WorldWideScience

Sample records for dynamic scientific research

  1. Sergio Bertolucci - Towards dynamic scientific research

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    Sergio Bertolucci has become Director for Research and Scientific Computing at the moment when the LHC is almost ready to deliver its first physics data. In this interview, he explains the importance of the perfect mix of collaboration and competition that will make the LHC scientific programme successful. Sergio Bertolucci’s enthusiasm for being at CERN at this historic time is evident from the first minute of the interview and has not waned after an hour speaking with us. Bertolucci’s recipe for a successful start-up of the physics delivery phase of the LHC is "Festina lente", a Latin motto that means something like ‘hasten slowly’. "The LHC is probably the biggest and most complex scientific enterprise ever undertaken by humanity," says Bertolucci. "It will certainly lead us towards a new phase of our understanding of the Universe. Nature is already giving us some indications but only the LHC will allow us to observe the ne...

  2. Monitoring Scientific Developments from a Dynamic Perspective: Self-Organized Structuring To Map Neural Network Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyons, E. C. M.; van Raan, A. F. J.

    1998-01-01

    Using bibliometric mapping techniques, authors developed a methodology of self-organized structuring of scientific fields which was applied to neural network research. Explores the evolution of a data generated field structure by monitoring the interrelationships between subfields, the internal structure of subfields, and the dynamic features of…

  3. The dynamics of big data and human rights: the case of scientific research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vayena, Effy; Tasioulas, John

    2016-12-28

    In this paper, we address the complex relationship between big data and human rights. Because this is a vast terrain, we restrict our focus in two main ways. First, we concentrate on big data applications in scientific research, mostly health-related research. And, second, we concentrate on two human rights: the familiar right to privacy and the less well-known right to science. Our contention is that human rights interact in potentially complex ways with big data, not only constraining it, but also enabling it in various ways; and that such rights are dynamic in character, rather than fixed once and for all, changing in their implications over time in line with changes in the context we inhabit, and also as they interact among themselves in jointly responding to the opportunities and risks thrown up by a changing world. Understanding this dynamic interaction of human rights is crucial for formulating an ethic tailored to the realities-the new capabilities and risks-of the rapidly evolving digital environment.This article is part of the themed issue 'The ethical impact of data science'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  4. Dynamic Framing in the Communication of Scientific Research: Texts and Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Pryce R.; Russ, Rosemary S.

    2015-01-01

    The fields of science education and science communication share the overarching goal of helping non-experts and non-members of the professional science community develop knowledge of the content and processes of scientific research. However, the specific audiences, methods, and aims employed in the two fields have evolved quite differently and as…

  5. Dynamic Framing in the Communication of Scientific Research: Texts and Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Pryce R.; Russ, Rosemary S.

    2015-01-01

    The fields of science education and science communication share the overarching goal of helping non-experts and non-members of the professional science community develop knowledge of the content and processes of scientific research. However, the specific audiences, methods, and aims employed in the two fields have evolved quite differently and as…

  6. Contributions to Positioning Accounting in Relation to Scientific Research

    OpenAIRE

    Vasile Patrut

    2009-01-01

    The paper approaches some epistemological and methodological aspects of scientific research in accounting, such as: the distinction between accounting research and scientific research in accounting; the products, dynamics and mechanism of scientific creation; scientific research as a fundamental premise of scientific creation; the challenges and conditions of scientific creation; the double standing of accounting, as object and result of the research, in relation to scientific research.

  7. Dishonesty in scientific research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazar, Nina; Ariely, Dan

    2015-11-02

    Fraudulent business practices, such as those leading to the Enron scandal and the conviction of Bernard Madoff, evoke a strong sense of public outrage. But fraudulent or dishonest actions are not exclusive to the realm of big corporations or to evil individuals without consciences. Dishonest actions are all too prevalent in everyone's daily lives, because people are constantly encountering situations in which they can gain advantages by cutting corners. Whether it's adding a few dollars in value to the stolen items reported on an insurance claim form or dropping outlier data points from a figure to make a paper sound more interesting, dishonesty is part of the human condition. Here, we explore how people rationalize dishonesty, the implications for scientific research, and what can be done to foster a culture of research integrity.

  8. A study of seismology as a dynamic, distributed area of scientific research

    CERN Document Server

    Wagner, Caroline S

    2009-01-01

    Seismology has several features that suggest it is a highly internationalized field: the subject matter is global, the tools used to analyse seismic waves are dependent upon information technologies, and governments are interested in funding cooperative research. We explore whether an emerging field like seismology has a more internationalised structure than the older, related field of geophysics. Using aggregated journal-journal citations, we first show that, within the citing environment, seismology emerged from within geophysics as its own field in the 1990s. The bibliographic analysis, however, does not show that seismology is more internationalised than geophysics: in 2000, seismology had a lower percentage of all articles co-authored on an international basis. Nevertheless, social network analysis shows that the core group of cooperating countries within seismology is proportionately larger and more distributed than that within geophysics. While the latter exhibits an established network with a hierarch...

  9. Scientific Research: How Many Paradigms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strawn, George O.

    2012-01-01

    As Yogi Berra said, "Predictions are hard, especially about the future." In this article, the author offers a few forward-looking observations about the emerging impact of information technology on scientific research. Scientific research refers to a particular method for acquiring knowledge about natural phenomena. This method has two dimensions:…

  10. Scientific Research: How Many Paradigms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strawn, George O.

    2012-01-01

    As Yogi Berra said, "Predictions are hard, especially about the future." In this article, the author offers a few forward-looking observations about the emerging impact of information technology on scientific research. Scientific research refers to a particular method for acquiring knowledge about natural phenomena. This method has two dimensions:…

  11. INVENTIVENESS AND SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH WORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostadin S. Tričković

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available The concept of invention and of its components is explained as a form of creativity and creation of something new. Likewise, the essence of the scientific work is also viewed as an activity aiming at discovering new knowledge and its use for new changes. The importance of invention and scientific research work is stressed for economy and development of the country. The personality of the inventor and of the scientific research worker is described as the subject of inventiveness and creativity. Of special consideration are scientific research workers of universities and scientific institutions as possible inventors; the accompanying recommendation refers to the need for transforming a scientific result into a contrivance. A critical view of our society and economy is given regarding results and application of the inventions and science in practice as well as suggestions for correcting the present attitudes.

  12. Scientific research in education

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shavelson, Richard J; Towne, Lisa

    2002-01-01

    ... of the committee responsible for the report were chosen for their special competences and with regard for appropriate balance. This study was supported by Contract No. ED-00-00-0038 between the National Academy of Sciences and the U.S. Department of Education National Educational Research Policy and Priorities Board. Any opinions, findings, conclus...

  13. Research ethics in the dynamic of scientific field: challenges in the building of guidelines for social sciences and humanities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerriero, Iara Coelho Zito; Bosi, Maria Lúcia Magalhães

    2015-09-01

    The development of guidelines on research ethics for social science and humanities (SSH) takes place in the scientific field, marked by disputes aimed at the establishment of hegemonic scientific standard. In Brazil, the National Health Council is responsible for approving these guidelines, which involve certain specificities. Based on the authors' experience in the SSH Working Group of the National Commission on Research Ethics (GT CHS / CONEP), this article presents the process of development of guidelines for SSH, and some its challenges: the distance between the statutory guarantee and the effective execution of guidelines; the biomedical hegemony and the marginal position of the SSH in the CEP / CONEP system; the inadequacy of the current resolution facing the research features in CHS; the use of the concept of risk in guidelines aimed at SSH in the health area. Some interfaces and tensions in the debate between scientific merit and ethical evaluation are also discussed. The analysis highlights important impasses and difficulties regarding inter-paradigmatic dialogue in health research, considered the characteristics of the different traditions, the CONEP's heavily relying on the positivist perspective and the defense of that paradigm hegemony.

  14. Scientific Research and Technological Innovation: The Brazilian Approach to Biotechnology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nara Azevedo; Luiz Otavio Ferreira; Simone Petraglia Kropf; Wanda Susana Hamilton

    2002-01-01

    .... The research shows that the lag between scientific capability and technological development at FIOCRUZ resulted from the institutional dynamic related to its process of reconstruction beginning in...

  15. Scientific Research in Computer Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arwa al-Yasiry

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper displays the importance of selection research objective and supervisor; In addition this paper suggested the optimal research methods that help researcher to get to optimal results in efficient way. This paper shows the thesis writing style and arrangement in way that to be readable for reader about reality of type and size of the work. The one important result of this paper it's the successful of scientific research must depend about many features that join together and miss one of the research methods that mean unsuccessful research.

  16. The Logic of Scientific Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyna, Valerie F.

    This paper considers the case for scientifically based research. The paper presents the case in concise outline form, providing a rationale; an analogy to medicine; strength of evidence argument; and thoughts about educational sciences. It asks and answers the questions What is EBE? (Evidence Based Education); and What is empirical evidence? In…

  17. 50 CFR 600.512 - Scientific research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Scientific research. 600.512 Section 600... research. (a) Scientific research activity. Persons planning to conduct scientific research activities on board a scientific research vessel in the EEZ that may be confused with fishing are encouraged to submit...

  18. SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH IN ROMANIAN TRADE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BĂLĂȘESCU SIMONA

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims to identify the importance of scientific research for romaian trade companies, how they deal with marketing research and what aspects retailer companies generally want to study, concerning the market they operate in. Although, research is not necessarily specific for trading, however, companies in this area , have began to show their availability to carry out research of customer needs, their suggestions, their capacity to purchase, the level of training and the habits of buying and using, the way how their products are received by individual customers. To understand exactly how the above issues are addressed by traders through a qualitative marketing research we were able to identify the opinions and attitudes of traders concerning the use of market research methods. The research was based on sampling retailer companies in Braşov.

  19. Draft scientific concept of the research project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bazić Miljojko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Every scientific research involves the systematic study of phenomena and processes that occur in nature and society. Such a systematic study is not possible without the use of objective instruments for collecting, processing and analyzing data and without the application of scientific methods for drawing conclusions, propriety and legality of the researching object properties. That is why all systematic scientific studies require advance planning and design, and that in one scientific, operational and planning document, called the research project is devised a way of acquiring scientific knowledge, which will represent a logical, structured unit, rational and purposeful, mutually compatible and functionally related attitudes, judgments and conclusions of the research subject. The general methodology of scientific research has defined the scientific standards, rules and procedures by which a scientific research project is created. The project of scientific research has a standard structure element of the project which consists of: a draft scientific concept; b research plans; iv research instruments, including a plan of arrangement and data processing. Since numerous difficulties encountered by young researchers in establishing draft scientific ideas in theirs Master's and Doctoral Theses in the last edition of the Megatrend journal, we have offered to scientific and professional public the first three elements of the scientific concept structure draft of the research project: formulation of the research problem, determination of research subject and the formulation of scientific and social research objectives. In this edition of the Megatrend journal, according to the strict requirements of the general methodology of science and special methodology of science, scientific and professional community, we present the following three elements of the draft of the scientific concept of research: a hypothetical framework of the research, the method of

  20. Data Transparency in Privately Funded Scientific Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, P. G.

    2016-12-01

    Research investigations funded by the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative (GoMRI) have resulted in a large pulse of scientific data produced by studies ranging across the research goals of the program. These studies have produced datasets from laboratory, field, and modeling activities describing phenomenon ranging from microscopic fluid dynamics to large-scale ocean currents, bacteria to marine mammals, and detailed field observations to synoptic mapping. One of GoMRI's central tenets is to ensure that all data are preserved and made publicly available. Thus, GoMRI formed the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative Data and Information Cooperative (GRIIDC) with the mission to ensure a data and information legacy that promotes continual scientific discovery and public awareness of the Gulf of Mexico ecosystem. The GoMRI Research Board commitment to open data is exemplified in GoMRI's data program policies and management. The Research Board established a policy that research data must be publically available as soon as possible and no later than one year following collection or at the time of publication. GRIIDC's data specialists, and computer system experts along with a team of researchers funded by GOMRI and GoMRI Research Board members developed a data management system and process for storing and distributing all of the scientific data generated by the GoMRI researchers. Researcher compliance with the data policy is a requirement for annual funding increments, No Cost Extensions, and eligibility for future funding. Since data compliance is an important element of grant performance compliance with GOMRI data policies data are actively tracked and reported to the Board. This initiative comprises an essential component of GoMRI's research independence and legacy.

  1. Scientific knowledge dynamics and relatedness in biotech cities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschma, Ron; Heimeriks, Gaston; Balland, Pierre-Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the impact of scientific relatedness on knowledge dynamics in biotech at the city level during the period 1989-2008. We assess the extent to which the emergence of new research topics and the disappearance of existing topics in cities are dependent on their degree of scientif

  2. Draft scientific concept of the research project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bazić Miljojko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Every scientific research is the systematic study of subjects, phenomena and processes that occur in nature and society, based on the use of scientific instruments for collecting, processing and analyzing data as well as the application of scientific methods for drawing conclusions about the properties of researching objects. precisely because each study needs to have systematic research character, it is necessary to design and plan in advance. The research project is a fundamental scientific and operational- planning document that represents a pre-designed model of acquiring scientific knowledge, structured as a target, rational purposeful system of mutually compatible and functionally related knowledge, attitudes, judgments and conclusions about the research subject. Because there are a number of different scientific disciplines and within them an even greater number of different types of research, general methodology of scientific research, as well as universal science, has defined certain standards and rules under which compiles every scientific project. Regardless of the scientific field, research project has a standard global structure consisting of: a draft scientific ideas; b research plans; c research instruments, including plans for processing data. Given the importance of the conceptualization of the research project, as a pre-designed model of acquisition of scientific knowledge and the numerous difficulties encountered by young researchers in establishing a draft of the scientific concept of their master and doctoral theses, the authors of this article have decided to offer an overall structure of the scientific draft of the research project, according to the requirements of modern general methodology and special sciences methodologies to the wider scientific community, in the next two editions of the Megatrend university journal. Due to the volume of subject matter, this paper refers only to the first three elements of the

  3. Methodology of Military-Scientific Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The book gives an analysis of the methodology used in military- scientific research. The authors examine the characteristics of such research and the...Marxist dialectic method , logic and statistical method used in it; also discussed is the process of military-scientific research and recommendations...on the literary finalization of a scientific work and on the preparation of a manuscript for the press; the methodology for organizing military-scientific work is discussed in detail.

  4. 50 CFR 300.104 - Scientific research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Scientific research. 300.104 Section 300... REGULATIONS Antarctic Marine Living Resources § 300.104 Scientific research. (a) The management measures... vessel for research purposes, unless otherwise indicated. (b) Catches taken by any vessel for research...

  5. Scientific Research: Commodities or Commons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeir, Koen

    2013-01-01

    Truth is for sale today, some critics claim. The increased commodification of science corrupts it, scientific fraud is rampant and the age-old trust in science is shattered. This cynical view, although gaining in prominence, does not explain very well the surprising motivation and integrity that is still central to the scientific life. Although…

  6. Scientific Research: Commodities or Commons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeir, Koen

    2013-01-01

    Truth is for sale today, some critics claim. The increased commodification of science corrupts it, scientific fraud is rampant and the age-old trust in science is shattered. This cynical view, although gaining in prominence, does not explain very well the surprising motivation and integrity that is still central to the scientific life. Although…

  7. Scientific Final Report: COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: CONTINUOUS DYNAMIC GRID ADAPTATION IN A GLOBAL ATMOSPHERIC MODEL: APPLICATION AND REFINEMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William J. Gutowski; Joseph M. Prusa, Piotr K. Smolarkiewicz

    2012-04-09

    This project had goals of advancing the performance capabilities of the numerical general circulation model EULAG and using it to produce a fully operational atmospheric global climate model (AGCM) that can employ either static or dynamic grid stretching for targeted phenomena. The resulting AGCM combined EULAG's advanced dynamics core with the 'physics' of the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model (CAM). Effort discussed below shows how we improved model performance and tested both EULAG and the coupled CAM-EULAG in several ways to demonstrate the grid stretching and ability to simulate very well a wide range of scales, that is, multi-scale capability. We leveraged our effort through interaction with an international EULAG community that has collectively developed new features and applications of EULAG, which we exploited for our own work summarized here. Overall, the work contributed to over 40 peer-reviewed publications and over 70 conference/workshop/seminar presentations, many of them invited.

  8. Scientific Research: Commodities or Commons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeir, Koen

    2013-10-01

    Truth is for sale today, some critics claim. The increased commodification of science corrupts it, scientific fraud is rampant and the age-old trust in science is shattered. This cynical view, although gaining in prominence, does not explain very well the surprising motivation and integrity that is still central to the scientific life. Although scientific knowledge becomes more and more treated as a commodity or as a product that is for sale, a central part of academic scientific practice is still organized according to different principles. In this paper, I critically analyze alternative models for understanding the organization of knowledge, such as the idea of the scientific commons and the gift economy of science. After weighing the diverse positive and negative aspects of free market economies of science and gift economies of science, a commons structured as a gift economy seems best suited to preserve and take advantage of the specific character of scientific knowledge. Furthermore, commons and gift economies promote the rich social texture that is important for supporting central norms of science. Some of these basic norms might break down if the gift character of science is lost. To conclude, I consider the possibility and desirability of hybrid economies of academic science, which combine aspects of gift economies and free market economies. The aim of this paper is to gain a better understanding of these deeper structural challenges faced by science policy. Such theoretical reflections should eventually assist us in formulating new policy guidelines.

  9. Geological Scientific Research Institute of Shengli Oilfield

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1995-01-01

    @@ Geological Scientific Research Institute of Shengli Oilfield is a scientific and technological research organization for exploration and development of oil/gas fields in Shengli oil province. The main work of the institute involves program for exploration and development, medium/long term planning,program for productivity construction in the new areas, program for adjustment of the old oilfields and undertaking key task of scientific research assigned by CNPC and Shengli Petroleum Administrative Bureau.

  10. Managing scientific information and research data

    CERN Document Server

    Baykoucheva, Svetla

    2015-01-01

    Innovative technologies are changing the way research is performed, preserved, and communicated. Managing Scientific Information and Research Data explores how these technologies are used and provides detailed analysis of the approaches and tools developed to manage scientific information and data. Following an introduction, the book is then divided into 15 chapters discussing the changes in scientific communication; new models of publishing and peer review; ethics in scientific communication; preservation of data; discovery tools; discipline-specific practices of researchers for gathering and using scientific information; academic social networks; bibliographic management tools; information literacy and the information needs of students and researchers; the involvement of academic libraries in eScience and the new opportunities it presents to librarians; and interviews with experts in scientific information and publishing.

  11. Mapping the research on scientific collaboration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU; Jianhua; CHEN; Chaomei; YAN; Jianxin

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to identify the trends and hot topics in the study of scientific collaboration via scientometric analysis.Information visualization and knowledge domain visualization techniques were adopted to determine how the study of scientific collaboration has evolved.A total of 1,455 articles on scientific cooperation published between 1993 and 2007 were retrieved from the SCI,SSCI and A&HCI databases with a topic search of scientific collaboration or scientific cooperation for the analysis.By using CiteSpace,the knowledge bases,research foci,and research fronts in the field of scientific collaboration were studied.The results indicated that research fronts and research foci are highly consistent in terms of the concept,origin,measurement,and theory of scientific collaboration.It also revealed that research fronts included scientific collaboration networks,international scientific collaboration,social network analysis and techniques,and applications of bibliometrical indicators,webmetrics,and health care related areas.

  12. Ethical virtues in scientific research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnik, David B

    2012-01-01

    Most approaches to promoting integrity in research are principle-based in that they portray ethical conduct as consisting of adherence to ethical rules, duties, or responsibilities. Bruce MacFarlane has recently criticized the principle-based approach to promoting integrity in research and offered a virtue-based alternative. MacFarlane argues that principle-based approaches do not provide adequate guidance for ethical decision-making and are not very useful in moral education. In this article, I examine and critique MacFarlane's defense of the virtue-based approach. I argue that virtue-based and principle-based approaches to ethics are complementary and that they both can help promote research integrity.

  13. Scientific Research in Education: A Socratic Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boody, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    Socrates and Admetus discuss the value of scientific research in education. They conclude that although RCTs have their place, they are not a panacea for education, and that the push for them by NCLB is not warranted.

  14. Scientific Research Enjoys Enhanced Support in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ Scientific research in China is receiving enhanced support from both the government and the public, as science and technology are playing an increasingly constructive role in the country's social progress and economic growth, states CAS President Lu Yongxiang.

  15. Scientific Research in Education: A Socratic Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boody, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    Socrates and Admetus discuss the value of scientific research in education. They conclude that although RCTs have their place, they are not a panacea for education, and that the push for them by NCLB is not warranted.

  16. Open access to scientific research

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "A number of influential scientists have begun to argue that the cost of research publications has grown so large that it impedes the distribution of knowledge... So a coalition led by Dr. Harold Varmus, the former director of the National Institutes of Health, is creating a new model, called the Public Library of Science" (1/2 page).

  17. The importance of indifference in scientific research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Martin A

    2015-08-01

    Current issues regarding scientific ethics have focused for the most part on regulations governing research and publication. I suggest that the internal process by which we separate self interest from the scientific process is a crucial and neglected part of training. Consideration of these issues might help us train better scientists instead of just scientists who adhere to the rules.This is a follow-up to the essay 'The importance of stupidity in scientific research' by Martin A. Schwartz (J. Cell Sci. 121, 1771).

  18. The Ethics of Teaching and Scientific Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, Sidney; And Others

    A compilation of essays deals with two vital ethical issues: (1) in such matters as genetic research, human subject research, and behavior modification, the conflict between freedom in scientific research and protection of the immediate public; and (2) the question of whether ethical guidelines have to be developed for teachers, or academic…

  19. Understanding Peer Review of Scientific Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Association of American Universities, 2011

    2011-01-01

    An important factor in the success of America's national research system is that federal funds for university-based research are awarded primarily through peer review, which uses panels of scientific experts, or "peers," to evaluate the quality of grant proposals. In this competitive process, proposals compete for resources based on their…

  20. HONESTY AND GOOD PRACTICE IN SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jože Trontelj

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In the field of science, we see cases of misconduct ranging from relatively minor departurefrom good manners and practice to more severe dishonesty and even criminal behaviour.Unethical experiments on human beings are among the worst abuses in scientific researchin medicine. Unethical research is usually also worthless from the scientific point of view.The commonest types of offence, however, include mismanagement of data, conscious misinterpretation,wrongful authorship, biased citation of work by others, plagiarism, misquotationor suppression of findings for the interests or upon the request of the sponsor or In the field of science, we see cases of misconduct ranging from relatively minor departurefrom good manners and practice to more severe dishonesty and even criminal behaviour.Unethical experiments on human beings are among the worst abuses in scientific researchin medicine. Unethical research is usually also worthless from the scientific point of view.The commonest types of offence, however, include mismanagement of data, conscious misinterpretation,wrongful authorship, biased citation of work by others, plagiarism, misquotationor suppression of findings for the interests or upon the request of the sponsor or In the field of science, we see cases of misconduct ranging from relatively minor departurefrom good manners and practice to more severe dishonesty and even criminal behaviour.Unethical experiments on human beings are among the worst abuses in scientific researchin medicine. Unethical research is usually also worthless from the scientific point of view.The commonest types of offence, however, include mismanagement of data, conscious misinterpretation,wrongful authorship, biased citation of work by others, plagiarism, misquotationor suppression of findings for the interests or upon the request of the sponsor or even a senior scientist in the team. Every case of misconduct and fraud may causedamage: it may undermine confidence of the

  1. Scientific Research Competencies of Prospective Teachers and their Attitu des toward Scientific Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Hüseyin Şahan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Present study has been constructed to determine scientific research competencies of prospective teachers and identify the extent of effect of prospective teachers’ attitudes toward scientific research and scientific research methods course on their research skills and attitudes towards research. This study has two dimensions: it is a descriptive study by virtue of identifying prospective teachers’ research skills and attitudes toward research, also an experimental study by virtue of determining the effect of scientificresearch methods course on prospective teachers’ skills and their attitudes toward research. In order to obtain the data related to identified sub-problems “Scale for Identifying Scientific Research Competencies” and “Scale for Identifying the Attitude toward Research” have been utilized. Data collection tools were applied to 445 prospective teachers. It has thus been concluded in this study that scientific research methods course had no significant effect in gaining scientific research competencies to prospective teachers and that this effect demonstrated no differentiation with respect to departments. On the other hand it has been explored that scientific research methods course had a negative effect onthe attitudes of prospective teachers toward research and that there was a differentiation to the disadvantage of prospective teachers studying at Primary Education Mathematics Teaching Department.

  2. Scientific Management Training | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI intramural program is one of the largest centers for cancer research in the world, with approximately 200 principal investigators and 500 postdoctoral fellows. While outstanding scientific research is conducted at NCI, many of the scientists who go on to lead their own laboratories have few management skills. The Scientific Management Training course focuses on personnel and project management. In the “Art of Supervision” section, the emphasis is on the uniqueness of each person and how each staff member should be treated to achieve desired outcomes.

  3. General Critical Properties of the Dynamics of Scientific Discovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettencourt, L. M. A. (LANL); Kaiser, D. I. (MIT)

    2011-05-31

    Scientific fields are difficult to define and compare, yet there is a general sense that they undergo similar stages of development. From this point of view it becomes important to determine if these superficial similarities can be translated into a general framework that would quantify the general advent and subsequent dynamics of scientific ideas. Such a framework would have important practical applications of allowing us to compare fields that superficially may appear different, in terms of their subject matter, research techniques, typical collaboration size, etc. Particularh' important in a field's history is the moment at which conceptual and technical unification allows widespread exchange of ideas and collaboration, at which point networks of collaboration show the analog of a percolation phenomenon, developing a giant connected component containing most authors. Here we investigate the generality of this topological transition in the collaboration structure of scientific fields as they grow and become denser. We develop a general theoretical framework in which each scientific field is an instantiation of the same large-scale topological critical phenomenon. We consider whether the evidence from a variety of specific fields is consistent with this picture, and estimate critical exponents associated with the transition. We then discuss the generality of the phenomenon and to what extent we may expect other scientific fields — including very large ones — to follow the same dynamics.

  4. Methods of Scientific Research: Teaching Scientific Creativity at Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Dennis; Ford, K. E. Saavik

    2016-01-01

    We present a scaling-up plan for AstroComNYC's Methods of Scientific Research (MSR), a course designed to improve undergraduate students' understanding of science practices. The course format and goals, notably the open-ended, hands-on, investigative nature of the curriculum are reviewed. We discuss how the course's interactive pedagogical techniques empower students to learn creativity within the context of experimental design and control of variables thinking. To date the course has been offered to a limited numbers of students in specific programs. The goals of broadly implementing MSR is to reach more students and early in their education—with the specific purpose of supporting and improving retention of students pursuing STEM careers. However, we also discuss challenges in preserving the effectiveness of the teaching and learning experience at scale.

  5. The Knowledge Management Research of Agricultural Scientific Research Institution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Based on the perception of knowledge management from experts specializing in different fields,and experts at home and abroad,the knowledge management of agricultural scientific research institution can build new platform,offer new approach for realization of explicit or tacit knowledge,and promote resilience and innovative ability of scientific research institution.The thesis has introduced functions of knowledge management research of agricultural science.First,it can transform the tacit knowledge into explicit knowledge.Second,it can make all the scientific personnel share knowledge.Third,it is beneficial to the development of prototype system of knowledge management.Fourth,it mainly researches the realization of knowledge management system.Fifth,it can manage the external knowledge via competitive intelligence.Sixth,it can foster talents of knowledge management for agricultural scientific research institution.Seventh,it offers the decision-making service for leaders to manage scientific program.The thesis also discusses the content of knowledge management of agricultural scientific research institution as follows:production and innovation of knowledge;attainment and organizing of knowledge;dissemination and share of knowledge;management of human resources and the construction and management of infrastructure.We have put forward corresponding countermeasures to further reinforce the knowledge management research of agricultural scientific research institution.

  6. Scientific research in America at risk

    CERN Multimedia

    Wojcicki, Esther

    2008-01-01

    "It is hard to believe, but science in America is struggling. Funding for scientific research has been cut back for years, but this year it is so bad that Fermi National Laboratory in the Chicago area, needs to close down for six weeks in 2008 to make ends meet." (1/2 page)

  7. Applications of artificial intelligence to scientific research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Mary Ellen

    1986-01-01

    Artificial intelligence (AI) is a growing field which is just beginning to make an impact on disciplines other than computer science. While a number of military and commercial applications were undertaken in recent years, few attempts were made to apply AI techniques to basic scientific research. There is no inherent reason for the discrepancy. The characteristics of the problem, rather than its domain, determines whether or not it is suitable for an AI approach. Expert system, intelligent tutoring systems, and learning programs are examples of theoretical topics which can be applied to certain areas of scientific research. Further research and experimentation should eventurally make it possible for computers to act as intelligent assistants to scientists.

  8. The epistemic integrity of scientific research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Winter, Jan; Kosolosky, Laszlo

    2013-09-01

    We live in a world in which scientific expertise and its epistemic authority become more important. On the other hand, the financial interests in research, which could potentially corrupt science, are increasing. Due to these two tendencies, a concern for the integrity of scientific research becomes increasingly vital. This concern is, however, hollow if we do not have a clear account of research integrity. Therefore, it is important that we explicate this concept. Following Rudolf Carnap's characterization of the task of explication, this means that we should develop a concept that is (1) similar to our common sense notion of research integrity, (2) exact, (3) fruitful, and (4) as simple as possible. Since existing concepts do not meet these four requirements, we develop a new concept in this article. We describe a concept of epistemic integrity that is based on the property of deceptiveness, and argue that this concept does meet Carnap's four requirements of explication. To illustrate and support our claims we use several examples from scientific practice, mainly from biomedical research.

  9. Scientific research in the Soviet Union

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mtingwa, S.K.

    1990-03-19

    I report on the scientific aspects of my US/USSR Interacademy Exchange Visit to the Soviet Union. My research was conducted at three different institutes: the Lebedev Physical Institute in Moscow, the Leningrad Nuclear Physics Institute in Gatchina, and the Yerevan Physics Institute in Soviet Armenia. I included relevant information about the Soviet educational system, salaries of Soviet physicists, work habits and research activities at the three institutes, and the relevance of that research to work going on in the United States. 18 refs.

  10. [Animal experimentation, animal welfare and scientific research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tal, H

    2013-10-01

    Hundreds of thousands of laboratory animals are being used every year for scientific experiments held in Israel, mostly mice, rats, rabbits, guinea pigs, and a few sheep, cattle, pigs, cats, dogs, and even a few dozen monkeys. In addition to the animals sacrificed to promote scientific research, millions of animals slain every year for other purposes such as meat and fine leather fashion industries. While opening a front against all is an impossible and perhaps an unjustified task, the state of Israel enacted the Animal Welfare (Animal Experimentation) Law (1994). The law aims to regulate scientific animal experiments and to find the appropriate balance between the need to continue to perform animal experiments for the advancement of research and medicine, and at the same time to avoid unnecessary trials and minimize animal suffering. Among other issues the law deals with the phylogenetic scale according to which experimental animals should be selected, experiments for teaching and practicing, and experiments for the cosmetic industry. This article discusses bioethics considerations in animal experiments as well as the criticism on the scientific validity of such experiments. It further deals with the vitality of animal studies and the moral and legal obligation to prevent suffering from laboratory animals.

  11. 50 CFR 15.22 - Permits for scientific research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permits for scientific research. 15.22... for scientific research. (a) Application requirements for permits for scientific research. Each... description of the scientific research to be conducted on the exotic bird requested, including: (i) Formal...

  12. The Internet of Scientific Research Things

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Cynthia; Shepherd, Adam; Arko, Robert; Leadbetter, Adam; Groman, Robert; Kinkade, Danie; Rauch, Shannon; Allison, Molly; Copley, Nancy; Gegg, Stephen; Wiebe, Peter; Glover, David

    2016-04-01

    The sum of the parts is greater than the whole, but for scientific research how do we identify the parts when they are curated at distributed locations? Results from environmental research represent an enormous investment and constitute essential knowledge required to understand our planet in this time of rapid change. The Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO) curates data from US NSF Ocean Sciences funded research awards, but BCO-DMO is only one repository in a landscape that includes many other sites that carefully curate results of scientific research. Recent efforts to use persistent identifiers (PIDs), most notably Open Researcher and Contributor ID (ORCiD) for person, Digital Object Identifier (DOI) for publications including data sets, and Open Funder Registry (FundRef) codes for research grants and awards are realizing success in unambiguously identifying the pieces that represent results of environmental research. This presentation uses BCO-DMO as a test case for adding PIDs to the locally-curated information published out as standards compliant metadata records. We present a summary of progress made thus far; what has worked and why, and thoughts on logical next steps.

  13. Advanced Scientific Computing Research Network Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacon, Charles; Bell, Greg; Canon, Shane; Dart, Eli; Dattoria, Vince; Goodwin, Dave; Lee, Jason; Hicks, Susan; Holohan, Ed; Klasky, Scott; Lauzon, Carolyn; Rogers, Jim; Shipman, Galen; Skinner, David; Tierney, Brian

    2013-03-08

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science (SC), the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of SC programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 25 years. In October 2012, ESnet and the Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) of the DOE SC organized a review to characterize the networking requirements of the programs funded by the ASCR program office. The requirements identified at the review are summarized in the Findings section, and are described in more detail in the body of the report.

  14. Applying the Scientific Method of Cybersecurity Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tardiff, Mark F.; Bonheyo, George T.; Cort, Katherine A.; Edgar, Thomas W.; Hess, Nancy J.; Hutton, William J.; Miller, Erin A.; Nowak, Kathleen E.; Oehmen, Christopher S.; Purvine, Emilie AH; Schenter, Gregory K.; Whitney, Paul D.

    2016-09-15

    The cyber environment has rapidly evolved from a curiosity to an essential component of the contemporary world. As the cyber environment has expanded and become more complex, so have the nature of adversaries and styles of attacks. Today, cyber incidents are an expected part of life. As a result, cybersecurity research emerged to address adversarial attacks interfering with or preventing normal cyber activities. Historical response to cybersecurity attacks is heavily skewed to tactical responses with an emphasis on rapid recovery. While threat mitigation is important and can be time critical, a knowledge gap exists with respect to developing the science of cybersecurity. Such a science will enable the development and testing of theories that lead to understanding the broad sweep of cyber threats and the ability to assess trade-offs in sustaining network missions while mitigating attacks. The Asymmetric Resilient Cybersecurity Initiative at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is a multi-year, multi-million dollar investment to develop approaches for shifting the advantage to the defender and sustaining the operability of systems under attack. The initiative established a Science Council to focus attention on the research process for cybersecurity. The Council shares science practices, critiques research plans, and aids in documenting and reporting reproducible research results. The Council members represent ecology, economics, statistics, physics, computational chemistry, microbiology and genetics, and geochemistry. This paper reports the initial work of the Science Council to implement the scientific method in cybersecurity research. The second section describes the scientific method. The third section in this paper discusses scientific practices for cybersecurity research. Section four describes initial impacts of applying the science practices to cybersecurity research.

  15. Customizable scientific web portal for fusion research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abla, G., E-mail: abla@fusion.gat.co [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, CA (United States); Kim, E.N.; Schissel, D.P.; Flanagan, S.M. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2010-07-15

    Web browsers have become a major application interface for participating in scientific experiments such as those in magnetic fusion. The recent advances in web technologies motivated the deployment of interactive web applications with rich features. In the scientific world, web applications have been deployed in portal environments. When used in a scientific research environment, such as fusion experiments, web portals can present diverse sources of information in a unified interface. However, the design and development of a scientific web portal has its own challenges. One such challenge is that a web portal needs to be fast and interactive despite the high volume of information and number of tools it presents. Another challenge is that the visual output of the web portal must not be overwhelming to the end users, despite the high volume of data generated by fusion experiments. Therefore, the applications and information should be customizable depending on the needs of end users. In order to meet these challenges, the design and implementation of a web portal needs to support high interactivity and user customization. A web portal has been designed to support the experimental activities of DIII-D researchers worldwide by providing multiple services, such as real-time experiment status monitoring, diagnostic data access and interactive data visualization. The web portal also supports interactive collaborations by providing a collaborative logbook, shared visualization and online instant messaging services. The portal's design utilizes the multi-tier software architecture and has been implemented utilizing web 2.0 technologies, such as AJAX, Django, and Memcached, to develop a highly interactive and customizable user interface. It offers a customizable interface with personalized page layouts and list of services, which allows users to create a unique, personalized working environment to fit their own needs and interests. This paper describes the software

  16. Without bounds a scientific canvas of nonlinearity and complex dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ryazantsev, Yuri; Starov, Victor; Huang, Guo-Xiang; Chetverikov, Alexander; Arena, Paolo; Nepomnyashchy, Alex; Ferrus, Alberto; Morozov, Eugene

    2013-01-01

    Bringing together over fifty contributions on all aspects of nonlinear and complex dynamics, this impressive topical collection is both a scientific and personal tribute, on the occasion of his 70th birthday, by many outstanding colleagues in the broad fields of research pursued by Prof. Manuel G Velarde. The topics selected reflect the research areas covered by the famous Instituto Pluridisciplinar at the Universidad Complutense of Madrid, which he co-founded over two decades ago, and include: fluid physics and related nonlinear phenomena at interfaces and in other geometries, wetting and spreading dynamics, geophysical and astrophysical flows, and novel aspects of electronic transport in anharmonic lattices, as well as topics in neurodynamics and robotics.

  17. Scientific research: What it means to me

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayant V. Narlikar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This article gives a personal perception of the author, of what scientific research means. Citing examples from the lives of all time greats like Newton, Kelvin and Maxwell he stresses the agonies of thinking up new ideas, the urge for creativity and the pleasure one derives from the process when it is completed. He then narrates instances from his own life that proved inspirational towards his research career. In his early studenthood, his parents and maternal uncle had widened his intellectual horizons while in later life his interaction with Fred Hoyle made him take up research challenges away from the beaten path. He concludes that taking up an anti-Establishment stand in research can create many logistical difficulties, but the rewards of success are all the more pleasing.

  18. [Ethical principles in human scientific research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Coke, R

    1994-07-01

    Hippocrates was the first physician to use the scientific method to find rational and not religious or mythic causes, for the etiology of diseases. Hippocrates and Aristoteles did not dare to dissect the human body. Afterwards however, many scientists such as Herophilus, Erasitastrus, Vesalus and Fallopio, performed experiments in human beings using vivisection. According to that age's ideas, there was no cruelty in performing vivisection in criminals, since useful knowledge for the progress of medicine and relief of diseases was obtained. Only during the nineteenth century and with Claude Bernard (1865), the ethical principles of systematic scientific research in humans were defined. These principles were violated by nazi physicians during Hitler's dictatorship in Germany (1933-1945). As a response to these horrors, the Ethical Codes of Nuremberg (1947) and Geneva (1948), that reestablished all the strength of Hippocratic principles, were dictated. The Nuremberg rules enact that a research subject must give a voluntary consent, that the experiment must by necessary and exempt of death risk, that the research must be qualified and that the experiment must be discontinued if there is a risk for the subject. The Geneva statement is a modernized hippocratic oath that protects patient's life above all. These classical rules, in force at the present time, are the essential guides that must be applied by physicians and researchers.

  19. Replication, Communication, and the Population Dynamics of Scientific Discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard McElreath

    Full Text Available Many published research results are false (Ioannidis, 2005, and controversy continues over the roles of replication and publication policy in improving the reliability of research. Addressing these problems is frustrated by the lack of a formal framework that jointly represents hypothesis formation, replication, publication bias, and variation in research quality. We develop a mathematical model of scientific discovery that combines all of these elements. This model provides both a dynamic model of research as well as a formal framework for reasoning about the normative structure of science. We show that replication may serve as a ratchet that gradually separates true hypotheses from false, but the same factors that make initial findings unreliable also make replications unreliable. The most important factors in improving the reliability of research are the rate of false positives and the base rate of true hypotheses, and we offer suggestions for addressing each. Our results also bring clarity to verbal debates about the communication of research. Surprisingly, publication bias is not always an obstacle, but instead may have positive impacts-suppression of negative novel findings is often beneficial. We also find that communication of negative replications may aid true discovery even when attempts to replicate have diminished power. The model speaks constructively to ongoing debates about the design and conduct of science, focusing analysis and discussion on precise, internally consistent models, as well as highlighting the importance of population dynamics.

  20. Replication, Communication, and the Population Dynamics of Scientific Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElreath, Richard; Smaldino, Paul E

    2015-01-01

    Many published research results are false (Ioannidis, 2005), and controversy continues over the roles of replication and publication policy in improving the reliability of research. Addressing these problems is frustrated by the lack of a formal framework that jointly represents hypothesis formation, replication, publication bias, and variation in research quality. We develop a mathematical model of scientific discovery that combines all of these elements. This model provides both a dynamic model of research as well as a formal framework for reasoning about the normative structure of science. We show that replication may serve as a ratchet that gradually separates true hypotheses from false, but the same factors that make initial findings unreliable also make replications unreliable. The most important factors in improving the reliability of research are the rate of false positives and the base rate of true hypotheses, and we offer suggestions for addressing each. Our results also bring clarity to verbal debates about the communication of research. Surprisingly, publication bias is not always an obstacle, but instead may have positive impacts-suppression of negative novel findings is often beneficial. We also find that communication of negative replications may aid true discovery even when attempts to replicate have diminished power. The model speaks constructively to ongoing debates about the design and conduct of science, focusing analysis and discussion on precise, internally consistent models, as well as highlighting the importance of population dynamics.

  1. Accelerating Neoproterozoic Research through Scientific Drilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condon, Daniel; Prave, Anthony; Boggiani, Paulo; Fike, David; Halverson, Galen; Kasemann, Simone; Knoll, Andrew; Zhu, Maoyan

    2014-05-01

    The Neoproterozoic Era (1.0 to 0.541 Ga) and earliest Cambrian (541 to ca. 520 Ma) records geologic changes unlike any other in Earth history: supercontinental tectonics of Rodinia followed by its breakup and dispersal into fragments that form the core of today's continents; a rise in oxygen that, perhaps for the first time in Earth history, resulted in the deep oceans becoming oxic; snowball Earth, which envisages a blanketing of global ice cover for millions of years; and, at the zenith of these combined biogeochemical changes, the evolutionary leap from eukaryotes to animals. Such a concentration of hallmark events in the evolution of our planet is unparalleled and many questions regarding Earth System evolution during times of profound climatic and geological changes remain to be answered. Neoproterozoic successions also offer insight into the genesis of a number of natural resources. These include banded-iron formation, organic-rich shale intervals (with demonstrated hydrocarbon source rocks already economically viable in some countries), base and precious metal ore deposits and REE occurrences, as well as industrial minerals and dimension stone. Developing our understanding of the Neoproterozoic Earth-system, combined with regional geology has the potential to impact the viability of these resources. Our understanding of the Neoproterozoic and early Cambrian, though, is overwhelmingly dependent on outcrop-based studies, which suffer from lack of continuity of outcrop and, in many instances, deep weathering profiles. A limited number of research projects study Precambrian strata have demonstrated the potential impact of scientific drilling to augment and complement ongoing outcrop based studies and advancing research. An ICDP and ECORD sponsored workshop, to be held in March 2014, has been convened to discuss the utility of scientific drilling for accelerating research of the Neoproterozoic through early Cambrian (ca. 0.9 to 0.52 Ga) rock record. The aim is to

  2. Global scientific collaboration in COPD research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yanbing; Long, Chao; Yu, Qi; Zhang, Juan; Wu, Daisy; Duan, Zhiguang

    2017-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to investigate the multiple collaboration types, quantitatively evaluate the publication trends and review the performance of institutions or countries (regions) across the world in COPD research. Materials and methods Scientometric methods and social network analysis were used to survey the development of publication trends and understand current collaboration in the field of COPD research based on the Web of Science publications during the past 18 years. Results The number of publications developed through different collaboration types has increased. Growth trends indicate that the percentage of papers authored through multinational and domestic multi-institutional collaboration (DMIC) have also increased. However, the percentage of intra-institutional collaboration and single-authored (SA) studies has reduced. The papers that produced the highest academic impact result from international collaboration. The second highest academic impact papers are produced by DMIC. Out of the three, the papers that are produced by SA studies have the least amount of impact upon the scientific community. A handful of internationally renowned institutions not only take the leading role in the development of the research within their country (region) but also play a crucial role in international research collaboration in COPD. Both the amount of papers produced and the amount of cooperation that occurs in each study are disproportionally distributed between high-income countries (regions) and low-income countries (regions). Growing attention has been generated toward research on COPD from more and more different academic domains. Conclusion Despite the rapid development in COPD research, collaboration in the field of COPD research still has room to grow, especially between different institutions or countries (regions), which would promote the progress of global COPD research.

