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Sample records for dynamic stress stimulation

  1. Stimulated resonant scattering at stressed fused silica surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchut, Philippe; Reymermier, Maryse

    2015-01-01

    The radiative emission in CO 2 laser heated stressed fused silica is radically modified when gold microspheres are on the surface. At high heating rates, the emission dynamics changes from thermoluminescence to stimulated resonant scattering with an emission rate that is increased tenfold and the near infrared (NIR) spectrum is red-shifted. We show that the dynamic tensile stress that rises in heated silica is coupled with a fluctuating electromagnetic field that enables electromagnetic friction between moving OH emitters from silica bulk and NIR resonant scatterers at the silica surface. (paper)

  2. Brain stimulation in posttraumatic stress disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladan Novakovic

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD is a complex, heterogeneous disorder that develops following trauma and often includes perceptual, cognitive, affective, physiological, and psychological features. PTSD is characterized by hyperarousal, intrusive thoughts, exaggerated startle response, flashbacks, nightmares, sleep disturbances, emotional numbness, and persistent avoidance of trauma-associated stimuli. The efficacy of available treatments for PTSD may result in part from relief of associated depressive and anxiety-related symptoms in addition to treatment of core symptoms that derive from reexperiencing, numbing, and hyperarousal. Diverse, heterogeneous mechanisms of action and the ability to act broadly or very locally may enable brain stimulation devices to address PTSD core symptoms in more targeted ways. To achieve this goal, specific theoretical bases derived from novel, well-designed research protocols will be necessary. Brain stimulation devices include both long-used and new electrical and magnetic devices. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT and Cranial electrotherapy stimulation (CES have both been in use for decades; transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS, magnetic seizure therapy (MST, deep brain stimulation (DBS, transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS, and vagus nerve stimulation (VNS have been developed recently, over approximately the past twenty years. The efficacy of brain stimulation has been demonstrated as a treatment for psychiatric and neurological disorders such as anxiety (CES, depression (ECT, CES, rTMS, VNS, DBS, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD (DBS, essential tremor, dystonia (DBS, epilepsy (DBS, VNS, Parkinson Disease (DBS, pain (CES, and insomnia (CES. To date, limited data on brain stimulation for PTSD offer only modest guidance. ECT has shown some efficacy in reducing comorbid depression in PTSD patients but has not been demonstrated to improve most core PTSD symptoms. CES and VNS have shown some efficacy in

  3. Memory dynamics under stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaedflieg, Conny W E M; Schwabe, Lars

    2018-03-01

    Stressful events have a major impact on memory. They modulate memory formation in a time-dependent manner, closely linked to the temporal profile of action of major stress mediators, in particular catecholamines and glucocorticoids. Shortly after stressor onset, rapidly acting catecholamines and fast, non-genomic glucocorticoid actions direct cognitive resources to the processing and consolidation of the ongoing threat. In parallel, control of memory is biased towards rather rigid systems, promoting habitual forms of memory allowing efficient processing under stress, at the expense of "cognitive" systems supporting memory flexibility and specificity. In this review, we discuss the implications of this shift in the balance of multiple memory systems for the dynamics of the memory trace. Specifically, stress appears to hinder the incorporation of contextual details into the memory trace, to impede the integration of new information into existing knowledge structures, to impair the flexible generalisation across past experiences, and to hamper the modification of memories in light of new information. Delayed, genomic glucocorticoid actions might reverse the control of memory, thus restoring homeostasis and "cognitive" control of memory again.

  4. Dynamic stimulated Brillouin scattering analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Djupsöbacka, A.; Jacobsen, Gunnar; Tromborg, Bjarne

    2000-01-01

    We present a new simple analysis - including the effect of spontaneous emission - of the (dynamic) influence of SBS on the detected receiver eye diagram. It applies in principle for general types of modulation formats such as the digital formats of ASK, FSK, and PSK. The analysis is formulated fo...

  5. Bubble nonlinear dynamics and stimulated scattering process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jie, Shi; De-Sen, Yang; Sheng-Guo, Shi; Bo, Hu; Hao-Yang, Zhang; Shi-Yong, Hu

    2016-02-01

    A complete understanding of the bubble dynamics is deemed necessary in order to achieve their full potential applications in industry and medicine. For this purpose it is first needed to expand our knowledge of a single bubble behavior under different possible conditions including the frequency and pressure variations of the sound field. In addition, stimulated scattering of sound on a bubble is a special effect in sound field, and its characteristics are associated with bubble oscillation mode. A bubble in liquid can be considered as a representative example of nonlinear dynamical system theory with its resonance, and its dynamics characteristics can be described by the Keller-Miksis equation. The nonlinear dynamics of an acoustically excited gas bubble in water is investigated by using theoretical and numerical analysis methods. Our results show its strongly nonlinear behavior with respect to the pressure amplitude and excitation frequency as the control parameters, and give an intuitive insight into stimulated sound scattering on a bubble. It is seen that the stimulated sound scattering is different from common dynamical behaviors, such as bifurcation and chaos, which is the result of the nonlinear resonance of a bubble under the excitation of a high amplitude acoustic sound wave essentially. The numerical analysis results show that the threshold of stimulated sound scattering is smaller than those of bifurcation and chaos in the common condition. Project supported by the Program for Changjiang Scholars and Innovative Research Team in University, China (Grant No. IRT1228) and the Young Scientists Fund of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11204050 and 11204049).

  6. Neural dynamics during repetitive visual stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoneva, Tsvetomira; Garcia-Molina, Gary; Desain, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Objective. Steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs), the brain responses to repetitive visual stimulation (RVS), are widely utilized in neuroscience. Their high signal-to-noise ratio and ability to entrain oscillatory brain activity are beneficial for their applications in brain-computer interfaces, investigation of neural processes underlying brain rhythmic activity (steady-state topography) and probing the causal role of brain rhythms in cognition and emotion. This paper aims at analyzing the space and time EEG dynamics in response to RVS at the frequency of stimulation and ongoing rhythms in the delta, theta, alpha, beta, and gamma bands. Approach.We used electroencephalography (EEG) to study the oscillatory brain dynamics during RVS at 10 frequencies in the gamma band (40-60 Hz). We collected an extensive EEG data set from 32 participants and analyzed the RVS evoked and induced responses in the time-frequency domain. Main results. Stable SSVEP over parieto-occipital sites was observed at each of the fundamental frequencies and their harmonics and sub-harmonics. Both the strength and the spatial propagation of the SSVEP response seem sensitive to stimulus frequency. The SSVEP was more localized around the parieto-occipital sites for higher frequencies (>54 Hz) and spread to fronto-central locations for lower frequencies. We observed a strong negative correlation between stimulation frequency and relative power change at that frequency, the first harmonic and the sub-harmonic components over occipital sites. Interestingly, over parietal sites for sub-harmonics a positive correlation of relative power change and stimulation frequency was found. A number of distinct patterns in delta (1-4 Hz), theta (4-8 Hz), alpha (8-12 Hz) and beta (15-30 Hz) bands were also observed. The transient response, from 0 to about 300 ms after stimulation onset, was accompanied by increase in delta and theta power over fronto-central and occipital sites, which returned to baseline

  7. Stimulated bioluminescence by fluid shear stress associated with pipe flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao Jing; Wang Jiangan; Wu Ronghua, E-mail: caojing981@126.com [Col. of Electronic Eng., Naval University of Engineering, Wuhan 430033 (China)

    2011-01-01

    Dinoflagellate can be stimulated bioluminescence by hydrodynamic agitation. Two typical dinoflagellate (Lingulodinium polyedrum and Pyrocystis noctiluca) was choosed to research stimulated bioluminescence. The bioluminescence intensity and shear stress intensity were measured using fully developed pipe flow. There is shear stress threshold to agitate organism bioluminescence. From these experiment, the response thresholds of the stimulated bioluminscence always occurred in laminar flows at a shear stress level of 0.6-3 dyn/cm{sup 2}. At the same time, the spectral characteristc of dinoflagellate was recorded, the wavelength of them is about 470nm, and the full width at half maximum is approximate 30nm.

  8. Hyperosmotic stress stimulates autophagy via polycystin-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Oyarzun, Daniel; Troncoso, Rodrigo; Kretschmar, Catalina; Hernando, Cecilia; Budini, Mauricio; Morselli, Eugenia; Lavandero, Sergio; Criollo, Alfredo

    2017-08-22

    Various intracellular mechanisms are activated in response to stress, leading to adaptation or death. Autophagy, an intracellular process that promotes lysosomal degradation of proteins, is an adaptive response to several types of stress. Osmotic stress occurs under both physiological and pathological conditions, provoking mechanical stress and activating various osmoadaptive mechanisms. Polycystin-2 (PC2), a membrane protein of the polycystin family, is a mechanical sensor capable of activating the cell signaling pathways required for cell adaptation and survival. Here we show that hyperosmotic stress provoked by treatment with hyperosmolar concentrations of sorbitol or mannitol induces autophagy in HeLa and HCT116 cell lines. In addition, we show that mTOR and AMPK, two stress sensor proteins involved modulating autophagy, are downregulated and upregulated, respectively, when cells are subjected to hyperosmotic stress. Finally, our findings show that PC2 is required to promote hyperosmotic stress-induced autophagy. Downregulation of PC2 prevents inhibition of hyperosmotic stress-induced mTOR pathway activation. In conclusion, our data provide new insight into the role of PC2 as a mechanosensor that modulates autophagy under hyperosmotic stress conditions.

  9. Modeling thermal stress propagation during hydraulic stimulation of geothermal wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Gunnar; Miller, Stephen A.

    2017-04-01

    A large fraction of the world's water and energy resources are located in naturally fractured reservoirs within the earth's crust. Depending on the lithology and tectonic history of a formation, fracture networks can range from dense and homogeneous highly fractured networks to single large scale fractures dominating the flow behavior. Understanding the dynamics of such reservoirs in terms of flow and transport is crucial to successful application of engineered geothermal systems (also known as enhanced geothermal systems or EGS) for geothermal energy production in the future. Fractured reservoirs are considered to consist of two distinct separate media, namely the fracture and matrix space respectively. Fractures are generally thin, highly conductive containing only small amounts of fluid, whereas the matrix rock provides high fluid storage but typically has much smaller permeability. Simulation of flow and transport through fractured porous media is challenging due to the high permeability contrast between the fractures and the surrounding rock matrix. However, accurate and efficient simulation of flow through a fracture network is crucial in order to understand, optimize and engineer reservoirs. It has been a research topic for several decades and is still under active research. Accurate fluid flow simulations through field-scale fractured reservoirs are still limited by the power of current computer processing units (CPU). We present an efficient implementation of the embedded discrete fracture model, which is a promising new technique in modeling the behavior of enhanced geothermal systems. An efficient coupling strategy is determined for numerical performance of the model. We provide new insight into the coupled modeling of fluid flow, heat transport of engineered geothermal reservoirs with focus on the thermal stress changes during the stimulation process. We further investigate the interplay of thermal and poro-elastic stress changes in the reservoir

  10. New electrical stimulation techniques in dynamic myopasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zonnevylle, Erik Dirk Hendrik

    2002-01-01

    It has become common practice in reconstructive surgery to transpose or transplant a variety of autologous tissues to fill defects at a recipient site. Using muscle tissue, it becomes possible to dynamically assist or replace an impaired or lost function. For these procedures the term ‘dynamic

  11. Dynamics of force and muscle stimulation in human vertical jumping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bobbert, M.F.; van Zandwijk, J.P.

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to gain insight into the importance of stimulation dynamics for force development in human vertical jumping. METHODS: Maximum height squat jumps were performed by 21 male subjects. As a measure of signal dynamics, rise time (RT) was used, i.e., the time taken

  12. Evaluation of dynamic MRCP after secretin stimulation for biliopancreatic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohhigashi, Seiji; Nishio, Takeki; Watanabe, Fumihiko; Haradome, Hiroki; Doi, Osamu

    2000-01-01

    Both pancreaticobiliary maljunction and pancreatogastrostomy after pancreatoduodenectomy were analyzed to assess the utility of dynamic MRCP after secretin stimulation. Dynamic MRCP obtained every 60 seconds for 15 minutes after secretin administration revealed the bile and pancreatic fluid kinetics. Calculating the intensity value from the MR images allowed objective estimation of the bile and pancreatic fluid kinetics. Thus, this study demonstrated that dynamic MRCP after secretin stimulation was significantly useful in evaluating not only the morphologic features in pancreaticobiliary maljunction but also pancreatic exocrine function after resection of the pancreas. (author)

  13. Design of a dynamic transcranial magnetic stimulation coil system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Sheng; Jiang, Ruoli; Wang, Ruimin; Chen, Ji

    2014-08-01

    To study the brain activity at the whole-head range, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) researchers need to investigate brain activity over the whole head at multiple locations. In the past, this has been accomplished with multiple single TMS coils that achieve quasi whole-head array stimulation. However, these designs have low resolution and are difficult to position and control over the skull. In this study, we propose a new dynamic whole-head TMS mesh coil system. This system was constructed using several sagittal and coronal directional wires. Using both simulation and real experimental data, we show that by varying the current direction and strength of each wire, this new coil system can form both circular coils or figure-eight coils that have the same features as traditional TMS coils. Further, our new system is superior to current coil systems because stimulation parameters such as size, type, location, and timing of stimulation can be dynamically controlled within a single experiment.

  14. Stress- and Chemistry-Mediated Permeability Enhancement/Degradation in Stimulated Critically-Stressed Fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derek Elsworth; Abraham S. Grader; Chris Marone; Phillip Halleck; Peter Rose; Igor Faoro; Joshua Taron; André Niemeijer; Hideaki Yasuhara

    2009-03-30

    This work has investigated the interactions between stress and chemistry in controlling the evolution of permeability in stimulated fractured reservoirs through an integrated program of experimentation and modeling. Flow-through experiments on natural and artificial fractures in Coso diorite have examined the evolution of permeability under paths of mean and deviatoric stresses, including the role of dissolution and precipitation. Models accommodating these behaviors have examined the importance of incorporating the complex couplings between stress and chemistry in examining the evolution of permeability in EGS reservoirs. This document reports the findings of experiment [1,2] and analysis [3,4], in four sequential chapters.

  15. Dynamics stresses in pipelines and components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prates, C.L.M.; Stukart, R.N.L.; Halbritter, A.L.

    1982-01-01

    The procedure to generate the dynamic stresses caused by external events, necessary for the structural calculation of pipelines and components in nuclear power plants is presented. A special attention is given to the stress caused by the action of earthquakes and exterior explosions. In the dynamic analysis of pipeline and components is usually to show the stresses procedured by these events under the response spectra form. The methodology to obtain these response spectra is shown and discussed. Some pratical examples of spectra from nuclear power plant building are still shown. (E.G.) [pt

  16. Point defects dynamics in a stress field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smetniansky de De Grande, Nelida.

    1989-01-01

    The dependence of anisotropic defect diffusion on stress is studied for a hexagonal close packed (hcp) material under irradiation and uniaxially stressed. The diffusion is described as a discrete process of thermally activated jumps. It is shown that the presence of an external stress field enhances the intrinsic anisotropic diffusion, being this variation determined by the defect dipole tensors' symmetry in the equilibrium and saddle point configurations. Also, the point defect diffusion equations to sinks, like edge dislocations and spherical cavities, are solved and the sink strengths are calculated. The conclusion is that the dynamics of the interaction between defects and sinks is controlled by the changes in diffusivity induced by stress fields. (Author) [es

  17. Transcutaneous mechanical nerve stimulation using perineal vibration: a novel method for the treatment of female stress urinary incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sønksen, Jens; Ohl, Dana A; Bonde, Birthe

    2007-01-01

    We defined basic guidelines for transcutaneous mechanical nerve stimulation in modifying pelvic floor responses in women and determined the efficacy of transcutaneous mechanical nerve stimulation in treating stress urinary incontinence.......We defined basic guidelines for transcutaneous mechanical nerve stimulation in modifying pelvic floor responses in women and determined the efficacy of transcutaneous mechanical nerve stimulation in treating stress urinary incontinence....

  18. Hypertrophic stimulation increases beta-actin dynamics in adult feline cardiomyocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundaravadivel Balasubramanian

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The myocardium responds to hemodynamic stress through cellular growth and organ hypertrophy. The impact of cytoskeletal elements on this process, however, is not fully understood. While alpha-actin in cardiomyocytes governs muscle contraction in combination with the myosin motor, the exact role of beta-actin has not been established. We hypothesized that in adult cardiomyocytes, as in non-myocytes, beta-actin can facilitate cytoskeletal rearrangement within cytoskeletal structures such as Z-discs. Using a feline right ventricular pressure overload (RVPO model, we measured the level and distribution of beta-actin in normal and pressure overloaded myocardium. Resulting data demonstrated enriched levels of beta-actin and enhanced translocation to the Triton-insoluble cytoskeletal and membrane skeletal complexes. In addition, RVPO in vivo and in vitro hypertrophic stimulation with endothelin (ET or insulin in isolated adult cardiomyocytes enhanced the content of polymerized fraction (F-actin of beta-actin. To determine the localization and dynamics of beta-actin, we adenovirally expressed GFP-tagged beta-actin in isolated adult cardiomyocytes. The ectopically expressed beta-actin-GFP localized to the Z-discs, costameres, and cell termini. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP measurements of beta-actin dynamics revealed that beta-actin at the Z-discs is constantly being exchanged with beta-actin from cytoplasmic pools and that this exchange is faster upon hypertrophic stimulation with ET or insulin. In addition, in electrically stimulated isolated adult cardiomyocytes, while beta-actin overexpression improved cardiomyocyte contractility, immunoneutralization of beta-actin resulted in a reduced contractility suggesting that beta-actin could be important for the contractile function of adult cardiomyocytes. These studies demonstrate the presence and dynamics of beta-actin in the adult cardiomyocyte and reinforce its usefulness in measuring

  19. Physiology-driven adaptive virtual reality stimulation for prevention and treatment of stress related disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosić, Kresimir; Popović, Sinisa; Kukolja, Davor; Horvat, Marko; Dropuljić, Branimir

    2010-02-01

    The significant proportion of severe psychological problems related to intensive stress in recent large peacekeeping operations underscores the importance of effective methods for strengthening the prevention and treatment of stress-related disorders. Adaptive control of virtual reality (VR) stimulation presented in this work, based on estimation of the person's emotional state from physiological signals, may enhance existing stress inoculation training (SIT). Physiology-driven adaptive VR stimulation can tailor the progress of stressful stimuli delivery to the physiological characteristics of each individual, which is indicated for improvement in stress resistance. Following an overview of physiology-driven adaptive VR stimulation, its major functional subsystems are described in more detail. A specific algorithm of stimuli delivery applicable to SIT is outlined.

  20. Stress inoculation training supported by physiology-driven adaptive virtual reality stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popović, Sinisa; Horvat, Marko; Kukolja, Davor; Dropuljić, Branimir; Cosić, Kresimir

    2009-01-01

    Significant proportion of psychological problems related to combat stress in recent large peacekeeping operations underscores importance of effective methods for strengthening the stress resistance of military personnel. Adaptive control of virtual reality (VR) stimulation, based on estimation of the subject's emotional state from physiological signals, may enhance existing stress inoculation training (SIT). Physiology-driven adaptive VR stimulation can tailor the progress of stressful stimuli delivery to the physiological characteristics of each individual, which is indicated for improvement in stress resistance. Therefore, following an overview of SIT and its applications in the military setting, generic concept of physiology-driven adaptive VR stimulation is presented in the paper. Toward the end of the paper, closed-loop adaptive control strategy applicable to SIT is outlined.

  1. Tonic aortic depressor nerve stimulation does not impede baroreflex dynamic characteristics concomitantly mediated by the stimulated nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawada, Toru; Turner, Michael J; Shimizu, Shuji; Kamiya, Atsunori; Shishido, Toshiaki; Sugimachi, Masaru

    2018-03-01

    Although electrical activation of the carotid sinus baroreflex (baroreflex activation therapy) is being explored as a device therapy for resistant hypertension, possible effects on baroreflex dynamic characteristics of interaction between electrical stimulation and pressure inputs are not fully elucidated. To examine whether the electrical stimulation of the baroreceptor afferent nerve impedes normal short-term arterial pressure (AP) regulation mediated by the stimulated nerve, we electrically stimulated the right aortic depressor nerve (ADN) while estimating the baroreflex dynamic characteristics by imposing pressure inputs to the isolated baroreceptor region of the right ADN in nine anesthetized rats. A Gaussian white noise signal with a mean of 120 mmHg and standard deviation of 20 mmHg was used for the pressure perturbation. A tonic ADN stimulation (2 or 5 Hz, 10 V, 0.1-ms pulse width) decreased mean sympathetic nerve activity (367.0 ± 70.9 vs. 247.3 ± 47.2 arbitrary units, P ADN stimulation did not affect the slope of dynamic gain in the neural arc transfer function from pressure perturbation to sympathetic nerve activity (16.9 ± 1.0 vs. 14.7 ± 1.6 dB/decade, not significant). These results indicate that electrical stimulation of the baroreceptor afferent nerve does not significantly impede the dynamic characteristics of the arterial baroreflex concomitantly mediated by the stimulated nerve. Short-term AP regulation by the arterial baroreflex may be preserved during the baroreflex activation therapy.

  2. Electroconvulsive stimulations prevent stress-induced morphological changes in the hippocampus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hageman, I; Nielsen, M; Wörtwein, Gitta

    2008-01-01

    whether repeated electroconvulsive stimulations (ECSs) could influence such changes in stressed rats. Furthermore, we investigated whether ECSs per se could influence neuronal branching and total length of the CA3 hippocampal neuronal dendritic tree in normal rats. Rats were stressed using the 21-day 6 h...

  3. Transcranial Stimulation of the Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex Prevents Stress-Induced Working Memory Deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanov, Mario; Schwabe, Lars

    2016-01-27

    Stress is known to impair working memory performance. This disruptive effect of stress on working memory has been linked to a decrease in the activity of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC). In the present experiment, we tested whether transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) of the dlPFC can prevent stress-induced working memory impairments. We tested 120 healthy participants in a 2 d, sham-controlled, double-blind between-subjects design. Participants completed a test of their individual baseline working memory capacity on day 1. On day 2, participants were exposed to either a stressor or a control manipulation before they performed a visuospatial and a verbal working memory task. While participants completed the tasks, anodal, cathodal, or sham tDCS was applied over the right dlPFC. Stress impaired working memory performance in both tasks, albeit to a lesser extent in the verbal compared with the visuospatial working memory task. This stress-induced working memory impairment was prevented by anodal, but not sham or cathodal, stimulation of the dlPFC. Compared with sham or cathodal stimulation, anodal tDCS led to significantly better working memory performance in both tasks after stress. Our findings indicate a causal role of the dlPFC in working memory impairments after acute stress and point to anodal tDCS as a promising tool to reduce cognitive deficits related to working memory in stress-related mental disorders, such as depression, schizophrenia, or post-traumatic stress disorder. Working memory deficits are prominent in stress-related mental disorders, such as depression, schizophrenia, or post-traumatic stress disorder. Similar working memory impairments have been observed in healthy individuals exposed to acute stress. So far, attempts to prevent such stress-induced working memory deficits focused mainly on pharmacological interventions. Here, we tested the idea that transcranial direct current stimulation of the dorsolateral prefrontal

  4. An education management information system with simultaneous monitoring of stress stimulators for students Mental Health management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manimaran, S; Jayakumar, S; Lakshmi, K Bhagya

    2016-11-14

    Education Management Information System (EMIS) is a widely acceptable and developing technology within the Information Technology field. The advancement in technology in this century is being collaborated with scientific invention or explorer and information strengthening or development. This paper presents the results and experiences gained from applying students oriented EMIS for monitoring and managing mental health. The Mental Health of students depends on the acquiring adequate knowledge on basic concepts within a time period or academic schedule. It's obviously significance to evaluate and appraise the stress stimulators as a challenge or threat. The theoretical framework for the study was designed for analyzing the stress stimulators, academic performance and EMIS accessibility. The sample examined in this study was stratified random sample from 75 students specifically all engineering college in Dindigul District of Tamilnadu. The primary factor is the academic stress stimulators that form one module of EMIS for each of the key variable such as curriculum & instruction related stressors, placement related, teamwork related and assessment related. The Mental Health related stress stimulators namely curriculum & syllabus, placement related, assessment related and team work related have a significant influence on academic performance by students in various institution. The important factor leading to the EMIS application in monitoring stress stimulators is curriculum & syllabus related and assessment related.

  5. Neurocontrol of the inverse dynamics in functional electrical stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spaanenburg, L; Nijhuis, JAG; Ypma, A; Silva, FL; Principe, JC; Almeida, LB

    1997-01-01

    The rehabilitation of paraplegia can be pursued by functional electrical stimulation (FES) combined with biofeedback This requires control by surface electromyographical (EMG) signals to predict the muscle stimulation patterns while compensating the inherent phase lag. This can be realized by a

  6. Transcranial direct current stimulation may modulate extinction memory in posttraumatic stress disorder

    OpenAIRE

    van?t Wout, Mascha; Longo, Sharon M.; Reddy, Madhavi K.; Philip, Noah S.; Bowker, Marguerite T.; Greenberg, Benjamin D.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Abnormalities in fear extinction and recall are core components of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Data from animal and human studies point to a role of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) in extinction learning and subsequent retention of extinction memories. Given the increasing interest in developing noninvasive brain stimulation protocols for psychopathology treatment, we piloted whether transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) during extinction lear...

  7. Hot carrier injection degradation under dynamic stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Xiao-Hua; Cao Yan-Rong; Hao Yue; Zhang Yue

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we have studied hot carrier injection (HCI) under alternant stress. Under different stress modes, different degradations are obtained from the experiment results. The different alternate stresses can reduce or enhance the HC effect, which mainly depends on the latter condition of the stress cycle. In the stress mode A (DC stress with electron injection), the degradation keeps increasing. In the stress modes B (DC stress and then stress with the smallest gate injection) and C (DC stress and then stress with hole injection under V g = 0 V and V d = 1.8 V), recovery appears in the second stress period. And in the stress mode D (DC stress and then stress with hole injection under V g = −1.8 V and V d = 1.8 V), as the traps filled in by holes can be smaller or greater than the generated interface states, the continued degradation or recovery in different stress periods can be obtained. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  8. Sublethal Heavy Metal Stress Stimulates Innate Immunity in Tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilanjan Chakraborty

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Effect of sublethal heavy metal stress as plant biotic elicitor for triggering innate immunity in tomato plant was investigated. Copper in in vivo condition induced accumulation of defense enzymes like peroxidase (PO, polyphenol oxidase (PPO, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL, and β-1,3 glucanase along with higher accumulation of total phenol, antioxidative enzymes (catalase and ascorbate peroxidase, and total chlorophyll content. Furthermore, the treatment also induced nitric oxide (NO production which was confirmed by realtime visualization of NO burst using a fluorescent probe 4,5-diaminofluorescein diacetate (DAF-2DA and spectrophotometric analysis. The result suggested that the sublethal dose of heavy metal can induce an array of plant defense responses that lead to the improvement of innate immunity in plants.

  9. New model for surface fracture induced by dynamical stress

    OpenAIRE

    Andersen, J. V.; Lewis, L. J.

    1997-01-01

    We introduce a model where an isotropic, dynamically-imposed stress induces fracture in a thin film. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we study how the integrated fragment distribution function depends on the rate of change and magnitude of the imposed stress, as well as on temperature. A mean-field argument shows that the system becomes unstable for a critical value of the stress. We find a striking invariance of the distribution of fragments for fixed ratio of temperature and rate of ch...

  10. Anti-stress effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on colonic motility in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimoto, Sazu; Babygirija, Reji; Dobner, Anthony; Ludwig, Kirk; Takahashi, Toku

    2012-05-01

    Disorders of colonic motility may contribute to symptoms in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and stress is widely believed to play a major role in developing IBS. Stress increases corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) of the hypothalamus, resulting in acceleration of colonic transit in rodents. In contrast, hypothalamic oxytocin (OXT) has an anti-stress effect via inhibiting CRF expression and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity. Although transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) and acupuncture have been shown to have anti-stress effects, the mechanism of the beneficial effects remains unknown. We tested the hypothesis that TENS upregulates hypothalamic OXT expression resulting in reduced CRF expression and restoration of colonic dysmotility in response to chronic stress. Male SD rats received different types of stressors for seven consecutive days (chronic heterotypic stress). TENS was applied to the bilateral hind limbs every other day before stress loading. Another group of rats did not receive TENS treatment. TENS significantly attenuated accelerated colonic transit induced by chronic heterotypic stress, which was antagonized by a central injection of an OXT antagonist. Immunohistochemical study showed that TENS increased OXT expression and decreased CRF expression at the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) following chronic heterotypic stress. It is suggested that TENS upregulates hypothalamic OXT expression which acts as an anti-stressor agent and mediates restored colonic dysmotility following chronic stress. TENS may be useful to treat gastrointestinal symptoms associated with stress.

  11. External stimulation strength controls actin response dynamics in Dictyostelium cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hsin-Fang; Westendorf, Christian; Tarantola, Marco; Zykov, Vladimir; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Beta, Carsten

    2015-03-01

    Self-sustained oscillation and the resonance frequency of the cytoskeletal actin polymerization/depolymerization have recently been observed in Dictyostelium, a model system for studying chemotaxis. Here we report that the resonance frequency is not constant but rather varies with the strength of external stimuli. To understand the underlying mechanism, we analyzed the polymerization and depolymerization time at different levels of external stimulation. We found that polymerization time is independent of external stimuli but the depolymerization time is prolonged as the stimulation increases. These observations can be successfully reproduced in the frame work of our time delayed differential equation model.

  12. Electroconvulsive Stimulation, but not Chronic Restraint Stress, Causes Structural Alterations in Adult Rat Hippocampus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Mikkel V.; Wörtwein, Gitta; Pakkenberg, Bente

    2015-01-01

    The neurobiological mechanisms underlying depression are not fully understood. Only a few previous studies have used validated stereological methods to test how stress and animal paradigms of depression affect adult hippocampal neurogenesis and whether antidepressant therapy can counteract possible...... changes in an animal model. Thus, in this study we applied methods that are state of the art in regard to stereological cell counting methods. Using a validated rat model of depression in combination with a clinically relevant schedule of electroconvulsive stimulation, we estimated the total number...... of newly formed neurons in the hippocampal subgranular zone. Also estimated were the total number of neurons and the volume of the granule cell layer in adult rats subjected to chronic restraint stress and electroconvulsive stimulation either alone or in combination. We found that chronic restraint stress...

  13. Control of Single Molecule Fluorescence Dynamics by Stimulated Emission Depletion

    OpenAIRE

    Marsh, R. J.; Osborne, M. A.; Bain, A. J.

    2003-01-01

    The feasibility of manipulating the single molecule absorption-emission cycle using picosecond stimulated emission depletion (STED) is investigated using a stochastic computer simulation. In the simulation the molecule is subjected to repeated excitation and depletion events using time delayed pairs of excitation (PUMP) and depletion (DUMP) pulses derived from a high repetition rate pulsed laser system. The model is used to demonstrate that a significant and even substantial reduction in the ...

  14. Parenting stress in parents of children with refractory epilepsy before and after vagus nerve stimulation implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Tse Li

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate parenting stress in parents of children with refractory epilepsy before and after their children received vagus nerve stimulation (VNS implantation. Methods: Parents of children with refractory epilepsy completed the Parenting Stress Index (PSI under a psychologist's assessment before and at least 12 months after their children received VNS implantation. The PSI questionnaire measures parenting stress in two domains; a parent domain with seven subscales, and a child domain with six. Age, gender, epilepsy comorbidity, VNS implantation date, seizure frequency, and anticonvulsant history before and after VNS implantation were obtained from reviews of medical charts. Results: In total, 30 parents completed the first and follow-up PSI questionnaires. Seventeen of their children (56.7% were boys. The children aged from 1 to 12 years (7.43 ± 3.59 years, mean ± SD. After VNS implantation, the mean total parenting stress scores decreased from 282.1 ± 38.0 to 272.4 ± 42.9. A significant decrease was found on the spouse subscale of the parent domain. For the parents of boys, the mean total parenting stress scores decreased significantly. The mean total parenting stress scores also decreased significantly for parents of epileptic children without autism and who did not taper off the number of different anticonvulsants used after VNS. Conclusions: VNS is an advisable choice to treat refractory epilepsy. Our study showed that 12 months or more after VNS implantation, seizure frequency and parenting stress typically decreased. However, in some special cases the parenting stress may increase, and external help may be required to support these patients and their parents. Key Words: children, refractory epilepsy, parenting stress, vagus nerve stimulation

  15. Optical stimulation of the hearing and deaf cochlea under thermal and stress confinement condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, M.; Baumhoff, P.; Kallweit, N.; Sato, M.; Krüger, A.; Ripken, T.; Lenarz, T.; Kral, A.

    2014-03-01

    There is a controversy, to which extend cochlear stimulation with near infrared laser pulses at a wavelength of 1860 nm is based on optoacoustic stimulation of intact hair cells or -in contrast- is based on direct stimulation of the nerve cells in absence of functional hair cells. Thermal and stress confinement conditions apply, because of the pulse duration range (5 ns, 10 μs-20 ms) of the two lasers used. The dependency of the signal characteristics on pulse peak power and pulse duration was investigated in this study. The compound action potential (CAP) was measured during stimulation of the cochlea of four anaesthetized guinea pigs, which were hearing at first and afterwards acutely deafened using intracochlear neomycin-rinsing. For comparison hydrophone measurements in a water tank were performed to investigate the optoacoustic signals at different laser interaction regimes. With rising pulse peak power CAPs of the hearing animals showed first a threshold, then a positively correlated and finally a saturating dependency. CAPs also showed distinct responses at laser onset and offset separated with the pulse duration. At pulse durations shorter than physiological response times the signals merged. Basically the same signal characteristics were observed in the optoacoustic hydrophone measurements, scaled with the sensitivity and response time of the hydrophone. Taking together the qualitative correspondence in the signal response and the absence of any CAPs in deafened animals our results speak in favor of an optoacoustic stimulation of intact hair cells rather than a direct stimulation of nerve cells.

  16. The temporal dynamics of the stress response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koolhaas, J.M.; Meerlo, P; de Boer, S.F.; Strubbe, J.H.; Bohus, B.G J

    1997-01-01

    This paper summarises the available evidence that failure of defense mechanisms in (semi)-natural social groups of animals may lead to serious forms of stress pathology. Hence the study of social stress may provide animal models with a high face validity. However, most of the animal models of human

  17. Dynamic impedance model of the skin-electrode interface for transcutaneous electrical stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Vargas Luna

    Full Text Available Transcutaneous electrical stimulation can depolarize nerve or muscle cells applying impulses through electrodes attached on the skin. For these applications, the electrode-skin impedance is an important factor which influences effectiveness. Various models describe the interface using constant or current-depending resistive-capacitive equivalent circuit. Here, we develop a dynamic impedance model valid for a wide range stimulation intensities. The model considers electroporation and charge-dependent effects to describe the impedance variation, which allows to describe high-charge pulses. The parameters were adjusted based on rectangular, biphasic stimulation pulses generated by a stimulator, providing optionally current or voltage-controlled impulses, and applied through electrodes of different sizes. Both control methods deliver a different electrical field to the tissue, which is constant throughout the impulse duration for current-controlled mode or have a very current peak for voltage-controlled. The results show a predominant dependence in the current intensity in the case of both stimulation techniques that allows to keep a simple model. A verification simulation using the proposed dynamic model shows coefficient of determination of around 0.99 in both stimulation types. The presented method for fitting electrode-skin impedance can be simple extended to other stimulation waveforms and electrode configuration. Therefore, it can be embedded in optimization algorithms for designing electrical stimulation applications even for pulses with high charges and high current spikes.

  18. Mild salinity stimulates a stress-induced morphogenic response in Arabidopsis thaliana roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolla, Gaston; Heimer, Yair M; Barak, Simon

    2010-01-01

    Plant roots exhibit remarkable developmental plasticity in response to local soil conditions. It is shown here that mild salt stress stimulates a stress-induced morphogenic response (SIMR) in Arabidopsis thaliana roots characteristic of several other abiotic stresses: the proliferation of lateral roots (LRs) with a concomitant reduction in LR and primary root length. The LR proliferation component of the salt SIMR is dramatically enhanced by the transfer of seedlings from a low to a high NO3- medium, thereby compensating for the decreased LR length and maintaining overall LR surface area. Increased LR proliferation is specific to salt stress (osmotic stress alone has no stimulatory effect) and is due to the progression of more LR primordia from the pre-emergence to the emergence stage, in salt-stressed plants. In salt-stressed seedlings, greater numbers of LR primordia exhibit expression of a reporter gene driven by the auxin-sensitive DR5 promoter than in unstressed seedlings. Moreover, in the auxin transporter mutant aux1-7, the LR proliferation component of the salt SIMR is completely abrogated. The results suggest that salt stress promotes auxin accumulation in developing primordia thereby preventing their developmental arrest at the pre-emergence stage. Examination of ABA and ethylene mutants revealed that ABA synthesis and a factor involved in the ethylene signalling network also regulate the LR proliferation component of the salt SIMR.

  19. Dynamic Behavior of Fault Slip Induced by Stress Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-an Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fault slip burst is a serious dynamic hazard in coal mining. A static and dynamic analysis for fault slip was performed to assess the risk of rock burst. A numerical model FLAC3D was established to understand the stress state and mechanical responses of fault rock system. The results obtained from the analysis show that the dynamic behavior of fault slip induced by stress waves is significantly affected by mining depth, as well as dynamic disturbance intensity and the distance between the stope and the fault. The isolation effect of the fault is also discussed based on the numerical results with the fault angle appearing to have the strongest influence on peak vertical stress and velocity induced by dynamic disturbance. By taking these risks into account, a stress-relief technology using break-tip blast was used for fault slip burst control. This technique is able to reduce the stress concentration and increase the attenuation of dynamic load by fracturing the structure of coal and rock. The adoption of this stress-relief method leads to an effective reduction of fault slip induced rock burst (FSIRB occurrence.

  20. Stress Distribution in Graded Cellular Materials Under Dynamic Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Wang

    Full Text Available Abstract Dynamic compression behaviors of density-homogeneous and density-graded irregular honeycombs are investigated using cell-based finite element models under a constant-velocity impact scenario. A method based on the cross-sectional engineering stress is developed to obtain the one-dimensional stress distribution along the loading direction in a cellular specimen. The cross-sectional engineering stress is contributed by two parts: the node-transitive stress and the contact-induced stress, which are caused by the nodal force and the contact of cell walls, respectively. It is found that the contact-induced stress is dominant for the significantly enhanced stress behind the shock front. The stress enhancement and the compaction wave propagation can be observed through the stress distributions in honeycombs under high-velocity compression. The single and double compaction wave modes are observed directly from the stress distributions. Theoretical analysis of the compaction wave propagation in the density-graded honeycombs based on the R-PH (rigid-plastic hardening idealization is carried out and verified by the numerical simulations. It is found that stress distribution in cellular materials and the compaction wave propagation characteristics under dynamic compression can be approximately predicted by the R-PH shock model.

  1. Gold nanoparticle-mediated laser stimulation induces a complex stress response in neuronal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannsmeier, Sonja; Heeger, Patrick; Terakawa, Mitsuhiro; Kalies, Stefan; Heisterkamp, Alexander; Ripken, Tammo; Heinemann, Dag

    2018-04-25

    Stimulation of neuronal cells generally resorts to electric signals. Recent advances in laser-based stimulation methods could present an alternative with superior spatiotemporal resolution. The avoidance of electronic crosstalk makes these methods attractive for in vivo therapeutic application. In particular, nano-mediators, such as gold nanoparticles, can be used to transfer the energy from a laser pulse to the cell membrane and subsequently activate excitable cells. Although the underlying mechanisms of neuronal activation have been widely unraveled, the overall effect on the targeted cell is not understood. Little is known about the physiological and pathophysiological impact of a laser pulse targeted onto nanoabsorbers on the cell membrane. Here, we analyzed the reaction of the neuronal murine cell line Neuro-2A and murine primary cortical neurons to gold nanoparticle mediated laser stimulation. Our study reveals a severe, complex and cell-type independent stress response after laser irradiation, emphasizing the need for a thorough assessment of this approach's efficacy and safety.

  2. The impact of static stress change, dynamic stress change, and the background stress on aftershock focal mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardebeck, Jeanne L.

    2014-01-01

    The focal mechanisms of earthquakes in Southern California before and after four M ≥ 6.7 main shocks provide insight into how fault systems respond to stress and changes in stress. The main shock static stress changes have two observed impacts on the seismicity: changing the focal mechanisms in a given location to favor those aligned with the static stress change and changing the spatial distribution of seismicity to favor locations where the static stress change aligns with the background stress. The aftershock focal mechanisms are significantly aligned with the static stress changes for absolute stress changes of ≥ 0.02 MPa, for up to ~20 years following the main shock. The dynamic stress changes have similar, although smaller, effects on the local focal mechanisms and the spatial seismicity distribution. Dynamic stress effects are best observed at long periods (30–60 s) and for metrics based on repeated stress cycling in the same direction. This implies that dynamic triggering operates, at least in part, through cyclic shear stress loading in the direction of fault slip. The background stress also strongly controls both the preshock and aftershock mechanisms. While most aftershock mechanisms are well oriented in the background stress field, 10% of aftershocks are identified as poorly oriented outliers, which may indicate limited heterogeneity in the postmain shock stress field. The fault plane orientations of the outliers are well oriented in the background stress, while their slip directions are not, implying that the background stress restricts the distribution of available fault planes.

  3. Dynamic stress intensity factors for a longitudinal semi-elliptical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    elliptical crack in a thick-walled cylinder subjected to transient dynamic stresses. First, the problem of dynamic elasticity in a thick-walled cylinder is solved analytically using the finite Hankel transform. Transient pressure is assumed to act on ...

  4. Alcohol, psychomotor-stimulants and behaviour: methodological considerations in preclinical models of early-life stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnell-Dowling, Kate; Miczek, Klaus A

    2018-04-01

    In order to assess the risk associated with early-life stress, there has been an increase in the amount of preclinical studies investigating early-life stress. There are many challenges associated with investigating early-life stress in animal models and ensuring that such models are appropriate and clinically relevant. The purpose of this review is to highlight the methodological considerations in the design of preclinical studies investigating the effects of early-life stress on alcohol and psychomotor-stimulant intake and behaviour. The protocols employed for exploring early-life stress were investigated and summarised. Experimental variables include animals, stress models, and endpoints employed. The findings in this paper suggest that there is little consistency among these studies and so the interpretation of these results may not be as clinically relevant as previously thought. The standardisation of these simple stress procedures means that results will be more comparable between studies and that results generated will give us a more robust understanding of what can and may be happening in the human and veterinary clinic.

  5. Dynamic Response in Transient Stress-Field Behavior Induced by Hydraulic Fracturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Andrew

    Hydraulic fracturing is a technique which is used to exploit geologic features and subsurface properties in an effort to increase production in low-permeability formations. The process of hydraulic fracturing provides a greater surface contact area between the producing formation and the wellbore and thus increases the amount of recoverable hydrocarbons from within the reservoir. The use of this stimulation technique has brought on massive applause from the industry due to its widespread success and effectiveness, however the dynamic processes that take part in the development of hydraulic fractures is a relatively new area of research with respect to the massive scale operations that are seen today. The process of hydraulic fracturing relies upon understanding and exploiting the in-situ stress distribution throughout the area of study. These in-situ stress conditions are responsible for directing fracture orientation and propagation paths throughout the period of injection. The relative magnitude of these principle stresses is key in developing a successful stimulation plan. In horizontal well plan development the interpretation of stress within the reservoir is required for determining the azimuth of the horizontal well path. These horizontal laterals are typically oriented in a manner such that the well path lies parallel to the minimum horizontal stress. This allows for vertical fractures to develop transversely to the wellbore, or normal to the least principle stress without the theoretical possibility of fractures overlapping, creating the most efficient use of the fluid energy during injection. The orientation and magnitude of these in-situ stress fields however can be dynamic, controlled by the subsequent fracture propagation and redistribution of the surrounding stresses. That is, that as the fracture propagates throughout the reservoir, the relative stress fields surrounding the fractures may see a shift and deviate from their original direction or

  6. Salivary alpha-amylase and cortisol responsiveness following electrical stimulation stress in major depressive disorder patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yoshihiro; Ishitobi, Yoshinobu; Maruyama, Yoshihiro; Kawano, Aimi; Ando, Tomoko; Okamoto, Shizuko; Kanehisa, Masayuki; Higuma, Haruka; Ninomiya, Taiga; Tsuru, Jusen; Hanada, Hiroaki; Kodama, Kensuke; Isogawa, Koichi; Akiyoshi, Jotaro

    2012-03-30

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is often associated with dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis by chronic stress. In comparison, psychosocial stress-induced activation of salivary α-amylase (sAA) functions as a marker of sympathoadrenal medullary system (SAM) activity. However, in contrast to salivary cortisol, sAA has been less extensively studied in MDD patients. The present study measured sAA and salivary cortisol levels in patients with MDD. The authors determined Profile of Mood State (POMS) and State-Trait anxiety Inventory (STAI) scores, Heart Rate Variability (HRV), and sAA and salivary cortisol levels in 88 patients with MDD and 41 healthy volunteers following the application of electrical stimulation stress. Patients with major depressive disorder were 8 points or more on Hamilton Depression Scale (HAM-D) scores. Tension-Anxiety, Depression-Dejection, Anger-Hostility, Fatigue, and Confusion scores in patients with major depressive disorder were significantly increased compared to healthy controls. In contrast, Vigor scores in patients with MDD were significantly decreased compared with healthy controls. There was no difference in heart rate variability measures between MDD patients and healthy controls. The threshold of electrical stimulation applied in MDD patients was lower than that in healthy controls. SAA levels in female MDD patients were significantly elevated relative to controls both before and after electrical stimulation. Finally, there were no differences in salivary cortisol levels between major depressive patients and controls. In the present study only three time points were explored. Furthermore, the increased secretion of sAA before and after stimulation could allude to an increased responsiveness of novel and uncontrollable situations in patients with MDD. These preliminary results suggest that sAA might be a useful biological marker of MDD. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Dynamic stresses, coulomb failure, and remote triggering: corrected

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, David P.

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic stresses associated with crustal surface waves with 15–30 s periods and peak amplitudes Coulomb failure models based on a frictional strength threshold offer one explanation for instances of rapid‐onset triggered seismicity that develop during the surface‐wave peak dynamic stressing. Evaluation of the triggering potential of surface‐wave dynamic stresses acting on critically stressed faults using a Mohr’s circle representation together with the Coulomb failure criteria indicates that Love waves should have a higher triggering potential than Rayleigh waves for most fault orientations and wave incidence angles. That (1) the onset of triggered seismicity often appears to begin during the Rayleigh wave rather than the earlier arriving Love wave, and (2) Love‐wave amplitudes typically exceed those for Rayleigh waves suggests that the explanation for rapid‐onset dynamic triggering may not reside solely with a simple static‐threshold friction mode. The results also indicate that normal faults should be more susceptible to dynamic triggering by 20‐s Rayleigh‐wave stresses than thrust faults in the shallow seismogenic crust (<10  km) while the advantage tips in favor of reverse faults greater depths. This transition depth scales with wavelength and coincides roughly with the transition from retrograde‐to‐prograde particle motion. Locally elevated pore pressures may have a role in the observed prevalence of dynamic triggering in extensional regimes and geothermal/volcanic systems. The result is consistent with the apparent elevated susceptibility of extensional or transtensional tectonic regimes to remote triggering by Rayleigh‐wave dynamic stresses than compressional or transpressional regimes.

  8. Dynamical mechanisms for sensitive response of aperiodic firing cells to external stimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Yong; Xu Jianxue; Hu Sanjue; Kang Yanmei; Yang Hongjun; Duan Yubin

    2004-01-01

    An interesting phenomenon that aperiodic firing neurons have a higher sensitivity to drugs than periodic firing neurons have been reported for the chronically compressed dorsal root ganglion neurons in rats. In this study, the dynamical mechanisms for such a phenomenon are uncovered from the viewpoint of dynamical systems theory. We use the Rose-Hindmarsh neuron model to illustrate our opinions. Periodic orbit theory is introduced to characterize the dynamical behavior of aperiodic firing neurons. It is considered that bifurcations, crises and sensitive dependence of chaotic motions on control parameters can be the underlying mechanisms. And then, a similar analysis is applied to the modified Chay model describing the firing behavior of pancreatic beta cells. The same dynamical mechanisms can be obtained underlying that aperiodic firing cells are more sensitive to external stimulation than periodic firing ones. As a result, we conjecture that sensitive response of aperiodic firing cells to external stimulation is a universal property of excitable cells

  9. Dynamic properties of sensory stimulation evoked responses in mouse cerebellar granule cell layer and molecular layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bing, Yan-Hua; Zhang, Guang-Jian; Sun, Lei; Chu, Chun-Ping; Qiu, De-Lai

    2015-01-12

    Sensory information coming from climbing fiber and mossy fiber-granule cell pathways, generates motor-related outputs according to internal rules of integration and computation in the cerebellar cortex. However, the dynamic properties of sensory information processing in mouse cerebellar cortex are less understood. Here, we studied the dynamic properties of sensory stimulation-evoked responses in the cerebellar granule cell layer (GCL) and molecular layer (ML) by electrophysiological recordings method. Our data showed that air-puff stimulation (5-10 ms in duration) of the ipsilateral whisker pad evoked single-peak responses in the GCL and ML; whereas a duration of stimulation ≥30 ms in GCL and ≥60 ms in ML, evoked double-peak responses that corresponded with stimulation-on and -off responses via mossy fiber pathway. The highest frequency of stimulation train for evoking GCL responses was 33 Hz. In contrast, the highest frequency of stimulation train for evoking ML responses was 4 Hz. These results indicate that the cerebellar granule cells transfer the high-fidelity sensory information from mossy fibers, which is cut-off by molecular layer interneurons (MLIs). Our results suggest that the MLIs network acts as a low-pass filter during the processing of high-frequency sensory information. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Direct current stimulation of the left temporoparietal junction modulates dynamic humor appreciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaby, Isabella; Holmes, Amanda; Moran, Joseph M; Eddy, Marianna D; Mahoney, Caroline R; Taylor, Holly A; Brunyé, Tad T

    2015-11-11

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of transcranial direct current stimulation targeting the left temporoparietal junction (TPJ) on humor appreciation during a dynamic video rating task. In a within-participants design, we targeted the left TPJ with anodal, cathodal, or no transcranial direct current stimulation, centered at electrode site C3 using a 4×1 targeted stimulation montage. During stimulation, participants dynamically rated a series of six stand-up comedy videos for perceived humor. We measured event-related (time-locked to crowd laughter) modulation of humor ratings as a function of stimulation condition. Results showed decreases in rated humor during anodal (vs. cathodal or none) stimulation; this pattern was evident for the majority of videos and was only partially predicted by individual differences in humor style. We discuss the possibility that upregulation of neural circuits involved in the theory of mind and empathizing with others may reduce appreciation of aggressive humor. In conclusion, the present data show that neuromodulation of the TPJ can alter the mental processes underlying humor appreciation, suggesting critical involvement of this cortical region in detecting, comprehending, and appreciating humor.

  11. Blade dynamic stress analysis of rotating bladed disks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kellner J.

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with mathematical modelling of steady forced bladed disk vibrations and with dynamic stress calculation of the blades. The blades are considered as 1D kontinuum elastic coupled with three-dimensional elastic disk centrally clamped into rotor rotating with constant angular speed. The steady forced vibrations are generated by the aerodynamic forces acting along the blade length. By using modal synthesis method the mathematical model of the rotating bladed disk is condensed to calculate steady vibrations. Dynamic stress analysis of the blades is based on calculation of the time dependent reduced stress in blade cross-sections by using Hubert-Misses-Hencky stress hypothesis. The presented method is applied to real turbomachinery rotor with blades connected on the top with shroud.

  12. Sequential segmental neuromuscular stimulation reduces fatigue and improves perfusion in dynamic graciloplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zonnevijlle, E D; Somia, N N; Abadia, G P; Stremel, R W; Maldonado, C J; Werker, P M; Kon, M; Barker, J H

    Dynamic graciloplasty is used as a treatment modality for total urinary incontinence caused by a paralyzed sphincter. A problem with this application is undesirable fatigue of the muscle caused by continuous electrical stimulation. Therefore, the neosphincter must be trained via a rigorous regimen

  13. Regeneration of Achilles' tendon: the role of dynamic stimulation for enhanced cell proliferation and mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jongman; Guarino, Vincenzo; Gloria, Antonio; Ambrosio, Luigi; Tae, Giyoong; Kim, Young Ha; Jung, Youngmee; Kim, Sang-Heon; Kim, Soo Hyun

    2010-01-01

    The tissue engineering of tendon was studied using highly elastic poly(L-lactide-co-epsilon-caprolactone) (PLCL) scaffolds and focusing on the effect of dynamic tensile stimulation. Tenocytes from rabbit Achilles tendon were seeded (1.0 x 10(6) cells/scaffold) onto porous PLCL scaffolds and cultured for periods of 2 weeks and 4 weeks. This was performed in a static system and also in a bioreactor equipped with tensile modulation which mimicked the environmental surroundings of tendons with respect to tensile extension. The degradation of the polymeric scaffolds during the culture was relatively slow. However, there was an indication that cells accelerated the degradation of PLCL scaffolds. The scaffold/cell adducts from the static culture exhibited inferior strength (at 2 weeks 350 kPa, 4 weeks 300 kPa) compared to the control without cells (at 2 weeks 460 kPa, 4 weeks 340 kPa), indicating that the cells contributed to the enhanced degradation. On the contrary, the corresponding values of the adducts from the dynamic culture (at 2 weeks 430 kPa, 4 weeks 370 kPa) were similar to, or higher than, those from the control. This could be explained by the increased quantity of cells and neo-tissues in the case of dynamic culture compensating for the loss in tensile strength. Compared with static and dynamic culture conditions, mechanical stimulation played a crucial role in the regeneration of tendon tissue. In the case of the dynamic culture system, cell proliferation was enhanced and secretion of collagen type I was increased, as evidenced by DNA assay and histological and immunofluorescence analysis. Thus, tendon regeneration, indicated by improved mechanical and biological properties, was demonstrated, confirming the effect of mechanical stimulation. It could be concluded that the dynamic tensile stimulation appeared to be an essential factor in tendon/ligament tissue engineering, and that elastic PLCL co-polymers could be very beneficial in this process.

  14. Moving-window dynamic optimization: design of stimulation profiles for walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosen, Strahinja; Popović, Dejan B

    2009-05-01

    The overall goal of the research is to improve control for electrical stimulation-based assistance of walking in hemiplegic individuals. We present the simulation for generating offline input (sensors)-output (intensity of muscle stimulation) representation of walking that serves in synthesizing a rule-base for control of electrical stimulation for restoration of walking. The simulation uses new algorithm termed moving-window dynamic optimization (MWDO). The optimization criterion was to minimize the sum of the squares of tracking errors from desired trajectories with the penalty function on the total muscle efforts. The MWDO was developed in the MATLAB environment and tested using target trajectories characteristic for slow-to-normal walking recorded in healthy individual and a model with the parameters characterizing the potential hemiplegic user. The outputs of the simulation are piecewise constant intensities of electrical stimulation and trajectories generated when the calculated stimulation is applied to the model. We demonstrated the importance of this simulation by showing the outputs for healthy and hemiplegic individuals, using the same target trajectories. Results of the simulation show that the MWDO is an efficient tool for analyzing achievable trajectories and for determining the stimulation profiles that need to be delivered for good tracking.

  15. Lifetime stress cumulatively programs brain transcriptome and impedes stroke recovery: benefit of sensory stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabíola C R Zucchi

    Full Text Available Prenatal stress (PS represents a critical variable affecting lifetime health trajectories, metabolic and vascular functions. Beneficial experiences may attenuate the effects of PS and its programming of health outcomes in later life. Here we investigated in a rat model (1 if PS modulates recovery following cortical ischemia in adulthood; (2 if a second hit by adult stress (AS exaggerates stress responses and ischemic damage; and (3 if tactile stimulation (TS attenuates the cumulative effects of PS and AS. Prenatally stressed and non-stressed adult male rats underwent focal ischemic motor cortex lesion and were tested in skilled reaching and skilled walking tasks. Two groups of rats experienced recurrent restraint stress in adulthood and one of these groups also underwent daily TS therapy. Animals that experienced both PS and AS displayed the most severe motor disabilities after lesion. By contrast, TS promoted recovery from ischemic lesion and reduced hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity. The data also showed that cumulative effects of adverse and beneficial lifespan experiences interact with disease outcomes and brain plasticity through the modulation of gene expression. Microarray analysis of the lesion motor cortex revealed that cumulative PS and AS interact with genes related to growth factors and transcription factors, which were not affected by PS or lesion alone. TS in PS+AS animals reverted these changes, suggesting a critical role for these factors in activity-dependent motor cortical reorganization after ischemic lesion. These findings suggest that beneficial experience later in life can moderate adverse consequences of early programming to improve cerebrovascular health.

  16. Rap system of stress stimulation can promote bone union after lower tibial bone fracture: a clinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jian-fei; Shen, Jia-zuo; Li, Da-kun; Lin, Da-sheng; Li, Lin; Li, Qiang; Qi, Peng; Lian, Ke-jian; Ding, Zhen-qi

    2012-01-01

    Lower tibial bone fracture may easily cause bone delayed union or nonunion because of lacking of dynamic mechanical load. Research Group would design a new instrument as Rap System of Stress Stimulation (RSSS) to provide dynamic mechanical load which would promote lower tibial bone union postoperatively. This clinical research was conducted from January 2008 to December 2010, 92 patients(male 61/female 31, age 16-70 years, mean 36.3 years) who suffered lower tibial bone closed fracture were given intramedullary nail fixation and randomly averagely separated into experimental group and control group(according to the successively order when patients went for the admission procedure). Then researchers analysed the clinical healing time, full weight bearing time, VAS (Visual Analogue Scales) score and callus growth score of Lane-Sandhu in 3,6,12 months postoperatively. The delayed union and nonunion rates were compared at 6 and 12 months separately. All the 92 patients had been followed up (mean 14 months). Clinical bone healing time in experimental group was 88.78±8.80 days but control group was 107.91±9.03 days. Full weight bearing time in experimental group was 94.07±9.81 days but control group was 113.24±13.37 days respectively (Ptibial bone union, reduce bone delayed union or nonunion rate. It is an adjuvant therapy for promoting bone union after lower tibial bone fracture.

  17. T-Stimulator effect on cotton protein composition and synthesis in salinization stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibragimova, E.A.; Nazirova, E.R.; Samarkhodjaeva, N.R.; Nalbandyan, A.A.; Babaev, T.A.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: T-stimulator was established to possess a wide spectrum of physiological effects, to enhance plant adaptation to thermal stress and to increase plant resistance to pathogens. Plant adaptation to unfavorable conditions manifests in changes in many links of metabolism, that of proteins included. We studied effect of cottonseed treatment with T-stimulator on composition and synthesis of plasma membrane proteins upon chloride salinization by means of the radioisotope method. Electrophoretic fractionation of cottonseed plasma membrane proteins showed absence of more than 40 polypeptides with molecular mass from 10 to more than 100 kDa in the cotton root membranes. Major fractions-polypeptides with molecular mass of 61, 53, 46, 25, 21, 20 and 18 kDa constitute about 50% of the total polypeptide composition. The salinization significantly affects the total membrane protein output, proportion of some polypeptides and their synthesis rate. Analysis of phoreogram radioautographs showed that 2-hour exposition of cotton roots to 35 S methionine suppresses synthesis of major polypeptides with molecular mass of 63, 61 and 53 kDa, that of low molecular polypeptides (46, 20, 18 kDa) increasing. Changes in the proportion of major polypeptides in cotton plasma membranes, reduction in rate of biosynthesis of high molecular fractions with the general suppression of label inclusion in the membrane fraction are the evidence for a disturbance in biosynthesis of some membrane proteins in cotton tissue cells upon salinization. The inhibiting effect of salinization on the protein-synthesizing system was observed in plants treated with T-stimulator, but the rate of synthesis in plasma membranes of the treated plants was found significantly higher. The activation of some plasma membrane proteins under T-stimulator effect suggests an association with the increase in adaptation of the treated plants to the disturbing effect of salinization

  18. Particle stimulated nucleation during dynamic and metadynamic recrystallisation of Ni-30%Fe-Nb-C alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereloma, Elena V., E-mail: elenap@uow.edu.au [School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); UOW Electron Microscopy Centre, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2500 (Australia); Mannan, Parvez [School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Casillas, Gilberto [UOW Electron Microscopy Centre, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2500 (Australia); Saleh, Ahmed A. [School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia)

    2017-03-15

    For the first time, a combination of scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron back-scattering diffraction is used to elucidate the early stages of particle stimulated recrystallisation at Nb carbides in Ni-30wt.%Fe alloy subjected to high temperature plane strain compression. While particles with sizes even below 1 μm were found to induce dynamic or metadynamic recrystallisation, only a small fraction of coarse particles served as nucleation sites. - Highlights: • The early stages of particle stimulated recrystallisation at Nb carbides are elucidated • A combination of transmission electron microscopy and electron back scattering diffraction used • Particles below 1 μm size could induce dynamic or metadynamic recrystallization.

  19. Particle stimulated nucleation during dynamic and metadynamic recrystallisation of Ni-30%Fe-Nb-C alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereloma, Elena V.; Mannan, Parvez; Casillas, Gilberto; Saleh, Ahmed A.

    2017-01-01

    For the first time, a combination of scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron back-scattering diffraction is used to elucidate the early stages of particle stimulated recrystallisation at Nb carbides in Ni-30wt.%Fe alloy subjected to high temperature plane strain compression. While particles with sizes even below 1 μm were found to induce dynamic or metadynamic recrystallisation, only a small fraction of coarse particles served as nucleation sites. - Highlights: • The early stages of particle stimulated recrystallisation at Nb carbides are elucidated • A combination of transmission electron microscopy and electron back scattering diffraction used • Particles below 1 μm size could induce dynamic or metadynamic recrystallization

  20. Developing a dynamic virtual stimulation protocol to induce linear egomotion during orthostatic posture control test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo José Guimarães Da-Silva

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction In this work, the effect of a dynamic visual stimulation (DS protocol was used to induce egomotion, the center of pressure (COP displacement response. Methods DS was developed concerning the scenario structure (chessboard-pattern floor and furniture and luminance. To move the scenario in a discrete forward (or backward direction, the furniture is expanded (or reduced and the black and white background is reversed during floor translation while the luminance is increased (or reduced by steps of 2 cd/m2. This protocol was evaluated using COP signals from 29 healthy volunteers: standing on a force platform observing the virtual scene (1.72 × 1.16 m projected 1 m ahead (visual incidence angle: θl = 81.4° and θv = 60.2°, which moves with constant velocity (2 m/s during 250 ms. A set of 100 DS was applied in random order, interspersed by a 10 s of static scene. Results The Tukey post-hoc test (p < 0.001 indicated egomotion in the same direction of DS. COP displacement increased over stimulation (8.4 ± 1.7 to 22.6 ±5.3 mm, as well as time to recover stability (4.1 ± 0.4 to 7.2 ± 0.6 s. The peak of egomotion during DSF occurred 200 ms after DSB (Wilcoxon, p = 0.002. Conclusion The dynamic configuration of this protocol establishes virtual flow effects of linear egomotion dependent on the direction of the dynamic visual stimulation. This finding indicates the potential application of the proposed virtual dynamic stimulation protocol to investigate the cortical visual evoked response in postural control studies.

  1. Computational Psychometrics for Modeling System Dynamics during Stressful Disasters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Cipresso

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Disasters can be very stressful events. However, computational models of stress require data that might be very difficult to collect during disasters. Moreover, personal experiences are not repeatable, so it is not possible to collect bottom-up information when building a coherent model. To overcome these problems, we propose the use of computational models and virtual reality integration to recreate disaster situations, while examining possible dynamics in order to understand human behavior and relative consequences. By providing realistic parameters associated with disaster situations, computational scientists can work more closely with emergency responders to improve the quality of interventions in the future.

  2. Dynamic energy release rate in couple-stress elasticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morini, L; Piccolroaz, A; Mishuris, G

    2013-01-01

    This paper is concerned with energy release rate for dynamic steady state crack problems in elastic materials with microstructures. A Mode III semi-infinite crack subject to loading applied on the crack surfaces is considered. The micropolar behaviour of the material is described by the theory of couple-stress elasticity developed by Koiter. A general expression for the dynamic J-integral including both traslational and micro-rotational inertial contributions is derived, and the conservation of this integral on a path surrounding the crack tip is demonstrated

  3. Trigeminal Nerve Stimulation for Comorbid Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Major Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Ian A; Abrams, Michelle; Leuchter, Andrew F

    2016-04-01

    External stimulation of the trigeminal nerve (eTNS) is an emerging neuromodulation therapy for epilepsy and depression. Preliminary studies suggest it has an excellent safety profile and is associated with significant improvements in seizures and mood. Neuroanatomical projections of the trigeminal system suggest eTNS may alter activity in structures regulating mood, anxiety, and sleep. In this proof-of-concept trial, the effects of eTNS were evaluated in adults with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and comorbid unipolar major depressive disorder (MDD) as an adjunct to pharmacotherapy for these commonly co-occurring conditions. Twelve adults with PTSD and MDD were studied in an eight-week open outpatient trial (age 52.8 [13.7 sd], 8F:4M). Stimulation was applied to the supraorbital and supratrochlear nerves for eight hours each night as an adjunct to pharmacotherapy. Changes in symptoms were monitored using the PTSD Patient Checklist (PCL), Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS-17), Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (QIDS-C), and the Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire (Q-LES-Q). Over the eight weeks, eTNS treatment was associated with significant decreases in PCL (p = 0.003; median decrease of 15 points; effect size d 1.5), HDRS-17 (p depression severity were achieved in the eight weeks of acute eTNS treatment. This novel approach to wearable brain stimulation may have use as an adjunct to pharmacotherapy in these disorders if efficacy and tolerability are confirmed with additional studies. © 2016 International Neuromodulation Society.

  4. The water avoidance stress induces bladder pain due to a prolonged alpha1A adrenoceptor stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, Rita; Serrão, Paula; Rodriguez, Larissa; Birder, Lori Ann; Cruz, Francisco; Charrua, Ana

    2017-08-01

    Bladder Pain Syndrome/Interstitial Cystitis (BPS/IC) remains an elusive disease with the cause for the pain unclear. BPS/IC patients present increased sympathetic activity and high levels of urinary noradrenaline. At the experimental level, it has been shown that chronic adrenergic stimulation produces pain and bladder changes through an alpha 1A adrenoceptor mediated mechanism. Water avoidance stress (WAS) in rodents reproduces signs of nociception and bladder changes seen in BPS/IC patients. In this study, we explore the possible role of alpha 1A adrenoceptor in bladder pain and morphological changes. WAS was induced in a group of female Wistar rats. A separate WAS group received 0.2 mg/kg day silodosin (WAS + S). Lower abdominal pain was determined by performing sensitivity to Von Frey filaments. Bladder reflex activity was determined by cystometry in anaesthetised animals. Urine was collected for noradrenaline quantification by HPLC. Bladders were harvested and stained with Haematoxylin-eosin (to analyse urothelial morphology and to determine the disruption of surface umbrella cells) or with Toluidine Blue 0.1% to analyse mast cell infiltration. WAS increased urinary noradrenaline level and bladder frequency and decreased mechanical pain threshold, which was reversed by silodosin. WAS induced lymphocytic and mast cells infiltration in the mucosa and mild urothelial disruption, which was absent in WAS + S group. Alpha 1A adrenoceptor stimulation has an important role in the appearance of bladder pain in rats. Since BPS/IC patients present high levels of noradrenaline, alpha 1A stimulation may be an additional trigger for bladder dysfunction presented by these patients. Further studies will determine the clinical relevance of this finding in the treatment of BPS/IC patients.

