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Sample records for dynamic stark effect

  1. Dynamic Stark effect in strongly coupled microcavity exciton polaritons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayat, Alex; Lange, Christoph; Rozema, Lee A; Darabi, Ardavan; van Driel, Henry M; Steinberg, Aephraim M; Nelsen, Bryan; Snoke, David W; Pfeiffer, Loren N; West, Kenneth W

    2012-07-20

    We present experimental observations of a nonresonant dynamic Stark shift in strongly coupled microcavity quantum well exciton polaritons--a system which provides a rich variety of solid-state collective phenomena. The Stark effect is demonstrated in a GaAs/AlGaAs system at 10 K by femtosecond pump-probe measurements, with the blueshift approaching the meV scale for a pump fluence of 2  mJ cm(-2) and 50 meV red detuning, in good agreement with theory. The energy level structure of the strongly coupled polariton Rabi doublet remains unaffected by the blueshift. The demonstrated effect should allow generation of ultrafast density-independent potentials and imprinting well-defined phase profiles on polariton condensates, providing a powerful tool for manipulation of these condensates, similar to dipole potentials in cold-atom systems.

  2. Dynamic Stark effect and forbidden-transition spectrallineshapes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stalnaker, Jason E.; Budker, D.; Freedman, S.J.; Guzman, J.S.; Rochester, S.M.; Yashchuk, V.V.

    2005-12-15

    We report on an experimental and theoretical study of thedynamic (ac) Stark effect on a for bidden transition. A general frameworkfor parameterizing and describing off-resonant ac-Stark shifts ispresented. A model is developed to calculate spectral line shapesresulting from resonant excitation of atoms in an intense standinglight-wave in the presence of off-resonant ac-Stark shifts. The model isused in the analysis and interpretation of a measurement of the ac-Starkshifts of the static-electric-field-induced 6s2 1S0 -->5d6s 3D1transition at 408 nm in atomic Yb. The results are in agreement withestimates of the ac-Stark shift of the transition under the assumptionthat the shift is dominated by that of the 6s2 1S0 ground state. Adetailed description of the experiment and analysis is presented. Abi-product of this work is an ind ependent determination (from thesaturation behavior of the 408-nm transition) of the Stark transitionpolarizability, which is found to be in agreement with our earliermeasurement. This work is part of the ongoing effort aimed at a precisionmeasurement of atomic parity-violation effects in Yb.

  3. Long-Time Dynamical Behaviour of Alternative-Current Stark Effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Wen-Guo; CHEN Jing-Biao

    2007-01-01

    We report the long time dynamical behaviour of ac Stark effect in a simple quantum model in which two level atoms interact with quantized coherent radiation field. A new phenomenon of periodic quantum collapse and revival of the ac Stark shift of energy level due to ac Stark effect is expressed accurately by analysing the phase of transition probability amplitude. The analytic prediction is confirmed by the numerical results.

  4. The Covariant Stark Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Land, M C

    2001-01-01

    This paper examines the Stark effect, as a first order perturbation of manifestly covariant hydrogen-like bound states. These bound states are solutions to a relativistic Schr\\"odinger equation with invariant evolution parameter, and represent mass eigenstates whose eigenvalues correspond to the well-known energy spectrum of the non-relativistic theory. In analogy to the nonrelativistic case, the off-diagonal perturbation leads to a lifting of the degeneracy in the mass spectrum. In the covariant case, not only do the spectral lines split, but they acquire an imaginary part which is lnear in the applied electric field, thus revealing induced bound state decay in first order perturbation theory. This imaginary part results from the coupling of the external field to the non-compact boost generator. In order to recover the conventional first order Stark splitting, we must include a scalar potential term. This term may be understood as a fifth gauge potential, which compensates for dependence of gauge transformat...

  5. Full-dimensional control of the radiationless decay in pyrazine using the dynamic Stark effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saab, Mohamad, E-mail: mohamad.saab@univ-montp2.fr; Lasorne, Benjamin, E-mail: benjamin.lasorne@univ-montp2.fr; Gatti, Fabien, E-mail: gatti@univ-montp2.fr [CTMM, Institut Charles Gerhardt Montpellier (UMR5253), CC 15001, Université Montpellier 2, F-34095 Montpellier, Cedex 05 (France); Sala, Matthieu; Guérin, Stéphane [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne (UMR 6303) CNRS, Université de Bourgogne, BP 47870, F-21078 Dijon (France)

    2014-10-07

    We present a full quantum-mechanical study of the laser control of the radiationless decay between the B{sub 3u}(nπ{sup *}) and B{sub 2u}(ππ{sup *}) states of pyrazine using the dynamic Stark effect. In contrast to our previous study [Sala et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 194309 (2014)], where a four-dimensional model was used, all the 24 degrees of freedom are now included in order to test the robustness of the strategy of control. Using a vibronic coupling Hamiltonian model in a diabatic representation, the multi-layer version of the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method is exploited to propagate the corresponding wave packets. We still observe a trapping of the wavepacket on the B{sub 2u}(ππ{sup *}) potential energy surface due to the Stark effect for a longer time than the “non-resonant field-free” B{sub 2u}(ππ{sup *}) lifetime.

  6. Laser control of the radiationless decay in pyrazine using the dynamic Stark effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sala, Matthieu, E-mail: matthieu.sala@u-bourgogne.fr; Guérin, Stéphane, E-mail: sguerin@u-bourgogne.fr [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne UMR 6303 CNRS, Université de Bourgogne, BP 47870, F-21078 Dijon (France); Saab, Mohamad; Lasorne, Benjamin; Gatti, Fabien [CTMM, Institut Charles Gerhardt UMR 5253 CNRS, CC 15001, Université Montpellier 2, F-34095 Montpellier (France)

    2014-05-21

    The laser control of the radiationless decay between the B{sub 3u}(nπ*) and B{sub 2u}(ππ*) states of pyrazine using the dynamic Stark effect has been investigated. A vibronic coupling model Hamiltonian in diabatic representation, including potential energy, transition dipole, and static polarizability surfaces as a function of the four most important vibrational modes of the molecule has been parametrized using multi-reference electronic structure calculations. The interaction of the molecule with a strong non-resonant laser pulse has been analyzed in terms of dressed potential energy surfaces. Because of the large polarizability difference between the vibronically coupled B{sub 3u}(nπ*) and B{sub 2u}(ππ*) states, the Stark effect induced by the non-resonant laser pulse shifts the conical intersection away from the Franck-Condon region. We have shown, by solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for the molecule interacting with a relatively weak pump pulse driving the electronic excitation from the ground state to the B{sub 2u}(ππ*) state, and a strong non-resonant control pulse, that this control mechanism can be used to trap the wavepacket on the B{sub 2u}(ππ*) potential energy surface for a much longer time than the natural B{sub 2u}(ππ*) lifetime.

  7. Non-resonant dynamic stark control of vibrational motion with optimized laser pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomas, Esben Folger; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    2016-01-01

    The term dynamic Stark control (DSC) has been used to describe methods of quantum control related to the dynamic Stark effect, i.e., a time-dependent distortion of energy levels. Here, we employ analytical models that present clear and concise interpretations of the principles behind DSC. Within...

  8. The Stark effect in linear potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinett, R W [Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)], E-mail: rick@phys.psu.edu

    2010-01-15

    We examine the Stark effect (the second-order shifts in the energy spectrum due to an external constant force) for two one-dimensional model quantum mechanical systems described by linear potentials, the so-called quantum bouncer (defined by V(z) = Fz for z > 0 and V(z) = {infinity} for z < 0) and the symmetric linear potential (given by V(z) = F|z|). We show how straightforward use of the most obvious properties of the Airy function solutions and simple Taylor expansions gives closed form results for the Stark shifts in both systems. These exact results are then compared to other approximation techniques, such as perturbation theory and WKB methods. These expressions add to the small number of closed-form descriptions available for the Stark effect in model quantum mechanical systems.

  9. The Stark effect in linear potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Robinett, R W

    2009-01-01

    We examine the Stark effect (the second-order shift in the energy spectrum due to an external constant force) for two 1-dimensional model quantum mechanical systems described by linear potentials, the so-called quantum bouncer (defined by V(z) = Fz for z>0 and V(z) infinite for z<0) and the symmetric linear potential (given by V(z) = F|z|). We show how straightforward use of the most obvious properties of the Airy function solutions and simple Taylor expansions give closed form results for the Stark shifts in both systems. These exact results are then compared to other approximation techniques, such as perturbation theory and WKB methods. These expressions add to the small number of closed-form descriptions available for the Stark effect in model quantum mechanical systems.

  10. Motional Stark effect diagnostic on TEXTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubowska, K.; De Bock, M.; Jaspers, R.; von Hellermann, M.; Shmaenok, L.

    2004-10-01

    A motional Stark effect diagnostic at the tokamak TEXTOR has been constructed and brought recently into operation. In contrast to diagnostics used on other tokamaks, this diagnostic reveals the direction of the magnetic field from the intensity ratio of the π and σ components of the emitted Balmer-α and not from a polarization measurement of a single line. Moreover, the complete spectrum is measured which allows determining the radial position of the measurement, and in principle the radial electric field.

  11. The Stark Effect in Linear Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinett, R. W.

    2010-01-01

    We examine the Stark effect (the second-order shifts in the energy spectrum due to an external constant force) for two one-dimensional model quantum mechanical systems described by linear potentials, the so-called quantum bouncer (defined by V(z) = Fz for z greater than 0 and V(z) = [infinity] for z less than 0) and the symmetric linear potential…

  12. Lighting the Landscape: Molecular Events Under Dynamic Stark Shifts

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Bo Y; Shin, Seokmin

    2016-01-01

    A new perspective on how to manipulate molecules by means of very strong laser pulses is emerging with insights from the so-called light-induced potentials, which are the adiabatic potential energy surfaces of molecules severely distorted by the effect of the strong field. Different effects appear depending on how the laser frequency is tuned, to a certain electronic transition, creating light-induced avoided crossings, or very off-resonant, generating Stark shifts. In the former case it is possible to induce dramatic changes in the geometry and redistribution of charges in the molecule while the lasers are acting and to fully control photodissociation reactions as well as other photochemical processes. Several theoretical proposals taken from the work of the authors are reviewed and analyzed showing the unique features that the strong-laser chemistry opens to control the transient properties and the dynamics of molecules.

  13. Stark Effect in Lax-Phillips Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Ari, T B; Ari, Tamar Ben

    2004-01-01

    The scattering theory of Lax and Phillips, originally developed to describe resonances associated with classical wave equations, has been recently extended to apply as well to the case of the Schroedinger equation in the case that the wave operators for the corresponding Lax-Phillips theory exist. It is known that the bound state levels of an atom become resonances (spectral enhancements) in the continuum in the presence of an electric field (in all space) in the quantum mechanical Hilbert space. Such resonances appear as states in the extended Lax-Phillips Hilbert space. We show that for a simple version of the Stark effect, these states can be explicitly computed, and exhibit the (necessarily) semigroup property of decay in time. The widths and location of the resonances are those given by the poles of the resolvent of the standard quantum mechanical form.

  14. Fast cooling of trapped ions using the dynamical Stark shift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Retzker, A [Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Imperial College London, SW7 2PE (United Kingdom); Plenio, M B [Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Imperial College London, SW7 2PE (United Kingdom)

    2007-08-15

    A laser cooling scheme for trapped ions is presented which is based on the fast dynamical Stark shift gate, described in (Jonathan et al 2000 Phys. Rev. A 62 042307). Since this cooling method does not contain an off resonant carrier transition, low final temperatures are achieved even in a traveling wave light field. The proposed method may operate in either pulsed or continuous mode and is also suitable for ion traps using microwave addressing in strong magnetic field gradients.

  15. Non-resonant dynamic stark control of vibrational motion with optimized laser pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomas, Esben Folger; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    2016-01-01

    The term dynamic Stark control (DSC) has been used to describe methods of quantum control related to the dynamic Stark effect, i.e., a time-dependent distortion of energy levels. Here, we employ analytical models that present clear and concise interpretations of the principles behind DSC. Within...... a linearly forced harmonic oscillator model of vibrational excitation, we show how the vibrational amplitude is related to the pulse envelope, and independent of the carrier frequency of the laser pulse, in the DSC regime. Furthermore, we shed light on the DSC regarding the construction of optimal pulse...... envelopes - from a time-domain as well as a frequency-domain perspective. Finally, in a numerical study beyond the linearly forced harmonic oscillator model, we show that a pulse envelope can be constructed such that a vibrational excitation into a specific excited vibrational eigenstate is accomplished...

  16. The Motional Stark Effect diagnostic at TEXTOR-94

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elzendoorn, B. S. Q.; R. Jaspers,

    2001-01-01

    Knowledge of the current distribution in a tokamak is indispensable for an understanding of the energy transport in the plasma and controlling instabilities. A diagnostic exploiting the Motional Stark Effect (MSE) has the potential to obtain this quantity. This is based on a measurement of the polar

  17. THz quantum-confined Stark effect in semiconductor quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turchinovich, Dmitry; Monozon, Boris S.; Livshits, Daniil A.;

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate an instantaneous all-optical manipulation of optical absorption at the ground state of InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) via a quantum-confined Stark effect (QCSE) induced by the electric field of incident THz pulses with peak electric fields reaching 200 kV/cm in the free space...

  18. Stark effect in Lax-Phillips scattering theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Ari, Tamar [Department of Physics, Bar Ilan University, Ramat Gan 52900 (Israel); Horwitz, L.P. [Department of Physics, Bar Ilan University, Ramat Gan 52900 (Israel) and School of Physics, Tel Aviv University, Ramat Aviv 69978 (Israel)]. E-mail: larry@post.tau.ac.il

    2004-11-15

    We show that for a simple version of the Stark effect, the Lax-Phillips eigenstate associated with the resonance can be explicitly computed, and we exhibit the (necessarily) semigroup property of decay in time. The widths and location of the resonances are those given by the poles of the resolvent of the standard quantum mechanical form.

  19. Fast optical cooling of a nanomechanical cantilever by a dynamical Stark-shift gate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Leilei; Zhang, Jian-Qi; Zhang, Shuo; Feng, Mang

    2015-10-01

    The efficient cooling of nanomechanical resonators is essential to exploration of quantum properties of the macroscopic or mesoscopic systems. We propose such a laser-cooling scheme for a nanomechanical cantilever, which works even for the low-frequency mechanical mode and under weak cooling lasers. The cantilever is coupled by a diamond nitrogen-vacancy center under a strong magnetic field gradient and the cooling is assisted by a dynamical Stark-shift gate. Our scheme can effectively enhance the desired cooling efficiency by avoiding the off-resonant and undesired carrier transitions, and thereby cool the cantilever down to the vicinity of the vibrational ground state in a fast fashion.

  20. Fast optical cooling of a nanomechanical cantilever by a dynamical Stark-shift gate

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Leilei; Zhang, Shuo; Feng, Mang

    2014-01-01

    The efficient cooling of the nanomechanical resonators is essential to exploration of quantum properties of the macroscopic or mesoscopic systems. We propose such a laser-cooling scheme for a nanomechanical cantilever, which works even for the low-frequency mechanical mode and under weak cooling lasers. The cantilever is attached by a diamond nitrogen-vacancy center under a strong magnetic field gradient and the cooling is assisted by a dynamical Stark-shift gate. Our scheme can effectively enhance the desired cooling efficiency by avoiding the off-resonant and unexpected carrier transitions, and thereby cool the cantilever down to the vicinity of the vibrational ground state in a fast fashion.

  1. Stark effect in a wedge-shaped quantum box

    CERN Document Server

    Reyes-Esqueda, J A; Castillo-Mussot, M; Vazquez, G J; Reyes-Esqueda, Jorge-Alejandro; Mendoza, Carlos I.; Castillo-Mussot, Marcelo del; Vazquez, Gerardo J.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of an external applied electric field on the electronic ground state energy of a quantum box with a geometry defined by a wedge is studied by carrying out a variational calculation. This geometry could be used as an approximation for a tip of a cantilever of an atomic force microscope. We study theoretically the Stark effect as function of the parameters of the wedge: its diameter, angular aperture and thickness; as well as function of the intensity of the external electric field applied along the axis of the wedge in both directions; pushing the carrier towards the wider or the narrower parts. A confining electronic effect, which is sharper as the wedge dimensions are smaller, is clearly observed for the first case. Besides, the sign of the Stark shift changes when the angular aperture is changed from small angles to angles theta>pi. For the opposite field, the electronic confinement for large diameters is very small and it is also observed that the Stark shift is almost independent with respect t...

  2. Spectral-Kinetic Coupling and Effect of Microfield Rotation on Stark Broadening in Plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander V. Demura

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The study deals with two conceptual problems in the theory of Stark broadening by plasmas. One problem is the assumption of the density matrix diagonality in the calculation of spectral line profiles. This assumption is closely related to the definition of zero wave functions basis within which the density matrix is assumed to be diagonal, and obviously violated under the basis change. A consistent use of density matrix in the theoretical scheme inevitably leads to interdependence of atomic kinetics, describing the population of atomic states with the Stark profiles of spectral lines, i.e., to spectral-kinetic coupling. The other problem is connected with the study of the influence of microfield fluctuations on Stark profiles. Here the main results of the perturbative approach to ion dynamics, called the theory of thermal corrections (TTC, are presented, within which the main contribution to effects of ion dynamics is due to microfield fluctuations caused by rotations. In the present study the qualitative behavior of the Stark profiles in the line center within predictions of TTC is confirmed, using non-perturbative computer simulations.

  3. Imaging motional Stark effect measurements at ASDEX Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, O. P.; Burckhart, A.; McDermott, R.; Pütterich, T.; Wolf, R. C.

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents an overview of results from the Imaging Motional Stark Effect (IMSE) diagnostic obtained during its first measurement campaign at ASDEX Upgrade since installation as a permanent diagnostic. A brief overview of the IMSE technique is given, followed by measurements of a standard H-mode discharge, which are compared to equilibrium reconstructions showing good agreement where expected. The development of special discharges for the calibration of pitch angle is reported and safety factor profile changes during sawteeth crashes are shown, which can be resolved to a few percent due to the high sensitivity at good time resolution of the new IMSE system.

  4. Time Ordering Effects on Hydrogen Zeeman-Stark Line Profiles in Low-Density Magnetized Plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Rosato

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Stark broadening of hydrogen lines is investigated in low-density magnetized plasmas, at typical conditions of magnetic fusion experiments. The role of time ordering is assessed numerically, by using a simulation code accounting for the evolution of the microscopic electric field generated by the charged particles moving at the vicinity of the atom. The Zeeman effect due to the magnetic field is also retained. Lyman lines with a low principal quantum number n are first investigated, for an application to opacity calculations; next Balmer lines with successively low and high principal quantum numbers are considered for diagnostic purposes. It is shown that neglecting time ordering results in a dramatic underestimation of the Stark effect on the low-n lines. Another conclusion is that time ordering becomes negligible only when ion dynamics effects vanish, as shown in the case of high-n lines.

  5. Hyperfine Stark effect of shallow donors in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pica, Giuseppe; Wolfowicz, Gary; Urdampilleta, Matias; Thewalt, Mike L. W.; Riemann, Helge; Abrosimov, Nikolai V.; Becker, Peter; Pohl, Hans-Joachim; Morton, John J. L.; Bhatt, R. N.; Lyon, S. A.; Lovett, Brendon W.

    2014-11-01

    We present a complete theoretical treatment of Stark effects in bulk doped silicon, whose predictions are supported by experimental measurements. A multivalley effective mass theory, dealing nonperturbatively with valley-orbit interactions induced by a donor-dependent central cell potential, allows us to obtain a very reliable picture of the donor wave function within a relatively simple framework. Variational optimization of the 1 s donor binding energies calculated with a new trial wave function, in a pseudopotential with two fitting parameters, allows an accurate match of the experimentally determined donor energy levels, while the correct limiting behavior for the electronic density, both close to and far from each impurity nucleus, is captured by fitting the measured contact hyperfine coupling between the donor nuclear and electron spin. We go on to include an external uniform electric field in order to model Stark physics: with no extra ad hoc parameters, variational minimization of the complete donor ground energy allows a quantitative description of the field-induced reduction of electronic density at each impurity nucleus. Detailed comparisons with experimental values for the shifts of the contact hyperfine coupling reveal very close agreement for all the donors measured (P, As, Sb, and Bi). Finally, we estimate field ionization thresholds for the donor ground states, thus setting upper limits to the gate manipulation times for single qubit operations in Kane-like architectures: the Si:Bi system is shown to allow for A gates as fast as ≈10 MHz.

  6. Instrumentation for a multichord motional Stark effect diagnostic in KSTAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, J.; Ko, J.; De Bock, M. F. M.; Jaspers, R. J. E.

    2014-11-01

    The motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic is used to measure the radial magnetic pitch angle profile in neutral beam heated plasmas. This information is used to calculate the safety factor, q, with magnetic equilibrium reconstruction codes such as EFIT. The MSE diagnostic is important during active shaping of the q profile to optimize confinement and stability, and it has become a key diagnostic in high performance tokamaks. A multichord photo-elastic modulator (PEM) based MSE system is being developed for a real-time plasma current profile control in Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR). The PEM-based approach is a standard method that measures the polarization direction of a single Stark line with narrow tunable bandpass filters. A tangential view of the heating beam provides good spatial resolution of 1-3 cm, which provides an opportunity to install 25 spatial channels spanning the major radius from 1.74 m to 2.84 m. Application of real-time control is a long-term technical goal after commissioning the diagnostic in KSTAR, which is expected in 2015. In this paper, we describe the design of this newly-constructed multichord MSE diagnostic in KSTAR.

  7. Instrumentation for a multichord motional Stark effect diagnostic in KSTAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, J., E-mail: jinil@nfri.re.kr; Ko, J. [National Fusion Research Institute, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); De Bock, M. F. M.; Jaspers, R. J. E. [Eindhoven University of Technology, 5612 AZ, Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2014-11-15

    The motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic is used to measure the radial magnetic pitch angle profile in neutral beam heated plasmas. This information is used to calculate the safety factor, q, with magnetic equilibrium reconstruction codes such as EFIT. The MSE diagnostic is important during active shaping of the q profile to optimize confinement and stability, and it has become a key diagnostic in high performance tokamaks. A multichord photo-elastic modulator (PEM) based MSE system is being developed for a real-time plasma current profile control in Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR). The PEM-based approach is a standard method that measures the polarization direction of a single Stark line with narrow tunable bandpass filters. A tangential view of the heating beam provides good spatial resolution of 1–3 cm, which provides an opportunity to install 25 spatial channels spanning the major radius from 1.74 m to 2.84 m. Application of real-time control is a long-term technical goal after commissioning the diagnostic in KSTAR, which is expected in 2015. In this paper, we describe the design of this newly-constructed multichord MSE diagnostic in KSTAR.

  8. Stark-effect investigations of the sodium D2 line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windholz, L.; Musso, M.

    1989-03-01

    The Stark effect of the sodium D2 line was investigated by use of high-resolution laser-atomic-beam spectroscopy. The shift and splitting of the hyperfine components of the line could be obtained and compared with theoretical calculations. This allows the determination of the scalar and tensor polarizabilities with high accuracy to be 49.28(15) and -21.97(10) kHz/(kV/cm)2, respectively. These values are compared with semiempirical calculated polarizabilities. Additionally, the behavior of the relative intensity of the components could be studied. In fields greater than 100 kV/cm, the two groups of components with MJ=(1/2 and (3/2 are widely separated and the pattern of each group is independent from the field strength, showing an ``electrical'' Paschen-Back effect. The relative intensities agree satisfactorily with the computations.

  9. The Stark effect in atomic Rydberg states through a quantum defect approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menéndez, J. M.; Martín, I.; Velasco, A. M.

    A basis set of quantum defect orbitals (QDOs) has been adopted for the diagonalization of the Hamiltonian matrix of nonhydrogenic atoms in the presence of an external electric field, so that the Stark structure of the Rydberg states has been possible to determine. The presently obtained Stark maps are in excellent agreement with those resulting from theory and experiment, as reported in the literature for a few representative atoms. The adequacy of the Stark quantum defect orbital (SQDO) procedure for accurately dealing with properties related to the Stark effect in atoms is suggested.

  10. Quantum-confined Stark effect in band-inverted junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Fernández, A.; Domínguez-Adame, F.

    2017-09-01

    Topological phases of matter are often characterized by interface states, which were already known to occur at the boundary of a band-inverted junction in semiconductor heterostructures. In IV-VI compounds such interface states are properly described by a two-band model, predicting the appearance of a Dirac cone in single junctions. We study the quantum-confined Stark effect of interface states due to an electric field perpendicular to a band-inverted junction. We find a closed expression to obtain the interface dispersion relation at any field strength and show that the Dirac cone widens under an applied bias. Thus, the Fermi velocity can be substantially lowered even at moderate fields, paving the way for tunable band-engineered devices based on band-inverted junctions.

  11. Fast cooling of trapped ions using the dynamical Stark shift gate

    OpenAIRE

    Retzker, A.; Plenio, M. B.

    2006-01-01

    A laser cooling scheme for trapped ions is presented which is based on the fast dynamical Stark shift gate, described in [Jonathan etal, PRA 62, 042307]. Since this cooling method does not contain an off resonant carrier transition, low final temperatures are achieved even in traveling wave light field. The proposed method may operate in either pulsed or continuous mode and is also suitable for ion traps using microwave addressing in strong magnetic field gradients.

  12. The motional stark effect diagnostic at TEXTOR-94

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elzendoorn, B.S.Q. E-mail: ben@rijnh.nl; Jaspers, R

    2001-10-01

    Knowledge of the current distribution in a tokamak is indispensable for an understanding of the energy transport in the plasma and controlling instabilities. A diagnostic exploiting the Motional Stark Effect (MSE) has the potential to obtain this quantity. This is based on a measurement of the polarisation of the Balmer-{alpha} light emitted by neutral particles injected into tokamaks. On the tokamak TEXTOR-94 a new MSE system is under development which exploits the full spectral information, along with its polarisation. This system consists of 30 radial channels, measuring the spectrum at two orthogonal angles. This is accomplished by inserting a Glan-Laser prism in the optical path. All the optics is housed in five camera modules and located inside the vessel to improve the radial resolution and minimise changes in polarisation due to optical elements. Fibres transfer the light by a vacuum feedthrough towards a spectrometer. The simple construction of the fibre feedthrough and its reliable operation opens the possibility to observe plasma light at all conceivable angles and positions, irrespective of suitable locations of windows.

  13. Optical Stark effect in the four-wave mixing and stimulated Raman spectra of N2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosmuller, H.; She, C. Y.; Huo, Winifred M.

    1989-01-01

    The influence of the optical Stark effect on spectral line shapes in four-wave-mixing Raman spectroscopy (FWMRS) and stimulated Raman spectroscopy (SRS) is investigated experimentally and theoretically. Using an experimental setup capable of rapid alternation between the simultaneous measurement of coherent Stokes Raman spectroscopy and inverse Raman spectroscopy at low and high intensities, together with a sophisticated frequency reference scheme, it was possible to perform a rather direct comparison between Stark-broadened and non-Stark-broadened spectra of both classes of Raman spectroscopies. The results demonstrate that SRS spectra show more Stark shift and broadening than their FWMRS counterparts. A discrepancy with theoretical results is pointed out, and an attempt is made to explain it.

  14. DLTS study of the Wannier-Stark effect in Ge/Si QD superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolev, Mikhail M.; Cirlin, Georgii E.; Tonkikh, Alexander A.

    2007-12-01

    Deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) has been applied to study the emission of electrons from quantum states in a 20-layer quantum-dot superlattice (QDSL) of Ge in a Ge/Si p-n heterostructure. Changes in the DLTS spectra of this structure strongly depend on the applied bias Ur. There are three bias ranges corresponding to three modes of the Wannier-Stark effect: Wannier-Stark ladder mode, Wannier-Stark localization and non-resonant Zener tunneling. The DLTS peaks for all the three modes are associated with emission of electrons from deep-level defects into the Wannier-Stark localized states resulting from the splitting of the electron miniband of the Ge/Si QDSL.

  15. DLTS study of the Wannier-Stark effect in Ge/Si QD superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobolev, Mikhail M. [A.F. Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, 26 Polytechnicheskaya ul., 194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)], E-mail: m.sobolev@mail.ioffe.ru; Cirlin, Georgii E.; Tonkikh, Alexander A. [A.F. Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, 26 Polytechnicheskaya ul., 194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2007-12-15

    Deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) has been applied to study the emission of electrons from quantum states in a 20-layer quantum-dot superlattice (QDSL) of Ge in a Ge/Si p-n heterostructure. Changes in the DLTS spectra of this structure strongly depend on the applied bias U{sub r}. There are three bias ranges corresponding to three modes of the Wannier-Stark effect: Wannier-Stark ladder mode, Wannier-Stark localization and non-resonant Zener tunneling. The DLTS peaks for all the three modes are associated with emission of electrons from deep-level defects into the Wannier-Stark localized states resulting from the splitting of the electron miniband of the Ge/Si QDSL.

  16. Excitonic Stark effect in MoS2 monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharf, Benedikt; Frank, Tobias; Gmitra, Martin; Fabian, Jaroslav; Žutić, Igor; Perebeinos, Vasili

    2016-12-01

    We theoretically investigate excitons in MoS2 monolayers in an applied in-plane electric field. Tight-binding and Bethe-Salpeter equation calculations predict a quadratic Stark shift, of the order of a few meV for fields of 10 V/μ m , in the linear absorption spectra. The spectral weight of the main exciton peaks decreases by a few percent with an increasing electric field due to the exciton field ionization into free carriers as reflected in the exciton wave functions. Subpicosecond exciton decay lifetimes at fields of a few tens of V/μ m could be utilized in solar energy harvesting and photodetection. We find simple scaling relations of the exciton binding, radius, and oscillator strength with the dielectric environment and an electric field, which provides a path to engineering the MoS2 electro-optical response.

  17. Alternating Current Zeeman and Stark Interference Effect in Ramsey Separated Oscillating Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jing-Biao; WANG Feng-Zhi; YANG Dong-Hai; WANG Yi-Qiu

    2001-01-01

    Analytic expressions have been derived of the alternating current (ac) Zeeman and ac Stark effect in an atomic beam magnetic resonance method using Ramsey separated oscillating fields. An interesting feature which will affect the normal Ramsey pattern is that an interference fringe is superimposed on the dispersion lineshapes of the normal ac Zeeman or ac Stark effect. We point out that this new character of ac Zeeman (ac Stark) effect generally exists in all kinds of Ramsey method, for example, in the optical Ramsey atomic interferometer and atomic beam frequency standard. An important implication is that, particularly in an atomic beam frequency standard using Ramsey method, this effect has an influence on the evaluation of the second-order Doppler frequency shift.PACS: 32. 60. +i, 06. 20. Fn, 32. 30. Dx

  18. Large polarization-dependent exciton optical Stark effect in lead iodide perovskites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ye; Yang, Mengjin; Zhu, Kai; Johnson, Justin C.; Berry, Joseph J.; van de Lagemaat, Jao; Beard, Matthew C.

    2016-08-01

    A strong interaction of a semiconductor with a below-bandgap laser pulse causes a blue-shift of the bandgap transition energy, known as the optical Stark effect. The energy shift persists only during the pulse duration with an instantaneous response time. The optical Stark effect has practical relevance for applications, including quantum information processing and communication, and passively mode-locked femtosecond lasers. Here we demonstrate that solution-processable lead-halide perovskites exhibit a large optical Stark effect that is easily resolved at room temperature resulting from the sharp excitonic feature near the bandedge. We also demonstrate that a polarized pump pulse selectively shifts one spin state producing a spin splitting of the degenerate excitonic states. Such selective spin manipulation is an important prerequisite for spintronic applications. Our result implies that such hybrid semiconductors may have great potential for optoelectronic applications beyond photovoltaics.

  19. Motional Stark Effect and Its Active Cancellation in Diamagnetic Spectrum of Barium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QUAN Wei; LIU Hong-Ping; SHEN Li; ZHAN Ming-Sheng

    2007-01-01

    With time-of-flight and electric field ionization detection technique, we investigate the motional Stark effect for highly excited Rydberg barium in high magnetic field and its active cancellation experimentally. In the experiment, the atom beam is aligned at a small angle of 15° with respect to the magnetic field. The motional Stark effect cancellation is demonstrated on two sets of circularly polarized spectra in static magnetic field B = 1.00000 Tesla and B = 1.70000 Tesla, respectively, although the effect is very small (~ 3.5 Vcm-1) in our apparatus configuration.

  20. Enhanced Quantum Confined Stark Effect in a mesoporous hybrid multifunctional system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogoi, M.; Deb, P.; Sen, D.; Mazumder, S.; Kostka, A.

    2014-06-01

    Quantum Confined Stark Effect in hybrid of CdTe quantum dot with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in both nonporous and mesoporous silica matrix has been realized. The observed QCSE is due to the local electric field induced by charge dispersion at SiO2/polar solvent interface. Enhanced Stark shift of 89.5 meV is observed in case of mesoporous hybrid structure and the corresponding local electric field has been evaluated as 4.38×104 V/cm. The enhancement is assumed to be caused by greater density of charge in the mesoporous hybrid. The conjugation of superparamagnetic nanoparticles in this tailored hybrid microstructure has not imparted any alteration to the Stark shift, but has added multifunctional attribute. The present study on the local electric field induced enhanced QCSE with wavelength modulation towards red end paves the way of developing magneto-fluorescent hybrid systems for biomedical imaging application.

  1. Quantum-Confined Stark Effect in Ensemble of Colloidal Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhi-Bing; ZHANG Hui-Chao; ZHANG Jia-Yu; Huaipeng Su; Y.Andrew Wang

    2010-01-01

    @@ The presence of a strong,changing,randomly-oriented,local electric field,which is induced by the photo-ionization that occurs universally in colloidal semiconductor quantum dots(QDs),makes it difficult to observe the quantumconfined Stark effect in ensemble of colloidal QDs.We propose a way to inhibit such a random electric field,and a clear quantum-confined Stark shift is observed directly in close-packed colloidal QDs.Besides the applications in optical switches and modulators,our experimental results indicate how the oscillator strengths of the optical transitions are changed under external electric fields.

  2. Manipulation of ferromagnets via the spin-selective optical Stark effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qaiumzadeh, A.; Bauer, G.E.W.; Brataas, A.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the nonresonant all-optical switching of magnetization. We treat the inverse Faraday effect (IFE) theoretically in terms of the spin-selective optical Stark effect for linearly or circularly polarized light. In the dilute magnetic semiconductors (Ga,Mn)As, strong laser pulses below th

  3. Manipulation of ferromagnets via the spin-selective optical Stark effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qaiumzadeh, A.; Bauer, G.E.W.; Brataas, A.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the nonresonant all-optical switching of magnetization. We treat the inverse Faraday effect (IFE) theoretically in terms of the spin-selective optical Stark effect for linearly or circularly polarized light. In the dilute magnetic semiconductors (Ga,Mn)As, strong laser pulses below th

  4. Selectively tunable optical Stark effect of anisotropic excitons in atomically thin ReS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Sangwan; Lee, Doeon; Noh, Minji; Cha, Soonyoung; Soh, Chan Ho; Sung, Ji Ho; Jo, Moon-Ho; Choi, Hyunyong

    2016-11-01

    The optical Stark effect is a coherent light-matter interaction describing the modification of quantum states by non-resonant light illumination in atoms, solids and nanostructures. Researchers have strived to utilize this effect to control exciton states, aiming to realize ultra-high-speed optical switches and modulators. However, most studies have focused on the optical Stark effect of only the lowest exciton state due to lack of energy selectivity, resulting in low degree-of-freedom devices. Here, by applying a linearly polarized laser pulse to few-layer ReS2, where reduced symmetry leads to strong in-plane anisotropy of excitons, we control the optical Stark shift of two energetically separated exciton states. Especially, we selectively tune the Stark effect of an individual state with varying light polarization. This is possible because each state has a completely distinct dependence on light polarization due to different excitonic transition dipole moments. Our finding provides a methodology for energy-selective control of exciton states.

  5. Quantum confined Stark effect in Gaussian quantum wells: A tight-binding study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramírez-Morales, A.; Martínez-Orozco, J. C.; Rodríguez-Vargas, I. [Unidad Académica de Física, Universidad Autónoma de Zacatecas, Calzada Solidaridad Esquina Con Paseo La Bufa S/N, 98060 Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico)

    2014-05-15

    The main characteristics of the quantum confined Stark effect (QCSE) are studied theoretically in quantum wells of Gaussian profile. The semi-empirical tight-binding model and the Green function formalism are applied in the numerical calculations. A comparison of the QCSE in quantum wells with different kinds of confining potential is presented.

  6. Observation of a motional Stark effect to determine the second-order Doppler effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagel, G; Battesti, R; Nez, F; Julien, L; Biraben, F

    2002-11-11

    The high resolution two-photon spectroscopy of hydrogen is often limited by the second-order Doppler effect. To determine this effect, we apply a magnetic field perpendicular to the atomic beam. This field induces a quadratic motional Stark shift proportional, as the second-order Doppler effect, to v(2) (v atomic velocity). For some magnetic field, these two effects are opposite and the total shift due to the atomic velocity is reduced. We present the first observation of this effect for the 1S-3S transition in hydrogen.

  7. Internal Stark effect mediates intramolecular excited-state proton transfer in 3-hydroxyflavone derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klymchenko, Andriy S.; Demchenko, Alexander P.

    2002-12-01

    Internal Stark effect in electronic spectra is the effect that is observed when the electronic bands shift udner the influence of promixal charges. In order to study the possible involvement of this effect in modulating the intramolecular proton transfer reactions in the excited state, we designed and studied several derivatives of 3-hydroxyflavone. They include the species containing neutral and positively charged substituents in 6 position of chromone ring. These compounds were studied in solvents of different polarities. In these experiments the shifts of both normal and tautomer flurosence bands are clearly observed in a manner predicted by Stark effect theory. In addition, a dramatic effect of suppression by introduced charge of intramolecular excited-state proton transfer was observed.

  8. K-shell spectroscopy in hot plasmas: Stark effect, Breit interaction and QED corrections

    CERN Document Server

    Pain, Jean-Christophe; Comet, Maxime; Gilles, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    The broadening of lines by Stark effect is widely used for inferring electron density and temperature in plasmas. Stark-effect calculations often rely on atomic data (transition rates, energy levels,...) not always exhaustive and/or valid only for isolated atoms. In this work, we first present a recent development in the detailed opacity code SCO-RCG for K-shell spectroscopy. The approach is adapted from the work of Gilles and Peyrusse. Neglecting non-diagonal terms in dipolar and collision operators, the line profile is expressed as a sum of Voigt functions associated to the Stark components. The formalism relies on the use of parabolic coordinates and the relativistic fine-structure of Lyman lines is included by diagonalizing the hamiltonian matrix associated to quantum states having the same principal quantum number n. The SCO-RCG code enables one to investigate plasma environment effects, the impact of the microfield distribution, the decoupling between electron and ion temperatures and the role of satell...

  9. Stark effect modeling in the detailed opacity code SCO-RCG

    CERN Document Server

    Pain, Jean-Christophe; Gilles, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    The broadening of lines by Stark effect is an important tool for inferring electron density and temperature in plasmas. Stark-effect calculations often rely on atomic data (transition rates, energy levels,...) not always exhaustive and/or valid for isolated atoms. We present a recent development in the detailed opacity code SCO-RCG for K-shell spectroscopy (hydrogen- and helium-like ions). This approach is adapted from the work of Gilles and Peyrusse. Neglecting non-diagonal terms in dipolar and collision operators, the line profile is expressed as a sum of Voigt functions associated to the Stark components. The formalism relies on the use of parabolic coordinates within SO(4) symmetry. The relativistic fine-structure of Lyman lines is included by diagonalizing the hamiltonian matrix associated to quantum states having the same principal quantum number $n$. The resulting code enables one to investigate plasma environment effects, the impact of the microfield distribution, the decoupling between electron and i...

  10. Initial operation of a newly developed multichord motional Stark effect diagnostic in KSTAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, J.; Ko, J.; Wi, H.; Messmer, M.; Schenkelaars, S.; Scheffer, M.; Jaspers, R. J. E.

    2016-11-01

    A photo-elastic modulator based 25-chord motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic has been successfully developed and commissioned in Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research. The diagnostic measures the radial magnetic pitch angle profile of the Stark splitting of a D-alpha line at 656.1 nm by the electric field associated with the neutral deuterium heating beam. A tangential view of the neutral beam provides a good spatial resolution of 1-3 cm for covering the major radius from 1.74 m to 2.28 m, and the time resolution is achieved at 10 ms. An in-vessel calibration before the vacuum closing as well as an in situ calibration during the tokamak operation was performed by means of specially designed polarized lighting sources. In this work, we present the final design of the installed MSE diagnostic and the first results of the commissioning.

  11. Stark effect on a geometry defined by a cake' slice

    CERN Document Server

    Reyes-Esqueda, J A; Castillo-Mussot, M; Vazquez, G J; Reyes-Esqueda, Jorge-Alejandro; Mendoza, Carlos I.; Castillo-Mussot, Marcelo del; Vazquez, Gerardo J.

    2005-01-01

    By using a variational calculation, we study the effect of an external applied electric field on the ground state of electrons confined in a quantum box with a geometry defined by a slice of a cake. This geometry is a first approximation for a tip of a cantilever of an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). By modeling the tip with the slice, we calculate the electronic ground state energy as function of the slice's diameter, its angular aperture, its thickness and the intensity of the external electric field applied along the slice. For the applied field pointing to the wider part of the slice, a confining electronic effect in the opposite side is clearly observed. This effect is sharper as the angular slice's aperture is smaller and there is more radial space to manifest itself.

  12. Magnetically induced Stark-like splitting and asymmetric refractive index effect in plasmonic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wanguo; Shen, Yang; Liu, Wenjie; Jin, Chongjun

    2017-05-01

    We develop an analytical method to investigate the eigenmodes of the surface plasmonic polaritons propagating along the interface of metal and magneto-optical (MO) medium by using perturbation theory. The solution shows that the MO activity can eliminate the eigenfrequency degeneracy of a pair of time-reversed waves. Analogously to the electron's magneto-Stark effect, we show this splitting can be understood as a result of "Lorentz force" acting on photons and it exhibits a Stark-like shape, which causes a difference between the forward and backward refractive index. It can be further enhanced by the surface plasmonic polaritons. Then, a hybrid structure composed with MO medium and metallic array is proposed to demonstrate this effect. In such a hybrid structure, the one-way property of surface wave presents a much higher efficiency than that of conventional magnetic photonic crystal. This Stark-like splitting at the interface of metal and magneto-optical (MO) medium can be used in the design of nanophotonic circuits, such as surface wave diode and asymmetric prism.

  13. A theoretical study of the optical Stark effect in InGaAs/InAlAs quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nhu Thao, Dinh; Bao, Le Thi Ngoc; Dinh Phuoc, Duong; Quang, Nguyen Hong

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we examine the three-level optical Stark effect of excitons in InGaAs/InAlAs quantum dots using renormalized wavefunction formulation. The system was assumed to be irradiated by two lasers in which a strong laser dynamically couples electron-quantized levels, while a weaker laser probes interband absorption. Our results show that, in the presence of the resonant strong laser, two new absorption peaks of excitons appear in the absorption spectrum as a clear indication of the effect. In addition, we propose that the formation of the effect in low-dimensional structures could have connection to the splitting of electron levels. Furthermore, we seek to explain the essential dependence of the amplitude and position of two peaks on pump field detuning.

  14. Quantum-Confined Stark Effects in a Single GaN Quantum Dot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yong-Hui; WANG Xue-Feng; LI Shu-Shen

    2008-01-01

    Using analytical expressions for the polarization field in GaN quantum dot, and an approximation by separating the potential into a radial and an axial, we investigate theoretically the quantum-confined Stark effects. The electron and hole energy levels and optical transition energies are calculated in the presence of an electric field in different directions. The results show that the electron and hole energy levels and the optical transition energies can cause redshifts for the lateral electric field and blueshifts for the vertical field. The rotational direction of electric field can also change the energy shift.

  15. Influence of the ac Stark effect on stimulated hyper-Raman profiles in sodium vapor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, M.A.; Garrett, W.R.; Payne, M.G.

    1988-08-01

    When pumping near the two-photon 3d resonance in pure sodium vapor and observing the backward hyper-Raman emission to the 3p substates, an asymmetry in ratios of 3p/sub 1/2/, 3p/sub 3/2/ associated emissions was observed dependent upon the direction of the initial laser detuning from the resonance. It has been determined that this asymmetry can be attributed to the ac Stark effect induced by the hyper-Raman emission itself. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  16. Development of signal analysis method for the motional Stark effect diagnostic on EAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jia; Lyu, Bo; Liu, Haiqing; Li, Yingying; Liu, Dongmei; Wei, Yongqing; Fan, Chao; Shi, Yuejiang; Wu, Zhenwei; Wan, Baonian

    2017-10-01

    A pilot single-channel Motional Stark Effect (MSE) diagnostic has been developed on EAST since 2015. The dual photo-elastic modulators (PEM) were employed to encode the polarization angle into a time-varying signal. The pitch angle was related to the ratio of modulation amplitude at the second harmonic frequency. A digital harmonic analyzer (DHA) technique was developed for extracting the second harmonic amplitude. The results were validated with a hardware phase lock-in amplifier, and is also consistent with the software dual phase-locking algorithm.

  17. The trouble with orbits: the Stark effect in the old and the new quantum theory

    CERN Document Server

    Duncan, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    The old quantum theory and Schr\\"odinger's wave mechanics (and other forms of quantum mechanics) give the same results for the line splittings in the first-order Stark effect in hydrogen, the leading terms in the splitting of the spectral lines emitted by a hydrogen atom in an external electric field. We examine the account of the effect in the old quantum theory, which was hailed as a major success of that theory, from the point of view of wave mechanics. First, we show how the new quantum mechanics solves a fundamental problem one runs into in the old quantum theory with the Stark effect. It turns out that, even without an external field, it depends on the coordinates in which the quantum conditions are imposed which electron orbits are allowed in a hydrogen atom. The allowed energy levels and hence the line splittings are independent of the coordinates used but the size and eccentricity of the orbits are not. In the new quantum theory, this worrisome non-uniqueness of orbits turns into the perfectly innocu...

  18. On the anomalous Stark effect in a thin disc-shaped quantum dot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oukerroum, A [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere Condensee, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, BP 140, Bd Yassima, 28820 Mohammedia (Morocco); Feddi, E [LaMIPI, ENSET de Rabat, Universite Mohamed V Souissi, BP 6207, Rabat-Institut, 10100 Rabat (Morocco); Bailach, J Bosch; MartInez-Pastor, J [Instituto de Ciencia de los Materiales, Universidad de Valencia, PO Box 2085, E-46071 Valencia (Spain); Dujardin, F [Laboratoire de Physique des Milieux Denses, Universite Paul Verlaine, 1 Bd Arago, F-57078 Metz (France); Assaid, E, E-mail: feddi@univ-metz.f [Laboratoire d' Electronique et Optique des Nanostructures de Semiconducteurs, Faculte des Sciences, BP 20, 24000 El Jadida (Morocco)

    2010-09-22

    The effect of a lateral external electric field F on an exciton ground state in an InAs disc-shaped quantum dot has been studied using a variational method within the effective mass approximation. We consider that the radial dimension of the disc is very large compared to its height. This situation leads to separating the excitonic Hamiltonian into two independent parts: the lateral confinement which corresponds to a two-dimensional harmonic oscillator and an infinite square well in the growth direction. Our calculations show that the complete description of the lateral Stark shift requires both the linear and quadratic terms in F which explains that the exciton possess nonzero lateral dipolar moment and polarizability. The fit of the calculated Stark shift permits us to estimate the lateral permanent dipole moment and the polarizability according to the disc size. Our results are compared to those existing in the literature. In addition the behavior of the optical integral shows that the exciton lifetime is greater than that under zero field which is due to the field-induced polarization.

  19. Computation of the Stark effect in P impurity states in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debernardi, A.; Baldereschi, A.; Fanciulli, M.

    2006-07-01

    We compute within the effective-mass theory and without adjustable parameters the Stark effect for shallow P donors in Si with anisotropic band structure. Valley-orbit coupling is taken into account in a nonperturbative way and scattering effects of the impurity core are included to properly describe low-lying impurity states. The ground-state energy slightly decreases with increasing electric field up to a critical value Ecr˜25keV/cm , at which the donor can be ionized by tunneling due to a field-induced mixing of the “ 1s -like” singlet ground state with a “ 2p0 -like” excited state in zero field. The resulting ground-state wave function at high field extends significantly outside the potential barrier surrounding the impurity. Calculations of the hyperfine splitting and of the A -shell superhyperfine coupling constants as a function of the electric field complete the work.

  20. Influence of the ac Stark effect on multiphoton transitions in molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerts, W. Leo; Ozier, Irving; Hougen, Jon T.

    1989-05-01

    A multiphoton mechanism for molecular beam transitions is presented which relies on a large first-order ac Stark effect to modulate the energy separation of the initial and final states of the multiphoton transition, but which does not require the presence of any intermediate level(s). The theoretical formalism uses ideas from the laser multiphoton literature for a two-level system interacting with a monochromatic electromagnetic radiation field, together with a close analog of the rotating wave approximation. The diagonal matrix elements of the Hamiltonian operator corresponding to the large ac Stark effect are removed by a mathematical substitution which in effect transforms appropriate differences of these diagonal elements into transition moments involving higher harmonics of the frequency of the monochromatic radiation field. The electric field strength of the true monochromatic radiation field is ``distributed'' among the higher harmonics of the effective field according to an expression involving Bessel functions. Because these Bessel functions are bounded, there exists for a given time t of exposure to the radiation, a threshold for the magnitude of the transition dipole matrix element coupling the two levels: Below this threshold, the transition probability in a traditional one-photon molecular beam electric resonance experiment cannot be made unity simply by increasing the amplitude of the radiation field. In fact, if the coupling matrix element is small enough, the molecular beam electric resonance signal cannot be detected within exposure time t. The algebraic formalism described above is checked by computer solution of an initial value problem involving four real coupled linear differential equations. It is then used to explain the multiphoton transitions previously observed in molecular beam electric resonance studies on the two symmetric top molecules OPF3 and CH3 CF3, where the number of photons involved in a given transition varies from 1

  1. ac Stark effect in ultracold polar 87Rb133Cs molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Philip D.; Blackmore, Jacob A.; Aldegunde, Jesus; Hutson, Jeremy M.; Cornish, Simon L.

    2017-08-01

    We investigate the effect of far-off-resonant trapping light on ultracold bosonic 87Rb133Cs molecules. We use kHz-precision microwave spectroscopy to measure the differential ac Stark shifts between the ground and first excited rotational levels of the molecule with hyperfine-state resolution. We demonstrate through both experiment and theory that coupling between neighboring hyperfine states manifests in rich structure with many avoided crossings. This coupling may be tuned by rotating the polarization of the linearly polarized trapping light. A combination of spectroscopic and parametric heating measurements allows complete characterization of the molecular polarizability at a wavelength of 1550 nm in both the ground and first excited rotational states.

  2. Motional Stark Effect Diagnostic Expansion for the DIII-D Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, C. T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Allen, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ellis, R. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Geer, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jayakumar, R. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Morris, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Makowski, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Moller, J. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Seppala, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2005-08-01

    A repositioning of a heating neutral beam on the DIII-D tokamak provides an opportunity to expand and improve the Motional Stark Effect diagnostic (MSE) used to constrain the current profile. Dα emission from the neutral beam is split into components parallel (π) and perpendicular (σ) to the total electric field ETotal = vxB + Eplasma. The MSE diagnostic measures the polarization of the σ component to determine the local magnetic field pitch angle Bz/Bφ and the local radial plasma electric field ER. This is typically done using the EFIT current profile reconstruction code. Two independent measurements of the pitch angle γ at each radius are required to differentiate the contributions from the Stark and plasma electric fields. Presently, three MSE diagnostics provide multiple views of a single neutral beam. Our ability to accurately differentiate Bz and ER is limited because these views do not overlap with sufficient radial resolution in some locations, and this limits the accuracy of the current profile reconstructions. The beam rearrangement allows us to build a fourth MSE view of a second beam injected counter to the plasma current. The combination of the new view with the old will improve radial resolution about a factor of 3, reduce ER uncertainty by a factor of 2 in the core and 5-6 in the edge, and reduce Bz uncertainty by 20-30%. The design of the new system is presented in this paper, focusing on the mechanical and optical details at the tokamak port on which it will be installed.

  3. Influence of the Stark Shift on Entanglement Sudden Death and Birth in Cavity QED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jian-Song; CHEN Ai-Xi; WU Kun-Hua

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the entanglement dynamics of two two-level atoms interacting with two vacuum fields of two spatially separated cavities with the Stark effects by employing the concurrence. It is shown that the entanglement sudden death (ESD) and birth (ESB) could be controlled by adjusting the Stark-shift parameters. If the Stark-shift parameters are chosen appropriately, then ESD and ESB phenomena will appear. In addition, the appearance of ESD before or after ESB depends on the Stark-shift values.

  4. THE POTENTIAL MODEL INVESTIGATION OF STARK EFFECT IN CAESIUM RYDBERG STATE ATOMS AND COMPARISON WITH EXPERIMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU ZHENG-FA; ZHOU SHI-KANG; GONG SHUN-SHENG; ZHAN MING-SHENG

    2000-01-01

    The potential model method for computation of Stark structure of Cs Rydberg states atoms and oscillator strength is described,for external electric fields varying from 0 to 600V/cm.Anticrossing,l-mixing and n-mixing phenomena are observed clearly from the map of Stark.Corresponding experiment is performed under the same condition,and the two results are in good agreement with each other within the experimental uncertainty.

  5. The motional Stark effect diagnostic for ITER using a line-shift approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, E L; Levinton, F M; Yuh, H Y; Zakharov, L E

    2008-10-01

    The United States has been tasked with the development and implementation of a motional Stark effect (MSE) system on ITER. In the harsh ITER environment, MSE is particularly susceptible to degradation, as it depends on polarimetry, and the polarization reflection properties of surfaces are highly sensitive to thin film effects due to plasma deposition and erosion of a first mirror. Here we present the results of a comprehensive study considering a new MSE-based approach to internal plasma magnetic field measurements for ITER. The proposed method uses the line shifts in the MSE spectrum (MSE-LS) to provide a radial profile of the magnetic field magnitude. To determine the utility of MSE-LS for equilibrium reconstruction, studies were performed using the ESC-ERV code system. A near-term opportunity to test the use of MSE-LS for equilibrium reconstruction is being pursued in the implementation of MSE with laser-induced fluorescence on NSTX. Though the field values and beam energies are very different from ITER, the use of a laser allows precision spectroscopy with a similar ratio of linewidth to line spacing on NSTX as would be achievable with a passive system on ITER. Simulation results for ITER and NSTX are presented, and the relative merits of the traditional line polarization approach and the new line-shift approach are discussed.

  6. Stark shift and g-factor tuning in nanowires with Rashba effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alhaddad, Iman; Habanjar, Khulud [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Beirut Arab University, P.O. Box 11, 5020 Riad El Solh, 11072809 - Beirut (Lebanon); Sakr, M.R., E-mail: msakr@alexu.edu.eg [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Beirut Arab University, P.O. Box 11, 5020 Riad El Solh, 11072809 - Beirut (Lebanon); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Alexandria University, Moharram Bek, Alexandria 21511 (Egypt)

    2015-10-15

    We report on the Stark shift of the energy subbands and the possibility of tuning the g-factor of electrons in nanowires subjected to external magnetic field. The electric field is applied along the direction of quantum confinement. Our analysis is based on numerical and perturbation calculations in the weak Rashba regime. For in-plane magnetic fields, the Stark shift is rigid and depends on the square of the electric field. Such rigid shift results in a field independent g-factor. Perpendicular magnetic fields induce a similar Stark shift accompanied by a lateral displacement of the energy spectra that is linear in the electric field. In this case, the g-factor shows square dependence on weak electric fields that varies with the subband index. However, in strong electric fields, the g-factor becomes subband independent and varies linearly with the field. - Highlights: • Energy spectra of electrons in nanowires are calculated in the weak Rashba regime. • For in-plane magnetic field, the Stark shift is rigid and the g-factor cannot be tuned. • Perpendicular magnetic fields add lateral displacement to the Stark shift. • The g-factor can be tuned by external electric field in this case. • The tuning of the g-factor is linear and unique for all subbands at high fields.

