomous discrete dynamical systems given by a sequence {fi}∞/i=1 of continuous self-maps of a compact topological space.The basic properties and the invariant with respect to equiconjugacy of pre-image entropy for the non-autonomous discrete dynamical systems are obtained.

  6. Dynamic Range Improvement of GMRT Low Frequency Images

    CERN Document Server

    Prasad, Peeyush

    2011-01-01

    This paper outlines some new observational and data processing techniques for enhancing the dynamic range of low frequency images obtained with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope. We illustrate new software tools developed to facilitate visibility editing and calibration as well as other preprocessing required to enhance the dynamic range of images from a planned survey.

  7. Dynamic infrared imaging for skin cancer screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoy, Sebastián E.; Ramirez, David A.; Myers, Stephen A.; von Winckel, Greg; Krishna, Sanchita; Berwick, Marianne; Padilla, R. Steven; Sen, Pradeep; Krishna, Sanjay

    2015-05-01

    Dynamic thermal imaging (DTI) with infrared cameras is a non-invasive technique with the ability to detect the most common types of skin cancer. We discuss and propose a standardized analysis method for DTI of actual patient data, which achieves high levels of sensitivity and specificity by judiciously selecting pixels with the same initial temperature. This process compensates the intrinsic limitations of the cooling unit and is the key enabling tool in the DTI data analysis. We have extensively tested the methodology on human subjects using thermal infrared image sequences from a pilot study conducted jointly with the University of New Mexico Dermatology Clinic in Albuquerque, New Mexico (ClinicalTrials ID number NCT02154451). All individuals were adult subjects who were scheduled for biopsy or adult volunteers with clinically diagnosed benign condition. The sample size was 102 subjects for the present study. Statistically significant results were obtained that allowed us to distinguish between benign and malignant skin conditions. The sensitivity and specificity was 95% (with a 95% confidence interval of [87.8% 100.0%]) and 83% (with a 95% confidence interval of [73.4% 92.5%]), respectively, and with an area under the curve of 95%. Our results lead us to conclude that the DTI approach in conjunction with the judicious selection of pixels has the potential to provide a fast, accurate, non-contact, and non-invasive way to screen for common types of skin cancer. As such, it has the potential to significantly reduce the number of biopsies performed on suspicious lesions.

  8. Dynamic infrared imaging for the detection of malignancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Button, Terry M [Department of Radiology, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Li, Haifang [Department of Radiology, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Fisher, Paul [Department of Radiology, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Rosenblatt, Ruth [Department of Radiology, Strang Cancer Prevention Center, New York, NY 10021 USA (United States); Dulaimy, Khaldoon [Department of Radiology, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Li, Song [Department of Radiology, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); O' Hea, Brian [Department of Surgery, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Salvitti, Mathew [Department of Radiology, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Geronimo, Veronica [Department of Radiology, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Geronimo, Christine [Department of Radiology, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Jambawalikar, Sachin [Department Biomedical Engineering, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Carvelli, Paola [Department of Radiology, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Weiss, Richard [Department of Radiology, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States)

    2004-07-21

    The potential for malignancy detection using dynamic infrared imaging (DIRI) has been investigated in an animal model of human malignancy. Malignancy was apparent in images formed at the vasomotor and cardiogenic frequencies of tumour bearing mice. The observation of malignancy was removed by the administration of an agent that blocks vasodilation caused by nitric oxide (NO). Image patterns similar to those that characterize malignancy could be mimicked in normal mice using an NO producing agent. Apparently DIRI allows for cancer detection in this model through vasodilation caused by malignancy generated NO. Dynamic infrared detection of vasomotor and cardiogenic surface perfusion was validated in human subjects by a comparison with laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF). Dynamic infrared imaging technology was then applied to breast cancer detection. It is shown that dynamic infrared images formed at the vasomotor and cardiogenic frequencies of the normal and malignant breast have image pattern differences, which may allow for breast cancer detection.

  9. Low Dynamic Range Solutions to the High Dynamic Range Imaging Problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shanmuganathan RAMAN; Subhasis CHAUDHURI

    2010-01-01

    While capturing a real world scene using a common digital camera,due to limitations of the sensar dynamic range,we will not be able to capture the entire dynamic range of the soene.This problem is evident while capturing a picture of a scene which has both brightly and poorly illumninated regions.High Dynamic Range (HDR) imaging aims to recover the entire dynamic range of the scene by compositing multi-exposure images.Tone reproduction is required for displaying HDR images as the corresponding Low Dynamic Range(LDR) images on common displays.This paper discusses novel approaches to reconstruct LDR images directly from multi-exposure images.It is assumed that there is no knowledge of camera response function and other caraera settings.At last,it is explained how this task can be achieved effectively for static and dynamic scenes.

  10. Imaging complex nutrient dynamics in mycelial networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricker, M D; Lee, J A; Bebber, D P; Tlalka, M; Hynes, J; Darrah, P R; Watkinson, S C; Boddy, L

    2008-08-01

    Transport networks are vital components of multi-cellular organisms, distributing nutrients and removing waste products. Animal cardiovascular and respiratory systems, and plant vasculature, are branching trees whose architecture is thought to determine universal scaling laws in these organisms. In contrast, the transport systems of many multi-cellular fungi do not fit into this conceptual framework, as they have evolved to explore a patchy environment in search of new resources, rather than ramify through a three-dimensional organism. These fungi grow as a foraging mycelium, formed by the branching and fusion of threadlike hyphae, that gives rise to a complex network. To function efficiently, the mycelial network must both transport nutrients between spatially separated source and sink regions and also maintain its integrity in the face of continuous attack by mycophagous insects or random damage. Here we review the development of novel imaging approaches and software tools that we have used to characterise nutrient transport and network formation in foraging mycelia over a range of spatial scales. On a millimetre scale, we have used a combination of time-lapse confocal imaging and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching to quantify the rate of diffusive transport through the unique vacuole system in individual hyphae. These data then form the basis of a simulation model to predict the impact of such diffusion-based movement on a scale of several millimetres. On a centimetre scale, we have used novel photon-counting scintillation imaging techniques to visualize radiolabel movement in small microcosms. This approach has revealed novel N-transport phenomena, including rapid, preferential N-resource allocation to C-rich sinks, induction of simultaneous bi-directional transport, abrupt switching between different pre-existing transport routes, and a strong pulsatile component to transport in some species. Analysis of the pulsatile transport component using Fourier

  11. Computed tomographic coronary angiography for patients with heart failure (CTA-HF): a randomized controlled trial (IMAGE HF Project 1-C).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Benjamin J W; Green, Rachel E; Coyle, Doug; Laine, Mika; Hanninen, Helena; Leskinen, Hanna; Rajda, Miroslav; Larose, Eric; Hartikainen, Juha; Hedman, Marja; Mielniczuk, Lisa; O'Meara, Eileen; deKemp, Robert A; Klein, Ran; Paterson, Ian; White, James A; Yla-Herttuala, Seppo; Leber, Alex; Tandon, Vikas; Lee, Ting; Al-Hesayen, Abdul; Hessian, Renee; Dowsley, Taylor; Kass, Malek; Kelly, Cathy; Garrard, Linda; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Knuuti, Juhani; Beanlands, Rob S; Wells, George A

    2013-12-26

    The prevalence of heart failure (HF) is rising in industrialized and developing countries. Though invasive coronary angiography (ICA) remains the gold standard for anatomical assessment of coronary artery disease in HF patients, alternatives are being sought. Computed tomographic coronary angiography (CTA) has emerged as an accurate non-invasive diagnostic tool for coronary artery disease (CAD) and has been demonstrated to have prognostic value. Whether or not CTA can be used in HF patients is unknown. Acknowledging the aging population, the growing prevalence of HF and the increasing financial burden of healthcare, we need to identify non-invasive diagnostic tests that are available, safe, accurate and cost-effective. The proposed study aims to provide insight into the efficacy of CTA in HF patients. A multicenter randomized controlled trial will enroll 250 HF patients requiring coronary anatomical definition. Enrolled patients will be randomized to either CTA or ICA (n = 125 per group) as the first test to define coronary anatomy. The primary outcomes will be collected to determine downstream resource utilization. Secondary outcomes will include the composite clinical events and major adverse cardiac events. In addition, the accuracy of CTA for detecting coronary anatomy and obstruction will be assessed in patients who subsequently undergo both CTA and ICA. It is expected that CTA will be a more cost-effective strategy for diagnosis: yielding similar outcomes with fewer procedural risks and improved resource utilization. ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01283659. Team grant #CIF 99470.

  12. A framework of region-based dynamic image fusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhong-hua; QIN Zheng; LIU Yu

    2007-01-01

    A new framework of region-based dynamic image fusion is proposed. First, the technique of target detection is applied to dynamic images (image sequences) to segment images into different targets and background regions. Then different fusion rules are employed in different regions so that the target information is preserved as much as possible. In addition, steerable non-separable wavelet frame transform is used in the process of multi-resolution analysis, so the system achieves favorable characters of orientation and invariant shift. Compared with other image fusion methods, experimental results showed that the proposed method has better capabilities of target recognition and preserves clear background information.

  13. Dynamic Data Updating Algorithm for Image Superresolution Reconstruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAN Bing; XU Qing; ZHANG Yan; XING Shuai

    2006-01-01

    A dynamic data updating algorithm for image superesolution is proposed. On the basis of Delaunay triangulation and its local updating property, this algorithm can update the changed region directly under the circumstances that only a part of the source images has been changed. For its high efficiency and adaptability, this algorithm can serve as a fast algorithm for image superesolution reconstruction.

  14. Simultaneous multi-headed imager geometry calibration method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Vi-Hoa; Meikle, Steven Richard; Smith, Mark Frederick

    2008-02-19

    A method for calibrating multi-headed high sensitivity and high spatial resolution dynamic imaging systems, especially those useful in the acquisition of tomographic images of small animals. The method of the present invention comprises: simultaneously calibrating two or more detectors to the same coordinate system; and functionally correcting for unwanted detector movement due to gantry flexing.

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Dynamic Pelvic Floor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... being imaged, send and receive radio waves, producing signals that are detected by the coils. The electric current does not come in contact with the patient. A computer then processes the signals and generates a series of images, each of ...

  16. Dynamic contrast-enhanced 3D photoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Philip; Kosik, Ivan; Carson, Jeffrey J. L.

    2013-03-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) is a hybrid imaging modality that integrates the strengths from both optical imaging and acoustic imaging while simultaneously overcoming many of their respective weaknesses. In previous work, we reported on a real-time 3D PAI system comprised of a 32-element hemispherical array of transducers. Using the system, we demonstrated the ability to capture photoacoustic data, reconstruct a 3D photoacoustic image, and display select slices of the 3D image every 1.4 s, where each 3D image resulted from a single laser pulse. The present study aimed to exploit the rapid imaging speed of an upgraded 3D PAI system by evaluating its ability to perform dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging. The contrast dynamics can provide rich datasets that contain insight into perfusion, pharmacokinetics and physiology. We captured a series of 3D PA images of a flow phantom before and during injection of piglet and rabbit blood. Principal component analysis was utilized to classify the data according to its spatiotemporal information. The results suggested that this technique can be used to separate a sequence of 3D PA images into a series of images representative of main features according to spatiotemporal flow dynamics.

  17. [Staging urinary bladder cancer with dynamic MR imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, K; Narumi, Y; Nakamura, H; Nonomura, I; Okuyama, A

    2000-11-01

    This article reviews the magnetic resonance (MR) staging of bladder cancer. The multiplanar and soft-tissue characterization capabilities of MR imaging make it a valuable diagnostic tool to image the urinary bladder. Recent advances of MR imaging such as fast imaging, pelvic phased array coil, and dynamic imaging improve the image quality and diagnostic accuracy for staging bladder cancer. Some patient-related factors are also important for optimal imaging of the urinary bladder, especially motion artifacts from the gastrointestinal tract and the degree of bladder distension. An anticholinergic agent should be used for suppressing the motion artifacts. Optimal bladder filling can be achieved by asking patients to void and drink water 1 hour before examinations. Scanning perpendicular to the bladder wall is necessary for optimal evaluation for staging bladder cancer. Oblique scanning is needed in cases when a tumor is not located on the dome, base, anterior wall, posterior wall, or lateral walls. The early phase image of dynamic imaging is most useful for staging tumors. Better contrast between tumor and bladder wall on dynamic images provides high staging accuracy, especially in differentiation between superficial tumors and tumors with muscle invasion. MR imaging is comparable to computed tomography (CT) in the evaluation of lymph nodes. Although MR imaging currently is not appropriate for screening for bladder cancer and detecting small tumors, it has been proved to be most useful in the staging of bladder cancer.

  18. Generation of high-dynamic range image from digital photo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Potemin, Igor S.; Zhdanov, Dmitry D.; Wang, Xu-yang; Cheng, Han

    2016-10-01

    A number of the modern applications such as medical imaging, remote sensing satellites imaging, virtual prototyping etc use the High Dynamic Range Image (HDRI). Generally to obtain HDRI from ordinary digital image the camera is calibrated. The article proposes the camera calibration method based on the clear sky as the standard light source and takes sky luminance from CIE sky model for the corresponding geographical coordinates and time. The article considers base algorithms for getting real luminance values from ordinary digital image and corresponding programmed implementation of the algorithms. Moreover, examples of HDRI reconstructed from ordinary images illustrate the article.

  19. Dynamic Chest Image Analysis: Model-Based Perfusion Analysis in Dynamic Pulmonary Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiuru Aaro

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The "Dynamic Chest Image Analysis" project aims to develop model-based computer analysis and visualization methods for showing focal and general abnormalities of lung ventilation and perfusion based on a sequence of digital chest fluoroscopy frames collected with the dynamic pulmonary imaging technique. We have proposed and evaluated a multiresolutional method with an explicit ventilation model for ventilation analysis. This paper presents a new model-based method for pulmonary perfusion analysis. According to perfusion properties, we first devise a novel mathematical function to form a perfusion model. A simple yet accurate approach is further introduced to extract cardiac systolic and diastolic phases from the heart, so that this cardiac information may be utilized to accelerate the perfusion analysis and improve its sensitivity in detecting pulmonary perfusion abnormalities. This makes perfusion analysis not only fast but also robust in computation; consequently, perfusion analysis becomes computationally feasible without using contrast media. Our clinical case studies with 52 patients show that this technique is effective for pulmonary embolism even without using contrast media, demonstrating consistent correlations with computed tomography (CT and nuclear medicine (NM studies. This fluoroscopical examination takes only about 2 seconds for perfusion study with only low radiation dose to patient, involving no preparation, no radioactive isotopes, and no contrast media.

  20. Three-dimensional computed tomographic imaging in the diagnosis of vertebral column trauma: experience based on 21 patients and review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domenicucci, M.; Preite, R.; Ramieri, A.; Osti, M.; Ciappetta, P.; Delfini, R. [Universita degli studi di Roma, ``la Spienza``, Piazzale Aldo Moro (Italy)

    1997-11-01

    3-D images produced by recently available, software provide a 3-D understanding much more readily than do multiple two two-dimensional images. Because it would be very difficult to standardize this method of imaging, it seems best that the specialist (orthopedic surgeon, neurosurgeon, neuro-radiologist) be present during the investigation to decide the viewing angles. An important limitation to this method is the presence of degenerative disease or osteoporosis, mainly in elderly patients. (authors)

  1. Comparison between different tomographic reconstruction algorithms in nuclear medicine imaging; Comparacion entre distintos algoritmos de reconstruccion tomografica en imagenes de medicina nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llacer Martos, S.; Herraiz Lablanca, M. D.; Puchal Ane, R.

    2011-07-01

    This paper compares the image quality obtained with each of the algorithms is evaluated and its running time, to optimize the choice of algorithm to use taking into account both the quality of the reconstructed image as the time spent on the reconstruction.

  2. Analysis of Dynamic Brain Imaging Data

    CERN Document Server

    Mitra, P

    1998-01-01

    Modern imaging techniques for probing brain function, including functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging, intrinsic and extrinsic contrast optical imaging, and magnetoencephalography, generate large data sets with complex content. In this paper we develop appropriate techniques of analysis and visualization of such imaging data, in order to separate the signal from the noise, as well as to characterize the signal. The techniques developed fall into the general category of multivariate time series analysis, and in particular we extensively use the multitaper framework of spectral analysis. We develop specific protocols for the analysis of fMRI, optical imaging and MEG data, and illustrate the techniques by applications to real data sets generated by these imaging modalities. In general, the analysis protocols involve two distinct stages: `noise' characterization and suppression, and `signal' characterization and visualization. An important general conclusion of our study is the utility of a frequency-based repres...

  3. High Dynamic Range Processing for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukerkar, Preeti A.; Meade, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To minimize feature loss in T1- and T2-weighted MRI by merging multiple MR images acquired at different TR and TE to generate an image with increased dynamic range. Materials and Methods High Dynamic Range (HDR) processing techniques from the field of photography were applied to a series of acquired MR images. Specifically, a method to parameterize the algorithm for MRI data was developed and tested. T1- and T2-weighted images of a number of contrast agent phantoms and a live mouse were acquired with varying TR and TE parameters. The images were computationally merged to produce HDR-MR images. All acquisitions were performed on a 7.05 T Bruker PharmaScan with a multi-echo spin echo pulse sequence. Results HDR-MRI delineated bright and dark features that were either saturated or indistinguishable from background in standard T1- and T2-weighted MRI. The increased dynamic range preserved intensity gradation over a larger range of T1 and T2 in phantoms and revealed more anatomical features in vivo. Conclusions We have developed and tested a method to apply HDR processing to MR images. The increased dynamic range of HDR-MR images as compared to standard T1- and T2-weighted images minimizes feature loss caused by magnetization recovery or low SNR. PMID:24250788

  4. High dynamic range processing for magnetic resonance imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy H Hung

    Full Text Available To minimize feature loss in T1- and T2-weighted MRI by merging multiple MR images acquired at different TR and TE to generate an image with increased dynamic range.High Dynamic Range (HDR processing techniques from the field of photography were applied to a series of acquired MR images. Specifically, a method to parameterize the algorithm for MRI data was developed and tested. T1- and T2-weighted images of a number of contrast agent phantoms and a live mouse were acquired with varying TR and TE parameters. The images were computationally merged to produce HDR-MR images. All acquisitions were performed on a 7.05 T Bruker PharmaScan with a multi-echo spin echo pulse sequence.HDR-MRI delineated bright and dark features that were either saturated or indistinguishable from background in standard T1- and T2-weighted MRI. The increased dynamic range preserved intensity gradation over a larger range of T1 and T2 in phantoms and revealed more anatomical features in vivo.We have developed and tested a method to apply HDR processing to MR images. The increased dynamic range of HDR-MR images as compared to standard T1- and T2-weighted images minimizes feature loss caused by magnetization recovery or low SNR.

  5. RADIANCE DOMAIN COMPOSITING FOR HIGH DYNAMIC RANGE IMAGING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Renu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available High dynamic range imaging aims at creating an image with a range of intensity variations larger than the range supported by a camera sensor. Most commonly used methods combine multiple exposure low dynamic range (LDR images, to obtain the high dynamic range (HDR image. Available methods typically neglect the noise term while finding appropriate weighting functions to estimate the camera response function as well as the radiance map. We look at the HDR imaging problem in a denoising frame work and aim at reconstructing a low noise radiance map from noisy low dynamic range images, which is tone mapped to get the LDR equivalent of the HDR image. We propose a maximum aposteriori probability (MAP based reconstruction of the HDR image using Gibb’s prior to model the radiance map, with total variation (TV as the prior to avoid unnecessary smoothing of the radiance field. To make the computation with TV prior efficient, we extend the majorize-minimize method of upper bounding the total variation by a quadratic function to our case which has a nonlinear term arising from the camera response function. A theoretical justification for doing radiance domain denoising as opposed to image domain denoising is also provided.