  3. Global scientific collaboration in COPD research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yanbing; Long, Chao; Yu, Qi; Zhang, Juan; Wu, Daisy; Duan, Zhiguang

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the multiple collaboration types, quantitatively evaluate the publication trends and review the performance of institutions or countries (regions) across the world in COPD research. Scientometric methods and social network analysis were used to survey the development of publication trends and understand current collaboration in the field of COPD research based on the Web of Science publications during the past 18 years. The number of publications developed through different collaboration types has increased. Growth trends indicate that the percentage of papers authored through multinational and domestic multi-institutional collaboration (DMIC) have also increased. However, the percentage of intra-institutional collaboration and single-authored (SA) studies has reduced. The papers that produced the highest academic impact result from international collaboration. The second highest academic impact papers are produced by DMIC. Out of the three, the papers that are produced by SA studies have the least amount of impact upon the scientific community. A handful of internationally renowned institutions not only take the leading role in the development of the research within their country (region) but also play a crucial role in international research collaboration in COPD. Both the amount of papers produced and the amount of cooperation that occurs in each study are disproportionally distributed between high-income countries (regions) and low-income countries (regions). Growing attention has been generated toward research on COPD from more and more different academic domains. Despite the rapid development in COPD research, collaboration in the field of COPD research still has room to grow, especially between different institutions or countries (regions), which would promote the progress of global COPD research.

  4. Uncovering the dynamics of citations of scientific papers

    CERN Document Server

    Golosovsky, Michael

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a comprehensive framework that accounts for citation dynamics of scientific papers and for the age distribution of references. We show that citation dynamics of scientific papers is nonlinear and this nonlinearity has far-reaching consequences, such as diverging citation distributions and runaway papers. We propose a nonlinear stochastic dynamic model of citation dynamics based on link copying/redirection mechanism. The model is fully calibrated by empirical data and does not contain free parameters. This model can be a basis for quantitative probabilistic prediction of citation dynamics of individual papers and of the journal impact factor.

  5. Global scientific collaboration in COPD research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su YB

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Yanbing Su,1 Chao Long,2 Qi Yu,1 Juan Zhang,1 Daisy Wu,3 Zhiguang Duan1 1School of Management, Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan, People’s Republic of China; 2School of Medicine, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA, 3Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH, USA Purpose: This study aimed to investigate the multiple collaboration types, quantitatively evaluate the publication trends and review the performance of institutions or countries (regions across the world in COPD research.Materials and methods: Scientometric methods and social network analysis were used to survey the development of publication trends and understand current collaboration in the field of COPD research based on the Web of Science publications during the past 18 years.Results: The number of publications developed through different collaboration types has increased. Growth trends indicate that the percentage of papers authored through multinational and domestic multi-institutional collaboration (DMIC have also increased. However, the percentage of intra-institutional collaboration and single-authored (SA studies has reduced. The papers that produced the highest academic impact result from international collaboration. The second highest academic impact papers are produced by DMIC. Out of the three, the papers that are produced by SA studies have the least amount of impact upon the scientific community. A handful of internationally renowned institutions not only take the leading role in the development of the research within their country (region but also play a crucial role in international research collaboration in COPD. Both the amount of papers produced and the amount of cooperation that occurs in each study are disproportionally distributed between high-income countries (regions and low-income countries (regions. Growing attention has been generated toward research on COPD from more and more different

  6. Scientific fraud: definitions, policies, and implications for nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chop, R M; Silva, M C

    1991-01-01

    Scientific research typically has been founded on high ethical standards established by researchers in academia and health care research institutions. Scientific fraud, an act of deception or misrepresentation of one's own work, violates these ethical standards. It can take the form of plagiarism, falsification of data, and irresponsible authorship. Scientific fraud has been attributed to misdirected attempts to attain high levels of personal and professional success. Researchers so prone commit scientific fraud in a search for promotion, status, tenure, and the obtaining of research grants. To divert scientific fraud, three recommendations are suggested: (1) socialize prospective nurse researchers into an atmosphere where intellectual and professional integrity prevail; (2) have established nurse researchers serve as role models and mentors who can educate the neophyte researcher about the ethics of research, including scientific fraud; and (3) emphasize and reward quality in research and publications, rather than quantity.

  7. Problems of information support in scientific research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamaev, V. G.; Gorshkov, A. B.

    2015-11-01

    This paper reports on the creation of the open access Akustika portal (AKDATA.RU) designed to provide Russian-language easy-to-read and search information on acoustics and related topics. The absence of a Russian-language publication in foreign databases means that it is effectively lost for much of the scientific community. The portal has three interrelated sections: the Akustika information search system (ISS) (Acoustics), full-text archive of the Akusticheskii Zhurnal (Acoustic Journal), and 'Signal'naya informatsiya' ('Signaling information') on acoustics. The paper presents a description of the Akustika ISS, including its structure, content, interface, and information search capabilities for basic and applied research in diverse areas of science, engineering, biology, medicine, etc. The intended users of the portal are physicists, engineers, and engineering technologists interested in expanding their research activities and seeking to increase their knowledge base. Those studying current trends in the Russian-language contribution to international science may also find the portal useful.

  8. Lakatos' Scientific Research Programmes as a Framework for Analysing Informal Argumentation about Socio-Scientific Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shu-Nu; Chiu, Mei-Hung

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore how Lakatos' scientific research programmes might serve as a theoretical framework for representing and evaluating informal argumentation about socio-scientific issues. Seventy undergraduate science and non-science majors were asked to make written arguments about four socio-scientific issues. Our analysis…

  9. Dynamic Research Sketching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Thomas; Bang, Anne Louise; Knutz, Eva

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we offer a new explanatory tool, called ‘dynamic research sketching’ useful for mapping and understanding how research through design can be a vehicle for theory construction. ‘Research through design’ is often used as an all-inclusive umbrella term for research practices that recog......In this paper we offer a new explanatory tool, called ‘dynamic research sketching’ useful for mapping and understanding how research through design can be a vehicle for theory construction. ‘Research through design’ is often used as an all-inclusive umbrella term for research practices...... that recognize the process of designing and making an artifact as a legitimate method of inquiry. However, even though this type of research is thus grounded in design practice there are many different ways in which the process of designing and making an artifact can be used as a method of inquiry in order...... a first step toward such a methodology. Initially, we set the scene by providing a critical examination of existing literature on the subject. Then, we demonstrate the explanatory strength of dynamic research sketching by applying it to three case examples. In so doing, we uncover three different methods...

  10. Scientific communication and its relevance to research policy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roosendaal, H.E.; Geurts, P.A.Th.M.

    1999-01-01

    This paper addresses the relation between developments in scientific communication and research. The developments in scientific communication are related to developments brought about by opportunities provided by the development and wide-scale introduction of modern information and communication tec

  11. Mythical thinking, scientific discourses and research dissemination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hroar Klempe, Sven

    2011-06-01

    This article focuses on some principles for understanding. By taking Anna Mikulak's article "Mismatches between 'scientific' and 'non-scientific' ways of knowing and their contributions to public understanding of science" (IPBS 2011) as a point of departure, the idea of demarcation criteria for scientific and non-scientific discourses is addressed. Yet this is juxtaposed with mythical thinking, which is supposed to be the most salient trait of non-scientific discourses. The author demonstrates how the most widespread demarcation criterion, the criterion of verification, is self-contradictory, not only when it comes to logic, but also in the achievement of isolating natural sciences from other forms of knowledge. According to Aristotle induction is a rhetorical device and as far as scientific statements are based on inductive inferences, they are relying on humanities, which rhetoric is a part of. Yet induction also has an empirical component by being based on sense-impressions, which is not a part of the rhetoric, but the psychology. Also the myths are understood in a rhetorical (Lévi-Strauss) and a psychological (Cassirer) perspective. Thus it is argued that both scientific and non-scientific discourses can be mythical.

  12. Equating Research Production in Different Scientific Fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Pedro; Pulgarin, Antonio

    1998-01-01

    Diffusion in a scientific field is regarded as the dissemination of knowledge, channeled through citations distributed over different periods of time and propagated via scientific journals. Here it is considered to be a latent variable defined by a set of citations used in different fields; the Quantum Measurement technique is used to measure that…

  13. [Academician Li Lianda talking about doctors doing scientific research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ping; Li, Yi-kui

    2015-09-01

    At present, Chinese medical field faces with an important problem of how to correctly handle the relationship between medical and scientific research. Academician Li Lianda advocates doctors doing scientific research under the premise of putting the medical work first. He points out that there are many problems in the process of doctors doing scientific research at present such as paying more attention to scientific research than medical care, excessively promoting building scientific research hospital, only paying attention to training scientific talents, research direction be flashy without substance, the medical evaluation system should be improved and so on. Medical, scientific research and teaching are inseparable because improving medical standards depends on scientific research and personnel training. But not all doctors need to take into account of medical treatment, scientific research and teaching in the same degree while not all hospitals need to turn into three-in-one hospital, scientific research hospital or teaching hospital. It must be treated differently according to the actual situation.

  14. [Eleven thesis on the archive of scientific research, for a new patrimonial and scientific policy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Bertrand

    2015-12-01

    Abstracting the main content of a recent report on the bad state of the archives of scientific research, this paper puts forward eleven thesis likely to feed, in this time of numeric transition to a new documentary regime and to a new patrimonial policy. The recent numeric conditions impose to set new archival pratices, more proactive, anticipative and prospective. Archives of scientific research must be thought in a double memorial and scientific dimension, and not only as a patrimonial or historical one.

  15. The Sociological Research Programme of Scientific Specialty and its Dynamics%社会学视域中的学科研究纲领及其嬗变

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    童童; 赵超

    2015-01-01

    学科既是人类认知活动的组织模式和实践模式,同时也成为现代社会中人类知识本身的构成方式。学科的社会学研究最早始于以默顿为代表的实证主义研究纲领,而后经历了以库恩为代表的后实证主义以及科学知识社会学的批判性反思,并在当代布迪厄等人的综合性视野中得到了新的发展。%Scientific specialties are not only the organizational and practical patterns of human cognitive activities, but also the formations of human knowledge. The scientific specialty study begins with Robert Merton’s positivistic framework, and then through Thomas Kuhn and SSK’s critics. On the contemporary Pierre Bourdieu and other sociologists’ comprehensive visions make this field a new development.

  16. THE VISIBILITY AND PERFORMANCE OF THE ROMANIAN SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    STELIANA SANDU

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The wide dissemination of scientific research results represents the means for outlining of the prestige and visibility of Romanian scientific research on the global or regional arena and for highlighting the performance and the contribution of Romanian researchers to the scientific progress in their specific scientific interest field. Evaluation of the scientific performances is a complex process, involving quantitative and qualitative methods and approaches. The evaluation of the publications and the ranking of the authors, of the scientific papers and of the research institutions could be a useful instrument for policy makers in order to enhance the management of research activity and for its efficient funding, taking into consideration not only the social and economic priorities of the scientific topics or the relevance of research projects, but also, the performance of the scientific activity of the research teams. Despite of shortcomings and of criticisms drawn by some authors, especially when it comes to the social sciences, the bibliometric assessments are a tool for profiling of the visibility and impact of the research activity and for allowing interesting and relevant international comparisons. Drawing on bibliometric data from the Scimago Journal and Country Rank, this paper aims to evaluate the position of the Romanian scientific research in international hierarchy, and the factors that influenced the current position of research activity from Romania.

  17. Mental health of scientific researchers. I. Characteristics of job stress among scientific researchers working at a research park in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kageyama, T; Matsuzaki, I; Morita, N; Sasahara, S; Satoh, S; Nakamura, H

    2001-04-01

    In order to clarify the characteristics of job stress in scientific researchers, a self-administered questionnaire survey for 16,330 workers was carried out at Tsukuba Research Park City, Japan. The data of 7,063 (43%) workers aged 20-59 years old were analyzed, and the characteristics of job stress in 3,290 scientific researchers were compared with those of 1,799 technicians and 1,849 clerks. The researchers perceived higher quantitative and qualitative workload, greater job control (job decision latitude), and greater reward from work, than did the other two job groups. In addition, young male researchers received a large amount of support from their coworkers, while middle-aged male researchers perceived difficulty in personal relationships with their coworkers. From the viewpoints of the demand-control-support model and the effort-reward imbalance model, the researchers, particularly men, were typically occupied in active jobs, and the large amount of effort required for their work seemed to be balanced by greater reward from work. Compared with male researchers, however, female researchers perceived lesser job demand, lesser job control, and lesser reward from work. The working environment of female researchers may be related to the so-called career stress of working women. The mental health status of these scientific researchers should be examined directly in a future study.

  18. Application of Logic Models in a Large Scientific Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keefe, Christine M.; Head, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    It is the purpose of this article to discuss the development and application of a logic model in the context of a large scientific research program within the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO). CSIRO is Australia's national science agency and is a publicly funded part of Australia's innovation system. It conducts…

  19. [The representation of scientific research through a poster].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupin, Cécile-Marie

    2013-12-01

    The poster is a medium of scientific communication. When presented in public, it optimises the value of an original research approach. The poster sessions are devoted to one-to-one exchanges with peers on the subject of the research. The poster can help to integrate scientific knowledge into the nursing decision-making process.

  20. Application of Logic Models in a Large Scientific Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keefe, Christine M.; Head, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    It is the purpose of this article to discuss the development and application of a logic model in the context of a large scientific research program within the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO). CSIRO is Australia's national science agency and is a publicly funded part of Australia's innovation system. It conducts…

  1. Some perspective on the Large Scale Scientific Computation Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Qiang

    2004-01-01

    @@ The "Large Scale Scientific Computation (LSSC) Research"project is one of the State Major Basic Research projects funded by the Chinese Ministry of Science and Technology in the field ofinformation science and technology.

  2. Some perspective on the Large Scale Scientific Computation Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU; Qiang

    2004-01-01

    The "Large Scale Scientific Computation (LSSC) Research"project is one of the State Major Basic Research projects funded by the Chinese Ministry of Science and Technology in the field ofinformation science and technology.……

  3. Scientific research projects in vocational training schools

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Vocational schools are a resource for many students, with usually low motivation and high learning difficulties. The fact that this type of teaching is of a more practical, experimental, and job oriented type, points to teaching strategies less theoretical and focus on a more practical student involvement. Profiting from those characteristics, the study of the use of scientific projects on vocational teaching was initiated. It was proposed to vocational school st...

  4. Communication about scientific uncertainty in environmental nanoparticle research - a comparison of scientific literature and mass media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidmann, Ilona; Milde, Jutta

    2014-05-01

    The research about the fate and behavior of engineered nanoparticles in the environment is despite its wide applications still in the early stages. 'There is a high level of scientific uncertainty in nanoparticle research' is often stated in the scientific community. Knowledge about these uncertainties might be of interest to other scientists, experts and laymen. But how could these uncertainties be characterized and are they communicated within the scientific literature and the mass media? To answer these questions, the current state of scientific knowledge about scientific uncertainty through the example of environmental nanoparticle research was characterized and the communication of these uncertainties within the scientific literature is compared with its media coverage in the field of nanotechnologies. The scientific uncertainty within the field of environmental fate of nanoparticles is by method uncertainties and a general lack of data concerning the fate and effects of nanoparticles and their mechanisms in the environment, and by the uncertain transferability of results to the environmental system. In the scientific literature, scientific uncertainties, their sources, and consequences are mentioned with different foci and to a different extent. As expected, the authors in research papers focus on the certainty of specific results within their specific research question, whereas in review papers, the uncertainties due to a general lack of data are emphasized and the sources and consequences are discussed in a broader environmental context. In the mass media, nanotechnology is often framed as rather certain and positive aspects and benefits are emphasized. Although reporting about a new technology, only in one-third of the reports scientific uncertainties are mentioned. Scientific uncertainties are most often mentioned together with risk and they arise primarily from unknown harmful effects to human health. Environmental issues itself are seldom mentioned

  5. I Can Make a Scientific Research: A Course about Scientific Research Methods, in Which Learning Management System (LMS) Is Used

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özden, Bülent

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the changes in the perception of teacher candidates towards scientific research process and their self-efficacy in this process, during Scientific Research Methods course that has been conducted using "Learning Management System" based on out-of-class learning activities. Being designed as a…

  6. Reconciling scientific approaches for organic farming research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baars, T.

    2002-01-01

    Part I : Reflection on research methods in organic grassland and animal production at the Louis Bolk Institute, The Netherlands

    Key words: organic agriculture, anthroposophy, methodology, research strategy, experiential science,

  7. On the Scientific Maturity of Digital Forensics Research

    OpenAIRE

    Olivier, Martin; Gruner, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Part 1: THEMES AND ISSUES; International audience; This paper applies a scientific maturity grade schema from the software engineering domain to research in the field of digital forensics. On the basis of this maturity schema and its grades, the paper classifies the current maturity of digital forensics research. The findings show that much more research conducted at higher levels of “scientificness” is necessary before the new field of digital forensics can be considered to be scientifically...

  8. [Criteria of scientific validity in research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, Céline; Pagé, Ginette

    2002-03-01

    The purpose of this article is to present the evaluative criteria of qualitative and quantitative research. Philosophical foundations of positivism, postpositivism and constructivism are explored. Triangulation and crystallization expose the controversies about them. Finally, Lincoln and Guba criteria are retained for the evaluation of qualitative and quantitative research.

  9. Science Teaching as Educational Interrogation of Scientific Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginev, Dimitri

    2013-01-01

    The main argument of this article is that science teaching based on a pedagogy of questions is to be modeled on a hermeneutic conception of scientific research as a process of the constitution of texts. This process is spelled out in terms of hermeneutic phenomenology. A text constituted by scientific practices is at once united by a hermeneutic…

  10. Science Teaching as Educational Interrogation of Scientific Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginev, Dimitri

    2013-01-01

    The main argument of this article is that science teaching based on a pedagogy of questions is to be modeled on a hermeneutic conception of scientific research as a process of the constitution of texts. This process is spelled out in terms of hermeneutic phenomenology. A text constituted by scientific practices is at once united by a hermeneutic…

  11. Discourse Functions of Subject in Scientific Research Articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosden, Hugh

    1993-01-01

    Reports on one important component of language by means of which scientific Research Article (RA) writers structure textual interaction with the external community, namely choices of unmarked theme, i.e., grammatical subject. A functional analysis is presented that reveals how the changing discourse roles of subjects throughout scientific RAs…

  12. Brazil research in selected scientific areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingwersen, Peter

    2009-01-01

    for Brazil and Mexico are identical, with a vast increase since 1991. In contrast, RSA follows the global growth rate. From 1996 to 2005 both Latin American countries almost doubles their research publications in English, probably influencing the growth in relative citation impact, as measured by FCI......  The paper analyses the general development of research in Brazil, 1981-2005 and compares to Mexico, Republic of South Africa (RSA) and the world. Publications from 15 research areas and their citations are analyzed for the three countries covering two five-year periods 1996-2005. The paper...... applies publication growth as well as Citedness and Field Crown Indicators (FCI). Results show that across all research fields, including the Social Sciences, from 1996 the absolute citation impact of Brazil and Mexico are alike, steadily increasing, and just below that of RSA. Publication growth patterns...

  13. Making graduate research in science education more scientific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firman, Harry

    2016-02-01

    It is expected that research conducted by graduate students in science education provide research findings which can be utilized as evidence based foundations for making decisions to improve science education practices in schools. However, lack of credibility of research become one of the factors cause idleness of thesis and dissertation in the context of education improvement. Credibility of a research is constructed by its scientificness. As a result, enhancement of scientific characters of graduate research needs to be done to close the gap between research and practice. A number of guiding principles underlie educational researchs as a scientific inquiry are explored and applied in this paper to identify common shortages of some thesis and dissertation manuscripts on science education reviewed in last two years.

  14. Funding shapes the anatomy of scientific research

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Athen; Latora, Vito

    2015-01-01

    Research projects are primarily collaborative in nature through internal and external partnerships, but what role does funding play in their formation? Here, we examined over 43,000 funded projects in the past three decades, enabling us to characterise changes in the funding landscape and their impacts on the underlying collaboration patterns. We observed rising inequality in the distribution of funding and its effect was most noticeable at the institutional level in which the leading universities diversified their collaborations and increasingly became the knowledge brokers. Furthermore, these universities formed a cohesive core through their close ties, and such reliance appeared to be a key for their research success, with the elites in the core over-attracting resources but in turn rewarding in both research breadth and depth. Our results reveal how collaboration networks undergo previously unknown adaptive organisation in response to external driving forces, which can have far-reaching implications for f...

  15. Collaboratory for support of scientific research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casper, T.A.; Meyer, W.H.; Moller, J.M.

    1998-06-25

    Collaboration is an increasingly important aspect of magnetic fusion energy research. With the increased size and cost of experiments needed to approach reactor conditions, the numbers being constructed has become limited. In order to satisfy the desire for many groups to conduct research on these facilities, we have come to rely more heavily on collaborations. Fortunately, at the same time, development of high performance computers and fast and reliable wide area networks has provided technological solutions necessary to support the increasingly distributed work force without the need for relocation of entire research staffs. Development of collaboratories, collaborative or virtual laboratories, is intended to provide the capability needed to interact from afar with colleagues at multiple sites. These technologies are useful to groups interacting remotely during experimental operations as well as to those involved in the development of analysis codes and large scale simulations The term ``collaboratory`` refers to a center without walls in which researchers can perform their studies without regard to geographical location - interacting with colleagues, accessing instrumentation, sharing data and computational resources, and accessing information from digital libraries [1],[2]. While it is widely recognized that remote collaboration is not a universal replacement for personal contact, it does afford a means for extending that contact in a manner that minimizes the need for relocation and for travel while more efficiently utilizmg resources and staff that are geographically distant from the central facility location, be it an experiment or design center While the idea of providing a remote environment that is ``as good as being there`` is admirable, it is also important to recognize and capitalize on any differences unique to being remote [3] Magnetic fusion energy research is not unique in its increased dependence on and need to improve methods for collaborative

  16. Scientific research: ¿higher meta-cognition?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Williams Serrano

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The scientific-technological development speed forces a solid meta- cognition development to make a more conscientious and creative use of knowledge. The scientific research of students is an early way to relate them with professional problems and actively contributes to create an analytic and scientific approach. Objective: To determine the relation between achieved results in students' scientific research and academic average. Methods: This study includes 157 students of second course of Medicine Studies divided in two groups. Inclusion criteria: academic average ≥4 and Results: Students with research results had higher academic average and, although the coefficient showed low correlation, ANOVA showed relations between variables and the odd ratio the group number 2, with poor research activity has higher risk (2, 6 of presenting academic problems.

  17. STUDENT FORUMS AS MOTIVATION FOR CREATIVE AND SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH WORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ms. Nelly A. Finskaya

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers participating of students in the annual electronic Student forums of RANS as motivation to continue their scientific activity and research of cross-cultural communication in the sphere of professional education .

  18. Improving Research and Scientific Publications in Africa: Analysis of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Improving Research and Scientific Publications in Africa: Analysis of a ... factors that can guarantee career success in the field of biomedical science in Nigeria. ... in the article, c) Number of figures and presentation of data within the figures, ...

  19. The scientific research potential of virtual worlds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainbridge, William Sims

    2007-07-27

    Online virtual worlds, electronic environments where people can work and interact in a somewhat realistic manner, have great potential as sites for research in the social, behavioral, and economic sciences, as well as in human-centered computer science. This article uses Second Life and World of Warcraft as two very different examples of current virtual worlds that foreshadow future developments, introducing a number of research methodologies that scientists are now exploring, including formal experimentation, observational ethnography, and quantitative analysis of economic markets or social networks.

  20. Raising money for scientific research through crowdfunding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheat, Rachel E; Wang, Yiwei; Byrnes, Jarrett E; Ranganathan, Jai

    2013-02-01

    In this article we discuss the utility of crowdfunding from the perspective of individual scientists or laboratory groups looking to fund research. We address some of the main factors determining the success of crowdfunding campaigns, and compare this approach with the use of traditional funding sources.

  1. Polarized neutrons for Australian scientific research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Shane J.

    2005-02-01

    Polarized neutron scattering has been a feature at ANSTO's HIFAR research reactor since the first polarization analysis (PA) spectrometer Longpol began operation over 30 years ago. Since that time, we have improved performance of Longpol and added new capabilities in several reincarnations of the instrument. Most of the polarized neutron experiments have been in the fields of magnetism and superconductivity, and most of that research has involved PA. Now as we plan our next generation neutron beam facility, at the Replacement Research Reactor (RRR), we intend to continue the tradition of PA but with a far broader scope in mind. Our new capabilities will combine PA and energy analysis with both cold and thermal neutron source spectra. We will also provide capabilities for research with polarized neutrons in small-angle neutron scattering and in neutron reflectometry. The discussion includes a brief historical account of the technical developments with a summary of past and present applications of polarized neutrons at HIFAR, and an outline of the polarized neutron capabilities that will be included in the first suite of instruments, which will begin operation at the new reactor in 2006.

  2. Science Funding cuts threaten scientific research

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Page 1 of 3 Researchers are in uproar after a recently established quango unveiled a series of cuts and abandoned some projects altogether because of an estimated 80m funding shortfall. Martin Rees, the Astronomer Royal, argues that Britain will pay a far higher price if it scraps vital projects now

  3. [Organisation of scientific and research work of Navy medical service].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrilov, V V; Myznikov, I L; Kuz'minov, O V; Shmelev, S V; Oparin, M Iu

    2013-03-01

    The main issues of organization of scientific and research work of medical service in the North Fleet are considered in the present article. Analysis of some paragraphs of documents, regulating this work at army level is given. The authors give an example of successful experience of such work in the North Fleet, table some suggestions which allow to improve the administration of scientific and research work in the navy and also on the district scale.

  4. Profile and scientific production of Brazilian National Council of Technological and Scientific Development researchers in Pediatrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Maria Christina L.; Martelli, Daniella Reis B.; Pinheiro, Sergio Veloso; Miranda, Debora Marques; Quirino, Isabel Gomes; Leite, Barbara Gusmão L.; Colosimo, Enrico Antonio; Silva, Ana Cristina S. e; Martelli-Júnior, Hercílio; Oliveira, Eduardo Araujo

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the profile and the scientific production of researchers in Pediatrics with scholarship from the National Counsel of Technological and Scientific Development. METHODS: The Lattes curricula of 34 researchers in Pediatrics with active scholarships, from 2006 to 2008 were included in the analysis. The variables of interest were: gender, affiliation, time since PHD, tutoring of undergraduate students, mentorship of masters and doctors, scientific production and the papers' impact. RESULTS: In a total of 411 researchers in Medicine, 34 (8%) belonged to Pediatrics. Males (77%) and scholars in the category 2 of productivity (62%) prevailed. Three states of Brazil were responsible for approximately 90% of the researchers: São Paulo (53%), Minas Gerais (21%), and Rio Grande do Sul (15%). During their academic career, the Pediatrics researchers have published 3,122 articles with a median of 89 articles per researcher (interquartile range - IQ=51-119). Of the total, 40 and 59% articles were indexed in the Web of Science and Scopus databases, respectively. The Pediatrics researchers have published papers in 599 journals with a median impact factor of 2.35 (IQ=1.37-3.73) for the 323 indexed journals. CONCLUSIONS: The Pediatrics researchers have a relevant scientific output from the quantity point of the view, but there is a need to improve quality. PMID:24142308

  5. Profile and scientific production of Brazilian National Council of Technological and Scientific Development researchers in Pediatrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Christina L. Oliveira

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the profile and the scientific production of researchers in Pediatrics with scholarship from the National Counsel of Technological and Scientific Development. METHODS: The Lattes curricula of 34 researchers in Pediatrics with active scholarships, from 2006 to 2008 were included in the analysis. The variables of interest were: gender, affiliation, time since PHD, tutoring of undergraduate students, mentorship of masters and doctors, scientific production and the papers' impact. RESULTS: In a total of 411 researchers in Medicine, 34 (8% belonged to Pediatrics. Males (77% and scholars in the category 2 of productivity (62% prevailed. Three states of Brazil were responsible for approximately 90% of the researchers: São Paulo (53%, Minas Gerais (21%, and Rio Grande do Sul (15%. During their academic career, the Pediatrics researchers have published 3,122 articles with a median of 89 articles per researcher (interquartile range - IQ=51-119. Of the total, 40 and 59% articles were indexed in the Web of Science and Scopus databases, respectively. The Pediatrics researchers have published papers in 599 journals with a median impact factor of 2.35 (IQ=1.37-3.73 for the 323 indexed journals. CONCLUSIONS: The Pediatrics researchers have a relevant scientific output from the quantity point of the view, but there is a need to improve quality.

  6. The Myth of "Scientific Method" in Contemporary Educational Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowbottom, Darrell Patrick; Aiston, Sarah Jane

    2006-01-01

    Whether educational research should employ the "scientific method" has been a recurring issue in its history. Hence, textbooks on research methods continue to perpetuate the idea that research students ought to choose between competing camps: "positivist" or "interpretivist". In reference to one of the most widely referred to educational research…

  7. An open science cloud for scientific research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Bob

    2016-04-01

    The Helix Nebula initiative was presented at EGU 2013 (http://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EGU2013/EGU2013-1510-2.pdf) and has continued to expand with more research organisations, providers and services. The hybrid cloud model deployed by Helix Nebula has grown to become a viable approach for provisioning ICT services for research communities from both public and commercial service providers (http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.16001). The relevance of this approach for all those communities facing societal challenges in explained in a recent EIROforum publication (http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.34264). This presentation will describe how this model brings together a range of stakeholders to implement a common platform for data intensive services that builds upon existing public funded e-infrastructures and commercial cloud services to promote open science. It explores the essential characteristics of a European Open Science Cloud if it is to address the big data needs of the latest generation of Research Infrastructures. The high-level architecture and key services as well as the role of standards is described. A governance and financial model together with the roles of the stakeholders, including commercial service providers and downstream business sectors, that will ensure a European Open Science Cloud can innovate, grow and be sustained beyond the current project cycles is described.

  8. Synergy within a Scientific Research Centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Marinescu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of the social-economic systems prove us that the whole is distinct from the sum of the parts. The concurrence of the components forming a system produces cumulated effects whose value exceeds the sum of effects of the components considered individually. Interactions at the level of parts help us understand the causes that sometimes generate spectacular outcomes of the system composing them. As a matter of fact, organizations exist because they mean more than the sum of the parts. Synergy facilitates precisely this pulling together of the members of an organization around a joint vision. From this perspective, we can connect organizational dynamics to the components of organizational culture. In this article, we aim at making a summary analysis of how synergy has intensifying effects by cooperation among the departments of CSOL-UB, but also between the latter and other entities: TEAM WORK,AERS, CARO, CAEN, SPHERAA SCHOOL, etc.Synergy analysis at the level of CSOL-UB leads us to the conclusion that cooperation among its departments generates benefits to the partners as well.

  9. Radioecology[1997 Scientific Report of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandecasteele, Ch.

    1998-07-01

    Food chains are important contributors to the radiological dose of populations exposed to radionuclides released from the nuclear fuel cycle. A good understanding of the behaviour of radionuclides in the environment and a profound insight in the transfer mechanisms of radioisotopes through the ecosystem component is required in order to assess radiological exposure through the diet, to select appropriate remedial action to limit the contamination levels in food, and to restore contaminated sites. This research project aims to evaluate the mechanisms and dynamics of radionuclide transfers in the biosphere, considering all circumstances affecting the transfer parameters and their variability. The scientific methodology consists of laboratory and field experiments. The results of the research can contribute to the selection of appropriate countermeasures for the reduction of the transfer of radionuclides through the food-chain. The feasibility and effectiveness of these countermeasures are experimentally tested. Another important objective is to provide information to the authorities, enabling to assess the consequences of routine and accidental releases. The main achievements for 1997 are given.

  10. The socialisation of scientific and technological research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades, production of science and technology as well as science-society relationships started changing rapidly. Research is asked to be more effective, fast, accountable, trans-disciplinary, result-oriented, policy-driven and able to generate benefits for people and firms in the short and middle run. While a strong intensification of science-society relationships is occurring, an increasing number of actors and stakeholders are involved in research production. At the same time, pervasiveness of technology is rendering users an active part in technological development; economic and social interests on science and technology are growing on a global scale; new democratic and ethical issues emerge. Despite the European institutions’ efforts, all those trends and phenomena are occurring in an extremely fragmented way. In this scenario, a fairly balanced and consistent co-evolution between science and society can no longer be taken for granted. This is just the starting point of the following comment section that, through the Luciano d’Andrea, Sally Wyatt, Erik Aarden, Jos Lejten and Peter Sekloča’s writings, aims to analyse the different aspects and questions around the socialisation of science and technology’s matter.

  11. Profile and scientific production of Brazilian researchers in oral pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Ivanilde Pereira Santos

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the profile and scientific production of researchers in oral pathology who received grants in the area of Dentistry from the Brazilian National Research and Development Council. MATERIAL AND METHOD : The standardized online curriculum vitae (Curriculum Lattes of 34 researchers in oral pathology who received grants in the years 2008-2010 were analyzed. The variables were: gender, affiliation, time from completion of the PhD program, scientific production, and supervision of undergraduate students and Master's and PhD programs. RESULT: The States of São Paulo (52.94% and Minas Gerais (26.47% were responsible for 79.41% of the researchers. Regarding affiliation, three institutions accounted for approximately 44.11% of the researchers: UNICAMP (17.64%; USP (14.70%; and UFMG (11.76%. The researchers published a total of 906 full-text articles, with a median of 26.64 articles per researcher in the triennium and 8.88 articles per year. It was found that of 906 articles published, 366 (40.39% were published in strata A (qualis-CAPES. Oral pathology researchers supervised 437 scientific initiation and post-graduate students. Of these, 138 (31.57% were scientific initiation, 169 (38.67% were Master and 130 (29.74% were PhD students. CONCLUSION: An important scientific production of oral pathology researchers in the 2008-2010 triennium was observed. By knowing the profile of researchers in oral pathology, more effective strategies for encouraging scientific production and demanding resources to finance research projects can be defined.

  12. CREATIVE CORE WITHIN THE SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH OF EDUCATIONAL PROBLEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir I. Zagvyazinsky

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The authors continue to explore the issue of practical methodology of research studies (Education and Science No 8, 2014. The aim of the study is to reveal theoretical and practical issues of empirical-research activity at the stages of conceptual problem understanding of pedagogical research, ideas promotion, development of the conception of their practical implementation and formation of scientifically grounded constructive hypotheses. Methods. The applied methods include theoretical analysis, synthesis, abstraction, idealization, generalization, specification, comparison, classification, extrapolation, modelling and hermeneutic interpretation. Results. Scientifically grounded description of the process of creative research of educational problems is presented in the paper. The content of such notions as «concept», «creative core», «idea», «plot», and «research hypothesis» is revealed. The creative core of scientific research is considered in close relation to the key aspects of the scientific inquiry: problematics definition, research topic and subject selection, clarification of initial facts and theoretical statements, definition of the conceptual framework, determination of essential novelty. The authors explore the mechanisms of the scientific research through the analysis of the educational situation and initial facts to the formation of a conceptual framework of research and the further working out of its instrumental component. The creative core of research is characterised as its most difficult element including the inception of idea transformation, its realisation into some conception and expansion into productive hypothesis. The authors describe the types of hypotheses, such as working and scientific (ready, functional and explanatory. The logical and gnoseological structure of a scientific hypothesis is shown in the study. The methodological requirements to the formulation of the scientific hypotheses are

  13. Research initiatives for plug-and-play scientific computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curfman McInnes, Lois; Dahlgren, Tamara; Nieplocha, Jarek; Bernholdt, David; Allan, Ben; Armstrong, Rob; Chavarria, Daniel; Elwasif, Wael; Gorton, Ian; Kenny, Joe; Krishan, Manoj; Malony, Allen; Norris, Boyana; Ray, Jaideep; Shende, Sameer

    2007-07-01

    This paper introduces three component technology initiatives within the SciDAC Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS) that address ever-increasing productivity challenges in creating, managing, and applying simulation software to scientific discovery. By leveraging the Common Component Architecture (CCA), a new component standard for high-performance scientific computing, these initiatives tackle difficulties at different but related levels in the development of component-based scientific software: (1) deploying applications on massively parallel and heterogeneous architectures, (2) investigating new approaches to the runtime enforcement of behavioral semantics, and (3) developing tools to facilitate dynamic composition, substitution, and reconfiguration of component implementations and parameters, so that application scientists can explore tradeoffs among factors such as accuracy, reliability, and performance.

  14. Research initiatives for plug-and-play scientific computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McInnes, Lois Curfman [Mathematics and Computer Science, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States); Dahlgren, Tamara [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Nieplocha, Jarek [Computational Sciences and Mathematics, Pacific Northwest Nat. Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Bernholdt, David [Computer Science and Mathematics, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Allan, Ben [Scalable Computing R and D, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States); Armstrong, Rob [Scalable Computing R and D, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States); Chavarria, Daniel [Computational Sciences and Mathematics, Pacific Northwest Nat. Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Elwasif, Wael [Computer Science and Mathematics, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gorton, Ian [Computational Sciences and Mathematics, Pacific Northwest Nat. Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Kenny, Joe [Scalable Computing R and D, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States); Krishan, Manoj [Computational Sciences and Mathematics, Pacific Northwest Nat. Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Malony, Allen [Computer and Information Science, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR (United States); Norris, Boyana [Mathematics and Computer Science, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States); Ray, Jaideep [Advanced Software R and D, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States); Shende, Sameer [Computer and Information Science, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR (United States)

    2007-07-15

    This paper introduces three component technology initiatives within the SciDAC Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS) that address ever-increasing productivity challenges in creating, managing, and applying simulation software to scientific discovery. By leveraging the Common Component Architecture (CCA), a new component standard for high-performance scientific computing, these initiatives tackle difficulties at different but related levels in the development of component-based scientific software: (1) deploying applications on massively parallel and heterogeneous architectures, (2) investigating new approaches to the runtime enforcement of behavioral semantics, and (3) developing tools to facilitate dynamic composition, substitution, and reconfiguration of component implementations and parameters, so that application scientists can explore tradeoffs among factors such as accuracy, reliability, and performance.

  15. Research initiatives for plug-and-play scientific computing.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McInnes, L. C.; Dahlgren, T.; Nieplocha, J.; Bernholdt, D.; Allan, B.; Armstrong, R.; Chavarria, D.; Elwasif, W.; Gorton, I.; Krishan, M.; Malony, A.; Norris, B.; Ray, J.; Shende, S.; Mathematics and Computer Science; LLNL; PNNL; ORNL; SNL; Univ. of Oregon

    2007-01-01

    This paper introduces three component technology initiatives within the SciDAC Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS) that address ever-increasing productivity challenges in creating, managing, and applying simulation software to scientific discovery. By leveraging the Common Component Architecture (CCA), a new component standard for high-performance scientific computing, these initiatives tackle difficulties at different but related levels in the development of component-based scientific software: (1) deploying applications on massively parallel and heterogeneous architectures, (2) investigating new approaches to the runtime enforcement of behavioral semantics, and (3) developing tools to facilitate dynamic composition, substitution, and reconfiguration of component implementations and parameters, so that application scientists can explore tradeoffs among factors such as accuracy, reliability, and performance.

  16. Author Impact Factor: tracking the dynamics of individual scientific impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Raj Kumar; Fortunato, Santo

    2014-05-01

    The impact factor (IF) of scientific journals has acquired a major role in the evaluations of the output of scholars, departments and whole institutions. Typically papers appearing in journals with large values of the IF receive a high weight in such evaluations. However, at the end of the day one is interested in assessing the impact of individuals, rather than papers. Here we introduce Author Impact Factor (AIF), which is the extension of the IF to authors. The AIF of an author A in year t is the average number of citations given by papers published in year t to papers published by A in a period of Δt years before year t. Due to its intrinsic dynamic character, AIF is capable to capture trends and variations of the impact of the scientific output of scholars in time, unlike the h-index, which is a growing measure taking into account the whole career path.

  17. Author Impact Factor: tracking the dynamics of individual scientific impact

    CERN Document Server

    Pan, Raj Kumar

    2013-01-01

    The impact factor (IF) of scientific journals has acquired a major role in the evaluations of the output of scholars, departments and whole institutions. Typically papers appearing in journals with large values of the IF receive a high weight in such evaluations. However, at the end of the day one is interested in assessing the impact of individuals, rather than papers. Here we introduce Author Impact Factor (AIF), which is the extension of the IF to authors. The AIF of an author A in year $t$ is the average number of citations given by papers published in year $t$ to papers published by A in a period of $\\Delta t$ years before year $t$. Due to its intrinsic dynamic character, AIF is capable to capture trends and variations of the impact of the scientific output of scholars in time, unlike the $h$-index, which is a growing measure taking into account the whole career path.

  18. Author Impact Factor: tracking the dynamics of individual scientific impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Raj Kumar; Fortunato, Santo

    2014-05-12

    The impact factor (IF) of scientific journals has acquired a major role in the evaluations of the output of scholars, departments and whole institutions. Typically papers appearing in journals with large values of the IF receive a high weight in such evaluations. However, at the end of the day one is interested in assessing the impact of individuals, rather than papers. Here we introduce Author Impact Factor (AIF), which is the extension of the IF to authors. The AIF of an author A in year t is the average number of citations given by papers published in year t to papers published by A in a period of Δt years before year t. Due to its intrinsic dynamic character, AIF is capable to capture trends and variations of the impact of the scientific output of scholars in time, unlike the h-index, which is a growing measure taking into account the whole career path.

  19. Scientific research of Italian neurologists from 2008 to 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinazzi, Michele; Toni, Danilo; Veronese, Marco; Ajena, Domenico; Cruccu, Giorgio; Calabresi, Paolo

    2014-03-01

    Quantifying the number of publications is the easiest way to estimate the scientific production of a country in any scientific field. The aim of this article is to provide information about the scientific production from 2008 to 2011 of Italian neurologists and to compare it with scientific production data of other countries. The analysis regarded the research in Web of Science, in the Subject Category Clinical Neurology, of the publications published from 2008 to 2011, with at least one Italian author belonging to a scientific Italian institution. The overall data, their quality and scientific impact were compared with those of the first 15 world countries for scientific production. We observed that even if the Gross National Product of Italy registered a slight and gradual reduction from 2008 to 2011, the neurological scientific production of Italian neurologists showed an increase in the number of papers, maintaining the fifth position in these four years after USA, Germany, England and Japan. Moreover, dividing the neurological journals in quartiles according to the impact factor, we observed constant increase of the numbers of Italian publications in the highest quartile journals during the considered period. These data suggest that from 2008 to 2011 Italian neurologists have increased the number of publications, also improving the quality of works.

  20. KNOWLEDGE INTEGRITY IN METHODOLOGY OF INTELLECTUAL SCIENTIFIC-RESEARCH SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Koleshko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes a category of knowledge integrity in philosophical and methodological conception of the intellectual technology. Relationship of knowledge integrity and its uncertainty in the methodology of intellectual scientific research is considered in the paper. The paper  reveals a role of purpose uncertainty of intellectual research process in formation of knowledge integrity properties. An analysis of integrity notion functioning has been executed while considering a problem on relationship of general and partial components. The paper shows changes in the given relationship while making transition from value-orientated research process to purpose-orientated scientific investigation. Determination of diffusion, differentiated and integrated knowledge integrity is shown at various stages of intellectual scientific research.

  1. CERN openlab Whitepaper on Future IT Challenges in Scientific Research

    CERN Document Server

    Di Meglio, Alberto; Purcell, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    This whitepaper describes the major IT challenges in scientific research at CERN and several other European and international research laboratories and projects. Each challenge is exemplified through a set of concrete use cases drawn from the requirements of large-scale scientific programs. The paper is based on contributions from many researchers and IT experts of the participating laboratories and also input from the existing CERN openlab industrial sponsors. The views expressed in this document are those of the individual contributors and do not necessarily reflect the view of their organisations and/or affiliates.

  2. Bringing Scientific Inquiry Alive Using Real Grass Shrimp Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aultman, Terry; Curran, Mary Carla; Partridge, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This lesson was developed for middle school students using actual research on grass shrimp ("Palaemonetes pugio") to illustrate the process of a scientific investigation. The research was conducted at Savannah State University and funded by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Office of Education through the Living Marine…

  3. A Vital Research Force on the Scientific Front

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    THERE are several research institutes in Wuhan under the Chinese Academy of Sciences, employing large numbers of talented scientific and technological personnel. Women make up a vital force among these workers. Once we arrived in the Wuhan Institute of Virology, President He Tianfu enthusiastically introduced us to the five women research fellows at his institute.

  4. Bringing Scientific Inquiry Alive Using Real Grass Shrimp Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aultman, Terry; Curran, Mary Carla; Partridge, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This lesson was developed for middle school students using actual research on grass shrimp ("Palaemonetes pugio") to illustrate the process of a scientific investigation. The research was conducted at Savannah State University and funded by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Office of Education through the Living Marine…

  5. Modeling Scientific Research Articles – Shifting Perspectives and Persistent Issues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Waard, Anita; Kircz, Joost

    2008-01-01

    We review over 10 years of research at Elsevier and various Dutch academic institutions on establishing a new format for the scientific research article. Our work rests on two main theoretical principles: the concept of modular documents, consisting of content elements that can exist and be publishe

  6. Scientific questions about South China Sea ocean dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Rui Xin; DU Yan

    2015-01-01

    South China Sea, its circulation and connection with other parts of the world oceans, poses important scientific questions. From the prospective view, we postulate ten key research directions to be pursued in the coming future, including ventilation of a monsoon dominated sea, water mass formation/transformation, heat/salt and water mass balance, energetics and mixing, mesoscale eddies, the role of typhoon, deep circulation and paleoclimate records, interaction with adjacent oceans, upwelling and ecology system, and response to climate changes.