  7. Vibrational Stark Effect to Probe the Electric-Double Layer of the Ionic Liquid-Metal Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Rey, Natalia; Moore, Alexander Knight; Toyouchi, Shuichi; Dlott, Dana

    2017-06-01

    Vibrational sum frequency generation (VSFG) spectroscopy is used to study the effect of room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) in situ at the electrical double layer (EDL). RTILs have been recognized as electrolytes without solvent for applications in batteries, supercapacitors and electrodeposition^{1}. The molecular response of the RTIL in the EDL affects the performance of these devices. We use the vibrational Stark effect on CO as a probe to detect the changes in the electric field affected by the RTIL across the EDL on metal electrodes. The Stark effect is a shift in the frequency in response to an externally applied electric field and also influenced by the surrounding electrolyte and electrode^{2}. The CO Stark shift is monitored by the CO-VSFG spectra on Pt or Ag in a range of different imidazolium-based RTILs electrolytes, where their composition is tuned by exchanging the anion, the cation or the imidazolium functional group. We study the free induction decay (FID)^{3} of the CO to monitor how the RTIL structure and composition affect the vibrational relaxation of the CO. Combining the CO vibrational Stark effect and the FID allow us to understand how the RTIL electrochemical response, molecular orientation response and collective relaxation affect the potential drop of the electric field across the EDL, and, in turn, how determines the electrical capacitance or reactivity of the electrolyte/electrode interface. ^{1}Fedorov, M. V.; Kornyshev, A. A., Ionic Liquids at Electrified Interfaces. Chem. Rev. 2014, 114, 2978-3036. ^{2} (a) Lambert, D. K., Vibrational Stark Effect of Adsorbates at Electrochemical Interfaces. Electrochim. Acta 1996, 41, 623-630. (b) Oklejas, V.; Sjostrom, C.; Harris, J. M., SERS Detection of the Vibrational Stark Effect from Nitrile-Terminated SAMs to Probe Electric Fields in the Diffuse Double-Layer. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2002, 124, 2408-2409. ^{3}Symonds, J. P. R.; Arnolds, H.; Zhang, V. L.; Fukutani, K.; King, D. A

  8. Design of a new optical system for Alcator C-Mod motional Stark effect diagnostic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Jinseok; Scott, Steve; Bitter, Manfred; Lerner, Scott

    2008-10-01

    The motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic on Alcator C-Mod uses an in-vessel optical system (five lenses and three mirrors) to relay polarized light to an external polarimeter because port access limitations on Alcator C-Mod preclude a direct view of the diagnostic beam. The system experiences unacceptable, spurious drifts of order several degrees in measured pitch angle over the course of a run day. Recent experiments illuminated the MSE diagnostic with polarized light of fixed orientation as heat was applied to various optical elements. A large change in measured angle was observed as two particular lenses were heated, indicating that thermal-stress-induced birefringence is a likely cause of the spurious variability. Several new optical designs have been evaluated to eliminate the affected in-vessel lenses and to replace the focusing they provide with curved mirrors; however, ray tracing calculations imply that this method is not feasible. A new approach is under consideration that utilizes in situ calibrations with in-vessel reference polarized light sources.

  9. Magnetohydrodynamic interference with the edge pedestal motional Stark effect diagnostic on DIII-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, J. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550-9234 (United States); University of California-Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720-7300 (United States); Makowski, M. A.; Holcomb, C. T.; Allen, S. L.; Hill, D. N.; Meyer, W. H.; Geer, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550-9234 (United States); La Haye, R. J.; Petty, C. C.; Van Zeeland, M. A. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Turco, F. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830-8050 (United States); Rhodes, T. L. [University of California-Los Angeles, PO Box 957099, Los Angeles, California 90095-7099 (United States); Morse, E. C. [University of California-Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720-7300 (United States)

    2011-03-15

    Accurate measurement of internal magnetic field direction using motional Stark effect (MSE) polarimetry in the edge pedestal is desired for nearly all tokamak scenario work. A newly installed 500 kHz 32-channel digitizer on the MSE diagnostic of DIII-D allows full spectral information of the polarimeter signal to be recovered for the first time. Fourier analysis of this data has revealed magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fluctuations in the plasma edge pedestal at {rho}{>=} 0.92. By correlating edge localized mode fluctuations seen on lock-in amplifier outputs with MSE spectrograms, it has been shown that edge pedestal tearing mode fluctuations cause interference with MSE second harmonic instrument frequencies. This interference results in unrecoverable errors in the real-time polarization angle measurement that are more than an order of magnitude larger than typical polarimeter uncertainties. These errors can cause as much as a 38% difference in local q. By using a redundant measure of the linear polarization found at the fourth harmonic photo-elastic modulator (PEM) frequency, MHD interference can be avoided. However, because of poorer signal-to-noise the fourth harmonic signal computed polarization angle shows no improvement over the MHD polluted second harmonics. MHD interference could be avoided in future edge pedestal tokamak polarimeters by utilizing PEMs with higher fundamental frequencies and a greater separation between their frequencies.

  10. Magnetohydrodynamic interference with the edge pedestal motional Stark effect diagnostic on DIII-D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, J D; Makowski, M A; Holcomb, C T; Allen, S L; Hill, D N; La Haye, R J; Turco, F; Petty, C C; Van Zeeland, M A; Rhodes, T L; Meyer, W H; Geer, R; Morse, E C

    2011-03-01

    Accurate measurement of internal magnetic field direction using motional Stark effect (MSE) polarimetry in the edge pedestal is desired for nearly all tokamak scenario work. A newly installed 500 kHz 32-channel digitizer on the MSE diagnostic of DIII-D allows full spectral information of the polarimeter signal to be recovered for the first time. Fourier analysis of this data has revealed magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fluctuations in the plasma edge pedestal at ρ ≥ 0.92. By correlating edge localized mode fluctuations seen on lock-in amplifier outputs with MSE spectrograms, it has been shown that edge pedestal tearing mode fluctuations cause interference with MSE second harmonic instrument frequencies. This interference results in unrecoverable errors in the real-time polarization angle measurement that are more than an order of magnitude larger than typical polarimeter uncertainties. These errors can cause as much as a 38% difference in local q. By using a redundant measure of the linear polarization found at the fourth harmonic photo-elastic modulator (PEM) frequency, MHD interference can be avoided. However, because of poorer signal-to-noise the fourth harmonic signal computed polarization angle shows no improvement over the MHD polluted second harmonics. MHD interference could be avoided in future edge pedestal tokamak polarimeters by utilizing PEMs with higher fundamental frequencies and a greater separation between their frequencies.

  11. The multichannel motional stark effect diagnostic in the JFT-2M tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamiya, Kensaku; Miura, Yukitoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-02-01

    Simultaneous measurements of profiles of the magnetic field pitch angle and the radial electric field (E{sub r}) using Motional Stark Effect polarimetry (MSE) are discussed. Using 'P10' port in the JFT-2M tokamak, it can be possible to view two neural beam lines (one is co-parallel to the plasma current and the other is counter-parallel) simultaneously and near tangentially to the toroidal magnetic field from only one spectroscopic instruments. It provides the highest sensitivity in E{sub r} with good spatial resolution and the magnetic field pitch angle is also measured with a smallest uncertainty. Such as method of E{sub r} measurement with MSE using two beam lines, which is the first attempt in the would, can provide the best accuracy among other techniques. If polarization angle is obtained with an accuracy of 0.1 deg., then E{sub r} can be determined within an accuracy of about 4 kV/m. (author)

  12. Robotic calibration of the motional Stark effect diagnostic on Alcator C-Mod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumgaard, Robert T.; Scott, Steven D.; Ko, Jinseok

    2014-05-01

    The capability to calibrate diagnostics, such as the Motional Stark Effect (MSE) diagnostic, without using plasma or beam-into-gas discharges will become increasingly important on next step fusion facilities due to machine availability and operational constraints. A robotic calibration system consisting of a motorized three-axis positioning system and a polarization light source capable of generating arbitrary polarization states with a linear polarization angle accuracy of deployed on Alcator C-Mod. The polarization response of the complex diagnostic is shown to be fully captured using a Fourier expansion of the detector signals in terms of even harmonics of the input polarization angle. The system's high precision robotic control of position and orientation allow it to be used also to calibrate the geometry of the instrument's view. Combined with careful measurements of the narrow bandpass spectral filters, this system fully calibrates the diagnostic without any plasma discharges. The system's high repeatability, flexibility, and speed has been exploited to quantify several systematics in the MSE diagnostic response, providing a more complete understanding of the diagnostic performance.

  13. A photoelastic-modulator-based motional Stark effect polarimeter for ITER that is insensitive to polarized broadband background reflections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorman, A.; Michael, C.; De Bock, M.; Howard, J.

    2016-07-01

    A motional Stark effect polarimeter insensitive to polarized broadband light is proposed. Partially polarized background light is anticipated to be a significant source of systematic error for the ITER polarimeter. The proposed polarimeter is based on the standard dual photoelastic modulator approach, but with the introduction of a birefringent delay plate, it generates a sinusoidal spectral filter instead of the usual narrowband filter. The period of the filter is chosen to match the spacing of the orthogonally polarized Stark effect components, thereby increasing the effective signal level, but resulting in the destructive interference of the broadband polarized light. The theoretical response of the system to an ITER like spectrum is calculated and the broadband polarization tolerance is verified experimentally.

  14. Catalytic efficiency of dehaloperoxidase A is controlled by electrostatics--application of the vibrational Stark effect to understand enzyme kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schkolnik, Gal; Utesch, Tillmann; Zhao, Junjie; Jiang, Shu; Thompson, Matthew K; Mroginski, Maria-Andrea; Hildebrandt, Peter; Franzen, Stefan

    2013-01-18

    The vibrational Stark effect is gaining popularity as a method for probing electric fields in proteins. In this work, we employ it to explain the effect of single charge mutations in dehaloperoxidase-hemoglobin A (DHP A) on the kinetics of the enzyme. In a previous communication published in this journal (BBRC 2012, 420, 733-737) it has been shown that an increase in the overall negative charge of DHP A through mutation causes a decrease in its catalytic efficiency. Here, by labeling the protein with 4-mercaptobenzonitrile (MBN), a Stark probe molecule, we provide further evidence that the diffusion control of the catalytic process arises from the electrostatic repulsion between the enzyme and the negatively charged substrate. The linear correlation observed between the nitrile stretching frequency of the protein-bound MBN and the catalytic efficiency of the single-site mutants of the enzyme indicates that electrostatic interactions play a dominant role in determining the catalytic efficiency of DHP A.

  15. Stark effects of ZnO thin film and ZnO/ZnMgO quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, K.; Abe, T.; Fujinuma, R.; Yasuda, K.; Yamaguchi, T.; Kasada, H.; Ando, K. [Department of Information and Electronics, Graduate School of Engineering, Tottori University, 4-101 Koyama-Minami, Tottori 680-8552 (Japan)

    2012-08-15

    We have investigated external electric field dependent Stark effects of ZnO thin film and ZnO/ZnMgO QWs by electroreflectance (ER) spectroscopy to develop electroabsorption modulators. The ZnO single film and ZnO/ZnMgO QWs were grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PA-MBE). ZnO single film exhibited red-shift of 8 meV by applying external bias at 18 K. This red-shift is due to Stark effect in a low electric field, but it was changed to Franz-Keldysh effect in a high electric field region. We confirmed a large blue-shift of 39 meV for ZnO/ZnMgO QWs by external bias at room temperature. This energy shift, originated from quantum confined Stark effect (QCSE) in ZnO/ZnMgO QWs, proved a large exciton binding energy of this system. (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  16. New Aspects of Field Entropy Squeezing as an Indicator for Mixed State Entanglement in an Effective Two-Level System with Stark Shift

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S.Abdel-Khalek; M.M.A.Ahmed; A-S F.Obada

    2011-01-01

    We present an effective two-level system in interaction through two-photon processes with a single mode quantized electromagnetic field,initially prepared in a coherent state.Field entropy squeezing as an indicator of the entanglement in a mixed state system is suggested.The temporal evolution of the negativity,Wehrl entropy,Wehrl phase distribution and field entropy squeezing are investigated.The results highlight the important roles played by both the Stark shift parameters and the mixed state setting in the dynamics of the Wehrl entropy,Wehrl phase distribution and field entropy squeezing.%We present an effective two-level system in interaction through two-photon processes with a single mode quantized electromagnetic Reid, initially prepared in a coherent state. Field entropy squeezing as an indicator of the entanglement in a mixed state system is suggested. The temporal evolution of the negativity, Wehrl entropy, Wehrl phase distribution and field entropy squeezing are investigated. The results highlight the important roles played by both the Stark shift parameters and the mixed state setting in the dynamics of the Wehrl entropy, Wehrl phase distribution and field entropy squeezing.

  17. Theoretical and experimental study of the Stark effect in the ground state of alkali atoms in helium crystals

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    This thesis work describes a detailed study of the Stark interaction in the ground state of cesium atoms trapped in a solid helium matrix. The motivation for the investigation of electric field effects on alkali species implanted in solid helium is related to the original main goal of our experimental activities, i.e., the measurement of a permanent atomic electric dipole moment (EDM). The existence of an atomic EDM simultaneously violates the discrete symmetries of time reversal (T) and pari...

  18. Stark and Zeeman effects on the lower electronic states of s-triazine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aartsma, Thijs J.; Wiersma, Douwe A.

    1973-01-01

    A detailed optical study of the lower electronic states of s-triazine in a pure crystal at 1.8 degrees K is presented. Stark and Zeeman experiments on these States give no Support to previous assignments. The experiments indicate that the lowest triplet state observed In s-triazine corresponds to ei

  19. Influence of Stark Shift on Entanglement of Two Qubits in the Two-Photon Tavis-Cummings Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mastyugin M.S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering two-atom degenerate two-photon Tavis-Cummings model, we investigate the entanglement between two atoms prepared initially in the coherent disentangled states and cavity field prepared in few-photon Fock state, and study the effect of the Stark shift on entanglement. The results show that the atom–atom negativity evolve periodically with time and the periods are affected by the Stark shift and initial coherent atomic state and that the atom–atom entanglement can be greatly enhanced due to the presence of Stark shift. We also have shown that entanglement sudden death effect vanishes for some parameters of the considered system due to the presence of Stark shift. In addition, the entanglement sudden death effect vanishes due to the presence of Stark shift. We have derived that the dynamic Stark shift can be used to control entanglement between two initially disentangled atoms.

  20. Identification of Ion-Pair Structures in Solution by Vibrational Stark Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hack, John; Grills, David C; Miller, John R; Mani, Tomoyasu

    2016-02-18

    Ion pairing is a fundamental consideration in many areas of chemistry and has implications in a wide range of sciences and technologies that include batteries and organic photovoltaics. Ions in solution are known to inhabit multiple possible states, including free ions (FI), contact ion pairs (CIP), and solvent-separated ion pairs (SSIP). However, in solutions of organic radicals and nonmetal electrolytes, it is often difficult to distinguish between these states. In the first part of this work, we report evidence for the formation of SSIPs in low-polarity solvents and distinct measurements of CIP, SSIP, and FI, by using the ν(C≡N) infrared (IR) band of a nitrile-substituted fluorene radical anion. Use of time-resolved IR detection following pulse radiolysis allowed us to unambiguously assign the peak of the FI. In the presence of nonmetal electrolytes, two distinct red-shifted peaks were observed and assigned to the CIP and SSIP. The assignments are interpreted in the framework of the vibrational Stark effect (VSE) and are supported by (1) the solvent dependence of ion-pair populations, (2) the observation of a cryptand-separated sodium ion pair that mimics the formation of SSIPs, and (3) electronic structure calculations. In the second part of this work, we show that a blue-shift of the ν(C≡N) IR band due to the VSE can be induced in a nitrile-substituted fluorene radical anion by covalently tethering it to a metal-chelating ligand that forms an intramolecular ion pair upon reduction and complexation with sodium ion. This adds support to the conclusion that the shift in IR absorptions by ion pairing originates from the VSE. These results combined show that we can identify ion-pair structures by using the VSE, including the existence of SSIPs in a low-polarity solvent.

  1. Unusual quantum confined Stark effect and Aharonov-Bohm oscillations in semiconductor quantum rings with anisotropic effective masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa, G. O.; da Costa, D. R.; Chaves, Andrey; Farias, G. A.; Peeters, F. M.

    2017-05-01

    The effects of external electric and magnetic fields on the energy spectrum of quantum rings made out of a bidimensional semiconductor material with anisotropic band structures are investigated within the effective-mass model. The interplay between the effective-mass anisotropy and the radial confinement leads to wave functions that are strongly localized at two diametrically opposite regions where the kinetic energy is lowest due to the highest effective mass. We show that this quantum phenomenon has clear consequences on the behavior of the energy states in the presence of applied in-plane electric fields and out-of-plane magnetic fields. In the former, the quantum confined Stark effect is observed with either linear or quadratic shifts, depending on the direction of the applied field. As for the latter, the usual Aharonov-Bohm oscillations are not observed for a circularly symmetric confining potential, however they can be reinstated if an elliptic ring with an appropriate aspect ratio is chosen.

  2. Stark broadening of Mg I and Mg II spectral lines and Debye shielding effect in laser induced plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cvejić, M.; Gavrilović, M.R.; Jovićević, S. [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, 11081 Belgrade, P.O. Box 68 (Serbia); Konjević, N., E-mail: nikruz@ff.bg.ac.rs [Faculty of Physics, University of Belgrade, 11001 Belgrade, P.O. Box 368 (Serbia)

    2013-07-01

    We report Stark broadening parameters for three Mg I lines and one Mg II line in the electron number density range (0.67–1.09) · 10{sup 17} cm{sup −3} and electron temperature interval (6200–6500) K. The electron density is determined from the half width of hydrogen impurity line, the H{sub α}, while the electron temperature is measured from relative intensities of Mg I or Al II lines using Boltzmann plot technique. The plasma source was induced by Nd:YAG laser radiation at 1.06 μm having pulse width 15 ns and pulse energy 50 mJ. Laser induced plasma is generated in front of a solid state surface. High speed photography is used to determine time of plasma decay with good homogeneity and then applied line self-absorption test and Abel inversion procedure. The details of data acquisition and data processing are described and illustrated with typical examples. The experimental results are compared with two sets of semiclassical calculations and the results of this comparison for Mg I lines are not unambiguous while for Mg II 448.1 nm line, the results of Dimitrijević and Sahal-Bréchot calculations agree well with our and other experimental results in the temperature range (5000–12,000) K and these theoretical results are recommended for plasma diagnostic purposes. The study of line shapes within Mg I 383.53 nm multiplet shows that the use of Debye shielding correction improves the agreement between theoretical and experimental Stark broadening parameters. - Highlights: • Stark broadening parameters for three Mg I and one Mg II line. • Comparison of Stark parameters with other experimental and theoretical results. • Recommendation of Mg II 448.1 nm line for plasma diagnostics. • Influence of Debye shielding effect to line widths of Mg I 383.53 nm multiplet. • Application of laser induced plasma for Stark broadening parameters measurement.

  3. Measurement of dynamic Stark polarizabilities by analyzing spectral lineshapes of forbidden transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Dounas-Frazer, D R; Family, A; Budker, D

    2010-01-01

    We present a measurement of the dynamic scalar and tensor polarizabilities of the excited state 3D1 in atomic ytterbium. The polarizabilities were measured by analyzing the spectral lineshape of the 408-nm 1S0->3D1 transition driven by a standing wave of resonant light in the presence of static electric and magnetic fields. Due to the interaction of atoms with the standing wave, the lineshape has a characteristic polarizability-dependent distortion. A theoretical model was used to simulate the lineshape and determine a combination of the polarizabilities of the ground and excited states by fitting the model to experimental data. This combination was measured with a 13% uncertainty, only 3% of which is due to uncertainty in the simulation and fitting procedure. The scalar and tensor polarizabilities of the state 3D1 were measured for the first time by comparing two different combinations of polarizabilities. We show that this technique can be applied to similar atomic systems.

  4. Ge/SiGe quantum confined Stark effect electro-absorption modulation with low voltage swing at λ = 1550 nm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, D C S; Gallacher, K; Rhead, S; Myronov, M; Leadley, D R; Paul, D J

    2014-08-11

    Low-voltage swing (≤1.0 V) high-contrast ratio (6 dB) electro-absorption modulation covering 1460 to 1560 nm wavelength has been demonstrated using Ge/SiGe quantum confined Stark effect (QCSE) diodes grown on a silicon substrate. The heterolayers for the devices were designed using an 8-band k.p Poisson-Schrödinger solver which demonstrated excellent agreement with the experimental results. Modelling and experimental results demonstrate that by changing the quantum well width of the device, low power Ge/SiGe QCSE modulators can be designed to cover the S- and C-telecommunications bands.

  5. Fast Tuneable InGaAsP DBR Laser Using Quantum-Confined Stark-Effect-Induced Refractive Index Change

    OpenAIRE

    Pantouvaki, M.; Renaud, C. C.; Cannard, P; Robertson, M. J.; Gwilliam, R; Seeds, A. J.

    2007-01-01

    We report a monolithically integrated InGaAsP DBR ridge waveguide laser that uses the quantum-confined Stark effect (QCSE) to achieve fast tuning response. The laser incorporates three sections: a forward-biased gain section, a reverse-biased phase section, and a reverse-biased DBR tuning section. The laser behavior is modeled using transmission matrix equations and tuning over similar to 8 nm is predicted. Devices were fabricated using post-growth shallow ion implantation to reduce the loss ...

  6. Stark effect of interfering electronic states: Localization of the nπ* excitations in toluquinone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galaup, J. P.; Trommsdorff, H. P.

    1984-04-01

    High-precision Stark measurements on oriented single crystals of toluquinone at low temperatures have been performed and lead to an assessment of the electronic parenthood of the levels giving rise to the complex spectral region of interference between the two nearby nπ* excited states. The origin bands of the lowest excited singlet and triplet states are characterized by a measure of their factor-group splittings and an evaluation of the change in dipole moment and in polarizability upon excitation. The value of the change in dipole moment is shown to vary strongly between different vibrational levels of the lower state and an evaluation of the degree of localization of the electronic excitation on one CO group is made. The previous assignment of the second nπ* state is confirmed by the sign of the corresponding Stark shift. From measurements on crystals having been oriented in an electric field the absolute orientation of the polar crystal as well as the sign of the pyroelectric coefficient are proposed.

  7. Stark effect and photoconductivity of fullerene C70 measured on samples with a submicron electrode grating and sandwich geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blinov, L. M.; Lazarev, V. V.; Yudin, S. G.

    2016-09-01

    The electroabsorption (Stark effect) and photoconductivity of polycrystalline fullerene C70 in thinfilm samples with radically different geometries (sample 1 with interdigital Cr electrodes and sandwichlike sample 2 with SnO2 and Al electrodes) have been investigated. It is noteworthy that sample 1 is a submicron grating with 0.88-µm gaps between electrodes. When measuring electroabsorption and photoconductivity, the external voltage does not exceed 4 V. It was assumed that the small gap size may significantly affect the polycrystalline film morphology and surface effects and, as a consequence, the electroabsorption and charge carrier mobility. However, the results of the Stark effect measurements on samples with different geometries differ by only 25%, whereas the spectral photoconductivity values differ by factors of 1-2.5. The increase in photoconductivity may be related to the decrease in the carrier mobility in the sandwich sample or the increase in the number of carriers under the influence of atmospheric oxygen in the surface layer of C70 sample with interdigital electrodes.

  8. An Overview Of The Motional Stark Effect Diagnostic On DIII-D And Design Work For An ITER MSE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, C T; Allen, S L; Makowski, M A; Jayakumar, R J; Gu, M F; Lerner, S; Morris, K L; Latkowski, J; Moller, J M; Meyer, W; Ellis, R; Geer, R; Behne, D; Chipman, R; Smith, P; McClain, S

    2007-09-20

    The advanced tokamak research program at DIII-D relies critically on the measurement of the current density profile. This was made possible by the development of a Motional Stark Effect (MSE) polarimeter that was first installed in 1992. Three major upgrades have since occurred, and improvements in our understanding of critical performance issues and calibration techniques are ongoing. In parallel with these improvements, we have drawn on our DIII-D experience to begin studies and design work for MSE on burning plasmas and ITER. This paper first reviews how Motional Stark Effect polarimetry (MSE) is used to determine the tokamak current profile. It uses the DIII-D MSE system as an example, and shows results from the latest upgrade that incorporates an array of channels from a new counter-Ip injected neutral beam. The various calibration techniques presently used are reviewed. High-leverage or unresolved issues affecting MSE performance and reliability in ITER are discussed. Next, we show a four-mirror collection optics design for the two ITER MSE views. Finally, we discuss measurements of the polarization properties of a few candidate mirrors for the ITER MSE.

  9. The static and dynamic polarisability, and the Stark and black-body radiation frequency shifts of the molecular hydrogen ions H2+, HD+, and D2+

    CERN Document Server

    Schiller, Stephan; Bekbaev, Ashat K; Korobov, Vladimir I

    2014-01-01

    We calculate the DC Stark effect for three molecular hydrogen ions in the non-relativistic approximation. The effect is calculated both in dependence on the rovibrational state and in dependence on the hyperfine state. We discuss special cases and approximations. We also calculate the AC polarisabilities for several rovibrational levels, and therefrom evaluate accurately the black-body radiation shift, including the effects of excited electronic states. The results enable the detailed evaluation of certain systematic shifts of the transitions frequencies for the purpose of ultra-high-precision optical, microwave or radio-frequency spectroscopy in ion traps.

  10. Static and dynamic polarizability and the Stark and blackbody-radiation frequency shifts of the molecular hydrogen ions H2+, HD+, and D2+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, S.; Bakalov, D.; Bekbaev, A. K.; Korobov, V. I.

    2014-05-01

    We calculate the dc Stark effect for three molecular hydrogen ions in the nonrelativistic approximation. The effect is calculated both in dependence on the rovibrational state and in dependence on the hyperfine state. We discuss special cases and approximations. We also calculate the ac polarizabilities for several rovibrational levels and therefrom evaluate accurately the blackbody radiation shift, including the effects of excited electronic states. The results enable the detailed evaluation of certain systematic shifts of the transitions frequencies for the purpose of ultrahigh-precision optical, microwave, or radio-frequency spectroscopy in ion traps.

  11. Measurements with magnetic field in the National Spherical Torus Experiment using the motional Stark effect with laser induced fluorescence diagnostic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foley, E. L.; Levinton, F. M. [Nova Photonics, Inc., Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    The motional Stark effect with laser-induced fluorescence diagnostic (MSE-LIF) has been installed and tested on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. The MSE-LIF diagnostic will be capable of measuring radially resolved profiles of magnetic field magnitude or pitch angle in NSTX plasmas. The system includes a diagnostic neutral hydrogen beam and a laser which excites the n = 2 to n = 3 transition. A viewing system has been implemented which will support up to 38 channels from the plasma edge to past the magnetic axis. First measurements of MSE-LIF signals in the presence of small applied magnetic fields in neutral gas are reported.

  12. Method for correction of measured polarization angles from motional Stark effect spectroscopy for the effects of electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luce, T. C.; Petty, C. C.; Meyer, W. H.; Holcomb, C. T.; Burrell, K. H.; Bergsten, L. J.

    2016-12-01

    An approximate method to correct the motional Stark effect (MSE) spectroscopy for the effects of intrinsic plasma electric fields has been developed. The motivation for using an approximate method is to incorporate electric field effects for between-pulse or real-time analysis of the current density or safety factor profile. The toroidal velocity term in the momentum balance equation is normally the dominant contribution to the electric field orthogonal to the flux surface over most of the plasma. When this approximation is valid, the correction to the MSE data can be included in a form like that used when electric field effects are neglected. This allows measurements of the toroidal velocity to be integrated into the interpretation of the MSE polarization angles without changing how the data is treated in existing codes. In some cases, such as the DIII-D system, the correction is especially simple, due to the details of the neutral beam and MSE viewing geometry. The correction method is compared using DIII-D data in a variety of plasma conditions to analysis that assumes no radial electric field is present and to analysis that uses the standard correction method, which involves significant human intervention for profile fitting. The comparison shows that the new correction method is close to the standard one, and in all cases appears to offer a better result than use of the uncorrected data. The method has been integrated into the standard DIII-D equilibrium reconstruction code in use for analysis between plasma pulses and is sufficiently fast that it will be implemented in real-time equilibrium analysis for control applications.

  13. Experimental methods in cryogenic spectroscopy: Stark effect measurements in substituted myoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Bradley M.

    Dawning from well-defined tertiary structure, the active regions of enzymatic proteins exist as specifically tailored electrostatic microenvironments capable of facilitating chemical interaction. The specific influence these charge distributions have on ligand binding dynamics, and their impact on specificity, reactivity, and biological functionality, have yet to be fully understood. A quantitative determination of these intrinsic fields would offer insight towards the mechanistic aspects of protein functionality. This work seeks to investigate the internal molecular electric fields that are present at the oxygen binding site of myoglobin. Experiments are performed at 1 K on samples located within a glassy matrix, using the high-resolution technique spectral hole-burning. The internal electric field distributions can be explored by implementing a unique mathematical treatment for analyzing the effect that externally applied electric fields have on the spectral hole profiles. Precise control of the light field, the temperature, and the externally applied electric field at the site of the sample is crucial. Experimentally, the functionality of custom cryogenic temperature confocal scanning microscope was extended to allow for collection of imaging and spectral data with the ability to modulate the polarization of the light at the sample. Operation of the instrumentation was integrated into a platform allowing for seamless execution of input commands with high temporal inter-instrument resolution for collection of data streams. For the regulated control and cycling of the sample temperature. the thermal characteristics of the research Dewar were theoretically modeled to systematically predict heat flows throughout the system. A high voltage feedthrough for delivering voltages of up to 5000 V to the sample as positioned within the Dewar was developed. The burning of spectral holes with this particular experimental setup is highly repeatable. The quantum mechanical

  14. Self-screening of the quantum confined Stark effect by the polarization induced bulk charges in the quantum barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zi-Hui; Liu, Wei; Ju, Zhengang; Tiam Tan, Swee; Ji, Yun; Kyaw, Zabu; Zhang, Xueliang; Wang, Liancheng; Wei Sun, Xiao, E-mail: exwsun@ntu.edu.sg, E-mail: volkan@stanfordalumni.org [LUMINOUS Centre of Excellence for Semiconductor Lighting and Displays, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Volkan Demir, Hilmi, E-mail: exwsun@ntu.edu.sg, E-mail: volkan@stanfordalumni.org [LUMINOUS Centre of Excellence for Semiconductor Lighting and Displays, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Department of Electrical and Electronics, Department of Physics, and UNAM-Institute of Material Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, TR-06800 Ankara (Turkey)

    2014-06-16

    InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) grown along the polar orientations significantly suffer from the quantum confined Stark effect (QCSE) caused by the strong polarization induced electric field in the quantum wells, which is a fundamental problem intrinsic to the III-nitrides. Here, we show that the QCSE is self-screened by the polarization induced bulk charges enabled by designing quantum barriers. The InN composition of the InGaN quantum barrier graded along the growth orientation opportunely generates the polarization induced bulk charges in the quantum barrier, which well compensate the polarization induced interface charges, thus avoiding the electric field in the quantum wells. Consequently, the optical output power and the external quantum efficiency are substantially improved for the LEDs. The ability to self-screen the QCSE using polarization induced bulk charges opens up new possibilities for device engineering of III-nitrides not only in LEDs but also in other optoelectronic devices.

  15. OBSERVATION OF MHD INSTABILITY AND DIRECT MEASUREMENT OF LOCAL PERTURBED MAGNETIC FIELD USING MOTIONAL STARK EFFECT DIAGNOSTIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JAYAKUMAR,RJ; MAKOWSKI,MA; ALLEN,SL; AUSTIN,ME; GAROFALO,AM; LA HAYE,RJ; REIMERDES,H; RHODES,TL

    2003-11-01

    OAK-B135 The local oscillating component of the poloidal magnetic field in plasma associated with MHD instabilities has been measured using the motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic on the DIII-D tokamak. The magnetic field perturbations associated with a resistive wall mode (RWM) rotated by internal coils at 20 Hz was measured using the conventional MSE operation mode. These first observations of perturbations due to a MHD mode were obtained on multiple MSE channels covering a significant portion of the plasma and the radial profile o the amplitude of the perturbed field oscillations was obtained. The measured profile is similar to the profile of the amplitude of the electron temperature oscillation measured by electron cyclotron emission (ECE) measurements. In a new mode of measurement, the amplitude of a tearing mode rotating at a high frequency ({approx} 7 kHz) was observed using the spectral analysis of high frequency MSE data on one channel. The spectrum consists of the harmonics of the light modulation employed in the MSE diagnostics, their mutual beat frequencies and their beat frequencies with the rotation frequency of the tearing mode. The value and time variation of the frequency of the observed perturbations is in good agreement with that measured by Mirnov probes and ECE. The paper demonstrates that the MSE diagnostic can be used for observing low and high frequency phenomena such as MHD instabilities and electromagnetic turbulence.

  16. The effects of ultrasonic pretreatment and structural changes during the osmotic dehydration of the 'Starking' apple (Malus domestica Borkh)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosa-Mendoza, M. E.; Fernandez-Munoz, J. L.; Arjona-Roman, J. L.

    2012-11-01

    During the osmotic dehydration (OD) of fruit, the cell membrane displays a high resistance to mass transfer, thereby reducing the dehydration rate. To reduce thermal damage to cell membranes, alternative methods have recently been introduced to reduce the initial moisture content and/or modify the structure of fruit tissue. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of an ultrasound (US) pretreatment for OD on the effective diffusion coefficients and to observe the changes in the molecular structure of 'Starking' apple cubes by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) during a 3 h process using a 45 dregee Bx sucrose solution at 60 degree centigrade. In the pretreatment step, apple samples were immersed in an ultrasonic bath at 45 kHz for 20 min. The effective diffusion coefficients for water (Dew) and solids (Des) were calculated from the observed osmotic kinetics according to Fick's second law for the transient state. The solids coefficients were higher than the water coefficients in both processes due to the concentration difference (De = 7.7 × 10{sup -}9 and 9.7 × 10{sup -}9 m{sup 2} s{sup -}1 for ODUS). The structural changes were determined by FTIR by measuring the molecular vibration frequency for sucrose. The 1,500-900 cm{sup -}1 region of the infrared spectra was used to monitor the effect of sucrose concentration on fruit structure. We observed that the first bonds formed were C-H and C-O-C stretching (at 920 and 1,129 cm{sup -}1, respectively) in the sucrose skeleton and glycoside bonds among sucrose molecules. The water concentration affected the diffusion coefficient significantly due to its dependence on the physical structure of the food. (Author) 27 refs.

  17. Lamb shift and Stark effect in simultaneous space-space and momentum-momentum noncommutative quantum mechanics and $\\theta$-deformed $su(2)$ algebra

    CERN Document Server

    Alavi, S A

    2005-01-01

    We study the spectrum of Hydrogen atom, Lamb shift and Stark effect in the framework of simultaneous space-space and momentum-momentum (s-s, p-p) noncommutative quantum mechanics. The results show that the widths of Lamb shift due to noncommutativity is bigger than the one presented in [1]. We also study the algebras of abservables of systems of identical particles in s-s, p-p noncommutative quantum mechanics. We intoduce $\\theta$-deformed $su(2)$ algebra.

  18. Design of Ge/SiGe quantum-confined Stark effect modulators for CMOS compatible photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lever, Leon; Ikonić, Zoran; Valavanis, Alex; Kelsall, Robert W.

    2010-02-01

    A simulation technique for modeling optical absorption in Ge/SiGe multiple quantum well (MQW) heterostructures is described, based on a combined 6 × 6 k • p hole wave-function a one-band effective mass electron wavefunction calculation. Using this model, we employ strain engineering to target a specific applications-oriented wavelength, namely 1310 nm, and arrive at a design for a MQW structure to modulate light at this wavelength. The modal confinement in a proposed device is then found using finite-element modeling, and we estimate the performance of a proposed waveguide-integrated electroabsorption modulator.

  19. Experimental Study on the Stark Effect of Caesium Rydberg Atoms in an Electric Fields%Rydberg态Cs原子的Stark效应的实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡正发; 柳晓军; 龚顺生; 詹明生; 周士康

    2000-01-01

    With an atomic beam apparatus and two lasers at λ1 = 852.1nm and λ2=510 nm, the Cs atoms are excited to high Rydberg states via a two-step process. The Stark effect of the Rydberg Cs atom has been experimentally studied in the range of external field 0~600 V/cm, the map of the Stark spectra reveal profound “l-mixing” and “n-mixing” of the Stark sublevels.%利用原子束装置,采用双束波长为λl=852.1 nm和λ2=510 nm激光的两步激发, 实验研究了Cs Rydberg态原子在外加电场为0~600V/cm时的Stark扇形图,观察到在外电 场的作用下能级出现ι混合和n混合的现象.

  20. Hole burning, Stark effect, and data storage: 2: holographic recording and detection of spectral holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caro, C D; Renn, A; Wild, U P

    1991-07-10

    The properties of holographic recording and detection of spectral holes in the frequency and electric-field dimension are investigated. To optimize the storage properties of optical memory devices, based on spectral hole burning and holography, cross-talk effects between adjacent holograms have to be minimized. These interactions depend on the relative phases of the holograms chosen during the recording stage. Using free-base chlorin (2,3-dihydroporphyrin) in polyvinyl butyral as host at a temperature of 1.7 K, the influence of the relative phase difference between holograms is demonstrated in both the frequency and the electric-field dimension. Experimental results are presented for rows and columns of holograms stored either in the laser frequency or the electric-field dimension and compared to transmission data. Using both dimensions a 10 x 10 matrix of holograms has been stored within the range of a single wave number.

  1. Excitonic dynamical Franz-Keldysh effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordstrøm, K.B.; Johnsen, Kristinn; Allen, S.J.

    1998-01-01

    The dynamical Franz-Keldysh effect is exposed by exploring near-band-gap absorption in the presence of intense THz electric fields. It bridges the gap between the de Franz-Keldysh effect and multiphoton absorption and competes with the THz ac Stark effect in shifting the energy of the excitonic...... resonance. A theoretical model which includes the strong THz field nonperturbatively via a nonequilibrium Green functions technique is able to describe the dynamical Franz-Keldysh effect in the presence of excitonic absorption....

  2. Stark echo modulation for quantum memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcangeli, A.; Ferrier, A.; Goldner, Ph.

    2016-06-01

    Quantum memories for optical and microwave photons provide key functionalities in quantum processing and communications. Here we propose a protocol well adapted to solid-state ensemble-based memories coupled to cavities. It is called Stark echo modulation memory (SEMM) and allows large storage bandwidths and low noise. This is achieved in an echo-like sequence combined with phase shifts induced by small electric fields through the linear Stark effect. We investigated the protocol for rare-earth nuclear spins and found a high suppression of unwanted collective emissions that is compatible with single-photon-level operation. Broadband storage together with high fidelity for the Stark retrieval process is also demonstrated. SEMM could be used to store optical or microwave photons in ions and/or spins. This includes nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond and rare-earth-doped crystals, which are among the most promising solid-state quantum memories.

  3. Observation of the Quantum-Confined Stark Effect in a GaAs/AlGaAs P-I-N Diode by Room Temperature Photocurrent Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. S. Ison

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Room temperature photocurrent spectroscopy is performed on an MBE-grown GaAs/AlGaAs MQWp-i-n device. An observed shift to longer wavelengths is seen with increasing reverse bias voltages. Thisbehavior is explained through a mechanism called the Quantum-Confined Stark Effect. Applied electricfields are estimated using second-order correction for infinite quantum wells. The estimated built-inelectric field is 20 kV/cm corresponding to a 9-meV shift from the flatband energy transition. An observedshift to shorter wavelengths is seen under an optically applied field for both biased and unbiased conditions.

  4. Lamb Shift and Stark Effect in Simultaneous Space-Space and Momentum-Momentum Noncommutative Quantum Mechanics and θ-DEFORMED su(2) Algebra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, S. A.

    We study the spectrum of hydrogen atom, Lamb shift and Stark effect in the framework of simultaneous space-space and momentum-momentum (s-s, p-p) noncommutative quantum mechanics. The results show that the widths of Lamb shift due to noncommutativity is bigger than the one presented in Ref. 1. We also study the algebras of observables of systems of identical particles in s-s, p-p noncommutative quantum mechanics. We introduce θ-deformed su(2) algebra.

  5. 氢原子斯塔克效应的结构平衡模型仿真%Structural Equation Modeling Simulation of Hydrogen Atom Stark Effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周志祥

    2015-01-01

    斯塔克效应常应用于原子分子结构的研究,对氢原子进行结构平衡模型数学建模和仿真,可以准确分析氢原子在外电场作用下能级和光谱特性.传统的氢原子斯塔克效应结构平衡采用双线间隔分离模型,对原始读数和测量值的等价分析具有随机性,不能有效实现结构平衡.提出一种基于固有电偶极矩外电场分析的氢原子斯塔克效应的结构平衡模型.首先分析氢原子的原子特性,进行斯塔克效应数学建模,分析氢原子的晶体反应谱线分裂特征模型,光谱的发射是由于价电子的跃迁形成,电场一定会改变原子内部电荷的分布,得出斯塔克效应下的结构平衡和模型的能级分裂,其裂距与电场强度成正比,采用固有电偶极矩外电场分析,实现数学模型构建,并通过Matlab进行仿真实现.实验结果表明,模型能有效反映氢原子斯塔库克效应下的光谱特征,基于固有电偶极矩外电场分析,外电场能耗降低,性能稳定.%The study of Stark effect applied to atomic and molecular structure, structural balance model for mathematical modeling and Simulation of the hydrogen atom, can accurate analysis of the hydrogen atom in the level in the external elec-tric field and spectral characteristics. The traditional hydrogen atomic Stark effect structure equilibrium separation model adopts double spaced, randomness is equivalent to the original reading and analysis of the measured value, can not effec-tively to achieve structural balance. Put forward a kind of intrinsic electric dipole moment equilibrium structure analysis of external electric field of the hydrogen atom Stark effect model based on. The first atomic properties analysis of atomic and hydrogen, Stark effect on mathematical modeling, analysis of crystal reaction of hydrogen atomic spectral line splitting fea-ture model, spectral emission is due to transition of the valence electron, electric field distribution will

  6. Pressure influence on the Stark effect of impurity states in a strained wurtzite GaN/Al_xGa_(1-x)N heterojunction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Min; Ban Shi-Liang

    2009-01-01

    A variational method is adopted to investigate the properties of shallow impurity states near the interface in a free strained wurtzite GaN/Al_xzGal_(1-x)N heterojunction under hydrostatic pressure and external electric field by using a simplified coherent potential approximation. Considering the biaxial strain due to lattice mismatch or epitaxial growth and the uniaxial strains effects, we investigated the Stark energy shift led by an external electric field for impurity states as functions of pressure as well as the impurity position, Al component and areal electron density. The numerical result shows that the binding energy near linearly increases with pressure from O to 10 GPa. It is also found that the binding energy as a function of the electric field perpendicular to the interface shows an un-linear red shift or a blue shift for different impurity positions. The effect of increasing x on blue shift is more significant than that on the red shift for the impurity in the channel near the interface. The pressure influence on the Stark shift is more obvious with increase of electric field and the distance between an impurity and the interface. The increase of pressure decreases the blue shift but increases the red shift.

  7. Stark spectrum of barium in highly excited Rydberg states

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Hai-Feng; Gao Wei; Cheng Hong; Liu Xiao-Jun; Liu Hong-Ping

    2013-01-01

    We present observations of Stark spectra of barium in highly excited Rydberg states in the energy region around n =35.The one-photon excitation concerns the π transition.The observed Stark spectra at electric fields ranging from 0 to 60 V·cm-1 are well explained by the diagonalization of the Hamiltonian incorporating the core effects.From the Stark maps,the anti-crossings between energy levels are identified experimentally and theoretically.The time of flight spectra at the specified Stark states are recorded,where the deceleration and acceleration of barium atoms are observed.This is very consistent with the prediction derived from the Stark maps from the point of view of energy conservation.

  8. Stark spectroscopy of mixed-valence systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Lisa N; Kanchanawong, Pakorn; Treynor, Thomas P; Boxer, Steven G

    2008-01-13

    Many mixed-valence systems involve two or more states with different electric dipole moments whose magnitudes depend upon the charge transfer distance and the degree of delocalization; these systems can be interconverted by excitation of an intervalence charge transfer transition. Stark spectroscopy involves the interaction between the change in dipole moment of a transition and an electric field, so the Stark spectra of mixed-valence systems are expected to provide quantitative information on the degree of delocalization. In limiting cases, a classical Stark analysis can be used, but in intermediate cases the analysis is much more complex because the field affects not only the band position but also the intrinsic bandshape. Such non-classical Stark effects lead to widely different bandshapes. Several examples of both classes are discussed. Because electric fields are applied to immobilized samples, complications arise from inhomogeneous broadening, along with other effects that limit our ability to extract unique parameters in some cases. In the case of the radical cation of the special pair in photosynthetic reaction centres, where the mixed-valence system is in a very complex but structurally well-defined environment, a detailed analysis can be performed.

  9. Stark effect-dependent of impurity-related nonlinear optical absorption of a (In,Ga)N-GaN spherical quantum dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Ghazi, Haddou; Zorkani, Izeddine; Jorio, Anouar

    2015-03-01

    The nonlinear intra-conduction band optical properties of a wurtzite (In,Ga)N-GaN spherical quantum dot are investigated. The linear, third-order nonlinear, and total absorption coefficients (ACs) of the 1s-1p transition are computed via a combination of the quantum genetic algorithm (QGA) and the Hartree-Fock-Roothaan (HFR) method. The external applied electric field effect is examined within the single-band effective mass and the one-parabolic-band approximations under a finite potential barrier. It is found that the electric field has a great impact on the optical properties of QDs: (i) a significant redshift of the resonant peak is obtained, (ii) the maximum of the amplitude of the optical total AC decreases nonlinearly, and (iii) the Stark shift increases nonlinearly, tending toward the saturation regime. Compared with findings, good agreement is shown.

  10. Stark and Zeeman effect in the [18.6]3.5 – X(1)4.5 transition of uranium monofluoride, UF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linton, C., E-mail: colinton@unb.ca [Centre for Laser, Atomic, and Molecular Sciences, Physics Department, University of New Brunswick, 8 Bailey Drive, Fredericton, New Brunswick E3B 5A3 (Canada); Adam, A. G. [Centre for Laser, Atomic, and Molecular Sciences, Chemistry Department, University of New Brunswick, 30 Dineen Drive, Fredericton, New Brunswick E3B 5A3 (Canada); Steimle, T. C. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1604 (United States)

    2014-06-07

    High resolution spectra of the 0-0 band of the [18.6]3.5 – X(1)4.5 transition of uranium monofluoride, UF, obtained using a laser ablation spectrometer, showed a perturbation in the upper state. Examination of the Stark and Zeeman effects yielded permanent electric dipole moments of 2.01 and 1.88 D and magnetic g-factors of 3.28 and 3.26 for the ground and excited states, respectively. Both the dipole moment and g-factor of the ground state are in good agreement with ab initio calculations [I. O. Antonov and M. C. Heaven, J. Phys. Chem. A 117, 9684 (2013)]. The Zeeman effect results confirm that the ground state arises primarily from the U{sup +}(5f {sup 3}7s{sup 24}I{sub 4.5})F{sup −} configuration and suggest several possible configurations for the upper state.

  11. Wannier-Stark electro-optical effect, quasi-guided and photonic modes in 2D macroporous silicon structures with SiO2 coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karachevtseva, L.; Goltviansky, Yu.; Sapelnikova, O.; Lytvynenko, O.; Stronska, O.; Bo, Wang; Kartel, M.

    2016-12-01

    Opportunities to enhance the properties of structured surfaces were demonstrated on 2D macroporous silicon structures with SiO2 coatings. We investigated the IR light absorption oscillations in macroporous silicon structures with SiO2 coatings 0-800 nm thick. The Wannier-Stark electro-optical effect due to strong electric field on Si-SiO2boundary and an additional electric field of quasi-guided optical modes were taken into account. The photonic modes and band gaps were also considered as peculiarities in absorbance spectra of macroporous silicon structures with a thick SiO2 coating. The photonic modes do not coincide with the quasi-guided modes in the silicon matrix and do not appear in absorption spectra of 2D macroporous silicon structures with surface nanocrystals.

  12. Combining ligand-induced quantum-confined stark effect with type II heterojunction bilayer structure in CdTe and CdSe nanocrystal-based solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaacobi-Gross, Nir; Garphunkin, Natalia; Solomeshch, Olga; Vaneski, Aleksandar; Susha, Andrei S; Rogach, Andrey L; Tessler, Nir

    2012-04-24

    We show that it is possible to combine several charge generation strategies in a single device structure, the performance of which benefits from all methods used. Exploiting the inherent type II heterojunction between layered structures of CdSe and CdTe colloidal quantum dots, we systematically study different ways of combining such nanocrystals of different size and surface chemistry and with different linking agents in a bilayer solar cell configuration. We demonstrate the beneficial use of two distinctly different sizes of NCs not only to improve the solar spectrum matching but also to reduce exciton binding energy, allowing their efficient dissociation at the interface. We further make use of the ligand-induced quantum-confined Stark effect in order to enhance charge generation and, hence, overall efficiency of nanocrystal-based solar cells.

  13. Rydberg State Stark Spectroscopy and Applications to Plasma Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-03-01

    discrepancies between experiment and theory.13 5 The initial calculation of the high field Zeeman effect ( Paschen - Back ) was performed by Lorenz from a classical...identify by block number) FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP ’ i/ : . , 20 09 ydbaxq atoms, Stark effect , 09 03 1 ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify...of the Stark effect was exploited to determine the field direction as well as magnitude (electronic field vector). Measurements of low electric fields

  14. Integrated Multichannel Customer Service Plan For Stark

    OpenAIRE

    Oinasmaa, Roosa

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis was to introduce three compatible integrated customer service templates for Stark according to the needs and wants of the customer service department. These providers all offer integrated technological solutions for multichannel services. This was done in order to improve work efficiency and thus have a positive effect on the customer experience. The purpose of the thesis was to find out what tools and programs the customer service representatives and the hea...

  15. Diffusive Suppression of AC-Stark Shifts in Atomic Magnetometers

    CERN Document Server

    Sulai, I A; Kauer, M; Smetana, G S; Wakai, R T; Walker, T G

    2012-01-01

    In atomic magnetometers, the vector AC-Stark shift associated with circularly polarized light generates spatially varying effective magnetic fields which limit the magnetometer response and serve as sources of noise. We describe a scheme whereby optically pumping a small sub-volume of the magnetometer cell and relying on diffusion to transport polarized atoms allows a magnetometer to be operated with minimal sensitivity to the AC-Stark field.

  16. Magnetic quantum phase transition in Cr-doped Bi2(SexTe1-x)3 driven by the Stark effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zuocheng; Feng, Xiao; Wang, Jing; Lian, Biao; Zhang, Jinsong; Chang, Cuizu; Guo, Minghua; Ou, Yunbo; Feng, Yang; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; He, Ke; Ma, Xucun; Xue, Qi-Kun; Wang, Yayu

    2017-08-07

    The recent experimental observation of the quantum anomalous Hall effect has cast significant attention on magnetic topological insulators. In these magnetic counterparts of conventional topological insulators such as Bi2Te3, a long-range ferromagnetic state can be established by chemical doping with transition-metal elements. However, a much richer electronic phase diagram can emerge and, in the specific case of Cr-doped Bi2(SexTe1-x)3, a magnetic quantum phase transition tuned by the actual chemical composition has been reported. From an application-oriented perspective, the relevance of these results hinges on the possibility to manipulate magnetism and electronic band topology by external perturbations such as an electric field generated by gate electrodes-similar to what has been achieved in conventional diluted magnetic semiconductors. Here, we investigate the magneto-transport properties of Cr-doped Bi2(SexTe1-x)3 with different compositions under the effect of a gate voltage. The electric field has a negligible effect on magnetic order for all investigated compositions, with the remarkable exception of the sample close to the topological quantum critical point, where the gate voltage reversibly drives a ferromagnetic-to-paramagnetic phase transition. Theoretical calculations show that a perpendicular electric field causes a shift in the electronic energy levels due to the Stark effect, which induces a topological quantum phase transition and, in turn, a magnetic phase transition.

  17. Influence of quantum-confined Stark effect on optical properties within trench defects in InGaN quantum wells with different indium content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaitkevičius, A., E-mail: augustas.vaitkevicius@gmail.com; Mickevičius, J.; Dobrovolskas, D.; Tamulaitis, G. [Semiconductor Physics Department and Institute of Applied Research, Vilnius University, Sauletekio 9-III, LT-10222 Vilnius (Lithuania); Tuna, Ö.; Giesen, C.; Heuken, M. [AIXTRON SE, Kaiserstr. 98, 52134 Herzogenrath (Germany)

    2014-06-07

    The trench defects in InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well structures are studied using confocal photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. A strong blueshift (up to ∼280 meV) and an intensity increase (by up to a factor of 700) of the emission are demonstrated for regions enclosed by trench loops. The influence of the difference in the well width inside and outside the trench loops observed by transmission electron microscopy, the compositional pulling effect, the strain relaxation inside the loop, and corresponding reduction in the built-in field on the PL band peak position and intensity were estimated. The competition of these effects is mainly governed by the width of the quantum wells in the structure. It is shown that the PL band blueshift observed within the trench defect loops in the InGaN structures with wide quantum wells is mainly caused by the reduction in efficiency of the quantum-confined Stark effect due to strain relaxation.

  18. Vibrational Stark Effect of the Electric-Field Reporter 4-Mercaptobenzonitrile as a Tool for Investigating Electrostatics at Electrode/SAM/Solution Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Hildebrandt

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available 4-mercaptobenzonitrile (MBN in self-assembled monolayers (SAMs on Au and Ag electrodes was studied by surface enhanced infrared absorption and Raman spectroscopy, to correlate the nitrile stretching frequency with the local electric field exploiting the vibrational Stark effect (VSE. Using MBN SAMs in different metal/SAM interfaces, we sorted out the main factors controlling the nitrile stretching frequency, which comprise, in addition to external electric fields, the metal-MBN bond, the surface potential, and hydrogen bond interactions. On the basis of the linear relationships between the nitrile stretching and the electrode potential, an electrostatic description of the interfacial potential distribution is presented that allows for determining the electric field strengths on the SAM surface, as well as the effective potential of zero-charge of the SAM-coated metal. Comparing this latter quantity with calculated values derived from literature data, we note a very good agreement for Au/MBN but distinct deviations for Ag/MBN which may reflect either the approximations and simplifications of the model or the uncertainty in reported structural parameters for Ag/MBN. The present electrostatic model consistently explains the electric field strengths for MBN SAMs on Ag and Au as well as for thiophenol and mercaptohexanoic acid SAMs with MBN incorporated as a VSE reporter.

  19. Conditional control of donor nuclear spins in silicon using stark shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfowicz, Gary; Urdampilleta, Matias; Thewalt, Mike L W; Riemann, Helge; Abrosimov, Nikolai V; Becker, Peter; Pohl, Hans-Joachim; Morton, John J L

    2014-10-10

    Electric fields can be used to tune donor spins in silicon using the Stark shift, whereby the donor electron wave function is displaced by an electric field, modifying the hyperfine coupling between the electron spin and the donor nuclear spin. We present a technique based on dynamic decoupling of the electron spin to accurately determine the Stark shift, and illustrate this using antimony donors in isotopically purified silicon-28. We then demonstrate two different methods to use a dc electric field combined with an applied resonant radio-frequency (rf) field to conditionally control donor nuclear spins. The first method combines an electric-field induced conditional phase gate with standard rf pulses, and the second one simply detunes the spins off resonance. Finally, we consider different strategies to reduce the effect of electric field inhomogeneities and obtain above 90% process fidelities.

  20. CMISTARK: Python package for the Stark-effect calculation and symmetry classification of linear, symmetric and asymmetric top wavefunctions in dc electric fields

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Yuan-Pin; Sartakov, Boris; Küpper, Jochen

    2013-01-01

    The Controlled Molecule Imaging group (CMI) at the Center for Free Electron Laser Science (CFEL) has developed the CMIstark software to calculate, view, and analyze the energy levels of adiabatic Stark energy curves of linear, symmetric top and asymmetric top molecules. The program exploits the symmetry of the Hamiltonian to generate fully labeled adiabatic Stark energy curves. CMIstark is written in Python and easily extendable, while the core numer- ical calculations make use of machine optimized BLAS and LAPACK routines. Calculated energies are stored in HDF5 files for convenient access and programs to extract ASCII data or to generate graphical plots are provided.

  1. Effect of holding period prior to storage on the chemical attributes of Starking Delicious apples during refrigerated storage Efeito do período que antecede o armazenamento nos atributos químicos de maças Starking Delicious durante o armazenamento refrigerado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aynur Batkan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the effects of three different holding periods (6, 12 and 24 hours prior to storage on the quality attributes of Starking Delicious apples were investigated during storage of 8 months at 0.5 ± 1.0 ºC. Changes in weight loss, flesh firmness, pH values, soluble dry matter amount, titratable acidity values, ascorbic acid contents, and total and reducing sugar content were determined. According to the results, the holding period showed statistically significant changes in the quality attributes of the apples (p Neste trabalho, os efeitos de três diferentes tempos de espera (6, 12 e 24 horas antes do armazenamento sobre os atributos de qualidade de maçãs tipo Starking Delicious foram investigados durante o armazenamento de 8 meses a 0,5 ± 1,0 ºC. Alterações na perda de peso, firmeza da polpa, valores de pH, quantidade de matéria seca solúvel, valores de acidez titulável, teor de ácido ascórbico e teor de açúcar redutor e total das amostras foram determinadas. De acordo com os resultados da análise, o tempo de espera causou alterações estatisticamente significativas sobre as nos atributos de qualidade das maçãs (p < 0,05.