  5. Rupture Dynamics and Scaling Behavior of Hydraulically Stimulated Micro-Earthquakes in a Shale Reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viegas, G. F.; Urbancic, T.; Baig, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    In hydraulic fracturing completion programs fluids are injected under pressure into fractured rock formations to open escape pathways for trapped hydrocarbons along pre-existing and newly generated fractures. To characterize the failure process, we estimate static and dynamic source and rupture parameters, such as dynamic and static stress drop, radiated energy, seismic efficiency, failure modes, failure plane orientations and dimensions, and rupture velocity to investigate the rupture dynamics and scaling relations of micro-earthquakes induced during a hydraulic fracturing shale completion program in NE British Columbia, Canada. The relationships between the different parameters combined with the in-situ stress field and rock properties provide valuable information on the rupture process giving insights into the generation and development of the fracture network. Approximately 30,000 micro-earthquakes were recorded using three multi-sensor arrays of high frequency geophones temporarily placed close to the treatment area at reservoir depth (~2km). On average the events have low radiated energy, low dynamic stress and low seismic efficiency, consistent with the obtained slow rupture velocities. Events fail in overshoot mode (slip weakening failure model), with fluids lubricating faults and decreasing friction resistance. Events occurring in deeper formations tend to have faster rupture velocities and are more efficient in radiating energy. Variations in rupture velocity tend to correlate with variation in depth, fault azimuth and elapsed time, reflecting a dominance of the local stress field over other factors. Several regions with different characteristic failure modes are identifiable based on coherent stress drop, seismic efficiency, rupture velocities and fracture orientations. Variations of source parameters with rock rheology and hydro-fracture fluids are also observed. Our results suggest that the spatial and temporal distribution of events with similar

  6. The conformity of BPP and vibroacoustic stimulation results in fetal non reactive non stress test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Modarres

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The most frequently used test for evaluation of fetal health is the Non Stress Test (NST. Unfortunately it has a high incidence of false positive results. The combination of vibroacoustic stimulation with the NTS has been shown to reduce non reactive results. Methods: A tests assessment method was chosen with a simple randomized sampling. 40 pregnant women with non reactive NST in the first 20 minutes who received VAS in one of Tehran University's Hospitals were compared with BPP scores. A vibroacoustic stimulation was applied for a 3 seconds on the maternal abdomen and fallowed within 10 minutes.Data collection tools were NST, sonography instruments ,NST result paper, tooth brusher, watch, demographic questioner and check list. Data analysis was made by descriptive static and by using the Fisher's Exact Test (with level of significant at p<0/05. All statistical analysis were performed using an spss/win. Results: After VAS, 70% of non reactive tracing became reactive. All cases with fetal reactivity response after a VAS had a subsequent BPP score of 8 (negative predictive value of 100%. False positivity of VAS was lower than NST. Conclusion: VAS offers benefits, by decreasing the incidence of non reactive test and reducing test time. VAS lowers the rate of false positive NST. VAS is safe and allows more efficient of prenatal services. This test could be used as a rapid antepartum test to predict fetal well-being.

  7. ITER vacuum vessel dynamic stress analysis of a disruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riemer, B.W.; Conner, D.L.; Strickler, D.J.; Williamson, D.E.

    1994-01-01

    Dynamic stress analysis of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor vacuum vessel loaded by disruption forces was performed. The deformation and stress results showed strong inertial effects when compared to static analyses. Maximum stress predicted dynamically was 300 MPa, but stress shown by static analysis from loads at the same point in time reached only 80 MPa. The analysis also provided a reaction load history in the vessel's supports which is essential in evaluating support design. The disruption forces were estimated by assuming a 25-MA plasma current decaying at 1 MA/ms while moving vertically. In addition to forces developed within the vessel, vertical loadings from the first wall/strong back assemblies and the divertor were applied to the vessel at their attachment points. The first 50 natural modes were also determined. The first mode's frequency was 6.0 Hz, and its shape is characterized by vertical displacement of the vessel inner leg. The predicted deformation of the vessel appeared similar to its first mode shape combined with radial contraction. Kinetic energy history from the analysis also correlated with the first mode frequency

  8. Investigation of Balance Function Using Dynamic Posturography under Electrical-Acoustic Stimulation in Cochlear Implant Recipients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Schwab

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the effect of electrical-acoustic stimulation on vestibular function in CI patients by using the EquiTest and to help answer the question of whether electrically stimulating the inner ear using a cochlear implant influences the balance system in any way. Material and Methods. A test population (=50 was selected at random from among the cochlear implant recipients. Dynamic posturography (using the EquiTest was performed with the device switched off an switched on. Results. In summary, it can be said that an activated cochlear implant affects the function of the vestibular system and may, to an extent, even lead to a stabilization of balance function under the static conditions of dynamic posturography, but nevertheless also to a significant destabilization. Significant improvements in vestibular function were seen mainly in equilibrium scores under conditions 4 and 5, the composite equilibrium score, and the vestibular components as revealed by sensory analysis. Conclusions. Only under the static conditions are significantly poorer scores achieved when stimulation is applied. It may be that the explanation for any symptoms of dizziness lies precisely in the fact that they occur in supposedly noncritical situations, since, when the cochlear implant makes increased demands on the balance system, induced disturbances can be centrally suppressed.

  9. Stochastic Nonlinear Evolutional Model of the Large-Scaled Neuronal Population and Dynamic Neural Coding Subject to Stimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Rubin; Yu Wei

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate how the population of neuronal oscillators deals with information and the dynamic evolution of neural coding when the external stimulation acts on it. Numerically computing method is used to describe the evolution process of neural coding in three-dimensioned space. The numerical result proves that only the suitable stimulation can change the coupling structure and plasticity of neurons

  10. Velocity and stress autocorrelation decay in isothermal dissipative particle dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhri, Anuj; Lukes, Jennifer R.

    2010-02-01

    The velocity and stress autocorrelation decay in a dissipative particle dynamics ideal fluid model is analyzed in this paper. The autocorrelation functions are calculated at three different friction parameters and three different time steps using the well-known Groot/Warren algorithm and newer algorithms including self-consistent leap-frog, self-consistent velocity Verlet and Shardlow first and second order integrators. At low friction values, the velocity autocorrelation function decays exponentially at short times, shows slower-than exponential decay at intermediate times, and approaches zero at long times for all five integrators. As friction value increases, the deviation from exponential behavior occurs earlier and is more pronounced. At small time steps, all the integrators give identical decay profiles. As time step increases, there are qualitative and quantitative differences between the integrators. The stress correlation behavior is markedly different for the algorithms. The self-consistent velocity Verlet and the Shardlow algorithms show very similar stress autocorrelation decay with change in friction parameter, whereas the Groot/Warren and leap-frog schemes show variations at higher friction factors. Diffusion coefficients and shear viscosities are calculated using Green-Kubo integration of the velocity and stress autocorrelation functions. The diffusion coefficients match well-known theoretical results at low friction limits. Although the stress autocorrelation function is different for each integrator, fluctuates rapidly, and gives poor statistics for most of the cases, the calculated shear viscosities still fall within range of theoretical predictions and nonequilibrium studies.

  11. Copper ions stimulate the proliferation of hepatic stellate cells via oxygen stress in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, San-qing; Zhu, Hui-yun; Lin, Jian-guo; Su, Tang-feng; Liu, Yan; Luo, Xiao-ping

    2013-02-01

    This study examined the effect of copper ions on the proliferation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and the role of oxidative stress in this process in order to gain insight into the mechanism of hepatic fibrosis in Wilson's disease. LX-2 cells, a cell line of human HSCs, were cultured in vitro and treated with different agents including copper sulfate, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) and buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) for different time. The proliferation of LX-2 cells was measured by non-radioactive cell proliferation assay. Real-time PCR and Western blotting were used to detect the mRNA and protein expression of platelet-derived growth factor receptor β subunit (PDGFβR), ELISA to determine the level of glutathione (GSH) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG), dichlorofluorescein assay to measure the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and lipid hydroperoxide assay to quantify the level of lipid peroxide (LPO). The results showed that copper sulfate over a certain concentration range could promote the proliferation of LX-2 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. The effect was most manifest when LX-2 cells were treated with copper sulfate at a concentration of 100 μmol/L for 24 h. Additionally, copper sulfate could dose-dependently increase the levels of ROS and LPO, and decrease the ratio of GSH/GSSG in LX-2 cells. The copper-induced increase in mRNA and protein expression of PDGFβR was significantly inhibited in LX-2 cells pre-treated with NAC, a precursor of GSH, and this phenomenon could be reversed by the intervention of BSO, an inhibitor of NAC. It was concluded that copper ions may directly stimulate the proliferation of HSCs via oxidative stress. Anti-oxidative stress therapies may help suppress the copper-induced activation and proliferation of HSCs.

  12. Possible stimulation of anti-tumor immunity using repeated cold stress: a hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radoja Sasa

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The phenomenon of hormesis, whereby small amounts of seemingly harmful or stressful agents can be beneficial for the health and lifespan of laboratory animals has been reported in literature. In particular, there is accumulating evidence that daily brief cold stress can increase both numbers and activity of peripheral cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer cells, the major effectors of adaptive and innate tumor immunity, respectively. This type of regimen (for 8 days has been shown to improve survival of mice infected with intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii, which would also be consistent with enhanced cell-mediated immunity. Presentation of the hypothesis This paper hypothesizes that brief cold-water stress repeated daily over many months could enhance anti-tumor immunity and improve survival rate of a non-lymphoid cancer. The possible mechanism of the non-specific stimulation of cellular immunity by repeated cold stress appears to involve transient activation of the sympathetic nervous system, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal and hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axes, as described in more detail in the text. Daily moderate cold hydrotherapy is known to reduce pain and does not appear to have noticeable adverse effects on normal test subjects, although some studies have shown that it can cause transient arrhythmias in patients with heart problems and can also inhibit humoral immunity. Sudden immersion in ice-cold water can cause transient pulmonary edema and increase permeability of the blood-brain barrier, thereby increasing mortality of neurovirulent infections. Testing the hypothesis The proposed procedure is an adapted cold swim (5–7 minutes at 20 degrees Celsius, includes gradual adaptation to be tested on a mouse tumor model. Mortality, tumor size, and measurements of cellular immunity (numbers and activity of peripheral CD8+ T lymphocytes and natural killer cells of the cold-exposed group would be compared to

  13. Spatio-temporal Dynamics and Mechanisms of Stress Granule Assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Ohshima

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Stress granules (SGs are non-membranous cytoplasmic aggregates of mRNAs and related proteins, assembled in response to environmental stresses such as heat shock, hypoxia, endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress, chemicals (e.g. arsenite, and viral infections. SGs are hypothesized as a loci of mRNA triage and/or maintenance of proper translation capacity ratio to the pool of mRNAs. In brain ischemia, hippocampal CA3 neurons, which are resilient to ischemia, assemble SGs. In contrast, CA1 neurons, which are vulnerable to ischemia, do not assemble SGs. These results suggest a critical role SG plays in regards to cell fate decisions. Thus SG assembly along with its dynamics should determine the cell fate. However, the process that exactly determines the SG assembly dynamics is largely unknown. In this paper, analyses of experimental data and computer simulations were used to approach this problem. SGs were assembled as a result of applying arsenite to HeLa cells. The number of SGs increased after a short latent period, reached a maximum, then decreased during the application of arsenite. At the same time, the size of SGs grew larger and became localized at the perinuclear region. A minimal mathematical model was constructed, and stochastic simulations were run to test the modeling. Since SGs are discrete entities as there are only several tens of them in a cell, commonly used deterministic simulations could not be employed. The stochastic simulations replicated observed dynamics of SG assembly. In addition, these stochastic simulations predicted a gamma distribution relative to the size of SGs. This same distribution was also found in our experimental data suggesting the existence of multiple fusion steps in the SG assembly. Furthermore, we found that the initial steps in the SG assembly process and microtubules were critical to the dynamics. Thus our experiments and stochastic simulations presented a possible mechanism regulating SG assembly.

  14. Numerical modeling of injection, stress and permeability enhancement during shear stimulation at the Desert Peak Enhanced Geothermal System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, David; Kelkar, Sharad; Davatzes, Nick; Hickman, Stephen H.; Moos, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Creation of an Enhanced Geothermal System relies on stimulation of fracture permeability through self-propping shear failure that creates a complex fracture network with high surface area for efficient heat transfer. In 2010, shear stimulation was carried out in well 27-15 at Desert Peak geothermal field, Nevada, by injecting cold water at pressure less than the minimum principal stress. An order-of-magnitude improvement in well injectivity was recorded. Here, we describe a numerical model that accounts for injection-induced stress changes and permeability enhancement during this stimulation. In a two-part study, we use the coupled thermo-hydrological-mechanical simulator FEHM to: (i) construct a wellbore model for non-steady bottom-hole temperature and pressure conditions during the injection, and (ii) apply these pressures and temperatures as a source term in a numerical model of the stimulation. In this model, a Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion and empirical fracture permeability is developed to describe permeability evolution of the fractured rock. The numerical model is calibrated using laboratory measurements of material properties on representative core samples and wellhead records of injection pressure and mass flow during the shear stimulation. The model captures both the absence of stimulation at low wellhead pressure (WHP ≤1.7 and ≤2.4 MPa) as well as the timing and magnitude of injectivity rise at medium WHP (3.1 MPa). Results indicate that thermoelastic effects near the wellbore and the associated non-local stresses further from the well combine to propagate a failure front away from the injection well. Elevated WHP promotes failure, increases the injection rate, and cools the wellbore; however, as the overpressure drops off with distance, thermal and non-local stresses play an ongoing role in promoting shear failure at increasing distance from the well.

  15. Direct Imaging of Natural Fractures and Stress Compartments Stimulated by Hydraulic Fracturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacazette, A.; Vermilye, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    This contribution will present results from passive seismic studies of hydraulic fracture treatments in North American and Asian basins. One of the key data types is a comparatively new surface-based seismic imaging product - "Tomographic Fracture Images®" (TFI®). The procedure is an extension of Seismic Emission Tomography (SET), which is well-established and widely used. Conventional microseismic results - microearthquake hypocenter locations, magnitudes, and focal mechanism solutions - are also obtained from the data via a branch of the processing workflow. TFI is accomplished by summing the individual time steps in a multidimensional SET hypervolume over extended periods of time, such as an entire frac stage. The dimensions of a SET hypervolume are the X, Y, and Z coordinates of the voxels, the time step (typically on the order of 100 milliseconds), and the seismic activity value. The resulting summed volume is skeletonized to produce images of the main fracture surfaces, which are known to occupy the maximum activity surfaces of the high activity clouds from theory, field studies, and experiments. The orientation vs. area of the resulting TFIs can be analyzed in detail and compared with independent data sets such as volumetric structural attributes from reflection seismic data and borehole fracture data. We find that the primary effect of hydraulic fracturing is to stimulate preexisting natural fracture networks and faults. The combination of TFIs with hypocenter distributions and microearthquake focal mechanisms provides detailed information on subsurface stress compartmentalization. Faults are directly imaged which allows discrimination of fault planes from auxiliary planes of focal mechanism solutions. Examples that will be shown include simultaneous movement on a thrust fault and tear fault and examples of radically different stress compartments (e.g. extensional vs. wrench faulting) stimulated during a single hydraulic fracture treatment. The figure

  16. Gene Expression Dynamics Accompanying the Sponge Thermal Stress Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Christine; Conaco, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Marine sponges are important members of coral reef ecosystems. Thus, their responses to changes in ocean chemistry and environmental conditions, particularly to higher seawater temperatures, will have potential impacts on the future of these reefs. To better understand the sponge thermal stress response, we investigated gene expression dynamics in the shallow water sponge, Haliclona tubifera (order Haplosclerida, class Demospongiae), subjected to elevated temperature. Using high-throughput transcriptome sequencing, we show that these conditions result in the activation of various processes that interact to maintain cellular homeostasis. Short-term thermal stress resulted in the induction of heat shock proteins, antioxidants, and genes involved in signal transduction and innate immunity pathways. Prolonged exposure to thermal stress affected the expression of genes involved in cellular damage repair, apoptosis, signaling and transcription. Interestingly, exposure to sublethal temperatures may improve the ability of the sponge to mitigate cellular damage under more extreme stress conditions. These insights into the potential mechanisms of adaptation and resilience of sponges contribute to a better understanding of sponge conservation status and the prediction of ecosystem trajectories under future climate conditions.

  17. Calculation of dynamic stresses in viscoelastic sandwich beams using oma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pelayo, F.; Aenlle, M. L.; Ismael, G.

    2017-01-01

    The mechanical response of sandwich elements with viscoelastic core is time and temperature dependent. Laminated glass is a sandwich element where the mechanical behavior of the glass layers is usually considered linear-elastic material whereas the core is made of an amorphous thermoplastic which...... data. In simple structures, analytical mode shapes can be used alternatively to the numerical ones. In this paper, the dynamic stresses on the glass layers of a laminated glass beam have estimated using the experimental acceleration responses measured at 7 points of the beam, and the experimental mode...

  18. Learning by stimulation avoidance: A principle to control spiking neural networks dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinapayen, Lana; Masumori, Atsushi; Ikegami, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Learning based on networks of real neurons, and learning based on biologically inspired models of neural networks, have yet to find general learning rules leading to widespread applications. In this paper, we argue for the existence of a principle allowing to steer the dynamics of a biologically inspired neural network. Using carefully timed external stimulation, the network can be driven towards a desired dynamical state. We term this principle "Learning by Stimulation Avoidance" (LSA). We demonstrate through simulation that the minimal sufficient conditions leading to LSA in artificial networks are also sufficient to reproduce learning results similar to those obtained in biological neurons by Shahaf and Marom, and in addition explains synaptic pruning. We examined the underlying mechanism by simulating a small network of 3 neurons, then scaled it up to a hundred neurons. We show that LSA has a higher explanatory power than existing hypotheses about the response of biological neural networks to external simulation, and can be used as a learning rule for an embodied application: learning of wall avoidance by a simulated robot. In other works, reinforcement learning with spiking networks can be obtained through global reward signals akin simulating the dopamine system; we believe that this is the first project demonstrating sensory-motor learning with random spiking networks through Hebbian learning relying on environmental conditions without a separate reward system.

  19. Stat5 signaling specifies basal versus stress erythropoietic responses through distinct binary and graded dynamic modalities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ermelinda Porpiglia

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Erythropoietin (Epo-induced Stat5 phosphorylation (p-Stat5 is essential for both basal erythropoiesis and for its acceleration during hypoxic stress. A key challenge lies in understanding how Stat5 signaling elicits distinct functions during basal and stress erythropoiesis. Here we asked whether these distinct functions might be specified by the dynamic behavior of the Stat5 signal. We used flow cytometry to analyze Stat5 phosphorylation dynamics in primary erythropoietic tissue in vivo and in vitro, identifying two signaling modalities. In later (basophilic erythroblasts, Epo stimulation triggers a low intensity but decisive, binary (digital p-Stat5 signal. In early erythroblasts the binary signal is superseded by a high-intensity graded (analog p-Stat5 response. We elucidated the biological functions of binary and graded Stat5 signaling using the EpoR-HM mice, which express a "knocked-in" EpoR mutant lacking cytoplasmic phosphotyrosines. Strikingly, EpoR-HM mice are restricted to the binary signaling mode, which rescues these mice from fatal perinatal anemia by promoting binary survival decisions in erythroblasts. However, the absence of the graded p-Stat5 response in the EpoR-HM mice prevents them from accelerating red cell production in response to stress, including a failure to upregulate the transferrin receptor, which we show is a novel stress target. We found that Stat5 protein levels decline with erythroblast differentiation, governing the transition from high-intensity graded signaling in early erythroblasts to low-intensity binary signaling in later erythroblasts. Thus, using exogenous Stat5, we converted later erythroblasts into high-intensity graded signal transducers capable of eliciting a downstream stress response. Unlike the Stat5 protein, EpoR expression in erythroblasts does not limit the Stat5 signaling response, a non-Michaelian paradigm with therapeutic implications in myeloproliferative disease. Our findings show how the

  20. Sensory trigeminal ULF-TENS stimulation reduces HRV response to experimentally induced arithmetic stress: A randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaco, Annalisa; Cattaneo, Ruggero; Ortu, Eleonora; Constantinescu, Marian Vladimir; Pietropaoli, Davide

    2017-05-01

    Ultra Low Frequency Transcutaneous Electric Nervous Stimulation (ULF-TENS) is extensively used for pain relief and for the diagnosis and treatment of temporomandibular disorders (TMD). In addition to its local effects, ULF-TENS acts on the autonomic nervous system (ANS), with particular reference to the periaqueductal gray (PAG), promoting the release of endogenous opioids and modulating descending pain systems. It has been suggested that the PAG participates in the coupling between the emotional stimulus and the appropriate behavioral autonomic response. This function is successfully investigated by HRV. Therefore, our goal is to investigate the effects of trigeminal ULF-TENS stimulation on autonomic behavior in terms of HRV and respiratory parameters during an experimentally-induced arithmetic stress test in healthy subjects. Thirty healthy women between 25 and 35years of age were enrolled and randomly assigned to either the control (TENS stimulation off) or test group (TENS stimulation on). Heart (HR, LF, HF, LF/HF ratio, DET, RMSSD, PNN50, RR) and respiratory (BR) rate were evaluated under basal, T1 (TENS off/on), and stress (mathematical task) conditions. Results showed that HRV parameters and BR significantly changed during the arithmetic stress paradigm (pTENS and control group could be discriminated only by non-linear HRV data, namely RR and DET (p=0.038 and p=0.027, respectively). During the arithmetic task, LF/HF ratio was the most sensitive parameter to discriminate between groups (p=0.019). Our data suggest that trigeminal sensory ULF-TENS reduces the autonomic response in terms of HRV and BR during acute mental stress in healthy subjects. Future directions of our work aim at applying the HRV and BR analysis, with and without TENS stimulation, to individuals with dysfunctional ANS among those with TMD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Combined nitrogen limitation and cadmium stress stimulate total carbohydrates, lipids, protein and amino acid accumulation in Chlorella vulgaris (Trebouxiophyceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Mathias Ahii; Lombardi, Ana Teresa; da Graça Gama Melão, Maria; Parrish, Christopher C

    2015-03-01

    Metals have interactive effects on the uptake and metabolism of nutrients in microalgae. However, the effect of trace metal toxicity on amino acid composition of Chlorella vulgaris as a function of varying nitrogen concentrations is not known. In this research, C. vulgaris was used to investigate the influence of cadmium (10(-7) and 2.0×10(-8)molL(-1) Cd) under varying nitrogen (2.9×10(-6), 1.1×10(-5) and 1.1×10(-3)molL(-1)N) concentrations on its growth rate, biomass and biochemical composition. Total carbohydrates, total proteins, total lipids, as well as individual amino acid proportions were determined. The combination of Cd stress and N limitation significantly inhibited growth rate and cell density of C. vulgaris. However, increasing N limitation and Cd stress stimulated higher dry weight and chlorophyll a production per cell. Furthermore, biomolecules like total proteins, carbohydrates and lipids increased with increasing N limitation and Cd stress. Ketogenic and glucogenic amino acids were accumulated under the stress conditions investigated in the present study. Amino acids involved in metal chelation like proline, histidine and glutamine were significantly increased after exposure to combined Cd stress and N limitation. We conclude that N limitation and Cd stress affects the physiology of C. vulgaris by not only decreasing its growth but also stimulating biomolecule production. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Combined nitrogen limitation and cadmium stress stimulate total carbohydrates, lipids, protein and amino acid accumulation in Chlorella vulgaris (Trebouxiophyceae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chia, Mathias Ahii, E-mail: chia28us@yahoo.com [Department of Botany, Federal University of São Carlos, Rodovia Washington Luis km 235, São Carlos, SP Cep 13565905 (Brazil); Lombardi, Ana Teresa [Department of Botany, Federal University of São Carlos, Rodovia Washington Luis km 235, São Carlos, SP Cep 13565905 (Brazil); Graça Gama Melão, Maria da [Department of Hydrobiology, Federal University of São Carlos, Rodovia Washington Luis km 235, São Carlos, SP Cep 13565905 (Brazil); Parrish, Christopher C. [Department of Ocean Sciences, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s, Newfoundland A1C 5S7 (Canada)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Chlorella vulgaris was exposed to Cd under varying N concentrations. • Growth rate and cell density decreased with increasing Cd stress and N limitation. • Dry weight, chlorophyll a, total lipid, carbohydrate and protein were accumulated. • Amino acids like proline and glutamine were accumulated under N and Cd stress. • Changes in amino acid composition are sensitive biomarkers for Cd and N stress. - Abstract: Metals have interactive effects on the uptake and metabolism of nutrients in microalgae. However, the effect of trace metal toxicity on amino acid composition of Chlorella vulgaris as a function of varying nitrogen concentrations is not known. In this research, C. vulgaris was used to investigate the influence of cadmium (10{sup −7} and 2.0 × 10{sup −8} mol L{sup −1} Cd) under varying nitrogen (2.9 × 10{sup −6}, 1.1 × 10{sup −5} and 1.1 × 10{sup −3} mol L{sup −1} N) concentrations on its growth rate, biomass and biochemical composition. Total carbohydrates, total proteins, total lipids, as well as individual amino acid proportions were determined. The combination of Cd stress and N limitation significantly inhibited growth rate and cell density of C. vulgaris. However, increasing N limitation and Cd stress stimulated higher dry weight and chlorophyll a production per cell. Furthermore, biomolecules like total proteins, carbohydrates and lipids increased with increasing N limitation and Cd stress. Ketogenic and glucogenic amino acids were accumulated under the stress conditions investigated in the present study. Amino acids involved in metal chelation like proline, histidine and glutamine were significantly increased after exposure to combined Cd stress and N limitation. We conclude that N limitation and Cd stress affects the physiology of C. vulgaris by not only decreasing its growth but also stimulating biomolecule production.

  3. Unsteady exergy destruction of the neuron under dynamic stress conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genc, S.; Sorguven, E.; Ozilgen, M.; Aksan Kurnaz, I.

    2013-01-01

    Just like all physical systems, biological systems also obey laws of thermodynamics, and as such the useful work potential of a biological system is its exergy. In some studies, exergy of living systems is considered with respect to work performance of humans in offices or buildings; however the exergy analysis of biochemical reactions in a cell as a closed system goes largely untouched. In this study, exergy analysis was applied to glucose metabolism of a model neuron, and dynamic exergy destructions were calculated for four different conditions, namely normoxia, hypoxia, glucose starvation and excess glucose. Our results showed that neuronal metabolism achieved a new steady state under each condition within 5 min. This dynamic model predicts that, both exergy destruction and work potential rates increase with increasing blood glucose concentration. The ratio of exergy destruction rate to work potential rate increases logarithmically with increasing blood glucose concentration. The neuronal metabolism is thus found to function in an efficient way and switches to lower exergy destruction under stress conditions such as glucose starvation. This behavior seen in this exergy analysis study confirms the assumption of minimum entropy production in living systems. - Highlights: • Unsteady exergy analysis of glucose metabolism of a model neuron is performed. • Dynamic exergy losses were calculated for four different conditions: normoxia, hypoxia, glucose starvation and excess glucose. • Neuronal metabolism achieved a new steady state under each condition within 5 min. • Both exergy loss and work potential rates increase with increasing blood glucose concentration. • Neuronal metabolism functions in an efficient way and switches to lower exergy loss under stress conditions

  4. Dynamic Changes in Nociception and Pain Perception After Spinal Cord Stimulation in Chronic Neuropathic Pain Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biurrun Manresa, José A; Sörensen, Jan; Andersen, Ole K; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Gerdle, Björn

    2015-12-01

    Patients with an implanted spinal cord stimulation (SCS) system for pain management present an opportunity to study dynamic changes in the pain system in a situation where patients are not stimulated (ie, experiencing severe pain) compared with a situation in which patients have just been stimulated (ie, pain free or greatly reduced pain). The aims of this study were (1) to determine if there are differences in nociceptive withdrawal reflex thresholds (NWR-T) and electrical pain thresholds (EP-T) before and after SCS; and (2) to establish if these differences are related to psychological factors associated with chronic pain. Seventeen volunteers with chronic neuropathic pain participated in the experiment. Electrical stimuli were applied to assess the NWR-T and the EP-T. In addition, psychological factors (ie, pain characteristics, depression, anxiety, and disability indexes) were also recorded. The NWR-T and EP-T were assessed with the SCS system off (at least 8 h before the experiment), and then reassessed 1 hour after the SCS system was turned on. Ongoing pain intensity ratings decreased (P=0.018), whereas the NWR-T increased (P=0.028) after the SCS was turned on, whereas no significant difference was found for EP-T (P=0.324). Psychological factors were significant predictors for EP-T but not for NWR-T. The results of this study suggest that pain relief after SCS is partially mediated by a decrease in the excitability of dorsal horn neurons in the spinal cord.

  5. Dynamic Changes in Host Gene Expression following In Vitro Viral Mimic Stimulation in Crocodile Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subir Sarker

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The initial control of viral infection in a host is dominated by a very well orchestrated early innate immune system; however, very little is known about the ability of a host to control viral infection outside of mammals. The reptiles offer an evolutionary bridge between the fish and mammals, with the crocodile having evolved from the archosauria clade that included the dinosaurs, and being the largest living reptile species. Using an RNA-seq approach, we have defined the dynamic changes of a passaged primary crocodile cell line to stimulation with both RNA and DNA viral mimics. Cells displayed a marked upregulation of many genes known to be involved in the mammalian response to viral infection, including viperin, Mx1, IRF7, IRF1, and RIG-I with approximately 10% of the genes being uncharacterized transcripts. Both pathway and genome analysis suggested that the crocodile may utilize the main known mammalian TLR and cytosolic antiviral RNA signaling pathways, with the pathways being responsible for sensing DNA viruses less clear. Viral mimic stimulation upregulated the type I interferon, IFN-Omega, with many known antiviral interferon-stimulated genes also being upregulated. This work demonstrates for the first time that reptiles show functional regulation of many known and unknown antiviral pathways and effector genes. An enhanced knowledge of these ancient antiviral pathways will not only add to our understanding of the host antiviral innate response in non-mammalian species, but is critical to fully comprehend the complexity of the mammalian innate immune response to viral infection.

  6. A novel approach for evaluating the effects of odor stimulation on dynamic cardiorespiratory functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eriko Kawai

    Full Text Available We aimed to develop a novel method to quantitatively evaluate the effects of odor stimulation on cardiorespiratory functions over time, and to examine the potential usefulness of clinical aromatherapy. Eighteen subjects participated. Nine people were assigned to each of the two resting protocols. Protocol 1: After resting for 2 min in a sitting position breathing room air, the subject inhaled either air or air containing sweet marjoram essential oil from the Douglas bag for 6 min, Protocol 2: After resting for 5 min in a supine position, the subject inhaled the essential oil for 10 min, and then recovered for 10 min breathing room air. All subjects inhaled the essential oil through a face mask attached to one-way valve, and beat-to-beat heart rate (HR and arterial blood pressure (BP as well as breath-by-breath respiratory variables were continuously recorded. In both protocols, during fragrance inhalation of the essential oil, time-dependent decrease in mean BP and HR were observed (P<0.05. During post-inhalation recovery, the significant fragrance-induced bradycardic effect lasted at least 5 min (- 3.1 ± 3.9% vs. pre-inhalation baseline value, p<0.05. The mean BP response at the start of odor stimulation was approximated by a first-order exponential model. However, such fragrance-induced changes were not observed in the respiratory variables. We established a novel approach to quantitatively and accurately evaluate the effects of quantitative odor stimulation on dynamic cardiorespiratory functions, and the duration of the effect. This methodological approach may be useful for scientific evaluation of aromatherapy as an approach to integrated medicine, and the mechanisms of action of physiological effects in fragrance compounds.

  7. Effect of Magnetohydrodynamic Couple Stresses on Dynamic Characteristics of Exponential Slider Bearing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.B. Naduvinamani

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of couple stresses on static and dynamic characteristics of exponential slider bearing in the presence of magnetic field considering squeeze action is theoretically analyzed in this paper. The modified magnetohydrodynamic couple stress Reynolds type equation is derived on the basis of Stokes couple stress model and closed form expressions are obtained for static and dynamic character coefficients. Comparing with bearing lubricated with non-conducting Newtonian lubricants, the magnetohydrodynamic couple stress lubrication provides the higher steady load carrying capacity, dynamic stiffness and damping coefficient. The exponential bearing shows higher efficiency for small film thickness at higher value of couple stress parameter and Hartmann number.

  8. TLR Stimulation Dynamically Regulates Heme and Iron Export Gene Expression in Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Philip

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pathogenic bacteria have evolved multiple mechanisms to capture iron or iron-containing heme from host tissues or blood. In response, organisms have developed defense mechanisms to keep iron from pathogens. Very little of the body’s iron store is available as free heme; rather nearly all body iron is complexed with heme or other proteins. The feline leukemia virus, subgroup C (FeLV-C receptor, FLVCR, exports heme from cells. It was unknown whether FLVCR regulates heme-iron availability after infection, but given that other heme regulatory proteins are upregulated in macrophages in response to bacterial infection, we hypothesized that macrophages dynamically regulate FLVCR. We stimulated murine primary macrophages or macrophage cell lines with LPS and found that Flvcr is rapidly downregulated in a TLR4/MD2-dependent manner; TLR1/2 and TLR3 stimulation also decreased Flvcr expression. We identified several candidate TLR-activated transcription factors that can bind to the Flvcr promoter. Macrophages must balance the need to sequester iron from systemic circulating or intracellular pathogens with the macrophage requirement for heme and iron to produce reactive oxygen species. Our findings underscore the complexity of this regulation and point to a new role for FLVCR and heme export in macrophages responses to infection and inflammation.

  9. Dynamics of ponderomotive self-focusing and periodic bursts of stimulated Brillouin backscattering in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreev, N.E.; Gorbunov, L.M.; Tarakanov, S.V.; Zykov, A.I.

    1993-01-01

    The space--time evolution of ponderomotive self-focusing of electromagnetic beams in a plasma is investigated. The quasineutral, hydrodynamic plasma response to the ponderomotive force is considered. The set of coupled quasioptic and acoustic equations is solved both analytically and numerically for slab and cylindrical beams. It is shown that the transient process of self-focusing has the form of a nonlinear wave propagating along the beam axis from boundary into the interior of a plasma with velocity considerably higher than the ion-sound velocity. Mutual dynamics of self-focusing and stimulated Brillouin backscattering (SBBS) is computed. It is shown that self-focusing results in the high intensity periodical bursts of SBBS. However, the time average level of scattered radiation is quite low

  10. Studies of ground-state dynamics in isolated species by ionization-detected stimulated Raman techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felker, P.M. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles (United States)

    1993-12-01

    First, the author aims to develop methods of nonlinear Raman spectroscopy for application in studies of sparse samples. Second, the author wishes to apply such methods to structural and dynamical studies of species (molecules, complexes, and clusters) in supersonic molecular beams. In the past year, the author has made progress in several areas. The first pertains to the application of mass-selective ionization-detected stimulated Raman spectroscopies (IDSRS) to the size-specific vibrational spectroscopy of solute-solvent{sub n} clusters. The second involves the application of IDSRS methods to studies of jet-cooled benzene clusters. The third pertains to the use of IDSRS methods in the study of intermolecular vibrational transitions in van der Waals complexes.

  11. Neuropeptide Y stimulation as primary target for preventive measures of maladaptative cardiovascular reactions in occupational chronic stress exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciumaşu-Rîmbu, Mălina; Popa, Livia; Vulpoi, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    Chronic stress may produce a decrease in central NPY expression and subjects exposed to it may prove hypersensitivity to a novel stressor with dysfunctions in the NPY system and cardiovascular maladaptation to stress, even hypertension. Upregulation of NPY expression may contribute to successful behavioral adaptation to stress by reducing cardiovascular tone and suppressing anxious behaviors. Adaptogens, a new class of metabolic regulators stimulate NPY expression and release. The aim of this study is to increase tolerance and adaptation to stress of hypersensitive to novel stressor, occupational chronic stress exposed subjects with cardiovascular maladaptation to mild new stressor using adaptogens as part of prevention protocol. 40 military personnel with known cardiostressor reactional mode and occupational chronic stress exposure were exposed to mild novel stressor: occupational medicine routine evaluation and clinically assessed for maladaptative cardiovascular response prior and before application of 30 day prevention protocol. Employees were randomly split in two groups, one receiving standard prevention protocol (lifestyle counseling) plus adaptogens in multiple dose administration, twice daily and the other receiving only standard prevention protocol. We found significant statistic differences in all cardiovascular parameters in adaptogen group and only in diastolic blood pressure in control group. Adaptogens could be an important factor in successful prevention protocols of chronic occupational stress dysfunctions involving NPY systems.

  12. Transcriptome Dynamics of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 under Water Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gülez, Gamze; Dechesne, Arnaud; Workman, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Water deprivation can be a major stressor to microbial life in surface and subsurface soil. In unsaturated soils, the matric potential (Ψm) is often the main component of the water potential, which measures the thermodynamic availability of water. A low matric potential usually translates...... into water forming thin liquid films in the soil pores. Little is known of how bacteria respond to such conditions, where, in addition to facing water deprivation that might impair their metabolism, they have to adapt their dispersal strategy as swimming motility may be compromised. Using the pressurized...... porous surface model (PPSM), which allows creation of thin liquid films by controlling Ψm, we examined the transcriptome dynamics of Pseudomonas putida KT2440. We identified the differentially expressed genes in cells exposed to a mild matric stress (–0.4 MPa) for 4, 24, or 72 h. The major response...

  13. Intraoperative hemidiaphragm electrical stimulation reduces oxidative stress and upregulates autophagy in surgery patients undergoing mechanical ventilation: exploratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert T. Mankowski

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mechanical ventilation (MV during a cardio-thoracic surgery contributes to diaphragm muscle dysfunction that impairs weaning and can lead to the ventilator- induced diaphragm dysfunction. Especially, it is critical in older adults who have lower muscle reparative capacity following MV. Reports have shown that the intraoperative intermittent hemidiaphragm electrical stimulation can maintain and/or improve post-surgery diaphragm function. In particular, from a molecular point of view, intermittent electrical stimulation (ES may reduce oxidative stress and increase regulatory autophagy levels, and therefore improve diaphragm function in animal studies. We have recently shown in humans that intraoperative ES attenuates mitochondrial dysfunction and force decline in single diaphragm muscle fibers. The aim of this study was to investigate an effect of ES on oxidative stress, antioxidant status and autophagy biomarker levels in the human diaphragm during surgery. Methods One phrenic nerve was simulated with an external cardiac pacer in operated older subjects (62.4 ± 12.9 years (n = 8 during the surgery. The patients received 30 pulses per min every 30 min. The muscle biopsy was collected from both hemidiaphragms and frozen for further analyses. 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE, an oxidative stress marker, and autophagy marker levels (Beclin-1 and the ratio of microtubule-associated protein light chain 3, I and II-LC3 II/I protein concentrations were detected by the Western Blot technique. Antioxidant enzymatic activity copper-zinc (CuZnSOD and manganese (MnSOD superoxide dismutase were analyzed. Results Levels of lipid peroxidation (4-HNE were significantly lower in the stimulated side (p  0.05. Additionally, the protein concentrations of Beclin-1 and the LC3 II/I ratio were higher in the stimulated side (p < 0.05. Conclusion These results suggest that the intraoperative electrical stimulation decreases oxidative stress levels

  14. Stresses and elastic constants of crystalline sodium, from molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiferl, S.K.

    1985-02-01

    The stresses and the elastic constants of bcc sodium are calculated by molecular dynamics (MD) for temperatures to T = 340K. The total adiabatic potential of a system of sodium atoms is represented by pseudopotential model. The resulting expression has two terms: a large, strictly volume-dependent potential, plus a sum over ion pairs of a small, volume-dependent two-body potential. The stresses and the elastic constants are given as strain derivatives of the Helmholtz free energy. The resulting expressions involve canonical ensemble averages (and fluctuation averages) of the position and volume derivatives of the potential. An ensemble correction relates the results to MD equilibrium averages. Evaluation of the potential and its derivatives requires the calculation of integrals with infinite upper limits of integration, and integrand singularities. Methods for calculating these integrals and estimating the effects of integration errors are developed. A method is given for choosing initial conditions that relax quickly to a desired equilibrium state. Statistical methods developed earlier for MD data are extended to evaluate uncertainties in fluctuation averages, and to test for symmetry. 45 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs

  15. Microbial Dynamics During a Temporal Sequence of Bioreduction Stimulated by Emulsified Vegetable Oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schadt, C. W.; Gihring, T. M.; Yang, Z.; Wu, W.; Green, S.; Overholt, W.; Zhang, G.; Brandt, C. C.; Campbell, J. H.; Carroll, S. C.; Criddle, C.; Jardine, P. M.; Lowe, K.; Mehlhorn, T.; Kostka, J. E.; Watson, D. B.; Brooks, S. C.

    2011-12-01

    Amendments of slow-release substrates (e.g. emulsified vegetable oil; EVO) are potentially pragmatic alternatives to short-lived labile substrates for sustained uranium bioimmobilization within groundwater systems. The spatial and temporal dynamics of geochemical and microbial community changes during EVO amendment are likely to differ significantly from populations stimulated by readily utilizable soluble substrates (e.g. ethanol or acetate). We tracked dynamic changes in geochemistry and microbial communities for 270 days following a one-time EVO injection at the Oak Ridge Integrated Field Research Challenge (ORIFRC) site that resulted in decreased groundwater U concentrations for ~4 months. Pyrosequencing and quantitative PCR of 16S rRNA and dissimilatory sulfite reductase (dsrA) genes from monitoring well samples revealed a rapid decline in bacterial community richness and evenness after EVO injection, concurrent with increased 16S rRNA copy levels, indicating the selection of a narrow group consisting of 10-15 dominant OTUs, rather than a broad community stimulation. By association of the known physiology of close relatives identified in the pyrosequencing analysis, it is possible to infer a hypothesized sequence of microbial functions leading the major changes in electron donors and acceptors in the system. Members of the Firmicutes family Veillonellaceae dominated after injection and most likely catalyzed the initial oil decomposition and utilized the glycerol associated with the oils. Sulfate-reducing bacteria from the genus Desulforegula, known for LCFA oxidation to acetate, also dominated shortly after EVO amendment and are thought to catalyze this process. Acetate and H2 production during LCFA degradation appeared to stimulate NO3-, Fe(III), U(VI), and SO42- reduction by members of the Comamonadaceae, Geobacteriaceae, and Desulfobacterales. Methanogenic archaea flourished late in the experiment and in some samples constituted over 25 % of the total

  16. Structural dynamics of a noncovalent charge transfer complex from femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujisawa, Tomotsumi; Creelman, Mark; Mathies, Richard A

    2012-09-06

    Femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy is used to examine the structural dynamics of photoinduced charge transfer within a noncovalent electron acceptor/donor complex of pyromellitic dianhydride (PMDA, electron acceptor) and hexamethylbenzene (HMB, electron donor) in ethylacetate and acetonitrile. The evolution of the vibrational spectrum reveals the ultrafast structural changes that occur during the charge separation (Franck-Condon excited state complex → contact ion pair) and the subsequent charge recombination (contact ion pair → ground state complex). The Franck-Condon excited state is shown to have significant charge-separated character because its vibrational spectrum is similar to that of the ion pair. The charge separation rate (2.5 ps in ethylacetate and ∼0.5 ps in acetonitrile) is comparable to solvation dynamics and is unaffected by the perdeuteration of HMB, supporting the dominant role of solvent rearrangement in charge separation. On the other hand, the charge recombination slows by a factor of ∼1.4 when using perdeuterated HMB, indicating that methyl hydrogen motions of HMB mediate the charge recombination process. Resonance Raman enhancement of the HMB vibrations in the complex reveals that the ring stretches of HMB, and especially the C-CH(3) deformations are the primary acceptor modes promoting charge recombination.

  17. The precise adjustment of coil location for transcranial magnetic stimulation during dynamic motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Taku; Yaeshima, Katsutoshi; Yamamoto, Shin-Ichiro; Kawashima, Noritaka

    2013-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to the cerebral cortex is a major in vitro technique that is used in the field of neurophysiology. The magnitude of the motor-evoked potentials (MEP) that are elicited by TMS to the primary motor cortex reflect the excitability of the corticospinal pathway. MEPs are very sensitive to the scalp location of the stimulus coil, especially when corticospinal excitability is recorded during walking or other dynamic motions. In this study, we created a coil navigational system that consisted of three-dimensional motion analysis cameras, rigid bodies on the head and coil, and programming software. In order to evaluate the feasibility of the use of our system, pseudo TMS was applied during treadmill walking with or without the navigational system. As a result, we found that the variances due to coil location and/or distance from the target site were reduced with our system. This technique enabled us to realize high precision and accuracy in coil placement, even during dynamic motion.

  18. Electroconvulsive stimulation reverses anhedonia and cognitive impairments in rats exposed to chronic mild stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    K, Henningsen,; Woldbye, David Paul Drucker; Wiborg, Ove

    2013-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy remains the most effective treatment for depression including a fast onset of action. However, this therapeutic approach suffers from some potential drawbacks. In the acute phase this includes amnesia. Electroconvulsive stimulation (ECS) has previously been shown...

  19. Dynamic Fluid Flow Mechanical Stimulation Modulates Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Minyi; Yeh, Robbin; Lien, Michelle; Teeratananon, Morgan; Agarwal, Kunal; Qin, Yi-Xian

    2013-03-01

    Osteoblasts are derived from mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which initiate and regulate bone formation. New strategies for osteoporosis treatments have aimed to control the fate of MSCs. While functional disuse decreases MSC growth and osteogenic potentials, mechanical signals enhance MSC quantity and bias their differentiation toward osteoblastogenesis. Through a non-invasive dynamic hydraulic stimulation (DHS), we have found that DHS can mitigate trabecular bone loss in a functional disuse model via rat hindlimb suspension (HLS). To further elucidate the downstream cellular effect of DHS and its potential mechanism underlying the bone quality enhancement, a longitudinal in vivo study was designed to evaluate the MSC populations in response to DHS over 3, 7, 14, and 21 days. Five-month old female Sprague Dawley rats were divided into three groups for each time point: age-matched control, HLS, and HLS+DHS. DHS was delivered to the right mid-tibiae with a daily "10 min on-5 min off-10 min on" loading regime for five days/week. At each sacrifice time point, bone marrow MSCs of the stimulated and control tibiae were isolated through specific cell surface markers and quantified by flow cytometry analysis. A strong time-dependent manner of bone marrow MSC induction was observed in response to DHS, which peaked on day 14. After 21 days, this effect of DHS was diminished. This study indicates that the MSC pool is positively influenced by the mechanical signals driven by DHS. Coinciding with our previous findings of mitigation of disuse bone loss, DHS induced changes in MSC number may bias the differentiation of the MSC population towards osteoblastogenesis, thereby promoting bone formation under disuse conditions. This study provides insights into the mechanism of time-sensitive MSC induction in response to mechanical loading, and for the optimal design of osteoporosis treatments.

  20. Dynamic stereotypic responses of basal ganglia neurons to subthalamic nucleus high frequency stimulation in the parkinsonian primate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anan eMoran

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Deep brain stimulation in the subthalamic nucleus (STN is a well-established therapy for patients with severe Parkinson‟s disease (PD; however, its mechanism of action is still unclear. In this study we explored static and dynamic activation patterns in the basal ganglia during high frequency macro-stimulation of the STN. Extracellular multi-electrode recordings were performed in primates rendered parkinsonian using 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine. Recordings were preformed simultaneously in the STN and the globus pallidus externus and internus. Single units were recorded preceding and during the stimulation. During the stimulation, STN mean firing rate dropped significantly, while pallidal mean firing rates did not change significantly. The vast majority of neurons across all three nuclei displayed stimulation driven modulations, which were stereotypic within each nucleus but differed across nuclei. The predominant response pattern of STN neurons was somatic inhibition. However, most pallidal neurons demonstrated synaptic activation patterns. A minority of neurons across all nuclei displayed axonal activation. Temporal dynamics were observed in the response to stimulation over the first 10 seconds in the STN and over the first 30 seconds in the pallidum. In both pallidal segments, the synaptic activation response patterns underwent delay and decay of the magnitude of the peak response due to short term synaptic depression. We suggest that during STN macro stimulation the STN goes through a functional ablation as its upper bound on information transmission drops significantly. This notion is further supported by the evident dissociation between the stimulation driven pre-synaptic STN somatic inhibition and the post-synaptic axonal activation of its downstream targets. Thus, basal ganglia output maintains its firing rate while losing the deleterious effect of the STN. This may be a part of the mechanism leading to the beneficial

  1. Dynamic stereotypic responses of Basal Ganglia neurons to subthalamic nucleus high-frequency stimulation in the parkinsonian primate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Anan; Stein, Edward; Tischler, Hadass; Belelovsky, Katya; Bar-Gad, Izhar

    2011-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is a well-established therapy for patients with severe Parkinson's disease (PD); however, its mechanism of action is still unclear. In this study we explored static and dynamic activation patterns in the basal ganglia (BG) during high-frequency macro-stimulation of the STN. Extracellular multi-electrode recordings were performed in primates rendered parkinsonian using 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine. Recordings were preformed simultaneously in the STN and the globus pallidus externus and internus. Single units were recorded preceding and during the stimulation. During the stimulation, STN mean firing rate dropped significantly, while pallidal mean firing rates did not change significantly. The vast majority of neurons across all three nuclei displayed stimulation driven modulations, which were stereotypic within each nucleus but differed across nuclei. The predominant response pattern of STN neurons was somatic inhibition. However, most pallidal neurons demonstrated synaptic activation patterns. A minority of neurons across all nuclei displayed axonal activation. Temporal dynamics were observed in the response to stimulation over the first 10 seconds in the STN and over the first 30 seconds in the pallidum. In both pallidal segments, the synaptic activation response patterns underwent delay and decay of the magnitude of the peak response due to short term synaptic depression. We suggest that during STN macro-stimulation the STN goes through a functional ablation as its upper bound on information transmission drops significantly. This notion is further supported by the evident dissociation between the stimulation driven pre-synaptic STN somatic inhibition and the post-synaptic axonal activation of its downstream targets. Thus, BG output maintains its firing rate while losing the deleterious effect of the STN. This may be a part of the mechanism leading to the beneficial effect of DBS in PD.

  2. Communicating Intrapersonally about Stress: The Dynamics on Self.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edson, Belle A.

    When designing a workshop about communication and stress, it is important to consider the medical definition--that stress is a physiological reaction to an external force that is interpreted by the individual--and the psychological definition--which suggests that through communication with self one can change the stress in one's life. Stress can…

  3. Cocaine enhances resistance to extinction of responding for brain-stimulation reward in adult prenatally stressed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shuibo; Suenaga, Toshiko; Oki, Yutaka; Yukie, Masao; Nakahara, Daiichiro

    2011-10-01

    The present experiment assessed whether prenatal stress (PS) can alter the ability of acute and chronic cocaine administration to increase and decrease the rewarding effectiveness of the medial forebrain bundle (MFB) using intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS), and also whether PS can affect the extinction of the MFB stimulation response. Adult male offspring of female rats that received PS or no PS (nPS) were implanted with MFB stimulating electrodes, and were then tested in ICSS paradigms. In both nPS and PS offspring, acute cocaine injection decreased ICSS thresholds dose-dependently. However, the threshold-lowering effects at any dose were not significantly different between groups. There was also no group-difference in the threshold-elevating effects of chronic cocaine administration. Nevertheless, chronically drug-administered PS rats exhibited a resistance to the extinguishing of the response for brain-stimulation reward when acutely treated with cocaine, as compared to extinction without cocaine treatment. The results suggest that PS may weaken the ability for response inhibition under cocaine loading in male adult offspring. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Conceptualizing the dynamics of workplace stress: a systems-based study of nursing aides

    OpenAIRE

    Jetha, Arif; Kernan, Laura; Kurowski, Alicia

    2017-01-01

    Background Workplace stress is a complex phenomenon that may often be dynamic and?evolving over time. Traditional linear modeling does not allow representation of recursive feedback loops among the implicated factors. The objective of this study was to develop a multidimensional system dynamics model (SDM) of workplace stress among nursing aides and conduct simulations to illustrate how changes in psychosocial perceptions and workplace factors might influence workplace stress over time. Metho...

  5. Whole-body heat stress and exercise stimulate the appearance of platelet microvesicles in plasma with limited influence of vascular shear stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Eurico N; González-Alonso, José; Chiesa, Scott T; Trangmar, Steven J; Kalsi, Kameljit K; Rakobowchuk, Mark

    2017-11-01

    Intense, large muscle mass exercise increases circulating microvesicles, but our understanding of microvesicle dynamics and mechanisms inducing their release remains limited. However, increased vascular shear stress is generally thought to be involved. Here, we manipulated exercise-independent and exercise-dependent shear stress using systemic heat stress with localized single-leg cooling (low shear) followed by single-leg knee extensor exercise with the cooled or heated leg (Study 1, n  = 8) and whole-body passive heat stress followed by cycling (Study 2, n  = 8). We quantified femoral artery shear rates (SRs) and arterial and venous platelet microvesicles (PMV-CD41 + ) and endothelial microvesicles (EMV-CD62E + ). In Study 1, mild passive heat stress while one leg remained cooled did not affect [microvesicle] ( P  ≥ 0.05). Single-leg knee extensor exercise increased active leg SRs by ~12-fold and increased arterial and venous [PMVs] by two- to threefold, even in the nonexercising contralateral leg ( P  body passive heat stress increased arterial [PMV] compared with baseline (mean±SE, from 19.9 ± 1.5 to 35.5 ± 5.4 PMV . μ L -1. 10 3 , P  stress increased [PMV] further in the venous circulation (from 27.5 ± 2.2 at baseline to 57.5 ± 7.2 PMV . μ L -1. 10 3 during cycling with heat stress, P  body heat stress may increase arterial [PMV], and intense exercise engaging either large or small muscle mass promote PMV formation locally and systemically, with no influence upon [EMV]. Local shear stress, however, does not appear to be the major stimulus modulating PMV formation in healthy humans. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  6. Maternal stress-associated cortisol stimulation may protect embryos from cortisol excess in zebrafish

    OpenAIRE

    Faught, Erin; Best, Carol; Vijayan, Mathilakath M.

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal embryo cortisol level causes developmental defects and poor survival in zebrafish (Danio rerio). However, no study has demonstrated that maternal stress leads to higher embryo cortisol content in zebrafish. We tested the hypothesis that maternal stress-associated elevation in cortisol levels increases embryo cortisol content in this asynchronous breeder. Zebrafish mothers were fed cortisol-spiked food for 5 days, to mimic maternal stress, followed by daily breeding for 10 days to mon...

  7. Laplace-SGBEM analysis of the dynamic stress intensity factors and the dynamic T-stress for the interaction between a crack and auxetic inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Kibum

    A dynamic analysis of the interaction between a crack and an auxetic (negative Poisson ratio)/non-auxetic inclusion is presented. The two most important fracture parameters, namely the stress intensity factors and the T-stress are analyzed by using the symmetric Galerkin boundary element method in the Laplace domain for three different models of crack-inclusion interaction. To investigate the effects of auxetic inclusions on the fracture behavior of composites reinforced by this new type of material, comparisons of the dynamic stress intensity factors and the dynamic T-stress are made between the use of auxetic inclusions as opposed to the use of traditional inclusions. Furthermore, the technique presented in this research can be employed to analyze for the interaction between a crack and a cluster of auxetic/non-auxetic inclusions. Results from the latter models can be employed in crack growth analysis in auxetic-fiber-reinforced composites.

  8. Reconstructing a Network of Stress-Response Regulators via Dynamic System Modeling of Gene Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Sheng Wu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Unicellular organisms such as yeasts have evolved mechanisms to respond to environmental stresses by rapidly reorganizing the gene expression program. Although many stress-response genes in yeast have been discovered by DNA microarrays, the stress-response transcription factors (TFs that regulate these stress-response genes remain to be investigated. In this study, we use a dynamic system model of gene regulation to describe the mechanism of how TFs may control a gene’s expression. Then, based on the dynamic system model, we develop the Stress Regulator Identification Algorithm (SRIA to identify stress-response TFs for six kinds of stresses. We identified some general stress-response TFs that respond to various stresses and some specific stress-response TFs that respond to one specifi c stress. The biological significance of our findings is validated by the literature. We found that a small number of TFs is probably suffi cient to control a wide variety of expression patterns in yeast under different stresses. Two implications can be inferred from this observation. First, the response mechanisms to different stresses may have a bow-tie structure. Second, there may be regulatory cross-talks among different stress responses. In conclusion, this study proposes a network of stress-response regulators and the details of their actions.

  9. Altered oscillatory brain dynamics after repeated traumatic stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruf Martina

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Repeated traumatic experiences, e.g. torture and war, lead to functional and structural cerebral changes, which should be detectable in cortical dynamics. Abnormal slow waves produced within circumscribed brain regions during a resting state have been associated with lesioned neural circuitry in neurological disorders and more recently also in mental illness. Methods Using magnetoencephalographic (MEG-based source imaging, we mapped abnormal distributions of generators of slow waves in 97 survivors of torture and war with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD in comparison to 97 controls. Results PTSD patients showed elevated production of focally generated slow waves (1–4 Hz, particularly in left temporal brain regions, with peak activities in the region of the insula. Furthermore, differential slow wave activity in right frontal areas was found in PTSD patients compared to controls. Conclusion The insula, as a site of multimodal convergence, could play a key role in understanding the pathophysiology of PTSD, possibly accounting for what has been called posttraumatic alexithymia, i.e., reduced ability to identify, express and regulate emotional responses to reminders of traumatic events. Differences in activity in right frontal areas may indicate a dysfunctional PFC, which may lead to diminished extinction of conditioned fear and reduced inhibition of the amygdala.

  10. Electroconvulsive stimulations normalizes stress-induced changes in the glucocorticoid receptor and behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hageman, Ida; Nielsen, Marianne; Wörtwein, Gitta

    2009-01-01

    Animal models of chronic stress, such as 21 days of 6h/daily restraint stress cause changes in neuronal morphology in the hippocampus and alter behaviour. These changes are partly mediated by the glucocorticoids. The objective of this study was threefold: (1) to study how this particular chronic ...

  11. [Effect of axial stress stimulation on tibial and fibular open fractures healing after Taylor space stent fixation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Qihang; Wan, Chunyou; Liu, Yabei; Ji, Xu; Ma, Jihai; Cao, Haikun; Yong, Wei; Liu, Zhao; Zhang, Ningning

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the effect of axial stress stimulation on tibial and fibular open fractures healing after Taylor space stent fixation. The data of 45 cases with tibial and fibular open fractures treated by Taylor space stent fixation who meet the selection criteria between January 2015 and June 2016 were retrospectively analysed. The patients were divided into trial group (23 cases) and control group (22 cases) according to whether the axial stress stimulation was performed after operation. There was no significant difference in gender, age, affected side, cause of injury, type of fracture, and interval time from injury to operation between 2 groups ( P >0.05). The axial stress stimulation was performed in trial group after operation. The axial load sharing ratio was tested, and when the value was less than 10%, the external fixator was removed. The fracture healing time, full weight-bearing time, and external fixator removal time were recorded and compared. After 6 months of external fixator removal, the function of the limb was assessed by Johner-Wruhs criteria for evaluation of final effectiveness of treatment of tibial shaft fractures. There were 2 and 3 cases of needle foreign body reaction in trial group and control group, respectively, and healed after symptomatic anti allergic treatment. All the patients were followed up 8-12 months with an average of 10 months. All the fractures reached clinical healing, no complication such as delayed union, nonunion, or osteomyelitis occurred. The fracture healing time, full weight-bearing time, and external fixator removal time in trial group were significantly shorter than those in control group ( P good in 6 cases, fair in 3 cases, and poor in 1 case in trial group, with an excellent and good rate of 82.6%; and was excellent in 5 cases, good in 10 cases, fair in 4 cases, and poor in 3 cases in control group, with an excellent and good rate of 68.2%, showing significant difference between 2 groups ( Z =-2.146, P =0

  12. The dynamic efficiency of instruments for stimulating the dissemination of renewable energy technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamy, M.L.; Menanteau, Ph.; Finon, D.

    2002-06-01

    In this paper the authors examine the efficiency of the different incentive schemes for the development of renewable energy sources, both from a theoretical point of view by comparing price-based approaches with quantity-based approaches, and from a practical point of view by looking at concrete examples of how these different instruments have been implemented. The main focus is on the dynamic efficiency of the different instruments taking as an illustration the recent experience of stimulating wind power development in European countries. Theoretically, price-based or quantity-based approaches should be comparable methods for achieving renewable energy targets but uncertainty and implementing conditions may modify the symmetry of the two approaches. Accordingly, fixed feed in tariffs have clearly been superior to competitive bidding as far as installed capacity or industrial development are concerned. Finally the paper also examines the possibility that the price versus quantity issue could be reactivated with the emergence of the green certificate markets which present theoretical advantages of quota-based approaches without the limitations of competitive bidding systems. (author)

  13. [Dynamics of hormone secretion during chronic emotional stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiragova, M G; Kovalev, S V; Svirskaia, R I

    1979-05-01

    Study of spontaneous secretion of corticosteroids and thyroid hormones and the direct hormonal response to stress revealed the pathogenic effect of chronic combined emotional stress upon the hormonal function of adrenal glands. The hippocampus takes part in formation of the emotional tension in response to stress stimulus and of the following hormonal secretion.

  14. Dietary intake and the dynamics of stress, hypertension and obesity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hypertension increased with mean age whiles stress decreased with mean age. Hypertensive subjects recorded a significantly higher BMI and sodium intake whiles high stress individuals recorded a lower animal protein but a higher cereal protein intake (p<.05). Chronic stress was associated with intake of low animal ...

  15. Dietary intake and the dynamics of stress, hypertension and obesity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-03-01

    Mar 1, 2016 ... with high stress (32.89%) especially in females (57.14%, p=.036). Hypertension increased with mean age whiles stress decreased with mean age. Hypertensive subjects recorded a significantly higher BMI and sodium intake whiles high stress individuals recorded a lower animal protein but a higher cereal ...

  16. Estimation of flow stress of radiation induced F/M steels using molecular dynamics and discrete dislocation dynamics approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    More, Ameya; Dutta, B.K.; Durgaprasad, P.V.; Arya, A.K.

    2012-01-01

    Fe-Cr based Ferritic/Martensitic (F/M) steels are the candidate structural materials for future fusion reactors. In this work, a multi-scale approach comprising atomistic Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations and Discrete Dislocation Dynamics (DDD) simulations are used to model the effect of irradiation dose on the flow stress of F/M steels. At the atomic scale, molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the dislocation interaction with irradiation induced defects, i.e. voids and He bubbles. Whereas, the DDD simulations are used to estimate the change in flow stress of the material as a result of irradiation hardening. (author)

  17. Chew the Pain Away: Oral Habits to Cope with Pain and Stress and to Stimulate Cognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxane Anthea Francesca Weijenberg

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The acute effects of chewing gum on cognitive performance, stress, and pain have been intensively studied in the last decade. The results have been contradicting, and replication studies proved challenging. Here, we review some of the recent findings of this topic and explore possible explanations for these discrepancies by incorporating knowledge derived from studies into oral habits and bruxism. Both stress and cerebral functional specialization (i.e., the involvement of specific brain structures in distinctive cognitive processes are hypothesized to play a major role in the underlying physiological mechanisms of the diverse effects of chewing gum on cognition, stress, and pain.

  18. Bacterial exopolysaccharide and biofilm formation stimulate chickpea growth and soil aggregation under salt stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aisha Waheed Qurashi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available To compensate for stress imposed by salinity, biofilm formation and exopolysaccharide production are significant strategies of salt tolerant bacteria to assist metabolism. We hypothesized that two previously isolated salt-tolerant strains Halomonas variabilis (HT1 and Planococcus rifietoensis (RT4 have an ability to improve plant growth, These strains can form biofilm and accumulate exopolysacharides at increasing salt stress. These results showed that bacteria might be involved in developing microbial communities under salt stress and helpful in colonizing of bacterial strains to plant roots and soil particles. Eventually, it can add to the plant growth and soil structure. We investigated the comparative effect of exopolysacharide and biofilm formation in two bacterial strains Halomonas variabilis (HT1 and Planococcus rifietoensis (RT4 in response to varying salt stress. We found that biofilm formation and exopolysaccharide accumulation increased at higher salinity. To check the effect of bacterial inoculation on the plant (Cicer arietinum Var. CM-98 growth and soil aggregation, pot experiment was conducted by growing seedlings under salt stress. Inoculation of both strains increased plant growth at elevated salt stress. Weight of soil aggregates attached with roots and present in soil were added at higher salt concentrations compared to untreated controls. Soil aggregation was higher at plant roots under salinity. These results suggest the feasibility of using above strains in improving plant growth and soil fertility under salinity.

  19. Negative/positive chemotaxis of a droplet: Dynamic response to a stimulant gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuta, Hiroki; Magome, Nobuyuki; Mori, Yoshihito; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2016-05-01

    We report here the repulsive/attractive motion of an oil droplet floating on an aqueous phase caused by the application of a stimulant gas. A cm-sized droplet of oleic acid is repelled by ammonia vapor. In contrast, a droplet of aniline on an aqueous phase moves toward hydrochloric acid as a stimulant. The mechanisms of these characteristic behaviors of oil droplets are discussed in terms of the spatial gradient of the interfacial tension caused by the stimulant gas.

  20. Neuroprotective activity of Leontice leontopetalum extract against H2O2-stimulated oxidative stress in PC12 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sahranavard*

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Neuronal toxicity can be induced by oxidative stress via free radicals production. In recent years, great interest has been expressed to the traditional and herbal medicines. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the neuroprotective activity of Leontice leontopetalum methanol extract against H2O2-stimulated oxidative stress in PC12 cells. Methods: The plantLeontice leontopetalum was selected based on the ethnobotanical approach, which is used traditionally for the treatment of diseases related to inflammation and pain in Turkmen Sahra, Iran. Cytotoxicity of different concentrations of the methanol extract against PC12 cells was evaluated by MTT assay. Then PC12 cells were exposed to H2O2 in the presence or absence of the extract. In the next step, the total protein concentration was measured via Bradford assay and cyclooxygenase inhibition was determined by a screening assay kit. Nitrite accumulated in culture medium of supernatant was measured by Griess reaction. Results: Our results indicated that the methanol extract of Leontice leontopetalum significantly inhibited cyclooxygenase activity in the presence of H2O2; however, it was not able to inhibit nitric oxide generation in the stimulated PC12 cells. Conclusion: The results suggested that Leontice leontopetalum may be useful in reducing risk of neurodegenerative related diseases such as Alzheimer Disease.

  1. Effective stimulation of the biotechnological potential of the medicinal white rot fungus: Phellinus pini by menadione-mediated oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaszek, Magdalena; Kos, Katarzyna; Matuszewska, Anna; Grąz, Marcin; Stefaniuk, Dawid; Osińska-Jaroszuk, Monika; Prendecka, Monika; Jóźwik, Ewa; Grzywnowicz, Krzysztof

    2014-09-01

    The effect of menadione (MQ; 2-methyl-1,4-naphtoquinone), a superoxide-generating agent, on the natural biodegradation system in the medicinal white rot fungus Phellinus pini was determined. While measuring the activities of extracellular manganese-dependent peroxidase (MnP) and intracellular chitinase, it was found that the application of MQ (0.75 mM) distinctly stimulated the activities of these enzymes in comparison to the control values (without MQ). Using the capillary electrophoresis (CE) method, an increase in the extracellular oxalic acid (OXA) concentration was detected during the first days after the addition of MQ. It was observed that the rate of intracellular proteolysis at pH 3.5 evidently decreased under oxidative stress conditions. Contrary to these results, the activities of serine proteases at pH 9.5 measured against fluorogenic peptide substrates distinctly increased in stressed cultures. The MQ treatment also caused an evident increase in the catalase (CAT) activity, as well as the levels of superoxide anion radicals (SORs), formaldehyde (FA), and phenolic compounds (PHC) in the experimental cultures. The results obtained confirm that prooxidants may find application as an effective way to stimulate biotechnological production of MnP and chitinase by white rot fungi.

  2. Neutrophils stimulation index in people under consumption of broiler chickens meat at pre-slaughter stress correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Grabovskyi

    2015-09-01

    introduced before slaughter (experimental group. The neutrophils stimulation index decreased in men blood (–2,21 after consumption of broiler chickens meat at pre-slaughter stress (control group. The neutrophils stimulation index in men blood of experimental and control groups differed by 34,8%, but did not go beyond the physiological norm. At the final stage of poultry feeding it is necessary to consider pre-slaughter stress and to apply biologically active substances of natural origin, such as spleen extract. The results obtained in the experiment on broiler chickens can be used in studies of non-specific resistance indices of the farm animals for increasing the organism resistance, correction and avoiding of pre-slaughter stress and improvement of product quality

  3. ADHD-specific stimulant misuse, mood, anxiety, and stress in college-age women at high risk for or with eating disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Elise L.; Kass, Andrea E.; Eichen, Dawn M.; Fitzsimmons-Craft, Ellen E.; Trockel, Mickey; Wilfley, Denise E.; Taylor, C. Barr

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine the misuse of ADHD-specific stimulants in a college population at high risk for or with clinical or subclinical eating disorders. Participants 448 college-age women ages 18–25 at high risk for or with a clinical or subclinical eating disorder. Methods Participants completed assessments of stimulant misuse and psychopathology from September 2009 - June 2010. Results Greater eating disorder pathology, objective binge eating, purging, eating disorder-related clinical impairment, depressive symptoms, perceived stress, and trait anxiety were associated with an increased likelihood of stimulant misuse. Subjective binge eating, excessive exercise, and dietary restraint were not associated with stimulant misuse. Conclusions ADHD-specific stimulant misuse is associated with eating disorder and comorbid pathology among individuals at high risk for or with clinical or subclinical eating disorders. Screening for stimulant misuse and eating disorder pathology may improve identification of college-age women who may be engaging in maladaptive behaviors and inform prevention efforts. PMID:26822019

  4. Gold nanoparticle-mediated laser stimulation causes a complex stress signal in neuronal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannsmeier, Sonja; Heeger, Patrick; Terakawa, Mitsuhiro; Kalies, Stefan; Heisterkamp, Alexander; Ripken, Tammo; Heinemann, Dag

    2017-07-01

    Gold nanoparticle mediated laser stimulation of neuronal cells allows for cell activation on a single-cell level. It could therefore be considered an alternative to classical electric neurostimulation. The physiological impact of this new approach has not been intensively studied so far. Here, we investigate the targeted cell's reaction to a laser stimulus based on its calcium response. A complex cellular reaction involving multiple sources has been revealed.