  7. Public Participation in Scientific Research: a Framework for Deliberate Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L. Shirk

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Members of the public participate in scientific research in many different contexts, stemming from traditions as varied as participatory action research and citizen science. Particularly in conservation and natural resource management contexts, where research often addresses complex social-ecological questions, the emphasis on and nature of this participation can significantly affect both the way that projects are designed and the outcomes that projects achieve. We review and integrate recent work in these and other fields, which has converged such that we propose the term public participation in scientific research (PPSR to discuss initiatives from diverse fields and traditions. We describe three predominant models of PPSR and call upon case studies suggesting that - regardless of the research context - project outcomes are influenced by (1 the degree of public participation in the research process and (2 the quality of public participation as negotiated during project design. To illustrate relationships between the quality of participation and outcomes, we offer a framework that considers how scientific and public interests are negotiated for project design toward multiple, integrated goals. We suggest that this framework and models, used in tandem, can support deliberate design of PPSR efforts that will enhance their outcomes for scientific research, individual participants, and social-ecological systems.

  8. Mineral resources: Research objectives for continental scientific drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-01-01

    The importance of a scientific drilling program to study mineralized hydrothermal systems has been emphasized in numerous workshops and symposia. To some degree the present report, prepared by the Panel on Mineral Resources of the Continental Scientific Drilling Committee, both reinforces and expands upon earlier recommendations. The report of the Los Alamos workshop, Continental Scientific Drilling Program, placed a major emphasis on maximizing the industry and government, supplementing these efforts with holes drilled solely for scientific purposes. Although the present report notes the importance of opportunities for scientific investigations added on to current, mission-oriented drilling activities, the Panel on Mineral Resources recognized that such opportunities are limited and thus focused on holes dedicated to broad scientific objectives. In the present report, the panel has developed a program that will provide answers to many scientific questions that have existed for almost 100 years concerning mineralized hydrothermal systems. The committee notes that research drilling may lead to results in addition to those anticipated, results that will provide new directions and ideas of equal or greater value that those basic ones originally posed. 58 refs.

  9. 78 FR 58526 - Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program, Scientific Advisory Board; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-24

    ... of the Secretary Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program, Scientific Advisory Board... Environmental Research and Development Program, Scientific Advisory Board (SAB). DATES: Tuesday, October 15... Designated Federal Officer (DFO) for the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program, Scientific...

  10. 75 FR 3542 - Rehabilitation Research and Development Service Scientific Merit Review Board; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-21

    ... AFFAIRS Rehabilitation Research and Development Service Scientific Merit Review Board; Notice of Meeting... Act) that the Rehabilitation Research and Development Service Scientific Merit Review Board will meet... rehabilitation research and development applications for scientific and technical merit and to make...

  11. 76 FR 1602 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Scientific Research, Exempted Fishing, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-11

    ...; Scientific Research, Exempted Fishing, and Exempted Activity Submissions AGENCY: National Oceanic and... Fishing Permits (EFPs), Scientific Research Permits (SRPs), Display Permits, Letters of Acknowledgment... necessary for the collection of Highly Migratory Species (HMS) for public display and scientific research...

  12. 75 FR 40036 - Rehabilitation Research and Development Service Scientific Merit Review Board; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-13

    ... AFFAIRS Rehabilitation Research and Development Service Scientific Merit Review Board; Notice of Meeting... Act) that the Rehabilitation Research and Development Service Scientific Merit Review Board will meet... rehabilitation research and development applications for scientific and technical merit and to make...

  13. Embedding Scientific Integrity and Ethics into the Scientific Process and Research Data Lifecycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundersen, L. C.

    2016-12-01

    Predicting climate change, developing resources sustainably, and mitigating natural hazard risk are complex interdisciplinary challenges in the geosciences that require the integration of data and knowledge from disparate disciplines and scales. This kind of interdisciplinary science can only thrive if scientific communities work together and adhere to common standards of scientific integrity, ethics, data management, curation, and sharing. Science and data without integrity and ethics can erode the very fabric of the scientific enterprise and potentially harm society and the planet. Inaccurate risk analyses of natural hazards can lead to poor choices in construction, insurance, and emergency response. Incorrect assessment of mineral resources can bankrupt a company, destroy a local economy, and contaminate an ecosystem. This paper presents key ethics and integrity questions paired with the major components of the research data life cycle. The questions can be used by the researcher during the scientific process to help ensure the integrity and ethics of their research and adherence to sound data management practice. Questions include considerations for open, collaborative science, which is fundamentally changing the responsibility of scientists regarding data sharing and reproducibility. The publication of primary data, methods, models, software, and workflows must become a norm of science. There are also questions that prompt the scientist to think about the benefit of their work to society; ensuring equity, respect, and fairness in working with others; and always striving for honesty, excellence, and transparency.

  14. Book Review: Opening Space Research: Dreams, Technology, and Scientific Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Gregory A.

    2012-05-01

    In Opening Space Research: Dreams, Technology, and Scientific Discovery, George Ludwig takes the reader behind the scenes of space exploration in the 1950s. The well-known episodes in this history—such as the stories of Sputnik, Laika the cosmodog, and the founding of NASA—are here placed in the rich context of the scientific and technical goals that motivated Ludwig and his fellow researchers. Ludwig relates the personal experiences of the many engineers, physicists, and university students who made possible humanity’s first ventures into space.

  15. Intertech Corporation Equipment for Laboratory Analysis and Scientific Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romanov, S.N.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Intertech Corporation is an American company supplying instruments in Ukraine for laboratory analysis and scientific research for 15 years. The Company is an exclusive dealer of Thermo Fisher Scientific, TA Instruments and some other companies. Intertech Corporation offers instrumentation for elemental and molecular analysis, surface and nanostructure investigation, thermal analysis, sample preparation and provides certified service and methodological sup port for supplied equipment. There are two service centers in Ukraine — in Kyiv and Donetsk. More than 100 Ukrainian enterprises use instrumentation supplied by Intertech Corporation including metallurgical, machine-building, chemical and food industries, academic and research institutions, medical institutions and ecology inspections.

  16. Space research scientific and educational project of Moscow State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasotkin, S. A.; Mjagkova, I. N.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Radchenko, V. V.; Ryazantseva, M. O.

    The scientific and educational project of space research was initiated in Lomonosov Moscow State University in order to incorporate modern space research in the university and high education, to popularize basics of space physics, and to enhance public interest in space exploration. On 20 January, 2005 the First Russian University Satellite UNIVERSITETSKIY was launched into circular polar orbit (inclination 83 deg., altitude 940-980 km). The onboard scientific complex TATYANA as well as the mission control and information receiving center, was designed and developed in Moscow State University. The scientific program of the mission include measurements of space radiation in different energy channels, and Earth UV luminosity and lightening. A multimedia lectures "Life of the Earth in the Solar Atmosphere" containing the basic information and demonstrations of the heliophysics (including Sun structure and solar activity, heliosphere and geophysics, solar-terrestrial connections and solar influence on the Earth's life) was created for upper high-school and junior university students. For the upper-university students there was created a dozen of special computerized lab exercises based on the experimental quasi-realtime data obtained from our satellites. Students specialized in space physics from a few Russian universities are involved in scientific work based. Educational program of the project (both the multimedia lectures and lab exercises) is concentrated to upper high school, middle university and special level for space physics students. The space research scientific and educational activity of Moscow State University is a non-profit project and is open for all interested parties.

  17. Supporting Scientific Research with the Energy Sciences Network

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva; Monga, Inder

    2016-01-01

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is a high-performance, unclassified national network built to support scientific research. Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science (SC) and managed by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, ESnet provides services to more than 40 DOE research sites, including the entire National Laboratory system, its supercomputing facilities, and its major scientific instruments. ESnet also connects to 140 research and commercial networks, permitting DOE-funded scientists to productively collaborate with partners around the world. ESnet Division Director (Interim) Inder Monga and ESnet Networking Engineer David Mitchell will present current ESnet projects and research activities which help support the HEP community. ESnet  helps support the CERN community by providing 100Gbps trans-Atlantic network transport for the LHCONE and LHCOPN services. ESnet is also actively engaged in researching connectivity to cloud computing resources for HEP workflows a...

  18. GUIDING MARKS REGARDING THE REASONING OF SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH IN ACCOUNTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IULIANA CENAR

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The scientific research activity in accounting is governed by the principles of logic thinking, is not subject to change and must be conducted according to a strict and rigorous schedule. For these reasons, it is a planned activity, but it shouldn’t be seen as rigid, because it can withstand changes or adjustments during its deployment. Naturally, scientific reasoning is at the foundation of any research undertaking, including in the area of accounting. This paper deals with issues related to the positioning of accounting within the areas of research, the components of the reasoning used in all the stages involved in accounting research, from establishing its objective or research subject to exploiting the obtained results.

  19. Taking steps to increase the trustworthiness of scientific research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarborough, Mark

    2014-09-01

    To enjoy the public's trust, the research community must first be clear about what it is expected to do and then avoid the incidents that prevent it from meeting those expectations. Among other things, there are expectations that published scientific results will be reliable, that research has the potential to contribute to the common good, and that research will be conducted ethically. Consequently, the scientific community needs to avoid lapses that prevent it from meeting these three expectations. This requires a strong commitment to trustworthy research practices, as well as mechanisms that diminish lapses that inevitably occur in complex endeavors such as scientific research. The author presents a model to assess the strength of commitment to trustworthy research and explores proven quality assurance mechanisms that can diminish lapses in research injurious to the public's trust. Some mechanisms identify in advance ways that things can go wrong so that steps can be taken to prevent them from going wrong in the first place. Other mechanisms investigate past errors or near misses to discover their causes so that they can be addressed to avoid similar future instances. The author explains why such methods are useful to efforts to promote research worthy of the public's trust.

  20. Socialization of scientific and technological research: further comments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Research systems are increasingly required to be more practically oriented and to address issues which appear more promising in economic and social results, with special reference to trans-disciplinary research fields, such as nanotechnology or ICTs; policy makers show a sharp tendency to establish research priorities and to drive research systems; universities and research institutions are asked to be more transparent and open to dialogue with social actors on contents, impacts, ethical implications and practical applications of scientific and technological research. These transformations affecting both the ways in which science and technology are produced and their relationships with society pose new challenges to European research. All the aspects of research activities are concerned, including the life of the research groups, the approaches to scientific evaluation, the development of European research policies and the interaction between researchers with their social environment. Continuing a reflection started in the last issue of JCOM, Luisa Prista, Evanthia Kalpazidou-Schmidt, Brigida Blasi, Sandra Romagnosi and Miguel Martínez López offered their contribution in identifying some of the key implications and risks which these changes are bringing about, mainly in the perspective of the construction of the European Research Area.

  1. The United States of America and scientific research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hather, Gregory J; Haynes, Winston; Higdon, Roger; Kolker, Natali; Stewart, Elizabeth A; Arzberger, Peter; Chain, Patrick; Field, Dawn; Franza, B Robert; Lin, Biaoyang; Meyer, Folker; Ozdemir, Vural; Smith, Charles V; van Belle, Gerald; Wooley, John; Kolker, Eugene

    2010-08-16

    To gauge the current commitment to scientific research in the United States of America (US), we compared federal research funding (FRF) with the US gross domestic product (GDP) and industry research spending during the past six decades. In order to address the recent globalization of scientific research, we also focused on four key indicators of research activities: research and development (R&D) funding, total science and engineering doctoral degrees, patents, and scientific publications. We compared these indicators across three major population and economic regions: the US, the European Union (EU) and the People's Republic of China (China) over the past decade. We discovered a number of interesting trends with direct relevance for science policy. The level of US FRF has varied between 0.2% and 0.6% of the GDP during the last six decades. Since the 1960s, the US FRF contribution has fallen from twice that of industrial research funding to roughly equal. Also, in the last two decades, the portion of the US government R&D spending devoted to research has increased. Although well below the US and the EU in overall funding, the current growth rate for R&D funding in China greatly exceeds that of both. Finally, the EU currently produces more science and engineering doctoral graduates and scientific publications than the US in absolute terms, but not per capita. This study's aim is to facilitate a serious discussion of key questions by the research community and federal policy makers. In particular, our results raise two questions with respect to: a) the increasing globalization of science: "What role is the US playing now, and what role will it play in the future of international science?"; and b) the ability to produce beneficial innovations for society: "How will the US continue to foster its strengths?"

  2. The United States of America and scientific research.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory J Hather

    Full Text Available To gauge the current commitment to scientific research in the United States of America (US, we compared federal research funding (FRF with the US gross domestic product (GDP and industry research spending during the past six decades. In order to address the recent globalization of scientific research, we also focused on four key indicators of research activities: research and development (R&D funding, total science and engineering doctoral degrees, patents, and scientific publications. We compared these indicators across three major population and economic regions: the US, the European Union (EU and the People's Republic of China (China over the past decade. We discovered a number of interesting trends with direct relevance for science policy. The level of US FRF has varied between 0.2% and 0.6% of the GDP during the last six decades. Since the 1960s, the US FRF contribution has fallen from twice that of industrial research funding to roughly equal. Also, in the last two decades, the portion of the US government R&D spending devoted to research has increased. Although well below the US and the EU in overall funding, the current growth rate for R&D funding in China greatly exceeds that of both. Finally, the EU currently produces more science and engineering doctoral graduates and scientific publications than the US in absolute terms, but not per capita. This study's aim is to facilitate a serious discussion of key questions by the research community and federal policy makers. In particular, our results raise two questions with respect to: a the increasing globalization of science: "What role is the US playing now, and what role will it play in the future of international science?"; and b the ability to produce beneficial innovations for society: "How will the US continue to foster its strengths?"

  3. National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center 2007 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hules, John A.; Bashor, Jon; Wang, Ucilia; Yarris, Lynn; Preuss, Paul

    2008-10-23

    This report presents highlights of the research conducted on NERSC computers in a variety of scientific disciplines during the year 2007. It also reports on changes and upgrades to NERSC's systems and services aswell as activities of NERSC staff.

  4. Comparison of Scientific Research Projects of Education Faculties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altunay, Esen; Tonbul, Yilmaz

    2015-01-01

    Many studies indicate that knowledge and knowledge production are the main predictors of social development, welfare and the ability to face the future with confidence. It could be argued that knowledge production is mainly carried out by universities. This study compares 1266 scientific research projects (SRPs) completed by faculties of education…

  5. A Glance Back at Five Decades of Scientific Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudarshan, E C G [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C1600, Austin, TX 78712-0264 (United States)

    2007-11-15

    I review my scientific research career for the last 50 years, with emphasis on the issue of 'Poincare recurrences': I stress some ideas of mine which became so popular that they have been taken up (recurred) by others, sometimes forgetting the original source.

  6. Scientific and technical information output of the Langley Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    Scientific and technical information that the Langley Research Center produced during the calendar year 1983 is compiled. Included are citations for Formal Reports, Quick-Release Technical Memorandums, Contractor Reports, Journal Articles and other Publications, Meeting Presentations, Technical Talks, Computer Programs, Tech Briefs, and Patents.

  7. A "Sense of Place" in Public Participation in Scientific Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haywood, Benjamin K.

    2014-01-01

    Public participation in scientific research (PPSR) within the natural sciences has been demonstrated as an effective strategy to expand cognitive knowledge and understanding of ecology, with implications regarding individual perspectives, attitudes, and behaviors about the environment and feelings about the personal relevance of science. Yet the…

  8. Comparison of Scientific Research Projects of Education Faculties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altunay, Esen; Tonbul, Yilmaz

    2015-01-01

    Many studies indicate that knowledge and knowledge production are the main predictors of social development, welfare and the ability to face the future with confidence. It could be argued that knowledge production is mainly carried out by universities. This study compares 1266 scientific research projects (SRPs) completed by faculties of education…

  9. 1997 Scientific Report[1997 Scientific Report of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Govaerts, P.

    1998-07-01

    The 1997 Scientific Report of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN describes progress achieved in nuclear safety, radioactive waste management, radiation protection and safeguards. In the field of nuclear research, the main projects concern the behaviour of high-burnup and MOX fuel, the embrittlement of reactor pressure vessels, the irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of reactor internals, and irradiation effects on materials of fusion reactors. In the field of radioactive waste management, progress in the following domains is reported: the disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent fuel in a clay formation, the decommissioning of nuclear installations, the study of alternative waste-processing techniques. For radiation protection and safeguards, the main activities reported on are in the field of site and environmental restoration, emergency planning and response and scientific support to national and international programmes.

  10. KNOWLEDGE INTEGRITY IN METHODOLOGY OF INTELLECTUAL SCIENTIFIC-RESEARCH SYSTEMS

    OpenAIRE

    V. M. Koleshko; A. V. Gulay; V. A. Gulay

    2010-01-01

    The paper analyzes a category of knowledge integrity in philosophical and methodological conception of the intellectual technology. Relationship of knowledge integrity and its uncertainty in the methodology of intellectual scientific research is considered in the paper. The paper  reveals a role of purpose uncertainty of intellectual research process in formation of knowledge integrity properties. An analysis of integrity notion functioning has been executed while considering a problem on rel...

  11. Progress of Scientific Research Work of CEFR in 2012

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU; Pei-de; HU; Ping; ZHAO; Zhong-zhen

    2012-01-01

    <正>The emphasis of the scientific research work in 2012 of the China Experimental Fast Reactor Engineering Department is the new project application based on the subject of the key technical problems to be solved for the demonstration fast reactor; continue to promote the establishment of the commercial demonstration fast reactor project; ensure the effective implementation of the ongoing research projects according to plan.

  12. Doing Science: managing colleagues and collaborations in scientific research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardavella, Georgia; Saad, Neil; Bjerg, Anders

    2015-03-01

    Talent, dedication and organisational skills play a pivotal role in the success of scientific and clinical research. However, your capacity to flourish and succeed is often affected by your professional relationships with your peers and bosses. Throughout your career, you will be faced (if not already) with a variety of awkward interpersonal situations. This is the point where sophisticated management skills are required to tackle difficulties and smooth out any rough edges that can potentially roadblock your research.

  13. 77 FR 6784 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Scientific Research, Exempted Fishing, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-09

    ...; Scientific Research, Exempted Fishing, and Exempted Activity Submissions AGENCY: National Oceanic and... generally affect scientific research activities conducted by a scientific research vessel. Persons planning to conduct such research are encouraged to submit a scientific research plan to ensure that the...

  14. Customer Relationship Management in scientific and research institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaromir Matulewicz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Basing on the example of a scientific institute, this article shows: – potential areas in which CRM philosophy, procedures and tools could be applied – purpose of applying CRM – outcomes to expect from CRM application The article shows the Customer Relationship Management idea exclusively, along with areas of its use in scientific and research institutions and also a proposal to determine a group of clients for these institutions. The summary of the article consists of information regarding sources of knowledge about CRM philosophy and procedures (mainly bibliographical and also about IT systems which support CRM.

  15. The globalization of health research: harnessing the scientific diaspora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Nalini P; Hofman, Karen J; Glass, Roger I

    2009-04-01

    The scientific diaspora is a unique resource for U.S. universities. By drawing on the expertise, experience, and catalytic potential of diaspora scientists, universities can capitalize more fully on their diverse intellectual resources to make lasting contributions to global health. This article examines the unique contributions of the diaspora in international research collaborations, advantages of harnessing the diaspora and benefits to U.S. universities of fostering these collaborations, challenges faced by scientists who want to work with their home countries, examples of scientists engaging with their home countries, and specific strategies U.S. universities and donors can implement to catalyze these collaborations. The contributions of the diaspora to the United States are immense: International students enrolled in academic year 2007-2008 contributed an estimated $15 billion to the U.S. economy. As scientific research becomes increasingly global, the percentage of scientific publications with authors from foreign countries has grown from 8% in 1988 to 20% in 2005. Diaspora scientists can help build trusting relationships with scientists abroad, and international collaborations may improve the health of underserved populations at home. Although opportunities for diaspora networks are increasing, most home countries often lack enabling policies, infrastructure, and resources to effectively utilize their diaspora communities abroad. This article examines how some governments have successfully mobilized their scientific diaspora to become increasingly engaged in their national research agendas. Recommendations include specific strategies, including those that encourage U.S. universities to promote mini-sabbaticals and provide seed funding and flexible time frames.

  16. Why participating in (certain) scientific research is a moral duty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stjernschantz Forsberg, Joanna; Hansson, Mats G; Eriksson, Stefan

    2014-05-01

    Our starting point in this article is the debate between John Harris and Iain Brassington on whether or not there is a duty to take part in scientific research. We consider the arguments that have been put forward based on fairness and a duty to rescue, and suggest an alternative justification grounded in a hypothetical agreement: that is, because effective healthcare cannot be taken for granted, but requires continuous medical research, and nobody knows what kind of healthcare they will need, participating in research should be viewed from the perspective of a social contract, based on our mutual need for medical advances.

  17. Humanities’ Metaphysical Underpinnings of Late Frontier Scientific Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alcibiades Malapi-Nelson

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The behavior/structure methodological dichotomy as locus of scientific inquiry is closely related to the issue of modeling and theory change in scientific explanation. Given that the traditional tension between structure and behavior in scientific modeling is likely here to stay, considering the relevant precedents in the history of ideas could help us better understand this theoretical struggle. This better understanding might open up unforeseen possibilities and new instantiations, particularly in what concerns the proposed technological modification of the human condition. The sequential structure of this paper is twofold. The contribution of three philosophers better known in the humanities than in the study of science proper are laid out. The key theoretical notions interweaving the whole narrative are those of mechanization, constructability and simulation. They shall provide the conceptual bridge between these classical thinkers and the following section. Here, a panoramic view of three significant experimental approaches in contemporary scientific research is displayed, suggesting that their undisclosed ontological premises have deep roots in the Western tradition of the humanities. This ontological lock between core humanist ideals and late research in biology and nanoscience is ultimately suggested as responsible for pervasively altering what is canonically understood as “human”.

  18. The NASA Ames Research Center Institutional Scientific Collection: History, Best Practices and Scientific Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rask, Jon C.; Chakravarty, Kaushik; French, Alison; Choi, Sungshin; Stewart, Helen

    2017-01-01

    The NASA Ames Life Sciences Institutional Scientific Collection (ISC), which is composed of the Ames Life Sciences Data Archive (ALSDA) and the Biospecimen Storage Facility (BSF), is managed by the Space Biosciences Division and has been operational since 1993. The ALSDA is responsible for archiving information and animal biospecimens collected from life science spaceflight experiments and matching ground control experiments. Both fixed and frozen spaceflight and ground tissues are stored in the BSF within the ISC. The ALSDA also manages a Biospecimen Sharing Program, performs curation and long-term storage operations, and makes biospecimens available to the scientific community for research purposes via the Life Science Data Archive public website (https:lsda.jsc.nasa.gov). As part of our best practices, a viability testing plan has been developed for the ISC, which will assess the quality of archived samples. We expect that results from the viability testing will catalyze sample use, enable broader science community interest, and improve operational efficiency of the ISC. The current viability test plan focuses on generating disposition recommendations and is based on using ribonucleic acid (RNA) integrity number (RIN) scores as a criteria for measurement of biospecimen viablity for downstream functional analysis. The plan includes (1) sorting and identification of candidate samples, (2) conducting a statiscally-based power analysis to generate representaive cohorts from the population of stored biospecimens, (3) completion of RIN analysis on select samples, and (4) development of disposition recommendations based on the RIN scores. Results of this work will also support NASA open science initiatives and guides development of the NASA Scientific Collections Directive (a policy on best practices for curation of biological collections). Our RIN-based methodology for characterizing the quality of tissues stored in the ISC since the 1980s also creates unique

  19. Scientific Reasoning and Argumentation: Advancing an Interdisciplinary Research Agenda in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Frank; Kollar, Ingo; Ufer, Stefan; Sodian, Beate; Hussmann, Heinrich; Pekrun, Reinhard; Neuhaus, Birgit; Dorner, Birgit; Pankofer, Sabine; Fischer, Martin; Strijbos, Jan-Willem; Heene, Moritz; Eberle, Julia

    2014-01-01

    Scientific reasoning and scientific argumentation are highly valued outcomes of K-12 and higher education. In this article, we first review main topics and key findings of three different strands of research, namely research on the development of scientific reasoning, research on scientific argumentation, and research on approaches to support…

  20. 78 FR 18680 - Rehabilitation Research and Development Scientific Merit Review Board, Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-27

    ... AFFAIRS Rehabilitation Research and Development Scientific Merit Review Board, Notice of Meeting The..., that a meeting of the Rehabilitation Research and Development Service Scientific Merit Review Board... evaluate Rehabilitation Research and Development Center of Excellence and Research Enhancement Award...

  1. Seeking quality scientific information for research in Psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Colepicolo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This report aims to present the researcher in Psychology techniques for search and retrieval of information for academic and science research. Is based on my experiences as university librarian and as a doctoral student in Psychology, in a project on scientometry of the Social Skills field.  This goal is to obtain information reliable and with quality to develop research, from sources of online information. Are recommended and described steps to the process of searching for scientific information, with examples from the Social Skills field: defining research topic; applying appropriate search tactics; selecting reliable sources of information and experts on the topic; translating research into the language of the information source; developing an effective search strategy; evaluating the quality and reliability of the obtained items. It is expected that by following these steps, the researcher obtain a coherent corpus with the subject, time saving and quality bibliographic.

  2. From scientifically based research to evidence based learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Cera

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This essay is a reflection on the peculiarities of the scientifically based research and on the distinctive elements of the EBL (evidence based learning, methodology used in the study on the “Relationship between Metacognition, Self-efficacy and Self-regulation in Learning”. The EBL method, based on the standardization of data, explains how the students’ learning experience can be considered as a set of “data” and can be used to explain how and when the research results can be considered generalizable and transferable to other learning situations. The reflections present in this study have also allowed us to illustrate the impact that its results have had on the micro and macro level of reality. They helped to fill in the gaps concerning the learning/teaching processes, contributed to the enrichment of the scientific literature on this subject and allowed to establish standards through rigorous techniques such as systematic reviews and meta-analysis.

  3. The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory - An Isolated Nuclear Research Establishment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradbury, Norris E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Meade, Roger Allen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-23

    Early in his twenty-five year career as the Director of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, Norris Bradbury wrote at length about the atomic bomb and the many implications the bomb might have on the world. His themes were both technical and philosophical. In 1963, after nearly twenty years of leading the nation’s first nuclear weapons laboratory, Bradbury took the opportunity to broaden his writing. In a paper delivered to the International Atomic Energy Agency’s symposium on the “Criteria in the Selection of Sites for the Construction of Reactors and Nuclear Research Centers,” Bradbury took the opportunity to talk about the business of nuclear research and the human component of operating a scientific laboratory. This report is the transcript of his talk.

  4. The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory - An Isolated Nuclear Research Establishment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradbury, Norris E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Meade, Roger Allen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-23

    Early in his twenty-five year career as the Director of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, Norris Bradbury wrote at length about the atomic bomb and the many implications the bomb might have on the world. His themes were both technical and philosophical. In 1963, after nearly twenty years of leading the nation’s first nuclear weapons laboratory, Bradbury took the opportunity to broaden his writing. In a paper delivered to the International Atomic Energy Agency’s symposium on the “Criteria in the Selection of Sites for the Construction of Reactors and Nuclear Research Centers,” Bradbury took the opportunity to talk about the business of nuclear research and the human component of operating a scientific laboratory. Below is the transcript of his talk.

  5. Challenges facing the marketing of scientific and research institutes

    OpenAIRE

    Bogdan Sojkin

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the challenges that scientific research institutions face in terms of their marketing, which have been divided into two groups of those associated with internal marketing and those linked to external marketing. The most significant and important determinants that constitute challenges to both internal and external marketing were described. The key aspects of each of the identified challenges were indicated, as was their impact on the implementation of the marketing polic...

  6. Challenges facing the marketing of scientific and research institutes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Sojkin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the challenges that scientific research institutions face in terms of their marketing, which have been divided into two groups of those associated with internal marketing and those linked to external marketing. The most significant and important determinants that constitute challenges to both internal and external marketing were described. The key aspects of each of the identified challenges were indicated, as was their impact on the implementation of the marketing policy at institutions.

  7. A Critique for the Methodology of Scientific Research Programmes

    OpenAIRE

    Naji, S

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to evaluate of Imre Lakatos' MSRP (Methodology of Scientific Research Programs). Presenting the methodology which is based on Popperian Refutationism, Lakatos intended to overcome Pluralism (, Relativism and Skepticism) and distinguishes the best theory (/program) in science. The question is that did the lakatos' secondary change in the form and content of MSRP -against some historical facts and criticisms- make some serious deficiencies in his methodology? The ans...

  8. African Scientific Network: A model to enhance scientific research in developing countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebede, Abebe

    2002-03-01

    Africa has over 350 higher education institutions with a variety of experiences and priorities. The primary objectives of these institutions are to produce white-collar workers, teachers, and the work force for mining, textiles, and agricultural industries. The state of higher education and scientific research in Africa have been discussed in several conferences. The proposals that are generated by these conferences advocate structural changes in higher education, North-South institutional linkages, mobilization of the African Diaspora and funding. We propose a model African Scientific Network that would facilitate and enhance international scientific partnerships between African scientists and their counterparts elsewhere. A recent article by James Lamout (Financial Times, August 2, 2001) indicates that emigration from South Africa alone costs $8.9 billion in lost human resources. The article also stated that every year 23,000 graduates leave Africa for opportunities overseas, mainly in Europe, leaving only 20,000 scientists and engineers serving over 600 million people. The International Organization for Migration states that the brain drain of highly skilled professionals from Africa is making economic growth and poverty alleviation impossible across the continent. In our model we will focus on a possible networking mechanism where the African Diaspora will play a major role in addressing the financial and human resources needs of higher education in Africa

  9. Team Structure and Scientific Impact of "Big Science" Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauto, Giancarlo; Valentin, Finn; Jeppesen, Jacob

    the facility and to an external university of research laboratory (secondments) out-perform all other types of institutional affiliations. ii.) Teams spanning multiple institutional types have the lowest performance. This is the case whether or not teams include resident scientists from Oak Ridge National...... Laboratories. iii.). Knowledge integration at the level of individual scientists clearly outperforms team level integration. iv.) Team diversity is associated with stronger performance in basic research than in applied research. Implications for the organisation of research collaboration of LSRFs...... of the Neutron Science Department of Oak Ridge National Laboratories in 2006-2009. Given the collaborative nature of research carried out at LSRFs, it is important to understand how its organization affects scientific impact. Diversity of teams along the institutional and cognitive dimensions affects both...

  10. 1 Scientific research as a felt need for society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Gregorio Loza-Murguia

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available At birth the Journal of the Andean Forest Research Society, in September 2008, seeks to make visible to researchers and research, which often are locked in libraries, which spread in tiny, not transcending beyond the laboratory , cabinet or presentation at a local conference. The publications resulting from research, experi ence, methodological reflections or opinions on relevant issues, with collective interest, should be part of an obligation on professional and scientific society. The importance of a manuscript at various stages of evaluation, to its approval, depends on the editorial board, to maintain the frequency, which helps to maintain the prestige and opens doors for writers to see the seriousness it has. At present research has become a cornerstone of the university, institute, governmental or nongovernmental organization, being this is incor porated into the training of human resources for undergraduate and graduate students who are perpet rators of social transformation and bear fruits that are translated into events that transcend borders, which in turn is why the analysis, comment and / or citation in a journal pair, as this gives pa ttern of product quality that is being offered to society. Finally I thank the editorial staff and researchers, professionals, send their manuscripts to rely on the work being done to keep this means of dissem ination of scientific information, which has no political or economic interest, in favor of ge nerating scientific knowledge, being authors, reviewers, editors, and each contributes to th e generations that are being formed with updated information and this is true, and they generate impr ovements in quality of life of our society as a whole

  11. Dynamics of Research through Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basballe, Ditte Amund; Halskov, Kim

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate Research through Design at a micro-level, by addressing the dynamic interplay of research and design as they unfold throughout a design process. As our principal case, we consider the design of a three-dimensional projection installation, a process that unfolded over...... a one-year period. We analyse material collected from 18 key events during the process, in order to identify the ongoing dynamics. Based on the analysis, we establish how the interplay evolves in a complex structure, where the design and research interests continuously couple, interweave, and decouple...

  12. Dynamics of Research through Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basballe, Ditte Amund; Halskov, Kim

    2012-01-01

    a one-year period. We analyse material collected from 18 key events during the process, in order to identify the ongoing dynamics. Based on the analysis, we establish how the interplay evolves in a complex structure, where the design and research interests continuously couple, interweave, and decouple......In this paper, we investigate Research through Design at a micro-level, by addressing the dynamic interplay of research and design as they unfold throughout a design process. As our principal case, we consider the design of a three-dimensional projection installation, a process that unfolded over...

  13. Institute for Scientific Computing Research Annual Report: Fiscal Year 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keyes, D E

    2005-02-07

    Large-scale scientific computation and all of the disciplines that support and help to validate it have been placed at the focus of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) by the Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) program of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) initiative of the Office of Science of the Department of Energy (DOE). The maturation of computational simulation as a tool of scientific and engineering research is underscored in the November 2004 statement of the Secretary of Energy that, ''high performance computing is the backbone of the nation's science and technology enterprise''. LLNL operates several of the world's most powerful computers--including today's single most powerful--and has undertaken some of the largest and most compute-intensive simulations ever performed. Ultrascale simulation has been identified as one of the highest priorities in DOE's facilities planning for the next two decades. However, computers at architectural extremes are notoriously difficult to use efficiently. Furthermore, each successful terascale simulation only points out the need for much better ways of interacting with the resulting avalanche of data. Advances in scientific computing research have, therefore, never been more vital to LLNL's core missions than at present. Computational science is evolving so rapidly along every one of its research fronts that to remain on the leading edge, LLNL must engage researchers at many academic centers of excellence. In Fiscal Year 2004, the Institute for Scientific Computing Research (ISCR) served as one of LLNL's main bridges to the academic community with a program of collaborative subcontracts, visiting faculty, student internships, workshops, and an active seminar series. The ISCR identifies researchers from the academic community for computer science and computational science

  14. GLOBE at Night: Scientific Research outside of the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, S.; Walker, C. E.; Geary, E.; Pompea, S. M.

    2005-12-01

    Increased and robust understanding of our environment requires learning opportunities that take place outside of the traditional K-12 classroom and beyond the confines of the school day. GLOBE at Night is a new event within The GLOBE Program that provides a mechanism for a nontraditional learning activity involving teachers, students, and their families taking observations of the night sky around the world and reporting their observations via a central data base for analysis. To support activities centered on authentic research experiences such as GLOBE at Night, The GLOBE Program has changed its approach to professional development (PD). The new focus of GLOBE PD efforts is centered on teachers being able to facilitate student research in and out of the classroom reflective of authentic scientific research experiences. It has been recognized that there is a critical need for effective teacher professional development programs that support teacher involvement in meaningful scientific research that encourages partnerships between scientists, teachers, and students. Partnerships promoting scientific research for K-12 audiences provides the foundation for The GLOBE Program, an international inquiry-based program designed to engage teachers with their students in partnership with research scientists to better understand the environment at local, regional, and global scales. GLOBE is an ongoing international science and education program that unites students, teachers, and scientists in the study of the Earth System. Students participating in GLOBE engage in hands-on activities, including the collection, analysis, and sharing of research quality scientific data with their peers around the world. Students interact with members of the science community who use the data collected from locations around the world in their research - data that would often not be available otherwise. As of September 2005, over 30,000 teachers representing over 16,000 schools worldwide have

  15. World scientific collaboration in coronary heart disease research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qi; Shao, Hongfang; He, Peifeng; Duan, Zhiguang

    2013-08-10

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) will continue to exert a heavy burden for countries all over the world. Scientific collaboration has become the only choice for progress in biomedicine. Unfortunately, there is a scarcity of scientific publications about scientific collaboration in CHD research. This study examines collaboration behaviors across multiple collaboration types in the CHD research. 294,756 records about CHD were retrieved from Web of Science. Methods such as co-authorship, social network analysis, connected component, cliques, and betweenness centrality were used in this study. Collaborations have increased at the author, institution and country/region levels in CHD research over the past three decades. 3000 most collaborative authors, 572 most collaborative institutions and 52 countries/regions are extracted from their corresponding collaboration network. 766 cliques are found in the most collaborative authors. 308 cliques are found in the most collaborative institutions. Western countries/regions represent the core of the world's collaboration. The United States ranks first in terms of number of multi-national publications, while Hungary leads in the ranking measured by their proportion of collaborative output. The rate of economic development in the countries/regions also affects the multi-national collaboration behavior. Collaborations among countries/regions need to be encouraged in the CHD research. The visualization of overlapping cliques in the most collaborative authors and institutions are considered "skeleton" of the collaboration network. Eastern countries/regions should strengthen cooperation with western countries/regions in the CHD research. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Citizen science: integrating scientific research, ecological conservation and public participation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Zhang

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Citizen science, also known as “public participation in scientific research”, is defined as scientific activities in which non-professional scientists participate as volunteers in data collection, analysis and dissemination within a scientific project. With the advent of the information age, citizen science projects, especially in ecological conservation and environmental monitoring, are rapidly expanding our knowledge of the world around us, and contributing to management and policy decisions. Citizen science projects can be classified into five types of models: contractual, contributory, collaborative, co-created and collegial projects. In China, public participation in science related activities has had a long history, but current contributions in citizen science are limited because of relatively low public participation, and the weaknesses in data quality control, data management and analysis. Recently, citizen science has been applied to bird watching and plant monitoring, with some positive and negative experiences. To better increase citizen science activities and enhance such contributions to academic research, improvements are urgently required in financial support, the development of project platforms, the application of new technology, and international collaboration. We believe that the enhancement of citizen science will greatly promote the development of ecological conservation, environmental monitoring and related research fields. To help with this we have established a platform for China citizen science projects (http://www.gongzhongkexue.org to promote communication and cooperation among scientists, governments, other organizations and the public.

  17. Ten Years of Support for Basic Scientific Research by CONACYT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Humberto Fabila Castillo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the results of ten years of support for basic scientific research by the CONACYT. The paper identifies the strongest areas of knowledge in basic science in Mexico and concludes that the institutions where basic science is done are mainly public higher education institutions, followed by also public research centers, while private institutions of higher education and companies carry out almost no research in basic science. Findings show that research on basic science in state universities has grown impressively in recent years, reaching the level of the institutions of higher education of the Federal District. Finally, the implications of these findings as well as the public policies through which support has been granted are discussed.

  18. Fraud in scientific research - birth of the Concordat to uphold research integrity in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khajuria, Ankur; Agha, Riaz

    2014-02-01

    Fraud in research has risen exponentially and recent high profile cases may just be the tip of the iceberg. This threatens to have a major impact on public health, with policy makers and clinicians acting on erroneous data. To address this, the new research "Concordat", a consensus statement on research misconduct, has been published. Can it hold the key to rebuilding public confidence in scientific research in the United Kingdom? This review focuses on the concept of research misconduct, highlighting prominent cases and discussing strategies in order to restore confidence in the validity of scientific research.

  19. 78 FR 63454 - Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program, Scientific Advisory Board; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-24

    ... of the Secretary Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program, Scientific Advisory Board... of the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program Scientific Advisory Board on October... Department of Defense published a notice announcing a meeting of the Strategic Environmental Research and...

  20. 78 FR 29122 - Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program, Scientific Advisory Board; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-17

    ... of the Secretary Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program, Scientific Advisory Board... open meeting of the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program, Scientific Advisory Board... 13, 2013 meeting is to review continuing research and development projects requesting Strategic...

  1. 78 FR 29121 - Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program, Scientific Advisory Board; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-17

    ... of the Secretary Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program, Scientific Advisory Board... open meeting of the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program, Scientific Advisory Board... 12, 2013 meeting is to review new start research and development projects requesting Strategic...

  2. 75 FR 28686 - Clinical Science Research and Development Service; Cooperative Studies Scientific Evaluation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-21

    ... AFFAIRS Clinical Science Research and Development Service; Cooperative Studies Scientific Evaluation... Research and Development Service on the relevance and feasibility of proposed projects and the scientific... (Federal Advisory Committee Act) that a meeting of the Clinical Science Research and Development...

  3. The effectiveness of domestic Scientific research on Iran development Indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Ehsani

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, research has growth Increasingly in Iran and, consequently, the country has risen dramatically in world rankings, based on the number of scientific documents. Meanwhile, research policy makers of different societies have concentrated, more and more, on "the effectiveness of researches" and today, their main concern is to ensure that researches are truly contributing to achieve development goals. The issue of "use of research to improve society" has also been emphasized by Iran high-ranking managers and consultants in superior governmental documents, implying their agreement on the importance and necessity of it. Experts' view about the necessity for science to play a fundamental role in the process of society improvement, research impact assessment specialists' models in which they directly emphasize on "promotion of development scale" as the research final expected effect, and the proven high correlation between scientific progress and economic development of societies, create a reasonable expectation that as a consequent of "remarkable progress in research", Iran has experienced a tangible improvement in other aspects and this improvement has been reflected in development indicators. This expectation leads to a question which has been the main reason for this study to be implemented. The purpose of this study is to examine the effectiveness of Iran increasingly research growth in recent three decades on the country development. The study uses a Descriptive-Analytical method and valid secondary data have been the base of analyses. At first, the reliable development indicators for which data were available for a number of countries in an appropriate timeframe were selected. Next, the rank of Iran determined in any indicator among 215 countries (based on the number of countries in World Bank Web site. Then, the trend of Iran's research position was compared with the trend of Iran's position in terms of each development

  4. Scientific advances in headache research: an update on neurostimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Jan; Magis, Delphine

    2013-01-01

    The pathophysiological understanding of migraine and other primary headaches has been substantially improved over the last 20 years. A milestone that paved the way for successful research was the development of the International Classification of Headache Disorders published by the International Headache Society in 1988. The classification facilitated a clear clinical diagnosis of headache disorders and allowed research efforts to be focused on clearly defined syndromes. Recent advances in the understanding of headache disorders have been driven by the availability of new research tools, such as advanced imaging techniques, genetic tools, pharmaceutical compounds and devices for electrical or magnetic stimulation. The latest scientific and clinical advances were presented at the recent European Headache and Migraine Trust International Congress (EHMTIC) in London (UK).

  5. Statistical principles and techniques in scientific and social research

    CERN Document Server

    Krzanowski, Wojtek J

    2007-01-01

    This text provides a clear discussion of the basic statistical concepts and methods frequently encountered in statistical research. Assuming only a basic level of Mathematics, and with numerous examples and illustrations, this text is a valuable resource for students and researchers in the Sciences and Social Sciences. - ;This graduate-level text provides a survey of the logic and reasoning underpinning statistical analysis, as well as giving a broad-brush overview of the various statistical techniques that play a major role in scientific and social investigations. Arranged in rough historical order, the text starts with the ideas of probability that underpin statistical methods and progresses through the developments of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries to modern concerns and solutions. Assuming only a basic level of Mathematics and with numerous examples and illustrations, this text presents a valuable resource not only to the experienced researcher but also to the student, by complementing courses in ...

  6. The scientific research programmes of Lakatos and applications in parasitology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cabaret J.

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The methodology of scientific research programme (MSRP proposed by Lakatos was in the line of the proposals made by Popper. MSRP were intended for constructing and evaluating research programme, which is unique among philosophers of science. Surprisingly, scientists dedicated to research in mathematics, physic or biology have not used much MRSP. This could be due to the fact that scientists are not aware of the existence of MSRP, or they find it difficult to apply to their own investigations. That is why we present firstly the main characteristics of this methodology (hard core – the group of hypothesis that are admitted by experts in the field, auxiliary hypotheses – which are intended to protect and refine the hypotheses of the hard-core, and heuristics for mending and evaluating the MSRP and, secondly, propose an example in helminthology. We think that the methodology of Lakatos, is a useful tool, but it cannot encompass the large flexibility of investigations pathways.

  7. Preliminary Study on Management of Agricultural Scientific Research Projects in the New Situation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haiyan LUO; Qingqun YAO; Lizhen CHEN; Yu ZHENG

    2015-01-01

    Project management of agricultural scientific research institutions is an important section of agricultural scientific research plan management. It is of great significance for sustainable development of scientific research work of scientific research institutions. According to a series of opinions and notices about scientific and technological system reform issued by the state,and combining current situations of management of scientific research projects in scientific research institutions,this paper made a preliminary study on management of agricultural scientific research projects in the new trend. Finally,on the basis of the current situations of management of agricultural scientific research projects,it came up with pertinent recommendations,including strengthening communication and cooperation and actively declaring projects,strengthening preliminary planning of projects and establishing project information database,reinforcing project process management,ensuring on-time and high quality completion of projects,and strengthening learning and improving quality of management personnel.