  2. Nanometer-scale monitoring of quantum-confined Stark effect and emission efficiency droop in multiple GaN/AlN quantum disks in nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagonel, L. F.; Tizei, L. H. G.; Vitiello, G. Z.; Jacopin, G.; Rigutti, L.; Tchernycheva, M.; Julien, F. H.; Songmuang, R.; Ostasevicius, T.; de la Peña, F.; Ducati, C.; Midgley, P. A.; Kociak, M.

    2016-05-01

    We report on a detailed study of the intensity dependent optical properties of individual GaN/AlN quantum disks (QDisks) embedded into GaN nanowires (NW). The structural and optical properties of the QDisks were probed by high spatial resolution cathodoluminescence (CL) in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). By exciting the QDisks with a nanometric electron beam at currents spanning over three orders of magnitude, strong nonlinearities (energy shifts) in the light emission are observed. In particular, we find that the amount of energy shift depends on the emission rate and on the QDisk morphology (size, position along the NW and shell thickness). For thick QDisks (>4 nm), the QDisk emission energy is observed to blueshift with the increase of the emission intensity. This is interpreted as a consequence of the increase of carriers density excited by the incident electron beam inside the QDisks, which screens the internal electric field and thus reduces the quantum confined Stark effect (QCSE) present in these QDisks. For thinner QDisks (current threshold above which the energy shifts, marking the transition from unscreened to partially screened QCSE. From the threshold value we estimate the lifetime in the unscreened regime. These observations suggest that, counterintuitively, electrons of high energy can behave ultimately as single electron-hole pair generators. In addition, when we increase the current from 1 to 10 pA the light emission efficiency drops by more than one order of magnitude. This reduction of the emission efficiency is a manifestation of the "efficiency droop" as observed in nitride-based 2D light emitting diodes, a phenomenon tentatively attributed to the Auger effect.

  3. Stark effect on holes in the absorption spectra of phthalocyanine and the aluminum-phthalocyanine complex in polymer matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulitskiĭ, N. I.; Snegirev, E. P.; Personov, R. I.

    2002-06-01

    The effect of an external electric field on narrow spectral holes in S1←S0 absorption bands of molecules of free-base phthalocyanine and its complex with Al in polyvinyl butyral films at 4.2 K was studied. It was found that the average values of the change in the electric dipole moment due to phototransitions in the free-base phthalocyanine and its complex amount to 0.135 and 0.145 D, respectively. Both these values considerably exceed the relevant values for phthalocyanine complexes with Zn and Mg in the same matrix. Possible causes of the observed effects are discussed. Most probably, they are related to the differences in the structure of the central part of phthalocyanine-type molecules.

  4. STARK STRUCTURE OF THE RYDBERG STATES OF ALKALINE-EARTH ATOMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郅妙婵; 戴长建; 李士本

    2001-01-01

    The Stark effects of the Rydberg states in the alkaline-earth atoms are studied theoretically. Using a method similar to the treatment of alkali atoms, the properties of the Stark states of Mg, Ca, Sr and Ba atoms in the regions far away from the perturbers are investigated. The Stark maps for Mg (n=16, M=0), Ca (n=10, M=0), Sr (n=12,M=0) and Ba (n=13, |M|=0,1) are presented. Topics such as the general methods of calculation, the treatment of fine structure, and the structure of level anti-crossings are discussed. The comparison between the theoretical and experimental Stark maps is satisfactory.

  5. Quantum state engineering in a cavity by Stark chirped rapid adiabatic passage

    CERN Document Server

    Amniat-Talab, M; Guérin, S

    2006-01-01

    We propose a robust scheme to generate single-photon Fock states and atom-photon and atom-atom entanglement in atom-cavity systems. We also present a scheme for quantum networking between two cavity nodes using an atomic channel. The mechanism is based on Stark-chirped rapid adiabatic passage (SCRAP) and half-SCRAP processes in a microwave cavity. The engineering of these states depends on the design of the adiabatic dynamics through the static and dynamic Stark shifts.

  6. The Stark interaction of identical particles with vacuum electromagnetic field as quantum Poisson process suppressing collective spontaneous emission

    CERN Document Server

    Basharov, A M

    2011-01-01

    The effective Hamiltonian describing resonant interaction of an ensemble of identical quantum particles with a photon-free vacuum electromagnetic field has been obtained with allowance for the second-order terms over the coupling constant (the Stark interaction) by means of the perturbation theory on the basis of the unitary transformation of the system quantum state. It has been shown that in the Markov approximation the effective Hamiltonian terms of the first-order coupling constant are represented as the quantum Wiener process, whereas the second-order terms are expressed by the quantum Poisson process. In the course of investigation it was established that the Stark interaction played a significant role in the ensemble dynamics, thus influencing the collective spontaneous decay of the ensemble of an appreciably high number of identical particles. New fundamental effects have been discovered, i.e., the excitation conservation in a sufficiently dense ensemble of identical particles and superradiance suppre...

  7. Stark broadening of B IV spectral lines

    CERN Document Server

    Dimitrijevic, Milan S; Simic, Zoran; Kovacevic, Andjelka; Sahal-Brechot, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Stark broadening parameters for 157 multiplets of helium like boron (B IV) have been calculated using the impact semiclassical perturbation formalism. Obtained results have been used to investigate the regularities within spectral series. An example of the influence of Stark broadening on B IV lines in DO white dwarfs is given.

  8. Stark broadening data for stellar plasma research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrijević, M. S.

    Results of an effort to provide to astrophysicists and physicists an as much as possible complete set of Stark broadening parameters needed for stellar opacity calculations, stellar atmosphere modelling, abundance determinations and diagnostics of different plasmas in astrophysics, physics and plasma technology, are presented. Stark broadening has been considered within the semiclassical perturbation, and the modified semiempirical approaches.

  9. Quantum-Confined Stark Effect Analysis of GeSn/SiGeSn Quantum Wells for Mid-Infrared Si-Based Electroabsorption Devices Based on Many-Body Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Fujisawa, Takeshi; Saitoh, Kunimasa

    2015-01-01

    Quantum-confined Stark effect (QCSE) of group IV Ge(Sn)/SiGe(Sn) quantum wells (QWs) on Si substrate is analyzed by microscopic many-body theory for mid-infrared (mid-IR) Si-based electroabsorption devices. To show the validity of the theory, QCSE of Ge/SiGe QW is investigated and very good agreement between theory and reported measured results is obtained. Next, the QCSE of GeSn/SiGeSn QWs is analyzed and the QW design for electroabsorption modulators to obtain large extinction ratio in mid-...

  10. Propagation of vector solitons in a quasi-resonant medium with stark deformation of quantum states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sazonov, S. V., E-mail: sazonov.sergei@gmail.com [National Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Ustinov, N. V., E-mail: n_ustinov@mail.ru [Moscow State Railway University, Kaliningrad Branch (Russian Federation)

    2012-11-15

    The nonlinear dynamics of a vector two-component optical pulse propagating in quasi-resonance conditions in a medium of nonsymmetric quantum objects is investigated for Stark splitting of quantum energy levels by an external electric field. We consider the case when the ordinary component of the optical pulse induces {sigma} transitions, while the extraordinary component induces the {pi} transition and shifts the frequencies of the allowed transitions due to the dynamic Stark effect. It is found that under Zakharov-Benney resonance conditions, the propagation of the optical pulse is accompanied by generation of an electromagnetic pulse in the terahertz band and is described by the vector generalization of the nonlinear Yajima-Oikawa system. It is shown that this system (as well as its formal generalization with an arbitrary number of optical components) is integrable by the inverse scattering transformation method. The corresponding Darboux transformations are found for obtaining multisoliton solutions. The influence of transverse effects on the propagation of vector solitons is investigated. The conditions under which transverse dynamics leads to self-focusing (defocusing) of solitons are determined.

  11. Photonic Bloch oscillations and Wannier-Stark ladders in exponentially chirped Bragg gratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, P B

    2002-05-01

    The formation of photonic Bloch oscillations and Wannier-Stark ladders is demonstrated in an exponentially chirped one-dimensional Bragg grating. The photonic Bloch oscillations are investigated using Hamiltonian optics, and direct analogies are made with electron dynamics in periodic potentials. The results of transfer matrix calculations are presented, which show the existence of a photonic Wannier-Stark ladder that should be detectable in experiments.

  12. Entropy squeezing and atomic inversion in the k-photon Jaynes—Cummings model in the presence of the Stark shift and a Kerr medium: A full nonlinear approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    H, R. Baghshahi; M, K. Tavassoly; A, Behjat

    2014-07-01

    The interaction between a two-level atom and a single-mode field in the k-photon Jaynes—Cummings model (JCM) in the presence of the Stark shift and a Kerr medium is studied. All terms in the Hamiltonian, such as the single-mode field, its interaction with the atom, the contribution of the Stark shift and the Kerr medium effects are considered to be f-deformed. In particular, the effect of the initial state of the radiation field on the dynamical evolution of some physical properties such as atomic inversion and entropy squeezing are investigated by considering different initial field states (coherent, squeezed and thermal states).

  13. Model electrochemical interfaces in ultra-high vacuum: solvent-induced surface potential profiles on Pt(111) from work-function measurements and infrared Stark effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizhakevariam, Naushad; Villegas, Ignacio; Weaver, Michael J.

    1995-08-01

    The influence of various solvents upon the interfacial-potential profile on Pt(111) has been investigated by means of work-function changes and infrared frequency Stark shifts attending sequential-molecular dosing in ultra-high vacuum (UHV) at a suitably low temperature (ca. 100 K) with the primary objective of assessing the role of surface solvation in related electrochemical systems. The solvents examined — dichloromethane, benzene, acetone, acetonitrile, methanol, and ammonia — span a range of polarity and other solvating properties. These species were dosed onto both clean and CO-saturated Pt(111), the Stark shifts being evaluated for the CO stretching mode of terminally co-ordinated carbon monoxide. Marked decreases (≥ 1 eV) in the work function, Φ, and hence in the surface potential, φ, are observed on the addition of most solvents onto clean Pt(111). Milder yet still substantial Φ decreases are also observed for solvent dosage upon CO-saturated Pt(111). These latter Φ changes correlate approximately with the observed vCO frequency downshifts, suggesting that the latter property is also sensitive to the solvent-induced electrostatic interfacial field. The functional form of both the Φ decreases and the corresponding vCO frequency downshifts induced by solvent dosage provide insight into the dosage-dependent potential profile and its relationship to both the monolayer and multilayer solvent structure. The present findings are also briefly compared with corresponding vtCO - Φ data obtained for potassium atom dosing, where the surface potential is altered instead by varying the surface electronic charge in the presence of a given solvent. The underlying factors responsible for the surprisingly large solvent-induced surface potential shifts are discussed in detail, and the likely importance of the surface electronic charge distribution as well as solvent dipole orientation and adsorbate-metal charge sharing is pointed out.

  14. Optical Stark Spectroscopy of Gold Chrolride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruohan; Steimle, Timothy

    2014-06-01

    The bonding and electrostatic properties of gold containing molecules are highly influenced by relativistic effects and electron correlation. Hence it is difficult to predict those properties via electron structure calculation, and such calculation are guided by experimental observations. Here we report on the A(Ω=1)-X1Σ+ and B(Ω=0)-X1Σ+ bands of AuCl, which have been previously recorded at Doppler limited resolution. A cold molecular beam sample was generated and the bands were recorded at high resolution (FWHM =35 MHz) using laser excitation spectroscopy, both field-free and in the presence of a static electric field. An improved set of spectroscopic parameters for the A(Ω=1) and B(Ω=0) states were obtained. The Stark induced shifts were analyzed to determine the permanent electric dipole moments for the X, A, and B states. A comparison with AuF and theory will be made. P. Pyykko; Angew Chem. Int {43} 4412, 2004. L. C. O'Brien, A. L. Elliott, and M. Dulick; J. Mol. Spectrosc, 194, 124, 1999.

  15. Theory for planetary exospheres: I. Radiation pressure effect on dynamical trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beth, A.; Garnier, P.; Toublanc, D.; Dandouras, I.; Mazelle, C.

    2016-03-01

    The planetary exospheres are poorly known in their outer parts, since the neutral densities are low compared with the instruments detection capabilities. The exospheric models are thus often the main source of information at such high altitudes. We present a new way to take into account analytically the additional effect of the radiation pressure on planetary exospheres. In a series of papers, we present with an Hamiltonian approach the effect of the radiation pressure on dynamical trajectories, density profiles and escaping thermal flux. Our work is a generalisation of the study by Bishop and Chamberlain (Bishop, J., Chamberlian, J.W. [1989]. Icarus 81, 145-163). In this first paper, we present the complete solutions of particles trajectories, which are not conics, under the influence of the solar radiation pressure with some assumptions. This problem is similar to the classical Stark problem (Stark, J. [1914]. Ann. Phys. 348, 965-982). This problem was largely tackled in the literature and more specifically, recently by Lantoine and Russell (Lantoine, G., Russell, R.P. [2011]. Celest. Mech. Dynam. Astron. 109, 333-366) and by Biscani and Izzo (Biscani, F., Izzo, D. [2014]. Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 439, 810-822) as we will discuss in this paper. We give here the full set of solutions for the motion of a particle (in our case for an atom or a molecule), i.e. the space coordinates and the time solution for bounded and unbounded trajectories in terms of Jacobi elliptic functions. We thus provide here the complete set of solutions for this so-call Stark effect (Stark, J. [1914]. Ann. Phys. 348, 965-982) in terms of Jacobi elliptic functions (Jacobi, C.G.J. [1829]. Fundamenta nova theoriae functionum ellipticarum. Sumtibus fratrum), which may be used to model the trajectories of particles in planetary exospheres.

  16. Surface-modified Wannier-Stark states in a 1D optical lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Maury, A; Gorza, M -P; Lambrecht, A; Guérout, R

    2016-01-01

    We study the energy spectrum of atoms trapped in a vertical 1D optical lattice in close proximity to a reflective surface. We propose an effective model to describe the interaction between the atoms and the surface at any distance. Our model includes the long-range Casimir-Polder potential together with a short-range Lennard-Jones potential, which are considered non-perturbatively with respect to the optical lattice potential. We find an intricate energy spectrum which contains a pair of loosely-bound states localized close to the surface in addition to a surface-modified Wannier-Stark ladder at long distances. Atomic interferometry involving those loosely-bound atom-surface states is proposed to probe the adsorption dynamics of atoms on mirrors.

  17. Time Averaged Quantum Dynamics and the Validity of the Effective Hamiltonian Model

    CERN Document Server

    Gamel, Omar

    2010-01-01

    We develop a technique for finding the dynamical evolution in time of an averaged density matrix. The result is an equation of evolution that includes an Effective Hamiltonian, as well as decoherence terms in Lindblad form. Applying the general equation to harmonic Hamiltonians, we confirm a previous formula for the Effective Hamiltonian together with a new decoherence term which should in general be included, and whose vanishing provides the criteria for validity of the Effective Hamiltonian approach. Finally, we apply the theory to examples of the AC Stark Shift and Three- Level Raman Transitions, recovering a new decoherence effect in the latter.

  18. Laser-assisted Stark deceleration of polar diatomic molecules in the Χ1Σ state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yunxia; Xu, Shuwu; Yang, Xiaohua

    2016-07-01

    The traditional Stark deceleration method is difficult to apply in chemically stable polar diatomic molecules in their ground (Χ1Σ) state because the Χ1Σ state normally experiences little Stark shift and the rovibronic ground level is mostly high-field-seeking. To solve this problem, we propose a laser-assisted Stark deceleration scheme to decelerate such molecules in the present paper. Our results show that, owing to the transverse bunching effect of the applied red-detuning laser beam, the molecules of the high-field-seeking level |J = 0, M = 0> in the Χ1Σ state can be effectively decelerated. Furthermore, the present scheme is more effective because the interaction between the molecules and the combined fields can produce the pseudo-first-order Stark effect, and thus increase the depth of the effective potential. Compared to those molecules in the low-field-seeking state |J = 1, MΩ = -1> in the usual electrostatic Stark deceleration, a higher molecular density and lower velocity can be achieved under an equivalent initial phase angle.

  19. Advanced switching schemes in a Stark decelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Dongdong; Meijer, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    We revisit the operation of the Stark decelerator and present a new, optimized operation scheme, which substantially improves the efficiency of the decelerator at both low and high final velocities, relevant for trapping experiments and collision experiments, respectively. Both experimental and simulation results show that this new mode of operation outperforms the schemes which have hitherto been in use. This new mode of operation could potentially be extended to other deceleration techniques.

  20. Density measurements using coherence imaging spectroscopy based on Stark broadeninga)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lischtschenko, O.; Bystrov, K.; De Temmerman, G.; Howard, J.; Jaspers, R. J. E.; König, R.

    2010-10-01

    A coherence imaging camera has been set up at Pilot-PSI. The system is to be used for imaging the plasma density through the Stark effect broadening of the Hγ line. Local density values are then obtained by the Abel inversion of the measured interferometric fringe contrast. This report will present the instrument setup and proof-of-principle demonstration. The inverted spatial electron density profiles obtained near the cascaded arc source of Pilot-PSI in discharges with axial magnetic field of B=0.4 T are compared with an independent measurement of electron density by Thomson scattering and good agreement is found.

  1. Density measurements using coherence imaging spectroscopy based on Stark broadening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lischtschenko, O.; Bystrov, K.; De Temmerman, G. [Association EURATOM-FOM, FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, partner in the Trilateral Euregio Cluster, P.O. Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Howard, J. [Research Laboratory, Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200 (Australia); Jaspers, R. J. E. [Fusion Group, Eindhoven University of Technology, Postbus 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Koenig, R. [EURATOM Association, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, TI Greifswald, Wendelsteinstr.1, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany)

    2010-10-15

    A coherence imaging camera has been set up at Pilot-PSI. The system is to be used for imaging the plasma density through the Stark effect broadening of the H{sub {gamma}} line. Local density values are then obtained by the Abel inversion of the measured interferometric fringe contrast. This report will present the instrument setup and proof-of-principle demonstration. The inverted spatial electron density profiles obtained near the cascaded arc source of Pilot-PSI in discharges with axial magnetic field of B=0.4 T are compared with an independent measurement of electron density by Thomson scattering and good agreement is found.

  2. Measurement of atomic Stark parameters of many Mn I and Fe I spectral lines using GMAW process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zielinska, S; Pellerin, S; Valensi, F [GREMI, Universite d' Orleans (Site de Bourges)/CNRS, BP 4043, 18028 Bourges cedex (France); Dzierzega, K; Musiol, K [Marian Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Jagellonian University, Krakow (Poland); Briand, F, E-mail: sylwia.zielinska@airliquide.co, E-mail: stephane.pellerin@univ-orleans.f, E-mail: krzycho@netmail.if.uj.edu.p, E-mail: flavien.valensi@laplace.univ-tsle.f, E-mail: ufmusiol@cyf-kr.edu.p, E-mail: francis.briand@airliquide.co [CTAS-Air Liquide Welding, Saint Ouen l' Aunone, 95315 Cergy-Pontoise cedex (France)

    2010-11-03

    The particular character of the welding arc working in pure argon, whose emission spectrum consists of many spectral lines strongly broadened by the Stark effect, has allowed measurement, sometimes for the first time, of the Stark parameters of 15 Mn I and 10 Fe I atomic spectral lines, and determination of the dependence on temperature of normalized Stark broadening in N{sub e} = 10{sup 23} m{sup -3} of the 542.4 nm atomic iron line. These results show that special properties of the MIG plasma may be useful in this domain because composition of the wire-electrode may be easily adapted to the needs of an experiment.

  3. Dynamic Treatment Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckman, James J; Humphries, John Eric; Veramendi, Gregory

    2016-02-01

    This paper develops robust models for estimating and interpreting treatment effects arising from both ordered and unordered multistage decision problems. Identification is secured through instrumental variables and/or conditional independence (matching) assumptions. We decompose treatment effects into direct effects and continuation values associated with moving to the next stage of a decision problem. Using our framework, we decompose the IV estimator, showing that IV generally does not estimate economically interpretable or policy relevant parameters in prototypical dynamic discrete choice models, unless policy variables are instruments. Continuation values are an empirically important component of estimated total treatment effects of education. We use our analysis to estimate the components of what LATE estimates in a dynamic discrete choice model.

  4. The STARK-B database VAMDC node

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahal-Bréchot, S.; Dimitrijević, M. S.; Moreau, N.; Nessib, N. Ben

    2017-03-01

    Accurate spectroscopic diagnostics and modelling require the knowledge of numerous collisional line profiles. The access to such data via an on line database is essential. The aim of STARK-B is to meet these needs for widths and shifts of "isolated" lines of neutral and ionized atoms due to electron and ion impacts. It is devoted to modelling and spectroscopic diagnostics of stellar atmospheres and envelopes, laboratory plasmas, laser equipments and technological plasmas. So, the range of temperatures and densities covered by the tables is broad and depends on the ionization degree of the radiating atom. STARK-B is a collaborative project between the Astronomical Observatory of Belgrade (AOB) and the laboratory LERMA at Observatory of Paris, which started at the end of 2008. STARK-B is a database of LERMA and a node of VAMDC (Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Centre) and thus complies with the standards of the Virtual Observatories. This database opened at the end of 2008. Today, the database contains our calculated data for a various number of transitions of neutral or ionized atoms, published in more than 150 papers in international refereed journals. We continue to implement our previously published data, and the new ones as soon as they are published. A summary of the scientific objectives, the key points of the impact-semiclassical-perturbation method used for the calculations, the current state of development of our ongoing work and our plans for the future objectives of the database are presented. Finally, an example of the results of a query is displayed.

  5. Stark Broadening in Compact Stars: Xe VI Lines

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Milan S. Dimitrijević; Zoran Simić; Andjelka Kovačević; Aleksandar Valjarević; Sylvie Sahal-Bréchot

    2015-12-01

    We will consider Stark broadening of non hydrogenic spectral lines in the impact approximation in compact stars: pre-white dwarf and white dwarf atmospheres. In order to show an example, Stark broadening parameters have been calculated, using the impact semiclassical perturbation approach for four Xe VI spectral lines. Obtained results have been used to demonstrate the influence of Stark broadening in DA and DB white dwarf atmospheres.

  6. Rydberg-Stark states in oscillating electric fields

    CERN Document Server

    Zhelyazkova, V

    2015-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies of the effects of weak radio-frequency electric fields on Rydberg-Stark states with electric dipole moments as large as 10000 D are reported. High-resolution laser spectroscopic studies of Rydberg states with principal quantum number $n=52$ and $53$ were performed in pulsed supersonic beams of metastable helium with the excited atoms detected by pulsed electric field ionisation. Experiments were carried out in the presence of sinusoidally oscillating electric fields with frequencies of 20~MHz, amplitudes of up to 120~mV/cm, and dc offsets of up to 4.4~V/cm. In weak fields the experimentally recorded spectra are in excellent agreement with the results of calculations carried out using Floquet methods to account for electric dipole couplings in the oscillating fields. This highlights the validity of these techniques for the accurate calculation of the Stark energy level structure in such fields, and the limitations of the calculations in stronger fields where $n-$mixing and ...

  7. Rydberg-Stark states in oscillating electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhelyazkova, V.; Hogan, S. D.

    2015-12-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies of the effects of weak radio-frequency electric fields on Rydberg-Stark states with electric dipole moments as large as 10,000 D are reported. High-resolution laser spectroscopic studies of Rydberg states with principal quantum number n = 52 and 53 were performed in pulsed supersonic beams of metastable helium with the excited atoms detected by pulsed electric field ionisation. Experiments were carried out in the presence of sinusoidally oscillating electric fields with frequencies of 20 MHz, amplitudes of up to 120 mV/cm, and dc offsets of up to 4.4 V/cm. In weak fields, the experimentally recorded spectra are in excellent agreement with the results of calculations carried out using Floquet methods to account for electric dipole couplings in the oscillating fields. This highlights the validity of these techniques for the accurate calculation of the Stark energy level structure in such fields, and the limitations of the calculations in stronger fields where n-mixing and higher order contributions become important.

  8. Interference effects and Stark broadening in XUV intrashell transitions in aluminum under conditions of intense XUV free-electron-laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galtier, E.; Rosmej, F. B.; Calisti, A.; Talin, B.; Mossé, C.; Ferri, S.; Lisitsa, V. S.

    2013-03-01

    Quantum mechanical interference effects in the line broadening of intrashell transitions are investigated for dense plasma conditions. Simulations that involved LSJ-split level structure and intermediate coupling discovered unexpected strong line narrowing for intrashell transitions L-L while M-L transitions remained practically unaffected by interference effects. This behavior allows a robust study of line narrowing in dense plasmas. Simulations are carried out for XUV transitions of aluminum that have recently been observed in experiments with the FLASH free-electron laser in Hamburg irradiating solid aluminum samples with intensities greater than 1016 W/cm2. We explore the advantageous case of Al that allows, first, simultaneous observation of M-L transitions and L-L intrashell transitions with high-resolution grating spectrometers and, second, has a convenient threshold to study interference effects at densities much below solid. Finally, we present simulations at near solid density where the line emission transforms into a quasicontinuum.

  9. Development of polaron-transformed explicitly correlated full configuration interaction method for investigation of quantum-confined Stark effect in GaAs quantum dots

    CERN Document Server

    Blanton, Christopher J; Chakraborty, Arindam

    2012-01-01

    The effect of external electric field on electron-hole correlation in GaAs quantum dots is investigated. The electron-hole Schrodinger equation in the presence of external electric field is solved using explicitly correlated full configuration interaction (XCFCI) method and accurate exciton binding energy and electron-hole recombination probability are obtained. The effect of the electric field was included in the 1-particle single component basis functions by performing variational polaron transformation. The quality of the wavefunction at small inter-particle distances was improved by using Gaussian-type geminal function that depended explicitly on the electron-hole separation distance. The parameters of the explicitly correlated function were determined variationally at each field strength. The scaling of total exciton energy, exciton binding energy, and electron-hole recombination probability with respect to the strength of the electric field was investigated. It was found that a 500 kV/cm change in elect...

  10. Infrared Stark Effect Spectroscopy for Interface Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    system integrity. The adhesion of silica films to crystalline materials such as germanium and zinc selenide has been a problem, especially if the...importance. Examples include nonmetallic coatings or films on metal surfaces and reinforcement fibers in a variety of matrices. Thin films serve as...discuss the use of an epitaxially grown layer of silicon as an adhesion layer for structures consisting of a silica sol-gel film on a crystalline

  11. Stark spectroscopy of the light-harvesting complex II in different oligomerisation states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palacios, M.A.; Frese, R.N.; Gradinaru, C.C.; Stokkum, van I.H.M.; Premvardhan, L.L.; Horton, P.; Ruban, A.V.; Grondelle, van R.; Amerongen, van H.

    2003-01-01

    The electric field-induced absorption changes (Stark effect) of light-harvesting complex 11 (LHCII) in different oligomerisation states-monomeric, trimeric and aggregated-have been probed at 77 K. All the chlorophyll (Chl) a molecules exhibit electro-optic properties in the Q(y) absorption region ch

  12. Stark ladder in a one-dimensional quasiperiodic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niizeki, K.; Matsumura, A.

    1993-08-01

    We have investigated the effect of a uniform field F on the energy spectrum of the Harper model, which includes an irrational ω and the phase variable cphi as parameters. The energy levels Ei(cphi), iEopenZ, are periodic on cphi, Ei(cphi+1)=Ei(cphi), and form a two-dimensional (2D) pattern in the cphi-E plane. The pattern which we term a 2D Wannier-Stark ladder (2DWSL) has 2D periodicity because of the equalities Ei(cphi)=iF+E0(cphi+iω), i∈openZ . The energy spectrum is a vertical section of the 2DWSL through the specified cphi and represents a quasiperiodic WSL.

  13. Stark Widths of Spectral Lines of Neutral Neon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Milan S. Dimitrijević; Zoran Simić; Andjelka Kovačević; Aleksandar Valjarević; Sylvie Sahal-Bréchot

    2015-12-01

    In order to complete Stark broadening data for Ne I spectral lines which are needed for analysis of stellar atmospheres, collisional widths and shifts (the so-called Stark broadening parameters) of 29 isolated spectral lines of neutral neon have been determined within the impact semiclassical perturbation method. Calculations have been performed for the broadening by collisions with electrons, protons and ionized helium for astrophysical applications, and for collisions with ionized neon and argon for laboratory plasma diagnostics. The shifts have been compared with existing experimental values. The obtained data will be included in the STARK-B database, which is a part of the Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Center – VAMDC.

  14. Physician refer thyself: is Stark II, phase III the final voyage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; McMahon, Erin Brisbay

    2007-11-01

    , the Stark I prohibition on self-referrals by physicians expanded to include 10 additional healthcare services known as designated health services or DHS. The 1993 expansion of Stark I was enacted in 1995 as Stark II. In 2007, CMS adopted Phase III of the regulations interpreting Stark II. Phase III made multiple changes and clarified many previous issues, and it becomes effective December 4, 2007. While it is mandatory to obtain expert legal advice and this manuscript in no way provides the extensive navigation required through the maze of Stark laws and other anti-kickback statutes, it is incumbent on interventionalists in all settings of practice to have appropriate knowledge of the Stark laws and exceptions and of the anti-kickback statute and safe harbors. Penalties for violating the Stark laws are severe, including fines of up to dollars 15,000 per service and the economic threat of exclusion from participation in federal healthcare programs, which may result in exclusion of any type of healthcare program and loss of privileges at hospitals and surgery centers. This manuscript reviews physician practices in general, physician payments, and self-referral patterns in particular, the evolution of the Stark law and regulations and its implications for physician practices. This article is not, and should not be, construed as legal advice or an opinion on specific situations.

  15. Theoretical model for a Stark anomalous dispersion optical filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, B.; Shay, T. M.

    1993-01-01

    A theoretical model for the first atomic Stark anomalous dispersion optical filter is reported. The results show the filter may serve as a widely tunable narrow bandwidth and high throughput optical filter for freespace laser communications and remote sensing.

  16. Continuous ammonia monitor using a Stark microwave cavity resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uehara, H; Ijuuin, Y; Morino, Y; Kamidate, T; Nakamura, A; Imai, H

    1980-03-01

    An ammonia monitor has been made by using a rectangular Stark microwave cavity tightly coupled through an iris to a Gunn oscillator. The Stark electrode installed inside the cavity is provided with a 100 kHz sinusoidal modulation voltage and a dc sweep voltage. The oscillation of the Gunn diode is tuned with the coupled Stark cavity to a frequency near a J,K=3,3 transition (23870.1 MHz) of ammonia. By fixing the Stark dc bias to a voltage which gives a peak intensity of the derivative output of the electric-resonance signal, ammonia is continuously monitored. An extremely good long-term stability is obtained. The noise level corresponds to 0.08 ppm of ammonia.

  17. Slowing polar molecules using a wire Stark decelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Marian, Adela; Geng, Peter; Meijer, Gerard

    2010-01-01

    We have designed and implemented a new Stark decelerator based on wire electrodes, which is suitable for ultrahigh vacuum applications. The 100 deceleration stages are fashioned out of 0.6 mm diameter tantalum and the array's total length is 110 mm, approximately 10 times smaller than a conventional Stark decelerator with the same number of electrode pairs. Using the wire decelerator, we have removed more than 90% of the kinetic energy from metastable CO molecules in a beam.

  18. Solid state optical refrigeration using stark manifold resonances in crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seletskiy, Denis V.; Epstein, Richard; Hehlen, Markus P.; Sheik-Bahae, Mansoor

    2017-02-21

    A method and device for cooling electronics is disclosed. The device includes a doped crystal configured to resonate at a Stark manifold resonance capable of cooling the crystal to a temperature of from about 110K to about 170K. The crystal host resonates in response to input from an excitation laser tuned to exploit the Stark manifold resonance corresponding to the cooling of the crystal.

  19. Stark laws and fair market value exceptions: an introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebrasse, Paul B

    2007-01-01

    This article will focus on one aspect of complexity in modern healthcare, namely the implications of Stark laws and other fraud and abuse provisions, including anti-kickback statutes and HIPAA. Also, this article explores the prevalence of fair market value as an exception in the Stark laws and discusses the meanings of those exceptions. Finally, the article explores basic approaches to assessing fair market value, including cost, income, and marketing approaches.

  20. Theoretical study of quantum confined Stark shift in InAs/GaAs quantum dots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Ru-Hai; Shi Hong-Yan; Sun Xiu-Dong

    2004-01-01

    The quantum confined Stark effect (QCSE) of the self-assembled InAs/GaAs quantum dots has been investigated theoretically. The ground-state transition energies for quantum dots in the shape of a cube, pyramid or "truncated pyramid" are calculated and analysed. We use a method based on the Green function technique for calculating the strain in quantum dots and an efficient plane-wave envelope-function technique to determine the ground-state electronic structure of them with different shapes. The symmetry of quantum dots is broken by the effect of strain. So the properties of carriers show different behaviours from the traditional quantum device. Based on these results, we also calculate permanent built-in dipole moments and compare them with recent experimental data. Our results demonstrate that the measured Stark effect in self-assembled InAs/GaAs quantum dot structures can be explained by including linear grading.

  1. THE STARK EFFECT IN THE STIMULATED RAMAN SPECTRA (SRS) OF MOLECULE C2H2%C2H2分子受激Raman光谱中的光学Stark效应研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高文斌; 杨永德; 徐娙梅

    2002-01-01

    本文研究了C2H2分子受激Raman光谱(SRS)中的光学斯塔克(Stark)效应,同时还研究了激光功率以及单一转动态量子数J与Stark效应的关系.实验表明:C2H2分子在高强度激光电场作用下,它的SRS由于光学Stark效应产生明显的非对称加宽,利用Stark线型加宽数值模拟,从理论上计算了Raman光谱线型,与实验的SRS线型比较,二者符合程度相当好.

  2. Emotional effects of dynamic textures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toet, A.; Henselmans, M.; Lucassen, M.P.; Gevers, T.

    2011-01-01

    This study explores the effects of various spatiotemporal dynamic texture characteristics on human emotions. The emotional experience of auditory (eg, music) and haptic repetitive patterns has been studied extensively. In contrast, the emotional experience of visual dynamic textures is still largely

  3. Emotional Effects of Dynamic Textures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Toet

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the effects of various spatiotemporal dynamic texture characteristics on human emotions. The emotional experience of auditory (eg, music and haptic repetitive patterns has been studied extensively. In contrast, the emotional experience of visual dynamic textures is still largely unknown, despite their natural ubiquity and increasing use in digital media. Participants watched a set of dynamic textures, representing either water or various different media, and self-reported their emotional experience. Motion complexity was found to have mildly relaxing and nondominant effects. In contrast, motion change complexity was found to be arousing and dominant. The speed of dynamics had arousing, dominant, and unpleasant effects. The amplitude of dynamics was also regarded as unpleasant. The regularity of the dynamics over the textures' area was found to be uninteresting, nondominant, mildly relaxing, and mildly pleasant. The spatial scale of the dynamics had an unpleasant, arousing, and dominant effect, which was larger for textures with diverse content than for water textures. For water textures, the effects of spatial contrast were arousing, dominant, interesting, and mildly unpleasant. None of these effects were observed for textures of diverse content. The current findings are relevant for the design and synthesis of affective multimedia content and for affective scene indexing and retrieval.

  4. Stark Broadening Parameters for Neutral Oxygen Spectral Lines

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N. Alonizan; R. Qindeel; N. Ben Nessib; S. Sahal-Bréchot; Milan S. Dimitrijević

    2015-12-01

    Stark broadening parameters for nine neutral oxygen (O I) lines have been determined within the impact approximation and the semiclassical perturbation method. The atomic data have been taken from the TOPbase and NIST atomic databases. The electron and proton Stark widths and shifts and ion broadening parameter values for these O I lines have been calculated for electron density of 1016 cm$^{−3}$ and for 4 different electron temperatures in the range of 5000 K to 40000 K. These Stark broadening parameters are compared with our previous results (Ben Nessib, N. et al. 1996, Physica Scripta, 54, 603–613), where we calculated Stark broadening parameters for only four O I spectral lines and where Stark widths and shifts were compared with experimental and theoretical data available in the literature. In the present paper, we have also compared our results with the Griem's book (Griem, H. R. 1974, Spectral line broadening by plasmas) and VALD (Ryabchikova, T. et al. 2015, Physica Scripta, 90, 054005) values.

  5. Asymmetric Stark shift in an impurity doped dome-shaped quantum dot with wetting layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niculescu, E. C.; Cristea, M.; Bejan, D.

    2017-02-01

    The effects of vertical electric field and donor impurity on the electronic properties of the dome-shaped InAs/GaAs quantum dot coupled to its wetting layer were investigated. The dependence of the electron density, energy and Stark shift of the S-, P- and WL-states on the applied electric field was studied with and without impurity. The S- and P-states have no significant qualitative changes in the shape of the wave functions with increasing the electric field, except that they become slightly shifted due to the competition between the field action and the quantum confinement. The wave function of the WL-state is strongly modified in polarized structures. Our results reveal that the Stark shift of electron energies can be fitted with a quadratic dependence on the electric field, the linear and quadratic terms corresponding to the dipole moment and static electron polarizability. Their estimated values reasonable agree with those calculated.

  6. Laser Stripping via a Broad Stark State for a High-Intensity Proton Ring

    CERN Document Server

    Yamane, I; Takayama, K; Yamane, Isao; Suzuki, Toshikazu; Takayama, Ken

    2002-01-01

    A new type of charge-exchange injection scheme for high-intensity proton rings that use a laser beam and an undulator magnet is proposed. The elementary stripping process is resonant photoionization via a broad Stark state formed by the Stark effect at an energy level near the peak of the potential barrier. The method used to estimate the parameters of the necessary laser beam and magnetic field is described. As an application to an actual accelerator, a laser stripping system using a high-finesse Fabry-Perot resonator and an undulator is proposed. An estimation of the photon loss due to the pumping-up of H$^0$ atoms, tunability of the system and the emittance growth due to stripping in the undulator magnet is also given.

  7. Simple Analytic Formula for the Stark Recurrence Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Rueda, Heric; Jensen, R. V.; Wright, J. D.; Morgan, T. J.

    2001-05-01

    Characterization of the structure of the recurrence spectrum in a strong electric field has attracted recent experimental and theoretical attention [1, 2]. Theoretical approaches have included a purely quantum mechanical explanation based on the regularities in the Stark photoabsorption spectrum, a semiquantal approach focusing on quantized energy levels and semiclassical ideas using closed orbit theory. In the present work we have used the results of our previous study [2] to find simple analytic formula that can be used to obtain the structure of the Stark recurrence spectrum. Both peak locations and amplitudes for Stark recurrences are found to be in good agreement when compared with experimental data for Rydberg Helium m = 1 states. Work supported by the National Science Foundation. [1] V. Kondratovich and J. Delos, Phys. Rev. A 57, 4604 (1998) [2] R. V. Jensen, H. Flores-Rueda, J. D. Wright, M. L. Keeler and T. J. Morgan, Phys. Rev. A 62, 53410 (2000)

  8. A Simultaneous Discovery: The Case of Johannes Stark and Antonino Lo Surdo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Matteo; Paoletti, Alessandro; Robotti, Nadia

    2004-09-01

    In 1913 the German physicist Johannes Stark (1874 1957) and the Italian physicist Antonino Lo Surdo (1880 1949)discovered virtually simultaneously and independently that hydrogen spectral lines are split into components by an external electric field. Both of their discoveries ensued from studies on the same phenomenon, the Doppler effect in canal rays, but they arose in different theoretical contexts. Stark had been working within the context of the emerging quantum theory, following a research program aimed at studying the effect of an electric field on spectral lines. Lo Surdo had been working within the context of the classical theory, and his was an accidental discovery. Both discoveries, however, played important roles in the history of physics: Stark’s discovery contributed to the establishment of both the old and the new quantum theories; Lo Surdo’s discovery led Antonio Garbasso (1871 1933)to introduce research on the quantum theory into Italian physics. Ironically, soon after their discoveries, both Stark and Lo Surdo rejected developments in modern physics and allied themselves with the political and racial programs of Hitler and Mussolini.

  9. Graphene mediated Stark shifting of quantum dot energy levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnischtzke, Laura; Goodfellow, Kenneth M.; Chakraborty, Chitraleema; Lai, Yi-Ming; Fält, Stefan; Wegscheider, Werner; Badolato, Antonio; Vamivakas, A. Nick

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate an optoelectronic device comprised of single InAs quantum dots in an n-i-Schottky diode where graphene has been used as the Schottky contact. Deterministic electric field tuning is shown using Stark-shifted micro-photoluminescence from single quantum dots. The extracted dipole moments from the Stark shifts are comparable to conventional devices where the Schottky contact is a semi-transparent metal. Neutral and singly charged excitons are also observed in the well-known Coulomb-blockade plateaus. Our results indicate that graphene is a suitable replacement for metal contacts in quantum dot devices which require electric field control.

  10. On the Stark Broadening of Lu III Spectral Lines

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zlatko Majlinger; Zoran Simić; Milan S. Dimitrijević

    2015-12-01

    The electron-impact widths for 27 Lu III spectral lines have been calculated by using the modified semiempirical method. Calculations have been also performed with the published relativistic Hartree-Fock oscillator strengths and additionally, with the approximate formula of Cowley.With the obtained results, the influence of Stark broadening on Lu III lines was investigated in the spectra of A-type stars. The obtained data will be included in the STARK-B database, which is part of the Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Center – VAMDC.

  11. Probing the effect of the binding site on the electrostatic behavior of a series of carotenoids reconstituted into the light-harvesting 1 complex from purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum detected by stark spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Katsunori; Suzuki, Satoru; Fujii, Ritsuko; Gardiner, Alastair T; Cogdell, Richard J; Nango, Mamoru; Hashimoto, Hideki

    2008-08-01

    Reconstitutions of the LH1 complexes from the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum S1 were performed with a range of carotenoid molecules having different numbers of C=C conjugated double bonds. Since, as we showed previously, some of the added carotenoids tended to aggregate and then to remain with the reconstituted LH1 complexes (Nakagawa, K.; Suzuki, S.; Fujii, R.; Gardiner, A.T.; Cogdell, R.J.; Nango, M.; Hashimoto, H. Photosynth. Res. 2008, 95, 339-344), a further purification step using a sucrose density gradient centrifugation was introduced to improve purity of the final reconstituted sample. The measured absorption, fluorescence-excitation, and Stark spectra of the LH1 complex reconstituted with spirilloxanthin were identical with those obtained with the native, spirilloxanthin-containing, LH1 complex of Rs. rubrum S1. This shows that the electrostatic environments surrounding the carotenoid and bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a) molecules in both of these LH1 complexes were essentially the same. In the LH1 complexes reconstituted with either rhodopin or spheroidene, however, the wavelength maximum at the BChl a Qy absorption band was slightly different to that of the native LH1 complexes. These differences in the transition energy of the BChl a Qy absorption band can be explained using the values of the nonlinear optical parameters of this absorption band, i.e., the polarizability change Tr(Deltaalpha) and the static dipole-moment change |Deltamu| upon photoexcitation, as determined using Stark spectroscopy. The local electric field around the BChl a in the native LH1 complex (ES) was determined to be approximately 3.0x10(6) V/cm. Furthermore, on the basis of the values of the nonlinear optical parameters of the carotenoids in the reconstituted LH1 complexes, it is possible to suggest that the conformations of carotenoids, anhydrorhodovibrin and spheroidene, in the LH1 complex were similar to that of rhodopin glucoside in crystal structure of

  12. Measurement of the DC Stark shift for visible NeI lines and electric field distribution in the cathode sheath of an abnormal glow discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanović, N. V.; Šišović, N. M.; Spasojević, Dj; Konjević, N.

    2017-03-01

    We present the results of an experimental study of the DC Stark shift for seven visible NeI lines in the plane cathode sheath region of an abnormal glow discharge operated in neon with a small admixture of hydrogen. The electric field (up to 13.4 kV cm‑1) in the cathode sheath region is measured from the π-polarized profile of the H alpha line of hydrogen using the Stark polarization spectroscopy technique. Within the realized range of the electric field, the NeI lines exhibit a quadratic Stark effect. The values of coefficients, correlating Stark shift and electric field strength, were determined, enabling their future use for unknown electric field strength measurements. Among the studied lines, so far only the Stark effect analysis of the NeI 511.367 nm line has been reported, in which case our results are in good agreement with the best fit formula proposed by Jäger and Windholz (1984 Phys. Scr. 29 344) for one out of three Stark components detected under our experimental conditions.

  13. Stark Shifts of the Visible Absorption Systems of the NO2- Ion in NaNO2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyling, Jan H.; Wiersma, Douwe A.

    1977-01-01

    Stark effect measurements on the lowest triplet and singlet transitions of the nitrite ion show that the change of dipole moment on excitation is very small (ca. 0.30 D) and of opposite sign for the two states. The dipole moment change in the triplet manifold is also found to distinctly depend on vi

  14. Stark-induced resonances in the photoionization of hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glab, W.L.; Nayfeh, M.H.

    1985-01-01

    We report the first observation of electric-field-induced resonances in the multistep photoionization of hydrogen. Asymmetric profiles having blue wings are observed near the photoionization limit resulting from tunneling across the Stark-Coulomb combined potential (shape resonance). We measured the dependence of the spacing of the resonances on the electric field strength.

  15. On the Application of Stark Broadening Data Determined with a Semiclassical Perturbation Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan S. Dimitrijević

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The significance of Stark broadening data for problems in astrophysics, physics, as well as for technological plasmas is discussed and applications of Stark broadening parameters calculated using a semiclassical perturbation method are analyzed.

  16. Order effects in dynamic semantics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graben, Peter Beim

    2014-01-01

    In their target article, Wang and Busemeyer (2013) discuss question order effects in terms of incompatible projectors on a Hilbert space. In a similar vein, Blutner recently presented an orthoalgebraic query language essentially relying on dynamic update semantics. Here, I shall comment on some interesting analogies between the different variants of dynamic semantics and generalized quantum theory to illustrate other kinds of order effects in human cognition, such as belief revision, the resolution of anaphors, and default reasoning that result from the crucial non-commutativity of mental operations upon the belief state of a cognitive agent.

  17. Quantum mechanical calculation of electric fields and vibrational Stark shifts at active site of human aldose reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xianwei [Center for Optics and Optoelectronics Research, College of Science, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310023 (China); State Key Laboratory of Precision Spectroscopy, Institute of Theoretical and Computational Science, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China); Zhang, John Z. H.; He, Xiao, E-mail: xiaohe@phy.ecnu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Precision Spectroscopy, Institute of Theoretical and Computational Science, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China); NYU-ECNU Center for Computational Chemistry at NYU Shanghai, Shanghai 200062 (China)

    2015-11-14

    Recent advance in biophysics has made it possible to directly measure site-specific electric field at internal sites of proteins using molecular probes with C = O or C≡N groups in the context of vibrational Stark effect. These measurements directly probe changes of electric field at specific protein sites due to, e.g., mutation and are very useful in protein design. Computational simulation of the Stark effect based on force fields such as AMBER and OPLS, while providing good insight, shows large errors in comparison to experimental measurement due to inherent difficulties associated with point charge based representation of force fields. In this study, quantum mechanical calculation of protein’s internal electrostatic properties and vibrational Stark shifts was carried out by using electrostatically embedded generalized molecular fractionation with conjugate caps method. Quantum calculated change of mutation-induced electric field and vibrational Stark shift is reported at the internal probing site of enzyme human aldose reductase. The quantum result is in much better agreement with experimental data than those predicted by force fields, underscoring the deficiency of traditional point charge models describing intra-protein electrostatic properties.

  18. Quantum mechanical calculation of electric fields and vibrational Stark shifts at active site of human aldose reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xianwei; Zhang, John Z H; He, Xiao

    2015-11-14

    Recent advance in biophysics has made it possible to directly measure site-specific electric field at internal sites of proteins using molecular probes with C = O or C≡N groups in the context of vibrational Stark effect. These measurements directly probe changes of electric field at specific protein sites due to, e.g., mutation and are very useful in protein design. Computational simulation of the Stark effect based on force fields such as AMBER and OPLS, while providing good insight, shows large errors in comparison to experimental measurement due to inherent difficulties associated with point charge based representation of force fields. In this study, quantum mechanical calculation of protein's internal electrostatic properties and vibrational Stark shifts was carried out by using electrostatically embedded generalized molecular fractionation with conjugate caps method. Quantum calculated change of mutation-induced electric field and vibrational Stark shift is reported at the internal probing site of enzyme human aldose reductase. The quantum result is in much better agreement with experimental data than those predicted by force fields, underscoring the deficiency of traditional point charge models describing intra-protein electrostatic properties.

  19. Dynamical Franz-Keldysh Effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jauho, Antti-Pekka; Johnsen, Kristinn

    1996-01-01

    We introduce and analyze the properties of dynamical Franz-Keldysh effect, i.e., the change of density of states, or absorption spectra, of semiconductors under the influence of time-dependent electric fields. In the case of a harmonic time dependence, we predict the occurrence of significant fine...

  20. Effects of Curvature on Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Dutta, Gautam

    2010-01-01

    In this article we discuss the effect of curvature on dynamics when a physical system moves adiabatically in a curved space. These effects give a way to measure the curvature of the space intrinsically without referring to higher dimensional space. Two interesting examples, the Foucault Pendulum and the perihelion shift of planetary orbits, are presented in a simple geometric way. A paper model is presented to see the perihelion shift.

  1. A Robust Ramsey Interferometer for Atomic Timekeeping in Dynamic Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotru, Krish; Brown, Justin; Butts, David; Choy, Jennifer; Galfond, Marissa; Johnson, David M.; Kinast, Joseph; Timmons, Brian; Stoner, Richard

    2014-05-01

    We present a laser-based approach to atomic timekeeping, in which atomic phase information is extracted using modified Raman pulses in a Ramsey sequence. We overcome systematic effects associated with differential AC Stark shifts by employing atom optics derived from Raman adiabatic rapid passage (ARP). ARP drives coherent transfer between two hyperfine ground states by sweeping the frequency difference of two optical fields and maintaining a large single-photon detuning. Compared to resonant, pulsed Raman transitions, ARP atom optics afford a >150x reduction in sensitivity to differential AC Stark shifts in a Ramsey interferometer. We also demonstrate that ARP preserves fringe contrast in Ramsey interferometers for cloud displacements reaching the 1/e2 intensity radius of the laser beam. ARP can thus be expected to improve the robustness of clock interferometers operating in dynamic environments. Copyright ©2014 by The Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Atom-interferometric measurement of Stark level splittings

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Limei; Zhang, Linjie; Raithel, Georg; Zhao, Jianming; Jia, Suotang

    2015-01-01

    Multiple adiabatic/diabatic passages through avoided crossings in the Stark map of cesium Rydberg atoms are employed as beam splitters and recombiners in an atom-interferometric measurement of energy-level splittings. We subject cold cesium atoms to laser-excitation, electric-field and detection sequences that constitute an (internal-state) atom interferometer. For the read-out of the interferometer we utilize state-dependent collisions, which selectively remove atoms of one kind from the detected signal. We investigate the dependence of the interferometric signal on timing and field parameters, and find good agreement with time-dependent quantum simulations of the interferometer. Fourier analysis of the interferometric signals yield coherence frequencies that agree with corresponding energy-level differences in calculated Stark maps. The method enables spectroscopy of states that are inaccessible to direct laser-spectroscopic observation, due to selection rules, and has applications in field metrology.

  3. Measured Stark widths and shifts in the O IV spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đeniže Stevan

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Stark widths (W and shifts (d of 5 prominent triply ionized oxygen (O IV spectral lines in 3 multiplets have been measured in oxygen plasma at 42 000 K electron temperature using a linear, low-pressure, pulsed arc discharge as an optically thin plasma source. Obtained W and d values have been compared to available experimental and theoretical data. We found a good agreement among our experimental W and d values and theoretical expectations.

  4. Measurement and numerical calculation of Rubidium Rydberg Stark spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Grimmel, Jens; Karlewski, Florian; Jessen, Florian; Reinschmidt, Malte; Sándor, Nóra; Fortágh, József

    2015-01-01

    We report on the measurement of Stark shifted energy levels of $^{87}$Rb Rydberg atoms in static electric fields by means of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). Electric field strengths of up to 500V/cm, ranging beyond the classical ionisation threshold, were applied using electrodes inside a glass cell with rubidium vapour. Stark maps for principal quantum numbers $n=35$ and $n=70$ have been obtained with high signal-to-noise ratio for comparison with results from ab initio calculations following the method described in [M. L. Zimmerman et al., Phys. Rev. A 20, 2251 (1979)], which was originally only verified for states around $n=15$. We also calculate the dipole matrix elements between low-lying states and Stark shifted Rydberg states to give a theoretical estimate of the relative strength of the EIT signal. The present work significantly extends the experimental verification of this numerical method in the range of both high principal quantum numbers and high electric fields with an accuracy of...

  5. Dynamical effects in electron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Jianqiang Sky, E-mail: jianqiang.zhou@polytechnique.edu; Reshetnyak, Igor; Giorgetti, Christine; Sottile, Francesco; Reining, Lucia [Laboratoire des Solides Irradiés, École Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA-DSM-IRAMIS, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91128 Palaiseau (France); Kas, J. J.; Rehr, J. J. [Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-1560 (United States); Sponza, Lorenzo [Department of Physics, King’s College London, London WC2R 2LS (United Kingdom); Guzzo, Matteo [Institut für Physik und IRIS Adlershof, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Gatti, Matteo [Laboratoire des Solides Irradiés, École Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA-DSM-IRAMIS, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91128 Palaiseau (France); Synchrotron SOLEIL, L’Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin, BP 48, F-91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2015-11-14

    One of the big challenges of theoretical condensed-matter physics is the description, understanding, and prediction of the effects of the Coulomb interaction on materials properties. In electronic spectra, the Coulomb interaction causes a renormalization of energies and change of spectral weight. Most importantly, it can lead to new structures, often called satellites. These can be linked to the coupling of excitations, also termed dynamical effects. State-of-the-art methods in the framework of many-body perturbation theory, in particular, the widely used GW approximation, often fail to describe satellite spectra. Instead, approaches based on a picture of electron-boson coupling such as the cumulant expansion are promising for the description of plasmon satellites. In this work, we give a unified derivation of the GW approximation and the cumulant expansion for the one-body Green’s function. Using the example of bulk sodium, we compare the resulting spectral functions both in the valence and in the core region, and we discuss the dispersion of quasi-particles and satellites. We show that self-consistency is crucial to obtain meaningful results, in particular, at large binding energies. Very good agreement with experiment is obtained when the intrinsic spectral function is corrected for extrinsic and interference effects. Finally, we sketch how one can approach the problem in the case of the two-body Green’s function, and we discuss the cancellation of various dynamical effects that occur in that case.

  6. Laser-induced plasma electron number density: Stark broadening method versus the Saha-Boltzmann equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnab, Sarkar; Manjeet, Singh

    2017-02-01

    We report spectroscopic studies on plasma electron number density of laser-induced plasma produced by ns-Nd:YAG laser light pulses on an aluminum sample in air at atmospheric pressure. The effect of different laser energy and the effect of different laser wavelengths were compared. The experimentally observed line profiles of neutral aluminum have been used to extract the excitation temperature using the Boltzmann plot method, whereas the electron number density has been determined from the Stark broadened as well as using the Saha-Boltzmann equation (SBE). Each approach was also carried out by using the Al emission line and Mg emission lines. It was observed that the SBE method generated a little higher electron number density value than the Stark broadening method, but within the experimental uncertainty range. Comparisons of N e determined by the two methods show the presence of a linear relation which is independent of laser energy or laser wavelength. These results show the applicability of the SBE method for N e determination, especially when the system does not have any pure emission lines whose electron impact factor is known. Also use of Mg lines gives superior results than Al lines.

  7. Spin-exchange collision mixing of the K and Rb ac Stark shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yao; Quan, Wei; Duan, Lihong; Lu, Yan; Jiang, Liwei; Fang, Jiancheng

    2016-11-01

    In a hybrid pumping alkali-metal vapor cell filled with both K and Rb atoms, the K atom spins are optically pumped by the laser and the Rb atom spins are polarized by the K spins through spin exchange. We discovered that the ac Stark shift of the Rb atom spins, caused by the far-off-resonant pumping laser tuned to the K absorption lines, was mixed together with the ac Stark shift of the K atom spins through fast spin exchange. This mixing is studied and we demonstrate a K-Rb-21Ne comagnetometer in which the ac Stark shift of the Rb atom spins is eliminated by compensating for the Rb ac Stark shift with the K ac Stark shift. An ac Stark shift elimination method has been developed.

  8. Effect of Conductor Verbalization, Dynamic Markings, Conductor Gesture, and Choir Dynamic Level on Singers' Dynamic Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skadsem, Julie A.

