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Sample records for dynamic resistance

  1. Measurement of Dynamic Resistance in Resistance Spot Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Pei; Zhang, Wenqi; Bay, Niels

    Through years, the dynamic resistance across the electrodes has been used for weld quality estimation and contact resistance measurement. However, the previous methods of determining the dynamic resistance were mostly based on measuring the voltage and current on the secondary side...... of the transformer in resistance welding machines, implying defects from induction noise and interference with the leads connected to the electrodes for measuring the voltage. In this study, the dynamic resistance is determined by measuring the voltage on the primary side and the current on the secondary side......, as another application, the proposed method is used to measure the faying surface contact resistance....

  2. Measurement of Dynamic Resistance in Resistance Spot Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Pei; Zhang, Wenqi; Bay, Niels

    Through years, the dynamic resistance across the electrodes has been used for weld quality estimation and contact resistance measurement. However, the previous methods of determining the dynamic resistance were mostly based on measuring the voltage and current on the secondary side...... of the transformer in resistance welding machines, implying defects from induction noise and interference with the leads connected to the electrodes for measuring the voltage. In this study, the dynamic resistance is determined by measuring the voltage on the primary side and the current on the secondary side......, as another application, the proposed method is used to measure the faying surface contact resistance....

  3. Measurement of dynamic resistance in resistance spot welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Pei; Lü Jiaheng; Wenqi Zhang; Niels Bay

    2007-01-01

    The conventional methods of determining the dynamic resistance were mostly done by measuring the voltage and current at secondary side of transformer in resistance welding machines, in which the measuring set-up normally interferes with the movement of electrode, and the measuring precision is influenced by inductive noise caused by the high welding current. In this study, the dynamic resistance is determined by measuring the voltage at primary side and current at secondary side. This increases the accuracy of measurement because of higher signal-noise ratio, and allows to apply to in-process system without any wires connected to electrodes.

  4. Measurement of Dynamic Resistance in Resistance Spot Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Pei; Lu, J.; Zhang, Wenqi

    2007-01-01

    The conventional methods of determining the dynamic resistance were mostly done by measuring the voltage and current at secondary side of transformer in resistance welding machines, in which the measuring set-up normally interferes with the movement of electrode, and the measuring precision...... is influenced by inductive noise caused by the high welding current. In this study, the dynamic resistance is determined by measuring the voltage at primary side and current at secondary side. This increases the accuracy of measurement because of higher signal-noise ratio, and allows to apply to in...

  5. Measurement of Dynamic Resistance in Resistance Spot Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Pei; Lu, J.; Zhang, Wenqi

    2007-01-01

    The conventional methods of determining the dynamic resistance were mostly done by measuring the voltage and current at secondary side of transformer in resistance welding machines, in which the measuring set-up normally interferes with the movement of electrode, and the measuring precision...... is influenced by inductive noise caused by the high welding current. In this study, the dynamic resistance is determined by measuring the voltage at primary side and current at secondary side. This increases the accuracy of measurement because of higher signal-noise ratio, and allows to apply to in...

  6. Resistance as Organizational Change Dynamic:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plotnikof, Mie

    2017-01-01

    in change processes. As regards, this paper investigates the constitutive role of resistance during collaborative change processes initiated by local educational management departments to meet central political reforms, as the different involved actors struggle to turn political visions into practice...... collaborative governance processes explores both potentials and problems, when different stakeholders such as politicians, administrators, frontline staff and citizens are engaged in welfare innovation (Osborne, 2009; Ansell & Gash, 2008; Griggs & Sullivan, 2014). Whereas the potential of public innovation...... and value-creation are intriguing to democratic ideals, the challenges include cultural diversity, conflicts, misunderstandings and inefficiency. Nonetheless, the literature stresses that despite the challenges, the demand for collaborative governance in welfare policy is needed now more than ever (Bryson...

  7. Reservoir resistivity characterization incorporating flow dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Arango, Santiago

    2016-04-07

    Systems and methods for reservoir resistivity characterization are provided, in various aspects, an integrated framework for the estimation of Archie\\'s parameters for a strongly heterogeneous reservoir utilizing the dynamics of the reservoir are provided. The framework can encompass a Bayesian estimation/inversion method for estimating the reservoir parameters, integrating production and time lapse formation conductivity data to achieve a better understanding of the subsurface rock conductivity properties and hence improve water saturation imaging.

  8. Calculation of the dynamic air flow resistivity of fibre materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarnow, Viggo

    1997-01-01

    The acoustic attenuation of acoustic fiber materials is mainly determined by the dynamic resistivity to an oscillating air flow. The dynamic resistance is calculated for a model with geometry close to the geometry of real fibre material. The model constists of parallel cylinders placed randomly. ......-consistent procedure gives the same results as the more complicated procedure based on average over Voronoi cells. Graphs of the dynamic resistivity versus frequency are given for fiber densities and diameters typical for acoustic fiber materials.......The acoustic attenuation of acoustic fiber materials is mainly determined by the dynamic resistivity to an oscillating air flow. The dynamic resistance is calculated for a model with geometry close to the geometry of real fibre material. The model constists of parallel cylinders placed randomly...

  9. Carriage and transmission dynamics of multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haverkate, M.R.

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial-resistant bacteria cause big problems in health care. Infections with these bacteria are hard to treat and lead to high morbidity, mortality, and costs. In this PhD thesis, carriage and transmission dynamics of multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae have been investigated in various se

  10. Emerging pathogens: Dynamics, mutation and drug resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perelson, A.S.; Goldstein, B.; Korber, B.T. [and others

    1997-10-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objectives of this project were to develop models of the spread of pathogens, such as HIV-1 and influenza, in humans, and then to use the models to address the possibility of designing appropriate drug therapies that may limit the ability of the pathogen to escape treatment by mutating into a drug resistant form. We have developed a model of drug-resistance to amantidine and rimantadine, the two major antiviral drugs used to treat influenza, and have used the model to suggest treatment strategies during an epidemic.

  11. Dynamics of imidacloprid resistance and cross-resistance in the brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominant and extensive use of imidacloprid for suppressing the brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens, has placed heavy selection pressure on the target insect. A systematic study was carried out to determine imidacloprid resistance dynamics and cross-resistance. A 3-yr monitoring data (2005-2007) sh...

  12. Transmission dynamics and resistance in staphylococci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hetem, D.J.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis will focus on nosocomial transmission and resistance of S. aureus and CoNS. After the general introduction on S. aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci, part II focuses on the nosocomial transmission capacity of different MRSA clones in the hospital setting. In chapter 2 the nosocom

  13. Transmission dynamics and resistance in staphylococci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hetem, D.J.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis will focus on nosocomial transmission and resistance of S. aureus and CoNS. After the general introduction on S. aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci, part II focuses on the nosocomial transmission capacity of different MRSA clones in the hospital setting. In chapter 2 the

  14. Sustainability transition dynamics: Towards overcoming policy resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Gooyert, V. de; Rouwette, E.A.J.A.; Kranenburg, H.L. van; Freeman, R.E.; Van Breen, H.J.

    2016-01-01

    Sustainability transitions receive major scholarly attention, often explicitly with the intention to develop policy recommendations aimed towards progressing such transitions. Despite these efforts, many implemented transition policies have not been able to meet expectations. This tendency of systems to defeat the policies that have been designed to improve them is known as ‘policy resistance’. This paper addresses the question how we can explain the persistence of policy resistance in the co...

  15. Population Dynamics of Patients with Bacterial Resistance in Hospital Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leilei Qu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available During the past decades, the increase of antibiotic resistance has become a major concern worldwide. The researchers found that superbugs with new type of resistance genes (NDM-1 have two aspects of transmission characteristics; the first is that the antibiotic resistance genes can horizontally transfer among bacteria, and the other is that the superbugs can spread between humans through direct contact. Based on these two transmission mechanisms, we study the dynamics of population in hospital environment where superbugs exist. In this paper, we build three mathematic models to illustrate the dynamics of patients with bacterial resistance in hospital environment. The models are analyzed using stability theory of differential equations. Positive equilibrium points of the system are investigated and their stability analysis is carried out. Moreover, the numerical simulation of the proposed model is also performed which supports the theoretical findings.

  16. A new measurement method for the dynamic resistance signal during the resistance spot welding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lijing; Hou, Yanyan; Zhang, Hongjie; Zhao, Jian; Xi, Tao; Qi, Xiangyang; Li, Yafeng

    2016-09-01

    To measure the dynamic resistance signal during the resistance spot welding process, some original work was carried out and a new measurement method was developed. Compared with the traditional method, using the instantaneous electrode voltage and welding current at peak current point in each half cycle, the resistance curve from the newly proposed method can provide more details of the dynamic resistance changes over time. To test the specific performance of the proposed method, a series of welding experiments were carried out and the tensile shear strengths of the weld samples were measured. Then, the measurement error of the proposed method was evaluated. Several features were extracted from the dynamic resistance curves. The correlations between the extracted features and weld strength were analyzed and the results show that these features are closely related to the weld strength and they can be used for welding quality monitoring. Moreover, the dynamic resistance curve from the newly proposed method can also be used to monitor some abnormal welding conditions.

  17. Superhydrophobic resistance to dynamic freshwater biofouling inception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, K Ghokulla; Malm, Peter; Loth, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Superhydrophobic nanotextured surfaces have gained increased usage in various applications due to their non-wetting and self-cleaning abilities. The aim of this study was to investigate nanotextured surfaces with respect to their resistance to the inception of freshwater biofouling at transitional flow conditions. Several coatings were tested including industry standard polyurethane (PUR), polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), capstone mixed polyurethane (PUR + CAP) and nanocomposite infused polyurethane (PUR + NC). Each surface was exposed to freshwater conditions in a lake at 4 m s(-1) for a duration of 45 min. The polyurethane exhibited the greatest fouling elements, in terms of both height and number of elements, with the superhydrophobic nanocomposite based polyurethane (PUR + NC) showing very little to no fouling. A correlation between the surface characteristics and the degree of fouling inception was observed.

  18. Enhanced oxidation resistance of active nanostructures via dynamic size effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Yi; Xiao, Jianping; Yu, Liang; Liu, Qingfei; Ning, Yanxiao; Zhou, Zhiwen; Chen, Hao; Huang, Wugen; Liu, Ping; Bao, Xinhe

    2017-02-01

    A major challenge limiting the practical applications of nanomaterials is that the activities of nanostructures (NSs) increase with reduced size, often sacrificing their stability in the chemical environment. Under oxidative conditions, NSs with smaller sizes and higher defect densities are commonly expected to oxidize more easily, since high-concentration defects can facilitate oxidation by enhancing the reactivity with O2 and providing a fast channel for oxygen incorporation. Here, using FeO NSs as an example, we show to the contrary, that reducing the size of active NSs can drastically increase their oxidation resistance. A maximum oxidation resistance is found for FeO NSs with dimensions below 3.2 nm. Rather than being determined by the structure or electronic properties of active sites, the enhanced oxidation resistance originates from the size-dependent structural dynamics of FeO NSs in O2. We find this dynamic size effect to govern the chemical properties of active NSs.

  19. Characterisation of Dynamic Mechanical Properties of Resistance Welding Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Pei; Zhang, Wenqi; Bay, Niels

    2005-01-01

    The dynamic mechanical properties of a resistance welding machine have significant influence on weld quality, which must be considered when simulating the welding process numerically. However, due to the complexity of the machine structure and the mutual coupling of components of the machine system...... characterizing the dynamic mechanical characteristics of resistance welding machines is suggested, and a test set-up is designed determining the basic, independent machine parameters required in the model. The model is verified by performing a series of mechanical tests as well as real projection welds......., it is very difficult to measure or calculate the basic, independent machine parameters required in a mathematical model of the machine dynamics, and no test method has so far been presented in literature, which can be applied directly in an industrial environment. In this paper, a mathematical model...

  20. Characterisation of Dynamic Mechanical Properties of Resistance Welding Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Pei; Zhang, Wenqi; Bay, Niels

    2005-01-01

    The dynamic mechanical properties of a resistance welding machine have significant influence on weld quality, which must be considered when simulating the welding process numerically. However, due to the complexity of the machine structure and the mutual coupling of components of the machine system......, it is very difficult to measure or calculate the basic, independent machine parameters required in a mathematical model of the machine dynamics, and no test method has so far been presented in literature, which can be applied directly in an industrial environment. In this paper, a mathematical model...... characterizing the dynamic mechanical characteristics of resistance welding machines is suggested, and a test set-up is designed determining the basic, independent machine parameters required in the model. The model is verified by performing a series of mechanical tests as well as real projection welds....

  1. Analysis Of Dynamic Dent Resistance Of Auto Body Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deolgaonkar, S. S.; Nandedkar, V. M.

    2007-04-01

    In automotive industry there is increasing demand for higher quality exterior panels, better functional properties and lower weight. The demand for weight reduction has led to thinner sheets, greater use of high strength steels and a change from steel to aluminum grades. This thickness reduction, which causes decrease in the dent resistance, promoted examination of the dent resistance against static and dynamic concentrated loads. This paper describes an investigation of the suitability of explicit dynamic FE analysis as a mean to determine the dynamic dent properties of the panel. This investigation is carried out on the body panel of utility vehicle and covers two parts, in first experimental analysis is carried out on developed test rig, which is interfaced with the computer. This test rig measures deflection with accuracy of .001mm. The experimental results are then compared with the simulation results, which is the second part. Simulation is carried with non-linear transient dynamic explicit analysis using Ansys -Ls Dyna. The experimental results show great accuracy with simulation results. The effect of change in thickness and geometry of the existing fender is then studied with help of simulation technique. By considering the best possible option overall weight of fender is reduced by 7.07 % by keeping the dent resistance of the panel constant.

  2. Dynamic resistance training decreases sympathetic tone in hypertensive ovariectomized rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimojo, G.L.; Palma, R.K.; Brito, J.O.; Sanches, I.C. [Laboratório de Fisiologia Translacional, Programa de Ciências da Reabilitação, Universidade Nove de Julho, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Irigoyen, M.C. [Instituto do Coração, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); De Angelis, K. [Laboratório de Fisiologia Translacional, Programa de Ciências da Reabilitação, Universidade Nove de Julho, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-03-27

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of resistance exercise training on hemodynamics and cardiac autonomic control in ovariectomized spontaneously hypertensive rats. Female rats were divided into 4 groups: sedentary control (SC), sedentary hypertensive (SH), sedentary hypertensive ovariectomized (SHO), and resistance-trained hypertensive ovariectomized (RTHO). Resistance exercise training was performed on a vertical ladder (5 days/week, 8 weeks) at 40-60% maximal load. Direct arterial pressure was recorded. Vagal and sympathetic tones were measured by heart rate (HR) responses to methylatropine (3 mg/kg, iv) and propranolol (4 mg/kg, iv). Ovariectomy resulted in additional increases in blood pressure in hypertensive rats and was associated with decreased vagal tone. Resistance exercise trained rats had lower mean arterial pressure than untrained rats (RTHO: 159±2.2 vs SHO: 177±3.4 mmHg), as well as resting bradycardia (RTHO: 332±9.0 vs SHO: 356±5 bpm). Sympathetic tone was also lower in the trained group. Moreover, sympathetic tone was positively correlated with resting HR (r=0.7, P<0.05). The additional arterial pressure increase in hypertensive rats caused by ovarian hormone deprivation was attenuated by moderate-intensity dynamic resistance training. This benefit may be associated with resting bradycardia and reduced cardiac sympathetic tone after training, which suggests potential benefits of resistance exercise for the management of hypertension after ovarian hormone deprivation.

  3. Cervical Resistance Training: Effects on Isometric and Dynamic Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-01

    skinfold thicknesses . San Diego, CA: Naval Health Research Center; 1984. Report No: 84–39. 3. Coakwell MR, Bloswick DS, Moser R Jr. High-risk head and...Strength, Dynamic Strength, and Neck Circumference Isometric strength values are displayed in Table I. For isometric strength-flexion, the 2 2 ANOVA...Also, a main effect was observed TABLE I. RESISTANCE TRAINING VS. CONTROL GROUPS: ISOMETRIC STRENGTH (LB). RT Group (n 5) C Group (n 5) FLX EXT

  4. Cooperative Bacterial Growth Dynamics Predict the Evolution of Antibiotic Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemova, Tatiana; Gerardin, Ylaine; Hsin-Jung Li, Sophia; Gore, Jeff

    2011-03-01

    Since the discovery of penicillin, antibiotics have been our primary weapon against bacterial infections. Unfortunately, bacteria can gain resistance to penicillin by acquiring the gene that encodes beta-lactamase, which inactivates the antibiotic. However, mutations in this gene are necessary to degrade the modern antibiotic cefotaxime. Understanding the conditions that favor the spread of these mutations is a challenge. Here we show that bacterial growth in beta-lactam antibiotics is cooperative and that the nature of this growth determines the conditions in which resistance evolves. Quantitative analysis of the growth dynamics predicts a peak in selection at very low antibiotic concentrations; competition between strains confirms this prediction. We also find significant selection at higher antibiotic concentrations, close to the minimum inhibitory concentrations of the strains. Our results argue that an understanding of the evolutionary forces that lead to antibiotic resistance requires a quantitative understanding of the evolution of cooperation in bacteria.

  5. Experience with dynamic reinforcement rates decreases resistance to extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Andrew R; Shahan, Timothy A

    2016-03-01

    The ability of organisms to detect reinforcer-rate changes in choice preparations is positively related to two factors: the magnitude of the change in rate and the frequency with which rates change. Gallistel (2012) suggested similar rate-detection processes are responsible for decreases in responding during operant extinction. Although effects of magnitude of change in reinforcer rate on resistance to extinction are well known (e.g., the partial-reinforcement-extinction effect), effects of frequency of changes in rate prior to extinction are unknown. Thus, the present experiments examined whether frequency of changes in baseline reinforcer rates impacts resistance to extinction. Pigeons pecked keys for variable-interval food under conditions where reinforcer rates were stable and where they changed within and between sessions. Overall reinforcer rates between conditions were controlled. In Experiment 1, resistance to extinction was lower following exposure to dynamic reinforcement schedules than to static schedules. Experiment 2 showed that resistance to presession feeding, a disruptor that should not involve change-detection processes, was unaffected by baseline-schedule dynamics. These findings are consistent with the suggestion that change detection contributes to extinction. We discuss implications of change-detection processes for extinction of simple and discriminated operant behavior and relate these processes to the behavioral-momentum based approach to understanding extinction.

  6. Seasonal dynamics of insecticide resistance, multiple resistance, and morphometric variation in field populations of Culex pipiens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taskin, Belgin Gocmen; Dogaroglu, Taylan; Kilic, Sercan; Dogac, Ersin; Taskin, Vatan

    2016-05-01

    three different seasons. The results of this study have advanced our knowledge of the potential dynamics of insecticide resistance among populations of the Cx. pipiens complex. The implications of these results to the understanding of the evolution of insecticide resistance and the management of resistance in mosquitoes are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Enhanced oxidation resistance of active nanostructures via dynamic size effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Yi; Xiao, Jianping; Yu, Liang; Liu, Qingfei; Ning, Yanxiao; Zhou, Zhiwen; Chen, Hao; Huang, Wugen; Liu, Ping; Bao, Xinhe

    2017-01-01

    A major challenge limiting the practical applications of nanomaterials is that the activities of nanostructures (NSs) increase with reduced size, often sacrificing their stability in the chemical environment. Under oxidative conditions, NSs with smaller sizes and higher defect densities are commonly expected to oxidize more easily, since high-concentration defects can facilitate oxidation by enhancing the reactivity with O2 and providing a fast channel for oxygen incorporation. Here, using FeO NSs as an example, we show to the contrary, that reducing the size of active NSs can drastically increase their oxidation resistance. A maximum oxidation resistance is found for FeO NSs with dimensions below 3.2 nm. Rather than being determined by the structure or electronic properties of active sites, the enhanced oxidation resistance originates from the size-dependent structural dynamics of FeO NSs in O2. We find this dynamic size effect to govern the chemical properties of active NSs. PMID:28223687

  8. Dynamics of immune response and drug resistance in malaria infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurarie David

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria parasites that concurrently infect a host compete on the basis of their intrinsic growth rates and by stimulating cross-reactive immune responses that inhibit each others' growth. If the phenotypes also show different drug sensitivities ('sensitive' vs. 'resistant' strains, drug treatment can change their joint dynamics and the long-term outcome of the infection: most obviously, persistent drug pressure can permit the more resistant, but otherwise competitively-inferior, strains to dominate. Methods Here a mathematical model is developed to analyse how these and more subtle effects of antimalarial drug use are modulated by immune response, repeated re-inoculation of parasites, drug pharmacokinetic parameters, dose and treatment frequency. Results The model quantifies possible effects of single and multiple (periodic treatment on the outcome of parasite competition. In the absence of further inoculation, the dosage and/or treatment frequency required for complete clearance can be estimated. With persistent superinfection, time-average parasite densities can be derived in terms of the basic immune-regulating parameters, the drug efficacy and treatment regimen. Conclusion The functional relations in the model are applicable to a wide range of conditions and transmission environments, allowing predictions to be made on both the individual and the community levels, and, in particular, transitions from drug-sensitive to drug-resistant parasite dominance to be projected on both levels.

  9. Study and Applications of Dynamic Resistance Profiles During Resistance Spot Welding of Coated Hot-Stamping Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ighodaro, Osayande Lord-Rufus; Biro, Elliot; Zhou, Y. Norman

    2017-02-01

    This work compares the role of press hardened steel coating type (Al-Si and GA) on resistance spot welding by analyzing the dynamic resistance curves measured during the weld cycles of the respective materials. It was seen that the dynamic resistance profiles for GA- and Al-Si-coated steels are similar. But the GA specimens exhibited higher resistance than Al-Si-coated specimens in the as-received condition, while the Al-Si-coated specimens exhibited higher resistance after hot stamping. From the early stages of the dynamic resistance profiles, data were obtained and applied for computing the values of components of resistances associated with the different coatings since each coating exhibits characteristic value at the early stages. The results revealed that at the start of the welding cycle, the resistance of the electrode/sheet interface was significantly higher than that of the faying surface or the bulk resistance regardless of whether the steel was Al-Si- or GA-coated. The possible uses of these resistance values in studying welding current requirement and electrode tip life were discussed.

  10. Transmission dynamics of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence eCrombé

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available From the mid-2000s on, numerous studies have shown that methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, renowned as human pathogen, has a reservoir in pigs and other livestock. In Europe and North America, clonal complex (CC 398 appears to be the predominant lineage involved. Especially worrisome is its capacity to contaminate humans in close contact with affected animals. Indeed, the typical multi-resistant phenotype of MRSA CC398 and its observed ability of easily acquiring genetic material suggests that MRSA CC398 strains with an increased virulence potential may emerge, for which few therapeutic options would remain. This questions the need to implement interventions to control the presence and spread of MRSA CC398 among pigs. MRSA CC398 shows a high but not fully understood transmission potential in the pig population and is able to persist within that population. Although direct contact is probably the main route for MRSA transmission between pigs, also environmental contamination, the presence of other livestock, the herd size and farm management are factors that may be involved in the dissemination of MRSA CC398. The current review aims at summarizing the research that has so far been done on the transmission dynamics and risk factors for introduction and persistence of MRSA CC398 in farms.

  11. Acute effects of dynamic stretching exercise on power output during concentric dynamic constant external resistance leg extension

    OpenAIRE

    YAMAGUCHI, TAICHI; Ishii, Kojiro; Yamanaka, Masanori; YASUDA, KAZUNORI

    2007-01-01

    AbstractThe purpose of the present study was to clarify the acute effect of dynamic stretching exercise on muscular performance during concentric dynamic constant external resistance (DCER, formally called isotonic) muscle actions under various loads. Concentric DCER leg extension power outputs were measured in 12 healthy male students after 2 types of pretreatment. The pre- treatments were: (a) dynamic stretching treatment including 2 types of dynamic stretching exercises of leg extensors an...

  12. Unilateral eccentric resistance training: A direct comparison between isokinetic and dynamic constant external resistance modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coratella, Giuseppe; Milanese, Chiara; Schena, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Aim of the study was to compare the effects of unilateral eccentric-only training using constant velocity vs. constant external load. Forty-seven participants were randomized in isokinetic (IK), dynamic constant external resistance (DCER) unilateral eccentric training or control groups. Knee extension 1RM and isometric, eccentric and concentric knee extensors peak torque, as well as changes in vastus lateralis fascicle pennation angle, fascicle length, muscle thickness, and quadriceps fat-free mass were measured. Both IK and DCER training consisted in 5 × 8 eccentric-only repetitions, 2d/w, for 6 weeks. IK and DCER training sessions were matched for total volume. After training, both IK and DCER similarly increased 1RM (respectively, +4.4 kg, CI95% 1.8-7.0 and +5.5 kg, CI95% 3.3-7.9), isometric (respectively, +34.5 N/m, CI95% 23.0-45.9 and +15.8, CI95% 5.4-26.2) and concentric peak torque (respectively, +17.0 N/m, CI95% 6.6 to +27.4 and 12.2 CI95% 2.8-21.7). IK increased eccentric peak torque significantly more than DCER (respectively, +84.2 N/m, CI95% 66.3-102.1 and +38.2 N/m, CI95% 21.9-54.4). Both IK and DCER similarly increased fascicle length (respectively, +14.7 mm, CI95% 5.4-24.0 and +14.4 mm, CI95% 5.4-23.3) and muscle thickness (respectively, +3.3 mm, CI95% 1.5-5.1, and +4.1 mm, CI95% 2.5-5.7). Matching the training volume resulted in similar adaptations comparing eccentric-only IK or DCER resistance training. Both in rehabilitation and in training practice, the use of easily available gym devices can be a good substitute for expensive and often unavailable IK devices.

  13. Current perspectives on the dynamics of antibiotic resistance in different reservoirs

    OpenAIRE

    Eduarda Gomes-Neves

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance consists of a dynamic web. In this review, we describe the path by which different antibiotic residues and antibioticresistance genes disseminate among relevant reservoirs (human, animal, and environmental settings), evaluating how these events contribute tothe current scenario of antibiotic resistance. The relationship between the spread of resistance and the contribution of different genetic elementsand events is revisited, exploring examples of the processes by which ...

  14. Dynamics of Quinolone Resistance in Fecal Escherichia coli of Finishing Pigs after Ciprofloxacin Administration

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Kang; Xu, Chang-Wen; Zeng, Bo; XIA, Qing-Qing; Zhang, An-Yun; LEI, Chang-Wei; Guan, Zhong-Bin; Cheng, Han; Wang, Hong-ning

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Escherichia coli resistance to quinolones has now become a serious issue in large-scale pig farms of China. It is necessary to study the dynamics of quinolone resistance in fecal Escherichia coli of pigs after antimicrobial administration. Here, we present the hypothesis that the emergence of resistance in pigs requires drug accumulation for 7 days or more. To test this hypothesis, 26 pigs (90 days old, about 30 kg) not fed any antimicrobial after weaning were selected and divided in...

  15. Resistive magnetohydrodynamic reconnection: Resolving long-term, chaotic dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keppens, R.; Restante, A. L.; Lapenta, G. [Centre for mathematical Plasma-Astrophysics, Department of Mathematics, KU Leuven (Belgium); Porth, O. [Department of Applied Mathematics, The University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Galsgaard, K.; Frederiksen, J. T. [The Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, København K (Denmark); Parnell, C. [School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of St. Andrews, Fife (United Kingdom)

    2013-09-15

    In this paper, we address the long-term evolution of an idealised double current system entering reconnection regimes where chaotic behavior plays a prominent role. Our aim is to quantify the energetics in high magnetic Reynolds number evolutions, enriched by secondary tearing events, multiple magnetic island coalescence, and compressive versus resistive heating scenarios. Our study will pay particular attention to the required numerical resolutions achievable by modern (grid-adaptive) computations, and comment on the challenge associated with resolving chaotic island formation and interaction. We will use shock-capturing, conservative, grid-adaptive simulations for investigating trends dominated by both physical (resistivity) and numerical (resolution) parameters, and confront them with (visco-)resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations performed with very different, but equally widely used discretization schemes. This will allow us to comment on the obtained evolutions in a manner irrespective of the adopted discretization strategy. Our findings demonstrate that all schemes used (finite volume based shock-capturing, high order finite differences, and particle in cell-like methods) qualitatively agree on the various evolutionary stages, and that resistivity values of order 0.001 already can lead to chaotic island appearance. However, none of the methods exploited demonstrates convergence in the strong sense in these chaotic regimes. At the same time, nonperturbed tests for showing convergence over long time scales in ideal to resistive regimes are provided as well, where all methods are shown to agree. Both the advantages and disadvantages of specific discretizations as applied to this challenging problem are discussed.

  16. Phosphorylation and proteome dynamics in pathogen-resistant tomato plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stulemeijer, I.J.E.

    2008-01-01

    Microbial plant pathogens impose a continuous threat on global food production. Similar to disease resistance in mammals, an innate immune system allows plants to recognise pathogens and swiftly activate defence. For the work described in this thesis, the interaction between tomato and the extracell

  17. Phosphorylation and proteome dynamics in pathogen-resistant tomato plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stulemeijer, I.J.E.

    2008-01-01

    Microbial plant pathogens impose a continuous threat on global food production. Similar to disease resistance in mammals, an innate immune system allows plants to recognise pathogens and swiftly activate defence. For the work described in this thesis, the interaction between tomato and the

  18. Phosphorylation and proteome dynamics in pathogen-resistant tomato plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stulemeijer, I.J.E.

    2008-01-01

    Microbial plant pathogens impose a continuous threat on global food production. Similar to disease resistance in mammals, an innate immune system allows plants to recognise pathogens and swiftly activate defence. For the work described in this thesis, the interaction between tomato and the extracell

  19. Current perspectives on the dynamics of antibiotic resistance in different reservoirs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caniça, Manuela; Manageiro, Vera; Jones-Dias, Daniela; Clemente, Lurdes; Gomes-Neves, Eduarda; Poeta, Patrícia; Dias, Elsa; Ferreira, Eugénia

    2015-09-01

    Antibiotic resistance consists of a dynamic web. In this review, we describe the path by which different antibiotic residues and antibiotic resistance genes disseminate among relevant reservoirs (human, animal, and environmental settings), evaluating how these events contribute to the current scenario of antibiotic resistance. The relationship between the spread of resistance and the contribution of different genetic elements and events is revisited, exploring examples of the processes by which successful mobile resistance genes spread across different niches. The importance of classic and next generation molecular approaches, as well as action plans and policies which might aid in the fight against antibiotic resistance, are also reviewed. Copyright © 2015 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Experience with Dynamic Reinforcement Rates Decreases Resistance to Extinction

    OpenAIRE

    Craig, Andrew R.; Shahan, Timothy A

    2016-01-01

    The ability of organisms to detect reinforcer-rate changes in choice preparations is positively related to two factors: the magnitude of the change in rate and the frequency with which rates change. Gallistel (2012) suggested similar rate-detection processes are responsible for decreases in responding during operant extinction. Although effects of magnitude of change in reinforcer rate on resistance to extinction are well known (e.g., the partial-reinforcement-extinction effect), effects of f...

  1. Resolution of discordant HIV-1 protease resistance rankings using molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, David W; Coveney, Peter V

    2011-10-24

    The emergence of drug resistance is a major challenge for the effective treatment of HIV. In this article, we explore the application of atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to quantify the level of resistance of a patient-derived HIV-1 protease sequence to the inhibitor lopinavir. A comparative drug ranking methodology was developed to compare drug resistance rankings produced by the Stanford HIVdb, ANRS, and RegaDB clinical decision support systems. The methodology was used to identify a patient sequence for which the three rival online tools produced differing resistance rankings. Mutations at only three positions ( L10I , A71IV, and L90M ) influenced the resistance level assigned to the sequence. We use ensemble molecular dynamics simulations to elucidate the origin of these discrepancies and the mechanism of resistance. By simulating not only the full patient sequences but also systems containing the constituent mutations, we gain insight into why resistance estimates vary and the interactions between the various mutations. In the same way, we also gain valuable knowledge of the mechanistic causes of resistance. In particular, we identify changes in the relative conformation of the two beta sheets that form the protease dimer interface which suggest an explanation of the relative frequency of different amino acids observed in patients at residue 71.

  2. Dynamics of liquid solidification thermal resistance of contact layer

    CERN Document Server

    Lipnicki, Zygmunt

    2017-01-01

    This monograph comprehensively describes phenomena of heat flow during phase change as well as the dynamics of liquid solidification, i.e. the development of a solidified layer. The book provides the reader with basic knowledge for practical designs, as well as with equations which describe processes of energy transformation. The target audience primarily comprises researchers and experts in the field of heat flow, but the book may also be beneficial for both practicing engineers and graduate students.

  3. Use Of Dynamic Resistance And Dynamic Energy To Compare Two Resistance Spot Welding Equipments For Automotive Industry In Zinc Coated And Uncoated Sheets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Batista

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Resistance spot welding is a fabrication process highly used in the structures assembly. This fact evidences the importance of this welding process control, due to its efficiency, productivity speediness and straightforward simple automation. This work aimed to study the weldability of zinc coated and uncoated steel sheets for automotive industry, comparing the performance of two welding equipments with two current outputkinds: alternating current (AC and medium frequency direct current (DC. The welding parameters were kept constant: 260 kgf (force, 150 ms (time and 7.0 kA (welding current, based upon an optimization parameters methodology. The joints were characterized using optical metallography (spot diameter, indentation depth and weld penetration depth, mechanical tensile-shear tests and electrical measurements: contact electrical resistance, dynamic resistance and dynamic energy. The results showed that welding in medium frequency direct current was more efficient in generating heat in zinc coated sheets and uncoated sheets than alternating current equipment. In welding using AC and DC equipments in zinc coated sheets, the spot weld time formation was 25ms longer than uncoated steel sheets spot weld time. The burn of zinc during welding did not damage the spot weld formation with AC or DC equipments. The electrical contact resistance increased with the roughnessand also presented 52% higher in uncoated sheets than in zinc coated sheets. Finally, the increase in dynamicresistance and dynamic energy augmented the spot weld diameter for both welding equipments. As a final conclusion, the medium frequency direct current equipment presented better results than wave alternating current

  4. Acute effects of dynamic stretching exercise on power output during concentric dynamic constant external resistance leg extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Taichi; Ishii, Kojiro; Yamanaka, Masanori; Yasuda, Kazunori

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of the present study was to clarify the acute effect of dynamic stretching exercise on muscular performance during concentric dynamic constant external resistance (DCER, formally called isotonic) muscle actions under various loads. Concentric DCER leg extension power outputs were measured in 12 healthy male students after 2 types of pretreatment. The pretreatments were: (a) dynamic stretching treatment including 2 types of dynamic stretching exercises of leg extensors and the other 2 types of dynamic stretching exercises simulating the leg extension motion (2 sets of 15 times each with 30-second rest periods between sets; total duration: about 8 minutes), and (b) nonstretching treatment by resting for 8 minutes in a sitting position. Loads during measurement of the power output were set to 5, 30, and 60% of the maximum voluntary contractile (MVC) torque with isometric leg extension in each subject. The power output after the dynamic stretching treatment was significantly (p after the nonstretching treatment under each load (5% MVC: 468.4 +/- 102.6 W vs. 430.1 +/- 73.0 W; 30% MVC: 520.4 +/- 108.5 W vs. 491.0 +/- 93.0 W; 60% MVC: 487.1 +/- 100.6 W vs. 450.8 +/- 83.7 W). The present study demonstrated that dynamic stretching routines, such as dynamic stretching exercise of target muscle groups and dynamic stretching exercise simulating the actual motion pattern, significantly improve power output with concentric DCER muscle actions under various loads. These results suggested that dynamic stretching routines in warm-up protocols enhance power performance because common power activities are carried out by DCER muscle actions under various loads.

  5. Colonization and resistance dynamics of gram-negative bacteria in patients during and after hospitalization.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.M.G. Filius (Margreet); I.C. Gyssens (Inge); I.M. Kershof (Irma); P.J. Roovers (Patty); A. Ott (Alewijn); A.G. Vulto (Arnold); H.A. Verbrugh (Henri); H.P. Endtz (Hubert)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractThe colonization and resistance dynamics of aerobic gram-negative bacteria in the intestinal and oropharyngeal microfloras of patients admitted to intensive care units (ICU) and general wards were investigated during and after hospitalization. A total of 3,316 specimens were obtained fro

  6. The dynamics of resistance to change: A sequential analysis of change agents in action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klonek, F.E.; Lehmann-Willenbrock, N.K.; Kauffeld, S.

    2014-01-01

    Despite consensus that successful change management depends on how change is are communicated to the employees, the dynamic communication process between change agents and recipients remains largely unexplored. We discuss how change language can capture recipients' resistance to and readiness for ch

  7. Corticospinal responses of resistance-trained and un-trained males during dynamic muscle contractions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tallent, J.; Goodall, S.; Hortobagyi, T.; Gibson, A. St Clair; Howatson, G.

    2013-01-01

    Little is known regarding the modulation and the plasticity of the neural pathway interconnecting elements of the central nervous system and skeletal muscle in resistant-trained individuals. The aim of the study was to compare corticospinal and spinal responses measured during dynamic muscle contrac

  8. The dynamics of resistance to change: A sequential analysis of change agents in action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klonek, F.E.; Lehmann-Willenbrock, N.K.; Kauffeld, S.

    2014-01-01

    Despite consensus that successful change management depends on how change is are communicated to the employees, the dynamic communication process between change agents and recipients remains largely unexplored. We discuss how change language can capture recipients' resistance to and readiness for

  9. Neuromuscular fatigue during dynamic maximal strength and hypertrophic resistance loadings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Simon; Davis, Lisa; Avela, Janne; Häkkinen, Keijo

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the acute neuromuscular fatigue during dynamic maximal strength and hypertrophic loadings, known to cause different adaptations underlying strength gain during training. Thirteen healthy, untrained males performed two leg press loadings, one week apart, consisting of 15 sets of 1 repetition maximum (MAX) and 5 sets of 10 repetition maximums (HYP). Concentric load and muscle activity, electromyography (EMG) amplitude and median frequency, was assessed throughout each set. Additionally, maximal bilateral isometric force and muscle activity was assessed pre-, mid-, and up to 30 min post-loading. Concentric load during MAX was decreased after set 10 (Pmuscle activity during HYP loading. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Abundance and dynamics of antibiotic resistance genes and integrons in lake sediment microcosms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn Berglund

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance in bacteria causing disease is an ever growing threat to the world. Recently, environmental bacteria have become established as important both as sources of antibiotic resistance genes and in disseminating resistance genes. Low levels of antibiotics and other pharmaceuticals are regularly released into water environments via wastewater, and the concern is that such environmental contamination may serve to create hotspots for antibiotic resistance gene selection and dissemination. In this study, microcosms were created from water and sediments gathered from a lake in Sweden only lightly affected by human activities. The microcosms were exposed to a mixture of antibiotics of varying environmentally relevant concentrations (i.e., concentrations commonly encountered in wastewaters in order to investigate the effect of low levels of antibiotics on antibiotic resistance gene abundances and dynamics in a previously uncontaminated environment. Antibiotic concentrations were measured using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Abundances of seven antibiotic resistance genes and the class 1 integron integrase gene, intI1, were quantified using real-time PCR. Resistance genes sulI and ermB were quantified in the microcosm sediments with mean abundances 5 and 15 gene copies/10(6 16S rRNA gene copies, respectively. Class 1 integrons were determined in the sediments with a mean concentration of 3.8 × 10(4 copies/106 16S rRNA gene copies. The antibiotic treatment had no observable effect on antibiotic resistance gene or integron abundances.

  11. Transmission intensity and drug resistance in malaria population dynamics: implications for climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artzy-Randrup, Yael; Alonso, David; Pascual, Mercedes

    2010-10-26

    Although the spread of drug resistance and the influence of climate change on malaria are most often considered separately, these factors have the potential to interact through altered levels of transmission intensity. The influence of transmission intensity on the evolution of drug resistance has been addressed in theoretical studies from a population genetics' perspective; less is known however on how epidemiological dynamics at the population level modulates this influence. We ask from a theoretical perspective, whether population dynamics can explain non-trivial, non-monotonic, patterns of treatment failure with transmission intensity, and, if so, under what conditions. We then address the implications of warmer temperatures in an East African highland, where, as in other similar regions at the altitudinal edge of malaria's distribution, there has been a pronounced increase of cases from the 1970s to the 1990s. Our theoretical analyses, with a transmission model that includes different levels of immunity, demonstrate that an increase in transmission beyond a threshold can lead to a decrease in drug resistance, as previously shown, but that a second threshold may occur and lead to the re-establishment of drug resistance. Estimates of the increase in transmission intensity from the 1970s to the 1990s for the Kenyan time series, obtained by fitting the two-stage version of the model with an explicit representation of vector dynamics, suggest that warmer temperatures are likely to have moved the system towards the first threshold, and in so doing, to have promoted the faster spread of drug resistance. Climate change and drug resistance can interact and need not be considered as alternative explanations for trends in disease incidence in this region. Non-monotonic patterns of treatment failure with transmission intensity similar to those described as the 'valley phenomenon' for Uganda can result from epidemiological dynamics but under poorly understood assumptions.

  12. GENE EXPRESSION DYNAMICS IN PATIENTS WITH SEVERE THERAPY-RESISTANT ASTHMA DURING TREATMENT PERIOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. S. Kulikov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The leading mechanisms and causes of severe therapy resistant asthma are poorly understood. The aim of this study was to define global patterns of gene expression in adults with severe therapy-resistant asthma in dynamic during treatment period.Methods: Performed 24-week prospective interventional study in parallel groups. Severe asthma patients was aposterior divided at therapy sensitive and resistant patients according to ATS criteria. Global transcriptome profile was characterized using the Affymetrix HuGene ST1.0 chip. Cluster analysis was performed.Results and conclusion: According to our data several mechanisms of therapy resistance may be considered: increased levels of nitric oxide and beta2-agonists nitration, dysregulation of endogenous steroids secretion and involvement in the pathogenesis of Staphylococcus aureus. Absence of suppression of gene expression KEGG-pathway “asthma" may reflect the low efficiency or long period of anti-inflammatory therapy effect realization.

  13. Embedded Artificial Neuval Network-Based Real-Time Half-Wave Dynamic Resistance Estimation during the A.C. Resistance Spot Welding Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Gong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Online monitoring of the instantaneous resistance variation during the A.C. resistance spot welding is of paramount importance for the weld quality control. On the basis of the welding transformer circuit model, a new method is proposed to measure the transformer primary-side signal for estimating the secondary-side resistance in each 1/4 cycle. The tailored computing system ensures that the measuring method possesses a real-time computational capacity with satisfying accuracy. Since the dynamic resistance cannot be represented via an explicit function with respect to measurable parameters from the primary side of the welding transformer, an offline trained embedded artificial neural network (ANN successfully realizes the real-time implicit function calculation or estimation. A DSP-based resistance spot welding monitoring system is developed to perform ANN computation. Experimental results indicate that the proposed method is applicable for measuring the dynamic resistance in single-phase, half-wave controlled rectifier circuits.

  14. Modelling and analysis of dynamics of viral infection of cells and of interferon resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getto, Ph.; Kimmel, M.; Marciniak-Czochra, A.

    2008-08-01

    Interferons are active biomolecules, which help fight viral infections by spreading from infected to uninfected cells and activate effector molecules, which confer resistance from the virus on cells. We propose a new model of dynamics of viral infection, including endocytosis, cell death, production of interferon and development of resistance. The novel element is a specific biologically justified mechanism of interferon action, which results in dynamics different from other infection models. The model reflects conditions prevailing in liquid cultures (ideal mixing), and the absence of cells or virus influx from outside. The basic model is a nonlinear system of five ordinary differential equations. For this variant, it is possible to characterise global behaviour, using a conservation law. Analytic results are supplemented by computational studies. The second variant of the model includes age-of-infection structure of infected cells, which is described by a transport-type partial differential equation for infected cells. The conclusions are: (i) If virus mortality is included, the virus becomes eventually extinct and subpopulations of uninfected and resistant cells are established. (ii) If virus mortality is not included, the dynamics may lead to extinction of uninfected cells. (iii) Switching off the interferon defense results in a decrease of the sum total of uninfected and resistant cells. (iv) Infection-age structure of infected cells may result in stabilisation or destabilisation of the system, depending on detailed assumptions. Our work seems to constitute the first comprehensive mathematical analysis of the cell-virus-interferon system based on biologically plausible hypotheses.

  15. Molecular Dynamics Studies on Ballistic Thermal Resistance of Graphene Nano-Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Wen-Jun; Cao, Bing-Yang

    2015-05-01

    Ballistic thermal resistance of graphene nano-junctions is investigated using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation. The simulation system is consisted of two symmetrical trapezoidal or rectangular graphene nano-ribbons (GNRs) and a connecting nanoscale constriction in between. From the simulated temperature profile, a big temperature jump resulted from the constriction is found, which is proportional to the heat current and corresponds to a local ballistic thermal resistance. Fixing the constriction width and the length of GNRs, this ballistic thermal resistance is independent of the width of the GNRs bottom layer, i.e., the convex angle. But interestingly, this thermal resistance has obvious size effect. It is inversely proportional to the constriction width and will disappear with the constriction being wider. Moreover, based on the phonon dynamics theory, a theoretical model of the ballistic thermal resistance in two-dimensional nano-systems is developed, which gives a good explanation on microcosmic level and agrees well with the simulation result quantitatively and qualitatively. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 51322603, 51136001, 51356001, Science Fund for Creative Research Groups (No. 51321002), the Program for New Century Excellent Talents in University, Tsinghua University Initiative Scientific Research Program, the Tsinghua National Laboratory for Information Science and Technology of China

  16. A molecular dynamics investigation on the crizotinib resistance mechanism of C1156Y mutation in ALK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Hui-Yong [Shandong University of Technology, Zibo 255049 (China); Ji, Feng-Qin, E-mail: fengqinji@mail.hzau.edu.cn [National Key Laboratory of Crop Genetic Improvement, College of Life Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Center for Bioinformatics, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The study revealed the detailed resistance mechanism of the non-active mutation C1156Y in ALK. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C1156Y leads to crizotinib displacement and conformational changes in the binding cavity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The conformations cause a decline in the vdW and electrostatic energy between crizotinib and ALK. -- Abstract: Crizotinib is an anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitor that has recently been approved in the US for the treatment of non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). Despite its outstanding safety and efficacy, several resistant mutations against crizotinib have been detected in the treatment of NSCLC. However, in contrast to the widely accepted mechanism of steric hindrance by mutations at the active site, the mechanism by which the C1156Y non-active site mutation confers resistance against crizotinib remains unclear. In the present study, the resistance mechanism of C1156Y in ALK was investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The results suggest that despite the non-active site mutation, C1156Y causes the dislocation of crizotinib as well as the indirect conformational changes in the binding cavity, which results in a marked decrease in the van der Waals and electrostatic interactions between crizotinib and ALK. The obtained results provide a detailed explanation of the resistance caused by C1156Y and may give a vital clue for the design of drugs to combat crizotinib resistance.

  17. The dynamics of resistance to change: A sequential analysis of change agents in action

    OpenAIRE

    Klonek, F.E.; Lehmann-Willenbrock, N.K.; Kauffeld, S.

    2014-01-01

    Despite consensus that successful change management depends on how change is are communicated to the employees, the dynamic communication process between change agents and recipients remains largely unexplored. We discuss how change language can capture recipients' resistance to and readiness for change, in terms of change versus sustain talk, and adopt a coding instrument from clinical psychology (Motivational Interviewing Skill Code, MISC). We explored whether autonomy-restrictive change ag...

  18. The DCRS: Dynamic compaction resistance sintering. A flash sintering process with a dynamic loading ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acquier, P.; Lemonnier, S.; Barraud, E.; Rusinek, A.; Grosdidier, T.; Allain-Bonnasso, N.; Terner, C.

    2012-08-01

    A homemade powder processing device combining Joule heating and dynamic compaction is presented. This device has been tested at temperatures as high as 1850 ∘C with heating rates up to 1000 ∘C/min. A detailed description of this device is given here followed by mechanical response and thermal validation tests. This highlights the reproducibility of the results on both the thermal and mechanical point of view.

  19. The DCRS: Dynamic compaction resistance sintering. A flash sintering process with a dynamic loading ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allain-Bonnasso N.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A homemade powder processing device combining Joule heating and dynamic compaction is presented. This device has been tested at temperatures as high as 1850 ∘C with heating rates up to 1000 ∘C/min. A detailed description of this device is given here followed by mechanical response and thermal validation tests. This highlights the reproducibility of the results on both the thermal and mechanical point of view.

  20. Resistance mechanism of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 protease to inhibitors: A molecular dynamic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Dayer

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 protease inhibitors comprise an important class of drugs used in HIV treatments. However, mutations of protease genes accelerated by low fidelity of reverse transcriptase yield drug resistant mutants of reduced affinities for the inhibitors. This problem is considered to be a serious barrier against HIV treatment for the foreseeable future. In this study, molecular dynamic simulation method was used to examine the combinational and additive effects of all known mutations involved in drug resistance against FDA approved inhibitors. Results showed that drug resistant mutations are not randomly distributed along the protease sequence; instead, they are localized on flexible or hot points of the protein chain. Substitution of more hydrophobic residues in flexible points of protease chains tends to increase the folding, lower the flexibility and decrease the active site area of the protease. The reduced affinities of HIV-1 protease for inhibitors seemed to be due to substantial decrease in the size of the active site and flap mobility. A correlation was found between the binding energy of inhibitors and their affinities for each mutant suggesting the distortion of the active site geometry in drug resistance by preventing effective fitting of inhibitors into the enzymes' active site. To overcome the problem of drug resistance of HIV-1 protease, designing inhibitors of variable functional groups and configurations is proposed.

  1. Dynamics of Mutator and Antibiotic-Resistant Populations in a Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Macià, María D.; Pérez, José L.; Molin, Søren;

    2011-01-01

    Biofilm growth, antibiotic resistance, and mutator phenotypes are key components of chronic respiratory infections by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis patients. We examined the dynamics of mutator and antibiotic-resistant populations in P. aeruginosa flow-cell biofilms, using fluorescent...

  2. Adaptive Landscape by Environment Interactions Dictate Evolutionary Dynamics in Models of Drug Resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Brandon Ogbunugafor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The adaptive landscape analogy has found practical use in recent years, as many have explored how their understanding can inform therapeutic strategies that subvert the evolution of drug resistance. A major barrier to applications of these concepts is a lack of detail concerning how the environment affects adaptive landscape topography, and consequently, the outcome of drug treatment. Here we combine empirical data, evolutionary theory, and computer simulations towards dissecting adaptive landscape by environment interactions for the evolution of drug resistance in two dimensions-drug concentration and drug type. We do so by studying the resistance mediated by Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR to two related inhibitors-pyrimethamine and cycloguanil-across a breadth of drug concentrations. We first examine whether the adaptive landscapes for the two drugs are consistent with common definitions of cross-resistance. We then reconstruct all accessible pathways across the landscape, observing how their structure changes with drug environment. We offer a mechanism for non-linearity in the topography of accessible pathways by calculating of the interaction between mutation effects and drug environment, which reveals rampant patterns of epistasis. We then simulate evolution in several different drug environments to observe how these individual mutation effects (and patterns of epistasis influence paths taken at evolutionary "forks in the road" that dictate adaptive dynamics in silico. In doing so, we reveal how classic metrics like the IC50 and minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC are dubious proxies for understanding how evolution will occur across drug environments. We also consider how the findings reveal ambiguities in the cross-resistance concept, as subtle differences in adaptive landscape topography between otherwise equivalent drugs can drive drastically different evolutionary outcomes. Summarizing, we discuss the results with

  3. Adaptive Landscape by Environment Interactions Dictate Evolutionary Dynamics in Models of Drug Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbunugafor, C Brandon; Wylie, C Scott; Diakite, Ibrahim; Weinreich, Daniel M; Hartl, Daniel L

    2016-01-01

    The adaptive landscape analogy has found practical use in recent years, as many have explored how their understanding can inform therapeutic strategies that subvert the evolution of drug resistance. A major barrier to applications of these concepts is a lack of detail concerning how the environment affects adaptive landscape topography, and consequently, the outcome of drug treatment. Here we combine empirical data, evolutionary theory, and computer simulations towards dissecting adaptive landscape by environment interactions for the evolution of drug resistance in two dimensions-drug concentration and drug type. We do so by studying the resistance mediated by Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) to two related inhibitors-pyrimethamine and cycloguanil-across a breadth of drug concentrations. We first examine whether the adaptive landscapes for the two drugs are consistent with common definitions of cross-resistance. We then reconstruct all accessible pathways across the landscape, observing how their structure changes with drug environment. We offer a mechanism for non-linearity in the topography of accessible pathways by calculating of the interaction between mutation effects and drug environment, which reveals rampant patterns of epistasis. We then simulate evolution in several different drug environments to observe how these individual mutation effects (and patterns of epistasis) influence paths taken at evolutionary "forks in the road" that dictate adaptive dynamics in silico. In doing so, we reveal how classic metrics like the IC50 and minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) are dubious proxies for understanding how evolution will occur across drug environments. We also consider how the findings reveal ambiguities in the cross-resistance concept, as subtle differences in adaptive landscape topography between otherwise equivalent drugs can drive drastically different evolutionary outcomes. Summarizing, we discuss the results with regards to their

  4. Adaptive Landscape by Environment Interactions Dictate Evolutionary Dynamics in Models of Drug Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbunugafor, C. Brandon; Wylie, C. Scott; Diakite, Ibrahim; Weinreich, Daniel M.; Hartl, Daniel L.

    2016-01-01

    The adaptive landscape analogy has found practical use in recent years, as many have explored how their understanding can inform therapeutic strategies that subvert the evolution of drug resistance. A major barrier to applications of these concepts is a lack of detail concerning how the environment affects adaptive landscape topography, and consequently, the outcome of drug treatment. Here we combine empirical data, evolutionary theory, and computer simulations towards dissecting adaptive landscape by environment interactions for the evolution of drug resistance in two dimensions—drug concentration and drug type. We do so by studying the resistance mediated by Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) to two related inhibitors—pyrimethamine and cycloguanil—across a breadth of drug concentrations. We first examine whether the adaptive landscapes for the two drugs are consistent with common definitions of cross-resistance. We then reconstruct all accessible pathways across the landscape, observing how their structure changes with drug environment. We offer a mechanism for non-linearity in the topography of accessible pathways by calculating of the interaction between mutation effects and drug environment, which reveals rampant patterns of epistasis. We then simulate evolution in several different drug environments to observe how these individual mutation effects (and patterns of epistasis) influence paths taken at evolutionary “forks in the road” that dictate adaptive dynamics in silico. In doing so, we reveal how classic metrics like the IC50 and minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) are dubious proxies for understanding how evolution will occur across drug environments. We also consider how the findings reveal ambiguities in the cross-resistance concept, as subtle differences in adaptive landscape topography between otherwise equivalent drugs can drive drastically different evolutionary outcomes. Summarizing, we discuss the results with

  5. "Dynamic range" of inferred phenotypic HIV drug resistance values in clinical practice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke C Swenson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: 'Virtual' or inferred phenotypes (vPhenotypes are commonly used to assess resistance to antiretroviral agents in patients failing therapy. In this study, we provide a clinical context for understanding vPhenotype values. METHODS: All HIV-infected persons enrolled in the British Columbia Drug Treatment Program with a baseline plasma viral load (pVL and follow-up genotypic resistance and pVL results were included up to October 29, 2008 (N = 5,277. Change from baseline pVL was determined as a function of Virco vPhenotype, and the "dynamic range" (defined here by the 10th and 90th percentiles for fold-change in IC₅₀ amongst all patients was estimated from the distribution of vPhenotye fold-changes across the cohort. RESULTS: The distribution of vPhenotypes from a large cohort of HIV patients who have failed therapy are presented for all available antiretroviral agents. A maximum change in IC₅₀ of at least 13-fold was observed for all drugs. The dideoxy drugs, tenofovir and most PIs exhibited small "dynamic ranges" with values of 99% of samples. In contrast, zidovudine, lamivudine, emtricitabine and the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inihibitors (excluding etravirine had large dynamic ranges. CONCLUSION: We describe the populational distribution of vPhenotypes such that vPhenotype results can be interpreted relative to other patients in a drug-specific manner.

  6. Genetic diversity, transmission dynamics and drug resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Angola

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdigão, João; Clemente, Sofia; Ramos, Jorge; Masakidi, Pedro; Machado, Diana; Silva, Carla; Couto, Isabel; Viveiros, Miguel; Taveira, Nuno; Portugal, Isabel

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) poses a serious public health problem in Angola. No surveillance data on drug resistance is available and nothing is known regarding the genetic diversity and population structure of circulating Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains. Here, we have genotyped and evaluated drug susceptibility of 89 Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates from Luanda. Thirty-three different spoligotype profiles corresponding to 24 different Shared International Types (SIT) and 9 orphan profiles were detected. SIT 20 (LAM1) was the most prevalent (n = 16, 18.2%) followed by SIT 42 (LAM9; n = 15, 17.1%). Overall, the M. tuberculosis population structure in this sample was dominated by LAM (64.8%) and T (33.0%) strains. Twenty-four-loci MIRU-VNTR analysis revealed that a total of 13 isolates were grouped in 5 distinct clusters. Drug susceptibility data showed that 22 (24.7%) of the 89 clinical isolates were resistant to one or more antibacillary drugs of which 4 (4.5%) were multidrug resistant. In conclusion, this study demonstrates a high predominance of LAM strains circulating in the Luanda setting and the presence of recent transmission events. The rate and the emergence dynamics of drug resistant TB found in this sample are significant and highlight the need of further studies specifically focused on MDR-TB transmission. PMID:28230095

  7. TOTAL RESISTANCE PREDICTION OF SELF PROPELLED COAL BARGE (SPCB USING COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agung Purwana

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper the computational fluid dynamic (CFD technique is applied to predict the total resistance (Rt of Self Propelled Coal Barge (SPCB. The simulation process was executed using ANSYS®software based on fluid flow (CFX solver. The selected CFD method is volume of fluid (VOF. The solid modeling of SPCB is developed using Maxsurf®. Boundary conditions are set on each domain area covering bottom,free surface, inlet, outlet, shipand wall. The variation of computaitional grid (meshing grid which is used in computation are SST (Shear Stress Transport67,000, SST 73,000, SST 103,000, SST 117,000, SST 127,000, SST 147,000, SST 157,000, and SST 200,500. Total resistance (Rt resulted from CFX computation is validated with total resistance (Rt resulted from Holtrop. The larger of grid meshing size, the better of validation result. The CFD technique demonstrated good agreement with Holtrop formulae in predicting the total resistance (Rt of SPCB.

  8. Dynamic simulation of resistance spot welding of zinc-coated steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Lu; Wang Min; Lu Fenggui

    2006-01-01

    A model was developed to simulate the temperature distribution and nugget formation during resistance spot welding ( RSW) of zinc-coated steels. It employs a coupled thermal-electrical-mechanical analysis simulating the dynamic RSW process. Temperature-dependent thermal-electrical-mechanical material properties were considered including contact-resistance.The contact area was determined from a coupled thermal-mechanical analysis. A layer of transition elements was used to represent the change of contact area by killing or activating elements. The heat generation and temperature field were computed in a coupled thermal-electrical model. All these analyses were solved using the commercial finite element method ( FEM) based on ANSYS code, and some advanced functions were used by writing a paragraph of codes by the authors.Compared with the results from only coupled thermal-electrical model in which contact area was uniform during the whole process, the result matches better to the experimental results.

  9. Dynamics of skyrmions and edge states in the resistive regime of mesoscopic p-wave superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Becerra, V.; Milošević, M. V.

    2017-02-01

    In a mesoscopic sample of a chiral p-wave superconductor, novel states comprising skyrmions and edge states have been stabilized in out-of-plane applied magnetic field. Using the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equations we shed light on the dynamic response of such states to an external applied current. Three different regimes are obtained, namely, the superconducting (stationary), resistive (non-stationary) and normal regime, similarly to conventional s-wave superconductors. However, in the resistive regime and depending on the external current, we found that moving skyrmions and the edge state behave distinctly different from the conventional kinematic vortex, thereby providing new fingerprints for identification of p-wave superconductivity.

  10. Dynamics of graphite fiber intercalation: In situ resistivity measurements with a four point probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworske, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    The dynamics of ferric chloride intercalation of single graphite fibers were studied, in situ, using a four point dc bridge. Measurements before, during and after the intercalation showed that the intercalation occurred within minutes at 200 C. Changes in fiber resistivity after exposure to air suggested hydration of the graphite intercalation compound. Deintercalation of the ferric chloride was initiated at temperatures in excess of 400 C. cycling the intercalant into and out of the graphite fiber gave no improvements in fiber resistivity. The activation energy of the ferric chloride intercalation reaction was found to be 17 + or - 4 kcal/mol 1 consistent with the concept of a preliminary nucleation step in the intercalation reaction.

  11. Direct current (DC) resistivity and Induced Polarization (IP) monitoring of active layer dynamics at high temporal resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doetsch, J.; Fiandaca, G.; Ingeman-Nielsen, Thomas;

    2015-01-01

    With permafrost thawing and changes in active layer dynamics induced by climate change, interactions between biogeochemical and thermal processes in the ground are of great importance. Here, active layer dynamics have been monitored using direct current (DC) resistivity and induced polarization (IP...... the soil freezing as a strong increase in resistivity. While the freezing horizon generally moves deeper with time, some variations in the freezing depth are observed along the profile. Comparison with depth-specific soil temperature indicates an exponential relationship between resistivity and below...

  12. Simulation on Dynamic Characteristic of Negative Resistance Arc in Pulsed TIG Welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Lijun; HAN Pengbo; DONG Tianshun; ZHANG Jian; XU Licheng

    2007-01-01

    A mathematical model is established on the basis of the physical characteristic of the negative resistance arc when a low current of 0-50 A is applied in pulsed TIG welding. The simulation model converted from the mathematical model is run in MATLAB environment, and the discussion is focused on the way the peak current ranging from 29 A to 50 A and the time constant of arc in the span of 0.003-0.006 s influence the simulating results and the dynamic characteristic. The simulating data are close to that of welding experiments and correspond to the theoretical conclusion.

  13. Numerical modeling of the transmission dynamics of drug—sensitive and drug—resistant HSV—2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.B.GUMEL

    2001-01-01

    A competitive finite-difference method will be constructed and used to solve a modified deterministic model for the spread of herpes simplex virus type-2(HSV-2) within a given population.The model monitors the transmission dynamics and control of drug-sensitive and drug-resistant HSV-2.Unlike the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method (RK4),which fails when the discretization parameters exceed certain values,the novel numerical method to be developed in this paper gives convergent results for all parameter values.