  8. CPTAC Scientific Symposium - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    On behalf of the National Cancer Institute and the Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research, you are invited to the First Annual CPTAC Scientific Symposium on Wednesday, November 13, 2013. The purpose of this symposium, which consists of plenary and poster sessions, is for investigators from CPTAC community and beyond to share and discuss novel biological discoveries, analytical methods, and translational approaches using CPTAC data. All scientists who use, or wish to use CPTAC data are welcome to participate at this free event. The symposium will be held at the Natcher Conference Facility on the main campus of the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland.

  9. Development of nature of science ideas through authentic scientific research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgin, Stephen Randall

    Understanding the ways in which scientific knowledge develops, or the epistemology of science, is believed to be a crucial component of scientific literacy. This construct is more formally known as Nature of Science (NOS) within the science education community. The merits of three different approaches to NOS teaching and learning in the context of authentic scientific research on high school student participants' NOS ideas were explored in this study. These approaches were an explicit/reflective approach, a reflective approach and an implicit approach. The effectiveness of explicit approaches over implicit approaches has been demonstrated in school contexts, but little is known regarding the merits of these approaches when the practices that learners engage in are highly authentic in the ways in which they model the work of professional scientists. If an implicit approach yields positive impacts in authentic contexts, then which specific factors within those contexts are influential in doing so? The Authentic Experiences in Science Program (AESP), a summer program designed for high school students offered at a major research university, offered a wonderful context for an investigation of these issues. In this program, high school students worked for an extended period of time in a research scientist's laboratory on an authentic research project. Additionally, seminars offered through the program provided a venue for the implementation of the three aforementioned NOS teaching and learning approaches. An open-ended questionnaire designed to assess respondent NOS ideas was administered to 30 participants of the AESP both at the beginning and again at the end of the program. From those thirty, six case study participants were selected, and through a series of observations and interviews, influential factors impacting their NOS ideas within their specific laboratory placements were identified. Results of categorical data analysis of the questionnaires revealed that the

  10. Scientific integrity: critical issues in environmental health research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merlo Domenico

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Environmental health research is a relatively new scientific area with much interdisciplinary collaboration. Regardless of which human population is included in field studies (e.g., general population, working population, children, elderly, vulnerable sub-groups, etc. their conduct must guarantee well acknowledged ethical principles. These principles, along with codes of conduct, are aimed at protecting study participants from research-related undesired effects and guarantee research integrity. A central role is attributed to the need for informing potential participants (i.e., recruited subjects who may be enrolled in a study, obtaining their written informed consent to participate, and making them aware of their right to refuse to participate at any time and for any reason. Data protection is also required and communication of study findings must respect participant's willingness to know or not know. This is specifically relevant for studies including biological markers and/or storing biological samples that might be analysed years later to tackle research objectives that were specified and communicated to participants at the time of recruitment or that may be formulated after consent was obtained. Integrity is central to environmental health research searching for causal relations. It requires open communication and trust and any violation (i.e., research misconduct, including fabrication or falsification of data, plagiarism, conflicting interests, etc. may endanger the societal trust in the research community as well as jeopardize participation rates in field projects.

  11. Scientific integrity: critical issues in environmental health research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlo, Domenico Franco; Vahakangas, Kirsi; Knudsen, Lisbeth E

    2008-06-05

    Environmental health research is a relatively new scientific area with much interdisciplinary collaboration. Regardless of which human population is included in field studies (e.g., general population, working population, children, elderly, vulnerable sub-groups, etc.) their conduct must guarantee well acknowledged ethical principles. These principles, along with codes of conduct, are aimed at protecting study participants from research-related undesired effects and guarantee research integrity. A central role is attributed to the need for informing potential participants (i.e., recruited subjects who may be enrolled in a study), obtaining their written informed consent to participate, and making them aware of their right to refuse to participate at any time and for any reason. Data protection is also required and communication of study findings must respect participant's willingness to know or not know. This is specifically relevant for studies including biological markers and/or storing biological samples that might be analysed years later to tackle research objectives that were specified and communicated to participants at the time of recruitment or that may be formulated after consent was obtained.Integrity is central to environmental health research searching for causal relations. It requires open communication and trust and any violation (i.e., research misconduct, including fabrication or falsification of data, plagiarism, conflicting interests, etc.) may endanger the societal trust in the research community as well as jeopardize participation rates in field projects.

  12. On the formalization and reuse of scientific research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Ross D; Liakata, Maria; Lu, Chuan; Oliver, Stephen G; Soldatova, Larisa N

    2011-10-07

    The reuse of scientific knowledge obtained from one investigation in another investigation is basic to the advance of science. Scientific investigations should therefore be recorded in ways that promote the reuse of the knowledge they generate. The use of logical formalisms to describe scientific knowledge has potential advantages in facilitating such reuse. Here, we propose a formal framework for using logical formalisms to promote reuse. We demonstrate the utility of this framework by using it in a worked example from biology: demonstrating cycles of investigation formalization [F] and reuse [R] to generate new knowledge. We first used logic to formally describe a Robot scientist investigation into yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) functional genomics [f(1)]. With Robot scientists, unlike human scientists, the production of comprehensive metadata about their investigations is a natural by-product of the way they work. We then demonstrated how this formalism enabled the reuse of the research in investigating yeast phenotypes [r(1) = R(f(1))]. This investigation found that the removal of non-essential enzymes generally resulted in enhanced growth. The phenotype investigation was then formally described using the same logical formalism as the functional genomics investigation [f(2) = F(r(1))]. We then demonstrated how this formalism enabled the reuse of the phenotype investigation to investigate yeast systems-biology modelling [r(2) = R(f(2))]. This investigation found that yeast flux-balance analysis models fail to predict the observed changes in growth. Finally, the systems biology investigation was formalized for reuse in future investigations [f(3) = F(r(2))]. These cycles of reuse are a model for the general reuse of scientific knowledge.

  13. Replicative nature of Indian research, essence of scientific temper, and future of scientific progress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajai R. Singh

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available A lot of Indian research is replicative in nature. This is because originality is at a premium here and mediocrity is in great demand. But replication has its merit as well because it helps in corroboration. And that is the bedrock on which many a fancied scientific hypothesis or theory stands, or falls. However, to go from replicative to original research will involve a massive effort to restructure the Indian psyche and an all round effort from numerous quarters. The second part of this paper deals with the essence of scientific temper,which need not have any basic friendship, or animosity, with religion, faith, superstition and other such entities. A true scientist follows two cardinal rules. He is never unwilling to accept the worth of evidence, howsoever damning to the most favourite of his theories. Second, and perhaps more important, for want of evidence, he withholds comment. He says neither yes nor no. Where will Science ultimately lead Man is the third part of this essay. One argument is that the conflict between Man and Science will continue tilleither of them is exhausted or wiped out. The other believes that it is Science which has to be harnessed for Man and not Man used for Science. And with the numerous checks and balances in place, Science will remain an effective tool for man's progress. The essential value-neutrality of Science will have to be supplemented by the values that man has upheld for centuries as fundamental, and which religious thought and moral philosophy have continuously professed.

  14. Using prediction markets to estimate the reproducibility of scientific research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreber, Anna; Pfeiffer, Thomas; Almenberg, Johan; Isaksson, Siri; Wilson, Brad; Chen, Yiling; Nosek, Brian A; Johannesson, Magnus

    2015-12-15

    Concerns about a lack of reproducibility of statistically significant results have recently been raised in many fields, and it has been argued that this lack comes at substantial economic costs. We here report the results from prediction markets set up to quantify the reproducibility of 44 studies published in prominent psychology journals and replicated in the Reproducibility Project: Psychology. The prediction markets predict the outcomes of the replications well and outperform a survey of market participants' individual forecasts. This shows that prediction markets are a promising tool for assessing the reproducibility of published scientific results. The prediction markets also allow us to estimate probabilities for the hypotheses being true at different testing stages, which provides valuable information regarding the temporal dynamics of scientific discovery. We find that the hypotheses being tested in psychology typically have low prior probabilities of being true (median, 9%) and that a "statistically significant" finding needs to be confirmed in a well-powered replication to have a high probability of being true. We argue that prediction markets could be used to obtain speedy information about reproducibility at low cost and could potentially even be used to determine which studies to replicate to optimally allocate limited resources into replications.

  15. Teaching through Research--Research through Teaching: Comparing Scientific and Subjective Theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patry, Jean-Luc

    2014-01-01

    Teaching through research has a great potential for Master's studies. The paper presents how this has been done in a particular case, comparing scientific and subjective theories, and how this course was simultaneously used to do research about this topic. The course proved to be a win-win-situation for the students and for the teacher/researcher.…

  16. 77 FR 21622 - Rehabilitation Research and Development Service Scientific Merit Review Board; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-10

    ... AFFAIRS Rehabilitation Research and Development Service Scientific Merit Review Board; Notice of Meeting... Committee Act) that a meeting of the Rehabilitation Research and Development Service Scientific Merit Review..., Rehabilitation Research and Development Service, and the Chief Research and Development Officer on the scientific...

  17. 75 FR 72872 - Rehabilitation Research and Development Service Scientific Merit Review Board; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-26

    ... AFFAIRS Rehabilitation Research and Development Service Scientific Merit Review Board; Notice of Meeting... Committee Act) that a meeting of the Rehabilitation Research and Development Service Scientific Merit Review... Research and Development Service, and the Chief Research and Development Officer on the scientific and...

  18. 78 FR 50144 - Rehabilitation Research and Development Service Scientific Merit Review Board; Notice of Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-16

    ... AFFAIRS Rehabilitation Research and Development Service Scientific Merit Review Board; Notice of Meetings.... App. 2, that the subcommittees of the Rehabilitation Research and Development Service Scientific Merit..., Rehabilitation Research and Development Service, and the Chief Research and Development Officer on the scientific...

  19. The scientific benefits of inertially confined fusion research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Key, M

    1999-05-14

    A striking feature of 25 years of research into inertially confined fusion (ICF) and inertial fusion energy (IFE) has been its significant impact in other fields of science. Most ICF facilities worldwide are now being used in part to support a wider portfolio of research than simply ICF. Reasons for this trend include the high intrinsic interest of the new science coupled with the relative ease and low marginal cost of adapting the facilities particularly lasers, to carry out experiments with goals other than ICF. The availability at ICF laboratories of sophisticated theory and modeling capability and advanced diagnostics has given added impetus. The expertise of ICF specialists has also triggered more lateral scientific spin-offs leading for example to new types of lasers and to related developments in basic science. In a generic sense, the facilities developed for ICF have made possible study of new regimes of the properties of matter at extremely high-energy density and the interaction of ultraintense light with matter. This general opportunity has been exploited in numerous and diverse specific lines of research. Examples elaborated below include laboratory simulation of astrophysical phenomena; studies of the equation of state (EOS) of matter under conditions relevant to the interior of planets and stars; development of uniquely intense sources of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) to hard x-ray emission, notably the x-ray laser; understanding of the physics of strong field interaction of light and matter; and related new phenomena such as laser-induced nuclear processes and high-field-electron accelerators. Some of these developments have potential themselves for further scientific exploitation such as the scientific use of advanced light sources. There are also avenues for commercial exploitation, for example the use of laser plasma sources in EUV lithography. Past scientific progress is summarized here and projections are made for new science that may flow from the

  20. Plagiarism in Scientific Research and Publications and How to Prevent It

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masic, Izet

    2014-01-01

    Quality is assessed on the basis of adequate evidence, while best results of the research are accomplished through scientific knowledge. Information contained in a scientific work must always be based on scientific evidence. Guidelines for genuine scientific research should be designed based on real results. Dynamic research and use correct methods of scientific work must originate from everyday practice and the fundamentals of the research. The original work should have the proper data sources with clearly defined research goals, methods of operation which are acceptable for questions included in the study. When selecting the methods it is necessary to obtain the consent of the patients/respondents to provide data for execution of the project or so called informed consent. Only by the own efforts can be reached true results, from which can be drawn conclusions and which finally can give a valid scholarly commentary. Text may be copied from other sources, either in whole or in part and marked as a result of the other studies. For high-quality scientific work necessary are expertise and relevant scientific literature, mostly taken from publications that are stored in biomedical databases. These are scientific, professional and review articles, case reports of disease in physician practices, but the knowledge can also be acquired on scientific and expert lectures by renowned scientists. Form of text publications must meet standards on writing a paper. If the article has already been published in a scientific journal, the same article cannot be published in any other journal with a few minor adjustments, or without specifying the parts of the first article which is used in another article. Copyright infringement occurs when the author of a new article, with or without mentioning the author, uses a substantial portion of previously published articles, including past contributions in the first article. With the permission of the publisher and the author, another journal

  1. Plagiarism in scientific research and publications and how to prevent it.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masic, Izet

    2014-04-01

    Quality is assessed on the basis of adequate evidence, while best results of the research are accomplished through scientific knowledge. Information contained in a scientific work must always be based on scientific evidence. Guidelines for genuine scientific research should be designed based on real results. Dynamic research and use correct methods of scientific work must originate from everyday practice and the fundamentals of the research. The original work should have the proper data sources with clearly defined research goals, methods of operation which are acceptable for questions included in the study. When selecting the methods it is necessary to obtain the consent of the patients/respondents to provide data for execution of the project or so called informed consent. Only by the own efforts can be reached true results, from which can be drawn conclusions and which finally can give a valid scholarly commentary. Text may be copied from other sources, either in whole or in part and marked as a result of the other studies. For high-quality scientific work necessary are expertise and relevant scientific literature, mostly taken from publications that are stored in biomedical databases. These are scientific, professional and review articles, case reports of disease in physician practices, but the knowledge can also be acquired on scientific and expert lectures by renowned scientists. Form of text publications must meet standards on writing a paper. If the article has already been published in a scientific journal, the same article cannot be published in any other journal with a few minor adjustments, or without specifying the parts of the first article which is used in another article. Copyright infringement occurs when the author of a new article, with or without mentioning the author, uses a substantial portion of previously published articles, including past contributions in the first article. With the permission of the publisher and the author, another journal

  2. [Future of scientific research on preventive medicine in Korea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hyun-Sul

    2006-03-01

    The Korean Society of Preventive Medicine has undergone continuous development, after overcoming the difficult early years, in the 59 years since its establishment in 1947. It has repeatedly upgraded its quality and quantity of research with the first journal edition in 1968 and the continuous increase in publication numbers, scientific articles, joint research projects, intra-field exchanges and participation in various international scientific activities. In the future, we should gather a more extensive collection of opinions regarding the introduction of clinical preventive medicine specialists and prepare for the establishment of a training program for clinical specialists into a preventive medicine residency course. Moreover, we should raise interest in the importance of protecting individual information and maintaining medicine ethics. It's impossible to develop academic activities without cooperation. We need such cooperation with basic medical approaches across a wide range of fields. Furthermore, we should strengthen our cooperation with aspects of clinical and drug epidemiology in many fields including public health, statistics, and dietetics. Finally, we should raise the level of international cooperation with many countries, including North Korea, to prevent diseases and promote health. Preventive medicine is a science in which practice is as important as theory. We must aim to nurture preventive medicine specialists who practice in many areas of society with the goal of preventing diseases, promoting health, improving fertility, and securing healthy elderly life for individuals and the entire population. To this end, we will endeavor to promote both theoretical and practical components of academic development.

  3. Interview with Sergio Bertolucci, Director for Research and Scientific Computing

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Video Productions

    2009-01-01

    Questions : 1. How do you feel as Director for Research at a moment when the LHC is ready to produce data for the first time? 2. Is 3.5 Tev per beam enough for the very large community of physicists expecting data for a year now? 3. What do you expect as a physicist and what would you wish to find at this energy? 4. Do you think the Tevatron at FERMILAB still has a chance to get interesting results before the LHC? 5. How complex is it to run the LHC and how difficult is the data taking? 6. What is the historical importance of the LHC in scientific research in general? 7. What spin offs on society can we expect from the LHC?

  4. Application of BIM technology in green scientific research office building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Xin; Sun, Jianhua; Wang, Bo

    2017-05-01

    BIM technology as a kind of information technology, has been along with the advancement of building industrialization application in domestic building industry gradually. Based on reasonable construction BIM model, using BIM technology platform, through collaborative design tools can effectively improve the design efficiency and design quality. Vanda northwest engineering design and research institute co., LTD., the scientific research office building project in combination with the practical situation of engineering using BIM technology, formed in the BIM model combined with related information according to the energy energy model (BEM) and the application of BIM technology in construction management stage made exploration, and the direct experience and the achievements gained by the architectural design part made a summary.

  5. Hoe de Nederlandse wetenschap beter te maken. [Improving the health of scientific research in The netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clevers, J.C.

    2005-01-01

    Biomedical science in the Netherlands and other continental European countries is lagging behind scientific research in English-speaking countries. A comparison between the two systems reveals several crucial differences. Although levels of government funding of scientific research are approximately

  6. Hoe de Nederlandse wetenschap beter te maken. [Improving the health of scientific research in The netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clevers, J.C.

    2005-01-01

    Biomedical science in the Netherlands and other continental European countries is lagging behind scientific research in English-speaking countries. A comparison between the two systems reveals several crucial differences. Although levels of government funding of scientific research are approximately

  7. 75 FR 79446 - Clinical Science Research and Development Service; Cooperative Studies Scientific Evaluation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-20

    ... AFFAIRS Clinical Science Research and Development Service; Cooperative Studies Scientific Evaluation... (Federal Advisory Committee Act) that a meeting of the Clinical Science Research and Development Service Cooperative Studies Scientific Evaluation Committee will be held on January 13, 2011, at The...

  8. Institute for Scientific Computing Research Fiscal Year 2002 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keyes, D E; McGraw, J R; Bodtker, L K

    2003-03-11

    The Institute for Scientific Computing Research (ISCR) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is jointly administered by the Computing Applications and Research Department (CAR) and the University Relations Program (URP), and this joint relationship expresses its mission. An extensively externally networked ISCR cost-effectively expands the level and scope of national computational science expertise available to the Laboratory through CAR. The URP, with its infrastructure for managing six institutes and numerous educational programs at LLNL, assumes much of the logistical burden that is unavoidable in bridging the Laboratory's internal computational research environment with that of the academic community. As large-scale simulations on the parallel platforms of DOE's Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASCI) become increasingly important to the overall mission of LLNL, the role of the ISCR expands in importance, accordingly. Relying primarily on non-permanent staffing, the ISCR complements Laboratory research in areas of the computer and information sciences that are needed at the frontier of Laboratory missions. The ISCR strives to be the ''eyes and ears'' of the Laboratory in the computer and information sciences, in keeping the Laboratory aware of and connected to important external advances. It also attempts to be ''feet and hands, in carrying those advances into the Laboratory and incorporating them into practice. In addition to conducting research, the ISCR provides continuing education opportunities to Laboratory personnel, in the form of on-site workshops taught by experts on novel software or hardware technologies. The ISCR also seeks to influence the research community external to the Laboratory to pursue Laboratory-related interests and to train the workforce that will be required by the Laboratory. Part of the performance of this function is interpreting to the external community appropriate (unclassified

  9. Funding food science and nutrition research: financial conflicts and scientific integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Sylvia; Alexander, Nick; Clydesdale, Fergus; Applebaum, Rhona; Atkinson, Stephanie; Black, Richard; Dwyer, Johanna; Hentges, Eric; Higley, Nancy; Lefevre, Michael; Lupton, Joanne; Miller, Sanford; Tancredi, Doris; Weaver, Connie; Woteki, Catherine; Wedral, Elaine

    2009-05-01

    There has been significant public debate about the susceptibility of research to biases of various kinds. The dialogue has extended to the peer-reviewed literature, scientific conferences, the mass media, government advisory bodies, and beyond. While biases can come from myriad sources, the overwhelming focus of the discussion, to date, has been on industry-funded science. Given the critical role that industry has played and will continue to play in the research process, the International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI) North America Working Group on Guiding Principles has, in this paper, set out proposed conflict-of-interest guidelines, regarding industry funding, for protecting the integrity and credibility of the scientific record, particularly with respect to health, nutrition, and food-safety science. Eight principles are enumerated, specifying ground rules for industry-sponsored research. The paper, which issues a challenge to the broader scientific community to address all bias issues, is only a first step; the document is intended to be dynamic, prompting ongoing discussion and refinement. The Guiding Principles are as follows. In the conduct of public/private research relationships, all relevant parties shall: 1) conduct or sponsor research that is factual, transparent, and designed objectively; according to accepted principles of scientific inquiry, the research design will generate an appropriately phrased hypothesis and the research will answer the appropriate questions, rather than favor a particular outcome; 2) require control of both study design and research itself to remain with scientific investigators; 3) not offer or accept remuneration geared to the outcome of a research project; 4) prior to the commencement of studies, ensure that there is a written agreement that the investigative team has the freedom and obligation to attempt to publish the findings within some specified time-frame; 5) require, in publications and conference presentations

  10. Funding food science and nutrition research: financial conflicts and scientific integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Sylvia; Alexander, Nick; Clydesdale, Fergus M; Applebaum, Rhona S; Atkinson, Stephanie; Black, Richard M; Dwyer, Johanna T; Hentges, Eric; Higley, Nancy A; Lefevre, Michael; Lupton, Joanne R; Miller, Sanford A; Tancredi, Doris L; Weaver, Connie M; Woteki, Catherine E; Wedral, Elaine

    2009-05-01

    There has been significant public debate about the susceptibility of research to biases of various kinds. The dialogue has extended to the peer-reviewed literature, scientific conferences, the mass media, government advisory bodies, and beyond. Whereas biases can come from myriad sources, the overwhelming focus of the discussion to date has been on industry-funded science. Given the critical role that industry has played and will continue to play in the research process, the International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI) North America Working Group on Guiding Principles has, in this article, proposed conflict-of-interest guidelines regarding industry funding to protect the integrity and credibility of the scientific record, particularly with respect to health, nutrition, and food-safety science. Eight principles are enumerated, which specify the ground rules for industry-sponsored research. This article, which issues a challenge to the broader scientific community to address all bias issues, is only a first step; the document is intended to be dynamic, prompting ongoing discussion and refinement. In the conduct of public/private research relationships, all relevant parties shall 1) conduct or sponsor research that is factual, transparent, and designed objectively, and, according to accepted principles of scientific inquiry, the research design will generate an appropriately phrased hypothesis and the research will answer the appropriate questions, rather than favor a particular outcome; 2) require control of both study design and research itself to remain with scientific investigators; 3) not offer or accept remuneration geared to the outcome of a research project; 4) ensure, before the commencement of studies, that there is a written agreement that the investigative team has the freedom and obligation to attempt to publish the findings within some specified time frame; 5) require, in publications and conference presentations, full signed disclosure of all financial

  11. The critical steps for successful research: The research proposal and scientific writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pitchai Balakumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An interactive workshop on ′The Critical Steps for Successful Research: The Research Proposal and Scientific Writing′ was conducted in conjunction with the 64 th Annual Conference of the Indian Pharmaceutical Congress-2012 at Chennai, India. In essence, research is performed to enlighten our understanding of a contemporary issue relevant to the needs of society. To accomplish this, a researcher begins search for a novel topic based on purpose, creativity, critical thinking, and logic. This leads to the fundamental pieces of the research endeavor: Question, objective, hypothesis, experimental tools to test the hypothesis, methodology, and data analysis. When correctly performed, research should produce new knowledge. The four cornerstones of good research are the well-formulated protocol or proposal that is well executed, analyzed, discussed and concluded. This recent workshop educated researchers in the critical steps involved in the development of a scientific idea to its successful execution and eventual publication.

  12. Fissile solution dynamics: Student research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hetrick, D.L.

    1994-09-01

    There are two research projects in criticality safety at the University of Arizona: one in dynamic simulation of hypothetical criticality accidents in fissile solutions, and one in criticality benchmarks using transport theory. We have used the data from nuclear excursions in KEWB, CRAC, and SILENE to help in building models for solution excursions. An equation of state for liquids containing gas bubbles has been developed and coupled to point-reactor dynamics in an attempt to predict fission rate, yield, pressure, and kinetic energy. It appears that radiolytic gas is unimportant until after the first peak, but that it does strongly affect the shape of the subsequent power decrease and also the dynamic pressure.

  13. [Scientific research in nursing education: Rio de Janeiro and Minas Gerais research groups].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Diana Coelho; Backes, Vânia Marli Schubert; Lino, Mônica Motta; Canever, Bruna Pedroso; Ferraz, Fabiane; Schveitzer, Mariana Cabral

    2011-06-01

    This study aims to characterize the scientific production of the Research Groups in Nursing Education (RGNE) of the states of Rio de Janeiro and Minas Gerais, in Brazil. This is a documentary quantitative descriptive retrospective research, conducted by searching the CVs of all researchers who are part of the RGNEs in the Lattes database, followed by the search, organization, and evaluation of their scientific production according to Qualis/CAPES. The period studied was from 1995 to 2009 (the last five CAPES triennia) and included articles, books, book chapters, and full papers in conference proceedings. Results show that Rio de Janeiro has the higher number of articles in Nursing Education, highlighting the qualification of researchers at doctorate level. Both states present historic and socio-economic factors that favor scientific development.

  14. 50 CFR 216.45 - General Authorization for Level B harassment for scientific research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... harassment for scientific research. 216.45 Section 216.45 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES... Authorization for Level B harassment for scientific research. (a) General Authorization. (1) Persons are..., as defined in § 216.3, for purposes of bona fide scientific research Provided, That: (i) They submit...

  15. 77 FR 8330 - Health Services Research and Development Service Scientific Merit Review Board; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-14

    ... AFFAIRS Health Services Research and Development Service Scientific Merit Review Board; Notice of Meeting... Committee Act) that various subcommittees of the Health Services Research and Development Service Scientific... health care delivery and management, and nursing research. Applications are reviewed for scientific and...

  16. 3 CFR 13505 - Executive Order 13505 of March 9, 2009. Removing Barriers to Responsible Scientific Research...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Barriers to Responsible Scientific Research Involving Human Stem Cells 13505 Order 13505 Presidential... Scientific Research Involving Human Stem Cells By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution... scientific community that the research should be supported by Federal funds. For the past 8 years, the...

  17. 50 CFR 216.41 - Permits for scientific research and enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permits for scientific research and... AND IMPORTING OF MARINE MAMMALS Special Exceptions § 216.41 Permits for scientific research and enhancement. In addition to the requirements under §§ 216.33 through 216.38, permits for scientific research...

  18. 75 FR 65404 - Rehabilitation Research and Development Service Scientific Merit Review Board; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-22

    ... AFFAIRS Rehabilitation Research and Development Service Scientific Merit Review Board; Notice of Meeting... of the Rehabilitation Research and Development Service Scientific Merit Review Board will be held... Service, and the Chief Research and Development Officer on the scientific and technical merit, the mission...

  19. 76 FR 42167 - Rehabilitation Research and Development Service Scientific Merit Review Board; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-18

    ... AFFAIRS Rehabilitation Research and Development Service Scientific Merit Review Board; Notice of Meeting... Committee Act) that a meeting of the Rehabilitation Research and Development Service Scientific Merit Review... Service, and the Chief Research and Development Officer on the scientific and technical merit, the mission...

  20. 77 FR 42365 - Health Services Research and Development Service Scientific Merit Review Board, Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-18

    ... AFFAIRS Health Services Research and Development Service Scientific Merit Review Board, Notice of Meeting... Committee Act) that various subcommittees of the Health Services Research and Development Service Scientific... health care delivery and management, and nursing research. Applications are reviewed for scientific and...

  1. 50 CFR 18.31 - Scientific research permits and public display permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Scientific research permits and public... Scientific research permits and public display permits. The Director may, upon receipt of an application and... importation of marine mammals for scientific research purposes or for public display. (a) Application...

  2. 50 CFR 600.745 - Scientific research activity, exempted fishing, and exempted educational activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Scientific research activity, exempted...-STEVENS ACT PROVISIONS General Provisions for Domestic Fisheries § 600.745 Scientific research activity, exempted fishing, and exempted educational activity. (a) Scientific research activity. Nothing in this part...

  3. Course-Based Undergraduate Research Experiences Can Make Scientific Research More Inclusive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangera, Gita; Brownell, Sara E.

    2014-01-01

    Current approaches to improving diversity in scientific research focus on graduating more science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) majors, but graduation with a STEM undergraduate degree alone is not sufficient for entry into graduate school. Undergraduate independent research experiences are becoming more or less a prerequisite…

  4. Course-Based Undergraduate Research Experiences Can Make Scientific Research More Inclusive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangera, Gita; Brownell, Sara E.

    2014-01-01

    Current approaches to improving diversity in scientific research focus on graduating more science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) majors, but graduation with a STEM undergraduate degree alone is not sufficient for entry into graduate school. Undergraduate independent research experiences are becoming more or less a prerequisite…

  5. The educational research and the “evidence-based scientific research” movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Chizzotti

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes a movement of criticism towards humanities and educational research. The ‘evidence-based scientific research’ movement proclaims itself fit to raise the educational research to scientific level and criticizes severely the scientific production in the area, on the presumption of the exemplary validity of experimental research to achieve scientific forum and conduct public policies for education on the basis of scientific evidence. The movement admits an exemplary model of the research derived from the medical area and adopts the experimental and quasi-experimental research as single pattern of investigation, of positivist extraction, unaware of the advances of qualitative research in the humanities and in education.

  6. Scientific visualization in computational aerodynamics at NASA Ames Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancroft, Gordon V.; Plessel, Todd; Merritt, Fergus; Walatka, Pamela P.; Watson, Val

    1989-01-01

    The visualization methods used in computational fluid dynamics research at the NASA-Ames Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation facility are examined, including postprocessing, tracking, and steering methods. The visualization requirements of the facility's three-dimensional graphical workstation are outlined and the types hardware and software used to meet these requirements are discussed. The main features of the facility's current and next-generation workstations are listed. Emphasis is given to postprocessing techniques, such as dynamic interactive viewing on the workstation and recording and playback on videodisk, tape, and 16-mm film. Postprocessing software packages are described, including a three-dimensional plotter, a surface modeler, a graphical animation system, a flow analysis software toolkit, and a real-time interactive particle-tracer.

  7. Optimizing Communications Between Arctic Residents and IPY Scientific Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapleton, M.; Carpenter, L.

    2007-12-01

    BACKGROUND International Polar Year, which was launched in March 2007, is an international program of coordinated, interdisciplinary scientific research on Earth's polar regions. The northern regions of the eight Arctic States (Canada, Alaska (USA), Russia, Sweden, Norway, Finland. Iceland and Greenland (Denmark) have significant indigenous populations. The circumpolar Arctic is one of the least technologically connected regions in the world, although Canada and others have been pioneers in developing and suing Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in remote areas. The people living in this vast geographic area have been moving toward taking their rightful place in the global information society, but are dependent on the outreach and cooperation of larger mainstream societies. The dominant medium of communication is radio, which is flexible in accommodating multiple cultures, languages, and factors of time and distance. The addition of newer technologies such as streaming on the Internet can increase access and content for all communities of interest, north and south. The Arctic Circle of Indigenous Communicators (ACIC) is an independent association of professional Northern indigenous media workers in the print, radio, television, film and Internet industries. ACIC advocates the development of all forms of communication in circumpolar North areas. It is international in scope. Members are literate in English, French, Russian and many indigenous languages. ACIC has proposed the establishment of a headquarters for monitoring IPY projects are in each area, and the use of community radio broadcasters to collect and disseminate information about IPY. The cooperation of Team IPY at the University of Colorado, Arctic Net at Laval University, and others, is being developed. ACIC is committed to making scientific knowledge gained in IPY accessible to those most affected - residents of the Arctic. ABSTRACT The meeting of the American Geophysical Union will be held

  8. Reading, Writing, and Presenting Original Scientific Research: A Nine-Week Course in Scientific Communication for High School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Sarah Danka

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available High school students are not often given opportunities to communicate scientific findings to their peers, the general public, and/or people in the scientific community, and therefore they do not develop scientific communication skills. We present a nine-week course that can be used to teach high school students, who may have no previous experience, how to read and write primary scientific articles and how to discuss scientific findings with a broad audience. Various forms of this course have been taught for the past 10 years as part of an intensive summer research program for rising high school seniors that is coordinated by the Young Scientist Program at Washington University in St. Louis. The format presented here includes assessments for efficacy through both rubric-based methods and student self-assessment surveys.

  9. Dynamic analysis, transformation, dissemination and applications of scientific multidimensional data in ArcGIS Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, S. R.; Collow, T. W.; Rose, B.

    2016-12-01

    Scientific datasets are generated from various sources and platforms but they are typically produced either by earth observation systems or by modelling systems. These are widely used for monitoring, simulating, or analyzing measurements that are associated with physical, chemical, and biological phenomena over the ocean, atmosphere, or land. A significant subset of scientific datasets stores values directly as rasters or in a form that can be rasterized. This is where a value exists at every cell in a regular grid spanning the spatial extent of the dataset. Government agencies like NOAA, NASA, EPA, USGS produces large volumes of near real-time, forecast, and historical data that drives climatological and meteorological studies, and underpins operations ranging from weather prediction to sea ice loss. Modern science is computationally intensive because of the availability of an enormous amount of scientific data, the adoption of data-driven analysis, and the need to share these dataset and research results with the public. ArcGIS as a platform is sophisticated and capable of handling such complex domain. We'll discuss constructs and capabilities applicable to multidimensional gridded data that can be conceptualized as a multivariate space-time cube. Building on the concept of a two-dimensional raster, a typical multidimensional raster dataset could contain several "slices" within the same spatial extent. We will share a case from the NOAA Climate Forecast Systems Reanalysis (CFSR) multidimensional data as an example of how large collections of rasters can be efficiently organized and managed through a data model within a geodatabase called "Mosaic dataset" and dynamically transformed and analyzed using raster functions. A raster function is a lightweight, raster-valued transformation defined over a mixed set of raster and scalar input. That means, just like any tool, you can provide a raster function with input parameters. It enables dynamic processing of only the

  10. A more comprehensive index in the evaluation of scientific research: the single researcher impact factor proposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelnuovo, Gianluca; Limonta, Daniel; Sarmiento, Luis; Molinari, Enrico

    2010-11-05

    Good alternatives to the Impact Factor (IF) algorithm are needed. The Thomson IF represents a limited measure of the importance of an individual article because 80% of a journal's IF is determined by only the 20% of the papers published. In the past few years, several new indexes has been created to provide alternatives to the IF algorithm. These include the removal of self citations from the calculation of the IF using the Adjusted IF, Index Copernicus initiative and other modifications such as the Cited Half-Life IF, Median IF, Disciplinary IF, and Prestige Factor. There is also the Euro-Factor, born in Europe to avoid the strong US centrality, and the English language basis of the Thomson database. One possible strategy to avoid "IF supremacy" is to create a new index, the Single Researcher Impact Factor (SRIF), that would move the evaluation from the power of scientific journals to the quality of single researchers. This measure can take into account the number and quality of the traditional publications and other activities usually associated with being a researcher, such as reviewing manuscripts, writing books, and attending scientific meetings. Also, in funding policy, it might be more useful to consider the merits, contributions, and real impact of all the scientific activities of a single researcher instead of adding only the journals' IF numbers. The major aim of this paper is to propose and describe the SRIF index that could represent a novel option to evaluate scientific research and researchers.

  11. Validity of Eureka initiative: discourse by Italian Minister for University and Scientific and Technological Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-07-01

    A broad review is given of the evolution of the aims and objectives of Eureka, a European based, coordinated international research and development program. Whereas initial projects were concentrated on the use of technology to restore areas which have suffered environmental damage, present proposals are being geared towards the development of preventive techniques. Robotics research is also being strengthened. With the aim of optimizing conditions for a more dynamic, collaborative research effort by participating high-tech firms, research centers and universities, a data bank is being developed whose aim is to identify and classify areas of technological and scientific expertise among participants. Efforts are being made to complement Eureka activities with European Community technological development goals and to augment the involvement of Third World countries.

  12. The 3rd All-Russian Scientific Conference on “The Dynamics of Modern Ecosystems in the Holocene”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galimova Madina Sh.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available On March 12-15, 2013, Kazan hosted the Third All-Russian Scientific Conference with International Participation "The Dynamics of modern ecosystems in the Holocene". The scientific forum was organized by the Institute of Ecology and Mineral Wealth, Tatarstan Academy of Sciences, the Institute of Ecology and Evolution named after A.N. Severtsov, Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS, and the Institute of Plant and Animal Ecology of the RAS Urals Branch, with support from the Russian Foundation for Fundamental Research. The conference was attended by over 200 researchers from different regions of Russia and ten foreign countries. The presented reports covered a wide range of problems, such as the dynamics of the natural environment in Northern Eurasia during the Holocene, the history of human interaction with the environment, etc. They contained the results of natural science studies in archeozoology, paleontology, paleobotany, paleoclimate reconstructions and paleolandscapes that are important for the archaeological science research.

  13. Information from imagery: ISPRS scientific vision and research agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Dowman, Ian; Li, Songnian; Li, Zhilin; Madden, Marguerite; Mills, Jon; Paparoditis, Nicolas; Rottensteiner, Franz; Sester, Monika; Toth, Charles; Trinder, John; Heipke, Christian

    2016-05-01

    With the increased availability of very high-resolution satellite imagery, terrain based imaging and participatory sensing, inexpensive platforms, and advanced information and communication technologies, the application of imagery is now ubiquitous, playing an important role in many aspects of life and work today. As a leading organisation in this field, the International Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ISPRS) has been devoted to effectively and efficiently obtaining and utilising information from imagery since its foundation in the year 1910. This paper examines the significant challenges currently facing ISPRS and its communities, such as providing high-quality information, enabling advanced geospatial computing, and supporting collaborative problem solving. The state-of-the-art in ISPRS related research and development is reviewed and the trends and topics for future work are identified. By providing an overarching scientific vision and research agenda, we hope to call on and mobilise all ISPRS scientists, practitioners and other stakeholders to continue improving our understanding and capacity on information from imagery and to deliver advanced geospatial knowledge that enables humankind to better deal with the challenges ahead, posed for example by global change, ubiquitous sensing, and a demand for real-time information generation.

  14. RESEARCH ON NONLINEAR PROBLEMS IN STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research on nonlinear problems structural dynamics is briefly summarized. Panel flutter was investigated to make a critical comparison between theory...panel flutter in aerospace vehicles, plausible simplifying assumptions are examined in the light of experimental results. Structural dynamics research

  15. Investigating the Impact on Skill Development of an Undergraduate Scientific Research Skills Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeoman, Kay H.; Zamorski, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the design and subsequent impact of a scientific research skills course. Student understanding of the university research environment, their confidence in finding and using scientific literature and in scientific writing and presentation pre- and post-course was investigated. The findings suggested that understanding of the…

  16. Perceptions That Influence the Maintenance of Scientific Integrity in Community-Based Participatory Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer Diaz, Anne E.; Spears Johnson, Chaya R.; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    Scientific integrity is necessary for strong science; yet many variables can influence scientific integrity. In traditional research, some common threats are the pressure to publish, competition for funds, and career advancement. Community-based participatory research (CBPR) provides a different context for scientific integrity with additional and…

  17. 30 CFR 280.11 - What must I do before I may conduct scientific research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Apply for a Permit or File a Notice § 280.11 What must I do before I may conduct scientific research? You may conduct G&G scientific research activities related to hard minerals on the OCS only after you... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What must I do before I may conduct scientific...

  18. On Application of ABC Approach in Management of Agri- scientific Research Cost

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liangchun; ZHA

    2014-01-01

    This paper firstly introduced theoretical background of the Activity-Based Costing(ABC). Then,it analyzed necessity,extension resistance and difficulty of ABC approach in agri-scientific research institutions. Finally,it came up with some recommendations for scientifically learning and steadily promoting ABC method in agri-scientific research field.

  19. The Scientific Research in Libya: The Role of the New Generation of Researchers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tashani OA

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a potential for improving the scientific research environment in Libya. One reason to be optimistic about the prospects of the future of science in Libya is the number of postgraduate students in all disciplines who are training in European and North American Universities. According to statistics of the Higher Education Authorities in Libya, there are approximately 3000 Libyan students enrolled in postgraduate studies in British universities alone and almost half of this number in North America [1]. However, research output of Libyan universities’ academic staff members is still very low. For example, a recent survey of published medical literature revealed that the average annual production rate at the Al-Fateh Medical University is 1.4 article/100 academic staff [2]. In my opinion, four major reasons may explain the problems facing scientific research in Arab countries in general and in Libya in particular: 1 Brain Drain 2 Lack of funding 3 Lack of scientific infrastructure and incompetent supportive staff, and 4 Teaching overload. I will discuss the role that the new generation of Libyan researchers* could play to advance the scientific research output in Libya.

  20. Organization of Biomedical Data for Collaborative Scientific Research: A Research Information Management System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myneni, Sahiti; Patel, Vimla L

    2010-06-01

    Biomedical researchers often work with massive, detailed and heterogeneous datasets. These datasets raise new challenges of information organization and management for scientific interpretation, as they demand much of the researchers' time and attention. The current study investigated the nature of the problems that researchers face when dealing with such data. Four major problems identified with existing biomedical scientific information management methods were related to data organization, data sharing, collaboration, and publications. Therefore, there is a compelling need to develop an efficient and user-friendly information management system to handle the biomedical research data. This study evaluated the implementation of an information management system, which was introduced as part of the collaborative research to increase scientific productivity in a research laboratory. Laboratory members seemed to exhibit frustration during the implementation process. However, empirical findings revealed that they gained new knowledge and completed specified tasks while working together with the new system. Hence, researchers are urged to persist and persevere when dealing with any new technology, including an information management system in a research laboratory environment.

  1. Astrophysical Dynamics 1999/2000 Merging Research and Education

    CERN Document Server

    Romeo, A B

    2000-01-01

    The workshop `Astrophysical Dynamics 1999/2000' followed a homonymous advanced research course, and both activities were organized by me. In this opening paper of the proceedings book, I describe them and document their strong impact on the academic life of the local institutions. The advanced research course was open to graduate students, senior researchers, and motivated under-graduate students with good background in physics and mathematics. The course covered several multi-disciplinary issues of modern research on astrophysical dynamics, and thus also of interest to physicists, mathematicians and engineers. The major topic was gas dynamics, viewed in context with stellar dynamics and plasma physics. The course was complemented by parallel seminars on hot topics given by experts in such fields, and open to a wide scientific audience. In particular, I gave a friendly introduction to wavelets, which are becoming an increasingly powerful tool not only for processing signals and images but also for analysing f...

  2. Organization of Biomedical Data for Collaborative Scientific Research: A Research Information Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myneni, Sahiti; Patel, Vimla L.

    2010-01-01

    Biomedical researchers often work with massive, detailed and heterogeneous datasets. These datasets raise new challenges of information organization and management for scientific interpretation, as they demand much of the researchers’ time and attention. The current study investigated the nature of the problems that researchers face when dealing with such data. Four major problems identified with existing biomedical scientific information management methods were related to data organization, data sharing, collaboration, and publications. Therefore, there is a compelling need to develop an efficient and user-friendly information management system to handle the biomedical research data. This study evaluated the implementation of an information management system, which was introduced as part of the collaborative research to increase scientific productivity in a research laboratory. Laboratory members seemed to exhibit frustration during the implementation process. However, empirical findings revealed that they gained new knowledge and completed specified tasks while working together with the new system. Hence, researchers are urged to persist and persevere when dealing with any new technology, including an information management system in a research laboratory environment. PMID:20543892

  3. The Zooniverse: Cutting Edge Scientific Research in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borden, K. A.; Whyte, L. F.; Smith, A.; Tarnoff, A.; Schmitt, H.

    2012-12-01

    Increasingly scientists and researchers from a multitude of disciplines are finding themselves inundated with more data than they could possibly interpret in a lifetime. Computers can be used entirely or partially for some data analysis; but there are some tasks that are currently best suited to human eyes, ears and brains. Zooniverse (www.zooniverse.org) invites members of the public to help researchers analyze and interpret data. To date, hundreds of thousands of volunteers have been involved in classifying images, interpreting sounds and transcribing texts. Zooniverse citizen scientists are providing valuable analyses across a variety of fields, from the hunt for exoplanets in Planet Hunters (planethunters.org) to the transcription of Greek papyri in Ancient Lives (ancientlives.org). Multiple academic publications have resulted from the combined efforts of the Zooniverse community and science teams demonstrating that citizen science is more than ever becoming a well-established method of doing research. Unlike most research projects the data, analysis and interactions with the science teams have an established and visible online presence through the project website and related discussion sites and blogs. These in themselves provide a valuable classroom resource, an opportunity for free and easy access to cutting edge scientific research. Anecdotal evidence exists that teacher can and already do use Zooniverse projects. By providing a rich and varied scaffolding to accompany the Zooniverse projects the opportunity exists for bringing citizen scientists to a wider classroom audience. An audience that may include non-specialist teachers, who require additional support to deliver challenging content, or time strapped educators who haven't the time to develop their own accompanying resources to weave Zooniverse projects into their lessons. During the session we will discuss the recent Zooniverse projects specifically designed to support and promote classroom adoption

  4. On the Cultivation of Automation Majors' Research Innovation Ability Based on Scientific Research Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lipeng; Li, Mingqiu

    2012-01-01

    Currently, it has become a fundamental goal for the engineering major to cultivate high-quality engineering technicians with innovation ability in scientific research which is an important academic ability necessary for them. This paper mainly explores the development of comprehensive and designing experiments in automation based on scientific…

  5. 78 FR 12422 - Health Services Research and Development Service Scientific Merit Review Board, Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-22

    ... AFFAIRS Health Services Research and Development Service Scientific Merit Review Board, Notice of Meeting... States Code Appendix 2, that the Health Services Research and Development Service Scientific Merit Review... Services Research (HSR) subcommittees and its Nursing Research Initiative (NRI) subcommittee. The HSR...