    1997-01-01

    Examines the effects of conductor verbalization, dynamic markings, conductor gesture, and choir dynamic level on individual singers' dynamic responses. Indicates that verbal instructions from the conductor elicited significantly stronger dynamic performance responses than did the other instructional conditions. Suggests that additional research…

  9. Spectroscopie rovibrationnelle de l'éthylène : Effet Stark : Application à l'éthylène dans les zéolithes

    OpenAIRE

    Sanzharov, Maxim

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this report is to present a study as complete as possible of the Stark effect in the asymmetric top molecules of X2Y4 type possessing the D2h symmetry group and to apply it to the problem of the spectroscopy of the ethylene molecule trapped in a zeolite. For the first time, a tensorial formalism adapted to the study of the Stark effect for the O(3) D2h group chain was developed. In parallel, a computer package was worked out as a new generation of software called D2hTDS-ST us...

  10. Quantum Superlattices, Wannier Stark Ladders and the 'Resonance' technique

    CERN Document Server

    Papageorgiou, C D; Raptis, T E

    2016-01-01

    We present a new method for solving the Schrodinger equation using the Lossless Transmission Line Model (LTL). The LTL model although extensively used in fiber optics and optical fiber design, it has not yet found application in solid state problems. We develop the transformation theory mapping the wave equation to LTL and we apply the model to the case of a solid state periodic lattice. We extend the theory with an additional Wannier-Stark term and we show with results the flexibility and the strength of the technique. The advantages of the method for arbitrary potentials are also stressed.

  11. Precise dipole moment of methanol by microwave Stark spectroscopy III: Parent 12CH316OH species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Indra; Sastry, K. V. L. N.

    2015-06-01

    In this work, precise Stark effect measurements have been carried out on several transitions in the first four torsional states of methanol. The Stark shifted transition frequencies for a wide range of steady electric field have been measured with an accuracy of approximately ±10 kHz. Detailed analysis of the data allowed for the determination of the dipole moment components in the first four torsional states of the ground vibrational state. The extrapolated zero field frequencies of the transitions studied have been determined and found to be in perfect agreement with known values. For the torsional ground state the values of μa = 0.8961(2) and μb = 1.4201(9) have been obtained, whereas for the first excited torsional state the corresponding values obtained are 0.9035(1) and 1.4317(5) (These values are in Debye, denoted by D). These values confirm the fact that the dipole moment values increase at a considerable rate as one move toward higher torsional states as seen in previous studies. To our knowledge, this is the first time the most accurate and elaborate dipole moment values of methanol are being reported.

  12. On the Stark broadening of Cr VI spectral lines in astrophysical plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrijević, M. S.; Simić, Z.; Sahal-Bréchot, S.

    2017-02-01

    Stark broadening parameters for Cr VI lines have been calculated using semiclassical perturbation method for conditions of interest for stellar plasma. Here are presented, as an example of obtained results, Stark broadening parameters for electron- and proton-impact broadening for Cr VI 4s 2S-4p 2P° λ = 1430 Å and Cr VI 4p 2P°-5s 2S λ = 611.8 Å multiplets. The obtained results are used to demonstrate the importance of Stark broadening of Cr VI in DO white dwarf atmospheres. Also the obtained results will enter in STARK-B database which is included in Virtual Atomic and Molecula Data Center - VAMDC.

  13. Optical Stark Spectroscopy of Chloro-Methylene HCCl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Xiujuan; Steimle, Timothy C.; Wang, Zhong

    2011-06-01

    The optical spectrum of chloro-methylene, HCCl, has been studied for more than 40 years by both conventional and laser-based spectroscopy. Surprisingly, numerous visible bands have yet to be characterized, due in part to known perturbations. Furthermore, the permanent electric dipole moment, μEl, for any state has yet to be determined. Here we report on the field-free and optical Stark spectrum of the tilde{A}1A'' (060)- tilde{X}1A '(000) band system. A cold molecular beam sample was produced by skimming the output of a pulsed discharge source and the spectrum recorded at a resolution of approximately 30 MHz via LIF detection. The field-free spectrum was analyzed to produce an improved set of spectroscopic parameters for the tilde{A}1A''(060)state. The Stark induced shifts were analyzed to determine the values of the a-component of μEl for the tilde{X}1A^ {'}(000)state of 0.498(8)D. Small perturbations in the tilde{A}1A''(060)state will be described. A. J. Merer and D.N. Travis Can. J. Phys., 44, 525 1966. M.Kakimoto, S.Saito and E. Hirota J.Mol.Spectrosc., 97, 194 1983. B.-C.Chang and T. Sears J.Mol.Spectrosc., 173, 391 1995. H. Fan, I. Ionescu, C. Annesley, J. Cummins, M. Bowers and S. A. Reid J.Mol.Spectrosc., 225, 43 2004.

  14. Balancer effects in opinion dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Cheon, Taksu

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a novel type of contrarian agent, the balancer, to Galam model of opinion dynamics, in order to account for the skepticism over one-sidedness and for the sense of fairness. We find that the inclusion of balancers along with floaters and inflexibles brings about a critical point on parametric plane of the dynamical system, which results in the new kind of stable final states of the opinion dynamics, that seem to capture several intriguing features found often in mature democracies.

  15. Rydberg-Stark deceleration of atoms and molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Hogan, Stephen D

    2016-01-01

    The large electric dipole moments associated with highly excited Rydberg states of atoms and molecules make gas-phase samples in these states very well suited to deceleration and trapping using inhomogeneous electric fields. The methods of Rydberg-Stark deceleration with which this can be achieved are reviewed here. Using these techniques, the longitudinal motion of beams of atoms and molecules moving at speeds as high as 2500~m/s have been manipulated, with changes in kinetic energy of up to $|\\Delta E_{\\mathrm{kin}}|=1.3\\times10^{-20}$~J ($|\\Delta E_{\\mathrm{kin}}|/e=80$~meV or $|\\Delta E_{\\mathrm{kin}}|/hc=650$~cm$^{-1}$) achieved, while decelerated and trapped samples with number densities of $10^6$--$10^7$~cm$^{-3}$ and translational temperatures of $\\sim150$~mK have been prepared. Applications of these samples in areas of research at the interface between physics and physical chemistry are discussed.

  16. Stark absorption spectroscopy of peridinin and allene-modified analogues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusumoto, Toshiyuki; Horibe, Tomoko [Department of Physics and CREST-JST, Graduated School of Science, Osaka City University, 3-3-138 Sugimoto, Sumiyoshi-ku, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Kajikawa, Takayuki; Hasegawa, Shinji [Department of Chemistry, School of Science and Technology, Kwansei Gakuin University, Gakuen 2-1, Sanda, Hyogo 669-1337 (Japan); Iwashita, Takashi [Suntory Institute for Bioorganic Research, Wakayamadai 1-1-1, Shimamoto, Mishimagunn, Osaka 618-8503 (Japan); Cogdell, Richard J. [Glasgow Biomedical Research Centre, University of Glasgow, 120 University Place, Glasgow G12 8QQ, Scotland (United Kingdom); Birge, Robert R.; Frank, Harry A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Connecticut, 55 North Eagleville Road, Storrs, CT 06269-3060 (United States); Katsumura, Shigeo [Department of Chemistry, School of Science and Technology, Kwansei Gakuin University, Gakuen 2-1, Sanda, Hyogo 669-1337 (Japan); Hashimoto, Hideki, E-mail: hassy@sci.osaka-cu.ac.jp [Department of Physics and CREST-JST, Graduated School of Science, Osaka City University, 3-3-138 Sugimoto, Sumiyoshi-ku, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan)

    2010-07-19

    Stark absorption spectra of peridinin (Per) and five allene-modified analogues and their angular dependence as a function of an externally applied electric field were measured in methyl methacrylate polymer at 77 K. In all cases, the energetically lowest absorption band has a significant change of static dipole-moment upon photoexcitation ({Delta}{mu}). In particular, Per has the largest value of |{Delta}{mu}|. The angles between {Delta}{mu} and the transition dipole-moment of all the analogues were determined. It is suggested that the allene group in Per plays a key role as the electron donor in the charge transfer process following photoexcitation. The results of MNDO-PSDCI calculations support this idea.

  17. Parasitic Effects on Memristor Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Makoto; Chua, Leon O.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we show that parasitic elements have a significant effect on the dynamics of memristor circuits. We first show that certain 2-terminal elements such as memristors, memcapacitors, and meminductors can be used as nonvolatile memories, if the principle of conservation of state variables hold by open-circuiting, or short-circuiting, their terminals. We also show that a passive memristor with a strictly-increasing constitutive relation will eventually lose its stored flux when we switch off the power if there is a parasitic capacitance across the memristor. Similarly, a memcapacitor (resp., meminductor) with a positive memcapacitance (resp., meminductance) will eventually lose their stored physical states when we switch off the power, if it is connected to a parasitic resistance. We then show that the discontinuous jump that circuit engineers assumed to occur at impasse points of memristor circuits contradicts the principles of conservation of charge and flux at the time of the discontinuous jump. A parasitic element can be used to break an impasse point, resulting in the emergence of a continuous oscillation in the circuit. We also define a distance, a diameter, and a dimension, for each circuit element in order to measure the complexity order of the parasitic elements. They can be used to find higher-order parasitic elements which can break impasse points. Furthermore, we derived a memristor-based Chua’s circuit from a three-element circuit containing a memristor by connecting two parasitic memcapacitances to break the impasse points. We finally show that a higher-order parasitic element can be used for breaking the impasse points on two-dimensional and three-dimensional constrained spaces.

  18. Wannier-Stark localization and terahertz electroluminescence of natural SiC superlattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sankin, V. I.; Andrianov, A. V.; Petrov, A. G.; Zakhar' in, A. O. [A.F. Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, 194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-04

    We report on efficient terahertz electroluminescence in the region of 1.5-2 THz from high electric field biased 6H-SiC n{sup +}−n{sup −}−n{sup +} structures with a natural superlattice at 7 K. The properties of the terahertz emission allow it to be attributed to spontaneous radiation resulting from electron Bloch oscillations in SiC natural superlattice. The use of the unique object, namely, natural superlattice of SiC allowed us to demonstrate a whole series of remarkable effects of Wannier-Stark localization and to get the intensive terahertz emission under steady-state electrical excitation of Bloch oscillations.

  19. DYNAMIC EFFECTIVE SHEAR STRENGTH OF SATURATED SAND

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵生俊; 谢定义

    2002-01-01

    The dynamic effective shear strength of saturated sand under cyclic loading is discussed in this paper. The discussion includes the transient time dependency behaviors based on the analysis of the results obtained in conventional cyclic triaxial tests and cyclic torsional shear triaxial tests. It has been found that the dynamic effective shear strength is composed of effective frictional resistance and viscous resistance, which are characterized by the strain rate dependent feature of strength magnitude, the coupling of consolidation stress with cyclic stress and the dependency of time needed to make the soil strength suffciently mobilized, and can also be expressed by the extended Mohr-Coulomb's law. The two strength parameters of the dynamic effective internal frictional angle φd and the dynamic viscosity coefficient η are determined. The former is unvaried for different number of cyclic loading, dynamic stress form and consolidation stress ratio. And the later is unvaried for the different dynamic shear strain rate γt developed during the sand liquefaction, but increases with the increase of initial density of sand. The generalization of dynamic effective stress strength criterion in the 3-dimensional effective stress space is studied in detail for the purpose of its practical use.

  20. Schwinger's Dynamical Casimir Effect Bulk Energy Contribution

    CERN Document Server

    Carlson, C E; Pérez-Mercader, J; Visser, M; Carlson, C E; Carlson, Carl E.; Molina-Paris, Carmen; Perez-Mercader, Juan; Visser, Matt

    1997-01-01

    Schwinger's Dynamical Casimir Effect is one of several candidate explanations for sonoluminescence. Recently, several papers have claimed that Schwinger's estimate of the Casimir energy involved is grossly inaccurate. In this letter, we show that these calculations omit the crucial volume term. When the missing term is correctly included one finds full agreement with Schwinger's result for the Dynamical Casimir Effect. We have nothing new to say about sonoluminescence itself except to affirm that the Casimir effect is energetically adequate as a candidate explanation. Schwinger's Dynamical Casimir Effect is one of several candidate explanations for sonoluminescence. Recently, several papers have claimed that Schwinger's estimate of the Casimir energy involved is grossly inaccurate. In this letter, we show that these calculations omit the crucial volume term. When the missing term is correctly included one finds full agreement with Schwinger's result for the Dynamical Casimir Effect. We have nothing new to say...

  1. Dynamical 3-Space Gravitational Waves: Reverberation Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Cahill, Reginald T

    2012-01-01

    Gravity theory missed a key dynamical process that became apparent only when expressed in terms of a velocity field, instead of the Newtonian gravitational acceleration field. This dynamical process involves an additional self-interaction of the dynamical 3-space, and experimental data reveals that its strength is set by the fine structure constant, implying a fundamental link between gravity and quantum theory. The dynamical 3-space has been directly detected in numerous light-speed anisotropy experiments. Quantum matter has been shown to exhibit an acceleration caused by the time-dependence and inhomogeneity of the 3-space flow, giving the first derivation of gravity from a deeper theory, as a quantum wave refraction effect. EM radiation is also refracted in a similar manner. The anisotropy experiments have all shown 3-space wave/turbulence effects, with the latest revealing the fractal structure of 3-space. Here we report the prediction of a new effect, namely a reverberation effect, when the gravitational...

  2. Rydberg-Stark deceleration of atoms and molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogan, Stephen D. [University College London, Department of Physics and Astronomy, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-12-15

    The large electric dipole moments associated with highly excited Rydberg states of atoms and molecules make gas-phase samples in these states very well suited to deceleration and trapping using inhomogeneous electric fields. The methods of Rydberg-Stark deceleration with which this can be achieved are reviewed here. Using these techniques, the longitudinal motion of beams of atoms and molecules moving at speeds as high as 2500 m/s have been manipulated, with changes in kinetic energy of up to vertical stroke ΔE{sub kin} vertical stroke = 1.3 x 10{sup -20} J (vertical stroke ΔE{sub kin} vertical stroke /e = 80 meV or vertical stroke ΔE{sub kin} vertical stroke /hc = 650 cm{sup -1}) achieved, while decelerated and trapped samples with number densities of 10{sup 6}-10{sup 7} cm{sup -3} and translational temperatures of ∝150 mK have been prepared. Applications of these samples in areas of research at the interface between physics and physical chemistry are discussed. (orig.)

  3. The STARK-B database as a resource for \\textquotedblleft STARK" widths and shifts data: State of advancement and program of development

    CERN Document Server

    Sahal-Bréchot, Sylvie; Moreau, Nicolas; Nessib, Nabil Ben

    2013-01-01

    \\textquotedblleft Stark" broadening theories and calculations have been extensively developed for about 50 years and can now be applied to many needs, especially for accurate spectroscopic diagnostics and modeling. This requires the knowledge of numerous collisional line profiles. Nowadays, the access to such data via an online database becomes essential. STARK-B is a collaborative project between the Astronomical Observatory of Belgrade and the Laboratoire d'\\'Etude du Rayonnement et de la mati\\`ere en Astrophysique (LERMA). It is a database of calculated widths and shifts of isolated lines of atoms and ions due to electron and ion collisions (impacts). It is devoted to modeling and spectroscopic diagnostics of stellar atmospheres and envelopes, laboratory plasmas, laser equipments and technological plasmas. Hence, the domain of temperatures and densities covered by the tables is wide and depends on the ionization degree of the considered ion. STARK-B has been fully opened since September 2008 and is in free...

  4. Effects of Cohesion On the Dynamic Response of A Conical Bead Pile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palchoudhuri, Paroma; Lehman, Susan; Jacobs, D. T.

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the critical behavior of a 3D conical bead pile built from uniform 3 mm steel spheres. The pile is initially built on a circular base and is subsequently slowly driven through the addition of one bead at a time to the apex of the pile. We investigate the dynamic response of the pile by recording avalanches from the pile over the course of tens of thousands of bead drops, and determining the resulting distribution of avalanche size. In previous work, we have shown that dropping the beads onto the pile from a greater height causes the distribution to deviate from a simple power law due to a stark reduction in number of the largest avalanches. By placing the pile in a uniform magnetic field, we are now observing changes in the avalanche size distribution due to cohesion. When there is cohesion between beads, we find an increase in probability for the largest avalanches and a strong decrease in the probability of medium-sized avalanches. We also observe an increase in the time between avalanches as the cohesion of the system increases. Preliminary results on the effect of simultaneously increasing cohesion, which tends to make large avalanches more probable, and increasing drop height, which tends to make large avalanches less probable, will also be presented.

  5. Stark Broadening of in III Lines in Astrophysical and Laboratory Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Simic, Z; Kovacevic, A B; Sahal-Brechot, S

    2012-01-01

    Besides the need of Stark broadening parameters for a number of problems in physics, and plasma technology, in hot star atmospheres the conditions exist where Stark widths are comparable and even larger than the thermal Doppler widths. Using the semiclassical perturbation method we investigated here the influence of collisions with charged particles for In III spectral lines. We determined a number of Stark broadening parameters important for the investigation of plasmas in the atmospheres of A-type stars and white dwarfs. Also, we have compared the obtained results with existing experimental data. The results will be included in the STARK-B database, the Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Center and the Serbian Virtual Observatory.

  6. Examining the impact of the new Stark rules on joint ventures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washlick, John R

    2008-11-01

    The new Stark rules will affect joint ventures involving physicians and hospitals in four primary areas: Services provided "under arrangement". "Per click" lease arrangements. Percentage-based compensation. "Stand-in-the-shoes" provisions.

  7. Spin exchange collision mixing of the K and Rb ac Stark shifts

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Yao; Fang, Jiancheng

    2016-01-01

    In a hybrid pumping alkali vapor cell that both K and Rb are filled, K atom spins are optically pumped by laser and Rb atom spins are polarized by the K spins through spin exchange. We find that the AC Stark shift of the Rb atoms is composed of not only the AC Stark shift of the Rb atoms caused by the far off resonant pumping laser which is tuned to the K absorption lines, but also the AC Stark shift of the K atom spins. The mixing of the light shifts through fast spin exchange between K and Rb atoms are studied in this paper and we demonstrate a K-Rb-21Ne co-magnetometer in which the AC Stark shift of the Rb atoms are reduced by the collision mixing.

  8. Optimizing the Stark-decelerator beamline for the trapping of cold molecules using evolutionary strategies

    CERN Document Server

    Gilijamse, J J; Hoekstra, S; De van Meerakker, S Y T; Meijer, G; Gilijamse, Joop J.; K\\"upper, Jochen; Hoekstra, Steven; Meerakker, Sebastiaan Y. T. van de; Meijer, Gerard

    2006-01-01

    We demonstrate feedback control optimization for the Stark deceleration and trapping of neutral polar molecules using evolutionary strategies. In a Stark-decelerator beamline pulsed electric fields are used to decelerate OH radicals and subsequently store them in an electrostatic trap. The efficiency of the deceleration and trapping process is determined by the exact timings of the applied electric field pulses. Automated optimization of these timings yields an increase of 40 % of the number of trapped OH radicals.

  9. Dynamical memory effects in correlated quantum channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addis, Carole; Karpat, Göktuǧ; Macchiavello, Chiara; Maniscalco, Sabrina

    2016-09-01

    Memory effects play a fundamental role in the study of the dynamics of open quantum systems. There exist two conceptually distinct notions of memory discussed for quantum channels in the literature. In quantum information theory quantum channels with memory are characterized by the existence of correlations between successive applications of the channel on a sequence of quantum systems. In open quantum systems theory memory effects arise dynamically during the time evolution of quantum systems and define non-Markovian dynamics. Here we relate and combine these two different concepts of memory. In particular, we study the interplay between correlations between multiple uses of quantum channels and non-Markovianity as nondivisibility of the t -parametrized family of channels defining the dynamical map.

  10. Dynamical 3-Space Gravitational Waves: Reverberation Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahill R. T.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Gravity theory missed a key dynamical process that became ap parent only when ex- pressed in terms of a velocity field, instead of the Newtonian gravitational acceleration field. This dynamical process involves an additional self-i nteraction of the dynam- ical 3-space, and experimental data reveals that its streng th is set by the fine struc- ture constant, implying a fundamental link between gravity and quantum theory. The dynamical 3-space has been directly detected in numerous li ght-speed anisotropy ex- periments. Quantum matter has been shown to exhibit an accel eration caused by the time-dependence and inhomogeneity of the 3-space flow, givi ng the first derivation of gravity from a deeper theory, as a quantum wave refraction effect. EM radiation is also refracted in a similar manner. The anisotropy experiments have all shown 3-space wave / turbulence effects, with the latest revealing the fractal structure of 3-s pace. Here we report the prediction of a new effect, namely a reverberation effect, when the gravi- tational waves propagate in the 3-space inflow of a large mass . This effect arises from the non-linear dynamics of 3-space. These reverberations c ould offer an explanation for the Shnoll effect, in which cosmological factors influence stochastic pro cesses, such as radioactive decay rates.

  11. Dynamic effects of diabatization in distillation columns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Thomas; Huusom, Jakob Kjøbsted; Abildskov, Jens

    2013-01-01

    The dynamic effects of diabatization in distillation columns are investigated in simulation emphasizing the heat-integrated distillation column (HIDiC). A generic, dynamic, first-principle model has been formulated, which is flexible enough to describe various diabatic distillation configurations....... Dynamic Relative Gain Array and Singular Value Analysis have been applied in a comparative study of a conventional distillation column and a HIDiC. The study showed increased input-output coupling due to diabatization. Feasible SISO control structures for the HIDiC were also found and control...

  12. Effect of Dynamic Meditation on Mental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Naved; Singh, Archana; Aleem, Sheema

    2016-02-01

    Although traditional meditation has been found to be effective in improving physical and mental health of subjects, there was a paucity of research of the effect of active or dynamic meditation on these variables. Therefore, the present study was aimed at studying the effect of dynamic meditation on mental health of the subjects. Total sample of the present study comprised 60 subjects, 30 each in experimental and control group. Subjects in experimental group were given 21-day training in dynamic meditation. Mental health of the experimental and control group subjects was measured in pre- and post-condition with the help of Mental Health Inventory developed by Jagadish and Srivastava (Mental Health inventory, Manovaigyanik Parikshan Sansthan, Varanasi, 1983). Obtained data were analyzed with the help of ANCOVA. In post-condition, experimental group scored better than control group on integration of personality, autonomy and environmental mastery. Effect sizes of dynamic meditation on these dimensions of mental health were large. However, experimental group and control group did not differ significantly on positive self-evaluation, perception of reality and group-oriented attitude dimensions of mental health in post-condition. Overall, dynamic meditation training was effective in improving mental health of the subjects.

  13. Nuclear Dynamics with Effective Field Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Epelbaum, Evgeny

    2013-01-01

    These are the proceedings of the international workshop on "Nuclear Dynamics with Effective Field Theories" held at Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Germany from July 1 to 3, 2013. The workshop focused on effective field theories of low-energy QCD, chiral perturbation theory for nuclear forces as well as few- and many-body physics. Included are a short contribution per talk.

  14. Dynamical Analysis of DTNN with Impulsive Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Chen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We present dynamical analysis of discrete-time delayed neural networks with impulsive effect. Under impulsive effect, we derive some new criteria for the invariance and attractivity of discrete-time neural networks by using decomposition approach and delay difference inequalities. Our results improve or extend the existing ones.

  15. Stark-assisted population control of coherent CS(2) 4f and 5p Rydberg wave packets studied by femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knappenberger, Kenneth L; Lerch, Eliza-Beth W; Wen, Patrick; Leone, Stephen R

    2007-09-28

    A two-color (3+1(')) pump-probe scheme is employed to investigate Rydberg wave packet dynamics in carbon disulfide (CS(2) (*)). The state superpositions are created within the 4f and 5p Rydberg manifolds by three photons of the 400 nm pump pulse, and their temporal evolution is monitored with femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy using an 800 nm ionizing probe pulse. The coherent behavior of the non-stationary superpositions are observed through wavepacket revivals upon ionization to either the upper (12) or lower (32) spin-orbit components of CS(2) (+). The results show clearly that the composition of the wavepacket can be efficiently controlled by the power density of the excitation pulse over a range from 500 GWcm(2) to 10 TWcm(2). The results are consistent with the anticipated ac-Stark shift for 400 nm light and demonstrate an effective method for population control in molecular systems. Moreover, it is shown that Rydberg wavepackets can be formed in CS(2) with excitation power densities up to 10 TWcm(2) without significant fragmentation. The exponential 1e population decay (T(1)) of specific excited Rydberg states are recovered by analysis of the coherent part of the signal. The dissociation lifetimes of these states are typically 1.5 ps. However, a region exhibiting a more rapid decay ( approximately 800 fs) is observed for states residing in the energy range of 74 450-74 550 cm(-1), suggestive of an enhanced surface crossing in this region.

  16. Dynamic Dilution Effects in Polymeric Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Anne Ladegaard; Sommer-Larsen, Peter; Hassager, Ole

    2006-01-01

    processes, namely the reptation of linear species within the network and the arm withdrawal process of star arms in the sol fraction and of dangling single-chain ends attached to the network. The relaxation spectra are influenced by the stoichiometry to a large extent due to dynamic dilution effects caused...... by the change in the amount of dangling arms and solubles with stoichiometry. The star arm relaxation is suppressed by washing out the sol fraction which is seen as a clear example of the dynamic dilution effect arising from the small amount of non-reactive PDMS....

  17. Dynamical effects of overparametrization in nonlinear models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Luis Antonio; Billings, S. A.

    1995-01-01

    This paper is concemed with dynamical reconstruction for nonlinear systems. The effects of the driving function and of the complexity of a given representation on the bifurcation patter are investigated. It is shown that the use of different driving functions to excite the system may yield models with different bifurcation patterns. The complexity of the reconstructions considered is quantified by the embedding dimension and the number of estimated parameters. In this respect it appears that models which reproduce the original bifurcation behaviour are of limited complexity and that excessively complex models tend to induce ghost bifurcations and spurious dynamical regimes. Moreover, some results suggest that the effects of overparametrization on the global dynamical behaviour of a nonlinear model may be more deleterious than the presence of moderate noise levels. In order to precisely quantify the complexity of the reconstructions, global polynomials are used although the results are believed to apply to a much wider class of representations including neural networks.

  18. Effective dynamics of a classical point charges

    CERN Document Server

    Polonyi, Janos

    2013-01-01

    The effective Lagrangian of a point charge is derived by eliminating the electromagnetic field within the framework of the classical closed time path formalism. The short distance singularity of the electromagnetic field is regulated by an UV cutoff. The Abraham-Lorentz force is recovered and its similarity to anomalies is underlined. The full cutoff-dependent linearized equation of motion is obtained, no runaway trajectories are found but the effective dynamics shows acausality if the cutoff is beyond the classical charge radius. The strength of the radiation reaction force displays a pole in its cutoff-dependence in a manner reminiscent of the Landau-pole of perturbative QED. Similarity between the dynamical breakdown of the time reversal invariance and dynamical symmetry breaking is pointed out.

  19. Memory effects in nanoparticle dynamics and transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanghi, Tarun; Bhadauria, Ravi; Aluru, N. R.

    2016-10-01

    In this work, we use the generalized Langevin equation (GLE) to characterize and understand memory effects in nanoparticle dynamics and transport. Using the GLE formulation, we compute the memory function and investigate its scaling with the mass, shape, and size of the nanoparticle. It is observed that changing the mass of the nanoparticle leads to a rescaling of the memory function with the reduced mass of the system. Further, we show that for different mass nanoparticles it is the initial value of the memory function and not its relaxation time that determines the "memory" or "memoryless" dynamics. The size and the shape of the nanoparticle are found to influence both the functional-form and the initial value of the memory function. For a fixed mass nanoparticle, increasing its size enhances the memory effects. Using GLE simulations we also investigate and highlight the role of memory in nanoparticle dynamics and transport.

  20. Chaos in effective classical and quantum dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Casetti, L; Modugno, M; Casetti, Lapo; Gatto, Raoul; Modugno, Michele

    1998-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of classical and quantum N-component phi^4 oscillators in presence of an external field. In the large N limit the effective dynamics is described by two-degree-of-freedom classical Hamiltonian systems. In the classical model we observe chaotic orbits for any value of the external field, while in the quantum case chaos is strongly suppressed. A simple explanation of this behaviour is found in the change in the structure of the orbits induced by quantum corrections. Consistently with Heisenberg's principle, quantum fluctuations are forced away from zero, removing in the effective quantum dynamics a hyperbolic fixed point that is a major source of chaos in the classical model.

  1. Quantum coherence in the dynamical Casimir effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samos-Sáenz de Buruaga, D. N.; Sabín, Carlos

    2017-02-01

    We propose to use quantum coherence as the ultimate proof of the quantum nature of the radiation that appears by means of the dynamical Casimir effect in experiments with superconducting microwave waveguides. We show that, unlike previously considered measurements such as entanglement and discord, quantum coherence does not require a threshold value of the external pump amplitude and is highly robust to thermal noise.

  2. Femtosecond dynamics of the nonlinear index near the band edge in AlGaAs waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, K. K.; LaGasse, M. J.; Wang, C. A.; Fujimoto, J. G.; Haus, H. A.

    1990-05-01

    The transient behavior of the nonresonant nonlinear index is investigated in AlGaAs waveguides with femtosecond time resolution. Both the refractive index and the absorption changes are measured by time division interferometry and pump probe techniques. Different mechanisms which contribute to the nonlinear index are distinguished by examining their dynamics, including the optical Stark effect, resonantly excited carriers, and two-photon absorption processes. The relative contribution from each mechanism is a strong function of wavelength near the band edge.

  3. Multiple Temperature-Sensing Behavior of Green and Red Upconversion Emissions from Stark Sublevels of Er3+

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baosheng Cao

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Upconversion luminescence properties from the emissions of Stark sublevels of Er3+ were investigated in Er3+-Yb3+-Mo6+-codoped TiO2 phosphors in this study. According to the energy levels split from Er3+, green and red emissions from the transitions of four coupled energy levels, 2H11/2(I/2H11/2(II, 4S3/2(I/4S3/2(II, 4F9/2(I/4F9/2(II, and 2H11/2(I + 2H11/2(II/4S3/2(I + 4S3/2(II, were observed under 976 nm laser diode excitation. By utilizing the fluorescence intensity ratio (FIR technique, temperature-dependent upconversion emissions from these four coupled energy levels were analyzed at length. The optical temperature-sensing behaviors of sensing sensitivity, measurement error, and operating temperature for the four coupled energy levels are discussed, all of which are closely related to the energy gap of the coupled energy levels, FIR value, and luminescence intensity. Experimental results suggest that Er3+-Yb3+-Mo6+-codoped TiO2 phosphor with four pairs of energy levels coupled by Stark sublevels provides a new and effective route to realize multiple optical temperature-sensing through a wide range of temperatures in an independent system.

  4. Molecular quantum mechanical gradients within the polarizable embedding approach—Application to the internal vibrational Stark shift of acetophenone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    List, Nanna Holmgaard, E-mail: nhl@sdu.dk; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aagaard; Kongsted, Jacob [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Pharmacy, University of Southern Denmark, Campusvej 55, Odense M, Odense DK-5230 Denmark (Denmark); Beerepoot, Maarten T. P.; Gao, Bin; Ruud, Kenneth [Centre for Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Tromsø–The Arctic University of Norway, N-9037 Tromsø (Norway); Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Pharmacy, University of Southern Denmark, Campusvej 55, Odense M, Odense DK-5230 Denmark (Denmark); Laboratory of Computational Chemistry and Biochemistry, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2015-01-21

    We present an implementation of analytical quantum mechanical molecular gradients within the polarizable embedding (PE) model to allow for efficient geometry optimizations and vibrational analysis of molecules embedded in large, geometrically frozen environments. We consider a variational ansatz for the quantum region, covering (multiconfigurational) self-consistent-field and Kohn–Sham density functional theory. As the first application of the implementation, we consider the internal vibrational Stark effect of the C=O group of acetophenone in different solvents and derive its vibrational linear Stark tuning rate using harmonic frequencies calculated from analytical gradients and computed local electric fields. Comparisons to PE calculations employing an enlarged quantum region as well as to a non-polarizable embedding scheme show that the inclusion of mutual polarization between acetophenone and water is essential in order to capture the structural modifications and the associated frequency shifts observed in water. For more apolar solvents, a proper description of dispersion and exchange–repulsion becomes increasingly important, and the quality of the optimized structures relies to a larger extent on the quality of the Lennard-Jones parameters.

  5. Molecular quantum mechanical gradients within the polarizable embedding approach--application to the internal vibrational Stark shift of acetophenone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    List, Nanna Holmgaard; Beerepoot, Maarten T P; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard; Gao, Bin; Ruud, Kenneth; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aagaard; Kongsted, Jacob

    2015-01-21

    We present an implementation of analytical quantum mechanical molecular gradients within the polarizable embedding (PE) model to allow for efficient geometry optimizations and vibrational analysis of molecules embedded in large, geometrically frozen environments. We consider a variational ansatz for the quantum region, covering (multiconfigurational) self-consistent-field and Kohn-Sham density functional theory. As the first application of the implementation, we consider the internal vibrational Stark effect of the C=O group of acetophenone in different solvents and derive its vibrational linear Stark tuning rate using harmonic frequencies calculated from analytical gradients and computed local electric fields. Comparisons to PE calculations employing an enlarged quantum region as well as to a non-polarizable embedding scheme show that the inclusion of mutual polarization between acetophenone and water is essential in order to capture the structural modifications and the associated frequency shifts observed in water. For more apolar solvents, a proper description of dispersion and exchange-repulsion becomes increasingly important, and the quality of the optimized structures relies to a larger extent on the quality of the Lennard-Jones parameters.

  6. Dynamical magnetic effects in photoexcited ferromagnetic semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chovan, J. [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas, P. O. Box 1527, 711 10 Heraklion (Greece); Kavousanaki, E.G. [Department of Physics, University of Crete, P. O. Box 2208, 710 03 Heraklion (Greece); Perakis, I.E. [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas, P. O. Box 1527, 711 10 Heraklion (Greece); Department of Physics, University of Crete, P. O. Box 2208, 710 03 Heraklion (Greece)

    2006-08-15

    We develop a theory of photoinduced dynamical magnetic effects in III-Mn-V ferromagnetic semiconductors valid in presence of strong carrier spin relaxation and dephasing. We treat relaxation by using the Lindblad semigroup method and calculate the nonlinear response numerically. We predict Mn-spin relaxation and precession towards the direction determined by nonlinear optical polarization. These effects occur during the pulse. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. Effects of heat current on magnetization dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetro, Francesco Antonio; Brechet, Sylvain; Ansermet, Jean-Philippe

    The work is aimed at investigating the interplay between spin dynamics and heat currents in single-crystal Yttrium Iron Garnet (YIG). The irreversible thermodynamics for a continuous medium predicts that a thermal gradient, in the presence of magnetization waves, produces a magnetic induction field, thus a magnetic analog of the well-known Seebeck effect. Time-resolved transmission measurements revealed a change in the attenuation of magnetization waves propagating along the thermal gradient when the gradient is reversed. This magnetic damping change can be accounted for by the Magnetic Seebeck effect. In order to characterize this effect further, we have conducted studies on magnetization dynamic in YIG single crystal samples placed in various geometrical configurations, e.g. with YIG disks in which magnetic vortices might be present. Various magnetic resonance schemes were used, e.g. local probes and cavities.

  8. Dipole moment of methanol by microwave stark spectroscopy IV: 13CD316OH species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Indra; Sastry, K. V. L. N.

    2015-10-01

    In this work, Stark effect measurements have been carried out on several transitions C-13 substituted species of triply-deuterated (D3) methanol. The analysis of the data allowed the determination of the dipole moment components in the first two torsional states of the ground vibrational state of this species. The extrapolated zero field frequencies of the transitions studied have been determined and found to be in excellent agreement with known values. For the torsional ground state the values {in Debye (D)} of μa = 0.9080(9) and μb = 1.4378(10) have been obtained for this species. These values increase for the first excited state as was observed for other species. The dipole moment values are considerably higher than the non-deuterated species. To our knowledge the present study represents the measurement of the most accurate dipole moment values of 13CD3OH for the first time. The results obtained will prove useful for radio astronomy and in understanding of large amplitude internal energy pathways in polyatomic molecules.

  9. Continuum-state selectivity in hydrogen in Stark fields by charge-shape tuning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ying, Y.; Nayfeh, M.H.

    1987-02-15

    We present numerical calculations of the photoionization of atomic hydrogen in the presence of a strong dc electric field, using three-photon excitation with two-photon resonance with intermediate Stark states. The systematics of the dependence of the cross section on the intermediate Stark states is calculated for the n = 2 to n = 9 manifolds. Our results indicate that one can use ''charge-shape tuning'' to selectively excite and enhance Stark-induced giant dipoles near E = 0 in hydrogen without the excitation of the overlapping continuum. Frequency selectivity can be used to excite from 1s (spherical charge) an intermediate whose charge is focused along the field followed by another excitation to the giant dipoles. Charge tunability can be achieved by controlling the degree of focusing by choice of the field and intermediates.

  10. Effective evolution equations from quantum dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Benedikter, Niels; Schlein, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    These notes investigate the time evolution of quantum systems, and in particular the rigorous derivation of effective equations approximating the many-body Schrödinger dynamics in certain physically interesting regimes. The focus is primarily on the derivation of time-dependent effective theories (non-equilibrium question) approximating many-body quantum dynamics. The book is divided into seven sections, the first of which briefly reviews the main properties of many-body quantum systems and their time evolution. Section 2 introduces the mean-field regime for bosonic systems and explains how the many-body dynamics can be approximated in this limit using the Hartree equation. Section 3 presents a method, based on the use of coherent states, for rigorously proving the convergence towards the Hartree dynamics, while the fluctuations around the Hartree equation are considered in Section 4. Section 5 focuses on a discussion of a more subtle regime, in which the many-body evolution can be approximated by means of t...

  11. Dynamical effects in the fusion hindrance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abe Yasuhisa

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that there is a hindrance to fusion in collisions with heavy nuclei that plays a decisive role in synthesis of the super-heavy elements (SHE. The origin of the fusion hindrance is nowadays qualitatively understood but there are still quantitative ambiguities on the dynamics of the fusion mechanism and the predictions need to be assessed. In this communication, we stress the fact that dynamical effects play a crucial role in the amplitude of the reduction of the fusion probability. We found that the fast evolution of the neck degree of freedom affects the slow radial motion, i.e., the fusioning motion, through a dynamical coupling. We showed that we could do a so-called adiabatic elimination of the fast variable in the coupled equation, resulting in an effective one-dimensional equation for the radial motion with a shift of the starting point. This treatment of the dynamical coupling leads to a larger hindrance.

  12. Dynamical effects in fusion with exotic nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo-Phuoc, K.; Simenel, C.; Simpson, E. C.

    2016-08-01

    Background: Reactions with stable beams have demonstrated strong interplay between nuclear structure and fusion. Exotic beam facilities open new perspectives to understand the impact of neutron skin, large isospin, and weak binding energies on fusion. Microscopic theories of fusion are required to guide future experiments. Purpose: To investigate new effects of exotic structures and dynamics in near-barrier fusion with exotic nuclei. Method: Microscopic approaches based on the Hartree-Fock (HF) mean-field theory are used for studying fusion barriers in -54Ca40+116Sn reactions for even isotopes. Bare potential barriers are obtained assuming frozen HF ground-state densities. Dynamical effects on the barrier are accounted for in time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) calculations of the collisions. Vibrational couplings are studied in the coupled-channel framework and near-barrier nucleon transfer is investigated with TDHF calculations. Results: The development of a neutron skin in exotic calcium isotopes strongly lowers the bare potential barrier. However, this static effect is not apparent when dynamical effects are included. On the contrary, a fusion hindrance is observed in TDHF calculations with the most neutron-rich calcium isotopes which cannot be explained by vibrational couplings. Transfer reactions are also important in these systems due to charge equilibration processes. Conclusions: Despite its impact on the bare potential, the neutron skin is not seen as playing an important role in the fusion dynamics. However, the charge transfer with exotic projectiles could lead to an increase of the Coulomb repulsion between the fragments, suppressing fusion. The effects of transfer and dissipative mechanisms on fusion with exotic nuclei deserve further studies.

  13. A Riemann-Hilbert approach to the inverse problem for the Stark operator on the line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Its, A.; Sukhanov, V.

    2016-05-01

    The paper is concerned with the inverse scattering problem for the Stark operator on the line with a potential from the Schwartz class. In our study of the inverse problem, we use the Riemann-Hilbert formalism. This allows us to overcome the principal technical difficulties which arise in the more traditional approaches based on the Gel’fand-Levitan-Marchenko equations, and indeed solve the problem. We also produce a complete description of the relevant scattering data (which have not been obtained in the previous works on the Stark operator) and establish the bijection between the Schwartz class potentials and the scattering data.

  14. Stark profiles of forbidden and allowed transitions in a dense, laser produced helium plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ya'akobi, B.; George, E. V.; Bekefi, G.; Hawryluk, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    Comparisons of experimental and theoretical Stark profiles of the allowed 2(1)P-3(1)D helium line at 6678 A and of the forbidden 2(1)P-3(1)P component at 6632 A in a dense plasma were carried out. The plasma was produced by optical breakdown of helium by means of a repetitive, high power CO2 laser. The allowed line shows good agreement with conventional theory, but discrepancies are found around the centre of the forbidden component. When normally neglected ion motions are taken into consideration, the observed discrepancies are partially removed. Tables of the Stark profiles for the pair of lines are given.

  15. Effective dynamics of strongly dissipative Rydberg gases

    CERN Document Server

    Marcuzzi, M; Olmos, B; Lesanovsky, I

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the evolution of interacting Rydberg gases in the limit of strong noise and dissipation. Starting from a description in terms of a Markovian quantum master equation we derive effective equations of motion that govern the dynamics on a "coarse-grained" timescale where fast dissipative degrees of freedom have been adiabatically eliminated. Specifically, we consider two scenarios which are of relevance for current theoretical and experimental studies --- Rydberg atoms in a two-level (spin) approximation subject to strong dephasing noise as well as Rydberg atoms under so-called electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) conditions and fast radiative decay. In the former case we find that the effective dynamics is described by classical rate equations up to second order in an appropriate perturbative expansion. This drastically reduces the computational complexity of numerical simulations in comparison to the full quantum master equation. When accounting for the fourth order correction in this e...

  16. Some Dynamical Effects of the Cosmological Constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axenides, M.; Floratos, E. G.; Perivolaropoulos, L.

    Newton's law gets modified in the presence of a cosmological constant by a small repulsive term (antigravity) that is proportional to the distance. Assuming a value of the cosmological constant consistent with the recent SnIa data (Λ~=10-52 m-2), we investigate the significance of this term on various astrophysical scales. We find that on galactic scales or smaller (less than a few tens of kpc), the dynamical effects of the vacuum energy are negligible by several orders of magnitude. On scales of 1 Mpc or larger however we find that the vacuum energy can significantly affect the dynamics. For example we show that the velocity data in the local group of galaxies correspond to galactic masses increased by 35% in the presence of vacuum energy. The effect is even more important on larger low density systems like clusters of galaxies or superclusters.

  17. Dynamical effects in fusion with exotic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Vo-Phuoc, K; Simpson, E C

    2016-01-01

    [Background] Reactions with stable beams have demonstrated a strong interplay between nuclear structure and fusion. Exotic beam facilities open new perspectives to understand the impact of neutron skin, large isospin, and weak binding energies on fusion. Microscopic theories of fusion are required to guide future experiments. [Purpose] To investigate new effects of exotic structures and dynamics in near-barrier fusion with exotic nuclei. [Method] Microscopic approaches based on the Hartree-Fock (HF) mean-field theory are used for studying fusion barriers in $^{40-54}$Ca+$^{116}$Sn reactions for even isotopes. Bare potential barriers are obtained assuming frozen HF ground-state densities. Dynamical effects on the barrier are accounted for in time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) calculations of the collisions. Vibrational couplings are studied in the coupled-channel framework and near-barrier nucleon transfer is investigated with TDHF calculations. [Results] The development of a neutron skin in exotic calcium iso...

  18. Effective "Gluon" Dynamics in a Stochastic Vacuum

    CERN Document Server

    Magpantay, J A

    2002-01-01

    Using the new scalar and vector degrees of freedom derived from the non-linear gauge condition (grad-dot-D)(grad-dot-A)=0, we show that the effective dynamics of the vector fields (identified as ``gluons'') in the stochastic vacuum defined by the scalars result in the vector fields acquiring a mass. We also find the vector fields losing their self-interactions.

  19. Effective Dynamics of Disordered Quantum Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kropf, Chahan M.; Gneiting, Clemens; Buchleitner, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    We derive general evolution equations describing the ensemble-average quantum dynamics generated by disordered Hamiltonians. The disorder average affects the coherence of the evolution and can be accounted for by suitably tailored effective coupling agents and associated rates that encode the specific statistical properties of the Hamiltonian's eigenvectors and eigenvalues, respectively. Spectral disorder and isotropically disordered eigenvector distributions are considered as paradigmatic test cases.

  20. Aspects of effective dynamics for nonequilibrium systems

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Simi

    2013-01-01

    In this work we present a few general and some specific aspects of effective dynamics of macroscopic observables, obtained through the study of some models. The purpose of statistical physics is to build connections between microscopic variables (which are enormous in number and usually fast in ``speed'') and the macroscopic variables (usually fewer and slower compared to the microscopic variables). Much can be inferred about the microscopic state of a system from the nature of a well defined...

  1. Integrability and separation of variables in Calogero-Coulomb-Stark and two-center Calogero-Coulomb systems

    CERN Document Server

    Hakobyan, Tigran

    2015-01-01

    We define the integrable N-dimensional Calogero-Coulomb-Stark and two-center Calogero-Coulomb systems and construct their constants of motion via the Dunkl operators. Their Schroedinger equations decouple in parabolic and elliptic coordinates, respectively, into the set of three differential equations like for the Coulomb-Stark and two-center Coulomb problems.

  2. Stark width measurements of Fe II lines with wavelengths in the range 260-300 nm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aragon, C; Aguilera, J A [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Publica de Navarra, Campus de ArrosadIa, E-31006 Pamplona (Spain); Vega, P, E-mail: carlos.aragon@unavarra.es [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Oviedo, C/Calvo Sotelo s/n, E-33007 Oviedo (Spain)

    2011-03-14

    The Stark widths of 21 Fe II lines with wavelengths in the range 260-300 nm have been measured using laser-induced plasmas as spectroscopic sources. A set of Fe-Cu samples has been employed to generate the plasmas. To reduce self-absorption, each line has been measured using a different sample, with an iron concentration determined by means of the curve-of-growth methodology. The remaining error due to self-absorption has been estimated to be lower than 10%. Different instants of the plasma evolution, from 0.84 to 2.5 {mu}s, are included in the measurements. The electron density, in the range (1.6-7.3) x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3}, is determined by the Stark broadening of the H{sub {alpha}} line. Within this range, the Stark widths are found to be proportional to the electron density. The Boltzmann plot method is used to obtain the plasma temperature, which is in the range 12 900-15 200 K. The Stark widths obtained have been compared with available experimental and theoretical data.

  3. Stark broadening measurements in plasmas produced by laser ablation of hydrogen containing compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Miloš; Hermann, Jörg

    2016-08-01

    We present a method for the measurement of Stark broadening parameters of atomic and ionic spectral lines based on laser ablation of hydrogen containing compounds. Therefore, plume emission spectra, recorded with an echelle spectrometer coupled to a gated detector, were compared to the spectral radiance of a plasma in local thermal equilibrium. Producing material ablation with ultraviolet nanosecond laser pulses in argon at near atmospheric pressure, the recordings take advantage of the spatially uniform distributions of electron density and temperature within the ablated vapor. By changing the delay between laser pulse and detector gate, the electron density could be varied by more than two orders of magnitude while the temperature was altered in the range from 6,000 to 14,000 K. The Stark broadening parameters of transitions were derived from their simultaneous observation with the hydrogen Balmer alpha line. In addition, assuming a linear increase of Stark widths and shifts with electron density for non-hydrogenic lines, our measurements indicate a change of the Stark broadening-dependence of Hα over the considered electron density range. The presented results obtained for hydrated calcium sulfate (CaSO4ṡ2H2O) can be extended to any kind of hydrogen containing compounds.

  4. Electron Capture from Linear Stark Rydberg States above the Matching Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciocca, M.; Creasey, C.; MacAdam, K. B.

    1998-05-01

    The relative cross section for electron capture by singly charged ions from linear Stark Rydberg states of Na has been measured, both as a function of the angle of impact and of projectile velocity. The target, the topmost state of the n = 24 Stark manifold, was prepared by two-step laser excitation from the Na ground state, via 3p_3/2, in an electric field F_Stark= 160 V/cm. By means of a device perfected in our laboratory (the "Stark Barrel"), we aligned the target by adiabatically switching the electric field, after excitation, down to a preset low value and a desired direction in the plane determined by the ion and Na beams. Thermionic emission ion sources of Li and Na were operated at accelerating voltages 400-2000 V to allow study of electron capture in the reduced velocity range v = 1.0 - 2.5. This augments an earlier study by Homan footnote D. M. Homan, Ph. D. Dissertation, University of Kentucky 1997, unpublished. at lower velocities.

  5. Collisional excitation and emission of H-alpha Stark multiplet in fusion plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marchuk, O.; Ralchenko, Y.; Janev, R. K.; Biel, W.; Delabie, E.; Urnov, A. M.

    2010-01-01

    We study the excitation of parabolic Stark states in hydrogen atoms by collisions with fast ions. It is shown that excitation cross sections are very sensitive to the angle between the electric field and the projectile velocity. The calculated collisional data are implemented in a newly developed co

  6. Developmental characters of Pseitina iijimae (Jordan and Starks), bothid flat fishes- pisces

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Devi, C.B.L.

    Post larval stages of Psettina iQimae (Jordan and Starks) ranging from 1.8 mm NL to 44.6 mm SL collected during Naga Expedition and International Indian Ocean Expedition (JIOE) are described The characteristics which help to identify larval stages...

  7. Framing Effects: Dynamics and Task Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang

    1996-11-01

    The author examines the mechanisms and dynamics of framing effects in risky choices across three distinct task domains (i.e., life-death, public property, and personal money). The choice outcomes of the problems presented in each of the three task domains had a binary structure of a sure thing vs a gamble of equal expected value; the outcomes differed in their framing conditions and the expected values, raging from 6000, 600, 60, to 6, numerically. It was hypothesized that subjects would become more risk seeking, if the sure outcome was below their aspiration level (the minimum requirement). As predicted, more subjects preferred the gamble when facing the life-death choice problems than facing the counterpart problems presented in the other two task domains. Subjects' risk preference varied categorically along the group size dimension in the life-death domain but changed more linearly over the expected value dimension in the monetary domain. Framing effects were observed in 7 of 13 pairs of problems, showing a positive frame-risk aversion and negative frame-risk seeking relationship. In addition, two types of framing effects were theoretically defined and empirically identified. A bidirectional framing effect involves a reversal in risk preference, and occurs when a decision maker's risk preference is ambiguous or weak. Four bidirectional effects were observed; in each case a majority of subjects preferred the sure outcome under a positive frame but the gamble under a negative frame. In contrast, a unidirectional framing effect refers to a preference shift due to the framing of choice outcomes: A majority of subjects preferred one choice outcome (either the sure thing or the gamble) under both framing conditions, with positive frame augmented the preference for the sure thing and negative frame augmented the preference for the gamble. These findings revealed some dynamic regularities of framing effects and posed implications for developing predictive and testable

  8. Dynamic stall and 3D effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjoerck, A.; Thor, S.E. [Aeronautical Research Inst. of Sweden, Bromma (Sweden)

    1996-12-01

    The JOULE II project `Dynamic stall and 3D effects` started in January 1994 and was completed in September 1995. The objective of the project has been to increase the understanding of the three-dimensional and unsteady aerodynamics of stall controlled HAWT`s. The objectives have also been to develop `engineering models` suitable for inclusion into aero-elastic codes. The project included the participation of 13 parties within Europe. This paper describes an overview of the work carried out within the project and key results. 3 refs, 4 figs

  9. Ultrastrong optomechanics incorporating the dynamical Casimir effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nation, P. D.; Suh, J.; Blencowe, M. P.

    2016-02-01

    We propose a superconducting circuit comprising a dc superconducting quantum interference device with a mechanically compliant arm embedded in a coplanar microwave cavity that realizes an optomechanical system with a degenerate or nondegenerate parametric interaction generated via the dynamical Casimir effect. For experimentally feasible parameters, this setup is capable of reaching the single-photon ultrastrong-coupling regime while simultaneously possessing a parametric coupling strength approaching the renormalized cavity frequency. This opens up the possibility of observing the interplay between these two fundamental nonlinearities at the single-photon level.

  10. Thermodynamic Cross-Effects from Dynamical Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Matyas, L; Vollmer, J; Matyas, Laszlo; Tel, Tamas; Vollmer, Jurgen

    1999-01-01

    We give a thermodynamically consistent description of simultaneous heat and particle transport, as well as of the associated cross-effects, in the framework of a chaotic dynamical system, a generalized multibaker map. Besides the density, a second field with appropriate source terms is included in order to mimic, after coarse graining, a spatial temperature distribution and its time evolution. A new expression is derived for the irreversible entropy production in a steady state, as the average of the growth rate of the relative density, a unique combination of the two fields.

  11. Effect of signal modulating noise in bistable stochastic dynamical systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖方红; 闫桂荣; 张新武

    2003-01-01

    The effect of signal modulating noise in bistable stochastic dynamical systems is studied.The concept of instan taneous steady state is proposed for bistable dynamical systems.By making a dynamical analysis of bistable stochastic systems,we find that global and local effect of signal modulating noise as well as stochastic resonance can occur in bistable dynamical systems on which both a weak sinusoidal signal and noise are forced.The effect is demonstrated by numerical simulation.

  12. Case studies on recent Stark broadening calculations and STARK-B database development in the framework of the European project VAMDC (Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Center)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahal-Brechot, S, E-mail: Sylvie.sahal-brechot@obspm.fr [Paris Observatory, CNRS-UMR 8112 and University Pierre et Marie Curie, LERMA, 5 Place Jules Janssen, 92190 Meudon (France)

    2010-11-01

    Stark broadening theories and calculations have been extensively developed for about 50 years. The theory can now be considered as mature for many applications, especially for accurate spectroscopic diagnostics and modelling. In astrophysics, with the increasing sensitivity of observations and spectral resolution, in all domains of wavelengths from far UV to infrared, it has become possible to develop realistic models of interiors and atmospheres of stars and interpret their evolution and the creation of elements through nuclear reactions. For hot stars, especially white dwarfs, Stark broadening is the dominant collisional line broadening process. This requires the knowledge of numerous profiles, especially for trace elements, which are used as useful probes for modern spectroscopic diagnostics. Hence, calculations based on a simple but enough accurate and fast method, are necessary for obtaining numerous results. Ab initio calculations are a growing domain of development. Nowadays, the access to such data via an on line database becomes crucial. This is the object of STARK-B, which is a collaborative project between the Paris Observatory and the Astronomical Observatory of Belgrade. It is a database of calculated widths and shifts of isolated lines of atoms and ions due to electron and ion collisions. It is devoted to modelling and spectroscopic diagnostics of stellar atmospheres and envelopes. In addition, it is relevant to laboratory plasmas, laser equipments and technological plasmas. It is a part of VAMDC (Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Centre), which is an European Union funded collaboration between groups involved in the generation and use of atomic and molecular data.

  13. Effects of Telecoupling on Global Vegetation Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viña, A.; Liu, J.

    2016-12-01

    With the ever increasing trend in telecoupling processes, such as international trade, all countries around the world are becoming more interdependent. However, the effects of this growing interdependence on vegetation (e.g., shifts in the geographic extent and distribution) remain unknown even though vegetation dynamics are crucially important for food production, carbon sequestration, provision of other ecosystem services, and biodiversity conservation. In this study we evaluate the effects of international trade on the spatio-temporal trajectories of vegetation at national and global scales, using vegetation index imagery collected over more than three decades by the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) satellite sensor series together with concurrent national and international data on international trade (and its associated movement of people, goods, services and information). The spatio-temporal trajectories of vegetation are obtained using the scale of fluctuation technique, which is based on the decomposition of the AVHRR image time series to obtain information on its spatial dependence structure over time. Similar to the correlation length, the scale of fluctuation corresponds to the range over which fluctuations in the vegetation index are spatially correlated. Results indicate that global vegetation has changed drastically over the last three decades. These changes are not uniform across space, with hotspots in active trading countries. This study not only has direct implications for understanding global vegetation dynamics, but also sheds important insights on the complexity of human-nature interactions across telecoupled systems.

  14. Bottleneck effects on the bidirectional crowd dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao-Xia; Dong, Hai-Rong; Yao, Xiu-Ming; Sun, Xu-Bin

    2016-12-01

    The bottleneck effect on bidirectional crowd dynamics is of great theoretical and practical significance, especially for the designing of corridors in public places, such as subway stations or airports. Based on the famous social force model, this paper investigates the bottleneck effects on the free flow dynamics and breakdown phenomenon under different scenarios, in which different corridor shapes and inflow ratios are considered simultaneously. Numerical simulation finds an interesting self-organization phenomenon in the bidirectional flow, a typical characteristic of such a phenomenon is called lane formation, and the existence of which is independent of the corridor’s shape and inflow rate. However, the pattern of the lane formed by pedestrian flow is related to the corridor’s shape, and the free flow efficiency has close relationship with the inflow rate. Specifically, breakdown phenomenon occurs when inflows from both sides of the corridor are large enough, which mostly originates from the bottleneck and then gradually spreads to the other regions. Simulation results further indicate that the leaving efficiency becomes low as breakdown occurs, and the degree of congestion is proportional to the magnitude of inflow. The findings presented in this paper match well with some of our daily observations, hence it is possible to use them to provide us with theoretical suggestions in design of infrastructures. Project supported jointly by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61322307 and 2016YJS023).