  6. Personal computer aided cerebral perfusion imaging with dynamic CT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林燕; 高培毅

    2004-01-01

    @@Reports on the clinical implementation of dynamic computerised tomography (CT) perfusion imaging and quantitative measurement have increased dramatically of late.1-8 The advantages of dynamic CT perfusion imaging and quantitative measurement for the diagnosis of acute cerebral infarction have been acknowledged. However, most overseas CT vendors set perfusion imaging software package as an option for graphic workstation at a too high price for domestic practitioners. To foster the domestic implementation and development of this new technology, we have extended the earlier work.1,2 Applying the theory of central volume principle to DICOM 3.0 standard forms of prime CT images, we developed dynamic CT perfusion imaging and quantitative measure-ment programmes for PCs using Visual C+ + in Windows 98 system.

  7. 阴影模型的正则化无设备重建与实时定位%Device-free Reconstruction and Real-time Location Based on Shadowing Model in Radio Tomographic Imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊一枫; 卢继华; 何梓珮; 曹晨曦

    2015-01-01

    The emerging technology, radio tomographic imaging (RTI), uses the attenuation characteristic of wireless signal to locate and trace objects. A linear model with the SPIN communication protocol for received signal strength (RSS) measurements is presented in this paper to get objects0 image in our deployed RTI system. To improve the image reconstruction speed, least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) algorithm of compressed sensing field is referred to and compared. Moreover, modified l1-norm regularization is adopted to enhance the resolution of image reconstruction, which is compared with Tikhonov. Based on sixteen JENNIC 5 139 sensor nodes, some experiments have been developed for imaging and tracking the objects inside an area of sixteen square feet. Although there are some differences between simulations and real experiments, the positions of objects can be accurately located from both simulations and real measurements.%在综合静态无线射频层析成像(Radio tomographic imaging, RTI)算法基础上,给出了一种可行且有效的实现无线传感器节点在空旷环境和障碍物条件下无线信号衰减原理障碍物监控的方法,实现定位与追踪。利用阴影衰落模型建立接收信号强度测量值线性系统模型,并采用SPIN令牌环通信协议收集接收信号强度;创新性地引入最小角回归算法与最小绝对值收缩和选择因子算法(Least absolute shrinkage and selection operator, LASSO),提高了图像重建速度。即在吉洪诺夫正则化与l1正则化算法分析对比前提下,创新性引入改进的最小角回归(Least angle regression, LARS)重建模型与算法,保证重建效果与复杂LASSO算法相似的同时,将重建图像速度提高一个数量级。实测基于16平方米范围内的16个JENNIC 5139节点进行定位与追踪。实测结果与仿真相比虽稍有偏差,但近似符合。这充分表明:吉洪诺夫正则化与l1正则化适用于不同分辨率场

  8. Optical imaging of fast, dynamic neurophysiological function.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rector, D. M. (David M.); Carter, K. M. (Kathleen M.); Yao, X. (Xincheng); George, J. S. (John S.)

    2002-01-01

    Fast evoked responses were imaged from rat dorsal medulla and whisker barrel cortex. To investigate the biophysical mechanisms involved, fast optical responses associated with isolated crustacean nerve stimulation were recorded using birefringence and scattered light. Such studies allow optimization of non-invasive imaging techniques being developed for use in humans.

  9. High Dynamic Range Image Based on Multiple Exposure Time Synthetization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshifumi Shimodaira

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available High dynamic range of illumination may cause serious distortions and otherproblems in viewing and further processing of digital images. In this paper a new tonereproduction preprocessing algorithm is introduced which may help in developing hardly ornon-viewable features and content of the images. The method is based on the synthetizationof multiple exposure images from which the dense part, i.e. regions having the maximumlevel of detail are included in the output image. The resulted high quality HDR image makeseasier the information extraction and effectively supports the further processing of theimage.

  10. Tomographic diagnosis of defects in hydraulic concrete structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mingjie ZHAO; Xibin XU

    2008-01-01

    The ultrasonic tomographic technology is applied to diagnose the defects in hydraulic concrete structure. In order to improve the precision of diagnoses, the wavelet transformation is used in the processing of ultrasonic signals. The influences of water, scale and ori-entation of defect, processing methods and theoretical model on image resolution are investigated. The experi-mental results indicate that the result of the tomographic diagnosis of a single defect is sensitive and the boundary can be clearly determined. However, the image resolution of multiple defects is not satisfactory. The water content and scale of a defect may significantly affect the imaging resolution. Defects with the orientation perpendicular to the direction of the diagnosis may have higher precision in diagnosing. The wavelet transformation technology can elevate the imaging resolution. The applied calculation model plays a very important role in improving the accu-racy of detection.

  11. Dynamic Imaging of a Pigmented Free-Floating Vitreous Cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grewal, Dilraj S; Fekrat, Sharon

    2016-10-01

    The authors present an incidentally noted pigmented anterior vitreous cyst in an asymptomatic male adult. Observation was elected. Stability during the course of 2 years and mobility of the vitreous cyst using dynamic imaging are demonstrated. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2016;47:975-977.].

  12. Study on the Medical Image Distributed Dynamic Processing Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张全海; 施鹏飞

    2003-01-01

    To meet the challenge of implementing rapidly advanced, time-consuming medical image processing algorithms,it is necessary to develop a medical image processing technology to process a 2D or 3D medical image dynamically on the web. But in a premier system, only static image processing can be provided with the limitation of web technology. The development of Java and CORBA (common object request broker architecture) overcomes the shortcoming of the web static application and makes the dynamic processing of medical images on the web available. To develop an open solution of distributed computing, we integrate the Java, and web with the CORBA and present a web-based medical image dynamic processing methed, which adopts Java technology as the language to program application and components of the web and utilies the CORBA architecture to cope with heterogeneous property of a complex distributed system. The method also provides a platform-independent, transparent processing architecture to implement the advanced image routines and enable users to access large dataset and resources according to the requirements of medical applications. The experiment in this paper shows that the medical image dynamic processing method implemented on the web by using Java and the CORBA is feasible.

  13. Increasing the Dynamic Range of Synthetic Aperture Vector Flow Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villagómez Hoyos, Carlos Armando; Stuart, Matthias Bo; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2014-01-01

    In current ultrasound systems the dynamic range of detectable velocities is susceptible to the selected pulse repetition frequency, thus limiting the dynamic range of flow mapping. To establish the feasibility of extending the range of detectable velocities towards low velocity vessels, results...... standard deviations are 1.59% and 6.12%, respectively. The presented method can improve the estimates by synthesizing a lower pulse repetition frequency, thereby increasing the dynamic range of the vector velocity imaging....

  14. Positron Emission Tomographic Imaging of Iodine 124 Anti–Prostate Stem Cell Antigen–Engineered Antibody Fragments in LAPC-9 Tumor–Bearing Severe Combined Immunodeficiency Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey V. Leyton

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The humanized antibody (hu1G8 has been shown to localize to prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA and image PSCA-positive xenografts. We previously constructed hu1G8 anti-PSCA antibody fragments and tested them for tumor targeting and the ability to image prostate cancer at early and late time points postinjection by positron emission tomography (PET. We now then compare the PET imaging and the radioactivity accumulation properties in prostate cancer tumors and nontarget tissues to determine the superior 124I-labeled hu1G8 antibody format. 124I-labeled diabody, minibody, scFv-Fc, scFv-Fc double mutant (DM, and parental IgG were administered into severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID mice bearing LAPC-9 xenografts and followed by whole-body PET imaging of mice at preselected time points. Regions of interest were manually drawn around tumor and nontarget tissues and evaluated for radioactivity accumulation. The 124I-hu1G8 IgG has its best time point for tumor high-contrast imaging at 168 hours postinjection. The 124I-hu1G8 minibody at 44 hours postinjection results in superior tumor high-contrast imaging compared to the other antibody formats. The 124I-hu1G8 minibody at 44 hours postinjection also has comparable percent tumor radioactivity compared to 124I-hu1G8 IgG at 168 hours postinjection. The 124I-hu1G8 minibody is the best engineered hu1G8 antibody format for imaging prostate cancer.

  15. Imaging plants dynamics in heterogenic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorani, Fabio; Rascher, Uwe; Jahnke, Siegfried; Schurr, Ulrich

    2012-04-01

    Noninvasive imaging sensors and computer vision approaches are key technologies to quantify plant structure, physiological status, and performance. Today, imaging sensors exploit a wide range of the electromagnetic spectrum, and they can be deployed to measure a growing number of traits, also in heterogenic environments. Recent advances include the possibility to acquire high-resolution spectra by imaging spectroscopy and classify signatures that might be informative of plant development, nutrition, health, and disease. Three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of surfaces and volume is of particular interest, enabling functional and mechanistic analyses. While taking pictures is relatively easy, quantitative interpretation often remains challenging and requires integrating knowledge of sensor physics, image analysis, and complex traits characterizing plant phenotypes.

  16. Accelerating Dynamic Cardiac MR Imaging Using Structured Sparse Representation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nian Cai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Compressed sensing (CS has produced promising results on dynamic cardiac MR imaging by exploiting the sparsity in image series. In this paper, we propose a new method to improve the CS reconstruction for dynamic cardiac MRI based on the theory of structured sparse representation. The proposed method user the PCA subdictionaries for adaptive sparse representation and suppresses the sparse coding noise to obtain good reconstructions. An accelerated iterative shrinkage algorithm is used to solve the optimization problem and achieve a fast convergence rate. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method improves the reconstruction quality of dynamic cardiac cine MRI over the state-of-the-art CS method.

  17. Advanced High Dynamic Range Imaging Theory and Practice

    CERN Document Server

    Banterle, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    Imaging techniques seek to simulate the array of light that reaches our eyes to provide the illusion of sensing scenes directly. Both photography and computer graphics deal with the generation of images. Both disciplines have to cope with the high dynamic range in the energy of visible light that human eyes can sense. Traditionally photography and computer graphics took different approaches to the high dynamic range problem. Work over the last ten years though has unified these disciplines and created powerful new tools for the creation of complex, compelling and realistic images. This book pr

  18. Accelerated dynamic EPR imaging using fast acquisition and compressive recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Rizwan; Samouilov, Alexandre; Zweier, Jay L.

    2016-12-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) allows quantitative imaging of tissue redox status, which provides important information about ischemic syndromes, cancer and other pathologies. For continuous wave EPR imaging, however, poor signal-to-noise ratio and low acquisition efficiency limit its ability to image dynamic processes in vivo including tissue redox, where conditions can change rapidly. Here, we present a data acquisition and processing framework that couples fast acquisition with compressive sensing-inspired image recovery to enable EPR-based redox imaging with high spatial and temporal resolutions. The fast acquisition (FA) allows collecting more, albeit noisier, projections in a given scan time. The composite regularization based processing method, called spatio-temporal adaptive recovery (STAR), not only exploits sparsity in multiple representations of the spatio-temporal image but also adaptively adjusts the regularization strength for each representation based on its inherent level of the sparsity. As a result, STAR adjusts to the disparity in the level of sparsity across multiple representations, without introducing any tuning parameter. Our simulation and phantom imaging studies indicate that a combination of fast acquisition and STAR (FASTAR) enables high-fidelity recovery of volumetric image series, with each volumetric image employing less than 10 s of scan. In addition to image fidelity, the time constants derived from FASTAR also match closely to the ground truth even when a small number of projections are used for recovery. This development will enhance the capability of EPR to study fast dynamic processes that cannot be investigated using existing EPR imaging techniques.

  19. Stereo Vision-Based High Dynamic Range Imaging Using Differently-Exposed Image Pair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Won-Jae; Ji, Seo-Won; Kang, Seok-Jae; Jung, Seung-Won; Ko, Sung-Jea

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a high dynamic range (HDR) imaging method based on the stereo vision system is presented. The proposed method uses differently exposed low dynamic range (LDR) images captured from a stereo camera. The stereo LDR images are first converted to initial stereo HDR images using the inverse camera response function estimated from the LDR images. However, due to the limited dynamic range of the stereo LDR camera, the radiance values in under/over-exposed regions of the initial main-view (MV) HDR image can be lost. To restore these radiance values, the proposed stereo matching and hole-filling algorithms are applied to the stereo HDR images. Specifically, the auxiliary-view (AV) HDR image is warped by using the estimated disparity between initial the stereo HDR images and then effective hole-filling is applied to the warped AV HDR image. To reconstruct the final MV HDR, the warped and hole-filled AV HDR image is fused with the initial MV HDR image using the weight map. The experimental results demonstrate objectively and subjectively that the proposed stereo HDR imaging method provides better performance compared to the conventional method. PMID:28640235

  20. Stereo Vision-Based High Dynamic Range Imaging Using Differently-Exposed Image Pair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won-Jae Park

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a high dynamic range (HDR imaging method based on the stereo vision system is presented. The proposed method uses differently exposed low dynamic range (LDR images captured from a stereo camera. The stereo LDR images are first converted to initial stereo HDR images using the inverse camera response function estimated from the LDR images. However, due to the limited dynamic range of the stereo LDR camera, the radiance values in under/over-exposed regions of the initial main-view (MV HDR image can be lost. To restore these radiance values, the proposed stereo matching and hole-filling algorithms are applied to the stereo HDR images. Specifically, the auxiliary-view (AV HDR image is warped by using the estimated disparity between initial the stereo HDR images and then effective hole-filling is applied to the warped AV HDR image. To reconstruct the final MV HDR, the warped and hole-filled AV HDR image is fused with the initial MV HDR image using the weight map. The experimental results demonstrate objectively and subjectively that the proposed stereo HDR imaging method provides better performance compared to the conventional method.

  1. Dynamic Granularity for X-Ray Imaging Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissel, Matthias; Bigman, Verle H.; Edens, Aaron D.; Schollmeier, Marius; Smith, Ian C.; Shores, Jonathon E.; Porter, John L.

    2013-10-01

    Dynamic range and spatial resolution are correlated, because imaging units such as pixels or film grains can cover a wider dynamic range if they are larger, so that they can contain more electrons in a well or fluorescence centers in a grain. However, for systems that are subject to low photon flux, statistical noise influences the spatial resolution. Statistical noise is important for many experiments that rely on single shot X-ray imaging diagnostics. Detectors face a limited photon flux and often also a limited detection probability, where photons of higher energy may just penetrate the detector. The effective spatial resolution depends on detector efficiency, incident photon flux, detector cell size (grain/pixel), and the detector's inherent noise. We describe the combined influences with a ``dynamic granularity'' function, based on measurements of the grain size dependent distinguishability of grey levels. The dynamic granularity is unique to each imaging system, but allows us to quantify the performance of different detectors in a system. We have characterized a fast microchannel plate imaging detector and imaging plate with respect to dynamic granularity on the 6.151 keV crystal imaging system at the Z-Beamlet laser. Sandia Natl. Labs is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corp., a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corp., for the U.S. Dept. of Energy's Natl. Nucl. Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL8500.

  2. Beyond the Black Box: Coupling x-ray tomographic imaging of multi-phase flow processes to numerical models and traditional laboratory measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wildenschild, Dorthe; Porter, M.L.; Schaap, M.G.

    Quantitative non-invasive imaging has evolved rapidly in the last decade, and is now being used to assess a variety of problems in vadose zone research, including unsaturated flow and transport of water and contaminants, macropore-dominated processes, soil-water-root interactions, more recent work...... on colloidal processes, and significant work on NAPL-water interactions . We are now able to use non-invasive imaging to probe processes that could not previously be quantified because of lack of opacity, resolution, or accurate techniques for quantitative measurement. This work presents an overview of recent...... advances in x-ray microtomography techniques that can generate high-resolution image-based data for (1) validation of pore-scale multi-phase flow models such as the lattice-Boltzmann technique and pore network models (with respect to fluid saturations, fluid distribution, and relationships among capillary...

  3. HFSB-seeding for large-scale tomographic PIV in wind tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caridi, Giuseppe Carlo Alp; Ragni, Daniele; Sciacchitano, Andrea; Scarano, Fulvio

    2016-12-01

    A new system for large-scale tomographic particle image velocimetry in low-speed wind tunnels is presented. The system relies upon the use of sub-millimetre helium-filled soap bubbles as flow tracers, which scatter light with intensity several orders of magnitude higher than micron-sized droplets. With respect to a single bubble generator, the system increases the rate of bubbles emission by means of transient accumulation and rapid release. The governing parameters of the system are identified and discussed, namely the bubbles production rate, the accumulation and release times, the size of the bubble injector and its location with respect to the wind tunnel contraction. The relations between the above parameters, the resulting spatial concentration of tracers and measurement of dynamic spatial range are obtained and discussed. Large-scale experiments are carried out in a large low-speed wind tunnel with 2.85 × 2.85 m2 test section, where a vertical axis wind turbine of 1 m diameter is operated. Time-resolved tomographic PIV measurements are taken over a measurement volume of 40 × 20 × 15 cm3, allowing the quantitative analysis of the tip-vortex structure and dynamical evolution.

  4. Determining of the CME dynamics by digital image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigozo, Nivaor R.; Dal Lago, Alisson; Schuch, Nelson Jorge

    We have developed a new technique to detection of Coronal Mass Eject (CME) by used image processing. This is technique permit determined the CME dynamic (distance, velocity and acceleration radial, and distance, velocity and acceleration expansion). The CME dynamic is determined by selection a direction radial in a given LASCO image, which starts just before the occulter (close to the center) and extends to the extremity of the image. By tacking a series of image and extracting the same direction radial, for each of them and placing them side by side. It is possible to have a time history of any moving feature inside this direction. This technique allows you to choose the number of directions that will be used in CME detecting, i.e., in determining its dynamics.

  5. Does the prevalence of levator ani muscle avulsion differ when assessed using tomographic ultrasound imaging at rest vs on maximum pelvic floor muscle contraction?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delft, K. van; Thakar, R.; Sultan, A.H.; Kluivers, K.B.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: It has been suggested that transperineal ultrasound images obtained during maximum pelvic floor muscle contraction improve the diagnosis of levator ani muscle (LAM) avulsion by comparison with those obtained at rest. The objective of this study was to establish, using transperineal tomogr

  6. Experimental Study on Effect of Compound Biejia Ruangan Prescription(复方鳖甲软肝方) on High-Resolution Computerized Tomographic Images in Bleomycin Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张东伟; 王继峰; 牛建昭; 高宝华; 李贡宇

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the therapeutic effect of Compound Biejia Ruangan prescription (CBRP) on rat model with pulmonary fibrosis induced by bleomycin. Methods: Fifty-four male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 6 groups (9 rats in each group). From the first day to the 28th day of the experiment, except to those in the sham-model control group that were treated with normal saline, the same amount of bleomycin injection as the normal saline given to the control group was given through endotracheal instillation to all the rats in all the other groups. From the 29th day of the modeling, CBRP solution of different dosages was respectively injected into the rats in the high, moderate and low CBRP dose group, while equal volume of normal saline was given to those in the sham-model control group and the model control group, and an equal volume of prednisone solution was given to rats in the prednisone group. On the 80th day, the high-resolution computerized tomographic (HRCT) images were observed on an equal footing, and HRCT-pathology was correlatively studied. Results: Different HRCT pathological changes were shown in the rats with pulmonary fibrosis, such as lung consolidation, thickening of interlobular septum and interlobular mesenchyma as well as lobular deformation, nodule shadow, abnormal brochiovascular tract, thickened pleura with irregular junction and polished glass-like dense shadows. Honeycomb lung was observed in some cases. Pathological sections showed fibrotic proliferation of lung tissues and noticeable pulmonary interstitial fibrosis. CBRP could improve HRCT images of rats with pulmonary fibrosis, and lower fibrotic proliferation of the lung tissue.Conclusion: CBRP plays its therapeutic role possibly through its effect on the structure of the lung in rats with pulmonary fibrosis.