  14. Rolling Resistance and Mechanical Properties of Grinded Copper Surfaces Using Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Shih-Wei; Wang, Chih-Hao; Fang, Te-Hua

    2016-09-01

    Mechanical properties of copper (Cu) film under grinding process were accomplished by molecular dynamics simulation. A numerical calculation was carried out to understand the distributions of atomic and slip vector inside the Cu films. In this study, the roller rotation velocity, temperature, and roller rotation direction change are investigated to clarify their effect on the deformation mechanism. The simulation results showed that the destruction of materials was increased proportionally to the roller rotation velocity. The machining process at higher temperature results in larger kinetic energy of atoms than lower temperature during the grinding process of the Cu films. The result also shows that the roller rotation in the counterclockwise direction had the better stability than the roller rotation in the clockwise direction due to significantly increased backfill atoms in the groove of the Cu film surface. Additionally, the effects of the rolling resistances on the Cu film surfaces during the grinding process are studied by the molecular dynamics simulation method.

  15. Rolling Resistance and Mechanical Properties of Grinded Copper Surfaces Using Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Shih-Wei; Wang, Chih-Hao; Fang, Te-Hua

    2016-12-01

    Mechanical properties of copper (Cu) film under grinding process were accomplished by molecular dynamics simulation. A numerical calculation was carried out to understand the distributions of atomic and slip vector inside the Cu films. In this study, the roller rotation velocity, temperature, and roller rotation direction change are investigated to clarify their effect on the deformation mechanism. The simulation results showed that the destruction of materials was increased proportionally to the roller rotation velocity. The machining process at higher temperature results in larger kinetic energy of atoms than lower temperature during the grinding process of the Cu films. The result also shows that the roller rotation in the counterclockwise direction had the better stability than the roller rotation in the clockwise direction due to significantly increased backfill atoms in the groove of the Cu film surface. Additionally, the effects of the rolling resistances on the Cu film surfaces during the grinding process are studied by the molecular dynamics simulation method.

  16. Dynamics of quinolone resistance in fecal Escherichia coli of finishing pigs after ciprofloxacin administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kang; Xu, Chang-Wen; Zeng, Bo; Xia, Qing-Qing; Zhang, An-Yun; Lei, Chang-Wei; Guan, Zhong-Bin; Cheng, Han; Wang, Hong-Ning

    2014-09-01

    Escherichia coli resistance to quinolones has now become a serious issue in large-scale pig farms of China. It is necessary to study the dynamics of quinolone resistance in fecal Escherichia coli of pigs after antimicrobial administration. Here, we present the hypothesis that the emergence of resistance in pigs requires drug accumulation for 7 days or more. To test this hypothesis, 26 pigs (90 days old, about 30 kg) not fed any antimicrobial after weaning were selected and divided into 2 equal groups: the experimental (EP) group and control (CP) group. Pigs in the EP group were orally treated daily with 5 mg ciprofloxacin/kg of body weight for 30 days, and pigs in the CP group were fed a normal diet. Fresh feces were collected at 16 time points from day 0 to day 61. At each time point, ten E. coli clones were tested for susceptibility to quinolones and mutations of gyrA and parC. The results showed that the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) for ciprofloxacin increased 16-fold compared with the initial MIC (0.5 µg/ml) after ciprofloxacin administration for 3 days and decreased 256-fold compared with the initial MIC (0.5 µg/ml) after ciprofloxacin withdrawal for 26 days. GyrA (S83L, D87N/ D87Y) and parC (S80I) substitutions were observed in all quinolone-resistant E. coli (QREC) clones with an MIC ≥8 µg/ml. This study provides scientific theoretical guidance for the rational use of antimicrobials and the control of bacterial resistance.

  17. The Analysis of Motion Dynamics and Resistance of the Multipurpose Boat Operating in Shallow Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Kulczyk

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Polish market of small boats has been developed very dynamically in recent years. Market competition forces the shipyards to build new more efficient hull forms and to cut the cost of production as well. This is why modern computer simulation programs are used more often by naval architects. Another trend is to design more universal ships that may be used by larger number of diversified customers. This paper presents project proposal of multipurpose boat hull form. The boat was design to fulfil the requirements imposed by public services like water police, fire brigades, and border guards. It is supposed to be operated on unexplored floodplains and other type shallow waters. The analysis of boat’s motion was based on computer simulations. The resistance curve was evaluated with two methods: comparison study of model test results of similar ships and CFD methods. The results obtained from Ansys Fluent and FINE/Marine systems were compared in this paper. It was shown that taking into consideration dynamic trim and sinkage has a significant impact on free surface capture and resistance values.

  18. A dynamic resistance nonuniformity compensation circuit for uncooled microbolometer detector arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Omer Ozgur; Akin, Tayfun

    2006-05-01

    This paper presents a new approach for compensating resistance nonuniformity of uncooled microbolometers by adjusting the bias currents of both detector and reference pixels. Contrary to conventional nonuniformity compensation circuits, this approach eliminates the need for digital-to-analog converters (DACs), which usually occupy a large area, dissipate high power, and require complicated external circuitry with high frequency data transfer to the microbolometer chip. The proposed circuit uses a feedback structure that dynamically changes the bias currents of the reference and detector pixels and does not need complicated external circuitry. A special feature of the circuit is that it provides continuous compensation for the detector and reference resistances due to temperature changes over time. The circuit is implemented in a 0.6μm 5V CMOS process and occupies an area of only 160μm × 630μm. Test results of the prototype circuit show that the circuit reduces the offset current due to resistance nonuniformity about 2.35% of its uncompensated value, i.e., an improvement of about 42.5 times is achieved, independent of the nonuniformity amount. The circuit achieves this compensation in 12μsec. Considering its simplicity and low cost, this approach is suitable for large array commercial infrared imaging systems.

  19. Transmission dynamics of resistant bacteria in a predator-prey system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xubin; Pan, Qiuhui; He, Mingfeng

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the impact on human health caused by the addition of antibiotics in the feed of food animals. We use the established transmission rule of resistant bacteria and combine it with a predator-prey system to determine a differential equations model. The equations have three steady equilibrium points corresponding to three population dynamics states under the influence of resistant bacteria. In order to quantitatively analyze the stability of the equilibrium points, we focused on the basic reproduction numbers. Then, both the local and global stability of the equilibrium points were quantitatively analyzed by using essential mathematical methods. Numerical results are provided to relate our model properties to some interesting biological cases. Finally, we discuss the effect of the two main parameters of the model, the proportion of antibiotics added to feed and the predation rate, and estimate the human health impacts related to the amount of feed antibiotics used. We further propose an approach for the prevention of the large-scale spread of resistant bacteria and illustrate the necessity of controlling the amount of in-feed antibiotics used.

  20. Alterations in ovarian cancer cell adhesion drive taxol resistance by increasing microtubule dynamics in a FAK-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrail, Daniel J; Khambhati, Niti N; Qi, Mark X; Patel, Krishan S; Ravikumar, Nithin; Brandenburg, Chandler P; Dawson, Michelle R

    2015-04-17

    Chemorefractory ovarian cancer patients show extremely poor prognosis. Microtubule-stabilizing Taxol (paclitaxel) is a first-line treatment against ovarian cancer. Despite the close interplay between microtubules and cell adhesion, it remains unknown if chemoresistance alters the way cells adhere to their extracellular environment, a process critical for cancer metastasis. To investigate this, we isolated Taxol-resistant populations of OVCAR3 and SKOV3 ovarian cancer cell lines. Though Taxol-resistant cells neither effluxed more drug nor gained resistance to other chemotherapeutics, they did display increased microtubule dynamics. These changes in microtubule dynamics coincided with faster attachment rates and decreased adhesion strength, which correlated with increased surface β1-integrin expression and decreased focal adhesion formation, respectively. Adhesion strength correlated best with Taxol-sensitivity, and was found to be independent of microtubule polymerization but dependent on focal adhesion kinase (FAK), which was up-regulated in Taxol-resistant cells. FAK inhibition also decreased microtubule dynamics to equal levels in both populations, indicating alterations in adhesive signaling are up-stream of microtubule dynamics. Taken together, this work demonstrates that Taxol-resistance dramatically alters how ovarian cancer cells adhere to their extracellular environment causing down-stream increases in microtubule dynamics, providing a therapeutic target that may improve prognosis by not only recovering drug sensitivity, but also decreasing metastasis.

  1. Dynamic changes and surveillance function of prion protein expression in gastric cancer drug resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji-Heng Wang; Jing-Ping Du; Ying-Hai Zhang; Xiao-Jun Zhao; Ru-Ying Fan; Zhi-Hong Wang; Zi-Tao Wu; Ying Han

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To explore the dynamic changes of prion protein (PrPc) in the process of gastric cancer drug resistance and the role of PrPc expression in the prognosis of gastric cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. METHODS: A series of gastric cancer cell lines resistant to different concentrations of adriamycin was established,and the expression of PrPc, Bcl-2 and Bax was detected in these cells. Apoptosis was determined using Annexin V staining. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry were performed to detect the expression of PrPc in patients receiving chemotherapy and to explore the role of PrPc expression in predicting the chemosensitivity and the outcome of gastric cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. Follow-up was performed for 2 years. RESULTS: PrPc expression was increased with the increase in drug resistance. Bcl-2, together with PrPc, increased the level of anti-apoptosis of cancer cells. Increased PrPc expression predicted the enhanced level of anti-apoptosis and resistance to anticancer drugs. PrPc expression could be used as a marker for predicting the efficacy of chemotherapy and the prognosis of gastric cancer. Increased PrPc expression predicted both poor chemosensitivity and a low 2-year survival rate. Contrarily, low PrPc expression predicted favorable chemosensitivity and a relatively high 2-year survival rate.CONCLUSION: PrPc expression is associated with histological types and differentiation of gastric cancer cells; The PrPc expression level might be a valuable marker in predicting the efficacy of chemotherapy and the prognosis of gastric cancer patients receiving chemotherapy.

  2. Dynamic thermal characteristics of heat pipe via segmented thermal resistance model for electric vehicle battery cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feifei; Lan, Fengchong; Chen, Jiqing

    2016-07-01

    Heat pipe cooling for battery thermal management systems (BTMSs) in electric vehicles (EVs) is growing due to its advantages of high cooling efficiency, compact structure and flexible geometry. Considering the transient conduction, phase change and uncertain thermal conditions in a heat pipe, it is challenging to obtain the dynamic thermal characteristics accurately in such complex heat and mass transfer process. In this paper, a "segmented" thermal resistance model of a heat pipe is proposed based on thermal circuit method. The equivalent conductivities of different segments, viz. the evaporator and condenser of pipe, are used to determine their own thermal parameters and conditions integrated into the thermal model of battery for a complete three-dimensional (3D) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. The proposed "segmented" model shows more precise than the "non-segmented" model by the comparison of simulated and experimental temperature distribution and variation of an ultra-thin micro heat pipe (UMHP) battery pack, and has less calculation error to obtain dynamic thermal behavior for exact thermal design, management and control of heat pipe BTMSs. Using the "segmented" model, the cooling effect of the UMHP pack with different natural/forced convection and arrangements is predicted, and the results correspond well to the tests.

  3. Production of Dynamic Frozen Waves: Controlling shape, location (and speed) of diffraction-resistant beams

    CERN Document Server

    Vieira, Tárcio A; Zamboni-Rached, Michel; Recami, Erasmo

    2015-01-01

    In recent times, we experimentally realized a quite efficient modeling of the shape of diffraction-resistant optical beams; thus generating for the first time the so-called Frozen Waves (FW), whose longitudinal intensity pattern can be arbitrarily chosen, within a prefixed space interval of the propagation axis. Such waves possess a host of potential applications: in medicine, biomedical optics, optical tweezers, atom guiding, remote sensing, tractor beams, optical communications or metrology, and other topics in photonic areas. In this work, we extend our theory of FWs -- which led to beams endowed with a static envelope -- through a dynamic modeling of the FWs, whose shape is now allowed to evolve in time in a predetermined way. And we experimentally create such dynamic FWs in Optics, via a computational holographic technique and a spatial light modulator. Experimental results are here presented for two cases of dynamic FWs, one of the zeroth and the other of higher order, the last one being the most intere...

  4. Dynamic baroreflex control of blood pressure: influence of the heart vs. peripheral resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huang-Ku; Guild, Sarah-Jane; Ringwood, John V; Barrett, Carolyn J; Leonard, Bridget L; Nguang, Sing-Kiong; Navakatikyan, Michael A; Malpas, Simon C

    2002-08-01

    The aim in the present experiments was to assess the dynamic baroreflex control of blood pressure, to develop an accurate mathematical model that represented this relationship, and to assess the role of dynamic changes in heart rate and stroke volume in giving rise to components of this response. Patterned electrical stimulation [pseudo-random binary sequence (PRBS)] was applied to the aortic depressor nerve (ADN) to produce changes in blood pressure under open-loop conditions in anesthetized rabbits. The stimulus provided constant power over the frequency range 0-0.5 Hz and revealed that the composite systems represented by the central nervous system, sympathetic activity, and vascular resistance responded as a second-order low-pass filter (corner frequency approximately 0.047 Hz) with a time delay (1.01 s). The gain between ADN and mean arterial pressure was reasonably constant before the corner frequency and then decreased with increasing frequency of stimulus. Although the heart rate was altered in response to the PRBS stimuli, we found that removal of the heart's ability to contribute to blood pressure variability by vagotomy and beta(1)-receptor blockade did not significantly alter the frequency response. We conclude that the contribution of the heart to the dynamic regulation of blood pressure is negligible in the rabbit. The consequences of this finding are examined with respect to low-frequency oscillations in blood pressure.

  5. Bifurcation of resistive wall mode dynamics predicted by magnetohydrodynamic-kinetic hybrid theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, S. X.; Wang, Z. X., E-mail: zxwang@dlut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Beams of the Ministry of Education, School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Wang, S.; Hao, G. Z., E-mail: haogz@swip.ac.cn; Song, X. M.; Wang, A. K. [Southwestern Institute of Physics, P.O.Box 432, Chengdu 610041 (China); Liu, Y. Q. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Southwestern Institute of Physics, P.O.Box 432, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2015-09-15

    The magnetohydrodynamic-kinetic hybrid theory has been extensively and successfully applied for interpreting experimental observations of macroscopic, low frequency instabilities, such as the resistive wall mode, in fusion plasmas. In this work, it is discovered that an analytic version of the hybrid formulation predicts a bifurcation of the mode dynamics while varying certain physical parameters of the plasma, such as the thermal particle collisionality or the ratio of the thermal ion to electron temperatures. This bifurcation can robustly occur under reasonably large parameter spaces as well as with different assumptions, for instance, on the particle collision model. Qualitatively similar bifurcation features are also observed in full toroidal computations presented in this work, based on a non-perturbative hybrid formulation.

  6. Analytical Solution for Model-Based Dynamic Power Factor Measurement in AC Resistance Spot Welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    On the basis of welding transformer circuit model, a new measuring method was proposed. This method measures the peak angle of the welding current, and then calculates the dynamic power factor in each half-wave.An artificial neural network is trained and used to generate simulation data for the analytical solution, i.e. a highorder binary polynomial, which can be easily adopted to calculate the power factor online. The tailored sensing and computing system ensures that the method possesses a real-time computational capacity and satisfying accuracy. A DSP-based resistance spot welding monitoring system was developed to perform ANN computation. The experimental results suggest that this measuring method is feasible.

  7. An Overview of Dynamic Contact Resistance Measurement of HV Circuit Breakers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhole, A. A.; Gandhare, W. Z.

    2016-06-01

    With the deregulation of the electrical power industry, utilities and service companies are operating in a changing business environment. High voltage circuit breakers are extremely important for the function of modern electric power supply systems. The need to predict the proper function of circuit breaker grew over the years as the transmission networks expanded. The maintenance of circuit breakers deserves special consideration because of their importance for routine switching and for protection of other equipments. Electric transmission system breakups and equipment destruction can occur if a circuit breaker fails to operate because of a lack of preventive maintenance. Dynamic Contact Resistance Measurement (DCRM) is known as an effective technique for assessing the condition of power circuit breakers contacts and operating mechanism. This paper gives a general review about DCRM. It discusses the practical case studies on use of DCRM for condition assessment of high voltage circuit breakers.

  8. High Dynamic Magnetic Beam Current Measurements by Means of Optimised Magneto-Resistance (MR) Sensor Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Hape, M; Ricken, W

    2005-01-01

    The GSI-FAIR project (facility for antiprotons and ion research) will comprehend DC currents up to around 5 A in the SIS 100 synchrotron and after bunch compression down to 50 ns pulse length the peak currents will reach up to 100 A. To meet these higher demands of beam current measurements new sensor techniques are foreseen. The measurement device itself will be designed in form of a clip-on ampere-meter. The air gap of the flux concentrator is assumed to be around 5 mm and thus, the estimated maximum field therein is around 30 mT for a beam current of 100 A peak. The resolution of this device is aimed to be 1 mA in beam current, corresponding to a system dynamic of around 105. This high demands of beam current measurement require more sophisticated sensor types than just using a Hall probe. The characteristics of AMR (anisotropic magneto-resistance), GMR (giant magneto-resistance) and GMI (giant magneto-impedance) sensors like hysteresis, linearity and sensitivity have been measured within the magnetic fiel...

  9. The Effect of High RAP and High Asphalt Binder Content on the Dynamic Modulus and Fatigue Resistance of Asphalt Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Tomlinson, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    This thesis investigates the effects of using various percentages of RAP and asphalt binder contents on the dynamic modulus and fatigue resistance of asphalt concrete. Two RAP percentages (20% and 40%) and three binder percentages (plant-mixed, plant-mixed + 0.5%, and plant-mixed + 1.0%) were evaluated. A Superpave gyratory compactor and an asphalt vibratory compactor were used to prepare dynamic modulus samples and fatigue beam samples at 7% air voids. Three replicate samples for each percen...

  10. Dynamic resistance of a high-T c coated conductor wire in a perpendicular magnetic field at 77 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhenan; Toyomoto, Ryuki; Amemiya, Naoyuki; Zhang, Xingyou; Bumby, Chris W.

    2017-03-01

    Superconducting high-T c coated conductor (CC) wires comprise a ceramic thin film with a large aspect ratio. This geometry can lead to significant dissipative losses when exposed to an alternating magnetic field. Here we report experimental measurements of the ‘dynamic resistance’ of commercially available SuperPower and Fujikura CC wires in an AC perpendicular field. The onset of dynamic resistance occurs at a threshold field amplitude, which is determined by the total DC transport current and the penetration field of the conductor. We show that the field-dependence of the normalised magnetisation loss provides an unambiguous value for this threshold field at zero transport current. From this insight we then obtain an expression for the dynamic resistance in perpendicular field. This approach implies a linear relationship between dynamic resistance and applied field amplitude, and also between threshold field and transport current and this is consistent with our experimental data. The analytical expression obtained yields values that closely agree with measurements obtained across a wide range of frequencies and transport currents, and for multiple CC wires produced by different wire manufacturers and with significantly differing dimensions and critical currents. We further show that at high transport currents, the measured DC resistance includes an additional nonlinear term which is due to flux-flow resistance incurred by the DC transport current. This occurs once the field-dependent critical current of the wire falls below the DC transport current for part of each field cycle. Our results provide an effective and simple approach to calculating the dynamic resistance of a CC wire, at current and field magnitudes consistent with those expected in superconducting machines.

  11. Field enhanced charge carrier reconfiguration in electronic and ionic coupled dynamic polymer resistive memory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Junhui; Thomson, Douglas J; Freund, Michael S [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB (Canada); Pilapil, Matt; Pillai, Rajesh G; Aminur Rahman, G M, E-mail: thomson@ee.umanitoba.ca, E-mail: michael_freund@umanitoba.ca [Department of Chemistry, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB (Canada)

    2010-04-02

    Dynamic resistive memory devices based on a conjugated polymer composite (PPy{sup 0}DBS{sup -}Li{sup +} (PPy: polypyrrole; DBS{sup -}: dodecylbenzenesulfonate)), with field-driven ion migration, have been demonstrated. In this work the dynamics of these systems has been investigated and it has been concluded that increasing the applied field can dramatically increase the rate at which information can be 'written' into these devices. A conductance model using space charge limited current coupled with an electric field induced ion reconfiguration has been successfully utilized to interpret the experimentally observed transient conducting behaviors. The memory devices use the rising and falling transient current states for the storage of digital states. The magnitude of these transient currents is controlled by the magnitude and width of the write/read pulse. For the 500 nm length devices used in this work an increase in 'write' potential from 2.5 to 5.5 V decreased the time required to create a transient conductance state that can be converted into the digital signal by 50 times. This work suggests that the scaling of these devices will be favorable and that 'write' times for the conjugated polymer composite memory devices will decrease rapidly as ion driving fields increase with decreasing device size.

  12. Spatio-temporal dynamics of the penetration resistance of recultivated soils formed after open cast mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Zhukov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of studying the spatio-temporal dynamics of soil penetration resistance we proved the existence of the technozem ecomorphs as above horizon soil formations. Research was carried out at a research center for study of recultivation processes in Ordzhonikidze city. Measurement of soils penetration was made in field conditions using an Eijkelkamp penetrometer on a regular grid at depths of up to50 cmwith intervals of5 cm. Calculation of average values and degrees of variation was performed by means of descriptive statistical tools. The extent of soil penetration spatial dependence was assessed and the existence of ecomorphs was proved by means of geostatistical analysis. The degree of associativity of spatial distribution of indicators of a soil body in different years of research was established by means of correlation analysis. The level of variation in space and in time of  technozem penetration generated on loess-like loams, grey-green, red-brown clays, and also pedozems was revealed. The degree of spatial dependence of  technozem penetration within soil layers and also the linear sizes of ecomorphs as above horizon soil structures was established. The time dynamics of  penetration of various recultozems were described. As a result of research into the spatio-temporal dynamics of penetration of technozems, data confirming the hypothesis of the existence of ecomorphs as above horizon morphological soil formations were obtained. An ecomorphic approach to the study of the morphological structure of technozems is proposed. The comparative characteristics of ecomorphs from various types of technozem are presented. The results obtained solve the problem of combining the higher and lowest levels in the hierarchical system of soil organisation as a natural body, which should raise the efficiency of the analysis of relations of morphological elements as a basis for detailed reconstruction of recultivation processes, soil formation, and

  13. Characterising thermal resistances and capacitances of GaN high-electron-mobility transistors through dynamic electrothermal measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Wei; Mikkelsen, Jan H.; Jensen, Ole Kiel

    2014-01-01

    This study presents a method to characterise thermal resistances and capacitances of GaN high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMTs) through dynamic electrothermal measurements. A measured relation between RF gain and the channel temperature (Tc) is formed and used for indirect measurements...

  14. Direct current (DC) resistivity and induced polarization (IP) monitoring of active layer dynamics at high temporal resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doetsch, Joseph; Ingeman-Nielsen, Thomas; Christiansen, Anders V.

    2015-01-01

    With permafrost thawing and changes in active layer dynamics induced by climate change, interactions between biogeochemical and thermal processes in the ground are of great importance. Here, active layer dynamics have been monitored using direct current (DC) resistivity and induced polarization (IP...... and subsurface temperatures supplemented the DC-IP measurements. A time-lapse DC-IP monitoring system has been acquiring at least six datasets per day on a 42-electrode profile with 0.5. m electrode spacing since July 2013. Remote control of the data acquisition system enables interactive adaptation...... of the measurement schedule, which is critically important to acquire data in the winter months, where extremely high contact resistances increase the demands on the resistivity meter. Data acquired during the freezing period of October 2013 to February 2014 clearly image the soil freezing as a strong increase...

  15. Comparative Study of the Effect of Aerobic and Resistance Exercise on Static and Dynamic Balance in Elderly Males

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojgan Banihashemi Emamghisi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Stumbling or falling is a major health problem among the elderly which accounts for their majority of physical injuries such as pelvic fractures, disability, loss of independency and even death. The goal of the study was comparison of the effect of aerobic and resistance exercise on static and dynamic balance in old men. Methods: A quasi-experimental study was conducted and thirty elderly males, who were referred to Jahandidegan institute of Borujen, were divided randomly in three empirical groups subdividing aerobic, resistance and control group. 24 hours before the start of and 24 hours after completion of eight weeks -aerobic and resistance exercise, all participants went under static and dynamic balance examination. The results were analysed by SPSS software edition 19. Results: Mean and standard deviation of dynamic balance scores before the exercise for the resistance, aerobic and control groups were 1017.6±212.7, 930.5±238.2, 1119.6±287.3 and after eight weeks exercise were 851.7±155.5, 743.4±130.1, 1220.06±226.9 respectively. On the other hand, Mean and standard deviation of static balance scores before the exercise in resistance, aerobic and control groups were 2280.3±2286.2, 3534.9±4455.4, 1284.1±231.4 and after eight weeks exercise were 5563.4±8014.6, 6089±7888.4, 1297.1±214.4 respectively. ANOVA test revealed that the difference in changes of three groups were not statistically significant (P > 0.05. Conclusion: Despite marginal correlation between static and dynamic balance as the outcomes of aerobic and resistant exercise these activities are proposed because such the exercises reduce incidence of falling events and related-injuries and also risk of independency among older adults.

  16. Detecting rupture precursors and determining the main fracture spread direction of rock with dynamic rock resistivity change anisotropy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@ In the past, domestic and abroad scientific workers have done a large number of experiment researches on a great number of researches of experiment for the relationship between electrical resistivity change and the load stress on rock (Geoelectric Testing Group, Department of Geophysics, Peking University and Research Division, Seismological Brigade of Lanzhou, 1978; Zhang, 1981; Chen, et al, 1983; Zhao, et al, 1983; Zhang, Lu, 1983; Zhang, et al, 1985; Brace, Orange, 1968; Kurite, 1986; Teisseyre, 1989), such as imitating dynamic fracture of rock, frictional sliding course, and observing its resistivity change shape with a lot of experimental workssuch as simulating the dynamic course of crustal rocks fracturing and frictional slipping along the fracture surface, and observing its resistivity change shape with experiment. They found that, in the fracture process of rock under loading, not only its resistivity shape change notably, and its direction changes also very clearly, and therefore many scientific workers have shown strong interest in anisotropy of resistivity change, and have done some researches onfor it.

  17. Incremental dynamic analysis of concrete moment resisting frames reinforced with shape memory composite bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, Adeel; Andrawes, Bassem

    2012-02-01

    Fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) reinforcing bars have been used in concrete structures as an alternative to conventional steel reinforcement, in order to overcome corrosion problems. However, due to the linear behavior of the commonly used reinforcing fibers, they are not considered in structures which require ductility and damping characteristics. The use of superelastic shape memory alloy (SMA) fibers with their nonlinear elastic behavior as reinforcement in the composite could potentially provide a solution for this problem. Small diameter SMA wires are coupled with polymer matrix to produce SMA-FRP composite, which is sought in this research as reinforcing bars. SMA-FRP bars are sought in this study to enhance the seismic performance of reinforced concrete (RC) moment resisting frames (MRFs) in terms of reducing their residual inter-story drifts while still maintaining the elastic characteristics associated with conventional FRP. Three story one bay and six story two bay RC MRF prototype structures are designed with steel, SMA-FRP and glass-FRP reinforcement. The incremental dynamic analysis technique is used to investigate the behaviors of the two frames with the three different reinforcement types under a suite of ground motion records. It is found that the frames with SMA-FRP composite reinforcement exhibit higher performance levels including lower residual inter-story drifts, high energy dissipation and thus lower damage, which are important for structures in highly seismic zones.

  18. Acute effect of static stretching on power output during concentric dynamic constant external resistance leg extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Taichi; Ishii, Kojiro; Yamanaka, Masanori; Yasuda, Kazunori

    2006-11-01

    The purpose of the present study was to clarify the effect of static stretching on muscular performance during concentric isotonic (dynamic constant external resistance [DCER]) muscle actions under various loads. Concentric DCER leg extension power outputs were assessed in 12 healthy male subjects after 2 types of pretreatment. The pretreatments included (a) static stretching treatment performing 6 types of static stretching on leg extensors (4 sets of 30 seconds each with 20-second rest periods; total duration 20 minutes) and (b) nonstretching treatment by resting for 20 minutes in a sitting position. Loads during assessment of the power output were set to 5, 30, and 60% of the maximum voluntary contractile (MVC) torque with isometric leg extension in each subject. The peak power output following the static stretching treatment was significantly (p extensive static stretching significantly reduces power output with concentric DCER muscle actions under various loads. Common power activities are carried out by DCER muscle actions under various loads. Therefore, the result of the present study suggests that relatively extensive static stretching decreases power performance.

  19. Sexual reproduction with variable mating systems can resist asexuality in a rock-paper-scissors dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza, Juan; Polo, Vicente

    2015-07-01

    While sex can be advantageous for a lineage in the long term, we still lack an explanation for its maintenance with the twofold cost per generation. Here we model an infinite diploid population where two autosomal loci determine, respectively, the reproductive mode, sexual versus asexual and the mating system, polygynous (costly sex) versus monogamous (assuming equal contribution of parents to offspring, i.e. non-costly sex). We show that alleles for costly sex can spread when non-costly sexual modes buffer the interaction between asexual and costly sexual strategies, even without twofold benefit of recombination with respect to asexuality. The three interacting strategies have intransitive fitness relationships leading to a rock-paper-scissors dynamics, so that alleles for costly sex cannot be eliminated by asexuals in most situations throughout the parameter space. Our results indicate that sexual lineages with variable mating systems can resist the invasion of asexuals and allow for long-term effects to accumulate, thus providing a solution to the persisting theoretical question of why sex was not displaced by asexuality along evolution.

  20. Sexual reproduction with variable mating systems can resist asexuality in a rock–paper–scissors dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza, Juan; Polo, Vicente

    2015-01-01

    While sex can be advantageous for a lineage in the long term, we still lack an explanation for its maintenance with the twofold cost per generation. Here we model an infinite diploid population where two autosomal loci determine, respectively, the reproductive mode, sexual versus asexual and the mating system, polygynous (costly sex) versus monogamous (assuming equal contribution of parents to offspring, i.e. non-costly sex). We show that alleles for costly sex can spread when non-costly sexual modes buffer the interaction between asexual and costly sexual strategies, even without twofold benefit of recombination with respect to asexuality. The three interacting strategies have intransitive fitness relationships leading to a rock–paper–scissors dynamics, so that alleles for costly sex cannot be eliminated by asexuals in most situations throughout the parameter space. Our results indicate that sexual lineages with variable mating systems can resist the invasion of asexuals and allow for long-term effects to accumulate, thus providing a solution to the persisting theoretical question of why sex was not displaced by asexuality along evolution. PMID:26587254

  1. The evaluation of dynamic cracking resistance of chosen casting alloys in the aspect of the impact bending test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.Sadowski

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The increase of quality and durability of produced casting alloys can be evaluated on the base of material tests performed on a high level. One of such modern test methods are tests of the dynamic damage process of materials and the evaluation on the base of obtained courses F(f, F(t of parameters of dynamic cracking resistance KId, JId, performed with the usage of instrumented Charpy pendulums. In the paper there was presented the evaluation of dynamic cracking resistance parameters of casting alloys such as: AK12 aluminum alloy, L20G cast steel and spheroid cast iron. The methodology of the evaluation of that parameters was described and their change as well, for the AK12 alloy with the cold work different level, L20G cast steel cooled from different temperatures in the range +20oC -60oC, and for the spheroid cast iron in different stages of treatment i.e. raw state, after normalization, spheroid annealing and graphitizing annealing.Obtained parameters of dynamic cracking resistance KId, JId of tested casting alloys enabled to define the critical value of the ad defect that can be tolerated by tested castings in different work conditions with impact loadings.

  2. The Effects of Multiple-Joint Isokinetic Resistance Training on Maximal Isokinetic and Dynamic Muscle Strength and Local Muscular Endurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratamess, Nicholas A; Beller, Noah A; Gonzalez, Adam M; Spatz, Gregory E; Hoffman, Jay R; Ross, Ryan E; Faigenbaum, Avery D; Kang, Jie

    2016-03-01

    The transfer of training effects of multiple-joint isokinetic resistance training to dynamic exercise performance remain poorly understood. Thus, the purpose of the present study was to investigate the magnitude of isokinetic and dynamic one repetition-maximum (1RM) strength and local muscular endurance increases after 6 weeks of multiple-joint isokinetic resistance training. Seventeen women were randomly assigned to either an isokinetic resistance training group (IRT) or a non-exercising control group (CTL). The IRT group underwent 6 weeks of training (2 days per week) consisting of 5 sets of 6-10 repetitions at 75-85% of subjects' peak strength for the isokinetic chest press and seated row exercises at an average linear velocity of 0.15 m s(-1) [3-sec concentric (CON) and 3-sec eccentric (ECC) phases]. Peak CON and ECC force during the chest press and row, 1RM bench press and bent-over row, and maximum number of modified push-ups were assessed pre and post training. A 2 x 2 analysis of variance with repeated measures and Tukey's post hoc tests were used for data analysis. The results showed that 1RM bench press (from 38.6 ± 6.7 to 43.0 ± 5.9 kg), 1RM bent-over row (from 40.4 ± 7.7 to 45.5 ± 7.5 kg), and the maximal number of modified push-ups (from 39.5 ± 13.6 to 55.3 ± 13.1 repetitions) increased significantly only in the IRT group. Peak isokinetic CON and ECC force in the chest press and row significantly increased in the IRT group. No differences were shown in the CTL group for any measure. These data indicate 6 weeks of multiple-joint isokinetic resistance training increases dynamic muscle strength and local muscular endurance performance in addition to specific isokinetic strength gains in women. Key pointsMultiple-joint isokinetic resistance training increases dynamic maximal muscular strength, local muscular endurance, and maximal isokinetic strength in women.Multiple-joint isokinetic resistance training increased 1RM strength in the bench press (by

  3. Rapport-Building with Resistant Children: Re-Conceptualizing Relational Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Joshua M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews existing conceptualizations of resistance in counseling children. The author posits that resistance is an "expected" aspect of all counseling and offers an alternative orientation toward client resistance based on exploring the child's "helping narratives." Two case studies illustrate the implementation of this…

  4. Landscape refuges delay resistance of the European corn borer to Bt-maize: a demo-genetic dynamic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyutyunov, Yuri; Zhadanovskaya, Ekaterina; Bourguet, Denis; Arditi, Roger

    2008-08-01

    We constructed a reaction-diffusion model of the development of resistance to transgenic insecticidal Bt crops in pest populations. Kostitzin's demo-genetic model describes local interactions between three competing pest genotypes with alleles conferring resistance or susceptibility to transgenic plants, the spatial spread of insects being modelled by diffusion. This new approach makes it possible to combine a spatial demographic model of population dynamics with classical genetic theory. We used this model to examine the effects of pest dispersal and of the size and shape of the refuge on the efficiency of the "high-dose/refuge" strategy, which was designed to prevent the development of resistance in populations of insect pests, such as the European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis Hübner (Lepidoptera, Crambidae). We found that, with realistic combinations of refuge size and pest dispersal, the development of resistance could be considerably delayed. With a small to medium-sized farming area, contiguous refuge plots are more efficient than a larger number of smaller refuge patches. We also show that the formal coupling of classical Fisher-Haldane-Wright population genetics equations with diffusion terms inaccurately describes the development of resistance in a spatially heterogeneous pest population, notably overestimating the speed with which Bt resistance is selected in populations of pests targeted by Bt crops.

  5. Finite difference method for inner-layer equations in the resistive MagnetoHydroDynamic stability analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokuda, Shinji [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment; Watanabe, Tomoko

    1996-08-01

    The matching problem in resistive MagnetoHydroDynamic stability analysis by the asymptotic matching method has been reformulated as an initial-boundary value problem for the inner-layer equations describing the plasma dynamics in the thin layer around a rational surface. The third boundary conditions at boundaries of a finite interval are imposed on the inner layer equations in the formulation instead of asymptotic conditions at infinities. The finite difference method for this problem has been applied to model equations whose solutions are known in a closed form. It has been shown that the initial value problem and the associated eigenvalue problem for the model equations can be solved by the finite difference method with numerical stability. The formulation presented here enables the asymptotic matching method to be a practical method for the resistive MHD stability analysis. (author)

  6. Border Malaria Associated with Multidrug Resistance on Thailand-Myanmar and Thailand-Cambodia Borders: Transmission Dynamic, Vulnerability, and Surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adisak Bhumiratana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This systematic review elaborates the concepts and impacts of border malaria, particularly on the emergence and spread of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax multidrug resistance (MDR malaria on Thailand-Myanmar and Thailand-Cambodia borders. Border malaria encompasses any complex epidemiological settings of forest-related and forest fringe-related malaria, both regularly occurring in certain transmission areas and manifesting a trend of increased incidence in transmission prone areas along these borders, as the result of interconnections of human settlements and movement activities, cross-border population migrations, ecological changes, vector population dynamics, and multidrug resistance. For regional and global perspectives, this review analyzes and synthesizes the rationales pertaining to transmission dynamics and the vulnerabilities of border malaria that constrain surveillance and control of the world’s most MDR falciparum and vivax malaria on these chaotic borders.

  7. Bending resistance and dynamic and static cyclic fatigue life of Reciproc and WaveOne large instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De-Deus, Gustavo; Leal Vieira, Victor Talarico; Nogueira da Silva, Emmanuel João; Lopes, Helio; Elias, Carlos Nelson; Moreira, Edson Jorge

    2014-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the bending resistance and the dynamic and static cyclic fatigue life of Reciproc R40 and WaveOne large instruments. A sample of 68 nickel-titanium instruments (25 mm in length) for use under reciprocation movement (Reciproc and WaveOne) from 3 different lots was tested. Reciproc R40 and WaveOne Large files, both of which had a nominal size of 0.40 mm at D0, were selected. The bending resistance was performed in 10 instruments of each system by using a universal testing machine. Dynamic and static models for cyclic fatigue testing were performed by using a custom-made device. For these tests, an artificial canal measuring 1.4 mm in diameter and 19 mm total length was fabricated from a stainless steel tube. Scanning electron microscopy analysis was performed to determine the mode of fracture. Statistical analysis was performed by using parametric methods, 1-way analysis of variance. Post hoc pair-wise comparisons were performed by using Tukey test for multiple comparisons. WaveOne instruments presented significantly higher bending resistance than Reciproc (P < .05). Moreover, Reciproc revealed a significantly longer cyclic fatigue life (P < .05) in both static and dynamic tests (P < .05). Reciproc R40 instruments resisted dynamic and static cyclic fatigue significantly more than WaveOne Large instruments. Furthermore, WaveOne instruments presented significantly less flexibility than Reciproc. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Dynamics and mechanisms of permethrin resistance in a field population of the horn fly, Haematobia irritans irritans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrew Y. Li; Kimbedy H. Lohmeyer; J. Allen Miller

    2009-01-01

    A study was conducted at the Pressler ranch, near Kerrville, Texas, USA between 2002 and 2006 to determine the dynamics and mechanisms of resistance to permethrin in a field population of the horn fly, Haematobia irritans irritans (L.). Changes of resistance to pyrethroid insecticide associated with use of a pour-on formulation of cyfluthrin in 2002 and use of diazinon ear tags in subsequent years were studied using a filter paper bioassay technique and a polymerase chain reaction assay that detects two sodium channel mutations, kdr and super-kdr resistance alleles. A maximum of 294-fold resistance to permethrin was observed in the summer of 2002. A significant decrease in the resistance level was observed in spring 2003, and resistance continued to decline after animals were treated with diazinon ear tags. In response to pyrethroid treatments, the allelic kdr and super-kdr frequency increased from 56.3% to 93.8% and from 7.5% to 43.8%, respectively in 2002, and decreased significantly in 2003 when the pyrethroid insecticide was no longer used to treat animals. Females were found to have a higher allelic super-kdr frequency than males in 2002, while no difference was detected between males and females in the allelic kdr frequency. There was a significant positive correlation between frequencies of the sodium channel mutations and levels of permethrin resistance, suggesting that the sodium channel mutations, kdr and super-kdr, are the major mechanisms of resistance to pyrethroids in this horn fly population. Results of synergist bioassays also indicated possible contributions of two metabolic detoxification mechanisms, the mixed function oxidases (MFO) and glutathione S-trans-ferases (GST). Compared to a horn fly infestation of an untreated herd, treatments with the pyrethroid pour-on formulation failed to control horn flies at the Pressler ranch in 2002. Sustained control of horn flies was achieved with the use of diazinon ear tags in 2003 and subsequent years.

  9. Dynamic and Static High Temperature Resistant Ceramic Seals for X- 38 re-Entry Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handrick, Karin E.; Curry, Donald M.

    2002-01-01

    concentrated on the development, qualification and manufacture of dynamic seals in the rudder area, the responsibility of MAN Technologie focused on the development, lay-out, qualification and flight hardware manufacture of static and dynamic seals in ceramic hot structures' associated gaps and interfaces, dealing with re-entry temperatures up to 1600°C. This paper presents results for temperature and mechanical stability, flow, scrub (up to 1000 cycles) and of arc jet tests under representative low boundary conditions and plasma step/gap tests, conducted during the development and qualification phases of these different kind of ceramic seals. Room temperature seal compression tests were performed at low compression levels to determine load versus linear compression, preload, contact area, stiffness and resiliency characteristics under low load conditions. Flow tests with thermally aged seals were conducted at ambient temperature to examine leakage at low compression levels and in as-manufactured conditions. Seal scrub tests were performed to examine durability and wear resistance and to recommend surface treatments required to maximize seal wear life. Results of arc jet/plasma tests under simulated re-entry conditions (pressure, temperature) verified seal temperature stability and function under representative assembly and interface conditions. Each of these specifically developed seals fulfilled the requirements and is qualified for flight on X-38, V201.

  10. A membrane computing simulator of trans-hierarchical antibiotic resistance evolution dynamics in nested ecological compartments (ARES).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Marcelino; Llorens, Carlos; Sempere, José M; Futami, Ricardo; Rodriguez, Irene; Carrasco, Purificación; Capilla, Rafael; Latorre, Amparo; Coque, Teresa M; Moya, Andres; Baquero, Fernando

    2015-08-05

    Antibiotic resistance is a major biomedical problem upon which public health systems demand solutions to construe the dynamics and epidemiological risk of resistant bacteria in anthropogenically-altered environments. The implementation of computable models with reciprocity within and between levels of biological organization (i.e. essential nesting) is central for studying antibiotic resistances. Antibiotic resistance is not just the result of antibiotic-driven selection but more properly the consequence of a complex hierarchy of processes shaping the ecology and evolution of the distinct subcellular, cellular and supra-cellular vehicles involved in the dissemination of resistance genes. Such a complex background motivated us to explore the P-system standards of membrane computing an innovative natural computing formalism that abstracts the notion of movement across membranes to simulate antibiotic resistance evolution processes across nested levels of micro- and macro-environmental organization in a given ecosystem. In this article, we introduce ARES (Antibiotic Resistance Evolution Simulator) a software device that simulates P-system model scenarios with five types of nested computing membranes oriented to emulate a hierarchy of eco-biological compartments, i.e. a) peripheral ecosystem; b) local environment; c) reservoir of supplies; d) animal host; and e) host's associated bacterial organisms (microbiome). Computational objects emulating molecular entities such as plasmids, antibiotic resistance genes, antimicrobials, and/or other substances can be introduced into this framework and may interact and evolve together with the membranes, according to a set of pre-established rules and specifications. ARES has been implemented as an online server and offers additional tools for storage and model editing and downstream analysis. The stochastic nature of the P-system model implemented in ARES explicitly links within and between host dynamics into a simulation, with

  11. A Comparison of Resistance to Extinction Following Dynamic and Static Schedules of Reinforcement

    OpenAIRE

    Craig, Andrew R.

    2013-01-01

    Resistance to extinction of single-schedule performance is negatively related to the reinforcer rate that an organism experienced in the pre-extinction context. This finding opposes the predications of behavioral momentum theory, which states that resistance to change, in general, is positively related to reinforcer rates. The quantitative model of extinction provided by behavioral momentum theory can describe resistance to extinction following single schedules in a post-hoc fashion, and only...

  12. Phenotypic resistance and the dynamics of bacterial escape from phage control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bull, James J.; Vegge, Christina Skovgaard; Schmerer, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The canonical view of phage - bacterial interactions in dense, liquid cultures is that the phage will eliminate most of the sensitive cells; genetic resistance will then ascend to restore high bacterial densities. Yet there are various mechanisms by which bacteria may remain sensitive to phages...... mathematical models of these processes and suggest how different types of this 'phenotypic' resistance may be elucidated. We offer preliminary in vitro studies of a previously characterized E. coli model system and Campylobacter jejuni illustrating apparent phenotypic resistance. As phenotypic resistance may...

  13. The Model of Motivational Dynamics in Sport: Resistance to Peer Influence, Behavioral Engagement and Disaffection, Dispositional Coping, and Resilience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Robert Nicholls

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Model of Motivational Dynamics (MMD; Skinner and Pitzer, 2012 infers that peers influence behavioral engagement levels, which in turn is linked to coping and resilience. Scholars, however, are yet to test the MMD among an athletic population. The purpose of this paper was to assess an a priori model that included key constructs from the MMD, such as resistance to peer influence, behavioral engagement and disaffection, coping, and resilience among athletes. Three hundred and fifty-one athletes (male n = 173, female n = 178; M age = 16.15 years completed a questionnaire that measured each construct. Our results provide support for the model. In particular, there were positive paths between resistance to peer influence and behavioral engagement, behavioral engagement and task-oriented coping, and task-oriented coping with resilience. There was also a positive path between resilience and resistance to peer influence, but a negative path from resistance to peer influence to behavioral disaffection. Due to the reported benefits of enhancing resistance to peer influence and behavioral engagement, researchers could devise sport specific interventions to maximize athletes’ scores in these constructs.

  14. An analysis of the dynamic resistance and the instantaneous energy of the CO2 arc welding process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Zhenmin; Xue Jiaxiang; Dong Fei; Yang Guohua; Lu Xiaoming

    2007-01-01

    A self-developed welding dynamic arc wavelet analyzer was adopted to analyze and assess the welding process of two CO2 arc welding machines. The experimental results indicate that the instantaneous energy can reflect the influence of the welding current and voltage on dynamic arc characteristic synthetically. Through calculating and analyzing the instantaneous energy, the energy during arc ignition and short circuit in CO2 welding process can be confirmed rationally, thus the foundation for the accurate design and control of the welding current and voltage can be provided. By reducing the ripple disturbance of the dynamic resistance, avoiding peak current and voltage waveform,and enhancing the transition frequency of short circuit suitably, the stability of the welding arc and the weld appearance can be improved.

  15. Dynamic iso-resistive trunk extension simulation: contributions of the intrinsic and reflexive mechanisms to spinal stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davarani, S Zeinali; Shirazi-Adl, A; Hemami, H; Mousavi, S J; Parnianpour, M

    2007-01-01

    The effects of external resistance on the recruitment of trunk muscles and the role of intrinsic and reflexive mechanisms to ensure the spinal stability are significant issues in spinal biomechanics. A computational model of spine under the control of 48 anatomically oriented muscle actions was used to simulate iso-resistive trunk movements. Neural excitation of muscles was attained based on inverse dynamics approach along with the stability-based optimization. The effect of muscle spindle reflex response on the trunk movement stability was evaluated upon the application of a perturbation moment. In this study, the trunk extension movement at various resistance levels while extending from 60 degrees flexion to the upright posture was investigated. Incorporation of the stability condition as an additional constraint in the optimization algorithm increased antagonistic activities for all resistance levels demonstrating that the co-activation caused an increase in the intrinsic stiffness of the spine and its stability in a feed-forward manner. During the acceleration phase of the movement, extensors activity increased while flexors activity decreased in response to the higher resistance. The co-activation ratio noticed in the braking phase of the movement increased with higher resistance. In presence of a 30 Nm flexion perturbation moment, reflexive feed-back noticeably decreased the induced deviation of the velocity and position profiles from the desired ones at all resistance levels. The stability-generated co-activation decreased the reflexive response of muscle spindles to the perturbation demonstrating that both intrinsic and reflexive mechanisms contribute to the trunk stability. The rise in muscle co-activation can ameliorate the corruption of afferent neural sensory system at the expense of higher loading of the spine.

  16. Long-term effects of penicillin resistance and fitness cost on pneumococcal transmission dynamics in a developed setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Tilevik

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The increasing prevalence of penicillin non-susceptible pneumococci (PNSP throughout the world threatens successful treatment of infections caused by this important bacterial pathogen. The rate at which PNSP clones spread in the community is thought to mainly be determined by two key determinants; the volume of penicillin use and the magnitude of the fitness cost in the absence of treatment. The aim of the study was to determine the impacts of penicillin consumption and fitness cost on pneumococcal transmission dynamics in a developed country setting. Methods: An individual-based network model based on real-life demographic data was constructed and applied in a developed country setting (Sweden. A population structure with transmission of carriage taking place within relevant mixing groups, i.e. families, day care groups, school classes, and other close contacts, was considered to properly assess the transmission dynamics for susceptible and PNSP clones. Several scenarios were simulated and model outcomes were statistically analysed. Results: Model simulations predicted that with an outpatient penicillin use corresponding to the sales in Sweden 2010 (118 recipes per 1,000 inhabitants per year, the magnitude of a fitness cost for resistance must be at least 5% to offset the advantage of penicillin resistance. Moreover, even if there is a fitness cost associated with penicillin resistance, a considerable reduction of penicillin usage appears to be required to significantly decrease the incidence of PNSP in a community. Conclusion: The frequency of PNSP clones is hard to reverse by simply reducing the penicillin consumption even if there is a biological cost associated with resistance. However, because penicillin usage does promote further spread of PNSP clones, it is important to keep down penicillin consumption considering future resistance problems.

  17. Effects of multiple resistive shells and transient electromagnetic torque on the dynamics of mode locking in reversed field pinch plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, S. C.; Chu, M. S.

    2002-11-01

    The effects of multiple resistive shells and transient electromagnetic torque on the dynamics of mode locking in the reversed field pinch (RFP) plasmas are studied. Most RFP machines are equipped with one or more metal shells outside of the vacuum vessel. These shells have finite resistivities. The eddy currents induced in each of the shells contribute to the braking electromagnetic (EM) torque which slows down the plasma rotation. In this work we study the electromagnetic torque acting on the plasma (tearing) modes produced by a system of resistive shells. These shells may consist of several nested thin shells or several thin shells enclosed within a thick shell. The dynamics of the plasma mode is investigated by balancing the EM torque from the resistive shells with the plasma viscous torque. Both the steady state theory and the time-dependent theory are developed. The steady state theory is shown to provide an accurate account of the resultant EM torque if (dω/dt)ω-2≪1 and the time scale of interest is much longer than the response (L/R) time of the shell. Otherwise, the transient theory should be adopted. As applications, the steady state theory is used to evaluate the changes of the EM torque response from the resistive shells in two variants of two RFP machines: (1) modification from Reversed Field Experiment (RFX) [Gnesotto et al., Fusion Eng. Des. 25, 335 (1995)] to the modified RFX: both of them are equipped with one thin shell plus one thick shell; (2) modification from Extrap T2 to Extrap T2R [Brunsell et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 43, 1457 (2001)]: both of them are equipped with two thin shells. The transient theory has been applied numerically to study the time evolution of the EM torque during the unlocking of a locked tearing mode in the modified RFX.

  18. Transmission Intensity and Drug Resistance in Malaria Population Dynamics : Implications for Climate Change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Artzy-Randrup, Yael; Alonso, David; Pascual, Mercedes

    2010-01-01

    Although the spread of drug resistance and the influence of climate change on malaria are most often considered separately, these factors have the potential to interact through altered levels of transmission intensity. The influence of transmission intensity on the evolution of drug resistance has b

  19. Evolutionary dynamics of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus within a healthcare system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hsu, Li-Yang; Harris, Simon R.; Chlebowicz, Monika A.; Lindsay, Jodi A.; Koh, Tse-Hsien; Krishnan, Prabha; Tan, Thean-Yen; Hon, Pei-Yun; Grubb, Warren B.; Bentley, Stephen D.; Parkhill, Julian; Peacock, Sharon J.; Holden, Matthew T. G.

    2015-01-01

    Background: In the past decade, several countries have seen gradual replacement of endemic multi-resistant healthcare-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) with clones that are more susceptible to antibiotic treatment. One example is Singapore, where MRSA ST239, the dominant

  20. Transcriptome and Small RNAome Dynamics during a Resistant and Susceptible Interaction between Cucumber and Downy Mildew

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyssa Burkhardt

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cucumber ( L. downy mildew, caused by the obligate oomycete pathogen (Berk. and Curt. Rostov., is the primary factor limiting cucumber production. Although sources of resistance have been identified, such as plant introduction line PI 197088, the genes and processes involved in mediating resistance are still unknown. In the current study, we conducted a comprehensive transcriptome and small RNAome analysis of a resistant (PI 197088 and susceptible (‘Vlaspik’ cucumber during a time course of infection using Illumina sequencing. We identified significantly differentially expressed (DE genes within and between resistant and susceptible cucumber leaves over a time course of infection. Weighted gene correlation network analyses (WGCNA created coexpression modules containing genes with unique expression patterns between Vlaspik and PI 197088. Recurring data trends indicated that resistance to cucumber downy mildew is associated with earlier response to the pathogen, hormone signaling, and regulation of nutrient supply. Candidate resistance genes were identified from multiple transcriptome analyses and literature support. Additionally, parallel sequencing of small RNAs (sRNAs from cucumber and during the infection time course was used to identify and quantify novel and existing microRNA (miRNA in both species. Predicted miRNA targets of cucumber transcripts suggest a complex interconnectedness of gene expression regulation in this plant–pathogen system. This work bioinformatically uncovered gene expression patterns involved in the mediation of or response to resistance. Herein, we provide the foundation for future work to validate candidate resistance genes and miRNA-based regulation proposed in this study.

  1. Coastal groundwater dynamics off Santa Barbara, California: combining geochemical tracers, electromagnetic seepmeters, and electrical resistivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarzenski, Peter W.; Izbicki, John A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents repeat field measurements of 222Rn and 223,224,226,228Ra, electromagnetic seepage meter-derived advective fluxes, and multi-electrode, stationary and continuous marine resistivity surveys collected between November 2005 and April 2007 to study coastal groundwater dynamics within a marine beach in Santa Barbara, California. The study provides insight into magnitude and dynamics of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) and associated nutrient loadings into near-shore coastal waters, where the predominant SGD drivers can be both spatially and temporally separated. Rn-222 and 223,224,226,228Ra were utilized to quantify the total and saline contribution, respectively, of SGD. The two short-lived 224,223Ra isotopes provided an estimate of apparent near-shore water mass age, as well as an estimate of the Ra-derived eddy diffusion coefficient, Kh (224Ra = 2.86 ?? 0.7 m2 s-1; 223Ra = 1.32 ?? 0.5 m2 s-1). Because 222Rn (t1/2 = 3.8 day) and 224Ra (t1/2 = 3.66 day) have comparable half-lives and production terms, they were used in concert to examine respective water column removal rates. Electromagnetic seepage meters recorded the physical, bi-directional exchange across the sediment/water interface, which ranged from -6.7 to 14.5 cm day-1, depending on the sampling period and position relative to the low tide line. Multi-day time-series 222Rn measurements in the near-shore water column yielded total (saline + fresh) SGD rates that ranged from 3.1 ?? 2.6 to 9.2 ?? 0.8 cm day-1, depending on the sampling season. Offshore 226Ra (t1/2 = 1600 year) and 222Rn gradients were used with the calculated Kh values to determine seabed flux estimates (dpm m-2 day-1), which were then converted into SGD rates (7.1 and 7.9 cm day-1, respectively). Lastly, SGD rates were used to calculate associated nutrient loads for the near-shore coastal waters off Santa Barbara. Depending on both the season and the SGD method utilized, the following SGD-derived nutrient inputs were

  2. Stronger biotic resistance in tropics relative to temperate zone: effects of predation on marine invasion dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freestone, Amy L; Rutz, Gregory M; Torchin, Mark E

    2013-06-01

    Latitudinal patterns of nonnative species richness suggest fewer successful invasions in the tropics, relative to temperate regions. One main hypothesis for this pattern is that biotic resistance to invasion is stronger in the tropics than at higher latitudes. Biotic resistance can limit the distribution and abundance of nonnative species and, in extreme cases, can prevent establishment. We provide the first experimental test of this hypothesis, comparing the strength of biotic resistance in a tropical and a temperate marine ecosystem. Predation is one mechanism of biotic resistance, and since predation can be stronger at lower latitudes, we predicted that predation will serve to increase biotic resistance more in the tropics than at higher latitude. We conducted predator-exclusion experiments on marine epifaunal communities, a heavily invaded system, focusing on nonnative tunicates as a model fauna. The effect of predation on species richness of nonnative tunicates was more than three times greater at sites in tropical Panama than in temperate Connecticut, consistent with the prediction of stronger biotic resistance in the tropics. In Connecticut, predation reduced the abundance of one nonnative tunicate but did not affect the abundances of any other nonnative tunicate species, and no species were excluded from communities. In contrast, predation resulted in striking reductions in abundance and often exclusion of nonnative tunicates from experimental communities in Panama. If proved to be general, latitudinal differences in the biotic resistance of communities to nonnative species establishment may help explain emerging patterns of global invasions.

  3. Dynamics of biotypes B and Q of the whitefly Bemisia tabaci and its impact on insecticide resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Abraham Rami; Ishaaya, Isaac

    2014-10-01

    The whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) is a key pest in many agricultural crops, including vegetables, ornamentals and field crops. B. tabaci is known for its genetic diversity, which is expressed in a complex of biotypes or, as recently suggested, a complex of distinct cryptic species. The biotypes are largely differentiated on the basis of biochemical or molecular polymorphism and differ in characteristics such as host plant range, attraction by natural enemies, secondary symbionts and expression of insecticide resistance. An extensive survey of B. tabaci biotypes and their impact on insecticide resistance was conducted from 2003 to 2012 in cotton fields and other crops from several locations in Israel. Two biotypes of B. tabaci, B and Q, were identified, and some differences in the biotype dynamics were recorded from different areas. In northern Israel from 2003 to 2007, a higher proportion of the B biotype was consistently found in early season. However, by the end of the season a definite rise of the Q biotype was sampled, ranging from 60 to 100%, along with high resistance to the insect growth regulator (IGR) pyriproxyfen and to a lesser extent to the neonicotinoid insecticides. In fields located in the central part of Israel, the Q biotype was predominant throughout the seasons, with high resistance to pyriproxyfen. Since 2009, a significant shift in the biotype ratios has been observed: the B biotype has come to predominate over the Q biotype ranging up to 90% or more in most fields. At the same time, resistance to the IGR pyriproxyfen was reduced considerably. The possible reasons for the change in the dynamics of B. tabaci biotypes, and its implications for resistance management, are discussed. Strong B. tabaci resistance to pyriproxyfen in Israel has been associated with the Q rather than with the B biotype. The B biotype is more competitive than the Q biotype under untreated conditions. Reduction in the acreage of cotton fields

  4. Dynamic Strength Evaluations for Self-Piercing Rivets and Resistance Spot Welds Joining Similar and Dissimilar Metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2007-10-01

    This paper summarizes the dynamic joint strength evaluation procedures and the measured dynamic strength data for thirteen joint populations of self-piercing rivets (SPR) and resistance spot welds (RSW) joining similar and dissimilar metals. A state-of-the-art review of the current practice for conducting dynamic tensile/compressive strength tests in different strain rate regimes is first presented, and the generic issues associated with dynamic strength test are addressed. Then, the joint strength testing procedures and fixture designs used in the current study are described, and the typical load versus displacement curves under different loading configurations are presented. Uniqueness of the current data compared with data in the open literature is discussed. The experimental results for all the joint populations indicate that joint strength increases with increasing loading rate. However, the strength increase from 4.47m/s (10mph) to 8.94m/s (20mph) is not as significant as the strength increase from static to 4.47m/s. It is also found that with increasing loading velocity, displacement to failure decreases for all the joint samples. Therefore, “brittleness” of the joint sample increases with impact velocity. Detailed static and dynamic strength data and the associated energy absorption levels for all the samples in the thirteen joint populations are also included.

  5. Adaptive Landscape by Environment Interactions Dictate Evolutionary Dynamics in Models of Drug Resistance: e1004710

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    C Brandon Ogbunugafor; C Scott Wylie; Ibrahim Diakite; Daniel M Weinreich; Daniel L Hartl

    2016-01-01

      The adaptive landscape analogy has found practical use in recent years, as many have explored how their understanding can inform therapeutic strategies that subvert the evolution of drug resistance...

  6. Dynamic expression analysis of early response genes induced by potato virus Y in PVY-resistant Nicotiana tabacum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuai; Li, Fengxia; Liu, Dan; Jiang, Caihong; Cui, Lijie; Shen, Lili; Liu, Guanshan; Yang, Aiguo

    2017-02-01

    Dynamic transcriptional changes of the host early responses genes were detected in PVY-resistant tobacco varieties infected with Potato virus Y; PVY resistance is a complex process that needs series of stress responses. Potato virus Y (PVY) causes a severe viral disease in cultivated crops, especially in Solanum plants. To understand the molecular basis of plant responses to the PVY stress, suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) and microarray approaches were combined to identify the potentially important or novel genes that were involved in early stages (12 h, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8 days) of tobacco response to PVY infection. Dynamic changes of the host plant early responses to PVY infection on a transcriptional level were detected. In total, 167 different expressed ESTs were identified. The majority of genes involved in the metabolic process were found to be down-regulated at 12 h and 1 day, and then up-regulated at least one later period. Genes related to signaling and transcriptions were almost up-regulated at 12 h, 1 or 2 days, while stress response genes were almost up-regulated at a later stage. Genes involved in transcription, transport, cell wall, and several stress responses were found to have changed expression during the PVY infection stage, and numbers of these genes have not been previously reported to be associated with tobacco PVY infection. The diversity expression of these genes indicated that PVY resistance is a complex process that needs a series of stress responses. To resist the PVY infection, the tobacco plant has numerous active and silent responses.

  7. Usefulness of Dynamic Urethral Resistance Relation (DURR) measurement for differential diagnosis between static and dynamic urinary obstruction in male spinal cord injury patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vírseda, Miguel; Salinas, Jesús; López, Antonio; Esteban, Manuel

    2012-04-01

    To study the validity of Dynamic Urethral Resistance Relation (DURR) for differential diagnosis between static and dynamic urinay obstruction in male spinal cord injury patients. A case-control study was conducted. The case group consisted of 24 male patients with spinal cord injury, aged under 40 years, with detrusor-periurethral sphincter dyssynergia and bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) according to the urethral resistance factor (URA). The control group consisted of 24 male patients with no neurological lesions, aged over 49 years, diagnosis of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and BOO according to Schäfer's minimum urethral opening pressure (Pmuo) and the URA. A pressure/flow study was performed in both groups, and the DURR was recorded graphically. Both groups showed significantly different DURR characteristics with respect to the number of spikes (higher in the case group), the intensity of the first three spikes and the maximum duration of the spikes (significantly longer in the case group). The patients in the case group had a DURR characterized by at least three spikes, located throughout the whole voiding cycle (pattern A). The patients in the control group had a DURR mainly characterized by a spike located at the start of micturition and a maximum second spike located at the end of micturition (pattern B). Pattern A showed a sensitivity with respect to the dynamic obstruction of 79% and a specificity of 100%. The sensitivity of pattern B with respect to the diagnosis of static obstruction was 71% and the specificity was 100%. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. System identification of dynamic closed-loop control of total peripheral resistance by arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreceptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljuri, A. N.; Bursac, N.; Marini, R.; Cohen, R. J.