  15. The dynamical Casimir effect generates entanglement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felicetti, Simone; Sanz, Mikel; Lamata, Lucas; Romero, Guillermo; Johansson, Göran; Delsing, Per; Solano, Enrique

    2014-03-01

    The existence of vacuum fluctuations, i.e., the presence of virtual particles in empty space, represents one of the most distinctive results of quantum mechanics. It is also known, under the name of dynamical Casimir effect, that fast-oscillating boundary conditions can generate real excitations out of the vacuum fluctuations. Long-awaited, the first experimental demonstration of this phenomenon has been realized only recently, in the framework of superconducting circuits [C. M. Wilson et al. Nature 479, 376-379 (2011)]. In this contribution, we will discuss novel theoretical results, showing that the dynamical Casimir effect can be exploited to generate bipartite and multipartite entanglement among qubits. We will also present a superconducting circuit design which can feasibly implement the model considered with current technology. Our scheme is composed of a SQUID device side-coupled to two transmission line resonators, each one interacting with a superconducting qubit. Such proposal can be straightforwardly generalized to the multipartite case, and it can be scaled up to build strongly correlated cavity lattices for quantum simulation and quantum computation. The authors acknowledge support from Spanish MINECO FIS2012-36673-C03-02; UPV/EHU UFI 11/55;Basque Government IT472-10; SOLID, CCQED, PROMISCE and SCALEQIT EU projects.

  16. Dynamical Casimir effect for surface plasmon polaritons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hizhnyakov, V.; Loot, A., E-mail: ardi.loot@ut.ee; Azizabadi, S.Ch.

    2015-02-20

    The emission of photon pairs by a metal–dielectric interface placed between the mirrors of the resonator and excited by a plane wave is considered. The excitation causes oscillations in time of the optical length of surface plasmon polaritons in the interface. This leads to the dynamical Casimir effect – the generation of pairs of surface plasmon polariton quanta, which transfer to photons outside the interface. In the case of a properly chosen interface, the yield of two-photon emission may exceed that of the usual spontaneous parametric down-conversion. - Highlights: • The theory of dynamical Casimir effect (DCE) in the metal–dielectric interface excited by a monochromatic wave is proposed. • It is shown that the field enhancement associated with surface plasmon polaritons strongly enhances the yield of the DCE. • The numerical calculations of the enhancement factor are made. • The scheme of experimental setup to observe the DCE in the metal–dielectric interface is proposed. • Additional methods to enhance the DCE in the metal–dielectric interface are discussed.

  17. The Relevance of the Dynamic Stall Effect for Transient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jauch, Clemens; Sørensen, Poul; Bak-Jensen, Birgitte

    2005-01-01

    This article describes a methodology to quantify the influence of dynamic stall on transient fault operations of active-stall turbines. The model of the dynamic stall effect is introduced briefly. The behaviour of the dynamic stall model during a transient fault operation is described...... mathematically, and from this its effect quantified. Two quantities are chosen to describe the influence of the dynamic stall effect: one is active power and the other is time delay. Subsequently a transient fault scenario is simulated with and without the dynamic stall effect and the differences discussed. From...... this comparison, the conclusion is drawn that the dynamic stall effect has some influence on the post-fault behaviour of the wind turbine, and it is hence suggested that the dynamic stall effect is considered if an active-stall wind turbine is to be modelled realistically....

  18. Static Versus Dynamic Stretching Effect on Agility Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Troumbley, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare effects of static and dynamic stretching on explosive agility movements, and to examine the effect of the interaction of dynamic and static stretching prior to explosive agility movements. Fourteen men and 10 women performed the different warm-up protocols, including no warm-up (NWU), static stretching (SS), dynamic stretching (DS), and dynamic stretching with static stretching (DS+SS). The T-Drill was used to assess agility. The results indicated n...

  19. Semiclassical Szego limit of resonance clusters for the hydrogen atom Stark Hamiltonian

    CERN Document Server

    Hislop, Peter D

    2011-01-01

    We study the weighted averages of resonance clusters for the hydrogen atom with a Stark electric field in the weak field limit. We prove a semiclassical Szego-type theorem for resonance clusters showing that the limiting distribution of the resonance shifts concentrates on the classical energy surface corresponding to a rescaled eigenvalue of the hydrogen atom Hamiltonian. This result extends Szego-type results on eigenvalue clusters to resonance clusters. There are two new features in this work: first, the study of resonance clusters requires the use of non self-adjoint operators, and second, the Stark perturbation is unbounded so control of the perturbation is achieved using localization properties of coherent states corresponding to hydrogen atom eigenvalues.

  20. Can the Stark-Einstein law resolve the measurement problem from an animate perspective?

    CERN Document Server

    Thaheld, Fred H

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of the Stark-Einstein law as it applies to the retinal molecule, which is part of the rhodopsin molecule within the rod cells of the retina, reveals that it may provide the solution to the measurement problem from an animate perspective. That it represents a natural boundary where the Schroedinger equation or wave function automatically goes from linear to nonlinear while remaining in a deterministic state. It will be possible in the near future to subject this theory to empirical tests as has been previously proposed. This analysis provides a contrast to the many decades well studied and debated inanimate measurement problem and would represent an addition to the Stark-Einstein law involving information carried by the photon.

  1. Can the Stark-Einstein law resolve the measurement problem from an animate perspective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaheld, Fred H

    2015-09-01

    Analysis of the Stark-Einstein law as it applies to the retinal molecule, which is part of the rhodopsin molecule within the rod cells of the retina, reveals that it may provide the solution to the measurement problem from an animate perspective. That it represents a natural boundary where the Schrödinger equation or wave function automatically goes from linear to nonlinear while remaining in a deterministic state. It will be possible in the near future to subject this theory to empirical tests as has been previously proposed. This analysis provides a contrast to the many decades well studied and debated inanimate measurement problem and would represent an addition to the Stark-Einstein law involving information carried by the photon.

  2. Engineering Large Stark Shifts for Control of Individual Clock State Qubits

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Aaron C; Richerme, Philip; Neyenhuis, Brian; Hess, Paul W; Zhang, Jiehang; Monroe, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    In quantum information science, the external control of qubits must be balanced with the extreme isolation of the qubits from the environment. Atomic qubit systems typically mitigate this balance through the use of gated laser fields that can create superpositions and entanglement between qubits. Here we propose the use of high-order optical Stark shifts from optical fields to manipulate the splitting of atomic qubits that are insensitive to other types of fields. We demonstrate a fourth-order AC Stark shift in a trapped atomic ion system that does not require extra laser power beyond that needed for other control fields. We individually address a chain of tightly-spaced trapped ions and show how these controlled shifts can produce an arbitrary product state of ten ions as well as generate site-specific magnetic field terms in a simulated spin Hamiltonian.

  3. Stark spectra of Rydberg states in atomic cesium in the vicinity of n=18

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Hui-Jie; Wang Ting; Li Chang-Yong; Zhao Jian-Ming; Zhang Lin-Jie

    2013-01-01

    The Stark structures in a cesium atom around n =18 are numerically calculated.The results show that the components of 20D states with a small azimuthal quantum number |m| shift upward a lot,and those with a large |m| shift downward a little within 1100 V/cm.All components of P states shift downward.Experimental work has been performed in ultracold atomic cesium.Atoms initially in 6P3/2 state are excited to high-n Rydberg states by a polarization light perpendicular to the field,and Stark spectra with 丨m丨=1/2,3/2,5/2 are simultaneously observed with a large linewidth for the first time.The observed spectra are analyzed in detail.The relative transition probability is calculated.The experimental results are in good agreement with our numerical computation.

  4. An atomic clock with $1\\times 10^{-18}$ room-temperature blackbody Stark uncertainty

    CERN Document Server

    Beloy, K; Phillips, N B; Sherman, J A; Schioppo, M; Lehman, J; Feldman, A; Hanssen, L M; Oates, C W; Ludlow, A D

    2014-01-01

    The Stark shift due to blackbody radiation (BBR) is the key factor limiting the performance of many atomic frequency standards, with the BBR environment inside the clock apparatus being difficult to characterize at a high level of precision. Here we demonstrate an in-vacuum radiation shield that furnishes a uniform, well-characterized BBR environment for the atoms in an ytterbium optical lattice clock. Operated at room temperature, this shield enables specification of the BBR environment to a corresponding fractional clock uncertainty contribution of $5.5 \\times 10^{-19}$. Combined with uncertainty in the atomic response, the total uncertainty of the BBR Stark shift is now $1\\times10^{-18}$. Further operation of the shield at elevated temperatures enables a direct measure of the BBR shift temperature dependence and demonstrates consistency between our evaluated BBR environment and the expected atomic response.

  5. Temperature Dependence of Stark Width of the 463.054 nm NII Spectral Line

    OpenAIRE

    Milosavljevic, Vladimir; Konjevic, Ruzica; Djenize, Stevan

    1999-01-01

    Stark width of the 463.054 nm singly ionized nitrogen spectral line, that belong to transition, have been measured in a linear pulsed, low pressure, arc discharge. The working gas was helium-nitrogen-oxygen mixture. Electron densities of 0.751023 to 1.451023 were determined in the electron temperature range between 30000 K - 38000 K. The measured values have been compared with our calculated data, using the modified semiempirical approximation. On the basis of the agreement among experimental...

  6. Kickbacks, stark violations, client billing, and joint ventures: facts and controversies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannava, Kathleen A; Bercovitch, Lionel; Grant-Kels, Jane M

    2013-01-01

    Many current business trends in the field of dermatopathology deserve ethical scrutiny. An important point to consider in these analyses is that which is legal is not necessarily ethical. We examine the topics of client billing, contractual joint ventures, and health information technology donations, including both the legal implications as pertaining to the Stark Law and Anti-Kickback Statute, and the ethical ramifications of these practices.

  7. AC Stark cooling of C 2 - ion in penning trap using Simbuca

    CERN Document Server

    Cui, Hao

    2016-01-01

    This article is going to summarize work I did in my 2 month project on AC Stark cooling simulation, and the object is to help my colleague carry on it and make further progress. In this article, I will meanly explain the formula I used, the content and flowchart of my c++ code, some conclusion and knowledge we obtained about cooling efficiency from our simulation, and some important tips we noticed before.

  8. Reframing violence against women as a human rights violation: Evan Stark's Coercive Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libal, Kathryn; Parekh, Serena

    2009-12-01

    Evan Stark claims that partner-perpetrated physical abuse and other forms of violence against women ought to be understood as a human rights violation. The authors engage Stark's rhetorically powerful political and analytical innovation by outlining one theoretical and one practical challenge to shifting the paradigm that researchers, advocates, and policy makers use to describe, explain, and remedy the harms of coercive control from misdemeanor assault to human rights violation. The theoretical challenge involves overcoming the public/ private dichotomy that underpins liberal conceptions of human rights.The practical challenge involves using the human rights framework in the United States, given public indifference to human rights rhetoric or law, reluctance of U.S. policy makers to submit to scrutiny or justice-oriented processes under international law on issues of human rights and especially war crimes, and the consequent U.S. legacy of refusal to participate meaningfully in the international human rights process. The authors conclude that employing a human rights framework holds potential in the United States, but the paradigm shift Stark advocates will not materialize without widespread mobilization of interest in and understanding of human rights among domestic violence advocates and the society in general.

  9. Real time and in situ determination of ammonia concentration in the atmosphere by intermodulated Stark resonant CO2 laser spectroscopy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sauren, H.; Gerkema, E.; Bicanic, D.; Jalink, H.

    1993-01-01

    A concept of Intermodulated Photoacoustic Stark Spectroscopy (IMPASS) was used in an attempt to perform the interference-free field measurement of trace ammonia (3-40 ppbv) concentration levels in the air with a time resolution of 40 s.

  10. Degravitation, Orbital Dynamics and the Effective Barycentre

    CERN Document Server

    Dirkes, Alain

    2016-01-01

    In this article we present a particular theory of gravity in which Einstein's field equations are modified by promoting Newton's constant $G$ to a covariant differential operator $G_\\Lambda(\\Box_g)$. The general idea was obviously outlined for the first time in [13-16] and originates from the quest of finding a mechanism that is able to degravitate the vacuum energy on cosmological scales. We suggest in this manuscript a precise covariant coupling model which acts like a high-pass filter with a macroscopic distance filter scale $\\sqrt{\\Lambda}$. In the context of this specific theory of gravity we review some cosmological aspects before we briefly recall the effective relaxed Einstein equations outlined for the first time in [1]. We present a general procedure to determine the gravitational potentials for a far away wave zone field point. Moreover we work out the modified orbital dynamics of a binary-system as well as the effective 1.5 post-Newtonian barycentre for a generic $n$-body system. We notice that it...

  11. The ac stark shift and space-borne rubidium atomic clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formichella, V.; Camparo, J.; Sesia, I.; Signorile, G.; Galleani, L.; Huang, M.; Tavella, P.

    2016-11-01

    Due to its small size, low weight, and low power consumption, the Rb atomic frequency standard (RAFS) is routinely the first choice for atomic timekeeping in space. Consequently, though the device has very good frequency stability (rivaling passive hydrogen masers), there is interest in uncovering the fundamental processes limiting its long-term performance, with the goal of improving the device for future space systems and missions. The ac Stark shift (i.e., light shift) is one of the more likely processes limiting the RAFS' long-term timekeeping ability, yet its manifestation in the RAFS remains poorly understood. In part, this comes from the fact that light-shift induced frequency fluctuations must be quantified in terms of the RAFS' light-shift coefficient and the output variations in the RAFS' rf-discharge lamp, which is a nonlinear inductively-couple plasma (ICP). Here, we analyze the light-shift effect for a family of 10 on-orbit Block-IIR GPS RAFS, examining decade-long records of their on-orbit frequency and rf-discharge lamp fluctuations. We find that the ICP's light intensity variations can take several forms: deterministic aging, jumps, ramps, and non-stationary noise, each of which affects the RAFS' frequency via the light shift. Correlating these light intensity changes with RAFS frequency changes, we estimate the light-shift coefficient, κLS, for the family of RAFS: κLS = -(1.9 ± 0.3) × 10-12/%. The 16% family-wide variation in κLS indicates that while each RAFS may have its own individual κLS, the variance of κLS among similarly designed RAFS can be relatively small. Combining κLS with our estimate of the ICP light intensity's non-stationary noise, we find evidence that random-walk frequency noise in high-quality space-borne RAFS is strongly influenced by the RAFS' rf-discharge lamp via the light shift effect.

  12. Frequency-dependent dynamic effective properties of porous materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peijun Wei; Zhuping Huang

    2005-01-01

    The frequency-dependent dynamic effective properties (phase velocity, attenuation and elastic modulus) of porous materials are studied numerically. The coherent plane longitudinal and shear wave equations, which are obtained by averaging on the multiple scattering fields, are used to evaluate the frequency-dependent dynamic effective properties of a porous material. It is found that the prediction of the dynamic effective properties includes the size effects of voids which are not included in most prediction of the traditional static effective properties. The prediction of the dynamic effective elastic modulus at a relatively low frequency range is compared with that of the traditional static effective elastic modulus, and the dynamic effective elastic modulus is found to be very close to the Hashin-Shtrikman upper bound.

  13. The origin of the unusual Qy red shift in LH1-RC complexes from purple bacteria Thermochromatium tepidum as revealed by Stark absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Fei; Yu, Long-Jiang; Wang-Otomo, Zheng-Yu; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2015-12-01

    Native LH1-RC of photosynthetic purple bacteria Thermochromatium (Tch.) tepidum, B915, has an ultra-red BChl a Qy absorption. Two blue-shifted complexes obtained by chemical modification, B893 and B882, have increasing full widths at half maximum (FWHM) and decreasing transition dipole oscillator strength. 77K Stark absorption spectroscopy studies were employed for the three complexes, trying to understand the origin of the 915 nm absorption. We found that Tr(∆α) and |∆μ| of both Qy and carotenoid (Car) bands are larger than for other purple bacterial LH complexes reported previously. Moreover, the red shifts of the Qy bands are associated with (1) increasing Tr(∆α) and |∆μ| of the Qy band, (2) the red shift of the Car Stark signal and (3) the increasing |∆μ| of the Car band. Based on the results and the crystal structure, a combined effect of exciton-charge transfer (CT) states mixing, and inhomogeneous narrowing of the BChl a site energy is proposed to be the origin of the 915 nm absorption. CT-exciton state mixing has long been found to be the origin of strong Stark signal in LH1 and special pair, and the more extent of the mixing in Tch. tepidum LH1 is mainly the consequence of the shorter BChl-BChl distances. The less flexible protein structure results in a smaller site energy disorder (inhomogeneous narrowing), which was demonstrated to be able to influence |∆μ| and absorption.

  14. Fluid dynamic effects on staphylococci bacteria biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Erica; Bayles, Kenneth; Endres, Jennifer; Wei, Timothy

    2016-11-01

    Staphylococcus aureus bacteria are able to form biofilms and distinctive tower structures that facilitate their ability to tolerate treatment and to spread within the human body. The formation of towers, which break off, get carried downstream and serve to initiate biofilms in other parts of the body are of particular interest here. It is known that flow conditions play a role in the development, dispersion and propagation of biofilms in general. The influence of flow on tower formation, however, is not at all understood. This work is focused on the effect of applied shear on tower development. The hypothesis being examined is that tower structures form within a specific range of shear stresses and that there is an as yet ill defined fluid dynamic phenomenon that occurs hours before a tower forms. In this study, a range of shear stresses is examined that brackets 0.6 dynes/cm2, the nominal shear stress where towers seem most likely to form. This talk will include µPTV measurements and cell density data indicating variations in flow and biofilm evolution as a function of the applied shear. Causal relations between flow and biofilm development will be discussed.

  15. Dynamic Effects of Diabatization in Distillation Columns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Thomas; Huusom, Jakob Kjøbsted; Abildskov, Jens

    2012-01-01

    The dynamic eects of diabatization in distillation columns are investigated in simulation with primary focus on the heat-integrated distillation column (HIDiC). A generic, dynamic, rst-principle model has been formulated, which is exible to describe various diabatic distillation congurations....... Dynamic Relative Gain Array and Singular Value Analysis have been applied in a comparative study of a conventional distillation column and a HIDiC. The study showed increased input-output coupling due to diabatization. Feasible SISO control structures for the HIDiC were also found. Control...

  16. Adsorbate dynamics on a silica-coated gold surface measured by Rydberg Stark spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naber, J.; Machluf, S.; Torralbo-Campo, L.; Soudijn, M. L.; van Druten, N. J.; van Linden van den Heuvell, H. B.; Spreeuw, R. J. C.

    2016-05-01

    Trapping a Rydberg atom close to a surface is an important step towards the realisation of many proposals for quantum information processing or hybrid quantum systems. One of the challenges in these experiments is posed by the electric field emanating from contaminations on the surface. Here we report on measurements of an electric field created by 87Rb atoms adsorbed on a 25 nm thick layer of SiO2, covering a 90 nm layer of Au. The electric field is measured using a two-photon transition to the 23{D}5/2 and 25{S}1/2 states. The electric field value that we measure is higher than typical values measured above metal surfaces, but is consistent with a recent measurement above a SiO2 surface. In addition, we measure the temporal behaviour of the field and observe that we can reduce it in a single experimental cycle, using ultraviolet light or by mildly locally heating the surface with one of the excitation lasers, whereas the buildup of the field takes thousands of cycles. We explain these results by a change in the adatom distribution on the surface. These results indicate that, while the stray electric field can be reduced, achieving field-free conditions above a silica-coated gold chip remains challenging.

  17. Adsorbate dynamics on a silica-coated gold surface measured by Rydberg Stark spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Naber, J; Torralbo-Campo, L; Soudijn, M L; van Druten, N J; Heuvell, H B van Linden van den; Spreeuw, R J C

    2015-01-01

    Trapping a Rydberg atom close to a surface is an important step towards the realisation of many proposals of quantum information or hybrid quantum systems. One of the challenges in these experiments is to overcome the electric field emanating from contaminations on the surface. Here we report on measurements of an electric field created by $^{87}$Rb atoms absorbed on a 25$\\,$nm thick layer of SiO$_2$, covering a 90$\\,$nm layer of Au. The electric field is measured using a two-photon transition to the 23$D_{5/2}$ and 25$S_{1/2}$ state. The electric field value that we measure is higher than typical values measured above metal surfaces, but is consistent with other measurements above SiO$_2$ surfaces. In addition, we measure the temporal behaviour of the field and observe that we can reduce it in a single experimental cycle, using UV light or by mildly heating the surface, whereas the buildup of the field takes thousands of cycles. We explain these results by a change in the ad-atoms distribution on the surface...

  18. Stark Contrast

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Three years after an8.0-magnitude earthquake hit southwest China’s Sichuan Province,disaster-affected areas have gained a new look.1.FRESH LOOK:The new Yingxiu Town has emerged with the help of Dongguan in Guangdong Province on land that was leveled by the Wenchuan

  19. Orogenic delamination - dynamics, effects, and geological expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Kosuke; Gerya, Taras

    2010-05-01

    Unbundling of continental lithosphere and removal of its mantle portion have been described by two mutually rather exclusive models, convective thinning and integral delamination. Either disburdens the remaining lithosphere, weakens the remainder, and causes uplift and extension. Increased heat flux is likely to promote high-degree crustal melting, and has been viewed as a source for voluminous granitic intrusions in late or collapsing orogenic settings. Collapse may be driven by any of gravitational potential differences from orogen to foreland, by stress inversion in the unburdened domain, or by suction of a retreating trench. In this study, we investigate prerequisites, mechanism, and development paths for orogeny-related mantle lithosphere removal. Our experiments numerically reproduce delamination which self-consistently results from the dynamics of a decoupling collision zone. In particular, it succeeds without a seed facilitating initial separation of layers. External shortening of a continent - ocean - continent assembly, such as to initiate oceanic subduction, is lifted before the whole oceanic part is consumed, leaving slab pull to govern further convergence. Once buoyant continental crust enters, the collision zone locks, and convergence diminishes. Under favourable conditions, delamination then initiates close to the edge of the mantle wedge and at deep crustal levels. While it initially separates upper crust from lower crust according to the weakness minimum in the lithospheric strength profile, the lower crust is eventually also delaminated from the subducting lithospheric mantle, owing to buoyancy differences. The level of delamination within the lithosphere seems thus first rheology-controlled, then density-controlled. Subduction-coupled delamination is contingent on retreat and decoupling of the subducting slab, which in turn is dependent on effective rheological weakening of the plate contact. Weakening is a function of shear-heating and hereby of

  20. Memory effects in nonadiabatic molecular dynamics at metal surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Thomas; Schiøtz, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    We study the effect of temporal correlation in a Langevin equation describing nonadiabatic dynamics at metal surfaces. For a harmonic oscillator, the Langevin equation preserves the quantum dynamics exactly and it is demonstrated that memory effects are needed in order to conserve the ground state...... energy of the oscillator. We then compare the result of Langevin dynamics in a harmonic potential with a perturbative master equation approach and show that the Langevin equation gives a better description in the nonperturbative range of high temperatures and large friction. Unlike the master equation...... the temporal correlation function and dynamical friction within density functional theory....

  1. Calculation of Stark resonance parameters for valence orbitals of the water molecule

    CERN Document Server

    Laso, Susana Arias

    2016-01-01

    An exterior complex scaling technique is applied to compute Stark resonance parameters for two molecular orbitals ($1b_{1}$ and $1b_{2}$) represented in the field-free limit in a single-center expansion. For electric DC field configurations that guarantee azimuthal symmetry of the solution the calculation is carried out by solving a two-dimensional partial differential equation in spherical polar coordinates using a finite-element method. The resonance positions and widths as a function of electric field strengths are shown for field strengths starting in the tunnelling ionization regime, and extending well into the over-barrier ionization region.

  2. Two attosecond pulse transient absorption spectroscopy and extraction of the instantaneous AC Stark shift in helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bækhøj, Jens E.; Bojer Madsen, Lars

    2016-07-01

    In two attosecond pulse absorption spectroscopy (TAPAS) the use of two attosecond XUV pulses allows the extraction of atomic and molecular quantum mechanical dipole phases from spectroscopic measurements. TAPAS relies on interference between processes that individually only include a single XUV photon, and therefore does not rely on high intensity attosecond pulses. To show the usefulness and limitations of the TAPAS method we investigate its capability of capturing the instantaneous AC Stark shift induced by a midinfrared 3200 nm pulse in the | 1{{s}}2{{p}}> state of helium.

  3. Precision measurement and compensation of optical stark shifts for an ion-trap quantum processor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häffner, H; Gulde, S; Riebe, M; Lancaster, G; Becher, C; Eschner, J; Schmidt-Kaler, F; Blatt, R

    2003-04-11

    Using optical Ramsey interferometry, we precisely measure the laser-induced ac-Stark shift on the S(1/2)-D(5/2) "quantum bit" transition near 729 nm in a single trapped 40Ca+ ion. We cancel this shift using an additional laser field. This technique is of particular importance for the implementation of quantum information processing with cold trapped ions. As a simple application we measure the atomic phase evolution during a n x 2 pi rotation of the quantum bit.

  4. ON THE CONCENTRATION PROPERTIES FOR THE NONLINEAR SCHR(O)DINGER EQUATION WITH A STARK POTENTIAL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Shihui; Zhang Jian

    2011-01-01

    In this paper,we study blow-up solutions of the Cauchy problem to the L2 critical nonlinear Schr(o)dinger equation with a Stark potential.Using the variational characterization of the ground state for nonlinear Schr(o)dinger equation without any potential,we obtain some concentration properties of blow-up solutions,including that the origin is the blow-up point of the radial blow-up solutions,the phenomenon of L2-concentration and rate of L2-concentration of blow-up solutions.

  5. The ac Stark shifts of the terahertz clock transitions of barium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余庚华; 耿鹰鸽; 李隆; 周超; 段丞博; 柴瑞鹏; 杨永明

    2015-01-01

    Wavelength-dependent AC Stark shifts and magic wavelengths of the terahertz clock transitions between the metastable triplet states 6s5d 3D1 and 6s5d 3D2 are investigated with considering the optical lattice trapping of barium atoms with the linearly polarized laser. The trap depths and the slopes of light shift difference with distinct magic wave-lengths of the optical lattices are also discussed in detail. Several potentially suitable working points for the optical lattice trapping laser are recommended and selected from these magic wavelengths.

  6. Dynamic enhancement of the exchange bias training effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, S.; Polisetty, S.; Binek, Ch.; Berger, A.

    2007-03-01

    Exchange bias in coupled magnetic thin films and its accompanying training effect are fundamental interface phenomena with significant impact in spintronic applications. Both effects are well known in heterosystems of ferro- and antiferromagnetic thin films. Here, we report on the dynamic enhancement of the training effect in an exchange coupled bilayer of soft and hard ferromagnetic materials. Training is referred to as a gradual change of the bias field, which evolves upon cycling the soft layer through consecutive hysteresis loops. Its dynamic enhancement is observed with increasing sweep rate of the applied magnetic field from quasistatic to the fully dynamic range. A dynamically generalized theory based on triggered relaxation is in excellent agreement with the training data. Additionally, we evidence the remarkable universality of our theoretical approach when applying it to the dynamically altered training effect of a conventional exchange bias system involving an antiferromagnetic pinning layer.

  7. Ultrafast dynamics in InAs quantum dot and GaInNAs quantum well semiconductor heterostructures

    OpenAIRE

    Malins, David B

    2007-01-01

    The quantum confined Stark effect (QCSE) and ultrafast absorption dynamics near the bandedge have been investigated in p-i-n waveguides comprising quantum confined heterostructures grown on GaAs substrates, for emission at 1.3um. The materials are; isolated InAs/InGaAs dot-in-a-well (DWELL) quantum dots (QD), bilayer InAs quantum dots and GaInNAs multiple quantum wells (MQW). The focus was to investigate these dynamics in a planar waveguide geometry, for the purpose of large scale integ...

  8. Electron Density Measurements in the National Spherical Torus Experiment Detached Divertor Region Using Stark Broadening of Deuterium Infrared Paschen Emission Lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soukhanovskii, V A; Johnson, D W; Kaita, R; Roquemore, A L

    2007-04-27

    Spatially resolved measurements of deuterium Balmer and Paschen line emission have been performed in the divertor region of the National Spherical Torus Experiment using a commercial 0.5 m Czerny-Turner spectrometer. While the Balmer emission lines, Balmer and Paschen continua in the ultraviolet and visible regions have been extensively used for tokamak divertor plasma temperature and density measurements, the diagnostic potential of infrared Paschen lines has been largely overlooked. We analyze Stark broadening of the lines corresponding to 2-n and 3-m transitions with principle quantum numbers n = 7-12 and m = 10-12 using recent Model Microfield Method calculations (C. Stehle and R. Hutcheon, Astron. Astrophys. Supl. Ser. 140, 93 (1999)). Densities in the range (5-50) x 10{sup 19} m{sup -3} are obtained in the recombining inner divertor plasma in 2-6 MW NBI H-mode discharges. The measured Paschen line profiles show good sensitivity to Stark effects, and low sensitivity to instrumental and Doppler broadening. The lines are situated in the near-infrared wavelength domain, where optical signal extraction schemes for harsh nuclear environments are practically realizable, and where a recombining divertor plasma is optically thin. These properties make them an attractive recombining divertor density diagnostic for a burning plasma experiment.

  9. Effects of the quantisation ambiguities on the Big Bounce dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Hrycyna, Orest; Szydlowski, Marek

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we investigate dynamics of the modified loop quantum cosmology models using dynamical systems methods. Modifications considered come from the choice of the different field strength operator $\\hat{F}$ and result in different forms of the effective Hamiltonian. Such an ambiguity of the choice of this expression from some class of functions is allowed in the framework of loop quantisation. Our main goal is to show how such modifications can influence the bouncing universe scenario in the loop quantum cosmology. In effective models considered we classify all evolutional paths for all admissible initial conditions. The dynamics is reduced to the form of a dynamical system of the Newtonian type on a 2-dimensional phase plane. These models are equivalent dynamically to the FRW models with the decaying effective cosmological term parametrised by the canonical variable $p$ (or by the scale factor $a$). We find that for the positive cosmological constant there is a class of oscillating models without the ...

  10. Varying parameter models to accommodate dynamic promotion effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foekens, E.W.; Leeflang, P.S.H.; Wittink, D.R.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the dynamic effects of sales promotions. We create dynamic brand sales models (for weekly store-level scanner data) by relating store intercepts and a brand's own price elasticity to a measure of the cumulated previous price discounts - amount and time - for t

  11. Estimation of Spatial Dynamic Nonparametric Durbin Models with Fixed Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Minghui; Hu, Ridong; Chen, Jianwei

    2016-01-01

    Spatial panel data models have been widely studied and applied in both scientific and social science disciplines, especially in the analysis of spatial influence. In this paper, we consider the spatial dynamic nonparametric Durbin model (SDNDM) with fixed effects, which takes the nonlinear factors into account base on the spatial dynamic panel…

  12. The biomechanical and physiological effect of two dynamic workstations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botter, J.; Burford, E.M.; Commissaris, D.; Könemann, R.; Mastrigt, S.H.V.; Ellegast, R.P.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this research paper was to investigate the effect, both biomechanically and physiologically, of two dynamic workstations currently available on the commercial market. The dynamic workstations tested, namely the Treadmill Desk by LifeSpan and the LifeBalance Station by RightAngle, were com

  13. Varying parameter models to accommodate dynamic promotion effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foekens, E.W.; Leeflang, P.S.H.; Wittink, D.R.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the dynamic effects of sales promotions. We create dynamic brand sales models (for weekly store-level scanner data) by relating store intercepts and a brand's own price elasticity to a measure of the cumulated previous price discounts - amount and time - for

  14. Effect of the Longitudinal Contact Location on Vehicle Dynamics Simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgelman, N.; Li, Z.; Dollevoet, R.

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the effect of the calculation of the longitudinal location of a wheel rail contact point on the wheelset’s motion in a vehicle dynamic simulation. All current vehicle dynamic software programs assume that the contact between wheel and rail takes place in the vertical plane th

  15. Spectroscopy between parabolic states in hydrogen: Enhancement of the Stark-induced resonances in its photoionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glab, W.L.; Ng, K.; Yao, D.; Nayfeh, M.H.

    1985-06-01

    We present calculations of the photoionization spectrum of excited hydrogen using ..pi.. polarization in the presence of a strong electric field as a function of the spherical (applicable to complex atoms) and parabolic quantum numbers of the excited state. We also present corresponding measurements of the photoionization yield from the individual parabolic states of n = 2. Both the calculations and the measurements show an enhancement of the depth of the so-called ''Stark-induced modulation'' in the region E> or =0 when the initial excited state is a pure m/sub l/ = 0 blue state, and disappear almost completely when the initial state is a pure m/sub l/ = 0 red state. These results are understood using arguments based on the fact that the charge distribution of the Stark-induced states is tremendously extended up field. Because of the excellent signal to noise ratio of the enhanced modulations, we were able to measure the field dependence of the spacings with sufficient accuracy to confirm the (3/4) power law and rule out the recently suggested (2/3) power law.

  16. Plasma density characterization at SPARC-LAB through Stark broadening of Hydrogen spectral lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filippi, F., E-mail: francesco.filippi@roma1.infn.it [Dipartimento di Scienze di Base e Applicate per l' Ingegneria (SBAI), ‘Sapienza’ Università di Roma, Via A. Scarpa 14-16, 00161 Roma (Italy); INFN-Roma1, Piazzale Aldo Moro, 2 00161 Roma (Italy); Anania, M.P.; Bellaveglia, M.; Biagioni, A.; Chiadroni, E. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, INFN, Via E. Fermi, Frascati (Italy); Cianchi, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universitá di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Di Giovenale, D.; Di Pirro, G.; Ferrario, M. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, INFN, Via E. Fermi, Frascati (Italy); Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L. [Dipartimento di Scienze di Base e Applicate per l' Ingegneria (SBAI), ‘Sapienza’ Università di Roma, Via A. Scarpa 14-16, 00161 Roma (Italy); INFN-Roma1, Piazzale Aldo Moro, 2 00161 Roma (Italy); Pompili, R.; Shpakov, V.; Vaccarezza, C.; Villa, F. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, INFN, Via E. Fermi, Frascati (Italy); Zigler, A. [Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

    2016-09-01

    Plasma-based acceleration techniques are of great interest for future, compact accelerators due to their high accelerating gradient. Both particle-driven and laser-driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration experiments are foreseen at the SPARC-LAB Test Facility (INFN National Laboratories of Frascati, Italy), with the aim to accelerate high-brightness electron beams. In order to optimize the efficiency of the acceleration in the plasma and preserve the quality of the accelerated beam, the knowledge of the plasma electron density is mandatory. The Stark broadening of the Hydrogen spectral lines is one of the candidates used to characterize plasma density. The implementation of this diagnostic for plasma-based experiments at SPARC-LAB is presented. - Highlights: • Stark broadening of Hydrogen lines has been measured to determine plasma density. • Plasma density diagnostic tool for plasma-based experiments at SPARC-LAB is presented. • Plasma density in tapered laser triggered ablative capillary discharge was measured. • Results of plasma density measurements in ablative capillaries are shown.

  17. Discontinuity effects in dynamically loaded tilting pad journal bearings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Kim; Klit, Peder; Vølund, Anders

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes two discontinuity effects that can occur when modelling radial tilting pad bearings subjected to high dynamic loads. The first effect to be treated is a pressure build-up discontinuity effect. The second effect is a contact-related discontinuity that disappears when a contact...

  18. The Optical Stark Spectrum of the [17.8]0+-X1Σ+ Band of Gold Monofluoride, AuF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruohan; Qin, Chengbing; Steimle, Timothy C.; Varberg, Thomas

    2012-06-01

    The bonding and electrostatic prperties of gold containig molecules are highly influenced by realtivistic effects. Recently Varberg's group reported on the field-free detection and analysis of the [17.8]0+-X1Σ+ band system of AuF at Doppler limited resolution. Here we report on the analysis of the same band recorded field free and in the presence of a static electric field for a cold molecular beam sample. The Stark induced shifts of the R(0)(17756.156 cm-1), R(1)(17756.640 cm-1) and P(1)(17755.123 cm-1)branch features were analyzed to determine the permanent electric dipole moment, μel, of 2.025 D and 4.218 D for the [17.8]0+ and X1Σ+ states, respectively. The agreement with the various DFT and wave-function based predictions will be discussed. P.Pyykko; Angew Chem. Int 43 4412, 2004. E.K. Butler, B. J. Knurr, K. J. Manke, T. R. Vervoot, and T. D. Varberg; J. Phys. Chem. A 114 4831, 2010. E. Goll, and H. Stoll; Phys. Rev. A 76 032507, 2007. F. Holka, A. Avramopoulos, O. Loboda, V. Kello, and M.G. Papadopoulos; Chem.Phys. Lett 472 185, 2009.

  19. Effective Free Energy for Individual Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Grauwin, Sebastian; Bertin, Eric; Jensen, Pablo; 10.1142/S0219525911003128

    2011-01-01

    Physics and economics are two disciplines that share the common challenge of linking microscopic and macroscopic behaviors. However, while physics is based on collective dynamics, economics is based on individual choices. This conceptual difference is one of the main obstacles one has to overcome in order to characterize analytically economic models. In this paper, we build both on statistical mechanics and the game theory notion of Potential Function to introduce a rigorous generalization of the physicist's free energy, which includes individual dynamics. Our approach paves the way to analytical treatments of a wide range of socio-economic models and might bring new insights into them. As first examples, we derive solutions for a congestion model and a residential segregation model.

  20. Robust dynamical effects in traffic and chaotic maps on trees

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bosiljka Tadić; Zoran Levnajić

    2008-06-01

    In the dynamic processes on networks collective effects emerge due to the couplings between nodes, where the network structure may play an important role. Interaction along many network links in the nonlinear dynamics may lead to a kind of chaotic collective behavior. Here we study two types of well-defined diffusive dynamics on scale-free trees: traffic of packets as navigated random walks, and chaotic standard maps coupled along the network links. We show that in both cases robust collective dynamic effects appear, which can be measured statistically and related to non-ergodicity of the dynamics on the network. Specifically, we find universal features in the fluctuations of time series and appropriately defined return-time statistics.

  1. Effect of the Longitudinal Contact Location on Vehicle Dynamics Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Burgelman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the effect of the calculation of the longitudinal location of a wheel rail contact point on the wheelset’s motion in a vehicle dynamic simulation. All current vehicle dynamic software programs assume that the contact between wheel and rail takes place in the vertical plane through the wheelset’s rolling axis. However, when the yaw angle of the wheelset is nonzero, the contact point is situated up to 10 mm from that plane. This difference causes a difference in the yaw moment on the wheelset which is used in the vehicle dynamic simulation. To such an end, an existing analytical method to determine the longitudinal method was validated using a numerical approach. Then vehicle dynamic simulations with both the classic and the new contact location were performed, concluding that using a more accurate contact point location results in a smaller wheelset yaw angle in a vehicle dynamic simulation, although the effect is small.

  2. Dynamic Ground Effects Simulation Using OVERFLOW-D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Bill

    1999-01-01

    This presentation is broken into 5 logical sections. The Background Information section describes the technical issues being address by this study. The Approach section describes the organization of the contract effort which was laid out as the most effective means of quantifying, with validated methods, the magnitude of dynamic ground effects for the TCA (Technology Concept Aircraft) configuration. The Validation Case section describes the analysis of the XB-70 configuration in both static and dynamic ground effect, with comparisons to wind tunnel and flight test data. The TCA Analysis section then describes the application of the same codes and methodologies to the TCA in both static and dynamic ground effect. Comparisons are made between the static and dynamic, as well as to early static data from a recent wind tunnel test on the TCA configuration. Finally, the work to date is summarized and the future direction of this study is outlined.

  3. Effects of Dynamic Neuromuscular Analysis Training on Static and Dynamic Balance in Indian Female Basketball Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archna Sharma

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to investigate the effects of dynamic neuromuscular analysis on static and dynamic balance of Indian state level female athletes. It was hypothesized that the training protocol would improve both static and dynamic components of the balance, improving dynamic balance more than static. A total of 43 randomly selected state level female basketball players aged 16 -18 years participated in the study. The subjects were further divided into two groups, viz. Dynamic Neuromuscular Analysis (DNA group (n=23 and control group (n = 20. Pre and post static balance was tested to all the subjects by Stork Balance Test (SBT and Balance Error Scoring System (BESS, and dynamic balance was measured by Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT. DNA intervention of 90 minutes was given for 6 weeks while the control group followed traditional training. Results showed a significant improvement both in static and dynamic balance (p<0.001. It might be concluded that 6 week DNA training designed for the prevention of ACL injuries could also improve both static and dynamic balance in Indian female basketball players.

  4. Dynamical Casimir effect in Circuit QED for Nonuniform Trajectories

    CERN Document Server

    Corona-Ugalde, Paulina; Wilson, C M; Mann, Robert B

    2015-01-01

    We propose a generalization of the superconducting circuit simulation of the dynamical Casimir effect where we consider relativistically moving boundary conditions following different trajectories. We study the feasibility of the setup used in the past to simulate the dynamical Casimir effect to reproduce richer relativistic trajectories differing from purely sinusoidal ones. We show how different relativistic oscillatory trajectories of the boundaries of the same period and similar shape produce a rather different spectrum of particles characteristic of their respective motions.

  5. Electrical detection of magnetization dynamics via spin rectification effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harder, Michael; Gui, Yongsheng; Hu, Can-Ming

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the current status of a frontier in dynamic spintronics and contemporary magnetism, in which much progress has been made in the past decade, based on the creation of a variety of micro and nanostructured devices that enable electrical detection of magnetization dynamics. The primary focus is on the physics of spin rectification effects, which are well suited for studying magnetization dynamics and spin transport in a variety of magnetic materials and spintronic devices. Intended to be intelligible to a broad audience, the paper begins with a pedagogical introduction, comparing the methods of electrical detection of charge and spin dynamics in semiconductors and magnetic materials respectively. After that it provides a comprehensive account of the theoretical study of both the angular dependence and line shape of electrically detected ferromagnetic resonance (FMR), which is summarized in a handbook format easy to be used for analysing experimental data. We then review and examine the similarity and differences of various spin rectification effects found in ferromagnetic films, magnetic bilayers and magnetic tunnel junctions, including a discussion of how to properly distinguish spin rectification from the spin pumping/inverse spin Hall effect generated voltage. After this we review the broad applications of rectification effects for studying spin waves, nonlinear dynamics, domain wall dynamics, spin current, and microwave imaging. We also discuss spin rectification in ferromagnetic semiconductors. The paper concludes with both historical and future perspectives, by summarizing and comparing three generations of FMR spectroscopy which have been developed for studying magnetization dynamics.

  6. Nonlocal memory effects in the dynamics of open quantum systems

    CERN Document Server

    Laine, Elsi-Mari; Piilo, Jyrki; Li, Chuan-Feng; Guo, Guang-Can

    2011-01-01

    We study a model of two entangled photons interacting locally with two dephasing environments. It is shown that initial correlations between the local environments can generate a nonlocal quantum process from a local interaction Hamiltonian. While the global dynamics of the two-photon polarization state exhibits strong memory effects, the induced local dynamics of either of the two photons is found to be Markovian. A direct connection between the degree of memory effects and the amount of correlations in the initial environmental state is derived. The results demonstrate that, contrary to conventional wisdom, enlarging an open system can change the dynamics from Markovian to non-Markovian.

  7. Surface acoustic BLOCH oscillations, the Wannier-Stark ladder, and Landau-Zener tunneling in a solid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima, M M; Kosevich, Yu A; Santos, P V; Cantarero, A

    2010-04-23

    We present the experimental observation of Bloch oscillations, the Wannier-Stark ladder, and Landau-Zener tunneling of surface acoustic waves in perturbed grating structures on a solid substrate. A model providing a quantitative description of our experimental observations, including multiple Landau-Zener transitions of the anticrossed surface acoustic Wannier-Stark states, is developed. The use of a planar geometry for the realization of the Bloch oscillations and Landau-Zener tunneling allows a direct access to the elastic field distribution. The vertical surface displacement has been measured by interferometry.

  8. Effect of social group dynamics on contagion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhenyuan; Calderón, J. P.; Xu, Chen; Zhao, Guannan; Fenn, Dan; Sornette, Didier; Crane, Riley; Hui, Pak Ming; Johnson, Neil F.

    2010-05-01

    Despite the many works on contagion phenomena in both well-mixed systems and heterogeneous networks, there is still a lack of understanding of the intermediate regime where social group structures evolve on a similar time scale to individual-level transmission. We address this question by considering the process of transmission through a model population comprising social groups which follow simple dynamical rules for growth and breakup. Despite the simplicity of our model, the profiles produced bear a striking resemblance to a wide variety of real-world examples—in particular, empirical data that we have obtained for social (i.e., YouTube), financial (i.e., currency markets), and biological (i.e., colds in schools) systems. The observation of multiple resurgent peaks and abnormal decay times is qualitatively reproduced within the model simply by varying the time scales for group coalescence and fragmentation. We provide an approximate analytic treatment of the system and highlight a novel transition which arises as a result of the social group dynamics.

  9. Effects of Gas Dynamics on Rapidly Collapsing Bubbles

    CERN Document Server

    Bauman, Spenser

    2013-01-01

    The dynamics of rapidly collapsing bubbles are of great interest due to the high degree of energy focusing that occurs withing the bubble. Molecular dynamics provides a way to model the interior of the bubble and couple the gas dynamics with the equations governing the bubble wall. While much theoretical work has been done to understand how a bubble will respond to an external force, the internal dynamics of the gas system are usually simplified greatly in such treatments. This paper shows how the gas system dynamics affect bubble collapse and illustrates what effects various modeling assumptions can have on the motion of the bubble wall. In addition, we present a method of adaptively partitioning space to improve the performance of collision intersection calculations when using an energy dependent collision cross section.

  10. Opinion dynamics: models, extensions and external effects

    CERN Document Server

    Sîrbu, Alina; Servedio, Vito D P; Tria, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Recently, social phenomena have received a lot of attention not only from social scientists, but also from physicists, mathematicians and computer scientists, in the emerging interdisciplinary field of complex system science. Opinion dynamics is one of the processes studied, since opinions are the drivers of human behaviour, and play a crucial role in many global challenges that our complex world and societies are facing: global financial crises, global pandemics, growth of cities, urbanisation and migration patterns, and last but not least important, climate change and environmental sustainability and protection. Opinion formation is a complex process affected by the interplay of different elements, including the individual predisposition, the influence of positive and negative peer interaction (social networks playing a crucial role in this respect), the information each individual is exposed to, and many others. Several models inspired from those in use in physics have been developed to encompass many of t...

  11. ICM METALLICITY EVOLUTION: EFFECTS OF DYNAMICAL PROCESSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Cora

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a study on the origin of the metallicity evolution of the intracluster medium (ICM by applying a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation to N-Body/SPH non-radiative cosmological simulations of clusters of galaxies. The results obtained for a set of clusters with virial masses of - 1:5 - 1015 h-1M contribute to the theoretical interpretation of recent observational X-ray data, which indicate a decrease of the average iron content of the intracluster gas with increasing redshift, z. We nd that this evolution is mainly due to a progressive increase of the iron content within 15 per cent of the virial radius as a result of dynamical processes. The clusters have been considerably enriched by z - 1 with very low contribution from recent star formation. Low entropy gas that has been enriched at high z sink to the cluster centre contributing to the evolution of the metallicity pro les.

  12. Dynamic stabilization of the optical resonances of single nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond

    CERN Document Server

    Acosta, V M; Faraon, A; Huang, Z; Fu, K -M C; Stacey, A; Simpson, D A; Tomljenovic-Hanic, S; Greentree, A D; Prawer, S; Beausoleil, R G

    2011-01-01

    We report electrical tuning by the Stark effect of the excited-state structure of single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers located less than ~100 nm from the diamond surface. The zero-phonon line (ZPL) emission frequency is controllably varied over a range of 300 GHz. Using high-resolution emission spectroscopy, we observe electrical tuning of the strengths of both cycling and spin-altering transitions. Under resonant excitation, we apply dynamic feedback to stabilize the ZPL frequency, nearly eliminating spectral diffusion on timescales greater than ~50 ms.

  13. 不同微场分布函数对Stark加宽和频移的影响%The Stark Broadening and Stark Shift with Different Electric Microfield Distribution Functions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冉俊霞; 李霞; 张少朋; 董丽芳

    2009-01-01

    The Stark broadening and Stark shift were described with different electric microfield distribution functions. These microfield distribution functions include Holtsmark, Neutral Point, Nearest-Neighbor and Mayer model microfield distribution function. The Stark profiles with four microfield distribution functions were studied and the Stark broadening and Stark shift were obtained from the Stark profiles to study the influence of different electric microfield distribution functions on Stark broade-ning and Stark shift. The results show that the influence of different electric microfield distribution functions on Stark broadening and Stark shift increases with the plasma ions impact parameter with the same electrons impact broadening parameter. With the increase in the plasma electrons impact parameter the influence of different electric microfield distribution functions increases with the same ion impact broadening parameter. Especially, the influence of Mayer model electric microfield distribution function is very distinct when the ion impact broadening parameter is larger. It is illuminated that the plasma ions intense impact has great influence on the spectral line profile. It is very important for the plasma diagnosis to select appropriate electric microfield distri-bution function. The results have important reference for the plasma diagnosis.%分别采用Holtsmark,Neutral Point,Nearest-Neighbor和Mayer模犁微场分布函数对Stark线型进行了研究,进而得到相应微场函数下的Stark加宽和频移,研究了4种不同的微场分布函数对Stark加宽和频移的影响.研究结果表明,在电子加宽参数不变时,4种微场分布函数对stark加宽和频移的影响随离子加宽参数的增加而增加;在离子加宽参数不变时,4种微场分布甬数对Stark加宽和频移的影响随电子加宽参数的增加而增加;特别是,当离子加宽参数较大时,Mayer模型微场分布函数对Stark加宽和频移的影响异常明显.

  14. A switched ring Stark decelerator for both light and heavy polar molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Shunyong; Wang, Qin; Deng, Lianzhong; Yin, Jianping

    2016-03-01

    There is increasing interest in cold heavy polar molecular species for their applications in fundamental physics, such as the tests of the electron’s electric dipole moment. Here we propose a switched ring Stark decelerator suitable for slowing both light and heavy polar molecules. Two typical polar molecular species, ND3 and 205TlF, are employed to test the feasibility of our scheme with the help of trajectory calculation. Our proposed scheme is found to share many advantages with the state-of-the-art traveling wave decelerator, yet with relatively simple electronics and flexible operation modes. Sub-millikelvin molecular samples can be conveniently obtained in our decelerator using a combined operation mode. These monochromatic beams are ideal starting points for precise studies of molecular collision, cold chemistry and high-resolution spectroscopy.

  15. LIMITING BEHAVIOR OF BLOW-UP SOLUTIONS OF THE NLSE WITH A STARK POTENTIAL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Shihui; Zhang Jian

    2012-01-01

    This article is concerned with blow-up solutions of the Cauchy problem of critical nonlinear Schr(o)dinger equation with a Stark potential.By using the variational characterization of corresponding ground state,the limiting behavior of blow-up solutions with critical and small super-critical mass are obtained in the natural energy space ∑ ={u ∈ H1; ∫RN [x|2|u|2dx < +o}.Moreover,an interesting concentration property of the blow-up solutions with critical mass is gotten,which reads that |u(t,x)|2→‖Q‖2L2δx =x1 as t→ T.

  16. Deterministic implementations of quantum gates with circuit QEDs via Stark-chirped rapid adiabatic passages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jingwei [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Physics and Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Wei, L.F., E-mail: weilianfu@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Physics and Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Quantum Optoelectronics Laboratory, School of Physics and Technology, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China)

    2015-10-23

    Highlights: • A specific SCRAP technique is proposed to realize quantum gates in the circuit QED. • These quantum gates are insensitive to the durations of the applied pluses. • The implemented quantum gates are robustness against the operational imperfections. - Abstract: We show that a set of universal quantum gates could be implemented robustly in a circuit QED system by using Stark-chirped rapid adiabatic passage (SCRAP) technique. Under the adiabatic limit we find that the population transfers could be deterministically passaged from one selected quantum states to the others, and thus the desired quantum gates can be implemented. The proposed SCRAP-based gates are insensitive to the details of the operations and thus relax the designs of the applied pulses, operational imperfections, and the decoherence of the system.

  17. Plasma density characterization at SPARC_LAB through Stark broadening of Hydrogen spectral lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippi, F.; Anania, M. P.; Bellaveglia, M.; Biagioni, A.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Di Giovenale, D.; Di Pirro, G.; Ferrario, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.; Pompili, R.; Shpakov, V.; Vaccarezza, C.; Villa, F.; Zigler, A.

    2016-09-01

    Plasma-based acceleration techniques are of great interest for future, compact accelerators due to their high accelerating gradient. Both particle-driven and laser-driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration experiments are foreseen at the SPARC_LAB Test Facility (INFN National Laboratories of Frascati, Italy), with the aim to accelerate high-brightness electron beams. In order to optimize the efficiency of the acceleration in the plasma and preserve the quality of the accelerated beam, the knowledge of the plasma electron density is mandatory. The Stark broadening of the Hydrogen spectral lines is one of the candidates used to characterize plasma density. The implementation of this diagnostic for plasma-based experiments at SPARC_LAB is presented.

  18. One-Dimensional Discrete Stark Hamiltonian and Resonance Scattering by Impurities

    CERN Document Server

    Dmitrieva, L A; Melnikov, Yu B; Kuperin, Yu.A.; Melnikov, Yu.B.

    1997-01-01

    A one-dimensional discrete Stark Hamiltonian with a continuous electric field is constructed by extension theory methods. In absence of the impurities the model is proved to be exactly solvable, the spectrum is shown to be simple, continuous, filling the real axis; the eigenfunctions, the resolvent and the spectral measure are constructed explicitly. For this (unperturbed) system the resonance spectrum is shown to be empty. The model considering impurity in a single node is also constructed using the operator extension theory methods. The spectral analysis is performed and the dispersion equation for the resolvent singularities is obtained. The resonance spectrum is shown to contain infinite discrete set of resonances. One-to-one correspondence of the constructed Hamiltonian to some Lee-Friedrichs model is established.

  19. Random operators disorder effects on quantum spectra and dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Aizenman, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This book provides an introduction to the mathematical theory of disorder effects on quantum spectra and dynamics. Topics covered range from the basic theory of spectra and dynamics of self-adjoint operators through Anderson localization-presented here via the fractional moment method, up to recent results on resonant delocalization. The subject's multifaceted presentation is organized into seventeen chapters, each focused on either a specific mathematical topic or on a demonstration of the theory's relevance to physics, e.g., its implications for the quantum Hall effect. The mathematical chapters include general relations of quantum spectra and dynamics, ergodicity and its implications, methods for establishing spectral and dynamical localization regimes, applications and properties of the Green function, its relation to the eigenfunction correlator, fractional moments of Herglotz-Pick functions, the phase diagram for tree graph operators, resonant delocalization, the spectral statistics conjecture, and rela...

  20. Hygrothermal effect of bamboo by dynamic mechanical analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUAN Mingjie; ZHANG Qisheng

    2006-01-01

    Dynamic properties of bamboo,Phyllostachys pubescens,with moisture content (MC) ranging from -130 to 130℃,were studied by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA).The results showed that the hygrothermal effect on dynamic mechanical properties was negative.The storage modulus decreases with increasing temperature and MC,and glass transition temperature decreases with increasing MC.The glass transition temperature and tan delta of bamboo were 30.5℃,0.02 and 10.61℃,0.04,when MC was 10% and 34%,respectively.

  1. Information Feedback and Mass Media Effects in Cultural Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    González-Avella, Juan Carlos; Cosenza, Mario G.; Klemm, Konstantin; Eguíluz, Víctor M; San Miguel, Maxi

    2007-01-01

    We study the effects of different forms of information feedback associated with mass media on an agent-agent based model of the dynamics of cultural dissemination. In addition to some processes previously considered, we also examine a model of local mass media influence in cultural dynamics. Two mechanisms of information feedback are investigated: (i) direct mass media influence, where local or global mass media act as an additional element in the network of interactions of each agent, and (i...

  2. Information feedback and mass media effects in cultural dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    González-Avella, Juan Carlos; Mario G. Cosenza; Klemm, Konstantin; Eguíluz, Víctor M.; San Miguel, Maxi

    2007-01-01

    We study the effects of different forms of information feedback associated with mass media on an agent-agent based model of the dynamics of cultural dissemination. In addition to some processes previously considered, we also examine a model of local mass media influence in cultural dynamics. Two mechanisms of information feedback are investigated: (i) direct mass media influence, where local or global mass media act as an additional element in the network of interactions of each agent, and (i...