  7. Efficacy of Stent-Retriever Thrombectomy in Magnetic Resonance Imaging Versus Computed Tomographic Perfusion-Selected Patients in SWIFT PRIME Trial (Solitaire FR With the Intention for Thrombectomy as Primary Endovascular Treatment for Acute Ischemic Stroke).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menjot de Champfleur, Nicolas; Saver, Jeffrey L; Goyal, Mayank; Jahan, Reza; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Bonafe, Alain; Levy, Elad I; Pereira, Vitor M; Cognard, Christophe; Yavagal, Dileep R; Albers, Gregory W

    2017-06-01

    The majority of patients enrolled in SWIFT PRIME trial (Solitaire FR With the Intention for Thrombectomy as Primary Endovascular Treatment for Acute Ischemic Stroke) had computed tomographic perfusion (CTP) imaging before randomization; 34 patients were randomized after magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Patients with middle cerebral artery and distal carotid occlusions were randomized to treatment with tPA (tissue-type plasminogen activator) alone or tPA+stentriever thrombectomy. The primary outcome was the distribution of the modified Rankin Scale score at 90 days. Patients with the target mismatch profile for enrollment were identified on MRI and CTP. MRI selection was performed in 34 patients; CTP in 139 patients. Baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score was 17 in both groups. Target mismatch profile was present in 95% (MRI) versus 83% (CTP). A higher percentage of the MRI group was transferred from an outside hospital (P=0.02), and therefore, the time from stroke onset to randomization was longer in the MRI group (P=0.003). Time from emergency room arrival to randomization did not differ in CTP versus MRI-selected patients. Baseline ischemic core volumes were similar in both groups. Reperfusion rates (>90%/TICI [Thrombolysis in Cerebral Infarction] score 3) did not differ in the stentriever-treated patients in the MRI versus CTP groups. The primary efficacy analysis (90-day mRS score) demonstrated a statistically significant benefit in both subgroups (MRI, P=0.02; CTP, P=0.01). Infarct growth was reduced in the stentriever-treated group in both MRI and CTP groups. Time to randomization was significantly longer in MRI-selected patients; however, site arrival to randomization times were not prolonged, and the benefits of endovascular therapy were similar. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01657461. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Noninvasive tomographic and velocimetric monitoring of multiphase flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaouki, J. [Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Quebec (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Larachi, F. [Laval Univ., Quebec (Canada); Dudukovic, M.P. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States). Chemical Reaction Engineering Lab.

    1997-11-01

    A condensed review of recent advances accomplished in the development and the applications of noninvasive tomographic and velocimetric measurement techniques to multiphase flows and systems is presented. In recent years utilization of such noninvasive techniques has become widespread in many engineering disciplines that deal with systems involving two immiscible phases or more. Tomography provides concentration, holdup, or 2D or 3D density distribution of at least one component of the multiphase system, whereas velocimetry provides the dynamic features of the phase of interest such as the flow pattern, the velocity field, the 2D or 3D instantaneous movements, etc. The following review is divided into two parts. The first part summarizes progress and developments in flow imaging techniques using {gamma}-ray and X-ray transmission tomography; X-ray radiography; neutron transmission tomography and radiography; positron emission tomography; X-ray diffraction tomography; nuclear magnetic resonance imaging; electrical capacitance tomography; optical tomography; microwave tomography; and ultrasonic tomography. The second part of the review summarizes progress and developments in the following velocimetry techniques: positron emission particle tracking; radioactive particle tracking; cinematography; laser-Doppler anemometry; particle image velocimetry; and fluorescence particle image velocimetry. The basic principles of tomography and velocimetry techniques are outlined, along with advantages and limitations inherent to each technique. The hydrodynamic and structural information yielded by these techniques is illustrated through a literature survey on their successful applications to the study of multiphase systems in such fields as particulate solids processes, fluidization engineering, porous media, pipe flows, transport within packed beds and sparged reactors, etc.

  9. Striatal adenosine A{sub 2A} receptor-mediated positron emission tomographic imaging in 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats using [{sup 18}F]-MRS5425

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharjee, Abesh Kumar; Lang Lixin; Jacobson, Orit [Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Shinkre, Bidhan [Chemical Biology Unit, Laboratory of Cell Biochemistry and Biology, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Ma Ying [Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Niu Gang [Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Warren Grant Magnuson Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Trenkle, William C. [Chemical Biology Unit, Laboratory of Cell Biochemistry and Biology, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Jacobson, Kenneth A. [Molecular Recognition Section, Laboratory of Bioorganic Chemistry, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Chen Xiaoyuan [Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Kiesewetter, Dale O., E-mail: dk7k@nih.gov [Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)

    2011-08-15

    Introduction: A{sub 2A} receptors are expressed in the basal ganglia, specifically in striatopallidal GABAergic neurons in the striatum (caudate-putamen). This brain region undergoes degeneration of presynaptic dopamine projections and depletion of dopamine in Parkinson's disease. We developed an {sup 18}F-labeled A{sub 2A} analog radiotracer ([{sup 18}F]-MRS5425) for A{sub 2A} receptor imaging using positron emission tomography (PET). We hypothesized that this tracer could image A{sub 2A} receptor changes in the rat model for Parkinson's disease, which is created following unilateral injection of the monoaminergic toxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) into the substantia nigra. Methods: [{sup 18}F]-MRS5425 was injected intravenously in anesthetized rats, and PET imaging data were collected. Image-derived percentage injected doses per gram (%ID/g) in regions of interest was measured in the striatum of normal rats and in rats unilaterally lesioned with 6-OHDA after intravenous administration of saline (baseline), D{sub 2} agonist quinpirole (1.0 mg/kg) or D{sub 2} antagonist raclopride (6.0 mg/kg). Results: Baseline %ID/g reached a maximum at 90 s and maintained plateau for 3.5 min, and then declined slowly thereafter. In 6-OHDA-lesioned rats, %ID/g was significantly higher in the lesioned side compared to the intact side, and the baseline total %ID/g (data from both hemispheres were combined) was significantly higher compared to quinpirole stimulation starting from 4.5 min until the end of acquisition at 30 min. Raclopride did not produce any change in uptake compared to baseline or between the hemispheres. Conclusion: Thus, increase of A{sub 2A} receptor-mediated uptake of radioactive MRS5425 could be a superior molecular target for Parkinson's imaging.

  10. Efficient sinogram smoothing for dynamic neuroreceptor PET imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiaochuan; La Riviere, Patrick J.; Ye, James; Mukherjee, J.; Chen, Chin-Tu

    1997-05-01

    We have developed image-restoration techniques applicable to dynamic positron emission tomography that improve the visual quality and quantitative accuracy of neuroreceptor images. Starting wit data from a study of dopamine D-2 receptors in rhesus monkey striata using selective radioligands such as fallypride, we performed a novel effective 3D smoothing of the dynamic sinogram at a much lower computational cost than a truly 3D, adaptive smoothing. The processed sinogram was then input to a standard filtered back-projection algorithm and the resulting images were sharper and less noisy than images reconstructed from the unprocessed sinogram. Simulations were performed and the radioligand binding curves extracted from the restored images were found to be smoother and more accurate than those extracted form the unprocessed reconstructions. Comparison was also made to reconstructions from sinograms processed by the principal component analysis/projection onto convex sets algorithm.

  11. SPICE benchmark for global tomographic methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yilong; Capdeville, Yann; Maupin, Valerie; Montagner, Jean-Paul; Lebedev, Sergei; Beucler, Eric

    2008-11-01

    The existing global tomographic methods result in different models due to different parametrization, scale resolution and theoretical approach. To test how current imaging techniques are limited by approximations in theory and by the inadequacy of data quality and coverage, it is necessary to perform a global-scale benchmark to understand the resolving properties of each specific imaging algorithm. In the framework of the Seismic wave Propagation and Imaging in Complex media: a European network (SPICE) project, it was decided to perform a benchmark experiment of global inversion algorithms. First, a preliminary benchmark with a simple isotropic model is carried out to check the feasibility in terms of acquisition geometry and numerical accuracy. Then, to fully validate tomographic schemes with a challenging synthetic data set, we constructed one complex anisotropic global model, which is characterized by 21 elastic constants and includes 3-D heterogeneities in velocity, anisotropy (radial and azimuthal anisotropy), attenuation, density, as well as surface topography and bathymetry. The intermediate-period (>32 s), high fidelity anisotropic modelling was performed by using state-of-the-art anisotropic anelastic modelling code, that is, coupled spectral element method (CSEM), on modern massively parallel computing resources. The benchmark data set consists of 29 events and three-component seismograms are recorded by 256 stations. Because of the limitation of the available computing power, synthetic seismograms have a minimum period of 32 s and a length of 10 500 s. The inversion of the benchmark data set demonstrates several well-known problems of classical surface wave tomography, such as the importance of crustal correction to recover the shallow structures, the loss of resolution with depth, the smearing effect, both horizontal and vertical, the inaccuracy of amplitude of isotropic S-wave velocity variation, the difficulty of retrieving the magnitude of azimuthal

  12. Color Sensitivity Multiple Exposure Fusion using High Dynamic Range Image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varsha Borole

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a high dynamic range imaging (HDRI method using a capturing camera image using normally exposure, over exposure and under exposure. We make three different images from a multiple input image using local histogram stretching. Because the proposed method generated three histogram-stretched images from a multiple input image, ghost artifacts that are the result of the relative motion between the camera and objects during exposure time, are inherently removed. Therefore, the proposed method can be applied to a consumer compact camera to provide the ghost artifacts free HDRI. Experiments with several sets of test images with different exposures show that the proposed method gives a better performance than existing methods in terms of visual results and computation time.

  13. Project, construction and test of a mini computerized tomograph

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira Junior, J.M. de [Universidade de Sorocaba (UNISO), SP (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologicas (CETEC)

    2003-06-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) refers to the cross-sectional imaging of an object from both transmission or reflection data collected by illuminating the object from many different directions. CT is an imaging technique that has revolutionized the field of medical diagnostics. There are many others applications for CT images, such as, nondestructive evaluation of industrial products and analysis of biological specimens. A mini computerized tomograph was projected, constructed and tested. It operates with a gamma ray source of {sup 241} Am (photons of 60 keV and 100 mCi of intensity) and a NaI(Tl) solid state detector. The system features translation and rotation scanning modes, a 100 mm effective field of view, and 1 mm spatial resolution. The preliminary results indicated a resolution between 5 % to 7 % to detect mass attenuation coefficient variations. The total cost of the Mini Computerized Tomograph of UNISO (MTCU) was about US$ 20.000,00. (author)

  14. Prognostic importance of scintigraphic left ventricular cavity dilation during intravenous dipyridamole technetium-99m sestamibi myocardial tomographic imaging in predicting coronary events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClellan, J R; Travin, M I; Herman, S D; Baron, J I; Golub, R J; Gallagher, J J; Waters, D; Heller, G V

    1997-03-01

    Left ventricular (LV) cavity dilation during stress myocardial perfusion imaging has been associated with multivessel disease, and may be an independent prognostic marker in addition to perfusion defects. The present study examines the predictive value for future cardiac events of transient or fixed LV dilation during dipyridamole technetium-99m (Tc-99m) sestamibi single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging. The study included 512 consecutive patients who underwent SPECT imaging with Tc-99m sestamibi after dipyridamole infusion. Transient LV dilation was seen in 70 patients (14%) and 74 had fixed cavity dilation (14%); cavity size was normal in 368 patients (72%). Each perfusion scan was classified as normal or abnormal, and if abnormal, defects were categorized as transient or fixed, and as small, medium, or large (depending upon the number of abnormal vascular territories). Events during a mean follow-up of 12.8 +/- 6.8 months were tabulated by direct review of hospital charts and death certificates. The cardiac event rate (cardiac death or nonfatal infarction) was 1.9% in patients with normal cavity size, 11.4% with transient LV dilation, and 13.5% with fixed LV dilation (p < 0.01). Compared with patients with normal cavity size, those with transient LV dilation were more likely to sustain a myocardial infarction (p < 0.01) and those with fixed dilation more frequently suffered cardiac death (p < 0.01) and hospitalization for heart failure (p < 0.01). The group with the highest risk had both a large perfusion defect and cavity dilation. By Cox proportional hazard regression analysis, both transient and fixed LV dilation were strong independent predictors of cardiac events. Transient or fixed LV dilation are commonly seen during dipyridamole Tc-99m sestamibi SPECT imaging (14% incidence for each) and are useful predictors of cardiac events.

  15. 断层超声显像诊断左肾静脉压迫综合征的意义%The significance of the related factors in diagnosis of left renal vein entrapment syndrome by tomographic ultrasound imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄枢; 闫建平; 项金凤

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the significance of related factors in diagnosis of left renal vein entrapment syndrome by tomographic ultrasound imaging. Methods We randomly collected 70 patients with left renal vein entrapment syndrome and use ultrasound technology to image them,compute the corresponding ratio of LRV diameters of the distended to the narrowed portions and the aortomesenteric angle (A MA, the angle between the aorta and the superior mesenteric artery) .then make 70 randomly selected normal people as control group. Results The fast display rate was 65% by two dimensional ultrasound, which was 100% by TUI. The correlation coefficient between the AMA and the ratio of the inner diameter for patients was - 0. 277 (P < 0.05 ). The inner diameter and the AMA are significantly related. The bigger the ratio of the inner diameter was, the bigger the AMA was. Conclusion Measuring the inner diameter ratio and the AMA is significant to diagnose the left renal vein entrapment syndrome,which is better than two dimensional ultrasound.%目的 探讨断层超声显像(tomographic ultrasound imaging,TUI)诊断左肾静脉压迫综合征相关指标的意义.方法 对70例左肾静脉压迫综合征患者(实验组)进行断层超声诊断并利用相关软件进行定量分析,得出相应的左肾静脉扩张段内径与狭窄段内径比值及肠系膜上动脉与腹主动脉之间的夹角,与对照组进行比较分析.结果 应用二维超声技术快速显示占65%,应用TUI技术快速显示占100%.实验组肠系膜上动脉与腹主动脉之间的角度为(23.58°±3.29°),与对照组角度比差异有统计学意义(P<0.01);实验组内径比值为(4.02 +0.73),与对照组内径比差异有统计学意义(P<0.01).实验组角度与内径比值相关系数(r)为-0.277(P<0.05),表明实验组角度与内径比之间存在负相关,即肠系膜上动脉与腹主动脉之间的角度越小,左肾静脉内径比值越大.结论 利用TUI测量左肾静脉

  16. Dynamic PET Image reconstruction for parametric imaging using the HYPR kernel method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Benjamin; Qi, Jinyi; Badawi, Ramsey D.; Wang, Guobao

    2017-03-01

    Dynamic PET image reconstruction is a challenging problem because of the ill-conditioned nature of PET and the lowcounting statistics resulted from short time-frames in dynamic imaging. The kernel method for image reconstruction has been developed to improve image reconstruction of low-count PET data by incorporating prior information derived from high-count composite data. In contrast to most of the existing regularization-based methods, the kernel method embeds image prior information in the forward projection model and does not require an explicit regularization term in the reconstruction formula. Inspired by the existing highly constrained back-projection (HYPR) algorithm for dynamic PET image denoising, we propose in this work a new type of kernel that is simpler to implement and further improves the kernel-based dynamic PET image reconstruction. Our evaluation study using a physical phantom scan with synthetic FDG tracer kinetics has demonstrated that the new HYPR kernel-based reconstruction can achieve a better region-of-interest (ROI) bias versus standard deviation trade-off for dynamic PET parametric imaging than the post-reconstruction HYPR denoising method and the previously used nonlocal-means kernel.

  17. High Dynamic Range Digital Imaging of Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karr, Brian A.; Chalmers, Alan; Debattista, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    The ability to capture engineering imagery with a wide degree of dynamic range during rocket launches is critical for post launch processing and analysis [USC03, NNC86]. Rocket launches often present an extreme range of lightness, particularly during night launches. Night launches present a two-fold problem: capturing detail of the vehicle and scene that is masked by darkness, while also capturing detail in the engine plume.

  18. Ship dynamics for maritime ISAR imaging.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2008-02-01

    Demand is increasing for imaging ships at sea. Conventional SAR fails because the ships are usually in motion, both with a forward velocity, and other linear and angular motions that accompany sea travel. Because the target itself is moving, this becomes an Inverse- SAR, or ISAR problem. Developing useful ISAR techniques and algorithms is considerably aided by first understanding the nature and characteristics of ship motion. Consequently, a brief study of some principles of naval architecture sheds useful light on this problem. We attempt to do so here. Ship motions are analyzed for their impact on range-Doppler imaging using Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar (ISAR). A framework for analysis is developed, and limitations of simple ISAR systems are discussed.

  19. Ultrahigh resolution and brilliance laser wakefield accelerator betatron x-ray source for rapid in vivo tomographic microvasculature imaging in small animal models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourmaux, Sylvain; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Krol, Andrzej

    2017-03-01

    We are developing ultrahigh spatial resolution (FWHM animal models using optimized contrast agent. It exploits Laser Wakefield Accelerator (LWFA) betatron x-ray emission phenomenon. Ultrashort high-intensity laser pulse interacting with a supersonic gas jet produces an ion cavity ("bubble") in the plasma in the wake of the laser pulse. Electrons that are injected into this bubble gain energy, perform wiggler-like oscillations and generate burst of incoherent x-rays with characteristic duration time comparable to the laser pulse duration, continuous synchrotron-like spectral distribution that might extend to hundreds keV, very high brilliance, very small focal spot and highly directional emission in the cone-beam geometry. Such LWFA betatron x-ray source created in our lab produced 1021 -1023 photonsṡ shot-1ṡmrad-2ṡmm-2/0.1%bw with mean critical energy in the12-30 keV range. X-ray source size for a single laser shot was FWHM=1.7 μm x-ray beam divergence 20-30 mrad, and effective focal spot size for multiple shots FWHM= 2 μm. Projection images of simple phantoms and complex biological objects including insects and mice were obtained in single laser shots. We conclude that ultrahigh spatial resolution μCTA (FWHM 2 μm) requiring thousands of projection images could be accomplished using LWFA betatron x-ray radiation in approximately 40 s with our existing 220 TW laser and sub seconds with next generation of ultrafast lasers and x-ray detectors, as opposed to several hours required using conventional microfocal x-ray tubes. Thus, sub second ultrahigh resolution in vivo microtomographic microvasculature imaging (in both absorption and phase contrast mode) in small animal models of cancer and vascular diseases will be feasible with LWFA betatron x-ray source.

  20. Study about quantification and classification of biological tissues in tomographic images from histograms; Estudo sobre quantificacao e classificacao dos tecidos biologicos em imagens tomograficas a partir de histogramas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Rafael T.F.; Lemke, Ney; Hormaza, Joel Mesa; Alvarez, Matheus, E-mail: rafael@ibb.unesp.b [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquisa Filho (DFB/IB/UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Biociencias. Dept. de Fisica e Biofisica; Pina, Diana R.; Teixeira, Altamir S. [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquisa Filho (HC/FM/UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Hospital de Clinicas. Dept. de Doencas Tropicais e Diagnostico por Imagem

    2010-06-15

    An algorithm for determining the equivalent thickness of biological tissue by the removal of Gaussian from the histograms was proposed. This algorithm classifies the different biological tissues using histograms, constructed from CT scans in DICOM format and calculates the average thickness of these tissues. The founded results show to be coherent with literature, with discrepancies of up to 21.6% on the bone, and analyzed for the anthropomorphic phantom (RANDO). These results allow the use of this method in living tissues for the construction of chest homogeneous phantoms of newborn and suckling patients, which are subsequently used in the optimization process of pediatric radiographic images. (author)

  1. Hypertemporal Imaging of NYC Grid Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Bianco, Federica B; Mydlarz, Charlie; Sharma, Mohit S

    2016-01-01

    Hypertemporal visible imaging of an urban lightscape can reveal the phase of the electrical grid granular to individual housing units. In contrast to in-situ monitoring or metering, this method offers broad, persistent, real-time, and non-permissive coverage through a single camera sited at an urban vantage point. Rapid changes in the phase of individual housing units signal changes in load (e.g., appliances turning on and off), while slower building- or neighborhood-level changes can indicate the health of distribution transformers. We demonstrate the concept by observing the 120 Hz flicker of lights across a NYC skyline. A liquid crystal shutter driven at 119.75 Hz down-converts the flicker to 0.25 Hz, which is imaged at a 4 Hz cadence by an inexpensive CCD camera; the grid phase of each source is determined by analysis of its sinusoidal light curve over an imaging "burst" of some 25 seconds. Analysis of bursts taken at ~15 minute cadence over several hours demonstrates both the stability and variation of p...