  5. Chromophore dynamics in the PYP photocycle from femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creelman, Mark; Kumauchi, Masato; Hoff, Wouter D; Mathies, Richard A

    2014-01-23

    Femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) is used to examine the structural dynamics of the para-hydroxycinnamic acid (HCA) chromophore during the first 300 ps of the photoactive yellow protein (PYP) photocycle, as the system transitions from its vertically excited state to the early ground state cis intermediate, I0. A downshift in both the C7═C8 and C1═O stretches upon photoexcitation reveals that the chromophore has shifted to an increasingly quinonic form in the excited state, indicating a charge shift from the phenolate moiety toward the C9═O carbonyl, which continues to increase for 170 fs. In addition, there is a downshift in the C9═O carbonyl out-of-plane vibration on an 800 fs time scale as PYP transitions from its excited state to I0, indicating that weakening of the hydrogen bond with Cys69 and out-of-plane rotation of the C9═O carbonyl are key steps leading to photoproduct formation. HOOP intensity increases on a 3 ps time scale during the formation of I0, signifying distortion about the C7═C8 bond. Once on the I0 surface, the C7═C8 and C1═O stretches blue shift, indicating recovery of charge to the phenolate, while persistent intensity in the HOOP and carbonyl out-of-plane modes reveal HCA to be a cissoid structure with significant distortion about the C7═C8 bond and of C9═O out of the molecular plane.

  6. Stress, strain, and structural dynamics an interactive handbook of formulas, solutions, and Matlab toolboxes

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Bingen

    2005-01-01

    Stress, Strain, and Structural Dynamics is a comprehensive and definitive reference to statics and dynamics of solids and structures, including mechanics of materials, structural mechanics, elasticity, rigid-body dynamics, vibrations, structural dynamics, and structural controls. This text integrates the development of fundamental theories, formulas and mathematical models with user-friendly interactive computer programs, written in the powerful and popular MATLAB. This unique merger of technical referencing and interactive computing allows instant solution of a variety of engineering problems

  7. Cdc42 and RhoA reveal different spatio-temporal dynamics upon local stimulation with Semaphorin-3A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico eIseppon

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Small RhoGTPases, such as Cdc42 and RhoA, are key players in integrating external cues and intracellular signaling pathways that regulate growth cone (GC motility. Indeed, Cdc42 is involved in actin polymerization and filopodia formation, whereas RhoA induces GC collapse and neurite retraction through actomyosin contraction. In this study we employed Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET microscopy to study the spatio-temporal dynamics of Cdc42 and RhoA in GCs in response to local Semaphorin-3A stimulation obtained with lipid vesicles filled with Semaphorin-3A and positioned near the selected GC using optical tweezers. We found that Cdc42 and RhoA were activated at the leading edge of NG108-15 neuroblastoma cells during spontaneous cycles of protrusion and retraction, respectively. The release of Semaphorin-3A brought to a progressive activation of RhoA within 30 seconds from the stimulus in the central region of the GC that collapsed and retracted. In contrast, the same stimulation evoked waves of Cdc42 activation propagating away from the stimulated region. A more localized stimulation obtained with Sema3A coated beads placed on the GC, led to Cdc42 active waves that propagated in a retrograde manner with a mean period of 70 seconds, and followed by GC retraction. Therefore, Semaphorin-3A activates both Cdc42 and RhoA with a complex and different spatial-temporal dynamics.

  8. Prediction of flow- induced dynamic stress in an axial pump impeller using FEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, J Y; Hou, Y S; Xi, S Z; Cai, Z H; Yao, P P; Shi, H L

    2013-01-01

    Axial pumps play an important role in water supply and flood control projects. Along with growing requirements for high reliability and large capacity, the dynamic stress of axial pumps has become a key problem. Unsteady flow is a significant reason which results structural dynamic stress of a pump. This paper reports on a flow-induced dynamic stress simulation in an axial pump impeller at three flow conditions by using FEM code. The pressure pulsation obtained from flow simulation using CFD code was set as the force boundary condition. The results show that the maximum stress of impeller appeared at joint between blade and root flange near trailing edge or joint between blade and root flange near leading edge. The dynamic stress of the two zones was investigated under three flow conditions (0.8Q d , 1.0Q d , 1.1Q d ) in time domain and frequency domain. The frequencies of stress at zones of maximum stress are 22.9Hz and 37.5Hz as the fundamental frequency and its harmonics. The fundamental frequencies are nearly equal to vane passing frequency (22.9 Hz) and 3 times blade passing frequency (37.5Hz). The first dominant frequency at zones of maximum stress is equal to the vane passing frequency due to rotor-stator interaction between the vane and the blade. This study would be helpful for axial pumps in reducing stress, improving structure design and fatigue life

  9. Dynamic changes in saliva after acute mental stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumova, Ella A.; Sandulescu, Tudor; Bochnig, Clemens; Khatib, Philipp Al; Lee, Wing-Kee; Zimmer, Stefan; Arnold, Wolfgang H.

    2014-01-01

    Stress-related variations of fluoride concentration in supernatant saliva and salivary sediment, salivary cortisol, total protein and pH after acute mental stress were assessed. The hypothesis was that stress reactions have no influence on these parameters. Thirty-four male students were distributed into two groups: first received the stress exposure followed by the same protocol two weeks later but without stress exposure, second underwent the protocol without stress exposure followed by the stress exposure two weeks later. The stressor was a public speech followed by tooth brushing. Saliva was collected before, immediately after stress induction and immediately, at 10, 30 and 120 min. after tooth brushing. Cortisol concentrations, total protein, intraoral pH, and fluoride content in saliva were measured. The data were analyzed statistically. Salivary sediment was ca 4.33% by weight of whole unstimulated saliva. Fluoride bioavailability was higher in salivary sediment than in supernatant saliva. The weight and fluoride concentration was not altered during 2 hours after stress exposure. After a public speech, the salivary cortisol concentration significantly increased after 20 minutes compared to the baseline. The salivary protein concentration and pH also increased. Public speaking influences protein concentration and salivary pH but does not alter the fluoride concentration of saliva. PMID:24811301

  10. Dynamic regulation of cerebral DNA repair genes by psychological stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsberg, Kristin; Aalling, Nadia; Wörtwein, Gitta

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal genotoxic insults from oxidative stress constitute a putative molecular link between stress and depression on the one hand, and cognitive dysfunction and dementia risk on the other. Oxidative modifications to DNA are repaired by specific enzymes; a process that plays a critical role...... restraint stress (6h/day) or daily handling (controls), and sacrificed after 1, 7 or 21 stress sessions. The mRNA expression of seven genes (Ogg1, Ape1, Ung1, Neil1, Xrcc1, Ercc1, Nudt1) involved in the repair of oxidatively damaged DNA was determined by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction...

  11. Dynamic release and clearance of circulating microparticles during cardiac stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustine, Daniel; Ayers, Lisa V; Lima, Eduardo; Newton, Laura; Lewandowski, Adam J; Davis, Esther F; Ferry, Berne; Leeson, Paul

    2014-01-03

    Microparticles are cell-derived membrane vesicles, relevant to a range of biological responses and known to be elevated in cardiovascular disease. To investigate microparticle release during cardiac stress and how this response differs in those with vascular disease. We measured a comprehensive panel of circulating cell-derived microparticles by a standardized flow cytometric protocol in 119 patients referred for stress echocardiography. Procoagulant, platelet, erythrocyte, and endothelial but not leukocyte, granulocyte, or monocyte-derived microparticles were elevated immediately after a standardized dobutamine stress echocardiogram and decreased after 1 hour. Twenty-five patients developed stress-induced wall motion abnormalities suggestive of myocardial ischemia. They had similar baseline microparticle levels to those who did not develop ischemia, but, interestingly, their microparticle levels did not change during stress. Furthermore, no stress-induced increase was observed in those without inducible ischemia but with a history of vascular disease. Fourteen patients subsequently underwent coronary angiography. A microparticle rise during stress echocardiography had occurred only in those with normal coronary arteries. Procoagulant, platelet, erythrocyte, and endothelial microparticles are released during cardiac stress and then clear from the circulation during the next hour. This stress-induced rise seems to be a normal physiological response that is diminished in those with vascular disease.

  12. The Impact of Simultaneously Applying Normal Stress and Vibrotactile Stimulation for Feedback of Exteroceptive Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reza Motamedi, M; Otis, Martin; Duchaine, Vincent

    2017-06-01

    Commercially available prosthetic hands do not convey any tactile information, forcing amputees to rely solely on visual attention. A promising solution to this problem is haptics, which could lead to new prostheses in which tactile information is conveyed between the amputee and the artificial limb. However, the haptic feedback must be optimized so that amputees can use it effectively; and although several studies have examined how specific haptic feedback systems can transmit certain types of tactile information, there has not yet been much research on the effects of superposing two or more types of feedback at the same location, which might prove to be more effective than using a single type of feedback alone. This paper investigates how the simultaneous application of two different types of haptic feedback-vibration and normal stress-impacts the human sensory perception of each separate feedback type. These stimuli were applied to glabrous skin on the forearms of 14 participants. Our experiments tested whether participants experienced more accurate sensory perception, compared to vibration or normal stress alone, when vibration was applied at the same time as the normal stress, at either the same location, or at a different location 6 cm away. Results indicate that although participants' perception of the normal stress diminished when vibration was applied at the same location, the same combination improved their perception of the vibration. Apparently, vibration has a negative impact upon the ability to perceive normal stress, whether applied at the same or a different location; whereas the opposite is true for the effect of normal stress upon the perception of vibration.

  13. Chronic inflammatory diseases are stimulated by current lifestyle: how diet, stress levels and medication prevent our body from recovering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bosma-den Boer Margarethe M

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Serhan and colleagues introduced the term "Resoleomics" in 1996 as the process of inflammation resolution. The major discovery of Serhan's work is that onset to conclusion of an inflammation is a controlled process of the immune system (IS and not simply the consequence of an extinguished or "exhausted" immune reaction. Resoleomics can be considered as the evolutionary mechanism of restoring homeostatic balances after injury, inflammation and infection. Under normal circumstances, Resoleomics should be able to conclude inflammatory responses. Considering the modern pandemic increase of chronic medical and psychiatric illnesses involving chronic inflammation, it has become apparent that Resoleomics is not fulfilling its potential resolving capacity. We suggest that recent drastic changes in lifestyle, including diet and psycho-emotional stress, are responsible for inflammation and for disturbances in Resoleomics. In addition, current interventions, like chronic use of anti-inflammatory medication, suppress Resoleomics. These new lifestyle factors, including the use of medication, should be considered health hazards, as they are capable of long-term or chronic activation of the central stress axes. The IS is designed to produce solutions for fast, intensive hazards, not to cope with long-term, chronic stimulation. The never-ending stress factors of recent lifestyle changes have pushed the IS and the central stress system into a constant state of activity, leading to chronically unresolved inflammation and increased vulnerability for chronic disease. Our hypothesis is that modern diet, increased psycho-emotional stress and chronic use of anti-inflammatory medication disrupt the natural process of inflammation resolution ie Resoleomics.

  14. Molecular Mechanisms That Underlie the Dynamic Adaptation of Innate Monocyte Memory to Varying Stimulant Strength of TLR Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ruoxi; Geng, Shuo; Li, Liwu

    2016-01-01

    In adaptation to rising stimulant strength, innate monocytes can be dynamically programed to preferentially express either pro- or anti-inflammatory mediators. Such dynamic innate adaptation or programing may bear profound relevance in host health and disease. However, molecular mechanisms that govern innate adaptation to varying strength of stimulants are not well understood. Using lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the model stimulant of toll-like-receptor 4 (TLR4), we reported that the expressions of pro-inflammatory mediators are preferentially sustained in monocytes adapted by lower doses of LPS, and suppressed/tolerized in monocytes adapted by higher doses of LPS. Mechanistically, monocytes adapted by super-low dose LPS exhibited higher levels of transcription factor, interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5), and reduced levels of transcriptional modulator B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein-1 (Blimp-1). Intriguingly, the inflammatory monocyte adaptation by super-low dose LPS is dependent upon TRAM/TRIF but not MyD88. Similar to LPS, we also observed biphasic inflammatory adaptation and tolerance in monocytes challenged with varying dosages of TLR7 agonist. In sharp contrast, rising doses of TLR3 agonist preferentially caused inflammatory adaptation without inducing tolerance. At the molecular level, the differential regulation of IRF5 and Blimp-1 coincides with unique monocyte adaptation dynamics by TLR4/7 and TLR3 agonists. Our study provides novel clue toward the understanding of monocyte adaptation and memory toward distinct TLR ligands.

  15. Molecular mechanisms that underlie the dynamic adaptation of innate monocyte memory to varying stimulant strength of TLR ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruoxi Yuan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In adaptation to rising stimulant strength, innate monocytes can be dynamically programmed to preferentially express either pro- or anti-inflammatory mediators. Such dynamic innate adaptation or programming may bear profound relevance in host health and disease. However, molecular mechanisms that govern innate adaptation to varying strength of stimulants are not well understood. Using lipopolysaccharide (LPS, the model stimulant of Toll-Like-Receptor 4 (TLR4, we reported that the expressions of pro-inflammatory mediators are preferentially sustained in monocytes adapted by lower doses of LPS, and suppressed/tolerized in monocytes adapted by higher doses of LPS. Mechanistically, monocytes adapted by super-low dose LPS exhibited higher levels of transcription factor IRF5 and reduced levels of transcriptional modulator BLIMP-1. Intriguingly, the inflammatory monocyte adaptation by super-low dose LPS is dependent upon TRAM/TRIF but not MyD88. Similar to LPS, we also observed biphasic inflammatory adaptation and tolerance in monocytes challenged with varying dosages of TLR7 agonist. In sharp contrast, rising doses of TLR3 agonist preferentially caused inflammatory adaptation without inducing tolerance. At the molecular level, the differential regulation of IRF5 and Blimp-1 coincides with unique monocyte adaptation dynamics by TLR4/7 and TLR3 agonists. Our study provides novel clue toward the understanding of monocyte adaptation and memory toward distinct TLR ligands.

  16. Evalutation of efficiency of dynamic laser magnetic stimulation of eye drainage system of patients with open angle glaucomatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidelnikova V.S.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study is to develop a comprehensive treatment aimed at improving uveoscleral outflow in the application of dynamic laser magnetic stimulation of the drainage system of the eye and evaluation of its effectiveness in treating patients with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG. Material. 106 patients diagnosed POAG I, II, III stages were examined. Group 1 consisted of 62 patients treated with medical therapy and dynamic laser magnetic stimulation of the drainage system of the eye using the "AMO-ATOS-ICL", produced by JSC "TRIMA", Saratov. Group 2 consisted of 64 patients who received only medical therapy. Comprehensive survey including standard eye examination, static perimetry, visual evoked potentials study, the study of intraocular blood flow was conducted to all patients. Analysis of the results of the complex therapeutic effects showed that as the result of treatment 73% of patients had a decrease of intraocular pressure and the ease factor outflow increase. 52% of patients had a decrease in the number and area of relative. 63% of patients had activation of intraocular blood flow. These indices remained stable for three months. Conclusion. The treatment with the technique of dynamic laser magnetic stimulation of the drainage system of the eye of patients with primary open-angle glaucoma leads to lower intraocular pressure, and to the improvement of dopple-rographic and perimetric indications.

  17. Chew the pain away: oral habits to cope with pain and stress and to stimulate cognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijenberg, R.A.F.; Lobbezoo, F.

    2015-01-01

    The acute effects of chewing gum on cognitive performance, stress, and pain have been intensively studied in the last decade. The results have been contradicting, and replication studies proved challenging. Here, we review some of the recent findings of this topic and explore possible explanations

  18. Chew the pain away - Oral habits to cope with pain and stress, and to stimulate cognition?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijenberg, R.A.F.; Lobbezoo, F.

    2015-01-01

    The acute effects of chewing gum on cognitive performance, stress, and pain have been intensively studied in the last decade. The results have been contradicting, and replication studies proved challenging. Here, we review some of the recent findings of this topic and explore possible explanations

  19. Effects of progesterone stimulated allopregnanolone on craving and stress response in cocaine dependent men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milivojevic, Verica; Fox, Helen C; Sofuoglu, Mehmet; Covault, Jonathan; Sinha, Rajita

    2016-03-01

    Fluctuations in progesterone levels during the menstrual cycle have been shown to affect physiological and subjective effects of cocaine. Furthermore, our laboratory has demonstrated that following drug-cue exposure, cocaine dependent women with high levels of circulating progesterone display lower diastolic and systolic blood pressure responses and report lower levels of anxiety and drug craving compared to cocaine dependent women with low levels of progesterone. In the current study we examined the role of the progesterone derived neuroactive steroid allopregnanolone (ALLO) on stress arousal, inhibitory control and drug craving in cocaine dependent subjects. Plasma levels of ALLO were measured using GC/MS in 46 treatment-seeking cocaine dependent men and women on day 5 of a 7-day treatment regimen of micronized progesterone (15M/8F) (400mg/day) or placebo (14M/9F) administered in a double blind, randomized manner. As a control, levels of the testosterone derived neurosteroid androstanediol (ADIOL) were also measured. All subjects participated in laboratory sessions on days 5-7 of progesterone/placebo administration in which they were exposed to a series of 5-min personalized guided imagery of either a stressful situation, cocaine use or of a neutral setting and dependent variables including subjective craving, mood, Stroop task as a measure of inhibitory control performance and plasma cortisol were assessed. Participants were grouped by high or low ALLO level and levels of dependent variables compared between ALLO groups. Progesterone relative to placebo significantly increased ALLO levels with no sex differences. There were no effects of micronized progesterone on the testosterone derived ADIOL. Individuals in the high versus the low ALLO group showed decreased levels of cortisol at baseline, and a higher cortisol response to stress; higher positive mood scores at baseline and improved Stroop performance in the drug-cue and stress conditions, and reduced cocaine

  20. Treating Stress-Related Pain with the Flotation Restricted Environmental Stimulation Technique: Are There Differences between Women and Men?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Å Bood

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to explore, for the first time, sex differences among patients diagnosed with stress-related pain before and after flotation restricted environmental stimulation technique (REST treatment, delivered 12 times during seven weeks. The present study included 88 patients (69 women, 19 men from three different studies (post hoc analysis. They had been diagnosed by a physician as having chronic stress-related muscle tension pain. The analyses indicated that the flotation-REST treatment had beneficial effects on stress, anxiety, depression, sleep quality and pain and that there were few sex differences. Women were more depressed than men before treatment, but after treatment there was no difference between sexes. However, there was a sex difference in the ability to endure experimentally induced pain, suggesting that men exhibited greater endurance both before and after the flotation-REST treatment. The results also showed, for the first time, that both sexes improved their ability to endure experimentally induced pain (higher scores for upper pain threshold following the successful flotation-REST pain treatment.

  1. In vitro stimulation of vascular endothelial growth factor by borate-based glass fibers under dynamic flow conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Sisi; Yang, Qingbo; Brow, Richard K.; Liu, Kun; Brow, Katherine A.; Ma, Yinfa

    2017-01-01

    Bioactive borate glass has been recognized to have both hard and soft tissue repair and regeneration capabilities through stimulating both osteogenesis and angiogenesis. However, the underlying biochemical and cellular mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, dynamic flow culturing modules were designed to simulate the micro-environment near the vascular depletion and hyperplasia area in wound-healing regions, thus to better investigate the mechanisms underlying the biocompatibility and functionality of borate-based glass materials. Glass fibers were dosed either upstream or in contact with the pre-seeded cells in the dynamic flow module. Two types of borate glasses, doped with (1605) or without (13-93B3) CuO and ZnO, were studied along with the silicate-based glass, 45S5. Substantial fiber dissolution in cell culture medium was observed, leading to the release of ions (boron, sodium and potassium) and the deposition of a calcium phosphate phase. Different levels of vascular endothelial growth factor secretion were observed from cells exposed to these three glass fibers, and the copper/zinc containing borate 1605 fibers exhibited the most positive influence. These results indicate that dynamic studies of in vitro bioactivity provide useful information to understand the in vivo response to bioactive borate glasses. - Highlights: • Novel dynamic flow cell culture modules were designed. • Bioactive glass fibers were evaluated for their effects on VEGF secretion. • Borate-based glass fibers stimulate VEGF secretion under dynamic condition. • CuO and ZnO doped borate-based glass fibers stimulate the greatest VEGF release.

  2. In vitro stimulation of vascular endothelial growth factor by borate-based glass fibers under dynamic flow conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Sisi [Department of Chemistry, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States); Center for Biomedical Science and Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States); Yang, Qingbo [Department of Chemistry, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States); Center for Biomedical Science and Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States); Center for Single Nanoparticle, Single Cell, and Single Molecule Monitoring, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States); Brow, Richard K. [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States); Center for Biomedical Science and Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States); Liu, Kun [Department of Chemistry, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States); Center for Single Nanoparticle, Single Cell, and Single Molecule Monitoring, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States); Brow, Katherine A. [Department of Chemistry, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States); Ma, Yinfa [Department of Chemistry, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States); Center for Biomedical Science and Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States); Center for Single Nanoparticle, Single Cell, and Single Molecule Monitoring, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States); and others

    2017-04-01

    Bioactive borate glass has been recognized to have both hard and soft tissue repair and regeneration capabilities through stimulating both osteogenesis and angiogenesis. However, the underlying biochemical and cellular mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, dynamic flow culturing modules were designed to simulate the micro-environment near the vascular depletion and hyperplasia area in wound-healing regions, thus to better investigate the mechanisms underlying the biocompatibility and functionality of borate-based glass materials. Glass fibers were dosed either upstream or in contact with the pre-seeded cells in the dynamic flow module. Two types of borate glasses, doped with (1605) or without (13-93B3) CuO and ZnO, were studied along with the silicate-based glass, 45S5. Substantial fiber dissolution in cell culture medium was observed, leading to the release of ions (boron, sodium and potassium) and the deposition of a calcium phosphate phase. Different levels of vascular endothelial growth factor secretion were observed from cells exposed to these three glass fibers, and the copper/zinc containing borate 1605 fibers exhibited the most positive influence. These results indicate that dynamic studies of in vitro bioactivity provide useful information to understand the in vivo response to bioactive borate glasses. - Highlights: • Novel dynamic flow cell culture modules were designed. • Bioactive glass fibers were evaluated for their effects on VEGF secretion. • Borate-based glass fibers stimulate VEGF secretion under dynamic condition. • CuO and ZnO doped borate-based glass fibers stimulate the greatest VEGF release.

  3. Development of crankshaft dynamic stress prediction; Jitsudoji crankshaft oryoku yosoku shuho no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, S; Iwamoto, A; Miyazawa, H; Sato, K; Ozaki, H [Honda R and D Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    In this paper, the development of the simulation model which predicts the stress of the crankshaft under running condition precisely is described. This simulation model considers about the nonlinearity of the oil film stiffness in the main bearing, the dynamic characteristic of the crankshaft system including resonance and the cylinder block stiffness. By the development of this stress analysis simulation, the stress m each part of the crankshaft during durability testing could be precisely predicted. 1 ref., 10 figs.

  4. Cardiorespiratory Dynamic Response to Mental Stress: A Multivariate Time-Frequency Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devy Widjaja

    2013-01-01

    out continuously in time to evaluate the dynamic response to mental stress and attention. The results show an increased heart and respiratory rate during stress and attention, compared to a resting condition. Also a fast reduction in vagal activity is noted. The partial TF analysis reveals a faster reduction of RRV power related to (3 s than unrelated to (30 s respiration, demonstrating that the autonomic response to mental stress is driven by mechanisms characterized by different temporal scales.

  5. UVB radiation prevents skeleton growth and stimulates the expression of stress markers in sea urchin embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonaventura, Rosa; Poma, Veronica; Costa, Caterina; Matranga, Valeria

    2005-01-01

    Ozone depletion results in an increased flux of biologically damaging radiations reaching the earth. Although ultraviolet (UV) penetration is attenuated by the seawater, harmful effects can be still observed at low depths where sea urchin embryos are living. We have used Paracentrotus lividus embryos to study the impacts of UV radiation on their development. Blastula cultures were exposed to different doses of UVB (312 nm) radiations and the resulting endpoint effects were evaluated in terms of embryonic morphological abnormalities, variations in specific gene expression, and changes in the levels of stress proteins. We found that embryos were moderately sensitive to 50 J/m 2 UVB radiation; an increase in the number of developmentally delayed and malformed embryos was detected when increasing doses, up to 1000 J/m 2 , were used. Major developmental defects, observed 24 and 48 h after exposure, consisted in the failure of skeleton elongation and patterning. Accordingly, we found a reduction in the number of primary mesenchyme cells that expressed Pl-SM30, a gene coding for one of the specific matrix proteins of the skeleton. The morphological effects observed 1, 24, and 48 h after exposure were correlated with a dose-dependent increase in the level and in the activation of two recognized stress markers, namely hsp70 and p38 MAPk, respectively, consistent with their role in mediating cellular response to stress and suggesting a function in embryo survival

  6. Cellular stress stimulates nuclear localization signal (NLS) independent nuclear transport of MRJ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Joel F.; Sykora, Landon J.; Barik-Letostak, Tiasha; Menezes, Mitchell E.; Mitra, Aparna; Barik, Sailen; Shevde, Lalita A.; Samant, Rajeev S.

    2012-01-01

    HSP40 family member MRJ (DNAJB6) has been in the spot light for its relevance to Huntington’s, Parkinson’s diseases, limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, placental development, neural stem cells, cell cycle and malignancies such as breast cancer and melanoma. This gene has two spliced variants coding for 2 distinct proteins with significant homology. However, MRJ(L) (large variant) is predominantly localized to the nucleus whereas MRJ(S) (small variant) is predominantly cytoplasmic. Interestingly MRJ(S) translocates to the nucleus in response to heat shock. The classical heat shock proteins respond to crises (stress) by increasing the number of molecules, usually by transcriptional up-regulation. Our studies imply that a quick increase in the molar concentration of MRJ in the nuclear compartment is a novel method by which MRJ responds to stress. We found that MRJ(S) shows NLS (nuclear localization signal) independent nuclear localization in response to heat shock and hypoxia. The specificity of this response is realized due to lack of such response by MRJ(S) when challenged by other stressors, such as some cytokines or UV light. Deletion analysis has allowed us to narrow down on a 20 amino acid stretch at the C-terminal region of MRJ(S) as a potential stress sensing region. Functional studies indicated that constitutive nuclear localization of MRJ(S) promoted attributes of malignancy such as proliferation and invasiveness overall indicating distinct phenotypic characteristics of nuclear MRJ(S). PMID:22504047

  7. Cellular stress stimulates nuclear localization signal (NLS) independent nuclear transport of MRJ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrews, Joel F.; Sykora, Landon J.; Barik Letostak, Tiasha; Menezes, Mitchell E.; Mitra, Aparna; Barik, Sailen; Shevde, Lalita A.; Samant, Rajeev S.

    2012-01-01

    HSP40 family member MRJ (DNAJB6) has been in the spot light for its relevance to Huntington's, Parkinson's diseases, limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, placental development, neural stem cells, cell cycle and malignancies such as breast cancer and melanoma. This gene has two spliced variants coding for 2 distinct proteins with significant homology. However, MRJ(L) (large variant) is predominantly localized to the nucleus whereas MRJ(S) (small variant) is predominantly cytoplasmic. Interestingly MRJ(S) translocates to the nucleus in response to heat shock. The classical heat shock proteins respond to crises (stress) by increasing the number of molecules, usually by transcriptional up-regulation. Our studies imply that a quick increase in the molar concentration of MRJ in the nuclear compartment is a novel method by which MRJ responds to stress. We found that MRJ(S) shows NLS (nuclear localization signal) independent nuclear localization in response to heat shock and hypoxia. The specificity of this response is realized due to lack of such response by MRJ(S) when challenged by other stressors, such as some cytokines or UV light. Deletion analysis has allowed us to narrow down on a 20 amino acid stretch at the C-terminal region of MRJ(S) as a potential stress sensing region. Functional studies indicated that constitutive nuclear localization of MRJ(S) promoted attributes of malignancy such as proliferation and invasiveness overall indicating distinct phenotypic characteristics of nuclear MRJ(S).

  8. Cellular stress stimulates nuclear localization signal (NLS) independent nuclear transport of MRJ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, Joel F.; Sykora, Landon J.; Barik Letostak, Tiasha; Menezes, Mitchell E.; Mitra, Aparna [Department of Oncologic Sciences, Mitchell Cancer Institute, University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL (United States); Barik, Sailen [Center for Gene Regulation in Health and Disease, Department of Biological, Geological, and Environmental Sciences, College of Science, Cleveland State University, Cleveland, OH (United States); Shevde, Lalita A. [Department of Oncologic Sciences, Mitchell Cancer Institute, University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL (United States); Samant, Rajeev S., E-mail: rsamant@usouthal.edu [Department of Oncologic Sciences, Mitchell Cancer Institute, University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL (United States)

    2012-06-10

    HSP40 family member MRJ (DNAJB6) has been in the spot light for its relevance to Huntington's, Parkinson's diseases, limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, placental development, neural stem cells, cell cycle and malignancies such as breast cancer and melanoma. This gene has two spliced variants coding for 2 distinct proteins with significant homology. However, MRJ(L) (large variant) is predominantly localized to the nucleus whereas MRJ(S) (small variant) is predominantly cytoplasmic. Interestingly MRJ(S) translocates to the nucleus in response to heat shock. The classical heat shock proteins respond to crises (stress) by increasing the number of molecules, usually by transcriptional up-regulation. Our studies imply that a quick increase in the molar concentration of MRJ in the nuclear compartment is a novel method by which MRJ responds to stress. We found that MRJ(S) shows NLS (nuclear localization signal) independent nuclear localization in response to heat shock and hypoxia. The specificity of this response is realized due to lack of such response by MRJ(S) when challenged by other stressors, such as some cytokines or UV light. Deletion analysis has allowed us to narrow down on a 20 amino acid stretch at the C-terminal region of MRJ(S) as a potential stress sensing region. Functional studies indicated that constitutive nuclear localization of MRJ(S) promoted attributes of malignancy such as proliferation and invasiveness overall indicating distinct phenotypic characteristics of nuclear MRJ(S).

  9. Cellular stress stimulates nuclear localization signal (NLS) independent nuclear transport of MRJ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, Joel F.; Sykora, Landon J.; Barik Letostak, Tiasha; Menezes, Mitchell E.; Mitra, Aparna [Department of Oncologic Sciences, Mitchell Cancer Institute, University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL (United States); Barik, Sailen [Center for Gene Regulation in Health and Disease, Department of Biological, Geological, and Environmental Sciences, College of Science, Cleveland State University, Cleveland, OH (United States); Shevde, Lalita A. [Department of Oncologic Sciences, Mitchell Cancer Institute, University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL (United States); Samant, Rajeev S., E-mail: rsamant@usouthal.edu [Department of Oncologic Sciences, Mitchell Cancer Institute, University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL (United States)

    2012-06-10

    HSP40 family member MRJ (DNAJB6) has been in the spot light for its relevance to Huntington's, Parkinson's diseases, limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, placental development, neural stem cells, cell cycle and malignancies such as breast cancer and melanoma. This gene has two spliced variants coding for 2 distinct proteins with significant homology. However, MRJ(L) (large variant) is predominantly localized to the nucleus whereas MRJ(S) (small variant) is predominantly cytoplasmic. Interestingly MRJ(S) translocates to the nucleus in response to heat shock. The classical heat shock proteins respond to crises (stress) by increasing the number of molecules, usually by transcriptional up-regulation. Our studies imply that a quick increase in the molar concentration of MRJ in the nuclear compartment is a novel method by which MRJ responds to stress. We found that MRJ(S) shows NLS (nuclear localization signal) independent nuclear localization in response to heat shock and hypoxia. The specificity of this response is realized due to lack of such response by MRJ(S) when challenged by other stressors, such as some cytokines or UV light. Deletion analysis has allowed us to narrow down on a 20 amino acid stretch at the C-terminal region of MRJ(S) as a potential stress sensing region. Functional studies indicated that constitutive nuclear localization of MRJ(S) promoted attributes of malignancy such as proliferation and invasiveness overall indicating distinct phenotypic characteristics of nuclear MRJ(S).

  10. Friends, not foes: Magnetoencephalography as a tool to uncover brain dynamics during transcranial alternating current stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuling, Toralf; Ruhnau, Philipp; Fuscà, Marco; Demarchi, Gianpaolo; Herrmann, Christoph S; Weisz, Nathan

    2015-09-01

    Brain oscillations are supposedly crucial for normal cognitive functioning and alterations are associated with cognitive dysfunctions. To demonstrate their causal role on behavior, entrainment approaches in particular aim at driving endogenous oscillations via rhythmic stimulation. Within this context, transcranial electrical stimulation, especially transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS), has received renewed attention. This is likely due to the possibility of defining oscillatory stimulation properties precisely. Also, measurements comparing pre-tACS with post-tACS electroencephalography (EEG) have shown impressive modulations. However, the period during tACS has remained a blackbox until now, due to the enormous stimulation artifact. By means of application of beamforming to magnetoencephalography (MEG) data, we successfully recovered modulations of the amplitude of brain oscillations during weak and strong tACS. Additionally, we demonstrate that also evoked responses to visual and auditory stimuli can be recovered during tACS. The main contribution of the present study is to provide critical evidence that during ongoing tACS, subtle modulations of oscillatory brain activity can be reconstructed even at the stimulation frequency. Future tACS experiments will be able to deliver direct physiological insights in order to further the understanding of the contribution of brain oscillations to cognition and behavior. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Deep-brain magnetic stimulation promotes adult hippocampal neurogenesis and alleviates stress-related behaviors in mouse models for neuropsychiatric disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS)/ Deep-brain Magnetic Stimulation (DMS) is an effective therapy for various neuropsychiatric disorders including major depression disorder. The molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the impacts of rTMS/DMS on the brain are not yet fully understood. Results Here we studied the effects of deep-brain magnetic stimulation to brain on the molecular and cellular level. We examined the adult hippocampal neurogenesis and hippocampal synaptic plasticity of rodent under stress conditions with deep-brain magnetic stimulation treatment. We found that DMS promotes adult hippocampal neurogenesis significantly and facilitates the development of adult new-born neurons. Remarkably, DMS exerts anti-depression effects in the learned helplessness mouse model and rescues hippocampal long-term plasticity impaired by restraint stress in rats. Moreover, DMS alleviates the stress response in a mouse model for Rett syndrome and prolongs the life span of these animals dramatically. Conclusions Deep-brain magnetic stimulation greatly facilitates adult hippocampal neurogenesis and maturation, also alleviates depression and stress-related responses in animal models. PMID:24512669

  12. Effects of vagus nerve stimulation on extinction of conditioned fear and post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, L J; Gonzalez, I J; Meruva, V B; Callahan, K A; Belfort, B D; Ramanathan, K R; Meyers, E; Kilgard, M P; Rennaker, R L; McIntyre, C K

    2017-08-22

    Exposure-based therapies help patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) to extinguish conditioned fear of trauma reminders. However, controlled laboratory studies indicate that PTSD patients do not extinguish conditioned fear as well as healthy controls, and exposure therapy has high failure and dropout rates. The present study examined whether vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) augments extinction of conditioned fear and attenuates PTSD-like symptoms in an animal model of PTSD. To model PTSD, rats were subjected to a single prolonged stress (SPS) protocol, which consisted of restraint, forced swim, loss of consciousness, and 1 week of social isolation. Like PTSD patients, rats subjected to SPS show impaired extinction of conditioned fear. The SPS procedure was followed, 1 week later, by auditory fear conditioning (AFC) and extinction. VNS or sham stimulation was administered during half of the extinction days, and was paired with presentations of the conditioned stimulus. One week after completion of extinction training, rats were given a battery of behavioral tests to assess anxiety, arousal and avoidance. Results indicated that rats given SPS 1 week prior to AFC (PTSD model) failed to extinguish the freezing response after eleven consecutive days of extinction. Administration of VNS reversed the extinction impairment and attenuated reinstatement of the conditioned fear response. Delivery of VNS during extinction also eliminated the PTSD-like symptoms, such as anxiety, hyperarousal and social avoidance for more than 1 week after VNS treatment. These results provide evidence that extinction paired with VNS treatment can lead to remission of fear and improvements in PTSD-like symptoms. Taken together, these findings suggest that VNS may be an effective adjunct to exposure therapy for the treatment of PTSD.

  13. Baseline Goblet Cell Mucin Secretion in the Airways Exceeds Stimulated Secretion over Extended Time Periods, and Is Sensitive to Shear Stress and Intracellular Mucin Stores.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunxiang Zhu

    Full Text Available Airway mucin secretion studies have focused on goblet cell responses to exogenous agonists almost to the exclusion of baseline mucin secretion (BLMS. In human bronchial epithelial cell cultures (HBECCs, maximal agonist-stimulated secretion exceeds baseline by ~3-fold as measured over hour-long periods, but mucin stores are discharged completely and require 24 h for full restoration. Hence, over 24 h, total baseline exceeds agonist-induced secretion by several-fold. Studies with HBECCs and mouse tracheas showed that BLMS is highly sensitive to mechanical stresses. Harvesting three consecutive 1 h baseline luminal incubations with HBECCs yielded equal rates of BLMS; however, lengthening the middle period to 72 h decreased the respective rate significantly, suggesting a stimulation of BLMS by the gentle washes of HBECC luminal surfaces. BLMS declined exponentially after washing HBECCs (t1/2 = 2.75 h, to rates approaching zero. HBECCs exposed to low perfusion rates exhibited spike-like increases in BLMS when flow was jumped 5-fold: BLMS increased >4 fold, then decreased within 5 min to a stable plateau at 1.5-2-fold over control. Higher flow jumps induced proportionally higher BLMS increases. Inducing mucous hyperplasia in HBECCs increased mucin production, BLMS and agonist-induced secretion. Mouse tracheal BLMS was ~6-fold higher during perfusion, than when flow was stopped. Munc13-2 null mouse tracheas, with their defect of accumulated cellular mucins, exhibited similar BLMS as WT, contrary to predictions of lower values. Graded mucous metaplasia induced in WT and Munc13-2 null tracheas with IL-13, caused proportional increases in BLMS, suggesting that naïve Munc13-2 mouse BLMS is elevated by increased mucin stores. We conclude that BLMS is, [i] a major component of mucin secretion in the lung, [ii] sustained by the mechanical activity of a dynamic lung, [iii] proportional to levels of mucin stores, and [iv] regulated differentially from agonist

  14. Baseline Goblet Cell Mucin Secretion in the Airways Exceeds Stimulated Secretion over Extended Time Periods, and Is Sensitive to Shear Stress and Intracellular Mucin Stores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Sean P.; Nguyen, Kristine; Ribeiro, Carla M. P.; Vasquez, Paula A.; Forest, M. Gregory; Lethem, Michael I.; Dickey, Burton F.; Davis, C. William

    2015-01-01

    Airway mucin secretion studies have focused on goblet cell responses to exogenous agonists almost to the exclusion of baseline mucin secretion (BLMS). In human bronchial epithelial cell cultures (HBECCs), maximal agonist-stimulated secretion exceeds baseline by ~3-fold as measured over hour-long periods, but mucin stores are discharged completely and require 24 h for full restoration. Hence, over 24 h, total baseline exceeds agonist-induced secretion by several-fold. Studies with HBECCs and mouse tracheas showed that BLMS is highly sensitive to mechanical stresses. Harvesting three consecutive 1 h baseline luminal incubations with HBECCs yielded equal rates of BLMS; however, lengthening the middle period to 72 h decreased the respective rate significantly, suggesting a stimulation of BLMS by the gentle washes of HBECC luminal surfaces. BLMS declined exponentially after washing HBECCs (t1/2 = 2.75 h), to rates approaching zero. HBECCs exposed to low perfusion rates exhibited spike-like increases in BLMS when flow was jumped 5-fold: BLMS increased >4 fold, then decreased within 5 min to a stable plateau at 1.5–2-fold over control. Higher flow jumps induced proportionally higher BLMS increases. Inducing mucous hyperplasia in HBECCs increased mucin production, BLMS and agonist-induced secretion. Mouse tracheal BLMS was ~6-fold higher during perfusion, than when flow was stopped. Munc13-2 null mouse tracheas, with their defect of accumulated cellular mucins, exhibited similar BLMS as WT, contrary to predictions of lower values. Graded mucous metaplasia induced in WT and Munc13-2 null tracheas with IL-13, caused proportional increases in BLMS, suggesting that naïve Munc13-2 mouse BLMS is elevated by increased mucin stores. We conclude that BLMS is, [i] a major component of mucin secretion in the lung, [ii] sustained by the mechanical activity of a dynamic lung, [iii] proportional to levels of mucin stores, and [iv] regulated differentially from agonist-induced mucin

  15. The effects of Thalamic Deep Brain Stimulation on speech dynamics in patients with Essential Tremor: An articulographic study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doris Mücke

    Full Text Available Acoustic studies have revealed that patients with Essential Tremor treated with thalamic Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS may suffer from speech deterioration in terms of imprecise oral articulation and reduced voicing control. Based on the acoustic signal one cannot infer, however, whether this deterioration is due to a general slowing down of the speech motor system (e.g., a target undershoot of a desired articulatory goal resulting from being too slow or disturbed coordination (e.g., a target undershoot caused by problems with the relative phasing of articulatory movements. To elucidate this issue further, we here investigated both acoustics and articulatory patterns of the labial and lingual system using Electromagnetic Articulography (EMA in twelve Essential Tremor patients treated with thalamic DBS and twelve age- and sex-matched controls. By comparing patients with activated (DBS-ON and inactivated stimulation (DBS-OFF with control speakers, we show that critical changes in speech dynamics occur on two levels: With inactivated stimulation (DBS-OFF, patients showed coordination problems of the labial and lingual system in terms of articulatory imprecision and slowness. These effects of articulatory discoordination worsened under activated stimulation, accompanied by an additional overall slowing down of the speech motor system. This leads to a poor performance of syllables on the acoustic surface, reflecting an aggravation either of pre-existing cerebellar deficits and/or the affection of the upper motor fibers of the internal capsule.

  16. Correlation between electron-irradiation defects and applied stress in graphene: A molecular dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kida, Shogo; Yamamoto, Masaya; Kawata, Hiroaki; Hirai, Yoshihiko; Yasuda, Masaaki, E-mail: yasuda@pe.osakafu-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics and Electronics, Osaka Prefecture University, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Tada, Kazuhiro [Department of Electrical and Control Systems Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Toyama College, Toyama 939-8630 (Japan)

    2015-09-15

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to study the correlation between electron irradiation defects and applied stress in graphene. The electron irradiation effect is introduced by the binary collision model in the MD simulation. By applying a tensile stress to graphene, the number of adatom-vacancy (AV) and Stone–Wales (SW) defects increase under electron irradiation, while the number of single-vacancy defects is not noticeably affected by the applied stress. Both the activation and formation energies of an AV defect and the activation energy of an SW defect decrease when a tensile stress is applied to graphene. Applying tensile stress also relaxes the compression stress associated with SW defect formation. These effects induced by the applied stress cause the increase in AV and SW defect formation under electron irradiation.

  17. Imaging the spatio-temporal dynamics of supragranular activity in the rat somatosensory cortex in response to stimulation of the paws.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M L Morales-Botello

    Full Text Available We employed voltage-sensitive dye (VSD imaging to investigate the spatio-temporal dynamics of the responses of the supragranular somatosensory cortex to stimulation of the four paws in urethane-anesthetized rats. We obtained the following main results. (1 Stimulation of the contralateral forepaw evoked VSD responses with greater amplitude and smaller latency than stimulation of the contralateral hindpaw, and ipsilateral VSD responses had a lower amplitude and greater latency than contralateral responses. (2 While the contralateral stimulation initially activated only one focus, the ipsilateral stimulation initially activated two foci: one focus was typically medial to the focus activated by contralateral stimulation and was stereotaxically localized in the motor cortex; the other focus was typically posterior to the focus activated by contralateral stimulation and was stereotaxically localized in the somatosensory cortex. (3 Forepaw and hindpaw somatosensory stimuli activated large areas of the sensorimotor cortex, well beyond the forepaw and hindpaw somatosensory areas of classical somatotopic maps, and forepaw stimuli activated larger cortical areas with greater activation velocity than hindpaw stimuli. (4 Stimulation of the forepaw and hindpaw evoked different cortical activation dynamics: forepaw responses displayed a clear medial directionality, whereas hindpaw responses were much more uniform in all directions. In conclusion, this work offers a complete spatio-temporal map of the supragranular VSD cortical activation in response to stimulation of the paws, showing important somatotopic differences between contralateral and ipsilateral maps as well as differences in the spatio-temporal activation dynamics in response to forepaw and hindpaw stimuli.

  18. Multibody Dynamic Stress Simulation of Rigid-Flexible Shovel Crawler Shoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Frimpong

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Electric shovels are used in surface mining operations to achieve economic production capacities. The capital investments and operating costs associated with the shovels deployed in the Athabasca oil sands formation are high due to the abrasive conditions. The shovel crawler shoes interact with sharp and abrasive sand particles, and, thus, are subjected to high transient dynamic stresses. These high stresses cause wear and tear leading to crack initiation, propagation and premature fatigue failure. The objective of this paper is to develop a model to characterize the crawler stresses and deformation for the P&H 4100C BOSS during propel and loading using rigid-flexible multi-body dynamic theory. A 3-D virtual prototype model of the rigid-flexible crawler track assembly and its interactions with oil sand formation is simulated to capture the model dynamics within multibody dynamics software MSC ADAMS. The modal and stress shapes and modal loads due to machine weight for each flexible crawler shoes are generated from finite element analysis (FEA. The modal coordinates from the simulation are combined with mode and stress shapes using modal superposition method to calculate real-time stresses and deformation of flexible crawler shoes. The results show a maximum von Mises stress value of 170 MPa occurring in the driving crawler shoe during the propel motion. This study provides a foundation for the subsequent fatigue life analysis of crawler shoes for extending crawler service life.

  19. Role of Reynolds stress and toroidal momentum transport in the dynamics of internal transport barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S. S.; Jhang, Hogun; Diamond, P. H.

    2012-01-01

    We study the interplay between intrinsic rotation and internal transport barrier (ITB) dynamics through the dynamic change of the parallel Reynolds stress. Global flux-driven gyrofluid simulations are used for this study. In particular, we investigate the role of parallel velocity gradient instability (PVGI) in the ITB formation and the back transition. It is found that the excitation of PVGI is followed by a change in the Reynolds stress which drives a momentum redistribution. This significantly influences E×B shear evolution and subsequent ITB dynamics. Nonlocal interactions among fluctuations are also observed during the PVGI excitation, resulting in turbulence suppression at the ITB.

  20. Changes in dynamics processes of the muscles’ traction under influence of stress-factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. Nozdrenko

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Change of fibers’ dynamic parameters of the frog Rana temporaria skeletal muscle m. tibialis traction under influence of modulated stimulation and aluminium chloride solutions was studied. At 10-4,5·10-4 and 10‑3 M·l-1 concentrations of aluminium chloride the nonlinear decrease of the muscle fibers’ traction parameters was observed.

  1. Dynamic control of modeled tonic-clonic seizure states with closed-loop stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryce eBeverlin II

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Seizure control using deep brain stimulation (DBS provides an alternative therapy to patients with intractable and drug resistant epilepsy. This paper presents novel DBS stimulus protocols to disrupt seizures. Two protocols are presented: open-loop stimulation and a closed-loop feedback system utilizing measured firing rates to adjust stimulus frequency. Stimulation suppression is demonstrated in a computational model using 3000 excitatory Morris-Lecar model neurons connected with depressing synapses. Cells are connected using second order network topology to simulate network topologies measured in cortical networks. The network spontaneously switches from tonic to clonic as synaptic strengths and tonic input to the neurons decreases. To this model we add periodic stimulation pulses to simulate DBS. Periodic forcing can synchronize or desynchronize an oscillating population of neurons, depending on the stimulus frequency and amplitude. Therefore, it is possible to either extend or truncate the tonic or clonic phases of the seizure. Stimuli applied at the firing rate of the neuron generally synchronize the population while stimuli slightly slower than the firing rate prevent synchronization. We present an adaptive stimulation algorithm that measures the firing rate of a neuron and adjusts the stimulus to maintain a relative stimulus frequency to firing frequency and demonstrate it in a computational model of a tonic-clonic seizure. This adaptive algorithm can affect the duration of the tonic phase using much smaller stimulus amplitudes than the open-loop control.

  2. 5 Hz Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for posttraumatic stress disorder comorbid with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Linda L; Conelea, Christine; Tyrka, Audrey R; Welch, Emma S; Greenberg, Benjamin D; Price, Lawrence H; Niedzwiecki, Matthew; Yip, Agustin G; Barnes, Jennifer; Philip, Noah S

    2018-08-01

    Standard clinical protocols for repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) for major depressive disorder (MDD) apply 10 Hz pulses over left prefrontal cortex, yet little is known about the effects of rTMS in more diagnostically complex depressed patients. Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is commonly comorbid with MDD, and while rTMS has been shown to alleviate PTSD symptoms in preliminary studies, ideal parameters remain unclear. We conducted a prospective, open-label study of 5 Hz rTMS for patients with comorbid PTSD + MDD and hypothesized stimulation would reduce symptoms of both disorders. Outpatients (N = 40) with PTSD + MDD and at least moderate global severity were enrolled. 5 Hz rTMS included up to 40 daily sessions followed by a 5-session taper. Symptoms were measured using the PTSD Checklist (PCL-5) and Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology, Self-Report (IDS-SR). Baseline-to-endpoint changes were analyzed. The intent-to-treat population included 35 participants. Stimulation significantly reduced PTSD symptoms (PCL-5 baseline mean ± SD score 52.2 ± 13.1 versus endpoint 34.0 ± 21.6; p < .001); 23 patients (48.6%) met a pre-defined categorical PTSD response criteria. MDD symptoms also improved significantly (IDS-SR, baseline 47.8 ± 11.9 to endpoint 30.9 ± 18.9; p < .001); 15 patients (42.9%) demonstrated categorical response and 12 (34.3%) remitted. PTSD and MDD symptom change was highly correlated (r = 0.91, p < .001). Unblinded single-arm study, with modest sample size. Significant and clinically meaningful reductions in both MDD and PTSD symptoms were observed following stimulation. The preliminary efficacy of 5 Hz rTMS for both symptom domains in patients with comorbid disorders supports future controlled studies. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The Stimulation Effects of N+ Ion Beam on Liquorice and Its Influence on Water Stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Shenglin; Liu Jingnan; Wu Lijun; Wang Jiabao; Yu Zengliang

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a large number of exocrine glands on liquorice leaves and facilitated polysaccharide secretion. Liquorice polysaccharide possesses stronger bound water affinity to gaseous water compared with sucrose and glucose. Our results show that the bound water affinity of liquorice polysaccharide to gaseous water is 49.75% higher than glucose (p + implantation (total dosage of 4.68x10 16 ions/cm 2 and energy of 20 keV) into dry liquorice seeds, both the bound water affinity to gaseous water and the bound water content of dry liquorice leaf can be significantly increased 30.24% ( p + implantation into dry liquorice seeds, the leaf polysaccharide content under water stress (ψ w = -1.5 MPa) can increase significantly (p<0.05) and the plant growth can also improve significantly (p<0.05)

  4. Network Mechanisms of Clinical Response to Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Major Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, Noah S; Barredo, Jennifer; van 't Wout-Frank, Mascha; Tyrka, Audrey R; Price, Lawrence H; Carpenter, Linda L

    2018-02-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) therapy can modulate pathological neural network functional connectivity in major depressive disorder (MDD). Posttraumatic stress disorder is often comorbid with MDD, and symptoms of both disorders can be alleviated with TMS therapy. This is the first study to evaluate TMS-associated changes in connectivity in patients with comorbid posttraumatic stress disorder and MDD. Resting-state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging was acquired before and after TMS therapy in 33 adult outpatients in a prospective open trial. TMS at 5 Hz was delivered, in up to 40 daily sessions, to the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Analyses used a priori seeds relevant to TMS, posttraumatic stress disorder, or MDD (subgenual anterior cingulate cortex [sgACC], left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, and basolateral amygdala) to identify imaging predictors of response and to evaluate clinically relevant changes in connectivity after TMS, followed by leave-one-out cross-validation. Imaging results were explored using data-driven multivoxel pattern activation. More negative pretreatment connectivity between the sgACC and the default mode network predicted clinical improvement, as did more positive amygdala-to-ventromedial prefrontal cortex connectivity. After TMS, symptom reduction was associated with reduced connectivity between the sgACC and the default mode network, left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and insula, and reduced connectivity between the hippocampus and the salience network. Multivoxel pattern activation confirmed seed-based predictors and correlates of treatment outcomes. These results highlight the central role of the sgACC, default mode network, and salience network as predictors of TMS response and suggest their involvement in mechanisms of action. Furthermore, this work indicates that there may be network-based biomarkers of clinical response relevant to these commonly comorbid disorders

  5. Family stress dynamics, domestic violence and their combined ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study utilized the classical ABCX family crisis model in identifying how families perceive, interpret and react to various sources of stress confronting them and their perceived impact on their health. The study is timely because of the recent upsurge in domestic violence cases in Ghana, which are mainly attributable to ...

  6. Maintained benefits and improved survival of dynamic cardiomyoplasty by activity-rest stimulation: 5-year results of the Italian trial on "demand" dynamic cardiomyoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigatelli, Gianluca; Barbiero, Mario; Rigatelli, Giorgio; Riccardi, Roberto; Cobelli, Franco; Cotogni, Angelo; Bandello, Attilio; Carraro, Ugo

    2003-01-01

    Latissimus dorsi (LD) muscular degeneration caused by continuous electrical stimulation has been the main cause of the poor results of dynamic cardiomyoplasty (DCMP) and its exclusion from the recent international guidelines on heart failure. To avoid full transformation of the LD and to improve results, a new stimulation protocol was developed; fewer impulses per day are delivered, providing the LD wrap with daily periods of rest ("demand" stimulation), based on a heart rate cut-off. The aim of this work is to report the results at 5 years of follow-up of the Italian Trial of Demand Dynamic Cardiomyoplasty and to discuss their impact on the destiny of this type of cardiac assistance. Twelve patients with dilated myocardiopathy (M/F=11/1, mean age 58.2+/-5.8 years, sinus rhythm/atrial fibrillation=11/1) were submitted during the period 1993-1996 to DCMP and at different intervals to demand protocol. Clinical, echocardiographic, mechanographic and cardiac invasive assessments were scheduled before initiating the demand protocol and during the follow-up at 0, 6 and every 12 months. The mean duration of follow-up was 40.2+/-13.8 months (range 18-64). There were no perioperative deaths. The demand stimulation protocol showed a decrease in 5 years in New York Health Association (NYHA) class (3.17+/-0.38-1.67+/-0.77, P=0.0001), an improvement of left ventricular ejection fraction (22.6+/-4.38-32.0+/-7.0, Pactuarial survival of 83.3% (one patient was switched to heart transplantation programme due to clinical worsening and another one died of massive pulmonary embolism). Demand DCMP maintains over time LD muscular properties, enhances clinical benefits and improves survival of DCMP, thus reopening the debate whether this type of treatment should be considered in patients with end-stage heart failure.

  7. Perturbation and Nonlinear Dynamic Analysis of Acoustic Phonatory Signal in Parkinsonian Patients Receiving Deep Brain Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Victoria S.; Zhou, Xiao Ping; Rahn, Douglas A., III; Wang, Emily Q.; Jiang, Jack J.

    2008-01-01

    Nineteen PD patients who received deep brain stimulation (DBS), 10 non-surgical (control) PD patients, and 11 non-pathologic age- and gender-matched subjects performed sustained vowel phonations. The following acoustic measures were obtained on the sustained vowel phonations: correlation dimension (D[subscript 2]), percent jitter, percent shimmer,…

  8. cHRV Uncovering Daily Stress Dynamics Using Bio-Signal from Consumer Wearables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Tian; Chang, Henry; Ball, Marion; Lin, Kun; Zhu, Xinxin

    2017-01-01

    Knowing the dynamics of one's daily stress is essential to effective stress management in the context of smart and connected health. However, there lacks a practical and unobtrusive means to obtain real-time and longitudinal stress information. In this paper, we attempt to derive a convenient HRV-based (heart rate variability) biomarker named cHRV, which can be used to reliably reflect stress dynamics. cHRV's key advantage lies in its low maintenance and high practicality. It can be efficiently calculated only using data from photoplethysmography (PPG) sensors, the mainstream heart rate sensor embedded in most of the consumer wearables like Apple Watch. Benefiting from the proliferation of wearables, cHRV is ideal for day-to-day stress monitoring. To evaluate its feasibility and performance, we have conducted 14 in-lab controlled experiments. The result shows that the proposed cHRV has strong correlation with the stress dynamics (r > 0.95), therefore exhibits great potential for continuous stress assessment.

  9. Bone morphogenic protein 4 produced in endothelial cells by oscillatory shear stress stimulates an inflammatory response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorescu, George P.; Sykes, Michelle; Weiss, Daiana; Platt, Manu O.; Saha, Aniket; Hwang, Jinah; Boyd, Nolan; Boo, Yong C.; Vega, J. David; Taylor, W. Robert; hide

    2003-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is now viewed as an inflammatory disease occurring preferentially in arterial regions exposed to disturbed flow conditions, including oscillatory shear stress (OS), in branched arteries. In contrast, the arterial regions exposed to laminar shear (LS) are relatively lesion-free. The mechanisms underlying the opposite effects of OS and LS on the inflammatory and atherogenic processes are not clearly understood. Here, through DNA microarrays, protein expression, and functional studies, we identify bone morphogenic protein 4 (BMP4) as a mechanosensitive and pro-inflammatory gene product. Exposing endothelial cells to OS increased BMP4 protein expression, whereas LS decreased it. In addition, we found BMP4 expression only in the selective patches of endothelial cells overlying foam cell lesions in human coronary arteries. The same endothelial patches also expressed higher levels of intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) protein compared with those of non-diseased areas. Functionally, we show that OS and BMP4 induced ICAM-1 expression and monocyte adhesion by a NFkappaB-dependent mechanism. We suggest that BMP4 is a mechanosensitive, inflammatory factor playing a critical role in early steps of atherogenesis in the lesion-prone areas.

  10. Effects of upper mantle heterogeneities on the lithospheric stress field and dynamic topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osei Tutu, Anthony; Steinberger, Bernhard; Sobolev, Stephan V.; Rogozhina, Irina; Popov, Anton A.

    2018-05-01

    The orientation and tectonic regime of the observed crustal/lithospheric stress field contribute to our knowledge of different deformation processes occurring within the Earth's crust and lithosphere. In this study, we analyze the influence of the thermal and density structure of the upper mantle on the lithospheric stress field and topography. We use a 3-D lithosphere-asthenosphere numerical model with power-law rheology, coupled to a spectral mantle flow code at 300 km depth. Our results are validated against the World Stress Map 2016 (WSM2016) and the observation-based residual topography. We derive the upper mantle thermal structure from either a heat flow model combined with a seafloor age model (TM1) or a global S-wave velocity model (TM2). We show that lateral density heterogeneities in the upper 300 km have a limited influence on the modeled horizontal stress field as opposed to the resulting dynamic topography that appears more sensitive to such heterogeneities. The modeled stress field directions, using only the mantle heterogeneities below 300 km, are not perturbed much when the effects of lithosphere and crust above 300 km are added. In contrast, modeled stress magnitudes and dynamic topography are to a greater extent controlled by the upper mantle density structure. After correction for the chemical depletion of continents, the TM2 model leads to a much better fit with the observed residual topography giving a good correlation of 0.51 in continents, but this correction leads to no significant improvement of the fit between the WSM2016 and the resulting lithosphere stresses. In continental regions with abundant heat flow data, TM1 results in relatively small angular misfits. For example, in western Europe the misfit between the modeled and observation-based stress is 18.3°. Our findings emphasize that the relative contributions coming from shallow and deep mantle dynamic forces are quite different for the lithospheric stress field and dynamic

  11. Cognitive Processes (Probably Stimulated By Using Digital Game "Dynamic Metabolic Diagram Virtual Krebs´ Cycle"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. P Azevedo

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available This work describes some of the possible cognitive operations related to the use of an educational game type activity, which  is  part  of  the  software  e-metabolismo,  developed  to  improve  biochemical  learning.  This  interactive  activity, called  DMDV   – Dynamic  Metabolic  Diagram,  allows  participants  to  drag-and-drop  components  of  the  sequence  of chemical  reactions,  which describe  the  metabolic  route  under study.  It  also offers  to the students  quizzes  and texts about  the  subject.  The  suggestion  of  cognitive  processes  possibly  triggered  by  the  software,  which  must  improve effective learning, was based on Jean Piaget’s genetic epistemological ideas to explain the cognitive activity. One of these  processes  is  the  mere  act  of  playing  the  game,  which  Piaget  relates  to  humans  needs  of  learning  rules  of socialization.  It  also  can  be  seen  as  a  first  step  in  cognition  process,  the  so  called  adaptation  function  that  include assimilation and accommodation, interactive processes between intelligent activities and elements from the reality, to became part of the individual´s mental structures. Another example: drag and drop substracts and enzymes pieces in a  virtual  board,  each  one  corresponding  to  an  specific  place  in  a  metabolic  route.  This  operation  can  be  related  to motivation,  an  affective  element  proposed  by  Piaget  to  stimulate  curiosity  and  improve  construction  of  knowledge structures.  Besides  this  issue,  the  act  of  choosing  pieces  is  assumed  to  inform  the  student  previous  knowledge (previous  cognitive  structures,  which,  according  to  Piaget,  must  be  misbalanced  (equilibration  of  new  structures  is supposed to be part of the dynamic

  12. Dynamical System Analysis of Reynolds Stress Closure Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girimaji, Sharath S.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, we establish the causality between the model coefficients in the standard pressure-strain correlation model and the predicted equilibrium states for homogeneous turbulence. We accomplish this by performing a comprehensive fixed point analysis of the modeled Reynolds stress and dissipation rate equations. The results from this analysis will be very useful for developing improved pressure-strain correlation models to yield observed equilibrium behavior.

  13. Low-frequency transcranial magnetic stimulation over left dorsal premotor cortex improves the dynamic control of visuospatially cued actions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ward, Nick S; Bestmann, Sven; Hartwigsen, Gesa

    2010-01-01

    Left rostral dorsal premotor cortex (rPMd) and supramarginal gyrus (SMG) have been implicated in the dynamic control of actions. In 12 right-handed healthy individuals, we applied 30 min of low-frequency (1 Hz) repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) over left rPMd to investigate...... the involvement of left rPMd and SMG in the rapid adjustment of actions guided by visuospatial cues. After rTMS, subjects underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging while making spatially congruent button presses with the right or left index finger in response to a left- or right-sided target. Subjects were...... that left rPMd and SMG-AIP contribute toward dynamic control of actions and demonstrate that low-frequency rTMS can enhance functional coupling between task-relevant brain regions and improve some aspects of motor performance....

  14. ER stress stimulates production of the key antimicrobial peptide, cathelicidin, by forming a previously unidentified intracellular S1P signaling complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyungho; Ikushiro, Hiroko; Seo, Ho Seong; Shin, Kyong-Oh; Kim, Young Il; Kim, Jong Youl; Lee, Yong-Moon; Yano, Takato; Holleran, Walter M; Elias, Peter; Uchida, Yoshikazu

    2016-03-08

    We recently identified a previously unidentified sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) signaling mechanism that stimulates production of a key innate immune element, cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide (CAMP), in mammalian cells exposed to external perturbations, such as UVB irradiation and other oxidative stressors that provoke subapoptotic levels of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, independent of the well-known vitamin D receptor-dependent mechanism. ER stress increases cellular ceramide and one of its distal metabolites, S1P, which activates NF-κB followed by C/EBPα activation, leading to CAMP production, but in a S1P receptor-independent fashion. We now show that S1P activates NF-κB through formation of a previously unidentified signaling complex, consisting of S1P, TRAF2, and RIP1 that further associates with three stress-responsive proteins; i.e., heat shock proteins (GRP94 and HSP90α) and IRE1α. S1P specifically interacts with the N-terminal domain of heat shock proteins. Because this ER stress-initiated mechanism is operative in both epithelial cells and macrophages, it appears to be a universal, highly conserved response, broadly protective against diverse external perturbations that lead to increased ER stress. Finally, these studies further illuminate how ER stress and S1P orchestrate critical stress-specific signals that regulate production of one protective response by stimulating production of the key innate immune element, CAMP.

  15. Stimulated Raman scattering and ion dynamics: the role of Langmuir wave non-linearities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnaud, G.; Pesme, D.

    1988-02-01

    The non-linear evolution of stimulated Raman scattering by coupling of the SRS-driven Langmuir waves to ion acoustic waves is studied numerically, in a homogeneous density laser-irradiated plasma. The coupled wave amplitude behaviour is represented either by envelope equations or by complete wave-like equations. The various physical phenomena which are involved are described. This preliminary work has been presented at the 17th Anomalous Absorption Conference, held in last May, in Lake Tahoe City (USA) [fr

  16. Demonstrating the potential for dynamic auditory stimulation to contribute to motion sickness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behrang Keshavarz

    Full Text Available Auditory cues can create the illusion of self-motion (vection in the absence of visual or physical stimulation. The present study aimed to determine whether auditory cues alone can also elicit motion sickness and how auditory cues contribute to motion sickness when added to visual motion stimuli. Twenty participants were seated in front of a curved projection display and were exposed to a virtual scene that constantly rotated around the participant's vertical axis. The virtual scene contained either visual-only, auditory-only, or a combination of corresponding visual and auditory cues. All participants performed all three conditions in a counterbalanced order. Participants tilted their heads alternately towards the right or left shoulder in all conditions during stimulus exposure in order to create pseudo-Coriolis effects and to maximize the likelihood for motion sickness. Measurements of motion sickness (onset, severity, vection (latency, strength, duration, and postural steadiness (center of pressure were recorded. Results showed that adding auditory cues to the visual stimuli did not, on average, affect motion sickness and postural steadiness, but it did reduce vection onset times and increased vection strength compared to pure visual or pure auditory stimulation. Eighteen of the 20 participants reported at least slight motion sickness in the two conditions including visual stimuli. More interestingly, six participants also reported slight motion sickness during pure auditory stimulation and two of the six participants stopped the pure auditory test session due to motion sickness. The present study is the first to demonstrate that motion sickness may be caused by pure auditory stimulation, which we refer to as "auditorily induced motion sickness".

  17. Using Mouse and Keyboard Dynamics to Detect Cognitive Stress During Mental Arithmetic

    OpenAIRE

    Ayesh, Aladdin, 1972-; Stacey, Martin; Lim, Yee Mei

    2015-01-01

    To build a personalized e-learning system that can deliver adaptive learning content based on student’s cognitive effort and efficiency, it is important to develop a construct that can help measuring perceived mental state, such as stress and cognitive load. The construct must be able to be quantified, computerized and automated. Our research investigates how mouse and keyboard dynamics analyses could be used to detect cognitive stress, which is induced by high mental arithmetic demand with t...

  18. Local Segmental Dynamics and Stresses in Polystyrene - C$_{60}$ Mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Vogiatzis, Georgios G.; Theodorou, Doros N.

    2014-01-01

    The polymer dynamics of homogeneous C$_{60}$-polystyrene mixtures in the molten state are studied via molecular simulations using two interconnected levels of representation for polystyrene nanocomposites: (a) A coarse-grained representation, in which each polystyrene repeat unit is mapped into a single "superatom" and each fullerene is viewed as a spherical shell. Equilibration of coarse-grained polymer-nanoparticle systems at all length scales is achieved via connectivity-altering Monte Car...

  19. Utilization of the molecular dynamic to study the effect of hydrogen in the stress corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnoux, P.

    2007-01-01

    Many microscopic and theoretical models of stress corrosion have been proposed, in particularly to explain the grain boundary cracking of stainless steels and nickel base. In this work calculus of molecular dynamic have been used to propose a mechanism of stress corrosion at the atomic scale. The author aims to reproduce, by molecular dynamic, the mechanism of an open crack in irradiated stainless steel in PWR reactor and show that the growth of the oxide at the crack back produce hydrogen. (A.L.B.)

  20. Mean-Field Scenario for the Athermal Creep Dynamics of Yield-Stress Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chen; Martens, Kirsten; Barrat, Jean-Louis

    2018-01-01

    We develop a theoretical description based on an existent mean-field model for the transient dynamics prior to the steady flow of yielding materials. The mean-field model not only reproduces the experimentally observed nonlinear time dependence of the shear-rate response to an external stress, but also allows for the determination of the different physical processes involved in the onset of the reacceleration phase after the initial slowing down and a distinct fluidization phase. The fluidization time displays a power-law dependence on the distance of the applied stress to an age-dependent yield stress, which is not universal but strongly dependent on initial conditions.