    2001-01-01

    Prolonged exposure to microgravity in space flight missions (days) impairs the mechanisms responsible for defense of arterial blood pressure (ABP) and cardiac output (CO) against orthostatic stress in the post-flight period. The mechanisms responsible for the observed orthostatic intolerance are not yet completely understood. Additionally, effective counter measures to attenuate this pathophysiological response are not available. The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of our proposed system identification method to predict closed-loop dynamic changes in TPR induced by changes in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and right atrial pressure (RAP). For this purpose we designed and employed a novel experimental animal model for the examination of arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreceptors in the dynamic closed-loop control of total peripheral resistance (TPR), and applied system identification to the analysis of beat-to-beat fluctuations in the measured signals. Grant numbers: NAG5-4989. c 2001. Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Ab initio molecular dynamics studies on effect of Zr on oxidation resistance of TiAlN coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pi, Jingwu [State Key Lab of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha,Hunan 410083 (China); Kong, Yi, E-mail: yikong@csu.edu.cn [State Key Lab of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha,Hunan 410083 (China); Chen, Li [State Key Lab of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha,Hunan 410083 (China); Zhuzhou Cemented Carbide Cutting Tools Co., Ltd., Zhuzhou, Hunan 412007 (China); Du, Yong [State Key Lab of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha,Hunan 410083 (China)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • The lowest bonding energy sequence for dimers in the vacuum: Zr−O < Ti−O < Al−O. • The lowest bonding energy sequence for oxygen above the surface: Ti−O < Zr−O < Al−O. • At 300 K, the addition of Zr benefitting the formation of vacancy and TiO{sub 2}. • At 1123 K, the addition of Zr leading to a more stable surface. • Our findings explain that the oxidation resistance of TiAlZrN superior to TiAlN at 1123 K as well as TiAlZrN at 300 K. - Abstract: It was demonstrated experimentally that doping Zr into TiAlN coatings at room temperature will detriment its oxidation resistance. On the other hand, there are evidences that doping Zr into TiAlN at high temperature will improve coating's oxidation resistance. In the present work, we address the effect of Zr on the oxidation resistance of TiAlN by means of ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The TiAlN and TiAlZrN (1 Zr atom replacing 1 Ti atom) surfaces covered with 4 oxygen atoms at 300 K and 1123 K were simulated. Based on the analysis of the atomic motion, bond formation after relaxation, and the charge density difference maps we find that at 300 K, the addition of Zr induces escape of Ti atoms from the surface, resulting in formation of surface vacancies and subsequently TiO{sub 2}. Comparison of metal-oxygen dimers in the vacuum and above the TiAlZrN surface further shows that the addition of Zr in the TiAlN surface will change the lowest bonding energy sequence from Zr−O < Ti−O < Al−O in the vacuum to Ti−O < Zr−O < Al−O above the TiAlZrN surface. From Molecular Dynamics simulations at 1123 K, it is find that no Ti vacancies were generated in the surface. Moreover, less charge is transferred from metal to N atoms and the bond lengths between Ti and O atoms become shorter at 1123 K as compared with 300 K, suggesting that the addition of Zr atom promotes the interaction of Ti and O at TiAlZrN surface at 1123 K, leading to a more stable surface. Our simulation

  10. Dynamics of resistance development to imatinib under increasing selection pressure: a combination of mathematical models and in vitro data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Werner

    Full Text Available In the last decade, cancer research has been a highly active and rapidly evolving scientific area. The ultimate goal of all efforts is a better understanding of the mechanisms that discriminate malignant from normal cell biology in order to allow the design of molecular targeted treatment strategies. In individual cases of malignant model diseases addicted to a specific, ideally single oncogene, e.g. Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML, specific tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI have indeed been able to convert the disease from a ultimately life-threatening into a chronic disease with individual patients staying in remission even without treatment suggestive of operational cure. These developments have been raising hopes to transfer this concept to other cancer types. Unfortunately, cancer cells tend to develop both primary and secondary resistance to targeted drugs in a substantially higher frequency often leading to a failure of treatment clinically. Therefore, a detailed understanding of how cells can bypass targeted inhibition of signaling cascades crucial for malignant growths is necessary. Here, we have performed an in vitro experiment that investigates kinetics and mechanisms underlying resistance development in former drug sensitive cancer cells over time in vitro. We show that the dynamics observed in these experiments can be described by a simple mathematical model. By comparing these experimental data with the mathematical model, important parameters such as mutation rates, cellular fitness and the impact of individual drugs on these processes can be assessed. Excitingly, the experiment and the model suggest two fundamentally different ways of resistance evolution, i.e. acquisition of mutations and phenotype switching, each subject to different parameters. Most importantly, this complementary approach allows to assess the risk of resistance development in the different phases of treatment and thus helps to identify the critical periods where

  11. Infection dynamics of vancomycin and inducible clindamycin resistant Enterococcus faecalis in an Indian teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debasmita Dubey

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To do surveillance for vancomycin and inducible clindamycin resistance of Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis, a Gram-positive bacterium in a teaching hospital. Methods: E. faecalis strains isolated from clinical samples were screened for vancomycin and inducible clindamycin resistance, i.e., D-test positivity, using vancomycin screen agar and blood agar plates, respectively. For the D-test screening, erythromycin resistant (Er-r and clindamycin sensitive (Cd-s strain were used. Results: Of 265 isolated E. faecalis strains, 159 (60% were vancomycin resistant Enterococcus (VRE and 106 were vancomycin sensitive Enterococcus (VSE. Of 265 strains, 42 were constitutively resistant to clindamycin and erythromycin and of 148 Er-r and Cd-s strains, 87 (32.83% had D-test positivity, while the rest 61 strains were D-test negatives. D-test results examined with 6 hospital factors as bivalents, only 2 factors, the VSE/VRE and the presence/absence of prior antibiotic use > 90 days bivalent were statistically significant. A VRE strain with D-test positivity would be picked up 0.570 2 times more frequently than a strain with VSE and D-test positivity. Also, patients with prior antibiotic use > 90 days had 3.737 5 times more chance of picking up D-test positive strains than patients without any prior antibiotic use. Resistance pattern of E. faecalis strains to individual 14 antibiotics were recorded; the maximum values of resistance were against ampicillin 10 μg/disc and linezolid 30 μg/disc. Student’s t-test for hospital acquired and community acquired data revealed that drug resistant strains were equally prevalent in both sources. Conclusions: Prevalence of 60% VRE in both hospital and adjoining community creates consternation. In total 87 (32.83% strains had D-test positivity; patients who had used antibiotics within the last 90 days have got an ample chance of picking of D-test positive E. faecalis. D-test protocol should be followed with

  12. Stability Analysis of an HIV/AIDS Dynamics Model with Drug Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qianqian Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model of HIV/AIDS transmission incorporating treatment and drug resistance was built in this study. We firstly calculated the threshold value of the basic reproductive number (R0 by the next generation matrix and then analyzed stability of two equilibriums by constructing Lyapunov function. When R0<1, the system was globally asymptotically stable and converged to the disease-free equilibrium. Otherwise, the system had a unique endemic equilibrium which was also globally asymptotically stable. While an antiretroviral drug tried to reduce the infection rate and prolong the patients’ survival, drug resistance was neutralizing the effects of treatment in fact.

  13. Understanding the origins of bacterial resistance to aminoglycosides through molecular dynamics mutational study of the ribosomal A-site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Romanowska

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Paromomycin is an aminoglycosidic antibiotic that targets the RNA of the bacterial small ribosomal subunit. It binds in the A-site, which is one of the three tRNA binding sites, and affects translational fidelity by stabilizing two adenines (A1492 and A1493 in the flipped-out state. Experiments have shown that various mutations in the A-site result in bacterial resistance to aminoglycosides. In this study, we performed multiple molecular dynamics simulations of the mutated A-site RNA fragment in explicit solvent to analyze changes in the physicochemical features of the A-site that were introduced by substitutions of specific bases. The simulations were conducted for free RNA and in complex with paromomycin. We found that the specific mutations affect the shape and dynamics of the binding cleft as well as significantly alter its electrostatic properties. The most pronounced changes were observed in the U1406C∶U1495A mutant, where important hydrogen bonds between the RNA and paromomycin were disrupted. The present study aims to clarify the underlying physicochemical mechanisms of bacterial resistance to aminoglycosides due to target mutations.

  14. Does freezing and dynamic flexing of frozen branches impact the cavitation resistance of Malus domestica and the Populus clone Walker?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, Karen K; Tyree, Melvin T

    2013-11-01

    Frost damage to the xylem conduits of trees is a phenomenon of eco-physiological importance. It is often documented in terms of the percentage loss of conductivity (PLC), an indicator of air filling of the conduits. However, trees that refill their conduits in spring could be impacted more by damage to the conduits that reduce cavitation resistance, making them more susceptible to future drought events. We investigated whether ice formation, dynamic flexing of frozen branches or freeze-thaw events could reduce the cavitation resistance (cause "frost fatigue") in first-year shoots of apple (Malus domestica) and clonal hybrid cottonwood (Walker). Frost fatigue was measured in terms of P50 (the negative xylem pressure required to cause a 50 % loss of conductivity). All treatment groups showed significant frost fatigue, with the exception of the pre-flushed, constantly frozen poplar branches. The P50 following freeze treatments was approximately 50 % of the pre-freeze values. The effect tended to be greater in freeze-thawed branches. Dynamic bending of the branches had no effect on either PLC or P50. In three out of four cases, there was a significant correlation between P50 and PLC. Frost fatigue occurred in both apple and poplar, two unrelated species with different drought and frost tolerances, suggesting that it may be a widespread phenomenon that could impact the ecophysiology of temperate forests.

  15. Effects of Single Vs. Multiple Sets Water-Based Resistance Training on Maximal Dynamic Strength in Young Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buttelli Adriana Cristine Koch

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the effects of single vs. multiple sets water-based resistance training on maximal dynamic strength in young men. Twenty-one physically active young men were randomly allocated into 2 groups: a single set group (SS, n=10 and a multiple sets group (MS, n=11. The single set program consisted of only 1 set of 30 s, whereas the multiple sets comprised 3 sets of 30 s (rest interval between sets equaled 1 min 30 s. All the water-based resistance exercises were performed at maximal effort and both groups trained twice a week for 10 weeks. Upper (bilateral elbow flexors and bilateral elbow extensors, peck deck and inverse peck deck as well as lower-body (bilateral knee flexors and unilateral knee extensors one-repetition maximal tests (1RM were used to assess changes in muscle strength. The training-related effects were assessed using repeated measures two-way ANOVA (α=5%. Both SS and MS groups increased the upper and lower-body 1RM, with no differences between groups. Therefore, these data show that the maximal dynamic strength significantly increases in young men after 10 weeks of training in an aquatic environment, although the improvement in the strength levels is independent of the number of sets performed.

  16. Dynamic proteome profiling of individual proteins in human skeletal muscle after a high-fat diet and resistance exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camera, Donny M; Burniston, Jatin G; Pogson, Mark A; Smiles, William J; Hawley, John A

    2017-08-30

    It is generally accepted that muscle adaptation to resistance exercise (REX) training is underpinned by contraction-induced, increased rates of protein synthesis and dietary protein availability. By using dynamic proteome profiling (DPP), we investigated the contribution of both synthesis and breakdown to changes in abundance on a protein-by-protein basis in human skeletal muscle. Age-matched, overweight males consumed 9 d of a high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet during which time they either undertook 3 sessions of REX or performed no exercise. Precursor enrichment and the rate of incorporation of deuterium oxide into newly synthesized muscle proteins were determined by mass spectrometry. Ninety proteins were included in the DPP, with 28 proteins exhibiting significant responses to REX. The most common pattern of response was an increase in turnover, followed by an increase in abundance with no detectable increase in protein synthesis. Here, we provide novel evidence that demonstrates that the contribution of synthesis and breakdown to changes in protein abundance induced by REX differ on a protein-by-protein basis. We also highlight the importance of the degradation of individual muscle proteins after exercise in human skeletal muscle.-Camera, D. M., Burniston, J. G., Pogson, M. A., Smiles, W. J., Hawley, J. A. Dynamic proteome profiling of individual proteins in human skeletal muscle after a high-fat diet and resistance exercise. © FASEB.

  17. The Effects of Multiple-Joint Isokinetic Resistance Training on Maximal Isokinetic and Dynamic Muscle Strength and Local Muscular Endurance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas A. Ratamess, Noah A. Beller, Adam M. Gonzalez, Gregory E. Spatz, Jay R. Hoffman, Ryan E. Ross, Avery D. Faigenbaum, Jie Kang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The transfer of training effects of multiple-joint isokinetic resistance training to dynamic exercise performance remain poorly understood. Thus, the purpose of the present study was to investigate the magnitude of isokinetic and dynamic one repetition-maximum (1RM strength and local muscular endurance increases after 6 weeks of multiple-joint isokinetic resistance training. Seventeen women were randomly assigned to either an isokinetic resistance training group (IRT or a non-exercising control group (CTL. The IRT group underwent 6 weeks of training (2 days per week consisting of 5 sets of 6-10 repetitions at 75-85% of subjects’ peak strength for the isokinetic chest press and seated row exercises at an average linear velocity of 0.15 m s-1 [3-sec concentric (CON and 3-sec eccentric (ECC phases]. Peak CON and ECC force during the chest press and row, 1RM bench press and bent-over row, and maximum number of modified push-ups were assessed pre and post training. A 2 x 2 analysis of variance with repeated measures and Tukey’s post hoc tests were used for data analysis. The results showed that 1RM bench press (from 38.6 ± 6.7 to 43.0 ± 5.9 kg, 1RM bent-over row (from 40.4 ± 7.7 to 45.5 ± 7.5 kg, and the maximal number of modified push-ups (from 39.5 ± 13.6 to 55.3 ± 13.1 repetitions increased significantly only in the IRT group. Peak isokinetic CON and ECC force in the chest press and row significantly increased in the IRT group. No differences were shown in the CTL group for any measure. These data indicate 6 weeks of multiple-joint isokinetic resistance training increases dynamic muscle strength and local muscular endurance performance in addition to specific isokinetic strength gains in women.

  18. Population Dynamics among Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Isolates in Germany during a 6-Year Period

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaumburg, Frieder; Koeck, Robin; Mellmann, Alexander; Richter, Laura; Hasenberg, Felicitas; Kriegeskorte, Andre; Friedrich, Alexander W.; Gatermann, Soeren; von Eiff, Christof; Becker, Karsten; Peters, Georg

    2012-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) originated from the health care setting but is now emerging in communities without health care contact (CA-MRSA) or in livestock (LA-MRSA). The impact on the whole MRSA population was assessed in a German prospective multicenter study. Thirty-three

  19. Quantifying and Contrasting Spatial and Temporal Dynamics of Vadose Zone Moisture under Different Vegetation Types Using Electrical Resistivity Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma Acharya, B.; Zou, C.; Halihan, T.

    2016-12-01

    Spatial-temporal dynamics of vadose zone moisture is important for assessing deep drainage in water-limited ecosystems. Time-lapse electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) was used to monitor vadose zone moisture to a depth of 9 m in a tallgrass prairie and a prairie heavily encroached by a juniper species (Juniperus virigiana) in the south-central Great Plains, US. Resistivity images were converted to volumetric water content images based on site-specific relationship between volumetric water content and inverted resistivity values. Results show (a) vegetation induced vertical soil moisture profiling in the vadose zone, (b) increased spatial-temporal variability in rooting zone conductivity under juniper-encroached site compared with tallgrass prairie site, and (c) two-layered conductivity profiles irrespective of vegetation types, with increased conductivity below 3 m soil depth. ERI could be used as an effective approach to quantify spatial-temporal variation of vadose zone moisture and time-lapse ERI images can be used to assess deep drainage potential associated with different land cover types in water-limited ecosystems.

  20. Genetic Based Plant Resistance and Susceptibility Traits to Herbivory Influence Needle and Root Litter Nutrient Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Classen, Aimee T [ORNL; Chapman, Samantha K. [Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, Edgewater, MD; Whitham, Thomas G [Northern Arizona University; Hart, Stephen C [Northern Arizona University; Koch, George W [Northern Arizona University

    2007-01-01

    It is generally assumed that leaf and root litter decomposition have similar drivers and that nutrient release from these substrates is synchronized. Few studies have examined these assumptions, and none has examined how plant genetics (i.e., plant susceptibility to herbivory) could affect these relationships. Here we examine the effects of herbivore susceptibility and resistance on needle and fine root litter decomposition of pi on pine, Pinus edulis. The study population consists of individual trees that are either susceptible or resistant to herbivory by the pi on needle scale, Matsucoccus acalyptus, or the stem-boring moth, Dioryctria albovittella. Genetic analyses and experimental removals and additions of these insects have identified trees that are naturally resistant and susceptible to these insects. These herbivores increase the chemical quality of litter inputs and alter soil microclimate, both of which are important decomposition drivers. Our research leads to four major conclusions: Herbivore susceptibility and resistance effects on 1) needle litter mass loss and phosphorus (P) retention in moth susceptible and resistant litter are governed by microclimate, 2) root litter nitrogen (N) and P retention, and needle litter N retention are governed by litter chemical quality, 3) net nutrient release from litter can reverse over time, 4) root and needle litter mass loss and nutrient release are determined by location (above- vs. belowground), suggesting that the regulators of needle and root decomposition differ at the local scale. Understanding of decomposition and nutrient retention in ecosystems requires consideration of herbivore effects on above- and belowground processes and how these effects may be governed by plant genotype. Because an underlying genetic component to herbivory is common to most ecosystems of the world and herbivory may increase in climatic change scenarios, it is important to evaluate the role of plant genetics in affecting carbon and

  1. Water content dynamics at plot scale - comparison of time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography monitoring and pore pressure modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zieher, Thomas; Markart, Gerhard; Ottowitz, David; Römer, Alexander; Rutzinger, Martin; Meißl, Gertraud; Geitner, Clemens

    2017-01-01

    Physically-based dynamic modelling of shallow landslide susceptibility rests on several assumptions and simplifications. However, the applicability of physically-based models is only rarely tested in the field at the appropriate scale. This paper presents results of a spray irrigation experiment conducted on a plot of 100 m2 on an Alpine slope susceptible to shallow landsliding. Infiltrating precipitation applied at a constant rate (27.5 mm/h for 5.3 h) was monitored by means of 2D time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography, combined with time-domain reflectometry sensors installed at various depths. In addition, regolith characteristics were assessed by dynamic cone penetration tests using a light-weight cone penetrometer. The spray irrigation experiment resulted in a vertically progressing wetting front to a depth of 80-100 cm. Below that, the unconsolidated material was already saturated by rainfall in the previous days. The observed mean resistivity reduction attributed to infiltrating water during irrigation was scaled to pressure head. Mean variations in pore pressure were reproduced by a linear diffusion model also used in physically-based dynamic landslide susceptibility modelling. Sensitive parameters (hydraulic conductivity and specific storage) were tested over selected value ranges and calibrated. Calibrated parameter values are within published and experimentally derived ranges. The results of the comparison of observations and model results suggest that the model is capable of reproducing mean changes of pore pressure at a suitable scale for physically-based modelling of shallow landslide susceptibility. However, small-scale variations in pore pressure that may facilitate the triggering of shallow landslides are not captured by the model.

  2. Assessment of the Resistance of a Polymethylmethacrylate (Pmma Dynamic Compression Plate (DCP Prototype Tested on Osteotomized Canine Femurs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonel Cardona R.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Femur fractures are the most frequent long bone fractures in small animals. Due to the femur’s anatomical position, it is difficult to immobilize, and therefore internal fixations are very useful. Dynamic compression plates (DCP provide high stability, are durable, minimize fragment movement and promote primary healing of the bone. Advantages of this treatment include anatomical reconstruction, early mobility and carrying capacity of the affected limb. Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA is an acrylic resin that has proved very useful in bone tumor treatment, cranial deformation prosthesis, percutaneous vertebroplasty and testicular prosthesis in animals. The purpose of this study was to manufacture DCP-PMMA and test its resistance to the different forces present in a fracture. Forty-eight (48 3.5MM x 4-hole DCP were made from an alginate mold. Six (6 femurs were obtained from canine cadavers zeighing from 10 to 20 kg, which underwent osteotomy simulating an oblique fracture. The plates were subsequently positioned in the osteotomized bones to submit them to the various forces involved in a fracture. The DCP-PMMA resisted a torque force of 2.83 newton/metres and a compression and flexion force of 0.21 kilonewton. The obtained resistance of the DCP-PMMA was an average of 20 kg per force. The results of this study show that it is possible to make a DCP-PMMA 3.5 mm x 4-hole, the resistance of which is of 20 kg against the three applied forces, and that it can be used to stabilize long bone fractures subjected to a pressure of less than 20 kg.

  3. Electrical resistivity dynamics beneath a fractured sedimentary bedrock riverbed in response to temperature and groundwater-surface water exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steelman, Colby M.; Kennedy, Celia S.; Capes, Donovan C.; Parker, Beth L.

    2017-06-01

    Bedrock rivers occur where surface water flows along an exposed rock surface. Fractured sedimentary bedrock can exhibit variable groundwater residence times, anisotropic flow paths, and heterogeneity, along with diffusive exchange between fractures and rock matrix. These properties of the rock will affect thermal transients in the riverbed and groundwater-surface water exchange. In this study, surface electrical methods were used as a non-invasive technique to assess the scale and temporal variability of riverbed temperature and groundwater-surface water interaction beneath a sedimentary bedrock riverbed. Conditions were monitored at a semi-daily to semi-weekly interval over a full annual period that included a seasonal freeze-thaw cycle. Surface electromagnetic induction (EMI) and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) methods captured conditions beneath the riverbed along a pool-riffle sequence of the Eramosa River in Canada. Geophysical datasets were accompanied by continuous measurements of aqueous specific conductance, temperature, and river stage. Time-lapse vertical temperature trolling within a lined borehole adjacent to the river revealed active groundwater flow zones along fracture networks within the upper 10 m of rock. EMI measurements collected during cooler high-flow and warmer low-flow periods identified a spatiotemporal riverbed response that was largely dependent upon riverbed morphology and seasonal groundwater temperature. Time-lapse ERT profiles across the pool and riffle sequence identified seasonal transients within the upper 2 and 3 m of rock, respectively, with spatial variations controlled by riverbed morphology (pool versus riffle) and dominant surficial rock properties (competent versus weathered rock rubble surface). While the pool and riffle both exhibited a dynamic resistivity through seasonal cooling and warming cycles, conditions beneath the pool were more variable, largely due to the formation of river ice during the winter season

  4. Dynamic evolution of hepatitis C virus resistance-associated substitutions in the absence of antiviral treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltahla, Auda A.; Leung, Preston; Pirozyan, Mehdi R.; Rodrigo, Chaturaka; Grebely, Jason; Applegate, Tanya; Maher, Lisa; Luciani, Fabio; Lloyd, Andrew R.; Bull, Rowena A.

    2017-01-01

    Resistance against new hepatitis C virus (HCV) antivirals is an area of increasing interest. Resistance-associated substitutions (RASs) have been identified in treatment-naïve individuals, but pressures driving treatment-independent RAS emergence are poorly understood. We analysed the longitudinal evolution of RASs in twelve participants with early acute HCV infections. Full-genome deep sequences were analysed for changes in RAS frequency within NS3, NS5A and NS5B-coding regions over the course of the infection. Emergence of RASs relevant only to the polymerase non-nucleoside inhibitors (NNI) was detected, and these lay within CD8+ T-cell epitopes. Conversely, the loss of NNI RASs over time appeared likely to be driven by viral fitness constraints. These results highlight the importance of monitoring CD8+ T cell epitope-associated RASs in populations with dominant HLA types. PMID:28139734

  5. A dynamic aerodynamic resistance approach to calculate high resolution sensible heat fluxes in urban areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Ben; Grimmond, Sue; Kent, Christoph; Gabey, Andrew; Ward, Helen; Sun, Ting; Morrison, William

    2017-04-01

    Remotely sensed data from satellites have potential to enable high-resolution, automated calculation of urban surface energy balance terms and inform decisions about urban adaptations to environmental change. However, aerodynamic resistance methods to estimate sensible heat flux (QH) in cities using satellite-derived observations of surface temperature are difficult in part due to spatial and temporal variability of the thermal aerodynamic resistance term (rah). In this work, we extend an empirical function to estimate rah using observational data from several cities with a broad range of surface vegetation land cover properties. We then use this function to calculate spatially and temporally variable rah in London based on high-resolution (100 m) land cover datasets and in situ meteorological observations. In order to calculate high-resolution QH based on satellite-observed land surface temperatures, we also develop and employ novel methods to i) apply source area-weighted averaging of surface and meteorological variables across the study spatial domain, ii) calculate spatially variable, high-resolution meteorological variables (wind speed, friction velocity, and Obukhov length), iii) incorporate spatially interpolated urban air temperatures from a distributed sensor network, and iv) apply a modified Monte Carlo approach to assess uncertainties with our results, methods, and input variables. Modeled QH using the aerodynamic resistance method is then compared to in situ observations in central London from a unique network of scintillometers and eddy-covariance measurements.

  6. Horn fly population dynamics as prediction tool for the fixation of pesticide resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    This research project was conducted to establish the population dynamics of the horn fly. Two cattle herds were monitored to establish if contrasting climatic regional conditions, in addition to temperature and precipitation, related to the number of rainy days as a factor influencing horn fly infes...

  7. Sporulation dynamics and spore heat resistance in wet and dry biofilms of Bacillus cereus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hayrapetyan, Hasmik; Abee, Tjakko; Nierop Groot, Masja

    2016-01-01

    Environmental conditions and growth history can affect the sporulation process as well as subsequent properties of formed spores. The sporulation dynamics was studied in wet and air-dried biofilms formed on stainless steel (SS) and polystyrene (PS) for Bacillus cereus ATCC 10987 and the

  8. Drought resistance across California ecosystems: Evaluating changes in carbon dynamics using satellite imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Sparkle; Tulbure, Mirela; Pérez-Luque, Antonio J.; Assal, Timothy J.; Bremer, Leah; Drucker, Debora; Hillis, Vicken; Varela, Sara; Goulden, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Drought is a global issue that is exacerbated by climate change and increasing anthropogenic water demands. The recent occurrence of drought in California provides an important opportunity to examine drought response across ecosystem classes (forests, shrublands, grasslands, and wetlands), which is essential to understand how climate influences ecosystem structure and function. We quantified ecosystem resistance to drought by comparing changes in satellite-derived estimates of water-use efficiency (WUE = net primary productivity [NPP]/evapotranspiration [ET]) under normal (i.e., baseline) and drought conditions (ΔWUE = WUE2014 − baseline WUE). With this method, areas with increasing WUE under drought conditions are considered more resilient than systems with declining WUE. Baseline WUE varied across California (0.08 to 3.85 g C/mm H2O) and WUE generally increased under severe drought conditions in 2014. Strong correlations between ΔWUE, precipitation, and leaf area index (LAI) indicate that ecosystems with a lower average LAI (i.e., grasslands) also had greater C-uptake rates when water was limiting and higher rates of carbon-uptake efficiency (CUE = NPP/LAI) under drought conditions. We also found that systems with a baseline WUE ≤ 0.4 exhibited a decline in WUE under drought conditions, suggesting that a baseline WUE ≤ 0.4 might be indicative of low drought resistance. Drought severity, precipitation, and WUE were identified as important drivers of shifts in ecosystem classes over the study period. These findings have important implications for understanding climate change effects on primary productivity and C sequestration across ecosystems and how this may influence ecosystem resistance in the future.

  9. Complexity and dynamics of HIV-1 chemokine receptor usage in a multidrug-resistant adolescent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavarelli, Mariangela; Mainetti, Lara; Pignataro, Angela Rosa; Bigoloni, Alba; Tolazzi, Monica; Galli, Andrea; Nozza, Silvia; Castagna, Antonella; Sampaolo, Michela; Boeri, Enzo; Scarlatti, Gabriella

    2014-12-01

    Maraviroc (MVC) is licensed in clinical practice for patients with R5 virus and virological failure; however, in anecdotal reports, dual/mixed viruses were also inhibited. We retrospectively evaluated the evolution of HIV-1 coreceptor tropism in plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of an infected adolescent with a CCR5/CXCR4 Trofile profile who experienced an important but temporary immunological and virological response during a 16-month period of MVC-based therapy. Coreceptor usage of biological viral clones isolated from PBMCs was investigated in U87.CD4 cells expressing wild-type or chimeric CCR5 and CXCR4. Plasma and PBMC-derived viral clones were sequenced to predict coreceptor tropism using the geno2pheno algorithm from the V3 envelope sequence and pol gene-resistant mutations. From start to 8.5 months of MVC treatment only R5X4 viral clones were observed, whereas at 16 months the phenotype enlarged to also include R5 and X4 clones. Chimeric receptor usage suggested the preferential usage of the CXCR4 coreceptor by the R5X4 biological clones. According to phenotypic data, R5 viruses were susceptible, whereas R5X4 and X4 viruses were resistant to RANTES and MVC in vitro. Clones at 16 months, but not at baseline, showed an amino acidic resistance pattern in protease and reverse transcription genes, which, however, did not drive their tropisms. The geno2pheno algorithm predicted at baseline R5 viruses in plasma, and from 5.5 months throughout follow-up only CXCR4-using viruses. An extended methodological approach is needed to unravel the complexity of the phenotype and variation of viruses resident in the different compartments of an infected individual. The accurate evaluation of the proportion of residual R5 viruses may guide therapeutic intervention in highly experienced patients with limited therapeutic options.

  10. Low-Resistant Band-Passing Noise and Its Dynamical Effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Zhan-Wu

    2007-01-01

    We propose an n-order noise, which is realized by driving an n-order linear differential equation with a Gaussian white noise. The time-derivative noise is a low-resistant band-passing noise. If the derivative noise is regarded as a thermal one, the system has a vanishing effective friction and it should induce ballistic diffusion of a free particle at long times. The simulation method for the generalized Langevin equation driven by the n-order noise is discussed systematically. The features of three-order derivative noises are presented when they are applied to a ratchet system.

  11. Brownian dynamics simulations of a flexible polymer chain which includes continuous resistance and multibody hydrodynamic interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Jason E.; Shaqfeh, Eric S. G.

    2005-01-01

    Using methods adapted from the simulation of suspension dynamics, we have developed a Brownian dynamics algorithm with multibody hydrodynamic interactions for simulating the dynamics of polymer molecules. The polymer molecule is modeled as a chain composed of a series of inextensible, rigid rods with constraints at each joint to ensure continuity of the chain. The linear and rotational velocities of each segment of the polymer chain are described by the slender-body theory of Batchelor [J. Fluid Mech. 44, 419 (1970)]. To include hydrodynamic interactions between the segments of the chain, the line distribution of forces on each segment is approximated by making a Legendre polynomial expansion of the disturbance velocity on the segment, where the first two terms of the expansion are retained in the calculation. Thus, the resulting linear force distribution is specified by a center of mass force, couple, and stresslet on each segment. This method for calculating the hydrodynamic interactions has been successfully used to simulate the dynamics of noncolloidal suspensions of rigid fibers [O. G. Harlen, R. R. Sundararajakumar, and D. L. Koch, J. Fluid Mech. 388, 355 (1999); J. E. Butler and E. S. G. Shaqfeh, J. Fluid Mech. 468, 204 (2002)]. The longest relaxation time and center of mass diffusivity are among the quantities calculated with the simulation technique. Comparisons are made for different levels of approximation of the hydrodynamic interactions, including multibody interactions, two-body interactions, and the "freely draining" case with no interactions. For the short polymer chains studied in this paper, the results indicate a difference in the apparent scaling of diffusivity with polymer length for the multibody versus two-body level of approximation for the hydrodynamic interactions.

  12. Static and Dynamic Magnetization Investigation in Permalloy Electrodeposited onto High Resistive N-Type Silicon Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenedy Freitas

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study reports on the development of permalloy thin films obtained by electrodeposition onto low-doped n-type silicon substrates. While changing from non-percolated clusters into percolated thin films upon increasing the electrodeposition time, the static and dynamic magnetic properties of the as-obtained structures were investigated. We found the experimental magnetic results to be in very good agreement with the simulations performed by solving the Landau-Lifshitz for the dynamics of the magnetic moment. For short electrodeposition times we found the static and dynamic magnetization behavior of the as-formed nanoclusters evidencing vortex magnetization with random chirality and polarization, which is explained in terms of dipolar interaction minimization. Indeed, it is herein emphasized that recent applications of ferromagnetic materials in silicon-based spintronic devices, such as logic and bipolar magnetic transistors and magnetic memories, have revived the possible utilization of low cost and simple electrodeposition techniques for the development of these upcoming hetero-nanostructured devices.

  13. Radiation resistance of (Ni,Fe)Cr{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinels by molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Brutzel, Laurent, E-mail: laurent.vanbrutzel@cea.fr; Alvarez, Pierre; Chartier, Alain

    2014-05-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are carried out to study primary radiation damage in NiCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} and FeCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinels, which are part of the corrosion layer of the vapour generators used in nuclear reactors. The radiation resistance of both spinels is evaluated by studying point defect recombination processes, threshold displacement energies, and 20 keV displacement cascades initiated with different PKA masses. Results are mainly in agreement with previous studies involving MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} showing that radiation facilitates the transition to inverse spinel structure or NaCl structure. However, we find some differences between the two studied spinels indicating that NiCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} is more sensitive to radiation.

  14. Obesity and Prader-Willi Syndrome Affect Heart Rate Recovery from Dynamic Resistance Exercise in Youth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diobel M. Castner

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Following exercise, heart rate decline is initially driven by parasympathetic reactivation and later by sympathetic withdrawal. Obesity delays endurance exercise heart rate recovery (HRR in both children and adults. Young people with Prader-Willi Syndrome (PWS, a congenital cause for obesity, have shown a slower 60-s endurance exercise HRR compared to lean and obese children, suggesting compromised regulation. This study further evaluated effects of obesity and PWS on resistance exercise HRR at 30 and 60 s in children. PWS (8–18 years and lean and obese controls (8–11 years completed a weighted step-up protocol (six sets x 10 reps per leg, separated by one-minute rest, standardized using participant stature and lean body mass. HRR was evaluated by calculated HRR value (HRRV = difference between HR at test termination and 30 (HRRV30 and 60 (HRRV60 s post-exercise. PWS and obese had a smaller HRRV30 than lean (p < 0.01 for both. Additionally, PWS had a smaller HRRV60 than lean and obese (p = 0.01 for both. Obesity appears to delay early parasympathetic reactivation, which occurs within 30 s following resistance exercise. However, the continued HRR delay at 60 s in PWS may be explained by either blunted parasympathetic nervous system reactivation, delayed sympathetic withdrawal and/or poor cardiovascular fitness.

  15. Corrosion Resistant FBG-Based Quasi-Distributed Sensor for Crude Oil Tank Dynamic Temperature Profile Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério da Silva Marques

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a corrosion resistant, maneuverable, and intrinsically safe fiber Bragg grating (FBG-based temperature optical sensor. Temperature monitoring is a critical activity for the oil and gas industry. It typically involves acquiring the desired parameters in a hazardous and corrosive environment. The use of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE was proposed as a means of simultaneously isolating the optical fiber from the corrosive environment and avoiding undesirable mechanical tensions on the FBGs. The presented sensor head is based on multiple FBGs inscribed in a lengthy single mode fiber. The sensor presents an average thermal sensitivity of 8.82 ± 0.09 pm/°C, resulting in a typical temperature resolution of ~0.1 °C and an average time constant value of 6.25 ± 0.08 s. Corrosion and degradation resistance were verified by infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy during 90 days exposure to high salinity crude oil samples. The developed sensor was tested in a field pilot test, mimicking the operation of an inland crude tank, demonstrating its abilities to dynamically monitor temperature profile.

  16. Study of the resistance of SAMs on aluminium to acidic and basic solutions using dynamic contact angle measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liakos, Ioannis L; Newman, Roger C; McAlpine, Eoghan; Alexander, Morgan R

    2007-01-30

    We report the development of a method to determine the aqueous stability of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) using the Wilhelmy plate dynamic contact angle (DCA) experiment. The DCA is measured in solutions over a range of pH values for alkyl carboxylic and alkyl phosphonic acid SAMs formed on magnetron-sputtered aluminum. The change in DCA on repeated immersion is used as a measure of the degradation of the SAMs by hydrolytic attack. The short and intermediate chain length alkyl acids are not stable in water of neutral pH, whereas molecules with the longest alkyl chains show considerably greater stability in neutral and both high and low pH solutions. The packing density inferred from the DCA and the contact angle hysteresis suggests the C18CO2H monolayer to be slightly less well packed than that of the C18P(=O)(OH)2; this is consistent with related friction force microscopy and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy findings published elsewhere (Foster, T. T.; Alexander, M. R.; Leggett, G. J.; McAlpine, E. Langmuir 2006, 22, 9254-9259). The resistance of the SAMs to acid and alkaline environments is discussed in the context of aluminum oxide solubility, SAM packing density, and the resistance of the interfacial phosphate and carboxylate functionalities to different aqueous conditions.

  17. Effect of surface fields on the dynamic resistance of planar HgCdTe mid-wavelength infrared photodiodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Kai; Zhou, Song-Min; Li, Yang; Wang, Xi; Zhang, Peng; Chen, Yi-Yu; Xie, Xiao-Hui; Lin, Chun; Ye, Zhen-Hua; Wang, Jian-Xin; Zhang, Qin-Yao

    2015-05-01

    This work investigates the effect of surface fields on the dynamic resistance of a planar HgCdTe mid-wavelength infrared photodiode from both theoretical and experimental aspects, considering a gated n-on-p diode with the surface potential of its p-region modulated. Theoretical models of the surface leakage current are developed, where the surface tunnelling current in the case of accumulation is expressed by modifying the formulation of bulk tunnelling currents, and the surface channel current for strong inversion is simulated with a transmission line method. Experimental data from the fabricated devices show a flat-band voltage of V F B = - 5.7 V by capacitance-voltage measurement, and then the physical parameters for bulk properties are determined from the resistance-voltage characteristics of the diode working at a flat-band gate voltage. With proper values of the modeling parameters such as surface trap density and channel electron mobility, the theoretical R 0 A product and corresponding dark current calculated from the proposed model as functions of the gate voltage Vg demonstrate good consistency with the measured values. The R 0 A product remarkably degenerates when Vg is far below or above VFB because of the surface tunnelling current or channel current, respectively; and it attains the maximum value of 5.7 × 10 7 Ω . cm 2 around the transition between surface depletion and weak inversion when V g ≈ - 4 V , which might result from reduced generation-recombination current.

  18. Dynamic GLUT4 sorting through a syntaxin-6 compartment in muscle cells is derailed by insulin resistance-causing ceramide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Kevin P; Klip, Amira

    2014-04-04

    GLUT4 constitutively recycles between the plasma membrane and intracellular depots. Insulin shifts this dynamic equilibrium towards the plasma membrane by recruiting GLUT4 to the plasma membrane from insulin-responsive vesicles. Muscle is the primary site for dietary glucose deposition; however, how GLUT4 sorts into insulin-responsive vesicles, and if and how insulin resistance affects this process, is unknown. In L6 myoblasts stably expressing myc-tagged GLUT4, we analyzed the intracellular itinerary of GLUT4 as it internalizes from the cell surface and examined if such sorting is perturbed by C2-ceramide, a lipid metabolite causing insulin resistance. Surface-labeled GLUT4myc that internalized for 30 min accumulated in a Syntaxin-6 (Stx6)- and Stx16-positive perinuclear sub-compartment devoid of furin or internalized transferrin, and displayed insulin-responsive re-exocytosis. C2-ceramide dispersed the Stx6-positive sub-compartment and prevented insulin-responsive re-exocytosis of internalized GLUT4myc, even under conditions not affecting insulin-stimulated signaling towards Akt. Microtubule disruption with nocodazole prevented pre-internalized GLUT4myc from reaching the Stx6-positive perinuclear sub-compartment and from undergoing insulin-responsive exocytosis. Removing nocodazole allowed both parameters to recover, suggesting that the Stx6-positive perinuclear sub-compartment was required for GLUT4 insulin-responsiveness. Accordingly, Stx6 knockdown inhibited by ∼50% the ability of internalized GLUT4myc to undergo insulin-responsive re-exocytosis without altering its overall perinuclear accumulation. We propose that Stx6 defines the insulin-responsive compartment in muscle cells. Our data are consistent with a model where ceramide could cause insulin resistance by altering intracellular GLUT4 sorting.

  19. Experimental dynamical characterization of five autonomous chaotic oscillators with tunable series resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minati, Ludovico, E-mail: lminati@ieee.org, E-mail: ludovico.minati@unitn.it [MR-Lab, Center for Mind/Brain Science, University of Trento, Trento, Italy and Scientific Department, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Neurologico Carlo Besta, Milan (Italy)

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, an experimental characterization of the dynamical properties of five autonomous chaotic oscillators, based on bipolar-junction transistors and obtained de-novo through a genetic algorithm in a previous study, is presented. In these circuits, a variable resistor connected in series to the DC voltage source acts as control parameter, for a range of which the largest Lyapunov exponent, correlation dimension, approximate entropy, and amplitude variance asymmetry are calculated, alongside bifurcation diagrams and spectrograms. Numerical simulations are compared to experimental measurements. The oscillators can generate a considerable variety of regular and chaotic sine-like and spike-like signals.

  20. Effect of trading momentum and price resistance on stock market dynamics: a Glauber Monte Carlo simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castiglione, F.; Pandey, R. B.; Stauffer, D.

    2001-01-01

    A Monte Carlo computer simulation model is presented to study the evolution of stock price and the distribution of price fluctuation. The resistance is described by an elastic energy Ee= e· x2 resulting from the price deviation x from an initial value and the momentum trading by the potential energy Ep=- b· y in a price gradient y field. The distribution of price fluctuation ( P( y)) is symmetric and shows a long time tail compatible over some range with a power-law, P( y)∼ y- μ with μ≃4 at e=1.0, b=5 . The volatility auto-correlation function ( c( τ)) is positive for several iterations.

  1. Estimating the dynamics and dependencies of accumulating mutations with applications to HIV drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montazeri, Hesam; Günthard, Huldrych F; Yang, Wan-Lin; Kouyos, Roger; Beerenwinkel, Niko

    2015-10-01

    We introduce a new model called the observed time conjunctive Bayesian network (OT-CBN) that describes the accumulation of genetic events (mutations) under partial temporal ordering constraints. Unlike other CBN models, the OT-CBN model uses sampling time points of genotypes in addition to genotypes themselves to estimate model parameters. We developed an expectation-maximization algorithm to obtain approximate maximum likelihood estimates by accounting for this additional information. In a simulation study, we show that the OT-CBN model outperforms the continuous time CBN (CT-CBN) (Beerenwinkel and Sullivant, 2009. Markov models for accumulating mutations. Biometrika 96: (3), 645-661), which does not take into account individual sampling times for parameter estimation. We also show superiority of the OT-CBN model on several datasets of HIV drug resistance mutations extracted from the Swiss HIV Cohort Study database.

  2. Modelling of Dynamic Transmission Cable Temperature Considering Soil-Specific Heat, Thermal Resistivity, and Precipitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Rasmus; Anders, George J.; Holboell, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an algorithm for the estimation of the time-dependent temperature evolution of power cables, when real-time temperature measurements of the cable surface or a point within its vicinity are available. The thermal resistivity and specific heat of the cable surroundings are varied...... as functions of the moisture content which is known to vary with time. Furthermore, issues related to the cooling effect during rainy weather are considered. The algorithm is based on the lumped parameters model and takes as input distributed temperature sensing measurements as well as the current and ambient...... temperature. The concept is verified by studying a laboratory setup of a 245 kV cable system....

  3. Dynamics of electroforming in binary metal oxide-based resistive switching memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Abhishek A.; Karpov, Ilya V.; Kotlyar, Roza; Kwon, Jonghan; Skowronski, Marek; Bain, James A.

    2015-09-01

    The onset of localized conduction in TaOx- and TiOx-based resistive switching devices during forming has been characterized. The novel temperature and voltage dependencies of forming times were extracted with pulsed forming experiments that spanned five orders of magnitude in time and showed three different regimes of electroforming. A universal field-induced-nucleation theory which included self-heating effects was used to explain a strong reduction in forming voltage with increasing forming time over all observed regimes of electroforming. It was shown that the effective activation energy for the incubation time changes inversely proportional with the electric field. A diameter of the volatile filament that precedes forming was estimated at ˜1 nm.

  4. Electrical resistivity dynamics beneath a fractured sedimentary bedrock riverbed in response to temperature and groundwater–surface water exchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Steelman

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Bedrock rivers occur where surface water flows along an exposed rock surface. Fractured sedimentary bedrock can exhibit variable groundwater residence times, anisotropic flow paths, and heterogeneity, along with diffusive exchange between fractures and rock matrix. These properties of the rock will affect thermal transients in the riverbed and groundwater–surface water exchange. In this study, surface electrical methods were used as a non-invasive technique to assess the scale and temporal variability of riverbed temperature and groundwater–surface water interaction beneath a sedimentary bedrock riverbed. Conditions were monitored at a semi-daily to semi-weekly interval over a full annual period that included a seasonal freeze–thaw cycle. Surface electromagnetic induction (EMI and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT methods captured conditions beneath the riverbed along a pool–riffle sequence of the Eramosa River in Canada. Geophysical datasets were accompanied by continuous measurements of aqueous specific conductance, temperature, and river stage. Time-lapse vertical temperature trolling within a lined borehole adjacent to the river revealed active groundwater flow zones along fracture networks within the upper 10 m of rock. EMI measurements collected during cooler high-flow and warmer low-flow periods identified a spatiotemporal riverbed response that was largely dependent upon riverbed morphology and seasonal groundwater temperature. Time-lapse ERT profiles across the pool and riffle sequence identified seasonal transients within the upper 2 and 3 m of rock, respectively, with spatial variations controlled by riverbed morphology (pool versus riffle and dominant surficial rock properties (competent versus weathered rock rubble surface. While the pool and riffle both exhibited a dynamic resistivity through seasonal cooling and warming cycles, conditions beneath the pool were more variable, largely due to the formation of river

  5. Exenatide improves both hepatic and adipose tissue insulin resistance: A dynamic positron emission tomography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastaldelli, Amalia; Gaggini, Melania; Daniele, Giuseppe; Ciociaro, Demetrio; Cersosimo, Eugenio; Tripathy, Devjit; Triplitt, Curtis; Fox, Peter; Musi, Nicolas; DeFronzo, Ralph; Iozzo, Patricia

    2016-12-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists (GLP-1-RAs) act on multiple tissues, in addition to the pancreas. Recent studies suggest that GLP-1-RAs act on liver and adipose tissue to reduce insulin resistance (IR). Thus, we evaluated the acute effects of exenatide (EX) on hepatic (Hep-IR) and adipose (Adipo-IR) insulin resistance and glucose uptake. Fifteen male subjects (age = 56 ± 8 years; body mass index = 29 ± 1 kg/m(2) ; A1c = 5.7 ± 0.1%) were studied on two occasions, with a double-blind subcutaneous injection of EX (5 μg) or placebo (PLC) 30 minutes before a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). During OGTT, we measured hepatic (HGU) and adipose tissue (ATGU) glucose uptake with [(18) F]2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose/positron emission tomography, lipolysis (RaGly) with [U-(2) H5 ]-glycerol, oral glucose absorption (RaO) with [U-(13) C6 ]-glucose, and hepatic glucose production (EGP) with [6,6-(2) H2 ]-glucose. Adipo-IR and Hep-IR were calculated as (FFA0-120min ) × (Ins0-120min ) and (EGP0-120min ) × (Ins0-120min ), respectively. EX reduced RaO, resulting in reduced plasma glucose and insulin concentration from 0 to 120 minutes postglucose ingestion. EX decreased Hep-IR (197 ± 28 to 130 ± 37; P = 0.02) and increased HGU of orally administered glucose (23 ± 4 to 232 ± 89 [μmol/min/L]/[μmol/min/kg]; P = 0.003) despite lower insulin (23 ± 5 vs. 41 ± 5 mU/L; P insulin suppression of RaGly by decreasing Adipo-IR (23 ± 4 to 13 ± 3; P = 0.009). No significant effect of insulin was observed on ATGU (EX = 1.16 ± 0.15 vs. PLC = 1.36 ± 0.13 [μmol/min/L]/[μmol/min/kg]). Acute EX administration (1) improves Hep-IR, decreases EGP, and enhances HGU and (2) reduces Adipo-IR, improves the antilipolytic effect of insulin, and reduces plasma free fatty acid levels during OGTT. (Hepatology 2016;64:2028-2037). © 2016 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  6. Tbx2 confers poor prognosis in glioblastoma and promotes temozolomide resistance with change of mitochondrial dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Fuxin; Du, Jianzhou; Ni, Weimin; Liu, Weixian

    2017-01-01

    Tbx2 is a cancer-related protein that was found to be overexpressed in several human malignancies. The present study aims to investigate the clinical significance and biological role of Tbx2 in human astrocytoma. We examined its protein expression in 102 cases of astrocytoma tissues using immunohistochemical staining. Negative Tbx2 staining was observed in normal astrocytes, and positive nuclear staining was found in 41 out of 102 astrocytoma specimens. The rate of Tbx2 overexpression in pylocytic astrocytoma, diffuse astrocytoma, anaplastic astrocytoma, and glioblastoma multiform (GBM) were 0%, 26.1%, 40%, and 52%, respectively. Tbx2 overexpression correlated with poor prognosis in patients with astrocytoma or GBM. Tbx2 plasmid transfection was performed in A172 cells, and Tbx2 siRNA knockdown was carried out in U251 cells. Cell Counting Kit-8, cell cycle analysis, and matrigel invasion assay showed that Tbx2 overexpression upregulated cell proliferation, G1-S transition, and invasion, with corresponding change of cyclin D1, p21, and MMP 2 and 9. Importantly, we demonstrated that Tbx2 reduced apoptosis and conferred resistance to temozolomide in GBM cell lines. Further experiments showed that Tbx2 could regulate mitochondrial fission/fusion balance. Western blot showed that Tbx2 overexpression reduced caspase 3 cleavage, while it induced Bcl-2 and p-Drp1 upregulation. In conclusion, our results indicated that Tbx2 might serve as an indicator for poor prognosis and also be useful as an important therapeutic in human GBM, which inhibits apoptosis through regulation of mitochondrial function. PMID:28260920

  7. Insight into herbicide resistance of W574L mutant Arabidopsis thaliana acetohydroxyacid synthase:molecular dynamics simulations and binding free energy calculations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Acetohydroxyacid synthase(AHAS) is the target enzyme of several classes of herbicides,such as sulfonylureas and imidazolinones.Now many mutant AHASs with herbicide resistance have emerged along with extensive use of herbicides,therefore it is imperative to understand the detailed interaction mechanism and resistance mechanism so as to develop new potent inhibitors for wild-type or resistant AHAS.With the aid of available crystal structures of the Arabidopsis thaliana(At) AHAS-inhibitor complex,molecular dynamics(MD) simulations were used to investigate the interaction and resistance mechanism directly and dynamically at the atomic level.Nanosecond-level MD simulations were performed on six systems consisting of wild-type or W574L mutant AtAHAS in the complex with three sulfonylurea inhibitors,separately,and binding free energy was calculated for each system using the MM-GBSA method.Comprehensive analyses from structural and energetic aspects confirmed the importance of residue W574,and also indicated that W574L mutation might alert the structural charactersistic of the substrate access channel and decrease the binding affinity of inhibitors,which cooperatively weaken the effective channel-blocked effect and finally result in weaker inhibitory effect of inhibitor and corresponding herbicide resistance of W574L mutant.To our knowledge,it is the first report about MD simulations study on the AHAS-related system,which will pave the way to study the interactions between herbicides and wild-type or mutant AHAS dynamically,and decipher the resistance mechanism at the atomic level for better designing new potent anti-resistance herbicides.

  8. Effect of surface fields on the dynamic resistance of planar HgCdTe mid-wavelength infrared photodiodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Kai; Wang, Xi; Zhang, Peng; Chen, Yi-Yu [Key Laboratory of Infrared Imaging Materials and Detectors, Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200083 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhou, Song-Min; Xie, Xiao-Hui; Lin, Chun, E-mail: chun-lin@mail.sitp.ac.cn; Ye, Zhen-Hua; Wang, Jian-Xin; Zhang, Qin-Yao, E-mail: qinyao@mail.sitp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Infrared Imaging Materials and Detectors, Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200083 (China); Li, Yang [Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2015-05-28

    This work investigates the effect of surface fields on the dynamic resistance of a planar HgCdTe mid-wavelength infrared photodiode from both theoretical and experimental aspects, considering a gated n-on-p diode with the surface potential of its p-region modulated. Theoretical models of the surface leakage current are developed, where the surface tunnelling current in the case of accumulation is expressed by modifying the formulation of bulk tunnelling currents, and the surface channel current for strong inversion is simulated with a transmission line method. Experimental data from the fabricated devices show a flat-band voltage of V{sub FB}=−5.7 V by capacitance-voltage measurement, and then the physical parameters for bulk properties are determined from the resistance-voltage characteristics of the diode working at a flat-band gate voltage. With proper values of the modeling parameters such as surface trap density and channel electron mobility, the theoretical R{sub 0}A product and corresponding dark current calculated from the proposed model as functions of the gate voltage V{sub g} demonstrate good consistency with the measured values. The R{sub 0}A product remarkably degenerates when V{sub g} is far below or above V{sub FB} because of the surface tunnelling current or channel current, respectively; and it attains the maximum value of 5.7×10{sup 7} Ω · cm{sup 2} around the transition between surface depletion and weak inversion when V{sub g}≈−4 V, which might result from reduced generation-recombination current.

  9. Dynamic aspects of soil water availability for isohydric plants: Focus on root hydraulic resistances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couvreur, V.; Vanderborght, J.; Draye, X.; Javaux, M.

    2014-11-01

    Soil water availability for plant transpiration is a key concept in agronomy. The objective of this study is to revisit this concept and discuss how it may be affected by processes locally influencing root hydraulic properties. A physical limitation to soil water availability in terms of maximal flow rate available to plant leaves (Qavail) is defined. It is expressed for isohydric plants, in terms of plant-centered variables and properties (the equivalent soil water potential sensed by the plant, ψs eq; the root system equivalent conductance, Krs; and a threshold leaf water potential, ψleaf lim). The resulting limitation to plant transpiration is compared to commonly used empirical stress functions. Similarities suggest that the slope of empirical functions might correspond to the ratio of Krs to the plant potential transpiration rate. The sensitivity of Qavail to local changes of root hydraulic conductances in response to soil matric potential is investigated using model simulations. A decrease of radial conductances when the soil dries induces earlier water stress, but allows maintaining higher night plant water potentials and higher Qavail during the last week of a simulated 1 month drought. In opposition, an increase of radial conductances during soil drying provokes an increase of hydraulic redistribution and Qavail at short term. This study offers a first insight on the effect of dynamic local root hydraulic properties on soil water availability. By better understanding complex interactions between hydraulic processes involved in soil-plant hydrodynamics, better prospects on how root hydraulic traits mitigate plant water stress might be achieved.

  10. Whitefly population dynamics and evaluation of whitefly-transmitted tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV)-resistant tomato genotypes as whitefly and TYLCV reservoirs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Rajagopalbabu; Riley, David; Diffie, Stan; Sparks, Alton; Adkins, Scott

    2012-08-01

    Sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius), and whitefly-transmitted tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) are major threats to tomato production in the southeastern United States. TYLCV was introduced to Florida from the Caribbean islands and has spread to other southern states of the United States. In Georgia, in recent years, the incidence of TYLCV has been steadily increasing. Studies were conducted to monitor population dynamics of whiteflies in the vegetable production belt of Georgia, to evaluate TYLCV-resistant genotypes against whiteflies and TYLCV, and to assess the potential role of resistant genotypes in TYLCV epidemiology. Monitoring studies indicated that the peak incidence of whiteflies varied seasonally from year to year. In general, whitefly populations were not uniformly distributed. Tomato genotypes exhibited minor differences in their ability to support whitefly populations. TYLCV symptoms were visually undetectable in all but one resistant genotype. The infection rates (visually) in susceptible genotypes ranged from 40 to 87%. Greenhouse inoculations with viruliferous whiteflies followed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) indicated that up to 100% of plants of resistant genotypes were infected, although predominantly symptomless. TYLCV acquisition by whiteflies from TYLCV-infected genotypes was tested by PCR; TYLCV acquisition rates from resistant genotypes were less than from susceptible genotypes. Nevertheless, this difference did not influence TYLCV transmission rates from resistant to susceptible genotypes. Results emphasize that resistant genotypes can serve as TYLCV and whitefly reservoirs and potentially influence TYLCV epidemics.

  11. A comparison of the resistance of Temporary Edge Protection Systems to static and dynamic loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González, M. N.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Temporary Edge Protection Systems (TEPS are designed to withstand the impact of a worker that walks, stumbles, and falls against them. This is by nature a dynamic action; however, many standards evaluate TEPS when the surface or slope is slightly inclined (less than 10°, applying static requirements. The performance requirements demanded by these standards are assumed to be equivalent to the impact of a worker, however this point has not been tested. In this study, TEPS with tubular steel guardrails and wooden boards of different quality under two types of loads are evaluated using the static requirements detailed in standard EN 13374. TEPS are subjected to an impact energy of 180 J, simulating a worker of 90 kg walking at a speed of 2 m/s. The results demonstrate that the static requirements of EN 13374 are more demanding than the impact of 180 J in all the systems under study.Los sistemas provisionales de protección de borde (SPPB están diseñados para detener el impacto de un trabajador que camina, tropieza y golpea contra ellas. Esto supone una acción de naturaleza dinámica. Sin embargo, muchas normas evalúan SPPB utilizando requisitos de tipo estático cuando la superficie de trabajo está poco inclinada (menos de 10° suponiendo que equivalen al impacto de un trabajador. No obstante, este aspecto no se ha confirmado experimentalmente. En este trabajo SPPB con barandillas de tubos de acero y de tablas de madera se han evaluado usando los requisitos estáticos definidos por la norma EN 13374. Posteriormente, se han sometido a una energía de impacto de 180 J, que simula a un trabajador de 90 kg caminando a una velocidad de 2 m/s. Los resultados demuestran que los requisitos estáticos de la norma EN 13374 son más exigentes que el impacto de 180 J en todos los sistemas estudiados.

  12. Big-data-based edge biomarkers: study on dynamical drug sensitivity and resistance in individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Tao; Zhang, Wanwei; Yu, Xiangtian; Liu, Xiaoping; Li, Meiyi; Chen, Luonan

    2016-07-01

    Big-data-based edge biomarker is a new concept to characterize disease features based on biomedical big data in a dynamical and network manner, which also provides alternative strategies to indicate disease status in single samples. This article gives a comprehensive review on big-data-based edge biomarkers for complex diseases in an individual patient, which are defined as biomarkers based on network information and high-dimensional data. Specifically, we firstly introduce the sources and structures of biomedical big data accessible in public for edge biomarker and disease study. We show that biomedical big data are typically 'small-sample size in high-dimension space', i.e. small samples but with high dimensions on features (e.g. omics data) for each individual, in contrast to traditional big data in many other fields characterized as 'large-sample size in low-dimension space', i.e. big samples but with low dimensions on features. Then, we demonstrate the concept, model and algorithm for edge biomarkers and further big-data-based edge biomarkers. Dissimilar to conventional biomarkers, edge biomarkers, e.g. module biomarkers in module network rewiring-analysis, are able to predict the disease state by learning differential associations between molecules rather than differential expressions of molecules during disease progression or treatment in individual patients. In particular, in contrast to using the information of the common molecules or edges (i.e.molecule-pairs) across a population in traditional biomarkers including network and edge biomarkers, big-data-based edge biomarkers are specific for each individual and thus can accurately evaluate the disease state by considering the individual heterogeneity. Therefore, the measurement of big data in a high-dimensional space is required not only in the learning process but also in the diagnosing or predicting process of the tested individual. Finally, we provide a case study on analyzing the temporal expression

  13. Human Lysozyme Synergistically Enhances Bactericidal Dynamics and Lowers the Resistant Mutant Prevention Concentration for Metronidazole to Helicobacter pylori by Increasing Cell Permeability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolin Zhang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Metronidazole (MNZ is an effective agent that has been employed to eradicate Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori. The emergence of broad MNZ resistance in H. pylori has affected the efficacy of this therapeutic agent. The concentration of MNZ, especially the mutant prevention concentration (MPC, plays an important role in selecting or enriching resistant mutants and regulating therapeutic effects. A strategy to reduce the MPC that can not only effectively treat H. pylori but also prevent resistance mutations is needed. H. pylori is highly resistant to lysozyme. Lysozyme possesses a hydrolytic bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan and a cationic dependent mode. These effects can increase the permeability of bacterial cells and promote antibiotic absorption into bacterial cells. In this study, human lysozyme (hLYS was used to probe its effects on the integrity of the H. pylori outer and inner membranes using as fluorescent probe hydrophobic 1-N-phenyl-naphthylamine (NPN and the release of aspartate aminotransferase. Further studies using a propidium iodide staining method assessed whether hLYS could increase cell permeability and promote cell absorption. Finally, we determined the effects of hLYS on the bactericidal dynamics and MPC of MNZ in H. pylori. Our findings indicate that hLYS could dramatically increase cell permeability, reduce the MPC of MNZ for H. pylori, and enhance its bactericidal dynamic activity, demonstrating that hLYS could reduce the probability of MNZ inducing resistance mutations.

  14. Cancer systems biology in the genome sequencing era: part 2, evolutionary dynamics of tumor clonal networks and drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Edwin; Zou, Jinfeng; Zaman, Naif; Beitel, Lenore K; Trifiro, Mark; Paliouras, Miltiadis

    2013-08-01

    A tumor often consists of multiple cell subpopulations (clones). Current chemo-treatments often target one clone of a tumor. Although the drug kills that clone, other clones overtake it and the tumor recurs. Genome sequencing and computational analysis allows to computational dissection of clones from tumors, while singe-cell genome sequencing including RNA-Seq allows profiling of these clones. This opens a new window for treating a tumor as a system in which clones are evolving. Future cancer systems biology studies should consider a tumor as an evolving system with multiple clones. Therefore, topics discussed in Part 2 of this review include evolutionary dynamics of clonal networks, early-warning signals (e.g., genome duplication events) for formation of fast-growing clones, dissecting tumor heterogeneity, and modeling of clone-clone-stroma interactions for drug resistance. The ultimate goal of the future systems biology analysis is to obtain a 'whole-system' understanding of a tumor and therefore provides a more efficient and personalized management strategies for cancer patients. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Resistive wall instabilities and tearing mode dynamics in the EXTRAP T2R thin shell reversed-field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmberg, J.-A.; Brunsell, P. R.