  2. Quantitative imaging of heterogeneous dynamics in drying and aging paints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Kooij, Hanne M; Fokkink, Remco; van der Gucht, Jasper; Sprakel, Joris

    2016-09-29

    Drying and aging paint dispersions display a wealth of complex phenomena that make their study fascinating yet challenging. To meet the growing demand for sustainable, high-quality paints, it is essential to unravel the microscopic mechanisms underlying these phenomena. Visualising the governing dynamics is, however, intrinsically difficult because the dynamics are typically heterogeneous and span a wide range of time scales. Moreover, the high turbidity of paints precludes conventional imaging techniques from reaching deep inside the paint. To address these challenges, we apply a scattering technique, Laser Speckle Imaging, as a versatile and quantitative tool to elucidate the internal dynamics, with microscopic resolution and spanning seven decades of time. We present a toolbox of data analysis and image processing methods that allows a tailored investigation of virtually any turbid dispersion, regardless of the geometry and substrate. Using these tools we watch a variety of paints dry and age with unprecedented detail.

  3. Electron Tomographic Analysis of Synaptic Ultrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burette, Alain C.; Lesperance, Thomas; Crum, John; Martone, Maryann; Volkmann, Niels; Ellisman, Mark H.; Weinberg, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Synaptic function depends on interactions among sets of proteins that assemble into complex supramolecular machines. Molecular biology, electrophysiology, and live-cell imaging studies have provided tantalizing glimpses into the inner workings of the synapse, but fundamental questions remain regarding the functional organization of these “nano-machines.” Electron tomography reveals the internal structure of synapses in three dimensions with exceptional spatial resolution. Here we report results from an electron tomographic study of axospinous synapses in neocortex and hippocampus of the adult rat, based on aldehyde-fixed material stabilized with tannic acid in lieu of postfixation with osmium tetroxide. Our results provide a new window into the structural basis of excitatory synaptic processing in the mammalian brain. PMID:22684938

  4. Scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging dynamics at low accelerating voltages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lugg, N.R. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Findlay, S.D. [Institute of Engineering Innovation, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 116-0013 (Japan); Shibata, N. [Institute of Engineering Innovation, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 116-0013 (Japan); PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Mizoguchi, T. [Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); D' Alfonso, A.J. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Allen, L.J., E-mail: lja@unimelb.edu.au [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Ikuhara, Y. [Institute of Engineering Innovation, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 116-0013 (Japan); Nanostructures Research Laboratory, Japan Fine Ceramic Center, Nagoya 456-8587 (Japan); WPI Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2011-07-15

    Motivated by the desire to minimize specimen damage in beam sensitive specimens, there has been a recent push toward using relatively low accelerating voltages (<100kV) in scanning transmission electron microscopy. To complement experimental efforts on this front, this paper seeks to explore the variations with accelerating voltage of the imaging dynamics, both of the channelling of the fast electron and of the inelastic interactions. High-angle annular-dark field, electron energy loss spectroscopic imaging and annular bright field imaging are all considered. -- Highlights: {yields} Both elastic and inelastic scattering in STEM are acceleration voltage dependent. {yields} HAADF, EELS and ABF imaging are assessed with a view to optimum imaging. {yields} Lower accelerating voltages improve STEM EELS contrast in very thin crystals. {yields} Higher accelerating voltages give better STEM EELS contrast in thicker crystals. {yields} At fixed resolution, higher accelerating voltage aids ABF imaging of light elements.

  5. Pulse sequence for dynamic volumetric imaging of hyperpolarized metabolic products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Charles H.; Chen, Albert P.; Lustig, Michael; Hargreaves, Brian A.; Lupo, Janine; Xu, Duan; Kurhanewicz, John; Hurd, Ralph E.; Pauly, John M.; Nelson, Sarah J.; Vigneron, Daniel B.

    2008-07-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization and dissolution of a 13C-labeled substrate enables the dynamic imaging of cellular metabolism. Spectroscopic information is typically acquired, making the acquisition of dynamic volumetric data a challenge. To enable rapid volumetric imaging, a spectral-spatial excitation pulse was designed to excite a single line of the carbon spectrum. With only a single resonance present in the signal, an echo-planar readout trajectory could be used to resolve spatial information, giving full volume coverage of 32 × 32 × 16 voxels every 3.5 s. This high frame rate was used to measure the different lactate dynamics in different tissues in a normal rat model and a mouse model of prostate cancer.

  6. Tomographic imaging of the effects of Peruvian flat slab subduction on the Nazca slab and surrounding mantle under central and southern Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scire, A. C.; Zandt, G.; Beck, S. L.; Bishop, B.; Biryol, C. B.; Wagner, L. S.; Long, M. D.; Minaya, E.; Tavera, H.

    2014-12-01

    The modern central Peruvian Andes are dominated by a laterally extensive region of flat slab subduction. The Peruvian flat slab extends for ~1500 km along the strike of the Andes, correlating with the subduction of the Nazca Ridge in the south and the theorized Inca Plateau in the north. We have used data from the CAUGHT and PULSE experiments for finite frequency teleseismic P- and S-wave tomography to image the Nazca slab in the upper mantle below 95 km depth under central Peru between 10°S and 18°S as well as the surrounding mantle. Since the slab inboard of the subducting Nazca Ridge is mostly aseismic, our results provide important constraints on the geometry of the subducting Nazca slab in this region. Our images of the Nazca slab suggest that steepening of the slab inboard of the subducting Nazca Ridge locally occurs ~100 km further inland than was indicated in previous studies. The region where we have imaged the steepening of the Nazca slab inboard of the Nazca Ridge correlates with the location of the Fitzcarrald Arch, a long wavelength upper plate topographic feature which has been suggested to be a consequence of ridge subduction. When the slab steepens inboard of the flat slab region, it does so at a very steep (~70°) angle. The transition from the Peruvian flat slab to the more normally dipping slab south of 16°S below Bolivia is characterized by an abrupt bending of the slab anomaly in the mantle in response to the shift from flat to normal subduction. The slab anomaly appears to be intact south of the Nazca Ridge with no evidence for tearing of the slab in response to the abrupt change in slab dip. A potential tear in the slab is inferred from an observed offset in the slab anomaly north of the Nazca Ridge extending subparallel to the ridge axis between 130 and 300 km depth. A high amplitude (-5-6%) slow S-wave velocity anomaly is observed below the projection of the Nazca Ridge. This anomaly appears to be laterally confined to the mantle

  7. Change over time in brain computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging findings in healthy elderly persons. A 10 year prospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasahara, Hiroo [Jikei Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1998-09-01

    Early detection, treatment and prevention of dementia have become increasingly important as the population ages. I have performed a follow-up study of changes in the brains of healthy elderly persons with computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) since 1982. One hundred thirty-three healthy elderly volunteers were first examined in 1982 with CT or MRI, electroencephalography, the Benton Visual Retention Test (BVRT), blood pressure measurement, and interview. Subsequent examinations were done in 1986, 1989, and 1992. On CT, microinfarctions were found in 15.0% of subjects in 1982 and in 13.0% in 1986, and periventricular lucency (PVL) was found in 6.0% and 8.3%. The most frequent findings were vascular changes, which were observed in six persons (5.6%), followed by PVL, which was found in four persons (3.7%). Thus, vascular changes became more pronounced during the follow-up period. Lesions with high signal intensity on T{sub 2}-weighted images (T{sub 2}HSI) were found in 69.5% of subjects and increased in prevalence with age in the 1989 study. Such T{sub 2}HSI lesions were found most frequently in the basal ganglia (61.9%), followed by the thalamus (39.0%), parietal lobe (37.0%), temporal lobe (12.7%), and the pons (8.5%). Of these lesions, lacunar infarctions showed low signal intensity on T{sub 1}-weighted images and were found in 24.6% of subjects; their prevalence also increased with age. Results of BVRT were closely correlated with T{sub 2}HSI lesions, suggesting that T{sub 2}HSIs lesions may affect cognitive function. By 1992, 10 years after the start of the study, 34 (25.6%) of subjects had died and 19 (14.3%) had become demented. Subjects were divided into surviving and dead groups and dementia and non-dementia groups. Findings on CT and BVRT in this study have provided clear clinical indices of death and dementia, especially maximal width of third ventricule in impairment of the diagnosis of dementia. (author)

  8. Femtosecond photodissociation dynamics of I studied by ion imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, J.J.; Bjerre, N.; Mørkbak, N.J.

    1998-01-01

    on imaging is employed to analyze the fragments from timed Coulomb explosion studies of femtosecond (fs) molecular dynamics. The technique provides high detection efficiency and direct recording of the two-dimensional velocity of all ionized fragments. We illustrate the approach by studying photo...... agreement with quantum mechanical wave packet simulations. We discuss the perspectives for extending the studies to photochemical reactions of small polyatomic molecules......on imaging is employed to analyze the fragments from timed Coulomb explosion studies of femtosecond (fs) molecular dynamics. The technique provides high detection efficiency and direct recording of the two-dimensional velocity of all ionized fragments. We illustrate the approach by studying...

  9. IMPACT OF TONE MAPPING IN HIGH DYNAMIC RANGE IMAGE COMPRESSION

    OpenAIRE

    Narwaria, Manish; Perreira Da Silva, Matthieu; Le Callet, Patrick; Pépion, Romuald

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Tone mapping or range reduction is often used in High Dynamic Range (HDR) visual signal compression to take advantage of the existing image/video coding architectures. Thus, it is important to study the impact of tone mapping on the visual quality of decompressed HDR visual signals. To our knowledge, most of the existing studies focus only on the quality loss in the resultant low dynamic range (LDR) signal (obtained via tone mapping) and typically employ LDR displays f...

  10. Imaging with high Dynamic using an Ionization Chamber

    OpenAIRE

    Menk, Ralf-Hendrik; Amenitsch, Heinz; Arfelli, Fulvia; Bernstorff, Sigrid; Besch, Hans Juergen; Voltolina, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    In this work a combination of an ionization chamber with one-dimensional spatial resolution and a MicroCAT structure will be presented. The combination between gas gain operations and integrating front-end electronics yields a dynamic range as high as eight to nine orders of magnitude. Therefore this device is well suitable for medical imaging or applications such as small angle x-ray scattering, where the requirements on the dynamic of the detector are exceptional high. Basically the describ...

  11. Three-dimensional mid-infrared tomographic imaging of endogenous and exogenous molecules in a single intact cell with subcellular resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaroni, Luca; Obst, Martin; Nowak, Marcus; Zobi, Fabio

    2015-01-02

    Microscopy in the mid-infrared spectral range provides detailed chemical information on a sample at moderate spatial resolution and is being used increasingly in the characterization of biological entities as challenging as single cells. However, a conventional cellular 2D imaging measurement is limited in its ability to associate specific compositional information to subcellular structures because of the interference from the complex topography of the sample. Herein we provide a method and protocols that overcome this challenge in which tilt-series infrared tomography is used with a standard benchtop infrared microscope. This approach gives access to the quantitative 3D distribution of molecular components based on the intrinsic contrast provided by the sample. We demonstrate the method by quantifying the distribution of an exogenous metal carbonyl complex throughout the cell and by reporting changes in its coordination sphere in different locations in the cell. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Research on hyperspectral dynamic scene and image sequence simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Dandan; Liu, Fang; Gao, Jiaobo; Sun, Kefeng; Hu, Yu; Li, Yu; Xie, Junhu; Zhang, Lei

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents a simulation method of hyperspectral dynamic scene and image sequence for hyperspectral equipment evaluation and target detection algorithm. Because of high spectral resolution, strong band continuity, anti-interference and other advantages, in recent years, hyperspectral imaging technology has been rapidly developed and is widely used in many areas such as optoelectronic target detection, military defense and remote sensing systems. Digital imaging simulation, as a crucial part of hardware in loop simulation, can be applied to testing and evaluation hyperspectral imaging equipment with lower development cost and shorter development period. Meanwhile, visual simulation can produce a lot of original image data under various conditions for hyperspectral image feature extraction and classification algorithm. Based on radiation physic model and material characteristic parameters this paper proposes a generation method of digital scene. By building multiple sensor models under different bands and different bandwidths, hyperspectral scenes in visible, MWIR, LWIR band, with spectral resolution 0.01μm, 0.05μm and 0.1μm have been simulated in this paper. The final dynamic scenes have high real-time and realistic, with frequency up to 100 HZ. By means of saving all the scene gray data in the same viewpoint image sequence is obtained. The analysis results show whether in the infrared band or the visible band, the grayscale variations of simulated hyperspectral images are consistent with the theoretical analysis results.

  13. Automated detection of pulmonary embolism (PE) in computed tomographic pulmonary angiographic (CTPA) images: multiscale hierachical expectation-maximization segmentation of vessels and PEs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chuan; Chan, Heang-Ping; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Chughtai, Aamer; Patel, Smita; Cascade, Philip N.; Sahiner, Berkman; Wei, Jun; Ge, Jun; Kazerooni, Ella A.

    2007-03-01

    CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) has been reported to be an effective means for clinical diagnosis of pulmonary embolism (PE). We are developing a computer-aided detection (CAD) system to assist radiologist in PE detection in CTPA images. 3D multiscale filters in combination with a newly designed response function derived from the eigenvalues of Hessian matrices is used to enhance vascular structures including the vessel bifurcations and suppress non-vessel structures such as the lymphoid tissues surrounding the vessels. A hierarchical EM estimation is then used to segment the vessels by extracting the high response voxels at each scale. The segmented vessels are pre-screened for suspicious PE areas using a second adaptive multiscale EM estimation. A rule-based false positive (FP) reduction method was designed to identify the true PEs based on the features of PE and vessels. 43 CTPA scans were used as an independent test set to evaluate the performance of PE detection. Experienced chest radiologists identified the PE locations which were used as "gold standard". 435 PEs were identified in the artery branches, of which 172 and 263 were subsegmental and proximal to the subsegmental, respectively. The computer-detected volume was considered true positive (TP) when it overlapped with 10% or more of the gold standard PE volume. Our preliminary test results show that, at an average of 33 and 24 FPs/case, the sensitivities of our PE detection method were 81% and 78%, respectively, for proximal PEs, and 79% and 73%, respectively, for subsegmental PEs. The study demonstrates the feasibility that the automated method can identify PE accurately on CTPA images. Further study is underway to improve the sensitivity and reduce the FPs.

  14. Three-dimensional volume tomographic study of the imaging accuracy of impacted teeth: MSCT and CBCT comparison--an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Elisabeth; Medelnik, Jürgen; Fink, Martin; Lell, Michael; Hirschfelder, Ursula

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the imaging accuracy of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) data sets compared with multislice spiral computed tomography (MSCT) data sets in determining the exact mesiodistal width of unerupted porcine tooth germs and to compare the radiologically obtained results of width measurements with the actual mesiodistal dimension of the tooth germs. In MSCT and CBCT data sets, the largest diameter of 24 tooth germs was determined with the aid of the mesial and distal contact points. The reference method used was mesiodistal width measurement using sliding callipers after the tooth germs had been osteotomized. Accuracy and precision were ascertained with difference plots and a one-way model II analysis of variance with random effects. Analysis of accuracy revealed marked differences between the measuring methods in the difference plot: slightly higher mean values were measured by MSCT and markedly lower values by CBCT than by the reference method (calliper); the mean deviation was significantly greater for CBCT. The width of the confidence interval in the comparison of CBCT versus clinical measurements is more than 4 times higher than in the comparison of MSCT versus clinical values. Precision analysis found that repeatability was twice as high with CBCT as with clinical measurement, whereas MSCT and clinical measurement differed only slightly. The mesiodistal width of displaced teeth can be determined by MSCT but also by CBCT. MSCT is superior to CBCT in determining tooth width; the difference was statistically significant (P = 0.05).

  15. P-wave tomographic images in the Central Betics-Alborán Sea (South Spain) using local earthquakes: Contribution for a continental collision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Inmaculada; Morales, José; Zhao, Dapeng; Torcal, Federico; Vidal, Francisco

    To investigate the relationship between shallow and intermediate-depth earthquakes and the crust and upper mantle structure beneath the Betic-Cordillera and Alborán sea region, we have applied seismic tomography to 2569 P-wave arrival times from 367 microearthquakes recorded by both permanent and temporary seismic stations deployed in the region. These earthquakes occurred in the depth range of 0 to 110 km beneath the Central Betic Cordilleras and Alborán sea. Our results have revealed significant structural heterogeneities in the crust and upper mantle beneath the study area. In the upper crust there is a high-velocity anomaly at Sierra Gorda (western boundary of the Granada basin) penetrating to 15 km depth, which is in good agreement with the aeromagnetic anomaly. In the Granada basin, a low-velocity anomaly is located in the middle crust, which coincides with a previously detected greater cutoff depth of seismicity, and are considered to be associated with a highly fractured zone generated by an intracrustal detachment. The northern boundary of the Alborán sea (Málaga coast) is well imaged as low velocities from 50 to 90 km depths. This low-velocity zone in the upper mantle is associated with the intermediate-depth seismicity, which outline a section of continental crust related to the collision/subduction beneath the northern part of the Alborán sea-southern part of the Central Betics.

  16. Dynamic "inline" images: context-sensitive retrieval and integration of images into Web documents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Charles E

    2008-09-01

    Integrating relevant images into web-based information resources adds value for research and education. This work sought to evaluate the feasibility of using "Web 2.0" technologies to dynamically retrieve and integrate pertinent images into a radiology web site. An online radiology reference of 1,178 textual web documents was selected as the set of target documents. The ARRS GoldMiner image search engine, which incorporated 176,386 images from 228 peer-reviewed journals, retrieved images on demand and integrated them into the documents. At least one image was retrieved in real-time for display as an "inline" image gallery for 87% of the web documents. Each thumbnail image was linked to the full-size image at its original web site. Review of 20 randomly selected Collaborative Hypertext of Radiology documents found that 69 of 72 displayed images (96%) were relevant to the target document. Users could click on the "More" link to search the image collection more comprehensively and, from there, link to the full text of the article. A gallery of relevant radiology images can be inserted easily into web pages on any web server. Indexing by concepts and keywords allows context-aware image retrieval, and searching by document title and subject metadata yields excellent results. These techniques allow web developers to incorporate easily a context-sensitive image gallery into their documents.

  17. Improving visibility in photoacoustic imaging using dynamic speckle illumination

    CERN Document Server

    Gateau, Jérôme; Katz, Ori; Gigan, Sylvain; Bossy, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    In high-frequency photoacoustic imaging with uniform illumination, homogenous photo-absorbing structures may be invisible because of their large size or limited-view issues. Here we show that it is possible to reveal features, which are normally invisible with a photoacoustic system comprised of a 20MHz linear ultrasound array, by exploiting dynamic speckle illumination. We demonstrate imaging of a \\emptyset 5mm absorbing cylinder and a 30 \\mu m black thread arranged in a complex shape. The hidden structures are directly retrieved from photoacoustic images recorded for different random speckle illuminations of the phantoms by assessing the variation in the value of each pixel over the illumination patterns.