  6. 7 CFR 3400.21 - Scientific peer review for research activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Scientific peer review for research activities. 3400... STATE RESEARCH, EDUCATION, AND EXTENSION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SPECIAL RESEARCH GRANTS PROGRAM Peer and Merit Review Arranged by Grantees § 3400.21 Scientific peer review for research...

  7. A Critique for the Methodology of Scientific Research Programmes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Naji

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the paper is to evaluate of Imre Lakatos' MSRP (Methodology of Scientific Research Programs. Presenting the methodology which is based on Popperian Refutationism, Lakatos intended to overcome Pluralism (, Relativism and Skepticism and distinguishes the best theory (/program in science. The question is that did the lakatos' secondary change in the form and content of MSRP -against some historical facts and criticisms- make some serious deficiencies in his methodology? The answer to this question is positive. One of Lakatos' changes in MSRP is to resort to a new concept of "rationality". Presenting a logical analysis, the paper shows that this change causes MSRP to be unable to distinguish the best program among others. Furthermore he gives a new definition of the term 'methodology'. This definition, in its turn, makes MSRP main task to be inactive.Showing the irreparable harms Lakatos' changes produce in MSRP, the paper shows that these changes not only cannot get rid of the deficiencies therein, but it is also unable to meet lakatos' original purpose for MSRP.

  8. Dynamic recrystallization--scientific curiosity or industrial tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonas, J.J. (Department of Metallurgical Engineering, McGill University, 3450 University Street, Montreal, Que. H3A 2A7 (Canada))

    1994-08-15

    Rolling processes are categorized by the lengths of their interpass times: those that involve interpass intervals significantly longer than 1 s (e.g. reversing mills) are particularly suitable for conventional controlled rolling or recrystallization-controlled rolling; by contrast, those involving interpass times of 15-100 ms or more (e.g. the finishing trains of tandem mills) are shown to be suitable for dynamic or metadynamic recrystallization-controlled rolling. This distinction relies on the minimum time required to permit strain-induced precipitation, the occurrence of which inhibits both static and dynamic recrystallization. The effect of metadynamic recrystallization on the austenite grain size and on the retained strain is described. Examples are given of industrial processes in which dynamic recrystallization can play an important role. These include the stretch-reducing mill for the finishing of seamless tubes, the finishing stages of rod rolling, and the finishing of microalloyed steels in hot-strip mills. The practical consequences of dynamic recrystallization on the microstructures produced by these operations and on the modelling of rolling load are also described. ((orig.))

  9. Variation in the Interpretation of Scientific Integrity in Community-based Participatory Health Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer Diaz, Anne E.; Spears Johnson, Chaya R.; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    Community-based participatory research (CBPR) has become essential in health disparities and environmental justice research; however, the scientific integrity of CBPR projects has become a concern. Some concerns, such as appropriate research training, lack of access to resources and finances, have been discussed as possibly limiting the scientific integrity of a project. Prior to understanding what threatens scientific integrity in CBPR, it is vital to understand what scientific integrity means for the professional and community investigators who are involved in CBPR. This analysis explores the interpretation of scientific integrity in CBPR among 74 professional and community research team members from of 25 CBPR projects in nine states in the southeastern United States in 2012. It describes the basic definition for scientific integrity and then explores variations in the interpretation of scientific integrity in CBPR. Variations in the interpretations were associated with team member identity as professional or community investigators. Professional investigators understood scientific integrity in CBPR as either conceptually or logistically flexible, as challenging to balance with community needs, or no different than traditional scientific integrity. Community investigators interpret other factors as important in scientific integrity, such as trust, accountability, and overall benefit to the community. This research demonstrates that the variations in the interpretation of scientific integrity in CBPR call for a new definition of scientific integrity in CBPR that takes into account the understanding and needs of all investigators. PMID:24161098

  10. Variation in the interpretation of scientific integrity in community-based participatory health research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer Diaz, Anne E; Spears Johnson, Chaya R; Arcury, Thomas A

    2013-11-01

    Community-based participatory research (CBPR) has become essential in health disparities and environmental justice research; however, the scientific integrity of CBPR projects has become a concern. Some concerns, such as appropriate research training, lack of access to resources and finances, have been discussed as possibly limiting the scientific integrity of a project. Prior to understanding what threatens scientific integrity in CBPR, it is vital to understand what scientific integrity means for the professional and community investigators who are involved in CBPR. This analysis explores the interpretation of scientific integrity in CBPR among 74 professional and community research team members from of 25 CBPR projects in nine states in the southeastern United States in 2012. It describes the basic definition for scientific integrity and then explores variations in the interpretation of scientific integrity in CBPR. Variations in the interpretations were associated with team member identity as professional or community investigators. Professional investigators understood scientific integrity in CBPR as either conceptually or logistically flexible, as challenging to balance with community needs, or no different than traditional scientific integrity. Community investigators interpret other factors as important in scientific integrity, such as trust, accountability, and overall benefit to the community. This research demonstrates that the variations in the interpretation of scientific integrity in CBPR call for a new definition of scientific integrity in CBPR that takes into account the understanding and needs of all investigators.

  11. Scientific Articles, Types of Scientific Research and Productivity in Health Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Víctor Patricio Díaz-Narváez; Aracelis Calzadilla Núñez

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe different types of useful research and its importance in the formative research, research training and research itself in health sciences. It is stated that one of the sources of these rejections could be because the authors did not resolve correctly, from a methodological point of view, the concatenation between the research types, research designs, the type of problems inherent to these types and research designs; objectives and methods should be propose...

  12. One exhibition, many goals. Combining scientific research and risk communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charrière, Marie; Bogaard, Thom; Junier, Sandra; Malet, Jean-Philippe; Mostert, Erik

    2015-04-01

    How effective is visual communication to increase awareness of natural hazards and risks? To answer this research question, we developed a research design that was at the same time an experimental setting and an actual communication effort. Throughout the full length of the 2-years project held in the Ubaye valley (southeastern France), we collaborated with local and regional stakeholders (politicians and technicians). During a consultation phase, the communication context was determined, the audience of the project was defined and finally the testing activity-communication effort was determined. We were offered the opportunity to design an exhibition for the local public library. In a consultation phase that corresponded to the design of the exhibition, the stakeholders contributed to its content as well as helping with the funding of the exhibition. Finally, during the experimentation phase, the stakeholders participated in advertising the activity, gathering of participants and designing the scientific survey. In order to assess the effects of the exhibition on risk awareness, several groups of children, teenagers and adults were submitted to a research design, consisting of 1) a pre-test, 2) the visit of the exhibition and 3) a post-test similar to the pre-test. In addition, the children answered a second post-test 3 months after the visit. Close ended questions addressed the awareness indicators mentioned in the literature, i.e. worry level, previous experiences with natural hazards events, exposure to awareness raising, ability to mitigate/respond/prepare, attitude to risk, and demographics. In addition, the post-test included several satisfaction questions concerning the visual tools displayed in the exhibition. A statistical analysis of the changes between the pre- and post- tests (paired t-test, Wilcoxon signed-rank test and bootstrapping) allowed to verify whether the exhibition had an impact on risk awareness or not. In order to deduce which variable

  13. Improving Scientific Research for the GEO Geohazard Supersites through a Virtual Research Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvi, S.; Trasatti, E.; Rubbia, G.; Romaniello, V.; Spinetti, C.; Corradini, S.; Merucci, L.

    2016-12-01

    The EU's H2020 EVER-EST Project is dedicated to the realization of a Virtual Research Environment (VRE) for Earth Science researchers, during 2015-2018. EVER-EST implements state-of-the-art technologies in the area of Earth Science data catalogues, data access/processing and long-term data preservation together with models, techniques and tools for the computational methods, such as scientific workflows. The VRE is designed with the aim of providing the Earth Science user community with an innovative virtual environment to enhance their ability to interoperate and share knowledge and experience, exploiting also the Research Object concept. The GEO Geohazard Supersites is one of the four Research Communities chosen to validate the e-infrastructure. EVER-EST will help the exploitation of the full potential of the GEO Geohazard Supersite and Natural Laboratories (GSNL) initiative demonstrating the use case in the Permanent Supersites of Mt Etna, Campi Flegrei-Vesuvius, and Icelandic volcanoes. Besides providing tools for active volcanoes monitoring and studies, we intend to demonstrate how a more organized and collaborative research environment, such as a VRE, can improve the quality of the scientific research on the Geohazard Supersites, addressing at the same time the problem of the slow uptake of scientific research findings in Disaster Risk Management. Presently, the full exploitation of the in situ and satellite data made available for each Supersite is delayed by the difficult access (especially for researchers in developing countries) to intensive processing and modeling capabilities. EVER-EST is designed to provide these means and also a friendly virtual environment for the easy transfer of scientific knowledge as soon as it is acquired, promoting collaboration among researchers located in distant regions of the world. A further benefit will be to increase the societal impact of the scientific advancements obtained in the Supersites, allowing a more uniform

  14. Ports Primer: 8.1 Using Scientific Data and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Communities can demonstrate environmental concerns by providing scientific evidence of environmental impact. Communities may be able to access existing local data and conduct their own analyses or communities may turn to existing studies.

  15. Evolution of NASA Scientific Ballooning and Particle Astrophysics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, William Vernon

    2017-01-01

    Particle astrophysics research has a history in ballooning that spans over 100 years, ever since Victor Hess discovered cosmic rays on a manned balloon in 1912. The NASA Particle Astrophysics Program currently covers the origin, acceleration and transport of Galactic cosmic rays, plus the Nature of Dark Matter and Ultrahigh Energy Neutrinos. Progress in each of these topics has come from sophisticated instrumentation flown on Long Duration Balloon (LDB) flights around Antarctica for more than two decades. Super Pressure Balloons (SPB) and International Space Station (ISS) platforms are emerging opportunities that promise major steps forward for these and other objectives. NASA has continued development and qualification flights leading to SPB flights capable of supporting 1000 kg science instruments to 33 km for upwards of hundred day missions, with plans for increasing the altitude to 38 km. This goal is even more important now, in view of the Astro2010 Decadal Study recommendation that NASA should support Ultra-Long Duration Balloon (ULDB) flight development for studies of particle astrophysics, cosmology and indirect detection of dark matter. The mid-latitude test flight of an 18.8 MCF SPB launched from Wanaka, NZ in 2015 achieved 32 days of nearly constant altitude exposure, and an identical SPB launched from Wanaka in 2016 with a science payload flew for 46 days. Scientific ballooning as a vital infrastructure component for cosmic ray and general astrophysics investigations, including training for young scientists, graduate and undergraduate students, leading up to the 2020 Decadal Study and beyond, will be presented and discussed.

  16. 77 FR 9731 - Rehabilitation Research and Development Service Scientific Merit Review Board; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-17

    ... Injury: Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and Stroke; Musculoskeletal/Orthopedic Rehabilitation; Psychological... research and development applications and advise the Director, Rehabilitation Research and Development... AFFAIRS Rehabilitation Research and Development Service Scientific Merit Review Board; Notice of Meeting...

  17. On the formalization and reuse of scientific research

    OpenAIRE

    King, R. D.

    2011-01-01

    Copyright © 2011 The Royal Society. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. The reuse of scientific knowledge obtained from one investigation in another investigation is basic to the advance of science. Scientific investigations should therefore be recorded in ways that promote the reuse of the knowledge ...

  18. Making Sense of the Evolution of a Scientific Domain: A Visual Analytic Study of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Research

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Chaomei; Vogeley, Michael S; 10.1007/s11192-009-0123-x

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a new visual analytic approach to the study of scientific discoveries and knowledge diffusion. Our approach enhances contemporary co-citation network analysis by enabling analysts to identify co-citation clusters of cited references intuitively, synthesize thematic contexts in which these clusters are cited, and trace how research focus evolves over time. The new approach integrates and streamlines a few previously isolated techniques such as spectral clustering and feature selection algorithms. The integrative procedure is expected to empower and strengthen analytical and sense making capabilities of scientists, learners, and researchers to understand the dynamics of the evolution of scientific domains in a wide range of scientific fields, science studies, and science policy evaluation and planning. We demonstrate the potential of our approach through a visual analysis of the evolution of astronomical research associated with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) using bibliographic data between 1...

  19. Research on Evaluation of Chinese Students' Competence in Written Scientific Argumentation in the Context of Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yang; Wang, Houxiong

    2017-01-01

    Attending to practice has become a significant topic in science education today. As scientific argumentation is a typical form of scientific practice as well as an important educational practice, more and more attention has been paid to it by science education researchers. Evaluating students' competence in scientific argumentation is one of the…

  20. Individual and Institutional Liability of Researchers in the Case of Scientific Fraud: Values and Ethics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baier, Eric; Dupraz, Laure

    2007-01-01

    How have university institutions generally tackled the fight against scientific fraud? We intend to throw light on the very process of public disclosure of scientific fraud, as it has transformed in the last 30 years within the framework of scientific research institutions. By focusing our analysis on the "denunciation process", we intend to refer…

  1. 校长在学校科研工作中的作用%The role of headmaster in the school scientific research work

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王兴荣

    2012-01-01

      在学校科研工作中,校长要拓宽教育视野,增强科研意识;掌握教改动态,明确课题目标;加大科研课题的管理力度;重视科研队伍建设;注重教育科研的效益;适时地推广教师的教研成果。%  In school scientific research work, the headmaster should widen educational view, enhance the consciousness of scientific research;master the teaching dynamic, explicit subject goal;increase the scientific research management;pay attention to scientific research team building;focus on education and scientific research benefit;to promote teachers' teaching and research achievements.

  2. 75 FR 5288 - Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program, Scientific Advisory Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-02

    ... of the Secretary Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program, Scientific Advisory Board... section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463). The Scientific Advisory Board will meet on March 2-4, 2010, to review new start research requesting Strategic Environmental Research...

  3. 78 FR 9455 - Rehabilitation Research and Development Service Scientific Merit Review Board, Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-08

    ... AFFAIRS Rehabilitation Research and Development Service Scientific Merit Review Board, Notice of Meeting.... App. 2, that the subcommittees of the Rehabilitation Research and Development Service Scientific Merit... February 26-28, *VA Central Office. Program and Research Career 2013. Scientists. Spinal Cord Injury...

  4. 78 FR 6854 - Health Services Research and Development Service Scientific Merit Review Board; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-31

    ... AFFAIRS Health Services Research and Development Service Scientific Merit Review Board; Notice of Meeting..., Program Manager, Scientific Merit Review Board, Department of Veterans Affairs, Health Services Research.... App. 2, that the Centers of Innovation subcommittee of the Health Services Research and Development...

  5. 76 FR 5650 - Rehabilitation Research and Development Service Scientific Merit Review Board; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    ... AFFAIRS Rehabilitation Research and Development Service Scientific Merit Review Board; Notice of Meeting... Committee Act) that a meeting of the Rehabilitation Research and Development Service Scientific Merit Review... Program. The purpose of the Board is to review rehabilitation research and development applications and...

  6. Nanotechnology in Europe: scientific trends and organizational dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malsch, Ineke

    1999-03-01

    We give evidence on how closely different areas of research in the nanometre range are integrated and on what established and new networks and research programmes at EU level may contribute to the further development of the nanosciences. A Delphi study, participant observation, interviews and informal contacts form the basis of this empirical and sociological study. The analysis shows that the invention of scanning probe techniques and other nanotools is entering a variety of areas of research, which are largely unrelated. The EU networks and research programmes present in the selection environment stimulate the emergence of nanotechnology as one among several technologies which use nanotools, are based on nanometre-long structures and utilize properties which can only be made at a nanoscale.

  7. Scientific and technical photography at NASA Langley Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidhazy, Andrew

    1994-12-01

    As part of my assignment connected with the Scientific and Technical Photography & Lab (STPL) at the NASA Langley Research Center I conducted a series of interviews and observed the day to day operations of the STPL with the ultimate objective of becoming exposed first hand to a scientific and technical photo/imaging department for which my school prepares its graduates. I was also asked to share my observations with the staff in order that these comments and observations might assist the STPL to better serve its customers. Meetings with several individuals responsible for various wind tunnels and with a group that provides photo-optical instrumentation services at the Center gave me an overview of the services provided by the Lab and possible areas for development. In summary form these are some of the observations that resulted from the interviews and daily contact with the STPL facility. (1) The STPL is perceived as a valuable and almost indispensable service group within the organization. This comment was invariably made by everyone. Everyone also seemed to support the idea that the STPL continue to provide its current level of service and quality. (2) The STPL generally is not perceived to be a highly technically oriented group but rather as a provider of high quality photographic illustration and documentation services. In spite of the importance and high marks assigned to the STPL there are several observations that merit consideration and evaluation for possible inclusion into the STPL's scope of expertise and future operating practices. (1) While the care and concern for artistic rendition of subjects is seen as laudable and sometimes valuable, the time that this often requires is seen as interfering with keeping the tunnels operating at maximum productivity. Tunnel managers would like to shorten down-time due to photography, have services available during evening hours and on short notice. It may be of interest to the STPL that tunnel managers are

  8. Discussions about Management of Scientific Research Projects in Agricultural Research Institutes: A Case Study of EPPI of CATAS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoqiang; CHU; Hanchun; QIN; Guoyan; SHAN; Peiqun; LIN; Guixiu; HUANG

    2015-01-01

    Taking Environment and Plant Protection Institute in Chinese Academy of Tropical Agricultural Sciences as an example,it summarized major experience and practice in management of scientific research projects from strengthening project database,enhancing project planning,reinforcing scientific research management team construction,bringing into play functions of academies and institutes,and improving management system. It analyzed existing problems and came up with recommendations from strengthening project process management,improving management team quality,and improving incentive mechanism,in the hope of providing reference for scientific research project management in agricultural scientific research institutes.

  9. 30 CFR 280.21 - What must I do in conducting G&G prospecting or scientific research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... scientific research? 280.21 Section 280.21 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... prospecting or scientific research? While conducting G&G prospecting or scientific research activities under a... you are prospecting or conducting scientific research activities. (b) Consult and coordinate your G&G...

  10. Constitutional restraints on the regulations of scientific speech and scientific research: commentary on "Democracy, individual rights and the regulation of science".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Robert

    2009-09-01

    The question of what constitutional constraints should apply to government efforts to regulate scientific speech is frequently contrasted to the question of what constitutional constraints should apply to government efforts to regulate scientific research. This comment argues that neither question is well formulated for constitutional analysis, which should instead turn on the relationship to constitutional values of specific acts of scientific speech and research.

  11. Research networks and scientific production in Economics: The recent Spanish Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente Royuela

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies Spanish scientific production in Economics from 1994 to 2004. It focuses on aspects that have received little attention in other bibliometric studies, such as the impact of research and the role of scientific collaborations in the publications produced by Spanish universities. Our results show that national research networks have played a fundamental role in the increase in Spanish scientific production in this discipline. The outcome of this research is an invitation to universities in developing countries to encourage and stimulate the practice of academic co-authorships since they increase the level, quality, impact and diffusion of scientific production.

  12. A model of scientific attitudes assessment by observation in physics learning based scientific approach: case study of dynamic fluid topic in high school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusliana Ekawati, Elvin

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to produce a model of scientific attitude assessment in terms of the observations for physics learning based scientific approach (case study of dynamic fluid topic in high school). Development of instruments in this study adaptation of the Plomp model, the procedure includes the initial investigation, design, construction, testing, evaluation and revision. The test is done in Surakarta, so that the data obtained are analyzed using Aiken formula to determine the validity of the content of the instrument, Cronbach’s alpha to determine the reliability of the instrument, and construct validity using confirmatory factor analysis with LISREL 8.50 program. The results of this research were conceptual models, instruments and guidelines on scientific attitudes assessment by observation. The construct assessment instruments include components of curiosity, objectivity, suspended judgment, open-mindedness, honesty and perseverance. The construct validity of instruments has been qualified (rated load factor > 0.3). The reliability of the model is quite good with the Alpha value 0.899 (> 0.7). The test showed that the model fits the theoretical models are supported by empirical data, namely p-value 0.315 (≥ 0.05), RMSEA 0.027 (≤ 0.08)

  13. How Might Research Inform Scientific Literacy in Schools?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Edgar

    2010-01-01

    Scientific literacy is now seen as an essential component of informed citizenship and a key curriculum goal in many parts of the world. The relevant literature is vast and replete with a variety of definitions, descriptions, prescriptions, slogans and theoretical perspectives. It addresses not only formal education but also fields as diverse as…

  14. CPTAC Scientific Symposium Highlights - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The first CPTAC Public Scientific Symposium was recently held on November 13, 2013 at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, MD. The symposium brought together a record number of registrants, 450 scientists, who shared and discussed novel biological discoveries, analytical methods, and translational approaches using CPTAC data.

  15. It's Theories All the Way Down: A Response to Scientific Research in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, James Paul

    2005-01-01

    This article considers the six principles that the National Research Council's report Scientific Research in Education claims define an enterprise as scientific. I argue that these principles are relatively vacuous generalities because one cannot determine anything about any of them from outside specific theories of specific domains (and domains…

  16. Learning from the Mistakes of Others: A Look at Scientific Misconduct in Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibelman, Margaret; Gelman, Sheldon R.

    2001-01-01

    Examines the issue of scientific misconduct and its implications for training social work researchers. Analyzes cases in which violation of legal and ethical research standards have occurred. Explores implications for faculty and curriculum development, and makes recommendations for the prevention and resolution of scientific misconduct in social…

  17. Pre-Service Science Teachers' Perception of the Principles of Scientific Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can, Sendil; Kaymakci, Güliz

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the current study employing the survey method is to determine the pre-service science teachers' perceptions of the principles of scientific research and to investigate the effects of gender, grade level and the state of following scientific publications on their perceptions. The sampling of the current research is comprised of 125…

  18. 76 FR 59407 - Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research Report of Scientific and Medical Literature and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-26

    ... ``Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research Report of Scientific and Medical Literature and Information... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research Report of Scientific and Medical Literature and Information on Non-Standardized Allergenic Extracts in the Diagnosis...

  19. Bioremediation of polluted wasewaterwater influent: phiosphorus and nitrogen removal. Scientific Research and Essays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muchie, Mammo; Akpor, OB

    2010-01-01

    Akpor OB and Muchie M. (2010). Bioremediation of polluted wasewaterwater influent: phiosphorus and nitrogen removal. Scientific Research and Essays, Vol. 5(21), pp. 3222–3230......Akpor OB and Muchie M. (2010). Bioremediation of polluted wasewaterwater influent: phiosphorus and nitrogen removal. Scientific Research and Essays, Vol. 5(21), pp. 3222–3230...

  20. Bioremediation of polluted wasewaterwater influent: phiosphorus and nitrogen removal. Scientific Research and Essays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muchie, Mammo; Akpor, OB

    2010-01-01

    Akpor OB and Muchie M. (2010). Bioremediation of polluted wasewaterwater influent: phiosphorus and nitrogen removal. Scientific Research and Essays, Vol. 5(21), pp. 3222–3230......Akpor OB and Muchie M. (2010). Bioremediation of polluted wasewaterwater influent: phiosphorus and nitrogen removal. Scientific Research and Essays, Vol. 5(21), pp. 3222–3230...

  1. 78 FR 70102 - Clinical Science Research and Development Service Cooperative Studies; Scientific Evaluation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-22

    ... AFFAIRS Clinical Science Research and Development Service Cooperative Studies; Scientific Evaluation... Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. 2, that the Clinical Science Research and Development Service Cooperative Studies Scientific Evaluation Committee will hold a meeting on December 12, 2013, at the...

  2. 76 FR 65781 - Clinical Science Research and Development Service Cooperative Studies Scientific Evaluation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-24

    ... AFFAIRS Clinical Science Research and Development Service Cooperative Studies Scientific Evaluation... (Federal Advisory Committee Act) that a meeting of the Clinical Science Research and Development Service Cooperative Studies Scientific Evaluation Committee will be held on November 9-10, 2011, at The Residence...

  3. 78 FR 53015 - Clinical Science Research and Development Service Cooperative Studies Scientific Evaluation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-27

    ... AFFAIRS Clinical Science Research and Development Service Cooperative Studies Scientific Evaluation... Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. 2, that the Clinical Science Research and Development Service Cooperative Studies Scientific Evaluation Committee will hold a meeting on September 18, 2013, at 131 M Street...

  4. 78 FR 41198 - Clinical Science Research and Development Service Cooperative Studies Scientific Evaluation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-09

    ... AFFAIRS Clinical Science Research and Development Service Cooperative Studies Scientific Evaluation... Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. 2, that the Clinical Science Research and Development Service Cooperative Studies Scientific Evaluation Committee will hold a meeting on July 10, 2013, at 131 M Street...

  5. 77 FR 31072 - Clinical Science Research and Development Service Cooperative Studies Scientific Evaluation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-24

    ... AFFAIRS Clinical Science Research and Development Service Cooperative Studies Scientific Evaluation... (Federal Advisory Committee Act) that a meeting of the Clinical Science Research and Development Service Cooperative Studies Scientific Evaluation Committee will be held on July 12, 2012, at the Sheraton Suites...

  6. 76 FR 73781 - Clinical Science Research and Development Service; Cooperative Studies Scientific Evaluation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-29

    ... AFFAIRS Clinical Science Research and Development Service; Cooperative Studies Scientific Evaluation... (Federal Advisory Committee Act) that a meeting of the Clinical Science Research and Development Service Cooperative Studies Scientific Evaluation Committee will be held on December 20, 2011, at the Hamilton...

  7. 27 CFR 19.71 - Experimental or research operations by scientific institutions and colleges of learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Experimental or research operations by scientific institutions and colleges of learning. (a) General. The... scientific research to produce, receive, blend, treat, test, and store spirits, without payment of tax, for... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Experimental or...

  8. 76 FR 19189 - Clinical Science Research and Development Service Cooperative Studies Scientific Evaluation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-06

    ... AFFAIRS Clinical Science Research and Development Service Cooperative Studies Scientific Evaluation... (Federal Advisory Committee Act) that a meeting of the Clinical Science Research and Development Service Cooperative Studies Scientific Evaluation Committee will be held on April 25, 2011, at The Ritz-Carlton...

  9. 78 FR 50144 - Health Services Research and Development Service, Scientific Merit Review Board; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-16

    ... AFFAIRS Health Services Research and Development Service, Scientific Merit Review Board; Notice of Meeting.... App. 2, that the Health Services Research and Development Service (HSR&D) Scientific Merit Review..., Washington, DC; HSR 7--Aging and Diminished Capacity in the Context of Aging on Tuesday, August 27, 2013,...

  10. Scientific and technical photography at NASA Langley Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidhazy, Andrew

    1994-01-01

    As part of my assignment connected with the Scientific and Technical Photography & Lab (STPL) at the NASA Langley Research Center I conducted a series of interviews and observed the day to day operations of the STPL with the ultimate objective of becoming exposed first hand to a scientific and technical photo/imaging department for which my school prepares its graduates. I was also asked to share my observations with the staff in order that these comments and observations might assist the STPL to better serve its customers. Meetings with several individuals responsible for various wind tunnels and with a group that provides photo-optical instrumentation services at the Center gave me an overview of the services provided by the Lab and possible areas for development. In summary form these are some of the observations that resulted from the interviews and daily contact with the STPL facility. (1) The STPL is perceived as a valuable and almost indispensable service group within the organization. This comment was invariably made by everyone. Everyone also seemed to support the idea that the STPL continue to provide its current level of service and quality. (2) The STPL generally is not perceived to be a highly technically oriented group but rather as a provider of high quality photographic illustration and documentation services. In spite of the importance and high marks assigned to the STPL there are several observations that merit consideration and evaluation for possible inclusion into the STPL's scope of expertise and future operating practices. (1) While the care and concern for artistic rendition of subjects is seen as laudable and sometimes valuable, the time that this often requires is seen as interfering with keeping the tunnels operating at maximum productivity. Tunnel managers would like to shorten down-time due to photography, have services available during evening hours and on short notice. It may be of interest to the STPL that tunnel managers are

  11. 77 FR 40412 - Rehabilitation Research and Development Service Scientific Merit Review Board, Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-09

    ... Injury: Traumatic Brain Injury and Stroke; Musculoskeletal/Orthopedic Rehabilitation; and Psychological... and development applications and advise the Director, Rehabilitation Research and Development Service... AFFAIRS Rehabilitation Research and Development Service Scientific Merit Review Board, Notice of Meeting...

  12. Scientific media education in the classroom and beyond: a research agenda for the next decade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Grace; Norris, Stephen P.

    2016-03-01

    Scientific media education is the ability to draw on a knowledge of the media and science, in order to choose, understand, evaluate, and respond to representations of science across diverse media genres. We begin this manuscript by reviewing research that shows scientific media education is one of the most important content areas that could be taught in and out of the science classroom. We then set out to identify a research agenda that will help make scientific media education a key content area in both formal and informal science learning environments. In particular, we identified research avenues that will allow us to better understand: (1) limitations in current practices of scientific media education; (2) what scientific media education should look like in the future; and (3) ways we might overcome barriers to implementing a new and improved scientific media education.

  13. Dinâmica de distribuição de fontes de capitais científicos entre docentes / pesquisadores de um programa de pós- graduação Stricto- Sensu de uma universidade pública Dynamics of distribution of sources of scientific capital among teachers / researchers of a Master's and Doctorate's degree program of a public university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Cristina Teixeira

    2012-03-01

    as publications and academic contributions to the field of knowledge and institutional scientific capital (as occupying the positions that give them the power of decision within the field of science. Bourdieu's approach (2003, 2004a; 2004b about the scientific field was considered, because it allows us to apprehend the dynamics of capital distribution, which represents specific types of power. The approach was quantitative and qualitative, using documentary research in the curriculum Lattes of twenty- three teachers participating of the program, which is located in a city in Minas Gerais (Brazil and belongs to the area of Applied Social Sciences. As main results, the dynamics demonstrates (1 that mostly teachers occupy median positions within the distribution of capital, (2 it's difficult to accumulate both types of capital, (3 there isn't a polarization among teachers that have a strong accumulation of one kind of capital, and weak accumulation of the other capital, and (4 it's easier to convert institutional capital into pure scientific capital.

  14. Discussions about Management of Scientific Research Projects in Agricultural Research Institutes: A Case Study of EPPI of CATAS

    OpenAIRE

    CHU, Xiaoqiang; Qin, Hanchun; SHAN, Guoyan; LIN, Peiqun; Huang, Guixiu

    2015-01-01

    Taking Environment and Plant Protection Institute in Chinese Academy of Tropical Agricultural Sciences as an example, it summarized major experience and practice in management of scientific research projects from strengthening project database, enhancing project planning, reinforcing scientific research management team construction, bringing into play functions of academies and institutes, and improving management system. It analyzed existing problems and came up with recommendations from str...

  15. Research on Visualization in Scientific Computation of Grinding Temperature Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The paper introduces the concepts, classification and method of visualization in scientific computation. Visual C++ developing tool is used to compute surface grinding forces and grinding temperature field models. The three-dimensional entity model of workpiece is made with OpenGL tool, and the different colors on the workpiece entity show different value of temperature, so the visualization of grinding temperature field is realized. The temperature value of every points in grinding temperature field, the c...

  16. Scaling Phenomena in the Growth Dynamics of Scientific Output

    CERN Document Server

    Matia, K; Luwel, M; Moed, H F; Stanley, H E; Matia, Kaushik; Amaral, Luis A. Nunes; Luwel, Marc; Moed, Henk. F.

    2005-01-01

    We analyze a set of three databases at different levels of aggregation (i) a database of approximately $10^6$ publications of 247 countries in the period between 1980--2001. (ii) A database of 508 academic institutions from European Union (EU) and 408 institutes from USA in the 11 year period between during 1991--2001. (iii) A database comprising of 2330 Flemish authors in the period 1980--2000. At all levels of aggregation we find that the mean annual growth rates of publications is independent of the number of publications of the various units involved. We also find that the standard deviation of the distribution of annual growth rates decays with the number of publications as a power law with exponent $\\approx 0.3$. These findings are consistent with those of recent studies of systems such as the size of R&D funding budgets of countries, the research publication volumes of US universities, and the size of business firms.

  17. Social sciences, scientific research, higher education and social developments - An Albanian inside of dialectics and structured scientific research, in social sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada Kallçiu

    2013-01-01

    At first this will involve the policy makers at the central level, like the Ministry of Education and Sciences and the main research actors in the public and in the private sector. The criteria of the geographical and the subjects coverage has been also used in order to be able to present a public institutions of the higher education and research but even the enterprises that act in the research area are mainly focusing to the integration of these two systems which have been working separately for a long period of time and that must become efficient in order to adapt to the conditions of a country that has limited financial resources. This article is intended to provide a comprehensive overview of the scientific research in Albania, focusing in defining the priority areas for the research in social sciences. The information about the higher education and the potential problems that it faces, is based on a big number of research institutions, selected based on their involvement in scientific research in social sciences. This article brings into evidence the fact that in order to establish a stable and effective infrastructure in scientific research in Albania, is important to work in different directions. A successful way to increase the efficasity through the elements of the “innovative system” is by working with organizations that work in specific sectors of the economy, aiming for a possible cooperation in scientific search, for an important social contribution.

  18. Pursuing Scientific Excellence Globally: Internationalising Research as a Policy Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasthiotakis, Helen; Sigurdson, Kristjan; Sá, Creso M.

    2013-01-01

    International collaboration is a rapidly growing aspect of university research and a priority of research funding agencies. This article investigates the rationales that underlie Canadian federal research councils' support of international research collaborations. Such support has deep roots in Canadian science and technology policy but has taken…

  19. Scientific Self-Regulation: A Brief Primer for Research Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Timothy N.

    2005-01-01

    The National Academies of Science recently recommended a battery of guidelines for Academe to create an "environment" conducive to the responsible conduct of research. These guidelines affect the research administration field as a whole, as research administrators will be expected to assist in these changes. Research administrators,…

  20. Patient and public perspectives shaping scientific and medical research: panels for data, discussions, and decisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver S

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Seilin Uhm1, Kristin Liabo1, Ruth Stewart1,2, Rebecca Rees1, Sandy Oliver11Social Science Research Unit, Institute of Education, University of London, London, UK; 2The Centre for Language and Culture, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South AfricaAbstract: This paper explores the role of patient panels for shaping research for health, scientific research about health and illness, and applied medical research. After examining the history and purposes of involving patients in discussions and decision making for research, it outlines the expertise and skills required if panels are to be successful. The paper also analyses existing guidance for panels that include patients. Panels benefit from the experiential knowledge of panel members, craft knowledge of panel facilitators, and organizational knowledge gained through previous experience of hosting panels. Guidance is available that addresses structures and resources (for panel funders and interpersonal communication and group dynamics (for panel members and facilitators. This guidance is most comprehensive when it has itself been developed by all these types of stakeholders.Keywords: public involvement, patient panels, expert panels, guidelines, guidance

  1. Paul Scherrer Institute Scientific and Technical Report 2000. Volume VI: Large Research Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foroughi, Fereydoun; Bercher, Renate; Buechli, Carmen; Zumkeller, Lotty [eds.

    2001-07-01

    The PSI Department Large Research Facilities (GFA) joins the efforts to provide an excellent research environment to Swiss and foreign research groups on the experimental facilities driven by our high intensity proton accelerator complex. Its divisions care for the running, maintenance and enhancement of the accelerator complex, the primary proton beamlines, the targets and the secondary beams as well as the neutron spallation source SINQ. The division for technical support and coordination provides for technical support to the research facility complementary to the basic logistic available from the department for logistics and marketing. Besides running the facilities, the staff of the department is also involved in theoretical and experimental research projects. Some of them address basic scientific questions mainly concerning the properties of micro- or nanostructured materials: experiments as well as large scale computer simulations of molecular dynamics were performed to investigate nonclassical materials properties. Others are related to improvements or extensions of the capabilities of our facilities. We also report on intriguing results from applications of the neutron capture radiography, the prompt gamma activation method and the isotope production facility at SINQ.

  2. Promoting and evaluating scientific rigour in qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillie, Lesley

    2015-07-15

    This article explores perspectives on qualitative research and the variety of views concerning rigour in the research process. Evaluating and ensuring the quality of research are essential considerations for practitioners who are appraising evidence to inform their practice or research. Several criteria and principles for evaluating quality in qualitative research are presented, recognising that their application in practice is influenced by the qualitative methodology used. The article examines a range of techniques that a qualitative researcher can use to promote rigour and apply it to practice.

  3. The Suborbital Research Association: Using Suborbital Platforms for Scientific and Student Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pletser, V.; Migeotte, P. F.; Legros, J. C.; Deneyer, B.; Caron, R.

    2016-10-01

    The Suborbital Research Association (SRA), created in Brussels in June 2013, seeks to raise the awareness of the scientific community to the possibilities for scientific and technological research purposes offered by long suborbital trajectories, yielding several minutes of continuous microgravity at an attractive cost. The SRA, which is open to all forms of cooperation, has set its objectives: " to encourage, to assist, to facilitate and to promote suborbital scientific research; to give the necessary assistance, within the possibilities of the Association, to the practical realization of fundamental and applied scientific research in the suborbital environment, independently and in a complementary manner to existing structures; to organize or to participate in the organization of promotion events of scientific research in suborbital flights to the general public, the youth and the students." The first on-going project of the SRA is to organize a first scientific flight with the XCOR Lynx suborbital spaceplane in 2016 or 2017 to perform scientific and student experiments. A SRA Selection Committee evaluated 17 experiment proposals from six European countries and recommended ten experiments for this first flight: five scientific and technological experiments from European Scientists, a historical promotional experiment, and four student experiments from Belgian secondary schools. Further flights will be organised as soon as possible. The paper presents the SRA and put in context the proposed use of suborbital platforms for microgravity research. The selected experiments are further introduced.

  4. The Scientific Research and the Problem of its Justification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Cárdenas

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to show the conflict that has to do with epistemic and methodological issues involved in Boyle/Spinoza discussion, which allows to appreciate how it should be reassessed, at least two things, in the growing natural science of the Seventeenth Century: i the preference of a hypothetical and practical knowledge instead of the mere pretence of an absolute certainty of the scientific knowledge. And ii the investigation of the nature demands a careful experimentation that stresses the development of some epistemological approaches and different method to those to which most modern philosophers were accustomed to.

  5. Scientific Applications of Optical Instruments to Materials Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witherow, William K.

    1997-01-01

    Microgravity is a unique environment for materials and biotechnology processing. Microgravity minimizes or eliminates some of the effects that occur in one g. This can lead to the production of new materials or crystal structures. It is important to understand the processes that create these new materials. Thus, experiments are designed so that optical data collection can take place during the formation of the material. This presentation will discuss scientific application of optical instruments at MSFC. These instruments include a near-field scanning optical microscope, a miniaturized holographic system, and a phase-shifting interferometer.

  6. Scientific Applications of Optical Instruments to Materials Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witherow, William K.

    1997-01-01

    Microgravity is a unique environment for materials and biotechnology processing. Microgravity minimizes or eliminates some of the effects that occur in one g. This can lead to the production of new materials or crystal structures. It is important to understand the processes that create these new materials. Thus, experiments are designed so that optical data collection can take place during the formation of the material. This presentation will discuss scientific application of optical instruments at MSFC. These instruments include a near-field scanning optical microscope, a miniaturized holographic system, and a phase-shifting interferometer.

  7. English as a scientific and research language debates and discourses

    CERN Document Server

    Plo Alastrué, Ramón

    2015-01-01

    This volume examines the role of English in academic and research settings in Europe and provides recommendations on the challenges posed by the dominance of English over national languages as languages of science and research dissemination; the need for language support for academics that need to disseminate their research in English; and the effect of past and present language policies.

  8. 南海大陆边缘动力学:科学实验与研究进展%Dynamics of the continental margins of South China Sea: scientific experiments and research progresses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李家彪

    2011-01-01

    Comprehensive geophysical survey, including the multi-channel seismic survey with long streamer and large air-gun source and the wide-angle refraction/reflection seismic survey of OBS, has been deployed in the southern margin and Southwest Sub-basin of the South China Sea for the first time. Based on the interpretation of these geophysical data, combined with studies on tectonic structure, geochemistry, and dynamic simulation, etc, our project worked out the dynamics of the continental margin in South China Sea. Major conclusions are as follows: Two sea-floor spreading events occurred in Cenozoic. The first episode happened between 33. 5 ~ 25 Ma, and after a 1. 5 Ma tectonic adjustment, started the second episode of sea-floor spreading between 23. 5~15. 5 Ma. In both episodes the South China Sea experienced propagation rifting and spreading from east to west, resulting in a structural framework featured with blocks innorth-south direction and segments in east-west direction; Cenozoic marginal basins in the northern and southern continental margins show different rift-terminated time, which correspond with the two episodic sea-floor spreading respectively. The continental crust of the South China Sea might have experienced depth-dependent stretching. The lower crust and top of upper mantle have been magnetized and no obvious velocity anomalies of the mantle have been found in oceanic basin. South China Sea margins are a kind of magma-poor rifting, although lower crustal bodies of high-velocity occur in the east of the northern margin, but without SDR. The origin and evolution of sediment basins on northern and southern continental margins are very distinct, and the hydrocarbon accumulations are distributed in a cirque with oil outside and gas inside. We believe that the hydrocarbon-bearing perspectives in southern continental marginal basins are superior to these northern continental marginal basins. In Mesozoic the northern and southern margin of the South

  9. Profile of scientific and technological production in nursing education research groups in the south of Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lino, Mônica Motta; Backes, Vânia Marli Schubert; Canever, Bruna Pedroso; Ferraz, Fabiane; Prado, Marta Lenise

    2010-01-01

    This research aimed to present the profile of production of Nursing Education Research Groups (NERG) scientific and technological production in the South of Brazil. This documentary, quantitative, exploratory-descriptive retrospective research was guided by the active search for products in the Lattes curriculum of previously selected NERG researchers, based on the 2006 Census of the Research Group Directory/CNPq, between 1995 and 2008. The results indicated that the 18 NERG from southern Brazil produced 453 papers in proceedings, 371 book chapters, 206 books, 1,437 scientific articles and 08 technological products, but no patent was registered. NERGs scientific production in the research region has grown progressively over the past 14 years. To strengthen this structure, the establishment of collaborative networks can be used as a strategy, so that political-scientific joint actions in the sector can advance science and technology.

  10. 1991 Annual report on scientific programs: A broad research program on the sciences of complexity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-31

    1991 was continued rapid growth for the Santa Fe Institute (SFI) as it broadened its interdisciplinary research into the organization, evolution and operation of complex systems and sought deeply the principles underlying their dynamic behavior. Research on complex systems--the focus of work at SFI--involves an extraordinary range of topics normally studied in seemingly disparate fields. Natural systems displaying complex behavior range upwards from proteins and DNA through cells and evolutionary systems to human societies. Research models exhibiting complexity include nonlinear equations, spin glasses, cellular automata, genetic algorithms, classifier systems, and an array of other computational models. Some of the major questions facing complex systems researchers are: (1) explaining how complexity arises from the nonlinear interaction of simples components, (2) describing the mechanisms underlying high-level aggregate behavior of complex systems (such as the overt behavior of an organism, the flow of energy in an ecology, the GNP of an economy), and (3) creating a theoretical framework to enable predictions about the likely behavior of such systems in various conditions. The importance of understanding such systems in enormous: many of the most serious challenges facing humanity--e.g., environmental sustainability, economic stability, the control of disease--as well as many of the hardest scientific questions--e.g., protein folding, the distinction between self and non-self in the immune system, the nature of intelligence, the origin of life--require deep understanding of complex systems.