  1. Single-blind, randomized, controlled trial of pelvic floor muscle training, electrical stimulation, vaginal cones, and no active treatment in the management of stress urinary incontinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo A. Castro

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To compare the effectiveness of pelvic floor exercises, electrical stimulation, vaginal cones, and no active treatment in women with urodynamic stress urinary incontinence. PATIENTS AND METHODS: One hundred eighteen subjects were randomly selected to recieve pelvic floor exercises (n=31, ES (n=30, vaginal cones (n=27, or no treatment (untreated control (n=30. Women were evaluated before and after completion of six months of treatment by the pad test, quality of life questionnaire (I-QOL, urodynamic test, voiding diary, and subjective response. RESULTS: In the objective evaluation, we observed a statistically significant reduction in the pad test (p=0.003, in the number of stress urinary episodes (p<0.001, and a significant improvement in the quality of life (p<0.001 in subjects who used pelvic floor exercises, electrical stimulation, and vaginal cones compared to the control group. No significant difference was found between groups in the urodynamic parameters. In the subjective evaluation, 58%, 55%, and 54% of women who had used pelvic floor exercises, electrical stimulation, and vaginal cones, respectively, reported being satisfied after treatment. In the control group, only 21% patients were satisfied with the treatment. CONCLUSION: Based on this study, pelvic floor exercises, electrical stimulation, and vaginal cones are equally effective treatments and are far superior to no treatment in women with urodynamic stress urinary incontinence.

  2. Shearographic System for Dynamic Analysis of Materials under Heat Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson A. Correa-Rojas

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Shearography is a tool for monitoring and inspecting of structural flaws and imperfections in different types of industrial, automotive and aeronautics applications. It is based on digital correlation of two speckle patterns in two states of interest: with and without load. The technique has the special quality of being very robust against environmental disturbances. We present a shearographic system to analyze the dynamic behavior of the strain that suffers a material in response to changes in temperature throughout the thermal load process.

  3. THE DYNAMIC INTERCONNECTION BETWEEN MAN AND ENVIRONMENT, A FACTOR OF STRESS AND ECO STRESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SIMIONESCU (BARBU IRINA

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The reason for writing this paper is the omnipresence but also the impact of stress in our times. In order to explain why stress has gained an important place in modern history, we need to understand the evolution of medical science and technology, which over the last decades, have taken important steps towards establishing the biological links between stress and human behaviour but also the political and cultural contexts that have endowed with meaning and authority the scientific knowledge. In the same time, we must concentrate on the interaction between the individual and his social and physical environment from a holistic perspective, surpassing the interdisciplinary limits. The term ‘stress’ is used as a metaphor for disasters at a macroeconomic level, when national economies are destabilized and recently it has been associated with the idea of environmental damage. All natural disasters are environmental events, and their impact on human beings (from a psychological, physical, economic and social point of view can be seen as a major eco-stress. It’s essential to understand man`s influence on the environment in order to review the attitude of communities that, under the pretext of modernity, continue to exert destructive actions

  4. Comparison of erythrocyte dynamics in shear flow under different stress-free configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordasco, Daniel; Yazdani, Alireza; Bagchi, Prosenjit

    2014-04-01

    An open question that has persisted for decades is whether the cytoskeleton of a red blood cell is stress-free or under a stress. This question is important in the context of theoretical modeling of cellular motion under a flowing condition where it is necessary to make an assumption about the stress-free state. Here, we present a 3D numerical study to compare the cell dynamics in a simple shear flow under two different stress-free states, a biconcave discocyte representing the resting shape of the cell, and a nearly spherical oblate shape. We find that whether the stress-free states make a significant difference or not depends on the viscosity of the suspending medium. If the viscosity is close to that of blood plasma, the two stress-free states do not show any significant difference in cell dynamics. However, when the suspending medium viscosity is well above that of the physiological range, as in many in vitro studies, the shear rate separating the tank-treading and tumbling dynamics is observed to be higher for the biconcave stress-free state than the spheroidal state. The former shows a strong shape oscillation with repeated departures from the biconcave shape, while the latter shows a nearly stable biconcave shape. It is found that the cell membrane in the biconcave stress-free state is under a compressive stress and a weaker bending force density, leading to a periodic compression of the cell. The shape oscillation then leads to a higher energy barrier against membrane tank-tread leading to an early transition to tumbling. However, if the cells are released with a large off-shear plane angle, the oscillations can be suppressed due to an azimuthal motion of the membrane along the vorticity direction leading to a redistribution of the membrane points and lowering of the energy barrier, which again results in a nearly similar behavior of the cells under the two different stress-free states. A variety of off-shear plane dynamics is observed, namely, rolling

  5. Dynamic strain aging of zircaloy-4 PWR fuel cladding in biaxial stress state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Ki Seong; Lee, Byong Whi

    1989-01-01

    The expanding copper mandrel test performed at three strain rates (3.2x10E-5/s,2.0x10E-6/s and 1.2x10E-7/s) over 553-873 K temperature range by varying the heating rates (8-10deg C/s,1-2deg C/s and 0.5deg C/s) in air and in vacuum (5x10E-5 torr). The yield stress peak, the strain rate sensitivity minimum and the activation volume peaks could be explained in terms of the dynamic strain aging. The activation energy for dynamic strain aging obtained from the yield stress peak temperature and strain rate was 196 KJ/mol and this value was in good agreement with the activation energy for oxygen diffusion in α-zirconium and Zircaloy-2 (207-220KJ/mol). Therefore, oxygen atoms are responsible for the dynamic strain aging which appeared between 573K and 673K. The yield stress increase due to the oxidation was obtained by comparing the yield stress in air with that in vacuum and represented by the percentage increase of yield stress (σ y a -σ y v /σ y v ). The slower the strain rate, the greater the percentage increase occurs. In order to estimate the yield stress of PWR fuel cladding material under the service environment, the yield stress in water was obtained by comparing the oxidation rate in air that in water assuming the relationship between the oxygen pick-up amount and the yield stress increase. (Author)

  6. Simultaneous perineal ultrasound and vaginal pressure measurement prove the action of electrical pudendal nerve stimulation in treating female stress incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Siyou; Zhang, Shujing

    2012-11-01

    Study Type - Diagnostic (case series) Level of Evidence 4. What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? Pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) and transvaginal electrical stimulation (TES) are two commonly used forms of conservative treatment for stress urinary incontinence (SUI). PFMT may build up the structural support of the pelvis, but many SUI patients are unable to perform PFMT effectively and its primary disadvantage is lack of long-term patient compliance. TES is a passive treatment that produces PFM contraction and patient compliance with it is good; however, its effect is not as good as that of PFMT when performed correctly. Electrical pudendal nerve stimulation (EPNS) combines the advantages of PFMT and TES and incorporates the technique of deep insertion of long needles. In this study, simultaneous perineal ultrasound and vaginal pressure measurement prove that EPNS can contract the PFM and simulate PFMT. It is shown that EPNS is an alternative therapy for female SUI patients who fail PFMT and TES and the therapy can also be used for severe SUI. • To prove that electrical pudendal nerve stimulation (EPNS) can contract the pelvic floor muscles (PFM) and simulate pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT). • To show that EPNS is an alternative therapy for female stress urinary incontinence (SUI) that does not respond effectively to PFMT and transvaginal electrical stimulation (TES). • Thirty-five female patients with SUI who did not respond effectively to PFMT and TES (group I) were enrolled and 60 other female patients with SUI were allocated to group II (30 patients) and group III (30 patients). • Long needles were deeply inserted into four sacral points and electrified to stimulate the pudendal nerves. Group I and group II were treated by a doctor skilled in performing EPNS and group III, by a doctor unskilled in performing EPNS. • When EPNS was performed in group I, perineal ultrasonographic PFM movements, vaginal pressure (VP) and PFM

  7. Comparison of dynamic ultrasound and stress radiology for assessment of inferior glenohumeral laxity in asymptomatic shoulders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, S.C.; Wallace, W.A.; Hulse, D.; Fairbairn, K.J.; Clarke, M.

    2008-01-01

    To determine the level of agreement between dynamic ultrasound imaging and stress radiography used for the measurement of inferior glenohumeral laxity in asymptomatic shoulders, and to determine the repeatability of the dynamic ultrasound technique. Using a custom-made stress device to apply an inferior displacement force of 90 N, we assessed 20 asymptomatic male subjects for inferior glenohumeral laxity, using stress radiography and dynamic ultrasound. Paired differences between the two methods were evaluated by the 95% limits of agreement method. At a separate session, 19 subjects had inferior glenohumeral laxity assessed by two observers, using dynamic ultrasound. Inter- and intra-observer repeatability was determined for the ultrasound technique. The mean [± standard deviation (SD)] inferior translation was 4.7 ± 4.1 mm by stress radiography and 4.4 ± 2.3 mm by dynamic ultrasound. The 95% limits of agreement showed good agreement between the two methods. The paired difference between the two measurement methods varied with the magnitude of the measurement (P < 0.001). Intra-observer repeatability of dynamic ultrasound was determined by the use of intra-class correlation coefficients and was 0.94 and 0.89 for the two investigators. Inter-observer repeatability was 0.85. The standard error of the measurement was 0.60 mm and 0.66 mm, for repeated measurements by the two investigators, and 0.85 mm between investigators. Repeatability coefficients demonstrated excellent consistency of measurement between sessions and good consistency between observers. Dynamic ultrasound is a valid and reproducible method for the assessment and quantification of inferior glenohumeral laxity. (orig.)

  8. Propagating stress-pulses and wiggling transition revealed in string dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhenwei

    2018-02-01

    Understanding string dynamics yields insights into the intricate dynamic behaviors of various filamentary thin structures in nature and industry covering multiple length scales. In this work, we investigate the planar dynamics of a flexible string where one end is free and the other end is subject to transverse and longitudinal motions. Under transverse harmonic motion, we reveal the propagating pulse structure in the stress profile over the string, and analyze its role in bringing the system into a chaotic state. For a string where one end is under longitudinal uniform acceleration, we identify the wiggling transition, derive the analytical wiggling solution from the string equations, and present the phase diagram.

  9. A Nonlinear Dynamics-Based Estimator for Functional Electrical Stimulation: Preliminary Results From Lower-Leg Extension Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Marcus; Zhong, Qiang; Kirsch, Nicholas; Dani, Ashwin; Clark, William W; Sharma, Nitin

    2017-12-01

    Miniature inertial measurement units (IMUs) are wearable sensors that measure limb segment or joint angles during dynamic movements. However, IMUs are generally prone to drift, external magnetic interference, and measurement noise. This paper presents a new class of nonlinear state estimation technique called state-dependent coefficient (SDC) estimation to accurately predict joint angles from IMU measurements. The SDC estimation method uses limb dynamics, instead of limb kinematics, to estimate the limb state. Importantly, the nonlinear limb dynamic model is formulated into state-dependent matrices that facilitate the estimator design without performing a Jacobian linearization. The estimation method is experimentally demonstrated to predict knee joint angle measurements during functional electrical stimulation of the quadriceps muscle. The nonlinear knee musculoskeletal model was identified through a series of experiments. The SDC estimator was then compared with an extended kalman filter (EKF), which uses a Jacobian linearization and a rotation matrix method, which uses a kinematic model instead of the dynamic model. Each estimator's performance was evaluated against the true value of the joint angle, which was measured through a rotary encoder. The experimental results showed that the SDC estimator, the rotation matrix method, and EKF had root mean square errors of 2.70°, 2.86°, and 4.42°, respectively. Our preliminary experimental results show the new estimator's advantage over the EKF method but a slight advantage over the rotation matrix method. However, the information from the dynamic model allows the SDC method to use only one IMU to measure the knee angle compared with the rotation matrix method that uses two IMUs to estimate the angle.

  10. Comparison of soluble guanylate cyclase stimulators and activators in models of cardiovascular disease associated with oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa H Costell

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC, the primary mediator of nitric oxide (NO bioactivity, exists as reduced (NO-sensitive and oxidized (NO-insensitive forms. We tested the hypothesis that the cardiovascular protective effects of NO-insensitive sGC activation would be potentiated under conditions of oxidative stress compared to NO-sensitive sGC stimulation. The cardiovascular effects of the NO-insensitive sGC activator GSK2181236A (a non-depressor dose and a higher dose which lowered mean arterial pressure [MAP] by 5-10mmHg and equi-efficacious doses of the NO-sensitive sGC stimulator BAY 60-4552 were assessed in Sprague Dawley rats during coronary artery ischemia/reperfusion (I/R and spontaneously hypertensive stroke prone rats (SHR-SP on a high salt/fat diet (HSFD. In I/R, neither compound reduced infarct size. In SHR-SP, HSFD increased MAP, urine output, microalbuminuria and mortality, caused left ventricular hypertrophy and impaired endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation. The low dose of BAY 60-4552 but not GSK2181236A decreased urine output and mortality. Conversely, the low dose of GSK2181236A attenuated cardiac hypertrophy. The high doses of both compounds similarly attenuated cardiac hypertrophy and mortality. In addition, the high dose of BAY 60-4552 reduced urine output, microalbuminuria and MAP. Neither compound improved endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation. In SHR-SP aorta, the vasodilatory responses to the NO-dependent compounds carbachol and sodium nitroprusside were attenuated by HSFD. In contrast, the vasodilatory responses to GSK2181236A and BAY 60-4552 were unaltered by HSFD, indicating that reduced NO-bioavailability and not changes in the sGC oxidative state is responsible for the vascular dysfunction. In summary, GSK2181236A and BAY 60-4552 provide partial benefit against hypertension-induced end organ damage. The differential beneficial effects observed between these compounds could reflect tissue-specific changes in the s

  11. Effects of moving dynamic tyre loads on tyre-pavement contact stresses

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Steyn, WJvdM

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to indicate the effect that moving dynamic tyre loads has on the tyre-pavement contact stresses used in pavement analysis. Traditionally tyre loads (in pavement analysis) are modelled as constant loads applied through...

  12. Ultrafast Dynamics in Light-Driven Molecular Rotary Motors Probed by Femtosecond Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hall, Christopher R.; Conyard, Jamie; Heisler, Ismael A.; Jones, Garth; Frost, James; Browne, Wesley R.; Feringa, Ben L.; Meech, Stephen R.

    2017-01-01

    Photochemical isomerization in sterically crowded chiral alkenes is the driving force for molecular rotary motors in nanoscale machines. Here the excited-state dynamics and structural evolution of the prototypical light-driven rotary motor are followed on the ultrafast time scale by femtosecond

  13. Death and population dynamics affect mutation rate estimates and evolvability under stress in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenoy, Antoine; Bonhoeffer, Sebastian

    2018-05-01

    The stress-induced mutagenesis hypothesis postulates that in response to stress, bacteria increase their genome-wide mutation rate, in turn increasing the chances that a descendant is able to better withstand the stress. This has implications for antibiotic treatment: exposure to subinhibitory doses of antibiotics has been reported to increase bacterial mutation rates and thus probably the rate at which resistance mutations appear and lead to treatment failure. More generally, the hypothesis posits that stress increases evolvability (the ability of a population to generate adaptive genetic diversity) and thus accelerates evolution. Measuring mutation rates under stress, however, is problematic, because existing methods assume there is no death. Yet subinhibitory stress levels may induce a substantial death rate. Death events need to be compensated by extra replication to reach a given population size, thus providing more opportunities to acquire mutations. We show that ignoring death leads to a systematic overestimation of mutation rates under stress. We developed a system based on plasmid segregation that allows us to measure death and division rates simultaneously in bacterial populations. Using this system, we found that a substantial death rate occurs at the tested subinhibitory concentrations previously reported to increase mutation rate. Taking this death rate into account lowers and sometimes removes the signal for stress-induced mutagenesis. Moreover, even when antibiotics increase mutation rate, we show that subinhibitory treatments do not increase genetic diversity and evolvability, again because of effects of the antibiotics on population dynamics. We conclude that antibiotic-induced mutagenesis is overestimated because of death and that understanding evolvability under stress requires accounting for the effects of stress on population dynamics as much as on mutation rate. Our goal here is dual: we show that population dynamics and, in particular, the

  14. Effects of gas periodic stimulation on key enzyme activity in gas double-dynamic solid state fermentation (GDD-SSF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongzhang; Shao, Meixue; Li, Hongqiang

    2014-03-05

    The heat and mass transfer have been proved to be the important factors in air pressure pulsation for cellulase production. However, as process of enzyme secretion, the cellulase formation has not been studied in the view of microorganism metabolism and metabolic key enzyme activity under air pressure pulsation condition. Two fermentation methods in ATPase activity, cellulase productivity, weight lose rate and membrane permeability were systematically compared. Results indicated that gas double-dynamic solid state fermentation had no obviously effect on cell membrane permeability. However, the relation between ATPase activity and weight loss rate was linearly dependent with r=0.9784. Meanwhile, the results also implied that gas periodic stimulation had apparently strengthened microbial metabolism through increasing ATPase activity during gas double-dynamic solid state fermentation, resulting in motivating the production of cellulase by Trichoderma reesei YG3. Therefore, the increase of ATPase activity would be another crucial factor to strengthen fermentation process for cellulase production under gas double-dynamic solid state fermentation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. In vitro stimulation of vascular endothelial growth factor by borate-based glass fibers under dynamic flow conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sisi; Yang, Qingbo; Brow, Richard K; Liu, Kun; Brow, Katherine A; Ma, Yinfa; Shi, Honglan

    2017-04-01

    Bioactive borate glass has been recognized to have both hard and soft tissue repair and regeneration capabilities through stimulating both osteogenesis and angiogenesis. However, the underlying biochemical and cellular mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, dynamic flow culturing modules were designed to simulate the micro-environment near the vascular depletion and hyperplasia area in wound-healing regions, thus to better investigate the mechanisms underlying the biocompatibility and functionality of borate-based glass materials. Glass fibers were dosed either upstream or in contact with the pre-seeded cells in the dynamic flow module. Two types of borate glasses, doped with (1605) or without (13-93B3) CuO and ZnO, were studied along with the silicate-based glass, 45S5. Substantial fiber dissolution in cell culture medium was observed, leading to the release of ions (boron, sodium and potassium) and the deposition of a calcium phosphate phase. Different levels of vascular endothelial growth factor secretion were observed from cells exposed to these three glass fibers, and the copper/zinc containing borate 1605 fibers exhibited the most positive influence. These results indicate that dynamic studies of in vitro bioactivity provide useful information to understand the in vivo response to bioactive borate glasses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Stress and Systemic Inflammation: Yin-Yang Dynamics in Health and Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Qing

    2018-01-01

    Studies in psychoneuroimmunology (PNI) would provide better insights into the "whole mind-body system." Systems biology models of the complex adaptive systems (CASs), such as a conceptual framework of "Yin-Yang dynamics," may be helpful for identifying systems-based biomarkers and targets for more effective prevention and treatment. The disturbances in the Yin-Yang dynamical balance may result in stress, inflammation, and various disorders including insomnia, Alzheimer's disease, obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, skin disorders, and cancer. At the molecular and cellular levels, the imbalances in the cytokine pathways, mitochondria networks, redox systems, and various signaling pathways may contribute to systemic inflammation. In the nervous system, Yin and Yang may represent the dynamical associations between the progressive and regressive processes in aging and neurodegenerative diseases. In response to the damages to the heart, the Yin-Yang dynamical balance between proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokine networks is crucial. The studies of cancer have revealed the importance of the Yin-Yang dynamics in the tumoricidal and tumorigenic activities of the immune system. Stress-induced neuroimmune imbalances are also essential in chronic skin disorders including atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. With the integrative framework, the restoration of the Yin-Yang dynamics can become the objective of dynamical systems medicine.

  17. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) insights into agitation stress methods in biopharmaceutical development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Ge; Bee, Jared S; Biddlecombe, James G; Chen, Quanmin; Leach, W Thomas

    2012-02-28

    Agitation of small amounts of liquid is performed routinely in biopharmaceutical process, formulation, and packaging development. Protein degradation commonly results from agitation, but the specific stress responsible or degradation mechanism is usually not well understood. Characterization of the agitation stress methods is critical to identifying protein degradation mechanisms or specific sensitivities. In this study, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was used to model agitation of 1 mL of fluid by four types of common laboratory agitation instruments, including a rotator, orbital shaker, magnetic stirrer and vortex mixer. Fluid stresses in the bulk liquid and near interfaces were identified, quantified and compared. The vortex mixer provides the most intense stresses overall, while the stir bar system presented locally intense shear proximal to the hydrophobic stir bar surface. The rotator provides gentler fluid stresses, but the air-water interfacial area and surface stresses are relatively high given its low rotational frequency. The orbital shaker provides intermediate-level stresses but with the advantage of a large stable platform for consistent vial-to-vial homogeneity. Selection of experimental agitation methods with targeted types and intensities of stresses can facilitate better understanding of protein degradation mechanisms and predictability for "real world" applications. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Internal stress evolution in Fe laths deformed at low temperature analysed by dislocation dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaussidon, Julien; Fivel, Marc; Robertson, Christian; Marini, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    Stress evolution in Fe laths undergoing plastic deformation is investigated using three-dimensional dislocation dynamics simulations adapted to body centred cubic crystals, in the ductile to brittle transition temperature range. The selected boundary conditions, applied stress tensor and initial dislocation structures account for the realistic microstructure observed in bainitic steels. The effective stress field projected in the three different {1 0 0}cleavage planes is calculated for two different temperatures (50 and 200 K) and presented quantitatively, in the form of stress/frequency diagrams. It is shown that plastic activity tends to relax the stress acting in certain cleavage planes (the (0 1 0) and (0 0 1) planes) while, at the same time, amplifying the stress acting in other cleavage planes (the (1 0 0) planes). The selective stress amplification in the latter planes depends on the applied load direction, in combination with the limited set of available slip systems and the lath geometry. In the examined configuration, this selection effect is more pronounced with decreasing temperature, emphasizing the role of thermally activated plasticity on deformation-induced stress concentrations

  19. Distribution of Side Abutment Stress in Roadway Subjected to Dynamic Pressure and Its Engineering Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Qiangling

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The borehole stress-meter was employed in this study to investigate the distribution of the side abutment stress in roadway subjected to dynamic pressure. The results demonstrate that the side abutment stress of the mining roadway reaches a peak value when the distance to the gob is 8 m and the distribution curve of the side abutment stress can be divided into three zones: stress rising zone, stress stabilizing zone, and stress decreasing zone. Further numerical investigation was carried out to study the effect of the coal mass strength, coal seam depth, immediate roof strength, and thickness on the distribution of the side abutment stress. Based on the research results, we determined the reasonable position of the mining roadway and the optimal width of the barrier pillar. The engineering application demonstrates that the retention of the barrier pillar with a width of 5 m along the gob as the haulage roadway for the next panel is feasible, which delivers favorable technological and economic benefits.

  20. Comparing of Normal Stress Distribution in Static and Dynamic Soil-Structure Interaction Analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kholdebarin, Alireza; Massumi, Ali; Davoodi, Mohammad; Tabatabaiefar, Hamid Reza

    2008-01-01

    It is important to consider the vertical component of earthquake loading and inertia force in soil-structure interaction analyses. In most circumstances, design engineers are primarily concerned about the analysis of behavior of foundations subjected to earthquake-induced forces transmitted from the bedrock. In this research, a single rigid foundation with designated geometrical parameters located on sandy-clay soil has been modeled in FLAC software with Finite Different Method and subjected to three different vertical components of earthquake records. In these cases, it is important to evaluate effect of footing on underlying soil and to consider normal stress in soil with and without footing. The distribution of normal stress under the footing in static and dynamic states has been studied and compared. This Comparison indicated that, increasing in normal stress under the footing caused by vertical component of ground excitations, has decreased dynamic vertical settlement in comparison with static state

  1. Time-resolved stimulated emission depletion and energy transfer dynamics in two-photon excited EGFP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, T. A.; Robinson, N. A.; Marsh, R. J.; Blacker, T. S.; Armoogum, D. A.; Larijani, B.; Bain, A. J.

    2018-04-01

    Time and polarization-resolved stimulated emission depletion (STED) measurements are used to investigate excited state evolution following the two-photon excitation of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). We employ a new approach for the accurate STED measurement of the hitherto unmeasured degree of hexadecapolar transition dipole moment alignment ⟨α40 ⟩ present at a given excitation-depletion (pump-dump) pulse separation. Time-resolved polarized fluorescence measurements as a function of pump-dump delay reveal the time evolution of ⟨α40 ⟩ to be considerably more rapid than predicted for isotropic rotational diffusion in EGFP. Additional depolarization by homo-Förster resonance energy transfer is investigated for both ⟨α20 ⟩ (quadrupolar) and ⟨α40 ⟩ transition dipole alignments. These results point to the utility of higher order dipole correlation measurements in the investigation of resonance energy transfer processes.

  2. Stimulated Raman scattering and ion dynamics: the role of Langmuir wave non-linearities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnaud, G.; Pesme, D.

    1987-01-01

    The saturation of the Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) is studied by means of wave-coupling numerical simulations. A new code (CHEOPS) has been designed in order to model these couplings, in real 1-D space, with aperiodic boundary conditions. Each wave can be represented either by a complete amplitude or by an envelope amplitude only. The choice of the wave set to be coupled allows to investigate separately some mechanisms relevant in long time SRS evolution. The various mechanisms which may inhibit SRS growth are reviewed and the SRS saturation scenarios are exhibited in an homogeneous density plasma slab. The ion dependent mechanisms appear to be the most efficient ones to saturate SRS. Their importance is strongly bound to the electron temperature and to the ion fluctuation level at time when SRS has already grown many e-foldings

  3. Glucose-stimulated calcium dynamics in islets of Langerhans in acute mouse pancreas tissue slices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andraž Stožer

    Full Text Available In endocrine cells within islets of Langerhans calcium ions couple cell stimulation to hormone secretion. Since the advent of modern fluorimetry, numerous in vitro studies employing primarily isolated mouse islets have investigated the effects of various secretagogues on cytoplasmic calcium, predominantly in insulin-secreting beta cells. Due to technical limitations, insights of these studies are inherently limited to a rather small subpopulation of outermost cells. The results also seem to depend on various factors, like culture conditions and duration, and are not always easily reconcilable with findings in vivo. The main controversies regard the types of calcium oscillations, presence of calcium waves, and the level of synchronized activity. Here, we set out to combine the in situ acute mouse pancreas tissue slice preparation with noninvasive fluorescent calcium labeling and subsequent confocal laser scanning microscopy to shed new light on the existing controversies utilizing an innovative approach enabling the characterization of responses in many cells from all layers of islets. Our experiments reproducibly showed stable fast calcium oscillations on a sustained plateau rather than slow oscillations as the predominant type of response in acute tissue slices, and that calcium waves are the mechanistic substrate for synchronization of oscillations. We also found indirect evidence that even a large amplitude calcium signal was not sufficient and that metabolic activation was necessary to ensure cell synchronization upon stimulation with glucose. Our novel method helped resolve existing controversies and showed the potential to help answer important physiological questions, making it one of the methods of choice for the foreseeable future.

  4. Dynamic functional connectivity and individual differences in emotions during social stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobia, Michael J; Hayashi, Koby; Ballard, Grey; Gotlib, Ian H; Waugh, Christian E

    2017-12-01

    Exposure to acute stress induces multiple emotional responses, each with their own unique temporal dynamics. Dynamic functional connectivity (dFC) measures the temporal variability of network synchrony and captures individual differences in network neurodynamics. This study investigated the relationship between dFC and individual differences in emotions induced by an acute psychosocial stressor. Sixteen healthy adult women underwent fMRI scanning during a social evaluative threat (SET) task, and retrospectively completed questionnaires that assessed individual differences in subjectively experienced positive and negative emotions about stress and stress relief during the task. Group dFC was decomposed with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) into 10 components, each with a temporal signature, spatial network of functionally connected regions, and vector of participant loadings that captures individual differences in dFC. Participant loadings of two networks were positively correlated with stress-related emotions, indicating the existence of networks for positive and negative emotions. The emotion-related networks involved the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, cingulate cortex, anterior insula, and amygdala, among other distributed brain regions, and time signatures for these emotion-related networks were uncorrelated. These findings demonstrate that individual differences in stress-induced positive and negative emotions are each uniquely associated with large-scale brain networks, and suggest that dFC is a mechanism that generates individual differences in the emotional components of the stress response. Hum Brain Mapp 38:6185-6205, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Electroconvulsive stimulations prevent chronic stress-induced increases in L-type calcium channel mRNAs in the hippocampus and basolateral amygdala

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maigaard, Katrine; Pedersen, Ida Hageman; Jørgensen, Anders

    2012-01-01

    Although affective disorders have high prevalence, morbidity and mortality, we do not fully understand disease etiopathology, nor have we determined the exact mechanisms by which treatment works. Recent research indicates that intracellular calcium ion dysfunction might be involved. Here we use...... the chronic restraint stress model of affective disorder (6 h restraint per day for 21 days) in combination with electroconvulsive stimulations to examine the effects of stress and an effective antidepressive treatment modality on L-type voltage gated calcium channel subunit mRNA expression patterns...... in the brain. We find that stress tended to upregulate Ca(v)1.2 and Ca(v)1.3 channels in a brain region specific manner, while ECS tended to normalise this effect. This was more pronounced for Ca(v)1.2 channels, where stress clearly increased expression in both the basolateral amygdala, dentate gyrus and CA3...

  6. Sonomyography Analysis on Thickness of Skeletal Muscle During Dynamic Contraction Induced by Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Shuang; Feng, Jing; Xu, Jiapeng; Xu, Rui; Zhao, Xin; Zhou, Peng; Qi, Hongzhi; Zhang, Lixin; Ming, Dong

    2017-01-01

    Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) that stimulates skeletal muscles to induce contractions has been widely applied to restore functions of paralyzed muscles. However, the architectural changes of stimulated muscles induced by NMES are still not well understood. The present study applies sonomyography (SMG) to evaluate muscle architecture under NMES-induced and voluntary movements. The quadriceps muscles of seven healthy subjects were tested for eight cycles during an extension exercise of the knee joint with/without NMES, and SMG and the knee joint angle were recorded during the process of knee extension. A least squares support vector machine (LS-SVM) LS-SVM model was developed and trained using the data sets of six cycles collected under NMES, while the remaining data was used to test. Muscle thickness changes were extracted from ultrasound images and compared between NMES-induced and voluntary contractions, and LS-SVM was used to model a relationship between dynamical knee joint angles and SMG signals. Muscle thickness showed to be significantly correlated with joint angle in NMES-induced contractions, and a significant negative correlation was observed between Vastus intermedius (VI) thickness and rectus femoris (RF) thickness. In addition, there was a significant difference between voluntary and NMES-induced contractions . The LS-SVM model based on RF thickness and knee joint angle provided superior performance compared with the model based on VI thickness and knee joint angle or total thickness and knee joint angle. This suggests that a strong relation exists between the RF thickness and knee joint angle. These results provided direct evidence for the potential application of RF thickness in optimizing NMES system as well as measuring muscle state under NMES.

  7. Stress relaxation in vanadium under shock and shockless dynamic compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanel, G. I.; Razorenov, S. V.; Garkushin, G. V.; Savinykh, A. S.; Zaretsky, E. B.

    2015-01-01

    Evolutions of elastic-plastic waves have been recorded in three series of plate impact experiments with annealed vanadium samples under conditions of shockless and combined ramp and shock dynamic compression. The shaping of incident wave profiles was realized using intermediate base plates made of different silicate glasses through which the compression waves were entered into the samples. Measurements of the free surface velocity histories revealed an apparent growth of the Hugoniot elastic limit with decreasing average rate of compression. The growth was explained by “freezing” of the elastic precursor decay in the area of interaction of the incident and reflected waves. A set of obtained data show that the current value of the Hugoniot elastic limit and plastic strain rate is rather associated with the rate of the elastic precursor decay than with the local rate of compression. The study has revealed the contributions of dislocation multiplications in elastic waves. It has been shown that independently of the compression history the material arrives at the minimum point between the elastic and plastic waves with the same density of mobile dislocations

  8. The Role of Molecular Microtubule Motors and the Microtubule Cytoskeleton in Stress Granule Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen M. Bartoli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress granules (SGs are cytoplasmic foci that appear in cells exposed to stress-induced translational inhibition. SGs function as a triage center, where mRNAs are sorted for storage, degradation, and translation reinitiation. The underlying mechanisms of SGs dynamics are still being characterized, although many key players have been identified. The main components of SGs are stalled 48S preinitiation complexes. To date, many other proteins have also been found to localize in SGs and are hypothesized to function in SG dynamics. Most recently, the microtubule cytoskeleton and associated motor proteins have been demonstrated to function in SG dynamics. In this paper, we will discuss current literature examining the function of microtubules and the molecular microtubule motors in SG assembly, coalescence, movement, composition, organization, and disassembly.

  9. Investigation of NAA and NAAG dynamics underlying visual stimulation using MEGA-PRESS in a functional MRS experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landim, Ricardo C G; Edden, Richard A E; Foerster, Bernd; Li, Li Min; Covolan, Roberto J M; Castellano, Gabriela

    2016-04-01

    N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA) is responsible for the majority of the most prominent peak in (1)H-MR spectra, and has been used as diagnostic marker for several pathologies. However, ~10% of this peak can be attributed to N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate (NAAG), a neuropeptide whose release may be triggered by intense neuronal activation. Separate measurement of NAA and NAAG using MRS is difficult due to large superposition of their spectra. Specifically, in functional MRS (fMRS) experiments, most work has evaluated the sum NAA+NAAG, which does not appear to change during experiments. The aim of this work was to design and perform an fMRS experiment using visual stimulation and a spectral editing sequence, MEGA-PRESS, to further evaluate the individual dynamics of NAA and NAAG during brain activation. The functional paradigm used consisted of three blocks, starting with a rest (baseline) block of 320 s, followed by a stimulus block (640 s) and a rest block (640 s). Twenty healthy subjects participated in this study. On average, subjects followed a pattern of NAA decrease and NAAG increase during stimulation, with a tendency to return to basal levels at the end of the paradigm, with a peak NAA decrease of -(21±19)% and a peak NAAG increase of (64±62)% (Wilcoxon test, pNAA and glutamate; 2) a relationship between NAAG and the BOLD response. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Dynamic high pressure induced strong and weak hydrogen bonds enhanced by pre-resonance stimulated Raman scattering in liquid water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shenghan; Fang, Wenhui; Li, Fabing; Gong, Nan; Li, Zhanlong; Li, Zuowei; Sun, Chenglin; Men, Zhiwei

    2017-12-11

    355 nm pulsed laser is employed to excite pre-resonance forward stimulated Raman scattering (FSRS) of liquid water at ambient temperature. Due to the shockwave induced dynamic high pressure, the obtained Raman spectra begin to exhibit double peaks distribution at 3318 and 3373 cm -1 with the input energy of 17 mJ,which correspond with OH stretching vibration with strong and weak hydrogen (H) bonds. With laser energy rising from 17 to 27 mJ, the Stokes line at 3318 cm -1 shifts to 3255 and 3230 cm -1 because of the high pressure being enlarged. When the energy is up to 32 mJ, only 3373 cm -1 peak exists. The strong and weak H bond exhibit quite different energy dependent behaviors.

  11. Contraction-stimulated glucose transport in muscle is controlled by AMPK and mechanical stress but not sarcoplasmatic reticulum Ca2+ release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thomas Elbenhardt; Sylow, Lykke; Rose, Adam John

    2014-01-01

    signals through proteins such as AMPK. Here, we demonstrate in incubated mouse muscle that Ca(2+) release is neither sufficient nor strictly necessary to increase glucose transport. Rather, the glucose transport response is associated with metabolic feedback signals through AMPK, and mechanical stress......-activated signals. Furthermore, artificial stimulation of AMPK combined with passive stretch of muscle is additive and sufficient to elicit the full contraction glucose transport response. These results suggest that ATP-turnover and mechanical stress feedback are sufficient to fully increase glucose transport...

  12. Short-term salt stress strongly affects dynamic photosynthesis, but not steady-state photosynthesis, in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Yuqi; Kaiser, Elias; Zhang, Yating; Yang, Qichang; Li, Tao

    2018-01-01

    Salt stress occurs worldwide due to widespread soil salinization. Also, plants are often subjected to rapidly alternating periods of sun and shade (sunflecks). Despite this combined occurrence of salt stress and sunflecks, dynamic photosynthetic responses to sunflecks under salt stress remain

  13. The influence of N-acetyl-L-cysteine on oxidative stress and nitric oxide synthesis in stimulated macrophages treated with a mustard gas analogue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Milton

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sulphur mustard gas, 2, 2'-dichlorodiethyl sulphide (HD, is a chemical warfare agent. Both mustard gas and its monofunctional analogue, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulphide (CEES, are alkylating agents that react with and diminish cellular thiols and are highly toxic. Previously, we reported that lipopolysaccharide (LPS significantly enhances the cytotoxicity of CEES in murine RAW 264.7 macrophages and that CEES transiently inhibits nitric oxide (NO production via suppression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS protein expression. NO generation is an important factor in wound healing. In this paper, we explored the hypotheses that LPS increases CEES toxicity by increasing oxidative stress and that treatment with N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC would block LPS induced oxidative stress and protect against loss of NO production. NAC stimulates glutathione (GSH synthesis and also acts directly as a free radical scavenger. The potential therapeutic use of the antibiotic, polymyxin B, was also evaluated since it binds to LPS and could thereby block the enhancement of CEES toxicity by LPS and also inhibit the secondary infections characteristic of HD/CEES wounds. Results We found that 10 mM NAC, when administered simultaneously or prior to treatment with 500 μM CEES, increased the viability of LPS stimulated macrophages. Surprisingly, NAC failed to protect LPS stimulated macrophages from CEES induced loss of NO production. Macrophages treated with both LPS and CEES show increased oxidative stress parameters (cellular thiol depletion and increased protein carbonyl levels. NAC effectively protected RAW 264.7 cells simultaneously treated with CEES and LPS from GSH loss and oxidative stress. Polymyxin B was found to partially block nitric oxide production and diminish CEES toxicity in LPS-treated macrophages. Conclusion The present study shows that oxidative stress is an important mechanism contributing to CEES toxicity in LPS stimulated macrophages and

  14. Dynamic changes in left ventricular function during cold pressor stimulation assessed with gold-195m

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dymond, D.S.; Caplin, J.; Flatman, W.

    1985-01-01

    The temporal changes in left ventricular function induced by cold pressor stimulation were assessed in 12 normal controls and 12 patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) by rapid, sequential first-pass nuclear angiography with gold-195m. Imaging was performed at rest, after 1, 2.5, and 4 min of cold pressor and after 2 min of recovery. After 1 min, LVEF (left ventricular ejection fraction) fell significantly in normals and in patients but only in the coronary patients was a significant fall maintained at 2.5 and 4 min. The number of new abnormalities on the regional ejection fraction images for normals and those with CAD, respectively, was 12 and 19 at 1 min, 1 and 21 at 2.5 min, 2 and 13 at 4 min, and 0 and 8 during recovery. The authors conclude that (1) cold pressor-induced depression of left ventricular function is transient in normals but often prolonged in patients with CAD and (2) the temporal dissociation between rise in blood pressure and fall in LVEF suggests factors other than afterload changes may be involved in depression of cardiac function

  15. Lifting the veil on the dynamics of neuronal activities evoked by transcranial magnetic stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bingshuo; Virtanen, Juha P; Oeltermann, Axel; Schwarz, Cornelius; Giese, Martin A; Ziemann, Ulf

    2017-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a widely used non-invasive tool to study and modulate human brain functions. However, TMS-evoked activity of individual neurons has remained largely inaccessible due to the large TMS-induced electromagnetic fields. Here, we present a general method providing direct in vivo electrophysiological access to TMS-evoked neuronal activity 0.8–1 ms after TMS onset. We translated human single-pulse TMS to rodents and unveiled time-grained evoked activities of motor cortex layer V neurons that show high-frequency spiking within the first 6 ms depending on TMS-induced current orientation and a multiphasic spike-rhythm alternating between excitation and inhibition in the 6–300 ms epoch, all of which can be linked to various human TMS responses recorded at the level of spinal cord and muscles. The advance here facilitates a new level of insight into the TMS-brain interaction that is vital for developing this non-invasive tool to purposefully explore and effectively treat the human brain. PMID:29165241

  16. Lifting the veil on the dynamics of neuronal activities evoked by transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bingshuo; Virtanen, Juha P; Oeltermann, Axel; Schwarz, Cornelius; Giese, Martin A; Ziemann, Ulf; Benali, Alia

    2017-11-22

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a widely used non-invasive tool to study and modulate human brain functions. However, TMS-evoked activity of individual neurons has remained largely inaccessible due to the large TMS-induced electromagnetic fields. Here, we present a general method providing direct in vivo electrophysiological access to TMS-evoked neuronal activity 0.8-1 ms after TMS onset. We translated human single-pulse TMS to rodents and unveiled time-grained evoked activities of motor cortex layer V neurons that show high-frequency spiking within the first 6 ms depending on TMS-induced current orientation and a multiphasic spike-rhythm alternating between excitation and inhibition in the 6-300 ms epoch, all of which can be linked to various human TMS responses recorded at the level of spinal cord and muscles. The advance here facilitates a new level of insight into the TMS-brain interaction that is vital for developing this non-invasive tool to purposefully explore and effectively treat the human brain.

  17. Molecular dynamics stimulations to study laser dye aggregation in water (comparison with experiments)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dare-Doyen, St.; Doizi, D.

    2000-01-01

    A laser facility consists of dye laser chains where the active medium is composed of fluorescent dyes dissolved in ethanol. The use of water as a solvent would offer two major advantages: greater safety of the laser facility by drastically reducing fire risks, easier design of the laser beam correcting devices required at the end of the dye laser chains, thanks to the properties of water. Unfortunately, laser dyes exhibit poor optical properties in water, due to the formation of dye aggregates. Molecular dynamics simulations were used to study and develop means to prevent this behavior between two charged species. The results were compared with NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) experiments

  18. Ultrafast table-top dynamic radiography of spontaneous or stimulated events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smilowitz, Laura; Henson, Bryan

    2018-01-16

    Disclosed herein are representative embodiments of methods, apparatus, and systems for performing radiography. For example, certain embodiments concern X-ray radiography of spontaneous events. Particular embodiments of the disclosed technology provide continuous high-speed x-ray imaging of spontaneous dynamic events, such as explosions, reaction-front propagation, and even material failure. Further, in certain embodiments, x-ray activation and data collection activation are triggered by the object itself that is under observation (e.g., triggered by a change of state detected by one or more sensors monitoring the object itself).

  19. Dynamic regulation of NMDAR function in the adult brain by the stress hormone corticosterone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiu Chung eTse

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Stress and corticosteroids dynamically modulate the expression of synaptic plasticity at glutamatergic synapses in the developed brain. Together with alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid receptors (AMPAR, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR are critical mediators of synaptic function and are essential for the induction of many forms of synaptic plasticity. Regulation of NMDAR function by cortisol/corticosterone (CORT may be fundamental to the effects of stress on synaptic plasticity. Recent reports of the efficacy of NMDAR antagonists in treating certain stress-associated psychopathologies further highlight the importance of understanding the regulation of NMDAR function by CORT. Knowledge of how corticosteroids regulate NMDAR function within the adult brain is relatively sparse, perhaps due to a common belief that NMDAR function is relatively stable in the adult brain. We review recent results from our laboratory and others demonstrating dynamic regulation of NMDAR function by CORT in the adult brain. In addition, we consider the issue of how differences in the early life environment may program differential sensitivity to modulation of NMDAR function by CORT and how this may influence synaptic function during stress. Findings from these studies demonstrate that NMDAR function in the adult hippocampus remains sensitive to even brief exposures to CORT and that the capacity for modulation of NMDAR may be programmed, in part, by the early life environment. Modulation of NMDAR function may contribute to dynamic regulation of synaptic plasticity and adaptation in the face of stress, however enhanced NMDAR function may be implicated in mechanisms of stress related psychopathologies including depression.

  20. Cellular Dynamics of Rad51 and Rad54 in Response to Postreplicative Stress and DNA Damage in HeLa Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eui-Hwan; Yoon, Seobin; Hahn, Yoonsoo; Kim, Keun P

    2017-02-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is necessary for maintenance of genomic integrity and prevention of various mutations in tumor suppressor genes and proto-oncogenes. Rad51 and Rad54 are key HR factors that cope with replication stress and DNA breaks in eukaryotes. Rad51 binds to single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) to form the presynaptic filament that promotes a homology search and DNA strand exchange, and Rad54 stimulates the strand-pairing function of Rad51. Here, we studied the molecular dynamics of Rad51 and Rad54 during the cell cycle of HeLa cells. These cells constitutively express Rad51 and Rad54 throughout the entire cell cycle, and the formation of foci immediately increased in response to various types of DNA damage and replication stress, except for caffeine, which suppressed the Rad51-dependent HR pathway. Depletion of Rad51 caused severe defects in response to postreplicative stress. Accordingly, HeLa cells were arrested at the G2-M transition although a small amount of Rad51 was steadily maintained in HeLa cells. Our results suggest that cell cycle progression and proliferation of HeLa cells can be tightly controlled by the abundance of HR proteins, which are essential for the rapid response to postreplicative stress and DNA damage stress.

  1. Dynamics of brain responses to phobic-related stimulation in specific phobia subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caseras, Xavier; Mataix-Cols, David; Trasovares, Maria Victoria; López-Solà, Marina; Ortriz, Hector; Pujol, Jesus; Soriano-Mas, Carles; Giampietro, Vincent; Brammer, Michael J; Torrubia, Rafael

    2010-10-01

    Very few studies have investigated to what extent different subtypes of specific phobia share the same underlying functional neuroanatomy. This study aims to investigate the potential differences in the anatomy and dynamics of the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) responses associated with spider and blood-injection-injury phobias. We used an event-related paradigm in 14 untreated spider phobics, 15 untreated blood-injection-injury phobics and 17 controls. Phobic images successfully induced distress only in phobic participants. Both phobic groups showed a similar pattern of heart rate increase following the presentation of phobic stimuli, this being different from controls. The presentation of phobic images induced activity within the same brain network in all participants, although the intensity of brain responses was significantly higher in phobics. Only blood-injection-injury phobics showed greater activity in the ventral prefrontal cortex compared with controls. This phobia group also presented a lower activity peak in the left amygdala compared with spider phobics. Importantly, looking at the dynamics of BOLD responses, both phobia groups showed a quicker time-to-peak in the right amygdala than controls, but only spider phobics also differed from controls in this parameter within the left amygdala. Considering these and previous findings, both phobia subtypes show very similar responses regarding their immediate reaction to phobia-related images, but critical differences in their sustained responses to these stimuli. These results highlight the importance of considering complex mental processes potentially associated with coping and emotion regulation processes, rather than exclusively focusing on primary neural responses to threat, when investigating fear and phobias. © 2010 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience © 2010 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Dynamic Pain Phenotypes are Associated with Spinal Cord Stimulation-Induced Reduction in Pain: A Repeated Measures Observational Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Claudia M; Buenaver, Luis F; Raja, Srinivasa N; Kiley, Kasey B; Swedberg, Lauren J; Wacnik, Paul W; Cohen, Steven P; Erdek, Michael A; Williams, Kayode A; Christo, Paul J

    2015-07-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) has become a widely used treatment option for a variety of pain conditions. Substantial variability exists in the degree of benefit obtained from SCS and patient selection is a topic of expanding interest and importance. However, few studies have examined the potential benefits of dynamic quantitative sensory testing (QST) to develop objective measures of SCS outcomes or as a predictive tool to help patient selection. Psychological characteristics have been shown to play an important role in shaping individual differences in the pain experience and may aid in predicting responses to SCS. Static laboratory pain-induction measures have also been examined in their capacity for predicting SCS outcomes. The current study evaluated clinical, psychological and laboratory pain measures at baseline, during trial SCS lead placement, as well as 1 month and 3 months following permanent SCS implantation in chronic pain patients who received SCS treatment. Several QST measures were conducted, with specific focus on examination of dynamic models (central sensitization and conditioned pain modulation [CPM]) and their association with pain outcomes 3 months post SCS implantation. Results suggest few changes in QST over time. However, central sensitization and CPM at baseline were significantly associated with clinical pain at 3 months following SCS implantation, controlling for psycho/behavioral factors and pain at baseline. Specifically, enhanced central sensitization and reduced CPM were associated with less self-reported pain 3 months following SCS implantation. These findings suggest a potentially important role for dynamic pain assessment in individuals undergoing SCS, and hint at potential mechanisms through which SCS may impart its benefit. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Nonlinear dynamics of a flexible rotor supported by turbulent journal bearings with couple stress fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo, C.-Y.; Chang-Jian, C.-W.

    2008-01-01

    This study presents a dynamic analysis of a rotor supported by two turbulent flow model journal bearings and lubricated with couple stress fluid under nonlinear suspension. The dynamics of the rotor center and bearing center is studied. The dynamic equations are solved using the Runge-Kutta method. The analysis methods employed in this study is inclusive of the dynamic trajectories of the rotor center and bearing center, power spectra, Poincare maps and bifurcation diagrams. The maximum Lyapunov exponent analysis is also used to identify the onset of chaotic motion. The results show that the values of dimensionless parameters l* strongly influence dynamic motions of bearing and rotor centre. It is found that couple stress fluid improve the stability of the system when l* > 0.4 even if the flow of this system is turbulent. We also demonstrated that the dimensionless rotational speed ratios s and the dimensionless unbalance parameter β are also significant system parameters. The modeling results thus obtained by using the method proposed in this paper can be employed to predict the stability of the rotor-bearing system and the undesirable behavior of the rotor and bearing center can be avoided

  4. Inhibition of xanthine oxidase reduces oxidative stress and improves skeletal muscle function in response to electrically stimulated isometric contractions in aged mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Michael J.; Jackson, Janna R.; Hao, Yanlei; Leonard, Stephen S.; Alway, Stephen E.

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a putative factor responsible for reducing function and increasing apoptotic signaling in skeletal muscle with aging. This study examined the contribution and functional significance of the xanthine oxidase enzyme as a potential source of oxidant production in aged skeletal muscle during repetitive in situ electrically stimulated isometric contractions. Xanthine oxidase activity was inhibited in young adult and aged mice via a subcutaneously placed time release (2.5 mg/day) allopurinol pellet, 7 days prior to the start of in situ electrically stimulated isometric contractions. Gastrocnemius muscles were electrically activated with 20 maximal contractions for three consecutive days. Xanthine oxidase activity was 65% greater in the gastrocnemius muscle of aged mice compared to young mice. Xanthine oxidase activity also increased after in situ electrically stimulated isometric contractions in muscles from both young (33%) and aged (28%) mice, relative to contralateral non-contracted muscles. Allopurinol attenuated the exercise-induced increase in oxidative stress, but it did not affect the elevated basal levels of oxidative stress that was associated with aging. In addition, inhibition of xanthine oxidase activity decreased caspase 3 activity, but it had no effect on other markers of mitochondrial associated apoptosis. Our results show that compared to control conditions, suppression of xanthine oxidase activity by allopurinol reduced xanthine oxidase activity, H2O2 levels, lipid peroxidation and caspase-3 activity, prevented the in situ electrically stimulated isometric contraction-induced loss of glutathione, prevented the increase of catalase and copper-zinc superoxide dismutase activities, and increased maximal isometric force in the plantar flexor muscles of aged mice after repetitive electrically evoked contractions. PMID:21530649

  5. Dynamics of Mount Somma-Vesuvius edifice: from stress field inversion to analogue and numerical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Matteo, Ada; Massa, Bruno; D'Auria, Luca; Castaldo, Raffaele

    2017-04-01

    Geological processes are generally very complex and too slow to be directly observed in their completeness; modelling procedures overcome this limit. The state of stress in the upper lithosphere is the main responsible for driving geodynamical processes; in order to retrieve the active stress field in a rock volume, stress inversion techniques can be applied on both seismological and structural datasets. This approach has been successfully applied to active tectonics as well as volcanic areas. In this context the best approach in managing heterogeneous datasets in volcanic environments consists in the analysis of spatial variations of the stress field by applying robust techniques of inversion. The study of volcanic seismicity is an efficient tool to retrieve spatial and temporal pattern of the pre-, syn- and inter-eruptive stress field: magma migration as well as dynamics of magma chamber and hydrothermal system are directly connected to the volcanic seismicity. Additionally, analysis of the temporal variations of stress field pattern in volcanoes could be a useful monitoring tool. Recently the stress field acting on several active volcanoes has been investigated by using stress inversion techniques on seismological datasets (Massa et al., 2016). The Bayesian Right Trihedra Method (BRTM; D'Auria and Massa, 2015) is able to successfully manage heterogeneous datasets allowing the identification of regional fields locally overcame by the stress field due to volcano specific dynamics. In particular, the analysis of seismicity and stress field inversion at the Somma-Vesuvius highlighted the presence of two superposed volumes characterized by different behaviour and stress field pattern: a top volume dominated by an extensional stress field, in accordance with a gravitational spreading-style of deformation, and a bottom volume related to a regional extensional stress field. In addition, in order to evaluate the dynamics of deformation, both analogue and numerical

  6. The wake-promoting drug modafinil stimulates specific hypothalamic circuits to promote adaptive stress responses in an animal model of PTSD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, S; Ifergane, G; Vainer, E; Matar, M A; Kaplan, Z; Zohar, J; Mathé, A A; Cohen, H

    2016-10-11

    Pharmacotherapeutic intervention during traumatic memory consolidation has been suggested to alleviate or even prevent the development of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). We recently reported that, in a controlled, prospective animal model, depriving rats of sleep following stress exposure prevents the development of a PTSD-like phenotype. Here, we report that administering the wake-promoting drug modafinil to rats in the aftermath of a stressogenic experience has a similar prophylactic effect, as it significantly reduces the prevalence of PTSD-like phenotype. Moreover, we show that the therapeutic value of modafinil appears to stem from its ability to stimulate a specific circuit within the hypothalamus, which ties together the neuropeptide Y, the orexin system and the HPA axis, to promote adaptive stress responses. The study not only confirms the value of sleep prevention and identifies the mechanism of action of a potential prophylactic treatment after traumatic exposure, but also contributes to understanding mechanisms underlying the shift towards adaptive behavioral response.

  7. Extension to linear dynamics for hybrid stress finite element formulation based on additional displacements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumihara, K.

    Based upon legitimate variational principles, one microscopic-macroscopic finite element formulation for linear dynamics is presented by Hybrid Stress Finite Element Method. The microscopic application of Geometric Perturbation introduced by Pian and the introduction of infinitesimal limit core element (Baby Element) have been consistently combined according to the flexible and inherent interpretation of the legitimate variational principles initially originated by Pian and Tong. The conceptual development based upon Hybrid Finite Element Method is extended to linear dynamics with the introduction of physically meaningful higher modes.

  8. Proteome dynamics and physiological responses to short-term salt stress in Leymus chinensis leaves.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jikai Li

    Full Text Available Salt stress is becoming an increasing threat to global agriculture. In this study, physiological and proteomics analysis were performed using a salt-tolerant grass species, Leymus chinensis (L. chinensis. The aim of this study is to understand the potential mechanism of salt tolerance in L. chinensis that used for crop molecular breeding. A series of short-term (<48 h NaCl treatments (0 ~ 700 mM were conducted. Physiological data indicated that the root and leaves growth were inhibited, chlorophyll contents decreased, while hydraulic conductivity, proline, sugar and sucrose were accumulated under salt stress. For proteomic analysis, we obtained 274 differentially expressed proteins in response to NaCl treatments. GO analysis revealed that 44 out of 274 proteins are involved in the biosynthesis of amino acids and carbon metabolism. Our findings suggested that L. chinensis copes with salt stress by stimulating the activities of POD, SOD and CAT enzymes, speeding up the reactions of later steps of citrate cycle, and synthesis of proline and sugar. In agreement with our physiological data, proteomic analysis also showed that salt stress depress the expression of photosystem relevant proteins, Calvin cycle, and chloroplast biosynthesis.

  9. Cardiorespiratory dynamic response to mental stress: a multivariate time-frequency analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widjaja, Devy; Orini, Michele; Vlemincx, Elke; Van Huffel, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    Mental stress is a growing problem in our society. In order to deal with this, it is important to understand the underlying stress mechanisms. In this study, we aim to determine how the cardiorespiratory interactions are affected by mental arithmetic stress and attention. We conduct cross time-frequency (TF) analyses to assess the cardiorespiratory coupling. In addition, we introduce partial TF spectra to separate variations in the RR interval series that are linearly related to respiration from RR interval variations (RRV) that are not related to respiration. The performance of partial spectra is evaluated in two simulation studies. Time-varying parameters, such as instantaneous powers and frequencies, are derived from the computed spectra. Statistical analysis is carried out continuously in time to evaluate the dynamic response to mental stress and attention. The results show an increased heart and respiratory rate during stress and attention, compared to a resting condition. Also a fast reduction in vagal activity is noted. The partial TF analysis reveals a faster reduction of RRV power related to (3 s) than unrelated to (30 s) respiration, demonstrating that the autonomic response to mental stress is driven by mechanisms characterized by different temporal scales.

  10. Mitochondrial oxidative stress contributes differently to rat pancreatic islet cell apoptosis and insulin secretory defects after prolonged culture in a low non-stimulating glucose concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roma, L P; Pascal, S M; Duprez, J; Jonas, J-C

    2012-08-01

    Pancreatic beta cells chronically exposed to low glucose concentrations show signs of oxidative stress, loss of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) and increased apoptosis. Our aim was to confirm the role of mitochondrial oxidative stress in rat islet cell apoptosis under these culture conditions and to evaluate whether its reduction similarly improves survival and GSIS. Apoptosis, oxidative stress-response gene mRNA expression and glucose-induced stimulation of mitochondrial metabolism, intracellular Ca(2+) concentration and insulin secretion were measured in male Wistar rat islets cultured for 1 week in RPMI medium containing 5-10 mmol/l glucose with or without manganese(III)tetrakis(4-benzoic acid)porphyrin (MnTBAP) or N-acetyl-L-: cysteine (NAC). Oxidative stress was measured in islet cell clusters cultured under similar conditions using cytosolic and mitochondrial redox-sensitive green fluorescent protein (roGFP1/mt-roGFP1). Prolonged culture in 5 vs 10 mmol/l glucose increased mt-roGFP1 (but not roGFP1) oxidation followed by beta cell apoptosis and loss of GSIS resulting from reduced insulin content, mitochondrial metabolism, Ca(2+) influx and Ca(2+)-induced secretion. Tolbutamide-induced, but not high K(+)-induced, Ca(2+) influx was also suppressed. Under these conditions, MnTBAP, but not NAC, triggered parallel ~50-70% reductions in mt-roGFP1 oxidation and beta cell apoptosis, but failed to protect against the loss of GSIS despite significant improvement in glucose-induced and tolbutamide-induced Ca(2+) influx. Mitochondrial oxidative stress contributes differently to rat pancreatic islet cell apoptosis and insulin secretory defects during culture in a low glucose concentration. Thus, targeting beta cell survival may not be sufficient to restore insulin secretion when beta cells suffer from prolonged mitochondrial oxidative stress, e.g. in the context of reduced glucose metabolism.

  11. Vestibular stimulation interferes with the dynamics of an internal representation of gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sá Teixeira, Nuno Alexandre; Hecht, Heiko; Diaz Artiles, Ana; Seyedmadani, Kimia; Sherwood, David P; Young, Laurence R

    2017-11-01

    The remembered vanishing location of a moving target has been found to be displaced downward in the direction of gravity (representational gravity) and more so with increasing retention intervals, suggesting that the visual spatial updating recruits an internal model of gravity. Despite being consistently linked with gravity, few inquiries have been made about the role of vestibular information in these trends. Previous experiments with static tilting of observers' bodies suggest that under conflicting cues between the idiotropic vector and vestibular signals, the dynamic drift in memory is reduced to a constant displacement along the body's main axis. The present experiment aims to replicate and extend these outcomes while keeping the observers' bodies unchanged in relation to physical gravity by varying the gravito-inertial acceleration using a short-radius centrifuge. Observers were shown, while accelerated to varying degrees, targets moving along several directions and were required to indicate the perceived vanishing location after a variable interval. Increases of the gravito-inertial force (up to 1.4G), orthogonal to the idiotropic vector, did not affect the direction of representational gravity, but significantly disrupted its time course. The role and functioning of an internal model of gravity for spatial perception and orientation are discussed in light of the results.

  12. Single Cell Dynamics Causes Pareto-Like Effect in Stimulated T Cell Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosette, Jérémie; Moussy, Alice; Onodi, Fanny; Auffret-Cariou, Adrien; Neildez-Nguyen, Thi My Anh; Paldi, Andras; Stockholm, Daniel

    2015-12-09

    Cell fate choice during the process of differentiation may obey to deterministic or stochastic rules. In order to discriminate between these two strategies we used time-lapse microscopy of individual murine CD4 + T cells that allows investigating the dynamics of proliferation and fate commitment. We observed highly heterogeneous division and death rates between individual clones resulting in a Pareto-like dominance of a few clones at the end of the experiment. Commitment to the Treg fate was monitored using the expression of a GFP reporter gene under the control of the endogenous Foxp3 promoter. All possible combinations of proliferation and differentiation were observed and resulted in exclusively GFP-, GFP+ or mixed phenotype clones of very different population sizes. We simulated the process of proliferation and differentiation using a simple mathematical model of stochastic decision-making based on the experimentally observed parameters. The simulations show that a stochastic scenario is fully compatible with the observed Pareto-like imbalance in the final population.

  13. Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can be life-saving. But chronic stress can cause both physical and mental harm. There are at least three different types of stress: Routine stress related to the pressures of work, family, and other daily responsibilities Stress brought about ...

  14. The dynamics of stress and fatigue across menopause: attractors, coupling, and resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor-Swanson, Lisa; Wong, Alexander E; Pincus, David; Butner, Jonathan E; Hahn-Holbrook, Jennifer; Koithan, Mary; Wann, Kathryn; Woods, Nancy F

    2018-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the regulatory dynamics between stress and fatigue experienced by women during the menopausal transition (MT) and early postmenopause (EPM). Fatigue and perceived stress are commonly experienced by women during the MT and EPM. We sought to discover relationships between these symptoms and to employ these symptoms as possible markers for resilience. Participants were drawn from the longitudinal Seattle Midlife Women's Health Study. Eligible women completed questionnaires on 60+ occasions (annual health reports and monthly health diaries) (n = 56 women). The total number of observations across the sample was 4,224. STRAW+10 criteria were used to stage women in either in late reproductive, early or late transition, or EPM stage. Change values were generated for fatigue and stress and analyzed with a multilevel structural equation model; slopes indicate how quickly a person returns to homeostasis after a perturbation. Coupling of stress and fatigue was modeled to evaluate resilience, the notion of maintaining stability during change. Eligible women were on average 35 years old (SD = 4.71), well educated, employed, married or partnered, and white. Fit indices suggested the model depicts the relationships of stress and fatigue (χ(9 df) = 7.638, P = 0.57, correction factor = 4.9244; root mean square error of approximation (RMSEA) 90% CI = 0.000 ≤ 0.000 ≤ 0.032; comparative fit index (CFI) = 1.00). A loss in model fit across stages suggests that the four stages differed in their dynamics (χΔ(12 df) = 21.181, P = .048). All stages showed fixed-point attractor dynamics: fatigue became less stable over time; stress generally became more stable over time. Coupling relationships of stress on fatigue show evidence for shifts in regulatory relationships with one another across the MT. Results are suggestive of general dysregulation via disruptions to coupling relationships of stress and

  15. A study on the evaluation of dynamic stress intensity factor in repeated impact bending test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sim, Jae Ki; Cho, Gyu Jae; Han, Gill Young

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper was to establish the evaluation of the dynamic stress intensity factor in repeated impact three point bending test. Contact force between the impact bar and the cracked beam (simple supported beam) was analyzed by the using Hertz's contact law. In order to clarify the validity of theoretical analysis, experiments of dynamic stress intensity factir k I (t) are made on the cracked beam. The results obtained from this study are as follow: 1. In case of impact force analysis the theoretical result was obtained by the use of the Hertz's contact law. It's result was agreemant with the experimental result. Particularly, it was good agreement in the low impact velocity range. 2. The time variation of the dynamic stress intensity was determined by using the simple formula developed in this pqper. And the validity of it's result can be confirmed by experiment. Particlarly, this theoretical analysis was a good agreement to actual phenomena on from 0.3 msec to 0.65 msec. (Author)

  16. The Role of Musculoskeletal Dynamics and Neuromuscular Control in Stress Development in Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWoody, Yssa

    1996-01-01

    The role of forces produced by the musculotendon units in the stress development of the long bones during gait has not been fully analyzed. It is well known that the musculotendons act as actuators producing the joint torques which drive the body. Although the joint torques required to perform certain motor tasks can be recovered through a kinematic analysis, it remains a difficult problem to determine the actual forces produced by each muscle that resulted in these torques. As a consequence, few studies have focused on the role of individual muscles in the development of stress in the bone. This study takes a control theoretic approach to the problem. A seven-link, eight degrees of freedom model of the body is controlled by various muscle groups on each leg to simulate gait. The simulations incorporate Hill-type models of muscles with activation and contraction dynamics controlled through neural inputs. This direct approach allows one to know the exact muscle forces exerted by each musculotendon throughout the gait cycle as well the joint torques and reaction forces at the ankle and knee. Stress and strain computed by finite element analysis on skeletal members will be related to these derived loading conditions. Thus the role of musculoskeletal dynamics and neuromuscular control in the stress development of the tibia during gait can be analyzed.

  17. In vitro mechanical stimulation facilitates stress dissipation and sealing ability at the conventional glass ionomer cement-dentin interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledano, Manuel; Osorio, Raquel; Osorio, Estrella; Cabello, Inmaculada; Toledano-Osorio, Manuel; Aguilera, Fátima S

    2018-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the induced changes in the chemical and mechanical performance at the glass-ionomer cement-dentin interface after mechanical load application. A conventional glass-ionomer cement (GIC) (Ketac Bond), and a resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (RMGIC) (Vitrebond Plus) were used. Bonded interfaces were stored in simulated body fluid, and then tested or submitted to the mechanical loading challenge. Different loading waveforms were applied: No cycling, 24 h cycled in sine or loaded in sustained hold waveforms. The cement-dentin interface was evaluated using a nano-dynamic mechanical analysis, estimating the complex modulus and tan δ. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) imaging, Raman analysis and dye assisted confocal microscopy evaluation (CLSM) were also performed. The complex modulus was lower and tan delta was higher at interfaces promoted with the GIC if compared to the RMGIC unloaded. The conventional GIC attained evident reduction of nanoleakage. Mechanical loading favored remineralization and promoted higher complex modulus and lower tan delta values at interfaces with RMGIC, where porosity, micropermeability and nanoleakage were more abundant. Mechanical stimuli diminished the resistance to deformation and increased the stored energy at the GIC-dentin interface. The conventional GIC induced less porosity and nanoleakage than RMGIC. The RMGIC increased nanoleakage at the porous interface, and dye sorption appeared within the cement. Both cements created amorphous and crystalline apatites at the interface depending on the type of mechanical loading. Remineralization, lower stress concentration and resistance to deformation after mechanical loading improved the sealing of the GIC-dentin interface. In vitro oral function will favor high levels of accumulated energy and permits micropermeability at the RMGIC-dentin interface which will become remineralized. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Haptic subjective vertical shows context dependence: task and vision play a role during dynamic tilt stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, William Geoffrey; Glasauer, Stefan

    2003-10-01

    Perceiving one's vertical is an integral part of efficiently functioning in an environment physically polarized along that dimension. How one determines the direction of gravity is not a task left only to inertial sensors, such as the vestibular organs, rather as numerous studies have shown, this task is influenced visually and somatosensorily. In addition, there is evidence that higher order cognitive effects such as expectancies and context are critical in perception of the vertical. One's ability to integrate these various inputs during normal activity is not generally questioned, one's doubts being satisfied by observing a waiter navigating a crowded restaurant with a tray balanced on one hand, neither tripping or dropping an entree. But how these various sources are integrated is still debated. Most research focuses on subjective vertical perception used visual matching/alignment tasks, verbal reports, or saccadic eye movements as a dependent measure. Although a motor task involving a joystick or indicator to be aligned with gravity without visual feedback is used much less frequently, there is good evidence that individuals easily orient limbs to an external gravity-aligned coordinate axis while being statically tilted. By exposure to a dynamic situation, the central nervous system should be no more challenged by the task of determining the subjective vertical than during static conditions, because our spatial orientation systems were likely selected for just that. In addition, the sensitive calibration between visual and other sensory input also must have been key to its selection. This sensory interaction can be tested by changing the relation between the various sources. With the advent of virtual reality technology, a complex and "natural" visual stimulus is achievable and is easily manipulable. How one tests perception of verticality is also a pertinent question when researching spatial orientation systems. The system's performance may be better

  19. DMPD: Macrophage-stimulating protein and RON receptor tyrosine kinase: potentialregulators of macrophage inflammatory activities. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 12472665 Macrophage-stimulating protein and RON receptor tyrosine kinase: potential...:545-53. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Macrophage-stimulating protein and RON receptor tyrosine kinase:...le Macrophage-stimulating protein and RON receptor tyrosine kinase: potentialregulators of macrophage inflam

  20. Strain-rate effect on initial crush stress of irregular honeycomb under dynamic loading and its deformation mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Zheng, Zhijun; Liao, Shenfei; Yu, Jilin

    2018-02-01

    The seemingly contradictory understandings of the initial crush stress of cellular materials under dynamic loadings exist in the literature, and a comprehensive analysis of this issue is carried out with using direct information of local stress and strain. Local stress/strain calculation methods are applied to determine the initial crush stresses and the strain rates at initial crush from a cell-based finite element model of irregular honeycomb under dynamic loadings. The initial crush stress under constant-velocity compression is identical to the quasi-static one, but less than the one under direct impact, i.e. the initial crush stresses under different dynamic loadings could be very different even though there is no strain-rate effect of matrix material. A power-law relation between the initial crush stress and the strain rate is explored to describe the strain-rate effect on the initial crush stress of irregular honeycomb when the local strain rate exceeds a critical value, below which there is no strain-rate effect of irregular honeycomb. Deformation mechanisms of the initial crush behavior under dynamic loadings are also explored. The deformation modes of the initial crush region in the front of plastic compaction wave are different under different dynamic loadings.