  18. Research Dynamics of the Classification Methods of Remote Sensing Images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan; ZHANG; Baoguo; WU; Dong; WANG

    2013-01-01

    As the key technology of extracting remote sensing information,the classification of remote sensing images has always been the research focus in the field of remote sensing. The paper introduces the classification process and system of remote sensing images. According to the recent research status of domestic and international remote sensing classification methods,the new study dynamics of remote sensing classification,such as artificial neural networks,support vector machine,active learning and ensemble multi-classifiers,were introduced,providing references for the automatic and intelligent development of remote sensing images classification.

  19. High Dynamic Range Imaging by Perceptual Logarithmic Exposure Merging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florea Corneliu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we emphasize a similarity between the logarithmic type image processing (LTIP model and the Naka–Rushton model of the human visual system (HVS. LTIP is a derivation of logarithmic image processing (LIP, which further replaces the logarithmic function with a ratio of polynomial functions. Based on this similarity, we show that it is possible to present a unifying framework for the high dynamic range (HDR imaging problem, namely, that performing exposure merging under the LTIP model is equivalent to standard irradiance map fusion. The resulting HDR algorithm is shown to provide high quality in both subjective and objective evaluations.

  20. Quantitative Functional Imaging Using Dynamic Positron Computed Tomography and Rapid Parameter Estimation Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeppe, Robert Allen

    Positron computed tomography (PCT) is a diagnostic imaging technique that provides both three dimensional imaging capability and quantitative measurements of local tissue radioactivity concentrations in vivo. This allows the development of non-invasive methods that employ the principles of tracer kinetics for determining physiological properties such as mass specific blood flow, tissue pH, and rates of substrate transport or utilization. A physiologically based, two-compartment tracer kinetic model was derived to mathematically describe the exchange of a radioindicator between blood and tissue. The model was adapted for use with dynamic sequences of data acquired with a positron tomograph. Rapid estimation techniques were implemented to produce functional images of the model parameters by analyzing each individual pixel sequence of the image data. A detailed analysis of the performance characteristics of three different parameter estimation schemes was performed. The analysis included examination of errors caused by statistical uncertainties in the measured data, errors in the timing of the data, and errors caused by violation of various assumptions of the tracer kinetic model. Two specific radioindicators were investigated. ('18)F -fluoromethane, an inert freely diffusible gas, was used for local quantitative determinations of both cerebral blood flow and tissue:blood partition coefficient. A method was developed that did not require direct sampling of arterial blood for the absolute scaling of flow values. The arterial input concentration time course was obtained by assuming that the alveolar or end-tidal expired breath radioactivity concentration is proportional to the arterial blood concentration. The scale of the input function was obtained from a series of venous blood concentration measurements. The method of absolute scaling using venous samples was validated in four studies, performed on normal volunteers, in which directly measured arterial concentrations

  1. Bell's inequalities in the tomographic representation

    CERN Document Server

    Lupo, C; Marmo, G

    2006-01-01

    The tomographic approach to quantum mechanics is revisited as a direct tool to investigate violation of Bell-like inequalities. Since quantum tomograms are well defined probability distributions, the tomographic approach is emphasized to be the most natural one to compare the predictions of classical and quantum theory. Examples of inequalities for two qubits an two qutrits are considered in the tomographic probability representation of spin states.

  2. Subtraction and dynamic MR images of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murakami, Yoshitaka; Aoki, Manabu; Harada, Junta (Jikei Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1993-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic effectiveness of subtraction and dynamic MR imaging in patients with breast masses. In 23 breast cancers and six fibroadenomas, spin echo T1 images were obtained at 0.2 Tesla before and every minute after intravenous injection of Gd-DTPA (0.1 or 0.2 mmol/kg). Subtraction images were obtained sequentially on the CRT monitor. All breast masses were enhanced after gadolinium and stood out as bright lesions on subtraction images. The tumor margin and its extension were more precisely evaluated on subtraction MR images than on conventional postcontrast MR images. Breast cancer showed a characteristic time-intensity curve with an early peak, in contrast to fibroadenoma, which showed a gradual increase in signal intensity. Subtraction MR imaging is a simple method for the evaluation of breast masses, and further, the time-intensity curve obtained by dynamic study is helpful in the differential diagnosis of lesions. (author).

  3. Universal imaging: Dissociative ionization of polyatomic molecules, chemical dynamics beamline 9.0.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, M.; Chen, D.; Suits, A.G. [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    A third endstation was recently added to the Chemical Dynamics beamline, designed to exploit the high flux broadband undulator light for a range of studies of reactive scattering, photochemistry and photoionization processes using time-of-flight mass spectroscopy coupled with position-sensitive detection. Two molecular beam sources are fixed at right angles, with the undulator light, or laser beams, intersecting the molecular beams at 45{degrees}. To date, beamline experiments have included a study of dissociative photoionization of a variety of molecules including N{sub 2}O and SF{sub 6}. In this mode, a single molecular beam source is used, with the tunable undulator light inducing, in SF{sub 6} for example, the process SF{sub 6} {r_arrow} SF{sub 6}{sup +} + e{sup {minus}} {r_arrow} SF{sub 5}{sup +} + F + e{sup {minus}}. The SF{sub 5}{sup +} ions are accelerated up the flight tube, mass selected and detected as a function of position on a phosphor screen viewed by a CCD camera. The position directly reveals the recoil speed (or translational energy release) and angular distribution for the dissociative ionization process. Furthermore, this measurement is obtained for all recoil speeds and angles simultaneously. Such detailed angular information has not previously been obtained for dissociative ionization processes; typically ion time-of-flight profiles are deconvoluted to yield rough insight into the angular distributions. The recorded image is actually a 2-dimensional projection of the nascent 3-dimensional velocity distribution, but established tomographic techniques enable the authors to reconstruct the 3-D distribution.

  4. Reproducibility of tomographic evaluation of posterolateral lumbar arthrodesis consolidation

    OpenAIRE

    Marcelo Italo Risso Neto; Guilherme Rebechi Zuiani; Roberto Rossanez; Sylvio Mistro Neto; Augusto Celso Scarparo Amato Filho; Paulo Tadeu Maia Cavali; Ivan Guidolin Veiga; Wagner Pasqualini; Marcos Antônio Tebet; Elcio Landim

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate interobserver agreement of Glassman classification for posterolateral lumbar spine arthrodesis.METHODS: One hundred and thirty-four CT scans from patients who underwent posterolateral arthrodesis of the lumbar and lumbosacral spine were evaluated by four observers, namely two orthopedic surgeons experienced in spine surgery and two in training in this area. Using the reconstructed tomographic images at oblique coronal plane, 299 operated levels were systematically analy...

  5. 基于电阻抗成像的植物单根断层图像重建%Tomographic image reconstruction of plant single root by electrical impedance tomography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李星恕; 崔猛; 杨剑雄; 韩文霆; 熊秀芳

    2014-01-01

    (GPR) due to its portability, safety and low cost. To verify whether EIT is applicable for reconstruction of plant root segment and explore the effect of image reconstruction algorithm and soil water content on image reconstruction quality, an experimental system composed of LCR analyzer, PC and self-made experimental cell with 16 electrodes was built and adjacent measurement mode was used to obtain the voltage data for imaging. These voltage data at different soil water contents was measured, Newton’s One-Step Error Reconstructor (NOSER) and the Primal Dual-Interior Point Method algorithm (PD-IPM) were used to obtain the reconstruction images. During the procedure of reconstruction, the reconstruction image domain was divided into 3922 units by triangular elements. The reconstruction algorithms were mainly used to calculate the electrical resistivity of the corresponding triangular unit. Then the colors representing different values mapped out the reconstruction images. On account of the apparent color differences between the root and soil, the reconstruction of the root was realized. The colorful reconstruction image was firstly processed into binarized image, then the location, area and circularity of root were calculated by pixel accumulation method. Coincidence degree index between the calculated and actual value was used to evaluate the reconstruction image quality. The results showed that the tomographic image reconstruction of single root for plant can be achieved by the EIT method effectively. The binarized image was more intuitive and can be used easily to evaluate the quality of reconstruction. NOSER and PD-IPM both reflected the shape of the root well, but the coordinate of root centroid was not presented accurately, the former can get more accurate information on the size of the roots. Soil water content had a great effect on the area and location of the root in the reconstructed image, higher moisture content produced more accurate reconstruction image

  6. Dynamic particle enhancement in limited-view optoacoustic tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Dean-Ben, X L; Razansky, D

    2015-01-01

    Limited-view artefacts are commonly present in optoacoustic tomography images, mainly due to practical geometrical and physical constraints imposed by the imaging systems as well as limited light penetration into large optically opaque samples. Herein, a new approach termed dynamic particle-enhanced optoacoustic tomography (DPOT) is proposed for improving image contrast and visibility of optoacoustic images under limited-view scenarios. The method is based on the non- linear combination of a temporal sequence of tomographic reconstructions representing sparsely distributed moving particles. We demonstrate experimental performance by dynamically imaging the flow of suspended microspheres in three dimensions, which shows promise for DPOT applicability in angiographic imaging in living organisms.

  7. Towards imaging of ultrafast molecular dynamics using FELs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rouzee, A.; Johnsson, P.; Rading, L.; Siu, W.; Huismans, Y.; Duesterer, S.; Redlin, H.; Tavella, F.; Stojanovic, N.; Al-Shemmary, A.; Lepine, F.; Holland, D. M. P.; Schlathölter, Thomas; Hoekstra, R.; Fukuzawa, H.; Ueda, K.; Vrakking, M. J. J.; Hundertmark, A.

    2013-01-01

    The dissociation dynamics induced by a 100 fs, 400 nm laser pulse in a rotationally cold Br-2 sample was characterized by Coulomb explosion imaging (CEI) using a time-delayed extreme ultra-violet (XUV) FEL pulse, obtained from the Free electron LASer in Hamburg (FLASH). The momentum distribution of

  8. Reduction of noise in medullary renograms from dynamic MR images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giele, ELW; de Priester, JA; Blom, JA; den Boer, JA; van Engelshoven, JMA; Hasman, A

    2000-01-01

    Dynamic magnetic resonance images of the kidney can be used to acquire separate renograms of the cortex and medulla, A high-quality cortical renogram can be determined directly from a region of interest (ROI) placed in the cortex. Due to partial volume effects, part of the signal from a ROI placed i

  9. Tomographic patient registration and conformal avoidance tomotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldridge, Jennifer Stacy

    Development of tomotherapy has led to the emergence of several processes, providing the basis for many unique investigative opportunities. These processes include setup verification, tomographic verification, megavoltage dose reconstruction, and conformal avoidance tomotherapy. Setup verification and conformal avoidance tomotherapy, in particular, are two closely intertwined matters. In order to avoid critical structures located within or adjacent to indistinct tumor regions, accurate patient positioning from fraction to fraction must be ensured. With tomographic patient registration, a higher level of assurance is offered than with traditional positioning methods. Translational and rotational offsets are calculated directly from projection data using cross- correlation or fast Fourier transforms. Experiments assessing the algorithm's ability to calculate individual offsets were conducted using the University of Wisconsin's Tomotherapy Benchtop. These experiments indicate statistical errors within +/-1 mm for offsets up to approximately 20 mm, with maximum offset errors of about +/-2 mm for displacements up to 35 mm. The angular offset component is within +/-2°. To evaluate the registration process as a whole, experimental results from a few multi-parameter examples are also analyzed. With the development of tomographic patient registration in projection space, efforts to promote further sparing of critical structures are justified. Conformal avoidance tomotherapy has as its objective to treat an indistinct tumor region while conformally avoiding any normal critical structures in that region. To demonstrate the advantages of conformal avoidance tomotherapy, conventional and tomotherapy treatments are contrasted for both nasopharyngeal and breast carcinoma cases. For initial research efforts, computed tomography data sets of a human male and female were obtained via the ``Visible Human Project''. Since these data sets are on the order of hundreds of megabytes, both

  10. Spatio-temporal diffusion of dynamic PET images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tauber, C; Chalon, S; Guilloteau, D [Inserm U930, CNRS ERL3106, Universite Francois Rabelais, Tours (France); Stute, S; Buvat, I [IMNC, IN2P3, UMR 8165 CNRS-Paris 7 and Paris 11 Universities, Orsay (France); Chau, M [ASA-Advanced Solutions Accelerator, Montpellier (France); Spiteri, P, E-mail: clovis.tauber@univ-tours.fr [IRIT-ENSEEIHT, UMR CNRS 5505, Toulouse (France)

    2011-10-21

    Positron emission tomography (PET) images are corrupted by noise. This is especially true in dynamic PET imaging where short frames are required to capture the peak of activity concentration after the radiotracer injection. High noise results in a possible bias in quantification, as the compartmental models used to estimate the kinetic parameters are sensitive to noise. This paper describes a new post-reconstruction filter to increase the signal-to-noise ratio in dynamic PET imaging. It consists in a spatio-temporal robust diffusion of the 4D image based on the time activity curve (TAC) in each voxel. It reduces the noise in homogeneous areas while preserving the distinct kinetics in regions of interest corresponding to different underlying physiological processes. Neither anatomical priors nor the kinetic model are required. We propose an automatic selection of the scale parameter involved in the diffusion process based on a robust statistical analysis of the distances between TACs. The method is evaluated using Monte Carlo simulations of brain activity distributions. We demonstrate the usefulness of the method and its superior performance over two other post-reconstruction spatial and temporal filters. Our simulations suggest that the proposed method can be used to significantly increase the signal-to-noise ratio in dynamic PET imaging.

  11. Acute myocardial infarction in a young athlete: Optical coherence tomographic features of the culprit lesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matjaz Klemenc

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: We report on a young male athlete who suffered from acute myocardial infarction immediately after a vigorous training. Methods: A comprehensive optical coherence tomographic investigation of the culprit coronary artery was performed after the combined mechanical and pharmacological thrombus removal. Results and Conclusion: The imaging discovered a tear at the junction of the non-obstructive, largely fibrotic plaque with the normal arterial wall. This exertion-related vessel damage resulted in a dynamic thrombosis that almost completely occluded the culprit artery. As the vessel obstruction was not considered flow-limiting, the stent implantation was not required and the patient was discharged on the double antiplatelet therapy and statin.

  12. SIMA: Python software for analysis of dynamic fluorescence imaging data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick eKaifosh

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence imaging is a powerful method for monitoring dynamic signals in the nervous system. However, analysis of dynamic fluorescence imaging data remains burdensome, in part due to the shortage of available software tools. To address this need, we have developed SIMA, an open source Python package that facilitates common analysis tasks related to fluorescence imaging. Functionality of this package includes correction of motion artifacts occurring during in vivo imaging with laser-scanning microscopy, segmentation of imaged fields into regions of interest (ROIs, and extraction of signals from the segmented ROIs. We have also developed a graphical user interface (GUI for manual editing of the automatically segmented ROIs and automated registration of ROIs across multiple imaging datasets. This software has been designed with flexibility in mind to allow for future extension with different analysis methods and potential integration with other packages. Software, documentation, and source code for the SIMA package and ROI Buddy GUI are freely available at http://www.losonczylab.org/sima/.

  13. Dynamic Fractal Transform with Applications to Image Data Compression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王舟; 余英林

    1997-01-01

    A recent trend in computer graphics and image processing is to use Iterated Function System(IFS)to generate and describe both man-made graphics and natural images.Jacquin was the first to propose a fully automation gray scale image compression algorithm which is referred to as a typical static fractal transform based algorithm in this paper.By using this algorithm,an image can be condensely described as a fractal transform operator which is the combination of a set of reactal mappings.When the fractal transform operator is iteratedly applied to any initial image,a unique attractro(reconstructed image)can be achieved.In this paper,a dynamic fractal transform is presented which is a modification of the static transform.Instea of being fixed,the dynamic transform operator varies in each decoder iteration,thus differs from static transform operators.The new transform has advantages in improving coding efficiency and shows better convergence for the deocder.

  14. Computed tomographic findings of trichuriasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Naime Tokmak; Zafer Koc; Serife Ulusan; Ismail Soner Koltas; Nebil Bal

    2006-01-01

    In this report, we present computed tomographic findings of colonic trichuriasis. The patient was a 75-year-old man who complained of abdominal pain, and weight loss.Diagnosis was achieved by colonoscopic biopsy. Abdominal computed tomography showed irregular and nodular thickening of the wall of the cecum and ascending colon.Although these findings are nonspecific, they may be one of the findings of trichuriasis. These findings, confirmed by pathologic analysis of the biopsied tissue and KatoKatz parasitological stool flotation technique, revealed adult Trichuris. To our knowledge, this is the first report of colonic trichuriasis indicated by computed tomography.

  15. Imaging of aortic valve dynamics in 4D OCT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schnabel Christian

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical components of the heart, especially the valves and leaflets, are enormous stressed during lifetime. Therefore, those structures undergo different pathophysiological tissue transformations which affect cardiac output and in consequence living comfort of affected patients. These changes may lead to calcific aortic valve stenosis (AVS, the major heart valve disease in humans. The knowledge about changes of the dynamic behaviour during the course of this disease and the possibility of early stage diagnosis is of particular interest and could lead to the development of new treatment strategies and drug based options of prevention or therapy. 4D optical coherence tomography (OCT in combination with high-speed video microscopy were applied to characterize dynamic behaviour of the murine aortic valve and to characterize dynamic properties during artificial stimulation. We present a promising tool to investigate the aortic valve dynamics in an ex vivo disease model with a high spatial and temporal resolution using a multimodal imaging setup.

  16. Adaptive fusion of infrared and visible images in dynamic scene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guang; Yin, Yafeng; Man, Hong; Desai, Sachi

    2011-11-01

    Multiple modalities sensor fusion has been widely employed in various surveillance and military applications. A variety of image fusion techniques including PCA, wavelet, curvelet and HSV has been proposed in recent years to improve human visual perception for object detection. One of the main challenges for visible and infrared image fusion is to automatically determine an optimal fusion strategy for different input scenes along with an acceptable computational cost. This paper, we propose a fast and adaptive feature selection based image fusion method to obtain high a contrast image from visible and infrared sensors for targets detection. At first, fuzzy c-means clustering is applied on the infrared image to highlight possible hotspot regions, which will be considered as potential targets' locations. After that, the region surrounding the target area is segmented as the background regions. Then image fusion is locally applied on the selected target and background regions by computing different linear combination of color components from registered visible and infrared images. After obtaining different fused images, histogram distributions are computed on these local fusion images as the fusion feature set. The variance ratio which is based on Linear Discriminative Analysis (LDA) measure is employed to sort the feature set and the most discriminative one is selected for the whole image fusion. As the feature selection is performed over time, the process will dynamically determine the most suitable feature for the image fusion in different scenes. Experiment is conducted on the OSU Color-Thermal database, and TNO Human Factor dataset. The fusion results indicate that our proposed method achieved a competitive performance compared with other fusion algorithms at a relatively low computational cost.

  17. From in vitro to in vivo by dynamic multiwavelength imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, Daniel L.; Ballou, Byron T.; Fisher, Gregory W.; Taylor, D. Lansing

    1995-04-01

    There is a clear trend today towards non-invasive, dynamic, digital approaches to biomedical imaging, and a need for even higher resolution. Light is particularly well suited for such investigations, as its temporal, spatial and intensity range are unparalleled. A convergence of new capabilities from fields as diverse as electronics, optics, molecular biology, computer science and dye chemistry have transformed light microscopy from a traditional, static, 2D tool into a highly useful, dynamic, 3D research capability for biology and medicine. We believe that the understanding of certain fundamental biological functions by dynamic mapping of events in living systems is within reach, based on novel, interdisciplinary methods. For imaging molecular events with high resolution (live cells, in vitro), light microscopy has continued to improve in performance, and we survey here some of our recent progress. The same dynamic mapping can be extended to organs, whole animals and humans, by monitoring molecules labeled with the long-wavelength dyes that proved useful in microscopy. We report here results obtained by in vivo imaging of fluorescently labeled monoclonal antibodies, indicative of tumor location and evolution in nude mice.