  11. 1991 Annual report on scientific programs: A broad research program on the sciences of complexity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-01

    1991 was continued rapid growth for the Santa Fe Institute (SFI) as it broadened its interdisciplinary research into the organization, evolution and operation of complex systems and sought deeply the principles underlying their dynamic behavior. Research on complex systems--the focus of work at SFI--involves an extraordinary range of topics normally studied in seemingly disparate fields. Natural systems displaying complex behavior range upwards from proteins and DNA through cells and evolutionary systems to human societies. Research models exhibiting complexity include nonlinear equations, spin glasses, cellular automata, genetic algorithms, classifier systems, and an array of other computational models. Some of the major questions facing complex systems researchers are: (1) explaining how complexity arises from the nonlinear interaction of simples components, (2) describing the mechanisms underlying high-level aggregate behavior of complex systems (such as the overt behavior of an organism, the flow of energy in an ecology, the GNP of an economy), and (3) creating a theoretical framework to enable predictions about the likely behavior of such systems in various conditions. The importance of understanding such systems in enormous: many of the most serious challenges facing humanity--e.g., environmental sustainability, economic stability, the control of disease--as well as many of the hardest scientific questions--e.g., protein folding, the distinction between self and non-self in the immune system, the nature of intelligence, the origin of life--require deep understanding of complex systems.

  12. Study of the comprehension of the scientific method by members of a university health research laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlamaque-Neto, A C; Santos, G R; Lisbôa, L M; Goldim, J R; Machado, C L B; Matte, U; Giugliani, R

    2012-02-01

    In Brazil, scientific research is carried out mainly at universities, where professors coordinate research projects with the active participation of undergraduate and graduate students. However, there is no formal program for the teaching/learning of the scientific method. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the comprehension of the scientific method by students of health sciences who participate in scientific projects in an academic research laboratory. An observational descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted using Edgar Morin complexity as theoretical reference. In a semi-structured interview, students were asked to solve an abstract logical puzzle - TanGram. The collected data were analyzed using the hermeneutic-dialectic analysis method proposed by Minayo and discussed in terms of the theoretical reference of complexity. The students' concept of the scientific method is limited to participation in projects, stressing the execution of practical procedures as opposed to scientific thinking. The solving of the TanGram puzzle revealed that the students had difficulties in understanding questions and activities focused on subjects and their processes. Objective answers, even when dealing with personal issues, were also reflected on the students' opinions about the characteristics of a successful researcher. Students' difficulties concerning these issues may affect their scientific performance and result in poorly designed experiments. This is a preliminary study that should be extended to other centers of scientific research.

  13. Study of the comprehension of the scientific method by members of a university health research laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.C. Burlamaque-Neto

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In Brazil, scientific research is carried out mainly at universities, where professors coordinate research projects with the active participation of undergraduate and graduate students. However, there is no formal program for the teaching/learning of the scientific method. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the comprehension of the scientific method by students of health sciences who participate in scientific projects in an academic research laboratory. An observational descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted using Edgar Morin complexity as theoretical reference. In a semi-structured interview, students were asked to solve an abstract logical puzzle - TanGram. The collected data were analyzed using the hermeneutic-dialectic analysis method proposed by Minayo and discussed in terms of the theoretical reference of complexity. The students’ concept of the scientific method is limited to participation in projects, stressing the execution of practical procedures as opposed to scientific thinking. The solving of the TanGram puzzle revealed that the students had difficulties in understanding questions and activities focused on subjects and their processes. Objective answers, even when dealing with personal issues, were also reflected on the students’ opinions about the characteristics of a successful researcher. Students’ difficulties concerning these issues may affect their scientific performance and result in poorly designed experiments. This is a preliminary study that should be extended to other centers of scientific research.

  14. Scientific Articles on Magnetic Materials and Applications Research from 2006 - 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    March 2015 Final 01 October 2006 – 01 October 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE SCIENTIFIC ARTICLES ON MAGNETIC MATERIALS AND APPLICATIONS RESEARCH FROM... scientific and technical information exchange, and its publication does not constitute the Government’s approval or disapproval of its ideas or...unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES PA Case Number: 88ABW-2015-1932; Clearance Date: 15 Apr 2015. 14. ABSTRACT This program addresses basic scientific

  15. Analysis and Discussion about Quantitative Grading Standard for Salary Promotion of Agricultural Scientific Researchers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xingquan; ZOU; Jia; ZHANG; Chengxing; YAN; Mingjing; QING

    2013-01-01

    The existing performance salary system has several grades in the same job title. When the number of workers qualified for promotion is more than the target,quantitative grading is usually adopted to determine salary promotion personnel. Scientific,fair and reasonable grading content and standard directly concern income and remuneration of scientific researchers,and also concern recognition and respect degree of contribution made by scientific researchers. Therefore,quantitative grading standard is of the utmost importance to keeping stability,arousing enthusiasm and creativity of scientific researchers,and promoting smooth development of scientific research. Achievements awarded,papers published and project research can reflect scientific research level,ability and working performance of agricultural scientific researchers. This paper takes these three items as examples,analyzes,discusses and compares the establishment and evaluation of quantitative grading standard. It states that " one yardstick" and " one vote veto system" should be adhered to when evaluating using the quantitative grading standard. It is expected to provide reference for organizations of the same trade in establishing quantitative grading standard and conducting evaluation.

  16. Understanding the validity of data : a knowledge-based network underlying research expertise in scientific disciplines.

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    This article considers what might be taught to meet a widely held curriculum aim of students being able to understand research in a discipline. Expertise, which may appear as a ‘chain of practice’, is widely held to be underpinned by networks of understanding. Scientific research expertise is considered from this perspective. Within scientific disciplines, how research is conducted to solve different problems varies with concomitant effects on the validity of the data and the strengths of the...

  17. Analysis of the Actual Scientific Inquiries of Physicists I -- Focused on research motivation

    CERN Document Server

    Jang, J P K

    2005-01-01

    This study was investigated to understand the in-depth features and processes of physicists' scientific inquiries. At first, research motives were investigated by interviewing six physicists who were prominent worldwide. As a result, three main types - incompleteness, discovery, and conflict - and nine subtypes of research motivation, were identified. Six additional background factors were found which might affect the design and start of research. Based on these findings, implications for teaching scientific inquiries to students were discussed.

  18. Cloud-Enabled Scientific Collaborative Research Environment (CESCRE) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Provide a collaborative research environment to streamline software delivery and execution process. Integrate cloud computing with NASA science algorithms Improve...

  19. Publication, cooperation and productivity measures in scientific research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gauffriau, Marianne; Larsen, P.O.; Maye, I.

    2007-01-01

    The literature on publication counting demonstrates the use of various terminologies and methods. In many scientific publications, no information at all is given about the counting methods used. There is a lack of knowledge and agreement about the sort of information provided by the various methods......, about the theoretical and technical limitations for the different methods and about the size of the differences obtained by using various methods. The need for precise definitions and terminology has been expressed repeatedly but with no success. Counting methods for publications are defined...... and analysed with the use of set and measure theory. The analysis depends on definitions of basic units for analysis (three chosen for examination), objects of study (three chosen for examination) and score functions (five chosen for examination). The score functions define five classes of counting methods...

  20. Revisiting four scientific debates in ocean acidification research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Andersson

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, ocean acidification has gained continuously increasing attention from scientists and a number of stakeholders and has raised serious concerns about its effects on marine organisms and ecosystems. With the increase in interest, funding resources, and the number of scientific investigations focusing on this environmental problem, increasing amounts of data and results have been produced, and a progressively growing and more rigorous understanding of this problem has begun to develop. Nevertheless, there are still a number of scientific debates, and in some cases misconceptions, that keep reoccurring at a number of forums in various contexts. In this article, we revisit four of these topics that we think require further thoughtful consideration including: (1 surface seawater CO2 chemistry in shallow water coastal areas, (2 experimental manipulation of marine systems using CO2 gas or by acid addition, (3 net versus gross calcification and dissolution, and (4 CaCO3 mineral dissolution and seawater buffering. As a summation of these topics, we emphasize that: (1 many coastal environments experience seawater pCO2 that is significantly higher than expected from equilibrium with the atmosphere and is strongly linked to biological processes; (2 addition of acid, base or CO2 gas to seawater can all be useful techniques to manipulate seawater chemistry in ocean acidification experiments; (3 estimates of calcification or CaCO3 dissolution based on present techniques are measuring the net of gross calcification and dissolution; and (4 dissolution of metastable carbonate mineral phases will not produce sufficient alkalinity to buffer the pH and carbonate saturation state of shallow water environments on timescales of decades to hundreds of years to the extent that any potential negative effects on marine calcifiers will be avoided.

  1. Web of Science: showing a bug today that can mislead scientific research output's prediction

    CERN Document Server

    Batista, Pablo Diniz; Fauth, Leduc Hermeto de Almeida; Brandão, Marcia de Oliveira Reis

    2016-01-01

    As it happened in all domains of human activities, economic issues and the increase of people working in scientific research have altered the way scientific production is evaluated so as the objectives of performing the evaluation. Introduced in 2005 by J. E. Hirsch as an indicator able to measure individual scientific output not only in terms of quantity, but also in terms of quality, h index has spread throughout the world. In 2007, Hirsch proposed its adoption also as the best to predict future scientific achievement and, consequently, a useful guide for investments in research and for institutions when hiring members for their scientific staff. Since then, several authors have also been using the Thomson ISI Web of Science database to develop their proposals for evaluating research output. Here we show that a subtle flaw in Web of Science can inflate the results of info collected, therefore compromising the exactness and, consequently, the effectiveness of Hirsch's proposal and its variations

  2. Documentation in Evaluation Research: Managerial and Scientific Requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, William E.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The role of documentation in the planning and control functions of project management is reviewed. The importance of documentation in the assessment of research quality with respect to objectivity, validity, and replicability is discussed. An outline of documentation required in different phases of research projects is provided. (Author/DWH)

  3. ACADEMIC PARTNERSHIP AND GENERATION OF SCIENTIFIC KNOWLEDGE: THE CASE OF THE INTERNATIONAL NETWORK OF RESEARCHERS ON COMPETITIVENESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Guadalupe Vargas Hernández

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper has the objective to demonstrate the contributions achieved by the International Network of Researchers in Competitiveness (INRCO in academic collaboration and scientific knowledge generation. Part of the assumption sustaining that economic globalization processes, information and communication technologies revolution lead to the increasing environmental complexity and uncertainty of a knowledge society. One answer is the study and analysis of competitiveness considered as the strategy to achieve higher levels of economic growth and socio-cultural development in all micro, meso and macro levels. The method used is the analytic-deductive based on the evidence of related data with the activity and results in publications of the International Network of Researchers in Competitiveness. Consequently, it has been adapted certain speculative notions in a theoretical analysis exploring the social dynamics of the scientific activities. It is concluded that the management of the researchers’ dynamic network is capable to generate, apply and recycle the critical knowledge and the assets of academic and scientific talent through a dynamic combination of resources that have a position inside the formal e informal borders and between these borders of participant academics and institutions.

  4. Instant-On Scientific Data Warehouses: Lazy ETL for Data-Intensive Research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kargin, Y.; Pirk, H.; Ivanova, M.G.; Manegold, S.; Kersten, M.L.

    2012-01-01

    In the dawning era of data intensive research, scientific discovery deploys data analysis techniques similar to those that drive business intelligence. Similar to classical Extract, Transform and Load (ETL) processes, data is loaded entirely from external data sources (repositories) into a scientif

  5. Scientific Media Education in the Classroom and Beyond: A Research Agenda for the Next Decade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Grace; Norris, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    Scientific media education is the ability to draw on a knowledge of the media and science, in order to choose, understand, evaluate, and respond to representations of science across diverse media genres. We begin this manuscript by reviewing research that shows scientific media education is one of the most important content areas that could be…

  6. 78 FR 37242 - Draft Report and Recommendations Prepared by the Research Committee of the Scientific Working...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-20

    ... of Justice Programs Draft Report and Recommendations Prepared by the Research Committee of the Scientific Working Group on Medicolegal Death Investigation AGENCY: National Institute of Justice, DOJ..., the U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, National Institute of Justice, Scientific...

  7. Obstacles to Scientific Research in Light of a Number of Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algadheeb, Nourah A.; Almeqren, Monira A.

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to identify the scientific research obstacles facing faculty members in the College of Education at Princess Nora bint Abdul Rahman University (PNU) and to determine the differences in the obstacles according to age, academic rank, scientific specialty, marital status, number of completed studies, and time since the last…

  8. Games as a Platform for Student Participation in Authentic Scientific Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnussen, Rikke; Hansen, Sidse Damgaard; Planke, Tilo; Sherson, Jacob Friis

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents results from the design and testing of an educational version of Quantum Moves, a Scientific Discovery Game that allows players to help solve authentic scientific challenges in the effort to develop a quantum computer. The primary aim of developing a game-based platform for student-research collaboration is to investigate if…

  9. Scientific Media Education in the Classroom and Beyond: A Research Agenda for the Next Decade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Grace; Norris, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    Scientific media education is the ability to draw on a knowledge of the media and science, in order to choose, understand, evaluate, and respond to representations of science across diverse media genres. We begin this manuscript by reviewing research that shows scientific media education is one of the most important content areas that could be…

  10. Obstacles to Scientific Research in Light of a Number of Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algadheeb, Nourah A.; Almeqren, Monira A.

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to identify the scientific research obstacles facing faculty members in the College of Education at Princess Nora bint Abdul Rahman University (PNU) and to determine the differences in the obstacles according to age, academic rank, scientific specialty, marital status, number of completed studies, and time since the last…

  11. Searching for a Common Ground--A Literature Review of Empirical Research on Scientific Inquiry Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rönnebeck, Silke; Bernholt, Sascha; Ropohl, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    Despite the importance of scientific inquiry in science education, researchers and educators disagree considerably regarding what features define this instructional approach. While a large body of literature addresses theoretical considerations, numerous empirical studies investigate scientific inquiry on quite different levels of detail and also…

  12. Scientific Uncertainty in News Coverage of Cancer Research: Effects of Hedging on Scientists' and Journalists' Credibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Jakob D.

    2008-01-01

    News reports of scientific research are rarely hedged; in other words, the reports do not contain caveats, limitations, or other indicators of scientific uncertainty. Some have suggested that hedging may influence news consumers' perceptions of scientists' and journalists' credibility (perceptions that may be related to support for scientific…

  13. Assessing the effects of fire disturbance on ecosystems: a scientific agenda for research and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel L. Schmoldt; David L. Peterson; Robert E. Keane; James M. Lenihan; Donald McKenzie; David R. Weise; David V. Sandberg

    1999-01-01

    A team of fire scientists and resource managers convened 17-19 April 1996 in Seattle, Washington, to assess the effects of fire disturbance on ecosystems. Objectives of this workshop were to develop scientific recommendations for future fire research and management activities. These recommendations included a series of numerically ranked scientific and managerial...

  14. Research Progress of Nuclear Astrophysics Physics:Study of Key Scientific Problems in Nuclear Synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO; Bing; LIU; Wei-ping; LI; Zhi-hong; WANG; You-bao; HE; Jian-jun; SHI; Jian-rong; TANG; Xiao-dong; YAN; Sheng-quan; SU; Jun; LI; Yun-ju; ZENG; Sheng; LIAN; Gang; BAI; Xi-xiang; CHEN; Yong-shou; PANG; Dan-yang; GU; Jian-zhong; HAN; Zhi-yu; LI; Xin-yue

    2015-01-01

    1 Summary A systematic study of the key scientific problems in nuclear synthesis has been conducted.Significant research achievements from several important subjects such as direct measurement of astrophysical reaction,observation of abundances of elements,studies on decay properties of nuclei and reaction rates of primordial nucleosynthesis have been made utilizing large scientific facilities from China

  15. The future of human embryonic stem cell research: addressing ethical conflict with responsible scientific research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, David M

    2004-05-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells have almost unlimited regenerative capacity and can potentially generate any body tissue. Hence they hold great promise for the cure of degenerative human diseases. But their derivation and the potential for misuse have raised a number of ethical issues. These ethical issues threaten to paralyze pubic funding for ES cell research, leaving experimentation in the hands of the private sector and precluding the public's ability to monitor practices, research alternatives, and effectively address the very ethical issues that are cause for concern in the first place. With new technology being inevitable, and the potential for abuse high, government must stay involved if the public is to play a role in shaping the direction of research. In this essay, I will define levels of ethical conflict that can be delineated by the anticipated advances in technology. From the urgent need to derive new ES cell lines with existing technology, to the most far-reaching goal of deriving genetically identical tissues from an adult patients cells, technology-specific ethical dilemmas can be defined and addressed. This staged approach provides a solid ethical framework for moving forward with ES cell research. Moreover, by anticipating the moral conflicts to come, one can predict the types of scientific advances that could overcome these conflicts, and appropriately direct federal funding toward these goals to offset potentially less responsible research directives that will inevitably go forward via private or foreign funding.

  16. 大学科技活动动态激励综合评价——基于研究型大学的实证分析%Dynamic Comprehensive Evaluation of Scientific and Technological Activities of Research-oriented Universities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈洪转; 胡海东

    2012-01-01

    Technology activities are bridging the research-oriented universities of different functions organization such as scientific research, training, science, and technology innovation into a powerful vector and promoting the de- velopment of the carrier progress. Based on the characteristics of the science and technology activities of re- search-oriented universities, a research evaluation system was established from the angle of input and output. In or- der to reflect the relations between time, space and other factors with the university science and technology activities, dual incentive line method and the dynamic comprehensive evaluation model were set up. Technology activities of 10 representative research-oriented universities in different areas of our country were dynamically evaluated based on the date of 2002-2009. With the incentive line method, the empirical knowledge of policy makers were thought, and the 'motivation' and 'punish' areas and evolution features of research-oriented universities in various time points were effectively revealed. Finally based on the results, the input-output mechanisms were analyzed.%基于大学科技活动的特点,从投入产出角度构建了科技活动评价指标体系。为有效反应时间、空间等因素与大学科技活动的演变关系,引入激励控制线构建了双激励控制线动态综合评价模型,将离散信息的动态评价问题转化为连续信息的动态评价,实现对科技活动在时间上的离散和动态集结,从时间和空间角度对我国不同区域的10所代表性研究型大学在2002--2009年的科技活动进行了动态实证评价,通过激励控制线引入决策者的经验知识,各研究型大学在各时间点上的“激励”与“惩罚”面积及演变特征,结合评价结果从空间和时间角度做了相关分析。

  17. Scientific Research Collaboration and Knowledge Communication%科研合作与知识交流

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵蓉英; 温芳芳

    2011-01-01

    Through discussing the definition of scientific research collaboration, the motivations of scientific research collaboration, the relationship between scientific research collaboration and co-authorship, the relationship between scientific research collaboration and knowledge communication, the paper proposes 7 characteristic of scientific research collaboration and summarize it' s definition and 5 collaborative motivations, as well as analyzes the advantages and shortcomings in collaboration research through co-authorship meth- od. The difference and linkage between scientific research collaboration and knowledge communication are also pointed. The paper intends to improve the understanding of basic concepts and theories about scientific research collaboration and make up the shortcomings of theory research in the field of scientific research collaboration.%探讨科研合作的定义、科研合作的动机、科研合作与合著的关系、科研合作与知识交流的关系等4个方面的问题。指出科研合作的七大特征,提出其定义,归纳其5类主要合作动机,辩证地分析利用合著论文研究科研合作的优势和不足以及科研合作与知识交流的区别和联系,以期能够增进对科研合作基本概念和基础理论的认识和理解,弥补科研合作领域在基础理论研究方面的不足。

  18. Return on Scientific Investment - RoSI: a PMO dynamical index proposal for scientific projects performance evaluation and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caous, Cristofer André; Machado, Birajara; Hors, Cora; Zeh, Andrea Kaufmann; Dias, Cleber Gustavo; Amaro Junior, Edson

    2012-01-01

    To propose a measure (index) of expected risks to evaluate and follow up the performance analysis of research projects involving financial and adequate structure parameters for its development. A ranking of acceptable results regarding research projects with complex variables was used as an index to gauge a project performance. In order to implement this method the ulcer index as the basic model to accommodate the following variables was applied: costs, high impact publication, fund raising, and patent registry. The proposed structured analysis, named here as RoSI (Return on Scientific Investment) comprises a pipeline of analysis to characterize the risk based on a modeling tool that comprises multiple variables interacting in semi-quantitatively environments. This method was tested with data from three different projects in our Institution (projects A, B and C). Different curves reflected the ulcer indexes identifying the project that may have a minor risk (project C) related to development and expected results according to initial or full investment. The results showed that this model contributes significantly to the analysis of risk and planning as well as to the definition of necessary investments that consider contingency actions with benefits to the different stakeholders: the investor or donor, the project manager and the researchers.

  19. [Scientific cooperation: limiting freedom of research by criminal law?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dölling, D

    2000-09-01

    Even after the strengthening by the law of 1997, the German criminal law regarding corruption is no obstacle for cooperation between medical research and industry. The injustice of corruption is an irregular exchange between performing one's duty and benefits. According to this, an enterprise may give funds to a scientist for research purposes if no counter performance exceeding the research is associated with this. However, it makes a difference if the scientist has to show his appreciation by influencing economic decisions of the clinic in favor of the enterprise. In case of such an injustice, it is, under the new law, no longer important if the benefit is destined for the scientist himself or for another person or organization. Thus, it is in the interest of both research and industry to avoid the suspicion of corruption in the first place. A prerequisite for this is the strict observance of the legal and administrative regulations concerning projects financed by third-party funds.

  20. Fraud in scientific research – birth of the Concordat to uphold research integrity in the United Kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khajuria, Ankur; Agha, Riaz

    2014-01-01

    Fraud in research has risen exponentially and recent high profile cases may just be the tip of the iceberg. This threatens to have a major impact on public health, with policy makers and clinicians acting on erroneous data. To address this, the new research “Concordat”, a consensus statement on research misconduct, has been published. Can it hold the key to rebuilding public confidence in scientific research in the United Kingdom? This review focuses on the concept of research misconduct, highlighting prominent cases and discussing strategies in order to restore confidence in the validity of scientific research. PMID:24262890

  1. Student Scientific Research within Communities-of-Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genet, Russell; Armstrong, James; Blanko, Philip; Boyce, Grady Boyce, Pat; Brewer, Mark; Buchheim, Robert; Calanog, Jae; Castaneda, Diana Chamberlin, Rebecca; Clark, R. Kent; Collins, Dwight; Conti, Dennis Cormier, Sebastien; Fitzgerald, Michael; Estrada, Chris; Estrada, Reed; Freed, Rachel Gomez, Edward; Hardersen, Paul; Harshaw, Richard; Johnson, Jolyon Kafka, Stella; Kenney, John; Mohanan, Kakkala; Ridgely, John; Rowe, David Silliman, Mark; Stojimirovic, Irena; Tock, Kalee; Walker, Douglas; Wallen, Vera

    2017-06-01

    Social learning theory suggests that students who wish to become scientists will benefit by being active researchers early in their educational careers. As coauthors of published research, they identify themselves as scientists. This provides them with the inspiration, motivation, and staying power that many will need to complete the long educational process. This hypothesis was put to the test over the past decade by a one-semester astronomy research seminar where teams of students managed their own research. Well over a hundred published papers coauthored by high school and undergraduate students at a handful of schools substantiated this hypothesis. However, one could argue that this was a special case. Astronomy, after all, is supported by a large professional-amateur community-of-practice. Furthermore, the specific area of research-double star astrometry-was chosen because the observations could be quickly made, the data reduction and analysis was straight forward, and publication of the research was welcomed by the Journal of Double Star Observations. A recently initiated seminar development and expansion program-supported in part by the National Science Foundation-is testing a more general hypothesis that: (1) the seminar can be successfully adopted by many other schools; (2) research within astronomy can be extended from double star astrometry to time series photometry of variable stars, exoplanet transits, and asteroids; and (3) the seminar model can be extended to a science beyond astronomy: environmental science-specifically atmospheric science. If the more general hypothesis is also supported, seminars that similarly feature published high school and undergraduate student team research could have the potential to significantly improve science education by increasing the percentage of students who complete the education required to become professional scientists.

  2. Historical fencing and scientific research medieval weapons: common ground

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. V. Hrynchyshyn

    2015-07-01

    We considered various approaches to the reconstruction of the historical fencing. It is proved that the activities of such societies has a positive effect on the process research of features of medieval weapons, fighting tactics of different periods The various approaches to the reconstruction of the historical fencing. Proved that the activities of such societies has a positive effect on the process research of features of medieval weapons, fighting tactics of different periods.

  3. Assessment of scientific research: a case-study of CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, B.R.; Minchin, N.; Skea, J.; Peacock, T.; Crouch, D.; Irvine, J.

    1987-03-01

    The review aims to demonstrate that formal methods of evaluating research performance can play a valuable role in overcoming some of the problems with decision-making in basic science based on peer review. An approach which combines a number of research output indicators, including bibliometric measures derived from publication and citation analysis, is first outlined and then applied in a case study of the European Laboratory for Particle Physics, CERN, over the period 1961-1984.

  4. The Impact of Electronic Media Violence: Scientific Theory and Research

    OpenAIRE

    HUESMANN, L. ROWELL

    2007-01-01

    Since the early 1960s research evidence has been accumulating that suggests that exposure to violence in television, movies, video games, cell phones, and on the internet increases the risk of violent behavior on the viewer’s part just as growing up in an environment filled with real violence increases the risk of them behaving violently. In the current review this research evidence is critically assessed, and the psychological theory that explains why exposure to violence has detrimental eff...

  5. Scientific Mobility and International Research Networks: Trends and Policy Tools for Promoting Research Excellence and Capacity Building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Merle; Meek, V. Lynn

    2013-01-01

    One of the ways in which globalization is manifesting itself in higher education and research is through the increasing importance and emphasis on scientific mobility. This article seeks to provide an overview and analysis of current trends and policy tools for promoting mobility. The article argues that the mobility of scientific labour is an…

  6. Dynamics of International Business Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kunz, Werner; Manning, Stephan; Pedersen, Torben

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the evolution of the field of international business (IB) research based on a relational cluster analysis of co-citations in the Journal of International Business Studies (JIBS) from 1982 to 2011. Particularly, we examine the changing role of theory in relation to empirical IB...... research. Based on a factor and network analysis, we identify distinct clusters of IB research and their relations over time. We show that the initial focus of IB research on issues of international expansion has shifted towards issues of governance and implementation. In this process, debates on foreign...... entry mode and culture have served as important integrating themes. At the same time, theory debates in IB have expanded from a narrow focus on explaining international expansion, to a rather heterogeneous conglomerate of approaches which have assisted increasingly differentiated empirical research. Our...

  7. Building a platform for scientific-research cooperation under circumstances of realized asymmetry of potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiśniowski Witold

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Growing complexity of the environment arising both from the processes of globalization in world economy and from the development processes in Poland has become a strategic challenge for the Institute of Aviation. Significant disproportions of the potential of Poland, compared to Germany, United States, or China (especially in terms of the economic dimension and the adopted model for financing scientific research, as well as distant position of Polish universities on the scientific map of the world lead to the necessity to create a model for managing the Institute of Aviation based on internationalization of research and cooperation with leading scientific and (Ohio State University – OSU technological centres (General Electric – GE. The experiences of the Institute of Aviation show that what should be the basis of international competitiveness of research institutes is well educated scientific personnel, modern research infrastructure and competences of cooperation. A proof of this is 16-year-long strategic alliance (private-public partnership of the Institute and GE, cooperation with OSU and activities in European research consortia. The innovative dimension of scientific cooperation with OSU (2+2 formula, research internships, commission for predicting new directions of scientific research and other foreign partners allows the Institute of Aviation to achieve success in competition of international character.

  8. E-book for Knowledge Management in Scientific Research Conducted in the Medical Sciences Graduate Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oramis Sosa Palacios

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The training of students enrolled in the Medical Sciences graduate program (residents includes research activities such as research projects, the final paper of the specialty, scientific events and scientific publications. Knowledge gaps in residents lead to problems seen in both the poor quality of the research project and the final paper of the specialty and in the lack of autonomy to make decisions, affecting their overall training. An electronic book aimed at residents was created for knowledge management in scientific research. The first version was designed using the Crheasoft 2.0 program. It consists of: presentation, start modules, list of topics and complementary information. It comprises condensed knowledge on: research management, research methodology, statistics, information management, computer science, linguistics and language. This e-book contributes to the execution of research activities and promotes learning independence.

  9. Scientific research can be prone to bubbles too – neuroscience risks being the next one

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendricks, Vincent Fella

    2014-01-01

    Science, like any other field that attracts investment, is prone to bubbles. Overly optimistic investments in scientific fields, research methods and technologies generate episodes comparable to those experienced by financial markets prior to crashing. Assessing the toxic intellectual debt...

  10. 75 FR 51439 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Application and Reports for Scientific Research...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Application and Reports for Scientific Research and Enhancement Permits Under the Endangered Species Act...

  11. Hi-tech Researches Speed up Scientific and Technological Innovations of CNOOC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Weiliang; Wang Weiyuan

    2007-01-01

    @@ The scientific and technological development of CNOOC Limited entered a new stage during the Tenth Five-Year Plan period. High-tech researches in the company have catalyzed the technological innovation of the offshore petroleum industry.

  12. Individual characteristics and student's engagement in scientific research: a cross-sectional study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Salgueira, Ana; Costa, Patrício; Gonçalves, Mónica; Magalhães, Eunice; Costa, Manuel João

    2012-01-01

    ... of undergraduate medical students. For this study, all undergraduate students and alumni of the School of Health Sciences in Minho, Portugal were invited to participate in a survey about voluntary engagement in scientific research activities...

  13. Time, science and consensus: the different times involving scientific research, political decision and public opinion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Aparecido de

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This essay analyses the asymmetrical relationship between the time of scientific research and the time of the different segments interested in their results, focusing mainly on necessity to establish technical consensus about the fields of science that require rigorous investigations and texts. In the last years, civil society sectors - mainly scientific journalism, legislative power, and public opinion - has shown growing interest in participating of the decision making process that regulates science routes. In this study, we analyzed the decision making process of the Biosafety Law, as it allows research with embryonic stem cells in Brazil. The results allow us to conclude that this asymmetrical relationship between the different times (of science, scientific disclosure, public opinion, and public power contribute to the maturing of the dialog on scientific policies, as well as to the establishment of a consensus concerning science routes, which aims at the democratization of scientific work.

  14. Rethinking the Role of Information Technology-Based Research Tools in Students' Development of Scientific Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Eijck, Michiel; Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2007-06-01

    Given the central place IT-based research tools take in scientific research, the marginal role such tools currently play in science curricula is dissatisfying from the perspective of making students scientifically literate. To appropriately frame the role of IT-based research tools in science curricula, we propose a framework that is developed to understand the use of tools in human activity, namely cultural-historical activity theory (CHAT). Accordingly, IT-based research tools constitute central moments of scientific research activity and neither can be seen apart from its objectives, nor can it be considered apart from the cultural-historical determined forms of activity (praxis) in which human subjects participate. Based on empirical data involving students participating in research activity, we point out how an appropriate account of IT-based research tools involves subjects' use of tools with respect to the objectives of research activity and the contribution to the praxis of research. We propose to reconceptualize the role of IT-based research tools as contributing to scientific literacy if students apply these tools with respect to the objectives of the research activity and contribute to praxis of research by evaluating and modifying the application of these tools. We conclude this paper by sketching the educational implications of this reconceptualized role of IT-based research tools.

  15. SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH ACTIVITY: THE ORIGIN OF TEACHING METHODOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IURMANOVA S.A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article provides a historical overview of the methods of teaching the Russian language in the aspect of the formation of the idea of a conscious, creative approach to teaching in the writings of prominent local teachers; the necessity of developing a specific, step by step teaching method of research work in the study of language in the modern world.

  16. Research Funding for Psychology and Other Scientific Disciplines: An Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowman, Robert P.

    From 1967 to 1982 federally funded research in psychology became increasingly dependent upon money from the Department of Defense and the Department of Health and Human Services. This is a return to the funding patterns that existed prior to the Korean war. While exact comparisons cannot be made with figures from before 1967 (because of changes in…

  17. The complex and transdisciplinarity thought as frames of scientific research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvio Galati

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The work aims to describe and support, from the methodological point of view, Edgar Morin’s complex thought and Basarab Nicolescu’s transdisciplinarity. It is structured based on the philosophical and logical contexts of multi-method; and then developing methodological ideas from transdisciplinarity and complexity. The methodology used is the documentation, taking into account articles on doctrine and teaching experience. There is discourse analysis, classification and interpretation, also creating categories. The implications of integrative, complex and transdisciplinary philosophy are seen, in a research design for Social Sciences. Transdisciplinary category of "property" is provided, adding it to the "production" category. Developing the complexity and transdisciplinarity as a methodology, "transdisciplinary instructions" arise, which are applied to research although they were originally thought for teaching. From the structure of the research design, unsystematic transdisciplinary methodological strategies and systematic strategies element by element of the research project are identified. As another result, the creation of the category of "General Theory / Interim Science" is added, approached from transdisciplinarity

  18. The Consequences of Citing Hedged Statements in Scientific Research Articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Kelly

    2001-01-01

    Highlights the significance of what happens when scientists cite and paraphrase the conclusions of past research. Discusses the implications of changing the hedges that describe the uncertainty of the conclusions, which in turn can change the uncertainty of past results. (Contains 42 references.) (DDR)

  19. Excellence in the knowledge-based economy: from scientific to research excellence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mads P.; Bloch, Carter Walter; Young, Mitchell

    2016-01-01

    In 2013, the European Union (EU) unveiled its new ‘Composite Indicator for Scientific and Technological Research Excellence’. This is not an isolated occurrence; policy-based interest in excellence is growing all over the world. The heightened focus on excellence and, in particular, attempts....... This change is evidenced by the ‘Composite Indicator for Scientific and Technological Research Excellence’, its rationale and its components....

  20. The organization of scientists and its relation to scientific productivity: Perceptions of Chinese stem cell researchers

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Joy Yueyue

    2010-01-01

    Chinese government funding of R&D ranks third in the world. Yet China ranks only 17th in terms of scientific productivity per unit of investment. The author recently conducted fieldwork on the team structure of 22 Chinese stem cell research groups. Interview data suggest that although Chinese research groups closely resemble their international counter-parts in many respects, there are also significant differences which are perceived by interviewees to affect levels of scientific productivity...

  1. The information determinants in marketing of a research and scientific institution

    OpenAIRE

    Bogdan Sojkin

    2014-01-01

    The article deals with information – based marketing of scientific research institutes, which has been named SAVE (Solution – Access – Value – Education). A proper use of marketing instruments requires information assets which are defined in terms of the essence, the scope and the form of the defined information needs. The essence, the form and the pattern of information needs in reference to SAVE has been defined and described in the case of scientific research institute. The specification o...

  2. Return on Scientific Investment – RoSI: a PMO dynamical index proposal for scientific projects performance evaluation and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristofer André Caous

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To propose a measure (index of expected risks to evaluateand follow up the performance analysis of research projects involvingfinancial and adequate structure parameters for its development.Methods: A ranking of acceptable results regarding researchprojects with complex variables was used as an index to gauge aproject performance. In order to implement this method the ulcerindex as the basic model to accommodate the following variableswas applied: costs, high impact publication, fund raising, and patentregistry. The proposed structured analysis, named here as RoSI(Return on Scientific Investment comprises a pipeline of analysis tocharacterize the risk based on a modeling tool that comprises multiplevariables interacting in semi-quantitatively environments. Results:This method was tested with data from three different projects in ourInstitution (projects A, B and C. Different curves reflected the ulcer indexes identifying the project that may have a minor risk (project C related to development and expected results according to initial or full investment. Conclusion: The results showed that this model contributes significantly to the analysis of risk and planning as well as to the definition of necessary investments that consider contingency actions with benefits to the different stakeholders: the investor or donor, the project manager and the researchers.

  3. Framing of scientific knowledge as a new category of health care research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador-Carulla, Luis; Fernandez, Ana; Madden, Rosamond; Lukersmith, Sue; Colagiuri, Ruth; Torkfar, Ghazal; Sturmberg, Joachim

    2014-12-01

    The new area of health system research requires a revision of the taxonomy of scientific knowledge that may facilitate a better understanding and representation of complex health phenomena in research discovery, corroboration and implementation. A position paper by an expert group following and iterative approach. 'Scientific evidence' should be differentiated from 'elicited knowledge' of experts and users, and this latter typology should be described beyond the traditional qualitative framework. Within this context 'framing of scientific knowledge' (FSK) is defined as a group of studies of prior expert knowledge specifically aimed at generating formal scientific frames. To be distinguished from other unstructured frames, FSK must be explicit, standardized, based on the available evidence, agreed by a group of experts and subdued to the principles of commensurability, transparency for corroboration and transferability that characterize scientific research. A preliminary typology of scientific framing studies is presented. This typology includes, among others, health declarations, position papers, expert-based clinical guides, conceptual maps, classifications, expert-driven health atlases and expert-driven studies of costs and burden of illness. This grouping of expert-based studies constitutes a different kind of scientific knowledge and should be clearly differentiated from 'evidence' gathered from experimental and observational studies in health system research. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Strategies towards Evaluation beyond Scientific Impact. Pathways not only for Agricultural Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birge M. Wolf

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Various research fields, like organic agricultural research, are dedicated to solving real-world problems and contributing to sustainable development. Therefore, systems research and the application of interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary approaches are increasingly endorsed. However, research performance depends not only on self-conception, but also on framework conditions of the scientific system, which are not always of benefit to such research fields. Recently, science and its framework conditions have been under increasing scrutiny as regards their ability to serve societal benefit. This provides opportunities for (organic agricultural research to engage in the development of a research system that will serve its needs. This article focuses on possible strategies for facilitating a balanced research evaluation that recognises scientific quality as well as societal relevance and applicability. These strategies are (a to strengthen the general support for evaluation beyond scientific impact, and (b to provide accessible data for such evaluations. Synergies of interest are found between open access movements and research communities focusing on global challenges and sustainability. As both are committed to increasing the societal benefit of science, they may support evaluation criteria such as knowledge production and dissemination tailored to societal needs, and the use of open access. Additional synergies exist between all those who scrutinise current research evaluation systems for their ability to serve scientific quality, which is also a precondition for societal benefit. Here, digital communication technologies provide opportunities to increase effectiveness, transparency, fairness and plurality in the dissemination of scientific results, quality assurance and reputation. Furthermore, funders may support transdisciplinary approaches and open access and improve data availability for evaluation beyond scientific impact. If they begin to

  5. The impact of electronic media violence: scientific theory and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huesmann, L Rowell

    2007-12-01

    Since the early 1960s, research evidence has been accumulating that suggests that exposure to violence in television, movies, video games, cell phones, and on the Internet increases the risk of violent behavior on the viewer's part, just as growing up in an environment filled with real violence increases the risk of them behaving violently. In the current review this research evidence is critically assessed and the psychological theory that explains why exposure to violence has detrimental effects for both the short and long-term is elaborated. Finally the size of the "media violence effect" is compared with some other well-known threats to society to estimate how important a threat it should be considered.

  6. IMPROVEMENT OF THE ASSESSMENT CRITERIA FOR SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH PROJECTS - A PREMISE OF INCREASING THE UNIVERSITY SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Marius TOMA

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The National Plan for Research, Development and Innovation 2007 – 2013, called herein the National Plan II, represents the main instrument used to implement the National Strategy for Research, Development and Innovation. Universities play a unique role in the development of the knowledge-based society, through its contribution to knowledge generation, transmission, dissemination and utilization. The essential role of the university is to shape the highly qualified human resource, a process that implies a symbiosis between the education and research, the education system performances contributing in this way to a great extent to the society development. The highly qualified human resource represents an important asset of a nation. This study is dedicated to the analysis of the assessment criteria for the Exploratory Research Projects (ERP handed in the competitions in 2007, 2008, 2011 and 2012 and to highlight the importance of improving the assessment criteria in order to improve their quality.

  7. Dynamical interplay between the dissemination of scientific knowledge and rumor spreading in emergency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Liang'an; Song, Naixiang

    2016-11-01

    Rumor is an important form of social interaction and its spreading has a significant impact on human lives. Accounting to rumors' spread, we present a way of analysis on interaction between two processes, and a frame about the dissemination of scientific knowledge in order to prevent rumor transition. Based on this analysis, a 4D dynamic model is established and numerical simulations are performed. Mathematical analysis of the system with regard to boundedness of solutions, local and global stability of the feasible equilibria and persistence of the system are presented. When the rate of scientific knowledge dissemination reaches a critical value, it can be concluded that the strictly positive interior equilibria undergoes Hopf-bifurcation. The rumor spreading rate also plays an important role on the dynamic behavior of our system, which can be showed from our simulation results that lower rumor spreading rate drives the rumormongers to extinction.

  8. Institute for Scientific Computing Research Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keyes, D; McGraw, J

    2004-02-12

    The University Relations Program (URP) encourages collaborative research between Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the University of California campuses. The Institute for Scientific Computing Research (ISCR) actively participates in such collaborative research, and this report details the Fiscal Year 2003 projects jointly served by URP and ISCR.

  9. 76 FR 20335 - Meeting of the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program, Scientific Advisory Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-12

    ... of the Secretary Meeting of the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program, Scientific... meeting on June 16, 2011 is to review continuing research and development projects requesting Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program funds in excess of $1M. This meeting is open to the public. Any...

  10. 75 FR 55778 - Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program, Scientific Advisory Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-14

    ... of the Secretary Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program, Scientific Advisory Board... October 19-21, 2010, is to review new start research and development projects requesting Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program funds in excess of $1M. This meeting is open to the public. Any...

  11. 77 FR 51785 - Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program, Scientific Advisory Board; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-27

    ... of the Secretary Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program, Scientific Advisory Board... meeting on October 23-25, 2012 is to review new start research and development projects requesting Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program funds in excess of $1 million. This meeting is open...

  12. 76 FR 45542 - Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP), Scientific Advisory Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-29

    ... of the Secretary Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP), Scientific...-463). The topic of the meeting on September 13, 2011 is to review new start research and development... projects are requesting Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program funds in excess of $1M...

  13. 77 FR 9896 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Application and Reports for Scientific Research...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-21

    ...; Application and Reports for Scientific Research and Enhancement Permits Under the Endangered Species Act... research/enhancement purposes. The corresponding regulations established procedures for persons to apply... research/enhancement permits, and (2) reporting requirements for permits issued. The required information...

  14. 77 FR 49439 - Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program, Scientific Advisory Board; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-16

    ... of the Secretary Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program, Scientific Advisory Board... meeting on September 11-12, 2012 is to review new start research and development projects requesting Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program funds in excess of $1 million. This meeting is open...

  15. 76 FR 49753 - Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program Scientific Advisory Board Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-11

    ... of the Secretary Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program Scientific Advisory Board... on October 12-13, 2011 is to review new start research and development projects requesting Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) funds in excess of $1M. This meeting is open to the...

  16. 76 FR 81918 - Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP), Scientific Advisory Board...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-29

    ... of the Secretary Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP), Scientific... topic of the meeting on March 13-14, 2012 is to review new start research and development projects requesting Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) funds in excess of $1M. This...

  17. Scientific Research in Jordanian Higher Education Institutions: An Evaluation of the Status and Obstacles

    Science.gov (United States)

    bin Tareef, Atif

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed at identifying the status and obstacles of scientific research in Jordanian higher education institutions. And defined by being an attempt to increase faculty member's, researcher's and educational leader's attention to the necessity of improving research planning or strategies, professional development, working conditions,…

  18. Knowledge as a Common Good: The Societal Relevance of Scientific Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouter, Lex M.

    2010-01-01

    Universities are, to a large extent, publicly funded. It is reasonable to expect that society should benefit as a result. This means that scientific research should at least have a potential societal impact. Universities and individual researchers should therefore give serious thought to the societal relevance of their research activities and…

  19. Examining Research Questions on Germination from the Perspective of Scientific Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir Kaçan, Sibel

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted with the participation of 31 pre-service science teachers. Participants were asked to develop various research questions on germination. The study aims to examine research questions on the subject germination from the perspective of scientific creativity. The research questions were examined using the fluency, science…

  20. 77 FR 26521 - Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program, Scientific Advisory Board; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-04

    ... of the Secretary Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program, Scientific Advisory Board... meeting on June 19-20, 2012 is to review new start research and development projects requesting Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) funds in excess of $1M. This meeting is open to the...

  1. 76 FR 46756 - Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP), Scientific Advisory Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-03

    ... of the Secretary Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP), Scientific...-463). The topic of the meeting on September 14, 2011 is to review new start research and development.... These projects are requesting Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program funds in excess...

  2. A Semantic Web-Based Methodology for Describing Scientific Research Efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandara, Aida

    2013-01-01

    Scientists produce research resources that are useful to future research and innovative efforts. In a typical scientific scenario, the results created by a collaborative team often include numerous artifacts, observations and relationships relevant to research findings, such as programs that generate data, parameters that impact outputs, workflows…

  3. [Ethics of medical scientific research: informed consent and the therapeutic misconception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, M.C. de; Leeuwen, E. van

    2008-01-01

    --Ethical approval of research involving human beings is based on two pillars: supervision of the scientific merit of the research and the risks and burdens for participants by an institutional review board (IRB) or the Dutch Central Committee on Research Involving Human Subjects (CCMO), and obtaini

  4. Scientific Research in Jordanian Higher Education Institutions: An Evaluation of the Status and Obstacles

    Science.gov (United States)

    bin Tareef, Atif

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed at identifying the status and obstacles of scientific research in Jordanian higher education institutions. And defined by being an attempt to increase faculty member's, researcher's and educational leader's attention to the necessity of improving research planning or strategies, professional development, working conditions,…

  5. Knowledge as a Common Good: The Societal Relevance of Scientific Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouter, Lex M.