  3. Stark-potential evaporative cooling of polar molecules in a novel optical-access opened electrostatic trap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙慧; 王振霞; 王琴; 李兴佳; 刘建平; 印建平

    2015-01-01

    We propose a novel optical-access opened electrostatic trap to study the Stark-potential evaporative cooling of polar molecules by using two charged disk electrodes with a central hole of radius r0=1.5 mm, and derive a set of new analytical equations to calculate the spatial distributions of the electrostatic field in the above charged-disk layout. Afterwards, we calculate the electric-field distributions of our electrostatic trap and the Stark potential for cold ND3 molecules, and analyze the dependences of both the electric field and the Stark potential on the geometric parameters of our charged-disk scheme, and find an optimal condition to form a desirable trap with the same trap depth in the x, y, and z directions. Also, we propose a desirable scheme to realize an efficient loading of cold polar molecules in the weak-field-seeking states, and investigate the dependences of the loading efficiency on both the initial forward velocity of the incident molecular beam and the loading time by Monte Carlo simulations. Our study shows that the maximal loading efficiency of our trap scheme can reach about 95%, and the corresponding temperature of the trapped cold molecules is about 28.8 mK. Finally, we study the Stark-potential evaporative cooling for cold polar molecules in our trap by the Monte Carlo method, and find that our simulated evaporative cooling results are consistent with our developed analytical model based on trapping-potential evaporative cooling.

  4. Effects of Shoreline Dynamics on Saltmarsh Vegetation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shailesh; Goff, Joshua; Moody, Ryan M; McDonald, Ashley; Byron, Dorothy; Heck, Kenneth L; Powers, Sean P; Ferraro, Carl; Cebrian, Just

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the impact of shoreline dynamics on fringing vegetation density at mid- and low-marsh elevations at a high-energy site in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Particularly, we selected eight unprotected shoreline stretches (75 m each) at a historically eroding site and measured their inter-annual lateral movement rate using the DSAS method for three consecutive years. We observed high inter-annual variability of shoreline movement within the selected stretches. Specifically, shorelines retrograded (eroded) in year 1 and year 3, whereas, in year 2, shorelines advanced seaward. Despite shoreline advancement in year 2, an overall net erosion was recorded during the survey period. Additionally, vegetation density generally declined at both elevations during the survey period; however, probably due to their immediate proximity with lateral erosion agents (e.g., waves, currents), marsh grasses at low-elevation exhibited abrupt reduction in density, more so than grasses at mid elevation. Finally, contrary to our hypothesis, despite shoreline advancement, vegetation density did not increase correspondingly in year 2 probably due to a lag in response from biota. More studies in other coastal systems may advance our knowledge of marsh edge systems; however, we consider our results could be beneficial to resource managers in preparing protection plans for coastal wetlands against chronic stressors such as lateral erosion.

  5. Dynamics of Markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCauley, Joseph L.

    2004-06-01

    Standard texts and research in economics and finance ignore the absence of evidence from the analysis of real, unmassaged market data to support the notion of Adam Smith's stabilizing Invisible Hand. In stark contrast, this text introduces a new empirically-based model of financial market dynamics that explains the volatility of prices options correctly and clarifies the instability of financial markets. The emphasis is on understanding how real markets behave, not how they hypothetically 'should' behave.

  6. Wave operator theory of quantum dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Philippe; Paidarová, Ivana

    1998-09-01

    An energy-dependent wave operator theory of quantum dynamics is derived for time-independent and time-dependent Hamiltonians. Relationships between Green's functions, wave operators, and effective Hamiltonians are investigated. Analytical properties of these quantities are especially relevant for studying resonances. A derivation of the relationship between the Green's functions and the (t,t') method of Peskin and Moiseyev [J. Chem. Phys. 99, 4590 (1993)] is presented. The observable quantities can be derived from the wave operators determined with the use of efficient iterative procedures. As in the theory of Bloch operators for bound states, the theory is based on a partition of the full Hilbert space into three subspaces: the model space, an intermediate space, and the outer space. On the basis of this partition an alternative definition of active spaces currently considered in large scale calculations is suggested. A numerical illustration is presented for several model systems and for the Stark effect in the hydrogen atom.

  7. Effects of Instantaneous Multiband Dynamic Compression on Speech Intelligibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herzke Tobias

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The recruitment phenomenon, that is, the reduced dynamic range between threshold and uncomfortable level, is attributed to the loss of instantaneous dynamic compression on the basilar membrane. Despite this, hearing aids commonly use slow-acting dynamic compression for its compensation, because this was found to be the most successful strategy in terms of speech quality and intelligibility rehabilitation. Former attempts to use fast-acting compression gave ambiguous results, raising the question as to whether auditory-based recruitment compensation by instantaneous compression is in principle applicable in hearing aids. This study thus investigates instantaneous multiband dynamic compression based on an auditory filterbank. Instantaneous envelope compression is performed in each frequency band of a gammatone filterbank, which provides a combination of time and frequency resolution comparable to the normal healthy cochlea. The gain characteristics used for dynamic compression are deduced from categorical loudness scaling. In speech intelligibility tests, the instantaneous dynamic compression scheme was compared against a linear amplification scheme, which used the same filterbank for frequency analysis, but employed constant gain factors that restored the sound level for medium perceived loudness in each frequency band. In subjective comparisons, five of nine subjects preferred the linear amplification scheme and would not accept the instantaneous dynamic compression in hearing aids. Four of nine subjects did not perceive any quality differences. A sentence intelligibility test in noise (Oldenburg sentence test showed little to no negative effects of the instantaneous dynamic compression, compared to linear amplification. A word intelligibility test in quiet (one-syllable rhyme test showed that the subjects benefit from the larger amplification at low levels provided by instantaneous dynamic compression. Further analysis showed that the increase

  8. Vehicle dynamic effects in the course of passing over turnouts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zelenka J.

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available For the quantification of vehicle dynamic effects at passing over turnouts at a higher speed there was developed a methodology for evaluating of acceleration measured on vehicle axle boxes in the year 2003. The methodology is based on statistical evaluation of lateral and vertical acceleration measured values at passing over both critical parts of a turnout (tongue, frog. The created methodology was used for investigation of vehicle dynamic effects by running at speed up to 230 km/h in the year 2004 in terms of high speed tests of tilting-body unit class 680 CD. There was found relatively high values of dynamic effects already at a speed 160 km/h. In terms of tilting-body unit class 680 tests at a higher speed in curves of chosen track lines of 1st and 2nd corridor of Czech Railways there was carried out also verification of curved turnouts state according to methodology mentioned above with a view to possibility of speed increasing at curved throats of chosen stations. Lateral vehicle dynamic effects at passing over a curved turnout frog area were evaluated. There were carried out simulation calculations of vehicle passing over a turnout based on measured geometric parameters of wheelset as well as chosen turnouts. Results of the calculations were compared with measurements. The increased vehicle dynamic effects found in pulsed beats character influence negatively the turnouts part (not only wheel contacting parts as well as operating life all unsuspended parts of vehicles.

  9. Dynamical Lamb effect versus dissipation in superconducting quantum circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukov, A. A.; Shapiro, D. S.; Pogosov, W. V.; Lozovik, Yu. E.

    2016-06-01

    Superconducting circuits provide a new platform for study of nonstationary cavity QED phenomena. An example of such a phenomenon is the dynamical Lamb effect, which is the parametric excitation of an atom due to nonadiabatic modulation of its Lamb shift. This effect was initially introduced for a natural atom in a varying cavity, while we suggest its realization in a superconducting qubit-cavity system with dynamically tunable coupling. In the present paper, we study the interplay between the dynamical Lamb effect and the energy dissipation, which is unavoidable in realistic systems. We find that despite naive expectations, this interplay can lead to unexpected dynamical regimes. One of the most striking results is that photon generation from vacuum can be strongly enhanced due to qubit relaxation, which opens another channel for such a process. We also show that dissipation in the cavity can increase the qubit excited-state population. Our results can be used for experimental observation and investigation of the dynamical Lamb effect and accompanying quantum effects.

  10. Framing effects: behavioral dynamics and neural basis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hongming; Wang, X T; Zhu, Liqi

    2010-09-01

    This study examined the neural basis of framing effects using life-death decision problems framed either positively in terms of lives saved or negatively in terms of lives lost in large group and small group contexts. Using functional MRI we found differential brain activations to the verbal and social cues embedded in the choice problems. In large group contexts, framing effects were significant where participants were more risk seeking under the negative (loss) framing than under the positive (gain) framing. This behavioral difference in risk preference was mainly regulated by the activation in the right inferior frontal gyrus, including the homologue of the Broca's area. In contrast, framing effects diminished in small group contexts while the insula and parietal lobe in the right hemisphere were distinctively activated, suggesting an important role of emotion in switching choice preference from an indecisive mode to a more consistent risk-taking inclination, governed by a kith-and-kin decision rationality.

  11. Dynamic Capability and Its Effects on Firm Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Wei Lin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The study has been mainly attempted as an extension to previous studies made on dynamic capabilities and their necessity in organizational firms for goals accomplishments. Approach: The literature review illustrates the effects of dynamic capabilities on product innovation, firm performance and environmental dynamism. The researches of different authors and theorists on the subject of dynamic capability have been consulted and analysed to present a research study through this study. Results: The study has provided with a detailed understanding of the dynamic capability strategies that have been found to be highly significant in successful organizational performance. The development of different propositions also reflect the increasing importance of dynamic capabilities in organizations that managers are integrating in their strategic management practices all the more from before. Conclusion: This study reveals that the availability of dynamic capabilities imply that a firm may be protected from the negative impacts through planned strategic measures intended to encounter challenges and uncertainties and yet perform to the utmost level and succeed in achieving organizational goals and objectives.

  12. Opinion dynamics within a virtual small group: the stubbornness effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guazzini, Andrea; Cini, Alessandro; Bagnoli, Franco; Ramasco, José

    2015-09-01

    The modeling of opinion dynamics is social systems has attracted a good deal of attention in the last decade. Even though based on intuition and observation, the mechanisms behind many of these models need solid empirical grounding. In this work, we investigate the relation among subjective variables (such as the personality), the dynamics of the affinity network dynamics, the communication patterns emerging throughout the social interactions and the opinions dynamics in a series of experiments with five small groups of ten people each. In order to ignite the discussion, the polemic topic of animal experimentation was proposed. The groups essentially polarized in two factions with a set of stubborn individuals (those not changing their opinions in time) playing the role of anchors. Our results suggest that the different layers present in the group dynamics (i.e., individual level, group dynamics and meso-communication) are deeply intermingled, specifically the stubbornness effect appears to be related to the dynamical features of the network topologies, and only in an undirected way to the personality of the participants.

  13. Opinion dynamics within a virtual small group: the stubbornness effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea eGuazzini

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The modeling of opinion dynamics is social systems has attracted a good deal of attention in the last decade. Even though based on intuition and observation, the mechanisms behind many of these models need solid empirical grounding. In this work, we investigate the relation among subjective variables (such as the personality, the dynamics of the affinity network dynamics, the communication patterns emerging throughout the social interactions and the opinions dynamics in a series of experiments with five small groups of ten people each. In order to ignite the discussion, the polemic topic of animal experimentation was proposed. The groups essentially polarized in two factions with a set of stubborn individuals (those not changing their opinions in time playing the role of anchors. Our results suggest that the different layers present in the group dynamics (i.e., individual level, group dynamics and meso-communication are deeply intermingled, specifically the stubbornness effect appears to be related to the dynamical features of the network topologies, and only in an undirected way to the personality of the participants.

  14. Infrared Stark and Zeeman spectroscopy of OH-CO: The entrance channel complex along the OH + CO → trans-HOCO reaction pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brice, Joseph T.; Liang, Tao; Raston, Paul L.; McCoy, Anne B.; Douberly, Gary E.

    2016-09-01

    Sequential capture of OH and CO by superfluid helium droplets leads exclusively to the formation of the linear, entrance-channel complex, OH-CO. This species is characterized by infrared laser Stark and Zeeman spectroscopy via measurements of the fundamental OH stretching vibration. Experimental dipole moments are in disagreement with ab initio calculations at the equilibrium geometry, indicating large-amplitude motion on the ground state potential energy surface. Vibrational averaging along the hydroxyl bending coordinate recovers 80% of the observed deviation from the equilibrium dipole moment. Inhomogeneous line broadening in the zero-field spectrum is modeled with an effective Hamiltonian approach that aims to account for the anisotropic molecule-helium interaction potential that arises as the OH-CO complex is displaced from the center of the droplet.

  15. Perceptual Effects of Dynamic Range Compression in Popular Music Recordings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortkjær, Jens; Walther-Hansen, Mads

    2014-01-01

    The belief that the use of dynamic range compression in music mastering deteriorates sound quality needs to be formally tested. In this study normal hearing listeners were asked to evaluate popular music recordings in original versions and in remastered versions with higher levels of dynamic range...... compression. Surprisingly, the results failed to reveal any evidence of the effects of dynamic range compression on subjective preference or perceived depth cues. Perceptual data suggest that listeners are less sensitive than commonly believed to even high levels of compression. As measured in terms...... of differences in the peak-to-average ratio, compression has little perceptual effect other than increased loudness or clipping effects that only occur at high levels of compression. One explanation for the inconsistency between data and belief might result from the fact that compression is frequently...

  16. Perceptual effects of dynamic range compression in popular music recordings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortkjær, Jens; Walther-Hansen, Mads

    2014-01-01

    The belief that the use of dynamic range compression in music mastering deteriorates sound quality needs to be formally tested. In this study normal hearing listeners were asked to evaluate popular music recordings in original versions and in remastered versions with higher levels of dynamic range...... compression. Surprisingly, the results failed to reveal any evidence of the effects of dynamic range compression on subjective preference or perceived depth cues. Perceptual data suggest that listeners are less sensitive than commonly believed to even high levels of compression. As measured in terms...... of differences in the peak-to-average ratio, compression has little perceptual effect other than increased loudness or clipping effects that only occur at high levels of compression. One explanation for the inconsistency between data and belief might result from the fact that compression is frequently...

  17. Dynamic nonlinear thermal optical effects in coupled ring resonators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenguang Huang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the dynamic nonlinear thermal optical effects in a photonic system of two coupled ring resonators. A bus waveguide is used to couple light in and out of one of the coupled resonators. Based on the coupling from the bus to the resonator, the coupling between the resonators and the intrinsic loss of each individual resonator, the system transmission spectrum can be classified by three different categories: coupled-resonator-induced absorption, coupled-resonator-induced transparency and over coupled resonance splitting. Dynamic thermal optical effects due to linear absorption have been analyzed for each category as a function of the input power. The heat power in each resonator determines the thermal dynamics in this coupled resonator system. Multiple “shark fins” and power competition between resonators can be foreseen. Also, the nonlinear absorption induced thermal effects have been discussed.

  18. Dynamic analyses of viscoelastic dielectric elastomers incorporating viscous damping effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junshi; Zhao, Jianwen; Chen, Hualing; Li, Dichen

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, based on the standard linear solid rheological model, a dynamics model of viscoelastic dielectric elastomers (DEs) is developed with incorporation of viscous damping effect. Numerical calculations are employed to predict the damping effect on the dynamic performance of DEs. With increase of damping force, the DEs show weak nonlinearity and vibration strength. Phase diagrams and Poincaré maps are utilized to detect the dynamic stability of DEs, and the results indicate that a transition from aperiodic vibration to quasi-periodic vibration occurs with enlargement of damping force. The resonance properties of DEs including damping effect are subsequently analyzed, demonstrating a reduction of resonant frequency and resonance peak with increase of damping force.

  19. Dynamics of Multistage Gear Transmission with Effects of Gearbox Vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, F. K.; Tu, Y. K.; Zakrajsek, J. J.; Townsend, Dennis P.

    1990-01-01

    A comprehensive approach is presented in analyzing the dynamic behavior of multistage gear transmission systems with the effects of gearbox induced vibrations and mass imbalances of the rotor. The modal method, with undamped frequencies and planar mode shapes, is used to reduce the degrees of freedom of the gear system for time-transient dynamic analysis. Both the lateral and torsional vibration modes of each rotor-bearing-gear stage as well as the interstage vibrational characteristics are coupled together through localized gear mesh tooth interactions. In addition, gearbox vibrations are also coupled to the rotor-bearing-gear system dynamics through bearing support forces between the rotor and the gearbox. Transient and steady state dynamics of lateral and torsional vibrations of the geared system are examined in both time and frequency domains to develop interpretations of the overall modal dynamic characteristics under various operating conditions. A typical three-stage geared system is used as an example. Effects of mass imbalance and gearbox vibrations on the system dynamic behavior are presented in terms of modal excitation functions for both lateral and torsional vibrations. Operational characteristics and conclusions are drawn from the results presented.

  20. Osho Dynamic Meditation’s Effect on Serum Cortisol Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Anuj; Mittal, Ashish

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Dynamic meditation is one of the most popular active meditation, introduced by an Indian mystic Osho in 1970. This one hour meditation consists of five stages: Deep fast chaotic breathing, catharsis, using a mantra "Hoo", silence, and dancing. A previous study observed that Osho dynamic meditation causes decrease in several psychopathological variables such as aggressive behaviour, anxiety and depression. However, it is not objectively established that the dynamic meditation has an anti-stress effect. Aim To find out the effect of Osho dynamic meditation on the serum cortisol levels (cortisol is an indicator of stress) and therefore to observe whether it has any anti-stress effect. Materials and Methods An experimental study was planned doing the dynamic meditation empty stomach in morning at 6 to 7 am every day for 21 days from 1st March 2015 to 21st March 2015 at Lucknow. Twenty healthy volunteers between 20 to 50 years (14 males and 6 females) participated in the study. Serum cortisol level was estimated from the blood samples collected in the morning one day prior (baseline) and post-meditation on the 21st day of the study. The difference between mean cortisol levels of the baseline and post-meditation groups were tested for significance by applying the paired t-test. Results Sixteen volunteers out of the 20 completed the study while four dropped out due to their health and personal reasons. The serum cortisol levels were decreased in all the 16 participants on 21st day as compared to the baseline levels and the decline in the mean cortisol level was highly significant (pstress effects. The mechanism of action could primarily be attributed to the release of repressed emotions and psychological inhibitions and traumas. Thus, dynamic meditation could be recommended for the amelioration of stress and stress related physical and mental disorders. More clinical studies should be done on dynamic meditation to prove its efficacy and become an approved

  1. Effects of culling on mesopredator population dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James C Beasley

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic changes in land use and the extirpation of apex predators have facilitated explosive growth of mesopredator populations. Consequently, many species have been subjected to extensive control throughout portions of their range due to their integral role as generalist predators and reservoirs of zoonotic disease. Yet, few studies have monitored the effects of landscape composition or configuration on the demographic or behavioral response of mesopredators to population manipulation. During 2007 we removed 382 raccoons (Procyon lotor from 30 forest patches throughout a fragmented agricultural ecosystem to test hypotheses regarding the effects of habitat isolation on population recovery and role of range expansion and dispersal in patch colonization of mesopredators in heterogeneous landscapes. Patches were allowed to recolonize naturally and demographic restructuring of patches was monitored from 2008-2010 using mark-recapture. An additional 25 control patches were monitored as a baseline measure of demography. After 3 years only 40% of experimental patches had returned to pre-removal densities. This stagnant recovery was driven by low colonization rates of females, resulting in little to no within-patch recruitment. Colonizing raccoons were predominantly young males, suggesting that dispersal, rather than range expansion, was the primary mechanism driving population recovery. Contrary to our prediction, neither landscape connectivity nor measured local habitat attributes influenced colonization rates, likely due to the high dispersal capability of raccoons and limited role of range expansion in patch colonization. Although culling is commonly used to control local populations of many mesopredators, we demonstrate that such practices create severe disruptions in population demography that may be counterproductive to disease management in fragmented landscapes due to an influx of dispersing males into depopulated areas. However, given

  2. Nonlocal effects on dynamic damage accumulation in brittle solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, E.P.

    1995-12-01

    This paper presents a nonlocal analysis of the dynamic damage accumulation processes in brittle solids. A nonlocal formulation of a microcrack based continuum damage model is developed and implemented into a transient dynamic finite element computer code. The code is then applied to the study of the damage accumulation process in a concrete plate with a central hole and subjected to the action of a step tensile pulse applied at opposite edges of the plate. Several finite element discretizations are used to examine the mesh size effect. Comparisons between calculated results based on local and nonlocal formulations are made and nonlocal effects are discussed.

  3. Pressure effects on dynamics behavior of multiwall boron nitride nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talebian, Taha [Faculty of Engineering, Neyshabur Branch, Islamic Azad University, Neyshabur (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    The dynamic behavior of Multiwall boron nitride nanotubes (MWBNNTs) is investigated by employing multiple elastic shells model. The influences of van der Waals interactions on layers are shown as nonlinear functions of the interlayer distance of MWBNNTs. Governing equations are solved by using the developed finite element method and by employing time history diagrams. The radial wave speed from the outermost layer to the innermost layer is computed. The effects of geometrical factors such as diameter-to-thickness ratio on dynamic behavior of MWBNNTs are determined. The magnification aspects of MWBNNTs are computed, and the effects of surrounding pressures on wave speed and magnification aspect of MWBNNTs are discussed.

  4. Universal Effective Hadron Dynamics from Superconformal Algebra

    CERN Document Server

    Brodsky, Stanley J; Dosch, Hans Gunter; Lorcé, Cédric

    2016-01-01

    An effective supersymmetric QCD light-front Hamiltonian for hadrons composed of light quarks, which includes a spin-spin interaction between the hadronic constituents, is constructed by embedding superconformal quantum mechanics into AdS space. A specific breaking of conformal symmetry inside the graded algebra determines a unique effective quark-confining potential for light hadrons, as well as remarkable connections between the meson and baryon spectra. The results are consistent with the empirical features of the light-quark hadron spectra, including a universal mass scale for the slopes of the meson and baryon Regge trajectories and a zero-mass pion in the limit of massless quarks. Our analysis is consistently applied to the excitation spectra of the $\\pi, \\rho, K, K^*$ and $\\phi$ meson families as well as to the $N, \\Delta, \\Lambda, \\Sigma, \\Sigma^*, \\Xi$ and $\\Xi^*$ in the baryon sector. We also predict the existence of tetraquarks which are degenerate in mass with baryons with the same angular momentum...

  5. Universal effective hadron dynamics from superconformal algebra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Téramond, Guy F.; Dosch, Hans Günter; Lorcé, Cédric

    2016-08-01

    An effective supersymmetric QCD light-front Hamiltonian for hadrons composed of light quarks, which includes a spin-spin interaction between the hadronic constituents, is constructed by embedding superconformal quantum mechanics into AdS space. A specific breaking of conformal symmetry inside the graded algebra determines a unique effective quark-confining potential for light hadrons, as well as remarkable connections between the meson and baryon spectra. The results are consistent with the empirical features of the light-quark hadron spectra, including a universal mass scale for the slopes of the meson and baryon Regge trajectories and a zero-mass pion in the limit of massless quarks. Our analysis is consistently applied to the excitation spectra of the π, ρ, K, K* and ϕ meson families as well as to the N, Δ, Λ, Σ, Σ*, Ξ and Ξ* in the baryon sector. We also predict the existence of tetraquarks which are degenerate in mass with baryons with the same angular momentum. The mass of light hadrons is expressed in a universal and frame-independent decomposition in the semiclassical approximation described here.

  6. Dynamic simulation for effective workforce management in new product development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mutingi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Effective planning and management of workforce for new product development (NPD projects is a great challenge to many organisations, especially in the presence of engineering changes during the product development process. The management objective in effective workforce management is to recruit, develop and deploy the right people at the right place at the right time so as to fulfill organizational objectives. In this paper, we propose a dynamic simulation model to address the workforce management problem in a typical NPD project consisting of design, prototyping, and production phases. We assume that workforce demand is a function of project work remaining and the current available skill pool. System dynamics simulation concepts are used to capture the causality relationships and feedback loops in the workforce system from a systems thinking. The evaluation of system dynamics simulation reveals the dynamic behaviour in NPD workforce management systems and shows how adaptive dynamic recruitment and training decisions can effectively balance the workforce system during the NPD process.

  7. Effective long wavelength scalar dynamics in de Sitter

    CERN Document Server

    Moss, Ian

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the effective infrared theory governing a light scalar's long wavelength dynamics in de Sitter spacetime. We show how the separation of scales around the physical curvature radius $k/a \\sim H$ can be performed consistently with a window function and how short wavelengths can be integrated out in the Schwinger-Keldysh path integral formalism. At leading order, and for time scales $\\Delta t \\gg H^{-1}$, this results in the well-known Starobinsky stochastic evolution. Our approach allows for the computation of quantum UV corrections, generating an effective potential on which the stochastic dynamics takes place, as well as the description of dynamics on spatial and temporal scales comparable to $H^{-1}$ and above. We further elaborate on the use of a Wigner function to evaluate the non-perturbative expectation values of field correlators and the stress-energy tensor of $\\phi$ within the stochastic formalism.

  8. Dynamic multileaf collimation without `tongue-and-groove' underdosage effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Santvoort, J. P. C.; Heijmen, B. J. M.

    1996-10-01

    In all commercially available multileaf collimators, a `tongue-and-groove' - or similar - construction is used for reduction of leakage radiation between adjacent leaves. These constructions can cause serious underdosages in intensity-modulated photon beams. A method for leaf trajectory calculation for dynamic multileaf collimation, which fully avoids these underdosage effects, is presented. The method is based on pairwise synchronizations of trajectories of adjacent leaf pairs, such that the delivered beam intensity in each `tongue-and-groove' region is always equal to the smallest of the two prescribed intensities for the two corresponding leaf pairs. The effectiveness of the method has been proven for a large number of intensity-modulated fields, using the dynamic multileaf collimation mode of our MM50 Racetrack Microtron. Compared to dynamic multileaf collimation without synchronization, beam-on times are always equal or longer. For the cases that we studied, the beam-on time was typically increased by 5 to 15%.

  9. Dynamic multileaf collimation without 'tongue-and-groove' underdosage effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Santvoort, J P; Heijmen, B J

    1996-10-01

    In all commercially available multileaf collimators, a 'tongue-and-groove'--or similar--construction is used for reduction of leakage radiation between adjacent leaves. These constructions can cause serious underdosages in intensity-modulated photon beams. A method for leaf trajectory calculation for dynamic multileaf collimation, which fully avoids these underdosage effects, is presented. The method is based on pairwise synchronizations of trajectories of adjacent leaf pairs, such that the delivered beam intensity in each 'tongue-and-groove' region is always equal to the smallest of the two prescribed intensities for the two corresponding leaf pairs. The effectiveness of the method has been proven for a large number of intensity-modulated fields, using the dynamic multileaf collimation mode of our MM50 Racetrack Microtron. Compared to dynamic multileaf collimation without synchronization, beam-on times are always equal or longer. For the cases that we studied, the beam-on time was typically increased by 5 to 15%.

  10. Geometric Phase Effects in Nonadiabatic Dynamics near Conical Intersections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryabinkin, Ilya G; Joubert-Doriol, Loïc; Izmaylov, Artur F

    2017-07-18

    Dynamical consideration that goes beyond the common Born-Oppenheimer approximation (BOA) becomes necessary when energy differences between electronic potential energy surfaces become small or vanish. One of the typical scenarios of the BOA breakdown in molecules beyond diatomics is a conical intersection (CI) of electronic potential energy surfaces. CIs provide an efficient mechanism for radiationless electronic transitions: acting as "funnels" for the nuclear wave function, they enable rapid conversion of the excessive electronic energy into the nuclear motion. In addition, CIs introduce nontrivial geometric phases (GPs) for both electronic and nuclear wave functions. These phases manifest themselves in change of the wave function signs if one considers an evolution of the system around the CI. This sign change is independent of the shape of the encircling contour and thus has a topological character. How these extra phases affect nonadiabatic dynamics is the main question that is addressed in this Account. We start by considering the simplest model providing the CI topology: two-dimensional two-state linear vibronic coupling model. Selecting this model instead of a real molecule has the advantage that various dynamical regimes can be easily modeled in the model by varying parameters, whereas any fixed molecule provides the system specific behavior that may not be very illustrative. After demonstrating when GP effects are important and how they modify the dynamics for two sets of initial conditions (starting from the ground and excited electronic states), we give examples of molecular systems where the described GP effects are crucial for adequate description of nonadiabatic dynamics. Interestingly, although the GP has a topological character, the extent to which accounting for GPs affect nuclear dynamics profoundly depends on topography of potential energy surfaces. Understanding an extent of changes introduced by the GP in chemical dynamics poses a problem of

  11. The Effects of Realism in Learning with Dynamic Visualizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheiter, Katharina; Gerjets, Peter; Huk, Thomas; Imhof, Birgit; Kammerer, Yvonne

    2009-01-01

    Two experiments are reported that investigated the relative effectiveness of a realistic dynamic visualization as opposed to a schematic visualization for learning about cell replication (mitosis). In Experiment 1, 37 university students watched either realistic or schematic visualizations. Students' subjective task demands ratings as well as…

  12. Modeling dynamic effects of promotion on interpurchase times

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Fok (Dennis); R. Paap (Richard); Ph.H.B.F. Franses (Philip Hans)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper we put forward a duration model to analyze the dynamic effects of marketing-mix variables on interpurchase times. We extend the accelerated failure-time model with an autoregressive structure. An important feature of our model is that it allows for different long-run and

  13. Modeling dynamic effects of promotion on interpurchase times

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Fok (Dennis); R. Paap (Richard); Ph.H.B.F. Franses (Philip Hans)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper we put forward a duration model to analyze the dynamic effects of marketing-mix variables on interpurchase times. We extend the accelerated failure-time model with an autoregressive structure. An important feature of our model is that it allows for different long-run and

  14. Dynamic Incentive Effects of Relative Performance Pay: A Field Experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Delfgaauw (Josse); A.J. Dur (Robert); J.A. Non (Arjan); W.J.M.I. Verbeke (Willem)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractWe conduct a field experiment among 189 stores of a retail chain to study dynamic incentive effects of relative performance pay. Employees in the randomly selected treatment stores could win a bonus by outperforming three comparable stores from the control group over the course of four w

  15. Dynamical Casimir effect and minimal temperature in quantum thermodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Benenti, G.; Strini, G.

    2014-01-01

    We study the fundamental limitations of cooling to absolute zero for a qubit, interacting with a single mode of the electromagnetic field. Our results show that the dynamical Casimir effect, which is unavoidable in any finite-time thermodynamic cycle, forbids the attainability of the absolute zero of temperature, even in the limit of an infinite number of cycles.

  16. Maximising effectiveness of distributed mobile observation systems in dynamic situations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kester, L.J.H.M.; Ditzel, M.

    2014-01-01

    The trend in modern day observation systems is towards distributed (often mobile) systems that are able to automatically adapt themselves in dynamic situations. They have to make most of their resources to maximise the system's effectiveness, all at reasonable cost. Currently, there is no formal fra

  17. Bauschinger effect in thin metal films: Discrete dislocation dynamics study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davoudi, K.M.; Nicola, L.; Vlassak, J.J.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of dislocation climb on plastic deformation during loading and unloading are studied using a two-dimensional discrete dislocation dynamics model. Simulations are performed for polycrystalline thin films passivated on both surfaces. Dislocation climb lowers the overall level of the stress

  18. Effect of Fluid Dynamic Viscosity on the Strength of Chalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, K.; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    The mechanical strength of high porosity and weakly cemented chalk is affected by the fluid in the pores. In this study, the effect of the dynamic viscosity of non-polar fluids has been measured on outcrop chalk from Sigerslev Quarry, Stevns, Denmark. The outcome is that the measured strength...

  19. Effective action approach to dynamical generation of fermion mixing

    CERN Document Server

    Blasone, Massimo; Smaldone, Luca

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we discuss a mechanism for the dynamical generation of flavor mixing, in the framework of the Nambu--Jona Lasinio model. Our approach is illustrated both with the conventional operatorial formalism and with functional integral and ensuing one-loop effective action. The results obtained are briefly discussed.

  20. Ultrafast Terahertz Dynamics and Switching in Quantum Dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turchinovich, Dmitry; Hoffmann, Matthias C.

    2012-01-01

    carrier release from the QDs with (sub-)picosecond time resolution, using optical pump–THz probe measurements. In the second part of this chapter we investigate the direct manipulation of the quantum confinement potential of the QDs by an electric field of a strong THz pulse. The resulting THz......-driven quantum-confined Stark effect leads to a strong modulation of a ground-state optical absorption in the QDs. Dynamically, such a THz-induced electro-absorption modulation in QDs (near-)instantaneously follows the absolute value of the electric field of the THz pulse, providing the capability for Tbit......In this Chapter we describe the experimental studies of ultrafast carrier dynamics and all-optical switching in semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) using ultrafast terahertz (THz) techniques. In the first part of this chapter we describe the studies of carrier capture into the QDs, and thermionic...

  1. Acute effects of dynamic stretching exercise on power output during concentric dynamic constant external resistance leg extension

    OpenAIRE

    YAMAGUCHI, TAICHI; Ishii, Kojiro; Yamanaka, Masanori; YASUDA, KAZUNORI

    2007-01-01

    AbstractThe purpose of the present study was to clarify the acute effect of dynamic stretching exercise on muscular performance during concentric dynamic constant external resistance (DCER, formally called isotonic) muscle actions under various loads. Concentric DCER leg extension power outputs were measured in 12 healthy male students after 2 types of pretreatment. The pre- treatments were: (a) dynamic stretching treatment including 2 types of dynamic stretching exercises of leg extensors an...

  2. Andic soils : mineralogical effect onto organic matter dynamics, organic matter effect onto mineral dynamics, or both?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basile-Doelsch, Isabelle; Amundson, Ronald; Balesdent, Jérome; Borschneck, Daniel; Bottero, Jean-Yves; Colin, Fabrice; de Junet, Alexis; Doelsch, Emmanuel; Legros, Samuel; Levard, Clément; Masion, Armand; Meunier, Jean-Dominique; Rose, Jérôme

    2014-05-01

    blocking the crystal growth of SRO-AlSi. Conversely, the effect of minerals on the dynamics of organic compounds also deserves to be studied in greater detail. If the "bulk" approaches showed that proto-imogolites involve long-term stabilized OM, other approaches such as densimetric fractionation and C3/C4 chronosequences (Basile-Doelsch et al. 2007; De Junet et al. 2013) led us to consider a new model involving two types of organo-mineral interactions: (1) OM stabilized by strong bonds to proto-imogolite, leading to a slow OM turnover and (2) OM retained within the porosity of the 3D structure formed by the proto-imogolite (similar to a gel structure), leading to a faster OM turnover. Understanding the mechanisms of organo-mineral interactions in andosols will open new research directions for understanding the mechanisms of stabilization of OM in any type of soil (Bonnard et al. 2012). Basile-Doelsch et al., Geoderma, 137, 477-489, 2007. Basile-Doelsch et al., European Journal of Soil Science, 56, 689-703, 2005. Bonnard et al., European Journal of Soil Science, 63, 5, 625-636, 2012. de Junet, et al., Journal of Analytical and Applied Pyrolysis, 99, 92-10, 2013, Levard et al, Geoderma, 183-184, 100-108, 2012. Levard et al. Chemistry Of Materials, 22, 2466-2473, 2010 Torn et al. Nature, London, 389, 170-173, 1997.

  3. Combined effect of successive competition periods on population dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Anazawa, Masahiro

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of competition between individuals on population dynamics when they compete for different resources during different seasons or during different growth stages. Individuals are assumed to compete for a single resource during each of these periods according to one of the following competition types: scramble, contest, or an intermediate between the two. The effect of two successive competition periods is determined to be expressed by simple relations on produc...

  4. Dynamics of Quantum Entanglement in Reservoir with Memory Effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝翔; 沙金巧; 孙坚; 朱士群

    2012-01-01

    The non-Markovian dynamics of quantum entanglement is studied by the Shabani-Lidar master equation when one of entangled quantum systems is coupled to a local reservoir with memory effects. The completely positive reduced dynamical map can be constructed in the Kraus representation. Quantum entanglement decays more slowly in the non-Markovian environment. The decoherence time for quantum entanglement can be markedly increased with the change of the memory kernel. It is found out that the entanglement sudden death between quantum systems and entanglement sudden birth between the system and reservoir occur at different instants.

  5. Magnetization dynamics induced by Rashba effect in a Permalloy nanodisk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huanan; Hua, Zhong; Li, Dongfei

    2017-02-01

    Magnetic vortex dynamics mediated by spin-polarized ac current of different amplitudes and frequencies are investigated by micromagnetic simulations in a system lacking structure inversion symmetry. Micromagnetic calculations reveal that the critical current density required to induce vortex core reversal may be decreased to below 1010 A m-2 due to strong transverse magnetic field by Rashba effect. We also find the spin torque of ac current plays a trivial role in magnetic vortex dynamics in a broken inversion symmetry system when the current density is on the order of 1010 A m-2 and the current with frequency close to the vortex eigenfrequency is the most efficient for reversal.

  6. Effects of the deposition of air pollutants on forest litter decomposition - a case study on soil at the feet of old beech trees highly polluted with acids and heavy metal from water running down the tree trunks. Auswirkungen der Deposition von Luftschadstoffen auf die Streuzersetzung in Waldoekosystemen - eine Fallstudie an den durch Stammablaufwasser stark saeure- und schwermetallbelasteten Baumfuss-Bodenbereichen alter Buchen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, H.

    1988-01-01

    The author investigated the effects of high concentrations of acids and heavy metals on the activity of soil microorganisms and on the biological cycles of elements in forest ecosystems. Samples taken from old beech forests were analyzed. An attempt was made to establish pathways towards the destabilisation of forest ecosystems. The need of preventing pollutant emissions is stressed.

  7. 4th post-Newtonian effective one-body dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Damour, Thibault; Schäfer, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    The conservative dynamics of gravitationally interacting two-point-mass systems has been recently determined at the 4th post-Newtonian (4PN) approximation [T. Damour, P. Jaranowski, and G. Sch\\"afer, Phys. Rev. D 89, 064058 (2014)], and found to be nonlocal-in-time. We show how to transcribe this dynamics within the effective one-body (EOB) formalism. To achieve this EOB transcription, we develop a new strategy involving the (infinite-)order-reduction of a nonlocal dynamics to an ordinary action-angle Hamiltonian. Our final, equivalent EOB dynamics comprises two (local) radial potentials, $A(r)$ and $\\bar{D}(r)$, and a non-geodesic mass-shell contribution $Q(r,p_r)$ given by an infinite series of even powers of the radial momentum $p_r$. Using an effective action technique, we complete our 4PN-level results by deriving two different, higher-order conservative contributions linked to tail-transported hereditary effects: the 5PN-level EOB logarithmic terms, as well as the 5.5PN-level, half-integral terms. We co...

  8. Vertical Dynamic Impedance of Tapered Pile considering Compacting Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenbing Wu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on complex stiffness transfer model, the vertical vibration of tapered pile embedded in layered soil is theoretically investigated by considering the compacting effect of the soil layer surrounding the tapered pile in the piling process. Allowing for the stratification of the surrounding soil and variable crosssection of the tapered pile, the pile-soil system is discretized into finite segments. By virtue of the complex stiffness transfer model to simulate the compacting effect, the complex stiffness of different soil segments surrounding the tapered pile is obtained. Then, substituting the complex stiffness into the vertical dynamic governing equation of tapered pile, the analytical solution of vertical dynamic impedance of tapered pile under vertical exciting force is derived by means of the Laplace technique and impedance function transfer method. Based on the presented solutions, the influence of compacting effect of surrounding soil on vertical dynamic impedance at the pile head is investigated within the low frequency range concerned in the design of dynamic foundation.

  9. Determination of ground and excited state dipole moments via electronic Stark spectroscopy: 5-methoxyindole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilke, Josefin; Wilke, Martin; Meerts, W Leo; Schmitt, Michael

    2016-01-28

    The dipole moments of the ground and lowest electronically excited singlet state of 5-methoxyindole have been determined by means of optical Stark spectroscopy in a molecular beam. The resulting spectra arise from a superposition of different field configurations, one with the static electric field almost parallel to the polarization of the exciting laser radiation, the other nearly perpendicular. Each field configuration leads to different intensities in the rovibronic spectrum. With an automated evolutionary algorithm approach, the spectra can be fit and the ratio of both field configurations can be determined. A simultaneous fit of two spectra with both field configurations improved the precision of the dipole moment determination by a factor of two. We find a reduction of the absolute dipole moment from 1.59(3) D to 1.14(6) D upon electronic excitation to the lowest electronically excited singlet state. At the same time, the dipole moment orientation rotates by 54(∘) showing the importance of the determination of the dipole moment components. The dipole moment in the electronic ground state can approximately be obtained from a vector addition of the indole and the methoxy group dipole moments. However, in the electronically excited state, vector addition completely fails to describe the observed dipole moment. Several reasons for this behavior are discussed.

  10. Stark Broadening Analysis Using Optical Spectroscopy of the Dense Plasma Focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Patrick; Bennett, Nikki; Dutra, Eric; Hagen, E. Chris; Hsu, Scott; Hunt, Gene; Koch, Jeff; Waltman, Tom; NSTec DPF Team

    2015-11-01

    To aid in validating numerical modeling of MA-class dense plasma focus (DPF) devices, spectroscopic measurements of the Gemini Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) were performed using deuterium and deuterium/dopant (argon/krypton) gas. The spectroscopic measurements were made using a fiber-coupled spectrometer and streak camera. Stark line-broadening analysis was applied to the deuterium beta emission (486 nm) in the region near the breakdown of the plasma and during the run-down and run-in phases of the plasma evolution. Densities in the range of 1e17 to low 1e18 cm-3 were obtained. These values are in agreement with models of the DPF performed using the LSP code. The spectra also show a rise and fall with time, indicative of the plasma sheath passing by the view port. Impurity features were also identified in the spectra which grew in intensity as the gas inside the DPF was discharged repeatedly without cycling. Implications of this impurity increase for D-T discharges (without fresh gas fills between every discharge) will be discussed. This work was done by National Security Technologies, LLC, under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25946, and by Los Alamos National Laboratory, under Contract no. DE-AC52-06NA25396 with the U.S. Department of Energy. DOE/NV/25946-2515.

  11. Enhancement of single-photon transistor by Stark-tuned F\\"orster resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Gorniaczyk, H; Bienias, P; Paris-Mandoki, A; Li, W; Mirgorodskiy, I; Büchler, H P; Lesanovsky, I; Hofferberth, S

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the use of Stark-tuned F\\"orster resonances to improve the efficiency of Rydberg-mediated single-photon transistors and the non-destructive detection of single Rydberg atoms. We show that our all-optical detection scheme enables high-resolution spectroscopy of two-state F\\"orster resonances, revealing the fine structure splitting of high-n Rydberg states and the non-degeneracy of Rydberg Zeeman substates in finite fields. We show that the 50S_{1/2},48S_{1/2} 49P_{1/2},48P_{1/2} resonance in 87Rb enables a transistor gain G > 100 and all-optical detection fidelity of single Rydberg atoms F > 0.8. Finally, we investigate the Rydberg transistor in coherent operation by reading out the gate photon after scattering source photons. We compare the observed reduction of readout efficiency to a model for the projection of the stored spin wave and phase imprinting by scattered and transmitted source photons and find very good agreement.

  12. Dynamic Leidenfrost effect: relevant time- and length-scales

    CERN Document Server

    Shirota, Minori; Sun, Chao; Prosperetti, Andrea; Lohse, Detlef

    2015-01-01

    When a liquid droplet impacts a hot solid surface, enough vapor may be generated under it as to prevent its contact with the solid. The minimum solid temperature for this so-called Leidenfrost effect to occur is termed the Leidenfrost temperature, or the dynamic Leidenfrost temperature when the droplet velocity is non-negligible. We observe the wetting/drying and the levitation dynamics of the droplet impacting on an (isothermal) smooth sapphire surface using high speed total internal reflection imaging, which enables us to observe the droplet base up to about 100 nm above the substrate surface. By this method we are able to reveal the processes responsible for the transitional regime between the fully wetting and the fully levitated droplet as the solid temperature increases, thus shedding light on the characteristic time- and length-scales setting the dynamic Leidenfrost temperature for droplet impact on an isothermal substrate.

  13. The effects of leading edge roughness on dynamic stall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrynuk, John

    2016-11-01

    Dynamic stall is a fundamental flow phenomenon that is commonly observed for insect flight and rotorcraft. Under certain conditions a leading edge vortex forms generating large but temporary lift forces. Historically, computations studying dynamic stall on airfoil shapes have struggled to predict this vortex formation time and separation point. Reduced order models and CFD have performed well when experiments have been performed to develop separation models, but this has limited the development of robust design tools. The current study looks at the effect of leading edge surface roughness on the formation of the Dynamic Stall Vortex (DSV). Roughness elements were applied to the leading edge of a NACA 0012 airfoil and PIV data of the vortex formation process was recorded. Measurements were taken at a Reynolds number of Re = 12,000 and baseline smooth NACA 0012 data was also recorded for comparison. Surface roughness elements, below the typical scale modeled by CFD, are shown to change DSV formation angle and location.

  14. Perceptual Effects of Dynamic Range Compression in Popular Music Recordings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortkjær, Jens; Walther-Hansen, Mads

    2014-01-01

    There is a widespread belief that the increasing use of dynamic range compression in music mastering (the loudnesswar) deteriorates sound quality but experimental evidence of perceptual effects is lacking. In this study, normal hearing listeners were asked to evaluate popular music recordings...... of response consistency between different presentations of the same music suggests that listeners are less sensitive to even high levels of dynamic range compression than often argued....... in original versions and in remastered versions with higher levels of dynamic range compression. Surprisingly, we found no evidence of preference for the less compressed music. We also failed to find differences in ratings of perceived "depth" between the original and more compressed audio. A low degree...

  15. Perceptual Effects of Dynamic Range Compression in Popular Music Recordings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortkjær, Jens; Walther-Hansen, Mads

    2014-01-01

    There is a widespread belief that the increasing use of dynamic range compression in music mastering (the loudnesswar) deteriorates sound quality but experimental evidence of perceptual effects is lacking. In this study, normal hearing listeners were asked to evaluate popular music recordings...... in original versions and in remastered versions with higher levels of dynamic range compression. Surprisingly, we found no evidence of preference for the less compressed music. We also failed to find differences in ratings of perceived "depth" between the original and more compressed audio. A low degree...... of response consistency between different presentations of the same music suggests that listeners are less sensitive to even high levels of dynamic range compression than often argued....

  16. Computational Investigation of Dynamic Glottal Aperture Effects on Respiratory Airflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Jinxiang; Yan, Hong; Dong, Haibo

    2008-11-01

    The periodic movement of the glottal aperture (vocal folds) during tidal breathing has been long recognized as a factor in altering the airflow dynamics in the tracheobrnchial region. The potential influence from these altered flow structures on the transport and deposition of inhaled particles is not known. However, studies devoted to this dynamic physiological feature are scarce due to the complex anatomy in of the larynx and numerical challenges in simulating dynamic geometries. In this study, a high-fidelity immersed boundary solver is used to investigate this problem. A 3D human oral-larynx-lung model is firstly reconstructed from MRI data. The role of the vocal fold movement and associated airflow characteristics such as vortex shedding, Coanda effect etc. during inhalation and exhalation are then numerically studied.

  17. Effective run-and-tumble dynamics of bacteria baths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paoluzzi, M; Di Leonardo, R; Angelani, L

    2013-10-16

    E. coli bacteria swim in straight runs interrupted by sudden reorientation events called tumbles. The resulting random walks give rise to density fluctuations that can be derived analytically in the limit of non-interacting particles or equivalently of very low concentrations. However, in situations of practical interest, the concentration of bacteria is always large enough to make interactions an important factor. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we study the dynamic structure factor of a model bacterial bath for increasing values of densities. We show that it is possible to reproduce the dynamics of density fluctuations in the system using a free run-and-tumble model with effective fitting parameters. We discuss the dependence of these parameters, e.g., the tumbling rate, tumbling time and self-propulsion velocity, on the density of the bath.

  18. The effects of bolted joints on dynamic response of structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, I.; Khalid, A.; Manshoor, B.; Araby, S.; Ghazali, M. I.

    2013-12-01

    Joint is an universal fastening technology for structural members; in particular bolted joints are extensively used in mechanical structures due to their simple maintenance and low cost. However, the components of bolted joints are imperative because failure could be catastrophic and endanger lives. Hence, in this study, the effects of bolted joints on vibrating structures are investigated by determining the structural dynamic properties, such as mode shapes, damping ratios and natural frequencies, and these are compared with the monolithic structures (welding). Two approaches of experimental rigs are developed: a beam and a frame where both are subjected to dynamic loading. The analysis reveals the importance of bolted joints in increasing the damping properties and minimizing the vibration magnitude of structures, this indicates the significant influence of bolted joints on the dynamic behaviour of assembled structures. The outcome of this study provides a good model for predicting the experimental variable response in different types of structural joints.

  19. Topology of surfaces for molecular Stark energy, alignment, and orientation generated by combined permanent and induced electric dipole interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Burkhard, E-mail: burkhard.schmidt@fu-berlin.de [Institute for Mathematics, Freie Universität Berlin, Arnimallee 6, D-14195 Berlin (Germany); Friedrich, Bretislav, E-mail: brich@fhi-berlin.mpg.de [Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Faradayweg 4-6, D-14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-02-14

    We show that combined permanent and induced electric dipole interactions of linear polar and polarizable molecules with collinear electric fields lead to a sui generis topology of the corresponding Stark energy surfaces and of other observables – such as alignment and orientation cosines – in the plane spanned by the permanent and induced dipole interaction parameters. We find that the loci of the intersections of the surfaces can be traced analytically and that the eigenstates as well as the number of their intersections can be characterized by a single integer index. The value of the index, distinctive for a particular ratio of the interaction parameters, brings out a close kinship with the eigenproperties obtained previously for a class of Stark states via the apparatus of supersymmetric quantum mechanics.

  20. Quantum state engineering with flux-biased Josephson phase qubits by Stark-chirped rapid adiabatic passages

    CERN Document Server

    Nie, W; Shi, X; Wei, L F

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the scheme of quantum computing based on Stark chirped rapid adiabatic passage (SCRAP) technique [L. F. Wei et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 113601 (2008)] is extensively applied to implement the quantum-state manipulations in the flux-biased Josephson phase qubits. The broken-parity symmetries of bound states in flux-biased Josephson junctions are utilized to conveniently generate the desirable Stark-shifts. Then, assisted by various transition pulses universal quantum logic gates as well as arbitrary quantum-state preparations could be implemented. Compared with the usual PI-pulses operations widely used in the experiments, the adiabatic population passage proposed here is insensitive the details of the applied pulses and thus the desirable population transfers could be satisfyingly implemented. The experimental feasibility of the proposal is also discussed.

  1. Dependence of the time of the appearance of a Stark echo response on irreversible relaxation of a system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhmedshina, E. N.; Nefed'ev, L. A.; Garnaeva, G. I.

    2016-09-01

    The dependence of the time of the appearance of a Stark (gradient) echo response on the irreversible transverse relaxation time of a system in the nanosecond range and on the width of the excitation region of an inhomogeneously broadened line has been investigated. It has been shown that the use of nonresonant laser pulses with an artificially created spatial inhomogeneity makes it possible to determine the relaxation time in the nanosecond range from the time of the appearance of a Stark (gradient) echo response, which is a more accurate method than the method of determining the relaxation time from the decay of the intensity by varying time intervals of the exposure to inhomogeneous electromagnetic fields.

  2. Identification of forbidden transitions in the nu-4 band of (N-14)H3 by intracavity laser-Stark spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, W. H.; Cohen, E. A.

    1983-01-01

    These transitions are forbidden in the sense that they follow the selection rule delta K = + or - 2, which violates the usual rule that delta K = + or - 1 for a perpendicular band of a symmetric top, where K is the projection of the total angular momentum onto the molecular symmetry axis. The assignments are based for the most part on laser-Stark measurements made with a CO laser and an intracavity Stark cell. The procedure followed in making the assignments is described. Attention is called to the significance of these new lines in the analysis of the nu-4 vibrational state and in an improved determination of the ground-state rotational and centrifugal distortion constants.

  3. Tangled nature model of evolutionary dynamics reconsidered: Structural and dynamical effects of trait inheritance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Christian Walther; Sibani, Paolo

    2016-05-01

    Based on the stochastic dynamics of interacting agents which reproduce, mutate, and die, the tangled nature model (TNM) describes key emergent features of biological and cultural ecosystems' evolution. While trait inheritance is not included in many applications, i.e., the interactions of an agent and those of its mutated offspring are taken to be uncorrelated, in the family of TNMs introduced in this work correlations of varying strength are parametrized by a positive integer K . We first show that the interactions generated by our rule are nearly independent of K . Consequently, the structural and dynamical effects of trait inheritance can be studied independently of effects related to the form of the interactions. We then show that changing K strengthens the core structure of the ecology, leads to population abundance distributions better approximated by log-normal probability densities, and increases the probability that a species extant at time tw also survives at t >tw . Finally, survival probabilities of species are shown to decay as powers of the ratio t /tw , a so-called pure aging behavior usually seen in glassy systems of physical origin. We find a quantitative dynamical effect of trait inheritance, namely, that increasing the value of K numerically decreases the decay exponent of the species survival probability.

  4. Unified nonequilibrium dynamical theory for exchange bias and training effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Kai-Cheng; Liu Bang-Gui

    2009-01-01

    We have investigated the exchange bias and training effect in the ferromagnetie/antiferromagnetic (FM/AF)heterostructures using a unified Monte Carlo dynamical approach. The magnetization of the uncompensated AF layer is still open after the first field cycling is finished. Our simulated results show obvious shift of hysteresis loops (exchange bias) and cycling dependence of exchange bias (training effect) when the temperature is below 45 K. The exchange bias field decreases with decreasing cooling rate or increasing temperature and the number of the field cycling. Essentially,these two effects can be explained on the basis of the microscopical coexistence of both reversible and irreversible moment reversals of the AF domains. Our simulations are useful to understand the real magnetization dynamics of such magnetic heterostructures.

  5. Effect of Coriolis coupling in chemical reaction dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Tian-Shu; Han, Ke-Li

    2008-05-14

    It is essential to evaluate the role of Coriolis coupling effect in molecular reaction dynamics. Here we consider Coriolis coupling effect in quantum reactive scattering calculations in the context of both adiabaticity and nonadiabaticity, with particular emphasis on examining the role of Coriolis coupling effect in reaction dynamics of triatomic molecular systems. We present the results of our own calculations by the time-dependent quantum wave packet approach for H + D2 and F(2P3/2,2P1/2) + H2 as well as for the ion-molecule collisions of He + H2 +, D(-) + H2, H(-) + D2, and D+ + H2, after reviewing in detail other related research efforts on this issue.

  6. Phasensynchroner FPGA-Pulsgenerator für Particle-Image-Velocimetry Messungen an rotierenden Maschinen mit stark schwankender Drehzahl

    OpenAIRE

    Förster, Wolfgang; Klinner, Joachim; VOGES, Melanie; Willert, Chris; Elfert, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Ein Particle-Image-Velocimetry-Messgerät (PIV) zeigte beim Einsatz in einem Prüfstand für rotierende Kühlkanäle starke Schwankungen in der Position der aufgenommen Bilddaten, die durch das Arbeitskonzept der vorhandenen Ablaufsteuerung in Kombination mit Prüfstands bedingten Drehzahlschwankungen verursacht wurden. Mit Hilfe von NI FPGA Komponenten sowie der Labview FPGA Software wurde eine neue Ablaufsteuerung entwickelt, die eine drastische Erhöhung der Positioniergenauigkeit des PIV-Syst...

  7. Partial volume effects in dynamic contrast magnetic resonance renal studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez, D. Rodriguez, E-mail: drodriguez@biotronics3d.co [CVSSP, Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey (United Kingdom); Wells, K., E-mail: k.wells@surrey.ac.u [CVSSP, Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey (United Kingdom); Diaz Montesdeoca, O., E-mail: o.diaz.montesdeoca@gmail.co [EUITT, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain); Moran Santana, A. [EUITT, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain); Mendichovszky, I.A., E-mail: iosifm@hotmail.co [Radiology and Physics Unit, UCL Institute of Child Health, London WC1N 1EH (United Kingdom); Gordon, I., E-mail: i.gordon@ich.ucl.ac.u [Radiology and Physics Unit, UCL Institute of Child Health, London WC1N 1EH (United Kingdom)

    2010-08-15

    This is the first study of partial volume effect in quantifying renal function on dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. Dynamic image data were acquired for a cohort of 10 healthy volunteers. Following respiratory motion correction, each voxel location was assigned a mixing vector representing the 'overspilling' contributions of each tissue due to the convolution action of the imaging system's point spread function. This was used to recover the true intensities associated with each constituent tissue. Thus, non-renal contributions from liver, spleen and other surrounding tissues could be eliminated from the observed time-intensity curves derived from a typical renal cortical region of interest. This analysis produced a change in the early slope of the renal curve, which subsequently resulted in an enhanced glomerular filtration rate estimate. This effect was consistently observed in a Rutland-Patlak analysis of the time-intensity data: the volunteer cohort produced a partial volume effect corrected mean enhancement of 36% in relative glomerular filtration rate with a mean improvement of 7% in r{sup 2} fitting of the Rutland-Patlak model compared to the same analysis undertaken without partial volume effect correction. This analysis strongly supports the notion that dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of kidneys is substantially affected by the partial volume effect, and that this is a significant obfuscating factor in subsequent glomerular filtration rate estimation.