  18. Kalman filter techniques for accelerated Cartesian dynamic cardiac imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xue; Salerno, Michael; Kramer, Christopher M; Meyer, Craig H

    2013-05-01

    In dynamic MRI, spatial and temporal parallel imaging can be exploited to reduce scan time. Real-time reconstruction enables immediate visualization during the scan. Commonly used view-sharing techniques suffer from limited temporal resolution, and many of the more advanced reconstruction methods are either retrospective, time-consuming, or both. A Kalman filter model capable of real-time reconstruction can be used to increase the spatial and temporal resolution in dynamic MRI reconstruction. The original study describing the use of the Kalman filter in dynamic MRI was limited to non-Cartesian trajectories because of a limitation intrinsic to the dynamic model used in that study. Here the limitation is overcome, and the model is applied to the more commonly used Cartesian trajectory with fast reconstruction. Furthermore, a combination of the Kalman filter model with Cartesian parallel imaging is presented to further increase the spatial and temporal resolution and signal-to-noise ratio. Simulations and experiments were conducted to demonstrate that the Kalman filter model can increase the temporal resolution of the image series compared with view-sharing techniques and decrease the spatial aliasing compared with TGRAPPA. The method requires relatively little computation, and thus is suitable for real-time reconstruction.

  19. Dynamic fluorescence lifetime imaging based on acousto-optic deflectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wei; Peng, Xiao; Qi, Jing; Gao, Jian; Fan, Shunping; Wang, Qi; Qu, Junle; Niu, Hanben

    2014-11-01

    We report a dynamic fluorescence lifetime imaging (D-FLIM) system that is based on a pair of acousto-optic deflectors for the random regions of interest (ROI) study in the sample. The two-dimensional acousto-optic deflector devices are used to rapidly scan the femtosecond excitation laser beam across the sample, providing specific random access to the ROI. Our experimental results using standard fluorescent dyes in live cancer cells demonstrate that the D-FLIM system can dynamically monitor the changing process of the microenvironment in the ROI in live biological samples.

  20. Multifractal analysis of dynamic infrared imaging of breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerasimova, E.; Audit, B.; Roux, S. G.; Khalil, A.; Argoul, F.; Naimark, O.; Arneodo, A.

    2013-12-01

    The wavelet transform modulus maxima (WTMM) method was used in a multifractal analysis of skin breast temperature time-series recorded using dynamic infrared (IR) thermography. Multifractal scaling was found for healthy breasts as the signature of a continuous change in the shape of the probability density function (pdf) of temperature fluctuations across time scales from \\sim0.3 to 3 s. In contrast, temperature time-series from breasts with malignant tumors showed homogeneous monofractal temperature fluctuations statistics. These results highlight dynamic IR imaging as a very valuable non-invasive technique for preliminary screening in asymptomatic women to identify those with risk of breast cancer.

  1. High Dynamic Range Beam Imaging with Two Simultaneously Sampling CCDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evtushenko, Pavel [JLAB; Douglas, David R. [JLAB; Legg, Robert A. [JLAB; Tennant, Christopher D. [JLAB

    2013-05-01

    Transverse beam profile measurement with sufficiently high dynamic range (HDR) is a key diagnostic to measure the beam halo, understand its sources and evolution. In this contribution we describe our initial experience with the HDR imaging of the electron beam at the JLab FEL. On contrary to HDR measurements made with wire scanners in counting mode, which provide only two or three 1D projections of transverse beam distribution, imaging allows to measure the distribution itself. That is especially important for non-equilibrium beams in the LINACs. The measurements were made by means of simultaneous imaging with two CCD sensors with different exposure time. Two images are combined then numerically in to one HDR image. The system works as an online tool providing HDR images at 4 Hz. An optically polished YAG:Ce crystal with the thickness of 100 {micro}m was used for the measurements. When tested with a laser beam images with the DR of about 10{sup 5} were obtained. With the electron beam the DR was somewhat smaller due to the limitations in the time structure of the tune-up beam macro pulse.

  2. High Dynamic Range Beam Imaging with Two Simultaneously Sampling CCDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evtushenko, Pavel E. [JLAB; Douglas, David R. [JLAB

    2013-06-01

    Transverse beam profile measurement with sufficiently high dynamic range (HDR) is a key diagnostic to measure the beam halo, understand its sources and evolution. In this contribution we describe our initial experience with the HDR imaging of the electron beam at the JLab FEL. On contrary to HDR measurements made with wire scanners in counting mode, which provide only two or three 1D projections of transverse beam distribution, imaging allows to measure the distribution itself. That is especially important for non-equilibrium beams in the LINACs. The measurements were made by means of simultaneous imaging with two CCD sensors with different exposure time. Two images are combined then numerically in to one HDR image. The system works as an online tool providing HDR images at 4 Hz. An optically polished YAG:Ce crystal with the thickness of 100 {micro}m was used for the measurements. When tested with a laser beam images with the DR of about 10{sup 5} were obtained. With the electron beam the DR was somewhat smaller due to the limitations in the time structure of the tune-up beam macro pulse.

  3. Dynamical image-charge effect in molecular tunnel junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Chengjun; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2014-01-01

    When an electron tunnels between two metal contacts it temporarily induces an image charge (IC) in the electrodes which acts back on the tunneling electron. It is usually assumed that the IC forms instantaneously such that a static model for the image potential applies. Here we investigate how th...... that the dynamical corrections can reduce the conductance by more than a factor of two when compared to static GW or density functional theory where the molecular energy levels have been shifted to match the exact quasiparticle levels....

  4. NMR imaging of fluid dynamics in reservoir core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, B A; Yamanashi, W S

    1988-01-01

    A medical NMR imaging instrument has been modified to image water and oil in reservoir rocks by the construction of a new receiving coil. Both oil and water inside the core produced readily detectable proton NMR signals, while the rock matrix produced no signal. Because of similar T2 NMR relaxation times, the water was doped with a paramagnetic ion, Mn+2, to reduce its T2 relaxation time. This procedure enhanced the separation between the oil and water phases in the resulting images. Sequential measurements, as water imbibed into one end and oil was expelled from the other end of a core plug, produced a series of images which showed the dynamics of the fluids. For water-wet Berea Sandstone a flood front was readily observed, but some of the oil was apparently left behind in small, isolated pockets which were larger than individual pores. After several additional pore volumes of water flowed through the plug the NMR image indicated a homogeneous distribution of oil. The amount of residual oil, as determined from the ratio of NMR intensities, closely approximated the residual oil saturation of fully flooded Berea samples measured by Dean-Stark extraction. A Berea sandstone core treated to make it partially oil-wet, did not show a definitive flood front, but appeared to channel the water around the perimeter of the core plug. The relative ease with which these images were made indicates that NMR imaging can be a useful technique to follow the dynamics of oil and water through a core plug for a variety of production processes.

  5. Digital optical tomography system for dynamic breast imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flexman, Molly L; Khalil, Michael A; Al Abdi, Rabah; Kim, Hyun K; Fong, Christopher J; Desperito, Elise; Hershman, Dawn L; Barbour, Randall L; Hielscher, Andreas H

    2011-07-01

    Diffuse optical tomography has shown promising results as a tool for breast cancer screening and monitoring response to chemotherapy. Dynamic imaging of the transient response of the breast to an external stimulus, such as pressure or a respiratory maneuver, can provide additional information that can be used to detect tumors. We present a new digital continuous-wave optical tomography system designed to simultaneously image both breasts at fast frame rates and with a large number of sources and detectors. The system uses a master-slave digital signal processor-based detection architecture to achieve a dynamic range of 160 dB and a frame rate of 1.7 Hz with 32 sources, 64 detectors, and 4 wavelengths per breast. Included is a preliminary study of one healthy patient and two breast cancer patients showing the ability to identify an invasive carcinoma based on the hemodynamic response to a breath hold.

  6. Compressive dynamic range imaging via Bayesian shrinkage dictionary learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xin

    2016-12-01

    We apply the Bayesian shrinkage dictionary learning into compressive dynamic-range imaging. By attenuating the luminous intensity impinging upon the detector at the pixel level, we demonstrate a conceptual design of an 8-bit camera to sample high-dynamic-range scenes with a single snapshot. Coding strategies for both monochrome and color cameras are proposed. A Bayesian reconstruction algorithm is developed to learn a dictionary in situ on the sampled image, for joint reconstruction and demosaicking. We use global-local shrinkage priors to learn the dictionary and dictionary coefficients representing the data. Simulation results demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed camera and the superior performance of the Bayesian shrinkage dictionary learning algorithm.

  7. A simplified method for processing dynamic images of gastric antrum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, J L; Graff, J; Fugisang, S

    2000-01-01

    of the corresponding time-activity curve might be crucial. To overcome this problem we evaluated a new technique based on a fixed box-ROI and a simple weighting principle. Eight healthy volunteers ingested a meal that contained a 99Tcm-stannous colloid labelled omelette. Gastric emptying was assessed from static...... images taken at 30-mm intervals for 2 h. Anterior dynamic frames of 1 s each, which were acquired for 5 mm after each static acquisition, were used to determine the frequency of antral contractions. In order to allow for precise outlining of the antrum, each set of dynamic images was at first reframed...... of radioactivity in the 15 columns was determined. On the assumption that the horizontal oscillations of the geometric centre of radioactivity in the ROI reflected the contractile activity of the antrum, the frequency of these contractions was calculated by fast Fourier transform analysis of the obtained time...

  8. Comparison among tomographic reconstruction with limited data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Eric F.; Dantas, Carlos C.; Vasconcelos, Daniel A.A.; Cadiz, Luis F., E-mail: ccd@ufpe.br [Department of Nuclear Energy (DEN). Federal University of Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Melo, Silvio B., E-mail: sbm@cin.ufpe.br [Informatic Center (CIN), Federal University of Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Nowadays there is a continuing interest in applying computed tomography (CT) techniques in non-destructive testing and inspection of many industrial products. These applications of CT usually require a differentiated analysis when there are strong limitations in acquiring a sufficiently large amount of projection data. The use of a low number of tomographic data normally degrades the quality of the reconstructed image, highlighting the formation of artifacts and noise. This work investigates the reconstruction methods most commonly used (FBP, ART, SIRT, MART, SMART) and shows the performance of each one in this limited scenario. For this purpose, all methods were implemented and tested with a phantom of uniform density with well-known distribution, with measures of transmission of gamma radiation in a first generation CT scanner. The phantom is a concentric stainless steel tube coupled with a half - cylinder of aluminum. The measurements were made with an highest root mean square error, with the formation of visible artifacts. The artifacts are diminished but still visible in the ART and SIRT techniques, and the best performance was observed with the techniques MART and SMART. The technical superiority of these multiplicative methods is clearly seen in the reconstructed image quality, endorsing their application to situations of limited input data. (author)

  9. Computed tomographic anatomy of the equine foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claerhoudt, S; Bergman, E H J; Saunders, J H

    2014-10-01

    This study describes a detailed computed tomographic reference of the normal equine foot. Ten forefeet of five adult cadavers, without evidence of orthopaedic disease, were used. Computed tomography (CT) was performed on all feet. Two-millimetre thick transverse slices were obtained, and sagittal and dorsal planes were reformatted. The CT images were matched with the corresponding anatomic slices. The phalanges and the distal sesamoid bone showed excellent detail. The extensor and flexor tendons (including their attachments) could be clearly evaluated. The collateral (sesamoidean) ligaments could be readily located, but were difficult to delineate at their proximal attachment. The distal digital annular ligament could only be distinguished from the deep digital flexor tendon proximal to the distal sesamoid bone, and its proximal attachment could be identified, but not its distal insertion. Small ligaments (impar ligament, chondrosesamoidean, chondrocoronal and chondrocompedal ligaments, axial and abaxial palmar ligaments of the proximal inter-phalangeal joint) were seen with difficulty and not at all slices. The joint capsules could not be delineated from the surrounding soft tissue structures. The lateral and medial proprius palmar digital artery and vein could be visualized occasionally on some slices. The ungular cartilages, corium and hoof wall layering were seen. The nerves, the articular and fibrocartilage of the distal sesamoid bone and the chondroungular ligament could not be assessed. Computed tomography of the equine foot can be of great value when results of radiography and ultrasonography are inconclusive. Images obtained in this study may serve as reference for CT of the equine foot.

  10. Tomographic Particle Localization and Velocity Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirner, S.; Forster, G.; Schein, J.

    2015-01-01

    Wire arc spraying is one of the most common and elementary thermal spray processes. Due to its easy handling, high deposition rate, and relative low process costs, it is a frequently used coating technology for the production of wear and corrosion resistant coatings. In order to produce reliable and reproducible coatings, it is necessary to be able to control the coating process. This can be achieved by analyzing the parameters of the particles deposited. Essential for the coating quality are, for example, the velocity, the size, and the temperature of the particles. In this work, an innovative diagnostic for particle velocity and location determination is presented. By the use of several synchronized CMOS-Cameras positioned around the particle jet, a series of images from different directions is simultaneously taken. The images contain the information that is necessary to calculate the 3D-location-vector of the particles and finally with the help of the exposure time the trajectory can be determined. In this work, the experimental setup of the tomographic diagnostic is presented, the mathematical method of the reconstruction is explained, and first measured velocity distributions are shown.

  11. Hybrid bright-field and hologram imaging of cell dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byeon, Hyeokjun; Lee, Jaehyun; Doh, Junsang; Lee, Sang Joon

    2016-09-01

    Volumetric observation is essential for understanding the details of complex biological phenomena. In this study, a bright-field microscope, which provides information on a specific 2D plane, and a holographic microscope, which provides information spread over 3D volumes, are integrated to acquire two complementary images simultaneously. The developed system was successfully applied to capture distinct T-cell adhesion dynamics on inflamed endothelial layers, including capture, rolling, crawling, transendothelial migration, and subendothelial migration.

  12. Linear dynamic range enhancement in a CMOS imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A CMOS imager with increased linear dynamic range but without degradation in noise, responsivity, linearity, fixed-pattern noise, or photometric calibration comprises a linear calibrated dual gain pixel in which the gain is reduced after a pre-defined threshold level by switching in an additional capacitance. The pixel may include a novel on-pixel latch circuit that is used to switch in the additional capacitance.

  13. Dynamic stimulus enhancement with Gabor-based filtered images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkus, Alan R.; Poteet, Miriam J.; Pantle, Allan J.

    2008-04-01

    In an empirical study, observers gave ratings of their ability to detect a military target in filtered images of natural scenes. The purpose of the study was twofold. First, the absolute value of the convolution images generated with oriented Gabor filters of different scales and orientations, and pairs of filters (corner filters), provided brightness images which were evaluated as saliency maps of potential target locations. The generation of the saliency maps with oriented Gabor filters was modeled after the second-order processing of texture in the visual system. Second, two methods of presentation of the saliency maps were compared. With the flicker presentation method, a saliency map was flickered on and off at a 2-Hz rate and superimposed upon the image of the original scene. The flicker presentation method was designed to take advantage of the known properties of the magnocellular pathway of the visual system. A second method (toggle presentation) used simply for comparison, required observers to switch back and forth between the saliency image and the image of the original scene. Primary results were that (1) saliency images produced with corner filters were rated higher than those produced with simple Gabor filters, and (2) ratings obtained with the flicker method were higher than those obtained with the toggle method, with the greatest advantage for filters tuned to lower spatial frequencies. The second result suggests that the flicker presentation method holds considerable promise as a new technique for combining information (dynamic image fusion) from two or more independently obtained (e.g., multi-spectral) or processed images.

  14. Image Quality of the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) Onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachter, R.; Schou, Jesper; Rabello-Soares, M. C.; Miles, J. W.; Duvall, T. L., Jr.; Bush, R. I.

    2011-01-01

    We describe the imaging quality of the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) as measured during the ground calibration of the instrument. We describe the calibration techniques and report our results for the final configuration of HMI. We present the distortion, modulation transfer function, stray light,image shifts introduced by moving parts of the instrument, best focus, field curvature, and the relative alignment of the two cameras. We investigate the gain and linearity of the cameras, and present the measured flat field.

  15. Polycystic ovary syndrome: dynamic contrast-enhanced ovary MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdem, C. Zuhal E-mail: sunarerdem@yahoo.com; Bayar, Ulku; Erdem, L. Oktay; Barut, Aykut; Gundogdu, Sadi; Kaya, Erdal

    2004-07-01

    Objective: to determine the enhancement behaviour of the ovaries in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (DCE-MR) imaging and to compare these data with those of normal ovulating controls. Method: 24 women with PCOS and 12 controls underwent DCE-MR imaging. Dynamic images were acquired before and after injection of a contrast bolus at 30 s and the min of 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5. On postprocessing examination: (i) the ovarian volumes; (ii) the signal intensity value of each ovary per dynamic study; (iii) early-phase enhancement rate; (iv) time to peak enhancement (T{sub p}); and (v) percentage of washout of 5th min were determined. Data of the ovaries of the women with PCOS and controls were compared with Mann-Whitney U-test. Results: the mean values of T{sub p} were found to be significantly lower in women with PCOS than in controls (p<0.05). On the other hand, the mean values of ovarian volume, the early-phase enhancement rate, and percentage of washout of 5th min of ovaries were significantly higher in PCOS patients (p<0.05). Examination of the mean signal intensity-time curve revealed the ovaries in women with PCOS showed a faster and greater enhancement and wash-out. Conclusion: the enhancement behaviour of ovaries of women with PCOS may be significantly different from those of control subjects on DCE-MR imaging examination. In our experience, it is a valuable modality to highlight the vascularization changes in ovarian stroma with PCOS. We believe that improved DCE-MR imaging techniques may also provide us additional parameters in the diagnosis and treatment strategies of PCOS.

  16. Tracking ultrafast relaxation dynamics of furan by femtosecond photoelectron imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yuzhu, E-mail: yuzhu.liu@gmail.com [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044 (China); Knopp, Gregor [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen 5232 (Switzerland); Qin, Chaochao [Department of Physics, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang 453007 (China); Gerber, Thomas [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen 5232 (Switzerland)

    2015-01-13

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Relaxation dynamics of furan are tracked by femtosecond photoelectron imaging. • The mechanism for ultrafast formation of α-carbene and β-carbene is proposed. • Ultrafast internal conversion from S{sub 2} to S{sub 1} is observed. • The transient characteristics of the fragment ions are obtained. • Single-color multi-photon ionization dynamics at 800 nm are also studied. - Abstract: Ultrafast internal conversion dynamics of furan has been studied by femtosecond photoelectron imaging (PEI) coupled with photofragmentation (PF) spectroscopy. Photoelectron imaging of single-color multi-photon ionization and two-color pump–probe ionization are obtained and analyzed. Photoelectron bands are assigned to the related states. The time evolution of the photoelectron signal by pump–probe ionization can be well described by a biexponential decay: two rapid relaxation pathways with time constants of ∼15 fs and 85 (±11) fs. The rapid relaxation is ascribed to the ultrafast internal conversion (IC) from the S{sub 2} state to the vibrationally hot S{sub 1} state. The second relaxation process is attributed to the redistributions and depopulation of secondarily populated high vibronic S{sub 1} state and the formation of α-carbene and β-carbene by H immigration. Additionally, the transient characteristics of the fragment ions are also measured and discussed as a complementary understanding.