    2010-01-01

    Universities are, to a large extent, publicly funded. It is reasonable to expect that society should benefit as a result. This means that scientific research should at least have a potential societal impact. Universities and individual researchers should therefore give serious thought to the societal relevance of their research activities and…

  6. A Semantic Web-Based Methodology for Describing Scientific Research Efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandara, Aida

    2013-01-01

    Scientists produce research resources that are useful to future research and innovative efforts. In a typical scientific scenario, the results created by a collaborative team often include numerous artifacts, observations and relationships relevant to research findings, such as programs that generate data, parameters that impact outputs, workflows…

  7. QUALIMETRIC ESTIMATION OF INTEGRATION OF RESEARCHERS INTO THE SCIENTIFIC COMMUNITY, BASED ON THE ANALYSIS OF CITATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loyko V. I.

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the criteria for evaluating the integration of researchers in the scientific community, based on an analysis of its citations. It is known, that one of the major components of interscientific communication (communication in the scientific community is a citation of scientific publications (monographs, articles, etc.. According to the sociological approach, a scientist is a part of society, ie, scientific community; under scientific community we understand scientific mega environment (opposed to research groups of institutions and their structural units. Integration of a researcher to the community has many aspects: on the one hand, it is - the importance of his work to the scientific community, on the other hand, it is - the use of a scientist social mega environment for building for their personal and professional development to improve their research and improve the quality of its results (in the context of the article we will consider the second aspect. Methodological bases of the research: systematic, competence, sociological, and mega-system qualimetric approaches. Methods: modeling, methods of quality control, methods of set theory, relations and graphs. Evaluation (diagnostics involvement of scientists in the scientific community - is more complicated metrology task than the evaluation of the significance of the results of its research activities. For the authors it is clear that a mature scientist (with a high level of research competence should intensively use the potential of the social and the cultural science international environment (community for their personal and professional development, to improve the efficiency of this research activities and the quality of this results. The proposed indicators can be considered as group indicator variables reflecting the level of the behavioral component of the research competence (scientist. Using social media for researcher’s potential – it is necessary, but not

  8. USING SCIENTIFIC PAPERS TO STIMULATE THE STUDY OF BIOCHEMISTRY AND THE UNDERSTANDING OF SCIENTIFIC KNOWLEDGE CONSTRUCTION: THE RESEARCH ON ADRENOLEUKODYSTROPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. B. Gagianone

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD is characterized by mutations in very long chain fatty acids (VLCFA peroxisome transporter, leading to VLCFA accumulation in myelin sheath. In the 70’s and 80’s it was hypothesized that X-ALD is caused by enzymatic deficits in FA-coenzyme A connection, VLCFA degradation or FA elongation. The latter enabled Lorenzo’s oil (LO treatment, which became famous by the homonym movie. The apparent initial therapy effectiveness lead to LO administration in many patients, although with biochemical knowledge progress its relevance has been questioned.Objectives Our aim was to discuss X-ALD researches in “Lipids Metabolism” classes during 2014 Biochemistry courses to Biology and Biomedicine undergraduate students at Fluminense Federal University to illustrate how scientific knowledge is constructed.Materials and MethodsIn order to contrast the recent scientific advances with the information spread to society through “Lorenzo’s Oil”, the movie in edited version was presented to students followed by a questionnaire with Likert scale to evaluate the perception of scientific knowledge exposed by the movie. Afterwards, a Guided Study containing a brief history and discursive questions based upon a paper (Wiesingner et.al, J. Biol. Chem. 288:19269, 2013 was applied in class.Results and DiscussionFrom 58 students who filled in the questionnaire,72,4% considered the movie shows that X-ALD biochemical knowledge has been achieved. This notion was confirmed since 84,5% agreed LO is an effective alternative treatment if X-ALD is early detected. The same percentage agreed that based on the movie the biochemical deficiency relies on an enzyme involved in VLCFA degradation. Although the movie transmits the idea that the cure has been found, 67,2% believed X-ALD biochemical mechanisms are not fully comprehended. ConclusionsThe Guided Study/movie application was very effective because allowed the

  9. Improving Scientific Research and Writing Skills through Peer Review and Empirical Group Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senkevitch, Emilee; Smith, Ann C; Marbach-Ad, Gili; Song, Wenxia

    2011-01-01

    Here we describe a semester-long, multipart activity called "Read and wRite to reveal the Research process" (R(3)) that was designed to teach students the elements of a scientific research paper. We implemented R(3) in an advanced immunology course. In R(3), we paralleled the activities of reading, discussion, and presentation of relevant immunology work from primary research papers with student writing, discussion, and presentation of their own lab findings. We used reading, discussing, and writing activities to introduce students to the rationale for basic components of a scientific research paper, the method of composing a scientific paper, and the applications of course content to scientific research. As a final part of R(3), students worked collaboratively to construct a Group Research Paper that reported on a hypothesis-driven research project, followed by a peer review activity that mimicked the last stage of the scientific publishing process. Assessment of student learning revealed a statistically significant gain in student performance on writing in the style of a research paper from the start of the semester to the end of the semester.

  10. Improving Scientific Research and Writing Skills through Peer Review and Empirical Group Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilee Senkevitch

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Here we describe a semester-long, multipart activity called “Read and wRite to reveal the Research process” (R3 that was designed to teach students the elements of a scientific research paper. We implemented R3 in an advanced immunology course. In R3, we paralleled the activities of reading, discussion, and presentation of relevant immunology work from primary research papers with student writing, discussion, and presentation of their own lab findings. We used reading, discussing, and writing activities to introduce students to the rationale for basic components of a scientific research paper, the method of composing a scientific paper, and the applications of course content to scientific research. As a final part of R3, students worked collaboratively to construct a Group Research Paper that reported on a hypothesis-driven research project, followed by a peer review activity that mimicked the last stage of the scientific publishing process. Assessment of student learning revealed a statistically significant gain in student performance on writing in the style of a research paper from the start of the semester to the end of the semester.

  11. Semiotic Engineering Methods for Scientific Research in HCI

    CERN Document Server

    Sieckenius de Souza, Clarisse

    2009-01-01

    Semiotic engineering was originally proposed as a semiotic approach to designing user interface languages. Over the years, with research done at the Department of Informatics of the Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro, it evolved into a semiotic theory of human-computer interaction (HCI). It views HCI as computer-mediated communication between designers and users at interaction time. The system speaks for its designers in various types of conversations specified at design time. These conversations communicate the designers' understanding of who the users are, what they know the us

  12. Games as a Platform for Student Participation in Authentic Scientific Research

    CERN Document Server

    Magnussen, Rikke; Planke, Tilo; Sherson, Jacob Friis

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents results from the design and testing of an educational version of Quantum Moves, a Scientific Discovery Game that allows players to help solve authentic scientific challenges in the effort to develop a quantum computer. The primary aim of developing a game-based platform for student-research collaboration is to investigate if and how this type of game concept can strengthen authentic experimental practice and the creation of new knowledge in science education. Researchers and game developers tested the game in three separate high school classes. The tests were documented using video observations of students playing the game, qualitative interviews, and qualitative and quantitative questionnaires. The focus of the tests has been to study players motivation and their experience of learning through participation in authentic scientific inquiry. In questionnaires conducted in the two first test classes students found that the aspects of doing real scientific research and solving physics problem...

  13. User Facilities of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences: A National Resource for Scientific Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-01-01

    The BES user facilities provide open access to specialized instrumentation and expertise that enable scientific users from universities, national laboratories, and industry to carry out experiments and develop theories that could not be done at their home institutions. These forefront research facilities require resource commitments well beyond the scope of any non-government institution and open up otherwise inaccessible facets of Nature to scientific inquiry. For approved, peer-reviewed projects, instrument time is available without charge to researchers who intend to publish their results in the open literature. These large-scale user facilities have made significant contributions to various scientific fields, including chemistry, physics, geology, materials science, environmental science, biology, and biomedical science. Over 16,000 scientists and engineers.pdf file (27KB) conduct experiments at BES user facilities annually. Thousands of other researchers collaborate with these users and analyze the data measured at the facilities to publish new scientific findings in peer-reviewed journals.

  14. FORMING OF FUNCTIONAL MAINTENANCE OF INFORMATIVE SYSTEM PLANNING OF SCIENTIFIC RESEARCHES IN NAPN OF UKRAINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetyana V. Kuznetsova

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Relevance of the material stated in article is caused by urgent needs of society in creation of administrative information systems, in particular Information system of planning of scientific researches in National Academy of Pedagogical Sciences of Ukraine on Internet basis (ІС "Planning". Information and technological support of processes of planning of scientific researches which are carried out in scientific institutions of NAPS of Ukraine is the purpose of creation of this system. The parameters of the functional maintenance of the informative system are pointed in the article, technology of treatment of documents on planning of scientific researches, scheme of routes of working of separate documents, and proper diagrams of their business-processes, on the basis of which using programmatic facilities of Microsoft Sharepoint the functions of programming are automatized, is examined.

  15. Conflicting demands and shifts between policy and intra-scientific orientation during conservation research programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranius, Thomas; Rudolphi, Jörgen; Sténs, Anna; Mårald, Erland

    2017-03-15

    Conservation scientists must meet the sometimes conflicting demands of policy and science, but not necessarily at the same time. We analysed the policy and intra-scientific orientations of research projects on effects of stump extraction on biodiversity, and found shifts over time associated with these demands. Our results indicate that uncertainties related to both factual issues and human decisions are often ignored in policy-oriented reports and syntheses, which could give misleading indications of the reliability or feasibility of any conclusions. The policy versus intra-scientific orientation of the scientific papers generated from the surveyed projects varied substantially, although we argue that in applied research, societal relevance is generally more important than intra-scientific relevance. To make conservation science more socially relevant, there is a need for giving societal relevance higher priority, paying attention to uncertainties and increasing the awareness of the value of cross-disciplinary research considering human decisions and values.

  16. Scientific Research Data Management for Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere Data – The TR32DB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constanze Curdt

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of a scientific research data management system is an important task within long-term, interdisciplinary research projects. Besides sustainable storage of data, including accurate descriptions with metadata, easy and secure exchange and provision of data is necessary, as well as backup and visualisation. The design of such a system poses challenges and problems that need to be solved.This paper describes the practical experiences gained by the implementation of a scientific research data management system, established in a large, interdisciplinary research project with focus on Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere Data.

  17. [Health-related scientific and technological capabilities and university-industry research collaboration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britto, Jorge; Vargas, Marco Antônio; Gadelha, Carlos Augusto Grabois; Costa, Laís Silveira

    2012-12-01

    To examine recent developments in health-related scientific capabilities, the impact of lines of incentives on reducing regional scientific imbalances, and university-industry research collaboration in Brazil. Data were obtained from the Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico (Brazilian National Council for Scientific and Technological Development) databases for the years 2000 to 2010. There were assessed indicators of resource mobilization, research network structuring, and knowledge transfer between science and industry initiatives. Based on the regional distribution map of health-related scientific and technological capabilities there were identified patterns of scientific capabilities and science-industry collaboration. There was relative spatial deconcentration of health research groups and more than 6% of them worked in six areas of knowledge areas: medicine, collective health, dentistry, veterinary medicine, ecology and physical education. Lines of incentives that were adopted from 2000 to 2009 contributed to reducing regional scientific imbalances and improving preexisting capabilities or, alternatively, encouraging spatial decentralization of these capabilities. Health-related scientific and technological capabilities remain highly spatially concentrated in Brazil and incentive policies have contributed to reduce to some extent these imbalances.

  18. Tracing Scientific Facilities through the Research Literature Using Persistent Identifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayernik, M. S.; Maull, K. E.

    2016-12-01

    Tracing persistent identifiers to their source publications is an easy task when authors use them, since it is a simple matter of matching the persistent identifier to the specific text string of the identifier. However, trying to understand if a publication uses the resource behind an identifier when such identifier is not referenced explicitly is a harder task. In this research, we explore the effectiveness of alternative strategies of associating publications with uses of the resource referenced by an identifier when it may not be explicit. This project is explored within the context of the NCAR supercomputer, where we are broadly interesting in the science that can be traced to the usage of the NCAR supercomputing facility, by way of the peer-reviewed research publications that utilize and reference it. In this project we explore several ways of drawing linkages between publications and the NCAR supercomputing resources. Identifying and compiling peer-reviewed publications related to NCAR supercomputer usage are explored via three sources: 1) User-supplied publications gathered through a community survey, 2) publications that were identified via manual searching of the Google scholar search index, and 3) publications associated with National Science Foundation (NSF) grants extracted from a public NSF database. These three sources represent three styles of collecting information about publications that likely imply usage of the NCAR supercomputing facilities. Each source has strengths and weaknesses, thus our discussion will explore how our publication identification and analysis methods vary in terms of accuracy, reliability, and effort. We will also discuss strategies for enabling more efficient tracing of research impacts of supercomputing facilities going forward through the assignment of a persistent web identifier to the NCAR supercomputer. While this solution has potential to greatly enhance our ability to trace the use of the facility through

  19. A Review of NASA Human Research Program's Scientific Merit Processes: Letter Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawelczyk, James A. (Editor); Strawbridge, Larisa M. (Editor); Schultz, Andrea M. (Editor); Liverman, Catharyn T. (Editor)

    2012-01-01

    At the request of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the Institute of Medicine (IOM) convened the Committee on the Review of NASA Human Research Program's (HRP's) Scientific Merit Assessment Processes in December 2011. The committee was asked to evaluate the scientific merit assessment processes that are applied to directed research tasks2 funded through the HRP and to determine best practices from similar assessment processes that are used in other federal agencies. This letter report and its recommendations are the product of a 10-member ad hoc committee, which included individuals who had previously conducted research under the HRP, were familiar with the HRP s research portfolio and operations, had specific knowledge of peer review processes, or were familiar with scientific merit assessment processes used in other organizations and federal agencies, such as the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR); National Institutes of Health (NIH); National Science Foundation (NSF); and U.S. Departments of Agriculture (USDA), Defense (DOD), and Transportation.

  20. Cultivating the scientific research ability of undergraduate students in teaching of genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanjin, Xing; Morigen, Morigen

    2016-11-20

    The classroom is the main venue for undergraduate teaching. It is worth pondering how to cultivate undergraduate's research ability in classroom teaching. Here we introduce the practices and experiences in teaching reform in genetics for training the research quality of undergraduate students from six aspects: (1) constructing the framework for curriculum framework systematicaly, (2) using the teaching content to reflect research progress, (3) explaining knowledge points with research activities, (4) explaining the scientific principles and experiments with PPT animation, (5) improving English reading ability through bilingual teaching, and (6) testing students' analysing ability through examination. These reforms stimulate undergraduate students' enthusiasm for learning, cultivate their ability to find, analyze and solve scientific problems, and improve their English reading and literature reviewing capacity, which lay a foundation for them to enter the field of scientific research.

  1. A Review of NASA Human Research Program's Scientific Merit Processes: Letter Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawelczyk, James A. (Editor); Strawbridge, Larisa M. (Editor); Schultz, Andrea M. (Editor); Liverman, Catharyn T. (Editor)

    2012-01-01

    At the request of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the Institute of Medicine (IOM) convened the Committee on the Review of NASA Human Research Program's (HRP's) Scientific Merit Assessment Processes in December 2011. The committee was asked to evaluate the scientific merit assessment processes that are applied to directed research tasks2 funded through the HRP and to determine best practices from similar assessment processes that are used in other federal agencies. This letter report and its recommendations are the product of a 10-member ad hoc committee, which included individuals who had previously conducted research under the HRP, were familiar with the HRP s research portfolio and operations, had specific knowledge of peer review processes, or were familiar with scientific merit assessment processes used in other organizations and federal agencies, such as the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR); National Institutes of Health (NIH); National Science Foundation (NSF); and U.S. Departments of Agriculture (USDA), Defense (DOD), and Transportation.

  2. WORK EXPERIENCE OF THE OPERA TIVE INFORMATION SUPPORT SERVICE FOR SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH A T THE MEDICAL RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH CENTER NAMED AFTER A.F . TSYB – BRANCH OF THE FEDERAL STATE BUDGET INSTITUTION "NATIONAL MEDICAL RESEARCH RADIOLOGICAL CENTER” OF T

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. P. Savina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:The Operative Information Support Service for Scientific Research of the Medical Radiological Research Center named after A. F. Tsyb — Branch of the FSBI «National Medical Research Radiological Center” of the RF Health Ministry presented a report on providing off-budget support for scientific activities over the period from 1993 to 2014 using domestic and foreign information resources. The dynamics of employee activities in institutional sectors with aim to receive financial support for fundamental and applied scientific research on a competitive and non-competitive basis was given. The analysis of the obtained data indicated that a multi-channeling in off-budget funding was formed. It also showed to some extent a situation at the open market of grants in the field of medical radiology, radiobiology, and radiation epidemiology among leading investors in intellectual products.

  3. Scientific Research and Evaluation in Public Security Colleges Based on Scientific Measurement%基于科学计量学的公安院校与评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱营周

    2015-01-01

    Academic research of the public security colleges is still lack of the subject foundation, and has lower social influence. Scientific research foundation of public security colleges is weak, scientific research con?sciousness is not strong and the research level is low. Promoting the development of scientific research in public security colleges needs some evaluation mechanisms. Through scientific research evaluation, the scientific re?search achievements of public security colleges in a certain period of time are analyzed, we can find the close de?gree of the combination between scientific research and public security work and the transfer degree of scientific research achievements, which provide the basis for the supervision, forecast, adjustment and control of scientific research management activities and scientific research decision-making. In particular, it can provide some theo?retical support for the construction of discipline.%公安院校开展学术研究尚缺乏依赖的学科基础,社会影响力较低.通过科研评价,对一定时期内公安院校科研成果采用科学的方法进行分析,能够发现其科学研究与公安工作结合的紧密度及科研成果转化程度,为监督、预测、调控科研管理活动及科研决策提供依据,特别是对于学科建设能为其构建提供一定的理论支撑.

  4. Principles of scientific research team formation and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milojević, Staša

    2014-03-18

    Research teams are the fundamental social unit of science, and yet there is currently no model that describes their basic property: size. In most fields, teams have grown significantly in recent decades. We show that this is partly due to the change in the character of team size distribution. We explain these changes with a comprehensive yet straightforward model of how teams of different sizes emerge and grow. This model accurately reproduces the evolution of empirical team size distribution over the period of 50 y. The modeling reveals that there are two modes of knowledge production. The first and more fundamental mode employs relatively small, "core" teams. Core teams form by a Poisson process and produce a Poisson distribution of team sizes in which larger teams are exceedingly rare. The second mode employs "extended" teams, which started as core teams, but subsequently accumulated new members proportional to the past productivity of their members. Given time, this mode gives rise to a power-law tail of large teams (10-1,000 members), which features in many fields today. Based on this model, we construct an analytical functional form that allows the contribution of different modes of authorship to be determined directly from the data and is applicable to any field. The model also offers a solid foundation for studying other social aspects of science, such as productivity and collaboration.

  5. Innovation activity management in scientific and research and development organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Baruk

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A new trend called “revolution of innovation” is clear visible in the development of the modern economy. Its benefits can be maximized through the rational approach to innovation activity management, knowledge management (treated as a source of innovation and systemic connection between the science with industry and customers in the process of creating value. The content of the publication is thus the concept of systematic approach to innovation activity management, with special emphasis on the commercialization of innovation, and using of knowledge as a source of innovation. Three models of approach to management are proposed: 1 model of rational organization management, 2 model of conceptual structure of innovative activity management, 3 model of integration of knowledge management and innovation management. Management according to the proposed models allows to use resources of various organizations in creating value materialized in innovations in the optimal way, especially in the context of the relatively low impact of universities and research organizations on creating ideas of innovations.

  6. Principles of scientific research team formation and evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Milojević, Staša

    2014-01-01

    Research teams are the fundamental social unit of science, and yet there is currently no model that describes their basic property: size. In most fields teams have grown significantly in recent decades. We show that this is partly due to the change in the character of team-size distribution. We explain these changes with a comprehensive yet straightforward model of how teams of different sizes emerge and grow. This model accurately reproduces the evolution of empirical team-size distribution over the period of 50 years. The modeling reveals that there are two modes of knowledge production. The first and more fundamental mode employs relatively small, core teams. Core teams form by a Poisson process and produce a Poisson distribution of team sizes in which larger teams are exceedingly rare. The second mode employs extended teams, which started as core teams, but subsequently accumulated new members proportional to the past productivity of their members. Given time, this mode gives rise to a power-law tail of l...

  7. Scientific authority in policy contexts: Public attitudes about environmental scientists, medical researchers, and economists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Timothy L

    2013-10-01

    This paper uses data from the US General Social Survey to examine public support for scientists in policy contexts and its link to scientific disciplines. An analysis of attitudes about the amount of influence that environmental scientists, two kinds of medical researchers, and economists should have over policy decisions reveals that in each discipline the extent to which scientists are thought to serve the nation's best interests is the strongest determinant of attitudes about scientists as policy advisors. Perceptions of scientists' technical knowledge and the level of consensus in the scientific community also have direct, albeit weaker effects on opinions about scientists' appropriate roles in policy settings. Whereas previous research has stressed the importance of local variability in understanding the transfer of scientific authority across institutional boundaries, these results point to considerable homogeneity in the social bases of scientific authority in policy contexts.

  8. Management Strategies of Scientific and Technological Talents of Scientific Research Institutes%论科研院所科技人才管理措施

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱荣静

    2013-01-01

    Science research institute refers to the main force of China’s scientific research and carry out the important function of this industry. In this case, scientific research is helpful to promote the country’s scientific and technological in-novation. Therefore, scientific research institutes need to attract and cultivate a bunch of outstanding young scientific and technological workers. The paper elaborates the management strategies of scientific and technological talents of scientific and research institutes, based on the status quo and characters of the development of the country's scientific and technological talents.%  科研院所是我国科研力量的主力,承担着行业科研的重要职能。高素质的科研人才有利于推动我国科技创新,因此科研院所需要吸引、培养和凝聚一批优秀青年科技工作者。文章通过分析我国科技人才发展现状与特点,探讨科研院所科技人才管理措施。

  9. Social sciences, scientific research, higher education and social developments - An Albanian inside of dialectics and structured scientific research, in social sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada Kallçiu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The social sciences have inherited a not so clear relationship with the social politics throughout the history. At the first moment the concept of social sciences came into use in the 19th century the first organizations that were promoting them were not located in the universities. They were located in the Public Sector. They brought into the scenery not only professional of the area, but also politicians, clerics and businessmen. The main objective was the promoting of the reforms that consider the social politics able to improve the so defined social problems. These associations thought that by collecting different kind of data regarding these problems they would reach a clear insight on the directions the state should follow in the framework of different politics and reforms. As a result, the national research capacity is of the highest importance to the ability of a state to invent and implement successfully its politics based on evidences that concern and come as a reaction to the concerns and issues of the social problems as a whole. In this article I will be presenting first of all an overview of the scientific research in Albania in the area of the social sciences by pointing out the main areas that deserve to be the prior ones in the contest of developing activities that aim the implementation of the research in Social Sciences. Also, a great number of Institutions has been contacted with the aim of receiving official information and data on the functioning and on the potential problems that can be faced during the research processes. These institutions have been selected based on their involvement at the area of the scientific research of the social sciences. At first this will involve the policy makers at the central level, like the Ministry of Education and Sciences and the main research actors in the public and in the private sector. The criteria of the geographical and the subjects coverage has been also used in order to be able

  10. A Critical Look at the ResearchGate Score as a Measure of Scientific Reputation

    OpenAIRE

    Kraker, Peter; Lex, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present an assessment of the ResearchGate score as a measure of a researcher’s scientific reputation. This assessment is based on well-established bibliometric guidelines for research metrics. In our evaluation, we find that the ResearchGate Score has three serious shortcomings: (1) the score is intransparent and irreproducible, (2) the score incorporates the journal impact factor to evaluate individual researchers, and (3) changes in the score cannot be reconstructed....

  11. Scientific rigour in qualitative research--examples from a study of women's health in family practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamberg, K; Johansson, E; Lindgren, G; Westman, G

    1994-06-01

    The increase in qualitative research in family medicine raises a demand for critical discussions about design, methods and conclusions. This article shows how scientific claims for truthful findings and neutrality can be assessed. Established concepts such as validity, reliability, objectivity and generalization cannot be used in qualitative research. Alternative criteria for scientific rigour, initially introduced by Lincoln and Guba, are presented: credibility, dependability, confirmability and transferability. These criteria have been applied to a research project, a qualitative study with in-depth interviews with female patients suffering from chronic pain in the locomotor system. The interview data were analysed on the basis of grounded theory. The proposed indicators for scientific rigour were shown to be useful when applied to the research project. Several examples are given. Difficulties in the use of the alternative criteria are also discussed.

  12. ORI findings of scientific misconduct in clinical trials and publicly funded research, 1992-2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Sandra M

    2004-01-01

    Since 1992 the Office of Research Integrity (ORI) had reviewed investigations of scientific misconduct in research funded by the US Public Health Service (PHS). ORI defined scientific misconduct as "fabrication, falsification, plagiarism, or other practices that seriously deviate from those that are commonly accepted within the scientific community for proposing, conducting, or reporting research". The purpose of this study was to summarize the findings and administrative actions reported in ORI notices of scientific misconduct in clinical trials occurring between May 1992 and 2002. Findings of misconduct were gathered from publicly available sources: the ORI annual reports and the NIH Guide to Grants and Contracts. Clinical trials accounted for 17 (13%) of the 136 investigations that resulted in findings of scientific misconduct, and they were noted in 12 (11%) of the 113 brief reports of investigations closed with findings of no scientific misconduct. In clinical trials, the most severe sanction, debarment from US Government funding, was applied in six (35%) of the cases of misconduct compared to 79 (66%) of 119 cases from all other types of research combined. Of individuals cited for misconduct in clinical trials, three (18%) held doctorates in contrast to 81 (68%) in other types of research. In clinical trials, junior employees may bear the burden of sanction for scientific misconduct. The most frequently applied sanction was the requirement that a plan of supervision of the sanctioned employees accompany any future application for funding which would include them. This imposition of sanction on an individual employee does not address possible causes of misconduct which may be inherent in the overall pattern of leadership, training and supervision in the trial. Furthermore, the definition of misconduct, as interpreted by the Departmental Appeals Board, excludes carelessness and other poor research practices that may lead to dissemination of more incorrect data

  13. Using "Household Chemistry Projects" To Develop Research Skills and To Teach Scientific Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Michael H.

    1997-04-01

    Students in a junior-level Chemistry library resources and scientific writing course were assigned semester-long "Household Chemistry Projects." Students were asked to independently develop written proposals for research they could do at their homes using ordinary household supplies. Upon approval of their proposals, students performed the research and wrote up in their results in standard journal format. The final drafts were subjected to peer review, and published in a class journal. Through feedback and rewriting, students not only improved their scientific writing skills, but also learned about designing, conducting, and criticizing research.

  14. The academic formation and the scientific production of physiotherapist researchers from Amazon region

    OpenAIRE

    Warken, Gianne de La-Rocque Barros; Freitas,Jofre Jacob da Silva; Domingues, Robson José de Souza; Kietzer, Katia Simone

    2016-01-01

    This article correlates educational data from 66 Amazonian physiotherapist researchers with their scientific production. The data show that only 24.2% are doctors, 50% had studied at the graduate level in the Amazon region, and 13% had graduate study in the physiotherapy area, in all cases outside of the Amazon region. It was found that the scientific production is concentrated in journals Qualis B. We believe that the way for the physiotherapist of the region to produce knowledge oriented to...

  15. Time, science and consensus: the different times involving scientific research, political decision and public opinion

    OpenAIRE

    José Aparecido; Isaac Epstein

    2010-01-01

    This essay analyses the asymmetrical relationship between the time of scientific research and the time of the different segments interested in their results, focusing mainly on necessity to establish technical consensus about the fields of science that require rigorous investigations and texts. In the last years, civil society sectors - mainly scientific journalism, legislative power, and public opinion - has shown growing interest in participating of the decision making process that regulate...

  16. Ethical implication of providing scientific data and services to diverse stakeholders: the case of the EPOS research infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freda, Carmela; Atakan, Kuvvet; Cocco, Massimo

    2017-04-01

    EPOS, the European Plate Observing System, is an ESFRI infrastructure serving the needs of the solid Earth science community as a whole. EPOS promotes the use of multidisciplinary solid Earth data to improve the understanding of physical and chemical processes controlling earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, tsunamis as well as those driving tectonics and surface dynamics. The EPOS mission is to create a single, sustainable, and distributed infrastructure that integrates the diverse European research infrastructures for solid Earth science under a common framework with the final goal of delivering a suite of domain-specific and multidisciplinary data, products, and services in one single and integrated platform. Addressing ethics issues is a relevant challenge for any initiative, program or project dealing with scientific data and products provision, access to services for scientific purposes and communication with different stakeholders, including industry and society at large. In examining the role of EPOS on openly and freely delivering scientific data and products to diverse stakeholders including but not limited to scientists, we are looking at ethical issues associated with the use and re-use of these data and products possibly leading to a malevolent use and/or misuse of the data with implications on, for example, national security, environmental protection and risk communication. Moreover, EPOS is aware that the research promoted by the use of data delivered through its platform can have a profound influence on the environment, human health and wellbeing, economic development, and other facets of societies. We know there is nothing intrinsically bad about openly and freely delivering scientific data, as it serves as a tool for leveraging researches leading to solutions for a responsible management of Earth's resources and mitigation of natural hazards. However, we must evaluate the effects of such a data provision and feel the obligation to adopt a responsible

  17. Scientific projects as a way to provide dynamism in small French remote colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boer, Michel; Strajnic, Jean

    Scientific projects as a way to provide dynamism in small French remote colleges. Though 77% of the French population lives in towns, they are still quite a lot of people in rural areas. The educational model has favored the proximity colleges instead of forcing the students to make long journeys to get to the school, or to be in boarding schools. This means that grade 6-9 students can be in colleges as small as 100-150 children, specifically in remote areas, e.g. in the Alpes de Haute-Provence. Though small structures have many advantages in terms of discipline and proximity of the educational team with both the students and their parents, some "conservatism" may arise from the low turnover of the population. Children stay for long in the same village, and their access to culture, activities, knowledge of the outside can be restricted, inducing a loss of dynamism. In order to fight this tendency the Observatoire de Haute-Provence has started a program together with the regional educational authorities and the teacher teams proposing to work on scientific projects in astronomy, and soon in environmental sciences. Though the children and their teachers visit OHP, and scientists the college, the idea is that the teachers and the classmates become autonomous, the link being maintained via videoconferencing and electronic blackboard. This is based also on the presence of a prominent scientific institute in a rural district.

  18. The Effects of University-Industry Relationships and Academic Research on Scientific Performance: Synergy or Substitution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjarres-Henriquez, Liney; Gutierrez-Gracia, Antonio; Carrion-Garcia, Andres; Vega-Jurado, Jaider

    2009-01-01

    This paper evaluates whether university-industry relationships (UIR) and academic research activities have complementary effects on the scientific production of university lecturers. The analysis is based on a case study of two Spanish universities. We find that the effects of R&D contracts with industry, and academic research activity on…

  19. Scientifically Based Research and Evidence-Based Education: A Federal Policy Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Anne

    2003-01-01

    This article provides a look at the federal policy context for the scientifically based research (SBR) and evidence-based education (EBE) initiatives by sharing U.S. Department of Education presentations and related publications about SBR and EBE. It discusses the impact of these policy initiatives on special education research activities.…

  20. The structure and comparative advantages of China's scientific research: Quantitative and qualitative perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, L.

    2014-01-01

    In recent decades there has been a sharp increase in China's scientific output. Behind its fast growth, little is known about China's comparative advantages in different academic disciplines. Meanwhile, despite China's rising position (now in second place worldwide for research output), its research

  1. Scientific Paradigms and Falsification: Kuhn, Popper, and Problems in Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyslop-Margison, Emery James

    2010-01-01

    By examining the respective contributions of Karl Popper and Thomas Kuhn to the philosophy of science, the author highlights some prevailing problems in this article with the methods of so-called scientific research in education. The author enumerates a number of reasons why such research, in spite of its limited tangible return, continues to gain…

  2. 77 FR 72438 - Clinical Science Research and Development Service Cooperative Studies Scientific Evaluation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-05

    ... AFFAIRS Clinical Science Research and Development Service Cooperative Studies Scientific Evaluation... Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. 2, that the Clinical Science Research and Development Service Cooperative... provided by section 10(d) of Public Law 92-463, as amended, closing portions of this meeting is...

  3. Scientific and technical information output of the Langley Research Center for calendar year 1980

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    This document is a compilation of the scientific and technical information that the Langley Research Center has produced during the calendar year 1980. Approximately 1400 citations are given. Formal reports, quick-release technical memorandums, contractor reports, journal articles, meeting/conference papers, computer programs, tech briefs, patents, and unpublished research are included.

  4. The Conflicts between Grounded Theory Requirements and Institutional Requirements for Scientific Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckerhoff, Jason; Guillemette, Francois

    2011-01-01

    The authors examined the conflicts between grounded theory (GT) requirements and institutional requirements for scientific research such as they were experienced by researchers and students. The overview of how GT was originally conceived served as background to the analysis of the problems GT users often faced when they submitted research…

  5. An annotated bibliography of scientific literature on research and management activities conducted in Coram Experimental Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilana Abrahamson; Katie Lyon

    2012-01-01

    The Coram Experimental Forest represents western larch-mixed conifer forests of the Northern Rockies. Western larch research was centered at Coram Experimental Forest (CEF) to provide a scientific basis to regenerate and grow this important and valuable species. For example, the long-term silvicultural studies installed at CEF are allowing researchers and managers to...

  6. 1993 Annual report on scientific programs: A broad research program on the sciences of complexity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    This report provides a summary of many of the research projects completed by the Santa Fe Institute (SFI) during 1993. These research efforts continue to focus on two general areas: the study of, and search for, underlying scientific principles governing complex adaptive systems, and the exploration of new theories of computation that incorporate natural mechanisms of adaptation (mutation, genetics, evolution).

  7. Using Biological-Control Research in the Classroom to Promote Scientific Inquiry & Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Matthew L.; Richardson, Scott L.; Hall, David G.

    2012-01-01

    Scientists researching biological control should engage in education because translating research programs into classroom activities is a pathway to increase scientific literacy among students. Classroom activities focused on biological control target all levels of biological organization and can be cross-disciplinary by drawing from subject areas…

  8. The Users and Uses of Scientific and Technical Information: Critical Research Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, James E.; Rubenstein, Albert H.

    At a 1973 workshop held in Denver, Colorado, 21 participants familiar with the uses of Scientific and Technical Information (STI) services gathered to identify the system's major research needs. Initially, 50 research projects were suggested in the areas of design, management, operations, marketing, and global considerations. Using a priority…

  9. 78 FR 69823 - Atlantic Highly Migratory Species; Exempted Fishing, Scientific Research, Display, and Chartering...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-21

    ... purposes of scientific data collection and public display. Chartering permits allow the collection of HMS... an LOA to researchers to indicate that the proposed activity meets the definition of research... satellite archival tags on billfish, sharks, and tunas to determine migration patterns of these...

  10. Beyond Data Points and Research Contributions: The Personal Meaning and Value Associated with Public Participation in Scientific Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haywood, Benjamin K.

    2016-01-01

    As public participation in scientific research (PPSR) initiatives have expanded rapidly among private, public, and non-profit science research communities over the past decade, program managers and scholars regularly promote, evaluate, and manage such programs with a focus on the value and impact of PPSR efforts on the practice and relevancy of…

  11. Deepening Our Understanding of Academic Inbreeding Effects on Research Information Exchange and Scientific Output: New Insights for Academic Based Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horta, Hugo

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyzes the impact of academic inbreeding in relation to academic research, and proposes a new conceptual framework for its analysis. We find that mobility (or lack of) at the early research career stage is decisive in influencing academic behaviors and scientific productivity. Less mobile academics have more inward oriented…

  12. Turning Crisis into Opportunity: Nature of Science and Scientific Inquiry as Illustrated in the Scientific Research on Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Siu Ling; Kwan, Jenny; Hodson, Derek; Yung, Benny Hin Wai

    2009-01-01

    Interviews with key scientists who had conducted research on Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), together with analysis of media reports, documentaries and other literature published during and after the SARS epidemic, revealed many interesting aspects of the nature of science (NOS) and scientific inquiry in contemporary scientific research…

  13. The Dynamics of Exchanges and References among Scientific Texts, and the Autopoiesis of Discursive Knowledge

    CERN Document Server

    Lucio-Arias, Diana

    2009-01-01

    Discursive knowledge emerges as codification in flows of communication. The flows of communication are constrained and enabled by networks of communications as their historical manifestations at each moment of time. New publications modify the existing networks by changing the distributions of attributes and relations in document sets, while the networks are self-referentially updated along trajectories. Codification operates reflexively: the network structures are reconstructed from the perspective of hindsight. Codification along different axes differentiates discursive knowledge into specialties. These intellectual control structures are constructed bottom-up, but feed top-down back upon the production of new knowledge. However, the forward dynamics of diffusion in the development of the communication networks along trajectories differs from the feedback mechanisms of control. Analysis of the development of scientific communication in terms of evolving scientific literatures provides us with a model which ...

  14. Modeling, Simulation and Analysis of Complex Networked Systems: A Program Plan for DOE Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, D L

    2009-05-01

    Many complex systems of importance to the U.S. Department of Energy consist of networks of discrete components. Examples are cyber networks, such as the internet and local area networks over which nearly all DOE scientific, technical and administrative data must travel, the electric power grid, social networks whose behavior can drive energy demand, and biological networks such as genetic regulatory networks and metabolic networks. In spite of the importance of these complex networked systems to all aspects of DOE's operations, the scientific basis for understanding these systems lags seriously behind the strong foundations that exist for the 'physically-based' systems usually associated with DOE research programs that focus on such areas as climate modeling, fusion energy, high-energy and nuclear physics, nano-science, combustion, and astrophysics. DOE has a clear opportunity to develop a similarly strong scientific basis for understanding the structure and dynamics of networked systems by supporting a strong basic research program in this area. Such knowledge will provide a broad basis for, e.g., understanding and quantifying the efficacy of new security approaches for computer networks, improving the design of computer or communication networks to be more robust against failures or attacks, detecting potential catastrophic failure on the power grid and preventing or mitigating its effects, understanding how populations will respond to the availability of new energy sources or changes in energy policy, and detecting subtle vulnerabilities in large software systems to intentional attack. This white paper outlines plans for an aggressive new research program designed to accelerate the advancement of the scientific basis for complex networked systems of importance to the DOE. It will focus principally on four research areas: (1) understanding network structure, (2) understanding network dynamics, (3) predictive modeling and simulation for complex

  15. MO-C-BRB-00: President’s Symposium: Revitalizing Scientific Excellence: Turning Research Into Clinical Reality Through Translational Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-06-15

    Diagnostic radiology and radiation oncology are arguably two of the most technologically advanced specialties in medicine. The imaging and radiation medicine technologies in clinical use today have been continuously improved through new advances made in the commercial and academic research arenas. This symposium explores the translational path from research through clinical implementation. Dr. Pettigrew will start this discussion by sharing his perspectives as director of the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB). The NIBIB has focused on promoting research that is technological in nature and has high clinical impact. We are in the age of precision medicine, and the technological innovations and quantitative tools developed by engineers and physicists working with physicians are providing innovative tools that increase precision and improve outcomes in health care. NIBIB funded grants lead to a very high patenting rate (per grant dollar), and these patents have higher citation rates by other patents, suggesting greater clinical impact, as well. Two examples of clinical translation resulting from NIH-funded research will be presented, in radiation therapy and diagnostic imaging. Dr. Yu will describe a stereotactic radiotherapy device developed in his laboratory that is designed for treating breast cancer with the patient in the prone position. It uses 36 rotating Cobalt-60 sources positioned in an annular geometry to focus the radiation beam at the system’s isocenter. The radiation dose is delivered throughout the target volume in the breast by constantly moving the patient in a planned trajectory relative to the fixed isocenter. With this technique, the focal spot dynamically paints the dose distribution throughout the target volume in three dimensions. Dr. Jackson will conclude this symposium by describing the RSNA Quantitative Imaging Biomarkers Alliance (QIBA), which is funded in part by NIBIB and is a synergistic collaboration

  16. Games as a platform for student participation in authentic scientific research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnussen, Rikke; Hansen, Sidse Damgaard; Planke, Tilo

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents results from the design and testing of an educational version of Quantum Moves, a Scientific Discovery Game that allows players to help solve authentic scientific challenges in the effort to develop a quantum computer. The primary aim of developing a game-based platform...... for student-research collaboration is to investigate if and how this type of game concept can strengthen authentic experimental practice and the creation of new knowledge in science education. Researchers and game developers tested the game in three separate high school classes (Class 1, 2, and 3). The tests....... In questionnaires conducted in the two first test classes students found that the aspects of doing “real scientific research” and solving physics problems were the more interesting aspects of playing the game. However, designing a game that facilitates professional research collaboration while simultaneously...

  17. EU guidelines for the care and welfare of an "exceptional invertebrate class" in scientific research. Commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Alessandra; Vitale, Augusto; Carere, Claudio; Alleva, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Cephalopods have been defined as "advanced invertebrates" due to the complexity of their nervous system and to their sophisticated behavioural repertoire. However, until recently, the protection and welfare of this class of invertebrates has been mostly disregarded by EU regulations on the use of laboratory animals. The inclusion of "live cephalopods" in the Directive 2010/63/EU has been prompted by new scientific knowledge on the "sentience" of animals used for experimental or other scientific purposes, a fundamental criterion to which animal species are included or not under the protective umbrella of the Directive. In this scenario, the imminent publication of the Guidelines for the care and welfare of cephalopods in research as an initiative by the CephRes-FELASA-Boyd Group is a sign of ethical progress in the consideration of animals in research, and is likely to have a significant impact on both scientific and practical aspects of research conducted with these animals.

  18. Research progress of the NSFC Major Research Plan “Dynamic Disaster Evolution of Major Engineering Structures”

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The NSFC Major Research Plan aims to conduct researches at the international research frontiers on modeling of strong earthquake ground motions and strong wind or typhoon fields, and investigating the damage and failure evolution process of the major engineering structures under dynamic actions, focusing on the following two key scientific problems: (1) characteristics and laws of strong earthquake ground motions and strong wind or typhoon fields, and (2) process and mechanism of dynamic disaster evolution of the major engineering structures. For these goals, the research work is targeted at (1) modeling and predicting of strong earthquake ground motion and strong wind or typhoon fields, (2) identifying critical parameters influencing the dynamic disaster evolution of the major engineering structures, (3) analyzing the whole dynamic disaster evolution process of the major engineering structures, and (4) integration and verification of simulation systems for dynamic disaster evolution of the major engineering structures.

  19. Shaping scientific attitude of biology education students through research-based teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firdaus, Darmadi

    2017-08-01

    Scientific attitude is need of today's society for peaceful and meaningful living of every person in a multicultural world. A case study was conducted at the Faculty of Teacher Training and Education, University of Riau, Pekanbaru in order to describe the scientific attitude that shaped by research-based teaching (RBT). Eighteen students of English for Biology bilingual program were selected from 88 regular students as a subject of the study. RBT designed consists of 9 steps: 1) field observations, 2) developing research proposals, 3) research proposal seminar, 4) field data collecting, 5) data analyzing & ilustrating, 6) writing research papers, 7) preparing power point slides, 8) creating a scientific poster, 9) seminar & poster session. Data were collected by using check list observation instuments during 14 weeks (course sessions), then analyzed by using descriptive-quantitative method. The results showed that RBT were able to shape critical-mindedness, suspended judgement, respect for evidence, honesty, objectivity, and questioning attitude as well as tolerance of uncertainty. These attitudes which shaped were varies according to every steps of learning activities. It's seems that the preparation of scientific posters and research seminar quite good in shaping the critical-mindedness, suspended judgment, respect for evidence, honesty, objectivity, and questioning attitude, as well as tolerance of uncertainty. In conclusion, the application of research-based teaching through the English for Biology courses could shape the students scientific attitudes. However, the consistency of the appearance of a scientific attitude in every stage of Biology-based RBT learning process need more intensive and critical assessment.

  20. My Precious! The Location and Diffusion of Scientific Research: Evidence from the Synchrotron Diamond Light Source

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the impact of the establishment of a GBP 380 million basic scientific research facility in the UK on the geographical distribution of related research. We investigate whether the siting of the Diamond Light Source, a 3rd generation synchrotron light source, in Oxfordshire induced a clustering of related research in its geographic proximity. To account for the potentially endogenous location choice of the synchrotron, we exploit the availability of a 'runner-up' site near Manchester...