    2002-01-01

    Observations of resistive wall instabilities and tearing mode dynamics in the EXTRAP T2R thin shell (τw=6 ms) reversed field pinch are described. A nonresonant mode (m=1,n=-10) with the same handedness as the internal field grows nearly exponentially with an average growth time of about 2.6 ms (less than 1/2 of the shell time) consistent with linear stability theory. The externally nonresonant unstable modes (m=1,n>0), predicted by linear stability theory, are observed to have only low amplitudes (in the normal low-Θ operation mode of the device). The radial field of the dominant internally resonant tearing modes (m=1,n=-15 to n=-12) remain low due to spontaneous fast mode rotation, corresponding to angular phase velocities up to 280 krad/s. Phase aligned mode structures are observed to rotate toroidally with an average angular velocity of 40 krad/s, in the opposite direction of the plasma current. Toward the end of the discharge, the radial field of the internally resonant modes grows as the modes slow down and become wall-locked, in agreement with nonlinear computations. Fast rotation of the internally resonant modes has been observed only recently and is attributed to a change of the front-end system (vacuum vessel, shell, and TF coil) of the device.

  16. The resistance of hazel (Corylus avellana to hazelnut weevil (Curculio nucum L.- Coleoptera, Curculionidae. Part II. The physicochemical characteristics of the pericarp and dynamics of nut development and cultivar resistance to the pest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdzisław Piskornik

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Significant differences were found among the 22 studied hazel cultivars (Corylus avellana L. in their resistance to hazelnut weevil (Curculio nucum L. which is the main pest of this crop in Europe. The study investigated the relationships between the resistance of the cultivars to the pest and the physicochemical properties of the pericarp, i.e. the lignification dynamics, changes in thickness and hardness during nut development and the rate of nutlet development. Correlation analysis showed that there was no dependence between the physicochemical properties of the pericarp and the resistance of the hazel cultivars to the hazelnut weevil. Nut development dynamics were also found to be unrelated to resistance to the pest. Laboratory feeding experiments showed that during the initial feeding phase and at the time the insect searches for an oviposition site, it seems to prefer cultivars with the largest nutlets. However, in the period of intensive oviposition, traits other than nutlet size seem to be decisive for the beetles choice of cultivar.

  17. Exploring the molecular mechanism of cross-resistance to HIV-1 integrase strand transfer inhibitors by molecular dynamics simulation and residue interaction network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Weiwei; Jin, Xiaojie; Ning, Lulu; Wang, Meixia; Liu, Huanxiang; Yao, Xiaojun

    2013-01-28

    The rapid emergence of cross-resistance to the integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) has become a serious problem in the therapy of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. Understanding the detailed molecular mechanism of INSTIs cross-resistance is therefore critical for the development of new effective therapy against cross-resistance. On the basis of the homology modeling constructed structure of tetrameric HIV-1 intasome, the detailed molecular mechanism of the cross-resistance mutation E138K/Q148K to three important INSTIs (Raltegravir (RAL, FDA approved in 2007), Elvitegravir (EVG, FDA approved in 2012), and Dolutegravir (DTG, phase III clinical trials)) was investigated by using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and residue interaction network (RIN) analysis. The results from conformation analysis and binding free energy calculation can provide some useful information about the detailed binding mode and cross-resistance mechanism for the three INSTIs to HIV-1 intasome. Binding free energy decomposition analysis revealed that Pro145 residue in the 140s 1oop (Gly140 to Gly149) of the HIV-1 intasome had strong hydrophobic interactions with INSTIs and played an important role in the binding of INSTIs to HIV-1 intasome active site. A systematic comparison and analysis of the RIN proves that the communications between the residues in the resistance mutant is increased when compared with that of the wild-type HIV-1 intasome. Further analysis indicates that residue Pro145 may play an important role and is relevant to the structure rearrangement in HIV-1 intasome active site. In addition, the chelating ability of the oxygen atoms in INSTIs (e.g., RAL and EVG) to Mg(2+) in the active site of the mutated intasome was reduced due to this conformational change and is also responsible for the cross-resistance mechanism. Notably, the cross-resistance mechanism we proposed could give some important information for the future rational design of novel

  18. HIV quasispecies dynamics during pro-active treatment switching: impact on multi-drug resistance and resistance archiving in latent reservoirs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max von Kleist

    Full Text Available The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV can be suppressed by highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART in the majority of infected patients. Nevertheless, treatment interruptions inevitably result in viral rebounds from persistent, latently infected cells, necessitating lifelong treatment. Virological failure due to resistance development is a frequent event and the major threat to treatment success. Currently, it is recommended to change treatment after the confirmation of virological failure. However, at the moment virological failure is detected, drug resistant mutants already replicate in great numbers. They infect numerous cells, many of which will turn into latently infected cells. This pool of cells represents an archive of resistance, which has the potential of limiting future treatment options. The objective of this study was to design a treatment strategy for treatment-naive patients that decreases the likelihood of early treatment failure and preserves future treatment options. We propose to apply a single, pro-active treatment switch, following a period of treatment with an induction regimen. The main goal of the induction regimen is to decrease the abundance of randomly generated mutants that confer resistance to the maintenance regimen, thereby increasing subsequent treatment success. Treatment is switched before the overgrowth and archiving of mutant strains that carry resistance against the induction regimen and would limit its future re-use. In silico modelling shows that an optimal trade-off is achieved by switching treatment at days after the initiation of antiviral therapy. Evaluation of the proposed treatment strategy demonstrated significant improvements in terms of resistance archiving and virological response, as compared to conventional HAART. While continuous pro-active treatment alternation improved the clinical outcome in a randomized trial, our results indicate that a similar improvement might also be reached after

  19. Insight on Mutation-Induced Resistance from Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the Native and Mutated CSF-1R and KIT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Silva Figueiredo Celestino Gomes, Priscila; Chauvot De Beauchêne, Isaure; Panel, Nicolas; Lopez, Sophie; De Sepulveda, Paulo; Geraldo Pascutti, Pedro; Solary, Eric; Tchertanov, Luba

    2016-01-01

    The receptors tyrosine kinases (RTKs) for the colony stimulating factor-1, CSF-1R, and for the stem cell factor, SCFR or KIT, are important mediators of signal transduction. The abnormal function of these receptors, promoted by gain-of-function mutations, leads to their constitutive activation, associated with cancer or other proliferative diseases. A secondary effect of the mutations is the alteration of receptors’ sensitivity to tyrosine kinase inhibitors, compromising effectiveness of these molecules in clinical treatment. In particular, the mutation V560G in KIT increases its sensitivity to Imatinib, while the D816V in KIT, and D802V in CSF-1R, triggers resistance to the drug. We analyzed the Imatinib binding affinity to the native and mutated KIT (mutations V560G, S628N and D816V) and CSF-1R (mutation D802V) by using molecular dynamics simulations and energy calculations of Imatinib•target complexes. Further, we evaluated the sensitivity of the studied KIT receptors to Imatinib by measuring the inhibition of KIT phosphorylation. Our study showed that (i) the binding free energy of Imatinib to the targets is highly correlated with their experimentally measured sensitivity; (ii) the electrostatic interactions are a decisive factor affecting the binding energy; (iii) the most deleterious impact to the Imatinib sensitivity is promoted by D802V (CSF-1R) and D816V (KIT) mutations; (iv) the role of the juxtamembrane region, JMR, in the imatinib binding is accessory. These findings contribute to a better description of the mutation-induced effects alternating the targets sensitivity to Imatinib. PMID:27467080

  20. Dynamics of antibiotic resistance genes in microbial fuel cell-coupled constructed wetlands treating antibiotic-polluted water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuai; Song, Hai-Liang; Yang, Xiao-Li; Huang, Shan; Dai, Zhe-Qin; Li, Hua; Zhang, Yu-Yue

    2017-07-01

    Microbial fuel cell-coupled constructed wetlands (CW-MFCs) use electrochemical, biological, and ecological functions to treat wastewater. However, few studies have investigated the risks of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) when using such systems to remove antibiotics. Therefore, three CW-MFCs were designed to assess the dynamics of ARGs in filler biofilm and effluent over 5000 h of operation. The experimental results indicated that relatively high steady voltages of 605.8 mV, 613.7 mV, and 541.4 mV were obtained at total influent antibiotic concentrations of 400, 1,000, and 1600 μg L(-1), respectively. The 16S rRNA gene level in the cathode layer was higher than those in the anode and two middle layers, but the opposite trend was observed for the sul and tet genes. The relative abundance of the three tested sul genes were in the order sulI > sulII > sulIII, and those of the five tet genes were in the order tetA > tetC > tetW > tetO > tetQ. The levels of sul and tet genes in the media biofilm showed an increase over the treatment period. The effluent water had relatively low abundances of sul and tet genes compared with the filler biofilm. No increases were observed for most ARGs over the treatment period, and no significant correlations were observed between the ARGs and 16S rRNA gene copy numbers, except for sulI and tetW in the effluent. However, significant correlations were observed among most of the ARG copy numbers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Insight into the effect of inhibitor resistant S130G mutant on physico-chemical properties of SHV type beta-lactamase: a molecular dynamics study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Hassan Baig

    Full Text Available Bacterial resistance is a serious threat to human health. The production of β-lactamase, which inactivates β-lactams is most common cause of resistance to the β-lactam antibiotics. The Class A enzymes are most frequently encountered among the four β-lactamases in the clinic isolates. Mutations in class A β-lactamases play a crucial role in substrate and inhibitor specificity. SHV and TEM type are known to be most common class A β-lactamases. In the present study, we have analyzed the effect of inhibitor resistant S130G point mutation of SHV type Class-A β-lactamase using molecular dynamics and other in silico approaches. Our study involved the use of different in silico methods to investigate the affect of S130G point mutation on the major physico-chemical properties of SHV type class A β-lactamase. We have used molecular dynamics approach to compare the dynamic behaviour of native and S130G mutant form of SHV β-lactamase by analyzing different properties like root mean square deviation (RMSD, H-bond, Radius of gyration (Rg and RMS fluctuation of mutation. The results clearly suggest notable loss in the stability of S130G mutant that may further lead to decrease in substrate specificity of SHV. Molecular docking further indicates that S130G mutation decreases the binding affinity of all the three inhibitors in clinical practice.

  2. Dynamic evolution of resistance gene analogs in the orthologous genomic regions of powdery mildew resistance gene MlIW170 in Triticum dicoccoides and Aegilops tauschii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheat is one of the most important staple grain crops in the world. Powdery mildew disease caused by Blumeria graminis f.sp. tritici can result in significant losses in both grain yield and quality in wheat. In this study, the wheat powdery mildew resistance gene MlIW170 locus located on the short ...

  3. TO STUDY THE EFFECT OF AGILITY AND PERTURBATION EXERCISES VERSUS DYNAMIC RESISTANCE EXERCISES TO IMPROVE KNEE FUNCTION IN KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS A COMPARATIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeutishree Roy

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Primary osteoarthritis is more commonly found in post menopausal women; Secondary osteoarthritis had an underlying cause such as trauma, obesity or inflammatory arthritis. It is characterized by a progressive degeneration of the articular cartilage with subsequent remodeling and hypertrophy of the bone at the joint margins. Muscle weakness is associated with increased functional limitation, disability. Muscle strengthening through resistance exercises increases physical function; decreases pain due to osteoarthritis and reduces self reported disability. Agility is the ability to change direction and maintain stability and is more often important in changing direction and speed; In order to train muscle to react quickly neuromuscular training is essential; Perturbation enhances the ability of the proprioceptor signals to the muscle and prevent injuries and enhances performance. The aim of this study is to compare the effectiveness of agility training and dynamic resistance training in patients with primary osteoarthritis. Methods: 50 subjects were assigned in two groups 25 each group and subjects were selected by convenient sampling method. Group A with agility training and Group B with dynamic resistance training. The treatment session was performed 3 days a week for 3 weeks lasting for 45minutes. Day 0 is the starting day of the session and Day-21 last day of the session. Each subject performed all the measurement with knee function assessed by Timed up and Go test (TUG and Lower extremity function Scale (LEFS. Both outcomes were tested at starting day and at the end of 21st day. Results: All the analysis was carried out in PASW version 21.0. An alpha level of 0.05 was used to determine statistical significance. The between group analysis of agility training and dynamic strengthening for LEFS and TUG in evaluation of knee function was done using independent ‘t’ test showed statistically very significant (P=0.000. Conclusions

  4. Allele-specific real-time PCR testing for minor HIV-1 drug resistance mutations: assay preparation and application to reveal dynamic of mutations in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Dong-xing; LI Jing-yun; LI Han-ping; LI Lin; ZHUANG Dao-min; JIAO Li-yan; WANG Zheng; BAO Zuo-yi; LIU Si-yang; LIU Yong-jian

    2010-01-01

    Background It is very important for the clinical management to test for minor HIV-1 resistance mutations accurately and sensitively. The conventional genotypic assays of HIV drug resistance detection based on sequencing can only discriminate the mutations which present in more than 20%-30%. The aim of this study was to evaluate allele-specific real-time PCR (ASPCR) to detect the resistance-related mutations located at positions 103, 184 and 215.Methods We developed the allele-specific PCR assay, using the most common drug resistance mutations in Chinese AIDS patients, K103N, M184V/I, T215F/Y as a model system. The standards were constructed by cloning the wild-type and mutant DNA fragments into the T-vector. We designed specific primers to discriminate mutant templates in the real-time PCR using SYBR green as a fluorescence reporter. And then we evaluated the ASPCR assay and tested 140clinical samples using this method.Results The sensitivities of ASPCR assay were 0.04% for K103N, 0.30% for M1841, 0.40% for M184V, 0.03% for T215F and 0.02% for T215Y. The intra-assay and inter-assay coefficients of variation were less than 0.42. One hundred and forty plasma samples were tested by ASPCR and dynamic resistance curves of ten patients were obtained.Conclusions Drug resistance emerged half a year after the start of antiretroviral therapy. The mutation of T215Yemerged 1 to 1.5 years after starting treatment and then increased rapidly. The ASPCR assay we developed was a sensitive, accurate and rapid method to detect the minor HIV-1 variants and it can provide earlier and more drug-resistance information for HIV research and AIDS antiretroviral therapy.

  5. Why Finish Your Antibiotics? A Novel, Hands-On, Classroom Approach for Teaching the Dynamics of Antibiotic Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassmer, Gary T.; Kipe-Nolt, Judith A.; Chayko, Catherine A.

    2006-01-01

    We present an effective, engaging, and fun method for teaching how the use or misuse of antibiotics can select for resistant strains of bacteria. This method uses candy as a substitute for strains of bacteria varying in resistance to a given antibiotic. Results and discussion are presented in the context of this emerging healthcare crisis.

  6. Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Goodman, Lawrence E

    2001-01-01

    Beginning text presents complete theoretical treatment of mechanical model systems and deals with technological applications. Topics include introduction to calculus of vectors, particle motion, dynamics of particle systems and plane rigid bodies, technical applications in plane motions, theory of mechanical vibrations, and more. Exercises and answers appear in each chapter.

  7. Comparative dynamics of the emergence of fluoroquinolone resistance in staphylococci from the nasal microbiota of patients treated with fluoroquinolones according to their environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munier, Anne-Lise; de Lastours, Victoire; Barbier, François; Chau, Françoise; Fantin, Bruno; Ruimy, Raymond

    2015-12-01

    Fluoroquinolone-resistant staphylococci (FQRS) are primarily selected in the nasal microbiota during fluoroquinolone (FQ) treatment. To gain insight into the dynamics of the emergence of FQRS, 49 hospitalised patients (HPs) and 62 community patients (CPs) treated with FQs were studied. Nasal swabs were collected before (T0), at the end of (T1) and 1 month after (T2) FQ treatment. FQRS were identified by mass spectrometry. Antibiotic resistance was determined. Pre- and post-exposure staphylococci populations were compared phenotypically and by MLST to determine the origin of FQRS. At T0, 33/49 HPs (67%) and 24/62 CPs (39%) carried FQRS (OR=3.3, 95% CI: 1.4-7.9; P<0.001). Among patients with no FQRS at T0, 15/16 HPs (94%) and 16/38 CPs (42%) had FQRS detected at T1 and/or T2 (OR=19.6, 95% CI: 2.5-902; P<0.001). Among FQRS having emerged, co-resistance to meticillin was detected in 87% and 82% of HPs and CPs, respectively. No selection of resistance emerging from the initial microbiota was evidenced. FQRS showed decreased species diversity in favour of Staphylococcus haemolyticus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. As a consequence of FQ treatment, acquisition of FQRS in the nasal microbiota is frequent in the community and almost inevitable in hospitals. Acquisition from extranasal sites prevails. A restriction in species diversity in favour of more pathogenic and resistant species occurs. This highlights the major impact of FQ treatment on nasal microbiota, the role of the ecological environment in the emergence of FQRS, and the high-risk of dissemination of resistant staphylococci. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  8. Human Management of a Wild Plant Modulates the Evolutionary Dynamics of a Gene Determining Recessive Resistance to Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulicard, Nils; Pacios, Luis Fernández; Gallois, Jean-Luc; Piñero, Daniel; García-Arenal, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    This work analyses the genetic variation and evolutionary patterns of recessive resistance loci involved in matching-allele (MA) host-pathogen interactions, focusing on the pvr2 resistance gene to potyviruses of the wild pepper Capsicum annuum glabriusculum (chiltepin). Chiltepin grows in a variety of wild habitats in Mexico, and its cultivation in home gardens started about 25 years ago. Potyvirus infection of Capsicum plants requires the physical interaction of the viral VPg with the pvr2 product, the translation initiation factor eIF4E1. Mutations impairing this interaction result in resistance, according to the MA model. The diversity of pvr2/eIF4E1 in wild and cultivated chiltepin populations from six biogeographical provinces in Mexico was analysed in 109 full-length coding sequences from 97 plants. Eleven alleles were found, and their interaction with potyvirus VPg in yeast-two-hybrid assays, plus infection assays of plants, identified six resistance alleles. Mapping resistance mutations on a pvr2/eIF4E1 model structure showed that most were around the cap-binding pocket and strongly altered its surface electrostatic potential, suggesting resistance-associated costs due to functional constraints. The pvr2/eIF4E1 phylogeny established that susceptibility was ancestral and resistance was derived. The spatial structure of pvr2/eIF4E1 diversity differed from that of neutral markers, but no evidence of selection for resistance was found in wild populations. In contrast, the resistance alleles were much more frequent, and positive selection stronger, in cultivated chiltepin populations, where diversification of pvr2/eIF4E1 was higher. This analysis of the genetic variation of a recessive resistance gene involved in MA host-pathogen interactions in populations of a wild plant show that evolutionary patterns differ according to the plant habitat, wild or cultivated. It also demonstrates that human management of the plant population has profound effects on the

  9. Human Management of a Wild Plant Modulates the Evolutionary Dynamics of a Gene Determining Recessive Resistance to Virus Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils Poulicard

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This work analyses the genetic variation and evolutionary patterns of recessive resistance loci involved in matching-allele (MA host-pathogen interactions, focusing on the pvr2 resistance gene to potyviruses of the wild pepper Capsicum annuum glabriusculum (chiltepin. Chiltepin grows in a variety of wild habitats in Mexico, and its cultivation in home gardens started about 25 years ago. Potyvirus infection of Capsicum plants requires the physical interaction of the viral VPg with the pvr2 product, the translation initiation factor eIF4E1. Mutations impairing this interaction result in resistance, according to the MA model. The diversity of pvr2/eIF4E1 in wild and cultivated chiltepin populations from six biogeographical provinces in Mexico was analysed in 109 full-length coding sequences from 97 plants. Eleven alleles were found, and their interaction with potyvirus VPg in yeast-two-hybrid assays, plus infection assays of plants, identified six resistance alleles. Mapping resistance mutations on a pvr2/eIF4E1 model structure showed that most were around the cap-binding pocket and strongly altered its surface electrostatic potential, suggesting resistance-associated costs due to functional constraints. The pvr2/eIF4E1 phylogeny established that susceptibility was ancestral and resistance was derived. The spatial structure of pvr2/eIF4E1 diversity differed from that of neutral markers, but no evidence of selection for resistance was found in wild populations. In contrast, the resistance alleles were much more frequent, and positive selection stronger, in cultivated chiltepin populations, where diversification of pvr2/eIF4E1 was higher. This analysis of the genetic variation of a recessive resistance gene involved in MA host-pathogen interactions in populations of a wild plant show that evolutionary patterns differ according to the plant habitat, wild or cultivated. It also demonstrates that human management of the plant population has profound

  10. Molecular dynamics simulation studies of the wild type and E92Q/N155H mutant of Elvitegravir-resistance HIV-1 integrase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Qi [Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ., Shanghai (China). State Key Lab. of Microbial Metabolism and College of Life Science and Biotechnology; Cheng, Xiaolin [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Center for Molecular Biophysics; Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Cellular and Molecular Biology; Wei, Dongqing [Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ., Shanghai (China). State Key Lab. of Microbial Metabolism and College of Life Science and Biotechnology; Xu, Qin [Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ., Shanghai (China). State Key Lab. of Microbial Metabolism and College of Life Science and Biotechnology

    2014-11-06

    Although Elvitegravir (EVG) is a newly developed antiretrovirals drug to treat the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), drug resistance has already been found in clinic, such as E92Q/N155H and Q148H/G140S. Several structural investigations have already been reported to reveal the molecular mechanism of the drug resistance. As full length crystal structure for HIV-1 integrase is still unsolved, we use in this paper the crystal structure of the full length prototype foamy virus (PFV) in complex with virus DNA and inhibitor Elvitegravir as a template to construct the wild type and E92Q/N155H mutant system of HIV-1 integrase. Molecular dynamic simulations was used to revel the binding mode and the drug resistance of the EVG ligand in E92Q/N155H. Several important interactions were discovered between the mutated residues and the residues in the active site of the E92Q/N155H double mutant pattern, and cross correlation and clustering methods were used for detailed analysis. The results from the MD simulation studies will be used to guide the experimental efforts of developing novel inhibitors against drug-resistant HIV integrase mutants.

  11. A report on infection dynamics of inducible clindamycin resistance of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from a teaching hospital in India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Debasmita Dubey; Shakti Rath; Mahesh C Sahu; Subhrajita Rout; Nagen K Debata; Rabindra N Padhy

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the infection of hospital-and community-acquired“erythromycin-induced clindamycin resistant”strains or D-test positives of clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) (with and without methicillin resistance) in a hospital. Methods: Strains of S. aureus isolated from clinical specimens were subjected to D-test and antibiotic profiling. Results: Of the total 278 isolates, 140 (50.35%) were D-test positives and the rest were D-test negatives. Further, of 140 (100%) positives, 87 (62.14%) and 53 (37.85%) strains were from males and females, respectively. Of 140 (100%) positives, 117 (83.57%) were methicillin resistant S. aureus and 23 (16.42%) were methicillin sensitive S. aureus;of 140 strains, 103 (73.57%) strains from persons with and 37 (26.42%) were without related infections;of 140 strains, 91 (65%) and 49 (35%) were from hospital-and community-acquired samples, respectively. In 140 strains, 118 (84.28%) with comorbidities and 22 (15.71%) without comorbidities cases were recorded;similarly, persons with prior antibiotic uses contributed 108 (77.14%) and without 32 (22.85%) positive strains. These binary data of surveillance were analyzed by a univariate analysis. It was evident that the prior antibiotic uses and comorbidities due to other ailments were the determinative factors in D-test positivity, corroborated by low P values, P=0.001 1 and 0.002 4, respectively. All isolates (278) were resistant to 17 antibiotics of nine groups, in varying degrees;the minimum of 28%resistance for vancomycin and the maximum of 97%resistance for gentamicin were recorded. Further, of 278 strains, only 42 (15.1%) strains were resistant constitutively to both antibiotics, erythromycin resistant and clindamycin resistant, while 45 (16.2%) strains were constitutively sensitive to both antibiotics (erythromycin sensitive and clindamycin sensitive). Further, of the rest 191 (68.7%) strains were with erythromycin resistant and clindamycin

  12. Dynamics of Bemisia tabaci biotypes and insecticide resistance in Fujian province in China during 2005–2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Feng-Luan; Zheng, Yu; Huang, Xiao-Yan; Ding, Xue-Ling; Zhao, Jian-Wei; Desneux, Nicolas; He, Yu-Xian; Weng, Qi-Yong

    2017-01-01

    The whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) is an important agricultural insect pest worldwide. The B and Q biotypes are the two most predominant and devastating biotypes prevalent across China. However, there are few studies regarding the occurrence of the Q biotype in Fujian Province, China, where high insecticide resistance has been reported in the B biotype. Differences in some biological characteristics between the B and Q biotypes, especially insecticide resistance, are considered to affect the outcome of their competition. Extensive surveys in Fujian revealed that the B biotype was predominant during 2005–2014, whereas the Q biotype was first detected in some locations in 2013 and widely detected throughout the province in 2014. Resistance to neonicotinoids (that have been used for more than 10 years) exhibited fluctuations in open fields, but showed a continual increasing trend in protected areas. Resistance to lambda-cyhalothrin, chlorpyrifos, and abamectin exhibited a declining trend. Resistance to novel insecticides, such as nitenpyram, pymetrozine, sulfoxaflor, and cyantraniliprole, in 2014 was generally below a moderate level. A decline in insecticide resistance in the B biotype and the rapid buildup of protected crops under global temperature increase may have promoted the establishment of the Q biotype in Fujian. PMID:28112233

  13. Cumulative ozone effect on canopy stomatal resistance and the impact on boundary layer dynamics and CO2 assimilation at the diurnal scale: A case study for grassland in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Super, I.; Vilà-Guerau De Arellano, J.; Krol, M.C.

    2015-01-01

    Biological, chemical, and dynamical processes occurring at the surface strongly interact at diurnal scales. Therefore, this study examines the seasonal ozone impact on stomatal resistance, surface energy balance, boundary layer dynamics, and CO2 assimilation at this (sub)diurnal scale under changing

  14. Cumulative ozone effect on canopy stomatal resistance and the impact on boundary layer dynamics and CO2 assimilation at the diurnal scale: A case study for grassland in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Super, I.; Vilà-Guerau De Arellano, J.; Krol, M.C.

    2015-01-01

    Biological, chemical, and dynamical processes occurring at the surface strongly interact at diurnal scales. Therefore, this study examines the seasonal ozone impact on stomatal resistance, surface energy balance, boundary layer dynamics, and CO2 assimilation at this (sub)diurnal scale under changing

  15. Dynamics of extended-spectrum cephalosporin resistance in pathogenic Escherichia coli isolated from diseased pigs in Quebec, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahanbakhsh, Seyedehameneh; Smith, Matthew G; Kohan-Ghadr, Hamid-Reza; Letellier, Ann; Abraham, Sam; Trott, Darren J; Fairbrother, John Morris

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the evolution with time of ceftiofur-resistant Escherichia coli clinical isolates from pigs in Québec, Canada, between 1997 and 2012 with respect to pathotypes, clones and antimicrobial resistance. Eighty-five ceftiofur-resistant E. coli isolates were obtained from the OIE (World Organisation for Animal Health) Reference Laboratory for Escherichia coli. The most prevalent pathovirotypes were enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC):F4 (40%), extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) (16.5%) and Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC):F18 (8.2%). Susceptibility testing to 15 antimicrobial agents revealed a high prevalence of resistance to 13 antimicrobials, with all isolates being multidrug-resistant. blaCMY-2 (96.5%) was the most frequently detected β-lactamase gene, followed by blaTEM (49.4%) and blaCTX-M (3.5%). Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) applied to 45 representative E. coli isolates revealed that resistance to ceftiofur is spread both horizontally and clonally. In addition, the emergence of extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing E. coli isolates carrying blaCTX-M was observed in 2011 and 2012 in distinct clones. The most predominant plasmid incompatibility (Inc) groups were IncFIB, IncI1, IncA/C and IncFIC. Resistance to gentamicin, kanamycin and chloramphenicol as well as the frequency of blaTEM and IncA/C significantly decreased over the study period, whereas the frequency of IncI1 and multidrug resistance to seven antimicrobial categories significantly increased. These findings reveal that extended-spectrum cephalosporin-resistant porcine E. coli isolates in Québec belong to several different clones with diverse antimicrobial resistance patterns and plasmids. Furthermore, blaCMY-2 was the major β-lactamase gene in these isolates. From 2011, we report the emergence of blaCTX-M in distinct clones.

  16. Dynamics of multiple insecticide resistance in the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae in a rice growing area in South-Western Burkina Faso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ouédraogo Jean-Bosco

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insecticide resistance of the main malaria vector, Anopheles gambiae, has been reported in south-western Burkina Faso, West Africa. Cross-resistance to DDT and pyrethroids was conferred by alterations at site of action in the sodium channel, the Leu-Phe kdr mutation; resistance to organophosphates and carbamates resulted from a single point mutation in the oxyanion hole of the acetylcholinesterase enzyme designed as ace-1R. Methods An entomological survey was carried out during the rainy season of 2005 at Vallée du Kou, a rice growing area in south-western Burkina Faso. At the Vallée du Kou, both insecticide resistance mechanisms have been previously described in the M and S molecular forms of An. gambiae. This survey aimed i to update the temporal dynamics and the circumsporozoite infection rate of the two molecular forms M and S of An. gambiae ii to update the frequency of the Leu-Phe kdr mutation within these forms and finally iii to investigate the occurrence of the ace-1R mutation. Mosquitoes collected by indoor residual collection and by human landing catches were counted and morphologically identified. Species and molecular forms of An. gambiae, ace-1R and Leu-Phe kdr mutations were determined using PCR techniques. The presence of the circumsporozoite protein of Plasmodium falciparum was determined using ELISA. Results Anopheles gambiae populations were dominated by the M form. However the S form occurred in relative important proportion towards the end of the rainy season with a maximum peak in October at 51%. Sporozoite rates were similar in both forms. The frequency of the Leu-Phe kdr mutation in the S form reached a fixation level while it is still spreading in the M form. Furthermore, the ace-1R mutation prevailed predominately in the S form and has just started spreading in the M form. The two mutations occurred concomitantly both in M and S populations. Conclusion These results showed that the Vallée du Kou

  17. Diversity and dynamics of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in cheese as determined by PCR denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flórez, Ana Belén; Mayo, Baltasar

    2015-12-01

    This work reports the composition and succession of tetracycline- and erythromycin-resistant bacterial communities in a model cheese, monitored by polymerase chain reaction denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE). Bacterial 16S rRNA genes were examined using this technique to detect structural changes in the cheese microbiota over manufacturing and ripening. Total bacterial genomic DNA, used as a template, was extracted from cultivable bacteria grown without and with tetracycline or erythromycin (both at 25 μg ml(-1)) on a non-selective medium used for enumeration of total and viable cells (Plate Count agar with Milk; PCA-M), and from those grown on selective and/or differential agar media used for counting various bacterial groups; i.e., lactic acid bacteria (de Man, Rogosa and Sharpe agar; MRSA), micrococci and staphylococci (Baird-Parker agar; BPA), and enterobacteria (Violet Red Bile Glucose agar; VRBGA). Large numbers of tetracycline- and erythromycin-resistant bacteria were detected in cheese samples at all stages of ripening. Counts of antibiotic-resistant bacteria varied widely depending on the microbial group and the point of sampling. In general, resistant bacteria were 0.5-1.0 Log10 units fewer in number than the corresponding susceptible bacteria. The PCR-DGGE profiles obtained with DNA isolated from the plates for total bacteria and the different bacterial groups suggested Escherichia coli, Lactococcus lactis, Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus spp. as the microbial types resistant to both antibiotics tested. This study shows the suitability of the PCR-DGGE technique for rapidly identifying and tracking antibiotic resistant populations in cheese and, by extension, in other foods.

  18. A study (1977-1992) of population dynamics of endoparasites featuring benzimidazole-resistant small strongyles (population S) in Shetland ponies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, E T; Tolliver, S C; Drudge, J H; Stamper, S; Swerczek, T W; Granstrom, D E

    1996-11-01

    Critical tests (91) were done between 1977 and 1992 in Shetland ponies to evaluate drug susceptibility and population dynamics (present paper) of endoparasites. The test ponies, most less than 1 year old, were from a herd where older animals were treated every 8 weeks initially with cambendazole (CBZ) (1974-1978) and then with oxibendazole (OBZ) (1978-1992). Previous field test data (1974-1992) on older ponies in the breeding herd indicated the presence of benzimidazole (BZ) resistant small strongyles. Data on population dynamics from the present critical tests indicated that 28 species of small strongyles persisted over the study period in spite of initial susceptibility and later refractiveness of six species to both CBZ and OBZ. Changes in intensities and other aspects were observed for the six BZ-resistant species (Cyathostomum catinatium, Cyathostomum coronatum, Cylicocyclus nassatus, Cylicostephanus calicatus, Cylicostephanus goldi, and Cylicostephanus longibursatus). Variabilities, some striking, were found in prevalence and intensity in bots, stomach worms, ascarids, eyeworms, large strongyles, pinworms and tapeworms.

  19. In situ TEM imaging of defect dynamics under electrical bias in resistive switching rutile-TiO₂.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamaladasa, Ranga J; Sharma, Abhishek A; Lai, Yu-Ting; Chen, Wenhao; Salvador, Paul A; Bain, James A; Skowronski, Marek; Picard, Yoosuf N

    2015-02-01

    In this study, in situ electrical biasing was combined with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in order to study the formation and evolution of Wadsley defects and Magnéli phases during electrical biasing and resistive switching in titanium dioxide (TiO2). Resistive switching devices were fabricated from single-crystal rutile TiO2 substrates through focused ion beam milling and lift-out techniques. Defect evolution and phase transformations in rutile TiO2 were monitored by diffraction contrast imaging inside the TEM during electrical biasing. Reversible bipolar resistive switching behavior was observed in these single-crystal TiO2 devices. Biased induced reduction reactions created increased oxygen vacancy concentrations to such an extent that shear faults (Wadsley defects) and oxygen-deficient phases (Magnéli phases) formed over large volumes within the TiO2 TEM specimen. Nevertheless, the observed reversible formation/dissociation of Wadsley defects does not appear to correlate to resistive switching phenomena at these length scales. These defect zones were found to reversibly reconfigure in a manner consistent with charged oxygen vacancy migration responding to the applied bias polarity.

  20. Effects of Short-Term Dynamic Constant External Resistance Training and Subsequent Detraining on Strength of the Trained and Untrained Limbs: A Randomized Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo B. Costa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Short-term resistance training has been shown to increase isokinetic muscle strength and performance after only two to nine days of training. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of three days of unilateral dynamic constant external resistance (DCER training and detraining on the strength of the trained and untrained legs. Nineteen men were randomly assigned to a DCER training group or a non-training control group. Subjects visited the laboratory eight times, the first visit was a familiarization session, the second visit was a pre-training assessment, the subsequent three visits were for training sessions (if assigned to the training group, and the last three visits were post-training assessments 1, 2, and 3 (i.e., 48 h, 1 week, and 2 weeks after the final training session. Strength increased in both trained and untrained limbs from pre- to post-training assessment 1 for the training group and remained elevated at post-training assessments 2 and 3 (p ≤ 0.05. No changes were observed in the control (p > 0.05. Possible strength gains from short-term resistance training have important implications in clinical rehabilitation settings, sports injury prevention, as well as other allied health fields such as physical therapy, occupational therapy, and athletic training.

  1. Structural Studies of a Rationally Selected Multi-Drug Resistant HIV-1 Protease Reveal Synergistic Effect of Distal Mutations on Flap Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agniswamy, Johnson; Louis, John M.; Roche, Julien; Harrison, Robert W.; Weber, Irene T. (GSU); (NIH); (Iowa State)

    2016-12-16

    We report structural analysis of HIV protease variant PRS17 which was rationally selected by machine learning to represent wide classes of highly drug-resistant variants. Crystal structures were solved of PRS17 in the inhibitor-free form and in complex with antiviral inhibitor, darunavir. Despite its 17 mutations, PRS17 has only one mutation (V82S) in the inhibitor/substrate binding cavity, yet exhibits high resistance to all clinical inhibitors. PRS17 has none of the major mutations (I47V, I50V, I54ML, L76V and I84V) associated with darunavir resistance, but has 10,000-fold weaker binding affinity relative to the wild type PR. Comparable binding affinity of 8000-fold weaker than PR is seen for drug resistant mutant PR20, which bears 3 mutations associated with major resistance to darunavir (I47V, I54L and I84V). Inhibitor-free PRS17 shows an open flap conformation with a curled tip correlating with G48V flap mutation. NMR studies on inactive PRS17 D25N unambiguously confirm that the flaps adopt mainly an open conformation in solution very similar to that in the inhibitor-free crystal structure. In PRS17, the hinge loop cluster of mutations, E35D, M36I and S37D, contributes to the altered flap dynamics by a mechanism similar to that of PR20. An additional K20R mutation anchors an altered conformation of the hinge loop. Flap mutations M46L and G48V in PRS17/DRV complex alter the Phe53 conformation by steric hindrance between the side chains. Unlike the L10F mutation in PR20, L10I in PRS17 does not break the inter-subunit ion pair or diminish the dimer stability, consistent with a very low dimer dissociation constant comparable to that of wild type PR. Distal mutations A71V, L90M and I93L propagate alterations to the catalytic site of PRS17. PRS17 exhibits a molecular mechanism whereby mutations act synergistically to alter the flap dynamics resulting in significantly weaker binding yet maintaining active site contacts with darunavir.

  2. Rapid evolutionary dynamics in a 2.8-Mb chromosomal region containing multiple prolamin and resistance gene families in Aegilops tauschii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Lingli; Huo, Naxin; Wang, Yi; Deal, Karin; Wang, Daowen; Hu, Tiezhu; Dvorak, Jan; Anderson, Olin D; Luo, Ming-Cheng; Gu, Yong Q

    2016-09-01

    Prolamin and resistance gene families are important in wheat food use and in defense against pathogen attacks, respectively. To better understand the evolution of these multi-gene families, the DNA sequence of a 2.8-Mb genomic region, representing an 8.8 cM genetic interval and harboring multiple prolamin and resistance-like gene families, was analyzed in the diploid grass Aegilops tauschii, the D-genome donor of bread wheat. Comparison with orthologous regions from rice, Brachypodium, and sorghum showed that the Ae. tauschii region has undergone dramatic changes; it has acquired more than 80 non-syntenic genes and only 13 ancestral genes are shared among these grass species. These non-syntenic genes, including prolamin and resistance-like genes, originated from various genomic regions and likely moved to their present locations via sequence evolution processes involving gene duplication and translocation. Local duplication of non-syntenic genes contributed significantly to the expansion of gene families. Our analysis indicates that the insertion of prolamin-related genes occurred prior to the separation of the Brachypodieae and Triticeae lineages. Unlike in Brachypodium, inserted prolamin genes have rapidly evolved and expanded to encode different classes of major seed storage proteins in Triticeae species. Phylogenetic analyses also showed that the multiple insertions of resistance-like genes and subsequent differential expansion of each R gene family. The high frequency of non-syntenic genes and rapid local gene evolution correlate with the high recombination rate in the 2.8-Mb region with nine-fold higher than the genome-wide average. Our results demonstrate complex evolutionary dynamics in this agronomically important region of Triticeae species.

  3. Comparison of cutout resistance of dynamic condylar screw and proximal femoral nail in reverse oblique trochanteric fractures: A biomechanical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gursimrat Singh Cheema

    2012-01-01

    Results: The bending moment of the PFN group was approximately 50% less than that of the DCS group (P<0.0001. The PFN group resisted more number of cycles than the DCS group (P=0.03 and showed lesser number of component failures as compared with the DCS group (P=0.003. Conclusions: The PFN is biomechanically superior to DCS for the fixation of reverse oblique trochanteric fractures of femur.

  4. Effects of Supplemental Citrulline-Malate Ingestion on Blood Lactate, Cardiovascular Dynamics, and Resistance Exercise Performance in Trained Males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wax, Benjamin; Kavazis, Andreas N; Luckett, William

    2016-01-01

    Citrulline-malate (CM) has been proposed to provide an ergogenic effect during resistance exercise; however, there is a paucity of research investigating these claims. Therefore, we investigated the impact that CM supplementation would have on repeated bouts of resistance exercise. Fourteen resistance-trained males participated in a randomized, counterbalanced, double-blind study. Subjects were randomly assigned to placebo (PL) or CM (8 g) and performed three sets each of chin-ups, reverse chin-ups, and push-ups to failure. One week later, subjects ingested the other supplement and performed the same protocol. Blood lactate (BLa), heart rate (HR), and blood pressure (BP) were measured preexercise, with BLa measured a second time immediately following the last set, while HR and BP were measured 5 and 10 min postexercise. Citrulline-malate ingestion significantly increased the amount of repetitions performed for each exercise (chin-ups: PL = 28.4 ± 7.1, CM = 32.2 ± 5.6, p = .003; reverse chin-ups: PL = 26.6 ± 5.6, CM = 32.1 ± 7.1, p = .017; push-ups: PL = 89.1 ± 37.4, CM = 97.7 ± 36.1, p < .001). Blood lactate data indicated a time effect (p < .001), but no treatment differences (p = .935). Systolic BP data did not show differences for time (p = .078) or treatment (p = .119). Diastolic BP data did not show differences for time (p = .069), but indicated treatment differences (p = .014) for subjects ingesting CM. Collectively, these findings suggests that CM increased upper-body resistance performance in trained college-age males.

  5. Jasmonate response decay and defense metabolite accumulation contributes to age-regulated dynamics of plant insect resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Ying-Bo; Liu, Yao-Qian; Chen, Dian-Yang; Chen, Fang-Yan; Fang, Xin; Hong, Gao-Jie; Wang, Ling-Jian; Wang, Jia-Wei; Chen, Xiao-Ya

    2017-01-01

    Immunity deteriorates with age in animals but comparatively little is known about the temporal regulation of plant resistance to herbivores. The phytohormone jasmonate (JA) is a key regulator of plant insect defense. Here, we show that the JA response decays progressively in Arabidopsis. We show that this decay is regulated by the miR156-targeted SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE9 (SPL9) group of proteins, which can interact with JA ZIM-domain (JAZ) proteins, including JAZ3. As SPL9 levels gradually increase, JAZ3 accumulates and the JA response is attenuated. We provide evidence that this pathway contributes to insect resistance in young plants. Interestingly however, despite the decay in JA response, older plants are still comparatively more resistant to both the lepidopteran generalist Helicoverpa armigera and the specialist Plutella xylostella, along with increased accumulation of glucosinolates. We propose a model whereby constitutive accumulation of defense compounds plays a role in compensating for age-related JA-response attenuation during plant maturation. PMID:28067238

  6. Dynamics of knockdown pyrethroid insecticide resistance alleles in a field population of Anopheles gambiae s.s. in southwestern Nigeria

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    T.S. Awolola, A.O. Oduola, I.O. Oyewole, J.B. Obansa, C.N. Amajoh

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Pyrethroid insecticide resistance in the malaria vector Anopheles gambiaeGiles is mainly associated with reduced target site sensitivity arising from a single point mutation inthe sodium channel gene, often referred to as knockdown resistance (kdr. This resistance mechanismis widespread in West Africa and was reported for the first time in Nigeria in 2002. Here we presentchanges in the susceptibility/resistance status of the molecular ‘M’ and ‘S’ forms of An. gambiae andthe frequency of the kdr alleles from 2002–05.Methods: Adult anophelines were sampled quarterly inside human dwellings from January 2002 toDecember 2005 and adults reared from wild larvae were identified using morphological keys. Samplesbelonging to the An. gambiae complex were subjected to PCR assays for species identification anddetection of molecular ‘M’ and ‘S’ forms. Insecticide susceptibility tests were carried out usingstandard WHO procedures and test kits only on 2–3 days old adult An. gambiae s.s. reared fromlarval collections. The kdr genotypes were determined in both live and dead specimens of An. gambiaes.s. using alleles-specific polymerase chain reaction diagnostic tests.Results: The overall collection showed that the molecular ‘S’ form was predominant (>60% but theproportions of both forms in the mosquito populations from 2002–05 were not statistically different.Both forms also occurred throughout the period without apparent relationship to wet or dry season.Insecticide susceptibility tests did not show any significant increase in the resistance status recordedfor either Permethrin or DDT from 2002–05, rather, an improvement in the susceptibility status ofthe mosquitoes to these insecticides was observed from 2004–05 relative to the tests performed in2002–03.Conclusion: The proportion of the molecular ‘M’ and ‘S’ form of An. gambiae and the kdr frequencieshave not increased significantly from 2002

  7. Analysis of Dynamic Reliability for Resisting Seismic Loading of Mega Steel Frame MSCSS%巨型钢框架MSCSS抗震动力可靠度研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈叶; 张洵安; 邹玲

    2012-01-01

    The model of MSC3S is established by using finite element software SAP2000. Using the dynamic time-history analysis method of SAP2000, both MSCSS and MF are analyzed under the measured ground motion records and El-Centro artificial seismic wave which is composed by HHT. The analysis results are disposed in the MATLAB software, the probability density evolution analysis for stochastic seismic response of MSCSS is proceeded, the first - passage failure mechanism is adopted and the damage limits state of structure is defined by using storey force-resistance, and the computational method of dynamic reliability for resisting seismic loading of MSCSS is represented. The results indicate that comparing with the MF, the effect of seismic control of MSCSS is better, and the dynamic reliability for resisting seismic loading of MSCSS is higher obviously; so it can be seen that the MSCSS has higher structural safety and reliability.%通过有限元分析软件SAP2000对巨-子型有控结构进行建模,利用SAP2000中的动力时程分析法,分别选用实测的地震动记录和通过HHT方法合成的El-Centro人工波,对巨-子型有控结构及巨型框架结构进行弹塑性时程分析;利用SAP2000与MATLAB接口程序将SAP2000的分析结果在MATLAB软件中做进一步的计算分析,进行结构随机地震响应的概率密度演化分析,采用首次超越破坏机制,定义结构层间位移为极限状态控制指标,确定了基于概率密度演化方法的结构抗震动力可靠度的计算方法.结果表明:巨-子型有控结构比巨型框架结构具有更好的振动控制性能,抗震动力可靠度远大于巨型框架结构的抗震动力可靠度,具有更高的结构安全性和可靠性.

  8. Graphene damage effects on radiation-resistance and configuration of copper–graphene nanocomposite under irradiation: A molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hai; Tang, Xiaobin; Chen, Feida; Liu, Jian; Li, Huan; Chen, Da

    2016-12-01

    Metal–graphene nanocomposite is a kind of potential radiation tolerant material. Graphene damage of the composite is inevitable within radiation environments. In this paper, two kinds of copper–graphene nanocomposite (CGNC) systems containing perfect graphene and prefabricated damage graphene, respectively, were adopted to expound the influences of graphene damage on the properties (radiation-resistance and configuration) of CGNC under irradiation by atomistic simulations. In the CGNC containing perfect graphene, the increasing graphene damage induced by the increase of the number of cascades, did not obviously impair the role of copper–graphene interface in keeping the properties of CGNC. In the CGNC containing prefabricated damage graphene, the properties of CGNC would significantly deteriorate once the radius of prefabricated damage exceeds 10 Å, and even stacking fault tetrahedral would occur in the CGNC. The results highlighted that prefabricated graphene damage have greater effects on the change of the properties of CGNC. Therefore, it is very necessary to maintain the structural integrity of graphene for improving the radiation-resistance and configuration of CGNC.

  9. Heat coma as an indicator of resistance to environmental stress and its relationship to ocean dynamics in the sea skaters, Halobates (Heteroptera: Gerridae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tetsuo Harada; Shiho Takenaka; Takero Sekimoto; Mitsuru Nakajyo; Takao Inoue; Takamasa Ishibashi; Chihiro Katagiri

    2011-01-01

    The tolerance to temperature increase was tested for Halobates individuals collected during two cruises in the western tropical Pacific Ocean (MR-06-05-Leg 3,December 21,2006-January 12,2007,0°N-8°N; KH-06-02-Leg 5,August 18-31,2006,12°N-1 7°N).High temperature coma experiments were conducted on adults and 5th instar larvae.On average,H.sericeus (distributed in the wide latitude zone of 5°N-40°N),H.germanus (distributed in the moderate latitude zone of 0°N-35°N) and H.micans (distributed mainly in the lower latitudes around the equator) were on average paralyzed at 35.6℃ (SD:0.89),32.9℃ (SD:2.17) and 31.6℃ (SD:2.60),respectively (P =0.035).According to the current dynamics during the cruise,the colony of H.sericeus at one station (5°N 137°E) may have been transferred from the northern area of 14°N by three currents (North Equatorial Current,Mindanao Current and North Equatorial Counter Current) to the area of 5°N 138°E.Extremely high heat resistance was shown by the adults of H.germanus in the sea area around the equator.Dynamic current and air movements in this area around the equator,that is a “warm seawater pool”,could be hypothesized to be related to the high resistance to heat shown in this study.

  10. Identification of anaerobic threshold by analysis of heart rate variability during discontinuous dynamic and resistance exercise protocols in healthy older men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, Rodrigo Polaquini; Castello-Simões, Viviane; Mendes, Renata Gonçalves; Archiza, Bruno; Dos Santos, Daniel Augusto; Bonjorno, José Carlos; de Oliveira, Claudio Ricardo; Catai, Aparecida Maria; Arena, Ross; Borghi-Silva, Audrey

    2014-03-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine anaerobic threshold (AT) during discontinuous dynamic and resistive exercise protocols by analysing of heart rate variability (HRV) and blood lactate (BL) in healthy elderly subjects and compare the cardiovascular, metabolic and autonomic variables obtained from these two forms of exercise. Fourteen elderly (70 ± 4 years) apparently healthy males underwent the following tests: (i) incremental ramp test on cycle ergometer, (ii) one repetition maximum (1RM) leg press at 45°, (iii) a discontinuous exercise test on a cycle ergometer (DET-C) protocol and (iv) a resistance exercise leg press (DET-L) protocol. Heart rate, blood pressure and BL were obtained during each increment of exercise intensity. No significant differences (P>0·05) were found between methods of AT determination (BL and HRV) nor the relative intensity corresponding to AT (30% of maximum intensity) between the types of exercise (DET-C and DET-L). Furthermore, no significant differences (P>0·05) were found between the DET-C and DET-L in relation to HRV, however, the DET-L provided higher values of systolic blood pressure and BL (Pexercise protocols were similar when compared at the same relative intensity. However, DET-L resulted in higher values of blood pressure and BL at workloads beyond AT. © 2013 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Enhancement of methanol resistance of Yarrowia lipolytica lipase 2 using β-cyclodextrin as an additive: Insights from experiments and molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hao; Jiang, Yang; Zhang, Haiyang; Nie, Kaili; Lei, Ming; Deng, Li; Wang, Fang; Tan, Tianwei

    2017-01-01

    The methanol resistance of lipase is a critical parameter in enzymatic biodiesel production. In the present work, the methanol resistance of Yarrowia lipolytica Lipase 2 (YLLIP2) was significantly improved using β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) as an additive. According to the results, YLLIP2 with β-CD exhibited approximately 7000U/mg specific activity in 30wt% methanol for 60min compared with no activity without β-CD under the same conditions. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation results indicated that the β-CD molecules weakened the conformational change of YLLIP2 and maintained a semi-open state of the lid by overcoming the interference caused by methanol molecules. Furthermore, the β-CD molecule could directly stabilize "pathway" regions (e.g., Asp61-Asp67) and indirectly stabilize "pathway" regions (e.g., Gly44-Phe50) by forming hydrogen bonds with "pathway" regions and nearby "pathway" regions, respectively. The regions stabilized by the β-CD molecule then prevented the closure of active pockets, thus retaining the enzymatic activity of YLLIP2 with β-CD in methanol solvent. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Study on Spatial-temporal Dynamics of Bt Toxic Protein Expression in Insect-resistant Transgenic Cotton and Its Degradation in Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yiwen ZHANG; Lianrong WANG; Liancheng ZHANG; Jun ZHANG; Xinbo JI; Jinmao WANG

    2012-01-01

    [Ob.jcctive] This study aimed to investigate the spatial-temporal dynamics of Bt toxic protein expression in insect-resistant transgenic cotton and its degradation in soil. [Meth~d] BtcrylAc toxic protein expression in roots, stems and leaves of trans- genic cotton Guoshen GK45 at different developmental stages and the annual aver- age content of BtCrylAc toxin protein in the topsoil, rhizosphere soil and following cotton-growing area were explored and analyzed by using enzyme linked immuno sorbed assay (ELISA). [Result] The content of exogenous BtCrylAc toxin protein de- creased during the growth process of insect-resistant transgenic cotton; to be specif- ic, the content of BtCrylAc toxin protein in cotton stems and leaves decreased more slowly and always maintained a high level, while that in roots decreased rapidly and reached a minimum level to the following plant growth and development stage. BtCrylAc toxin protein was detected in topsoil of both non-transgenic and transgenic cotton-growing areas, and the content of BtCrylAc toxin protein increased in topsoil of following cotton-growing area, which was very low in rhizosphere soil. [Conclusion] Determination of BtcrylAc toxic protein provides scientific basis for the risk assess- ment of the cultivation of genetically modified crops and the safety evaluation of soil ecosystem.

  13. Transcript dynamics at early stages of molecular interactions of MYMIV with resistant and susceptible genotypes of the leguminous host, Vigna mungo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Anirban; Patel, Anju; Paul, Sujay; Pal, Amita

    2015-01-01

    Initial phases of the MYMIV-Vigna mungo interaction is crucial in determining the infection phenotype upon challenging with the virus. During incompatible interaction, the plant deploys multiple stratagems that include extensive transcriptional alterations defying the virulence factors of the pathogen. Such molecular events are not frequently addressed by genomic tools. In order to obtain a critical insight to unravel how V. mungo respond to Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV), we have employed the PCR based suppression subtractive hybridization technique to identify genes that exhibit altered expressions. Dynamics of 345 candidate genes are illustrated that differentially expressed either in compatible or incompatible reactions and their possible biological and cellular functions are predicted. The MYMIV-induced physiological aspects of the resistant host include reactive oxygen species generation, induction of Ca2+ mediated signaling, enhanced expression of transcripts involved in phenylpropanoid and ubiquitin-proteasomal pathways; all these together confer resistance against the invader. Elicitation of genes implicated in salicylic acid (SA) pathway suggests that immune response is under the regulation of SA signaling. A significant fraction of modulated transcripts are of unknown function indicating participation of novel candidate genes in restricting this viral pathogen. Susceptibility on the other hand, as exhibited by V. mungo Cv. T9 is perhaps due to the poor execution of these transcript modulation exhibiting remarkable repression of photosynthesis related genes resulting in chlorosis of leaves followed by penalty in crop yield. Thus, the present findings revealed an insight on the molecular warfare during host-virus interaction suggesting plausible signaling mechanisms and key biochemical pathways overriding MYMIV invasion in resistant genotype of V. mungo. In addition to inflate the existing knowledge base, the genomic resources identified in

  14. Transcript dynamics at early stages of molecular interactions of MYMIV with resistant and susceptible genotypes of the leguminous host, Vigna mungo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anirban Kundu

    Full Text Available Initial phases of the MYMIV-Vigna mungo interaction is crucial in determining the infection phenotype upon challenging with the virus. During incompatible interaction, the plant deploys multiple stratagems that include extensive transcriptional alterations defying the virulence factors of the pathogen. Such molecular events are not frequently addressed by genomic tools. In order to obtain a critical insight to unravel how V. mungo respond to Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV, we have employed the PCR based suppression subtractive hybridization technique to identify genes that exhibit altered expressions. Dynamics of 345 candidate genes are illustrated that differentially expressed either in compatible or incompatible reactions and their possible biological and cellular functions are predicted. The MYMIV-induced physiological aspects of the resistant host include reactive oxygen species generation, induction of Ca2+ mediated signaling, enhanced expression of transcripts involved in phenylpropanoid and ubiquitin-proteasomal pathways; all these together confer resistance against the invader. Elicitation of genes implicated in salicylic acid (SA pathway suggests that immune response is under the regulation of SA signaling. A significant fraction of modulated transcripts are of unknown function indicating participation of novel candidate genes in restricting this viral pathogen. Susceptibility on the other hand, as exhibited by V. mungo Cv. T9 is perhaps due to the poor execution of these transcript modulation exhibiting remarkable repression of photosynthesis related genes resulting in chlorosis of leaves followed by penalty in crop yield. Thus, the present findings revealed an insight on the molecular warfare during host-virus interaction suggesting plausible signaling mechanisms and key biochemical pathways overriding MYMIV invasion in resistant genotype of V. mungo. In addition to inflate the existing knowledge base, the genomic resources

  15. Experimental infection dynamics: using immunosuppression and in vivo parasite tracking to understand host resistance in an amphibian-trematode system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaFonte, Bryan E; Johnson, Pieter T J

    2013-10-01

    Although naturally occurring hosts often exhibit pronounced differences in infection and pathology, the relative importance of factors associated with host life history and immunity in explaining such patterns often remains speculative. Research in eco-immunology highlights the trade-offs between host physiology and immunity, for which natural variations in disease susceptibility offer a valuable platform to test predictions within this framework. Here, we combined use of a novel, in vivo assay for tracking parasite fate and an experimental manipulation of host immune function (via chronic corticosterone exposure) to assess the role of host immunity in regulating susceptibility of amphibian hosts to three larval trematodes: Ribeiroia ondatrae, Echinostoma trivolvis and Alaria sp. 2. Results from the in vivo parasite-tracking assay revealed marked differences in initial parasite penetration and subsequent host clearance. Relative to infections in a highly susceptible species (Pseudacris regilla), the virulent trematode R. ondatrae was -25% less successful at penetrating larvae of three hylid frog species and was cleared > 45(×) faster, such that all parasites were rapidly cleared from hylid hosts over 72 h following a Weibull distribution. Immune suppression of Hyla versicolor sharply reduced this resistance and increased infection of all three trematodes by 67 to 190%, with particularly strong increases for R. ondatrae. Diminished resistance correlated with a 62% decrease in circulating eosinophils. Correspondingly, 10 days after corticosterone exposures ended, infections declined dramatically while eosinophil levels returned to normal. In light of ongoing declines and deformities in amphibian populations, these findings have application potential for mitigating disease-driven effects.

  16. The dynamic influence of the DRB1*1101 allele on the resistance of sheep to experimental Teladorsagia circumcincta infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Musa; Good, Barbara; Hanrahan, James P; Campion, Deirdre; Sayers, Gearoid; Mulcahy, Grace; Sweeney, Torres

    2011-03-08

    Suffolk sheep carrying the DRB1*1101 (previously referred to as-DRB1*0203 or G2) allele have been reported to show increased resistance to natural Teladorsagia circumcincta infection compared to non-carriers. The objective of this study was to compare the biochemical and physiological responses of DRB1*1101 carrier and non-carrier twin lambs to an experimental infection with 3 × 10(4) L3 Teladorsagia circumcincta. The variables studied included worm burden, faecal egg count, abomasal mast cells, IgA, IgE, IgG1 plus IgG2 and haematological parameters at 0, 3, 7, 21 and 35 days post infection (dpi), and duodenal smooth muscle contractility at 0 and 35 dpi. DRB1*1101 carrier lambs had significantly lower worm burden, higher mast cell and plasma platelet counts than the DRB1*1101 non-carriers (P < 0.05). Before infection, the non-carrier lambs exhibited significantly higher mucosal levels of all antibody isotypes measured compared to the carriers; these levels remained relatively stable over the course of infection in the non-carriers while there was a slow build up of these antibodies in the carriers up to day 21 post infection (pi). The DRB1*1101 non-carrier lambs had a significantly higher plasma lymphocyte count, and produced greater duodenal contractile force relative to the carrier lambs (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference between genotypes in the level of plasma eosinophils, monocytes, neutrophils or FEC. This evidence suggests that resistance conferred by DRB1*1101 is acquired rather than innate, depends on worm expulsion rather than fecundity and is dependent on mucosal mast cell proliferation, platelet activation, and IgA and IgE antibody responses.

  17. Outcomes, infectiousness, and transmission dynamics of patients with extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis and home-discharged patients with programmatically incurable tuberculosis: a prospective cohort study

    KAUST Repository

    Dheda, Keertan

    2017-01-19

    Background: The emergence of programmatically incurable tuberculosis threatens to destabilise control efforts. The aim of this study was to collect prospective patient-level data to inform treatment and containment strategies. Methods: In a prospective cohort study, 273 South African patients with extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis, or resistance beyond extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis, were followed up over a period of 6 years. Transmission dynamics, infectiousness, and drug susceptibility were analysed in a subset of patients from the Western Cape using whole-genome sequencing (WGS; n=149), a cough aerosol sampling system (CASS; n=26), and phenotypic testing for 18 drugs (n=179). Findings: Between Oct 1, 2008, and Oct 31, 2012, we enrolled and followed up 273 patients for a median of 20·3 months (IQR 9·6-27·8). 203 (74%) had programmatically incurable tuberculosis and unfavourable outcomes (treatment failure, relapse, default, or death despite treatment with a regimen based on capreomycin, aminosalicylic acid, or both). 172 (63%) patients were discharged home, of whom 104 (60%) had an unfavourable outcome. 54 (31%) home-discharged patients had failed treatment, with a median time to death after discharge of 9·9 months (IQR 4·2-17·4). 35 (20%) home-discharged cases were smear-positive at discharge. Using CASS, six (23%) of 26 home-discharged cases with data available expectorated infectious culture-positive cough aerosols in the respirable range (<5 μm), and most reported inter-person contact with suboptimal protective mask usage. WGS identified 17 (19%) of the 90 patients (with available sequence data) that were discharged home before the diagnosis of 20 downstream cases of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis with almost identical sequencing profiles suggestive of community-based transmission (five or fewer single nucleotide polymorphisms different and with identical resistance-encoding mutations for 14 drugs). 11 (55%) of these downstream

  18. Revealing plot scale heterogeneity in soil moisture dynamics under contrasting vegetation assemblages using 3D electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Jonathan; Tetzlaff, Doerthe; Bradford, John; Soulsby, Chris

    2016-04-01

    Soil moisture is a fundamental component of the water cycle that influences many hydrological processes, such as flooding, solute transport, biogeochemical processes, and land-atmosphere interactions. The relationship between vegetation and soil moisture is complex and reciprocal. Soil moisture may affect vegetation distribution due to its function as the primary source of water, in turn the structure of vegetation canopies regulate water partitioning into interception, throughfall and steam flow. Such spatial differences in inputs, together with complex patterns of water uptake from distributed root networks can create marked heterogeneity in soil moisture dynamics at small scales. Traditional methods of monitoring soil moisture have revolved around limited point measurements, but improved geophysical techniques have facilitated a trend towards more spatially distributed measurements to help understand this heterogeneity. Here, we present a study using 3D ERT surveys in a 3.2km upland catchment in the Scottish Highlands where increasing afforestation (for climate change adaptation, biofuels and conservation) has the potential to increase interception losses and reduce soil moisture storage. The study combined 3D surveys, traditional point measurements and laboratory analysis of soil cores to assess the plot scale soil moisture dynamics in podzolic soils under forest stands of 15m high Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) and adjacent non-forest plots dominated by heather (Calluna vulgaris) shrubs (water content in the soils below. These results are important as the point to potential water stresses with planned increased afforestation which may be compounded by climate change projections of decreasing precipitation during the growing season.