  17. Dynamic, nondestructive imaging of a bioengineered vascular graft endothelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryce M Whited

    Full Text Available Bioengineering of vascular grafts holds great potential to address the shortcomings associated with autologous and conventional synthetic vascular grafts used for small diameter grafting procedures. Lumen endothelialization of bioengineered vascular grafts is essential to provide an antithrombogenic graft surface to ensure long-term patency after implantation. Conventional methods used to assess endothelialization in vitro typically involve periodic harvesting of the graft for histological sectioning and staining of the lumen. Endpoint testing methods such as these are effective but do not provide real-time information of endothelial cells in their intact microenvironment, rather only a single time point measurement of endothelium development. Therefore, nondestructive methods are needed to provide dynamic information of graft endothelialization and endothelium maturation in vitro. To address this need, we have developed a nondestructive fiber optic based (FOB imaging method that is capable of dynamic assessment of graft endothelialization without disturbing the graft housed in a bioreactor. In this study we demonstrate the capability of the FOB imaging method to quantify electrospun vascular graft endothelialization, EC detachment, and apoptosis in a nondestructive manner. The electrospun scaffold fiber diameter of the graft lumen was systematically varied and the FOB imaging system was used to noninvasively quantify the affect of topography on graft endothelialization over a 7-day period. Additionally, results demonstrated that the FOB imaging method had a greater imaging penetration depth than that of two-photon microscopy. This imaging method is a powerful tool to optimize vascular grafts and bioreactor conditions in vitro, and can be further adapted to monitor endothelium maturation and response to fluid flow bioreactor preconditioning.

  18. Comparative validation of the radiographic and tomographic measurement of patellar height

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio Schueda

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate and validate the radiographic measurement of patellar height with computerized tomography scans. METHODS: Measured the patellar height through the lateral radiographic image supported by one foot and sagittal tomographic view of the knee in extension, flexion of 20°, and quadriceps contraction of 40 patients (80 knees, asymptomatic and no history of knee injuries using Insall-Salvati index. There were 20 adult females and 20 adult males. RESULTS: The height patellar index was higher in women of all images taken, in proportion. There was no statistical difference of patellar height index between the radiographics and tomographics images. CONCLUSION: The Insall-Salvati index in females was higher in all cases evaluated. Furthermore, it is possible to measure the patellar height index during tomographic study without distorting the results obtained, using to define the presence of patella alta or patella baja.

  19. Imaging Cellular Dynamics with Spectral Relaxation Imaging Microscopy: Distinct Spectral Dynamics in Golgi Membranes of Living Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajevardipour, Alireza; Chon, James W. M.; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha; Clayton, Andrew H. A.

    2016-11-01

    Spectral relaxation from fluorescent probes is a useful technique for determining the dynamics of condensed phases. To this end, we have developed a method based on wide-field spectral fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy to extract spectral relaxation correlation times of fluorescent probes in living cells. We show that measurement of the phase and modulation of fluorescence from two wavelengths permit the identification and determination of excited state lifetimes and spectral relaxation correlation times at a single modulation frequency. For NBD fluorescence in glycerol/water mixtures, the spectral relaxation correlation time determined by our approach exhibited good agreement with published dielectric relaxation measurements. We applied this method to determine the spectral relaxation dynamics in membranes of living cells. Measurements of the Golgi-specific C6-NBD-ceramide probe in living HeLa cells revealed sub-nanosecond spectral dynamics in the intracellular Golgi membrane and slower nanosecond spectral dynamics in the extracellular plasma membrane. We interpret the distinct spectral dynamics as a result of structural plasticity of the Golgi membrane relative to more rigid plasma membranes. To the best of our knowledge, these results constitute one of the first measurements of Golgi rotational dynamics.

  20. Imaging Cellular Dynamics with Spectral Relaxation Imaging Microscopy: Distinct Spectral Dynamics in Golgi Membranes of Living Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajevardipour, Alireza; Chon, James W M; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha; Clayton, Andrew H A

    2016-11-22

    Spectral relaxation from fluorescent probes is a useful technique for determining the dynamics of condensed phases. To this end, we have developed a method based on wide-field spectral fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy to extract spectral relaxation correlation times of fluorescent probes in living cells. We show that measurement of the phase and modulation of fluorescence from two wavelengths permit the identification and determination of excited state lifetimes and spectral relaxation correlation times at a single modulation frequency. For NBD fluorescence in glycerol/water mixtures, the spectral relaxation correlation time determined by our approach exhibited good agreement with published dielectric relaxation measurements. We applied this method to determine the spectral relaxation dynamics in membranes of living cells. Measurements of the Golgi-specific C6-NBD-ceramide probe in living HeLa cells revealed sub-nanosecond spectral dynamics in the intracellular Golgi membrane and slower nanosecond spectral dynamics in the extracellular plasma membrane. We interpret the distinct spectral dynamics as a result of structural plasticity of the Golgi membrane relative to more rigid plasma membranes. To the best of our knowledge, these results constitute one of the first measurements of Golgi rotational dynamics.

  1. Dynamic and data-driven classification for polarimetric SAR images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlmann, S.; Kiranyaz, S.; Ince, T.; Gabbouj, M.

    2011-11-01

    In this paper, we introduce dynamic and scalable Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) terrain classification based on the Collective Network of Binary Classifiers (CNBC). The CNBC framework is primarily adapted to maximize the SAR classification accuracy on dynamically varying databases where variations do occur in any time in terms of (new) images, classes, features and users' relevance feedback. Whenever a "change" occurs, the CNBC dynamically and "optimally" adapts itself to the change by means of its topology and the underlying evolutionary method MD PSO. Thanks to its "Divide and Conquer" type approach, the CNBC can also support varying and large set of (PolSAR) features among which it optimally selects, weighs and fuses the most discriminative ones for a particular class. Each SAR terrain class is discriminated by a dedicated Network of Binary Classifiers (NBC), which encapsulates a set of evolutionary Binary Classifiers (BCs) discriminating the class with a distinctive feature set. Moreover, with each incremental evolution session, new classes/features can be introduced which signals the CNBC to create new corresponding NBCs and BCs within to adapt and scale dynamically to the change. This can in turn be a significant advantage when the current CNBC is used to classify multiple SAR images with similar terrain classes since no or only minimal (incremental) evolution sessions are needed to adapt it to a new classification problem while using the previously acquired knowledge. We demonstrate our proposed classification approach over several medium and highresolution NASA/JPL AIRSAR images applying various polarimetric decompositions. We evaluate and compare the computational complexity and classification accuracy against static Neural Network classifiers. As CNBC classification accuracy can compete and even surpass them, the computational complexity of CNBC is significantly lower as the CNBC body supports high parallelization making it applicable to grid

  2. A method for dynamic subtraction MR imaging of the liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setti Ernesto

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Subtraction of Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced 3D Magnetic Resonance (DCE-MR volumes can result in images that depict and accurately characterize a variety of liver lesions. However, the diagnostic utility of subtraction images depends on the extent of co-registration between non-enhanced and enhanced volumes. Movement of liver structures during acquisition must be corrected prior to subtraction. Currently available methods are computer intensive. We report a new method for the dynamic subtraction of MR liver images that does not require excessive computer time. Methods Nineteen consecutive patients (median age 45 years; range 37–67 were evaluated by VIBE T1-weighted sequences (TR 5.2 ms, TE 2.6 ms, flip angle 20°, slice thickness 1.5 mm acquired before and 45s after contrast injection. Acquisition parameters were optimized for best portal system enhancement. Pre and post-contrast liver volumes were realigned using our 3D registration method which combines: (a rigid 3D translation using maximization of normalized mutual information (NMI, and (b fast 2D non-rigid registration which employs a complex discrete wavelet transform algorithm to maximize pixel phase correlation and perform multiresolution analysis. Registration performance was assessed quantitatively by NMI. Results The new registration procedure was able to realign liver structures in all 19 patients. NMI increased by about 8% after rigid registration (native vs. rigid registration 0.073 ± 0.031 vs. 0.078 ± 0.031, n.s., paired t-test and by a further 23% (0.096 ± 0.035 vs. 0.078 ± 0.031, p t-test after non-rigid realignment. The overall average NMI increase was 31%. Conclusion This new method for realigning dynamic contrast-enhanced 3D MR volumes of liver leads to subtraction images that enhance diagnostic possibilities for liver lesions.

  3. Tomographic probability representation for quantum fermion fields

    CERN Document Server

    Andreev, V A; Man'ko, V I; Son, Nguyen Hung; Thanh, Nguyen Cong; Timofeev, Yu P; Zakharov, S D

    2009-01-01

    Tomographic probability representation is introduced for fermion fields. The states of the fermions are mapped onto probability distribution of discrete random variables (spin projections). The operators acting on the fermion states are described by fermionic tomographic symbols. The product of the operators acting on the fermion states is mapped onto star-product of the fermionic symbols. The kernel of the star-product is obtained. The antisymmetry of the fermion states is formulated as the specific symmetry property of the tomographic joint probability distribution associated with the states.

  4. Dynamic magnetic resonance imaging of swallowing and laryngeal motion using parallel imaging at 3 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breyer, Tobias; Echternach, Matthias; Arndt, Susan; Richter, Bernhard; Speck, Oliver; Schumacher, Martin; Markl, Michael

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of an optimized MRI protocol based on high field imaging at 3 T in combination with accelerated data acquisition by parallel imaging for the analysis of oropharyngeal and laryngeal function. Fast 2D gradient echo (GRE) MRI with different spatial resolutions (1.7x2.7 and 1.1x1.5 mm2) and image update rates (4 and 10 frames per second) was employed to assess pharyngeal movements and visualize swallowing via tracking of an oral contrast bolus (blueberry juice). In a study with 10 normal volunteers, image quality was semi-quantitatively graded by three independent observers with respect to the delineation of anatomical detail and depiction of oropharynx and larynx function. Additionally, the feasibility of the technique for the visualization of pathological pre- and post-surgical oropharynx and larynx function was evaluated in a patient with inspiratory stridor. Image grading demonstrated the feasibility of dynamic MRI for the assessment of normal oropharynx and larynx anatomy and function. Superior image quality (Pswallowing. Results of the volunteer study demonstrated the feasibility of dynamic MRI at 3 T for the visualization of the oropharynx and larynx function during breathing, movements of the tongue and swallowing. Future studies are necessary to evaluate its clinical value compared to existing modalities based on endoscopy or radiographic techniques.

  5. Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in chronic Achilles tendinosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gärdin, Anna; Brismar, Torkel B; Movin, Tomas; Shalabi, Adel

    2013-11-22

    Chronic Achilles tendinosis is a common problem. When evaluating and comparing different therapies there is a need for reliable imaging methods. Our aim was to evaluate if chronic Achilles tendinosis affects the dynamic contrast-enhancement in the tendon and its surroundings and if short-term eccentric calf-muscle training normalizes the dynamic contrast-enhancement. 20 patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy were included. Median duration of symptoms was 31 months (range 6 to 120 months). Both Achilles tendons were examined with dynamic contrast enhanced MRI before and after a 12- week exercise programme of eccentric calf-muscle training. The dynamic MRI was evaluated in tendon, vessel and in fat ventrally of tendon. Area under the curve (AUC), time to peak of signal, signal increase per second (SI/s) and increase in signal between start and peak as a percentage (SI%) was calculated. Pain and performance were evaluated using a questionnaire. In the fat ventrally of the tendon, dynamic contrast enhancement was significantly higher in the symptomatic leg compared to the contralateral non-symptomatic leg before but not after treatment. Despite decreased pain and improved performance there was no significant change of dynamic contrast enhancement in symptomatic tendons after treatment. In Achilles tendinosis there is an increased contrast enhancement in the fat ventrally of the tendon. The lack of correlation with symptoms and the lack of significant changes in tendon contrast enhancement parameters do however indicate that dynamic enhanced MRI is currently not a useful method to evaluate chronic Achilles tendinosis.

  6. Design and implementation of a noise radar tomographic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmuth, Mark A.; Shin, Hee Jung; Narayanan, Ram M.; Rangaswamy, Muralidhar

    2015-05-01

    A hardware system has been developed to perform ultrawideband (UWB) noise radar tomography over the 3-5 GHz frequency range. The system utilizes RF hardware to transmit multiple independent and identically distributed UWB random noise waveforms. A 3-5 GHz band-limited signal is generated using an arbitrary waveform generator and the waveform is then amplified and transmitted through a horn antenna. A linear scanner with a single antenna is used in place of an antenna array to collect backscatter. The backscatter is collected from the transmission of each waveform and reconstructed to form an image. The images that result from each scan are averaged to produce a single tomographic image of the target. After background subtraction, the scans are averaged to improve the image quality. The experimental results are compared to the theoretical predictions. The system is able to successfully image metallic and dielectric cylinders of different cross sections.

  7. Fast regional readout CMOS Image Sensor for dynamic MLC tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zin, H.; Harris, E.; Osmond, J.; Evans, P.

    2014-03-01

    Advanced radiotherapy techniques such as volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) require verification of the complex beam delivery including tracking of multileaf collimators (MLC) and monitoring the dose rate. This work explores the feasibility of a prototype Complementary metal-oxide semiconductor Image Sensor (CIS) for tracking these complex treatments by utilising fast, region of interest (ROI) read out functionality. An automatic edge tracking algorithm was used to locate the MLC leaves edges moving at various speeds (from a moving triangle field shape) and imaged with various sensor frame rates. The CIS demonstrates successful edge detection of the dynamic MLC motion within accuracy of 1.0 mm. This demonstrates the feasibility of the sensor to verify treatment delivery involving dynamic MLC up to ~400 frames per second (equivalent to the linac pulse rate), which is superior to any current techniques such as using electronic portal imaging devices (EPID). CIS provides the basis to an essential real-time verification tool, useful in accessing accurate delivery of complex high energy radiation to the tumour and ultimately to achieve better cure rates for cancer patients.

  8. Segmentation of dynamic PET images with kinetic spectral clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouysset, S.; Zbib, H.; Stute, S.; Girault, J. M.; Charara, J.; Noailles, J.; Chalon, S.; Buvat, I.; Tauber, C.

    2013-10-01

    Segmentation is often required for the analysis of dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) images. However, noise and low spatial resolution make it a difficult task and several supervised and unsupervised methods have been proposed in the literature to perform the segmentation based on semi-automatic clustering of the time activity curves of voxels. In this paper we propose a new method based on spectral clustering that does not require any prior information on the shape of clusters in the space in which they are identified. In our approach, the p-dimensional data, where p is the number of time frames, is first mapped into a high dimensional space and then clustering is performed in a low-dimensional space of the Laplacian matrix. An estimation of the bounds for the scale parameter involved in the spectral clustering is derived. The method is assessed using dynamic brain PET images simulated with GATE and results on real images are presented. We demonstrate the usefulness of the method and its superior performance over three other clustering methods from the literature. The proposed approach appears as a promising pre-processing tool before parametric map calculation or ROI-based quantification tasks.

  9. Computed Tomographic Evaluation of Mandibular Ameloblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Eswar

    2003-01-01

    Five interesting cases of mandibular ameloblastoma are presented here, each case showing different histological pattern and corresponding computer tomographic appearance. Also an attempt is made to establish CT pattern in these histological varieties of ameloblastoma.

  10. Reduction of noise in medullary renograms from dynamic MR images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giele, E L; de Priester, J A; Blom, J A; den Boer, J A; van Engelshoven, J M; Hasman, A

    2000-02-01

    Dynamic magnetic resonance images of the kidney can be used to acquire separate renograms of the cortex and medulla. A high-quality cortical renogram can be determined directly from a region of interest (ROI) placed in the cortex. Due to partial volume effects, part of the signal from a ROI placed in the medulla is caused by cortical tissue. By subtracting a fraction of the cortical signal from the cortico-medullary signal, a purer medullary renogram can be obtained. A side effect of this subtraction is an increase in noise level. The noise level increases with larger partial volume fractions. Using a matched image filter, it is possible to exclude those areas from the ROI that have a high partial volume content, thus reducing the amount of cortical signal that has to be separated from the medullary signal. Noise reductions of up to 50% have been achieved in the medullary renogram, with an average reduction of 23%.

  11. Dynamic fluorescence imaging for multiparametric measurement of tumor vasculature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Myunghwan; Choi, Kyungsun; Ryu, Seung-Wook; Lee, Jungwhoi; Choi, Chulhee

    2011-04-01

    Angiogenesis is essential for tumor growth and a promising target for cancer therapy. Blood vessel monitoring is an indispensable tool for evaluation and development of anti-angiogenic drugs. Here, we report a new noninvasive in vivo imaging tool, named dynamic fluorescence imaging (DyFI), for the simultaneous measurement of multiple vascular parameters including vascular density, perfusion rate, and permeability using spatiotemporal profiles of indocyanine green. Using DyFI in a tumor xenograft model, we quantitatively measured multiple vascular parameters in tumors and normal tissues with high spatial resolution. The multimodality of this method allowed us to find negative spatial correlations between perfusion and permeability. Moreover, DyFI was effective for revealing the early effects of an anti-angiogenic drug. We suggest that DyFI could be a useful tool for the preclinical development of anti-angiogenic drugs.

  12. Dynamic force microscopy for imaging of viruses under physiological conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kienberger Ferry

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic force microscopy (DFM allows imaging of the structure and the assessment of the function of biological specimens in their physiological environment. In DFM, the cantilever is oscillated at a given frequency and touches the sample only at the end of its downward movement. Accordingly, the problem of lateral forces displacing or even destroying bio-molecules is virtually inexistent as the contact time and friction forces are reduced. Here, we describe the use of DFM in studies of human rhinovirus serotype 2 (HRV2 weakly adhering to mica surfaces. The capsid of HRV2 was reproducibly imaged without any displacement of the virus. Release of the genomic RNA from the virions was initiated by exposure to low pH buffer and snapshots of the extrusion process were obtained. In the following, the technical details of previous DFM investigations of HRV2 are summarized.

  13. Speckle Decorrelation and Dynamic Range in Speckle Noise Limited Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Sivaramakrishnan, A; Hodge, P E; MacIntosh, B A; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Lloyd, James P.; Hodge, Philip E.; Macintosh, Bruce A.

    2002-01-01

    The useful dynamic range of an image in the diffraction limited regime is usually limited by speckles caused by residual phase errors in the optical system forming the image. The technique of speckle decorrelation involves introducing many independent realizations of additional phase error into a wavefront during one speckle lifetime, changing the instantaneous speckle pattern. A commonly held assumption is that this results in the speckles being `moved around' at the rate at which the additional phase screens are applied. The intention of this exercise is to smooth the speckles out into a more uniform background distribution during their persistence time, thereby enabling companion detection around bright stars to be photon noise limited rather than speckle-limited. We demonstrate analytically why this does not occur, and confirm this result with numerical simulations. We show that the original speckles must persist, and that the technique of speckle decorrelation merely adds more noise to the original speck...

  14. Imaging the ageing dynamics of polymer solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seeland, Marco; Roland, Roesch; Harald, Hoppe [Institute of Physics, Ilmenau University of Technology (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Nowadays, many attempts are existing on the route towards higher power conversion efficiencies in polymer solar cells. In addition, the lifetimes of such devices play a key role for the market entry as commercial products. To investigate the timescale of degradation processes, we applied long-time stability measurements with devices stored in the dark and under illumination and compare the results with luminescence images. The application of those techniques allows us to investigate the ageing dynamics in our devices consisting of an interpenetrating network of P3HT and PCBM, sandwiched between the ITO/PEDOT:PSS and aluminium electrode.

  15. Applications of image metrics in dynamic scene adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadjadi, Firooz A.

    1992-08-01

    One of the major problems in dealing with the changes in the information contented a scene which is one of the characteristics of any dynamic scene is how adapt to these variations such that the performance of any automatic scene analyzer such as object recognizer be at its optimum. In this paper we examine the use of image and signal metrics for characterizing any scene variations and then we describe an automated system for the extraction of these quality measures and finally we will show how these metrics can be used for the automatic adaptation of an object recognition system and the resulting jump in the performance of this system.

  16. Hyperpolarized 13C metabolic imaging using dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hurd, Ralph E.; Yen, Yi‐Fen; Chen, Albert

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the basic physics of dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (dissolution‐DNP), and the impact of the resulting highly nonequilibrium spin states, on the physics of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detection. The hardware requirements for clinical translation...... of this technology are also presented. For studies that allow the use of externally administered agents, hyperpolarization offers a way to overcome normal magnetic resonance sensitivity limitations, at least for a brief T1‐dependent observation window. A 10,000–100,000‐fold signal‐to‐noise advantage provides...