  1. Scientific research can be prone to bubbles too – neuroscience risks being the next one

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendricks, Vincent Fella

    2014-01-01

    Science, like any other field that attracts investment, is prone to bubbles. Overly optimistic investments in scientific fields, research methods and technologies generate episodes comparable to those experienced by financial markets prior to crashing. Assessing the toxic intellectual debt...... that builds up when too much liquidity is concentrated on too few assets is an important task if research funders want to avoid going short on overvalued research....

  2. Webgraph connectivity and dynamics: Russian research institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey A. Pechnikov

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This research paper proposes a webgraph dynamics model for research institutes based on a webgraph constructed on a set of instants of time and “return back” through removal of multiple hyperlinks. Analysis of the dynamics model, conducted for the webgraph of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS using real data obtained from websites age determination, shows that emergence of new links for each temporary step in the dynamics model of the webgraph cannot be explained only by the well-known principles of preferential attachment and initial attractiveness of vertices. Of much more importance are the so-called ‘administrative actions’ – target programs implemented by policy makers both at the regional and national level, which are aimed at developing information resources. Investigations revealed there is an almost perfect match between the model dates marking significant changes in the webgraph dynamics model and the real dates when administrative actions came into force. The webgraph dynamics and connectivity of RAS research institutions were shown to depend on administrative actions of policy makers, implemented at both the regional and national level in the form of targeted programs aimed at developing information resources.

  3. Intelligent tools for building a scientific information platform from research to implementation

    CERN Document Server

    Skonieczny, Łukasz; Rybiński, Henryk; Kryszkiewicz, Marzena; Niezgódka, Marek

    2014-01-01

    This book is a selection of results obtained within three years of research performed under SYNAT—a nation-wide scientific project aiming at creating an infrastructure for scientific content storage and sharing for academia, education and open knowledge society in Poland. The book is intended to be the last of the series related to the SYNAT project. The previous books, titled “Intelligent Tools for Building a Scientific Information Platform” and “Intelligent Tools for Building a Scientific Information Platform: Advanced Architectures and Solutions”, were published as volumes 390 and 467 in Springer's Studies in Computational Intelligence. Its contents is based on the SYNAT 2013 Workshop held in Warsaw. The papers included in this volume present an overview and insight into information retrieval, repository systems, text processing, ontology-based systems, text mining, multimedia data processing and advanced software engineering, addressing the problems of implementing intelligent tools for building...

  4. Confined to grow?. Publication dynamics and the proliferation of scientific journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daruka, Istvan

    2014-01-01

    The number of research papers published yearly shows a staggering exponential growth. One can in fact witness a century-long publication avalanche (Fig.1). According to the two major databases INSPEC and Thomson Reuters, there is a 300-fold increase in the number of published items since the year 1900. The world of science has recently reached such a level of proliferating complexity that its structural evolution itself poses challenging scientific problems.

  5. [Investigation methodology and application on scientific and technological personnel of traditional Chinese medical resources based on data from Chinese scientific research paper].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hai-yan; Li, Yuan-hai; Yang, Yang; Liu, Fang-zhou; Wang, Jing; Tian, Ye; Yang, Ce; Liu, Yang; Li, Meng; Sun Li-ying

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study is to identify the present status of the scientific and technological personnel in the field of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) resource science. Based on the data from Chinese scientific research paper, an investigation regarding the number of the personnel, the distribution, their output of paper, their scientific research teams, high-yield authors and high-cited authors was conducted. The study covers seven subfields of traditional Chinese medicine identification, quality standard, Chinese medicine cultivation, harvest processing of TCM, market development and resource protection and resource management, as well as 82 widely used Chinese medicine species, such as Ginseng and Radix Astragali. One hundred and fifteen domain authority experts were selected based on the data of high-yield authors and high-cited authors. The database system platform "Skilled Scientific and Technological Personnel in the field of Traditional Chinese Medicine Resource Science-Chinese papers" was established. This platform successfully provided the retrieval result of the personnel, output of paper, and their core research team by input the study field, year, and Chinese medicine species. The investigation provides basic data of scientific and technological personnel in the field of traditional Chinese medicine resource science for administrative agencies and also evidence for the selection of scientific and technological personnel and construction of scientific research teams.

  6. WHY SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH OF A LECTURER IS THE «LAME HORSE» OF MODERN SCIENCE?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A. Belyaeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is to represent reflections on the crisis of science and logical thinking (within the framework of Social Science, Humanities and higher education that has its local and global manifestations; the author focused own attention on the manifestations in order to understand its depth and possible ways of overcoming them. Methods. A number of theoretical methods have been used in the article: analysis and synthesis, induction and deduction, comparison and classification, methods of extrapolation and modeling, as well as participant observation. Results. Local manifestations of the crisis of science and logical thinking associated with human factor in the national system of higher professional education in the era of virtualization and commercialization are expressed in reducing efforts and productivity of scientific research, due to the existing contradictions between changed requirements that enumerate professional duties of a lecturer and possibilities of combining and productive implementation of traditional and new professional roles. In particular, researches turn to promoters of themselves to solve financial and organizational issues of a scientific research and promotion of ratings. Changes in the sense of scientific activity in respect to educators and their personal attitude to new requirements will eventually face the eternal problem of attitude to knowledge and to the actual problem of change of knowledge subject in non-classical model and post-non-classical model of science. Expression of a researcher’s individuality encounters many obstacles (the author has identified 10 of them and is complicated by new facets of this subjectivity, induced by «logistics turn point» in science. Scientific novelty. The author proves that it is necessary to change nonclassical subject knowledge model (where the corporate subject leaning for the general ways and collective norms of scientific activity dominates for

  7. Are Scientific Abstracts Written in Poetic Verse an Effective Representation of the Underlying Research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illingworth, Samuel

    2016-04-01

    The central purpose of science is to explain (Purtill, 1970). However, who is that explanation for, and how is this explanation communicated once it has been deduced? Scientific research is typically communicated via papers in journals, with an abstract presented as a summary of that explanation. However, in many instances they may be written in a manner which is non-communicatory to a lay reader (Halliday and Martin, 2003). Research concerning climate change in particular demands to be communicated, because of its global relevance and the potential societal consequences of its findings. This study begins to investigate if poetry could be used as an alternative form of communication, by first assessing if poetic verse is an effective form of communication to other scientists. In order to assess this suitability, a survey was conducted in which two different groups of participants were asked questions based on a scientific abstract. One group of participants was given the original scientific abstract, whilst the second group was instead given a poem written about the scientific study. Quantitative analysis found that whilst a scientific audience found a poetic interpretation of a scientific abstract to be no less interesting or inspiring than the original prose, they did find it to be less accessible. However, further qualitative analysis suggested that the poem did a good job in conveying a similar meaning to that presented in the original abstract. The results of this study indicate that whilst for a scientific audience poetry should not replace the prose abstract, it could be used alongside the original format to inspire the reader to find out more about the topic. Further research is needed to investigate the effectiveness of this approach for a general audience. References: HALLIDAY, M. A. K. & MARTIN, J. R. 2003. Writing science: Literacy and discursive power, Taylor & Francis. PURTILL, R. 1970. The purpose of science. Philosophy of Science, 301-306.

  8. Scientific Reproducibility in Biomedical Research: Provenance Metadata Ontology for Semantic Annotation of Study Description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Satya S; Valdez, Joshua; Rueschman, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Scientific reproducibility is key to scientific progress as it allows the research community to build on validated results, protect patients from potentially harmful trial drugs derived from incorrect results, and reduce wastage of valuable resources. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) recently published a systematic guideline titled "Rigor and Reproducibility " for supporting reproducible research studies, which has also been accepted by several scientific journals. These journals will require published articles to conform to these new guidelines. Provenance metadata describes the history or origin of data and it has been long used in computer science to capture metadata information for ensuring data quality and supporting scientific reproducibility. In this paper, we describe the development of Provenance for Clinical and healthcare Research (ProvCaRe) framework together with a provenance ontology to support scientific reproducibility by formally modeling a core set of data elements representing details of research study. We extend the PROV Ontology (PROV-O), which has been recommended as the provenance representation model by World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), to represent both: (a) data provenance, and (b) process provenance. We use 124 study variables from 6 clinical research studies from the National Sleep Research Resource (NSRR) to evaluate the coverage of the provenance ontology. NSRR is the largest repository of NIH-funded sleep datasets with 50,000 studies from 36,000 participants. The provenance ontology reuses ontology concepts from existing biomedical ontologies, for example the Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine Clinical Terms (SNOMED CT), to model the provenance information of research studies. The ProvCaRe framework is being developed as part of the Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) data provenance project.

  9. [Ten year anniversary of The Samara Scientific Research Institute "International Center for the Problems of the Elderly". Scientific achievements in gerontology and geriatrics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iakovlev, O G; Zakharova, N O

    2006-01-01

    The paper covers the decade period of activity of The Samara Scientific Research Institute "International Center for the Problems of the Elderly", which is part of Samara Regional Hospital for War Veterans. Basic research in gerontology and geriatrics are in focus of the article. It also contains selected information on research conferences and publishing activities over the decade.

  10. The development of scientific identification theory to conduct operation research in education management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardhienata, S.

    2017-01-01

    Operations research is a general method used in the study and optimization of a system through modeling of the system. In the field of education, especially in education management, operations research has not been widely used. This paper gives an exposition of ideas about how operations research can be used to conduct research and optimization in the field of education management by developing SITOREM (Scientific Identification Theory for Operation Research in Education Management). To clarify the intent of the idea, an example of applying SITOREM to enhance the professional commitment of lecturers associated with achieving the vision of university will be described.

  11. On the implementation of error handling in dynamic interfaces to scientific codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomon, Cynthia Jean [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    1993-11-01

    With the advent of powerful workstations with windowing systems, the scientific community has become interested in user friendly interfaces as a means of promoting the distribution of scientific codes to colleagues. Distributing scientific codes to a wider audience can, however, be problematic because scientists, who are familiar with the problem being addressed but not aware of necessary operational details, are encouraged to use the codes. A more friendly environment that not only guides user inputs, but also helps catch errors is needed. This thesis presents a dynamic graphical user interface (GUI) creation system with user controlled support for error detection and handling. The system checks a series of constraints defining a valid input set whenever the state of the system changes and notifies the user when an error has occurred. A naive checking scheme was implemented that checks every constraint every time the system changes. However, this method examines many constraints whose values have not changed. Therefore, a minimum evaluation scheme that only checks those constraints that may have been violated was implemented. This system was implemented in a prototype and user testing was used to determine if it was a success. Users examined both the GUI creation system and the end-user environment. The users found both to be easy to use and efficient enough for practical use. Moreover, they concluded that the system would promote distribution.

  12. The speech cited in the textual macrostructure of scientific articles of young researchers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Cezinaldo Rocha Bessa

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we have examined the speech quoted in scientific articles of young researchers, observing the use of this linguistic and discursive mechanism due to the organization and distribution of information in the textual macrostructure. This work is based on studies of the Bakhtin Circle and works in the Swales perspective. Privileging a qualitative approach and an analysis of interpretative nature, the investigation includes a review of 10 scientific articles of masters students of the Language and Linguistics areas. The analysis confirms that forms and purposes of usage of quoted speech in scientific articles of young researchers inevitably suffer strong determination of the section of the article in which they are mobilized, but also the personal way the producer selects and organizes information in his text, revealing the complex and tense relationship between the style of the speech genre and the individual style of the producer.

  13. Caldera processes and magma-hydrothermal systems continental scientific drilling program: thermal regimes, Valles caldera research, scientific and management plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goff, F.; Nielson, D.L. (eds.)

    1986-05-01

    Long-range core-drilling operations and initial scientific investigations are described for four sites in the Valles caldera, New Mexico. The plan concentrates on the period 1986 to 1993 and has six primary objectives: (1) study the origin, evolution, physical/chemical dynamics of the vapor-dominated portion of the Valles geothermal system; (2) investigate the characteristics of caldera fill and mechanisms of caldera collapse and resurgence; (3) determine the physical/chemical conditions in the heat transfer zone between crystallizing plutons and the hydrothermal system; (4) study the mechanism of ore deposition in the caldera environment; (5) develop and test high-temperature drilling techniques and logging tools; and (6) evaluate the geothermal resource within a large silicic caldera. Core holes VC-2a (500 m) and VC-2b (2000 m) are planned in the Sulphur Springs area; these core holes will probe the vapor-dominated zone, the underlying hot-water-dominated zone, the boiling interface and probable ore deposition between the two zones, and the deep structure and stratigraphy along the western part of the Valles caldera fracture zone and resurgent dome. Core hole VC-3 will involve reopening existing well Baca number12 and deepening it from 3.2 km (present total depth) to 5.5 km, this core hole will penetrate the deep-crystallized silicic pluton, investigate conductive heat transfer in that zone, and study the evolution of the central resurgent dome. Core hole VC-4 is designed to penetrate deep into the presumably thick caldera fill in eastern Valles caldera and examine the relationship between caldera formation, sedimentation, tectonics, and volcanism. Core hole VC-5 is to test structure, stratigraphy, and magmatic evolution of pre-Valles caldera rocks, their relations to Valles caldera, and the influences of regional structure on volcanism and caldera formation.

  14. Social Scientific Research and Societal Practice: Action Research and Cultural-Historical Research in Methodological Light from Kurt Lewin and Lev S. Vygotsky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiklin, Seth

    2011-01-01

    The main interest is the relationship between social scientific research and societal practice, with specific attention on action research and cultural-historical research. To provide a productive way to engage with these research traditions, a historically-grounded, superordinate perspective is formulated that places practice in the centre. This…

  15. Social Scientific Research and Societal Practice: Action Research and Cultural-Historical Research in Methodological Light from Kurt Lewin and Lev S. Vygotsky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiklin, Seth

    2011-01-01

    The main interest is the relationship between social scientific research and societal practice, with specific attention on action research and cultural-historical research. To provide a productive way to engage with these research traditions, a historically-grounded, superordinate perspective is formulated that places practice in the centre. This…

  16. HR Excellence in Research as an attribute of scientific institutions’ competitiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarosławska-Sobór Sylwia

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available What plays a major role in the process of building the competitiveness of an organization is not just the ability to adapt to the changing conditions in the environment, but also acquiring characteristics distinguishing it, which make it possible to keep, or improve its position on the market. What may be such a handicap for a scientific unit is the HR Excellence in Research (HRE logo, which is awarded by the European Commission under the strategy “Human Resources Strategy for Researchers” (HRS4R. It is awarded to scientific institutions, which implement the rules of the „European Charter for Researchers” and the „Code of Conduct for the Recruitment of Researchers”, and thanks to this create a friendly work environment and opportunities for development. In 2015 Central Mining Institute (GIG took steps aimed at getting the HR Excellence in Research logo, which is supposed to boost the attractiveness of the institute for scientists and contribute to further development of science and achieving a better position on the market. In the article the results of an internal analysis, which includes research on the opinions of scientific and research employees of GIG concerning the existing practices and rules governing research at the institute, are discussed. As a result of the research a Report together with an Action Plan were drawn up. They are supposed to support the creation of a friendly environment for scientific work and transparent rules for recruiting scientific employees. Also, the article highlights the most important challenges which the institute has to face in order to fully implement the guidelines of HRE, which stimulate economic and personal development.

  17. Understanding the Impact of an Apprenticeship-Based Scientific Research Program on High School Students' Understanding of Scientific Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydeniz, Mehmet; Baksa, Kristen; Skinner, Jane

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the impact of an apprenticeship program on high school students' understanding of the nature of scientific inquiry. Data related to seventeen students' understanding of science and scientific inquiry were collected through open-ended questionnaires. Findings suggest that although engagement in authentic…

  18. Understanding the Impact of an Apprenticeship-Based Scientific Research Program on High School Students' Understanding of Scientific Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydeniz, Mehmet; Baksa, Kristen; Skinner, Jane

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the impact of an apprenticeship program on high school students' understanding of the nature of scientific inquiry. Data related to seventeen students' understanding of science and scientific inquiry were collected through open-ended questionnaires. Findings suggest that although engagement in authentic…

  19. The importance of knowledge on the evaluation criteria in university scientific research projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Toma

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Scientific research is part of any university mission, at least of big universities, as it represents the complementary element required by the learning process. A learning process based on engendering knowledge is much more valuable and competitive than a learning process which is reduced to a mere transfer of knowledge from the teacher to the students. The important universities consider that “the development of scientific research as a fundamental competence is essential for survival in a more and more competitive environment on global level and that is why, research should be part of the university mission”1. This study aims to highlight how important it is for the university members to be aware of the evaluation criteria for the research projects they undertake. For this purpose, I have interviewed a number of 55 persons, project managers and team members in the projects from the “Research for Excellency” program and the National Plan of Research, Development and Innovation PN II 2007 – 2013. Out of the evaluation criteria for research, the most important ones were considered to be the scientific quality of the project and the quality of the human resources involved in the project.

  20. [h Index and scientific output of researchers in medicine from the University of Guadalajara, Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panduro, Arturo; Ojeda-Granados, Claudia; Rivera, Horacio; Roman, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate by the h index the scientific output of researchers from the University of Guadalajara who belong to the Sistema Nacional de Investigadores in the field of Medicine and Health Sciences. Researchers from the University of Guadalajara were selected from the Active SNI Researchers 2013 file. The scientific output of researchers in the fields of Medicine/Health Sciences and Biology/Chemistry was evaluated using the h index estimated by the Scopus website. A sample of capital researchers and Emeritus scientists was taken to perform the same procedure and compare data. The total number of researchers in the University of Guadalajara who are members of the SNI was 711, of which 67.2 % were level I and in less proportion were level II and III. Only 24.2 % of them were classified in the fields of Medicine/Health Sciences and Biology/Chemistry. The average h index value of researchers level I, II and III in Medicine/Health Sciences field was 5.4, 10.5 and 14.5, respectively. Capital and Emeritus scientists had an average h index of 23.4 and 19.8, respectively. The h index measures the quantity and quality of the scientific output and it also avoids bias in the evaluation process. It should be useful for future evaluations of the SNI members and for medical doctors who sign up for the National Academy of Medicine.

  1. Scientific research and human rights: a response to Kitcher on the limitations of inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victor, Elizabeth

    2014-12-01

    In his recent work exploring the role of science in democratic societies Kitcher (Science in a democratic society. Prometheus Books, New York, 2011) claims that scientists ought to have a prominent role in setting the agenda for and limits to research. Against the backdrop of the claim that the proper limits of scientific inquiry is John Stuart Mill’s Harm Principle (Kitcher in Science, truth, and democracy. Oxford University Press, New York, 2001), he identifies the limits of inquiry as the point where the outcomes of research could cause harm to already vulnerable populations. Nonetheless, Kitcher argues against explicit limitations on unscrupulous research on the grounds that restrictions would exacerbate underlying social problems. I show that Kitcher’s argument in favor of dissuading inquiry through conventional standards is problematic and falls prey to the same critique he offers in opposition to official bans. I expand the conversation of limiting scientific research by recognizing that the actions that count as ‘science’ are located in the space between ‘thinking’ and ‘doing’. In this space, we often attempt to balance freedom of research, as scientific speech, against the disparate impact citizens might experience in light of such research. I end by exploring if such disparate impact justifies limiting research, within the context of the United States, under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 or under international human rights standards more generally.

  2. Excellence in the Knowledge-Based Economy: From Scientific to Research Excellence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Mads P.; Bloch, Carter; Young, Mitchell

    2016-01-01

    In 2013, the European Union (EU) unveiled its new "Composite Indicator for Scientific and Technological Research Excellence." This is not an isolated occurrence; policy-based interest in excellence is growing all over the world. The heightened focus on excellence and, in particular, attempts to define it through quantitative indicators…

  3. Evolutionary convergence of the patterns of international research collaborations across scientific fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, L.; Coccia, M.

    2015-01-01

    Frame and Carpenter (1979) analysed the pattern of international research collaboration among scientific fields in 1970s. Starting from this pioneering work, this paper investigates international collaborations over 1997-2012 and compares the critical results with earlier studies to detect the evolu

  4. The evaluation of scientific research on the basis of estimation parameters in economics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Lorusso

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Below are some considerations following on from a past Editorial entitled “The evaluation of scientific research: the result of merit-based or discretionary criteria?” published in issue No.11 (2011 of the historical-technical journal “Conservation Science in Cultural Heritage”. The Editorial looked at various tools for evaluating scientific research and expressed some reservations about the bibliometric criteria: - Impact Factor (IF, the most well-known bibliometric tool, owned by Thomson Reuters – Institute for Scientific Information (ISI, which collects data from over 14,000 journals in its web portal: an evaluation system that determines the frequency with which an article is cited in a given period; - Peer Review, a quality indicator typically used in selecting articles for publication; - Open Linking, a reference service offered by aggregators which transforms citations into hyperlinks and allows researchers to browse online from article to article regardless of the journal or publisher; - H Factor or H Index, which aims to quantify the overall scientific contribution of a researcher.

  5. Obstacles of Scientific Research with Faculty of University of Jadara from Their Point of View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatamleh, Habes Moh'd

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to estimate the existence of the scientific research obstacles' degree from the point of faculty at the University of Jadara from their point of view. The number of members that responded to the study reached 100 samples, and this number accounts for 80% of the study society. To achieve the objectives of the study, the researcher…

  6. Museum-University Partnerships as a New Platform for Public Engagement with Scientific Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Jamie; Chesebrough, David; Cryan, Jason; Koster, Emlyn

    2016-01-01

    A growing trend in natural history museums, science museums, and science centers is the establishment of innovative new partnerships with universities to bring scientific research to the public in compelling and transformative ways. The strengths of both kinds of institutions are leveraged in effective and publicly visible programs, activities,…

  7. Scientific Research in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia: Potential for Excellence and Indicators of Underdevelopment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshayea, Ali

    2013-01-01

    This study analyzes the status of scientific research and development efforts in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, and then sheds lights on the potential for excellence in this area in terms of organization and structure, financing and partnership, and human resources. Accordingly, the study reviews both achievements and indicators of underdevelopment…

  8. Evolutionary convergence of the patterns of international research collaborations across scientific fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, L.; Coccia, M.

    2015-01-01

    Frame and Carpenter (1979) analysed the pattern of international research collaboration among scientific fields in 1970s. Starting from this pioneering work, this paper investigates international collaborations over 1997-2012 and compares the critical results with earlier studies to detect the

  9. Scientific discourse in educational research in Latin America: the case of Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Julia Castellanos Quintero

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available In this article it is presented the state of arts of the analysis of the scientific discourse in educational research in Mexico, particularly, in the curriculum design and development research. The development of the research in the area of university curricula started seriously in the decade of 80´s.The scientific discourse was oriented towards the searching of models and methods of teaching and evaluation, of the best way of the implementation of practicum and the correspondence between the professional formation and employment in the national context. In the other hand, the decade of 90´s is characterized by the influence of international educational policies, the use of CIT in the teaching-learning process, the appearance of more competitive occupational market, where professionals should be inserted. The scientific discourse was oriented towards the searching of curricular models that guarantee the correspondence between the professional formation and employment in the international framework. Nowadays an integral educational reform (RIE is taking place in Mexico where the competence approach is considered the guideline of the curriculum design in primary and secondary levels. Nevertheless, at the university level, different curriculum models are being implemented. This speaks about the diversity of the scientific discourse used in the curriculum research in Mexico.

  10. Open-source hardware is a low-cost alternative for scientific instrumentation and research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientific research requires the collection of data in order to study, monitor, analyze, describe, or understand a particular process or event. Data collection efforts are often a compromise: manual measurements can be time-consuming and labor-intensive, resulting in data being collected at a low f...

  11. Does the world need a scientific society for research on how to improve healthcare?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wensing, M.J.; Grimshaw, J.M.; Eccles, M.P.

    2012-01-01

    In this editorial, we reflect on the arguments for starting a scientific society focused on research on how to improve healthcare. This society would take an inclusive approach to what constitutes healthcare. For instance, it should include mental health healthcare, treatment for substance abuse, th

  12. MINRES-QLP Pack and Reliable Reproducible Research via Supportable Scientific Software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sou-Cheng Terrya Choi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The MINRES-QLP Pack is a suite of standard and extended Krylov subspace methods for solving large linear systems and linear least-squares problems in which the coefficient matrices are potentially singular or ill-conditioned and possibly have special symmetries. Our purpose is to develop robust open-source MATLAB implementations of these algorithms that are faithful to the theory, following the philosophy of reproducible research (RR, and practicing development principles of what we call supportable scientific software (SSS that promote reliable reproducible research (RRR. In this paper, we review key features in the ongoing theoretical and software development of our algorithms in the MINRES-QLP Pack. We highlight the most effective software engineering tools known to us that are potentially useful to other scientific research areas. We support open calls to create more incentives for practitioners of robust and reliable scientific software such as citations and grants for quality software. We encourage introducing principles of RRR via SSS to computational science students in advanced courses of scientific computing and to computational scientists through seminars, workshops, or conferences. To these ends, we started an experimental seminar course, “Reliable Mathematical Software” (IIT MATH-573 in our institution, and organized multiple sessions on “Reliable Computational Science” in the SIAM Annual Meeting 2014. We share our research practice and pedagogic experiences in this article.

  13. Scientific and technical information output of the Langley Research Center for Calendar Year 1985

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    A compilation of the scientific and technical information that the Langley Research Center has produced during the calendar year 1985 is presented. Included are citations for Formal Reports, Quick-Release Technical Memorandums, Contractor Reports, Journal Articles and Other Publications, Meeting Presentations, Technical Talks, Computer Programs, Tech Briefs, and Patents.

  14. Scientific and technical information output of the Langley Research Center for calendar year 1986

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    This document is a compilation of the scientific and technical information that the Langley Research Center has produced during the calendar year 1986. Included are citations for Formal Reports, Quick-Release Technical Memorandums, Contractor Reports, Journal Articles and Other Publications, Meeting Presentations, Techncial Talks, Computer Programs, Tech Briefs, and Patents.

  15. Pre-Service Elementary Mathematics Teachers' Metaphors on Scientific Research and Foundations of Their Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bas, Fatih

    2016-01-01

    In this study, it is aimed to investigate pre-service elementary mathematics teachers' perceptions about scientific research with metaphor analysis and determine the foundations of these perceptions. This phenomenological study was conducted with 182 participants. The data were collected with two open-ended survey forms formed for investigating…

  16. Scientific and technical information output of the Langley Research Center for calendar year 1984

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    The scientific and technical information that the Langley Research Center produced during the calendar year 1984 is compiled. Approximately 1650 citations are included comprising formal reports, quick-release technical memorandums, contractor reports, journal articles and other publications, meeting presentations, technical talks, computer programs, tech briefs, and patents.

  17. Management of Official Overseas Trips of Staff in Agri-scientific Research Institutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lizhen; CHEN; Yu; ZHENG; Haiyan; LUO; Qingqun; YAO

    2014-01-01

    Taking Tropical Crops Genetic Resources Institute( TCGRI) of Chinese Academy of Tropical Agricultural Sciences( CATAS) as an example,this paper discussed current situation of management of official overseas trips of staff in agric-scientific research institutions,analyzed existing problems,and finally came up with pertinent recommendations.

  18. Attitude, Certainty and Allusions to Common Knowledge in Scientific Research Articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutsantoni, Dimitra

    2004-01-01

    Acceptance of claims made in scientific research articles depends on the "stance" authors take and their resources for "appraisal" (Martin and White, http://www.grammatics.com/appraisal). "Stance" has been defined as "the ways authors project themselves into their texts to communicate their relationship to subject matter and the readers",…

  19. The Oil Drop Experiment: An Illustration of Scientific Research Methodology and its Implications for Physics Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Maria A.; Niaz, Mansoor

    2004-01-01

    The objectives of this study are: (1) evaluation of the methodology used in recent search for particles with fractional electrical charge (quarks) and its implications for understanding the scientific research methodology of Millikan; (2) evaluation of 43 general physics textbooks and 11 laboratory manuals, with respect to the oil drop experiment,…

  20. How to Read Scientific Research Articles: A Hands-On Classroom Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogucka, Roxanne; Wood, Emily

    2009-01-01

    Undergraduate students are generally unfamiliar with scientific literature. Further, students experience frustration when they read research articles the way they read textbooks, from beginning to end. Using a team-based active learning exercise, an instruction librarian and colleagues at University of Texas at Austin introduce nutritional…

  1. Lab notebooks as scientific communication: investigating development from undergraduate courses to graduate research

    CERN Document Server

    Stanley, Jacob T

    2016-01-01

    In experimental physics, lab notebooks play an essential role in the research process. For all of the ubiquity of lab notebooks, little formal attention has been paid to addressing what is considered `best practice' for scientific documentation and how researchers come to learn these practices in experimental physics. Using interviews with practicing researchers, namely physics graduate students, we explore the different experiences researchers had in learning how to effectively use a notebook for scientific documentation. We find that very few of those interviewed thought that their undergraduate lab classes successfully taught them the benefit of maintaining a lab notebook. Most described training in lab notebook use as either ineffective or outright missing from their undergraduate lab course experience. Furthermore, a large majority of those interviewed explained that they did not receive any formal training in maintaining a lab notebook during their graduate school experience and received little to no fe...

  2. Types of study in medical research: part 3 of a series on evaluation of scientific publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röhrig, Bernd; du Prel, Jean-Baptist; Wachtlin, Daniel; Blettner, Maria

    2009-04-01

    The choice of study type is an important aspect of the design of medical studies. The study design and consequent study type are major determinants of a study's scientific quality and clinical value. This article describes the structured classification of studies into two types, primary and secondary, as well as a further subclassification of studies of primary type. This is done on the basis of a selective literature search concerning study types in medical research, in addition to the authors' own experience. Three main areas of medical research can be distinguished by study type: basic (experimental), clinical, and epidemiological research. Furthermore, clinical and epidemiological studies can be further subclassified as either interventional or noninterventional. The study type that can best answer the particular research question at hand must be determined not only on a purely scientific basis, but also in view of the available financial resources, staffing, and practical feasibility (organization, medical prerequisites, number of patients, etc.).

  3. The world network of scientific collaborations between cities: domestic or international dynamics?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maisonobe, M.; Eckert, D.; Grossetti, M.; Jégou, L.; Milard, B.

    2016-07-01

    Earlier publication (Grossetti et al., 2014) has established that we are attending a decreasing concentration of scientific activities within “world-cities”. Given that more and more cities and countries are contributing to the world production of knowledge, this article analyzes the evolution of the world network of collaborations both at the domestic and international levels during the 2000s. Using data from the Science Citation Index Expanded, scientific authors’ addresses are geo-localized and grouped by urban areas. Our data suggests that interurban collaborations within countries have increased together with international linkages. In most countries, domestic collaborations have increased faster than international collaborations. Even among the top collaborating cities, sometimes referred to as “world cities”, the share of domestic collaborations is gaining momentum. Our results suggest that, contrary to common beliefs about the globalization process, national systems of research have been strengthening during the 2000s. (Author)

  4. 12th Meeting of China-Korea Joint Committee for Basic Scientific Research Held

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Yongtao

    2008-01-01

    @@ The 12th Meeting of the China-Korea Joint Committee for Basic Scientific Research was successfully held in Xiamen,China from May 21 to 24,2008.Through evaluation,the Joint Committee selected 37 bilateral cooperative projects to grant in FY 2008,including 12 joint seminars and 25 joint research projects.The Committee members also made in-depth discussions on the issues of strengthening future cooperation and selecting the topics for the Northeastern Asian Symposium.

  5. Decommissioning of the BR3 PWR[1997 Scientific Report of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massaut, V.

    1998-07-01

    The dismantling and the decommissioning of nuclear installations at the end of their life-cycle is a new challenge to the nuclear industry. Different techniques and procedures for the dismantling of a nuclear power plant on an existing installation, the BR-3 pressurized-water reactor, are described. The scientific program, objectives, achievements in this research area at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN for 1997 are summarized.

  6. A review of scientific research trends within ASPA No. 126 Byers Peninsula, South Shetland Islands, Antarctica

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Byers Peninsula, Livingston Island, was one of the first sites in Antarctica designated for environmental conservation and scientific protection. Research on Byers Peninsula has been predominantly international, with 88 indexed publications (93% of them published during last 20 years) from 209 authors affiliated to 110 institutions from 22 nations, all of which are signatories to the Antarctic Treaty. Palaeontological research represented 20% of the published articles. The variety of freshwat...

  7. Assessing the scientific research productivity of Puerto Rican cancer researchers: bibliometric analysis from the Science Citation Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calo, William A; Suárez-Balseiro, Carlos; Suárez, Erick; Soto-Salgado, Marievelisse; Santiago-Rodríguez, Eduardo J; Ortiz, Ana P

    2010-09-01

    The analysis of cancer scientific production in Puerto Rico is largely unexplored. The objective of this study was to characterize trends in cancer-related research publications by authors affiliated to Puerto Rican institutions in recent decades. Manuscripts were retrieved from the Science Citation Index (SCI) database from 1982 to 2009. Search criterions were that the author's affiliation field contained some institution located in Puerto Rico and that the manuscripts were related to cancer research (according to keywords from the National Cancer Institute' cancer definition). Indexes measured in our analysis included number and type of manuscript, scientific collaboration, author's affiliation, and journal visibility. All the analyses were conducted using ProCite for bibliographic information management and STATA and SEER Joinpoint for the statistical inquiry. From 1982-2009, cancer-related papers authored by scientists located in Puerto Rico came to 451. Over the last three decades the scientific production underwent significant growth (APC = 6.4%, p scientific production in Puerto Rico underwent constant growth during the last three decades. A complete understanding of citing, publishing, and collaboration patterns in Puerto Rico is critical to researchers, policy makers, and health-care professionals in order to make informed decisions about cancer research priorities.

  8. Theoretical research on aggregative dynamic pressure damper

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Jun-hua; CAO Shu-ping; LUO Xiao-hui; NIU Zi-hua; XIN Ji-song

    2009-01-01

    To broaden the frequency width and increase the damping coefficient of a dynamic pressure damper, we designed an aggregative dynamic pressure damper (ADPD). Combined with the advantages of traditional dynamic pressure dampers (TDPD), ADPD can not only increase the damping coefficient in wide frequency range for valve control system, but also absorb partial pressure pulsations and impacts in the low and high frequency fields. Based on the theoretical research and the analysis compared with TDPD, we concluded that the ADPD was superior to the TDPD in the middle high frequency field, and the main parameters influencing the performance of the damper were the damping stiffness, orifice flow coefficient, pre-charge pressure, and the volume of the damper accumulator.

  9. Regional information network systems on Scientific research - two examples of Ishikawa and Toyama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuma, Kenji

    Science and Technology Agency has been promoting regional information network systems on scientific research. The common purpose of the systems is to enhance good communications among various researchers in regions as well as between researchers in Tsukuba and researchers in regions, and accordingly to contribute to the evolution of the regional R&D. These network systems with the help of the pursonal computor communication system have been carried out as prototypes since 1988, in not only Tsukuba area, but four other regions. Two of them are in Ishikawa prefecture and Toyama prefecture. The situations and details of the two are explained.

  10. Lab notebooks as scientific communication: Investigating development from undergraduate courses to graduate research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Jacob T.; Lewandowski, H. J.

    2016-12-01

    In experimental physics, lab notebooks play an essential role in the research process. For all of the ubiquity of lab notebooks, little formal attention has been paid to addressing what is considered "best practice" for scientific documentation and how researchers come to learn these practices in experimental physics. Using interviews with practicing researchers, namely, physics graduate students, we explore the different experiences researchers had in learning how to effectively use a notebook for scientific documentation. We find that very few of those interviewed thought that their undergraduate lab classes successfully taught them the benefit of maintaining a lab notebook. Most described training in lab notebook use as either ineffective or outright missing from their undergraduate lab course experience. Furthermore, a large majority of those interviewed explained that they did not receive any formal training in maintaining a lab notebook during their graduate school experience and received little to no feedback from their advisors on these records. Many of the interviewees describe learning the purpose of, and how to maintain, these kinds of lab records only after having a period of trial and error, having already started doing research in their graduate program. Despite the central role of scientific documentation in the research enterprise, these physics graduate students did not gain skills in documentation through formal instruction, but rather through informal hands-on practice.

  11. The organization of scientists and its relation to scientific productivity: Perceptions of Chinese stem cell researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Joy Yueyue

    2010-06-01

    Chinese government funding of R&D ranks third in the world. Yet China ranks only 17th in terms of scientific productivity per unit of investment. The author recently conducted fieldwork on the team structure of 22 Chinese stem cell research groups. Interview data suggest that although Chinese research groups closely resemble their international counter-parts in many respects, there are also significant differences which are perceived by interviewees to affect levels of scientific productivity. One characteristic of Chinese research teams is a common deficiency in middle-layer positions. This shortage of experienced professionals is perceived by scientists participating in this study to have led to two consequences. First, inexperienced student researchers often form the backbone of scientific teams in China, which leads to frequent interruptions of research and extended laboratory training. Second, research teams consist of a relatively small number of personnel. These structural features are seen to create excessive social boundaries, which impede the exchange of information and further worsens the segmentation of resources. This article engages the question of the extent to which interviewees' local 'embedded' understandings of these difficulties may make a productive contribution to the analysis of the structural, and infra-structural, organization of Chinese professional bioscience teams.

  12. The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope: A summary update on the scientific potential for pulsating star research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Melissa L.

    2017-09-01

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will provide hundreds of deep images of the southern sky over its 10 year duration, enabling variability studies for an unprecedentedly large and unbiased population of objects. In this proceeding paper I will cover the aspects of the LSST's survey and data products that are most relevant to the study of stellar pulsations (Sect. 1), and provide a directory of pertinent materials for further information. I will also summarize the anticipated variable star sample sizes from the LSST, and highlight recent research from several members of the scientific community which evaluates the scientific potential of the LSST's data products with respect to pulsating stars (Sect. 2).

  13. COMPARISON OF SCIENTIFIC SOCIO-ECONOMIC RESEARCH PERFORMANCES IN EASTERN EUROPEAN UNIVERSITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Anton

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Scientific research performance measurement and its analysis creates the context where universities are forced to develop strategies to increase the values obtained from indicators such as number of scientific articles, the number of citations of these articles, h-index, g-index, etc. The purpose of this article is to analyze the performance differences arising in the socio-economic science between major universities in South-Eastern Europe, many of them EU Members. In addition, to see where they stand compared to Western Europe, will include a brief review of the results of a major university as LondonSchool of Economics and Political Science.

  14. Reflections about Research in Computer Science regarding the Classification of Sciences and the Scientific Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WAZLAWICK, R. S.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents some observations about Computer Science and the Scientific Method. Initially, the paper discusses the different aspects of Computer Science regarding the classification of sciences. It is observed that different areas inside Computer Science can be classified as different Sciences. The paper presents the main philosophical schools that define what is understood as the Scientific Method, and their influence on Computer Science. Finally, the paper discusses the distinction between Science and Technology and the degrees of maturity in Computer Science research.

  15. SensorWeb Hub infrastructure for open access to scientific research data

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Filippis, Tiziana; Rocchi, Leandro; Rapisardi, Elena

    2015-04-01

    The sharing of research data is a new challenge for the scientific community that may benefit from a large amount of information to solve environmental issues and sustainability in agriculture and urban contexts. Prerequisites for this challenge is the development of an infrastructure that ensure access, management and preservation of data, technical support for a coordinated and harmonious management of data that, in the framework of Open Data Policies, should encourages the reuse and the collaboration. The neogeography and the citizen as sensors approach, highlight that new data sources need a new set of tools and practices so to collect, validate, categorize, and use / access these "crowdsourced" data, that integrate the data sets produced in the scientific field, thus "feeding" the overall available data for analysis and research. When the scientific community embraces the dimension of collaboration and sharing, access and re-use, in order to accept the open innovation approach, it should redesign and reshape the processes of data management: the challenges of technological and cultural innovation, enabled by web 2.0 technologies, bring to the scenario where the sharing of structured and interoperable data will constitute the unavoidable building block to set up a new paradigm of scientific research. In this perspective the Institute of Biometeorology, CNR, whose aim is contributing to sharing and development of research data, has developed the "SensorWebHub" (SWH) infrastructure to support the scientific activities carried out in several research projects at national and international level. It is designed to manage both mobile and fixed open source meteorological and environmental sensors, in order to integrate the existing agro-meteorological and urban monitoring networks. The proposed architecture uses open source tools to ensure sustainability in the development and deployment of web applications with geographic features and custom analysis, as requested

  16. RESEARCH OF DYNAMIC CHARACTERIATIC FOR TRANSMISSION SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The kinetic precision of transmission chain is a key problem in the research of gear cutting machine transmission system.The traditional point of view is to consider the transmission chain as a geometrical meshing system,thus it is deemed that the kinetic precision of the transmission chain only depends on the manufacturing and assembly errors of its transmission parts.But further research reveals that the kinetic precision of transmission system is closely related with the system dynamic effects.Therefore,from the dynamic point of view,it is discerned that not only deems the transmission chain as a geometrical meshing system but also considers it as a dynamic system performing with torsional vibration.On the basis of analyses and processes of measuring data of samples from tests of cutting machine's kinetic precision of transmission chain,the results represent that the influences of dynamic characteristics of the transmission system on its kinetic precision is non-negligible.Experimental methods for discerning the transfer function of torsional vibration of gear transmission system and experimental results have been given.

  17. The Johns Hopkins Hunterian Laboratory Philosophy: Mentoring Students in a Scientific Neurosurgical Research Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Betty M; Liu, Ann; Sankey, Eric W; Mangraviti, Antonella; Barone, Michael A; Brem, Henry

    2016-06-01

    After over 50 years of scientific contribution under the leadership of Harvey Cushing and later Walter Dandy, the Johns Hopkins Hunterian Laboratory entered a period of dormancy between the 1960s and early 1980s. In 1984, Henry Brem reinstituted the Hunterian Neurosurgical Laboratory, with a new focus on localized delivery of therapies for brain tumors, leading to several discoveries such as new antiangiogenic agents and Gliadel chemotherapy wafers for the treatment of malignant gliomas. Since that time, it has been the training ground for 310 trainees who have dedicated their time to scientific exploration in the lab, resulting in numerous discoveries in the area of neurosurgical research. The Hunterian Neurosurgical Laboratory has been a unique example of successful mentoring in a translational research environment. The laboratory's philosophy emphasizes mentorship, independence, self-directed learning, creativity, and people-centered collaboration, while maintaining productivity with a focus on improving clinical outcomes. This focus has been served by the diverse backgrounds of its trainees, both in regard to educational status as well as culturally. Through this philosophy and strong legacy of scientific contribution, the Hunterian Laboratory has maintained a positive and productive research environment that supports highly motivated students and trainees. In this article, the authors discuss the laboratory's training philosophy, linked to the principles of adult learning (andragogy), as well as the successes and the limitations of including a wide educational range of students in a neurosurgical translational laboratory and the phenomenon of combining clinical expertise with rigorous scientific training.

  18. Empirical research on the service mode of China’s scientific fitness demonstration area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Wenqi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Continuous improvement on promoting the scientific fitness service system of mass sports is an important measure to implement nationwide fitness strategy; develop sport industry; and promote sport consumption. This study takes the experimental units of scientific fitness demonstration area regulated by General Administration of Sport of China as the study objects. It combines theoretical research and empirical study together and reached the following conclusions: in order to obtain scientific, demonstrative and sustainable fitness demonstration areas, we shall stick to the guidance of our government; introduce marketing operational mechanism; combine the advantages of human capital from institutions of higher learning; and apply the PPP mode operated by the cooperation between government purchasing service and social capital, making it possible to realize the organic combination of public service and private service.

  19. Distributed scientific communication in the European information society: Some cases of "Mode 2" fields of research

    CERN Document Server

    Heimeriks, Gaston; Besselaar, Peter Van den

    2010-01-01

    Can self-organization of scientific communication be specified by using literature-based indicators? In this study, we explore this question by applying entropy measures to typical "Mode-2" fields of knowledge production. We hypothesized these scientific systems to be developing from a self-organization of the interaction between cognitive and institutional levels: European subsidized research programs aim at creating an institutional network, while a cognitive reorganization is continuously ongoing at the scientific field level. The results indicate that the European system develops towards a stable level of distribution of cited references and title-words among the European member states. We suggested that this distribution could be a property of the emerging European system. In order to measure to degree of specialization with respect to the respective distributions of countries, cited references and title words, the mutual information among the three frequency distributions was calculated. The so-called t...

  20. Curating Scientific Research Data for the Long Term: A Preservation Analysis Method in Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Conway

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The challenge of digital preservation of scientific data lies in the need to preserve not only the dataset itself but also the ability it has to deliver knowledge to a future user community. A true scientific research asset allows future users to reanalyze the data within new contexts. Thus, in order to carry out meaningful preservation we need to ensure that future users are equipped with the necessary information to re-use the data. This paper presents an overview of a preservation analysis methodology which was developed in response to that need on the CASPAR and Digital Curation Centre SCARP projects. We intend to place it in relation to other digital preservation practices, discussing how they can interact to provide archives caring for scientific data sets with the full arsenal of tools and techniques necessary to rise to this challenge.