  8. Determination of Stark parameters by cross-calibration in a multi-element laser-induced plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hao; Truscott, Benjamin S.; Ashfold, Michael N. R.

    2016-05-01

    We illustrate a Stark broadening analysis of the electron density Ne and temperature Te in a laser-induced plasma (LIP), using a model free of assumptions regarding local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). The method relies on Stark parameters determined also without assuming LTE, which are often unknown and unavailable in the literature. Here, we demonstrate that the necessary values can be obtained in situ by cross-calibration between the spectral lines of different charge states, and even different elements, given determinations of Ne and Te based on appropriate parameters for at least one observed transition. This approach enables essentially free choice between species on which to base the analysis, extending the range over which these properties can be measured and giving improved access to low-density plasmas out of LTE. Because of the availability of suitable tabulated values for several charge states of both Si and C, the example of a SiC LIP is taken to illustrate the consistency and accuracy of the procedure. The cross-calibrated Stark parameters are at least as reliable as values obtained by other means, offering a straightforward route to extending the literature in this area.

  9. Stark spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen balmer-alpha line for electric field measurement in plasmas by saturation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, S.; Katayama, K.; Nakano, H.; Goto, M.; Sasaki, K.

    2016-09-01

    Detailed structures of electric fields in sheath and pre-sheath regions of various plasmas are interested from the viewpoint of basic plasma physics. Several researchers observed Stark spectra of Doppler-broadened Rydberg states to evaluate electric fields in plasmas; however, these measurements needed high-power, expensive tunable lasers. In this study, we carried out another Stark spectroscopy with a low-cost diode laser system. We applied saturation spectroscopy, which achieves a Doppler-free wavelength resolution, to observe the Stark spectrum of the Balmer-alpha line of atomic hydrogen in the sheath region of a low-pressure hydrogen plasma. The hydrogen plasma was generated in an ICP source which was driven by on-off modulated rf power at 20 kHz. A planar electrode was inserted into the plasma. Weak probe and intense pump laser beams were injected into the plasma from the counter directions in parallel to the electrode surface. The laser beams crossed with a small angle above the electrode. The observed fine-structure spectra showed shifts, deformations, and/or splits when varying the distance between the observation position and the electrode surface. The detection limit for the electric field was estimated to be several tens of V/cm.

  10. Two—photon Nonlinear Jaynes—Cummings Model with Stark Shift

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董传华; 卢俊

    2002-01-01

    Two-photon Jaynes-Cummimgs model is generalized to the case of Kerr medium in this paper,The field and atom are prepared initially in two-photon superposition state and ground state respectively.Nonlinear coefficient affects the dynamic behaviors of the field and atom.Evolutions of the squeezing for the operators of field and atom and the quantum inversion are discussed.In particular,the higher-order squeezing for atomic dipole and the effects of nonlinearity on it,which have not been studied by other authors,are investigated,Increasing the nonlinear coefficient will decrease the squeezing depth of atomic dipole.

  11. Stock price dynamics and option valuations under volatility feedback effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanniainen, Juho; Piché, Robert

    2013-02-01

    According to the volatility feedback effect, an unexpected increase in squared volatility leads to an immediate decline in the price-dividend ratio. In this paper, we consider the properties of stock price dynamics and option valuations under the volatility feedback effect by modeling the joint dynamics of stock price, dividends, and volatility in continuous time. Most importantly, our model predicts the negative effect of an increase in squared return volatility on the value of deep-in-the-money call options and, furthermore, attempts to explain the volatility puzzle. We theoretically demonstrate a mechanism by which the market price of diffusion return risk, or an equity risk-premium, affects option prices and empirically illustrate how to identify that mechanism using forward-looking information on option contracts. Our theoretical and empirical results support the relevance of the volatility feedback effect. Overall, the results indicate that the prevailing practice of ignoring the time-varying dividend yield in option pricing can lead to oversimplification of the stock market dynamics.

  12. Noninertial effects on the quantum dynamics of scalar bosons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, Luis B. [Universidade Federal do Maranhao, Departamento de Fisica, Sao Luis, MA (Brazil)

    2016-02-15

    The noninertial effect of rotating frames on the quantum dynamics of scalar bosons embedded in the background of a cosmic string is considered. In this work, scalar bosons are described by the Duffin-Kemmer-Petiau (DKP) formalism. Considering the DKP oscillator in this background the combined effects of a rotating frames and cosmic string on the equation of motion, energy spectrum, and DKP spinor are analyzed and discussed in detail. Additionally, the effect of rotating frames on the scalar bosons' localization is studied. (orig.)

  13. Dynamic effective connectivity of inter-areal brain circuits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demian Battaglia

    Full Text Available Anatomic connections between brain areas affect information flow between neuronal circuits and the synchronization of neuronal activity. However, such structural connectivity does not coincide with effective connectivity (or, more precisely, causal connectivity, related to the elusive question "Which areas cause the present activity of which others?". Effective connectivity is directed and depends flexibly on contexts and tasks. Here we show that dynamic effective connectivity can emerge from transitions in the collective organization of coherent neural activity. Integrating simulation and semi-analytic approaches, we study mesoscale network motifs of interacting cortical areas, modeled as large random networks of spiking neurons or as simple rate units. Through a causal analysis of time-series of model neural activity, we show that different dynamical states generated by a same structural connectivity motif correspond to distinct effective connectivity motifs. Such effective motifs can display a dominant directionality, due to spontaneous symmetry breaking and effective entrainment between local brain rhythms, although all connections in the considered structural motifs are reciprocal. We show then that transitions between effective connectivity configurations (like, for instance, reversal in the direction of inter-areal interactions can be triggered reliably by brief perturbation inputs, properly timed with respect to an ongoing local oscillation, without the need for plastic synaptic changes. Finally, we analyze how the information encoded in spiking patterns of a local neuronal population is propagated across a fixed structural connectivity motif, demonstrating that changes in the active effective connectivity regulate both the efficiency and the directionality of information transfer. Previous studies stressed the role played by coherent oscillations in establishing efficient communication between distant areas. Going beyond these early

  14. Dynamic Effective Connectivity of Inter-Areal Brain Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, Demian; Witt, Annette; Wolf, Fred; Geisel, Theo

    2012-01-01

    Anatomic connections between brain areas affect information flow between neuronal circuits and the synchronization of neuronal activity. However, such structural connectivity does not coincide with effective connectivity (or, more precisely, causal connectivity), related to the elusive question “Which areas cause the present activity of which others?”. Effective connectivity is directed and depends flexibly on contexts and tasks. Here we show that dynamic effective connectivity can emerge from transitions in the collective organization of coherent neural activity. Integrating simulation and semi-analytic approaches, we study mesoscale network motifs of interacting cortical areas, modeled as large random networks of spiking neurons or as simple rate units. Through a causal analysis of time-series of model neural activity, we show that different dynamical states generated by a same structural connectivity motif correspond to distinct effective connectivity motifs. Such effective motifs can display a dominant directionality, due to spontaneous symmetry breaking and effective entrainment between local brain rhythms, although all connections in the considered structural motifs are reciprocal. We show then that transitions between effective connectivity configurations (like, for instance, reversal in the direction of inter-areal interactions) can be triggered reliably by brief perturbation inputs, properly timed with respect to an ongoing local oscillation, without the need for plastic synaptic changes. Finally, we analyze how the information encoded in spiking patterns of a local neuronal population is propagated across a fixed structural connectivity motif, demonstrating that changes in the active effective connectivity regulate both the efficiency and the directionality of information transfer. Previous studies stressed the role played by coherent oscillations in establishing efficient communication between distant areas. Going beyond these early proposals, we

  15. Finite-size effects on the lattice dynamics in spin crossover nanomaterials. II. Molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikolasek, Mirko; Nicolazzi, William; Terki, Férial; Molnár, Gábor; Bousseksou, Azzedine

    2017-07-01

    In the first part of this work, an experimental study of the lattice dynamics of spin crossover nanoparticles was performed using the nuclear inelastic scattering (NIS). A size dependence of low energy phonon modes appears under 10 nm, but its origin is not well understood. In this paper, we investigate the phonon confinement effects in the framework of molecular dynamics simulations by modeling three-dimensional nanoparticles considering a cubic lattice with an octahedral pattern. The vibrational density of states is computed and compared to the experiment. The simulations allow one to highlight both the role of the phonon quantification and the role of the size and shape distributions of particles on the extracted parameters leading to a better understanding of the experimental results.

  16. Slowing and cooling of heavy or light (even with a tiny electric dipole moment) polar molecules using a novel, versatile electrostatic Stark decelerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qin; Hou, Shunyong; Xu, Liang; Yin, Jianping

    2016-02-21

    To meet some demands for realizing precise measurements of an electric dipole moment of electron (eEDM) and examining cold collisions or cold chemical physics, we have proposed a novel, versatile electrostatic Stark decelerator with an array of true 3D electric potential wells, which are created by a series of horizontally-oriented, U-shaped electrodes with time-sequence controlling high voltages (± HV) and two guiding electrodes with a constant voltage. We have calculated the 2D electric field distribution, the Stark shifts of the four lowest rotational sub-levels of PbF molecules in the X1(2)Π1/2(v = 0) electronic and vibrational ground states as well as the population in the different rotational levels. We have discussed the 2D longitudinal and transverse phase-space acceptances of PbF molecules in our decelerator. Subsequently, we have simulated the dynamic processes of the decelerated PbF molecules using the 3D Monte-Carlo method, and have found that a supersonic PbF beam with a velocity of 300 m s(-1) can be efficiently slowed to about 5 m s(-1), which will greatly enhance the sensitivities to research a parity violation and measure an eEDM. In addition, we have investigated the dependences of the longitudinal velocity spread, longitudinal temperature and bunching efficiency on both the number of guiding stages and high voltages, and found that after bunching, a cold packet of PbF molecules in the J = 7/2, MΩ = -7/4 state with a longitudinal velocity spread of 0.69 m s(-1) (corresponding to a longitudinal temperature of 2.35 mK) will be produced by our high-efficient decelerator, which will generate a high energy-resolution molecular beam for studying cold collision physics. Finally, our novel decelerator can also be used to efficiently slow NO molecules with a tiny electric dipole moment (EDM) of 0.16 D from 315 m s(-1) to 28 m s(-1). It is clear that our proposed new decelerator has a good slowing performance and experimental feasibility as well as wide

  17. Characteristics of Multipath Effects in GPS Dynamic Deformation Monitoring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Shengxiang; JIN Xiangsheng; YANG Baocen

    2006-01-01

    The multipath has long been considered a major error source in GPS applications. The characteristics of the GPS signal multipath effects are analyzed, based on which an experiment that considers the characteristics of dynamic deformation monitoring has been carried out. The solution results of observation data in two successive days are processed by a method, which combines the wavelet filtering and the differential correction between two successive days. The research demonstrates that the multipath errors have stronger repeatability on successive days; after significantly mitigating the influence of multipath effects, the accuracy of three-dimensional positioning for GPS dynamic deformation monitoring can attain the mm level, an obvious accuracy improving particularly in vertical component. The characteristics of GPS signal multipath, the experimental scheme and the qualitative and quantitative analysis of results are detailed.

  18. Estimation of Nonlinear Dynamic Panel Data Models with Individual Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Hu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper suggests a generalized method of moments (GMM based estimation for dynamic panel data models with individual specific fixed effects and threshold effects simultaneously. We extend Hansen’s (Hansen, 1999 original setup to models including endogenous regressors, specifically, lagged dependent variables. To address the problem of endogeneity of these nonlinear dynamic panel data models, we prove that the orthogonality conditions proposed by Arellano and Bond (1991 are valid. The threshold and slope parameters are estimated by GMM, and asymptotic distribution of the slope parameters is derived. Finite sample performance of the estimation is investigated through Monte Carlo simulations. It shows that the threshold and slope parameter can be estimated accurately and also the finite sample distribution of slope parameters is well approximated by the asymptotic distribution.

  19. The effect of team dynamics on software development process improvement

    OpenAIRE

    O'Connor, Rory V.; Basri, Shuib

    2012-01-01

    peer-reviewed This article identifies the effect of team dynamics in the context of software development teams and its impact on software process improvement (SPI) activities in very small companies, in order to understand the relationship between these two variables. Most software development work is done by teams of software engineers working together in a collaborative manner to execute a software development process. Although there is much literature examining software proc...

  20. Caloric Effects in Methylammonium Lead Iodide from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Shi; Cohen, Ronald E.

    2016-01-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite architecture could serve as a robust platform for materials design to realize functionalities beyond photovoltaic applications. We explore caloric effects in organometal halide perovskites, taking methylammonium lead iodide (MAPbI$_3$) as an example, using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations with a first-principles based interatomic potential. The adiabatic thermal change is estimated directly by introducing different driving fields in the simulations. ...

  1. Cervical Resistance Training: Effects on Isometric and Dynamic Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-01

    skinfold thicknesses . San Diego, CA: Naval Health Research Center; 1984. Report No: 84–39. 3. Coakwell MR, Bloswick DS, Moser R Jr. High-risk head and...Strength, Dynamic Strength, and Neck Circumference Isometric strength values are displayed in Table I. For isometric strength-flexion, the 2 2 ANOVA...Also, a main effect was observed TABLE I. RESISTANCE TRAINING VS. CONTROL GROUPS: ISOMETRIC STRENGTH (LB). RT Group (n 5) C Group (n 5) FLX EXT

  2. Polarizability effects on the structure and dynamics of ionic liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavalcante, Ary de Oliveira, E-mail: arycavalcante@ufam.edu.br [Institute of Chemistry, University of Campinas – UNICAMP, Cx. P. 6154, Campinas, SP 13084-862 (Brazil); Departamento de Química, Universidade Federal do Amazonas, Av. Rodrigo Octávio, 6200, Coroado, Manaus, AM (Brazil); Ribeiro, Mauro C. C. [Laboratório de Espectroscopia Molecular, Instituto de Química, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP C.P. 26077, 05513 970 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Skaf, Munir S. [Institute of Chemistry, University of Campinas – UNICAMP, Cx. P. 6154, Campinas, SP 13084-862 (Brazil)

    2014-04-14

    Polarization effects on the structure and dynamics of ionic liquids are investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. Four different ionic liquids were simulated, formed by the anions Cl{sup −} and PF{sub 6}{sup −}, treated as single fixed charge sites, and the 1-n-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium cations (1-ethyl and 1-butyl-), which are polarizable. The partial charge fluctuation of the cations is provided by the electronegativity equalization model (EEM) and a complete parameter set for the cations electronegativity (χ) and hardness (J) is presented. Results obtained from a non-polarizable model for the cations are also reported for comparison. Relative to the fixed charged model, the equilibrium structure of the first solvation shell around the imidazolium cations shows that inclusion of EEM polarization forces brings cations closer to each other and that anions are preferentially distributed above and below the plane of the imidazolium ring. The polarizable model yields faster translational and reorientational dynamics than the fixed charges model in the rotational-diffusion regime. In this sense, the polarizable model dynamics is in better agreement with the experimental data.

  3. Vibrational mechanics nonlinear dynamic effects, general approach, applications

    CERN Document Server

    Blekhman, Iliya I

    2000-01-01

    This important book deals with vibrational mechanics - the new, intensively developing section of nonlinear dynamics and the theory of nonlinear oscillations. It offers a general approach to the study of the effect of vibration on nonlinear mechanical systems.The book presents the mathematical apparatus of vibrational mechanics which is used to describe such nonlinear effects as the disappearance and appearance under vibration of stable positions of equilibrium and motions (i.e. attractors), the change of the rheological properties of the media, self-synchronization, self-balancing, the vibrat

  4. Dynamical gap generation in graphene with frequency dependent renormalization effects

    CERN Document Server

    Carrington, M E; von Smekal, L; Thoma, M H

    2016-01-01

    We study the frequency dependencies in the renormalization of the fermion Greens function for the $\\pi$-band electrons in graphene and their influence on the dynamical gap generation at sufficiently strong interaction. Adopting the effective QED-like description for the low-energy excitations within the Dirac-cone region we self consistently solve the fermion Dyson-Schwinger equation in various approximations for the photon propagator and the vertex function with special emphasis on frequency dependent Lindhard screening and retardation effects.

  5. The Dynamic Effects of Entrepreneurship on Regional Economic Growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matejovsky, Lukas; Mohapatra, Sandeep; Steiner, Bodo

    2014-01-01

    This study explores the temporal pattern of income disparity for Canadian provinces in two estimation steps. First, an econometric growth regression model is applied to identify the impact of entrepreneurship on regional economic growth. The estimation results suggest that entrepreneurship......, measured in terms of the selfemployment rate, plays a pivotal role in determining regional development in Canada. Second, a dynamic vector autoregression (VAR) model is employed to predict the long-run regional growth effects that result from policy shocks affecting entrepreneurship. Compared to other...... growth drivers, entrepreneurship is found to have more pronounced and long-term stimulative effects on regional development for the period of 1987 to 2007...

  6. Modeling of dynamic effects of a low power laser beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, George N.; Scholl, Marija S.; Khatib, AL

    1988-01-01

    Methods of modeling some of the dynamic effects involved in laser beam propagation through the atmosphere are addressed with emphasis on the development of simple but accurate models which are readily implemented in a physical optics code. A space relay system with a ground based laser facility is considered as an example. The modeling of such characteristic phenomena as laser output distribution, flat and curved mirrors, diffraction propagation, atmospheric effects (aberration and wind shear), adaptive mirrors, jitter, and time integration of power on target, is discussed.

  7. Investigation of compressibility effects on dynamic stall of pitching airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangwan, Jyoti; Sengupta, Tapan K.; Suchandra, Prasoon

    2017-07-01

    In the present work, effects of compressibility on the dynamic stall of NACA 0012 airfoil, pitching sinusoidally from 5.03° to 24.79°, are investigated computationally using implicit large eddy simulations in a finite difference framework. Simulations of two-dimensional (2D), high Reynolds number, compressible flows are carried out without any transition or turbulence model to capture the physics of the dynamic stall process. The problem is formulated in a body-fixed, rotating, non-inertial frame. High accuracy, dispersion relation preserving optimized upwind compact scheme is used to compute convective flux derivatives, and an optimized three-stage Runge-Kutta method is used for time integration. Results are presented for free stream Mach number M∞ = 0.283, 0.4, and 0.5, where the Mach number is varied independent of the Reynolds number. The computations have been quite successful in capturing the essential features of the dynamic stall mechanism. It is observed that dynamic moment and lift stalls occur at smaller angles of attack as the Mach number increases. Reduction in the size of airload hysteresis loops and maximum attainable load coefficients are observed with increasing Mach number. Weak shock waves are observed near the leading edge (LE) at M∞ = 0.4, and lambda-shock is formed near the LE for M∞ = 0.5. It is observed that with increasing Mach number, the impact of dynamic stall on the aerodynamic loads (Cl, Cd, and Cm) becomes less dramatic as the maximum value attained by these aerodynamic loads decreases with an increase in the Mach number. An increase in positive damping area in the hysteresis loop is observed with an increase in the Mach number, inhibiting possible vulnerability to stall flutter.

  8. Effect of Two-Photon Stark Shift on the Multi-Frequency Raman Spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Yan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available High order Raman generation has received considerable attention as a possible method for generating ultrashort pulses. A large number of Raman orders can be generated when the Raman-active medium is pumped by two laser pulses that have a frequency separation equal to the Raman transition frequency. High order Raman generation has been studied in the different temporal regimes, namely: adiabatic, where the pump pulses are much longer than the coherence time of the transition; transient, where the pulse duration is comparable to the coherence time; and impulsive, where the bandwidth of the ultrashort pulse is wider than the transition frequency. To date, almost all of the work has been concerned with generating as broad a spectrum as possible, but we are interested in studying the spectra of the individual orders when pumped in the transient regime. We concentrate on looking at extra peaks that are generated when the Raman medium is pumped with linearly chirped pulses. The extra peaks are generated on the low frequency side of the Raman orders. We discuss how linear Raman scattering from two-photon dressed states can lead to the generation of these extra peaks.

  9. AC Stark effect in ThO $H^3\\Delta_1$ for the electron EDM search

    CERN Document Server

    Petrov, A N

    2015-01-01

    A method and code for calculations of diatomic molecules in the external variable electromagnetic field have been developed. Code applied for calculation of systematics in the electron's electric dipole moment search experiment on ThO $H^3\\Delta_1$ state related to geometric phases, including dependence on $\\Omega$-doublet, rotational level, and external static electric field. It is found that systematics decrease cubically with respect to the frequency of the rotating transverse component of the electric field. Calculation confirms that experiment on ThO $H^3\\Delta_1$ state is very robust against systematic errors related to geometric phases.

  10. Loop quantum cosmology of Bianchi IX: effective dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corichi, Alejandro; Montoya, Edison

    2017-03-01

    We study solutions to the effective equations for the Bianchi IX class of spacetimes within loop quantum cosmology (LQC). We consider Bianchi IX models whose matter content is a massless scalar field, by numerically solving the loop quantum cosmology effective equations, with and without inverse triad corrections. The solutions are classified using certain geometrically motivated classical observables. We show that both effective theories—with lapse N  =  V and N  =  1—resolve the big bang singularity and reproduce the classical dynamics far from the bounce. Moreover, due to the positive spatial curvature, there is an infinite number of bounces and recollapses. We study the limit of large field momentum and show that both effective theories reproduce the same dynamics, thus recovering general relativity. We implement a procedure to identify amongst the Bianchi IX solutions, those that behave like k  =  0,1 FLRW as well as Bianchi I, II, and VII0 models. The effective solutions exhibit Bianchi I phases with Bianchi II transitions and also Bianchi VII0 phases, which had not been studied before. We comment on the possible implications of these results for a quantum modification to the classical BKL behaviour.

  11. Loop quantum cosmology of Bianchi IX: Effective dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Corichi, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    We study numerically the solutions to the effective equations of Bianchi IX spacetimes within Loop Quantum Cosmology. We consider Bianchi IX models with and without inverse triad corrections whose matter content is a scalar field without mass. The solutions are classified using the classical observables. We show that both effective theories --with lapse N=V and N=1-- solve the big bang singularity and reproduce the classical dynamics far from the bounce. Moreover, due to the spatial compactness, there is an infinity number of bounces and recollapses. We study the limit of large volume and show that both effective theories reproduce the same dynamics, thus recovering general relativity. We implement a procedure to identify amongst the Bianchi IX solutions, those that behave like k=0,1 FLRW as well as Bianchi I, II, and VII_0 models. The effective solutions exhibit Bianchi I phases with Bianchi II transitions and also Bianchi VII_0 phases, which had not been studied before, at the quantum nor effective level. W...

  12. Dynamic effects in reversible hydro systems towards safety solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgado, Pedro A.; Ramos, Helena M. [Civil Engineering Department and CEHIDRO, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Technical University of Lisbon, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to establish general strategies to evaluate the dynamic effects occurring in reversible hydro systems (i.e. turbine/pumping) with long penstocks resulting from the regular operation of the hydro equipments and, most significantly, from accidental events. It is of great importance these particular aspects are considered in the early stages of a design, in order to ensure the best technical, economical and safety operation for each developed solution. This work presents two complementary approaches to the study of dynamic effects associated to reversible hydro systems based on a parametric analysis and a simulation-based procedure, as well as in the definition of design and operation rules to guarantee a safe solution. The first approach establishes the dynamic behavior of the system by means of a parametric analysis of the hydraulic and the hydro mechanical aspects associated to system operation. Based on this methodology, it is possible to estimate the maximum upsurge, the flow variation under turbogenerators runaway conditions and a valve manoeuvre. The second approach consists in the implementation of a numerical model that simulates accurately enough, the interaction between different components of the system during transient flow regimes associated to the hydropower load rejection, pumps shutdown, actuation of upsurge protection devices and wave propagations along the all system. This methodology gathers the necessary tools for the computational transient analysis of a complex reversible system.

  13. Effects of a Sprinkler on Evacuation Dynamics in Fire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiro Yamamoto

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A fire in an enclosed space, such as a room in a building, is generally called a compartment fire. To prevent the compartment fire, a sprinkler for first-aid fire-fighting is installed in rooms. However, it is difficult to determine the degree to which smoke generation and the fire spreading will be inhibited when sprinklers are on. In particular, demonstrating evacuation behavior assuming an actual fire is impossible. In this study, we evaluated an effectiveness of the sprinkler by numerical simulations. To consider evacuation dynamics, a real-coded cellular automata (RCA was used, where we can freely set the direction and velocity of an evacuee based on a floor field model. To consider the situation in the room fire, we used a simulator called Fire Dynamics Simulator (FDS. Two cases with and without the sprinkler were compared to see the validity of the sprinkler on evacuation dynamics. The effect of smoke and the expansion of the fire-spreading region were discussed. Results show that, since the fire-spreading region disappears when the sprinkler is actuated, the evacuation time decreases. Even though the sprinkler is actuated, the smoke generated at the beginning of a fire diffuses inside the whole room. However, the duration of evacuees being overwhelmed by smoke is less, because the amount of smoke generated by the pyrolysis reaction is much decreased.

  14. Entanglement effect in polymer melts by Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khani, Shaghayegh; Maia, Joao

    2015-03-01

    Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) is a mesoscale simulation method that has shown a very good potential in modeling different soft matter systems from colloidal suspensions to highly entangled polymers. Like any other simulation technique DPD is associated with some deficiencies, for instance in the case of entangled polymers soft repulsions used in DPD allow particle overlap which may result in topology violations that prevent the correct capturing of the entanglement effect. Therefore, in the present work in order to properly reproduce the dynamics and viscoelastic properties of polymers the soft repulsions between the particles are substituted with a repulsive potential between non-adjacent bonds of different FENE chains. Also, DPD is a coarse-grained simulation method that can be used to model time and length scales longer than atomistic models; however, due to the existence of an upper level limit for the level of coarse graining this method is not applicable for the whole mesoscopic range. Thus, this work represents a new approach for tuning the level of coarse-graining by adjusting the simulation parameters. The ability of the method in capturing the entanglement effects is validated by simulating dynamic and viscoelastic properties of polymers.

  15. Dynamical tides in general relativity: Effective action and effective-one-body Hamiltonian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhoff, Jan; Hinderer, Tanja; Buonanno, Alessandra; Taracchini, Andrea

    2016-11-01

    Tidal effects have an important impact on the late inspiral of compact binary systems containing neutron stars. Most current models of tidal deformations of neutron stars assume that the tidal bulge is directly related to the tidal field generated by the companion, with a constant response coefficient. However, if the orbital motion approaches a resonance with one of the internal modes of the neutron star, this adiabatic description of tidal effects starts to break down, and the tides become dynamical. In this paper, we consider dynamical tides in general relativity due to the quadrupolar fundamental oscillation mode of a neutron star. We devise a description of the effects of the neutron star's finite size on the orbital dynamics based on an effective point-particle action augmented by dynamical quadrupolar degrees of freedom. We analyze the post-Newtonian and test-particle approximations of this model and incorporate the results into an effective-one-body Hamiltonian. This enables us to extend the description of dynamical tides over the entire inspiral. We demonstrate that dynamical tides give a significant enhancement of matter effects compared to adiabatic tides, at least for neutron stars with large radii and for low mass-ratio systems, and should therefore be included in accurate models for gravitational-wave data analysis.

  16. Salinity effects on the dynamics and patterns of desiccation cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokri, N.; Zhou, P.

    2012-12-01

    Cracking arising from desiccation is a ubiquitous phenomenon encountered in various industrial and geo-environmental applications including drying of clayey soil, cement, ceramics, gels, and many more colloidal suspensions. Presence of cracks in muddy sediments modifies the characteristics of the medium such as pore structure, porosity, and permeability which in turn influence various flow and transport processes. Thus it remains a topic of great interest in many disciplines to describe the dynamics of desiccation cracking under various boundary conditions. To this end, we conducted a comprehensive study to investigate effects of NaCl concentrations on cracking dynamics and patterns during desiccation of Bentonite. Mixtures of Bentonite and NaCl solutions were prepared with NaCl concentration varying from 2 to 10 percent in 0.5 percent increment (totally 17 configurations). The slurry was placed in a Petri dish mounted on a digital balance to record the evaporation dynamics. The atmospheric conditions were kept constant using an environmental chamber. An automatic camera was used to record the dynamics of macro-cracks (mm scale) at the surface of desiccating clay each minute. The obtained results illustrate the significant effects of salt concentration on the initiation, propagation, morphology and general dynamics of macro-cracks. We found that higher salt concentrations results in larger macro cracks' lengths attributed to the effects of NaCl on compressing the electric double layer of particles at increasing electrolyte concentrations which reduce considerably the repulsive forces among the particles and causing instability of the slurry and flocculation of the colloidal particles. Rheological measurements by means of a stress controlled rheometer revealed that the yield stress of the slurry decreases as NaCl concentration increases which may indicate aggregation of larger units in the slurry as a result of flocculation causing larger cracks' lengths due to

  17. Effective Field Theory of Dark Energy: a Dynamical Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Frusciante, Noemi; Silvestri, Alessandra

    2013-01-01

    The effective field theory (EFT) of dark energy relies on three functions of time to describe the background dynamics. The viability of these functions is investigated here by means of a thorough dynamical analysis. While the system is underdetermined, and one can always find a set of functions reproducing any expansion history, we are able to determine general compatibility conditions for these functions by requiring a viable background cosmology. In particular, we identify a set of variables that allows us to transform the non-autonomous system of equations into an infinite-dimensional one characterized by a significant recursive structure. We then analyze several autonomous sub-systems, obtained truncating the original one at increasingly higher dimension, that correspond to increasingly general models of dark energy and modified gravity. Furthermore, we exploit the recursive nature of the system to draw some general conclusions on the different cosmologies that can be recovered within the EFT formalism an...

  18. Modeling the effect of dynamic surfaces on membrane penetration

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lehn, Reid; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo

    2011-03-01

    The development of nanoscale materials for targeted drug delivery is an important current pursuit in materials science. One task of drug carriers is to release therapeutic agents within cells by bypassing the cell membrane to maximize the effectiveness of their payload and minimize bodily exposure. In this work, we use coarse-grained simulations to study nanoparticles (NPs) grafted with hydrophobic and hydrophilic ligands that rearrange in response to the amphiphilic lipid bilayer. We demonstrate that this dynamic surface permits the NP to spontaneously penetrate to the bilayer midplane when the surface ligands are near an order-disorder transition. We believe that this work will lead to the design of new drug carriers capable of non-specifically accessing cell interiors based solely on their dynamic surface properties. Our work is motivated by existing nanoscale systems such as micelles, or NPs grafted with highly mobile ligands or polymer brushes.

  19. Effect of Bearing Housings on Centrifugal Pump Rotor Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yashchenko, A. S.; Rudenko, A. A.; Simonovskiy, V. I.; Kozlov, O. M.

    2017-08-01

    The article deals with the effect of a bearing housing on rotor dynamics of a barrel casing centrifugal boiler feed pump rotor. The calculation of the rotor model including the bearing housing has been performed by the method of initial parameters. The calculation of a rotor solid model including the bearing housing has been performed by the finite element method. Results of both calculations highlight the need to add bearing housings into dynamic analyses of the pump rotor. The calculation performed by modern software packages is more a time-taking process, at the same time it is a preferred one due to a graphic editor that is employed for creating a numerical model. When it is necessary to view many variants of design parameters, programs for beam modeling should be used.

  20. A Contribution to Documenting and Validating Dynamic Interaction Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lars

    2007-01-01

    On structures carrying humans (e.g. floors, grandstands in stadia etc.) there may be two different types of crowds present: Active and passive crowds of people. The active crowd, comprising people in motion, may generate dynamic loads causing the structure to vibrate. The passive (stationary) crowd....... Controlled laboratory tests, employing a vibrating test floor carrying stationary crowds of people, are designed and carried out to investigate the dynamic interaction. The paper describes the tests and the modal identification procedures employed for the assessment of model validity. Besides from aspects...... and a floor in vertical motion. The mechanism of crowd-structure interaction is not well understood and the primary aim of the paper is to present results of experimental investigations documenting effects of crowd-structure interaction and to exploring the validity of a crowd-structure interaction model...

  1. Effective multicasting algorithm for dynamic membership with delay constraint

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Lin; XU Zheng-quan

    2006-01-01

    This paper proposes an effective heuristic algorithm for dynamic multicast routing with delay-constrained DDMR.The tree constructed by DDMR has the following characteristics: (1) multicast tree changes with the dynamic memberships; (2)the cost of the tree is as small as possible at each node addition/removal event; (3) all of the path delay meet a fixed delay constraint;(4) minimal perturbation to an existing tree. The proposed algorithm is based on "damage" and "usefulness" concepts proposed in previous work, and has a new parameter bf(Balancing Factor) for judging whether or not to rearrange a tree region when membership changes. Mutation operation in Genetic Algorithm (GA) is also employed to find an attached node for a new adding node.Simulation showed that our algorithm performs well and is better than static heuristic algorithms, in term of cost especially.

  2. Atomistic Hydrodynamics and the Dynamical Hydrophobic Effect in Porous Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Steven E; Eaves, Joel D

    2016-05-19

    Mirroring their role in electrical and optical physics, two-dimensional crystals are emerging as novel platforms for fluid separations and water desalination, which are hydrodynamic processes that occur in nanoscale environments. For numerical simulation to play a predictive and descriptive role, one must have theoretically sound methods that span orders of magnitude in physical scales, from the atomistic motions of particles inside the channels to the large-scale hydrodynamic gradients that drive transport. Here, we use constraint dynamics to derive a nonequilibrium molecular dynamics method for simulating steady-state mass flow of a fluid moving through the nanoscopic spaces of a porous solid. After validating our method on a model system, we use it to study the hydrophobic effect of water moving through pores of electrically doped single-layer graphene. The trend in permeability that we calculate does not follow the hydrophobicity of the membrane but is instead governed by a crossover between two competing molecular transport mechanisms.

  3. The effects of psammophilous plants on sand dune dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Bel, Golan

    2013-01-01

    Psammophilous plants are special plants that flourish in sand moving environments. There are two main mechanisms by which the wind affects these plants: (i) sand drift exposes roots and covers branches--the exposed roots turn into new plants and the covered branches turn into new roots; both mechanisms result in an enhanced growth rate of the psammophilous plant cover of the dunes; (ii) strong winds, often associated with sand movement, tear branches and seed them in nearby locations, resulting in new plants and an enhanced growth rate of the psammophilous plant cover of the dunes. Despite their important role in dune dynamics, to our knowledge, psammophilous plants have never been incorporated into mathematical models of sand dunes. Here, we attempt to model the effects of these plants on sand dune dynamics. We construct a set of three ordinary differential equations for the fractions of surface cover of regular vegetation, biogenic soil crust and psammophilous plants. The latter reach their optimal growth u...

  4. Quantifying Chiral Magnetic Effect from Anomalous-Viscous Fluid Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Yin; Yin, Yi; Liao, Jinfeng

    2016-01-01

    Chiral Magnetic Effect (CME) is the macroscopic manifestation of the fundamental chiral anomaly in a many-body system of chiral fermions, and emerges as anomalous transport current in the fluid dynamics framework. Experimental observation of CME is of great interest and has been reported in Dirac and Weyl semimetals. Significant efforts have also been made to search for CME in heavy ion collisions. Encouraging evidence of CME-induced charge separation in those collisions has been reported, albeit with ambiguity due to background contamination. Crucial for addressing such issue, is the need of quantitative predictions for CME signal with sophisticated modelings. In this paper we develop such a tool, the Anomalous Viscous Fluid Dynamics (AVFD) framework, which simulates the evolution of fermion currents in QGP on top of the data-validated VISHNU bulk hydrodynamic flow. With realistic initial conditions and magnetic field lifetime, the AVFD-predicted CME signal could be quantitatively consistent with measured ch...

  5. Collisional effects in the dynamics of a dipolar gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykes, Andrew

    2016-05-01

    In this talk, we discuss the role of collisions in dipolar gases which are far from equilibrium. We compare and contrast collisional mechanisms with mean-field effects. We consider several cases of dynamical behaviour. We begin with cross-dimensional relaxation, where the time-scale of equilibration is studied following a quench in the trap parameters. We also discuss the damping of monopole and quadrupole excitations. Finally we discuss time-of-flight expansion dynamics. Our results demonstrate that collisions can play a significant role. We use these results to extract an estimate of the deca-heptuplet s-partial-wave scattering length of bosonic dysprosium, and to improve the accuracy of experimental time-of-flight expansion imaging. Financial support from the Marie Sklodowska-Curie H2020 framework program.

  6. Enhanced oxidation resistance of active nanostructures via dynamic size effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Yi; Xiao, Jianping; Yu, Liang; Liu, Qingfei; Ning, Yanxiao; Zhou, Zhiwen; Chen, Hao; Huang, Wugen; Liu, Ping; Bao, Xinhe

    2017-02-01

    A major challenge limiting the practical applications of nanomaterials is that the activities of nanostructures (NSs) increase with reduced size, often sacrificing their stability in the chemical environment. Under oxidative conditions, NSs with smaller sizes and higher defect densities are commonly expected to oxidize more easily, since high-concentration defects can facilitate oxidation by enhancing the reactivity with O2 and providing a fast channel for oxygen incorporation. Here, using FeO NSs as an example, we show to the contrary, that reducing the size of active NSs can drastically increase their oxidation resistance. A maximum oxidation resistance is found for FeO NSs with dimensions below 3.2 nm. Rather than being determined by the structure or electronic properties of active sites, the enhanced oxidation resistance originates from the size-dependent structural dynamics of FeO NSs in O2. We find this dynamic size effect to govern the chemical properties of active NSs.

  7. Molecular Modeling of Enzyme Dynamics Towards Understanding Solvent Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wedberg, Nils Hejle Rasmus Ingemar

    This thesis describes the development of a molecular simulation methodology to study properties of enzymes in non-aqueous media at fixed thermodynamic water activities. The methodology is applied in a molecular dynamics study of the industrially important enzyme Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB...... integration, while for small systems, it seems to be even better. The method is applied to compute the excess Gibbs energy of the mixtures of water and organic solvents used in the simulations of CALB. This allows to determine the water activity of the simulated systems and thus to compare protein properties......), BMC Struct. Biol., 8) and the approach to fix the water activity which often is used in experimental studies. The water activity is shown to have a profound effect on the structure and dynamics of CALB. Conformational flexibility, for instance, increases with increasing hydration in acetone, t...

  8. Dynamical 3-Space Gravity Theory: Effects on Polytropic Solar Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahill R. T.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous experiments and observations have confirmed the existence of a dynamical 3-space, detectable directly by light-speed anisotropy experiments, and indirectly by means of novel gravitational effects, such as bore hole g-anomalies, predictable black hole masses, flat spiral-galaxy rotation curves, and the expansion of the universe, all without dark matter and dark energy. The dynamics for this 3-space follows from a unique generalisation of Newtonian gravity, once that is cast into a velocity formalism. This new theory of gravity is applied to the solar model of the sun to compute new density, pressure and temperature profiles, using polytrope modelling of the equation of state for the matter. These results should be applied to a re-analysis of solar neutrino production, and to stellar evolution in general.

  9. Dynamical 3-Space Gravity Theory: Effects on Polytropic Solar Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    May R. D.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous experiments and observations have confirmed the existence of a dynamical 3-space, detectable directly by light-speed anisotropy experiments, and indirectly by means of novel gravitational effects, such as bore hole g anomalies, predictable black hole masses, flat spiral-galaxy rotation curves, and the expansion of the universe, all without dark matter and dark energy. The dynamics for this 3-space follows from a unique generalisation of Newtonian gravity, once that is cast into a velocity formalism. This new theory of gravity is applied to the solar model of the sun to compute new density, pressure and temperature profiles, using polytrope modelling of the equation of state for the matter. These results should be applied to a re-analysis of solar neutrino production, and to stellar evolution in general.

  10. Effect of Adaptive Delivery Capacity on Networked Traffic Dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Xian-Bin; DU Wen-Bo; CHEN Cai-Long; ZHANG Jun

    2011-01-01

    @@ We introduce an adaptive delivering capacity mechanism into the traffic dynamic model on scale-free networks under shortest path routing strategy and focus on its effect on the network capacity measured by the critical point(Rc) of phase transition from free flow to congestion.Under this mechanism,the total node's delivering capacity is fixed and the allocation of delivering capacity on node i is proportional to niφ,where ni is the queue length of node i and φ is the adjustable parameter.It is found that the network capacity monotonously increases with the increment of φ,but there exists an optimal value of parameter φ leading to the highest transportation efficiency measured by average travelling time(〈T〉).Our work may be helpful for optimal design of networked traffic dynamics.%We introduce an adaptive delivering capacity mechanism into the traffic dynamic model on scale-free networks under shortest path routing strategy and focus on its effect on the network capacity measured by the critical point (Rc) of phase transition from free flow to congestion.Under this mechanism, the total node's delivering capacity is fixed and the allocation of delivering capacity on node i is proportional to niφ, where ni is the queue length of node i and φ is the adjustable parameter.It is found that the network capacity monotonously increases with the increment of φ, but there exists an optimal value of parameter φ leading to the highest transportation efficiency measured by average travelling time (<T>).Our work may be helpful for optimal design of networked traffic dynamics.

  11. Theoretical studies of electrostatic Stark deceleration for subsonic NH3 molecular b eams%亚声速NH3分子束静电Stark减速的理论研究∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate theoretically the Stark deceleration and cooling of subsonic NH3 molecular beams based on our second-generation electrostatic Stark decelerator with 180 stages. Firstly, we calculate the Stark shifts of NH3 molecules in the|J =1, K =1⟩states and show the stable area of longitudinal phase space for different synchronous phase angles. Secondly, we study the slowing performance of NH3 molecular beams in the traditional mode, and discuss the relationships between various parameters (such as the kinetic energy loss per stage, final velocity and the slowing efficiency) and the synchronous phase angle ϕ0, as well as the dependence of final velocity on the applied voltages. It is found that a subsonic NH3 molecular beam can be decelerated from 280 to 6.7 m/s at ϕ0 = 26.08◦ when the high voltages applied on the electrodes are ±13 kV, corresponding to a removal of 99.9% kinetic energy. The translational temperature of the molecular packets in the moving frame is significantly reduced from 1.34 K to 80 mK. Finally, we study the slowing performance of NH3 molecules and the dependence of final velocity on the synchronous phase angle in an alternate operation mode. In this mode, a synchronous phase angleϕ0=0◦is chosen to bunch the molecules by using the first 15 stages. The remaining 165 stages are then used to slow a subsonic molecular beam at a certain synchronous phase angle. Our result shows that a molecular beam with a mean velocity of 280 m/s can be decelerated to 20.7 m/s at ϕ0 =65.4◦ when the voltages applied are ±6.5 kV, indicating a 99.4% kinetic energy removal, and the translational temperature of the molecular packets can be reduced from 1.34 K to 1.6 mK. By comparing the results obtained from the two operational modes, the temperature of the slowed molecular packet in the alternate mode is 50 times lower than that in the traditional mode. It is shown that our second-generation 180-stage Stark decelerator can effectively

  12. Salt—Water Dynamics in Soils:II.Effect of Precipitation on SaltWater Dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YOUWEN-RUI; MENGFAN-HUA

    1992-01-01

    Through a simulation test carried out with soil columns (61.8cm in diameter),the effect of precipitation on salt-water dynamics in soils was studied by in-situ monitoring of salt-water dynamics using soil salinity sensors and tensioneters.The results show that in the profile of whole silty loam soil,the surface runoff volume due to precipitation and the salt-leaching role of infiltrated precipitation increased with the depth of ground water;and in the profile with an intercalated bed of clay or with a thick upper layer of clay,the amount of surface runoff was greater but the salt-leaching role of precipitation was smaller than those in the profile of whole silty loam soil.In case of soil water being supplemented by precipitation,the evaporation of groundwater in the soil columns reduced,resulting in a great decline of salt accumulation from soil profile to surface soil.The effect of precipitation on the water regime of soil profile was performed via both water infiltration and water pressure transfer.The direct infiltration depth of precipitation was less than 1m in general,but water pressure transfer could go up to groundwater surface directly.

  13. Rotational dynamics in ammonia borane: Evidence of strong isotope effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantelli, Rosario; Paolone, Annalisa; Palumbo, Oriele; Leardini, F.; Autrey, Thomas; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Luedtke, Avery T.

    2013-12-15

    This work reports anelastic spectroscopy measurements on the partially deuterated (ND3BH3 and NH3BD3) and perdeuterated (ND3BD3) ammonia borane (NH3BH3) compounds. The relaxations previously reported in NH3BH3 are observed in all the samples, and are ascribed to the rotational and torsional dynamics of NH(D)3BH(D)3 complexes. A new thermally activated peak appears at 70 K (for a vibration frequency of 1 kHz) in the spectrum of NH3BD3 and ND3BD3. The peak is practically a single-time Debye process, indicating absence of interaction between the relaxing units, and has a strikingly high intensity. A secondary relaxation process is also detected around 55 K. The anelastic spectrum of the ND3BH3 only displays this less intense process at 55 K. The analysis of the peaks supplies information about the dynamics of the relaxing species, and the obtained results provide indications on the effect of partial and selective deuteration on the hydrogen (deuterium) dynamics.

  14. Continuous Trading Dynamically Effectively Complete Market with Heterogeneous Beliefs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qin, Zhenjiang

    In a framework of heterogeneous beliefs, I investigate a two-date consumption model with continuous trading over the interval [0; T], in which information on the aggregate consumption at time T is revealed by an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck Bridge. This information structure allows investors to speculate o...... a sufficient statistic for computation of the price of redundant dividend derivative and the equilibrium portfolios. The investors form their Pareto optimal trading strategies as if they intend to dynamically endogenously replicate the value of the dividend derivative....... on the heterogeneous posterior variance of dividend throughout [0; T). The market populated with many time-additive exponential-utility investors is dynamically effectively complete, if investors are allowed to trade in only two long-lived securities continuously. The underlying mechanism is that these assumptions...... imply that the Pareto efficient individual consumption plans are measurable with respect to the aggregate consumption. Hence, I may not need a dynamically complete market to facilitate a Pareto efficient allocation of consumption, the securities only have to facilitate an allocation which is measurable...

  15. Dynamics of barred galaxies: effects of disk height

    CERN Document Server

    Klypin, A; Colin, P; Quinn, T

    2008-01-01

    We study dynamics of bars in models of disk galaxies embeded in realistic dark matter halos. We find that disk thickness plays an important, if not dominant, role in the evolution and structure of the bars. We also make extensive numerical tests of different N-body codes used to study bar dynamics. Models with thick disks typically used in this type of modeling (height-to-length ratio hz/Rd=0.2) produce slowly rotating, and very long, bars. In contrast, more realistic thin disks with the same parameters as in our Galaxy (hz/Rd= 0.1) produce bars with normal length Rbar approx R_d, which rotate quickly with the ratio of the corotation radius to the bar radius 1.2-1.4 compatible with observations. Bars in these models do not show a tendency to slow down, and may lose as little as 2-3 percent of their angular momentum due to dynamical friction with the dark matter over cosmological time. We attribute the differences between the models to a combined effect of high phase-space density and smaller Jeans mass in the...

  16. THE EFFECTS OF STATIC AND DYNAMIC STRETCHING ON AGILITY PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bergun MERİÇ

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the effects of static and dynamic stretching protocols on agility performance in warm-up sessions. Twenty-three football players (mean ± SD age = 15,04± 0,77 years; weight = 62,35± 6,48kg; height = 1,73± 0,06cm participated to this study from Kocaeli Amateur Football League. Three different warm-up protocols were applied to the players every 48 hours. The first protocol was a general warm-up consisting of 5 minutes jogging with no stretching (GWU+NS, the second protocol was GWU with dynamic stretching (GWU+DS and the third protocol was GWU with static stretching (GWU+SS respectively. In the GWU+DS and GWU+SS protocols, 10 different movements were worked out with 12-15 repetitions in 30 seconds for each muscle group. Following each protocols, the players applied an agility performance test. SPSS (17.0 program used to compare the data obtained from 3 protocols and between two of them. In result, there were no statistically differences between NS and SS protocols (p>0.05. However, statistically difference was seen between DS and SS protocols and between DS and NS protocols (p<0.05. The warm up protocols consist of dynamic stretching exercises before agility activities should be preferred to have better performance.

  17. Damping Effects of Drogue Parachutes on Orion Crew Module Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubuchon, Vanessa V.; Owens, D. Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Because simulations of the Orion Crew Module (CM) dynamics with drogue parachutes deployed were under-predicting the amount of damping seen in free-flight tests, an attach-point damping model was applied to the Orion system. A key hypothesis in this model is that the drogue parachutes' net load vector aligns with the CM drogue attachment point velocity vector. This assumption seems reasonable and has historically produced good results, but has never been experimentally verified. The wake of the CM influences the drogue parachutes, which makes performance predictions of the parachutes difficult. Many of these effects are not currently modeled in the simulations. A forced oscillation test of the CM with parachutes was conducted in the NASA LaRC 20-Ft Vertical Spin Tunnel (VST) to gather additional data to validate and refine the attach-point damping model. A second loads balance was added to the original Orion VST model to measure the drogue parachute loads independently of the CM. The objective of the test was to identify the contribution of the drogues to CM damping and provide additional information to quantify wake effects and the interactions between the CM and parachutes. The drogue parachute force vector was shown to be highly dependent on the CM wake characteristics. Based on these wind tunnel test data, the attach-point damping model was determined to be a sufficient approximation of the parachute dynamics in relationship to the CM dynamics for preliminary entry vehicle system design. More wake effects should be included to better model the system.

  18. Dynamical approach to study and interpret geodynamical and geophysical effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferronsky, V.

    2009-04-01

    It was proved by satellite and terrestrial observation that the hydrostatics, which operates by the outer forces, is not able to ensure correct description and interpretation of geodynamical and geophysical effects. In order to find solution of the problem, we applied to dynamics. For this purpose the outer force field of the Earth was replaced by its inner (volumetric) force pressure. Doing so we introduced new physical basis for study dynamics of the planet in its own force field. The analytics for that is as follows. The body is considered as a system of n elementary particles (n → ∞) of masses mi and many degrees of freedom. The volumetric moment of a particle pi is written as pi = midri/dt. Then the moment of momentum M of the system is found to be derivative from the moment of inertia I in the form: M = ∑piri = ∑miridri/dt = d/dt(∑½ miri2) = ½ dI/dt. Then derivative on time from M gives the energy of the system as second derivative from I: M' = ∑pidri/dt + ∑ridpi/dt = ½I" where ∑pidri/dt = 2T is the kinetic energy and ∑ridpi/dt = U is the potential energy of the oscillating moment of inertia (interacting particles). So, equation of dynamical equilibrium (equation of state) of a body, where the interacted particles are presented by nonlinear oscillators, is ½I" = 2T + U. We used this for study and interpretation of oscillation and rotation parameters of the Earth. Note that the center of mass of the Earth is presented here by a surface of asymmetric spheroid. For more information see our works: Ferronsky V.I. and S.V.Ferronsky (2007). Dynamics of the Earth, Scientific World, Moscow; Ferronsky V.I. (2008) Non-averaged virial theorem for natural systems: http://zhurnal.ape.relarn.ru/articles/2008/066e.pdf

  19. Observation of the Dynamical Casimir Effect in a Superconducting Circuit

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, C M; Pourkabirian, A; Johansson, J R; Duty, T; Nori, F; Delsing, P

    2011-01-01

    One of the most surprising predictions of modern quantum theory is that the vacuum of space is not empty. In fact, quantum theory predicts that it teems with virtual particles flitting in and out of existence. While initially a curiosity, it was quickly realized that these vacuum fluctuations had measurable consequences, for instance producing the Lamb shift of atomic spectra and modifying the magnetic moment for the electron. This type of renormalization due to vacuum fluctuations is now central to our understanding of nature. However, these effects provide indirect evidence for the existence of vacuum fluctuations. From early on, it was discussed if it might instead be possible to more directly observe the virtual particles that compose the quantum vacuum. 40 years ago, Moore suggested that a mirror undergoing relativistic motion could convert virtual photons into directly observable real photons. This effect was later named the dynamical Casimir effect (DCE). Using a superconducting circuit, we have observ...

  20. Environmental Radiation Effects on Mammals A Dynamical Modeling Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Smirnova, Olga A

    2010-01-01

    This text is devoted to the theoretical studies of radiation effects on mammals. It uses the framework of developed deterministic mathematical models to investigate the effects of both acute and chronic irradiation in a wide range of doses and dose rates on vital body systems including hematopoiesis, small intestine and humoral immunity, as well as on the development of autoimmune diseases. Thus, these models can contribute to the development of the system and quantitative approaches in radiation biology and ecology. This text is also of practical use. Its modeling studies of the dynamics of granulocytopoiesis and thrombocytopoiesis in humans testify to the efficiency of employment of the developed models in the investigation and prediction of radiation effects on these hematopoietic lines. These models, as well as the properly identified models of other vital body systems, could provide a better understanding of the radiation risks to health. The modeling predictions will enable the implementation of more ef...

  1. Disorder, dynamic and entropy effects in the solid state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Torben R.; Li, Hai-Wen

    2016-12-01

    Storage of renewable energy remains a significant challenge for the implementation of a future carbon neutral and sustainable society based on renewable energy. New technologies providing a paradigm shift for energy storage may likely be based on novel materials with new functionalities. This review provides new perspectives for rational design of functional materials for energy storage using dynamic, disorder or entropy effects as a design concept. These effects may be introduced into the solid state using complex anions such as BH4- or B12H122-. These dynamic effects may facilitate anion substitution and preparation of materials that may stabilize high temperature polymorphs at lower temperatures. This has provided new ion conductors for lithium batteries and perovskite type metal borohydrides, which can be modified to resemble the well-known useful metal halide photovoltaics. Completely new metal hydrides, which stores hydrogen and may also be ion conductors or have magnetic, optical or electronic properties may be designed and prepared. This review reveals extreme structural and compositional flexibility of metal hydrides and provides new inspiration for rational materials design towards multi-functionality.

  2. Investigation of topographical effects on rupture dynamics and ground motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, H.; Chen, X.; Zhang, Z.

    2016-12-01

    Using the curved grid finite-difference method (CG-FDM), we model spontaneous dynamic rupture on vertical strike-slip faults with irregular free surfaces to investigate the effect of topography on near-source ground motion. Four groups of simulations, in which the epicentral distances from the topographical perturbations of the nucleation patch were varied, are modeled in this work. The simulated results show that the presence of irregular topography along the fault trace may increase the ground motion. Whether the irregular topography exhibits higher ground motion overall depends on the irregular topography's ability to prevent the sub-Rayleigh-to-supershear transition. When irregular topography prevents this transition, sub-Rayleigh rupture produces stronger ground motions than those of the sub-Rayleigh-to-supershear transition, although the moment magnitudes does not differ substantially between the two cases. To thoroughly understand the effects of irregular topography on near-source ground motion, we also model spontaneous dynamic rupture on a planar fault in full-space and half-space with varying initial shear stresses, and the corresponding modeling results indicate that the effect of initial shear stress on near-source ground motion is strong. These results may have implications for ground-motion prediction in future earthquakes involving geometrically complex faults.

  3. Resonant magnetic perturbation effect on tearing mode dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frassinetti, L.; Olofsson, K. E. J.; Brunsell, P. R.; Drake, J. R.

    2010-03-01

    The effect of a resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) on the tearing mode (TM) dynamics is experimentally studied in the EXTRAP T2R device. EXTRAP T2R is equipped with a set of sensor coils and active coils connected by a digital controller allowing a feedback control of the magnetic instabilities. The recently upgraded feedback algorithm allows the suppression of all the error field harmonics but keeping a selected harmonic to the desired amplitude, therefore opening the possibility of a clear study of the RMP effect on the corresponding TM. The paper shows that the RMP produces two typical effects: (1) a weak oscillation in the TM amplitude and a modulation in the TM velocity or (2) a strong modulation in the TM amplitude and phase jumps. Moreover, the locking mechanism of a TM to a RMP is studied in detail. It is shown that before the locking, the TM dynamics is characterized by velocity modulation followed by phase jumps. Experimental results are reasonably explained by simulations obtained with a model.

  4. Effects of microscale inertia on dynamic ductile crack growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques, N.; Mercier, S.; Molinari, A.

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the role of microscale inertia in dynamic ductile crack growth. A constitutive model for porous solids that accounts for dynamic effects due to void growth is proposed. The model has been implemented in a finite element code and simulations of crack growth in a notched bar and in an edge cracked specimen have been performed. Results are compared to predictions obtained via the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN) model where micro-inertia effects are not accounted for. It is found that microscale inertia has a significant influence on the crack growth. In particular, it is shown that micro-inertia plays an important role during the strain localisation process by impeding void growth. Therefore, the resulting damage accumulation occurs in a more progressive manner. For this reason, simulations based on the proposed modelling exhibit much less mesh sensitivity than those based on the viscoplastic GTN model. Microscale inertia is also found to lead to lower crack speeds. Effects of micro-inertia on fracture toughness are evaluated.