  19. The dynamic influence of the DRB1*1101 allele on the resistance of sheep to experimental Teladorsagia circumcincta infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Musa

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Suffolk sheep carrying the DRB1*1101 (previously referred to as-DRB1*0203 or G2 allele have been reported to show increased resistance to natural Teladorsagia circumcincta infection compared to non-carriers. The objective of this study was to compare the biochemical and physiological responses of DRB1*1101 carrier and non-carrier twin lambs to an experimental infection with 3 × 104 L3 Teladorsagia circumcincta. The variables studied included worm burden, faecal egg count, abomasal mast cells, IgA, IgE, IgG1 plus IgG2 and haematological parameters at 0, 3, 7, 21 and 35 days post infection (dpi, and duodenal smooth muscle contractility at 0 and 35 dpi. DRB1*1101 carrier lambs had significantly lower worm burden, higher mast cell and plasma platelet counts than the DRB1*1101 non-carriers (P DRB1*1101 non-carrier lambs had a significantly higher plasma lymphocyte count, and produced greater duodenal contractile force relative to the carrier lambs (P DRB1*1101 is acquired rather than innate, depends on worm expulsion rather than fecundity and is dependent on mucosal mast cell proliferation, platelet activation, and IgA and IgE antibody responses.

  20. How membranes organize during seed germination: three patterns of dynamic lipid remodelling define chilling resistance and affect plastid biogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiamei; Li, Aihua; Li, Weiqi

    2016-01-01

    Imbibitional chilling injury during germination causes agricultural losses but this can be overcome by osmopriming. It remains unknown how membranes reorganize during germination. Herein, we comparatively profiled changes of membrane lipids during imbibition under normal and chilling temperatures in chilling-tolerant and -sensitive soybean seeds. We found three patterns of dynamic lipid remodelling during the three phases of germination. Pattern 1 involved a gradual increase in plastidic lipids during phases I and II, with an abrupt increase during phase III. This abrupt increase was associated with initiation of photosynthesis. Pattern 3 involved phosphatidic acid (PA) first decreasing, then increasing, and finally decreasing to a low level. Pattern 1 and 3 were interrupted in chilling-sensitive seeds under low temperature, which lead a block in plastid biogenesis and accumulation of harmful PA respectively. However, they were rescued and returned to their status under a normal temperature after polyethylene glycol (PEG) osmopriming. We specifically inhibited phospholipase D (PLD)-mediated PA formation in chilling-sensitive seeds of soybean, cucumber, and pea and found their germination under low temperature was significantly improved. These results indicate that membranes undergo specific and functional reorganization of lipid composition during germination and demonstrate that PLD-mediated PA causes imibibitional chilling injury. PMID:25474382

  1. Insights into resistance mechanism of the macrolide biosensor protein MphR(A) binding to macrolide antibiotic erythromycin by molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Tingting; Zhang, Yanjun; Ding, Jing-Na; Fan, Song; Han, Ju-Guang

    2015-12-01

    Macrolide biosensor protein MphR(A) has been known as a key regulatory protein in metabolite sensing and genetic expression regulating. MphR(A) protein binds to macrolide antibiotic erythromycin (Ery) and releases the gene operon, thus activates expression of the mphA gene and initiates Ery resistance. The two mutant amino acid residues (V66L and V126L) might potentially disrupt Ery binding to MphR(A). In these studies, the binding of macrolide antibiotic Ery to wild type (Wt) MphR(A) and double mutant (V66L/V126L) MphR(A) are explored by molecular dynamics simulations. Compared to the Apo-MphR(A) protein and Wt-MphR(A)-Ery complex, many interesting effects owing to the double mutant (V66L/V126L) are discovered. In the case of Ery, Helix I which plays an important role in transcription shows itself a right-hand α helix in Wt-MphR(A)-Ery, whereas the activated helix is broken down in double mutant-V66L/V126L-MphR(A)-Ery. The calculated results exhibit that the double mutant V66L/V126L reduces the binding affinity of the V66L/V126L-MphR(A) to Ery, resulting in the block of Ery resistance. The binding free energy decomposition analysis reveals that the decrease of the binding affinity for the variant V66L/V126L-MphR(A)-Ery is mainly attributed to the gas phase electrostatic energies. The residue Leu66, Thr154, and Arg122 enhance the binding affinity of V66L/V126L-MphR(A) to Ery. The residues Tyr103 and His147 contributes mainly to binding energies in the Wt-MphR(A)-Ery complex, whereas the two residues have no contribution to the binding free energy inV66L/V126L-MphR(A)-Ery complex. Our study gives useful insights into the nature of amino acids mutation effect, the mechanism of blocking drug resistance at the atomic level and the characteristics in binding affinity for Ery to double mutant (V66L/V126L) MphR(A), which will contribute to the design of more effective macrolide antibiotics.

  2. Insights into resistance mechanism of the macrolide biosensor protein MphR(A) binding to macrolide antibiotic erythromycin by molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Tingting; Zhang, Yanjun; Ding, Jing-Na; Fan, Song; Han, Ju-Guang

    2015-12-01

    Macrolide biosensor protein MphR(A) has been known as a key regulatory protein in metabolite sensing and genetic expression regulating. MphR(A) protein binds to macrolide antibiotic erythromycin (Ery) and releases the gene operon, thus activates expression of the mphA gene and initiates Ery resistance. The two mutant amino acid residues (V66L and V126L) might potentially disrupt Ery binding to MphR(A). In these studies, the binding of macrolide antibiotic Ery to wild type (Wt) MphR(A) and double mutant (V66L/V126L) MphR(A) are explored by molecular dynamics simulations. Compared to the Apo-MphR(A) protein and Wt-MphR(A)-Ery complex, many interesting effects owing to the double mutant (V66L/V126L) are discovered. In the case of Ery, Helix I which plays an important role in transcription shows itself a right-hand α helix in Wt-MphR(A)-Ery, whereas the activated helix is broken down in double mutant-V66L/V126L-MphR(A)-Ery. The calculated results exhibit that the double mutant V66L/V126L reduces the binding affinity of the V66L/V126L-MphR(A) to Ery, resulting in the block of Ery resistance. The binding free energy decomposition analysis reveals that the decrease of the binding affinity for the variant V66L/V126L-MphR(A)-Ery is mainly attributed to the gas phase electrostatic energies. The residue Leu66, Thr154, and Arg122 enhance the binding affinity of V66L/V126L-MphR(A) to Ery. The residues Tyr103 and His147 contributes mainly to binding energies in the Wt-MphR(A)-Ery complex, whereas the two residues have no contribution to the binding free energy inV66L/V126L-MphR(A)-Ery complex. Our study gives useful insights into the nature of amino acids mutation effect, the mechanism of blocking drug resistance at the atomic level and the characteristics in binding affinity for Ery to double mutant (V66L/V126L) MphR(A), which will contribute to the design of more effective macrolide antibiotics.

  3. Remote Monitoring of Near-Surface Soil Moisture Dynamics In Unstable Slopes Using a Low-Power Autonomous Resistivity Imaging System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, J. E.; Meldrum, P.; Gunn, D.; Wilkinson, P. B.; Uhlemann, S.; Swift, R. T.; Kuras, O.; Inauen, C.; Hutchinson, D.; Butler, S.

    2016-12-01

    ERT monitoring has been demonstrated in numerous studies as an effective means of imaging near surface processes for applications as diverse as permafrost studies and contaminated land assessment. A limiting factor in applying time-lapse ERT for long-term studies in remote locations has been the availability of cost-effective ERT measurement systems designed specifically for monitoring applications. Typically, monitoring is undertaken using repeated manual data collection, or by building conventional survey instruments into a monitoring setup. The latter often requires high power and is therefore difficult to operate remotely without access to mains electricity. We describe the development of a low-power resistivity imaging system designed specifically for remote monitoring, taking advantage of, e.g., solar power and data telemetry. Here, we present the results of two field deployments. The system has been installed on an active railway cutting to provide insights into the effect of vegetation on the moisture dynamics in unstable infrastructure slopes and to gather subsurface information for pro-active remediation measures. The system, comprising 255 electrodes, acquires 4596 reciprocal measurement pairs twice daily during standard operation. In case of severe weather events, the measurement schedule is reactively changed, to gather high temporal resolution data to image rainfall infiltration processes. The system has also been installed along a leaking and marginally stable canal embankment; a less favourable location for remote monitoring, with limited solar power and poor mobile reception. Nevertheless, the acquired data indicated the effectiveness of remedial actions on the canal. The ERT results showed that one leak was caused by the canal and fixed during remediation, while two other "leaks" were shown to be effects of groundwater dynamics. The availability of cost-effective, low-power ERT monitoring instrumentation, combined with an automated workflow of

  4. A novel approach for multi-domain and multi-gene family identification provides insights into evolutionary dynamics of disease resistance genes in core eudicot plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofberger, Johannes A; Zhou, Beifei; Tang, Haibao; Jones, Jonathan D G; Schranz, M Eric

    2014-11-08

    Recent advances in DNA sequencing techniques resulted in more than forty sequenced plant genomes representing a diverse set of taxa of agricultural, energy, medicinal and ecological importance. However, gene family curation is often only inferred from DNA sequence homology and lacks insights into evolutionary processes contributing to gene family dynamics. In a comparative genomics framework, we integrated multiple lines of evidence provided by gene synteny, sequence homology and protein-based Hidden Markov Modelling to extract homologous super-clusters composed of multi-domain resistance (R)-proteins of the NB-LRR type (for NUCLEOTIDE BINDING/LEUCINE-RICH REPEATS), that are involved in plant innate immunity. To assess the diversity of R-proteins within and between species, we screened twelve eudicot plant genomes including six major crops and found a total of 2,363 NB-LRR genes. Our curated R-proteins set shows a 50% average for tandem duplicates and a 22% fraction of gene copies retained from ancient polyploidy events (ohnologs). We provide evidence for strong positive selection and show significant differences in molecular evolution rates (Ka/Ks-ratio) among tandem- (mean = 1.59), ohnolog (mean = 1.36) and singleton (mean = 1.22) R-gene duplicates. To foster the process of gene-edited plant breeding, we report species-specific presence/absence of all 140 NB-LRR genes present in the model plant Arabidopsis and describe four distinct clusters of NB-LRR "gatekeeper" loci sharing syntenic orthologs across all analyzed genomes. By curating a near-complete set of multi-domain R-protein clusters in an eudicot-wide scale, our analysis offers significant insight into evolutionary dynamics underlying diversification of the plant innate immune system. Furthermore, our methods provide a blueprint for future efforts to identify and more rapidly clone functional NB-LRR genes from any plant species.

  5. Computational analysis of Amsacrine resistance in human topoisomerase II alpha mutants (R487K and E571K) using homology modeling, docking and all-atom molecular dynamics simulation in explicit solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sader, Safaa; Wu, Chun

    2017-03-01

    Amsacrine is an effective topoisomerase II enzyme inhibitor in acute lymphatic leukemia. Previous experimental studies have successfully identified two important mutations (R487K and E571K) conferring 100 and 25 fold resistance to Amsacrine respectively. Although the reduction of the cleavage ligand-DNA-protein ternary complex has been well thought as the major cause of drug resistance, the detailed energetic, structural and dynamic mechanisms remain to be elusive. In this study, we constructed human topoisomerase II alpha (hTop2α) homology model docked with Amsacrine based on crystal structure of human Top2β in complex with etoposide. This wild type complex was used to build the ternary complex with R487K and E571K mutants. Three 500ns molecular dynamics simulations were performed on complex systems of wild type and two mutants. The detailed energetic, structural and dynamic analysis were performed on the simulation data. Our binding data indicated a significant impairment of Amsacrine binding energy in the two mutants compared with the wild type. The order of weakening (R487K>E571K) was in agreement with the order of experimental drug resistance fold (R489K>E571K). Our binding energy decomposition further indicated that weakening of the ligand-protein interaction rather than the ligand-DNA interaction was the major contributor of the binding energy difference between R487K and E571K. In addition, key residues contributing to the binding energy (ΔG) or the decrease of the binding energy (ΔΔG) were identified through the energy decomposition analysis. The change in ligand binding pose, dynamics of protein, DNA and ligand upon the mutations were thoroughly analyzed and discussed. Deciphering the molecular basis of drug resistance is crucial to overcome drug resistance using rational drug design. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Infection Dynamics and Antimicrobial Resistance Profile of Salmonella Paratyphi B d-tartrate Positive (Java) in a Persistently Infected Broiler Barn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloska, Franziska; Beyerbach, Martin; Klein, Günter

    2017-01-21

    The infection dynamics of S. Java were examined in three consecutive rearing periods on a broiler farm in Northwestern Germany which had been persistently infected with S. Java for more than five years. The barn was investigated for Salmonella occurrence after cleaning and disinfection to verify the persistent contamination of the broiler house with S. Java before the start of the first rearing cycle. Confirmation of Salmonella absence in day-old chicks (time-point 1) as well as early establishment of infection between days 5-7 (time-point 2) were confirmed by caecal swabs prepared for qPCR and classical microbiological methods. At three time-periods (between days 11-15 (time-point 3), days 25-28 (time-point 4), and days 38-40 (time-point 5)) caecal content was examined for colony forming units (CFU) Salmonella/g. In general, there was an increase in Salmonella Java load at time-point 4 compared to time-points 3 and 5. Therefore, we observed a bell-shaped course of infection resulting in higher rates of Salmonella CFU/g prior to prethinning than at final slaughter. The antimicrobial susceptibility testing revealed resistance to tetracycline, fluorquinolones, trimethoprim, and cefoxitin.

  7. Infection Dynamics and Antimicrobial Resistance Profile of Salmonella Paratyphi B d-tartrate Positive (Java) in a Persistently Infected Broiler Barn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloska, Franziska; Beyerbach, Martin; Klein, Günter

    2017-01-01

    The infection dynamics of S. Java were examined in three consecutive rearing periods on a broiler farm in Northwestern Germany which had been persistently infected with S. Java for more than five years. The barn was investigated for Salmonella occurrence after cleaning and disinfection to verify the persistent contamination of the broiler house with S. Java before the start of the first rearing cycle. Confirmation of Salmonella absence in day-old chicks (time-point 1) as well as early establishment of infection between days 5–7 (time-point 2) were confirmed by caecal swabs prepared for qPCR and classical microbiological methods. At three time-periods (between days 11–15 (time-point 3), days 25–28 (time-point 4), and days 38–40 (time-point 5)) caecal content was examined for colony forming units (CFU) Salmonella/g. In general, there was an increase in Salmonella Java load at time-point 4 compared to time-points 3 and 5. Therefore, we observed a bell-shaped course of infection resulting in higher rates of Salmonella CFU/g prior to prethinning than at final slaughter. The antimicrobial susceptibility testing revealed resistance to tetracycline, fluorquinolones, trimethoprim, and cefoxitin. PMID:28117713

  8. Utilizing multichannel electrical resistivity methods to examine the dynamics of the fresh water–seawater interface in two Hawaiian groundwater systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimova, Natasha T.; Swarzenski, Peter W.; Dulaiova, Henrieta; Glenn, Craig R.

    2012-01-01

    Multichannel electrical resistivity (ER) measurements were conducted at two contrasting coastal sites in Hawaii to obtain new information on the spatial scales and dynamics of the fresh water–seawater interface and rates of coastal groundwater exchange. At Kiholo Bay (located on the dry, Kona side of the Big Island) and at a site in Maunalua Bay (Oahu), there is an evidence for abundant submarine groundwater discharge (SGD). However, the hydrologic and geologic controls on coastal groundwater discharge are likely to be different at these two sites. While at Kiholo Bay SGD is predominantly through lava tubes, at the Maunalua Bay site exchange occurs mostly through nearshore submarine springs. In order to calculate SGD fluxes, it is important to understand the spatial and temporal scales of coastal groundwater exchange. From ER time series data, subsurface salinity distributions were calculated using site-specific formation factors. A salinity mass balance box model was then used to calculate rates of point source (i.e., spatially discreet) and total fresh water discharge. From these data, mean SGD rates were calculated for Kiholo Bay (∼9,200 m3/d) and for the Maunalua Bay site (∼5,900 m3/d). While such results are on the same order of magnitude to geochemical tracer-derived SGD rates, the ER SGD rates provide enhanced details of coastal groundwater exchange that can enable a more cohesive whole watershed perspective.

  9. Variation of the residual resistivity ratio of the aluminium stabiliser for the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) conductor under dynamic stress at 4.2 K

    CERN Document Server

    Seeber, B; Flükiger, R; Horváth, I L; Neuenschwander, J

    2000-01-01

    Superconducting detector magnets are frequently manufactured with aluminium stabilised NbTi cables. Actually there are two new detectors in fabrication, namely the CMS and the ATLAS detector at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland. For the CMS project we have studied the variation of the residual resistivity ratio (RRR) of high purity aluminium (HPA) (99.998%) under dynamic mechanical stress, applied at 4.2 K, and in a transverse magnetic field of up to 6 T. This information is required for the design of the quench protection system. Because of the mechanical weakness of HPA, a high strength aluminium (HSA) alloy reinforces the CMS-conductor. According to the specification for CMS, the conductor at maximum field is strained up to 0.15%. At this strain the HSA is still in the elastic regime, whereas the HPA is already deformed plastically. Applying a full stress cycle (e.g. loading and unloading of the magnet), the HPA is deformed first under tension and then under compression, resulting in a decrease of the RRR. For m...

  10. Temporal Characterization of Hydrates System Dynamics beneath Seafloor Mounds. Integrating Time-Lapse Electrical Resistivity Methods and In Situ Observations of Multiple Oceanographic Parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutken, Carol [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Macelloni, Leonardo [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); D' Emidio, Marco [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Dunbar, John [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Higley, Paul [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States)

    2015-01-31

    This study was designed to investigate temporal variations in hydrate system dynamics by measuring changes in volumes of hydrate beneath hydrate-bearing mounds on the continental slope of the northern Gulf of Mexico, the landward extreme of hydrate occurrence in this region. Direct Current Resistivity (DCR) measurements were made contemporaneously with measurements of oceanographic parameters at Woolsey Mound, a carbonate-hydrate complex on the mid-continental slope, where formation and dissociation of hydrates are most vulnerable to variations in oceanographic parameters affected by climate change, and where changes in hydrate stability can readily translate to loss of seafloor stability, impacts to benthic ecosystems, and venting of greenhouse gases to the water-column, and eventually, the atmosphere. We focused our study on hydrate within seafloor mounds because the structurally-focused methane flux at these sites likely causes hydrate formation and dissociation processes to occur at higher rates than at sites where the methane flux is less concentrated and we wanted to maximize our chances of witnessing association/dissociation of hydrates. We selected a particularly well-studied hydrate-bearing seafloor mound near the landward extent of the hydrate stability zone, Woolsey Mound (MC118). This mid-slope site has been studied extensively and the project was able to leverage considerable resources from the team’s research experience at MC118. The site exhibits seafloor features associated with gas expulsion, hydrates have been documented at the seafloor, and changes in the outcropping hydrates have been documented, photographically, to have occurred over a period of months. We conducted observatory-based, in situ measurements to 1) characterize, geophysically, the sub-bottom distribution of hydrate and its temporal variability, and 2) contemporaneously record relevant environmental parameters (temperature, pressure, salinity, turbidity, bottom currents) to

  11. Resistance-resistant antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldfield, Eric; Feng, Xinxin

    2014-12-01

    New antibiotics are needed because drug resistance is increasing while the introduction of new antibiotics is decreasing. We discuss here six possible approaches to develop 'resistance-resistant' antibiotics. First, multitarget inhibitors in which a single compound inhibits more than one target may be easier to develop than conventional combination therapies with two new drugs. Second, inhibiting multiple targets in the same metabolic pathway is expected to be an effective strategy owing to synergy. Third, discovering multiple-target inhibitors should be possible by using sequential virtual screening. Fourth, repurposing existing drugs can lead to combinations of multitarget therapeutics. Fifth, targets need not be proteins. Sixth, inhibiting virulence factor formation and boosting innate immunity may also lead to decreased susceptibility to resistance. Although it is not possible to eliminate resistance, the approaches reviewed here offer several possibilities for reducing the effects of mutations and, in some cases, suggest that sensitivity to existing antibiotics may be restored in otherwise drug-resistant organisms.

  12. Novel 5-oxo-hexahydroquinoline derivatives: design, synthesis, in vitro P-glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistance reversal profile and molecular dynamics simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahraki, Omolbanin; Edraki, Najmeh; Khoshneviszadeh, Mehdi; Zargari, Farshid; Ranjbar, Sara; Saso, Luciano; Firuzi, Omidreza; Miri, Ramin

    2017-01-01

    Overexpression of the efflux pump P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is one of the important mechanisms of multidrug resistance (MDR) in many tumor cells. In this study, 26 novel 5-oxo-hexahydroquinoline derivatives containing different nitrophenyl moieties at C4 and various carboxamide substituents at C3 were designed, synthesized and evaluated for their ability to inhibit P-gp by measuring the amount of rhodamine 123 (Rh123) accumulation in uterine sarcoma cells that overexpress P-gp (MES-SA/Dx5) using flow cytometry. The effect of compounds with highest MDR reversal activities was further evaluated by measuring the alterations of MES-SA/Dx5 cells' sensitivity to doxorubicin (DXR) using MTT assay. The results of both biological assays indicated that compounds bearing 2-nitrophenyl at C4 position and compounds with 4-chlorophenyl carboxamide at C3 demonstrated the highest activities in resistant cells, while they were devoid of any effect in parental nonresistant MES-SA cells. One of the active derivatives, 5c, significantly increased intracellular Rh123 at 100 µM, and it also significantly reduced the IC50 of DXR by 70.1% and 88.7% at 10 and 25 µM, respectively, in MES-SA/Dx5 cells. The toxicity of synthesized compounds against HEK293 as a noncancer cell line was also investigated. All tested derivatives except for 2c compound showed no cytotoxicity. A molecular dynamics simulation study was also performed to investigate the possible binding site of 5c in complex with human P-gp, which showed that this compound formed 11 average H-bonds with Ser909, Thr911, Arg547, Arg543 and Ser474 residues of P-gp. A good agreement was found between the results of the computational and experimental studies. The findings of this study show that some 5-oxo-hexahydroquinoline derivatives could serve as promising candidates for the discovery of new agents for P-gp-mediated MDR reversal.

  13. Novel 5-oxo-hexahydroquinoline derivatives: design, synthesis, in vitro P-glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistance reversal profile and molecular dynamics simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahraki, Omolbanin; Edraki, Najmeh; Khoshneviszadeh, Mehdi; Zargari, Farshid; Ranjbar, Sara; Saso, Luciano; Firuzi, Omidreza; Miri, Ramin

    2017-01-01

    Overexpression of the efflux pump P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is one of the important mechanisms of multidrug resistance (MDR) in many tumor cells. In this study, 26 novel 5-oxo-hexahydroquinoline derivatives containing different nitrophenyl moieties at C4 and various carboxamide substituents at C3 were designed, synthesized and evaluated for their ability to inhibit P-gp by measuring the amount of rhodamine 123 (Rh123) accumulation in uterine sarcoma cells that overexpress P-gp (MES-SA/Dx5) using flow cytometry. The effect of compounds with highest MDR reversal activities was further evaluated by measuring the alterations of MES-SA/Dx5 cells’ sensitivity to doxorubicin (DXR) using MTT assay. The results of both biological assays indicated that compounds bearing 2-nitrophenyl at C4 position and compounds with 4-chlorophenyl carboxamide at C3 demonstrated the highest activities in resistant cells, while they were devoid of any effect in parental nonresistant MES-SA cells. One of the active derivatives, 5c, significantly increased intracellular Rh123 at 100 µM, and it also significantly reduced the IC50 of DXR by 70.1% and 88.7% at 10 and 25 µM, respectively, in MES-SA/Dx5 cells. The toxicity of synthesized compounds against HEK293 as a noncancer cell line was also investigated. All tested derivatives except for 2c compound showed no cytotoxicity. A molecular dynamics simulation study was also performed to investigate the possible binding site of 5c in complex with human P-gp, which showed that this compound formed 11 average H-bonds with Ser909, Thr911, Arg547, Arg543 and Ser474 residues of P-gp. A good agreement was found between the results of the computational and experimental studies. The findings of this study show that some 5-oxo-hexahydroquinoline derivatives could serve as promising candidates for the discovery of new agents for P-gp-mediated MDR reversal. PMID:28243063

  14. Fitness Costs Associated with Evolved Herbicide Resistance Alleles in Plants

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Martin M. Vila-Aiub; Paul Neve; Stephen B. Powles

    2009-01-01

    .... There have been many studies quantifying the fitness costs associated with novel herbicide resistance alleles, reflecting the importance of fitness costs in determining the evolutionary dynamics of resistance...

  15. Accelerating dynamic genetic conservation efforts: Use of FT-IR spectroscopy for the rapid identification of trees resistant to destructive pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. Villari; R.A. Sniezko; L.E. Rodriguez-Saona; P. Bonello

    2017-01-01

    A strong focus on tree germplasm that can resist threats such as non-native insects and pathogens, or a changing climate, is fundamental for successful genetic conservation efforts. However, the unavailability of tools for rapid screening of tree germplasm for resistance to critical pathogens and insect pests is becoming an increasingly serious bottleneck. Here we...

  16. Resistance to Taxanes in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Associates with the Dynamics of a CD49f+ Tumor-Initiating Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Gómez-Miragaya

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Taxanes are a mainstay of treatment for breast cancer, but resistance often develops followed by metastatic disease and mortality. Aiming to reveal the mechanisms underlying taxane resistance, we used breast cancer patient-derived orthoxenografts (PDX. Mimicking clinical behavior, triple-negative breast tumors (TNBCs from PDX models were more sensitive to docetaxel than luminal tumors, but they progressively acquired resistance upon continuous drug administration. Mechanistically, we found that a CD49f+ chemoresistant population with tumor-initiating ability is present in sensitive tumors and expands during the acquisition of drug resistance. In the absence of the drug, the resistant CD49f+ population shrinks and taxane sensitivity is restored. We describe a transcriptional signature of resistance, predictive of recurrent disease after chemotherapy in TNBC. Together, these findings identify a CD49f+ population enriched in tumor-initiating ability and chemoresistance properties and evidence a drug holiday effect on the acquired resistance to docetaxel in triple-negative breast cancer.

  17. Antibiotic Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lives. But there is a growing problem of antibiotic resistance. It happens when bacteria change and become able ... resistant to several common antibiotics. To help prevent antibiotic resistance Don't use antibiotics for viruses like colds ...

  18. Drug Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    HIV Treatment Drug Resistance (Last updated 3/2/2017; last reviewed 3/2/2017) Key Points As HIV multiplies in the ... the risk of drug resistance. What is HIV drug resistance? Once a person becomes infected with HIV, ...

  19. Bacterial fitness shapes the population dynamics of antibiotic-resistant and -susceptible bacteria in a model of combined antibiotic and anti-virulence treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ternent, Lucy; Dyson, Rosemary J.; Krachler, Anne-Marie; Jabbari, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to antibiotic treatment is a huge concern: introduction of any new antibiotic is shortly followed by the emergence of resistant bacterial isolates in the clinic. This issue is compounded by a severe lack of new antibiotics reaching the market. The significant rise in clinical resistance to antibiotics is especially problematic in nosocomial infections, where already vulnerable patients may fail to respond to treatment, causing even greater health concern. A recent focus has been on the development of anti-virulence drugs as a second line of defence in the treatment of antibiotic-resistant infections. This treatment, which weakens bacteria by reducing their virulence rather than killing them, should allow infections to be cleared through the body׳s natural defence mechanisms. In this way there should be little to no selective pressure exerted on the organism and, as such, a predominantly resistant population should be less likely to emerge. However, before the likelihood of resistance to these novel drugs emerging can be predicted, we must first establish whether such drugs can actually be effective. Many believe that anti-virulence drugs would not be powerful enough to clear existing infections, restricting their potential application to prophylaxis. We have developed a mathematical model that provides a theoretical framework to reveal the circumstances under which anti-virulence drugs may or may not be successful. We demonstrate that by harnessing and combining the advantages of antibiotics with those provided by anti-virulence drugs, given infection-specific parameters, it is possible to identify treatment strategies that would efficiently clear bacterial infections, while preventing the emergence of antibiotic-resistant subpopulations. Our findings strongly support the continuation of research into anti-virulence drugs and demonstrate that their applicability may reach beyond infection prevention. PMID:25701634

  20. Bacterial fitness shapes the population dynamics of antibiotic-resistant and -susceptible bacteria in a model of combined antibiotic and anti-virulence treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ternent, Lucy; Dyson, Rosemary J; Krachler, Anne-Marie; Jabbari, Sara

    2015-05-07

    Bacterial resistance to antibiotic treatment is a huge concern: introduction of any new antibiotic is shortly followed by the emergence of resistant bacterial isolates in the clinic. This issue is compounded by a severe lack of new antibiotics reaching the market. The significant rise in clinical resistance to antibiotics is especially problematic in nosocomial infections, where already vulnerable patients may fail to respond to treatment, causing even greater health concern. A recent focus has been on the development of anti-virulence drugs as a second line of defence in the treatment of antibiotic-resistant infections. This treatment, which weakens bacteria by reducing their virulence rather than killing them, should allow infections to be cleared through the body׳s natural defence mechanisms. In this way there should be little to no selective pressure exerted on the organism and, as such, a predominantly resistant population should be less likely to emerge. However, before the likelihood of resistance to these novel drugs emerging can be predicted, we must first establish whether such drugs can actually be effective. Many believe that anti-virulence drugs would not be powerful enough to clear existing infections, restricting their potential application to prophylaxis. We have developed a mathematical model that provides a theoretical framework to reveal the circumstances under which anti-virulence drugs may or may not be successful. We demonstrate that by harnessing and combining the advantages of antibiotics with those provided by anti-virulence drugs, given infection-specific parameters, it is possible to identify treatment strategies that would efficiently clear bacterial infections, while preventing the emergence of antibiotic-resistant subpopulations. Our findings strongly support the continuation of research into anti-virulence drugs and demonstrate that their applicability may reach beyond infection prevention.

  1. Inversion of Schlumberger resistivity sounding data from the critically dynamic Koyna region using the Hybrid Monte Carlo-based neural network approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Maiti

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Koyna region is well-known for its triggered seismic activities since the hazardous earthquake of M=6.3 occurred around the Koyna reservoir on 10 December 1967. Understanding the shallow distribution of resistivity pattern in such a seismically critical area is vital for mapping faults, fractures and lineaments. However, deducing true resistivity distribution from the apparent resistivity data lacks precise information due to intrinsic non-linearity in the data structures. Here we present a new technique based on the Bayesian neural network (BNN theory using the concept of Hybrid Monte Carlo (HMC/Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC simulation scheme. The new method is applied to invert one and two-dimensional Direct Current (DC vertical electrical sounding (VES data acquired around the Koyna region in India. Prior to apply the method on actual resistivity data, the new method was tested for simulating synthetic signal. In this approach the objective/cost function is optimized following the Hybrid Monte Carlo (HMC/Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC sampling based algorithm and each trajectory was updated by approximating the Hamiltonian differential equations through a leapfrog discretization scheme. The stability of the new inversion technique was tested in presence of correlated red noise and uncertainty of the result was estimated using the BNN code. The estimated true resistivity distribution was compared with the results of singular value decomposition (SVD-based conventional resistivity inversion results. Comparative results based on the HMC-based Bayesian Neural Network are in good agreement with the existing model results, however in some cases, it also provides more detail and precise results, which appears to be justified with local geological and structural details. The new BNN approach based on HMC is faster and proved to be a promising inversion scheme to interpret complex and non-linear resistivity problems. The HMC-based BNN results

  2. Viscous, Resistive Magnetorotational Modes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pessah, Martin Elias; Chan, Chi-kwan

    2008-01-01

    We carry out a comprehensive analysis of the behavior of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in viscous, resistive plasmas. We find exact, non-linear solutions of the non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations describing the local dynamics of an incompressible, differentially rotating...

  3. Simultaneous Effect of Resistance Training and Portulace Oleraceal Supplementation on Some Biochemical Markers of Bone Dynamics in Women with Type II Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shokufe Ziadloo (MSc

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Osteoporosis is one of the complications of diabetes. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of resistance training along with Portulaca oleracea supplementation on OPG and NFκB levels (bone markers in women with type II diabetes. Methods: Overall, 28 women with type II diabetes (44 to 60 years old were randomly and equally assigned into four groups (supplement, training, training-supplement and control. An eight-week resistance training program (three one-hour sessions per week with one repetition maximum was performed using three types of bands with different resistances, at 40-50% intensity and 50-70% maximum heart rate. P. oleracea seeds were supplemented daily (7.5 grams mixed in yogurt for eight weeks. The data was analyzed using descriptive statistics, paired t-test and ANOVA. Results: After 8 weeks, OPG and NFκB levels in the three groups of supplement, training and training-supplement increased and decreased, respectively. The highest change in both variables was observed in the training-supplement group. Moreover, the level of these two variables in the training-supplement group had significant difference with the controls and other groups (P=0.000. Conclusion: As a non-pharmacological therapeutic approach, the regular resistance training and P. oleracea supplementation can increase bone formation markers and reduce bone resorption in women with type II diabetes.

  4. Comparison of the fracture resistances of glass fiber mesh- and metal mesh-reinforced maxillary complete denture under dynamic fatigue loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, So-Min; Huh, Yoon-Hyuk; Cho, Lee-Ra; Park, Chan-Jin

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of reinforcing materials on the fracture resistances of glass fiber mesh- and Cr-Co metal mesh-reinforced maxillary complete dentures under fatigue loading. Glass fiber mesh- and Cr-Co mesh-reinforced maxillary complete dentures were fabricated using silicone molds and acrylic resin. A control group was prepared with no reinforcement (n = 15 per group). After fatigue loading was applied using a chewing simulator, fracture resistance was measured by a universal testing machine. The fracture patterns were analyzed and the fractured surfaces were observed by scanning electron microscopy. After cyclic loading, none of the dentures showed cracks or fractures. During fracture resistance testing, all unreinforced dentures experienced complete fracture. The mesh-reinforced dentures primarily showed posterior framework fracture. Deformation of the all-metal framework caused the metal mesh-reinforced denture to exhibit the highest fracture resistance, followed by the glass fiber mesh-reinforced denture (Pdenture primarily maintained its original shape with unbroken fibers. River line pattern of the control group, dimples and interdendritic fractures of the metal mesh group, and radial fracture lines of the glass fiber group were observed on the fractured surfaces. The glass fiber mesh-reinforced denture exhibits a fracture resistance higher than that of the unreinforced denture, but lower than that of the metal mesh-reinforced denture because of the deformation of the metal mesh. The glass fiber mesh-reinforced denture maintains its shape even after fracture, indicating the possibility of easier repair.

  5. Comparison of the fracture resistances of glass fiber mesh- and metal mesh-reinforced maxillary complete denture under dynamic fatigue loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of reinforcing materials on the fracture resistances of glass fiber mesh- and Cr–Co metal mesh-reinforced maxillary complete dentures under fatigue loading. MATERIALS AND METHODS Glass fiber mesh- and Cr–Co mesh-reinforced maxillary complete dentures were fabricated using silicone molds and acrylic resin. A control group was prepared with no reinforcement (n = 15 per group). After fatigue loading was applied using a chewing simulator, fracture resistance was measured by a universal testing machine. The fracture patterns were analyzed and the fractured surfaces were observed by scanning electron microscopy. RESULTS After cyclic loading, none of the dentures showed cracks or fractures. During fracture resistance testing, all unreinforced dentures experienced complete fracture. The mesh-reinforced dentures primarily showed posterior framework fracture. Deformation of the all-metal framework caused the metal mesh-reinforced denture to exhibit the highest fracture resistance, followed by the glass fiber mesh-reinforced denture (P<.05) and the control group (P<.05). The glass fiber mesh-reinforced denture primarily maintained its original shape with unbroken fibers. River line pattern of the control group, dimples and interdendritic fractures of the metal mesh group, and radial fracture lines of the glass fiber group were observed on the fractured surfaces. CONCLUSION The glass fiber mesh-reinforced denture exhibits a fracture resistance higher than that of the unreinforced denture, but lower than that of the metal mesh-reinforced denture because of the deformation of the metal mesh. The glass fiber mesh-reinforced denture maintains its shape even after fracture, indicating the possibility of easier repair. PMID:28243388

  6. Piggyback resistive Micromegas

    CERN Document Server

    Attié, D; Durand, D; Desforge, D; Ferrer-Ribas, E; Galán, J; Giomataris, Y; Gongadze, A; Iguaz, F J; Jeanneau, F; de Oliveira, R; Papaevangelou, T; Peyaud, A; Teixeira, A

    2013-01-01

    Piggyback Micromegas consists in a novel readout architecture where the anode element is made of a resistive layer on a ceramic substrate. The resistive layer is deposited on the thin ceramic substrate by an industrial process which provides large dynamic range of resistivity (10$^6$ to 10$^{10}$\\,M$\\Omega$/square). The particularity of this new structure is that the active part is entirely dissociated from the read-out element. This gives a large flexibility on the design of the anode structure and the readout scheme. Without significant loss, signals are transmitted by capacitive coupling to the read-out pads. The detector provides high gas gain, good energy resolution and the resistive layer assures spark protection for the electronics. This assembly could be combined with modern pixel array electronic ASICs. First tests with different Piggyback detectors and configurations will be presented. This structure is adequate for cost effective fabrication and low outgassing detectors. It was designed to perform ...

  7. The resistance dynamics of Musca domestica to insecticides and the control strategies in the 26 years in Jinan city%济南市家蝇26年抗药性动态及防制对策

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王永明; 刘慧媛; 王东; 彭文广; 辛正

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the resistance dynamics of Musca domestica in the 26 years in Jinan city for the development of its control strategies. Methods The micro - drop method was used for bioassay of M. domestuia collected in different years in different parts of the city to determine its resistance status and trends. Insecticides dissolved in acetone were applied topically on the thoracic notum of female adults. Results M. domestica in Jinan city and surrounding area in 1982 were susceptible to conventional pyrethrin chemicals. However, 26 years later, the susceptibility of M. domestica to conventional pyrethrin chemicals decreased to varying degrees. Compared with the susceptible strain, the resistance of field housefly to deltamethrn and to bata-cypermethrinwas was 75.00-211.67 and 25.52-116.21 folds in 2008 respectively, indicating that the degree of housefly resistance was at a medium or high level. Conclusion The resistance of M. domestica to pyrethrin chemicals in Jinan and the surrounding areas has developed to varying degrees. Strategies for the control of resistance should be developed based on the local conditions.%目的 了解济南市家蝇26年来抗药性的发展动态,探讨其防制对策.方法 采用微量点滴法,对不同年份采集的不同地区家蝇进行生物测定,以确定家蝇的抗药性状况及其发展趋势.结果 1982年济南市区及周边地区家蝇对常用菊酯类药剂均处于敏感阶段,26年后对菊酯类药剂敏感性均有不同程度的下降.2008年,济南市家蝇对溴氰菊酯的抗性为75.00~211.67倍,对高效氯氰菊酯的抗性为25.52~116.21倍,均已达到中、高度抗性.结论 济南市区及周边地区的家蝇对菊酯类药剂已产生不同程度的抗性,各县(市、区)应根据当地的具体情况制定防制对策.

  8. Molecular dynamics simulation and free energy landscape methods in probing L215H, L217R and L225M βI-tubulin mutations causing paclitaxel resistance in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Shubhandra; Srivastava, Gaurava; Sharma, Ashok

    2016-08-05

    Drug resistance poses a threatening challenge for mankind, as the development of resistance to already well-established drugs causes serious therapeutic problems. Resistance to paclitaxel (Ptxl), a complex diterpenoid working as microtubule stabilizer, is one such issue in cancer treatment. Microtubule stabilizer drugs, stabilises microtubules upon binding to β-tubulin subunit of tubulin heterodimer thus causing mitotic arrest leading to death of cancer cell. Leucine point mutations viz. L215H, L217R, and L225M were reported for Ptxl resistance in various cancers. In the current study, molecular mechanism of these resistance causing mutations was explored using molecular docking, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, binding energy estimation (MMPBSA), free energy decomposition, principle component analysis (PCA) and free energy landscape (FEL) methods. A total of five systems including unbound βI-tubulin (Apo), docked wild+Ptxl, L215H+Ptxl, L217R+Ptxl and L225M+Ptxl were prepared, and 50 ns MD simulation was performed for each system. Binding energy estimation indicated that leucine mutation reduces the binding affinity of Ptxl in mutant types (MTs) as compared to wild type (WT). Further, in contrast to WT Ptxl interactions with the M-loop (PHE270-VAL286), S6-S7 loop and H9-H10 were significantly altered in MTs. Results showed that in MTs, Ptxl had weak interaction with M-loop residues, while having strong affinity with S6-S7 loop and H6-H7 loop. Moreover, PCA and FEL analysis revealed that M-loop flexible region (THR274-LEU284) was strongly bound with Ptxl in WT preventing its flexible movement and the causing factor for microtubule stabilization. In MTs due to poor interaction with Ptxl, M-loop flexible region retains its flexibility, therefore unable to stabilize microtubule. This study will give an insight into the importance of M-loop flexible region interaction with Ptxl for microtubule stabilization. In addition, it clearly provides the molecular basis of

  9. Prolonged clonal spreading and dynamic changes in antimicrobial resistance of Escherichia coli ST68 among patients who stayed in a respiratory care ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Ming; Ke, Se-Chin; Li, Chia-Ru; Chiou, Chien-Shun; Chang, Chao-Chin

    2014-11-01

    From 2007 to 2009, we collected a total of 83 bacteraemic isolates of Escherichia coli with reduced susceptibility or resistance to third-generation cephalosporins (TGCs). Isolates were genotyped by PFGE and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The PFGE patterns revealed two highly correlated clusters (cluster E: nine isolates; cluster G: 22 isolates) associated with this prolonged clonal spreading. Compared with cluster E isolates, cluster G isolates were significantly more likely to harbour aac(6')-Ib-cr (Pcoli cases caused by cluster E and G isolates were significantly associated with having stayed in our hospital's respiratory care ward (Pcoli ST68 associated with a stay in a long-term care facility. Using epidemiological investigations and PFGE and MLST analyses, we have identified long-term clonal spreading caused by E. coli ST68, with extra antimicrobial-resistance genes possibly acquired during the prolonged spreading period.

  10. Hydrated Ordinary Portland Cement as a Carbonic Cement: The Mechanisms, Dynamics, and Implications of Self-Sealing and CO2 Resistance in Wellbore Cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guthrie, George Drake Jr. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pawar, Rajesh J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Carey, James William [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Karra, Satish [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Harp, Dylan Robert [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Viswanathan, Hari S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2017-07-28

    This report analyzes the dynamics and mechanisms of the interactions of carbonated brine with hydrated Portland cement. The analysis is based on a recent set of comprehensive reactive-transport simulations, and it relies heavily on the synthesis of the body of work on wellbore integrity that we have conducted for the Carbon Storage Program over the past decade.

  11. Antimicrobial Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... emergence and spread of antibacterial resistance, including optimal use of antibiotics in both humans and animals. A global action plan on antimicrobial resistance was adopted by Member States at the ...

  12. 接触角与液固界面热阻关系的分子动力学模拟*%A molecular dynamics simulation on the relationship between contact angle and solid-liquid interfacial thermal resistance*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    葛宋; 陈民†

    2013-01-01

      本文利用分子动力学方法模拟了液体在固体表面的接触角及液固界面热阻,并探讨了二者之间的关系。通过分别改变液固结合强度和固体的原子性质来分析接触角和界面热阻的关系及变化趋势。模拟结果显示增强液固间相互作用时,接触角减小的同时界面热阻也随之单调减小;而改变固体原子间结合强度和原子质量时,接触角几乎保持不变,但界面热阻显著改变。固体原子间结合强度和原子质量影响界面热阻的原因是其改变了固体的振动频率分布,导致液固原子间的振动耦合程度发生变化。本文的结果表明界面热阻不仅与由接触角所表征的液固结合强度有关,还与液固原子间的振动耦合程度有关。接触角与界面热阻间不存在单值的对应关系,不能单一地将接触角作为液固界面热阻的评价标准。%With the fast development of nanotechnology, the solid-liquid interfacial thermal resistance draws increasing research interest due to its importance in nanoscale energy transport. The contact angle is an important quantity characterizing the interfacial properties and is easy to be measured experimentally. Previous researchers have tried to correlate the contact angle to the interfacial thermal resistance. Using molecular dynamics simulation, we have calculated the contact angle and interfacial thermal resistance at a solid/liquid interface and discuss the relationship between the two quantities. The solid/liquid bonding strength and the solid properties are varied to test their effects on both contact angle and interfacial thermal resistance. The simulation results demonstrate that with increasing solid/liquid bonding strength, both the contact angle and interfacial thermal resistance decrease. However, the bonding strength between solid atoms and the solid atomic mass influence the interfacial resistance remarkably while they have little effect

  13. Dynamic pilot plant facility for applications in CSP: Evaluation of corrosion resistance of A516 in a nitrate molten salt mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Francisco Javier; Encinas-Sánchez, Víctor; García-Martín, Gustavo; Lasanta, María Isabel; de Miguel, María Teresa

    2017-06-01

    This paper evaluates the corrosion of A516 carbon steel in the binary Solar Salt (60 wt.% NaNO3/40 wt.% KNO3) by immersion tests with continuous salt flow at 500 °C. To this end, a novel patented experimental facility enabling dynamic degradation tests of materials in contact with molten mediums was developed and used. Experimental results showed greater corrosion rates and thicker oxide layers in samples subjected to tests with continuous salt flow than the static ones. The dynamic test facility simulates real conditions (flux, thermocycling, etc.) of a CSP plant. The patented experimental pilot plant is a great step forward in learning about the physicochemical properties and behavior of molten salts and also behavior of substrates in contact with them under realistic working conditions.

  14. Dynamic emergence of the mesenchymal CD44(pos)CD24(neg/low) phenotype in HER2-gene amplified breast cancer cells with de novo resistance to trastuzumab (Herceptin).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveras-Ferraros, Cristina; Vazquez-Martin, Alejandro; Martin-Castillo, Begoña; Cufí, Silvia; Del Barco, Sonia; Lopez-Bonet, Eugeni; Brunet, Joan; Menendez, Javier A

    2010-06-18

    Evidence is mounting that the occurrence of the CD44(pos)/CD24(neg/low) cell population, which contains potential breast cancer (BC) stem cells, could explain BC clinical resistance to HER2-targeted therapies. We investigated whether de novo refractoriness to the anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody trastuzumab (Tzb; Herceptin) may relate to the dynamic regulation of the mesenchymal CD44(pos)/CD24(neg/low) phenotype in HER2-positive BC. We observed that the subpopulation of Tzb-refractory JIMT-1 BC cells exhibiting CD44(pos)/CD24(neg/low)-surface markers switched with time. Low-passage JIMT-1 cell cultures were found to spontaneously contain approximately 10% of cells bearing the CD44(pos)/CD24(neg/low) immunophenotype. Late-passage (>60) JIMT-1 cultures accumulated approximately 80% of CD44(pos)/CD24(neg/low) cells and closely resembled the CD44(pos)/CD24(neg/low)-enriched ( approximately 85%) cell population constitutively occurring in HER2-negative MDA-MB-231 mesenchymal BC cells. Dynamic expression of mesenchymal markers was not limited to CD44/CD24 because high-passages of JIMT-1 cells exhibited also reduced expression of the HER2 protein and over-secretion of pro-invasive/metastatic chemokines and metalloproteases. Accordingly, late-passage JIMT-1 cells displayed an exacerbated migratogenic phenotype in plastic, collagen, and fibronectin substrates. Intrinsic genetic plasticity to efficiently drive the emergence of the CD44(pos)/CD24(neg/low) mesenchymal phenotype may account for de novo resistance to HER2 targeting therapies in basal-like BC carrying HER2 gene amplification.

  15. Dynamic soluble changes in sVEGFR1, HGF, and VEGF promote chemotherapy and bevacizumab resistance: A prospective translational study in the BECOX (GEMCAD 09-01) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda, Estela; Salud, A; Vila-Navarro, E; Safont, M J; Llorente, Beatriz; Aparicio, J; Vera, R; Escudero, P; Casado, E; Bosch, C; Bohn, U; Pérez-Carrión, R; Carmona, A; Ayuso, J R; Ripollés, T; Bouzas, R; Gironella, M; García-Albéniz, X; Feliu, J; Maurel, J

    2017-06-01

    Despite initial responsiveness, acquired resistance to both bevacizumab and chemotherapy in metastatic colorectal cancer is universal. We have recently published that in vitro, chronically oxaliplatin resistance upregulates soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1, downregulates vascular endothelial growth factor, and also promotes c-MET, b-catenin/transcription factor 4, and AKT activation. We tested whether variation in three serum biomarkers such as the natural c-MET ligand (hepatocyte growth factor), soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1, and vascular endothelial growth factor-A was associated with efficacy in metastatic colorectal cancer patients treated in the prospective BECOX study. Serum levels of vascular endothelial growth factor-A165, soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1, and hepatocyte growth factor were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method basally and every 3 cycles (at the time of computed tomography evaluation) in a preplanned translational study in the first-line BECOX trial in metastatic colorectal cancer patients treated with CAPOX plus bevacizumab. Response was evaluated by routine contrast-enhanced computed tomography by RECIST 1.1 by investigator assessment and by three blinded independent radiologists. Ratios between soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1/vascular endothelial growth factor-A and hepatocyte growth factor/vascular endothelial growth factor-A were established and variations through time were related to RECIST 1.1 by investigator assessment and independent radiologist. The BECOX trial included 68 patients, and 27 patients were analyzed in the translational trial. A total of 80 RECIST 1.1 evaluations were done by investigator assessment and 56 by independent radiologist. We found that a 3.22-fold increase in soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1/vascular endothelial growth factor-A by investigator assessment and a 3.06-fold increase in

  16. Long time scale GPU dynamics reveal the mechanism of drug resistance of the dual mutant I223R/H275Y neuraminidase from H1N1-2009 influenza virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Christopher J; Malaisree, Maturos; Pattarapongdilok, Naruwan; Sompornpisut, Pornthep; Hannongbua, Supot; Mulholland, Adrian J

    2012-05-29

    Multidrug resistance of the pandemic H1N1-2009 strain of influenza has been reported due to widespread treatment using the neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors, oseltamivir (Tamiflu), and zanamivir (Relenza). From clinical data, the single I223R (IR(1)) mutant of H1N1-2009 NA reduced efficacy of oseltamivir and zanamivir by 45 and 10 times, (1) respectively. More seriously, the efficacy of these two inhibitors against the double mutant I223R/H275Y (IRHY(2)) was significantly reduced by a factor of 12 374 and 21 times, respectively, compared to the wild-type.(2) This has led to the question of why the efficacy of the NA inhibitors is reduced by the occurrence of these mutations and, specifically, why the efficacy of oseltamivir against the double mutant IRHY was significantly reduced, to the point where oseltamivir has become an ineffective treatment. In this study, 1 μs of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations was performed to answer these questions. The simulations, run using graphical processors (GPUs), were used to investigate the effect of conformational change upon binding of the NA inhibitors oseltamivir and zanamivir in the wild-type and the IR and IRHY mutant strains. These long time scale dynamics simulations demonstrated that the mechanism of resistance of IRHY to oseltamivir was due to the loss of key hydrogen bonds between the inhibitor and residues in the 150-loop. This allowed NA to transition from a closed to an open conformation. Oseltamivir binds weakly with the open conformation of NA due to poor electrostatic interactions between the inhibitor and the active site. The results suggest that the efficacy of oseltamivir is reduced significantly because of conformational changes that lead to the open form of the 150-loop. This suggests that drug resistance could be overcome by increasing hydrogen bond interactions between NA inhibitors and residues in the 150-loop, with the aim of maintaining the closed conformation, or by designing inhibitors that can form

  17. Camptothecin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brangi, M; Litman, Thomas; Ciotti, M;

    1999-01-01

    The mitoxantrone resistance (MXR) gene encodes a recently characterized ATP-binding cassette half-transporter that confers multidrug resistance. We studied resistance to the camptothecins in two sublines expressing high levels of MXR: S1-M1-80 cells derived from parental S1 colon cancer cells...... and MCF-7 AdVp3,000 isolated from parental MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Both cell lines were 400- to 1,000-fold more resistant to topotecan, 9-amino-20(S)-camptothecin, and the active metabolite of irinotecan, 7-ethyl-10-hydroxycamptothecin (SN-38), than their parental cell lines. The cell lines...... demonstrated much less resistance to camptothecin and to several camptothecin analogues. Reduced accumulation and energy-dependent efflux of topotecan was demonstrated by confocal microscopy. A significant reduction in cleavable complexes in the resistant cells could be observed after SN-38 treatment...

  18. Nanosecond dynamics of influenza A/M2TM and an amantadine resistant mutant probed by time-dependent red shifts of a native tryptophan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanda, Vikas [Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School – UMDNJ, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Department of Biochemistry, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School – UMDNJ, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Cristian, Lidia [Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6059 (United States); Toptygin, Dmitri; Brand, Ludwig [Department of Biology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); DeGrado, William F., E-mail: William.Degrado@ucsf.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94158 (United States)

    2013-08-30

    Highlights: ► Examined nanosecond dynamics of essential tryptophan residue of M2 proton channel. ► Channel blocking drugs restrict the ability of M2 to stabilize charge. ► Dielectric relaxation of M2 consistent with molecular dynamics simulation studies. - Abstract: Proteins involved in functions such as electron transfer or ion transport must be capable of stabilizing transient charged species on time scales ranging from picoseconds to microseconds. We study the influenza A M2 proton channel, containing a tryptophan residue that serves as an essential part of the proton conduction pathway. We induce a transition dipole in tryptophan by photoexcitation, and then probe the dielectric stabilization of its excited state. The magnitude of the stabilization over this time regime was larger than that generally found for tryptophan in membrane or protein environments. M2 achieves a water-like stabilization over a 25 ns time scale, slower than that of bulk water, but sufficiently rapid to contribute to stabilization of charge as protons diffuse through the channel. These measurements should stimulate future MD studies to clarify the role of sidechain versus non-bulk water in defining the process of relaxation.

  19. Viscous, Resistive Magnetorotational Modes

    CERN Document Server

    Pessah, Martin E

    2008-01-01

    We carry out a comprehensive analysis of the behavior of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in viscous, resistive plasmas. We find exact, non-linear solutions of the non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations describing the local dynamics of an incompressible, differentially rotating background threaded by a vertical magnetic field when disturbances with wavenumbers perpendicular to the shear are considered. We provide a geometrical description of these viscous, resistive MRI modes and show how their physical structure is modified as a function of the Reynolds and magnetic Reynolds numbers. We demonstrate that when finite dissipative effects are considered, velocity and magnetic field disturbances are no longer orthogonal (as it is the case in the ideal MHD limit) unless the magnetic Prandtl number is unity. We generalize previous results found in the ideal limit and show that a series of key properties of the mean Reynolds and Maxwell stresses also hold for the viscous, resistive MRI. In particular, ...

  20. Basal/HER2 breast carcinomas: integrating molecular taxonomy with cancer stem cell dynamics to predict primary resistance to trastuzumab (Herceptin).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Castillo, Begoña; Oliveras-Ferraros, Cristina; Vazquez-Martin, Alejandro; Cufí, Silvia; Moreno, José Manuel; Corominas-Faja, Bruna; Urruticoechea, Ander; Martín, Ángel G; López-Bonet, Eugeni; Menendez, Javier A

    2013-01-15

    High rates of inherent primary resistance to the humanized monoclonal antibody trastuzumab (Herceptin) are frequent among HER2 gene-amplified breast carcinomas in both metastatic and adjuvant settings. The clinical efficacy of trastuzumab is highly correlated with its ability to specifically and efficiently target HER2-driven populations of breast cancer stem cells (CSCs). Intriguingly, many of the possible mechanisms by which cancer cells escape trastuzumab involve many of the same biomarkers that have been implicated in the biology of CS-like tumor-initiating cells. In the traditional, one-way hierarchy of CSCs in which all cancer cells descend from special self-renewing CSCs, HER2-positive CSCs can occur solely by self-renewal. Therefore, by targeting CSC self-renewal and resistance, trastuzumab is expected to induce tumor shrinkage and further reduce breast cancer recurrence rates when used alongside traditional therapies. In a new, alternate model, more differentiated non-stem cancer cells can revert to trastuzumab-refractory, CS-like cells via the activation of intrinsic or microenvironmental paths-to-stemness, such as the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Alternatively, stochastic transitions of trastuzumab-responsive CSCs might also give rise to non-CSC cellular states that lack major attributes of CSCs and, therefore, can remain "hidden" from trastuzumab activity. Here, we hypothesize that a better understanding of the CSC/non-CSC social structure within HER2-overexpressing breast carcinomas is critical for trastuzumab-based treatment decisions in the clinic. First, we decipher the biological significance of CSC features and the EMT on the molecular effects and efficacy of trastuzumab in HER2-positive breast cancer cells. Second, we reinterpret the genetic heterogeneity that differentiates trastuzumab-responders from non-responders in terms of CSC cellular states. Finally, we propose that novel predictive approaches aimed at better forecasting

  1. Comparison of oxidation resistance of UHMWPE and POM in H2O2 solution from ReaxFF reactive molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wu; Duan, Hai-tao; Hua, Meng; Gu, Ka-li; Shang, Hong-fei; Li, Jian

    2014-08-28

    The oxidation mechanism of ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) and polyoxymethylene (POM) in hydrogen peroxide solution was investigated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations via reactive force field (ReaxFF) method. MD results from ReaxFF suggested that UHMWPE provided better antioxidation activity at high temperature (>373 K) than its POM counterpart in the same concentration of hydrogen peroxide solution. Furthermore, POM was relatively more susceptible to erosion and swelling because of the infiltration of H2O2 solution. Calculations of the diffusion coefficient at different temperatures permit further understanding of the chemical phenomena involved in the level of oxidation in the course of MD simulations. Results of the simulations are generally consistent with the previous experimental available in literature. The simulations also provide new insights into understanding the mechanism resulting oxidation products among the interested polymers.

  2. Minipenetrômetro dinâmico para determinação da resistência à penetração em amostras de solo indeformadas A dynamic minipenetrometer for assessment of soil mechanical resistance in undisturbed soil samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Aurélio Carolino de Sá

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi descrever e testar um minipenetrômetro dinâmico para a determinação da resistência do solo à penetração, em amostras indeformadas. Foram construídas quatro peças de diferentes massas, para a mensuração da resistência à penetração em solos com conteúdos variáveis de água. Para o teste, foram utilizadas amostras de um Latossolo Vermelho, sob sistemas de plantio convencional e direto. Avaliaram-se o índice de cone, a densidade do solo e os conteúdos gravimétrico e volumétrico de água do solo. O equipamento avaliado é confiável, preciso, de baixo custo e tem potencial para promover mais estudos sobre intervalo hídrico ótimo do solo.The objective of this study was to describe and to test a dynamic minipenetrometer for measuring soil mechanical resistance in undisturbed soil samples. Four pieces with different weight were constructed for impact analysis of soil with diverse water content. Undisturbed soil samples were taken from an Oxisol (Rhodic Haplustox under conventional and no-tillage systems. Cone index, soil density, gravimetric and volumetric water content were evaluated. The equipment is reliable, accurate, obtainable at a low cost, besides having potential to promote more studies on the determination of soil least limiting water range.

  3. Emerging Threats for Human Health in Poland: Pathogenic Isolates from Drug Resistant Acanthamoeba Keratitis Monitored in terms of Their In Vitro Dynamics and Temperature Adaptability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia Chomicz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Amphizoic amoebae generate a serious human health threat due to their pathogenic potential as facultative parasites, causative agents of vision-threatening Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK. Recently, AK incidences have been reported with increasing frequency worldwide, particularly in contact lens wearers. In our study, severe cases of AK in Poland and respective pathogenic isolates were assessed at clinical, morphological, and molecular levels. Misdiagnoses and the unsuccessful treatment in other ophthalmic units delayed suitable therapy, and resistance to applied chemicals resulted in severe courses and treatment difficulties. Molecular assessment indicated that all sequenced pathogenic corneal isolates deriving from Polish patients with AK examined by us showed 98–100% homology with Acanthamoeba genotype T4, the most prevalent genotype in this human ocular infection worldwide. In vitro assays revealed that the pathogenic strains are able to grow at elevated temperature and have a wide adaptive capability. This study is our subsequent in vitro investigation on pathogenic Acanthamoeba strains of AK originating from Polish patients. Further investigations designed to foster a better understanding of the factors leading to an increase of AK observed in the past years in Poland may help to prevent or at least better cope with future cases.

  4. Emerging Threats for Human Health in Poland: Pathogenic Isolates from Drug Resistant Acanthamoeba Keratitis Monitored in terms of Their In Vitro Dynamics and Temperature Adaptability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomicz, Lidia; Conn, David Bruce; Padzik, Marcin; Szaflik, Jacek P; Walochnik, Julia; Zawadzki, Paweł J; Pawłowski, Witold; Dybicz, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Amphizoic amoebae generate a serious human health threat due to their pathogenic potential as facultative parasites, causative agents of vision-threatening Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK). Recently, AK incidences have been reported with increasing frequency worldwide, particularly in contact lens wearers. In our study, severe cases of AK in Poland and respective pathogenic isolates were assessed at clinical, morphological, and molecular levels. Misdiagnoses and the unsuccessful treatment in other ophthalmic units delayed suitable therapy, and resistance to applied chemicals resulted in severe courses and treatment difficulties. Molecular assessment indicated that all sequenced pathogenic corneal isolates deriving from Polish patients with AK examined by us showed 98-100% homology with Acanthamoeba genotype T4, the most prevalent genotype in this human ocular infection worldwide. In vitro assays revealed that the pathogenic strains are able to grow at elevated temperature and have a wide adaptive capability. This study is our subsequent in vitro investigation on pathogenic Acanthamoeba strains of AK originating from Polish patients. Further investigations designed to foster a better understanding of the factors leading to an increase of AK observed in the past years in Poland may help to prevent or at least better cope with future cases.

  5. Antibiotic Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munck, Christian

    morbidity and mortality as well as an increase in the cost of treatment. Understanding how bacteria respond to antibiotic exposure gives the foundations for a rational approach to counteract antimicrobial resistance. In the work presented in this thesis, I explore the two fundamental sources...... of antimicrobial resistance: (1) adaptive mutations and (2) horizontal acquisition of resistance genes from antibiotic gene reservoirs. By studying the geno- and phenotypic changes of E. coli in response to single and drug-pair exposures, I uncover the evolutionary trajectories leading to adaptive resistance. I...... to rationally design drug combinations that limit the evolution of antibiotic resistance due to counteracting evolutionary trajectories. My results highlight that an in-depth knowledge about the genetic responses to the individual antimicrobial compounds enables the prediction of responses to drug combinations...

  6. The (Street) Art of Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Awad, Sarah H.; Wagoner, Brady; Glaveanu, Vlad Petre

    2017-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the interrelation between resistance, novelty and social change We will consider resistance as both a social and individual phenomenon, a constructive process that articulates continuity and change and as an act oriented towards an imagined future of different communities....... In this account, resistance is thus a creative act having its own dynamic and, most of all, aesthetic dimension. In fact, it is one such visibly artistic form of resistance that will be considered here, the case of street art as a tool of social protest and revolution in Egypt. Street art is commonly defined...... in sharp contrast with high or fine art because of its collective nature and anonymity, its different kind of aesthetics, and most of all its disruptive, ‘anti-social’ outcomes. With the use of illustrations, we will argue here that street art is prototypical of a creative form of resistance, situated...