  1. Elevated nonlinearity as an indicator of shifts in the dynamics of populations under stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dakos, Vasilis; Glaser, Sarah M; Hsieh, Chih-Hao; Sugihara, George

    2017-03-01

    Populations occasionally experience abrupt changes, such as local extinctions, strong declines in abundance or transitions from stable dynamics to strongly irregular fluctuations. Although most of these changes have important ecological and at times economic implications, they remain notoriously difficult to detect in advance. Here, we study changes in the stability of populations under stress across a variety of transitions. Using a Ricker-type model, we simulate shifts from stable point equilibrium dynamics to cyclic and irregular boom-bust oscillations as well as abrupt shifts between alternative attractors. Our aim is to infer the loss of population stability before such shifts based on changes in nonlinearity of population dynamics. We measure nonlinearity by comparing forecast performance between linear and nonlinear models fitted on reconstructed attractors directly from observed time series. We compare nonlinearity to other suggested leading indicators of instability (variance and autocorrelation). We find that nonlinearity and variance increase in a similar way prior to the shifts. By contrast, autocorrelation is strongly affected by oscillations. Finally, we test these theoretical patterns in datasets of fisheries populations. Our results suggest that elevated nonlinearity could be used as an additional indicator to infer changes in the dynamics of populations under stress. © 2017 The Author(s).

  2. Dynamic stress of impeller blade of shaft extension tubular pump device based on bidirectional fluid-structure interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kan, Kan; Liu, Huiwen; Yang, Chunxia [Hohai University, Nanjing (China); Zheng, Yuan [National Engineering Research Center of Water Resources Efficient Utilization and Engineering Safety, Nanjing (China); Fu, Shifeng; Zhang, Xin [Power China Huadong Engineering Corporation, Hangzhou (China)

    2017-04-15

    Current research on the stability of tubular pumps is mainly concerned with the transient hydrodynamic characteristics. However, the structural response under the influence of fluid-structure interaction hasn't been taken fully into consideration. The instability of the structure can cause vibration and cracks, which may threaten the safety of the unit. We used bidirectional fluid-structure interaction to comprehensively analyze the dynamic stress characteristics of the impeller blades of the shaft extension tubular pump device. Furthermore, dynamic stress of impeller blade of shaft extension tubular pump device was solved under different lift conditions of 0° blade angle. Based on Reynolds-average N-S equation and SST k-ω turbulence model, numerical simulation was carried out for three-dimensional unsteady incompressible turbulent flow field of the pump device whole flow passage. Meanwhile, the finite element method was used to calculate dynamic characteristics of the blade structure. The blade dynamic stress distribution was obtained on the basis of fourth strength theory. The research results indicate that the maximum blade dynamic stress appears at the joint between root of inlet side of the blade suction surface and the axis. Considering the influence of gravity, the fluctuation of the blade dynamic stress increases initially and decreases afterwards within a rotation period. In the meantime, the dynamic stress in the middle part of inlet edge presents larger relative fluctuation amplitude. Finally, a prediction method for dynamic stress distribution of tubular pump considering fluid-structure interaction and gravity effect was proposed. This method can be used in the design stage of tubular pump to predict dynamic stress distribution of the structure under different operating conditions, improve the reliability of pump impeller and analyze the impeller fatigue life.

  3. Deep brain stimulation of the basolateral amygdala for treatment-refractory combat post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD): study protocol for a pilot randomized controlled trial with blinded, staggered onset of stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koek, Ralph J; Langevin, Jean-Philippe; Krahl, Scott E; Kosoyan, Hovsep J; Schwartz, Holly N; Chen, James W Y; Melrose, Rebecca; Mandelkern, Mark J; Sultzer, David

    2014-09-10

    Combat post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) involves significant suffering, impairments in social and occupational functioning, substance use and medical comorbidity, and increased mortality from suicide and other causes. Many veterans continue to suffer despite current treatments. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has shown promise in refractory movement disorders, depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder, with deep brain targets chosen by integration of clinical and neuroimaging literature. The basolateral amygdala (BLn) is an optimal target for high-frequency DBS in PTSD based on neurocircuitry findings from a variety of perspectives. DBS of the BLn was validated in a rat model of PTSD by our group, and limited data from humans support the potential safety and effectiveness of BLn DBS. We describe the protocol design for a first-ever Phase I pilot study of bilateral BLn high-frequency DBS for six severely ill, functionally impaired combat veterans with PTSD refractory to conventional treatments. After implantation, patients are monitored for a month with stimulators off. An electroencephalographic (EEG) telemetry session will test safety of stimulation before randomization to staggered-onset, double-blind sham versus active stimulation for two months. Thereafter, patients will undergo an open-label stimulation for a total of 24 months. Primary efficacy outcome is a 30% decrease in the Clinician Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) total score. Safety outcomes include extensive assessments of psychiatric and neurologic symptoms, psychosocial function, amygdala-specific and general neuropsychological functions, and EEG changes. The protocol requires the veteran to have a cohabiting significant other who is willing to assist in monitoring safety and effect on social functioning. At baseline and after approximately one year of stimulation, trauma script-provoked 18FDG PET metabolic changes in limbic circuitry will also be evaluated. While the rationale for studying DBS

  4. In vivo dynamics of GFRα1-positive spermatogonia stimulated by GDNF signals using a bead transplantation assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchida, Aya; Kishi, Kasane; Aiyama, Yoshimi; Miura, Kento [Department of Veterinary Anatomy, The University of Tokyo, Yayoi, Tokyo, 113-8657 (Japan); Takase, Hinako M.; Suzuki, Hitomi; Kanai-Azuma, Masami [Department of Experimental Animal Model for Human Disease, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, 113-8510 (Japan); Iwamori, Tokuko [Center of Biomedical Research, Kyusyu University, Fukuoka, 812-8582 (Japan); Kurohmaru, Masamichi; Tsunekawa, Naoki [Department of Veterinary Anatomy, The University of Tokyo, Yayoi, Tokyo, 113-8657 (Japan); Kanai, Yoshiakira, E-mail: aykanai@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Veterinary Anatomy, The University of Tokyo, Yayoi, Tokyo, 113-8657 (Japan)

    2016-08-05

    In mouse testes, spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs), a subpopulation of GFRα1 (GDNF family receptor-α1)-positive spermatogonia, are widely distributed along the convoluted seminiferous tubules. The proliferation and differentiation of the SSCs are regulated in part by local expression of GDNF (glial cell-derived neurotorphic factor), one of major niche factors for SSCs. However, the in vivo dynamics of the GDNF-stimulated GFRα1-positive spermatogonia remains unclear. Here, we developed a simple method for transplanting DiI-labeled and GDNF-soaked beads into the mouse testicular interstitium. By using this method, we examined the dynamics of GFRα1-positive spermatogonia in the tubular walls close to the transplanted GDNF-soaked beads. The bead-derived GDNF signals were able to induce the stratified aggregate formation of GFRα1-positive undifferentiated spermatogonia by day 3 post-transplantation. Each aggregate consisted of tightly compacted A{sub single} and marginal A{sub paired}–A{sub aligned} GFRα1-positive spermatogonia and was surrounded by A{sub aligned} GFRα1-negative spermatogonia at more advanced stages. These data not only provide in vivo evidence for the inductive roles of GDNF in forming a rapid aggregation of GFRα1-positive spermatogonia but also indicate the usefulness of this in vivo assay system of various growth factors for the stem/progenitor spermatogonia in mammalian spermatogenesis. - Highlights: • A novel bead transplantation assay was developed to examine the in vivo effects of growth factors on spermatogonia. • A rapid aggregation of GFRα1-positive spermatogonia was induced by the transplanted GDNF-soaked beads. • Tightly-compacted A{sub single} and marginal A{sub paired}–A{sub aligned} spermatogonia were formed in each GFRα1-positive aggregate.

  5. Effects of flotation-restricted environmental stimulation technique on stress-related muscle pain: what makes the difference in therapy--attention-placebo or the relaxation response?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bood, Sven A; Sundequist, Ulf; Kjellgren, Anette; Nordstrom, Gun; Norlander, Torsten

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the potential effects of attention-placebo on flotation tank therapy. Flotation-restricted environmental stimulation technique is a method whereby an individual lies in a floating tank and all stimuli are reduced to a minimum. Thirty-two patients were diagnosed as having stress-related muscular pain. In addition, 16 of the participants had received the diagnosis of burnout depression. The patients were treated with flotation-restricted environmental stimulation technique for six weeks. One-half of the patients were also given special attention for 12 weeks (high attention), while the remainder received attention for only six weeks (normal attention). The participants exhibited lowered blood pressure, reduced pain, anxiety, depression, stress and negative affectivity, as well as increased optimism, energy and positive affectivity. The results were largely unaffected by the degree of attention-placebo or diagnosis. It was concluded that flotation therapy is an effective, noninvasive method for treating stress-related pain, and that the method is not more affected by placebo than by other methods currently used in pain treatment. The treatment of both burnout depression and pain related to muscle tension constitutes a major challenge for the patient as well as the care provider, an area in which great gains can be made if the treatment is effective. Flotation therapy may constitute an integral part of such treatment.

  6. [Comparison of the efficacy and safety between TVT-O and TVT-O with biofeedback pelvic floor electrical stimulation on female stress urinary incontinence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Ling; Zhao, Xia

    2015-01-01

    To compare the efficacy and safety between tension-free vaginal tape obturator technique (TVT-O) and TVT-O with biofeedback pelvic floor electrical stimulation on the therapy of female stress urinary incontinence. In this prospective study, 120 female patients of female stress urinary incontinence were enrolled from January 2012 to December 2013. The patients were randomly assigned to two groups, 60 in group A received TVT-O alone, while 60 in group B not only received TVT-O but also received biofeedback pelvic floor electrical stimulation. All the patients were followed up for 12 months to assess the efficacy and safety of the two procedures. Subjective indices [total volume of urine (TV), the total frequency of urination (TOV), the total leakage of urine events (TL), urinary incontinence related quality of life questionnaire (I-QOL), International Advisory Committee on urinary incontinence urinary incontinence questionnaire short form scale (ICI-Q-SF)] and objective indices [Valsalva leak point pressure (VLPP), maximum flow rate (MFR), residual urine volume (RUV),pad test] were analyzed. Overall, the cure rate was 75% at 1 year follow-up for group A and 88.33% for group B (PTVT-O on the treatment of female stress urinary incontinence.

  7. Conceptualizing the dynamics of workplace stress: a systems-based study of nursing aides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jetha, Arif; Kernan, Laura; Kurowski, Alicia

    2017-01-05

    Workplace stress is a complex phenomenon that may often be dynamic and evolving over time. Traditional linear modeling does not allow representation of recursive feedback loops among the implicated factors. The objective of this study was to develop a multidimensional system dynamics model (SDM) of workplace stress among nursing aides and conduct simulations to illustrate how changes in psychosocial perceptions and workplace factors might influence workplace stress over time. Eight key informants with prior experience in a large study of US nursing home workers participated in model building. Participants brainstormed the range of components related to workplace stress. Components were grouped together based on common themes and translated into feedback loops. The SDM was parameterized through key informant insight on the shape and magnitude of the relationship between model components. Model construction was also supported utilizing survey data collected as part of the larger study. All data was entered into the software program, Vensim. Simulations were conducted to examine how adaptations to model components would influence workplace stress. The SDM included perceptions of organizational conditions (e.g., job demands and job control), workplace social support (i.e., managerial and coworker social support), workplace safety, and demands outside of work (i.e. work-family conflict). Each component was part of a reinforcing feedback loop. Simulations exhibited that scenarios with increasing job control and decreasing job demands led to a decline in workplace stress. Within the context of the system, the effects of workplace social support, workplace safety, and work-family conflict were relatively minor. SDM methodology offers a unique perspective for researchers and practitioners to view workplace stress as a dynamic process. The portrayal of multiple recursive feedback loops can guide the development of policies and programs within complex organizational contexts

  8. Two-dimensional simulation of the thermal stress effect on static and dynamic VDMOS characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alwan, M.; Beydoun, B.; Ketata, K.; Zoaeter, M.

    2005-01-01

    Using a two-dimensional simulator, the effect of the thermal stress on static and dynamic vertical double-diffusion metal oxide semiconductor (VDMOS) characteristics have been investigated. The use of the device under certain thermal stress conditions can produce modifications of its physical and electrical properties. Based on physics and 2D simulations, this paper proposes an analysis of this stress effect observed on the electrical characteristics of the device. Parameters responsible of these modifications are determined. Approximate expressions of the ionization coefficients and breakdown voltage in terms of temperature are proposed. Non-punch-through junction theory is used to express the breakdown voltage and the space charge extension with respect to the impurity concentration and the temperature. The capacitances of the device have been also studied. The effect of the stress on C-V characteristics is observed and analyzed. We notice that the drain-gate, drain-source and gate-source capacitances are shifted due to the degradation of device physical properties versus thermal stress

  9. Electron transfer dynamics of triphenylamine dyes bound to TiO2 nanoparticles from femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Hoffman, David P.

    2013-04-11

    Interfacial electron transfer between sensitizers and semiconducting nanoparticles is a crucial yet poorly understood process. To address this problem, we have used transient absorption (TA) and femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) to investigate the photoexcited dynamics of a series of triphenylamine-coumarin dye/TiO2 conjugates. The TA decay is multiexponential, spanning time scales from 100 fs to 100 ps, while the characteristic transient Raman spectrum of the radical cation decays biexponentially with a dominant ∼3 ps component. To explain these observations, we propose a model in which the decay of the TA is due to hot electrons migrating from surface trap states to the conduction band of TiO 2 while the decay of the Raman signature is due to internal conversion of the dye molecule. Furthermore, the S1 Raman spectrum of TPAC3, a dye wherein a vinyl group separates the triphenylamine and coumarin moieties, is similar to the S1 Raman spectrum of trans-stilbene; we conclude that their S1 potential energy surfaces and reactivity are also similar. This correlation suggests that dyes containing vinyl linkers undergo photoisomerization that competes with electron injection. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  10. Stress Analysis of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Leaflets Under Dynamic Loading: Effect of Reduced Tissue Thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Mostafa; Azadani, Ali N

    2017-07-01

    In order to accommodate transcatheter valves to miniaturized catheters, the leaflet thickness must be reduced to a value which is typically less than that of surgical bioprostheses. The study aim was to use finite-element simulations to determine the impact of the thickness reduction on stress and strain distribution. A 23 mm transcatheter aortic valve (TAV) was modelled based on the Edwards SAPIEN XT (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA, USA). Finite-element (FE) analysis was performed using the ABAQUS/Explicit solver. An ensemble-averaged transvalvular pressure waveform measured from in-vitro tests conducted in a pulse duplicator was applied to the leaflets. Through a parametric study, uniform TAV leaflet thickness was reduced from 0.5 to 0.18 mm. By reducing leaflet thickness, significantly higher stress values were found in the leaflet's fixed edge during systole, and in the commissures during diastole. Through dynamic FE simulations, the highest stress values were found during systole in the leaflet fixed edge. In contrast, at the peak of diastole high-stress regions were mainly observed in the commissures. The peak stress was increased by 178% and 507% within the leaflets after reducing the thickness of 0.5 mm to 0.18 mm at the peak of systole and diastole, respectively. The study results indicated that, the smaller the leaflet thickness, the higher the maximum principal stress. Increased mechanical stress on TAV leaflets may lead to accelerated tissue degeneration. By using a thinner leaflet, TAV durability may not atch with that of surgical bioprostheses.

  11. ALS mutant SOD1 interacts with G3BP1 and affects stress granule dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal, Jozsef; Kuang, Lisha; Barnett, Kelly R; Zhu, Brian Z; Shissler, Susannah C; Korotkov, Konstantin V; Hayward, Lawrence J; Kasarskis, Edward J; Zhu, Haining

    2016-10-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease. Mutations in Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) are responsible for approximately 20 % of the familial ALS cases. ALS-causing SOD1 mutants display a gain-of-toxicity phenotype, but the nature of this toxicity is still not fully understood. The Ras GTPase-activating protein-binding protein G3BP1 plays a critical role in stress granule dynamics. Alterations in the dynamics of stress granules have been reported in several other forms of ALS unrelated to SOD1. To our surprise, the mutant G93A SOD1 transgenic mice exhibited pathological cytoplasmic inclusions that co-localized with G3BP1-positive granules in spinal cord motor neurons. The co-localization was also observed in fibroblast cells derived from familial ALS patient carrying SOD1 mutation L144F. Mutant SOD1, unlike wild-type SOD1, interacted with G3BP1 in an RNA-independent manner. Moreover, the interaction is specific for G3BP1 since mutant SOD1 showed little interaction with four other RNA-binding proteins implicated in ALS. The RNA-binding RRM domain of G3BP1 and two particular phenylalanine residues (F380 and F382) are critical for this interaction. Mutant SOD1 delayed the formation of G3BP1- and TIA1-positive stress granules in response to hyperosmolar shock and arsenite treatment in N2A cells. In summary, the aberrant mutant SOD1-G3BP1 interaction affects stress granule dynamics, suggesting a potential link between pathogenic SOD1 mutations and RNA metabolism alterations in ALS.

  12. Impact of an intensive dynamic exercise program on oxidative stress and on the outcome in patients with fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal F Soliman

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion Twelve weeks of intensive dynamic exercise program should be recommended to patients with FM as it was effective in decreasing the oxidative stress parameters, increasing the antioxidant parameters, and improving the clinical outcome of this disease.

  13. Dynamic Stress Concentration at the Boundary of an Incision at the Plate Under the Action of Weak Shock Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikulich Olena

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes the novel technique for analysis of dynamic stress state of multi-connected infinite plates under the action of weak shock waves. For solution of the problem it uses the integral and discrete Fourier transforms. Calculation of transformed dynamic stresses at the incisions of plates is held using the boundary-integral equation method and the theory of complex variable functions. The numerical implementation of the developed algorithm is based on the method of mechanical quadratures and collocation technique. For calculation of originals of the dynamic stresses it uses modified discrete Fourier transform. The algorithm is effective in the analysis of the dynamic stress state of defective plates.

  14. Effects of heat stress on dynamic absorption process, tissue distribution and utilization efficiency of vitamin C in broilers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Guohua; Chen Guosheng; Cai Huiyi

    1998-01-01

    The experiment was conducted to determine the effects of heat stress on ascorbic acid nutritional physiology of broilers with radioisotope technology. 3 H-Vc was fed to broilers and then the blood, liver, kidney, breast muscle, and excreta were sampled to determine the dynamic absorption process, the tissue distribution and the utilization efficiency of vitamin C. The results indicated that the absorption, metabolism and mobilization of supplemented vitamin C in broilers with heat stress was faster than that in broilers without heat stress. However, the utilization efficiency of supplemented vitamin C in broilers with heat stress was not higher than that of broilers without heat stress

  15. Quantitative analysis of localized stresses in irradiated stainless steels using high resolution electron backscatter diffraction and molecular dynamics modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, D.C.; Kuhr, B.; Farkas, D.; Was, G.S.

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative measurements of stress near dislocation channel–grain boundary (DC–GB) interaction sites were made using high resolution electron backscatter diffraction (HREBSD) and have been compared with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Tensile stress normal to the grain boundary was significantly elevated at discontinuous DC–GB intersections with peak magnitudes roughly an order of magnitude greater than at sites where slip transfer occurred. These results constitute the first measurement of stress amplification at DC–GB intersections and provide support to the theory that high normal stress at the grain boundary may be a key driver for the initiation of irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracks.

  16. Mechanical loading by fluid shear stress of myotube glycocalyx stimulates growth factor expression and nitric oxide production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Juffer, P.; Bakker, A.D.; Klein-Nulend, J.; Jaspers, R.T.

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle fibers have the ability to increase their size in response to a mechanical overload. Finite element modeling data suggest that mechanically loaded muscles in vivo may experience not only tensile strain but also shear stress. However, whether shear stress affects biological pathways

  17. Dynamic stresses in a Francis model turbine at deep part load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Wilhelm; von Locquenghien, Florian; Conrad, Philipp; Koutnik, Jiri

    2017-04-01

    A comparison between numerically obtained dynamic stresses in a Francis model turbine at deep part load with experimental ones is presented. Due to the change in the electrical power mix to more content of new renewable energy sources, Francis turbines are forced to operate at deep part load in order to compensate stochastic nature of wind and solar power and to ensure grid stability. For the extension of the operating range towards deep part load improved understanding of the harsh flow conditions and their impact on material fatigue of hydraulic components is required in order to ensure long life time of the power unit. In this paper pressure loads on a model turbine runner from unsteady two-phase computational fluid dynamics simulation at deep part load are used for calculation of mechanical stresses by finite element analysis. Therewith, stress distribution over time is determined. Since only few runner rotations are simulated due to enormous numerical cost, more effort has to be spent to evaluation procedure in order to obtain objective results. By comparing the numerical results with measured strains accuracy of the whole simulation procedure is verified.

  18. Stress wave velocity and dynamic modulus of elasticity of yellow-poplar ranging from 100 to 10 percent moisture content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jody D. Gray; Shawn T. Grushecky; James P. Armstrong

    2008-01-01

    Moisture content has a significant impact on mechanical properties of wood. In recent years, stress wave velocity has been used as an in situ and non-destructive method for determining the stiffness of wooden elements. The objective of this study was to determine what effect moisture content has on stress wave velocity and dynamic modulus of elasticity. Results...

  19. The Dynamics of Migration-Related Stress and Coping of Female Domestic Workers from the Philippines: An Exploratory Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Ham, A.J.; Ujano-Batangan, M.T.; Ignacio, R.; Wolffers, I.N.

    2015-01-01

    Female domestic workers face many migration-related stressors that affect their mental health, but we know little about the dynamics of stress and coping in different migration phases. This exploratory study aims to assess stress and coping of female migrant domestic workers from the Philippines in

  20. Dynamic of bioelectric activity back hypothalamus changes in conditions of pyroxan application on the background of stress-reaction developmen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. G. Chaus

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic of changes of capacity of electroencephalogram’s rhythms back hypothalamus at animals of control group and group in stress conditions in parallel with rats who on a background of stress development accepted pyroxan is analyzed. The submitted results have shown influence of a pharmacological preparation pyroxan on bioelectric activity of back hypothalamus in stress conditions that restoration of electric activity under action of this preparation was more shown at 3 weeks of its application.

  1. Contraction-stimulated glucose transport in muscle is controlled by AMPK and mechanical stress but not sarcoplasmatic reticulum Ca2+ release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas E. Jensen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how muscle contraction orchestrates insulin-independent muscle glucose transport may enable development of hyperglycemia-treating drugs. The prevailing concept implicates Ca2+ as a key feed forward regulator of glucose transport with secondary fine-tuning by metabolic feedback signals through proteins such as AMPK. Here, we demonstrate in incubated mouse muscle that Ca2+ release is neither sufficient nor strictly necessary to increase glucose transport. Rather, the glucose transport response is associated with metabolic feedback signals through AMPK, and mechanical stress-activated signals. Furthermore, artificial stimulation of AMPK combined with passive stretch of muscle is additive and sufficient to elicit the full contraction glucose transport response. These results suggest that ATP-turnover and mechanical stress feedback are sufficient to fully increase glucose transport during muscle contraction, and call for a major reconsideration of the established Ca2+ centric paradigm.

  2. Dynamic characteristics of rotating pretwisted clamped-clamped beam under thermal stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Bo; Li, Yueming; Lu, Wei Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Effects of thermal stress on the vibration characteristics, buckling limit and critical speed of a rotating pretwisted beam clamped to rigid hub at a stagger angle were investigated. By considering the work done by thermal stress, the thermal influence on stiffness matrix was introduced in the dynamic model. The motion equations were derived based on Lagrange equation by employing three pure Cartesian deformation variables combined with nonlinear von Karman strain formula. Numerical investigations studied the modal characteristics of the beam. Numerical results calculated from a commercial finite element code and obtained with the present modeling method were in good agreement with the previous results reported in the literature. The combined softening effects due to the thermal stress and the rotation motion were observed. Furthermore, it is shown that the inclusion of thermal stress is necessary for blades operating under a high temperature field. Buckling thermal loads and the critical rotating speed were calculated through solving the corresponding nonlinear equations numerically, and some pertinent conclusions are outlined. It is also found that the peak value position of the first mode shape approaches to the tip of blade with the increment of rotating speed and hub radius. However, the variation in the environment temperature causes only a slight alteration in the mode shape

  3. Dynamics of neuroendocrine stress response: bistability, timing, and control of hypocortisolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Orsogna, Maria; Chou, Tom; Kim, Lae

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is a neuroendocrine system that regulates numerous physiological processes. Disruptions in its activity are correlated with stress-related diseases such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and major depressive disorder. We characterize ``normal'' and ``diseased'' states of the HPA axis as basins of attraction of a dynamical system describing the inhibition of peptide hormones, corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), by circulating glucocorticoids such as cortisol (CORT). Our model includes ultradian oscillations, CRH self-upregulation of CRH release, and distinguishes two components of negative feedback by cortisol on circulating CRH levels: a slow direct suppression of CRH synthesis and a fast indirect effect on CRH release. The slow regulation mechanism mediates external stress-driven transitions between the stable states in novel, intensity, duration, and timing-dependent ways. We find that the timing of traumatic events may be an important factor in determining if and how the hallmarks of depressive disorders will manifest. Our model also suggests a mechanism whereby exposure therapy of stress disorders may act to normalize downstream dysregulation of the HPA axis.

  4. Dynamic characteristics of rotating pretwisted clamped-clamped beam under thermal stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Bo; Li, Yueming [State Key Laboratory for Strength and Vibration of Mechanical Structures, Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Environment and Control for Flight Vehicle, School of Aerospace, Xi' an Jiaotong UniversityXi' an (China); Lu, Wei Zhen [Dept. of Civil and Architectural Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China)

    2016-09-15

    Effects of thermal stress on the vibration characteristics, buckling limit and critical speed of a rotating pretwisted beam clamped to rigid hub at a stagger angle were investigated. By considering the work done by thermal stress, the thermal influence on stiffness matrix was introduced in the dynamic model. The motion equations were derived based on Lagrange equation by employing three pure Cartesian deformation variables combined with nonlinear von Karman strain formula. Numerical investigations studied the modal characteristics of the beam. Numerical results calculated from a commercial finite element code and obtained with the present modeling method were in good agreement with the previous results reported in the literature. The combined softening effects due to the thermal stress and the rotation motion were observed. Furthermore, it is shown that the inclusion of thermal stress is necessary for blades operating under a high temperature field. Buckling thermal loads and the critical rotating speed were calculated through solving the corresponding nonlinear equations numerically, and some pertinent conclusions are outlined. It is also found that the peak value position of the first mode shape approaches to the tip of blade with the increment of rotating speed and hub radius. However, the variation in the environment temperature causes only a slight alteration in the mode shape.

  5. Dynamic response of plant genome to ultraviolet radiation and other genotoxic stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molinier, Jean; Oakeley, Edward J.; Niederhauser, Olivier; Kovalchuk, Igor; Hohn, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    Oligonucleotide microarray technology was used to identify genes, which are responding after exposure to UV-C radiation and to other agents causing genotoxic stress. The effect of these conditions on recombinational DNA repair was monitored in parallel. Global changes in gene expression were investigated in Arabidopsis wild-type plants challenged with UV-C, bleomycin, another abiotic agent and xylanase, a biotic factor, all leading to elevated homologous recombination frequencies. The comparison of the expression profile of each treatment allowed defining genes specifically involved in the dynamic response to UV. In the future, the potential roles of such genes in the different forms of stress recognition, signal transduction, and their roles in DNA repair processes will be assessed by using reverse genetic tools available for Arabidopsis thaliana

  6. Effect of dynamic strain aging on cyclic stress response and deformation behavior of Zircaloy-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudhakar Rao, G.; Verma, Preeti; Mahobia, G.S.; Santhi Srinivasa, N.C.; Singh, Vakil; Chakravartty, J.K.; Nudurupatic, Saibaba

    2016-01-01

    The effect of strain rate and temperature was studied on cyclic stress response and deformation behavior of annealed Zircaloy-2. Dynamic strain aging was exhibited under some test conditions. The cyclic stress response was found to be dependent on temperature and strain rate. At 300 °C, with decrease in strain rate, there was decrease in the rate as well as the degree of cyclic hardening. However, at 400°C, there was opposite trend and with decrease in strain rate both the rate as well as the degree of hardening increased. The deformation substructure showed dislocation bands, dislocation vein structure, PSB wall structure at both the temperatures. Irrespective of the temperature, there was dislocation loop structure, known as corduroy structure, at both the test temperatures. Based on the dislocation structure, the initial linear hardening is attributed to development of veins and PSB wall structure and the secondary hardening to the Corduroy structure. (author)

  7. Telomere dynamics in human mesenchymal stem cells after exposure to acute oxidative stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harbo, M.; Koelvraa, S.; Serakinci, N.

    2012-01-01

    mesenchymal stem cells, either primary or hTERT immortalized, were exposed to sub-lethal doses of hydrogen peroxide, and the short term effect on telomere dynamics was monitored by Universal STELA and TRF measurements. Both telomere measures were then correlated with the percentage of senescent cells......A gradual shortening of telomeres due to replication can be measured using the standard telomere restriction fragments (TRF) assay and other methods by measuring the mean length of all the telomeres in a cell. In contrast, stress-induced telomere shortening, which is believed to be just...... estimated by senescence-associated beta-galactosidase staining. The exposure to acute oxidative stress resulted in an increased number of ultra-short telomeres, which correlated strongly with the percentage of senescent cells, whereas a correlation between mean telomere length and the percentage...

  8. Gene expression dynamics in the oxidative stress response of fission yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papadakis, Emmanouil

    Changes in the environment continuously challenge living organisms during their lifetime. A cell’s survival depends on its ability to coordinate a rapid and successful stress response when exposed to acute doses of damaging agents. Oxidative stress caused by an excess of reactive oxygen species......, especially using model organisms. The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe is a unicellular eukaryotic organism that possesses genome features and molecular pathways that are highly conserved in humans. Moreover, the limited redundancy of its genome make S. pombe well suited for phenotypic studies...... (HP, 0.5 mM). The applied experimental design allowed us to measure both the activation and recovery phases of the response at a sufficiently high time resolution to model transcription and translation dynamics. Absolute expression levels (copies per cell) and time-resolved expression profiles for 4...

  9. Dynamic Stresses in the LHC TCDS Diluter from 7 TeV Beam Loading

    CERN Document Server

    Goddard, B; Presland, A; Weterings, W

    2006-01-01

    In the event of an unsynchronised beam abort, the MSD extraction septum of the LHC beam dumping system is protected from damage by the TCDS diluter. The simultaneous constraints of obtaining sufficient beam dilution while ensuring the survival of the TCDS make the design difficult, with high thermally induced dynamic stresses occurring in the material needed to attenuate the particle showers induced by the primary beam impact. In this paper, full 3D simulations are described where the worst-case beam loading has been used to generate the local temperature rise and to follow the resulting time evolution of the mechanical stresses. The results and the accompanying design changes for the TCDS, to provide an adequate performance margin, are detailed.

  10. Temporal dynamics of the response to Al stress in Eucalyptus grandis × Eucalyptus camaldulensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berenice K. de Alcântara

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Lipid peroxidation and root elongation of Eucalyptus grandis × Eucalyptus camaldulensis were studied under stress conditions in response to aluminum (Al, a metal known to limit agricultural productivity in acidic soils primarily due to reduced root elongation. In Brazil, the Grancam 1277 hybrid (E. grandis × E. camaldulensis has been planted in the "Cerrado", a region of the country with a wide occurrence of acidic soils. The present study demonstrated that the hybrid exhibited root growth reduction and increased levels of lipid peroxidation after 24h of treatment with 100 µM of Al, which was followed by a reduction in lipid peroxidation levels and the recovery of root elongation after 48h of Al exposure, suggesting a rapid response to the early stressful conditions induced by Al. The understanding of the temporal dynamics of Al tolerance may be useful for selecting more tolerant genotypes and for identifying genes of interest for applications in bioengineering.

  11. Flow stress and dynamic strain-ageing of β-transformed Zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, O.T.; Tseng, D.; Tangri, K.; MacEwen, S.R.

    1979-01-01

    The 0.2% yield stress of β-transformed Zircaloy-4 was found to be independent of prior-β grain size but varied as the inverse of the transformed β plate width. A dislocation loop expansion model originally proposed by Langford and Cohen (1969) for cold-drawn iron wires is used to explain the inverse plate width dependence. Both air-cooled and water-quenched samples exhibited dynamic strain-ageing effects in approximately the same temperature range of 573 to 673 K: (a) a local minimum in strain-rate sensitivity is associated with a peak or an inflection point in the temperature dependence of the 0.2% yield stress for water-quenched or air-cooled samples respectively, and (b) yield drops were observed in strain rate change tests. (Auth.)

  12. Heat Stress and Lipopolysaccharide Stimulation of Chicken Macrophage-Like Cell Line Activates Expression of Distinct Sets of Genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Slawinska

    Full Text Available Acute heat stress requires immediate adjustment of the stressed individual to sudden changes of ambient temperatures. Chickens are particularly sensitive to heat stress due to development of insufficient physiological mechanisms to mitigate its effects. One of the symptoms of heat stress is endotoxemia that results from release of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS from the guts. Heat-related cytotoxicity is mitigated by the innate immune system, which is comprised mostly of phagocytic cells such as monocytes and macrophages. The objective of this study was to analyze the molecular responses of the chicken macrophage-like HD11 cell line to combined heat stress and lipopolysaccharide treatment in vitro. The cells were heat-stressed and then allowed a temperature-recovery period, during which the gene expression was investigated. LPS was added to the cells to mimic the heat-stress-related endotoxemia. Semi high-throughput gene expression analysis was used to study a gene panel comprised of heat shock proteins, stress-related genes, signaling molecules and immune response genes. HD11 cell line responded to heat stress with increased mRNA abundance of the HSP25, HSPA2 and HSPH1 chaperones as well as DNAJA4 and DNAJB6 co-chaperones. The anti-apoptotic gene BAG3 was also highly up-regulated, providing evidence that the cells expressed pro-survival processes. The immune response of the HD11 cell line to LPS in the heat stress environment (up-regulation of CCL4, CCL5, IL1B, IL8 and iNOS was higher than in thermoneutral conditions. However, the peak in the transcriptional regulation of the immune genes was after two hours of temperature-recovery. Therefore, we propose the potential influence of the extracellular heat shock proteins not only in mitigating effects of abiotic stress but also in triggering the higher level of the immune responses. Finally, use of correlation networks for the data analysis aided in discovering subtle differences in the gene

  13. Growing up with stress - carbon sequestration and allocation dynamics of a broadleaf evergreen forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griebel, Anne; Bennett, Lauren T.; Arndt, Stefan K.

    2016-04-01

    Evergreen forests have the potential to sequester carbon year-round due to the presence of leaves with a multi-year lifespan. Eucalypt forests occur in warmer climates where temperature and radiation are not imposing a strong seasonality. Thus, unlike deciduous or many coniferous trees, many eucalypts grow opportunistically as conditions allow. As such, many eucalypts do not produce distinct growth rings, which present challenges to the implementation of standard methods and data interpretation approaches for monitoring and explaining carbon allocation dynamics in response to climatic stress. As a consequence, there is a lack of detailed understanding of seasonal growth dynamics of evergreen forests as a whole, and, in particular, of the influence of climatic drivers on carbon allocation to the various biomass pools. We used a multi-instrument approach in a mixed species eucalypt forest to investigate the influence of climatic drivers on the seasonal growth dynamics of a predominantly temperate and moisture-regulated environment in south-eastern Australia. Ecosystem scale observations of net ecosystem exchange (NEE) from a flux tower in the Wombat forest near Melbourne indicated that the ecosystem is a year-round carbon sink, but that intra-annual variations in temperature and moisture along with prolonged heat waves and dry spells resulted in a wide range of annual sums over the past three years (NEE ranging from ~4 to 12 t C ha-1 yr-1). Dendrometers were used to monitor stem increments of the three dominant eucalypt species. Stem expansion was generally opportunistic with the greatest increments under warm but moist conditions (often in spring and autumn), and the strongest indicators of stem growth dynamics being radiation, vapour pressure deficit and a combined heat-moisture index. Differences in the seasonality of stem increments between species were largely due to differences in the canopy position of sampled individuals. The greatest stem increments were

  14. Dynamic Fungal Cell Wall Architecture in Stress Adaptation and Immune Evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopke, Alex; Brown, Alistair J P; Hall, Rebecca A; Wheeler, Robert T

    2018-04-01

    Deadly infections from opportunistic fungi have risen in frequency, largely because of the at-risk immunocompromised population created by advances in modern medicine and the HIV/AIDS pandemic. This review focuses on dynamics of the fungal polysaccharide cell wall, which plays an outsized role in fungal pathogenesis and therapy because it acts as both an environmental barrier and as the major interface with the host immune system. Human fungal pathogens use architectural strategies to mask epitopes from the host and prevent immune surveillance, and recent work elucidates how biotic and abiotic stresses present during infection can either block or enhance masking. The signaling components implicated in regulating fungal immune recognition can teach us how cell wall dynamics are controlled, and represent potential targets for interventions designed to boost or dampen immunity. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Non-invasive Vagal Nerve Stimulation Effects on Hyperarousal and Autonomic State in Patients with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and History of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: Preliminary Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damon G. Lamb

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD is a reaction to trauma that results in a chronic perception of threat, precipitating mobilization of the autonomic nervous system, and may be reflected by chronic disinhibition of limbic structures. A common injury preceding PTSD in veterans is mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI. This may be due to the vulnerability of white matter in these networks and such damage may affect treatment response. We evaluated transcutaneous vagal nerve stimulation (tVNS, a non-invasive, low-risk approach that may alter the functions of the limbo-cortical and peripheral networks underlying the hyperarousal component of PTSD and thus improve patient health and well-being. In this single visit pilot study evaluating the impact of tVNS in 22 combat veterans, we used a between-subjects design in people with either PTSD with preceding mTBI or healthy controls. Participants were randomized into stimulation or sham groups and completed a posturally modulated autonomic assessment and emotionally modulated startle paradigm. The primary measures used were respiratory sinus arrhythmia (high-frequency heart rate variability during a tilt-table procedure derived from an electrocardiogram, and skin conductance changes in response to acoustic startle while viewing emotional images (International Affective Picture System. The stimulation was well tolerated and resulted in improvements in vagal tone and moderation of autonomic response to startle, consistent with modulation of autonomic state and response to stress in this population. Our results suggest that tVNS affects systems underlying emotional dysregulation in this population and, therefore, should be further evaluated and developed as a potential treatment tool for these patients.

  16. Sex-Specific Consequences of Neonatal Stress on Cardio-Respiratory Inhibition Following Laryngeal Stimulation in Rat Pups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldy, Cécile; Chamberland, Simon

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The presence of liquid near the larynx of immature mammals triggers prolonged apneas with significant O2 desaturations and bradycardias. When excessive, this reflex (the laryngeal chemoreflex; LCR) can be fatal. Our understanding of the origins of abnormal LCR are limited; however, perinatal stress and male sex are risk factors for cardio-respiratory failure in infants. Because exposure to stress during early life has deleterious and sex-specific consequences on brain development it is plausible that respiratory reflexes are vulnerable to neuroendocrine dysfunction. To address this issue, we tested the hypothesis that neonatal maternal separation (NMS) is sufficient to exacerbate LCR-induced cardio-respiratory inhibition in anesthetized rat pups. Stressed pups were separated from their mother 3 h/d from postnatal days 3 to 12. At P14–P15, pups were instrumented to monitor breathing, O2 saturation (Spo2), and heart rate. The LCR was activated by water injections near the larynx (10 µl). LCR-induced apneas were longer in stressed pups than controls; O2 desaturations and bradycardias were more profound, especially in males. NMS increased the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous EPSCs (sEPSCs) in the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMNV) of males but not females. The positive relationship between corticosterone and testosterone observed in stressed pups (males only) suggests that disruption of neuroendocrine function by stress is key to sex-based differences in abnormal LCR. Because testosterone application onto medullary slices augments EPSC amplitude only in males, we propose that testosterone-mediated enhancement of synaptic connectivity within the DMNV contributes to the male bias in cardio-respiratory inhibition following LCR activation in stressed pups. PMID:29308430

  17. TIA-1 Self-Multimerization, Phase Separation, and Recruitment into Stress Granules Are Dynamically Regulated by Zn2+

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph B. Rayman

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Stress granules are non-membranous structures that transiently form in the cytoplasm during cellular stress, where they promote translational repression of non-essential RNAs and modulate cell signaling by sequestering key signal transduction proteins. These and other functions of stress granules facilitate an adaptive cellular response to environmental adversity. A key component of stress granules is the prion-related RNA-binding protein, T cell intracellular antigen-1 (TIA-1. Here, we report that recombinant TIA-1 undergoes rapid multimerization and phase separation in the presence of divalent zinc, which can be reversed by the zinc chelator, TPEN. Similarly, the formation and maintenance of TIA-1-positive stress granules in arsenite-treated cells are inhibited by TPEN. In addition, Zn2+ is released in cells treated with arsenite, before stress granule formation. These findings suggest that Zn2+ is a physiological ligand of TIA-1, acting as a stress-inducible second messenger to promote multimerization of TIA-1 and subsequent localization into stress granules. : Rayman et al. show that Zn2+ is a stress-inducible second messenger that triggers self-multimerization and phase separation of TIA-1 and regulates dynamic recruitment of TIA-1 into stress granules. This mechanism is part of an adaptive cellular response to environmental adversity. Keywords: TIA-1, TIA1, stress granules, cellular stress, functional prion, phase separation, zinc regulation

  18. Research on Formation Mechanism of Dynamic Response and Residual Stress of Sheet Metal Induced by Laser Shock Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Aixin; Cao, Yupeng; Wang, Heng; Zhang, Zhengang

    2018-01-01

    In order to reveal the quantitative control of the residual stress on the surface of metal materials, the relevant theoretical and experimental studies were carried out to investigate the dynamic response of metal thin plates and the formation mechanism of residual stress induced by laser shock wave. In this paper, the latest research trends on the surface residual stress of laser shock processing technology were elaborated. The main progress of laser shock wave propagation mechanism and dynamic response, laser shock, and surface residual stress were discussed. It is pointed out that the multi-scale characterization of laser and material, surface residual stress and microstructure change is a new hotspot in laser shock strengthening technology.

  19. Stress distribution in dental prosthesis under an occlusal combined dynamic loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merdji, A.; Bachir Bouiadjra, B.; Ould Chikh, B.; Mootanah, R.; Aminallah, L.; Serier, B.; Muslih, I.M.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The mechanical stress reaches the highest in areas of cortical bones. ► The mechanical stress in the cancellous bone reaches greatest in the bottom of the dental implant. ► Implant with low-volume bone might cause increased stress concentration in the cortical bone. -- Abstract: The biomechanical behavior of osseointegrated dental prostheses systems plays an important role in its functional longevity inside the bone. Simulation of these systems requires an accurate modeling of the prosthesis components, the jaw bone, the implant–bone interface, and the response of the system to different types of applied forces. The purpose of this study was to develop a new three-dimensional model of an osseointegrated molar dental prosthesis and to carry out finite element analysis to evaluate stress distributions in the bone and the dental prosthesis compounds under an occlusal combined dynamic load was applied to the top of the occlusale face of the prosthesis crown. The jaw bone model containing cortical bone and cancellous bone was constructed by using computer tomography scan pictures and Computer Aided Design tools. The dental prosthesis compounds were constructed, simulating the commercially available cylindrical implant of 4.8 mm diameter and 10 mm length. Both finite element models were created in Abaqus finite element software. All materials used in the models were considered to be isotropic, homogeneous and linearly elastic. The elastic properties, loads and constraints used in the model were taken from published data. Results of our finite element analyses, indicated that the maximum stresses were located around the mesial neck of the implant, in the marginal bone. Thus, this area should be preserved clinically in order to maintain the bone–implant interface structurally and functionally.

  20. Insulin-like growth factor stimulation increases radiosensitivity of a pancreatic cancer cell line through endoplasmic reticulum stress under hypoxic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isohashi, Fumiaki; Endo, Hiroko; Mukai, Mutsuko; Inoue, Masahiro; Inoue, Takehiro

    2008-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia is an obstacle to radiotherapy. Radiosensitivity under hypoxic conditions is determined by molecular oxygen levels, as well as by various biological cellular responses. The insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling pathway is a widely recognized survival signal that confers radioresistance. However, under hypoxic conditions the role of IGF signaling in radiosensitivity is still poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that IGF-II stimulation decreases clonogenic survival under hypoxic conditions in the pancreatic cancer cell lines AsPC-1 and Panc-1, and in the human breast cancer cell line MCF-7. IGF treatment under hypoxic conditions suppressed increased radiation sensitivity in these cell lines by pharmacologically inhibiting the phosphoinositide 3-kinase-mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, a major IGF signal-transduction pathway. Meanwhile, IGF-II induced the endoplasmic reticulum stress response under hypoxia, including increased protein levels of CHOP and ATF4, mRNA levels of CHOP, GADD34, and BiP as well as splicing levels of XBP-1. The response was suppressed by inhibiting phosphoinositide 3-kinase and mammalian target of rapamycin activity. Overexpression of CHOP in AsPC-1 cells increased radiation sensitivity by IGF-II simulation under hypoxic conditions, whereas suppression of CHOP expression levels with small hairpin RNA or a dominant negative form of a proline-rich extensin-like receptor protein kinase in hypoxia decreased IGF-induced radiosensitivity. IGF-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress contributed to radiosensitization independent of cell cycle status. Taken together, IGF stimulation increased radiosensitivity through the endoplasmic reticulum stress response under hypoxic conditions. (author)

  1. Dynamics of food availability, body condition and physiological stress response in breeding Black-legged Kittiwakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaysky, A.S.; Wingfield, J.C.; Piatt, John F.

    1999-01-01

    1. The seasonal dynamics of body condition (BC), circulating corticosterone levels (baseline, BL) and the adrenocortical response to acute stress (SR) were examined in long-lived Black-legged Kittiwakes, Rissa tridactyla, breeding at Duck (food-poor colony) and Gull (food-rich colony) Islands in lower Cook Inlet, Alaska. It was tested whether the dynamics of corticosterone levels reflect a seasonal change in bird physiological condition due to reproduction and/or variation in foraging conditions. 2. BC declined seasonally, and the decline was more pronounced in birds at the food-poor colony. BL and SR levels of corticosterone rose steadily through the reproductive season, and BL levels were significantly higher in birds on Duck island compared with those on Gull Island. During the egg-laying and chick-rearing stages, birds had lower SR on Duck Island than on Gull Island. 3. The results suggest that, in addition to a seasonal change in bird physiology during reproduction, local ecological factors such as food availability affect circulating levels of corticosterone and adrenal response to acute stress.

  2. Manipulating the magnetic anisotropy and magnetization dynamics by stress: Numerical calculation and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, M. A.; Bohn, F.

    2018-05-01

    We perform a theoretical and experimental investigation of the magnetic properties and magnetization dynamics of a ferromagnetic magnetostrictive multilayer grown onto a flexible substrate and submitted to external stress. We calculate the magnetic behavior and magnetoimpedance effect for a trilayered system from an approach that considers a magnetic permeability model for planar geometry and a magnetic free energy density which takes into account induced uniaxial and magnetoelastic anisotropy contributions. We verify remarkable modifications of the magnetic anisotropy with external stress, as well as we show that the dynamic magnetic response is strongly affected by these changes. We discuss the magnetic features that lead to modifications of the frequency limits where distinct mechanisms are responsible by the magnetoimpedance variations, enabling us to manipulate the resonance fields. To test the robustness of the approach, we directly compare theoretical results with experimental data. Thus, we provide experimental evidence to confirm the validity of the theoretical approach, as well as to manipulate the resonance fields to tune the MI response according to real applications in devices.

  3. Dynamics of seed germination, seedling growth and physiological responses of sweet corn under peg-induced water stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, W.; Zhang, X.; Li, G.; Suo, H.; Ashraf, U.; Mo, Z.

    2017-01-01

    Stress induced variations in seed germination of various crops has been well reported but germination potential of sweet corn seeds under osmotic stress with relation to time dynamics is still elusive. Present study explored the water absorption, germination potential and physiological indices and of sweet corn seeds exposed to five different levels of PEG-induced water stress i.e., 0, -0.3, -0.6, -0.9 and -1.2 M Pa water potential (Psi /sub w/) with respect to time dynamics. Results showed that enhanced water stress for prolonged time period (96 h) led to substantial reduction in water absorption and seed moisture contents, seed germination and vigor index as well as seedlings growth and fresh and dry biomass. Osmotic stress triggered antioxidant defense system like super-oxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD) and catalase (CAT) and accumulation of soluble sugars, proline and protein contents considerably. Initially, activities of SOD and CAT were higher but then reduced as stress persisted, however, POD showed a linear increase with respect to stress exposure time. Water stress also increased MDA contents up to 36 h then declined. Further, alpha-amylase activity and soluble protein showed significant correlations with maize seed germination. Overall, germination potential decreased with increase in osmotic stress in sweet corn seeds. (author)

  4. Probabilistic molecular dynamics evaluation of the stress-strain behavior of polyethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stowe, J.Q.; Predecki, P.K.; Laz, P.J.; Burks, B.M.; Kumosa, M.

    2009-01-01

    The primary goal of this study was to utilize molecular dynamics to predict the mechanical behavior of polyethylene. In particular, stress-strain relationships, the Young's modulus and Poisson ratio were predicted for low-density polyethylene at several molecular weights and polymer configurations with the number of united CH 2 atoms ranging between 500 and 5000. Probabilistic Monte Carlo methods were also used to identify the extent of uncertainty in mechanical property predictions. In general, asymptotic behavior was observed for stress and the Young's modulus as the molecular weight of the models increased. At the same time, significant variability, of the order of 1000% of the mean, in the stress-strain relationships and the Young's modulus predictions was observed, especially for low molecular weight models. The variability in the Young's modulus predictions ranged from 17.9 to 3.2 GPa for the models ranging from 100 to 5000 CH 2 atom models. However, it was also found that the mean value of the Young's modulus approached a physically possible value of 194 MPa for the 5000 atom model. Poisson ratio predictions also resulted in significant variability, from 200% to 425% of the mean, and ranged from 0.75 to 1.30. The mean value of the Poisson ratios calculated in this study ranged from 0.32 to 0.44 for the 100 to 5000 atom models, respectively.

  5. Angiogenin enhances cell migration by regulating stress fiber assembly and focal adhesion dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saisai Wei

    Full Text Available Angiogenin (ANG acts on both vascular endothelial cells and cancer cells, but the underlying mechanism remains elusive. In this study, we carried out a co-immunoprecipitation assay in HeLa cells and identified 14 potential ANG-interacting proteins. Among these proteins, β-actin, α-actinin 4, and non-muscle myosin heavy chain 9 are stress fiber components and involved in cytoskeleton organization and movement, which prompted us to investigate the mechanism of action of ANG in cell migration. Upon confirmation of the interactions between ANG and the three proteins, further studies revealed that ANG co-localized with β-actin and α-actinin 4 at the leading edge of migrating cells. Down-regulation of ANG resulted in fewer but thicker stress fibers with less dynamics, which was associated with the enlargements of focal adhesions. The focal adhesion kinase activity and cell migration capacity were significantly decreased in ANG-deficient cells. Taken together, our data demonstrated that the existence of ANG in the cytoplasm optimizes stress fiber assembly and focal adhesion formation to accommodate cell migration. The finding that ANG promoted cancer cell migration might provide new clues for tumor metastasis research.

  6. Long-range correlations and fractal dynamics in C. elegans: Changes with aging and stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Luiz G. A.; Winter, Peter B.; Ferreira, Leonardo N.; Brielmann, Renée M.; Morimoto, Richard I.; Amaral, Luís A. N.

    2017-08-01

    Reduced motor control is one of the most frequent features associated with aging and disease. Nonlinear and fractal analyses have proved to be useful in investigating human physiological alterations with age and disease. Similar findings have not been established for any of the model organisms typically studied by biologists, though. If the physiology of a simpler model organism displays the same characteristics, this fact would open a new research window on the control mechanisms that organisms use to regulate physiological processes during aging and stress. Here, we use a recently introduced animal-tracking technology to simultaneously follow tens of Caenorhabdits elegans for several hours and use tools from fractal physiology to quantitatively evaluate the effects of aging and temperature stress on nematode motility. Similar to human physiological signals, scaling analysis reveals long-range correlations in numerous motility variables, fractal properties in behavioral shifts, and fluctuation dynamics over a wide range of timescales. These properties change as a result of a superposition of age and stress-related adaptive mechanisms that regulate motility.

  7. Wall Shear Stress Estimation of Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Febina

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available An attempt has been made to evaluate the effects of wall shear stress (WSS on thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD. Aneurysm is an excessive localized swelling of the arterial wall due to many physiological factors and it may rupture causing shock or sudden death. The existing imaging modalities such as MRI and CT assist in the visualization of anomalies in internal organs. However, the expected dynamic behaviour of arterial bulge under stressed condition can only be effectively evaluated through mathematical modelling. In this work, a 3D aneurysm model is reconstructed from the CT scan slices and eventually the model is imported to Star CCM+ (Siemens, USA for intensive CFD analysis. The domain is discretized using polyhedral mesh with prism layers to capture the weakening boundary more accurately. When there is flow reversal in TAA as seen in the velocity vector plot, there is a chance of cell damage causing clots. This is because of the shear created in the system due to the flow pattern. It is observed from the proposed mathematical modelling that the deteriorating WSS is an indicator for possible rupture and its value oscillates over a cardiac cycle as well as over different stress conditions. In this model, the vortex formation pattern and flow reversals are also captured. The non-Newtonian model, including a pulsatile flow instead of a steady average flow, does not overpredict the WSS (15.29 Pa compared to 16 Pa for the Newtonian model. Although in a cycle the flow behaviour is laminar-turbulent-laminar (LTL, utilizing the non-Newtonian model along with LTL model also overpredicted the WSS with a value of 20.1 Pa. The numerical study presented here provides good insight of TAA using a systematic approach to numerical modelling and analysis.

  8. Field Measurement of Dynamic Compressive Stress Response of Pavement-Subgrade Induced by Moving Heavy-Duty Trucks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingshi An

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the dynamic compressive stress response of pavement-subgrade induced by moving heavy-duty trucks. In order to study the distribution characteristic of dynamic pressure of pavement-subgrade in more detail, truck loadings, truck speeds, and dynamic pressure distributions at different depths were monitored under twenty-five working conditions on the section of Qiqihar-Nenjiang Highway in Heilongjiang Province, China. The effects of truck loading, truck speed, and depth on dynamic compressive stress response can be concluded as follows: (1 increasing truck loading will increase the dynamic pressure amplitude of subgrade-pavement and dominant frequencies are close to the characteristic frequencies caused by heavy-duty trucks at the speed of 70 km/h; (2 as truck speed increases, the dynamic pressure amplitudes of measuring points have an increasing tendency; the dynamic pressure spectrums are also significantly influenced by truck speed: the higher the truck speed, the wider the spectrum and the higher the dominant frequencies; (3 as depth increases, the dynamic pressure amplitudes of measuring points decrease rapidly. The influence of the front axle decreases gradually until disappearing and the compressive stress superposition phenomenon caused by rear double axles can be found with increasing depth.

  9. Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... taking care of an aging parent. With mental stress, the body pumps out hormones to no avail. Neither fighting ... with type 1 diabetes. This difference makes sense. Stress blocks the body from releasing insulin in people with type 2 ...

  10. Electron transfer dynamics of triphenylamine dyes bound to TiO2 nanoparticles from femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Hoffman, David P.; Lee, Olivia P.; Millstone, Jill E.; Chen, Mark S.; Su, Timothy A.; Creelman, Mark; Frechet, Jean; Mathies, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    Interfacial electron transfer between sensitizers and semiconducting nanoparticles is a crucial yet poorly understood process. To address this problem, we have used transient absorption (TA) and femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS

  11. The dynamics of migration-related stress and coping of female domestic workers from the Philippines: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Ham, Alida Joanna; Ujano-Batangan, Maria Theresa; Ignacio, Raquel; Wolffers, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Female domestic workers face many migration-related stressors that affect their mental health, but we know little about the dynamics of stress and coping in different migration phases. This exploratory study aims to assess stress and coping of female migrant domestic workers from the Philippines in different phases of the migration process; prior to migration, in the country of destination and upon return to the Philippines. Data were collected in 2010 using questionnaires (N = 500). Validation of findings took place in a work shop (23 participants) and two focus groups (13 and 8 participants). Stress levels of women were significantly higher abroad than in the Philippines. Stress and coping in the Philippines was primarily related to financial issues, while stress and coping abroad related more strongly loneliness, working conditions and employers. Findings from this study provide insight in the phase-specific and transnational dimensions of stress and coping.

  12. SAP-4, Static and Dynamic Linear System Stress Analysis for Various Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zawadzki, S.

    1984-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: SAP4 is a structural analysis program for determining the static and dynamic response of linear systems. The structural systems to be analyzed may be composed of combinations of a number of different structural elements. Currently the program contains the following element types - (a) three-dimensional truss element, (b) three-dimensional beam element, (c) plane stress and plane strain element, (d) two-dimensional axisymmetric solid, (e) three-dimensional solid, (f) variable-number nodes thick shell and three-dimensional element, (g) thin-plate or thin-shell element, (h) boundary element, and (i) pipe element (tangent and bend). 2 - Method of solution: The formation of the structure matrices is carried out in the same way in a static or dynamic analysis. The static analysis is continued by solving the equations of equilibrium followed by the computation of element stresses. In a dynamic analysis the choice is between frequency calculations only, frequency calculations followed by response history analysis, frequency calculations followed by response spectrum analysis, or response history analysis by direct integration. To obtain the frequencies and vibration mode shapes, solution routines are used which calculate the required eigenvalues and eigenvectors directly without a transformation of the structure stiffness matrix and mass matrix to a reduced form. To perform the direct integration an unconditionally stable scheme is used, which also operates on the original structure stiffness matrix and mass matrix. In this manner the program operation and input data required for a dynamic analysis are simple extensions of those needed for a static analysis. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The capacity of the program depends mainly on the total number of nodal points in the system, the number of eigenvalues needed in the dynamic analysis, and the computer used. There is practically no restriction on the number of

  13. Non-Destructive Evaluation Method Based On Dynamic Invariant Stress Resultants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Junchi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Most of the vibration based damage detection methods are based on changes in frequencies, mode shapes, mode shape curvature, and flexibilities. These methods are limited and typically can only detect the presence and location of damage. Current methods seldom can identify the exact severity of damage to structures. This paper will present research in the development of a new non-destructive evaluation method to identify the existence, location, and severity of damage for structural systems. The method utilizes the concept of invariant stress resultants (ISR. The basic concept of ISR is that at any given cross section the resultant internal force distribution in a structural member is not affected by the inflicted damage. The method utilizes dynamic analysis of the structure to simulate direct measurements of acceleration, velocity and displacement simultaneously. The proposed dynamic ISR method is developed and utilized to detect the damage of corresponding changes in mass, damping and stiffness. The objectives of this research are to develop the basic theory of the dynamic ISR method, apply it to the specific types of structures, and verify the accuracy of the developed theory. Numerical results that demonstrate the application of the method will reflect the advanced sensitivity and accuracy in characterizing multiple damage locations.

  14. Using the Dynamic Model of Affect (DMA) to examine leisure time as a stress coping resource: Taking into account stress severity and gender difference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Xinyi Lisa; Yarnal, Careen M.; Almeida, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Affective complexity (AC) is a marker of psychological well-being. According to the Dynamic Model of Affect (DMA), stressful experiences reduce AC while positive events increase AC. One type of positive events is leisure, which was also identified as a coping resource. This study extended the DMA and leisure coping research by assessing gender difference in how daily stress severity and leisure time influence AC. Analyzing eight-day diary data, we found that females, compared to males, experienced greater decrease in AC with increase in stress severity but also bigger increase in AC with increase in leisure time. The finding highlights gender difference in affective reactivity to and coping with daily stress, the value of the DMA, and the importance of severity appraisal. PMID:25242824

  15. Dynamic thermo-chemo-mechanical strain of Zircaloy-4 slotted rings for evaluating strategies that mitigate stress corrosion cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrier, G.A.; Metzler, J.; Farahani, M.; Chan, P.K.; Corcoran, E.C. [Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in Zircaloy-4 fuel sheaths has been investigated by static loading of slotted ring samples under hot and corrosive conditions. However, in nuclear reactors, power ramps can have short (e.g., 10-20 minutes) and recurring time frames due to dynamic processes such as on-power refuelling, adjuster rod manoeuvres, and load following. Therefore, to enable out-reactor dynamic testing, an apparatus was designed to dynamically strain slotted ring samples under SCC conditions. This apparatus can additionally be used to test fatigue properties. Unique capabilities of this apparatus and preliminary results obtained from static and dynamic tests are presented. (author)

  16. Investigation into Mechanism of Floor Dynamic Rupture by Evolution Characteristics of Stress and Mine Tremors: A Case Study in Guojiahe Coal Mine, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangjian Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to explore the mechanism of floor dynamic rupture, the current study adopts a thin plate model to further investigate the condition of floor failure. One of the possible explanations could be floor buckling due to high horizontal stress and dynamic disturbance ultimately leading to rapid and massive release of elastic energy thus inducing dynamic rupture. Seismic computed tomography and 3D location were employed to explore the evolution characteristics of floor stress distribution and positions of mine tremors. In the regions of floor dynamic rupture, higher P-wave velocity was recorded prior to the dynamic rupture. On the contrary, relatively lower reading was observed after the dynamic rupture thus depicting a high stress concentration condition. Meanwhile, evolution of mine tremors revealed the accumulation and subsequent release of energy during the dynamic rupture process. It was further revealed that dynamic rupture was induced due to the superposition of static and dynamic stresses: (i the high static stress concentration due to frontal and lateral abutment stress from coal pillar and (ii dynamic stress from the fracture and caving of coal pillar, hard roof, and key stratum. In the later part of this study, the floor dynamic rupture occurrence process would be reproduced through numerical simulations within a 0.6 sec time frame. The above-mentioned findings would be used to propose a feasible mechanism for prewarning and prevention of floor dynamic rupture using seismic computed tomography and mine tremors 3D location.

  17. Carbon and Nitrogen dynamics in deciduous and broad leaf trees under drought stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Jobin; Schaub, Marcus; Arend, Matthias; Saurer, Matthias; siegwolf, Rolf; Weiler, Markus; Gessler, Arthur

    2017-04-01

    Climate change is projected to lead to an increased frequency and duration of severe drought events in future. Already within the last twenty years, however, drought stress related forest mortality has been increasing across the globe. Tree and forest die off events have multiple adverse effects on ecosystem functioning and might convert previous carbon sinks to act as carbon sources instead and can thus intensify the effect of climate change and global warming. Current predictions of forest's functioning under drought and thus forest mortality under future climatic conditions are constrained by a still incomplete picture of the trees' physiological reactions that allows some trees to survive drought periods while others succumb. Concerning the effects of drought on the carbon balance and on tree hydraulics our picture is getting more complete, but still interactions between abiotic factors and pest and diseases as well as the interaction between carbon and nutrient balances as factors affecting drought induced mortality are not well understood. Reduced carbon allocation from shoots to roots might cause a lack of energy for root nutrient uptake and to a shortage of carbon skeletons for nitrogen assimilation and thus to an impaired nutrient status of trees. To tackle these points, we have performed a drought stress experiment with six different plant species, 3 broad leaf (maple, beech and oak) and 3 deciduous (pine, fir and spruce). Potted two-year-old seedlings were kept inside a greenhouse for 5 months and 3 levels of drought stress (no stress (control), intermediate and intensive drought stress) were applied by controlling water supply. Gas exchange measurements were performed periodically to monitor photosynthesis, transpiration, stomatal conductance. At the pinnacle of drought stress, we applied isotopic pulse labelling: On the one hand we exposed trees to 13CO2 to investigate on carbon dynamics and the allocation of new assimilates within the plant. Moreover

  18. Characterizing the intra-urban spatiotemporal dynamics of High Heat Stress Zones (Hotspots)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shreevastava, A.; Rao, P. S.; McGrath, G. S.

    2017-12-01

    In this study, we present an innovative framework to characterize the spatio-temporal dynamics of High Heat Stress Zones (Hot spots) created within an Urban area in the event of a Heat Wave. Heat waves are one of the leading causes of weather-related human mortality in many countries, and cities receive its worst brunt. The extreme heat stress within urban areas is often a synergistic combination of large-scale meteorological events, and the locally exacerbated impacts due to Urban Heat Islands (UHI). UHI is typically characterized as the difference between mean temperature of the urban and rural area. As a result, it fails to capture the significant variability that exists within the city itself. This variability arises from the diverse and complex spatial geometries of cities. Previous studies that have attempted to quantify the heat stress at an intra-urban scale are labor intensive, expensive, and difficult to emulate globally as they rely on availability of extensive data and their assimilation. The proposed study takes advantage of the well-established notion of fractal properties of cities to make the methods scalable to other cities where in-situ observational data might not be available. As an input, land surface temperatures are estimated using Landsat data. Using clustering analysis, we probe the emergence of thermal hotspots. The probability distributions (PD) of these hotspots are found to follow a power-law distribution in agreement with fractal characteristics of the city. PDs of several archetypical cities are then investigated to compare the effect of different spatial structures (e.g. monocentric v/s polycentric, sprawl v/s compact). Further, the temporal variability of the distributions on a diurnal as well as a seasonal scale is discussed. Finally, the spatiotemporal dynamics of the urban hotspots under a heat-wave (E.g. Delhi Heat wave, 2015) are compared against the non-heat wave scenarios. In summary, a technique that is globally adaptive and

  19. Transverse stress induced LP 02-LP 21 modal interference of stimulated Raman scattered light in a few-mode optical fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, A.; Posey, R.

    1996-02-01

    Four-photon mixing followed by stimulated Raman scattering is observed in LP 02 mode in a 7.9 μm core diameter optical fiber. A localized transverse stress efficiency couples LP 02 to the LP 21 mode with a macroscopic beat length of 1.8 mm. LP 02-LP 21 modal interference is investigated by detecting the 550-590 nm SRS through a pinhole in the far field exit plane. Quantitative explanation of wavelength dependent intensity modulation results in a precise experimental determination of {∂[β 02(λ) - β 21(λ)] }/{∂λ}, for mode-propagation constants β02( λ) and β21( λ) of LP 02 and LP 21 modes respectively, as well as Δ, the relative core-cladding refractive index difference. The LP 02-LP 21 modal interference is used for sensing of temperature between 50-300°C.

  20. Effects of fluid dynamic stress on fracturing of cell-aggregated tissue during purification for islets of Langerhans transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shintaku, H; Kawano, S [Department of Mechanical Science and Bioengineering, Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Okitsu, T [Transplantation Unit, Kyoto University Hospital, Kawara-cho Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Matsumoto, S [Baylor Research Institute Islet Cell Laboratory, 1400 Eight Avenue, Fort Worth, TX 76104 (United States); Suzuki, T; Kanno, I; Kotera, H [Department of Microengineering, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Honmachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)], E-mail: shintaku@me.es.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2008-06-07

    Among clinical treatments for type 1 diabetes mellitus, the transplantation of islets of Langerhans to the portal vein of the hepar is a commonly used treatment for glucose homeostasis. Islet purification using the density gradient of a solution in a centrifuge separator is required for safety and efficiency. In the purification, the number of tissues to be transplanted is reduced by removing the acinar tissue and gathering the islet from the digest of pancreas. However, the mechanical effects on the fracture of islets in the centrifuge due to fluid dynamic stress are a serious problem in the purification process. In this study, a preliminary experiment using a cylindrical rotating viscometer with a simple geometry is conducted in order to systematically clarify the effect of fluid dynamic stress on the fracture of islets. The effects of fluid dynamic stress on the islet configuration is quantitatively measured for various flow conditions, and a predictive fracture model is developed based on the experimental results. Furthermore, in the practical purification process in the COBE (Gambro BCT), which is widely used in clinical applications, we perform a numerical analysis of the fluid dynamic stress based on Navier-Stokes equations to estimate the stress conditions for islets. Using the fracture model and numerical analysis, the islet fracture characteristics using the COBE are successfully investigated. The results obtained in this study provide crucial information for the purification of islets by centrifuge in practical and clinical applications.