  5. Memory effects in stock price dynamics: evidences of technical trading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzarelli, Federico; Cristelli, Matthieu; Pompa, Gabriele; Zaccaria, Andrea; Pietronero, Luciano

    2014-03-01

    Technical trading represents a class of investment strategies for Financial Markets based on the analysis of trends and recurrent patterns in price time series. According standard economical theories these strategies should not be used because they cannot be profitable. On the contrary, it is well-known that technical traders exist and operate on different time scales. In this paper we investigate if technical trading produces detectable signals in price time series and if some kind of memory effects are introduced in the price dynamics. In particular, we focus on a specific figure called supports and resistances. We first develop a criterion to detect the potential values of supports and resistances. Then we show that memory effects in the price dynamics are associated to these selected values. In fact we show that prices more likely re-bounce than cross these values. Such an effect is a quantitative evidence of the so-called self-fulfilling prophecy, that is the self-reinforcement of agents' belief and sentiment about future stock prices' behavior.

  6. Observation of the dynamical Casimir effect in a superconducting circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, C M; Johansson, G; Pourkabirian, A; Simoen, M; Johansson, J R; Duty, T; Nori, F; Delsing, P

    2011-11-16

    One of the most surprising predictions of modern quantum theory is that the vacuum of space is not empty. In fact, quantum theory predicts that it teems with virtual particles flitting in and out of existence. Although initially a curiosity, it was quickly realized that these vacuum fluctuations had measurable consequences--for instance, producing the Lamb shift of atomic spectra and modifying the magnetic moment of the electron. This type of renormalization due to vacuum fluctuations is now central to our understanding of nature. However, these effects provide indirect evidence for the existence of vacuum fluctuations. From early on, it was discussed whether it might be possible to more directly observe the virtual particles that compose the quantum vacuum. Forty years ago, it was suggested that a mirror undergoing relativistic motion could convert virtual photons into directly observable real photons. The phenomenon, later termed the dynamical Casimir effect, has not been demonstrated previously. Here we observe the dynamical Casimir effect in a superconducting circuit consisting of a coplanar transmission line with a tunable electrical length. The rate of change of the electrical length can be made very fast (a substantial fraction of the speed of light) by modulating the inductance of a superconducting quantum interference device at high frequencies (>10 gigahertz). In addition to observing the creation of real photons, we detect two-mode squeezing in the emitted radiation, which is a signature of the quantum character of the generation process.

  7. Memory effects in stock price dynamics: evidences of technical trading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzarelli, Federico; Cristelli, Matthieu; Pompa, Gabriele; Zaccaria, Andrea; Pietronero, Luciano

    2014-01-01

    Technical trading represents a class of investment strategies for Financial Markets based on the analysis of trends and recurrent patterns in price time series. According standard economical theories these strategies should not be used because they cannot be profitable. On the contrary, it is well-known that technical traders exist and operate on different time scales. In this paper we investigate if technical trading produces detectable signals in price time series and if some kind of memory effects are introduced in the price dynamics. In particular, we focus on a specific figure called supports and resistances. We first develop a criterion to detect the potential values of supports and resistances. Then we show that memory effects in the price dynamics are associated to these selected values. In fact we show that prices more likely re-bounce than cross these values. Such an effect is a quantitative evidence of the so-called self-fulfilling prophecy, that is the self-reinforcement of agents' belief and sentiment about future stock prices' behavior. PMID:24671011

  8. Memory effects in stock price dynamics: evidences of technical trading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzarelli, Federico; Cristelli, Matthieu; Pompa, Gabriele; Zaccaria, Andrea; Pietronero, Luciano

    2014-03-27

    Technical trading represents a class of investment strategies for Financial Markets based on the analysis of trends and recurrent patterns in price time series. According standard economical theories these strategies should not be used because they cannot be profitable. On the contrary, it is well-known that technical traders exist and operate on different time scales. In this paper we investigate if technical trading produces detectable signals in price time series and if some kind of memory effects are introduced in the price dynamics. In particular, we focus on a specific figure called supports and resistances. We first develop a criterion to detect the potential values of supports and resistances. Then we show that memory effects in the price dynamics are associated to these selected values. In fact we show that prices more likely re-bounce than cross these values. Such an effect is a quantitative evidence of the so-called self-fulfilling prophecy, that is the self-reinforcement of agents' belief and sentiment about future stock prices' behavior.

  9. Wave packet dynamics under effect of a pulsed electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, A. R. C. B.; de Moura, F. A. B. F.; Dias, W. S.

    2016-06-01

    We studied the dynamics of an electron in a crystalline one-dimensional model under effect of a time-dependent Gaussian field. The time evolution of an initially Gaussian wave packet it was obtained through the numerical solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. Our analysis consists of computing the electronic centroid as well as the mean square displacement. We observe that the electrical pulse is able to promote a special kind of displacement along the chain. We demonstrated a direct relation between the group velocity of the wave packet and the applied electrical pulses. We compare those numerical calculations with a semi-classical approach.

  10. Dynamic modeling of cost-effectiveness of rotavirus vaccination, Kazakhstan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freiesleben de Blasio, Birgitte; Flem, Elmira; Latipov, Renat; Kuatbaeva, Ajnagul; Kristiansen, Ivar Sønbø

    2014-01-01

    The government of Kazakhstan, a middle-income country in Central Asia, is considering the introduction of rotavirus vaccination into its national immunization program. We performed a cost-effectiveness analysis of rotavirus vaccination spanning 20 years by using a synthesis of dynamic transmission models accounting for herd protection. We found that a vaccination program with 90% coverage would prevent ≈880 rotavirus deaths and save an average of 54,784 life-years for children vaccine cost at vaccination program costs would be entirely offset. To further evaluate efficacy of a vaccine program, benefits of indirect protection conferred by vaccination warrant further study.

  11. Effect of Coulomb interaction on multi-electronwave packet dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiokawa, T. [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, 305-8571 (Japan); Takada, Y. [Faculty of Engineering, Tokyo University of Science, Chiyoda, Tokyo, 102-0073, Japan and CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (Japan); Konabe, S.; Hatsugai, Y. [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, 305-8571, Japan and CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (Japan); Muraguchi, M. [Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai, 980-8579, Japan and CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (Japan); Endoh, T. [Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai, 980-8579, Japan and Center for Spintronics Integrated Systems, Tohoku University, Sendai, 980-8577, Japan and CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (Japan); Shiraishi, K. [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, 305-8571, Japan and Center for Computational Science, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, 305-8577, Japan and CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (Japan)

    2013-12-04

    We have investigated the effect of Coulomb interaction on electron transport in a one-dimensional nanoscale structure using a multi-electron wave packet approach. To study the time evolution, we numerically solve the time-dependent Hartree-Fock equation, finding that the electron wave packet dynamics strongly depends on the Coulomb interaction strength. When the Coulomb interaction is large, each electron wave packet moves separately in the presence of an electric field. With weak Coulomb interaction, however, the electron wave packets overlap, forming and moving as one collective wave packet.

  12. Dynamic Model of Linear Induction Motor Considering the End Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. A. Hairik

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the dynamic behavior of linear induction motor is described by a mathematical model taking into account the end effects and the core losses. The need for such a model rises due to the complexity of linear induction motors electromagnetic field theory. The end affects by introducing speed dependent scale factor to the magnetizing inductance and series resistance in the d-axis equivalent circuit. Simulation results are presented to show the validity of the model during both no-load and sudden load change intervals. This model can also be used directly in simulation researches for linear induction motor vector control drive systems.

  13. Effect of Smart Phone Use on Dynamic Postural Balance

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Sung-Hak; Choi, Mun-Hee; Goo, Bong-Oh

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The present study investigated what kind of effect smart phone use has on dynamic postural balance. [Subjects] The study subjects were 30 healthy students in their 20’s who were recruited from a University in Busan, Korea. [Methods] The present experiment was quasi-experimental research which measured the postural balance (Biodex) of subjects while they sent text messages via smart phones in the standing position with the eyes open, and while they used two-way SNS. [Results] There w...

  14. Dynamic hysteresis modeling including skin effect using diffusion equation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Souad; Louai, Fatima Zohra; Nait-Said, Nasreddine; Benabou, Abdelkader

    2016-07-01

    An improved dynamic hysteresis model is proposed for the prediction of hysteresis loop of electrical steel up to mean frequencies, taking into account the skin effect. In previous works, the analytical solution of the diffusion equation for low frequency (DELF) was coupled with the inverse static Jiles-Atherton (JA) model in order to represent the hysteresis behavior for a lamination. In the present paper, this approach is improved to ensure the reproducibility of measured hysteresis loops at mean frequency. The results of simulation are compared with the experimental ones. The selected results for frequencies 50 Hz, 100 Hz, 200 Hz and 400 Hz are presented and discussed.

  15. Effects of El Chichon volcanic effluents on stratospheric aerosol dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pueschel, R. F.; Snetsinger, K. G.; Russell, P. B.; Oberbeck, V. R.; Livingston, J. M.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of El Chichon's April 1982 eruption on stratospheric aerosol dynamics are presently discussed in terms of log-normal size distributions over 15-20 km sample altitudes between 30 and 45 deg N over the contiguous U.S. After collection, samples were studied by SEM, and log-normal size distributions were fitted to the data-points obtained. It is found that stratospheric aerosol behavior is explainable by the laws of aerosol mechanics more easily than has been the case for tropospheric aerosol, for which the source-sink relationship is much more complex.

  16. Dynamic hysteresis modeling including skin effect using diffusion equation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamada, Souad, E-mail: souadhamada@yahoo.fr [LSP-IE: Research Laboratory, Electrical Engineering Department, University of Batna, 05000 Batna (Algeria); Louai, Fatima Zohra, E-mail: fz_louai@yahoo.com [LSP-IE: Research Laboratory, Electrical Engineering Department, University of Batna, 05000 Batna (Algeria); Nait-Said, Nasreddine, E-mail: n_naitsaid@yahoo.com [LSP-IE: Research Laboratory, Electrical Engineering Department, University of Batna, 05000 Batna (Algeria); Benabou, Abdelkader, E-mail: Abdelkader.Benabou@univ-lille1.fr [L2EP, Université de Lille1, 59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France)

    2016-07-15

    An improved dynamic hysteresis model is proposed for the prediction of hysteresis loop of electrical steel up to mean frequencies, taking into account the skin effect. In previous works, the analytical solution of the diffusion equation for low frequency (DELF) was coupled with the inverse static Jiles-Atherton (JA) model in order to represent the hysteresis behavior for a lamination. In the present paper, this approach is improved to ensure the reproducibility of measured hysteresis loops at mean frequency. The results of simulation are compared with the experimental ones. The selected results for frequencies 50 Hz, 100 Hz, 200 Hz and 400 Hz are presented and discussed.

  17. Demonstration of photon Bloch oscillations and Wannier-Stark ladders in dual-periodical multilayer structures based on porous silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estevez, J Octavio; Arriaga, Jesús; Mendez-Blas, Antonio; Reyes-Ayona, Edgar; Escorcia, José; Agarwal, Vivechana

    2012-07-23

    : Theoretical demonstration and experimental evidence of photon Bloch oscillations and Wannier-Stark ladders (WSLs) in dual-periodical (DP) multilayers, based on porous silicon, are presented. An introduction of the linear gradient in refractive indices in DP structure, which is composed by stacking two different periodic substructures N times, resulted in the appearance of WSLs. Theoretical time-resolved reflection spectrum shows the photon Bloch oscillations with a period of 130 fs. Depending on the values of the structural parameters, one can observe the WSLs in the near infrared or visible region which may allow the generation of terahertz radiation with a potential applications in several fields like imaging.

  18. Simple Floquet-Wannier-Stark-Andreev viewpoint and emergence of low-energy scales in a voltage-biased three-terminal Josephson junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mélin, Régis; Caputo, Jean-Guy; Yang, Kang; Douçot, Benoît

    2017-02-01

    A three-terminal Josephson junction consists of three superconductors coupled coherently to a small nonsuperconducting island, such as a diffusive metal, a single or double quantum dot. A specific resonant single quantum dot three-terminal Josephson junction (Sa,Sb,Sc) biased with voltages (V ,-V ,0 ) is considered, but the conclusions hold more generally for resonant semiconducting quantum wire setups. A simple physical picture of the steady state is developed, using Floquet theory. It is shown that the equilibrium Andreev bound states (for V =0 ) evolve into nonequilibrium Floquet-Wannier-Stark-Andreev (FWS-Andreev) ladders of resonances (for V ≠0 ). These resonances acquire a finite width due to multiple Andreev reflection (MAR) processes. We also consider the effect of an extrinsic linewidth broadening on the quantum dot, introduced through a Dynes phenomenological parameter. The dc-quartet current manifests a crossover between the extrinsic relaxation dominated regime at low voltage to an intrinsic relaxation due to MAR processes at higher voltage. Finally, we study the coupling between the two FWS-Andreev ladders due to Landau-Zener-Stückelberg transitions, and its effect on the crossover in the relaxation mechanism. Three important low-energy scales are identified, and a perspective is to relate those low-energy scales to a recent noise cross-correlation experiment (Y. Cohen et al., arXiv:1606.08436).

  19. Prefactor in the dynamically assisted Sauter-Schwinger effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Christian; Schützhold, Ralf

    2016-10-01

    The probability of creating an electron-positron pair out of the quantum vacuum by a strong electric field can be enhanced tremendously via an additional weaker time-dependent field. This dynamically assisted Sauter-Schwinger effect has already been studied in several works. It has been found that the enhancement mechanism depends on the shape of the weaker field. For example, a Sauter pulse 1 /cosh (ω t )2 and a Gaussian profile exp (-ω2t2) exhibit significant, qualitative differences. However, so far most of the analytical studies were focused on the exponent entering the pair-creation probability. Here, we study the subleading prefactor in front of the exponential using the worldline instanton method. We find that the main features of the dynamically assisted Sauter-Schwinger effect, including the dependence on the shape of the weaker field, are basically unaffected by the prefactor. To test the validity of the instanton approximation, we compare the number of produced pairs to a numerical integration of the full Riccati equation.

  20. Explicit inclusion of electronic correlation effects in molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julien, Jean-Pierre; Kress, Joel D.; Zhu, Jian-Xin

    2017-07-01

    We design a quantum molecular dynamics method for strongly correlated electron metals. The strong electronic correlation effects are treated within a real-space version of the Gutzwiller variational approximation (GA), which is suitable for the inhomogeneity inherent in the process of quantum molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We also propose an efficient algorithm based on the second-moment approximation to the electronic density of states for the search of the optimal variation parameters, from which the renormalized interatomic MD potentials are fully determined. By considering a minimal one-correlated-orbital Anderson model with parameterized spatial dependence of tight-binding hopping integrals, this fast GA-MD method is benchmarked with that using exact diagonalization to solve the GA variational parameters. The efficiency and accuracy are illustrated. We have demonstrated the effect of temperature coupled with electronic correlation on structural properties simulated with MD. This method will open up an unprecedented opportunity enabling large-scale quantum MD simulations of strongly correlated electronic materials.

  1. Dynamic effects induced transition of droplets on biomimetic superhydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yong Chae; Bhushan, Bharat

    2009-08-18

    Superhydrophobic surfaces have considerable technological potential for various applications because of their extreme water-repellent properties. Dynamic effects, such as the bouncing and vibration of a droplet, can destroy the composite solid-air-liquid interface. The impact pressure of a bouncing droplet and the inertia force of a vibrating droplet affect the transition from a solid-air-liquid interface to a solid-liquid interface. Therefore, it is necessary to study the dynamic effect of droplets under various system parameters (impact velocity and frequency and amplitude of vibration). A new model for the prediction of the wetting and dewetting process during droplet vibration based on the relationship between the adhesion force and the inertia force of a droplet is proposed. To investigate whether micro-, nano-, and hierarchical structures can resist the destabilizing factors responsible for the transition, a study of bouncing and vibration of a water droplet is systematically conducted on various surfaces. The physics of wetting phenomena for water droplet studies is of fundamental importance in the geometrical design of superhydrophobic surfaces.

  2. Virtual mass effect in dynamic micromechanical mass sensing in liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiker, P.; Oesterschulze, E.

    2016-06-01

    Weighing individual micro- or nanoscale particles in solution using dynamic micromechanical sensors is quite challenging: viscous losses dramatically degrade the sensor's performance by both broadening the resonance peak and increasing the effective total mass of the resonator by the dragged liquid. While the virtual mass of the resonator was discussed frequently, little attention has been paid to the virtual mass of particles attached to the resonator's surface and its impact on the accuracy of mass sensing. By means of the in situ detection of a polystyrene microbead in water using a bridge-based microresonator, we demonstrate that the virtual mass of the bead significantly affects the observed frequency shift. In fact, 55 % of the frequency shift was caused by the virtual mass of the adsorbed bead, predicted by Stoke's theory. Based on the observed shift in the resonator's quality factor during particle adsorption, we confirm this significant effect of the virtual mass. Thus, a quantitative analysis of the mass of a single adsorbed particle is strongly diminished if dynamic micromechanical sensors are operated in a liquid environment.

  3. Effects of Dragonfly Wing Structure on the Dynamic Performances

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huaihui Ren; Xishu Wang; Xudong Li; Yinglong Chen

    2013-01-01

    The configurations of dragonfly wings,including the corrugations of the chordwise cross-section,the microstructure of the longitudinal veins and membrane,were comprehensively investigated using the Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy (ESEM).Based on the experimental results reported previously,the multi-scale and multi-dimensional models with different structural features of dragonfly wing were created,and the biological dynamic behaviors of wing models were discussed through the Finite Element Method (FEM).The results demonstrate that the effects of different structural features on dynamic behaviors of dragonfly wing such as natural frequency/modal,bending/torsional deformation,reaction force/torque are very significant.The corrugations of dragonfly wing along the chordwise can observably improve the flapping frequency because of the greater structural stiffness of wings.In updated model,the novel sandwich microstructure of the longitudinal veins remarkably improves the torsional deformation of dragonfly wing while it has a little effect on the flapping frequency and bending deformation.These integrated structural features can adjust the deformation of wing oneself,therefore the flow field around the wings can be controlled adaptively.The fact is that the flights of dragonfly wing with sandwich microstructure of longitudinal veins are more efficient and intelligent.

  4. On the Effect of Offshore Wind Parks on Ocean Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludewig, E.; Pohlmann, T.

    2012-12-01

    Nowadays renewable energy resources play a key role in the energy supply discussion and especially an increasingly interest in wind energy induces intensified installations of wind parks. At this offshore wind energy gains in popularity in the course of higher and more consistent energy availability than over land. For example Germany's government adopted a national interurban offshore wind energy program comprising the construction of hundreds of wind turbines within Germany's Exclusive Economic Zone to ensure up to 50% of Germany's renewable energy supply. The large number of installation in coastal regions asks for analyzing the impact of offshore wind parks (OWPs) on the atmosphere and the ocean. As known from literature such wind parks excite also-called wake-effect and such an influence on the wind field in turn affects ocean circulation. To cover OWP's impact on ocean dynamics we evaluate model simulations using the Hamburg Shelf-Ocean-Model (HAMSOM). All simulations were driven with a wind forcing produced by the Mesoscale Atmosphere Model of the Hamburg University (METRAS) which has implemented wind turbines. Wind forcing data were generated in collaboration with and by courtesy of the Meteorological Institute of the University of Hamburg, Department Technical Meteorology, Numeric Modeling-METRAS. To evaluate dynamical changes forced by the OWP's wind wake-effect we did a sensitivity study with a theoretical setup of a virtual ocean of 60m depth with a flat bottom and a temperature and salinity stratification according to common North Sea's conditions. Here our results show that already a small OWP of 12 wind turbines, placed in an area of 4 km^2, lead to a complex change in ocean dynamics. Due to the wake-effect zones of upwelling and downwelling are formed within a minute after turning-on wind turbines. The evolving vertical cells have a size of around 15x15 kilometers with a vertical velocity in order of 10^-2 mm/sec influencing the dynamic of an area

  5. Molecular dynamics simulations of thermal effects in nanometric cutting process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the basic action of how material removing in nanoscale is a critical issue of producing well-formed components.In order to clarify thermal effects on material removal at atomic level,molecular dynamics(MD)simulations of nanometric cutting of mono-crystalline copper are performed with Morse,EAM and Tersoff potential.The effects of cutting speed on temperature distribution are investigated.The simulation results demonstrate that the temperature distribution shows a roughly concentric shape around shear zone and a steep temperature gradient lies in diamond tool,a relative high temperature is located in shear zone and machined surface,but the highest temperature is found in chip.At a high cutting speed mode,the atoms in shear zone with high temperature implies a large stress is built up in a local region.

  6. Studying the effects of dynamical parameters on reactor core temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Khodabakhsh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to increase productivity, reduce depreciation, and avoid possible accidents in a system such as fuel rods' melting and overpressure, control of temperature changes in the reactor core is an important factor. There are several methods for solving and analysing the stability of point kinetics equations. In most previous analyses, the effects of various factors on the temperature of the reactor core have been ignored. In this work, the effects of various dynamical parameters on the temperature of the reactor core and stability of the system in the presence of temperature feedback reactivity with external reactivity step, ramp and sinusoidal for six groups of delayed neutrons were studied using the method of Lyapunov exponent. The results proved to be in good agreement with other works

  7. Impact of dynamic distribution of floc particles on flocculation effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NAN Jun; HE Weipeng; Song Xinin; LI Guibai

    2009-01-01

    Polyaluminum chloride (PAC) was used as coagulant and suspended particles in kaolin water. Online instruments including turbidimeter and particle counter were used to monitor the flocculation process. An evaluation model for demonstrating the impact on the flocculation effect was established based on the multiple linear regression analysis method. The parameter of the index weight of channels quantitatively described how the variation of floc particle population in different size ranges cause the decrement of turbidity. The study showed that the floc particles in different size ranges contributed differently to the decrement of turbidity and that the index weight of channel could excellently indicate the impact degree of floc particles dynamic distribution on flocculation effect. Therefore, the parameter may significantly benefit the development of coagulation and sedimentation techniques as well as the optimal coagulant selection.

  8. Quantum wavepacket ab initio molecular dynamics: an approach for computing dynamically averaged vibrational spectra including critical nuclear quantum effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumner, Isaiah; Iyengar, Srinivasan S

    2007-10-18

    We have introduced a computational methodology to study vibrational spectroscopy in clusters inclusive of critical nuclear quantum effects. This approach is based on the recently developed quantum wavepacket ab initio molecular dynamics method that combines quantum wavepacket dynamics with ab initio molecular dynamics. The computational efficiency of the dynamical procedure is drastically improved (by several orders of magnitude) through the utilization of wavelet-based techniques combined with the previously introduced time-dependent deterministic sampling procedure measure to achieve stable, picosecond length, quantum-classical dynamics of electrons and nuclei in clusters. The dynamical information is employed to construct a novel cumulative flux/velocity correlation function, where the wavepacket flux from the quantized particle is combined with classical nuclear velocities to obtain the vibrational density of states. The approach is demonstrated by computing the vibrational density of states of [Cl-H-Cl]-, inclusive of critical quantum nuclear effects, and our results are in good agreement with experiment. A general hierarchical procedure is also provided, based on electronic structure harmonic frequencies, classical ab initio molecular dynamics, computation of nuclear quantum-mechanical eigenstates, and employing quantum wavepacket ab initio dynamics to understand vibrational spectroscopy in hydrogen-bonded clusters that display large degrees of anharmonicities.

  9. Global Dynamics of Avian Influenza Epidemic Models with Psychological Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanhong Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cross-sectional surveys conducted in Thailand and China after the outbreaks of the avian influenza A H5N1 and H7N9 viruses show a high degree of awareness of human avian influenza in both urban and rural populations, a higher level of proper hygienic practice among urban residents, and in particular a dramatically reduced number of visits to live markets in urban population after the influenza A H7N9 outbreak in China in 2013. In this paper, taking into account the psychological effect toward avian influenza in the human population, a bird-to-human transmission model in which the avian population exhibits saturation effect is constructed. The dynamical behavior of the model is studied by using the basic reproduction number. The results demonstrate that the saturation effect within avian population and the psychological effect in human population cannot change the stability of equilibria but can affect the number of infected humans if the disease is prevalent. Numerical simulations are given to support the theoretical results and sensitivity analyses of the basic reproduction number in terms of model parameters that are performed to seek for effective control measures for avian influenza.

  10. Electron Density and Temperature Measurement by Stark Broadening in a Cold Argon Arc-Plasma Jet at Atmospheric Pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Qiuping; CHENG Cheng; MENG Yuedong

    2009-01-01

    Determination of both the electron density and temperature simultaneously in a cold argon arc-plasma jet by analyzing the Stark broadening of two different emission lines is presented.This method is based on the fact that the Stark broadening of different lines has a different dependence on the electron density and temperature.Therefore,a comparison of two or more line broadenings allows us to diagnose the electron density and temperature simultaneously.In this study we used the first two Balmer series hydrogen lines H_α and H_β for their large broadening width.For this purpose,a small amount of hydrogen was introduced into the discharge gas.The results of the Gigosos-Cardenoso computational model,considering more relevant processes for the hydrogen Balmer lines,is used to process the experimental data.With this method,we obtained reliable electron density and temperature,1.88 ×10 ~(15) cm~(-3 )and 13000 K,respectively.Possible sources of error were also analyzed.

  11. Stark level analysis of the spectral line shape of electronic transitions in rare earth ions embedded in host crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinkemper, H.; Fischer, S.; Hermle, M.; Goldschmidt, J. C.

    2013-05-01

    Rare earth ions embedded in host crystals are of great interest for many applications. Due to the crystal field of the host material, the energy levels of the rare earth ions split into several Stark levels. The resulting broadening of the spectral line shapes of transitions between those levels determines the upconversion phenomena, especially under broad-spectrum illumination, which are relevant for photovoltaics for instance. In this paper, we present a method to determine the spectral line shape of energy level transitions of rare earth ions from the absorption spectrum of the investigated material. A parameter model is used to describe the structure of the individual energy levels based on a representation of the Stark splitting. The parameters of the model are then determined with an evolutionary optimization algorithm. The described method is applied to the model system of β-NaEr0.2Y0.8F4. The results indicate that for illumination with a wavelength around 1523 nm, simple upconversion processes such as two-step absorption or direct energy transfer are less efficient than commonly assumed. Hence a sequence of efficient processes is suggested as an explanation for the high upconversion quantum yield of β-NaEr0.2Y0.8F4, which has not yet been reported in the literature.

  12. Theory of deep ultraviolet generation at maximum coherence assisted by Stark-chirped two-photon resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Myslivets, S A; Kimberg, V V; George, T F; George, Thomas F.

    2003-01-01

    A scheme is analyzed for effcient generation of vacuum ultraviolet radiation through four-wave mixing processes assisted by the technique of Stark-chirped rapid adiabatic passage. These opportunities are associated with pulse excitation of laddertype short-wavelength two-photon atomic or molecular transitions so that relaxation processes can be neglected. In this three-laser technique, a delayed-pulse of strong oR-resonant infrared radiation sweeps the laser-induced Stark-shift of a two-photon transition in a such way that facilitates robust maximum two-photon coherence induced by the first ultraviolet laser. A judiciously delayed third pulse scatters at this coherence and generates short-wavelength radiation. A theoretical analysis of these problems based on the density matrix is performed. A numerical model is developed to carry out simulations of a typical experiment. The results illustrate a behavior of populations, coherence and generated radiation along the medium as well as opportunities of effcient ge...

  13. Characteristic dynamics near two coalescing eigenvalues incorporating continuum threshold effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garmon, Savannah; Ordonez, Gonzalo

    2017-06-01

    It has been reported in the literature that the survival probability P(t) near an exceptional point where two eigenstates coalesce should generally exhibit an evolution P (t ) ˜t2e-Γ t, in which Γ is the decay rate of the coalesced eigenstate; this has been verified in a microwave billiard experiment [B. Dietz et al., Phys. Rev. E 75, 027201 (2007)]. However, the heuristic effective Hamiltonian that is usually employed to obtain this result ignores the possible influence of the continuum threshold on the dynamics. By contrast, in this work we employ an analytical approach starting from the microscopic Hamiltonian representing two simple models in order to show that the continuum threshold has a strong influence on the dynamics near exceptional points in a variety of circumstances. To report our results, we divide the exceptional points in Hermitian open quantum systems into two cases: at an EP2A two virtual bound states coalesce before forming a resonance, anti-resonance pair with complex conjugate eigenvalues, while at an EP2B two resonances coalesce before forming two different resonances. For the EP2B, which is the case studied in the microwave billiard experiment, we verify that the survival probability exhibits the previously reported modified exponential decay on intermediate time scales, but this is replaced with an inverse power law on very long time scales. Meanwhile, for the EP2A the influence from the continuum threshold is so strong that the evolution is non-exponential on all time scales and the heuristic approach fails completely. When the EP2A appears very near the threshold, we obtain the novel evolution P (t ) ˜1 -C1√{t } on intermediate time scales, while further away the parabolic decay (Zeno dynamics) on short time scales is enhanced.

  14. Influence of permanent dipole and dynamic core-electron polarization on tunneling ionization of polar molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Van-Hung; Zhao, Song-Feng; Le, Van-Hoang; Le, Anh-Thu

    2017-02-01

    We present a detailed theoretical investigation on strong-field ionization of polar (CO and NO) as well as nonpolar molecules (N2, O2, and CO2). Our results indicate that accounting for the Stark correction in the molecular tunneling ionization theory leads to overall fairly good agreements with numerical solutions of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. Furthermore, we show that the effect of dynamic core-electron polarization, in general, has a weak influence on the angle-dependent ionization probability. However, in the case of CO we confirm the recent finding by B. Zhang, J. Yuan, and Z. Zhao [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 163001 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.163001] that accounting for dynamic core-polarization is crucial to achieving an overall good agreement with experiments.

  15. Dengue dynamics and vaccine cost-effectiveness in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, David P; Ndeffo Mbah, Martial L; Medlock, Jan; Luz, Paula M; Meyers, Lauren A; Paltiel, A David; Galvani, Alison P

    2013-08-20

    Recent Phase 2b dengue vaccine trials have demonstrated the safety of the vaccine and estimated the vaccine efficacy with further trials underway. In anticipation of vaccine roll-out, cost-effectiveness analysis of potential vaccination policies that quantify the dynamics of disease transmission are fundamental to the optimal allocation of available doses. We developed a dengue transmission and vaccination model and calculated, for a range of vaccination costs and willingness-to-pay thresholds, the level of vaccination coverage necessary to sustain herd-immunity, the price at which vaccination is cost-effective and is cost-saving, and the sensitivity of our results to parameter uncertainty. We compared two vaccine efficacy scenarios, one a more optimistic scenario and another based on the recent lower-than-expected efficacy from the latest clinical trials. We found that herd-immunity may be achieved by vaccinating 82% (95% CI 58-100%) of the population at a vaccine efficacy of 70%. At this efficacy, vaccination may be cost-effective for vaccination costs up to US$ 534 (95% CI $369-1008) per vaccinated individual and cost-saving up to $204 (95% CI $39-678). At the latest clinical trial estimates of an average of 30% vaccine efficacy, vaccination may be cost-effective and cost-saving at costs of up to $237 (95% CI $159-512) and $93 (95% CI $15-368), respectively. Our model provides an assessment of the cost-effectiveness of dengue vaccination in Brazil and incorporates the effect of herd immunity into dengue vaccination cost-effectiveness. Our results demonstrate that at the relatively low vaccine efficacy from the recent Phase 2b dengue vaccine trials, age-targeted vaccination may still be cost-effective provided the total vaccination cost is sufficiently low.

  16. Health assessment for TRW Proposed National Priorities List (NPL) Site, Minerva, Stark County, Ohio, Region 5. CERCLIS No. OHD004179339. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-31

    The TRW site is a Proposed National Priorities List (NPL) site located about one mile northeast of downtown Minerva, Stark County, Ohio. Previous disposal practices by the former TRW plant (currently owned by PCC Airfoils, Inc.) introduced polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into on-site and off-site soils and ground water. Off-site residential wells were contaminated with elevated levels of VOCs, especially vinyl chloride. In 1985, contaminated soils and sediments from the former disposal areas were excavated and disposed of in an on-site secure landfill (cell). In addition, in 1986 a Consent Order between TRW and the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency was signed, in which TRW agreed to implement an on-site and off-site ground water 'pump and treat' operation to intercept the VOC contaminant plumes. The site is of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health that could result from possible exposure to hazardous substances at levels that may result in adverse health effects over time.

  17. Radiation Recoil Effects on the Dynamical Evolution of Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotto-Figueroa, Desiree

    The Yarkovsky effect is a radiation recoil force that results in a semimajor axis drift in the orbit that can cause Main Belt asteroids to be delivered to powerful resonances from which they could be transported to Earth-crossing orbits. This force depends on the spin state of the object, which is modified by the YORP effect, a variation of the Yarkovsky effect that results in a torque that changes the spin rate and the obliquity. Extensive analyses of the basic behavior of the YORP effect have been previously conducted in the context of the classical spin state evolution of rigid bodies (YORP cycle). However, the YORP effect has an extreme sensitivity to the topography of the asteroids and a minor change in the shape of an aggregate asteroid can stochastically change the YORP torques. Here we present the results of the first simulations that self-consistently model the YORP effect on the spin states of dynamically evolving aggregates. For these simulations we have developed several algorithms and combined them with two codes, TACO and pkdgrav. TACO is a thermophysical asteroid code that models the surface of an asteroid using a triangular facet representation and which can compute the YORP torques. The code pkdgrav is a cosmological N-body tree code modified to simulate the dynamical evolution of asteroids represented as aggregates of spheres using gravity and collisions. The continuous changes in the shape of an aggregate result in a different evolution of the YORP torques and therefore aggregates do not evolve through the YORP cycle as a rigid body would. Instead of having a spin evolution ruled by long periods of rotational acceleration and deceleration as predicted by the classical YORP cycle, the YORP effect is self-limiting and stochastic on aggregate asteroids. We provide a statistical description of the spin state evolution which lays out the foundation for new simulations of a coupled Yarkovsky/YORP evolution. Both self-limiting YORP and to a lesser

  18. The Effects of Price Elasticity Dynamics on a Firm’s Profit

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Jazayeri; Narjes Jazayeri

    2011-01-01

    This paper studies the dynamic behavior of price elasticity and its effects on the overall profit.Although price elasticity has a significant effect on sales, its dynamics have not been examined sofar in pricing models. In this paper, a simple pricing model is suggested in which, price elasticity isconsidered dynamic. The suggested pricing model is concerned with a monopolist that its objectiveis to maximize profit by determining the optimal price. Dynamics of price elasticity is described by...

  19. Effects of noise on the phase dynamics of nonlinear oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daffertshofer, A.

    1998-07-01

    Various properties of human rhythmic movements have been successfully modeled using nonlinear oscillators. However, despite some extensions towards stochastical differential equations, these models do not comprise different statistical features that can be explained by nondynamical statistics. For instance, one observes certain lag one serial correlation functions for consecutive periods during periodic motion. This work aims at an extension of dynamical descriptions in terms of stochastically forced nonlinear oscillators such as ξ¨+ω20ξ=n(ξ,ξ˙)+q(ξ,ξ˙)Ψ(t), where the nonlinear function n(ξ,ξ˙) generates a limit cycle and Ψ(t) denotes colored noise that is multiplied via q(ξ,ξ˙). Nonlinear self-excited systems have been frequently investigated, particularly emphasizing stability properties and amplitude evolution. Thus, one can focus on the effects of noise on the frequency or phase dynamics that can be analyzed by use of time-dependent Fokker-Planck equations. It can be shown that noise multiplied via polynoms of arbitrary finite order cannot generate the desired period correlation but predominantly results in phase diffusion. The system is extended in terms of forced oscillators in order to find a minimal model producing the required error correction.

  20. The Dynamic Characteristic and Hysteresis Effect of an Air Spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löcken, F.; Welsch, M.

    2015-02-01

    In many applications of vibration technology, especially in chassis, air springs present a common alternative to steel spring concepts. A design-independent and therefore universal approach is presented to describe the dynamic characteristic of such springs. Differential and constitutive equations based on energy balances of the enclosed volume and the mountings are given to describe the nonlinear and dynamic characteristics. Therefore all parameters can be estimated directly from physical and geometrical properties, without parameter fitting. The numerically solved equations fit very well to measurements of a passenger car air spring. In a second step a simplification of this model leads to a pure mechanical equation. While in principle the same parameters are used, just an empirical correction of the effective heat transfer coefficient is needed to handle some simplification on this topic. Finally, a linearization of this equation leads to an analogous mechanical model that can be assembled from two common spring- and one dashpot elements in a specific arrangement. This transfer into "mechanical language" enables a system description with a simple force-displacement law and a consideration of the nonobvious hysteresis and stiffness increase of an air spring from a mechanical point of view.

  1. Enhanced oxidation resistance of active nanostructures via dynamic size effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Yi; Xiao, Jianping; Yu, Liang; Liu, Qingfei; Ning, Yanxiao; Zhou, Zhiwen; Chen, Hao; Huang, Wugen; Liu, Ping; Bao, Xinhe

    2017-01-01

    A major challenge limiting the practical applications of nanomaterials is that the activities of nanostructures (NSs) increase with reduced size, often sacrificing their stability in the chemical environment. Under oxidative conditions, NSs with smaller sizes and higher defect densities are commonly expected to oxidize more easily, since high-concentration defects can facilitate oxidation by enhancing the reactivity with O2 and providing a fast channel for oxygen incorporation. Here, using FeO NSs as an example, we show to the contrary, that reducing the size of active NSs can drastically increase their oxidation resistance. A maximum oxidation resistance is found for FeO NSs with dimensions below 3.2 nm. Rather than being determined by the structure or electronic properties of active sites, the enhanced oxidation resistance originates from the size-dependent structural dynamics of FeO NSs in O2. We find this dynamic size effect to govern the chemical properties of active NSs. PMID:28223687

  2. Solar Dynamics and Its Effects on the Heliosphere and Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Baker, D. N; Schwartz, S. J; Schwenn, R; Steiger, R

    2007-01-01

    The SOHO and Cluster missions form a single ESA cornerstone. Yet they observe very different regions in our solar system: the solar atmosphere on one hand and the Earth’s magnetosphere on the other. At the same time the Ulysses mission provides observations in the third dimension of the heliosphere, and many others add to the picture from the Lagrangian point L1 to the edge of the heliosphere. It is the aim of this ISSI volume to tie these observations together in addressing the topic of Solar Dynamics and its Effects on the Heliosphere and Earth, thus contributing to the International Living With a Star (ILWS) program. The volume starts out with an assessment and description of the reasons for solar dynamics and how it couples into the heliosphere. The three subsequent sections are each devoted to following one chain of events from the Sun all the way to the Earth’s magnetosphere and ionosphere: The normal solar wind chain, the chain associated with coronal mass ejections, and the solar energetic particl...

  3. Effects of random noise in a dynamical model of love

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Yong, E-mail: hsux3@nwpu.edu.cn [Department of Applied Mathematics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China); Gu Rencai; Zhang Huiqing [Department of Applied Mathematics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China)

    2011-07-15

    Highlights: > We model the complexity and unpredictability of psychology as Gaussian white noise. > The stochastic system of love is considered including bifurcation and chaos. > We show that noise can both suppress and induce chaos in dynamical models of love. - Abstract: This paper aims to investigate the stochastic model of love and the effects of random noise. We first revisit the deterministic model of love and some basic properties are presented such as: symmetry, dissipation, fixed points (equilibrium), chaotic behaviors and chaotic attractors. Then we construct a stochastic love-triangle model with parametric random excitation due to the complexity and unpredictability of the psychological system, where the randomness is modeled as the standard Gaussian noise. Stochastic dynamics under different three cases of 'Romeo's romantic style', are examined and two kinds of bifurcations versus the noise intensity parameter are observed by the criteria of changes of top Lyapunov exponent and shape of stationary probability density function (PDF) respectively. The phase portraits and time history are carried out to verify the proposed results, and the good agreement can be found. And also the dual roles of the random noise, namely suppressing and inducing chaos are revealed.

  4. The Dynamic Characteristic and Hysteresis Effect of an Air Spring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Löcken F.

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In many applications of vibration technology, especially in chassis, air springs present a common alternative to steel spring concepts. A design-independent and therefore universal approach is presented to describe the dynamic characteristic of such springs. Differential and constitutive equations based on energy balances of the enclosed volume and the mountings are given to describe the nonlinear and dynamic characteristics. Therefore all parameters can be estimated directly from physical and geometrical properties, without parameter fitting. The numerically solved equations fit very well to measurements of a passenger car air spring. In a second step a simplification of this model leads to a pure mechanical equation. While in principle the same parameters are used, just an empirical correction of the effective heat transfer coefficient is needed to handle some simplification on this topic. Finally, a linearization of this equation leads to an analogous mechanical model that can be assembled from two common spring- and one dashpot elements in a specific arrangement. This transfer into ”mechanical language” enables a system description with a simple force-displacement law and a consideration of the nonobvious hysteresis and stiffness increase of an air spring from a mechanical point of view.

  5. Dynamics around black holes: Radiation Emission and Tidal Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Brito, Richard

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis we study several dynamical processes involving black holes in four and higher dimensions. First, using perturbative techniques, we compare the massless and massive scalar radiation emitted by a particle radially infalling into a Schwarzchild black hole. We show that the late-time waveform of massive scalar perturbations is dominated by a universal oscillatory decaying tail, which appears due to curvature effects. We also show that the energy spectrum is in perfect agreement with a ZFL calculation once no-hair properties of black holes are taken into account. In the second part, we study the phenomenon of superradiance in higher dimensions and conjecture that the maximum energy extracted from a rotating black hole can be understood in terms of the ergoregion proper volume. We then study some consequences of superradiance in the dynamics of moons orbiting around higher-dimensional rotating black holes. In four-dimensional spacetime, moons around black holes generate low-amplitude tides, and the e...

  6. Risk management of domino effects considering dynamic consequence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khakzad, Nima; Khan, Faisal; Amyotte, Paul; Cozzani, Valerio

    2014-06-01

    Domino effects are low-probability high-consequence accidents causing severe damage to humans, process plants, and the environment. Because domino effects affect large areas and are difficult to control, preventive safety measures have been given priority over mitigative measures. As a result, safety distances and safety inventories have been used as preventive safety measures to reduce the escalation probability of domino effects. However, these safety measures are usually designed considering static accident scenarios. In this study, we show that compared to a static worst-case accident analysis, a dynamic consequence analysis provides a more rational approach for risk assessment and management of domino effects. This study also presents the application of Bayesian networks and conflict analysis to risk-based allocation of chemical inventories to minimize the consequences and thus to reduce the escalation probability. It emphasizes the risk management of chemical inventories as an inherent safety measure, particularly in existing process plants where the applicability of other safety measures such as safety distances is limited. © 2013 Society for Risk Analysis.

  7. High-Frequency Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen Entanglement via Atomic Memory Effects in Four-Wave Mixing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xue-Hua; HU Xiang-Ming; KONG Ling-Feng; ZHANG Xiu

    2010-01-01

    @@ Atomic memory effects occur when the atomic relaxation times are comparable to or much longer than the cavity relaxation times.We show that by using the memory effects,it is possible to obtain high-frequency Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen entanglement between a pair of Stokes and anti-Stokes fields in a four-wave mixing system.The physical origin is traced to the dynamical Stark splittings of dressed states due to the parametrically amplified fields.This mechanism provides an alternative and efficient way for sideband entanglement.

  8. Cloud Susceptibilities to Ice Nuclei: Microphysical Effects and Dynamical Feedbacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paukert, Marco; Hoose, Corinna

    2015-04-01

    The impact of aerosols on cloud properties is currently not well established. This is largely attributed to the interdependencies of aerosols and cloud microphysical processes, among which primary ice formation contributes to considerable uncertainties. Although it is known that in a large range of thermodynamic conditions aerosol particles are required to initiate ice formation, identifying and characterizing the effect of specific ice nuclei is among current scientific efforts. Here we attempt to quantify the change of cloud properties with varying aerosol background concentrations. We adapt the concept of susceptibilities for mixed-phase and ice clouds, defining the susceptibility as the derivation of a macrophysical quantity with respect to ice nucleating aerosol concentrations. A focus of our study is the use of different model approaches in order to identify the distinct contributions of both cloud microphysics and cloud-dynamical feedbacks to the overall susceptibility. The classical method is the direct comparison of two independent model runs, where the whole range of microphysical and cloud-dynamical feedbacks contributes to different cloud properties in a perturbed simulation. Our alternative method relies on a single simulation which incorporates multiple executions of the microphysical scheme within the same time step, each "perturbed microphysics" scheme with varying aerosol concentrations and an additional set of cloud particle tracers. Since in the latter case the model dynamics are held constant and only microphysical feedbacks contribute to the properties of perturbed clouds, we can distinguish between the pure microphysical effect and the dynamical enhancement or suppression. For a persistent Arctic mixed-phase stratocumulus cloud layer which is expected to be particularly sensitive to feedback cycles, we show an enhancement of the cloud susceptibility to ice nucleating particles by dynamics of around 50%, but a decay of the enhancement with time

  9. Dynamical Tides in General Relativity: Effective Action and Effective-One-Body Hamiltonian

    CERN Document Server

    Steinhoff, Jan; Buonanno, Alessandra; Taracchini, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Tidal effects have an important impact on the late inspiral of compact binary systems containing neutron stars. Most current models of tidal deformations of neutron stars assume that the tidal bulge is directly related to the tidal field generated by the companion, with a constant response coefficient. However, if the orbital motion approaches a resonance with one of the internal modes of the neutron star, this adiabatic description of tidal effects starts to break down, and the tides become dynamical. In this paper, we consider dynamical tides in general relativity due to the quadrupolar fundamental oscillation mode of a neutron star. We devise a description of the effects of the neutron star's finite size on the orbital dynamics based on an effective point-particle action augmented by dynamical quadrupolar degrees of freedom. We analyze the post-Newtonian and test-particle approximations of this model and incorporate the results into an effective-one-body Hamiltonian. This enables us to extend the descripti...

  10. Illuminating the Effects of Dynamic Lighting on Student Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S. Mott

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Light is universally understood as essential to the human condition. Yet light quality varies substantially in nature and in controlled environments leading to questions of which artificial light characteristics facilitate maximum learning. Recent research has examined lighting variables of color temperature, and illumination for affecting sleep, mood, focus, motivation, concentration, and work and school performance. This has resulted in artificial light systems intended to support human beings in their actualization through dynamic lighting technology allowing for different lighting conditions per task. A total of 84 third graders were exposed to either focus (6000K-100fc average maintained or normal lighting. Focus lighting led to a higher percentage increase in oral reading fluency performance (36% than did control lighting (17%. No lighting effects were found for motivation or concentration, possibly attributable to the younger age level of respondents as compared with European studies. These findings illuminate the need for further research on artificial light and learning.

  11. Effect of smart phone use on dynamic postural balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sung-Hak; Choi, Mun-Hee; Goo, Bong-Oh

    2014-07-01

    [Purpose] The present study investigated what kind of effect smart phone use has on dynamic postural balance. [Subjects] The study subjects were 30 healthy students in their 20's who were recruited from a University in Busan, Korea. [Methods] The present experiment was quasi-experimental research which measured the postural balance (Biodex) of subjects while they sent text messages via smart phones in the standing position with the eyes open, and while they used two-way SNS. [Results] There were significant differences between standing and the dual-task situations. Among dual tasks using smart phones, SNS using situations showed the highest instability. [Conclusion] The use of smart phones in less stable conditions such as while walking or in moving vehicles should be discouraged.

  12. Schmidt number effects in dissipative particle dynamics simulation of polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symeonidis, Vasileios; Karniadakis, George Em; Caswell, Bruce

    2006-11-14

    Simulation studies for dilute polymeric systems are presented using the dissipative particle dynamics method. By employing two different thermostats, the velocity-Verlet and Lowe's scheme, we show that the Schmidt number (S(c)) of the solvent strongly affects nonequilibrium polymeric quantities. The fractional extension of wormlike chains subjected to steady shear is obtained as a function of S(c). Poiseuille flow in microchannels for fixed polymer concentration and varying number of repeated units within a chain is simulated. The nonuniform concentration profiles and their dependence on S(c) are computed. We show the effect of the bounce-forward wall boundary condition on the depletion layer thickness. A power law fit of the velocity profile in stratified Poiseuille flow in a microchannel yields wall viscosities different from bulk values derived from uniform, steady plane Couette flow. The form of the velocity profiles indicates that the slip flow model is not useful for the conditions of these calculations.

  13. Evaluating Effectiveness of Tamper Proofing on Dynamic Graph Software Watermarks

    CERN Document Server

    Khiyal, Malik Sikandar Hayat; Amjad, Sehrish; Khalil, M Shahid

    2010-01-01

    For enhancing the protection level of dynamic graph software watermarks and for the purpose of conducting the analysis which evaluates the effect of integrating two software protection techniques such as software watermarking and tamper proofing, constant encoding technique along with the enhancement through the idea of constant splitting is proposed. In this paper Thomborson technique has been implemented with the scheme of breaking constants which enables to encode all constants without having any consideration about their values with respect to the value of watermark tree. Experimental analysis which have been conducted and provided in this paper concludes that the constant encoding process significantly increases the code size, heap space usage, and execution time, while making the tamper proofed code resilient to variety of semantic preserving program transformation attacks.

  14. Singularity free gravitational collapse in an effective dynamical quantum spacetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, R., E-mail: ramon.torres-herrera@upc.edu; Fayos, F., E-mail: f.fayos@upc.edu

    2014-06-02

    We model the gravitational collapse of heavy massive shells including its main quantum corrections. Among these corrections, quantum improvements coming from Quantum Einstein Gravity are taken into account, which provides us with an effective quantum spacetime. Likewise, we consider dynamical Hawking radiation by modeling its back-reaction once the horizons have been generated. Our results point towards a picture of gravitational collapse in which the collapsing shell reaches a minimum non-zero radius (whose value depends on the shell initial conditions) with its mass only slightly reduced. Then, there is always a rebound after which most (or all) of the mass evaporates in the form of Hawking radiation. Since the mass never concentrates in a single point, no singularity appears.

  15. Dynamic effects of linkage joints in electrostatic microengines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, J.J.; Miller, S.L.; LaVigne, G.F. [and others

    1998-05-01

    The electrostatic micro-engine is one of the major actuators used in MEMS applications. To ensure this MEMS actuator is operated in a fashion that will produce peak performance and long life, the system dynamics must be fully understood. One of the major trade-offs in the micro-engine design is the use of either pin or flexure joints. This paper will develop the equations of motion for flexure-jointed and pin-jointed surface micromachined microengines. An analytical mechanics approach will be used to derive the equations of motion and the appropriate equations of constraint. The effect of the flexure joints on the drive signals of the micro engine is experimentally shown to be significant during static tests.

  16. Effective local dynamic routing strategy for air route networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Wenjun; Zhao Lingxi

    2015-01-01

    With the rapid development of air transportation, network service ability has attracted a lot of attention in academe. Aiming to improve the throughput of the air route network (ARN), we propose an effective local dynamic routing strategy in this paper. Several factors, such as the rout-ing distance, the geographical distance and the real-time local traffic, are taken into consideration. When the ARN is in the normal free-flow state, the proposed strategy can recover the shortest path routing (SPR) strategy. When the ARN undergoes congestion, the proposed strategy changes the paths of flights based on the real-time local traffic information. The throughput of the Chinese air route network (CARN) is evaluated. Results confirm that the proposed strategy can significantly improve the throughput of CARN. Meanwhile, the increase in the average flying distance and time is tiny. Results also indicate the importance of the distance related factors in a routing strategy designed for the ARN.

  17. Effects of the Basal Boundary on Debris-flow Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, R. M.; Logan, M.; Lahusen, R. G.; Berti, M.

    2006-12-01

    Data aggregated from 37 large-scale experiments reveal some counterintuitive effects of bed roughness on debris-flow dynamics. In each experiment 10 m3 of water-saturated sand and gravel, mixed with 1 to 12% silt and clay by dry weight, was abruptly released from a gate at the head of a 2-m wide, 1.2-m deep, 82.5-m long rectangular flume inclined 31° throughout most of its length and adjoined to a gently sloping, planar runout surface at its toe. The flume's basal boundary consisted of either a smooth, planar concrete surface or a concrete surface roughened with a grid of conical bumps. Tilt-table tests with dry debris-flow sediment showed that this roughness imparted a basal friction angle of 38°, comparable to the sediment's internal friction angle of 38-42°, whereas the smooth-bed friction angle was 28°. About 20 electronic sensors installed in the flume yielded data on flow speeds and depths as well as basal stresses and pore pressures. Behavior observed in all experiments included development of steep, unsaturated, coarse-grained debris-flow snouts and tapering, liquefied, fine-grained tails. Flows on the rough bed were typically about 50% thicker and 20% slower than flows on the smooth bed, although the rough bed caused snout steepening that enabled flow fronts to move faster than expected, given the increased bed friction. Moreover, flows on rough beds ran out further than flows on smooth beds owing to enhanced grain-size segregation and lateral levee formation. With the rough bed, measured basal stresses and pore pressures differed little from values expected from static gravitational loading of partially liquefied debris. With the smooth bed, however, measured basal stresses and pore pressures were nearly twice as large as expected values. This anomaly resulted from flow disturbance at the upstream lips of steel plates in which sensors were mounted. The lips produced barely visible ripples in otherwise smooth flow surfaces, yet sufficed to generate

  18. Thermal effects in the dynamics of disordered elastic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bustingorry, S.; Kolton, A.B. [Centro Atomico Bariloche, 8400 S.C. de Bariloche (Argentina); Rosso, A. [CNRS, LPTMS, Univ. Paris-Sud, UMR 8626, Orsay Cedex F-91405 (France); Krauth, W. [CNRS-Laboratoire de Physique Statistique, Ecole Normale Superieure, 24 rue Lhomond, 75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Giamarchi, T. [DPMC-MaNEP, University of Geneva, 24 Quai Ernest Ansermet, 1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland)], E-mail: Thierry.Giamarchi@physics.unige.ch

    2009-03-01

    Many seemingly different macroscopic systems (magnets, ferroelectrics, CDW, vortices, etc.) can be described as generic disordered elastic systems. Understanding their static and dynamics thus poses challenging problems both from the point of view of fundamental physics and of practical applications. Despite important progress many questions remain open. In particular the temperature has drastic effects on the way these systems respond to an external force. We address here the important question of the thermal effect close to depinning, and whether these effects can be understood in the analogy with standard critical phenomena, analogy so useful to understand the zero temperature case. We show that close to the depinning force temperature leads to a rounding of the depinning transition and compute the corresponding exponent. In addition, using a novel algorithm it is possible to study precisely the behavior close to depinning, and to show that the commonly accepted analogy of the depinning with a critical phenomenon does not fully hold, since no divergent lengthscale exists in the steady state properties of the line below the depinning threshold.

  19. Electromagnetic effects on dynamics of high-beta filamentary structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Wonjae; Krasheninnikov, Sergei I., E-mail: skrash@mae.ucsd.edu [University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Umansky, Maxim V. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Angus, J. R. [Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Avenue, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    The impacts of the electromagnetic effects on blob dynamics are considered. Electromagnetic BOUT++ simulations on seeded high-beta blobs demonstrate that inhomogeneity of magnetic curvature or plasma pressure along the filament leads to bending of the blob filaments and the magnetic field lines due to increased propagation time of plasma current (Alfvén time). The bending motion can enhance heat exchange between the plasma facing materials and the inner scrape-off layer (SOL) region. The effects of sheath boundary conditions on the part of the blob away from the boundary are also diminished by the increased Alfvén time. Using linear analysis and BOUT++ simulations, it is found that electromagnetic effects in high temperature and high density plasmas reduce the growth rate of resistive drift wave instability when resistivity drops below a certain value. The blobs temperature decreases in the course of its motion through the SOL and so the blob can switch from the electromagnetic to the electrostatic regime where resistive drift waves become important again.

  20. Bimatoprost Effects on Aqueous Humor Dynamics in Monkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David F. Woodward

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of bimatoprost on aqueous humor dynamics were quantified in monkey eyes. Uveoscleral outflow was measured by the anterior chamber perfusion method, using FITC-dextran. Total outflow facility was determined by the two-level constant pressure method. Aqueous flow was measured with a scanning ocular fluorophotometer. Uveoscleral outflow was 0.96±0.19 L min−1 in vehicle-treated eyes and 1.37±0.27 L min−1 (=6; <.05 in eyes that received bimatoprost 0.01% b.i.d. × 5 days. Bimatoprost had no effect on total outflow facility, which was 0.42±0.05 L min−1 at baseline and 0.42±0.04 L min−1 after bimatoprost treatment. Bimatoprost had no significant effect on aqueous humor flow. This study demonstrates that bimatoprost increases uveoscleral outflow but not total outflow facility or aqueous humor flow, indicating that it lowers intraocular pressure in ocular normotensive monkeys by a mechanism that exclusively involves uveoscleral outflow.