  7. Lantibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, Lorraine A; Cotter, Paul D; Hill, Colin; Ross, R Paul

    2015-06-01

    The dramatic rise in the incidence of antibiotic resistance demands that new therapeutic options will have to be developed. One potentially interesting class of antimicrobials are the modified bacteriocins termed lantibiotics, which are bacterially produced, posttranslationally modified, lanthionine/methyllanthionine-containing peptides. It is interesting that low levels of resistance have been reported for lantibiotics compared with commercial antibiotics. Given that there are very few examples of naturally occurring lantibiotic resistance, attempts have been made to deliberately induce resistance phenotypes in order to investigate this phenomenon. Mechanisms that hinder the action of lantibiotics are often innate systems that react to the presence of any cationic peptides/proteins or ones which result from cell well damage, rather than being lantibiotic specific. Such resistance mechanisms often arise due to altered gene regulation following detection of antimicrobials/cell wall damage by sensory proteins at the membrane. This facilitates alterations to the cell wall or changes in the composition of the membrane. Other general forms of resistance include the formation of spores or biofilms, which are a common mechanistic response to many classes of antimicrobials. In rare cases, bacteria have been shown to possess specific antilantibiotic mechanisms. These are often species specific and include the nisin lytic protein nisinase and the phenomenon of immune mimicry.

  8. Mechanisms of Resistance to Cabazitaxel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, George E.; Wang, Yan C.; Francisco, E. Brian; Rose, John C.; Martinez, Francisco J.; Coller, John; Brassard, Diana; Vrignaud, Patricia; Sikic, Branimir I.

    2015-01-01

    We studied mechanisms of resistance to the novel taxane cabazitaxel in established cellular models of taxane resistance. We also developed cabazitaxel-resistant variants from MCF-7 breast cancer cells by stepwise selection in drug alone (MCF-7/CTAX) or drug plus the transport inhibitor PSC-833 (MCF-7/CTAX-P). Among multidrug resistant (MDR) variants, cabazitaxel was relatively less cross-resistant than paclitaxel and docetaxel (15 vs. 200-fold in MES-SA/Dx5 and 9 vs. 60-fold in MCF-7/TxT50, respectively). MCF-7/TxTP50 cells that were negative for MDR but had 9-fold resistance to paclitaxel were also 9-fold resistant to cabazitaxel. Selection with cabazitaxel alone (MCF-7/CTAX) yielded 33-fold resistance to cabazitaxel, 52-fold resistance to paclitaxel, activation of ABCB1, and 3-fold residual resistance to cabazitaxel with MDR inhibition. The MCF-7/CTAX-P variant did not express ABCB1, nor did it efflux rhodamine-123, BODIPY-labeled paclitaxel, and [3H]-docetaxel. These cells are hypersensitive to depolymerizing agents (vinca alkaloids and colchicine), have reduced baseline levels of stabilized microtubules, and impaired tubulin polymerization in response to taxanes (cabazitaxel or docetaxel) relative to MCF-7 parental cells. Class III β-tubulin (TUBB3) RNA and protein were elevated in both MCF-7/CTAX and MCF-7/CTAX-P. Decreased BRCA1 and altered epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers are also associated with cabazitaxel resistance in these MCF-7 variants, and may serve as predictive biomarkers for its activity in the clinical setting. In summary, cabazitaxel resistance mechanisms include MDR (although at a lower level than paclitaxel and docetaxel), and alterations in microtubule dynamicity, as manifested by higher expression of TUBB3, decreased BRCA1, and by the induction of EMT. PMID:25416788

  9. ESTIMATION OF INCREASE OF STRESS RESISTANCE AMONG STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drobysheva O. M.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available By results of the estimation of stress resistance on dynamics of the regulation-adaptive status we can observe, that the autogenic training at the end of one academic year did not cause authentic changes in stress resistance in students with high and low levels of stress resistance. At the same time, it raised stress resistance for persons with a moderate level of stress resistance

  10. Resident resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, J L; Cleary, B

    1999-01-01

    Clearly, faculty must work hard with residents to explore the nature of their resistance to a program's learning and growth opportunities. Initial steps to a deeper, more effective, and longer-lasting change process must be pursued. If resident resistance is mishandled or misunderstood, then learning and professional growth may be sidetracked and the purposes of residency training defeated. Listening to the whole person of the resident and avoiding the trap of getting caught up in merely responding to select resident behaviors that irritate us is critical. Every faculty member in the family practice residency program must recognize resistance as a form of defense that cannot immediately be torn down or taken away. Resident defenses have important purposes to play in stress reduction even if they are not always healthy. Residents, especially interns, use resistance to avoid a deeper and more truthful look at themselves as physicians. A family practice residency program that sees whole persons in their residents and that respects resident defenses will effectively manage the stress and disharmony inherent to the resistant resident.

  11. Resistance distribution and anti-fouling characteristics of precoating dynamic membrane in emulsified oily wastewater treatment%预涂动态膜在乳化油废水处理中的阻力分布及其抗污染特性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨涛; 杨期勇; 李国朝

    2012-01-01

    In order to discuss the anti-fouling characteristics of the precoating dynamic membrane,the resistance distributions of the ceramic membrane,kaolin precoating dynamic membrane and kaolin/MnO2 composite precoating dynamic membrane were determined in emulsified oily wastewater treatment.The characterizations of the topography of the polluted precoating dynamic membranes were scanned by the SEM.The results showed that the fouling resistances caused by emulsified oil were obviously higher than the support(ceramic membrane) resistance or the resistance caused by coating particles.The membrane flux reduction was mainly due to the fouling effect by emulsified oil.The support fouling resistances of the precoating dynamic membranes were lower than the internal fouling resistance in ceramic membrane.The support fouling resistance in composite precoating dynamic membrane was the lowest.The composite dynamic layer was less polluted than the kaolin dynamic layer.For the precoating dynamic membranes,there presented clear colloidal materials on the surface,and no colloidal materials appeared on the outer wall surface of the supports.The dynamic layer can effectively protect the support in wastewater treatment,which shows very good anti-fouling characteristics.%为讨论预涂动态膜的抗污染特性,测定了陶瓷膜、高岭土预涂动态膜和高岭土/MnO2复合预涂动态膜分别在乳化油废水处理中的阻力分布,并用SEM扫描电镜对污染预涂动态膜形貌进行了表征。结果表明,乳化油污染阻力明显高于基膜(或陶瓷膜)固有阻力及涂膜粒子形成的阻力,乳化油对预涂动态膜或陶瓷膜的污染是导致膜通量衰减的主要原因;高岭土和复合预涂动态膜所用基膜污染阻力低于陶瓷膜的内部污染阻力,其中复合预涂动态膜所用基膜的污染阻力最小;复合动态膜层比高岭土动态膜层的污染程度低;污染预涂动态膜表面呈现明显的凝胶态物质,

  12. Reducing Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindell, Johanna

    care may influence decisions on antibiotic use. Based on video-and audio recordings of physician-patient consultations it is investigated how treatment recommendations are presented, can be changed, are forecast and explained, and finally, how they seemingly meet resistance and how this resistance......Antibiotic resistance is a growing public health problem both nationally and internationally, and efficient strategies are needed to reduce unnecessary use. This dissertation presents four research studies, which examine how communication between general practitioners and patients in Danish primary...... is responded to.The first study in the dissertation suggests that treatment recommendations on antibiotics are often done in a way that encourages patient acceptance. In extension of this, the second study of the dissertation examines a case, where acceptance of such a recommendation is changed into a shared...

  13. Anticoagulant Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiberg, Ann-Charlotte

    Although sewer rat control is carried out in more than 80 % of all Danish municipalities, with usage of large amounts of anticoagulant rodenticides, knowledge on anticoagulant resistance among rats living in the sewers is limited. As rat problems in urban areas are believed to be related to sewer...... problems (70-90 % in UK and DK) unawareness of resistance amongst these populations of Brown rats may constitute a future control problem and knowledge on this issue has become crucial. Rats were captured in sewers from seven different locations in the suburban area of Copenhagen. Locations was chosen...... to represent different sewer rat management strategies i) no anticoagulants for approx. 20 years ii) no anticoagulants for the last 5 years and iii) continuous control for many years. Animals were tested for resistance to bromadiolone by Blood-Clotting Response test, as bromadiolone is the most frequently used...

  14. Androgen resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Ieuan A; Deeb, Asma

    2006-12-01

    Androgen resistance causes the androgen insensitivity syndrome in its variant forms and is a paradigm of clinical syndromes associated with hormone resistance. In its complete form, the syndrome causes XY sex reversal and a female phenotype. Partial resistance to androgens is a common cause of ambiguous genitalia of the newborn, but a similar phenotype may result from several other conditions, including defects in testis determination and androgen biosynthesis. The biological actions of androgens are mediated by a single intracellular androgen receptor encoded by a gene on the long arm of the X chromosome. Mutations in this gene result in varying degrees of androgen receptor dysfunction and phenotypes that often show poor concordance with the genotype. Functional characterization and three-dimensional modelling of novel mutant receptors has been informative in understanding the mechanism of androgen action. Management issues in syndromes of androgen insensitivity include decisions on sex assignment, timing of gonadectomy in relation to tumour risk, and genetic and psychological counselling.

  15. Superconductor Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Gömöry, F

    2014-01-01

    Superconductors used in magnet technology could carry extreme currents because of their ability to keep the magnetic flux motionless. The dynamics of the magnetic flux interaction with superconductors is controlled by this property. The cases of electrical transport in a round wire and the magnetization of wires of various shapes (circular, elliptical, plate) in an external magnetic field are analysed. Resistance to the magnetic field penetration means that the field produced by the superconducting magnet is no longer proportional to the supplied current. It also leads to a dissipation of electromagnetic energy. In conductors with unequal transverse dimensions, such as flat cables, the orientation with respect to the magnetic field plays an essential role. A reduction of magnetization currents can be achieved by splitting the core of a superconducting wire into fine filaments; however, new kinds of electrical currents that couple the filaments consequently appear. Basic formulas allowing qualitative analyses ...

  16. Population dynamics and insecticide resistance of Plutella xylostella in Inner Mongolia%内蒙古小菜蛾种群数量动态及抗药性监测

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周晓榕; 常静; 庞保平; 吴青君; 张友军

    2013-01-01

    2009-2011年对内蒙古呼和浩特市郊区十字花科蔬菜和武川县油菜上小菜蛾Plutella xylostella(L.)种群消长动态进行了调查,并比较了呼和浩特地区小菜蛾对11种杀虫剂的抗药性.结果表明,在呼和浩特郊区,小菜蛾成虫于4月上旬开始出现,一年中有4个发生高峰,分别为4月下旬或5月上旬、6月中旬、8月下旬和10月上旬;小菜蛾幼虫在春甘蓝和秋白菜整个生长期间均有发生,大约有4个发生高峰,分别为6月上中旬、6月下旬或7月上旬、9月上旬和10月上旬.在武川县,小菜蛾成虫于4月末或5月初开始发生,春夏季数量高于秋季,共有2个发生高峰,2009年为5月下旬和6月中旬,2010年为6月上旬和8月上中旬;小菜蛾幼虫在6月下旬开始出现,在油菜整个生长期间,小菜蛾幼虫约有3个数量高峰,分别为7月初、7月末和8月下旬,秋季数量高于春夏季.在供试的11种杀虫剂中,溴虫腈对小菜蛾幼虫的毒力最高,LC50为0.22 mg·L-1;其次为多杀菌素、氯虫苯甲酰胺、氟虫腈和BT,LC50分别为0.82 ~0.83、1.09、1.36和3.41 mg·L-1;再次为茚虫威和阿维菌素,LC50分别为15.74 mg·L-1和6.03~23.47 mg·L-1;然后为丁醚尿、虫酰肼和啶虫隆,LC50分别为51.30、52.66和61.91 mg·L-1;最低为高效氯氰菊酯,LC50为462.66~673.26 mg·L-1.抗药性测定表明,呼和浩特地区小菜蛾幼虫未对溴虫腈、虫酰肼、氯虫苯甲酰胺和丁醚尿产生抗性,对多杀菌素和氟虫腈为低抗性,对茚虫威和BT为中抗性,对高效氯氰菊酯、啶虫隆和阿维菌素为极高抗性.%The population dynamics and insecticide resistance of the diamondback moth, Plutetla xylostella ( L.) , were investigated on cruciferous vegetables in a Hohhot suburb, and on rapeseed in Wuchuan County, Inner Mongolia from 2009 to 2011. In the suburb of Hohhot city, adult moths began to occur in early April and had four peaks of abundance during the year: late

  17. Drug resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorter, J.A.; Potschka, H.; Noebels, J.L.; Avoli, M.; Rogawski, M.A.; Olsen, R.W.; Delgado-Escueta, A.V.

    2012-01-01

    Drug resistance remains to be one of the major challenges in epilepsy therapy. Identification of factors that contribute to therapeutic failure is crucial for future development of novel therapeutic strategies for difficult-to-treat epilepsies. Several clinical studies have shown that high seizure f

  18. Multilevel Resistance Programming in Conductive Bridge Resistive Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalanabis, Debayan

    This work focuses on the existence of multiple resistance states in a type of emerging non-volatile resistive memory device known commonly as Programmable Metallization Cell (PMC) or Conductive Bridge Random Access Memory (CBRAM), which can be important for applications such as multi-bit memory as well as non-volatile logic and neuromorphic computing. First, experimental data from small signal, quasi-static and pulsed mode electrical characterization of such devices are presented which clearly demonstrate the inherent multi-level resistance programmability property in CBRAM devices. A physics based analytical CBRAM compact model is then presented which simulates the ion-transport dynamics and filamentary growth mechanism that causes resistance change in such devices. Simulation results from the model are fitted to experimental dynamic resistance switching characteristics. The model designed using Verilog-a language is computation-efficient and can be integrated with industry standard circuit simulation tools for design and analysis of hybrid circuits involving both CMOS and CBRAM devices. Three main circuit applications for CBRAM devices are explored in this work. Firstly, the susceptibility of CBRAM memory arrays to single event induced upsets is analyzed via compact model simulation and experimental heavy ion testing data that show possibility of both high resistance to low resistance and low resistance to high resistance transitions due to ion strikes. Next, a non-volatile sense amplifier based flip-flop architecture is proposed which can help make leakage power consumption negligible by allowing complete shutdown of power supply while retaining its output data in CBRAM devices. Reliability and energy consumption of the flip-flop circuit for different CBRAM low resistance levels and supply voltage values are analyzed and compared to CMOS designs. Possible extension of this architecture for threshold logic function computation using the CBRAM devices as re

  19. Longitudinal tracking of subpopulation dynamics and molecular changes during LNCaP cell castration and identification of inhibitors that could target the PSA-/lo castration-resistant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rycaj, Kiera; Cho, Eun Jeong; Liu, Xin; Chao, Hsueh-Ping; Liu, Bigang; Li, Qiuhui; Devkota, Ashwini K; Zhang, Dingxiao; Chen, Xin; Moore, John; Dalby, Kevin N; Tang, Dean G

    2016-03-22

    We have recently demonstrated that the undifferentiated PSA-/lo prostate cancer (PCa) cell population harbors self-renewing long-term tumor-propagating cells that are refractory to castration, thus representing a therapeutic target. Our goals here are, by using the same lineage-tracing reporter system, to track the dynamic changes of PSA-/lo and PSA+ cells upon castration in vitro, investigate the molecular changes accompanying persistent castration, and develop large numbers of PSA-/lo PCa cells for drug screening. To these ends, we treated LNCaP cells infected with the PSAP-GFP reporter with three regimens of castration, i.e., CDSS, CDSS plus bicalutamide, and MDV3100 continuously for up to ~21 months. We observed that in the first ~7 months, castration led to time-dependent increases in PSA-/lo cells, loss of AR and PSA expression, increased expression of cancer stem cell markers, and many other molecular changes. Meanwhile, castrated LNCaP cells became resistant to high concentrations of MDV3100, chemotherapeutic drugs, and other agents. However, targeted and medium-throughput library screening identified several kinase (e.g., IGF-1R, AKT, PI3K/mTOR, Syk, GSK3) inhibitors as well as the BCL2 inhibitor that could effectively sensitize the LNCaP-CRPC cells to killing. Of interest, LNCaP cells castrated for >7 months showed evidence of cyclic changes in AR and the mTOR/AKT signaling pathways potentially involving epigenetic mechanisms. These observations indicate that castration elicits numerous molecular changes and leads to enrichment of PSA-/lo PCa cells. The ability to generate large numbers of PSA-/lo PCa cells should allow future high-throughput screening to identify novel therapeutics that specifically target this population.

  20. Dynamics of Tectonic Plates

    CERN Document Server

    Pechersky, E; Sadowski, G; Yambartsev, A

    2014-01-01

    We suggest a model that describes a mutual dynamic of tectonic plates. The dynamic is a sort of stick-slip one which is modeled by a Markov random process. The process defines a microlevel of the dynamic. A macrolevel is obtained by a scaling limit which leads to a system of integro-differential equations which determines a kind of mean field systems. Conditions when Gutenberg-Richter empirical law are presented on the mean field level. These conditions are rather universal and do not depend on features of resistant forces.

  1. Anthelmintic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, P J

    1997-11-01

    Since the first reports of resistance to the broad spectrum anthelmintics were made some three decades ago, this phenomenon has changed from being considered merely as a parasitological curiosity to a state of industry crisis in certain livestock sectors. This extreme situation exists with the small ruminant industry of the tropical/sub-tropical region of southern Latin America where resistance to the entire broad spectrum anthelmintic arsenal now occurs. In contrast, the cattle industry does not appear to be threatened--or so it seems. Although field reports of resistance have been made to the range of broad spectrum anthelmintics in nematode parasites of cattle, it appears that the evolution of resistance in cattle parasites is not as dramatic as for sheep worms. However, one cannot remain confident that this state of affairs will remain static. Concern is shared amongst parasitologists that we have not looked closely enough. In regions of the world where internal parasites are considered a problem in cattle and drenching occurs frequently, no widespread surveys have been carried out. It appears that because of the very high costs and risks associated with taking a new active drug down the development track to marketing, that the pharmaceutical industry has, in general, turned away from this activity. By implication, the international small ruminant industry is too small for these companies to make the necessary investment. This begs two questions: What is the fate of the sheep (and goat) industries in those parts of the world where resistance is rampant and immediate ameliorative parasite control options are required? What will be the response if significant resistance is found in cattle parasites? There is a body of opinion which suggests that if resistance becomes an issue in the control of cattle parasites then the pharmaceutical industry will find it commercially attractive to re-enter the anthelmintic discovery and development business. This is based on the

  2. Sustainability transition dynamics: Towards overcoming policy resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gooyert, V. de; Rouwette, E.A.J.A.; Kranenburg, H.L. van; Freeman, R.E.; Breen, H.J. van

    2016-01-01

    Sustainability transitions receive major scholarly attention, often explicitly with the intention to develop policy recommendations aimed towards progressing such transitions. Despite these efforts, many implemented transition policies have not been able to meet expectations. This tendency of

  3. Nonlinear dynamics of resistive electrostatic drift waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsholm, Søren Bang; Michelsen, Poul; Pécseli, H.L.

    1999-01-01

    The evolution of weakly nonlinear electrostatic drift waves in an externally imposed strong homogeneous magnetic field is investigated numerically in three spatial dimensions. The analysis is based on a set of coupled, nonlinear equations, which are solved for an initial condition which is pertur......The evolution of weakly nonlinear electrostatic drift waves in an externally imposed strong homogeneous magnetic field is investigated numerically in three spatial dimensions. The analysis is based on a set of coupled, nonlinear equations, which are solved for an initial condition which...... is perturbed by a small amplitude incoherent wave-field. The initial evolution is exponential, following the growth of perturbations predicted by linear stability theory. The fluctuations saturate at relatively high amplitudes, by forming a pair of magnetic field aligned vortex-like structures of opposite...

  4. Dinâmica da resistência à penetração de um Latossolo Vermelho da Microrregião de Goiânia, GO Penetration resistance dynamics of a Dark Red Latosol of Microregion of Goiania, State of Goias, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo C. Oliveira

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo principal deste estudo é avaliar o efeito da umidade e da densidade do solo na dinâmica da resistência à penetração de um Latossolo Vermelho da Microrregião de Goiânia, GO. Foram amostradas: área sob pastejo rotacionado, na 1 Touceira e 2 Entre touceira; 3 Barreirão (área de renovação de pastagem; 4 Área sob Pivô Central; 5 Área sob Plantio Direto; 6 Mata. Realizaram-se, em cada área, testes de penetrometria em três diferentes teores de umidade no solo e se coletaram seis amostras não deformadas, nas profundidades de 0-5 e 20-30 cm em anéis volumétricos, para determinação da densidade do solo, capacidade de campo, volume total de poros, microporosidade e macroporosidade do solo. Os tratamentos afetaram, de forma diferenciada todos os atributos analisados; pelo teste de penetrometria, o diagnóstico mostrou-se eficiente quando acompanhado da análise de densidade do solo e da umidade; o Latossolo em estudo deve oferecer alguma restrição ao desenvolvimento das plantas cultivadas nas áreas sob pivô central e pastejo rotacionado, quando o solo se encontrar em baixas condições de umidade.This study aims to evaluate soil moisture and bulk density effects on penetration resistance dynamics of Dark Red Latosol, located in the Microregion of Goiânia, Goias. Area under rotating pasture were sampled 1 in lines and 2 between lines; 3 pasture renewal area; 4 area under Central Pivot; 5 area under no-tillage and 6 forest. Penetrometry tests were done for three different soil moistures, and six undisturbed soil samples were collected in layers of 0-5 and 20-30 cm for determination of bulk density, soil moisture at field capacity, total porosity, and micro and macro-porosity. Soil use and management affected in a differentiated way, all analyzed soil attributes; penetrometry diagnosis test was efficient when accompanied by bulk density and soil moisture analysis; the Dark Red Latosol studied appears to offer a

  5. Antibiotic Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Malene Plejdrup; Hoffmann, Tammy C; McCullough, Amanda R

    2015-01-01

    Numerous opportunities are available in primary care for alleviating the crisis of increasing antibiotic resistance. Preventing patients from developing an acute respiratory infection (ARI) will obviate any need for antibiotic use downstream. Hygiene measures such as physical barriers and hand...... will greatly improve the use of antibiotics for ARIs. However, used in concert, combinations are likely to enable clinicians and health care systems to implement the strategies that will reduce antimicrobial resistance in the future....... antibiotic prescribing are a major factor in the prescribing for ARIs. Professional interventions with educational components are effective, although they have modest effects, and are expensive. GPs' perceptions - that mistakenly assume as a default that patients want antibiotics for their ARIs - are often...

  6. Resistant starches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, D J; Kendall, C W

    2000-03-01

    Initially, it was hoped that resistant starches (ie, starches that enter the colon) would have clear advantages in the reduction of colon cancer risk and possibly the treatment of ulcerative colitis. Recent studies have confirmed the ability of resistant starch to increase fecal bulk, to increase the molar ratio of butyrate in relation to other short-chain fatty acids, and to dilute fecal bile acids. However, reduction in fecal ammonia, phenols, and N-nitroso compounds have not been achieved. At this point the picture from the standpoint of colon cancer risk reduction is not clear. Nevertheless, there is a fraction of what has been termed resistant starch (RS1), which enters the colon and acts as slowly digested, or lente, carbohydrate. Foods in this class are low glycemic index and have been shown to reduce the risk of chronic disease. They have been associated with systemic physiologic effects such as reduced postprandial insulin levels and higher high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Consumption of low glycemic index foods has been shown to be related to a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes has in turn been related to a higher risk of colon cancer, especially colon cancer deaths. If carbohydrate has a protective role in colon cancer prevention, it may lie in the systemic effects of low glycemic index foods. The colonic advantages of different carbohydrates, therefore, remain to be documented. However, there is reason for optimism about the possible health advantages of so-called resistant starches that are slowly digested in the small intestine.

  7. Dynamic expression of resistance genes during Cisplatin resistance process of ovarian can-cer%铂类耐药相关基因在卵巢癌顺铂耐药形成过程中表达量的动态变化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石丽君; 于红静; 李力; 王琪

    2013-01-01

    目的:了解卵巢癌患者在铂类治疗过程中产生获得性耐药相关基因表达动态变化的情况,为临床预后的预测及个体化治疗奠定理论基础。方法采用Benjamini-Hochberg(BH)法对源于TCGA数据库(The Cancer Genome Atlas)的256例敏感和耐药患者的卵巢癌全基因表达谱数据进行差异表达基因筛选。采用DAVID软件中的KEGG模块对筛选出的差异基因进行通路富集,筛选出P<0.05的通路,对筛选出的通路所包含的基因采用成组t检验找出差异显著的基因(P<0.05)。对筛选出的基因采用COREMINE工具进行文本挖掘,找出与多药耐药及肿瘤耐药存在线性相关的基因,将其与患者预后进行分析,确定存在差异显著的基因。采用实时荧光定量PCR法检测所筛选出的基因在裸鼠诱导耐药模型不同给药阶段的表达变化情况。结果 BH法共筛选出306个差异表达基因,其中上调基因110个,下调基因196个。DAVID软件的KEGG模块分别筛选出5条上调及4条下调通路,成组t检验筛选出有差异的基因共37个,其中上调基因18个,下调基因19个。COREMINE工具检索出与多药耐药及肿瘤耐药存在线性相关的上调基因为ITPA、IMPDH2、RPS7、PDE5A和PDE4D,下调基因为GNAS、CFTR、BUB3、PRKDC、RBL2、SMC1A、CALR、CCNE2及CHEK1。生存分析结果提示CALR及PRKDC基因的表达与患者生存时间有关,CALR和PRKDC基因高表达组的患者生存时间长于低表达组。qRT-PCR检测发现,CALR和PRKDC基因随顺铂注射次数增多,在SKOV3-GFP及SKOV3/DDP英肿瘤组织中的表达量逐渐降低。结论 CALR与PRKDC基因可能与卵巢癌铂类耐药及患者的预后密切相关,且随着耐药的产生,CALR和PRKDC基因的表达量逐渐降低。%Objective To study the dynamic expression of resistance genes during chemotherapy resistance process,so as to provide evidences for exploring reversal targets and

  8. Aspirin Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Mansour

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of adverse cardiovascular events despite aspirin use has established an interest in a possible resistance to the drug. Several definitions have been set and various laboratory testing modalities are available. This has led to a wide range of prevalence reports in different clinical entities. The etiologic mechanism has been related to clinical, genetic, and other miscellaneous factors. The clinical implications of this phenomenon are significant and warrant concern. Management strategies are currently limited to dosing alteration and introduction of other anitplatelet agents. However, these measures have not met the expected efficacy or safety.

  9. Insulin Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Benjamin Anderschou Holbech

    Insulin resistance (IR) is escalating with alarming pace and is no longer restricted to westernized countries. As a forerunner for some of the most serious threats to human health including metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular diseases, and type 2-diabetes, the need for new treatment modalities...... interventions. We further show that improving the inflammatory toning, using fish oil as fat source, protects mice against diet induced obesity and -inflammation while preserving insulin sensitivity, even in the absence of free fatty acid receptor 4. Conversely, HFD-induced intestinal dysbiosis is associated...

  10. Resistant hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armario, P; Oliveras, A; de la Sierra, A

    2013-11-01

    A 53 year old woman with hypercholesterolemia treated with statins, with no history of cardiovascular disease, was referred to the Hypertension and Vascular Risk Unit for management of hypertension resistant to 4 antihypertensive agents at full doses. The patient had obesity, with a body mass index of 36.3kg/m(2) and office blood pressure 162/102mm Hg. Physical examination showed no data of interest. glucose 120mg/dl, glycated Hb: 6.4%, albuminuria 68mg/g, kidney function and study of the renin angiotensin system and other biochemical parameters were normal. Echocardiography: left ventricular mass, 131g/m(2) (normal, <110g/m(2)). True resistant hypertension was confirmed by ambulatory monitoring of blood pressure during 24h (153/89mm Hg). Spironolactone treatment (25mg/day) was added and was well tolerated, with no change in renal function and kaliemia within normal (4.1mmol/l) following the treatment. After 8 weeks, blood pressure was well controlled: office blood pressure 132/86mm Hg and 24h-ambulatory blood pressure: 128/79mm Hg. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  11. Thermal resistance between amorphous silica nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fanhe; Elsahati, Muftah; Liu, Jin; Richards, Robert F.

    2017-05-01

    Nanoparticle-based materials have been used as thermal insulation in a variety of macroscale and microscale applications. In this work, we investigate the heat transfer between nanoparticles using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. We calculate the total thermal resistance and thermal boundary resistance between adjacent amorphous silica nanoparticles. Numerical results are compared to interparticle resistances determined from experimental measurements of heat transfer across packed silica nanoparticle beds. The thermal resistance between nanoparticles is shown to increase rapidly as the particle contact radius decreases. More significantly, the interparticle resistance depends strongly on the forces between particles, in particular, the presence or absence of chemical bonds between nanoparticles. In addition, the effect of interfacial force strength on thermal resistance increases as the nanoparticle diameter decreases. The simulations results are shown to be in good agreement with experimental results for 20 nm silica nanoparticles.

  12. Design of Blast Resistant Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. K. Gautam

    1997-04-01

    Full Text Available A shock blast resistant structure designed, developed and experimentally evaluated by the authors is described. We structure, capable of with standing dynamic loading (12 psi and a static pressure of 1.5 m earth cover due to blast or any other explosion, also gives protection against radiation, chemical and thermal hazards. Some results and details of analysis and experimentation are presented.

  13. Resistance welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels; Zhang, Wenqi; Rasmussen, Mogens H.

    2003-01-01

    Resistance welding comprises not only the well known spot welding process but also more complex projection welding operations, where excessive plastic deformation of the weld point may occur. This enables the production of complex geometries and material combinations, which are often not possible...... to weld by traditional spot welding operations. Such joining processes are, however, not simple to develop due to the large number of parameters involved. Development has traditionally been carried out by large experimental investigations, but the development of a numerical programme system has changed...... this enabling prediction of the welding performance in details. The paper describes the programme in short and gives examples on industrial applications. Finally investigations of causes for failure in a complex industrial joint of two dissimilar metals are carried out combining numerical modelling...

  14. Resistance welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels; Zhang, Wenqi; Rasmussen, Mogens H.

    2003-01-01

    this enabling prediction of the welding performance in details. The paper describes the programme in short and gives examples on industrial applications. Finally investigations of causes for failure in a complex industrial joint of two dissimilar metals are carried out combining numerical modelling......Resistance welding comprises not only the well known spot welding process but also more complex projection welding operations, where excessive plastic deformation of the weld point may occur. This enables the production of complex geometries and material combinations, which are often not possible...... to weld by traditional spot welding operations. Such joining processes are, however, not simple to develop due to the large number of parameters involved. Development has traditionally been carried out by large experimental investigations, but the development of a numerical programme system has changed...

  15. [A dynamic study of drug resistance in populations of fecal "Escherichia coli" from axenic mice, fed chlortetracycline continuously and associated with flora from infant, calf and piglet (author's transl)].

    OpenAIRE

    Corpet, D E

    1980-01-01

    International audience; In order to prove the effect of low doses of antibiotics on the level of drug resistance of the gastrointestinal flora, gnotoxenic mice, harbouring various microflora from newborn calf, piglet or infant, were given continuously water containing 20 microgram/ml chlortetracycline. Control mice, harbouring the same flora, were maintained as well in isolators. Sensible and resistant fecal Escherichia coli were counted daily. Results showed that even before the introduction...

  16. Density-dependent resistance of the gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar, to its nucleopolyhedrovirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    James R. Reilly; Ann E. Hajek

    2007-01-01

    The processes controlling disease resistance can strongly influence the population dynamics of insect outbreaks. Evidence that disease resistance is density-dependent is accumulating, but the exact form of this relationship is highly variable from species to species.

  17. Insulin Resistance and Mitochondrial Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Franquesa, Alba; Patti, Mary-Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Insulin resistance precedes and predicts the onset of type 2 diabetes (T2D) in susceptible humans, underscoring its important role in the complex pathogenesis of this disease. Insulin resistance contributes to multiple tissue defects characteristic of T2D, including reduced insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in insulin-sensitive tissues, increased hepatic glucose production, increased lipolysis in adipose tissue, and altered insulin secretion. Studies of individuals with insulin resistance, both with established T2D and high-risk individuals, have consistently demonstrated a diverse array of defects in mitochondrial function (i.e., bioenergetics, biogenesis and dynamics). However, it remains uncertain whether mitochondrial dysfunction is primary (critical initiating defect) or secondary to the subtle derangements in glucose metabolism, insulin resistance, and defective insulin secretion present early in the course of disease development. In this chapter, we will present the evidence linking mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance, and review the potential for mitochondrial targets as a therapeutic approach for T2D.

  18. Mechanisms of drug resistance: quinolone resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, David C; Jacoby, George A

    2015-09-01

    Quinolone antimicrobials are synthetic and widely used in clinical medicine. Resistance emerged with clinical use and became common in some bacterial pathogens. Mechanisms of resistance include two categories of mutation and acquisition of resistance-conferring genes. Resistance mutations in one or both of the two drug target enzymes, DNA gyrase and DNA topoisomerase IV, are commonly in a localized domain of the GyrA and ParE subunits of the respective enzymes and reduce drug binding to the enzyme-DNA complex. Other resistance mutations occur in regulatory genes that control the expression of native efflux pumps localized in the bacterial membrane(s). These pumps have broad substrate profiles that include quinolones as well as other antimicrobials, disinfectants, and dyes. Mutations of both types can accumulate with selection pressure and produce highly resistant strains. Resistance genes acquired on plasmids can confer low-level resistance that promotes the selection of mutational high-level resistance. Plasmid-encoded resistance is due to Qnr proteins that protect the target enzymes from quinolone action, one mutant aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme that also modifies certain quinolones, and mobile efflux pumps. Plasmids with these mechanisms often encode additional antimicrobial resistances and can transfer multidrug resistance that includes quinolones. Thus, the bacterial quinolone resistance armamentarium is large.

  19. Detecting the Resistivity Distribution of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Concrete by Electrical Resistance Tomography Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Dongliang; Li Zhuoqiu; Song Xianhui; Lü Yong

    2006-01-01

    According to the principle of electrical resistance tomography (ERT), the resistivity distribution of the carbon fiber reinforced concrete (CFRC) in the sensing field can be measured by injecting exciting current and measuring the voltage on the sensor electrode arrays installed on the surface of the object Therefore, measurement of the resistivity distribution of CFRC is divided into first measuring the boundary conditions and then inversely computing the resistivity distribution. To reach this goal, an ERT system was constructed, which is composed of a sensor array unit, a data acquisition unit and an image reconstruction unit. Simulations of static ERT was performed on set-ups with many objects spread in a homogeneous background, and a simulation of dynamic ERT was also done on a rectangular board, the resistivity of which was changed within a small domain of it. Then, the resistivity distribution of a CFRC sample with a circlar hole as the target was detected by the ERT system. Simulation and experimental results show that the reconstructed ERT image reflects the resistivity distribution or the resistivity change of CFRC structure well. Especially, a small change in resistivity can be identified from the reconstructed images in the simulation of dynamic ERT images.

  20. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Veterinary Safety & Health Antimicrobial Resistance Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... produced a nine-minute animation explaining how antimicrobial resistance both emerges and proliferates among bacteria. Over time, ...

  1. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Veterinary Home Animal & Veterinary Safety & Health Antimicrobial Resistance Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it ... Veterinary Medicine is cited as the corporate author. Animation Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance (WMV - 19.2MB) 9: ...

  2. Wrestling with Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartzell, Gary

    1996-01-01

    Discusses reasons for and methods to defuse classroom teachers' resistance to change in the workplace. Suggestions include planning for resistance, acknowledging peoples' concerns and addressing them specifically, avoiding criticism of current methods, individualizing resistance reduction, and providing ongoing support. (JKP)

  3. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Veterinary Home Animal & Veterinary Safety & Health Antimicrobial Resistance Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it ... Veterinary Medicine is cited as the corporate author. Animation Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance (WMV - 19.2MB) 9: ...

  4. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Animal & Veterinary Safety & Health Antimicrobial Resistance Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... CVM) produced a nine-minute animation explaining how antimicrobial resistance both emerges and proliferates among bacteria. Over time, ...

  5. Dynamic Logics of Dynamical Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Platzer, André

    2012-01-01

    We survey dynamic logics for specifying and verifying properties of dynamical systems, including hybrid systems, distributed hybrid systems, and stochastic hybrid systems. A dynamic logic is a first-order modal logic with a pair of parametrized modal operators for each dynamical system to express necessary or possible properties of their transition behavior. Due to their full basis of first-order modal logic operators, dynamic logics can express a rich variety of system properties, including safety, controllability, reactivity, liveness, and quantified parametrized properties, even about relations between multiple dynamical systems. In this survey, we focus on some of the representatives of the family of differential dynamic logics, which share the ability to express properties of dynamical systems having continuous dynamics described by various forms of differential equations. We explain the dynamical system models, dynamic logics of dynamical systems, their semantics, their axiomatizations, and proof calcul...

  6. Resistance to antibiotics

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    The antibiotics represent the most important therapeutic arsenal in the fight against pathogen microorganisms. Even in the beginning of their use, there was registered bacterial resistance, phenomenon thatbecame an alarming subject in the last decades. There are some types of resistance to antibiotics that are influenced by many factors. The resistance term can be used as microbiological resistance and clinical resistance. The resistance to antibiotics can be a natural phenomenon or a gained ...

  7. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... More in Antimicrobial Resistance National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring ... Note: If you need help accessing information in different file formats, see Instructions for Downloading ...

  8. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... More in Antimicrobial Resistance National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring ... Note: If you need help accessing information in different file formats, see Instructions for Downloading ...

  9. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resistance National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System 2014 NARMS ... Note: If you need help accessing information in different file formats, see Instructions for Downloading ...

  10. Antibiotic resistance in Chlamydiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoz, Kelsi M; Rockey, Daniel D

    2010-09-01

    There are few documented reports of antibiotic resistance in Chlamydia and no examples of natural and stable antibiotic resistance in strains collected from humans. While there are several reports of clinical isolates exhibiting resistance to antibiotics, these strains either lost their resistance phenotype in vitro, or lost viability altogether. Differences in procedures for chlamydial culture in the laboratory, low recovery rates of clinical isolates and the unknown significance of heterotypic resistance observed in culture may interfere with the recognition and interpretation of antibiotic resistance. Although antibiotic resistance has not emerged in chlamydiae pathogenic to humans, several lines of evidence suggest they are capable of expressing significant resistant phenotypes. The adept ability of chlamydiae to evolve to antibiotic resistance in vitro is demonstrated by contemporary examples of mutagenesis, recombination and genetic transformation. The isolation of tetracycline-resistant Chlamydia suis strains from pigs also emphasizes their adaptive ability to acquire antibiotic resistance genes when exposed to significant selective pressure.

  11. Effect of the microstructure in the dynamic fracture resistance in a high strength low alloy steel; Efeito da microestrutura na resistencia a fratura dinamica de um aco de alta resistencia e baixa liga

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elias, Carlos N.; Romero, Alfonso W. [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Secao de Engenharia e Ciencia dos Materiais; Rios, Paulo R. [Pontificia Univ. Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    1990-12-31

    In this work, low-alloyed high resistance steel proof samples were heated under different conditions and submitted to a explosion-induced sheet impact. After this assay, the behaviour of the materials submitted to high deformation rates may change, depending on the defects and micro-crack propagation. 11 figs., 2 tabs., 3 refs.

  12. Effect of ultraviolet illumination on metal oxide resistive memory

    KAUST Repository

    Duran Retamal, Jose Ramon

    2014-12-22

    We investigate the photoelectrical and resistive switching properties of Pt/ZnO/Pt capacitor operated in unipolar mode under ultraviolet (UV) illumination. The oxygen photodesorption under UV illumination explains the photoconduction observed in initial and high resistance states. Meanwhile, oxygen readsorption at surface-related defects justifies the different photoresponses dynamics in both states. Finally, UV illumination significantly reduces the variations of resistance in high resistance state, set voltage and reset voltage by 58%, 33%, and 25%, respectively, stabilizing Pt/ZnO/Pt capacitor. Our findings in improved switching uniformity via UV light give physical insight into designing resistive memory devices.

  13. Numerical simulation of an amphibious vehicle sailing resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhangxia Guo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to evaluate the waterborne performance of amphibious vehicle, based on Fluid Dynamics and principle of marine mechanics related knowledge, the resistances and viscous flow field of amphibious vehicle in different headway were numericaly simulated by solving Navier-Stokes equatlons with the turbulence model. we obtained the result of frictiona resistance coefficientresidual resistance coefficient and running resistance coefficient,thus we can calculate its total resistances. the reliability of computing methed was validated by comparing the calculation results with the test data.

  14. 鲍曼不动杆菌连续12年的感染分布及耐药性动态变迁%Dynamic changes of drug resistance and infectious distribution of Acinetobacter baumannii for twelve successive years

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周秀珍; 刘建华; 王艳玲; 张智杰; 孙继梅; 刘勇

    2011-01-01

    Objective To understand the distribution characteristics and drug resistance of Acinetobacter baumannii in clinical specimens. Methods The result of drug susceptibility and clinical distribution of Acinetobacter baumannii from Jan 1999 to Dec 2010 in our hospital were analyzed and studied retrospectively. Acinetobacter baumannii was identified by API and VITEK2 system, and its antimicrobial resistance was determined by Kirby - Bauer method . The antimicrobial resistance rates were analyzed by WHONET 5. 4 software. Results The isolation rate and the resistance rate of Acinetobacter baumannii to 19 kinds of drugs appeared increasing trend during from 1999 to 2010. Acinetobacter baumannii strains were mainly distributed at 1CU wards and respiratory department , the same as the multi - drug resistance and pan - drug resistance strains. The major strains was isolated from sputum, the older the age, the higher the appearing rate. Conclusion Acinetobacter baumannii has severe drug resistance, the isolation rate of Acinetobacter baumannii is increasing and the resistance rate to drugs appears increasing trend, the number of multi - drug resistant and pan - drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii had been increased sharply, we should enhance to this kind of isolates detection, control the A. Baumannii colonization and spread in hospital in order to prevent the outbreak and epidemic of nosocomial infections.%目的 了解本院鲍曼不动杆菌的临床分布及耐药性变迁情况.方法 回顾性分析1999年1月至2010年12月本院临床标本中分离的鲍曼不动杆菌的临床感染特点及其药敏结果;用API鉴定系统及VITEK2系统进行细菌鉴定;用K-B纸片扩散法进行药敏试验;用WHONET5.4软件分析鲍曼不动杆菌的耐药性.结果 鲍曼不动杆菌的临床分离率及对临床常用的19种抗菌药物耐药率,总体呈上升趋势;其感染主要发生在重症监护病房(ICU)和呼吸内科;鲍曼不动杆菌的多重耐

  15. Deciphering the evolution of herbicide resistance in weeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Délye, Christophe; Jasieniuk, Marie; Le Corre, Valérie

    2013-11-01

    Resistance to herbicides in arable weeds is increasing rapidly worldwide and threatening global food security. Resistance has now been reported to all major herbicide modes of action despite the development of resistance management strategies in the 1990s. We review here recent advances in understanding the genetic bases and evolutionary drivers of herbicide resistance that highlight the complex nature of selection for this adaptive trait. Whereas early studied cases of resistance were highly herbicide-specific and largely under monogenic control, cases of greatest concern today generally involve resistance to multiple modes of action, are under polygenic control, and are derived from pre-existing stress response pathways. Although 'omics' approaches should enable unraveling the genetic bases of complex resistances, the appearance, selection, and spread of herbicide resistance in weed populations can only be fully elucidated by focusing on evolutionary dynamics and implementing integrative modeling efforts. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Facts about Antibiotic Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cost References Español: Datos breves Facts about Antibiotic Resistance Antibiotic resistance is one of the world’s most pressing public ... antibiotic use is a key strategy to control antibiotic resistance. Antibiotic resistance in children and older adults are ...

  17. Genetic control of a cytochrome P450 metabolism-based herbicide resistance mechanism in Lolium rigidum

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    The dynamics of herbicide resistance evolution in plants are influenced by many factors, especially the biochemical and genetic basis of resistance. Herbicide resistance can be endowed by enhanced rates of herbicide metabolism because of the activity of cytochrome P450 enzymes, although in weedy plants the genetic control of cytochrome P450-endowed herbicide resistance is poorly understood. In this study we have examined the genetic control of P450 metabolism-based herbicide resistance in a w...

  18. [Change in drug resistance of Staphylococcus aureus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yan; Liu, Yan; Luo, Yan-Ping; Liu, Chang-Ting

    2013-11-01

    To analyze the change in drug resistance of Staphylococcus aureus (SAU) in the PLA general hospital from January 2008 to December 2012, and to provide solid evidence to support the rational use of antibiotics for clinical applications. The SAU strains isolated from clinical samples in the hospital were collected and subjected to the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion test. The results were assessed based on the 2002 American National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS) guidelines. SAU strains were mainly isolated from sputum, urine, blood and wound excreta and distributed in penology, neurology wards, orthopedics and surgery ICU wards. Except for glycopeptide drugs, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) had a higher drug resistance rate than those of the other drugs and had significantly more resistance than methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) (P resistance, we discovered a gradual increase in drug resistance to fourteen test drugs during the last five years. Drug resistance rate of SAU stayed at a higher level over the last five years; moreover, the detection ratio of MRSA keeps rising year by year. It is crucial for physicians to use antibiotics rationally and monitor the change in drug resistance in a dynamic way.

  19. Strain Engineering of Kapitza Resistance in Few-Layer Graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Jie; Walther, Jens Honore; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate through molecular dynamics simulations that the Kapitza resistance in few-layer graphene (FLG) can be controlled by applying mechanical strain. For unstrained FLG, the Kapitza resistance decreases with the increase of thickness and reaches an asymptotic value of 6 × 10–10 m2K/W at ...

  20. Answers to the Gaze: A Genealogical Poaching of Resistances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, Ronald F.

    1996-01-01

    States that how discourse plays a central role in social relations/power dynamics is better understood because of M. Foucault's insights on power--central to Foucault's theory concerning the power-knowledge-discourse dialectic is that for every force there is resistance. Offers a new genealogy, which better suggests how resistance might appear in…

  1. Consolidating and Exploring Antibiotic Resistance Gene Data Resources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xavier, Basil Britto; Das, Anupam J.; Cochrane, Guy

    2016-01-01

    The unrestricted use of antibiotics has resulted in rapid acquisition of antibiotic resistance (AR) and spread of multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacterial pathogens. With the advent of next-generation sequencing technologies and their application in understanding MDR pathogen dynamics, it has become...

  2. Random telegraph noise and resistance switching analysis of oxide based resistive memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Shinhyun; Yang, Yuchao; Lu, Wei

    2013-12-01

    Resistive random access memory (RRAM) devices (e.g. ``memristors'') are widely believed to be a promising candidate for future memory and logic applications. Although excellent performance has been reported, the nature of resistance switching is still under extensive debate. In this study, we perform systematic investigation of the resistance switching mechanism in a TaOx based RRAM through detailed noise analysis, and show that the resistance switching from high-resistance to low-resistance is accompanied by a semiconductor-to-metal transition mediated by the accumulation of oxygen-vacancies in the conduction path. Specifically, pronounced random-telegraph noise (RTN) with values up to 25% was observed in the device high-resistance state (HRS) but not in the low-resistance state (LRS). Through time-domain and temperature dependent analysis, we show that the RTN effect shares the same origin as the resistive switching effects, and both can be traced to the (re)distribution of oxygen vacancies (VOs). From noise and transport analysis we further obtained the density of states and average distance of the VOs at different resistance states, and developed a unified model to explain the conduction in both the HRS and the LRS and account for the resistance switching effects in these devices. Significantly, it was found that even though the conduction channel area is larger in the HRS, during resistive switching a localized region gains significantly higher VO and dominates the conduction process. These findings reveal the complex dynamics involved during resistive switching and will help guide continued optimization in the design and operation of this important emerging device class.Resistive random access memory (RRAM) devices (e.g. ``memristors'') are widely believed to be a promising candidate for future memory and logic applications. Although excellent performance has been reported, the nature of resistance switching is still under extensive debate. In this study, we

  3. Persistence, resistance, resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsadka, Maayan

    Sound cannot travel in a vacuum, physically or socially. The ways in which sound operates are a result of acoustic properties, and the ways by which it is considered to be music are a result of social constructions. Therefore, music is always political, regardless of its content: the way it is performed and composed; the choice of instrumentation, notation, tuning; the medium of its distribution; its inherent hierarchy and power dynamics, and more. My compositional praxis makes me less interested in defining a relationship between music and politics than I am in erasing---or at least blurring---the borders between them. In this paper I discuss the aesthetics of resonance and echo in their metaphorical, physical, social, and musical manifestations. Also discussed is a political aesthetic of resonance, manifested through protest chants. I transcribe and analyze common protest chants from around the world, categorizing and unifying them as universal crowd-mobilizing rhythms. These ideas are explored musically in three pieces. Sumud: Rhetoric of Resistance in Three Movements, for two pianos and two percussion players, is a musical interpretation of the political/social concept of sumud, an Arabic word that literally means "steadfastness" and represents Palestinian non-violent resistance. The piece is based on common protest rhythms and uses the acoustic properties inherent to the instruments. The second piece, Three Piano Studies, extends some of the musical ideas and techniques used in Sumud, and explores the acoustic properties and resonance of the piano. The final set of pieces is part of my Critical Mess Music Project. These are site-specific musical works that attempt to blur the boundaries between audience, performers and composer, in part by including people without traditional musical training in the process of music making. These pieces use the natural structure and resonance of an environment, in this case, locations on the UCSC campus, and offer an active

  4. Durable strategies to deploy plant resistance in agricultural landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabre, Frédéric; Rousseau, Elsa; Mailleret, Ludovic; Moury, Benoit

    2012-03-01

    The deployment of resistant crops often leads to the emergence of resistance-breaking pathogens that suppress the yield benefit provided by the resistance. Here, we theoretically explored how farmers' main leverages (resistant cultivar choice, resistance deployment strategy, landscape planning and cultural practices) can be best combined to achieve resistance durability while minimizing yield losses as a result of plant viruses. Assuming a gene-for-gene type of interaction, virus epidemics are modelled in a landscape composed of a mosaic of resistant and susceptible fields, subjected to seasonality, and a reservoir hosting viruses year-round. The model links the genetic and the epidemiological processes, shaping at nested scales the demogenetic dynamics of viruses. The choice of the resistance gene (characterized by the equilibrium frequency of the resistance-breaking virus at mutation-selection balance in a susceptible plant) is the most influential leverage of action. Our results showed that optimal strategies of resistance deployment range from 'mixture' (where susceptible and resistant cultivars coexist) to 'pure' strategies (with only resistant cultivar) depending on the resistance characteristics and the epidemiological context (epidemic incidence and landscape connectivity). We demonstrate and discuss gaps concerning virus epidemiology across the agro-ecological interface that must be filled to achieve sustainable disease management.

  5. Study on resistance dynamic changes of Klebsiella pneumonia and Acinetobacter baumannii and differences among different specimens%肺炎克雷伯菌和鲍曼不动杆菌耐药性的动态变化及在不同标本间的差异性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张贻荣; 苏银凤

    2015-01-01

    目的::研究肺炎克雷伯菌和鲍曼不动杆菌耐药性的动态变化及在不同标本间的差异性。方法:选择收集的血液、胸水、痰、尿液等各类标本。通过药敏试验和细菌分离,对可疑菌落进行鉴定。结果:鲍曼不动杆菌的临床分离株数在3年内呈现出逐年增加的趋势,抗菌药物的耐药率表现为下降的趋势;肺炎克雷伯菌的临床分离株数在3年内呈现出逐年增加的趋势,抗菌药物的耐药率表现为下降的趋势, ICU和呼吸内科标本中分离的肺炎克雷伯菌和鲍曼不动杆菌耐药性均有明显的差异(P<0.05)。结论:肺炎克雷伯菌和鲍曼不动杆菌耐药性因不同的情况而出现动态变化,以及在不同标本间也存在差异。%Objective:To investigate resistance dynamic changes of Klebsiella pneumonia and Acinetobacter baumannii, and difference among different specimens. Methods:All kinds of specimens were selected, including blood, pleural fluid, sputum, urine and the like. Through the drug sensitive test and bacteria isolation, the suspected colonies were identified. Results:The clinical sepa-rated Acinetobacter baumannii strains and Klebsiella pneumonia strains increased year by year in the three years;however, their antibi-otic resistances decreased year by year in the three years. There were significant differences in the resistances of the specimens of the ICU and department of respiratory medicine (P<0. 05). Conclusions:Klebsiella pneumonia and Acinetobacter baumannii resistances will be dynamically changed because of different conditions, and could be different among different specimens.

  6. Dynamical Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Huimin

    The following sections are included: * Definition of Dynamical Languages * Distinct Excluded Blocks * Definition and Properties * L and L″ in Chomsky Hierarchy * A Natural Equivalence Relation * Symbolic Flows * Symbolic Flows and Dynamical Languages * Subshifts of Finite Type * Sofic Systems * Graphs and Dynamical Languages * Graphs and Shannon-Graphs * Transitive Languages * Topological Entropy

  7. Resistive MHD jet simulations with large resistivity

    CERN Document Server

    Cemeljic, Miljenko; Vlahakis, Nektarios; Tsinganos, Kanaris

    2009-01-01

    Axisymmetric resistive MHD simulations for radially self-similar initial conditions are performed, using the NIRVANA code. The magnetic diffusivity could occur in outflows above an accretion disk, being transferred from the underlying disk into the disk corona by MHD turbulence (anomalous turbulent diffusivity), or as a result of ambipolar diffusion in partially ionized flows. We introduce, in addition to the classical magnetic Reynolds number Rm, which measures the importance of resistive effects in the induction equation, a new number Rb, which measures the importance of the resistive effects in the energy equation. We find two distinct regimes of solutions in our simulations. One is the low-resistivity regime, in which results do not differ much from ideal-MHD solutions. In the high-resistivity regime, results seem to show some periodicity in time-evolution, and depart significantly from the ideal-MHD case. Whether this departure is caused by numerical or physical reasons is of considerable interest for nu...

  8. Dynamic hardness of metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xuecheng

    Dynamic hardness (Pd) of 22 different pure metals and alloys having a wide range of elastic modulus, static hardness, and crystal structure were measured in a gas pulse system. The indentation contact diameter with an indenting sphere and the radius (r2) of curvature of the indentation were determined by the curve fitting of the indentation profile data. r 2 measured by the profilometer was compared with that calculated from Hertz equation in both dynamic and static conditions. The results indicated that the curvature change due to elastic recovery after unloading is approximately proportional to the parameters predicted by Hertz equation. However, r 2 is less than the radius of indenting sphere in many cases which is contradictory to Hertz analysis. This discrepancy is believed due to the difference between Hertzian and actual stress distributions underneath the indentation. Factors which influence indentation elastic recovery were also discussed. It was found that Tabor dynamic hardness formula always gives a lower value than that directly from dynamic hardness definition DeltaE/V because of errors mainly from Tabor's rebound equation and the assumption that dynamic hardness at the beginning of rebound process (Pr) is equal to kinetic energy change of an impact sphere over the formed crater volume (Pd) in the derivation process for Tabor's dynamic hardness formula. Experimental results also suggested that dynamic to static hardness ratio of a material is primarily determined by its crystal structure and static hardness. The effects of strain rate and temperature rise on this ratio were discussed. A vacuum rotating arm apparatus was built to measure Pd at 70, 127, and 381 mum sphere sizes, these results exhibited that Pd is highly depended on the sphere size due to the strain rate effects. P d was also used to substitute for static hardness to correlate with abrasion and erosion resistance of metals and alloys. The particle size effects observed in erosion were

  9. Modeling resistance to genetic control of insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alphey, Nina; Bonsall, Michael B; Alphey, Luke

    2011-02-07

    The sterile insect technique is an area-wide pest control method that reduces pest populations by releasing mass-reared sterile insects which compete for mates with wild insects. Modern molecular tools have created possibilities for improving and extending the sterile insect technique. As with any new insect control method, questions arise about potential resistance. Genetic RIDL(®)(1) (Release of Insects carrying a Dominant Lethal) technology is a proposed modification of the technique, releasing insects that are homozygous for a repressible dominant lethal genetic construct rather than being sterilized by irradiation. Hypothetical resistance to the lethal mechanism is a potential threat to RIDL strategies' effectiveness. Using population genetic and population dynamic models, we assess the circumstances under which monogenic biochemically based resistance could have a significant impact on the effectiveness of releases for population control. We assume that released insects would be homozygous susceptible to the lethal genetic construct and therefore releases would have a built-in element of resistance dilution. We find that this effect could prevent or limit the spread of resistance to RIDL constructs; the outcomes are subject to competing selective forces deriving from the fitness properties of resistance and the release ratio. Resistance that is spreading and capable of having a significant detrimental impact on population reduction is identifiable, signaling in advance a need for mitigating action.

  10. Antibiotic / Antimicrobial Resistance Glossary

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What Everyone Should Know What You Can Do Antibiotic Resistance Q&As Fast Facts Antibiotics Quiz Glossary For ... Pharmacists Continuing Education & Curriculum Opportunities Weighing in on Antibiotic Resistance Improving Prescribing Core Elements of Outpatient Antibiotic Stewardship ...

  11. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... showing how bacterial antimicrobial resistance can develop and spread. All FDA CVM produced material may be copied, ... Displays About NARMS Partners in Antibiotic Resistance and Food Safety Bacteria Tested NARMS at Work Meetings and ...

  12. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... how antimicrobial resistance both emerges and proliferates among bacteria. Over time, the use of antimicrobial drugs will result in the development of resistant strains of bacteria, complicating clinician's efforts to select the appropriate antimicrobial ...

  13. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... how antimicrobial resistance both emerges and proliferates among bacteria. Over time, the use of antimicrobial drugs will result in the development of resistant strains of bacteria, complicating clinician's efforts to select the appropriate antimicrobial ...

  14. Resistance to Powdery Mildews

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siwoszek, Agnieszka Izabela

    in majority of them. Resistance to barley powdery mildew in the field is controlled by use of resistant varieties in a combination with fungicides. Early disease management is crucial for effective control. Yet, the pathogen commonly develops fungicide resistance due to simple point mutations. Several studies...... investigated reduced fitness of plants as a cost of resistance to pathogens. In case of barley powdery mildew, most common resistance (mlo) is linked to a higher susceptibility to other pathogens and spontaneous necrosis that leads to yield reduction. Thus, there is a clear need for alternative methods of crop...... protection. In the present study, I provide an overview of the current knowledge about plant pathogens and plant disease resistance. I use Arabidopsis as a model to investigate the mechanism of non-host resistance, presumed to be the most durable and broad-spectrum form of resistance. I attempt to determine...

  15. Resistance to Linezolid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vester, Birte; Ntokou, Eleni

    2017-01-01

    Linezolid is an antimicrobial agent that binds to the bacterial ribosome and thereby inhibits protein synthesis. Soon after its release as a clinical drug, it became clear that bacteria could become resistant to linezolid. The resistance mechanisms are mainly causing alteration of the drug target...... site, but probably efflux might also play a role. The resistance is still rare in surveillance studies, but outbreaks of resistant clones from hospitals have been observed. So far the main mechanisms of resistance are occurrence of mutations in ribosomal genes or obtaining plasmids with a gene coding...... for a methyltransferase providing resistance. The most obvious way to avoid resistance may be development of derivatives of linezolid overcoming the known resistance mechanisms....

  16. Antibiotic resistance of acinetobacter baumannii isolated from 2007 to 2009:a dynamic analysis%2007-2009年鲍氏不动杆菌的耐药动态分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王飞; 俞建; 严伟

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To monitor drug resistance of Acinetobacter baumannii in hospital from 2007 to 2009 in order to provide evidence to proper use antibacterial drug in clinics. METHODS A. baumannii isolates were collected from 2007 to 2009. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed by K-B method. RESULTS The isolating rate of A. baumannii from 2007 to 2009 was 4. 86%, 4. 98% and 5. 12%, respectively. There was a elevated tendency of the resistance rates to common antibacterials in A. baumannii during the past3a. The resistance rates of A. baumannii to cefoperazone-sulbactam and tobramycin were less than 50%, the others were more than 50. 00%. The increasing resistance rates of ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin cefoperazone-sulbactam were very quickly. The resistance rates of antibacterials added β-lactamase inhibitors were lower than that without β-lactamase inhibitors. The sensitivity of A. baumannii to imipenem was decreased. CONCLUSION To prevent the A. baumannii infection outbreak, it is very important to monitor the drug sensitive test of bacteria and advocate the reasonable medication before beginning the treatment of infection caused by A. baumannii.%目的 监测医院临床标本鲍氏不动杆菌的耐药情况,指导临床合理用药. 方法 回顾性调查2007-2009年从患者不同标本分离的鲍氏不动杆菌,采用K-B纸片扩散法对常用的抗菌药物进行耐药动态分析. 结果 鲍氏不动杆菌3年检出率分别为4.86%、4.98%、5.12%;对常用抗菌药物的耐药率总体呈上升趋势,其中头孢哌酮/舒巴坦和妥布霉素的耐药率最低,3年来均保持<50.00%,其他药物的耐药率均有>50.00%的现象;头孢曲松、环丙沙星、头孢哌酮/舒巴坦的耐药率上升最快;加酶抑制剂的抗菌药物的耐药率相对较低;亚胺培南的敏感度已下降. 结论 动态监测鲍氏不动杆菌的耐药谱变化,及时调整治疗方案,有助于有效减少和控制鲍氏不动杆菌引起的医院感染.

  17. Resisting Organizational Change

    OpenAIRE

    Gunnar Andersson

    2015-01-01

    We are continuously reminded of how change induces controversy and resistance, regardless of support. We repeatedly experience resistance in difficulties of implementation, little progress, and poor results, rather than increased productivity as anticipated. In a detailed account of how change plays out, a mosaic of what resistance looks like emerges. The picture is both familiar and absolutely concrete, and challenges the structural assumptions and dichotomies on support and resistance in an...

  18. Overcoming resistance to change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, L

    1993-01-01

    The pace of change in health care organizations challenges nursing administrators at all levels of management to be effective change agents. As resistance is an inevitable element in the process of planned change, inclusion of interventions to overcome resistance is critical to the change agent role. The author presents five theoretically-based strategies for reducing the levels of resistance to planned change.

  19. Effective graph resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellens, W.; Spieksma, F.M.; Mieghem, P. van; Jamakovic, A.; Kooij, R.E.