  1. Effects of fluid dynamic stress on fracturing of cell-aggregated tissue during purification for islets of Langerhans transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shintaku, H; Kawano, S; Okitsu, T; Matsumoto, S; Suzuki, T; Kanno, I; Kotera, H

    2008-01-01

    Among clinical treatments for type 1 diabetes mellitus, the transplantation of islets of Langerhans to the portal vein of the hepar is a commonly used treatment for glucose homeostasis. Islet purification using the density gradient of a solution in a centrifuge separator is required for safety and efficiency. In the purification, the number of tissues to be transplanted is reduced by removing the acinar tissue and gathering the islet from the digest of pancreas. However, the mechanical effects on the fracture of islets in the centrifuge due to fluid dynamic stress are a serious problem in the purification process. In this study, a preliminary experiment using a cylindrical rotating viscometer with a simple geometry is conducted in order to systematically clarify the effect of fluid dynamic stress on the fracture of islets. The effects of fluid dynamic stress on the islet configuration is quantitatively measured for various flow conditions, and a predictive fracture model is developed based on the experimental results. Furthermore, in the practical purification process in the COBE (Gambro BCT), which is widely used in clinical applications, we perform a numerical analysis of the fluid dynamic stress based on Navier-Stokes equations to estimate the stress conditions for islets. Using the fracture model and numerical analysis, the islet fracture characteristics using the COBE are successfully investigated. The results obtained in this study provide crucial information for the purification of islets by centrifuge in practical and clinical applications

  2. Three dimensional viscoelastic simulation on dynamic evolution of stress field in North China induced by the 1966 Xingtai earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lian-Wang; Lu, Yuan-Zhong; Liu, Jie; Guo, Ruo-Mei

    2001-09-01

    Using three dimensional (3D) viscoelastic finite element method (FEM) we study the dynamic evolution pattern of the coseismic change of Coulomb failure stress and postseismic change, on time scale of hundreds years, of rheological effect induced by the M S=7.2 Xingtai earthquake on March 22, 1966. Then, we simulate the coseismic disturbance in stress field in North China and dynamic change rate on one-year scale caused by the Xingtai earthquake and Tangshan earthquake during 15 years from 1966 to 1980. Finally, we discuss the triggering of a strong earthquake to another future strong earthquake.

  3. A method for the dynamic and thermal stress analysis of space shuttle surface insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojalvo, I. U.; Levy, A.; Austin, F.

    1975-01-01

    The thermal protection system of the space shuttle consists of thousands of separate insulation tiles bonded to the orbiter's surface through a soft strain-isolation layer. The individual tiles are relatively thick and possess nonuniform properties. Therefore, each is idealized by finite-element assemblages containing up to 2500 degrees of freedom. Since the tiles affixed to a given structural panel will, in general, interact with one another, application of the standard direct-stiffness method would require equation systems involving excessive numbers of unknowns. This paper presents a method which overcomes this problem through an efficient iterative procedure which requires treatment of only a single tile at any given time. Results of associated static, dynamic, and thermal stress analyses and sufficient conditions for convergence of the iterative solution method are given.

  4. Dynamic Network Reconstruction from Gene Expression Data Describing the Effect of LiCl Stimulation on Hepatocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zellmer Sebastian

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Wnt/β-catenin signalling plays an important role in zonation of liver parenchyma and in patterning of hepatocyte heterogeneity. A characteristic marker of this heterogeneity is glutamine synthetase, which is expressed only in a subset of pericentrally located hepatocytes. To investigate, whether and how the Wnt/β-catenin signalling pathway is involved a culture of hepatocytes was stimulated by LiCl. This resulted in an increase in the specific GS activity, indicating that the Wnt/β-catenin pathway may participate in regulating GS levels. Affymetrix GeneChip oligonucleotide arrays were used to monitor the gene expression changes during a period from 2 to 24 hours after stimulation by LiCl. Samples from a cultivation without stimulation were used as controls. Based on the gene expression profiles a hypothetic signal transduction network was constructed by a reverse engineering algorithm. The network robustness was tested and the most stable structure was identified.

  5. Studies of earthquakes stress drops, seismic scattering, and dynamic triggering in North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudero Ayala, Christian Rene

    at 1.5, 3, 5, 7.5, 10.5, and 13.5 Hz. Coda Q present a great correlation with tectonic and geology setting, as well as the crustal thickness. I analyze global and Middle American Subduction Zone (MASZ) seismicity from 1998 to 2008 to quantify the transient stresses effects at teleseismic distances. I use the Bulletin of the International Seismological Centre Catalog (ISCCD) published by the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS). To identify MASZ seismicity changes due to distant, large (Mw ¿ 7) earthquakes, I first identify local earthquakes that occurred before and after the mainshocks. I then group the local earthquakes within a cluster radius between 75 to 200 km. I obtain statistics based on characteristics of both mainshocks and local earthquakes clusters, such as cluster-mainshock azimuth, mainshock focal mechanism, and local earthquakes clusters within the MASZ. Based on the lateral variations of the dip along the subducted oceanic plate, I divide the Mexican subduction zone into four segments. I then apply the Paired Samples Statistical Test (PSST) to the sorted data to identify increment, decrement or either in the local seismicity associated with distant large earthquakes passage of surface waves. I identify dynamic triggering for all MASZ segments produced by large earthquakes emerging from specific azimuths, as well as, a decrease for some cases. I find no dependence of seismicity changes on mainshock focal mechanism.

  6. Microsecond molecular dynamics simulations of intrinsically disordered proteins involved in the oxidative stress response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elio A Cino

    Full Text Available Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs are abundant in cells and have central roles in protein-protein interaction networks. Interactions between the IDP Prothymosin alpha (ProTα and the Neh2 domain of Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2, with a common binding partner, Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1(Keap1, are essential for regulating cellular response to oxidative stress. Misregulation of this pathway can lead to neurodegenerative diseases, premature aging and cancer. In order to understand the mechanisms these two disordered proteins employ to bind to Keap1, we performed extensive 0.5-1.0 microsecond atomistic molecular dynamics (MD simulations and isothermal titration calorimetry experiments to investigate the structure/dynamics of free-state ProTα and Neh2 and their thermodynamics of bindings. The results show that in their free states, both ProTα and Neh2 have propensities to form bound-state-like β-turn structures but to different extents. We also found that, for both proteins, residues outside the Keap1-binding motifs may play important roles in stabilizing the bound-state-like structures. Based on our findings, we propose that the binding of disordered ProTα and Neh2 to Keap1 occurs synergistically via preformed structural elements (PSEs and coupled folding and binding, with a heavy bias towards PSEs, particularly for Neh2. Our results provide insights into the molecular mechanisms Neh2 and ProTα bind to Keap1, information that is useful for developing therapeutics to enhance the oxidative stress response.

  7. Dynamic Changes in the Protein Localization in the Nuclear Environment in Pancreatic β-Cell after Brief Glucose Stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kang, Taewook; Jensen, Pia; Solovyeva, Vita

    2018-01-01

    , we identified 20 components of the nuclear organization processes, including nuclear pore organization, ribonucleoprotein complex, and pre-mRNA transcription. We found alteration of the nuclear pore complex, together with calcium/calmodulin-binding chaperones that facilitate protein and RNA import......Characterization of molecular mechanisms underlying pancreatic β-cell function in relation to glucose-stimulated insulin secretion is incomplete, especially with respect to global response in the nuclear environment. We focus on the characterization of proteins in the nuclear environment of β...... the nucleus and the cytoplasm is an important process, highly involved in the initial molecular mechanism underlying glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells....

  8. Dynamic stress effects in technical superconductors and the ''training'' problem of superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasztor, G.; Schmidt, C.

    1978-01-01

    The behavior of NbTi superconductors under dynamic mechanical stress was investigated. A training effect was found in short-sample tests when the conductor was strained in a magnetic field and with a transport current applied. Possible mechanisms are discussed which were proposed to explain training in short samples and in magnets. A stress-induced microplastic as well as an incomplete pseudoelastic behavior of NbTi was detected by monitoring acoustic emission. The experiments support the hypothesis that microplastic or shape memory effects in NbTi involving dislocation processes are responsible for training. The minimum energy needed to induce a normal transition in short-sample tests is calculated with a computer program, which gives the exact solution of the heat equation. A prestrain treatment of the conductor at room temperature is shown to be a simple method of reducing training of short samples and of magnets. This is a direct proof that the same mechanisms are involved in both cases

  9. Dynamic, large-deflection, inelastic and thermal stress analysis by the finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haisler, W.E.; Stricklin, J.A.

    1975-01-01

    A finite element theory and computer program have been developed for predicting the dynamic, large displacement, inelastic and thermal response of stiffened and layered structures. The dependence of material properties on temperature is explicitly accounted for and any arbitrary, transient mechanical or thermal load history is allowed. The shell may have internal or external stiffeners and be constructed with up to three layers. The equations of motion are developed by using the pseudo force approach to represent all nonlinearities and are then solved by using either the Houbolt method or central differences. Moderately large rotations are allowed. The program is based on an incremental theory of plasticity using the Von Mises yield condition and associated flow rule. The post yield or work-hardening behavior is idealized with either the isotropic hardening or mechanical sublayer models. Two models are utilized since it has been found through comparison with experimental results that isotropic hardening is best for simple loading conditions while the mechanical sublayer model is better for reverse and cyclic loading. Strain-rate effects are also accounted for in the program by using a power-law type model based on the strain rate. The dependence of material properties on temperature is taken into account in the pseudo forces. Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, thermal coefficient of expansion, the yield stress, and the entire stress strain curve are treated as functions of the applied temperature. Containment vessels subjected to transient and shock-type mechanical and thermal loads have been analyzed

  10. Projections of rising heat stress over the western Maritime Continent from dynamically downscaled climate simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Eun-Soon; Kang, Suchul; Eltahir, Elfatih A. B.

    2018-06-01

    This study assesses the future changes in heat stress in response to different emission scenarios over the western Maritime Continent. To better resolve the region-specific changes and to enhance the performance in simulating extreme events, the MIT Regional Climate Model with a 12-km horizontal resolution is used for the dynamical downscaling of three carefully selected CMIP5 global projections forced by two Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP4.5 and RCP8.5) scenarios. Daily maximum wet-bulb temperature (TWmax), which includes the effect of humidity, is examined to describe heat stress as regulated by future changes in temperature and humidity. An ensemble of projections reveals robust pattern in which a large increase in temperature is accompanied by a reduction in relative humidity but a significant increase in wet-bulb temperature. This increase in TWmax is relatively smaller over flat and coastal regions than that over mountainous region. However, the flat and coastal regions characterized by warm and humid present-day climate will be at risk even under modest increase in TWmax. The regional extent exposed to higher TWmax and the number of days on which TWmax exceeds its threshold value are projected to be much higher in RCP8.5 scenario than those in RCP4.5 scenario, thus highlighting the importance of controlling greenhouse gas emissions to reduce the adverse impacts on human health and heat-related mortality.

  11. Non-linear hydrotectonic phenomena: Part I - fluid flow in open fractures under dynamical stress loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archambeau, C.B.

    1994-01-01

    A fractured solid under stress loading (or unloading) can be viewed as behaving macroscopically as a medium with internal, hidden, degrees of freedom, wherein changes in fracture geometry (i.e. opening, closing and extension) and flow of fluid and gas within fractures will produce major changes in stresses and strains within the solid. Likewise, the flow process within fractures will be strongly coupled to deformation within the solid through boundary conditions on the fracture surfaces. The effects in the solid can, in part, be phenomenologically represented as inelastic or plastic processes in the macroscopic view. However, there are clearly phenomena associated with fracture growth and open fracture fluid flows that produce effects that can not be described using ordinary inelastic phenomenology. This is evident from the fact that a variety of energy release phenomena can occur, including seismic emissions of previously stored strain energy due to fracture growth, release of disolved gas from fluids in the fractures resulting in enhanced buoyancy and subsequent energetic flows of gas and fluids through the fracture system which can produce raid extension of old fractures and the creation of new ones. Additionally, the flows will be modulated by the opening and closing of fractures due to deformation in the solid, so that the flow process is strongly coupled to dynamical processes in the surrounding solid matrix, some of which are induced by the flow itself

  12. Oxidative stress and nitrite dynamics under maximal load in elite athletes: relation to sport type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubrilo, Dejan; Djordjevic, Dusica; Zivkovic, Vladimir; Djuric, Dragan; Blagojevic, Dusko; Spasic, Mihajlo; Jakovljevic, Vladimir

    2011-09-01

    Maximal workload in elite athletes induces increased generation of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (RONS) and oxidative stress, but the dynamics of RONS production are not fully explored. The aim of our study was to examine the effects of long-term engagement in sports with different energy requirements (aerobic, anaerobic, and aerobic/anaerobic) on oxidative stress parameters during progressive exercise test. Concentrations of lactates, nitric oxide (NO) measured through stabile end product-nitrites (NO(2) (-)), superoxide anion radical (O(2) (•-)), and thiobarbituric reactive substances (TBARS) as index of lipid peroxidation were determined in rest, after maximal workload, and at 4 and 10th min of recovery in blood plasma of top level competitors in rowing, cycling, and taekwondo. Results showed that sportmen had similar concentrations of lactates and O(2) (•-) in rest. Nitrite concentrations in rest were the lowest in taekwondo fighters, while rowers had the highest levels among examined groups. The order of magnitude for TBARS level in the rest was bicycling > taekwondo > rowing. During exercise at maximal intensity, the concentration of lactate significantly elevated to similar levels in all tested sportsmen and they were persistently elevated during recovery period of 4 and 10 min. There were no significant changes in O(2) (•-), nitrite, and TBARS levels neither at the maximum intensity of exercise nor during the recovery period comparing to the rest period in examined individuals. Our results showed that long term different training strategies establish different basal nitrites and lipid peroxidation levels in sportmen. However, progressive exercise does not influence basal nitrite and oxidative stress parameters level neither at maximal load nor during the first 10 min of recovery in sportmen studied.

  13. Higher glucose level and systemic oxidative stress decrease the mean velocity index of the retinal artery during flickering light stimulation in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debelić, Vladimir; Drnovšek Olup, Brigita; Žižek, Bogomir; Skitek, Milan; Jerin, Aleš

    2016-10-31

    To determine whether higher glucose level and systemic oxidative stress decrease mean velocity (MV) index of the central retinal artery (CRA) during flickering light stimulation in type 1 diabetes (T1D). The study was performed in the period from 2008 to 2015 at the University Eye Clinic in Ljubljana. 41 patients with T1D and 37 participants without diabetes were included. MV in the CRA was measured using Doppler ultrasound diagnostics in basal conditions and during 8 Hz flickering light irritation. The plasma levels of glucose, fructosamine, 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), triglycerides, cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) were measured. Patients with T1D had significantly higher levels of blood glucose (Ptriglycerides (P=0.108), cholesterol (P=0.531), and LDL (P=0.645) between the groups. Patients with T1D also had a significantly lower MV index in the CRA (1.11±0.15 vs 1.24±0.23; P=0.010). In the T1D group, a significant negative correlation was found between the level of glucose (r=0.58; Pindex in the CRA. At the same time, in this group fructosamine and 8-OHdG levels had a separate effect on the MV index (adjusted R2=0.38, Pglucose levels, the medium-term glucose level, and systemic oxidative stress could importantly reduce retinal vasodilatation during flickering light irritation in patients with T1D.

  14. l-Arginine induces antioxidant response to prevent oxidative stress via stimulation of glutathione synthesis and activation of Nrf2 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Mingcai; Wang, Zhengxuan; Li, Hui; Cai, Liang; Pan, Jianghao; He, Hongjuan; Wu, Qiong; Tang, Yinzhao; Ma, Jiapei; Yang, Lin

    2018-05-01

    Arginine is a conditionally essential amino acid. To elucidate the influence of l-arginine on the activation of endogenous antioxidant defence, male Wistar rats were orally administered daily with l-arginine at different levels of 25, 50, 100 mg/100 g body weight. After 7 and 14 days feeding, the antioxidative capacities and glutathione (GSH) contents in the plasma and in the liver were uniformly enhanced with the increasing consumption of l-arginine, whereas the oxidative stress was effectively suppressed by l-arginine treatment. After 14 days feeding, the mRNA levels and protein expressions of Keap1 and Cul3 were gradually reduced by increasing l-arginine intake, resulting that the nuclear factor Nrf2 was activated. Upon activation of Nrf2, the expressions of antioxidant responsive element (ARE)-dependent genes and proteins (GCLC, GCLM, GS, GR, GST, GPx, CAT, SOD, NQO1, HO-1) were up-regulated by l-arginine feeding, indicating an upward trend in antioxidant capacity uniformly with the increasing consumption of l-arginine. The present study demonstrates that the supplementation of l-arginine stimulates GSH synthesis and activates Nrf2 pathway, leading to the up-regulation of ARE-driven antioxidant expressions via Nrf2-Keap1 pathway. Results suggest the availability of l-arginine is a critical factor to suppress oxidative stress and induce an endogenous antioxidant response. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of fiber ellipticity and orientation on dynamic stress concentrations in porous fiber-reinforced composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasheminejad, Seyyed M.; Sanaei, Roozbeh

    2007-11-01

    Interaction of time harmonic fast longitudinal and shear incident plane waves with an elliptical fiber embedded in a porous elastic matrix is studied. The novel features of Biot dynamic theory of poroelasticity along with the classical method of eigen-function expansion and the pertinent boundary conditions are employed to develop a closed form series solution involving Mathieu and modified Mathieu functions of complex arguments. The complications arising due to the non-orthogonality of angular Mathieu functions corresponding to distinct wave numbers in addition to the problems associated with appearance of additional angular dependent terms in the boundary conditions are all avoided by expansion of the angular Mathieu functions in terms of transcendental functions and subsequent integration, leading to a linear set of independent equations in terms of the unknown scattering coefficients. A MATHEMATICA code is developed for computing the Mathieu functions in terms of complex Fourier coefficients which are themselves calculated by numerically solving appropriate sets of eigen-systems. The analytical results are illustrated with numerical examples in which an elastic fiber of elliptic cross section is insonified by a plane fast compressional or shear wave at normal incidence. The effects of fiber cross sectional ellipticity, angle of incidence (fiber two-dimensional orientation), and incident wave polarization (P, SV, SH) on dynamic stress concentrations are studied in a relatively wide frequency range. Limiting cases are considered and fair agreements with well-known solutions are established.

  16. Dynamic airway pressure-time curve profile (Stress Index): a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terragni, Pierpaolo; Bussone, Guido; Mascia, Luciana

    2016-01-01

    The assessment of respiratory mechanics at the bedside is necessary in order to identify the most protective ventilatory strategy. Indeed in the last 20 years, adverse effects of positive ventilation to the lung structures have led to a reappraisal of the objectives of mechanical ventilation. The ventilator setting requires repeated readjustment over the period of mechanical ventilation dependency and careful respiratory monitoring to minimize the risks, preventing further injury and permitting the lung and airways healing. Among the different methods that have been proposed and validated, the analysis of dynamic P-t curve (named Stress Index, SI) represents an adequate tool available at the bedside, repeatable and, therefore, able to identify the amount of overdistension occurring in the daily clinical practice, when modifying positive end-expiratory pressure. In this review we will analyze the evidence that supports respiratory mechanics assessment at the bedside and the application of the dynamic P/t curve profile (SI) to optimize protective ventilation in patients with acute respiratory failure.

  17. Stress state in the neighborhood of subways and pipe lines under the action of dynamic loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexeyeva, L.A.; Eskalieva, A.Z.; Shershnev, V.V.

    2001-01-01

    We consider the long underground constructions of deep and shallow types such as transport subways, mines, underground pipes etc. by the action of dynamic lads. Situated in areas of seismic activity, they are subjected to the influence of seismic waves during earthquakes and can be destroyed. Running loads inside constructions (transport for instance) affect upon toughness and stability of both subways and surrounding medium. If underground construction dispose near a day's surface, it acts also on nearby buildings. Evaluations of behavior of underground and pipes under dynamic influences in real conditions of usage are determined of stress state of constructions in the interaction with environment medium. Here underground constructions are simulated by infinitely long cylindrical cavities in utter ambience. As utter ambience the isotropic elastic medium and two-component medium of Biot are researched. Last one allows simulating saturated water oils. The elastic cylindrical shell simulates supporting of a tunnel (or pipeline). Both a tress state of construction and surrounding medium were investigated for a different contact conditions between support of tunnel and environment (rigid, slippery and viscous contacts). (author)

  18. Structural damping values as a function of dynamic response stress and deformation levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, J.D.

    1980-01-01

    Damping as it is normally defined is the means by which the response motion of a structural system is reduced as the result of energy losses. However, as used in the context of nuclear plant design, the effects of changes in structural stiffness, geometry, support configuration, and modulus of elasticity are also usually lumped under the general heading of damping in current design methods. For convenience in structural design, damping in usually assumed as viscous in nature and in recognition of its use in modal response spectrum dynamic analysis is normally expressed as a percent of critical. In general, it should be understood that damping as used in design or analysis of nuclear plants is an experimentally determined factor which is used to make the results of linear elasticity analysis of dynamic systems agree reasonably well with observed experimental results. In this paper, damping data existing in the open literature applicable to nuclear power plant structures and equipment is summarized and statistically analyzed. Results of this analysis are used to develop damping trend curves which predict applicable damping values to be used in design at various levels of stress or deformation. (orig.)

  19. Manipulation of food intake and weight dynamics using retrograde neural gastric electrical stimulation in a chronic canine model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aelen, P.; Neshev, E.; Cholette, M.; Crisanti, K.; Mitchell, P.; De bru, E.; Church, N.; Mintchev, M.P.

    2008-01-01

    Neural gastric electrical stimulation (NGES) could be a new technique for treating obesity. However, chronic animal experimentation exploring the efficacy of this therapy is lacking. In this study we investigated the utility of retrograde NGES in a chronic canine model. Nine mongrel dogs (26.8 ± 5.2

  20. AtchitIV gene expression is stimulated under abiotic stresses and is spatially and temporally regulated during embryo development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliane B. de A. Gerhardt

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The expression of AtchitIV gene was analysed in Arabidopsis plants submitted to abiotic stresses. Transcript accumulation was detected in leaves in response to UV light exposure, exogenous salicylic acid administration and wounding. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants carrying AtchitIV promoter::gus fusion also showed differential expression of the reporter gene in response to these treatments. The AtchitIV expression was also analysed during Arabidopsis embryo development. GUS assay demonstrated AtchitIV promoter activation in zygotic embryos from torpedo stage up to full maturation. Promoter deletion analysis indicated that all the 5' cis-acting elements responsible for the specific tissue expression are located in a region of 1083 bp, adjacent to the start of transcription. A negative regulatory region located between portions -1083 and -600 was also observed.

  1. Chaos and dynamics on 0.5--300 ps time scales in vibrationally excited acetylene: Fourier transform of stimulated-emission pumping spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pique, J.P.; Chen, Y.; Field, R.W.; Kinsey, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    A recently proposed technique based on the Fourier transform of the spectrum is applied to the stimulated-emission pumping spectrum of acetylene at --26 500 cm/sup -1/ above the vibrational ground state. Correlations on two different time scales (--3 and --45 ps) were found from analysis of low-resolution (0.3 cm/sup -1/) and high-resolution (0.05 cm/sup -1/) spectra, respectively. Additional structure produced dynamic information on a wider (0.5--300 ps) time scale. The results show that acetylene at 26 500 cm/sup -1/ is in the transition from the regular to the chaotic regime

  2. Nicotine stimulates pancreatic cancer xenografts by systemic increase in stress neurotransmitters and suppression of the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Wadei, Hussein A N; Plummer, Howard K; Schuller, Hildegard M

    2009-03-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a leading cause of cancer mortality in Western countries. We have shown previously that four representative human PDAC cell lines were regulated by beta-adrenoreceptors via cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent signaling. In the current study, we have tested the hypothesis that nicotine stimulates the growth of PDAC xenografts in nude mice by increasing the systemic levels of the stress neurotransmitters adrenaline and noradrenaline, which are the physiological agonists for beta-adrenoreceptors and that inhibition by gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) of the adenylyl cyclase-dependent pathway downstream of adrenoreceptors blocks this effect. The size of xenografts from PDAC cell line Panc-1 was determined 30 days after inoculation of the cancer cells. Stress neurotransmitters in serum as well as cAMP in the cellular fraction of blood and in tumor tissue were assessed by immunoassays. Levels of GABA, its synthesizing enzymes GAD65 and GAD67 and beta-adrenergic signaling proteins in the tumor tissue were determined by western blotting. Nicotine significantly increased the systemic levels of adrenaline, noradrenaline and cAMP while increasing xenograft size and protein levels of cAMP, cyclic AMP response element-binding protein and p-extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 in the tumor tissue. Nicotine additionally reduced the protein levels of both GAD isozymes and GABA in tumor tissue. Treatment with GABA abolished these responses to nicotine and blocked the development of xenografts in mice not exposed to nicotine. These findings suggest that the development and progression of PDAC is subject to significant modulation by stimulatory stress neurotransmitters and inhibitory GABA and that treatment with GABA may be useful for marker-guided cancer intervention of PDAC.

  3. Stress tensor and viscosity of water: Molecular dynamics and generalized hydrodynamics results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolini, Davide; Tani, Alessandro

    1995-08-01

    The time correlation functions (CF's) of diagonal and off-diagonal components of the stress tensor of water have been calculated at 245 and 298 K in a molecular dynamics (MD) study on 343 molecules in the microcanonical ensemble. We present results obtained at wave number k=0 and at a few finite values of k, in the atomic and molecular formalism. In all cases, more than 98% of these functions are due to the potential term of the stress tensor. At k=0, their main features are a fast oscillatory initial decay, followed by a long-time tail more apparent in the supercooled region. Bulk and shear viscosities, calculated via Green-Kubo integration of the relevant CF at k=0, are underestimated with respect to experimental data, mainly at low temperature, but their ratio (~=2) is correctly reproduced. Both shear and bulk viscosity decrease as a function of k, the latter more rapidly, so that they become almost equal at ~=1 Å-1. Also, both viscosities drop rapidly from their maximum at ω=0. This behavior has been related to the large narrowing observed in the acoustic band, mainly in the supercooled region. The infinite frequency bulk and shear rigidity moduli have been shown to be in fair agreement with the experimental data, provided the MD value used for comparison is that corresponding to the frequency range relevant to ultrasonic measurements. The MD results of stress-stress CF's compare well with those predicted by Bertolini and Tani [Phys. Rev. E 51, 1091 (1995)] at k=0, by an application of generalized hydrodynamics [de Schepper et al., Phys. Rev. A 38, 271 (1988)] in the molecular formalism, to the same model of water (TIP4P) [Jorgensen et al., J. Chem. Phys. 79, 926 (1983)]. These CF's are essentially equal in the atomic and molecular formalism, the only minor difference being restricted to the high frequency librational region of the shear function. By a comparison of atomic and molecular results, we show here that neglecting libration has no effect on the

  4. Hemodynamic Changes After Static and Dynamic Exercises and Treadmill Stress Test; Different Patterns in Patients with Primary Benign Exertional Headache?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Rostami

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The pathophysiology of primary benign exertional headache (EH is not still clearly defined. Some researchers have suggested an impaired vascular response as the etiology of this disorder. In this study we investigated whether there are any differences in blood pressure (BP and heart rate (HR of the subjects in course of the static and dynamic exercises and the treadmill stress test between those with and without EH. From university students, 22 patients with EH (mean age: 19.8 ± 2.10, Female to Male: 7:15 and 20 normal subjects (mean age: 19.3 ± 1.97, Female: Male: 8:12 were recruited. All the subjects performed the static and dynamic exercises at 30 and 20 percent of the maximal voluntary contraction (MVC and Bruce treadmill stress test according to the standard protocols. HR and BP of all the cases at the baseline and during and immediately after each test were measured. No significant difference was found between the mean rise of HR, systolic and diastolic BP of the subjects with and without EH in static and dynamic exercises and also treadmill stress test. It seems that between those with and without EH, there is no significant difference in rise of HR and BP response to static and dynamic exercises and treadmill stress test. Further studies are required to find the pathophysiology and risk factors of EH.

  5. Hemodynamic changes after static and dynamic exercises and treadmill stress test; different patterns in patients with primary benign exertional headache?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordi, Ramin; Mazaheri, Reza; Rostami, Mohsen; Mansournia, Mohammad Ali

    2012-01-01

    The pathophysiology of primary benign exertional headache (EH) is not still clearly defined. Some researchers have suggested an impaired vascular response as the etiology of this disorder. In this study we investigated whether there are any differences in blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) of the subjects in course of the static and dynamic exercises and the treadmill stress test between those with and without EH. From university students, 22 patients with EH (mean age: 19.8 ± 2.10, Female to Male: 7:15) and 20 normal subjects (mean age: 19.3 ± 1.97, Female: Male: 8:12) were recruited. All the subjects performed the static and dynamic exercises at 30 and 20 percent of the maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) and Bruce treadmill stress test according to the standard protocols. HR and BP of all the cases at the baseline and during and immediately after each test were measured. No significant difference was found between the mean rise of HR, systolic and diastolic BP of the subjects with and without EH in static and dynamic exercises and also treadmill stress test. It seems that between those with and without EH, there is no significant difference in rise of HR and BP response to static and dynamic exercises and treadmill stress test. Further studies are required to find the pathophysiology and risk factors of EH.

  6. Reduced Insulin/IGF-1 Signaling Restores the Dynamic Properties of Key Stress Granule Proteins during Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie C. Lechler

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Low-complexity “prion-like” domains in key RNA-binding proteins (RBPs mediate the reversible assembly of RNA granules. Individual RBPs harboring these domains have been linked to specific neurodegenerative diseases. Although their aggregation in neurodegeneration has been extensively characterized, it remains unknown how the process of aging disturbs RBP dynamics. We show that a wide variety of RNA granule components, including stress granule proteins, become highly insoluble with age in C. elegans and that reduced insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1 daf-2 receptor signaling efficiently prevents their aggregation. Importantly, stress-granule-related RBP aggregates are associated with reduced fitness. We show that heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF-1 is a main regulator of stress-granule-related RBP aggregation in both young and aged animals. During aging, increasing DAF-16 activity restores dynamic stress-granule-related RBPs, partly by decreasing the buildup of other misfolded proteins that seed RBP aggregation. Longevity-associated mechanisms found to maintain dynamic RBPs during aging could be relevant for neurodegenerative diseases. : Lechler et al. show that RNA-binding proteins (RBPs including stress granule proteins are prone to aggregate with age in C. elegans. Aggregation of stress granule RBPs with “prion-like” domains is associated with reduced fitness. Their aggregation is prevented by longevity pathways and promoted by the aggregation of other misfolded proteins. Keywords: neurodegenerative diseases, Caenorhabditis elegans, protein aggregation, aging, RNA-binding proteins, stress granules, HSF-1, DAF-2, longevity

  7. Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Hanne Dauer

    2015-01-01

    Kapitlet handler om stress som følelse, og det trækker primært på de få kvalitative undersøgelser, der er lavet af stressforløb.......Kapitlet handler om stress som følelse, og det trækker primært på de få kvalitative undersøgelser, der er lavet af stressforløb....

  8. Stress !!!

    OpenAIRE

    Fledderus, M.

    2012-01-01

    Twee op de vijf UT-studenten hebben last van ernstige studiestress, zo erg zelfs dat het ze in hun privéleven belemmert. Die cijfers komen overeen met het landelijk beeld van stress onder studenten. Samen met 14 andere universiteits- en hogeschoolbladen enquêteerde UT Nieuws bijna 5500 studenten. Opvallend is dat mannelijke studenten uit Twente zich veel minder druk lijken te maken over hun studie. Onder vrouwen ligt de stress juist erg hoog ten opzichte van het landelijk gemiddelde.

  9. Comparison of proximally versus distally placed spatially distributed sequential stimulation electrodes in a dynamic knee extension task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Laubacher

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Spatially distributed sequential stimulation (SDSS has demonstrated substantial power output and fatigue benefits compared to single electrode stimulation (SES in the application of functional electrical stimulation (FES. This asymmetric electrode setup brings new possibilities but also new questions since precise placement of the electrodes is one critical factor for good muscle activation. The aim of this study was to compare the power output, fatigue and activation properties of proximally versus distally placed SDSS electrodes in an isokinetic knee extension task simulating knee movement during recumbent cycling. M. vastus lateralis and medialis of seven able-bodied subjects were stimulated with rectangular bi-phasic pulses of constant amplitude of 40 mA and at an SDSS frequency of 35 Hz for 6 min on both legs with both setups (i.e. n=14. Torque was measured during knee-extension movement by a dynamometer at an angular velocity of 110 deg/s. Mean power, peak power and activation time were calculated and compared for the initial and final stimulation phases, together with an overall fatigue index. Power output values (Pmean, Ppeak were scaled to a standardised reference input pulse width of 100 μs (Pmean,s, Ppeak,s. The initial evaluation phase showed no significant differences between the two setups for all outcome measures. Ppeak and Ppeak,s were both significantly higher in the final phase for the distal setup (25.4 ± 8.1 W vs. 28.2 ± 6.2 W, p=0.0062 and 34.8 ± 9.5 W vs. 38.9 ± 6.7 W, p=0.021, respectively. With distal SDSS, there was modest evidence of higher Pmean and Pmean,s (p=0.071, p=0.14, respectively but of longer activation time (p=0.096. The rate of fatigue was similar for both setups. For practical FES applications, distal placement of the SDSS electrodes is preferable.

  10. A Modified Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar Approach for Mimicking Dynamic Oscillatory Stress Fluctuations During Earthquake Rupture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braunagel, M. J.; Griffith, W. A.

    2017-12-01

    Past experimental work has demonstrated that rock failure at high strain rates occurs by fragmentation rather than discrete fracture and is accompanied by a dramatic increase in rock strength. However, these observations are difficult to reconcile with the assertion that pulverized rocks in fault zones are the product of impulsive stresses during the passage of earthquake ruptures, as the distance from the principal slip zones of some pulverized rock is too great to exceed fragmentation transition. One potential explanation to this paradox that has been suggested is that repeated loading over the course of multiple earthquake ruptures may gradually reduce the pulverization threshold, in terms of both strain rate and strength. We propose that oscillatory loading during a single earthquake rupture may further lower these pulverization thresholds, and that traditional dynamic experimental approaches, such as the Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) wherein load is applied as a single, smooth, sinusoidal compressive wave, may not reflect natural loading conditions. To investigate the effects of oscillatory compressive loading expected during earthquake rupture propagation, we develop a controlled cyclic loading model on a SHPB apparatus utilizing two striker bars connected by an elastic spring. Unlike traditional SHPB experiments that utilize a gas gun to fire a projectile bar and generate a single compressive wave on impact with the incident bar, our modified striker bar assembly oscillates while moving down the gun barrel and generates two separate compressive pulses separated by a lag time. By modeling the modified assembly as a mass-spring-mass assembly accelerating due to the force of the released gas, we can predict the compression time of the spring upon impact and therefore the time delay between the generation of the first and second compressive waves. This allows us to predictably control load cycles with durations of only a few hundred microseconds. Initial

  11. Dysregulation of Prefrontal Cortex-Mediated Slow-Evolving Limbic Dynamics Drives Stress-Induced Emotional Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultman, Rainbo; Mague, Stephen D; Li, Qiang; Katz, Brittany M; Michel, Nadine; Lin, Lizhen; Wang, Joyce; David, Lisa K; Blount, Cameron; Chandy, Rithi; Carlson, David; Ulrich, Kyle; Carin, Lawrence; Dunson, David; Kumar, Sunil; Deisseroth, Karl; Moore, Scott D; Dzirasa, Kafui

    2016-07-20

    Circuits distributed across cortico-limbic brain regions compose the networks that mediate emotional behavior. The prefrontal cortex (PFC) regulates ultraslow (stress-related illnesses including major depressive disorder (MDD). To uncover the mechanism whereby stress-induced changes in PFC circuitry alter emotional networks to yield pathology, we used a multi-disciplinary approach including in vivo recordings in mice and chronic social defeat stress. Our network model, inferred using machine learning, linked stress-induced behavioral pathology to the capacity of PFC to synchronize amygdala and VTA activity. Direct stimulation of PFC-amygdala circuitry with DREADDs normalized PFC-dependent limbic synchrony in stress-susceptible animals and restored normal behavior. In addition to providing insights into MDD mechanisms, our findings demonstrate an interdisciplinary approach that can be used to identify the large-scale network changes that underlie complex emotional pathologies and the specific network nodes that can be used to develop targeted interventions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Dying piece by piece: carbohydrate dynamics in aspen seedlings under severe carbon stress and starvation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Erin; Chow, Pak; Landhäusser, Simon

    2016-04-01

    Carbon stress and starvation remain poorly understood in trees, despite their potential role in mortality from a variety of agents. To explore the effects of carbon stress on nonstructural carbohydrate (NSC) dynamics and recovery potential and to examine the process of starvation, we grew aspen seedlings under one of three levels of shade: 40% (light shade), 8% (medium shade), and 4% (dark shade) of full sunlight. We then exposed seedlings to 24 hours darkness at either 20° or 28° C until trees had died. Periodically, seedlings were harvested for NSC analysis and to measure stem and root respiration. In addition, some seedlings were moved back into the light to determine if recovery was possible at certain points during starvation. Specifically, we sought to address the following questions: 1) Do NSC concentrations or mass influence tree survival under carbon stress? 2) At what carbohydrate levels do trees fail to recover and starve? 3) Does temperature affect the NSC level at which trees starve? Increasing shade reduced growth, but surprisingly did not reduce NSC levels, except in a portion of deep shade seedlings that experienced dieback. Once in darkness, leaves died first, with final NSC levels ranging from ~4% (Medium shade, 28 degrees) to 7.5% (Light shade). Stem death generally occurred gradually down the stem. Stem tissues retained ~1-2% NSC when dead. Recovery was still possible when only the upper half of the stem had died; at this point, seedlings had relatively high root NSC levels in their remaining roots (7-10%), with 1-3% starch. No trees recovered after the whole stem had died, at which point, some trees root systems were completely dead. However, most retained substantial amounts of live roots, averaging 5-6% NSC, with 0.25-1.5% starch. Despite the initially similar NSC concentrations, light shade seedlings took longer to reach half stem and whole stem death than seedlings from medium and dark shade. Longer survival times were associated with

  13. Lowered quality of life in mood disorders is associated with increased neuro-oxidative stress and basal thyroid-stimulating hormone levels and use of anticonvulsant mood stabilizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Caroline Sampaio; Maes, Michael; Roomruangwong, Chutima; Moraes, Juliana Brum; Bonifacio, Kamila Landucci; Vargas, Heber Odebrecht; Barbosa, Decio Sabbatini; Anderson, George; de Melo, Luiz Gustavo Piccoli; Drozdstoj, Stoyanov; Moreira, Estefania; Carvalho, André F; Nunes, Sandra Odebrecht Vargas

    2018-04-17

    Major affective disorders including bipolar disorder (BD) and major depressive disorder (MDD) are associated with impaired health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Oxidative stress and subtle thyroid abnormalities may play a pathophysiological role in both disorders. Thus, the current study was performed to examine whether neuro-oxidative biomarkers and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels could predict HRQoL in BD and MDD. This cross-sectional study enrolled 68 BD and 37 MDD patients and 66 healthy controls. The World Health Organization (WHO) QoL-BREF scale was used to assess 4 QoL subdomains. Peripheral blood malondialdehyde (MDA), advanced oxidation protein products, paraoxonaxe/CMPAase activity, a composite index of nitro-oxidative stress, and basal TSH were measured. In the total WHOQoL score, 17.3% of the variance was explained by increased advanced oxidation protein products and TSH levels and lowered CMPAase activity and male gender. Physical HRQoL (14.4%) was associated with increased MDA and TSH levels and lowered CMPAase activity. Social relations HRQoL (17.4%) was predicted by higher nitro-oxidative index and TSH values, while mental and environment HRQoL were independently predicted by CMPAase activity. Finally, 73.0% of the variance in total HRQoL was explained by severity of depressive symptoms, use of anticonvulsants, lower income, early lifetime emotional neglect, MDA levels, the presence of mood disorders, and suicidal ideation. These data show that lowered HRQoL in major affective disorders could at least in part result from the effects of lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, lowered antioxidant enzyme activities, and higher levels of TSH. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Effect of extracorporeal magnetic energy stimulation on bothersome lower urinary tract symptoms and quality of life in female patients with stress urinary incontinence and overactive bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Tsia-Shu; Tseng, Ling-Hong; Lin, Yi-Hao; Liang, Ching-Chung; Lu, Ching-Yi; Pue, Leng Boi

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of extracorporeal magnetic stimulation (EMS) for the treatment of bothersome and severe symptoms of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) and overactive bladder syndrome (OAB) in female patients. A retrospective review was conducted on patients with SUI and OAB who were referred to EMS therapy. Successful treatment for the bothersome symptoms of OAB and SUI was defined as score ≤1 for questions 2 and 3 on the Urodynamic Distress Inventory-6. The objective cure of SUI and OAB was defined as no urinary leakage during the cough stress test and any urgency, urge incontinence and voiding frequency of less than eight times per 24 h based on the 3-day bladder diary, after the 9 weeks of treatment, respectively. Ninety-three patients with SUI or OAB underwent a 9-week course of EMS at 20 min twice weekly. Seventy-two (77%) patients completed EMS treatment. Geographical factor and poor economic status were two main factors for dropout. A total of 94.1% (32 of 34) and 86.8% (33 of 38) of subjects had successful treatment for the bothersome symptoms of OAB and SUI, respectively. In contrast, the cure rate for OAB and SUI was only 61.7% and 42.1%, respectively. There was also a significant improvement in both Urogenital Distress Inventory Short Form (bothersome on lower urinary tract symptoms) and the Incontinence Impact Questionnaire Short Form (quality of life) total score in both groups after EMS. EMS is a safe and effective alternative method for treating SUI and OAB. Further studies are needed to evaluate the long-term efficacy. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2013 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  15. Orthostatic stress is necessary to maintain the dynamic range of cardiovascular control in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baisch, J. F.; Wolfram, G.; Beck, L.; Drummer, C.; Stormer, I.; Buckey, J.; Blomqvist, G.

    2000-01-01

    In the upright position, gravity fills the low-pressure systems of human circulation with blood and interstitial fluid in the sections below the diaphragm. Without gravity one pressure component in the vessels disappears and the relationship between hydrostatic pressure and oncotic pressure, which regulates fluid passage across the capillary endothelium in the terminal vascular bed, shifts constantly. The visible consequences of this are a puffy face and "bird" legs. The plasma volume shrinks in space and the range of cardiovascular control is reduced. When they stand up for the first time after landing, 30-50% of astronauts suffer from orthostatic intolerance. It remains unclear whether microgravity impairs cardiovascular reflexes, or whether it is the altered volume status that causes the cardiovascular instability following space flight. Lower body negative pressure was used in several space missions to stimulate the cardiovascular reflexes before, during and after a space flight. The results show that cardiovascular reflexes are maintained in microgravity. However, the astronauts' volume status changed in space, towards a volume-retracted state, as measurements of fluid-regulating hormones have shown. It can be hypothesized that the control of circulation and body fluid homeostasis in humans is adapted to their upright posture in the Earth's gravitational field. Autonomic control regulates fluid distribution to maintain the blood pressure in that posture, which most of us have to cope with for two-thirds of the day. A determined amount of interstitial volume is necessary to maintain the dynamic range of cardiovascular control in the upright posture; otherwise orthostatic intolerance may occur more often.

  16. Kaolin modulates ABA and IAA dynamics and physiology of grapevine under Mediterranean summer stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinis, L-T; Bernardo, S; Luzio, A; Pinto, G; Meijón, M; Pintó-Marijuan, M; Cotado, A; Correia, C; Moutinho-Pereira, J

    2018-01-01

    The foliar exogenous application of kaolin, a radiation-reflecting inert mineral, has proven to be an effective short-term climate change mitigation strategy for Mediterranean vineyards. In this work, we address the hypothesis that kaolin could improve both the hormonal dynamics and physiological responses of grapevines growing in Douro Region, northern Portugal. For this purpose, the leaf water potential, gas exchange and chlorophyll a fluorescence parameters were monitored, as well as the abscisic acid (ABA) and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) quantification and immunolocalization were assessed. The study revealed a slight decrease in ABA and an increase in IAA in the kaolin treatment, which in turn were associated with the improvement of physiological performance. A month after spraying, kaolin improves the water potential respectively, 30% and 17% in the predawn and midday periods. Besides, plants treated with kaolin showed higher values of stomatal conductance, net CO 2 assimilation rate and intrinsic water use efficiency. Kaolin also ameliorates the effective PSII efficiency (67%), as well as the maximum quantum efficiency of photosystem II and the photosynthetic electron transport rate (>73%). These results were consistent with the higher photochemical quenching and the lower non-photochemical quenching observed in treated leaves and with the better performance obtained by the JIP test parameters. Physiological and hormonal analysis confirmed that kaolin effectively enhance grapevine summer stress tolerance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Investigating the running abilities of Tyrannosaurus rex using stress-constrained multibody dynamic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William I. Sellers

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The running ability of Tyrannosaurus rex has been intensively studied due to its relevance to interpretations of feeding behaviour and the biomechanics of scaling in giant predatory dinosaurs. Different studies using differing methodologies have produced a very wide range of top speed estimates and there is therefore a need to develop techniques that can improve these predictions. Here we present a new approach that combines two separate biomechanical techniques (multibody dynamic analysis and skeletal stress analysis to demonstrate that true running gaits would probably lead to unacceptably high skeletal loads in T. rex. Combining these two approaches reduces the high-level of uncertainty in previous predictions associated with unknown soft tissue parameters in dinosaurs, and demonstrates that the relatively long limb segments of T. rex—long argued to indicate competent running ability—would actually have mechanically limited this species to walking gaits. Being limited to walking speeds contradicts arguments of high-speed pursuit predation for the largest bipedal dinosaurs like T. rex, and demonstrates the power of multiphysics approaches for locomotor reconstructions of extinct animals.

  18. How does stress affect human being—a molecular dynamic simulation study on cortisol and its glucocorticoid receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Zhang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Stress can be either positive or negative to human beings. Under stressful conditions, the mental and physical conditions of human can be affected. There exists certain relation between stress and illness. The cortisol and other glucocorticoids bind to the same receptor, which is called glucocorticoid receptor. Some evidences indicated that cortisol molecule binding to its glucocorticoid receptor was necessary for the stress response. Up to now, the structure–function relationships between cortisol molecule and its glucocorticoid receptor have not been deliberated from the atomic-level. In order to get a detailed understanding of the structure–function relationships between the cortisol molecule and glucocorticoids receptor, we have carried out molecular dynamic (MD simulations on glucocorticoid receptor (Apo system and cortisol with its glucocorticoid receptor complex (HCY system. On the basis of molecular dynamic simulations, a couple of key residues were identified, which were crucial for the binding of cortisol molecule. The results of binding free energy calculations are in good agreement with the experiment data. Our research gives clear insights from atomic-level into the structural–functional aspects of cortisol molecule and its glucocorticoid receptor, and also provides valuable information for the design of drug which can treat stress related illnesses.

  19. Determination of the Critical Stress Associated with Dynamic Phase Transformation in Steels by Means of Free Energy Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clodualdo Aranas

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The double differentiation method overestimates the critical stress associated with the initiation of dynamic transformation (DT because significant amounts of the dynamic phase must be present in order for its effect on the work hardening rate to be detectable. In this work, an alternative method (referred to here as the free energy method is presented based on the thermodynamic condition that the driving force is equal to the total energy obstacle during the exact moment of transformation. The driving force is defined as the difference between the DT critical stress (measured in the single-phase austenite region and the yield stress of the fresh ferrite that takes its place. On the other hand, the energy obstacle consists of the free energy difference between austenite and ferrite, and the work of shear accommodation and dilatation associated with the phase transformation. Here, the DT critical stresses in a C-Mn steel were calculated using the free energy method at temperatures ranging from 870 °C to 1070 °C. The results show that the calculated critical stress using the present approach appears to be more accurate than the values measured by the double differentiation method.

  20. Effects of stress-shielding on the dynamic viscoelasticity and ordering of the collagen fibers in rabbit Achilles tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikoma, Kazuya; Kido, Masamitsu; Nagae, Masateru; Ikeda, Takumi; Shirai, Toshiharu; Ueshima, Keiichiro; Arai, Yuji; Oda, Ryo; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2013-11-01

    We investigated the effects of stress-shielding on both viscoelastic properties and microstructure of collagen fibers in the Achilles tendon by proton double-quantum filtered ((1) H-DQF) NMR spectroscopy. The right hind-limbs of 20 Japanese white rabbits were immobilized for 4 weeks in a cast with the ankle in plantarflexion. Dynamic viscoelasticity of the Achilles tendons was measured using a viscoelastic spectrometer. Proton DQF NMR signals were analyzed to determine the residual dipolar coupling of bound water molecules in the Achilles tendons. Both the dynamic storage modulus (E') and dynamic loss modulus (E″) decreased significantly in the Achilles tendons of the stress-shielding group. The results of the (1) H-DQF NMR examination demonstrated significantly reduced residual dipolar coupling in the Achilles tendons of this same group. The disorientation of collagen fibers by stress-shielding should contribute to degradation of the dynamic storage and loss moduli. The alterations of the collagen fiber orientation that contributed to the function of tendinous tissue can be evaluated by performing an analysis of (1) H DQF NMR spectroscopy. © 2013 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  1. Dopamine Dynamics during Continuous Intracranial Self-Stimulation: Effect of Waveform on Fast-Scan Cyclic Voltammetry Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The neurotransmitter dopamine is heavily implicated in intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS). Many drugs of abuse that affect ICSS behavior target the dopaminergic system, and optogenetic activation of dopamine neurons is sufficient to support self-stimulation. However, the patterns of phasic dopamine release during ICSS remain unclear. Early ICSS studies using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) rarely observed phasic dopamine release, which led to the surprising conclusion that it is dissociated from ICSS. However, several advances in the sensitivity (i.e., the use of waveforms with extended anodic limits) and analysis (i.e., principal component regression) of FSCV measurements have made it possible to detect smaller, yet physiologically relevant, dopamine release events. Therefore, this study revisits phasic dopamine release during ICSS using these tools. It was found that the anodic limit of the voltammetric waveform has a substantial effect on the patterns of dopamine release observed during continuous ICSS. While data collected with low anodic limits (i.e., +1.0 V) support the disappearance of phasic dopamine release observed in previous investigation, the use of high anodic limits (+1.3 V, +1.4 V) allows for continual detection of dopamine release throughout ICSS. However, the +1.4 V waveform lacks the ability to resolve narrowly spaced events, with the best balance of temporal resolution and sensitivity provided by the +1.3 V waveform. Ultimately, it is revealed that the amplitude of phasic dopamine release decays but does not fully disappear during continuous ICSS. PMID:27548680

  2. Effects of forced swimming stress on thyroid function, pituitary thyroid-stimulating hormone and hypothalamus thyrotropin releasing hormone expression in adrenalectomy Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qiuyan; Liu, Aihua; Ma, Yanan; Wang, Anyi; Guo, Xinhong; Teng, Weiping; Jiang, Yaqiu

    2016-11-01

    In order to study the impact that is imposed on the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis of adrenalectomy male Wistar rats by stress caused by swimming, the blood level of triiodothyronine (T3), thyroxine (T4) and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), the expression of TSHβ mRNA at the pituitary and thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) expression at the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) were measured. A total of 50 male Wistar rats of 6-8 weeks of age and with an average weight of 190-210 grams were randomly divided into the following two groups: The surgical (without adrenal glands) and non-surgical (adrenalectomy) group. These two groups were then divided into the following five groups, according to the time delay of sacrifice following forced swim (10 min, 2 h, 12 h and 24 h) and control (not subjected to swimming) groups. A bilateral adrenalectomy animal model was established. Serum TSH in the blood was measurement by chemiluminescent immunoassay, and cerebrum tissue were excised for the measurement of TRH expression using an immunohistochemistry assay. In addition, pituitaries were excised for the extraction of total RNA. Finally, reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction was performed for quantitation of TSHβ. Following swimming, the serum T3, T4 and TSH, the TSHβ mRNA expression levels in the pituitary and the TRH expression in the PVN of the surgical group were gradually increased. In the non-surgical group, no significant differences were observed in the serum T3, T4 and TSH levels compared with the control group. The TSHβ mRNA expression at the pituitary showed a similar result. Furthermore, the TRH expression at PVN was gradually increased and stress from swimming could increase the blood T4, T3 and TSH levels, TSHβ mRNA expression at the pituitary and TRH expression at the PVN in adrenalectomy Wistar rats. Moreover, the index in the surgical group changed significantly compared with the non-surgical group. In conclusion, the results

  3. Dissecting long-term adjustments of photoprotective and photo-oxidative stress acclimation occurring in dynamic light environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shizue Matsubara

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Changes in light intensity directly affect the performance of the photosynthetic apparatus. Light energy absorbed in excess of cells’ needs leads to production of reactive oxygen species and photo-oxidative damage. Excess light in both constant and dynamic environments induces photoprotective acclimation in plants. Distinct sets of signals and regulatory mechanisms are involved in acclimatory adjustment of photoprotection and photosynthesis under constant and dynamic (fluctuating light conditions. We are still far away from drawing a comprehensive picture of acclimatory signal transduction pathways, particularly in dynamic environments. In this perspective article, we propose the use of Arabidopsis plants that produce H2O2 in chloroplasts (GO plants under atmospheric CO2 levels as a tool to study the mechanisms of long-term acclimation to photo-oxidative stress. In our opinion there are new avenues to future investigations on acclimatory adjustments and signal transduction occurring in plants under dynamic light environments.

  4. Stress !!!

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fledderus, M.

    2012-01-01

    Twee op de vijf UT-studenten hebben last van ernstige studiestress, zo erg zelfs dat het ze in hun privéleven belemmert. Die cijfers komen overeen met het landelijk beeld van stress onder studenten. Samen met 14 andere universiteits- en hogeschoolbladen enquêteerde UT Nieuws bijna 5500 studenten.

  5. Dynamics of a self-Q-switched fiber laser with a Rayleigh-stimulated Brillouin scattering ring mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotiadi, Andrei A.; Mégret, Patrice; Blondel, Michel

    2004-05-01

    Backward light scattering can cause passive Q switching in fiber lasers. We propose a self-consistent description of the laser dynamics. Our model quantitatively reproduces the temporal structure of pulsation and is also attractive for analysis of laser stability and statistics. The validity of the model is directly verified in an experiment.

  6. Single-cell resolution of intracellular T cell Ca2+ dynamics in response to frequency-based H2O2 stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kniss-James, Ariel S; Rivet, Catherine A; Chingozha, Loice; Lu, Hang; Kemp, Melissa L

    2017-03-01

    Adaptive immune cells, such as T cells, integrate information from their extracellular environment through complex signaling networks with exquisite sensitivity in order to direct decisions on proliferation, apoptosis, and cytokine production. These signaling networks are reliant on the interplay between finely tuned secondary messengers, such as Ca 2+ and H 2 O 2 . Frequency response analysis, originally developed in control engineering, is a tool used for discerning complex networks. This analytical technique has been shown to be useful for understanding biological systems and facilitates identification of the dominant behaviour of the system. We probed intracellular Ca 2+ dynamics in the frequency domain to investigate the complex relationship between two second messenger signaling molecules, H 2 O 2 and Ca 2+ , during T cell activation with single cell resolution. Single-cell analysis provides a unique platform for interrogating and monitoring cellular processes of interest. We utilized a previously developed microfluidic device to monitor individual T cells through time while applying a dynamic input to reveal a natural frequency of the system at approximately 2.78 mHz stimulation. Although our network was much larger with more unknown connections than previous applications, we are able to derive features from our data, observe forced oscillations associated with specific amplitudes and frequencies of stimuli, and arrive at conclusions about potential transfer function fits as well as the underlying population dynamics.

  7. MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry Enables a Comprehensive and Fast Analysis of Dynamics and Qualities of Stress Responses of Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei F19

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schott, Ann-Sophie; Behr, Jürgen; Quinn, Jennifer; Vogel, Rudi F.

    2016-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are widely used as starter cultures in the manufacture of foods. Upon preparation, these cultures undergo various stresses resulting in losses of survival and fitness. In order to find conditions for the subsequent identification of proteomic biomarkers and their exploitation for preconditioning of strains, we subjected Lactobacillus (Lb.) paracasei subsp. paracasei TMW 1.1434 (F19) to different stress qualities (osmotic stress, oxidative stress, temperature stress, pH stress and starvation stress). We analysed the dynamics of its stress responses based on the expression of stress proteins using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry (MS), which has so far been used for species identification. Exploiting the methodology of accumulating protein expression profiles by MALDI-TOF MS followed by the statistical evaluation with cluster analysis and discriminant analysis of principle components (DAPC), it was possible to monitor the expression of low molecular weight stress proteins, identify a specific time point when the expression of stress proteins reached its maximum, and statistically differentiate types of adaptive responses into groups. Above the specific result for F19 and its stress response, these results demonstrate the discriminatory power of MALDI-TOF MS to characterize even dynamics of stress responses of bacteria and enable a knowledge-based focus on the laborious identification of biomarkers and stress proteins. To our knowledge, the implementation of MALDI-TOF MS protein profiling for the fast and comprehensive analysis of various stress responses is new to the field of bacterial stress responses. Consequently, we generally propose MALDI-TOF MS as an easy and quick method to characterize responses of microbes to different environmental conditions, to focus efforts of more elaborate approaches on time points and dynamics of stress responses. PMID:27783652

  8. MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry Enables a Comprehensive and Fast Analysis of Dynamics and Qualities of Stress Responses of Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei F19.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann-Sophie Schott

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria (LAB are widely used as starter cultures in the manufacture of foods. Upon preparation, these cultures undergo various stresses resulting in losses of survival and fitness. In order to find conditions for the subsequent identification of proteomic biomarkers and their exploitation for preconditioning of strains, we subjected Lactobacillus (Lb. paracasei subsp. paracasei TMW 1.1434 (F19 to different stress qualities (osmotic stress, oxidative stress, temperature stress, pH stress and starvation stress. We analysed the dynamics of its stress responses based on the expression of stress proteins using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry (MS, which has so far been used for species identification. Exploiting the methodology of accumulating protein expression profiles by MALDI-TOF MS followed by the statistical evaluation with cluster analysis and discriminant analysis of principle components (DAPC, it was possible to monitor the expression of low molecular weight stress proteins, identify a specific time point when the expression of stress proteins reached its maximum, and statistically differentiate types of adaptive responses into groups. Above the specific result for F19 and its stress response, these results demonstrate the discriminatory power of MALDI-TOF MS to characterize even dynamics of stress responses of bacteria and enable a knowledge-based focus on the laborious identification of biomarkers and stress proteins. To our knowledge, the implementation of MALDI-TOF MS protein profiling for the fast and comprehensive analysis of various stress responses is new to the field of bacterial stress responses. Consequently, we generally propose MALDI-TOF MS as an easy and quick method to characterize responses of microbes to different environmental conditions, to focus efforts of more elaborate approaches on time points and dynamics of stress responses.

  9. A Method to Estimate the Dynamic Displacement and Stress of a Multi-layered Pavement with Bituminous or Concrete Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng LU

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this research work, a method to estimate the dynamic characteristics of a multilayered pavement with bituminous or concrete materials is proposed. A mechanical model is established to investigate the dynamic displacement and stress of the multi-layered pavement structure. Both the flexible and the rigid pavements, corresponding to bituminous materials and concrete materials, respectively, are studied. The theoretical solutions of the multi-layered pavement structure are deduced considering the compatibility condition at the interface of the structural layers. By introducing FFT (Fast Fourier Transform algorithm, some numerical results are presented. Comparisons of the theoretical and experimental result implied that the proposed method is reasonable in predicting the stress and displacement of a multi-layered pavement with bituminous or concrete materials. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.20.4.6071

  10. On the relation between quasi-static and dynamic stress induced reversible structural relaxation of amorphous alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krueger, P.; Stucky, T.; Boewe, M.; Neuhaeuser, H.

    1993-01-01

    Quasi-static stress relaxation and dynamic internal friction measurements of stress induced reversible structural relaxation were performed on the amorphous alloy Fe 40 Ni 40 B 20 . The kinetics can be well described by a stretched exponential Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts quasi-static relaxation. The thermally activated part of the internal friction shows an Arrhenius temperature behaviour for a fixed vibration frequency and an inverse power frequency behaviour for a fixed temperature. The activation energies calculated from the Arrhenius equation and from the frequency shift method are significantly different. In order to explain this discrepancy the relation between the quasi-static and the dynamic descriptions of the reversible relaxation is reexamined. In particular it is shown that these two activation energies are connected by the Kohlrausch exponent of the quasi-static relaxation. (orig.)

  11. Investigating the Role of TNF-α and IFN-γ Activation on the Dynamics of iNOS Gene Expression in LPS Stimulated Macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taha Salim

    Full Text Available Macrophage produced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS is known to play a critical role in the proinflammatory response against intracellular pathogens by promoting the generation of bactericidal reactive nitrogen species. Robust and timely production of nitric oxide (NO by iNOS and analogous production of reactive oxygen species are critical components of an effective immune response. In addition to pathogen associated lipopolysaccharides (LPS, iNOS gene expression is dependent on numerous proinflammatory cytokines in the cellular microenvironment of the macrophage, two of which include interferon gamma (IFN-γ and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α. To understand the synergistic effect of IFN-γ and TNF-α activation, and LPS stimulation on iNOS expression dynamics and NO production, we developed a systems biology based mathematical model. Using our model, we investigated the impact of pre-infection cytokine exposure, or priming, on the system. We explored the essentiality of IFN-γ priming to the robustness of initial proinflammatory response with respect to the ability of macrophages to produce reactive species needed for pathogen clearance. Results from our theoretical studies indicated that IFN-γ and subsequent activation of IRF1 are essential in consequential production of iNOS upon LPS stimulation. We showed that IFN-γ priming at low concentrations greatly increases the effector response of macrophages against intracellular pathogens. Ultimately the model demonstrated that although TNF-α contributed towards a more rapid response time, measured as time to reach maximum iNOS production, IFN-γ stimulation was significantly more significant in terms of the maximum expression of iNOS and the concentration of NO produced.

  12. Investigating the Role of TNF-α and IFN-γ Activation on the Dynamics of iNOS Gene Expression in LPS Stimulated Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Taha; Sershen, Cheryl L; May, Elebeoba E

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage produced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is known to play a critical role in the proinflammatory response against intracellular pathogens by promoting the generation of bactericidal reactive nitrogen species. Robust and timely production of nitric oxide (NO) by iNOS and analogous production of reactive oxygen species are critical components of an effective immune response. In addition to pathogen associated lipopolysaccharides (LPS), iNOS gene expression is dependent on numerous proinflammatory cytokines in the cellular microenvironment of the macrophage, two of which include interferon gamma (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). To understand the synergistic effect of IFN-γ and TNF-α activation, and LPS stimulation on iNOS expression dynamics and NO production, we developed a systems biology based mathematical model. Using our model, we investigated the impact of pre-infection cytokine exposure, or priming, on the system. We explored the essentiality of IFN-γ priming to the robustness of initial proinflammatory response with respect to the ability of macrophages to produce reactive species needed for pathogen clearance. Results from our theoretical studies indicated that IFN-γ and subsequent activation of IRF1 are essential in consequential production of iNOS upon LPS stimulation. We showed that IFN-γ priming at low concentrations greatly increases the effector response of macrophages against intracellular pathogens. Ultimately the model demonstrated that although TNF-α contributed towards a more rapid response time, measured as time to reach maximum iNOS production, IFN-γ stimulation was significantly more significant in terms of the maximum expression of iNOS and the concentration of NO produced.

  13. On computing stress in polymer systems involving multi-body potentials from molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yao; Song, Jeong-Hoon

    2014-08-01

    Hardy stress definition has been restricted to pair potentials and embedded-atom method potentials due to the basic assumptions in the derivation of a symmetric microscopic stress tensor. Force decomposition required in the Hardy stress expression becomes obscure for multi-body potentials. In this work, we demonstrate the invariance of the Hardy stress expression for a polymer system modeled with multi-body interatomic potentials including up to four atoms interaction, by applying central force decomposition of the atomic force. The balance of momentum has been demonstrated to be valid theoretically and tested under various numerical simulation conditions. The validity of momentum conservation justifies the extension of Hardy stress expression to multi-body potential systems. Computed Hardy stress has been observed to converge to the virial stress of the system with increasing spatial averaging volume. This work provides a feasible and reliable linkage between the atomistic and continuum scales for multi-body potential systems.

  14. Does Leisure Time as a Stress Coping Resource Increase Affective Complexity? Applying the Dynamic Model of Affect (DMA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Xinyi (Lisa); Yarnal, Careen M.; Almeida, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Affective complexity, a manifestation of psychological well-being, refers to the relative independence between positive and negative affect (PA, NA). According to the Dynamic Model of Affect (DMA), stressful situations lead to highly inverse PA-NA relationship, reducing affective complexity. Meanwhile, positive events can sustain affective complexity by restoring PA-NA independence. Leisure, a type of positive events, has been identified as a coping resource. This study used the DMA to assess whether leisure time helps restore affective complexity on stressful days. We found that on days with more leisure time than usual, an individual experienced less negative PA-NA relationship after daily stressful events. The finding demonstrates the value of leisure time as a coping resource and the DMA’s contribution to coping research. PMID:24659826

  15. A Dynamic Model of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder for Military Personnel and Veterans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navid Ghaffarzadegan

    Full Text Available Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD stands out as a major mental illness; however, little is known about effective policies for mitigating the problem. The importance and complexity of PTSD raise critical questions: What are the trends in the population of PTSD patients among military personnel and veterans in the postwar era? What policies can help mitigate PTSD? To address these questions, we developed a system dynamics simulation model of the population of military personnel and veterans affected by PTSD. The model includes both military personnel and veterans in a "system of systems." This is a novel aspect of our model, since many policies implemented at the military level will potentially influence (and may have side effects on veterans and the Department of Veterans Affairs. The model is first validated by replicating the historical data on PTSD prevalence among military personnel and veterans from 2000 to 2014 (datasets from the Department of Defense, the Institute of Medicine, the Department of Veterans Affairs, and other sources. The model is then used for health policy analysis. Our results show that, in an optimistic scenario based on the status quo of deployment to intense/combat zones, estimated PTSD prevalence among veterans will be at least 10% during the next decade. The model postulates that during wars, resiliency-related policies are the most effective for decreasing PTSD. In a postwar period, current health policy interventions (e.g., screening and treatment have marginal effects on mitigating the problem of PTSD, that is, the current screening and treatment policies must be revolutionized to have any noticeable effect. Furthermore, the simulation results show that it takes a long time, on the order of 40 years, to mitigate the psychiatric consequences of a war. Policy and financial implications of the findings are discussed.

  16. A Dynamic Model of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder for Military Personnel and Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffarzadegan, Navid; Ebrahimvandi, Alireza; Jalali, Mohammad S.

    2016-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) stands out as a major mental illness; however, little is known about effective policies for mitigating the problem. The importance and complexity of PTSD raise critical questions: What are the trends in the population of PTSD patients among military personnel and veterans in the postwar era? What policies can help mitigate PTSD? To address these questions, we developed a system dynamics simulation model of the population of military personnel and veterans affected by PTSD. The model includes both military personnel and veterans in a “system of systems.” This is a novel aspect of our model, since many policies implemented at the military level will potentially influence (and may have side effects on) veterans and the Department of Veterans Affairs. The model is first validated by replicating the historical data on PTSD prevalence among military personnel and veterans from 2000 to 2014 (datasets from the Department of Defense, the Institute of Medicine, the Department of Veterans Affairs, and other sources). The model is then used for health policy analysis. Our results show that, in an optimistic scenario based on the status quo of deployment to intense/combat zones, estimated PTSD prevalence among veterans will be at least 10% during the next decade. The model postulates that during wars, resiliency-related policies are the most effective for decreasing PTSD. In a postwar period, current health policy interventions (e.g., screening and treatment) have marginal effects on mitigating the problem of PTSD, that is, the current screening and treatment policies must be revolutionized to have any noticeable effect. Furthermore, the simulation results show that it takes a long time, on the order of 40 years, to mitigate the psychiatric consequences of a war. Policy and financial implications of the findings are discussed. PMID:27716776

  17. THE EFFECTS OF ACUTE AND CHRONIC STRESS ON ERYTHROCYTE DYNAMIC IN COMBINATION WITH ß–ADRENERGIC RECEPTORS BLOCKADE IN RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucian Hritcu

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available : 3 consecutive days propranolol hydrochloride administration (5 mg/kg b.w., subcutaneous injections under acute and chronic stress conditions causes changes of peripheral erythrocyte distribution in rats. The effects of acute stress and its combination with ȕ-adrenergic receptor blockade on erythrocyte dynamic were more pregnant beside the effects of chronic stress and its combination with ȕ-adrenergic receptor blockade, respectively. ȕ-adrenergic mechanisms were shown to be involved in regulation of erythrocyte dynamic in acute and chronic stress response.

  18. Finite-size effect on the dynamic and sensing performances of graphene resonators: the role of edge stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang-Wan; Dai, Mai Duc; Eom, Kilho

    2016-01-01

    We have studied the finite-size effect on the dynamic behavior of graphene resonators and their applications in atomic mass detection using a continuum elastic model such as modified plate theory. In particular, we developed a model based on von Karman plate theory with including the edge stress, which arises from the imbalance between the coordination numbers of bulk atoms and edge atoms of graphene. It is shown that as the size of a graphene resonator decreases, the edge stress depending on the edge structure of a graphene resonator plays a critical role on both its dynamic and sensing performances. We found that the resonance behavior of graphene can be tuned not only through edge stress but also through nonlinear vibration, and that the detection sensitivity of a graphene resonator can be controlled by using the edge stress. Our study sheds light on the important role of the finite-size effect in the effective design of graphene resonators for their mass sensing applications.