  17. Molecular imaging with dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miles, K.A., E-mail: k.a.miles@bsms.ac.u [Clinical Imaging Sciences Centre, Brighton and Sussex Medical School, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-15

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) is a quantitative technique that employs rapid sequences of CT images after bolus administration of intravenous contrast material to measure a range of physiological processes related to the microvasculature of tissues. By combining knowledge of the molecular processes underlying changes in vascular physiology with an understanding of the relationship between vascular physiology and CT contrast enhancement, DCE-CT can be redefined as a molecular imaging technique. Some DCE-CT derived parameters reflect tissue hypoxia and can, therefore, provide information about the cellular microenvironment. DCE-CT can also depict physiological processes, such as vasodilatation, that represent the physiological consequences of molecular responses to tissue hypoxia. To date the main applications have been in stroke and oncology. Unlike some other molecular imaging approaches, DCE-CT benefits from wide availability and ease of application along with the use of contrast materials and software packages that have achieved full regulatory approval. Hence, DCE-CT represents a molecular imaging technique that is applicable in clinical practice today.

  18. Classification of cryo electron microscopy images, noisy tomographic images recorded with unknown projection directions, by simultaneously estimating reconstructions and application to an assembly mutant of Cowpea Chlorotic Mottle Virus and portals of the bacteriophage P22

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Junghoon; Zheng, Yili; Yin, Zhye; Doerschuk, Peter C.; Johnson, John E.

    2010-08-01

    Cryo electron microscopy is frequently used on biological specimens that show a mixture of different types of object. Because the electron beam rapidly destroys the specimen, the beam current is minimized which leads to noisy images (SNR substantially less than 1) and only one projection image per object (with an unknown projection direction) is collected. For situations where the objects can reasonably be described as coming from a finite set of classes, an approach based on joint maximum likelihood estimation of the reconstruction of each class and then use of the reconstructions to label the class of each image is described and demonstrated on two challenging problems: an assembly mutant of Cowpea Chlorotic Mottle Virus and portals of the bacteriophage P22.

  19. Dynamic hysteresis between gradient echo and spin echo attenuations in dynamic susceptibility contrast imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chao; Kiselev, Valerij G; Möller, Harald E; Fiebach, Jochen B

    2013-04-01

    Perfusion measurements using dynamic susceptibility contrast imaging provide additional information about the mean vessel size of microvasculature when supplemented with a dual gradient echo (GE) - spin echo (SE) contrast. Dynamic increase in the corresponding transverse relaxation rate constant changes, ΔR2GE and ΔR2SE , forms a loop on the (Δ R2SE3/2, ΔR2GE ) plane, rather than a reversible line. The shape of the loop and the direction of its passage differentiate between healthy brain and pathological tissue, such as tumour and ischemic tissue. By considering a tree model of microvasculature, the direction of the loop is found to be influenced mainly by the relative arterial and venous blood volume, as well as the tracer bolus dispersion. A parameter Λ is proposed to characterize the direction and shape of the loop, which might be considered as a novel imaging marker for describing the pathology of cerebrovascular network.

  20. ULTRASOUND AND COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC DIAGNOSIS OF OPTIC NERVE TUMORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Saakyan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive examination was made in 93 patients, including 18 children, with tumors of the optic nerve (ON. Duplex ultrasound scanning was performed in 39 patients, of them there were 11 patients with ON gliomas and 28 with ON meningiomas. The specific computed tomographic and echographic signs of ON glioma and meningiomas were detected. The studies have shown that duplex ultrasound scanning and structural computed tomography of orbital sockets are highly informative complementary imaging procedures for ON tumors, which permits one to make their correct diagnosis, to specify surgical volume, and to plan adequate treatment.

  1. Aircraft path planning for optimal imaging using dynamic cost functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Gordon; Chaudhry, Haseeb; Kochersberger, Kevin

    2015-05-01

    Unmanned aircraft development has accelerated with recent technological improvements in sensing and communications, which has resulted in an "applications lag" for how these aircraft can best be utilized. The aircraft are becoming smaller, more maneuverable and have longer endurance to perform sensing and sampling missions, but operating them aggressively to exploit these capabilities has not been a primary focus in unmanned systems development. This paper addresses a means of aerial vehicle path planning to provide a realistic optimal path in acquiring imagery for structure from motion (SfM) reconstructions and performing radiation surveys. This method will allow SfM reconstructions to occur accurately and with minimal flight time so that the reconstructions can be executed efficiently. An assumption is made that we have 3D point cloud data available prior to the flight. A discrete set of scan lines are proposed for the given area that are scored based on visibility of the scene. Our approach finds a time-efficient path and calculates trajectories between scan lines and over obstacles encountered along those scan lines. Aircraft dynamics are incorporated into the path planning algorithm as dynamic cost functions to create optimal imaging paths in minimum time. Simulations of the path planning algorithm are shown for an urban environment. We also present our approach for image-based terrain mapping, which is able to efficiently perform a 3D reconstruction of a large area without the use of GPS data.

  2. Simultaneous reconstruction and segmentation for dynamic SPECT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Martin; Rossmanith, Carolin; Zhang, Xiaoqun

    2016-10-01

    This work deals with the reconstruction of dynamic images that incorporate characteristic dynamics in certain subregions, as arising for the kinetics of many tracers in emission tomography (SPECT, PET). We make use of a basis function approach for the unknown tracer concentration by assuming that the region of interest can be divided into subregions with spatially constant concentration curves. Applying a regularised variational framework reminiscent of the Chan-Vese model for image segmentation we simultaneously reconstruct both the labelling functions of the subregions as well as the subconcentrations within each region. Our particular focus is on applications in SPECT with the Poisson noise model, resulting in a Kullback-Leibler data fidelity in the variational approach. We present a detailed analysis of the proposed variational model and prove existence of minimisers as well as error estimates. The latter apply to a more general class of problems and generalise existing results in literature since we deal with a nonlinear forward operator and a nonquadratic data fidelity. A computational algorithm based on alternating minimisation and splitting techniques is developed for the solution of the problem and tested on appropriately designed synthetic data sets. For those we compare the results to those of standard EM reconstructions and investigate the effects of Poisson noise in the data.

  3. Imaging and dynamics of light atoms and molecules on graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Jannik C; Girit, C O; Crommie, M F; Zettl, A

    2008-07-17

    Observing the individual building blocks of matter is one of the primary goals of microscopy. The invention of the scanning tunnelling microscope revolutionized experimental surface science in that atomic-scale features on a solid-state surface could finally be readily imaged. However, scanning tunnelling microscopy has limited applicability due to restrictions in, for example, sample conductivity, cleanliness, and data acquisition rate. An older microscopy technique, that of transmission electron microscopy (TEM), has benefited tremendously in recent years from subtle instrumentation advances, and individual heavy (high-atomic-number) atoms can now be detected by TEM even when embedded within a semiconductor material. But detecting an individual low-atomic-number atom, for example carbon or even hydrogen, is still extremely challenging, if not impossible, via conventional TEM owing to the very low contrast of light elements. Here we demonstrate a means to observe, by conventional TEM, even the smallest atoms and molecules: on a clean single-layer graphene membrane, adsorbates such as atomic hydrogen and carbon can be seen as if they were suspended in free space. We directly image such individual adatoms, along with carbon chains and vacancies, and investigate their dynamics in real time. These techniques open a way to reveal dynamics of more complex chemical reactions or identify the atomic-scale structure of unknown adsorbates. In addition, the study of atomic-scale defects in graphene may provide insights for nanoelectronic applications of this interesting material.

  4. An Endothelial Planar Cell Model for Imaging Immunological Synapse Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinelli, Roberta; Carman, Christopher V

    2015-12-24

    Adaptive immunity is regulated by dynamic interactions between T cells and antigen presenting cells ('APCs') referred to as 'immunological synapses'. Within these intimate cell-cell interfaces discrete sub-cellular clusters of MHC/Ag-TCR, F-actin, adhesion and signaling molecules form and remodel rapidly. These dynamics are thought to be critical determinants of both the efficiency and quality of the immune responses that develop and therefore of protective versus pathologic immunity. Current understanding of immunological synapses with physiologic APCs is limited by the inadequacy of the obtainable imaging resolution. Though artificial substrate models (e.g., planar lipid bilayers) offer excellent resolution and have been extremely valuable tools, they are inherently non-physiologic and oversimplified. Vascular and lymphatic endothelial cells have emerged as an important peripheral tissue (or stromal) compartment of 'semi-professional APCs'. These APCs (which express most of the molecular machinery of professional APCs) have the unique feature of forming virtually planar cell surface and are readily transfectable (e.g., with fluorescent protein reporters). Herein a basic approach to implement endothelial cells as a novel and physiologic 'planar cellular APC model' for improved imaging and interrogation of fundamental antigenic signaling processes will be described.

  5. First mesospheric wind images using the Michelson interferometer for airglow dynamics imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langille, J A; Ward, W E; Nakamura, T

    2016-12-10

    The Michelson interferometer for airglow dynamics imaging (MIADI) is a ground-based instrument that combines an imaging capability with the Doppler Michelson interferometry in order to remotely detect motions in the mesopause region using spectrally isolated airglow emissions: the O(S1) emission at 557.73 nm and the OH (6, 2) P1 (2) at 839.918 nm. A measurement and analysis approach has been developed that allows simultaneous images of the line-of-sight Doppler wind field and irradiance field to be obtained. A working field instrument was installed and tested at a field site outside Fredericton, NB (45.96 N, 66.65 W) during the summer of 2014. Successful measurements over a 6 h period were obtained on 31 July 2014. This paper describes the MIADI measurement and analysis approach and presents the work that has been done to extract images of the line-of-sight Doppler wind field and irradiances from these observations. The imaging capability is validated by identifying the presence of large-scale and small-scale geophysical perturbations in the images.

  6. Ultrafast image-based dynamic light scattering for nanoparticle sizing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Wu; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Lili; Cai, Xiaoshu, E-mail: usst-caixs@163.com [Institute of Particle and Two-Phase Flow Measurement, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Multiphase Flow and Heat Transfer in Power Engineering, University of Shanghai for Science and Technology, 516 Jungong Road, Shanghai 200093 (China)

    2015-11-15

    An ultrafast sizing method for nanoparticles is proposed, called as UIDLS (Ultrafast Image-based Dynamic Light Scattering). This method makes use of the intensity fluctuation of scattered light from nanoparticles in Brownian motion, which is similar to the conventional DLS method. The difference in the experimental system is that the scattered light by nanoparticles is received by an image sensor instead of a photomultiplier tube. A novel data processing algorithm is proposed to directly get correlation coefficient between two images at a certain time interval (from microseconds to milliseconds) by employing a two-dimensional image correlation algorithm. This coefficient has been proved to be a monotonic function of the particle diameter. Samples of standard latex particles (79/100/352/482/948 nm) were measured for validation of the proposed method. The measurement accuracy of higher than 90% was found with standard deviations less than 3%. A sample of nanosilver particle with nominal size of 20 ± 2 nm and a sample of polymethyl methacrylate emulsion with unknown size were also tested using UIDLS method. The measured results were 23.2 ± 3.0 nm and 246.1 ± 6.3 nm, respectively, which is substantially consistent with the transmission electron microscope results. Since the time for acquisition of two successive images has been reduced to less than 1 ms and the data processing time in about 10 ms, the total measuring time can be dramatically reduced from hundreds seconds to tens of milliseconds, which provides the potential for real-time and in situ nanoparticle sizing.

  7. Tomographic data fusion with CFD simulations associated with a planar sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J.; Liu, S.; Sun, S.; Zhou, W.; Schlaberg, I. H. I.; Wang, M.; Yan, Y.

    2017-04-01

    Tomographic techniques have great abilities to interrogate the combustion processes, especially when it is combined with the physical models of the combustion itself. In this study, a data fusion algorithm is developed to investigate the flame distribution of a swirl-induced environmental (EV) burner, a new type of burner for low NOx combustion. An electric capacitance tomography (ECT) system is used to acquire 3D flame images and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is applied to calculate an initial distribution of the temperature profile for the EV burner. Experiments were also carried out to visualize flames at a series of locations above the burner. While the ECT images essentially agree with the CFD temperature distribution, discrepancies exist at a certain height. When data fusion is applied, the discrepancy is visibly reduced and the ECT images are improved. The methods used in this study can lead to a new route where combustion visualization can be much improved and applied to clean energy conversion and new burner development.

  8. Imaging vascular function for early stage clinical trials using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leach, M.O.; Orton, M. [Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Cancer Research UK and EPSRC Cancer Imaging Centre, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Morgan, B. [Univ. of Leicester, College of Medicine, Biological Sciences and Psychology, Leicester (United Kingdom); Tofts, P.S. [Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Univ. of Sussex, Clinical Imaging Sciences Centre, Sussex (United Kingdom); Buckley, D.L. [University of Leeds, Division of Medical Physics, Leeds (United Kingdom); Huang, W. [Oregon Health and Science Univ., Advanced Imaging Research Centre, Portland, OR (United States); Horsfield, M.A. [Medical Physics Section, Leicester Royal Infirmary, Dept. of Cardiovascular Sciences, Leicester (United Kingdom); Chenevert, T.L. [Univ. of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Collins, D.J. [Royal Marsden Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Cancer Research UK and EPSRC Cancer Imaging Centre, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Jackson, A. [Univ. of Manchester, Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre, Withington, Manchester, M20 3LJ (United Kingdom); Lomas, D. [Univ. of Cambridge, Dept. of Radiology, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Whitcher, B. [Unit 2 Greenways Business Park, Mango Solutions, Chippenham (United Kingdom); Clarke, L. [Cancer Imaging Program, Imaging Technology Development Branch, Rockville, MD (United States); Plummer, R. [Univ. of Newcastle Upon Tyne, The Medical School, Medical Oncology, Northern Inst. for Cancer Research, Newcastle Upon Tyne (United Kingdom); Judson, I. [Royal Marsden Hospital, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Jones, R. [Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Alonzi, R. [Mount Vernon Cancer Centre, Northwood (United Kingdom); Brunner, T. [Gray Inst. for Radiation, Oncology and Biology, Oxford (United Kingdom); Koh, D.M. [Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Diagnostic Radiology, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom)] [and others

    2012-07-15

    Many therapeutic approaches to cancer affect the tumour vasculature, either indirectly or as a direct target. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) has become an important means of investigating this action, both pre-clinically and in early stage clinical trials. For such trials, it is essential that the measurement process (i.e. image acquisition and analysis) can be performed effectively and with consistency among contributing centres. As the technique continues to develop in order to provide potential improvements in sensitivity and physiological relevance, there is considerable scope for between-centre variation in techniques. A workshop was convened by the Imaging Committee of the Experimental Cancer Medicine Centres (ECMC) to review the current status of DCE-MRI and to provide recommendations on how the technique can best be used for early stage trials. This review and the consequent recommendations are summarised here. (orig.)

  9. Positron emission tomographic imaging of the cannabinoid type 1 receptor system with [¹¹C]OMAR ([¹¹C]JHU75528): improvements in image quantification using wild-type and knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herance, Raúl; Rojas, Santiago; Abad, Sergio; Jiménez, Xavier; Gispert, Juan Domingo; Millán, Olga; Martín-García, Elena; Burokas, Aurelijus; Serra, Miquel Àngel; Maldonado, Rafael; Pareto, Deborah

    2011-12-01

    In this study, we assessed the feasibility of using positron emission tomography (PET) and the tracer [¹¹C]OMAR ([¹¹C]JHU75528), an analogue of rimonabant, to study the brain cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor system. Wild-type (WT) and CB1 knockout (KO) animals were imaged at baseline and after pretreatment with blocking doses of rimonabant. Brain uptake in WT animals was higher (50%) than in KO animals in baseline conditions. After pretreatment with rimonabant, WT uptake lowered to the level of KO animals. The results of this study support the feasibility of using PET with the radiotracer [¹¹C]JHU75528 to image the brain CB1 receptor system in mice. In addition, this methodology can be used to assess the effect of new drugs in preclinical studies using genetically manipulated animals.

  10. Positron Emission Tomographic Imaging of the Cannabinoid Type 1 Receptor System with [11C]OMAR ([11C]JHU75528: Improvements in Image Quantification Using Wild-Type and Knockout Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Herance

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we assessed the feasibility of using positron emission tomography (PET and the tracer [11C]OMAR ([11C]JHU75528, an analogue of rimonabant, to study the brain cannabinoid type 1 (CB1 receptor system. Wild-type (WT andCB1 knockout (KO animals were imaged at baseline and after pretreatment with blocking doses of rimonabant. Brain uptake in WT animals was higher (50% than in KO animals in baseline conditions. After pretreatment with rimonabant, WT uptake lowered to the level of KO animals. The results of this study support the feasibility of using PET with the radiotracer [11C]JHU75528 to image the brain CB1 receptor system in mice. In addition, this methodology can be used to assess the effect of new drugs in preclinical studies using genetically manipulated animals.

  11. Two-photon imaging and analysis of neural network dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lütcke, Henry; Helmchen, Fritjof

    2011-08-01

    The glow of a starry night sky, the smell of a freshly brewed cup of coffee or the sound of ocean waves breaking on the beach are representations of the physical world that have been created by the dynamic interactions of thousands of neurons in our brains. How the brain mediates perceptions, creates thoughts, stores memories and initiates actions remains one of the most profound puzzles in biology, if not all of science. A key to a mechanistic understanding of how the nervous system works is the ability to measure and analyze the dynamics of neuronal networks in the living organism in the context of sensory stimulation and behavior. Dynamic brain properties have been fairly well characterized on the microscopic level of individual neurons and on the macroscopic level of whole brain areas largely with the help of various electrophysiological techniques. However, our understanding of the mesoscopic level comprising local populations of hundreds to thousands of neurons (so-called 'microcircuits') remains comparably poor. Predominantly, this has been due to the technical difficulties involved in recording from large networks of neurons with single-cell spatial resolution and near-millisecond temporal resolution in the brain of living animals. In recent years, two-photon microscopy has emerged as a technique which meets many of these requirements and thus has become the method of choice for the interrogation of local neural circuits. Here, we review the state-of-research in the field of two-photon imaging of neuronal populations, covering the topics of microscope technology, suitable fluorescent indicator dyes, staining techniques, and in particular analysis techniques for extracting relevant information from the fluorescence data. We expect that functional analysis of neural networks using two-photon imaging will help to decipher fundamental operational principles of neural microcircuits.

  12. Two-photon imaging and analysis of neural network dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luetcke, Henry; Helmchen, Fritjof [Brain Research Institute, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-8057 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2011-08-15

    The glow of a starry night sky, the smell of a freshly brewed cup of coffee or the sound of ocean waves breaking on the beach are representations of the physical world that have been created by the dynamic interactions of thousands of neurons in our brains. How the brain mediates perceptions, creates thoughts, stores memories and initiates actions remains one of the most profound puzzles in biology, if not all of science. A key to a mechanistic understanding of how the nervous system works is the ability to measure and analyze the dynamics of neuronal networks in the living organism in the context of sensory stimulation and behavior. Dynamic brain properties have been fairly well characterized on the microscopic level of individual neurons and on the macroscopic level of whole brain areas largely with the help of various electrophysiological techniques. However, our understanding of the mesoscopic level comprising local populations of hundreds to thousands of neurons (so-called 'microcircuits') remains comparably poor. Predominantly, this has been due to the technical difficulties involved in recording from large networks of neurons with single-cell spatial resolution and near-millisecond temporal resolution in the brain of living animals. In recent years, two-photon microscopy has emerged as a technique which meets many of these requirements and thus has become the method of choice for the interrogation of local neural circuits. Here, we review the state-of-research in the field of two-photon imaging of neuronal populations, covering the topics of microscope technology, suitable fluorescent indicator dyes, staining techniques, and in particular analysis techniques for extracting relevant information from the fluorescence data. We expect that functional analysis of neural networks using two-photon imaging will help to decipher fundamental operational principles of neural microcircuits.