    2011-01-01

    This paper studies an interesting graph measure that we call the effective graph resistance. The notion of effective graph resistance is derived from the field of electric circuit analysis where it is defined as the accumulated effective resistance between all pairs of vertices. The objective of the

  20. Resisting Mind Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Susan M.; Zimbardo, Philip G.

    1980-01-01

    Provides conceptual analyses of mind control techniques along with practical advice on how to resist these techniques. The authors stress that effective mind control stems more from everyday social relations than from exotic technological gimmicks. Suggestions are given for resisting persuasion, resisting systems, and challenging the system.…

  1. Antibiotic resistance reservoirs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versluis, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    One of the major threats to human health in the 21st century is the emergence of pathogenic bacteria that are resistant to multiple antibiotics, thereby limiting treatment options. An important route through which pathogens become resistant is via acquisition of resistance genes from environmental a

  2. Antibiotic resistance reservoirs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versluis, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    One of the major threats to human health in the 21st century is the emergence of pathogenic bacteria that are resistant to multiple antibiotics, thereby limiting treatment options. An important route through which pathogens become resistant is via acquisition of resistance genes from environmental

  3. DIRProt: a computational approach for discriminating insecticide resistant proteins from non-resistant proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meher, Prabina Kumar; Sahu, Tanmaya Kumar; Banchariya, Anjali; Rao, Atmakuri Ramakrishna

    2017-03-24

    also been developed for computational prediction of insecticide resistant proteins, which is accessible at http://cabgrid.res.in:8080/dirprot/ . The proposed approach is believed to supplement the efforts needed to develop dynamic insecticides in wet-lab by targeting the insecticide resistant proteins.

  4. HIV-1 drug resistance and resistance testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clutter, Dana S; Jordan, Michael R; Bertagnolio, Silvia; Shafer, Robert W

    2016-12-01

    The global scale-up of antiretroviral (ARV) therapy (ART) has led to dramatic reductions in HIV-1 mortality and incidence. However, HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) poses a potential threat to the long-term success of ART and is emerging as a threat to the elimination of AIDS as a public health problem by 2030. In this review we describe the genetic mechanisms, epidemiology, and management of HIVDR at both individual and population levels across diverse economic and geographic settings. To describe the genetic mechanisms of HIVDR, we review the genetic barriers to resistance for the most commonly used ARVs and describe the extent of cross-resistance between them. To describe the epidemiology of HIVDR, we summarize the prevalence and patterns of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) and acquired drug resistance (ADR) in both high-income and low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). We also review to two categories of HIVDR with important public health relevance: (i) pre-treatment drug resistance (PDR), a World Health Organization-recommended HIVDR surveillance metric and (ii) and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP)-related drug resistance, a type of ADR that can impact clinical outcomes if present at the time of treatment initiation. To summarize the implications of HIVDR for patient management, we review the role of genotypic resistance testing and treatment practices in both high-income and LMIC settings. In high-income countries where drug resistance testing is part of routine care, such an understanding can help clinicians prevent virological failure and accumulation of further HIVDR on an individual level by selecting the most efficacious regimens for their patients. Although there is reduced access to diagnostic testing and to many ARVs in LMIC, understanding the scientific basis and clinical implications of HIVDR is useful in all regions in order to shape appropriate surveillance, inform treatment algorithms, and manage difficult cases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B

  5. Intrinsic nanofilamentation in resistive switching

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Xing

    2013-03-15

    Resistive switching materials are promising candidates for nonvolatile data storage and reconfiguration of electronic applications. Intensive studies have been carried out on sandwiched metal-insulator-metal structures to achieve high density on-chip circuitry and non-volatile memory storage. Here, we provide insight into the mechanisms that govern highly reproducible controlled resistive switching via a nanofilament by using an asymmetric metal-insulator-semiconductor structure. In-situ transmission electron microscopy is used to study in real-time the physical structure and analyze the chemical composition of the nanofilament dynamically during resistive switching. Electrical stressing using an external voltage was applied by a tungsten tip to the nanosized devices having hafnium oxide (HfO2) as the insulator layer. The formation and rupture of the nanofilaments result in up to three orders of magnitude change in the current flowing through the dielectric during the switching event. Oxygen vacancies and metal atoms from the anode constitute the chemistry of the nanofilament.

  6. 新乡地区13年儿童与成人大肠埃希菌的耐药性动态监测及对比分析%DRUG RESISTANCE DYNAMIC SURVEILLANCE AND CONTRAST ON ESCHERICHIA COLI BETWEEN CHILDREN AND ADULTS FOR 13 YEARS IN XINXIANG AREA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张敏; 王淑娟; 王华; 申明凤

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] To dynamically monitor the drug resistance of Escherichia coli identified from clinic between children and adults in Xinxiang area for 13 years (1997-2009), and understand the drug resistance to clinical routine antibacterial medicines and contrast them. [Methods] We did sensitivity experiments by 28 antibacterial medicines to Escherichia coli (4037 from adults and 685 from children) identified from clinic during 13 years. [Results] The antibacterial medicines of high sensitivity to Escherichia coli were imipenetn, raoropenem, piperacillin/tazobactam, cefoperazonc/sulfbactalm and polymyiin B etc for children team and adults team. The antibacterial medicines of low sensitivity were ceftazidme, amikacin and cefepime. For other antibacterial medicines, especially amicillin, the resistance rate was higher. The resistance rates of adults team were universally higher than its of children team, such as cefuroxime, ceftriaxone and cefepime, peniciline, trimethoprim/sul-famethoxazole, netilnu'cn, the most 4-quinolones medicines and tetracycline etc. The differences were all significant mostly. Except choramphenicol had the significant decent, the resistance rates of antibacterial medicines almost had the hoist trend in 13 years. The difference was significant mostly. In recent three years, the resistance rates of some antibacterial medicines, such as amicillin, imipenem and levefloxacin had the fall trend, and the differences were significant. The prduced ESBl^ rates were 46.3% of children team and 49.6% of adults team separately. [Conclusion] Aim at the dynamic surveillance the drug resistance and difference of diversity between the children team and the adults team, the resistance rates to adults were not applied to children in order to improve the antibacterial medicines' treat effect. The resistance results of adults and children should be dynamic monitored periodically separately for clinical doctor to reasonable use antibacterial medicines in different

  7. Lattice Boltzmann Stokesian dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, E J

    2015-11-01

    Lattice Boltzmann Stokesian dynamics (LBSD) is presented for simulation of particle suspension in Stokes flows. This method is developed from Stokesian dynamics (SD) with resistance and mobility matrices calculated using the time-independent lattice Boltzmann algorithm (TILBA). TILBA is distinguished from the traditional lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) in that a background matrix is generated prior to the calculation. The background matrix, once generated, can be reused for calculations for different scenarios, thus the computational cost for each such subsequent calculation is significantly reduced. The LBSD inherits the merits of the SD where both near- and far-field interactions are considered. It also inherits the merits of the LBM that the computational cost is almost independent of the particle shape.

  8. Partially mixed household epidemiological model with clustered resistant individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiebeler, David E; Criner, Amanda Keck

    2007-02-01

    We study the dynamics of the spread of an infectious disease within a population partitioned into households, and stratified into resistant and nonresistant individuals. Variability in the level of resistance between households increases the initial rate of spread of the infection, as well as the infection level at the endemic equilibrium. This phenomenon is seen even when all individuals in the population are equally likely to be resistant, and can also be predicted by including spatial clustering of resistant individuals within an improved mean-field approximation.

  9. P2P trust model for resisting collusion and dynamic behavior of node%对抗共谋及节点行为动态性的P2P信任模型

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈作汉; 任旭鹏; 卢鹏丽

    2011-01-01

    针对现有P2P信任模型存在的网络开销大、不能很好地处理节点行为的动态性改变及共谋攻击等问题,提出了一种新的信任模型.通过直接交互节点的局部评价加权其评价可信度计算节点的全局信誉值;采用基于局部评价标准差、局部评价集中度的方法识别和抑制共谋攻击;根据节点行为的改变动态更新其信誉值和评价可信度.仿真实验表明,提出的模型较现有模型在网络开销、抑制共谋攻击和节点行为的动态性等方面有较大改进.%To solve the problems of great network costs, the deficiency in dealing with dynamic characteristic and collusion attack in current P2P trust model, a new trust model was proposed. It computed global reputation value through that the direct interaction peers' local evaluation weighted its evaluation credibility to avoid iterative computing process. The standard deviation and concentration ratio of local evaluation was used to identify and control collusion attack. Moreover,according to the node changes, its reputation value and evaluation credibility were updated dynamically. The simulation and experimental results indicate that the new model has advantages in reducing network costs, controlling dynamic characteristic of node and collusion attack over the existing trust models.

  10. Beverton-Holt discrete pest management models with pulsed chemical control and evolution of pesticide resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Juhua; Tang, Sanyi; Cheke, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Pest resistance to pesticides is usually managed by switching between different types of pesticides. The optimal switching time, which depends on the dynamics of the pest population and on the evolution of the pesticide resistance, is critical. Here we address how the dynamic complexity of the pest population, the development of resistance and the spraying frequency of pulsed chemical control affect optimal switching strategies given different control aims. To do this, we developed novel disc...

  11. Molecular dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladd, A.J.C.

    1988-08-01

    The basic methodology of equilibrium molecular dynamics is described. Examples from the literature are used to illustrate how molecular dynamics has been used to resolve theoretical controversies, provide data to test theories, and occasionally to discover new phenomena. The emphasis is on the application of molecular dynamics to an understanding of the microscopic physics underlying the transport properties of simple fluids. 98 refs., 4 figs.

  12. Dynamics of bacterial diversity and antibiotic resistance of Escherichia coli in Fu River, Chengdu%成都府河水体细菌动态变化及耐药性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黎丽雯; 邹立扣; 周杨; 胡苏; 庞玉娟

    2012-01-01

    To analyze the water quality of the Fu River, nine sampling sites were chosen from Baopingkou site in Dujiangyan to Wangjiang Park site in Fu River. Three microbiological indexes, including total number of bacteria, total coliform and the number of fecal coliform, have been selected to evaluate the water quality, analyze seasonal factors and find out the contamination sources in two different seasons. Besides, taking the antibiotic resistance rate of Escherichia coli at Baopingkou as background, 102 E. Coli identified by morphology and 16S rDNA have been selected for following antimicrobial susceptibility testing, and the susceptibility has been performed according to the standard disk diffusion K-B method. The results show that though the total number of bacteria, total coliform and fecal coliform varied from Baopingkou, Dujiangyan to Wangjiang Park, the total number of bacteria shows an increasing trend as the water flows. The nutrients enrich in spring and summer, and water quality decrease. The susceptibility of 13 antimicrobial agents tested against E. Coli isolated shows that 0.96% - 33.33% of the isolates are resistant to B-lactam, 1. 39% -7.84% to aminoglycoside, 11.43% -11.76% to fluoroquinolone, and 52.78% to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. The resistance to B-lactam and fluoroquinolone is related with the source of water, however, other resistances are in connection with polluted water discharged from hospital and residential areas. Generally, this study has provided theoretical foundation for the control of pollution in Fu River.%将府河从都江堰宝瓶口段至望江公园段分设9个监测点,在秋冬、春夏两季分别取水,首次建立由细菌总数、总大肠菌群数及粪大肠菌群数三个微生物学指标组成的体系,对府河两季水质进行对比监测分析,以综合评价水质、分析季节影响因素并反映出污染物来源.以都江堰宝瓶口大肠杆菌耐药率作为背景值,对整个河段的9个采

  13. Slag resistance of MgO-C material in low pressure and dynamic state/%MgO-C材料低压动态条件下抗侵蚀性的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王龙光; 李红霞; 周会俊; 刘鹏; 娄海琴

    2011-01-01

    The slag corrosion resistance of MgO-C material with 10% carbon was researched by bar immersion method in a vacuum induction furnace at 1 650 C for 25 min with vacuum degree of 5 kPa. The specimens after corrosion test were observed and measured and the microstructure was analyzed by SEM. The result shows that the corrosion rate of the molten slag is higher than the reaction rate between MgO and C;as the slag basicity increases,the corrosion to MgO-C material decreases; MgO-C material shows better slag resistance to CaO-Al2O3 slag.%采用真空感应炉浸棒法,在真空度为5 kPa,于1 650 ℃保温25 min的试验条件下研究了w(C)约为10%的MgO-C材料的抗熔渣侵蚀性;对试验后的试样进行观察与测量,并用SEM分析了侵蚀后试样显微结构.结果表明:在本试验条件下,熔渣的侵蚀速率大于MgO与C反应的脱碳速率,随着CaO-SiO渣系碱度的提高,MgO-C材料侵蚀量减少;MgO-C材料对CaO-AlO熔渣有较强的抗侵蚀性.

  14. Dynamics Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Dynamics Lab replicates vibration environments for every Navy platform. Testing performed includes: Flight Clearance, Component Improvement, Qualification, Life...

  15. Dynamical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Sternberg, Shlomo

    2010-01-01

    Celebrated mathematician Shlomo Sternberg, a pioneer in the field of dynamical systems, created this modern one-semester introduction to the subject for his classes at Harvard University. Its wide-ranging treatment covers one-dimensional dynamics, differential equations, random walks, iterated function systems, symbolic dynamics, and Markov chains. Supplementary materials offer a variety of online components, including PowerPoint lecture slides for professors and MATLAB exercises.""Even though there are many dynamical systems books on the market, this book is bound to become a classic. The the

  16. Resisting Organizational Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunnar Andersson

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We are continuously reminded of how change induces controversy and resistance, regardless of support. We repeatedly experience resistance in difficulties of implementation, little progress, and poor results, rather than increased productivity as anticipated. In a detailed account of how change plays out, a mosaic of what resistance looks like emerges. The picture is both familiar and absolutely concrete, and challenges the structural assumptions and dichotomies on support and resistance in an organization. The findings invite technologies, people, actions, practices and materiality to the discussions on support and resistance.

  17. Interplay Between Antibiotic Resistance and Virulence During Disease Promoted by Multidrug-Resistant Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisinger, Edward; Isberg, Ralph R

    2017-02-15

    Diseases caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria in hospitals are the outcome of complex relationships between several dynamic factors, including bacterial pathogenicity, the fitness costs of resistance in the human host, and selective forces resulting from interventions such as antibiotic therapy. The emergence and fate of mutations that drive antibiotic resistance are governed by these interactions. In this review, we will examine how different forms of antibiotic resistance modulate bacterial fitness and virulence potential, thus influencing the ability of pathogens to evolve in the context of nosocomial infections. We will focus on 3 important multidrug-resistant pathogens that are notoriously problematic in hospitals: Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Staphylococcus aureus. An understanding of how antibiotic resistance mutations shape the pathobiology of multidrug-resistant infections has the potential to drive novel strategies that can control the development and spread of drug resistance. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Improvements in resist performance towards EUV HVM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Oktay; Buitrago, Elizabeth; Hoefnagels, Rik; Meeuwissen, Marieke; Wuister, Sander; Rispens, Gijsbert; van Oosten, Anton; Derks, Paul; Finders, Jo; Vockenhuber, Michaela; Ekinci, Yasin

    2017-03-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography with 13.5 nm wavelength is the main option for sub-10nm patterning in the semiconductor industry. We report improvements in resist performance towards EUV high volume manufacturing. A local CD uniformity (LCDU) model is introduced and validated with experimental contact hole (CH) data. Resist performance is analyzed in terms of ultimate printing resolution (R), line width roughness (LWR), sensitivity (S), exposure latitude (EL) and depth of focus (DOF). Resist performance of dense lines at 13 nm half-pitch and beyond is shown by chemical amplified resist (CAR) and non-CAR (Inpria YA Series) on NXE scanner. Resolution down to 10nm half pitch (hp) is shown by Inpria YA Series resist exposed on interference lithography at the Paul Sherrer Institute. Contact holes contrast and consequent LCDU improvement is achieved on a NXE:3400 scanner by decreasing the pupil fill ratio. State-of-the-art imaging meets 5nm node requirements for CHs. A dynamic gas lock (DGL) membrane is introduced between projection optics box (POB) and wafer stage. The DGL membrane will suppress the negative impact of resist outgassing on the projection optics by 100%, enabling a wider range of resist materials to be used. The validated LCDU model indicates that the imaging requirements of the 3nm node can be met with single exposure using a high-NA EUV scanner. The current status, trends, and potential roadblocks for EUV resists are discussed. Our results mark the progress and the improvement points in EUV resist materials to support EUV ecosystem.

  19. Multidrug resistance associated proteins in multidrug resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Sodani, Kamlesh; Patel, Atish; Kathawala, Rishil J.; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2012-01-01

    Multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs) are members of the C family of a group of proteins named ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. These ABC transporters together form the largest branch of proteins within the human body. The MRP family comprises of 13 members, of which MRP1 to MRP9 are the major transporters indicated to cause multidrug resistance in tumor cells by extruding anticancer drugs out of the cell. They are mainly lipophilic anionic transporters and are reported to transport fr...

  20. Experimental and numerical analysis of the static and dynamic crack growth resistance behaviour of structural steels in the temperature range from 20 C to 350 C; Experimentelle und numerische Untersuchungen des statischen und dynamischen Risswiderstandsverhaltens verschiedener hoeherfester Baustaehle im Temperaturbereich von 20 C bis 350 C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aurich, D.; Gerwien, P.; Huenecke, J.; Klingbeil, D.; Krafka, H.; Kuenecke, G.; Ohm, K.; Veith, H.; Wossidlo, P. [Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und -pruefung (BAM), Berlin (Germany); Haecker, R.; 1

    1998-11-01

    The crack growth resistance behaviour of the steels StE 460 and 22NiMoCr3-7 was determined in the temperature range from 23 C to 350 C by means of C(T), M(T), and ISO-V specimens tested under quasistatic and dynamic loads. The Russian steel 15Ch2NMFA-A was tested at room temperature and 50 C. In the steels StE 460 and 22 NiMoCr3-7, the minimum crack growth resistance is observed at about 250 C, with measured values always being higher for the latter steel type. The crack growth resistance behaviour of the tested materials correlates with the behaviour of flow curve, yield strength, and notch impact toughness as a function of temperature. Impact tests of ISO-V specimens give higher crack resistance values than quasistatic load tests, and the temperature dependence is significantly lower than those of specimens tested under static loads. A metallurgical analysis of the materials shows the causes of the dissimilar behaviour. The stretching zones determined for the C(T) specimen correspond to the toughness of the steels examined, and they are not much influenced by the temperature. The numerical analysis using damaging models for simulation of ductile crack growth is reported for all specimen types and two different temperatures each. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] Mit C(T)-, M(T)- sowie quasistatisch und dynamisch geprueften ISO-V-Proben wurde das Risswiderstandsverhalten fuer die Staehle StE 460 und 22NiMoCr3-7 im Temperaturbereich von 23 C bis 350 C ermittelt, waehrend der russische Stahl 15Ch2NMFA-A fuer Raumtemperatur und fuer 50 C untersucht wurde. Das Minimum der Risszaehigkeit stellt sich bei StE 460 und 22 NiMoCr3-7 um etwa 250 C ein, wobei die Werte fuer den 22NiMoCr3-7 bei allen Temperaturen wesentlich hoeher liegen als beim StE 460. Dabei korreliert das Risswiderstandsverhalten der untersuchten Werkstoffe mit dem Verhalten von Fliesskurven, Streckgrenzen und Kerbschlagzaehigkeiten in Abhaengigkeit von der Temperatur. Schlagartig beanspruchte ISO-V-Proben liefern

  1. Efetividade do treinamento de resistência à fadiga dos músculos dos membros inferiores dentro e fora d'água no equilíbrio estático e dinâmico de idosos Effectiveness of aquatic and non-aquatic lower limb muscle endurance training in the static and dynamic balance of elderly people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Núbia C. P. Avelar

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXTUALIZAÇÃO: O envelhecimento compromete a habilidade do sistema nervoso central (SNC de realizar a manutenção do equilíbrio corporal bem como diminui a capacidade das reações adaptativas. Para prevenir as quedas, é necessário aprimorar as condições de recepção de informações sensoriais. OBJETIVOS: Comparar o impacto de um programa estruturado de exercícios de resistência muscular dos membros inferiores dentro e fora d'água no equilíbrio estático e dinâmico em idosos. MÉTODOS: Trata-se de um estudo clínico, prospectivo, aleatório, em que as variáveis utilizadas foram avaliadas antes e após o programa de treinamento. Foram avaliados 36 idosos por meio de quatro testes: Escala de Equilíbrio de Berg, Dynamic Gait Index, velocidade da marcha, Marcha Tandem. Posteriormente, houve a alocação dos voluntários em três grupos: grupo de exercício na piscina terapêutica, grupo de exercício no solo e grupo controle. Os grupos de exercícios foram submetidos a um programa de resistência muscular dos membros inferiores aplicado durante seis semanas, duas sessões semanais com 40 minutos de duração. Os voluntários foram reavaliados após seis semanas. Os dados foram analisados estatisticamente pelo teste ANOVA univariada para comparação entre os três grupos antes e após a intervenção. RESULTADOS: O programa de resistência muscular dos membros inferiores promoveu aumento significativo do equilíbrio dos idosos (pBACKGROUND: Aging compromises the ability of the central nervous system to maintain body balance and reduces the capacity for adaptive reactions. To prevent falls, the reception conditions for sensory information need to be improved. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the impact of a structured aquatic and a non-aquatic exercise program for lower-limb muscle endurance on the static and dynamic balance of elderly people. METHODS: This was a prospective randomized clinical study in which the variables were assessed

  2. Molecular dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergstra, J.A.; Bethke, I.

    2002-01-01

    Molecular dynamics is a model for the structure and meaning of object based programming systems. In molecular dynamics the memory state of a system is modeled as a fluid consisting of a collection of molecules. Each molecule is a collection of atoms with bindings between them. A computation is model

  3. Dynamic Squares

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blackburn, P.; Venema, Y.

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines various propositional logics in which the dynamic implication connective (discussed in Groenendijk and Stokhof's (1992) Dynamic Predicate Logic and Kamp's (1981) Discourse Representation Theory) plays the central role. Our approach is modal: the basic idea is to view as a binary

  4. Record dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robe, Dominic M.; Boettcher, Stefan; Sibani, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    When quenched rapidly beyond their glass transition, colloidal suspensions fall out of equilibrium. The pace of their dynamics then slows down with the system age, i.e., with the time elapsed after the quench. This breaking of time translational invariance is associated with dynamical observables...

  5. Fluid Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brorsen, Michael

    These lecture notes are intended mainly for the 7th semester course "Fluid Dynamics" offered by the Study Committee on Civil Engineering, Aalborg University.......These lecture notes are intended mainly for the 7th semester course "Fluid Dynamics" offered by the Study Committee on Civil Engineering, Aalborg University....

  6. Dynamics of seismogenic volcanic extrusion resisted by a solid surface plug, Mount St. Helens, 2004-2005: Chapter 21 in A volcano rekindled: the renewed eruption of Mount St. Helens, 2004-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, Richard M.; Sherrod, David R.; Scott, William E.; Stauffer, Peter H.

    2008-01-01

    The 2004-5 eruption of Mount St. Helens exhibited sustained, near-equilibrium behavior characterized by nearly steady extrusion of a solid dacite plug and nearly periodic occurrence of shallow earthquakes. Diverse data support the hypothesis that these earthquakes resulted from stick-slip motion along the margins of the plug as it was forced incrementally upward by ascending, solidifying, gas-poor magma. I formalize this hypothesis with a mathematical model derived by assuming that magma enters the base of the eruption conduit at a steady rate, invoking conservation of mass and momentum of the magma and plug, and postulating simple constitutive equations that describe magma and conduit compressibilities and friction along the plug margins. Reduction of the model equations reveals a strong mathematical analogy between the dynamics of the magma-plug system and those of a variably damped oscillator. Oscillations in extrusion velocity result from the interaction of plug inertia, a variable upward force due to magma pressure, and a downward force due to the plug weight. Damping of oscillations depends mostly on plug-boundary friction, and oscillations grow unstably if friction exhibits rate weakening similar to that observed in experiments. When growth of oscillations causes the extrusion rate to reach zero, however, gravity causes friction to reverse direction, and this reversal instigates a transition from unstable oscillations to self-regulating stick-slip cycles. The transition occurs irrespective of the details of rate-weakening behavior, and repetitive stick-slip cycles are, therefore, robust features of the system’s dynamics. The presence of a highly compressible elastic driving element (that is, magma containing bubbles) appears crucial for enabling seismogenic slip events to occur repeatedly at the shallow earthquake focal depths (8 N. These results imply that the system’s self-regulating behavior is not susceptible to dramatic change--provided that the

  7. Influence of MgO Content and Activity on Dynamic Pressure Resistance of Concrete%MgO掺量与活性对混凝土动态抗压强度的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈涛

    2015-01-01

    In order to study the mechanical properties of micro-expansion concrete mixed with MgO under different strain rates, uni-axial compression test are carried on about different MgO contents and different MgO activity. Basic mechanics parameters and corresponding damage mechanism of micro⁃expansion concrete are analyzed . The results show that the ultimate pressure resistance of concrete appears firstly increase then decrease with increase of MgO content. When MgO content is controlled between 6% with 9%, it can effectively limit the expansion of concrete crack;the ultimate pressure resistance of concrete appears first increase then level off with MgO activity continuing to increase, concrete ultimate compressive strength reaches a maximum when MgO activity at 100s;the ultimate pressure resistance of concrete appears a certain amount of growth with increase of strain rate, but this growth trend shows some of discrete;concrete damage is delayed relative to higher activity as less internal pore under lower MgO activity. MgO particles size increase corresponding with the increase of MgO activity, and the procrastination damage is not obvious at low strain rate.%为了研究外掺MgO微膨胀混凝土在不同应变速率条件下的力学性能,进行了不同MgO掺量以及不同MgO活性混凝土在不同应变速率的单轴压缩试验,并对微膨胀混凝土的抗压力学基本参数以及相应的破坏机理进行了深入分析。研究结果表明:随着MgO掺量的升高混凝土的极限抗压强度呈现出先增加后减小的规律,MgO掺量控制在6%~9%之间能有效的限制混凝土裂缝的扩展;随着MgO活性的不断提高混凝土极限抗压强度先增加后趋于平缓, MgO活性在100 s时混凝土极限抗压强度达到最大值;随着应变速率的升高,不同MgO掺量混凝土的极限抗压强度出现了一定的增长,但是这种增长趋势表现出了一定的离散性;MgO活性较低时

  8. Persuasion dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisbuch, Gérard; Deffuant, Guillaume; Amblard, Frédéric

    2005-08-01

    We here discuss a model of continuous opinion dynamics in which agents adjust continuous opinions as a result of random binary encounters whenever their difference in opinion is below a given threshold. We concentrate on the version of the model in the presence of few extremists which might drive the dynamics to generalized extremism. A network version of the dynamics is presented here, and its results are compared to those previously obtained for the full-mixing case. The same dynamical regimes are observed, but in rather different parameter regions. We here show that the combination of meso-scale features resulting from the first interaction steps determines the asymptotic state of the dynamics.

  9. Dynamic Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laird, Philip

    1992-01-01

    We distinguish static and dynamic optimization of programs: whereas static optimization modifies a program before runtime and is based only on its syntactical structure, dynamic optimization is based on the statistical properties of the input source and examples of program execution. Explanation-based generalization is a commonly used dynamic optimization method, but its effectiveness as a speedup-learning method is limited, in part because it fails to separate the learning process from the program transformation process. This paper describes a dynamic optimization technique called a learn-optimize cycle that first uses a learning element to uncover predictable patterns in the program execution and then uses an optimization algorithm to map these patterns into beneficial transformations. The technique has been used successfully for dynamic optimization of pure Prolog.

  10. Epidemiological models for the spread of anti-malarial resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antia R

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The spread of drug resistance is making malaria control increasingly difficult. Mathematical models for the transmission dynamics of drug sensitive and resistant strains can be a useful tool to help to understand the factors that influence the spread of drug resistance, and they can therefore help in the design of rational strategies for the control of drug resistance. Methods We present an epidemiological framework to investigate the spread of anti-malarial resistance. Several mathematical models, based on the familiar Macdonald-Ross model of malaria transmission, enable us to examine the processes and parameters that are critical in determining the spread of resistance. Results In our simplest model, resistance does not spread if the fraction of infected individuals treated is less than a threshold value; if drug treatment exceeds this threshold, resistance will eventually become fixed in the population. The threshold value is determined only by the rates of infection and the infectious periods of resistant and sensitive parasites in untreated and treated hosts, whereas the intensity of transmission has no influence on the threshold value. In more complex models, where hosts can be infected by multiple parasite strains or where treatment varies spatially, resistance is generally not fixed, but rather some level of sensitivity is often maintained in the population. Conclusions The models developed in this paper are a first step in understanding the epidemiology of anti-malarial resistance and evaluating strategies to reduce the spread of resistance. However, specific recommendations for the management of resistance need to wait until we have more data on the critical parameters underlying the spread of resistance: drug use, spatial variability of treatment and parasite migration among areas, and perhaps most importantly, cost of resistance.

  11. Selection and characterization of cyanophage resistance in marine Synechococcus strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoddard, Lauren I; Martiny, Jennifer B H; Marston, Marcia F

    2007-09-01

    Marine viruses are an important component of the microbial food web, influencing microbial diversity and contributing to bacterial mortality rates. Resistance to cooccurring cyanophages has been reported for natural communities of Synechococcus spp.; however, little is known about the nature of this resistance. This study examined the patterns of infectivity among cyanophage isolates and unicellular marine cyanobacteria (Synechococcus spp.). We selected for phage-resistant Synechococcus mutants, examined the mechanisms of phage resistance, and determined the extent of cross-resistance to other phages. Four strains of Synechococcus spp. (WH7803, WH8018, WH8012, and WH8101) and 32 previously isolated cyanomyophages were used to select for phage resistance. Phage-resistant Synechococcus mutants were recovered from 50 of the 101 susceptible phage-host pairs, and 23 of these strains were further characterized. Adsorption kinetic assays indicate that resistance is likely due to changes in host receptor sites that limit viral attachment. Our results also suggest that receptor mutations conferring this resistance are diverse. Nevertheless, selection for resistance to one phage frequently resulted in cross-resistance to other phages. On average, phage-resistant Synechococcus strains became resistant to eight other cyanophages; however, there was no significant correlation between the genetic similarity of the phages (based on g20 sequences) and cross-resistance. Likewise, host Synechococcus DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (rpoC1) genotypes could not be used to predict sensitivities to phages. The potential for the rapid evolution of multiple phage resistance may influence the population dynamics and diversity of both Synechococcus and cyanophages in marine waters.

  12. Essentials of fluid dynamics with applications to hydraulics, aeronautics, meteorology and other subjets

    CERN Document Server

    Prandtl, Ludwig

    1953-01-01

    Equilibrium of liquids and gases ; kinematics : dynamics of frictionless fluids ; motion of viscous fluids : turbulence : fluid resistance : practical applications ; flow with appreciable volume changes (dynamics of gases) ; miscellaneous topics.

  13. Challenges to Resistance Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Quanfeng

    This report originates from the compulsory defense during my Ph.D. study at the Technical University of Denmark. Resistance welding is an old and well-proven technology. Yet the emergence of more and more new materials, new designs, invention off new joining techniques, and more stringent...... requirement in quality have imposed challenges to the resistance welding. More some research and development have to be done to adapt the old technology to the manufacturing industry of the 21st century. In the 1st part of the report, the challenging factors to the resistance welding are reviewed. Numerical...... simulation of resistance welding has been under development for many years. Yet it is no easy to make simulation results reliable and accurate because of the complexity of resistance welding process. In the 2nd part of the report numerical modeling of resistance welding is reviewed, some critical factors...

  14. Challenges to Resistance Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Quanfeng

    This report originates from the compulsory defense during my Ph.D. study at the Technical University of Denmark. Resistance welding is an old and well-proven technology. Yet the emergence of more and more new materials, new designs, invention off new joining techniques, and more stringent...... requirement in quality have imposed challenges to the resistance welding. More some research and development have to be done to adapt the old technology to the manufacturing industry of the 21st century. In the 1st part of the report, the challenging factors to the resistance welding are reviewed. Numerical...... simulation of resistance welding has been under development for many years. Yet it is no easy to make simulation results reliable and accurate because of the complexity of resistance welding process. In the 2nd part of the report numerical modeling of resistance welding is reviewed, some critical factors...

  15. 耐碳青霉烯类鲍曼不动杆菌临床分布及耐药谱动态观察%Distribution characteristics and dynamic observation of antimicrobial re-sistant spectrum of carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鲍群丽; 汪宏良; 柯俊

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨耐碳青霉烯类鲍曼不动杆菌(CRAB)临床分布特点与耐药情况,为临床合理使用抗菌药物、CRAB 感染的治疗及其医院感染的防控提供参考依据。方法回顾性分析2009年1月—2013年12月临床标本分离的 CRAB 临床资料,应用 WHONET 5.5软件统计其标本分布和耐药情况。结果5年共分离鲍曼不动杆菌(AB)标本888株,检出 CRAB 421株,检出率为47.4%,其中2011、2012和2013年检出率均在50.0%左右;标本来源以痰为主,占73.4%;科室分布以重症监护室(ICU)为主,占61.3%,其次是神经外科病房,为12.4%。CRAB 呈现高度耐药性,除头孢噻肟和头孢曲松外,CRAB 对检测的其他抗菌药物(头孢他啶、头孢吡肟、头孢哌酮/舒巴坦、氨曲南、亚胺培南、阿米卡星、庆大霉素、米诺环素、氯霉素、左氧氟沙星、环丙沙星、复方磺胺甲口恶唑)耐药率均高于非 CRAB,差异均有统计学意义(均 P ≤0.01);5年来对头孢哌酮/舒巴坦耐药率最低(<15%),其次是米诺环素,对其余抗菌药物耐药率多>80.0%。结论应继续加强 CRAB 监测,重点关注 ICU 及呼吸系统医院感染的预防控制。%Objective To investigate the distribution characteristics and antimicrobial resistance of carbapenem-resistantAcinetobacter baumannii (CRAB),and to guide effective clinical prevention and rational antimicrobial use. Methods Data about clinically isolated CRAB between January 2009 and December 2013 were analyzed retrospec-tively,distribution and antimicrobial resistance were analyzed by WHONET 5.5 software.Results A total of 888 Acinetobacter baumannii strains were isolated,421 of which were CRAB,the isolation rate was 47.4%,the isola-tion rates in 2011 ,2012 and 2013 were all about 50.0%;CRAB strains were mainly isolated from sputum (73.4%) and mostly distributed in intensive care unit (ICU)(61 .3

  16. Dynamic triggering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, David P.; Prejean, Stephanie; Schubert, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic stresses propagating as seismic waves from large earthquakes trigger a spectrum of responses at global distances. In addition to locally triggered earthquakes in a variety of tectonic environments, dynamic stresses trigger tectonic (nonvolcanic) tremor in the brittle–plastic transition zone along major plate-boundary faults, activity changes in hydrothermal and volcanic systems, and, in hydrologic domains, changes in spring discharge, water well levels, soil liquefaction, and the eruption of mud volcanoes. Surface waves with periods of 15–200 s are the most effective triggering agents; body-wave trigger is less frequent. Triggering dynamic stresses can be < 1 kPa.

  17. Galactic dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Binney, James

    2008-01-01

    Since it was first published in 1987, Galactic Dynamics has become the most widely used advanced textbook on the structure and dynamics of galaxies and one of the most cited references in astrophysics. Now, in this extensively revised and updated edition, James Binney and Scott Tremaine describe the dramatic recent advances in this subject, making Galactic Dynamics the most authoritative introduction to galactic astrophysics available to advanced undergraduate students, graduate students, and researchers. Every part of the book has been thoroughly overhauled, and many section

  18. Oil Pressure Signal Attenuation Resistance Monitoring System Design Based on Content Networking Dynamic Measurement%基于物联网压力动态测量中油井信号抗衰减监测系统设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韦抒

    2013-01-01

      针对传统的油井开采过程中压力变化动态性较强,区域较为广阔,当面对井喷、井漏风险的井下情况时,压力波会随着距离的传递发生明显地衰减,系统检测存在局限性与不确定性的问题,本文提出一种基于物联网压力动态监控的油井意外风险检测系统,详细分析了油井生产中的各种相关数据产生与处理,以无线传感网络为基础搭建物联网硬件平台,使用信息增益比,作为软件设计中决策树属性分裂的衡量指标,对冗余属性进行了合理地约束。实验证明,这种方法能够将传统油井危险情况预测的准确率大幅度提高,对实际的油井生产提供有效指导。%  Based on the traditional oil well drilling pressure changes in the process of dynamic, strong regional relatively broad, when faced with underground blowout, the risk of well leakage, pressure wave will happen with the distance relay obvious attenuation, system testing limitations and uncertainty. Therefore proposed based on content networking pressure dynamic monitoring of the oil wells risks incident detection system, a detailed analysis of the oil well production all sorts of relevant data and processing, based on wireless sensor network structures networking hardware platform, the use of in-formation gain than for decision tree attributes in the software design of indexes, the redundant attributes of the reason-able restraint. Experiments show that this method can be traditional oil wells of dangerous situation prediction accuracy greatly raised, provide effective guidance for actual production of oil wells.

  19. Regicide and Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flohr, Mikkel

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the role of resistance in Michel Foucault’s political thought. The article recovers this otherwise obscured aspect of Foucault’s thought through a systematic analysis of his theoretical regicide and consequent reconceptualization of power, agency and resistance. It is argued...... that Foucault developed a highly original account of resistance, which was, and should continue to be considered, central to his thought and its critical potential. It is shown how Foucault’s concept of resistance overcomes the limitation of voluntarism and determinism, which continue to mare contemporary...

  20. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... more understandable to non-scientists by showing how bacterial antimicrobial resistance can develop and spread. All FDA CVM ... Education Inspections & Compliance Federal, State & Local ...

  1. Resistance/reactance level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beutler, Larry E; Harwood, T Mark; Michelson, Aaron; Song, Xiaoxia; Holman, John

    2011-02-01

    Psychotherapists from all professions and perspectives periodically struggle to effectively manage a patient's resistance to change. This article provides definitions and examples of patient-treatment matching applied to patient resistance or reactance. We report the results from an original meta-analysis of 12 select studies (N = 1,102) on matching therapist directiveness to patient reactance. Our findings support the hypothesis that patients exhibiting low levels of trait-like resistance respond better to directive types of treatment, while patients with high levels of resistance respond best to nondirective treatments (d = .82). Limitations of the research reviewed are noted, and practice recommendations are advanced. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Surveillance of antibiotic resistance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnson, Alan P

    2015-01-01

    .... Surveillance of antibiotic resistance involves the collection of antibiotic susceptibility test results undertaken by microbiology laboratories on bacteria isolated from clinical samples sent for investigation...

  3. Understanding and managing resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, D S

    1998-01-01

    As many as 25 to 45 percent of patients using triple therapy with protease inhibitors will develop resistance due to a change in the genetic HIV code. However, patients who develop resistance may still benefit clinically when protease inhibitors are used in combination with other antiretrovirals. These patients may not have undetectable viral loads although they may have stable T4-cell counts. Resistance does not always lead to disease progression. Newer drugs under development or available through compassionate track programs may benefit people with resistance. DMP-266 (Sustiva) is a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor that shows promise for these patients. Other drugs in development include Compound 141, 1592, and adefovir.

  4. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Animal & ... antimicrobial resistance both emerges and proliferates among bacteria. Over time, the use of antimicrobial drugs will result in the development ...

  5. Dynamic capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grünbaum, Niels Nolsøe; Stenger, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    it was dominated by a lack of systematism, assessment, monitoring, marketing speculations and feasibility calculation. Furthermore, the sphere was dictated by asymmetric supplier-customer relationships and negotiation power leading, among other possible factors, to meager profitability.......The consequences of dynamic capabilities (i.e. innovation performance and profitability) is an under researched area in the growing body of literature on dynamic capabilities and innovation management. This study aims to examine the relationship between dynamic capabilities, innovation performance...... and profitability of small and medium sized manufacturing enterprises operating in volatile environments. A multi-case study design was adopted as research strategy. The findings reveal a positive relationship between dynamic capabilities and innovation performance in the case companies, as we would expect. It was...

  6. Elastohydrodynamic wake and wave resistance

    CERN Document Server

    Arutkin, Maxence; Salez, Thomas; Raphaël, Elie

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of a thin elastic sheet lubricated by a narrow layer of liquid is relevant to various situations and length scales. In the continuity of our previous work on viscous wakes, we study theoretically the effects of an external pressure disturbance moving at constant speed along the surface of a thin lubricated elastic sheet. In the comoving frame, the imposed pressure field creates a stationary deformation of the free interface that spatially vanishes in the far-field region. The shape of the wake and the way it decays depend on the speed and size of the external disturbance, as well as the rheological properties of both the elastic and liquid layers. The wave resistance, namely the force that has to be externally furnished in order to maintain the wake, is analyzed in detail.

  7. African Women Writing Resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jennifer Browdy de Hernandez; Pauline Dongala; Omotayo; Jolaosho; Anne Serafin

    2011-01-01

    AFRICAN Women Writing Resistance is the first transnational anthology to focus on women's strategies of resistance to the challenges they face in Africa today.The anthology brings together personal narratives,testimony,interviews,short stories,poetry,performance scripts,folktales and lyrics.

  8. Antimicrobial Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Khanal

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pneumococcal infections are important cause of morbidity and mortality. Knowledge of antimicrobial susceptibility patterns plays important role in the selection of appropriate therapy. Present study was undertaken to analyze the susceptibility patterns of pneumococcal isolates against commonly used antimicrobials with special reference to determination of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of penicillin in a tertiary care hospital in eastern Nepal. Methods: Twenty-six strains of S. pneumoniae isolated from various clinical specimens submitted to microbiology laboratory were evaluated. All isolates were tested for antimicrobial susceptibility by disk diffusion method. MIC of penicillin was tested by broth dilution method. Results: Of the total isolates 19 (73% were from invasive infections. Seven isolates were resistant to cotrimoxazole. No resistance to penicillin was seen in disk diffusion testing. Less susceptibility to penicillin (MIC 0.1-1.0 mg/L was observed in five (17% isolates. High level resistance to penicillin was not detected. One isolate was multidrug resistant. Conclusions: S. pneumoniaeisolates with intermediate resistance to penicillin prevail in Tertiary Care Hospital in eastern Nepal, causing invasive and noninvasive infections. As intermediate resistance is not detected in routine susceptibility testing, determination of MIC is important. It helps not only in the effective management of life threatening infections but is also essential in continuous monitoring and early detection of resistance. In addition, further study on pneumococcal infections, its antimicrobial resistance profile and correlation with clinical and epidemiological features including serotypes and group prevalence is recommended in future. Keywords: antimicrobial susceptibility pattern, penicillin, Streptococcus pneumoniae.

  9. Resistance to change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dow, J.; Perotti, E.

    2009-01-01

    Established firms often fail to maintain leadership following disruptive market shifts. We argue that such firms are more prone to internal resistance. A radical adjustment of assets affects the distribution of employee rents, creating winners and losers. Losers resist large changes when strong cust

  10. Resistance to change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dow, J.; Perotti, E.

    2013-01-01

    Established firms often fail to maintain leadership following disrup tive market shifts. We argue that such firms are more prone to internal resistance. A radical adjustment of assets affects the distribution of employee rents, creating winners and losers. Losers resist large changes when strong cus

  11. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Skip to common links HHS U.S. Department of Health and Human Services U.S. Food and Drug Administration ... Tobacco Products Animal & Veterinary Home Animal & Veterinary Safety & Health Antimicrobial Resistance Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance Share Tweet ...

  12. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CVM produced material may be copied, reproduced, and distributed as long as FDA's Center for Veterinary Medicine ... More in Antimicrobial Resistance National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring ... Note: If you need help accessing information in different file formats, see Instructions for Downloading ...

  13. Glycosphingolipids and insulin resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Langeveld; J.F.M.G. Aerts

    2009-01-01

    Obesity is associated with an increased risk for insulin resistance, a state characterized by impaired responsiveness of liver, muscle and adipose tissue to insulin. One class of lipids involved in the development of insulin resistance are the (glyco)sphingolipids. Ceramide, the most simple sphingol

  14. Engineered plant virus resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvez, Leny C; Banerjee, Joydeep; Pinar, Hasan; Mitra, Amitava

    2014-11-01

    Virus diseases are among the key limiting factors that cause significant yield loss and continuously threaten crop production. Resistant cultivars coupled with pesticide application are commonly used to circumvent these threats. One of the limitations of the reliance on resistant cultivars is the inevitable breakdown of resistance due to the multitude of variable virus populations. Similarly, chemical applications to control virus transmitting insect vectors are costly to the farmers, cause adverse health and environmental consequences, and often result in the emergence of resistant vector strains. Thus, exploiting strategies that provide durable and broad-spectrum resistance over diverse environments are of paramount importance. The development of plant gene transfer systems has allowed for the introgression of alien genes into plant genomes for novel disease control strategies, thus providing a mechanism for broadening the genetic resources available to plant breeders. Genetic engineering offers various options for introducing transgenic virus resistance into crop plants to provide a wide range of resistance to viral pathogens. This review examines the current strategies of developing virus resistant transgenic plants.

  15. Resistance to change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dow, J.; Perotti, E.

    2013-01-01

    Established firms often fail to maintain leadership following disrup tive market shifts. We argue that such firms are more prone to internal resistance. A radical adjustment of assets affects the distribution of employee rents, creating winners and losers. Losers resist large changes when strong

  16. Resistance to change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dow, J.; Perotti, E.

    2009-01-01

    Established firms often fail to maintain leadership following disruptive market shifts. We argue that such firms are more prone to internal resistance. A radical adjustment of assets affects the distribution of employee rents, creating winners and losers. Losers resist large changes when strong

  17. Drug resistance in malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S C Parija

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Antimalarial chemotherapy is an important component of all malaria control programmes throughout the world. This is especially so in light of the fact that there are no antimalarial vaccines which are available for clinical use at present. Emergence and spread of malaria parasites which are resistant to many of the available antimalarials today is, therefore, a major cause for concern. Till date, resistance to all groups of antimalarials excluding artemisinin has been reported. In recent years, in vitro resistance to even artemisinin has been described. While resistance to antibacterial agents has come to prominence as a clinical problem in recent years, antiparasitic resistance in general and antimalarial resistance in particular has not received much attention, especially in the Indian scenario. The present review deals with commonly used antimalarial drugs and the mechanisms of resistance to them. Various methods of detecting antimalarial resistance and avoiding the same have also been dealt with. Newer parasite targets which can be used in developing newer antimalarial agents and antimalarials obtained from plants have also been mentioned.

  18. Flora distribution and drug resistance dynamics in urinary tract infection of Guangdong provincal TCM hospital during 2006 to 2008%2006~2008年广东省中医医院泌尿系感染病原菌菌群分布及耐药性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    甘澍; 向松涛; 蓝锴; 王树声; 陈志强

    2011-01-01

    Objective To study the flora distribution and drug resistance dynamics in urinary tract infection .provide data-based advice of the medicine usage in urinary diseases. Methods The total 1 681 strains of pathogens which were isolated and cultured from the patients' urine specimens from Jan 2006 to Dec 2008 were classified and the drug resistance was analyzed,and was compared with the previous literature data. Results The frist four leading pathogens are Escherichia coli(39. 8%), klebsiella pneumoniae(8. 98%),Enterococcus faecalis(6. 6%),Candida albicans(5. 53%). The E. COLI and KP were highly resistant to ampicillin,bactrim,ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin. Extended spectrum β-lactamase(ESBLs) was detected in 59.1% E. COLI and 59.6% KP. Enterococcus faecalis was higher resistant to tetracycline, streptomycin, levofloxacin and ciprofloxacin. The fungi resistance was not common in general. Conclusions The main pathogen of urinary tract infection is still E.COLI.ESBLs-produced bacteria is rising; Urinary fungal infection rate is rising;The urine culture and drug sensitivity test should be done as soon as possible in the clinic. Β-lactam antimicrobial agents can be used at frist, quinolones are not recommended.%目的 探讨泌尿系感染的病原菌分布及耐药性的变化,为临床及时、正确、合理应用抗菌药物提供依据.方法 对我院2006年1月~2008年12月尿液标本培养出的1 681株病原菌进行菌种分类及耐药性分析,并与既往文献报道的泌尿系感染菌群及耐药性情况进行比较.结果 前4位的病原菌依次为大肠埃希菌(39.08%)、肺炎克雷伯菌(8.98%)、粪肠球菌(6.6%)、白色假丝酵母菌(5.53%);大肠埃希菌、肺炎克雷伯菌对氨苄西林、复方新诺明、环丙沙星、左旋氧氟沙星耐药率较高,且超广谱β-内酰胺酶(ESBLs)阳性率分别为59.1%、59.6%;粪肠球菌对四环素、链霉素、左旋氧氟沙星、环丙沙星等药物耐药性较高;

  19. Dynamics of a photochromic spiropyran under aqueous conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heckel A.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of a water soluble spiropyran is investigated by means of femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy in the visible and infrared spectral range revealing an ultrafast reversible switching behavior under aqueous conditions with a high fatigue resistance.

  20. HEAT-RESISTANT COMPOSITES CURED BY ELECTRON BEAM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-wen Bao; Yang Li; Xiang-bao Chen; Feng-mei Li

    2001-01-01

    Electron beam (EB) curing of composites has many advantages. Heat-resistant EB-curing composites could substitute polyimide composites used in aeronautical engines. In this paper, the effects of catalyst and dose on the cured resin were investigated. The heat-resistance of the resin cured by EB was evaluated by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). The experimental results show that the mechanical properties of the composites cured by EB could meet the specifications of aeronautical engines at 250°C.

  1. HIV resistance to raltegravir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavel, Francois

    2009-11-24

    Similar to all antiretroviral drugs, failure of raltegravir-based treatment regimens to fully supress HIV replication almost invariably results in emergence of HIV resistance to this new drug. HIV resistance to raltegravir is the consequence of mutations located close to the integrase active site, which can be divided into three main evolutionary pathways: the N155H, the Q148R/H/K and the Y143R/C pathways. Each of these primary mutations can be accompanied by a variety of secondary mutations that both increase resistance and compensate for the variable loss of viral replicative capacity that is often associated with primary resistance mutations. One unique property of HIV resistance to raltegravir is that each of these different resistance pathways are mutually exclusive and appear to evolve separately on distinct viral genomes. Resistance is frequently initiated by viruses carrying mutations of the N155H pathway, followed by emergence and further dominance of viral genomes carrying mutations of the Q148R/H/K or of the Y143R/C pathways, which express higher levels of resistance. Even if some natural integrase polymorphisms can be part of this evolution process, these polymorphisms do not affect HIV susceptibility in the absence of primary mutations. Therefore, all HIV-1 subtypes and groups, together with HIV-2, are naturally susceptible to raltegravir. Finally, because interaction of integrase strand transfer inhibitors with the HIV integrase active site is comparable from one compound to another, raltegravir-resistant viruses express significant cross resistance to most other compounds of this new class of antiretroviral drugs.

  2. HIV resistance to raltegravir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clavel François

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Similar to all antiretroviral drugs, failure of raltegravirbased treatment regimens to fully supress HIV replication almost invariably results in emergence of HIV resistance to this new drug. HIV resistance to raltegravir is the consequence of mutations located close to the integrase active site, which can be divided into three main evolutionary pathways: the N155H, the Q148R/H/K and the Y143R/C pathways. Each of these primary mutations can be accompanied by a variety of secondary mutations that both increase resistance and compensate for the variable loss of viral replicative capacity that is often associated with primary resistance mutations. One unique property of HIV resistance to raltegravir is that each of these different resistance pathways are mutually exclusive and appear to evolve separately on distinct viral genomes. Resistance is frequently initiated by viruses carrying mutations of the N155H pathway, followed by emergence and further dominance of viral genomes carrying mutations of the Q148R/H/K or of the Y143R/C pathways, which express higher levels of resistance. Even if some natural integrase polymorphisms can be part of this evolution process, these polymorphisms do not affect HIV susceptibility in the absence of primary mutations. Therefore, all HIV-1 subtypes and groups, together with HIV-2, are naturally susceptible to raltegravir. Finally, because interaction of integrase strand transfer inhibitors with the HIV integrase active site is comparable from one compound to another, raltegravir-resistant viruses express significant cross resistance to most other compounds of this new class of antiretroviral drugs.

  3. Echinocandin Resistance in Candida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlin, David S

    2015-12-01

    Invasive fungal infections are an important infection concern for patients with underlying immunosuppression. Antifungal therapy is a critical component of patient care, but therapeutic choices are limited due to few drug classes. Antifungal resistance, especially among Candida species, aggravates the problem. The echinocandin drugs (micafungin, anidulafungin, and caspofungin) are the preferred choice to treat a range of candidiasis. They target the fungal-specific enzyme glucan synthase, which is responsible for the biosynthesis of a major cell wall polymer. Therapeutic failure involves acquisition of resistance, although it is a rare event among most Candida species. However, in some settings, higher-level resistance has been reported among Candida glabrata, which is also frequently resistant to azole drugs, resulting in difficult-to-treat multidrug-resistant strains. The mechanism of echinocandin resistance involves amino acid changes in "hot spot" regions of FKS-encoded subunits of glucan synthase, which decreases the sensitivity of enzyme to drug, resulting in higher minimum inhibitory concentration values. The cellular processes promoting the formation of resistant FKS strains involve complex stress response pathways that yield a variety of adaptive compensatory genetic responses. Standardized broth microdilution techniques can be used to distinguish FKS mutant strains from wild type, but testing C. glabrata with caspofungin should be approached cautiously. Finally, clinical factors that promote echinocandin resistance include prophylaxis, host reservoirs including biofilms in the gastrointestinal tract, and intra-abdominal infections. An understanding of clinical and molecular factors that promote echinocandin resistance is critical to develop better diagnostic tools and therapeutic strategies to overcome resistance. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For

  4. HIV resistance testing and detected drug resistance in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schultze, A.; Phillips, A.N.; Paredes, R.; Battegay, M.; Rockstroh, J.K.; Machala, L.; Tomazic, J.; Girard, P.M.; Januskevica, I.; Gronborg-Laut, K.; Lundgren, J.D.; Cozzi-Lepri, A.; Burger, D.M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe regional differences and trends in resistance testing among individuals experiencing virological failure and the prevalence of detected resistance among those individuals who had a genotypic resistance test done following virological failure. DESIGN: Multinational cohort

  5. Herbicide resistance modelling: past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renton, Michael; Busi, Roberto; Neve, Paul; Thornby, David; Vila-Aiub, Martin

    2014-09-01

    Computer simulation modelling is an essential aid in building an integrated understanding of how different factors interact to affect the evolutionary and population dynamics of herbicide resistance, and thus in helping to predict and manage how agricultural systems will be affected. In this review, we first discuss why computer simulation modelling is such an important tool and framework for dealing with herbicide resistance. We then explain what questions related to herbicide resistance have been addressed to date using simulation modelling, and discuss the modelling approaches that have been used, focusing first on the earlier, more general approaches, and then on some newer, more innovative approaches. We then consider how these approaches could be further developed in the future, by drawing on modelling techniques that are already employed in other areas, such as individual-based and spatially explicit modelling approaches, as well as the possibility of better representing genetics, competition and economics, and finally the questions and issues of importance to herbicide resistance research and management that could be addressed using these new approaches are discussed. We conclude that it is necessary to proceed with caution when increasing the complexity of models by adding new details, but, with appropriate care, more detailed models will make it possible to integrate more current knowledge in order better to understand, predict and ultimately manage the evolution of herbicide resistance.

  6. A database of antimalarial drug resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ringwald Pascal

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A large investment is required to develop, license and deploy a new antimalarial drug. Too often, that investment has been rapidly devalued by the selection of parasite populations resistant to the drug action. To understand the mechanisms of selection, detailed information on the patterns of drug use in a variety of environments, and the geographic and temporal patterns of resistance is needed. Currently, there is no publically-accessible central database that contains information on the levels of resistance to antimalaria drugs. This paper outlines the resources that are available and the steps that might be taken to create a dynamic, open access database that would include current and historical data on clinical efficacy, in vitro responses and molecular markers related to drug resistance in Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax. The goal is to include historical and current data on resistance to commonly used drugs, like chloroquine and sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine, and on the many combinations that are now being tested in different settings. The database will be accessible to all on the Web. The information in such a database will inform optimal utilization of current drugs and sustain the longest possible therapeutic life of newly introduced drugs and combinations. The database will protect the valuable investment represented by the development and deployment of novel therapies for malaria.

  7. Variation of resistance and infectivity between Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 and bacteriophage Ф2 and its therapeutic implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hanchen; Chen; Guohua; Chen

    2015-01-01

    <正>Dear Editor,Studies of the coevolutionary dynamics between Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 and bacteriophageФ2 can explore host resistance and parasite infectivity with applications in the ecological and therapeutic fields.Coevolutionary dynamics determine the efficacy of phage-based therapy.In the study described here,bacterial resistance and phage infectivity fluctuated with culture

  8. Antibiotic resistance in the wild: an eco-evolutionary perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virta, Marko

    2017-01-01

    The legacy of the use and misuse of antibiotics in recent decades has left us with a global public health crisis: antibiotic-resistant bacteria are on the rise, making it harder to treat infections. At the same time, evolution of antibiotic resistance is probably the best-documented case of contemporary evolution. To date, research on antibiotic resistance has largely ignored the complexity of interactions that bacteria engage in. However, in natural populations, bacteria interact with other species; for example, competition and grazing are import interactions influencing bacterial population dynamics. Furthermore, antibiotic leakage to natural environments can radically alter bacterial communities. Overall, we argue that eco-evolutionary feedback loops in microbial communities can be modified by residual antibiotics and evolution of antibiotic resistance. The aim of this review is to connect some of the well-established key concepts in evolutionary biology and recent advances in the study of eco-evolutionary dynamics to research on antibiotic resistance. We also identify some key knowledge gaps related to eco-evolutionary dynamics of antibiotic resistance, and review some of the recent technical advantages in molecular microbiology that offer new opportunities for tackling these questions. Finally, we argue that using the full potential of evolutionary theory and active communication across the different fields is needed for solving this global crisis more efficiently. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Human influences on evolution, and the ecological and societal consequences'. PMID:27920384

  9. Jumping Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sannino, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    We propose an alternative paradigm to the conjectured Miransky scaling potentially underlying the physics describing the transition from the conformally broken to the conformally restored phase when tuning certain parameters such as the number of flavors in gauge theories. According to the new...... paradigm the physical scale and henceforth also the massive spectrum of the theory jump at the lower boundary of the conformal window. In particular we propose that a theory can suddenly jump from a Quantum Chromodynamics type spectrum, at the lower boundary of the conformal window, to a conformal one...... without particle interpretation. The jumping scenario, therefore, does not support a near-conformal dynamics of walking type. We will also discuss the impact of jumping dynamics on the construction of models of dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking....

  10. Dynamic Bifurcations

    CERN Document Server

    1991-01-01

    Dynamical Bifurcation Theory is concerned with the phenomena that occur in one parameter families of dynamical systems (usually ordinary differential equations), when the parameter is a slowly varying function of time. During the last decade these phenomena were observed and studied by many mathematicians, both pure and applied, from eastern and western countries, using classical and nonstandard analysis. It is the purpose of this book to give an account of these developments. The first paper, by C. Lobry, is an introduction: the reader will find here an explanation of the problems and some easy examples; this paper also explains the role of each of the other paper within the volume and their relationship to one another. CONTENTS: C. Lobry: Dynamic Bifurcations.- T. Erneux, E.L. Reiss, L.J. Holden, M. Georgiou: Slow Passage through Bifurcation and Limit Points. Asymptotic Theory and Applications.- M. Canalis-Durand: Formal Expansion of van der Pol Equation Canard Solutions are Gevrey.- V. Gautheron, E. Isambe...

  11. On Resistance Factors and Dynamic Mechanism in Industry-university-research Cooperation from the Per- spective of Government Management%政府治理视域下产学研合作阻力因素分析及动力机制研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵欣; 何云峰

    2012-01-01

    产学研合作是推进科技进步,建立国家创新体系的重要依托。从政府治理的视角分析了推进产学研合作必要性与迫切性,着重分析了体制政策、信息服务、投资方式等阻力因素,进行了政府介入产学研合作体系的动力机制分析,并提出促进导向、决策主导、协调服务等促进产学研合作的具体举措。%Industry- university-research cooperation is the important guarantee to promote scientific and technological pro- gress, and to establish national innovation system. This article discusses the necessity and urgency of promoting coopera- tion from the perspective of government management. It focuses on institutional policy, information services, investment and other resistance factors and analyzes its dynamic mechanism of government intervene in industry-university-research cooperation. It also puts forward specific measures to promote the cooperation such as promotion orientation, decision- making domination and coordination services.

  12. Linezolid Resistance in Staphylococci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Stefani

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Linezolid, the first oxazolidinone to be used clinically, is effective in the treatment of infections caused by various Gram-positive pathogens, including multidrug resistant enterococci and methicillin-resistant Staphylococus aureus. It has been used successfully for the treatment of patients with endocarditis and bacteraemia, osteomyelitis, joint infections and tuberculosis and it is often used for treatment of complicated infections when other therapies have failed. Linezolid resistance in Gram-positive cocci has been encountered clinically as well as in vitro, but it is still a rare phenomenon. The resistance to this antibiotic has been, until now, entirely associated with distinct nucleotide substitutions in domain V of the 23S rRNA genes. The number of mutated rRNA genes depends on the dose and duration of linezolid exposure and has been shown to influence the level of linezolid resistance. Mutations in associated ribosomal proteins also affect linezolid activity. A new phenicol and clindamycin resistance phenotype has recently been found to be caused by an RNA methyltransferase designated Cfr. This gene confers resistance to lincosamides, oxazolidinones, streptogramin A, phenicols and pleuromutilins, decrease the susceptibility of S. aureus to tylosin, to josamycin and spiramycin and thus differs from erm rRNA methylase genes. Research into new oxazolidinones with improved characteristics is ongoing. Data reported in patent applications demonstrated that some oxazolidinone derivatives, also with improved characteristics with respect to linezolid, are presently under study: at least three of them are in an advanced phase of development.

  13. Addressing antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Kalpana

    2003-02-01

    Management of uncomplicated urinary tract infections (UTIs) has traditionally been based on 2 important principles: the spectrum of organisms causing acute UTI is highly predictable (Escherichia coli accounts for 75% to 90% and Staphylococcus saprophyticus accounts for 5% to 15% of isolates), and the susceptibility patterns of these organisms have also been relatively predictable. As a result, empiric therapy with short-course trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) has been a standard management approach for uncomplicated cystitis.However, antibiotic resistance is now becoming a major factor not only in nosocomial complicated UTIs, but also in uncomplicated community-acquired UTIs. Resistance to TMP-SMX now approaches 18% to 22% in some regions of the United States, and nearly 1 in 3 bacterial strains causing cystitis or pyelonephritis demonstrate resistance to amoxicillin. Fortunately, resistance to other agents, such as nitrofurantoin and the fluoroquinolones, has remained low, at approximately 2%. Preliminary data suggest that the increase in TMP-SMX resistance is associated with poorer bacteriologic and clinical outcomes when TMP-SMX is used for therapy. As a result, these trends have necessitated a change in the management approach to community-acquired UTI. The use of TMP-SMX as a first-line agent for empiric therapy of uncomplicated cystitis is only appropriate in areas where TMP-SMX resistance prevalence is resistance to TMP-SMX exceeds this rate, alternative agents need to be considered.