  19. Effects of gender, body weight, and blood glucose dynamics on the growth hormone response to the glucagon stimulation test in patients with pituitary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jessica R; Utz, Andrea L; Devin, Jessica K

    2016-02-01

    Body weight blunts the growth hormone (GH) response to provocative stimuli. The appropriate GH cut-off to confirm GH deficiency in obese and overweight patients undergoing the glucagon stimulation test (GST) has recently been questioned. We hypothesized that the peak GH would be inversely related to the nadir blood glucose (BG) after glucagon and that this may be a mechanism influencing peak GH in overweight patients. This retrospective study examined effects of gender, body weight, and BG dynamics on GH response to GST in patients evaluated in our Pituitary Center. Adult patients who underwent GST from September 2009-2014 were included. Continuous variable comparisons were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U-test and categorical data by Fisher's Exact Test. Spearman correlation was used to determine associations between continuous variables. 42 patients (N=28, 66.7% female) had sufficient data for analysis. Obese patients (N=26) had a reduced GH response, summarized as GH area under the curve (AUC) (p=0.03 vs. non-obese patients) and higher BG during GST, summarized as AUC (pAUC (rs=-0.45; p=0.01), peak GH response (rs=-0.42; p=0.02) and nadir BG (rs=0.48; pAUC (rs=-0.38; p=0.03) and peak GH (rs=-0.37; p=0.04) such that patients (N=32) with higher nadir BG had lower peak GH in response to glucagon. Obese patients, particularly women, do not respond as robustly to glucagon stimulation. These data suggest that there exists an altered BG profile during GST in obese individuals, and that a less robust hypoglycemic stimulus may contribute to an impaired GH response. We suggest measuring BG levels during glucagon stimulation testing to assist with clinical interpretation of GH dynamics. The diagnostic accuracy of the GST in patients with known disorders in glucose metabolism and those taking anti-diabetic medications deserves further study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Dynamics and mechanisms of hot chemistry stimulated by recoil methods. Progress report, March 1, 1977--February 28, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spicer, L.D.

    1977-11-01

    Evaluation of the nuclear recoil chemical activation process in cyclobutane-t and subsequent collisional energy transfer processes has shown: The average quanta of energy transferred from cyclobutane excited to vibrational energies near 100 kcal/mole upon collision is in the kcal/collision range, and also the hot tritium for hydrogen replacement reaction deposits about 46% of its kinetic energy into internal modes of the cyclobutane-t and the energy distribution of activated molecules is relatively independent of the composition of mixed bath systems. An evaluation of the average energy at which recoil stimulated, hot hydrogen replacement reaction in cyclohexane and n-butane occurs has been made as a function of added moderator. Calculated results indicate that the average reaction energy is relatively independent of composition over the range from 0 to 99% moderation with noble gases in well scavenged systems of moderate reactivity. Geometrical isomerization accompanying the gas phase chlorine atom replacement reaction in 2,3 dichlorohexafluoro-2-butene as a function of moderation has been investigated. Both a thermal or near thermal reaction path having a trans/cis product ratio of 1.3 and a high energy process which preferentially forms trans product from both cis and trans reactant are found

  1. Hypoxic stress simultaneously stimulates vascular endothelial growth factor via hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and inhibits stromal cell-derived factor-1 in human endometrial stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuzuki, Tomoko; Okada, Hidetaka; Cho, Hisayuu; Tsuji, Shoko; Nishigaki, Akemi; Yasuda, Katsuhiko; Kanzaki, Hideharu

    2012-02-01

    Hypoxia of the human endometrium is a physiologic event occurring during the perimenstrual period and the local stimulus for angiogenesis. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of hypoxic stress on the regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1/CXCL12), and the potential role of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) in the endometrium. Human endometrial stromal cells (ESCs, n= 22 samples) were studied in vitro. ESCs were cultured under hypoxic and normoxic conditions and treated with cobalt chloride (CoCl₂; a hypoxia-mimicking agent) and/or echinomycin, a small-molecule inhibitor of HIF-1α activity. The mRNA levels and production of VEGF and SDF-1 were assessed by real-time PCR and ELISA, respectively. The HIF-1α protein levels were measured using western blot analysis. Hypoxia simultaneously induced the expression of mRNA and production of VEGF and attenuated the expression and production of SDF-1 from ESCs in a time-dependent manner. Similar changes were observed in the ESCs after stimulation with CoCl₂ in a dose-dependent manner. CoCl₂ significantly induced the expression of HIF-1α protein, and its highest expression was observed at 6 h. Echinomycin inhibited hypoxia-induced VEGF production without affecting the HIF-1α protein level and cell toxicity and had no effect on SDF-1 secretion (P hypoxic conditions that could influence angiogenesis in the human endometrium.

  2. Daily maternal separations during stress hyporesponsive period decrease the thresholds of panic-like behaviors to electrical stimulation of the dorsal periaqueductal gray of the adult rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges-Aguiar, Ana Cristina; Schauffer, Luana Zanoni; de Kloet, Edo Ronald; Schenberg, Luiz Carlos

    2018-05-15

    The present study examined whether early life maternal separation (MS), a model of childhood separation anxiety, predisposes to panic at adulthood. For this purpose, male pups were submitted to 3-h daily maternal separations along postnatal (PN) days of either the 'stress hyporesponsive period' (SHRP) from PN4 to PN14 (MS11) or throughout lactation from PN2 to PN21 (MS20). Pups were further reunited to conscious (CM) or anesthetized (AM) mothers to assess the effect of mother-pup interaction upon reunion. Controls were subjected to brief handling (15 s) once a day throughout lactation (BH20). As adults (PN60), rats were tested for the thresholds to evoke panic-like behaviors upon electrical stimulation of dorsal periaqueductal gray matter and exposed to an elevated plus-maze, an open-field, a forced swim and a sucrose preference test. A factor analysis was also performed to gain insight into the meaning of behavioral tests. MS11-CM rather than MS20-CM rats showed enhanced panic responses and reductions in both swimming and sucrose preference. Panic facilitations were less intense in mother-neglected rats. Although MS did not affect anxiety, MS11-AM showed robust reductions of defecation in an open-field. Factor analysis singled out anxiety, hedonia, exploration, coping and gut activity. Although sucrose preference and coping loaded on separate factors, appetite (adult weight) correlated with active coping in both forced swim and open-field (central area exploration). Concluding, whereas 3h-daily maternal separations during SHRP increased rat's susceptibility to experimental panic attacks, separations throughout lactation had no effects on panic and enhanced active coping. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Supplementation with linoleic acid-rich soybean oil stimulates macrophage foam cell formation via increased oxidative stress and diacylglycerol acyltransferase1-mediated triglyceride biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rom, Oren; Jeries, Helana; Hayek, Tony; Aviram, Michael

    2017-01-02

    During the last decades there has been a staggering rise in human consumption of soybean oil (SO) and its major polyunsaturated fatty acid linoleic acid (LA). The role of SO or LA in cardiovascular diseases is highly controversial, and their impact on macrophage foam cell formation, the hallmark of early atherogenesis, is unclear. To investigate the effects of high SO or LA intake on macrophage lipid metabolism and the related mechanisms of action, C57BL/6 mice were orally supplemented with increasing levels of SO-based emulsion or equivalent levels of purified LA for 1 month, followed by analyses of lipid accumulation and peroxidation in aortas, serum and in peritoneal macrophages (MPM) of the mice. Lipid peroxidation and triglyceride mass in aortas from SO or LA supplemented mice were dose-dependently and significantly increased. In MPM from SO or LA supplemented mice, lipid peroxides were significantly increased and a marked accumulation of cellular triglycerides was found in accordance with enhanced triglyceride biosynthesis rate and overexpression of diacylglycerol acyltransferase1 (DGAT1), the key enzyme in triglyceride biosynthesis. In cultured J774A.1 macrophages treated with SO or LA, triglyceride accumulated via increased oxidative stress and a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-mediated overexpression of DGAT1. Accordingly, anti-oxidants (pomegranate polyphenols), inhibition of p38 MAPK (by SB202190) or DGAT1 (by oleanolic acid), all significantly attenuated SO or LA-induced macrophage triglyceride accumulation. These findings reveal novel mechanisms by which supplementation with SO or LA stimulate macrophage foam cell formation, suggesting a pro-atherogenic role for overconsumption of SO or LA. © 2016 BioFactors, 43(1):100-116, 2017. © 2016 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  4. The effects of different substrates on the electron stimulated desorption dynamics of O - from physisorbed O2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedhili, M. N.; Parenteau, L.; Huels, M. A.; Azria, R.; Tronc, M.; Sanche, L.

    1997-11-01

    We report condensed phase measurements of kinetic energy (Ek) distributions of O-, produced by dissociative electron attachment (DEA) at 6 eV incident electron energy; they are obtained under identical experimental conditions from submonolayer quantities of 16O2 deposited on disordered multilayer substrates of 18O2, Ar, Kr, Xe, CH4, and C2H6, all condensed at 20 K on polycrystalline platinum (Pt). The results suggest that the desorption dynamics of O- DEA fragments is, in part, determined by large angle elastic scattering of O- prior to desorption, as well as the net image charge potential (Ep) induced in the condensed dielectric solid and the Pt metal. The measurements also indicate that, particularly at small Kr substrate thicknesses, the Ep may not necessarily be uniform across the surface, but may fluctuate due to surface roughness. Thus, in addition to energy losses in the substrate prior to, and during, DEA, these effects may influence the dissociation dynamics of the O2- resonance itself, as well as the desorption of the DEA O- fragment.

  5. Asymptotic solution on the dynamic buckling of a column stressed by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper analysis the dynamic stability of a dynamically oscillatory system with slowly varying time dependent parameters. It utilizes the concept of multiple times scaling in an asymptotic evaluation of the dynamic buckling load of the imperfect elastic structure under investigation. Unlike most similar investigations to date ...

  6. Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, David W

    2008-01-01

    We all experience stress as a regular, and sometimes damaging and sometimes useful, part of our daily lives. In our normal ups and downs, we have our share of exhaustion, despondency, and outrage--matched with their corresponding positive moods. But burnout and workaholism are different. They are chronic, dysfunctional, self-reinforcing, life-shortening habits. Dentists, nurses, teachers, ministers, social workers, and entertainers are especially susceptible to burnout; not because they are hard-working professionals (they tend to be), but because they are caring perfectionists who share control for the success of what they do with others and perform under the scrutiny of their colleagues (they tend to). Workaholics are also trapped in self-sealing cycles, but the elements are ever-receding visions of control and using constant activity as a barrier against facing reality. This essay explores the symptoms, mechanisms, causes, and successful coping strategies for burnout and workaholism. It also takes a look at the general stress response on the physiological level and at some of the damage American society inflicts on itself.

  7. Implications for anomalous mantle pressure and dynamic topography from lithospheric stress patterns in the North Atlantic Realm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffer, Christian; Nielsen, Søren Bom

    2016-08-01

    With convergent plate boundaries at some distance, the sources of the lithospheric stress field of the North Atlantic Realm are mainly mantle tractions at the base of the lithosphere, lithospheric density structure and topography. Given this, we estimate horizontal deviatoric stresses using a well-established thin sheet model in a global finite element representation. We adjust the lithospheric thickness and the sub-lithospheric pressure iteratively, comparing modelled in plane stress with the observations of the World Stress Map. We find that an anomalous mantle pressure associated with the Iceland and Azores melt anomalies, as well as topography are able to explain the general pattern of the principle horizontal stress directions. The Iceland melt anomaly overprints the classic ridge push perpendicular to the Mid Atlantic ridge and affects the conjugate passive margins in East Greenland more than in western Scandinavia. The dynamic support of topography shows a distinct maximum of c. 1000 m in Iceland and amounts <150 m along the coast of south-western Norway and 250-350 m along the coast of East Greenland. Considering that large areas of the North Atlantic Realm have been estimated to be sub-aerial during the time of break-up, two components of dynamic topography seem to have affected the area: a short-lived, which affected a wider area along the rift system and quickly dissipated after break-up, and a more durable in the close vicinity of Iceland. This is consistent with the appearance of a buoyancy anomaly at the base of the North Atlantic lithosphere at or slightly before continental breakup, relatively fast dissipation of the fringes of this, and continued melt generation below Iceland.

  8. Effects of a father-based in-home intervention on perceived stress and family dynamics in parents of children with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendixen, Roxanna M; Elder, Jennifer H; Donaldson, Susan; Kairalla, John A; Valcante, Greg; Ferdig, Richard E

    2011-01-01

    Parents of children with autism report high rates of stress. Parental differences in stress are inconsistent, with most research indicating that mothers report higher levels of stress than fathers. We explored parental differences before and after an in-home training program. Fathers were taught an intervention designed to improve their child's social reciprocity and communication; they then trained mothers. Stress was assessed with the Parenting Stress Index-Short Form, and family dynamics was assessed with the Family Adaptability and Cohesion Evaluation Scales II. Both mothers and fathers reported high preintervention levels of stress. After intervention, fathers' stress was reduced, but not significantly, possibly because of the variability in fathers' scores; mothers' stress scores were significantly reduced. Parenting styles were significantly different before and after intervention. Interdisciplinary teams, including occupational therapists, nurses, and special educators, can work.together to have a positive impact on the lives of families of children with autism.

  9. Stress Analysis and Fatigue Behaviour of PTFE-Bronze Layered Journal Bearing under Real-Time Dynamic Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duman, M. S.; Kaplan, E.; Cuvalcı, O.

    2018-01-01

    The present paper is based on experimental studies and numerical simulations on the surface fatigue failure of the PTFE-bronze layered journal bearings under real-time loading. ‘Permaglide Plain Bearings P10’ type journal bearings were experimentally tested under different real time dynamic loadings by using real time journal bearing test system in our laboratory. The journal bearing consists of a PTFE-bronze layer approximately 0.32 mm thick on the steel support layer with 2.18 mm thick. Two different approaches have been considered with in experiments: (i) under real- time constant loading with varying bearing widths, (ii) under different real-time loadings at constant bearing widths. Fatigue regions, micro-crack dispersion and stress distributions occurred at the journal bearing were experimentally and theoretically investigated. The relation between fatigue region and pressure distributions were investigated by determining the circumferential pressure distribution under real-time dynamic loadings for the position of every 10° crank angles. In the theoretical part; stress and deformation distributions at the surface of the journal bearing analysed by using finite element methods to determine the relationship between stress and fatigue behaviour. As a result of this study, the maximum oil pressure and fatigue cracks were observed in the most heavily loaded regions of the bearing surface. Experimental results show that PTFE-Bronze layered journal bearings fatigue behaviour is better than the bearings include white metal alloy.

  10. Topography on a subcellular scale modulates cellular adhesions and actin stress fiber dynamics in tumor associated fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azatov, Mikheil; Sun, Xiaoyu; Suberi, Alexandra; Fourkas, John T.; Upadhyaya, Arpita

    2017-12-01

    Cells can sense and adapt to mechanical properties of their environment. The local geometry of the extracellular matrix, such as its topography, has been shown to modulate cell morphology, migration, and proliferation. Here we investigate the effect of micro/nanotopography on the morphology and cytoskeletal dynamics of human pancreatic tumor-associated fibroblast cells (TAFs). We use arrays of parallel nanoridges with variable spacings on a subcellular scale to investigate the response of TAFs to the topography of their environment. We find that cell shape and stress fiber organization both align along the direction of the nanoridges. Our analysis reveals a strong bimodal relationship between the degree of alignment and the spacing of the nanoridges. Furthermore, focal adhesions align along ridges and form preferentially on top of the ridges. Tracking actin stress fiber movement reveals enhanced dynamics of stress fibers on topographically patterned surfaces. We find that components of the actin cytoskeleton move preferentially along the ridges with a significantly higher velocity along the ridges than on a flat surface. Our results suggest that a complex interplay between the actin cytoskeleton and focal adhesions coordinates the cellular response to micro/nanotopography.

  11. QTAIM and Stress Tensor Characterization of Intramolecular Interactions Along Dynamics Trajectories of a Light-Driven Rotary Molecular Motor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lingling; Huan, Guo; Momen, Roya; Azizi, Alireza; Xu, Tianlv; Kirk, Steven R; Filatov, Michael; Jenkins, Samantha

    2017-06-29

    A quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) and stress tensor analysis was applied to analyze intramolecular interactions influencing the photoisomerization dynamics of a light-driven rotary molecular motor. For selected nonadiabatic molecular dynamics trajectories characterized by markedly different S 1 state lifetimes, the electron densities were obtained using the ensemble density functional theory method. The analysis revealed that torsional motion of the molecular motor blades from the Franck-Condon point to the S 1 energy minimum and the S 1 /S 0 conical intersection is controlled by two factors: greater numbers of intramolecular bonds before the hop-time and unusually strongly coupled bonds between the atoms of the rotor and the stator blades. This results in the effective stalling of the progress along the torsional path for an extended period of time. This finding suggests a possibility of chemical tuning of the speed of photoisomerization of molecular motors and related molecular switches by reshaping their molecular backbones to decrease or increase the degree of coupling and numbers of intramolecular bond critical points as revealed by the QTAIM/stress tensor analysis of the electron density. Additionally, the stress tensor scalar and vector analysis was found to provide new methods to follow the trajectories, and from this, new insight was gained into the behavior of the S 1 state in the vicinity of the conical intersection.

  12. Analysis of domain wall dynamics based on skewness of magnetic Barkhausen noise for applied stress determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Song [College of Electrical Engineering and Control Science, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 211816 (China); School of Automation Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210016 (China); Tian, GuiYun, E-mail: tian280@hotmail.com [School of Automation Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210016 (China); School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Merz Court, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, Newcastle NE1 7RU (United Kingdom); Dobmann, Gerd; Wang, Ping [School of Automation Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210016 (China)

    2017-01-01

    Skewness of Magnetic Barkhausen Noise (MBN) signal is used as a new feature for applied stress determination. After experimental studies, skewness presents its ability for measuring applied tensile stress compared with conventional feature, meanwhile, a non-linear behavior of this new feature and an independence of the excitation conditions under compressive stress are found and discussed. Effective damping during domain wall motion influencing the asymmetric shape of the MBN statistical distribution function is discussed under compressive and tensile stress variation. Domain wall (DW) energy and distance between pinning edges of the DW are considered altering the characteristic relaxation time, which is the reason for the non-linear phenomenon of skewness. - Highlights: • The skewness of magnetic Barkhausen noise profile is proposed as a new feature for applied stress determination. • The skewness is sensitive to applied stress and independent to excitation frequency. • Domain wall energy and pinning distance influence the relaxation time of domain wall, which leads to a non-linear behavior of skewness under compressive stress.

  13. Relationship between levels of thyroid stimulating hormone, age, and gender, with symptoms of depression among patients with thyroid disorders as measured by the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale 21 (DASS-21).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saidi, Sanisah; Iliani Jaafar, Siti Nur; Daud, Azlina; Musa, Ramli; Nik Ahmad, Nik Noor Fatnoon

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between levels of depression symptoms and age, thyroid-stimulating hormone levels, and stressful life events of the participants. Patients above 18 years old, with any thyroid disorders, and without psychiatric disorders were included in this study. All participants completed the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale 21 (DASS-21). The depression symptom score was calculated and interpreted as follows: less than 9: no depression; between 10 and 13: mild depression; between 14 and 20: moderate depression; between 21 and 27: severe depression, and more than 28: extremely severe depression. The total number of participants in this study was 199. There was no correlation between age, thyroid stimulating hormone, and the DASS score. There was also no significant difference in the DASS-21 score between genders. However, there was a positive correlation between depression symptoms and stressful life events (r=0.201, n=199, p < 0.05). These findings would suggest that increased depression symptom scores correlate with increased stressful life events. A larger study should be undertaken to confirm these findings. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Summary of calculations of dynamic response characteristics and design stress of the 1/5 scale PSE torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthur, D.

    1977-01-01

    The Lawrence Livermore Laboratory is currently involved in a 1/5 scale testing program on the Mark I BWR pressure suppression system. A key element of the test setup is a pressure vessel that is a 90 0 sector of a torus. Proper performance of the 90 0 torus depends on its structural integrity and structural dynamic characteristics. It must sustain the internal pressurization of the planned tests, and its dynamic response to the transient test loads should be minimal. If the structural vibrations are too great, interpretation of important load cell and pressure transducer data will be difficult. The purpose of the report is to bring together under one cover calculations pertaining to the structural dynamic characteristics and structural integrity of 90 0 torus. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) system description in which the torus and associated hardware are briefly described; (2) structural dynamics in which calculations of natural frequency and dynamic response are presented; and (3) structural integrity in which stress calculations for design purposes are presented; and an appendix which contains an LLL internal report comparing the expected load cell response for a three and four-point supported torus

  15. Forgiveness, Stress, and Health: a 5-Week Dynamic Parallel Process Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toussaint, Loren L; Shields, Grant S; Slavich, George M

    2016-10-01

    Psychological stress is a well-known risk factor for poor health, and recent research has suggested that the emotion-focused coping process of forgiveness may help mitigate these effects. To date, however, no studies have examined how levels of forgiveness, stress, and health fluctuate and interrelate over time. We addressed this issue by examining how forgiveness, stress, and mental and physical health symptoms change and relate to one another over 5 weeks. We hypothesized that increases in state levels of forgiveness would be associated with decreases in perceptions of stress, which would in turn be related to decreases in mental and physical health symptoms. A reverse effects model was also tested. We recruited a large, community-based sample of 332 young, middle-aged, and older adults (16-79 years old; M age  = 27.9). Each week for 5 weeks, participants reported on their levels of state forgiveness, perceived stress, and mental and physical health symptoms. Levels of forgiveness, stress, and mental and physical health symptoms each showed significant change and individual variability in change over time. As hypothesized, increases in forgiveness were associated with decreases in stress, which were in turn related to decreases in mental (but not physical) health symptoms (i.e., forgiveness → stress → health). The reverse effects model (i.e., health → stress → forgiveness) provided a relatively poorer fit. This study is the first to provide prospective, longitudinal evidence showing that greater forgiveness is associated with less stress and, in turn, better mental health. Strategies for cultivating forgiveness may thus have beneficial effects on stress and health.

  16. Dynamic MRI confirms support of the mid-urethra by TVT and TVT-O surgery for stress incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinne, Kirsi; Kainulainen, Sakari; Aukee, Sinikka; Heinonen, Seppo; Nilsson, Carl G

    2011-06-01

    To study changes in mid-urethral function with dynamic MRI in stress urinary incontinent women undergoing either tension-free vaginal tape (TVT) or TVT-obturator sling operations. Prospective clinical study. University hospital. Forty-two parous women with stress urinary incontinence recruited to dynamic magnetic resonance imaging before and after mid-urethral sling surgery. Control group of 16 healthy women. Dynamic magnetic resonance imaging at rest, during pelvic floor muscle contraction, coughing and voiding with a bladder volume of 200-300 ml. X- and Y- coordinates were used to determine the location of the mid-urethra during these activities. Changes in mid-urethral position after TVT and TVT-obturator operations during the different activities. Postoperatively the women could elevate their mid-urethra by pelvic floor muscle contraction significantly higher than before the operation (pTVT and the TVT-O mid-urethral slings, we could not see any differences in the movement patterns. Mid-urethral slings support the mid-urethra and restrict downward movement during different activities. Movement patterns are similar after TVT and TVT-O operations. © 2011 The Authors Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica© 2011 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  17. Experimental Study on Wing Crack Behaviours in Dynamic-Static Superimposed Stress Field Using Caustics and High-Speed Photography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.Y. Yang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available During the drill-and-blast progress in rock tunnel excavation of great deep mine, rock fracture is evaluated by both blasting load and pre-exiting earth stress (pre-compression. Many pre-existing flaws in the rock mass, like micro-crack, also seriously affect the rock fracture pattern. Under blasting load with pre-compression, micro-cracks initiate, propagate and grow to be wing cracks. With an autonomous design of static-dynamic loading system, dynamic and static loads were applied on some PMMA plate specimen with pre-existing crack, and the behaviour of the wing crack was tested by caustics corroding with a high-speed photography. Four programs with different static loading modes that generate different pre-compression fields were executed, and the length, velocity of the blasting wing crack and dynamic stress intensity factor (SIF at the wing crack tip were analyzed and discussed. It is found that the behaviour of blasting-induced wing crack is affected obviously by blasting and pre-compression. And pre-compression, which is vertical to the direction of the wing crack propagation, hinders the crack propagation. Furthermore, the boundary constraint condition plays an important role on the behaviour of blasting induced crack during the experiment.

  18. Dynamic stress relaxation due to cyclic variation of strain at elevated temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, F.

    1975-01-01

    The relaxation of stress which occurs when low amplitude alternating strains are superimposed on constant mean total strains is studied in this paper. Experiments were carried out on a 0.16 per cent carbon steel and an AISI 347 stainless steel at 450 0 C and 650 0 C respectively in which the decrease of axial mean stress was measured as a function of time. When even a low amplitude alternating strain was applied, the rate of stress relaxation was observed to increase. Analytical predictions based on creep and static relaxation data show fairly good agreement with experiments in the period corresponding to transient creep. (author)

  19. Insights into thermal stress in Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix): dynamics of immunoendocrine and biochemical responses during and after chronic exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazar, Franco Nicolas; Videla, Emiliano Ariel; Fernandez, Maria Emilia; Labaque, Maria Carla; Marin, Raul Hector

    2018-05-01

    Avian require comfortable temperatures for optimal development and heat stress is a high concern in warm weather countries. We aimed to assess the dynamics of immunoendocrine and biochemical variables responses of birds exposed to a heat stressor applied during daylight hours, during the chronic stress and the recovery periods. We hypothesize that variables involved in the birds response will be differentially and gradually modified during those periods. Female quail (n = 210) were housed in six rearing boxes. At 29 days of age, the temperature in three boxes was increased from 24 to 34 °C during the light period throughout the nine days (Stress Treatment). The other three boxes remained at 24 °C and were used as controls. The subsequent 12 days were considered as recovery period. Different sets of 12 birds/treatment were blood-sampled at 29 (basal), 32, 35, 38 (stress), 41, 44, 47, and 50 (recovery) days of age, respectively. Immunoendocrine (corticosterone, lymphoproliferation, heterophil/lymphocyte ratio (H/L), and antibody response) and biochemical (glucose, total proteins, globulins, and albumin) variables were assessed. During stress, progressive corticosterone and H/L increments, and antibody titers and lymphoproliferation decreases were detected. No clear pattern of changes was found in biochemical variables. During recovery, while corticosterone and lymphoproliferation had recovered three days after the stressor ended, H/L and antibody responses required respectively nine and 12 days to recover to their basal levels, respectively. Findings suggest that immunity is already threatened when heat stress is sustained for three or more days. However, the system appears resilient, needing six to 12 days to recover to their basal responses.

  20. Alterations of markers of oxidative stress caused by environmental factors and their dynamics under impact of native biomodulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stasytyte-Buneviciene, D.; Juozulynas, A.; Bunevicius, J.

    2004-01-01

    Intensified formation of free radicals is one of the most important harmful factors of ionizing radiation acting upon human organism. Under physiological conditions, anti oxidative system preserves from harmful influence of free radicals. To avoid a disturbing influence of oxidative stress upon the processes of human homeostasis, additional quantities of antioxidants are indispensable. Among native biomodulators, pollen are well known for their anti oxidative, antitoxic and radioprotective properties. Dynamics of alterations of markers of oxidative stress as well as possibilities of restitution of their qualitative and quantitative indices were studied using native pollen. Correction programme was performed on 50 persons, 9 males and 41 female, residing and working under impact of harmful factors of oxidative stress, who used pollen 10 g per day during a period of 30 days. Control group consisted of 57 persons, 10 males and 47 females living and working under the same conditions. Blood tests (diene conjugates, malonic dialdehyde and katalase) using standard spectrophotometric methodic were studied before and after the course of treatment. After the treatment, contents of metabolites of lipid peroxidation, diene conjugates and malonic dialdehyde in blood serum essentially reduced. Activity of catalase decreased significantly in blood serum of the males and regularly smoking females. In conclusion, data presented demonstrate anti oxidative efficiency of native pollen and suggest more often it's applying in cases with alterated processes of homeostasis under impact of harmful factors of oxidative stress including influence of ionizing radiation. (author)

  1. The modulatory role of alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone administered spinally in the regulation of blood glucose level in d-glucose-fed and restraint stress mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Yun-Beom; Park, Soo-Hyun; Kim, Sung-Su; Lim, Su-Min; Jung, Jun-Sub; Suh, Hong-Won

    2014-08-01

    Alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) is known as a regulator of the blood glucose homeostasis and food intake. In the present study, the possible roles of α-MSH located in the spinal cord in the regulation of the blood glucose level were investigated in d-glucose-fed and immobilization stress (IMO) mouse models. We found in the present study that intrathecal (i.t.) injection with α-MSH alone did not affect the blood glucose level. However, i.t. administration with α-MSH reduced the blood glucose level in d-glucose-fed model. The plasma insulin level was increased in d-glucose-fed model and was further increased by α-MSH, whereas α-MSH did not affect plasma corticosterone level in d-glucose-fed model. In addition, i.t. administration with glucagon alone enhanced blood glucose level and, i.t. injection with glucagon also increased the blood glucose level in d-glucose-fed model. In contrasted to results observed in d-glucose-fed model, i.t. treatment with α-MSH caused enhancement of the blood glucose level in IMO model. The plasma insulin level was increased in IMO model. The increased plasma insulin level by IMO was reduced by i.t. treatment with α-MSH, whereas i.t. pretreatment with α-MSH did not affect plasma corticosterone level in IMO model. Taken together, although spinally located α-MSH itself does not alter the blood glucose level, our results suggest that the activation of α-MSH system located in the spinal cord play important modulatory roles for the reduction of the blood glucose level in d-glucose fed model whereas α-MSH is responsible for the up-regulation of the blood glucose level in IMO model. The enhancement of insulin release may be responsible for modulatory action of α-MSH in down-regulation of the blood glucose in d-glucose fed model whereas reduction of insulin release may be responsible for modulatory action of α-MSH in up-regulation of the blood glucose in IMO model. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The 1911 M ~6.6 Calaveras earthquake: Source parameters and the role of static, viscoelastic, and dynamic coulomb stress changes imparted by the 1906 San Francisco earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doser, D.I.; Olsen, K.B.; Pollitz, F.F.; Stein, R.S.; Toda, S.

    2009-01-01

    The occurrence of a right-lateral strike-slip earthquake in 1911 is inconsistent with the calculated 0.2-2.5 bar static stress decrease imparted by the 1906 rupture at that location on the Calaveras fault, and 5 yr of calculated post-1906 viscoelastic rebound does little to reload the fault. We have used all available first-motion, body-wave, and surface-wave data to explore possible focal mechanisms for the 1911 earthquake. We find that the event was most likely a right-lateral strikeslip event on the Calaveras fault, larger than, but otherwise resembling, the 1984 Mw 6.1 Morgan Hill earthquake in roughly the same location. Unfortunately, we could recover no unambiguous surface fault offset or geodetic strain data to corroborate the seismic analysis despite an exhaustive archival search. We calculated the static and dynamic Coulomb stress changes for three 1906 source models to understand stress transfer to the 1911 site. In contrast to the static stress shadow, the peak dynamic Coulomb stress imparted by the 1906 rupture promoted failure at the site of the 1911 earthquake by 1.4-5.8 bar. Perhaps because the sample is small and the aftershocks are poorly located, we find no correlation of 1906 aftershock frequency or magnitude with the peak dynamic stress, although all aftershocks sustained a calculated dynamic stress of ???3 bar. Just 20 km to the south of the 1911 epicenter, we find that surface creep of the Calaveras fault at Hollister paused for ~17 yr after 1906, about the expected delay for the calculated static stress drop imparted by the 1906 earthquake when San Andreas fault postseismic creep and viscoelastic relaxation are included. Thus, the 1911 earthquake may have been promoted by the transient dynamic stresses, while Calaveras fault creep 20 km to the south appears to have been inhibited by the static stress changes.

  3. Photoelastic stress investigation in underground large hole in permafrost soil (statics, thermoelasticity, dynamics, photoelastic strain-gauges)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savostjanov, V. N.; Dvalishvili, V. V.; Sakharov, V. N.; Isajkin, A. S.; Frishter, L.; Starchevsky, A. V.

    1991-12-01

    The development of many-year-frost rock (MYFR) region hydrotechnic construction, the MYFR being quite a reliable construction based provided it is situated outside the seasonal temperature fluctuation layer, requires the rock stress-deformed state evaluating criteria working out with maximal possible account of static, dynamic, blast-hole drilling, and temperature effect on their properties. In estimating the hydroelectrical power station (HPS) underground building stress-deformed state the present work refers to experimental data and calculations, received by solving a linear task with further account of the building profile changing effect in the process of construction and the concrete and rock mechanic properties heterogeneity. The proposed order is justified, provided the rock mass defrosting depth value is small as compared to the rock separate block dimensions and it corresponds to the building construction period. The results are given for the Kolymskaya Hydroelectrical Power Station building cross-section, considered under flat deformation conditions.

  4. Dynamics of a Lüders Band and Destruction of an Aluminum-Magnesium Alloy, Initiated by a Stress Concentrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibkov, A. A.; Zheltov, M. A.; Gasanov, M. F.; Zolotov, A. E.

    2018-02-01

    Spatio-temporal localization of deformation and the rupture of the aluminum-magnesium AlMg6 alloy, initiated by a geometrical stress concentrator, are studied in situ by video recording at a speed of 500 to 20000 frames/s. It is established that a stress concentrator in the form of a small notch with a depth about 1% of the width of a flat specimen is an attractor of bands of macrolocalized plastic deformation, starting from a Lüders band and ending with the start of the main crack. The key role of intersecting deformation macrobands in the development of the main crack is revealed. Possible micromechanisms of viscous destruction associated with the dynamics of the intersection of deformation bands are discussed.

  5. Dynamic Failure Processes Under Confining Stress in AlON, a Transparent Polycrystalline Ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    homogeneous compressive stress state in the specimen, a 500 µm thick, soft-annealed AISI 4140 steel ‘cushion’ is sandwiched between the specimen and the...1. The AlON prismatic specimen (shown in green in the figure) is placed between two very hard steel “T-blocks” made from ~ HRC 55 hardened AISI ... 4140 steel alloy. The blocks were polished to obtain precise dimensions and a mirror surface finish. Compressive stress was generated by tightening

  6. Pulmonary artery wave propagation and reservoir function in conscious man: impact of pulmonary vascular disease, respiration and dynamic stress tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Junjing; Manisty, Charlotte; Simonsen, Ulf; Howard, Luke S; Parker, Kim H; Hughes, Alun D

    2017-10-15

    Wave travel plays an important role in cardiovascular physiology. However, many aspects of pulmonary arterial wave behaviour remain unclear. Wave intensity and reservoir-excess pressure analyses were applied in the pulmonary artery in subjects with and without pulmonary hypertension during spontaneous respiration and dynamic stress tests. Arterial wave energy decreased during expiration and Valsalva manoeuvre due to decreased ventricular preload. Wave energy also decreased during handgrip exercise due to increased heart rate. In pulmonary hypertension patients, the asymptotic pressure at which the microvascular flow ceases, the reservoir pressure related to arterial compliance and the excess pressure caused by waves increased. The reservoir and excess pressures decreased during Valsalva manoeuvre but remained unchanged during handgrip exercise. This study provides insights into the influence of pulmonary vascular disease, spontaneous respiration and dynamic stress tests on pulmonary artery wave propagation and reservoir function. Detailed haemodynamic analysis may provide novel insights into the pulmonary circulation. Therefore, wave intensity and reservoir-excess pressure analyses were applied in the pulmonary artery to characterize changes in wave propagation and reservoir function during spontaneous respiration and dynamic stress tests. Right heart catheterization was performed using a pressure and Doppler flow sensor tipped guidewire to obtain simultaneous pressure and flow velocity measurements in the pulmonary artery in control subjects and patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) at rest. In controls, recordings were also obtained during Valsalva manoeuvre and handgrip exercise. The asymptotic pressure at which the flow through the microcirculation ceases, the reservoir pressure related to arterial compliance and the excess pressure caused by arterial waves increased in PAH patients compared to controls. The systolic and diastolic rate constants

  7. Transcriptome profiling of low temperature-treated cassava apical shoots showed dynamic responses of tropical plant to cold stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An Dong

    2012-02-01

    in transcripts and enzyme activities of ROS scavenging genes and the accumulation of total soluble sugars (including sucrose and glucose were also detected. Conclusions The dynamic expression changes reflect the integrative controlling and transcriptome regulation of the networks in the cold stress response of cassava. The biological processes involved in the signal perception and physiological response might shed light on the molecular mechanisms related to cold tolerance in tropical plants and provide useful candidate genes for genetic improvement.

  8. Drought stress, growth and nonstructural carbohydrate dynamics of pine trees in a semi-arid forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Tamir; Hoch, Günter; Yakir, Dan; Körner, Christian

    2014-09-01

    In trees exposed to prolonged drought, both carbon uptake (C source) and growth (C sink) typically decrease. This correlation raises two important questions: (i) to what degree is tree growth limited by C availability; and (ii) is growth limited by concurrent C storage (e.g., as nonstructural carbohydrates, NSC)? To test the relationships between drought, growth and C reserves, we monitored the changes in NSC levels and constructed stem growth chronologies of mature Pinus halepensis Miller trees of three drought stress levels growing in Yatir forest, Israel, at the dry distribution limit of forests. Moderately stressed and stressed trees showed 34 and 14% of the stem growth, 71 and 31% of the sap flux density, and 79 and 66% of the final needle length of healthy trees in 2012. In spite of these large reductions in growth and sap flow, both starch and soluble sugar concentrations in the branches of these trees were similar in all trees throughout the dry season (2-4% dry mass). At the same time, the root starch concentrations of moderately stressed and stressed trees were 47 and 58% of those of healthy trees, but never drought there is more than one way for a tree to maintain a positive C balance. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Stress- and temperature-dependent scaling behavior of dynamic hysteresis in soft PZT bulk ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yimnirun, R; Wongsaenmai, S; Wongmaneerung, R; Wongdamnern, N; Ngamjarurojana, A; Ananta, S; Laosiritaworn, Y

    2007-01-01

    Effects of electric field-frequency, electric field-amplitude, mechanical stress, and temperature on the hysteresis area, especially the scaling form, were investigated in soft lead zirconate titanate (PZT) bulk ceramics. The hysteresis area was found to depend on the frequency and field-amplitude with the same set of exponents as the power-law scaling for both with and without stresses. The inclusion of stresses into the power-law was obtained in the form of σ=0 > ∝ f -0.25 E 0 σ 0.45 which indicates the difference in energy dissipation between the under-stress and stress-free conditions. The power-law temperature scaling relations were obtained for hysteresis area (A) and remanent polarization P r , while the coercivity E C was found to scale linearly with temperature T. The three temperature scaling relations were also field-dependent. At fixed field amplitude E 0 , the scaling relations take the forms of ∝ T -1.1024 , P r ∼T -1.2322 and (E C0 - E C ) ∼T

  10. Experimental study of vertical stress profiles of a confined granular bed under static and dynamic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandato, S; Cuq, B; Ruiz, T

    2012-07-01

    In a wet agglomeration process inside a low shear mixer, the blade function is to induce i) homogenization of the liquid sprayed on the powder surface and ii) a stress field able to transfer the mechanical energy at the particle scale. In this work we study the mechanical state of a confined powder bed through the analysis of stress distributions (by force measurements) in a rectangular cell in two cases: for a classical model powder (i.e. glass beads) and a complex powder (i.e. wheat semolina). Two types of vertical stress profiles are obtained according to the type of measurements carried out in the powder bed, either locally (at different positions in the cell) or globally (at the entire base). The global vertical stress profile follows Janssen's model and the local vertical stress profile highlights a critical length, identified as the percolation threshold of the force network, and a shielding length near the bottom, which is similar to an influence length of the side walls. In the context of wet agglomeration, the results allow to consider the role of the characteristic lengths in the mixing bowl under vertical mechanical solicitation.

  11. Stability of cracked pipe under seismic/dynamic displacement-controlled stresses. Subtask 1.2 final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, G.; Veith, P.; Marschall, C.

    1997-06-01

    Results of displacement-controlled pipe fracture experiments, analyses, and material characterization efforts performed within the International Piping Integrity Research Group, IPIRG, Program Subtask 1.2 are discussed. Effects of dynamic versus quasi-static and monotonic versus cyclic loading were evaluated for ductile tearing of two materials, A106 Grade B ferritic steel and TP304 austenitic steel. Twelve through-wall-cracked pipe experiments were conducted on 6-inch diameter Schedule 120 pipe at 288 C (550 F). The results indicated dynamic loading at seismic strain rates marginally increased the load-carrying capacity of austenitic steel. The ferritic steel tested was sensitive to dynamic strain-aging, and consequently, its load-carrying capacity decreased at dynamic strain rates. Two parameters were found to affect the apparent ductile crack growth resistance during cyclic loading, load ratio (R) and incremental plastic displacement that occurs in a cycle. Cyclic (R = 0) loading had minimal effect on ductile tearing for both materials. However, fully reversed loading decreased the load-carrying capacity and toughness for both materials. The incremental plastic displacement can be as important as the load ratio; however, it is harder to quantify from design stress reports. Large plastic displacements will minimize the effect of negative load ratios

  12. Stress map for ion irradiation: Depth-resolved dynamic competition between radiation-induced viscoelastic phenomena in SiO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillen, T. van; Siem, M.Y.S.; Polman, A.

    2004-01-01

    The dynamic competition between structural transformation, Newtonian viscous flow, and anisotropic strain generation during ion irradiation of SiO 2 , leads to strongly depth-dependent evolution of the mechanical stress, ranging between compressive and tensile. From independent in situ stress measurements during irradiation, generic expressions are derived of the nuclear stopping dependence of both the structural transformation rate and the radiation-induced viscosity. Using these data we introduce and demonstrate the concept of a 'stress map' that predicts the depth-resolved saturation stress in SiO 2 for any irradiation up to several MeV

  13. Experimental evaluation of the pure configurational stress assumption in the flow dynamics of entangled polymer melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Bejenariu, Anca Gabriela; Hassager, Ole

    2010-01-01

    to the flow in the non-linear flow regime. This has allowed highly elastic measurements within the limit of pure orientational stress, as the time of the flow was considerably smaller than the Rouse time. A Doi-Edwards [J. Chem. Soc., Faraday Trans. 2 74, 1818-1832 (1978)] type of constitutive model...... with the assumption of pure configurational stress was accurately able to predict the startup as well as the reversed flow behavior. This confirms that this commonly used theoretical picture for the flow of polymeric liquids is a correct physical principle to apply. c 2010 The Society of Rheology. [DOI: 10.1122/1.3496378]...

  14. Chronic electroconvulsive stimulation but not chronic restraint stress modulates mRNA expression of voltage-dependent potassium channels Kv7.2 and Kv11.1 in the rat piriform cortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjæresen, Marie-Louise; Hageman, Ida; Wörtwein, Gitta

    2008-01-01

    The mechanisms by which stress and electroconvulsive therapy exert opposite effects on the course of major depression are not known. Potential candidates might include the voltage-dependent potassium channels. Potassium channels play an important role in maintaining the resting membrane potential...... and controlling neuronal excitability. To explore this hypothesis, we examined the effects of one or several electroconvulsive stimulations and chronic restraint stress (6 h/day for 21 days) on the expression of voltage-dependent potassium channel Kv7.2, Kv11.1, and Kv11.3 mRNA in the rat brain using in situ...... hybridization. Repeated, but not acute, electroconvulsive stimulation increased Kv7.2 and Kv11.1 mRNA levels in the piriform cortex. In contrast, restraint stress had no significant effect on mRNA expression of Kv7.2, Kv11.1, or Kv11.3 in any of the brain regions examined. Thus, it appears that the investigated...

  15. New Insights into the Role of Mitochondrial Dynamics and Autophagy during Oxidative Stress and Aging in the Heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiyuki Ikeda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The heart is highly sensitive to the aging process. In the elderly, the heart tends to become hypertrophic and fibrotic. Stiffness increases with ensuing systolic and diastolic dysfunction. Aging also affects the cardiac response to stress. At the molecular level, the aging process is associated with accumulation of damaged proteins and organelles, partially due to defects in protein quality control systems. The accumulation of dysfunctional and abnormal mitochondria is an important pathophysiological feature of the aging process, which is associated with excessive production of reactive oxygen species. Mitochondrial fusion and fission and mitochondrial autophagy are crucial mechanisms for maintaining mitochondrial function and preserving energy production. In particular, mitochondrial fission allows for selective segregation of damaged mitochondria, which are afterward eliminated by autophagy. Unfortunately, recent evidence indicates that mitochondrial dynamics and autophagy are progressively impaired over time, contributing to the aging process. This suggests that restoration of these mechanisms could delay organ senescence and prevent age-associated cardiac diseases. Here, we discuss the current understanding of the close relationship between mitochondrial dynamics, mitophagy, oxidative stress, and aging, with a particular focus on the heart.

  16. Numerical analysis of dynamic behavior of pre-stressed shape memory alloy concrete beam-column joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, S.; Xiao, Z. F.; Lin, M. Y.; Niu, J.

    2018-04-01

    Beam-column joints are important parts of a main frame structure. Mechanical properties of beam-column joints have a great influence on dynamic performances of the frame structure. Shape memory alloy (SMA) as a new type of intelligent metal materials has wide applications in civil engineering. The paper aims at proposing a novel beam-column joint reinforced with pre-stressed SMA tendons to increase its dynamic performance. Based on the finite element analysis (FEA) software ABAQUS, a numerical simulation for 6 beam-column scaled models considering different SMA reinforcement ratios and pre-stress levels was performed, focusing on bearing capacities, energy-dissipation and self-centering capacities, etc. These models were numerically tested under a pseudo-static load on the beam end, companying a constant vertical compressive load on the top of the column. The numerical results show that the proposed SMA-reinforced joint has a significantly increased bearing capacity and a good self-centering capability after unloading even though the energy-dissipation capacity becomes smaller due the less residual deformation. The concept and mechanism of the novel joint can be used as an important reference for civil engineering applications.

  17. Dynamic magnetic resonance imaging of the behavior of the mid-urethra in healthy and stress incontinent women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinne, Kirsi Marja; Kainulainen, Sakari; Aukee, Sinikka; Heinonen, Seppo; Nilsson, Carl Gustaf

    2010-03-01

    Support of the mid-urethra is thought to be an essential element of urinary continence in the female. Our aim was to image the behavior of the mid-urethra in healthy volunteers and in stress urinary incontinence (SUI) patients by dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Prospective study. Gynecology outpatient clinic association with Department of Radiology in University Hospital of Kuopio, Finland. Fifteen healthy volunteers and 40 SUI women underwent dynamic MRI at rest, during pelvic floor muscle contraction, coughing and voiding with a bladder volume of 200 ml. Our aim was to determine the precise location and movement of the mid-urethra during these activities. The co-ordinate location and movement of the mid-urethra. Continent volunteers can elevate their mid-urethra significantly higher than incontinent women. Moreover, the mid-urethra of incontinent women rotated significantly more dorsocaudally during straining and coughing than in continent women. Elevation of the mid-urethra was more marked in continent compared to urinary incontinent women on pelvic floor muscle contraction suggesting sufficient support of the urethra. Downward movement of the mid-urethra was more significant in stress incontinent women than in continent volunteers.

  18. Importance of initial stress for abdominal aortic aneurysm wall motion: Dynamic MRI validated finite element analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merkx, M.A.G.; Veer, van 't M.; Speelman, L.; Breeuwer, M.; Buth, J.; Vosse, van de F.N.

    2009-01-01

    Currently the transverse diameter is the primary decision criterion to assess rupture risk in patients with an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). To obtain a measure for more patient-specific risk assessment, aneurysm wall stress, calculated using finite element analysis (FEA), has been evaluated in

  19. Signaling dynamics of palmitate-induced ER stress responses mediated by ATF4 in HepG2 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cho Hyunju

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Palmitic acid, the most common saturated free fatty acid, has been implicated in ER (endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis. This lipoapotosis is dependent, in part, on the upregulation of the activating transcription factor-4 (ATF4. To better understand the mechanisms by which palmitate upregulates the expression level of ATF4, we integrated literature information on palmitate-induced ER stress signaling into a discrete dynamic model. The model provides an in silico framework that enables simulations and predictions. The model predictions were confirmed through further experiments in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2 cells and the results were used to update the model and our current understanding of the signaling induced by palmitate. Results The three key things from the in silico simulation and experimental results are: 1 palmitate induces different signaling pathways (PKR (double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase, PERK (PKR-like ER kinase, PKA (cyclic AMP (cAMP-dependent protein kinase A in a time dependent-manner, 2 both ATF4 and CREB1 (cAMP-responsive element-binding protein 1 interact with the Atf4 promoter to contribute to a prolonged accumulation of ATF4, and 3 CREB1 is involved in ER-stress induced apoptosis upon palmitate treatment, by regulating ATF4 expression and possibly Ca2+ dependent-CaM (calmodulin signaling pathway. Conclusion The in silico model helped to delineate the essential signaling pathways in palmitate-mediated apoptosis.

  20. Uniaxial stress-driven coupled grain boundary motion in hexagonal close-packed metals: A molecular dynamics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zong, Hongxiang; Ding, Xiangdong; Lookman, Turab; Li, Ju; Sun, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Stress-driven grain boundary (GB) migration has been evident as a dominant mechanism accounting for plastic deformation in crystalline solids. Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on a Ti bicrystal model, we show that a uniaxial stress-driven coupling is associated with the recently observed 90° GB reorientation in shock simulations and nanopillar compression measurements. This is not consistent with the theory of shear-induced coupled GB migration. In situ atomic configuration analysis reveals that this GB motion is accompanied by the glide of two sets of parallel dislocation arrays, and the uniaxial stress-driven coupling is explained through a composite action of symmetrically distributed dislocations and deformation twins. In addition, the coupling factor is calculated from MD simulations over a wide range of temperatures. We find that the coupled motion can be thermally damped (i.e., not thermally activated), probably due to the absence of the collective action of interface dislocations. This uniaxial coupled mechanism is believed to apply to other hexagonal close-packed metals

  1. The dual role of cyclin C connects stress regulated gene expression to mitochondrial dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randy Strich

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Following exposure to cytotoxic agents, cellular damage is first recognized by a variety of sensor mechanisms. Thenceforth, the damage signal is transduced to the nucleus to install the correct gene expression program including the induction of genes whose products either detoxify destructive compounds or repair the damage they cause. Next, the stress signal is disseminated throughout the cell to effect the appropriate changes at organelles including the mitochondria. The mitochondria represent an important signaling platform for the stress response. An initial stress response of the mitochondria is extensive fragmentation. If the damage is prodigious, the mitochondria fragment (fission and lose their outer membrane integrity leading to the release of pro-apoptotic factors necessary for programmed cell death (PCD execution. As this complex biological process contains many moving parts, it must be exquisitely coordinated as the ultimate decision is life or death. The conserved C-type cyclin plays an important role in executing this molecular Rubicon by coupling changes in gene expression to mitochondrial fission and PCD. Cyclin C, along with its cyclin dependent kinase partner Cdk8, associates with the RNA polymerase holoenzyme to regulate transcription. In particular, cyclin C-Cdk8 repress many stress responsive genes. To relieve this repression, cyclin C is destroyed in cells exposed to pro-oxidants and other stressors. However, prior to its destruction, cyclin C, but not Cdk8, is released from its nuclear anchor (Med13, translocates from the nucleus to the cytoplasm where it interacts with the fission machinery and is both necessary and sufficient to induce extensive mitochondria fragmentation. Furthermore, cytoplasmic cyclin C promotes PCD indicating that it mediates both mitochondrial fission and cell death pathways. This review will summarize the role cyclin C plays in regulating stress-responsive transcription. In addition, we will detail

  2. Pipe stress intensity factors and coupled depressurization and dynamic crack propagation. 1976 Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emery, A.F.; Kobayashi, A.S.; Love, W.J.

    1978-04-01

    This report contains the description of predictive models for the initiation and propagation of cracks in pipes and the numerical results obtained. The initiation of the crack was studied by evaluating stress intensity factors under static conditions for a series of representative flaws. Three-dimensional static stress intensity factors were determined for quarter-elliptical cracks at the corner of a hole in an infinite plate and at the corner of a bore in a rotating disk. Semi-elliptical cracks for plates in bending and in pressurized and thermally stressed hollow cylinders were also evaluated. The stress fields, in the absence of a crack, were used in the ''alternating technique'' to compute the stress intensity factors along the crack front. Parametric studies were made to assess the effects of crack thickness, the ratio of the major and minor axes of the ellipse and the thickness of the cylinders or plates. These parametric results may be used to predict critical flaw sizes for the initiation of the running crack. The initiation and propagation of axial through cracks in pressurized pipes was studied by using an elastic-plastic finite different shell code coupled with a one-dimensional thermal-hydraulic code which computed the leakage through the crack opening and the depressurization of the fluid in the pipe. The effects of large deflections and different fluid pressure profiles were investigated. The results showed that the crack opening shape is dependent upon the fracture criterion used and upon the average pressure on the crack flaps, but not upon the specific pressure profile. The consideration of large deflections changed the opening size of the crack and through the coupling with the pipe pressures, strongly affected the crack tip speed. However, for equal crack lengths, there was little difference between calculations made for large and small deflection

  3. Social group dynamics predict stress variability among children in a New Zealand classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spray, Julie; Floyd, Bruce; Littleton, Judith; Trnka, Susanna; Mattison, Siobhan

    2018-03-27

    Previous research proposes stress as a mechanism for linking social environments and biological bodies. In particular, non-human primate studies investigate relationships between cortisol as a measure of stress response and social hierarchies. Because human social structures often include hierarchies of dominance and social status, humans may exhibit similar patterns. Studies of non-human primates, however, have not reached consistent conclusions with respect to relationships between social position and levels of cortisol. While human studies report associations between cortisol and various aspects of social environments, studies that consider social status as a predictor of stress response also report mixed results. Others have argued that perceptions of social status may have different implications for stress response depending upon social context. We propose here that characteristics of children's social networks may be a better predictor of central tendencies and variability of stress response than their perceptions of social status. This is evaluated among 24 children from 9.4 to 11.3 years of age in one upper middle-class New Zealand primary school classroom, assessed through observation within the classroom, self-reports during semi-structured interviews and 221 serial saliva samples provided daily over 10 consecutive school days. A synthetic assessment of the children's networks and peer-relationships was developed prior to saliva-cortisol analysis. We found that greater stability of peer-relationships within groups significantly predicts lower within-group variation in mid-morning cortisol over the two-week period, but not overall within-group differences in mean cortisol. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. Cross-talk between lipid and protein carbonylation in a dynamic cardiomyocyte model of mild nitroxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Griesser

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS play an important role in the regulation of cardiac function. Increase in ROS/RNS concentration results in lipid and protein oxidation and is often associated with onset and/or progression of many cardiovascular disorders. However, interplay between lipid and protein modifications has not been simultaneously studied in detail so far. Biomolecule carbonylation is one of the most common biomarkers of oxidative stress. Using a dynamic model of nitroxidative stress we demonstrated rapid changes in biomolecule carbonylation in rat cardiomyocytes. Levels of carbonylated species increased as early as 15 min upon treatment with the peroxynitrite donor, 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1, and decreased to values close to control after 16 h. Total (lipids+proteins vs. protein-specific carbonylation showed different dynamics, with a significant increase in protein-bound carbonyls at later time points. Treatment with SIN-1 in combination with inhibitors of proteasomal and autophagy/lysosomal degradation pathways allowed confirmation of a significant role of the proteasome in the degradation of carbonylated proteins, whereas lipid carbonylation increased in the presence of autophagy/lysosomal inhibitors. Electrophilic aldehydes and ketones formed by lipid peroxidation were identified and relatively quantified using LC-MS/MS. Molecular identity of reactive species was used for data-driven analysis of their protein targets. Combination of different enrichment strategies with LC-MS/MS analysis allowed identification of more than 167 unique proteins with 332 sites modified by electrophilic lipid peroxidation products. Gene ontology analysis of modified proteins demonstrated enrichment of several functional categories including proteins involved in cytoskeleton, extracellular matrix, ion channels and their regulation. Using calcium mobilization assays, the effect of nitroxidative stress on the activity of several ion

  5. Estimating the Reactivation Potential of Pre-Existing Fractures in Subsurface Granitoids from Outcrop Analogues and in-Situ Stress Modeling: Implications for EGS Reservoir Stimulation with an Example from Thuringia (Central Germany)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasch, N.; Ustaszewski, K. M.; Siegburg, M.; Navabpour, P.; Hesse, G.

    2014-12-01

    The Mid-German Crystalline Rise (MGCR) in Thuringia (central Germany) is part of the European Variscan orogen and hosts large extents of Visean granites (c. 350 Ma), locally overlain by up to 3 km of Early Permian to Mid-Triassic volcanic and sedimentary rocks. A geothermal gradient of 36°C km-1 suggests that such subsurface granites form an economically viable hot dry rock reservoir at > 4 km depth. In order to assess the likelihood of reactivating any pre-existing fractures during hydraulic reservoir stimulation, slip and dilation tendency analyses (Morris et al. 1996) were carried out. For this purpose, we determined orientations of pre-existing fractures in 14 granite exposures along the southern border fault of an MGCR basement high. Additionally, the strike of 192 Permian magmatic dikes affecting the granite was considered. This analysis revealed a prevalence of NW-SE-striking fractures (mainly joints, extension veins, dikes and subordinately brittle faults) with a maximum at 030/70 (dip azimuth/dip). Borehole data and earthquake focal mechanisms reveal a maximum horizontal stress SHmax trending N150°E and a strike-slip regime. Effective in-situ stress magnitudes at 4.5 km depth, assuming hydrostatic conditions and frictional equilibrium along pre-existing fractures with a friction coefficient of 0.85 yielded 230 and 110 MPa for SHmax and Shmin, respectively. In this stress field, fractures with the prevailing orientations show a high tendency of becoming reactivated as dextral strike-slip faults if stimulated hydraulically. To ensure that a stimulation well creates fluid connectivity on a reservoir volume as large as possible rather than dissipating fluids along existing fractures, it should follow a trajectory at the highest possible angle to the orientation of prevailing fractures, i.e. subhorizontal and NE-SW-oriented. References: Morris, A., D. A. Ferrill, and D. B. Henderson (1996), Slip-tendency analysis and fault reactivation, Geology, 24, 275-278.

  6. Identification of Dynamic Flow Stress Curves Using the Virtual Fields Methods: Theoretical Feasibility Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leem, Dohyun; Kim, Jin-Hwan; Barlat, Frédéric; Song, Jung Han; Lee, Myoung-Gyu

    2018-03-01

    An inverse approach based on the virtual fields method (VFM) is presented to identify the material hardening parameters under dynamic deformation. This dynamic-VFM (D-VFM) method does not require load information for the parameter identification. Instead, it utilizes acceleration fields in a specimen's gage region. To investigate the feasibility of the proposed inverse approach for dynamic deformation, the virtual experiments using dynamic finite element simulations were conducted. The simulation could provide all the necessary data for the identification such as displacement, strain, and acceleration fields. The accuracy of the identification results was evaluated by changing several parameters such as specimen geometry, velocity, and traction boundary conditions. The analysis clearly shows that the D-VFM which utilizes acceleration fields can be a good alternative to the conventional identification procedure that uses load information. Also, it was found that proper deformation conditions are required for generating sufficient acceleration fields during dynamic deformation to enhance the identification accuracy with the D-VFM.

  7. growth stimulant

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of timing and duration of supplementation of LIVFIT VET ® (growth stimulant) as substitute for fish meal on the growth performance, haematology and clinical enzymes concentration of growing pigs.

  8. Dynamics of fibrillar precursors of shishes as a function of stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balzano, Luigi; Cavallo, Dario; Van Erp, Tim B; Ma Zhe; Housmans, Jan-Willem; Fernandez-Ballester, Lucia; Peters, Gerrit W M, E-mail: G.W.M.Peters@tue.n

    2010-11-15

    Shishes are fibrillar crystallites that can be created by deforming a polymer melt. The formation of shishes takes place when flow is strong enough to stretch molecules. In the early stages, bundles of stretched molecules with pre-crystalline order form metastable precursors whose stability depends on their size and, hence, on the stress level. We find that for a specific isotactic polypropylene, close to the nominal melting point, a stress larger than 0.10 MPa leads to stable fibrillar precursors that are partially crystalline immediately after flow. On the other hand, below 0.10 MPa, the aspect ratio of precursors tends to unity and the lack of crystallinity makes these structures prone to dissolution.

  9. TRANSCRIPTOME DYNAMICS IN MANGO FRUIT PEEL REVEALS MECHANISMS OF CHILLING STRESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velu Sivankalyani

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Cold storage is considered the most effective method for prolonging fresh produce storage. However, subtropical fruit is sensitive to cold. Symptoms of chilling injury in mango include red and black spots that start from discolored lenticels and develop into pitting. The response of ‘Keitt’ mango fruit to chilling stress was monitored by transcriptomic, physiological and microscopic analyses. Transcriptomic changes in the mango fruit peel were evaluated during optimal (12°C and suboptimal (5°C cold storage. Two days of chilling stress upregulated genes involved in the plant stress response, including those encoding transmembrane receptors, calcium-mediated signal transduction, NADPH oxidase, MAP kinases and WRKYs, which can lead to cell death. Indeed, cell death was observed around the discolored lenticels after 19 days of cold storage at 5°C. Localized cell death and cuticular opening in the lumen of discolored lenticels were correlated with increased general decay during shelf-life storage, possibly due to fungal penetration. We also observed increased phenolics accumulation around the discolored lenticels, which was correlated with the biosynthesis of phenylpropanoids that were probably transported from the resin ducts. Increased lipid peroxidation was observed during chilling injury by both the biochemical malondialdehyde method and a new non-destructive luminescent technology, correlated to upregulation of the α-linolenic acid oxidation pathway. Genes involved in sugar metabolism were also induced, possibly to maintain osmotic balance. This analysis provides an in-depth characterization of mango fruit response to chilling stress and could lead to the development of new tools, treatments and strategies to prolong cold storage of subtropical fruit.

  10. Transcriptome Dynamics in Mango Fruit Peel Reveals Mechanisms of Chilling Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivankalyani, Velu; Sela, Noa; Feygenberg, Oleg; Zemach, Hanita; Maurer, Dalia; Alkan, Noam

    2016-01-01

    Cold storage is considered the most effective method for prolonging fresh produce storage. However, subtropical fruit is sensitive to cold. Symptoms of chilling injury (CI) in mango include red and black spots that start from discolored lenticels and develop into pitting. The response of ‘Keitt’ mango fruit to chilling stress was monitored by transcriptomic, physiological, and microscopic analyses. Transcriptomic changes in the mango fruit peel were evaluated during optimal (12°C) and suboptimal (5°C) cold storage. Two days of chilling stress upregulated genes involved in the plant stress response, including those encoding transmembrane receptors, calcium-mediated signal transduction, NADPH oxidase, MAP kinases, and WRKYs, which can lead to cell death. Indeed, cell death was observed around the discolored lenticels after 19 days of cold storage at 5°C. Localized cell death and cuticular opening in the lumen of discolored lenticels were correlated with increased general decay during shelf-life storage, possibly due to fungal penetration. We also observed increased phenolics accumulation around the discolored lenticels, which was correlated with the biosynthesis of phenylpropanoids that were probably transported from the resin ducts. Increased lipid peroxidation was observed during CI by both the biochemical malondialdehyde method and a new non-destructive luminescent technology, correlated to upregulation of the α-linolenic acid oxidation pathway. Genes involved in sugar metabolism were also induced, possibly to maintain osmotic balance. This analysis provides an in-depth characterization of mango fruit response to chilling stress and could lead to the development of new tools, treatments and strategies to prolong cold storage of subtropical fruit. PMID:27812364

  11. The effect of stress tolerance on dynamics of activity-travel behavior : numerical simulation results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Psarra, I.; Arentze, T.A.; Timmermans, H.J.P.

    2014-01-01

    The primary and secondary effects of various spatial and transportation policies can be evaluated with models of activity–travel behavior. Whereas existing activity-based models of travel demand simulate a typical day, dynamic models simulate behavioral response to endogenous or exogenous change,

  12. Stress wave radiation from brittle crack extension by molecular dynamics and FEM

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hora, Petr; Červená, Olga; Uhnáková, Alena; Machová, Anna; Pelikán, Vladimír

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 1 (2013), s. 23-30 ISSN 1802-680X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/09/1630 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : molecular dynamics * finite element simulation * bcc iron crystal Subject RIV: BI - Acoustic s

  13. Influence of the rotor-stator interaction on the dynamic stresses of Francis runners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillaume, R; Scolaro, D; Deniau, J L; Colombet, C

    2012-01-01

    Thanks to advances in computing capabilities and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) techniques, it is now possible to calculate realistic unsteady pressure fields in Francis turbines. This paper will explain methods to calculate the structural loads and the dynamic behaviour in order to optimize the turbine design and maximize its reliability and lifetime. Depending on the operating conditions of a Francis turbine, different hydraulic phenomena may impact the mechanical behaviour of the structure. According to their nature, these highly variable phenomena should be treated differently and specifically in order to estimate the potential risks arising on submerged structures, in particular the runner. The operating condition studied thereafter is the point at maximum power with the maximum head. Under this condition, the runner is excited by only one dynamic phenomenon named the Rotor-Stator Interaction (RSI). The origin of the phenomenon is located on the radial gap of the turbine and is the source of pressure fluctuations. A fluid-structure analysis is performed to observe the influence of that dynamic pressure field on the runner behaviour. The first part of the paper deals with the unsteady fluid computation. The RSI phenomenon is totally unsteady so the fluid simulation must take into account the entire machine and its rotation movement, in order to obtain a dynamic pressure field. In the second part of the paper, a method suitable for the RSI study is developed. It is known that the fluctuating pressure in this gap can be described as a sum of spatial components. By evaluating these components in the CFD results and on the scale model, it is possible to assess the relevance of the numerical results on the whole runner. After this step, the numerical pressure field can be used as the dynamic load of the structure. The final part of the paper presentsthe mechanical finite element calculations. A modal analysis of the runner in water and a harmonic analysis of its

  14. Evaluation of femoral perfusion using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI after simultaneous initiation of electrical stimulation and steroid treatment in an osteonecrosis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Hiroki; Ueshima, Keiichiro; Saito, Masazumi; Ikoma, Kazuya; Ishida, Masashi; Goto, Tsuyoshi; Hayashi, Shigeki; Ikegami, Akira; Fujioka, Mikihiro; Mazda, Osam; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2018-04-30

    This study aimed to evaluate femoral perfusion using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) for two weeks after the simultaneous initiation of electrical stimulation (ES) and steroid treatment in a steroid-induced osteonecrosis (ON) model. A single dose of methylprednisolone was injected into 14 rabbits. Seven rabbits underwent ES (ES group), and seven rabbits did not (control group). DCE-MRI was performed before steroid administration and 1, 5, 10, and 14 days after steroid administration. Regions of interest were set in the bilateral proximal femora. The enhancement ratio, initial slope, and area under the curve were analyzed. These parameters were evaluated after steroid administration in each group and between the two groups, and the ratios of ON in both groups were compared. In the control group, the minimum values of all parameters decreased significantly after steroid administration (P < 0.05), but in the ES group, the parameters did not decrease. In the ES group, all parameter values were significantly increased on the 10th and 14th days (P < 0.05). All parameter values in the ES group were significantly higher than those in the control group on the 14th day (P < 0.05). In the control group, ON was detected in three of five rabbits (in three of ten femora). In the ES group, ON was not detected. These results suggest that increased femoral blood flow elicited by ES may be related to ON prevention after steroid administration.

  15. Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder-Specific Stimulant Misuse, Mood, Anxiety, and Stress in College-Age Women at High Risk for or with Eating Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Elise L.; Kass, Andrea E.; Eichen, Dawn M.; Fitzsimmons-Craft, Ellen E.; Trockel, Mickey; Wilfley, Denise E.; Taylor, C. Barr

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To examine the misuse of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)-specific stimulants in a college population at high risk for or with clinical or subclinical eating disorders. Participants: Four hundred forty-eight college-age women aged 18-25 at high risk for or with a clinical or subclinical eating disorder. Methods:…

  16. Heat stress redistributes blood flow in arteries of the brain during dynamic exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kohei; Oue, Anna; Yoneya, Marina; Sadamoto, Tomoko; Ogoh, Shigehiko

    2016-04-01

    We hypothesized that heat stress would decrease anterior and posterior cerebral blood flow (CBF) during exercise, and the reduction in anterior CBF would be partly associated with large increase in extracranial blood flow (BF). Nine subjects performed 40 min of semirecumbent cycling at 60% of the peak oxygen uptake in hot (35°C; Heat) and thermoneutral environments (25°C; Control). We evaluated BF and conductance (COND) in the external carotid artery (ECA), internal carotid artery (ICA), and vertebral artery (VA) using ultrasonography. During the Heat condition, ICA and VA BF were significantly increased 10 min after the start of exercise (P Heat. Compared with the Control, either BF or COND of ICA and VA at the end of Heat tended to be lower, but not significantly. In contrast, ECA BF and COND at the end of Heat were both higher than levels in the Control condition (P Heat, a reduction in ICA BF appears to be associated with a decline in end-tidal CO2 tension (r = 0.84), whereas VA BF appears to be affected by a change in cardiac output (r = 0.87). In addition, a change in ECA BF during Heat was negatively correlated with a change in ICA BF (r = -0.75). Heat stress resulted in modification of the vascular response of head and brain arteries to exercise, which resulted in an alteration in the distribution of cardiac output. Moreover, a hyperthermia-induced increase in extracranial BF might compromise anterior CBF during exercise with heat stress. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  17. 3D Discrete Dislocation Dynamics: Influence of Segment Mobility on Critical Shear Stress

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Záležák, Tomáš; Dlouhý, Antonín

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 128, č. 4 (2015), s. 654-656 ISSN 0587-4246. [ISPMA 13 - International Symposium on Physics of Materials /13./. Praha, 31.08.2014-04.09.2014] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.20.0214; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-22834S Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : metal matrix composites * discrete dislocation dynamics * high temperature creep Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy Impact factor: 0.525, year: 2015

  18. JNK Phosphorylates SIRT6 to Stimulate DNA Double-Strand Break Repair in Response to Oxidative Stress by Recruiting PARP1 to DNA Breaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Van Meter

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The accumulation of damage caused by oxidative stress has been linked to aging and to the etiology of numerous age-related diseases. The longevity gene, sirtuin 6 (SIRT6, promotes genome stability by facilitating DNA repair, especially under oxidative stress conditions. Here we uncover the mechanism by which SIRT6 is activated by oxidative stress to promote DNA double-strand break (DSB repair. We show that the stress-activated protein kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK, phosphorylates SIRT6 on serine 10 in response to oxidative stress. This post-translational modification facilitates the mobilization of SIRT6 to DNA damage sites and is required for efficient recruitment of poly (ADP-ribose polymerase 1 (PARP1 to DNA break sites and for efficient repair of DSBs. Our results demonstrate a post-translational mechanism regulating SIRT6, and they provide the link between oxidative stress signaling and DNA repair pathways that may be critical for hormetic response and longevity assurance.

  19. Optimization Design of Structures Subjected to Transient Loads Using First and Second Derivatives of Dynamic Displacement and Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qimao Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper developed an effective optimization method, i.e., gradient-Hessian matrix-based method or second order method, of frame structures subjected to the transient loads. An algorithm of first and second derivatives of dynamic displacement and stress with respect to design variables is formulated based on the Newmark method. The inequality time-dependent constraint problem is converted into a sequence of appropriately formed time-independent unconstrained problems using the integral interior point penalty function method. The gradient and Hessian matrixes of the integral interior point penalty functions are also computed. Then the Marquardt's method is employed to solve unconstrained problems. The numerical results show that the optimal design method proposed in this paper can obtain the local optimum design of frame structures and sometimes is more efficient than the augmented Lagrange multiplier method.

  20. Dynamic pull-in instability of geometrically nonlinear actuated micro-beams based on the modified couple stress theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid M. Sedighi

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the dynamic pull-in instability of vibrating micro-beams undergoing large deflection under electrosatically actuation. The governing equation of motion is derived based on the modified couple stress theory. Homotopy Perturbation Method is employed to produce the high accuracy approximate solution as well as the second-order frequency- amplitude relationship. The nonlinear governing equation of micro beam vibrations predeformed by an electric field includes both even and odd nonlinearities. The influences of basic non-dimensional parameters on the pull-in instability as well as the natural frequency are studied. It is demonstrated that two terms in series expansions are sufficient to produce high accuracy solution of the micro-structure. The accuracy of proposed asymptotic approach is validated via numerical results. The phase portrait of the system exhibits periodic and homoclinic orbits.

  1. Expression dynamics of HSP70 during chronic heat stress in Tharparkar cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharati, Jaya; Dangi, S S; Chouhan, V S; Mishra, S R; Bharti, M K; Verma, V; Shankar, O; Yadav, V P; Das, K; Paul, A; Bag, S; Maurya, V P; Singh, G; Kumar, P; Sarkar, M

    2017-06-01

    Six male Tharparkar cattle aged 2-3 years were selected for the study. The animals were acclimatized in the psychrometric chamber at thermoneutral zone (TNZ) for 15 days and then exposed to 42 °C temperature up to 23 days followed by 12 days of recovery period. Physiological responses were estimated, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated at TNZ on day 1, day 5, and day 12; after 6 h of heat stress exposure on day 16 to day 20, day 25, day 30, day 32, day 34, day 36, and day 38; and a recovery period on day 45 and day 50. The PBMCs were cultured to study the effect of thermal challenge on HSP70 messenger RNA (mRNA) expression pattern at different temperature-time combinations. The mRNA and protein expression of HSP70 in PBMCs along with serum extracellular HSP70 (eHSP70) was increased (P cattle and the biphasic expression pattern may be providing a second window of protection during chronic heat stress.

  2. The cell envelope stress response of Bacillus subtilis: from static signaling devices to dynamic regulatory network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radeck, Jara; Fritz, Georg; Mascher, Thorsten

    2017-02-01

    The cell envelope stress response (CESR) encompasses all regulatory events that enable a cell to protect the integrity of its envelope, an essential structure of any bacterial cell. The underlying signaling network is particularly well understood in the Gram-positive model organism Bacillus subtilis. It consists of a number of two-component systems (2CS) and extracytoplasmic function σ factors that together regulate the production of both specific resistance determinants and general mechanisms to protect the envelope against antimicrobial peptides targeting the biogenesis of the cell wall. Here, we summarize the current picture of the B. subtilis CESR network, from the initial identification of the corresponding signaling devices to unraveling their interdependence and the underlying regulatory hierarchy within the network. In the course of detailed mechanistic studies, a number of novel signaling features could be described for the 2CSs involved in mediating CESR. This includes a novel class of so-called intramembrane-sensing histidine kinases (IM-HKs), which-instead of acting as stress sensors themselves-are activated via interprotein signal transfer. Some of these IM-HKs are involved in sensing the flux of antibiotic resistance transporters, a unique mechanism of responding to extracellular antibiotic challenge.

  3. Competing pressures on populations: long-term dynamics of food availability, food quality, disease, stress and animal abundance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Colin A; Schoof, Valérie A M; Bonnell, Tyler R; Gogarten, Jan F; Calmé, Sophie

    2015-05-26

    Despite strong links between sociality and fitness that ultimately affect the size of animal populations, the particular social and ecological factors that lead to endangerment are not well understood. Here, we synthesize approximately 25 years of data and present new analyses that highlight dynamics in forest composition, food availability, the nutritional quality of food, disease, physiological stress and population size of endangered folivorous red colobus monkeys (Procolobus rufomitratus). There is a decline in the quality of leaves 15 and 30 years following two previous studies in an undisturbed area of forest. The consumption of a low-quality diet in one month was associated with higher glucocorticoid levels in the subsequent month and stress levels in groups living in degraded forest fragments where diet was poor was more than twice those in forest groups. In contrast, forest composition has changed and when red colobus food availability was weighted by the protein-to-fibre ratio, which we have shown positively predicts folivore biomass, there was an increase in the availability of high-quality trees. Despite these changing social and ecological factors, the abundance of red colobus has remained stable, possibly through a combination of increasing group size and behavioural flexibility. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of cross-anisotropy and stress-dependency of pavement layers on pavement responses under dynamic truck loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafiqul A. Tarefder

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies by the authors have determined pavement responses under dynamic loading considering cross-anisotropy in one layer only, either the cross-anisotropic viscoelastic asphalt concrete (AC layer or the cross-anisotropic stress-dependent base layer, but not both. This study evaluates pavement stress–strain responses considering cross-anisotropy in all layers, i.e. AC, base and subbase, using finite element modeling (FEM technique. An instrumented pavement section on Interstate I-40 near Albuquerque, New Mexico was used in ABAQUS framework as model geometry. Field asphalt cores were collected and tested in the laboratory to determine the cross-anisotropy (n-values defined by horizontal to vertical modulus ratio, and other viscoelastic parameters as inputs of the model incorporated through user defined material interface (UMAT functionality in ABAQUS. Field base and subbase materials were also collected and tested in the laboratory to determine stress-dependent nonlinear elastic model parameters, as inputs of the model, again incorporated through UMAT. The model validation task was carried out using field-measured deflections and strain values under falling weight deflectometer (FWD loads at the instrumented section. The validated model was then subjected to an actual truck loading for studying cross-anisotropic effects. It was observed that horizontal tensile strain at the bottom of the AC layer and vertical strains in all layers decreased with an increase in n-value of the asphalt layer, from n < 1 (anisotropy to n=1 (isotropy. This indicates that the increase in horizontal modulus caused the decrease in layer strains. It was also observed that if the base and subbase layers were considered stress-dependent instead of linear elastic unbound layers, the horizontal tensile strain at the bottom of the asphalt layer increased and vertical strains on top of the base and subbase also increased.

  5. A new look at stress: abscisic acid patterns and dynamics at high-resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Alexander M

    2016-04-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a key phytohormone promoting abiotic stress tolerance as well as developmental processes such as seed dormancy. A spatiotemporal map of ABA concentrations would greatly advance our understanding of the cell type and timing of ABA action. Organ and tissue-level ABA measurements, as well as indirect in vivo measurements such as cell-specific transcriptional analysis of ABA metabolic enzymes and ABA-responsive promoters, have all contributed to current views of the localization and timing of ABA accumulations. Recently developed Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) biosensors for ABA that sense ABA levels directly promise to add unprecedented resolution to in vivo ABA spatiotemporal mapping and expand our knowledge of the mechanisms controlling ABA levels in space and time. © 2015 Carnegie Institution for Science New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  6. Nerve growth factor (NGF) immunoreactive neurons in the juvenile rat hippocampus: response to acute and long-term high-light open-field (HL-OF) or forced swim (FS) stress stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badowska-Szalewska, E; Spodnik, E; Ludkiewicz, B; Klejbor, I; Moryś, J

    2011-12-29

    This study aimed at examining and comparing the influence of two different stress stimuli on the density (number of cells/mm²) of nerve growth factor (NGF) containing neurons in the hippocampal CA1 and CA3 pyramidal cell layers and the dentate gyrus (DG) granule cell layer in juvenile rats (P28; P-postnatal day). The high-light open-field (HL-OF) test and forced swim (FS) test were employed to investigate the effects of a single, 15-min acute exposure and repeated (15 min daily for 21 days) long-term exposure to stress. In order to detect NGF-ir neurons, immunohistochemical (-ir) techniques were used. In comparison with nonstressed animals, acute and long-term HL-OF or FS stimulation resulted in a marked increase (P<0.001) in the density of NGF-ir containing cells in all the hippocampal structures. The frequency of stress application (acute vs. long-term), however, did not have a substantial impact on the studied parameter, with the exception of the CA3 sector, where a decreased density (P<0.001) of NGF-ir neurons was observed after long-term exposure to FS. It may be concluded that a rise in the density of NGF-ir neurons in the juvenile rat hippocampus after exposure to HL-OF or FS stressors could have affected the activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) stress axis. Prolonged HL-OF or FS stress was probably aggravating enough not to trigger the habituation process. The type of stressor applied (HL-OF vs. FS) was not essentially a factor determining the density of NGF-ir cells in the hippocampus. Copyright © 2011 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Anodal Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Shows Minimal, Measure-Specific Effects on Dynamic Postural Control in Young and Older Adults: A Double Blind, Sham-Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Chesney E; Doumas, Michail

    2017-01-01

    We investigated whether stimulating the cerebellum and primary motor cortex (M1) using transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) could affect postural control in young and older adults. tDCS was employed using a double-blind, sham-controlled design, in which young (aged 18-35) and older adults (aged 65+) were assessed over three sessions, one for each stimulatory condition-M1, cerebellar and sham. The effect of tDCS on postural control was assessed using a sway-referencing paradigm, which induced platform rotations in proportion to the participant's body sway, thus assessing sensory reweighting processes. Task difficulty was manipulated so that young adults experienced a support surface that was twice as compliant as that of older adults, in order to minimise baseline age differences in postural sway. Effects of tDCS on postural control were assessed during, immediately after and 30 minutes after tDCS. Additionally, the effect of tDCS on corticospinal excitability was measured by evaluating motor evoked potentials using transcranial magnetic stimulation immediately after and 30 minutes after tDCS. Minimal effects of tDCS on postural control were found in the eyes open condition only, and this was dependent on the measure assessed and age group. For young adults, stimulation had only offline effects, as cerebellar stimulation showed higher mean power frequency (MPF) of sway 30 minutes after stimulation. For older adults, both stimulation conditions delayed the increase in sway amplitude witnessed between blocks one and two until stimulation was no longer active. In conclusion, despite tDCS' growing popularity, we would caution researchers to consider carefully the type of measures assessed and the groups targeted in tDCS studies of postural control.

  8. Interfacial dynamics driven by Marangoni stresses on a slowly moving liquid film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hewakandamby, Buddhika Naleen

    2002-01-01

    Differential surface tension is a common phenomenon in many chemical and biomedical processes. Localized surface tension gradients due to differential surface loading in thin films give rise to a moving shock front in the direction of higher surface tension. Existence of a background flow enhances the shock wave giving rise to wave breaking and wave separation mechanisms. The effect of a background flow field on Marangoni stress induced shock fronts were investigated in this thesis. Furthermore, a numerical procedure to find approximate solutions to the fully nonlinear flow problem that arises due to Marangoni spreading is proposed. A set of surface evolution equations that incorporates the effects of the background flow field is studied in two major respects: (i) breaking the horizontal symmetry and (ii) nonlinear accretion leading to shock front breaking or separation. The evolution of the surface is evaluated by numerical simulations for a wide range of parameter values. The investigation showed that there are two breaking mechanisms switched by the value of Peclet number. Furthermore it showed that the life time of the shock front is determined by the volumetric flow rate of the film. It is shown here that a weak Marangoni force generates a pure capillary gravity wave that propagates faster than the surfactant front. It is customary to use the lubrication approximations to simplify thin film problems. As a result, the inertial terms in flow equations and nonlinear terms in surface stress balances become excluded. To analyze the fully nonlinear flow, a finite element (FEM) analysis is proposed. The simulations shows that the lubrication theory holds globally in predicting the spreading rates but fails to do so locally until a quasi-steady state is reached. The FEM model shows the formation of two counter-rotating vortices at the beginning which diminishes as time evolves. The FEM results are compared with the lubrication theory simulations. The FEM model shows

  9. Global protein phosphorylation dynamics during deoxynivalenol-induced ribotoxic stress response in the macrophage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Xiao [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Center for Integrative Toxicology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Whitten, Douglas A. [Research Technology Support Facility, Proteomics Core, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Wu, Ming [Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Chan, Christina [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Wilkerson, Curtis G. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Research Technology Support Facility, Proteomics Core, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Pestka, James J., E-mail: pestka@msu.edu [Center for Integrative Toxicology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    Deoxynivalenol (DON), a trichothecene mycotoxin produced by Fusarium that commonly contaminates food, is capable of activating mononuclear phagocytes of the innate immune system via a process termed the ribotoxic stress response (RSR). To encapture global signaling events mediating RSR, we quantified the early temporal (≤ 30 min) phosphoproteome changes that occurred in RAW 264.7 murine macrophage during exposure to a toxicologically relevant concentration of DON (250 ng/mL). Large-scale phosphoproteomic analysis employing stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) in conjunction with titanium dioxide chromatography revealed that DON significantly upregulated or downregulated phosphorylation of 188 proteins at both known and yet-to-be functionally characterized phosphosites. DON-induced RSR is extremely complex and goes far beyond its prior known capacity to inhibit translation and activate MAPKs. Transcriptional regulation was the main target during early DON-induced RSR, covering over 20% of the altered phosphoproteins as indicated by Gene Ontology annotation and including transcription factors/cofactors and epigenetic modulators. Other biological processes impacted included cell cycle, RNA processing, translation, ribosome biogenesis, monocyte differentiation and cytoskeleton organization. Some of these processes could be mediated by signaling networks involving MAPK-, NFκB-, AKT- and AMPK-linked pathways. Fuzzy c-means clustering revealed that DON-regulated phosphosites could be discretely classified with regard to the kinetics of phosphorylation/dephosphorylation. The cellular response networks identified provide a template for further exploration of the mechanisms of trichothecenemycotoxins and other ribotoxins, and ultimately, could contribute to improved mechanism-based human health risk assessment. - Highlights: ► Mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) induces immunotoxicity via ribotoxic stress response. ► SILAC phosphoproteomics using

  10. Global protein phosphorylation dynamics during deoxynivalenol-induced ribotoxic stress response in the macrophage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Xiao; Whitten, Douglas A.; Wu, Ming; Chan, Christina; Wilkerson, Curtis G.; Pestka, James J.

    2013-01-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON), a trichothecene mycotoxin produced by Fusarium that commonly contaminates food, is capable of activating mononuclear phagocytes of the innate immune system via a process termed the ribotoxic stress response (RSR). To encapture global signaling events mediating RSR, we quantified the early temporal (≤ 30 min) phosphoproteome changes that occurred in RAW 264.7 murine macrophage during exposure to a toxicologically relevant concentration of DON (250 ng/mL). Large-scale phosphoproteomic analysis employing stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) in conjunction with titanium dioxide chromatography revealed that DON significantly upregulated or downregulated phosphorylation of 188 proteins at both known and yet-to-be functionally characterized phosphosites. DON-induced RSR is extremely complex and goes far beyond its prior known capacity to inhibit translation and activate MAPKs. Transcriptional regulation was the main target during early DON-induced RSR, covering over 20% of the altered phosphoproteins as indicated by Gene Ontology annotation and including transcription factors/cofactors and epigenetic modulators. Other biological processes impacted included cell cycle, RNA processing, translation, ribosome biogenesis, monocyte differentiation and cytoskeleton organization. Some of these processes could be mediated by signaling networks involving MAPK-, NFκB-, AKT- and AMPK-linked pathways. Fuzzy c-means clustering revealed that DON-regulated phosphosites could be discretely classified with regard to the kinetics of phosphorylation/dephosphorylation. The cellular response networks identified provide a template for further exploration of the mechanisms of trichothecenemycotoxins and other ribotoxins, and ultimately, could contribute to improved mechanism-based human health risk assessment. - Highlights: ► Mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) induces immunotoxicity via ribotoxic stress response. ► SILAC phosphoproteomics using

  11. Brain Stimulation Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Magnetic Seizure Therapy Deep Brain Stimulation Additional Resources Brain Stimulation Therapies Overview Brain stimulation therapies can play ... for a shorter recovery time than ECT Deep Brain Stimulation Deep brain stimulation (DBS) was first developed ...

  12. A New View of the Dynamics of Reynolds Stress Generation in Turbulent Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantwell, Brian J.; Chacin, Juan M.

    1998-01-01

    The structure of a numerically simulated turbulent boundary layer over a flat plate at Re(theta) = 670 was studied using the invariants of the velocity gradient tensor (Q and R) and a related scalar quantity, the cubic discriminant (D = 27R(exp 2)/4 + Q(exp 3)). These invariants have previously been used to study the properties of the small-scale motions responsible for the dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy. In addition, these scalar quantities allow the local flow patterns to be unambiguously classified according to the terminology proposed by Chong et al. The use of the discriminant as a marker of coherent motions reveals complex, large-scale flow structures that are shown to be associated with the generation of Reynolds shear stress -u'v'(bar). These motions are characterized by high spatial gradients of the discriminant and are believed to be an important part of the mechanism that sustains turbulence in the near-wall region.

  13. Dying piece by piece: carbohydrate dynamics in aspen (Populus tremuloides) seedlings under severe carbon stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Erin; Hoch, Günter; Landhäusser, Simon M

    2017-11-02

    Carbon starvation as a mechanism of tree mortality is poorly understood. We exposed seedlings of aspen (Populus tremuloides) to complete darkness at 20 or 28 °C to identify minimum non-structural carbohydrate (NSC) concentrations at which trees die and to see if these levels vary between organs or with environmental conditions. We also first grew seedlings under different shade levels to determine if size affects survival time under darkness due to changes in initial NSC concentration and pool size and/or respiration rates. Darkness treatments caused a gradual dieback of tissues. Even after half the stem had died, substantial starch reserves were still present in the roots (1.3-3% dry weight), indicating limitations to carbohydrate remobilization and/or transport during starvation in the absence of water stress. Survival time decreased with increased temperature and with increasing initial shade level, which was associated with smaller biomass, higher respiration rates, and initially smaller NSC pool size. Dead tissues generally contained no starch, but sugar concentrations were substantially above zero and differed between organs (~2% in stems up to ~7.5% in leaves) and, at times, between temperature treatments and initial, pre-darkness shade treatments. Minimum root NSC concentrations were difficult to determine because dead roots quickly began to decompose, but we identify 5-6% sugar as a potential threshold for living roots. This variability may complicate efforts to identify critical NSC thresholds below which trees starve. © Society for Experimental Biology 2017.

  14. Modeling fish dynamics and effects of stress in a hydrologically pulsed ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeAngelis, Donald L.; Loftus, William F.; Trexler, Joel C.; Ulanowicz, Robert E.

    1997-01-01

    Many wetlands undergo seasonal cycles in precipitation and water depth.This environmental seasonality is echoed in patterns of production of fishbiomass, which, in turn, influence the phenology of other components of thefood web, including wading birds. Human activities, such as drainage orother alterations of the hydrology, can exacerbate these natural cycles andresult in detrimental stresses on fish production and the higher trophic levels dependent on this production. In this paper we model theseasonal pattern of fish production in a freshwater marsh, with specialreference to the Everglades/Big Cypress region of southern Florida.The model illustrates the temporal pattern of production through theyear, which can result in very high densities of fish at the end of ahydroperiod (period of flooding), aswell as the importance of ponds and other deep depressions, both as refugia and sinks during dry periods. The model predicts that: (1) there is an effective threshold in the length of the hydroperiod that must beexceeded for high fish-population densities to be produced, (2) large,piscivorous fishes do not appear tohave a major impact on smaller fishes in the marsh habitat, and (3) therecovery of small-fish populations in the marsh following a major droughtmay require up to a year. The last of these results is relevant toassessing anthropogenic impacts on marsh production, as these effectsmay increase the severity and frequency of droughts.

  15. Hemodynamic mechanisms of the attenuated blood pressure response to mental stress after a single bout of maximal dynamic exercise in healthy subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.J. Neves

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available To determine the hemodynamic mechanisms responsible for the attenuated blood pressure response to mental stress after exercise, 26 healthy sedentary individuals (age 29 ± 8 years underwent the Stroop color-word test before and 60 min after a bout of maximal dynamic exercise on a treadmill. A subgroup (N = 11 underwent a time-control experiment without exercise. Blood pressure was continuously and noninvasively recorded by infrared finger photoplethysmography. Stroke volume was derived from pressure signals, and cardiac output and peripheral vascular resistance were calculated. Perceived mental stress scores were comparable between mental stress tests both in the exercise (P = 0.96 and control (P = 0.24 experiments. After exercise, the blood pressure response to mental stress was attenuated (pre: 10 ± 13 vs post: 6 ± 7 mmHg; P 0.05. In conclusion, a single bout of maximal dynamic exercise attenuates the blood pressure response to mental stress in healthy subjects, along with lower stroke volume and cardiac output, denoting an acute modulatory action of exercise on the central hemodynamic response to mental stress.

  16. Dynamic of oxidative and nitrosative stress markers during the convalescent period of stroke patients undergoing rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manolescu, Bogdan Nicolae; Berteanu, M; Oprea, E; Chiriac, N; Dumitru, L; Vladoiu, S; Popa, O; Ianas, O

    2011-07-01

    Stroke patients have a redox imbalance, a consequence of both the cerebrovascular event and the associated pathological conditions. Our study was aimed to investigate the dynamic of some oxidative and nitrosative markers during the convalescent phase of postacute stroke patients undergoing rehabilitation. We assessed thiol, advanced oxidation protein product, protein carbonyl, 3-nitro-l-tyrosine, ceruloplasmin and oxidized LDL concentrations, as well as gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase (GGT) activity in 20 patients at the beginning of the hospitalization and at the discharge moment, respectively, and 24 apparently healthy controls. We found significantly increased values for GGT (P = 0.04), ceruloplasmin (P = 0.01) and protein carbonyl (P = 0.04) in stroke patients at the hospitalization moment when compared with healthy controls, while total thiols were significantly decreased (P = 0.002). Rehabilitation was associated with a significant decrease of protein carbonyl (P = 0.03) and oxidized LDL particle concentrations (P = 0.03), as well as GGT activity (P = 0.02). At the hospitalization moment, both GGT and ceruloplasmin were significantly negatively correlated with non-proteic thiols (r = -0.44, P = 0.049, and r = -0.53, P = 0.015, respectively) and significantly positively with protein carbonyls (r = +0.80, P stroke patients, and the possible benefits of an antioxidant-based therapy for the recovery of these patients.

  17. Can gas exchange dynamics predict non-structural carbohydrate use under drought stress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannenberg, S.; Phillips, R.

    2016-12-01

    osmoregulatory compounds. Collectively, our work also demonstrates that NSC dynamics may be coupled to hydraulic strategies and proposes a link between a tree's degree of isohydry, C allocation patterns, and potential mechanisms of tree mortality.

  18. Dynamic relationship between neurostimulation and N-acetylaspartate metabolism in the human visual cortex: evidence that NAA functions as a molecular water pump during visual stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baslow, Morris H; Hrabe, Jan; Guilfoyle, David N

    2007-01-01

    N-acetyl-l-aspartic acid (NAA), an amino acid synthesized and stored primarily in neurons in the brain, has been proposed to be a molecular water pump (MWP) whose function is to rapidly remove water from neurons against a water gradient. In this communication, we describe the results of a functional (1)H proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (fMRS) study, and provide evidence that in the human visual cortex, over a 10-min period of visual stimulation, there are stimulation-induced graded changes in the NAA MRS signal from that of a preceding 10-min baseline period with a decline in the NAA signal of 13.1% by the end of the 10-min stimulation period. Upon cessation of visual stimulation, the NAA signal gradually increases during a 10-min recovery period and once again approaches the baseline level. Because the NAA MRS signal reflects the NAA concentration, these changes indicate rapid focal changes in its concentration, and transient changes in its intercompartmental metabolism. These include its rates of synthesis and efflux from neurons and its hydrolysis by oligodendrocytes. During stimulation, the apparent rate of NAA efflux and hydrolysis increased 14.2 times, from 0.55 to 7.8 micromol g(-1) h(-1). During recovery, the apparent rate of synthesis increased 13.3 times, from 0.55 to 7.3 micromol g(-1) h(-1). The decline in the NAA signal during stimulation suggests that a rapid increase in the rate of NAA-obligated water release to extracellular fluid (ECF) is the initial and seminal event in response to neurostimulation. It is concluded that the NAA metabolic cycle in the visual cortex is intimately linked to rates of neuronal signaling, and that the functional cycle of NAA is associated with its release to ECF, thus supporting the hypothesis that an important function of the NAA metabolic cycle is that of an efflux MWP.

  19. On the nanotoxicity of PAMAM dendrimers: Superfect® stimulates the EGFR-ERK1/2 signal transduction pathway via an oxidative stress-dependent mechanism in HEK 293 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Saghir; Chandrasekhar, Bindu; Attur, Sreeja; Yousif, Mariam H M; Benter, Ibrahim F

    2013-05-01

    Polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers are cationic branch-like macromolecules that may serve as drug delivery systems for gene-based therapies such as RNA interference. For their safe use in the clinic, they should ideally only enhance drug delivery to target tissues and exhibit no adverse effects. However, little is known about their toxicological profiles in terms of their interactions with cellular signal transduction pathways such as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). The EGFR is an important signaling cascade that regulates cell growth, differentiation, migration, survival and apoptosis. Here, we investigated the impact of naked, unmodified Superfect (SF), a commercially available generation 6 PAMAM dendrimer, on the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase-extracellular-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) signaling pathway in human embryonic kidney (HEK 293) cells. At concentrations routinely used for transfection, SF exhibited time and dose-dependent stimulation of EGFR and ERK1/2 phosphorylation whereas AG1478, a selective EGFR tyrosine kinase antagonist, inhibited EGFR-ERK1/2 signaling. SF-induced phosphorylation of EGFR for 1h was partly reversible upon removal of the dendrimer and examination of cells 24 later. Co-treatment of SF with epidermal growth factor (EGF) ligand resulted in greater EGFR stimulation than either agent alone implying that the stimulatory effects of SF and the ligand are synergistic. Dendrimer-induced stimulation of EGFR-ERK1/2 signaling could be attenuated by the antioxidants apocynin, catalase and tempol implying that an oxidative stress dependent mechanism was involved. These results show for the first time that PAMAM dendrimers, aside from their ability to improve drug delivery, can modulate the important EGFR-ERK1/2 cellular signal transduction pathway - a novel finding that may have a bearing on their safe application as drug delivery systems. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Melatonin-Stimulated Triacylglycerol Breakdown and Energy Turnover under Salinity Stress Contributes to the Maintenance of Plasma Membrane H+-ATPase Activity and K+/Na+ Homeostasis in Sweet Potato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yicheng; Wang, Aimin; Li, Xiang; Kou, Meng; Wang, Wenjun; Chen, Xianyang; Xu, Tao; Zhu, Mingku; Ma, Daifu; Li, Zongyun; Sun, Jian

    2018-01-01

    Melatonin (MT) is a multifunctional molecule in animals and plants and is involved in defense against salinity stress in various plant species. In this study, MT pretreatment was simultaneously applied to the roots and leaves of sweet potato seedlings [ Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.], which is an important food and industry crop worldwide, followed by treatment of 150 mM NaCl. The roles of MT in mediating K + /Na + homeostasis and lipid metabolism in salinized sweet potato were investigated. Exogenous MT enhanced the resistance to NaCl and improved K + /Na + homeostasis in sweet potato seedlings as indicated by the low reduced K + content in tissues and low accumulation of Na + content in the shoot. Electrophysiological experiments revealed that exogenous MT significantly suppressed NaCl-induced K + efflux in sweet potato roots and mesophyll tissues. Further experiments showed that MT enhanced the plasma membrane (PM) H + -ATPase activity and intracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) level in the roots and leaves of salinized sweet potato. Lipidomic profiling revealed that exogenous MT completely prevented salt-induced triacylglycerol (TAG) accumulation in the leaves. In addition, MT upregulated the expression of genes related to TAG breakdown, fatty acid (FA) β-oxidation, and energy turnover. Chemical inhibition of the β-oxidation pathway led to drastic accumulation of lipid droplets in the vegetative tissues of NaCl-stressed sweet potato and simultaneously disrupted the MT-stimulated energy state, PM H + -ATPase activity, and K + /Na + homeostasis. Results revealed that exogenous MT stimulated TAG breakdown, FA β-oxidation, and energy turnover under salinity conditions, thereby contributing to the maintenance of PM H + -ATPase activity and K + /Na + homeostasis in sweet potato.

  1. Bifunctional role of ephrin A1-Eph system in stimulating cell proliferation and protecting cells from cell death through the attenuation of ER stress and inflammatory responses in bovine mammary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Minkyung; Jeong, Wooyoung; Bae, Hyocheol; Lim, Whasun; Bazer, Fuller W; Song, Gwonhwa

    2018-03-01

    Structural and functional development of the mammary gland is constant in the mammary gland life cycle. Eph receptors and their ligands, ephrins, control events through cell-to-cell interactions during embryonic development, and adult tissue homeostasis; however, little information on participation of ephrin A1, a representative ligand of the Eph receptor, in the development and function of normal mammary glands is known. In this study, we demonstrated functional effects of the ephrin A1-Eph system and mechanisms of its action on bovine mammary epithelial (MAC-T) cells. The in vitro cultured MAC-T cells expressed the ephrin A1 ligand and EphA1, A2, A4, A7, and A8 among the eight members of the Eph A family. Our results revealed that ephrin A1 induced MAC-T cell cycle progression and stimulated cell proliferation with abundant expression of nucleic PCNA and cyclin D1 proteins. Additionally, ephrin A1 induced activation of intracellular signaling molecules involved in PI3 K/AKT and MAPK signaling, and the proliferation-stimulating effect of ephrin A1 was mediated by activation of these pathways. Furthermore, ephrin A1 influenced expression and activation of various ER stress-related proteins and protected MAC-T cells from stress-induced cell death. Finally, ephrin A1 alleviated LPS-induced cell death through down-regulation of inflammatory cytokines. In conclusion, the results of this study suggest that the Eph A-ephrin A1 system is a positive factor in the increase and maintenance of epithelial cells in mammary glands of cows; the signaling system contributes to development, remodeling, and functionality of normal mammary glands and could overcome mastitis in cows and other mammals. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Melatonin-Stimulated Triacylglycerol Breakdown and Energy Turnover under Salinity Stress Contributes to the Maintenance of Plasma Membrane H+–ATPase Activity and K+/Na+ Homeostasis in Sweet Potato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yicheng Yu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin (MT is a multifunctional molecule in animals and plants and is involved in defense against salinity stress in various plant species. In this study, MT pretreatment was simultaneously applied to the roots and leaves of sweet potato seedlings [Ipomoea batatas (L. Lam.], which is an important food and industry crop worldwide, followed by treatment of 150 mM NaCl. The roles of MT in mediating K+/Na+ homeostasis and lipid metabolism in salinized sweet potato were investigated. Exogenous MT enhanced the resistance to NaCl and improved K+/Na+ homeostasis in sweet potato seedlings as indicated by the low reduced K+ content in tissues and low accumulation of Na+ content in the shoot. Electrophysiological experiments revealed that exogenous MT significantly suppressed NaCl-induced K+ efflux in sweet potato roots and mesophyll tissues. Further experiments showed that MT enhanced the plasma membrane (PM H+–ATPase activity and intracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP level in the roots and leaves of salinized sweet potato. Lipidomic profiling revealed that exogenous MT completely prevented salt-induced triacylglycerol (TAG accumulation in the leaves. In addition, MT upregulated the expression of genes related to TAG breakdown, fatty acid (FA β-oxidation, and energy turnover. Chemical inhibition of the β-oxidation pathway led to drastic accumulation of lipid droplets in the vegetative tissues of NaCl-stressed sweet potato and simultaneously disrupted the MT-stimulated energy state, PM H+–ATPase activity, and K+/Na+ homeostasis. Results revealed that exogenous MT stimulated TAG breakdown, FA β-oxidation, and energy turnover under salinity conditions, thereby contributing to the maintenance of PM H+–ATPase activity and K+/Na+ homeostasis in sweet potato.

  3. Low nitrogen stress stimulating the indole-3-acetic acid biosynthesis of Serratia sp. ZM is vital for the survival of the bacterium and its plant growth-promoting characteristic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Liming; Pei, Haiyan; Xu, Zhaohui

    2017-04-01

    Serratia sp. ZM is a plant growth-promoting (PGP) bacterial strain isolated from the rhizospheric soil of Populus euphratica in northwestern China. In this study, low nitrogen supply significantly stimulated the production of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) in Serratia sp.ZM. The inoculation of the bacterium to wheat seedlings improved plant growth compared with the uninoculated group, and the stimulating effect was more prominent under low nitrogen stress. Inactivation of the predicted key gene in the IAA biosynthesis pathway impaired IAA production and significantly hampered mutant growth in poor medium. Furthermore, the IAA-deficient mutant lost the PGP effect under either normal or low nitrogen conditions in plant experiments. This study revealed the significant impact of environmental nitrogen levels on IAA production in the PGP strain and the vital effect of IAA on resistance physiology of both the bacterium and host plant. The characteristics of Serratia sp. ZM also indicated its application potential as a biofertilizer for plants, especially those suffering from poor nitrogen soil.

  4. Algorithm for study on the stressed-strained state of thermonuclear device vacuum chambers under dynamic loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuravleva, A.M.; Litvinov, V.B.

    1982-01-01

    The problem of dynamic analysis of stressed-strained state of vacuum chambers is vital for large thermonuclear devices during the stall of the plasma-filament apd other tpansitional operation regimes when loading for a chamber are nonstationary. To plot a mathematical model the design of the vacuum chamber is discreted on the basis of the method of final elements. To approximate vacuum shell, a plate triangular element with 3 joint points and 5 parameters in the joint is used. It is obtained due to the unity of the bemded element and the element for the flat problem. To investigate nonstationary oscillations of vacuum chambers discreted on the basis of the method of final elements, it is suggested to use the numeric conversion of the Japlace transformation. On the basis of the algorithm suggested a program of numerical function conversion is developed. Test calculations have shown a good stability of the algorithm when selecting the values of transformation parameter in the range of lower intrinsic system frequencies. The advantage of the above method is in the fact that the time-structure shift function is found instantly in the form of the series for the whole time interval and does not require temporary steps, which bring about large expenses of counting time and error accumulation

  5. Impact of competitive flow on wall shear stress in coronary surgery: computational fluid dynamics of a LIMA-LAD model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordgaard, Håvard; Swillens, Abigail; Nordhaug, Dag; Kirkeby-Garstad, Idar; Van Loo, Denis; Vitale, Nicola; Segers, Patrick; Haaverstad, Rune; Lovstakken, Lasse

    2010-12-01

    Competitive flow from native coronary vessels is considered a major factor in the failure of coronary bypass grafts. However, the pathophysiological effects are not fully understood. Low and oscillatory wall shear stress (WSS) is known to induce endothelial dysfunction and vascular disease, like atherosclerosis and intimal hyperplasia. The aim was to investigate the impact of competitive flow on WSS in mammary artery bypass grafts. Using computational fluid dynamics, WSS was calculated in a left internal mammary artery (LIMA) graft to the left anterior descending artery in a three-dimensional in vivo porcine coronary artery bypass graft model. The following conditions were investigated: high competitive flow (non-significant coronary lesion), partial competitive flow (significant coronary lesion), and no competitive flow (totally occluded coronary vessel). Time-averaged WSS of LIMA at high, partial, and no competitive flow were 0.3-0.6, 0.6-3.0, and 0.9-3.0 Pa, respectively. Further, oscillatory WSS quantified as the oscillatory shear index (OSI) ranged from (maximum OSI = 0.5 equals zero net WSS) 0.15 to 0.35, OSI similar to the no competitive flow condition. Graft flow is highly dependent on the degree of competitive flow. High competitive flow was found to produce unfavourable WSS consistent with endothelial dysfunction and subsequent graft narrowing and failure. Partial competitive flow, however, may be better tolerated as it was found to be similar to the ideal condition of no competitive flow.

  6. Shock-induced transformations in crystalline RDX: a uniaxial constant-stress Hugoniostat molecular dynamics simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedrov, Dmitry; Hooper, Justin B; Smith, Grant D; Sewell, Thomas D

    2009-07-21

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of uniaxial shock compression along the [100] and [001] directions in the alpha polymorph of hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (alpha-RDX) have been conducted over a wide range of shock pressures using the uniaxial constant stress Hugoniostat method [Ravelo et al., Phys. Rev. B 70, 014103 (2004)]. We demonstrate that the Hugoniostat method is suitable for studying shock compression in atomic-scale models of energetic materials without the necessity to consider the extremely large simulation cells required for an explicit shock wave simulation. Specifically, direct comparison of results obtained using the Hugoniostat approach to those reported by Thompson and co-workers [Phys. Rev. B 78, 014107 (2008)] based on large-scale MD simulations of shocks using the shock front absorbing boundary condition (SFABC) approach indicates that Hugoniostat simulations of systems containing several thousand molecules reproduced the salient features observed in the SFABC simulations involving roughly a quarter-million molecules, namely, nucleation and growth of nanoscale shear bands for shocks propagating along the [100] direction and the polymorphic alpha-gamma phase transition for shocks directed along the [001] direction. The Hugoniostat simulations yielded predictions of the Hugoniot elastic limit for the [100] shock direction consistent with SFABC simulation results.

  7. Intraoperative muscle electrical stimulation for accurate positioning of the temporalis muscle tendon during dynamic, one-stage lengthening temporalis myoplasty for facial and lip reanimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Har-Shai, Yaron; Gil, Tamir; Metanes, Issa; Labbé, Daniel

    2010-07-01

    Facial paralysis is a significant functional and aesthetic handicap. Facial reanimation is performed either by two-stage microsurgical methods or by regional one-stage muscle pedicle flaps. Labbé has modified and improved the regional muscle pedicle transfer flaps for facial reanimation (i.e., the lengthening temporalis myoplasty procedure). This true myoplasty technique is capable of producing a coordinated, spontaneous, and symmetrical smile. An intraoperative electrical stimulation of the temporal muscle is proposed to simulate the smile of the paralyzed side on the surgical table. The intraoperative electrical stimulation of the temporalis muscle, employing direct percutaneous electrode needles or transcutaneous electrical stimulation electrodes, was utilized in 11 primary and four secondary cases with complete facial palsy. The duration of the facial paralysis was up to 12 years. Postoperative follow-up ranged from 3 to 12 months. The insertion points of the temporalis muscle tendon to the nasolabial fold, upper lip, and oral commissure had been changed according to the intraoperative muscle stimulation in six patients of the 11 primary cases (55 percent) and in all four secondary (revisional) cases. A coordinated, spontaneous, and symmetrical smile was achieved in all patients by 3 months after surgery by employing speech therapy and biofeedback. This adjunct intraoperative refinement provides crucial feedback for the surgeon in both primary and secondary facial palsy cases regarding the vector of action of the temporalis muscle and the accuracy of the anchoring points of its tendon, thus enhancing a more coordinated and symmetrical smile.

  8. Simulation of bending stress variation in long buried thick-walled pipes under the earth’s movement using combined linear dynamics and beam theories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salau Tajudeen A.O.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study reported a simulation approach to the understanding of the interactions between a buried pipe and the soil system by computing the bending stress variation of harmonically-excited buried pipes. The established principles of linear dynamics theory and simple beam theory were utilised in the analysis of the problem of buried pipe bending stress accumulation and its dynamics. With regards to the parameters that influence the bending stress variations, the most important are the isolation factor, uniform external load, and the corresponding limiting conditions. The simulated mathematical expressions, containing static and dynamic parameters of the buried pipe and earth, were coded in Fortran programming language and applied in the simulation experiment. The results obtained showed that harmonically-excited buried thick-walled pipe became stable and effective when the ratio of the natural frequency of vibration to the forced frequency is greater than 2.0, whenever the damped factor is used as the control parameter for the maximum bending stress. The mirror image of the stress variation produces variation in the location of the maximum bending stress in quantitative terms. The acceptable pipe materials for the simulated cases must have yield strength in bending greater than or equal to 13.95 MPa. The results obtained in this work fill a gap in the literature and will be useful to pipeline engineers and designers, as well as to environmental scientists in initialising and controlling environmental issues and policy formulation concerning the influence of buried pipe on the soil and water in the environment.

  9. Adenosine-stress dynamic real-time myocardial perfusion CT and adenosine-stress first-pass dual-energy myocardial perfusion CT for the assessment of acute chest pain: Initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weininger, Markus [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Schoepf, U. Joseph, E-mail: schoepf@musc.edu [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Ramachandra, Ashok [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Fink, Christian [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University (Germany); Rowe, Garrett W.; Costello, Philip [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Henzler, Thomas [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: Recent innovations in CT enable the evolution from mere morphologic imaging to dynamic and functional testing. We describe our initial experience performing myocardial stress perfusion CT in a clinical population with acute chest pain. Methods and materials: Myocardial stress perfusion CT was performed on twenty consecutive patients (15 men, 5 women; mean age 65 ± 8 years) who presented with acute chest pain and were clinically referred for stress/rest SPECT and cardiac MRI. Prior to CT each patient was randomly assigned either to Group A or to Group B in a consecutive order (10 patients per group). Group A underwent adenosine-stress dynamic real-time myocardial perfusion CT using a novel “shuttle” mode on a 2nd generation dual-source CT. Group B underwent adenosine-stress first-pass dual-energy myocardial perfusion CT using the same CT scanner in dual-energy mode. Two experienced observers visually analyzed all CT perfusion studies. CT findings were compared with MRI and SPECT. Results: In Group A 149/170 myocardial segments (88%) could be evaluated. Real-time perfusion CT (versus SPECT) had 86% (84%) sensitivity, 98% (92%) specificity, 94% (88%) positive predictive value, and 96% (92%) negative predictive value in comparison with perfusion MRI for the detection of myocardial perfusion defects. In Group B all myocardial segments were available for analysis. Compared with MRI, dual-energy myocardial perfusion CT (versus SPECT) had 93% (94%) sensitivity, 99% (98%) specificity, 92% (88%) positive predictive value, and 96% (94%) negative predictive value for detecting hypoperfused myocardial segments. Conclusion: Our results suggest the clinical feasibility of myocardial perfusion CT imaging in patients with acute chest pain. Compared to MRI and SPECT both, dynamic real-time perfusion CT and first-pass dual-energy perfusion CT showed good agreement for the detection of myocardial perfusion defects.

  10. Adenosine-stress dynamic real-time myocardial perfusion CT and adenosine-stress first-pass dual-energy myocardial perfusion CT for the assessment of acute chest pain: Initial results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weininger, Markus; Schoepf, U. Joseph; Ramachandra, Ashok; Fink, Christian; Rowe, Garrett W.; Costello, Philip; Henzler, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Recent innovations in CT enable the evolution from mere morphologic imaging to dynamic and functional testing. We describe our initial experience performing myocardial stress perfusion CT in a clinical population with acute chest pain. Methods and materials: Myocardial stress perfusion CT was performed on twenty consecutive patients (15 men, 5 women; mean age 65 ± 8 years) who presented with acute chest pain and were clinically referred for stress/rest SPECT and cardiac MRI. Prior to CT each patient was randomly assigned either to Group A or to Group B in a consecutive order (10 patients per group). Group A underwent adenosine-stress dynamic real-time myocardial perfusion CT using a novel “shuttle” mode on a 2nd generation dual-source CT. Group B underwent adenosine-stress first-pass dual-energy myocardial perfusion CT using the same CT scanner in dual-energy mode. Two experienced observers visually analyzed all CT perfusion studies. CT findings were compared with MRI and SPECT. Results: In Group A 149/170 myocardial segments (88%) could be evaluated. Real-time perfusion CT (versus SPECT) had 86% (84%) sensitivity, 98% (92%) specificity, 94% (88%) positive predictive value, and 96% (92%) negative predictive value in comparison with perfusion MRI for the detection of myocardial perfusion defects. In Group B all myocardial segments were available for analysis. Compared with MRI, dual-energy myocardial perfusion CT (versus SPECT) had 93% (94%) sensitivity, 99% (98%) specificity, 92% (88%) positive predictive value, and 96% (94%) negative predictive value for detecting hypoperfused myocardial segments. Conclusion: Our results suggest the clinical feasibility of myocardial perfusion CT imaging in patients with acute chest pain. Compared to MRI and SPECT both, dynamic real-time perfusion CT and first-pass dual-energy perfusion CT showed good agreement for the detection of myocardial perfusion defects.

  11. Spinal cord stimulation suppresses bradycardias and atrial tachyarrhythmias induced by mediastinal nerve stimulation in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinal, René; Pagé, Pierre; Vermeulen, Michel; Bouchard, Caroline; Ardell, Jeffrey L; Foreman, Robert D; Armour, J Andrew

    2006-11-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) applied to the dorsal aspect of the cranial thoracic cord imparts cardioprotection under conditions of neuronally dependent cardiac stress. This study investigated whether neuronally induced atrial arrhythmias can be modulated by SCS. In 16 anesthetized dogs with intact stellate ganglia and in five with bilateral stellectomy, trains of five electrical stimuli were delivered during the atrial refractory period to right- or left-sided mediastinal nerves for up to 20 s before and after SCS (20 min). Recordings were obtained from 191 biatrial epicardial sites. Before SCS (11 animals), mediastinal nerve stimulation initiated bradycardia alone (12 nerve sites), bradycardia followed by tachyarrhythmia/fibrillation (50 sites), as well as tachyarrhythmia/fibrillation without a preceding bradycardia (21 sites). After SCS, the number of responsive sites inducing bradycardia was reduced by 25% (62 to 47 sites), and the cycle length prolongation in residual bradycardias was reduced. The number of responsive sites inducing tachyarrhythmia was reduced by 60% (71 to 29 sites). Once elicited, residual tachyarrhythmias arose from similar epicardial foci, displaying similar dynamics (cycle length) as in control states. In the absence of SCS, bradycardias and tachyarrhythmias induced by repeat nerve stimulation were reproducible (five additional animals). After bilateral stellectomy, SCS no longer influenced neuronal induction of bradycardia and atrial tachyarrhythmias. These data indicate that SCS obtunds the induction of atrial arrhythmias resulting from excessive activation of intrinsic cardiac neurons and that such protective effects depend on the integrity of nerves coursing via the subclavian ansae and stellate ganglia.

  12. Protection against Ischemia-Induced Oxidative Stress Conferred by Vagal Stimulation in the Rat Heart: Involvement of the AMPK-PKC Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Jin Zang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS production is an important mechanism in myocardial ischemia and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH oxidase is one of major sources of ROS in the heart. Previous studies showed that vagus nerve stimulation (VNS is beneficial in treating ischemic heart diseases. However, the effect of VNS on ROS production remains elusive. In this study, we investigated the role of VNS onischemia-induced ROS production. Our results demonstrated that VNS alleviated the myocardial injury, attenuated the cardiac dysfunction, reserved the antioxidant enzyme activity and inhibited the formation of ROS as evidenced by the decreased NADPH oxidase (Nox activity and superoxide fluorescence intensity as well as the expression of p67phox, Rac1 and nitrotyrosine. Furthermore, VNS resulted in the phosphorylation and activation of adenosine monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPK, which in turn led to an inactivation of Nox by protein kinase C (PKC; however, the phenomena were repressed by the administration of a muscarinic antagonist atropine. Taken together, these data indicate that VNS decreases ROS via AMPK-PKC-Nox pathway; this may have potential importance for the treatment of ischemic heart diseases.

  13. Step-wise stimulated martensitic transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Airoldi, G.; Riva, G.

    1991-01-01

    NiTi alloys, widely known both for their shape memory properties and for unusual pseudoelastic behaviour, are now on the forefront attention for step-wise induced memory processes, thermal or stress stimulated. Literature results related to step-wise stimulated martensite (direct transformation) are examined and contrasted with step-wise thermal stimulated parent phase (reverse transformation). Hypothesis are given to explain the key characters of both transformations, a thermodynamic model from first principles being till now lacking

  14. Zinc rescues obesity-induced cardiac hypertrophy via stimulating metallothionein to suppress oxidative stress-activated BCL10/CARD9/p38 MAPK pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shudong; Gu, Junlian; Xu, Zheng; Zhang, Zhiguo; Bai, Tao; Xu, Jianxiang; Cai, Jun; Barnes, Gregory; Liu, Qiu-Ju; Freedman, Jonathan H; Wang, Yonggang; Liu, Quan; Zheng, Yang; Cai, Lu

    2017-06-01

    Obesity often leads to obesity-related cardiac hypertrophy (ORCH), which is suppressed by zinc-induced inactivation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK). In this study, we investigated the mechanisms by which zinc inactivates p38 MAPK to prevent ORCH. Mice (4-week old) were fed either high fat diet (HFD, 60% kcal fat) or normal diet (ND, 10% kcal fat) containing variable amounts of zinc (deficiency, normal and supplement) for 3 and 6 months. P38 MAPK siRNA and the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 were used to suppress p38 MAPK activity in vitro and in vivo, respectively. HFD activated p38 MAPK and increased expression of B-cell lymphoma/CLL 10 (BCL10) and caspase recruitment domain family member 9 (CARD9). These responses were enhanced by zinc deficiency and attenuated by zinc supplement. Administration of SB203580 to HFD mice or specific siRNA in palmitate-treated cardiomyocytes eliminated the HFD and zinc deficiency activation of p38 MAPK, but did not significantly impact the expression of BCL10 and CARD9. In cultured cardiomyocytes, inhibition of BCL10 expression by siRNA prevented palmitate-induced increased p38 MAPK activation and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) expression. In contrast, inhibition of p38 MAPK prevented ANP expression, but did not affect BCL10 expression. Deletion of metallothionein abolished the protective effect of zinc on palmitate-induced up-regulation of BCL10 and phospho-p38 MAPK. HFD and zinc deficiency synergistically induce ORCH by increasing oxidative stress-mediated activation of BCL10/CARD9/p38 MAPK signalling. Zinc supplement ameliorates ORCH through activation of metallothionein to repress oxidative stress-activated BCL10 expression and p38 MAPK activation. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  15. Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Goodman, Lawrence E

    2001-01-01

    Beginning text presents complete theoretical treatment of mechanical model systems and deals with technological applications. Topics include introduction to calculus of vectors, particle motion, dynamics of particle systems and plane rigid bodies, technical applications in plane motions, theory of mechanical vibrations, and more. Exercises and answers appear in each chapter.

  16. Underground verification of the large deflection performance of fibre reinforced shotcrete subjected to high stresses and convergence and to dynamic loading.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Joughin, WC

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available and polypropylene fibre reinforced shotcrete compared to mesh reinforced shotcrete in tunnels subject to high stresses and convergence and possibly, to dynamic loading. In particular: • A direct comparison of the in situ performance of mesh reinforced shotcrete... with that of steel and polypropylene fibre reinforced shotcrete; • Confirmation that the performance of fibre reinforced shotcrete matches the performance of mesh reinforced shotcrete under large deformation; • A comparative basis for theoretical analysis...

  17. Development of a system for measuring wall shear stress in blood vessels using magnetic resonance imaging and computational fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Keita; Nagao, Taisuke; Okada, Kouji; Miyazaki, Shohei; Yang, Xiaomei; Yamazaki, Youichi; Murase, Kenya

    2008-01-01

    We developed a system for measuring the wall shear stress (WSS) in blood vessels using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The time-dependent velocity at the center of the blood vessel was measured by phase-contrast MRI and was approximated by finite Fourier series, which was used for generating the velocity profile at the inlet for the boundary condition to the CFD method. To validate the CFD method, we compared the WSS obtained by the CFD method with the theoretical value in a straight cylinder with various radii for both steady and pulsatile flows. We also investigated the dependence of the WSS on the inlet velocity profile incorporated into the CFD method. For steady flow, there was a good agreement between the WSS obtained by the CFD method and the theoretical value. For pulsatile flow, there was a relatively good agreement between them when the radius of the cylinder was 2.5 mm and the inlet velocity profile was given by the Womersley solution for fully developed pulsatile flow in a straight circular cylinder. When the radius of the cylinder was 5 mm and/or the inlet velocity profile was assumed to be parabolic, large differences were observed between them, suggesting that the assumption of fully developed flow does not hold true in these cases. In human studies, the vortex due to the secondary blood flow in the carotid arterial sinus was clearly observed. The WSS in the bifurcation was the highest, while that in the carotid arterial sinus was the smallest. In conclusion, the system presented here appears to be useful for measuring the WSS in blood vessels and for analyzing the cause and/or extent of atherosclerosis, and our results suggest that the inlet velocity profile should be carefully considered. (author)

  18. Dynamic ocean topography from CryoSat-2: examining recent changes in ice-ocean stress and advancing a theory for Beaufort Gyre stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewey, S.; Morison, J.; Kwok, R.; Dickinson, S.; Morison, D.; Andersen, R.

    2017-12-01

    Model and sparse observational evidence has shown the ocean current speed in the Beaufort Gyre to have increased and recently stabilized. However, full-basin altimetric observations of dynamic ocean topography (DOT) and ocean surface currents have yet to be applied to the dynamics of gyre stabilization. DOT fields from retracked CryoSat-2 retrievals in Arctic Ocean leads have enabled us to calculate 2-month average ocean geostrophic currents. These currents are crucial to accurately computing ice-ocean stress, especially because they have accelerated so that their speed rivals that of the overlying sea ice. Given these observations, we can shift our view of the Beaufort Gyre as a system in which the wind drives the ice and the ice drives a passive ocean to a system with the following feedback: After initial input of energy by wind, ice velocity decreases due to water drag and internal ice stress and the ocean drives the ice, reversing Ekman pumping and decelerating the gyre. This reversal changes the system from a persistently convergent regime to one in which freshwater is released from the gyre and doming of the gyre decreases, without any change in long-term average wind stress curl. Through these processes, the ice-ocean stress provides a key feedback in Beaufort Gyre stabilization.

  19. Numerical simulation of temperature and thermal stress for nuclear piping by using computational fluid dynamics analysis and Green’s function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boo, Myung-Hwan [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Company, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Chang-Kyun; Kim, Hyun-Su [KEPCO Engineering and Construction Company, Gimcheon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Choeng-Ryul [ELSOLTEC, Inc., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    Owing to the fact that thermal fatigue is a well-known damage mechanism in nuclear power plants, accurate stress and fatigue evaluation are highly important. Operating experience shows that the design condition is conservative compared to the actual one. Therefore, various fatigue monitoring methods have been extensively utilized to consider the actual operating data. However, defining the local temperature in the piping is difficult because temperature-measuring instruments are limited. The purpose of this paper is to define accurate local temperature in the piping and evaluate thermal stress using Green’s function (GF) by performing a series of computational fluid dynamics analyses considering the complex fluid conditions. Also, the thermal stress is determined by adopting GF and comparing it with that of the design condition. The fluid dynamics analysis result indicates that the fluid temperature slowly varies compared to the designed one even when the flow rate changes abruptly. In addition, the resulting thermal stress can significantly decrease when reflecting the actual temperature.

  20. Work Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Roeters, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Most of us agree that stress is a growing problem within organizations. We hear about the postal workers who had killed fellow employees and supervisors, and then hear that a major cause of tension is at work. Friends tell us that they are stressed due to increased workload and he has to work overtime because the company is restructured. We read the polls that employees complain about the stress in trying to balance family life with the work. Stress is a dynamic condition in which an individu...

  1. Dynamic Interaction of Stress Granules, DDX3X, and IKK-α Mediates Multiple Functions in Hepatitis C Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pène, Véronique; Li, Qisheng; Sodroski, Catherine; Hsu, Ching-Sheng; Liang, T Jake

    2015-05-01

    The ubiquitous ATP-dependent RNA helicase DDX3X is involved in many cellular functions, including innate immunity, and is a pivotal host factor for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Recently, we showed that DDX3X specifically recognizes the HCV 3' untranslated region (UTR), leading to the activation of IKK-α and a cascade of lipogenic signaling to facilitate lipid droplet biogenesis and viral assembly (Q. Li, V. Pene, S. Krishnamurthy, H. Cha, and T. J. Liang, Nat Med 19:722-729, 2013, http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nm.3190). The interaction of DDX3X with HCV core protein seems to be dispensable for its proviral role. In this study, through systematic imaging and biochemical and virologic approaches, we identified a dynamic association between DDX3X and various cellular compartments and viral elements mediating multiple functions of DDX3X in productive HCV infection. Upon HCV infection, the HCV 3'UTR interacts with DDX3X and IKK-α, which redistribute to speckle-like cytoplasmic structures shown to be stress granules (SGs). As viral proteins accumulate in infected cells, DDX3X granules together with SG-associated proteins redistribute and colocalize with HCV core protein around lipid droplets (LDs). IKK-α, however, does not relocate to the LD but translocates to the nucleus. In HCV-infected cells, various HCV nonstructural proteins also interact or colocalize with DDX3X in close proximity to SGs and LDs, consistent with the tight juxtaposition of the replication complex and the assembly site at the surface of LDs. Short interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated silencing of DDX3X and multiple SG components markedly inhibits HCV infection. Our data suggest that DDX3X initiates a multifaceted cellular program involving dynamic associations with HCV RNA and proteins, IKK-α, SG, and LD surfaces for its crucial role in the HCV life cycle. IMPORTANCE DDX3X is a proviral host factor for HCV infection. Recently, we showed that DDX3X binds to the HCV 3'UTR, activating IKK-α and

  2. Channelled scaffolds for engineering myocardium with mechanical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ting; Wan, Leo Q; Xiong, Zhuo; Marsano, Anna; Maidhof, Robert; Park, Miri; Yan, Yongnian; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2012-10-01

    The characteristics of the matrix (composition, structure, mechanical properties) and external culture environment (pulsatile perfusion, physical stimulation) of the heart are important characteristics in the engineering of functional myocardial tissue. This study reports on the development of chitosan-collagen scaffolds with micropores and an array of parallel channels (~ 200 µm in diameter) that were specifically designed for cardiac tissue engineering using mechanical stimulation. The scaffolds were designed to have similar structural and mechanical properties of those of native heart matrix. Scaffolds were seeded with neonatal rat heart cells and subjected to dynamic tensile stretch using a custom designed bioreactor. The channels enhanced oxygen transport and facilitated the establishment of cell connections within the construct. The myocardial patches (14 mm in diameter, 1-2 mm thick) consisted of metabolically active cells that began to contract synchronously after 3 days of culture. Mechanical stimulation with high tensile stress promoted cell alignment, elongation, and expression of connexin-43 (Cx-43). This study confirms the importance of scaffold design and mechanical stimulation for the formation of contractile cardiac constructs. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Channeled Scaffolds for Engineering Myocardium with Mechanical Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ting; Wan, Leo Q.; Xiong, Zhuo; Marsano, Anna; Maidhof, Robert; Park, Miri; Yan, Yongnian; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2011-01-01

    The characteristics of the matrix (composition, structure, mechanical properties) and external culture environment (pulsatile perfusion, physical stimulation) are critically important for engineering functional myocardial tissue. We report the development of chitosan-collagen scaffolds with micro-pores and an array of parallel channels (~200 μm in diameter) that were specifically designed for cardiac tissue engineering with mechanical stimulation. The scaffolds were designed to have the structural and mechanical properties similar to those of the native human heart matrix. Scaffolds were seeded with neonatal rat heart cells and subjected to dynamic tensile stretch using a custom-designed bioreactor. The channels enhanced oxygen transport and facilitated the establishment of cell connections within the construct. The myocardial patches (14 mm in diameter, 1–2 mm thick) consisted of metabolically active cells and started to contract synchronously after 3 days of culture. Mechanical stimulation with high tensile stresses promoted cell alignment, elongation, and the expression of connexin-43 (Cx-43). This study confirms the importance of scaffold design and mechanical stimulation for the formation of contractile cardiac constructs. PMID:22081518

  4. Impacts of the Mesoscale Ocean-Atmosphere Coupling on the Peru-Chile Ocean Dynamics: The Current-Induced Wind Stress Modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oerder, V.; Colas, F.; Echevin, V.; Masson, S.; Lemarié, F.

    2018-02-01

    The ocean dynamical responses to the surface current-wind stress interaction at the oceanic mesoscale are investigated in the South-East Pacific using a high-resolution regional ocean-atmosphere coupled model. Two simulations are compared: one includes the surface current in the wind stress computation while the other does not. In the coastal region, absolute wind velocities are different between the two simulations but the wind stress remains very similar. As a consequence, the mean regional oceanic circulation is almost unchanged. On the contrary, the mesoscale activity is strongly reduced when taking into account the effect of the surface current on the wind stress. This is caused by a weakening of the eddy kinetic energy generation near the coast by the wind work and to intensified offshore eddy damping. We show that, above coherent eddies, the current-stress interaction generates eddy damping through Ekman pumping and eddy kinetic energy dissipation through wind work. This alters significantly the coherent eddy vertical structures compared with the control simulation, weakening the temperature and vorticity anomalies and increasing strongly the vertical velocity anomalies associated to eddies.

  5. Implications for anomalous mantle pressure and dynamic topography from lithospheric stress patterns in the North Atlantic Realm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiffer, Christian; Nielsen, Søren Bom

    2016-01-01

    With convergent plate boundaries at some distance, the sources of the lithospheric stress field of the North Atlantic Realm are mainly mantle tractions at the base of the lithosphere, lithospheric density structure and topography. Given this, we estimate horizontal deviatoric stresses using a wel...

  6. TIA-1 Self-Multimerization, Phase Separation, and Recruitment into Stress Granules Are Dynamically Regulated by Zn2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayman, Joseph B; Karl, Kevin A; Kandel, Eric R

    2018-01-02

    Stress granules are non-membranous structures that transiently form in the cytoplasm during cellular stress, where they promote translational repression of non-essential RNAs and modulate cell signaling by sequestering key signal transduction proteins. These and other functions of stress granules facilitate an adaptive cellular response to environmental adversity. A key component of stress granules is the prion-related RNA-binding protein, T cell intracellular antigen-1 (TIA-1). Here, we report that recombinant TIA-1 undergoes rapid multimerization and phase separation in the presence of divalent zinc, which can be reversed by the zinc chelator, TPEN. Similarly, the formation and maintenance of TIA-1-positive stress granules in arsenite-treated cells are inhibited by TPEN. In addition, Zn 2+ is released in cells treated with arsenite, before stress granule formation. These findings suggest that Zn 2+ is a physiological ligand of TIA-1, acting as a stress-inducible second messenger to promote multimerization of TIA-1 and subsequent localization into stress granules. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Why social attachment and oxytocin protect against addiction and stress: Insights from the dynamics between ventral and dorsal corticostriatal systems.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tops, M.; Koole, S.L.; IJzerman, H.; Buisman-Pijlman, F.T.

    2014-01-01

    The present article advances a neurobiological model of the reciprocal associations between social attachment and drug abuse, and social attachment and chronic stress, as overlapping systems are involved in stress coping and social attachment. In terms of coping, responding to a novel stressor or

  8. Why social attachment and oxytocin protect against addiction and stress : Insights from the dynamics between ventral and dorsal corticostriatal systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tops, M.; Koole, S.L.; Ijzerman, H.; Buisman-Pijlman, F.T.A.

    2014-01-01

    The present article advances a neurobiological model of the reciprocal associations between social attachment and drug abuse, and social attachment and chronic stress, as overlapping systems are involved in stress coping and social attachment. In terms of coping, responding to a novel stressor or

  9. Structural modelling and molecular dynamics of a multi-stress responsive WRKY TF-DNA complex towards elucidating its role in stress signalling mechanisms in chickpea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konda, Aravind Kumar; Farmer, Rohit; Soren, Khela Ram; P S, Shanmugavadivel; Setti, Aravind

    2017-07-28

    Chickpea is a premier food legume crop with high nutritional quality and attains prime importance in the current era of 795 million people being undernourished worldwide. Chickpea production encounters setbacks due to various stresses and understanding the role of key transcription factors (TFs) involved in multiple stresses becomes inevitable. We have recently identified a multi-stress responsive WRKY TF in chickpea. The present study was conducted to predict the structure of WRKY TF to identify the DNA-interacting residues and decipher DNA-protein interactions. Comparative modelling approach produced 3D model of the WRKY TF with good stereochemistry, local/global quality and further revealed W19, R20, K21, and Y22 motifs within a vicinity of 5 Å to the DNA amongst R18, G23, Q24, K25, Y36, Y37, R38 and K47 and these positions were equivalent to the 2LEX WRKY domain of Arabidopsis. Molecular simulations analysis of reference protein -PDB ID 2LEX, along with Car-WRKY TF modelled structure with the DNA coordinates derived from PDB ID 2LEX and docked using HADDOCK were executed. Root Mean Square (RMS) Deviation and RMS Fluctuation values yielded consistently stable trajectories over 50 ns simulation. Strengthening the obtained results, neither radius of gyration, distance and total energy showed any signs of DNA-WRKY complex falling apart nor any significant dissociation event over 50 ns run. Therefore, the study provides first insights into the structural properties of multi-stress responsive WRKY TF-DNA complex in chickpea, enabling genome wide identification of TF binding sites and thereby deciphers their gene regulatory networks.

  10. Effect of interleukin-2 on cell proliferation, sister-chromatid exchange induction, and nuclear stress protein phosphorylation in PHA-stimulated Fischer 344 rat spleen lymphocytes: Modulation by 2-mercaptoethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, S.M.; Aidoo, A.; Domon, O.E.; McGarrity, L.J.; Kodell, R.L.; Schol, H.M.; Hinson, W.G.; Pipkin, J.L.; Casciano, D.A. (National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The effect of interleukin-2 (IL-2) on cell proliferation, sister-chromatid exchange (SCE) frequency, and the phosphorylation of nuclear stress proteins was evaluated in phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated spleen lymphocytes isolated from Fischer 344 rats. In addition, the ability of 2-mercaptoethanol (2-ME) to modulate the induction of these biological responses was characterized. Cell proliferation, as measured by the mitotic index, increased significantly. The average generation time (AGT) did not respond to IL-2 in a concentration-dependent manner and decreased significantly. The number of SCE increased significantly from control frequencies, to frequencies of 18.5 to 21.5 SCE per cell as the concentration of IL-2 in the culture medium increased to 50 half-maximal units per ml. A reduction in SCE frequency was observed when cells were cultured with 20 {mu}M 2-ME and IL-2 compared to IL-2 alone. Three nuclear proteins, with relative molecular masses of approximately 13,000-18,000, 20,000, and 80,000, were phosphorylated in IL-2-exposed G{sub 1}-phase nuclei. Elicitation of these nuclear proteins in IL-2-exposed cells was not affected by exposure to 2-ME.

  11. Lattice dynamics approach to determine the dependence of the time-of-flight of transversal polarized acoustic waves on external stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarar, K. S.; Pluta, M.; Amjad, U.; Grill, W.

    2011-04-01

    Based on the lattice dynamics approach the dependence of the time-of-flight (TOF) on stress has been modeled for transversal polarized acoustic waves. The relevant dispersion relation is derived from the appropriate mass-spring model together with the dependencies on the restoring forces including the effect of externally applied stress. The lattice dynamics approach can also be interpreted as a discrete and strictly periodic lumped circuit. In that case the modeling represents a finite element approach. In both cases the properties relevant for wavelengths large with respect to the periodic structure can be derived from the respective limit relating also to low frequencies. The model representing a linear chain with stiffness to shear and additional stiffness introduced by extensional stress is presented and compared to existing models, which so far represent each only one of the effects treated here in combination. For a string this effect is well known from musical instruments. The counteracting effects are discussed and compared to experimental results.

  12. The association between high levels of cumulative life stress and aberrant resting state EEG dynamics in old age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Amanda C; Cooper, Nicholas R

    2017-07-01

    Cumulative experienced