  14. Antibiotic-Resistant Gonorrhea (ARG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Gonorrhea Antibiotic Resistance Basic Information Laboratory Information Resources & References Combating the ... Page Surveillance Trends and Treatment Challenges Laboratory Issues Antibiotic resistance (AR) is the ability of bacteria to resist ...

  15. Antibiotic Resistance Questions and Answers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on the Farm Get Smart About Antibiotics Week Antibiotic Resistance Questions and Answers Language: English (US) Español ( ... Many ear infections Top of Page Questions about Antibiotic Resistance Examples of How Antibiotic Resistance Spreads Click for ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: clopidogrel resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions clopidogrel resistance clopidogrel resistance Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Clopidogrel resistance is a condition in which the drug ...

  17. A Stochastic Cobweb Dynamical Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Brianzoni

    2008-01-01

    _,__0__1, and the forward predictor with probability (1−, so that the expected price at time is a random variable and consequently the dynamics describing the price evolution in time is governed by a stochastic dynamical system. The dynamical system becomes a Markov process when the memory rate vanishes. In particular, we study the Markov chain in the cases of discrete and continuous time. Using a mixture of analytical tools and numerical methods, we show that, when prices take discrete values, the corresponding Markov chain is asymptotically stable. In the case with continuous prices and nonnecessarily zero memory rate, numerical evidence of bounded price oscillations is shown. The role of the memory rate is studied through numerical experiments, this study confirms the stabilizing effects of the presence of resistant memory.

  18. Dynamical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Birkhoff, George D

    1927-01-01

    His research in dynamics constitutes the middle period of Birkhoff's scientific career, that of maturity and greatest power. -Yearbook of the American Philosophical Society The author's great book€¦is well known to all, and the diverse active modern developments in mathematics which have been inspired by this volume bear the most eloquent testimony to its quality and influence. -Zentralblatt MATH In 1927, G. D. Birkhoff wrote a remarkable treatise on the theory of dynamical systems that would inspire many later mathematicians to do great work. To a large extent, Birkhoff was writing about his o

  19. Forest dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frelich, Lee

    2016-01-01

    Forest dynamics encompass changes in stand structure, species composition, and species interactions with disturbance and environment over a range of spatial and temporal scales. For convenience, spatial scale is defined as individual tree, neighborhood, stand, and landscape. Whether a given canopy-leveling disturbance will initiate a sequence of development in structure with little change in composition or initiate an episode of succession depends on a match or mismatch, respectively, with traits of the dominant tree species that allow the species to survive disturbance. When these match, certain species-disturbance type combinations lock in a pattern of stand and landscape dynamics that can persist for several generations of trees; thus, dominant tree species regulate, as well as respond to, disturbance. A complex interaction among tree species, neighborhood effects, disturbance type and severity, landform, and soils determines how stands of differing composition form and the mosaic of stands that compose the landscape. Neighborhood effects (e.g., serotinous seed rain, sprouting, shading, leaf-litter chemistry, and leaf-litter physical properties) operate at small spatial extents of the individual tree and its neighbors but play a central role in forest dynamics by contributing to patch formation at stand scales and dynamics of the entire landscape. Dominance by tree species with neutral to negative neighborhood effects leads to unstable landscape dynamics in disturbance-prone regions, wherein most stands are undergoing succession; stability can only occur under very low-severity disturbance regimes. Dominance by species with positive effects leads to stable landscape dynamics wherein only a small proportion of stands undergo succession at any one time. Positive neighborhood effects are common in temperate and boreal zones, whereas negative effects are more common in tropical climates. Landscapes with positive dynamics have alternate categories of dynamics

  20. An Investigation of Airfoil Dynamic Stall with Large Amplitude Motions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-10-01

    solid aluminum pieces and excavated to provide interior mounting locations for nineteen (19) miniature piezo -resistive pressure transducers. A side...PRESSURE MEASUREMENT SYSTEM Unsteady pressures were measured by miniature, dynamic piezo -resistive transducers possessing a high frequency response...motions introduces - another possible source of "contamination," namely, the influence of -. flow phenomena which are either multiples or subharmonics

  1. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McNerney Ruth

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With almost 9 million new cases each year, tuberculosis remains one of the most feared diseases on the planet. Led by the STOP-TB Partnership and WHO, recent efforts to combat the disease have made considerable progress in a number of countries. However, the emergence of mutated strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis that are resistant to the major anti-tuberculosis drugs poses a deadly threat to control efforts. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB has been reported in all regions of the world. More recently, extensively drug resistant-tuberculosis (XDR-TB that is also resistant to second line drugs has emerged in a number of countries. To ensure that adequate resources are allocated to prevent the emergence and spread of drug resistance it is important to understand the scale of the problem. In this article we propose that current methods of describing the epidemiology of drug resistant tuberculosis are not adequate for this purpose and argue for the inclusion of population based statistics in global surveillance data. Discussion Whereas the prevalence of tuberculosis is presented as the proportion of individuals within a defined population having disease, the prevalence of drug resistant tuberculosis is usually presented as the proportion of tuberculosis cases exhibiting resistance to anti-tuberculosis drugs. Global surveillance activities have identified countries in Eastern Europe, the former Soviet Union and regions of China as having a high proportion of MDR-TB cases and international commentary has focused primarily on the urgent need to improve control in these settings. Other regions, such as sub-Saharan Africa have been observed as having a low proportion of drug resistant cases. However, if one considers the incidence of new tuberculosis cases with drug resistant disease in terms of the population then countries of sub-Saharan Africa have amongst the highest rates of transmitted MDR-TB in the world. We propose

  2. Resistance to Powdery Mildews

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siwoszek, Agnieszka Izabela

    how the basic resistance components contribute to resistance against powdery mildews. Furthermore, I propose an alternative strategy of achieving resistance to barley powdery mildew by application of peptide aptamers. Peptide aptamers are small proteins selected to specifically target conserved Yx......C motif of barley powdery mildew effectors. I present a proof-of-concept study in Arabidopsis, where overexpression of peptide aptamers significantly reduced the susceptibility to barley powdery mildew. Moreover, I set the discovery in a bigger context by summarizing genetic engineering technologies...

  3. Negative differential resistance in Josephson junctions coupled to a cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Niels Falsig; Filatrella, G.; Pierro, V.

    2014-01-01

    or external – is often used. A cavity may also induce a negative differential resistance region at the lower side of the resonance frequency. We investigate the dynamics of Josephson junctions with a negative differential resistance in the quasi particle tunnel current, i.e. in the McCumber curve. We find......Regions with negative differential resistance can arise in the IV curve of Josephson junctions and this phenomenon plays an essential role for applications, in particular for THz radiation emission. For the measurement of high frequency radiation from Josephson junctions, a cavity – either internal...

  4. Economic implications of antibiotic resistance in a global economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudholm, Niklas

    2002-11-01

    This paper concerns the economic implications of antibiotic resistance in a global economy. The global economy consists of several countries, where antibiotic consumption creates a stock of bacteria which is resistant to antibiotics. This stock affects the welfare in all countries because of the risk that resistant bacterial strains may be transmitted. The main purpose of the paper is to compare the socially optimal resource allocation with the allocation brought forward by the decentralized market economy. In addition, a dynamic Pigouvian tax designed to implement the globally optimal resource allocation is presented.

  5. Hydraulic resistance of biofilms

    KAUST Repository

    Dreszer, C.

    2013-02-01

    Biofilms may interfere with membrane performance in at least three ways: (i) increase of the transmembrane pressure drop, (ii) increase of feed channel (feed-concentrate) pressure drop, and (iii) increase of transmembrane passage. Given the relevance of biofouling, it is surprising how few data exist about the hydraulic resistance of biofilms that may affect the transmembrane pressure drop and membrane passage. In this study, biofilms were generated in a lab scale cross flow microfiltration system at two fluxes (20 and 100Lm-2h-1) and constant cross flow (0.1ms-1). As a nutrient source, acetate was added (1.0mgL-1 acetate C) besides a control without nutrient supply. A microfiltration (MF) membrane was chosen because the MF membrane resistance is very low compared to the expected biofilm resistance and, thus, biofilm resistance can be determined accurately. Transmembrane pressure drop was monitored. As biofilm parameters, thickness, total cell number, TOC, and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) were determined, it was demonstrated that no internal membrane fouling occurred and that the fouling layer actually consisted of a grown biofilm and was not a filter cake of accumulated bacterial cells. At 20Lm-2h-1 flux with a nutrient dosage of 1mgL-1 acetate C, the resistance after 4 days reached a value of 6×1012m-1. At 100Lm-2h-1 flux under the same conditions, the resistance was 5×1013m-1. No correlation of biofilm resistance to biofilm thickness was found; Biofilms with similar thickness could have different resistance depending on the applied flux. The cell number in biofilms was between 4×107 and 5×108 cellscm-2. At this number, bacterial cells make up less than a half percent of the overall biofilm volume and therefore did not hamper the water flow through the biofilm significantly. A flux of 100Lm-2h-1 with nutrient supply caused higher cell numbers, more biomass, and higher biofilm resistance than a flux of 20Lm-2h-1. However, the biofilm thickness

  6. Mechanobiology of Antimicrobial Resistant Escherichia coli and Listeria innocua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajkarimi, Mehrdad; Harrison, Scott H; Hung, Albert M; Graves, Joseph L

    2016-01-01

    A majority of antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections in the United States are associated with biofilms. Nanoscale biophysical measures are increasingly revealing that adhesive and viscoelastic properties of bacteria play essential roles across multiple stages of biofilm development. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) applied to strains with variation in antimicrobial resistance enables new opportunities for investigating the function of adhesive forces (stickiness) in biofilm formation. AFM force spectroscopy analysis of a field strain of Listeria innocua and the strain Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655 revealed differing adhesive forces between antimicrobial resistant and nonresistant strains. Significant increases in stickiness were found at the nanonewton level for strains of Listeria innocua and Escherichia coli in association with benzalkonium chloride and silver nanoparticle resistance respectively. This advancement in the usage of AFM provides for a fast and reliable avenue for analyzing antimicrobial resistant cells and the molecular dynamics of biofilm formation as a protective mechanism.

  7. Expanding the eco-evolutionary context of herbicide resistance research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neve, Paul; Busi, Roberto; Renton, Michael; Vila-Aiub, Martin M

    2014-09-01

    The potential for human-driven evolution in economically and environmentally important organisms in medicine, agriculture and conservation management is now widely recognised. The evolution of herbicide resistance in weeds is a classic example of rapid adaptation in the face of human-mediated selection. Management strategies that aim to slow or prevent the evolution of herbicide resistance must be informed by an understanding of the ecological and evolutionary factors that drive selection in weed populations. Here, we argue for a greater focus on the ultimate causes of selection for resistance in herbicide resistance studies. The emerging fields of eco-evolutionary dynamics and applied evolutionary biology offer a means to achieve this goal and to consider herbicide resistance in a broader and sometimes novel context. Four relevant research questions are presented, which examine (i) the impact of herbicide dose on selection for resistance, (ii) plant fitness in herbicide resistance studies, (iii) the efficacy of herbicide rotations and mixtures and (iv) the impacts of gene flow on resistance evolution and spread. In all cases, fundamental ecology and evolution have the potential to offer new insights into herbicide resistance evolution and management.

  8. Fitness costs associated with evolved herbicide resistance alleles in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila-Aiub, Martin M; Neve, Paul; Powles, Stephen B

    2009-12-01

    Predictions based on evolutionary theory suggest that the adaptive value of evolved herbicide resistance alleles may be compromised by the existence of fitness costs. There have been many studies quantifying the fitness costs associated with novel herbicide resistance alleles, reflecting the importance of fitness costs in determining the evolutionary dynamics of resistance. However, many of these studies have incorrectly defined resistance or used inappropriate plant material and methods to measure fitness. This review has two major objectives. First, to propose a methodological framework that establishes experimental criteria to unequivocally evaluate fitness costs. Second, to present a comprehensive analysis of the literature on fitness costs associated with herbicide resistance alleles. This analysis reveals unquestionable evidence that some herbicide resistance alleles are associated with pleiotropic effects that result in plant fitness costs. Observed costs are evident from herbicide resistance-endowing amino acid substitutions in proteins involved in amino acid, fatty acid, auxin and cellulose biosynthesis, as well as enzymes involved in herbicide metabolism. However, these resistance fitness costs are not universal and their expression depends on particular plant alleles and mutations. The findings of this review are discussed within the context of the plant defence trade-off theory and herbicide resistance evolution.

  9. Mechanisms of drug resistance: daptomycin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Truc T; Munita, Jose M; Arias, Cesar A

    2015-09-01

    Daptomycin (DAP) is a cyclic lipopeptide with in vitro activity against a variety of Gram-positive pathogens, including multidrug-resistant organisms. Since its introduction into clinical practice in 2003, DAP has become an important key frontline antibiotic for severe or deep-seated infections caused by Gram-positive organisms. Unfortunately, DAP resistance (DAP-R) has been extensively documented in clinically important organisms such as Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus spp., and Streptococcus spp. Studies on the mechanisms of DAP-R in Bacillus subtilis and other Gram-positive bacteria indicate that the genetic pathways of DAP-R are diverse and complex. However, a common phenomenon emerging from these mechanistic studies is that DAP-R is associated with important adaptive changes in cell wall and cell membrane homeostasis with critical changes in cell physiology. Findings related to these adaptive changes have provided novel insights into the genetics and molecular mechanisms of bacterial cell envelope stress response and the manner in which Gram-positive bacteria cope with the antimicrobial peptide attack and protect vital structures of the cell envelope, such as the cell membrane. In this review, we will examine the most recent findings related to the molecular mechanisms of resistance to DAP in relevant Gram-positive pathogens and discuss the clinical implications for therapy against these important bacteria.

  10. Multidrug resistance associated proteins in multidrug resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kamlesh Sodani; Atish Patel; Rishil J. Kathawala; Zhe-Sheng Chen

    2012-01-01

    Multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs) are members of the C family of a group of proteins named ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters.These ABC transporters together form the largest branch of proteins within the human body.The MRP family comprises of 13 members,of which MRP1 to MRP9 are the major transporters indicated to cause multidrug resistance in tumor cells by extruding anticancer drugs out of the cell.They are mainly lipophilic anionic transporters and are reported to transport free or conjugates of glutathione (GSH),glucuronate,or sulphate.In addition,MRP1 to MRP3 can transport neutral organic drugs in free form in the presence of free GSH.Collectively,MRPs can transport drugs that differ structurally and mechanistically,including natural anticancer drugs,nucleoside analogs,antimetabolites,and tyrosine kinase inhibitors.Many of these MRPs transport physiologically important anions such as leukotriene C4,bilirubin glucuronide,and cyclic nucleotides.This review focuses mainly on the physiological functions,cellular resistance characteristics,and probable in vivo role of MRP1 to MRP9.

  11. Development of Magnetorheological Resistive Exercise Device for Rowing Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vytautas Grigas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Training equipment used by professional sportsmen has a great impact on their sport performance. Most universal exercisers may help only to improve the general physical condition due to the specific kinematics and peculiar resistance generated by their loading units. Training of effective techniques and learning of psychomotor skills are possible only when exercisers conform to the movements and resistance typical for particular sports kinematically and dynamically. Methodology of developing a magnetorheological resistive exercise device for generating the desired law of passive resistance force and its application in a lever-type rowing machine are described in the paper. The structural parameters of a controllable hydraulic cylinder type device were found by means of the computational fluid dynamics simulation performed by ANSYS CFX software. Parameters describing the magnetorheological fluid as non-Newtonian were determined by combining numerical and experimental research of the resistance force generated by the original magnetorheological damper. A structural scheme of the device control system was developed and the variation of the strength of magnetic field that affects the magnetorheological fluid circulating in the device was determined, ensuring a variation of the resistance force on the oar handle adequate for the resistance that occurs during a real boat rowing stroke.

  12. Development of Magnetorheological Resistive Exercise Device for Rowing Machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigas, Vytautas; Šulginas, Anatolijus; Žiliukas, Pranas

    2015-01-01

    Training equipment used by professional sportsmen has a great impact on their sport performance. Most universal exercisers may help only to improve the general physical condition due to the specific kinematics and peculiar resistance generated by their loading units. Training of effective techniques and learning of psychomotor skills are possible only when exercisers conform to the movements and resistance typical for particular sports kinematically and dynamically. Methodology of developing a magnetorheological resistive exercise device for generating the desired law of passive resistance force and its application in a lever-type rowing machine are described in the paper. The structural parameters of a controllable hydraulic cylinder type device were found by means of the computational fluid dynamics simulation performed by ANSYS CFX software. Parameters describing the magnetorheological fluid as non-Newtonian were determined by combining numerical and experimental research of the resistance force generated by the original magnetorheological damper. A structural scheme of the device control system was developed and the variation of the strength of magnetic field that affects the magnetorheological fluid circulating in the device was determined, ensuring a variation of the resistance force on the oar handle adequate for the resistance that occurs during a real boat rowing stroke.

  13. Resistência do solo à penetração, após o tráfego com dois tipos de pneus utilizando-se um equipamento para ensaio dinâmico Soil penetration resistance after the traffic with two types of tyres using the dynamic test equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto K. Nagaoka

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Com este trabalho objetivou-se, principalmente, avaliar a resistência do solo à penetração, em função do tipo de pneu (diagonal e radial e da carga vertical, utilizando-se um equipamento de ensaio de pneu agrícola individual, e verificar os efeitos nas camadas do solo pela passagem do pneu. O equipamento utilizado foi projetado para ser acoplado na traseira do trator e acionado pela tomada de potência afim de realizar ensaios de pneus em condições de campo, sendo ainda, constituído, de uma caixa de transmissão mecânica de trator e instrumentos eletrônicos de medição. Este trabalho foi desenvolvido no Núcleo de Engenharia Rural da Faculdade de Ciências Agronômicas (FCA/UNESP em Botucatu. Os dados obtidos no experimento foram analisados considerando-se o delineamento experimental em blocos, no esquema de parcelas subdivididas, tendo na parcela os pneus (radial e diagonal e na subparcelas as cargas (10.000, 13.000, 16.000 e 19.000 N com cinco repetições. O pneu radial mostrou vantagem em relação ao diagonal, por apresentar menores valores de índice de cone. As cargas mais elevadas provocaram maiores valores de índice de cone e seus incrementos, nas camadas de 0 a 10 e de 10 a 20 cm.The main objective of this research was to evaluate the soil cone index results as a function of tyre type (radial and bias tyres and tyre load using a single wheel testing equipment and verifying the effect on the layers after tyre traffic. This equipment was projected for linking at the rear of a tractor and was activated by the power with the purpose of testing individual tyre under field conditions and constituted of a mechanical transmission box and electronic instruments of measurement. This study was conducted at the Agricultural Tyre Testing Center - NEMPA of Rural Engineering Department, Faculty of Agronomic Sciences, UNESP, Botucatu, SP. The data obtained were analyzed considering a random block experimental design in split plot with

  14. Beverton-Holt discrete pest management models with pulsed\\ud chemical control and evolution of pesticide resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Juhua; Tang, Sanyi; Cheke, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Pest resistance to pesticides is usually managed by switching between different types of pesticides. The optimal switching time, which depends on the dynamics of the pest population and on the evolution of the pesticide resistance, is critical. Here we address how the dynamic complexity of the pest population, the development of resistance and the spraying frequency of pulsed chemical control affect optimal switching strategies given different control aims. To do this, we developed novel disc...

  15. Internetwork dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, R.J.

    1995-01-01

    This review places current research in quiet-Sun chromospheric dynamics in the context of past and future work, concentrating on observational aspects of three-minute oscillations and Ca II K2V grains. The subject is of interest at present because observations and simulations come together to permit

  16. Structural dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Strømmen, Einar N

    2014-01-01

    This book introduces to the theory of structural dynamics, with focus on civil engineering structures that may be described by line-like beam or beam-column type of systems, or by a system of rectangular plates. Throughout this book the mathematical presentation contains a classical analytical description as well as a description in a discrete finite element format, covering the mathematical development from basic assumptions to the final equations ready for practical dynamic response predictions. Solutions are presented in time domain as well as in frequency domain. Structural Dynamics starts off at a basic level and step by step brings the reader up to a level where the necessary safety considerations to wind or horizontal ground motion induced dynamic design problems can be performed. The special theory of the tuned mass damper has been given a comprehensive treatment, as this is a theory not fully covered elsewhere. For the same reason a chapter on the problem of moving loads on beams has been included.

  17. Coastal Dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, W.T.

    1998-01-01

    This book deals on "Coastal Dynamics", which will be defined in a narrow sense as a mathematical theory, which starts from given equations of motion for the sediment, which leads with the continuity equation and given boundary conditions to a calculated (eventually schematized) coastal topography,

  18. Membrane dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    Current topics include membrane-protein interactions with regard to membrane deformation or curvature sensing by BAR domains. Also, we study the dynamics of membrane tubes of both cells and simple model membrane tubes. Finally, we study membrane phase behavior which has important implications...... for the lateral organization of membranes as wells as for physical properties like bending, permeability and elasticity...

  19. Glassy Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henrik J.; Sibani, Paolo

    2007-01-01

    The term glassy dynamics is often used to refer to the extremely slow relaxation observed in several types of many component systems. The time span needed to reach a steady, time independent, state will typically be far beyond experimentally accessible time scales. When melted alloys are cooled d...

  20. Dynamic LIMIDS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Díez, F.J.; Gerven, M.A.J. van

    2011-01-01

    One of the objectives of artificial intelligence is to build decision-support models for systems that evolve over time and include several types of uncertainty. Dynamic limited-memory influence diagrams (DLIMIDs) are a new type of model proposed recently for this kind of problems. DLIMIDs are simila

  1. Dynamic LIMIDS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Díez, F.J.; Gerven, M.A.J. van

    2011-01-01

    One of the objectives of artificial intelligence is to build decision-support models for systems that evolve over time and include several types of uncertainty. Dynamic limited-memory influence diagrams (DLIMIDs) are a new type of model proposed recently for this kind of problems. DLIMIDs are simila

  2. Record dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robe, Dominic M.; Boettcher, Stefan; Sibani, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    -facto irreversible and become increasingly harder to achieve. Thus, a progression of record-sized dynamical barriers are traversed in the approach to equilibration. Accordingly, the statistics of the events is closely described by a log-Poisson process. Originally developed for relaxation in spin glasses...

  3. System Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morecroft, John

    System dynamics is an approach for thinking about and simulating situations and organisations of all kinds and sizes by visualising how the elements fit together, interact and change over time. This chapter, written by John Morecroft, describes modern system dynamics which retains the fundamentals developed in the 1950s by Jay W. Forrester of the MIT Sloan School of Management. It looks at feedback loops and time delays that affect system behaviour in a non-linear way, and illustrates how dynamic behaviour depends upon feedback loop structures. It also recognises improvements as part of the ongoing process of managing a situation in order to achieve goals. Significantly it recognises the importance of context, and practitioner skills. Feedback systems thinking views problems and solutions as being intertwined. The main concepts and tools: feedback structure and behaviour, causal loop diagrams, dynamics, are practically illustrated in a wide variety of contexts from a hot water shower through to a symphony orchestra and the practical application of the approach is described through several real examples of its use for strategic planning and evaluation.

  4. Classical dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Greenwood, Donald T

    1997-01-01

    Graduate-level text for science and technology students provides strong background in the more abstract and intellectually satisfying areas of dynamical theory. Topics include d'Alembert's principle and the idea of virtual work, Hamilton's equations, Hamilton-Jacobi theory, canonical transformations, more. Problems and references at chapter ends.

  5. Internetwork dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, R.J.

    2001-01-01

    This review places current research in quiet-Sun chromospheric dynamics in the context of past and future work, concentrating on observational aspects of three-minute oscillations and Ca II K2V grains. The subject is of interest at present because observations and simulations come together to permit

  6. Mitotic dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐孝威

    1996-01-01

    A new model for mitotic dynamics of eukaryotic cells is proposed. In the kinetochore mo-tor-midzone motor model two kinds of motors, the kinetochore motors and the midzone motors, play important roles in chromosome movement. Using this model the chromosome congression during prometaphase, the chromosome oscillation during metaphase and the chromatid segregation during anaphase are described in a unified way.

  7. Steroid resistant asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhadia, S K

    2014-03-01

    Inspite of very safe and effective treatment, Bronchial asthmatics do not respond well in 5-10% of cases which are labelled as Refractory Asthma. Besides compliance, presence of psychogenic and trigger factors and comorbid illness, steroid insensitiveness or resistance may play a significant role in the poorly controlled/responding asthmatics. Type I Steroid resistance is due to lack of binding affinity of steroids to glucocorticoid receptors and may respond to higher doses of steroids while type II steroid resistance is because of reduced number of cells with glucocorticoid receptors, which is very rare and do not respond to even higher doses of systemic steroids and these cases require alternative/novel therapies. Future treatment of steroid resistant and severe refractory asthma is likely to be targeted towards cytokines and Bronchial Thermoplasty.

  8. Glucocorticoid feedback resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Kloet, E R; Vreugdenhil, E; Oitzl, M S; Joëls, M

    1997-01-01

    Glucocorticoid feedback resistance can be inherited or locally acquired. The implications of these two forms of resistance for disease are strikingly different. The inherited form is characterized by enhanced adrenocortical function and hypercorticism to compensate for a generalized deficit in the glucocorticoid receptor gene, but these individuals lack symptoms of Cushing's syndrome. By contrast, resistance acquired at the level of the hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) neurons is linked to hypercorticism, which is not compensatory but overexposes the rest of the body and the brain to glucocorticoids. This cell-specific glucocorticoid resistance can be acquired by genetically predisposed individuals failing to cope with (early) life events and causes enhanced vulnerability to disease-specific actions of glucocorticoids. (c) 1997, Elsevier Science Inc. (Trends Endocrinol Metab 1997; 8:26-33).

  9. CONFERENCE REPORT ANTIRETROVIRAL RESISTANCE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    selection of NNRTI-resistant virus should therefore come as no surprise. The consequences of suboptimal nevirapine use are probably not unique to .... Africa) frequently has a natural polymorphism at codon 93 in the protease gene known as ...

  10. Solvent resistant nanofiltration membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Dutczak, S.M.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis describes preparation and characterization of membranes for organic solvent filtration (OSF). The main aim was developing membranes for solvent resistant nanofiltration (SRNF) with molecular weight cut-off below 500 g mol-1.

  11. Insulin Resistance and Atherosclerosis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nigro, Julie; Osman, Narin; Dart, Anthony M; Little, Peter J

    2006-01-01

    ... morbidity and mortality. It is only now being recognized that the major antecedent of type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance with its attendant syndrome, is the major underlying cause of the susceptibility to type 2 diabetes...

  12. HIV Resistance Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tube when ARVs are added. Genotypic resistance: The genetic code of HIV has mutations that are linked to ... phenotypic tests are somewhat quicker. GENOTYPIC TESTING The genetic code of the sample virus is compared to the ...

  13. Tetracycline Antibiotics and Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Trudy H

    2016-04-01

    Tetracyclines possess many properties considered ideal for antibiotic drugs, including activity against Gram-positive and -negative pathogens, proven clinical safety, acceptable tolerability, and the availability of intravenous (IV) and oral formulations for most members of the class. As with all antibiotic classes, the antimicrobial activities of tetracyclines are subject to both class-specific and intrinsic antibiotic-resistance mechanisms. Since the discovery of the first tetracyclines more than 60 years ago, ongoing optimization of the core scaffold has produced tetracyclines in clinical use and development that are capable of thwarting many of these resistance mechanisms. New chemistry approaches have enabled the creation of synthetic derivatives with improved in vitro potency and in vivo efficacy, ensuring that the full potential of the class can be explored for use against current and emerging multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogens, including carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, MDR Acinetobacter species, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  14. Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the past 70 years, antimicrobial drugs, such as antibiotics, have been successfully used to treat patients with bacterial and infectious diseases. Why Is the Study of Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance a Priority for NIAID? Over time, many infectious ...

  15. Antibiotics and Resistance: Glossary

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chromosomes and plasmids. Transposons often carry genes specifying antimicrobial resistance. Virus An extremely small infective agent, visible only with an electron microscope. Viruses can cause disease in humans, animals and plants. Viruses consist of a protein coat ...

  16. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Animal & ... antimicrobial resistance both emerges and proliferates among bacteria. Over time, the use of antimicrobial drugs will result in the development ...

  17. [Resistance profile of rilpivirine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imaz, Arkaitz; García, Federico; di Yacovo, Silvana; Llibre, Josep M

    2013-06-01

    Rilpivirine (RPV) is a new second-generation nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) approved for use in combination with two nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI) as initial therapy in treatment-naïve HIV-1-infected patients with a baseline viral load ≤100,000 copies/mL. RPV is a diarylpyrimidine derivative with potent in vitro activity against multiple HIV-1 variants with resistance mutations to first-generation NNRTI such as K103N. In vitro studies and phase III clinical trials have allowed the identification of 16 mutations associated with resistance to RPV K101E/P, E138A/G/K/Q/R, V179L, Y181C/I/V, Y188L, H221Y, F227C and M230I/L. The risk of virologic failure in patients receiving RPV plus 2 NRTI with plasma viral load ≤ 100,000 copies/mL is low, but a high percentage of patients failing RPV develop resistance mutations to both RPV and NRTI. The most common resistance mutation that emerges in this setting is E138K. This mutation is usually associated with M184I due to a double compensatory effect of this combination, which confers resistance to RPV, as well as to lamivudine and emtricitabine. The emergence of RPV resistance confers cross-resistance to all NNRTI and, importantly, high percentages of cross-resistance to etravirine. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  18. Rolling resistance of tires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Junio, M.; Roesgen, A.; Corvasce, F. [Goodyear Technical Center Luxembourg, Colmar-Berg (Luxembourg)

    1999-07-01

    After a review of the contribution of tire rolling resistance to fuel economy, the tire rolling resistance is defined and measurement methods discussed. The significant effects of the 'external' factors such as load, inflation, temperature, speed, etc. that are not controlled by the tire developers, are reviewed. Tire construction changes that reduce deformations and compound changes reducing hysteresis are discussed and information is provided on what has been achieved so far and what might be done in the future. (orig.)

  19. Stab resistant body armour

    OpenAIRE

    Horsfall, Ian

    2000-01-01

    There is now a widely accepted need for stab resistant body armour for the police in the UK. However, very little research has been done on knife resistant systems and the penetration mechanics of sharp projectiles are poorly understood. This thesis explores the general background to knife attack and defence with a particular emphasis on the penetration mechanics of edged weapons. The energy and velocity that can be achieved in stabbing actions has been determined for a numb...

  20. Development of herbicide resistance in black-grass (Alopecurus myosuroides in Bavaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gehring, Klaus

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Black-grass (Alopecurus myosuroides is one of the most important grass weeds in Bavaria. Chemical weed control with high efficacy is very important in crops like winter cereals, oilseed rape and maize. Crop rotations with more winter cereals, reduced soil cultivation and e.g. contract harvesting enhanced distribution of blackgrass in arable farming regions. Effects of herbicide resistance were observed since the last 20 years. The blackgrass herbicide resistance is well observed by the official plant protection service of Bavaria. A wide experience of resistance tests shows the development of resistant black-grass and provides an opportunity for future prospects in resistance dynamics.

  1. The role of compensatory mutations in the emergence of drug resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Handel

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Pathogens that evolve resistance to drugs usually have reduced fitness. However, mutations that largely compensate for this reduction in fitness often arise. We investigate how these compensatory mutations affect population-wide resistance emergence as a function of drug treatment. Using a model of gonorrhea transmission dynamics, we obtain generally applicable, qualitative results that show how compensatory mutations lead to more likely and faster resistance emergence. We further show that resistance emergence depends on the level of drug use in a strongly nonlinear fashion. We also discuss what data need to be obtained to allow future quantitative predictions of resistance emergence.

  2. Discrete dynamics versus analytic dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toxværd, Søren

    2014-01-01

    For discrete classical Molecular dynamics obtained by the “Verlet” algorithm (VA) with the time increment h there exists a shadow Hamiltonian H˜ with energy E˜(h) , for which the discrete particle positions lie on the analytic trajectories for H˜ . Here, we proof that there, independent...

  3. Applied dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Schiehlen, Werner

    2014-01-01

    Applied Dynamics is an important branch of engineering mechanics widely applied to mechanical and automotive engineering, aerospace and biomechanics as well as control engineering and mechatronics. The computational methods presented are based on common fundamentals. For this purpose analytical mechanics turns out to be very useful where D’Alembert’s principle in the Lagrangian formulation proves to be most efficient. The method of multibody systems, finite element systems and continuous systems are treated consistently. Thus, students get a much better understanding of dynamical phenomena, and engineers in design and development departments using computer codes may check the results more easily by choosing models of different complexity for vibration and stress analysis.

  4. Fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Bernard, Peter S

    2015-01-01

    This book presents a focused, readable account of the principal physical and mathematical ideas at the heart of fluid dynamics. Graduate students in engineering, applied math, and physics who are taking their first graduate course in fluids will find this book invaluable in providing the background in physics and mathematics necessary to pursue advanced study. The book includes a detailed derivation of the Navier-Stokes and energy equations, followed by many examples of their use in studying the dynamics of fluid flows. Modern tensor analysis is used to simplify the mathematical derivations, thus allowing a clearer view of the physics. Peter Bernard also covers the motivation behind many fundamental concepts such as Bernoulli's equation and the stream function. Many exercises are designed with a view toward using MATLAB or its equivalent to simplify and extend the analysis of fluid motion including developing flow simulations based on techniques described in the book.

  5. Resistant starches and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Cyril W C; Emam, Azadeh; Augustin, Livia S A; Jenkins, David J A

    2004-01-01

    It was initially hypothesized that resistant starches, i.e., starch that enters the colon, would have protective effects on chronic colonic diseases, including reduction of colon cancer risk and in the treatment of ulcerative colitis. Recent studies have confirmed the ability of resistant starch to increase fecal bulk, increase the molar ratio of butyrate in relation to other short-chain fatty acids, and dilute fecal bile acids. However the ability of resistant starch to reduce luminal concentrations of compounds that are damaging to the colonic mucosa, including fecal ammonia, phenols, and N-nitroso compounds, still requires clear demonstration. As such, the effectiveness of resistant starch in preventing or treating colonic diseases remains to be assessed. Nevertheless, there is a fraction of what has been termed resistant (RS1) starch, which enters the colon and acts as slowly digested or lente carbohydrate in the small intestine. Foods in this class are low glycemic index and have been shown to reduce the risk of chronic disease. They have been associated with systemic physiological effects such as reduced postprandial insulin levels and higher HDL cholesterol levels. Consumption of low glycemic index foods has been shown to be related to reductions in risk of coronary heart disease and Type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes has in turn been related to a higher risk of colon cancer. If carbohydrates have a protective role in colon cancer prevention this may lie partly in the systemic effects of low glycemic index foods. The colonic advantages of different carbohydrates, varying in their glycemic index and resistant starch content, therefore, remain to be determined. However, as recent positive research findings continue to mount, there is reason for optimism over the possible health advantages of those resistant starches, which are slowly digested in the small intestine.

  6. Linezolid resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavani Gandham

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Linezolid is the only antibiotic available as an oral formulation for resistant staphylococcal infections. It is effective in skin and soft tissue infections, nosocomial pneumonias including VAP, infective endocarditis and MRSA meningitis. It is also effective in the eradication of both nasal and throat colonization of MRSA. Its high bioavailability and post antibiotic effect, ease of switching to oral therapy during its use and the fact that it can be used in patients of all ages, also in patients with liver disease and poor kidney function and its increased effectiveness over glycopeptides makes this drug a precious drug in the treatment of resistant staphylococcal infections. Linezolid resistance in staphylococcus is defined as a linezolid MIC of and #8805;8 mg/L. Reported Linezolid resistance in India and elsewhere is 2-20%. There is clonal dissemination of Linezolid Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LRSA within or across health care settings which demands continuous surveillance to determine the emergent risk of resistance strains and to establish guidelines for appropriate use. Clinical laboratories should confirm any LRSA preferably by a second method, prior to using linezolid for serious infections. Effective surveillance, more judicious use of this antibiotic, avoiding linezolid usage for empiric therapy in hospital acquired staphylococcus infections, optimization of the pharmacological parameters of the antibiotics in specific clinical situation, decreasing bacterial load by timely surgical debridement or drainage of collections, use of combination therapies would prevent the emergence of resistance to linezolid in staphylococcus aureus. [Int J Res Med Sci 2014; 2(4.000: 1253-1256

  7. Dynamic capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grünbaum, Niels Nolsøe; Stenger, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    and profitability of small and medium sized manufacturing enterprises operating in volatile environments. A multi-case study design was adopted as research strategy. The findings reveal a positive relationship between dynamic capabilities and innovation performance in the case companies, as we would expect. It was...... it was dominated by a lack of systematism, assessment, monitoring, marketing speculations and feasibility calculation. Furthermore, the sphere was dictated by asymmetric supplier-customer relationships and negotiation power leading, among other possible factors, to meager profitability....

  8. Cybersecurity Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-20

    envisioned) Science of Cybersecurity:  Soul: Security (concepts)  Brain: Cybersecurity Dynamics (kind of Complexity Science)  Muscle & Blood ...Complexity Science)  Muscle & Blood : Probability Theory, Number Theory, Abstract Algebra, etc.  Thrust I: Building a systematic theory of...Under-specification, composition and emergent properties. In Proc. NSPW’97, pp. 83–93. [11] A. Kubík. Toward a formalization of emergence. Artif . Life

  9. DYNAMIC EFFECTIVE SHEAR STRENGTH OF SATURATED SAND

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵生俊; 谢定义

    2002-01-01

    The dynamic effective shear strength of saturated sand under cyclic loading is discussed in this paper. The discussion includes the transient time dependency behaviors based on the analysis of the results obtained in conventional cyclic triaxial tests and cyclic torsional shear triaxial tests. It has been found that the dynamic effective shear strength is composed of effective frictional resistance and viscous resistance, which are characterized by the strain rate dependent feature of strength magnitude, the coupling of consolidation stress with cyclic stress and the dependency of time needed to make the soil strength suffciently mobilized, and can also be expressed by the extended Mohr-Coulomb's law. The two strength parameters of the dynamic effective internal frictional angle φd and the dynamic viscosity coefficient η are determined. The former is unvaried for different number of cyclic loading, dynamic stress form and consolidation stress ratio. And the later is unvaried for the different dynamic shear strain rate γt developed during the sand liquefaction, but increases with the increase of initial density of sand. The generalization of dynamic effective stress strength criterion in the 3-dimensional effective stress space is studied in detail for the purpose of its practical use.

  10. Electromigration early resistance increase measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Niehof, J; Flinn, P. A.; Maloney, T.J.

    1993-01-01

    An early resistance change measurement set-up, using an AC bridge technique, has been developed, and measurements have been performed. Large sample-to-sample variations occur. The characteristic time for the resistance change curve is shorter for resistance increase (under current stress) than for resistance decay (during recovery).

  11. Desiccation resistance in Arcobacter butzleri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otth Laura

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The desiccation resistance of A. butzleri was studied. Two, 3 and 4 of the strains did not resist desiccation for more than 2, 12 and 36 h, respectively. Two strains resisted desiccation for > 48 h. A. butzleri seems to be more resistant to desiccation than the classical enteropathogenic Campylobacter species.

  12. Antibiotic Resistance in Acne Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Brandon L; Kornmehl, Heather; Armstrong, April W

    2017-08-01

    What is the evidence for antibiotic resistance in acne, and how does resistance affect treatment? Use of topical and systemic antibiotics for acne is associated with formation of resistance in Propionibacterium acnes and other bacteria, with clinical consequences. Guidelines recommend resistance reduction strategies including avoidance of antibiotic monotherapy, combination treatment with topical modalities, and limiting the duration of oral antibiotic use.

  13. Clopidogrel Resistance: Current Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NS Neki

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Antiplatelet agents are mainly used in the prevention and management of atherothrombotic complications. Dual antiplatelet therapy, combining aspirin and clopidogrel, is the standard care for patients having acute coronary syndromes or undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention according to the current ACC/AHA and ESC guidelines. But in spite of administration of dual antiplatelet therapy, some patients develop recurrent cardiovascular ischemic events especially stent thrombosis which is a serious clinical problem. Antiplatelet response to clopidogrel varies widely among patients based on ex vivo platelet function measurements. Clopidogrel is an effective inhibitor of platelet activation and aggregation due to its selective and irreversible blockade of the P2Y12 receptor. Patients who display little attenuation of platelet reactivity with clopidogrel therapy are labeled as low or nonresponders or clopidogrel resistant. The mechanism of clopidogrel resistance remains incompletely defined but there are certain clinical, cellular and genetic factors including polymorphisms responsible for therapeutic failure. Currently there is no standardized or widely accepted definition of clopidogrel resistance. The future may soon be realised in the routine measurement of platelet activity in the same way that blood pressure, cholesterol and blood sugar are followed to help guide the therapy, thus improving the care for millions of people. This review focuses on the methods used to identify patients with clopidogrel resistance, the underlying mechanisms, metabolism, clinical significance and current therapeutic strategies to overcome clopidogrel resistance. J Enam Med Col 2016; 6(1: 38-46

  14. MSMA resistance studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camper, N D; Keese, R J; Coker, P S

    2004-05-01

    Monosodium methanearsonate (MSMA)-resistant and -susceptible common cocklebur (Xanthium strumarium L.) and cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) were treated with MSMA. Plant parameters analyzed were: glutathione synthetase activity, selected amino acid (arginine, glutamic acid, alanine, citrulline, glutamine, and glutathione) content and arsenic content (MSMA, total arsenic, and arsonate). No reduction of arsenic from the parent pentavalent form present in MSMA to the trivalent form was detected. Arginine, glutamic acid, and glutamine content increased in tissue three days after MSMA treatment. Glutathione content decreased during the first three days after treatment; however, five days after treatment the resistant biotype of cocklebur and cotton had elevated glutathione levels (8-20 times greater, respectively). Glutathione Synthetase activity was higher in cotton than in either of the cocklebur biotypes; MSMA did not affect its activity in cotton or either cocklebur biotype. Resistant biotypes have a slightly higher activity than the susceptible biotype. Tolerance of cotton to MSMA may be related to glutathione synthetase activity and possibly to the presence of phytochelatins. Also, increased glutathione levels in the resistant biotype may implicate phytochelatin involvement in the resistance mechanism.

  15. Spore Resistance Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setlow, Peter

    2014-10-01

    Spores of various Bacillus and Clostridium species are among the most resistant life forms known. Since the spores of some species are causative agents of much food spoilage, food poisoning, and human disease, and the spores of Bacillus anthracis are a major bioweapon, there is much interest in the mechanisms of spore resistance and how these spores can be killed. This article will discuss the factors involved in spore resistance to agents such as wet and dry heat, desiccation, UV and γ-radiation, enzymes that hydrolyze bacterial cell walls, and a variety of toxic chemicals, including genotoxic agents, oxidizing agents, aldehydes, acid, and alkali. These resistance factors include the outer layers of the spore, such as the thick proteinaceous coat that detoxifies reactive chemicals; the relatively impermeable inner spore membrane that restricts access of toxic chemicals to the spore core containing the spore's DNA and most enzymes; the low water content and high level of dipicolinic acid in the spore core that protect core macromolecules from the effects of heat and desiccation; the saturation of spore DNA with a novel group of proteins that protect the DNA against heat, genotoxic chemicals, and radiation; and the repair of radiation damage to DNA when spores germinate and return to life. Despite their extreme resistance, spores can be killed, including by damage to DNA, crucial spore proteins, the spore's inner membrane, and one or more components of the spore germination apparatus.

  16. Elements and modulation of functional dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Alan C

    2014-10-09

    The existing structure-function paradigm of drug discovery has been evolving toward the essential incorporation of dynamics data. This new functional dynamics paradigm emphasizes conformational entropy as a driving force of protein function and intermolecular recognition. Conformational dynamics (a proxy of conformational entropy) impacts the degree of protein (dis)order and the constitution of the conformational ensemble, the mechanisms of allostery and drug resistance, and the free energy of ligand binding. Specific protein and ligand conformations facilitate favorable, reciprocal interactions. The number of protein and ligand conformers that exhibit favorable binding interactions will vary from system to system. All binding scenarios can modulate protein dynamics by various levels of enthalpic and entropic contribution, with significant influence on the functional dynamics of the system. Analysis and consideration of resulting changes of activity, signaling, catalysis, and subsequent phenotypic outcome are powerful motivations in the drug design process.

  17. Measurement of insulin resistance in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Hien; Utzschneider, Kristina M; de Boer, Ian H

    2011-11-01

    Insulin resistance is a known complication of end-stage renal disease that also appears to be present in earlier stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD). It is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and an important potential therapeutic target in this population. Measurement of insulin resistance is reviewed in the context of known pathophysiologic abnormalities in CKD. Insulin resistance in CKD is due to a high prevalence of known risk factors (e.g. obesity) and to unique metabolic abnormalities. The site of insulin resistance in CKD is localized to skeletal muscle. Estimates based on fasting insulin concentration may not adequately capture insulin resistance in CKD because they largely reflect hepatic defects and because CKD impairs insulin catabolism. A variety of dynamic tests are available to directly measure insulin-mediated glucose uptake. Insulin resistance may be an important therapeutic target in CKD. Complementary methods are available to assess insulin resistance, and each method has unique advantages, disadvantages, and levels of complexity. These characteristics, and the likelihood that CKD alters the performance of some insulin resistance measurements, must be considered when designing and interpreting clinical studies.

  18. Freezing resistance of high iron phoasphoaluminate cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S. X.; Lu, L. C.; Wang, S. D.; Zhao, P. Q.; Gong, C. C.

    2017-03-01

    The influence of freeze-thaw cycle on the mechanical properties of high iron phoasphoaluminate cement was investigated in the present study. The visual examination was conducted to evaluate the surface damage. The deterioration considering the weight loss, modulus loss of relative dynamic elastic and strength loss of mortar were also investigated. The morphology of hydration products were analysed by SEM. Compared with ordinary Portland cement and sulphoaluminate cement, the frost resistance of high iron phosphoraluminate cement is better. Hydration products of high iron phoasphoaluminate cement contain sheet crystals, and a lot of gel form a dense three-dimensional network structure, which results in a lower porosity. Different from ordinary Portland cement, the hydration product of high iron phoasphoaluminate cement does not contain Ca(OH)2, and low alkalinity reduces its osmotic pressure. The lower porosity and osmotic pressure are the two main reasons which causes in the higher frost resistance of high iron phoasphoaluminate cement.

  19. Biological improvement of radiation resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, K. J.; Lee, Y. K.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, J. K.; Lee, S. J

    2000-08-01

    To investigate the mechanisms of gene action related to the radiation resistance in microorganisms could be essentially helpful for the development of radiation protectants and hormeric effects of low dose radiation. This book described isolation of radiation-resistant microorganisms, induction of radiation-resistant and functionally improved mutants by gamma-ray radiation, cloning and analysis of the radiation resistance related genes and analysis of the expressed proteins of the radiation resistant related genes.

  20. Resistance to Insecticides in Insects

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, the frequent usage of insecticides in struggle aganist insects, has caused development of resistance to those chemicals in insects. The increase in dosage of insecticide used due to development of resistance in insects, causes important problems in terms of environment and human health. This study includes topics such as insecticides which are used frequently in insect struggle, insecticide resistant types, genetic changes posing resistance, enzymes of resistance and resistan...

  1. A MODEL OF PESTICIDE RESISTANCE AS A COMMON PROPERTY AND EXHAUSTIBLE RESOURCE

    OpenAIRE

    Secchi, Silvia; Bruce A. Babcock

    1999-01-01

    A dynamic farm production model analyzes the interaction between the externalities caused by pest mobility and the development of pesticide resistance, a nonrenewable resource, in the context of agricultural biotechnologies. The model measures the effect of farmers' myopic behavior and the impact of pest mobility on the path of resistance.

  2. Assessment of selected antibiotic resistances in ungrazed native Nebraska prairie soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Measurements of antibiotic resistance from manure-impacted soils result in conflated data. It is difficult to sort out the features that are a result of human antibiotic use, from the features that are a result of the inherent spatial heterogeneity, complexity and dynamics of antibiotic resistant b...

  3. Mathematical modeling on bacterial resistance to multiple antibiotics caused by spontaneous mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibargüen-Mondragón, Eduardo; Mosquera, Saulo; Cerón, Miller; Burbano-Rosero, Edith Mariela; Hidalgo-Bonilla, Sandra P; Esteva, Lourdes; Romero-Leitón, Jhoana P

    2014-03-01

    We formulate a mathematical model that describes the population dynamics of bacteria exposed to multiple antibiotics simultaneously, assuming that acquisition of resistance is through mutations due to antibiotic exposure. Qualitative analysis reveals the existence of a free-bacteria equilibrium, resistant-bacteria equilibrium and an endemic equilibrium where both bacteria coexist.

  4. Rise of multiple insecticide resistance in Anopheles funestus in Malawi: a major concern for malaria vector control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riveron, Jacob M; Chiumia, Martin; Menze, Benjamin D; Barnes, Kayla G; Irving, Helen; Ibrahim, Sulaiman S; Weedall, Gareth D; Mzilahowa, Themba; Wondji, Charles S

    2015-09-15

    Deciphering the dynamics and evolution of insecticide resistance in malaria vectors is crucial for successful vector control. This study reports an increase of resistance intensity and a rise of multiple insecticide resistance in Anopheles funestus in Malawi leading to reduced bed net efficacy. Anopheles funestus group mosquitoes were collected in southern Malawi and the species composition, Plasmodium infection rate, susceptibility to insecticides and molecular bases of the resistance were analysed. Mosquito collection revealed a predominance of An. funestus group mosquitoes with a high hybrid rate (12.2 %) suggesting extensive species hybridization. An. funestus sensu stricto was the main Plasmodium vector (4.8 % infection). Consistently high levels of resistance to pyrethroid and carbamate insecticides were recorded and had increased between 2009 and 2014. Furthermore, the 2014 collection exhibited multiple insecticide resistance, notably to DDT, contrary to 2009. Increased pyrethroid resistance correlates with reduced efficacy of bed nets (change in resistance dynamics is mirrored by prevalent resistance mechanisms, firstly with increased over-expression of key pyrethroid resistance genes (CYP6Pa/b and CYP6M7) in 2014 and secondly, detection of the A296S-RDL dieldrin resistance mutation for the first time. However, the L119F-GSTe2 and kdr mutations were absent. Such increased resistance levels and rise of multiple resistance highlight the need to rapidly implement resistance management strategies to preserve the effectiveness of existing insecticide-based control interventions.

  5. Treatment-Resistant Schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howes, Oliver D; McCutcheon, Rob; Agid, Ofer

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Research and clinical translation in schizophrenia is limited by inconsistent definitions of treatment resistance and response. To address this issue, the authors evaluated current approaches and then developed consensus criteria and guidelines. METHOD: A systematic review of randomized...... antipsychotic clinical trials in treatment-resistant schizophrenia was performed, and definitions of treatment resistance were extracted. Subsequently, consensus operationalized criteria were developed through 1) a multiphase, mixed methods approach, 2) identification of key criteria via an online survey, and 3...... impairment; 3) prior treatment consisting of at least two different antipsychotic trials, each for a minimum duration and dosage; 4) systematic monitoring of adherence and meeting of minimum adherence criteria; 5) ideally at least one prospective treatment trial; and 6) criteria that clearly separate...

  6. Pyrethroid resistance in mosquitoes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NANNAN LIU; QIANG XU; FANG ZHU; LEE ZHANG

    2006-01-01

    Repeated blood feedings throughout their life span have made mosquitoes ideal transmitters of a wide variety of disease agents. Vector control is a very important part of the current global strategy for the control of mosquito-associated diseases and insecticide application is the most important component in this effort. Pyrethroids, which account for 25% of the world insecticide market, are currently the most widely used insecticides for the indoor control of mosquitoes and are the only chemical recommended for the treatment of mosquito nets, the main tool for preventing malaria in Africa. However, mosquito-borne diseases are now resurgent, largely because of insecticide resistance that has developed in mosquito vectors and the anti-parasite drug resistance of parasites. This paper reviews our current knowledge of the molecular mechanisms governing metabolic detoxification and the development of target site insensitivity that leads to pyrethroid resistance in mosquitoes.

  7. Heat-resistant materials

    CERN Document Server

    1997-01-01

    This handbook covers the complete spectrum of technology dealing with heat-resistant materials, including high-temperature characteristics, effects of processing and microstructure on high-temperature properties, materials selection guidelines for industrial applications, and life-assessment methods. Also included is information on comparative properties that allows the ranking of alloy performance, effects of processing and microstructure on high-temperature properties, high-temperature oxidation and corrosion-resistant coatings for superalloys, and design guidelines for applications involving creep and/or oxidation. Contents: General introduction (high-temperature materials characteristics, and mechanical and corrosion properties, and industrial applications); Properties of Ferrous Heat-Resistant Alloys (carbon, alloy, and stainless steels; alloy cast irons; and high alloy cast steels); Properties of superalloys (metallurgy and processing, mechanical and corrosion properties, degradation, and protective coa...

  8. HULL GESTURE AND RESISTANCE PREDICTION OF HIGH-SPEED VESSELS*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NI Chong-ben; ZHU Ren-chuan; MIAO Guo-ping; FAN Ju

    2011-01-01

    Since trim and sinkage are significant while vessels are advancing forward with high speed, the predicted vessel resistance based on restrained model theory or experiment may not be real resistance of vessels during voyage. It is necessary to take the influence of hull gesture into account for oredicting the resistance of high-speed ship. In the present work the resistance problem of high speed ship is treated with the viscous flow theory, and the dynamic mesh technique is adopted to coincide with variation of hull gesture of high speed vessel on voyage. The simulation of the models of S60 ship and a trimaran moving in towing tank with high speed are conducted by using the above theory and technique. The corresponding numerical results are in good agreement with the experimental data. It indicates that the resistance prediction for high speed vessels should take hull gesture into consideration and the dynamic mesh method proposed here is effective in calculating the resistance of high speed vessels.

  9. Generalized effective medium resistivity model for low resistivity reservoir

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    With the advancement in oil exploration,producible oil and gas are being found in low resistivity reservoirs,which may otherwise be erroneously thought as water zones from their resistivity.However,the evaluation of low resistivity reservoirs remains difficult from log interpretation.Since low resistivity in hydrocarbon bearing sands can be caused by dispersed clay,laminated shale,conductive matrix grains,microscopic capillary pores and high saline water,a new resistivity model is required for more accurate hydrocarbon saturation prediction for low resistivity formations.Herein,a generalized effective medium resistivity model has been proposed for low resistivity reservoirs,based on experimental measurements on artificial low resistivity shaly sand samples,symmetrical anisotropic effective medium theory for resistivity interpretations,and geneses and conductance mechanisms of low resistivity reservoirs.By analyzing effects of some factors on the proposed model,we show theoretically the model can describe conductance mechanisms of low resistivity reservoirs with five geneses.Also,shale distribution largely affects water saturation predicted by the model.Resistivity index decreases as fraction and conductivity of laminated shale,or fraction of dispersed clay,or conductivity of rock matrix grains increases.Resistivity index decreases as matrix percolation exponent,or percolation rate of capillary bound water increases,and as percolation exponent of capillary bound water,or matrix percolation rate,or free water percolation rate decreases.Rock sample data from low resistivity reservoirs with different geneses and interpretation results for log data show that the proposed model can be applied in low resistivity reservoirs containing high salinity water,dispersed clay,microscopic capillary pores,laminated shale and conductive matrix grains,and thus is considered as a generalized resistivity model for low resistivity reservoir evaluation.

  10. Generalized effective medium resistivity model for low resistivity reservoir

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG YanJie; TANG XiaoMin

    2008-01-01

    With the advancement in oil exploration, producible oil and gas are being found in low resistivity reservoirs, which may otherwise be erroneously thought as water zones from their resistivity. However,the evaluation of low resistivity reservoirs remains difficult from log interpretation. Since low resistivity in hydrocarbon bearing sands can be caused by dispersed clay, laminated shale, conductive matrix grains, microscopic capillary pores and high saline water, a new resistivity model is required for more accurate hydrocarbon saturation prediction for low resistivity formations. Herein, a generalized effective medium resistivity model has been proposed for low resistivity reservoirs, based on experimental measurements on artificial low resistivity shaly sand samples, symmetrical anisotropic effective medium theory for resistivity interpretations, and geneses and conductance mechanisms of low resistivity reservoirs. By analyzing effects of some factors on the proposed model, we show theoretically the model can describe conductance mechanisms of low resistivity reservoirs with five geneses. Also,shale distribution largely affects water saturation predicted by the model. Resistivity index decreases as fraction and conductivity of laminated shale, or fraction of dispersed clay, or conductivity of rock matrix grains increases. Resistivity index decreases as matrix percolation exponent, or percolation rate of capillary bound water increases, and as percolation exponent of capillary bound water, or matrix percolation rate, or free water percolation rate decreases. Rock sample data from low resistivity reservoirs with different geneses and interpretation results for log data show that the proposed model can be applied in low resistivity reservoirs containing high salinity water, dispersed clay, microscopic capillary pores, laminated shale and conductive matrix grains, and thus is considered as a generalized resistivity model for low resistivity reservoir evaluation.

  11. Dynamic tensile resistance of concrete-split Hopkinson bar test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weerheijm, J.; Sharma, A.; Ozbolt, J.

    2013-01-01

    The behavior of concrete structures is strongly influenced by the loading rate. Compared to quasi-static loading, on meso and macro-scale concrete loaded by impact loading acts in a different way. First, there is a strain-rate influence on strength, stiffness, ductility, and, second, there are inert

  12. Dynamic tensile resistance of concrete - Split hopkinson bar test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ožbolt, J.; Weerheijm, J.; Sharma, A.

    2013-01-01

    The behavior of concrete structures is strongly influenced by the loading rate. Compared to quasi-static loading, on meso and macro-scale concrete loaded by impact loading acts in a different way. First, there is a strain-rate influence on strength, stiffness, ductility, and, second, there are inert

  13. Vegetation dynamics and erosion resistance of sea dyke grassland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprangers, J.T.C.M.

    1999-01-01

    In the Netherlands, in addition to the width and height of the dyke body itself, renewed measures for reconstruction and maintenance of dykes have stressed the importance to the safeguarding of the dyke, of the grass cover's protection of the clay-layer against erosion.

    F

  14. Vegetation dynamics and erosion resistance of sea dyke grassland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprangers, J.T.C.M.

    1999-01-01

    In the Netherlands, in addition to the width and height of the dyke body itself, renewed measures for reconstruction and maintenance of dykes have stressed the importance to the safeguarding of the dyke, of the grass cover's protection of the clay-layer against

  15. Vegetation dynamics and erosion resistance of sea dyke grassland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprangers, H.

    1999-01-01

    In the Netherlands, in addition to the width and height of the dyke body itself, renewed measures for reconstruction and maintenance of dykes have stressed the importance to the safeguarding of the dyke, of the grass cover's protection of the clay-layer against erosion.From an inventory of different

  16. Kinetically Controlled Drug Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Xin E.; Hansen, Bjarne Gram; Hedstrom, Lizbeth

    2011-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Penicillium brevicompactum produces the immunosuppressive drug mycophenolic acid (MPA), which is a potent inhibitor of eukaryotic IMP dehydrogenases (IMPDHs). IMPDH catalyzes the conversion of IMP to XMP via a covalent enzyme intermediate, E-XMP*; MPA inhibits by trapping E...... of resistance is not apparent. Here, we show that, unlike MPA-sensitive IMPDHs, formation of E-XMP* is rate-limiting for both PbIMPDH-A and PbIMPDH-B. Therefore, MPA resistance derives from the failure to accumulate the drug-sensitive intermediate....

  17. Hamiltonian dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Vilasi, Gaetano

    2001-01-01

    This is both a textbook and a monograph. It is partially based on a two-semester course, held by the author for third-year students in physics and mathematics at the University of Salerno, on analytical mechanics, differential geometry, symplectic manifolds and integrable systems. As a textbook, it provides a systematic and self-consistent formulation of Hamiltonian dynamics both in a rigorous coordinate language and in the modern language of differential geometry. It also presents powerful mathematical methods of theoretical physics, especially in gauge theories and general relativity. As a m

  18. The Resistance of Breakdown in Transformer Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozef Kudelcik

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The conditions under which breakdown of composite liquid - solid insulation can be occurred, e.g., in transformer,play an important role in designing of such insulation. The initial state of breakdown development is explained on the basisof bubble theory and formation of a plasma channel between the electrodes. The electrical resistance of plasma channel iscalculated using several theories and its changes from a few ohms to a few hundred milliohms due to Joule heating caused byhigh arc current which flows through the plasma. The dynamics of the arc current depends on the parameters of outer circuitand is represented by RLC circuit.

  19. PREFACE: Cooperative dynamics Cooperative dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gov, Nir

    2011-09-01

    The dynamics within living cells are dominated by non-equilibrium processes that consume chemical energy (usually in the form of ATP, adenosine triphosphate) and convert it into mechanical forces and motion. The mechanisms that allow this conversion process are mostly driven by the components of the cytoskeleton: (i) directed (polar) polymerization of filaments (either actin or microtubules) and (ii) molecular motors. The forces and motions produced by these two components of the cytoskeleton give rise to the formation of cellular shapes, and drive the intracellular transport and organization. It is clear that these systems present a multi-scale challenge, from the physics of the molecular processes to the organization of many interacting units. Understanding the physical nature of these systems will have a large impact on many fundamental problems in biology and break new grounds in the field of non-equilibrium physics. This field of research has seen a rapid development over the last ten years. Activities in this area range from theoretical and experimental work on the underlying fundamental (bio)physics at the single-molecule level, to investigations (in vivo and in vitro) of the dynamics and patterns of macroscopic pieces of 'living matter'. In this special issue we have gathered contributions that span the whole spectrum of length- and complexity-scales in this field. Some of the works demonstrate how active forces self-organize within the polymerizing cytoskeleton, on the level of cooperative cargo transport via motors or due to active fluxes at the cell membrane. On a larger scale, it is shown that polar filaments coupled to molecular motors give rise to a huge variety of surprising dynamics and patterns: spontaneously looping rings of gliding microtubules, and emergent phases of self-organized filaments and motors in different geometries. All of these articles share the common feature of being out-of-equilibrium, driven by metabolism. As demonstrated here

  20. Advances in pneumococcal antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jae-Hoon

    2013-10-01

    Antimicrobial resistance and serotypes in Streptococcus pneumoniae have been evolving with the widespread use of antibiotics and the introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV). Particularly, among various types of antimicrobial resistance, macrolide resistance has most remarkably increased in many parts of the world, which has been reported to be >70% among clinical isolates from Asian countries. Penicillin resistance has dramatically decreased among nonmeningeal isolates due to the changes in resistance breakpoints, although resistance to other β-lactams such as cefuroxime has increased. Multidrug resistance became a serious concern in the treatment of invasive pneumococcal diseases, especially in Asian countries. After PCV7 vaccination, serotype 19A has emerged as an important cause of invasive pneumococcal diseases which was also associated with increasing prevalence of multidrug resistance in pneumococci. Widespread use of PCV13, which covers additional serotypes 3, 6A and 19A, may contribute to reduce the clonal spread of drug-resistant 19A pneumococci.